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Full text of "Sessional Papers 14 to 26, 1883"

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in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sessional1426s1883cana 



University tfOftawa 

DOCUMENTS OFFICIALS 

GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS 

University of Ottawa 



SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



Universfte d'Ottawa 
DOCUMENTS OFFICES 
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS 
University oi Ottawa 



VOLUME 10. 



FIRST SESSION of the FIFTH PARLIAMENT 



OP THE 







DOMINION OF CANADA 



SESSION 1883. 



VOL. XYI. 



Printed by MacLean, Roger & Co., Wellington Street, Ottawa. 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883-- 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



VOL. XVI,— SESSION 1883. 



AKEANGED ALPHABETICALLY. 



A No. 
Accidental and Life Insurance, abstract for 

1882 126 

Accidents on G.T. R 76a 

Accidents on I.C. R 40 i 

Administration of Justice, claims of the Pro- 
vinces 119 

Adulteration of Food 4 

Agents, duty on, by Registrar of Supreme 

Court - 63 

Agricultural Implements, &c, imported into 

Manitoba and N.W.T ..• 103 to 1036 

Agriculture, Annual Report. 14 

Albert County Court....... 67a 

Albert (Port) Harbor 46« 

Allan Line and I.C.R. Freight Tariff for 

season 1882-83 S9 & 39a 

Appropriation Accounts 6 

Appointments, Civil Service -13a, 21 

Auditor-General's Report 6 

Award, Ontario Boundary , 95 

B 

Baie des Chaleurs Railway Co., subsidy to.. 121 

Bailiffs,. Dominion, appointment of 62 & 62a 

Baker, David, appointment of. 110 

Banks, shareholders of 19 

Banque de St. Jean 34 

Baptisms, Marriages and Burials 44 

Batteries, "A" and "B," No, instructed, &c 31c 

Batteries " A " and " B," officers staff. 56a 

Bayfield Harbor , 46/ 

Belgium, commercial arrangements with. ... 89 

Bernatchsz, N., tobacco seizure 35a 

Berthier, camp at, in 1882 .. 31/ 

Blackeby's Report..' 16 

Blankets for Militia 316 

Bonds and Securities « 25 

Boundary Award, Ontario 95 

Bounty, claims for fishing 37,37c 

Bounty to fishermen , 37c 

Brae, Prince Co., P.E.I 52c 

Brandy Pots and River du Loup Semaphores 74 

Brazil, trade between Canada and 98 

Breakwaters - 52 to 52c 

Breakwaters, New Harbor, N.S... 52a 

do Port Lome, N.S 52 

Bridge at St. John, railway 47 & 47a 

British Canadian Loan and Investment Co., 73 
British Columbia Coast, H.M. Ships of war on 106- 

British Columbia, Constitution, &c 70 

British Columbia, immigration into... 93,93a 

British Columbia Penitentiary 29a 

British Columbia, Pilots and Pilotage Ill 

Buoys and Beacons, Lake Huron 87 

Burials, Baptisms and Marriages 44 

3 



c No. 

Cadets, Royal Military College 56 

Callander and Gravenhurst, railway be- 
tween, subsidy to.., .». 121 

Campbellton, steamer connecting with I.C.R 40/s 
Canada Central R'y acquisition byC.P.R.... 27/i 
Canada Central Railway, Pembroke bonus . 69 

Canada, ordnance for 116 

Canada, railway map of .... 8a 

Canada trade with We3t Indies and Brazil. . 98 

Canadian Extradition Act 32 

Canadian Pacltic Land Bonds 27c, 27/ 

Canadian Pacific Railway 27 to 27r, 69 

Canadian Pacific Railway Commission 27^ 

do do map of, &c. 27o 

Canadian Statutes 17 to 175, 28 

do Tobacco... 35 & 35a 

Canadian Vessels in the Great Lakes, dis- 
asters, &c £8 

Canal Statistics 4 

Canals 4, 81,83, 105 to K 5c, 109 

Canals and Railways, Annual Report 8 

Canals, Public Debt incurred for 109 

Cape Breton Constitution, &c ,-..» 70 

Carsquet Railway Co., N.B., subsidy to 121 

Carillon and Grenville Canal 105 to 1056 

Cartridge Factory, Quebec 99 

Census and Statistics 24 

Charybdh, H.M.S 120 

Chinese Immigration into British Columbia. 93a 
Civil Service, appointments and promotions 13a 

do Examiners' Report 13 

do Montreal — . , 136 

Claims against Intercolonial Railway 406 

do for Fishing Bounty 37 

Coal Lands, North-West, sale and lease of. 366 

do Lands, regulations for 36a 

do quantity exported 36c 

do do from N.S 36 

Cockburn, James, Q.C., commission to ....17 to 176 

Collisions on I.C.R 40i 

Colonization Grants - 117 

Colonization, land for. 84 

Commercial arrangements France,Spain, &c. 89 

Commissioner of Fisheries, Report of 7 

Commissioner to France 60 

Commission, Intercolonial Railway 406 

Commission to James Cockburn, Q.C 17tol76 

do revise Canadian Statutes.. 17 to 176 

Consolidated Fund, expenditure and receipt 

charged to 30 

Constitutions, &c, of C.B., N.S., P.E.I., 

N.B., B.C. and Vancouver Island 70 

Construction, C.P.R., progress of 27a 7 

Contracts A. and B., C.P.R., change of con- 
struction 27p 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



Contracts, O.P.R 

County Court Judges, increase of salary .... 

County Court, New Brunswick 

County Courts .... — 67 

County Courts Kings arid Albert — ... 

Cour •• 68 

Credit Vail v, C.P R. interest in... 

Credit Valley Stock 

al statistics tor 1881 - 

ms Department, Montreal 

Customs Duties paid by O.P.R 



refunded at Toronto. 



No. 
27 i 

676 

H7 

to 676 

67a 

& 68a 

27m 

27a 

14 

135,49 

k7ra 

91 



Dauphence, Jas., claim of 115 

De la Chevrotiere, Mr. 0. 51 

Digby, N.S., wharfages at 79 

Dionne, — , Doctor's b 11 for attending 40c 

Disasters to Canadian Vessels in the Great _ 

Lakes. ■- ... 53 

Distilled and Fermented Liquors imported 

and manufactured 59 

Distribution, Canadian Statutes 28 

Dominion Bailiffs, appointment of.... 62 & 62a 

Dominion Police, expenditure of 18 

Dominion Statutes 17 to 176, 28 

Drawbacks., manufactured goods exported,.. 45a 

do • do iron do ... 45a 

Drawbacks, shipbuilding materials 45 

Drill Shed, Iona 50 

Drugs, analysis of 4a 

Duties on Salt 65 

Duties paid by C.P. R. on imports 27m 

E 

Eastern Extension Railway, N.S 40/ 

Ecuador, commercial arrangements with.... 89 

Egypt, do do .... 89 

.Election, General, 1882-83 77 & 77a 

Estimates, 1883-84 1 

Estimates, Supplementary, 1882-83 1 

Estimates, Supplementary, 1883-84 .... 1 

Estimates, Further Supplementary, 1883-84, 1 

Examination of Mates 7 

Excise, Montreal 136 

Expenditure, British Columbia Penitentiary 29a 

Expenditure, Dominion Police.. 18 

do and receipt charged to Consoli- 
dated Fund 30 

Expenses and Revenue, I. C.R 40a 

Expenses, unforeseen 22,42 

Exports and Imports la3t half 1882 92 

Extradition Act, Canadian 32 



Fabre, Hon. Hector, Commission to France. 60 

Factory Labor ... 16 & 16a 

Fermented and Distilled Liquors, imported 

and manufactured 59 

Fermented and Distilled Liquors, materials 

used in 59 

Field Battery, Richmond... 31c 

Fifth General Election 77 & 77a 

Fines and Seizures 38 

Fines exacted and how disposed of. 38 

Fire Insurance, 1880 to 1882 inclusive, in 

Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, Hamilton, 

Ottawa, Halifax, Bt. John, N. B 12c 

Fire and Marine Insurance, abstract for 1882 12a 

Fisheries 37 to 37e 

Fisheries and Marine, Annual Report 7 

Fisheries, Commissioner's Report? 7 

Fisheimen, bjun|y to *.«...*• •*•> • 37c 



F No. 

Fishery Inspectors, instructions as to 3aImoa 376 

do seizures made by 37& 

Fishing Bounty Claims 37,37c 

Fishing Leases or Licenses in N.B 37a 

Fishing, Lobster, close season 37e 

Fog-Whistle?, Shelburne Hirbor , 66 

Food, Adulteration of 4 & 4a 

France, commercial arrangements with...... 89- 

do Commissioner in .. ...... 60 

Freight Sheds and Warehouse at St, John, 

N.B,, I C.R 40$ 

Freight Tariff between I.C.R. and Allan 

Line for Season 1832-83 , 39 & 39a 

Freight Tariff, Western Division, C.P. R 27j 

Frontenac Terrace, Quebec 113 



Gaspe, Petition of the Fish Merchants of. ... 98 

Gasoe, steamer connecting with I.C.R 40k 

Gatineau Valley Railway Co., subsidy to.... 121 

General Election, 1882 77 & 77a 

General Election, 1882, list of Returning 

Officers 33 

Genii, request of the Master of, to release 

sailors 72 

Germany, commercial arrangement3 with... 89 
Germany, steamship communication with... 71 

Glendon, steamer to replace the 97 

Goodwin, Jas., amount paid 105 

Government Lien on G.T.R .769, 76c 

Government Survey, Lot No. 133, Manitoba 107 

Governor General's Warrants 26, 43 

Grain and Products of Grain 100 

Grand Trunk Railway 76 to 76c 

Gravenhurstto Callander, railway between, 

subsidy to 121 

Great American and European Short Line 

Railway Co , subsidy to - 121 

Greece's Point, Grenville Canal 105a, 1056 

Grenville and Carillon Canal., — IQj to 1056 



40> 
12c 



12c 



76 



Halifax and Cape Breton R'y and Coal Oo... 
Halifax, Fire Insurance in, from 1880 10 1882 

Halifax, troops in 

Hamilton, Fire Insurance in, from 1S80 to 

1882, , 

Hamilton & North-Western Railway, pur- 
chase of shares by G.T.R. 

Havelock and Petitcodiac, NB., railway be- 
tween, subsidy to «... 121 

Hebert, H., fraudulent practices 78 

Heney, Stewart & Co , Contractors 105a&1056 

H.M. Ships of War British Columbia Coast.. 106 

Hudson Bay..... 104 

Huron Lake, buoys and beacons. 87 

Hydrographical Survey.... 64 



Immigration..... - 93 to 93c 

Immigration into British Columbia 93, 93« 

Implements, agricultural, imported into 

Manitoba and N.W.T 103 to 1036 

Imports and Exports, last half 1882 92 

Indian Affairs, Annual Report ~ 5 

Indian Agency, Manitoba , 123- 

Inland Revenue, Annual Report „ 4 

Inland Revenue, Montreal 136 

Instruction Staff, Royal Military College.... 56a 

Insurance , 12 to 12c 

Insurance, Report of Superintendent 12 

Intercolonial Railway 40 to 40J, 121 

d» Commission. 406 



46 Yictoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



I No. 

Intercolonial Railway subsidy to 

Interior, Department of, Annual Report. 23 

International R'y Co., subsidy to 121 

Intoxicating Liquors.*.. 59 to 596 

IonaDrillShed BO 

Iron ma back oa if exported 45a 



Jamaica, commercial arrangements with. ... £9 

Jewish Refugees rrom Russia 93c 

Judges, County Court increase of 3alary.... (Ab 
Justice, administration of, claims of the 

Provinces 119 

K 

Kaministiquia River, C. P. R. terminus 27r 

Ketehum, H. G C, claim on I.C.R, *0l 

Kings County Court 67a 



Labor in Factories 16 & 16a 

Lake Huron, buoys and beacons 87 

Lake of the Woods, steamers for 114 

do St. John Railway 90 

Land Bonds, C P.R 27c, 27/ 

do for colonization 84 

Land Improvement Fund 20 

Land taken in St. John for I.C.R 40A 

Lands, C.P.R 21k 

Lands given to Canada by Imperial Govern- 
ment 113 

Lands, Ordnance 82 & 82a 

Lebel, Dr., account of 40c 

Legislation in P.Q., proposed, affecting 

Liquors 59a 

Library of Parliament, Annual Report 15 

Life and Accidental Insurance, abstract for 

1882 126 

Life-Saving Stations 112 

Lighthouse at Quaco 57 

Liquors, distilled and fermented 59 

do sale of 59a & 596, 61 

Liverpool Bay, breakwater at 526 

Loan and Investment Co., British Canadian 73 

Lobster Fishing, close season 37c 

Location Eastern Section, C.P.R 27.;' 

Luke's Report 16a 

Lyon, Mr. J. A , 122 

M 

Mail Service, between Canada and G.B....39 & 39a 
Manitoba, agricultural implements imported 

into 103 to 1036 

Manitoba Indian Agency 123 

Manitoba, subsidies for... 108 

Manufactured Gooda exported, drawback on 45a 

Marine and Fire Insurance, abstract for 1882 12a 

Marine and Fisheries, Annual Report 7 

Maritime 0«urt, Ontario, rules of, &c ; 68a 

do proceedings of 68 

Marriages, Baptisms and Burials 44 

Measures and Weights 4 

Meridian, prime or standard 48 

Militia 31 to 31/ 

Militia, Annual Report tf 

Militiamen, 1812 31 & 31a 

Miller, J. A., Judge 53 

Mineral Lands, regulations for the disposal 

of 102 

Mining Licenses in disputed territory (On- 
tario) 118 

Alining regulations for disposal of other than 

1.1 lands .-., , 102 

Hif&brchi Valley Railway Co., subsidy to... 12Q 



M No. 

3 imported by ve sels 586 

Montenegro, commercial arrangements with 89 

1 and Western R'y Co., subsidy to... 121 

Montreal Customs Department 49 

ranee in, from 1830 to 1882 12c 
: and Occidental Railway, 

acquisition by C.P.R 27« 

»; and Newji.eld S.S 101 

Morocco, commercial arrangements with. ... 89 

Morpeth Harbor on Lake Erie.. 4.6</ 

Murray Canal .•«• 83 

Mc 

McCallum, J. D., dismissal of 110 

McCallum,W.D correspondence concerning 40c 

N 

Naval Reserves and Ordnance Lands.. 82 & 82a 

Navigation and Trade, Annual Report 2 

Napanee, Tamworth and Quebec Railway, 

subsidy to 121 

New Brunswick Constitution, &c 70 

do County Court 67 

New Ji eld and Moravian S.S , 101 

New Harbor, N.S., breakwater 52a 

tforth Shore Railway, purchase of by G.T.R 76 
North- West Territories, agricultural imple- 
ments imported into 103 to 1036 

Nova Scotia Constitution, &c 70 

O 

Ocean Mail Service 39 & 39a 

O'Connor, Hon. John 85 

Officers' Staff, "A" and "B" Batteries 56a 

Okanagan and Shuswap Canal 81 

Ontario and Quebec Railway 21n 

do Boundary Award 95 

Ontario Lake, life-saving stations 112 

Ontario Maritime Court 68a 

Ordnance Lands and Naval Reserves 82 & 82a 

Ordnance for Canada 116 

Ottawa, fire insurance in, from 1880 to 188 2. 12c 

P 

Parliament Library, Annual Report 15 

Pembroke bonus to Canada Central Railway 69 

Penitentiaries, Annual Report., 29 

Penitentiary, British Columbia... r 29a 

Perley, Amos, claim of 37*2 

Petitcodiac to Havelock, N.B,, railway 

between, subsidy to . 121 

Pictou and Truro Branch I.C.R 40> 

Piers and Wharves 46 to 46^r 

do P.E.I., claims for refund 

of their expenditure on 46c & 46c? 

Pilots and Pilotage, British Columbia Ill 

Portage Island 96 

Port Albert Harbor - 46c 

Port Lome, N.S., breakwater 52 

Postmaster-General, Annual Report.. 3 

Post Office, Montreal 13b 

Prime Meridian. 48 

Prince Edward Island, Constitution, &c 70 

do Railway 86 

Kfcoducts of Grain, and Grain 10O 

Promotions, Civil Service 21,13a 

Provencher, J.A.N., Manitoba Indian Super- 
intendent , 123 

Provincial subsidy to Quebec 9i & !>4a 

Public Accounts, 1881-82 41, 1 

Public debt incurred forRail ways, Canals, &c 109 

Public Work?, Annual Report 10 & 10a 

do Dep't. of, telegram expenses. 1&& 

do tjsjwit, ii0 x 7 tu 1882 lwt 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



Q No. 

Q lighthouse 57 

Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Co, 

subsidy to 121 

do Cartridge Factory . 99 

do City, fire insurance in, 1880 to 1882.. 12c 

do Frontenac Terrace 113 

do Provincial subsidy 94 & 94a 



Railway Bridge, S,t. John 47 & 47a 

Railway, Canadian Pacific 27 to 27r 

Railway Commission, Canadian Pacific 2lg 

do Intercolonial 406 

Railway, Grand Trunk * 76 to 76c 

Railway, Intercolonial 40 to 401 

Railway, Lake St. John 90 

Railway map of Canada , 8a 

Railway, P.E.I.., . ... 86 

Railway Statistics 8a 

Railways and Canals, Annual Report 8 

Railways, public debt incurred for , ...... 109 

Railways, subsidies to 121 

Rainy Lake, steamers for 114 

Rapide Plat Canal , 105c 

Receipts and Expenditure charged to Con- 
solidated Fund 20 

Reciprocity between Canada and the U.S.... 55 
.Registered ships in Province of Quebec, &c. 58a 

Renouf, Dr, account of 40c 

Reserves, Naval 82 & 82a 

Returning Officers, list of 33 

Revenue and expenses, I.C.R 40a 

Revision Canadian Statutes 17 to 176 

Richmond Field Battery 31c 

River du Loup and Brandy Pots Semaphores 74 

River du Loup branch, sale of by G.T.R. 766 to 76c 

do & Riviere Ouelle, wharfs at. 75 

Rocky and Selkirk Mountains, C, P.R. line in 271 

Rolling Stock, Intercolonial Railway 40, 40/40e 

Roumania, commercial arrangements with.. 89 

Royal Military College ; .56, 56a 

Russell v. The Queen 80 

Russia, Jewish Refugees from 93c 

S 

Sailors' application for release 72 

Sale of Liquor 59a, 596 & 61 

Salmon Fishing ..... 376 

Saltduties 65 

Secretary of State, Annual Report 11 

Sections 14 and 15, C.P.R 27^ 

Securities and bonds 25 

Seizures and fines 38 

do at ports of entry „ . ... 38 

Seizures of tobacco 35a 

Selkirk and Rocky Mountains, C.P.R, line in 271 

Semaphores, River du Loup and Brandy Pots 74 

Servia, commercial arrangements with 89 

Shelburne Harbor, log-whistle 66 

Shipbuilding materials, drawback on 45 

Ships registered in the Province of Quebec, 

&c......... 58a 

Short-term prisoners, claim for refund for 

maintenance by P.E.I. Government. .46c & 46a* 

Shuswap and Okanagan Canal 81 

Spain, commercial arrangements with, 89 

Spellmacheen-Okanagan Canal 81 

S.S. New field and Moravian 101 

Standard Meridian .. 48 

tatistics and Census 24 



S No. 

Statistics, Criminal, for 1881 14 

do railway 8a 

Statutes, Canadian, classifying, &c 17 to 176 

teamboat Inspection 7 

Steamers for Lake of the Woods and Rainy 

Lake 114 

Steamship communication with Germany.... 71 

Stewart, John, volunteer of 1837-38 31<J 

St. Anne (Chicoutimi), wharf at... 466 

Ste. Agathe, Man., claims on lot No. 133.... 106 

St. Jean, banque de ,..., 34 

St. Jean Port Jolie, pier at 46 & 46a 

St. John, land taken in, for I.C.R 40h 

St. John, N.B., fire insurance in, from 1880 

to 1882.. 12c 

St. John Railway Bridge 47 & 47a 

St. John River, N.B 122 

St. Lawrence and Ottawa Railway, purchase 

of shares by G.T.R 76 

Subsidies for Manitoba... 108 

Subsidies to certain railways 121 

Subsidy, Province of Quebec. 94 & 94a 

Sugar and Syrup imported by vessels 586 

Summerside Harbor - 54 

Superannuation 21 to 216 

Superannuation List 21a 

Supercumerary Clerks, -Uontreal Customs... 49 

Supreme Court, amended rule 63 

Survey, Hydrographical 64 

Suspension of Extradition Act 32 

T 

Tariff between Intercolonial and Allan Mail 

Line 39 & 39a 

Telegram expenses, Dep't. Public Works... 124 

Thunder Bay, C.P.R. terminus 27r 

Timber Licenses in disputed territory (On- 
tario) - 118 

Tobacco, Canadian * 35 

Toronto, Customs duties refunded at. 91 

Toronto, fire insurance in, from 1880 to 1882. 12c 

Trade and Navigation, Annual Report 2 

Trade between Canada, West Indies and 

Brazil 98 

Troops in Halifax 88 

Truro and Pictou Branch LC.R 40j> 

U 

Unforseen expenses — . 22, 42 

Unsettled accounts with the Provinces 20 

V 

Vancouver Island Constitution, &c. 70 

Vessels importing sugar, syrup and molasses. 586 
Vessels, on the Great Lakes, disasters to 

Canadian 58 

Vessels, registered. 58a 

Veterans, 1812, deceased since 1875 31 

do surviving 31 & 31a 

do widows of. 31 

w 

Warrant3, Governor General's «. 26, 43 

Weights and Measures 4 

Wellington, Grey and Bruce Railway, pur- 
chase of shares by G.T.R 76 

West Indies, trade between Canada and 98 

Wharves and Piers 46 to 46#, 75 

Whitehead, Jos», Contractor. , „ 21 ff 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A, 1885 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS, 



ARKANGED NUMERICALLY AND IN VOLUMES. 



$o. l.. 



No. 2.. 

No. 3.. 

No. 4.. 



No. 4a. 

No, 5.., 

No, 6... 

No. 7.., 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME A. 

Census of Canada, 1380-81, Vol. III. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 

Public Accounts :— For the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882. 



1. 



Estimates : — Of sums required for the service of the Dominion, for the year ending 30th Juav. 
1884, 

Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion, 
for the year ending 30th June, 1883. 

Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion, 
for the year ending 30th June, lb84. 

Further Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the 
Dominion, for the year ending 30th June, 1884. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 2. 
Trade and Navigation .-—Tables of, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 3. 

Postmaster-General : — Report of, for the year ended 30th June, 1882. 

Inland Revenue :— Report, Returns and Statistics of, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882. 

Supplement No. 1 :— Canal Statistics for the season of Navigation, 1832. 

Supplement No. 2 :— Weights and Measures, 1882. 

Supplement No. 3:— Adulteration of Food, 1882. 

Return to Address (Senate) ; Return showing — The various drugs and articles 
of food, an analysis of which has been made by the official Analyst, and 
the Reports thereon. 

STENTS OF VOLUME No. 4. 

Indian Affairs :— Annual Report of the Department of, for the year ended 31st December, 1882. 
Vudito;:-Gexeral :— Report of, on Appropriation Accounts, for the year ended 30th June, 1882* 

CONTEXTS OF VOLUME No. 5. 

Marine and Fisheries :— Report of the Department of, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882. 

Supplement No. 1 :— Report of the Chaiman of the Board of Steamboat In- 
spection, Examination of Mates, &c, for the calendar year ended 31st 
December, 1882. 

Supplement No. 2:— Report of the Commissioner of Fisheries, for the vear 
ended 31st December, 1832. 

7 



46 Tictoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 


8.. 


No. 


8a. 


No. 


9.. 


No. 


10.. 



No. 10a 



No. 


11.. 


No. 


12.. 


No. 


12a. 


No, 12b 


No. 


12c 



No. 13,„. 

No. 13a. 

No. 136. 



No. 14... 

No. 15... 
No. 16... 

No. 16a. 
No. 17.. 

No. 17a. 
No. 176. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 6. 

Railways and Canals :— Annual Report of the Minister of, for the past fiscal- year ended 30th. 
Juno, IS 

Railway Statistics op Canada : — Capital, traffic ar'd working expenditure of the railways of 
the Dominion, for the year ended 30th June, 1882, with a map showing 
the Railways of Canada. 

Militia :— Report on the state of, for the year 1882. 

Public Works : — Annual Report of the Minister of, for the fiscal year 1881-82. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUMES Nos. 1 & 8. 

Public Works:— General Report of the Minister of,, from 30th June, 1867, to 1st July, 1882. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 9. 

Secretary op State op Canada : — Report of, for the year ended 31st December, 1882. 

Insurance :— Report of the Superintendent of, for 1881. 

Fire and Marine Insurance Companies : Abstract Statements of, for the year 
ended 31st December, 1882. 

Life and Accidental Insurance in Canada : Abstract of, for the year 1882. 

Return to Order : Htatement of the to'^l amounts of insurance premiums 
against fire collected and losses pa'-, during each of the years 1880, 1881 
and 1882, in each of the follGwh cities : Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, 
Hamihon, Ottawa, Halifax and St John, N.B. {Not printed.) 

Civil Service :— Report of the Examiners. 

Return of the names and salaries of all persons appointed or promoted in 
the Civil Service during the half-year ending 31st December, 1882, speci- 
fying the office to which been appointed or promoted, in com- 
pliance with the Canada Civil Service Act, 1882. 

Return to Ord urn showing the nanus, ajres and origin of all 

persons employed .Post and Inland Revenue cffices.at 

Montreal, since 1st May, 188:', to 20th February, 1883, and the salary of 
each of the said employes ; also the names of the employes in the offices of 
Customs and Excise, on the Civil Service List, as entitled to a pension. 
{Not printed.) 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 10. 

Agriculture :— Report of tie Minister, for the calendar year,' 1882. 

Criminal Statistics for 1881 :— Appendix to the Report of the Minister of 
Agriculture fur the year 1882. 

Library of Parliament :— Report of the Librarian. 

Labor in Factories : — Report (Senate) of A. EL Blackeby on the laws regulating labor in the 
State of Massachusetts. 

Report of W. Lukes on factories in England and Continent of Europe. 

Dominion Statutes: — Report of the Commissioner to collect, &c., passed by Parliament since 
Confederation. 

Return to Address ; Statement in detail of all expenditures made in connec- 
tion with the Commission to the Hon. James Cockburn, Q.C., to consoli- 
date the Dominion Statutes, and copies of the Commission, and of any 
reports made by him. 

Return to Address ; Copies of correspondence, &c, touching the appointment 
of a Commissioner in connection with the Revision of the Canadian 
Statutes. 

8 



, 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1833 



No. 18... 
No. 19... 
No. 20... 

No. 21... 

No. 21a. 

No. 216. 



No. 22... 

No. 23... 
No. 24... 

No. 25... 
No. 26,.. 



No. 27... 



No. 27a. 
No. 2U 

No. 27c. 
No. 27d. 



Dominion Police: — Statement of expenditure during the year 1883. (Not printed .) 

Banks :— Lists of Shareholders of the Canadian Bank?. (Not printed.) 

Land Improvement Fund :— Return to Address; Copies of nil letters, Ac, between this Gov- 
ernment and the Governments of Ontario and Quebec, from 1st, June, 
1882, relating to this Fund and unsettled accounts, also a statement show- 
ing the present balances, if any, due to the said Provinces. (Not printed.) 

Superannuation; — Statement of name, &c , of each person superannuated, &c , in accordance 
with the Civil Service Act, 45 Vic, chap. 4, sec 55, sub-sec 3. 

Return of the names of the persons on the Superannuation List, as on 23rd 
February, 1883, together with the amount of the annual allowances paid 
each. 

Returu (in part) to Order ; Statement showing separately for each year since 
the establishment of the Superannuation Fund : — 1. The .number of per- 
sons on the list for the year as entitled to the benefit of the Act. 2. The 
number superannuated during the year under the Act. 3. The number 
retired during the year on a gratuity under the Act. 4. The total 
amount paid into the Fund from the be ginniugby those who were, during 
the year, superannuated or retired on a gratuity ; distinguishing between, 
those whose superannuation was caused by the abolition of office. 5. 
The number of persons on the list, for r.he year, who died in the service \. 
— and 6. The total amount paid into the Fund from the beginning by 
those who, during the year, died in the service. 

Unforeseen Expenses: — Statement of payments charged to, by Order in Council, from 1st 
July, 1882, to date, in accordance with the Act 42 V., chap. 2, schedule B„. 

Interior :— Annual Report of the Department of, for the year 1882. 

Census and Statistics :— Report, required by sec. 25, of the Census and Statistics Act, of 1879 ? 
of operations and expenses during thecaleudaryear, 1882. (Not printed.) 

Bonds and Securities :— Detailed statement of, registered in the Department of the Secretary 
of State of Canada, submitted to Parliament,' in compliance with the 
Act 31 Vic , chap. 37, sec. 15. (Not printed.') 

Governor General's Warrants :— Statement of, issued pinoe the'last S^sion of Parliament, 
in accordance with the Act 41 Vic, chap. 7, sec. 32, sub-sec 2, oo. 
account of the fiscal years, 1881-82, and 1882-83. 



. CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 11. 

Canadian Pacific Railway x— Return to Resolution; Report giving full information on all 
subjects affecting the Railway up to the latest date : 1. The selection of 
the route ; 2. The progress of the work ; 3. The selection or reservation 
of landgj 4. The msymeut of mom y ; 5. The laying o;:t of branches; 6. 
The progress thereon; 7. The rates of tolls for passengers and freight; 
8. The particulars requ : red by the Consolidated Railway Act and amend- 
ments thereto, up to the end of the previous fiscal year ; 9. Like particulars 
up to the latest -practicable date before the presentation of the Return ; 10. 
Copies of all Orders in Council and' of nil Correspondence between the 
Government and the Railway Company, or any member or officer of 
either, relating to the affairs of the Company, 

Return to Resolution ; Memorandum as to substitution by the Railway of 
Credit Valley Stock for $1,000,000 cash deposit. 

Return to Resolution ; Report of the Company, in account with the Govern- 
ment of Canada, viz. :— Rails Advance Account, Land Grant Bond 
Account, Current Account and Suosidy Account. (Not printed.) 

Return to Resolution ; Schedule of Correspondence as to Canadian Pacific 
Land Grant Bonds. 

Return to Resolution ; Memorandum of the progress of construction of the 
Railway, dated iMontreal, 21st February, 1883. Also, a map of the 
country to be traversed by the Railway. (Not printed.) 
9 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 27*. 

No. 27/. 
No. 27<?.. 

No. 21 h. 
No. 27*,. 



No. 21 j, 
No. 27*. 



No. 21 L 



No. 27w. 



No. 21n, 



Canadian Pacific Railway : — Return \6 Resolution ; Further Report giving full information, 
not contained in No 27 ; and also, a plan showing lands for expropria- 
tions of the Railway, extending from the south-westerly side of the 
village of Prince Arthur's Landing easterly to Current River. 

Return to Resolution ; Copies of communications of the Railway on the 
subject of the allotment and conveyance of lands, as they are earned 
under the contract. 

Return to Order ; Statement, in detail, of all sums expended in connection 
with the Canadian Pacific Railway Commission, with dates and names of 
the persons paid, and particulars of the service in respect of which pay- 
ment is made — copy of all correspondence, contracts, accounts or 
arrangements, not already brought down, as to the printing of the 
evidence or Report. 

Return to Resolution ; Map showing the Railway, as located for construction 
between Callander and Algoma Mills, 191 miles. {Not printed.) 

€opies of contracts for the Railway, in terms of section 19 of the Act 37 
Victoria, chapter 14, as follows : — 

Between Horton & Son and Her Majesty the Queen, etc., — for the 
supply of 72 tons of iron bolts and nuts. (Contract No. 94.) 

Between Bayliss, Jones and Bayliss and Her Majesty the Queen, etc, 
— to supply bolts, nuts and spikes. (Contract No. 95.) 

Between Guest and Company and Her Majesty the Queen, etc,, — for 
the supply of steel rails and steel fish-plates. (Contract No. 96.) 

Between John McDonald and Her Majesty the Queen, etc., — to con- 
struct six combined pa&senger and freight buildings on 42nd con- 
tract. (Contract No. 97.) 

Between Colin Nichol Black and the Minister of Railways and Canals, 
etc., for the supply of 30,000 tamarack ties, 8'— x 7" x 6" at 25 
cts. each. (Contract No. 98.; 

Return to Resolution ; Location eastern section, Current Creek to Nipigon, 
and freight tariff, western division. 

Return to Order ; Statement of the total quantity of land agreed to be sold 
by the Company, the total price agreed to be paid therefor, during each 
month up to the 1st day of March, 1882, distinguishing between the sales 
of farming lands and those of town, village or station lots, woodland, 
• mirfera!, quarry lands and other special sales, and including the quantities 
and prices realized for lands in which the Company became interested by 
agreements in connection with the location of stations. (Not printed.) 

Return to Resolution ; Communication from W. C. Van Home, General 
Manager, dated Montreal, 18th April, 1883, respecting additional infor- 
mation concerning the line proposed to be adopted through the Rocky 
and Selkirk Mountains. 

Return to Order; Statement of duty paid, by the Company on articles 
imported by them, from the date of* their contract until 28th February, 
1883, specifying the ports of entry of euch goods, and the amount paid at 
each port. (.Not printed.) 

Return to Address; Copies of the official memorandum of the Company, 
dated J-ith December, 1882, describing its position and prospects. The 
advertisement published thereafter by the Company asking for subscrip- 
tions for its increased capital stock ; and all memoranda in connection 
therewith. 

Statement showing the amount of the subscribed stock of the Company 
prior to the increase of its capital stock ,frorn $25,000,000 to $100,000,000, 
and the amounts paid up on'su^h subscribed stock, with the date of each 
payment in cash, and also the amounts (if any), satisfied by the acqui- 
sition of property or otherwise, specifying in such case the consideration 
therefor and the amount of stock given, and the date. 

Statement of the facts as to the acquisition by the Company of the Canada 
Central Railway, the Montreal, Ottawa and Occidental Railway, and 
interest in the Credit Valley Railway and Ontario and Quebec Railway. 

Statement of the various matters required to be returned under the Consoli- 
dated Railway Act, 1879, and amendments thereto. 

Statement of the total sum expended up to the 1st of February, 1883, by the 
Company under their contract. 
10 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 27o 



No. 21p, 



No. 27g. 



No. 


27r. 


No. 


28... 


No. 


29... 


No. 


29a. 


No. 30... 


No. 


31... 






No. 31a. 

No. 316. 
No. 31c. 
No. 31a\ 

No. 31e. 

No. 31/. 
No. 32... 
No. 33... 

No. 34,.. 



Canadian Pacific Railway :— Return to Order ; Map or map3 showing (1) the location of the 
railway s? far as approved or constructed ; (2) its location so far as pro- 
posed : to Government, but not yet approved ; (3) the location of any 
branches constructed and of any now contemplated by the Company, so 
far as the Government is advised ; (4) the lands set apart for the Com- 
pany but not yet granted ; (5) the lands granted ; (6) the lands applied 
for out not yet set apart. {Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Statement showing the reduction made by change of 
construction in Contracts A and B, and the amount involved by such 
change ; also, the amount of each payment made to the respective con- 
tractors each month since the letting of the work ; also, all claims 
made by the contractors on each of these contracts, and the date of each 
claim. (Not p>rinted .) 

Papers in relation to Sections 14 and 15, Joseph Whitehead, Contractor. 
(Not printed.) 

Memorandum respecting Thunder Bay and River Kaministiquia. 

Dominion Statutes: — Official Return of the distribution of, being 45 Victoria, 1882. (Not 
printed. ) 

Penitentiaries in Canada : — Report of the Minister of Just ice on, for the year ended 30th 
June, 1882. 

Supplementary Return ; Expenditure of the British Columbia Penitentiary, 
for the fiscal year ended the 30th June, 1882. (Not printed .) 

Receipt and Expenditure : — Return to Order ; Return of, in detail, chargeable to the Con- 
solidated Fund, from 1st July, 1882, to 1st February, 1883. (Not printed.) 

Militia: — Return to Order; Statement of the number of Veterans of 1812 now surviving; of 
the number who have died since 1875. and of the number of widows of 
deceased who have applied for assistance. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Statement containing the names and residences of all the 
militiamen of 1812 who received their pensions during the last fiscal 
year, as well as the sum given to each of them. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Copies of all tenders, accounts, &c, in connection with 
the purchase of blankets for the militia during the recess. (Not printed .) 

Return to Order ; Return of all petitions and correspondence with respect to 
new guns for the Richmond Field Battery. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence relating to the application of 
John Stewart, of Woodbridge, one of the Volunteers of 1837-38, for 
assistance, for his services in defence of his country during those years. 
■ (Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Return showing the number of officers, non-commissioned 
officers and men who received instruction in "A" and il B" Batteries 
in each year since their establishment ; the number awarded a certificate 
of qualification in each year, and the entire C03t per annum of each 
battery for the same time. 

Return to Address (Senate); Conies of all tenders for work at the camp at 
Berthier, in 1832, stating the rates of the various tenders, and the names 
of persons to whom the contracts were awarded, etc. (Not printed.) 

Canadian Extradition Act :— Return to Address ; Correspondence, not already brought 
down, touching the Act, and the suspension of the Imperial Act within 
Canada. 

Returning Officers :— Return to Order; List appointed for the General Election, 1882, 
other than Registrars or Sheriffs, o pupations and residences of such 
officers, and a list of the Sheriffs and Registrars for the Districts in which 
such officers were appointed. 

Banque de St. Jlan :— Return to Order ; Copies of the return s, annual and monthly, made 
by the Bank since 1875, to the Government; also, copies of the certi- 
ficates granted by the Treasury Board to the said Bank on going into 
operation. (Not printed.) 
11 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 35.. 



No. 35a. 



No. 36... 



No. 36a, 



No. 26b 



No. 36c. 



No. 37... 



No. 37a. 



No. 21b 



nadian Tobacco : — Return to Order ; Return shewing: 1st. The number of licensed tobacco 
manufactories on 1st February, 1833, in which Canadian leaf is exclu- 
sively used ; 2nd. The quantity of Canadian leaf used in tobacco manu- 
factories since the passing of the Inland Revenue Act of 1880, to 1st 
February, 1883 ; and 3rd. The quantity of cigars and Cavendish pro- 
duced, respectively, since 1st May, 1880, to 1st February, 1883, in manu- 
factories in which Canadian Leaf is exclusively used. (Not printed.) 



Return to Order; Copies of all documents, &c. 
tobacco en the premises of Mr. N. Bernatchez, 
Montmagny. (Not printed.) 



relating to a seizure of 
and other merchants, of 



No. 37c 

No. 37d 

No. 37«. 
No. 38... 

No." 39... 

No. 39a. 
No. 40... 



Coal :— Return to Order ; Return showing the quantity in tons of coal exported from each 
port in Nova Scotia for the year ending June 30th, 1882; Also, for the 
six months ending December 31st, 1882, and the countries to which ex- 
ported ; Also, quantities sent by railway, and by water (separately), to 
any ports of Quebec and Ontario, naming places sent to. 

Coal Lands; Regulations for the disposal of, approved by His Excellency the 
Administrator of the Government in Council, on the 2nd iinrch, 1883, 
substituted for those of the 17th December, 1831. 

Return to Order ; Copies for all applications for sales or leases, and all cor- 
respondence or reports touching all leases of coal lands in the North- 
West, not already brought down; and a statement of the payments 
made under any such leases. 

Return to Order; Return giving a full statement of all coal entered ex- 
warebcuse free or lor exportation, during the years ending 30th June, 
1881 and 1882. 

Fisheries : — Copies of Orders in Council, instructions and forms for Fishing Bounty, submitted 
in compliance with the Act 45 Vic, cap. 18. 

Return to Order ; Return of lease? or licenses to fish on rivers in New Bruns- 
wick and the annual rent received on each ; Also, the number of leases 
or licenses cancelled or surrendered. 

Return to Order; Return of the instructions issued to the Inspectors of the 
Fisheries, as to the enforcement of the Order in Council of 11th June, 
1879. whereby fishing for salmon in Canada, excepting under authority 
froi-' iment of Marine and Fisheries, was prohibited, the num- 

ber < f eeizures and informations laid before Justices of the Peace 
against patties fishing without such lease or license ; the number of con- 
victions obtained, etc. 

Certified copy of a Report of the Hon. the Privy Council, on 2nd May, 1883, 
respecting an appropriation of at least $50,0C0 for bounty to fishermen. 

Return to Order ; Return of all correspondence, etc., had from 1st January, 
1877, to 31st March, 1883, between the Department of M?"ine and 
Fisheries at Ottawa and the Inspector of Fisheries for New Brunswick 
in iefeience to th^ claim of ex-Overseer Amos Perley, of Chatham, for 
services in connection with the Sme.lt Fishery of Miramichi, in the years 
1876 to 1S78. 

Return to Address; Copie3 of all Orders in Council in force regulating the 
close season for Lobster Fishing, &c. 

Seizures and Fines :— Return to Order ; Statement showing the number of seizures made at 
each port of entry in the Dominion during the last fiscal year, and also 
during the six months ended the 31st December 1882, the fines exacted, 
and how disposed of. (Not printed.) 

Ocean Mail Service : — Return to Address (Senate) ; Correspondence, &c, in the possession 
of any department or officer cf the Government, relating to the mail 
service between Canada and the United Kingdom, or to the rates of 
freight charged by the line of steamships by which such mail service is 
performed. 

Supplementary Return (Senate) to the preceding. 

Intercolonial Railway :— Return to Order ; Return showing rolling stock purchased during 
the year ended December 31st, 1882, &c. ; also, a statement showing 
what has been built during the year in the Government workshops. 
12 






46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 40a. 



No. 406 



No. 40c 



No. 40d. 



No. 40e. 



No. 40/. 



No. 40y. 



No. 40/i 



No. 40* 



No. 40/ 



No. 40A. 



No. 40Z. 



No. 41. 



No. 42. 



No. 43. 



No. 44... 



No. 45... 



Intercolonial Railway :— Return to Order; Statement of the revenue and working expenses 
for the Bix months of each year, ended December 31st, 1880, U.81 
and 1882, under the several divisions. 

Return to Address; Copies of all Orders in Council, correspondence, &c. f 
and the Commission in connection with claims made on the Government, 
arusiug out of the construction of the railway ; and statement of the 
matters referred to them so far; and of the remuneration to be paid to 
them and the Secretary of the Commission, Ac. 

Return to Order : All correspondence in reference to the removal and dis- 
missal of W.D.McCallum, Chief Train Despatcher at Truro. {Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Return of casualties on the railway, where no loss of life 
or personal injuries occurred, from March 1st, 1882, to March 1st, 1883, 
with the respective causes, &c ; of damage to property, and amount of 
compensation paid, as well as claims unsettled. {Not printed.') 

Return to Order; Copies of ihe accounts rendered by Doctors Lebel and 
Reuouf, of St. Gervais, for attendance on an employe of the railway 
named Dionne ; and a statementof the sums to them paid. {Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Return shewing the nature of the rolling stock purchased 
for the railway, as contained in the item of $153,853.84 in the Public 
Accounts of 1882 ; where such rolling stock was manufactured, and the 
price paid. 

Return to Order ; Return of all tenders submitted for the construction of the 
freight sheds and warehouses at the railway depot, St. John, N.B ; the 
nrmes of the several contractors, and the amount of each, contract , the 
number and names of the superintendents and overseers, and the amount 
paid for their services. {Not printed.') 

Return to Order ; Return of the amounts paid for lands taken on Mill and 
Pond streets, in St. John, N.B., for the railway ; the names of the arbi- 
trators appointed to appraise the land, the compensation paid to them 
and the awards made by them. 

Return to Order ; Return showing the rolling stock purchased for each year 
since the 1st of July, 1878, the nature of such rolling stock, and the 
place where manufactured, &c. 

Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence between the Government of 
Nova Scotia and the Departments of Railways and Public WorKs, re- 
specting the transfer of the branch railway between Truro arjd Pictou, 
and with the Halifax and Cape Breton Railway and Coal Company, re- 
specting Eastern Extension Kailway matters in Nova Scotia. 

Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence relating to the steamer run- 
ning in connection with the railway between Campbelltou, Gaspc and 
intermediate ports. {Not printed.) 

Papers in relation to H. G. C. Retchum's claim for overcharge, for the con- 
veyance of rails 1866-67 and '68, Intercolonial Railway. '{Not printed.) 

Public Accounts :— Return to Address ; Copies of all Orders in Council affecting certain 
items in the Public Accounts, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1862. 
{Not printed.) 

Unforeseen Expenses :— Return to Address ; Copies of all Orders in Council affecting certain 
items in the statement ot payments charged to Unforeseen Experses, 
referred by the House to the Select Standing Committee on Public 
Accounts, on the 23rd February, 1883. {Not printed.) 

Governor General's Warrants :— Return to Address; Copies of all Orders in Council 
affecting certain items in the statement of the Governor General's 
Warrants, issued during the fiscal years 1881-82 and 1882-83, referred to the 
Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts by the House, en the 23rd 
February, 1883. {N ot printed.) 

Baptisms, Marriages and Burials :— General statements and returns of, for certain districts 
of the Province of Quebec, for the year 1882. {Not printed.) 

Drawback on Shipbuilding Materials:— Return to Order; Return of all claims presented 
for drawback on materials used for shipbuilding, for the year ended 
30th June, 1882 ; also, for the six months ended 31st December, 1882. 
{Not printed.) 

13 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 45<z. Drawback on Manufactured Goods :— Return to Order ; Return of all claim3 presented for 
drawbacks on goods manufactured for export since 2nd Marcn, 1882, &c. ; 
also, copies of all regulations made by the Department with reference to 
such claims, together with a copy of one allowed claim and the sworn 
declaration thereto of each exporter of boilers, machinery, sewing 
machines or other manufactures of iron. 

No. 46... Wharves and Piers :— Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence with reference to the 
construction of an addition to the pier of St. Jean Port Jolie, County of 
L'Islet, &c , since the appropriation made for that object during the last 
Session of Parliament. (Not printed.) 

No. iQa. Return to Order; Completing the preceding return by furnishing the date of 

the memorandum closing the said papers. (Not printed.') 

No. 466. Return to Order ; Reports, &c, in relation to the construction of a wharf or 

pier at St. Anne, on the Saguenay, County of Chicoutimi. (Not printed.) 

No. 46c. Return (in part) to Address; Correspondence, &c, relating to any claim 

made by the Provincial Government of Prince Edward Island, for a 
refund of their expenditure upon public wharves and piers, and also in 
connection with the maintenance of short-term prisoners in that Province 
since its admission to the Union. (Printed/or Distribution .) 

No. 46d Supplementary Heturn to the preceding. (Printed/or Distribution.) 

Return to Order; Copy of all reports, estimates, &c, made by the Govern- 
ment Engineers of Port Albert Harbor, and all correspondence with the 
Port Albert Pier Company respecting said harbor. 

No. 46/. Return to Order; Copies of all reports, &c, made by the Government 

Engineers of Bayfield Harbor. 

No. 46^. Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence, appropriations, &c, relative 

to proposed improvement of Morpeth Harbor, on Lake Eriel 

No. 47... St. John Railway Bridge :— Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence with the Govern- 
ment during the year 1882, referring to the construction of a railway 
bridge over the St. John, at St. John. 

No. 47a. Telegram from Shadroch Holly, Mayor of St. John, N.B., with a copy of a 

memorial to the Governor General, in relation to the resolution respect- 
ing the proposed loan to the St. John Bridge and Railway Company. 

No. 48... Standard Meridian :— Return to Address (Senate) ; A copy of the memorial from the Royal 
Society of Canada, the Canadian Institute of Toronto, and of any docu- 
ments connected with the memorials, relative to the representation of 
Canada in the International Conference, to determine a standard meri- 
dian now contemplated by the Congress of the United States. (Printed 
Jor Distribution,) 

No. 49... Customs Department, Montreal : — Return to Order; Return of the names of persons in the 
employ of the Customs Department in the City of Montreal, as supernu- 
merary clerks constantly employed for not less than six months previous 
to 1st July, 1882, (Not printed.) 

No. 50... Drill Shed, Iona:— Return to Order ; Copy of contract, &c, for the building of the drill-shed 
at Iona, Ont., with report of inspection of the same. (Not printed.) 

No, 51... De la Chevrotiere, O.C , Dismissal of :— Return to Address ; Copies of the Order in Council, 
&c, dismissing Mr. Octave C. de la Chevrotiere from his position as 
keeper of a lighthouse situated in the Parish of Lotbiniere, in the County 
of Lotbiniere. (Not printed.) 

No. 52... Breakwaters: — Return to Order; Return of the advertisement for construction of the 
Breakwater at Po t Lome, N S., and the several tenders therefor ; the 
party to whom the contract was awarded, and the amount of such 
contract. (Not printed.) 



No. 52a. 



No. 526. 



Return to Order; Copies of all papers, reports of engineers, &c, relating to 
the building of a breakwater' at New Harbor, Guysboro' County, N.S. 
(Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence, &c, relating to the building 
of a breakwater on the west side of Liverpool Bay, from 1870 to 1882. 
(Not printed. ) 

14 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 52c 



No. 53.. 



No. 54... 



No. 55.. 



No. 56. 



No. 56a. 



No. 57. 



No. 58.. 



No. 58a 



No. 58b 



No. 59.. 



No. 59a. 



No. 596. 



No. 60... 



Breakwaters : — Return to Order ; Copies of Engineer's report of survey made at Brae, 
Prince County, Prince Eiward Island, during last summer, with a view 
to making harbor improvements. (Not printed.) 

Miller, J. A., Judge ;— Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence with Mr. J. A. Miller, 
late Justice of the Court of Queen's Bench, Manitoba, prior to his ap- 
pointment, relating to his becoming Justice of that Court, and subse- 
quently to his appointment on the subject of the resignation of his office. 
( Not printed. ) 

Summerside Habbor : — Return to Order; Copy of the Engineer's Report of Survey made at 
Summerside Harbor, Prince County, Prince Edward Island, during the 
last summer, with a view to improving the navigation of said Harbor. 
(Not printed.) 

Reciprocity between Canada and U. S. : — Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence 
between the Governments of Canada and the United States, or any 
Board of Trade in Canada or the United States, upon the question of 
Reciprocal Trade relations between the two countries, on the general 
basis of the Reciprocity Treaty of 1854, since 1878. 

Royal Military College: — Return to Order; Return of the number of Cadet3 that have 
graduated at the RoyaL Military College since its establishment; the 
number who have obtained Commissions in the Imperial service ; the 
number who have been appointed to the permanent Militia Corps : Also, 
names of any officers appointed to a A" and u B" Batteries of A Mllery 
since February 6th, 1880, who have not graduated at the Royal Military 
College, and of those appointed who graduated at the College. (Not 
printed.) 

Return to Order ; Return showing the name, salary and duty of each officer 
on the Instruction Staff of the Royal Military College, with the date of 
his appointment ; also a Return showing the full staff of officers of " A '"' 
and " B" Batteries, respectively, with salary and date of appointment. 
( Not printed. ) 

Quaco Lighthouse : — Return to Order ; Return of the tenders for the re-building of the 
Lighthouse at Quaco, New Brunswick, and to whom the Contract was 
awarded, and the amount of such Contract. (Not printed.) 

Disasters to Canadian Vessels in the Great Lakes : — Return to Order ; Return of all 
correspondence relating to the disasters which have occurred to Cana- 
dian vessels, navigating the Great Lakes and the Georgian Bay, within 
the past three years, &c. (Not printed.) 

Registered Vessels : — Return to Order ; Statement showing the vessels registered in the 
Province of Quebec ; also, the number of vessels sold and loat between 
1st January, 1873, and 1st January, 1882. (Not printed.) 

Vessels importing Sugar, Syrup and Molasses : — Return to Order ; Return showing the 
number of vessels with their tonnage, nationality and port of entry, in 
which sugar, syrup and molasses were imported into this country during 
the fiscal year ended 30tb June, 1881 ; the quantity of sugar above 14 
D.S., and of a lower grade by each vessel or steamship ; also a like Return 
from l3t July, 1881, to 1st January, 1882. (Not printed.) 

IntoxicatingHLiquors :— Return to Order ; Statement showing the quantities of distilled and 
fermented liquors, imported and manufactured for consumption in Can- 
ada, from 1868 to 1882, computed in Imperial gallon?, each Province 
separately, the value of the same and duty paid thereon ; the amount of 
materials used in brewing and distilling alcoholic liquors in the several 
Provinces of Canada during the same years. 

Return to Order ; Copies of any petitions from the Province of Quebec, on 
the subject of proposed legislation, as to the sale of intoxicating liquors. 
(Not printed.) 

Return to Address; Copies of despatches, &c, on the subject of Canadian 
and Provincial Laws, as to the imposition of restrictions on the sale of 
intoxicating drinks. (Not printed.) 

Fabre, Hon. Hector: — Return to Address; Copies of all correspondence, &c, respecting 
the appointment of Hon. Hector Fabre to the position he now occupies 
in France ; also, statement of his duties and the salary or commission 
paid or to be paid for such services, &c ; also, all reports on the results 
of the mission. (Not printed.) 
15 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 61... 

No. 62... 

No. 62a. 

No. 63... 

No. 64... 

No. 65... 
No. 6G... 

No. 67... 

No. 67a. 
No. 61b. 

No. 68... 
No. 68a. 

No. 69... 



No. 70... 



No. 71. 



Salb op Liquor ; — Return to Order; Copies ot all correspondence between any Member of 
the Government and any licensed victuallers, and of all petitions, &c, 
presented by any such person tin the legislation affecting the sale of 
liquors. (Not printed) 

Dominion Bailiffs : — Return to Address; Copies of all correspondence *with, and petitions 
from municipalities, referring to the appointment of, to convey prisoners 
from the county gaols to the Penitentiaries. {Not printed.) 

Supplementary Return to the preceding. (Not printed.) 

Amended Rule :— Statement of the Supreme (Jourt of Canada, that Schedule 
D, annexed to the rules of that Court, b3 amended; and that an allow- 
ance shall be taxed by the Registrar to the duly entered Agent in any 
appeal, in the discretion of the Registrar, to $20. (Not printed.) 



Supreme Court, 



Hydsogr'phical Survey:— Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence between any 
person and the Government, in relation to the hydrographical survey of 
the great lakes, the River and Gulf of St. Lawrence, and the othir mari- 
time coasts of Canada. 



Salt Duties 



■Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence, &c, in the hands of Govern- 
ment, on the subject of duties on salt. (Not printed.) 



Fog-whistle, Siielburne :— Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, received by 
the Department of Marine and Fisheries since 1st January, 1881, in 
reference to the erection of a fog-whi3tle at Shelburne Harbor, Nova 
Scotia. (Not printed.) 

County Courts : — Return to Address ; Copy of all correspondence between the Governments 
of New Brunswick and the Dominion, in relation to the creation of a new 
County Court in that Province, and the appointment of a Judge thereto. 
(Not printed.) 

Return to Address; Return of cases tried at each of the County Courts of 
the Counties of Kings and Albert, since 1st June, 1882, with the 
amount of verdicts and judgments entered thereon. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Copies of ail correspondence between the Government 
and the County Court Judges of the Dominion, and others, respecting 
the resolution submitted to the House during last Session of Parliament, 
by the late Minister of Justice, on the subject of the proposed increase of 
the salary of such Judges. (Not printed.) 

Maritime Court :— Return to Order : Return showing the cases disposed of, &c. ,by the Judge 
and several Surrogate Judges of the Maritime Court, since the creation 
of the said court, until the first day of February, 1882. (Not printed.) 

Return to Address; Return of all correspondence between the Judge or 
Judges of th^ Maritime Court of Ontario and the Government, respecting 
the rules, &c, of said court, and the simplification thereof; also, 
copies of any amended or proposed amended rules, since 1st January, 
1882. (Not printed.) 

Canada Central Railway— Pembroke Bonus -.—Return to Address; Copies of all corres- 
pondence upon the subject of the assumption by the Government of the 
payment of the amount granted by the Town of Pembroke, in aid of the 
Canada Central Railway. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 12. 

Constitutions of C.B., N.S., P.E.I., N.B., B-C, and Vancouver Island ;— Return to Address ; 
Copies of the charters or constitutions granted Dy the Crown or the 
Imperial Parliament, to the Provinces of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, 
Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, British Columbia and Vancouvei 
Island; also, copies of all Acts, Charters, Royal Instructions, Commis- 
sions, Orders in Council or Despatches altering or amending the same 
as originally granted, or conferring or withdrawing any political rights 
or privileges, before or after the granting of such •charters. 

Steamship Communication with Germany: — Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondenc J 
between any Member of the House of Commons, or other persons, an 
tne Government, in r-lation to the establishment of direct steamshi j 
communication- bt-iw '.en Montreal, Qfiebe©, St John, N.B.,. Halifax, an) 

Gewri|tta ESs^pq.^ 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 


72... 


No. 


73 .. 


No 


7 1... 


No. 


75... 



No. 76... 



No. 76a. 



No. 766, 



No. 76c. 
No. 77.. 



No. 77a, 



No. 78... 



No. 79.. 



No. 80. 



No. 81... 



No. 82. 



Sailor8' Application for Release: — Return to Address; Copies of all correspondence be- 
tween the Secretary of State and the Departments of Marine and Fish- 
eries and of Justice, con he application of divers sailors in the 
port of Quebec, praying for a release from confinement, and to return to 
sea, &c , at the request, of R. Temple, Muster of'.the British vessel Genii. 
(No 

British Canadian Loan and Investment Co.; — Return (Senate) — A list of shareholders, and 
also a statement of its affairs on 31st December, 1882. (Not printed.) 

Semaphores, River du Loup, and Brandy Pot3 : — Return to Address ; Copies o' all corres- 
pondence in relation to tha erection of Semaphores on the wharf at River 
du Loup, in the County of Temiscouata, and on the Brandy Pots. (Not 
printed.) 

Wharves at River du Loup and Riviere Ouelle : — Return to Order; Copies of all Reports 
made up to this date, respecting the movement of the ice at the wharves 
at River du Loup and Riviere Ouelle. (Not printed.) 

Grand Trunk Railway :— Return to Address ; Copy of all correspondence between the 
Government of Canada and the Company, in relation to the purchasing 
of bonds and shares of the Wellington, Grey and Bruce Railway ; also, 
certain stocks and shares of the Hamilton and North-Western Railway - 
Company, and of the St. Lawrence and Ottawa Railway Company; also, 
all copies of correspondence in relation to the purchase or sale of the 
North Shore Railway Company.. &c. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Return of all accidents and casualties which have occu: r p 1 
on the Railway, or anyof its branches or railways under its control, inv liv- 
ing either loss of life or injury to person or property, &c. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Copy of all correspondence between the Company and 
the Government, in reference to the purchase or sale of the Riviere du 
Loup Branch of the said railway, now owned by the Government ; also, 
any correspondence showing the manner in which the sail Company have 
expended or proposed to expend the money so received ; and also, all 
correspondence concerning the Government lien for the debt of 
.£3,111,500, and accrued interest. 

Supplementary Return to the preceding. 

Fifth General Election : — Report on the Dominion elections of 1832, and also each election 
held subsequently thereto up to date. 

Return to Order ; Return showing all sums paid to defray expenses of the 
late Dominion elections, in the different electoral districts. 

Hebert, H., Fraudulent Practices :— Return to Order; Copies of any complaint against 
Hubert Hebert, Chief Station Master at Montmagny, in relation to a 
. charge of fraudulent practices affirmed against him by P. B. Casgrain, 
Esq., Member for L'Islet. (Not printed.) 

Wharfage at Digby, N.S. :— Return to Order; Statement of the amount collected for 
wharfage at the public pier at Digby, for each year from 1879 to 1882, 
inclusive. (Not printed.) 

Russell vs. The Queen:— Return to Address; Copies of the judgments in the case of Russell 
and the Queen, in the Supreme Court of Canada and the Privy Council, 
and of the judgments iu any Provincial courts of superior jurisdiction, 
or in the Supreme Court of Canada, in all cases raising the right of a 
Provincial Legislature to pass laws affecting the number or character of 
persons licensed to sell intoxicating liquors, or the times of such sale. 

Shushwap and Okanagan Canal : — Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, 
in connection with the surveys made in 1882 for the construction of a 
canal between Lakes fchushwap and Okanagan, British Columbia. 

OrdnanceJLands and Naval Reserves: — Return to Order; Statement showing the gross 
amount of receipts from the sale or leasing of Ordnance Lands or Naval 
Reserves, in Ontario,, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, from 1st 
July, 1856, to 1st July, 1882, and the purpose to which the sums so 
received have been applied ; also a Statement showing the several pro- 
perties of which portions have been sold or leased, and the number of-" 1 
acres in each case. (Not printed.) 



No. 82a 



Supplementary Return tso the preoeffiiyg.. 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 83. 



No. 84... 



No. 85... 



No. 86.., 



No. 87... 



No. 88... 



No. £9. 



No. 90... 



No. 91... 



No. 92... 



No. 93.. 



No. 93a.. 



No. 936. 



No. 93c. 



No. 94... 



No. 94«. 



Mub'ray Canal :— Return to Address (Senate); Copies of all tenders received for the con- 
struction of the Murray Canal, and all correspondence, &c, concerning 
the same. 



Land for Colonization:— Return to Order ; Returns showing the total number of applications 
for land for colonization under plans Nos- 1 and 2 of the Land Regu- 
lations of 23rd December, 1881, up to 1st January, 1883, with the names 
of the applicants, the date of application, and the quantity of land in 
each case applied for. 

O'Connor, Hon. John: — Return to Address; Statement of any sums paid, and the arrange- 
ment on which such were paid, to the Hon. John O'Connor, since his 
retirement from office. {Not printed.) 

Prince Edwaed Island Railway :— Return to Order ; Return of all reports, estimated cost, 
&c, bearing upon the survey of a proposed branch line of railway, 
between Harmony Station on the railway, to Elmira, east point of 
P.E.I. 

Buoys and Beacons, Lake Huron: — Return to Order; Return of all correspondence with the 
Government within the past four years, copies of contracts and expendi- 
ture, in reference to buoys and beacons in the north channel of Lake 
Huron. {Not printed.) 

Teoops in Halifax: — Return to Address ; Copies of all despatches, Orders in Council and 
reports on the subject of the withdrawal of the troops from Halifax. (Not 
printed.) 

Commercial Relations with France, Spain, &c. : — Return to Address; Copies of all. des- 
patches, &c, between the Governments of the United Kingdom and 
Canada ; and between the Government of Canada and the High Com- 
missioner, touching negotiations for commercial arrangements with 
France, Spain or other countries. 

Lake St. John Railway :— Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence between the 
Government and the Lake St. John Railway Company, in relation to the 
subsidy granted to the said company, and a statement of all sums paid to 
the said company, on account of the said subsidy. (Not printed) 

Custom Duties Refunded at Toronto :— Return to Order ; Return of the names and respec- 
tive amounts of Customs duties refunded at the port of Toronto for the 
last fiscal year, and the articles or commodities upon which the duties 
were collected and refunded. (Not printed.) 

Imports and Exports :— Return to Order ; Return showing the imports and exports from July 
1st, 1882, to January 1st, J 883, and the countries from which imported 
and to which exported. (Not printed.) 

Immigration :— Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, of recent date between 
the Governments of the Dominion and British Columbia, on immigration 
into that Province. 

Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence between the British Columbia 
and Dominion Governments respecting immigration to British Columbia; 
also, on the question of Chinese immigration. 

Return to Order ; Return giving the number of Immigrant Agents (other than 
tho3e on the regular and published lists) sent from Canada to Europe, 
who received pay from the Government during the Calendar years of lfc81 
and 1882 ; the names of persons so employed ; the instructions given to • 
them, &c. 

Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence, &c, in reference to the 
immigration of Jewish refugees from Russia into Canada, and the 
subsequent maintenance and disposal of such immigrants. (Not 
printed) 

Quebec Provincial Subsidy :— Return to Address : Copy of any representation by the Legis- 
lature of Quebec, on the bubject of an increase of the provincial 
subsidy. 

Return to Address (Senate); All letters, correspondence, &c, which the 
Federal Authorities may have received from the Quebec Government or 
Legislature, asking for "better terms" or an increase of the Dominion 
Subsidy. 

18 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1888 



No. 95... 
No. 96... 

No. 97... 
No. 98... 

No. 99... 
No. 100. 

No. 101 . 

No. 102. 
No. 103.. 

No. 103a 

No. 1036 

No. 104. 

No. 105.. 

To. 105a 
To, 105fi 
To. 105c 



Ontario Boundary Award :— Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence between the 
Secretary of State and Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario, 
in relation to the award respecting the northern and north-western 
boundaries of that Province, not already communicated. 

Portage Island: — Return to Address; Copies of all correspondence between the Canadian 
Government and the British Government, in reference to the transfer of 
Portage Island, at the entrance of the Miramichi River, to the Govern- 
ment of Canada, together with all reports, &c, in reference to that 
subject. 

Steamer to replace the "Glendon" :— Return to Order; Return of the advertisement for 
the contract of the building of a steamer to replace the "Glendon"; 
the several tenders therefor, to whom the contract was awarded, and the 
amount of such contract. (Hot printed.) 

Trade between Canada, West Indies and Brazil :— Return to Order; Copy of the petition 
relative to the trade between Canada and the West Indies, and Brazil, 
signed by the principal fish merchants of the coast of Gaspe and Bay des 
Chaleurs, and addressed to the Hon. Minister of Finance, with a copy of 
the letter accompanying the said petition. 

Cartridge Factory at Querec :— Return to Order ; Return showing the cost of the cartridge 
factory at Quebec, since its establishment, and the names and salary of 
all the officers and employes, with the value and quantity of ammunition 
manufactured . (Not p tinted. ) 

Grain and Products op Grain :— .Return to Order; Statement showing: — 1st. The amount 
of duties collected between 15th March, 1879, and 1st January. 1883, on 
the cereals comprised under the head of "grain and products of grain " ; 
also the total quantities imported. 2nd. The quantity imported and en- 
tered for consumption in Canada ; also quantity exported during the 
years 1874 to 1882, inclusive. 

S.S. " Newpdjld " and " Moravian " :— Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence with 
the Minister of Marine and Fisheries concerning the employment of the 
Government steamer " Newfield " in aiding the wrecked steamship 
11 Moravian.' ' (Not printed.) 

Mining Regulations : — Copy of those governing the disposal of mineral lands other than coal 
lands. (Not printed.) 

Agricultural Implements, Ac, Imported into Man. and N.-W.T. :— Return to Order; State- 
ment of agricultural implements, waggons, sleighs and carriages, 
imported from 30 th June to 31st December, 1882, 

Return to Order ; Statement of all agricultural implements, carriages, wag- 
gons and sleighs shipped, in bond, to Manitoba from other Provinces of 
the Dominion, from 1st July to 3 1st December, 1882. 

Return to Order ; Statement of all agricultural implements, carriages, wag- 
gons and sleight shipped, in bond, to Manitoba from other Provinces of 
the Dominion, during the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882. 

Hudson Bay : — Return to Address ; Return of all information in reference to the duration of 
navigation, the soundings and the extent to which the Bay freezes over ; 
also, all documents bearing on its probable resources ; also, all reports 
on the mineral resources of the regions about the Bay and the Islands 
therein. 

Grenville and Carillon Canal :— Return to Order ; Copy of the award of arbitrator on 
claim for damages put in by the contractor for the Grenville and Carillon 
Canal, under contract in force in 1871-72, with statement of sums paid 
thereunder. 

Papers in relation to the construction of two locks, and other works, at 
Greece's Point. 

Award of John Page, Esq., Chief Engineer, on the claim of Messrs, Heney, 
Stewart <fe Co.. contractors for works at Greece's Point, 

Report of J. Page, Esq., Chief Engineer, on the Rapide Plat Canal. 

19 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1888? 



No. 106. 



No. 107.. 



No. 109. 



No. 110. 



No. Ill 



No. 112, 



No. 113.. 



No. 114. 



No. 115. 



No. 116. 



No, 117. 



No. 118. 



•Return to Address^ (Senate) ; Copies of all 
3, at Winnipeg, 



M, Ships on British Columbia Coast: — Return to Address (Senate); Copies of all cor- 
respondence between the Dominion and Imperial Governments, and 
between tbe Dominion and British Columbia Governments, on the 
subject of having one or more of Her Majesty's ships of war stationed 
continuously on the coast of British Columbia. (Not printed. ) 

Government Survey, Lot No. 133, Manitoba: 

correspondence between the Department of Cr'own Lands, 
or the Department of the Interior, and parties claiming lot No. 133 of the 
Government survey, or any right thereto, situated in the Parish of Ste. 
Agatbe, County of Provencher, Manitoba; also, copies of all Orders in 
Council or of the Department of the Interior, relating to the said lot. 
(Not printed.) 

No. 108.. [Subsidies for Manitoba :— Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, since the com- 
mencement of last Session, in reference to subsidies or grants for Manitoba. 

Public Debt incurred for Railways, Canals, etc : — Return to Order ; Statement showing 
the amounts charged in the Public Debt Account of the Dominion of 
Canada, which were expended on railways, canals and navigation secu- 
rities in British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, 
Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia proper, and Cape Breton Island, up 
to 1st July, 1882, &c. 

McMillan, J. D., Dismissal of :— Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, relat- 
ing to the diamissal of John D. McMillan from his office as Fishery 
Overseer, and the appointment in his place of David Baker. (Not printed.) 

Pilots and Pilotage, British Columbia :— Return to Order; Copies of all correspqndence, 
&c, between the Government and the Pilotage authorities of British 
Columbia, or any other parties in that Province, on the subject of Pilots 
and Pilotage. 

Life-saving Stations: — Return to Order; Copies of correspondence, &c, relative to the 
establishment and management of Life-saving stations on coast of 
Lake Ontario, or other waters, together with such other reports upon the 
construction and operation of Life-saving stations in other countries as 
may be in the possession of the Government. (Not printed.) 

Frontenac Tbrracb, Quebec: — Return to Address; Copies of all documents in relation to 
the granting by the Imperial Government to the Dominion Government, 
and by the latter to the Provincial Government, of various lands, and 
more particularly of the land on which is located Frontenac Terrace, in 
the City of Quebec. (Not printed.) 

Lake of the Woods and Rainy Lake : — Papers in relation to the construction of steamers 
for Lake of the Woods and Rainy Lake. (Not printed.) 

Dauphenbh, James, Claim of: — Return to Order; Copies of all petitions, &c, in reference 
to the claim of James Dauphenee, of Bridgewater, Lunenburg, for pay- 
ment of claim for refund of expenses incurred by him in discharge of his 
duties as a Fishery Warden of that County. (Not printed.) 

Ordnance for Canada: — Return to Order; Copy of contract, correspondence, &c.,*in con- 
nection with the manufacture of great guns for the Government of 
Canada. (Not printed.) 

Colonisation Grants : — Return to Order ; Return giving every form of patent arrangement 
or agreement, &c, between Companies and the Government in regard to 
colonization grants. 

Timber and Mining Licenses in Disputed Territory, Ontario :— Return to Address ; Copies 
of all correspondence, Orders in Council and papers not already brought 
down, relating to the cutting of timber or to mining on lands within the 
territory now in dispute with Ontario ; also, all correspondence, &c, and 
all permits and licenses granted to make timber ties, telegraph poles and 
saw logs, within the district of Rainy Lake and River, and Lake of the 
Woods and tributary streams. 

Admjnistbation of Justice, claims of the Provinces :— Return to Address ; Copies of corres- 
pondence, from 1st July, 1867, to date, between the Dominion and the 
Provincial Governments respecting the claims of each of the said Pro- 
vincial Governments, for the repayment of sums expended by them on 
account of the Dominion for the administration of justice ; also, a state- 
ment in detail of the claims settled. 
20 



No. 110. 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers, 



A. 1888 



No. 120.. 



. No. 121.. 



No. 122. 



No. 123. 



No. 124.. 



H. M. S. " Chabtbdis " : — Return to Order 
reports relating to the 
printed. ) 



Copies of all correspondence, expenditure and 
'Charybdis", not already brought down. (Not 



Subsidies to Cebtain Railways -.—Report to Council, 14th May, 1883, recommending the grant 
ot a subsidy of $ 3,200 per mile, for 12 miles, in all $38,400, towards the 
construction of a line of railway between Petitcodiac and Havelock 
Corner, N.B. 

Proposed smbsidy, $3,200 per mile for 80 miles from Canso to Louisburg or 
Sydney, in all $256,000, to the Great American and European Short Line 
Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile for 49 miles, in all $156,000, to the Inter- 
national Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile for 36 miles, in all $115,200, to the Caraquet 
Railway Company, N.B. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile, in all $160,000, to the Gatineau Valley 
Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile first 50-mile section out of St. Jerome, in 
all $160,000, to the Montreal and Western Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile for 28 miles, from Napanee to Tamworth, 
in all $89,600, to the Napanee, Tamworth and Quebec Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile for 25 miles, from St. Raymond to Lake 
St. John, in all $80,000, to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Com- 
pany. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile for 100 miles from Metapedia to Paspebiac, 
in all $320,000, to the Baie des Chaleurs Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile for 32 miles (from the Intercolonial Rail- 
way to Mr. Laggan's Mills), in all $102,400, to the Miramichi Valley Rail- 
way Company. ... 

Proposed farther subsidy at the rate of $6,000 per mile, or a further sum, in 
all of $660,000, from Gravenhurst to Callander, 110 miles, to such Com- 
pany as shall be approved by the Governor in Council. 

St. John River, N,B. :— Return to Address (Senate) ; Copies of all reports, letters, &c, since 
1878, between the Department of Public Works and Mr, J. A. Lyon, or 
any other person, in reference to the removal of obstructions in the St. 
John River, N.B. (Not printed.) 

Manitoba Indian Agency :— Return to Order ; Report, with evidence, on the condition 
and management of the Manitoba Indian Agency under J. A. N Pro- 
vencher, the Indian Superintendent of the Manitoba District, made by 
the Government Commission of Enquiry ; also vouchers dated 25th June, 
1875, for $180 ; 25th June, 1875, for $1,290 ; and 26th December, 1875, 
for $600, signed by one Tremblay, &c (Not printed.) 

Tblegbam Expenses, Department op Public Works :— Return to Order; Statement of the ex- 
penditure for each month elapsed for the current fiscal year, on telegrams 
charged to various works in the Department of Public Works, and a 
like statement from November, 1881, to 30th June, 1882, inclusive. (Not 
printed.)^ 



21 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.li.) A. 1883 



EEPORT 



MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



FOE THE CALENDAR YEAR 



1882. 



ftjintfll bg ©r^r L afl jjatfiametrt. 




OTTAWA : 
PRINTED BY MACLEAN, ROG-ER & CO. WELLINGTON STREET. 

1883. 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (}»^.14.) A. 188$ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Minister's Report : — 

I. General Remarks. 
II. Arts and Agriculture, containing Cattle Trade. 

Sheep. 



Cattle Quarantine. 
Sheep Scab. 
Phosphate of Lime. 
Forestry. 

Pictou Cattle Disease. 
Dominion Exhibition. 
Public Archives. 
III. Patents. 

IV. Copyrights, Trade Marks, &c. 
V. Quarantine. 
VI. Immigration. 
VII. Census and Statistics. 
VIII. Health Statistics. 

Annex : — 

Secretary's Report on Emigration from Canada on Western Frontier, 
Rules and Regulations, Vital Statistics. 
Appendices : 

Reports of Archivist. 

do Immigration Agents, 

do Quarantine Officers, 

do Cattle Quarantine Officers. 

t do General Subjects. 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188$ 



REPORT 



MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE 



CALENDAR YEAR 1882. 



To His Excellency the Bight Honourable Sir John Douglas Sutherland Campbell (com- 
monly called the Marquis of Lome'), one of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy 
Council, Knight of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, and 
Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St„ 
George, Governor General of Canada and Vice- Admiral of the same, <&c, <kc, dec. . 

May it Please Your Excellency, — 

I have the honour to submit the Report of the Department of Agriculture for 
the calendar year 1882.* 

L— GENERAL REMARKS. 

The following is a statement of the number of letters received and sent by the 
Department, during the year 1882 : — 

Month. Received. Sent. 

January 4,057 5,884 

February 3,314 3,614 

March • 3,508 4,059 

April , 3,775 3,848 

May 3,321 3,472 

June 2,614 3,887 

July 2,744 2,810 

August 2,766 2,925 

September 2,442 2,636 

October 2,992 4,123 

November 2,809 3,342 

December 3.028 4,382 



Total 37,370 45,032 

* Note. — This Report, while referring to the calendar year, contains, in certain cases, references 
to events up to the date of its presentation to Parliament. But all statements in figures refer to the 
calendar year. 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (fto.14.) 



A. 1883 



The following table shows a statistical statement of the business of the Department 
from the year 1864 to 1882, inclusive : 











Total Number of 








No. of cases of 


Immigrants 


Yearg 


Letters Received. 


Letters Sent. 


Patents, Copyrights, 
Trade Marks, &c. 


and Immigrant 
Passengers . 


1864 


5,422 


5,152 


181 


40,649 


1865 


6,694 


7,638 


200 


47,103 


1866 


7,435 


8,250 


337 


51,749 


1867 


7,571 


10,679 


840 


57,873 


1868 


8,696 


10,299 


643 


71,448 


1869 


9,516 


13,654 


965 


74,365 


mo 


11,442 


20,078 


1,110 


69,019 


1871 


18,416 


21,709 


2,035 


65,722 


1872 


20,271 


30,-61 


2,215 


89,186 


1873 


22,216 


31,786 


3,204 


99,109 


1874 


17,970 


22,673 


3,072 


80,022 


1875 


15,623 


17,927 


4,923 


43,458 


1876 


16,562 


18,512 


4,389 


36,549 


1877 


21,796 


30,079 


4,271 


35,285 


1878 


19,815 


28,429 


4,159 


40,032 


1879 


27,259 


22,419 


4,190 


61,052 


1880 


24,210 


30,988 


4,474 


85,850 


1881 


35.372 


40,826 


5,271 


117,016 


1882 


37,370 


45,032 


6,070 


193,150 



II.— ARTS AND AGRICULTURE. 

CATTLE TRADE. 

Importation. 

There has been a very large increase in the number of pure bred cattle imported 
as compared with past years, the importations being as follow :— 

Cattle 1,215 

Sheep 1,124 

Swine , 22 

They may be thus subdivided. For Canada— cattle, 574; sheep, 998; swine 
22. For United States —cattle, 640 ; sheep, 126. The value of such large importa- 
tions of pedigreed stock. (323 of these cattle being Polled Angus or Aberdeen,) and 
the consequent improvement in our herds, is difficult to estimate. 

Exportation. 

The cattle trade from Canadian ports during the past year shows a decrease as 

compared with 1881 ; but there has been a corresponding increase in sheep. The 

vi 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (Xo.14.) A. 1883 



exports were, cattle, 35,738 as against 45,535 in 1881; and sheep 75,905 as against 
82,404 in the previous year. The apparent falling off in the export trade to the 
United Kingdom does not, however, indicate a large reduction in the cattle trade of 
the Dominion, as the Customs returns to the 30th June last show that 16,145 cattle 
were exported to the United States, and in the same period 233,602 sheep were 
exported to the same country as against 7,558 cattle and 264,910 sheep, in 1881. 
The improvement in the quality of cattle becomes more marked every year ; and Mr. 
Dyke, in his Eeport, states so good are the ordinary cattle which are being 
landed from the Dominion, that, in point of breeding and quality, they would com- 
pare favourably with those in the best districts in the British Isles, a fact traceable 
to the importation of pedigree stock. 

SHEEP. 

The large dealers in Great Britain state that there will be a steadily increasing 
demand for sheep in the British markets, owing to the reported scarcity from 
disease amongst the flocks in the United Kingdom. 

The export of sheep from Canada is now assuming such large proportions, that 
it bids fair to become one of the leading industries of the agriculturist. The numbers 
of sheep shipped to Europe during the past year were 75,905, worth about $500,000, 
and to the United States 233,600, worth in round figures $900,000, or 
altogether a trade of about $1,400,000 per annum. I would strongly call the atten- 
tion of breeders to the necessity for improving their stock both by breeding and 
caring for them. The agent of this Department at Liverpool, states 
that owing to wet seasons, the British farmer has had a fearful 
disease to contend with in his flocks, the loss from which was, during 1882, calcu- 
lated to be 9 per cent. Added to this is the deficiency of lambs, and taking 7 per 
cent, of the sheep which died as breeding ewes, it would imply a deficiency of 
2,400,000 lambs, or a total decrease in the British flocks of 5,250,000. 
Under the circumstances, not only for next year, but for many years, the pros- 
pects for sheep farmers in the Dominion are exceedingly good, but it must be borne 
in mind that the English market only requires fat sheep. Mr. Grahame, the Glasgow 
agent of this Department, inserts in his Eeport a letter from Messrs. Swan & Sons of 
Edinburgh, very large dealers in the trade, in which they spoak of the high prices 
likely to be current for fat sheep. 

The question of the breed of sheep is at present one which has special interest 

and importance for Canada. It will be seen by the Eeports of the Agents of the 

Department in the United Kingdom, that particular attention is now directed to 

the very healthy importations from Canada, and to the endeavors used to aid the 

requirements of the trade abroad. This is a feature which it is the effort of 

the Government to maintain, but there is a further point. The farmers of the country 

vii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 

would find it very much to their advantage to change, to a very large extent, if not alto- 
gether, the present long-woolled varieties, for the shorter wools of medium fineness, 
such as the Shropshire and other Downs or Cheviots. The farmer will find that short 
wools are very readily marketable at high prices, while the reverse is the fact as res- 
pects long wools, for the reason that the long wool is not adapted to the present pro- 
cess of manufacturing. For sale in the market also, as mutton, the Downs' varieties 
are preferred. Farmers, for these reasons, will find it very greatly to their advan- 
tage to make the changes suggested. 

CATTLE QUARANTINE. 

The enforcement of a quarantine of ninety days, in accordance with the Order 
in Council of 23rd April, 1880, on all cattle imported during the past year, has been 
strictly maintained. No disease of a contagious nature manifested itself at the station 
during the year. The cattle quarantine grounds at Point Levis may now be con- 
sidered completed, and afford the best possible accommodation for nearly 700 head 
of cattle. The total number subjected to quarantine at Point Levis, in 1882, was 1,214 
cattle ; the sheep and swine that arrived being allowed to proceed to their destination, 
as no disease was apparent amongst them. There were fifty calves born in quaran- 
tine, and amongst all the cattle only five deaths occurred, all of which were from 
ordinary disease. 

During the summer a deputation of the United States Treasury Cattle Com- 
mission visited this station to inquire into our system, with a view to the adoption 
of a similar organization at American ports, and these Commissioners expressed their 
high approbation of the Point Levis cattle quarantine. 

Dr. McEachran, Veterinary Inspector, states that importers in the Western 
States expressed to him their hope that no restrictions would prevent them import- 
ing " on Canadian steamers by the St. Lawrence route through a country where no 
disease existed, and where the cost of quarantine was less than half what it has 
hitherto cost at United States ports." 

An Order in Council, dated 9th February, 1882, was passed, prohibiting the 
importation of head ropes that had been used. This was on representations made 
that second-hand ropes, which had been used for tying up cattle in the United King- 
dom, or on ship-board, were being imported, and that there was reason to believe 
contagious disease might be communicated by the use of such. 

The increasing demand in the west for the importation of cattle from the 
Western United States, for breeding purposes, necessitated action to be taken respect- 
ing it, and after mature consideration an Order in Council was passed 20th February, 
1882, declaring the establishment of a quarantine at Point Edward to admit neat 

viii 



46 Victoria. 'Sessional Papers (No.U.) A. 1S83* 



cattle for breeding purposes from t lie Western United States, subject to the restric- 
tions and regulations of the Order in Council of 23rd April, 1880. 

SHEEP SCAB. 

The existence of sheep scab in some of the counties adjoining Montreal, having 
been notified to the Department, it was deemed necessary to take active measures for 
its suppression, and as this disease manifested itself in the County of Laprairie and 
adjoining counties in the Province of Quebec, it was decided to provide for 
tho segregation and isolation, as far as possible, of animals affected, and an Order in 
Council was passed on 20th April, 1882, declaring that locality an infected district,. 
and prescribing certain^rules and regulations for the suppression of the disease. 

Acting under its provisions in every instance where diseased sheep were discovered 
the Veterinary Inspector reports that if the disease is not entirely exterminated, it 
exists only in a few places, as nearly all the diseased and infected sheep were killed, 
and the sanitary measures adopted will in most instances prevent its recurrenee. 

Sheep owners are strongly urged to co-operate in measures for the suppression of 
this disease. 

PICTOU, N.S., CATTLE DISEASE. 

The investigations that were commenced last year with a view to discover, if 
possible, the cause and to provide a remedy for, this disease, were carried on this 
year on a much larger scale, as the sum of $20,000 voted by Parliament during 
last session enabled me to largely extend operations and enquiry. For this 
purpose an Order in Council was passed on the 25th of May, authorizing me 
to declare farms and places on which animals suffering from this disease were found, 
"infected places," under the provisions of the " Contagious Diseases Animals Act ; " 
to appoint an inspector, to select places within the limits of the infected districts for 
the purpose of isolating and segregating diseased animals, those suspected of disease, 
or ^hich may have been exposed to it, and to order their removal to such selected places. 
The Inspector was also authorized to order the slaughter of any animal found so 
affected, and to pay its owner one-third of its value before it was affected, such com- 
pensation, however, not to exceed $20. In all other cases the compensation was to 
be two-thirds of the value of the animal slaughtered, but not to exceed $40. In all 
cases the value was to be established by appraisers appointed by me. 

In accordance with these instructions quarantines were established at Pictou, 

Merrigomisb, Knoydart and Pine Tree, to which all the cattle which had been exposed 

to infection were conveyed, and kept for a period of ninety days from the date of such 

contact. All farms on which the disease was reported, or found to exist were visited 

by the Inspector and Appraisers. All animals found affected were killed and buried 

eight feet deep, with a barrel of freshly slacked lime to each carcass. Animals in 

ix 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1885 

contact after being valued were removed to tbe nearest quarantine, and marked in 
euch a way as to indicate the property of the owner. They were kept secluded, 
and if no disease broke out in their quarantine within a period of 100 days they were 
returned to their owners, to whom under such circumstances no compensation was 
given. Before receiving back their animals, the buildings and premises had to be 
thoroughly cleansed ? and disinfected. The farmers generally gave their co-operation 
to these measures, affording the officers every assistance. Sanitary measures 
were carried out on all farms where the disease had broken out, and in many cases 
the old barns were burnt and replaced by new ones. Seventy-seven farms and 
places were declared infected. Active operations did not commence before the 15th 
July, up to which date (during this year) thirty-eight animals had died. 

During the period from the 15th of July to the 28th of November, there were 
ordered to be slaughtered in various places eighty -fi7e animals, and in quarantine 
fourteen, which, together with those that had died previous to the commencement of 
operations, made a total of 137 animals known as lost by the disease in 1882. 
There were 268 animals confiscated and placed in quarantine, and at the expira- 
tion of ninety days twenty-seven were returned to their owners, twenty-seven died 
or were slaughtered, and the remainder were sold for slaughter within the limits of the 
infected districts. The success of the measures adopted is proved by the fact that no 
actual ciihes have been reported since the 31st October. Of the amount voted by 
Parliament for extirpating the disease something less than half remains unex^ 
pended, so that should it be necessary to continue operations next summer sufficient 
funds remain for this purpose without asking Parliament for another'grant. 

With a view to endeavour to ascertain the nature and cause of the disease, I 
ordered experiments and investigations to be made by Prof. Osier and Dr. Wm. Mc- 
Eachran, of Montreal, both of whose reports will be found in the Appendices here- 
with. 

Owing to unavoidable circumstances at the time he was present, Prof. Osier 
says : " While the measures taken have been admirably adapted for the eradication 
of the disease, they have not been altogether favourable to its scientific investiga- 
tion." He further remarks ''that the infection is due to the existence of some special, 
and in this instance unknown, contagion which has got established in this region, 
and finds there suitable conditions for its maintenance and development." 

Dr. Wm. McEaehran says he is convinced there is some specific cause at work 
producing the disease, from the fact that he found it appear amongst well and ill 
kept stock alike. He tested inoculation, and made upwards of forty post mortem 
examinations' of animals "suffering from the disease, which all showed a diseased 
condition of the system, and the presence of certain bodies in the fluids, with which 
further and more accurate experiment is necessary. He condemns the use of the 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14 ) A, 1883 



beef and milk of animals suffering from this disease. He farther says that more 
extended experiments and observations than were made by him, owing to business 
pressure, will be necessary before the actual cause of the disease is determined. 

The various Eeports respecting this disease in the Appendices herewith, contain 
a great deal of valuable ^information on the whole subject. Dr. McEachran gives it 
as his opinion that the disease can be completely eradicated out in another season. 

PHOSPHATE OF LIME. 

The industry which has of late years been developed, more especially in the 
Ottawa district, in connection with this material is gradually on the increase. The 
exports during the past fiscal year amounted to 17,181 tons, valued at $327,667, as 
against 15,601 tons, valued at $239,493, in the previous year. The countries to which 
the phosphate was exported, in 1882, were : — GreatBritain, 13,197 tons ; to the 
United States, 2,080 tons; to Germany, 1,469 tons; and to Denmark, 435 tons. 
Frequent inquiries have recently been made by parties in the United States 
respecting this product, as the decline both in quantity and quality of Peruvian 
guano, used as a fertilizing material, has now created a very great demand for 
mineral phosphates, which enter largely into the manufacture of fertilizers. 
Hitherto, phosphate has been chiefly mined in France, Spain, Norway, the West 
Indian Islands, and in South Carolina. Canada may now be added to this list, the 
output for the past five years having been as follows : — 1878, 3,701 tons ; 1879, 
11,927 tons; 1880, 7,974 tons ; 1881,15,601 tons; and, in 1882, 17,181 tons. The 
Canadian phosphates are very similar to those of Spain, especially the Lograssan 
deposits of that country. The mineral is of a beautiful bluish-green colour, of crystal- 
line form, and is found in irregular and distorted veins, or in bunches, pockets and 
nest3 of all shapes and sizes, sometimes exceedingly pure, but at other times imbedded 
in limestone rock. It is found in some instances cropping out of the rocks, and at 
others overlaid by the soil. The method of mining this mineral is very simple and 
chea<>, the common derrick and horse-whin being so fa?-, the only machinery used 
outside of the shovel, pick and drill. The cost of mining and transportation is 
reported to bo about $8 per ton, and the phosphate sells readily in Montreal for from 
$17 to $20 per ton (twelve cubic feet of the mineral making a t ton of 2,240 pounds). 
The remark in last year's Eeport "that no general action has yet been taken 
here in regard to the conversion of the material in its raw state into the prepared 
form of super-phosphate ready for use as a fertilizer of the soil " applies to the past, 
jear also. Considerable attention is being paid in various quarters to its use in 
the raw state pulverized, bat the beneficial effects are said not to be visible during 
the fust year. Experiments to test its appliance in this state have been made at 
the Agricultural College, Guelph, but the result has not been made known. From 
present indications considerable attention will be paid to phosphate mining and ship- 
ment during 1833. 

xi 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188$ 



There has been a tendency in some of the old provinces, to cultivate continuously 
the cereals on rich virgin soils, and this process whatever may be the natural wealth 
of the soils, conduces to deterioration. This may be obviated by the application of 
artificial manure capable of imparting recuperative properties to the soil. Experiments 
have shown that phospate especially when chemically prepared possesses these 
qualities in a very high degree* I would strongly urge a trial of its effects, and the 
comparison of the yield of grain'afforded by land thus treated, with that on land without 
this stimulant. If an active demand were created for manufactured phosphate, its 
preparation would also largely aid in employing the labour of our country. 

Forestry. 

The subject of Forestry, which is now attracting considerable attention, is under 
my special consideration, and I would urge upon the farming community the neces" 
sity of preserving, as much as possible, the trees on their land, not only with a view 
to the conservation of timber for economic use, but also with a regard to the climatic 
influences attendant thereon. "Waste in standing timber should be avoided, and 
attention should be given to the planting of young trees, to supply the place of those 
already cut. The effect on climate, arising from the denudation of forests, manifests 
itself in protracted droughts, and drying up of water- courses, and unless the balance 
of nature, by means of trees, is restored, the ultimate consequences 10 agriculture- 
may be very serious. 

In the North-West especially, I would urge settlers to plant trees on their home- 
steads, as soon as they get possession. The beneficial effects of this will be manifold,, 
both as a protection from the prairie wind and as providing a source of fuel and 
timber for farm purposes. Planting hardwood and pine or other rapid-growing trees 
alternately in belts is recommended, as materially assisting growth. Pine will have 
acquired sufficient size to be of use, when the time for thinning out arrives. The 
whole subject of forestry is one deserving the attention of agriculturists especially, 
and the community generally. 

DOMINION EXHIBITION. 

A Provincial Exhibition was held at Kingston in the fall of 1882, to which, as 
in previous years, a Dominion character was given by the vote of Parlia- 
ment, last Session, of 85,000. The stormy weather prevailing at the time it 
was held, interfered somewhat with its success, but the industrial and agricultural 
exhibits, as well as those of live stock, were very creditable. 

ARCHIYES. 

The collection and copying of the Haldimand and Bouquet papers in England, is 

now completed. The Report of the Archivist (Appendix 1) will be found to contain 

much valuable information, including commercial statistics from 1763 to 1783, and a 

Eeport of the Export Trade of Quebec in minute detail from 1791. The work of 

indexing and calendaring the manuscripts is being steadily proceeded with. 

xii 



41 



tona. 



Sessional Papers (No.14 ) 



A. 18SS 



The catalogue at the end of the Archivist's Report will show the additions made 
during 1882. 

III.— PATENT OFFICE. 

The following Report of the transactions of this office, during the year 1882, is 
prepared in compliance with the 6th section of " The Patent Act of 1872." 

There has been a very large increase in Patent business during the past year 
when compared with the year 1881. 

The transactions of the office have almost doubled during the last three years, 
as can be seen on reference to the tabular statement given below : — 



Years. 


Applications 

for 

Patents. 


Patents 
Granted 


Caveats 
Filed. 


Transfers of 

Patents 
Registered. 


^ees 
Received, 
including De- 
signs and 
Trade Marks. 


1855 


99 

120 

126 

116 

142 

170 

160 

180 

207 

170 

184 

274 

369 

570 

781 

626 

279 

762 

1,124 

1,376 

1,418 

1,548 

1,445 

1,428 

1,358 

1,601 

1,955 

2,236 


92 

108 

115 

98 

112 

150 

142 

160 

156 

145 

162 

263 

218 

546 

588 

556 

509 

671 

1,026 

1,250 

1,323 

1,383 

1,35 J 

1,264 

1,238 

1,408 

1,732 

2,137 




32 

52 

54 

35 

26 

47 

56 

72 

78 

74 

70 

126 

193 

337 

470 

431 

445 

327 

547 

711 

791 

761 

841 

832 

728 

855 

907 

955 


$ ots. 

1,911 30 
2,370 50 
2,406 76 


1856 




1857. 




1858 




2,105 00 


1859 




2.479 75 


1860 




2,644 07 
3,012 70 
S 650 90 


1861 




1862 




1863 


3,759 90 
3 267 95 


1864 




1865 




3,618 76 

6,132 78 

8,110 00 

11,052 00 


1866 




1867 


1868 




1869 


♦60 
132 
151 
184 
171 
200 
194 
185 
168 
172 
203 
227 
226 
198 


14,214 14 
14,540 07 


1870 


1871 


14,097 00 
19,578 65 
29,830 14 
34 301 98 


1*872 


]873 


1874 


1875 


34,555 82 
36,187 63 
35,388 00 
33,663 67 
33 303 60 


18?6 


18TT 


1878 


1879 


1880 

1«81 


42,141 14 
52,856 65 


1882 


60 811 19 







*There were no caveats until 1869. 



XU1 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188* 



The following tabular statement gives the numbers of Patents and extensions of 
Patents issued under the system in force in Canada, since 1869, of granting Patents 
for periods of five, ten and fifteen years, at the option of patentees : — 









s~> 


t- 






£ 


a 


£ 


=2 


a 




'O 


Ti 


T3 


T3 


t» 




£ 


£ 


<x> 


13 


-o 




a 


a 


a 


a 


a 




o3 


03 


oS 


£ 


o 


Year. 


-2 3 


m o3 

a ►> 




«g 03 


X no 

a ^ 






.<g»a 

oS"- 4 




0> o 

~o3 - 1 




Cu 


P* 


Pm 


Pm 


Cm 


1869 


204 

556 

509 

624 

873 

1,098 

1,173 

1,261 

1,211 










1870 










1871 










1872 


19 
47 
38 
33 
21 
17 


28 
96 
87 
60 
55 
49 






1873 


4 
17 
35 
28 

47 


3 


1874 


5 


1875 


11 


1876 


9 


1877 


14 


1878 


1,109 
1,042 
1,144 
1,350 
1,633 


20 
9 
20 
23 
26 


43 

56 

88 

137 

187 


58 

73 
110 
138 
175 


19 


1879 


14 


1880 


23 


1881 


42 


1882 


58 







From 1869 to 1876, there were 6,298 Patents issued for five years ; and of this 
number 92 per cent, expired at the end of the five years' periods. 

The Patentees of the last eight years resided in the following Countries : — 



Countries. 



Ontario , 

England 

United States.... 

France 

Germany 

Other Countries 

Total... 



1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


1878. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


521 


575 


533 


452 


478 


490 


558 


44 


51 


46 


32 


51 


50 


69 


748 


736 


757 


771 


695 


843 


1,070 


3 


8 


2 


1 


2 


5 


15 


2 


3 


5 


5 


5 


7 


8 


2 


9 


10 


3 


6 


11 


12 


1,320 


1,382 


1,353 


1,264 


1,237 


1,406 


1,732 



1882. 



538 

103 

1,452 

9 

9 

26 

2,137 






X2V 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



The Canadian Patentees were distributed among the Provinces as follow :■ 



Provinces. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


1878. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 




348 

134 

24 

14 


380 

152 

19 

21 


340 

132 

22 

34 

2 


315 

100 

16 

17 

3 


308 
133 

16 

16 

2 

2 

1 


334 

122 

15 

18 

" 1 


361 

143 

19 

23 

2 

4 

6 


351 


Quebec 


129 




26 




25 


Prince Edward Island 


2 






1 
2 


4 


British Columbia 


1 


3 


1 


1 








Total 


521 


575 


538 


452 


478 


490 


558 


538 



Many applications for Patents, of the 2,2 66 filed during the year, were found to- 
be incorrectly prepared and allowed to be corrected by the applicants in accordance 
with the law, rules and practice of the office. 

Sixty-four applications were objected to for want of novelty ; but of these, twenty- 
eight were allowed to issue after modifications and alterations in the specifications 
and claims had been made. 

Fifteen Patents were found to be inoperative by reason of in sufficient descrip- 
tions j and re-issue patents were granted in accordance with the provisions of sec- 
tion 19 of the Act. 

Careful examinations are made of each application received, as to the novelty of 
the alleged inventions, and also as to whether inventors are legally entitled to pat- 
ents, under the Act, to prevent, as far as possible, old devices and machines, already 
public property, from being patented. 

An Act was|passed last Session giving power to extend the time of importation 
of patented articles into Canada, for a further period not exceeding one year beyond 
the twelve months allowed by law, and a few patentees have availed themselves of 
this privilege. 

A number of foreign patentees having, for reasons beyond their control, been 
unable to commence and carry on the construction and manufacture of their inven- 
tions, in Canada, within the two years prescribed after the issue of Patents, have 
been allowed, upon satisfactory proof adduced, to have the terms extended under 
authority of the 28th section of the Patent Act, in which they might make such con- 
struction and manufacture. 

The marked increase in the number of Patents applied for and issued as shown 
by the comparative tabular statement in this Report, adds largely to the correspon- 

xv 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No 14.) A. 1883 

•dence, to the writing of documents, &c. In fact the various proceedings incidental 
to the working of the Patent Office are more than double what they were three 
years ago. 

A list has just been printed, giving the names of patentees and the titles of 
Patents from the year 1824 up to 1872, when the publication of Patents in the 
" Patent Eecord " was begun. 

The Patent Record, published in connection with the Canadian Magazine of 
Science and the Industrial Arts, monthly, by the Burland Lithographic Company of 
Montreal, giving the specifications of claims and diagrams of all Patents granted, is 
creditable to the publishers, and of the utmost advantage to all persons interested in 
Patents, as it furnishes them, almost immediately after the issue takes place, with 
information as to what Patents have been granted, and the subjects covered by them. 

The December number of the Patent Eecord gives the diagrams on a much 
larger scale than heretofore, which it is hoped will prove of advantage to all parties 
interested, anl enable them to examine new inventions with greater readiness. 

The model rooms, as stated in the previous reports, are now over-crowded with 
models. It is with great difficulty the employes of the office can discharge their 
duties when searching for information, and it is almost impossible for the public 
properly to examine models in consequence of tho.cases containing them being so full. 

Under these circumstances it is most desirable that additional space should be 
obtained for the better classification and arrangement of models. 

During the year 4,480 strangers and persons desirous of studying the patents, 
registered their names in the visitor's book ; and a larger number visited the rooms 
without entering their names. 



xvi 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



IV.—COPYR1GHTS, TRADE MARKS, INDUSTRIAL DESIGNS AND 

TIMBER MARKS. 



The following table shows a Comparative Statement of the business of this 
Branch from 1868 to 1882, inclusive:— 









i 

GO 


i 

& 

o 


CO 

"5b 


03 
g 


CO 

a 


i 

CO 

a 

T3 


CO 

'bfi 

a> 


i 

a 


i 

"bfi 






9 






O 






bfi 

*3 


•— • CO 


no 


H 


OJ 






Q 
O 


d 


P3 


CO 


CO 


CO 


QT3 


o_bo 


■B 


o . 


CO 


Fees 


Years. 






o *» 


♦J 


c3 

<b a* 
IS 


-»J 


is® 




3 


ID'S 

*3 


03 

bfig 

3 5 


Receired. 




n 
<-> 

-4-5 


CO 

t-l 
O 
•fa 


•3 bO 

g-fi 


&% 

'"S* 
©•*» 


S .2 

co bfi 

d 




ft TS 

as 


^ JO 






J 


J 


o 


o 


H 


o 


O 


H 


o 


-^ 




























$ cts. 


1868 


110 
198 
473 
562 
523 
418 
1027 


128 
211 
473 

562 

523 

549 

1027 


34 
62 
66 

115 

87 

122 

134 


34 
62 
66 
115 
33 
38 
55 


32 

50 

72 

106 

103 

95 

163 


32 

50 

72 

106 

103 

95 

163 


6 
12 
23 
22 
17 
30 
30 


6 
12 
23 

22 
17 
30 
30 








183 00 


1869 








418 00 


1870 


190 
105 

64 
69 
41 


190 

105 

64 

96 

41 




877 00 


1871 




1,092 00 
927 00 


1872 


11 
20 
19 


1873 


940 50 


1874 


1,339 50 


1875 


943 


986 


131 


50 


149 


149 


31 


31 


21 


21 


15 


1,175 00 


1876 


1)75 


1240 


178 


57 


238 


238 


47 


47 


17 


17 


33 


1,758 25 


1877 


1190 
1210 
1104 
1145 


1246 
1285 
1127 
1292 


138 
193 
184 
185 


37 
61 
69 
93 


227 
223 
154 
113 


227 
223 
154 
113 


50 
40 
41 
40 


50 
40 
41 
40 


18 
10 
13 
19 


18 
10 
13 
19 


31 
14 
24 
28 


1,732 70 
1,671 25 


1878 


1879 


2,434 82 
3,806 15 


1880 


1881 


1172 
1192 


1307 
1264 


225 
224 


94 

87 


156 
160 


156 

160 


38 

45 


38 
45 


30 
21 


30 
21 


22 
64 


4,772 70 
4,956 40 


1882 





The total number of registrations of copyrights, trade marks, industrial designs 
and timber marks,*was 450 during the year 1882. Out of this number there were 224 
registrations of copyrights, besides 87 certificates ; 8 of interim copyrights, besides 
8 certificates ; 3 of temporary copyrights with certificates j 160 registrations of trade 
marks; 45 of industrial designs; and 21 of timber marks. 

The total number of assignments of these different rights recorded was 64. 
The correspondence of this Branch of the Department amounted to 1,192 letters 
received, and 1,264 sent. 

The fees during the year amounted to $4,956.40. 



Y. -QUARANTINE. 



GROSSE ISLE. 



Dr. Montizambert, Medical Superintendent at this Quarantine Station, reports 
that no vessel reported for inspection there during the past year. In anticipa- 
tion of an unhealthy summer based on meteorological observations for some years 
past, he suggests certain precautionary measures to betaken. Expenditure at this 
(Station in 1882 was §8,643.49. 

xv ii 
14- B 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



PORT OF QUEBEC. 

Dr. Kowand, Inspecting Physician, reports that immigrants and passengers 
arriving by tho St. Lawrence route during the yea;- have been all in good health. 
Amongst the arrivals in the early spring via Halifax, there was an epidemic of 
measles and diphtheria. The infected were sent to the Marine and Immigrant 
Hospital, and nineteen deaths occurred. The disease, fortunately, did not extend. 

HALIFAX. 

Dr. Wick wire, Inspecting Physician, reports one case of small-pox as termin- 
ating fatally, the other patients recovering. All reasonable precautions were taken 
to prevent the spread of the disease. He reports the buildings at this station 
in good repair. The expenditure during the yea* was $2,989.34. 

ST. JOHN. 

Dr. Harding, Inspecting Physician, reports no cases of infectious disease requir- 
ing treatment in quarantine. Several vessels from infected ports were inspected. 
Dr. Harding also describes thd measures taken to prevent disease being imported by 
bringing in by railway for burial the corpses of persons who have died of contagious 
or infectious diseases. He also gives some very interesting remarks on the general 
subject of quarantine. The expenditure during tho year was $1,960.*75. 

PTCTOU. 

Dr. Kirkwood, Inspecting Physician, reports no case of disease requiring 
quarantine during the past year, The buildings at that station are in good repai 
should any emergency arise. The expenditure during the year was $*727.26. 

CHARLOTTETOWN. 

Dr. Hobkirk, Inspecting Physician, reports no cases of infectious disease requirin 
quarantine during the year. The hospital is in a most efficient state and ready ftj 
any emergency. The expenditure during the year was $1,042.49. 

TRACADIE LAZARETTO. 

Dr. Smith, the visiting Physician of this institution, reports that there are nc 
twenty-six inmates of the institution in alt stages ot leprosy. One death occurr 
during the year, and five new patients were admitted. He states that this increase dc 
not imply that the disease is spreading, but arises from the gathering into t 
Lazaretto all known cases of tho disease in the vicinity. He has no instances 
cqntagion' to report during the past year. The greatest neatness and oleanlin 
prevail in the building, and the inmates are made as comfortable as possible w 
the means at the disposal of the Sisters in charge. Dr. Smith reports that sep. 
gation is complete. The yearly expenditure is $3,000.00. 



; 



xvni 



I 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 14.) 



A. 3 



VI. --IMMIGRATION". 

For ihe convenience of comparison tho same form of tablos as was used in 
previous years has been retained in this Report; and, therefore, in the first place, in 
the following statement, all arrivals both of immigrant passengers and imm 
settlers, who have entered the Dominion from 18*74 to 1882 inclusive, arc given: — 



— 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


!■ 


1879. 


3880. 


1881. 


1832. 


Vid the St. Lawrence 


23,894 
39,904 

2,114 


16,038 

18,322 

959 


10,901 
13,203 

1,311 


■ 7,713 
13,040 

2,749 


10,295 

15,814 

2,4SS 


1.7,251 
30,071 

3,955 


24,997 
47,296 


30,238 
61,823 

3,836 
5,715 


44,850 

* 90, 393 

13,426 


Vid Suspension Bridge and Inland 
Ports 

Maritime Province Ports, includ- 
ing Portland (4,369), Halifax 
(8,723) and St. John direct 
f334.) 


British Columbia 


|13,927 


Bntered at Custom Houses with 
settlers' goods 
















65,992 
14,110 


35,319 

8,139 


25,415 
11,134 


23,532 

11,753 


28,597 
11,435 
40,G32 


51,277 
9,775 


10,248 


101,612 
15,404 


162,596 
30,554 


Total 


80,022 


43,458 


36,549 


35,2*5 


61,052 


85,850 


117.016 


193 150 







'ID 



♦Note. — It may be explained that thi3 item of 90,393 is composed as follows : — Immigrants vi£ 
Suspension Bridge, 64,480 ; from United States by St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railway, 13,325-; 
American arrivals at various agencies 2,064, along the frontier from Emerson to Fori; Bentoa, 1,200 ; 
Americans entered at Coaticoofce 900, and arrivals at Montreal vid Bootoa 3,93i and vid New York 
4,440. 

f Of these, 6,200 were Whites, and 7,727 wore Chinese, 

The arrivals by the St. Lawrence route, both hy immigrant passengers and 
immigrant settlers, from 1854 to 1883, inclusive, are shown in the following table : — 

1854 53,180 

1855 , 21,274 

1856 22,439 

1857 32,097 

1858 12,810 

1859 8,178 

1860 10,150 

1861 19,923 

1862 22,176 

1363 19,419 

1864 19,147 

1865 • 21,355 

1866 28,648 

1867 30,757 

1868 34,309 

1869 , 43,114 

14-bJ 



d( 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1888 



18*70 
1811 

1872 
1873 

1874 
1875 

1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 

1880 



44,475 
37,020 
34,743 
36,901 
23,894 
16,038 
10,901 
7,743 
10,295 
17,251 
24,997 



1881 










.. 30,238 


1882 


. 44,850 

ars, and who were j 
intention to settle , 

1 


The number of immigrants who arrived during the last five ye 
reported by the Agents of the Department as having stated their 
in Canada, was as follows : — 




1877. 


1878. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 

■ 




4,201 

6,453 

930 

141 

1,513 


5,804 

7,022 

1,970 

276 

161 


11,017 
7,565 
3,430 


14,359 

5,770 

2,265 

90 

124 


15,614 

5,466 

948 

36 

348 


31,032 1* 
5,779 1;! 
1,431 






St John, N B 


564 j 






4,36t|§ 
8,424 1 

14 52f 1 


Montreal, vid Boston and New- 
York - 




*Manitoba and North-West, settlers 
entering at port3 other than 
those above enumerated, and 
other than those from the old 


2,084 


3,139 


7,905 


4,936 






12J86I I 
90 


From United States. 






















291 

171 

56 

185 

5,715 


21 j 












1,26 1 























46 


British Columbia 
























Reported with settlers' goods by Cus- 


15,323 
11,759 


18,372 
11,435 


30,717 
9,775 


27,544 
10,961 


32,587 
15,404 


81,9(1 

30,5! 




Total Settlers 


27,082 


29,807 


40,492 


38,505 


47,991 


112,41 1 



* The total number of persons who went into Manitoba and the North-West in 1882 was, in rotu 
numbers, about 70,532, ascertained as follows :— Reported at Emerson, 69,332 ; along the frontier fro 
Emerson to Fort Benton, 1,200. The nationalities were as follow : — Prom Europe, 11,326 ; from Canac 
44,681 ; from United States, 13,325. Of the total number, 70,532, apart from the 1,200 along the front 
from Emerson to Fort Benton, deduct 17 per cent, for floating population, 11,781, making total settle 
in Manitoba and the North- West 53,751. 



XX 



18 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 14.) 



A. 1SSS 



The numbers of immigrants reported as distributed by the various Agents may 
be found in excess of those above given, but this fact arises from movements of immi- 
grants between the stations, some of them being thus necessarily twice reported. 
JThe figures above are those given by the Agents at the points a^t which the 
immigrants enter the Dominion. 

There was an increase this year in arrivals at Quebec of 14,612 ; there was also 
increase at the Suspension Bridge of ^HY. 

The following table shows the number of immigrant passengers through Canada 
to the United States, and the number of settlers in Canada, fioin 1866 to 1882, 
inclusive, including and excluding the arrivals reported at the Customs Houses, with 
entries of settlors' goods which are reported elsewhere : — 



Year. 


Immigrant 
Passengers for 
United States. 


Immigrant 

Settlers 

in Canada 

(omitting vid 

Customs). 


Immigrant 
_ Settler. 
in Cana<;.i 
(including ici 

Customs . 


l«6«.... 

1867 

1868 , 


41,704 
47,212 
58,683 
57,202 
44,313 
37,949 
52,608 
49,059 
40,649 

9,214 
10,916 

5,640 
11,226 
20,560 
47,112 
69,025 
80,692 


10,091 
14,666 
12,765 
18,630 
24,705 
27,773 
36,578 
41,079 
25,26? 
19,24;:. 
14,499 
15,323 
18,372 
30,717 
27,544 
32,587 
81,904 








1869 

870 

.871 

.872 






.873 

874 

«75 


50,050 
39,373 
27,382 
25,633 

27,082 


876 

877 


878 

ufiS ■ 

^«8i::::::::::::::::.;:v:3::::::::::.:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::^ 

882 


29,807 
40,492 
38,505 
47,991 
112,458 


• Prior to this date Customs Returns not made separal 

1 

1.1 ' 
I 

(I 

mi 


e. 







30j 

i if I 



fto« 



xxi 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14 ) 



A- IS8S 



The origins of the immigrants who arrived in the Dominion are only reported 
at the Port of Quebec. They are as follow, from 1875 to 1882, as reported at that 
Port:— 



— 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 

4,646 

742 

799 

84 

1,004 

150 

74 

52 

183 

9 


1878. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


Inglish 


7,582 
1,449 
1,816 

176 
1,201 

534 


4.989 

808 

1,009 

104 

1,157 

289 

20 

1,167 

1,358 

20 


5,350 

1,042 

1,077 

238 

1,538 

155 

154 

418 

323 


10,395 

1,543 

1,448 

349 

2,872 

149 

33 

6 

248 

SOO 


11,059 

3,183 

2,875 

307 

7,402 

27 

3 

71 


13,154 

3,785 

2,880 

530 

9,600 

104 

45 

118 


20,881 
8,196 
4,617 
1,024 




Scotch 




Scandinavians 


8,279 

50 

*30 


French and Belgians 

Other Origin 


Icelanders 


22 

3,258 


129 


Mennonites 




Russians. 


70 


22 


270 


Jews 






1,375 




















Total 


16,038 


10,901 


7,743 


10,295 


17,251 


24,997 


30,238 


44,850 








* Austrian*. 



The trades and occupations of the steerage adults landed at the port of Quebec 
for the same years, were as follow : 





18T*. 


1876. 


1877. 


18T8. 


1879. 

1 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


Fanners 


1,188 

8,863 

977 

7 


510 

2,796 

491 

13 


209 

1,383 

1,118 

80 


888 

fe, 839 

807 

26 


340 

7,136 

923 

12 


689 

10,184 

903 

54 


310 

13,890 

330 

12 


3,286 

16,629 

1,420 


Labourers 


Mechanics . 


Chirks and Traders 


17 


Professional Men 






















Total 


6,035 


3,810 


2,740 


4,045 


8,411 


11,730 


14,542 


21,352 



I 



xxii 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. ISS3 



CUSTOMS AERLVALS. 



Prorince. 


Nationality. 


Number. 


Total. 


Value. 


Quebec 


English 


475 
248 
112 
135 
756 
12,320 
594 
9 


14,649 
679 
559 

13,758 

820 
89 


$ cts. 


New Brunswick 






Scotch 




Germans 




United States 




Canadians 




Other Countries 




Not stated 




English 


250,985 30 


79 
9 


' Nova Scotia 


Irish 




Scotch 




Germans 


3 

141 
437 

o 

7 




United States 




Canadian 




Other Countries 




Not stated 




English 


23,393 00 


139 

19 

56 

5 

71 

254 

""i'i 


Ontario 


Irish 




Scotch.. 




Germans 




United States 




Canadians 




Not stated 




English 


18,940 00 


1,615 

694 

582 

648 

2,227 

7,597 

323 

72 


Manitoba 


Irish 




Scotch 




Germans 




United States 

Canadians 




Other Countries 




Not stated 




English , 


574,296 29 


220 
43 
34 
18 
211 
195 
99 


Prince Edward Iiland.... 

m 


Irisn 




Scotch 




Germans 

United States 




Canadians 








English 


50,068 00 


25 


Irisn 




Scotch 


5 

5 

54 




United States 1 




Canadians 

Total 


1 9T0 00 






30,554 


925,612 58 








xxiii 









46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883' 



The number of arrivals in the above table is double that of last year, and which? 
for the purpose of comparison, may be thus shown : — 

Customs Arrivals, 1881 15,404 

do 1882 30,554 

I would, also call Your Excellency's attention to the fact that whilst in 1881 the 
number of Canadians reported in the Customs Returns was 9,821, it has this year 
reached the number of 20,857, or in other words ) has more than doubled. 

Notwithstanding the large numbers of these settlers who have come into the 
Dominion, and who have been registered name by name, in connection with entries of 
settlers' effects, I deem it proper to point out to Your Excellency, that many more 
came without making such entries, whose numbers cannot be ascertained, and of 
whom no record can be kept. The numbers of these would probably be quite as 
great, if not greatei , than of those who brought with them their houshold effects, and 
on which they made Customs entries. This very large influx of settlers from the 
United States, the major part of whom were returned Canadians, is undoubtedly 
owing to the prosperous times which have prevailed ; the great stimulus which has 
been given to manufacturing industries, and the opening sip of new lands in the 
North-West. 

I have already remarked that the Reports of the Distributing Agents showed 
that they had to deal with larger numbers of immigrants than recorded at the ports of 
entry, and it has been the custom, as above stated, to attribute this to the movements 
of immigrants from one station to another ; but I think it is also largely owing to 
the influx of the class of unrecorded immigrants to which I have referred. 



The value of the personal effects of the 30,554 immigrants entered at the Custom 
Houses as settlers' goods amounted in 1882 to $925,612.59, against $43*7,425 the pre- 
vious year. 

The value of cash and effects brought in by immigrants during the year is thus 
reported at the various agencies : — 



Halifax 

St. John 

Montreal via U.S. ports 

Ottawa 

Kingston 



$ 

286,520 
49,890 

245,500 
24,800 

110,288 



Toronto .. 
Hamilton. 
London ... 



Total 



385,520 
1,020,230 



$2,245,889 



To the above figures should be added the amounts of money brought in 1882 by 
other arrivals reported at Customs and not going through the agencies, viz. :— 

Reported at Agencies $2,245,889 00 

do Customs 925,612 59 

loall $3,171,501 59' 

xxiv 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No, 14 ) A. 1883 

It thus appears that the value in money and property ascertained as brought by 
the immigrants into the country in 1882 was $3,111,501.59, besides a very large amount 
unascertained taken into Manitoba and which it is impossible to approximate. In 
addition, there were the very considerable values in tools, implements and effects. 

The amount of money taken to Manitoba by intending settlers during 1882 was 
very considerable, and as will be seen by a note at the bottom of this page, it was 
stated by a banker that $8,000,000 were on deposit in Winnipeg, which sum had 
been taken in for investment before the middle of the year.* Still further capita* 
no doubt, was brought in after that date, of which no record is available. Part of this 
was from the older Provinces, but having in view the fact that capitalists from the 
Eastern Provinces, intending to invest in Manitoba, or the North-West Territory* 
would probably leave their deposits in their own banks, for draft upon them as 
required, a proportion of three-fourths of the above amount of $8,000,000, may be set 
to the credit of newly arrived immigrants ; and this cash capital without taking into 
account the monies deposited after the date above referred to, would make a total 
value of cash, goods and effects brought in by immigrants $10,000,000 in round 
numbers, in 1882. 

The efforts of the Agents of the Department which, as formerly, were mainly 
directed to the bringing out of agriculturists, with capital, together with agricultural 
labourers and female domestic servants, were, during the year 1882, much more gen- 
erally extended in consequence of the revival of trade and the general business of the 
country. All the agricultural labourers who came were placed in situations. The 
demand for this class of labourers in the spring and summer was very far from being 
satisfied. The number of artisans and factory operatives which arrived fell very far 
short of the demand, especially in western manufacturing cities and towns, where 
twice as many could have been satisfactorily placed. 

The Keturns of the Imperial Board of Trade for the past year shew that 51,399 
persons left the United Kingdom for Canada, as against 34,239 in 1881, and 28,830 in 
1880. There were 38,361 of British, and 13,038 of foreign origin in 1882, against 
23,554 and 10,685 respectively in 1881. The figures do not include persons sailing 
from Bristol and certain Irish ports, nor those who travel to the Dominion by the 



• Meeting of the Bank of Montreal, held on Monday, 5th June, 1882. The following conversation 
took place : — 

Mr. Lyman— I hope Mr. Stephen will be able to give us some information about the money brought 
into the country by the emigrants coming here now. 

Mr. Stephen— I am sorrv to say that I cannot give you any information on that subject. 

The Chairman— It is estimated that the emigrants coming to Castle Garden bring $90 apiece- 

Mr. Stephbn — The last time I was in Winnipeg the streets were more crowded than Broadway, 
New York. They were, for the most part, the finest looking lot of young fellows I have ever seen in 
my life. How much money they brought with them I do not know. A banker recently told me that 
there were 18,000,000 on deposit there— for investment, I suppose.— From the Official Report of the Meet- 
ing in the Journal of Commerce, Vol. XIV.., page 526. 

XXV 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (Wo. 14.) A. 1883 



New York route. The emigration of the past year to the United States during 1882, 
was 3£ per cent, in excess of that in 1881, whilst it was nearly 40 per cent, in 
Canada daring the same period, as shown" by the above Imperial returns. Irish 
emigration to the Dominion has doubled during the past year, and yet the figures 
given do not include persons sailing from Gal way, and those going from Queenstown 
via American ports. 

With respect to the number of immigrants who arrive in Canada via United 
States ports, I may call attention to the fact that a separate count of these is taken 
on arrival in Montreal, and the figures this year shew, via Portland, 4,369 ; vid Bos- 
ton, 3,984, and via New York, 4,440, or in all, by steamers arriving at these ports, 
the number of 12,793. 

As affording facilities for immigrants settling in the Canadian North- West, it 
may be mentioned that the Canadian Pacific Bail way is already open for passenger 
and freight traffic as far west as Swift Current, 511 miles west of Winnipeg, and during 
the coming season of 1883, it is expected the foot hills of the Kooky Mountains will b© 
reached. Facilities for settlement which were previously unattainable are thus opened. 
Surveyors report that settlers are now met with far in advance of the surveys to be 
made, and that buildings are being rapidly put up on lots, the limits of which have 
to bo ultimately defined by survey and settlement confirmed. The climate is as 
healthy as any in the world, while the soil is among the richest and best, and is par- 
ticularly fitted for the production of wheat. This grain has, in fact, been grown for 
many years in succession without the use of fertilizers. This has been done within 
the small enclosures of the original Selkirk settlement, since the first colonization, over 
half a century ago, the soil showing no diminution of vigour. 

The claims of Canada as a field for British immigration have of late been brought 
very prominently before the emigrating classes in the United Kingdom, and there is 
an increasing demand for information respecting all that pertains to this country. 
The recent visit of Your Excellency to British Columbia, reports of which have been 
widely circulated by means of the Press, will do much towards directing enquiry to 
the advantages that Province offers for settlement, and there is every reason to believe 
that with the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway a large immigration may 
be expected into that Province. 

It has been an object with me of almost paramount importance in relation to the 
interest of Canadian immigration, to establish fairly and satisfactorily a nucleus of 
German and Scandinavian settlement. The Germans and Scandinavians, from their 
industry and thrift and adaptation to the conditions of a northern climate, are espe- 
cially desirable as settlers. Wherever they have settled on the northern part of this 
oontinent, their success and prosperity have become conspicuous. I did last year 
canse four delegates to be invited from Germany and one from Switzerland to visit 

xxvi 






46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1383 



this country for the purpose of examination of its resources and reporting upon them, 
in the same way as was done by the delegates from the tenant farmers of the United 
Kingdom in previous years. These gentlemen spent some time in the Dominion, 
and they have all since made exceedingly favourable reports of their observations; 
which reports have been printed and very widely circulated in pamphlet form. 
Other pamphlets have also been printed in both the German and Scandinavian 
languages, and very widely circulated, with the result, it is believed, of making the 
resources of Canada better known in the centres of emigration on the Continent of 
Europe. 

The diffusion of this information has been coupled with a general and systematic 
advertising in Germany and Scandinavia, and in addition to this an arrangement has 
been made with agents of the great European transportation lines, which there is 
reason to believe, will, during the coming season of 1883, produce the results desired 
that is the making of a beginning of settlement from those countries which send out 
annually so many thousands of immigrants. The experience of the past has suffici- 
ently demonstrated that when this stream of immigration begins to .flow, it will very 
speedily widen its[own channel.* 

For the carrying out of this arrangement, Mr. Dyke, the agent of the Depart- 
ment in Liverpool, was during the year, despatched on a special mission to the Con- 
tinent, where he satisfactorily performed the difficult and delicate duties confided to 
him. 



•Note.— In this connection, and as bearing: on the supplies of Immigrants from the populations of 
Europe, it may be mentioned that there is in the February number of "The Nineteenth Century" a very 
able article by His Grace the Duke ot Argyll. It is shown in this article that:— " Since the long 
° period of the French revolutionary wars was closed at Waterloo — that is to say, in a period of sixty- 
" seven years — the population of Germany alone has increased by twenty-four millions. The United 
11 Kingdom has increased by eighteen millions ; that is to say, it has more than doubled. In neither of 
" these cases has there been any appeciable effect due to immigration, whilst in both cases the in crease has 
11 arisen in spite of large emigration." It is then shown that in British India the increase of population 
is still more remarkable in the face of conditions of poverty which, according to economists, should 
hav * produced reverse results, and also in Ireland His Grace finds that the same conditions of pov- 
erty and population prevail, and that to an extent which has forced upon Parliament the "Emigration 
Clauses." "This tendency to increase," the article continues, "is a force like that of a powerful 
" spriDg, which is always exerting, even when unseen, a certain tension, and is certain to make its 
u effects visible on the slightest lifting of some superincumbent weight, or on the slightest relaxation 
11 in the pressure of some internal structural resistance." The argument of the article, from this 
state offsets, is, that there are conditions in which increase of population in the absence of correspond- 



these principles to the "Economic Condition of the Highlands of Scotland," and this is done with 
great force and clearness. The object of my reference to the question, however, is to point out the 
relation of these principles to the actual position of the Dominion uf Canada. We have here, roughly 
speaking, one-half of the continent of North America open for settlement. There is a territory equal 
in extent to the whole of Europe, with the latitudes of Europe upwards from a line a little to the south 
of Paris. This refers to the North- West of Canada, including British Columbia. In this vast area 
there are almost illimitable agricultural resources, together with practically illimitable mineral 
wealth of all kinds, including coal; and these are coupled with equally remarkable commercial 
facilities and advantag s : the whole in a climate in the highest degree favourable for the condi- 
tions of health and the enjoyment of human life. "We have here the "powerful spring " to put into 
effect, the "potential energy" to which His Grace refers. These important facts, with the improved 
means for transport at present existing, will undoubtedly lead to a very large emigration from the 
European populations in the immediate future: the promise being beneficient as well from the 
point of view of the New World, as improving the conditions in the Old." 

xxvii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 

* ■ ..,,... , _^. 

Id the United Kingdom as is indeed abundantly apparent from the figures of 
the very great increase of immigration into Canada during the year, which I have the 
honour and pleasure of laying before your Excellency, there has been evinced an 
increased desire to obtain more particular information respecting Canada, which it 
has been the duty of my Department as far as possible to supply. 

During the winter Major Gaskill visited Canada with a view to make arrange- 
ments for the reception of Irish emigrants, whom the Imperial Government propose 
to assist to emigrate. 

In this connection, I may mention that a number of gentlemen have visited Ca- 
nada during the year for the purpose of obtaining personal information respecting 
its resources. The results of the observations of many of these gentlemen have ap- 
peared in the form of letters, articles and lectures. Among those who came I may 
mention Mr. J. G-. Holyoake, Mr. Staveley Hill, M. P., Lord Archibald Douglas (con- 
nected with the Eoman Catholic institutions favouring emigration under the 
auspie s of Cardinal Manning), Mr. Yere Foster, whose beneficent and self-sacrificing 
efforts for promoting Irish emigration are so well known, the Eev. Father Nugent, 
and Mr. Hodgkin who came on behalf of Mr. Tuke's Committee, the Eev. Styleman. 
Herring and Mr. John James Jones, both largely interested in Emigration from the 
United Kingdom, the Eev. Mr. Bridger, and Mr. Simpson of Liverpool, Mr. James 
Ingleby, Mr. Birks and Mr. Stephenson from Yorkshire, Mr. James Small, a large 
landed proprietor in Perthshire, Scotland, the Eev. Mr. Greenshields, from the Ork- 
ney Islands, and other gentlemen and ladies connected with well-known schemes for 
the Emigration and settlement of children. 

The mission of Mr. Holyoake had so far the sanction of the Imperial Govern- 
ment, that his expenses were paid on ; the recommendation of Mr. Gladstone, out of 
the Consolidated Eevenue of the United Kingdom. His special object in view of the 
tendency in the United Kingdom to emigrate, was to procure the publication of 
reliable Guide Books from Canada and the United States, which should be issued 
under the authority of the Governments, and therefore furnish information of a 
character which should not be misleading. A publication of this nature being quite 
within the scope of the operations which were carried on by my Department, I had 
no difficulty in at once complying with Mr. Holyoake's request, and the dedred 
publication has already been made. 

In addition to this, there has been an active issue of publications by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, having for object to make known among the emigrating classes 
the advantages offered by Canada as a fiold for settlement. These issues during the 
year reached the number of I,93?,570. In addition to these there was a very large 
circulation of publications prepared and issued under the superintendence of the High 
Commissioner in London. The several steamship companies in the United King- 

xxviii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No, 14.) A. 1883 

dom were also very active during the year, both in the United Kingdom and on the 
Continent, in advertising the resources of Canada, and particularly of the North- West, 
and its suitability as a field for settleme nt, as well by pamphlets and hand bills as by 
the newspaper press, The numbers of these combined publications would probably 
not be less, but more, than the total number issued by the Department of Agricul 
ture. 

I may further mention that in addition to the publications circulated by the 
Department and the agents of the Steamship Companies, the Canadian Pacific Kail- 
way Company has caused an active circulation to be made of publications having for 
object to make known the resources of the North- West. 

I think it proper to point out, I found, during the year, from the reports pub-, 
lished by the Treasury Department of the United States, that the figures of Emigra- 
tion from Canada, at the point of Port Huron, had been self evidently exaggerated. 
I, therefore, caused another examination to be made into the facts by the Secretary 
of the Department, and his Beport is published as an Annex herewith. It appears 
from this that while there is a claim of 71,424 emigrants from Canada ini * the 
United States, at that point, the real net Emigration was 2,442. A careful examina- 
tion of the evidence on which this statement is made cannot leave any doubt as to 
the fact. 

It is proper to observe in this connection that the able services rendered by Sir 
A. T. Gait, the High Commissioner for Canada at London, have been in the highest 
degree useful to the Dominion. The journey he undertook last autumn through the 
North- West Territory has enabled him to speak from personal observation of its 
resources, and the utmost confidence has been everywhere accorded to his utterances 
on this subject, since his return to England. 



XXIX 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A., 1833 



The following statement shows the number of immigrants, chiefly children, 
brought to Canada under the auspices of charitable societies and individuals during 
the last five years : — 



— 


1878. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 








132 

128 

44 

33 


97 

98 

61 

117 

39 


70 


Miss Macpherson ....* .. 

Mr. Middlemore 

Miss Rye. 

East London Family Emigration Fund of Hon. 
Mrs. Hobart 


79 
89 

42 


101 
60 
94 


204 

74 

121 


Children's Home, London ., 








39 










35 

37 

44 


44 


South Dublin Union 






28 
22 


82 






28 




Catholic Protective Society, Liverpool , 




30 


Kingswood Reformatory, Bristol. 

Mrs. Birt 






11 

144 






54 

84 

36 


61 
134 


70 


120 


Rev. Mr. Stephenson, Children's Home, Hamil- 


41 


Sisters of Mercy, Louchrea „ 




10 
39 
14 

7 
51 

9 














Ballvif!> man Union 










Old Castle Union 






9 

88 

""s 

6 
6 

12 










72 


















Boys' Agricultural School, London 










Friends' Mission, Dublin „.... 




















Boys' Farm School, Birmingham 




2 












11 












18 


Lord A. Douglas 










40 
13 


Dr. Barnardo, London... 










56 
10 














Totals 


384 


473 


672 


727 


1,048 







The whole of the immigrants who enter Canada by sea now come by steamers; 
this class of ships having driven sailing vessels completely out of the field, as respects 
this transport. The average time of the mail steamers from Liverpool was 11 days, 
and from Londonderry, 10 days ; that of the Dominion Line from Liverpool, 12| 
days, and from Belfast, ] If; that of the Temperleys, from London to Quebec, 16J 
days; and that of the Glasgow steamers, 13 days; Beaver Line from Liverpool, llf 
days, and from Belfast, 10|; Ross' London Line, 14J days. 

Assisted passages were granted during the year at the rate of £4 stg. for labour- 
ers and mechanics, and £2 10s. for female domestic ervants and. families of agricul- 
tural labourers. For agricultural labourers without families there was a special rate 
of £3 stg. 

The High Commissioner for Canada, Sir A. T. Gait, was aided by the same 
Emigration Agents of the Department in the United Kingdon as in 1881, viz. : —Mr. 

XXX 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1S83 



John Dyke, Liverpool ; Mr. J. W. Down, Bristol ; Mr. Thomas Grahame, Glasgow ; 
Mr. Charles Foy, Belfast ; Mr. Thomas Connolly, Dublin. 

On the European Continent, Dr. Otto Hahn, of Wurtemburg, acted as Agent in 
Germany, and Mr. J. Marmetto, in^JFrance. 

The annual Keports of the British Agents will be found in the -Appendices, 
annexed to the report of the High Commissoner, and contain valuable information 
on immigration matters and the trade in Canadian cattle and produce. 

Mr. Stafford, Agent at Quebec, states that the total arrivals of 1882 at that port 
as compared with the previous year show an increase of 14,612 souls, and that the 
total arrivals during the season of navigation were the largest since 1854. He claims 
this number would have been still larger had not peveral steamers destined for 
Quebec in the early spring been compelled on account of ice in the Gulf to land the r 
passengers at Halifax. He reports the immigrants as arriving in a very heal 
condition, aud although the various classes were much larger than usual they wei >> 
insufficient to supply orders. He further reports the number of those bound fl 
Manitoba about four times greater than in 18S1. He attributes the yearly increas- 
ing demand for farm servants to the prosperity of the farming community, and the 
increased demand for skilled artisans, is due to the development of manufacturing 
industries during the past year. The usual tables of occupations, destinations, and 
other information in detailed form, are embodied in his report. The increase of work 
at the Quebec Agency necessitated by this large immigration was satisfactorily per- 
formed by the existing force. 

Mr. Daley, the Montreal Agent, gives a series of tables showing the work of his 
Agency. The supplyof female domestic servants which was far in excess of 1881 was 
by no means equal to the demand. He attributes the want of this class in Montreal 
to the fact that the large cotton, woollen, and other industrial establishments 
' recently started there and in the vicinity, absorb a large number of females as 
operatives who were formerly engaged as domestic servants. The extensive railway, 
canal, and other public works in, and around Montreal, gavo an impetus to the 
demand for unskilled labour which met with ready employment at remunerative 
wages. There was very little sickness amongst the immigrants arriving, and the 
only deaths reported are those of two children. He reports a decided improvement 
in general appearance, habits, and social position of the immigrants. He also embodies 
a report on the falsity of a statement that had gained currency, respecting female 
immigrants being decoyed, which shows that there was no foundation for the same. 
He reports the value of money and effects brought in by immigrants who arrived 
there from United States ports alone at $ 245,500. 

Mr. Wills, the Agent at Ottawa, reports a very large increase in the number of 

immigrants disposed of at his Agency, and adds that many others settled in his 

xxxi 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A, 188S 

district without reporting themselves to him. He experienced no difficulty in pro- 
viding employment at much higher wages than in previous years, the extensive 
railway works around Ottawa, together with the phosphate and other mining 
industries, creating an unparalleled demand for general labour. He cites, as a mark of 
the prosperity of Ottawa and the surrounding district, that little or no destitution 
prevails this winter. A number of Germans passed through his Agency on their way 
to the County of Renfrew, the means for their transport having been remitted 
through him by friends and relatives already located there. He reports the 
amount of capital brought in by immigrants in 1882 as $14,600, and their effects at 
$10,200, or a total of $24,800. 

Mr. Macpherson, the Agent at Kingston, shows the operations of his Agency in 
very complete tables accompanying his report. He alludes to the manufacturing 
industries within his district as being in a very nourishing condition, and says that the 
cotton and woollen mills at Kingston find a difficulty in supplying the demand for 
their goods, a fact which necessarily calls for an increased supply of labour. In 
addition to these, the mining and lumbering interests, railway construction, 
and woik on the Murray Canal absorb all available labour. He reports the numbers 
placed oat by him during the past year as 150 per cent, greater than in 1881, and 
that the total arrivals at his Agency were upwards of 400 more than the total of 
the five previous years added together. He reports the value of money and effects 
brought in to his district, in 1882, at $110,288. 

Mr. Donaldson, Agent at Toronto, reports the greatest prosperity existing in 
every direction through his Agency, and as a consequence ready and immediate 
employment was found for all comers. The arrivals at his Agency were composed 
principally of farm, and general labourers. There was a falling off in the number 
of settlers in the free grants district, one reason for which he attributes to the induce- 
ments held out by Manitoba. He reports placing out on improved farms a number 
of new arrivals. The factories springing up in every direction around Toronto make 
it an objective point for labour. The sum of $262,600 in capital, and effects valued at 
$122,920, making a total of $385,520, was brought into his Agency by immigrants 
during the past year. 

Mr. John Smith, Agent at Hamilton, gives a voluminous report of his operations 

during the past season, and of the great prosperity prevailing in all classes of the 

community in his vicinity. Owing to this, the demand for all kinds of labour was so 

great that hundreds of applicants were unable to secure hands asked for. Operatives 

for mills and factories had to be engaged in and imported direct from the United States 

and Great Britain to supply the growing requirements arising from the demand for 

fabrics. Mr. Smith gives an interesting report on live stock, cattle breeding and 

dairy products in his Agency. Large numbers of immigrants were assisted out during 

the past year by their friends remitting through his Agency the cost of the ocean ■ 

xxxii 






I 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14) A. 1883 



passage. The amount of capital and value of effects brought into the Hamilton dis- 
trict during the past year is reported at $1,020,230. 

Mr. Smythe, Agent at London, Ont,, reports the demand for agricultural 
labourers greatly in excess of the supply. He urges immigrants of all classes to 
arrive, if possible, during April or May, as yearly engagements aie more easily 
entered into then than at any other time. He estimates the value of money and 
effects brought into his Agency during the past year at $123,141. 

Mr. Clay, the Agent at Halifax, reports the immigrants landed there of a 
very good class and possessed of considerable means. The detention of steamers in 
the ice during the spring was the cause of sickness amongst many of the children 
arriving, otherwise the general health was good. He reports no difficulty in finding 
employment for the immigrants destined for Nova Scotia, and that some of the 
better class purchased farms and settled there in preference to going inland. He 
states that an effort is being made to form a u Nova Scotia Immigration Society," 
with branches in every county. The bulk of immigration to that Province arrives 
during April and May, prior to the opening of navigation at Quebec. There were 
brought into the country, at that port by immigrants daring the season, 8286,520 in 
money and effects. 

Mr. Gardner, Agent at St. John, N.B., stated the number of immigrants at his 
Agency, apart from the Customs returns, for settlement in New Brunswick as 
301. In addition to these by other inlets there were 263, making a total of 561 
settlers. The amount brought in by these was in cash $44,500, and the value of their 
effects was $5,390. Mr. Gardner gives a synopsis of valuable information, which has 
been obtained by special inquiry, respecting the various counties of the Province, 
more especially as regards their agricultural products and capabilities. Referring to 
travel between Boston and St. John, he gives the figures, both outwards and inwards, 
for the year, which shows a balance in favour of the Province, notwithstanding the 
exodus cry. 

Mr. W. C. B. Grahame, Agent at Winnipeg, attaches to his report a number of 
tables, which will prove very useful as imparting concise information respecting wages, 
cost of living, and trade in Winnipeg, as well as a great deal of other valuable informa- 
tion. He states that the approximate number of 44,500 immigrants arrived during 
the year in Winnipeg,' that number being composed of 7,500 from Great Britain, 2,000 
from Europe, 10,000 from the United State*, and 25,000 from other Provinces of the 
Dominion. Mr. Grahame points with great satisfaction to the increase in the number 
of arrivals from the United States over those of last year. 

Mr. Thomas Bennett, Agent at Brandon, reports the majority of settlers in his 

Agency as of a superior class, and that thrift and industry are apparent in a marked 

. xxxiii 
14— c 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 188S 



degree. He advises immigrants not to "arrive in Manitoba before May and not later 
than September. The tables attached to his Report will be found very useful. 

Mr. J. E. Tetu, the Agent at Emerson, reports the total number of immigrants 
checked at his Agency during the year as 69,332, but deducting 17 per cent, for 
explorers and others visiting the country, and migrants from Ontario returning 
lor their families, the real total is 57,551. Mr. Tetu enumerates all the countries 
supplying the immigrants of the year through his Agency, and, like Mr. Grahame, 
calls marked attention to the largo number of arrivals from the United States. He 
says the capitalists and business men of the latter country, are now well aware of the 
advantages Manitoba offers. 

Mr. McGrovorn, the Agent at Duluth, gives a full description of the arrangements 
for facilitating the movements of immigrants for Manitoba via the Lake Route, who 
arrive at the Port of Duluth. He warns immigrants against the specious represen- 
tations made by the United States land speculators at St. Paul. He reports a, 
noticeabio feature of the season was the large number of wealthy tenant farmers 
from Europe. The tables appended to his Report on the trade passing through 
Duiuth to Manitoba show the extent to which it has attained. 

Mr. Lalime, Agent of this Department in the New England States, reports 633 
emigrants into Manitoba through his Agency, and he reports that the immigration 
to the United States from Canada during 1882, has decreased by at least 40 percent, 
as compared with the previous year. He anticipates a large movement from the 
Eastern States for Manitoba next season. The railways which connect the New 
England States with Canada, show in their reports for 1882 a decrease of about 50 
per cent in their ticket sales from Canada since 1881, and the receipts of tickets sold 
for Canada have increased in the same ratio. In Lowell. Mass., Manchester, N.H., 
and Fall River, the parochial census at the end of 1882, shows a large decrease in the 
French population there, and Mr. Lalime adds that the decrease in less important, 
localities must have been proportional. 

Mr. Taylor, Icelandic Agent in the North-West, states that immigration from 
Iceland was greatly hindered last year through the Polar ice blockading that Island, 
He reports the Icelanders in Manitoba as doing well, those who remain at the 
reserve supplementing their income from farm and fishing operations, by employ- 
ment at the saw mills erected near their reserve. The young people having acquired 
the language are being gradually identified with the English speaking citizens. 

An interesting Report of observations on a visit to the North- West is given bjj 

Messrs. Birks and Stephenson, two gentlemen from Yorkshire, England, who camel 

out on their own responsibility to ascertain the actual condition of the country as || 

field for settlement for the British tenant farmers. I requested them on their retur. 

to let me know their opinion and their Report will be found worthy of perusal. 

xxxiv 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1888 

The Annual Reports of the Ocean Mail Officers show that they have distributed 
a large amount of printed matter amongst the immigrants on the steamois arriving* 

An exhaustive Report by Mr. James Deans on Queen Charlotte Islands as a field 
for settlement, affords some very interesting information respecting those Islands on 
our Pacific Coast. 

A short Report by Mr. Alex Begg, on the Bow River District, not only gives aa 
idea of the trade, but also of the number of settlers across the frontier from the 
United States to the Canadian Territories, west of Emerson. 

Mr. Trutch, of British Columbia, furnishes an approximate statement of arrivals 
in British Columbia in 1882. 

The demand from abroad, as well as from our own Provinces, for printed matter 
and maps, has been unusually large, but has been promptly met. The Department 
received by mail during the year 3,414 letters, specially asking for pamphleta, 
maps and general information respecting Manitoba and the North- West. In 
every case these were supplied, and when special information was asked these 
applications were responded to, in addition to a very large number of others made 
either personally or in letters pertaining to other subjects. Every Agency also was 
furnished with a large supply of maps and pamphlets for distribution, and every 
available means has been used for bringing Canada prominently before the public. 



xxxv 
14— oj 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 18S3 



Table exhibiting the Total Expenditure of the Department, by Calendar Years, 



IMMIGRATION. 

Quebec Agency 

Montreal do 

Sherbrooke do 

Ottawa do 

Kingston do 

Toronto do 

Hamilton do 

London, Ont., do 

Halifax, N.S., do 

St. John, N.B., do 

JSTorth-West Agencies : — 

"Winnipeg ■ 

Icelandic Settlement 

Dufferiu (now Emerson) 

Special Agents with Immigrants on Intercolonial and G. Trunk Railroads 
Portland Agency (closed) 



Detroit 


do 


St. Paul 


do 


Worcester 


do 


Duluth 


do 


Brandon 


do 



do 



Colonization Road, Icelandic Settlement 

Icelandic Loan (for provisions and other supplies), advanced on mort- 
gage security under Dominion Lands Act, to be refunded 

''anadian Colonization 

Special Inspection of Children brought out by Miss Rye 

Mennonite Expenses 

<xeneral Immigration Expenditure, including Bonuses and Assisted SS. 
Passages, Immigration Publications and (since 1881) Inland Transport 

British Agencies' Salaries and Expenditures 

'Women's Protective Immigration Society 



Less— Amount of Refunds for Transport, &c. 



Paid in 1£79 but belonging to 1878 
Total Immigration Expenditure 



Vote of Parliament in aid of the Provinces for encouragement of Immi- 
gration 



QUARANTINE. 

Orosse Isle Quarantine 

Halifax do ... 

St. John, N.B , do 

Inspecting Physicians, Quebec 

Pictou Quarantine 

Hiramichi do 

Charlottetown, P.E.I 

Public Health (including Cattle Quarantines), 

Tiacadie Lazaretto 

Pictou Cattle Disease 



Total. 



Less— Amount of Refunds .... 

Toted Quarantine Expenditure 



1875. 



% cts, 

48,743 59 
13,412 99 
1,141 41 
3,971 27 
1,837 92 
2,923 42 
1,721 59 
1,700 47 
1,738 72 
1,114 46 

3,568 04 



46,234 37 

67,026 43 
109,988 95 



305,123 63 
8,430 72 



296,692 91 



12,353 22 

3,403 25 

2,916 15 

2,600 00 

732 25 

1,093 39 

803 70 

1,628 13 



25,530 09 



1876. 



$ cts. 

23,432 99 
16,277 56 
829 76 
4,848 23 
2,540 02 
6,825 33 
1,511 24 
2,394 36 
1,429 52 
1,071 82 



f26,165 12 

3,157 98 

1,128 00 

703 18 

1,839 08 

2,664 00 



3,147 18 



5,000 00 



3,713 50 

2,592 00 

20,719 00 

67, £33 54 
80,173 08 



285,495 07 
1,429 15 



284,065 92 



11,750 89 

3,195 83 

2,053 58 

2,399 93 

706 00 

Discontinued. 

899 09 

4,474 16 



25,473 51 



* The3e items simply include the Refunds received by this Department, 
f This includes Icelandic Advances to be repaid. 

xxxvi 



I 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No 14.) 



A, 188$ 



in the Service of Immigration and Quarantine, from 1875 to 1882, inclusive. 



1877. 


1878. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


$ cts. 

18,947 29 

8.312 61 

626 63 


$ cts. 

26,472 02 
9,707 47 
519 12 
2,878 10 
2,104 70 
5,803 26 
1,896 53 
1,492 72 

f9,515 13 
1,440 00 

}2,846 93 
3,788 04 
2,281 37 
1,504 55 


$ cts. 

54,947 42 
7,696 25 


$ cts. 

55,790 51 
7,106 84 


$ cts. 

9,038 59 
8,140 56 


$ c'tg. 

11,763 30 
4,325 60 


3,554 44 
2,180 88 
4,981 08 
1,754 41 
1,346 23 
1,670 88 
1,141 99 

1,667 88 
2,255 00 
3,527 69 
1,128 00 
*2,876 58 
900 ©0 


2,732 25 
2,014 58 
3,504 71 
1,834 36 
1.564 18 
fl9,833 96 
1,000 00 

3,253 38 

2,088 57 
2,305 45 
2,707 91 


2,965 24 
2,122 61 
3,185 38 
2,037 90 
1,587 98 
2,159 70 
1,313 40 

2,889 73 
1.200 00 
2,753 22 
3,809 68 


2,883 51 
2,153 44 
3,865 45 
2,061 02 
1,358 62 
2,326 91 
1,142 32 

2,811 45 
1,200 00 
2,315 73 
3,454 34 


3,658 01 
2,347 43 
4,157 03 
2,796 23 
1,700 99 
2,635 76 
1,304 05 

7,968 46 
1,200 00 
3,243 33 
3,335 40 






400 00 


801 65 


600 00 


2,074 04 


2,712 35 


460 00 






1,441 ('0 
3,056 56 
5,066 34 






3,282 01 
886 81 


3,099 07 
2,893 52 


2,164 37 
4,737 20 


2,608 16 
4,974 39 


2,287 70 
6,033 54 














30,717 40 


14,601 10 
934 67 










9,062 00 


2.124 75 


2,712 84 


4,068 57 


3,356 93 


3,496 60 


6,015 87 

34,582 50 
49,122 33 


641 73 

53,978 08 
29,177 92 


117 00 

80,500 40 
23,636 23 






18,311 70 
64,282 02 


|| 129,401 47 
22,247 01 


243,641 66 

36,745 69 

1,000 00 














188.984 25 
5,311 49 


186,210 35 
9,165 82 


198,766 97 
13,622 11 


205,852 56 
24.319 89 


206,853 19 
673 38 


348,346 29 
1,803 55 




177,044 53 
8,801 70 


185.144 86 
8,801 70 










181,532 67 


206,180 81 




183,672 76 


185,846 23 


176,343 16 


346,542 74 








§10,000 00 
















11,763 56 

3,183 58 

2, §05 08 

2,679 90 

700 00 

808 51 

20,111 01 


10,845 56 

2,948 04 

2,512 05 

2,733 42 

700 00 

836 22 
7,318 65 


9.865 03 
2,537 37 

1,524 96 

805 00 
3,197 69 


8.654 44 

3,712 HO 

1,095 25 
1,100 65 

915 85 

16,765 23 

656 50 


8,488 97 
2,766 00 

958 97 
731 00 

849 23 

17,106 99 

2,81*3 13 


8,643 49 
2,989 34 
1,960 75 
1,434 50 

727 26 

1,042 49 

26,920 69 

3,410 29 








12,722 13 












41,752 64 


27,893 94 


20,609 37 


34,213 62 


36,700 44 


59.850 94 
2,455 51 
















57,395 43 















* Transport included. f Including I.C.R.R. transport. 1 Nine months only. § To recoup 
Immigration Expenditure in N.B. || Inland Transport is charged in this item, and not to Quebec 
Agency, as formerly. 



XXXVll 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14 ) A. 1883 

A comparison of the results of operation of the Department, in 1881 and 1882, as 
respects Immigration, may thus be summarized : — 

Total number of settlers in Canada (including arrivals 

through the Customs) 47,991 *112,458 

Total amount of money and effects brought by immi- 
grants during the year, so far as ascertained $4,188,925 00 $10,000,000 00 

Total actual cost of immigration, including all establish- 
ments in Canada, the United Kingdom, the Conti- 
nent of Europe, the United States, and all immigra- 
tion propagand ism $206,180 81 $346,442 74 

Fer capita cost of 81,904 settlers (not including the 

arrivals reported through the Customs) $6 32 $4 23 

Ter capita cost of 112,458 settlors (including arrivals 

reported through the Customs) $4 29 $3 08 

By the same comparison, the per capita cost of settlers, since 1875, is as follows: 

1875 19,243 settlers, $14 00 

1876 14,490 do 19 60 

1877 15,223 do 12 00 

1878 18,372 do 9 63 

1879 . 30,717 do 5 74 

1880 27,544 do 6 59 

1881 32,587 do 6 32 

1882 81,904 do 4 23 

The total amounts spent for transport of immigrants, separately abstracted from 
the accounts of the Agencies, as given in the preceding table of expenditure of Immi- 
gration, are as follows, from 1871 to 1882, inclusive : — 

1871 $21,112 31 

1872 33,873 55 

1873 60,620 31 

1874 61,629 02 

1875.... 61,738 87 

1876 60,572 68 

1877 29,6(59 62 

1878 31,204 88 

1879 ..... 68,009 17 

1880 53,063 80 

1881.. 56,887 18 

1882 60,396 82 

In presenting these figures, it is proper that I should inform Your Excellency, 
that the operations of the Department have been carried on with a view to economy, 



XX XVI 11 



i 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



as rigorous as was compatible with efficiency. The expenditure for inland transport 
has been necessarily high ; partly owing to the very large increase in the immigration, 
and partly because of the withdrawal by the Government of the Province of Ontario 
from an arrangement which had been in operation for a period of about ten years — 
an arrangement, moreover, which was first entered into at the request of the Govern- 
ment of that Province, in order to increase immigrant settlement within its border ; 
and under which the Province defrayed a proportion of two-thirds of the expense, 
and the Dominion Government one- third. 

It has been the practice of the Dominion Government for many years, to defray 
the transport expenses of immigrants, without means, from the port of debarkation 
to points inland, where work could be procured, in order to prevent crowding 
and the consequent train of evils which would arise therefrom at the sea-port. 
The Province of Ontario suifered the loss of many immigrants of the labour- 
ing classes, as a consequence of this withdrawal, it being no part of the functions of 
my Department to provide transport as an inducement to immigrants to settle in 
any particular Province ; but only to remove such as could not pay their way from 
the port of debarkation to the nearest point in the Dominion at which work could be 
found. 

An increased] expenditure was incurred in the accounts which I have the 
honour to present, for assistance towards steamship transport as an inducement to 
promote immigration, and also for the very considerable number of publications 
issued by the Department. 

It is, however, to be stated that notwithstanding these increased expenditures, 
the^er capita cost of the immigrants who have settled in the Dominion during the 
year has, in view of the success which has attended the operations of the Depart- 
ment, been very much less than in any former year. 

£1 Note.— A question having arisen respecting immigration in the Province of Ontario during the 
pa year, the following figures show the actual results. 

Total net immigrants into Ontario in 1882, viz. : — 

Via Quebec 19,866 

Montreal from United States ports 6,899 

Suspension Bridge 6,649 

Halifax 1,006 

Agencies 2,035 

Customs 13,758 



I 



Passengers from Ontario reported at Manitoba , 38,327 

Less— 17 per cent, returned 6,516 

31,811 
Net balance of all passengers passing "West at point of 
Port Huron, where the bulk of the exodus is alleged 
to take place — assuming all these Ontarians 
(which they are not) is 2,422 



Gain to Ontario in 1882 

xxxix 



50,213 



34,233 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



VII. CENSUS AND STATISTICS. 

The Criminal Statistics Beturns for the past year are given in a Supplementary 
Appendix to the present volume. 

The First Volume of the Census of 1881, which was in the hands of the Printer 
at the time of making my .Report for that year, was completed and distributed before 
the close of the last Session of Parliament. The Third Volume was during this year 
compiled in advance of the Second, in view of the desirability of giving publication 
as early as possible to the information contained in it. It is now in the hands of the 
Printer, and will shortly be ready for distribution. It will contain the returns ot 
immoveable property and shipping owned by the inhabitants of each District, occu- 
piers of lands, and lands occupied, animals and animal products, field products, 
various products, and furs, products of the forest, fisheries, raw mineral products, and 
industries. 

Progress has already been made in the compilation of the Second Volume, and 
the Officer in charge reports that it may be expected to be ready for distribution 
during 1883. This volume will complete the whole compilation. 

The Expenditure during the year amounted to $57,913.22, and may be specified 
as follows : — 

Be numeration and Travelling Expenses of Chief 

Officers $3,464 29 

Bemuneration and Travelling Expenses of Commission- 
ers and Enumerators 6,960 27 

Bemuneration and Travelling Expenses of Officers and 

Employees 39,878 25 

Printing 5,513 37 

Stationery 575 21 

Miscellaneous 1,581 83 

Total $57,973 22 



xl 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



Tho result of the enumeration shows an increase of population of the four 
provinces and Prince Edward Island, and of the Dominion as now constituted. 





Population. 


Increase. 


Rate 




1871. 


1881. 


per cent. 


Prince Edward Island 


94,021 

387,800 

285,594 

1,191,516 

1,620,851 


108,891 

440,572 

321,233 

1,359,027 

1,923,228 


14,870 

52,772 

35,639 

167,511 

302,377 


15*8 


Nova Scotia 


13*6 


New Brunswick 


12-4 


Quebec 


14*6 


Ontario 


18-6 


Total 


3,579,782 


4,152,951 


573,169 


16'0 






Manitoba 


18,995 
36,247 


65,954 
49,459 
56,446 


46,960 
13,212 


247*0 


British Columbia 


36*3 


The Territories 












Total 


55,242 


171,859 


60,172 








Grand total 


3,635,024 


4,324,810 


633,341 


18-98 







. In 1871, in the four provinces, the population of cities and towns of over 5,000 
inhabitants comprised 12*3 per cent, of the whole. 

In 1881 the proportion of such city and town population, in the same four 
provinces, was 15*7 per cent, of the whole. 

In 1881 the population in the whole of Canada, residing in cities and towns of 
over 5,000 inhabitants, was 15*2 per cent. 

In 18*71 there were in Canada (as then constituted) 20 cities and towns of 5,000 
inhabitants and over, with a total population of 430,043. 

In 1881 there were in Canada (as now constituted) 37 such cities, having a total 
population of 660,040. The rate of increase per cent, over 1871 (leaving out the City 
of Hull and the Towns of St. Henri and Moncton, the limits of which were not then 
defined) is 29-71. 

The following tables show a comparison of the industries of 1871 and 1881, being 
abstracts from the Census compilations now in the printers' hands : — 



xli 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 14.) 



A. 1881 



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SME- 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



VIII. HEALTH STATISTICS. 

In consequence of repeated appeals made by the medical profession of the 
Dominion with offers of co-operation, and of reports coming from several City- 
Boards of Health in various Provinces, the Government was led to submit to Parlia- 
ment at the last Session, in the Estimates for the fiscal year 1882 83, a request for a 
grant of $10,000 for Health and Vital Statistics. 

After the Session, and until last fall, several conferences were held with medical 
men, and members of Local Boards of Health on the subject, and finally in November 
last, a numerous delegation was sent to Ottawa, from Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, 
New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, to confer with the Government on the 
subject. 

At the close of this last conference, a project, prepared by the Deputy Minister 
of Agriculture, and approved by me, was submitted to the conference, and concurred 
in by it. 

The scheme then laid down took the legal [form of " Eules and Forms, under 
the authority and in pursuance of the ' Census and Statistics Act,' " which Eules, etc., 
were approved by Your Excellency in Council, in December, and are given as an 
Annex to this Eeport. 

These rules provide for the collection, compilation, tabulation, and publication 
of mortuary statistics, including the causes of deaths, and the gathering of collateral 
information on the state of the public health . 

The working of that scheme is based on the organization of Local Board?, and 
their subsequent appointment of sanitary local officers, who are to be the statistical 
officers for the collection of the said mortuary statistics. 

It was found to be absolutely necessary to limit the trial of such difficult statis- 
tical labour to eleven cities, viz. : the capitals of the various Provinces, and such other 
cities as are possessed of a population of 25,000 inhabitants and over, according to the 
last Census ; but the system is framed in such a manner as to render it susceptible of 
indefinite extension, in the measure allowed by the Parliamentary grant, if found to 
produce accurate returns. 

The allotment to the cities from the grant, is composed of a bulk sum, which is 
not to exceed $400 in each case, and a per capita subsidy of one cent ($0.01) per head 
of the population of each place. The salary of the statistical officer is tak^n 
from that allotment, being twenty-five per cent of the same. The other 
expenses to be defrayed out of the said allotment, are : the payment of mort- 
uary certificates for each cape of death, to be delivered in the form and to the extent 

ibed by the rules and forms, for each of which a sum of fifteen cents ($0.15) is 

xliii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 18&& 



allowed ; and of a sum, varying with circumstances, to procure a medical statement, 
of the health, and subjects connected with it, in each of these cities and neighbour- 
hoods. 

The allotment for each of the eleven cities included in the experiment, which* 
allotment may not be all expended, but which cannot be exceeded, stands as folio 
iu round figures : — 

Montreal $1,800 

Toronto 1,260 

Quebec 1,020 

Halifax 760 

Hamilton 760 

Ottawa 670 

fit John, K B : 660 

Charlottetown, P. E. 1 510 

Winnipeg 480 

Fredericton, N. B 460 

Victoria, B. C 460 

Brides these outside expenses, there are the expenses of printing the Rules 
Forms, Circulars, Tables, Blank Certificates, the General compilation and all othei 
Contingent Expenses, incurred by the Department at Ottawa, for management an< 
distribution. 

The total expenditure (although in a measure dependent on the number < 
Deaths) is estimated at about $6,000 for six months of the fiscal year 1882-83, incluc 
ing all the preliminary expenses. 

It depends on the local authorities to establish the system within the limits 
their jurisdiction, and so far six of the eleven Cities have answered the Circula 
inviting them to it, namely, Montreal, Ottawa St. JohnN. B., Toronto, Hamilton ai] 
Charlottetown, P.E.I. ; and the local Sanitary Officers of these Cities are now appoint" 
Statistical Officers under the authority of the Eules and Forms, sanctioned by Yo] 
Excellency. 

The whole respectfully submitted. 

JOHN HENBY POPE, 

Minuter of Agricultore I 



xliv 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1383 



REPORT ON ALLEGED EXODUS TO WESTERN UNITED STATES. 



Ottawa, 20th February, 1883. 

g IR) — I have the honour to make a further Report upon the alleged large exodus 
>f Canadians to the Western United States at the point of Port Huron, as appears 
irorn the returns made by the Collector of Customs at that port, and published 
jffioially by the Treasury Department of the United States, over tho signature of 
Mr. Joseph Nimmo, jr., the Chief of the Bureau of Statistics, in a Report addressed to 
the Hon. C. J. Folger the Secretary of the Treasury. 

Mr. Nimmo in this Report, under date of 31st July, 1882, states that the number 
of immigrants arrived in the United States from the Dominion of Canada during the 
fiscal year ended 30th June, was 98,308 against 125,39 L for tho previous fiscal year, 
(1880-1), showing a decrease of 27,083. Of this alleged immigration Mr. Nimmo 
states that 11,424 entered at the point of Port Huron, during the first named of the 
fiscal years above referred to, against 111,170 in the previous fiscal year, showing a 
iecrease of 39,746, at that port. I will show you by an indubitable test, what value 
is to be placed on these figures. 

In the first place, however, it is well to point out that Mr. Nimmo states in a foot- 
DOte: " A part of the immigration into the United'States from the Dominion of 
Canada, consisted of immigrants from Europe who came by steamer to Montreal 
and thence reached Lake ports of the United States by railway." Mr. Nimmo does 
pot state what part of such immigration is of this character ; and I shall, also 
dn ieavour to show you the value that is to be placed on this note as a modifying 
statement. 

If we deduct from the total alleged immigration of 98,308 into the United States 
p the last fiscal year from Canada, the claim of the Port Huron Collector, of 71,424, 
( wo have only a remainder ot 26,884 ; and if these are considered as figures represent- 
ing an emigration from Canada from all points, and from which the figures of the 
'immigration into Canada from the United States, have not been deducted, a process 
which is necessary to show the true net emigration, it might not perhaps bj worth 
while to spend much time in criticising them, although something might be said as 
respects some of these figures. 

It is otherwise, however, with the figures atgPort Huron, of 71,421 which are 

officially given to the world under the authority of the Treasury Department of the 

United States. At that point there are two railways which cross from Canada to the 

United States ; one, the Grand Trunk, which is the main artery, the other, the 

Sarnia branch of the Great Western system of the Grand Trunk, which is only a 

branch and local line from London, Ontario. There is also a ferry served by little 

steamers between Sarnia and Port Huron ; but this would simply not be available for 

xiv 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No, 14.) A. 188& 

any emigration which it would be at all worth while to consider, and it is not even 
pretended that it is so. 

There remain then only the two railways ; and, fortunately for the purpose or 
this inquiry ,the extent and the kind of travel over them as well to the West as from* 
it, are matters of exact official record. I have obtained the figures which represent 
these facts from Mr. T, B. Hawson, the Auditor of the Grand Trunk Railway Company... 

In the first place it is better to state the total number of passengers going West 
by the main artery, the Grand Trunk Railway at this point. They are as follow I 

(Totals going West from Canada and Eastern United States.) 

From points in Canada to Manitoba via United States a 13,804 

From Canada to United States « b 50,364 

From United States to Manitoba , 460 

From points in Eastern United States to Western United 

States 53,759 

Total going West at this point .118,387 

(a) This item includes booked in Europe 2,643 

(b) Includes booked in Europe 10,966 



Making together to be deducted from the passengers from 

Canada going West at this point 13,609 

This deduction may be held to represent the European immigrants, referred to* 
by Mr. Limmo, in the extract from his Report which I have quoted. The relatione 
of these figures to the question at issue will appear. 

Against the figures of total travel to the West are to be set those of the totaL 
travel to the East at the same point. They are as follow : 

(Totals going East from Canada and Western United States.) 

From Manitoba to Canada via United States 3,214 

From Western United States to Canada 38,257 

From Manitoba to Eastern United States.. 287 

From Western United States to Eastern United States 35,776 

Total passengers going East 77,534 

We have thus a difference between these two grand totals of 40,853, or deduct-j 

ing the passengers booked in Europe, 27,244 in favour of those going West overl 

those going East. To arrive, however, at the result which is the object of thiej 

inquiry, all the figures in the foregoing enumeration, except those which have simple] 

reference to the numbers of passengers between points in Canada and points in th<) 

Western United States, must be eliminated. 

xlvi 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14,) A. 188$ 

We have from this the following net result : — 

(Totals between Canada alone and Western United States.) 

Total No. of passengers from Canada to Western United 

State* 50,304 

Less booked in Europe included in these figures 10,966 



39,398 

Total passengers from Western United States to Canada... 38,257 

Difference being the net emigration by the Grand Trunk 

Railway at Port Huron 1,141 

There remains the Sarnia branch of the Great Western. The figures are: — 

Total passengers from Canada to points in Western 

United States .... 1,879 

From Eastern United States to Western United States 17 



Total Western passengers 1,896 

On the other hand the total No. of Passengers from West- 
ern United States to Canada was b'78 

From Western United States to Eastern United States 852 



p 



Total Eastern passengers 1,530 

There is thus only a total difference between the East and West passengers at 
this point of 366 ; but the difference of those who went from Canada to the United 
States appears from the above figures to be 1,281 ; a fact which shows a local move- 
ment to this extent. 

The total net emigration, at the point of Port Huron, from Canada lo the United 
States for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882, appears from the record of these 
figures to be as follows: — 

By the Grand Trunk main line 1,141 

By the Sarnia branch 1,281 

Total net emigration at Port Huron 2,422 

This is the true and simple fact to set against the claim of 71,42-1, as set 
forth in the official figures of the United States Treasury Department, as the immi- 
gration from Canada at the point of Port Huron, in the fiscal year stated. 

The Grand Trunk Railway is an arterial thoroughfare between the Eastern and 

Western points of the continent, and taking all passengers within the twelve months 

in question, who had purchased tickets in Canada, including also those on the Sarnia 

xlvii 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 14 ) A. 1883 

branch of the Great Western, that is to say all passengers, for pleasure or business, 
all excursionists, of which there were many, and all migrants and immigrants to Mani- 
toba and the Canadian North- West, we have a grand total going West of 52,438. The 
"United States official claim, therefore, of immigration from Canada, at one single 
point, very widely published to the world, is an exaggeration of 36-20 per cent, in 
excess of the total figures of gross travel ; the actual net immigration which might 
be claimed, as established by the official figures furnished by the Eailway Company, 
being 2,422. 

If we add to the above total numbers of all passengers who purchased tickets in 
Canada for points in the West, the 13,609 included in the total figures furnished by 
Mr. Hawson, who purchased their tickets in Europe, we have a gross total of 66,047, 
against the claim of immigration of 71,424, showing an exaggeration which is simply 
grotesque. 

There is something, however, which appears from a further examination 
of these figures, that shows even worse features. 



■6 



I have received since I commenced to write this .Report, the Annual Statements 
of the Chief of the Bureau of Statistics under date December 31st, 1882, signed by 
Mr. Nimmo, and addressed to the Secretary of the United States Treasury. Mr. 
Nimmo says that this volume contains "complete statements" in regard to the 
immigration into the United States for the fiscal year ended June 30th, 1882. 

These " complete statements " purport to furnish details of the 71,424 immi- 
grants which are alleged to have arrived at Port Huron, giving them as 40,866 
males and 30,558 females. This table, moreover, determines that the whole of theae 
passengers were '•' aliens " arriving in the United States ; that there were not'among 
them any " citizens of the United States returning from abroad'" nor any "aliens 
not intending to remain in the United States." 

Another table, No. 41, again divides them into classes " under 15 years of age;" 
"15 and under 40;" " 40 and upwards;" giving the details of numbers of males 
and females at those respective ages; and the "country of last permanent residence 
or citizenship." The figures under all these headings are not given simply in round 
number.-', but with a detail of exactitude down to actual units. The Provinces of 
Quebec, Ontario, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island are 
specified as places from which the alleged immigrants came. 

The next table, No. 42, divides and classifies these immigrants by "Occupations," 
giving the names of such occupations to the long detail of 112 kinds as having been 
furnished by the Dominion. And again these are given with the still further detail 
of clasification at the three periods of age above stated, and still further into males 
and females in each of such periods. 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14 ) A. 1S85 



Table No. 43 gives the details of the nationalities of these alleged immigrants. 

And table No. 44 gives a detail of the " occupations " of the immigrants u by 
Countries." This last classification is so curious as to present features of humor. I 
furnish an abstract as an Exhibit to this report (marked A), giving a long list of 
actors, clergymen, dentists, druggists, editors, lawyers, bakers, barbers, blacksmiths, 
labourers, milliners, tailors, servants, speculators, etc., etc.; persons with " occupa- 
tions not stated ;" and 42,876 " without occupation," rather a large number of persons 
with nothing to do in the face of this minute classification, as distinguished from 
those with u occupations not stated." 

These minute details of information thus given, could only be, by any possibility, 
obtained by an actual registration ; and this is a statistical labour which would require 
both care and time to perform. It is a labour, moreover, which would be plain to the 
apprehension of all the passengers in the trains, the subjects of the information, as it 
would require to have questions asked and answered, and the answers taken down on 
the spot. 

Nothing of this kind is done. I have visited Port Huron twice, in obedience to 
your instructions for the purpose of making careful personal observations 
in pursuance of the object of this inquiry. I have crossed and re-crossed 
the river several times, and had both my hand luggage in the ears and my 
valise examined by the United States customs officers, in the same way as others on 
the trains. But no questions of any kind were asked of me either with respect to my 
age, or my intention to settle in the United States, or to find out what country I 
came from, or whether I was a returned American citizen who had been travelling ; 
or in short any point of information of the kind required by these tables. And no 
questions of any sort, which my observation ^enabled me to discover, were asked of 
any of the other passengers. The trains I crossed by were the regular Grand Trunk 
Express trains from Toronto connecting with the Eastern Provinces ; — these particular 
trains, in fact, which carry the bulk of the passengers between the Provinces of 
Canada and the Western States by this arterial railway. How did those officers who 
furnished the information for these tables know that I was not a " returned Ameri- 
can citizen," or a " speculator," or a " lawyer," or a " doctor," or of " occupation not 
stated " ? Or in what list did they put me ? I have crossed as a passenger more than 
twenty times during the. last three years, while enquiring into this question. 

In addition to the observations of my own, I " made as on previous occasions, 
eareful enquiries from well informed persons on the spot connected with the railway and 
customs on both sides, and I ascertained with a posifciveness that left no doubt, that 
the proceedings which I saw, were those which were usual. I feel, therefore, in a 
position to allege that there are no inquiries made, nor any registration of facts of 
such a nature as would enable the figures and the long aad minute details of inform- 
ation published by Mr. Nimiao to be obtained. 

xlix 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 

There is the further unquestioned, because I believe unquestionable statement 
which has been twice published in my reports on this subject; once, in that for 18i 
and again in that for 1881, communicated to me at an interview by the United Stat 
Customs Officer, who had the duty confided to him of making up these so calle 
statistics, that " questions were not asked, because it would be an impossibility to 
" them and record the answers within the time afforded — twenty men could not 
" this on some days." " That he could not ask the questions required by the Goven 
'* ment but had to arrive at the information as best he could." 

I subjoin a report of a circumstance I found in a newspaper (the Toronto Globe) 
which came into my hands while I was actually engaged in the West, in August 
last, in making an inquiry into this matter. I extract the following from the tele- 
graphic correspondence of that paper : — 

" Detroit, Mich., August 19. 

" Matthias Kiefer writes to a local paper that on Thursday last he was one of a 
" large party of excursionists from the County of Waterloo, Ont., to Detroit. When 
" they crossed the river at Sarnia to Port Huron, the officers of the United States 
" came on board and demanded the sum of 50 cents for the privilege of visiting the 
" United States. Keifer refused, and warned every one of his fellow- excursionists nol 
" to pay the money, but the conductor of the train came and said they had better pay 
" or they would have to lay over with the train on the river or go back. After th< 
" most earnest protests from the passengers who had already paid the 50 cents, th« 
" money was returned and they were allowed to proceed. Collector Bell, of Detroit 
11 was interviewed Friday, when he explained that the affair was a mistake." 

These proceedings may have been, according to the report in this telegram, ij 
mistake in the eyes of Mr. Collector Bell, of the Port of Detroit, under the order fron 
Washington on which a per capita tax of 50 cents on immigrants was laid ; but thej 
do, nevertheless, afford indubitable proof as to the practice of the Collector o 
Customs at Port Huron in setting down a large party of simple excursionists t 
Detroit from the county of Waterloo, Ont., as immigrants into the United States 
and that, up to the point of insistance of levying upon them the per capita tax o 
fifty cents, and refusing to allow them to eross the river until it was paid. It is c 
course, very easy to make large numbers of immigrants on such a thoroughfare a 
the Grand Trunk Eailway in this way ; and if there were only a sufficient total nun 
bcr of passengers it would not be difficult to reach the figures of the Collector < 
Customs of Port Huron. 

This per capita tax on immigrants arriving by the trains, was not long continue 
at Port Huron ; not longer than a period of about a fortnight, as I was given 1 
understand, owing to representations made at Washington to the effect that it wi 
impossible to collect^it. Of course it was impossible to collect it in such circui 
stances as those related in the telegraphic correspondence which I have quoted. Bi 
if the attempts to do so had been confined to actual immigrants, it is hard to pe 
ceive how there could have been greater difficulty in collecting 90 cents for a ta 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 

than there is in collecting a customs fee of 90 cents, very often wrung from poor 
immigrants for making an entry of a little old bedding or other household effects 
they may be taking with them. Had this per capita tax of 50 cents continued to be 
levied at Port Huron, it would have afforded a somewhat sharp tost of the extent of 
the immigration, as the persons who make and publish these statistics would not 
have been very likely to put half-a-dollar into the Treasury for every unit of exag- 
geration. 

I mentioned in my Report of last year that I had ascertained on the spot, 
there had been an enquiry by an United States official into the circumstances of the 
allegations contained in nry Eeport of 1880. I have not been able to ascertain that 
the Report of that official has been permitted to see the light ; and yet, in the face of 
the indubitable facts which are herein stated, these grossly exaggerated figures, 
which, if they were true, would imply a depopulating exodus from Canada, are per- 
sistently, year after year, given to the world on the authority of the Treasury De- 
partment of the United States, and everywhere abroad widely republished and 
hurtfully used, to the detriment of what may be called the immigration interests of 
Canada, as, if it were a country for people to flee from in such an exodus, it could not 
be said to be the most desirable one to emigrate to. It is in this, as I stated before, 
that the injustice to Canadian interests, from these exaggerations, lies. 

There are other tests of criticism which may be applied to these figures, which 
Mr. Nimmo has at his hands, for their correction, in that they are found in United 
States records. For instance, the United States census of 1870 compared with that 

\ of 1880. I subjoin as an Exhibit to this Report (marked B) an extract from those 
two censuses of the enumeration in nineteen Western and South Western States of the 
I nativities " of Canadians from the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec, with New Bruns- 

» wick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. The numbers are : — 

By the Census of 1880 , 344,938 

By do of 1870 218,329 

Difference or increase'remaining in 1880., 126,609 

The heading in the volume of " compendium " of the United States Census of 

1880, is "nativities," and if wo assume that this term means " place of birth," the 

figures given represent all who could have entered at Port Huron, and very largely 

more, as I purpose to show. There may be room for question, as to whether these 

figures do not, in many cases, include the whole of the members living in the family, 

that is including those born in the United States. But without raising this question, 

and assuming the figures to be correct, we have the fact that the net difference between 

the two decennial periods referred to would be 12,660 a year, without^allowing for a 

decrement by deaths. If, however, the figures are held to represent simply the 

•numeration under the heading of " place of birth," it is necessary to allow for a 

H 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (Na.14.) A. 188$ 

•considerable decrement by deaths, and to assume that there must have been an 
immigration of about 18,000 a year in the ten years, in order to leave the difference 
stated between the two censuses. 

The Port Huron figures of immigration, however, as shown by an official letter 
from the Collector's office, (quoted on page 4,of my Keport for 1880,) set forth that the 
immigration at that port alone in one year and four months, was 155,098. We have 
thus in sixteen months a claim for a numerical extent of immigration which very 
nearly approaches the utmost extent of immigration in nineteen States (covering the 
utmost extent of territory that could receive immigration from Port Huron), as esta- 
blished by the United States censuses in ten years, which is an impossible position. 

This, however, is not the only view. If any one will glance at the names of the 
nineteen Western and South-Western States, included in the figures I have stated, 
and look at their relations to the point of Port Huron, on a map of the United 
States, on which the railway and steamboat lines are marked, he will see that com- 
munications with them are open by more than a dozen important routes of travel, and 
that if an allowance of one-fourth of the whole annual total of 18,000 (if these figures are 
assumed) were made for the entries at Port Huron, it would give an average of 
emigration from Canada, at that point, of 4,500 a year, an average which nearly agrees 
with the differences between the ins and the outs for the last three years as shown in 
my Reports. 

I give this as an approximate generalisation based upon figures of which every one 
can see the value at a glance. There are no means in existence by which the exact 
figures of this movement, that is of the emigration, immigration, and re-emigratiou i 
on both sides of the frontier between tbe United States and Canada, can be obtained] 
and stated. The best, if not the only test which exists, is the difference between the I 
ins and the outs on the routes of travel. 

The proportion of the numbers of Canadian " nativities " to the populatiorl 
in the nineteen States referred to, in 1880, was 21 per thousand. The proportion o: 
the same in the whole of the United States to the whole population in the sanu 
year was 14 per thousand. The proportion of persons of United States birth in th< 
Province of Ontario in 1831 was 23-6 per thousand ; in the Province of Quebec 14*2 
and in the whole population of the Dominion 18. 

Tbe question of the possibility of mixing under the head of u nativities," nation 

ality, for place of birth, in the " compendium " of the United States Census abov 

referred to, is strengthened by looking at a series of tables, publishod by Mr. Nim 

in his volume of four quarterly reports of United States Statistics for 1882, in whic 

he gives the total immigration from all the British American Provinces, includin 

Newfoundland and Labrador, into the United States for sixty years, namely, froi 

1820 to 1380. The total of all this immigration, not making any allowances fi 

Hi 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188$ 

oaths, which must have made a most serious decrement in sixty years, is 592,304. 
The d< .ii h, from a rough estimate of these figures would have been in the neighbour- 
hood of 175,000, leaving a remainder in round numbers of the original immigrants of 
U7,000. The United States census of 1880, gives the "nativities" from the same 
[Provinces, that is all British America, at 717,15*7. Any calculation which might be 
undo upon Mr. Nimmo's figures of the total immigration from British America in 
lixty years would be very disturbing of any calculation that might be made to account 
or the same immigration as established by the United States census. On the other 
land the figures of the United States census are equally disturbing of any confidence 
t is possible to place in the figures, at least those of recent years, published by Mr. 
:!fimmo relating to immigration into the United States at Port Huron. 

As the figures ofjimmigration of Mr. Nimmo for sixty years, have interest in 
jonnection with this enquiry, I append them in Exhibit E. 

It is, of course, natural that two peoples inhabiting the same continent, having the 
•elations with each other" that exist between Canada and the United States, with a 
rery long line of frontier, should, to a very large extent, intermingle ; and that them 
ihould be a constant flux and reflux of immigration and emigration, with an acti\ i y 
W)re or less great, arising from the incidents of times of prosperity and depression 
ind the attractions of opening up new lands for settlement. 

It is impossible to make a study of the figures of the United States census with- 
!>ut being struck by what may be called two main facts : 

First, that the Canadians in the Western States are found most thick! v settled in 
those places where there have been new lands to open up within the last 1 < nty years. 
This represents mainly the emigration which has taken place from Ontario. 

Second. — "We find the next dense settlement of Canadians, on the authority of 
:he United States census, in the New England States; and this mainly represents 
khat has been known as the French Canadian emigration from the Province of 
Quebec. The State of Massachusetts alone contains more than one third of all tho 
Canadians represented to have settled in tho New England or Middle States from 
Maine to Pennsylvania. (See Exhibit C.) 

In this connection on the other hand, the returns of immigrant settlers in 
Canada, in connection with entries of settlers' goods during the year 1882, is very im- 
portant and suggestive. The total numbers of these returns wore 30,554, and thes.© 
figures are an exact registration, name by name being taken down, together with a 
fBtatement of the nationality of the immigrants or returned Canadians on their own 
declarations. Of this total| number, 20,857 were returned Canadians, and 3,411 
Icitizens of the United States. The numbers of immigrants as shown by this par- 
ticular registration, were about double those of the preceding year, the figures of 

Which were 15,404, against 10,961 in 1880, and 9,775 in 1879. 

liii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No 14.) A. 188S 

The numbers, however, which are obtained from this partieular kind of regis- 
tration, by no means represent the whole immigration ; and I think as many come 
without making entries of settlers' effects, as of those who do. This inward move- 
ment, therefore, from the United States, is assuming proportions of great significance,; 
and when it is coupled with the consideration of the vast areas of land now being 
opened up in the Canadian North- West, and the large amounts of capital employed 
in its development— both facts very largely necessitating and stimulating man- 
ufacturing industry to supply the wants created — there is reason to believe that the 
considerable immigration movement into Canada from the United States, which has 
set in, will in the near future, become of sufficient importance to redress the balance 
of the comparatively large figures of emigration to which I have referred. 

And this position is much strengthened by the analogy of facts which have 
been accomplished in the United States. When the western United States prairie 
lands were being settled, during the last twenty years, it was found that the migra- 
tion from the Eastern States to the Western, not only prevented a rapid increase of 
population within their borders, but actually eaused a decline in that of the States 
of New Hampshire and Maine, in the decennial period between 1860 and 
1880. The State of Vermont showed almost no increase between those years. Bui 
in the same period Dakota gained in its population, 193 per cent.; Kansas, 239 ; Min- 
nesota, 155; and Illinois, 48. On the other hand, the manufacturing State of Massa- 
chusetts, while it suffered the same drain in its agricultural population, still made a 
total gain of 18 per cent., its manufactures having found both a stimulant and a 
market in the wealth produced by the developement of prairie agriculture and com. 
merce in the Western States. In the Canadian North- West we have already similar 
per centages. The population of Manitoba, in the ten years ended 1881, increased 
439 per cent., while in the two last years the increase ^has been still more rapid, 
having been in fact nearly equal to that of the preceding ten years, the causes having 
been precisely the same as those which produced the enormous percentages of 
increase in the Western States ; and the effect in stimulating the manufactures and 
commerce of the Eastern Provinces precisely the same; causing also the remarkable 
features of immigration to Canada from the United States during the year, which I 
have noticed ; and reducing the balance at the point of Port Huron to figures scarcely 
worth consideration ; while in the Province of New Brunswick, as shown by Mr. 
Gardner, the Agent of the Department of Agriculture at St. John, the movement on 
the two main lines of travel between that Provincejand the United States, exhibits 
an actual gain in population ; the number of the Ins being more than the Outs. The 
figures were—going to the United States, 44,064 ; coming from the United States, 
44,982; the gain to New Brunswick 918. 






This lieport has been confined to an examination of the self apparent, grc 

exaggeration at the point of Port Huron, and for the reason that, when this ii 

liv 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1833 

eliminated from the United States, claim of immigration from Canada, there is 
practically nothing farther to notice. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN LOWE, 

Secretary 'of the Department of Agriculture. 
Hon. J. H. Powell inister of Agriculture. 



Iv 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188* 



EXHIBIT A. 

Statement, by Countries— viz., the Provinces of Quebec and Ontario, Nova Scotia, 
New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island — of Occupations of Immigrants 
alleged to have entered the United States during the Fiscal Year ended 30th. 
June, 1882; Abstracted from the Annual Report of the United States Bureau of 
Statistics, dated Washington, D.C., December 31st, 1882. 



Occupations. 


Quebec 

and 
Ontario. 


Nora Scotia. 


New 
Brunswick. 


Prince 
Edward 
Island. 


Professional. 
Actors 




1 

4 

28 

2 








6 

11 
1 
3 

1 
18 

4 

1 


























2 
3 

6 

3 

2 

10 

3> 




1 
1 










Musicians 












Physicians 

Teachers , 


26 
3 






1 


7 


Total c 


74 


93 


1 


9 




Skilled. 
Accountants, Book-keepers and Cashiers 


48 

1 

2 

995 

2 


1 
5 
6 
71 
1 
3 


1 




1 


Barbers and Hairdressers 


13 
9 


Blacksmiths 


12 




Bookbinders 






Brewers , 


2 






Brick-makers * 


1 
2 
7 
35 
1 

504 
1 

222 




1 


Builders 






Butchers 


6 
383 






Cabinet-makers ...'. 


2 








Carpenters and Joiners 


2,584 


61 


24 




Clerks 


94 


1 


16 
1 




Coopers 




12 
1 
1 
94 
21 
5 
6 












Divers 










2 

39 

1 


12 
1 


1 


Engineers 


Firemen 










Glaziers 


11 






Hatters 






\ 




4 


10 

1 
8 




Iron-workers , 






3 
1 

1 

50 

283 

61 

97 
7 
1 
2 

lvi 




1 


Knitters 




Machinists 


11 


. 5 . 




Manufacturers 






543 
56 

488 
-6 
9 


" 26*" 


22 

4 

37 


Masons 




Millers , 


Milliners 

Millwrights 


4 


2 


Miners , 


27'" 













46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188S 



EXHIBIT A.— Continued. 

A Statement, by Countries — viz., the Provinces of Quebec and Ontario, Nova Scotia, 
New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, &c. — Continued. 



Occupations. 


Quebec 

and 
Ontario. 


Nora Scotia. 


New 
Brunswick. 


Prince 

Edward 

Island. 


Skilled— Continued . 
Musical Instrument 




1 

24 

1 






Painters 


60 




8 


Paper-makers 






Plasterers > 




1 
3 




Printers 


1 


3 
3 




Rope-makers , 




Saddlers and Harness-makers .-, 


12 

1 

37 






Sail-makers 


5 

127 

51 

41 

11 

4 

22 

3 

2 

9 

1 

2 






Seamstresses 


1 

64 

5 


2 


Shipwrights 


7 


Shoemakers 


486 


2 


Spinners M 




Stone-cutters 


21 
42 






Tailors 


25 




Tanners and Curriers.. .. 


1 


Telegraph Operators 








Tinsmiths ... 

Tobacco, Cigar Manufacturers and Dealers .... 
Watch and Clock Makers 


12 
1 


1 


1 






Weavers .,,, 


1 






Wheelrights 


1 






Total 








5,392 


2,470 


235 


145 


Miscellaneous. 

Agents and Factors 

Bankers 




1 
4 


4 




1 








2 


1 




Cattle Dealers 


1 






1 
2 

1,454 






Contractors 


5 












Farmers 


12,079 
902 


217 


125 






Fishermen 


721 
2 

972 

22 

3 

319 

5 

1 

4 

1,369 




9 




10,328 
64 






Labourers 


645 


183 


Lumbermen 




Managers and Superintendents 








487 


1 


9 


Nurses 






131 






Salesmen 








22 
2 
2 


350 


390 


[Specula cors 






""ii 

3 




3 


Teamsters 


1 






1 










24,464 


4,912 


1,214 


722 


7,771 
41,547 


324 
5,500 


695 
208 


27 


'Without occupation 


621 






Note.— The details in the volume do not < 
■light. 


lvii 


ith the totals g 


iven, but the 


inaccuracy is 



46 



*/.- 



tori a. 



Sessional Papers (No, 14) 



A. 188S 



EXHIBIT B. 

Showing "Nativities" of Canadians in nineteen Western and South- Western States 
and Territories, extracted from United States Census Volumes. 



Michigan . 
Wisconsin 

Indiana 

Minnesota. 

Iowa 

Illinois .... 
Missouri ... 
Kansas .... 
Nebraska . 
Nevada.... 
Oregon „.., 
California 
Colorado ., 

Dakota 

Idaho 

Montana .. 
Utah 



Washington. 
Wyoming.... 



State. 



Total 



Difference or increase from 1870 remaining in 1880. 



1870. 



89,303 

25,336 

4,724 

16,095 

17,366 

31,572 

8,402 

5,010 

2,595 

2,342 

1,047 

9,639 

738 

906 

327 

1,147 

677 

781 

323 



218,329 



1880. 



148,770 

28,808 

5,534 

29,475 

21,019 

33,87* 

8,635 

12,496 

8,552 

3,12f 

2,863 

18,465 

5,76i 

10,661 

567 

2,403 

1,012 

2,432 

537 



344,988 



126,659 



EXHIBIT C. 

Showing " Nativities " of Canadians in nine New England and Middle States, 
extracted from United States Census Volumes. 



Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont ., 

Massachusetts.... 

Connecticut 

Rhode Island ... 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania .... 



Total 



State. 



Difference or increase from 1870 remaining in 1880, 



1870. 



20,633 
12,694 
28,480 
66,216 
10,778 
10,144 
78,088 
2,361 
9,802 



239,196 



1880. 



36,989 
27,079 
24,611 
116,430 
16,380 
18,156 
83,517 
3,429 
12,203 



338,794 



99,598 



lviii 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



EXHIBIT D. 

Showing " Nativities " of Canadians in the following named States, Territories 
and District from United States Census Volumes. 



State. 



Delaware 

Maryland 

Ohio .... 

Kentucky 

Tennessee , 

Tirginia , 

W«8t Virginia- 
North Carolina. 
South Carolina. 

Georgia 

Florida 



Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Arizona 

District of Columbia. 
New Mexico 



Total 



1870. 



19,047 



1886. 



103 


240 


625 


964 


12,923 


16,026 


1,029 | 


1,067 


580 


538 


301 


572 


195 


288 


165 


419 


75 


122 


244 


242 


166 


423 


173 j 


262 


368 i 


804 


656 


713 


557 


»> 436 


341 i 


776 


139 i 


i65 


281 


447 


124 


279 



26,793 



Note. — The Prorinces referred to in the preceding extracts of lt Nativities " are Quebec and Ontario 
(which are put together under the head of Canada) and New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Princa 
■dward Island. The totals for these Provinces of Canadian " Nativities " at the two deceanial periods 
tamed are as follow : — 

In 1870 , 476,572 

In 1880 710,575 

Including Newfoundland and other parts of British America, not specified, the Grand Totals for all 
itish America of Canadian " Nativities " at the two decennial periods named are as follow a3 appear 



British 

rom the volumes of the United States Census 



In 1870 490,041 

In 1880 717,157 



lix 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



EXHIBIT E. 

The following is a copy of the heading of a Statement taken from the Quarterly 
Keports of the Bureau of Statistics at Washington, for the four quarters of the fiscal 
year ended 30th September, 1882. 

u Showing the nationality and number of Alien passengers arrived in the United 
States during each year from 1820 to 1867, and of immigrants only during each year 
from 1868 to 1881. (The years of 1820 to 1831, from 1813 to 1850 inclusive, fiscal 
year ended September 30th. All other years are Calendar Years.)" 

The following extracts, taken from the Tables under the above heading, refer to 
immigrants from the whole of British America, that is to say : — Quebec and Ontario, 
Manitoba, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, British Columbia, 
Newfoundland and Labrador, and British North American Provinces not specified ; 
covering a period of sixty years, from 1820 to 1879; to correspond with the date of 
the last United States Census in decennial periods : — 



Date. 


Arrived. 


Date. 


Arrived. 


Date. 


Arrived . 


Date. 


Arrived. 


Date. 


Arrived. 


Date. 


Arrived. 


1820 


209 


1830 


189 


1840 


1,938 


1850 


9,376 


1860 


4,514 


1870 


53,340 


1821 


184 


1831 


176 


1841 


1,816 


1851 


7,438 


1861 


2,069 


1871 


39,929 


1822 


204 


1832 


608 


1842 


2,078 


1852 


6,352 


1862 


3,275 


1872 


40,288 


1823 


167 


1833 


1,194 


1843 


1,502 


1853 


5,424 


1863 


3,464 


1873 


29,508 


1824 


155 


1834 


1,020 


1844 


2,711 


1854 


6,891 


1864 


3,636 


1874 


30,596 


1825 


314 


1835 


1,193 


1845 


3,195 


1855 


7,761 


1865 


21,586 


1875 


23,420 


1826 


223 


1836 


2,814 


1846 


3,855 


1856 


6,493 


1866 


32,150 


1876 


21,218 


1827 


165 


1837 


1,279 


1847 


3,827 


1857 


5,670 


1867 


23,378 


1877 


22,121 


1828 


267 


1838 


1,476 


1848 


6,473 


1858 


4,603 


1868 


10,894 


1878 


30,102 


1829 


409 


1839 


1,926 


1849 


6,890 


1859 


4,163 


1869 


30,921 


1879 


53,267 


Totals. 


2,297 




11,875 




34,285 




64,171 




135,887 




343,789 



RECAPITULATION. 

Totals for the sixty years — 

For ten years ended 1829 2,297 

do 1839 , 11.875 

do 1849 , 34,285 

do 1859 64,171 

do 1869 135,887 

do 1879 343,789 

Grand Total 592,304 



lx 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A w , 1SS3 



RULES AND FORMS 

Respecting the Collection of Mortuary Statistics approved by the G-overnor 
General in Council on the 26th of December, 1882, and published in 
the Canada Gazette of 30th December, 1882. 



OEDER IN COUNCIL. 

Government House, Ottawa, 

Tuesday, 26th day of December, 1882. 
Present : 
His Excellency the Administrator of the Government in Council. 

On the recommendation of the Minister of Agriculture, and under the provisions 
of the Act passed in the Session of the Parliament of Canada held in the 42n<t year 
of Her Majesty's Reign, chapter 21, and intituled "An Act respecting Census and 
Statistics," — 

His Excellency by and with the advice of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada, 
has been pleased to order, and it is hereby ordered, that the Order in Council of the 
12th July, 1883, constituting Health Districts for the purpose of statistics, be, and the 
same is hereby cancelled, and that the annexed Rules, Eegulations and Forms for the 
collection and publication of Mortuary Statistics for the localities and in the manner 
and on the conditions therein set forth, be and the same are hereby approved and 
adopted. 

John J. McGee, 

Clerk Privy Council. 



1. The following rules, regulations and forms shall apply to the collections of 
statistics of deaths and their causes, within the limits of the following named cities 
and towns, being the capitals of Canada and of the Provinces, and others having a 
population of 25,000 inhabitants or upwards, according to the Census of 1880-81, 
that is to say : Montreal, Toronto, Quebec, Halifax, Hamilton, Ottawa, St. John, N.B., 
Charlottetown, Winnipeg, Fredericton and Victoria, B. C, to which neighbouring 
localities may be added from time to time, or to such other cities, towns or localities 
or joint cities, towns and localities whenever by experience it will appear that the 
system is satisfactorily worked, and when sufficient means aro granted by Parlia- 
ment for that purpose. 

2. In pursuance of Sec. 31st of the " Census and Statistics Act of 18*79," the system 
involved in the following rules, regulations and forms may be put in operation in 
each of the above mentioned cities by the Minister of Agriculture, whenever it is 
satisfactorily demonstrated to him that there is in existence for the said city a local 
" Board of Health," to which is attached a permanent salaried medical officer, 
whether such "Board of Health" and "Sanitary Medical Officer " are appointed and 
paid by the corporation of the said city or by the Provincial Government, or in any 
other way provided by the local laws or by-laws ; and on the further condition that 
the application of the system to any city can be withdrawn by the Minister of Agri- 

-culture for inability or negligence to cany it to such degree of accuracy as is 
necessary for the purpose intended. 

lxi 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 






3. On being satisfied of the existence of such fi Board of Health," and of the 
appoinment of such " Sanitary Medical Officer," being a licensed medical practitioner, 
the Minister of Agriculture shall take the necessary means to put the system of 
Mortuary Statistics, provided by these rules, into operation in such city as aforesaid. 

4. The Minister of Agriculture may, out of the grant voted by Parliament for 
vital or sanitary statistics, devote the sums necessary for the printing of schedules, 
forms, circulars and other necessary papers for the collection, compilation and publi- 
cation of the necessary information, and for all other expenses connected with the 
working of the system of mortuary statistics as aforesaid. 

5. The Minister of Agriculture may, subject to his own direction and arrange- 
ments, make out of the parliamentary grant hereinbefore mentioned, an allotment 
equal to one cent ($0.01) for every individual unit of the population, in favour of each 
of the cities aforesaid, in order to defray the expenses of collecting the said Mortuary 
Statistics, to be paid by monthly instalments, or otherwise, and such allotment may 
be withdrawn in case of unsatisfactory working of the system. 

6. The Minister of Agriculture may, if he deems it necessary, add to such allot- 
ment for every one of the said cities, a lump sum not to exceed four hundred dollars 
($400) in any case, to assist the local authorities in their procuring the necessary 
information of Mortuary Statistics, and may withdraw the granting of such lump 
sum. 

I. Pursuant to Section 30th of " the Census and Statistics Act of 18*79/' the Gov- 
ernor General in Council will, whenever one or more or all of the said cities have 
complied with the requirements hereinbefore stated, appoint the Sanitary Medical 
Officer of the local Board of Health, a Statistical Officer for the collection of Mortuary 
Statistics, from the local records, which appointment may be made to terminate for 
reason of unsatisfactory working of the system. 

8. The salary of the Statistical Officer aforesaid shall consist of twenty-five (25) 
per cent, of all the sums allotted as aforesaid to the city for which he is appointed ; 
which salary shall be paid to him by the Minister of Agriculture. 

9. In case of epidemics or endemics, or in the case of contagious or infectious 
diseases threatening or breaking out, the Minister of Agriculture may cause special 
investigations to be made, in any locality, by any or several of the said Statistical 
Officers, and regulate and defray out of the Parliamentary grant the cost of such 
investigations. 

10. The forms for collecting the said Mortuary Statistics shall be as prescribed 
in the Schedule hereunto annexed and marked A, the blanks of which shall be fur- 
nished by the Statistical Officers, free of charge, to be made use of and a copy returned 
with the required information, in accordance with the instructions given from time 
to time by the Minister of Agriculture. . 

II. The form for the Death and Burial Certificate from which the information 
sought for is to be derived shall be as indicated in the Schedule hereunto annexed and 
marked B, the blanks of which shall be furnished to the local Board of Health oi 
Statistical Officer by the Minister of Agriculture, free of charge. 



12. The Minister of Agriculture may request the Statistical Officer to supplemen 
the numerical returns by such statements and information as relate to the various 
medical and other, questions relevant to the subject of accidents, crimes, diseases anc 
public health as causes of deaths reported by the Mortuary Statistics as aforesaid. 

13. The sums allotted by the Minister of Agriculture for the collection of sucl 
Mortuary Statistics shall be employed in the manner and for the objects which, fron 
time to time, shall be directed by the Minister of Agriculture, who may, at any time 
withdraw the payment of such sums for non-compliance with his instructions. 

lxii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No,14.) A. 1883 

A. 

Form under which the information is to be collected for the Mortuary Statistics. 

Columns with their headings. 

1. Class of disease. 

2. Order of disease. 

3. Name of disease. 

4. Serial number of reference. 

5 and 6. Sexes of the deceased, Male, Female. 
7 to 21 inclusive. Age of the deceased. 
22 to 24 inclusive. Marriage state of deceased, Single, Married or Widowed. 
25 to 30 inclusive. Religion of the deceased, Roman Catholic, Anglican , Pres- 
byterian, Methodist, Baptist, other creeds. 
31 to 35 inclusive. Origin of the deceased, English, French, Irish, Scotch 
other origins. 
36 to 42 inclusive. Occupation of the deceased or of the head of the family of the 
deceased, Agricultural, Commercial, Domestic, Industrial, Profession:!, 
Labourers, not classed. 

The said information to be tabulated as regards ruling and space as shall sui t 
the requirements of the operation of the system adopted by the Rules and Regula 
tions. 



B. 
Death Certificate. 

Day of 18 

1. Name and surname of deceased. 

2. Sex of deceased. 

3. Age of deceased at death . 

4. Marriage State. 

5. Religion. 

6. Nationality. 

7. Occupation. 

8. Time of death, The of the 

month of 18 

9. Disease or other cause of death. 

Signature. 



lxiii 



iC) Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1881 



LIST OF APPENDICES. 



ARCHIVES. 

1. Report on Public Archives D. Brymner. 

IMMIGRATION, 

do of Immigration Agent, Quebec L. Stafford- 
do do Montreal J. J.Daley. 

do do Ottawa W.J. Wills. 

do do Kingston R. Macpherson. 

do do Toronto J. A.Donaldson. 

do do Hamilton John Smith. 

do do London (Ont.) A.G.Smyth. 

do do Halifax E. Clay. 

do do St. John S. Gardner. 

do do Winnipeg W. C. B. Grahame. 

do do Brandon Thomas Bennett. 

do do Emerson J. E. Tetu. 

do do Duluth J. M. McGovern. 

do of Travelling Immigration Agent J. Sumner. 

do do do A. 0. Kellam. 

do on Manitoba Colonization C. Lalime. 

do of Icelandic Agent J. Taylor. 

do on Visit to North-West Messrs. Birks and Stevenson. 

do HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR CANADA Sir A. T. GALT., K.C.M.G. 

Including Report from Government Agent, Liverpool... John Dyke. 

do Immigration Agent, Glasgow. ..Thomas Grahame. 

do do Belfast ....C. Foy. 

do do Dublin ....T. Connolly. 

do do Bristol J. W. Down. 

QUARANTINE. 

on Grosse Isle Quarantine F. Montizambert, M.D. 

Halifax do W.. N. Wickwire, M.D. 

St. John (N.B.) Quarantine W. S. Harding, M.D. 

Pictou (N.S.) do H. Kirkwood, M.D. 

Charlottetown (P.EI.) Quarantine W. H. Hobkirk, M.D. 

of Inspecting Physician, Tracadie Lazaretto.... A. C. Smith, M.D. 

do do Port of Quebec A. Rowand, M.D. 

on Ontario Cattle Quarantine A. Smith, V.S. 

Halifax do A. McFatridge. 

St. John, N.B. do R. Bunting, V.S. 

PointEdward do J. B. P. Westell, V.S. 

of Inspector of Stock, Windsor, Ont J. B. Wright, M.D., V.S. 

on Shipments of Live Stock L. Slater, V.S. 

of Chief Inspector of Cattle Quarantine D. McEachran, M.R..C. V.S. 

on Pictou Cattle Disease Dr. W. McEachran. 

do Prof. W. Osier, M.D. 

14— E 



. 


do 


. 


do 


t. 


do 




do 


. 


do 


. 


do 


.. 


do 


. 


do 


>. 


do 


>. 


do 


. 


do 


!. 


do 


!. 


do 


1. 


do 


). 


do 


5. 


do 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 1 



GENERAL. 

37. do of British Mail Officer A. Walmsley. 

38. do Ocean Mail Officer C. H. E. Tilstone 

39. do do W. F. Bowes. 

40. do do S.T.Green. 

41. do do J. Ferguson. 

42. do do F. H. Mickleburgh, 

43. do do F. P. Deat. 

44. do do J. O'Hara. 

45. do on Queen Charlotte Islands J. Deans. 

46. Remarks on Bow River District Alex. Begg. 

47. Approximate Immigration, British Columbia J. W. Trutch. 



! 



lxvi 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1885 



APPENDIX No. i 



REPORT ON PUBLIC ARCHIVES. 

(DOUGLAS BRYMNER, ARCHIVIST) 

Sir, — I have the honour to present the Annual Report respecting the Historical 
Archives under my charge. The catalogue at the end of this Report will show the 
addition- that have been made to the collection during the year. 

Tn rough the courtesy of the Governments of Ontario and Quebec, collections of 
the public documents of these Provinces, since Confederation, have been placed in the 
depository. The Right Honourable Sir George Jessel, Master of the Roils and Keeper 
of the Records of England, has made a very valuable gift of the Reports of the 
Historical Manuscripts Commission, whose labours were referred to in my last 
Report, besides the Reports from 1840 to 1882 (43 volumes), of the Deputy Keeper ot 
Records, London, and three volumes of the Calendars of the Colonial series of Stat© 
Papers, in addition to the two which were acquired last year. Two of the Reports 
on Historical Manuscripts (volumes 3 and 4) are out of print, but instructions have 
been sent to London to obtain them, if possible, so as to complete the set. Every 
exertion is being made to secure as complete sets as possible of the documents relating 
to the different periods of the history of the British North American Provinces and 
of the Dominion of Canada. 

Of the Haldimand and Bouquet collections, which have been copied in the British 
Museum, 144 volumes of the former and 17 volumes of the latter have been received. 
With the exception of those which have only lately been sent, the volumes have 
been calendared. The Calendar of one of those relating to the negotiations with 
Vermont and of a volume of correspondence relating to affairs in Detroit and expedi- 
tions from thence into the western country, &c, are printed at the end of this Report, 
to show the system adopted (See Note A). The last volume has been selected owing 
to the interest taken in the events referred to in it, as evinced by the frequent inquiries 
made by investigators respecting them. Instructions have been sent to have copies 
made of other papers in the Museum, the work on which is now in progress. 

The work of indexing has been continued steadily during the year, so as to 
make the papers as useful as possible to investigators. 

I would respectfully beg to direct attention to the question of enlarged space for 
the Archives rooms. In order to make the papers there easily accessible, it is 
necessary that there should be room to arrange systematically the various documents, 
manuscript or printed, according to Provinces, subjects and periods, besides divisions 
being yet apart for those of a general nature, bearing more or less directly on the 
interests of the Dominion or the Provinces, such as, to mention two instances, 
commercial and vital statistics. At present there is no possibility of making 
any other than temporary arrangements; there can be no permanent method of 
clatitiify n ig on the shelves ana arranging the catalogue; no way by which, without 
.trouble or hesitation, a work or paper can be given out for reference in the absence 
of the Archivist. The most has been, and will be, made of the accommodation 
• ed, but there has not been, and still less is there now, any room for satisfactory 
arrangement. This is a point to which I feel that attention should be directed, ft 
is probably impossible, in the present crowded state of the Departments, to find a 
remedy for this state of things in the buildings as they now are, but before long, it 
is evident, some remedy must be found for the general complaint ; and the growing 
importance of this branch will, it is to be hoped, lead to such arrangements as shall 
be sufficient for many years. 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1885 



li 






For the purpose of showing the necessity for such arrangements, the periods in 
the history of the Provinces and Dominion may be thus divided : — 

I. Canada under French Rule. — Included under this head, are the documen 
relating to Nouvelle France, and those relative to the discoveries made by th 
French explorers in the west, &c. The works of Parkman, which are in the Depart- 
ment, are of great historical value, and they are still more so from the help they 
aiford in the inquiry as to the sources from which documents can be obtained. 
Copies of the Journal as well as the Relations desJesuites, the works cfChampiain, the 
Edits et Ordonnances and others throw light on this period of history, but the great 
bulk of the papers must be obtained from the French Archives. The works of 
French writers ou Canadian history are still wauting. 

II. Province of Quebec— 1. From the cession of Great Britain down to 1791, 
when the old Province of Quebec was divided into Upper and Lower Canada ; 2. 
Lower Canada from 1791 to 1841, when the two Provinces were reunited into the 
Province of Canada ; 3. From 1841 to 1867 (the date of Confederation) in as far as 
relates to the special affairs of Canada East; 4. Since Confederation, when the old 
name — the Province of Quebec — was resumed. 

III. Province of Ontario. — 1. The settlement, &c. of the upper part of the 
Province of Quebec, from the cession to 1791. ; 2. Upper Canada from 1791 to 1841, 
the date of reunion; 3. From 1841 to 1867, in as far as relates to the special affairs of 
Canada West; 4. Since Confederation, when it was called the Province of Ontario. 

IV. Province of Nova Scotia. — From the discovery of this Province, about 
1497 or 149^, under the commission given to Cabot and his son* by Henry VII of 
England in 1496, no real attempts at settlement were made for upwards of a century. 
Shortly after the defeat by the Virginians of the attempted French settlement by De 
Monts (1604-1613), the grant to Sir William Alexander, referred to in my last Eeport, 
was made (1621 ). A collection of documents relating to this last transaction is among 
the Archives, but the general history of the Province down to 17 1 3 must be looked fori a 
among the Archives of London and Paris, it having repeatedly changed owners during 
that period. Since its tinal cession to Great Britain, however, in 1713, there are 
certain periods which may be distinctly indicated for the present purpose. 1. From 
1713 to 1758, when a constitution was granted ; 2. From J 75^ to 1770, when Princt 
Edward inland (then St. John's Island) was separated ; 3. From 1770 to 1784, whei 
New Brunswick was separated; 4. From 1784 to 1848, when responsible Gov 
ernment was granted ; 5. From 1848 to 1867, the date of Confederation ; 7. Fron 
Confederation onwards. 

V. Province of New Brunswick. — The early history of this Province is include* 
in that of Nova Scotia down to 1784. The periods as a separate Province are : 1 
From 1784 down to 1848, when responsible Government was granted. This periw 
includes the settlement of the U. E. Loyalists ; 2. From 1848 to 1867, the date o 
Confederation ; 3. From Confederation onwards. 

VI. Prince Edward Island (St. John's Island till 1800).— 1. Under • Frenc 
rule to 1763, including the settlements of the Acadians, after their expulsion fror 
Nova Scotia ; 2. From 1763, the date of its cession to Great Britain, when it wa 
placed under the Government of Nova Scotia, to 1770, when it was established as 
separate province ; 3. From 1770 to 1851, the date of responsible Government ; ' 
From 1851 to 1873, the date of admission into the Dominion ; 5. From 1873 onward 

VII. British Columbia, including therein Vancouver's Island. — 1. Under tl 
rule of i he Hudson's Bay Company ; 2. From 1858, when it was erected into'a Go 
ernment till 1866, when it was consolidated with Vancouver's Island ; 3. Vancouvei 
Island from 1859, when it was erected into a Government, till 1866, when it was co 
solidated with British Columbia ; 4. From 1866 to 1871, when it was admitted in 
the Dominion ; 5. From its admission onwards. 

VII I. The North-West Territories. — 1. Under the rule of the Hudson Bj 
Company, down to 1870, the date when they were trans! erred to the Dominion. 
this period are included the transactions of the rival fur and trading companies 
From the date of transfer onwards. 

2 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 188S 



IX. Province of Manitoba.— The early history forms part of that of the Nort.h- 
"West Territories. It would be well, however, if the materials would admit of it, to 
divide them from the rest, and have — 1. The papers relating especially to the events 
.at Fort Garry, now Winnipeg, the capital of Manitoba; 2. Manitoba since its erection 
into a Province in 1870. 

X. The Dominion of Canada from 1867, the date of its being organized by the 
confederation of the different Provinces. 

The policy of organizing new Provinces, as the North-West Territories become 
settled, has already necessitated further divisions, which cannot be overlooked in 
devising a system for the arrangement of the Archives, so as to render them of the 
greatest benefit. 

By an Order in Council, dated 8th May, 1882, four Provisional Districts have 
been formed out of these territories. They are: — 

1. District of Assiniboia, with an area of about 95,000 square miles. 

2. District of Saskatchewan, with an area of about 114,000 square miles. 

3. District of Alberta, with an area of about 100,000 square miles. 

4. District of Athabasca, with an area of about 122,000 square miles. 
In order to complete the collection of papers relating to the history of British 

North America, it seems desirable to make a collection of those relating to 
Newfoundland. The collection of manuscripts in the British Museum is not large, 
but they include 'he claims of Kirke and Sir George Calvert (afterwards Lord Bal- 
timore), an account of its se tlement, dated in 1676 ; accounts of the fishing trade so 
far back as 1615, up to 1700, not continuous ; with remarks on the relations between 
the French and English, besides other interesting information. Such a collection 
seems all the more desirable in view of the claims of France under the Treaty of 17^3. 
The>e main divisions must be sub-divided so as to allow of the annual accumula- 
tions being systematically added to the shelves. I refrain for the present from 
naking any special suggestions as to the best mode to be adopted in dealing with this 
jubject. Before, however, any determination is arrived at with respect to larger 
iccommodation, the important question of arrangement would require to be most 
jarefully considered. 

From the nature of the relations between the Federal and Provincial Govern- 
ments, the latter have retained the documents relating to the histories of the 
(■espective Provinces previous to Confederation, and also, of course, those since that 
ate. The papers to which investigators have occasion to refer are thus scattered in 
he Provincial Capitals. When an investigation is of a general nature, that is, one 
lating to all British North America, the great loss of time is of consequence and 
he cost of consulting the various documents is largely increased, as compared with 
hat it would be were a complete collection made as proposed in the petition of the 
mthors and historians, by whom the subject was so earnestly pressed in 1870 on the 
Parliament of Canada. Li lists of the records of the different Provinces in the posses- 
ion of their respective Governments were procurable, they would be of the greatest 
ise in proceeding with the work of this branch, and would assist very materially in 
nishing information to historical investigators who not unfrcquently make in- 
uiries as to the existence and places of deposit of papers which they desire to con- 
ult. The question of preparing such lists is one for the consideration of the Pro- 
incial Governments, but I may be pardoned for referring to it in this Eeport. 

The policy of having one general collection of historical documents at the seat 
f the Federal Government, and one special to each Province in each Provincial 
'apital, is of importance from various points of view. In respect to investigations 
fa general nature, all the documents should be together, classified and accessible, so 
t, at the least possible expense, those who desire to study the papers relating to 
e history of British North America should be able to do so, without being com- 
*led to make long and tedious journeys in search of the information wanted. On 
e other hand, the records of each Province being in the possession of the Provincial 
'^Povernment are available for the use of those who only seek to make a special 
' ivestigation. 

3 
14- 1J 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



But there is another and even more important end to be served. The possession 
of records in duplicate is a guarantee, to a large extent, of their preservation from 
destruction by fire. Experience, and not the least that of Canada, shows the risk 
from this cause, by which documents have been lost that can never be replaced, and 
it seems almost impossible to collect again, even the printed records of the past his- 
tory of the Provinces which hnve thus been destroyed. By the burning of the House 
of Assembly at Montreal, in 1849, the whole collection of printed and manuscript 
records contained in the library and departments in the building were swept away.. 
It was only by the greatest exertions and by appeals to the liberality of those who 
possessed collections of the printed papers that single copies of many of them could 
be secured for the Parliamentary Library. The destruction of the public buildings- 
at Fredericton, New Brunswick, of the Custom House and of the Court House at 
Quebec, are other instances of the danger to which attention is called. In respect to* 
printed documents the loss is very serious, but it need scarcely be pointed out that it 
is much more so when original manuscripts are destroyed of which no copy exists. 
A case to which my attention has recently been called, in connection with the burn- 
ing of the Custom House at Quebec, will serve to show that safety is not always 
secured even when there are duplicates. 

On the *J2nd of June last, Mr. J. W. Dunscomb, Collector of Customs at Quebec, 
wrote me about certain papers, of which he thought it desirable that copies should be 
obtained. I take the liberty of transcribing that portion of the correspondence 
which refers to them, as it gives a history of the fate of the papers in question. Mr. 
Dunscomb says : 

" The statistics of the Trade of Canada, and the history of this Custom House 
from the Conquest in 1*759 until 1791, when the Province of Quebec was divided into 
Upper and Lower Canada, down to the passage of the Union of Upper and Lowei 
Canada in 1841, cover a very interesting epoch in the annals of the early trade oi 
the country. 

" I took charge of this port in 1851, and found the old books and papers in di 
order and confusion. The Custom House had been moved from one building 
another, and I found the building occupied in 1851 over crowded, small and incon 
venient, so that accumulated papers could hardly be kept in order. 

" The new Custom House building was commenced in 1856, and was handec 
over to me for occupation in I860. Having plenty of room with an admirabbj 
designed building, I took the old records in hand, and, with the assistance of intelli 
gent and zealous co-operators, I got a mass of MSS into some shape : the personne 
of the establishment, imports, exports and shipping. 

" The old orders and letters of the Honourable Board of Customs (B. O.) w< 
curious, as showing the opinion entertained of the Colonial commercial world i 
those days, a fair reflection of the estimation held by Spain at the present day of th 
same class. The personnel furnished representatives of decayed families from En^ 
land, Ireland and Scotland, the army and navy, canvassers for Parliamentar 
elections and men from the race course. 

" In September, 1864, the building was burned and I lost many documents an 
papers; and the old records, with the work I had done on them, were destroyed. 

" Now in those days it was the rule to send every document to the Board 
Customs in London, and I have no doubt they have been all carefully kept in tl 
Museum at the Custom House, London. The change in both the volume and tl 
staple articles of the trade is foreshadowed by the extract which I transmit her 
with, made from the books of 1791, found after the fire." 

I made inquiries through Mr. Kingston, an officer of the Public Eecord offi(j 
thinking it possible that the papers might be found there. Mr. Kingston, writiii 
me on the 19th July, informed me that " The Trade Returns belonging to the Boaj 
of Customs from 1759 not being deposited in this office I communicated your letter 
the secretary of H.M. Customs, asking him if he could give me any information on t; 

4 



Undei 




From 


51 


u 


76 


n 


101 


it 


151 


it 


201 


u 


251 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No, 14.) A. 1883 



subject." The answer inclosed, after acknowledging receipt of the letter of inquiry, 
says : — 

" I am to state in reply that all documents deposited in London Custom House 
before the year 1814 were destroyed by a lire which occurred in 1815, and that the 
earliest documents referring to the Canadian Trade and Customs, now deposited in 
the Custom House are those for the year 1828." 

The returns for. 1791, sent b}^ Mr. Dunscomb, show very strikingly the enormous 
increase in the size of the ships since that date. I have made an abstract of the 
tonnage of the ships given in the returns, which shows that there were: 

Tons Ships. 

50 2 

to 75 7 

" 100 3 

" 150 22 

" 200 23 

<• 250 15 

" 800 7 

309 1 

339 1 

384 1 

411 1 

508 1 

84 

The returns not being of great length they are given in full in a note which. 
will be found at the end of this Keport. (See Note B). 

In the Haldimand collection there is a volume containing the statistics of the 
jTrade of Quebec, from 1768 to 1783, and these also are printed. I have slightly 
hanged the form of the accounts for the purpose of saving room, but with this 
exception the tables are an exact transcript of those in the original. (See Note C). 

There are some discrepancies between the totals and the items, but these I have 
aot rectified, as the errors may be in the details rather than in the addition. 

A list of the appointments to the Customs at Quebec and Montreal from the 
CJession of Canada is also given. (See Note D). 

I have thought it desirable to have these returns printed as, in the first place, 
hey are of great interest to the commercial community, and in the second, 
pecauso their publication may lead to an investigation by some of the old 
arms into documents that may be in their possession with regard to the trade of 
he various ports. Documents relating for instance, to the early trade of Montreal. 
Ealifax, N. S. ; St. John, N. B.; Charlottetown, P. JBJ. I.j St. Johns, Newfoundland ; 
ihoso connected with the lake trade, and others of a similar nature, would not only 
)e of interest but of great value. If gentlemen who are or who have been connected 
ffith the trade and commerce of the country would forward documents of the nature 
have indicated, a collection might be formed that would be of inestimable value as 
.he foundation for a thoroughly good history of the commercial progress of the 
British North American Provinces and the Dominion. Such information, even if it 
?et exists, is so scattered and practically inaccessible, as to be of comparatively little 
ralue. The various Chambers of Commerce and Boards of Trade, Harbour Commis- 
lioners and similar bodies, might render great assistance in promoting this object. 

There is another cause of loss of papers to which I beg leave to refer, namely, 
foe frequent destruction of printed records of parliamentary and departmental 
oroceedings ; reports of committees and other document*. These, which at present are 
tf comparatively little value, become in the course of time of great service to those 
lealing with public events. Unfortunately, from a desire to obviate a temporary 

5 



f- 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1885 



inconvenience, large collections of these papers have been scattered, many being sold 
for waste paper, without its being considered necesssry to keep even a small reserve. 
It would appear to be desirable in future that no such documents shall be thus 
disposed of, except after the most careful consideration and care taken to secure at 
least a minimum reserve for preservation. The value of these apparently useless 
documents is often discovered only after the want of the evidence contained in them 
is felt and their loss has become irretrievable. 

The changes that have taken place in the mode of writing history have rendered 
the collection of papers on social progress of much more consequence in the eyes of 
historians than was formerly the case. The importance of collecting the 
political records of the country has by no means diminished, but more 
attention is now paid to what is taking place in the social life of the 
various classes of the community to account for the progress or decay of 
the community as a whole. Political history is now traced to the source from 
which it springe, and, therefore, whilst the preservation of records of the move- 
ments and actions of Governments and Legislatures is of as much importance as. 
ever, other records of apparently a more obscure and less important nature cannot 
be neglected. The settlement of the country, the cause of the rapid growth in cer- 
tain localities, of the inertness and what must appear as stagnation in others, should 
be watched and the records preserved. The histories of the counties from their first 
establishment, after the population had so increased as to justify the creation of terri- 
torial divisions, and the growth and progress of municipal institutions, come 
properly within the scope of the Archivist. Acting on this view, Dr. Thorburn, 
formerly Principal of the Collegiate Institute of Ottawa, and now Librarian of the 
Geological Survey, offered a prize for the best account of the history of the county 
of Frontenac, one of the conditions being that the prize essay should be deposited 
among the Archives. The prize having been awarded to Miss A. M. Harman of 
Ottawa, her essay has accordingly been transmitted. 

The respective functions of the Library of Parliament and the Archives Office, 
are so liable to be misunderstood, that I may be pardoned for referring briefly to the 
subject. There are certain points at which both touch, in respect to the works 
which should be found in each, such, for instance, as those relating to the British 
North American Provinces. Still their different functions are clearly separate and 
distinct. 

The Library, as its name implies, is primarily intended for the use of the 
members of Parliament (Senate and House of Commons), and during each annual 
session it is reserved exclusively for their benefit. The works contained in it being 
for their information with regard to questions to be brought before Parliament, it is 
essential that the greater part of them, at least, shall be available for private study 
of such questions, and they must, to be of service, be removed fiom the Library for 
that purpose. As a matter of fact, books belonging to the Library are in the. 
possession of members in all parts of the Dominion. There is thus, inevitably, the 
risk of losing works of great value, and the certainty of their deterioration, however 
careful the members may be. During the annual sessions of Parliament, there is the 
necessary exclusion from the Library of those who are engaged in researches. Even 
if, through the relaxation of this rule, they are allowed to continue their studies, 
these can only be pursued under the most disadvantageous circumstances, arising from 
causes with which all are familiar, and such an investigator, coming with the special 
object of consulting works to be found only in the Library, is unable to obtain them 
fiom their being in the hands of members who have immediate need of them. 

The Archives Office, on the other hand, is charged with the collection, preserva- 
tion and arrangement ot the historical records of the country, to be kept in one 
central place of deposit from which they cannot be removed, so that they may hi 
immediately accessible at all times to those who may desire to consult them. The 
special object of the office is to obtain from all sources, private as well as public, su<" 
documents as may throw light on social, commercial and municipal, as well as purel] 
jpolitical history. When its aims and objects are clearly understood, it will 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



lundoubtedly become the depository of family papers of this nature, which it is most 
(improbable would ever be sent to the Library. In the absence, therefore, of such a 
Idepository as that of the Archives, most valuable materials for history would be 
entirely lost. On this point I may be permitted to repeat what I stated in last year's 
report. 

" There must be, in the hands of those who have occupied positions of a public 
nature, either as responsible advisers of the Crown, or as representative men in 
jvarious capacities, correspondence which Avould be of immense service in a historical 
point of view, but which there is every probability will be destroyed, or lost in the 
course of time. Here, where the children of the men of to-day are, politically speak- 
ing, the nobodies of to-morrow, or else who have moved away to other localities than 
those in which their fathers were known, it is impossible to preserve such papers, as 
has been done with old family records in Great Britain. There the researches of the 
commission on historical documents have unearthed papeis, letters, charters, &c, 
dating back to the sixth and seventh centuries, which throw a flood of light on the 
early history of the country. Here, it is well known, valuable collections have been 
destroyed by the care of the tidy house-keeper getting rid of them as rubbish. I 
yenture to suggest that, could they be obtained from leading men, or their represent- 
atives, such collections, the contents of which it might be at the present moment 
improper to make public, might be packed up in air-tight boxes, marked with the 
names of the depositors, and sealed up for a certain length of time, to remain in safe 
keeping in the vaults appropriated for the custody of the Archives. By this means 
they would be kept in safety, and available at the time when, without breach of pro- 
priety, their contents could be used by the historian." 

It is not necessary, I conceive, to enter more fully into this subject, further than 
to remark that, in so far as regards the history of British North America, every 
document relating to it should be found in the Archives Office, even such as at first 
sight may appear to have with it only a remote connection, following in this the 
example of the British Museum. The field covered by that institution is much wider, 
but the system pursued in it may be studied with advantage. 

The Archives Office must, of necessity, be of the nature of a Library, but one 
purely of reference on one special subject, and, therefore, all the works relating to 
that subject should be there. But, beyond that, it must also do the work to a 
certain extent of the Public Kecord Office, especially that part of it which the 
organization of the Historical Manuscripts Commission in the United Kingdom was 
designed to promote. The assistance of local historical societies, in this latter object, 
might be most valuable, and the attention, of the members may very properly be 
directed to the importance of the work to be accomplished by the establishment of a 
central place oi deposit for papers of the character I have had the honour to indicate. 

Without a list of the documents relating to the colonies to be found among the 
State Papers, of at least the United Kingdom and of France, such as I was entrusted 
to make of the mat uscripts in the British Museum, it is manifestly impossible to 
conduct the work either in a systematic or satisfactory manner. Copies of parts of 
collections of State Papers have been obtained by different Provincial Governments 
and Societies. Excepting those at Halifax and the three series of papers containing the 
correspondence of the French Government and documents relating to Canada and 
other French Colonies, from 1504 to 1778. deposited partly with the Literary and 
Historical Society of Quebec, and partly in the Library of Parliament, to which I 
beg to direct attention, they are not in any respect comple* e. L.sts of them, therefore, 
even if they could be obtained, would be of comparatively little use. I beg respect- 
fully to express the opinion, that the only safe way of proceeding, is to obtain copies 
|Of papers from the originals. Everyone, who is conversant with the subject, 
tknows the ever increasing liability to error, in copying from copies, the errors to be 
found in these being transferred to new copies with, very probably, other errors 
added. This is on the supposition, besides, that copies are accessible on this side 
of the Atlantic. It may be remarked that such as have been obtained, were got for 

7 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A., 188 J 



special purposes, and, in the case of most of them, if copies were taken, the work of 
collecting the Archives would be as far as ever from being carried on systematically 
there would be introduced an element of confusion into future investigations, and 
the expense would, to a large extent, be thrown away. What was said last year 
on this subject, I take the liberty of repeating : — 

" The papers relating to the Colonies are not the only sources from whicl 
to draw in the Public Record Office. There are many in the Domestic series, 
amongst the Treasury documents and in those relating to Foreign Affairs. These 
would all require to be examined carefully; the search necessarily would occupy a 
considerable time aud most conscientious labour, which, it is almost unnecessary to 
say, would be facilitated in every possible way by the officers of the State Depart- 
ments and of the Record Office. Without a thorough report as to the documents, it 
will be difficult, if not impossible, to arrive at a proper determination on the subject." 

I would, therefore, suggest that a complete investigation be made in the Public 
Record Office and the State Departments, in London, to be accompanied or followed 
by a similar investigation in Paris, and that, concurrently with the searches, com- 
petent persons should be employed to make copies of such documents as it shall be 
deemed advisable to obtain for deposit amongst the Archives of Canada. 

The whole respectfnlly submitted. 

DOUGLAS BRYMNER, 

Archivist. 
Ottawa, 30th December, 1882. 



NOTE A, 1. 

Letters from Captain Sherwood on Secret Service, 1780-1*781. 

1*780. PAGE 

October 26 to December 31. 

Justus Sherwood. Journal of an expedition to negotiate with the State of 

Vermont, with details \ 42 

1*781. 

February 19. 

Justus Sherwood to Captain Mathews. The inherent deceit of Allen and 
his party. The demand of Vermont for neutrality , 

March 10, St. John's. 

Same to the same. Johnston's statement of how Bailey gets news from 
Canada , ... ' 

March 20, Vercheres. 

Colonel Peters, to Captain Sherwood. Warning him against Johnson's 
cunning t 

April 9, Isle aux Noix. 

Justus Sherwood to Captain Mathews. Forwarding letter from Thomas 

Johnson, declaring his principles. Letter follows 9 

April 13, Isle anx Noix. 

Same to the same. Sending intelligence from Johnson. The report gives 
the names, manner of proceeding, &c, of those employed in getting 
news from Canada , 

May 8, Isle aux Noix. 

Same to the same. Col. Allen's account of feeling and prospects in Ver- 
mont. The attempt of Marsh to deceive IS 

8 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14 ) A. 1883 



1781. PA.JE 

Hay 9, Isle mix Noix. 

Same to the same. The equivocal conduct of Allen 20 

May 11, Tsle aux Noix. 

Same to the same. Account of negotiations with Col. Allen ; their unsatis- 
factory nature 20 

Same to the same. Details of negotiations with Allen continued 26 

Same to the same. Report and views of Col. Allen on the condition of 

and prospects for re-uuion in Vermont, with his answers to queries... 90 

May 15, Isle aux Noix. 

Same to the same. Further concerning negotiations with Allen 30 

May 18, Isle aux Noix. 

Same to the same. The conduct of Allen. Quin's loyalty. Thanks for 

sending Major Lernoult. Scouting parties sent off ........ 33 

Kay 20. 

Same to the same. Allen alarmed. Thinks by the 20th July the people 
of Vermont may be so prepared that commissioners can be sent to 
treat. A good army would soon bring them to terms 32 

Kay 22. 

Justus Sherwood to Major Lernoult. Transmitting Col. Allen's views on 

the position of Vermont , 37 

day 22. 

Same to the same. Allen disheartened for want of exchange of prisoners. 

The terms of accommodation, &c 40 

lay 7 to 25, Isle aux Noix. 

Justus Sherwood. Journal of the negotiations with Col. Ira Allen, with 

daily details , 59 

lay 25. 

Justus Sherwood to Captain Mathews. His reasons for believing that 

vigorous measures should be used towards Vermont 85 

'lay 25, Isle aux Noix. 

Justus Sherwood to Major Lernoult. His inability to come to a conclusion 
as to Vermont. Allen apparently in favour of re-union ; sends Love- 
less and Wing's intelligence, which follows. 86 

: une 2, Isle aux Noix. 

Justus Sherwood to Captain Mathews. Eeported agreement to extend 
the boundaries of Vermont. The employment of Rose by Allen to 
carry letters to New York, &c. Williams the only man likely to find 
out Allen's designs , 107 

uly 9, Loyal Block House. 

Same to the same. The result of the negotiations with Fay 112 

.ugust 2, Loyal Block House. 

Same to the same. Doubts of Allen's sincerity. . If sincere, he is the best 

man to go to Congress. Remarks on Allen's letters.. , 109 

.ugust 10. 

Same to the same. Further respecting the negotiations with Fay 115 

-Ugust 18, Dutchman's Point. 

Same to the same. Pilchard's scouts. Brackenriiigo's report Fay's 
remarks on it seem to indicate sincerity. His desire to return for 
the September elections. Doubts of success j interest, not loyalty, 

seems to actuate public men in Vermont , 117 

9 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papera (No, 14.) A. 1885 



1781. PAGE 

August 18, Vermont. \ 

Report of the proceedings of the Assembly ; their views ; those of the 

populace ; character and motives of leading men, &c 12 

August 19, Dutchman's Point. 

Justus Sherwood to Captain Mathews. Report by Prichard and Patterson. 
The subtle, cunning character of Beadle, and his influence with the 
marauders 120 



• 



September 1, St. John's. 

George Smyth to Captain Mathews. Sending Boston and other papers. 
The different inclinations of the Vermonters on the east and north 
side of the State. The good effect of a body of troops at Crown 
Point. Bailey and Biliis should be carried off. Report by Mrs. 
Brown that Captain Allen said guns had been fired at Bennington, 
rejoicing at the admission of Vermont as a fourteenth State 122 

No date (2nd or 3rd September), Montreal. 

Justus Sherwood to Captain Mathews. Confirming letter of Dr. Smyth 

(122). His state of health ; will start lor Skenesborough 124 

October 27, Ticonderoga. 

Same to the same. Arrival of Mr. Biakely with his own and other four 
families; he brings despatches ft om Allen, sent by Col. Walbridge. 
His fears of want of success in the new Assembly. Desires further 
instructions , 

November 2, Ticonderoga. 

Same to the same. The result of the negotiations with Vermont will 
depend on the turn of affairs at Chesapeake. Correspondence recom- 
mended with Ira Allen. Hopes of a war between Vermont and 
New York 132 

November 17, St. John's. 

Justus Sherwood to General Haldimand. Fears that events to the south- 
ward will prevent successful result in Vermont 13^ 

No date. 

Justus Sherwood to Captain Mathews. Capture of Johnson. His report 
concerning Vermont. His own course, and reasons for changing his 
views ; his desire for re-union. Desire for neutrality 

No date. 

General Haldimand to Justus Sherwood, with powers to negotiate with 
Vermont for a return to allegiance , , 

No date. 

Justus Sherwood. Report by Bethune of his visit to White Creek, Cam- 
bridge, Arlington, &c. Attempts to recruit are defeated by hopes of 
peace. Results of Convention ; the general feeling for re-union with 
Britain 

No date. 

Samuel Rose. His report as to correspondence between Sir Henry Clinton 
and General Allen 

JJo date. 

E. Hamley and B. Benedict. Report of their investigation in Vermont... 10 



10 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 188 J 

NOTE A, 2. 

Correspondence and Papers relating to Detroit. 

17T2-1184. — Volume I. 
1772. VAOM 

May 3, New York. 

Stephen Kemble, A.D.C. to Ethcrington, 60th Eegt. General order to 

secure uniformity in the issue of provisions at the different posts I 

1773. 
September 22, Detroit, Mich. 

Philip Dejean. Returns of the inhabitants of Detroit, their possessions, 

cattle, horses, servants and slaves 2 

1774. 

May 3, Vincennes. 

St. Marie to General Haldimand (?) (in French). Sending reports required 
by Gen. Gage. Has received one from M. Maisonville. Has had to 
visit the Illinois with Mr. Perthius to obtain information, part of the 
titles having been carried off by M. Clouvier. The census of Illinois 
ready and certified by Mr. St. Ange and Pierre Nasse, Commandant at 
St. Louis , ..., & 

September 14, Detroit, Mich. 

Alexis Maisonville to General Haldimand (in French). Census taken of 
Vincennes ; messenger delayed by Indian disturbances. Thanks the 
General for the free carriage of his effects by a King's ship 5- 

1777. 

February 6, Rahas. 

Richard McCarthy to Rocheblave (in French). Sends greetings to 
Roeheblave's family ; has been ill. Has written on current news. 
Arrival at and sudden departure from St. Louis of two Englishmen. 
Sends a deed for registration. Is looking for an Englishman reported 
to be a good builder of mills. Reported killing of two Frenchmen 
from Detroit. Four merchants abandon their houses on the Illinois, 

owing to threats of the Indians 6" 

1778. 

January (?), Detroit, Mich. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Carleton. The weak state of Fort Pitt. 
The taking of Philadelphia makes it unlikely that the rebels will 
strengthen it. The alarm on the Ohio ; inhabitants fleeing. George 
Morgan, the rebel Indian agent confined at Fort Pitt, but released. 
Killing of Shawanese by order of Commandant. Disbanded soldiers 
settled near Fort Pitt confined for loyalty. Friendly Indians bring 
in prisoners and scalps ; proposed attack on Pitt in the spring. De- 
mands for stores. Message to Delaware to assure the well affected of 
protection at Detroit. Should the old Jesuit missionary die, his 
papers to be secured. The loss of population by the restrictions on the 
settlement of land. Restoration of the rights of common on Hog 
Island recommended. Shall grants of land be made to refugees ? 
The river frozen across. , , 

february 3, Vincennes. 

Lt.-Govemor Edward Abbott to Major Benton (in French). Instructions 
to prevent inhabitants from taking possession of land ; to maintain 
Fort Sackville ; to prevent the sale of liquor ; to assure refugees 
flying from the violence of American settlers that they will enjoy 

protection. 10* 

11 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1888 



1W8. pagb 

February 8, Fort Gage. 

Eocheblave to Carleton (?) — no address given — (in French). Had gone 
to Yincennes to confer with Abbott, and returned by the Wabash to 
ascend the Mississippi. The disposition of the Indians. Armed boat 
from Fort Pitt plundering and taking prisoners. Design, to seize Lt.- 
Governors Abbott and Hamilton, and Eocheblave ; intrigues of 
Congress with inhabitants. Armed parties commanded by an officer 
from Philadelphia in the country, and Congress corresponding with 
the Spanish Governor of New Orleans and the Commandant. The 
design of Congress to seize the lower Mississippi, by the help of the 
people of Natchez ani Munchac, and to induce them to furnish 
war like stores. The strength of the country as a place of retreat for 
the chiefs of the revolt. Believes that this is the object, with reasons. 
The complicity of the Spaniards at New Orleans. Eegrets the 
absence of a small force to protect the country. Suggests the policy 
of encouraging desertion from the rebels and of granting land to 
refugees. The ruinous state of the roof of the Fort. Has drawn for 
his expenses which are necessary, although, deceived by the apparent 
quietude, he had formerly recommended their discontinuance. Will 
cease to charge expenses to the King's account, but will pay them at 
his own risk, trusting that he will not be left the plaything of the 
neighbours and Indians. Begs to be replaced by some one of 
English origin. His constant worries. Part of his expenditure has 
been charged in Lt.-Governor Abbott's account. 12 

February 15, Yincennes. 

Henry Butler's examination before Eocheblave (in French). Had come 
from Pennsylvania, and forced to bear arms for the rebels ; had left 
Fort Pitt three months before, and joined the Sieur Morin, whom he 
found hunting on Belle Eiviere. Hearsay evidence as to movements 
of Congress, &c 21 

February 26, Detroit, Mich. 

Prices curi en t of food at Detroit, enclosed in Lt.-Governor Hamilton's 

letter of 2 5th April 25 

March 11. 

Eocheblave to Lt.-Governor Hamilton (in French). Delaware war chief 
reports rebels making a fort on the Eiver Chaoiianos ; the Delawares 
killed four of them and lost a chief. Believes the rebels are preparing 
this country for a retreat ; troops wanted. Sieur de Groseelin going 
to look for M. Cerre's merchandize. Will warn Hamilton if the rebels 
take possession... 

March (?), Quebec. 

General Haldimand. Eemarks on Hamilton's letter dated 18th December, 
(to 28th), received at Quebec 19th March, 1^79 (see page 246), being 
criticisms on his measures and proposed measures 24' 

April 12, Yincennes. 

Eocheblave to Lt.-Governor Hamilton. M. Monbrun's report to the Com- 
mandant. (Monbrun was intrusted by Lt.-Governor Abbott with 
orders.) The state of the settlements on the Eivere aux Chanoinons. 
The settlers satisfied with the Lt.-Governor's orders, and willing to 
join his flag. The desire of the Indians to attack the English settle- 
ments, kill all they could find, and put a collar on Eocheblave's neck. 
The hardships of having to suffer, however loyal. The Indians 

•^atiefied with the Governor's promises, and ask for pardon, &c 

12 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



17*78. PAQK 

April 22, Detroit, Mich. 

Prices current of food at Detroit, enclosed in Lt.-Governor Hamilton's 

letter of 25th April 34 

April 25, Detroit, Mich. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Carleton. On 26th January, searched 
traders to Sandusky for correspondence with rebels, but failed to h'nd 
it. Fined them for excess of goods over pass 30th January — John 
Montour assists Virginians to escape to Fort Pitt ; they are followed 
and re-captured. Montour is released at the request of the Indian 
Chief; others kept in irons. 7th March — Arrival of Lt.-Governor 
Abbott and family from Vincennes. Wabash Indians at poet e an not 
be kept in order except at great expense, or by troops. The bad 
effects of French influence at all the remote posts. Reports from 
de Celoron of Indian expeditions on the Ohio. Ammunition sent; 
war parties exhorted to humanity. I lth March — Arrival of Indian 
warriors ; they have accepted war belts, and as they believe the 
Virginians can do little good or harm, they will likely be sincere. 
2'.Hh March— John Tierney, from Quebec, brings a belt to the West- 
ern Indians from the Six [Nations, through Colonel Butler, to support 
the Government. 1st April — Charles Baubin reports that with Lori- 
mier and Shawanese Indians, he reconnoitred the fort on the 
Kentucky, east of the Ohio. Daniel Boone and 26 men captured by 
Indians, who kept Boone. His account of distress on the frontier, 
and Kentucky. The humanity of the Indians ; inhabitants invited 
to come to Detroit. 20th April — Beturn of Hazle ; a messenger car- 
rying a letter to Moravian Minister has brought back a letter from 
McKee, Indian agent, confined by rebels at Fort Pitt, but escaped 
with three - men — two Girtys and one Matthew Elliott. 23rd 
April — Hazle is conducting the three men. McKee's char- 
acter and usefulness among the Indians. Designs of the Virginians 
against French .River. Colonel Bolton and Colonel Butler 
warned of them. Virginians have attacked a Delaware village 
by mistake. 25th April— Governor Abbott sends word of news from 
Boeheblave, of 28th February, that the Philadelphians had shaken off 
Congress and allowed the King's ships to come up the river ; that 
Congress had fled; that the people desired peace, and that the chiefs 
were flying by way of Fort Pitt. Capture of traders affects the 
rebels ; attempt on Biviero au Bceuf probably to divert the attention 
of the Delawares from the lower Ohio. Shall lay a bar in the way of 
communicating with New Orleans. ISTon-avrival of Lamothe with 
instructions. A Huron of Lorette reports that Bentley has supplied 
ammunition to rebels. Correspondence between Spaniards and 
Virginians , 35 

April 25, Detroit, Mich. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Carleton. The sloop " Angelica " adver- 
tised for Michillimakinak ; the great quantity of goods and provisions 
proposed to be sent in her by the merchants, and the extravagant price 
of grain and flour have induced him to have an investigation of the 
quantity of flour, live stock, &c, to prevent a monopoly and to secure 
the quantity necessary for the post The Hurons want another mis- 
sionary, the old Jesuit being superannuated. The jealousy between 
these and the Sandusky Hurons. They want possession cf the land 
taken from the rebels. The arms for militia very bad ; some wauted 
from Quebec. The expense of gunpowder for Indians. Sends letters 
from Boeheblave ; list of Indian trade licenses and prices current. 

Good conduct of the company of volunteers 43 

13 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



1778. pagi 

April 25, Detroit, Mich. 

Lt.- Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Eecom mending Captain 
James Andrews for his ability as a seaman, &c. Captain Thompson 
inspecting the Naval Department, has gone to Niagara. His report 
on the Naval Department at Detroit. The necessity for a person to 
superintend the arrival of vessels, their cargoes, &c. Captain 
Thompson recommends Mr. Algie, of Quebec, for the office. 

April 25, Detroit, Mich. 

Lt.-Governor Edward Abbott to General Carleton. Left Vincennes on 
3rd February, reaching Detroit on 7th March, after a painful journey. 
Had left the place before the arrival of the Indian hunt, to avoid the 
large expense for presents, the want of which would exasperate the 
Indians. Hopes for approval. Had been obliged to incur large ex- 
penses for Indians, for which had drawn on Mr. Dunn. Suggests the 
appointment of a person at Vincennes to prevent the Indians joining 
the rebels. Encloses instructions left with Major Benton 48 

April 26, Detroit. 

Census of Detroit, taken by order of the Lieutenant-Governor ........ 19ft 

May 26, Illinois. 

Inhabitants of the Illinois (Joseph Vesinaf, Joseph Verreault, Lorier 
Jaunetot, Louis Chatellerault, Amable Yel, Baptiste Casterique, 
Eustache Lambert,) to Rocheblave (in French). That Maillet had 
delivered the letters, and would zealously prosecute the work. The 
conference with the Indians who had had their minds prejudiced by 
the speech of the Spanish Governor at St. Louis, sent to Lt.-Gov- 
ernor Hamilton, rnd forwarded by him to Carleton on 6th August. 
This letter is stated in the endorsation to Lt.-Governor Hamil- 
ton's letter of 6th August (page 107) to have been written in 1777.... 

June 8, Detroit, Mich. 

Lt.-Governor Abbott to General Carleton. Encloses declaration of M. 
Monbrun, Vincennes. The employment of the Indians by the rebels 
has been of great hurt, but they were forced into that service to avoid 
pillage. The cruelty of the Indians to the defenceless. He advocates 
the securing the neutrality of the Indians rather than using them 
in war » 

June 9, Detroit, Mich. 

Governor Hamilton to General Carleton. The Indians to meet in council 
in a few days ; he hopes for instructions as to their inroads on the 
frontiers. If not received, will dispose of part of the savages in small 
scouts, but retain the most reputable in the neighbourhood to be ready 
for service. Lamothe not yet returned ; hones, however, to keep the 
savages in good humour ; sincere wishes for Carleton's safe voyage 
to Europe < 55 

June 14, Detroit, Mich. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. Keport of a council with the Ottawas, Chippe- 
was, Hurons, Pottawatarnies, Delawares, Shawanese, Miamis, Mingoes, 
Mohawks, the tribes of Waslitanon, Saginaw, Delawares and Senecas. 
Present : Lt. Governors Hamilton and Abbott, Deputy Agents Hay 
and McKee, besides other Indian officers. The names of the chiefs of 
the' tribes are given, and reports of the speeches made during the 

council, which lasted from the 14th to ohe 20th June 

14 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14,) A. 1883 



1778. PAGE 

June 29, Detroit, Mich. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. Keport of council with the Wtattonons, Quinqua- 
boos and Mascoutins. Present: Lt.-Governor Hamilton and Deputy 
Agents Hay and MeKee ; sworn interpreters, Charles Beaubien and 
Isidore Chesne. Names of chiefs given and reports of the speeches. 
Council iasted from 29th June to 3rd July 75 

June 20, Fort George. 

Eocheblave to Lt.-Governor Hamilton (?) (in French). Brigandage by 
detachments from Willing's men on the lower Mississippi ; ill-treat- 
ment of British subjects, after making them take the oath of neutrality. 
Eetaliation by the inhabitants of Natchez and others on the corps 
guilty of these Acts. The armed vessel, guns, &c. taken and tho 
marauders killed or made prisoners 89 

July 4, Fort Gage. 

Eocheblave to Carleton (?) — sent by Hamilton to Quebec, Gth August — 
(in French). Reports of brigandage of Willing, a so?' disant captain 
of Congress, Has carried off plunder from the British settlements on 
the lower Mississippi to the amount of $1,500,000. British Arkansas 
destroyed, and people carried off to Spanish settlements. Details of 
the acts of brigandage at Natchez by Willing, and by gangs, who 
had joined him. Their odious acts have roused resistance, but their 
success is due to the general sympathy with them of the great part of 
the settlers. The Spaniards at New Orleans have supplied Willing 
with clothing for three or four hundred men, under cover of selling to 
merchants, although the real merchants can only get a small quantity. 
Gunpowder also sold to the rebels. Barge loads of plunder sent off, 
and provisions from Fort Pitt to New Orleans. A messenger sent to 
Natchez. Spaniards preparing to build forts on the Illinois, where 
detachments are to be sent. Vessels despatched to Vera Cruz for 
soldiers. The discouragement of the settlers ; the conduct of people 
of English birth less patriotic than that of the new subjects, who, 
however, have little hope of defending themselves. Spaniards offering 
inducements for settlers to come into their territory, but unsuccess- 
fully. Suggests the plan of exporting the crop to New Orleans as a 
means of starving out the Spanish Battalion. The Spanish crews have 
settled in the houses of the British settlers. Complaints sent to New 
Orleans. Urges his being relieved from his charge in the Illinois by 
some ( one of British origin, to do away with the jealousies which 
exit-t, although these are groundless ; the selfishness and greed of the 
settlers. Troops urgently required to prevent the importation of 
munitions of war, &c, and the gathering of armed brigands ; no time 
to be lost if the affection of the people is to be retained. The Indians 
well disposed; but not to be trusted. His expenses since 24th May ; 
begs for a settlement ; will draw on Mr. Dunn ., 91 

fjuly 4, Fort Gage. 

Eocheblave to Thomas Dunn, Treasurer. Quebec (in French). That 
he has drawn in favour of Dejean for £1,262 sterling for expenditure 
since 24th May, 1777 101 

July"4, Fort Gage. 

Eochblave, Bill of Exchange for £1,262 10s. sterling on Treasurer Dunn, 

in favour of Dejean 102 

15 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14 



1778. 

No dale, probably, 

July, 1778. Detroit. 

Lieut. -Governor Hamilton, apparently addressed to General Carleton from 
Detroit in July. Hoping he would continue to govern the Provinces. 
Col. Bolton reports provisions wanted for Indians at Niagara. Sloop 
will sail for there with stores. Eeport on the Naval Depaitment. 
Arrival of Capt. Lernouit Eeturn of Lamothe from a scout. Death 
of Lieut, Gouin; his mothers destitute situation is worthy of relief. 
The Shawanese and Delaware* it is hoped will act more heartily than 
before ; provisions that are required for them. List of commissions, 
&c. Difficulty of obtaining men to act as judges. Lamothe will 
report as to prisoners taken in Indian scout. His zeal. (Letter p. 52, 
marked Detroit 4, is dated in June, 1778. Lamothe, it says, had not 
yet returned. The present letter, marked 5, speaks of his return, 
&c, and was evidently written before Hamilton went to Vincennes) 
August 2, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Lieut.-Governor Hamilton. De Lamothe has been 
detained for despatches. Has been paid £100 sterling for expenses... 

August 6, Detroit, Mich. 

Lieut.-Governor Hamilton to General Carleton. Enclosing letter of 26th 
May and 4th July, from Eocheblave. Reports that French and 
Spanish emissaries are tampering with the savages. Spaniards 
making every effort to alienate the savages, but so far they have not 
gained their good will or confidence 

August 6, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Lieut.-Governor Hamilton. Does not see any 
essential point would be gained bj reducing Fort Pitt, owing to its 
distance, but if there is a large magazine of stores there, it would be 
a useful service to destroy it, as well as the crops and habitations of 
the advanced settlers on the frontiers, as they will increase the diffi- 
culties of the rebels, if they attempt operations on the lakes; and by 
driving back the settlers, the increased consumption of goods would 
harrass their brethren and be better than inviting them to the posts, 
where they must be maintained at great expense, unless they were 
ready to take up arms. The plan of granting lands to such people would 
offer an expedient to the rebels to introduce their friends, who would 
act as spies. The grants, besides, must be made in a regular manner, 
and there is no time for such concerns. Has written on the subject 
of Lamothe. The heavy expense for maintaining so many in Detroit 
during the present troubles must be lessened where its necessity is not 
clear. Will attend to the wishes of the Indians for a Jesuit mission- 
ary (see letter 25th April). It would be good policy to give the 
Huron and Sandusky Indians the lands they take from the rehels, if 
the conquests are made without expense to His Majesty and do not 
interfere with the rights of other nations of Indians. The arms of 
the militia reported bad must be repaired as well as possible, as there 
are none till a supply is received from England. Every economy 
must be used in the distribution of gunpowder, but it is not his inten- 
sion to limit him (Hamilton) as he can best judge of the wants of so 
distant a department. Ships on the lakes placed under Col. Bolton's 
control and requisitions to be made to him. With respect to Indian 
inroads, he is to support Butler's movements with the Five Nations. 
The rest is left to his own judgment. To transmit copies of all stand- 
ing orders, &c, left with him. Eules laid down as to drawing bills 

for expenses and furnishing vouchers, &c 10 

16 



46 Victoria. Sessional Tapers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



1778. PAGE 

A.ugust 8, Detroit, Mich. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Carleion (?). A party of 300 rebels 
had arrived in the " Illinois," taken Boeheblave prisoner, and exacted 
from the people an oath of obedience io Congress. .Rebel officer and 
30 men gone to Cahokia to receive the allegiance of people there ; 
has no doubt they are now at Vincennes, as Gigault, a French priest, 
had his horse ready to start from Cahokia, to receive the submission 
of the people at Vincennes. De Celoron has set off with belts to the 
Wabash Indians. Eocheblave mentions four English frigates at the 
entrance of the Mississippi. No vessels at Detroit; sends this by 
batteau. To support the Wabash Indians properly will entail great 
expense, but they are the only barrier at present to the rebels, and 
to the French and Spaniards. A large quantity of provisions still 
to be forwarded to Detroit, besides merchandize from last year not 
yet arrived ; large quantities wanted for savages and trade, and 
vessels alone not sufficient for transport. Merchants would rather 
risk carriage in batteaux than incur loss, &c, by delays of last year. . 115 

August 10, Montreal. 

General Haldimand to Lt.-Governor Hamilton. Letter sent by Mr. 
Bellefeuille. His zeal while serving with Canadian troops. Seeks 
his fortune in the Upper Country, Is recommended to Hamilton's 
good services • . . 117 

uigust 11, Detroit, Mich. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Carleton (?). Sent off Chabert yester- 
day, with letters, by batteau to Niagara, and recapitulates the news 
in them, of the movements of rebels. Believes the party to be a part 
of the marauders from Fort Pitt under Willan (Witling? — see pages 
89, 91). His infamous character. His repulse at Natchez, and news 
of frigates in the Mississippi, have probably induced him to return 
without getting ammunition at New Orleans. Instructions to De 
Celoron to spike and destroy the guns at Vincennes, which would 
have deterred the Indians. .Refers to the expense in supporting the 
Wabash Indians already mentioned. Their satisfaction with their 
reception. Eeports of a war with France and Spain. The delays in 
bringing up merchandize, &c. His disagreeable situation with 
respect to the shipping, which is controlled by the commanding 
officer on the authority of Col. Bolton 118 

.ugust 12. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to Lt.-Governor Cramahe. Had left all the 
papers relating to Hog Island at Quebec last year. The claims of 
the inhabitants to be produced should Captain McDougall prosecute 
his pretensions, as he believes their title to be sufficient. If the 
island granted as a common, the inhabitants could not surrender the 
rights of tlueir posterity 124 

ugust 12, Detroit, Michigan. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to Cramahe (?). Is earnestly looking for news, 
instructions. &c, from Canada. Indians in good temper, but he can 
give them little support or troops in their expeditions. Beport of a 
French and Spanish war. His authority has lately been cramped, so 
that he will shortly have little influence left. Has no control over 
the vessels. The disposition of the people requires more than the 
shadow of authority, but he will do his duty as he sees a storm 

approaching x21 

17 
14—2 



k 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1881 



1778. pag* 

August 17, Detroit, Mich. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to Cramahe. Is sending papers relating to a 
prisoner for the Chief Justice. If sent to the Sheriff they might 
miscarry. The bad character of the prisoner, Nicholas alias Lamy 
Thibault, charged with murder. List of papers and witnesses; 
return of Indian trade licenses ; petition from the inhabitants of Hog 
Island. The vague and irregular character of law proceedings. 
Beport that Judge Livius is gone to England. Will send as full as 
possible a state of the post; sends American newspapers ; their bad 
effect ; will make an example of any who parade disloyalty. Girty 
reports that the Delaware* still go to Fort Pitt, but only till their 
corn is ripe enough to allow them to move to Scioto. If they remove 
the frontier will repent severely. At least 400 Indians are assembled 
to attack Fort Kentucky, and bands are ranging the banks of the 
Ohio. Has taken steps to intercept batteaux on their return. Goods 
arrived from Fort Erie for a trader at Michillimackinak. Desires 
instruction thereupon 12 

August 26, Montreal. 

General Haldimand to Lieut.-Governor Hamilton. To take steps to sup- 
port the Wabash Indians, but to see that the expense is not thrown 
away. The Indians ought, from the expense to which the Govern- 
ment has been put for them, to undertake to clear the Illinois of 
invaders ; the parties sent out, if well directed, should cut off com- 
munication with the French and Spanish. The important service to 
be rendered is to fall upon the boats and vessels as they pass. The 
favourable situation of the Wabash Indians for this, by acting in con- 
cert ; the lower part of the Ohio might be filled with savages, to be 
kept constantly succeeding each other. Communication to be kept 
up with Mr. Stuart among the Cherokees, as if the Southern natives 
could be engaged, success might be looked for; will reinforce Detroit 
from Niagara on arrival there of troops ; provisions also will be sent, 
but there are so many posts to supply that saving is urged. Has 
detained Eentley on the report of his being dangerous, but specific 
charges wanted ; he has been allowed to send up goods for the Illinois, 
the conduct of his men to be watched to prove his guilt or innocence. 
To watch how the powder, &c, of the merchants is disposed of, so 
that they may not fall into the hands of the rebels 

August 26, Montreal. 

General Haldimand to Lieut.-Governor Hamilton. Summary (in French) 
of the letter immediately preceding, and a similar summary of letter 
of the 27th August immediately following, and of letter of 7th Oc- 
tober, at page 215.* 1 

August 27, Montreal. 

General Haldimand to Lieut.-Governor Hamilton. Marked secret and 
confidential. Desires to know, from his knowledge of the disposi- 
tion of the Indians and Militia, and of the best modes and routes 
through the adjacent countries, what is Hamilton's idea of the prac- 
ticability of recovering the Illinois and the means to be employed for 
that purpose 

August 28, Fort I3owman, Eahos. 

Col. Geo. Rogers Clark, Virginia troops, to Kinaytounak, Kenard Chief. 
Endorsed : Commission given to the Renard Indians, sent by Gauthier 
to Major do Peyster, 13th May, 1778 (?) 



' 



18 I *i 

Ik 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



1778. PAGE 

L ugufet 28. Miainis. 

Ceioron to Lieut. -Governor Hamilton (in French). An Indian reports 
the arrival of Virginians at Viucennes ; they had arrested LeGros, after 
seizing his goods, and had sent him to Illinois; that Gudert and two 
settlers had also beeu seized to be sent there, but the Indians had 
claimed them as brothers. Has been detained by illness, and to get 
the reply of the village, not yet made. The Indians do not appear 
disposed to go to the Illinois. Indians who went to Kaskaskias to 
meet the rebels are not yet returned. The merchandize for Yin- 
cennes still at the Miamis. A party of savages gone to attack the 
rebels at the Falls 137 

Lugust 31, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. General "Report of the Militia and Volun- 
teers, al Detroit, Guillaume Lamothe ■ 139 

LUgust 31, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. General return of stores and provisions, 
received, forwarded, issued, condemned and remaining in store at 
Detroit, from the ls5th December, 1777, to 31st August, 1778, both 

days inclusive 141 

eptember 5 (?), Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Congratulates Haldi- 
mand on appointment. Will prepare reports, plans, &c, regarding 
the settlement, the forts and garrison. The general good conduct of 
the Indians ; the humanity of the Indians to prisoners. Eebel rein- 
forcements at Kentucky. Forts on that river and jealousy of the 
Shawanese. M. de Quindre brings reports from there of the defeats 
of the rebels, who are wearied out. Major de Peyster, from 
Michillimackinak, conhrms reports of taking of Kaskaskias and 
Cahokia. The Spaniards not inclined to help the rebels. The French 
at the outposts not to be trusted, and most of the traders rebels at 
heart. The ill effects of Rocheblave falling into rebel hands, as he had 
great influence over the Indians. No word from Illinois or Vincennes; 
will not be surprised to hear the rebels are driven away by the 
Indians and well received by the French. Has letters from 
Chevalier at St. Joseph ; does not trust him ; will root him out, when 
he has the power. Sends list of Indian goods purchased from Messrs. 
Macomb & Co. ; the reasonable prices charged by the Messrs. Macomb, 
&c, and their readiness to take Government bills. Recommends 
attention to the claims of Mr. Ad hemar, a trader. The refusal of 
Brigadier Robertson to honour bills tor wood. Han confiscated the 
goods of traders to Sandusky; the opinion of Attorney-Gen. Giant 
unfavourable, but will persevere in enforcing the law against traders 
supplying the rebels. The absence of Judge Owen, cause of loss, as 
he (Hamilton) is obliged to act as Judge and executioner of the law. 
Recommends Mr. Hay, Indian Agent, and Mr. de Jean, Justice of 
Peace. Can give little information respecting the post and its depen- 
dencies . Commission for officers of Militia, &c, not arrived. Has 
been obliged to buy all the powder for Indians this year Has 
written to Governor Cramahe the reason ot the neglect to send the 

state of the Naval Department, &e. 148 

iptember 5, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. Prices current at Detroit 143 

ptember 5, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. List of officers, interpreters, &c., in the Indian 

Department, District of Detroit 144 

1!) 
14—21 



40 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14) A. 1883) 






1778. paoiCc 

September 5, Detroit. 

Lt.-Goveruor Hamilton. List of goods on hand for the Indian Depart- 
ment 14S 

September 5, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. List of officers of Militia at Detroit 149 

September 5, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. List of barracks and furniture, bedding, iron 

utensils, &c, at Detroit , 15JJ 

September 9, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. The arrival of Capt: 
Grant, Capt. Shanks, Mr. Bellefeuille, Lamothe and others by the 
Gage. Lamothe preparing to go on a scout; his party consists of 
young active men. Is happy to have received answers to several 
letters with instructions, which will be attended to. Will render 
service to Mr. Bellefeuille, suggests his appointment as surveyor of 
roads and bridges. Has never granted lands, but has intimated that 
no Indian deeds are valid till authorized by the Chief Governor at 
Quebec, although he has allowed necessitous persons to till laaid for 
subsistence but without claim to its possession. Has written to Col. 
Bolton that Volunteers, Militia, or Indians will be sent to Col. Butler, 
while the season permits .. 16] 

September 9, De trait. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Will forward the instruc- 
tion^ he has received from Headquarters, from September, 1775, to 
the 8th of September, 1778 

September 16, 17, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Letters received by Capt. 
Bettan arrived in the " Dunmore." Will do everything in his power 
with regard to the Wabash and the invaders of the Illinois and 
Yincennes. Three Frenchmen, Myetto, Baron, and Monbrun, 
appointed to act for the rebels in the Miamis. Will forward a letter 
from de Celoron. The Wabash Indians do not relish the entry of 
Yirginians, and accuse the Piankashaws of having enticed them 
in. Bau bin's account of the intentions of the Indians towards the 
rebels ; the French are interfering in their (the rebels) favour. Capt. 
Lernoult has promised every help. He (Hamilton) is going with the 
Indians. The Shawanese with de Quindre have divided into two 
parties to attack two forts on the Kentucky. De Quindre expected 
in fourteen days. Has written Major De Peyster that he sets out in 
12 days; asks him to engage the Indians to co-operate. The low 
state of the water in the Miami River, but the change of weather will 
probably raise it. Is encouraged by the accounts of the disposition of 
the Indians towards the Virginians to support them ; has been prepar- 
ing and will carry presents to the chiefs, &c. Secrecy impossible but 
will do all he can to second Haldimand's views as to preventing the 
rebels from confirming themselves in the Illinois ; all the papers relat- 
ing to Bentley cannot have been delivered, and enumerates some that 
have been sent. His men will be watched by Lernoult. Has called 
in the traders at Sandusky, as their trade with the Virginians could 
not be concealed ; their sordid characters. To meet Indians in Council 
and will consult as to numbers needed for the enterprise. The 
prisoners and scalps taken by th* Indians 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 1-1.) A. IS33 



eptember 22, Detroit.^p8g$ ! '*""* 

M. Monforton to M. Cerre, Illinois (in French). Expressing bis feelings 
as to the ill-treatment M. Cerre, equally with M. Rocheblave, has 
experienced. His respect for Rocheblave and his regret at his 
treatment. The fate of the people of the Illinois if they are not able 
to throw off the yoke imposed on the plea of independence. The 
apprehensions that should be felt from the change to American rule 
instead of British. The treaty of commerce between the French and 
the Americans. Reasons for it and its effects. The lamentable 
prospects of bloodshed ; the wise choice of officers made by the 
British, and the chimerical pursuit of independence only to be pur- 
chased by the effusion of blood. The actions of Father Floquet, 
whose correspondence has been too long concealed. The proof of the 
mildness of Carleton's government in his conduct towards Floquet. 
The fidelity of the Bishop and clergy. Desires to obtain information 
respecting Rocheblave 161 

September 22, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. (The letter is written at 
different times, from 22nd September to 3rd October.) State of pre- 
paration for his expedition ; will take presents for the Indians, so as 
to encourage them to keep watch towards the banks of the Ohio. If 
the western Indians resent the invasion of the Americans, it would 
be a good opportunity to build a fort at the forks of the Ohio and 
Mississippi. Places that might be fortified if the step approved of. 
The Spanish hated ; the French fickle ; the Americans brave, but 
without resources ; the Indians can only get theirs through the 
English ; the favourable time shouM be taken advantage of. The 
good example of the better class of French ; the effect o€ a reinforce- 
ment from .Niagara. Will send accounts of numbers, &c, and Major 
Hay and Lieut. Duverr et will report as to the communication with 
the Illinois. Indian council ; leportsent; oath of allegiance taken 
by volunteers, &c. Has written to Chevalier at St. Joseph's, though 
distrusting him. Presents to the Shawanese. Arrival of Baubin 
with report from the Miamis of Clark wilh 80 men being at Vin- 
cennes and well received by the French. The Ouiattonon Indians 
timorous, will try to decide them; will cancel the sale of land by the 
Peaukashaws to the French and Virginians. Gilbault. a priest, 
active for the rebels. Militia sent to the Miamis to repair the carry- 
ing place, &c. Report of Celoron that J. B. Chapoton, Bosseron and 
Legras are on the best terms with the rebels at Vincenne?. Their 
characters. Will set out as soon as possible. Captain Lernoult will 
send reinforcements ; will use the time spent in Indian council at 
Miamis in fortifying the depot, &c. Captain McKee's orders on the 
Ohio. Troops may be forwarded to the southward all winter. 
Stores at the Miamis ; will fortify it. The danger of that post being 
taken by the rebels at Fort Pitt ; will suggest to Captain Lernoult the 
propriety of a letachment at Miami6 from Detroit. The weakness of 
that post. M. Maisonville the best to give information as to the coun- 
try through which the expedition is to go. Expects advantage from his 
knowledge at the Illinois. Messengers sent to the Chickasaws, and to 
go on to Mr. Stuart. The good spirits of the Indians ; no word of the 
expedition has yet reached the Miamis. Delay in repairing the craft; 
a second brigade will sail on the 5th. The high wages paid to volun- 
teers. The war song sung (3rd Oct.) by himself, by Capt. Lernoult 
and several officers. Captain Lernoult cannot spare men from the 

garrison. The strength in artillery. Will set oti' on the 6th 16T 

21 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14 J A 188! 



177?. PAG 

September 24, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. Report [of a council held r with the Ottawas, 

Chippewas, Pottawatamies, and fifty of their warriors 18 

September 27, Miamis. 

Speeches at a council of Indians, and the Virginians brought to Detroit 

by Charles Baubin...,. 19 

September 30, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. Return of officers, etc, of the Royal Artillery, 
Capt. Lamothe's company of volunteers and the militia of Detroit, 
who offered to serve in an enterprise against the rebels 179 

September 30, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to the commandant at St. Genevieve (in Spanish) 

respecting the rebels and their attempt to alienate the Indians 199 

•etobcr 1, Camp Wyatutimong. 

Col. Thomas Hartley, commanding U. S. forces on the frontiers of Penn- 
sylvania and Wyoming. Speech to the chiefs of the principal Indians 
of Chimun?, etc , warning them against continuing the killing of 
women and children, etc. The Kin:; of England has lost all but 
Canada, which must fall next campaign, and a continuance of oppo- 
sition will lead to the detraction of Indian settlements by fire and 
sword, &c 201 

October 4. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Mr. Monforton has done 
all in his power to open the eyes of the French in Illinois. Recom- 
mending him and sending a copy of his letter 203 

Octolcr 5, Detroit. 

Lt -Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. That he has drawn for 

£15,543 2s 6d in favour of Messrs. Macomb 204 

October, Quebec (?) 

Remarks on letter received from Lt.-Governor Hamilton with summary 

of their contents, &c 205 

October '7, Detroit. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand, Arrival of Charles and 
Nicholas Gouin, from the Miamis, with an account that M. de Celoron 
was at Wyattonon when de Couague, a bastard chief of the Peorias, 
arrived with belt and speech from the rebels to 1he Wabash Indians, 
demanding a passage Ihrongh the country to Detroit. De Celoron's 
precipitate ride to the Miamis. The suspicion it crea + es. The 
little confidence to be placed ia any. Traders gone off to Vincennes 
in spite of Baubin's prohibiten. Bellestre reported to have joined 
the rebels with 200 French. Alarming report brought by Indians of 
rebel movements. He (Hamilton) tells the Indians he had promised 
to assist the Wabash nation and would do so. At a council the Indians 
agree to accompany him. Capt. Bird with 50 men of the 8th Regi- 
ment arrived. Lieut. Shourd and a party of 30 men to accompany 
the expedition. His full strength, all be'ng volunteers , 211 

October 7, Sorel. 

General Haldimand to Lt.-Governor Hamilton. Urges raising supplies 
at the posts, to save great expense of transport, as well as their con- 
stant state of dependence. To purchase beef when cheap and try to 
raise grain and cattle. The letter recommending Bellefeuille was 

to lend him good will in business ; not to make an office for him 215 

22 






16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (\.j. 14.) A. 1883 



1118. PAGE 

October 14. Rocher de Bout. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Arrival of his force here. 
Provisions arriving. Accident to Lieut. Shourd, from which he had 
to return to Detroit. Indians joining ; news received of the rejection 
atVincennes of the terms offered by rebels. The treachery of de Celoron 217 

October 14 (?) 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Report of conference of 
Indians with rebels ; rejection of rebel offers. Return of Lieut, de 
Quindre from attacking the fort at Kentucky. Only 100 rebels at 
Vineennes ; reinforcements will probably go from Caskaskias ; will 
send out Indians to divide them 219 

)ctober 28, Miamistown. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Provisions passed up. 
Indians in good health and temper: the restraint on their passion for 
rum has improved them. His own people well. Indecision of the 
Wabashes. Ammunition sent to the Shawanese. Council held with 
Indians. Further respecting de Celoron's treachery 222 

November 1, Camp Petite Riviere. 

Lt.-Gavernor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Provisions sent off to 
the forks of the Wabash, under Capt. Duvernet. He (Hamilton) is 
setting off with provisions and Indians. Arrival of Chevalier with 
the Indians from St Joseph. Major Hay to follow with the last of 
the batteaux and Indians. Description of the carrying place and 
timber near. Curious sea fossils found on a ridge near the road. Will 
transmit Duvernet's sketch of the Miamis River. The Pottawatomy 
chief delivers up his French medal. Return of troops and Indians. 
Expected arrival of Shawanese under McKee. Their attempt to take 
a fort on the Ohio. It might be worth trying. Rebels building a 
fort on the island at the Ohio Falls. The Miamis of the River An- 
guille will probably join him. Operations on the river. De Celoron's 
treachery. He has a brother in the rebel service 224 

December 4, Ouiattonon. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Indians joining from 
different parts, but not in great numbers ; their good terms with each 
other. Varying accounts of strength of rebels. Macomb's goods to 
be forwarded ; supplies ior Indians to depend on this. Fort at the 
Fails of Ohio very insignificant; the fort here (Ouiattonon) a miser- 
able stockade. Indians numerous; French few and not to be trusted; 
The deed of sale of thePeaukashaws torn in open council and declared 
cancelled, and the land restored to the Indians. The conduct of De 
Celoron inexcusable. Legras, French trader, accepted a Major's 
commission from the rebels. Dejean sued at Montreal for acting 
under bis (Hamilton's) orders ; he is recommended for protection. 
At a loss about news of war with foreign states. Facility for building 
forts eastward of Mississippi to Ohio. Indians have offeicl to rise 
next spring. The uncertainty regarding future movements 228 

December 16, Yincennes. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton (in French) Warning to the inhabitants of Vin- 
eennes to rema*n quiet; all who have been misled and return to their 
duty will be pardoned ; those who hold by the rebels will be punished. 
The Indians need not be feared. Major Hay authorized to administer 

the oath of allegiance 233 

23 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 188S 



1778. PAGE 

December, Vincennes. 

Capt. Helm to Col. Clark, the commandant for Congress of the eastern 
Illinois. His inability to get news of the British Army till it was 
within three miles of the town. The ba-e conduct of the militia; will 
not be able to defend the fort but will act bravely 250 

December 17, Fort Saekville, Vincennes. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. Return of ordnance arid ordnance stores taken at 

Fort Saekville, Post Vincennes, this date 251 

December 18, Vincennes, 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. Return of Militia of Vincennes who were in pay 
of the rebels, and of those who bore commissions and were enrolled 
without pay, who laid down their arms 17t*h December, 1778 234 

December 19, Vincennes. 

Oath of allegiance taken by the inhabitants and oath by Lt.-Governor 
Hamilton, that those who take the first oath shall be assured in their 
possession, &c 252 

December 22, Fort Saekville. , 

Capt Duvernet. Flan of Fort Saekville 251a 

December 24, Vincennes. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. Return of troops under his command at the Post 

of Vincennes , 253 

December , Vincennes. 

Prices of provi>>ions,|&c., at Post Vincennes. 254 

December 28, Vincennes. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Capture of a scouting 
party from the rebels at Vincennes. Indians sent out to intercept 
news of the ariival of British troop*. A detachment sent forward; 
the impatience of the Indians. Major Hav sent to seize vessels in the 
river, and to take delivery of the Post of Vincennes if given up with- 
out resistence (17th) operations against and capture of the Post. 
Inroad of the Indians, but no cruelty committed ; capture of horses 
belonging to Congress. Letters went by the officers of Congress at 
Vincennes to commandant Clark, intercepted. The faithlessness of 
the people. Oath of allegiance administered. Good conduct of troops 
and Indians. Reasons for not wending a considerable party to the 
Illinois, this winter. Is about to strengthen the Fort, but the man- 
ner in which the houses are built, makes them formidable against 
any garrison. (25th) Letters sent to Mr. Stewart and belts from 
Chickasaws and Cherokees ; the southern Indians preparing. Pri- 
soners brought in by scouts, and also reports as to the position of the 

^ rebels. Will keep Capt. Helm on parole till it be known if Roche- 
blave can be exchanged for him. The unfitness of de Celoron for 
his post. (26th) Log barrack built; arrival of Indians ; their report 
of confederation of Indians. Assembly of tribes at the Chickasaw 
River. They are employed intercepting the rebels &c. (27th) 
Quigaboes (Kickapoos) gone te war towards Caskaskias. The 
Detroit militia allowed to return ; Vincennes militia under arms and 
taken the oath of allegiance. Has seized all the spirits and will des- 
troy the billiard tables. Could he catch the priest (Gilbault) he 
would send him down. Movement of scouts. The diminution in the 
number of Indians necessary on account of the consumption of 
provisions. 23 

L 24 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



1779. PAGE. 

January 4, Fort Pitt. 

John Dodge to Montour, stating bis escape from Quebec and arrival here. 
Has spoken in his (Montour's) favour, who will be well received, 
receive immediate employment and good wages. Desires he may 
send for Iowa and Ottawa chiefs, and as many of the others ax word 
can be sent to, that they maybe spoken to 308: 

January 5, Fort Pitt. 

Letter signed Taimenend y addressed to the Delawares and Shawanese, 
urging that a Council be held and that delegates be sent to Philadel- 
phia. (Girty, an interpreter, says it is written by a rebel, Colonel 
Morgan, Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the rebels) 259 

January 13, Yincennes. 

Lt. -Governor Hamilton to Don Bernardo de Galois, Governor of New 
Orleans. Gives an account of his expedition to Yincennes with the 
reasons. Trusts that the commerce in gunpowder with the rebels 
may be prohibited from New Orleans. The danger to Spaniards 
from the Indians, should the trade continue. The rebels report they 
will take refuge in Spanish territory in event of a force coming. 
The impropriety of granting an asylum. If granted will have to 
attack the Spanish post 26& 

January 18, Cooshocking. 

Signed Galalemend, and endorsed Capt. John Killbuck to John Montour. 
That he and his councillors desire to see Montour, and asking him to 
come as soon as possible. Urges him to explain to the Wyandots 
and others the strong chain that has been made with the United 
States, and get them to join 308- 

January 19, Ochaitown. 

Eev. D. Zeisbergcr to Col. Gibson. Eeporting the plans of Simon Gistie 
(Girty ?) to take Gibson's scalp; Killbuck, who sends the report, 
thinks the token by which friendly Indians are known, should be 
changed. Proposed expedition by Indians against Ford Lawrence ; 
other preparations, but the numbers not known. Eeported that the 
Ministers are to be carried off. Killbuck has sent men to meet 
Sample. Thanks to Gibson for having written to the General about 
the safety of the Ministers 311 

January 22, Fort Lawrence. 

Col. Gibson to Col. Brodhead. Sends copy of Zeisberger's letter ; prays 
that something be done for the Moravians and friendly Delawares. 
Has kept two sawyers and a team of Brodhead's men. Hopes the 
General will soon be rc-called' and that things will go on vigorously 
in spring. Asks him to write Morgan to do something for Ministers. 314. 

January 22, Fort Lawrence. 

Col. Gibson to Col. Morgan, with cony of Zeisberger's letter. Daniel 
Sullivan will not return till Indians return ; he has been trifling his 
time. Prays that help may bo sent to the Moravians; suggests that 
part of Brodhead's new levies be sent to the towns. Girty has not 
yet made his appearance. Militia have stolen horses from the 
Indians, who want to be paid for them ' 315 

January 22, Fort Lawrence. 

Col. Gibson to Major Taylor, at Fort Pitt, (no date, but the arrival of the 
clothing fixes it.) Arrival of clothing, a poor supply. The inten- 
tions of the Indians. Non-arrival of Mr. Berry and Ensign Han ison. 
They must appear at the Post and explain. The Assembly voted six 

1 months pay to troops. To try to collect the stragglers of the regi- 
ment, the clothing, &c 316- 
25 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



1719. PAGE 

January 22, Fort Lawrence. 

Col. Gibson to Brigadier Mcintosh. Clothing received, but it is a poor 
supply; no artificers come. Intentions of the Indians; hopes to 
trepan Gistre (Girty ?) If the Indians pen him up he will be in a bad 
way, unless supplies are sent, which should be brought with a strong 
escort. Non-arrival of stores. Can nothing be done to protect the 
poor Ministers and Delawares? Prays the General to strain a point 
for their safety. No medicines received. Will call Berry to account 
for his conduct. Indians teasing for pay of horses stolen 309 

January 24, Yincennes. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Plans of the Southern 
Indians for attacking the rebels. Party of volunteers, &c. sent to the 
Indians on the Cherokee ; desertion of some of the party Return of 
officer with French prisoners and flour from Caskaskias. Col. Clark, 
the rebel commandant, nearly captured . Will strengthen the Fort 
according to Hay's plan. Orders to Capt. Bloomer at the Natchez, 
employed intercepting supplies to rebels from New Orleans. Has 
written also to the Governor of New Orleans. Believes there [is 
war both with France and Spain, but has no word to justify him in 
offensive measures. Will send to the Miamis for the stores brought 
there. The dearness of everything on the spot. Duvernet wishes 
to return to Detroit. (26 Jan). Indian hands a letter written by 
Capt. Helm to Creek Indians; communicates contents to Indians 
then assembled. Indians going off to return at the opening of the 
season. No deaths since arrival ; want of arms and ammunition for 
Indians, but does not yet know the number. Will remain still, how- 
ever disagreeable the place, or advance if wanted, (27 Jan). The 
determination of the Ottawas to remain under his orders. The 
hostility of the Indians towards tbe Yirginians; names of the tribes 
and reasons given. The timidity of the Wabash Indians (28 Jan). 
Blockhouse raised. Indian scout sent off to the falls of the Ohio. 
Plan of the river preparing by Duvernet 266 

•January 26, Yincennes. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton. Substance of a conference with the Indians at 
Fort Sackville, this date, namely: Shawanese, Ottawas, Chippewas, 
Hurons, Miamis, Peaukaskias, Quigabocs (Kickapoos), Ouiattonons, 
Delawares. and a man from the Creeks.,.. 27* 

January 28, Fort Sackville, Yincennes. 

John Hay to Col. Butler. The difficulty of communicating with each 
other on Indian affairs, and the obstacles to collecting the Indians 
and keeping them together faithful. Account of the conference held 
on 26th Jan. The inhabitants of the place not to be trusted. The 

good effect of the expeditions from Detroit to the Lakes 27 

January 30, Fort S'ickville, Vincennes. 

Lt-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. The Commissary goes with 
a corvee of 30 to the Miamis for provisions. The Indians giving 
proof of attachment. War party set off for the falls of the Ohio. 
Indians as much united as it is possible they can be. Want of regu- 
lars and regular officers. The inconvenience of having no Indian 
Council but his bedroom. Commissions wanted for Lamotke and 
other officers. List sent of Indian officers and of Company officers.. 2£ 
January 30, Fort Sackville, Yincennes. 

Return of tbe state of the garrison, giving names of regiments and numbers 
of them, of the Indian Department and of artificers, with note of 

desertions, change of officers' &c, annexed 

*6 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



1779. PAGE 

.February 24, Vincennes. 

Journal of Col. Clarke, Commandant for Congress. March of bis troops, 
arrival and concealment, undiscovered. Message to the inhabitants ; 
the order of march for the attack. Seizure of the town, and firing on 
the fort during the night. Capture of Maisonville's scouting party. 
The garrison summoned to surrender, but refusing, an engagement 
takes place ; Hamilton's effort to surrender on honourable terms 
refused, as it must be done unconditionally. The negotiations and 
surrender, with terms of capitulation 289 

March 8, Vincennes. 

lit—Governor Hamilton to Captain Lernoult. Pass to Cournailler to go 

to Detroit and return, by permission of Col. Clark...... 297 

March 8, Vincennes. 

John Hay. .Recommendation of Mr. Pierre Cournailler for his kindness 

to the prisoners, <fec 298 

March 9, Vincennes. 

Col. G. E. Clark (U.S.) to P.Henry, Governor of Virginia. Cannot obtain 
the horses wanted ; the over estimate of their value. The value of 
those from New Mexico ; will try to get him mares in spring, 
through the Spanish Government. The Illinois horses spoiled by 
bad usage. Desires to have 3,000 acres on the French Lick, which 
he purchased, saved for him. The quality of the land ; is in hopes to 
send him a plan soon 304 

March 10, Vincennes. 

Col. Clark to Col. Harrison, Speaker, acknowledging the thanks of the 
House; will try to deserve the honour. The capture of Hamilton 
will nearly put an end to the Indian war ; had he men enough he 
-would silence the Indian nations in two months. Hopes to do some- 
thing clever with the help of the reinforcements reported as sent. 307 

; March 12, Vincennes. 

Major Jos. Bowman to P. Henry, Governor of Virginia, returning thanks 

for his appointment to a majority 303 

March 13, Vincennes. 

Col. G. E. Clark. Warrant to William Moires. Express with letters to 

press whatever he may need for the service, even by force, if necessary 302 

March 13, Sandusky. 

Lieut. Bird to Capt. Lernoult. Has taken it on himself to stop the vessel 
to send information, The chiefs returned from war seem to have 
something of importance. Has had difficulty in persuading Capt. 
Graham to remain. The chiefs have reinforced the fort at Tuscarawa. 
Has refused to interfere, and begged the Indians to send their deter- 
mination to him (Lernoult). Knives, flints, &c, wanting 336 

March 16, Vincennes. 

Col. G. E. Clark (U.S.) to Capt. Lernoult, sending letters left by prisoners 
for their friends, by the hands of inhabitants and others going to 
Detroit. Proposes exchange of Bentley. Is glad to hear that works 
are going on at Detroit, as it will save the Americans the expense of 
building , 301 

Ifarch 20, Vincennes. 

Major Jos. Bowman, Col. Clark's Battalion, to Captain E. B. Lernoult, 
Detroit, asking for the release of Bentley, a prisoner tor two years, 

on the ground of the lenity shown to the prisoners at Vincennes 299 

27 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1888 



1779. ' PAGE/ 

March 21, Vincennes. 

Lieut. John Girault to Capt. E. B. Lernoult, Detroit, asking for the release 

of Bentley, on the same grounds 30O 

March 31, Detroit 

Survey of the settlement of Detroit, taken by order of the commanding 
officer, each inhabitant being put on oath. The survey gives the 
name of each inhabitant (householder), the numbers of young men 
and children, slaves, quantities of provisions, and live stock 31! 

April 4, Falls of Ohio. 

Squire Boon to Arthur Comble. "Would prefer to get back his horse, but 

will let the gentleman keep it, if he sends £200 33( 

April 8, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Lt.-Governor Hamilton. The suddenness of his 
march against rebels on the Illinois prevented orders being sent him. 
The Secretary of State had been informed of his measures. News 
received of his progress. The General's anxiety about Niagara and 
Detroit has induced him to send Capt. Brehm to consult with 
Lernoult as to further steps. Successful results to the southward. 
Georgia redeemed. Will probably secure the southern Indians. 
Owing to want of information, cannot send orders ; urges due consid- 
eration before taking steps. Desires information as to the best 
means of conciliating the Indians 331. 

April 8. 

General Haldimand to Capt. Lernoult. It is satisfactory to hear of the 
steps taken to receive the rebels ; it is happy for the King's service 
that so important a post as Detroit should be entrusted to so careful 
an officer. Captain Brehm is sent to consult with him CLernoult), 
and to give Haldimand's orders respecting the post; to consult with 
him about Vincennes, and the further step3 to be taken by Hamilton. 
The conveyance of Macomb's goods to be favoured by Col. Bolton.... 334 I 

April 17, Vincenne-. 

Captain Chene's account of the attack on and capitulation of the fort at 

Vineenues by Lt. -Governor Hamilton 337 

April 20. 

Major Bowman to the chiefs of the Pottawatomies, addressed to the chief 
of the village of Chicago (in French), desiring the Indians to remain 
at home, to treat the French and other traders well, and to refuse to 
rise and go to war at the ins Ligation of bad persons. The Bostonian 
does not ask the Indian to war for him ; he does that for himself; the 
young people like war thou^n they do not desire it. If any want to 
fight for the English, let them do so like men ; but they (the Ameri- 
cans), are only deceived once, for punishment will follow crime 341 

April 20. 

General Clark (U. S.), to Nanaloibi, chief of the Pottawatomies, telling 
him and his people to remain quietly at home, and warning them of 
the danger of fighting against the Big Knives 342 

May 7, Huron Tillage. 

Guillaume Monforton to Captain Lernoult (in French), reporting the in- 
formation given by a Virginian, a prisoner among the Hurons, and 
adopted by them, that they had made peace with the Americans. 
Dealings of Montour with the Indians, in the interests of the Ameri- 
cans. A party of the Sauteux going to war are dissuaded by the 

Hurons 34 

28 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



1779. PAGE 

May 29, St. Joseph. 

Louis Chevalier to Captain Lernoult (in French), the reports of the 
Americans as to the taking of forts, and, in fact, of all Canada, ren- 
ders it impossible for him to raise the courage of the Indians; he 
asks Lernoult to help him in this effort, and to let him know his 
designs to meet the rebels. He has executed the orders received as 
to the Indians, except as to rum. He will obtain payment from Mr. 
Macomb, but has sent his accounts to Major de Peyster, &c 348 

- June 9, Upper Sandusky. 

Lieutenant Bird to Captain Lernoult. After collecting about 200 Indians, 
chiefly Shawanese, at Mingotown, news arrived of attacks by the 
Americans, and a number of Indians killed, &c. The men collected 
scattered instantly, leaving everything in confusion. The move- 
ments of his people. The method adopted by the rebels to get up 
excursions against the Indians to destroy their crops, &c 351 

June 12, Upper Sandusky. 

Lieutenant Bird to Captain Lernoult. Constant reports of the rebels attack- 
ing Indian towns. Chiefs send word to Lernoult that if he will assist, 
they will defend the country to the last; if not, they must abandon 
their crops and villages. Recommends Macarty as an interpreter; 
his services i 352 

June 13, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Captain Lernoult, sending authority to arrest dis- 
affected persons giving aid to the rebels, and to take hostages from 
such as are doubtful 354 

-Juno 16, Williamsbourg. 

Archibald Blair, Clerk of the Council ; certified account of the proceedings 
in relation to Lt.-Governor Hamilton, Philip Dejean and William 
Lamothe, prisoners of war. The council has resolved to begin on 
them with the work of retaliation, and to put them in irons, confine 
them in the dungeon of the public gaol, debar them of pen, ink and 
paper, and exclude them from all converse but with their keepers, 
(original printed), wiitten on the back, letter from Andrew Robin- 
son, 5th July, 1779, to Captain John Dodge, stating that Lt.-Governor 
Hamilton had been loaded with irons, and had incriminated Dodge. 
He (Robinson) had defended Dodge; wishes him to come down 355 

June 25, Detroit. 

Captain Lernoult to General Haldimand, that he has drawn'for his com- 
mand money, in favour of Alexander and W. Macomb 362 

June 26. 

Captain Lernoult to General Haldimand. Has received letters by Captain 
Brehm, and will exert every nerve in carrying on duty. The assis- 
tance given by his officers, especially Lieutenant Duvernet. Has 
unbosomed himself to Captain Brehm. Is satisfied with Mr. Baby's 
character and conduct 363 

July 13, Pittsburg. 

John Dodge to Philip Boyle, Sandusky. Has escaped from Quebec and 
obtained a captain's commission. Fisher and Groverat send remem- 
brances. Battle at Carolina ; English defeated, leaving 700 dead, 
the rest with cannon, &c, prisoners. Is going to Williamsburg to 
prosecute Hamilton, Dejean and Hay, who will all be hanged. Com- 
pliments to good Whigs at Detroit ; money plenty, fine times for the 

sons of liberty. Will soon be removed of these tyrants 368 

29 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 188& 



1779. * PAG 

July K>, Detroit. 

Alexander Mclvee to General Haldimand. Anxious to be of service. 
Accompanied Lieut. -Governor Hamilton on his expedition to unite 
the Indians, which failed by the unlucky event. A force must be 
employed to engage them again to act against the enemy. Colonel 
Johnson to be at Quebec and desires to see him ; asks directions as to 
drawing his salary 37 

July 18, Miamistown. 

Mich. Lorraine to Capt. Lernoult (in French). Intelligence of Clark's 
movements and his preparations for attacking Detroit. His force, 
guns, &c. Linctot has left the Illinois with 200 men, with orders to 
buy horses. Gamelin says they will be at Miamis by August, where 
they were to build a fort for stores, under charge of 50 Bostonians 
and 50 French 372 

July 19, Sandusky. 

Speech from the Hurons at Sandusky, with a prisoner (in French). The 
promises of Lieut.-Governor Hamilton to assemble the whites to drive 
the rebels from the Indian lands have not been kept. He had pro- 
mised also food and all things necessary but failed. Prays that the 
promises maybe fulfilled and theywilibein a position to defend 
themselves 37G> 

July 19, Sandusky. 

Capt. Lernoult's answer to the Shawanese, encouraging them to continue 
faithful and exert themselves. Thanks for their efforts to secure the 
Southern Indians. Exhorts them to be unanimous. The Six Nations 
are determined to defend themselves and country 373- 

July 20, Detroit. 

Deposition of Henrick Iago against James Cassidy and Boslick for 

treasonable language... 381 

July 21, Detroit. 

Deposition of John Laughton, naval storekeeper, against James Cassidy 

tor treasonable language 379 1 

July 21, Detroit. 

Deposition of William Miller as to the treasonable utterances of James 

Cassidy and William Boslick, at Detroit 378 

July 21, Detroit. 

Deposition of John Cornwall against Cassidy for treasonable language.... 380 

July 23, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Capt. Lernoult. Is satisfied of his zeal. Colonel 
Bolton informed of the impossibility of forwarding cannon for Detroit 
and Michillimakinak, owing to greater need for provisions ; guns 
may be taken out of the vessels. The astonishing consumption of 
rum at Detroit must be diminished. The issues at Niagara much 
less ; no allowance to the men except on particular occasions. The 
account for command money not in form and bill for the same cannot 
be received.... , 382 

July 28, Detroit. 

Deposition of John Cornwall against Jeremiah Cockran, Wiggins, a trader, 
and Fouche, a Frenchman from Post Vincennes, for treasonable lan- 
guage. Fouche, it is stated in a note, was the man who gave the 
rebels notice of the approach of the King's troops to Vincennes and 
employed Indians to carry goods out of the fort. 384 ! 

30 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



1779. PAGE 

July 29, Niagara. 

Capt. Brehm to Capt. Lernoult, sending him power to hold general courts 

martial, &c 386 

July 31, Lower Sandusky. 

William Arundel to Capt. Lernoult. Sending reports of speeches delivered 
by three Delawares (Killbuck, &c.,) to a council of Wyandots. The 
Wyandot chief is sending copies to Detroit and will do as directed. 
Baptiste Drouilliard is sending a printed paper given him by the 
blacksmith at the Upper Tillage, being a declaration of Count 
d'Estaing. The speeches of the Delawares urge the Wyandots to 
join the Indians for Congress 388 

August 2, Detroit. 

Capt. Lernoult's answer to the speech of the Hurons of Sandusky, made on 
2nd July, states he has been satisfied with their conduct at the begin- 
ning of the war, but finds fault with their dealings with the rebels, 
against the bad effect of which he warns them, as well as against 
Montour ; 305 

August 3, Detroit. 

Account of goods belonging to Laventure, Foucher and Brother, taken at 

Detroit by Thomas Williams, by orders of Capt. Lernoult 402 

August 3 and 6, St. Joseph . 

Essential part of the Council held with the Pottawatamies by Mr. 
Bennett (in French). He urges them to remain true to their alle- 
giance, and reports the extreme distress of the Americans and 
successes of the British. On the 6th, the War Chief; Petit Bled, 
advocates in the strongest terms, that the Indians should remain at 
home in peace. Answered by Bennet, and after difficulties raised, it 
was finally determined to follow Bennet on the road to Detroit 391 

August 26, Gaol, Williamsburgh. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand, stating that he has drawn 

bills for £400 stg., in favour of Samuel Beal. He may have to draw 

% again, as there are 8 officers and 18 men. Dejean, Lamothe and 

himself have been in gaol 75 days ; Major Hay, with the other 

prisoners of war are at Chesterfield 404 

August 28, Quebec. 

Capt. Mathews to Capt. Lernoult, stating that General Haldimand has 
promoted him (Lernoult) to be Major, and hoping he would have 

to inform him of something more to his advantage 405 

A.ugust 29, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Captain Lernoult, instructing him to transfer the 
command of Detroit to Major Depeyster, and repair at once to 
Niagara ..., 406 

August 30, Detroit. 

Capt. Thomas Aubrey 47th Regiment. Order to arrest Ensign Hamilton, 

for countermanding orders. 407 

September 5, Detroit. 

Capt. Lernoult to General Haldimand. Advising that he has drawn for 

£38,710 4s2dK Y. C'y., in favour of A. & W.Macomb 408 

ptember 17, Pittsburg. 
Report of Council between the Hurons and the Wyandots, held at Fort 
Pitt, and a copy brought to Detroit by Duentate, a chief of the 
Hurons. Both nations hostile to the English, as expressed in their 

speeches , 409 

31 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



1779. PAGE 

September 23, Detroit. 

Capt. Thos. Aubrey to General Hal dim and, stating that he had hoped 
the court martial on Lieuts. Bunbury and Glennie, at Carleton Island, 
would have been held. Trusts Glennie will not be allowed to go to 
England till tried. These two have done everything to set the 
officers against him, and other charges mentioned. False returns 
, made by Glennie ; insolence of Bun bury. 41.8 

October li, Detroit. 

Lieut. Thomas Bunbury, 47th Eegiment, to General Haldimand. Points 
out his long imprisonment and the nature of the charges against him, 
and prays for a court martial 421 

October 19th, Detroit. 

Declaration by Lieut. Irvine, respecting the conduct of Lieut. Glennie, 
and the means he took to obtain signatures against his commanding 
officer 423 

October 20, Shawanese Village. 

The chiefs and principal warriors of the Mingoes, Hurons, Delawares, and 
Shawanese to Major Lernoult, that they had met with success in the 
late expedition ; reports of large number of Virginians coming from 
Fo/rt Pitt, ask assistance to resist them, and, if he does, Detroit can 
never be in danger.... 424 

October 23, Shawneytown. 

Col. John Campbell to Capt. Lernoult. Stating the manner of his capture; 
he is detained as an Indian prisoner, although he surrendered to 
British troops ; asks to be taken to Detroit and held as a prisoner 
there 

October 29, Detroit. 

Lieut. Thomas Bunbury, 47th Regiment. Charges against Capt. Aubrey 42 

October 30, Detroit. 

Lieut. Thomas Bunbury to Lt.-Col. Bolton, transmitting a copy of his 

charges against Capt. Aubrey , 42) 

November 1,. Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. Has relieved Major Lernoult 
who sets oif with accounts of the defeat of Rogers on the Ohio, by 
Girty and Elliot. Enclosed papers of this affair and those found on 
the rebels. The great demands of the Indians; in the absence of 
Caldwell cannot assist them with troops but will give them goods and 
ammunition to be divided by McKee. Hamilton's messenger 
returned from Pensacola. Will write to Governor Chester with 
Spanish Governor's letter fl 

November 10, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Major Lernoult. Informing him that he'has been 
appointed Adjutant General, but that owing to the great change of 
climate from Detroit to Quebec, his presence will be dispensed with 
for the winter, during which time he can assist Col. Bolton. His 
appointment dated 1st August, and he will be notified when to come 
down 

November 15, Fort Pitt. 

Report of Council between the rebels, the Delawares, and a few of the 

Shawanese favourable to the rebels. .. , 

. 32 



46 Victoria. Sessional Tapers (Xo. 11.) A. IS 33 



1179. PAGE 

November 20, Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. Secret intelligence received from 
Col. Bolton. Cannot get the Indians to do much whil-t threatened 
by the Virginians and Indians in their interests. Virginians reported 
to be building a fort at Cashote Village. Is urging the Indians to 
prevent Clark from building a fort at the Falls of the Ohio ; this 
will take him off the Illinois country, and enable Lt.-Govcrnor Sin- 
clair to surprise Fort Louis at Pincour. Cannot qualify Thomas 
Williams to be Justice, till he himself is properly authorized. Is 
sending off Campbell, Col. of Militia, taken by the Indians 434 

December 4, Sandusky. 

Speech delivered to the Chiefs and Warriors of the Mingoes, Huions, 
Delawares, and Shawanese, by Lieut. Caldwell. Distributing goods 
and ammunition and urging them to continue faithful and zealous ; 
if they do, support and supplies will be sent them 436 

December 5, Niagara. 

Major Lernoult to Governor Haldimand, sending thanks for the appoint- 
ment of Adjutant General, and for dispensing with his attendance 
during the winter 458 

December 26, to 1880, January 22, Sandusky. 

Speeches from several nations assembled in Council at Sandusky, by Lieut. 
Caldwell, with his answers, and copies of rebel pass to Raven Chief, 
who explains his course. The endorsation of these is December, 

1778 and 1779, a palpable error 43i» 

1780. 

January 5, Detroit. 

Doctor Arthur to Capt. Brehm, respecting his appointment to be Surgeon 

for the Naval Department and Garrison. His claim of precedence... 459 

January 6, Detroit. 

Norman McLeod to Capt. Mathews. That he did not accept the pay of 
Town Major on the appointment of Lt.-Governor Hamilton, knowing 
that it was not sactioned by Gen. Carleton or Haldimand. Asks that 
his services be remembered in case of vacancy 461 

January 6, Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand, asking that a pass be granted 

for the conveyance of Macomb's goods from Montreal 463 

January, Detroit. 

Account current between Laverdure, Foucher & Brother and Ridly 

Bennet 464 

February 12, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Major De Peyster. Has honoured the last bill 
from Michillimakinak ; the enormous expense for Indians at that 
post. Governor Sinclair to be cautioned as to them. Hopes the 
stroke on the Ohio will have a good effect on the Indians. Approves 
of employing the Wabash Indians to prevent Clark establishing him- 
self at the falls of the Ohio; the effect of that establishment to open 
communication between Fort Pitt and the Mississippi ; Sinclair 
should strike at the Illinois 165 

March 8, Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. Sending report from Chevalier 
at St. Joseph that the rebels have evacuated the Illinois. Indians to 
] ire vent the rebels from re-crossing the Wabash. Arrival of Cald- 

33 
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46 Victoria.. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



l: 



1780. pagi 

March S, Detroit — Concluded. 

well, McKee, Elliot and the Girtys. Kebels had failed to establish a 
fort at Coosnocking, but had surrounded the country with forts. 
Eebel designs on the Miamis ; Indians ask help If a few soldiers 
could be sent all the Indians would rise and help. Will send a small 
party of soldiers ; the Indian officers and volunteers to go up the 
Grlaise and down the Great Miamis to the Ohio, This will facilitate 
Sinclair's movements on the Mississippi, and be of use to Brigadier 
Campbell, if he has not yet taken New Orleans - The Wabash 
Indians to amuse Clark at the falls of the Ohio 46 

March 10, Detroit. 

Capt. Thomas Aubrey to General Haldimand. Lieut. Bun bury drowned 

by the upsetting of a canoo 4'J 

March 10, Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. The death, by drowning, of 

Lieut. Bunbury and Mr. Godfrey, Conductor 4 1 ! 

March 10. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. Capt. McKee desires to go to 
Europe ; has prevailed on him to return to the Indian country to 
help in the present enterprise. His long services and offers of com- 
missions ; his influence with the Shawanese. Suggests that some- 
thing should be done to make up his losses and induce him to remain 
in the service , 

March 15, St. Joseph. 

Louis Chevalua- to Major De Peyster (in French.) Has received orders 
from Lieut. -Governor Sinclair to leave the post with arms and bag- 
gage, apparently from fear of a sudden attack of rebels, which is con- 
trary to the news he has received. The obstacles to immediate 
movement ; the good dispo8ition of the Indians who are setting out, 
even those who had been faithless before. The Grand Miamis has 
come for his present; talk with him and his resolution to go to war 
in consequence 

April 16, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Major De Peyster. Has determined to remove the 
fort to the Island of Michiliimakinak ; preparations for building to 
be made as speedily as possible ; accordingly orders sent to Lieut.- 
Governor Sinclair ; wheels and harness to be sent to Michiliima- 
kinak ....... 

May 6, Caskaskias. 

French proclamation by Jean de St. GermaiDe, purporting to be from the 
King of France, that the French, Spaniards and Americans are all 
one ; exhorting the Indians to stay at home and not meddle with a 
war which may be fatal to them if they do „. 

May 8. 

General Haldimand to Major De Peyster. Has determined to order Indian 
presents from England to save the enormous expense caused by the 
greed of traders. Orders given to send down estimates of the quan- 
tities; copy of same letter sent to Sinclair , 

May 8,. Quebec. 

General Haidimand to Major De Peyster. That in the arrangement of the 
affairs of Capt. McDougall rendered necessary by his death, Isle aux 
Cochons is not to be sold, but reclaimed by the Crown, for, the use of 
Detroit. Mrs. McDougall need not be afraid that anything will be 

done to her detriment ■ 

34 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14 A. 18S3 



1180. PAGE 

May 16, Detroit. 

Major DePeyster to General Haldimand. Advising his having drawn for 
£tf 4,035 8s. 8Jd. N. Y. Cy. in favour of Macomb, as per abstract and 
vouchers. .«. 483 

May 17, Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. That Capt. Bird would pass the 
carrying place last Tuesday and have all the way down stream to 
the Ohio. How the intention to amuse the rebels at the Ohio was 
baffled. The Delawares and Shawanese daily bringing in scalps and 
prisoners. Clark gone to establish a settlement on the Mississippi. 
The stranding of the Windot on Lake Huron « 484 

May 17, Detroit. 

" Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. Sending down M. Perrault 
taken prisoner by the Indians when on his way to Virginia to re- 
cover debts. Has been ill . 486 

June 1, Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. Arrival of chiefs from the 
Ohio at Micliillimakinak with scalps, two of those being of officers 
from Williamsburg to Clark. Arrival of Indians from Vincennes 
and St. Joseph ; they have gone olf to attack a post with 30 Virgin- 
ians under Dalton and to reconnoitre the Falls of the Ohio. The 
Canadians the worst enemies. About 2,000 warriors. fitted out for 
Ohio and Wabash. De Quindre, of St. Joseph, placed at the head of 
the Pottawatomies, and responsible for their behaviour 487 

June 8, Detroit. 

Major DePeyster to General Haldimand. Explaining the cause of the 
enormous expense of the Indian Department at Micliillimakinak. 
The Indians are now making their own demands, and the refusal of 
a trifle may turn a whole war party 489 

June 14, St. Joseph. 

Dagniau De Quindre to Major De Peyster (?) (in French.) His arrival at 
the same time as the Pottawatomies ; they produce a letter from the 
Illinois, of which Chevalier sends a copy. His obligations to 
Chevalier for help; without him there would not have been so large 
a party raised ; he has prevented a defection on account of stories 
raised by Indians from the Illinois. They have, however, agreed to 
follow him (De Quindre) and he will set out at once. The expense 
for presents and ammunition 492 

June 18, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Major De Peyster. Acknowledging receipt of 
news of rebel movements in the Illinois, Sandusky, Kentucky, &c. 
Approves of the steps taken to check their advance, and trusts the 
success of the expedition may stop for the present the demand of 
Indians for the help of troops which cannot be given ; hopes for rein- 
forcements. The help to Michillimackinak may weaken Detroit, but 
the Rangers should have joined by this time, who should be able with 
the Indians to repel any attack, and Detroit is safe in any event. 
Desires to assist McKee if he could see how to do so, as he is too 
valuable to be allowed to go to Europe. xVsks what he (De Peyster) 

would recommend 495 

Tune 19, Quebec. 

Macomb, Edgar and Macomb. Proposal to Bupply Government with mer- 
chandise and rum at Detroit 41)8 

35 
14— 3i 



40 Victoria S«^ion;i] l\\\w.v* (No. 14 ) A. ISS3 



17^0. PAGE 

June 26, S . Jdeoplt. 

Louis Chevalier to Major De Peyster (in French). The new orders have 
caused consternation ; ho must obey and is ready with arms and 
baggage to set out, in obedience to orders, along with all domiciled 
at the post. The effect of an ill conceived letter on the Indians; the 
young people, however, have followed De Quindre. This is the last 
proof of his zeal and fidelity. Is afraid of damage to his effects if the 
savages are not cautioned by De Peyster not to touch them 500 

June 2*7, Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. Enclosing a demand for Indian 

goods 503 

June 29, St. Joseph. 

Louis Chevalier to Major De Peyster (in French). Account of outrages 
committed by the Miamis on the Pottawatomies, who have called on 
the Ottawas and Sauteux for help, which they ask from Michilli- 
makinak also » 504 






July 6, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Major De Peyster, acknowledging receipt of dis- 
patches of Macomb and Perrault. Approves of the steps he has 
taken to guard against evil effects of the encroachment of people 
flying from Congress into Kentucky; desires he will prevent their 
becoming formidable to the Posts, and Indians, who in such cases 
will act heartily. The little confidence to be placed in the Indians, 
in spite of the expense lavished on them. To call their attention to 
these expenses in Council. To seize the Frenchmen who circulated 
stories, and send them to Quebec in irons. Prisoners may be sent to 
Quebec if inconvenient to keep them. The conduct of the rebels to 
prisoners would justify retaliation. Prisoners may be employed on 
the works and supplied with rations. Those refusing, to be sent 
down in close confinement. De Quindre may be employed, although 
the Indian Department should be diminished lieflections on the 
amazing sums spent on the Indian service, which he does not attri- 
bute to indifference of the officers, but to indulgence to the Indians; 
their comforts should be met, but no expense beyond providing these. 
Great part of the expense also has arisen from Government officials 
being traders. Not in future to allow any of them to be even con- 
cerned in trade. Is sensible of the difficulty of controlling demands, 
but it is a first duty. The expense accounted for at Michillimacki- 
nak; desires that a journal be kept for reference 50< 

July 6, Fort Clark, Caskaskias, Illinois. 

Lt.-Col. John Montgomery to Major Do Peyster, granting a pass to Philip 
Dejean to go to Detroit to bring his family back till a cartel is 
effected, with original pass dated 4th March, to enable Dejean to go 

to Clark's headquarters on parole 51 

July 13, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Major De Peyster. Has resolved to cultivate ground 
at each post for food, to save the enormous cost of transport. Can be 
supplied with an efficient farmer from Col. Bolton, Niagara. Hog 
Island to be appropriated for a farm, and every assistance is to be 
given to forward the work. Mrs. McDougall to receive compensation 51 
July 19, Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to Genoral Haldimand. Cap. Bird has been successful 
against the forts on Licking Creek ; his and McKee's letters for- 
warded 

36 



■ 



46 Victoria. Sessional P-ipom (No. 1\ ) A. 18SS 



1780. page; 

lJuly 25, Detroit. 

i Major De Peyster to General Haldimand, respecting Fouchet, wV- o 
effects were seized, as belonging to Kidley. Ridley's account 517 

July 30, Detroit. 

Henry Duvernet, return of ordnance wanted for the new fort at Detroit. . 518 

Liigust 10, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Major De Peyster. Has received estimate of ! r o 
Indian presents needed for a year. The propriety of diminishing 
the liberality; he is to make trial of it by distinguishing those who 
were hearty in the service. They cannot go to the rebels for sup- 
plies. He does not wish to curtail the deserving, but cannot feed the- 
idle, and those who are always calling for help to keep off the rebels ;;, 
complaints against Sinclair at Michillimakinak, brought by envious 
people ; urges to perfect confidence in each other, and no jealousy,, 
and to send Sinclair a statement of the reports ma le against him. 
To agree with Sinclair as to the treatment of the Indians at respec- 
tive posts. To regulate the trnde at Saguenaut (Saginaw) Bay a* 
formerly. The suspicious conduct of Finchler and Fisher require* 
that they be watched to prevent intercourse with the Colonists....... 519* 

August 10, Quebec. 

General Haldimand, to Major DePeyster ; report of Capt. Bird's success at. 
Licking Creek received. The Indians to be warned of the evil effec s 
of their perverse conduct in not supporting the plans for the effectual' 
destruction of their invaders. The inhabitants to supply straw for 
barracks at Government priee . 523 

/ugust 15, Lorimer's House. 

Bombardier Homan to Capt. Bird. Hearing of the approach of the rebels 
was preparing to carry off the ordnance and ammunition when an 
Indian carried off all the horses but one; managed to secure gm*, 
loose shot, &c. ; might have killed the Indian and companions, but 
was afraid of the result of an Indian war. The rebels have since 
evacuated the Indian territory after setting villages on fire. Iodtaus 
killing rebel prisoners to prevent their escaping with intelligence. 
The brutalities of the rebels. Has sent for flour and pork..: ., 524 

August 18, Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. Arrival of McKee and Bird. 
McKee sets out for the Indian country to rouse the Indians against 
the rebels ; they will be supported by Hare with Rangers and 
Chabert's Canadian volunteers. McKee's promise from Lord Dun- 
more of the rank of eolonel of a battalion ; his commission was 
intercepted and destroyed, so that it did not reach him. The only- 
way to serve Mr. McKee is to raise a Provincial corps .. 527 

August 22, Upper Sbawanese Village. 

Captain MiKee to Major De Peyster. The affair of the Shawanese settled 
before his arrival, and the enemy gone. The Chillieothes left their 
village and destroyed the fort. The advance of the rebels on P:.k- 
camee and description of the fight ; the slaughter of the rebels, who 
had destroyed the corn fields to the great distress of the Indian.-. 
Another rebel army reported coming from Fort Pitt. Expected 
arrival of Hare, whose troops will encourage the Indians ; is trying 
to get intelligence from Fort Pitt. Sends speech from the Indians... 529 

37 



4 ) Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1888 






1T80. PAGE 

August 22, Upper Shawanese Village. 

Speech of tbe Dela wares and Shawanese Village to Major De Peyster, 
referred to in immediately previous letter. That they had sent for 
help before ; the destruction of their villages ; another force 
approaching, and more help needed. The message sent from the 
rebel Delawares is enclosed 533 

August 30, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Major De Peyster. Pass to Mr. Perrault to proceed 

to the Illinois country for purposes -of trade 536 

August 30, Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. Rebels have left the Shawanese 
country after destroying the corn and villages ; the women and 
children coming for help. Rebels threaten the Wyandots at San- 
dusky. Captain Hare, with Rangers and Canadians, is moving to 
oppose them, with all the Indians McKee can raise. Captain 
Mompesson reports an expedition of Creoles against Michiilimakinak ; 
does not believe it likely ; cannot, however, weaken the garrison 
(Detroit) further, with detachments out, a^d so many sick. Should 
the news be confirmed the Rangers raay be back, and he will send out 
a detachment to their assistance. Arrival of De Quindre from St. 
Joseph with 200 Pottawatomies. They left him, but came in for 
presents, which are refused till they bring in the rebel traders 53 

August 3 ( , Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to Captain Mathews (?). The justices have no power 
to decide in cases of small debts ; unless it is granted great confusion 
will arise. Power must be sent to swear in Williams and him 54 1 

August 31 (?), Detroit. 

Major De Peyster to General Haldimand. Sending letters received by 

express ; will not answer them till he has orders * 541 

September 3, Detroit, 

Lieut. H. Duvernet, K.A. Return of ordnance required for the garrison 

of Detroit 542 

September 5, Detroit. 

Appraisement of the buildings on Hog Island, by Nathan Williams and 

Jean Baptiste Craisste 543 

September 8, Detroit. 

Major De Peyster lo General Haldimand. That he has drawn for 
£42,714 7s. 11 Jd., N.Y. currency, in favour of Macomb, Edgar and 
Macomb 544 

September 9, New York. 

Rocheblave to General Haldimand (in French). Has been disappointed 
in getting his vessel armed as he expected, and is afraid, therefore, of 
fresh misfortunes if he goes to Canada. Reports expedition to Vir- 
ginia ; he hopes to raise some troops to drive out the rebels from 
along the Mississippi, the Wabash and Ohio. Reported destruction 
of the rebel army by Cornwallis on the frontiers of North and South 
Carolina ; those escaping have fled to Virginia. The army of 
Washington is 40,000 strong ; detachments sent to the south ; 
the militia of Pennsylvania has disbanded. The French at 
Rhode Island. Some have joined Washington. Chevalier de 
la Luzerne, ambassador from France to Congress, keeping 
up relations with Canadians. The proposal made to him 

38 



6 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No, 14.) A. 1883 



1780. PAGE 

September 9, New York — Concluded. 

(Kocheblave) to serve Congress in the Illinois us Indian superin- 
tendent, &e. Had refused, and been proscribed by Congress, which 
lemands from Vaudreuii to banish him to France or the West 
Indies. His interview, and declaration of being a British subject 
owing to being abandoned by France at the peace. The intrigues 
of Linctot with the Indians. Linctot, a Canadian, had his head 
turned by a letter from d'Estaing and promises from Congress. 
Information as to St. Germain, Bentley, and their relations with the 
rebels. The rigorous imprisonment of Lt.-G-overnor Hamilton. 
Calls attention to his and Major Lord's losses by brigands 545 

leptember 9, Detroit. 

Major DePeyster to General Haldimand. Th;.t he has had the buildings 
on Hog Island appraised. Will settle Mr. Kiddle's and other three 
families, reserving grazing ground for the King's cattle 552 

September 15, Upper Shawanese Village, 

Speech sent by a Frenchman in the rebel service, at Fort Pitt, to the 
Shawanese, &c, with message from Broadstreet, at Fort Pitt. 
Keported movements of the enemy to concentrate at the Huron 
villages and advance on Detroit. The Shawanese, &c, resolved to 
oppose the rebels, and word sent to the Indians of Sandusky to unite 
with the same view •■ 553 

September 24, Detroit. 

Account of pay due to Lieut. Scheflin, in the Detroit volunteers, and 

Indian Department ,. 557 

>eptember 24, Quebec. 

Capt. Mathews to Major DePeyster. That the Commander-in-Chief is 
inclined to think better of Bentley. and will forgive what is past, if 
he firmly abides by his promises. He may get the small quantity of 
goods in he asks for, and may be useful, but particular attention may 
be paid to his conduct 558 

September 30, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Major DePeyster. That the request of Dejean 
for leave to take his family to Yincennes must be refused, for reasons 
given 560 

Dctober 1, Detroit. 

Major DePe3'ster to General Haldimand, explaining the mode of dis- 
tributing Indian presents ; the close attention he pays to the matter, 561 

)ctober 10, Detroit. 

Major DePeyster to General Haldimand. Has placed Loyalist families at 
Hog Island ; there is only room for two. it being 1T8 acres in all. 
Has employed prisoners in King's work, they will be placed on ceded 
Indian lands, if approved of, but, at present, the Indians make it 
dangerous to do so 563 

October 2V, Quebec. 

General Haldimand to Major DePeyster. Lieut. Scheflin has escaped 
from Williamsburg and will return to Detroit. He is to continue as 
Lieutenant and to be employed in the Indian Deportment if needed.. 567 

November 1, Detroit. 

State of the settlement: population, live stock, grain, land under cultiva- 
tion, &c 568 

39 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. :883- 



1780. PAGE 

November 16. Detroit. 

Major DePe}-ster to General Haldimand. Attack by Indians on a body of 
Canadians, under LaBalme, near the Miamis village. LaBalme and 
30 or 40 killed, Lis aide-camp taken prisoner. LaBalme designed a 
coup de main on Detroit. His papers, &c, sent on. The trouble the 
party under LaBalme might have given to Detroit had it been 
complete. Its rapid movements ; the efforts of the Indians. The 
Bangers sent to support the Miamis. The propriety of giving the 
Indians liberal presents, and keeping a trader (Baubin suggested) 
among them 569 

December 3, Carle ton Island. 

Lieut.-Gerrard. Irvine to General Haldimand, stating his services and. 

asking for promotion. 512 

December 12, New York. 

Lt.-Governor Hamilton to General Haldimand. Is doubtful as to his 
letters reaching ; the failure of his enterprise owing to treachery ; 
believes he can clear himself; his imprisonment ; offer of parole and. 
refusal at first, but acceptance after the third offer ; hopes to get 
exchanged. The distrebsed state of Major Hay; his services. 
Lamothe's illness from confinement. Scheffelin has set off for 
Quebec. Maisonville pat an end to himself in prison. Mr. Belle- 
feuille's good conduct, etc., recommends him as second lieutenant, 
should Lamothe's company be recruited. Mr. McBeath's sacrifices. 
Transmits bills, &c. Will sail for England with Sir H. Clinton's 
leave 573 

December 12, New York. 

Account current of Lt.-Governor Hamilton, from 24th February, 1779, to 

24th December, 1780 .'.. 579 



40 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 188S 



NOTE B. 

Eeports, Outwards, of Vessels from Quebec, during the Season of Navigation, 
from 10th June to 19th November, 1791. 



PORT OF QUEBEC. 



Date. 


Name of Ship. 


Master. 


OO 

a 
o 
H 

o 
6 


Destination. 


Cargo. 


1791. 
June 10 

do 21 

do 21 
do 22 

do 25 
do 27 

do 28 
do 30 

do 30 

do 30 
July 1 


Canada 


D. Howie 


205 
146 

239 
122 

110 
286 

207 
212 

227 

172 
411 


Greenock 


9,800 bushels wheat and 1,000 pine 
boards. 

350 barrels flour, 600 bags bread, 
5 bullocks, 300 pine boards for 
dunnage, 4 tons salt. 

10,000 bushels wheat, 1,000 pine 
boards. 

80 bushels and 350 bags, equal to 
1,214 bushels flax seed ; 5,640- 
pieces pipe and puncheon staves, 
2 trunks wearing apparel, 1 pipe 
Madeira wine cases. 

4,420 bushels wheat, 90 bushels 


Friendship 

London 


J. Tunsdell 


Newfoundland... 

Falmouth 

London 

Greenock 


J. Branon 


General Clarke. 
Nancy 


Thos. Lane 


W. Cochrane 

C. Pearson 


Amphitrite 

Oughton ,. 

Dunmore 


Liverpool 


peas, 200 pipe staves. 

92 pieces white oak, 45 pieces pine, 
100 pine boards, 14,299 pipe bar- 
rel staves and bolts, 18 hogs- 
heads, equal to 138 bushels flax 
seed. 

355 barrels flour, 1,600 quintals 
biscuits, 400 pine boards, 1,400 
bushels oats. 

1 cask peltries and 23 J castorum, 

6 barrels peltries, 7,300 bushels 
wheat, 1,200 pipe staves, 1 box 
castorum, equal to 30 lbs. 
and 22 casks pot ash ; 70 cask3 
flax, equal to 745 bushels flax 
seed ; 1 box wearing apparel, 
112 lbs. Scots sntfff, 2,o00 salmon 
hooks, 1 box. 

10,200 bushels wheat, 300 barrels 
flour, 1,400 pine boards, 2 kegs 
balsam, 6 boxes window glass. 

8,000 bushels wheat. 

309 pieces square oak, 8,474 double 
pipe staves, 1,040 short pipe 
staves, 3,043 single pipe staves, 
847 pieces oak, 6 ft. long, 660 
hogshead staves, 30 pine pieces ; 

7 puncheons, 6 kegs, 1 tierce, 2 
barrels peltries; 9 puncheons, con- 
taining 19 ox hides ; 30 pun- 
cheons, containing 430 bushels 
flax seed ; 1,000 seal skins. 


A. Syme 


Harbor Grace.... 
London.... 


A. Paterson 


King David 

Ark 


R. Linden 


Bristol 


N. Squires 


Falmouth 


Queen 


Wm. Dawson 


London 





41 



-46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papons (No. 14.) 



A. 1833 



NOTE B.— Continued 

Reports, Outwards, of Vessels from this Port, during the Season of Navigation, 
from I Oth June to 19th November. 



PORT OF QUEBEC— Continued. 



Date. 


Name of Ship. 


Master. 


m 

a 
o 
Eh 

o 
6 


Destination. 


Cargo. 


1791. 
July 2 


Hero 




108 
224 

122 

55 
135 

105 
159 

213 
155 

104 

76 

163 


Temple Bay 

Liverpool 

St. John, N.B. ... 

Fogo 

Newfoundland... 


800 tierce packs, 400 hogshead 
packs, 80 tierces flour, 300 bags 
bread, 20 barrels flour. 

50 pieces W. oak, 11,208 pipe bolts 
and staves, 800 boxes and 1,725 
barrel staves, 300 hogsheads, 
3 quintals and 23 pieces of head- 
ing, 30 casks containing 237 
bushels flax seed. 

300 barrels flour, 9,672 lbs biscuits, 
300 barrels oats, 2 bullocks, 2 
cows, 30 sheep, 2 horses, 2\ doz. 
turkeys and 6 doz. fowls. 

283 barrels flour and 328 quintals 
biscuit. 

180 barrels flour, 536 quintals bread, 
1,025 pine boards, 735 minots of 
oats, 12 spars and 1 horse. 

1,125 bags containing 4,500 W. 
bushels of wheat. 

2,177J bushels wheat, 250 barrels 
flour, 30 tierces salmon, 2,057 
barrel staves, 3,601 hogshead 
staves, 139 pipe packs, 50 hogs- 
head packs, 220 pine boards, 6 
ruts, 1 hogshead, 6£ casks Ma- 
deira wine. 

423 barrels flour, 9,700 bushels of 
wheat, 2,000 pipe and 500 hogs- 
head staves. 

110 barrels flour, 185 quintals oi 
biscuits, 896 bushels oats in 64 
puncheons, 8,391 barrel staves 
and 1,115 heading, 1,087 pint 
boards, 15 ft., 2,100 pine boards 
10 ft., 4,000 hoops, 44 tierce! 
and 26 barrels salmon. 

1,215 bushels of oats, 1,250 pin* 
planks, 1,500 pine boards and ' 
spars. 

3,000 W. bushels wheat, 300 pip' 
staves and 286 pine boards. 

2,680 and 4,920 bushels wheat. 


do 4 
do 7 


Cholmley 

Leopard 

Brig Ant 

George and Mary 

Posie 


Con. Cayley 

Wm, Bell 


do 8 
do 9 


J. Tiston 

T. Croft 


do 12 


J. Wiseman 


do 12 


Betsey 

Defiance...- 


J. Bishop 


Madeira 

Madeira 

Grenada 

St. John 


do 12 


R. Watts.... 

T. Hanford 

P. Wheaton 

T. Mourant 


do 1G 

do 19 

do 20 


Friends 

Nancy 

Diligent 

Mary Ann 


do 21 


A. McBride 


Madeira 



42 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 18831 



NOTE B— Continued. 

Beports, Outwards, of Vessels from this Port, during the Season of Navigation, 
from 10th June to 19th November. 



PORT OF QUEBEC— Continued. 



Date. 



1791 
July 22 



do 23 



do 25 



do 27 



Name of Ship. 



do 29 



do 29 



lo 29 Atlas 



Brig Mary 



B. Appolo B. Swayne 



Master, 



J. Ken 



Scipio. 



Caroline. 



W. W. Granville. 



Elizabeth 



log. 2 



Flora 



T. Davison. 



A. Paterson 



H. Wilson 



W. Payne 



H. Smith 



J. Payen 



165 



142 



191 



260 



Destination. 



Greenock, 



51 



192 



132 



339 



Cadiz 



London 



Halifax. 



St. John,Nfld. 



Newfoundland 



Liverpool, 



43 



Cargo. 



1,500 W. oak staves, 500 seal skins, 
1 trunk wearing apparel, 1 cop- 
per kettle, 1 jug, essence of 
spruce. 

1,117 quintals biscuits, 400 tierces 
flour, 164 pipes and 439 puncheon 
staves. 

7,900 bushels, in bulk, and 1,200 
bags wheat, 735 pine boards and 
planks, 456 ft. scantling. 

30 bales peltries, 2 puncheons and 

I hogshead peltries, 6^ hogsheads 
castorum, 1,000 seal skins, 31 
hogsheads, equal 1,839 gallons 
porpoise oil, 153 casks, 469 cwt., 

II lbs. pot and pearl ashes, 30 
hogsheads, equal 19,780 essence of 
spruce; 14 casks equal 112 minots 
flaxseed; 4casks,equal 5,776 cwt. 
brass and copper ; 18,779 oak 
staves and headings ; 1,28 1 pieces 
oak logs and 2 boxes wild plants ; 
1 table, 1 box mountain tea. 

130 tierces, equal to 650 bushels 
peas, 39 quintals bread; 12boxes. 
108, 20 kegs, 1,094. equal to 
1,202 cwt. essence, of spruce; 1 
paper parcel, 6 chaldrons of 
coals, a grave head and foot 
stone, a chimney piece. 

560 cwt., 2 qr., 7 lbs. bread, 225 
barrels flour, 2U sheep, 149 
planks, 130 tons salt, 30 pun- 
cheons foreign gin. 

196 barrels flour, 713 cwt., 2 qr., 
22 lbs. biscuit, 396 bushels oats, 
728 bushels barley, 100 sacks, 
equal to 500 bushels Indian 
corn, 10 live oxen, with pro- 
visions. 

18 beaver skins, 256 pieces oak 
timber, 15,425 white oak staves, 
650 pine planks, 1,600 pine 
boards, 5 boxes essence of 
spruce, 20 barrels flour, 30 oak 
planks. 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Tapers (No. 14.) 



A. 183S 



NOTE B—Continued. 

[Reports, Outwards, of Vessels from this Port, during the Season of Navigation. 
from 10th June to 19th November. 



PORT OF QUEBEC— Continued. 



Date. 


Name of Ship. 


Master. 


TO 

O 

o 
6 


Destination. 


Cargo. 


1791. 

Aug. 2 

do 3 


Lively 


S. Palmer 


242 
153 

112 

160 
185 
178 

101 

237 

177 

142 
75 


Falmouth 

Jamaica 


5,000 bushels wheat, 3,000 pine- 
boards. 

266 barrels fine, 360 barrels com- 


Swallow 


James Craig......... 


do 4 


Jean 


J. Sancster 


mon flour, 200 barrels bread, 80 
bushels peas, 7,000 staves, 1,000 
heading, 1,200 ft. pine boards, 
4,000 hoops, 140 barrels flour, 
45 quintals bread, 1,000 hoops. 

165 cwt. 3 qr. codfish, 150 barrels 
flour, 3,098 Winchester bushels 
wheat, 6 tierces salmon, 150 
bushels peas, 150 bushels oats, 2- 
pieces pine timber, 2 pieces oak 
timber, 600 pine boards. 

8,060 bushels wheat, 680 pine 
boards. 

8,000 Winchester bushels wheat, 
1,400 pine boards. 

326 casks of oil, equal to 100 tons 
and 87 gallons, 400 casks of oil, 
equal to 100 tons, 1,500 seal, 
skins. 

440 casks, containing 2, 744 bushels 
peas, 4 gallon kegs essence of 
spruce, 1 hogshead and 2 quarter 
casks Madeira wine. 

1 ,523 barrels flour, 20 puncheons, 
containing 60 quintals biscuits, 
20 puncheons, equal to 229 
bushels oats, 19 puncheons,- 
equal to 238 bushels peas, 85 
packages of old puncheons, 10 
puncheons of heading, 1,588 butt 
staves, 5£ ft. long, 3,840 box 
staves, 13,000 hoops, 12 ft. long, 
51 casks dry cod. 

49 pieces oak timber, 5,568 pipe 
staves, 2,360 hogshead staves, 
2,840 pine planks. 

7,000«bushels wheat in bulk. 

130 barrels flour, 504| casks biscuit . 


do 5 


Brig Jeannie 

John 


J. Sparling 


Falmouth 


do 6 


E. Boyd... 


do 


do 6 


Thetis 


D. Rutherford 

J. Lamb 




do 6 


Jean Sophia 

Bell 


Halifax 


do 6 


S. Ferry 


Jamaica 

Bristol 


do 10 


Martha 

Brig Coalition ... 
Brig Susanna.... 


E. Doran 

W. Garland 


do 19 


Cadiz 


do 20 


T. Nichols 


Little St. Law- 
rence. 







44 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14 ) 



A. 1883 



NOTE B— Continued. 

Reports, Outwards, of Vessels from this Port, during the Season of Navigation, 
from 10th June to 19th November. 



PORT OF QUEBEC— Continued. 



Date. 


Name of Ship. 


Master. 


TO 

CI 

o 
H 

o 
6 


Destination. 


Cargo. 


179 

Aug. 

do 


1. 

20 

23 

26 

26 

27 

31 
1 

o 
5 
6 
9 

9 

10 

17 

17 


Charlotte 


T.Fisher 


105 
262 

44 
62 

239 

189 
193 

152 
168 
155 

75 

260 

149 

209 

279 


Madeira 


270 barrels flour, 125 barrels bread, 


Hope 

Betsey 


A. Thomas 


London 


2,000 bushels wheat, 13,200 hogs- 
head and barrel staves. 

141 pieces square oak, 8,668 pipe 
staves, 940 puncheon staves, 19 
ban els peltries, 1 barrel hoofs of 
orignals, 47 packages baggage. 

100 bushels salt, 500 quintals bis- 
cuits, 10 barrels flour. 

420 casks containing 1,464 bushels 
pease, 15 potash kettles, bars, 
doors, 1 pipe Madeira wine, pas- 
senger baggage. 

8,000 bushels wheat, 874 barrels 
flour, 317 quintals biscuit, 800 
staves No. 960, 535 pine boards 
for dunnage. 


-do 
do 

do 

do 

Sept. 

do 

Jo 
do 
-do 

Jo 

do 
do 

io 


J. Smith 


St. John Island .. 
Halifax, N.B...... 

Madeira 


Betsey 

Fanny 


J. Davison 


T. Manners 


Nasseau. 

Eagle 

Tillies 


T. Turmey 

R. Symes 

R. Davis 

T. Trombes 


Cadiz 


Falmouth 




Oporto 

Barcelona 

Falmouth 


100 barrels flour, at If cwt. 
each; 1,900 pine boards. 

8,000 bushels wheat in bags. 

8,407 bushels wheat in bulk. 

7,500 bushels of wheat. 

2,450 bushels wheat, 144 bushels 
Indian corn, 200 pipe staves, 250 
boards. 

23,170 pipe staves, 797 hogshead 
staves, 1,483 barrel staves, 1,600 
seal-skins, 1,200 pini boards. 

8,000 bushels wheat. 


Mentor 

Nautilus 


R. Smith 


Brother 


T. Nankwel 


Lisbon 


Britania 


J. Atkinson 


London ,... 

Falmouth ... 

Leghorn 

Bristol 


Juno 

Oughton 

Polly & Charlotte 


A. Brown 


A. Syme 


S. Nordsford. 


salmon kept here, 38 barrels 
herring kept here, 616 tierces of 
salmon, 
17r> pieces oak, 1,985 pipe staves, 
1,050 hogshead staves, 8,311 bar- 
rel staves, 1,425 pine boards, 12 
barrels containing 24 cwt. and 
23 lbs., Pearl ashes; 40 barrels 
containing 125 cwt. 2 qr. 18 lbs., 
potash ; 3 boxes window glass. 





43 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 188$ 



NOTE B— Continued. 

Reports, Outwards, of Vessels from this Port, during the Season of Navigation, 
from 10th June to I9th November. 



POUT OF QUEBEC— Continued. 



Date. 



1791. 
Sept. 24 



Oct. 3 
do 4 



Name of Ship 



Master. 



Geo. & Margaret 



Montreal 
Ceres , 



do 7 

do 8 

do 10 

do 12 

do 15 



James 
Mary. . 



Catiche. 



do 17 

do 20 
do 21 



Admiral Parker 



L. Strong. 



L. Martin. 
J. Booth .. 



J. Service.. 
J. Gallong. 



L. March and. 



G. Skinner. 



Eliza J. Craig 



Two Friends. 

Atlas 

Eurinetta 



G. Alston..., 
E. Smith .... 
W. Beatson. 



127 



180 



154 



186 



23 



SO 



509 



95 



71 
132 

309 



Destination. 



London. 



Lisbon 

Aberdeen 

Barcelona 

Murray Harbour 

Barbadoes 

Plymouth 

St. Johns 

Jersey 

London 

London , 



46 



Careco. 



230 casks porpoise oil, equal 14,073 
gallons, 76 bales peltries, 10 
casks castorum, 121 casks of pot 
and pearl ashes, 6 kegs Canadian 
balsum, 6 kegs cranberries and 
.nuts, 3 trunks and 6 cases wear- 
ing apparel, 1,600 puncheo" 
staves. 

9,000 bushels wheat. 

10,330 pipe staves, 1,200 puncheon 
staves, 800 barrel staves, 17 
pieces pine timber, 560 pine 
planks, 100 pine boards, 30 casks 
potash. 



9,700 bushels wheat. 

110 barrels, 32 bags flour, 21 tierce 
bread, 2 hogsheads Spanish wine. 
1 puncheon rum. 

22 tierces and 1 barrel salmon, 2.' 
barrels herring, 2 barrels cot 
sounds, 1000 ft. boards, 2,00i 
hoops, 66 boards of 12 ft., 20 bar 
re Is flour. 

35 white pine masts, 39 bowsprits 
17,970 staves 5$ ft. long, 4,07 
staves 3£ feet long ; total, 22,044 

10,540 staves 3£ ft. long, 47 bar 
rels flour, 16,000 hoops, 100 busb 
els potatoes, 30 bushels potatoe 
loose, 4 barrels onions, 28 quin. 
tals biscuit, 1,000 lbs. beef, 6 
bushels oats, 48 turkeys, 85 bose 
essence of spruce. 

2,500 Winchester bushels wheat. 

6,350 pine boards, 18 kegs balsarr 

604 bales furs, 351 barrels potashes 
285 lbs. old copper and brass, £ 
lbs. islinglass, 1,017$ lbs. cash 
rum, 5 barrels and 5 kegs crai 
berries, 2 barrels Labrador tet 
1,410 staves, 169 cedar logs, 
pieces oak timber, 24 shook pui 
cheons, 1 box fowling pi< 
box old silver. 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No* 14,) 



A. 188S 



NOTE B- Continued. 

Eeports, Outwards, of Vessels from this Port, during the Season of Navigation, 
from 10th June to 19th November. 



PORT OF QUEBEC— Continued. 



Date. 



1791 
Oct. 22 



do 24 



do 27 



do 28 



Name of Ship. 



Integrity 



Mary 



General Wolfe ... 



Henrietta . 



do 31 



Nov, 3 



King David. 



Miner 



Master. 



John Stewart. 



278 



J.King 122 



D. Shepper 



W. Dexter. 



R. Linden 



Win. House. 



204 



199 



227 



Destination. 



London. 



Surinam. 



Barbadoes 



London. 



Bristol. 



180 Barcelona 
47 



Cargo. 



516 bales, 18 casks and 1 case of 
furs and peltries, 1,000 sealskins 
loose, 242 casks pot and pearl 
ashes, 1 pipe Madeira wine (164 
gallons), 2 cases Madeira wine 
(12 dozen), 3,476 lbs. castorum, 
8 casks essence of spruce, 714^ 
lbs of gensang, 6 dozen Bastard 
wine, 6 carribou nerves, 5 por- 
cupine boxes, 10 lbs. eider down, 
1,400 pipe oak staves, 6 cases 
baggage, 4 trunks, 2 bundles, 
1 portmanteau, 4 casks nuts, 2 
boxes Canada seeds, 396 lbs. old 
copper and brass. 

28 hogsheads oats, 11 packa *ea 
butter, 23 barrels salt, 212 shook 
casks, 2 hogsheads and 3 ham- 
pers porter, 1 cask cider, 1 hogs- 
head lime, 40 barrels herrings" 2 
pipes wine, 6 barrels and 40 
tierce onions, 5,000 bricks, 5,000 
hoops, 100 pine boards, 129 bush- 
els potatoes. 

42 barrels codfish, 10 tierces salmon, 
10 barrels herring, 800 barrels 
flour, 1,100 bushels oats in bulk, 
408 bushels in hogsheads, 11.500 
staves, 2,400 pieces heading, 
10,000 hoops, 30 chaldron of coal. 

173 barrels potash, 1 cask of furs, 
106 elk skins, 3/168 bushels flax 
seed. 4 hogsheads, 4 tierces, 25 
barrels feathers, 1 cask of down. 
80 hogsheads of oil, 2 bales of 
peltries, 1 bale peltries, 1 box, 12 
patterns of clock dials, 219 casks 
of oil, 14,580 gallons ; 1 cask of 
25 seal skins. 

11 hogsheads of porpoise oil, 688 
gallons; 10 casks seal oil, 1,008 
gallons ; 1 hogshead essence of 
spruce, 110 hogsheads flax seed, 
51 casks, 669 bushels flax seed, 
30 casks, 2,400 bushels flax seed, 
23 casks of potash, 1,000 staves, 
900 pine billets, 8,250 pine 
boards, 2 casks cranberries. 

10,082 bushels wheat. 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



NOTE B— Continued. 

Ee ports, Outwards, of Vessels from this Port, during the Season of Navigation, 
from 10th June to 19th November. 



PORT OF QUEBEC— Continued. 



Date. 



Name of Ship. 



1791. 
Nov. 4 Miisurnmer Bios- 



do 5 

do 7 

do 8 



do 9 



do 9 



do 9 



do 10 



Ferdinand 

Augustus. 

Peggy 



Harmony 



Providence 



Margaret 



Peggy. 



Master. 



W. Kayne 



G. Sammon 
J. Cole 

J. Hamilton 



A. Lastesly. 



384 



128 
220 

105 



A. Cowper 



D. Howie. 



G. Gifford 



270 



67 



204 



172 



Destination. 



London 



Newfoundland. 
•Jamaica.. 



London, 



Surinam . 



Greenock., 



London j. 



48 



Cargo. 



»'o 



50 logs, 26 masts, 3,412 pine boards, 
4,417 pine plank, 9,340 staves, 
940 bushels flax seed, 32 kegs, 2 
puncheons, 12 cases, 1 box 
essence of spruce, 1 box sugar, 
32 barrels pot and pearl ashes. 

7,000 bushels of wheat. 

25 tons coal, 1,000 biscuit, 2,000 
boards. 

<250 barrels flour, 13 puncheons bis- 
cuit, 2,000 white oak staves, 31 
puncheons peas, (403 bushels), 
1,180 puncheons dressed staves, 
880 puncheons dressed staves, 14,- 

000 hoops, 12 feet long : 100 tur- 
keys. N.B. remains on board of the 
cargo inwards, 1 pipe Madeira, 59 
quarter casks of Teneriff wiae. 

17,552 white oak staves, 711 pine 
boards, 25 casks pot and pearl 
ashes, 2 bales of furs, 7 casks 
essence of spruce, 5 casks mill 

1 box essence of spruce, 1 cask of 
onions, 1 cask of apples, 1 cask 
cranberries. 

29 barrels, 21 tierces salmon, 34 
barrels & 34 half-barrels herrings, ' 
1 barrel mackerel, 188 barrels 
biscuit, 5,100 staves and head 
ings, 3,000 pipe hoops. 



20 casks and 450 bags flax seed, 
1,110 bushels; 950 bushels wheat, 
1,864 pine plank, 3,550 pine 
boards, 1,632 bushels oats, 150 
casks pot and pearl ashes, 1,100 
pieces oak staves, 440 pieces pine 
staves, 4 cases cranberries, dun- \ 
nage and heading for the oats, 
and wheat. 

8,184 pieces of puncheon staves, 24 
anchor stocks, 16 handspikes, 
200 oars, 1,464 planks. 5C boards, 
12 hogsheads and 472 bags flax 
seed, 1,034 bushels ; in bulk of 
flax seed, 1,700 bushels: 12 
barrels pot ash, 13 casks pearl, 3 
casks pot, 7 casks cranberries 
and apples. 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



NOTE B— Concluded. 

Eepohts, Outwards, of Vessels from this Port, during the Season of Navigation, 
from 10th Juno to 19th November. 



PORT OP QUEBEC— Concluded. 



Date. 



1791. 
Nov. 12 



do 19 



Name of Ship. 



Rcovery , 



Union 



Master. 



P. Forrester 



J. Henderson 



15 '-> 



131 



Destination. 



London. 



Falmouth 



Cargo. 



10 bales furs, 33 casks oil, 1 keg 
castorum, 270 barrels pot ash, 6 
casks essence of spruce, 5 casks 
cranberries, 5,335 staves, 3 pieces 
oak, 24 packages cranberries, 
nuts and essence of spruce. 

6.161 bushels of wheat. 



SUMMAEY. 



essels 



ons 

iTheat 

leltries 

flour 

*'lax seed 

ssence of spruce 

ullocks 

iscuits 

otash 

It 

fearing apparel . 

adeira wine , 

ats 



anada balsam. , 
r indow glass... 
x hides 



leep ... 

ows 

orses. .. 
jrkeys 
wis. .. 
read .... 
icks .... 

30pS ... 

rring 
imon.. 



Bushels.. 
Packages 
Barrels .. 
Bushels.. 
Casks.... 



Quintals. 
Casks .... 

Tons 

Trunks ... 

Casks .... 

Bushels. . 

do . 

Kegs 

Boxes 



Cask? 



Dozen.... 

do .... 

Quintals. 

Pipe 



Barrels . 
Tierces.. 



84 

14,631 

193,575 

3,458 

6,233 

12,719 

7,088 

7 

4,224 

1,010 

154 

13 

120 

5,600 

4,502£ 

36 

6 

19 

3,455 

50 

2 

5 

3 

6 

1,776 

389 

24,000 

138 

1,554 



Coals 

Gin 

Barley 

Indian corn , 

Live oxen... 

Turkeys 

Codfish. 

Hoofs of orignal 



Cranberries 

Potatoes 

Fowling piece 

Old silver 

Old copper and brass 

Cider 

Onions 

Bricks .. 

Nails 

Apples 

Pine boards 

do planks 

Pipe and puncheon staves 

Oak timber 

Heading 

Scantling 

ftpars 

White pine masts 

do bowsprits 

Handspikes 



Chaldrons 
Puncheons 

Sacks 

do 



Casks 

Barrels .... 
Packages. 

Kegs 

Bushels.... 

Boxes 

do 

Lbs 

Casks 

bushels. ... 



Casks . 

do . 
Pieces. 

do . 

do . 
Feet... 
Pieces. 
Feet... 
Pieces. 

do . 

do . 

do . 



58 

30 

43 

100 

10 

160 

251 

1 

267 

66 

250 

1 

1 

696 

1 

26 

5,000 

5 

3 

• 26,000 

8,913 

244,263 

1,859 

9,223 

456 

12 

60 

39 

160 



14-4 ' 



49 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



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46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



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54 



i 


16 Victoria. 




Sessional 


Pcip 


ors 


(1 


> T o 


.14 


) 














A. 


1883 


1 < 


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46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 U 



NOTE C— Continued. 



PROVINCIAL DUTIES. 



Year. 



1775. 



1776. 



1777. 



1778. 



1780. 



1781. 



1782. 



1783. 



1784. 



In the Quarter ended 5th July 

do 10th October. 

do 5th January . 



In the Quarter ended 5th April 

do 5th July 

do 10th October, 

do 5th January. 



In the Quarter ended 5th April 

do 5th July 

do 10th October, 

do 5th January . 



In the Quarter ended 5th April 

do 5th July 

do 10th October, 

do 5th January., 



In the Quarter ended 5th July 

do 10th October 

do 5th January.. 



In the Quarter ended 5th April 

do 5th July 

do 10th October, 

do 5th January. 



In the Quarter ended 5th April 

do 5th July 

do 10th October 

do 5th January., 



In the Quarter ended 5th April 

do 5th July 

do 10th October, 

do 5th January . 



In the Quarter ended 5th July , 

do 10th October. 



56 



Silver at 5s. 6d. 
per Oz. 



oz. dwt. grs. 

583 6 

2,027 16 

1,907 6 2 



1,257 15 
11,312 15 
1,125 5 



9,509 
3,388 
2,711 



3,190 12 
22,638 10 



Duties. 



£ 
159 
557 
524 


s. d. 

11 3 

13 2 

9 11 


1,241 


14 4 



345 17 

3,111 

309 8 



3,766 



2,615 
931 
745 



4,292 



4,6L 



606 
6,231 
4,635 



3,888 

8,166 

981 



6,111 



277 
373 



8,101 19 



8 



11,473 19 



13,036 10 



4,535 3 

1,242 2 

334 1 



651 13 



4 



o* 



877 8 2 

6,225 11 10 

998 19 



509 15 « 
3,509 12 6i 
592 7} 



9 8$ 
19 8 
10 7J 



10 



; n 



n 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



NOTE C— Continued. 

Abstract of Duties on Imports and Provincial Duties of Quebec, from the Year 1768 

to the Year 1784, inclusive. 



Year. 



768. 
769. 
770. 
771. 

772. 
773. 
774. 
775. 
776. 
777., 
778. 
779. 



Produce of Great Britain, &c, with average for naval stores, &c 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 



Duties. 



£ 


s. 


d. 


365 


19 


7 


588 


1 


7 


694 


18 


10* 


718 


7 


5 


380 


19 


10* 


491 


3 





1,187 


16 


1 


1,660 


9 


7 


1,608 


4 


9 


1,387 


4 


H 


1,346 


5 


8 


1,026 


12 


2 



(The Abstract is not continued further than 1779.) 



57 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers 


(No.14.) 


A. 1883 




NOTE C— Continued, 




CLEARANCES. 






To 


Year. 

1768 

1768 
1768 

1769 

1769 , 
1769 

1770 
1770 
1770 

1771 
1771 
1771 

1772 

1772 
1772 

1773 
1773 
1773 

1774 
1774 
1774 

1775 

1775 
1776 


Vessels. 


Tons. 

1,700 

549 
900 


Guns. 


Men. 




From Table 1 :— 


11 

6 

14 


6 


131 

43 

87 


1 


(2) The southern pans of Europe, Africa and 
the West Indies 


















31 


3,149 


6 


261 




1 


22 
11 
53 


4,236 

600 

2,620 




265 

74 

291 




2 






3 , 














86 


7,456 




628 










1 


14 
14 
23 


1,630 
1,160 
1,410 




139 
105 
138 




2 






3 














51 


4,200 




382 










1 


26 
23 
22 


2.768 
2,251 
1,075 




232 
200 
124 




2 






3 , 














71 


6,09i 




556 










1 


19 
27 
17 


1,896 

2,632 

927 




1 

173 
224 

95 

492 


l 


2 




: 


3 














63 


5,451 












1 


15 

, 50 
23 


2,340 
5,206 
1,138 




146 

431 

ne 




2 


16 




3 


' 








88 


8,684 


16 


7<)l 




1 


33 
67 
51 


4,577 
7,115 
3,306 




32t 
535 

304 

1,161 




3 


8 












151 


14,998 


8 




1 


37 
26 
34 


5,784 
2,950 
2,107 




36i 
20i 

18? 




2 




L 


3 


L 










97 


10,841 




765 










58 













i46 Victoria, Sessional Papers 


(No. 14 


) 


A. 188* 


NOTE G— Continued. 


CLEARANCES— Continued. 








To 

i 


Year. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Guns. 


Men. 


from Table 1 : — {Continued) 

1 

2 

3 


1776 

1776 
1776 

1777 
1777 

1777 

1778 
1778 
1778 

1779 
1779 
1779 

1780 
1780 
1780 

1781 
1781 
1781 

1782 
1782 
1782 

1783 
1783 
1783 


18 
15 

17 


2,319 
1,159 
1,168 


68 
10 


195 

112 
102 


1 

2 




50 


4,646 


78 


409 


29 
18. 
25 


2,210 
1,790 
1,680 


l 

68 
86 

22 


177 
183 


3 


153 


1 

1 , 




72 


5,680 


176 


513 


21 
13 
38 


2,931 
2,273 
3,678 


130 
132 
198 


284 


2 


351 


3 


i 412 


1 

2 




72 


8,882 


460 


1,047 


27 
20 
19 


2,756 
2,943 
2,230 


114 
224 
134 


222 
579 


3 


264 


from Table 2 :— 




66 


7,749 


472 


1,065 


26 

8 

12 


4,186 

899 

1,205 


159 
76 

58 


385 


2 ,. .. 


160 


3 , 


160 


1 

2 

3 




46 


6,290 


293 


705 


40 
13 
18 


7,307 
2,220 
2,460 


278 
133 
116 


660 
271 
253 






71 


11,987 


527 


1,184 


38 

7 

25 


6,560 

820 

3,310 


352 

70 

183 


891 


2 


148 




381 


• 
1 




60 


10,690 


605 


1,420 


23 
13 
42 


4,043 

990 

4,395 




208 






121 


3 




355 


\ 




78 


9,428 




684 








59 











16 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 14.) 



A. 1833 



NOTE C— 



EXPORTS— To Great Britaim 



Beaver skins 

Martins 

Otters 

Minks 

Fishers 

Foxes 

Bears 

Deer in hair 

Dressed deer, lbs 

Muskrats 

Raccoons 

Cased catts 

Open catts 

Elks 

Wolves 

fBeaver eaters 

Tigers 

Pichoux.; 

Seals 

Bullocks 

Calfs 

Whistlers 

Pecans 

Hares 

Rabbits 

Castorum, lbs 

Stags 

Wood catts 

Weasels 

Coneys 

Fauns 

Cariboo 

Tobacco hogshead.3 

Squirrels 

Buffaloes 

Kitts 

Panther 

Ermines 



II 



YB 



1768. 



18.909 
15,618 
4,327 
1,224 
1,210 
1,085 
8,476 
6,439 



1769. 



8,274 

19,886 

27 

15,234 

1,523 

494 

383 



741 
126 



87,090 

61,497 

12,977 

3,512 

3,002 

4,590 

17,516 

15,980 

36,775 

20,974 

90,044 

667 

57,772 

4,344 

1,158 

33 

3 

538 

303 

360 

180 



1770. 



102,920 

51,879 

13,590 

3,938 

4,552 

1,749 

11,952 

21,417 

42,316 

32,185 

27,234 

253 

23,336 

6,499 

843 

57 

29 

2,144 

6,492 

412 



1771. 



94,936 

52,552 

12,477 

2,935 

3,599 

4,643 

8,482 

35,076 

53,589 

37,688 

34,328 

3,568 

16,544 

4,248 

1,373 

65 



195 
200* 



1772. 



1773. 



1774. ■ - 



108,588 

48,651 

13,382 

4,000 

3,456 

3,412 

9,057 

46,577 

54,624 

24,252 

47,631 

2,018 

6,745 

5,423 

778 

9 

4 

139 

285 



95,716 

27,544 

14,845 

3,000 

2,901 

3,170 

4,057 

30,267 

31,014 

32,352 

36,578 

5,118 

545 

3,423 

2,978 

279 

3 

2,256 

1,010 



35 
"2,472 



102,179 

40,017 

16,959 

3,600 

3,039 

3,766 

6,994 

64,379 

43,216 

65,735 

48,553 

4,010 

3,430 

5,869 

5,635 

86 

10 



180 



1,803 



1,915 



1,215 



1,487 



2,072 



328 



* Besides the above, there were, of different skins unassorted, 176,153 in the quarter ended the lOi 
October, 1768. 

fThe "Beaver Eater " was the fur hunters' name for the animal known as the Wolverine, Glutto 
or Carcajou. 



60 



4G Victoria 



Sessional Papers (No.14 ) 



A. 1883 



Continued. 



mtly, Christmas Quarter— FURS. 



ARS 



1775. 


1776. 


1777. 


1778. 


1779. 


1780. 


1781. 


1782. 


1783. 


103,730 


92,043 


118,248 


104,348 


137,740 


121,280 


125,782 


110,487 


105,434 


49,665 


60,108 


111,640 


45,042 


35,534 


41,889 


43,533 


21,950 


44,119 


14,593 


12,501 


18,681 


14,167 


14,508 


16,037 


15,379 


14,782 


19,599 


4,812 


3,632 


5,611 


4,668 


5,950 


6,137 


7,223 


4,766 


7,221 


4,553 


3,903 


4,236 


2,016 


3.545 


3,515 


3,852 


3,238 


3,817 


6,552 


5,318 


10,661 


10,456 


10,475 


10,654 


8,144 


3,245 


5,446 


11,891 


6,213 


11,189 


11,088 


9,338 


8,462 


6,768 


3,910 


11.396 


89,615 


87,709 


125,334 


123,129 


115,380 


110,982 


87,556 


89,404 


125.121 


41,525 


24,868 


40,192 


33,963 


32.693 


19,036 


16,819 


19,134 


30,648 


62,841 


42,889 


44,679 


66,750 


53,108 


94,950 


173,551 


51,470 


58,282 


110,647 


70,994 


191,660 


175.490 


116,988 


153,277 


22,447 


65,346 


93,252 


3,056 


3,221 


3,669 


4,225 


11,291 


5,619 


4,989 


3,598 


5,536 


53,578 


6,502 


18,019 


8,495 


6,991 


4,176 


3,624 


3,099 


4,197 


8,630 


7,268 


4,255 


8,102 


4,475 


5,529 


3,236 


4,190 


5,626 


5,674 


8,939 


5,773 


7,672 


7,546 


8,335 


8,608 


2,856 


5,858 


114 


173 


74 


23 


52 


69 


313 


24 


203 




4 
467 
577 
127 


29 

96 

241 


7 


6 


4 




4 


26 


2,611 
375 






838 


172 


1,147 


444 


236 


8 


I:::::::::::::::: 
















'::::::::.:::::: 




19 














53 


















3,478 
200 






3,040 


7,814 
309 


615 
















895 


229 

38 

6 


1,339 


1,096 


6,400 


































' 




21 


















710 


















134 










30 










30 












r 






31 


"*23*' 

2 


""96 


""299" 




489*" 


























5,831 






"• 












1 




i 
















29 




















! 
















• 



61 



16 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1885 



NOTE C— 

EXPO 



To 


Year. 


Codfish. 


Oil. 


Pot and Pearl 
Ashes. 


T2 

02 


u 




m 

"3 

o 

DO 

s 


a? 
so 
08 

<v 

a. 




0) Great Britain 


1768 


Q'tls. 

'610 
433 


Tons. Galls. 

117 99 
53 150 


Cwt. Qrs. Lbs. 
459 2 


Bush. 


Brls. 
" "l8 


Q'tls. 


IBrla. 

ii 




(2) West Indies, &c. ... 




(3) Continent of America 


1769 


























1,043 


170 249 


459 2 




18 




2( 










1 




6 102 


546 












2 














3 














1770 






















6 102 


546 




























1 




313 179 


627 2 . 












2 


2,886 






893 
592 


139 


32( 

40< 




3 




1 200 




40 






1771 






\ 






733 3 












1 




616 163 
4 




728 
97 


64 


40: 
2,25: 




2 


4,429 
150 




3 








75 






1772 






■ 




4,579 


620 153 


733 3 


75 


823 


64 


2,6* 


: 






185 157 


1,494 1 19 


820 
608 


122 
410 


65 

60 








i 


3 




3 




4,948 






1773 








■ 




5,304 


185 157 


1,494 1 19 


4,948 


1,428 


532 


1,25' 




1 




492 


1 801 


76 


12 

966 

1,405 




1,2§ 

2,16 




2 


3,300 
1,022 


6 




890 
3,818 




3 




3.... 


150 


1,517 
















4,322 


501 


1,951 


1,592 


2,383 


4,708 


3,41 








62 















:6 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



Continued. 
ITS. 





Salmon. 


Boards 

and 
Planks. 


Hoops. 


Staves. 


Masts. 


Logs 

and 

Timber. 


Whale- 
bone. 


Horses. 


Bush. 




2,670 




177,058 
7,040 


18 


642 
315 


2,850 




23,962 


50 


20,750 










2 


23,962 


















50 


2.670 


20,750 


184,098 


18 


957 


2,850 


2 






17,681 

100 

5,600 




196,540 
1,800 




395 


150 


























16 






















83,471 




198,340 




395 


150 


16 












3,539 

29,784 

! 18,499 


Brls. 
(sm'kd, ' 1,900 V 


26,262 
57.943 




54,740 




6,297 






12,000 








1 77/ 

500 i 4,200 


1,000 






Oats. 
740 


9 










1 


(sm'kd. 2,400) 
{ barrels, 77 J 


88,405 


12,000 


55,740 




6,297 


740 


9 






50,085 
'04,349 

39,380 




4,624 
4,260 

1,000 




208,398 
1,900 

3,700 




Pig iron, 
tons. 
138£ 






1 150 J 
j sm'kd, 4,700 ) 


12,200 
18,800 






24 








28 








193.814 


( 8m' kd, 5,300 ) 


9,884 


31,000 


213,998 




138$ 




52 


!"°» ox *| ( 157 j 








■ 5,945 
11,345 




120 
5,895 

2.240 


5,300 
2,000 


179,490 
5,305 

1,000 


Shingles. 


Pig iron. 
200 






(sm'kd, 1,344) 
t 57} 

| sm'kd, 800) 








8,000 


3 


3,632 






33,346 


(sm'kd, 2,144) 
1 70} 


8,155 


7,300 


185,795 


8,000 


203 


3,632 






12,560 
21,645 

30,711 

- 




50 

2,673 

100 




106,670 
11,800 


Oak, 
pieces. 
425 


78} 


Ash oars. 
1,000 
100 




( sm'kd, 340 ) 

(barrels, 216) 

sm'kd, 1,143 


5,100 
5,000 


40 










64,916 


f sm'kd, 1,483) 
1 216 } 


2,823 


10,100 


118,470 


425 


78$ 


1,100 


40 


1 








63 











16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



NOTE C— 
EXPORTS 



To 



Year. 



1774 



1775 



1776 



Q'tls. 



5,543 
300 



5,843 



5,270 



4,787 



4,787 



1777 



1778 



1779 



1780 



3,451 



3,451 



7,260 



280 



Oil. 



Tons. Galls 

507 58 
1 



508 58 



121. 
2. 



225 63 
7 128 
1 



Pot and Pearl 
Ashes. 



Cwt. Qrs. Lbs. 
1,856 1 



1,856 1 



1,417 



992 



333 191 992 



426 208 
26 150 



453 106 



572 158 
36 



608 226 



3 126 
90 



93 126 



256. 
4. 



Bush 



5,631 



2,100 



2,800 



2,800 



930 3 9 



930 3 9 



805 3 17 



805 3 17 



776 3 4 



776 3 4 



630 2 16 



3,430 



3,430 



Brls. 



90 
1,221 



1,311 



2,487 



885 
175 



1,060 



Q'tls. 



194 
3,923 



4,117 



4,628 



1,185 
100 



Brls. 

1,644 

694 

2,20* 



4,545 



1,285 



458 
7,462 



7,920 



133 



133 



2,000 



2,000 



1,318 
12,476 



13,794 



242 
3,842 



4,084 



330 
6,397 



6,727 



1,790 



1,790 



15 



280 



260. 



630 2 16 



63 



64 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1S8S 



Continued. 
—Continued. 



( Bush. 

76,376 

383,438 

1,004 


Salmon. 


Boards 

and 
Planks. 


Hoops. 


Staves. 


Oak. 


Pig Iron. 


Ash Oars. 


Horses. 




16,488 
4,550 
5,400 




192,290 

53,769 

4,300 


1,070 


136^ 


48 




433 
Smoked, 300 


17,000 
26,000 


172 








85 










460,818 


433 


26,438 


43,000 


250,359 


1,070 


136$ 


48 


257 


77,335 

88,724 

9,000 




34,000 

20,437 

4,108 




55,624 

11,006 

2,000 


1,834 


Bullocks. 


200 
698 


• 


349 
Smoked, 300 


25,000 
13,400 








193 













f smoked, 300 ) 
I 349 J 


58,545 


38,400 


68,624 


1,834 


193 


896 






33,000 
22,984 




18,981 

8,990 

12,100 




5,187 
1,712 


81 








fsm'kd, 1,387) 
{barrels, 599 J 


57,160 
4,000 


14 




64 
















j 55, 984 


fsm'kd, 1,387) 
\ 599 j 


40,071 


61,160 


6,899 


81 


64 




14 








1 1,044 




36,545 

27,652 

3,100 


32,950 
39,450 


54,411 
18,509 




Shingles. 


Headings. 




j 15,960 


fsm'kd, 2,500) 
1 390 j 




52,000 


2,500 


32 






17,004 














fsm'kd, 2,500) 
\ 390 j 


67,297 


72,400 


72,920 




52,000 


2,500 


32 






4,000 



10,175 




17,040 

28,511 

2,531 




44,470 
3,175 
1,000 


Oak and 
timber. 
491 


Ash oars. 

4,188 


Hand 
spikes. 
415 


Mackerel, 
brls. 


228 
Smoked, 100 


138,500 


619 


12 
















.4,175 


228 


48,082 


138,500 


48,645 


503 


4,188 


415 


619 






19,620 
84,615 
10,830 


106,541 
33,763 


Oak and 
timber. 


6,826 


Oak 
headings. 
2,600 

2.870 


Shingles. 





fsm'kd, 300) 
1 171 ) 


37,589 


40,770 


100 














igles 


fsm'kd, 300) 
I 171) 


115,065 


37,589 


140,304 


100 


6,826 


5,470 


40,770 




57,831 
28,618 
14,656 


1 

5,000 
5,200 


194,783 
19,000 


Spars. 

414 
56 


Ash oars. 
16,309 


Headings, 
pieces. 
6,377 
2,400 


Oak and 
timber,pdB 
182 


3,000 
- 


128 
40 


36 


















. ),000 


168 


101,105 


10,200 


213,783 


470 


16 ; 309 


7,777 


218 




14-5 






65 











46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



NOTE C— 
EXPORTS 





















. 


To 


Year. 


en 

o 
O 


Oil. 


Pot and Pearl 
Ashes. 

j 


m 


u 

o 


00 

♦J 

'3 

o 

DO 

m 


DO 

2 

o 

to 


fc 


1 


1781 


Q'tls. 


Tons. Galls. 
163 


Cwt. Qrs. Lbs. 
1,537 2 


Bush. 


Brls. 


Q'tls. 


No. 

2< 


' 


2 


699 


4 












3 
















*1782 














2 






699 


167 


1,537 2 








_. 








• 

1 


2,500 
70 


675 


f 125 1 22) 
11,423 27 j 


400 


60 







\±l 


2 


4 




3 


















1783 
















- 


— 




2,570 


679 


1,548 2 21 


400 


60 












1 


1,098 


386 


f 65 2 13) 
11,763 13 J 


90 


900 
3,681 




Pea; 




2 


8 


2,184 


7 




3 




























7 






1,098 


394 


1,828 2 26 


90 


4,581 


2,184 


— , 









\u 



66 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



Concluded. 

— Concluded. 



Shingles. 


Salmon. 


Boards 

and 
Planks. 


Hoops. 


Staves. 


Masts. 


Ash Oars. 


Headings. 


Oak 
and Tim- 
ber. 


i 

:o,ooo 




2,087 

50,236 
12,360 




219,918 

35,000 
1,200 


163 
379 


12,564 


f 1,100) 

1 7,200 j 
830 


293 


67 


31,000 


90 






35 















70,000 


67 


64,683 


31,000 


336,118 


542 


12.564 


9,130 


418 


Shingles 




2,730 
56,272 




146,963 
3,500 


123 
162 


5,010 


3,778 
3,000 


1,184 
344 




39 


7,300 


























80,292 


39 


59,002 


7,300 


150,463 


285 


5,010 


6.778 


1,528 


1 Oak 
timber. 
570 

260 




38,610 
34,600 


3,000 
2,300 


65,574 
3,200 


50 


Pig iron, 
tons. 

98 


4,120 


Spars. 
365 


275 




i 


















830 


275 


73,210 


5,300 


68,774 


50 


98 


4,120 


365 


*The 
fTn 1 


entrj is 2,500 La 
783 there were al 


brador cod 
30 84 horses 


and 400 L 
and 50 bi 


abrador oil 
illocks; de 


out of the ( 
3tination nc 


575. 

t given. 







14— 5J 



€7 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A >-S3S 



NOTE I). 



CONQUEST OF CANADA. 



Quebec taken, 13th September, 1759 

Montreal surrendered 8th September, 1760 

Canada ceded by the Crown of France to Britain by the Treaty 
of Paris, 10th February, 1763 

CUSTOMS APPOINTMENTS. 

Thomas Knox was appointed the first Collector of His Majesty's 
Customs at the Port of Quebec on the 5th April, 1762 

Thomas Ainslie, the first Controller, was appointed on the same 
date, when all the officers were appointed, the Customs' 
establishment duly organized and Quebec constituted a Port 
of Entry. Montreal was at the same time created an out- 
port of Quebec, Thomas Lambe being made Surveyor, and 
Eichaul Oakes, Waiter and Searcher 

Thomas Ainslie was Collector of Quebec, and Charles Stewart 
Controller, 1799 

Scott, Collector, died in 1810 

M. H. Percival, Collector, 1810 

M. H. Percival died at sea on 13th October. 1829 

L. H. Ferrier made Collector, 1830 

Montreal made a Port of Entry for general purposes, 1831. 
(During this year there were two steamboats employed in 
towing vessels from Quebec to Montreal. The boats, it was 
represented, had enough power to bring up four vessels at a 
time, besides barges fully laden.) 

In the Port of Montreal 80 vessels of 19,085 tons arrived from 
sea in 1831 

117 vessels of 27,764 tons in 1832 

Henry Jessupp, Surveyor, was made Collector of Montreal, and 
William Hall, Waiter and Searcher, was made controller,. 
1832 

L. H. Ferrier, Collector of Quebec, died in February 1833.. 

Henry Jessupp, Collector of Montreal, was promoted to be Col- 
lector of Quebec, and William Hall, Waiter and Searcher, 

was promoted to be Collector of Montreal, June, 1833 

(The office of Controller was this year abolished in the Cus- 
toms. All the foregoing appointments were made by the 
Lords of the Treasury and the Board of Commissioners 
of Customs, London.) 

John William Dunscomb, the Commissioner of Customs, Canada, 
was appointed Collector of Her Majesty's Customs, Quebec,. 
vice Henry Jessupp retired on full pension by the Imperial 
Government, and the Hon. S. H. Massue was appointed 

Surveyor, vice Charles Grey Stewart, 1851 

(These werothe first appointments made at Quebec by the 
Government of Canada, though the Customs establishments 
were being gradually handed over from the Board of Cus- 
toms, London, to the Government of Canada from the year 
1849.) 

68 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No 14.) A. 18S3 

CATALOGUE. 

MANUSOBIPT DOCUMENTS. 

Military Correspondence. 

Military chest, 1703 to 1845 24 

(The military chest was transferred to the Commissariat, under 

which title the remainder of the papers on this subject will 

be found.) 

Army miscellaneous. 1792tol870 9 

Claims for losses, 1812 to 1810 18 

" " Nova Scotia, 1786 to 1839 3 

Imperial miscellaneous, 1793 to 1837 ... 2 

Command money, 1793 to 1844 H 

Canals, 1830 to 1&68 25 

War of 1812, events preceding and claims arising out of, 1806 to 

1834 20 

Relations with the United States, 1790 to 1844 3 

United States Civil War, military preparations, crimping, &c, 

1861 to 1866 4 

Fenians, 1865 to i870 3 

Volunteers and Militia, 1794 to 1870.. 33 

•' mi disbandment, 1838, 1839 2A 

Canadian Troops, 1805 to 1841 3 

New Brunswick Fencibles, 1793 to 1830 2 

. Newfoundland Regiment, '1814 to 1834 1 

Provincial Marine, 1790 to 1845 21 

DcMeuron's Regiment, 1813 to 1818 1 

De Watteville's Regiment, 1813 to 1819 1 

Military aid at riots, &c, 1800 to 1870 4 

Queen's Rangers, 1799 to 1804 1 

Royal Veterans, 1807 to 1839 2 

Royal Canadian Rifles, J840 to 1870 , 19 

Mails, 1797 to 1845 4 

Telegraphic Service, 1797 to 1844 1 

Transports, 1790 to 1869 9 

Navy, 1799 to 1843 1 

North-West, 1800 to 1870 3 

Indians, 1767 to 1845 25 

Commissariat, 1788 to 1870 59 

Return of staff employed in Newfoundland, 1846 to 1864 ; Prince 
Edward Island, 1794 to 1870; Nova Scotia, 1859 to 1869; 

New Brunswick, 1821 to 1869 1 

Posts and barracks, 1801 to 1870 87 

(See also under the title Ordnance and Engineers.) 

Ordnance and Engineers, 1785 to 1870 115 

Surveys, 1811 to 1845 1 

Staff, 1786 to 1870 39 

Horse Guards, 1789 to 1833 22 

Cavalry, 1804 to 1846 ' 11 

Reports on political feeling, 1849, 1850 3 

Medical, 1787 to 1870 29 

Rebellion, 1837, 1838 8 

Aliens, 1796 to 1816 1 

Carried forward 674 

69 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Brought forward 674 

Courts Martial, 17&0to 1870 15 

Chaplaincies, 1792 to 1870 . 12 

Petitions for relief, 1787 to 1845 6 

Sorel and Loyalists, 1787 to 1869 1 

Lands at Sorel, 1792 to 1845 5 

Properties at Quebec and Lower Canada, 1785 to 1844 6 

" Montreal, 1796 to 1841 2 

(See also Ordnance and Engineers for the three preceding titles.) 

Lands and roads in "Upper Canada, 1795 to 1845 7 

Civil Government, Upper Canada, 1792 to 1845 4 

Civil Government, 1848 to 1870 4 

Military Piisons, 1846 to 1870 19 

Eoyal Artillery, 17S8to 1870 25 

Rifle Brigade, 1824 to 1870 6 

Military Train, 1862 to 1867 2 

Half-pay, 17S7to 1845 36 

Pensioners, 1831 to 1870 9 

Appointments, memorials, &c, 1786 to 1870 14 

Settlers, 1794 to 1845 15 

Deserters, 1845 to 1870 5 

Accounts, warrants and returns, 1805 to 1820 14 

Royal Regiments : — 

I. 1797 to 1855 , 4 

II. 1838 to 1851. IIT. 1814 to 1868. IV. 1794 to 1857. 

V. 1798 to 1867 1 

VI. 1793 to 1847 3 

VII. 1793 to 1868 1 

VIII. 1809 to 1859 3 

IX. 1804 to 1858. X. 1842 1 

XI. 1839 to 1840. XII. 1858 to 1861 1 

XIII. 1833 to 1861. XIV. 1841 to 1842 1 

XIV. 1843 to 1855 1 

XV. 1817 to 1858 6 

XVI. 1814 to 1868 7 

XVII. 1856 to 1868 7 

XVIII. 1839 to 1850. XIX. 1817 to 1849 1 

XIX. 1850 to 1852 1 

XX. 1848 to 1851 2 

XX. 1852 to 1865. XXI. 1793 to 1^52 1 

XXII. 1837 to 1838. XXIII. 1846 to 1853 1 

XXIII. 1828 to 1867 7 

XXIV. 1830 to 1843 7 

XXV. 1864 to 1867 1 

XXVI. 1T90 to 1855 2 

XXVII. 1865 to 1870 1 

XXVII. 1814 to 1850. XXVIII. 1844 to 1860 1 

XXrX. 1.788 to 1869. XXX. 1824 to 1861 1 

XXX. 1862 to 1868 4 

XXXII. 1830 to 1867 4 

XXXIV. 1838 1 

XXXIV. 1839 to 1853. XXXV. 1803 to 1862. XXXVI. 

1841 to 1856 1 

XXXVII. 1814 to 1843 9 

XXXIX. 1814 to 1864 2 

Carried forward 964 

70 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 

Brought forward 964 

Boyal Eegiments : — 

XL. 1815 to 1842. XLT. IT 99 to 1801 1 

XLI. 1802 to 1815 6 

XLI. 1816 to 1862. XLII. 1838 to 1855 , 1 

XL1II. 1838 to 1862 2 

XL1Y. 1814 to 1820. XLV. 1842 to 1865. XLVI. 1847 

to 1868 1 

XLVI. 1845 to 1846 1 

XLV1I. 1787 to 1864 3 

XLVIII. 1863. XLIX. 1802 to 1803. 1 

XLIX. 1804 to 1810 1 

XL1X. 1811 to I860- L. 1856. LI. 1849 1 

LII. 1818 to 1846 1 

LII. 1847 to 1864. LI1L 1856 to 1869 1 

LIV. 1809 to 1858 2 

LVI. 1840 to 1854. LVTI. 1815 to 1859. LVII1. 1814 to 

1849 1 

TJX. 1814. LX. 1787 to 1796 ...... 1 

LX. 1797 to 1846, 1861 to 1868 13 

LX. 1839 to 1870. LXL 1865 to 1870. LXU. 1814 to 

1862 1 

LXFII. 1864 to I860. LXIY. 1813 to 1866 1 

LXV. 1790 to 1841 1 

LXVI. 18i7to 1853 9 

LXVI. 1854 to 1860. LXV1I. 1810 to 1855 1 

LXVIII. 1818 to 1830 : 5 

LXVIII. 1835 to 1845. LXIX. 1853 to 1870 1 

LXX. 18!4to 1843 7 

LXXI. 1824 to 1865 7 

LXXIII. 1809 to 1841 i 

LXXiV. 1818 to 1828, 1 

LXX1V. 1841 to 1847. LXXY. 1865 1 

LXXVL 1814 to 1857.... 5 

LXXYII. 1846 to 1855. LXXYIII. 18>2 to 1869 1 

LXXIX. 1828 to 1851 6 

LXXX. 1814 to 1844. LXXXL 1849 1 

LXXXI. 1844 to 1846 1 

LXXXL 1846 to 1865. LXXXIL 1814 to 1843 1 

LXXXIT. 1844 to 1867 1 

LXXXIII. 1803 to 1S38 1 

LXXXIII. 1839 to 1840. LXXXIY. 1846 to 1870 1 

LXXXY. 1837 to 1844 2 

LXXXYI. 1845. LXXXYII. 1852. LXXXYIII. 1814 to 

1867. LXXXIX. 1812 to 1815 1 

LXXXIX. 1816 to 1852 1 

XC. 1813 to 1847. XCI. 1811. XCII. 1820 to 1848. 

XCII1. 1814 to 1839 1 

XCITI. 1839 to 1860 2 

XCYI. 1810 to 1832. XCYII. 1795 to 1854. XCYIII. 

1807 to 1848 1 

XCIX. 1811 to 1855 4 

C. 1805 to 1817, 1858 to 1868 8 

CI. 1808 to 1809. CII. 1814 to 1823. CHI. 1812 to 1814... 1 

Carried forward * 1076 

71 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (IS<>.14.) A. 188$ 



Brought forward 1076 

Eoyal Regiments: — 

CIII. 1814 to 1819 1 

CIV. 1811 to 1851 4 

Eoyal Marines, 1813 to 1843. Eoval Navy, 1840 to 1867 1 

7 Hussars, 1838 to 1842 , 1 

Coldstream Guards, 1838 to 1842. Scotch Fusiliers, 1862. 13 
Hussars, 1806, 1869. 6 Dragoons, 1863. 21 Dragoons, 

1846 to 1850. 24 Dragoons, 1807 .... 1 

1 Dragoons, 1833 to 1844 1 

19 Dragoons, 1811 to 1824 1 

Grenadier Guards, 1838 to 1864 1 

1,08* 

CIVIL AND MILITARY (MIXED). 

Warrants, 1780 to 1810 81 

Touchers, C. and S. Keeper General's Department, 1787 to 1805 80 

General accounts of ditto, 1787 to 1804 2 

Supernumerary Warrants, 1794 to 1808 1 

Eeceipts for accounts, 1808 to 1810 ,. 1 

Eeports of Council, 1803 to 1808 1 

Inspector's remarks, 1803 to 1806 1 

Accounts of seamen on the lakes, 1790 to 1804 1 

Correspondence with the Receiver-General, 1745 to 1808 1 

Vouchers, Indian, Engineer and' Army Departments, 1785 to 1789 5 

Accounts of ditto, 1799 to 1805] 16 

Powers of Attorney, 1784 to 1810 6 

" " papers respecting, 1802 to 1804 1 



197 

MISCELLANEOUS MSS. 

United Empire Loyalists, old list, giving names and residences of 1 

Copy of petition to Lord Dorchester against the Attorney Gen- 
eral, 1787 1 

Copy of introduction to observations upon the oral and written 
testimony adduced by Mr. Morley, in the investigation into 
the administration of justice in the District of Quebec, 
ordered on the 16th May, 1787, by the Governor and Council 
in consequence of an address by the Legislative Council 1 

Examination of two military prisoners taken by the French at 
Crown Point ; no date. (French) 1 

Reflections on Canada, apparently written about the time of the 
conquest. (French)., ,.... 1 

Letters frcm M. Mongolfier, Vicar- General to the Bishop of 
Quebec, written from Montreal in 1775, 1776 and 1777. 
(French) 1 

Memoire of M. Amable Berthelot, of Quebec, on the war of 1775. 
(French) 1 

Notes on the eventb ut' 1837, by an anonymous insurgent, dated 
Prison of Montreal, 1838. (French) 1 

Notes taken at Terrebonne by F. H. Seguin, Notary, 1831, 1832. 
(French) 1 

Journal kept at Three Rivers, by M. Badeau, Notary, begun on 
the 18th May, 1775. (French) 1 

Carried forward 10 1,284 

72 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Brought forward 10 1,284 

Journal kept during the siege of Fort St. John, in 1775, by M. 

Fouchor, formerly Notar} T , of Montreal. (French) 1 

Registration of baptisms and funerals at Fort Pont Chartrain 

du Detroit, 1704 1 

List of officers employed at ditto from 1703 to 1744 1 

Sketch of the Glengarry settlement by Bishop Macdonell, of 

Kingston 1 

The County of Frontenac, Mfss Harman (prize essay) 1 

Collection of letters presented by Hon. Sir Francis Hi neks: — 

A. N. Morin dated 8th May, 1841 

From Sir F. Hincks to Colonel Bruce respecting a Union of 
the Provinces, 10th December, 1853, with a short note 
from Mr. Morin approving of the views contained in 
the letter 13th December, 1853. (Copies.) 

Hon. James Morris, 4th September, 1846 

Hon. James Morris, 3 letters, 6th, 10th and 13th October, 
1851 

Hon. Edward Ellice, 3 letters, lith November and 28th 
December, 1854, and 12th September, 1855 

Hon. J. C. Morrison to Hon. John Eoss, 20th April, 1856. 
(Copy.) 

Sir Edmund Head, 3 letters, 2nd April, 1856, and 5th Sep- 
tember, and 31st October, 1858. (The signature of the 
last has been cut off.). 

Eepresentation of merchants of Boston to Hon. W. L. 
Marcy, U. S. Secretary of State, 31st May, 1856, on the 
subject of compensation to Mr. Israel I). Andrews for 
his efforts in securing the Reciprocity Treaty 

Sir F. Hincks to Sir Allan MciNab, 8th June, 1849. (Original 
draft.) 

Hon. W. Cayley, 19th June, 18i9 

Lord Wharnclitte, 7th August, 1855. (Signature has been 
cut off.) 

Hon. John Ross, 29th August, 1859. (End of the letter and 
signature wanting.) 

Colonel Bruce, 17th October, 1861 

Mr. Cyril C. Giaham, 28th May, 1870 



HALDIMANI) COLLECTION. 

Correspondence with Sir Jeffery Amherst, 1758 to 1777..... 1 

" " General Gage, 1758 to 1766 4 

" " Brigadier Sianwix, General Abercrombie, 

General Murray and Colonel Robertson, 1756 to 1775 1 

Report of General Murray on Quebec, 1763 1 

Governor Murray's transactions at Quebec 1 

Correspondence with Brigadier Burton, 1760 to 1765 1 

11 " Sir W. Johnson, and papers on Indian 

Affairs, 1759 to 1774 1 

Correspondence with Brigadier Taylor, and others, on Indian 

Affairs, 1765tol774.^ 2 

Correspondence with Governors of Provinces, 1765 to 1774 1 

Letters and accounts relating to ordnance affaire at Pensacola 

1764 to 1775 1 



15 



Carried forward 14 1,299 

73 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



Brought forward 14 1,299 

Accounts of Pensacola, &c, 1*767 to 1773 1 

General orders and letters relating to the garrison at Niagara, 

1759 to 1774 

Correspondence with Messrs. Wallace Boss & Co., 1765 to 1778.. 

" " Major F. Hutcheson, i766 to 1778 

Papers relating to the government of Three Kivers and the iron 

works there, 1760 to 1767 

Papers relating to Courts Martial, &c, 1758 to 1759 

General orders and instructions, 1763 to 1777 

Instructions for the ordnance officers and barracks at Quebec, 

1767 to 1771 

Accounts and papers relating to Long Meadow, Maryland, 1766. 
Journal of exploring expeditions, maps and plans, 1750 to 1780. 
Ledger of contingent wan an Is granted by General Haldimand, 

1773 and 1774 

Warrants granted by General Haldimand for contingent and 

extraordinary expenses, 1773-74 

Copies of letters of General Haldimand as Commander-in-Chief, 

1773 and 1774 

Correspondence with Lord Dartmouth. 1773 to 1775 

" " Lord Barrington, Secretary of War, 1764 

to 1777 

Correspondence Of the Ministers with Generals Amherst, Gage 

and Carleton, 1776 to 1778 

Letters from Sir Guy Carleton, 1776 to 1778 

Orders and instructions to General Haldimand, 1778 ,. ....... 

Letters from General Haldimand to Lord George Germaine and 

the Treasury, 1777 to 1779 

Letters from Lord George Germaine, 1777 to 1779 

" " English Ministers, 1782 to 1784 

" " the Treasury, 1777 to 1786 

" " Boards of Admiralty and Ordnance, 1778 to 1785... 

" " the Treasury, and to and from the War Office, 1778 

to 1785 

Letters to the Ministry, 1778 to 1790 

" " Treasury, 1778 to 1785 , 

" " Secretary of War, Ordnance, Admiralty and Board 

of Trade, 1778 to 1786 

Letters from the Secretaries of General Haldimand, 1779 to 1784 

" to various persons, 1778... . 

Private letters, 1784 

Letters to various persons, 1781 to 1791 

Letters from various persons, 1757 to 1777 3 

" to General Haldimand as Governor of Quebec, 1778 to 

1787, 6 

Letters to General Haldimand after his appointment ad Governor 

of Quebec, 1788 to 1791 1 

(These were, in reality, written after he had ceased to be Gov- 
ernor.) 

Minutes of Council at Quebec, 1778 to 1784 ., 2 

Letters from Adjutant-General's Office at Quebec, 1778 to 1783.. 3 
General Orders by Sir Guy Carleton and General Haldimand, 

1776 to 1783 1 

General Orders by General Haldimand, 1783 and 1784 1 

Carried forward 69 1,299 

74 



Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 188S 



Brought forward 69 1,299 

.Register of Military Commissions, 1778 to 1782 1 

" " Naval and Military Commissions, 1778 to 1782 1 

Warrants for the ordinary service of the Army, 1*7*78 to 1*784.... 2 
Abstract of warrants for the ordinary service of the Army, 1*7*78 

to 1*784 1 

Register of warrants for the extraordinary service of the Army, 

1*7*78 to 1784 6 

Abstract of warrants for the extraordinary service of the Army, 

1778 to 1784 1 

Correspondence with H. T. Cramahe and H. Hamilton., Lieut.- 

Governors of Quebec, 1778 to 1784 , 1 

Correspondence with officers commanding at Michillimakinak 

andNiagara, 1777 to 1783 2 

Correspondence with officers commanding at Michillimakinak, 

1778 to 1785 3 

Correspondence with officers commanding at Niagara, 1777 and 

1778 ,. 1 

Letters from Lieut.-Col. Campbell and others, 1778 to 1784 2 

Correspondence with Lieut.-Col D. Claus, 1778 to 1784 

Commission and instructions to Sir J. Johnson, 1782 and 1783.... 

Reports on Indian nations 

Letters from officers of the German Legion 

Correspondence and papers relating to Detroit, 1772 to 1784. . . 
Letters to officers commanding at Fort St. John's, 1778 to 1784.. 

Returns of Ordnance in Canada, 1779 to 1784 

Correspondance with Col. Gugy relative to the Loyalists, 1778 to 

1784 

Correspondance vvith Col. Cuyler and others, 1781 to 1784 

Surveys &c, relating to the settlement of the Loyalists, 178i to 

1784..... , 

Correspondence with Col de Tannancour and others at Three 

Rivers, 1778 to 1784 .... 

Letters from Capt. Sherwood and Dr. Smyth, 1777 to 1784. 

do do do 1780 to 1783 

do from Capt. Sherwood on Secret Service 1780-1781 

Journal of Col. de la Balme, 1779 

Pocket Book taken from a Rebel Sergent 

Correspondence with Postmaster General, Hugh Finlay, 1778 to 

1784 

Statistics of the Trade of Quebec, 1768 to 1783 

Letters of Chief Justice Peter Livius, 1777-1778 

Papers relating to Pierre du Calvet and Boyer Pillon, 1776 to 

1786 

Papers relating to Pierre Roubaud, 1771 to 1787 

Papers relating to the cases of Joseph Despins, (1778) and the 

cartel sloop" Sally," 1778 to 1781 

Memoranda relating to the Hon. John Cochrane, 1778 to 1784.. . 
Correspondence with Hon. J. Cochrane and David Gordon, 1779 

to 1784 

List of Plans 

Private diary of Gen. Haldimand, 1786 to 1790 

Correspondence with officers commanding at Detroit, 1776-1783. 

do do at Carleton Island, Oswego, 

and Cataraqui, 1781-1783 



Carried forward 125 1,292> 

75 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 181 



Brought forward ■ 125 1,299 

Letters to officers commanding at Carle ton Island 1779 to 1783... 

do Provincial Navy 1778 to 1784 

do Sir G. Carleton 1782 to 1783 

Miscellaneous papers relating to the Provincial Navy 1775 to 

1784, Vol. 2 

Letters to Governors of Nova Scotia and officers commanding at 

Halifax 1778 to 1784 

Correspondence with Colonel MacBean and officers of the Ord- 
nance 1778 to 1784 

Papers relating to Secret Intelligence, etc., 1775 to 1782. (Vol 2) 
Correspondence with Colonel T. Carleton and others 1778 to 

1784 

Returns and Papers relating to the Q. M. G. Department at 

Quebec 1778 to 1783 

Contingent and Current Accounts relating to the Commissariat 

1776 to 1785 

Commissariat Invoices of Cargoes, etc., 1779 to 1784 

Papers and Accounts of the Receiver General's Department, 

Quebec, 1777 to 1788 

Papers and Accounts of the .Receiver General 1777-1778. 

(Yol. 2) 

Correspondence with Major N. Cox, to Governor of Gaspe 1774 

to 1786 

Memorials from officers and soldieis 1778 to 1784 

Memorials from the Provincial Corps and Loyalists 1777 to 1785. 

(Yol. 2) ". 

Memorials from Civilians in Canada 1777 to 1785 

Memorials from French Inhabitants of Canada 1778 to 1784 

Forms of Warrants, Commissions, etc., 1776 to 1785 ; Lists of 

Officers in rarious Department* 1783-1784 

BOUQUET COLLECTION. 

Letters to General Gage, 17^3 to 1765 

Correspondence with Earl of Loudoun and Brigadier Forbes, 

1757 to 1759 

Government instructions to General Amherst, 1763 

Correspondence of Captain Ourry, 1758 to 1764 

Correspondence with Col. Washington, 1758 

Miscellaneous accounts and returns, 1758 to 1765 

Cash book, South Carolina, 1757-1758 

Letters to Col. Bouquet, 1761 to 1763 

General and Regimental Orders, 1759 to 1764 

Correspondence with General Amherst, 1759 to 1763 

Letters from Col.Bouquet to various persons 1757 to 1759 (Yol.l) 

Papers relating to Indian Affairs, 1758 to 1705 

Puolic Orders issued by Gen. Amherst and «Jol. Bouquet, 1761 to 

1765 

Inventory of effects belonging to the late Brig. -Gen. Bouquet, 

1765 



PROVINCE OP QUEBEC. 



•CEuvrcs de Champiain, 1598 to 1632. 
Champlain's Astrolabe (Russell) 



5 volumes in 2 

1 



17 



Carried forward * 3 1,460 

76 



toria. Sessional Papers (No.14 j A. 18S3 



Brought forward 3 1,460 

Journal des Jesuites, 1645 to 1668 1 

Relations des Jesuites .' 3 

Edits ot Ordonnances, including Commissions to the Governors 

and Intendants, 1540 to 1755 

Commissions to Officers of Justice, &c., 1638 to 17.>8 

Acts and Ordinances, Tables relative to, 1777 to 1841 1 

Plan of a Code of Laws for the Province of Quebec, by tho 

Advocate General (Marriott), 1774 1 

Collection of Commissions, &c-, relating to the Province of 

Quebec, since 1770 (Maseres), 1772 1 

Occasional Essays (Maseres), 1809 1 

Histoire de l'Amerique Septentrionale (De la Potherie), 1722.... 4 
Parkman's Works. 

Pioneers of France in the New World 1 

LaSalle and Discovery of the Great West 1 

The Old Eegime in Canada 1 

Conspiracy of Pontiac 2 

The Jesuits in North America 1 

The Oregon Trail .. 1 

Count Frontenac and New France 1 

Reports containing : 1 

Lord Durham's, 1839 

.Respecting Indians in B.N.A., 1839 

Rebellion Losses Bill, 1840 

Canada and the Canada Bill (Robinson, C. J.), 1840 1 

Statistics of Lower Canada, 1844 1 

Papers on Seigniorial tenure, 1852, 1856 3 

Organisation de la Milice, 1829 1 

Comite special sur l'Etat de 1 'Agriculture 1850 1 

Rules, &c, of the Council of Agriculture, 1870, (F and E) 1 

Colonisation du Bas-Canada, 1851 to 1861, (Drapeau) 1 

Travaux de Colonisation, 1854 to 1863. 2 

Parochial and Township subdivisions of Lower Canada, 1853, 

(FandE) 

List of County and Local Municipalities in Lower Canada, 1860. I 

Explorations et Arpentages, 1858 to 1863 1 

Cadastres abreges des Seigneuries de Montreal, 1860-61 3 

Quebec, 1858 to 1864 2 



o 



<< <( 



Trois-Rivieres, 1861 1 

" de la Couronne, 1864 1 7 

L'Abeille, 1848 to 1862 3 

(containing documents relating to the history of Canada, 
published by the Seminary of Quebec.) 

Dictionnaire Genealogique (Tanguay) 1 

State Trials, 1838, 1839 2 

L'Enquetedans le bureau dugreffier de la Couronne, kc, Montreal, 
1864 1 

Departmental Reports : — 

Grown Lands,-1868, 1870 to 1881, (F. and E.) 26 

Agriculture,— 1868, 1869, 1877, 1879 to 1881 6 

Public Accounts,— 1868 to 1881, (F. and E.) 28 

Prisons, Asylums, tCc, — 1859 to 1867, 1867-8, 1869, (F. and 
E), 1871, 1872 (E), 1874-5 (E). 1876-7 (E and F) 12 

Carried forward 12 113 1,460 

n 



46 Victoria. 



Session?! Papers (2wl4») 



A. 1883 A 



Brought forward 12 113 1,460 



Departmental Eeports : — 

Quebec Lunatic Asylum,— 1872-3 (E), 18*74 (E and F), 

1875 (F and E) 

Quebec Marine Hospital, 1853 

Keformatory School, 1874 



5 
1 

1 
— 19 



Superintendent of Education, — 1853, 1854, 1857, 1859 to 
1868, 1872, 1872-3, 1873-4, 1874, 1875-6, 1876, 1877, 

1877-8, 1878, 1878-9, 1879, 1879-80 31 

Statutes,— 1868 to 1876, 1878 to 1882 (F and E) 32 

Draft of Revised Statutes, (no date) 1 

Judicature Act (Amendment) (F and E) 2 

Municipal Act, and Amendments Lower Canada, 1860 to 

1866 1 

Lois des Magistrals, B.C., 1853, 1863 2 

Travaux de la Commission de Codification des Statuts 

1882 2 

Judicial Reform, Codification of the Statutes, 1882.... I 

3 

Abstract of Judicial Statistical Returns, 1860 to 1881 22 

63 

Official Gazette : — 

1869 to 1g82 

Debates : — 

1879 to 1881 3 

Report by the Count Henri de Puy-Jalon on the Geology north of 

the Gulf of St. Lawrence, 1882 

Railways : — 

Montreal Northern Colonization Railway Report on Hoche- 

laga and St. Jerome Section (Legge) 1869 

Exploration of routes, north and south side of Ottawa 

River (Legge and D. Macdonald) 1871 

Report of Special Committee, 1872 

North Shore Railway, Report of Engineer, 1873 

Montreal Northern Colonization Railway, 1874 

Report of exploration from Deep River to Georgian Bay 

(Legge) 1874 (E) 

The " Times " and its correspondents on Canadian Rail- 
ways (Allan) 1875 

Act respecting the Q. M. O. aud O. Railway, 1875 

Remarks by the Government Engineer on the Eastern 

Division of the Q. M. O. and O., 1877 

Copy of documents, Q. M. O. and O., 1879 

Reports " 1880 

1881 ... 

Speech on " (Chapleau) 1882 

Complaint by Silas Seymour, 1877 

" further statement of facts, 1877 

La necessite et la possibility d'un chemin de fer de Quebec 

au lac St. Jean (Langelier), 1873 

McGill College and its Medals (Sandham), 1872 

Bibliographie de la Nouvelle France, 1872 

History of Shefford (Thomas), 1877 

Le Nord (Langelier; 

Carried forward 282 1,46 

78 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Brought forward.. 282 1,460 

Institut Canadien Francais d'Ottawa, 1877 

La France et le Canada Fran gais, 1880 

Album do l'histoire des Trois Rivieres, 1634-1721 (Suite), with 

fac similes of original documents 

Three Rivers as a seaport (Balcer), 1880 

Actes et deliberations du Premier Congres Catholique, 1880 

Fete Nationale des Canadienes Francais a Quebec, 1880 

Annuaire de Quebec, 1882 

Montreal Exhibition, Handbook for Montreal (Dawson) and 

Programme, 1882 1 

Pamphlets, Collections of, bound in 38 

328 

PROVINCE OP CANADA. 

Appendix containing report of the exploration of the country 
between Lake Superior and the Red River settlement, 
and between the latter place and the Assiniboine and the 
Saskatchewan, by J. S. Dawson, and the Report on the 
Assiniboine and Saskatchewan exploring expedition by 
Henry Youle Hind, with maps, etc., 1859...-. 1 

Journals of Assembly, 1847, 1848, 1849, 1850, 1854, 1860, 
1861, 1862, 1863. (Vols. 21, 22) 1865 (Vols. 24, 25) 
1866 13 

Appendices to Journals: — 

1847 3 

1849 3 

1850 2 

1851 2 

1857 1 

1851 1 

1859 2 



14 



32 



Index to Journals : — 

1841 to 1851, 1852 to 1866,. 

Sessional Papers : — 

1860 4 

1861 3 

1862 5 

1863 6 

1864 5 

1865, Vol. 24 3 

" " 25 2 

1866 4 

Summary of Proceedings : — 

1852-3, 1854 5, 1857, 1858, 1859, 1862 6 

— 6 
Statutes : 

1845, 1847, 1852-3, 1854-5, 1857, 1858, 1859, 1860, 1861, 

1862, 1863, 1864, 1865, (1st and 2nd session), 1866.. 21 

Relating to Parliamentary Elections, 1859 •. 1 

Consolidated, 1859 1 

Index to 1856, (F. and E.) 2 

Tables of 1857 1 

— 26 

Carried forward ..... 94 1,788 

79 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188o 



Brought forward 94 1,188 

Departmental Eeports : — 

Postmaster General, 1855, 1856 to 1866 7 

Public Works, 1856 to 1866 6 

Public Accounts, 1852-53 to 1866 9 

Trade and Navigation, 1851 to 1866, 11 

Marine and Fisheries, 1856-62, 1863-7 2 

Militia, 1856, 1867 1 

Agriculture, 1854 63, 1865, 1866 (F. and E.), 1866-7 

(F. and E.) 7 

Crown Lands, 1856 to 1867, with maps 7 

Ottawa Buildings, 1865 (F. and B.). 2 

Estimates, 1852-1863 , 1 

Estimates, Miscellaneous information ) 

Rapport sur le Commerce, 1866 to 1868 ) 1 

Financial Commission, 186*3 (F. and E.) , 2 

Blue Books (MS.), Containing Miscellaneous Statistics 

and Reports, 1850, 1852, 1853, 1855 4 

Military Returns, 1849 1 

Proceedings of the Financial Committee of the Legislature, 

1850 1 

Reports of Committees on Public Accounts, 1854, 1858, 

1863 3 

Municipal Loan Fund and the Hospitals and Charities, 1864 1 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, Maps of Lower Canada, 
Upper Canada, Gaspe and Bonaventure, St. Maurice, 
Ottawa County, left bank of Lake Huron, Indian 

Territories and Hudson's Bay, 8 in all, 1857 1 

Asylums and Prisons, 1859,1860,1865 ., 3; 

Supervisor of Cullers on the Lumber Trade, 1861 1 

Miscellaneous Returns, containing 1 

Political Appointments and Elections, 1841 to 1865. 
Returns of Chartered Banks, 1865. 
Returns of Elections, 1868. 

Miscellaneous Returns, containing 1 

Political Appointments and Elections, 1841 to 1863. 

Miscellaneous Returns, containing 1 

Statistics of Canada, 1863. 

Municipal Returns for Upper and Lower Canada. 1853 

Condition and prospects of Canada, 184'^, from Lord Elgin's 

despatches. 
Return to an Address on the state of the Colonies, 1853. 
Reports of Votes at Elections of 1854, with Population. 
Returns of Sheriffs of Upper and Lower Canada for ten years 

to 3 1st December, 1853. 
Returns of Chartered Banks, 1860. 
Loose Pamphlets • 

Ministerial Crisis, Mr. D. B. Viger and his position (Hincks) 

1844. 
Annexation Manifesto, 1849. 
Reciprocity Treaty, 1854. 
.Documents relative to the Resignation of Canadian Ministry, 

1854. 
Reply to the speech of the Hon. Joseph Howe on the Union 
of the Provinces (Hincks), 1855. 

Carried forward 168 1,788- 

80 






Journals, 1868-9 to 1881 (2 to 14) 13 

lfc67 to 1874 General Index to Journals 1 — 14 

Sessional Papers, 1870-71 (jmrts 1, 2), 1873 (parts 1 and 3) 4 



U~fl 



14 



Vi.toria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Brought forward 168 1,788 

Loose Pamphlets : 

Political History of Canada, 1840 to 1855 (Hincks). 

The Irish Position in British and Republican North Ame- 
rica CMcGee), 1860. 

Two Speeches on the Union (McGee), 1865. 
Confederation, containing: 

Correspondence respecting the Union of British North Ame- 
rica Confederation Act, 1867. 168 

UPPER CANADA. 

Journals of Assembly, 1821, 1831-32, 1832-33, 1836 (and 

appendix) 1836 37, 1839 (and 2 appendices) 9 

Journals of Council, 1839 1 

Reports, Public Departments, 1839 1 

London Township, Miscellaneous Statistics (M. S.), 182 to 

1841 1 

Statutes applying exclusively to Upper Canada, 1859 1 

The York Gazette for 1812 , 1 

Loose Pamphlets. 

Trial of Randall, M.P.P., 1825. 

Message from Council to Assembly on Clergy Reserves, and 
resolution of Assembly thereon. Report of Select Committee of 
Council on claims of U. E. Loyalists 1835. 

Report of Select Committee of Assembly relative to a responsi- 
ble Exeiutive Council, 1836. 

Report of Select Committee of Council on complaint of the 
rejection of Bills sent to the Assembly 1^36. 

Proceedings of the Council on the Jury Laws, 1836. 

Address to Sir Francis Bond Head on the Independence of the 
Judges and cession of the Revenue under 14 George III. (1774), 
1836. 

Speeches, Messages and Replies of Sir P. Bond Head, 
1836 

Desj atch from Lord Glenelg to Sir Francis Bond Head, 1836. 

J) ncomb's Report on Education, 1836. 

Report of the Select Committee of the House of Assembly on 
the political state of the Provinces, 18.^8 

Brief History of the Church (of England) in Upper Canada 
(Bettridge) 1838. 

Proceedings of Legislature 1831-2 3, on School Lands, with 
despatches, etc., 1839. 

AWsages from the Governor General on the reunion of the 
Provinces, with resolutions of the House, amendments, votes, etc., 
1839. 

De Blaqniere's copies of Letters, etc., read in the Legislative 
Council on Clergy Reserves, 1840. 

Religious Endowments in Canada, a chapter in Canadian History 
(Him ks;, 1869. 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A* 



Brought forward 18 1,919 

Departmental Reports: — 

Agriculture and Arte, 1368 to 1881 14 

Public Works, 1871 to 1881 It 

Education, 1867 to 1881 14 

Registrar General, 1874, 1S7 - to 1880 ti 

Insurance, Inspector's Report, 1879, 1880, 1881 (and 

abstract) 4 

.Asylums and Prisons, 1871-72, 1872-73, 1874, 1876, 

lb78to 1881 .. 8 

Crown Lands, 1867 to 1881 15 

Division Courts. 1878, 1880 2 

Immigration, 1880, 1881 2 

Licenses, 1878-9, 1880-1 . 4 

Agricultural Commission, Report and four Appendices. 5 
Statute,. 1867-68, 186S-9, 1869, 1870-71, 1871-7^, 1873, 
1874(37 Vic), 1874 (38 Vic), 1875-6,1878 to 1882. 14 

1877 (Revised Statutes Vols, 2. 2 —16 

Fruit Growers' Association, 1871 to 1881 11 

Paleontology (Nicholson) 1871. 1875 2 

Report on Products, Manufactures, &c, (Provincial Ex- 
hibition) 1876 , , 1 

Official Gazette, 1868 to 1882 30 

163 

PROVINCE OP NOVA SCOTIA. 

Journals of Assembly 18^8, 1839, 1851, 1854—1855, 1856 to 1862, 

1864 to 1866, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1880, 1881 22 

Journals of Council, 1880 1 

Registres de Port Royal 

1702 a 1728. Vol. I 

1727 a 1741. Vol. II 

1741 a 1755. Vol. Ill 3 

Divers Registres de I'Acadie, 1768 a 1799 , 1 

Statutes, 1847, 1873, 1876 3 

Correspondence on constitutional questions between the House of 

Assembly and the Lieut.-Governor 1 

Mineralogy (Hind), 1868 < 1 

Nova Scotian Archives, 1869. » 1 

Stirling Peerage : — ♦ 

Narrative of the claimant, containing the charters of 1621, &c. 1 

Trial of Humphrys or Alexander (the claimant), Swinton's 
Report 1; Turnbull's, 1 2 

New Brunswick. 

Journals of Assembly. 1786-17*7, 1798-1817, 1817-1824, 
18251830, lr30, 1831-J833, 1836, 1836-1837, 1837, 
1837-1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842, 1843, 1844, 1845, 
1846, 1847, 1848, 1849, 1850, 1851, 1852-1855, 1853, 1854, 
1856, 1856-1857, 1857-1858, 1859, 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, 
1865,1866 to 1872, 1877 65 

Journals of Council. 1786-1830, 1831-1836, 1845, 1862, 1863, 
1864, 1865, 1866, 1867,1871, 1872 12 

Carried forward 77 2,163 

$2 



36 



£8 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 188S 



Brought forward - 77 2,169 

Statutes, 1872 1 

Census, 1840,1861 2 

Prize e>s:iys on immigration (Ellis, Edgar and Brown) 1860, 3 

pamphlets in 1 

Chubb's Almanac, 1836 1 

Facts lor emigrants (Watts) , 1 

School laws 1 

Geological pamphlets, containing 1 

Mines and minerals of New Brunswick, (Bailey) 1864. 

Southern New Brunswick (Bailey) 1865 g5 

New Brunswick (Hind; 1865 

Prince Edward Island. 

Acts of the General Assembly for 1773 to 1819 1 

Census for 1871 1 



NORTH-WEST. 

A Narrative of Occurrences in the Indian Countries of North 
America, since the connection of the Eight Hon. the Earl 
of Selkirk with, the Hudson Bay Company, &c, 1817, (F. 
and E.) 2 

Statement "Respecting the Earl of Selkirk's settlement at Kil- 
donan ; its destruction and the massacre of Governor 
Semple and his party, 1817 

Statement Eespecting the Earl of Selkirk's settlement upon the 
Eed Eiver, London, 1817 

Eeiation d'un Voyage a la Cotedu Nord Ouest, 1810-11-12-13- 

14, (Franchere, fils), 1820 

Hudson's Bay Company, Select Committee, British House of 

Commons, 1857 »..« 

Eeports of Select Committee of Senate on Eupert's Land and 

Eed River, 1870 

Dictionnaire et Grammaire de la Langue des Cris (Lacombe.) 
Dene-Dmdjie Indians and Esquimaux (Pettitot, translated by 

Brymner.) 
Part of New Testament in Chippewa (Jones). (These three are 

Astgjjf bound in one) ..-, 1 

Eeturn, Instructions to Hon. A. Archibald, 1871 1 

Eed Eiver Insurrection, Hon. W. McDougall's conduct reviewed, 

1870 . 1 

The North-West (Tache and Eussell), (2 pamphlets bound in 

one), 1870 1 

L'Amnistie (Tache i 1874. 

L'Amnistie Aux Metis de Manitoba (Riel) 1874 (Two pamphlets 

bound in one) , 1 

Winnipeg as it is in 1874, as it was in 1860, (Elliott) 1875 1 

ATour through Canada, (Moore), 1H79 1 

Lands of Plenty (Hepple Hall) 1880 1 

West and North West, a holiday trip (Mitchell) 1880 1 

A Trip to Bow Eiver (McEachran) 1881 ,.. 1 

Charges against Hon. E. B. Wood, petitions and reply, 1882.... 1 



Carried forward, 



83 



18 2,256 



14— 6i 



4:6 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188* 



Brought forward 18 2,256 

Hudson's Buy, its Commercial Importance (Bell) 1881 1 

Census of Ked River Colony, 1831 to 1846 (M.S.) 1 

Census of Manitoba, 1870 (M.S.) .' 1 



DOMINION OP CANADA. 



Journals of the House of Commons, 1S67, 1868, 1871, 1872, 
1876, 1877, (and appendix) 1879, lo80, (and appendix) 
I88i 12 



1867-68 


Sessional Papers. 


9 


1869 




6 


1870 




6 


1871...... 




6 


1872 




7 


1873 




6 


1874 




6 


1875 ... 




8 


18*76 




8 


1877 




9 


1878 




11 


1879 




10 


1880 --- 11 


1881 




7 


1882 




10 



Joi ci ala of the Serate. 1867-68, 1871, 1876, 187*, 1878, 1879, 

<1 p i a es for each year) 18-2....... ....... 13 

Dtb$u* o ? » Confederation, 1* 5 (P. and E )... 2 

of the Sei ate, 1878 to 1882 (F.a-dE.)... 10 

IL.use of ('< mmons, 1875 to 18*2 (F. and E.) 24 

I>cparh"rieniai Reports: — 

Post^axUr-Generat, 1867 to 1881 15 

Public Works, 18*. 7 to 1876, 1878tol88l, (1877 wanting) 14 

Vaunts mtd .Railway** 187., 1880, 18.4 3 

Public Accounts, 1868 to 1 81 14 

r General, 1879. 18-0. 1881 , 3 

'froth urui Navigation, 1867 to 18^1. ........ 15 

ne and Fisheries. 1 8 >8 lo lo72 5 

(bupp'ement).. 2 



: 874 (five 
1 -7 ; > (lour 
1 7 (four 

1877 Hvo 

1878 (ih eo 
is;<» two 
]8-<» (iwo 

shipping). 
1881 (;wo 



with lists of lights and lists of 



44 



Record of Proceedings of the Halifax Fisheries Commission 



21 



Carried forward 290 

84 



2,271 



t6 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188S 



Brought forward., 290 2,277 

Abstracts and .Results of Magnetical and Meteorological Observa- 
tions at the Magnetic Observatory, Toronto, 1841-1871 1 

Militia, 18t 8to 1881 14 

Department of the Interior, 1875 to 1881, (1874, and Indian De- 
partment, 1881, wanting) 8 

Extracts from Surveys, Reports of Township Surveys in 
Manitoba, Keewatin and North- West Territories, 1879, 18S2 2 

Inland Revenue, 1869 to 1873 5 

1874 wanting (three supplements) 3 

1875 (two supplements) 3 

1876 (three «• 4 

1877 (three " 4 

1878 (three " 4 

1879 (three " 4 

1880 (three " 4 

1881 (four " 5 36 

Agriculture, 1867 to 1881 (with supplement: 16 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance 1875 to 1881 7 

Railways : — 

Intercolonial, etc., F. 1864., 1 

" Maps 1 

— 2 

1855-1868,., 1 

Commissioners' Keports 1871, 1872 2 

The Intercolonial, a History, 1832 to 1876 (Fleming) 1 

— 6 
Canadian Pacific Charter, 1873 
Lord Dufferin's message as to oaths, 1873 

" " as to prorogation of Parlia- 

ment, 1873 
Lord Kimberley's Despatch 

Royal Commission, 1873. These five bound in 1 

Reports 1872, 1874 : 1876 to 1880 7 

Description of route (Tasse) 1 

Articles of Agreement entered into in connection with, 1 
(See also Miscellaneous Returns). 

Report of Commission, 1881. 3 

Letter respecting Commission by Mr. Sandford Fleming 

1884 1 

Canals. 

Canadian (Kingsford) 1 

Commission 1871 I 

Welland 1872 1 

tenders to complete Section 2, 1882 1 2 

Baie Verte, 1873 in ., 1 

(Keefer 1, Chief Engineer, 2) . 

Enlargement, 1876 1 

General Report, 1880 1 

Navigation of the St. Lawrence (Chief Engineer) 

1V74 1 

Carillon Dam and Locks, Correspondence 1873 to 1879 1 
'Geology : — 

Reports of Progress 1844, 1844-5, 1846, 1847 4 

1852-3, 1853 to 1856 2 

Carried forward 409 2,277 

85 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



Brought forward 409 2,277 

Geology : 

Geological Maps of the Lakes and Rivers between Lake 

Huron and Ottawa 1 

Report of Progress, 1858 1 

General Report, 18(13 (P and E) 2 

Maps to accompany, 1863... 2 4 

Reports of Progress, 1863 to 1879.... 7 

1880 and maps 2 

Mineral Resources, 1848 to 1868 1 

Select Committee, 1855, Economic Minerals, 1862 to 

1876 1 

Petroleum in Gaspe, (Hunt) 1 

Paleozoic Fossils 1 

Mesozoic Fossils, 1876, 1879 1 

Organic Remains ; Decades 1 to IV 1 

Fossil Plants, 1871, 1873 1 

North- West and Pacific, 1869, 1877 to 1879, 1881 1 

Exhibitions : 23 

Paris, Canada and the Exhibition of 1855, (F. and E.) . 2 

London, 1862, Catalogue 1 

Vienna, 1873, Reports 4 

Philadelphia, 1876, Report 1 

do Awards 6 

— 7 

Sydney, N.S.W., 1877 1 

Paris, 1878, Official Handbook 1 

do Reports 4 

— 5 
Australia: 

Melbourne, 1880-81 and Sydney, 1879. Report of Corn- 
mis ioners 1 

Eailway Statistics, 1875 to 1881 1 

Patents of Canada from 1824 ■ 5- 

Census of Canada : 

1851-52 2 

186M.2 2 

Abstract 1850 to 18^0 1 

1870-71 '. 3 

166i)-1871 1 

1608-1876 1 

— 5 

1880 81.,.., 1 

- 11 

Emigration Pamphlets (bound volumes) 10 

Agricultural do do 1 

Agricultural Pamphlets containing contagious diseases 
of cattle. (Duncan), la mouche des patates, (Tache), 
and the Colorado Potato Beetle, translation of same, 

(Brymner) , 

Miscellaneous Returns : 

Select Committee on Immigration and Colonization, 

1873, 1875, 1877, 1878, 1881 1 

Rapports de l'lmmigration, 1854-63 1 

Carried forward 483 2,277 

86 



Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A.. 1883 



Brought forward * 48J 2,277 

Miscellaneous Returns : , 

Report on disturbances on the line of the Grand Trunk 

Railway, 1877 
Papers connected with the awarding of Section 15, 
Canadian Paci6c Railway, 1877, (F. and E) 

do containing 1 

Report of Select Committee of Seriate, on route of Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway, 187 7. 
Report on Secret Service Fund, 1877, (F. and E.) 
Report on Canal Enlargement, 1877) (F. and E.) 
Report of Select Committee of the Senate, regarding 
dismissals by Harbour Commissioners, Montreal, 
1877. 

do 1 

Report by Committee of the House of Commons on 

depression, 137<> 

do. 

Report of Select Co remittee on the Boundaries between the 
Province of Ontario and the unorganized territories of 

the Dominion, 1^80 1 

do 1 

Rejort of Civil Service Commission, 1881 

Civil Service Allowances, Report by Brymner, Courtney and 

Cherriman, 1-76 1 

Miscellaneous Returns, 1878. 1 

Committee on awarding Contracts in Winnipeg (F and E). 

Report and evidence respecting Fort Frances Lock. 

Committee on payments to J. G. Moylan (E). 

Railway Statistics, 1876 — 7. 

Report and evidence on lands purchased at Fort William for 

terminus of O. P. Ry. 
Reports, &c. on location of line and a western terminal 

harbour C.P.Ry. 
Correspondence, &c. relative to expropriation for enlarge- 
ment of Lachine Canal . 
Railway Statistics, 1875-6. 

Miscellaneous Returns, 1878 1 

Railway Statistics, 1877-8. 

Select Committee on Canadian Pacific Railway, and Tele- 
graph west of Lake Superior. 
Papers relating to the claims of Murray & Co., on Inter- 
colonial Railway, and decision by S. Keefer. 
Committee on Public Accounts, Expenditure on Canadian 

Pacific Railway between Fort William and Red River. 
Committee on payments to J. G. Moylan ^F). 

Miscellaneous Returns, 1879 1 

The Fourth General Election for the House of Commons. 
Petitions &c relating to the dismissal of His Honour Luc 

Letellier Lieut.-Governor of Quebec (F. and E). 
Expenditure for North- West Mounted Police, 1876-78. 

Year Book of Canada, 1867 to 1878 5 

Dominion Board of Trade proceedings, 1S71 to 1879. Bound in. 2 
Home and Foreign Trade of Montreal (Patterson), 1869 to 1871. 2 

Carried forward 5u3 2,277 

87 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Brought forward 503 2,2*77 

Trade ParaphietB containing. 1 

Beport of the stale of Trade between the United States and 
the British Dominion (Larned), 1871. 

Two Trade Letters (Patterson), 18*76, 

Telegraphy, with islands, &c., on the St. Lawrence. 

Parliamentary Companion, ... 13 

Loveil's Gazetteer , .► 1 

Are Legislatures Parliament (Fennings Taylor) 1 

Travels in Canada (O'Leary) 1 

Beports of the Supreme Court 6 

Manual of Suoreme and Exchequer Court practice, 18*77, 
Amendments, 1880-81 1 

— 7 
Montreal Harbour Commissioners, collection of Beports and 

other papers just received and not yet yet sorted. 
Canadian Academy of Arts and Montreal Art Association, collec- 
tion of Beports, &c„ just received and not yet sorted. 527 

Miscellaneous. 

Papers relating to Her Majesty's Colonial Possessions 22 

Beports on the present state of Her Majesty's Colonial Possesions 9 

" on the past and present state of do 8 

Statistical A bstracts of the past and present state of do 7 

Statistical Tables of the past and present state of do 6 

Statistical Abstracts of the United Kingdom 2 

" Abstracts, Foreign Countries 3 

Tables " " 3 

" Abstracts of British India , 1 

Miscellaneous Statistics United Kingdom ... 4 

Agricultural Beturns of Great Britain, and Abstracts of United 

Kingdom 7 

Beport of Emigration Commission (Imperial) 5 

Information for Emigrants 1 

— 6 
Beport of the Commissioners on the treatment of Immigrants in 

British Guiana 1 

Beports from Her Majesty's Consuls 27 

" " Secretaries. 4 

Papers relative to the operations of the ballot in Australian 

Colo?nes 1 

Beports of the Registrar-General 10 

Navigation and Shipping .., 6 

Trade of United Kingdom with Foreign Countries 4 

Annual Begister 1758 to 1881 124 

Indexes, 1758 to 1782, 1758 to 1810. 2 

126 

Eeport of the Historical Manuscripts Commission (United King- 
dom) ., 6 

Beports of the Deputy Keeper of the Becords (England) 43 

Indexes , 2 

State Papers, Colonial 5 

— 56 

Carried forward 319 2,804 

88 






46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



Brought forward 319 2,801 

Various Papers relating to the Public Record Office, London, 

including 1 

Rules and Regulation* made by the Master of the Rolls, 
respecting the Public Use of the Record, &c. 
Regulations to be observed in Making Office Copies. 

Memorandum on the Subiect of the destruction of Use- 
less Documents, 1876. 

Amendment to Public Record Office Act of 1838, 1877. 

Account of the Construction of the Public Record 
Office and the Means adopted for its secuiity ftom 
Fire. 

Catalogue of the Library. 

" " Record Publications. 

Registry Horse, Edinburgh: 

Reports of Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland, 1 to 11, 16 
to 18, 1807 to 1863; lb bound in 3 

Treasury Minute Regulating the Various Offices, 1881 1 

Reports of thy Commissioners on the State of the Registers 
of Lard Rights in the Counties and Boroughs of Scot- 
land, 1*63. 

Report of Parliamentary Committee on Writs, Registration 
(Sc >tl:*nd) Bill, 1-63 (the two Report-* bound in one)... 1 

Three Yeas in Canada, 1826-7-8 (Mclaggart), 1829. 2 

Commercial and Financial Legislation of Europe and 
America ( McGiegor), 1841 1 

The Ri e of Canada (Roger), 1856 1 

Canadian Handbook, 1867 1 

The Shoe and Canoe (Bigsby), 1850 2 

Topographie du Canada (Buuchette), 1815 1 

The British Possessions in North America (Rouchette), 
I8d2 3 

The War of 1812 (Coffin) 1 

The Atlantic Neptune, 1781, Yol. A 1 

Detailed List of Maps and Charts. 

Canso Harbour, .'. 1 

Basin of Mines 1 

Saunders, Deane and Kcppell Harbours 

Egmont Harbour 

Cape George and Antigonish Harbour and the Barn.... 

Block Islaud, Watch Point, Point Judith and Great 
Lake .... , 

Six Views on the Nova Scoiian Coast 

Partridge Island 

Richibucto and Buctusb 

River St. Lawrence, Quebec to Anticosti, and Anticosti 
to St. Georges Bay, Newfoundland 

M in gan. Harbour, River St. John, Quarry Island 

Do. Quarry Island to Ste. Genevieve Island 

Bay ol Seven Islands . 

Harbour and Bay of Gaspe and Malbaie 

Island of Bonaventure and Cape Rowland to Little Pabos 

Bay of Chaleurs. , 

River St. Lawrence, Quebec to Kamarasky Islands 



Carried forward 17 338 2,804 

89 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1885 



Brought forward 17 338 2,804 

The Atlantic Neptune — 

Plans of Posts at York and Gloucester, Virginia, 
established by Lord Cornwallis, with the attacks by 
Washington and Count Eochambeau, resulting in the 
capitulation by Lord Corn waPis on the 17th October, 

1781 1 

(The positions of the different Armies are given with a 

table of references). 
Part of Hudson's Eiver, showing Fort Montgomery and 
Fort Clinton, and the positions of the obstruct ions to 
the passage of His Majesty's Forces under Sir Henry 

Clinton 2 

Charleston Harbour, with part of James' Island and 

Defences ,. . 1 

New York from the Atlantic to Haverstraw Bay, with a 

sketch of operations under Lord Howe in 1*776 1 

Sketch of the Battle near Camden, in South Carolina, 

16th August, 1780 1 

Eiver St. Lawrence, from Kamarasky Island to Cock 

Cove 1 

River St Lawrence, from Quebec, Foulon Cove, to 
Point Levy, with plans ot intrenched Camps of the 
French under Montcalm, and works of the British 

under Wolfe, in 1759 2 

Views of Quebec 1 

Eiver St Lawrence from Chaudiere to Lake St. Francis. 1 
Montreal Island, Isle Perrault to Lake St. Peter and 

from Lake St. Peter to Chaudiere 2 

Miramichi Bay 1 

Harbour of Eichibucto and Buctush 1 

Magdalen Isles 1 

South East Coa*t of the Island of St. John 1 

Cardigan Bay, Burnt Wood Cove to Eollo Eiver 1 

View of Louisbourg Harbour, Cape Breton ....... 1 

St. Ann Buy, Seymour Cove, Indian Bay .. 1 

Chart, north-east coast of Cape Breton from St. Ann 

Bay to Cape Morien 1 

South-east coast Cape Breton , 2 

Harbour of Louisbourg 1 

Total number of Maps and Views in Volume 41 

The Atlantic Neptune, Vol. B 1 

The Coast of Nova Scotia, New York, Jersey, the Gulf 

and Eiver of St. Lawrence from Lake Ontario to 

Newfoundland, (1777) ........ 1 

Views of Petit Passage and Grand Passage, Bay of 

Fundy .......... 2 

Port Haldimand and Port Amherst 1 

Gambier Harbour and Liverpool • 1. 

King's Bay, Lunen burgh Bay- and Harbour 1 

• Egmont Harbour and View 1 

Keppel, Knowles, Tangier, Saunder's and Dean Harbours 

with Views , 1 



i& Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



Brought forward 8 339 2,804 

The Atlantic Neptune — 

Spry Harbour, Port Dalhousie, Port North, Port Parker, 
Beaver Harbour and Fleming River with Yiew. . . . 

White Inlands Harbour, Port Stephens, Liscomb Har- 
bour, Houlton Harbour and River St. Mary. 

Sandwicli Bay, Port Bickerton, Montague County Har- 
bour, Port Hinchingbroke, Island Harbour 

Northumberland Straits, Bay Verte to Pictou Island 

St. George's Bay, Gut oi Ganso, Bay of Chedabucto 

Port Hood 

Port Hood, View of 

George's B.iy, view of Plaister Cliffs 

Frederick Bay, Rameheg Harbour to Pictou Harbour.... 

Pictou Harbour, Pictou Island to Cape George 

Northumberland Straits, Buctush to Bay Verte 

Port Shediack to Cocagne 

Sable Island :.... 

Sable Island Views 5 

Chart with all the soundings, showing Sable Island 
(On a large scale), 1766 2 

Sable Island, additional views.... 4 

View of the Naked Sand Hill, Sable Island 1 

Total number of Maps and Views 34 

The Sea Coast of Nova Scotia, Vol. C 

Chart of sounding round Sable Island, with sailing 

directions , 2 

Chignecto Bay ..." 1 

Annapolis Royal, St. Mary's Bay, and view of Gulliver's 

Hole 

Chart south-east part of the Bay of Fundy 

South-west Coast of Nova Scotia «.... 

Barrington Bay 

Ports Am o erst and Haldimand 

Port Campbell. * 

Port Mills to Liverpool 

King's Bay and Lunenburgh Bay..... 

Mecklenburgh Bay, Prince Harbour 

Charlotte Bay, Margaret's Bay. 

Leith Harbour, Prospect Harbour, Bristol Bay, Sambro 

Harbour, with view 

South-east coast of Nova Scotia 

Halifax Harbour, with views, Egmont Harbor, with 

views 

Keppel to Dear Harbours, with views « 

Spry Harbour to Fleming River, with views 

White Island to River St. Mary 

Sandwich Bay 

Tor Bay.. 

Whitehaven, with view 

Can^o Harbour to White Point, with view 

Crow Harbour, with view. .*. 

Milfordhaven, with view 

(Jonway Harbour, Port Aylesbury, Bay of Rocks 

Carried forward 2G 340 2,804 

91 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188S 



Brought forward 26 310 2,804 

The Sea Coast of Nova Scotia — 

East Entrance of Lenox Harbour, with view , 1 

Gut of Canso I 

Port Hood ... 1 

Kamsheg Harbour to Cape George .. 1 

Total number of maps and views 30 

The Atlantic Neptune Yol. D 1 

Coast of NovaScotia, &c, 1780 1 

Nova Scotia West, Bay of Fundy and Northumberland 

Straights 1 

Nova Scotia East, Cape Breton and Suble Island 1 

Bay of Fundy, River St. John, Grevilie Cove to Cape 

Spencer, w.th view 1 

Views of the Wolves, the Grand Manan, and the West of 

St. John River >a 3 

Isthmus of Nova Scotia, Chignecto Bay, Mines Channel, 

and Basin of Mines 1 

Chignecto Bay, and Bay Verte 1 

Annapolis Eoyal, and St. Mary's Bay 1 

Yiew of Annapolis Royal , 1 

Townshend Bay., 1 

River St. John to Beaver Point, with Mingan Island 1 

Bay of Fundy (West), part of Tusket Island and Cape 

Sable 1 

Barrington Bay to .Druid Bay 1 

Ports A.mberst and Haldimand 1 

Port Campbell, Buller Bay to Port Amheist 1 

Port Mills 1 

Stormont River to Liverpool 1 

Liverpool Bay and Harbour 1 

Port Jackson 1 

Kings B ay, Lunenburgh Bay and Harbour, to Mecklen- 

burgh Bay 1 

Views, Cape Prospect, Cape Sam bro, Hospatagoen, The 

Ovens, Cape Sable 2 

Entrance to Barrington Bay .' 5 

Mecklenburgh Bay, Prince Harbour, to Crown Point.... 1 

Charlotte Bay 1 

Leiih Harbour, to Sambro Harbour 1 

S. E. Coast, Nova Scotia, Bristol Bay, to Ragged Islands. 1 

" " Keppel Harbour, to Wreck Inlet. . 1 

Bay of Cbedabucto 1 

Halifax Harbour, Sambro Harbour, to Rucky Inlet, with 

Views 1 

Halifax Harbour and Bedford Basin 1 

" Fresh Wat r River to the Narrows. 

This map shows all the Wharfs, batteiies and dock yards 

along the harbour front 1 

•Views of Halifax , 6 

Egmont Harbour >. 1 

Keppell Harbour to Bean e Harbour 1 



Carried forward 46 341 2,804 

92 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1888 



Brought forward., 46 341 2,804 

The Atlantic Neptune — 

Views of Cape Bgmont, Entrance to Egmont Harbour, 
Entiance to Keppell Harbour, Entrance to Chi et- 
cook Inlet, Dartmouth Shore and Falls of Ilinch- 
inbroke River.. H 

Spry Harbour to Fleming River. 

White Island Harbour, lo River St. Mary 

Sandwich Bay 

Tor Bay, with view 

Whitehaven, with view 

Canso Hari our, Glasgow Harbour, and Durell Islaud to 
White Point 

Crow Harbour , - 

Lenox Passage, Bay of Rocks to St. Peter's Isle. 

Chedabucto and Milfordhaven 

Conway Harbour, Port Aylesbury and Bay of Rocks 

Views of the coast from White Islands to St. Mary's 
River, Entrance of Milfordhaven, Entrance of Port 
Bickerton , Entrance of Beaver Harbour, and the 
offing (2) shore to the westward of Canso and the 
Beaver Islands 8 

Gut of Canso, part of Cape Breton and the Richmond 
Isles 1 

Gut of Canso, Bay of Rocks to St. Peter's Island 1 

Frederick Bay, Cliff Cape to Plaister Cliffs.. 1 

Views of Sable Island 4 

Views; Port Hood, and Plaister Cliff. 2 

Total number of Maps and Views 79 

(In the four volumes, A, B, C, D, the soundings are minutely 
given ; the views are chiefly of the coast with Bailing directions tor 
the use of ships making the land, to enable them to a-c irtain their 
position, A few of the maps and charts are duplicates.) 

The American Atlas, 1116, Vol. E., containing 1 

North and South America .... 3 

Russian Discoveries previous to 17t ; 3 . 1 

North America, with the West India Islands, divided 
according to the Treaty of Peace of 10th February, 
1763, with the Provinces which compose the British 

Empire 2 

The Continent of Noith America 1 

The British Empire in North America .... 1 

The River St. Lawrence from Fort Frontenac to Anti- 

costi (with soundings, &c.,) 1 

The Gulf of St. Lawrence 1 

The Island of St. John, divided into Counties and 
Parishes; the lots granted to Government, with li>t 

of Proprietors, &c... 1 

The Island of Newfoundland 1 

The Banks of Newfoundland / .... 1 

Nova Scotia and Cape Breton 1 

New England (Provinces and Divisions of Counties and 
Townships, <fcc.) 2 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1S8S 



Brought forward, < 16 342 2,804 

The American Atlas — 

New York and New Jersey, divided into Manors, Counties 
and Townships j all the Grants made by French 

Governors between Lake Champlain and Montreal... 1 

Lake Champlain, including Lake George, &c, 1762. 1 

The Province of Quebec, according to the Boyal Procla- 
mation of 17th October, 1703 , 1 

Pennsylvania 1 

Virginia and Maryland 2 

North and South Carolina, showing Indian frontiers, 

Eoads, Boundaries, Townships, and other Divisions. 2 

Florida East and West 1 

The Biver Mississippi from the Balise to Fort # Chartres. .... 1 

Bay of Honduras ...../. 2 

South America 1 

The Straits of Magellan 1 

Number of Maps in Volume 30 

Documentary History of New York 3 

345 

"37149" 

Not including loose pamphlets and letters. 






94 






46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (NoJ4.) 



A.. 1883 



APPENDIX No. 2 



ANNUAL REPOBT OF QUEBEC IMMIGRATION AGENT. 

(Mr. L. Stafford.) 

Government Immigration Office, 

■ Quebec, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to enclose to you herewith, rny Annual Report for the 
Tear ending 31st December, 1882. 

The total arrivals at the Port of Quebec, in 1882, were : — * 





Cabin. 


Steerage. 


Total. 




iidd births at sea 


4,086 


40,782 
8 


44,868 
8 


)educt deaths at sea ! 






4,086 
1 

4,085 


40,790 
25 


44,876 
26 






40,765 


44,850 



The arrivals, compared with those of 1881, show an increase of 14,612 souls. 
Comparative Table of Arrivals 1881 and 1882. 



Where From. 




Total from United Kingdom. 
Vid United States, <fcc 



•bin 

Grand Total. 



1881. 



Cabin. Steerage. 



3,254 
119 
164 



3,537 



21,172 
2,361 
2,697 



26,230 
471 



26,701 
3,537 



30,238 



1882. 



Cabin. Steerage. 



3,802 

72 

211 



4,085 



29,848 
5,920 
4,265 



40,033 
732 



40,765 
4,085 



44,850 



Increase 



Decrease. 



9,224 
3,512 
1,615 



1. 

14,351 | 
231 I 



14,612 



Showing an increase of 14,351 in the immigration from the United Kingdom, 
id 261 ma United States, odd ships, &c. 

The total number of steamships which arrived with passengers was 117. 

The average passage of the Allan Line was : Mail steamers from Liverpool, 11 
iy8 ; Londonderry, 10 days ; Glasgow steamers from Glasgow, 13 days ; Dominion 
ine from Liverpool, 12 J days ; Belfast, 11 J days ; Beaver Line from Liverpool, 11 J 
^ys ; Belfast, 10 J days . 

Temperley's London Line, 20 days ; Ross London Line, 15^ days; Bristol Lino 
om Bristol 13J days. 

85 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1885 



The number of Cabin and Steerage by each line of vessels was as follows :• 



Allan Line Mail steamers 

do Glasgow steamers . 

do do from Liverpool 

do do from Londonderry. 

do do from Queenstown.. 

Dominion Line 

Beaver Line 

Temperley's London Line 

Ross London Line 

Bristol Line 

Fid United States, odd ships, &c 



Cabin. 



2,890 
211 



644 

245 

20 

11 

64 



4,085 



Steerage. 



18,332 

4, 265 

2,787 

291 

153 

9,056 

4.528 

125 

132 

364 

732 



40,765 



Total. 



21,222 

4,476 

2,787 

291 

153 

9,700 

4,773 

14* 

143 

428 

732 



44,850 



The nationalities of the passengers brought out by each line were as follow 



Line. 


on 
'3) 


oa 


o 

+^ 
o 
o 


00 

a 

cS 

g 

O 

583 

8 

81 

"296 
9 


m 
a 

.9 
a 



c 
a 

a; 
u 


a 

.5 

"55 


d 

CO 
P5 


2 

<u 

a 

aS 

IS 


t—i 


ai 

a 

06 

'B 

< 


Total. 


Allan Line Mail steamers from Liver- 
pool and Londonderry 

Glasgow steamers from Glasgow 


13,920 


3,615 


111 

4,339 

9 

""27 
47 


2,739 
'2,'352 

'3,132 
13 

'""43 


4 
33 

13 


250 
14 

' 6 




129 


20 

10 


21,222 
4,47* 


1.096 
279 

1 375 


do do Liverpool 

do do Londonderry 
do do Queenstown. 


331 




2,78' 


291 

153 

1,601 

2,314 


29] 
IBS 


Dominion Line 


3,489 
2,101 
145 
143 
428 
324 

20,881 


9,70( 

4,77: 

14! 


Beaver Line 

Temperley's London Line 


Ross London Line 

Bristol Line 


14: 
421 


Vi& United States, &c 


221 
8,195 


84 
4,617 


47 


73! 




1,024 


.8,279 


50 


270 


129 


30 


44,85 


The nationalities of the immigrants of 1882, compared 
as follows : — 

English. , .-. ............ 


1 


ith 
1881 

3,L 


those 

1 
>4 2( 


of 1 
882. 

)88] 


[ 


1, wer< | 



Irish , 3,785 

Scotch 2,880 



Germans. 

Scandinavians 

French and Belgians 

Italians 

Icelanders 

Russians 

Russians (Jews)...... 

Austrian! 



530 

9,600 

104 

26 
118 

22 

"l9 



8,195 
4,617 
1,024 

8,279 
50 

'l29 

270 

1,375 

30 



96 



30,238 44,850 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



The number of single men arrived was 1*7,192. 
The number of single women arrived was 5,034. 
Table No. 2 gives the number of passengers from each port in 1881 and 1882. 

The trades and callings of the steerage passengers as per passenger lists, were 
as folio ws : — 

Farmers 3,2*6 

Farm Labourers and Labourers 16,629 

Mechanics 1,420 

Clerks, &c. 11 



21,352 



Table No. 3 gives the number of immigrants arrived at the Port of Quebec, 
from 1829 to 1882, inclusive, showing a total of 1,510,930 or a yearly average of 

21,980. 

The following table gives the number of immigrants assisted to emigrate by 
rarious societies during the Year 1882. 



Date. 



- 



lar. 


20 


r 


8 
15 


Uj 


7 


do 


14 


do 


16 


do 


19 


do 


83 


do 


23 


une 


8 


do 


14 


io 


14 


Jo 


26 



io 

ug. 

io 

io 

io 

lo 

io 

apt. 

lo 

lo 



•lo 18 
lo 24 



Vessels. 



Polynesian 

ircassian 

Parisian 

Polynesian 

Mississippi 

Circassian 

Ontario , 

Nova Scetian 

Peruvian , 

Hanoverian , 

Polynesian 

do 

Circassian 

Peruvian 

Hanoverian 

Sardinian. 

Circassian , 

do 

Peruvian 

Parisian 

do 

Lake Winnipeg 

Sardinian 

do , 

do 



Circassian, 
Peruvian . 
Parisian .. 
Various.... 



By Whom Sent. 



Mrs. Birt 

Mi3S Macpherson 

Miss Rye 

Father Nugent, Liverpool 

Rev. Mr. Stephenson, Hamilton 

Mrs. Birt 

Refuse for Homeless Children, London.... 

Boys Farm School, Birmingham 

Rev. Mr. Wood, London 

Miss Bilborough 

Mr. Middlemore, Birmingham 

Mrs. Cadle, Kent 

Miss Macpherson 

Rev Lord A.. Douglas, London 

St. Catharine's Convent, Tralee 

South Dublin Union 

Miss Macpherson 

Cardinal Manning 

Miss Rye 

Dr. Baruardo, London 

Cardinal Manning 

Mobile Union, County Leitrim 

Cardinal Manning 

South Dublin Union 

National l.efuge lor Destitute Children, 

London ;... 

Catholic Protective Society, Liverpool — 

Cardinal Manning 

do 

Father Nugent, Liverpool 



Sexes. 



18 



17 



348 



7 

1 
3 

15 



8 
191 



52 


10 


56 


7 


11 




45 


6 


29 








37 


4 


3 




34 


2 


21 




4 




1 





471 



38 



Total. 



43 
48 
60 
36 
41 
77 
17 
2 
11 
70 
74 
18 
90 
40 
13 
42 
66 
12 
61 
56 
18 
10 
11 
40 

22 
31 
12 
19 



1,048 



14— 1 



97 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



The total number assisted with free transport by this office was 13,696 souls, 
equal to 11,032} 'adults, including 2,636 souls, equal to 2,208 adults, which arrived 
kere, vid Halifax, during the winter season of 1881-82 : — 

Souls. Adults. 

Males 7,418 7,418 

Females 2,526 2,526 

Children 2,177 1,088} 

Infants 1,575 

13,696 11,032} 

Their nationalities were : 

Souls. Adults. 

English 8,027 6,335} 

Irish ,.. 3,844 3,283 

Scotch ....- 1,122 850} 

Germans 359 ' 270 

Scandinavians 261 214} 

French and Belgians 34 30 

Austrians 29 29 

Icelanders 9 9 

Russians (Jews) 11 11 

13,696 11,032} 

They were forwarded to the following places : — 

Souls. Adults. 

Eastern Townships 1,520 1,338 

Montreal 846 744} 

Other places in Province of Quebec 64 44} 

Ottawa 1,588 1,368 

Centra/ District 3,811 3,341 

Toronto 5,546 3,960} 

West of Toronto 240 171} 

.New Brunswick 59 46 

Nova Scotia 22 18} 

13,696 11,032} 

The general destination ot the steerage passengers, as per returns from Gran* 
Trunk Railway, &c, were as follows : — 

Adults. 

Eastern Townships 1,375} 

Montreal 3.883 

Other places in Province of Quebec 142} 

Total Province of Quebec. 5,401 

Adults. 

Ottawa City ». 1,487 

Ottawa District 976 

Kingston City 1,348 

Kingston District 1,684} 

Toronto 7,373 

West of Toronto 2,031 

Total Province of Ontario 14,899} 

98 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1885 



Adults. 

Nova Scotia 21£ 

New Brunswick 49 

Manitoba 2,900£ 

British Columbia 3 

2,974 

23,274£ 
To which may be added one-third for children 

and infants 7,758 

Total number of souls remaining in Canada — 31,032 

Adults. Univeisite d'OHawa 

Eastern States 2,403^ DOCUMENTS OFFICES 

Western States (chiefly Scandinavians 8 > 35 %OVERNM£NT PUBLICATIOl 

10 760 University of Ottawa 



The total expenditure at this Agency, exclusive of transport, for the year ending 
51st December, 1882, was as follows : — 

Immigration. 

Meals, provisions and assistance to Immigrants — $ 2,856 29 

Agency charges 1,466 39 

Salaries of staff .. 4,350 00 

.Repairs, supplies, &c 1,444 87 

Pay of Guardians, Levis Sheds 1,444 75 

Local transport 201 00 

Total Immigration $11,763 30 

Quarantine, 

Inspecting Physician's salary $ 900 00 

Medicines, stationery, &c 84 50 

984 50 



Total expenditure at Agency... $12,747 80 

The arrivals at Quebec, during the season of navigation were the largest since 
354, and would have been still larger, but for the fact, that several steamers which 
uled for this port, in the month of April, encountered ice, put into Halifax and 
•nded passengers there. 

The immigrants were of the usual classes and landed in a healthy condition. 

Ploughmen, farm-labourers and domestic servants were in demand at all the 
land Agencies, and although the arrivals of the various classes were much larger 
ian usual, they were not sufficient to supply orders. 

Machinists, masons, stone-cutters, &c, found ready employment at high wage??. 

t Navvies and quarrymen were in demand ; several contractors in the West hud 
rats here nearly the whole season employing men ; as the numbers of experienced 
ds arriving were not sufficient for their demands, they frequently had to take 
en unaccustomed to railroad or quarry work. 

The stream of immigration to Manitoba and the North-West increases yearly. 
ie numbers of those who landed here in 1882, on their route, were about four timea 

09 ^-r T~- 

n-UOTHECA 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



those of 1881, and this season, in addition to the usual immigration of gentlemen and 
farmers with means, there were considerable numbers of builders, joiners, brick- 
layers, &c, bound for Winnipeg, induced, no doubt, by the reports sent home of the 
high wages obtained there. Manitoba requires builders, joiners, bricklayers and 
labourers, as well as farmers, and, I have no doubt, we shall shortly see large numbers 
of the most enterprising of tbese classes selecting the North- West as the most 
profitable place to invest their labour. 

A long succession of good crops and the high prices generally obtained for the 
produce of the farm, the dairy and live stock, has enabled the farmers of Canada to 
adopt many modern improvements which, some years ago, were beyond their means; 
for this as well as their household comforts they require extra male and female labour, 
which, in the aggregate, is one of the chief causes of the yearly increasing demands 
for farm servants. 

During the year many of our manufacturers have enlarged their establishments, 
and many new and important factories, now being constructed, will commence 
operations early next year. These industries will absorb a large amount of skilled 
labour, a considerable portion of which must be obtained from next year's arrivals. 

As the farming and manufacturing interests of the country were never in a 
more prosperous condition, added to which the large demands to be made on the 
labour market by the Canada Pacific and many other railways and public works now 
under construction, we have every reason to conclude that the immigrants arriving 
here in 1883, if of the proper classes and adapted to the general wants of the country, 
will find employment, on arrival, at good wages. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

L. STAFFOKD, 

Agent. 
To the Hon. the Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



100 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1S83 



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102 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Table No. 2. — Statement of the number of immigrants arrived at the Port of 

Quebec, distinguishing the countries from whence they sailed, during the seasoni 
1881 and 1882 :— 

England. 

1881. 1882. 

Liverpool 23,832 32,934 

London 544 288 

Plymouth 50 

Bristol 428 

24,426 33,650 

Ireland, 

Londonderry 1,941 3,048 

Belfast 302 1,114 

Queenstown. 237 1,052 

Galway 778 

2,4?0 5,992 

Scotland. 

Glasgow 2,861 4,476 

Vid United States, odd ships, &c 471 734 

Recapitulation. 

England 24,426 3^,650 

Ireland 2,480 5,992 

Scotland 2,861 4,476 

United States, odd ships, &c 471 732 

30,238 44,850 
L. STAFFOKD, 



GOVERNMENT IMMIGRATION OFFICE, 

Quebec, 31st December, 1882. 



Agent. 



103 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



Table No. 3. — Comparative Statement of the Number of Immigrants arrived at the 
Port of Quebec since the Year 1829 until 1882, inclusive. 



Years. 



1829 to 1833 
1834 " 1838 
1839 " 1843 
1844 " 1848 

1849 

1850 

1851 

1852 

1853 

1854 

1855 

1856 

1857 

1858 

1859 

1860 

1861. 

1862 .... 

1863 

1864 

1865 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 



England. 



43,386 

28,561 

30,791 

60,458 

8,980 

9,887 

9,677 

9,276 

9,585 

18,175 

6,754 

10,353 

15,471 

6,441 

4,846 

6,481 

7,780 

6,877 

6,317 

5,013 

9,296 

7,235 

9,509 

16,173 

27,876 

27,183 

23,710 

21,712 

25,129 

17,631 

12,456 

7,720 

5,927 

7,500 

14,113 

18,647 

24,426 

33,650 



Ireland 



615,002 



102,266 

54,904 

74,981 

112,192 

23,126 

17,976 

22,381 

15,983 

14,417 

16,165 

4,106 

1,688 

2,016 

1,153 

417 

376 

413 

4,545 

4,949 

3,767 

4,682 

2,230 

2,997 

2,585 

2,743 

2,534 

2,893 

3,274 

4,236 

2,503 

1,252 

688 

663 

913 

1,088 

2,485 

2,480 

5,992 



524,059 



Scotland. 



20,143 
11,061 
16,311 
12,767 
4,984 
2,879 
7,042 
5,477 
4,745 
6,446 
4,859 
2,794 
3,218 
1,424 
793 
979 
1,112 
2,979 
3,959 
2,914 
2,601 
2,222 
1,793 
1,924 
2,867 
5,356 
4,984 
5,022 
4,803 
2,491 
1,768 
2,131 
829 
1,425 
1,602 
2,845 
2,861 
4,476 



168,886 



Yearly average 27,980 



Government Immigration Office, 

Quebec, 31st December, 1882. 



Germany 

and 
Norway. 



15 
485 



9,728 

436 

849 

870 

7,256 

7,456 

11,537 

4,864 

7,343 

11,368 

3,578 

2,722 

2,314 

10,618 

7,728 

4,182 

7,453 

4,770 

16,958 

16,453 

13,607 

9,626 

9,396 

5,391 

4,414 

2,010 

857 



Other 
Countries. 



1,889 

1,346 

1,777 

1,219 

968 

701 

1,106 

1,184 

496 

857 

691 

261 

24 

214 



42 
321 
723 
412 
562 
362 
324 
457 
448 
1,020 
471 
732 



184,284 18,699 1,510,930 



Total. 



167,699 

96,357 
123.860 
196,364 

38,404 

32,292 

41,076 

39,176 

36,699 

53,180 

21,274 

22,439 

32,097 

12,810 
8.778 

10,150 

19,923 

22,176 

19,419 

19,147! 

21,356 

28,648 

30,757 

34,300 

43,114., b 

44,475 L 

37,020 

34,743 

36,901 

23,894 r 

16,038 ■ 

10.901 
7,743 

10,295 

17,251 

24,997 

30,238 

44,850 



L. STAFFOKD, 



Agent. 






104 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1833 



No, 3. 

ANNUAL KB PORT OF MONTRPSAL IMMIGRATION AGENT. 
(Mr.. John J. Daley.) 



Dominion Government Immigration Agency, 

Montbeal, 31st, December 1882. 

Sir, — 1 have the honour to submit my thirteenth Annual Report of the proceed- 
ings of this Agency with statements annexed for the year ending December 31, 
1882. 

distribution. 

Statement A, showing the number of immigrants arrived at this Agency, their 
nationality, trades, or occupations, also number assisted with free transport. 

WHERE SENT. 

Statement B, showing the points to which number of persons have been dis- 
tributed from this Agency for year 1882. 

VIA UNITED STATES. 

Statement C, showing the number of arrivals from the United States — viz., vid 
New York, Boston, and Portland, and amount of capital brought by them. 

IMMIGRANT CHILDREN. 

Statement D, showing the number of children arrived at this Agency, whom in. 
sharge of, and destination. 

FOOD AND CLOTHING. 

Statement E. — List of retail prices of the ordinary articles of food and clothing 
•equired by the working classes, at the Montreal Agency. 

RATES OF WAGES. 

Statement F. — Return of average rates of wages at the Montreal Agency paid 
io mechanics, labourers, and domestic servants. 

DOMESTIC SERVANTS. 

Female domestic servants who arrived during the year just ended were far in 
>xcess of the arrivals of the same class last year. Nevertheless, the supply was 
lot equal to the demand, good domestic servants being eagerly sought for at this 
Agency during the year. One of the principal reasons for the scarcity of this class 
>f labour lies in the fact that the large cotton, woollen, boot and shoe, andolherindus- 
rial establishments recently started in and around Montreal absorb and employ a 
arge number of female operatives who were formerly engaged as domestic ser- 
ants, thereby increasing the demand for this latter class. 

MECHANICS AND LABOURERS. 

Mechanics found immediate employment on arrival, and at remunerative rate* 
f wages. The extensive works of the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Lachine 
Janal enlargement and other public works in this city and neighbourhood increased 
be demand for unskilled labonr largely, so that the demand for navvies and common 
ibourers generally could not be satisfied. 

HEALTH. 

The health of the immigrants arriving this season has been remarkably good, 
ery little sickness having occurred, and only two children died during the summer. 

101 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



m 

ti- 



lt has been usual to say a few words as to the class of immigrants and their 
general appearance, &c. Under this head I would observe that in general appear- 
ance, habits, and social position there is a decided improvement from year to year, 
the past season taking the lead of former years as to numbers and wealth, and 
which will, no doubt, from all appearances be double in the season of 1883. 

It having been publicly stated in the press that female immigrants were 
frequently 'decoyed away, and that a proper supervision was not maintained, ar 
investigation was held on the subject, and I append the report made by me thereoi 
to the investigating committee: 

" I have been Immigration Agent at this port during the past thirteen years ; ] 
am confident that the statement made and circulated in the American press, to th< 
effect that young female immigrants were systematically decoyed to their ruin oi 
arrival at this city, is substantially untrue and without any solid foundation whatever 

"On the arrival of female immigrants at the port of landing, till arrival at then 
destination, they are well taken care of and protected. A travelling Agent and 
special car are provided for their accommodation, and they are under the travelling 
Agent's supervision to wherever they are destined for, and handed over to the Govern 
ment Agent at that port, who then takes charge of them, and whose duty it is to se 
that they are placed m respectable Situations. 

"As regards the female immigrants coming under my jurisdiction, I beg to stall it 
that on arrival at the Government Immigration Station (Tanneries Junction) they ar 
well received and properly treated with substantial meals and lodgings. My assistant 
also see that every care and protection is taken of them. 

" I may also state that for the last nine years I have had a matron connected with m; j{J 
department, whose dutjMtis, on notification from me, on arrival of female immigrants 
to be in attendance, and particularly look after and protect all female immigrant; i| 
arriving in this city till suitable situations are provided for them in respectable families «• 

"The regulations on the arrival of immigrants at the Government Station (Taij J{ 
neries Junction) are very strict; I allow no outsiders, male or female, to come i 
contact with the immigrants, except the employes of the department, and m; ted 
assistants had special instructions to carry out this rule. 

" During my long experience as the Government Immigration Agent I have ha ^: 
only a few cases which call for any special mention, and in those particular cases th. :- 
girls were found upon investigation to be of light character before leaving homr jd» 
I will here state that it is my opinion that the statement put forth has been put i| '_,' 
circulation by parties interested and enemies of the Dominion, so as to direct tb : '; S V 
stream ot this class of immigrants to ports outside the Dominion of Canada. 

" I have no hesitation in stating that female immigrants, and all other immigran 
coming to Canada, are well taken care of and protected, and such assistance give 
which they need, so as to make them feel comfortable and contented on their fir; 
arrival in a strange land. 

" It has always been my aim, and that of my brother Agents, to give the male ar 
female immigrants on arrival in our Dominion, a hearty reception, which mab 
such an impression on them that they ever after gratefully remember us. 

" The gentlemen composing this meeting, as well as the public in general, mi 
feel satisfied that the statements or allegations' which this meeting was calk 
to investigate are altogether untrue and unfounded as far as my experience ar 
knowledge are concerned." 

I enclose herewith the report of the Investigating Committee : — 

Report of Committee. 

A statement having been put forth as a telegraphic despatch to the Toronto Globe, frc 
Montreal, calling attention to an alleged outrage in September last, upon an alleged immigrant, a) 
followed by a statement to the effect substantially that there are many eases of the same kind whi 
are never brought to light, and that some members ot the detective force here had stated that twen 
per cent, of the immigrant girls to Montreal filled "the brothels of ill-fame in this city." The sar 
statement having been reproduced in a portion ot the press of this couitry, in the United Sta' 
and in England, it was thought by some prominent citizens that the matter should be fully inves 
gated. 

106 



it: 






h- 



'ie ; ; 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188$ 



To that effect the President of the St. Patrick's Society, Mr. F. B. McNamee, invited the 
Presidents of the other English speaking national societies to meet him. The following gentlemen 
responded to the invitation : Mr. G. W. Macrea, Q. C, President, and Mr. W. W. Ogilvie, Vice- 
President, of the St. Andrew's Society ; Mr. J. K. Ward, Vice-President, St. George's Society ; Mr, H, 
F. Bellew, First Vice-President of the St. Patrick's Society ; Mr. James Moore, President, and Mr. R. 
Thomas, Vice-President of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society ; Mr. W. C. Munderloh, President 
of the German Society ; Mr Hermann Drechsel, Secretary of the German Society. ; 

At the first meeting it was decided to invite the Rev. A. J. Bray to assist the committee in car- 
rying on the investigation, which invitation was accepted, and Mr. Bray attended all subsequent 
meetings. 

The Chief of Police of Montreal was first summoned, and the question put to him : " Do you 
know of any systematic attempt being made to decoy immigrant girls from the path of virtue?" 
Answer. — Decidedly there is not. 

Question. — Could there be any such systematic effort without your knowledge ? 
Answer. — No, there could not. 

Question.-- -Do you think that any appreciable number of girls are so decoyed ? 
Answer — No, not any. 

Question. — Do you know of any cases at all in which girls have been decoyed to their ruin ? 
Answer. — Not one. 

The Chief of Police stated that he did not believe there was any foundation for the statement 
made in the Globe by the Montreal correspondent. 

The committee then summoned the Chief of the Water Police, also the agents of both the 
Dominion and Provincial Governments, and made strict enquiry as to their methods of operation on 
the receipt of immigrant girls here. Mr. Daley for the Dominion Government, and Mr. Lesperance 
for the Provincial Government, explained their modvs operandi, from which it was quite evident that 
the machinery is complete and well administered ; that it is simply impossible for the work of 
decoying to be done. They stated ihat they had not known of any cases in which girls had 
been seduced from the path ef virtue since their taking office ; Mr. Daley has been in office over thir- 
teen years. 

The committee was satisfied with the statement of these officers but felt it their duty to go 
beyond them, in order to get independent corroborative evidence By the courtesy of General 
Manager Hickson, Mr. Kirkham, of the Grand Trunk Railway, and his chief officer, met the committee 
and stated that they had means of knowing as to whether the Government officials administered their 
toflBce properly or not. They also had means of knowing as to whether any attempts were being 
made, or had been made, to decoy immigrant girls, and they were prepared to affirm that no such 
thing bad occurred. The girls are carefully guarded until situations are obtained for them, and they 
new of no case in which a respectable girl had been led into temptation. 

The Montreal correspondent of the Globe, who was the author of the item referred to, was also 
isked to meet the committee. He did so, and stated the information had been received from one of 
the detective force, but refused to give his authority. In order to make this investigation complete, 
the committee then summoned Chief Detective Cullen and Detectives Richardson and Murphy, of the 
Montreal Detective Force. Being interrogated, they stated positively that there was no attempt made 
o decoy girls, neither with nor without system ; th.it while Old Country girls of loose character 
ould not be prevented from emigrating and following their own bent in this country, they had 
iever known a case of a respectable girl being betrayed into bad company. On being asked if they 
relieved there wa3 any ground for the siatement in the Globe, they declared unhesitatingly and 
mphatically that there was no such ground. 

The investigating committee therefore desire to give the most full and authoritative denial to 
he Montreal despatch to the Glebe of September 13th. They regret that any newspapers or news- 
paper correspondents should have been so reckless of the country's future as to put forward such 
Unfounded and damaging reports. They declare that immigrants to this country are well cared for a* 
to creature comforts, and all girls are well protected as to morality. Being thus confident, the com- 
mittee ask all the journals which copied the Globe's statement to give publication to this emphatic 
enial, 

Signed bv order of the Committee, 

F. B. McNAMEE, 

Chairman. 
HERMANN DRECHSEL, 

Hon. Secretary, 
Montreal, 10th January, 1883. 



e 



CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, I wish to return thanks to the several officials and staff of 
>f the Grand Trunk Railway, Canadian Pacific Railway, and North Shore Railway, 
or their kind services and assistance at all times during the past season. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, your obedient servant, 

JOHN J. DALEY, 

'o the Hon . the Minister of Agriculture, Dominion Government Immigration Agent* 
Ottawa. 

101 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.li.) 



A. 1883 



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108 



i6 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



atement B.-r-Showing the points to which 513 persona have been distributed for 

the Year 1882. 



Stations. 



(lteville 

►ckville 

tie ton Place... 

mpton 

Iteau Landing 

bourg 

pnwall 

joronto 

erson , 

*nby 

aanoque 

milton 

nmingford... 
if ax 

fston 
say 

don 

icaster.... 

hine 

noxville 

[■risburg 

brooke 

bank 

lawa 

lia 



*a 
a 



4 

55 

2 



Carried forward 



3 
9 

1 
2 
1 
1 
18 
5 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

131 



Stations. 



Brought forward. 



Ottawa , 

Prescott 

Peterboro' 

Pembroke 

Papineauville 

Perth 

Port Hope 

Quebec , 

Richmond 

St. John's, P.Q. 

St. Armand 

St. Hyacinthe.... 

Sarnia 

Stanbridge 

Sherbrooke 

Smith's Falls 

St. Catharines... 

St. Eustache 

St. Martine 

Toronto 

Three Rivers 

Trois Pistoles .. 

Waterloo 

Waubaushene ,. 



Total. 



2 

2 
d So 

a 



131 

91 
3 

18 
3 

18 
5 
3 

33 
1 
7 
8 
2 

10 
3 
5 
2 
1 
2 
1 

127 
4 
1 



513 



.tement 0.— Showing the Number of Arrivals at this Agency during the months 
of 1882, via New York, Boston and Portland. 



Month. 



1882. 

ry 

nary 

«... 

I 

V" 

|imber.., 
jr 

imber... 
aber ... 

Total, 



to 


d 
o 

tn 

O 
PQ 


a 

O 

Cu 


Destination. 




Total. 


Province 

of 
Quebec. 


Province 

of 
Ontario. 

420 
302 
810 
1,026 
1,716 
920 
286 
491 
167 
192 
209 
360 


Province 

of 
Manitoba. 


151 
29 

188 
543 
1,719 
683 
289 
315 
147 
154 
132 
90 


128 

71 

96 

601 

1,201 

1,062 

152 

352 

115 

61 

81 

64 


361 

374 

788 

1,745 


107 

118 

190 

208 

704 

418 

67 

225 

109 

76 

80 

128 


113 

54 

72 

1,655 

500 

516 

100 

100 

115 

31 

101 

107 


640 

474 

1,072 

2,889 

2.920 

1,854 

453 

816 

391 

299 

390 

595 


109 
12 
149 
129 
84 
177 
441 


4,440 


3,984 


4,369 


2,430 


6,899 


3,464 


12,793 



Money. 



12,000 
10,500 
16,000 
35,000 
40,000 
28,000 
16,000 
25,000 
18,000 
11,000 
16,000 
18,000 

245,500 



ioy 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



ii 



Statement D — Showing the Number of Children received at this Agency, whom ii 
charge of, and destination, for the year ending 31st December, i882. 



Date. 



April 10, 
do 16, 

May 8 
do 15 

June 9 
do 27 

July 2 

Aug. 6 
do 13 
do 20 

Sept. 19 



Name of Person in charge. 



Miss Bilborough . 

Miss Rodgers 

Two Nuns 

Mr. Butler 

Miss Bilborough 

Mrs. Merry ,. 

Lord Douglass — 

Mr. Merry , 

Miss Rodgers 

John Chill 

Mrs. Hodgson 

Total 



591 



O 5 


Destination. 


©rs 




JZJ.a 




O 




79 


Belleville. 


60 


do 


35 


Lindsay. 


41 


Hamilton. 


70 


Belleville. 


90 


Gait. 


40 


Ottawa. 


66 


Gait. 


60 


Niagara. 


18 


Ottawa. 


32 


do 



Statement E. — List of Retail Prices of the ordinary Articles of Food and Eaiment 
required by the Working Classes at Montreal Agency. 



Provisions. 



$ cts. 



Bacon, per lb 

Bread, best white, 4 lb. loaf 

do brown, 6 1b. loat 

Butter, salt, per lb , 

do fresh, do 

Beef, 12c, mutton, 8c, veal, 12c, pork 

Beer, per quart 

Candles, per lb ■ .. 

Cheese do 

Coffee do 

Corn meal, per 100 lbs 

Eggs, per doz 

Flour, per brl., 1st quality 

do do 2nd do 

do buckwheat, per 100 lbs 

Fish — dry or green cod, per cwt 

Firewood, per cord 

Ham, per lb. , 

do shoulders, per lb 

Herrings, per brl 

Mustard, per lb 

Milk, per quart 

Oatmeal, per 100 lbs 

Pepper, per lb ... 

Potatoes, per bush .-. 

Rice, per lb 

Soap, yellow, per lb , 

Sugar, brown, do 

Salt, per bush 

Tea, black, per lb 

do green, do 

Tobacco 



18 
18 
20 
25 
30 
13 



10 

10 
16 
30 
50 
25 
6 40 

6 00 

2 50 
8 00 

7 00 
15 
13 
6 00 
20 
07 

3 50 
15 
60 
05 
07 
09 
25 
60 
50 
50 



Clothing, &c 



Coats, under, tweed 

do over do 

Frowsers do 

Vests do 

Shirts, flannel 

do cotton... 

do under, "wove" 

Drawers, woollen, ' ' wove 

Hats, felt 

Socks, worsted, per pair... 

do cotton, do .... 

Blankets, per pair 

Rugs , 

Flannel, per yard 

Cotton Shirting, per yard . 

Sheeting, per yard 

Canadian cloth, per yard ., 
Shoes, men's. 

do women's ,.. 

Boots, men's 

do women's 



Indian rubber overshoes, men's. 



do 



do 



$ cts. $ cts. 



ton 



8 00 to 

Too to 



6 00 

10 00 

3 50 

1 60 

2 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 



30 to 
10 to 



110 



:6 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Statement F. — Average rate of Wages at the Montreal Agency in 188 1. 



% Ct8. $ cts- 

Farm Labourers, per day, without board 1 00 to 1 50 

do per month, with board 15 00 to 26 00 

Female Farm Servants, per mouth, with board 6 00 to 10 00 

Masons, per day, without board 1 50 to 2 50 

Bricklayers, do do 150 to 2 50 

Carpenters do do 1 60 to 2 25 

Lumbermen, per month do 25 00 to 30 00 

Shipwrights, per day do 150 to 2 CO 

Smiths do * do 1 50 to 2 00 

Wheelwrights do do 1 50 to 1 75 

Gardeners, per month, with board 20 00 to 25 00 

do per day, without board 1 00 to 150 

Female Cooks, per month 8 00 to 10 00 

Laundresses, per day 75 to 100 

Female Domestics, per month 6 00 to 10 00 

General Labourers, per day, without board 100 to 150 

Miners do do 1 5o to 2 00 

Mill Hands do do 100 to 150 

Engine Drivers do do 1 75 to 2 50 

Saddlers do do 2 00 to 2 50 

Bootmakers do do 1 25 to 2 00 

Tailors do do 100 to 2 00 

Railway Labourers do do 125 to 150 

Board, per week , 3 00 to 4 00 

Rent, per month for Labourers' and Mechanics' tenement housei 6 00 to 8 00 






JOHN J. DALEY, 

Dominion Government Immigration Agent. 



ontrbal Immigration Agency, 
31et December, 1882. 



Ill 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A, 1885 



No. 4. 

ANNUAL EBPORT OF OTTAWA IMMIGRATION AGENT. 
(Mr. W. J. Wills.) 



Government Immigration Ofeice, 

Ottawa, J 1st December, 1882. 

Sir, —I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of this Agency, showing- 
the number of immigrants who reached here during the year 1882, which, I am 
happy to say, as shown in the following tables, far exceeds that of any previous 
year:— 





European Immigration. 




Nationalities. 

• 


Via St. 
Lawrence. 


Vici United 
States. 


Total. 


English , 


958 
978 
164 
314 
45 ' 
108 
1,302 


36 
15 
15 
93 
13 
43 


995 


Irish 


993 


Scotch 


179 


Germans 


407 


French 


58 


Scandinavians 


151 


Sent from Quebec to other parts of this Agency 


1,302 








Total 


3,870 


215 


4,085 




•^ 









Table showing the number of immigrants who received assistance in the shapfr 
of transport and fuel ; 1,649 souls equal to 1,512, adults at SI. 20 per adult : — 



English 

Irish 

Scotch 

Germans 

French 

Scandinavians 

Total 



382 

392 

82 

123 

10 

52 



1,041 



96 

157 

15 

50 

8 

9 



335 



90 
10 

61 
2 

12 



273 




The Grermans who arrived were healthy and hardy, and certainly will make 
good settlers. In addition to remittances for German emigrants, I also sent to 
the British Isles nearly $2,000, for the purchase of passage tickets through the 
Agents there. 

In addition to this amount sent through my hands, a number of remittances 
went through the Department of Agriculture for a similar purpose. 

A number of children were brought out by Lord Douglas, from the St. Vincent 
Home in London, and others were sent by Cardinal Manning and the Tralee Union, 

112 



46 Victoria Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



amounting in all to 110 boys and 31 girls. They wore placed at the disposal of His 
iLordship the Bishop of Ottawa, who kindly undertook the distribution of them. 

As in other years, a large number of immigrants entered and settled in my 
fdistrict, without having come through my hands. Those who declared their effects 
at the Customs' ports are reported to the Department direct, by the Customs 
authorities. If all of these two classes were added to the number who pass through 
the Agency, the aggregate total this year would be found nearly double the figures 
given in my tables. 

In addition lo the employment afforded by railways, the enlargement of the 
G-renville Canal was a means of providing employment for quite a number of 
single men. 

Besides this, the phosphate mining industry and the iron mines afforded work 
for a large number, and the two latter industries, apparently, will create a demand 
yearly for steady working men. 

Owing to the general prosperity pervading the country, and the consequent 
great demand for labour in this district, I met with no difficulty in placing out all 
the immigrants that arrived here, and the railway works in progress in the vicinity 
could have absorbed a much larger number of hands if they had been offered. 

The wages ranged from SiG.OO to $18.00 per month with board, for agricultural 
labourers by the year, and during harvest $.5.00 and upwards was offered and 
accepted. 

The extension of the Canada Pacific Railw.-iy from the MaUawa, the Kingston 
and Pembroke Railway near Renfrew, the Ontario and Quebec Railway from Perth 
westward, the Toronto and Ottawa Railway in the same locality, and the (Janada 
Atlantic Railway from Ottawa eastward, were each and all applicants for labour, and 
[the wages paid were $1.50 per day of ten hours, the men finding their own board. 
|The latter, however, was easily obtainable at S3.0D per week, thus leaving a reason - 
ble sum at the men's disposal. 

Of other immigrants there were only a limited number of female domestics, a 
blass whose supply is never equal to the demand. Of clerks and mechanics, there 
;was the usual share, but, owing to the briskness of trade and commerce, I found less 
difficulty during the past season in disposing of them than in former years. 

A number of Germans who arrived found their fellow-countrymen already 
settled in the County of Renfrew, near Eganvi lie. The majority of them had been 
sent for by relatives and friends previously located there, who advanced $2,062.25 to 
)ay their ocean far. . 

The amount of capital brought into this Agency by immigrant arrivals during 
the year 1882 was about .§1-J,G0U, and the effects would amount to about $10 ; 200, or 
in all 24,800. 

A feature which clearly shows the prosperity of the city and surrounding dis- 
trict, is the fact that little or no destitution prevails here this winter. 

I am much indebted to the Department for the permission given mo to visit my 
district early in the year, as it enabled me to make satisfactory arrangements for 
placing out new comers without waiting to ascertain, on their arrival, where the 
demand for labour existed. 

I have endeavoured conscientiously to discharge all the duties of my ofiiee. 

I have kept the expenditure within as reasonable limits as possible, and I feel 
assured that the very large number of arrivals I have reported, and the prosperous 
■ndition of immigrant settlers, will be satisfactory to all who have the welfare of 
he Dominion at heart, and of this district more particularly. 

I append the usual tables to my report. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

AV. J. WILLS, 
To the Honourable Agent, 

The Minister of Agriculture, 

Ottawa. 
113 
14-8 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188$ 



The Immigrant arrivals were disposed of in the following order, viz : — 

Province of Ontario — 

Citvof Ottawa 602 

" Toronto 46 

" Kingston 11 

" Hamilton 2 

" Belleville 10 

" Brockville . 33 

" Cornwall 6 

County of Carleton 58? 

.Renfrew 541 

" Lanark 346 

Eussell 34 

" Prescott 5 

Leeds & Grenville 21 

" Stratford 1 

" Glengarry 1 

" Wentwortk 2 

, • 2,248 

Province of Quebec — 

City of Montreal 34 

" Quebec 2 

" Sherbrooke 4 

County of Ottawa 340 

Pontiac 36 

" Argenteuil 106 

" Soulanges 1 

532 

City of Winnipeg 2 

United States , 1 

Sent from Quebec to other parts of this Agency 1,302 

Total 4,085 






W. J. WILLS, 

Agent,. 



114 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



Table showing the demand and supply of Labour and the rates of Wages, 



Agricultural labourers.... 
Common do 
Servant maids 

do cooks 

do boys 

Bakers 

Blacksmiths 

Boiler-makers 

Bricklayers 

Butchers 

Clerks 

Carpenters 

Cooks (male) 

Coopers 

Dyers , 

Gardeners 

Grooms and Coachmen... 
Machinists and Engineers 
Masons and Stonecutters. 

Millers 

Moulders 

Painters 

Plasterers 

Plumber and Gasfitters ... 

Printers 

Saddlers 

Shoemakers 

Tailors 

Tanners 



Demand. 



621 

3,164 

584 

57 

112 

1 

6 



13 



Supply. 



512 
673 



} 2!0 { 



$14 to $20 per month, with board. 
$1.50 per diem, without board. 
$6 to $10 per month, with board. 



130 

10 

7 

1 

\H 

2 

76 

64 

3 

1 

2 

9 

24 

19 

45 

1 

2 

8 

6 

5 

4 

1 

9 

7 



$8 to $12* do do 

$4 to $8 do do 

$9 per week, without board. 
$9 do do 

*9 do do 

$2.50 



Rates of Wages. 



do 

do 
;b>z.du per diem do 

$18 }>er month with board. 

$1.50 to $1.75 per diem, without board. 
$26 per month, with board. 



$14 to $20 per month, with board. 
$12 to $18 do do 

$1.50 to $1.75 per diem, without board. 
$2.50 per diem do 



.25 to $1.50 per diem 
$1.25 to £1.50 do 



$8 to $10 per wvek 
$9 do 

Work by the piece. 
do 



do 
do 



do 
do 



W. J. WILLS, 

Agent. 



14— 8| 



11> 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



No. 5. 

ANNUAL EEPOET OF KINGSTON IMMIGRATION AGENT. 

(Mr. E. Macpherson.) 



Government Immigration Office, 

Kingston, 3 1st December, 1882. 



Sir, — I have the hoDOur to submit, for your information, my Annual Eeport, 
with statements annexed, for the year ending hslst December, 1882, viz. : — 

Statement (A) showing the number of immigrants arrived at the Kingston 
Agency, and their nationality, the numbers assisted with provisions and with free 
passes during the past twelve months. 

Statement (B) showing the monthly arrivals at this Agency, during the year 
1882, the number fed and distributed each month — also the number of meals 
furnished to destitute immigrants. 

Statement "(C) showing the number and destination of immigrants forwarded 
from this office by free passes, during the twelve months ended 31st December. 

Statement (D) giving the monthly arrivals within my district, classified as to 
sexes, nationality, occupation and general destination, also showing the value of 
effects and capital brought to the Dominion, which amounts to the very considerable 
sum of §llo,288. 

The number of settlers from the United States who have made entries at the 
several Ports of Entry Within my district during the past year, does not appear in the 
statements above alluded to, nor is the value of their effects included, this informa- 
tion being now obtained direct from the Department of Customs. 

The immigrants placed in this Agency, during the past year, were most suitable 
to the wants of the country and all in a healthy state, the great trouble being that 
there were not nearly enough of them to supply the demand, more particularly of 
farm and other labourers and female domestic servants. This, notwithstanding the 
fact that the number placed in my district, was lot) per cent, greater than during the 
year 1881. and upwards of 400 more immigrants than the total of the five previous 
years added together, as shown by statement herewith. 

Miss Bilborough, of Marchmont House, Belleville, is at present in Great Britain, 
and in'ends returning in early spring with a large number of children. She brought 
out 153 test season, principally from Mr. Quarrier's Home, in Glasgow. A fine, 
intelligent, healthy lot of children they w T ere, and will prove advantageous to the 
country. 

The manufacturing industries, within my distinct, continue in a flourishing con- 
dition, and are on the increase. The Kingston Locomotive Works now employ 
upwards of 450 men, and. I am informed, have, at present, orders sufficient to keep 
that number or even more constantly at work until August next. The large cotton 
and woollen mills, within my Agency, find a difficulty in supplying the demand for 
their goods, likewise the window-glasa works, at .Napanee; in fact ail the manufac- 
turing interests are booming. 

The Kingston Charcoal and Iron Company have established works at Sharbot 
Lake, capable of turning out 700 bushels of charcoal per day, of an excellent quality, 
and it is the intention of the company, [ understand, to manufacture charcoal iron. 

The quantity of iron ore forwarded from Kingston, the past season, has been 
greatly in excess of the previous year. Amounting to 40,9^2 tons, chiefly rrom the 
Townships of Pal rnerston and Levant, it is expected this quantity will be greatly 

116 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.U.) A. 1883 



increased during the year 1883. and there will also be an increased demand for 
miners and labourers at the several mines in those townships as well as at the mines 
in Madoc and Marmora townships, County of Hastings. There has likewise been 
a large quantity of phosphate forwarded from this port during the past year, say 
5,000 tons, the mining and handling of which gives employment to a lar£e number 
of men. The present working capacity of the Mississippi lion Mine, in Palmerston 
Township, is 100 tons (magnetic) ore per day — depth of shaft, i73foet; width of 
vein, 60 feet; length now open, Si00 feet; and, it is the intention to nearly double 
the out-put of ore at this mine, which is considered almost inexhaustible, and the 
deeper it is worked, the better the quality proves ; that now obtained being about 
60 per cent, metallic iron, and, I am informed, is worth at present about 86.50 per 
ton, delivered at Charlotte, N.Y. (to which place it is all being shipped), being equal 
to Swedish or Norway ores, and considered the best for the manufacture of Bessemer 
steel, having little or no sulphur, phosphorous, or titanic acid. 

The out-put of the Bethlehem Iron Company's mine, in Levant Township, is 
about 50 tons per day. It is also the intention to largely increase the working of 
this mine, by employing additional machinery and men. The quality of the ore is 
similar to that of the Mississippi Mine. The Caldwell mine, adjoining, will be 
largely worked during the coming season, likewise the Glendower Mine in Bedford 
Township, All of the iron ore is being shipped to the United States, and most oi 
the phosphate to Europe. There has been a valuable deposit of mica discovered 
lately near the boundary line between Palmers ton ami Clarendon Townships, and it is 
now being worked by an American Company. The quality is found to be excellent. 

From the mining interests described, the number of railways being constructed, 
the vast lumbering interests, and the progress of the works at the Murray Canal, it 
is easily seen that a large number of immigrants will be required in my Agency, 
during the coming season. There will also be a large demand tor farm labourers and 
female domestic servants, and 1 trust those of a good class will arrive in large 
numbers during the year 1883. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

E. MACPHERSON, 

Government Immigration Agent. 
To the Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



117 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



.Statement A. — bhowing the number of Immigrants arrived at the Kingston Agency, 
for the twelve months ending 31st December, 1882, and their Nationality, the 
number assisted with Provisions, and with free passes by Eailways, or other 
eonveyances, from this Agency to thtir respective places of destination. 



Country from. 


&i 

*■ a 

to o3 

> . 

< 


< 


Total. 


Remained in the 
Province of 
Ontario. 


Went to the 
United States. 


Number assisted 
with Provi- 
sions. 


Number assisted 
with Free 
Passes. 


Eagl&nd 

Ireland 

Scotland 


2,522 

2,097 

701 

27 

59 


26 

14 

1 


2,548 

2,111 

702 

27 

65 

23 

1 


2,544 

2,109 

702 

27 

65 

23 

1 


1 
2 


1 

1 

)■ 1,349 






742 


Jforway and Sweden 


6 
23 








1 
















5,407 


70 


5.477 


. 5,471 


3 


1,349 


742 



NOTE- 



-2 Eaglish went to Province of Manitoba. 
1 do do Quebec. 



Statement B. — Showing the total number of Immigrants arrived, and remained to 
be dealt with at the Kingston Agency, for the twelve months ending 31st 
December, 1882. 



Months. 



January... 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August.... 
September 
October ... 
November 
December. 



Via St. 
Lawrence. 



27 

33 

28 

209 

1,389 

1,103 

923 

652 

521 

291 

174 

57 



5,407 



Via the 
United 
States. 



Total. 



29 

34 

31 

209 

1,397 

1,107 

923 

653 

521 

332 

175 

6Q 



5,477 



Number 
Fed. 



10 

20 

23 

126 

385 

359 

182 

115 

30 

55 

32 

12 



1,349 



Number 

distributed 

by Free 

Passes. 



11 

2 

11 

18 

234 

227 

73 

45 

26 

50 

30 

15 



742 



Number 

of meals 

Furnished. 



22 
63 
53 

187 

720 

557 

302 

202 

44 

114 

47 

42 



2,353 



Arrivals of Immigrants at the Kingston Agency during the seven years ending 
31st December, 1882, exclusive of the numbers reported through the Customs. 





1876. 


1877. 


1878. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


Immigrants 


905 


809 


801 


1,193 


1,354 


2,196 


5,497 



118 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (Vo.14.) 



A. 1S83 



Statement C. — Showing the number and destination of Immigrants forwarded from 
this Agency by free passes, for the twelve months ending 31st December, 1882. 



Stations. 



Adolphustown 

Amherst Island 

Ballantyne 

Bath 

Belleville , 

Bowmanville 

Brighton 

Brockville 

Campbellford 

Cobonrg 

Colborne 

Deseronto 

Ernestown 

Fredericksburgh 

Grafton 

Hamilton , 

Harrowsmith 

Iroquois 

Kemptrille 

Landsdown 

Lyn 

Carried forward 



Adult 
Passes. 



10* 
24 

8 

2 
80 
16 

2 
66 

5 
10 

5 
21 
10 
18 

2 
2 
1 

4 
1 

1 

288J 



Stations. 



Brought forward 

Madoc 

Marysburgh..... , 

Montreal , 

Napanen , 

Newcastle 

Newton ville 

Northport 

Oshawa 

Oso , 

Ottawa , 

Palmerston 

Parham ........... 

Perth 

Peterboro' 

Picton 

Port Hope 

Toronto , 

Trenton , 

Whitby 

Wolfe Island.. 

Total 



Adult 
Passes. 



288J 

4 
22 

1 
17 

6 

3 
23* 

5| 
26 

1 
15J 

3 
61 

1 
344 
15 
614 
44 

3 
30 

666 



E. MACPHERSON, 

Government Immigration Agent 



119 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188$- 



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120 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 18S3 



No. 6. 

ANNUAL EEPORT OF TORONTO IMMIGRATION AGENT, 
(Mr. John A. Donaldson.) 



Immigration Office, 

Toronto, 3 1st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have now the honour of submitting this, my twenty-second annual 
Report, showing the working of this Agency during the year ending 31st December, 
882. 

The total number of arrivals here during that period was 23,041. Of these 
1,762 entered the country by way of Quebec or Halifax, and 1,2*79 via the United 
states. The number remaining in Ontario was 8,404. Some 4,621 reported them- 
elves as on the way to settle in the Korth-West, and the balance, 10,016, composed 
rincipally of Germans and Scandinavians, passed through to the Western States. 

It is gratifying to be able to state that the immigrants were, as a rule, of a most 
itisfactory class, being composed principally of farm and general labourers, for 
r hom the demand during the summer was very brisk. Ready and immediate 
mployment was found for all comers, until later in the season, after harvest, when 
le demand for help in the farming districts began to fall off, but by continuous visit- 
ig in my district I succeeded in obtaining employment for them. 

The general health of those arriving has not been so good as in former years, 
ome nine deaths have occurred, principally females, during the season. 

It is my pleasing duty to state that I have been enabled to place a large number 
improved farms, and from the statements and information already received 
irough our Agent in Europe, and the promises of Lord Derby in his speech at 
'anchester in connection with emigration, we may safely look forward to a large 
icrease in the number of arrivals this coming year. 

The number of settlers going to the free grant districts continues to show a large 
lling off over former years, for one reason, owing to the inducements held out by 
"anitoba. 

In my numerous visits through the principal parts of Ontario I found the 
'eatest prosperity exhibited everywhere, and the people happy and contented. 

The demand in Europe for cattle, ^heep, horses, &c, has opened a wide and 
•ofitable field for our farmers, and they are not wanting in enterprise to take 
Ivantage of it, as the increase in exportations shows. 

The rapid growth of this city is unprecedented. In every direction manufac- 
res are springing up, which bring in a large influx of workers, and with the 
idition of Parkdale and Yorkville, the population cannot be less than 100,000, just 
r,000 more than when I first came here, in 1833. 

Some $262,600 in capital and $1^2,920 value in effects, as far as I could ascer- 
in, hss been introduced into the country during the past year by immigrants. 

The demand for farm labourers during the spring and harvest has been greater 
an in former years, owing to the majority of this class of workers remaining in the 
)wer Provinces, and farmers were glad to hire any help that came along, to get 
eir crops in. 

The greatest civility and attention has been shown to immigrants by the con- 
ctors and officials on the trains, nor has a single complaint from want of this 
ached this office. 

121 



£6 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



In conclusion, I may state that the two delegates, Messrs. Stephenson and Birks, 
who visited the country this year, were greatly impressed with its capabilities, and; 
the advantages offered by us to immigrants and parties with capital, over other I 
countries. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



"To the Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



JOHN A. DONALDSON, 

Government Immigration Agent, 



122 



16 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



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123 



s a 

> o 
o <u 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 18851 



Statement showing the total number of Immigrants arrived, and remained to b' 
dealt with at the Toronto Agency, for the Twelve months ending 31st Decembe 
1882, 



Month. 



January 

February.... 

March 

April , 

May 

June., 

July 

August , 

September.. 

October 

November... 
December... 

Total 



Via 

St. Lawrence 

and 

Halifax. 



84 

125 

392 

1,339 

6,001 

5,526 

2,622 

1,983 

1,541 

1,209 

783 

157 



21,762 



Via 

the United 

States. 



15 
65 

394 
736 

7 



1,279 



Total. 



99 

190 

786 

2,075 

6,008 

5,526 

2,622 

1,983 

1,541 

1,209 

809 

193 



23,041 



Number 

of 

Free Meals. 



110 

175 

755 

822 

3,666 

2,977 

1,646 

1,700 

982 

636 

566 

400 



14,435 



Number 
distributed 

by 
Free Passes. 



54 
41 
148 
132 
790 
809 
522 
558 
317 
228 
250 
99 



3,948 



Number 
of 
Free Passe 



3,23 



Statement C. — Showing^the Number and De>tination of Immigrants forwarded fr< 
this Agency by Free Passes for the Twelve months ending 31st Decernb 

1882. 



Stations. 



Acton 

Agincourt .... 
Ailsa Craig.. 

Allandale 

Alliston. 

Alma 

Alton 

Alviston 

Amherstburg 

Angus 

Arthur 

Aurora 

Avening 

Aylmer 

Baden 

Bala 

Ballantrae.... 

Barrie 

Batteaux 

Beetou :... 

Belleville 

Berlin 

Bismark 

Bolton 

Bothwell 

Bowman villc 



Adult 
Passes. 



2 
13 

2 

9 
12 

6 

5 

4 

H 

3 

13 

1 

n 

i 

3 

1 
35 

9 

1 

3 
27* 

4 

5* 
8 
16 



Stations. 



Bracebridge 

Bradford 

Brampton 

Brantford 

Brecon....'. 

Brockville 

Bronte , 

Brucefield 

Brussels 

Burford 

Burlington 

Brigden 

Caledon 

Caledonia . 

Camlachk' 

Campbellford... 

Cargill 

Cayuga 

< 'entralia ... 

Charing Cross . 

Chatham 

Chatsworth 

Cheltenham 

Chesley 

Church's Falls. 

Churchville 

124 



Ad i 



G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1S83 



'ATEMENT C. — Showing the Number and Destination of Immigrants forwarded from 
this Agency, by Free Passes, etc. — Concluded. 



Stations. 



rkson's.... 

fforil 

fton 

ton 

>ourg 

den , 

d water... 
lingwood. 

well 

>kstown... 
fksville.... 

nwall 

igleirh 

ligvale 

enport.... 



Chester 

glas 

I'm 

in' s Creek 

das 

dalk 

bam 

ton 

mbo 

wood 

lonton 

JQ 



|H 

x Centre 



(■;■ 
U3. 

erton. 

s of Credit. 
est. 

Erie, 
her ton. 
bher. 



[inoque.. 
'.fraxa.... 
I ge tow n. 
Icoe 

Huron. 

irich 

I stone.... 

tham.... 

ton 



'enhurst 
sby 



)urton 
dton... 
urg... 



)urj 

fc 



Adult 
Passes. 



isburg.. 
Ustone. 

fall 

;ler 



3 

2 
10 

8£ 
2 
8 
15 

22£ 
1 
6 
6 

H 

i 

3 
6 

7 

6£ 
1 

1 

2 

32 

7 

4 

I 

6 

3 

2 
12 

7 

3 
11 

16 
17 

1 

i 

86 

1 
2 

25 
1 
1 

9 
9 

1 
3 

41 

3 
48 

5 
395£ 

3 

8 

3 

2 

6 

4* 

1 



Stations. 



Hornby 

Ingersoll 

Innerkip 

Islington 

Jarvis 

Kenil worth....... 

Kerwood 

Kingston 

Kincardine , 

Kleinburg 

Komoka 

Lambton 

Lefroy 

Limeiiouse 

Lindsay 

Lisle . 

Listowell 

London 

Longwood 

Lucan. 

Lucknow 

Luther 

Lynden 

Mai ton 

Markham 

Meadow vale.... 

Meaford 

Merritton 

Midland 

Milbrook 

Milton 

Milverton 

iMimico 

Minden 

[Mitchell 

Mono Road 

Montreal- 

Mount Bridges. 
Mount Forest... 

Napanee 

Newcastle 

New Lowell.... 

New Market 

.Veiny 

Newtonville 

Niagara 

Nerval 

Norwich 

Oakville 

Orangeville 

Orillia 

Osgoode , 

Oshawa 



12 



Ottawa , 

Owen Sound. 

Paisley 

Palmerston... 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound. 



Adult 
Passes. 



1 

43£ 

3 

7 
15 

7 

1 

2 
10 

6 

6 

1 

2 

4 
92 

5 

4 
323£ 

1 



1 

1 

10 

U 

3 

1 
11 

3 

4 

22 

1 

2 

10 

3 

3 
25 

1 

4 
17 
13 

2 

1 
74.V 
23~ 

1 
15 
20 
21 

3 

9 

6* 

9 

6 

7 
37 

3 
29£ 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No 4 14.) 



A. 188$ 



Statement C. — Showing the Number and Destination of Immigrants forwarded from* 
this Agency, by Free Passes, &c. — Concluded. 



Stations. 



Peffers 

Pembrooke 

Penetanguishene. 

Peterboro' 

Petrolia 

Phelpston 

Pickering 

Pinkerton , 

Port Carling 

Port Colborne 

Port Credit 

Port Dalhousie..., 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope 

Port Robinson 

Port Stanley 

Port Union 

Preston , 

Princeton 

Richmond Hill... 

Ridgetown 

Riverdale , 

Rockwood 

Rosseau 

Scarboro' 

Schan 

Seaforth 

Seabringville 

Severn 

Shakespeare 

Shelburne 

Simcoe 

Stayner 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Stoufville , 

Streetsville 

Sturgeon's Bay.... 
St. Catharines.... 

St. George 

St. Mary's 



Adult 
Passes. 



2 
2 
6 
8 
13 

4 
1 
3 

1 
3 

1 

8 

3 

4 

3 

1 

5 
10 
16 

9 

2 
30 

3 

2 

7 

7 I 

2* 

5$ 

6 

n 

14 
43 

7 

2 
10 
10 
35 

1 

6 



Stations. 



St. Thomas 

Stoney Point 

Sunderland 

Sutton 

Teeswater 

Thamesville 

Thorndale 

Thornhill 

Thorold 

Thornton 

Tilsonburg 

Tottenham 

Torrance 

Trenton 

Union ville 

Uxbridge . 

Victoria Harbour- 
Victoria Road 

Vivian 

Waubashene 

Walkerton 

Waterloo 

Watford 

Welland 

Weston 

Whitby 

Whites 

Wiarton 

Wick 

Williamsford 

Windsor 

Wingham 

Winona 

Woodbridge 

Woodstock 

Wood ville. ........ .. 

Wroxeter 

Yarmouth 

Zimmerman 

Total 



Adult 

Passes. 



60* 

1 

1 

2 

5 

3 

5* 
24 

2 

3 

1 

1 

2 

3 
18 

9 
21 

5 

12$. 
18 
10$ 
4 
21 

3 

8 

1 

3. 
20 

3 

1 
24 
17 

1 

2 

6* 

1 



3,236* 



J. A. DONALDSON, 

Agent, 



126 









£6 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1885 



No. 7. 

REPORT OF THE HAMILTON, ONT., IMMIGRATION AGENT. 

(Mr. John Smith.) 



Government Immigration Office, 

Hamilton, Ont., 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following Annual Immigration Report 
and Tabular Statements for the year ending the 31st December, 1882 . — 

There has been an increase in the number arriving as will be seen by a reference 
to the different Statements accompanying the Report, a large number having settled 
in the North-West Territories ; a slight decrease of those remaining in Ontario is shown 
as compared with the year previous. 

The immigrants arriving at this Agency and remaining in the Dominion during 
the past year, were comprised of a good healthy class, consisting of mechanics, agri- 
cultural and common labourers, artizans, operatives and tenant-farmers, possessed 
of ample means for the purchase of land, stock and implements, thereby providing 
capital and labour to aid in the development of the great natural resources of 
Canada, including lands of the older settlements and the almost unboundless rich 
prairie lands of the Great North- West Territories; the products of the mines and 
forests, the manufacturing industries and the commerce of the country, which are 
now attracting the attention of Europe as a field possessing superior advantages for 
intending emigrants, where rich lands and free homesteads can be obtained, insuring 
comfort and independence by the liberal provision offered by the Government. 

During the past year there has been a growing and increased demand for all 
kinds of labour, which it was utterly impossible to supply, as hundreds of applicants 
were disappointed in not being able to secure the necessary hands so much required, 
thereby entailing loss and inconvenience to the employers of labour. 

Agricultural Labourers have been in great request. The farmers in the vicinity 
and those from a distance have waited the arrival of the trains for the purpose of 
securing the immigrants on arrival, and, as a rule, there were three farmers for one 
labourer. A great many of them not being able to secure the necessary help, caused 
wages to advance to $30 and $35 per month, with board and lodging, for harvest 
hands, and a number of contracts were entered into by the year, for good hands, at 
the rate of $200 per annum with board and lodging. 

Female Servants. — The demand made upon the Agency was out of all propor- 
tion to the supply, although repeated applications were made to Quebec and Toronto 
to meet the daily enquiries, the great difficulty of obtaining domestic servants 
being caused by the inducements offered by the manufacturing industries of the 
Province. 

Mechanics. — There has been a good demand for all kinds of skilled workmen, 
who have found ready employment in the different engine, machine, tool and 
railway shops, in this district. 

Mill 0})eratives have been eagerly sought after ; the mill owners having to 
import hands from the United States and the Old Country to supply the growing 
requirements arising from the increased production of fabrics. 

Manufacturing Operatives have been in good request by the ready-made clothing 
establishments, the boot and shoe factories and other newly established industries. 

127 



4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Common and Skilled Labourers have met with ready employment in the foundries, 
rolling mills and upon the railways and public works in progress throughout the 
district. 

Agriculture. — The past year has been marked by a large degree of prosperity, 
owing to the heavy crops, including hay, cereals and roots, that have been secured 
in good condition — the yield being one of the largest ever produced in Canada and 
very seldom excelled in Britain, where a state of high cultivation prevails with the 
advantage of under-draining and the use of expensive fertilizers. Owing to a more 
favourable and productive harvest in Britain and the continent, and to the increased 
supply from India, cereals of all descriptions have met with a declining tendency in 
the British market, being noticeably so in breadstuff's, which has had a corresponding 
effect, both in Canada and the United States, until prices have been reduced to a 
nominal point, the loss arising from lower rates having been more than counter- 
balanced by the increased yield of production. 

Live Stock. — There has been a strong enquiry for beeves, sheep and hogs, for 
home consumption and export, with a keen competition at advanced rates, priecs 
ruling over the yearly average quotations. This interest has grown more rapidly, 
during the past year, than at any other period in the history of Canada, as will be 
noticed by the shipping returns of exports; and with the improvement inbreeding 
and feeding, and with the increased and improved accommodation and facilities, both 
by railways and ocean steamers, the Dominion is attaining a large ascending 
influence on the live stock and meat trade of Britain, competing strongly and 
successfully with home feeders at highly remunerative prices to the Canadian 
farmer. 

Herds and Flocks. — There has been a marked improvement in the different breed- 
ing establishments during the past year by the importation of new blood selected from 
the best tribes and families in England and Scotland, and the judicious selections and 
cros-es from the established herd:- in Canada, foremost of which stands the Canada 
West Farm Stock Association of Bow Park, the Belvoir and Manor herds, owned and 
established by the well known breeders, Richard and John Gibson, of Ilderton, 
Ontario, the herd of the Agricultural College, Guelph, and the widely known Cotnp- 
ton herd, owned by Senator Cochrane of Coiupton, Quebec. 

The annual sales of the Bow Park and Ilderton short-horns in the Western 
States have been noted, the animals offered being of high merit, bringing together 
the principal breeders from all parts of the Union, creating a keen and spirited com- 
petition amongst the buyers, the prices realized being highly satisfactory at the close 
of the sales. The Bow Park averages were the highest of any of the short-horn sales 
of the season. 

At the Chicago Fat Stock Show the Canadian reputation was well sustained, the 
stock being the special admiration of the breeders and feeders. The steers from the 
herds of the Goff Brothers, of Elmira, Ontario, and the Bow Park Association well 
deserved the honours conferred upon them, whilst the liood Brothers, of Guelph, dis- 
tanced all competitors in the pens by the fine display ol sheep. 

These western annual sales and shows are the means of bringing together all the 
leading breeders and dealers in the Union, and the display of Canadian stock has! 
established the reputation of the Dominion as the breeding ground of the west. 

The enquiry for short-horn Hereford and polled Angus bulls by the Canadian 
and Western States farmers has led to a keen competition for all first-class sires at' 
high figures, farmers realizing the necessity of improving their stock by judicious 
crossing, so as to obtain substance and early maturing properties to meet the growing 
export demand. 

.During the past season at the Provincial Exhibition, held at Kingston, the 
Central Fair of Hamilton, and the Toronto Exhibition, prizes were established foi 
jerseys, which are fast pushing into the front rank for dairy purposes, both ir 
Canada and the United States. At the gatherings a fine display was exhibited. The 
Oaklands herd, established last year and owned by Valancy E. Fuller, of Oaklandsj 
.Hamilton, Ontario, was much admired, being probably the most noted on the contil 

128 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 15S3 



nent for its numerical strength and the purity of its blood, the animals having been 
selected from the best tribes and families in the Isle of Jersey, Canada and the 
United States, being possessed of fine forms, good substance, rich in quality and grand 
escutcheons. The family was represented by imported Le Breve and OaklandvS 
Rex, two grand sires. Amongst the females on the grounds were the following, 
some of their weekly records being given as obtained from actual test: 

Bertha Morgan, 154 quarts of milk, 19 lbs. 6 oz. butter. 

Faith, of Oaklands, 147 quarts of milk. 

Epigea, 140 quarts of milk. 

Victory, 15 lbs. of butter. 

Bella, of Glencairn, 112 quarts of milk. 

Nancy, of St. Lambert's, two years old, 98 quarts of milk, 13 lbs. of butter. 

Nora, of St. Lambert's. 

Nymph, of St. Lambert's. 

Matchless, of St. Lambert's. 

Rose, of Eden. 

Satin Bird. 

Violet, of Glencairn . 

Since the purchase of Bertha Morgan, Mr. Fuller has been offered and refused 
$3,000 for her, whilst a son of Violet, of Glencairn, five months old, was sold for 
Western States account for the sum of $5u0. 

William Rolph, of Markham, Ontario, exhibited the Glen Rouge herd, which 
"were much admired, being well represented by Middlefield Boy, the females consist- 
ing of the following with weekly records, most of them being notable prize takers: 

Clematis, of St. Lambert 14 lbs. 3 oz. of butter. 

Mary Ann. " 14 " 8 •< 

Math. " 2 years old 10 " 8 " " 

Effie. 

Grace Fisher. 

Merry Girl. 

George Smith, Grimsby, Ontario, exhibited a number of very fine females 
which were highly commended, notably Lady Lorn, the dam of Oakland's Rose and 
imported Daisey, whi';h created great admiration — the calves completing the lot. 

J. Jardine & Sons, Saltfleet, Ontario, showed Crown Prince, a fine three- 
year old. 

Thomas Guy & Sons, of Oshawa, were represented by Bolivet, a promising 
young bull. 

Mrs. Jones, of Brockville, also exhibited a very fine herd at the Provincial 
Exhibition, Kingston. 

Horses. — A marked improvement has taken place during the year with active 
sales at advanced rates for first-class and medium animals, owing to the large de- 
mand for the North-West Territories, the United States, and Britain. 

The importers have gone largely into heavy draught horses for agricultural 
purposes, attracting the notice of the breeders from the Western States to whom 
^ales have been made at long figures. 

The stock farms of John White, Milton, Ontario, the Messrs. Hcndrie Bros., 
of Hamilton, and Mr. Wiser's farm, Prescott, Ontario, have all been replenished 
with new blood, to the great advantage of the farming community and the export 
trade of the country. 

Sheep — Have realized high prices for home consumption and export, the prices 
obtained being above the general average. 

Importations have been on an extended scale for breeding purposes, consisting 
principally of Downs or fine woolled sheep, there being an extensive and growing 
demand for this class of staple, for Canadian manufacturing purposes, at higher 
prices than can be realized for Cots wold, Leicester, or any other class of long 
stapled lustres. 

129 
14-9 



4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Hogs. — All offerings have been eagerly taken during the year for home con- 
sumption at prices considerably over the general yearly averages, the farmers being 
free sellers, a small portion of the receipts being taken by the curers for fancy cuts 
for the British market. 

Dairy Products. — During the year a steady business has been done at average 
rates, all offerings being freely taken for export, Canadian factories having attained 
a high reputation in the British markets, competing successfully with English dairy 
at full rates. 

Lumber. — During the year there has been an increased demand both for sawn 
and square timber for home consumption and export to Britain and the United 
States at advancing rates, which has given a large impetus to this important in- 
terest, which forms one of the principle revenues of the Dominion. 

Manufacturing Industries. — The district including Hamilton, Dundas, Brant- 
tord, Paris, Woodstock, Ingersoll, Gait, Preston, Hespeler, Gruelph, St. Catharines, 
and Merriton, have been largely developed during the past year, new factories hav- 
ing been erected and put into operation, whilst those previously established have 
been enlarged to meet the growing demand for Canadian staples and other manu- 
factured goods, thereby creating a home market for the labour of the mechanic, the 
operative, and the labouring population of the Dominion, and supplying an increased 
demand for the agricultural products of the country and increasing the national 
purchasing power of the Dominion. 

Flour Mills. — This interest has been largely increased during the past season, 
owing to the improvement in machinery and the increased consumptive demand 
created by the purchasing power of the people engaged in the various manufacturing 
industries of Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritime Provinces. In referring to the 
railway returns it will be found that the tonnage in flour shows a large increase and 
a corresponding decrease in the tonnage of wheat. It will also be noticed by a 
reference to the United Kingdom returns of flour imported from Canada that the 
same result is visible, the receipts for the year 1881 being lower than for the corres- 
ponding period of 1871. 

Railways— Have also shared in the general prosperity of the Dominion during 
the past year, as shown by the traffic returns and earnings, the increased dividends 
and the advance in the share, preference and debenture lists, as quoted by the Stock 
Exchange. 

Commerce. — The past year shows a large and increased business of a very satis- 
factory character in the various branches of business ; liabilities have been fairly and 
promptly met at all the principal centres, whilst as a rule the country merchants 
have met their engagements. 

Free Grant Lands. — During the past season there has been a large movement of 
the population of Ontario emigrating to the North-West Territories, to avail them- 
selves of the free grants and homesteads. The movement has been augmented by 
people from the various States of the Union, and by immigrants passing over 
Canadian Eailways via the St. Lawrence and the United States, whilst there hag 
been a decrease of Canadians leaving to settle in the United States, preference being 
given to the Dominion North- West. 

There has been some enquiry from Britain and the States respecting the fret 
grant lands of Muskoka, Parry Sound and Nippising, which are well adapted foi 
settlement, possessing many advantages, comprising good land, fine timbei 
and excellent water, and free from ague ; the country is capable of producing fine 
crops of cereals and roots, and for grazing purposes it cannot be excelled. 

With the construction of railways through the territory, and a liberal policy o: 
assistance to intending immigrants, the lands will become the home of a numerou 
and thriving population, within reach of all the principal markets of Ontario and th 
Dominion; 

During the season the Agency was visited by Mr. , George Jacob Holyoake 
under the auspices of the British Government in the interest of emigration. Durin; ■ 
his stay here he closely investigated the subject of immigration, making his owj 

130 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



personal observations by visiting the different places and institutions, including the 
Agricultural College of Ontario at Guelph, for the purpose of gathering information 
and satisfying himself of the advantages that Canada possesses as a field for the 
immigrant, and from his practical knowledge and the high standing in which he is 
held by the working people of Britain and all classes of the community, the 
unbounded confidence placed in his judgment and integrity, good results may be 
anticipated from his visit to Canada. Mr. Holyoake was accompanied by Mrs. Leach, 
who came out in the interest of national education, in connection with the school 
board, of which she is a trustee, and is the first lady elected to the position under 
the provisions of the extended franchise. 

Father Nugent, well known to the British public for the interest he has taken 
in the working classes in connection with emigration, also visited Ontario, and was 
much pleased with the advantages that the Province possesses as a field for the 
emigrant, and the provisions and arrangements made by the Government for the 
reception of the immigrant on arrival. 

Miss E. Richardson also visited this district, having been sent out by the 
Women's Emigration Society of London, to investigate and report upon the subject of 
female emigration and the provision made for the reception of this class upon their 
arrival. During her stay here she thoroughly investigated the object of her mis- 
sion, and received much valuable information to aid her in the appointed work 
allotted to her, and her report will prove to be a valuable aid to this class of 
emigrants. As there is an increasing and growing demand for female domestic 
servants, it is very desirable that a safe home should be provided with a female 
superintendent to receive them direct from the steamers on arriving at Quebec, 
with the necessary arrangements and facilities for locating and placing them in situ- 
ations direct from the home, instead of shipping them from one Agency to another, 
which would reduce the expenditure and add comfort and protection as compared 
with the present system. 

Owing to large number of farmers' sons leaving Ontario for the North -West 
Territories, agricultural labourers will be in great demand during the coming year. 
Many of the farmers are now enquiring for hands to be engaged by the year, and a 
number of them will be prepared to take married men and provide them with 
cottages for themselves and families. 

During the past season a large number of emigrants have been assisted to come 
out by their friends remitting drafts and pre-paid ocean passage certificates, and 
providing situations for them on their arrival. 

The contract having been let for the new emigrant sheds at this Agencj', the 
buildings will add very much to the comfort and welfare of the immigrants on their 
arrival, large and commodious baths and other necessary conveniences being pro- 
vided, so much required alter the ocean voyage. 

By the completion of the sheds and the amalgamation of the Grand Trunk and 
Great Western Railways arrangements may be effected to send the immigrants 
intended for this district direct to Hamilton, which would save the expenses 
incurred by the Ontario Department by the detention in Toronto, and would be of 
great advantage to the immigrants, as time would be saved, and the inconvenience of 
lying over would be avoided ; it would also instil a better feeling ot independence, 
as the immigrants, after they have been cared for at more than one Agency, are too 
apt to trust and look to the Government for further assistance rather than reiy on 
their own exertions. 

Statement A, shows the reported number of arrivals and their destination. 

Statement B, shows the reported number of arrivals in the District of the 
Hamilton Agency, and the nationality of those remaining in Ontario. 

Statement C, shows the reported number of arrivals and their general destina- 
tion, the increase to Manitoba being 1,391 for the year, as compared with the cor- 
responding period of 1881, the increase passing through to the Western Slates, beiug 
7,301 for the same period, and the decrease of those settling in Ontario being 693. 

Statement D, shows the number of children sent out by the different Pnilan- 

131 
H-9J 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No,14.) 



A. 1SS3 



thropic Societies, all of them being settled in comfortable homes, the work being 
well performed by the respective resident Superintendents. 

Statement E, shows the number of immigrants that have been assisted, with the 
number of meals and lodgings, and the number of passes granted; the number of 
immigrants fed shows an increase of 87, and an increase of 171 meals and 16 
lodgings, as compared with the previous year, and a decrease of 200 passes for the 
eame period; the decrease in the number of passes being caused by the farmers 
waiting upon the trains and furnishing transportation at their own expense, thereby 
relieving the Department of the expenditure. 

Statement F, shows the amount of capital reported and the value of effects; 
the increase for the year 1882 being $202,230.00 as compared With 1881. 

Statement (x, shows the number of free passes issued and their destination. 

Statement H, shows the destination of the immigrants settling in the Dominion. 

Statement I, shows the current rate of wages paid in the district for all kinds of 
labour. 

Statement J, shows the price of the ordinary articles of food and clothing required 
by the working classes. 



I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



To the Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture. 
Ottawa. 



JOHN SMITH, 

Dominion Immigration Agent. 



132 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



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46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



Statement B. — Shewing the number Of Immigrant. Arrivals and Departures at the 
Hamilton Agency for the year ending 3 1st December, 1882, and their 

Nationalities, the number of Free Meals, Lodgings and Free Passes by Eailways 
and other conveyances from this Agency to their respective place of destination. 





Number of Arrivals 
vid the St. Law- 
rence and Halifax. 


Number of Arrivals 
via the United 
States. 


o 
u 

a 

C co 


Remained in the 
Province of On- 
tario. 


c3 
O 

*3 
o 
a> 


Wentto the Western 
States. 


Nationalities of Immigrants 
settled in Ontario. 


g 

fa 

o 

£ 03 

1043 
872 

171 


1— 1 ~ 
%H ^ 

a ^ 

§ be 

524 
437 

87 


CO 

fa 

o ho 

.9 

a> be 

p 

264 
248 


9 


Year. 


a 


.d 


O 

o 


a 


3 
(-i 

a 

882 
1317 

435 


3 
O 

O . 

30 
91 

61 


fa 

Cm 

o 

» s> 

rQ OQ 

a,? 

gfa 


1882. 


3398 
2516 


64480 
57363 


67878 
59879 


5779 
6472 


2901 
1510 


59198 
51897 


2509 
2311 


850 
893 


924 
1010 

86 


584 

850 

266 


113 


1881 


313 






Increase 


882 


7117 


7999 




1391 


7301 


198 


43 


16 




Decrease . .... 


693 


200 



















Statement C. — Shewing the number of Immigrants Arriving and Departing in the 
District of the Hamilton Agency, for the year ending 31st December, 1882. 



Nationality. 


Number 
of Arrivals 

vid 
the St. Law- 
rence 
and Halifax. 


Number 
of Arrivals 

vid 
the United 

States. 


Total. 


GeneraliDestination. 


Ontario. 


Manitoba. 


Western 
States. 


English 

Irish 


2,044 

670 

652 

32 


4,733 

3,849 
2,550 

36,972 

1,456 
14 920 


6,777 
4,519 
3,202 

37,004 
1,456 

14,920 


2,509 
850 
924 
584 
882 
30 


661 
455 
515 
361 
574 
335 


3,607 
3,214 
1,763 


Scotch 


Crerman 


36,059 




Other Countries.... 




14,555 






M82 


3.398 
2,516 


64,480 
57,363 


67,878 
59,879 


5,779 
6.472 


2,901 
1,510 


59,198 
51,897 


1881 




Increase 


882 


7,117 


7,999 




1,391 


7,301 


Decrease 


693 















134 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (N^.14.) 



A. 1883 



Statement D. — Showing the number of Children brought into the District of the 
Hamilton Agency by the respective Societies engaged in Emigration, for the 
Year ending 31st December, 1882. 



Name of Society. 



cq 



.2 a oo 

a °°° 



° aco 

'h OOO 



!s£ 



.2Q 



Rev. Mr. Stephenson's Home, Hamilton 
Miss Rye's do Niagara. 

Miss McPherson'a do Gait 

Dr. Barnardo's do Hamilton 
Earl Shaftesbury, Hamilton 



38 

9 

128 

51 

22 



248 



3 

108 
55 



41 
117 
183 

51 

22 



166 



414 



6 

7 

38 



51 



3 

5 

30 

3 



41 



Statement E.-— Showing the number of Immigrants Assisted, the number of Meals 
and Lodgings ; also the number of Passes issued by Railways and other con- 
veyances, at the Hamilton Ageney, for the Year ending 31st December, 1882. 





1882. 


■ 
48 

O M 

u d 


Number of Free 
Meals given. 


an 

o 2 

jbi Pn 

ga° 


fe a 
o.2 

U m 

a§ 

apw 












































18 
113 
54 
59 
65 
99 
101 
15 


89 
194 

83 

95 
129 
197 
211 

45 


32 
52 
17 
24 
37 
49 
38 
15 


11 




14 


July 


14 




19 




16 




10 


November 


28 




1 




1882 






524 
437 


1,043 
872 


264 
248 


113 




1881 


313 










87 


171 


16 






Decrease 


200 















135 



16 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883" 



Statement F. — Showing the Amount of Capital and the Value of Effects brought 
into Canada by Immigrants and Settlers, in the District of the Hamilton 
Agency, for the Year ending Hist December, 1882. 



Month. 


1881. 


1882. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 




$ 
57,000 
44,500 
64,000 
76,000 
73,000 
88,500 
58,000 
68,000 
71,000 
88,000 
74,000 
56,000 


$ 

34,000 
57,000 
111,230 
178,000 
96,000 
92,500 
87,500 
87,500 
67,500 
60,500 
81,000 
67,500 


$ 


$ 














May 








July 








September 












December .♦. 










818,000 


1,020,230 


202,230 





Statement Gr. — Showing the Number and Destination of Immigrants forwarded by 
Free Passes from the Hamilton Agency, for the Year ending 31st December, 

1882. 



Station. 


No. 


Station. 


No. 


Bismark 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
3 

14 
1 

10 
1 


Brought forward 


53 


Barrie „ 






Bothwell 


3 


Brantford 


Orillia 


2 


Clifford 


1 


Chatham 


Port Hope 


2 


Courtland 


Preston 


4 


Caledonia .... 




4 


Clifton 


Simcoe 


4 


Dundas 




2 


Drumbo 


Southampton 


1 


Dunville 




2 


Erie ; 




3 


Fergus 


St. Thomas 


1 


Garnet 


Toronto 


12 


Gait 

Hagersville 


Thamesville 


1 
6 


Jarvis 


Woodstock 


2 


Lucknow 


Walkerton 


9 


London 


Zimmerman 


1 


Moorefield 












53 


113 







136 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



Statement H. — Showing the Local ion of Immigrants in the District of the 
Hamilton Agency, for the Year ending Hist December, 1882. 



County. 


No. 

24 

246 

228 

31 

9 

7 

117 

217 

6 

189 

5 

13 

62 

106 

113 

227 

78 

8 

5 

59 

2,901 

4,651 


County. 


No. 


Algoma 




4,651 


Bruce 




Brant 


445 


Cardwell 

Dun das 


Muskoka 


52 


Monk 


2 


Durham 


Norfolk 


172 


Essex 


Ontario 


27 


Elgin 


Oxford 


246 


Frontenac 


Ottawa 


3 


Grey 

Grenville 

Hastings 

Halton « 


Peel . 


77 


Perth 


30 


Peterboro' 


16 


Renfrew 


7 


Haldimand 


Simcoe 


118 


Huron 




2 


Kent 




32 


Lincoln 


Welland 


319 


Lanark 


Wentworth 


1,407 
286 


Leeds 


Wellington 


Lambton 


Waterloo 


439 




York 


349 






8,680 


, 








JOHN SMITH, 

Agent. 





137 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



Statement I. - Rate of Wages paid in the District of the Hamilton Agency. 



Employment. 


Wages. 


Employment. 


Wages. 


From 


To 


From 


To 




$ cts. 

1 50 
1 50 
1 25 
1 50 
1 25 

1 50 

2 50 
1 75 
1 75 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 75 
1 25 
1 00 
1 00 
1 75 
1 75 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 25 

1 75 

2 50 
I 25 
1 50 
1 50 
I 25 

1 50 

2 00 
1 50 


$ cts. 

2 00 
2 50 

1 75 

2 50 

1 50 

2 00 
2 75 
2 25 
2 00 
2 50 

1 75 

2 00 
2 25 
1 35 
1 25 

1 25 

2 25 

3 00 
2 50 

1 75 

2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 25 
2 75 
1 75 
1 75 

1 75 

2 00 

1 75 

2 50 
1 75 


Woollen Mills. 


$ cts. 

50 

1 00 

75 

1 00 
1 25 

50 

1 25 
80 

2 00 

9 00 

7 00 
10 00 

7 00 

8 00 
7 00 

12 00 
25 00 
20 00 


% cts. 








1 25 


Brewers 




1 50 


Butchers 




1 25 


Brickmakers 




1 25 


Bricklayers or Masons 




1 75 


Boiler makers 


Cotton Mills. 




Carpenters 








Coopers 




Curriers 


1 00 


Fitters .... 




1 50 


Labourers — Common 




1 15 


do Farm 

do Railway 


Over-lookers 

Females, per Month, with Board 
and Lodging. 


3 00 


Lathe hands 

Moulders 




Millwrights 




Millers 


10 00 


Painters 




8 00 


Plasterers 




15 00 


Plumbers 




8 00 






9 00 




Housemaids 

Monthly Hands, with Board and 
Lodging. 


9 00 


Stone cutters 




Stokers, Railway 








Tailors 


15 00 


Tinsmiths 


Harvest hands 


35 00 






30 00 


Rivetters 











JOHN SMITH, 

Agent. 



138 



Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1885 



Statement J. — Libt of Ketail Prices of the ordinary Articles of Food and Eaiment 

required by the Working Classes. 



Articles. 



Bacon per lb. 

do Ham do 

do Shoulders do 

Pork do 

Beef do 

Mutton , do 

Teal do 

Butter— Fresh do 

do Salt do 

Candles do 

Cheese do 

Coffee do 

Cod-fish do 

Mustard do 

Pepper do 

Rice do 

Soap do 

Sugar do 

Tea— Green do 

do Black do 

Tobacco do 

Corn meal p. 100 lbs 

Flour do 

Buckwheat flour do 

Cat-meal do 

Bread, per 4lb. loaf 

Beer, per quart , 

Milk do 



Price. 



From To 



$ cts. 

12 
14 
12 
10 
08 
07 
08 
15 
15 



13 
25 
06 
30 
20 
05 

e 05 

07 



$ cts. 

14 
16 
14 
12 
12 



12 

10 

28 

22 

12 

15 

40 

07 

35 

25 

06 

06 

10 

50 

50 

65 

2 00 

2 60 

2 25 

2 70 

12 

10 

06 



Articles. 



Eggs, per doz 

Potatoes, per 60 lbs 

Salt do 

Herrings, per brl 

Firewood, per cord 

Coats, over 

do under 

Pants 

Vests 

Shirts, flannel 

do cotton 

do underwove 

Drawers, woollen wove 

Hats, felt 

Socks, worsted 

do cotton 

Blankets, per pair 

Rugs do 

Flannel, per yard 

Cotton shirtings 

Sheeting, double 

Canadian Tweed cloth 

Shoes, men's.. p. pair 

do women's do 

Boots, men's do 

do women's do 

Rubbers, men's do 

do women's do 



Price. 


From 


To 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


15 


25 


50 


60 


60 


65 


5 75 


6 50 


4 50 


6 00 


7 00 


12 Of 


4 50 


6 5* 


3 00 


4 50 


1 50 


2 00 


1 50 


2 00 


75 


1 00 


25 


30 


90 


1 00 


75 


1 25 


25 


35 


10 


15 


3 00 


4 50 


2 00 


2 50 


30 


35 


12 


13 


24 


25 


75 


1 10 


2 00 


2 50 


1 25 


1 76 


2 00 


2 50 


1 25 


2 09 


80 


90 


60 


70 



JOHN SMITH, 
Dominion Government Immigration Agent. 



139 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



No. 8. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF LONDON (ONT.) IMMIGRATION AGENCY. 

(Mr. A. G. Smyth.) 

London, Ont., 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of this Agency for the year 
ending 31st December, 1882. 

Form A. — Statement showing the number of immigrants arrived in this Agency, 
their nationality, the number assisted with provisions and free passes by railways, 
or other conveyances to their respective places of destination. 

Form B. — Statement showing the total number of immigrants arrived via the 
St. Lawrence or Halifax and the United States, the number fed and the number dis- 
tributed by free passes tabulated by the month. 

Form O. — Statement showing the number and destination of immigrants for- 
warded from this Agency by free passes. 

Form D. — Annual statement of arrivals and departures of immigrants at this 
Agency to 31st December, showing sexes, nationalities, trade or occupation, general 
destination and value ot money and effects brought into the Dominion, by which it 
will be seen that 1,291 remained in Ontario, 399 went to Manitoba and the North- 
West, and 170 to the Western States. 

The demand for farm labourers was much in excess of the number of arrivals. 
The great majority of our farmers want single men, because they have not houses on 
their farms for their labourers, although it is generally conceded a married man will 
not be so easily induced to change his place, consequently, many of our well-to-do 
farmers arc making arrangements to be able to take on men with families, as most of 
the best skilled farm hands are married. Last season the demand was so great in 
this locality for agricultural labour, that many wero employed with but a limited 
knowledge of farming. They soon picked up the work and got good wages. Quite 
a number of those arriving early in the season sent over money to bring out their 
families, and expressed great satisfaction with the change they had made. 

There is a good opening for a large number of young girls for domestic service 
with our farmers, who .should be able to milk the cows, assist in the care of poultry, 
young cattle, &c. I am informed that a large number of that class are to be had in 
the old country, but are not able to emigrate for want of means. I find that all the 
domestic servants arriving here (and they are small in number) refuse to go into the 
country foi service, preferring to live in towns and cities, and from the great want of 
that class of labour, they can easily get suited in the place of their choice. 

The health of the immigrants arriving hero this season has been remarkably 
good ; no occasion on which I had to get medical advice. 

. Immigrants of all classes would find it much to their interest to arrive here 
during April and May to procure good summer work for the fall season. Many can 
then make yearly engagements, and parties looking for farms, to either purchase or 
lease, can form a better estimate of quality and value. 

I have had quite a number of enquiries from residents of the United States, for- 
merly from Great Britain, regarding Manitoba and the North West, and who stated 
their intention of taking up land. In all cases full information has been given andi 
maps and all other publications relative to the Province mailed them. 

140 



46 Victoria,. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



The prospeets for the coming season are very encouraging. Wages will be good 
^and the demand for labour greater than has prevailed for some years. 
All of which is most respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. G. SMYTH, 

Government Immigration Agent. 
To the Honorable 

The Minister of Agriculture. 



Statement A. — Shewing the number of Immigrants arrived at the London Agency, 
for the twelve months ending 31st December, 1882, and their Nationality, the 
number assisted with Provisions, and with Free Passes by Eailways, or other 
conveyances, from this Agency to their respective places of destination. 



Country from. 


Arrivals 

via. 

the St. 

Lawrence. 


Arrivals 

vid 

the United 

State3. 


Total. 


Remained 

in the 

Province 

of 
Ontario. 


Went to 

the United 

States. 


Number 

assisted 

with 

Provisions 


Number 

assisted 

with Free 

Passes. 


England 

Ireland 


617 

433 

181 

24 

19 


216 

102 

40 

56 

26 


833 

535 

221 

80 

45 


527 

419 

141 

49 

27 


306 

116 

80 

31 










Scotland 






Germany 






Norway, Sweden 


18 






Switzerland 






Iceland 














America 














Other Countries 


25 


31 


56 


38 


18 














1,299 


471 


1,770 


1,201 


*569 


360 


81 



399 of these went to Manitoba. 



141 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188S: 



Statement B. — Shewing the total number of Immigrants arrived, and remained to be 
dealt with at the London Agency, for the twelve Months ending 31st December, 



1882. 



Months. 



January..., 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October.... 
November. 
December. 



Via 
St. Lawrence. 



32 
39 
93 

107 

253 

174 

134 

115 

92 

97 

87 

76 



1,299 



Vict, the 
United States. 



15 
34 
26 
28 
87 
53 
47 
27 
26 
30 
44 
54 



471 



Total. 



47 
73 
119 
135 
340 
227 
181 
142 
118 
127 
131 
130 



1,770 



Number Fed. 



15 
15 
99 
53 
27 
19 
62 
13 
32 
24 



Number 

distributed 

by 

Free Passes. 



360 



8 
28 
8 
8 
9 
3 
3 
3 



81 



Statement C. — Shewing the dumber and Destination of Immigrants forwarded from 
this Agency by Free Passes, for the twelve months ending 31st December, 1882. 



Stations. 



Port Stanley 

Port Sarnia 

St. Thomas 

Ingersoll. 

Windsor 

Springfield 

Amherstburgh 

Brussels 

Bismark 

Fairfield 

Delaware 

Ettrick Siding 

London, Township. 
Thorndale 



Adult 
Passes. 



Stations. 



Clandeboye 

Bothwell 

Watford. 

Hyde Park 

Ilderton 

Chatham 

Newbury 

Toronto ... 

Dorchester 

Dublin 

Woodstock 

Total 



Adult 
Passes. 



11 
1 
3 
3 

4 

1 
6 
,1 
6 

4 
1 

81 



142 



40 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14) A. 1883 



No. 9. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF HALIFAX, N. S, IMMIGRATION AGENT. 

(Edwin Clay, M. D.) 



Dominion Immigration Office, 

Halifax, N.S., 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit for your information my Annual Report on 
the working of this Agency. 

The immigrants landed here during the first three months of the year were for 
the most part a very good class, and brought with them a very large amount of means. 
April and May brought us a much larger number than usual owing to the long con- 
tinued obstruction to navigation in the Gulf of St. Lawrence by ice. As a result of 
the detention of steamers in the ice for several days longer than usual, scarlet fever, 
measles, whooping cough, etc., made their appearance amongst many of the younger 
members of the immigrant families, and in not a few cases resulted fatally, produc- 
ing many very sad heart-rending scenes. Four children, between two and eleven 
3'ears of age, died within two hours after landing, the immediate cause of death being 
congestion of the lungs from the sudden change and exposure in coming from the 
warm ship into the cold atmosphere and drafts of a railway station just after the 
eruptions had disappeared, and no doubt a very large percentage of the deaths 
both here and at Quebec would have been prevented had they been carefully covered 
i*nd removed to warm rooms instead of starting on a long railway journey in this 
sad condition. 

I ventured to detain a few families on my own responsibility and all recovered, 
and last month I had a similar case in a Danish family, all of whom recovered. 

The deep water terminus is now nearly completed for the Intercolonial Railway, 
and the Department of Railways and Canals has spared no pains to facilitate the 
landing of immigrants by providing ticket offices, baggage rooms, well heated and 
lighted waiting rooms with suitable private wash rooms for females and children. 

The railway officials as usual have done everything in their power to expedite 
the transfer of immigrants and luggage from the steamer to the trains, and I would 
like to publicly thank them for the uniform courtesy shown to all the passengers 
going through their hands as well as to myself in the performance of my duties. 
Mr. Macdonald, Agent, Mr. Connors, Ticket Agent, Mr. Murray, Station Master, 
and Mr. Broadhurst, the Baggage Agent, as also Mr. Symonds, of the Messrs. 
Canard's staff (whose services in tracing lost baggage have been invaluable), are 
especially to be thanked ; and I may say that during my thirteen years service as 
Agent at this port I have never seen an unkind act or heard an improper word 
spoken to an immigrant by any of the I. C. R. officials. 

My correspondence has been very extensive during the past year, and I find 
that the interest in our great North- West is greatly increasing to judge from the 
large number of letters of enquiry received. I have had to answer letters from all 
parts of the United States, West Indies, Great Britain, and many parts of Europe, 
to say nothing of the local letters received, and I can safely predict a large immi- 
gration to Canada during the next year from abroad, as also quite an addition to the 
larrning interests of the North- West from the Maritime Provinces. 

The immigrants remaining in this Province have had no difficulty in finding 
employment. Several of the better class have purchased farms and settled here in 
preference to going inland, and there is no doubt that Nova Scotia presents better 

144 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



prospects for English, Irish, or Scotch farmers with a limited capital than many of 
the Provinces, especially for cattle, sheep and poultry raising for the English 
markets. 

An effort is being made to establish a "Nova Scotia Immigration Society" with 
an executive at Halifax, and branches in every county. Should its promoters real- 
ize all they ah tici pate, the resources of the Province and its fitness as a home for 
British tenant farmers and others will be better known than at present. What is 
really needed, however, to induce the proper class of people to locate here is a • 
thoroughly reliable pamphlet, and in order to make such effective it should emanate 
from the Provincial or Dominion Governments. A free distribution on the other 
side, and success would be guaranteed. 

The total immigration for the year was 8,723, being 

Males 4,970 

Females 2,080 

Children 1,667 

The nationalities were: 

English 5,597 

Irish 999 

Scotch 514 

Germans 39 

Scandinavians 1,565 

French 6 

Others , 3 

Annexed will bo found a statement showing the monthly arrivals and general 
classification of the immigration for the year with an approximate value of the im- 
migrants effects based upon enquiries made among them as they landed. 

Trusting that my report will bo sufficiently comprehensive, 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

EDWIN GLAY, M. D., 

Immigration Agent. 






I 

14-10 

HI 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (N...14) A. 1883 



No. 10. 

ANNUAL EEPORT OF ST. JOHN (N.B.) AGENT. 
(Mr. S. Gardner.) 

St. John, N.B., 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit, for your information, the following Report of 
this Agency for the past year : — 

, The number of arrivals of immigrants daring the year for settlement in the Pro- 
vince, via the St. Lawrence, Nova Scotia, and the United States, apart from the Customs 
(those returns now being made direct), shows through this office, 301, viz: — English, 
121; Irish, 45 ; Scotch, 11 ; Danes, 116; French and Belgians, 8, (quite an increase 
of Danes over last year.) Thirty-two of these were mechanics, all of whom obtained em- 
ployment within a day or two after arrival,the balance farmers,who are all located on the 
fertile lands in Yictoria County, principally on the Tobique Eiver. Some bought 
farms and others took up new lands, and went into the forest with a fixed 
purpose of turning the wilderness into cultivated fields. These brought in cash 
$11,100, and in other values not reported in Customs, $1,020. 

During 1882, as in 188 1. public attention was occasionally directed to the "exodus," 
^o called. From my personal observation, I note a large travel bound for the North- 
West Territory, many of whom came from Nova Scotia and other quarters, New 
Brunswick furnishing her quota, cheap rates induc ; ng travel through the United 
.States; yet with the influx to this Province and its increase, New Brunswick is gaining 
in population rapidly. 

The great number of tourists visiting New T Brunswick the past year increased the 
travel by the International Line of steamers running between Boston and St. John. 
In 1881, the travel by this route was, inwards, 15,571 ; outwards 14,431 ; for 1882, in- 
wards,19,024; outwards, 12,287 ; showing a balance in favor inwards, notwithstanding 
"the exodus cry. 

Again, this year, I am indebted to the politeness of the officials of the St. John 
■and Maine Bailway Company for 11 months return of the business of this outlet, viz : 
— Passengers inwards, 25,958; outwards, 31,777 : total, 57,735. Showing an increase 
in passenger traffic for eleven months, of 6, 135, as against twelve months for 1881. Also, 
freight on this line, although 1881 gave a large increase over 1880, this year 1882, 
shows still a greater amount of business. The total tonnage carried was 48,144 tons, 
an increase over 1881, of 26,4S2 tons. 

My observations on the gencal travel for the year show a large return of Cana- 
dians irom the United States to New Biunswick, viz : — Artizans, farmers and general 
labourers, who after considerable experience are content to live and die in it. 

The number of immigrants entering the Province by other inlets and not reported 
at any Custom House, gi\ing the Province the preference, are as follows: — 

Charlotte County, 130 ; halfof this number returnel Canadians ; Northumberland 
County, 12 English and settled in Blackville, a new settlement, 12 miles from New- 
castle; Carleton County, 92; Restigouche County, at Dalhousie, 4; Victoria County, 
25. 

These are the only counties report el yet as to immigrants, making in all as far as 
heard from 564 immigrants, that have positively settled in the Province, in addition to 
those regularly reported, an increase, over 1881, of 260. 

Their effects in cash were $33,400, other values, as ascertained and not reported at 
Customs, 84,370; increase over 1881, of $24,270. 

147 
14-lOi 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.li.) A. 1888 



the; 



As reported last year, I have had to reply to enquiries from almost every part of 
Europe, as to New Brunswick's climate, soil, government, schools, free grants, society, 
&c„ &c, as a home for every class of industries, and more particularly from the 
farmers. Each enquirer excuses himself for asking so many questions, from the 
fact that they could not find any manual, maps, or anything exclusively confined to 
New Brunswick, what they could find being merely fragmentary. 

I had to supply the deficiency by gathering all the information to enable me to 
answer some special enquiries, for instance from Wales, whore fishing and farming is 
combined as a business. 

The agricultural interests as reported last year, continue to be prosecuted vig- 
ourously, prompted by the increased demand and high prices for all the products of the 
farm. In several of the counties the farmers find cash customers at their doors for 
all they can produce, owing to the close proximity to the adjoining Republic. 

The enquiries made by me in the different sections of the Province, were not only 
for this report, but to answer the many applications made on me as before stated, 
Some of these I give below. 

Begining with Albert County, the correspondent writes : Albert, so named in 
honour of the late Prince Consort, constituted formerly a part of Westmoreland, has 
an area of 32,000 acres, originally settled by Acadians, because of the excellent water 
communication and a large portion of fertile soil, -including over 8,000 acres of alluvia' 
land of inexhaustible productiveness; these lands formed by a rich deposit of red 
mud from the salt water, have been easily reclaimed from any overflow of the sea 
and now produce from two to three tons of hay per acre. This hay may be timothy 
or new grass and clover. This land ranges in value from 49 to 100 dollars pei 
acre, a portion of it yet susceptible of improvement by drainage, ploughing, etc 
The uplands surrounding these low lands are varied in quality according to situatior 
and mineral characteristics. 

The parish of Harvey, in many parts rests on a red sandstone formation, an< 
the soil is a rich marl, pronounced by Professor Johnstone in his able report as firs 
quality. Hopevale, on the northern side of the river, dividing it from Harvey, cor 
tains a variety of soil, the most of which is well adapted for farming purposes. 

Alma is more hilly, and while this parsh has some good farms, its lumberin 
and mining facilities largely occupy the attention of the people. 

The other parishes, Hillsboro', Coverdale and Elgin, are well adapted for agricu 
ture. The latter, in addition to superior uplands, contains numerous tracts of intei 
vale and meadow along the branches of the Pocket and Coverdale Eivers. 

r i he raising of beef, chiefly for the English markets, is now being prosecuted wit* 
success ; one establishment alone has now on hand over 200 head of stall fed cattl 
For grazing and cattle feeding, Albert County is specially adapted and is generally a 
agricultural county. It is capable of supporting three times its present populatioi 
In spruce lumber a very considerable trade is done in some sections, and the actui 
cut ranges from 20,000,000 to 30,000,000 superficial feet. Ship building is carric 
on to a measurable extent along the shore of the Bay of Fundy. 

In fisheries, salmon, codtish, herrings, haddock, &c, are taken iu small quanl 
ties, and the shad fishing of the bay is unequalled anywhere. 

Albert County has long been noted for its mineral deposits. The rich vein 
Albertite coal has become exhausted, similiar deposits, however, exist, and in tl 
metals, copper is found in different parts, and is engaging the attention of capitalisi 
Gold, silver, manganese, iron, &c, are also found. 

Large quantities of freestone, gypsum, and limestone are being quarried, ai 
the supply of these is very extensive. 

With the proposed railway extension to Alma, every one of the six parishes 
the county will be intersected by a railway. In addition to facilities of communi< 
tion by bay and rivers, and for general convenience, and its extraordinary variety 
resources, Albert County is not equalled by any similar extent of area in Briti 
America. 

148 



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75 


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75 



48 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Testimony of yield per acre, Albert County, for 1882 : 

Wheat, by Ezra Bishop, 32 bush per acre, weight 

Barley, " " 35 " " " 

Wheat, by Judson Bishop, 28 " " 

Barley, " " 44 " " 

This is the testimony of twenty-four others of the average, viz : — Turner Bros., 
Smith Bros., W. Bobinson, M. Steeves, Charles Turner, W. A. West, Allan West, John 
Wilbur, Albert Derry, Wesley Derry, S. C. Stevens, Trueman Bishop, Harris Bishop, 
T. McClelan, Asrel Peck, Alonzo Stites, John Parker, Benjamin Smith, C. & F. Keiver, 
Warren Jones, Albert Smith and G-. E. Smith. 

$ Ct3. 

Buckwheat, Turner Bros., 40 bushels, weight 54 lbs., price 50 

Oats, Smith Bros., 42 bushels, weight 54 lbs., price 50 

Potatoes, Albert Dewy, 350 bushels, weight 60 lbs., price 40 

Turnips, Thomas McClelan, 800 bushels, price 25 

Hay, John Wilbur, If tons, average price 6 50 



The above are prices for delivery on the spot, and this is the testimony given by 
the above named persons. 

Number of beeves for the year : — 

$ cts. 

Turner Bros., Harvey Corners, 50, average weight 700 lbs., price... 8 00 

Smith Bros., " 700, " 700 <• ... 8 00 

W. Bobinson, " 15, " 700 " ... 8 00 

L. McClelan, K'verside, 30, average weight 7C0 lbs., price 8 00 

John Wilbur, Harvey Brook, 24, average weight 600 lbs,, price 8 00 

Charlotte County. — My St. Stephen's correspondent writes ''many emigrants 
, {returning to their homes from the "United States, the improved state of things at 
ri lborno rendering it advisable for them to do so." 

, The class of immigrants coming in here for the past year, are of a superior 

lCU plass to the general immigration, many of tbem being skilled mechanics for the 
^''sotton mill which is now in successful operation, many of these bringing consider- 
able means in addition to their household effects. 

The cotton mill has given a great impetus to trade in Milltown, where the mills 
ittl( ire located. Keal estate has gone up 100 per cent, in value, and many fine buildings 
'["lave been erected and occupied. The Cotton Mill Company have opened anew street, 
ill0l ind erected already ten new tenement houses for their operatives, and, I understand, 
" ntend to erect others in the spring, and this may all be attributed to tne N. P. 

As regards the general trade of the port, there has also been a marked increase. 
The imports for the year ending 30th June, 1881, were 8368,577, and the duty on 
ame $48,564.22; while the year ending 30th June, 1832, shows $519,539, and duties 
180,731.26. I cannot give you a correct statement of exports, as almost all our 
exports are from Calais, and are taken there by scows, rafts, teams and railways, 
anding direct from the mills. From my own knowledge and fact*, from the Calais 
Justom House we shipped or exported $250,000 in lumber knees, and in sleepers; 
20,000 in hoops ; $1,500, in bark and extract, while potatoes and eggs foot up over 
10,000, besides sundry other articles. 

Carleton County. — My informant writes: The export of our agricultural products 
nd animals shows, as passed through the Customs, $7t>,500, and includes but a small por« 
ion of the produce shipped from the county. Our farmers, as a class, are independent, 
nd numbers who commenced twenty years ago with little or nothing, are now well- 
Bii'|o-do and independent, and the wealth of the county is increasing. The balance to 
he credit of depositors in the Government Savings Bank is over §200,000, and is 

149 



wit' 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



largely due to farmers, besides large deposits in the Bank of Nova Scotia. The 
facilities for transporting out of this county are good, and situated as we are, in 
close proximity to the United States, we have the benefit of their markets. Our 
markets are good ; manufacturing industries are springing up in and around Wood- 
stock, and the population is increasing very fast. 

Victoria County. — My conespondent at Andover writes: Four American 8 ', two 
English and twenty-three returned Canadians have come in from the United 
States and settled in this county. I have no knowledge of the number of immi- 
grants entering the county at other ports, but know quite a number have been added 
to the new settlements in this county in the present year. I regret that a number 
ot young men have left for the West and the Canadian North-West; and men 
of wealth — for instance, the Beveridges, four families, in all sixteen persons — 
havo left to settle elsewhere, taking their wealth with them — some $200,000 — 
to the great injury of the county. Still the county is growing largely in population 
and the prospects look bright. The New Brunswick Bailway Company havo pre- 
pared to bring out about one hundred families from Europe next season. The 
following letter is an answer to questions put to an immigrant that passed through 
this office in the spring of 18- 1, and setted at Andover : 

" In answer to yours, I have great pleasure in telling you my experience as 
a farmer in Canada since May, 1881. I can honestly say I have done a great deal 
better than I should have done in England. The land is very good — better than I 
ever expected. Both wheat and oats are very good yielding — 1 can't say how much 
to the acre, as I have not threshed much. Potatoes will grow an immense crop and 
good; all kinds of roots do well. I have a flock of fifty-two sheep. They are doing 
very well, but I intend improving the breed with Shropshires as soon as possible. 
My family and I are all very pleased with our change, and the inhabitants aie good 
neighbours. My brother-in-law, Mr. Phillip*, has been seeing us this summer, and 
likes the country as well as we do. 

Mr. Dousland, from South Tilley, and Mark Light, from the Scotch Colony, have 
been seeing me, and they are well satisfied with the country. We havo heard from 
my son and Mr. Phillips. We are much obliged to you for your assistance and infor- 
mation. Good practical farmers are what this country want3, not towns-people, and 
then they will do well." 

James Williams. 

P. S. — I consider it a very healthy country, much more so than England. None 
of us have been sick since we came here. 

J. W. 

Northumberland. — My Newcastle correspondent writes : All kinds of farm pro- 
duce are commanding good prices, and of which we have an average crop. No one 
need be at a loss for a market for all he can raise on his farm, and at his own door. 

The Sugary Settlement has not increased any since I last wrote you. Yet those 
who are living there are doing well and are quite satisfied ; yet they are not farmers. 
They are mostly persons who have been working about mills and ship-yards, and 
don't know how to farm. 

The soil is good, well mixed ; and industrial, frugal families would sooi 
make for themselves good, comfortable homes. 

A new settlement has been laid off, called Breadalbane East; good, well mi: 
land. There is also another laid off in about the same vicinity called Breadalbane 
West, also good land and a good deal of intervale land in it, good for stock-raising. 

A good market gardener would do well here, and if he had any boys they a 
could get employment fixing up the gardens of people in the towns here, for no on( 
know* much about gardening. A man with a farm at the Sugary could do it well. 

The firm you mention from Cardiganshire can purchase here, on both sides 
of the river, good farms and good fishing privileges, such as farms belonging to 
estates, etc. Mr. Hutchinson, of the old house of Gilmour, Bankin & Co., has a 

150 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.U) A. 1883 



great many improved farms for sale. If at any time you direct any person up her© 
to have a look around, for the purpose of settlement, send them to mo; I will do 
all I can to get them the most reliable information. 

Bestigouche County. — My correspondent writes, one family of immigrants entered 
this district, comprising four persons, a Doctor and his family, from Edinburgh, 
bringing in cash, it is supposed from ten to fifteen thousand dollars. 

There is great improvement going on in this county in agriculture, and a large 
proportion of the ungranted lands is as good farming land as can be found in the 
Province. The chief crops raisei are hay, oats, barley, buckwheat, wheat, potatoes 
and turnips. The soil is well adapted to the raising of all kinds of cereals, and for 
root crops cannot be excelled. The wheat crop being the only uncertain one, as a 
changeable season affects it more than any other. Lumbering operations are 
yearly increasing , there were over 20,000 tons of shipping last season for foreign 
markets and next season will require over 30,000 to carry what is expected to be got 
out this winter, but there is no ship building going on at present. There is not much 
sea fishing prosecuted from this district, but between this and Bathurst, at a distance 
of fifty miles, fronting on the Bay Chaleur, there is eveiy facility to prosecute that 
line of business, and several good farms could be got at reasonable pi ices, but the 
price greatly depends on the quality of the buildings on the farm. 

I think there is no better place in the Province for capitalists to carry on 
farming and fishing than between these two places. There is also the Intercolonial 
Eailway running parallel with the coast the whole distance, giving every facility for 
shipping by land as well as water. 

Westmorelvnd County. — I am indebted to Mr. Josiah Woods. M.P.,who has kindly 
sent me the following from Mr. Trueman, who manages his farm, as answers to my 
enquiries. Mr. Woods, during 1882, raised barley, 450 bushels; oats, 965; turnip3 ? 
S,000 ; hay, 400 tons; 346 head of cattle, and sold off the farm, during the years 1881 
and 1882, l r <7 per year, nearly all of which were sold in the Glasgow and Liverpool 
markets ; and during the two years there have been sold 250 tons of hay, part of which 
went to the West Indies, the balance to Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

I have taken some pains to estimate the number of square miles of marsh lands 
between Dorchester and Amherst, and find as follow : — The Amherst block, 2 miles 
wide and 3 long, making 6 square miles ; the Fort Lawrence, 1 mile wide and 3 long ; 
the Sackville, 4 miles wide and 5 long, including the west coast, making 20, and 
Dorchester, 1 mile wide and 12 long, in all 41 square miles, or 26,240 acres. A portion 
of this is in pasture, and supposing the hay cut on the uplands to be equal in acreage 
to the pasture marsh, and judging that it cuts an average of one and one-half tons 
to the acre, gives 40,000 tons of ha}?, which is as near as I can answer that question. 
The average yield of wheat in Sackville would be about 7J bushels to the acre; the 
average of barley, S5, and oats, 40 per acre; potatoes, 200 ; turnips, 600, mangolds, 
750 per acre. 

Mr. Palmer estimated the number of acres of the marsh lying at the head 
of the Bay of Fundy at 60,000 acres, but I suppose he included the bog, which would 
-till make my estimate small. 

Saint John County. — This is by no means an agricultural county. 
Character of past season: Spiing, late; summer, warm and dry; soil, 
bt and gravelly. Principal crops: oats, buckwheat, wheat, hay and pota- 
toes. 'Yield: wheat, 20 bushels to the acre; corn. 30; oats, 30; 
buckwheat, 25; peas, 20; leans, 15; hay, 1J tons; potatoes, 180 bushels; 
.turnips, 200; carrots, 250. Our other industries, "principally lumber; 30,000,006 
Miperficial feet were cut the past year, and about 2,000 tons of shipping built. As to 
our fishing interest, I may say we have 24 vessols employed, 435 tons; 3*7 boats, 125 
men, 2,000 fishnets, 2 seines; catch : 3,500 barrels herring; 1,000 cwt. codfish, 800 
cwt. pollock; 300 haddock; 75 hake; 28 barrels shad ; 10 bbls. mackerel; 10 tons 
lobsters; 4,000 pounds halibut. 

Saint John City and County. — The manufacturing industries in our city and 

I suburbs are all actively engaged working extra timo and cannot fill the orders.. 
151 
: 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



The new cotton mill at Courtney Bay will soon be in running order and will employ 
from 350 to 400 hands. 

There has been an offshoot from the Crouehville Pottery built on the Loch 
Lomond Koad and in good running order, and both find a market for all they can 
produce. The Crouehville Pottery is going to add the manufacture of bath brick, the 
proprietors having a patent for this article. 

James .Robertson, of Montreal, and Saint John, built in this city a large brick 
factory for the manufacture of saws and paints, which will be in working order 
next spring. 

The Waterous Engine Works, &c, of Brantford, Ontario, have sold during the 
past year in the Provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia alone, twenty-five 
portable steam engines and four grist mills. One of the above engines is to drive a 
Dew factory just being started here called the New Brunswick Merino Company, for 
manufacturing all kind of knit goods. 

Moncton is progressing in all her industrial pursuits. Every manufacturing 
establishment is working full time and can't supply the demand. The population 
increased last year 1,000 ; it now numbers "7,000 , all this in a decade, from a 
squalid village. Expended $250,000 in building operations alone last year. 

Other counties in the Province have not yet answered my enquiries, though all, 
with one or two exceptions, have promised to do so. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

SAMUEL GARDNER, 

Immigration Agent. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agricultuie. 



152 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (2wl4.) A. 1883 



No 11. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF WINNIPEG AGKNT. 



(W. C. B. Graiiame.) 

Dominion Government Immigration Office, 

Winnipeg, Mar., 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to present you a report of the work done in the interest 
of immigration at this Agency during the season of 1882. 

Attached to this Beport will be found tabular statements illustrating the very 
rapid and at the same time healthy growth of the vast and prolific portion of Her 
Majesty's Dominion lying north of the 49th parallel. 

Being prevented through illness from taking active control of this Agency until 
about the middle of August last, 1 cannot speak from personal observation of the 
large amount of work done here during the spring and early summer months, when 
the rush of immigrants into the country was something unprecedented ; but, judging 
from the difficulties I myself had to contend with during those months, when the 
country from Crookston to St. Vincent was almost completely under water, thus 
impeding the transit of the numberless train loads of people who were en route for 
this place, I can well imagine that the position occupied by the Assistant Agent, Mr. 
Maas, who was in charge, was not what might be termed " a bed of roses." 

These impressions were strengthened on my examining the registry books and 
general appearance of the premises prior to their transfer from Mr. Hespeler to 
myself, and I can assure you that since the period of my assuming control of this 
Agency there have been no u idle hand*," as the following statements will show : — 

Table A shows the total number of arrivals, as near as can be ascertained, into 
Manitoba and the North West Territory during the year 1882. You will see a very 
marked increase in the number of arrivals from Europe over those of 1881, viz: — 
9,500 souls as against 4,109 ; increase over 1881, 5,391. The increase in the number 
of arrivals from the United States over those of 1881, viz : 7,243, is indeed a very 
flattering proof that the work I have b8en doing under your directions during the 
past two winters in the United States has been of some benefit, inasmuch as it has 
been instrumental in bringing to this country a very desirable class of settlers from 
among our neighbours. Of course it must be remembered that numbers of the Ameri- 
cans were working men, many of whom have returned to their homes in the United 
States for the winter, but who will return here as soon as the season of work opens 
again. 

Table B shows the number of immigrants who were accommodated at the Agency 
during the season of 1882. 

Table C shows the rate of wages to be earned by mechanic- 1 , common labourers, 
farm hands and domestic servants. I am sure these figures will be found far in excess 
of wages paid in other countries. 

Table D shows the retail cost of provisions in the city of "Winnipeg which may 
bo taken as a fair guide to the cjst of living through the entire country. 

Table E shows the average wholesale price of grain, live stock and general 
produce in the Winnipeg market. 

Table F shows the retail price of ordinary articles of wearing apparel in Winnipeg. 

Table G gives the price of building material in tie city of Winnipeg. 

Table H gives price of fuel. 

153 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A i-S28 



Table I gives prices of all agricaltural implements, waggons, etc., etc., and 
threshers, both steam and horse power, either Canadian or American manufacture. 

Table J gives the price of produce in some of the provincial markets. 

Table K shows the amount of building done in the city of Winnipeg, by streets, 
during the year 1882, with the total amount of money expended for building pur- 
poses, viz : $-1,457,622.00. It is very doubtful if any of the larger cities of the 
Dominion can show such an expenditure for the same purpose in such a short time. 

Table L shows the total foreign imports into Winnipeg, for eleven months, ending 
30th November, 1882, with their respective value and duty. 

Table M shows the value of foreign imports, including free goods, for euch month, 
as compared with the imports of 1881. 

Table N shows the number of loaded cars which arrived in and departed from 
Winnipeg during 1882. 

Table O shows the monies expended in public schools during the season of 188?, 
with an aggregate attendance. 

I adduce these statements to show how fast the population and business of the 
country is increasing ; that in spite of all the "cold water" showered upon it by 
American pamphlet writers, this Province is rapidly reaching that state where it will 
become a recognized power, both in point of numbers and commercial importance. As 
an instance of the former, I will state that in 1870 the population of Winnipeg was 
only 300 souls, and in 18b2 it has increased to 25,000, an increase of 24,700 in the 
short space of twelve years. As an instance of the latter, I will state that in 1872, 
the Custom duties collected at this port amounted to the sum of $47,840.00, and in 
1882, $1,557,327.00, an increase of $1,539,387 in the short space often years, and the 
end is not yet. 

During the pa-t season I have visited the greater portion of the settlers in this 
district and found the new comer?, with a very few exceptions, prepared to stand tho 
rigours of our northern winter. 

There have been received at this office, during the past season, very nearly 
5,000 letters; there have been sent from this office during the same period 770 letters, 
4,000 circulars and 1,500 pamphlets and maps, all of which I trust will aid mater- 
ially in swelling the number in the Annual Beport-of this Agency for 1883 to at least 
100,000 souls. These figures may seem large, but we have every reason to be pre- 
pared to receive this number next year, and I have no hesitation in saying that if the 
right kind of people come to this country, there will be found room and occupation 
for them all; there are hundreds of ways of making money in this country that will 
never occur in older countries. For instance a milk and dairy company might be 
started somewhere in the vicinity of Winnipeg, that could, if properly conducted, be 
made a very profitable investment. 

At present, and during the past summer, most of the hotels were importing tho 
milk supply from Minnesota; why this should be I cannot tell, for we have grass in 
abundance, and Mr. Ogilvie, of Ogilvie Milling Compiny, tells me that bran and 
other ground feed for cattle is much cheaper here than in the east. lie says that a 
barrel of flour can be bought cheaper in Winnipeg than in Montreal, thus giving the 
home consumers the benefit of the cost of transportation. 

For the report on the general health of the people who arrived here during the 
past season I would refer you to the enclosed rpportof Dr. Lynch attending physician. 

" In reporting on the condition of the general health of 1he immigrants coming 
under my observation at the Immigrant Sheds during the past year, I cannot 
say that there has been very much change from former year3 in respect of the 
general health, but the largely increased numbers over that of any previous 
year has of course resulted in a much larger number of cases of illness. The 
diseases have been chiefly as heretofore, scarlet-fever, measles and pneumonia, 
the two former occurring in greater numbers among the children of the Eussian 
Jews. I am of opinion, however, that by the improved sanitary conditions effected 
under your supervision last summer, and carrying out of some alterations in the 
building as agreed upon between us, by which we may be enabled to more effectually 

154 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No 14.) A. 1883 



isolate contagious diseases, the percentage in such caso will certainly be greatly 
reduced." 

J. S. Lynch, M.D. 

Trusting that this Report will meet your approval, 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

WM. C. B. GRAHAME, 

Government Immigration Agent* 
The Honourable Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



Statement showing the approximate number of immigrants arrivals at Winni- 
peg during the year ending 31st December, 1882 : — 

English ") 

Irish [■ 7,500 

Scotch J 

Germans.... >... ") 

Scandinavians 

French and Belgian [ 9 nna 

Russians f ^' uuu 

Icelanders ] 

Other parts of Europe ..,,,. J 

From Canadian Provinces 25,000 

From United States 10,000 

Total number of souls ,. 44,500 



155 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 14.) 



A. 1883 



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156 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



C. — Table showing the Rate of Wages paid to the Working Classes in Manitoba and 

the North-West Territory. 



Occupation. 



Male. 

Bricklayers 

Blacksmiths . 

Carpenters 

Cooks » 

Farm Laborers 

Laborers (common) in city 

Lumbermen for winter 

Machinists 

Moulders 

Painters 

Plasterers 

Railway laborers 

do on station work 

Stonecutters 

Shoemakers 

Saw-mill men (West) 

Spikers 

Tailors 

Teamsters 

do city 

Tinsmiths 



Female. 

Cooks 

Dining-room girls 

Housemaids 

General servants 

Nurses 

Laundresses 



Period. 



Rate. 



From To 



Per day 

do 

do 

Per month, with board 

do do 

Per day 



Per month, with board 
Per day 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Per yard 

Per day 

do 

Per month, with board 
Per day , 

do 

Per month, with board 

do without board , 
Per day 



Per month, with board 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



% cts 
4 50 



3 50 
50 00 
30 00 

2 75 
30 00 



3 00 

4 50 

2 25 



50 



2 50 
30 00 
50 00 

2 75 



20 00 



15 00 
10 00 
20 00 



% cts. 

7 00 

3 00 

4 00 
75 00 
40 00 

3 00 
40 00 
3 00 
3 50 
3 50 

5 00 

2 50 
23 
5 00 

3 00 
30 00 

2 50 

3 00 
35 00 
55 00 

3 00 



30 00 
15 00 
15 00 
20 00 
15 00 
25 00 



157 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



D. — Table showing the general price for Provisions in the City of Winnipeg. 



Description. 



Beef, roast per lb. 

do steak f| 

do corned (< 

do boiling 

do live weight percwt. 

do fanners' per side. 

Veal roast pey/ b - 

do chop 

Pork, roast a 

do steak 

Mutton, roast ..... 

do leg u 

do chop u 

Lamb •••• u 

Venison 

gam u 

Bacon f| 

Lard u 

Sausages ■ 

Shanks. ([ 

Liver [( 

Kidney 

Headcheese - 

Tongue 

Suet " 

Chickens 

Turkeys (j 

Ducks!".' ' per pair 

Butter per lb. 

Eggs perdoz 

Potatoes per bush 

Parsnips " 

Cabbage ~ per doz 



Rate. 



Prom To 



% cts. 



20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
25 
30 



18 



20 

25 

25 

40 

30 

35 

1 00 

1 50 

1 00 



$ cts. 

25 
25 
20 
15 
6 00 
12 00 



25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
30 
40 
20 
20 
25 
20 
05 
05 



20 

15 

20 

15 

25 

30 

30 

60 

35 

45 

1 50 

2 00 
1 25 



Description. 



Cabbage <... each. 

Turnips perbush. 

do each. 

Beets perbush. 

Carrots " 

Onions lt 

Pumpkins per doz 

Celery " 

Sage per bunch 

Thyme " 

Summer Savory " 



Game, Oysters and Fish. 



Lake Superior trout per lb. 

Fresh salmon. u 

Halibut " 

Codfish " 

Fresh mackeral " 

Smoked whitefish " 

Oysters, N. York counts per can 

Selects " 

Standards " 

Finnan haddies per lb. 

Prairie Chickens per pair. 

Partridges " 

Wild Ducks " 

Rabbits 

Vension per lb. 

Elk " 

Bear meat " 

Buffalo meat " 



Rate. 



From 



$ cts, 

10 

40 
05 
25 
20 
50 
50 



12J 



1 10 

o'io 



20 
20 



18 



To 



$ cts. 



25 
50 
10 
50 
50 
00 
00 
00 
05 
05 
05 



158 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188b 



E. — Table showing the price for Grain, Flour, Fruit and Live Stock in the 

Winnipeg Market. 



Description. 



Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Bran per cwt. 

Shorts " 

Corn feed 

Flaxseed 

Flour patent process 

do XXXX 

do XXX 

Hides, green ...per cwt. 

Oatmeal per bbl. 



Fruits. 
Apples per bbl. 



Rate. 



From 



$ cts. 

70 

45 
50 



85 



5 00 

6 50 



6 00 



To 



$ cts. 



6 75 



8 00 



Description. 



Cranberries per bbl. 

Lemons case. 

Oranges " 

California pears u 

A lmeria grapes " 

Spanish onions " 

Figs per lb, 



Live Stock. 



Beef, prime per cwt. 

do common " 

Mutton " 

Pork " 

Lamb " 



Rate. 



From 


$ cts. 


8 00 


8 00 

9 00 




5 50 
4 50 

7 00 

8 00 
4 50 



To 



$ cts. 

16 00 

12 00 

6 50 

9 00 

10 00 

12 00 

20 



6 50 
5 50 

8 00 

9 00 
5 00 



F. — Table showing the Retail Price of the ordinary Articles of Clothing, &c, 

the City of Winnipeg. 



Description. 



Coats, under, tweed 

do over do 

Trousers do 

Vest do 

Suits, Canadian & Scotch tweed 
Shirts, flannel 

do cotton 

do under, wove 

Drawers, wool „ 

do cotton 

Hats, felt 

do fur 

Socks, worsted 

do cotton 



Rate. 


From 


To 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


3 60 


10 00 


6 00 


16 00 


2 50 


6 00 


1 00 


3 00 


7 00 


20 00 


1 25 


2 50 


50 


1 25 


1 00 


1 25 


1 00 


1 25 


50 


75 


90 


2 00 


2 00 


5 00 


35 


50 


10 


25 



Description. 



Blanket3 

Rugs 

Flannel, per yard 

Shirting, cotton, per yard .... 
Canadian cloth do 
Scotch tweed do 

Mufflers, wool, heavy 

Mitts do per pair. 

Moleskin pants 

Buckskin mitts, per pair 

Boots, men's 

Shoes do 

do over, rubber 

Coats do 



Rate. 



From To 



$ cts. 

2 50 

3 00 
50 
15 
50 

90 

1 00 



$ cts. 

4 50 
6 00 
75 



2 50 
6 00 



Drugs and Chemicals about 15 per cent, higher than in Ontario. 



150 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



G. — Table showing the Price for Building Materials in the City of Winnipeg. 



Description. 



Lumber — Pine. 

1st common boards, dressed 

2nd do do 

1st do rough 

2nd do do 

Sheeting, rough 

Timber, 16 feet and under .... 

do 18 to 20 feet 

do each additional foot 

Dimensions and joists, 18-20 feet 

do do each additional ft... 

2 and 3 in. battens ... 

A stock boards, all widths 

B do do 

G do do 

D do do 

1st clear 1, l£, U, 2 inch 

2nd do " do 

Window and door casings 

Base boards, dressed 

1st pine flooring, siding, coiling 

2nd do do 

3rd do do 

Shingles from $5.00 to 

Laths from $5.00 to 



Rate 


per M. 


$ cts. 


35 00 


30 00 


32 00 


30 00 


30 00 


32 00 


34 00 


1 00 


32 00 


1 00 


35 00 


55 00 


50 00 


45 00 


40 00 


70 00 


60 00 


66 00 


60 00 


50 00 


45 00 


40 00 


6 00 


6 00 



Description. 



Lumber — Spruce. 

Timber, 26 feet and under 

do 15 feet, each additional foot 

Dimensions and joists, 16 feet 

do do 18 and 20 feet 

do do each additional ft 

Boards 

Oak piles, per foot 



Miscellaneous. 

Brick, perM from $20.00 to 

Sand, per car from $17.00 to 

Lime, per bushel 

Stone, per cord 

Building paper, tarred, per cwt 

do brown do 

Naib, cut, per cwt., lOd. and upwards.... 

do do 8d. and 9d 

do do 4d. and 5d 

do do 3d 

do do 3d., fine 



Rate 
per M. 



$ cts. 



30 00 
1 00 

28 00 

28 00 
1 00 

28 00 
18 



30 oa 

20 00 
50 

16 ce 

4 

5 
5 
5 
5 
6 



00 
00 

00 
50 
75 
75- 
8 75 



H.— Fuel, 



Description. 



Hard coal, per ton 

Soft do do , 

Poplar cord wood, per cord 
Tamarac do do 

Oak do do 



Rate. 


From 


To 


$ eta. 

16 00 

14 50 

7 00 

9 00 

9 00 


$ Ct3.- 




8 00 1 
11 00 ' 
11 00 



160 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1888 



I. — Table showing the Price of Agricultural Implements in the City of Winnipeg. 



Description. 


Rate. 


Description . 


Rats. 


American Manufacture. 

No. 80 garden plough * 

Prairie Queen, 12 in. complete breaker 
plough... 
do 14 do do 
do 16 do do 
Brash Breaker, 14 do do 
do Grader, 12 do do 
Wisc'sin Grub, 16 do do 
do 18 do do 
do 20 do do 
G.P. 11 Highlander,12 in. complete Cross 

plough... 
do 3 do 13 do 
do 5 do 14 do 
do 16 do 16 do 
do 13 do 13 do 
do 15 do 14 do 
No. 6 do 14 do 
Gang plough, with 12 in. breaker and 
G.P. 13 eross bottoms, 
do do do 
I Sulky with 16 in. G.P. 17 cross bottoms, 
do 14 breaker and G.P. It 


% cts. 

11 00 

25 00 
27 00 
32 00 
35 00 
40 00 
40 00 
44 00 
47 00 

18 00 

19 00 

21 00 

24 00 

23 00 

25 00 
18 00 

135 00 

110 00 

82 00 

100 ©0 

22 00 

24 00 

20 00 

20 00 

25 00 

23 00 

80 00 

90 00 

145 00 

100 00 

5 00 

315 00 
335 00 
193 00 


Harvesting Machines — Concluded. 
Daisy single reaper 


$ cts. 
144 00 


Wrought iron mower 


90 00 


Hand and selt-dump hay rake 


40 00 


Waggons, Cutters and Dob-Sleighs . 

Waggons with double box, spring seat, 
stay chain, whiffletrees and neck- 
yoke, 3j arm, No 1 


90 00 


Waggons with double box, spring seat, 
stay chain, whiffletrees and neck- 
yoke, 3^ arm, No. 2 


93 00 


Portland cutter 

No. 1 with 2f in. runner, complete bob- 
sleighs 


75 00 
50 00 


No. 2 with 2 in. runner ; complete bob- 
sleighs 


40 00 


Steam and Power Threshers. 
6 or 8 horse-power, down 


115 00 




10 or 12 do mounted 


225 00 


Canadian Manufacture . 


16 do agricul engine.... 

12 do do 

12 do agricul. traction 

engine 

6 or 8 do separator mount- 
ed engine 

10 or 12 do separator mount- 
ed for H.P 

10 or 12 do separator mount- 
ed for steam ... 
6 or 8 do with separator 


1,150 00 
925 00 

1,250 00 




335 00 


14 do cross plough, iron beam, complete 

- 

Harrows. 

-* Farmers' Friend, 60 teeth, Iron.: 


525 00 
556 00 
450 00 


do 75 do 


10 or 12 do with separator & 
power mounted 

12 do engine& separator 
complete 

12 do traction engi-e & 
separator com- 
plete 




Iron scuffler or cultivator 


750 00 


Seeders. 

1 

(it ! Monitor grain seeder, 12 bar 


1,515 00 

1,800 00 


do do 14 do 


Miscellaneous . 

I.X.L. combined reaper and mower 
complete. 


"" do do 18 do 




do drill, 13 hoe, 6 in. drill. 




Harvesting Machines. 

1 Harvesting and twine binder, 6 feet 

do do 7 do 

; Combined Imperial reaper and mower... 


165 00 
135 00 


do mower 

Road scrapers, 34 in steel face 


90 00 

11 00 

IS 




25 






14—11 

! 


11 


>1 

• 





46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188S 



J. Table showing the Provincial Markets at the following places, viz. 



Markets. 



Portage la Prairie. 

Wheat.. per bush. 

Oats " 

Barley " 

Potatoes " 

Beef.., per lb. 

Mutton " 

Pork " 

Ham " 

Bacon, smoked., " 

do green " 

Cheese lt 

Butter. " 

Eggs per doz. 

Flour, White Lily per cwt. 

do XXXX " 

do XXX " 

Hay per ton. 

West Lynne . 

Wheat per bush. 

Oats " 

Barley " 

Flax " 

Potatoes " 

Cord wood per cord. 

• 

Emerson . 

Wheat per bush. 

Oata « 



Rate. 



From To 



cts. 



75 
45 
50 
60 
10 
10 
15 
20 
20 
18 


""o 40* 






7 00 



75 
35 
40 


80 
40 
45 
80 


40 
7 00 


50 
9 00 


70 
35 


75 
37 



$ cts. 



80 
50 
60 
65 
25 
25 
20 
25 
25 
20 
25 
40 
45 
50 
00 
75 
8 00 



Markets. 



Emerson — C ontinued . 

Barley per bush. 

Flax » 

P tatoes u 

Carrots " 

Turnips " 

Beef, best cuts per lb. 

Mutton, hindquarter " 

Lamb ., " 

Pork " 

Veal " 

Chickens per pair. 

Ducks " 

Ham per lb. 

Bacon " 

Wood per cord 

Rapid City. 

Wheat per bush. 

Oats " 

Barley, " 

Potatoes " 

Turnips " 

Flour, Balkwill's per cwt. 

do XXXX (Portage) " 

Chopped stuff. " 

Bran " 

Butter per lb. 

Eggs per doz. 

Beet per lb. 

Wood per load. 



Rate. 



From To 



$ cts. 



$ cts. 

45 

85 
75 

75 
55 
25 
20 
25 
20 

20 

1 25 
36 



10 00 



70 


75 


70 


1 00 


45 


50 




75 


45 


50 


3 00 


3 25 


2 75 


3 00 


I 50 




1 00 




20 


25 





30 


10 


20 


3 50 


4 00 



162 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188a 



Table showing a Summary of the New Buildings (by Streets) erected 

during 1882. 



Name of Street. 



Alexander 

Armstrong's Point. 

Assiniboine., 

Adelaide 

Argyle 

Austin 

Annabelle 

Alfred 

Arthur 

Albert 

Annie 

Bannatyne 

Broadway 

Burrows Avenue .... 

Bushnell 

Carlton 

Common 

do 

Comez 

Charlotte 

Cumberland 

Donald 

Dagmar 

Disraeli 

Ellice 

Ellen 

Euclid 

Fonseca 

Fort .... . 

Francis 

Fountain 

Furby 

Graham 

Garry 

Grenville 

Gladstone 

George 

Gunell 

Gwendoline 

Gertie 

Biggins 

Harriett 

Hargrave 

Hfcllet 

Isabel 

Jemima 

Juno 

James 

Kate 

Kennedy , 

! >ogan 



Carried forward. 



Cost. 



71,480 
57,695 
34,900 
24,000 
11,000 



8,300 

5,800 

5,000 

2,000 

1,200 

1,200 

44,000 

41,450 

16,700 

8,000 

123,550 

32,800 

7,250 

3,900 

3,000 

51,850 

12,000 

23,000 

80,800 

20,500 

5,800 

37, 745 

27,500 

6,200 

1,300 

1,000 

32,800 

26,000 

17,600 

13,700 

7,800 

6,650 

5,600 

2,000 

45,350 

15,300 

13,200 

5,800 

9,800 

95,000 

22,800 

1,100 

33,500 

3,760 

34,200 



Name of Street. 



Brought forward. 



Lome .•... 

Lauria 

Lusted ... 

Lizzie 

Lily 

Lu'la 

Main 

McDermott 

McWilliam 

Market 

Marie 

McDonald 

Mary 

Manitoba 

McFarlane 

Maple 

Meade 

McMicken 

McTavish , 

Machray 

Notre Dame 

Nena 

Owen 

Owena 

Portage Avenue 

Point Douglas Avenue 

Public buildings 

Princess 

Post Office...., 

Patrick 

Pritchard 

Portland 

Quelch 

River Avenue 

Ross 

Rorie 

Rupert 

Sutherland 

St. James 

St. Mary 

St. John 

Smith 

Selkirk 

St. James 

Syndicate 

Thistle 

Vaughan 

Young 

York 



Total. 



Cost. 



17,200 

14,200 

18,600 

9,100 

7,500 

1,600 

,170,000 

74,500 

71,000 

28,000 

22,500 

20,952 

22,700 

9,350 

8,000 

9,025 

6,000 

6,000 

1,600 

800 

147,500 

12,060 

28,500 

4,900 

281,400 

280,100 

210,000 

141,000 

32,800 

13,100 

14,000 

5,000 

9,70<» 

177,400 

99,350 

14,500 

7,100 

7l,22f> 

36,850 

24,800 

22,700 

16,000 

3,400 

2,300 

2,000 

25,400 

3,300 

70,800 

29,800 



$4,457,622 



14— 11 J 



163 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188* 



L. — Table showing the Total Foreign Imports at Winnipeg for the Eleven Monthi 

ending ;-U)th November, 1882. 



Goods. 



Agricultural implements... .< 
Brass and manufactures of... 
Grain 



Breadstuffs, all other 

Coal of all kinds 

Cottons, manufactures of.... 
Drugs, dyes and medicines... 

Fruits, dried, and nuts 

Fruits, green 

Iron and steel 

Jewellery, gold and silver.... 
Leather and manufactures of. 



Carried forward. 



Value. 


Duty. 


$ 


$ 


67,603 


16,901 


13,249 


3,813 


93,026 


21,076 


23,731 


4,531 


58,837 


5,627 


344,317 


82,045 


9,575 


2,724 


59,451 


14,533 


128,136 


29,181 


1,247,136 


306,398 


33,925 


8,369 


56,175 


13,937 











Goods. 



Brought forward 

Metals. 

Musical instruments 

Coal oil 

Provisions 

Spirits, wines and liquors... 
Tobaccos, cigars and snuffs 
Wood and manufactures of.. 
Wool do 
Other articles 

Total for 11 months.... 



Value. 



12,939 

21,934 

4,770 

569,711 

73,629 

23,175 

1,064,182 

339,442 

1,799,170 



6,044,088 



Duty. 



3,134 

5,918 

2,625 

85,974 

52,474 

19,758 

250,702 

103,634 

463,961 



1,497,327 



M. — Table showing the Value of Foreign Imports, including Free Goods, for each 

Month, compared with 1881. 



Months. 



January...., 
February- 
March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October 



1881. 



70,021 
49,649 
174,266 
183,137 
384,596 
466,344 
200,272 
292,756 
290,267 
257,390 



1882. 



$ 

103,296 
413,384 
494,247 
446,014 
711,253 

1,074,388 
929,267 
968,532 

1,335,189 
694,908 



Carried forward Increase, 1881 over 1882 



Months. 



Brought forward., 



November. 
December. 



Total. 



Total foreign imports, '82 . 
do do '81. 



1881. 



237,925 
220,808 



2,837,431 



2,837,431 



1882. 



8,222,928 



8,222,928 



5,385,497 



164 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (Na.14.) 



A. 188$ 



Tables showing the number of Loaded Oars which Arrived in and Departed from 
Winnipeg, during the year ending 31st December, 1882. 



January ... 
February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August .... 
September. 

October 

November.. 
December.. 



Months. 



Going East. 



349 
301 



From East. 



491 

374 



511 
1,069 
1,294 
1,109 
1,907 
1,617 
1,766 
1.207 
1,200 



491 

1,193 
1,607 
1,329 
1,689 
1,719 
1,903 
1,450 
1,380 



Total. 



12,330 



13,613 



Months. 



.January 

♦ February 

March 

I April 

I May 

i June , 

July 

r August 

September 

October 

;November 

.December 

Total. 



Going South. 



Empty. 



586 

203 

279 

706 

1,356 

1,719 

2,107 

3,928 

2,649 

2,411 

2,101 

2,132 



20,167 



Loaded. 



107 
151 

58 

118 

182 

4 

183 

19 
137 
396 
304 

31 



1,690 



From South. 



Empty. 



140 



Loaded. 



917 
574 
261 
1,000 
2,593 
3,317 
2,909 
4,367 
2,993 
3,269 
2,640 
2,538 



27,441 



165 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 18S3 



Table showing the number of Loaded Cars which Arrived at and Departed from 

Winnipeg, &c.—~sCo7icluded. 



Months. 



January 

February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Total 



Going 


West. 


From West. 


Loaded. 


Empty. 


Loaded. 


Empty. 


1,110 

770 
913 
1,027 
2,018 
2,937 
2,543 
3,729 
2,469 
2,930 
1,994 
1,724 




251 

235 

68 

41 

137 

119 

10T 

68 

33 

221 

398 

382 


911 




790 




499 
7,396 
1,736 
2,809- 
2,564 
2,123 










2,714 
2,057 
1,332 






1,468 


24,164 




2,060 


20,742 





Table showing Moneys Expended on Public Schools in the City of Winnipeg, with 
Aggregate Attendance at each School for One Month. 



Particulars. 



Argyle Street School. 

Cost of two-room building 

Additions , 

Central School. 

Original cost 

Additions . 

New building.....'. 

Carlton Street School 

Cost of original school 

Additions :.... 

Carried forward.... 



Amount. 



$ cts. 



3,500 00 
5,000 00 



12,000 00 

9,000 00 

18,000 00 



3,000 00 
12,000 00 



62,500 00 



Particulars. 



Brought forward 

Dufferin School. 

Cost of original building ... 
Additions 

Louise Street School. 
Cost of building 

Euclid Street School. 
Cost of building 

Total 



166 



Amount. 



% cts. 
62,500 00 



3,500 0O 
5,000 00 



9,000 OO 



5,000 00 



85,000 00 



46 Vvfltaia. Sessional Papers (No. 14 ) A. 188$ 



This estimate does not include the value of the sites on which the Schools stand. 
The school census for the past year is not complete, but it will exceed 3,000. 
Below is the average attendance at each School for the month of October last: — 

Schools. Number of Souls. 

Central School 538 

Argyle Street School 99 

Dufferin School 136 

Carlton Street School 88 

Louise do c 26 

Total 881 

W. C. B. GRAHAME, 

Agent. 






167 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (N<*14.) A. 1883 



No. 12. 

ANNUAL RBPOET OF BRANDON AGENT. 



(Thos. Bennett.) 

Immigration Office, 

Brandon, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my Annual Report for the year ending 31st 
December, 1882. 

On my arrival here, I found the immigrant buildings nearly completed, and fit 
for occupancy. I had the necessary stoves and fixtures put in as soon as possible, and 
it is now one of the most comfortable immigrant reception houses in the Dominion. 

I found a large majority of the settlers throughout this Agency to be of a 
superior class, both those who came from the Old Countries of Europe, as well as those 
from the Older Provinces of the Dominion, and the United States. 

In accordance with a letter of instructions, dated 17th August, 1882, I obtained 
several letters from most reliable settlers, giving their opinion of the country, and 
the results of their operations as agriculturists, during the time they have been 
settled in this Province, and forwarded the same to your Department. I may 
add that from careful personal observation, I believe the statements set forth in 
them to be, as near as possible, correct. I was surprised at the progress made by 
settlers, through every section which I visited. The quantity of land brought under 
cultivation in so short a period, the amount of capital invested in the most 
improved kinds of agricultural implements, and the energy manifested, unmistake- 
ably told the confidence they had in the result of their enterprise in this new country. 

The districts which I visited, with two or three exceptions, are settled from 
eight months to four years, and the statement which I enclose (marked* A), will give 
as near#s possible the amount of land brought under cultivation, crops raised, etc. 

Also statement (marked B), will give quantity of agricultural implements sold 
in Brandon alone, last season, up to 1st September, and the amount of capital 
invested therein, which I think will give a fair idea of the progress made by the 
settlers during that period. 

I have not been able to ascertain the number of immigrants who have settled 
west of Portage LaPrairie this season, such statistics being kept more easily and 
correctly at Winnipeg. 

The country lying south of the railway, from Township 6,|Range 16, to Township 
1, Range 22, is mostly taken up and settled upon, and the thrift and industry of the 
settlers are apparent in a marked degree. In Milford, Souris City, Elliott Settlement, 
Langvale, Plum Creek and Little Souris, there are farmers thoroughly independent 
and comfortable, some having cleared, besides all expenses, from $8,000 to $15,000 
on last year's crop, and have not been settled upon their lands more than four years. 
They, however, cultivate from 400 to 600 acres, while smaller farmers do well in 
proportion to the amount cultivated. There are fine settlements, also, north of 
the railway, and farmers apparently comfortable. But what I corisider most remark- 
able is that I have yet to find a real grumbler— a man who does not consider it a 
good country to live in. There are inconveniences, no doubt ; winters are cold and 
wood scarce, but, as soon as the great coal fields of this country are opened, and a 
better class of farm buildings erected, both those inconveniences will be remedied to 
a great extent. 

168 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188J 



I have found a few settlers who have made a mistake in building their first 
house too large, a matter which should always be avoided, particularly in this 
country, where lumber and mechanical labour is so expensive. And I would advise 
immigrants not to come to this country before May nor later than September. By 
so doing they will avoid the unpleasantness of arriving in early spring, when the 
weather is unfavourable ; and it would give them time in the fall to build their 
houses and prepare for the coming winter. 

I find settlers are locating on lands along the line of railway as fast as the rails 
are laid, and, in some instances, regardless whether the land is surveyed and in the 
market or not. This I consider unwise, inasmuch as it is more than likely they 
squat upon Canadian Pacific, Hudson Bay or School lands instead of even-numbered 
sections, thereby incurring the risk of being removed and losing their improvements, 
while as good lands remain unsettled in surveyed districts, both convenient to rail- 
way and civilization. 

I am glad to notice that the immigrant buildings at Qu'Appelle are being 
advanced to completion, and will be fit for occupancy in early spring. This will be 
a great boon for those settlers who anticipate going to the new Province of Assini- 
boia, giving their families a chance to rest while their homesteads are being selected. 

Qu' Appelle Station will be an important point of debarkation for immigrants^ 
who wish to settle either to the north or south on those rich, rolling prairies. 

It is astonishing the rapidity with which villages and towns spring up as each 
railway station is located. In a few weeks irom a flaked prairie you will find a 
smart little town built, with all the requisites necessary for the accommodation of 
settlers, i. e., stores, blacksmith shops, post and telegraph offices, to be followed in a 
ahorl time by schools, churches, etc. 

Among the most noticeable is the City of Brandon. Although only eighteen 
months since it was an unbroken prairie, it is now a large business centre with a 
population of over 4,000. It has all the conveniences of an old town. It has three 
fine churches, a splendid two-story brick veneered school house, sixteen hotels, two 
banks, two banking brokers. It also has stores, blacksmith shops, harness and shoe- 
makers shops, one saw mill, two planing mills, one grist mill capable of grinding 
seventy-five barrels of flour daily, and furnished by farmers in the district. There 
are also two grain elevators capable of storing 50,000 bushels of grain, and another 
of greater capacity is to be erected next summer. It has also ten miles of streets, 
well graded and gravelled, eighteen miles of plank sidewalks, a well organized fire 
brigade and steam fire engine, and four large water tanks, nearly completed. It 
may justry be termed the Queen City of the West. JRegina also, although only three 
months old, is bidding fair to equal if not outstrip her sister towns, and as the 
capital of the New Province of Assinibola, will justly claim to be the Queen City of 
the Plains, the whole showing the rapid growth of this country wherever capital 
and enterprise are combined. 

I feel myself under deep obligations to Mr. Lowe, Secretary of your T'epart- 
ment, and to Mr. Small, Accountant, for their repeated kindness and instructions to 
me in the performance of my duties of office. And also to Mr. W. C. B. Grahame, 
Agent at Winnipeg, for his kind assistance and advice whenever required. 

Trusting the above Eeport will meet with your approval, 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

THOS. BENNETT, 

Dominion Government Immigration Agent. 

The Honourable the Minister of Agriculture, 

Ottawa. 



169 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



C.Q 



;?.$ 



A. — Memorandum of Crops raised in this section of the Provinces of Manitoba and 
Assiniboine, on line of Canadian Pacific Eailway, in the Year 1882. 



Town or District. 



Burnside 

Bagot 

McGregor 

Austin 

Sidney ... 

Carberry 

Brandon 

Milford 

Langvale 

Rapid City 

Alexander 

Griswold 

Oak Lake 

Virden 

Birtle , 

Burrows 

Broadview 

Grenfel 

Indian Head 

Troy or Qu'Appelle Sta- 
tion , 

Totals 



Acres 
under 
Cultiva- 
tion. 



7,000 

10,000 

300 

2,100 

1,000 

10,000 

10,000 

21.500 

1,000 

38,000 

1,200 

700 

200 

500 

10,000 

None. 

None. 

None. 

None. 

625 



114,125 



Wheat. 



Bush. 

100,000 

140,000 

4,000 

25', 000 

12,000 

140,000 

75,000 

390,000 

10,000 

350,000 

18,000 

8,750 

3,000 

6,000 

112,000 



6,000 



1,399,750 



Oats. 



Bush. 

151,000 

150,000 

7,500 

40,000 

26,000 

125,000 

240,000 

270,000 

30,000 

900,000 

15,090 

18,000 

4,000 

10.000 

211.500 



Barley. 



Bush. 

11.500 

25,000 



8,000 

5,000 

20,000 

15,000 

40,000 

1,200 

50,000 

6,000 

2,000 



Potatoes 

and 

Roots. 



18,000 



2,216,000 



,500 



Bush. 

40,000 
60,000 
1,200 
25,000 
30,000 
60,000 
65,000 

128,000 
12,000 

128,000 
20,000 
15,000 



65,000 



,000 



192,200 657,200 



Land 

Broken 

this year. 



600 

1,000 

200 

400 

500 

5,000 

8,000 

20,000 

1,000 

20,000 

2,000 

1,600 

1,500 

1,000 

6,500 

3,000 

400 

2,000 

3,570 

2.000 



80,270 



Hay. 



Tons. 

6,500 

15,000 

200 

700 

400 

1,500 

4,750 

3,000 

600 

50.000 

'500 

3,000 

2,000 

500 

15,000 

2,000 

1,200 

3.000 

5.000 

4.000 



111,850 



Note. — This calculation is supposed to represent the Railway Belt. 

B. — Memorandum of Agricultural Implements sold at Brandon during the Season 

of 1882. 



Implements. 



Ploughs 

Gang ploughs 

Harrows 

Seeders 

Mowers 

Reapers 

Self binders 

Horse rakes 

Two-horse waggons 

Fanning mills 

Threshers, 8 horse-power 
Steam threshers 



Number. 



2,369 
157 
693 
112 
385 
195 
128 
550 
647 
580 
27 
20 



Price each. 



$ cts. 



Total Value. 



$ cts. 



20 00 


47,380 00 


95 00 


14,915 00 


18 00 


12,474 00 


90 00 


10,080 00 


95 00 


36,575 00 


137 00 


26,715 00 


340 00 


43,520 00 


40 00 


22,000 00 


90 00 


58,230 00 


35 00 


20,300 00 


760 00 


20,520 00 


1,500 00 


30,000 00 



342,709 00 



110 



BENNETT, 

Brandon Agency. 



* 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188$ 



No. 13. 

ANNUAL EEPOET OF THE EMERSON AGENT. 



(Mr. J. E. T£tu.) 

Dominion Immigration Agency, 

Emerson, Manitoba, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit to you my Annual Report upon the operations 
of this Agency. 

The total number of immigrants checked at this Agency during the year 1882 
was 69,332, and comprised as follows : — 

Ontario 38,327 

United States 13,325 

English 6,962 

Quebec 2,496 

Scotch 2,359 

Nova Scotia 1,997 

New Brunswick 1,485 

Irish 1,043 

Russian Jews 393 

Germans 319 

Prince Edward Island 376 

Swedes 107 

French 65 

Icelanders 60 

Danes 13 

Chinese - 5 

Total for the year 1882 69,332 

From this total an allowance should be deducted for explorers and others visiting the countrj 7 
and migrants from Ontario returning for their families of 17 per cent, thus making the total 57,551. 

An examination of these figures shows that the largest share of the immigration 
eomes from the Canadian Provinces, of which Ontario supplied the largest numbers 
and Prince Edward the least. 

Ontario , 38,327 

Quebec 2.496 

Nova Scotia 1,997 

New Brunswick 1,485 

Prince Edward Island 376 

Total - , 44,681 

The immigration from Great Britain footed up, comprised as follows : — 

England , 6,962 

Scotland 2,359 

Ireland 1,043 

Total other foreign 962 

Total British and foreign 11,326 

The total immigration from the United States amounted to 13,325 or 2,001 souls 
more than the combined British and foreign immigration. The value of effects and 
Money brought in, is reported by the Customs direct. 

The European immigrants who landed in the United States have followed the 
construction of railways, by these they have been benefited and they now look for 
Manitoba and the North-West Territory as tne most advantageous field of immigra- 

171 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 18&> 



tion for them. See how rapidly the "Western States have been settled by immigrants 
from Europe and the Eastern States. 

Thousands of immigrants will certainly look for years to come to the great 
manufacturing cities of the United States, but the farming class, the class which is 
wanted in this country, will eventually find its way to our North- West and settle on 
our fertile lands. 

The capitalists and the business men of the States are well aware of the*advan- 
tages this country offers to the immigrants, but outside of these Manitoba's 
rich soil and resources are not known, and I am of opinion that whatever expenses 
might be incurred towards making her known would be repaid by an immense flow 
of immigration from that quarter. 

The flow of immigration which, it is to be noted, commenced early during the 
past winter, and continued the whole of the year, is altogether unprecedented in the 
annals of this country, and shows that a new era ofprogess and prosperity is opened 
up for Manitoba which has, in a short space of time, gathered into its population so 
great a number of the sons of Canadian farmers, for whom opportunity was not of- 
fered at home, and who find, here, the sure hope of becoming in a few years the pro- 
prietors of large and valuable farms; of European tenants who are here offered as the 
prize of industry, the easy privilege of becoming the lords of their gwn manors — and 
those sturdy pioneers of the Western States, whose large numbers coming this year, 
give proof that already the superiority of the Canadian North- West as a field for pro- 
fitable settlement, over the country to the south of us, is rapidly becoming recognized. 

In addition to these gratifying circumstances, which place the future beyond a 
doubt, we have abundant proof, that the slumbering capitalists of Europe have at last 
awakened to the importance of this country as a profitable field for the investment of 
their capital. 

Large as this immigration has been, it has taken place contending with many 
and unusual difficulties, such as the lateness of the season, the phenomenal spring, 
which will probably not occur again for a century, the want of accommodation for im- 
migrants, on both sides of the frontier, during the flood which washed away the track 
from St. Yincent to the frontier, and the false and exaggerated reports sent to many of 
the eastern papers by thoughtless or malicious correspondents. 

The pamphlet issued by the Northern Pacific Railway Company, whose gross 
misrepresentations were so well exposed and refuted by the pamphlet in reply thereto, 
issued by your Department on December 26th, had also a mischievous effect. 

In the face of all this, however, it is gratifying indeed, as showing the confidence 
in the future of this country and the advantages which it offers to the immigrant, to 
be able to report to your Department so unprecedentedly large an immigration at 
this Agency. 

The advantages of the construction of railways across the fertile prairies of the 
Canadian West are only now, after a year's experience, beginning to be known and 
recognized, and will induce a very large addition to the future immigration. 

The crop has been generally good, though the spring was later than usual, and 
the cropping season being late, very little grain If as yet been sold, and I am therefore 
deprived of figures stating the quantity of grain marketed at this point, as I did in 
past Annual Reports. 

In concluding, I wish to acknowledge and thank the able Secretary of the 
Department of Agriculture and other officers for the help afforded me. 

I may mention the name of Mr. Woodman, whose connection with this Agency 
for the past three years has been most gratifying to me and valuable to your 
Department. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. E. TUTU, 

Dominion Immigration Agent. 
The Honourable the Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 

172 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



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173 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



No. 14. 
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DULUTH AGENT. 



(Mr. J. M. McGovern.) 

Immigration Office, 

Duluth, Minnesota, U.S., 30th November, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following Report of my proceedings since 
assuming charge of this Agency, also tabular statements for the past season. 

On the 23rd of May, 1882, 1 received instructions from Ottawa, by official letter of 
that date, to proceed to Duluth and relieve the Agent at that place, Mr. W. C. B. 
Grahame, who was about to be transferred to another Agency. 

Immediately on my arrival here Mr. Grahame gave me charge of the Agency 
Buildings, and very kindly did everything in his power to make me thoroughly 
familiar with tbe duties of an Agent at this Station. 

In accordance with instructions received, I have carefully attended to the wants 
of our people at this Port, giving them all needed assistance and advice, and doing 
ray utmost to have them forwarded quickly and safely to their destination. My 
duties required that I should be present'- on the arrival of all steamers, which 
was frequently at night. As soon as possible I would board the boat, note the accom- 
modation provided, ascertain the number and sex of the immigrants, assist in having 
their baggage and effects either bonded or inspected by the United States Customs 
Officials, and then see them safely aboard the train for Winnipeg. I have also 
frequently accompanied large parties two or three hundred miles by rail, to see that 
they were not imposed upon by sharpers or land agents, direct them about changing 
cars, and to give them such information as they might find useful in their new home. 

There being but one train a day for Winnipeg, our people were frequently 
detained here from ten to twenty hours. At such times I conducted them to the 
Agency Building, where ample accommodation was provided for their comfort, and 
where there was always at their disposal a large amount of pamphlets, maps and 
other printed matter containing much useful information about Manitoba and the 
North- West. The Department is very fortunate in being able to lease such fine 
commodious buildings here, and the immigrants feel very grateful for the attention 
shown them. Sir A. T. Gait, High Commissioner in England, visited this Agency 
2nd August, while en route to Manitoba. He expressed himself as being much 
pleased with the arrangements for the comfort of the immigrants, and the way in 
which matters were conducted. 1 have foiyid it very necessary to visit St. Paul as 
often as my duties here would allow, for the purpose of encouraging and protecting 
immigrants who go by the all-rail route to Manitoba. 

St. Paul has for years been the stronghold of land speculators and railway land 
agents, and at no other point in the North-West are such strong inducements held 
out to'the Canadian immigrants to change their destination and settle in the United 
States. Large parties of immigrants are frequently detained there awaiting railway 
connexion, and at such times are annoyed by the attacks of these land agents, who, 
besides running down and misrepresenting tbe soil, climate and institutions of Canada, 
represent the affairs of their own country in the most glowing and false colours. I 
have earnestly ondeavoured to defeat the schemes of the above mentioned agents, and 
hy making the best use of the limited time at my disposal, invariably succeeded ia j ^ 
persuading our people to continue on to their destination. < r .'■< 

m Kjdii, 



ec 



Wj 



fovir 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No 14.) A. 1883 



It frequently happens that foreign immigrants arriving here are possessed of 
baggage in excess of the quantity allowed by the passenger rates, and the.se people 
invariably object to pay the charge for extra baggage demanded by the railway 
companies, claiming to have been assured before leaving home that no such charge 
would be made. T will here cite a case in point: - 

A gentleman and his family -from London, Eng., en route to Manitoba, arrived 
herein the latter part of July ; they held five tickets which entitled them to to the car- 
riage of 750 pounds of baggage, but. they had 3,450 pounds in excess of that amount, 
which subjected them to a charge of $93.15. This sum, the gentleman positively 
refused to pay, asserting that the Steamboat Agent in England guaranteed him the 
free transportation of his baggage to Manitoba. These people were delayed here 
twenty-four hours, and finally through my influence the matter was settled by the 
payment of $54. This is but one of the many similar cases that has occurred here 
during the past summer. I respectfully call your attention to this matter, as I know 
from personal observation that it has had a tendency to make the immigrants feel 
that they were being imposed upon, and has also been the cause of many letters being 
written which must have injured immigration to the Canadian North- We.it. I would, 
therefore, very respectfully suggest that Agents abroad be instructed to inform 
intending emigrants, whenever possible, that the American railway companies will 
not give free transportation for more than 150 pounds of baggage to each passenger. 
This knowledge will save the emigrants much unnecessary delay and annoyance on 
this side. 

The accommodation furnished immigrants arriving here by boats has, on the 
whole, been satisfactory, although the arrangements for steerage passengers might 
be improved upon, yet the officers of the steamers have always been so attentive and 
obliging that there has been very little cause for complaint. On my trip from Ottawa 
here I came from Sarnia by steamer " Ontario," of the North-West Transportation 
Company. There were between three and four hundred immigrants on board, and 
the careful consideration they received at the hands of the officers of the boat was 
very gratifying. 

Particular attention has been given to the comfort of Canadian immigrants by 
the different railway officials, and the passenger service has been all that could be 
expected, but in the early part of the season I received numerous letters complaining 
of the detention of household goods, etc., etc., sent as freight. Upon investigation, I 
found the detentions were not caused at this point, as the Northern Pacific .Railway 
Company were always prompt in forwarding goods. 

I am happy to be able to report that the class of immigrants going to Manitoba 
and the Canadian North- West, the past year, will make a most valuable addition to the 
population of these Provinces. They were as a rule hopeful, intelligent people, 
anxious for information and determined to become prosperous settlers. A very 
noticeable feature in the immigration of this year was the large number of wealthy 
tenant farmers from Europe, who, from the report of the Delegates of 1880 and the 
successful experience of some of their old neighbours, were induced to make Canada 
their future home. 

I am pleased to report that good health prevailed amongst the arrivals of the 
past season. Very few coses of sickness occurred, and but one death by accidental 
drowning. My monthly Heports to the Department contain a full explanation of 
these cases. 

A small number of indigent immigrants applied for assistance at the Agency. 
Having no authority to grant relief I reported the matter to the Department and was 
authorized to incur whatever expenditure was absolutely necessary. 

The total number of arrivals, via. this Port, as shown in table D, was 10,60f>, a 
very large increase ove* any preceding year since the establishment of the Agency, 
this increase being principally from foreign countries. 

It is impossible for me to make an accurate estimate of the amount of wealth 
brought into the country by immigrants via this Port, but as near as I could ascertain 
from careful observation and information obtained from the United States Customs, 
the following figures may be accepted, money and effects, $265,195. 

1Y5 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



The importations id to Manitoba via Duluth during season of 1882, as per state- 
ments A and B, show a large increase as compared with former years, and prove th* 
rapidly increasing trade and importance of that section of the Dominion. 

Statement C, shows number of bushels of wheat, value and duty, passing through 
Duluth in bond, from Manitoba to Canadian ports for 1882. 

Statement D, shows the number and nationality of immigrants arriving here en 
route to Manitoba during the season 1882. 

Statement E, shows total number of arrivals from 1878 to 1882 inclusive. 

In conclusion I wish to return my sincere thanks to the Secretary of the Depart- 
ment, Mr. John Lowe, and 1o Mr. H. B. Small, the Accountant. I am indebted to 
both these gentlemen for much valuable assistance and advice which has been of 
great help to me in discharging the duties of this office. I have also received many 
favours and much useful information from the former Agent at this place Mr. W". C. B. 
Grahame, who from his long residence here and thorough knowledge of immigration 
matters, was reliable authority on the many questions arising at a port of this kind. 
Mr. A. S. Chase, the General Eailway Agent here, has been very obliging and has 
invariably done everything in his power to facilitate the transportation of our 
people . 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

J. M. McGOVERN, 
Dominion Immigration Agent, 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agricultnre, 
Ottawa. 



Statement A. — Showing Quantity, Value and Duty of Goods shipped in Bond to 
Manitoba, via Port of Duluth, during Season of 1882. 


Merchandize. 
Total No. of Pounds. 


Railroad Iron. 
Number of Pounds. 


Lumber. 
Number of Feet. 


Total Value. 


Total Duty. 


20,592,409 


3,020,818 


6,645,473 


13,949,144 


$1,968,400.22 



Statement B. — Showing number of head of Live Stock imported into Manitoba, vid\ 
Duluth, Huring 1882 ; also their Value and Duty. 



Horses. 


Cows and Oxen. 


Sheep. 


Hogs. 


Value. 


Duty. 


548 


1,762 


£i3 


18 


$162,968 


$32,593.60 

1 



Statement C. — Showing number of Bushels of Wheat shipped from Manitoba ii! 
Bond, via Port of Duluth, to. Canadian Ports, during Season of 1882, with Valu< | 
and Duty. 



Number of Bushela 
Received. 


Nomber of Bushels 
Shipped . 


Approximate Valu«. 


Duty. 


318,713 


318,711 


$366,520 


$63,742.60 




17 


6 





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118 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.ll.) A. 1883 



No- 15. 
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRAVELLING IMMIGRATION AGENT. 

(Mr. John Sumner . ) 

Carleton Place, 30lh December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to present my Eleventh Annual Report as Travelling 
Immigration Agent for your Department. 

This season has been a very busy one, there having been a very large increase 
at Quebec over any summer for many years. 

Over 20,000 emigrants have come under my own personal charge in the mail 
steamers I have met at the above Port, and conveyed in most cases to Toronto ; 
those by the steamers via Halifax, going further westward, so far this winter, 
I mostly took to Montreal 

The number of female domestics has considerably increased during the year, 
many of a very good class being among them ; and all have been engaged at good 
wages . 

Agriculturists with families and a large number of single men of the same class 
have been the principal immigrants, and all found employment at high wages, the 
demand being much greater than the supply . 

Over 2,000 of above went to the Province of Manitoba, and had considerable meana 
to give them a start there ; those for the Province of Ontario, though not in affluent 
circumstances, would become good settlers. There was also a goodly number went 
to the Eastern Townships. 

Last winter, in my Report, I called the attention of the Department to the 
necessity of emigrant cars being provided with Miller couplings and platforms, the 
same as other passenger cars. So far no remedy has been applied. The danger to life, 
with the wide openings, is very great, and a very serious accident may some day 
occur ; indeed, I much dread to cross from one car to another on a stormy night, a& 
I often have to do in the performance of my duties. 

Trains are moved with better despatch on the Intercolonial Railway than last 
winter, and on the Grand Trunk Railway very fair running has been made. 

The refreshment rooms are satisfactory, and the officials on the road obliging. 

I have endeavoured to perform my duties to the satisfaction of the immigrants, as 
also of the Department. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN SUMNER, 

Travelling Ayent. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



H-m 



179 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



No. 16. 

ANNUAL EEPOET OF TRAVELLING IMMIGRATION AGENT. 
(Mr. A .0. Kellam.) 

Compton, December 31st, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honor to place in your hands ray Annual Report for the past 
season. 

During the past year I have met thirteen mail steamers at Halifax, and have 
brought all their steerage and nearly all their intermediate passengers (with the 
exception of a few who stopped in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick) safely to the 
Province of Quebec, and forwarded all to the west who wished to go. The exact 
number I have not kept, as that will appear in the Report of the Local Agents, but 
from my memorandum I think the number must average nearly two hundred to each 
trip, and of a very superior class. 

Of the passengers per S.S. Sarmatian which arrived on the 25th December there 
were five English immigrants, who came out last March and went to Manitoba and 
had taken up land there, and although their means were limited, had built a house 
and raised sufficient crops the past season for their families to live upon the present 
winter. They went home in November last, and were now returning with their 
families to their new home. They were satisfied and full of hope, and as they 
•expressed themselves, u a bright future was in store for them." The conveyance of 
immigrants over the Intercolonial Railway is greatly improved from last year; 
and several new and connlortable cars have been placed for their use. The officers of 
the road are courteous and obliging and the men civil and attentive. The victualing 
saloons are good, and the immigrants, although they nearly all buy their own meals, 
are satisfied and well pleased. During the past summer I met every week, the 
steamers that landed passengers at Point Levis, other than the mail steamer, and 
went with the people to Montreal. A very limited number stopped in the Province 
of Quebec. I am happy to be able again to report that no accident whatever during 
the past year, or previous years, has happened to the people while travelling under 
my charge. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. O. KELLAM, 

Travelling Immigration Agent. 
The Ilonourable 

The Minister of Agriculture. 

Ottawa. 






ISO 



N 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) , A. 1883 



No. 17- 

ANNUAL REPORT OF MANITOBA COLONIZATION AGENCY. 

(Mr, C. Lalime.) 

Worcester, Mass., 30th December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour for your information to submit the following Report for 
the year 1882, in compliance with instructions received from your Department. 

I am pleased to say that my labours for the immigration of Canadians from 
New England to the Province of Manitoba have been much more successful than in 
the year 1881. 

According to the list of names I forwarded to-day, you will find that 633 emi- 
grants have left New England for Manitoba. 

A certain number of the parties whose names appear on the list left with their 
whole families, and in many cases I omitted infants' names. 

I must also state, and your Agents at Winnipeg and West Lynne will corroborate 
my statement, that a great many families not mentioned in my list of names have 
left this section to go and settle in Manitoba. 

The reason that I cannot give the names of those immigrants is that my terri- 
tory being large, it was impossible for me to attend personally to the departure of 
each family. 

A fact to which I especially call your attention, is, that in years past, 
the French Canadians alone in New England, seemed to take interest in Manitoba 
and its development, almost all t>ur emigrants belonged to that nationality, while 
you will find in the accompanying list of names, that we have this year as many 
English as French emigrants, a noteworthy fact, and to my appreciation a proof that 
our Western Province is getting to be better known every day, and which gives me 
the greatest hopes for the future. 

I also take great pleasure in stating that the emigration from Canada to New 
England, during the year 1882, has certainly decreased by at least forty per cent, 
compared with years previous. 

I have had ample opportunities of becoming acquainted with that fact during my 
numerous trips to our New England manufacturing cities and towns, and, also, in the 
course of my relations with the different railroad corporations connecting Canada 
with New England. 

These Railroad Companies Reports for 1882, show a decrease of about fifty per 
cent, in their ticket sales less than in 1881, for tickets sold from Canada to New 
England; while, on the other hand, the receipts of tickets sold in New England for 
Canada, have increased in the same ratio. 

To add another proof to my statement, I might remark that at the time of the 
last parochial Census, in the latter part of the year 1882, by the French clergyman, 
it was ascertained that the French population in Lowell, Mass., Manchester, N.H., 
and Fall River had largely decreased. 

You are probably aware of the fact that the three above named places have the 
gest French population in New England, and I think we are justified, in the 
presence of these facts, in stating that the decrease in less important localities must 
have been proportional. 

During the year 1882, as formerly, I have visited intending immigrants, giving 
them all information, attending their departure and their baggage, distributing 
circulars and pamphlets, etc. 

181 



lar ; 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 






A matter which has attracted a good deal of attention, is the rumor, endorsed by 
several newspapers, that reserve lands would be provided for immigrants from New 
England and should that prove true, I can assure you it would meet the wishes of 
the French residents in the Eastern States. 

I am happy to say that my constantly increasing correspondence and calls for 
information about lands in Manitoba, give me ample reason to believe that emigration 
from the Eastern States will be much larger in 1883 than it has been in the year 
just expired. 

I remain, Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 



The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 

Ottawa. 



CHAS. LALIME, 

Special Immigration Agent, 



K 

it: 
It 
if 
n 

k 



182 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (N .14.) A. 1883 



No. 18. 

ANNUAL EEPOKT OF THE ICELANDIC AGENCY. 

(Mr. John Taylor.) 

Norse Landing, Assiniboine Kiver, 

Province of Manitoba, 

December 31st, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour of submitting the following Report from the Icelandic 
Agency for the year ending 31st December, 1882. 

The condition of general prosperity enjoyed by the Icelandic colonists at the 
close of 1881 has been maintained during the year now terminated. 

There was a movement of several Icelandic families during March and April 
from their reserve to Winnipeg. This change was not from necessity, as they 
appreciated the advantages enjoyed at the lake, but was caused by the expectation 
of obtaining high wages in the city, which has been fully realized. The eager desire 
to obtain money is justifiable when it is considered that funds were required to pay the 
passage to this country of friends and relations from Iceland. In no other place, it 
may be asserted, could this object be obtained more readily than at Winnipeg, and 
by the industrious and frugal Icelander. One of these families, consisting of the man 
and wife, a boy of eleven, and three young children, earned in one month by steady 
labour $150. Of this the little boy's portion was $40, the woman's supplemented by 
the milk of a cow $50, the man's wages $60. 

The families yet remaining at the reserve have also done well, as their income 
from farm and fishery has been greatly assisted by steady employment at the saw 
mills in operation on both sides of the lake. 

The Icelanders who have taken up land in the Souris District are well contented 
with their farms, and although subjected to the privations incident to persons of 
narrow means on new homesteads, are becoming independent settlers. About sixty 
entries of land have been made, and many more would be gladly taken up, were 
there any unoccupied. 

In Winnipeg the Icelanders are more numerous than in the other settlements, 
and are increasing in wealth. The younger people having acquired the language, are 
more identified with the citizens than the older ones. They do not, however, forgot 
their own people, to assist them when emigrating or on their arrival here. Some of 
the Icelanders in Winnipeg are not residents there, but come either from the reserve 
or from Dakotah, and are in search of higher wages than can be obtained elsewhere. 
Those who had settled in Nova Scotia have almost all found their way to thia 
Province. 

The expected immigration from Iceland has b. on greatly hindered by difficulty 
of embarking. The polar ice, which occasionally blockades the northern coast, has? 
remained there so long during the past summer, and has so affected the temperature, 
that little or no hay was saved. The cattle and sheep had, therefore, to be killed off, 
and as these form the wealth of the people and are essential to their existence, 
mothing remains for their maintenance during tho next soason. Belief has already 
been sent them by benevolent persons in England and elsewhere, but their winter 
provision being already laid in, the time of greatest need will be afterwards. 

Only a few hundred persons have found their way from Iceland the past year, 
but emigration on an extensive scale is required for the deliverance of the people from 
severe suffering or death. Unaided by others they cannot leave the country, which 
seems doomed to become a second edition of Greenland at no very distant period. 

183 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 18S3 



An offer has been made to pay the Icelandic indebtedness to the Dominion 
Government, on condition of obtaining the lands which form the security for said 
advances. This establishes the fact that no pecuniary loss will result to the country 
because of such advances. The offer could not be accepted, as it was not coupled 
with the obligation to place settlers on the vacated lots. 

In the present deplorable emergency in Iceland it is most desirable that some 
arrangement be made for the introduction to Canada of the hardy and able-abodied 
people of Iceland, who, although rather deficient on their first arrival, have fully 
shown their fitness for becoming good settlers and peaceable citizens. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN TAYLOE, 

Icelandic Agent. 
The Honourable the Minister of Agriculture, 

Ottawa. 



184 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1885 



No. 19. 

EEPOET ON VISIT TO.NOETH-WEST. 
(J. E. Birks and Thos. Stevenson.) 

Toronto, 20th Sept., 1882. 

Sir, — In accordance with your wish to have our Eeport on the North West Terri-' 
tory, we hereby submit to you the result of our observations. On arriving at 
Winnipeg we met with a large number of English workmen from Yorkshire, most of 
whom were in full work at« good wages. After spending a few days in Winnipeg and 
neighbourhood, noticing its rapid growth and increasing prosperity, we passed on to 
Brandon. We cannot, however, let the opportunity pass, without entering our pro- 
test against the absurd practice of the farmers in the neighbourhood of Kildonan, of 
suffering the thistles to grow until the wind carries the seed over the face of the 
surrounding country. Passing on to Brandon we observed at almost every station on 
the railway (and some places where there was no station) large numbers of agricul- 
tural implements, indicating the vast amount of land taken up, and on which they 
will be required. Without staying at Brandon, we went by stage waggon to Rapid 
City. Here we arrived somewhat late in the evening, and slept on the soft side of 
some laths nailed across what was called a bedstead, having straw feathers for our 
bed, and what we could catch for our pillows. Next morning we crossed the Assini- 
boine Eiverand saw the farm of Mr. McClay, who has some excellent crops of oats, 
from which he expects a large yield. We also visited the farm of Mr. McGowan, and 
witnessed the starting of a self binding reaper on a field of oats, which is the second 
crop, and calculated to have about 45 to 50 bushels to the acre. Mr. McGowan settled 
here on 320 acres of land three years ago, erected a small house and stable, and has 
now sold out for $6,000. Near to this farm is the Baptist College ; also the 
farm of Mr. Finlay, who has a field of splendid wheat, which must yield well. Here, 
too, we saw a stack of timothy grass, the raising of which, it was supposed, would 
not be a success. All doubt has, however, been dispelled, as the crop we saw stacked 
was calculated to have about two tons per acre. Mr. Chas. Howard, another farmer, 
Ironi Essex, England, has been here four years, and although he had previously been 
in Australia for seven years, he likes this country better than either, and would not 
go back to the Old Country on any consideration. The soil is rieh, tine black loam. 
The average of barley per acre is from 40 to 45 bushels ; and should the inhabitants 
of this city be successful in getting a railway, which they are earnestly endeavouring 
to do, it will be a "rapid city" in every sense of the word. While in this neighbour- 
hood we went on to the Oak Eiver District, where again we saw some excellent 
crops, as well as unbroken prairie land highly calculated for grazing purposes. Mr. 
Moore, on whom we called, came out here three years ago, with very small means, 
broke up with one yoke of oxen as much land a& produced 1,200 bushels of grain, built 
himself a house and necessary conveniences without any help, and has this year 
some splendid crops. Mr. Stanks, another farmer here, at whose home we were 
hospitably entertained, took up a section and a half of land four years ago, built him- 
self a house, broke up with one pair of oxen and a span of horses as much land as 
produced last year 3,000 bushels of grain. He has this year 90 acres under crop, the 
oats beating anything we have seen, and estimated to produce 80 bushels to the 
acre, while his wheat crop will probably be about 32 to 35 bushels. At the present 
time he has also upon his farm six cows, one splendid pedigree bull, two span of 
horses, and one yoke of oxen. 

185 



46 Victoria Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



From Oak Eiver and Eapid City we retraced our steps to Brandon, and thence- 
forward to South Qu'Appelle. On arriving at Broadview at 11.30 p. m., the train 
stopped for the night. 

Here we were introduced to a tent hotel. Slept or tried to do so, on straw and 
staves until nearly 6 o'clock in the morning, at which time we were told the lumber 
train would start for the end of the track, and that we should have to ride in the 
caboose (or guard's van as it is called in England), to the end of our journey. Ac- 
cordingly we hurried up at 5.30, got seated in the caboose for fear of being left 
behind, and after two hours and a half of shunting backwards and forwards, and 
waiting, without any breakfast, we did at last get started for Qu'Appelle. 

Not liking the jolting of the caboose, a number of us climbed upon the sleepers 
on the lumber cars, and the morning being fine we- enjoyed amazingly from our ele- 
vated position the pleasant breeze and splendid prospect of millions of acres of rich 
j>rairie land from horizon to horizon, far as the eye could reach on every side. We 
reached Qu'Appelle about 1.30, partook of some dinner in another tent hotel, and 
afterwards hired a stage to take us to the Fort. In this ride of 18 miles we pased over 
the land of the great "Bell Farming Company," on which we saw eighty oxen in teams 
of ten bullocks, each breaking up with double furrowed ploughs of fourteen inches 
each furrow, the prairie land. We did not think they were making very good 
work of it, as the ground was too dry an4 the season too late for efficient breaking. 
From this point until our return to Winnipeg we met with numbers of small 
farmers from England, who expressed in no measured terms, the way in which 
they had been treated by so-called Colonization companies, some of whom had 
purchased land, on which they had paid deposits on the good faith of its representa- 
tives, but who had turned, disheartened and disgusted with the sections that had been 
appointed to them, and who after losing much valuable time and money, had to seek 
for land in other places. We commend, therefore, to the consideration of the Govern- 
ment, the interests of the small settlers. Arriving at Fort Qu'Appelle we were again 
treated to long feathers and Hudson's Bay blankets. We must say, however, that 
the proprieters of the " Echo Hotel" were exceedingly kind, courteous and attentive 
to our comfort, as far as circumstances would allow, and expect to be far better pro- 
vided for their patrons next season. Being Sunday the next day we had Divine 
service in the hotel, morning and evening, conducted by a Presbyterian minister, who 
came out ^to establish a mission church here. On Monday we collected some 
samples of oats and barley from the farm of a " half breed " which does him credit. 
We were also told of a Mr. Eussell Smith in the Qu'Appelle valley, who has a field of 
forty-five acres of oats which is expected to yield over eighty bushels to the acre. 
The valley of the Qu'Appelle is indeed a lovely spot, with its unrivalled scenery of 
woodland, mountain, lakes, ravines and river, and must indeed be a favourite valley, 
as we were told on reliable authority, that Mr. Gordon, the land agent of the district 
and who had only opened his office tour weeks before, had taken $8,000 in fees for> 
homesteads and pre-emptions, and had disposed of 48,000 acres of land in one week. 
On leaving Fort Qu'Appelle wo took the wood mountain trail towards Troy, in search 
of some young farmers from Howden Dyke near Goole, England, of the names of 
" Blyth brothers," "Cade, and Maddems." About 2 o'clock, p.m., we found their 
shanty. They were delighted beyond measure to see us, and we were equally pleased 
to see them being so well known to them and to their friends at home. Here we spent 
most pleasantly two days and two nights sharing their humble fare, drinking their 
new milk fresh from the cow, eating their oatmeal porridge, and had the luxury of 
sleeping on a good Yorkshire goose feather bed in their little tent on the prairie. Here 
amid the decorations of their log and mud shanty, whose walls were hung with pic- 
tures of varied useful articles, more real than ever were painted on canvas, we wrote 
home to our own friends, and theirs, and assured them of their welfare and happiness, 
and with much regret were obliged to leave them sooner than we wished. We are 
sorry to state that these young men who came out, through my Agency, (J. E. Birks,) 
on the 5th of April last, with the Allan Line steamer "Parisian," and whom I accom- 
panied to Liverpool to see them sail, not„only lost much valuable time and money, in 

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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 



visiting the land of one of the "Colonization Companies," and on which they had 
paid a deposit, but were so disgusted with the section allotted them, that they turned 
away to seek fresh land elsewhere. 

After leaving these young men we came across the trail to Troy. But little 
land is broken up between Fort Qu'Appelle and this place, and no crops are as yet 
put in. On reaching Troy, we took the lumber train back again towards Winnipeg. 
We arrived at Broadview in the evening, and here again we were sorry to meet with 
another gentleman from Yorkshire, a near neighbour of Mr. Stephenson's, who had 
come out with his family and another young farmer, bought land of one of these 
"Colonization Companies," had taken up oxen, waggon, buckboard and horse, but who, 
when he saw the land that was his, turned away in disgust, and threatened to expose 
them in the newspapers. These things tell sadly against the country, and are likely 
to do more harm in the Old Country than can be conceived. One thing is certain, 
these Englishmen writing home to their friends, will give no good account of the way 
in which they have been treated, and another thing is equally certain, that the Agents 
of the United States Government are alive to the importance of catching all the 
settlers they can induce to take up land under their Government. 

We venture, therefore, to express the hope that the Canadian Government will 
protect the interests of the settlers, and treat them with the greatest liberality pos- 
sible. On our return journey we called at Brandon, and went over the farm of Mr. 
Whitehead, an energetic gentleman originally from Darlington, England. This gentle- 
man bought a section of land, 640 acres, put the first plough into the land on the first day 
of June, lastyear, 1881, and has this year 400 acres of oats from which he expects 
to thresh 24,000 bushels, while his wheat will average from thirty to thirty-five bushels 
per acre. From Brandon to Portage la Prairie, the self-binding reaper was at work 
on numberless farms of excellent crops, the whole country waving with golden grain, 
and the weather brilliant for its ingathering and threshing. We left the great North- 
West with the indelible conviction, that it is eminently the country for our young 
farmers and farmers' sons, who are unable to get farms in the Old Country, but who may 
here, with a small capital and determined perseverance, speedily raise themselves to an 
independency upon their own farms and be their own landlords. 

In conclusion we beg to express our sense of the kind courtesy and attention of 
the various Government Agents we have met with since we arrived in the country, 
more particularly of Mr. Stafford, of Quebec, Mr. Donaldson, Toronto, Mr. Grahame, 
Winnipeg, and Mr. McGovern, at Duluth. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, 

Yours obediently, 

J. R BIRKS, 

Auctioneer and Valuer, 8 New Street, York, England. 

THOS. STEVENSON, 
Farmer's Delegate, Cropton Pickering, York, England. 

The Honourable Minister of Agriculture, 

Ottawa. 



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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A, 1883 



No. 20. 

REP0ETS ON EMIGRATION FEOM THE UNITED KINGDOM ANI> 

EUROPE. 



THE ANNUAL EEPOET OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER FOE CANADA. 
(Sir A. T. Galt, G.C.M.G., &o.) 



Office of the High Commissioner, 
9 Victoria Chambers, 

London, S.W., 31st December, 1882. 

Sir,- — I have the honour to transmit the Reports of Messrs. Dyke, Grahame, Foy,, 
Connolly and Down, the Agents of the Department in the United Kingdom for the 
year just ended. 

By the courtesy of the Board of Trade, I am enabled to give the following 
particulars of the emigration from British Ports to Canada direct in 1882. 

Nationalities. 1882. 1881. 

English 27,534 17.088 

Scotch. 4,607 3,176 

Irish 6,220 3,290 

Total of British origin.. 38,361 23,554 

Foreigners 13,038 10,685 

Total 51,399 34,239 



These figures do not include the persons who travelled by way of the American 
ports— a considerable number, I believe — or those sailing from Bristol, Gal way and 
other places from which no returns are rendered to the Board of Trade. 



It will be observed that the emigration of British origin shows an increase of 

65 per cent, in excess of the number in 1881. The increase over 1880 is ninety per 

cent. This cannot be regarded but as a gratifying testimony of the success of th 

policy that has been pursued by your Department. It is interesting to notice th 

during the same period the British emigration to the United States only increased 

three and a half per cent, compared with 1881. It is reasonable to infer from these 

188 



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16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



figures — and also from the fact that emigration to Australia has been more numerous 
than in previous years — that the advantages the Colonies are able to offer are being 
appreciated, and that the tide of settlement is being turned, if only gradually, in 
'• their direction, which cannot fail to be productive of beneficial results, both to the 
settlers themselves, to Great Britain and to the Colonies. 

I have again to call attention to the figures that are from time to time published 
in the English newspapers — and, I am afraid, also quoted with some authority in a 
portion of the Canadian press — from American sources, forming summaries of statis- 
tics issued by the Official Bureau at Washington, which include the statement that a 
large emigration is taking place from Canada to the United States. It will be within 
your recollection that the able Report of the Secretary of your Department upon 
the subject was presented to the Imperial Houses of Parliament during the last 
Session. This exposed the inaccuracy of the figures to which I have alluded, and 
proved conclusively that they were entirely unreliable. It was also shown that 
any small emigration that had taken place was counterbalanced by a corresponding 
flow from the United States to the Dominion. Notwithstanding the publicity which 
the Report received in various ways, the statements have recently been repeated for 
the year just ended, and I thereupon published, through the courtesy of the press, the 
following announcement : — 

" The statistics recently published announcing a large emigration from Canada to 
the United States are not accepted as correct by the Canadian Government. Similar 
satistics have formed the subject of official investigation from time to time, the results 
showing that the figures were not reliable. This was clearly demonstrated in a paper 
presented to the Imperial Parliament last session containing a report made to the 
Governor General of Canada by the Canadian Department of Agriculture and Immi- 
gration. It is well known that a number of emigrants travel yearly to the United 
States by way of Canadian ports, who never intend to remain in the Dominion ; that 
settlers going to Manitoba and the North-West Territories have had up to the present 
time to pass over American railways to reach their destinations, and that a consider- 
able movement takes place between the two countries for commercial purposes and 
for ordinary travel. But such persons although apparently included in the statistics 
referred to, cannot with accuracy be described as emigrants from Canada to the 
United States." 

The business of the office so far as emigration is concerned has been very heavy 
! during the year, and the increased work has made great demands upon the staff, 
jj i which have, however, been cheerfully met. The same remark will apply to your 
local agents, whose reports I am enclosing. 



An immense quantity of pamphlets has again been distributed and other means 
been taken to extend in Great Britain, a better knowledge of the resources and capa- 
bilities of Canada than has hitherto prevailed. The actual enquiries made to me 
, through the medium of letters alone, numbered nearly 6,000. This is exclusive of 
official communications and numerous personal enquiries ; ladies and gentlemen 

frequently coming considerable distances for personal interviews respecting persons 

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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14 .) A. 1883 



in whom they may be interested. Applications for information have reached me 
from most parts of the world. A very numerous class of enquiry which has afforded 
me much gratification, has been that made by gentlemen of influence in their various 
districts — clergymen, land owners and others who have been seeking information for 
the people, who naturally look to them for advice. Another sign of the extending 
influence of the Dominion is seen in the number of applications I receive from 
persons who desire to act as agents of the Government in various parts of Great 
Britain. There can be no doubt that the emigrants who went to Canada last year 
have taken considerable capital with them — the amount it is impossible to estimate — 
and that the portion which consisted of mechanics and labouring men were all of a 
very superior and intelligent class — men any country would be proud to welcome. 

The number of enquiries 1 am receiving are very numerous, an 1 very practical 
in their nature. I do not expect that the numbers emigrating to Canada during the 
coming season will show any falling off, although the increase may not continue to 
he as great as in previous years. The enquiries may be divided into the following^ 
classes : persons with capital ; manufacturers and others who desire to make invest- 
ments ; gentlemen wishing to send out their sons, with a view to start them on land 
when they acquire the necessary knowledge ; farmers and farmers' sons with various 
amounts of capital ; mechanics, labourers and domestic servants. I also frequently 
receive letters from gentlemen following the professions, such as doctors, lawyers,, 
architects, surveyors, etc. 

Agriculture in this country is still in an unsatisfactory condition. Although, 
the crops presented a slight improvement over previous years, they were by no 
means abundant ; and the prices paid for products of various kinds have ruled low 
A large number of farms are still vacant in all parts of the country, and it is not 
improbable that the number will increase. There is a feeling of uncertainty pre 
vailing as to the future relations of landlord and tenant, the outcome of recent legis- 
lation in Ireland. This operates in the direction of preventing tenants from taking 
up farms just now, and of reducing the rents very considerably. 

With regard to the lighter professions, they are quite overdone, and gentlemen 
are looking round anxiously for other openings for their sons. The competition for 
the army is very keen, and the unsuccessful candidates numerous ; and what becomes 
of those who have qualified for the other professions, open to young men of education, 
is a problem difficult to solve. The labouring classes are also in a comparatively 
unsatisfactory condition, arising in a great measure, perhaps, from the large quan- 
tities of unskilled labour which now exists. It is not the custom, as it used to be, 
for boys to be apprenticed to trades. Hence the agitation, which is slowly making 
its way for a system of technical education. The export trade of the country doe: 
not keep pace with the increase in population, which tends, directly and indirectly 

to affect the position of the labourers. 

190 



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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers* (No. 14.) A. 188$ 



I have been receiving many enquiries from domestic servants anxious to emi- 
grate to Canada, but even the low assisted rate now in force does not allow me to 
send out as many as I desire. The wages in Australia are equally favourable with 
those offered in the Dominion, and the passage is cheaper. I am satisfied, as I have 
stated in previous Eeports, that the only way by which the emigration of a good 
class of domestic servants can be arranged is for the committees formed in the 
various towns in Canada to work in co-operation with the Women's Emigration. 
Society in this country. In order to enable the work to be successful, persons in 
Canada must advance the passages of the servants they may require, and if care is 
exercised in the selection of young women, there is no reason why a large number 
with satisfactory characters and qualifications should not be sent out. 

In connection with female emigration, particularly from Ireland, I must not 
omit to mention the name of Mr. Vere Foster, of Belfast. This gentleman has spent 
a large sum of money out of his private means to assist young women to emigrate to 
Canada and America, and the result has been satisfactory in every way. Mr. Foster 
went to Canada during last season, and in a circular recently published expresses 
himself in favour of sending servant girls to the Dominion. I have informed 
Mr. Foster that it will be a great pleasure to me to co-operate in this benevolent 
movement — one with which his name will always be gratefully remembered. These 
remarks are made with the object of showing that emigration is not likely to fall 
off to any extent, and I am hopeful that the more intelligent people of every class 
will make their way to the Colonies in greater numbers than hitherto. 

It is right that I should mention that the competition for emigration seems 
to increase rather than to decrease. The American land, railway and steamship 
companies, the publicity that everything American secures, and the large number of 
people who settled there before the resources of the Dominion became recognized, all 
operate in that direction. Besides the Australian Colonies are now again becoming 
active in encouraging emigration, of which you will be aware from my letters. The 
Government of Queensland is offering free passages to farm labourers and domestic 
servants. Families are taken oat for £4 for males and £2 for females, half those 
rates being charged for children between the ages of twelve and one. The assisted 
passage for all classes to New South Wales is £5, excepting the case of domestic 
servants, for whom the rate is £2. New Zealand offers free passage to domestic 
servants. The Government of the Cape of Good Hope are also encouraging emigra- 
tion on favourable terms. I believe I am within the mark in saying that each emi- 
grant sent to Australia costs the JGovernment of those Colonies £10 sterling: 
I do not anticipate, however, that the competition will have any adverse effect upon 
the position that Canada now occupies in Great Britain. It will only stimulate the 
able and zealous Agents of your Department in this country to still further endeavour- 

to keep the advantage of the Dominion prominent. 

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16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188S 

It has been a pleasure to me to observe that letters have been continually 
appearing in the press, particularly in the Provinces, from persons who have 
emigrated to Canada, with thoroughly satisfactory results. I have also noticed 
that Canadians visiting this country- have adopted means to assist in making 
the Dominion better known, both in the papers and in other ways. This is 
very valuable aid in removing the misapprehension which still prevails in the 
minds of many people upon the subject. Of course there have been published 
unfavourable reports respecting some parts of Canada, but they were merely 
the expression of individual opinion, have not attracted much attention, and have 
generally been answered and explained satisfactorily by other persons. I shall 
regard it as one of the most satisfactory recollectionsof my tenure of office, that 
although many thousands of emigrants have gone to Canada after communication 
with me, I have never received a single letter expressing regret at having done so. 

The assisted passages arranged last spring have had wide publicity, and have 
been generally availed of. They have been regarded with much favour in this 
country, and the result must be looked upon as a justification of the policy of the 
Government in the matter. Every endeavour has been made to ensure that only per- 
sons intending to remain in Canada should receive the benefit of the reduced fares, 
and I am satisfied that nearly all those who have participated in the concession were 
bona fide settlers, and went out with the determination of settling in the Dominion. 

The Dominion of Canada has lost a great friend in the late Archbishop of Canter- 
bury. The interest which His Grace evinced in the religious influence of emigra- 
tion and the action of the great religious societies and the clergy of this country in 
the same direction, has been of great importance. The better classes of emigrants 
going to the Colonies compared with those to foreign countries is attributable to the 
attention which has been devoted to the matter by the religious authorities in this 
country and Canada. You will be aware that an emigration Hand Book has been 
circulated among the clergy, and that an emigration committee has been formed by 
the Society for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge,— the Eev. John Bridget, well 
known in Canada, having been appointed to superintend its operation. Mr. 
Bridger took out a large and important party to Canada in the spring, and ;he Rev. 
Mr. Panckridge, a member of the Committee (mentioned in my Eeport last year), 
also made a tour through the country. While the clergy do not encourage indis- 
criminate emigration, they are ever ready to advise and often to assist substantially 
those who apply to them ; and they take care that the emigrants shall be sent to 
places where they can receive the spiritual care they have been accustomed to. I 
am continually receiving enquiries from clergymen of various denominations respect- 
ing persons in whom they are interested, and I have every confidence in stating that 
their efforts will earn the gratitude of many deserving men, whom they are helping 
■to secure a livelihood and a future for their families that would not be possible in this 

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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



country. The Bishop of Saskatchewan deliverol a very interesting lecture to the 
Boyal Colonial Institute, a short time ago, about his diocese, and several other 
clergymen of various denominations from Canada, who have visited England during 
the year, have also done good work in answering the multitude of enquiries that 
must have been addressed to them. The Beverend Styleman Herring, who is so 
well known for his connection with emigration, and all other proposals having for 
their object the good of the working classes, took a large party to Canada during the 
season, and, I believe, settled them all very satisfactorily. Mr. Herring is sparing 
neither time nor money in giving to the people who consult him the benefit of the 
experience he has acquired. 

It will be within your knowledge, that emigration from Ireland has been 
attracting considerable attention, and it is a question daily growing in importance. 
The opportune communication addressed by His Excellency the Govern or- General of 
Canada in 1880, to Her Majesty's Government, enclosing a memorandum from your- 
self, undoubtedly had much to do with the insertion in the Land Bill of the follow- 
ing year of the emigration clause, and has on various occasions formed the subject of 
much useful and interesting discussion. It is to be regretted that the emigration 
proposals finally adopted by the Government in that Act, have not proved to be 
workable. In the Arrears Act passed last Session, a further step has been taken in 
the direction of assisted emigration from the distressed districts, which may be 
attended with a measure of success during the coming season, especially in connec- 
tion with the Committee that has been formed by Mr. S. H. Take, well known for 
his great services in the direction of improving the condition of the people of Ireland. 
A committee has been formed by the Irish Government, for carrying out the emigra- 
tion clauses of the Arrears Act, and my co-operation has been asked in arranging 
some of the details that were necessary. This I have cheerfully accorded, so far as 
I have had the opportunity. As the grant per adult only amounts to £5, it is not 
possible to adopt any scheme which would enable the emigrants to be placed upon 
land in the North- West. The persons who are likely to receive the benefit of this 
grant are miserably poor, and money will have to be spent in addition to the ocean 
passage, in finding them outfits as well as paying for their transport to the port of 
embarkation, and from the place of landing to their destination. 
A.n additional sum must, therefore, in most cases be raised to supple- 
ment the £5 grant, and the Boards of Guardians have power under the 
|A.ct to ask advances from the Government at a low rate of interest, but it is doubtful, 
br various reasons,how far those bodies will avail themselves of it. I should add that 
he money grant is only made to certain scheduled districts. In those not scheduled 
he whole of ihe necessary money will have to be borrowed and charged to the rates. 
t must not be thought that the persons who may be assisted are inmates of the work- 
houses. They have been reduced in circumstances by bad seasons and bad crops, and 

n good years have only been able to secure a very poor living. Unless relieved they 

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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 






must go to the Unions eventually,and it is the object of the Act to prevent this, and v 
at the same time, remove the congestion in the West of Ireland — the cause of the 
troubles periodically disturbing that country. They consist mostly of families suit- 
able lor agricultural labourers and domestic servants,and, if judiciously selected,will, I 
believe, make valuable settlers. Mr. Tuke's Committee was in operation last year, and 
a considerable number of people were sent to Canada under its auspices. Satisfactory 
reports have been received from them, and large sums of money have been sent to the 
districts from which they were assisted. There is every reason to believe that the 
Committee view the Dominion with favour, and that an increased emigration during 
the coming season will result. Canada was visited last autumn by one of the Secre- 
taries of the Committee (Mr. Howard Hodgkin) and by Father Nugent of Liverpool. 
Both these gentlemen were much impressed with the advantages offered to settlers of 
all kinds, and their reports will doubtless be widely read. The emigration from Ire- 
land to Canada was double in 1882 what it was in 1881, and I received a large number 
of letters daily from every part of the island, asking for information. From the allu- 
sions in the Irish press — generally very favourable to the Dominion — it is evident that 
the people do not forget the interest which Canadians have always shown in the relief 
of the distress that sometimes prevails in Ireland, nor the grant of £20,000 made in 
1879-1880 ; and the success of emigrants in Canada is frequently brought home to them 
by the letters and substantial assistance they receive from their friends who are settled 
there. The Archbishop of Toronto last year visited Ireland. His Grace was evidently 
besieged with enquiries,and the necessity of answering them must have entailed a vast 
amount of trouble and inconvenience. In fact His Lordship was compelled to publish 
a letter in the Freeman's Journal, in answer to numerous applications,which was wide- 1 
ly read. It is not an uninteresting fact that the Irish party in the House of Commons; 
supported the emigration clauses in the Arrears Act before alluded to,and proposed a 
larger allowance than the Government were willing to afford, which will, I am sure,; 
be appreciated in the Dominion by those who have always shown a great interest in 
questions relating to the welfare of Ireland. 

In the spring of last year a considerable agitation arose in London amongst the 
unemployed, and a deputation waited upon the Lord Mayor, who suggested emigra 
tion as the proper remedy for their difficulties. Being without means, they threw 
themselves upon his Lordship's clemency, and a committee was formed to invite th€ 
public to subscribe the necessary funds. At his Lordship's request I became a mem 
ber, but although the appeal was made, the money was not forthcoming. 

The persecution of the Jews in Bussia attracted much attention in London, an' 

an influential committee was formed at the Mansion House under the presidency o 

the Lord Mayor, to assist them. Of this also I became a member. A considerable 

sum of money was collected and was devoted to emigrate those who had escape 

from their persecutors. Large numbers were sent to various parts of the work 

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4C "-rforia. Sessional Papers (No.14 j A. 1883 



particularly to the United States, and in conjunction with a local committee, a few 
were forwarded to Canada. The emigration was not, however, carried out as I 
desired, and in consequence a sum of money was voted by the committee at my 
request to carry the poor people over their first winter. 

I am glad to find that the question of continental emigration has received your 
earnest attention, and although there is not a large increase for the past season, there 
can be no doubt that Canada has advanced in publie opinion in Germany, Austria, 
ftbrway and Sweden, and I believe that the returns will increase to your satisfaction 
year by year. Mr. Dyke, the Liverpool Agent, who is acting under your own direc- 
tions, has made some journeys to the continent in connection with the matter, and 
is to be commended for the zeal and energy he has displayed in working out the 
comprehensive scheme that will shortly be in operation. 

I took an opportunity last summer of visiting the North-West Tenitories and 
passed through most of the country between Winnipeg and the. Ricky Mountains. 
I was exceedingly pleased with what I saw and am more than ever confirmed in my 
opinion that a great future lies before that part of Canada. With the exception of 
comparatively limited areas, the whole of the land I have mentioned is fit for settle- 
ment and will no doubt receive the attention it deserves, both in Great Britain and on 
the continent. The rapid progress made by the Canadian Pacific Railway is watched 
with interest by intending emigrants. It is regarded as disposing of what is felt to 
be an important question, the fuel and timber supply of the country. It now taps the 
forests in the Lake Superior region, will next year reach those near the Rocky Moun- 
tains, and will open up very soon the coal deposits known to exist, and which in some 
places are being worked with every sign of success. When a country is traversed by 
a railway, people regard it more favourably. They look upon the communication as 
.ensuring them markets and many of the comforts they have been accustomed to. 
On my return I was consulted by many people respecting the grazing farms and upon 
many other subjects. Luring my absence the office was left in charge of Mr. Joseph 
G. Colmer, the official secretary, with whose intelligent and zealous attention to his 
duties I desire to record my entire satisfaction . 

The visit of His Excellency the Governor General and Her Royal Highness the 
Princess Louise to British Columbia has attracted much attention, and the letters in 
the newspapers and the speech of His Excellency at Victoria reproduced here have 
been eagerly perused. I am frequently receiving enquiries respecting it. British 
Columbia is regarded as a terra incognita in Great Britain from the difficulty of 
reaching it, but now that there is an immediate prospect of direct railway communi- 
cation, interest is being awakened and many capitalists have made their way to the 
Pacific coast lately with a view to make investments. Its fisheries and coal mining 
industries have also formed the subject of frequent enquiry. The pamphlets at my 

disposal are meagre and not of recent date, and I would beg to bring this matter 

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4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1SS5 



to your notice. It is felt that so soon as the railway is constructed the Province will 
come prominently before the public ; its advantages in the way of climate and 
capabilities being so great. 

You will have observed in the press that during my absence in Canada, the 
British Association decided to meet in Montreal, in 1884. The importance of this 
fact cannot be over-estimated, and I am glad that the proposal has been taken up so 
warmly in Canada. The country is indebted for this honour to His Excellency the 
Marquis ot Lome, and to the Lord Bishop of Ontario. Captain Bedford Pirn took up the 
matter prominently in Great Britain. The formation of a very influential committee 
in Montreal, has been noticed in the English press, and it is to be hoped that the pre- 
cedent may induce other learned associations to follow the example of the British 
Association. 

The cattle trade is very fully and ably discussed in the Beports of Messrs. Dyke 
and Grahame, the Liverpool and Glasgow Agents. It is gratifying to notice that the 
quality of the stock sent over is improving in so marked a manner, although there is 
still a great deal more to be done in this direction; only a few cases of diseased! 
cattle arriving, have come under my notice, and related to sheep affected with scab. 
These were immediately reported to you, in some eases by cablegram; and I have 
no doubt, measures have been taken to cause shipments to be watched, even morej 
closely tnan is done now, under the admirable arrangements instituted by your 
Department. 

In conclusion. I beg to place on record my appreciation of the zeal displayed bj 
the officers of the Government in the United Kingdom, in the performance of the \ 
duties entrusted to them, aud to express my obligation to the various steamship com' 
panies, for the courtesy and co-operation, which I have invariably received at theii 
hands. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. T. GALT, 

High Commissioner. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 

The Reports of the British Agencies are appended herewith. 









196 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (N..14) A. 1S83 

EEPORT OF LIVERPOOL AGENT. 

(Mr. John Dyke.) 

15 Water Street, 

Liverpool, 31 st December, 1882. 

Sir, — According to instructions, I beg to present to you my Annual .Report of 
the operations of this Agency during the past year. 

The number and the nationalities of the emigrants who have left this port 
during the past two years are as follow : — 

1881. 1882. Increase. Decrease. 

English 99,158 116,406 17,248 

Scotch , 1,822 l,lb5 657 

Irish 21,190 18,522 2,668 

Foreigners 101,150 94,124 7,026 

Nationalities not given.... 5,493 4,085 1,408 



Total 228,813 234,302 17,248 11,759 

11,759 



Net increase 5,489 



1 



29.379 emigrants were carried by the Allan Line, 8,661 by the Dominion Line, 
and 2,8-7 by the Beaver Line. 

Of those destined for Canada, 5,144 were cabin passengers and 35,783 steerage, 
as compared with 4,588 cabin and 22,682 steerage last year. 

The various steamers have been visited, either by myself or my clerk, and kept 
well supplied with printed matter, whilst on the mail steamers the Dominion officers 
in charge of the mails have also distributed during the voyage large quantities of 
pamphlets and other printed matter which have been supplied by this Agency, and 
; which have afforded valuable information to emigrants and intending settlers. 

I have in former reports referred to the annually increasing utility of this 
Agency. I find that since it has become better known it has been more frequently 
used by intending settlers, capitalists, merchants and others whose interests are 
y|teonnected with the Dominion, and their visits and requirements have made increas- 
ing demands upon my time, this being the only place at this most important port 
where official information can be obtained. 

During the first half of the year the correspondence increased to an enormous 

ixtent, and the number of applications made in person for information by parties 

iving in the districts adjoining Liverpool, and by a still larger number who were en 

'oute for Canada, was unprecedented. I have also to note that several manufacturers 

lave gone forward through this Agency, principally to the Province of Ontario, 

vhere they have engaged in business. The inquiries from this class are increasing 

it a very satisfactory rate. The emigrants to Manitoba and the North-West during 

he past season were of a most superior class, and large numbers of them possessed 

apital. In some instances as much as $50,000 to $60,000 were taken out by 

•migrants who passed through this office. It would be difficult to ebtimate 

he value of these people. Not only must their capital, intelligence, and 

gricultural experience be taken into account, but their connection with capitalists 

n this country must prove of inestimable value to the Dominion in the future. A 

arge number of the sons and other relatives of Liverpool merchants have gone out 

uring the last few years, and during the last twelve months a still greater emigra- 

ion of this class has taken place. They are all apparently well satisfied with the 

hange from sedentary lives here to the active and varied careers opened for them in 

ae Dominion. Considerable numbers of tenant farmers with capital have also gone 

) the Eastern Townships, and to the Province of Ontario, and a few to the Maritime 

197 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1S8S 



Provinces. In this connection I might point out that the Maritime Provinces have 
not supplied us with pamphlets relating to their lespective districts. I have fre- 
quently written there for printed matter, but the only response has been a consignment 
of six copies of a pamphlet entitled " A Handbook of Information for Emigrants to 
New Brunswick " by M. H. Perley, Esq., and dated 1857, and two copies of a prize 
essay on New Brunswick as a home for emigrants, dated 1860. 

There is an increasing class of persons here who are living on the interest of 
their capital. The high price of living and the difficulty in placing their children 
in respectable positions in society is leading many of these to turn their thoughts to 
the Province of Ontario. Several have gone forward and have purchased homes in 
the Western Peninsula, and these, I feel confident, will be followed by many others 
next season. 

I have as far as possible kept on the track of the emigrants who have passed 
through this office, and a large number have communicated with me as to their 
success either directly or through their friends. 

I am happy to inform you that without any exception the reports of those who 
have gone forward during the last two or three years have been good, and as a con- 
sequence a large number of their friends and relatives are preparing to follow in the 
ensuing spring. An unusually large number of favourable letters have been inserted 
by the Provincial press from successful settlers in Manitoba, and this has had a most 
beneficial effect, for as a matter of fact the successful settler is by far the most efficient 
emigration agent. 

It is generally admitted by the representatives of the steamship lines, and by 
our competitors and others, that no portion of the American Continent ever stood so 
well before the emigrating British public as does the Canadian North-West at the 
present time. Our prospects for the ensuing season, although the general emigra- 
tion may for various reasons not be so large as in the past few yeary, are still most 
encouraging. At the same time our competitors are exceedingly active, and as in 
former years when the competition was very keen, have been using all kinds of 
devices and schemes to decry our country. I am happy to say, however, that the 
day for much success in this direction so far as England is concerned, is past, and 
there are now very few of the leading papets wh.ch would publish anything 
derogatory to the Dominion as a field for emigration, unless it came from reliable 
and disinterested sources. This is in marked contrast to the position the Dominion 
held before your Agencies were established in this country. 

In company with Mr. G-rahame, I attended the JRoyal Agricultural Show at, 
Heading, where we had a most interesting display of Canadian produce, and distri- 
buted a large quantity of pamphlets and other printed matter. This must bo of 
great service to us, as the Beading district was One which had not been so thoroughly 
worked up by your Agents, as many of the other leading agricultural districts in 
England have been. 

A great disadvantage under which Canada labours is that, with the exception 
the Oitawa Vailey and in two or three other places in Ontario, there are no nuclei 
emigrants from the continent. I am happy to state that the Germans in the Ottawa 
Valley have sent me a larger sum of money this year than during any former period 
to defray the passage of their friends to Canada. This shows the enormous impo 
tance of making fresh nuclei of Germans, no matter at what expense. Mr. Low< 
informed the Select Committee of the Hout-e of Commons that the funds for f 
transport of fully severity-five per cent, of the German emigrants, who left f( 
America, had been forwarded by their friends in the United States. This cons' 
quently left us only twenty-five per cent, upon whom there was any chance of oper, 
ting, and a certain proportion of these would accompany those emigrants whos< 
passages had been prepaid and who would most assuredly go to the friends who h; 
paid their expenses. Enormous as the emigration from Germany to the Unit 
States during the past soason has been, (it being represented that no less thai 
232,000 emigrants from Germany have landed at the various ports of the Union, a 
compared with 98,000 from England, Wales and Seolland), still the recent statistic 

198 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers ( \o,14.) A. 1883 



show that there is no fear of draining the German Empire. Since 18T5, the population 
has been increasing at the rate of over half a million per annum, and in 1880, when 
the last Census was taken, it was 45,250,000. Probably there will not be an increase 
in the number of German emigrants in the next few years, but with an ever 
increasing population, and the resources of the country not extending, an outlet must 
eventually be found, and it is to be hoped that through the measures now taken, the 
emigrants will be directed to the Canadian North- West. 

Acting under instructions, I proceeded to various parts of the continent, and bad 
interviews with the representatives of the steamship companies. They appeared to 
be somewhat prejudiced against the Dominion for reasons which I have ventured to 
explain to you. This antagonism, however, has been in a measure overcome, and as 
under your instructions I am now again about to visit them, I feel confident that a 
portion of this most valuable emigration will now be diverted to Canada. I may men- 
tion that it is calculated that in the last sixty j cars, 3,500,000 emigrants have left 
Germany. 

I am glad to say that so far as the cattle trade is concerned, the season has been 
almost advantageous one for Canadian exporters. I have had fortunately, only to 
report once or twice to the High Commissioner that any consignments of Canadian 
live stock had been stopped here by the Privy Council authorities, and those were 
some slight cases of scab, respecting which disease your Department, through the 
Dominion Government Veterinary Inspector, at once took prompt measures. Never- 
theless my constant attention has been required, and I have endeavoured, as far as 
possible, to keep you informed from time to time on important points connected with 
the trade. A noticeable feature has been that both our oattle and sheep have shown 
a marked improvement in quality. In fact salesmen here state that they could scarcely 
have credited the fact that such a change could have been made in so short a time in 
the cattle of any country. So good are the ordinary cattle which are being landed 
from the Dominion, that in point of breeding and quality they would favourably com- 
pete with those in the best districts in the British Isles. This of course 
is to a large extent to be traced to the enterprise of the importers of 
pedigree stock from this country, the results showing that the Can- 
adian farmers have appreciated the means thus placed within their 
reach, to improve the quality of their stock, and have availed themselves of it exten- 
sively. The sheep have been especially good, and large numbers of young ewes have 
been purchased and sent into the interior as breeding stock, on account of their good 
quality, and what is of more consequence, their healthy condition. I am informed 
that there will be at least twenty -five per cent, more live stock ready for shipment 
from the Dominion next year than has been shipped in the past, and undoubtedly 
there will be a good market here and a most profitable one. Owing to wet seasons, 
the British farmer has had a fearful disease to contend with in his flocks. Eecent 
statistics showed that there were thirty-two millions, two hundred and thirty-seven 
thousand, nine hundred and fifty-eight (32,237,958) sheep and lambs in the United 
Kingdom, and the loss by fluke is now estimated to be no less than two millions, 
eight hundred and eighty-nine thousand (2,889,000), or about nine per cent, of the 
total. To tins loss must be added the deficiency of the crop of lambs. Probably 
seven per cent, of the sheep which died were breeding ewes, and this would imply 
a deficiency of two millions four hundred thousand (2,400,000) lambs, which would 
make a total decrease in the flocks of five and a quarter millions. Our Canadian far- 
mer may have something in climate to contend with, but never need fear disease 
1 brought about by climatic causes. I merely give these figures to show that not only 
for next year, but for many years, the prospects for sheep farmers in the Dominion 
are exceedingly good, and it is especially gratifying to have to note that large 
numbers of the best sheep to be purchased in this Kingdom have been exported to 
the Dominion during the past season. It is to be hoped, however, that the Cana- 
dians will send fat sheep to this market and not be tempted by the high prices which 
store and breeding stock will command. In the agricultural returns for the year, I 
ticed that in consequence of a large amount of arable land being placed under pas- 

199 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



ture, it being no longer profitable to grow cereals in competition with the American 
continent, there were no less than one million six hundred and forty-three thou- 
sand six hundred and sixty-three (1,643,663) acres more permanent pastures in 1882 
than in 18*74, and six hundred thousand acres less wheat grown. At the same time 
for this pasture there were three hundred and eighteen thousand head of cattle less in 
England, Wales and Scotland than in 1874, and the consumption of meat in conse- 
quence of the growth of population has vastly increased. Breeding and store stock 
will have to be procured, and, thanks to the efforts of your Department in keeping 
Canadian stock free from disease and thereby securing an entrance into Great 
Britain for them, Canada has the best chance of supplying this want. 

I have received, I am happy to say, a great amount of assistance and courtesy 
from my colleagues, both in the Dominion and in this country, and the representa- 
tives of the steamship lines here have always been ready to render me any assistance 
or information which I may have required. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN DYKE, 

Canadian Government Agents 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



APPENDIX A. 

Return of Emigration from the Port of Liverpool for the twelve months ending 

31st December, 1882. 



Destination. 


1881. 


1882. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


United States 


197,074 

20,887 

6,383 

324 

132 

1,318 

197 

679 

1,808 

6 

5 


188,998 

32,468 

8,459 

459 

179 

1,303 

251 

704 

1,450 

31 




8,076 


Quebec 


11,581 

2,076 

135 

47 






Australia 




China 


;;• 


East Indies 


15 


West Indies 


54 

25 


West Coast Africa 




South America 


358 


South Africa 


25 


New Zealand 


5 










228,813 


234,302 


13.943 

8,454 


8,454 


Total Increase 


5,489 








1 



200 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14,) 



A. 188^ 



APPENDIX B. 

Return of Emigrants and Steamers sailed from Liverpool for Canada, for the Year 

ending 31st December, 1882. 



Date. 


Steamer. 


Quebec. 


Halifax. 


Total. 


Total. 


Cabin. 


Steerage 


Cabin. 


Steerage 


Cabin. 


Steerage 


1882. 
Jan. 3... 


Allan Line. 
Prussian 






8 
25 
69 
16 
18 
34 
22 

"*83 
51 
48 


8 

48 

112 

57 

101 

37 

81 

98 

252 

113 

229 

2 

175 

224 

515 

611 

464 

261 

705 

101 

323 


8 

25 
69 
16 
18 
34 
22 


8 

48 
112 

57 
101 

37 

81 

98 
252 
113 
229 
2 
175 
244 
515 
611 
464 
261 
705 
101 
323 
607 
766 
818 
741 
6§5 
568 
850 
459 
542 
656 
1,135 

26 
428 
431 
720 

40 
698 
882 

45 
375 
285 
527 

46 
682 
477 

24 
500 
542 

15 
426 
412 

47 
537 
490 

22 


16 


do 4... 








73 


do li- 








181 


do 18... 


Hibernian 






73 


do 25... 








119 


Feb. 1... 


Circassian 






71 


do 8... 


Nova Scotian 






103 


do 16... 


Toronto 

Parisian 






98 


do 22... 


83 
51 
48 


335 


March 1... 


Hibernian 






164 


do 8... 


Polynesian 






277 


do li- 


Grecian , 






2 


do 15... 


Peruvian , 






58 

61 

80 

104 


58 
61 
80 

104 


233 


do 22... 


Nova Scotian 






305 


do 28... 


Circassian > 






595 


April 5... 
do 12... 








715 


Phcenecian 






464 


do 12... 


Sarmatian 






106 
94 


106 
94 


367 


do 20... 
do 21... 


Polynesian 

Canadian 






799 
101 


do 25... 


Bibernian 






52 


52 
70 


375 


do 27... 


Peruvian 


70 
"*80 


607 
766 
818 


677 


do 27... 


Buenos Ayrean 






766 


May 14... 
do 9... 






80 
17 


898 


Prussian 


17 


741 


758 


do 10... 






655 

568 


655 


do 10... 


Nova Scotian 


55 






55 
158 

9 
95 


623 


do 18... 


Parisian .. 

Phcenecian 


" 9 


1,008 
468 


do 25... 


459 


do 25... 


Sarmatian 

Buenos Ayrean 

Polynesian 




656 


637 


do 27... 






656 


June 1... 


**46 


'"26 


88 
46 
47 

"T02 
46 

45 
119 

12 
105 


1,223 

72 


do 6... 


Austrian 


do 8... 


Hibernian 




431 


475 


do 9... 
do 15... 


Buenos Ayrean 

Circassian 

Nova Scotian 






431 

822 


do 20... 

do 22... 

do 29... 
J»ly 4... 

do 6... 

do 6... 

do 13... 

do 18... 

do 20... 

do 27... 
Aug. i... 

do 3... 

do 10... 

do 15... 

do 17... 

do 24... 

de 29... 

do 31... 
Sept. 7... 

do 12... 


46 


40 


86 


Peruvian... 


45 
119 


882 


743 


Parisian 


1,001 


Phoenecian 


12 


45 


57 


Sarmatian 


105 


375 
527 


489 


Hanovarian .., 


285 


Polynesian 


56 






56 

66 

109 

121 

49 

75 

165 

73 

143 

152 

76 

146 

80 

40 


583 


Hibernian 


66 


46 


112 


Sardinian 


109 
121 


682 
477 


791 


Circassian 






598 


Austrian 


49 


24 


73 


Peruvian 


75 
165 


542 


575 


Parisian 






707 


Nova Scotian 




15 


88 


Sarmatian 


143 
152 

76 
146 

80 


426 

412 

47 

490 


569 


Polynesian 






564 


Hibernian 






123 


Sardinian 

Circassian 






683 






570 


Austrian 


40 


22 


62. 



201 



16 Victoria. 



: oual Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



APPENDIX- £ -Continued. 

Return of Emigrants and Steamors sailed from Liverpool for Canada, for the Year 

ending 31st December, 1882. 



Date. 


Steamer. 


Quebec. 


Halifax. 


Total 


Total. 


Cabin. 


Steerage 


Cabin. 


Steerage 


Cabin. 


Steerage 


1882. 

Sept. 14... 
io 21... 


Allan Line — Concluded. 

Peruvian , 

Parisian , 


90 
153 


356 
558 






90 
153 
43 
85 
46 
11 
81 
40 
18 
94 
32 
43 
21 
16 
14 
29 
13 
19 
16 


356 

558 

6 

491 

335 

34 

405 

305 

50 

422 

299 

145 

120 

131 

100 

238 

58 

36 

41 


446 






711 


do 26... 


Nova Scotian 


43 


6 


49 


do 28... 




85 
46 


491 
335 


576 


Oct. 5... 


Polynesian 






381 


d© 10... 


Hibernian , 


ii 


34 


45 


do 12... 


Sardinian 


81 
40 


405 
305 


486 


do 19... 


Circassian 






345 


do 24... 


18 


50 


68 


do 26... 


Parisian 


94 
32 


422 
299 


516 


Nov. 2... 








331 


do 9... 




43 
21 
16 
14 
29 
13 
19 
16 


145 

120 

131 

100 

238 

58 

36 

41 


188 


do 16... 


Polynesian 






141 


do 23... 


Sardinian 






147 


do 30... 


Caspian 






114 


Dec. 7... 








267 


do 14... 


Sarmatian 






71 


do 22... 
do 28... 


Nova Scotian 






55 
57 




Dominion Line. 
Quebec 


2,708 


18,227 






1,530 


6,914 


4,238 


25,141 


29,379 


April 13... 
do 20... 


13 

17 
10 
17 
32 
29 
26 
10 
14 
10 

8 

9 
27 
14 
23 
12 
37 
26 
44 
32 
82 
30 
37 
14 
16 

3 
29 

9 


240 
542 
525 
603 
875 
655 
390 
675 
454 
232 
515 
198 
193 

168 
157 
132 
109 
156 

203 
134 

27 
109 
103 

118 






13 
17 
10 
17 
32 
29 
26 
10 
14 
19 

8 

9 
27 
14 
23 
12 
37 
26 
44 
32 
82 
30 
39 
14 
16 

3 
29 

9 


240 
542 
525 
603 
875 
655 
390 
675 
454 
232 
515 
198 
193 
163 
168 
157 
132 
109 
156 
115 
203 
134 
27 
109 
103 
115 
118 
88 
4 
7 
3 


253 






559 


do 27... 




» 




535 


May 4... 
do 10... 


Montreal 






620 


Brooklyn 






907 


do 18... 


Toronto 

Dominion 






684 


do 25... 






416 


June 8... 






685 


do 15... 








468 


do 22... 


Ontario 






244 


do 29... 


Brooklyn.. ., 

Toronto 






523 


July 6... 
do 13... 






207 








220 


do 20... 


Mis-issippi 






197 


do 27... 


Quebec 






191 


Aug. 3... 
do 10... 


Ontario 






169 








169 


do 17... 








135 


do 24... 


Dominion 

Mississippi 






200 


do 31... 






147 


Sept. 7... 
do 14... 






285 


Ontario 






164 


do 21... 








6S 


do 28... 


Toronto 






123 


Oct. 5.. 








119 


do 12... 


Mississippi 






118 


do 19... 






147 


do 26... 


Ontario 






97 


Nov. 16... 


Texas 




4 

7 
3 


4 


do 30... 








1 


1 


8 


Dec. 14... 








3 


















632 


8,014 


1 


14 


633 


8,032 


8,661 




202 













46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No 14.) 



A. 18S3 



APPENDIX B- Continued. 

Return of Emigrants and Steamers sailed from Liverpool for Canada, for the Year 

ending 31st December, 1882. 






Date. 


Steamer. 


Quebec. 


Halifax. 


Total, 


Total. 


Cabin. 


Steerage 


Cabin. 


Steerage 


Cabin. 


Steerage 


1882. 

April 19... 
do | 27... 


Beaver Line. 
Lake Manitoba 


8 

9 

7 

20 

2 

13 

13 

5 

10 

8 

2 

13 

5 

17 

20 

23 

42 

13 

13 

14 

3 

7 

6 


208 

470 

136 

276 

181 

183 

116 

113 

75 

77 

88 

45 

45 

63 

47 

80 

46 

76 

123 

44 

40 

41 

38 






8 

9 

7 

20 

2 

13 

13 

5 

10 

8 

2 

13 

5 

17 

20 

23 

42 

13 

13 

14 

3 

7 

6 


208 

470 

136 

279 

181 

183 

116 

113 

75 

77 

88 

45 

45 

63 

47 

80 

46 

76 

123 

44 

40 

41 

38 


21« 
479 


Lake Huron 

Lake Nepigon 

Lake Winnipeg 






May fS 4... 
do '18... 






143 






299 


do 25... 






183 


June 1... 


Lake Manitoba 






196 


do 15... 


Lake Nepigon 






12» 


do | 22... 

do< i 29... 


Lake Huron 






118 


Lake Winnipeg 






85 


July!?; 6... 
do * 22... 


Lake Champlain 






8» 


Lake Nepigon « 






90 


do ?■ 27... 


Lake Manitoba 






58 


-Aug. 3... 
do 10... 


Lake Huron 

Lake Winnipeg 






50 






80 


do 17... 


Lake Champlain 


€7 


do 31... 


Lake Nepigon 






103 


-Sept. 7... 
do 14... 


Lake Manitoba 

Lake Huron 






88 






89 


do 21... 


Lake Nepigon 


136 


do 28... 


Lake Winnipeg 






58 


Oct. 5... 


Lake Champlain 






43 


do 19... 


Lake Manitoba 






48 


■do 26... 


Lake Huron 






44 














273 


2,614 






273 


2,614 


2,887 









SUMMARY. 



Allan Line 

Dominion Line. 
Beaver Line 

Total 






2,708 
632 
273 


18,227 
8,014 
2,614 


1,530 
1 


6,914 
14 


4,238 
633 
273 


25,141 
8,028 
2,614 






3,613 


28,855 


1,531 


6,928 


5,141 


35,783 



29,379 
8,661 
2,887 

40,927 



203 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188$ 



ANNUAL REPORT FROM THOMAS GRAHAME, AGENT FOR SCOTLAND, 

FOR THE YEAR 1882. 



Canadian Government Agency, 

40 St. Enoch Square, 

Glasgow, 30th December, 1882. 

Sir, — In accordance with instructions I have the honour herewith to submit my 
Report for the year 1882. 

During the winter months I had a number of meetings in various districts of the 
country, some initiated by those directly interested in going out to Canada and others 
by clergymen and those acting in the interosts of people in connection witn whom 
they had concern. I was also of assistance to Dr. MacGregor, of Edinburgh, who 
delivered a very valuable lecture in the Town Hall of Glasgow. He delivered similar 
lectures in other towns in Scotland, which had a very beneficial effect in causing the 
stream of emigration to tend towards Manitoba and the North- West of Canada. I 
took advantage of all opportunities for the distribution of our various pamphlets, and 
what between meetings, agricultural shows, fairs, steamship companies and steam- 
ships, I disposed of very many thousands in an advantageous manner. 

The number of letters received at this office during the } r ear was considerably 
above two thousand, and a similar number despatched. The number of persons call- 
ing for personal information was also large, especially during the early spring and 
summer. 

Several letters appeared in the Scotch newspapers in the early spring from. 
American Railway Agents, among others one from the notorious Eli Perkins decry- 
ing Manitoba and the North- West, but the untruthfulness of their statements was 
quickly and effectively exposed by letters from Professor Bryce and others interest- 
ed in Canada. 

I have frequently been in communication with the Tenant Farmers' Delegates, 
sent out some years ago, and have afforded them information in a variety of ways 
regarding the continuous prosperity of our country for the benefit of those with 
whom they may be meeting or corresponding. Many of these delegates take a strong 
personal interest in Canada, and have been instrumental in inducing goodly numbers 
to emigrate to our various Provinces from their respective districts. 

In accordance with instructions I attended the Royal Show at Reading from the 
10th till the 15th July, and in conjunction with Mr. Dyke assisted in making a» 
creditable a display of Canadian productions as lay in our power. The exhibit was 
a great and continuous source of attraction, the chief difficulty being the want of 
sufficient space and of specimens on a larger scale, as in former years. A very large 
number of pamphlets was distributed, and eagerly sought after, chiefly by the 
agricultural population. I had conversations with large numbers who intended 
going out, and many with very considerable capital. 

I also attended the Highland and Agricultural Society's Show at Glasgow. There 
was a vary large attendance of the farming population during the week, and I met 
with many farmers who had made up their minds to go to Manitoba or the North- 
West very soon. I saw to the distribution here also of a large quantity and variety 
of our literature. At both this Show and the Royal at Reading there was a large 
number of Canadians present, who had come over for the purchase of pure bred 
pedigreed stock. 

In connection with these shows I may mention that the Centennial Exhibition 
of the Highland and Agricultural Society is to be held in Edinburgh in July, 1884.. 
This will be a very fine Exhibition, and preparations are already being made for it. 
I have no doubt it will be very laigely attended, and that people will be present 
from all parts of the globe. I think it would be of great importance in the interests 
of Canada that a special effort should be made so as to have a fine Canadian exhibit at 
that show. It would produce a much greater effect, and I am sure would be much 

204 



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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



more successful in its ulterior results if the various articles on exhibit were on a 
more extensive scale and more numerous than has hitherto been the case. In fact it 
would be well that preparations should be made in plenty of time, and the articles 
sent from Canada direct as a special Government exhibit. 

The colonization principle which has been adopted by Government is I think a 
very satisfactory one, and will I feel sure in the immediate future prove a fruitful 
source of emigration from districts where otherwise it would be doubtful whether any 
large numbers would go. 

The reduction in the rates of assisted passages to Canada has I think been pro- 
ductive of a larger amount of emigration than would otherwise have taken place this 
last season, at the same time I think in some cases of poor but worthy families a still 
further decrease in the rate would not be undesirable. Great care would of course 
require to be taken in the selection of such cases, should such a course be adopted, 
and Agents would have to be very particular in their inquiries in the exercise of any 
discretion that might be granted to them in this respect. 

In my opinion I am glad to say a great deal of satisfaction has been derived by 
intending emigrants from the good supply of maps which have been obtained during 
the last season, and I would venture to suggest that a still further improvement 
would be the supplyidg of separate maps of all the various Provinces, as many intend- 
ing emigrants are interested in one Province and not in any other. The supply of 
pamphlets has been very satisfactory and I have no doubt the new ones which have 
been issued will prove of great service to emigration interests. 

Our competitors have been busy as in former years in Scotland, and there has 
•been a very considerable emigration to Queensland (which colony has been advertis- 
ing very extensively) and others of the Australian colonies. Proportionately with 
our chief competitor, the United States, we stand in a much better position than has 
been the case in the past as will be seen by the statistics further on in this Report. 

The advertising which I have done during the year has resulted very satisfac- 
torily and more particularly in those journals whose circulation is exclusively or 
nearly so among the rural population, and I have no doubt similar results will accrue 
in the ensuing season. 

I have as heretofore on all occasions acted heartily in conjunction with the steam- 
ship companies connected with our own country, and I have done all in my power to 
supply them with the literature which has been sent to me as they required it. 

The great majority of those who have emigrated from Scotland this year, and it 
will be seen further on that the number is greatly in excess of former years, have 
gone to Manitoba, though there has been a large number of inquiries for the older 
Provinces also, more particularly Ontario, and many with means have gone to 
them. British Columbia is now exciting a good deal of interest, to a great extent 
owing to the visit of the Marquis of Lome (the Governor General) and the Princess 
Louise, to that Province. The admirable speeches of the Marquis, which have been 
copied extensively in the Scotch papers, will, I have no doubt, be productive of great 
.good to that Province. To my mind, in anticipation of the construction of the 
Canadian Pacific Railway through to the Pacific, British Columbia presents many 
•advantages to the intending emigrant, more especially if he has some considerable 
capital to start with ; and I speak of this with the more confidence from having 
spent six months in that Province a number of years ago. 

I have been much pleased to see that suggestions which have been thrown out 
in the past have been largely adopted by people engaged in trade between Canada 
and this country, in having their goods of various kinds labelled "Canadian," which 
has enabled our country to take just credit for many of the superior articles pro- 
duced within it, and which are exported to Scotland. 

One of the strongest indications which exists in this country of the prosperity 
of our various Provinces is the increasing number of valuable stock which from year 
to year are being sent to Canada for breeding purposes. Not only are short horn 
cattle and many valuable descriptions of sheep and pigs sent out as before, but a very 
largely increased number of Clydesdale horses have been exported this season, as well 

205 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A >S?,S 



as many polled Angus cattle, which description of stock would seem to be admirably 
adapted to many portions of our country, and, strange to say, it is only within the 
last few years that the breeders of Canada have been alive to their excellence. 
Polled .Galloway cattle have also been exported in considerable numbers. I have on 
several occasions seen about a hundred Clydesdale horses and the same number of 
cattle, chiefly Polls, go in one steamer from the Clyde for Quebec this season. In 
all there were sent out from the Clyde for Canada this season. 

Horses. Polled Cattle. Sheep. Dogs. 

375 344 28 51 

On all occasions I have done what lay in my power in assisting Canadians in 
having arrangements made for obtaining their stock, and in having them taken over 
in comfortable shape to whatever port they may have been destined. 

During the year, I have received personally or through friends, a number of letters t 
from people settled in the North-West and Ontario, which have been exceedingly in 
teresting to their friends and the general public, portions of which I give. 

The first is from a letter of Mr. Don. G-eorge Smith, who about eighteen months 
ago, after several interviews with mo, being introduced by a mutual friend, went out r 
and took up his abode at Carradale, Birtle, Manitoba. 

He says under date 9th May, 1882, in a letter to his brother : 

" I have promised many friends in the dear Old Country, to write them and b< 
let them know what I think of this country. I have also received many letters « 
asking me what I think of it. If I were to write to each one separately on the sub- tl 
ject, 1 would have no time left for farming here ; so, I intend to send this epistle to 
my brother in Glasgow, and he will give a reading of it to all who may wish to 
see it. 

" There is no doubt that this is a splendid farming country, and in my humble 
opinion, is admirably suited for mixed farming, or, in other words, stock and crop.* 

" As to crops, one farmer beside us, Mr. ■ — , had tifty bushels of oats to 

the acre last fall, on land he broke in the spring ; and that ground had never been back 
set, just the one turn over, and many others near here have had crops nearly as good. 
Oats here are worth at present, from 75 cents to a $1.00 per bushel, and in a month 
or two, they will be worth much more. 

" Stock pays here much better than crops, and both pay well, besides the value of 
land increasing rapidly. For many years to come our farm produce will have a good 
local market, and long before then we will have railway and water outlets for our 
surplus production. 

* * * « When M and I arrived at Winnipeg we bought a span of horses and a 

waggon, and started up country from Winnipeg. We drove the whole way to Birtle, 
and I must say I was very much disappointed with the country until we got nearly as 
far west as Birtle, and then I felt both pleased and satisfied. We had intended leaving 

our waggon and heavy traps at C 's, saddling our nags, and riding down to take a 

look at the Turtle Mountains; but we were both so pleased with the land round about 
here that we at once decided, to settle here, and not look about any further ; nor have 
we since had any cause to regret our decision. 

" I, for one, would not advise any of my own friends to come out here without any 
capital ; but any young fellow with about £a00 or upwards could not do better than 
come out and take up the homestead and pre-emption land, 320 acres in all ; and even 
if he gets tired of the life here he will get a good round sum for his land in three years 
when he gets the patent. 

li There are many stories going at home about settlers being taken in by the Cana. 
dian Government with regard to land, etc., but I think if these stories could be traced 
to the bottom, it would be found that they emanated from the United States, and from 
all I can hear of the States I am thankful we did not go there. Our Township of Car 
radale is 'Township 15, Eange 26,' near Birtle, and anyone coming from the Olc 
Country will always be warmly received at Carradale Lodge. I have been asked by 
letter more than once if there are many young ladies here, and with the exception oi 

206 



re: 



h 



I 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188* 



a few of these fair creatures at the town of Birtlo we are all out in the cold here ; but 
for my own part I have become wedded to my pipe,and, as tobacco is cheap, 1 find it 
suits me better than a wife with expensive tastes. We have been hearing stories of 
whole cartloads of marriageable young ladies coming np from Lower Canada for wives 
and housekeepers; but heaven forbid ; we are happy just now, and why should people 
try to make us miserable ? 

" In this part of the country the soil is mostly a rich dark, loam. "We have 
plenty of poplar bluffs for firewood and rails for fencing. The building logs are 
are getting rather few now, but I question if people are much cheaper with log 
houses than with sawn lumber houses — or frame houses, as they are called here. 
We have a good saw mill at Birtle, also a flour'mill, stores, etc., and expect a railway 
there in a year or so. Any fellow who is not afraid of a little hard work to begin 
with, and really likes a farmer's life, cannot do better than come here. Supposing 
two come out in partnership, they could do with less capital each, as they could do 
most of their improvements on the one half section, and simply do enough to the 
other to hold it. I think, if I were coming out again to look for land, 1 would leave 
Scotland about the beginning of June, and come on by train to Brandon — unless the 
railway is further on by that time. This would give plenty of time to make things 
snug before winter comes on. Any young fellow, even though unaccustomed to hard 
work, miirht like being here working on a farm ; but, if he has no capital, it would 
be years before he could start on his own place, and I, for one, would strongly 
recommend such not to come. But for farm servants who have been brought up to 
the work, this is a good country. They could not do much with the oxen to begin 
with, but until they got a little into the way of it they could get employment on 
farms where most of this work has been got over, and there are many where this is 
the case now. A farm servant, if a good man, will get from $250 to $300 a year 
with his board. At the same time, there are many fellows paying a premium to 
learn farming, and others working for their board — but these are not in the position 
of servants. We will be glad to take half-a-dozen on at these terms any day, 

" Our settlement here is known as the * Scotch Settlement/ and is famed for its 
respectability. There is plenty of shooting in this country, mostly small game. I 
Bhould have mentioned that sickness is almost unknown here. There has only been 
one death since we came, and that man was a dying man when he came here. 

" Of coui'se in all I have said regarding the country, I am simply giving my 
I opinion, and any one reading this must remember, that what pleases one does not 
always please another. For my part I have no regrets for having come here, and I 
do not know anyone here that has. 

" Should this be the means of bringing any of my friends out, I shall be glad to 
do all in my power for them." 

The next is from a letter sent to me by Mr. Thomas W. Mather, who went to 
Ontario in January last. He says, under date 6th September, 1882, from Blairton, 
County of Peterborough: — 

(i Although too new to the country to speak with the certainty that would better 
become an elder resident, still there are many things so obvious that it does not need 
any great penetration to observe them. In speaking of Canada too, my words might 
mislead, owing to the great size of the Dominion, and as I only give what I know 
from personal knowledge, to be facts, my letter may not be general enough to give 
a very good idea of the country. Most of my time had been spent here in the County 
of Peterborough and round Toronto. The Toronto country is very fine, but Peter- 
borough is too new to be anything of the sort. I am assured that this is the worst 
ming country in Canada. I do not, of course, include some of the back-lying 
i districts, such as Muskoka, Algoma, etc., which are little less than a sterile desert, 
\ with little patches of land among the rock and bush, which constitute nearly the 
j whole of the counties. Indeed there is a very great deal of rock and bush here, and 
farming is a matter of some difficulty, ploughing and reaping as they do among 
stumps and boulders. Yet the crops raised are beautiful, and farmers as a rule, are 
very contented. Still I cannot understand men coming here to settle, when there 

207 

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' 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (IN -.14.) A. 1883 



bo much room and such magnificent land as in the great North- West. In a few years 
the Canadian Pacific Kailway will be finished, and the land then must become more 
valuable. It is a mntter of great difficulty for a Britisher to conceive of the enormous 
extent of that portion of this great Dominion, and when one hears of the constant 
flow of immigration to the North-West, one is apt to wonder at there being so much 
room for more. 

" I think I can safely say that as far as money goes Canada is a much better coun- 
try than our own. I myself do not like the country nearly as well as Scotland, but 
unfortunately I cannot afford to live at homo. Of course if one is satisfied with what 
they can get in the way of pay one could stay there, but in the knowledge of what 
can be got here, 1 for one say that I cannot afford to stay in Scotland. Why, 
here no labourer would think of taking less than $1.50, or over 6 shillings, per day, 
and farm hands were getting $75, or over £1;> and board, for two months' harvesting, 
and even at that they could hardly be got. Now, board is very cheap here ; one can 
get good board in any good hotel at $5 or £1 per week, and in a respectable boarding 
house at $3 or 12 shillings per week. Of course it can be got at .very much higher 
rates according to accommodation. > 

"I see grape-vines, tomatoes, watermelons, cucumbers, peaches and apples, etc., 
growing out door here in great plenty. Tomatoes can be got some years (I do not 
know the present quotation) at 30 cents, or 1 shilling and 3 pence per bushel, cucum- 
bers (in the country here) for next to nothing, and I can get so many apples for the 
asking that I have not bought any yet. Now, while Canada is far from being a 
tropical paradise, yet the luxuries are cheap End plentiful. 

" Mechanics get splendid wages here ; for instance, bricklayers get $3 to $3.50 for 
laying 1,000 brick , now on some works they will lay 2,000 brick, which makes their 
day's earnings $7, or £1 8s. Of course the heavy winter throws this particular class 
out of work, but there are plenty others whom the winter does not affect. Mechanics 
engaged in the manufacture and structure of iron bridges earn $4 or 16 shillings per 
day, and these men have usually full work all the year round. iNo man need be idle 
in this country; indeed I never remember seeing one of these needy unfortunates 
who ' have got no work to do,' and I can vouch that I have never been accosted by 
such and solicited for alms. Except an occasional old or blind man, a beggar 
is rarely seen in Canada. I take this as one of the strongest proofs of its prosperity, 
and also as an index of the opportunities here afforded men of earning their bread — 
and plenty of it. 

"Kailways are continually being projected, opening up new parts of the country, 
and for many a year I believe the prosperity of Canada is secured. People have 
opportunities here that they have not at home. The climate is also very healthy. 
Had I given you heresay, unbelief might have succeeded astonishment, but all the 
faots written in this letter are facts, for I know them from personal acquaintance 
with them. All who are discontented at home with their prospects of success should 
take a trip here, or to some country like it — only don't let them say • I mean to stick to 
the one thing,' but rather let them take the first thing in any line that turns up, for 
in this country if a person wishes to succeed he must be ready to do anything, and I 
can vouch that he need not do anything derogatory to his honour." 

The last is from Mr. James H. Proctor with whom I had several interviews 
prior to his leaving for the North- West in March last. He says under date 14th 
November. 1882, in a letter to Dr. MacG-regor, from Southesk (Two Creeks) Virden, 
C. P. E , Manitoba : 

" I hear you still take as deep an interest in Manitoba as when I lefc Scotland. 
I believe over 16,000 Scotch people have entered Canada during the first nine months 
of the year, which number is largely in excess of any other nation. The township I 
am in is almost entirely filled with Scotch, and they are well settled through neigh- 
bouring townships as well. I have assisted a goodly number in taking up homesteads. 
Evidently your letters and those of the Special Correspondent of the Scotsman have 
greatly helped to make them come and settle in the country. I think I may taj 
that they are all confident of success, and generally confirm the opinions you express- 

208 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 18S5 



ed regarding the country. I have purposely refrained from writing or allowing- 
any one, as difficulties arc met with, and some hardships as well. These, however, 
are unavoidable in so vast a country just opened for settlement. It requires pluck 
and determination to get along at first. There was not a soul within twenty or thiry 
iniles of me when I took up my location, now the whole prairie is dotted with home- 
steads. My nearest neighbour is Major-General Piggot, of the British army. Thou- 
sands of acres will be brought under cultivation next year. I. have fully fifty acres 
broken and back set, and expect not less than 3,000 bushels therefrom next year. 
The seed crop 1 put in on my arrival was destroyed by cattle going along the trail 
in June and July. Fences will be up, and a herd law in existence next year. I am 
much pleased with the climate. What a change from muggy old Scotland. Al- 
though the winter may be cold, it is a steady « freeze ' throughout, and seems to be 
enjoyed by those who have spent several years here. Mosquitoes are the summer 
pest, but they are likely to go down as the country gets under cultivation. Eeally 
the country has but comparatively few drawbacks, and cannot fail to become great. 
If the Government would encourage tree planting the country would be very attractive, 
and greatly benefitted. I planted some sixty young poplars when I entered, all of 
which have done well. I hope to devote some time and attention to this subject next 
spring. I could write mucn more but I have said enough, I daresay, to satisfy you 
that your letters last autumn were not too glowing." 

Those I think are fair indications of what is thought of our country by people 
who have gone out of late. 

Another feature in the immigration of the past season is the number of people 
who, to my certain knowledge, have taken considerable capital with them. I have 
ascertained this very readily from -the number who have consulted me regarding the 
best and safest mode of transferring their money from .here to wherever they may 
have determined upon settling. In many cases I have been of considerable assist- 
ance to people in this respect. Many people who also have been settled in Canada 
for some time have been sending me money to procure steamship tickets for th eir 
friends or relatives, and this too is a sure indication of the prosperity of our country 
and the demand for labour. 

So far as I can judge, the prospects for next year are very encouraging. I am 
having a large number of enquiries already, and as the season advances, I have no doubt,, 
judging from former experience, these will be steadily increasing from week to week. 
A great number of letters have appeared in many of the Scotch papers, and these 
have almost entirely been of the most satisfactory character. In this way not only 
are the friends of those writing induced to emigrate, but also others who think of 
going to some new country. I have likewise met with several people, who had corres- 
ponded with me prior to going out to the North- West to take up land, and who have 
returned to this country for the winter, intending to go out in the spring again. 
These people speak very highly of the country, and will invariably be accompanied 
by large numbers of others. In one instance, the person who called upon me expected 
to have at least forty others with him. On the whole, I am of the opinion that the 
numbers next year will be greater than this, from Scotland, and this season the num- 
ber is much in excess of former years. As showing the interest taken in our country 
in all parts of the globe, I may mention that I have letters from India, Demeraraand 
New Zealand. 

During my visit to Canada, in the autumn, I met with many people connected 
with Scotland, and found, in almost all districts, a very great demand for labour of 
all kinds, particularly servant girls. I took the opportunity, when visiting the 
various shows in the country, which took place during my trip, to obtain a number 
of specimens of a variety of kinds of the productions of our country. I also obtained 
a nice selection of Manitoba specimens from your Department, and all of these I have 
constantly on exhibit in one of the rooms of my office. They prove very attractive 
to many who come to me for information. I found that in many ports of Ontario, 
people were prepared to dispose of their lands at very reasonable rates, but the district 
of country I was most struck with, in this respect, was the Eastern Townships of Que- 

209 
14—14 



! 



11? ; 



48 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 






bee, where I spent some days. There the lands afford many advantages to the British 
farmer, with some capital, from their being within easy access of such ports as Mon- 
treal, Quebec and Portland, and for the ample facilities for the transport of all 
descriptions of productions to a good market, by the various railway systems. For 
stock purposes, I consider these lands unrivalled for their cheapness. I met with a 
Scotchman, from Pumfrieshire, when there, who had been settled for some years 
in a new portion of the country, and his experience has been extremely satisfactory. 
He expects a number of his friends from Scotland will be joining him shortly. 

I have on a number of occasions met with Father Macginnis, of Ottawa, who 
brought me a letter of introduction from the Department. I have co-operated with 
him in as effectual a way as lay in my power, in promoting emigration to our country, 
and more particularly in connection with his co-religionists. I think very good 
results may flow from the efforts of Father Macginnis in this direction. 

I have been pleased to hear that explorations are going on with the view of 
opening up the Hudsons' Bay line of route from the North- West to the shipping 
ports of this country. I feci convinced that this will be of the greatest importance 
to the full opening up of our prairie and other lands of the North-West, from the 
distance being so much shorter by that route. 

From iniormation obtained from the Board of Trade and the various steamship 
companies, I herewith give the statistics of the emigration from the Clyde to Canada 
during 1882 and the previous year. * 

1881 3/742 

1882 5,968 

I may state that the returns by the Board of Trade of the emigration from the 
Clyde to Canada are not at all accurate, for the following reasons: During the six 
months of late autumn, winter, and early spring, almost no steamers go from the 
Clyde to Canadian ports. There were only three during that time last season, and 
though large numbers have gone, especially during the early spring, to Canada, 
via United States ports, they are all classed as emigrants to the United States. 
I know of one party of eighty which went together in that way. Then, 
not only at that time of year, but during the whole season, very considerable 
numbers for Canada go by steamship lines whose vessels only go to United 
States ports, and these are also all classed as emigrants to the United States. 
Besides those who are known as certainly going to Canada by these lines, there are 
many to my certain knowledge who only take out their tickets for their port of 
destination on the other side, and afterwards receive their railway ticket to whatever 
part of Canada they may be going. This is done for a variety of reasons; 
some may have friends in, or in the neighbourhood of, the port to which they may 
go, and others think they can j^et to their destination cheaper by travelling in that 
way. It is, of course, impossible to get at the full number of such emigrants. It 
will be seen, however, that there has been a very great increase in the number from 
the Clyde as compared with last year, and it must be remembered also that a large, 
and, I must think, an increasing proportionate number of emigrants from Scotland 
go by Liverpool, from the much greater facilities for their getting to Canadian ports 
in that way than by the Clyde. It is impossible to be exact in *an estimate of the 
number, but from all the information I have been enabled to obtain, I should saj 
about two thousand emigrants went from Scotland by the Liverpool route. 

I annex statistics of the nationalities of the emigrants from the Clyde for 1882: 



tes. 



1881. 



British 
Subjects. 



15,996 

3,742 

1,083 

210 

21,031 



Foreigners. 



21,350 



21,350 



Total. 



37,346 

3,742 

■ 1,083 

210 



42,381 



United States.... 

Canada * 

Australia , 

All other places 



1882. 



British 
Subjects. 



16,680 

5,825 

5,525 

111 



28,141 



Foreigners. 



20, J 



143 
26 

13 



20,982 



Total. 



37,480 
5,968 
5- 551 

'124 



49,123 



210 



X 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



I also herewith give the statistics of the arrivals of live stock from Canada at 
this point, during 1881 and this year. 

Horses. Cattle. Sheep. 

1881... — 12,030 8,006 

1882 ,...5 9,507 9,906 

It will be seen that, besides the five horses, like last year, cattle and sheep are 
the only animals which have been imported this season. The number of cattle is 
very considerably loss than last season. That, however, is to be accounted for from 
so many losses having been incurred last year, and from the prices in the beginning 
of the season not being anythiug like what they have been of late. Another circum- 
stance which prevented more cattle being shipped during the latter part of the year 
was the fact of so many steamships engaged in Canadian trade being employed by the 
Government in the Transport Service during the time of the Egyptian war, thus increas- 
ing the rate of freight about £L per head. Sheep, it will be observed, are in consider- 
ably larger numbers than last season. On the whole those engaged in the trade may 
congratulate themselves on the success of the season. Prices have paid shippers 
very satisfactorily, and there have been very few losses indeed of animals in course 
of transport, the cattle arriving in capital condition, The quality of the animals 
was, I am happy to say, much better than last year, but there is still room for great 
improvement in this respect. No doubt the quantity of pure bred stock exported to 
Canada of late will soon produce an appreciable effect in this "respect. If caution is 
■exercised in purchasing on the other side, the indications are, I think, very favour- 
able for next year, as prices are not likely to comedown to any great extent. 

I herewith insert a letter from Messrs. John Swan & Sons, of 37 Lawiston Place, 
Edinburgh, similar to last year, giving their views on the state of the trade. 

" With reference to your request we now beg to send you a Report of 
•the Canadian live stock trade during the past season. 

I" We believe in the aggregate the importations of the cattle from Canada have 
been considerably less this year than last, but that sheep have considerably 
increased. 
" Business on the whole has been satisfactory to shippers. Prices for all descrip- 
tions of stock throughout Great Britain during 1882 ruled exceptionally high; on 
the other hand freights in many cases have been rather against the trade, ranging 
from £3 10s. to £5 per head for cattle, and from 5 shillings to 9 shillings per head 
for sheep. This was caused in some measure by the withdrawal of a large 
number of ships for the Transport Service towards autumn. Towards the latter end 
of the season ships were not loaded with cattle on the top decks, which materially 
lightened the supplies to Glasgow. 

" .Regarding the quality of the cattle and sheep, we think there is a decided im- 
provement in the grades of the former while the latter largely consist of rams and 
ewes. There is still room for considerable improvement in both classes of stock 
which can only be effected by a freer use of pedigree sires. 

II On account of tho continued existence of foot aud mouth disease in England it 
is quite impossible to shift any stock from that country into this, hence with a good 
turnip crop in Scotland, store cattle have never been so dear, in which Canadian 
cattle participated. A very large proportion of the latter shipments were bought by 
farmers to foed in this country, and some of those lots brought in early have already 
been sold, and are paying the feeders well. There is no doubt whatever that with 
the further improvement in the breed Canadian cattle will certainly increase in 
favour here, as we find each year more of our farmers go in for them, their constitu- 
tion being fully stronger than either Irish or Scotch cattle. 

11 With regard to the prospects for 1883 there is a very large lot of cattle feeding 

in Scotland, We have an abundant supply of roots, and fully an average amount of 

straw, which, unless damaged by frost, will enable the supply to be regulated 

cording to the demand. There is not much to fear from American competition 

211 
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4G Victoria, Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 18S$ 



gaging tho prices here and there, in fact the margin even at the current high prices 
here is not sufficient to cover the shippers' risks. 

" It is difficult to estimate the result of the various Ranche Companies upon the 
future value of beef. So long, however, as the restrictions are in force, however 
large the importations may be from America, they will, while lessening the value of 
beef on this side, be unavailable to our farmers ; and it may be a subject for consider- 
ation to the Canadian agriculturists that producing well-bred stock will pay them 
better than producing beef, providing these vast Ranche Companies succeed. Re- 
garding sheep, it is impossible they can be cheap. Statistics show a great falling off 
in this class of stock, not only in Scotland, which is from vast tracts of land being 
turned into deer forests, incapable of producing anything like the numbers of former 
years, but both in England and Ireland sheep are wonderfully smaller in numbers. 
We venture to suggest that if Canadian farmers would turn their attention to the 
production of mutton of a suitable class, they would find it pay, as we see no pros- 
pect otherwise than very high prices likely to be current for fat sheep. Trade in this 
country is good in every department ; workpeople are fully employed at good wages, 
and the consumption is therefore large. We think, therefore, we may fairly predict 
that the value of all classes of stock in England and Scotland during 1S83 will be 
satisfactory to shippers from Canada, provided they have a surplus to send, not to 
raise the freights to an unreasonable figure." 

John Swan & Sons. 

From the Clyde Trust, Board of Trade and Custom House I have obtained the 
following statistics regarding articles of general import from British North America* 
to the Clyde :— 

For the year ending 30th June, 1882 :— 

The tonnage of sailing vessels was 21,490 

do steam do 14,537 



96,027 

As against the year ending 3Qth June, 1881 : — 

Sailing vessels 65,193 

Steam do 96,022 



161,215 

For the last half year the estimate is: — 

Sailing vessels 9,985 

Steam do 50,995 

60,980 

The articles imported during the year 1882 consist of the following, which I har6» 
prepared in a similar way to last year : — 

Flour, cwt 258,906 

Wheat, do 663,165 

Indian Corn, do 91,658 

Peas, do 169,290 

Oatmeal, do 6,700 

Hye } do 10,740 

Hamsand Bacon, boxes 191 

Cheese, do 55,321 

Butter, packages 15,028 

Fish, barrels : . 2,126 

Canned Meat, boxes 4,466 

212 



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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Spools, bags 1,876 

Asbestos, do ' 337 

Potash, barrels 2,063 

Linseed Cake, do 4,129 

Apples, do 22,198 

Extract, do 594 

Skins, cured 51,283 

Lobsters, cases • 2,858 

Phosphate, tons 170 

Tallow and Lard, hhds 1,144 

Oil, casks . 3,224 

Timber, pieces 1,473,048 

Rosin, barrels 6.938 

JBroom Handles, packages 113 

Starch, do 1,740 

Boots and Shoes, do 182 

Nails, do 771 

Besides other smaller articles too numerous to be specified. 

From all the information I have been able to gather, trade with Canada has been 
brisk. There have been large importations of butter, cheese, apples, wheat and 
other grains, as well as timber of a great variety of descriptions; and as usual the 
•quality of the flour has been unsurpassed. 

I have continued to have the hearty co-operation of Ihe Agents of the Govern- 
ment, both in Canada and in this country, in all the correspondence I have had with 
them. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

THOMAS GRAHAME. 
The Honourable, 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



REPORT OF THE BELFAST AGENT. 

(Mr. Charles For.) 

29 Victoria Place, 

Belfast, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — It is a cause of much gratification to me to be able to report that the 
sanguine expectation with regard to emigration for 1882, expressed in my Annual 
report for 1881, has been fully realized. More than double the number of the 
emigrants of 1881 sailed for Canada last year, and the emigrants were, as usual, of a 
superior class. The farm labourers who came under my view were of splendid 
physique, and of good character. The same description applies to the female 
•domestic servants ; of this class, all who went direct through this office had excellent 
discharges from their former employers, and I am happy to have in my power to 
report, from personal knowledge, that the classes mentioned have written to rela- 
tives to say that they will send for them in the coming spring. 

Of the farmer class, many brought considerable capital ; one man had £4,000 ; in 
almost every case they were the heads of large families. 

In my Annual Report for" 1880, 1 mentioned that the wife of an emigrant, whom I 
had sent the previous year to Manitoba, had taken the first prize for butter at the 
Agricultural Show in Winnipeg, in that year. I am happy in having it in my power 
to report that at the Show in Birtlo, last year, the wife of an emigrant, whom I sent 
at the close of the year 1881, won the first prize for butter, and four other prizes. 

213 



40 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



The Belfast News Letter, of the 13th instant, had for the subject of its leader, 
" Em ig rati on," with special reference to emigration to Canada, from which I quote the 
following extracts, as expressing the opinion of the employers of labour and of the 
landlord classes: — 

"We have received from a Canadian correspondent a copy of a report on the 
state of the crops for the season of the current year throughout the Province of Mani- 
toba and a portion of the North- West Territories. The document has been prepared 
by the Assistant Traffic Manager of the Canadian Pacific Eailway and embraces advices 
from eight-four points in the illimitable wilderness as the late Earl Beacon sfleld 
described the region referred to. * * * During the current year nearly thirty 
thousand 'newcomers,' as they are called, settled in Manitoba, and other thousands 
are invited to leave the overcrowded towns and counties of the mother country. 
Where are ' the overcrowded towns and counties' ' in Ireland ? Two or three of the 
western counties are overcrowded, and these we should like to have relieved ; but the 
overcrowding, even in these counties, is due to the want of towns in which the surplus 
population might find employment. Irish towns, as a rule, are depopulated 
and falling into dec;*y ; while there are many Irish counties which cannot be said to 
have any population, certainly not the population they could maintain in comfort. 
With respect to the farmers in Manitoba becoming ' independent,' we may remark 
that the Irish farmers are now, perhaps, the most independent of their class in the 
world. They are virtually joint-owners of the land ; they have fair rents and secu- 
rity of tenant. Moreover, in the North, there are industries to give employment, 
and there are advantages here as to convenient markets and rood prices, which will 
not be enjoyed in Manitoba for many years to come. Yet, the North, according to 
the General Eeport of the Census Commissioners, ' shows a larger percentage of 
decrease in the population, viz., 4.92 per cent., when compared with 18*71 than any 
of the other Provinces.' Emigration, we are told, is intended to relieve congested 
populations; but there is no congestion in Ulster, and Ulster is suffering by the 
draining away of the people. Emigration, we are told further, will tend to diminish 
crime ; but the parts of our country in which crime prevails are not losing as many 

Seople as the orderly, peaceable and industrious North. We should be very glad if 
[anitoba would take away from Ireland all the turbulent classes ; but the ageptj 
will not do anything of the kind. They only take the industrious and the well- 
behaved, leaving us the criminal and impoverished. Orderly and industrious people 
are quite as much needed in Ireland as they are in Manitoba or in any other part of 
the British Empire ; and what is more, our common duty is to try and keep these 
classes in Ireland. We have not as many acres in this Island as there are in Mani- 
toba; but let it not be forgotten that we have as rich a soil as there is in any of the 
colonies, and, all things considered, not a colony of the British Crown has a better 
climate. * * * Twenty millions of acres, all told, ought to be able to sustain 
more than our present population, and would sustain double the number of our people 
if our soil and other resources were made available — if we had a smaller area under 
grass, which leaves no room for men, and affords no means of employment. We 
have no sympathy with demagogues, and we are among the advocates of union with 
Great Britain ; but we object to our people being scattered over the earth in wilder- 
nesses, in fiigid and torrid zones, until every available resource in Ireland has been 
employed in the interests of the entire community. * * * * We have nothing 
to say against the Colonies; but we have to say that the soil and other resources of 
Ireland ought to bo developed for the benefit of us all. " 

These extracts are the best testimony as to the quality of the emigrants. Another 
evidence in their favour is that they encourage others to follow them, and write in 
most favourable terms of their adopted count i y. In my battles with the opponents of 
emigration I have no better weapon than reference to*the relatives of the emigrants. 
I sent last year a farm labouier who was the last of the connection in this country, the 
others having emigrated in successive years since I sent the pioneers of the family 
in 18*70. This is satisfactory proof that they have remained in Canada ; indeed I 

214 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1S83 



could, T ! oliove, give tho present address in Canada, of the large majority whom I 
sent for 1 1 e past thirteen years. 

The leader in the News Letter gave me an opening for a letter which I utilised, 
knowing well that the attention of the readers of the article would be given to my 

■• reply, and knowing also that the editor had protested too much, when he said that 
Ireland has a good climate — it had some thirty years ago — and that the soil was as 
good as Manitoba. His remarks about the area under grass, and his advice about 
increased tillage must be treated by the farmers as foolish ignorance, as they know 
that while crops have been a failure, grazing never paid better; in fact no person can 
tell the farmer what he does not know better about what pays him best. The Daily 
Express (Dublin) on the 11th ult., two days before the News Letter published its 
views, attributed the poverty of the farmers in a great measure, to over tillage, 
instead of stock raising that was paying so well, and for which the climate is mote 
suitable. From some experience of farming in this country I agree with the 

* Express. 

• The following is my reply : 

" In your leader in the News Letter of this day yon say, " But let it not bo 
forgotten that we have as rich a soil as in any of the colonies." You arc certainly 
in error as regards the comparative richness of the soil of Ireland and the soil of 
Manitoba, as 1 will prove to any of your readers who may call at this office and see 
specimens of the soil of Manitoba, and who may read the opinions of settlers and oi* 
visitors to that part of the Dominion — such men as the Duke of Manchester, Marquis 
of Lome, and others. Fanners from Ontario praise the richness of the soil of Mani- 
toba, and I have stood on land in the Province of Ontario that had given a wheat 
crop for twenty year's without manure. Manure is a nuisance in some parts of the 
North-West, so much so that farmers were in the habit of parting it on the ice of a 
lake — called on that account "stinking lake " — that it might be carried away in the 
spring when the frost broke up; but 1he Government, on account of the fish, put a 
stop to this practice. 

"You advocate more tillage in this country, and assert, what is well known, that 
you have no sympathy with demagogues. In a Dublin paper of yesterd -i the writer 
says that if the farmers had paid less attention to the demagogues who an vised them 
to increased tillage, and had stuck to* what was paying them — cattle raising — they 
would not be in the poverty they are owing to the failure of the potatoe and other 
crops. Which advice is the Irish farmer to take? 

* l As to climate. Your readers know that the climate of this country is the cause 
of the uncertainty of crop raising. We have now something like Canadian weather, 
with this difference: we have not summer overhead; instead of the clear blue sky 
and wai m sun of Canada, we have fogs. I prefer the clear atmosphere. 

" I am satisfied that you have no ill- feeling against the colonies, and I assure you 
that I have none against my native land ; besides, I have some pecuniary interest in. 
her welfare — far more than I have in that of Canada ; and if our farmers could do 
nearly as well for themselves and families in this country as in Canada, I would not 
only cease to advocate emigration, but 1 would become one of the stronge t oppo- 
nents of the emigration of self-ieliant, honest and industrious farmers of Ulster. 
When I returned from Canada men accepted my report of the country as true; now 
these men are the best immigration agents. They have proved both countries, In 
all honesty, I regret the necessity of emigration as much as the News- Letter, but there 
is no hiding the fact from the farmers. When friends write from Canada and say 
come, they will go. There is an old saying, everybody knows where the shoe 
pinches him, and the farmers who have lost one-half"or three-fourths of the potatoe 

■crop, owing to the wet season, cannot begot to see any beauty in the Irish climate. 
No writing can controvert plain facts." 



Charles Toy. 
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1G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1SS3 



It is well known that my relatives are connected with the land and commercial 
interests of Ireland, and that I would personally be much benefitted if both interests 
were prosperous ; in fact, to a larger amount than my salary as emigration agent ; 
consequently Tcan appeal to the farmers and others as to the honesty of my motives 
in advocating emigration. Besides, as I said in my reply, every person knows where 
the shoe pinches himself, and the farmers know that the bad climate is the cause of 
failure of crops every second or third year. That there will be a large emigration 
this year of enterprising farmers, and of labourers and domestic servants, I am most 
hopeful. What the allowance of $100,000 by the Imperial Government towards assisted 
emigration may result in, is a moot 'question. I have had several conversations with 
the philanthropic Yere Foster, Esq., who paid Canada a visit last year. He thinks that 
it is a great mistake of the Government to confine the assistance to families and to 
refuse it to single men and women, and he has had an interview with the Lord 
Lieutenant on the subject. I quite agree with his opinion. If the able-bodied 
young men and women were assisted to emigrate they would either send for 
their parents, or, if they considered them too old to transplant, would remit 
them the means of living; but old people would only clog their energies — 
and the locomotion necessary in a start for life in a new country. As to pauper 
emigration, I have not much faith in the self-reliance of any persons reared in 
a workhouse, and, as far as this part of Ireland is concerned, I do not know any 
workhouse in which there are men and women able to do a fair day's work, 
except, perhaps, in the workhouse of this town. The demand for domestic servants 
and labourers in the country districts is more than equal to the supply. Professional 
paupers I should be sony to see emigrate to Canada. Of the small farmer class, the 
holders of from eight acres to ten acres, I am sure that many would be anxious to 
emigrate ; of the farm labourer class, thousands would gladly leave their poverty; but 
the guardians of the Poor Law Unions, as employers of labour, do not wish this 
class to leave, so that they won't assist them, and it is only through the Board of 
Guardians the Government will supply the funds. I proposed that independent 
committees should be formed in each county, who would furnish the Government 
with the names of those whom they considered deserving of assistance, and thatthos* 
committees should have the disbursement of the money. If this plan were adopted, 
twice £100,000 would not be sufficient for the purpose of assisting all who would take 
advantage of it. 

Of the emigration of a large number of the very reliant farmers of the north, and 
of farm labourers and female domestics servants who will pay their own passages, I 
am hopeful of a fully fifty per cent., larger number than last year. I am encouraged 
to hope from the numerous inquiries I meet in my journeyings through the country. 
I think that it is also a fair logical deduction, that if the emigration in 1832, after a 
bountiful harvest in 1881, was large, the emigration in 1883, after the bad harvest in 
1882, should be larger. In 1881, the farmers were afraid that the potatoe crop, the i 
staple crop, was so enormous that the price would be at the most two pence per stone, 
of fourteen pounds, and so it would but for the demand from the United States.. The 
crop for 1882 was almost an entire failure in some places, and potatoes are selling now 
at £l 15s., to £4 17s 6d per ton, and the greater quantity are coming from Scotland; 
The farmers are realizing the uncertainty of the climate as they find, as a rule, that 
one good harvest is succeeded by two bad harvests, so that even had they their farms, 
rent free, they could not live. When men aro in this strait, the letters from relatives i 
and neighbours who emigrated to Canada, and who speak most encouragingly of that 
country, are sure to decide them. Taking all these considerations into account, I 
think that I am not over sanguine when I entertain the hope of an increase by one- 
half over the emigration of last year. 

Luring the year I distributed by post and by parcel express, a very large num- 
ber of pamphlets, etc., with which I was kept well supplied from the London office. I 
find that the plan I have adopted for the past thirteen years, i.e., following the printed 
information by viva voce interviews, in fairs and markets and in my office, cannot be 

216 



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iQ Victoria, Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1S83 



improved upon, and, encouragod by my great success in the past, I am continuing it 
with sanguine hopes for the future. 

I have the honour to remain, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

CHARLES FOY. . 

The Honourable, 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



KEPOKT OF THE DUBLIN AGENT. 

(Mr. Thomas Connolly.) 

Northumberland House, 

Dublin, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report that 1 have faithfully carried out your in- 
structions and performed tho duties of this Agency with zeal, diligence and industry. 
The High Commissioner on his return from Canada, has been good enough to approve 
of my work, and I have many letters in this office from public bodies and 
eminent men, thanking me for my advice and information regarding Canadian 
emigration. Since the opening of the season I have had thousands of people 
xisit this office, to whom I paid erery attention and gave fitting advice. The 
maps and pamphlets supplied to me by the Department, I distributed freely in all 
parts of Ireland, and having advertised in the Dublin and provincial papers, their 
editors very courteously published many excellent letters I received from successful 
emigrants I sent out during the year. I have had a large number of letters from 
•clergymen, land owners, poor law guardians and farmers residing in various parts of 
the country, asking for information and advice. I had also many letters from resi- 
dents in France, South Africa, India and the United States of America, to which I 
replied in. the fullest and clearest manner. In the early part oi the soason I had a 
visit from the High Commissioner, and profitted very much by carrying out his in- 
fitructions, and acting on his advice. At the same time, I had the honour of a visit 
from His Grace the Archbishop of Toronto, who kindly introduced and recommended 
me to a large number of tho Eoman Catholic Bishops and Clergy all over the coun- 
try, and His Grace has been good enough to write an excellent letter on Canadian 
emigration, which was published in the daily Freeman's Journal, that will assist the 
work of this Agency for many years. When the Hoo. Sir Charles Tapper visited 
the west of Ireland in September last, to learn from personal observation the condi- 
tion of the small farmers and peasantry, he conferred with me on his return, and gave 
me much useful instruction and advice, and when Professor Gold win Smith presided 
over a section of the Social Science Congress in Dublin, he did not overlook the 
advantages of Canadian emigration in his splendid inaugural address. During the 
Bitting of the congress, he gave me tho privilege of making several speeches on sub- 
jects pertaining to Canada, in which, I believe I held my own pretty well, for 
hich the learned doctor very* kindly paid me a complimentary visit before he 
left Dublin. During the season I visited many rural districts in the south, east and 
west of Ireland, to converse with the farmers and distribute printed matter, I also 
attended the horse and cattle shows and the agricultural exhibitions annually held in 
Dublin, and on ihe invitation of a member of the Council, I visited the agricultural 
show at Wexford. Some time after, I went to the great October fair of Ballinaclue, 
jBand before I returned to Dublin, I travelled over a large part of the County Gal way. 
" believe I am justified in reporting that a good cla.ss of emigrants went to Canada 
m Ireland this season, and that a largo proportion of them possessed ample means 
to setue on land in Manitoba, or to purchase farms in the older Provinces. In the 

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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188$ 






early spring, with the opening of navigation, my friend Mr. John Haverty, of Win 
nipeg, who had been to Ireland on a visit, took out with him about a dozen stou 
farm labourers, and he has written to me to say that all have refunded the money 
advanced to them for passage, and while some of them have sent considerable sums 
home, he still holds several hundred dollars of their savings, with which he purposes 
settling them on land next season. Almost continu >usly throughout the year, I have 
sent from this Agency to Canada, a large supply of skilled and unskilled labour. 
Through a philanthrophic society patronised and largely aided by Miss Pirn of Monk- 
town, about a dozen families were sent to Canada in the summer, comfortably 
provided for the voyage, and furnished with a little money to help them after land- 
ing. 

Last year the guardians of the South Dublin Union, on my recommendation, 
sent out thirty-seven men and twenty-eight women to Canada, and the favourable 
reports which the bulk of these emigrants sent homo induced the guardians to send 
out forty-two single females last July, and forty able-bodied labourers in August, 
who were employed on leaving the ship. These emigrants were selected with the 
greatest care by a committee of the guardians, aided by the Doctor and Chaplain. 
They were all supplied with comfortable outfits and I had to give a very full expla- 
nation to the local Government Board regarding their reception in Canada and the 
prospect of their profitable employment there. Each batch of emigrants was sent 
out in charge of a responsible officer employed by the Union, and the excellent 
reports which the officers made, on their return home, were extensively published 
in the leading daily papers, and I am satisfied the success of these emigrants 
influenced the Imperial Government very much to cany out the emigration clause 
of the Arrears Act, through the Agency of the poor law boards all over Ireland. 

Although I have kept back my Keport until the last moment I regret that I • n 
cannot give the Government statistics of Irish emigration for this year, as the 
returns will not be completed until after the end of December. However, from those 
to hand 1 learn that the number of emigrants who went from Irish ports to Canada i 
in 1876 and the three succeeding years, averaged 862. The number rose in 1880 to 
3,052, and in 1881 to 3,566. Not being able to procure the Government statistics in i 
time I wrote to the steamship companies who very kindly furnished me with returns 
from which I learn the Irish emigrants who sailed by the Allan Line to Canada, 
from the 1st of January, to December 8th, i8b2, numbered 4,941 ; by the Dominion 
Line 1,182, and by the Beaver Line 584, making a total of 6,707, or more than 
twice the number of Irish emigrants who went to Canada last year. Although the 
full number ol emigrants who left Ireland for all parts from the 1st of January, 
to 1st of December, 1882, was only 86,852, as compared with 93,624 for the corres- 
ponding eleven months of 18b0, it is clear from these figures that emigration from 
Ireland to Canada is becoming more popular every year, and I am satisfied it will 
increase still more, for the mass of the Irish people now realise the well oidered: 
freedom enjoyed in Canada and the wealth of its resources. 

Without taking into account the emigration promoted by the Imperial Govern- 
ment to relieve the congested districts of population, 1 am satisfied from public reports 
and intercourse with the people, that a large number of desirable emigrants will leave 
Ireland for Canada next season. One day last month two gentlemen called on me to 
advise about selling out their large estate,- and investing in Ontario farms or North- 
Western lands, and a large number of young men with whom I correspond are making 
preparations to start in the sprii g. 

The Irish farmers can now sell the interest in their holdings and acquire the 
means of settling in new countries, so we may calculate on a considerable emigration 
of that class in future. During the land agitation, on principle, they .would not leave, 
Their policy has been to hold a firm grip of the land. They held on to it tenaciously, 
and successfully contested many of the landlord's legal privileges. Beyond doubt the 
passing of the Land Act has been a substantial victory for the farmers. The aggre- 
gate rental of Irish lands will be reduced in future about £3,(i00,000 annually 
The farmer's rent is now fixed by the Land Court, and he is secure in the 

218 



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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 






possession of his farm on the sole condition of regularly paying the legal rent. The 
law in future insures him the full value of all the improvements he makes on the 
land. If he has one- fourth the price in hand, the Government lending three-fourths, 
he can purchase the fee simple without let or hindrance. The farmer can at anytime 
dispose of his interest in the farm to the highest bidder. 

During the last Session of the Imperial Parliament,an Act was passed dealing with 
the arrears of rent which had accumulated through a succession of bad harvests. By 
this Act the tenants will profit to the extent of nearly £2,000,000 sterling. I assist- 
ed a little in promoting that very useful measure, in reference to which I had the 
honour of receiving the following letter: — 

10 Downing Street, 

Whitehall, 31st January, 1882. 

Sir — I am directed by Mr. Gladstone to convey to you his best thanks for your 
interesting letter and its inelosure, which is herewith returned. He is also grateful 
for your kind expressions, 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Ewd. Hamilton. 

Mr. Thos. Connolly. 

It is to be desired that these remedial measures will in due course benefit this 
country and assist to promote peace and good will amongst the people. However, 
so far their beneficial effects are not very apparent. In town or country there is not 
much employment for the working people, and there is a scarcity of food already in 
the remote and poorer districts, and the sufferers have little prospect of relief, but 
must break up their miserable little homes and go into the workhouses. 

The dear old land is not a plentiful or a pleasant country to reside in at present. 
Li addition to twelve or fourteen thousand constabulary, there is a large army of 
horse, foot and marines employed to enforce the most stringent Coercion Act that has 
been applied to Ireland in modern times — an Act in which is embodied the memorable 
cuifew of William the Conqueror. 

Without the aid of manufacturing industry, I believe the agricultural products 
lof Ireland are insufficient to support in reasonable cemfort even its present moderate 
population of 5,1*74,836, especially when the chief part of the rich and fertile lands 
iare devoted to the raising of cattle, while the bulk of the rural population are 
icrowded into the remote and comparatively unproductive districts. 

The area of Ireland is little more than 20,000,000 acres, of which one-half is 
grass laud; water, barren mountain, waste land, marsh, bog, woods aud plantations, 
with roads and fences, cover one-lOurth of the island. Nearly 2,000,000 acres are 
under meadow and clover, while of the entire area only 3,119,275 acres are under 
tillage. 

This year the grain crop gave a fair average yield, but owing to a wet, pro- 
cted harvest, the quality was not so good as in dryer seasons. The root crops 
ve been under the average, and the potatoes have been so bad that in many districts 
of the country the whole of next year's seed will have to be purchased. However, 
jthis has been one of the best years on record for the grazers, and the prices of stock 
i [have been exceedingly high throughout the season. In the shipment from Irish 
ports this season, there has been the large increase of over 200.000 cattle, 110. 000 
pigs, and 5,000 in the number of horses ; but there has been a diminution of about 
20,000 in the number of sheep exported. 

The importance and value to Great Britain of Irish Agricultural products can be 
readily conceived from the nature and extent of these exports, and their magnitude 
will be more apparent if contrasted with the following imports to Liverpool from 
Canada and the United States for the past two years : — 

219 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1885 



Imported. 

1881.. 



Cattle. 

43,200 
60,612 



Imported. 



1882., 
1881.. 



Fresh Beef. 
Cwt. 

286,810 
480,955 



Fresh Mutton. 
Cwt. 

19,312 

29,862 



Fresh Pork. 
Cwt. 

2,306 
13,051 



Sheep. 

81,450 
65,436 

Bacon. 
Boxes. 

312,121 
566,071 



There is so large an area of Ireland devoted to the raising of live stock, that the 
extent of land uuder cereal and green crops is necessarily limited ; in 1882, there were 
837,919 acres under potatoes, 1,397,304 acres under oats, 187,443 acres under barley, 
and only 152,720 acres under wheat. Consequently, to meet the requirements of the 
country, there had to be imported more than a million quarters of wheat and other 
grain, and about 200,000 bags and sacks of flour, so that with their staple exports of 
live stock, butter, linen, whiskey and porter, the people of Ireland have to provide 
a part of their food, pay rent for laud, and purchase many million pounds' worth of 
English and foreign goods ; a great deal of which, with due encouragement, energy 
and enterprise, might be manufactured in Ireland, to profitably employ the people, 
and supplement the wealth produced from the soil. 

A Report presented to the House of Commons, on the 25th of April, 1872, givea 
the number of proprietors, who held land in fee simple, or on long leases, at chief 
rents, as 19,547, of whom, twenty-seven, own over 20,000 acres each, and forty-seven, 
from 10,000 to 20,000 acres each. The entire rental, for valuation purposes, is set 
down at £10,180,434, but the actual rent is a least 25 per cent, above that amount. 
The number of absentee proprietors is set down at 517, whose aggregate estates con- ( J" 
tain 5,129,169 acres, valued at £2,217,840. The following table, given in the census, 
fur 1881, just published, gives the number of agricultural holdings, persons, inhabitedj 
houses, out-houses and steadings : — 



Holdings not exceeding 1 acre 

do ' above 1 acre and not exceeding 5 acres 

do do 5 do 10 do 

do do 10 do 15 do 

do do 15 do 20 do 

do do 20 do 30 do 

do do 30 do 50 do 

do do 50 do 100 do 

do do 100 do 200 do 

do do 200 do 500 do 

do do 500 acres 

Total 



Number 




of 


Persons. 


Holdings.. 




16,879 


73,504 


61,751 


269,658 


82,399 


414,851 


65,424 


364,513 


57,013 


343,078 


65,504 


432,145 


65,709 


502,212 


51,566 


496.115 


21,570 


278,469 


8,881 


162, 169 


2,413 


81,163 


499,109 


3,417,877 



Inhabited 
Houses. 



16,369 
57,838 
82,462 
69,066 
63,029 
77,125 
87,667 
85,373 
48,507 
28,693 
14,876 

631,005 



Outbouseg 

and 
Steadings. 



20,624 

87,34$ 
159,357#~; 
167,787 
175,193 
242,371 
303,751 
309,321 
175,57* 
105,501 

50,71! 



1,797,5* 



From this table it appears that of the total number 499, 109 agricultural holdings i 
Ireland there are 348,970 not exceeding thirty acres each. Of these there are 283,46 
not exceeding twenty acres each, 226,453 not exceeding fifteen acres each, 161,029 n( 
exceeding ten acres each, 78,630 not exceeding five acres each, and 16,879 not axceedin 
one acre each. The proportion of population living on agricultural holdings nc 
exceeding thirty acres is : For Ireland, 36'7 per cent. ; for Leinster, 24*1 per cent. 
Munster, 23*4 per cent. ; Ulster, 41*8 per cent. ; and Connaught, 6ft-8 per ccn 
Where the extreme of this condition is met with is in the County of Mayo, in whic 
70*9 per cent, of the population live on holdings not exceeding thirty acres 

220 



1G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1833 



IT- 1 on holdings above thirty acres each, and but 12 por cent, reside in towns. 
While in Ireland there are 41,023 families who live in houses with only one room 
each and built of mud or other perishable materials. About one-third of all the 
agricultural holdings are not above ten acres each, while one-sixth are only five 
acres each or under. If the land which comprises these small holdings was good, or 
even of a fair average fertility on the whole, and the climate of Ireland favourable 
for tillage husbandry, with good local markets similar to the great manufacturing 
centres of England, the Irish small farmer and cottier, like the peasant proprietors 
of other countries, might live and thrive ; but a large proportion of these small 
holdings are reclaimed bog, marsh or mountain in remote out of the way districts, 
thirty acres of which free of rent could not support a family half so comfortably as 
they could live by their labour in any part of the Dominion of Canada. In many 
parts of Ulster the small farmers work at hand loom weaving and kindred occu- 
pations in connection with the linen trade. And in years past many thousand small 
farmers and cottiers in the west of Ireland left their homes and families annually to 
assist at farm operations in England, and returned at the close of the season with 
sufficient money to pay the rent and seed their land the following spring. But a 
succession of bad harvests and foreign agricultural competition limited the demand 
for their labour in England, and diminished the products and value of their bits of 
land at home. While, as if to aggravate the miserable condition of the poor, man) 
pf the resident gentry, as they aver, through the non-payment or reduction of rents, 
were obliged to reduce the number of their servants and labourers. 

The experience of last winter must have convinced the Imperial Government 
that the increasing destitution of the people could not be effectually dealt with in the 
ordinary manner, through the Poor Laws, therefore, they introduced an emigration 
clause in the Arrears Act, passed last Session, and Parliament, after much argu- 
iog, voted the very inadequate sum of £100,000 to enable families to emigrate from 
chose districts in which it is stated the population is congested. The cost for each per- 
son is not to exceed £5. The Lord Lieutenant has alread}' scheduled thirty Unions, 
parts of Unions, chiefly in the west of Ireland, and the gui.rdians are empowered 
So select the emigrants and to supplement the Government grant from the rates 
hen necessary, while Mr. Tuke's London Committee, which did so much good last 
jeason, will assist several of the more impoverished Unions. The guardians of those 
Unions not scheduled can now use the rates for emigration, and, if necessary, borrow 
■noney from the Government at a low rate of interest. I have given the two com- 
missioners appointed to carry out this immigration scheme, the fullest information 
(regarding the Dominion of Canada, and my office is close to the Custom Home wb re 
they are located, if they should require my services. I have no doubt but a large 
jiumbor of these poor families will go out to Canada in the coming season, and I am 
ally confident they will be treated with kindness and consideration by the Govern- 
nent and people of the Dominion. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

THOS. CONNOLLY, 
^he Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



EEPOET OF THE BRISTOL AGENT. 

(Mr. J. W. Down.) 

Bath Bridge, Bristol, 30th, December 1882. 

Sir,— -I have the honour to submit for your information the following Eeportfor 
e year just passing away. I have the gratification of again being in a position to 

221 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



report an increased emigration from these western counties daring the present year ; 
and also that the emigrants were of a very desirable class. As instructed, I have 
kept on posting pamphlets all through the year to farmers, and great success has 
attended these measures. Daring the year I have issued 297 tickets to parties going 
direct to Canada by the Allan Line, as against 182, Jin 1881. One hundred and 
twenty-eight of these were issued to farmers or men going out with good means to 
farm. Many took their families at the same time ; others have sent for them since, 
as against seventy-eight of this class in 1881 . Fifty-eight of these farmers booked 
through to Winnipeg, the remainder to various parts of Quebec and Ontario. The 
Great "Western Steamship Line from Bristol landed at Quebec during the year, 
eighty-eight saloon and 341 steerage passengers. Out of this latter number I gave 
them about sixty ; ten of these were for Winnipeg, the rest for Ontario. 

The following will show the rate at which the business of this office has been 
increasing: During 1879 i\\e number of letters received at this office was 907; this 
year it has reached nearly 4,000, including many from New Zealand, Australia, the 
Cape, India and Ceylon. 1 have had also, several applications from the States of 
Iowa and Nebraska for maps, etc., on Manitoba. A larger number of persons than 
usual holding prepaid tickets from Bristol to different parts in the Dominion of 
Canada, by the Allan Line, have had them changed at this office. Considerably over 
1,000 souls have gone to Canada this year through my hands. 

1 have received many letters this year from my North-West emigrants, all of 
whom are satisfied and not one complains. These letters have appeared from time 
to time in the Bristol weekly papers. During the year I must have distributed 
60,000 pamphlets, besides a great quantity of printed matter received at different 
times from the Messrs. Allan. 

I know of large numbers of young farmers now preparing to start early next 
spring, and I fully expect next year to improve my business very much, both as 
regards class and number. Our competitors in business have been active, as usual, 
more particularly respecting Queensland emigration ; but very few go to that 
Colony beyond those who get free passages, and are of a class who would go to any 
country as long as their passages were paid for them. Canada, I need scarcely say, 
needs none of this class. 

My opinion is that generally any young man who is not able to raise the small 
amount required to enable bim to reach Canada, is really no use to the Dominion or 
any other Colony. There are numbers of young, strong, able men in our work 
houses, and I hear some talk of the authorities of many parishes proposing to send 
such as would go abroad, in order to get rid of a great expense. All young men in 
Unions, over the age of sixteen, are, in my opinion, not a desirable class of emi- 
grants, and none should be assisted out to Canada over that age out of any Union. 
On the 6th inst. I received some apples and specimens of wheat, barley and oat 
from Ontario by S.S. "Bristol." On the Bristol great market day the apples and speci- 
mens were examined by many farmers from ail parts. The apples were pronounced 
by all to be excellent, and capable of comparison with our finest English fruit, and 
as most farmers begged one or two, they were soon scattered all over these western 
counties. The farmers were much astonished at such a variety of wheat and oats, 
the production of one country. They spoke highly of the quality of the samples 
Such little exhibits as this will do much good. This year the Canadian cattle trade 
with this port has again been small, but I think satisfactory, as I have heard no 
complaint*. I think, since beef and mutton always fetch a good price in this market 
this trade should increase. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN W. DOWN. 

The Honourable, 

The Minister of Agriculture 
Ottawa. 

222 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14,) A. 1383 



QUARANTINE OFFICERS REPORTS, 



No. 21, 

ANNUAL REPORT OF GROSSE ISLE QUARANTINE STATION, 

(F. MONTIZAMBERT, M.L.) 



| 

J 



Quebec, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report that no vessel whatsoever was presented at 
Hie Quarantine Station of Gross Isle for medical inspection during the year 1882. 

Meteorological observations for many years past prove that a winter with, 
unusual precipitation of snow and rain, such as Hie present one, is usually followed 
by a hot and dry summer, Should next season not prove an exception to this rule, 
the large immigration then expected, authoritatively estimated already at over 
150,000, can hardly fail to include a considerable number of cases of infectious 
disease. 

For this reason, in addition to those already urged, I would respectfully beg to 
press upon your attention the expediency of revising and modernizing the Quaran- 
tine Regulations — which were framed more than thirty years ago, when all passen- 
gers came by sailing vessels — to meet the changed conditions of the present 
day. 

In my last Annual Report I had the honour to submit some observations upon 
this important subject for your consideration. And now, in view of the possibility 
of your taking action in the matter, I venture again to bring before you the 
expediency of providing for certain works at the Station which I deem to be urgently 
required. 

1. The fitting up and furnishing of the new hospital, and the completion of its 
exterior. At present the only available hospital accommodation at the Station, for 
all classes of diseases, is the old small-pox shed. 

2. The providing telegraphic (or, better, telephonic) communication between 
the Station and the mainland, recommended in my Annual Report for 1875, and in 
letters before each Session since that date; also telephonic communication between 
the different divisions of the Station. 

3. The providing for separate steamboat service for the Station, not by market- 
boat, as at present. 

4. New quarters for the Protestant Chaplain, the present parsonage being well- 
nigh uninhabitable. 

5. If the present or anjr similar regulations are to be enforced^ the extension 
and increased frontier of the western pier in the healthy division, as suggested in 
my Annual Reports for 1875 and 1876. 

A survey was made for this in November, 1876, and, I believe, a Report, with plan 
and estimates, drawn up by the then Chief Engineer in the spring of 1877. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

FRED'K MONTIZAMBERT, M.D., Edin., L.R.C.S., 

Medical Superintendent. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agri culture, 
Ottawa. 

223 



£6 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



Quarantine Station, Grossc Isle. 



1882. 



April 
do 



24... 
30... 



May 31.. 



June 30... 



July 
do 


10... 
31... 


August 


31... 


Sept. 


30... 



Oct. 



Nor. 



Statement of Expenditure , Calendar Year 1882. 



Balance pay-list of wintering party.., 

Pay-list for April 

Steamboat service, Capt. Tremblay ., 
Contingencies, as per voucher 



Pay-list for May 

Steamboat service, Capt. Tremblay 
Contingencies, as per voucher 



Pay-list for June. 

Medicines, J. E. Burke $36 95 

do E. Giroux et frere 29 90 



Printing and stationery 
do do 



M. Miller & Son $38 60 

Dawson & Co 23 15 



General supplies- 
Dry goods, P. Gorman et frere $486 45 

Hardware, Beaudet & Chinic 243 21^ 

Groceries, Francois Auger 98 35 

Flour, J. B. Renaud & Co 92 70 

Straw, Fenelon Vczina 30 00 

Coal-oil, Ac, -Renaud & Co 21 87 

Wheat and vegetables, Leon Arel 8 80 



Contingencies, as per voucher. 



Steamboat service, Capt. Tremblay 

Pay-list for July , 

Steamboat service, Capt. Tremblay 
Contingencies, as per voucher 



Pay-list for August 

Steamboat service, Capt. Tremblay 
Contingencies, as per voucher 



Pay-list for September 

Steamboat service, Capt. Tremblay 
Contingencies, as per voucher 



31... Pay-list for October 

Steamboat service, Capt. Tremblay 
Contingencies, as per voucher 



30. 



Advance pay-list of wintering party 

Pay-list for November .* , 

Steamboat service, Capt. Tremblay 

Medicines, J. E. Burke $18 95 

do E. Giroux et frere 2 00 



Printing and stationery, M, Miller & Son 

General supplies — 

Hardware, Beaudet & Chinic $293 15 

Flour, J. B. Renaud & Co 45 75 

Coal-oil, Renaud <fc Co 9 70 

Groceries, Francois Auger 6 75 

Meat and vegetables, Leon Arel 5 75 

Dry goods, P. Gorman et frere , 2 00 

Centingencies, as per voucher 



Carried forward 



224 



$ cts. 



369 17 

150 00 

30 00 


531 08 

150 00 
278 00 


531 08 
66 85 

61 75 



981 38 
38 60 




531 08 
150 00 
34 80 


531 08 
150 00 
144 00 


531 08 
150 00 
482 00 


531 08 

150 00 

33 00 



531 08 
150 00 



20 95 
11 25 



363 10 
41 32 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1S83 



Quarantine Station, Grosse Isle — Concluded. 



Statement of Expenditure, §c. — Concluded. 
Brought forward 



Cr. 

By Deposit to credit of Receiver-General, sales in April 

do do do May 

do do do June 

do do do July 

do do do August 

do do do September. 

do do do October ..., 

do do do November . 



Total for Calendar Year 1882 



Synopsis of Expenditure, Fiscal Year 1881-82. 

Pay of officers 

General supplies 

Medicines and medical comforts 

Printing and stationery 

Steamboat service 

Contingencies 

(Synopsis of Expenditure, Calendar Year 1882. 
Pay of officers , 

General supplies 

Medicines and medical comforts 

Printing and stationery , 

Steamboat service 

Contingencies 

Synopsis of Expenditure, Half-Year to Zlst December, 1882. 

Pay of officers 

General supplies 

Medicines and medical comforts 

Printing and stationery , 

Steamboat service 

Contingencies , 



$ cts. 



21 61 
28 72 
10 63 
46 08 

22 68 
21 34 
16 72 

5 79 



4,860 52 

1,437 73 

6(3 85 

67 50 

1,200 00 

808 10 



4,856 99 
1,170 91 
87 80 
73 00 
1,200 00 
1,081 72 



3,171 40 

250 49 

20 95 

11 25 

900 00 

735 12 



% cts. 
8,643 99 



173 57 



8,470 42 



8,440 70 



8,470 42 



5,089 21 



FEEDEEICK MONTIZAMBERT, M.r., Edin., 
Medical Superintendent. 



225 



14—15 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No 14.) A. 1883 



No. 22. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE HALIFAX QUARANTINE STATION. 
(W. N.|Wickwire, M.D.) 



Quarantine Station, 

Halifax, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my Annual Report for the year 1882. 

I am able to state that although a large number of persons suffering from 
various kinds of disease, have been brought into this port during the year, yet not 
many cases were of that character which required removal to the Quarantine 
Station. 

On the 5th February the S.S. "Peruvian" of the Allan Line, arrived from 
Liverpool with one case of small-pox, which was removed to the Quarantine 
Hospital. On the 17th February, the same ship arrived from Boston with three more 
cases of Small-Pox ; these were also removed to Lawlor's Island ; all four persons 
belonged to the ship; three recovered and one unfortunately died ; all reasonable 
precautions were taken to prevent the spread of the disease, consistent with the 
interests of all concerned, and in accordance with the Quarantine regulations of the 
port. 

During the summer two of H. M. War ships arrived from the West Indies having 
left there in consequence of having had one or more cases of yellow fever on board ; 
the men on their arrival here, however, had quite recovered. 

The need of some house near the wharf, where nearly all steamers land their pas- 
sengers, for the removing to, of immigrants, particularly children suffering from 
slight ailments, was severely felt last winter. On several occasions, children belong- 
ing to immigrants, on arrival were found to be more or less ill from colds and from 
feverish conditions, which might be the beginning of any of the milder forms of 
childrens' or other diseases, and who, properly speaking, should have been kept from 
proceeding to their destinations by railway, until it was found if any actual disease 
developed itself. This in the case referred to, was not done in consequence of the 
parents being anxious to take them along at once, and because no provision had been 
made for taking care of them when once off the ship. The distance to the Quarantine 
station was too great to remove young children in winter, and besides there were cases 
of small pox there at the time. The trouble that occurred at Quebec by disease 
having been developed on the railway train, was under the circumstances scarcely 
avoidable. To prevent a ro-occurrence, provision is now being made by your De- 
partment for the taking care of and keeping under medical observation such caseSj 
until they are able to travel with safety to themselves and to others with whom thej 
may come in contact. 

In this connection I would respectfully suggest that, if possible, a second quaran- 
tine station be established for winter use. The present station — Lawlor's Island — if 
admirably adapted for the purpose during the milder months, and we could scarcely 
do without it in case of a ship arriving with a large number of cases of disease, foi 
instance cholera, as in the case of the S.S. " England " shortly before Confederation 
when several hundred were under treatment at one time. The distance from the pori 
is so great, and the fact that almost every season, of late years, ice forms around th< 
nearer approaches to the Island, necessitating the taking of patients many miles ou1 
to sea, and come back to the Island at the furthest point of land, render it unsuitabl< 
for a winter station. The exposure, and sometimes danger, attending the removal o 

226 



. 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



patients under such circumstances are very great. If a small piece of land could be 
obtained on either side of the harbour, and a cheap building erected, which might 
answer for temporary residence of the Steward of Lawlcr's Island, as well as a hospi- 
tal for winter months, a desirable and almost necessary object would be accomplished. 

1 may mention that the buildings at Lawlor's Island are in fair repair, but need 
painting exteriorly. 

The Port of Halifax is rapidly becoming a most important one, requiring a 
large portion of the time, and almost constant attention, of the Medical Officer. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



W. N. WICKWIEE, M.D., 

Inspecting Physician. 



14— 15J 



227 



ictoria. Sessional Papers ('^o.l4.) A. 1883 



No. 23. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE QUARANTINE STATION, ST. JOHN, N. B. 

(W. S. Harding, M.D.) 

St. John, N. B., 30th December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my Report for the year 1882. 

The ship "Senator Webber" arrived here from Rio De Janeiro on the 26th July, 
and was inspected. 

The ship " Importer " arrived here from Rio De Janerio on the 18th September, 
and was inspected. 

At the time these vessels were at Rio, both yellow fever and small-pox existed 
there, and consequently they were submitted for inspection on arrival here, pilots 
having been instructed to consider such place for the time an " infected port." Neither 
of these vessels were detained, no conditions existing to make it necessary. 

The three-masted schooner " Lavinia F. Warren " arrived here from Savannah, 
and laid to for inspection, one of the hands beiug sick. The sickness being found to 
be intermittent fever, the vessel was not detained. 

On board of the schooner "Isaac Burpee," at St. Marks, St. Domingo, in March 
last, some of the crew were taken down with small-pox. After sailing from there, all 
on. board (nine in number), one excepted, took the disease, and on or after her arrival 
at Providence, R. I., her first destination, two had died. The vessel remained at 
Providence thirty days, and then sailed for Newfoundland ; then for Sydney, Cape 
Breton; then for St. John, arriving here on 1st July. During the stay of the vessel 
at Providence (thirty days) the disease came to an end, and some process of disinfec- 
tion was used for the vessel, but the clothing of the men who had died had been put 
away in their chests, and was not disinfected. The treatment of the vessel, and the 
fact of going to and remaining at several ports before coming here, it wa3 supposed, 
exempted the vessel from the necessity of being inspected, and she was not inspected. 
But the clothing remained in their original state, and were to have been left on shore 
until friends of deceased living in Nova Scotia should come for them. 

Upon discovering the foregoing facts, I took charge of the clothing and sent 
them to Partridge Island. On examination there I found some of them suspicious 
looking, and there was uncertainty as to all ; and considering the fact of continued 
seclusion from the air, I thought there might be small-pox infection in them. At the 
Island the clothing was disinfected, and one lot delivered to the proper claimant 
The other lot is still in safe keeping. 

Although the above narration is somewhat long, it seems worth while to state 
the facts, as being illustrative of the insidious ways in which infection may be 
brought in. 

In January last application was made by the Manager of the St. John and Maine 
Railway to the Department for advice respecting the bringing of corpses from the 
States. In reply it was pointed out to the Manager that prevention of the evils 
recited was entirely within their own power, and suggestion made that they should 
act so as to prevent them. The following circular will show that the Company have 
acted on the advice given. 

" Corpses of persons who have died of contagious or infectious diseases, will not 
be hauled in the trains of this Railway, either in hermetically sealed cases or other- 
wise. 

" In other instances, corpses will only be taken when accompanied by a certificate, 
signed by a respectable well known medical officer, stating that death did not result 

223 






k 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A iS?J 



from a contagious or infectious disease. The certificate must also distinctly specify 
the name of the disease, or nature of the casualty that occasioned death. 

"Corpses will not bo hauled on passenger trains, but on freight trains only, 
and in all cases the freight charges must be prepaid." 

H. D. McLeod, 

Superintendent, 

J. Murray Kay, 
Manager, St. John and Maine Railway Company. 

REMARKS ON QUARANTINE. 

The diseases of mankind which kill, and other causes of death, may, according 
to Dr. Christison, be divided into nine groups* or classes of agents. In connection 
with that class usually placed in registration returns at the head of thelist, viz: 
infectious epidemic diseases, or diseases capable of epidemic evolution, I have a few 
remarks to make before asking you to consider the quarantine branch of preventative 
measures against such diseases. 

On the one hand the causes of death under the eight other groups, for example, 
deaths from violence, either accidental or of design, inflammations of all the organs 
or parts of the bod7/, pthisis, etc., etc., can scarcely be said to be preventable through 
any provision of the State or Government, or if so, in but a limited way. 

On the other hand the infectious or contagious class of diseases, few as they are 
in number — some ten or twelve — cause probably one-quarter of all deaths which occur, 
notwithstanding that the details under the other groups will show the causes to be 
vast in number. 

Now the most important thing to note regarding this class of diseases is the fact 
that the whole of the number, in contrast to the other classes, are preventable and by 
means which are direct in their bearing— that is to say by isolation. And in respect 
to the chief number of such diseases isolation affords the only safeguaid — one of 
these, however, viz: smali-pox, has, through vaccination, a valuable auxiliary 
means. 

The late Sir I. Y. Simpson, in a monograph written a short time before his death 
entitled " Proposal to stamp out small-pox and other contagious diseases by isola- 
tion," said : "That formidable quaternion of diseases, small-pox, scai latino, measles 
and hooping cough, kill annually in Europe over half a million of its inhabitants." 

Include the world in the estimate, and add two others to the list, viz : yellow 
fever, always more or less active in most tropical countries, and cholera, in varying 
degrees in India, frequently striding forth from its lair, a frightful number of deaths 
annually may be computed to result from such six diseases, which, according to the 
authority just named, the late Sir Thomas Watson and other authorities equally emi- 
nent, might be " abolished," they say, by isolation. 

It is under this system (isolation) that quarantine has its place ; but it is not alone 
all sufficient for preventing the spread of contagious diseases. As ships come to Canada 
from all parts of the world, so, in such way we may from time to time receive a 
share of whatever contagious diseases exist at any foreign ports anywhere throughout 
the world. Looking at this fact we must regard quarantine as the most important arm 
of disease prevention ; and for this and other reasons it has wisely been placed under 
the management of the Federal Government, which can, on occasion, deal in a more 
•Bummary manner than could local authorities with the formidable diseases, such as 
cholera, capable of inflicting vast evil on the whole Dominion. 

In considering, however, what is requisite for a complete system for preventing 
the spread of contagious diseases through the direct means spoken of (isolation), we 
ire not to lose sight of the fact that such diseases can come into the country by land 
rom the States as well as by vessels from all parts. This fact has been alluded to as 
essening the value of quarantine ; but I think it is not a correct view to take. Had 
[Harantine been vaunted as in itself all sufficient, this fact might be cited to qualify 

229 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188S 



its claim : quarantine needs ay its complement that local authorities should have a 
standing provision for enforcing the isolation of the important contagious diseases, 
such as small-pox. cholera, etc., come from where they may. This, I will assume, is 
in existence throughout the Dominion, or if not, should be arranged wherever 
deficient. By such double provision — quarantine and local authorities — a complete 
system of prevention results, in so far as legal enactment can secure it. 

But there is yet another requisite for securing exemption from the diseases in 
question. It is this: means should be taken, by distributing printed matter, as prac- 
tised in Ontario, to teach people the value of isolation, and how to manage it so 
that it may be efficient. The Ontario example is wise, and speaks loudly for their 
discernment in sanitary matters. People should be taught to act in their own behalf 
instead of leaving all to Hercules. 

Dr. Lyon Playfair, a few years ago said, in England, that isolation of all the 
infectious diseases would be made confpulsory at some future day, but that the public 
had not been so educated up that it would answer to deal with all such diseases in 
in that way yet. 

I must now refer again to one point touched upon, but still needing a few re- 
marks for the completion of the subject. 

Infectious disease, as is sometimes mentioned, may come by land from the 
States, arriving there in vessel or otherwise as may be. Yes, but there is another 
fact which has been lost sight of, and never mentioned. Such diseases may come 
here in vessels from any part of the world and also go to the States by land. 

On the one hand, therefore, as in the States they have, an^ rigidly enforce, laws 
to exclude disease which might come in ships, we also should >lo. By good quaran- 
tine enactments and practice, we and they, not only preserve people at home, but 
likewise fulfil an international* obligation, whether the obligation be expressed or 
only implied. No doubt whatever that at New York, and other of the seaports of 
the States they frequently stop cholera, small-pox, etc., and so preserve not only 
themselves but us their neighbours. 

Although it is true that our Quarantine Law and Eegulations are as good, if not 
better, than any others elsewhere,still it might be expe'dient to amend the regulations 
in some slight particulars. One of these I will mention. Let the regulations be, as 
now, imperative as to the detention of all the formidable diseases such as cholera, 
smallpox, typhus and typhoid fever, etc., but confer on the inspecting physicians 
discretionary power as to the manner of dealing with the less formidable diseases, 
such as measles, whooping cough and perhaps one or two others. 

Dr. Copcland, in his dictionary, speaking about quarantine, says : — 

"With highly qualified and duly remunerated health officers, there can be little 
to dread, either too great severity on the one hand, or too great laxity on the other, 
even should much be left to their discretion." 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

W. S. HAEDING, M.E.C.S., Eng. 

Medical Superintendent. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture. 






230 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



No. 24. 

ANNUAI/JEEPOET OF PICTOU, N. S., QUAEANTINE STATION. 
(Henry Kirkwood, M. D.) 



Quarantine Station, 

Pictou, N. S., December 30th, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my Eeport for the year 1882. 

I am again able to state that no case of disease requiring removal to the Quar- 
antine Station has occurred during the past year. 

I would also report that both of the buildings are in good repair, and ready 
should any emergency arise. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obededient servant, 

HENEY KIEKWOOD, M.D. 

Inspecting Physician. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 









231 



4G Victoria, Sessional Papers (No,14) A. 188$ 



No. 25. 

ANNUAL EEPOET OF CHAELOTTETOWN, P.E.I., QUAEANTINE STATION. 

(W. H. Hobkirk, M.D.) 



Quarantine Office, 
Charlottetown, P/E. Island, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my Eeport for the year 1882. 

There have been no cases of infectious diseases requiring [removal to the Quaran- 
tine Hospital during the year. 

The Hospital has been repaired, a small stable built, and a further supply of 
much needed necessaries provided; it is now in a most efficient state and ready for any 
emergency. 

There have been some cases of diseases incidental to sea-faring men, which after 
inspection have been removed, if necessary, to the City Hospital, where they received 
medical attendance, and were carefully nursed by the Sisters of Charity. 

I have exercised the usual care and precautions with regard to all classes of 
steamers and other vessels arriving in this port, and when required have givem 
certificates of health to vessels proceeding to foreign ports. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. H. HOBKIEK, F.E.S., Eng., 

Medical Superintendent. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



232 



k 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



No. 26. 

ANNUAL REPORT ON LAZARETTO, TRACADIE, N.B. 
(A. C. Smith, M. D.) 



Newcastle, N. B., 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my Annual Report on the Tracadio Lazaretto 
for the year 1882. 

There are at present twenty-six inmates of the Institution ; eleven males and fif- 
teen females. All stages of leprosy are represented, from its early form3 of fingers con- 
tracted tillthey touched the palm of the hand, and open ulcers,to those of blindness and 
deformity. There was one death during the year, and five new patients were 
admitted. The increase in the number of inmates, when compared with previous 
years, does not by any means imply that the disease is increasing in the district, for, 
as there are several at nearly the same stage of the malady, it is more than probable 
that a number of deaths will, before long, reduce the number of inmates to even less 
than its former standard. 

I am pleased to report that a careful investigation has resulted in showing that at 
present all known cases of the disease in the vicinity are now within the insti- 
tution. 

Of the five cases admitted during the past year, two were from Tracadie, two 
from Pokemoucbe and one from Shippegan ; all within a distance of twenty 
miles. 

All the cases now in the Institution are those of members of leprous families, so 
that I have no instances of contagion to report during the year just closed. 

In one of the cases admitted to the Lazaretto some years since, on my examina- 
tion, the disease has, from some cause, probably a change in the mode of living, been 
arrested, and has almost disappeared. I should have no hesitation in recommending 
the restoration of this person from the death-in-life of the Lazaretto to the freedom of 
the outer world, were it not that in former instances I have seen the disease return 
with terrible rapidity on the resumption of former habits and modes of life. 

The young girl admitted in January, 1874, during the short time when there 
was no physician attached to the Institution, and -who afterwards proved to be 
infected with lupus, not leprosy, but was allowed to remain, as she had neither home 
nor friends, has been gradually improving, and is now nearly recovered. 

A case of typhoid fever of one of the inmates, at the time of my visit last year, 
caused no little alarm in consequence of the want of a ward in which he could be 
isolated. I am pleased to report that during the past year a ward has been built for 
cases requiring isolation . 

I have much pleasure in reporting that the greatest neatness and cleanliness is 
to be observed both in the building and the persons of the unfortunate inmates who 
are made as comfortable as is possible (with the means at their disposal) by those 
who have charge of the Institution. 

The people of the district have access to the geounds, and might, if they wished, 
visit the building ; but it is noteworthy that, although many of them have relatives 
within its walls, all the visitors to the Lazaretto are from a distance, led thither by 
motives of curiosity or by official business ; hence, I have to report that segregation is 
complete. 

That the isolation of these unfortunates is necessary, and that a great revulsion 
From the so-called humanitarian views prevailing in recent years to the sterner ideas 

233 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No,14.) 



A. 1883 



of former times has taken place, is borne witness to by a recent writer who says : 
u Lepers belong to the dangerous classes of the community which require perpetual 
"confinement, and the sooner this remedy is applied the less seeming cruelty will be 
" attached to it." It is a fact that the only country which at the present time does 
not insist on the segregation of lepers, Noiway, has over a thousand of these unfor- 
tunates within its borders; while in other parts of the world where they have been 
isolated the disease is, as with us, rapidly disappeai ing. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant. 



The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



A. C. SMITH, M. D., 

Inspecting Physician. 






234 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (NoJ4.) A. 1883 



No. 27. 
ANNUAL REPORT OF INSPECTING PHYSICIAN, PORT OF QUEBEC. 

(A. Rowand, M.D.) 



Quebec, 29th November, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following Report of the immigrants and 
passengers who arrived at this port during the season of 1882. 

About 44,119 immigrants and passengers arrived by the River St. Lawrence. 
They were all sound and in good health. As always happens with the spring arrivals 
there were a few cases of measles and scarlatina among the children. No injury has 
ever resulted from sending such cases to the Marine and Emigrant Hospital, where 
they soon recover and are enabled to resume their journey, without spreading the in- 
fection ; and cause no damage to shipping by unnecessary delay at the Quarantine 
Station. They should, nevertheless, comply with the law, and leave such cases of in- 
fectious disease at the station, and without more delay go on their way up the river, 
going through the process of cleansing and disinfection during their progress. There 
were a few other cases of disease besides those mentioned above ; but as they were 
not of an infectious or contagious character, I need not say more about them. I 
should now close my report, having said all that comes within my province ; but I 
may be expected, however, to include in my report the epidemic of measles and diph- 
theria which was brought here in the spring by the Intercolonial Railroad from 
Halifax, and not by the River St. Lawrence. It was in this wise : About *700 immi- 
grants were landed at Halifax in the month of May. "While in the cars, going west, 
measles broke out among them, one or two deaths occurring. They were conveyed 
to the sheds at Point Levi and left there. More deaths occurred there. As the sheds 
were wanted by immigrants by the river, all the infected were sent to the Marine and 
Emigrant ELospital. Between forty and fifty were removed thither, and of these nine- 
teen died. The disease did not extend, but was confined to the same party of immi- 
grants, who came by the S.S. " Prussian" to Halifax. Four immigrant children, who 
had arrived by the S.S. "Toronto," and contracted measles after their arrival here,had 
been sent to hospital, by whom I know not, and being placed in the same ward with 
the other cases, contracted their disease, and all four died, I am sorry to add. After 
a time the cause of death was found to be diphtheria, which attacked the patients as 
the measles was passing off, and proved fatal. This complication of measles with 
diphtheria could not have been detected at Halifax if it did then exist, which is 
doubtful. 

I have the honour to bo, Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

A. ROWAND, M.D. 

Inspecting Physician, 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



235 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



No. 28. 

EEPORT ON ONTARIO CATTLE QUARANTINE. 
(Prof. Andrew Smith.) 



Toronto, 31st December, 1882. 



Sir, — The Government, by Order in Council, passed February 21th, 1882, decid- 
ed to admit cattle from the United States, into Canada for breeding purposes, under 
the ordinary quarantine regulations of ninety days. 

On my appointment as Veterinary Inspector of Ontario, and according to your 
instructions, I proceeded to Point Edward and made inspection of grounds, etc., 
under offer, and which subsequently have been secured by the Government for 
quarantine purposes. On these grounds were some buildings, which, with compara 
tively slight alterations, were got ready for the first consignment of cattle, which 
arrived on the 10th of April. An addition has since been made to the original build- 
ing, and a new and commodious one erected, at a considerable distance from the old 
one ; also a smaller building, entirely isolated, which is intended for hospital pur- 
poses, when necessary. Paddocks, separated from each other, have also been enclos- 
ed, where cattle are allowed exercise daily. A comfortable house for the use of 
the caretaker, has been built convenient to the quarantine buildings, which will en- 
abio him to exert a still closer superintendence of the animals under his charge. 

As the prohibition of American cattle had existed for several years, on the open- 
ing of quarantine a larger number were brought in than are likely to continue in the 
usual course of importation, so that I deem the present buildings sufficient in the 
meantime. 

The grounds, extending close on eighty acres, are convenient to the railway ; 
well watered and sheltered ; and, in my opinion, are admirably adapted for quaran- 
tine. 

Since opening, on April 10th, fifty-seven head of cattle have been admitted ; 
and owners have expressed satisfaction with the accommodation and general ar- 
rangements. 

The inspection of cattle in transit has been performed effectively and with ex- 
pedition by the different Inspectors at Amherstburg, Windsor and Point Edward." 

I am happy to be able to report that the health of cattle throughout the Pro- 
vince is satisfactory, being entirely free from epizootic disease. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

ANDREW SMITH, 

V.S., Edinburgh and F.A.R.C.V.S. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



236 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



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237 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



No. 29. 

ANNUAL REPOKT OF CATTLE QUARANTINE, HALIFAX, N.S. 
(Mr. A. McFatridge, V.S.) 

Halifax, N.S., 22nd December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report for the year 1882, there have been shipped 
from the Port of Halifax to Great Britain, during the year, 3,T8i head of cattle, 
2.978 head of sheep ; and there have been imported into Halifax from Great Britain, 
six polled Angus or Aberdeen cattle, by Mr. Wm. Stairs, and quarantined on part of 
his own farm, Dartmouth, Halifax County. The cattle arrived 201 h September on 
board steamer " Ardmore," from Glasgow, all in good health and discharged from 
quarantine in good health. Also, imported by the Central Board of Agriculture, of 
Nova Scotia, one Jersey bull, from Litchfield, Connecticut. United States, per steamer 
" Worcester," from Boston, 2nd October, and quarantined on Mr. Kelly's Farm, 
Dartmouth. 

It gives me much pleasure to inform you that there are no diseases contagious 
or infectious in my district. 

1 have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

ARCHIBALD McFATRIDGE. 

Inspector. 
To The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



238 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188$ 



No. 30. 

ANNUAL EEPOET OF CATTLE QUARANTINE, ST. JOHN, N.B. 
(Mr. Eoland Bunting.) 

St. John, N.B., 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report that there have been no importations from 
Europe of animals during the past year into the Port of St. John. 

I have also to report that there has not been, and there is not now, any infectious 
or contagious disease existing among animals within my district. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your obedient servant, 

EOLAND BUNTING, 

Inspector* 
The Honourable, 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



239 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1885 



No. 31. 

ANNUAL EEPOET OF CATTLE QUAEANTINE, POINT EDWAED, (ONT.) . 

(J. E. P. Westell, V.S.) 

Point Edward, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — In making this my first Annual Eeport of the Point Edward Cattle - 
Quarantine, I may first state that the yards were established in April, 1882. They 
are situated contiguous to the Grand Trunk Eailway on what are known as the 
Government Lands reserved for ordnance purposes. There are about eighty acres* 
of land. Enclosed by a high fence in the centre of which is a beautiful lake covering . 
about ten (10) acres. There are three barns capable of stabling about fifty head of 
cattle, and another small building nearly a quarter of a mile distant from the barns 
used for hospital purposes. The herdman has a dwelling near by which affords him 
every opportunity of paying strict attention to the cattle. 

The location is a very healthy one with perfect isolation and the best of water. 
In front of the barns there are several paddocks containing one quarter of an acre of 
land each and enclosed by a tight board fence six feet high, and separated by an 
interspace of 30 feet, into which the cattle are turned daily for exercise. We 
received our first consignment on the 10th day of April, and since then we have had 
fifty-six head of cattle of which there wore twelve males and forty-four females. 

We have had four classes namely, thirty Jersey's, two Holsteins, three 
Guernsey's, twenty-one Durhams. 

We have had six births and three deaths. The causes of death were dysentery, 
one apoplexy, one tabes-mesenterica. The average cost of feeding per head for the 
ninety days was $24. Total valuation of cattle admitted in Quarantine, $41,700, 
Attached I have scheduled the different consignments from which any further, 
information can be obtained. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

J. E. P. WESTELL, V.S., 

Inspector of Stock, 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



240 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



Statement of Cattle Quarantined at Point Edward, 18813. 



Date 

of 

Entry. 



1882. 



April 


10... 


do 


10... 


do 


10... 


do 


10... 


do 


10... 


do 


10... 


do 


10... 


do 


10... 


do 


10... 


do 


10... 


do 


10... 


Juue 


14.. 


do 


20... 


do 


20... 


do 


20... 


do 


20... 


do 


20... 


Dec 


24... 



Name. 



Isabella Avon 

Bertha Morgan 

May Flower of Avon.. 

Julia Wawa 

Blonde 2nd , 

Lucella of Kent 

Epigera 

Rose of Eden 

Emily Greenbank 

Thaiey 

Bull Calf 

Labreve 

Annie of Glencairn... 
Bella do 

Violet do 

Bull Calf. 

do 

Bull 



Breed. 



Jersey, 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do , 

do . 

do . 

do , 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 



Age. 



5 vears. 
11 * do . 

4 do . 
1 year.. 

6 years 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



2 years 
2 do . 
2 do . 
2 do . 



Valuation, $8,000 ; total number, 18 head. 






3 years. 



Births. 



Description. 



Fawn and white 

Blaek 

Light fawn 

Fawn 

Grey and white 

Bronze 

Brown 

Light fawn. 

Grey and br wn 

Fawn and white 

do 

Dark brown 

Silver gre} and white 

Black.... 

Fawn and white 

Fawn 

Fawn and white 

Dark silver grey 



Consignee. 



ton, Ont 



22nd May, 1882. Blonde 2nd gave birth to bull calf. 

18th June, 1882, Emily of Greenbank gave birth to bull calf. 

Deaths. 

23rd April, 1882, bull calf died ; cause, dysentery. 

20th June, 1882, Emily of Greenback died; cause, apoplexy. 

Cost per head for feeding while in Quarantine, $27. 



May 


29... 


do 


29... 


do 


29... 


do 


29... 


do 


29... 


do 


29... 


do 


29... 


do 


29... 


do 


29... 
Valuat 



Prince of Wales. 

Hattie 7th 

Alice 11th 

Hattie 9th 

Olive 10th 

Dora 4th 

Pearl lath 

Jennie Ird 

Rathbun Peavl... 



Jersey 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 
do 

do . 

do . 



5 years... 

do ... 

do ... 

do ... 

do ... 

do ... 

do ... 

do ... 

do ... 



Light brown 

Gray and white 

Fawn and white 

do 
Light fawn and white 
Dark fawn and white 
Silver gray and white 

Fawn and white 

Fawn 



Rathbun & Co., 
eronto, Que. 



De- 



valuation, $5,000 ; tot.-il number, 9 head. 

Birth. 
28th July, 1882, Eattie 9th gave birth to bull calf. 

Cost per head tor-feeding while in Quarantine, $29. 



Vpril 28... 
do 28... 


do 


28... 


do 


28... 


do 


28... 


do 


28... 


do 


28... 


do 


28... 


do 


28... 



Airdde Priuce 1st.. 
do 2nd 

Oxford Prince 

Red Rose 13th 

do 19th 

do 18th 

Rose Princess 5th .. 

Red Rose 26th 

H. Calf 



Shorthorn, 
do 

do . 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



7 years... 

8 months 
I year .... 



Valuation, $5,000; total number, 9 head. 
Cost per head for feeding while in Quarantine, $28. 

2il 
14—16 



Red and white 

do 

do 

Roan 

Red and white 

Roan 

Red and while 
Ked and roan . 
Red and white 



H. Attrill, Godericb. 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (!s„.14.) 



A. 1883 






Statement of Cattle Quarantined at Point Edward in 1882 — Continued. 



Date 
of 

Entry. 


Name. 


Breed. 


Age. 


Description. 


Consignee. 


1882. 

July 20... 
do 20... 
do 20... 


Andrie Duchess 4th .... 

D. of Hillhur3t 9th 

do 10th 

K. L. D. of Kent 2nd... 
D. of Hillhurst 11th 


Durham 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 


8 years .. 

2 do ... 

2 do ... 

7 do ... 

1 do ... 
19 months 
11 do ... 


Red 

Red and white 

Roan 


Bow Park, Brantford, 
Out. 


do 20... 


Red 




do 20... 


White 




Nov. 27... 


do | 


Fat steers returning 
from Chicago Show. 


do 27... 


Contest 


Roan J 






Valuation, $18,000; total number, 7 head. 



Birth. 



1st September, 1882, Kirk Ligingston D. of Kent gave birth to bull calf. 



Cost per head for feeding while in Quarantine, $28. 



.April 16. 
do 16. 



Not given 
do . 



Jersey, 
do . 



Valuation, $500; total number, 2 head. 



*th May, 1882, H. calf. 



2 years... 
2 do ... 



Birth. 



White and brown .... 
Gray and black 



A. McKee Rankin, 
Amherstburg. 



Cost per head for feeding while in Quarantine, $26. 



Sept. 2... 



Peppo- 



Jersey. 



8 months. iDark fawn. 



Rev. W. Orminston, 
Whitby, Ont. 



Valuation, $200. 

Cost. per head for feeding while in Quarantine, $18. 



July 22... 
do 22... 



Garon B Holsteins. 

Franconia do 



6 months . Black and white |E. Macklin, Cobourg, 

2 years.... I do j Ont. 



Valuation, $800; total number, 2 head. 

Cost per head for feeding while in Quarantine, $21. 



April 28... 
do 28... 



Charming Gain. 
Bull Calf 



Durham 7 years Red and white 



do 12 months 



do 



E. Gibson, London. 



Valuation, $1,200; total number, 2 head. 

Cost per head for feeding while in Quarantine, $20. 



April 


10... 


do 


10... 


do 


10 .. 



LaGrande ... 
Roquette 2nd. 
H. Calf 



3 years. 
5 do . 



Guernsey.. 
do . . 
do ... 

Valuation. $1. 000: total number, 3 head. 

Cost per head for feeding while in Quarantine, $27. 

242 



Dark fawn. 

do 
Fawn 



Hon. J. Abbott, Mon- 
treal. 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188S 



Statement of Cattle Quarantined at Point'Edward, 1882 — Continued 



Date 

of 

JCntry. 



1882. 
April 28.. 



Name. 



Kirk Livingston Duch- 
ess 27th 

Rowfaunt Peach 3rd... 
Lady Charlotte 



do 28... 
Sept. 5... 

Valuation, $2,000; total number, 3 head. 



Breed. 



Durham 

do 

do 



Age. 



3 years.... 
3 do .... 
2 do ... 



Description. 



Dark red and white... 

Roan 

Red 



Congignc 



S. White, Windsor, Ont. 



BlETH. 

30th 'May, 1882, Kirk Livingston Duchess 27th gave birth to heifer calf. 

Death. 
27th July, 1882, Rowfaunt Peach 3rd died ; cause, tabes-mesenterica. 



Coet per head for feeding while in Quarantine, $23. 



J. E. P. WESTELL, V.S., 

Inspector, 



14—16J 



243 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.H.) A. 1883 



No. 32. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF STOCK. • 

(J. B. Wright, M.D., Y.S.) 

Windsor, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir,— -In compliance with an instruction from the Department of Agriculture, 
dated the 6th day of November, 1882, I beg leave to submit the following Report of 
8tock inspected by me at the Port of Windsor for the year ending 31st December, 
1882. 

1882. No. of Cars. No. of Oars. 

Cattle. Hogs. 

January 626 4 

February 552 11 

March 338 54 

April 462 132 

May ., Ill 113 

June ..... .... 108 96 

July 221 82 

August 360 58 

September „ 303 101 

October 286 109 

November, 105 97 

December 63 81 

3,595 944 



The average number of cattle in each car would be from fifteen to eighteen ; of 
hogs from eighty to one hundred. Hogs are frequently overloaded, and I sometimes 
have to get a number removed from each deck of the car. Cattle are less 
frequently overloaded. I have all dead animals removed from the cars before they 
enter Canada. I have found no cases of contagious disease. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J.B.WRIGHT, M.D., V.S. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



244 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No 14.) 



A. 1885 



No- 33. 



REPORT OF SHIPMENTS OF LIVE STOCK. 
(Mr. L. Slater.) 

St. Thomas, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — Enclosed I beg to forward third Annual Eeport on the transit of United 
States live stock in bond and stopping at the Point of St. Thomas from west to east, 
via Canada Southern Railway and Grand Trunk and Great Western Railway Divisions, 
for the twelve months ending 31st December, 1882. i 

The number of cars ot each kind. 



Date. 


Company. 


Cattle. 

116 
629 
226 
549 
498 
321 
356 
429 
205 
186 
176 
162 
311 
215 
335 
372 
371 
344 
485 
379 
530 
101 
496 
69 

7,801 


Hogs. 


Sheep. 

98 
49 
77 
54 
77 
76 
56 
30 
10 
11 

6 
*4 
21 

4 
47 

8 
51 
17 
39 
36 
60 
102 
67 
73 


Horses. 


Mules. 


Poultry. 

4 

2 
2 

8 
11 

6 
4 
3 
8 
2 

2 
1 

7 
1 

61 


C.S.R 

470 
"507 

""hi 


G.T.& 

G. W. 

R'y. 


Total. 


1882. 
Jan. 31.... 


C. S. R'y... 


249 

8 

196 

14 

173 

56 

126 

105 

124 

107 

61 

103 

62 

71 

87 

62 

98 

112 

181 

108 

259 

83 

2!3 

81 


3 
5 
6 






do 31.... 


G. T & G. W. 11 y. 
O.S. R'y 


691 


1,161 


Feb. 28 






do 28.... 


G. T. & G. W. R'y. 
0. S. R'y 




617 


: 1,124 


Mar. 31.... 


21 
6 

10 
1 

12 
3 
5 
1 
8 
3 
5 




do 31.... 


G. T. & G. VV. Rj. 

O.S. R'y 

G. T. & G. W. R'y. 

CS. R'y 

G T. & G. W. R'y. 

OS. R'y 

G. T. & G. VV. R'y. 

C. S. R'y 

G. T. & G. W. R'y. 

C. S. R'y 

G. T. k G. W. Ry. 
C. S. R'y 




459 
"565 
"307 


1,23d 


Apr. 30.... 




556 


doi 30.... 




1,121 


May 31.... 
doi 31.... 




362 


669 


June 30.-... 


1 


255 




do 30.... 


210 


1 465 


July 31.,.. 




406 


I 


do 31.... 




293 


699 


Aug. 31.... 


1 

1 


478 




do 31.... 


441 


! 921 


Sept. 30.... 
do 30.... 


5 


553 




G. T. & G. W. RW. 
C. S. R'y 






473 


* 1,006 


Oct. 31.... 


5 




715 


do, 31.... 


G. T. <fe G. W. R'y. 
C. S. R'y ..... 




523 


' 1,238 


Nor. 30.... 


il 
3 

1 




862 




do 39.... 


G. T. & G. VV. R'y. 
C.S. R'y 




290 


1,152 


Dec. 31.... 




?84 




do 31.... 


G. T. & G. W. R'y 




224 


1,008 




114 




6,699 




2,742 


1,073 


3 


5,095 


11,794 



REMARKS. 

There have been rather more on the average of cars of cattle on the Canada 
Southern this year as against last year. The live stock trains arrive between the 
hours ot 5 p.m. and 1 a.m., and their mode of transportation is by regular stock 
trains, viz : No. 30, 22 and 24, and are timed to leave Amherstburg before 6 p.m. and 
make the run through Canada in about eleven hours; it takes one hour to examine 
cars and exchange engines at St. Thomas. The favorite kind of cattle car in use is 
the kind known as the Michigan Central Union Car, and is used more than any 

245 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 188$ 



other. The number of fat cattle in each car, sixteen, and stackers twenty-two, hogs 
160, and sheep about the same, horses fourteen, mules fourteen, and poultry is carried 
on flat cars in crates. The Grand Trunk and Great Western Division have not car- 
ried so much live stock as the Canada Southern Kailway; their system is different. 
They run most all of their live stock through by special train, and make about the 
same time. The total of cars of live stock shows a falling off as compared to 1881, 
and is owing to there being so much beef sent through in refrigerator cars and con- 
sumed in the Eastern States. Everything is working in accordance with the Order 
in Council, and both try to observe the restrictions as well as they can. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

L. SLATEE, 
Inspector. 
!The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



246 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



No. 34. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF STOCK. 
(D. McEachran, M.R.C.Y.S.) 



Montreal, 30th December, 1882. 

Sir, — I beg to submit the following Report of Inspection and Quarantine of 
Live Stock imported from European ports and subjected to quarantine at Quebec 
and Haliiax, during the year ending 31st December current. 

A swill be seen by the amended schedule, there has been a very large increase 
in the numbers of animals imported, as compared with past years, and while the 
numbers imported to the Dominion show a satisfatory increase, indicating the 
improvements which are going on in cattle breeding, the popularity of the St. 
Lawrence route, and of the quarantines at Canadian ports with American importers, 
is demonstrated by the large number of animals destined for the United States which 
Lave been quarantined at Quebec : — 



IMPORTATIONS FOR THREE TEARS. , 

Cattle. Sheep. 

1880 416 613 

1881 751 1,179 

1882 1,215 1,124 

There were for Canada and the United States as follows : — 



Cattle. 

Canada 574 

United States..... 640 



Sheep. 

998 
126 



IMPORTATIONS TO EACH PROVINCE. 

Cattle. Sheep. 

Ontario 287 878 

Quebec , 244 117 

N. W. Territories 23 

Manitoba 12 

Nova Scotia 8 3 

New Biunswick * 1 



Swine. 

12 
53 

22 



Swine. 
22 



Swine. 

19 
. 3 



247 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



SUMMARY OF BREEDS. 



CATTLE 





a 

Cm 
O 

■2 

Cm 

o 
js 
m 


-d 
u 

a 

OS 

u 

V 


i 

O 


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& 


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S 
20 


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w 

00 


a 

S 


In 

oa 

2 

17 


o 

OS 
M 

9 

16 


*3 

w 
O 

w 

50 






15 
o 




90 
14 


31 

142 

I 


323 
268 


56 
166 


, 7 


10 


19 


. 


574 


United States 


' 640 

















SHEEP. 















-d 






















D 






















03 






. 








V 


a 


F-i 




^3 

fcO 


u 


1 


. 








■9 

09 


o 

■73 


^3 


t 


H 


0) 




d 






u 




.3 


Cl 




- 


s 


o 






M 


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JO 




S 

e! 






.2 


o 


o 

a 


oa 

-^> 
o 




o 


m 


DQ 


a 


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o 


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Canada 


145 

84 


512 
22 


S3 




10 


110 


i 

12 
20 


t 
11 


50 



91 



998 


United States 


126 


. . 










.,_ 










. 



::: 



SWWK. 



Berkshire, 



Suffolk8. 



Total. 



Canada 



18 



22 



OATTLE. 

The value of such large importations of pure-bred cattle, and the improvement 
which they must produce in our stock, is difficult to estimate ; but the enterprise of 
our importers is shown by the 'fact that no less than 323 Polled Angus or Aberdeen 
cattle, costing, at a low average, $400 each, have enriched oar Canadian herds, and 
will do much towards raising the quality of our beef and supplying bulls for the 
great cattle ranches of the North-West. 

It is worthy of remark here that the herds of Hon. M. H. Cochrane, Compton 
Mr. R. H. Pope, Cookshire, and Mr. Geo. Whitfield, Rougemont, contain some of the 
best animals living of this now justly-famed breed. 

I beg to report that all of these cattle were subjected to a quarantine of ninety 
days from the date of sailing from a European port, and that no disease of a con- 
tagious nature was found to exist amongst them. 

There were born in the quarantine no less than fifty calves — of which thre< 
were born dead — and one died subsequently of diarrhoea. 

248 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Three deaths occured -on shipboard, in port, or had to be killed after being 
landed. 

Five deMths occured in the quarantine from the following causes: 

Inflammation of the bowels. ,. 2 

Per e to nit is, , 1 

Parturition 1 

Fracture of the snine, by falling 1 

Total "... 5 

SHEEP. 

The importation of sheep has increased this year, as compared with last, by forty- 
eight, there beingaimost a thousand pure brei sheep, many of them prize winners in 
Britain, which will do much towards improving our already fine flocks. In this 
branch Ontario takes the lead both in importation and in exportation. 

SWINE. 

The importation of swine shows a decrease of thirty-one, indicating that hog 
l'aising in Canada is not progressing. 

POINT LEVIS QUARANTINE. 

I have much pleasure in reporting that the quarantine buildings and grounds 
•may now be considered completed. Owing to the late arrival (November 9th,) 
of 146 cattle last year, it was found necessary to line and fill in with sawdust a 
sufficient number of the buildings to keep them in during the three winter months 
of their quarantine, and the late arrival of no less than 514 head this year necessi- 
tated similar preparation of all the other buildings, so that now the sheds are com- 
pleted and admirably adapted for both summer and winter use, affording the best 
possible accommodation for nearly 700 head of cattle. 

1 beg to report also that two of the largest and best fields which, spring and fall, 
were useless from the lodgement of water have been drained and will afford us in- 
creased accommodation for the large numbers which I am informed' will be imported 
and undergo quarantine here next summer. 

I beg also to report that on the 30th of August last, I accompanied the United 
States Treasury Cattle Commission, consisting of Mr. J. H. Sanders, Chicago; Pro- 
fessor James Law, Ithica, 1ST. Y., and Dr. Thayer, Newton, Mass., to the quarantine, 
they having been commissioned by the United States Government to visit and 
enquire into our system, with a view to adopt a similar system at American ports ; 
and I am glad to bo ablo to report that, though not perfect, yet none of them had 
ever visited one more so, and expressed themselves highly pleased with what they 
saw, and returned to organize quarantines at Portland, Boston, New York and Balti- 
more, on nearly similar principles. 

I am happy to be ablo to report that on a recent visit to Chioago, where I met 
most of the Western importers, the very highest compliments were paid to the Cana- 
dian quarantines, and nearly all of them expressed a hope that no restrictions would 
be placed on our quarantines that would prevent them importing by the St. Lawrence 
route, on Canadian steamers, which are so admirably adapted for safety and comfort 
of stock at sea, and through a country where no disease existed, and where the cost 
of quarantine was less than half what it has hitherto cost at United States ports, 
averaging from $ iO to $15 per head and where they were properly looke 1 after. They 
I also spoke in the highest terms of the facilities afforded by the Grand Trunk Kail- 
way for shipping West. 

249 






4C ""toria. Sessional Papers (No.U J < A. 1885 * 



I beg to recommend, therefore, thatno change be made in existing regulations*- 
■which would tend in any way to lessen the advantages offered to American importers 
to use our quarantines, with the arrangement and management of which they are at, 
present so well satisfied The extra cost is trifling compared with the advantages, 
direct and indirect, to our steamships and railways. 

ROUTINE OF QUARANTINE. 

No change has been made in the general routine of quarantine, all neat cattle 
are detained for a period of ninety days from the date of embarkation. Sheep and 
swine are allowed to proceed to their destination, if, on inspection, they are found free 
from disease. 

I beg to report that the duties of the quarantine continue to be conducted most 
satisfactorily by Mr. J. A. Couture, Y.S., assisted by Mr. William Welsh and the men 
under them ; in both, the Department has well informed, painstaking officers, who 
do their duty to the entire satisfaction of those most directly interested, the im- 
porters. 

Owing to the large number still in quarantine, it is necessary to keep it open* 
during nearly the whole winter. 

1 have much pleasure in reporting that the Inspectors have received the most, 
.hearty cooperation in carrying out the Orders in Council from the agents of the I 
steamships as well as from the owners and attendants of the cattle. 

The only difficulty we had to contend with was in the inspection of sheep. Being 
aware of the existence of scab in some of the counties adjoining Montreal, we en- -fc 
deavoured to prevent any sheep, from infected places, being exported or mixed £ 
with sheep for e port, and for nearly the whole season w<; succeeded. Unfortunately j jj, 
the last two shipments, as we afterwards discovered, contained sheep from infected i j! 
districts, but having no means of recognizing them and the disease not being ap- 
parent, they were allowed to be shipped and were slaughtered at Liverpool for scab., j j 
In this, however, no blame can be attached to the Port Inspectors, as in the early • : 
stages of the disease it is difficult to de'ect it except by very close examin- 
ation, and they were deceived by the sheep being represented as coming from healthy 
districts. 

I beg to suggest that either, all places known to be infected be so declared and 
quarantined until the disease is eraaicated, or ehe that shippers be obliged to give 
■correct information as to where they came from, under a severe penalty for misin- 
forming on that point. 

In conclusion I beg to report that the duties of port inspection were most faith- 
fully and sai isfactorily conducted at Montreal by Mr. M. C. Baker, V.S., and at Que- 
bec by Mr. J.A. Couture, V.S., the latter, assisted by Mr. Wm. Welch, also conducted 
the Point Levis quarantine in a very satisfactory manner. 

I beg also to acknowledge the valuable information received from time to time 
from the office of the Government Agent at Liverpool, Mr. John Dyke, whose 
watchful interest in the live stock trade of Canada at that port is frequently and 
favourably commented upon by both importers and exporters. 

Respectfully submitting the above report, 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient seivant, 

D. McEACHRAN. 

Inspector in-Chief . 
Hon. J. H. Pope, 

Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



250 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



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46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



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46 Victoria: 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188$ 





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253 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (£i^14.) 



A. 1883 



Statement showing Number of 







Steamer 


Line. 


Sailing from 


Durham. 


Hereford. 


Polled Angus. 


O 

"3 
Q 


23 


n 

O 
O 


O 

H 


00 


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O 
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23 
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27 
9 


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26 
23 


3 


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do 
do 
do 


10 
10 
10 
10 

10 

10 

16 

16 

22 

2 2 

22 

30 

19 

L9 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

15 

If. 

28 

30 

30 

19 

19 

19 

19 

21 

24 

2<i 

26 

1 

1 

13 
14 
19 
1 
1 
1 
5 
5 
8 
8 






Liverpool 

do 






23 
23 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 














53 


do 


do 


do 

do 








16 


53 
6 


69 

7 


32 


do 


do 


do 




do 


do 


do 


do 
Glasgow 






1 

| 


5 

14 

2 


1 
53 
12 


6 


do 




Donaldson ... 


67 


do 
do 


do 


do 

Allan 


do 

do 














14 


do 


do 

do 


do 


do 




















do 


do 


do 

London 

Liverpool 

do 


"i 


9 


""lO 




"l2 

1 


""l4 
3 


2 

""2 
1 


26 

"35 

2 


28 


do 




Donaldson 

do 








37 


do 


do 

do 


do 


3 


do 


do 


do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Glasgow 


10 

... 






10 


2 
2 




do 


do 


do 


6 


17 


?1 


do 


do 


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do 


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4 




do 


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do 


1 


July 
do 




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do 

do 


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5 


do 


do 


do 
















do 


do 


do 

do 

do 


do 












"5 
5 


13 


21 
6 


34 


do 

Aug. 
do 


do 


do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 


"2 

10 

1 


in 
14 

2 


24 
2 
3 


2 

1 


" "3 

4 


6 


do 


do 




do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 






do 


do 


do 


do 

do 

do 

r .do 

Liverpool 

do 
do 


"1 

1 

1 


6 

4 
3 


'"*6 

""5 

1 
3 








do 




..... 
'"5 


"*4 

4 

""l7 


"i 
5 

"ii 


do 




Allan 


do 


do 


do 


Sept. 
do 


Lake Manitoba 

do 


Beaver , 

do 


do 


do 


do 

do 


do 


do 

Lucerne 


do 
Glasgow 


2 


12 


14 










do 


Allan 










2 


?, 


do 


Quebec 


Dominion 

do 

White Cross 

Dominion 

do 


Liverpool 


















do 


Ontario 


do 

Antwerp 

Liverpool 


i 


S 


6 




"27 

14 


"*27 
36 








do 

•Oct. 


Helvetia... 

Brooklyn 


do 


do 


do 

Glasgow 

Liverpool 

Glasgow 

do 

do 


"i 




""a 


/2 


'"l 

' i 


""9 

" "3 
10 
37 
15 
16 
18 

383 

6 



1 




do 




10 


do 

do 


Texas 

Nestorian 


Dominion 

Allan 

do 




£Jov. 






do 


do 


do 


4 


do 


do 


do 

Beaver 


do 














10 

80 
15 
IS 


do 


Lake Huron 


Liverpool 

do 1 








1 


6 


"*7 


43 

'"2 

37 

202 


do 


Quebec 


Dominion 


do 


Manitoban 


Allan 


Glasgow 








do 


do 


do 


do , 














55 




Totals 

Imported to Halifax 




I 


38 


m 


104 


47 


126 


173 


585 

391 




1 

i 


























. 


55-4 





















48 Vict* Sessional Papers (No.l I.) 



A. 188^ 



Cattle Quarantined in 1882. 



Galloway. 


Dcvons. 


Sussea 




West Highl 


and. Shetland. 


Ayrshire, 


CO 


ta 




3 


m 


O 


3 



H 


en 
"3 


is 

O 




H 




E 





3 



H 


CO 


eri 

O 
O 


J3 
'o 


m 

cq 


O 

Q 


5 


E* 





'.'.'.'.'Z 






















* 


















































::.:::::. 




........ 
















1 


11 




"l2 








" "3 


4 


...... 














3 



" 5 


6 
""23 


9 


""28 


3 






4 








7 


1 




9 



10 


1 


6 
/ 


7 


3 


2 


5 


1 


9 


10 










..... 


"*'7 


"To 

















;;;;;;;;; 


















9 


23 


35 



















































































































































































2 









.::::: 











































































































::::::::: 
"36 


20 


20 

: 




































































\ 








i0 






1 •' 




3 













































4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14 ) 



A. 1SSS 











Statement 


show in 


g ~NurrA 


:er of Cattle 


"3 

> 


10 
10 
10 
10 

10 

10 

16 

16 

22 

22 

22 

30 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

5 

6 

5 

5 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

16 

15 

28 

30 

30 

19 

L9 

1 9 

19 

21 

24 

26 

26 

1 

] 

i:-. 

14 
19 
i 
1 
1 
f 

6 
8 


Steamer. 


Line. 


Sailing from 


Jersey. 


Holstein. 


Total. 


• 

re 

£ 

o> «: 
g" 8 


< 

o 
<t> 

O 




-rj 
> 

c 

3 


eg 
O 


m 

"3 

PC 


VJ 

o 


3 

o 


May 
do 
do 
do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
June 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
July 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Aug. 

do 

do 

do 


Texas 

do 


Dominion 

do 


Liverpool 

do 


J 

23 

53 

101 

7 

6 

61 

14 

7 

12 

28 

6 

102 

3 

14 

26 

10 

28 

1 

5 

5 

10 
34 
41 
12 
24 
2 
3 

6 

4 

10 

1 

3 

25 

27 

2 

6 

6 

50 

27 

10 

8 

20 

1 

4 

10 

80 

2? 

18 

156 


July 14 
do 14 
do 19 
do 1* 

do 14 
do 19 
do 23 
do m 

Aug. 4 
do 4 
do 4 
do 13 
do 28" 
do 28 
do 28 
do 28 
do 28 
do 28 
do 28 

Sept. 15 
do 15 
do 15 
do 15 
do lfr 

Oct. 1? 
do 18 
do 18 
do 18 
do 30 
do 39 

Nov. 15 
do 15 

- do 15 
Dec. 5 
do 5 
do 5 
do 5 
do 5 
do 11 
do 16 

i do 11 
do 19 
'do 19 


do 


do 


do 














do 


do 


do 














do 


do 


do 














do 


do 


do 

Glasgow 

do 
do 
do 
















Donaldson.. 

do 


do 




Allan 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 














Ocean King 


Donaldson 

do 
do 
flo 
do 

do 

do 

do 




1 
1 


5 

6 


6 
7 










Liverpool 

do 


do 








do 


do 














do 


do ...... 
















do 














do 


do 














do 


do 
















Glasgow 














do 


do 

do 


do 














do 


do 
















do 














. do 

Buenos Ayrian 

do ,. 


















do 

do , 

do 


do 














do 

do 


... 


... 




...... 







do 


do 

Dominion 

do 


do 

do 
















do 


Onta :io 


do 


do 


do 













I 


do 
do 


Lake Ch -mpjain 

Loban 


Beaver 

Allan 


do 












| 


do 










i 




do 


i do 


do 

Beaver 


do 
Liverpool. 


I 








i 




Sept. 
do 


'Lake Manitoba, .... 


do 


i do 


do ...... 










• 




do 


do 


j do 


do 

do 


1 


1 2 

i 


3 








do 


do 

ae 

j Quebec 

i Ontario 


j do 

Allan 








do 


Glasgow 

Liverpool 

do 




... 








| 


do 

do 


'Dominion 






White Cross.... 

Dominion ....... 

do 


Antwerp 

Liverpool 

do 








21 


29 


50 


Oct 


Brooklyn 


do 


do * 

jBuenos Ayrian 

i Texas 


do 


Allan 


Glasgow 


! 


i 










do 


Dominion 

Allan 




! 


j 








! 


do 


jNestorian 


Glasgow 


i 


i 






i 





Jfov. 


>verian 

do 


fio 

do .... 

do 

Beaver 

Dominion 


do 


i 




I 








do 


do 

do 




... 

f 


! 






do 






do 


i Lake Huron 


Liverpool 




I" 













do 




do 

Glasgow 

do 




t 








do 






do 


do 


do 










1 












:::;:.: ■ 










1 3 


■o 


16 


91 


2S 








5C 


1,215 






i 








i 

i 










253 



















46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. 1883 



Quarantined in 1882 — Continued. 



Names of Owners. 


Residence. 


i 
a 

ej 
U 

03 

S3 

a 
"5 . 
El 


a 

aJ 
t-> 
o3 


Cause of Death. 


Remarks. 




Bow River, N.W.T... 


...» 

2 
5 

1 


1 

1 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

2 
12 




Fell in the manger. 


Hon M. H. Cochrane 


Stillborn. 
1 still born, 1 diarr- 
hoea (calf)- 




Kansas City, W.S.... 
Pleasant Hill, Miss... 

Montreal, Que 












Galbraith & Bros 

Findlay & Anderson 


Jamesville, Wis. 
Lake Forrest, 111. 
Abington, 111 


From wounds received on 


T. B. Brown 

R. Campbell 


Petite Cote, Que 

RidingMountain,Man 
Montreal, Que 


2 

2 
2 
3 

2 
5 

4 

1 

6 


Apoplexy 

Congestion of the 
lungs. 


the ship. Was destroyed 
by order of Inspector.. 

Died on the ship at this 
port. 

Took sick on board th© 




V. Fuller 

Geo. Withfield 


Rougemont, Que 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Shanty Bay, Ont 

London, Ont 


W. H. Steele 


ship. 


C. C. Bridges 


Geo. Geary 








P. Davy 


Montray, Wis..... 


Following umbilical her- 
nia caused by a fall. 


A. B. Matthews 


Kansas City. 
Lachine, Que. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Chicago, 111. 
Compton, Que. 
Guelph, Ont. 

Ilderton, Ont 

Balsam, Ont. 
Brooklyn, Ont. 
Aurora, Ont. 
Lafayette, Ind. 
Beecher, 111. 
Rougemont, Que. 
Guelph, Ont. 
St. Paul, Minn 


Parturition. 

Enteritis. 

1 still born, 1 en- 
teritis. 


Dawes & Co.., 


R. Hay, M.P 








Hon. M. H. Cochrane 

' T. McRae 








i J. J. Davidson 












Earl & Stuart 




Wm. Leigh 

Geo. Withfield 




E. H. Barclay 




Jas. Hill 




W. Murray 


Chesterfield, 0. 
Delaware, Ohio. 
London, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Amherst, N.S. 
Mechanicsburg, Ohio 
Abington, 111. 
Aurora, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Beecher, 111. 
Lake Forrest, 111. 
Balsam, Ont. 
Lamville, 111. 

do 
Emerald Grove ^Wis. 

Compton, Que 

London, Ont. 

Cookshire, Que 

Lake Forrest, 111. _ 
Mount Leonard, Miss. 
Dartmouth, N.S. 


7 
. 4 

50 




M. Hill 




Geo. Geary 

Beattie & Miller 




C. Hillston 












Geo. E. Brown 

C. W. Cuthbertson 




Wm. Leigh 




Geo. Findlay 




Jas. J. Davidson 




. H. Norris 




do 








Hon. M. H. Cochrane 

Geo. Geary 




Hon. J. H. Pope 




' Geo. Findlav 




L. Leonard \ 

W. Stairs 















14—17 



257 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



EXPORT CATTLE TKADE. 

I beg to submit the following Report of the inspection of live stock from 
Canadian to European ports, during the year 1882, by which it will be seen that 
there has been a falling off in the number of cattle exported, of 9,79*7, but an increase 
in the number of sheep, of 13,504, as compared with last year. 

The following table will show the numbers exported for the past six years : — 

Cattle. Sheep. Swine. 

1877 6,940 

1878 18,655 

1879 25,009 

1880 50,905 

1881 45,535 

1882 35,738 

Numbers shipped from each port: — 

Montreal 28,183 

Halifax 5,784 

Quebec 808 

Via American Ports, 963 



9,509 


430 


41,225 


2,078 


80,332 


5,3b5 


81,843 


700 


62,404 




75,905 




65,183 




2,978 




5,839 




1,905 





Total.. , 35,738 75,905 

This apparent falling off in the export trade to Britain does not indicate a 
reduction in the cattle trade of the Dominion, as will be seen from the following 
return, kindly furnished by the Department of Customs, for the fiscal year, commenc- 
ing July 1st, 1881, and ending 30th June, 1882. 

Statement showing the numbers of animals exported to the United States from the Domin- 
ion of Canada, during the year ending 30th June, 1882. 

No. 

Cattle 16,145 

Sheep 233,602 

Swine 3,043 

Number of animals exported to the Uuited States during the year ending 
30th June, 1881. 

No. 

Cattle 7,558 

Sheep 264,910 

Swine 2,024 

Showing a large increase in the number of cattle, and a slight decrease in the number 
of sheep sold to United States buyers. 

The improvement in the quality of the cattle is becoming more marked every 
year, and the use of Short-horn, Hereford and Angus bulls must, in a few years, 
greally increase the value of Canadian cattle. 

SHEEP SCAB. 

As mentioned in my report last year, sheep-scab was discovered in some of our 
Canadian sheep at Liverpool, late in the autumn. In accordance with your instruc- 
tions, I employed Inspectors to visit the suspected counties, and, as reported in my 
preliminary report forwarded to the Department on the 13th of February, it was 
found to exist extensively in the County of Laprairie, Province of Quebec ; due in a 
great measure to the fact that in the vicinity of the town of Laprairie, there is a large 

258 



Wk 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A, »S33 



common on which adjoining farmers have a right to graze stock in common, and 
here sheep of all kinds, mostly of a very inferior quality, aro pastured, and this com- 
mon has become the centre of infection from which it is spread through the country. 
After prosecuting the investigation and acquiring the fullest possible information, 
I received the following Order in Council, with instructions to deal with it with a view 
to exterminating the disease with the least possible inconvenience to the owners. 

Government House, Ottawa. 

Thursday, 20th day of April, 1882. 

" Whereas a contagious disease known as -'Sheep Scab" affecting sheep prevails in 
the County of Laprairie and adjoining Counties in the Province of Quebec, and it is 
expedient to provide for the segregation and isolation, in as far as possible, of animals 
affected with such disease, — 

" His Excellency, on the recommendation of the Minister of Agriculture, and 
under the provisions of the Act 42 Victoria, chapter 23, and intituled " An Act to 
provide agaiust infectious or contagious diseases affecting animals," has been pleased 
to order, and it is hereby, ordered that the following Eegulations and Orders be 
enforced : — 

" 1. It is the duty of every farmei*, owner or breeder of, or dealer in, sheep, on 
perceiving the appearance of the disease of " sheep scab " among any one of the 
animals owned by him or under his care, to give immediate notice to the Minister of 
Agriculture at Ottawa, of the fact discovered by him, as required by section 2 of the 
said Act. 

" Negligence to comply with this obligation shall entail upon the owner of the said 
diseased sheep, the penalty of not being entitled to, nor granted any compensation 
for such animals as may be slaughtered in accordance with the provisions of the said 
Act, and further that concealment of such disease shall subject such person on con- 
viction thereof, to forfeit and pay a sum not exceeding two hundred dollars. 

11 2. If any person turn out, keep or graze any sheep knowing such animal to be 
infected with the disease of u sheep scab," or to have been exposed to infection or 
contagion therefrom, in or upon any forest, wood, moor, beach, marsh, common, waste 
land, open field, or other undivided or unenclosed land, such person shall, on convic- 
tion thereof, forfeit and pay a sum not exceeding two hundred dollars. 

" 3. Any person bringing into any market or other place any animal known by 
him to be infected with the disease of " sheep scab " shall, upon conviction thereof, 
forfeit and pay for every such offence a sum not exceeding two hundred dollars. 

" 4. Any person throwing or placing or causing to be placed or thrown into any 
river, stream, canal, navigable or other water, or into the sea within ten miles of the 
shore, the carcass of any sheep which has died of " sheep scab," or been slaughtered as 
having been so diseased shall, on conviction thereof, forfeit and pay a sum not 
exceeding two hundred dollars. 

" 5. Any person who digs up or causes or allows to be dug up a carcass buried of 
ft sheep having died or been suspected of having died, or been slaughtered, from the 
disease of " sheep scab," shall, on conviction thereof, forfeit and pay a sum not exceed- 
ing one hundred dollars. 

"6. In case any sheep affected with the disease of " sheep scab" be exposed or 

offered for sale, or be brought for such purposes into any market, fair or other open 

or public place where other animals are commonly exposed for sale, then any police 

or municipal officer or duly authorized Inspector shall cause the same, together with 

any pens, hurdles, troughs, litter, hay, straw or other articles, to be forfeited, destroyed 

or otherwise disposed of, in such manner as he may deem proper or as may be directed. 

"7. It shall be unlawful 1 ioVany person to have in his possession or under his 

arge a sheep affected with the disease of " sheep scab," without causing it to be 

eated with some dressing, dipping or remedy for " sheep scab." 

" 8. No sheep being affected with " sheep scab" or sheep which have been in con- 

t with other sheep suffering from " sheep scab," or have been in any field, stable, 

wshed or other premises in which " sheep scab" is found to exist, shall be allowed 

2*9 
14— Wi 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



to bo removed therefrom without a written order from an Inspector authorized by 
the Minister of Agriculture for that purpose. 

" 9. All sheds, outhouses and places used by sheep affected by " sheep scab" must 
be thoroughly cleansed and disinfected by scrubbing with hot water and carbolic 
acid — one" pound to four gallons — and afterwards white-washed with hot lime to which 
chloride of lime— one pound to a gallon — has been added, to a height of at least five 
feet from the ground or floor. 

" 10. When found necessary an Inspector shall order the slaughtering and burial 
of all badly affected sheep, and any person having in possession any sheep affected 
with " sheep scab," without treating such sheep by some dressing or dipping fluid 
shall be liable to such penalties as may be enacted under the provisions of the afore* 
said Act. 

John J. McGee, 

Asst. Clerk, Privy Council. 

I employed Mr. O. C. Coutlee, constable at Lapraire to distribute 
copies of the Order in Council in French and English throughout the infected 
parishes, and in every instance where he discovered diseased sheep he caused the 
owner to take them up and wash them with an approved sheep dipping remedy, 
which in some instances was several times repeated. Besides this, section 9 of the 
Order was rigidly enforced (all sheds, outhouses and places used by sheep were 
thoroughly cleansed and disinfected by scrubbing with hot water, with carbolic acid 
or chloride of lime and lime-wash to a height of five feet from the ground or floor,)' & 
so far as it could be with the limited assistance at my disposal. Occasional visita- 
tions were made by Mr. Baker and myself, and the spirit of the Order was carriedf ; 
out as far as we could, and I have much pleasure in reporting that if the disease is an 
not exterminated, it exists only in a few places, as nearly all the diseased and Pn 
infected have been killed, and I have reason to believe that the sanitary measures' kil 
adopted will be in most instances sufficient to prevent its recurrence. 

I would, however, recommend that the operations be continued and even more 
rigourously enforced, as the disease is one easily exterminated, if sheep-owners will il 
only co-operate with your Inspectors and promptly report its occurrence. 

As it is impossible for the Port Inspectors to recognize the sheep coming from ■ 
the infected districts, and as both farmers and dealers, blind to their own interests 
do not hesitate to mix them with sheep for exportation, it will be necessary to 1 \ 
declare certain counties to be infected places and enforce the penalties for infringing 
the Act, in cases where sheep are moved to a public market or shipping port from 
the quarai^tined districts. Otherwise it will be impossible for the Port Inspectors 
to be sure that infected sheep are not mixed with sound ones on the steamers. 

This, unfortunately, has occurred on at least two of our ships this season, fa 
November ; after the season for dipping had passed owing to cold weather, an" 
there being no declaration of infection nor quarantine enforced, sheep were freelj 
bought and shipped along with the healthy sheep, with the result above mentioned 

I would also recommend that all sheep intended for shipment be dipped in som< 
approved sheep dip before the Inspectors are allowed to certify them free fron 
infection. As will be seen from my report of the export trade, the exporting of sheej 
from Canada for shipment to Europe amounted to nearly 16,000, worth at the por'f 
about $500,000 for the year 1882, and the sheep trade with the United State 
amounts to about 230,000. worth about $900,000, or altogether a trade of about<| 
$1,400,000 per annum is thus menaced by the existence of a contagious disease ii 
a limited locality in close proximity to our most important shipping port. Th 
importance of the trade will amply warrant the adoption of the means necessary t*' I , 
thoroughly rid the country of the disease, which will result in a two fold benefit, viz 
the prevention of an embargo being placed on our sheep in European and America]' 
ports, and the improvement in the quality of our sheep which must follow th J • 
increased attention to breeding and caring for them, for as stated above, scab is onl; 
seen in the poorest quality and where they are neglected and badly cared for. 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



ANTHRAX. 

REPORT OF INVESTIGATION OP CATTLE DISEASE AT CARP VILLAGE, ONTARIO. 

In compliance with departmental instructions I visited Carp Tillage, Ontario, 
for the purpose of investigating a disease of a fatal character said to prevail there. I 
was met by Mr. Henry McBride, a farmer in Huntley Township from whom I 
obtained the following history and symptoms of the disease. 

Abont seven or eight years ago he had a cow die under the following circum- 
stances : — 

The herd showed no symptoms of disease, were milked as usual in the morning, 
and in the evening, when brought in for milking one of them was missing, and 
when searched for next morning was found dead in the field. 

He has lost some nearly every summer since then, most of them being fonnd 
dead. 

The few which were seen ill before death, stopped milking, did not feed, were 
noticed to tremble, with muscular twitchings, flapping of the ears, a haggard expres- 
sion, a staggering gate, convulsions, and death followed within a few hours. After death 
the body swells up rapidly and putrifies within a few hours. He lost two horses 
apparently from the same disease and nine sheep all of them young, died from it 
within a year. Mr. McBride could not give me any information as to the post 
mortem appearances. In burying them he seldom covered them with more than a 
foot and a half or two feet of earth, and it was quite common for the dogs to dig 
them up ; some were buried and a few were not buried at all. The graves were all 
within a short distance of a running stream and were all in the cow pastures ; the 
cattle having unrestricted liberty to feed over and around them. Portions of the 
carcasses were exposed here and there even in the straw yard where the cattle are 
daily feeding. I found limbs and ribs of dead cattle dragged there by the dogs from 
these graves. Mr. Anthony Dolan, a farmer adjoining Mr. McBride, has had no disease 
on his own farm, but seveu years ago he had one of his cows stray into McBride's 
field and was found dead. Four years ago he lost another under similar circum- 
stances. He buried both deeply. He had made, and assisted to make, several post 
jnortem examinations, he always found u the spleen large, filled with black thick 
bood like thick tar." In a mare belonging to his neighbour he found the same black 
(blood around the heart. She died in convulsions. Mr. Richard Cavanagh, an 
adjoining neighbour to McBride, with only a line fence between their pasture fields, 
four years ago lost four or five, all of which died suddenly, and he has lost nineteen 
altogether since then, two of them this spring within three weeks. 

He examined a few of the carcasses and found the spleen as described by Dolan 
find easilv torn with the fingers. He buried them all in his pasture, which is a 
ix>ttom land of the Carp, a small stream which overflows it in the spring, part of it 
is swampy and drains into the stream. Most of the graves are at the upper end of 
phis swamp ; he seldom covers them with more than one or two feet of earth, dogs 
[Dflen dig them up, some of them are partially covered by old logs, which are the only 
Covering, yet cattle are allowed to feed among them unrestricted. He even buried 
)ne in his barn yard. He has lost several horses from the same disease, at least 
inder the same circumstances of sudden death. 

Mr. McBride had lost one cow forty-eight hours before my arrival, which I had 
j)xhumated, but found putrifaction so far advanced, that we could not make a post 
Wrtem examination, except to note the enlarged condition of the spleen, which con- 
fined a quantity of black thick blood. From the information thus collected, and 
iacts observed, it is evident that the disease is the common form of anthrax, and 
fhat it is due chiefly to the non-burial or partial burial of animals. As explained in my 
Report of 1879-81, this disease is becoming more and more prevalent, and unless 
( iteps be taken to ensure thorough destruction of the bodies of animals dying from 
his fatal malady, the losses annually from this cause will before long, be very 
arge in the Dominion. 

261 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1833 



I beg to recommend, that a special constable be appointed in all infected dis- 
tricts, to whom all sudden deaths of animals would have to be reported under a 
penalty for not doing bo, and whose duty it would be to see, that said bodies were 
either burned or buried in a place specially set apart for the purpose, perfectly 
isolated from pastures where animals run. I beg also to recommend the introduction 
of inoculation by Pasteur's method, as described in my Eeport of 1881. I would also 
recommend that a concise account of the disease be published and distributed 
gratuitously among the farmers, so that they may understand the danger from their 
present carelessness in burying animals, and have an intelligent idea of the true 
Mature of the disease, instead of the false ideas of poisonous weeds, white foxes, etc., 
bow so generally entertained. 

ANTHRAX AT PRICE'S FARM AND POINT ST. CHARLES. 

On Monday, 5th June, I was called to investigate a disease from which cattle 
were dying at Point St. Charles. 

I found that about three weeks previously Mr. W. C. Hatley, agent for the 
steamship " City of Brantford," of Hartlepool, England, sent 510 cattle forward for 
shipment, and owing to the steamer not having arrived, they were turned out oh 
what is known as Price's Farm, River St. Pierre, within two miles of Montreal, which 
I have repeatedly reported as an anthrax district. Here they had very little to eat, 
and soon became poor. Shortly after seven were found dead in the field, after which 
they were removed into Point St. Charles yards, where sever* more died within four 
days. All of these deaths were from anthrax. They were retained from shipment 
till all danger was over, when they were shipped at this port. 

I again beg to urge the suggestions made, in my preliminary report on this out- 
break : u That steps be taken to prevent its recurrence by a systematic and proper 
burial of all anthrax carcasses, and the innoculation of cattle as practised by Pas- 
teur with so much success in France. 

If statistics of the yearly losses of animals in the Dominion from this disease 
were collected, I am convinced it would show a very large number, representing 
several hundred thousands of dollars; and knowing as we do that every dead animal 
which has died of this disease will infect the soil, water, and grasses for half a cen- 
tury or more, its importance for the present, and especially for the future of the 
country, is very great. 

Besides these, several less important investigations have been made of this 
disease in the Province of Quebec and elsewhere. 

EEPORT ON THE PICTOU CATTLE DISEASE. 

Sir, — I beg to submit the following report of the measures adopted to stamp out 
the disease known as the Pictou Cattle Disease, which were commenced in June and 
are still in progress. 

In my preliminary report of last year, I called your attention fo the following 
facts and measures necessary for the suppression of the disease. 

I. That a disease of a contagious nature has been prevailing to a limited extent 
in several parts of the County of Pictou, of the Province of Nova Scotia. 

II. That the disease has been hitherto undescribed, and that further investigation 
is necessary to discover its primary cause and its pathology. 

III. That since it was known to exist in the Province, the total number lost is 
about 1,396, of which 203 were lost in 1881, the maximum of mortality yet reached, 
showing that the disease is on the increase. 

IV. That the disease is contagious and incurable. 

V. That I believe that its continuance and spread is due to the illegal practice of 
throwing carcasses on the shore or leaving them unburied on commons, where other 
animals coming in contact with the animal fluids or tissues, become infected and thus 
the disease is spread. 

262 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



VI. That animals placed in buildings formerly occupied by diseased animals, will 
become i 'tec ted. 

I be- therefore to recommend : — 

a. That measures be taken to stamp out the disease — by killing the diseased 
animals and burning the bodies or burying them deeply with lime. 

b. By isolation cf those cattle which have been in contact with diseased animals 
or infected places; by declaring the district or farm as an infected place, and subject 
to necessary quarantine regulations. 

c. That all animals actually sick of the disease be slaughtered — one-third of their 
value being paid for them ; that all suspected animals be killed and that two-thirda 
of their value be paid to their owners. 

d. That the quarantine be maintained until such time as the infected buildings 
be renovated and disinfected to the satisfaction of the Inspector appointed to carry 
out the quarantine, and all carcasses burned or buried, and all graves of cattle 
thoroughly covered and that the law forbidding the exposure of carcasses on public 
places un buried, or throwing them into the sea or on to the shore, be enforced. 

To enable these suggestions to be carried out the following Older in Council 
was passed at your suggestion : — 

Government House, Ottawa. 

Thursday, 25th May, 1882. 

"Whereas a disease affecting Neat Cattle prevails in the County of Pictou, Nova 
Scotia, and parts of the adjoining County or Counties, it is expedient to provide for 
the segregation and isolation in as far as possible of animals affected with such. 
disease, and also to declare the places where such diseased animals are found, as in- 
fected places, — 

"His Excellency, on the recommendation of the Minister of Agriculture, and 
under the provisions of the Act 42 Victoria, chapter 23, and intituled " An Act to 
provide against infectious or contagious diseases affecting animals," has been pleased 
to order, and it is hereby ordered, that the following Eegulations and Orders be 
enforced : — 

" 1. A Veterinary Inspector duly authorized by the Minister of Agi > ulture shall 
visit the places in the said localities where such diseased animals are found, and all 
farms or places on which such animals are found, shall be declared infected places,, 
within the meaning of the Act aforesaid ; 

" 2. No person whatever, except an Inspector or Officer duly authorized by the 
Minister of Agricalture, shall remove any cattle from any of such farms or infected 
places, and then only for the purpose of carrying into effect the provisions of the said 
Act, under a penalty not exceeding two hundred dollars ; 

" 3. An Inspector or Officer duly authorized by the Minister of Agriculture may 
make a selection of a place or places within the limits of an infected district, for the 
purpose of isolating and segregating such animals as may be dis-ased or supposed to 
be diseased or which may have been exposed to disease, and order the removal of 
such animals to such selected places; 

* 4. An Inspector or Officer duly authorized by the Minister of Agriculture, under 
the provisions of Section 14 of the Act aforesaid, may order any animal to be slaugh- 
tered which is found affected by infectious or contagious disease, a compensation to 
the amount of one-third of the value of such animal before it became affected and 
ordered to be slaughtered, to be paid to the owner thereof, but such compensation 
not in any case to exceed twenty dollars. In all other cases the compensation to be 
two- thirds of the value of the animal ordered to be slaughtered, but not in any case 
to exceed forty dollars. The value of such animals to be in all cases established by 
an officer duly appointed for that purpose by the Minister of Agriculture, but no 
compensation whatever will be allowed in any cases where attempts have been made 
at fraudulent concealment of the existence of the disease or in any cases where the 

263 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



animals have been removed from infected places contrary to the provisions of the 
Act aforesaid, and particularly the first seven sections thereof. 

" 5. And farther a Veterinary Inspector or other officer duly authorized by the 
Minister of Agriculture, to be empowered to carry out generally the provisions of 
the Act aforesaid. 

"John J. McGee." 

Having been authorized to employ Dr. Wm. McEachran temporarily to carry out 
instructions and act as local inspector at the quaran lines, with Mr. George Caswell 
and Angus Grant as appraisers, to value the cattle, with power to employ men as 
required to assist them, in accordance with your instructions, I sent the local 
inspector the following letter of direction : 

Montreal, 6th July, 1882. 

11 In accordance with instructions from the Minister of Agriculture, I am to 
give you the following directions respecting the putting into effect of the measures 
necessary for the extirpation of the cattle disease at Pictou, Nova JScotia, under the 
provisions of the Order in Council, 27th May, 1882. 

" There shall be three classes or divisions of quarantine established : 

" 1. A quarantine of separate farms. 

M 2. A quarantine at some place or places, to be selected for suspected animals, 
but respecting which there is reasonable hope that the disease may not break out 
among them. 

" 3. A quarantine at some place or places, to be selected for animals which have 
been in such contact with the disease as to preclude hope of immunity from it. 

" All these three classes of quarantine shall be kept separate and distinct from 
each other, in such a way as to prevent all contact with outside cattle, or with those 
in each of the separate parts. 

M Farms on which no disease is found among the cattle, and among which it 
shall not have appeared for at least sixty days before the last visit of the Inspector, 
and on which the buildings and premises shall have been, and shall continue 
to be, thoroughly cleansed and disinfected, and where the Inspector has reason to 
believe that there is little or no danger to be anticipated from the disease, shall be 
held to come under Class No. 1, and be separately quarantined, being declared 
infected places. 

" This provision, you will understand, is to apply to farms within the limits of 
the-district referred to in the Order in Council of 27th May last, affected with the 
disease known as " The Pictou Cattle Disease. 

" All orders given by the Inspector to the owners of such farms and cattle must 
be strictly observed and carried out. 

" And in case3 where no disease shall appear on such farms within a period of 
ninety days, the quarantine may bo removed. 

" As respects the quarantine of the second class. It shall consist of animals which 
have been taken from the district in question among which there shall be no appear- 
ance of disease, and which shall bo found in such condition as shall lead the Inspector 
to believe that they may escape. 

" If no disease break out among the cattle in such quarantine within a period of 
one hundred days, the party from whom the animals have been taken may have 
them returned to him, upon the conditions however that he will thoroughly cleanse 
and disinfect his buildings and premises to the satisfaction of the Inspector; but in all 
cases when the party so takes back his cattle no money compensation will be paid 
to him. 

" All cattle which are taken from such herds or premises as have been badly 
affected with the disease, and respecting which in the opinion of the Inspector there 
is no serious danger of the disease continuing, shall be sent to the quarantine of the 
thir d class. 

264 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1885 



" While the three classes of quarantine are to be kept distinct as above stated, it 
shall be the duty of the Inspector, if he finds it necessary, from the breaking out of 
the disease, to order the removal of cattle from any farm in Class No. i to the 
general quarantine of Class No. 3 ; but in no case where disease has broken out on a 
"farm quarantine shall any cattle be removed to the general quarantine of Class No. 2, 
whi'm is hoped may be kept free from disease." 

" All cattle which are put in quarantine must be secluded. 

" All cattle which are quarantined must be marked in such away as to indicate 
the property of the owner. 

" All cattle now sick, or which may hereafter become sick with the disease 
known as Pictou Cattle Disease shall be immediately slaughtered, and the 
carcasses and hides disposed of in such a way as may be directed by the Minister of 
Agriculture or the Veterinary Inspector appointed by him." 

" By a careful study of the foregoing instructions you will see that it will be 
necessary for you to have two separate and distinct farms for quarantine grounds, 
say one at Pictou and one at Merigomish districts. 

" You must have a trustworthy man in charge of each ; you must see that the 
fences are good and sufficient to securely isolate th3 quarantine from adjoining farms. 
You will probably be able to arrange with the farmers to drive the cattle to the quar- 
antine, if not you must hire men for the purpose. Be careful in making your 
division of cattle for Nos. 2 and 3 classes. 

" All animals slaughtered must be buried until further orders, not less than 8 feet 
deep, and one barrel of freshly slacked lime to each carcass must be thrown over the 
>ody. In each case you will see that the graves are not near springs or sources of 
water supply. 

"All infected premises must be thoroughly cleaned, and where considered neces- 
sary, the woodwork of stalls destroyed by burning ; and all parts not removed must 
>e washed and scraped, then whitewashed with hot lime, to which a pound of chloride 
of lime or half a pound of impure carbolic acid has been added ; this must be applied 
o a height of five feet from the floor, and any yard fences or other boards with which 
iseased cattle may have been in contact, must be treated in the same way. Before 
commencing operations you should see that they are provided with lime and disin- 
fectants, otherwise your progress will be retarded. The farmers must provide them 
at their own expense. • 

"You will slaughter all animals in which the disease breaks out in any of the 
quarantines, and bury them as above. 

" In the event of any of the animals being returned to the owners from quarantine 
31ass No. i, you will receive back the certificate in lieu thereof, and notify mo so that 
the cheque may be cancelled by the Department. It is desirable that you have 
everything in readiness before commencing operations, and that you adopt a sys- 
tematic course of procedure, and that as little time as possible be lost. 

" I expect you to take advantage of your opportunities of making clinical obser- 
vations as to the following points:— Its contagiousness, its period of incubation, its 
iuration, and the pathological lesions observed in the different stages. 

" I wish you also to make a few experiments, which you can easily do, in Class 
No. 3, to see the result of cohabitation of healthy and sick, innoculation with serum, 
)lood, ete. ; and I wish you to furnish me with as thorough a report of the disease as 
Fou can. 

" I will send you in a few days the printed forms of Declaration of Inspection, 
Notice of Declaration, and Appraiser's Certificates. 

"Should any part of the.^e instructions not be clearly understood, write meat 
»nce for explanations. 

" Make regular repons of your progress, arid in all cases of doubt as to your 
ourse, commuuicate with me at once by letter or telegraph, as necessary. 

D. Mc Each ran," 

Chief Inspector. 

265 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No 14.) A. 188S 



At the same time I wrote Mr. David Mathison, Pictou, who took a lively interest 
in the matter, and in all communications on the subject represented the people of the 
district, as follows : 

" As I telegraphed you yesterday, Dr. Wm. McEeachran. who has 
been appointed to carry out the measures necessary for stamping out the disease m 
cattle prevailing in your district, leaves for Pictou to-morrow. Knowing the very 
great interest you have taken in the matter, I have taken the liberty of asking you 
to give him the benefit of your valuable assistance and • advice in carrying out his 
instructions. 

" I sincerely hope that the farmers who are most directly interested will co-oper- 
ate with us freely. Copies of the Order in Council will be sent for distribution, and 
the Inspector has been instructed to carry out the regulations with the least possible 
inconvenience to all concerned. 

" It is all important that the farmers should understand that it is all in their inter- 
est and that the success of the measures will greatly depend on their immediately? 
reporting the disease, and in carrying out the necessary cleansing and disinfection of 1 
their buildings, renovating floors, stalls, etc., and in every way seconding our efforts 
in their behalf. The desire of the Minister is, that while we must do it thoroughly, 
it should be done in a manner to give the least possible inconvenience, and as far as 
possible to give the greatest general satisfaction. 

" P does appear to me that a real danger of its re-appearing will arise from re- 
plenishing, and it will be in their own interest not to buy any cattle for at least six 
months after having had the disease on a farm, and then only after every precaution 
having been taken to guard against buying from infected herds or places. Whatever 
assistance you can give him will be duly appreciated by the Department and especi- 
ally by 

Your obedient servant, 

D. McEachran." 

The following is the form of declaration made by the Inspector under Section 20 
of the "Animal Contagious Diseases Act, 1879," to the Minister of Agriculture, and 
the notice of such declaration served on the farmers on whose farm the disease is 
found to exist : * 

Declaration by Veterinary Inspector. 

I, a Veterinary Inspector, duly authorized by 

the Honourable the Minister of Agriculture, do, under the authority of the Act 
of the Parliament of Canada, passed in the forty-second year of Her Majesty's 
reign, chaptered twenty-three, and called "The Animal Contagious O^eanes, 
Act, 18?9," and of the Order of the Governor in Council, dated the twenty-fifth 
day of May, A. D. 1882, made thereunder, declare that I find a contagious disH 
of animals, known as the Pictou Cattle Disease, to exist in ray district at (here 
insert description of the common, field, stable, cowshed or other premises in which infectious 
or contagious disease is found to exist.) 

Declared under my hand at the ... ^ay 

of. A.D. 188 . 



Veterinary Inspector. 



266 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188b 



Notice op Declaration by Veterinary Inspector. 

Take notice that I have made a declaration, under the Act of the Parliament of 
Canada, 42nd Victoria, chapter twenty-three, called " The Animal Contagious Diseases 
Act, 1879," and of the Order of the Governor in Council, dated the twenty-fifth day 
of May, A.D. 1882, that I find a contagious disease of animals, known as the Pictou 
cattle disease, to exist in mj district at (here insert description of the common, field, 
stable, cowshed or other premises where the disease is found) and you and all other per- 
sons are strictly forbidden to remove any cattle whatever from the said 

»nder the penalties prescribed in the said Act and Order in Council, and you and all 
parties concerned are hereby notified to govern yourselves accordingly. 

Dated at this day of. A.D. 188 . 

Veterinary Inspector. 



On the appointment of the Appraisers, I sent them the following letter of in- 
struction : 

" Your duties will be to visit such farms or places where cattle are, as will be 
indicated to you by the Inspector, and together you will value all cattle submitted to 
you by the Inspector, placing such a value on them, as if they were -not diseased, a 
certificate of such valuation being signed by both Appraisers, and given to the In- 

Spector for transmission to this office along with his slaughter or seizure certificate, a 
uplicate being retained by you. You will take your instructions from the local 
Inspector and make all reports to him for transmission to this office." 
The following is the form of certificate used by the Appraisers. 

DOMINION OF CANADA. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICTJLTRE. 



No. 87. 



Office of the Inspector of Stock, 

Pictou, N.S., 188 



We, the undersigned Appraisers of Cattle, duly appointed by the Minister of 

Agriculture, do hereby certiiy that we have this day visited the farm of Mr 

at and that we have examined and valued as 

inder : 

Number and Description of Animals. Appraised Value. 

$ Cts. 



.Bulls. 
Cows. 
Calves. 



(Signed). 



Appraisers of Cattle for Nova Scotia. 
(To be sent to the Department of Agriculture.) 

In accordance with instructions, quarantines were established at Pictou, 
Merigomish, Knoydazt and Pine Tree, to which all the cattle which had been exposed 
to infection were conveyed and kept for a period of ninety days from the date of such 
tontact. 

267 



4:6 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1SS3 



All farms on which the disease Was reported or found to exist, were visited by 
the Inspector and Appraisers. All animals found aifected with the disease were 
killed and buried as instructed, those in contact after being valued, and the certificate 
of valuation being given, were removed to the nearest quarantine, and a triplicate 
certificate was filled out and numbered, one was given to the farmer, one sent to the 
Department through this office, and one retained by the Inspector. 

The following is the form of slaughter certificate : — 

IN TKIPLICATE. 
{To be sent to the Departmeut of Agriculture,) 
DOMINION OP CANADA. 



DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE. 



Cattle Quarantine, Pictou and adjoining Counties, N.S. 



I hereby certify, that in accordnance with the provisions of the Animal Co-n- 
tagious Diseases Act of 1879, and Order in Council of May 27th, 1882, I have this 

day caused to be slaughtered Cows, Bulls, 

Calves, of the authorized appraised value written at foot hereof as Cattle Actually 
Diseased. Also that I have ordered to be removed to the isolated grounds, 

set apart for quarantine purposes, at k 

the following: Cows, Bulls, Calves, confis- 
cated as being infected, or suspected as being affected from contact with diseased 
animals, or other reasons, at the authorized appraised value written at foot hereof, at 
Cattle Infected or Suspected. 

The whole being the property of Mr 

of. , who is entitled to receive $ from 

the Minister of Agriculture at Ottawa. 

The cattle belonging to Mr „... 

marked 



Dated at. 



Inspector. 



1882. 



CATTLE ACTUALLY DISEASED. 


CATTLE INFECTED OR SUSPECTED. 


Number and 

Description of 

Animals. 


Appraised 
Value 


One-third 
Value Payable. 


Number and 

Description of 

Animals. 


Appraised 
Value. 


Two-thirds 
Value Payable. 


Bulls... 


$ 


$ 


Bulls.. 


$ 


$ 


Cows... 


Cows.. 




Calves... 








Total 




Total 














2( 


58 







46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.l 4 ) 



A. 138S 



These instructions were carefully carried out by the officers appointed, who re- 
ceived the co-operation of the farmers themselves, and they, with a praiseworthy spirit, 
not only raised no opposition to the proposed measures, but gave them every assist- 
ance, thereby rendering the duties of the officers less disagreeable. 

The sanitary measures were carried out on all farms where the disease had broken 
out, and on which diseased animals were found. In many cases the old barns were 
completely destroyed by burning, and replaced by new ones. Seventy-seven farms 
and places were declared infected places. 

The active operations did not commence before the 15th July. Up to that date 
(I am informed by the Inspector) thirty-eight animals, consisting of twenty-four 
cows, four steers, and ten heifers, had died. During the period from 15th July till 
28tb November there were ordered to be slaughtered eighty-five animals, consisting 
of sixty-six cows, seven steers, and twelve heifers. 

There were slaughtered in the quarantine, suffering from the disease, fourteen 
animals, consisting of one steer, eleven cows, and two heifers, making a total of 137 
animals lost by the disease in 1882. 

Animals confiscated and placed in quarantine were as follow: 

Quarantine. Steers. Bulls. Cows. Heifers. Calres. 

Pictou - 8 5 50 23 15 

Pine Tree 16 8 6 

Merigomish 6 5 38 18 7 

Knoydart 11 6 13 17 16 

25 16 ' 117 66 44 

Making a total of 268. 

These animals were kept on isolated pasture fields, and in the fall were taken in 
and fed on bran, moulde, and cotton-seed cake. At the expiration of the quarantine 
of ninety days, twenty-seven were returned to their owners, twenty-seven died or were 
slaughtered in quarantine, fourteen from the disease, nine from other causes, and four 
were used for experimental purposes, and the balance were sold for slaughter within 
the limits of the infected districts. 

The success of the measures adopted is proved by the fact that no cases have been 
reported since 31st October, except one which was suspected of having died from it, 
but, having strayed away and been found dead some time after, renders it uncertain if 
it was a case of this disease. 

I have pleasure in reporting that the duties of local Inspector were satisfactorily 
conducted by Dr. Wm. Eachran, and of Appraisers by Mr. Geo. Caswell and Mr. A. 
Grant. 

The former by instructions kept me cognizant of every circumstance, and 
received directions under your instructions, in every detail, necessitating a corres- 
pondence of sixty-five letters, and as many more to the Department. 

It is gratifying to find that out of the' sum of $20,000 voted for stamping out the 
disease there remains an unexpended balance of about $11,000, so that should it be 
necessary to continue the quarantine next summer sufficient funds remain for that 
purpose. 

It is scarcely to be expected that occassional reappearances of the disease will 
)t occur. 

On the closing of the quarantines immediately after the sale, with your consent, 
I dispensed with the services of the Inspector and the rest of the staff, retaining 
Mr. Geo. Caswell and one man to look after the experimental animals in quarantine. 

Mr. Caswell has been instructed to visit from time to time those farms which 
were infected places, and to report the state of health of the cattle theron. Also to 
report any new cases which may occur and otherwise continue the quarantine under 
lirections as may be necessary from time to time. 

I append herewith a synopsis of the statistics of the quarantines as furnished by 
le Inspector. 

269 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14 ) A. 188$ 



Experiments and Investigations to Ascertain the Nature of the Disease, 

In my report of last year, I described minutely the history, symptoms and post 
mortem lesions. I also pointed out the manner in which it appeared to be spread, 
especially through carelessness in disposal of the carcasses, admitting the probabl© 
existence of a specific virus, a contagious and incurable character, but attributing it 
in a great measure to the predisposing influences of deficiency of albumenoids in the 
food, and concluded by remarking that "until a careful chemical report from con- 
tinued observation repeatedly made by a competent Veterinarian, and a properly 
conducted series of experiments, by placing healthy and sick together, by inoculation, 
by keeping healthy animals in places supposed to be infected, to prove or disprove 
its contagiousness, and by thorough microscopic examination of the fluids and solid 
tissues of diseased animals, is made, we must remain ignorant of the true nature of 
the disease, and hence of the causes which give rise to it." 

Unfortunately owing to the whole time of the quarantine staff being occupied in 
the actual work of stamping out, and removing to quarantines the infected animals, 
superintending the burying of the dead, and disinfecting premises, but little time was 
left for scientific work. As instructed, however, a few experiments were conducted, 
the results of which are given in the reports of Professor Osier and Dr. William 
McEachran. 

Unfortunately, the authorization to employ Dr. Osier to aid in the investigation 
was delayed till scarcely a sick animal was left to examine or experiment upon. I 
quite agree with him when he says that " while the measures taken have been 
admirably adapted for the eradication of the disease, they have not been altogether 
favourable to its scientific investigation. It would have been better if an experi- \ to 
mental station had been established at first, and those data obtained which are abso- 
lutely essential, before a positive opinion can be given as to the nature of any 
disease." 

It is, therefore, with no small degree of disappointment that I have to report 
that while the measures adopted have proved highly successful in ridding the 
infected districts of the disease, I am not in a position to report as to the true pathology j 
of the causes which give rise to it. I, therefore, again beg to request that you 
authorize the establishment of an experimental station early in spring, or when the 
disease is most active, so as to clear up important points in the scientific consideration 
of the disease. 

I herewith subjoin the Reports of Professor Osier and Dr. William McEachran 
on the experiments which were made, and their general observations of the clinical 
and pathological characteristics of the disease. 

I have pleasure in expressing the belief that in the course of the coming year 
the disease will be completely eradicated from the Province of Nova Scotia. 

1 have the honour to be Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

■ D. McEACHRAN, F.R.C.V.S. 

Chief Inspector, 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



Ij 
h 



Kt 

jon 
I 

tot 
»eks 
lotr 

ioi 



Ifil! 



No. 35. 

REMARKS ON THE PICTOU CATTLE DISEASE, 
(By Db. Wm. McEachran.) 

Pictou, 30th December, 1882. 
History. 

This disease, although it has only been brought to the notice of the authoritiei 
within the past four years, has been present in the County of Pictou for at least fort} 

2?0 



Hod 












46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1885 



years, as many old men have stated to me that they remember the disease when boys, 
under the name of " horn distemper," a name which it still retains among the cow 
doctors of the County; the popular remedy for the disease being boring the horns and 
splitting the tails, with the additional torture of pepper and salt inserted into the 
wounds. It would appear from report to have been most virulent in and around the 
Town of Pictou, twenty-five years ago, about the same time it made its appearance 
to a considerable extent around New Glasgow. Twenty years ago attention was 
drawn to the large number of cattle lost in the district of Merigomish, and about 
the same time also, a number of cases were lost at Knoydart, on the borders of the 
County of Antigonish. Since that time it has continued in a more or less aggravated 
form in all these districts. 

In 1881, it appeared for the first time at Fisher's Grant, and this year it wag 
reported for the first time at Churchville. It will be seen, by reference to a map of 
the County, that it is confined to areas separated from each other by considerable 
distances, in one case ten miles, the spa r e between being perfectly free from this 
disease. The disease appears to affect animals most in the months of June, July and 
August, extreme heat favouring a rapid development and a rapid course. Cold 
retards the development, and favours a more chronic course. 

Nature. 

It would appear to be a constitutional affection manifesting itself in a disturbance 
of the functions of nutrition, at first, as constipation, followed by a copious diarrhoea 
which, in some cases, becomes watery in consistence; with this is a considerable 
elevation of temperature, and following is, in chronic cases, a more or less rapid 
wasting of the body, loss of appetite, and lessening or loss of thesecretiou of milk, in 
which there is found a peculiar dungy smell and taste ; but this is not present in all 
cases, as the same peculiar offensive smell is, in some cases, exhaled from the skin. 
These symptoms are accompanied with or followed by a greater or less effusion of 
Umpid serum into the peritoneal cavity, and an infiltration of serum into the sub- 
ritoneal and mesenteric connective tissue from the stomach to the rectum, without 
t the same time any inflammatory lesions in any part of the body. 

Games. 

During the winter months, I have found as a rule, the stables to be low, ill 
entilated and filthy in the extreme ; to this there are, of course, certain excep- 
ons. Feeding on badly cured hay and coarse marsh grass, as is the common custom 
luring the winter months, will unquestionably tend to lower the constitution of the 
nimals and render them liable to contract disease readily when exposed to it; and it 
s in this way that all these conditions taken together work, as I found that the 
najority of animals were put out on the grass last spring in a half-starved condition. 

That there is some specific cause at work producing the disease, I am convinced 
rom the fact that I have found the disease appear amongst well kept and ill kept 
itocks alike, and in thoroughbreds as well as well as the common breed of the 
iountry, producing, in all cases, the same symptoms and similar post mortem appear- 
inces. 1 beg to lay before you the results of the experiments conducted in this con- 
lection. 

(1.) A calf inoculated with serum from the peritoneal cavity of a cow whch was 
ick from the disease, and on which Dr. Osier and myself held a post mortem exam- 
nation. She was inoculated on 15th September, by hypodermic injection. There 
ras a considerable elevation of the temperature for a day or two, indicating fever ; 
he appetite kept good and rumination continued. Tha temperature then went down 
nd was taken every day till 2nd December; it varied greatly, being sometimes as 
| igh as 104° ; but no active symptoms of disease appeared, although the animal, not- 
withstanding a liberal supply of good food, did not thrive. 

She was killed on December 2nd, and post mortem showed no signs of disease 
hatever, neither necroscopically or microscopically. The same may bo said of a 

271 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188S 



second calf inoculated with serous fluid from the small intestines ; nearly the same 
symptoms, indicating septic fever, were observed. Post mortem, no pathological 
changes were observed. 

A sheep was also inoculated with intestinal fluid, and up to the present time, 
with the exception of slight septic fever at first, the animal appears to be in perfect 
health. 

"Stinking Willie. 1 ' 

There being a firm conviction in the minds of the majority of the people of this 
County that the disease was caused by the eating of a weed known as the " Stinking 
"Willie," scientifically known as " Senecio Jacobea." To set the matter at rest, two 
yearling cattle, a steer and a heifer, .were fed on the weed, in its green state, and 
al^o in its dried condition ; they have been receiving it at the rate of half a pound 
daily, cut fine and mixed in a mash; they did not eat it readily at first, but gradually 
took it without any difficulty. 

These showed no symptoms of disease whatever, the temperature never rising 
above 102°. On 2nd December I killed the heifer, and post mortem, no pathologi- 
cal changes were to be found, which proves conclusively that the weed has nothing 
whatever to do with the disease. The other two were subsequently killed and found 
healthy. 

These results prove that further and more extended experiments and observa- 
tions than were possible by me, considering the fact that I had the business part of 
the work to attend to as well as the scientific, will be necessary before the actual 
cause of the disease is determined. 

Symptoms. ■ 

This affection appears in two forms, an acute and a chronic or sub-acute. In the 
acute form the animal may be attached suddenly, constipation is observed, there may 
or may not be diarrhoea. The temperature rises from 103° to 104° or 105°. The pulse 
is rapid and weak 60 to 80 per minute. The breathing becomes hurried, and it will lie 
down or stand with a stupid look on the countenance and a peculiar glassy brightness 
of the eye. The head is protruded and she appears stupid ; in a lew cases I have 
observed symptoms of abdominal pain manifested by the looking back at the flank 
and heaving of the belly and sometimes straining, such cases will last from three to 
ten days. Delirium may sometimes be observed, but it is comparatively rare. 

In the chronic form the disease runs a longer course and the symptoms are slower 
in development. 

It shows itself in the majority of cases at first as constipation, this is folio wed 
after a few days by diarrhoea which gradually becomes copious and watery in consist 
ence.. It is of a peculiar dark tarry brown colour emitting a peculiar smell which is 
easily distinguishable, accompanying this there will be found, though not always $ 
peculiar dungy smell and taste in the milk, which is made more manifest on adding 
boiling water. In advanced cases the same odour is exhaled through the skin and the 
animal may be detected at a considerable distance. 

The animal gradually loses her appetite, rumination is interrupted and t losei 
flesh more or less rapidly. The coat is obseired to become rough and there is ai 
unthrifty and hidebound look ; the hair standing erect, it hangs its head and there is i 
heavy dull expression on the face, at the same time there is observed to be a peculia: 
glassy brightness of the eye which is staring. So7:'etimes delirium ensues and tb 
animal attacks any person or animal within reach or wanders off into the woods an< 
has been known to throw itself into the sea; these symptoms are mor< 
particularly observed incases where there is much peritoneal effusion. 

The disease, however, generally runs a more gradual course. The diarrhea 
gradually increases till it is watery. It loses flesh, becomes weaker day by day 
is often seen staggering about the fields, seeks isolation and shelter from the heal 
wanders off into the woods, where it may bo found, in a shaded place, ly ng wit) 

272 



l: 

iO: 

pii 

ton;; 



I. 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



its head stretched out, and if approached takes little or no.'notice, and gradually 
sinks and dies in the stable, or is found dead in the fields or woods. 

The temperature is at first elevated, but during the course of the disease it may- 
be found normal. In the first stages the temperature may be 103° to 104°, which, 
after a lew days, when the diarrhoea set* in, talis to normal, and may remain so till 
before death, when it rises to 105° to 106°. The pulse', in chronic cases, ranges from 
45 to 80, and is very weak, and in long standing cases is found to have a thieady 
oharacter. The respirations ar^ not much changed, except where there is much 
peritoneal effusion, when they are hurried. 

Post Mortem Appearances. 

I have made upwards of forty post mortem examinations of animals, which have 
died, or were slaughtered, as suffering from this disease. The same general appear- 
ances are found in all cases. One case may be taken as typical. The post mortem 
was performed by Professor Osier and myself. The animal, a cow, four years old, 
belonging to Mr. Thos. Millar, of Millhank Farm, near Pictou; she was examined, 
before death, and presented the general symptoms already described, she was so weak 
as to be unable to stand, and had to be dragged on a sled to the field, where she was 
killed by concussion and bleeding. On removing the skin some slight echymosin 
was observable ; the general muscular tissue was pale. On opening the abdominal 
cavity, several gallons of a limpid straw or urine coloured serum, without odour, wai 
found in the peritoneal cavity. Tne omentum was somewhat infiltrated with serum. 
There was much gelatinous infiltration in the gastric omentum and the mesentery 
was infiltrated throughout the whole course of the intestines, and somewhat 
©chymotic. 

The Paunch showed a large quantity of undigested food, and in the mucus mem 
brane at the junction with the reticulum, there were found between the papillae a 
large number of flukes (amphistoma conicwm). The mucus membrane appeared 
otherwise healthy. The reticulum showed no changes. 

The mucus membrane of the manyplies was dry, and the food caked. No sigm 
of inflammation were to be observed. The aboraasum contained some food ; the entire 
mucus membrane was elevated into irregular folds, and had a watery infiltrated 
look ; it was very thin and separated from the muscular coat by an enormously 
thickened and infiltrated sub-mucosa, 1J inches in thickness, due to an 
infiltration of serum, which could be readily squeezed out. The membrane was soft 
and easily torn. No congestion was observed; the vessels were empty; the muscu- 
laris looked natural. 

The Small Intestines contained a brownish serous fluid; the mucus membrane 
was soft, but otherwise showed no signs of change. 

The Large Intestines contained a quantity of brownish green soft faeces, more 
consistent towards the rectum. The mucus membrane showed no change. The 
mesentery here was intensly thickened with gelatinous infiltration. 

The Liver had a yellowish tinge, showing fatty degeneration. 

The Gall Bladder contained an average amount of greenish colored bile, the 
ducts were clean. 

The Pancreas was normal. 

The Spleen showed no change. 

The Kidneys were healthy looking. 

The Uterus contained a foetus two months old. 

The Ovary contained a corpus lentum. 

The Bladder contained a small quantity of normal looking urine ; the walls were 
healthy. 

The Heart contained a small quantity of fluid blood, and showed slight sub-peri- 
cardia! echymosis; the valves were healthy, and the walls showed no signs of change. 

The Aorta was free. 

273 
14—18 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.l4„) A. 188S 



The Lungs were normal with slight areas of natural collapse and the bronchi 
were free. 

The thoracic duct was free. 

The brain showed no effusion and was otherwise healthy. 

Microscopical, 

The Peritoneal Serum on microscopical examination showed : 

(I). A lew led corpuscles. 

(2). Leucocytes. 

(3). Numerous small refractile bodies just within the limits of a No. 9 glass ; 
they showed molecular movements. 

The Blood showed : 

(I). Orenation of the red blood corpuscles. 

(2). A number of granular masses j no micro-organisms were to be observed. 

The Intestinal Fluid from the small intestines when placed in a conical glass 
settled into a heavy deposit and a brownish turbid supernatent liquid; the latter 
on examination was found to be swarming with various forms of organisms, among 
which were recognized : 

(1). Ovoid bodies singly or arranged in chains, and containing towards one end 
a prominent highly refractile body. 

(2). Bacilli either single or with one joint, resembling closely the Bacillus of 
Anthrax or the Baccillus Subtilis of hay infusion. 

(3). Leucocytes in considerable number; none of these organisms had motion. 
The liver showed fatty changes only. The spleen showed the presence of small 
micrococci-like bodies; the corpuscles were normal. 

The Messenteric glands show many small granular bodies. 

These examinations show a diseased condition of the system and the presence 
of certain bodies in the fluids with which further and more accurate experiment is 
necessary. 

Spread of the Disease. 

I have not been able to make any accurate observations as to the means by 
which this disease is spread. But that every facility has hitherto been given is 
abundantly shown by the fact that it has been the common custom to allow animals 
which were sick of the disease to wander off into the woods or on the roadside, there 
to die and lie unburied for months. I would draw your attention to the fact that 
this county is very poorly off for fencing, there being very few farms which are 
completely fenced, and many are without fences at all except for grain, consequently 
the cattle of whole districts graze in common and In this way the whole district 
becomes infected should one animal take the disease. This is a subject which should 
be brought to the notice of the proper authorities, and the laws with regard to 
fencing property enforced. 

The Use of the Beef and Milk. 

The use of the beef and milk of animals suffering from this disease is to be 
condemned, in common with that of animals suffering from any disease whatever. 

I have, however, to report that I have made enquiries in all parts of the county, 
but have been unable to find any case in which disease in human beings could be 
traced in any way to the use of the beef and milk of cattle suffering from the Pictou 
cattle disease, although I have known the milk to be used for a considerable time 
after the animal waj known to be sick. 

In concluding my Report I would express a hope that, while the measures 
adopted this season have been successful in completely stamping it out, yet as, from 
the fact that a number of farms on which the disease was present in 1881, have 

274 



4C Victoria, Sessional Papers (No.14) A. 188S 



not reported any ca>es of it this season, and an outbreak may be anticipated where 
the sanitary measures have been neglected or imperfectly carried out, in the interests 
of the farmers of the Cbunty of Pictou as well as the country at large, the measures 
may be continued to a certain extent during the coming winter, and in a modified 
form during the ensuing summer. I am of the opinion that this disease can be 
completely stamped out in another season. 

In the carrying out of my instructions I have to acknowledge valuable assist 
ance rendered by John MeDougall, Esq., M.P., Mr. David Matheson, of Pictou, and 
others, and also the courtesy received horn the farmers generally with whom I came 
in contact in performing what was often a disagreeable duty. 

In conclusion I have to report that the duties of tho Appraisers were performed 
by Messrs. Caswell and Grant in a highly satisfactory manner, as were also the 
duties of Quarantine Officers by Messrs. Fraser, McQueen, Grant and McKinnon. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM MoBACHRAN, 

Veterinary Inspector* 
The]Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



14—181 



275 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188S 



1882. 



Statistics of the Pictoa Cattle Disease, 



Name. 


Residence. 


Date of Declaration 
of Infection . 


! 

Animals which Died this 
Year before 1st July. 


Animals ordered to b« 
Slaughtered by the In- 
spector as Diseased. 


3 


B0 

o 
D 


u 
0Q 


a 
* 

'3 
W 

1 


m 
a> 

o 

... 



S \s 


DD 

$ 

02 


oo 
U 

M 
l 


s 
> 

o 


Pictou Quarantine. 


West River Road 


! 

Ano-. 19 








i 
i 


do 


do do 19 ; 


T :::::: 

i 


! 


Simon R Fraser 


Loch Broom 


July 28 




George Hamilton 

do 


do 


do 28 
do 28 
do 20 
do 20 
do 20 
do 20 
do 20 
do 20 
do 23 
do 23 
do 23 
do 23 








i 


i 




do 




i 














Hugh Harris 


Town Gut 

do 








2 









do 


, I 












do 


do 


■:' " 




do ..., 


do 


1 i 








1 






do 


do 












i 




do 


do 


" 














' 


..... 




Kenneth Fraser. 


Carriboo 




do ......... 


do 


















do 


do 

do 















L . 


i 


do 






••••• 


...... 




...... 








Daniel Read 


West River Road 

do 

do 

do 
. do 
Beeches Road 


do 12 ! ! 




do 


do 12 

do 12 1 










do 




do 

do 


do 12 
do 12 
do 22 


1 


""" '" J 


Mrs. Wm. Germain 


1 1 









2 
2 


l 


Geo. W. Campbell 

do 


do 


do 14. I-— 










...... 1 ''".'.'. 


do 


do 14 

do 14 
Aug. 3 

do 3 
July 14 

do 14 


i 








■ 


do 


do 

do 


::::::!:::::: 










:::::: i:::::: :::::: 


James Foote 














1 






do , 


do 










Johnson Campbell 

John Yorston 


do 
















do 




i 




1 








1 




do 


do 


do 14 ! 






! 




John Herrit, sen 




do 24 
do 24 








1 






do 


do 










:::::: 












do 


do 


do 24 






John Nearn 


Fisher's Grant 


Aug. 20 

Jnlv 9.9. 




1 
1 






Roderick McRae 





















Smith Foster 


Fisber's Grant Anc. 2 













Roderick McRae 

Smith Foster 


Granton 

Fisher's Grant 


July 22 

Aug. 2 

do 2 

do 2 







! 










do , 


do 
















do 


do 








...... 


... ...... 


:::::: 






do 


do 


do 2! 

July 26 




William Christie 


do 








William Stevenson 


West River Road 


Aug 15 
do 15 
do 15 
do 15 
do 15 






2 










do 


do 

do 
do 

do 

do 




......... 








do 
do 
do 


:::::* 












:::::. 




...... 












do 


















do 

















"" 






do 


do 


do 15 

July 28 

do 28 




















Daniel Ross 














2 






.. 


do 


do 


















do ...... 


do 


do 28 
do 28 
do 28 
Aug. 15 
July 31 
do 31 





... 














do 


do 


...... 


:::::: 














do 


do 


John Clark 

Thomas Ross 


West River Road 

Alma 

do ..... 


! 


. .... 


do 


:::: 






.::::.""-- 








276 























to' 

to 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No 14.) 



A. 188S 



compiled by William MxjEachran, I.D., V.S., Inspector. 



1882. 



Animals Confiscated and enter-: Animals Slaughtered or which Animals Discharged from Quarantine for 
ed into Quarantine as Sus-i Died in Quarantine from the. Slaughter, or returned to Owners, being 
pected from being in Contact. Disease or other causes. Healthy. 


6 


m 

"3 


5 1 S 

1 O 1 03 


1 a 

! w 


■ 


6 


pq 


BO 

O 
O 


BO 

u 



CD 

03 


1 i 

w 


j to 

1 <D 

1 


1 
2 

3 

i 4 

i 5 
6 

! 7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 


pq 


* 

O 


c 

$ 

03 


pi 

w 


OB 

s 

1 




1 




1 

1 












! 




1 

! 


1 


i 

1 


1 
1 
1 


1 






2 


1 


i 




1 ' 


1 












3 


1.1 

i 

j 1 


j 




1 












4 


! 




.... J . 






1 








5 


1 ! l ! 


| ■ 








[ 


1 




6 




1 1 

i l 






7 


i ' r *" i "" " , ""■ 







! 






8 




i 

! \ 


I .1 






1 

1 




9 




! 1 


czcz/zzczzzcz 




i::::::::: ; :: 


1 




10 


1 


1 




1 




11 


1 


1 






1 


' \ 

1 




j 


12 


1 
1 
1 


). ..!..' I.....J .... 1 1 




1 


13 


i " 






i 


14 


i i 


. .. 






1 


15 


i 


1 | i 








1 


16 




:::::: 


i 

l 






1 


1 


1 


1 
1 






17 


1 










: 


j 










18 


1 
1 


1 
















1 

1 






19 












1 












20 






i 






1 ! 




■" 








1 


21 




l 
l 










czcz 




i 




1 
1 








22 













1 














23 




1 
1 





23 




r ■ 


1 












24 










1 




24 








1 




25 




...... 


i 
l 

l 

l 










1 
















26 












i 






26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 ! 

33 




1 

1 
1 








27 


.... 







::::::: 




1 
















28 










29 






i 




! 




"*• 


"Y 






1 


30 




i 






i 


j [ 






31 






1 


r 







:::::: 


1 






"1 




1 




32 


i 






.. 


I 


33 




l 
l 

i 












:::::::: i r 








34 












1 


1 




34 : 


1 


1 

1 








35 




h 






„ 






35 I 

36 ! 
37 
38 ! 

i 

40 1 

41 


1 







36 






i 


"39" 






:::::::::::: 

1 


...„. 




1 


1 


37 




l 
l 


:::::: 


1 


1 


j 




38 




! 


1 


■ 




39 




i 










40 


"T 


i 
i 
i 
i 


::::: 


1 








1 




41 




42 


"1 







1 


1 






42 














43 








*' 1 




...,.-. L... 




43 

44 ' 
45 




1 
1 
1 




! 




44 








1 














45 








■ 












! 


1 




46 
















1 


46 


1 








47 






i 

i 


47 








J ! 














48 


i 


... ( .... 










48 
49 


.... 








1 


49 


"Z\ i 

i | 


i 
... i 






1 ! 






1 


1 


1 1 








50 








50 ; 


1 


1 


::: 








51 






1 1 


51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 


1 j 


1 


1 




m 






1 ' 






.... 1. 


......... 


i 




1 | 




.53 


i 


. 


1 . 










'! 






54 


! 


! 


i 


















! 


1 


55 


1 
1 1 


1 ' 






.... 1 




1 
1 
1 








56 






1 j 












57 


1 1 


1 








9 



211 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



S?.$ 



1882. 



Statistics of the Pictou Cattle Disease 



Name. 


Residence. 


Date of Declaration 
of Infection. 


1 

1 

Animals which Died this 

Year before 1st July. ; 

i 


Animals ordered to b* 
Slaughtered by the In- 
spector as Diseased. 


m J go 

% I O 
PQ { © 




g 1 ml 

iS |5 i.S 


o 
© 


2 


CO 

*-> 

W 


o 


Pictou Quarantine-Con 
Kenneth Forbes 


Green Hill 

do 

do 


! ! 

July 18 1 2 




2 ! 






1 




do 


do 18 
do 18 
do 18 
do 20 
do 20 
do 20 
Sept. 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 12 
do 27 
do 27 
do 27 
do 27 










do 






|" 










do 


do 









■ 








Hugh Harris 


Town Gut 

do 

do 








:::::t::::: 


do 












! 






i 


do 








Estate H. Bone 


Pictou........ . , 

do ..... 

Scotch Hill 

do 






...1 -■ 


1. 


1 




I 


do 


i 










■ 


Lauchlin Mclnnes 














do 












! 


do 


do 









i 




j 


do 


do 

do 









i 




1 


do 















do 


do 

do 




* 






do 


i 








do 


do 


::::::i:::::: 








j 


do 


do 


i 


1 






1 


do 













j i 


do 


do 










*' :"' 


do 


do 














Millbank 

do 


f 


1 






1 






do 











do 


do „ 


i 







I 






do 


do 








C t 






do 


do 







1 







do 


do 








1 


Mrs. Donald Ross 










::::::!:::::::::::: 


?, 




1"" 


do 


do 








i 









do 


do 

do 

do 

do 

Churchville 

do 








■ 


:::::::::... 




.... 


do 








i 


............ 




do 


do 27' 









do 


do 27 




i 








William Robertson 


Oct. 24 
do 24 
do 24 




i 


1 






1 








do 













do 


do 













! 

i 






do 


do 


do 24 

do 24 




do 


do 






• 1 


do 


do 


do 24 I 

do 24 ! 

do 24 ! 

July 22 ! 








do 


do 








" i 

i 
i 

i 






do 


do 




Mrs. William Germain. 








Colin Ferguson 


Pictou Town 

do 

West River Road 

Three Brooks, Car- 


do 15 
do 14 
do 17 

do 17 
do 18 
do 26 
Aug. 15 
do 15 






, 




1 






Henry Myers 

Urs. Mary McKenzie.... 









I 




; 








| 




! 








1 


Mrs. Thos. McPherson. 


Fisher's Grant 

Beeches Road 


! 











2 










1 


Walter Tanner 


! 









2 
1 


... 








do 3|.. . 

do 30 

July 24 

1 


1 
"l 

8 






i 










i 5 






1 






C. J. Smith 


Fisher's Grant , 


... 





1 i 


Totals at Pictou.... 


E |= 


— — 
36 1 


5 1 








j 


1 


; 



278 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 14.) 



A. I 



compiled by William McEachran, M D., V.S., Inspector. 



1882. 



Animals Confiscated and enter-' Animils Slaughtered or which Animals Discharged from Quarantine for 
ed into Quarantine as Sus- Died in Quarantine, from the Slaughter, or returned to Owners, being 
pected from being in Contact. : Disease and other causes. ■ Healthy 



6 

{2. 


on 


1 ri 

i § 


£ 

a- 
' a> 

0Q 


1 E 

•g 

w 


Calves. 
No. 


L 

! 

1 


Cows. 
Steers. 


Heifers. 
Calves. 


! i 


CD 

1 « 


i E 
i 

i 

! ■ 




| Heifers. 


60 

i ° 


1 

58 


1 
i 

1 






1 


1 


58 


i 






59 1 1 


1 


. 




59 | 

! 


! 


1 


1:::::: .::::: 








60 
61 
62 
63 




1 




i 


j 60 

1 Ri 






! 1 

1 








. 1 




i 












i 




1 


62 


1 


1 


i 


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63 




i -::: 


, 1 1 




1 


















x , 


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i 




2 


65 




1 

1 1 

1 




1 . 






1 




S 64 
65 
66 
67 




1 
1 








! 


1 1 












66 : 

67 ! 

68 | 

69 ; 




|:;; . I::;:;: 




L. '.. .. 


■ 1 

! ! 




i 


1 




1 ! 

1 i 


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i 





1 :..: 


::::::::: 








1 ' 


1 68 








! 1 




1..., 1 


69 









70 i 




! 

l 

l 


; 70 
"72" 




1 ::, 


! 









71 




i ! 71 

i 1 , 


i 




1 




72 






! 






73 





! ! l 


1 1 





74 
75 

76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 






1 

1 


74 | ' i i" 

75 j ; 1 

76 1 1 | : 

::::::::::: ::::::::::: ::::::':::::: 


1 












| 




"T 


i 

... 


.... 




1 _ 

"77 i" ]!.!""!; 

78 J 1 ; 

79 - - 









i 


C !: ;.;::;:: 


1 








il 




1 


80 
81 
82 


' 




1 
1 

1 








j : 


! 






1 


' 


! 


j 


l 


83 


1 


1 


84 1 






84 




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1 


i 




85 
86 
87 
88 
89 





M 




, 


85 
86 

87 
81 











i 
l 


! 






1 


1 










i 


, 


1 ! 










1 
1 




• 





, 




1 












89 






1 


90 




1 
l 






1 j 






90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 





1 
1 
1 






91 
92 
93 






:::::: :::::: ::. 




i 






i 






1 1 










i 


■ 






!• ! 


' 


1 




94 










i 
i 
i 
i 






1 

1 


95 








i ;- 


1 

! 






96 






96 






1 




97 








! 


1 




97 


!_; 1 




H 
■«....... 




:::::: 

i 


4 










H 




4 ' 


i 




E|Ei 

: ' 


, 


! 




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I 

1 


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: 


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! 




1 
1 

j 










i 




. 


• 





< 


:::::.] 


'.Z'.X'.'.'... 
1 


::rc:: 




::::: \ 

E ' 

i 





:::::: : 


1 

:■■ eh 


:::::::::, 


......... j 







5 


50 


8 


23 


15 




1 


5 j 1 : 2 | 5 | | 5 | 


44 i 6 i 21 


12 
























1 


27 


9 















46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188J 



1882. 



Statistics of the Pictou Cattle Disease 



i 

Name. 

1 


Residence. 


Date of Declaration 
of Infection. 


.! 

Animals which Died this ' 
Year before 1st July. 


Animals ordered to be 
Slaugtered by the In- 
spector as Diseaged. 




(0 

pq 


00 

o 
o 


Si 

02 


a 


i 


pq 


° 

Q j 
1 


CO 

W 


00 

u 

'3 

m 


s 

IS 
o 


! 

Pine Tiee Quarantine. 
Robert Murray 


! 
1 

Fraser' s Mountain....' Jnlv 




1 










do j 


do ....! 
do 
do 
do 
Pine Tree 


do 7' 
do 7 
do 7 
do 7 
do 19 
do 19 


I 


| 


I 












do ! 


1 




i 


i 












do i 


! 


! S 


:::::.! 


i 


...... i 


1 

l ! 

i 

1 




i 






William Murray ' 

James M. Arthur 

do I 

do 1 


i 




1 


"ZC" 


i 

i 


; 


1 


[[."'. 




do 




do 


do 19 
do 4 
do 4 


! 


c 


t 




...... 






Michael Finnisey. 

do ; 


Fraser's Mountain.... 

do .... 


1 

1 


::::::i::::::l..l 




do i 


do 
do 
do 
do .... 


do 4 
do 4 
do 4 




... I.....J 


i 


:: i 






do 

do 


........ 

... „ 


zz 







.. ...i .. 






do 






" . '" '"J 

. ... . ... j... 




William Rae 


Pine Tree 

i\c\ 


do 23 

do 23 

do 23 

do 23 

do 20 

do 19 

! do 19 

• do 19 

| do 19 

'July 19 

[Sep. 20 

i do 20 





... 

!! 






do 






! 


i ! 






do do 




1 













do 

John McArthur 

James Fitzgerald 


do 

do 




::::..c:: 


"V 




' i 






do 




i 




...... 




1 




.i 




do ....1 do 

do do 


... 


.!....C... 

i 
















do 


do 

Pine Tree 

McClellan'g Brook.... 




1 " 










1 


r 




James Fitzgerald 

ffilliam Wylie 

do .... 


...... 


1 I 
1 "" 










! 


"TC 
i 




do 
do 
do 
do 
do 


1 1 | 










do 


< do 20 

do 20 

do 20 

do 20 

July 4 

'July 25 

: Sep. 28 

Sep. 27 

Sep. 28 

Oct. 16 

Oct. U 


1 \" 






t 




do 


i 1 i 


: . 










do 


1 j i i !"■ 






! 






do 


I ! 1 ! 




i 










Simon Fraser.... 


Chnro.hvillft 


1 1 l 


1 ! 




i 


1 

1 
1 
1 


1 !.!.... 







William McDonald do 




I 1 




I 




James Bowen 

John Weir 

John J. Grant 

W r illiam McLean 

James Murray 

Totals at Pine Tree 

ilerigoinishe Quaran- 
tine. 

John Meikle 




1 i""" 1"" 




! 


i 

1.1 1 




Pine Tree 


"" ' I 1 !"" 




New Glasgow 


::::::::::::i::::::i::::::c: 


! 


1 
1 






1 do 


1 j j ) ... 

1. L.J. L....L 


: -' 


I 




do 


r 




I 


i 


- 4 1 


! 

i l 

1 


i i 


i 


4 


i i 




L-. 


Aug. 2c 

do 2- 

1 do 21 

1 do 2: 

! do 2: 

1 do 2; 

j do 2: 

do 2: 

{ do 21 

July 2( 

do 2( 

. do 2( 

. do 21 

. do 2t 


j 






I 


1 








do do 


5 1 


1 


f " 








i 




do 


do 

do 

do 

do 

i do 




i i 






i 










do 


i .... 


1 ! 






.... 


| 






' 


do 


i 


! 


















do ..: 


J 


1 l" 








i ' . 




, 






do 


{1 I_. 




do 


do 

do 


5 










; 




j 






do 


J 




I 


j* 


i 




I ." . 




Mrs. William Copelanc 
Mrs. Robert Copelanc 

do 

do 


do 

1' do 




4 1 






! i 




i \'% 




do 

do 

do 


5| 






1 !'*'" 

i ! 


i 


I 


i r 

1 i 




do 






r*'*::':::... 


i :i:::::: 


; 


i;:::::i 








280 





46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (>i^14.) 



A. 1883 



complied by William McEachran, M.D., Y.S., Inspector. 



1882. 



r. Animals Confiscated and enter- 
ed into Quarantine, as Sus- 
pected from being in Contact. 


j 
Animal 3 Slaughtered or which Animals Discharged from Quarantine for 
Died in Quarantine from Slaughter, or returned to owners being 
the Disease or other cause. Healthy. 


6 

!Z5 


■ 

'a 
PQ 


CO 

o 
O 


00 

8 

02 


2 

W 


3 

Is 
o 


d 


m 
pq 


* 1 « 

> j © 

O 1 02 




O 


6 


■ 
CO 


01 

O 

Q 


m 

2 


2 
J 8 
W 


oa 

9 

D 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

? 

8 

11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
i 17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 




1 
1 




















1 




1 




" 




i" 


2 






1 




i 

1 












1 | 


3 

4 
fl 
6 
7 
8 




1 


1 


|;;;;;; 






1 


i 










1 






1 




i 


I 









1 






1 

1 








!' 

r 


1 

:::::: i;::::: 




1 
1 






1 






"l 






1 










i 








1 
1 
1 














i 


9 
10 
11 

;2 

13 




1 
1 
1 


































1 


i 












1 






; 


i 









1 












1 












1 










1 






...i 


14 










1 




1 

1 







! 


......i...... 


15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 




1 
1 












i 


:::::::::::: ::::::i:::::: 








1 
1 








1 i ' 






1 

1 






"l 
1 






















i ..!..., 




1 


















i 




1 
1 
1 


! 




1 















! 


21 








1 














i i 


22 




! 








1 
1 








! 


23 
24 






1 
















i | 





1 




1 













"..".*:;";; 


25 


......... 


1 








1 










! 


.... 


26 

27 
28 






1 













1 










• 









1 




1 








i . 









1 




1 
1 








29 




i 
1 


i 

















30 ...... 







i 

, 


































::::::::: 







i 

jEE:!.-:::: 





j 


:E:::E 




1 


...... 


! 

I 







r 











Ill 


1 













16 8 ' 


^ 








13 




i 8 


5 


1 

2 

i 3 

I 4 
i 5 




1 




















1 
2 




i 
1 






i 












; 






.. 









.... 














3 
























4 
5 

6 

7 
8 


. . 







, 






I 
1 

1 


. ( ... 












i 

i 
i 





i 6 


1 


1 




: 






7 


1 ; 


1 















8 


i 


l 

l 
















1 


1 9 














i"" 


9 

10 
11 








1 


1 10 





1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


,.. 














1 
1 








11 






















12 

13 

> 14 








12 
12 






1 : 










:::::: l:::::: 




...:., i 


i 




.... 




l 








14 1 




















2 


81 













46 Victoria. 


Sessional 


Papers (No 


.14) 








A. 


188^ 


i 


1882. 


Statistics of the Pictou Cattle Disease, 


(X 


Name. 


Residence. 


i. 

O o 
O o 

V. o 
Q 


Animals which Died this 
year before 1st July. 


Animals ordered to be 
Slaughtered by the In- 
spector as Diseased. 


■Ai 


to 

pq 


00 

O 
O 


. 

o 

<u 

m 




o 


OS 

PQ 


00 

o 


e 

XJ1 


"53 

w 


OB 

> 

O 




Merigomishe Quaran- 
tine — Con. 

James Grant 


Merigomishe 


Sep. 7 
do 7 





















do 


do 


' 


do 


do 


do 7 
do 7 
do 7 
do 7 
do 7 
do 7 
do 7 
Aug. 5 
Julv 22 







• 




do 


do 





















do 


do 

do 






do 






















do 


do 








1 








j 




do 


do 








1 












do 


do 


i 














Angus McDonald 

William Munro 


do 

Wentworth Grant.... 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Sutherland's River... 

do 

do 

do 








1 

1 










! j 








' 


Philip McBeath 


do 22.::: 


1 






.... 


do 


do 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 13 
do 13 
do 13 
do 13 
do 13 

Aug. 1 
do 1 
do 1 
do 1 
do 1 
do 1 

July 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 




:::::::::::::::::: 




! 






do 






! 1 










do 






i i i 




• 


do 




! 




1 


do 




! 


1 




1 


1 ' 


William Sutherland 

do 
do 




::::::i":::: 


1 ! 


1 


1 



! 

::::::i:::.:: 




2: 


do 
Mrs. Nelson Copeland. 
do 
do 


1 


" 1 


:::::: 


I:: 




"T 




i :::::: 


% 


do 

do 












I! 


do 


do ... 


:::::: :::::: :::::: 


i 




do 


do 














Mrs. Neil McLaurin 

do 
do 


Wentworth Grant.... 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 







j ! 

=PFF 




•::::::::::: 


J 


William McLaurin 






:::::. :::...:..::. 




1 ! 









do 


1 ! 






do 
John P. Olding 




.::...!:.: 




i 


:::.:: 








do 


do 














I 


do 


do .. 




1 


i ' 









do 


do 


















1 " 
1 


do 


do 

do 









! 










do 


:::::* :::::: :•: 


Archibald Lamont 


■ 


! 




i 









do 


do ... do 1 
do ... do 1 
do A" t 




I 








.1 


do 




, 











do 




! 










do 


do 

do ...| 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Merigomishe... ., 

do 

do 


do 1 
do 1 
do 1 
do 1 

do 1 
do 1 

July 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 13 

Aug. 23 




i 






1 


do 














do 




•"•"1 


i i j 


do 








i 


do 














do 






) 














1 

1 


,.. 










Finley Campbell 

do 


2 








2- 1 


i 







A 








• 


Mrs. N. Copeland 

John R. McKenzie , 


do 

Glenshee 




■ : ".. 








1 


, 


i 


i 






do 


do 


do 23 1 


;;;.;;; 


:•:::: 


....! i 




do 


do 


do 23 
do 23 


! 








!': 


Donald McVicar 


Merigomishe 




1 




I 


;.;;;; I;;;;;.|; 










28J 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188S 



sompiled by William McEachran, M.D., V.S., Inspector. 



1882, 



jA.nimals Confiscated and En- Animals Slaughtered or which 

! tered into Quarantine as Sus-1 Died in Quarantine from the 

pected from being in Contact, j Disease or Other Causes. 


Animals Discharged from Quarantine for 
Slaughter or Returned to Owners, being 
Healthy. 


6 


"3 1 © 
« 1 o 


s £ S 

m ! ft 1 o 


6 


m 

"3 
m 


1- 


a> 
g 


■a 

§ 

w 


05 

O 


1 A ' 
o ! 9 


o 


B 

O 

02 


a 

6 

"S 

w 


m 

■ 

CI 

Is 
o 


1 1S 
16 




! 






! 






\ 








i i 

I 15 


1 




...„, 


1 






' i 














1 16 
! 17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 


1 




17 




1 

1 
1 
1 




1 














1 

1 
1 
1 






1 18 

I 19 
20 
21 
22 
23 

, 24 
25 

, 26 
27 
28 















































































i 


1 


i 




• 














i 






1 




! 














1 












::::!: i:::::: 


























1 
1 

1 
1 

1 


















1 
1 

1 
1 
1 









i 






i 




























































28 
29 
30 
31 
32 










! 29 




1 1- 








; 







1 


..... 




30 








1 


1 









! 31 


l 












1 







1 








32 1 

1 33 ' 


1 
1 










I 






1 
1 







; i i.... 







! 






33 

34 
35 
36 
37 

38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 










34 






1 








1 




; 35 

36 
37 

i 38 
39 
40 

I 41 

i 42 
43 
44 

1 45 
46 

; 47 






i 
















1 







1 

1 


1 








i 








1 








; 








!' 








1 








1 

1 


















1 












.... 







.... 




: 


1 










1 


















/ 


1 


...... 


i 

\ 

1 
1 






1 

1 
1 
1 
1 






















, 



























































. 




,., 










1 






1 











i 












1 
1 

1 
1 












: 

j 








1 






i 48 

49 I 

1 60 ' 

51 1 


::::::|;::::: 


:::::: 









1 














49 












50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 


:i 














i 














52 








l 




1 















1 


53 
54 
55 




1 
1 

1 












1 





















1 

1 
1 














1 














56 .... 


1 








■ 















57 






1 









1 

1 
1 




58 








1 
1 

"T 





. .1 








:::::: 













59 








:::::. 




......... 




60 






i 




i ! 
• 




61 




1 1 




62 


1 








' 






i 




1 


1 j 




93 




I 


! 







i 


1 


64 






' 




1 


t 




, 


1 


65 











1 





I 




65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 




! 


.... rl 


1 


66 1 

67 ; i 


















"T 







; 67 

1 


l 








; 




68 











j 


1 




09 


l 











I 






i. 








70 




i i 













1 


fc 



283 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 188$ 





























1882. Statistics of the Pictou Cattle Disease, 


Name. 

i 


Residence. 


a 
o 

g 

u 

o a 
Q 


Animals which Died this 
Year before lit July. 


Animals ordered to b«> 
Slaughtered by the In- 
spector as Diseased. 


■ 
pq 


10 






05 

2 


. 1 

W | 


'3 



& \s\i 


'3 
W 


i 

► 




Merigomishe Quaran- 
tine — Con. 

David Mitchell 


Merigomishe 


Oct. 18 


1 










1 


i 

1 

1 








do 

"" ^ do 


do ! 

do J 


do 18 























Thomas Copeland .1 

John Jacob Copeland..! 

John S. Copeland 

Mrg. Thomas McLaurin 


French River 

do 


Oct. 28 

July 11 

do 11 


1 












...... 




2 




do 


-:••! 


1 




1 


















1 

14 

1 








Totals, Merigomish 

Knoydart Quarantine. 
Donald McDonald ' 









17 




3 








1 


5 


~ 


Knoydart 


July 25 
do 25 
do 25 









do 


do 








do 


do 












...... 

:::::: 




....... 




"l 




do 


do 


do 25' 




do 


do 


do 25 
do 25 
do 25 


...... 

" 


do 


do 


Donald McKinnon 


do 


do 


do 


do 25 

do 25 
do 25 
do 25 
do 25 




do 


do 























do 


do 








i 


I 








do 


do 























do 


do 








:::::: 




.. 
...... 


:::::: 




;;;;; 










do 


do 


do 25 

do 25 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 25 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 
do 22 




John McDonald 


do 




1 


2 
















do 


do 










2 








do 


do 




1 














do 


do 




do 


do ... 




















do 


do 


do 22 
do 22 
do 25 
Aug. 14 
do 25 
do 25 
do 25 
do 25 
do 25 
do 25 




I 














do 


do 


















Martin McDonald 


do 




1 

j- 
i 


1 


1 






1 


...... 


" 


Alex. McGillivray 


do 




Martin McDonald 


do 


do 


do 




1 










Hugh McDonald 


do 

do 














1 






... 


do 














do 


do 


















\ 


do 


do 




















do 


do 


do 25 


l 




. .„ 

















John A. McGillivray... 
do 


Dunmaglass 


do 1 
i do 

do 1 
1 do 1 
i do 1 
1 do 1 

do 1 

do 1 




1 


do 

do 






do 






i 
















Lauchlan McGillivray. 

do ;;; 


do 


1 


do 

do 




i 


i 




! 




...... 










do 


do 


. 




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46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



s 



•ompiled by William McEaciiran, M.D., V.S., Inspected 



1882. 



Animals Confiscated and enter- 
ed into Quarantine, as Sus- 
pected from being in Contact. 



Animals Slaughtered or which' Animals Discharged from Quarantine for 



Died in Quarantine from the 
Disease or other causes 



Slaughter, or returned to owners being 
Healthy. 



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Sessional 


Pape 


rs (No.14.) 








A. 


1888 


18*2. Statistics of the Pictou Cattle Disease 








Date of Declaration 
of Infection. 


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46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (5i,. 14.) 



A. 1883 



compiled by William McEachran, M.D., V.S., Inspector. 



1882. 



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r tered into Quarantine as Sus-i Died in Quarantine from the Slaughter or Returned to Owners, being 
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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A, 1SS3 



No. 36. 

EEPOET ON PICTOTJ CATTLE DISEASE INVESTIGATIONS. 
By Professor Wm. Osler, M.D., M.B.C.P.L. 

McGill College, 
Montreal, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — Pursuant to instructions received from the Department of Agriculture, I 
proceeded to Pictou in September last, and in conjunction with Dr. William McEach- 
ran, the resident Inspector, made such observations upon the disease as the limited 
time at my disposal permitted. Unfortunately for my purpose I arrived when there 
were very few animals sick, but we were able to institute certain experiments, the 
results of which have a bearing on some points in connection with the disease. 

My personal experience and the record of experiments are as follows: — 

1 Cow, aged 4, belonging to Mr. Thomas Millar, Milbank Farm, Pictou,who says he 
lost one animal last spring. Has a herd of seven, all of which were taken to quarantine. 
Animal calved in June; took the bull on the 22nd; appeared quite well until Sep- 
tember 9th, when the disease began by a copious diarrhoea, for which she was given 
fish oil and soot. Seen by Dr. Wm. McEachran on the 13th, temperature 101 f ° ; was 
standing up; was scouring and presented the marked features of the disease — 
staring, brilliant eyes, rough coat, and general look of sickness, and peculiar taste of 
the milk. When seen in the afternoon temperature 101°, dulness in lower abdominal 
region ; respirations and pulse slightly increased, latter 80, thready. 

On Thursday 15th, found her lying down and so weak that she could not rise 
up, was evidently sinking fast. Eespiration 60. 

Killed by slight blow on head and bleeding. Blood of good colour, not black or 
tarry. Skm, rough hair ; in subcutaneous tissue about mammary region a few eechy- 
moses. Abdomen, several gallons of brownish-yellow fluid flowed away — a little tur- 
bid, but with no shreds — general peritoneal surface smooth. Omentum, thickened by 
an infiltration of the tissue, and in the vicinity of the vessels there were numerous 
small ecchymoses. On stripping off this membrane the folds and grooves about the 
stomach presented a swollen appearance from the gelatinous infiltration. At one 
end of the many plies there was a clot in the peritoneal tissue the size of an egg. 

Paunch contained a large mass of food mixed with a good deal of liquid. Mem- 
brane presented no special change ; towards the reticulum was a patch in which 
thirty or forty amphistomes were attached. 

Reticulum normal. Many plies large ; the food between the layers dry and 
caked, particularly towards the periphery. 

Rennet contained food. The mucosa in its entire extent was elevated and 
formed irregular folds. On section this was found to be due to the uniform infiltra- 
tion of the submucosa with a gelatinous substance which formed a layer from one- 
half to ODe and a half inches in depth, quite clear; vessels not injected. The mucosa 
itself seemed pale and turbid, not the normal tint. The muscularis showed no 
change; the peritoneum was smooth, but in the folds much infiltrated. After 
section, the serum partially drained out of the submucosa. This condition was con- 
fined to the fourth stomach and did not extend to the duodenum. 

Small intestines contained dark brown liquid faeces ; mucous membrane pale, but 
>resented no special change. Muscularis and serosa normal. 

Large bowel contained a quantity of brownish-green soft faeces, which became 
nore consistent towards the rectum. Mesentery was everywhere thickened and 
nfiltrated with serum, thcugh not to the extent of the omentum. It was congested 
md presented innumerable ecchymoses. 

Spleen thin and small, on section natural looking. 

Liver a little pale, evidently fatty ; gall bladder contained a normal quantity of 
>ile. Vessels and duct slit open and found healthy . 

Pancreas looked normal. 

Kidneys of good colour and consistence ; no congestion. Bladder full of urine. 

289 
14-19 



iQ Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A, 1888 



Verm contained a two months' foetus. 

Heart contained but little blood ; valves healthy numerous sub-en docardial 
ecchymoses in the left ventricle. Muscle substance pale. 

Lungs crepitant, with a few scattered patches of collapse; bronchi free. 

Aorta and thoracic duct slit open ; no change . 

Brain presented sub-pial extravasation in the left hemisphere. Substance healthy. 

Microscopical examination conducted two and half hours after the post-mortem . 

Blood, from left auricle had clotted ; corpuscles crenated but natural-looking ; no 
micro-organisms. 

Peritonei U fluid contained leucocvtes and red corpuscles, with a few small, highly 
refractile bodies visible with No. 9 Hartnack. 

Spleen tissue normal. Thickened mesentery presented increase in interlitial 
leucocytes, and many of the fixed cospuscles appear swollen. 

Mesenteric glands a little swollen ; cells normal. 

Liver cells very fatty ; no farther change. 

Stomach. — The glands of the mucosa in teased specimens were very distinct, 
easily isolated, and the epithelial elements very plain ; protoplasm granular. The 
sub-mucous infilration consisted of the separated and swollen connective tissue fibres 
with occasional leucocytes. 

Intestinal fluid, when left to stand in conical glass separated into a small layer of 
brown sediment and a turbid brownish fluid. A drop of this under the microscope 
revealed the existence of many micro-organisms, none of which were motile of form; 
present there were (1) small round bodies, micrococci ; (2) ovoid bacteria, either 
single or in chains of two, three or four; very many of these contain at one end a 
small, bright, highly refractile body (a spore) ; (3) rod shaped Bacilli, tolerably 
abundant, either in single bits or double, the joint being somewhat bent. They 
resemble clearly the B. subtilis or anthracis. 

Food particles, etc., were in abundance, but nothing else of special note. 

II. Quarantine animal, ISTo. 59. — Steer, aged about fifteen months. • (Belonged to 
K. Forbes, of Green Hill, Pic. Co. Entered into quarantine 21st August, apparently 
healthy. Had come from a farm on which, in the summer of 1881, seven head were 
lost. In the spring of 1882, five head were lost, one of which had been 
slaughtered by order of Inspector. This animal was seen by Dr. W. McEachran last 
summer, and was then ill ; she seemed to recover, calved, and after it did not thrive 
and got weaker; was ordered to be killed. An undoubted case. 

On August 2 ( 7th, copious diarrhoea ; in evening, very weak and staggering ; wag 
placed in hospital, and ordered to be fed and treated with Tr. Ferri Mur. and Pot. 
lodii. 3i ; Tr. Gent. Co. 3g., aqua add Og m, et n. 

For the first three or four days the animal fell away rapidly, got very emaciated, 
did not eat ; temperature, taken daily, ranged from 103° to 104°. Then began to 
pick up, and bowels improved, though the temperature kept up. Medicines stopped 
on 9th September ; faeces consistent; appetite good, though looked unthrifty ; hair 
rough. JL 

From 13th, temperature was as follows: 13th, E., 103|° ; 14th, M., 102X° ; B.,r e 
10. X°; 15th, M., 102°; E., 1024°; 16th, M., 102f°; E., 102f° ; 17th, M., 102|° ; E., I 
102|°. 

18th, killed by concussion and bleeding. 

Abdomen. — Small quantity of peritoneal fluid, omentum natural ; no sub-peritoneal 
effusion ; no gelatinous infiltration. Lymph glands at back of abdomen deeplj 
injected. 

Stomach — 4th contains food; normal looking; digestion going on; membrane clear 
no infiltration. 3rd, Normal. 2nd presents no change. 

Paunch. — Full of food ; looks quite healthy ; about two dozen amphistomes ii 
usual position. 

Spleen.— Firm and normal. 

Intestines slit up ; a few solitary glands look prominent ; otherwise no change. 

In coscum. — Half a dozen whip worms ; fieces normal. 

290 



jfffl 

On 
to] 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



Kidneys. — Healthy. 

Liver. — Normal ; nothing in portal vessels or in bile ducts ; gall bladder moder- 
ately full. 

Thoracic viscera perfectly normal. 
Thoracic duct and aorta healthy. 

III. No. 23. — Heifer; well bred; aged fifteen months; came from a farm which has 
been badly affected ; three lost this season, among which was her mother ; entered 
quarantine on 14th of August ; about 22nd August became unthrifty ; did not look 
well ; hair rough ; looked thin ; had staring eye ; appetite failed ; did not rumimate ; 
copious diarrhoea and very weak; temperature for a week ranged about 104°; she got 
the Ferrum and Pot lodid ; put in hospital after first week, temperature 102°; medicines 
stopped on 9th September; faeces consistent; she appeared hide bound and rough; (she 
was very sleek) ; temperature range from 13th, E., 102£°; 14th, M., 102|°, E., ll)2£ ° ; 
15th, M., 102|°, E., do. ; 16th, M., 102|°, E., 103° ; 17th, M., 103°, E., 103°. 18th, 
killed by concussion and bleeding ; external appearance, normal ; in abdomen no in- 
filtration of omentum or peritoneum; no change in any of the abdominal viscera; the 
paunch had about one dozen amphistomes ; no change in any of the thoracic organs. 

IV. Quarantine animal, No. 76. — Cow, aged about seven, belonging to Louchlin 
Mclnnes ; there had never been any disease on his farm; was placed on the 14th of August 
with the suspected cattle,(his farm was the quarantine); on the 20th Dr. McEachran's 
attention was called to her as being loose in the bowels ; not very copious ; she was 
allowed to run for another day when she was thought ill enough to put in hospital ; 
the milk almost ceased; was treated in same way; her hair was rough and eye bright; 
abdomen very large ; temperature for the first week, 102°, 104° ; medicines seemed 
to give her great relief ; on third day much'better ; medicines stopped 9th September ; 
seemed better ; coat a little rough ; fed well ; on 19th killed ; abdomen greatly dis- 
tended ; paunch very large; about a pint of peritoneal fluid; paunch full of large mass 
of half macerated food ; membrane normal ; no amphistomes ; other viscera normal ; 
no trace of any affection in abdominal or thoracic organs. 

Quarantine Animal 62; cow aged three, from the farm of Hugh Harris, of the town 
Gut. He had lost two this season ; one died and one destroyed by order of Inspec- 
tor. Entered quarantine on 27th of August, calved on 22nd August. On September 
3rd was observed to be unthrifty ; loose, coat staining, appetite had failed, was 
orderedTto hospital, where she was given only wheat-heads. She seemed to improve, 
diarrhoea was only for three days, not very bad. Temperature 104° when she went 
to hospital and continued at that for three days. No change noticed, but looked out 
of sorts, coat rough, eyes bright. 

Killed 19th September by concussion. 

Paunch full, omentum clear, no infiltration, no affection of stomach or intes- 
tines, perfectly clear and natural .looking. Amphistomes in numbers in usual site ; half 
a dozen sclerostomes in small bowel. 

Heart and lungs normal. 

Cow the property of William Wylie. A well marked case ; ill about ten days. 
Killed by concussion. 

Post mortem lesions identical with those of case 1, (cow of Thomas Millar's). 

Expirement No. 1 — With peritoneal fluid from Millar's cow (case 1) inoculated a 
calf (No. 74) four months old, by incision and put the clot of the scrum beneath the 
ekin. 

On the 16th, 17th and 18th no change; no fever; Dr. McEachran reports that the 
animal was kept under continuous observation until 2nd December. There was some 
elevation of temperature during the first week but no sign of the disease appeared ; at 
she post mortem (December 2nd) there were no special lesions. 

II. 15th September. No. 75. Calf, injected hypodermally half drachm of 
intestinal fluid from Mr. Millar's cow. 

16th, 17th and 18th — No special change ; no fever. 

Dr. McEachran reports that the animal was kept under continuous observation 
intil 2nd December ; the temperature and pulse taken night arid morning. There 

291 
14-19J 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A, 1883 



was slight septic fever for a few days, bat it passed off, and the animal appeared in its 
usual health. No changes noticed at the post mortem. 

III. 15th September, 1882. Sheep inoculated with intestinal fluid from Mr. 
Millar's cow. 

16th, 17th and 18th. No change. 

Dr. McEachran reports that a careful record was a] so kept of this animal for 
over two months and a half, but it showed no signs of disease beyond slight febrile 
disturbance a few days after the inoculation. 

IV. 19th September, 1881. Two-year-old steer was fed on " Eagwort," or " Stink- 
ing Willie," about a half of a pound daily, chopped up and mixed with bran as a mash. 

Y. A two-year-old heifer was treated in the same way. Dr. McEachran reports 
that the feeding was continued until 2nd December. No appearance of the disease 
during this period, and a post mortem on the heifer showed the organs in a perfectly 
healthy condition. 

VI. 20th September, 1882. A heifer two years old, was placed in the shed, on 
the property of Mr. Thomas Millar, in which the cow, reported as case I., was ill for 
some days, and thoroughly saturated the straw and earth with her excreta. Kept until 
6th,December ; remained in good health until date, when she was sent to the quar- 
antine. 

General Considerations. — In spite of the numerous investigations which have been 
made, we are still in the dark as to the true nature of this affection. Injustice, 
however, to the gentlemen who have pursued these enquiries, it must be remarked 
that while the measures taken have been admirably adapted to the eradication of the 
disease, they have not been altogether favourable to its scientific investigation. It 
would have been better if an experimental station had been established at first and 
those data obtained which are absolutely essential before a positive opinion can be 
given as to the nature of any disease. 

It would appear tolerably certain that the affection is not due to any poisonous 
substances in the food or drink, but to the existence of some special — in this instance, 
unknown — contagion which has got established in the region, and find their suitable 
conditions for its maintenance and development. Experiments IV and V effectually 
dispose of the popular notion that it is due to the Senecio Jacobea, or Eagwort. 

To the questions is it inoculable? is it infectious ? is it contagious ? we can 
give but imperfect answers, based on insufficient evidence. Experiments I and II, 
appear to show that the disease is not directly inoculable, at least with the peritoneal 
fluid or the characteristic intestinal contents but the animals used were young and 
may not have been susceptible, so that further experiments alone can determine this 
point. Neither the infectious nor contagious nature has been satisfactorily i.e. 
scientifically demonstrated, though in the establishment of quarantine and in the 
measures taken for stamping out the affection it was very properly assumed to be 
both. That it is infectious appears probable from the way in which it has broken out 
in successive years in certain farms and not on others, even adjacent; as if special 
localities had become infected. The erection of new sheds and the thorough disinfec- 
tion of yards have eradicated the disease on some farms. Such facts can be best 
explained on the supposition that the poison attaches itself, i. e. y infects localities which 
have been contaminated by sick animals, and from time to time, as suitable conditions 
arise, fresh outbreaks occur. Indeed, the way in which this disease has haunted 
Pictou County, and the way in which sporadic cases or groups of them have 
aj>peared at intervals and tend to recur on farms where it once has got a foothold r 
reminds one strongly of the records of anthrax districts in some countries. Year after 
year in such regions cases occur varying in intensity and in the number of animals 
affected, not widespread enough to destroy all the cattle, but constantly kept alive 
and entailing great loss on the farmers. 

Experiment VI, in which a healthy beast was in a highly infected shed and 
remained well for ever two and a half months is against a high degree of infection, 
but it may be that the period of incubation extends over several months, or th# 
animal was one not susceptible to the poison. This is a circumstance to be borne in 

292 






16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 

mind, and is one amply illustrated in the history of many diseases even of a very 
catching kind. It is rare, except in very severe epizootics, for all the animals in a 
herd to be affected ; many escape, and go in this Pictou disease the susceptibility has 
been limited. Thus in Professor McEachran's Eeport, (1881) it is stated that during 
the season only nine of the 200 cows of the Town of Pictou, and only two of the 200 
animals of New Glasgow died of [the disease, yet these animals freely intermingled 
and frequented the same pastures. 

The contagiousness is still more doubtful. In the town cattle, the sick and 
healthy animals have been allowed to roam together, and yet, as the figures just 
quotod show, comparatively few caught the disease. Some of the farmers I spoke 
with were very positive about the contagious nature, but the facts already in pre- 
vious .Reports show that it must be slight and not a marked feature. The slow way 
in which it has spread is also against a high degree of contagion. 

I know of but one affection to which the disease has certain points of resem- 
blance, and that is the intestinal form of authrax mycosis intestinalis. In this remark- 
able disease the digestive canal is chiefly involved, and there are aodeoiatous, 
infillsations, haemorrhages and peritoneal effusions, just as occur in the Pictou cattle, 
bnt the characteristic baccilli are found not only in the intestine, but in the mesenteric 
blood vessels, and in the glands. In Millar's cow (Case I.) bacilli, not to be dis- 
tinguished from those of anthrax, were tolerably abundant in the intestinal contents, 
and in the mucosa, but none were found in submucous infiltrations, in the blood 
vessels or in the swollen mesenteric glands. In the . other typical case (YI.) the 
post mortem took place on the day I had to leave, and I had not an opportunity of 
examining the intestinal contents when fresh. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Wm. OSLEJR. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



293 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.l4>) A. 1883 



No. 37. 

ANNUAL EEPOET OF THE BKITISH MAIL OFFICEK, 1882. 

(Mr, A. Walmsley.) 

Montreal, 12th December, 1882. 

Sir, — I beg to report to your Department that I have carried out the instruc- 
tions received, and have supplied all the Mail Officers on the Allan Line of Steamers 
with books and pamphlets on immigration to be "distributed on board the steamers 
to passengers who are on their way out to this country — and have also given away 
books both in French and English to people who wish to go to the North-West; 
and a great many along the line of railways I travel have been induced to go and 
gee for themselves, and have returned quite satisfied, and most all intend returning 
to settle. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

A, WALMSLEY, 
.Lritish Mail Officer. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



204 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No,14.) 



A. 1S8S 



No. 38. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF OCEAN MAIL OFFICER. 
(Mr. Chas. H. E. Tilstone.) 

Halifax, 13th December, 1882. 

Sir, — I beg to report, for the information of the Department, that I have duly 
distributed the books and pamphlets received from Mr. Walmsley and Mr. Dyke, and 
have afforded every information in my power, to immigrants by the Allan Line. 

The class of immigrants who have come under my notice is far superior to any 
I have seen before. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



CHAS. H. E. TILSTONE, 



The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



Marine Mail Officer, 



295 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 188J 



No. 39. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF OCEAN MAIL OFFICER. 

(Mr. W. F. Bowes.) 

Montreal, 19th]December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to inform yon that during the present year I pursued the 
same course as in the past, by distributing, on the Allan Line of mail steamers and in fa 
portions of the rural districts of Great Britain, the information issued from your ib 
Department for intending settlers in the Dominion. The anticipations in my Report 
of last year regarding the increase of immigration during the last twelve months ^ 
have been fully realized, and the prospects for the next are very hopeful. 

I hope at the close of next year to congratulate your Department on a large w 
increase in immigration. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. F. BOWES, 

Mail Officer. 

The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



296 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



No. 40. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OCEAN MAUL OFFICEE. 
(Mr. S. T. Green). 

Levis, 30th November, 1882. 

Sir, — In compliance with your orders as to the furnishing of a Report of my 
duties in connection with immigration to Canada, I beg leave to state, that I have 
been most assiduous in distributing the books and pamphlets, furnished me amongst 
the steerage passengers eoming to the Dominion in the Montreal Ocean Steamship 
^ompany's steamers. And as I found many of a better class, who were travelling as 
5rst class passengers, I thought it advisable to furnish the saloon smoking-room, 
vith a select portion of the printed information for intended settlers, where I 
bund it read and discussed with great avidity and interest. 

Periodically, too, on my eastward trip, I have inclosed books and pamphlets 
'addressed to the Postmasters) in the mail bags, which I make up for the minor 
owns of England, Scotland and Ireland, which I am satisfied has produced a good 
iffect, and considerably helped to make the Dominion known as a promising and 
uitable field for emigration. 

To all who sought verbal information (and they were not a few) according to my 
lonest convictions I gave them the best account of the country, its present capabili- 
ies and future great prospects. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

S. T. GREEN. 

Marine Mail Officer. 
'he Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



297 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (Nail) A. 188S 






No. 41. 

EBPOKT OF THE OCEAN MAIL OFFICER. 
(Mr. James Ferguson.) 



15th December, 1882. 
Sir, — I beg leave to report that on every westward trip I made across the 
Atlantic during, the past twelve months, up to the present time, I never failed to have 
a supply of the various immigration pamphlets, published by the Dominion Govern- 
ment of Canada, which I distributed to the immigrants on board, and never lost an, 
opportunity anywhere of setting forth the wonderful richness of the soil of the 
North-Western Territories'of Canada. 

I have great satisfaction in further stating, that during the past summer there 
has been a large increase of immigrants to Winnipeg and the North- West, and of a 
elass that will be a benefit to that portion of the Dominion. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Tour obedient servant, 

JAMES FERGUSON, 

Marine Mail Officer 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



. 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14 ) A. 1883 



No. 42. 

ANNUAL KEPOET OF THE OCEAN MAIL OFFICER 
(Mr. F. H. Mioklebfrgh.) 

Toronto, 31st December, 1882. 

Sir, — I beg to report, that during the past year, I have distributed the pamphlets 
received from the Department, and also those received from Mr. Dyke, the Govern*, 
ment Agent at Liverpool. 

I need hardly state that the influx of immigrants has been steady and in large 
numbers during the year now ending. 

They appeared generally to be a class of people well suited for making good 
pet tiers, and, from what I could learn, many seemed to be well provided with money ; 
and, judging by the trade and occupations they had been previously engaged in, I 
ihould think they would easily find employment in Canada, particularly in the Pro- 
vinces of Manitoba and the North- West. 

In my position as Mail Officer on board the Allan steamers, I can testify to the 
rapid increase of the correspondence between people in these parts of Canada and 
Europe, and, from the appearance of the private correspondence, there must be many 
tiere who have emigrated from Europe, of good social standing, and probably of good 
neans. 

It is also very gratifying that there has been but little sickness on board the 
teamers* 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

F. H. MICKLEBUEGH, 

Marine Mail Officer* 
"he Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



299 






£6 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.14.) 



A. 1883 



No. 43. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OCEAN MAIL OFFICER. 

(Mr.F. P. Bent.) 

Halifax, N. S., 30th December, 1882. 

Sir. — I beg to report that during, the past season, I have distributed book* 
descriptive of Canada and its immense resources to a very large number of immi- 
grants who intend making it their home. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

FRANK P. BENT, 

Marine Mail Officer. 

The Honorable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



I 



300 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A, 1883 



No. 44. 

ANNUAL KEPOET OF OCEAN MAIL OFFICER. 

(Me James O'Hara.) 

Quebec, 30th December, 1882. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report that during the year I have distributed in 
every voyage' a large amount of printed immigration mutter, for which there was a 
great demand, not only amongst the steerage, but also by the cabin paseengers. I 
would have used a great many more maps if I had them. The immigrants were of 
a very substantial class, and many destined for the North-West. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JAMES O'HARA, 
Marine Mail Officer. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Agriculture, 
Ottawa. 



301 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1883 









No. 45. 

EEPOET ON QUEEN CHAKLOTTE ISLANDS AS A FIELD 
FOE SETTLEMENT: 

(Mr. James Deans.) 

Oakvale, 31st December, 1882. 



( 



Sir, — Queen Charlotte Islands, so named by Dixon in 1737, form an archipelago, 
separated by wide water ways from the islands which fringe the shore of the mainland 
of British Columbia to tho west, and the coast of the southern extremity of Alaska 
to the north. Dixon Entrance or Sound, to the north, has an average breadth of 
thirty-three miles. In shape they, are somewhat triangular, with a width at thejlfr 
south between Cape St. James, and Day Point, Millbank Sound, of eighty-eight 
miles; at the north, between Eose Point and Stephens' Island, twenty-se^en miles, 
this being the shortest crossing from any part of the Queen Charlotte Islands to 
those adjoining the mainland. These islands may be regarded as a partly submerged 
mountain range, a continuation of that of Vancouver Island, and the high region of 
the Olympian mountains of Washington Territory,north westward. The islands are 
placed between north latitude 54° 15' and 51° 55'; in west longitude between 131° 
2' and 133° 5'. Their extreme length, from point to point, is about one hundred and 
seventy miles : the greatest width, in a direction at right angles to the length, is t 
about sixty miles ; but as Mr. Dawson of the Dominion Government survey remarks, 
it is impossible to form even an approximately correct estimate of the area of the 
Islands, owing to the uncertainty which still obtains as to the position in longitude 
of the west coast. 

The islands forming the main chain, and representing the mountain series, are 
from south to north, Prevost, Moresby, and Graham, with North Island on the north 
west point of it. Prevost Island has a length of eleven and a-half miles. Moresby 
Island is seventy-two miles long, but badly cut up by inlets. Graham Island has a 
length of sixty-seven miles, with the width above assigned to both, as the maximun 
of the group. North Island is about five miles in extreme length; these distance' 
are given in nautical miles. The highest and most rugged part of the mountaii 
areas of the islands is found in latitude 52° 3' where patches of snow are seen all th< 
year round ; here are many peaks probably over 5,000 feet in height. Southwan 
high mountains are again found opposite Burnaby, while toward Cape St. James' th 
land gradually gets lower. Northward, about the head of Gumshewa and Skidega 
Inlets, and on Louise Island, the land is very rugged, with many summits exceeding " 
3,000 and 4,000 feet, while at other places they don't surpass 2,000 feet. The wee ( 
coast, excepting Eennell and Cartwright Sounds, Skidegat and Inskip Channels, an 
several other less notable, is in its whole length one unbroken wall of rock. Th 
most of these inlets, the natives tell me, possess excellent harbours, into which ! 
vessel could run and lie in safety during the terrific gales which sometimes blov 
along this the west coast. The south coast, from Cape St. James, latitude 52°, t 
Gumshewa inlet, latitude 53°, the land is terribly cut up. From Gumshewa t I 
Skidegat Channel, distance, say thirty miles, the land is unbroken and a considerabl 
fiat appears between the mountains in the back ground and the sea in front, her 
the Skidegats tell me, is a large tract of good land on each side of a brook. The 
also told me they intend to put a flock of sheep to graze here, as soon as they ai 
able to buy them. Here also is a rich, althongh somewhat broken up lode of coppe' 
Lately a Skidegat man told me he had made arrangements with his brother-in-la: 
(a white man), in Washington Territory to bring his sheep and cattle, to sett 

302 ttia 






8, 

iii 
rthe 



k 

u 

Ks i 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1883 



there. A few settlers at this place would do well ; they could sell all their surplus 
stock and produce at the Dog Fish Oil Refinery, and at the Anthracite coal mines, 
when opened ; they could, if they wished, find employment to help them along. 

PREVOST AND MORESBY ISLANDS 

Will never offer inducements to agricultural settlers, as arable lands are undoubt- 
edly scarce on them, owing not only to the mountainous nature of the country, but 
owing likewise to the way they are cut up by inlets of the sea. Not only do inlets, 
coming from either side of these islands, nearly meet each other ; but some, entering 
the land a few miles apart, meet and form islands, such as Louise, Burnaby, and 
others. Althougli thus badly cut up, I have but little doubt that more arable land 
will be found to exist than ever was anticipated, when once it is surveyed. I know 
from observation that nearly all of the hillsides might, if once cleared of timber, be 
cultivated up to a considerable height. The two islands above mentioned are, beyond 
doubt, rich in minerals ; copper has been mined at Huston Bay, Skincutfcle Inlet. 
At Gold Harbour, on the west coast, gold was mined in 1851 or 1852. One Indian I 
know found a nugget forwhich the Hudson Bay Company offered him forty blankets, 
or in those days nearly $400. While the men were at work, the Hudson's Bay 
Company's brig, under Captain Mitchel, was anchored close in shore in order to 
render assistance to the men in case of the natives offering violence. The captain 
told me that while lying, a blast was fired over the brig, and irom the quartz that fell on 
the deck he picked up three ounces of gold. This ledge was followed into deep water, 
where it could only be worked by erecting something to keep back the water. Of 
(ate years it has been visited by parties who drifted into the hill, but did not strike it 
rich enough to pay expenses ; yet I have little doubt but that the lode will again be 
found. 

Graham's island 

Is separated from the other two by Skidegat Inlet, which lies to the south south- 
westward. At about 8 miles from the bar at its entrance it is contracted to a width 
Hrf about a mile and a-half, between Image Point and that on the north east side of 
llliford Bay. Within this it opens widely, forming two great expansions, which are 
[eparated by Maud Island. The eastern part of the northern expansion is called 
u uilh-cdh by the natives, or on the maps Bear Skin Bay, while its western extremity, 
urning north-westward, forms Long Arm ; the total length of this inlet, from the 
tar to the head of Long Arm, being twenty-one miles. The deposit of coal which 
las been mined is situated in the angle east of Long Arm, at a place called Anchor 
)ove. Many islands, of which the largest is named Jahoouek, or The Meadows — 
iere is a tract of good land on which the natives grow potatoes — are scattered in the 
orthern expansion of the Inlet. The southern expansion holds one large i sland 
South Island—and at its western side passes into a narrow water which becomes 
kidegate Channel, and communicates with the Ocean to the west. This narrow 
►art, at low water, is nearly dry. The shores of this inlet are not so h ; gh as the 
lores of those further south and are fringed all along with a beach of a greater or 
width. The central portion of Skidegate Channel, though narrow, occupies the 
liddle of a valley of some width, and is bordered generally on both sides by low 
rooded land, sloping gradually up to the foot of the mountains, whieh rise to eleva- 
lions between 1,000 and 1,500 feet. 

The distance from Lawn Hill at the entrance to Skidegate, to Eose Point, is 
rty-six miles. The coast is straight and open, with no harbour, and scarcely even 
brook or protected cove for canoes or boats for long distances. Tl-ell River is the 
t that is met with. Before this the beach is gravel, with patches of coarse stones. 
>yond this it becomes sandy, and though not without some gravel, continues to 
Id this character to Rose Point. For miles northward, banks of clays and sands 
found along the shore, and for about seventeen miles northward from Ti'ell River 
ese often rise into cliffs, from 50 to 100 feet in height. These are generally wear- 

303 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.14.) A. 1583 



ing away under the fiction of the waves, and trees and stumps may be noticed in 
various stages of descent to the beach. In some places dense woods of fine, upright 
trees are thus exposed in section, and there must be much fine spruce timber 
in the wide low country which stretches back from the shore toward Masset Inlet. 
In some places where the timber is exposed to the sea breeze it is of an inferior 
quality. North of the range of cliffs the shore is almost everywhere bordered by 
sand hills, which are covered by coarse grass, and beach pea together with other 
similar plants, would afford fine grazing for cattle. 

Near Cape Fife are several lagoons ; the largest of them opens at this Cape, and 
affords a safe anchorage for boats or canoes at high tide, but is nearly dry at low 
water. On some parts of the shore near this Cape, magnetic iron sand is abundant, 
and in this numerous colors of gold can easily be found. 

Brase Point, or, as it is called by the natives, Nai Koon (Long Nose), is a 
remarkable promontory, caused by the meeting of the currents and waves from the 
southward and westward, round the corner of the Island. 

The inner part of Nai Koon, near Cape Fife, does not differ from the low, wooded 
coast to the south, though, according to Indian accounts, there are inland a great 
number of lakes and swamps, which may probably be lagoons like those just referred 
to, but have become completely land locked and hold fresh water. 

Further out, where the point is narrower and more exposed, it is clothed with 
small stunted woods, which in turn give place to rolling grass-covered sand hills. 

From Nai Koon to Masset, distance twenty-one miles, the indentations are so 
slight that it may be described as forming one grand Crescentic bay. Low sand 
hills generally form a border to the woods, which densely cover the land and grow 
in dark groves, with very little underbrush in many places, but generally rather 
scrubby. The trees are chiefly Abies Menziesii. Eight miles from Rose Point is 
the Hi-ellen Eiver, a stream of some size, which in the autumn is frequented by great 
numbers of salmon. There is a good boat harbour at its mouth. 

The north shore of Graham's Island, near Massett, is generally low, with shoal 
water extending far out. 

At Masset, instead of the wide open bays generally found, we have a funnel- 
shaped entrance, leading to the narrow waters of Masset Sound. 

The land in the neighborhood of Masset is all low, no hill being visible. It is 
generally densely timbered, with fine spruce trees, but there are reports of prairies in 
the interior. One man told me, in order to see what was inland, he borrowed a 
horse and rode three hours through a nice, open prairie. 

The length of Masset Sound from its southward entrance to where it expands 
is nineteen miles, and is about a mile in average width. The depth ascertained in a 
few places, varies from ten to twelve fathoms. A number of small streams enter 
at the sides, most of which, the Indians say, drain small lakes. 

At the end of the Inlet, it suddenly expands to a great sheet of inland water, 
which with an extreme east and west length of sixteen or seventeen miles, has a 
breadth where widest of five and a-half miles. On the south side of this great expan- 
sion, five miles from its eastern extremity, is a narrow passage, the mouth of which 
is partly blocked up with islands ; but which leads into another great expansion, con- 
taining many islands, the south and north sides of this sheet of water are low and 
heavily timbered, the other sides are high, rising into mountains in the distance. 
Many streams flow into those upper expansions of Masset Inlet, of which some, at 
least several well deserve the name of rivers. The Mu-min River joins the las 
named expansion at its east end, and has a wide delta flat about its mouth. 

The riso and fall of the spring tides at the entrance to Masset Sound was esti 
mated at about fourteen feet, but owing to the length of Narrow Sound, the fir 
expansion has a tide of from eight to ten feet only, and the second still less, abou 
six feet. The coast between Masset and Yirago Sounds is everywhere low, and 
differs from that east of Masset in being rocky or covered with boulders. No wide 
sandy bays occur. The points are generally of low rocks, dark in color and of ter- 
tiary age. Virago Sound, constituting the entrance to Naden Harbour, is situated in 

304 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 14.) A. 1888 



the bottom of a deep baj', in which, according to the Admirality sketch, the water 
averages about four fathoms in depth. The south-west water lies a little outside the 
narrow Sound, and is three and a-half fathoms, In the sound the water is from eight 
to 15 fathoms. 

The Sound is less than two miles in length, and leads into a spacious harbour 
about four mile in greatest length, and two in width with an average depth of eight 
to ton fathoms. Low land densely wooded with spruce, (A Menziesii) and hem- 
lock (A M'ertensiana) of line growth borders the harbour. 

Naden Biver enters the harbour at its south-east corner, and is probably the 
longest river in the Queen Charlotte Islands. Its general course is a few degrees 
west of south, and with the exception of a few swampy flats, its banks were densely 
wooded. Before many years extensive saw mills will doubtless be established on 
Naden Harbour. 

It is well situated for the export of lumber, The quality of the spruce timber is 
excellent, and beside the immediate shores of the harbour, logs might probably bo 
run down the Naden river from the lake above. 

From Naden Point, on the west side of Virago Sound, the general tend of the 
shore line is west, north-westward for about seventeen miles to Knoro Cape, forming 
the north-western extreme of Graham's Island. 

The shore -and country behind it arc generally low, though with some rocky 
cliffs of no great height. 

Klas-knun Point is a remarkable promontary rising in the centre to a hill about 
%66 feet in height, which, owing to the flat character of other pails of the shore for a 
long distance is very conspicuous. Halfway from Klas-knun Point to the east 
entrance to Parry Passage in the Jui-un River. 

This stream is of no great size, but its mouth, in the bottom of a little bay, 
forms an excellent canoe or boat harbour at high water. Three miles further west- 
ward is a small promontory, on the east side of which is another excellent boat 
harbour. 

Parry Passage separates North Island from Graham Island. The passage proper 
is about two miles in length, with a width of three-quarters of a mile. North 
Island is entirely composed of low land, no point probably reaching a height of 
300 feet. It is densely wooded. The land to the south of Perry Passage is of the 
same character. 

You will see that I have gone no further than the coast of these islands. I 
wish it were possible to give as good a description of the interior as I have been 
able to give of a few of the best places along the coast. As no white man has been 
any distance from the shore, all that can be said outside of conjecture is simply 
unknown. 

Until some party or parties, either connected with the Geological Survey or 
otherwise penetrate the vast interior, then only will it be safe to say anything 
, about it; however, as I know the thoughts of quite a number of people are turned 
towards these Islands, I will mention a few of the advantages offered bv 

Graham's island, (queen charlotte). 

This island may, in fact, be divided into two differently characterized regions by 
a line drawn from Image Point, Skidegate Inlet, to Jul-un Eiver, on the north coast. 
To the south-westward of this line is a country hilly and even mountainous, but so 
far as observed almost always densely forest clad, with trees which attain large 
. dimensions where not too much exposed. North-eastward lies a low, flat or gently 
uudulating country which seldom exceeds 300 feet in elevation. This country is also 
.densely wooded, the trees often attaining, magnificent dimensions. 

Although this island, from many points of viewing it, appears to be densely 
wooded, I have little hesitation in saying that I firmly believe there is a very 
considerable portion of it open land, or at least could easily be brought under culti- 
vation. It seems highly improbable that such a vast extent of land so level as is on 

305 
14—20 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No, 14.) A. 1883 



Graham's Island should all be heavily timbered. Its appearance from on board steam- 
boat, from Indian reports, and the evidence of a few white men who have little more 
than skirled its coasts; all go a long way to prove this assertion. 

The water of most of the streams on this island is of a coffee colour, which 
shows them to either run through rich bottom lands or through moss. 

The Hudson Bay Company's people, at their post at Masset, say that there is a 
large extent of good land in their neighborhood, and that the few cows they have, 
though never housed, are always fat. 

THE CLIMATE 



Of this point seems to be far drier than the other:?. The high mountains on its 
western coast intercept the rain clouds which form on the wide Pacific, and cause 
them to sper.d their contents amongst the mountains, feeding the numberless springs 
from which issue the many and varied streams whose waters fertilize the plains 
below. 

On the south-western parts of these islands it rains more or less all summer, 
owing to their being so mountainous. At Cowgats, where the Anthracite coal 
mines are, in 1869 the rain fall was above the average. Commencing early in July 
it never stopped for thirty-six days and nights ; the most of that time was a continuous 
drizzle. The next year there was comparatively little. The summer of 1882 may 
bo considered as a fair example of the weather in higher divisions of these islands. 

From early in the last week of April, to the 25th of May, the weather was dry 
and hot. From the 25th of May, to the 3rd of June, rain fell more or less every 
day. 

From the 3rd to 9th of June, dry and very hot, From the 9th June to 14th 
showery; from 14th to end of month, sultry with occasional showers. From 1st of 
July to 1st of August, there were fift