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HARVARD COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 




TRANSFERBED 

FROM TBI 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

OF 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



/^ 



, V r-.vt>*t-i<J 



VJ^ 



■y.^r 



SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



Volume XXXVIU. Part IV. 



Second Session of Eleventh Legislature 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



SESSION 1906. 



TOROXTO : 
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY L. K. CAMERON 

PRINTER TO THE KING's MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 
1906 



Cou^vy^ Dtrc^sSi ^* 1^ 



HAFVABO COLLEGt LIBflAHf 

RECEIVED THROUGH THE 

GRADUATE SCHUOL OF^ 

iUSINESS AUMiNISTKAflUII 

NOV 12ll'o0 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



Arranged alphabetically. 



Title. 



Accounts, Public 

Agricultural College, Report 

Agricultural and Experimental Union, Report . . . 

Archives, Report 

AsyJoms, Report 

A^Wums, Perquisites of Officials 

Edllot Papers, fac similes 

i>ee-Keepers' Association, Report 

Births, Deaths axid Marriages, Report 

Brock ville License Commissioners, Correspondence 

Canadian Improvement Company, Agreement .... 

iVntraJ Prison, Rope and Cord Contract 

Wood ware Contract 

'TiiJ Jren, Neglected, Report 

-olonial Investment Company, Assets 

?. 'Ionization, Report 

^r jwn Lands, Report 

Sales since 1887 

I'airymen's Association, Report 

division Coorts, Report 

SJQcation, Report of Minister 

Orders in Council 

Teachers' Certificates 

** Books on authorized list 

i^rctions. Return from Records 

^•rctrie Power Commission, Report 

Hatomological Society, Report « 

^:uitable Loan Company 

icdmates* 

Faeiories, Report 

^'^ and Exhibitions, Report 

banners' Institutes, Report 

iiiberies. Report 

Thames River 

^^'oit, Report 

[iii] 



No. 



Remarks. 



1 

14 
15 
41 
38 

58 



63 

20 

9 

6 

80 
65 
73 
43 
78 
32 
3 
54 

22 
33 

12 

51 
67 
76 
46 
49 
19 
78 
2 

8 
•26 
25 
31 
70 
24 



Printed. 



C Printed /or 
< distribution to 
(^ Members only. 

Not printed. 

Printed. 
« 

Not printed. 
Printed. 



Not printed. 

Printed, 
it 

Not printed. 
Printed. 

Printed. 
Not printed. 

u 
It 

Printed, 



Wot printed. 
Printed. 

Printed. 



Not printed. 
Printed. 



IV 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



Title. 



Fruit, Growers' Association, Report 

Experiment Stations, Report jm. 

Fumigation Appliances, Report , 

Game Commission, Report 

Gaols, Prisons, and Reformatories, Report 

Government Bond Issue, Correspondence 

Health, Report 

Highways, Report 

Home Guard, Fenian Raid, Certificates 

Hospitals and Charities, Report 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission, Report 

Indian Claim, Treaty No. 9 

Industries, Report 

Insurance, Report 

King's College,. Endowment of Grants to, etc 

Labour, Report 

Lands, Forests and Mines, Report 

Land Titles, Report 

Legal Offices, Report 

Library, Report 

License Commissioners and Inspectors, Correspondence 

License Commissioners, Brockville, Correspondence .... 

" " North Renfrew, Correspondence 

Liquor Licenses, Report , 

Live Stock Associations, Report , 

Loan Corporations, Statements 

McClure, Herchel, etc., withdrawal of lots in 

Market Fees, amount received etc ; 

Marriage Licenses, Issuers of, etc , 

Mines, Report 

Mining Divisions, 0. in C 

Municipal Auditor, Report 

Murphy, J., Correspondence, Timber Berth 

Panton, A. M., Correspondence re Scully V8, Peters 

Petewawa, Liquor License, Correspondence 

Pigeon River, Timber Berth, Block D 

Poultry Institute, Report 

Prisons and Reformatories, Report , 

Provincial Municipal Auditor, Report 

Public Accounts, 1905 



No. 



16 
17 
18 

30 
39 
68 

36 
27 
64 
40 . 
49 

71 

28 
10 

53 

29 
3 
75 
34 
47 
52 
69 
74 
44 
23 
11 

5r) 

62 

59 

5 

66 

45 

72 

61 
74 
72 
21 
39 
45 
1 



Remarks. 



Printed. 



Printed, 



Printed. 

Not printed. 
Printed. 



Not pHnted. 
Printed, 



Not printed. 

Printed. 

Not printed. 
Printed. 
Not printed. 



Printed. 



Not printed. 



Printed. 
( Printed for 
\ distribution 
[ only, 
PHnied. 
Not printed. 

Not printed. 



Printed, 



\ 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



Title. 



No. 



Fablic Institutions, Perquisites to Officials of . 

Public Works^ Report 

Qneen Victoria Niagara Falls Park, Report... . 



58 

7 
6 



Registrar-General, Report I 9 

Registry Offices, Report | 35 

Rope and Cord Oontract, Central Prison 65 

School of Practical Science, Calendar, 1906-7 



St Thomas, Audit, Correspondence 

Scnlly versus Peters, Correspondence 

Secretary and Registrar, Report 

Statutes, Distribution of. 

Socc^sion Duties, Orders in Council re Regulations. 
Surrogate Court Act, Fees under 



Temiskaming and N.O. Railway, Report 

Thames River Fisheries, Licenses Oranted 

Timber Berth, Block D, Pigeon River, Correspondence. . 

Toronto QDiversity , Report 

Toronto University Commission, Report 

Toronto University Endowments, Grants, etc., to 

Treasury Bills, six months, $6,000,000 

Vegetable Grower's Association, Report 

Woodenware Contract, Central Prison 



60 

79 
61 
37 
77 
50 
56,57 

48 
70 
72 
13 
42 
53 
6t 

4 

73 



Remarks. 



{Printed Jor 
distribution to 
Members Ofily. 
Printed. 

Printed. 

Printed. 



{Printed for 
distribution 
only. 
Not pHnted. 

Printed. 
Not 'printed. 



Printed. 
Not printed. 

Printed. 

Not printed. 
Printed, 

Printed. 

Printed. 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



irranged in Numerical Order with their Titles at full length; the dates 
when Ordered and when presented to the Legislature; the name of the 
Member who moved the same, and whether Ordered to be Printed or 

not. 



CONTENTS OF PART I. 

No. 1. Public Accounts of the Province for the year 1905. Presented to 
the Legislature, February 27th, 1906. Printed. 

Xo. 2. Estimates for the service of the Province until the Estimates of 
the year are finally passed. Presented to the Legislature 22nd 
February, 1906. Not Printed. Estimates for the year 1906. 
Presented to the Legislature 5th March, 1906. Printed. 
Estimates (Supplementary) for the year 1906. Presented to 
the Legislature, 9th May, 1906. Printed. 

No. 3. Report of the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines for the year 
1905. Presented to the Legislature 11th April, 1906. 
Printed. 

No. 4. Heport of the Vegetable Growers' Association for cue year 1905. 
Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. Printed. 

CONTENTS OF PART II. 

No. 5. Report of the Bureau of Mines for the year 1905. Presented to 
the Legislature, 24th April, 1906. Printed. 

No. 6. Report of the Commissioners of the Queen Victoria Niagara Falls 
Park, for the year 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 27th 
February, 1906. Printed. 

No. 7. Report of the Minister of Public Works for the year 1905. 
Presented to the Legislature, 4th April, 1906. Printed. 

No. 8. Report of the Inspectors of Factories for the year 1905. Presented 
to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. Printed. 

Xo. 9. Report relating to the Registration of Births, Marriages and Deaths 
for the \ear 1904. Presented to the Legislature, 20th Feb- 
ruary, 1906. Printed. 

CONTENTS OF PART III. 

Xo. 10. Report of the Inspector of Insurance for the year 1905. Presented 

to the Legislature, 19th March, 1906. Printed. 

[vii] 



VUl LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



No. 11. Loan Corporations, Statements by Building Societies, Loan and 
other Companies, for the year 1905. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 19th March, 1906. Printed. 

CONTENTS OF PART IV. 

No. 12. Eeport of the Minister of Education, for the year 1905, with the 
Statistics of 1904. Presented to the Legislature, 20th Feb- 
ruary, 1906. Printed. 

No. 13. Auditors' Report to the Board of Trustees, University of Toronto, 
on Capital and Income Accounts, for the year ending 30th 
June, 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 17th February, 
1906. Printed. 

No. 14. Report of the Ontario Agricultural College and Experimental Farm, 
for the year 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 21st Feb- 
ruary, 1906. Printed. 

CONTENTS OF PART V. 

No. 15. Report of the Ontario Agricultural and Experimental Union of 
the Province, for the year 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 
8th March, 1906. Printed. 

No. 16. Report of the Fruit Growers' Association of the Province, for the 
year 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 2l8t .February, 
1906. Printed. 

No. 17. Report of the Fruit Experimental Stations of the Province, for the 
year 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 14th March, 1906. 
Printed. 

No. 18. Report of the Inspector of Fumigation Appliances of the Province^ 
for the jfear 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 
1906. Printed. 

No. 19. Report of the EntoAiological Society, for the year 1905. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 21st February, 1906. Printed. 

No. 20. Report of the Bee-Keepers' Association of the Province, for the 
year 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. 
Printed. 

No. 21. Report of the Poultry Institute of the Province, for the year 1905. 
Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. Printed. 

No. 22. Reports of the Dairymen's Associations of the Province, for the 
year 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. 
Printed. 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. IX 



CONTENTS OF PART VI. 

Xo. 23. Reports of the Live Stock Associations of the Province, for the 
year 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. 
Printed, 

Xo. 24. Report on the Fruits of the Province? for the year 1905. Presented 
to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. Printed. 

Xo. 25. Report of the Farmers' Institutes of the Province, for the year 
1905. Presented to the Legislature, 11th April, 1906. Printed. 

CONTENTS OF PART VII. 

No. 26. Report of Ontario Fairs and Exhibitions of the Province, for the 
year 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 28th February. 1906. 
Printed. 

Xo. 27. Report of the Commissioner of Highways, for the year 1905. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 10th April, 1906. Printed. 

Xo. 28. Report of the Bureau of Industries of the Province, for the year 
1905 1 Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. Printed. 

Xo. 29. Report of the Bureau of Labour, for the year 1905. Presented to 
the Legislature, 24th April, 1906. Printed. 

Xo. 30. Report of the Ontario Game Commission, for the year 1905. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 22nd March, 1906. Pnwted. 

Xo. 31. Report of the Department of Fisheries, for the year 1905. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 28th March, 1906. 

CONTENTS OF PART VIII. 

Xo. 32. Report on Colonization, for the year 1905. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 9th May, 1906. Printed. 

Xo 33 Report of the Inspector of Division Courts, for the year 1905. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 9th March, 1906. Printed. 

Xo. 34. Report of the Inspector of Legal Offices, for the year 1905. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 14th March, 1906. Printed. 

Xo. 35- Report of the Inspector of Registry Offices, for the year 1905. 
Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. Printed. 

Xo. 36. Report of the Provincial'Board of Health, for the year 1905. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 21st February, 1906. Printed. 

Xo. 37. Report of the Secretary and Registrar of the Province, for the year 
1905. Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. Printed. 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



No. 38. Report upon the Lunatic and Idiot Asylums of the Province, for 
the year ending 30th September, 1905. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 21st February, 1906. Printed. 

No. 39. Report upon the Prisons and Reformatories of the Province, for 
the year ending 30th September, 1905. Presented to the 
Legislature, 21st February, 1906. Printed. 

CONTENTS OF PART IX. 

No. 40. Report upon the Hospitals and Charities of the Province, for the 
year ending 30th September, 1905. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 21st February, 1906. Prin'ted, 

No. 41. Report upon the Archives of the Province, for the year 1905. 
Presented to the Legislature, 30th April, 1906. Printed. 

No. 42. Report of the Royal Commission on the University of Toronto. 
Presented to the Legislature, 6th April, 1906. Printed. 

No. 43. Report of Work relating to Neglected and Dependent Children of 
Ontario, for the year 1905. Presented to the Legislature, 
20th April, 1906. Printed. 

CONTENTS OF PART X. 

No. 44. Report upon the Inspection of Liquor Licenses, for the year 1905. 
Presented to the Legislature, 20th February, 1906. Printed. 

No. 45. Report of the Provincial Municipal Auditor, for the year 1905. 
Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. Printed. 

No. 46. Supplementary Return from the Record of the several Elections 
in the Electoral Divisions of East Nipissing, Kingston and 
North Toronto, since the General Elections on January 25th, 
1905, shewing: (1) The number of Votes Polled for each 
Candidate in the Electoral District in which there was a con- 
test; (2) The majority whereby each successful Candidate 
was returned; (3) The total number of votes polled in each 
District; (4) The number of votes remaining unpolled; (5) 
The number of names on the Voters' Lists in each District ; 
(6) The population of each District as shewn by the last Cen- 
sus. Presented to the Legislature, 2nd April, 1906. Printed. 

No. 47. Report upon the state of the Library. Presented to the Legisla- 
ture, 22nd March, 1906. Not printed. 

No. 48. Report of the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway Conx- 
mission, for the year 1905. Presented to the Legislature, Ist 
March, 1906. Printed. 

No. 49. Report of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of the Province . 
Presented to the Legislature, 11th April, 1906. Printed. 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. xi 



Xo. 60. Copy of Order in Council approving of certain Regulations under 
Section 22 of the Succession Duties Act. Presented to the 
Legislature, 19th February, 1906. Not printed. 

Xo. 51. Copies of Orders in Council under the provision of Section 9, 
Chapter 38, 1 Edward VII., re Education. Presented to the 
Legislature, 20th February, 1906. Not printed. 

Xo. 52. Return, in part, to an Order of the House of the eleventh day of 
May, 1905, for a Return of, 1. Copies of all correspondence, 
documents, memoranda, instructions and circulars in con- 
nection with the appointment of license commissioners and 
inspectors for the present year, or in connection with their 
administration of their offices. 2. The names of all license 
inspectors who were dismissed, or have resigned during the 
present year and the reasons for their dismissals, or resigna- 
tions, with the names of those appointed in their places. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 20th February, 1906. Mr. J/c- 
DougaL Not printed, 

Xo. 53. Return to an Order of the House of the second day of May, 1905, 
for a Return shewing: — 1. The original endowment or grants 
to King's College, Toronto, in (a) Lands. (6) Monej?. 2. 
The amount derived from sale of land by King's College, or 
University College, Toronto, and statement of lands still owned 
by University College. 3. Statement shewing subsequent 
Legislative endowments, or grants, to University College or 
Toronto University in lands, or money. 4. (a) The property 
or funds at present held by, or in trust, for the University of 
Toronto, or University College, or any of the affiliated Col- 
leges, (b) The present annual revenue from such property oir 
funds. 5. Statement of expenditures, annually, on build- 
ings and equipment, salaries and maintenance of Toronto Uni- 
versity or University College for the last ten years. 6. The 
annual amount at present required for salaries and expenses of 
maintenance. 7. Statement of all legislative granfs, or 
expenditures,. for University purposes at any city in Ontario, 
other than Toronto. Presented to the Legislature, 20th Feb- 
ruray, 1906. Mr. Colder, Not printed. 

No. 54. Return to an Order of the House of the third day of May, 1905, 
for a Return shewing, by Counties, the amounts due the Pro- 
vince on acount of unpaid balances, due on sales of Crown 
Lands, from Confederation down to December 31st, 1904. 
Presented to the Legislature, 20th February, 1906. Mr. 
Sfniih (Sault Ste. Marie.) Not printed. 

Xo. 55. Return to an Address to His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, of 
the eighteenth day of May, 1905, praying that he will cause 
to be laid before the House a Return of copies of all Orders- 
in-Council, documents, correspondence and memoranda regard- 
ing the withdrawal of lots in the townships of McClure, Her- 
chel, Dungannon, Mount Eagle, Mayo, Limerick, Cardiff, 
Farraday and Chandos, from sale or location, or other disposi- 
tion, for a period of twenty-five years. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 28th February, 1906. Mr. Smyth. Not printed. 



XU LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



No. 56. Copies of Orders-in-Council under ss. 2 of section 84 of the Surro- 
gate Courts Act. Presented to the Legislature, 2nd March, 
1906. Not printed. 

No. 57. Copy of Order-in-Council authorizing the payment of surplus Sur- 
rogate fees to His Honour Judge Jamieson, Junior Judge of 
Wellington. Presented to the Legislature, 6th March, 1906. 
Not printed. 

No. 58. Eeturn to an Order of the House of the first day of March, 1906, 
for a Eeturn shewing, 1. The names of all officers, attendants, 
or other officials of the Asylums, Prisons and other Public 
Institutions of the Province, under the Department of the 
Provincial Secretary, receiving perquisites, allowances or pay- 
ments of any nature whatever, whether in cash, goods or sup- 
plies, beyond the amount voted for their salaries in the Esti- 
mates. 2. The nature and amount of such perquisites, allow- 
ances or payments received by such officer or other official. 
Presented to the Legislature, 6th March, 1906. Mr. Dunlop. 
Printed for distribution to Members only. 

No. 59. Return to an order of the House of the twenty-seventh day of 
February, 1906, for a Return shewing— ^1. How many persons, 
in Ontario, were commissioned to issue Marriage Licenses on 
the 7th day of February, 1905. 2. How many of such per- 
sons have 'had their authority revoked since such date. 3. 
How many persons have been commissioned to issue Marriage 
Licenses, in Ontario, between the 7th day of February, 1905, 
and the 7th day of February, 1906. Presented, to the Legis- 
lature, 7th March, 1906. Mr. Ross, Not printed. 

No. 60. Calendar of the Ontario School of Practical Science for the year 
1906-7. Presented to the Legislature, 16th March, 1906. 
Pririted for distribution only. 

No. 61. Return to an Order of the House of the fourteenth day of March, 
1906, for a Return of Copies of all correspondence, papers and 
documents between the Attorney-General, or other Member 
of the Government, and A. M. Panton and others, in the year 
1903, in any way relating to the action at law brought by Mr. 
Scully, against Mr. Peters for malicious prosecution. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 20th March, 1906. Mr. Torrance. 
Not printed. 

No. 62. Return to an Order of the House of the eleventh day of May, 1905, 
for a Return shewing the amount received in each of the last 
five years for Market Fees in Cities and Towns situated in 
Counties in which Toll Roads exist, or have existed during the 
past five years. And shewing as well what reductions, if any 
have been made in the respective market fees by Towns and 
Cities situated in Counties in which Toll Roads have been 
abolished during the past five years. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 22nd March, 1906. Mr. Thompson (Wentworth.) 
Not printed. 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. xiii 



Xo. 63. Beturn to an Order of the House of the twenty-first day of March, 
1906; That the Clerk of the House, ex-officio, Clerk of the 
Crown in Chancery, do lay upon the Table of the House, fac- 
similes of the Ballot papers furnished to the Eeturning Officers 
and Deputy Returning Officers, and used jn the recent Bye 
Elections in the City of Kingston and in the North Riding of 
the City of Toronto. Presented to the Legislature, 23rd 
March, 1906. Mr. Pense, Not printed. 

No. 64. Return to an Address to His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor of 
the sixteenth day of March, 1906, praying that he will cause 
to be laid before the House a Return of copies of all corres- 
pondence with the Government, or an;y member thereof, 
together with a copy of any Orders in Council, in the matter 
of granting Certificates to the Home Guard acting during the 
Fenian Raid in the year 1866. Presented to the Legislature, 
27th March, 1906. Mr. Smyth, Not printed. 

No. 65. Copy of an Agreement between the Province and William Bernard 
Converse, of Montreal, conditioned for the manufacture of rope 
and cord at the Central Prison. Presented to the Legislature, 
11th April, 1906. Printed.- 

Xo. 66. Copies of Orders in Council under the provisions of R.S.O., 1897, 
Chapter 36, Section 8, in re Mining Divisions. Presented to 
the Legislature, 28th March, 1906. Printed for distribution 
only, 

Xo. 67. Return to an Order of the House of the sixteenth day of March, 
1906, for a Return shewing the number of: — 1. Part II. 
Junior Leaving and Junior Teacher's Certificates. 2. Part I. 
Senior Leaving and Part I. Senior Teacher's Certificates, and 
3. Part II. Senior Leaving and Part II. Senior Teacher's 
Certificates, obtained at each of the following centres, at the 
examinations of 190-'01-'02-'03-'04 and '05, i;?z.— Barrie, 
Belleville, Berlin, Brantford, Chatham, Cobourg, Colling- 
-wood, Gait, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Lindsay, London, 
Morrisbug, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Perth, Peterborough, Ren- 
frew, Sarnia, Stratford, Toronto (Harbord Street), Toronto 
(Jamieson Avenue), Toronto (Jarvis Street), Harriston, Mea— 
ford. Mount Forest, Orangeville and Port Hope. Presented 
to the Legislature, 28th March, 1906. Mr. MacKay, Not 
printed, 

Xo. 68. Copies of correspondence in the matter of the sale of $6,000,000 six 
months' Treasury Bills, at a rate of discount not exceeding 
four per cent,, and to the subsequent issue of Government 
Bonds or Stock. Presented to the Lei>:islature, 29th March, 
1906. Printed. 

Xo. 69. Return to an Order of the House of the twenty-third day of March, 
1906, for a Return of copies of all correspondence between the 
Chairman of the Board of License Commissioners of the Town 
of Brockville; the License Inspector, or any citizen of the 
Town and the Government, or any Member thereof, or the 



XIV LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



License Department, with, reference to the enforcement or non- 
enforcement of the Liquor License Act, or to the granting, or 
withholding, of Licenses to the Imperial Hotel, or to Samuel 
Johnston. Presented to the Legislature, 3rd April, 1906. 
Mr. Graham. Not printed. 

No. 70. Return to an Order of the House of the twenty-third day of March, 
1906, for a Return shewing the number of fishing licenses 
granted on the River Thames, east of the City of Chatham, 
during the 3^ ears 1904, 1905 and* 1906; the Revenue received 
each year, and whether the fish were sold in Canada or the 
United States, and whether the fish were taken with nets, and 
if so, of what description. Presented to the Legislature, 3rd 
April, 1906. Mr. Ross, Not prirvted. 

No. 71. Return to an Address of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, of 
the ninth day of March, 1906, praying that he will cause to 
be laid before the House a Retlirn of copies of all papers and 
correspondence regarding the settlement of the Indian claim 
of Northern Ontario, known as Treaty No. 9, together with a 
copy of the Treaty as finally agreed upon. Presented to the 
Legislature, 6th April, 1906. Mr. Ross. Not printed. 

No. 72. Return to an Address to His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, of 
the twenty-third day of March, 1906, praying that he will 
cause to be laid before the House copies of all Orders in Coun- 
cil, papers and correspondence in any way relating to the can- 
cellation of the license of timber berth. Block D., Pigeou 
River, held by J. Murphy, which stands in the Public 
Accounts, 1905, page 319, as a charge of |18,787,10. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 10th March, 1906. Mr. McDougaL 
Not printed. 

No. 73. Copy of an Agreement between the Province and Ellen Charlotte 
Scott, of Toronto, trading under the name of Taylor, Scott 
& Co'y, respecting the manufacture of wooden ware at the 
Central Prison. Presented to the Legislature, 18th April, 
1906. Printed. 

No. 74. Return to an Order of the House, of the sixth day of April instant, 
for a Return of copies of all correspondence between the License 
Inspector of North Renfrew, or any member of the Board of 
License Commissioners, or af an^ citizen of Pembroke, and the 
License Department, or any Member of the Government, with 
reference to the granting of a liquor license at Petewawa. 
Presented to the Legislature, 12th April, 1906. Mr. Graham, 
Not printed. 

No. 75. Report of the Land Titles Office for the years 1903, 1904 and 1905. 
Presented to the Legislature, 27th April, 1906. Not printed. 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPEFS. XV 



Xo. 76. Hetum to an Order of the House of the fourth day of April, 1906, 
for a Return giving a complete list of all books on the author- 
ized list for public and high schools, with dates of authoriza- 
tion; names of authors; positions occupied by them; with the 
Royalties, or other considerations, paid to them, respecting 
such books and the selling price thereof, and how prices are 
arranged. Presented to the Legislature, 1st May, 1906. Mr. 
Craig, Printed, 

No. 77. Statement of distribution of Revised and Sessional Statutes, from 
Slst December, 1904, to Slst December, 1905. Presented to 
the Legislature, 1st May, 1906, Not printed. 

Xo. 78- Return to an Order of the House of the twenty-third day of April, 
1906, for a Return shewing: 1. On what terms the assets 
oi the Equitable Loan Company were taken over by the Colon- 
ial Investment and Loan Company and what percentage was 
paid in stock of Colonial Company to holders of terminating 
stock in Equitable Loan Company. 2. The names and 
addresses of Directors and officials of the Colonial Investment 
and Loan Company. 3. The names and addresses of the Dir- 
ectors and officials of Imperial Trusts Company. Presented 
to the Legislature, 7th May, 1906. Mr. Jamieson. Not 
printed, 

No. 79. Return to an Order of the House, of the first day of May, 1906, 
for a Return of copies of all correspondence between the Muni- 
cipal Council of the City of St. Thomas, or any official thereof 
and any other person or persons, proposing to the Govern- 
ment, or any official thereof, to have a special audit of the 
books of the Municipality of St. Thomas. Presented to the 
lieg^islature, 7th May, 1906, Mr. Macdiarmid, Not printed, 

No. SO, Copv of Agreement, Deed of Trust and Guaranty, made 
"by and between His Majesty the King and the Canadian 
Improvement Company and others. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 9th May, 1906. Printed. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Education 



Province of Ontario 

FOR THE YEAR 

1905 



PART I. 

(WITH THE STATISTICS OF 1904) 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 



w 



TORONTO: 
Pooled and PabGthed by L. K. CAMERON, Printer to tbe King • Mort Excellent Majealy 

1906 




WARWICK BROS & RUTTER, Limited. Pdntm. 
Toronto. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PART I. 



PAOK. 

lUiXTSTRATIONB vi- 

StASV OV DfiPABTKENT JX 

SUMMABY OF STATISTICS : 

I. — JBleinentary Schools *i 

II. — Secondary Schools '. xi" 

III. — General: Elementary and Secondary Schools xiii 

I. — PuBUO Schools, (inclnding Separate Schools.) 

1. School Population, Attendance xiv 

• 2. Classification of Pupils xv 

3. Teachers' Certificates xvi 

and Salaries xvii 

4. Receipts and Expenditure , xrii 

Cost per pupil xviii 

11. — ^RoKAN Cathouo Sepajlatb Schools xviii 

III. — Protebtakt Sepasatb Schools xviii 

IV. CoiJiBQZATS InSTXTUTBS AND HiGH SCHOOLS. 

1. Receipts, Expenditure, Attendance xix 

Cost per pupil xix 

2. Classification of Pupils, etc xx 

Occupation of parents xxi 

V. — ^Dbpaktmxntal Examinations, bto xxi 

VI. — Tmaobmrb' Institutes xxii 

VTI. PUBMC LlBHAHIRS, ETC Xxiii 

GENERAL REMARKS: 

I- — xxiv 

n. — ^PuHUo School CuBBiotTLUif , xxv 

m. — Tbk Public School Teacher xxx 

IV. — ^Public School Insfbctobs xxxii 

V. — The RtrKAL School P&oblek (Macdonald Consolidated School) xxxii 

VT. — School Rooms xxxv 

Vn. — ^Technical and Manual Instbuction xxxvii 

VIII- — OoimNUATiON Classes xxxviii 

IX- — ^RuxAL Public School Libbabies xxxviii 

X- — RxJBAL School Gabdenb xxxix 

XI. — Schools foe the Blind, and Deaf and Dumb xl 

XII. — ^Uhivebsitt Repobt, Commission, etc ^1 

XrH- — ^Educational Pbogress and Educational Gaols xl 

XrV.--OoiioLUsioN xli 

[in.] 



IV 



THE REPORT OF THE No. K 



APPENDICES. 
Afpbndxx a. — Statzstxoal Tabijbs, 1904. 

PAOB. 

Public SehooU, 

I.— Tablb a. — School Population, Total and Average Attendance, etc. 2 

II. — ^Tablb B. — ^Reading Glasses — ^Pupils in the yarious branches of instruction... 6 

III.— Tablb C— Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, etc 14 

IV. — ^Tablb D. — School Houses, Prayers, Maps, etc 16 

V. — ^Tabls E. — Financial Statement IS 

Boman Catholic Separate Schools. 

I.— Table F.— Financial Statement, Teachers, etc. 26 

II. — ^Tablb G. — Attendance, Pupils in the various branches of instruction, Maps, 

etc 30 

CoUegiate Institutes amd High Schools. 

I. — Tablb H. — Financial Statement, Charges per year ^ 34 

II. — Tablb I. — Attendance, Pupils in the various branches of instruction, and 

examination results 40 

III. — Tablb K. — ^Miscellaneous, School Houses, Pupils in the different schools, etc. 52 

Protestaait Separate Schools. 

Table L. — ^Protestant Separate Schools 58 

Miscellaneous. 

Tablb M.— Report on Truancy 69 

Tablb N.— Report on Kindergartens 60 

Table O.— Report on Night Schools 60 

General Statistical Abstract, 

Tablb P. — General Statistical Abstract 61 

Appendix B. — Teachers' Iitstituteb, Financial Statement, 1904 62 

Appbndix C. — Inspection of Schools, 1905. 

I. List of Inspectors 65 

II. Piplomas for School Premises 68 

Appendix D. — ^Rxtbal Public School Libraries, 1904-5 ($9 

Appbndix E. — Continuation Classbs, 1904-5 78 

Appbndix F. — ^Proceedings for the Tear 1905. 

I. Regulations and Circulars 87 

Apportionment of Public School Grant 88 

II. — Ordbrs in Council 128 

Appbndix G. — Fbkb Text Books in Rktral Schools, 1905 130 



1J« EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



PAOB. 

ArmiDiz. H. — Pvtbuc and Frub Lxbkabzkb, Lztbrabt and Soibntiho iNSTXTxmoifB, 

KTC, 1904. 
Report of the Inspector 131 

Libraries in the Province 132 

l.~Pte&lic Idbraries (not free) i 137 

II.— PnWic Libraries (free) 146 

Outvie Society of Artiste 153 



Literary and Scientific Institutions. 

1. Hamilton Scientific Association 153 

2. The Ottawa Literary and Scientific Society 154 

3. L'Institnt Ganadien Francais D'Ottawa 154 

4. St. Patrick's Literary and Scientific Association 154 

5. Tlie OtUwa Field Naturalists' Club 155 

6. The Scientific Society of the University of Ottawa 156 

7. The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada 156 

8. The Canadian Section of the Society of Chemical Industry 157 

9. The Canadian Institute 157 

10. Wellington Field Naturalists' Club 158 



Historical Societies. 

1. Easez Historical Society 158 

2. London and Middlesex Historical Society 158 

3. Lundy's Lane Historical Society 159 

4. Niagara Historical Society 159 

o. The Ontario Historical Society 160 

6. The Women's Canadian Historical Society of Toronto 160 

7. Women's Wentworth Historical Society 161 

8- Wentworth Historical Society 161 



AFrmtmnL I. — ^Rbpobt of the Libbarian ot the Education Dbpabtment 162 



J. — ^Admission of Candidatbb to Colijboiate Institutes and High 
Schools, 1905 175 



Afhrimx K. — ^Report of the Ontabio Institution fob the Education of the Blind, 

Bbantfobd 183 



L. — ^Repobt of the Ontabio Institution fob the Deaf and Dumb, Bblle- 
thjui , 234 



GENERAL REPORT. 1905. 



[Tii] 




Public and Model School, Athens. 





Maud Stabbach,"A.T.C.M., 
Graduated at O.I.B., 1902. 



Almbda Hart, A.T.C.M., 
Graduated at O.I.B., 1904. 




Maud Y'oung, A.T.C.M., 
Graduated at O.I.B., 1903. 



Mary Williams, A.T.C.M., 
(iiwhiated at O.I.B., 1905. 




c 

g 

pi 



c 

> 

< 

2 

a, 

^^ 
15 







e 

.a 



J 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



MINISTER OF EDUCATION: 

' HON. E. A. PTXE, M.D., LL.D., M.P.P. 

DEPUTY MINISTER OF EDUCATION. 



H. M. Wilkinson Chi^f Clerk and Accountant. 

A. 0. PauU Clerk of Records. 

C. James Clerk and Secretary to the Minister. 

T. J. Gbeene Assistant Clerk of Records. 

E. A. Faulds Clerk of Statistics. 

T. F* CallagHan Clerk of Correspondence. 

S. A. May Assistant Clerk of Correspondence. 

F. Woodley Assistant Accountant, 

AUen Ker Clerk and Stenographer. 

N. Brown Clerk. 

Miss E. Dennis Stenographer. 

Miss S. B. Shields Stenographer. ■ 

li. McCorkindale Caretaker. 

Departmental Examinations. 

W. H. Jenkins, B.A Resristrar. 

F. N. Nudel Assistant Registrar. 

W. W. Jeffers Clerk of Examinations. 

R. J. Bryce Assistant Clerk of Ezaminatioas. 

Public Libraries y Etc, 

T. W. H. Leavitt Inspector. 

Wm. Lemon Clerk. 

Departmental Library, Etc. 

J. Oeorge Hodgins, M.A., LL.D Historiographer. 

H. E. Alley Librarian. 

F. F.Evans Assistant Librarian. 

Museum. 

I>avid Boyle, Ph. B Superintendent. 

"W. A.Poole Guardian. 

W^. H.C.Phillips Clerk. 

fixl 



REPORT 

OF THE 



MINISTER OF EDUCATION 

FOR THE YEAR 1905 



PART I 



WITH THE STATISTICS OF 1904 



Tq th€ Hcnorable Wm. Mobtim£B Clark, K.C, 

ZAeutenant-Govemor of the Province of Ontario. 

Mat it Pi^ease Yotje Honoe : 

I herewith present Part I. of the Report of the Education Department 
for the year 1905 with the statistics for the year 1904. 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

1. Elementaet Schools. 

a. Public Schools. 

Sumber of Public Schools in 1904 5,768 

Increase for the year 24 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages in the Public Schools 

durin^r the year 39€,814 

Decrease for the year 6,347 

Average daily attendance of pupils , !^7,185 

Decrease, for the year 3,565 

Percenta^re of average attendance to total attendance 57.25 

Number of persons employed as teachers (exclusive of Kinder- 
garten and Night School teachers) in the Public Schools : 

men, 1,957; women, 6,653; total 8,610 

Decrease: men 105* increase, women, 155; 

total increase 50 

Number of teachers who attended Normal School 4,564 

Decrease for the year 231 

Number of teachers with a University degree 86 

Increase for the year 1 

Average annual salary for niale teachers I486 

Increase for the year $20 

txi] 



XII 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Ayerage annual salary of female teachers 

Increase for the year $11 

Amount expended for Public School houses (sites and buildings) 

" " for teachers' salaries *... 

" " for all other purposes 

Total amount expended on Public Schools 

Increase for the year |299,632 

Cost per pupil, (enrolled attendance) 

Increase for the year |.s^4 

6. Roman Catholic Separate SchooU, 

Number of Roman Catholic Separate Schools in 1904 

Increase for the year 7 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages 

Increase for the year 690 

Average daily attendance of pupils 

Increase for the year 382 

Percentage of average attendance to total attendance 

Number of teachers 

Increase for the year 48 

Amount expended for School houses (sites and buildings) 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries 

Amount expended for all other purposes 

Total amount expended on B. G. Separate Schools 

Increase for the year |81,992 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 

Increase for the year |1.68 



¥335 

1442,865 
|3,246,6T4 
11,263,743 
14,953,182 

$12.48 



419 

47,80T 

29,920 

62.58 
944 

1135,791 
1227,136 
1143,384 
1506,311 

110.59 



c, Protestant Separate Schools. 

Number of Protestant Separate Schools (included with Public 

Schools, a) in 1904 

Number of enrolled pupils 

Increase for the year 5 

Average daily attendance of pupils 

Increase for the year 1 

d. Kindergartens. 



Number of Kindergartens in 1904 

Increase for the year 

Number of pupils enrolled 

Increase for the year 

Average daily attendance of pupils 

Decrease for the year 

Number of teachers engaged 

Increase for the year 



e. Night Schools, 



Number of Night Schools in 1904-5 
Increase for the year 

Number of pupils enrolled 

Increase for the year 



141 



133 



5 
319 

192 



129 

12,021 

4,573 

255 

11 

702 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xiii 



Average daily attendance of pupils 278 

Increase for the year Ill 

Number of teachers engaged 9 

Increase for the year 2 

II. Secokdaby Schools.* 

a. High Schools. 

Nomber of High Schools (including 42 Collegiate Institutes) 

in 1904 138 

Increase for the year 3 

+Xumber of Teachers in Hiirh Schools 661 

Increase for the year 42 

Xumber of Pupils in High Schools 27,709 

Increase for the year 1,987 

tAyerage Annual Salary, Principals |1,246 

Increase for the year |26 

tATerage Annual Salary, Assistants $894 

Inctease for the year $19 

tAverage Annual Salary |967 

Increase for the year |17 

tHigliest Salary Paid |3,000 

Amount expended for High School teachers' salaries |620,710 

" houses (sites and buildings) $50,6lfe 

Amount expended for all other High School purposes $205,865 

Total amount expended on High Schools $877,087 

Increase for the year $61,005 

Cost per Pupil (enrolled attendance) $31.65 

Decrease for the year $.07 

h. Continuation Classes. 

Number of Continuation Classes, 1904-5 (included in Public and 
Separate Schools, I, a and h), practically Jbing High 
School work: Grade A, 78; Grade B, 39; Grade C, 138; 

Grade D, 227; total 48B 

Increase for the year, Grade A, 10; Grade C, 20; 

Grade D, 39 

Decrease, Grade B, 6 

Total increase for the year 63 

Number of pupils in attendance 5,349 

Increase for the year 751 

III. Genebal. 

Elehbntasy and Secondakt Schools. 

Total population of the Province, 1904 J2,215,864 

Pupils enrolled in Elementary and Secondary Schools 485,053 

Decrease for the year '.... 3,528 

The Oiirriciiliim of Beoondary Schools inolades all the rabjeote required for matrionlation 
mto tlie UnlTersltjr. 

tHiew lUtietloi are based on Beturns to the Department, dated January, 1906. 
rbtfmated. 



ZIV 



THE REPORT OF fUE 



No. 12 



1,792 



Ay«rage daily attendance 

Decrease for the year 

Percentage of total population enrolled 

Average length of school term in days 

Average number of days attended by each pupil enrolled 

Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) in all schools : 

1902 1903 

Sites and buildings fO 97 fO 98 

Teachers' salaries 7 63 7 94 

All other expenses 2 80 3 14 



For all purposes |11 40 |12 06 

Average cost per pupil (average attendance) in all schools : 



878,661 

21.89 
800.31 
115.07 

1904 

$1 30 

8 44 

3 32 

f 13 06 

1904 
12 26 
14 69 

5 79 

For aU purposes |19 93 |21 01 f22 74 

I. PUBLIC SCHOOLS (INCLUDING SEPABATE SCHOOLS). 

These tables, 1, 2, 3 and 4, for the purpose of comparison with previous 
years in which the B. C. Separate Schools were included with Public Schools, 
include B. C. Separate Schools. In the Statistical Tables, A, B, C, D, E, 
(Appendix A), the Separate Schools are excluded. 

1. — School Population — Attendance. 

The School population of the Province, as ascertained by the assessors, 
is as follows : 



1902 

Sites and buildings |1 70 

Teachers' salaries 13 34 

All other expenses 4 89 



1903 
|1 70 
13 84 

5 47 



Year. 


1 
1 


§ 
1 

1 


i6 

s 

! 


Pupils enrolled 5 to 21. 


> 
O 

1 

00 

1 


2 
g 

a . 

3 CD 


Average daily attendance . 


Percentage of average at- 
tendance to"totalJnum- 
ber attending school. 


1867 


5—16 
5—16 
5—16 
5—16 
5—21 
5—21 
5-21 
5— 2> 
5—21 
5-21 


447,726 
495,756 
494,804 
483,817 
611,212 
595,238 
590,055 
584,512 
677,383 
576,537 


i*,436 
1,352 
1,569 
1,636 
1,385 
1,001 
91T 
790 


0380,511 
a433,664 
488,553 
469,751 
491,242 
483,643 
481,120 
452,977 
449,255 
443,729 


621,132 
620,998 
877 
409 
401 
391 
272 
110 
106 
102 


401,643 
454,662 
490,860 
471,512 
493,212 
485,670 
482,777 
454,088 
450,278 
444,621 


163,974 
188,701 
217,184 
214,176 
245,152 
253,830 
273,544 
261,480 
260,268 
257,085 


40.82 


1872 


41. 50 


1877 


44.25 


1882 


45.42 


1887 

1892 


49.71 
52.26 


1897 


56.66 


1902 


57.58 


1903 


57. 80 


1904 


57.82 







a 5 — 16. b Other agea than 5 to 16. 
inoladed in above table. 



Kote.'Kindergarten and Night School papiU are not 



IMK 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



XT 



The decrease in the enrolled attendance in 1904 was partly offset by the 
increased attendance noticed in the R. C. Separate Schools, and in the High 
Schools and Collegiate Institutes. While there was a decrease of 6,347 in 
the Public Schools alone, the decrease in all the Schools was only 3,528. 

Ab in former years, there was an increase in 1904 in the urban school 
attendance, consequently the decrease in the rural schools was greater than 
the total decrease shown in the preceding table. This decline of attendance 
in the rural schools is, no doubt, owing principally to the movement^ now 
in progress for many years, of our farming population to North Western 
Canada and to the cities and towns of our own Province. The following 
table will illustrate this to a certain extent : 



Year. 



1903 
1904 



Attendance in Rural 
Schools. 



260,617 or 57.88% of total 
253,133 or 56.93% of total 



Attendance in Urban 
Schools . 



189,661 or 42.12% of total 
191,488 or 43.07% of totalj 



2. — Classification of Pupils. 



Year. I 



1S67..I 

1*72..: 

1-.~.| 
I*?.'..! 



I- 

n 



a 



79, dm 

]S2,36i 
ITaaOS 



70*^229 

ioo,a»3 

96,074 
91.330 



117^1 

nets' 

90.1111 



I 

OS 



67,440 
71.740 

§3.73S 
^,1CH 



1 ' 

S 1 














•2° 


1 


^ 1 




•i 




.• 






oji: 


«•£ 


si ■ 






6« 


t 


i 


o 


ft 




r 1 




< 


Q 


s 


3 




go 


71.M7 


231, 7S^ 


'2A^,^l 


5.45« 


272.173 


61,787 


47,618 


1 
147,4121 


'-^,6fiB 


HH,fiW 


3-JT.'2IS 


57,582 


327.139 


109,639 


110.083 


282.156 


n.n.^'il 


SM,00ii 


40-^. 'MM 


153.036 


375.951 


116,865 


168,942 


220,977] 


10,a57 


a^Wfi/lOI 


41ft ':iT 


176,482 


280.517 


150,989 


158,694 


209,1841 33,926 


10,2aH; 


4ii*i,31^ 


4^>,^■I45 


395,097 


316.791 


194.754 


203.567 


270,856 


71,525 


13.37tJ 


l&'i &lfi 


47S>.«tt 


435.239 


334.947 


253,956 


220.941 


294,331 


171.594 


21,ffrfi 


iiifi,fj'2b 


"171. ^9 


448,444 


342.189 


284,025 


238,915 


316,787 


215.34$ 


17p4Hfi 


44S,al(* 


44^^.573 


434.030 


318,755 


269,954 


268,356 


296.172 


194,459 


ia,^L 


>I4:4J1 1 


4 4(sl6S 


432,270 


314.318 


272.6.57 


264.181 


292,513 


195,506 


]6,]VG 


43^,010 


440,:I14 


426,612 


3*23.101 


287,165 


266,992 


305.829 


215,421 



The foUo'win.g table classifies the pupils in the various Readers in 1904, 
as to rural and urban schools. 



Raral Schools • 

Trban Schools (cities, towns and 
incorporated villages) 



>N . 


^-h-i 


Ti ^ 


u 


rH M 


OJl-H 


OhH 


G * 




:S <» 


First 
Read 
Part 


First 
Read 
Part 






60,784 


36,941 


47,930 


50,297 


47,289 


44,456 


27,800 


37,299 


39,814 


35,815 



si si 



9,892 



5 
o 



253,133 



6,304 191,488 



XVI 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Ko. 12 



3. — TeacheTB' Certificates and Salaries. 



TeachjBrs' Certificates. 



Year. 



1867 
1872 
1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1903 
1904 



4,890 
6,476 
6,468 
6,857 
7,694 
8,480 
9,128 
9,367 
9,466 
9,654 






2,840 
2,626 
3,020 
3,062 
2,718 
2,770 
2,784 
2,294 
2,160 
2,076 



;2 



2,041 
2,850 
3,448 
3,796 
4,876 
5,710 
6,344 
7.073 
7,296 
7,479 



1,899 
1,337 
260 
246 
262 
261 
343 
608 
610 






2,464 
1,477 
1,304 
2,169 
2,663 
3,047 



4,296 
4,461 
4,192 



2,084 
3,926 
3,471 
3,865 
4,299 
4,466 
3,432 
3,250 
3,396 




151 

578 

088 

971 

924 

873 

934 

1,031 

1,145 

1,331 



828 
1,084 
1.873 
2,434 
3,038 
3,643 
4,774 
4,967 
4,728 



NOTi.->Eindergarteii and Night Sohool teaeh«ni are not inelnded in aboTe table. 

The above table shows a steady decline of the percentage of men ii^ the 
teaching profession since 1867, when they were in the majority, or were 
58.26 per cent, of the whole number. In 1897 they had become reduced 
to 30.5 per cent, and in 1904 they formed only 21.72 per cent, of the whole. 

Improvement is noticed in the increase of the number of teachers witli 
First Glass certificates. The decrease in the number of Second Class and tlie 
increase in the Third and other Class in 1904 were due partlv to the leng- 
thening of the Normal School term in 1903, and partly because many 
Second Class teachers secured better positions in the North West. 

Eighty-six Public School-teachers held University degrees in Arts, an 
increase of one over the preceding year 1903. 

The following table classifies the teachers and certificates as to rural 
and urban schools, in 1904. 





Public School Teachers, 


/ Certificates. 




Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Ist Class. 


2nd 
Class. 


3rd Class. 


Other 
ClasB. 


Rural Schools 


6,974 
3,580 


1,469 
606 


4,506 
2,974 


162 
483 


1,944 
2,248 


3,107 
289 


771 


Urban (cities, towns and 
incoiporated villages). . 


560 



im 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



xvii 



Teachers' Salaries. 



as 



Year. 



'to 

1 

$ 

1^7 1 1,350 

IS72. , 1,000 

1S77 1 1,100 

1882. 1,100 

1S87 1 1,460 

1892. I 1,500 

1^7 i 1,500 

\902 1 1,600 

1903 ! 1,600 

19C4 1 1,600 



9 eS 



$ 

346 
360 
398 
415 
425 
421 
391 
436 
465 
485 



«2g 
1 A 



I 

226 
228 
264 
269 
292 
297 
294 
313 
324 
335 



13 ® 
g8 



« ( 

<1' 



I 

261 
305 
379 
385 
398 
383 
347 
372 
387 
402 



'3 8 



> 5 



$ 

189 
213 
251 
248 
271 
269 
254 
271 
283 
295 



fl 



$ 

532 
628 
735 
742 
832 
894 
892 
935 
951 
953 



1*^ 



$ 

2iS 
245 
307 
331 
382 
402 
425 
479 
491 
498 






2^: 



$ 

464 
507 
583 
576 
619 
648 
621 
667 
678 
705 



St a^ 



$ 

240 
216 
269 
273 
289 
298 
306 
317 
327 
341 



The average salaries for teachers in 1904 in incorporated villages, 
included in Counties etc. above, were $564 for men and $305 for women. 
In rural schools they were $385 and $294, and in all urban schools, $756 
and f406 respectively. 

The salaries were higher in both rural and urban schools in 1904 than 
in any previous year since 1867, although when the high cost of living of 
late years, as compared with that of twenty years ago, is bonsidered, the 
salaries then were higher, so far as the purchasing power of the dollar is 
eoncemed, than those paid last year. 

See pag'es 14 and 15 of this Report for salaries in the various Counties 
and Districts. 

4. — Receipts and Expenditure. 







Receipts. 






Expenditure. 










S 








1 


i 


•o 






Year. 


1 

> 

1 


it 
n 


II 

IS 

Hi 


i 

1 


1 
i 
S 


il 


1^' 


s 

-Hi 

II 


-a 

1 


& 

1 




t 


t 


t 


i 


f 


» 


S 


$ 


$ 


Ic. 


:^ 


l*7,L=t3 


l,lfil,S^ 


331.51B 


ijTo.m 


1.0»3hS17 


]4tJ95 


31, 3M 


399.123 


1,478, 119 


3 67 




2in,ll^ 


].Tfil.l9t 


^T.4<H> 


IMO^LJ 


i,a7i,sw 


4^fl,W3 


47,79S 


331,928 


2.207.364 


4 85 


'j<77 


25U»dS 


2,422J32 


7tO.<i«7 


a^-toft.oKi 


'J.0Sa,O99 


477,153 


47.6S9 


610,4&8 


3.073.489 


6 26 


>« 


2e.s.ns 

258,72:; 




7a;. OM 

97S,2»3 

1,227,5*1 


4,331,^i«7 


2,144,449 
2,4?W,&40 
2 7^,629 


427.!ftl 


1S,.W3 
27,&(» 
40, (MS 


525.025 
711,535 
833,f«5 
877.335 


3,026,975 
3.742,104 
4.a'>3,918 
4.015 670 


6 42 


1*7 


7 59 


l««i 


8 40 


im 


S 73 


1^62. 






1.^22, <W^ 


6.061,006 


3,198J32 


43-i,7.'^ 
42S,B17 


74,-3 <p. 


1,107,552 
1.264,573 


4.8-25.160 
5,077.869 


10 62 


»33 


11 27 


I«M 


405,362 


4,4M,227 


l,fiOO,S82 


*»4T0h571 


S,473,710 


178,666 


"■""1 


1,819,130 


5,459,493 


12 27 


1 




2e. 























XVIU 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



An increase in the govemnient and municipal grants and in the ex- 
penditure of the Public and Separate Schools is noticed above. The latter 
item in connection with the decreased attendance has increased the cost per 
pupil from |11.27 in 1903 to |12.27 in 1904. 

Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance.) 

1902. 1903. 1904. 

Sites and buildings | 95 | 95 | 1 30 

Teachers' salaries 7 04 7 35 7 81 

All other expenses 2 63 2 97 3 16 

For all purposes |10 62 |11 27 |12 27 

Average cost per pupil (average attendance.). 

1902. 1903. 1904. 

Sites and buildings I 1 65 | 1 65 | 2 25 

Teachers' salaries 12 23 12 72 13 51 

All other expenses 4 57 5(14 5 47 

For all purposes |18 45 fl9 51 |21 23 

The cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) for 1904 in the Public Schools 
alone will be found on pages 24 and 25 of this report, and for the R.C. 
Separate Schools on pages 28 and 29. 

II.— ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS. 



Year. 



1867 
1872 
1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1903 
1904 



Schools — Expenditure — 
Teachers. 




161 
171 
185 
190 
229 
312 
340 
391 
412 
419i 
I 




Number of pupils [attending — Number in the various 
Dranchee of instruction . ' 



$ 

48,628 
68,810 
120,266 
166,739 
229,848 
326,034 
335,324 
485,603 
472,395 
559,635 



$ 

42,719 
61,817 
114,806 
154,340 
211,283 
289,838 
302,169 
435,441 
424,319 
506,311 



210 
254 
334 
390 
491 
662 
752 
870 
896 
944 



18,924 
21,406 
24,952 
26,148 
30,373 
37,466 
41,620 
45,964 
47,117 
47,807 



5C 



^ 



18,924 
21,406 
24,952 
26,148 
30,373 
37,466 
41,620 
45,964 
47,117 
47,807 



10,749 
13,699 
17,932 
21,052 
27,824 
35,566 
39,724 
45,964 
41,117 
47,807 



S 

U3 



10,559 
12,189 
17,961 
21,524 
28,501 
25,936 
40,165 
45,964 
47,117 
47,807 



8,666 
8,011 
13,154 
13,900 
19,608 
26,299 
27,471 
29,788 
30,212 
32,483 



08 

s 

i 



5,688 
7,908 
11,174 
11,695 
18,678 
22,755 
26,071 
27,409 
28,609 
31,382 






C 
OS 

u 



7,548 
21,818 
32,682 
36,462 
41,962 
43,658 
43,866 



2,033 
8,578 
ll,05e 
18,127 
14,687 
20,559 
23,716 



III.— PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS. 



The complete list of Protestant Separate Schools is as follows : 
No. 9 Cambridge, No. 6 Plantaganet North, No. 1 N. Tilbury, L'Orig^ 
nal, and Penetanguishene. 
2a E. 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



XIX 



They were atttended by 319 pupils. The whole amount expended for 
their maintenance was |3,918.77. One teacher held a First Class, four 
teachers held a Second Class, two a Third Class and one a Temporary Certi- 
ficate. 

IV.— COLrL.EGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS. 

The following statistics respecting Collegiate Institutes and High 
Schools will be found suggestive: 

1. Heceipts, Expenditure, Attendance, etc. 



Receipts. 



Year. 



s. 

o 

a: 

1 



a? 



OS 





o 

B 



:s^: i 103| 

1?72 ! 104' 

:s:7 i04t 

;>-^2 1 104' 

hS7 1121 

.>^2 128' 

'y*: 130, 

l:*'2 VM\ 

.-a; ; 135! 

".•4 ' 1381 



1591 
239' 
2801 
3321 
898 
522i 
579 
593' 
619| 
661. 



15,605 

20,270 

20,753 

29,270 

56,198 

97,273 

110,859 

105,801 

111,0281 

116,758 




Expenditure. 



64,562 
79,543 
78,762 

o4,oOx 

91,977 
100,000 
101,250 
112,650 
118,773 
120,799 




^1 

PL4 



II. 

^3:3 



94,820 
141,812 
211,607 
253,864 
327,452 
472,029 
532,837 
547,402' 
571,559! 
620,710| 





a 

o 



& 



$ 

*19,190 

♦31,360 

*51,417 

♦19,361 

♦73,061 

♦91,1081 

♦46,627, 

44,246 

48,723; 

50,512| 



$ 

124,181 
210,005 
843,710 
343,720 
495,612 
696,114 
715,976 
769,680 
816,082 
877,087 





«c 






o 






E^ 






>3 






rt^ 






O^ 


*§* 




11 


a 

£ 




Percen 
tend 
ance 


K 






$ 


5,696 


55 


21 80 


7,968 


56 


26 36 


9,229| 56 


37 24 


12,348 


53 


27 56 


17,459 


59 


28 38 


22,837 


60 


30 48 


24,390 


61 


29 35 


24,472 


58.97 


31 45 


25,722 


59.55 


31 72 


27,709 


60.38 


31 65 



^ExpensM for repairs* etc., included. 

The above table shows an increase in the enrolled attendance of 1987 
over 1903. 

While the attendance at our Public Schools is decreasing that of our 
secondary schools is increasing year by year, showing that an increased 
percentage of our school population is taking advantage of those schools, 
ibont six per cent, of the total school attendance was enrolled in the 
< jllegiate Institutes and High Schools in 1904. About 20 per cent, of those 
^ho reach the Fourth Reader in the Public and Separate schools extend 
their course to the Continuation Classes, High Schools and Collegiate Insti- 
tates. 



Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) per year: 

1902. 1903. 

Sites and buildings |1 81 |1 89 

Teachers* salaries 22 37 22 22 

All other expenses ^ 7 27 7 61 



1904. 

|1 82 
22 40 

7 43 



For all purposes 



.. 131 45 131 72 13! 65 



XX 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



AverafJTe cost per pupil (average attendance) per year : 

1902. 1903. 1904. 

Sites and buildings | 3 07 | 3 18 | 3 02 

Teachers' salaries «. 37 93 37 31 37 10 

All other purposes 12 34 12 78 12 30 

For all purposes |53 34 |53 27 $52 42 

2. — Classification o.f Pupils, etc. 



Year. 



1867 . . . 
1872 . . . 
1877 . . . 
1882 . . . 
1887 . . . 
1892 . . . 
1897 . . . 

1902 . . . 

1903 .. . 

1904 .. . 



English. 



a 



a 

B 

6 

^ . 
.S a 



5,467' 4,091 
7,S84i 7,278 
8,772 
12,189 
17,171 



8,819 
12/275 

ITj.^hh 
22,rao 

21,576 
23,069 
25,019 



22,525 
^^4,195 
24,241 
25,875i 
27.298! 



'3 

i 



16,649 
1*2,468 
24,176 
23,768 
24,885 
^27,070 



w 



4,634 
7,513 
9,106 
12,220 
17,010 
22,328 
18,318 
23,559 
24,426 
27,709 



Mathematics. 



§1 

11 



5,264 
7,715 
0,158 
12,106 
16,9^2 
22,11H 
l:-;,747 
14,500| 
15,2^10i 
18,4931 



I 



5,526 
7,834 
9,227 
12,2H1 
16,0;i9 
21,8fi9 
liJ,798 

25,2491 



2,841 
' 6,033 

8,678 
11,742 
16,904 
22/>29 

24in)5 

22,V^r)3 
2:^,840 
25,143 



a 

o 



1,847 
2,592 
8,113 
11,148 
14,839 
17,791 
16,788 
16,881 
17,873 
20,519 



B 
o 

I 



141 

174 

359 

397 

1,017 

1,154 

1,652 

1.662 

1,618 

1,759 



Science. 



S 
•53 



6 



1,876 

1,921 

2,168 

2,880 

5,265 

6,601 

11,002 

12,758 

14,240 

17,837 



840 
1,151 
2,547 
2,522 
3,411 
3.710 
5,489 
5,860 
6.2M 
9,038 



a 

S 
o 
CQ 



4,640 
6,189 

12,892 
9,051 
9,442 

11,463 



* English Literature. 

2. Classification of Pupils, etc. — Continued, 







Languages. 












i 








- - - 


1 









^ 
jg 


• 




1 


s 














•43 


£ 


S 


m 






1 




• 






"^ 




^ 


a? 


Year. 




' 




t 


bD 


8 


g 


03 


^ 


2^ 










< 
to 


1 


9 
B 




.S d 


1-^ 






3 


1 


1 




P 


1 






,o o 


1 


1867 


5,171 
3,860 


802 


2,164 
2,82J^ 




676 


1,283 
3,127 








67 


3< 


1872 


900 


341 


2,176 


486 


300 


213 


28 


7€ 


1877 


4,955 


871 


3,091 


442 


2,755 


3,621 


555 


328 


564 


35 


ei 


1882 


4,591 


815 


5,363 


962 


3,441 


5,642 


881 


646 


751 


37 


(T 


1887 


5,409 


997 


6,180 


1,350 


14,295 


14,064 


1,141 


882 


791 


58 


5^ 


1892 


9,006 


1,070 


10,398 


2,796 


16,980 


16,700 


1,111 


1,006 


398 


77 


5 


1897 


16,873 


1,421 


13,761 


5,169 


12,252 


11,647 


1,368 


1,153 


409 


87 


4; 


1902 


18,884 


631 


13,595 


3,280 


10,721 


11.334 


1,573 


743 


705 


82 


5 


1903 


18,831 


602 


14,522 


3,229 


11,619 


12,264 


1,805 


844 


684 


81 


5S 


1904 


lf»,409 


637 


16,039 


3,274 


11,596 


13,334 


1,834 


811 


739 


82 


•^ 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



XXI 



Tlie following table will be of interest regarding the occupation of 
parents of Sigh School pupils, and will show the classes of our population 
receiYing most advantages from those institutions. 

Agricultural 8,516 

Commercial 7 , 646 

Mechanical 7,p99 

Professional 2,604 

Other callings 1,845 

The statistics in detail of the various Collegiate Institutes and High 
Schools in the Province will be found on pages 34 to 57 of this Report. 

V. DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATIONS, ETC. 

1. Table shewing the -Number of Teachers-in-Training at County Model 
Schools, Normal College, Provincial Normal Schools, etc., 1877-1904. 



Ye». 



iS77. 

mi.. 
m.. 



County Model 
Schools. 



50 
46 
55 
59 
60 
5^ 
55 
57 



.9 

e 



o ■ 



1,146 
882 
1.491 
1,283 
1,645 
1,171 
1,148 
1,122 



1,124 
837 
1,876 
1,225 
1,384 
1,138 
1,123 
1,097 



Normal College. 



10 
12 
15 
17 
17 



96 
180 
132 
127 
166 






$ c. 



1,63*00 
4,374 00 
2,405 00 
2,110 00 
2,776 00 



Normal and Model Schools, etc. 



^1 

"Si 



55 






1 



13 
16 
13 
Vz 
13 
16 
»25 
♦25 






257 
260 
441 
428 
407 
619 
586 
304 



d 3 I 



8 
15 
18 
22 
23 
31 
36 






643 
799 
763 
842 
832 
958 
1,067 
982 






a pu 



$ c 

7,905) 22 
18,783 50 
16,427 00 
19,016 00 
18,797 59 
20,735 00 
19,866 00 
20,212 00 






$ c 

25,780 88 
44,888 02 
40,188 66 
45,724 12 
46,390 91 
56,672 98 
61,678 08 
64,999 19 



* Induding thoee engaged in both a Normal and a Model School . 



2. Entrance Examinations, 1877-1905. 



No. 



of candidates 
examined. 



1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



7,383 
9,607 
16,248 
16,409 
16,384 
18,087 
19,058 
19,774 
20,295 



No. of candidates 
who paeaed. 

3,836 

4,371 

9,364 

8,427 
10,502 
13,300 
13,003 
14,632 
13,431 



XXll 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



3. Non professional Teacliers and Matriculation Examinations, 1905. 



No. candidates . 
No. who passed. 
No. of appeals . 
No. sustained. .. 



I 



280 

124 

3 






2,773 

1,482 
267 



3-5 2 

III 



2,195 

* 

43 
5 



S 2 



685 

405 

32 

2 



^5, 



r 



a-i 

as. 



483 


12 


275 


/ 


24 




10 





NOTB— (a) The Part I. Junior Leaving examination was aboliBhed in 1902. 

(b) In Junior Matriculation column above, 127 scholarBhip candidates are included. 

(c) The Commercial Diploma Part II. was abolished in 1904. 

*Owing to changes in matriculations the number who passed is not known. 



VI. TEACHEES' INSTITUTES. 

This table presents the work of the Teachers' Institutes for twenty- 
eight years : 



Year. 



1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1903 
1904 



1 




OP 


3 




■s 


e 




.9 


HH 






c 


e 


g 


o 


il 


^1 


-s 


•s 


®2 


6 


d 


dfi 


'A 


{25 


^ 


42 


1,181 


6,468 


62 


4,395 


6,857 


66 


6,781 


7,594 


69 


8,142 


8,480 


73 


7,627 


9,128 


77 


8,515 


9,367 


80 


8,783 


9,466 


79 


8,979 


9,554 



Receipts. 




$ c 
1,412 50 
2,900 00 
1,800 00 
1,950 00 
2,425 00 
2,515 00 
2,450 00 
2,575 00 



$ c 

100 00 
800 00 
1,879 45 
2,105 00 
2,017 45 
1,877 50 
1,834 00 
2,134 45 



a 

2 



ii 



$ c 

299 75 

1,088 84 

730 66 

875 76 

901 15 

1,171 80 

1,296 85 

1,328 45 



T3 



a 

i 

I 



$ C. 

2,769 44 
9,3W 28 
10,405 95 
12,043 54 
12,446 20 
13,171 26 
12,521 50 
13,342 11 



Expenditure. 




$ 



. 453 02 
1,234 08 
1,472 41 
1,479 88 
1,437 18 
1,095 55 
1,050 22 



^ c. 
1,127 63 
6,355 33 
4,975 50 
6.127 46 
6,598 84 
7,188 45 
6,736 63 
7,229 06 



See pages 62 to 64 for details for 1904. 

The Teachers' Institutes are doing excellent work, and at 
a trifling expenditure. In the United States it is not unusual for Teacliera' 
Associations to be held for a week or longer. The work attempted is, how- 
ever, somewhat like what is done in our County Model Schools. 



19K 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



XXlll 



VII. Public Libraries, Etc; 

The following extract is from the Inspector's Report 5 

1. Public Libraries, 

Abstract showing the Counties and Districts in which Public Libraries 
are established : — Addington (6), Algoma (13), Brant (7), Bruce (26), Carle- 
ton (10), Dufferin (10), Dundas (9), Durham (4), Elgin (11), Essex (9), 
Frontenac (7), Glengarry (3), Grenville (11), Grey (22), Haliburton (2), 
Haldimand (11), Halton (5), Hastings (9), Huron (18), Kent (12), Lambton 
^15), Lanark (13), Leeds (8), Lennox (2), Lincoln (9), Manitoulin Island 
(4), Middlesex (14), Muskoka (6), Nipissing (6), ' Norfolk (6), Northumber- 
land (8), Ontario (12, Oxford (14), Parry Sound (12), Peel (14), Perth (8), 
PeterbOTough (5), Prescott (2), Prince Edward (2), Rainy River (2), Ren- 
frew (9), Russell (2), Stormont (8), Simcoe (19), Victoria (12), Waterloo (14), 
Welland (9), Wellington (18), Wentworth (9), York (26). 

Abstract showing the Progress of Public Libraries from 1883 to 31st 

December, 1904: 



Year. 



a I 



l-:3 (April) 
\m " 
:m " 

:-5f9(Dec) 

l^j ** 

m 

m 



1 



a 

525 



1^^ 

to 

c 



93 13,672 
167 32,016 
255 84,088 
347 111,208 
364 121,397 
371 129,713 
147,208 
415;i55,361 
4461172,792 
4281173,940 
3971179,485 



I 

o 



1,758 
1,102 
1,117 
79 
35 
47 
35 
19 



59 
lOJ 
156 
200 
200 
188 
186 
194 
191 
186 
180 



■S-c 
ii 

t?5 



1,540 
3,041 
4.745 
5,834 
5,839 
5,773 
5,971 
6,062 
6,044 
5,982 
5,956 



OS 

Ba 



154,093 

311,048 

510,326 

789,082 

862,047 

918,022 

989,050 

1,066,117 

1,140,392 

1,164,573 

1,153,778 






B 

o 

IS 
> 



% 

a 

3 

5z; 



I % 



o 



251,920 
744,466 
1,415,867 
2,358,140 
2,547,131 
2,042,904 
2,634,711 
2,668,364 
2,738,590 
2,534,228 
2,507,233 



% c. 

59,716 00 
103,843 68 
160,556 26 
188,783 21 
193,421 20 
178,642 87 
210,635 49 
225,796 29 
246,315 29 
240,941 13 
219,760 77 



I 



$ c. 

225,190 00 

403,573 75 

685,412 17- 

870,167 54 

935,975 81 

966,667 38 

1,024,300 14 

1,080,601 71 

1,151,877 04 

1,269,605 22 

1,394,462 51 



397 Public Libraries (133 Free, 264 Not Free) reported for the year 
mduig Slst December, 1904. 

88 Public Libraries did not report for the year ending 31st December, • 
1904. 

6 Libraries, which have not yet reported, were established in the ye^ar 
1905. 

For particulars see Inspector's Report, pages 131-153. 



2. Literary cmS Scientific Institutions, etc. 

For Literary and Scientific Institutions, and Historical Societies, see 
Inspector's Report, pages 153-161. 



xxiv THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



GENERAL REMARKS. 
I. 

As in previous years, a very large portion of this Report is devoted to 
statistics. These will no doubt be useful for many purposes, and when properly 
interpreted may serve as a general basis for administrative and executive 
action in certain directions. It should not be supposed, however, that edu- 
cational progress can be wholly expressed in statistical tables. The spirit 
which pervades the schoolroom, the ideals which the schoolmaster seeks to 
hold before his pupils, the attitude of the community towards the work of the 
school, all elude the grasp of the statistician. Yet to know these things, and 
to endeavor to remove whaf is faulty, and to improve what is good, is one 
of the really important tasks of those concerned in the administration of 
educational affairs. 

One of the most serious obstacles to effective educational progress ^nd 
reform, is the apathy of the general public. This indifference, I may almost 
say neglect, is not peculiar to any one province or state. It seems to be 
almost universal. 'Here and there, 9ome one more than usually gifted and 
forceful, catches the ear of the public, and enlists public interest, with a 
great resultant gain to education locally. The spasm soon passes, however,, 
and the old languor returns. To arouse public interest, to direct it wisely, 
^nd above all to be able to sustain an intelligent and enthusiastic interest in. 
our schools and all that pertains to them, requires strong leadership backed 
by fii-m and unwearying executive direction and assistance, and the harmon- 
ious and sustained co-oporation of all those directly concerned in the manage- 
ment and control of our educational machinery. The public schdol inspiector^ 
the high school principal, our teachers, trustees and the pr^ss^ can all 
contribute to the educational awakening which is necessary to progress. It 
is but a platitude to say that the stability of a state depends upon the intel- 
ligence and moral fibre of its people. Yet it seems necessary to repeat it, 
until parents become impressed with the obligation which that truth imposes^ 
upon them. 

The development of any educational system is the work of years. Mod- 
ifications require to be made from time to time to meet changing conditions 
and aspirations. The system which would fairly meet the requirements o£ 
pioneer life and primitive conditions must be adjusted to conform with the 
increasing complexity of social and industrial life. Thus increasing com- 
plexity rather than simplification of educational ordinances seems to accom- 
pany the progress of commercial, industrial and social specialization. A, • 
. marked instance of this is to be seen in the case of Germany. An examina- 
tion of the occupations of the German people reveals the most extensive 
variety and specialization to be found in any civilized state. Coincident 
with this multiplicity of pursuits are the provisions for the education of the- 
people who are to engage in them. Nowhere else do we find so great a 
variety of special schools for the training of the people- for their particular^ 
vocations. All this leads to complexity in the organization and administra- 
tion of the educational machinery, and in no other state ia the educational 
organism so complicated. 

The changes above referred to, take place it is true, slowly, and the- 
accompanying adjustments in the educational systems are never violent. 
It is further true, that if any nation is to lead, and not merely to follow, 
in industrial, intellectual and social progress, it must have men upon tke- 
watch towers who are skilful in discerning the trend and character of tke- 
advances to be made, and so be able to direct the youth of the land to prepare^ 



^ _^_ 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxv 



tiiemselves for the proximate futitre. Educational adjustments are, therefore, 
required not only to meet present conditions, but also ttose which the grow- 
ing boy or girl must face on arriving at the age when formal school work is 
over, and the serious obligations of life are entered upon. 

All educational systems must be largely indigenous. A system which 
works admirably and produces excellent results in one country, would prob- 
ably be a failure if transplanted in another. Each country must face and 
solve its own educational problems. Yet many valuable suggestions may 
be obtained from those states in which the conditions do not vary greatly 
from our own. To appraise these and make the necessary modifications, is 
largely the work of the expert. In a subsequent portion of this report will 
be found a number of extracts from various educational reports, and these 
ire commended to the consideration of those interested in the matters to 
which they refer. 

During' the past year, my attention has been directed to a number of 
•jkanges which are considered desirable in our own provincial system. Many 
valuable sug^gestions have been made, all of which will be carefully consid- 
ered. A number of matters, which have engaged the attention of my depart- 
Hjent during the year just closed are referred to under separate headings. 

II. The Public School Curriculum. 

Reference was made in my last Report to the revised courses of study 
which went into operation in August, 1904. A year's experience is too 
iimited to properly estimate the value of the changes introduced, or what 
modifications, if any, are desirable. It may be found that some teachers 
have been too enthusiastic in dealing with the newer phases of school work 
and have g^ven these a prominence out of proportion to their importance 
in a well considered and balanced course, while other teachers may have been 
too conservative in this respect. The via media is generally the safer way 
and the one which leads most surely to the desired goal. 

DLscusBions in the public press, in educational journals and reports and 
La the conventions and associations of teachers all point to a growing interest 
b the question as to what constitutes the best programme of studies for the 
Public Schools. To some extent there has been a feeling of unrest and dis- 
satisfaction with the courses which have hitherto been prescribed for pupils 
if the elementary grades. This feeling has been manifested not only in our 
iwn Province but in many of the neighbouring States and on the Continent. 

Several quite distinct causes have been assigned for this dissatisfaction. 
In the opinion of not a few people the public school courses are thought to 
l« oveTloaded with subjects; that the amount of time spent on what are con- 
sidered ''essentials" is insufficient to secure the desired results. Those who 
give the above reason believe that all that our public schools should attempt 
is to train boys and girls to write neatly and legibly, to calculate rapidly and 
accurately, and to read with expression and intelligence. They would cut 
out all so-called "frills" and practically limit the course to the three R's. 
Many others, while in the main agreeing with those who would materially 
reduce the number of studies, are nevertheless anxious to secure a somewhat 
«ider outlook, and would include other branches than those just mentioned. 
The problem seems still further from solution when the opinions of many 
educationists of the first rank are sought. Many of these hold that a study of 
child mind and nature reveals so many interests and aptitudes, that a very 
limited curriculum results in dwarfing the child's intellectual and emotional 
development, and that any course of study designed for the elementary 



xxvL THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



grades sKould have more rather than fewer centres of interest. In this con- 
nection it may not be inappropriate to quote at some length the opinion of 
Superintendent Maxwell, the head of the educational system in the City of 
New York. It may be interesting, further, to note that when a vote was 
recently taken in that city as to the abolition or retention of the 'Tads and 
Frills," the parents by a large majority voted for their retention. 

Superintendent Maxwell says: 

**During the last quarter of a century a great movement for the reform 
of the elementary curriculum has been gathering strength. The most prom- 
inent characteristics of this movement would seem to have been the develop- 
ment of the imagination and the higher emotions through literature and art 
and music; the training of the body and the executive powers of the mind 
^ through physical training ; and the introduction of the child to the sources 
of material wealth, through the direct study of nature and of processes of 
manufacture. At first the movement seems to have been founded on psycho- 
logical bases. 'To-day the tendency is to seek a sociological foundation — to 
adjust the child to his environment of men and of nature. 

''At various times during the past ten or fiiteen years, and particularly 
during the last year, reactionary voices have been loudly raised against the 
New Education, and in favor of the old. Keactionary tendencies in education 
arise from three chief sources: 

"1. The demagogic contentions of selfish politicians who see that it costs 
more money to teach the new subjects of the curriculum than the old, and 
that thus a large proportion of the public revenue is diverted from the field 
of political spoils. These are the men who have invented the term "Fads and 
frills" to designate art, manual training, music and nature study. It mu3t 
be theirs to learn that it will require something more than a stupid allitera- 
tion to stem the tide of these irresistible forces that are making the modern 
school the faithful counterpart of the modern world and an adequate pre- 
paration for its activities. The saving common-sense of the common people, 
when deliberately appealed to, will always come to the rescue of the schools. 

"2. The reactionary tendency is due in part to an extremely conservative 
element that still exists among the teaching force. For the most part, 
teachers who are still extremely conservative were themselves brought up 
chiefly on the dry husks of a formal curriculum. They find it difficult to 
^ learn and to teach the new subjects. They dislike to be bothered by the 
assistance of special teachers. Accustomed to mass work both in learning and 
in teaching, they regret the introduction into the schoolroom of arts which, 
demand attention to individual pupils. 

**3. The reactionary tendency has its roots even among the more pro- 
gressive teachers in a vague feeling of disappointment and regret that manual 
training, correlation, and nature study have probably not accomplished all 
that their enthusiastic advocates promised ten to twenty years ago. Public 
.education has become a much more difficult thing than it was half a century 
ago. 

The following extracts are also worthy of careful perusal. They come 
from men who, like Superintendent Maxwell, have made a life-long study 
of elementary education. 

Respecting the aims of the Public Schools, and the Curriculum that 
should be followed, Mr. A. B. Blodgett, Superintendent of Schools for Syra- 
cuse, N. T., makes the following remarks: 

"The best that the public schools can do for the young is to make 
children acquainted with books, and processes, teach them how to use and 
study books ; and place in their hands the right tools for future needs. First 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxvii 



among these must always be counted strength, accuracy and facility in fun- 
damentals, the studies of the grammar schools. •This much is made man- 
datoiT through the compulsory attendance and the labor laws. At this point 
must enter the directing hand of the parent as to whether the child shall 
continue in school, or t.ake up work; and just here there is danger that parents 
may make the mistake of forcing the wrong tools into the hands of their 
rtildren. A boy who would excel in mechanics, may not care for books. The 
girl who loves literary work, should not be driven to study music or art; 
Leither should the musician or artist be expected to make a successful teacher. 
There are many misfits along these lines, and each boy and girl should have 
a chance to use the tools which he or she can handle to the best advantage. 
"For this reason the school curriculum should contain such features as 
will enable the pupils to discover their inclinations toward this or that avenue 
of endeavor, but the work should be kept within reasonable and conservative 
limits. We have such features in our course of study, but it is impossible 
in the limited time given to school life, to reach the degree of proficiency 
Thich many people through close application in one special line, year afteV 
Tear, thoughtlessly demand shall be the product of the public schools.'' 

''I often think that the old objection that 'a boy should not be educated 
^bove his probable station in life' is as selfish and absurd as it is cruel and 
Ticked. For why, if worldly position and wealth are denied to the many, 
shonid intellectual wealth be also denied ? The poor man has at least nowa- 
days opportunities to enjoy intellectual pleasures at museums, art and 
picture galleries, and free libraries, if he is trained to appreciate and under- 
stand them; so I hold that we ought so to educate and train our charges that 
they shall be able to indulge . their leisure hours in such enjoyments and 
intellectual pursuits as are open to, the so-called better classes. Thus then, 
in addition to a sound training in the mere tools of a rational existence — 
the three B's as they are popularly called — should be added instruction in 
music (vocal and instrumental), drawing and painting, some elementary 
science, some technical training in carpentering or other branch of trade, 
and some political economy." — Vine. 

A second reason given for the dissatisfaction already referred to is not 
that the curricula are too broad, but that they are unsuitable in character 
for the present day complexities of social life. The teacher's aim is to utilize 
subjects for the general development and discipline of the mind, while the 
parent seems to require that the pupil should be trained in those branches 
Thich have a direct application to his f utu,re requirements in earning a live- 
lihood. The cultural aim of the teacher, and the industrial or utilitarian 
aim of the parent, thus stand in somewhat sharp contrast. The resulting 
^^mpromise does not appear to have been a happy or satisfactory one. Pos- 
sibly a different compromise might result in securing a fair measure of 
harmony. 

The suggestion that above the very junior grades of the public schools 
there might reasonably be a differentiation in the courses prescribed for urban 
and for rural schools is quite pertinent and worthy of serious consideration. 
It is a fact, that notwithstanding the movement citywards of a considerable 
pertentage of rural boys and girls, the great mass of the rural population 
Temains associated with country life. Should the education which prepares 
^arh of these classes for the duties peculiar to each, be wholly the same? 
Thb question is already occupying the serious consideration of thoughtful 
men and women whether they are teachers, sociologists or the plain public. 
Mr. Howard J. Rogers very forcibly and clearly presents, in the following 



xxviii THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



extract, some of the manj; difficulties which perplex those concerned in the 
administration of educational affairs. 

''Almost every innovation or change of policy, in whatever country, 
has for its object the more thorough training of the youth for his future 
trade or occupation. The line of cleavage between the training of the many 
and the training of the few, or between industrial training and cultural 
training, is becoming more and more distinct, and what Belgium has long 
taken as the dictum of its own educational policy, may with equal correctness 
be applied to Europe in general. 

''The history of education in the United States for the last century has 
shown it to be eminently practical, and peculiarly responsive to public 
demand. Its close relation and responsibility to the people preclude its 
taking any other form. It is not a thing apart from the public and for the 
benefit of a few as in the day of Egyptian priesthood, but rather is the in- 
strument of the people in shaping the destiny of the country. Given then, 
the trend of the development of this country and there follows as its corollary 
the tendency of its education. The twentieth century will be the scene of 
a struggle for commercial and industrial supremacy. The United States has 
entered this world conflict with all its energy, and the successes it has already 
gained have startled its competitors. The kind of education, therefore, of 
value to these changed conditions, and best likely to train our citizens for 
their future work, will be the kind of education to which our schools will 
perforce adapt themselves. These modifications fall naturally into three 
divisions : education for commerce, education for trades and other industries, 
and education for agriculture. Our educational leaders must solve the prob- 
lem of how to adapt sufficient training in these lines to meet the demands of 
the age, and not destroy at the same time the* balance which has been main- 
tained in our curriculums with the more clearly cultural subjects, the broad 
and liberal training in which has been the source of our past strength and 
present power. This must not be sacrificed in the adjustment which must 
inevitably come, for to do so would be to remove the corner stone of the 
edifice. ' 

"I choose this term (Education for the Industries) because the term 
industrial training is invariably associated in the public mind with manual 
training, which is not all of what is meant. Education which trains for the 
work of the world, whether it be the arts, the trades, agriculture, mining, or 
commerce, is the subject which is engrossing more of public attention than 
any other in the educational field. The business and commercial world is 
asking in all seriousness if we cannot send out young men and women some- 
what better fitted for business conditions. There is no question about the 
training of those who are to enter the professional and technical fields, but 
for the workers in the varied industries there is doubt. Social life in th^s 
country has grown from simple needg to the complexity of the highest modem 
civilization with all the entailed obligations. Our education has grown and 
expanded with it. When the applications of steam and electricity from 1830 
to 1860 revolutionized the entire social structure, our education changed its 
form to meet the demands upon it. A revolution in industrial methods is 
going on to-day almost as marked, and our educational machinery must be 
remodeled sufficiently to meet it. Stripped of all verbiage our country is 
getting too large, and our needs too complex to train all children just alike. 
But the traditions and spirit of our country will not for a moment sanction 
the establishment, as in Europe, of two systems of instruction — one industrial 
and one cultural; one for working classes and one for governing classes. Our 
solution of the problem is forced to be a combination force ; the same for all 



1965 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxix 



ciildren in earlier years, with all which that implies of hope and opportunity, 
containing enough manual training to benefit all, and an option in the higher 
yean to afford the special training desired Jfor the work of life. How to adjust 
oar machineiy to the demands and the conditions, the kind and the extent 
of schools to be instituted to meet the requirements are our greatest problem 
to-dav." — Howard J. Rogers, (First Assistant State Superintendent of New 
York). 

The following remarks from Mr. E. L. Kemp, M. A., and from Miss 
Wilhelmina Seegmiller, Director of Art Instruction in the Public Schools of 
Indianapolis, add little that is new to Mr. Rogers' clear presentation, but 
gene to show how general the discussion of this problem has become. 

E. L. Kemp, A. M. 

Growth of Public Elementary Education, 

"It was characteristic of the social systems of the olden time to sacrifice 
the individual to the organization. The more ignorant and helpless the man 
was, the more completely he was suppressed and the more ruthlessly his 
claims to a man's ri'ghts were trampled upon. The tendency in the advanced 
civilizations of to-day is to sacrifice the organization for the individual, to 
m the machinery of government to lift up the man, increase his opportuni- 
ties, and otherwise promote his interests. In nothing else has this tendency 
been so clearly manifest as in the general effort to put a good education 
within the reach of all, nearly or quite at the public exx>ense. In nothing else 
did the civilization of the nineteenth^ century prove itself more beneficent, 
and the beneficence has already been justified by the results. The increased 
interest and participation of the masses of the people in the general life of 
the world, their increased productiveness, dignity, and comfort not only 
warrant what is now done, but also constitute a sufficient and urgent claim for 
broader and more generous effort in the future." 

Miss Seegmiller. 

"Since the congregation of the masses of people into great urban centres, 
children are deprived of sharing in the industrial occupations which on a 
time were necessary to the existence of the home. 

"Spinning and weaving, felling trees, tending stock, chopping wood, 
carrying water, were occupations which tended to the development of sterling 
qualities. 

"When the *No admittance' signs are prominent above the portals of 
the great centres of industrial activity to-day, there is little opportunity for 
children to enter into a sympathetic understanding of the present industrial 
forces. 

"When the home no longer provides opportunity for industrial occupa- 
tions and the centres of industrial activity are practically closed, it behooves 
the school for social, educational, and industrial reasons, to make provision 
for bringing children into sympathy with the great industrial forces which 
move the world and to provide opportunity for a measure of creative work in 
the fashioning of materials into forms of use and beauty. 

"The school recognizes the need, and educators who have at heart the 
Highest development of the three royal H's, the Head, the Heart, and the 
Hand, are earnestly endeavoring to provide for it. 

"Gathering together from widely scattered parts of the great continent 
we have varying experiences. 



XXX THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



f 



I 



4 



''Some base their creed upon race development, and from an historical 
study of the part industry has played in the upbuilding and maintaining of 
social life are fui^iishing stimulus for interest that children may re-live the 
experiences of the ages and the development in the manner of the race. 

''East and west and north and south there are special schools provided 
with every possible equipment. To those who are unhampered by difficulties 
we look for help in the establishment of ideals. j 

"There is the problem of the great cities where work must of necessity i 
be carried on under restrictions. \ 

"Among problems of interest are these: i 

"(1) What types of industrial work and materials are suited to primary i 
schools ? 

"(2) Is it best for girls to work with boys in the shops and for boys 
to cook? 

"(3) What can be done in inter-relating manual work with art study » 
games, music, history, literature? 

"(4) What is being done in gardening? 

"(5) With what freedon can children work along constructive lines? 

"(6) To what extent may manual work be used as seat occupation in 
grade schools ? 

"As manual work will demand much of our future educational endeavor 
these questions are of special import." 

III. The Public School Teacher. 

However perfect and efficiently administered an educational system may 
be, and however carefully a school curriculum may be designed, adequate 
results will not follow unless the teaching force is thoroughly efficient. One 
may go even' further and say that the teacher can make and unmake any 
educational system, and can bend to successful service a curriculum that is 
admittedly inferior. It is unfair, however, to this large body of men and 
women to environ them by conditions which hinder them in any degree from 
accomplishing the best service of which they are capable. Assuming however 
that all the necessary mechanical adjustments have been ihade, how can an 
efficient corps of teachers be provided for any state? Primarily, I venture 
to think, by exalting the teacher's office, and consequently the teacher's 
social position and influence. It is not to be expected that desirable and 
capable men and women will be attracted to a vocation, in which at best 
there is much that is wearisome and exacting, unless there are strong com- 
pensating advantages. The obligation and opportunity to create these rest 
primarily and largely with parents. When it is remembered that these men 
and women must prepare themselves for their duties by a long course of 
scholastic and professional training, and are finally rewarded often by less 
than a common laborer's wage, and occupy a social position far below that 
to which their knowledge and the importance of their work merit, it is small 
wonder that the profession is being gradually depleted, and that little per- 
manence is found. 

So far as this Province is concerned, the present situation is not reas- 
suring. The proportion of male teachers is rapidly decreasing, while the male 
recruits are so few that they may almost be disregarded. One public school 
inspector reports that he finds it increasingly difficult to get women teachers 
to take charge of rural schools, because of the isolation and other unfavorable 
conditions surrounding such positions. They will accept less remuneration 
in an urban school! 



1916 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxxi 



From nearly every county, complaint is made that the supply of quali- 
fied teacliers in inadequate. Inspectors are struggling to keep their schools 
open, and to this end the number of applications for temporary certificates 
or "permits" has been steadily increasing. These must be given, often, to 
the merest tyros. What shall be done P Shall the standards of qualifications 
of our teachers be reduced P I do not believe such a proposal would meet the 
approval of the least progressive board of trustees in this Province. At 
most, snch an expedient should only be a temporary one. The situation calls 
for vigorous and united action by parents, school officials and all concerned 
in school administration. 

Beverting to the teacher's qualifications and the importance of his work, 
tiie following remarks of that eminent French statesman, M. Guizot, may be 
Trailed. Although uttered many years ^go (in introducing educatio^nal 
legislation) to the French Chamber of Deputies, they are prudent and weighty 
Tords, and true to-day as they were true then, and will be true as long as 
die necessity for school masters exists. 

''All the provisions hitherto described would be of none effect if we took 
an pains to procure for the public school thus constituted an able master, and 
Torthv of the high vocation of instructing the people. It cannot be too often 
repeated that it is the master that makes the school. And, indeed, what a 
lell-assorted union of qualities is required to constitute a good schoolmaster I 
A good schoolmaster ought to be a man who knows much more than he is 
called upon to teach, that he may teach with intelligence and with taste ; 
nh is to live in ^ humble sphere, and yet have a noble and elevated mind, 
that he may preserve that dignity of sentiment and of deportment, without 
wMci lie will never obtain the respect and confidence of families ; who pos- 
sesses a rare mixture of gentleness and firmness, * * * * ^^^ 
obsequious servant of none — ^a man not ignorant of his rights, but thinking 
much more of his duties ; showing to all a good example, and serving to all 
as a counsellor; not given to change his condition, but satisfied with his 
riiuation, because it gives him the power of doing good, and who has made 
ip his mind to live and die in the service of primary instruction, which to 
Mm is the service of God and his fellow-creatures. To rear masters approach- 
ing to such a model is a difficult task; yet we must succeed in it, or else we 
hve done nothing for elementary instruction.^' ' • 

In most continental countries the schoolmaster is more highly esteemed, 
tis position more secure, and his future more assured than in either the 
United States or Canada. Some of these compensating advantages are 
referred to in a report prepared for the English Education Department, from 
^hieh a short extract is given. 

From Report of Alex. Morgan on the Training and Status of Primary and 
Secondary Teachers in Switzerland. (Dec, 1899). 

"This report will have shown that while teachers in Switzerland receive 
moderate compensation, they enjoy many compensating advantages. A safe 
pension to a large extent relieves them from the gnawing anxiety regarding 
age aud illness. They have comparative security of tenure, with the right 
of appeal to the central authority, and this, too, in one of the most democratic 
^^untries of the present day. Education is in Switzerland considered one of 
the chief duties of the State, and teachers are esteemed as public officials 
discharging an important function in the nation. Through their school 
chapters and school synods they have a voice in the ^school legislation of their 
country. Each chapter appoints a member of the School Committee of the 



xxxil THfi REPORT OF THE No. 12 



district, and the syn^d nominateB two of the 6even memberB of the Education 
Council of the canton, and thus the teachers have a share too in the admin- 
istration of their country.*' 

IV. Public School Inspectors. 

The duties of these oflBcers bring them into intimate relation with the 
many agencies concerned in the successful operation of the school. Upon 
them rests a large measure of responsibility, not onl;^ in seeing that the school 
regulations are observed, but in guiding and inspiring the teaching force, 
and in creating and sustaining popular interest and sympathy in the work 
and aims of the schools. 

In addressing by circular the Inspectors of New York State, Mr. C. R. 
Skinner, late State Superintendent, points out with admirable precision, the 
^uties and opportunities of these important officers, and calls upon them to 
give more than perfunctory service, and to become real educational leaders . 

Mr. Skinner says: — ''The importance of the work you have to do cannot 
be too greatly emphasized. You are determining, influencing and passing: 
upon standards of work, of systems and of conditions in all of the departments 
of the Public Schools throughout the State. The possibilities before you to 
help, aid and encourage to better conditions and to advance ideals are prac- 
.tically unlimited. It is therefore a work of the utmost responsibility, and 
you must spare no pains to keep yourself up to the times in all matters per- 
taining to it. You must devote what time you can to reading the best that 
there is bearing upon the work, and must miss no oppcHrtunity to converse 
with those who have had wide and successful experience and earned distinc- 
tion because of their work as tea^chers. All connected with the Public Schools 
must be made to feel that you are there to help, not to criticise; to build up, 
not to tear down; to encourage, not to find fault. Criticism will be needed 
and must l)e given, but it should be of the right kind, and should be given 
in the right manner and spirit. It should always be constructive, not de- 
structive.*' 

None of. the above remarks are made in a censorious spirit. The many 
difficulties which the Inspectors are called upon to meet, and the many 
limitations which hinder the best service are recognized. Here, as elsewhere, 
however, there must be strenuous endeavor, and a faith, hope and enthusiasm, 
which will prevent them from becoming weary in well doing. 

It is a matter for serious consideration by county councillors whether the 
number of schools assigned to each Inspector should not be considerably re- 
duced. A county inspector, who has the maximum number (120) permitted 
by the present statutes can give but little time, nor more than a day of each 
school year, in assisting, directing and overseeing the work of each. school. 
For only one day put of over 200 in each school year is the teacher under the 
immediate directing supervision of the inspector. He must, indeed, be a 
forceful man if he can awaken enthusiasms, which will survive the other 199 
days. Then, too, the frequent change of teachers is a constant source of dis- 
couragement and weakness. Against these and other difficulties, the inspector 
must certainly contend, and his reward should be commensurate with his 
endeavor and his ability. 

V. The Rural School Problem. 

In nearly every State of the Union to the south of us, and not less in 
Ontario than in many of these States, the "rural school problem" is engaging 
the serious attention of parents, teachers and legislatures. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxxiii 



Irr^Cpilar and small attendance, insufficient equipment, inadequate in- 
spection, the preponderance of the lowest grade of teachers, a curriculum 
not hitherto happily adjusted, and lack of provision for advanced instruction, 
all combine to make these schools as a clasp, far inferior to those in urban 
centres. 

In rural schools only 50 per cent, of the enrolled pupils are in daily 
.attendance; in town schools the percentage is 66, and in city schools 72 per 
cent. Thtifi it will be seen that in the first named schools there is a waste of 
nearly one-half of the educational energy. 

A well settled Ontario township of average size will have from twelve to 
fiirteen or eighteen school sections, each with its small school, its teacher 
and its school equipment. A neighboring village will have as large a school 
population with but half the number of teachers, and speakirg generally, the 
work of the urban school is superior to that of the rural schools. Of course 
there are exceptions but these are few. In the township schools twelve 
to eighteen separate buildings are to be erected and maintained while in the 
village school there is usually but one. Here again there is relative waste. 

In very few rural schools is work beyond the Entrance standard carried 
on, while nearly every village of any size has its continuation class or its 
High Scliool. Is not the rural population entitled to as advanced instruction 
as the nrban population? The urban boy or girl of brilliant promise, but 
whose parents may be in very humble circumstances, has at his door the 
opportunity for advancement, but to the rural boy or girl similarly placed, 
and with similar gifts, the path is barred. Of course urban life has been 
enriched by many a rural boy or girl whom no adverse circumstances could 
daunt, bnt what of those who are left behind? Those who believe that edu- 
cation is a benefit which should be diffused and not restricted, and who does 
not? can find no justification for the. continuance of conditions which give to 
one class of the community benefits from which others are excluded. 

Dlinois, Ohio, Iowa, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and many other 
States are wrestling with this problem. They claim to have solved it, at 
least partially, by the '^consolidation" of small weak rural schools into one 
strong central school. In many of the states named the plan is now past 
the experimental stage, and except in a very few instances there is no dis- 
position to return to the old order of things. Owing to the necessity, under 
this plan, of conveying pupils to the central school, the cost is somewhat 
greater than under the present plan of retaining the local school ; but if the 
people of this Province wish to advance they must be prepared to deal more 
generously with the schools. t. i mi i^r 

At present in Ontario there is but one consolidated school — The Mac- 
donald Consolidated Rural School near Guelph. The following report from 
the Principal of this school, Mr. J. W. Hotson, M. A., will give some idea 
of its 'woirhinff. 

•*It is one of the chief aims in the Macdonald Consolidated School at 
Guelph — and it should be of all rural education — to engender such an interest 
and love for country life that the boys and girls will not be lured away by 
the attractions of the city. j i. -u 

"I have great faith in the rural school, in its power to mould and build 
up a national character; but new educational methods must be used in order 
to secure the best results. In order to compete with our rivals in the world s 
markets — in order to equalize the advantages of country and city life,— m 
order to make our country life attractice enough to keep our bright boys and 
girls on thf^ farm, and thus maintain an intelligent, prosperous, progressive, 
and contented rural people,— we must give immediate and effective attention 

3*E 



xxxiv THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



to the needs of the rural school. A consolidated school makes it possible to 
so modify the curriculum that the development of the child is the ultimate 
aim and not the cramming of the mind with mere facts. 

"In the Consolidated School at Guelph, the New Regulations of the 
Department are followed quite closely, but the teachers put their own inter- 
pretation on them. They are reminded : 

"First, that they are dealing solely with rural children; 

"Second, that the majority of these children are going to spend their 
lives on the farm. 

"Keeping these two facts in mind an effort is made \o adapt the educa- 
tion to the special needs of the rural people. 

"In this undertaking there has been quite a marked degree of success. 
The parents are becoming more and more interested in the work of the school 
and show their appreciation of the work done by frequent visits and kind 
words of encouragenlent to the teachers. In connection with the school there 
is quite a strong organization, called The Association of Parents and Teachers, 
the object of which is to bring into closer relation the home and the school 
so that the parents and teachers may intelligently co-operate in the education 
of the children. 

"There have been many visitors at the Consolidated School the past year, 
and they invariably expressed themselves as being well pleased with it. 
Principal French, Director of Education in Lancaster, England, after his 
return from a visit to Canadian and American schools, says, *I was particu- 
larly pleased to see the working of the Consolidated School at Guelph, On- 
tario, which I consider has solved problems at present troubling many of the 
educational authorities in England.' 

"There are some advantages in connection with the Consolidated School 
at Guelph that have been quite marked. 

"1. There are seldom any late pupils. The vans are always on time. 

"2. The attendance is more regular. If there is one thing more than 
another that tends to discourage both teacher and pupils in rural schools, it 
is irregularity on the part of the pupils. 

"3. The' total attendance .has increased. The accompanying table gives 
a comparison of the total attendance, aVerage attendance, and percentage 
of attendance, during the first six months of 1904, before consolidation, and 
the first six months of 1905, under consolidation." 

Consolidated School, Guelph, 1905. 

Month. No. on Roll. Average Percentage. 

January 181 158. 87.84 

February 176 152.65 86.73 

March 177 159.65 90.19 

April 164 148.77 90.71 

May 195 178.29 91.43 

June 192 174.87 91.07 

Average percentage, 89.66. 

The Same Schools before Consolidation , 1904. 

Month. No. on Roll. Average Percentage . 

January 113 66,85 59.1 

February 99 64.11 64.7 

March 113 72.55 64.2 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxxv 



M^oj^th. No. on Roll. Average. Percentage. 

April 141 101.8 72.1 

May 146 105.27 72. 

June 144 98.27 68.1 

Average percentage, 66.8. 

Increase in Increase in 

Month. Total Attendance. Percentage. 

January 68 60.1 

February 77 77.7 

March 64 ^ 54!8 

April 23 16.3 

May 49 33.5 

June 48 33.3 

Average increase in total attendance, 50 per cent. 

VI. School Rooms. 

There has been much improvement in the school room accommodation in 
the Province of Ontario during the last ten or twelve years. Anyone ac- 
quainted with the conditions of country schools a quarter of a century ago 
will know how little provision was made for the comfort and health of the 
pupils. The old-fashioned box stove placed in the centre of the room has in 
many places given way to a furnace placed in the basement so as to heat the 
room with hot air, and thus save the children from constant disturbances in 
linnging in wood, and kee]ping up the necessary fire. It is to be hoped that 
at least in all the older parts of the Province improved systems of warming 
and ventilating school houses will soon become general*. It is a common 
tendency when the air of the school room becomes hot to raise a window, and 
let in the cold air from the bottom. As a consequence there is a direct draft 
upon tlie backs and shoulders of pupils sitting near the window. In very 
many cases ill health in later life can be traced back to carelessness in the 
method of ventilating and warming school rooms. 

The ventilation of the room from the bottom of the window is always 
dangerous to the health of pupils. Fresh air is very necessary. Foul air 
deteriorates the blood, and lowers the tone of the whole system. The fresh 
air should be introduced through the top of the window, and not through the 
bottom. If the window is not constructed so as to be lowered from the top, 
it should speedily be changed. Regarding this question of ventilation, Dr. 
W. T. Harris, Commissioner of Education for the TJ. S., remarks as follows : 

"I have said that all of the windows, and not some of them, should be 
lowered from the top. It will not do to fix one window alone and suppose that 
15 sufficient for the purpose of ventilating a whole school room. It will do 
wmething, but what it does will not be well done. For in order to affect the 
air of the whole room, it will be necessary to lower the window too much, and 
the consequence will be the creation of a too brisk current, the formation of a 
cataract of air, as it were, which will flow outward from the wall into the 
school room so far as to stike the pupils sitting nearest that window. All of 
the windows should be lowered, and no more than is necessary to produce the 
change of air in the whole room by the descent of a thin sheet of cold air 
down the windows and the wall to the floor. 

"This method of ventilating the rooms is not a matter of mere theory, 
hut has been tested by me during many years' practice. Any school room 
tlat has four windows to it may be ventilated by this process in a fairly ser- 
viceable way. But it is quite important that there should be ventilating 



xxxvi THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



flues at the bottom of the room opening into a large ventilating flue sur- 
rounding the smoke stacks which carry off the heat of the furnace. There 
is a sort of sour school room- air which the school visitor remembers vividly. 
This school room smell cannot be removed effectually except by ventilators 
at the bottom of the room. The ventilation by means of the tops of the 
windows that I have already described gives a fair supply of fresh air to all 
in the room, but it is not quite adequate to ren^ove this school room smell here 
spoken of. The ventilating flue at the bottom of the room opening into the 
smokestack is aupposed to draw the air out of the bottom of the room by the 
draft of the heated air ascending the smokestack. By the term 'smokestack' 
I refer to the iron pipes within the chimney through which the smoke and 
gases from the fuel escape up the chimney. A space left around this smoke- 
stack and open all the way to the top of the chimney furnishes the ventilating- 
flue which is found to do the service in school houses. When the building ^s 
not heated by furnace and the volume of air in the ventilating flues is not . 
heated, there will not be a draft sufficient to suck out the sour and fetid air 
from the bottom of the school room. An open fire place in some part of the 
school room will answer this purpose admirably if a small fire is kept up con- 
stantly, even in summer. A kerosene lamp of small size will do wonders by 
causing an ascending current of air which draws out the bad air at the bottom 
of the room. 

*'In case the room is heated by a stove, the stove should be a large one,, 
so that the door may be left open after the coal is ignited. The draft which 
carries the steam and gases up the chimney also draws out the bad air from 
the lower part of the room. In case wood is used, land an open door occasions 
too rapid combustion of the fuel, some other plan must be adopted. The old 
Franklin stove or fireplace makes the best ventilator, though a poor heater. 
Its heating capacity may be increased sufficiently by lengthening the pipe 
and carrying it around the top of the room before connecting it with the 
chimney. 

"I should have said above that when the outdoor temperature is 80^F., 
or above, the windows may be raised from the bottom a foot or so, and 
lowered from the top as much as possible. 

* 'There are devices of oblique boards placed at the bottom of the window, 
or at the top of it, which are intended to deflect the current of air upward, 
and thereby prevent its injurious effects on the shoulders of the pupils. I 
do not doubt that these devices are of some use, but in my experience I have 
never known them to be so good as the plan of lowering the windows from 
the top simply— -that is, one inch in cold weather, and a foot or more in mild 
weather, the reason, I suppose, to be this; that the oblique board serves to 
prevent the inflow of air when there is no breeze stirring outside the school 
room. For air, when still, refuses to climb over the oblique board, just as 
water, or any other fluid, refuses to climb over its bank. The oblique ar- 
rangement will only work when' the wind blows towards the school room. 

"Of all the methods of heating the school room by direct radiation, hot 
water pipes extending around the room connected with means of admitting^ 
fresh air under the pipes, is the best that I have seen. The steam coil is apt 
to overheat and injure the quality of the air, although this may be rendered 
unnecessary by a more liberal supply of coils. The stove and fireplace heat 
the school room unevnly, but they furnish a natural means of ventilation, 
while the steam coil or the hot water pipes demand some auxiliary process 
for ventilation, a process which is sometimes neglected, however. If ven- 
tilation is not provided for, the steam or hot water heating apparatus may- 
prove quite injurious to the health of the pupils." 



1905 . EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxxvii 



While the ventilation of the school rooms is a matter of greait importance 
to the physical welfare of the pupils, there is another element in school 
equipment which should not be overlooked. I refer to the element of artistic 
beauty as expressed in suitable school decoration and in architectural design 
of the school buildings. These appeal to the love of beauty so strong in young 
ciiildren and are surely matters of importance in any community which 
ispires to liberal culture. 

"There is great value," says President Eliot, ''in the sense of beauty. 
The enjoyment of it is unselfish . During the last twenty years philanthrop- 
']3t3 and educators have made wonderful progress in implanting and develop- 
ing' the senfie of beauty in the minds of the people. This is shown in the 
e^ablishment of public parks, cultivation of flowers and shrubs, and in the 
erection of beautiful buildings." 

"To go to school in a house well designed and well decorated gives a 
pleasure to the pupils, which is an important part of their training. To live 
in a pretty cottage surrounded by a pleasing garden is a great privilege for 
die country bred child. The boy who has been brought up in a New England 
fann house, overhung by stately elms, approached through an avenue of 
maples or limes, and having a dooryard hedged about with lilacs, will carry 
that fair picture in his mind through a long exile, and in his old age revisit 
:• with delight. When a just and kindly rich man builds a handsome place 
tor himself and family, his lavish expenditure does no harm to the commun- 
ity, but, on the contrary, provides it with a beautiful and appropriate object 
of sympathetic contemplation." 

When so many beautiful and inexpensive representations of great poets, 
statesmen and of historical events can now be so easily procured, there is 
little excuse for bare walls with all their depressing ugliness. 

VII. Technical and Manual Instruction. 

These important phases of educational effort form the subject of a special 
rpport which will be found in Part II. It is a mistake to suppose that these 
arp but modern fads. Hand training has formed part of the elementary 
» tool curricula of Germany, Austria, France, the Netherlands, Norway and 
*^weden, and of Great Britain for many years, while in Germany the pro- 
'.sions for technical instruction are at once the envy and despair not only 
f other nations of Continental Europe but also of America. In respect of 
toth of these departments Canada has shown a singular want of progressive- 
Bess. 

The introduction of manual instruction into the schools of Ontario, a 
few years ago, was due to the generoeity and far-sightedness of Sir William 
Macdonald, who has manifested such deep interest in all that concerns the 
intellectual development of Canadians. Since then considerable progress 
iias been made, and I am pleased to know that many school boards through- 
out Ontario are manifesting a desire to know more about this work, and 
that its introduction in several centres is being seriously considered. 

There is some tendency to confuse technical instruction, which is special 
ind directly applicable to the arts and industries, and manual instruction, 
Hhifh is a general subject and valuable for reasons which sustain other sub- 
iects in a school curriculum. There is much force in the advice of an Amer- 
>an educationist to "Put the whole boy to school." The constructive and 
rtrtistic aptitudes of children, as well as the intellectual and emotional 
aalures, require education. 



xxxviii THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



With the increase and specialization now taking place in our manufac- 
turing industries comes the necessity for preparing our young men and 
women for positions in which special knowledge and skill are required. 
To-day the great industries of the world are relying more and more upon 
the applications of scientific knowledge. From the trade schools and the 
technical schools and universities of Germany were sent forth a body of 
young men and women who have created industrial Germany and made it 
a formidable competitor for the world's commercial supremacy. 

It is gratifying to know that our Labor Councils, Boards of Trade, and 
Manufacturing Associations are alive to the importance of providing means 
to enable our own boys and girls to fit themselves to be the equals of skilled 
workers to be obtained anywhere. The days of the apprentice are passing 
and the school and school work shop, must supply their place. 

' yill. CoNTiinjATiON Classes. 

These clasess were called into existence several years ago in response 
to urgent representations that the ordinary public school courses were an 
insufficient preparation for the larger demands for intelligence, power and 
skill which industrial activity and competition were constantly making of 
labor. 

The work which these classes are doing, is practically that of the lower 
divisions of the High Schools. As yet, there does not appear to be any 
differentiation in the courses of study relating directly to the life of the com- 
munity in which the school exists. In this respect, they differ from many 
Continental Continuation Classes, whose programmes of study, while essen- 
tially liberal and cultural, yet contain the elements of some industrial or 
technical course relating to the predominating industry of the centre in which 
te school is situated. The suggestion made elsewhere, that considerable free- 
dom might be allowed in adapting courses to local interests, would probably 
be found more applicable to this class of schools, than to the elementary 
schools. 

For the academic year 1903-04, there were 419 of these schools. For 
1904-05, there were 482, showing a substantial increase of 63. The number 
of Grade A Schools (the highest grade) was, in 1903-04, 68; in 1904-05, 78. 
In this grade, the work done is that of the lower and middle divisions of the 
High School Course. In all but name, many of them are High Schools. 

Where these schools, as many of them do, confine their attention largely 
to the non-professional training of candidates for the teaching profession, 
there is some force in the suggestion to place them, for inspection purposes, 
under the jurisdiction of the High School Inspectors. 

IX. Rural Public School Libraries. 

The past year shows a gratifying increase in the number of rural schools 
establishing school libraries. At the end of the academic year in 1904, the 
number of these libraries was 773, upon which was expended the sum of 
18,195.70, of which the Legislature contributed |3,656.41. At the end of 
the academic year in 1905, the number of libraries was 1,231, an increase of 
458, or nearly 60 per cent. The amount expended in the same year vras 
111,641.85, of which |5,265.80 was contributed from Legislative grants. Tlie 
details are given in Appendix D, page 69, of this Report. 

In the County of Elgin, every rural school is now provided with, a 
library, a result which reflects great credit upon the local Inspector, and tKe 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. xxxix 



intelligence and liberality of the school supporters. Among other counties 
in which substantial increases were made during the year are, — West Bruce, 
Dundas, Elfirin^ Frontenac, North Hastings, East Huron, East Kent, East 
Lambton, Lincoln, East Middlesex, Perth, Prescott and Eussell, West Vic- 
toria, Wentworth, North York and Parry Sound. 

In my last report a very full reference was made to the value of these 
libraries as subsidiary school aids, and I therefore now merely note the splen- 
did achievement in this direction during the past year, and express the hope 
tiat each succeeding year will show at least equal advances, until we can 
Irfjast a well assorted library in every school in the Province. 

X. EuRAL School Gardens. 

In the jyractice of agriculture an eminent authority states that France 
Qour leads the world. ''In the last twenty-five years she has doubled the 
products of her farms. She encourages the minutiae of nature knowledge.*' 
France has 28,000 rural and elementary schools, each with a school garden 
and a "master capable of imparting a knowledge of the first principles of 
agriculture or horticulture." In Austria, in 1890, there were 8,000 school 
gardens. An Austrian school law says : "School inspectors shall see to it 
dut in country schools school gardens shall be established for agricultural 
nLtruction in all that relates to the soil, and the teacher shall make himself 
iilful in such instruction.'* In Sweden, in 2,016 schools, 22,000 school 
etildren yearly receive instruction in agriculture and horticulture. In the 
United States the movement is exciting great interest and many school boards 
bve made provisions for carrying on thi^ work. 

la Ontario, an essentially agricultural province, there are but six reg- 
ularly established and conducted school gardens ! Five of these are in the 
County of Carleton, and one in connection with the Macdonald Consolidated 
Rural School near Guelph. Regarding the former, Inspector Cowley writes : 
"Our gardens have had a very successful year and the idea has taken root 
in several other sections. I think we must have had small gardens during 
ie past year at nearly forty rural schools." 

The slight progress hitherto made in this Province is probably due to 
tbee main causes: (1) Lack of specially qualified teachers; (2) lack of defi- 
nite knowledge of the best methods of conducting such gardens; and (3) the 
disbelief in the ability of a school to give any instruction worth while in 
fattens relating to agriculture or horticulture. 

Begarding the last mentioned cause it may be noted that the same objec- 
tion was rex>eatedly urged against the attempt to teach trades and industrial 
occupations in the schools. It was held that the actual workshop is the only 
place in which the apprentice could receive proper instruction. The last 
forty yeaia have disproved this contention. Technical and trade schools are 
springing^ up everywhere throughout the United States and in Great Britain, 
ti well as in many of the countries of continental Europe and also in Japan. 
«)nr own Agricultural College at Guelph, our most famous technical and in- 
iugtrial school, has effectively demonstrated its usefulness to the farm. The 
experience of France, already referred to, proves that under proper direction 
tie resulting^ g&in to agriculture was intimately associated with the instruc- 
twn received in rural school gardens. 

At the Macdonald Institute, Guelph, special courses are given which 
rfl enable teachers to qualify themselves to properly direct this work. We 
aiay therefore hope for a considerable increase in the number of school gar- 
dens in each succeeding year. 



xl THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



XI, Schools fob the Blind, and Deaf and Dumb. 

At the beginning of 1905 the administration of the Institute for the Deaf 
and Dumb at Belleville, and of the Institute for the Blind at Brantford was 
transferred to my Department. 

The annual reports of the Principals of these schools will be found else- 
where in this report, and will furnish to those interested full information 
concerning the year's work. 

The problem of finding occupations suited to the very limited powers 
of those who are so heavily handicapped, will always be a difficult one. Even 
when such are found, and expert instructors engaged, it frequently happens, 
to the great discouragement of those who have so laboriously learned their 
trades or occupations, that their fields of labor are already occupied by those 
upon whom nature has not laid so great physical disabilities. Modern indus- 
try seems to know no sentiment of pity, and to exhibit no concern except 
where the annual dividend is liable to be affected. These schools could have 
no better friends than sympathetic employers of labor, whether corporations 
or individuals, who,- having positions which the graduates of these schools 
could fill, would reserve one or more to be open to the competition of these 
classes of deserving students. 

XII. University Report, Commission, etc. 

The annual statement of the President of the University of Toronto will 
be found in a subsequent part of this Report. The scope oTE university effort 
is yearly widening. The marked expansion in recent years of the Provincial 
University is a source of gratification to all its friends, and an increasing 
obligation upon the resources of the Province. This obligation was generously 
acknowledged by the Legislature at its last session by making large grants 
for university purposes. 

Further interest has also been manifested in its welfare by the appoint- 
ment of a coinmission to enquire into and report upon the best method of 
governing and administering its affairs. It is to be hoped that as a result 
of the commissioners' labors, a harmonious adjustment of all interests and 
powers will be secured, so that this great institution may render greater and 
more effective service to the Province, to the welfare of which it can so 
largely contribute. 

XIII. Educational Progress and Educational Goals. 

It has been the custom to give in previous reports opinions showing tte 
trend of educational thought. Last year several of the resolutions of tKe 
Dominion Educational Association at Winnipeg were published. The Na- 
tional Educational Association of the United States is one of the larg-est 
organizations of teachers and inspectors in the world. Its resolutions are 
always valuable. Several of its declarations made at the recent meeting* oj 
that body in 1905, are of interest to Ontario. They are as follows : 

**The National Educational Association notes with approval that tli< 
qualifications demanded of teachers in the public schools, and especially ii 
city public schools, are increasing annually, and particularly that in man^ 
localities special preparation is demanded of teachers. The idea that anyone 
with a fair education can teach school is gradually giving way to the cott^q: 
notion that teachers must make special preparation for the vocation of teact 
ing. The higher standard demanded of teachers must lead logically t< 



l!H):> EDUCATION DKPARTMRNT. xli 



higher salaries for teachers, and constant efforts should be made by all per- 
sons interested in education to secure for teachers adequate compensation f or 
*heir wort, 

'*Thc rapid establishment of township or rural high schools i« one of the 
most gratifying evidences of the progress of education. We believe that this 
movement should be encouraged until the children of rural communities 
eujoy the benefits of public education to an extent approximating as nearly 
a- practicable the education furnished in urban communities. 

"The association heartily approves of the efforts now being made to 
iptermine the proper place of industrial education in the public schools. 
We believe that the time ie rapidly approaching when industrial education 
Lould be introduced into all schools and should be made to harmonize with 
ilie occupations of the community. These courses when introduced should 
:. elude instruction in agriculture as Well as manual training, etc. Wher- 
^^ver the conditions justify their establishment, schools that show the appli- 

ution of the branches of knowledge to practical life, should be established. 
*'The X. E. A. regrets the revival, in some quarters, of the idea that the 
^>mmon school is a place for teaching nothing but reading, spelling, writing, 
iiid ciphering, and takes this occasion to declare that the ultimate object of 
f »piilar education is to teach the children how to live righteously, healthily, 

i«i happily, and that to accomplish this object it is essential that every school 
juiilcate the love of truth, justice, purity, and beauty through the study 
•: biography, history, ethics, natural history, music, drawing and manual 
.iris. 

"The National Educational Association wishes to record its approval of 
Ke increasing appreciation among educators of the fact that the building of 
haracter is the real aim of the schools and the ultimate reason for the ex- 
[tenditiire of millions for their maintenance. There is in the minds of the 
hildrpn and youth of to-day a tendency towards a disregard for constituted 
mhority, a lack of respect for age and superior wisdom ; a weak appreciation 
•t the demands of duty; a disposition to follow pleasure and interest rather 
lian obligation and order. T^his condition demands the earnest thought and 
.'lion of our leaders of opinion, and places important obligations upon school 
.uthorities. 

"The National Educational Association observes with great satisfaction 
hf tendency of cities and towns to replace large school committees or boards 
^iach have exercised through sub-committees executive functions, by sniall 
"urds which determine general policies, but entrust all executive functions 
" salaried experts. 

"Local taxation supplemented by state taxation, presents the best moans 

Hiip support of the public ^s(•bool8, and for securing that deep interest in 
• T!! which is necessary to their greatest efficiency. State aid should be 
i-riinted only as supplementary to local taxation, and not as a substitnlt* 
:-•! it." 

XIV. COXCLI'SIOX. 

In the preceding pages I have given a rapid summary of the principal 
lijatters which have engaged the attention of my Department during the pa.st 
vear. I regret that the general tone of my lieport is not more optimistic. 
Il rnnny directions serious and important work is to be done. To the suc- 
'Mul accomplishment of this I will give my best effort, which will, I feel 
N^ured, receive sympathetic and careful consideration from the people at 
i^nrc as well as from the Legislature. 
3*E. 



xlii THE REPORT OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



No. 1^ 



I cannot close this Report without reference to the loss which my Depart- 
ment and the cause of education in Ontario sustained in the death of the late 
Deputy Minister, — Mr. John Millar. During the fifteen years of zealous and 
prudent service which hQ rendered to the people of this Province, he always 
exhibited courtesy and patience in dealing with the public and sustained 
enthusiasm in the performance of his duties. 



E. A. Pyne, 
Minister of Education. 



Edxtcation Department, Tohonto, January, 1906. 



APPENDICES. 



I E. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX k.— STATISTICAL TABLES. 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

I. — Table A. —School Population, Attendance, etc. 



Counties, 

(including incorporated 
villages but not cities 
or towns) etc. 



S'2 9 

■^ 08 08 

Hi 



Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

6 Durham 

7 Elgin 

8 Essex 

9 Frontenac 

10 Glengarry 

11 Grey 

12 Haldimand 

13 Haliburton, S. Nipis- 

8infif,N.E. Muskoka 
and £. Parry Sound 

14 Halton 

15 Hastings 

16 Huron 

17 Kent 

18 Lambton 

19 Lanark 

20 Leeds and Grenville. 

21 Lennox & Addington 

22 Lincoln 

23 Middlesex 

24 Norfolk 

26 Northumberland 

26 Ontario 

27 Oxford 

28 Peel 

29 Perth 

30 Peterborough 

31 Prescott and Russell. 

32 Prince Edward 

33 Renfrew 

34 Simcoe&W. Muskoka 

35 Stormont 

36 Victoria AS. E.Mus- 

koka 

37 Waterloo 

38 Welland 

39 Wellington 

40 Wentworth 

41 York 

42 Rainy River & Thun- 

der Bav 

43 Algoma & Manitoulin 

44 N. Nipiseing, etc 

45 W. Parry Sound 

46 Moose Fort & Albany 



§•5 
1-^ 



3,640 
12,985 

9,161 
*4,971 

5,121 
♦5,106 

7,098 
10,248 

6,852 

4,545 
15,266 

4,805 



4,962 

4,198 

11,602 

13,777 

9,459 

10,747 

5,584 

10,502 

4,674 

♦4,418 

10,880 

*6,265 

6,724 

7,765 

8,498 

5,004 

8,198 

5,970 

12,267 

2,966 

11,941 

17,009 

4,845 



7,877 

7,526 

5,700 
10,649 

6,2511.... 
13,930 9 



6 
13 
15 
11 
35 
13 
20 
11 
44 
11 
52 

6 



45 

25 
6 
20 
12 
11 
42 
25 
17 
5 
26 
10 
13 



14 
7 
33 
9 
50 
40 
16 



^ 08 o» 



O 

p. S 



2,262 
6,713 
3,861 
5,117 
45 



Totals I 346,984 



24 
15 
16 



2,951 
10,068 
6,494 
4,271 
4,120 
4,241 
5,541 
6,183 
5,396 
3,763 
12,402 
3,586 



4,093 
3,158 
8,422 
9,593 
7,752 
8,629 
4,120 
8,540 
3,980 
3,529 
8,512 
5,128 
6,417 
6,553 
6,629 
3,670 
5,926 
4,666 
4,946 



787 



14,971 
3,73" 

6,268 
6,366 
4,821 
7,658 
4,617 
11,031 

1,776 . 
6,666 
3,085 
3,672^ 
34. 




264,6511 82 



2,959 
10,086 
6,512 
4,289 
4,155 
4,256 
6,562 
6,194 
5,440 
3,774 
12,459 
3,594 



4,138 
3,158 
8,447 
9,699 
7,773 
8,643 
4,134 
8,687 
4,006 
3,646 
8,618 
6,156 
6,480 
6,568 
6,630 
3,670 
5,941 
4,672 
4,981 
2,692 
7,362 
15,018 
3,753 

6,286 
5,375 
4,834 
7,676 
4,6171 
11,041 

1,776 
5,5941 
3,103' 
3,696| 

34| 



1,580 
5,275 
3,460 
2,252 
2,113 
2,154 
2,872 
3,159 
2,829 
1,960 
6,383 
1,876 



2,126 
1,633 
4,304 
4,997 
4,046 
4,49« 
2,088 
4,399 
2,069 
1,868 
4,470 
2,624 
2,833 
3,382 
3,430 
1,998 
3,150 
2,372 
2,546 
1,3"~ 
3,782i 
7,802 
1,924 

3,246 
2,914 
2,500 
4,056 
2,396 
5,930 

897 

2,858 

1,573 

1,880 

17 



265,520; 137,837 



1,379 
4,811 
3,052 
2,037 
2,042 
2,101 
2,690 
3,035 
2,611 
1,824 
6,076 
1,719 



2,012 
1,525 
4,143 
4,602 
3,727 
4,144 
2,046 
4,188 
1,937 
1,688 
4,048 
2,531 
2,597 
3,186 
3,200 
1,672 
2,791 
2,300i 
2,436 
1,254 
3,670 
7,216 
1,829 

3,040 
2,461 
2,334| 
3,620 
2,221 
6,111 

879 

2,736 

1,630 

1,816 

17 



127,683 



1,638 
5,450 
3,235 
1,902 
2,270 
2,292 
3,120 
3,068 
2,336 
1,756 
5,679 
2,208 



1,683 
1,683 
4,368 
5,6281 
3,985; 
4,910i 
2,304 
4,575, 
2,1341 
1,878 
4,790 
2,623 
3,011 
3,447 
3,819 
1,868 
3.518 
2,220 
2,412 
1,316 
3,230 
6,950 
1,973 

2,900 
3,364 
2,377 
4,191 
2,522 
5,734 

768 

2,525j 

1,384] 

1,531! 

22j 



65 
54 
50 
44 
55 
54 
56 
4S 
43 
4C 
4^ 
61 



4] 
5J 
52 
5^ 
61 
5: 
5< 
5J 
5J 
53 
6i 
5; 
b\ 
5! 
51 
5 
5 
41 
4 
5 
4 
4 
5 

4 

e 
4 

.1 
5 

A 
A 

4 

i 



136,5471 



* Estimated. 

la E. 



\m 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.— Continued, 
I. — ^Table A. — School Population, Attendance, etc. — Continued. 



Cides. 



iBeUeville .... 

t Bnntford 

SChatham 

4 Guelph 

5Hanultoii 

^ Kingston 

' London 

>>>gan Falls. 

5 Ottawa 

J St. Catharinee 
!1 St. Thomas. . . 
li&ratford 

'.I ToKffltO 

'4 Windsor 

U Woodstock . . . 

TotaJs 



Towns. 

1 Alexandria 

2AlJiston 

1 Ahnonte 

4 AxDheistboig . . 

3 Araprior 

^ AQTora 

" Aylmer 

5Earrie 

^Berlin 

'■ Blenheim 

^:Bothirell....... 

-Boinnanville .. 
-^ Bracebridge . . . 

^ Brampton 

''Erockville .... 
^ Brace Mines. . . 

"Cache Bay 

J5 Carleton Phice . 

'"•Clinton 

^ C<iboaig 

- CoUuigw<H)d . . 
^Copper Cliff ... 

3 Cornwall 

•' Dweronto 

"> Dresden 

JiDondag 

- r^mnTille 

> Dorham 

-^Eagt Toronto... 

SEasex 

J^FoTOt 

''-Fort Frances... 
'•Fort William., 
•^tialt 



s*^ o 

&|i 

CO 



1^ 



1,628 
3,852 
2,589 

*3,392 

14,366 
5,710 
8,934 
1,791 

17,455 
2,808 
2,773 
2,970 

53,663 
4,131 
2,157 



128,219 



490 

573 

865 

♦815 

1,111 

506 

497 

2,147 

2,961 

489 

231 

673 

800 

720 

2,412 

245 

365 

1,198 

603 

*980 

1,9 

297 

*2,097 

958 

475 

966 

560 

430 

♦1,036 

♦430 

360 

247 

1,087 

1,559 



IP 



> Ml 
O O 



1,269 
2,519 
1,548 
1,754 
8,166 
2,414 
5,790 
1,165 
5,177 
1,432 
1,961 
1,476 
30,007 
1,815 
1,552 



68,045 



78 
457 
372 
296 
578 
411 
407 

1,166 

1,539 
388 
211 
479 
705 
496 

1,258 
228 
156 
836 
443 
542 

1,398 
322 
635 
626 
410 
569 
445 
422 
777 
323 
293i 
197| 
763! 

1,3121 



CO 

■3 a "o 






1,269 
2,519 
1,548 
1,754 
8,166 
2,414 
5,791 
1,165 
5,177 
1,432 
1,961 
1,476 
30,011 
1,815 
1,552 



68,050 



79 
465 
372 
296 
578 
'411 
407 

1,166 

1,539 
388 
213 
479 
705 
496 

1,258 
228 
156 
836 
443 
542 

1,398 
322 
635 
626 
410 
569 
445 
425' 
777 
323 
293 
197 
768 

1,312 



I 



O 



P^ 






G 

'a a* 



8?! 

§5 ® 08 



645 

1,302 

804 

857 

4,136 

1,191 

2,896 

611 

2,652 

671 

967 

775 

14,951 

925 

760 



34,143 



44 

225 
187 
158 
278 
206 
176 
583 
780 
191 
115 
253 
340 
263 
598 
114 

57 
423 
229 
277 
716 
156 
321 
321 
192 
263 
223 
212 
395 
167 
123 

90 
400 
637i 



624' 

1,217, 

744 

897i 

4,030, 

1,223! 

2,8951 

554 

2,525i 

7611 

994' 

701 1 

15,060 

890 

792 



33,907 



818 
1,876 
1,043 
1,247 
6,096 
1,90" 
4,056 

729 
3,526 
1,007 
1,449 
1,108 
21,716 
1,294 
1,122 



48,994 



35 

240 
185 
138 
300 
205 
231 
583 
759 
197 

98 
226 
365 
233 
660 
114 

99 
413 
214 
265 
682 
166 
314 
305 
218 
306 
222 
213 
382 
156 
170 
107 
363; 
675j 



64 
74 
67 
71 
74 
79 
70 
63 
68 
70 
74 
75 
72 
71 
72 



72 



41 


52 


236 


51 


261 


70 


185 


62 


382 


66 


245 


59 


271 


66 


631 


54 


1,132 


74 


301 


78 


136 


64 


335 


70 


405 


57 


352 


71 


932 


74 


138 


60 


88 


56 


599 


71 


301 


68 


354 


65 


963 


69 


217 


67 


473 


74 


440 


70 


262 


64 


399 


70 


241 


54 


289 


68 


475 


61 


208 


64 


214 


73 


100 


51 


475 


62 


975 


74 



THE 1S.EPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.— ConfmM^d. 
I. — Table A. — School Population, Attendance, etc. — Continued. 



Towns. 



g-^ 






•3"o 

Hi 

I 



II 
§•31 






il^' I 



S « 

I o o 

I QD § 



««H 1 






OTT 






mber 
atten 
ool. 






§51 






3 = 3= 




■s 


Eh 


M 


O 



35 (xananoque 

36 Goderich 

37 Gore Bay 

38 Gravenhurst 

39 Haileybury 

40 Harriston 

41 Hawkesbury 

42 Heepelei' 

43 Huntsville 

44 Ingeraoll 

46 Kincardine 

46 KingBville 

47 Leamington .... 

48 LindBay 

49 Listowel 

50 Little Current . . . 

51 Maeeey 

52 Mattawa 

53 Meaford 

54 Midland 

55 Milton 

56 Mitchell 

57 Mount Forest 

58 Napanee 

59 New Liskeard . . . 

60 Newmarket 

61 Niagara 

62 North- Bay 

63 North Toronto... 

64 Oakvirie 

65 Orangeville 

66 Orilha 

67 Oshawa 

68 Owen Sound 

69 Palmerston 

70 Paris 

71 Parkhill 

72 Parry Sound 

73 Pembroke 

174 Penetanguishene 

76 Perth 

76 Peterborough . . . 

77 Petrolea 

78 Picton 

79 Port Arthur 

80 Port Hope 

81 Prescott 

82 Preston 

83 Rainy River 

84 Rat Portage(Kenora) 
86 Renfrew 

86 Ridgetown 

87 St. Mary's 

88 Sandwich 

89 Sarnia 



971 

991 

*372 

698 

150 

403 

1,327 

614 

670 

1,245 

5361 

483 

680| 

1,844 

817 

*426 

287 

183 

♦568 

1,360 

510 

638 

563 

650! 

360, 

671 1 

218 

1,227| 

628| 

6031 

9621 

1,522 

1,641 

2,570 

680 

945 

330 

*950 

1,631 

831 

1,046 

3,296 

*1,112 

7831 

1,198 

1,038| 

739| 

524 

2501 

1,100 

1,040 

552, 

860 

6211 

2,670i 



749 

567 

287 

620 

117 

326 

136| 

4991 

657 

736 

48.^ 

367 

445 
1,132 

642 

319 

198 
74 

426' . . 

975 .. 

388 . . 

374; . . 

398 

529 

242 

416 

215 

685 

520 

331 

537 

950 

806 
1,672 

3631 

513 

263 

858 

631 

634 

488 
1,890 

834 

599 

797 

828 

435 

3841. 

198. 

849'. 

4401. 

4461. 

557|. 

1631. 
1,469,. 



749 
567 i 
289| 
620, 
117| 
326i 
136 
499 
557' 
736 
485, 
367' 
445 
1,132, 
542 
3191 
198! 
74 
426! 
976 
388. 
374| 
398. 
529 
242 
416 
215 
585 
5201 
332 

537: 

960! 
806, 

1,6721 
3631 
513 
253i 
858^ 
631, 
634| 
488 

1,890 
834' 
599 
7971 
828' 
435 
3841 
198 
849 
440' 
446| 
567' 
163, 

1,4691 



381 1 
263| 
137 
314 

48 
162 

78 
2741 
279 
379; 
2.36! 
184 
218| 
647! 
288i 
I43I 
105; 

44 
203 
479) 
214 
180i 
218' 
231 
117| 
206 

nil 

295! 
246; 
173' 
240) 
468| 
383i 
8001 
1841 
278 
126 
403 
323 
339 
260 
944 
413 
313 
394 
403 
192 
188 

98 
423 
228 
220 
293 

84 
691: 



368 
294 
152' 
306 

69 
164 

58 
226 
278' 
367 
250 
183 
227 
585 
264 
1761 

93i 

301 
223| 
496 
174| 
194 
I80I 
298| 
126 

2ir 

104 1 
2901 
274 
1591 
297I 
4821 
422 
872 
179 
236 
127 
455 
308i 
295 
238! 
9461 
421 
286: 
403i 
425! 
243 
196i 
10(>! 
426| 
212 
226 
264 
79 
778, 



^^ ,1 


C5 


>^<t N- 




9 ^ .0 


" r 


* £= a> C c 


§ « 5 i| 


II 


< !a, 




518, 


69 


390! 


70 


151 i 


62 


388, 


63 


49 


42 


201 


62 


83 


61 


323 


65 


335 


60 


528 


72 


246| 


51 


234' 


64 


2851 


(H 


809 


71 


339 


62 


163 


51 


88' 


44 


32 


43 


279 


65 


6H5 


65 


231 ; 


59 


258 


09 


281 


71 


344 


65 


133 


55 


311 i 


75 


122 


57 


367 


63 


314 


60 


221 


66 


354 


66 


610 


64 


529j 


66 


1,205' 


72 


235 


65 


349 


6*^ 


139 


55 


518, 


6(] 


443| 


7G 


389l 


61 


35.'i 


7:^ 


1,345 


71 


652 


6* 


380 


(M 


488 


61 


660 


6* 


280| 


(>^ 


278. 


7\ 


691 


8i 


470 


5i 


382! 


7\ 


277; 


6 


39ll 


7i 


85 


5 


1,0411 


7 



m 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS— Ccmimt/ed. 



I.— Table A. — School Population, Attendance, etc. — Concluded. 




^)KtoltSte, Marie.... 

i^l Scaforth...- 

^ Simcoe 

S Smithes Falls 

5*4Stayner 

^ Steelton 

5^6 >^rathn)y 

97 Stuigeon Falls 

>* ^bniT 

^ Thegsalon 

M Thombarv 

iOl Thorold.: 

>£ TillBonbnig 

M Toronto Junction... 

IM Trenton 

KJ5 Uxbridge 

'QSVankkekHill 

lOT Wdkerton 

•JT6 Walken-ille 

jl^ WalUceborg 

ilO Waterloo 

i:i Welland 

:i2 Whitby 

13 Wiarton 

:i4 Wingham 



1,881 
588 
654 
*1.397 
351 
700 
750 

1,800 
525 
483 
180 
564 
689 

2,416 

1,164 

462 

*589| 

774i 

606 

»l,a37l 

709' 

395| 

650 

*878 

785 



Totals 101,334 



Totals. I 

:i Coontie?, etc ; 346,984 

-tltieg I 128,219 

^Towne 101,334 



4 Gnod totals 1904 .. J 576,537 
^ Grand totals, 1903. .. | 577,383 



*I»e:reafle8 



846 



* Peroentagw. 



I 



1, 
269 
480 

1,048 
286 
454 
492 
238 
224 
381 
162 
367 
433 

1,453 
594{ 
320| 
171 1 
4251 
330| 
642i 
582, 
282' 
387 
659| 
574 



3 63,226! 15 



I 



787 264,651, 82 

, . . . 68,045 5 

31 63,226' 15 



1,297 
2691 
4801 

1,048' 
2861 
454 
492! 
238 
224 
381 
162 
367 
433 

1,453 
594: 
3201 
172 
425 
330 
642 
582 
282i 
3871 
659 
5741 



655i 
133; 
243| 
499' 
161 1 
239| 
244 
114' 
119 
190 

88 
170 
217 
730 
306| 
150: 

90 ' 
202 
161 
329 

3ir 

159, 
196 
329 
260; 



642! 

13«! 

23: 

549 

125 

215 

248i 

124 

105! 

191 

74 
197 
216 
723 
288 
170 

82 
223 
169 
3131 
271 
123 
191 
330 
314 



8491 

219 

294J 

738' 

178 

238 

347 

126] 

1381 

189 

111 

208 

308 

957 

374 

221, 

114 

310, 

245, 

398i 

424; 

1821 

246i 

422^ 

3991 



790 395,9221 102 
9171 402,138 106 



127 6,216' 4 



.20; 99.77| .03 



265,520 137,837, 127,683' 136,547 
68,050 34,143 33,907 48,994 
63,244| 31,437' 31,807^ 41,624 



65 
81 
61 
70 
62 
62 
70 
53 
61 
50 
68 
57 
70 
66 
63 
69 
66 
73 
74 
62 
73 
64 
64 
64 
69 



63,244 31,437' 31,807' 41,624| 66 



51 
72 
66 



396,814 203,4171 193,397 
403,161, 206,7941 196,367 



227,165 f^7.25 
230,7301 57.20 



.05 



6,347 3,377 2,970| 3,565! 



51.26 48.74, 57.251 



'&tiinated. 

t IneladiDg Protestant Separate School. 

: Iq iDcoiponted villages, included in Counties, etc., there were 27,479 pupils, >vlth an average daily attend- 

K.n dt 17.J28. 

fiiodeffvten and Night School pupils are not included. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
II. — Table B. — Number of pupils in tin 



Counties 

(including incorporated 

villages, but not cities 

or towns), etc. 



Beading. 



S^ 



to 



B 



C5 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Durham 

7 Elgin" 

8 Essex 

9 Frontenac 

10 Glengarry 

11 Grey | 

12 Haldiniand 

13 Hali burton, etc 

14 Haltoii 

15 Hastings 

16 HuiHjn 

17 Kent 

18 Lambton 

19 Lanark 

20 Iseeds and Grenville. . 

21 Lennox & Addington. 

22 Lincoln 

23 Middlesex 

24 Norfolk 

25 Northumberland 

26 Ontario 

27 Oxford 

28 Peel 

29 Perth 

30 Peterborough 

31 Presoott and Russell . . 

32 Prince Edward 

33 Renfrew 

34 Simcoe & W. Muskoka 

35 Stormont 

36 Victoria and S. E. 

Muskoka 

37 Waterloo 

38 Welland 

39 Wellington 

40 Wentworth 

41 York I 

42 Rainy River & Thun- 

der Bav 

43 Algoma ic Manitoulin. 

44 N. Nipissing, etc 

45 AV. Parry Sound 

46 Moose Fort & Albany. 



587 
2,357 
1,474 

992 

874 

703 
1,178 
1,643 
1,313 
1,128 
3,072 

683 
1,303 

693 
2,432 
1,537 
1,841 
2,120 

923 
1,842 

912 

805 
1,637 
1,157 
1,177 
1,473 
1,304 

731 
1,049 
1,163 
1,567 

488 
2,099 
3,414 

855 

1,405 
1,090 
1,116 
1,530 

872 
2,628 

532 

1,743, 

1,1891 

l,12li 

12 



410 

1,489 
927 
591 
516 
632 
622 

1,276 
776 
614 

1,833 
515 
661 
441 

1,457 
963 

1,052 

1,458 
666] 

1,209 
552 
503 

1,090 
657 
712 
936 
981 
469 
751 
730 
865 
291 

1,247, 

2,280' 
525 



891 
762i 
674 
915' 
606 
1,489 

27' 
918 
601 
560 
6 



476 

1,930 

1,150 

713 

1,110 

954 

1,013 

1,247 

952 

830 

2,670 

693 

780 

498 

1,659 

1,840 

1,354 

1,480 

765 

1,568 

7311 

584! 

1,524 

1,070 

1,160 

1,159 

1,129 

654 

1,051 

877 

810 

458 

1,390 

2,794 

913 

1,217 
1,306 

881 
1,386 

828 
2,001 

350 
983 
535 
656. 
6 






712 

2,021 

1,139 

914 

726 

914 

1,089 

1,169 

1,158 

471 

2,521 

699 

772 

621 

1,539, 

2,030i 

1,378 

1,662 

849 

1,713 

808 

728 

1,^ 

945 

1,128 

1,287 

1,343 

803 

1,637 

885 

768 

454 

1,284 

2,875 

661 

1,321 
1,248 
954 
1,628 
1,150 
2,373 

357 

967 

. 511 

703 

71 



641 

1,805 

1,388 

877 

675 

865 

1,199 

742 

1,148 

641 

1,970 

829 

516 

763 

1,062 

2,353 

1,470 

1,472 

750 

1,918 

839 

869 

1,845; 

1,120 

1,082 

1,470 

1,431 

H46 

1,206 

912 

790 

679 

1,061 

2,790 

625 

1,163 
760i 
977 

1,717 
953 

2,299 

235 
871 
244 
540 

2' 



133 

484 
434 
202 
254 
187 
461 
117 

93 

90 
393 
175 
106 
142 
298 
876 
678 
451 
181 
337 
1641 

57 
522 
206 
171 
243 
442 
167 
247 
105 
181 
222 
271 
865 
174 

288 
209 
232 
400 
208 
251 

25 
112 

23 
115i 

1; 
-I- 



2,928 
9,706 
6,512 
4,235 
4,107 
4,255 
5,493 
6,119 
5,406 
3,774 

12,206 
3,594 
3,978 
3,158 
8,410 
9,519 
7,707 
8,563 
4,134' 
8,393 
4,006 
3,388 
8,518 
5,070 
5,272 
6,351 
6,483 
3,597 
5,805 
4,549 
4,634 
2,585 
6,785 

14,712 
3,753 

6, 131 1 
5,273' 
4,8261 
7.569i 
4,617 
10,730j 

1,762 
5,382, 
2,694| 
3,431 
34' 



2,951 
9,819 
6.512 
4,282 
4,134 
4,255 
5,634 
6,095 
5,406 
3,774 

12,058 
3,594 
3.9531 
3,1581 
8,415 
9,435 
7,707 
8,599 
4,134' 
8,386 
4,006| 
o,3Tb4| 
8,518 
5,104 
5,339 
6,429 
6,574 
3,662 
5,912 
4,556 
4,844 
2,586 
7,001 

14,863 
3,688 

6,133 
5,a34 
4,832 
7,529 
4,617 
10,743 

1,748 
5,383 
2,783 
3,514i 
29! 



2,92 
9,57 
6,51 
4,13 
3,9€ 
4,17 
5,45 
6,0€ 
5,4C 

3,7-; 

11,9( 
3,51 
3,6< 
3,K 
8.2^ 
9,2^ 
7,7( 
8,4i 
4.1i 
8,1! 
4,0 
3,0 
8,5 
5,0 
5,0 
6,3 
6,1 
3,5 
5,5 
4,3 
4,4 
2,5 
6,1 

14,4 
3,i 

6,C 

4,': 

7,1 

4,< 

10,1 

1, 

5J 
2, 
3, 



Totals |61,764 38,396 50,135! 52,822. 50,410! 11,9931 260,154; 261,272| 254, 



1!W5 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



SCHOOLS.— Coftfifitied. 
Tarioos bnnchee of instraction. 




^889 

3 i474i 

4 1911; 

f? 3.015 

: 4,530; 

^3,840 

« 3.504 
:0 2,408 
:i 9,3&5 
11 3.106 

14 2,330 
^ r;,028 

> 7,341 
IT n,618 
l< 5.S32 
13 2.h79 

^: 2,856 
iJ2406 
■::? fi.S92 
:4 :i7l2 
1^5 3,979 
-^ 4,379 
.7 4,916 

> 2,751' 
S 4,475 
31 3.317 
31 2.641 
t: 2.018 
^^ 4,040 
-4 9.614 
^3 2.7-21 

'i 4.447 

<: if<2S 

^ 3.176 
i^ 5.307 
Mj 3,342 

t1 T,9«5 

42 1,245 

43 2,801 
+4 1,434 
4-1 2,260 



1,873 
4,778! 
2,823! 
2,282 
2,444 
2,260 
3,573 
2,761 
2,416 
8721 
6,588 
1,778 

1,163: 

1,3291 
3,8421 
4,938 
4,400 
4,587i 
1,352| 
4,268| 

1,599 
6,309 
3,259 
1,921 
3,192 
3,344 
1,400 
4,755 
1,626 
1,542 
1,125 
1,197 
8,215 
1,089 

2,933, 
3,098 

2,350' 
3,784 
2,420 

6,405 
833 

1,547 
540 

1,122. 
34 



2,127 
6,63t 
4,481 
2,647 
3,131 
2,561 
4,036 
3,436 
3,119 
2,20li 
8,087 
2,677| 
l,876j 
2,312 
5,256' 
6,786 
5,159j 
5,740 
2,503 
5,847 
2,518 
2,299 
6,433 
3,562 
3,804 
4,312 
4,464 
2,343 
4,13ll 
2,754 
2,796 
1,923 
3,793 
8,943 
2,462 

4,105' 
3,099 
3,131 
4.906, 
3,1711 

7,680 
1,082 
2,712 
1,081 J 
1,892" 
111 



968 
2,648 
2,143. 
1,335 
1,070 

806 
2,219 
1,002 
l,620l 

7641 
3,098; 
1,247 

854! 
1,1211 
1,660 
3,201 
2,631; 
2,386 
1,0441 
2,941 
1,230 
1,123 
3,221 
1,568 
l,104i 
2,2591 
1,932| 

1,533: 

1,641 ; 

1,196- 
1,032 
1,035 
1,525 
4,316 
1,037 

1,606 

772; 

1,475 
2,235! 
1,389 

3,509 
371, 

1,188. 

385 
745 



1,389 
4,116 
2,522 
1,865 
1,383 
1,054 
2,871 
1,953 
2,093' 
943| 
5,066; 
1,472 
1,107 
1,475 
2,991 
4,820 
3,216, 
3,563 
l,568l 
3,724: 
1,595 
1,424 
4,225 
2,061 
1,6011 
1,9111 
2,795 
1,728! 
2,848' 
l,629t 
1,475 
1,190; 
2,124 
6,1791 

1,198; 

2,200 
1,775 
2,054 
3,180 
2,093 

4,262* 
670 

1,667! 
624 

1,232 



l,302i 

4,558 
2,177; 
1,756 
l,649j 
1,134 
3,162 
4,998 
1,977 
936 
7,966 
1,500 
1,005 
1,434 
5,175 
3,246 
3,491 
3,854 
1,291 
3,430 
1.6501 
1,541' 
5,337i 
1,859; 

1,541; 

2,523 
2,563 
1,284 
1,884 
1,565 
1,436 
1,475 
1,545 
5,646 
1,188! 
I 
1,8271 
1,226 
1,723 
3.038 
1,269 

4,463 
7351 

l,489i 
530' 

1,055, 



1,843 
5,087 
2,632 
2,660 
2,466 
1,810 
3,680 
3,266' 
3,2261 
1,625, 
7,962 
2,389| 
1,704. 
2,210 
5.773 
4,278 
2,706 
5,546 
2,247 
3,897' 
1,827| 
942 
5,899' 
2,668 
2,327 
2,585 
2,869 
1,788 
4,820 
1,819 
2,551 
1,570 
1,819 
10,405 
1,628 

2,441 
2,686 
2,060 
3,774 
2,343 

5,920 
694 

1,490 
388 

1,605 



108 
391 
375 

187 
211 
141 
404 
133; 
77' 
84 
4:^9 
184: 
110 
140 
782 
773 
642 
368 
125 
288 
132 
621 
509' 
202i 
244' 
237 
345 
167 
226 
106 
180' 
225! 
283. 
962, 
162. 

289; 
175: 
242. 
351 
208 

263- 
40 

105 
42 

104 



117 
464 
406 
192 

241 
155 
420 
106 

68' 

84 
365 
140; 

95! 
138 
286 
830 
677 
406 
170 
311 
139 

631 
496 
190 
178 
209 
444 
167 
221 
100 
162 
212 
266. 
849; 
155i 

I 
269! 
163 
2211 
364' 
214 

233 
34 
95 
25 

108 



107 
447 
359 
187 
236 
149| 
477 

98! 

59 

77 
341 
114 

90 
138 
264 
823 
670' 
371; 
165 
298! 
127i 

371 
487, 
180 
168i 
1981 
389. 
167: 
212 

96; 

150 
164 
242 
816 
249 

258 
142 
209 
360 
194 



2111 
211 
92J 
25 

106' 



139 100 

258! 277 

343- 331 

591 148 



169 

105 

703 

55 

98 
63| 



256 
242 
174 

21 
107 
300 
129 
102 

89 



214 
161 
195 
380 
43 
522 
101 



155 
142 

284 



103 
47 

293 
49 

46 



340! 149 

2291 95 

18, 15 

65' 55 

311; 91 

596 279 

647 141 



226 
98 

175 
45 
83 

1981 

II3I 
37 
49 



229 251 

2' 18 



222 
105 
59 
50 
37 
473, 
57 



143 
34 

232 
312| 176 
255' 91 



235 


1 
104. 


8 


10' 


39 


78 


10 


7 


31 


12 







292 

798 

906 

636 

1,103 

227 

1,136 

733 

521 

147 

1,604 

1,302 

118 

444 

697 

1,791 

2,293 

1,076 

216 

1,171 

614 

474 

2,348 

1,059 

494 

525 

745 

123 

1,191 

179 

613 

903 

460 

2,486 

508 

423 

400 

335 

1,099 

1,045 

758 
61 

172 
44 

241 



1<*.827 128,O5l!l70,019| 74,184!l02,92l!l06,332 135,825|ll,823;il,248'10,770| 8,93115,4101 34,509 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
II. — Table B. — Number of pupils in the 



Reading:. 



Cities. 









& 



c 



X 

CO 



V 

X 



X 



.s 

•c 



a 






1 Belleville 

2 Brentford 

3 Chatham 

4 Guelph , 

5 Hamilton 

i\ Kinmton 

7 London 

8 Niagara Falls . 

9 Ottawa 

10 St. Catharines 

11 St. Thomas . . . 

12 Stretford 

13 Toronto 

14 Windpor 

15 Woodstock . . . 



298 
511 
296 
328 

1,221 
560 

1,036! 
360 

1,017 
a51 
519 
280 

5,678 
562 
395 



Totals ,13,412 



223 
346 
214 
212i 

1,0531 
295; 
745, 
138| 
688| 
195 
229 
228 

3,572 
292 
237 



251 
395 
319 
250 

1,247 
295 

1,430; 
186! 
71 3l 
239' 
354i 
234 

6,618' 
367 
262 



8,667 13,16016,154 



236 
726 
338 
503 

2,250 
629 

1,338 
232 

l,a52 
370 
469 
389 

6,552 
405 
3a5 



53! 



Towns. 

1 Alexandria . . . 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherst burg .. 

5 Arnprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Aylmer 

8 Barrie 

9 Berlin 

10 Blenheim 

11 Bothwell 

12 Bowmanville. . . 

13 Bracebridge 

14 Brampton 

15 Brock vi lie 

16 Biuce Mines. . . 

17 Cache Bay 

18 Carleton Place. 

19 Clinton 

20 Cobourg 

21 CoUingwood . . . 

22 Copper Cliff... 

23 Cornwall 

24 Deseronto 

25 Dresden 

26 Dundae 

27 Dunnville 

28 Durham 

29 East Toronto... 

30 Essex 

31 Forest 

32 Fort Frances... 



15 


4| 


56 


64 


66 


72 


54 


58 


173 


107 


145 


49 



261 

488 

381i 

;^^3; 128 
l,885i 510 

6a5' 
1,242 

249 
1,229 

277 

390 

345 
6,416 

189 

293 



178 



14,613 



64 

251 

246 

57 

31 

97 

208 

98 

260 

52 

58 

223 

92 

90 

399 

150 

1901 



0/ 

150 

242 

83 

26 

62 

91 

83 

175 

19 

19 

157 

62 

83 

219 

37 

99 



217 


167 


104 


85 


159 


ia5 


71 


72 


76 


56 


264 


129 


98 


75 


76 


55 


! 40 


47 



19 
76 
94 
61 
111 
84 
83 
294 
412, 
80 
29 
95 
141 
97 
267! 
53 
37 
167 
1171 
1051 
195 
61. 
118| 
1091 
55i 
58 
107, 
85' 
118i 
51 j 
501 
351 



?1 

77 

69 

45 

102 

67 

116 

226 

391 

78 

28 

HI 

138 

136 

265 

31 

23 

135 

104 

136 

295 

34 

142 

95 

52 

138 

79 

60 

149 

62; 

36, 

40 



20 

63 

71 

40 

85 

66 

87 

245 

248 

52 

38 

■114 

58 

82 

291 

28 

154 

68 

128 

290 

29 

86 

38 

56 

109 

116 

49 

117 

37 

76 

18. 



1,175 



2,044 



1,269 
2,519 
1,548 
1,754 
8,166 
2,414 
5,791 
1,165 
5,177 
1,432 
1,961 
1,476 
30,011 
1,815 
1,552 



68,050 



129' 



38 



38 
61 



1,269' 
2,519 
1,548 
1,754| 
8,166 
2,4141 
5,791 
1,165 
5,177 
1,432 
1,961 
1,476> 
30,011 
1,815| 
1,5521 



45 
2 



11 



58 



171 



1,269 
2,519 
1,548 
1,754 
8,16*> 
2,414 
5,783 
1,165 
5,177 
1,432 
1,961 
1,476 
27,937 
1,815 
1,552 



68,050) 65,968 



79 


79 


79 


465 


420 


420 


372 


372 


372 


290 


295 


290 


578 


578 


578 


411 


411 


411 


407 


407 


407 


1,166 


1.166 


1,166 


1,539 


1,539 


1,539 


388 


388 


a^o 


213 


213 


195 


479 


479 


479 


695 


705 


695 


496 


496 


496 


1,258 


1,258 


1,258 


208 


228 


208 


156 


156 


156 


836 


836 


836 


443 


443 


443 


542 


542 


542 


1,398 


1,398 


1,898 


322 


322 


322 


635 


635 


6i^ 


626 


626 


626 


410 


410 


322 


569 


569 


569 


445 


445 


374 


376 


425 


376 


777 


777 


777 


323 


323 


1 323 


293 


293 


293 


197 


197 


1 197 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



SCHOOLS.— C<mh«ti«f. 

variooB branches of infltruction. — Continued. 



1 



5P 



3 



5?. 



o 

X 

.a 






.5 



-s 






•is 
1^ 



'>. 












ii 


s 


i 


^ 


X 




1- 


M 

1 




8 


1 


Elem 



£ 

9 



1 899 


533 
2,519 
1,548 
1,606 
8,136 
2,414 
5,791 

' '2,4i8 


i',i85 

27,937 
1,186 
1,552 


732 
1,837 
1,548 
1,754 
6,945 
1,850 
5,191 

667 
2,759 

886 

1,213 

1,012 

29,056 

1,523 

658 


261 
679 
847 
333 

3,128 
710 
790 
415 

1,407 
277 
390 
400 

5,346 
210 
293 


497 

1,366 

948 

838 

4,628 

1,208 

1,846 

563 

2,759 

460 

859 

522 

8,048 

781 

658 


497 
2,519 
1,169 

838 
5,127 
2,414 
5,630 

854 
2,759 

460 
1,961 

890 

23,0a5 

1,712 

920 


1,015 
2,519 
1,548 
1,698 
8,166 
2,414 
5,526 












2 2,519 


53 








230 


:> 1,368 










4 1,140 


128 
510 











5 6,906. 

6 l,746l 


499 


371 
635 


790 


286 


7 5,484 






1 


8 a58 











9 2J59 


5,177 
1,432 
1,961 
1,476 
9,778 
1,457 
1,552 


178 


178 








10 1,081 










U 1,213 
12 1,003 


















• 








13 28,208 

14 1,548 


3,154 


2 




163 




1,103 


15 920 


1 




















57,752 


56,825 


57,631 


15,486 


25,981 


50,755 


45,719 


4,023 


679 


1,006 


953 


516 


1,103 


1 60 


'"465 

60 

262 

578 

345 

"826 
1,539 
220 
93 
479 
646 
496 
1,258 
124 
77 
836 
443 
157 
944 
322 
635 
408 
244 
569 
272 
277 
777 
264 
255 
197 


60 
436 
237 
286 
578 
411 
286 
834 
639 
246 
182 
320 
705 
496 

1,258 
157 
79 
456 
284 
369 

1,398 
322 
246 
409 
281 
3a5 
302 
361 
582 
180 
293 
110 


20 

428 

71 

78 

85 

66 

87 

587 

176 

90 

99 

114 

127 

82 

556 

73 

19 

154 

68 

128 

406 

40 

86 

38 

166 

109 

57 

99 

117 

37 

76 

35 


41 
428 

99 
123 
187 
133 

87 
685 
248 
168 

99 
225 
255 
218 
556 
157 

42 
202 
172 
310 
509 

74 
228 
133 
166 
305 
173 
159 
266 

99 
112 

75 


41 
332 

71 
231 
578 
411 

87 
611 
248 
168 

64 
266 

58 

82 
1,258 

28 

42 
154 

68 

298 

1,398 

74 
246 
133 
108 
569 
173 
254 
384 
323 
112 

58 




■ 










2 420 
M 272 


465 
144 
207 

578 
345 


6;^ 


129 


129 


63 


129 




1 194 
5 298 


32 


37 


37 


32 


36 




6 411 












7 286 












8 915 


876 
1,539 

'i54 
479 
705 
496 

1,258 
71 

*"836 
443 
101 
1,398 
322 
635 
626 



569 
302 
425 
777 
81 
217 
197 


455 













9 i,a5i 












10 350 

11 163 

12 320 


38 
43 


38 
61 


38 
61 


88 

43 


38 
43 




13 4891 

14 315 


49 


66 


45 


47 


67 




15 1,258 












16 157 

17 156 

18 456 


38 
19 




45 
2 


32 
2 


38 


11 


*"'i9 


19 351 


! 1 








20 427 


1 




! 




21 1.398 








i \ 


22 322 

23 345 


11 


11 


ii 


\v ii! ii 

1 .... 1 . - . 


24 242 










25 281 

26 305 


58 


58 


58 


58; 58 


27 302 


' 




28 300 

29 667 


50 


99 


99 


50 99 


^ 190 










31 162 




' 




32 157 


17 


i7 


17 


i7 


17 


• 



10 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBUC 
II. — ^Table B. — Nomber of pupils in the 



Towns. 



Reading. 



il 



1 



■n 



B 

X 

< 



bo 

I 



33 Fort WiUiam 213 

34 Gait 274 

35 Gananoque 221 

36 Goderich 86 

37 Gore Bay 58 

38 Gravenhurst 266 

39 Haileybury 40 

40 Harriston 75 

41 Hawkeebury 35 

42 Hespeler 149 

43 Hunteville , 154 

44 Ingereoll 142 

45 Kincardine 95 

46 KingBville 107 

47 Leamington 101 

48 Lindsay 252 

49 Listowel 124 

50 Little Current 112 

51 Massey 69 

52 Mattawa 15 

53 Meaford 118 

54 Midland > 329 

55 Milton 87 

56 Mitchell 72 

57 Mount Forest 75 

58 Napanee 110 

59 New Liskeard 66 

60 Newmarket 72 

61 Niagara 48 

62 North Bay 240 

63 North Toronto 147 

64 Oakville 64 

65 Omngeville 95 

66 Orillia 229 

67 Oshawa 202 

68 Owen Sound 359 

69 Palmerston 103 

70 Paris 107 

71 Parkhill 50 

72 Parry Sound 320 

73 Pembroke 158 

74 *Penetanguishene 202 

75 Perth 107 

76 Peterborough ; 535 

77 Petrolea... | 287 

78 Picton I 180 

79 Port Arthur I 236 

80 Port Hope I 208 

81 Prescott | 109 

82 Preston | 



151 

65 

96 

68 

28 

35 

30 

39 

15 

60 

107 

67 

58 

39 

66 

110 

48 

41 

35 

15 

78 

120 

65 

39 

48 

93 

42 

71 

20 

92 

103 

49 

111 

150 

105 

215 

44 

96 

24 

84 

108 

115 

50 

268 

107 

82 

118 

153 

82 

62 



147 

324 

158 

115 

61 

127 

24 

55 

23 

95 

123 

182 

99 

68 

74 

269 

70 

67 

28 

15 

107 

229 

59 

54 

96 

88 

49 

141 

27 

103 

79 

79 

104 

183 

138 

372 

59 

80 

62 

115 

111 

101 

132 

355 

136 

99 

137 

141 

50 

73 



121 
326 
135 
174 

64 
111 

22 



127 

77 

167 

142 

83 

136 

259 

163 

40 

38 

8 

66 

154 

42 

108 

84 

107 

61 

54 

39 

71 

93 

50 

119 

178 

228 

346 

54 

143 

61 

142 

101 

122 

90 

35 

193 

116 

155 

160 

58 

89 



131 

323 

139 

115 

36 

81 

1 

88 

27 

47 

59 

178 

91 

56 

68 

242 

137 

39 



42 



21 
37 



14 



11 



17 



44 



17 

57| 
116| 

67 
101 

95 
131 

13 

78 

81 

79 

81 

90 
108! 
166 
132 
380 

62 41 

87 

56 
132 
153 

87 
109! 
3751 
111 
122 
151 
166 
1361 

621 



■65 



763 

1,312 
749 
557 
289 
620 
117 
326 
136 
499 
557 
736 
485 
367 
445 

1,132 
542 
319 
198 
61 
426 
975 
388 
374 
398 
529 
242 
416 
215 
585 
520 
332 
537 
950 
805 

1,672 
355 
513 
253 
793 
631 
634 
488 

1,890 
834 
599 
79: 
828 
435 
3841 



763 

1,312 
749 
557 
289 
620 
117 
326 
136 
499 
557 
736 
485 
367 
445 

1,132 
542 
319 
198 
61 
426 
975 
388 
374 
398 
529 
242 
416 
215 
586 
520 
332 
537 
950 
805 

1,672 
363 
513 
253 
858 
631 
634 
488 

1,890 
834 
599 
797 
828 
436 
384 



763 

1,312 
749 
557 
289 
620 
117 
326 
136 
499 
468 
736 
485 
367 
445 

1,132 
542 
319 
198 
60 
426 
975 
376 
374 
398 
529 
242 
416 
215 
585 
620 
332 
537 
906 
805 

1,672 
355 
513 
253 
858 
631 
543 
488 

1,890 
834 
599 
797 
82ft 
435 
384 



* Including Protestant Separate School . 



1905 



EDUCATION DEt>ARTMENT. 



11 



SCHOOLS. Cimtinutd. 

varioTiB branches of instruction. — OonHnued. 



§ . 

ii 



91 

ll 



g 

'9^ 



I 



f 



I 



n 



H 



S 



33 716 

34 1,312 

35 528 




567 
736 
486 
266 
277 
881 



68 1,098 

69 324 

70 513 

71 179 

72 471 

73 473 

74 406 

75 331 

76 1,087 

77 440 

78 537 

79 463 
SO 828 

81 435 

82 259 



715 


252 


1,312 


378 


360 


139 


339 


115 


168 


111 


253 


81 


63 


4 


251 


88 


136 


27 


m 


68 


307 


62 


623 


178 


332 


• 91 


307 


70 


445 


68 


941 


242 


334 


137 


207 


59 


129 


28 


15 


15 


426 


67 


975 


265 


388 


135 


209 


209 


275 


95 


529 


131 


242 


85 


416 


78 


167 


81 


460 


79 


620 


392 


268 


90 


537 


442 


713 


884 


671 


75 


1,098 


547 


260 


115 


230 


87 


179 


56 


471 


197 


473 


158 


480 


94 


331 


109 


1,087 


375 


369 


111 


537 


206 


463 


151 


828 


247 


435 


194 


151 


62 



284 
619 
274 
289 
111 
234 

23 
157 

67 
195 
173 
298 
199 
156 
204 
344 
264 
132 

66 

15 
160 
297 
177 
209 
179 
238 
134 
137 

81 
150 
449 
219 
442 
384 
178 
726 
191 
230 
117 
307 
254 
277 
151 
732 
304 
206 
242 
247 
296 
151 



252 

1,312 

360 

115 

69 

143 

4 

251 

67 
195 
284 
736 
332 
353 
445 
387 
137 
132 

66 

16 
426 
465 
374 
101 
398 
238 
242 
13' 
147 
585 
520 
219 
442 
384 
132 
1,0 
150 
513 
117 
199 
153 

90 
109 
732 
440 
599 
306 
828 
435 
151 



763 
1,312 
749 
557 
178 
62 



251 



557 
786 
485 
217 
445 
816 
542 
319 
198 
59 
426 
975 
388 
374 
398 
529 



416 
134 
585 
520 
332 
537 



1,672 
79 



329 
631 
131 
488 
1,515 
834 
599 
797 
828 
435 



22 



21 
37 



14 



3 

20 
2 



27 
81 



11 



10 



44 



65 



131 



52 



42 



42 



18 



21 
37 



21 
37 



14 



14 



37 



21 



20 
2 . 



20 



20 



20 



27 



27 



80 



20 



48 



11 



11 



11 



17 



17 



17 



41 



41 41 



41 



41 



65 

"7 



65 
"3 



65 
"3! 



65. 



12 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
II.— Table B. — Number of pupils in the 



Reading. 



Towns. 



I 00 



to 

.s 
•e 



9 

B 



2 



83 Rainy River 

84 Rat Portage (Kenora 

85 Renfrew 

86 Ridgetown 

87 St. Mary's 

88 Sandwich 

89 Sarnia 

90 SaultSte. Marie 

91 Seaforth 

92 Simcoe 

93 Smith's Falls 

94 Stayner 

95 Steelton 

96 Strathroy 

97 Stui-geon Falls 

98 Sudbury 

99 Thesealon 

100 Thornburv 

101 Thorold.' 

102 Tillsonburg 

103 Toronto Junction 

104 Trenton 

105 Uxbridge 

106 Vankleek Hill 

107 Walkerton 

108 Walkerville 

109 Wallaceburg 

110 Waterloo 

111 Welland 

112 Whitby 

113 Wiarton 

114 Wingham 

Totals. 



Totals. 

1 tCounties, etc. 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 



54 

314 

142 

116! 

83 

42 

424 

358 

34 

124 

•^89 

71 

134 

99 

72 

60 

129| 

35 

88 

78 

361 

130 

63 

46 

83 

93 

195 

110 

62 

78 

159 

101 



16,007 



61,764 
13,412 
16,007 



4 Grand Totals, 1904. . .'91,183 

5 Grand Totals, 1903. . .'91,872 



71 

116 

69 

45 

87 

32 

192 

242 

43 

38; 

154 

44 

63 

69 

35 

36 

66 

24 

51 

54 

221 

93 

62 

7 

74 
40 
82 
97 
50 
46 
163 
86 



32 

146 

63 

100 

80 

25 

323 

242 

61 

117 

216 

52 

135 

122 

43 

19 

52 

24 

71 

89 

262 

159 

66 

33 

77 

63 

122 

119 

42 

77 

161 

100 



9,328 12,450 



38,396 
8,667 
9,328 



56,391 



50,135 
13,160 
12,450 



22 

136 

64 

90 

162 

38 

282 

233 

54 

65 

186 

53 

72 

90 

43 

31 

57 

43 

88 

96 

317 

102 

73 

42 

77 

73 

102 

139 

58 

87 

107 

107 



15 

137 

102 

95 

145 

26 

248 

222 

7 

136 

203 

26 

50 

112 

25 

47 

62| 

28 

69 

116 

292l 

110 

56 

44 

114 

23 

49 

117 

70 

99 

69 

60 



40 



20 

21, 

15: 

8 



12,609 



75,745 



6 Increases . 

7 Decreases. 



8 Percentages. 



689 



58,777177,258 



2,386 



22.98 14.21 



1,513 



19.09 



52,822 
16,154 
12,609 



11,505 



50,410 
14,613 
11,505 



81,585 
81,937 



352 



20.56 



76,528 
77,791 



1,263 



38 
92 



120 



1,345 



198 
849 
440 
446 
557 
163 

1,469 

1,297 
269 
480 

1,048 
286 
454 
492 
238 
224 
381 
162 
367 
433 

1,453 
594 
320 
172 
425 
380 
598 
582 
282 
387 
659 
574 



63,029 



198 


198 


849 


849 


440 


440 


446. 


446 


557. 


492 


163, 


121 


1,469; 

1,297 

269 


1,423 

1,297 

269 


480 


480 


1,048 
286i 
454 


1,048 
264 
454 


492 


492 


238 


288 


224 


224 


381, 


381 


162| 


162 


3671 


345 


433 


433 


1.453 
594| 


1,453 
594 


320 


320 


1721 


172 


425' 


425 


330 


330 


642 


598 


582 


582 


282, 


282 


387 


:VS7 


659; 


659 


574 


490 



63,185 



11,993 
2,044 
1,345 



15,382 
15,526 



t 
260,154! 261,272 



68,050 
63,029 



68,050 
63,185 



62,316 



254,462 

65,968 
62,316 



391,233 392,507" 382,746 
396,5941 399,051! 388,612 



144 5,361 6,544) 5,866 



19.281 3.88' 98.59 



98.91 ' 96.45 



t In incorporated Tillages included in Counties, etc., the numbers in the Readers were: 1st Part I.. 6,179 ; 
Part II., 4,020 ; 2nd, 4^,994; Srd, 5,029; 4th, 4,930; 5th, 2,321. 



1»05 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



18 



SCHOOLS. —ConHnued. 

varione branches of instruction.— CoiicZtw/^d. 




.m,g->7a2S,051\17O,Oie 
57.752, 56,ft25\ 57,631 
^a39\ 49,196\ 46,797 



74,184102,921 
15,486 25,981 
16,446' 25,975 



280,618^234,0721274,447 
2M,106 231,9371263,904 



6,5li 2,136\ 10,543 7,192 4,712 



106,1161154,877 
98,924,150,165 



7:\.24 58.99 69.16 26.74, 39.03 



106,382 
50,755 
34,618 



191,705 
174,947 



16,758 



48.31 



135,825 
45.719 
48,276 



229,820 
242,337 



12,517 



57.91 



11,823111,248 
4,023 679 
1,510 1,293 



17,366 
17,096 



260 



13,220 
13,396 



10,770 
1,006 
1,233 



13,009 
13,944 



176 935 



4.37 



3.33| 3.28 



8,931 15,410| 34,509 

953' 616 1,103 

1,3791 873 331 



11,263:6,799 
9,3004,964 



1,96311,835 



36,943 
,36,268 



325 



2.8111.71 9.06 



14 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 











in. 


-Table C- 


-Teachers, 




II 

1- 


9 


& 


Salaries. 


Counties, 

(including incorporated villages, 
but not cities or towns) etc. 


Hiehest 
salary 
paid. 


Average 
salary 
male 
teacher. 


Average 
salary 
female 
teacher. 


1 Brant 


70 
224 
160 
106 
108 
116 
131 
119 
153 

82 
252 

94 
127 

76 
208 
221 
149 
206 
132 
262 
125 

82 
205 
121 
126 
141 
139 

89 
121 
113 
110 

81 
157 
304 

89 
156 
116 
102 
169 

95 
219 

48 
125 

83 

95 


18 
69 
29 
17 
39 
19 
34 
40 
20 
13 
68 
14 
18 
17 
53 
80 
38 
51 
10 
45 
18 
27 
55 
37 
41 
40 
52 
28 
48 
29 
22 
25 
23 
103 
21 
41 
42 
19 
50 
23 
62 
18 
30 
12 
18 


52 

155 

121 

89 

69 

97 

97 

79 

133 

69 

184 

80 

1^9 

59 

155 

141 

111 

155 

122 

217 

107 

55 

150 

84 

85 

101 

87 

61 

73 

84 

88 

56 

134 

201 

68 

115 

74 

83 

119 

72 

157 

30 

95 

71 

77 


$ 

575 

900 

600 

750 

600 

600 

550 

600 

500 

550 

750 

675 

575 

650 

850 

900 

725 

600 

600 

800 

550 

700 

550 

600 

700 

800 

625 ' 

650 

550 

700 

600 

600 

600 

750 

500 

650 

675 

800 

700 

600 

700 

900 

650 

500 

600 


412 
412 
402 
389 
367 
410 
455 
410 
296 
367 
393 
457 
366 
428 
387 
426 
410 
395 
357 
351 
330 
462 
404 
365 
405 
411 
429 
402 
414 
374 
363 
357 
374 
396 
344 
393 
467 
446 
435 
457 
442 
410 
329 
367 
366 


$ 

336 


2 Bruce 


316 


3 Carleton 


319 


4 Dufferin 


299 


5 Dundas 


274 


6 Durham 


306 


7 Elgin 


293 


8 Essex 


335 


9 Prontenac 


246 


10 Glen&rarrv 


272 


11 Grey 


294 


12 Haldimand 


305 


13 Haliburton. etc 


244 


14 Halton 


32'J 


15 HajBtings 


291 


16 Huron 


307 


17 Kent 


349 


18 Lambton 


322 


19 TiAnark 


257 


20 Leeds and Gren ville 


262 


21 Lennox and Addington 

22 Lincoln 


258 

279 


23 Middlesex 


328 


24 Norfolk 


300 


25 Northumberland 


283 


26 Ontario 


816 


27 Oxford 


323 


28 Peel 


317 


29 Perth 


325 


SO Peterborouffh 


282 


31 Prescott & Russell 


251 


32 Prince Edward 


299 


33 Renfrew 


257 


34 Simcoe and W. Muskoka 

35 Stormont 


303 
279 


36 Victoria and 8. E. Muskoka . . . 

37 Waterloo 


278 
323 


38 Welland 


306 


39 Wellinirton 


336 


40 Wentworth 


327 


41 York 


302 


42 Rainy River and Thunder Bay. 

43 Algoma and Manitoulin 

44 N NiDissinir. etc 


363 
265 
255 


45 W. Parrv Sound 


268 






*1 Totals. Counties, etc 


6,197 
1,281 
1,132 


1,576 
191 
190 


4,621 

1,090 

942 


900 
1,600 
1,200 


402 
953 
705 


295 


2 Totals. Cities 


498 


3 Totals. Towns 


341 






4 Grand Totals 1904 


8,610 
8,560 


1,957 
2,062 


6,653 
6,498 


1,600 
1,600 


485 
465 


335 


5 Grand Totals 1903 


324 






B Increasefl .....1 


50 


"ios" 


155 




20 


11 


7 Decreases 
















8 Percentages 




22.73 


77.27 









* In Incorporated villages, included in Counties, etc., there were 585 teachers, 146 male and 389 female, with 
average salaries of S564 and $305 respectively. 77 held First Glass, 886 Second ClasB, and 109 Third Class certificates . 
14 were University graduates. 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



15 



SCHOOLS.— Om«mu€d. 
Salsrieg, Certificates, Etc. 





Number of 
teachers who 
have attend- 
ed Normal 
School or 
Normal Col- 
lege. 


Certificates. 


SI 


Ill 


h 
1 1 


-Pi 


2 


-si 


[ 


II 




1 


43 

92 

I 74 

1 38 

42 

48 

1 58 

! 87 

23 

21 

105 

47 

3 

39 
69 
110 
74 
106 
34 
79 
31 
40 
119 
* 42 
71 
67 
79 
45 
69 
40 
13 
23 
23 
64 
20 
44 
64 
37 
89 
60 
136 
14 
22 

9 
11 


8 

18 

9 

5 

I 

11 
4 
1 
1 

11 
9 
3 
4 
2 
9 
3 
7 
1 
8 
1 
6 
7 
3 
2 
4 
7 
4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 

11 
3 
2 
6 
4 

11 

11 
8 
1 
1 

2 * 


36 
74 
65 
34 
39 
45 
47 
38 
22 
20 

100 

39 

9 

35 

71 

102 
71 
98 
33 
71 
30 
34 

114 
39 
69 
63 
72 
41 
66 
38 
12 
22 
20 
79 
17 
43 
59 
32 
82 
49 

131 

13 

22 

9 

12 






25 

119 
69 
67 
64 
67 
71 
64 

102 
48 

137 
46 
28 
37 

128 

109 
70 
86 
78 

179 
83 
39 
82 
68 
52 
67 
59 
44 
52 
52 
43 
53 
94 

208 
66 
88 
48 
62 
74 
34 
78 
17 
19 
11 
59 


1 

11 

6 




2 2 




1 


1 


3 5 


1 




4 3 






5 








B 














2 

9 

25 

13 

2 




* 1 






4 


9 5 




1 


2 


lu 1 






II 




1 


1 


12 1 






:5 





1 


30 


56 


14 






'i> 1 






7 

1 

4 

14 

18 

2 

10 

3 

2 

9 

1 

7 




lb 








17 1 


1 






\i 


1 




;^ 3 


2 




3) 1 




2 


n 1 


1 






^^ 1 






2 1 








u .. 




2 

1 




s 1 





1 


3H 






r 1 


1 






i-s 






' 


"9 










» 1 




1 


14 
7 
6 

24 
5 
1 

11 
1 


6 


n 




46 


:'0 








^ 


1 




17 


M 4 


1 
2 




35 . . .. 




1 


^ 1 




12 


r 




1 


1 


1 


4 




?> 




2 




ii 






1 


i: 


2 






i2 . 




12 
29 
41 
22 


5 


4:^ 2 






54 


14 





2 


20 


^5 .. 














1 38 

2 26 
22 


2,374 
1,232 

958 


226 

248 
151 


2,217 
988 
827 


13 

10 

9 


15 
6 
6 


3,145 

23 

120 


351 
9" 


230 

6 

10 


4 86 
i 5 85 


4,564 
4,796 


625 
597 


4,032 
4,292 


32 
37 


27 
36 


3,288 
3,129 


360 
347 


246 
122 


1 




28 








159 


13 


124 




231 


260 


' 


9 












' ^ 1 


53.01 


7.26 


46.83 








38.19 


4.18 





10 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
IV. Table D.— School 





School Houses. 




School Visits. 




Totals. 


1 

3 
5z; 


Brick. 


1 


Frame. 


i 


By Inspector. 


By Trustees. 


By Clergymen. 


By other persons. 


1 

40,649 


1 Counties, etc 


5,340 
173 


2,342 
152 


421 


2 291 


286 


10 833 


6,552 


1 
3,035 20,229 

429 12,72^ 


2 Cities 


17 


4 




2,846 


1.712 


17.716 


3 Towns 


245 


165 


27 


53 




1,998, 1-917 


392 3-181 7,788 






' 


1 


4 Grand Totals, 1904 


5,758 


2,659 


465 


2,348 


286 


15,677 


10,181 


3,856 36,439 66,153 


5 Grand Totals, 1903 


5.734 


2,625 
34 


468 


2,344 


297 


16,298 


11,183 


4,362 36,819 


68,(^2 


6 Increases 


24 


3 


4 








1 


7 Decreases 


11 


621 


1,002 


506i 380 


2,509 




1 
1 








8 Percentages 




46.18 


8 07 


40 78 


4.97 


23.70 


1539 


5.83 


55.08 













* In the City of Toronto there were set out 48 shrubs, 5,560 bulbs and 15,470 plants. 
* t To each school. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



17 



SCHOOLS.- 


-Qmtinued. 


















Hoo«s, Pnyerg, Etc. 






L 

CL 






• 








)lip8ind 


Globes. 

1 

5 


Exaraii 
Prij 


ber of Schools distri-j ? |. 
ting Prizes or Merit] § 
rds. £" 


ther persons. s 


. 


ber of Trees planted on 
bor Day. 


ber of Schools using author- 
d Scripture Readings. 


1 

h 

•** 

il 


¥ 1 S 


5 


ber of Public Kxam- 
itions. 


1 

.a 
1 

£4 


ber of Schools imp 
ligious Instruction. 


z 


S 


|.£ 


iia 






'4 


i^ , U 


is 


M 


1 


Jz; 


55 


JZ5 


CQ 


cq 


H 


^ I » 


k; 


z 


\^i 


1 
: 46,020^ 


4,890 


2,160 


594 


838 


227 


1,065 


j 
5,389' 3,056 


4,983 


2,237 


1,015 


: 6.W1 


268 


97 


98 


4 


88 


92 


* , 47 


170 


156 1 


•• 2,886 
1 


340 


67 


32 


105 


39 


144 


163 108 

1 


231 


144 23 


^ .>5,8»7i 


5,498 


2,324 


724 


947 


354 


1,301 


5,552 


3,211 


5,384 


2,5371 1,039 


• ^5.758 


5,408 


2,494 


699 


1,074 


346 


1,420 


7,724 


3,134 


5,561 


2,551 


980 


139 


90 


170 


25 




127 


8 


1 

1 


77 






59 




119 


2,172 


. 167 


14 


* +9.71 

1 


t.95 




12.57 


72.79 


27.21 






55.76 


93.5 


44.06! 18.04 

i 



2t 



18 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
v.— Table E.- 



Receipts. 



Counties 

(including incorporated villages but 

not cities ortowps), etc. 




1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Durham 

7 Elgin 

8 Essex 

9 Frontenac 

10 Glengarry 

11 Grey 

12 Haldimand 

13 Haliburton, etc 

14 Halton 

15 Hastings 

16 Huron 

17 Kent 

18 Lambton •. . . . 

19 Lanark 

20 Leeds and Grenville 

21 Lennox and Addington 

22 Lincoln 

23 Middlesex 

24 Norfolk 

25 Northumberland 

26 Ontario 

27 Oxford 

28 Peel 

29 Perth 

30 Peterborough 

31 Prescott and Russell 

32 Prince Edward 

33 Renfrew 

34 Simcoe and W. Muskoka 

35 Stormont 

36 Victoria and S.E. Muskoka 

37 Waterloo 

38 Welland 

39 Wellington 

40 Wentworth 

41 York 

42 Rainy River and Thunder Bay. 

43 Algoma and Manitoulin 

44 N. Nipissing, etc 

45 W. Parry Sound 

46 Moose Fort and Albany 



Totals 



2,190 58 
8,091 43 
5,200 36 
3,353 67 
3,362 18 
3,219 86 

5.073 81 1 
4,333 20 
4,619 25 i 
2,587 49 
8,262 20 j 
3.035 30 

10,595 55 I 
2,607 33 
7,826 59 I 
8,361 32 
6,461 90 i 
6,770 58 
4,110 32 , 
7,338 86 : 
3,681 53 i 
2,800 08*; 
7,060 82 
3,797 37 I 
4,146 33 ; 
5,554 30 I 
4,956 36 
2,738 74 
4,489 23 
4,159 93 

4.074 28 
2,349 70 
6,598 48 

15,673 63 
. I 2,884 33 
.1 8,041 66 
., 4,062 50 
.| 3,290 83 
.1 5,997 72 
.; 3,726 44 
.! 7,288 69 
.; 6,542 12 
. 15,582 85 
. 8,270 00 
. 10,611 50 : 
.j 200 00 

.[ 255,981 20 , 



29,243 24 
98,157 08 
52,466 00 

45.632 09 
39,364 40 
44,687 54 
53,629 60 
51,147 42 
40,671 90 
27,102 44 
95,202 49 
37,774 13 
25,975 07 
27,705 85 i 
68,222 54 
93,485 09 
65,984 35 
82,772 80 
37,257 77 
81,226 46 
35,422 17 

35.312 22 
88,866 81 
44,800 70 
49,073 44 
56,914 87 
63,726 18 
38,253 49 
54,728 46 
38,585 90 
34,180 23 

28.633 61 
47,265 47 

117,313 72 
28,643 58 
54,166 72 
54,825 29 
37,986 61 
77,165 11 
39,403 79 
95,936 a5 
17,908 06 ! 
37,989 90 
19,845 93 

23.313 23 



22,670 90 
44,297 29 
17,955 23 
14,436 25 

11.785 54 
20,905 31 
33,025 59 
26,041 21 
17,047 36 
10,362 10 
46,310 98 

17.786 62 
11,014 86 
15,627 88 
40,030 03 
40,375 80 

52.230 75 
60,930 65 
16,400 20 

32.231 03 
16,854 30 
17,657 22 
44,500 12 
27,578 70 
22.688 52 
25,503 60 
40,263 12 
20,008 53 
25,957 36 
14,356 83 
24,535 12 
15,959 93 
19,786 54 
58,718 36 

8,292 20 
18,728 52 
47,337 14 
21,382 81 
45,113 22 
34,248 16 
81,070 99 
11,342 66 
22,201 52 
10,110 23 

7,126 44 



2,317,920 40 | 1,222,787 72 



54,104 72 

150,545 80 

76,621 59 

63,422 01 

64,512 12 

68,812 71 

91,729 00 

81,621 83 

62,338 51 

40,052 03 

14fl,776 67 

58,596 05 

47,585 48 

45,941 06 

116,079 16 

142,222 21 

124,677 00 

140,474 03 

57.768 29 
120,796 35 

55,958 00 

55.769 52 
140,427 75 

76,176 77 
75,908 29 
87,972 77 

108,945 66 
61,000 76 
85,175 06 
57,052 66 
62,789 63 
46,943 24 
73,650 49 

191,706 71 
39,820 11 
80,936 90 

106,224 93 
62,660 25 

128.276 a5 
77,378 39 

184,296 33 
35,792 W 
75,774 27 
38,226 16 
41,051 17 
200.00 



3,796,689 32 



2a E. 



im 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



19 



SCHOOLS.— Owrfmw^d. 










YmDoal Statement 


- 















Expenditure. 




1 




. a 


-6 


1 
1 

brariee, maps, 
apparatus, 
prizes and 
school books. 


[ repairs, , 
d other | 

les. 1 


pendi- 
yr all , 
.School , 
es. 

1 


1 




r eS 
|1 


tes, an( 
ing sc 
houses 




)tal ex 
ture f( 
Public 
purpos 


I 1 




H 


*d5 


a 


S 


1 ^ 


i & 




$ c. 


1 c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1 

1 c. 


$ c. 




34,909 04 


1,461 67 


557 23 


9,322 65 


36,250 59 


17,854 13 


■» 


74,892 30 


13,545 06 


1,037 16 


28,415 91 


117,890 43 


32,a55 37 


I 


47,145 82 


4,862 97 


1,605 87 


11,413 91 


65,028 57 


10,593 02 


4 


32,929 32 


1,830 62 


936 17 


14.689 60 


50,385 71 


13,036 30 


^ 


34,220 14 


3,400 94 


487 19 


9,425 99 


47,534 26 


6,977 86 


•i 


37,501 83 


4,322 00 


250 86 


10,962 63 


53,037 32 


15,775 39 




44,106 06 


4,054 99 


2,048 17 


15.707 27 


65,916 49 


25,812 51 


.* 


41,374 07 


4,264 61 


402 19 


15,936 96 


61,977 83 


19,544 00 


S 


36,349 10 


2,714 33 


886 76 


9,727 23 


49,677 42 


12,661 09 


;-} 


23,001 64 


1,384 78 


676 77 


6,000 65 


31,063 84 


8,988 19 




81,292 20 


8,298 81 


1,254 17 


29,936 78 


120,781 96 


28,993 71 


•.» 


29,821 25 


2,933 09 


380 97 


8,815 75 


41,951 06 


16,644 99 


5 


28,216 35 


2,181 22 


416 92 


9,193 73 


40,008 22 


7,577 26 


u 


26,439 54 


745 07 


267 31 


9,783 55 


37,235 47 


8,705 59 


1? 


60,984 16 


13,975 39 


1,608 64 


18,067 45 


94,635 64 


21,443 52 


.6 


76,759 20 


8,913 07 


2,290 14 


24,499 28 


112,461 69 


29,760 52 


'." 


54,490 57 


6,401 10 


1,012 01 


20,717 79 


82,621 47 


42,055 53 


> 


68,363 02 


17,445 14 


1,317 31 


25,335 35 


112,460 82 


28,013 21 


:» 


31,587 57 


850 59 


535 65 


8,958 85 


44,932 66 


12,835 63 


:' 


71,690 90 


5,878 37 


1,055 32 


19,118 69 


97,743 28 


23,053 07 


;;_ 


32,117 00 


2,885 08 


324 34 


8,695 04 


44,021 46 


11,936 54 


4) 


27,477 10 


749 76 


862 48 


12,026 53 


41,115 87 


14,653 65 


*; 


70,191 27 


4,895 46 


2,483 88 


24,706 06 


102,276 67 


38,151 08 


^4 


38,131 52 


905 35 


676 14 


9,920 17 


49,633 18 


26,543 59 


,*^ 


41,612 16 


2,369 08 


487 58 


13,137 97 


57,606 79 


18,301 50 


JS 


47,743 24 


2,756 05 


1,535 00 


16,484 04 


68,518 33 


19,454 44 


ti 


51,276 71 


761 77 


1,502 01 


16,894 65 


70,435 14 


38,510 52 


.s 


30,496 68 


5,585 48 


1,339 42 


11,515 57 


48,937 15 


12,063 61 


;^' 


42,943 79 


4,532 79 


1,082 07 


16,954 91 


65,513 56 


19,661 49 


.»■' 


32,826 92 


4,372 65 


841 72 


8,892 22 


46,933 51 


10,119 15 


•■] 


29,471 16 


9,459 91 


1,295 48 


11,175 14 


51,401 69 


11,387 94 


«i 


25,301 54 


1,695 90 


1,938 63 


5,707 57 


34,646 64 


12,296 60 


Vy 


41,(^ 29 


8,301 32 


. 1,791 13 


11,406 58 


62,555 32 


11,095 17 


"A 


99,570 35 


18,462 16 


3,402 58 


26,023 80 


147,458 89 


44,246 82 




25,512 66 


3,192 05 


167 86 


6,241 42 


:S5,113 98 


4,706 13 


■'K 


46,337 88 


4,359 23 


i;581 30 


14,526 89 


66,805 30 


14,131 60 


T 


43,290 19 


4,290 14 


369 58 


13,969 43 


61,919 34 


44,305 59 


■3 


33,288 93 


532 94 


914 01 


1 9,516 69 


44,252 57 


18,407 68 


"4 


60,280 91 


12,817 35 


1,344 64 


21,428 08 


95,870 98 


32,405 07 


ri 


33,256 20 


5,874 03 


1,495 96 


11,108 14 


. 51,734 33 


25,644 06 


4] 


74,639 99 


24,480 30 


1,714 39 


33,532 95 


134,367 63 


49,928 70 


42 


16,556 68 


9,441 17 


748 36 


6,396 01 


33,142 22 


2,650 62 


i^. 


36,124 88 


7,872 71 


1,149 62 


i 13,955 21 


59,102 42 


16,671 85 


44 


17,735 20 


6,779 60 


441 56 


9,126 55 


34,082 91 


4,143 25 


i5 


24,806 12 


2,103 91 


280 08 


' 7,622 71 


34,812 82 


6,238 35 


tt 


160 00 






40 00 


200 00 














1,^1,282 45 


258,940 01 


48,796 62 


647,034 35 


2,906,053 43 


890,635 89 



20 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
v.— Table E.— 




1 Belleville 

2 Brantford . . . . 

3 Chatham 

4 Guelph 

5 Hamilton 

6 Kingston 

7 London 

8 Niagara Falls . 

9 Ottawa 

10 St. Catharines 

11 St. Thomas . . . 

12 Stratford 

13 Toronto 

14 Windsor 

15 Woodstock . . . 



1,026 00 
2,367 65 
1,284 10 
2,a56 45 
7,127 10 
2,279 35 

*6,770 60 
844 00 
5,646 45 
1,179 00 
1,642 00 
1,788 20 

31,233 40 
1,490 00 
1,361 00 



Totals I 68,095 30 



Towns. 



1 Alexandria . . . 

2 AUiston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg . 

5 Amprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Aylmer 

8 Barrie 

9 Berlin 

10 Blenheim 

11 Both well 

12 Bowmanville . . 

13 Bracebridge . . . 

14 Brampton 

15 Brockville 

16 Bruce Mines . . 

17 Cache Bav .... 

18 CarJeton Place. 

19 Clinton 

20 Cobourg 

21 Col ling wood . . 

22 Copper Cliff... 

23 Cornwall 

24 Deseronto 

25 Dresden 

26 Dundas 

27 Dunnville .... 

28 Durham 

29 East Toronto. . 

30 Essex 



11,296 86 
38,175 30 
20,459 86 
31,158 63 

119,806 72 
28,686 00 
98,099 76 
11,000 00 

106,762 00 
15,073 00 
24,103 17 
18,150 00 

593,826 00 
28,150 00 
14,950 00 



514 38 
3,744 27 
3,558 51 

825 86 

11,628 40 

1,750 90 

2,523 82 

430 98 
20,139 98 

146 00 

1,240 19 

2,068 12 

38,083 55 

219 01 
2.341 71 



1,159,697 30 



89,215 68 



12,837 24 
44,287 22 
25,302 47 
34,040 94 

138,562 22 
32,716 25 

107,394 18 
12,274 98 

132,548 43 
16,398 00 
26,985 36 
22,006 32 

663,142 95 
29,859 01 
18,652 71 



1,317,008 28 



65 00 


700 90 


1,480 43 


352 00 


2,300 00 


595 13 


270 00 


5,488 74 


646 90 


330 00 


2,600 00 


1,629 96 


275 00 


4,062 37 


4,052 26 


201 00 


2,600 00 


807 31 


291 65 


4,661 69 


302 81 


776 00 


10,556 32 


425 28 


1,404 75 


30,208 38 


771 33 


287 00 


4,112 93 


679 94 


204 00 


1,521 00 


672 56 


339 00 


4,800 00 


224 14 


623 00 


7,453 24 


303 64 


495 00 


4,556 93 


342 88 


1,346 00 


14,700 00 


984 11 


287 00 


350 00 


1,699 33 


69 00 


695 26 


4,315 20 


503 00 


5,500 00 


34 83 


427 00 


3,150 00 


384 33 


386 05 


6,640 00 


17 73 


850 00 


13,200 00 


887 78 


291 00 


3.879 68 


1.032 92 


471 00 


6.150 10 


1,191 42 


429 00 


5,300 00 


359 79 


293 00 


2.950 00 


260 85 


324 00 


5,029 00 


245 83 


269 00 


3,143 40 


16,528 16 


558 00 


3.841 56 


1,174 07 


211 00 


4,200 00 


1,693 53 


177 00 


2.374 34 


43 62 



2.246 38 

3.247 13 
6,405 64 
4,559 96 
8,389 63 
3.608 31 
5,256 15 

11,757 60 

32i384 46 
5.079 87 
2,397 bii 
5,363 14 
8,379 88 
5,394 81 

17,030 11 
2,336 33 
5,079 46 
6,037 8:^ 
3,961 33 
7,043 78 

14,937 78 
5,203 60 
7,812 52 
6,088 79 
3,503 85 
5,598 8:^ 

19,940 56 
5,573 63 
6,104 53 
2,594 9« 



* Grant of $1,500 re Normal School included. 



\m 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



21 



SCHOOLS.— Cwrfimwjd . 

FiBtncal Statement. — Continued. 



Expenditure 




9,158 36 
22,804 54 
13,133 27 
15,623 42 
87,625 89 
21,866 15 
68,768 34 
7,825 00 
76,688 60 
10,707 16 
18,687 31 
12,860 60 
432,1.58 07 I 
18,971 71 
12,517 50 1 



10,170 08 
19,426 47 

' 4,897' 6i !. 



142 10 
5,528 28 
1,578 93 I 



13,210 21 

495 00 

815 36 

1,045 57 

49,885 52 
650 65 



75 35 
3,645 40 



43 10 
1,312 08 
8,882 49 

53 43 
1,073 82 



3,159 46 

12,781 63 

11,626 49 

8,ia5 34 

25,924 53 

8,848 29 

33,728 83 

3,495 14 

32,285 77 

5,107 07 

7,373 39 

6,714 89 

164,949 06 

7,841 64 

4,429 39 



12,317 82 
44,287 22 
24,759 76 
34,040 94 

138,505 17 
32,293 37 

107,394 18 
11,395 49 

125,829 98 
16,309 23 
26,919 16 
21,933 14 

655,875 14 
27,517 43 
18,020 71 



$ C-. 

l519 42 

'542 7i' 

57*65' 
422 88 

"879'49' 

6,718 45 

88 77 

66 20 

73 18 

7,267 81 

2,341 58 

632 00 



829,:i95 92 



107,771 17 



23,910 73 



336,320 92 1 1,297,398 74 ' 19,609 54 



13 

14 
15 
'A 

Is 

1^ 
3'i 

l\ 

24 



864 
2,337 
4,272 
2,745 
3,675 
2,274 
3,225 
8,493 

14,451 
2,923 
1,613 
4,308 
4,621 
4,134 

10,437 

1,525 

725 

4,373 

2,987 

9!^ 
2,855 
5,215 
4,439 
2,941 
4.314 
2,607 
3,301 
4,635 
2,087 



16 99 


9 00 




4 50 


685 47 





710 17 

410 40 

9'960 12 

449 08 

55 25 

83 89 



14 93 
34 98 
37 25 
2,329 85 
59 85 



65 85 



109 34 
18 00 



82 75 



30 00 
27 25 



542 92 
308 49 
270 06 



363 26 
54 35 



3 50 
25 85 
10 00 



7,209 27 
1,510 38 



19 00 
270.00 



1,190 19 

780 31 
1,545 62 

874 71 
2,033 65 

572 13 
1,036 50 
2,600 31 
5,618 87 
1,233 42 

349 14 

839 59 
3,262 83 
1,160 30 
5,540 38 

797 09 
4,241 71 
1,101 01 

861 40 
2,392 04 
4,350 17 
1,577 71 
2,325 72 
1,296 10 

536 72 
1,225 58 

621 89 

705 39 
1,019 56 

491 11 



2,081 01 
3,117>41 
5,822 59 
4,305 18 
5,708 65 
2,862 02 
5,006 98 

11,540 99 

32,360 45 
4 665 80 
2,017 46 
5,232 16 
7,993 67 
0,378 24 

16,411 93 
2,322 09 
5,079 46 
5,501 40 
3,848 90 
6,727 29 

14,937 78 
4,795 55 
7,811 38 
5,739 14 
3,503 85 
5,550 09 

10,4,38 27 
5,536 74 
5,925 26 
2,578 81 



1(>5 32 

129 72 
583 05 
254 78 

2,680 98 
746 29 
249 17 
216 61 
24 01 
414 07 
380 10 

130 98 
386 21 

16 57 

618 18 

14 24 



536 43 
112 43 
316 49 


408 06 

1 14 

349 65 



48 74 

9,502 29 

36 89 

179 27 

16 15 



22 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 



v.— Table K- 




31 Forest 

82 Fort Frances 

33 Fort William 

34 Gait 

35 Gananoque 

36 Goderich 

37 Gore Bay 

38 Gravenhuret 

39 Haileybury 

40 Harriston 

41 Hawkesbury 

42 Hespeler 

43 Huntsville 

44 Ingersoll 

45 Kincardine . 

46 Kingsville 

47 Leamington 

48 Lindsay 

49 Listowel 

50 Little Current . . . . 

51 Massey 

52 Mattawa 

53 Meaford 

54 Midland ... .c ... . 

55 Milton 

56 Mitchell 

57 Mount Forest 

58 Napanee 

59 New Liskeard 

60 Newmarket 

61 Niagara 

62 North Bay 

63 North Toronto . . . 

64 Oakville 

65 Orangeville 

66 Orillia 

67 Oshawa 

68 Owen Sound 

69 Palmerston 

70 Paris 

71 Parkhill 

72 Parry Sound 

73 Pembroke 

74 *PenetanguiBhene. 

75 Perth 

76 Peterborough 

77 Petrolea 

78 Picton 

79 Port Arthur 

80 Port Hope 

81 Prescott 



$ c. 
341 00 
129 00 
523 00 
948 35 
597 00 
579 00 
487 00 
267 00 
100 00 
219 00 
32 00 
315 15 
467 00 
970 85 
441 00 
252 00 
318 00 
800 00 
335 45 
221 00 
40 50 
34 00 
393 00 
559 00 
490 00 
376 00 
401 00 
498 00 
121 00 
409 00 
174 00 
282 00 
284 00 
186 00 
462 00 
485 00 
466 00 

1,252 55 
271 00 
368 00 
138 00 

1,040 00 
325 00 
338 00 
459 00 

1,363 30 
475 00 
549 50 
401 00 
648 00 

434 og 



$ c. 
2,500 00 
1,972 10 
8,434 05 

14,900 00 
6,237 56. 
5,213 29 
1,105 00 
4,685 56 
600 00 
2,781 00 
2,800 00 
4,896 00 

13,800 00 
6,624 50 
4,636 08 

3.547 61 
4,324 00 

12,855 80 
4,473 00 ( 
1,439 00 , 

150 00 ; 

950 00 
4,007 00 
7,000 00 
2,676 58 
3,224 00 
3,654 00 
5,750 00 
1,800 00 
3,875 00 
2,100 00 
4,938 00 
4,974 72 

3.548 99 
4,437 00 
8,300 00 
6,800 00 

17,022 00 
3,529 00 
5,200 00 
2,245 00 
8,162 50 
4,961 76 
3,774 02 
4,405 24 

23,000 00 
8,500 00 

.5,500 00 
7,495 00 
6,941 35 
3,340 81 



I e. 

526 86 
235 94 

1,422 94 
628 98 
424 04 

2,436 04 

572 20 

64 57 

3,137 17 
35 84 
540 23 
60 71 
176 45 
352 02 
468 58 

2,754 13 
199 65 
112 00 
144 24 
811 24 
989 01 
161 16 
174 93 
549 53 
721 12 
144 23 
354 54 
260 45 
492 19 
765 71 
459 36 
389 18 
262 49 
42 16 
452 55 

6,767 44 

1,050 70 

1,440 65 

42 60 

34 58 

154 56 

126 47 

9 00 

651 58 

169 63 

5,945 71 
2 76 

4,135 86 
153 21 
467 40 
314 73 



$ c. 

3,367 86 
2,337 04 
10,379 99 
16,477 33 
7,258 60 
8,228 33 
2,164 20 
5,017 13 
3,837 17 
3,035 84 
3,372 23 
5,271 86 
14,443 46 
7,947 37 
5,545 66 
6,553 74 

4.841 65 
13,767 80 

4,952 69 
2,471 24 
1.179 51 
1,145 16 
4,574 93 
8,108 53 
3,887 70 
3,744 23 
4,409 54 
6,508 45 
2,413 19 
5,049 71 
2,733 36 
5,609 18 
5,521 21 
3,777 15 
5,a51 55 

15,552 55 
8,316 70 

19,715 20 

3.842 60 
5,602 58 
2,537 56 
9,328 97 
5,295 76 
4,763 60 
5,033 87 

30,309 01 
8,977 76 

10,185 36 
8,049 21 
8,056 75 
4,089 54 



■ Including Protestant Separate School. 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



23 



SCHOOLS.— Cbn<inw</, 

FiMndtl Statement . — Cuniinued, 



Expenditure. 






Pi 



m^? 



S-Sjs 






s s 



S. 



US 

o 



c - c 

jj rtj t^ 

c 3 a 



3Q 



^ 



'5s o 



•§ 

S 



$ c. 

2,665 00 
1,447 75 
5,966 20 

11,305 00 
5,124 97 
4,534 40 
1.800 00 
3,322 63 
532 50 
2,020 00 
1,272 50 
3,450 00 
3,027 57 
5,775 00 
3,351 25 
2,977 09 
2.949 28 
9,242 34 
3,249 02 
1,447 58 
851 08 
866 17 
3,a55 00 
5,531 50 
2,a51 52 
2,992 98 
3.211 09 
4,386 30 
1,343 00 
2,768 00 
1,485 00 
2,790 00 
3,421 91 
2,022 40 
3,ft57 32 
6,871 68 
5,193 60 

12,114 50 
2,760 00 
3,940 75 
1,575 00 
5,010 07 
4,052 31 
3,428 66 
3,655 00 

16.871 96 
6,361 35 
4,748 48 
5,327 35 
6,305 00 
3,162 83 



910 30 
150 50 



2,291 04 



447 95 

2,464 70 

73 58 

500 00 

298 37 

10,020 76 



85 20 
413 00 



925 00 
223 00 



130 00 



.1 



r 



412 17 



947 55 
2,516 02 



2 65 



I e. 

82 91 
117 07 
184 01 

97 45 
167 70 

^ 90 



12 55 



4 75 



25 37 

30 04 

61 81 ! 



33 44 



20 70 
30 00 



15 00 
75 00 
71 00 
31 00 
13 95 
77 28 
353 05 
50 44 



48 60 



8 10 





13 00 


1,965 83 


440 46 
38 20 


258 50 


6 00 


5i 86 


53 00 



284 35 

102 08 

29 00 

26 80 



I c. 

364 46 

755 95 

3,319 48 

4,924 38 

1,920 33 

1,367 99 

317 88 

1,234 00 

790 97 

679 47 

763 14 

1,498 12 

724 59 

2,081 89 

1,406 37 

3,410 45 

983 69 

4,228 12 

1,450 19 

574 10 

280 45 

278 99 

1,219 93 

1,333 89 

420 98 

647 86 

1,194 03 

1,369 25 

854 99 

2,256 78 

983 47 

2,744 06 

1,489 46 

1,723 75 

1,379 19 

2,205 74 

1,822 50 

2,963 46 

1,012 60 

1,625 63 

562 74 

1,729 39 

l,2a5 25 

H73 49 

1,314 81 

13,:^^2 25 

2,475 05 

2,113 61 

2,:«9 64 

1,722 75 

841 04 



I c. 

3,112 37 
2,320 77 

10,379 99 

16,477 33 
7,213 00 
8,228 33 
2,117 88 
5,017 13 
3,788 17 
2,777 80 
2,535 64 
5,271 86 

13,802 96 
7,918 70 
4,757 62 
6,521 34 
4,345 97 

13,470 46 
4,699 21 

2.029 78 
1,181 53 
1,145 16 
4,574 93 
7.790 39 
3,495 50 
3,674 28 
4,405 12 

5.776 25 
2,a57 99 
5,024 78 
2,483 47 
5,609 06 
5.394 54 

3.777 15 
5,350 46 
9,154 70 
8,316 70 

17,644 42 
3,772 60 
5,566 38 
2,1,'SO 74 

9.145 75 
5,295 76 
4,565 65 
4,969 81 

30,309 01 I 
8,836 40 

7.146 44 
7,781 72 
8,056 75 

4.030 67 



$ c. 

255 49 
16 27 



4566* 


46 32 

4966' 
258 04 
836 59 



640 49 

28 67 

788 04 

32 40 

495 68 

297 34 

253 48 

441 46 

47 98 



318 14 

392 20 

69 95 

4 42 

732 20 
55 20 
24 93 

249 89 
12 

126 67 



1 09 
6,397 74 

2,676*78' 

70 00 

36 20 

386 82 

183 22 



297 95 
64 06 

1 


141 36 

3,038 92 

267 49 


58 87 



24 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
v.— Table E. 



Towns. — Concluded . 






Receipts. 



r 





82 Preston 

83 Rainy River 

84 Rat Portage (Kenora) . 

85 Renfrew 

86 Ridgetown 

87 St. Mary's 

88 Sandwich 

89 Samia 

90 SaultSte. Marie 

91 Seaforth 

92 Simcoe 

93 Smith's Falls 

94 Stayner 

95 Steelton 

96 Strathroy 

97 Sturgeon Falls 

98 Sudbury 

99 Theesalon 

100 Thornburv 

101 Thorold..' 

102 Tillsonburg 

103 Tororito Junction 

104 Trenton 

105 Uxbridge 

106 Vankleekhill 

107 Walkerton 

108 Walkerville 

109 Wallaceburg 

110 Waterloo 

111 Welland 

112 Whitby 

113 Wiarton 

114 Wingham 



Totals 



Totals. 

1 Counties, etc 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 



4 Grand totals, 1904. 

5 ** 1903. 



6 Increases . 

7 Decreases . 



$ c. 

265 30 
136 00 
754 00 
386 00 I 
274 00 
418 00 I 
88 00 I 
1,005 00 i 
1,129 00 , 
210 00 
535 45 
727 00 
339 00 I 
151 50 ' 
523 00 ! 
155 00 ; 
128 00 I 
232 00 i 
95 00 
166 00 
292 15 
1,181 60 
461 00 
192 00 
277 00 
402 00 
428 00 
509 00 
379 90 
360 45 
393 00 
297 00 
475 00 



$ 

3,000 00 
2.250 00 
10,088 56 
4.253 26 
3,654 12 
5,000 00 

"28,6i8'36' 
11,511 00 
2,800 00 
3,979 01 
9,120 12 
3,860 00 
9,526 27 
4,746 00 
3,192 04 
2,700 00 
2,130 00 
1,840 a5 
2,850 00 
4,848 96 
31.961 08 
4,478 74 
2,688 98 
2,837 75 
4,037 58 
7,500 00 
5,170 00 
7,100 00 
2,900 00 
4,550 00 
3,750 00 
3,700 25 



I 



48,235 45 



255,981 20 
68,095 30 
48,235 45 



647,455 29 



2,317,920 40 

1,159,697 30 

647,455 29 



1,321 52 

630 58 

. 28 00 

274 94 

55 94 

527 94 

1,274 87 

924 24 

575 68 

936 84 

769 46 

10 19 

195 18 

57 99 

114 53 

206 59 

1,098 17 

42 24 

41 74 

54 87 

37 66 

699 63 

821 81 

229 25 

312 80 

199 44 

.35 91 

320 79 

133 50 

2,124 74 

70 24 

334 69 

508 50 



101,547 86 



I c. 

4,586 82 
3,016 oS 
10.870 5H 
4,914 20 
3,984 06 

5.945 94 
1,362 87 

30,547 60 
13,215 68 

3.946 84 
5,283 92 
9,857 81 
4,394 18 
9jm 76 
5,383 58 
3,553 m 
3,926 17 
2,404 24 
1,977 59 
3,070 87 
5,178 77 

33,842 31 
5.761 55 
3,110 23 
3,427 55 
4,639 02 
7,963 91 
5,999 79 
7,613 40 
5,385 19 
5,013 24 
4,381 69 
4,683 75 



797,238 60 



1,222,787 72 

89,215 68 

101,547 86 



3,796,689 32 

1,317,008 28 

797,238 60 



372,311 95 
357,964 25 



14,347 70 



4,125,072 99 
3,957,108 16 



1,413,551 26 
1,273,539 07 



5.910,936 20 
5,588,611 48 



167,964 83 140,012 19 I 322,324 72 



8 Percentages . 



6.3 



69.79 , 



23.91 



Cost per pupil, enrplled attendance : Counties, etc., |10«94; Cities, $19.06; 



1W5 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



25 



SOHOOLS.-C(moiiicZfdL 

Financial Statement. — Concluded. 



Expenditure . 



'5^ 



C. u 



r^? 









$ c. 



«*' 


1 
3,233 00 1 


\i 


905 53 : 


^ 


6,965 00 1 


M 


3,634 80 


y; 


2,996 a5 ■ 


\ 


4,067 59 


1> 


912 50 


»» 


9,675 48 


Jl 


8,869 81 




2,420 00 


■<] 


4,199 50 


v; 


7,047 75 


M 


2,169 32 


'*'} 


4.326 49 


•♦; 


4,056 25 
1,750 98 




«\ 


1,972 50 


'1 


1,960 00 


'II 


1,416 99 . 




2,029 67 


■'.' 


3,368 00 


.( 


13,550 00 


'4 


3,666 12 


i-) 


2,473 21 


ri 


1,964 00 


•c 


3,540 78 


■^ 


4,726 68 


" 


4,687 00 


1' 


5,133 37 


11 


2,314 50 


.' 


3,700 00 




3,410 00 


.4 


3,642 10 



895 12 
66 20 


65 25 , 


11 26- 


14 82 
13 20 


5 40 






1 


16,189 22 ' 


' 89 46 1 




34 28 


1 37 


151 29 
148 59 


1 10 
1,085 80 


33 53 
138 54 



29 30 ' 



77 40 

7 25 

96 96 



4 90 



*9,38i"56" 




177 00 




1 25 








342 70 


229 03 
110 75 



296 00 . 



178 28 



13 70 



4^,895 88 



76,153 61 




••iJ 



992 45 
1,126 18 
2,850 69 

929 25 

935 38 
1,872 95 

342 92 

4,593 44 

4,312 74 

992 19 

498 70 

2,660 97 

2,071 89 

3,449 09 

1,243 58 

1,280 45 

1,744 66 

437 44 

554 95 

1,037 72 

1,810 77 

10.386 39 

1,528 51 

603 47 

727 40 

971 82 

1,784 00 I 

1,034 90 

2,216 00 

722 92 

1,250 98 

936 14 
832 98 



4,225 45 ! 
2,992 08 
9,881 79 I 
4,590 13 I 

3.944 6:^ i 

5.945 94 
l,2.i5 42 

30,547 60 
13,182 55 
3,446 47 
4,850 86 ' 
9,857 31 ' 
4,275 84 I 
8,999 92 I 
5,377 23 
3,067 98 
3,814 12 
2,397 44 
1,976 84 
3,067 39 
5.178 77 
3:^,317 89 
5,371 63 
3,076 68 
2,692 65 
4,512 60 
7,082 41 
5,832 65 
7,527 65 
3.333 42 
4,964 68 
4,346 14 
4,475 08 



7,643 15 ' 200,037 57 I .749,730 21 






361137 

24 50 

988 77 

324 07 

39 43 



rl07 45 



33 13 
500 37 
433 06 



118 34 

735 84 

6 30 

485 65 

112 as 

6 80 

75 

3 48 



524 42 

389 92 

33 55 

734 90 

126 42 

881 60 

167 14 

85 75 

2,051 77 

48 56 

:« 55 

208 67 



47,508 39 



l,a51.282 45 

' 829,395 92 

465,8^5 88 


258,940 01 

107,771 17 

76,153 61 


48,796 62 

23,910 73 

7,643 15 


647,034 35 , 
336,320 92 1 
200,037 57 


2,906,a53 43 

1,297,398 74 

749,730 21 


8^K),6;i5 89 
19,609 54 
47,508 39 


' 3,246,574 25 
3,096,132 36 


442,864 79 
347,955 03 


80,350 50 
67,515 56 


1,183,392 84 
1,141,947 39 


4,953,182 38 
4,f)53,550 34 


957,753 82 
9:35,061 14 


' 150,441 89 


94,909 76 


12,834 94 


41,445 45 . 


29f),632 04 


22,692 68 


• 65.55 


8.94 


1.62 


23.89 













* 'ins, 111.85 ; Province, $12.48. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 

I.— Table F.— Financial Statement, 



Ck>untie8, 

(including incorporated vlUagee, but not 
cities or towne), etc. 






Receiptfl. 






5 

s 



&5 

SI 



I 
1 

I 

■c 

I 
3 



|s 



Expendi- 



■s 



S 

3 



1 Bruce 

2 Carleton. 

3 Essex 

4 Frontenac 

5 Grey 

6 Hastings 

7 Huron 

8 Kent 

9 Lambton 

10 Lanark 

11 Leeds and Grenyille 

12 Lennox and Addington 

18 Lincoln 

14 Middlesex 

15 Norfolk 

16 Northumberland 

17 Ontario 

18 Peel 

19 Perth 

20 Peterborough 

21 Prescott and Russell 

22 Renfrew 

28 Simcoe 

24 Stormont, Dundasand Glengarry., 

25 Waterloo 

26 Wellington 

27 Wentworth 

28 York 

29 Districts 



Totals . 



Cities 



1 Belleville 

2 Brantford 

8 Chatham 

4 Guelph 

5 Hamilton 

6 Klneston 

7 Lonaon 

M Niagara Falls.. 

9 Ottawa 

10 St. Catharines . 

11 St Thomas 

12 Stratford 

18 Toronto 

14 Windsor 

16 Woodstock 



Totals . 



7 
16 
26 
12 
7 
7 
9 

10 
2 
8 
5 
2 
2 
6 
1 
6 
11 
1 
7; 
1 
73 
12 
3 
13 
7 
8 
1 
2 
23 



273 



468 RO 
949 00 
1,391 00 
548 00 
275 00 
307 00 
258 Ob 
398 26 

61 00 
125 00 
248 00 
112 00 

75 00 
171 OOi 

46 00, 
815 00. 

75 00 

63 00 
194 00 

51 00 
2,848 00 
1,090 00 
212 00 
673 00 
804 00 
285 00 

41 00, 

48 00' 
2.486 OOl 



9 c. 

4,590 69 

8.858 68 

13.805 25, 

8,523 67' 

2,190 46; 

1,^10 09| 

4,187 Ml 

4,530 96 

647 051 

794 25 

1,535 48 

573 12 

1,101 02 

1,992 01 

452 12 

2,221 42 

321 96 

136 22 

3,246 19 

356 36 

25,135 38 

3,416 88 

1.192 58 

4,481 09' 

4.818 82! 

3,458 92 

125 00 

539 44 

5.440 80 



14,102 76 104,978 72 



2.188 98 
1.480 20 
7.783 79 

883 97. 

910 97 

789 321 
3,427 50| 
2,810 34 

127 37 

158*96 

406 84 
8? 76, 

290 19 

376 35; 

288 51' 
1.022 25, 

761 34^ 

88 87 

2,049 37 > 

4 53i 

12.956 28 

3,263 18| 

292 841 
3.980 08 
3.562 88 

985 18' 
87 56. 

460 11 
4,591 15 



55,964 62 



I 



9 c. 

7,193 17 
10,782 88 
22.980 04 
4,955 64i 
3,376 43! 
2,906 411 
7.873 86 
7.739 56 

885 421 
1,078 21 
2,190 82i 

770 881 
1.466 21 
2,.')89 36 

786 63 
3,558 67. 
1.158 30, 

228 09) 
6.489 561 

411 89i 
40.939 66! 
7,770 06i 
1,697 42 
9,134 12' 
8.685 70 
4,729 10| 

253 56 
1,047 55 
12,617 95. 



9 C. 

8.796 66 

6,427 62 

11.252 95 

3,060 00 

1.861 50 

1.830 00 

2,964 00 

3.525 65 

550 00 

755 00 

1,510 50 

560 00 

800 00 

1.68T 90 

Z50 00 

1,895 00 

750 00 

220 00 

2,366 25 

261 56 

20.566 86 

3,547 83 

1,115 00 

4.474 82 

2,955 00 

-2.530 Of 

225 00 

520 00 

6,017 42 



175.046 101 87,336 52 



2 


286 00] 


2 


240 00 


1 


199 001 


8 


258 00 


8 


1,120 00 


3 


459 00 


7 


704 00 


1 


112 00, 


23 


8,975 001 


8 


272 00, 


1 


185 00} 


1 


247 00, 


22 


3.787 001 


2 


492 00 


r 


66 00' 



-I- 



2.116 88 
1,946 25 
2,469 S3 
.S,476 83 

11,800 00 

11,728 08 

8.446 .51 

922 37 

48,750 00 
4,090 82 
1,918 95 
2.516 40 

60,385 36 

6.336 00 

485 50 



I 



80' 12,402 001 157,388 28 



150 51 

1.019 03 

1,222 07 

133 03 

1,427 07 

3,473 81 

3,255 87 

1.478 13 

46,834 01 

98 87 

4,824 93 

992 48 

11,806 33 



448 50 



76,659 64 



2.552 39 

3,205 28 

3.890 40 

3,867 S6 

14,347 07 

15.660 89 

12,406 38| 

2,512 .'iOi 

99.559 01! 

4,456 691 

6.928 88 

8.755 88i 

65.478 691 

6.8fi8 00 

1,000 00; 

l_ 



1.735 00 
1,150 00 
1.249 98 
1.900 00 
7,765 OO 
3.97-2 13 
3.466 67 
600 00 

29,607 80 
2,040 00 
1,000 OG 
1,300 OG 

23.'200 OO 

5,428 '2X1 

600 OO 



246,444 92| 85,014 7fi 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



27 



SEPASATE SCHOOLS. 
Teachers, Etc. 



Teachen. 





: 










" 






female (in ad- 
rs of Religious 
Ived free red- 


1 


y 




i 

1 




S2 






4) 
1 


1 


ti 


I 


H 
1 




1 






i 


if. 


if 
II 

I 


1 

5 


1 
< 


08 


1 


1 


1 


1 


> 


< 


f c 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1 c. 


9 c. 








9 


$ 


oQ2«2 


87 46 


1,681 10 


6,007 64 


1.186 53 


15 


4 


11 


380 


200 


I -2.Q0&9C 


247 88 


1,708 28 


9,384 03 


1,398 80 


29 




29 




214 


J 88SQ2 


366 87 


8,233 57 


20,787 91 


2,192 13 


40 


6 


84 


346 


267 


4 40555 


16 25 


774 38 


4.256 18 


699 46 


12 


3 


9 


237 


261 


T 76 oe 


40 47 


447 47 


2,425 44 


950 99 


7 


1 


6 


300 


284 


16 IC 




455 54 


2,301 64 


604 7? 


7 


1 


6 


240 


265 


2,5® 86 


35 80 


761 37 


6,630 83 


1,242 6S 


10 




10 




802 


' l,o(8» 


80 18 


1,819 54 


6,433 76 


1,305 80 


12 


2 


10 


437 


271 


J 8 12 




125 08 


683 20 


152 22 


2 




2 




275 


14 175 36 




84 04 


1,014 40 


63 81 


3 


1 


2 


280 


• 237 


n 22 06 




617 37 


2,149 92 


40 40 


8 


1 


7 


250 


189 


U 116 02 


6 75 


58 42 


741 19 


29 69 


2 


1 


1 


225 


885 


J SO 00 


20 90 


249 45 


1,413 35 


52 86 


4 




4 




200 


14 160 96 


8 12 


406 86 


2,263 84 


275 62 


6 


1 


5 


300 


268 




20 65 


50 00 


420 65 


365 98 


1 




1 




860 


> «7 00 


30 79 


612 16 


3,004 95 


558 72 


7 




7 




271 


2»01 




127 81 


1,146 32 


11 98 


2 


1 


• 1 


500 


260 


-» 




7 87 


227 87 


22 


1 




1 




220 


li 1.S05 06 


13197 


944 32 


4,747 60 


741 96 


8 


1 


7 


3i5 


802 


i 4 96 


29 20 


34 39 


830 10 


81 79 


1 




1 




260 


-I 7,U7 56 


561 88 


4,454 11 


32,790 40 


8,149 26 


95 


10 


85 


300 


222 


i 67»11 


823 21 


760 09 


5,304 24 


2,465 82 


15 




15 




233 


:3 5000 




848 28 


1,513 28 


184 14 


5 


1 


4 


425 


187 


:4 2.668 50 


342 57 


818 59 


8,289 48 


844 64 


18 


1 


17 


300 


266 


.' L616 82 


1 76 


1.161 57 


6,735 14 


2,950 56 


12 


1 


.11 


400 


282 


737 13 


4145 


588 39 


3,891 97 


837 13 


10 




10 




253 


^ 3 12 


644 


19 00 


253 56 




1 




1 




225 


N 


17 25 


206 77 


743 02 


304 58 


2 




2 





210 


^ 2jm 35 


327 19 


1,965 72 


10.581 68 


1.936 27 


25 


3 


22 


353 


245 


26^72 55 


2,734 53 


28.979 99 


145,423 59 


29,622 51 


360 


39 


321 


328 


242 


I TOOOI 




531 50 


2,336 50 


215 89 


6 


1 


5 


600 


200 


824 97 




1,232 43 


8,007 40 


197 88 


5 




5 




, 230 


I 1.288 IB 


29 20 


1,118 98 


8,686 45 


208 95 


7 




7 




200 


i 515 88 


142 56 


1.233 61 


3,792 04 


75 82 


8 




8 




237 


- 2.415 75 


986 06 


2,673 34 


18.8S9 14 


507 93 


37 




37 




190 


'- 1,9W27^ 


147 00 


4.235 27 


10,293 67 


6,367 22 


13 


1 


12 


700 


240 


603987 


150 OO 


2.528 00 


12.282 54 


128 84 


20 




20 




2oe 


% fOOOO 




810 50 


2,310 50 


202 00 


3 




3 




200 


^ 89,028 60 


689 91' 


30,232 70 


99,6^ 01 




125 


88 


87 


408 


240 


1,292 50 





1,124 J9 


4,456 69 




9 


1 


8 


600 


180 


5.499 84 


16 00 


400 82 


6,915 66 


822 


5 




5 




200 


~ 88626 


85 20 


1.354 26 


3.634 71 


121 17 


6 




6 




217 


■J 1Z479 56 


1,365 25 


25.368 36 


62,413 17 


3,066 52 


105 


26 


79 


323 


200 


:< 730 00 


66 80' 


603 00 


6,828 00 




13 




13 




400 






400 00 


1,000 00 




2 




2 




300 


73^19 78j 


3,675 96 


73.844 96 


286,855 48 


10,089 44 


364 


67 


297 


885 


223 



28 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
I.— Table F.— Financial 



Towns. 



1 Alexandria 

2 Almonte 

3 Amheretburg , 

4 Arnprior 

5 Barrie , 

6 Berlin 

7 Brockvllle 

8 Cobournr , 

9 Cornwall 

10 Dundas 

11 Fort Frances 

12 Fort William 

18 Gait 

14 Goderich 

15 Hawkesbury 

16 Ingersoll 

17 Lindsay 

18 Mattawa 

19 Newmarket 

20 North Bay 

21 Oakville 

22 Orillla 

23 Oshawa ". 

24 Owen Sound 

25 Parla 

26 Parkhill 

27 Pembroke , 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborongh 

80 Picton , 

31 Port Arthur .... ; 

82 Preacott 

88 Preston 

34 Rainy River , 

36 Rat Portage (Kenora) . 

36 Renfrew 

87 St. Mary's 

38 Sandwich 

39 Samia 

40 SaultSte. Marie 

41 Seaforth 

42 Steelton 

43 Sturgeon Falls 

44 Sudbury 

45 Thorold 

46 Trenton 

47 Vankleekhill 

48 Walkcrton 

49 Wallaceburg 

50 Waterloo 

51 Whitby 



Receipts. 



a 







Totals . 



66 



Totals. 



♦1 Counties, etc . 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 



4 Grand totals, 1904 . 

5 Grand totals, 1903 . 



6 Increases . 

7 Docreases. 



273 



419 
412 



I c. 

185 00 

85 00 

234 90 

174 00 

116 00 
291 00 
256 00 
141 00 
407 00 

91 00| 
15 001 
171 00 
62 OOi 
58 00^ 

226 oo; 

57 00 

210 00; 

167 00 

32 001 

159 00 

23 00| 

130 00; 

57 OOl 

70 001 

52 00 

29 00 

289 90 

143 00 

479 Ool 

38 00 

143 00 

102 00 

54 00 

34 00 

102 00 

167 00 

46 00 
110 00 

117 00 
148 00 

47 00 
100 00 
153 tiO 
137 00 

83 00 
129 00 
152 00 
113 00 
. 69 00 
75 00 
32 00 



6,545 00 



14,102 76 
12,402 00 
6,545 00 



$ C. 

2,243 69 
1,113 50 

899 75 
2,189 T 
1,410 65 
8,740 03 
2,617 16 
1,000 00 
5.049 14 

915 97 

242 60' 
1,267 92; 

580 941 

529 80| 
4,000 00 

835 17 
2.570 01 
5,492 67 

258 68 
1,890 00 

234 Sft 
1,672 24 

440 80 
1,023 29 

434 41 

211 28 
3,374 73 
1.028 20 
5,521 50 

499 39 
1,470 00 
1,251 26 

834 00 

550 00 
2,100 00 
1.134 92 

381 13 
2,338 80 
1,045 98 
2,000 b'l 

617 17 

530 00 
1,620 64 
1.898 63 

825 00 
1,265 00 
882 00 
690 04: 
747 00 
1,100 001 
222 72 



9 C. 

* 575 35 

90 00 

2.510 59 

3,818 52 

1.273 17 

366 76 

418 76 

144 65 

1,422 75 

542 40 



362 60 

54 83 

34 62 

259 73 

145 33 

57 56 

3.740 62 

209 50 

11,384 83 

54 10 

1,480 60 

61 88 

1,059 41 

4f 2 86 

211 01 

288 82 

148 00 

435 97 

501 63 

1.619 22 

1,227 81 

358 10 

■■**i89'67 
1,540 22 
259 77 
303 88 
614 81 
251 34 
83 91 

* 14*, 460*26 
10 00 
43 66 
147 4' 
438 75 
204 16 
665 52' 
242 50, 
116 84 



Expend!- 



9 c. 

8,004 04 
1,288 50, 
3.644 3<! 
6,182 29 
2,799 821 
4,397 79 
8,291 92' 
1.285 65i 
6,878 89' 
1.549 87 

257 50: 
1,801 52 

697 77 

622 42 
4,485 7J 
1.037 50 
2,837 57 
9,400 29 

500 18 
13,388 83 

811 45 
3,282 84' 

559 18; 
2,152 70 

969 27 

451 29 
3.947 55 
1,319 20 
6.436 47; 
1,039 02 
8,282 221 
2,580 5"! 
1.246 10| 

684 00! 
2841 071 
2,832 14! 

686 90 
2,75a 18 
1,777 79 
2,395 16 

748 08; 

680 00; 
16,233 84; 
2,045 63' 

951 66! 
1,541 47 
J,4Ti 75! 
1,007 20' 
1,481 52! 
1.417 50! 

370 56' 



76,792 15 54.807 08 



104,978 72 
157,383 28 
76.792 15 



3:^,049 76 
32,191 60, 



339.154 15 
30(?,7M 98 



858 16 



8 Percentages . 



6.91 



82,369 17 



60.6 



55,964 62 
76,669 64 
64,807 08 



187,481 34 
133,418 48 



175.046 10 
246,444 92 
138,144 23; 



1.7SO00 
^<0O00 

1,695 00 

1.596 00 
900 00 

1.750 00 

1,.S»00 
900(0 

4.1S0 00 
600 00 
142 50 
900 00 
325 00 
400 00 

2.400 00 
57') 00 

2.2.'i0 00 

1.709 07 
300 00 

1,822 29 
250 OU 

1,195 00 
438 2S 
500 00 
400 00 
315 00 

2,474 25 
800 00 

4,064 00 
440 00 

1,200 00 

1,224 96 
865 70 
330 00 

1,49« 00 

1.546 IS 
360 00 
947 74 
920 00 

1,200 00 
.552 50 
558 00 

1.212 » 

1,100 00 
600 00 
700 00 

1,000 00 
600 00 
958 02 
.500 00 



188,144 23[ 54.784 99 



87.836 .Vi 
85,014 7« 
54,784 99 



559,635 25| 
472,396 06; 



227J36 29 
218,860 74 



54.012 86' 87,240 19' 13,275 55 



83.49!. 



44. S6 



* In incorporated villages included with Counties, etc., there were 48 teachers, all female. Note— Cost per 



im 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



29 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS.— Om/imwrrf. 
Statement, Teachers, eta — Concluded. 



:jf. 


8 






Teachers. 






ill 


< 


' h 

** 


1 
1 


1 
1 

i 

1 

1 


£ 

8 
3 
7 
6 
4 
9 
8 
4 

14 
3 

1 

13 
2 
6 

} 

4 
1 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 
9 
4 

13 
2 
4 
4 
1 

2 

6 

\ 

4 
4 
2 

1 

4 
3 
4 
6 
4 
1 
3 
1 


1 

1 

> 
< 


if S 


1 c. t C. 

^281 71 80 

170 00= 35 00 

: 1*30 


% c. 

733 96 
264 00 

1,8M 41 
557 29 

1,527 74 
85f«34 
785 56 
369 15 

2,115 91 
363 42 


1 c. 

2,950 04 

1,209 00 

• 3,607 71 

5,636 47 

2,748 71 

4,012 49 

2.652 27 

1,269 15 

6,329 17 

1,168 42 

142 50 

1,801 52 

691 18 

616 45 

4,082 28 

982 06 

2,766 84 

9,400 29 

396 94 

13,383 83 

302 15 

1,644 86 

559 18 

888 10 

488 69 

450 65 

3.562 57 

1.319 20 

6,436 47 

506 81 

3,127 66 

1,531 00 

744 26 

567 39 

1,991 46 

2,494 50 

411 93 

2.228 33 

1,247 30 

2,095 91 

681 87 

024 30 

16,233 84 

1.828 69 

940 87 

1.412 48 

1.064 90 

914 12 

1,285 M 

770 72 

370 66 


1 c. 

64 00 

19 50 

36 63 

545 82 

51 11 

385 30 

639 65 

16 60 

549 72 

880 95 

115 00 


8 
8 
7 
7 

\ 

8 
4 

16 
3 

1 
8 
1 
2 

13 
2 
7 
5 
1 
4 
1 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 

10 

■1 

4 
4 
1 
1 
4 
6 
1 
4 
4 
4 
2 
4 
6 
4 
8 
4 
6 
4 
2 
3 
1 


i 

::::::: 

i 

1 

i 

i 

i 

2 

2 

i 


....•„ 

460 



:::::::: 

720 

756 

750 





600 

650 

750 

475 

SOU 

550 


% 

219 
266 
242 


4 1483 1^ 




200 


32097 




225 


^ 1.1« 65 


213 50 
66 71 


200 
225 


. 


226 


SOQO 
205 00 


33 26 


244 
200 






426 

ano 

325 
200 
200 


4600 


V.V.V.V.WV.'. 


855 52 

176 71 

206 45 

1,467 28 

234 28 

516 84 

4,436 00 

9894 

* 641 82 

52 15 

439 56 

113 76 

KS5 00 

88 69 

115 65 
792 44 
309 16 

1.896 58 

68 81 

681 00 

803 09 

116 06 
84 30 

363 46 
946 62 

K0 93 
1,193 84 
288 00 
M2 51 
128 87 

66 3U 
8,927 79 
303 79 
237 87 
587 48 


1*2 47 


766 
10 00 


6 .59 
5 97 
453 45 
56 44 
70 73 


175 00 


> IffiOO 


12 78 


287 
250 


3199 40 


65 82 


226 
800 


• 


101 24 


11 419 Tl 




881 
250 




i 


930 
1,687 98 




10 SO 
7 15 
4 SO 


299 


.'3 


200 


r8» 


1.264 60 

480 58 

64 

884 98 


250 
200 
340 
214 
200 
272 


r 2»"23 
> 2&S Of 


20 00 
6 65 
5 00 

16 81 


459 13 






530 21 

104 56 

1.040 57 

501 84 

16 61 
849 61 
337 64 
274 97 
528 85 
530 49 
299 25 

66 71 
6 70 


225 


129S66 




300 


2» 

' JS2aO 

m 09 




318 


32*66 


850 


130 00 


2^h 


' I 70 




267 


25 00 

' 8000 

12 00 

': noo 


6 00 

1 75 

27 30 

22 40 


350 
237 
230 
800 
295 






275 


•' 10.730 89 


8G2 66 
75 27 
58 00 


200 


35063 

4S0O 

*• 175 00 


216 94 
10 97 
128 99 
407 85 
93 08 
245 98 
646 78 


275 
200 
175 




64 90 


167 




3i4 U 
277 52 
131 00 
63 31 


150 







325 


129 7i 
7 25 


10 00 


167 
300 


S5JSS56 


1,236 36 


82,912 22 


124.632 18 


13,612 10 


220 


12 


208 


664 


239 


y m 55 

. mI>:9 78 

^jm^ 56 


2,734 58 
3.675 96 
1.236 36 


28.979 99 
73,844 96 
32,912 22 


145,423 59 
236,355 48 
124,532 13 1 


29,62.! 51 
10,089 44 
13.612 10 


360 
364 
220 


39 
67 
12 


321 
297 
208 


328 
3a=) 
564 


242 
223 
239 


^ l>r790 m 

^\m 61 


7,frl6 85 
6,970 05 


135,737 17 
122.626 59; 


506,311 20I 
424,318 ?9 


53,324 W) 
48,076 07 


944 
896 


118 
98 


826 
798 


884! 
3911 


234 
228 


M.9i9 28 


676 80 


18,110 58; 


81.992 21 
1 


5,247 98 


48 


20 


28i 


j 


6 




'1 




1 1 












* ».82 


1.51 


26.81 






1 


12.5 
rovlnct 


87.5 
J. $10.59. 


1 








3.31; Towns, \ 


H0.14:F 


— - 




M- enroiledi 


ittend&nce: C< 


mntles, etc., % 


8.19; Cities, $1 





30 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. Table G. — Attendance, pupils in the 





Number of pupils. 


i 


■5 
5 


Is 
>* 

5 


s 

1 


Reading. 






(including Incorpor- 
ated villagei but not 
cities or towns) etc. 


1 

1 


a' 

1 


5 


e 

186 

806 

409 

78 

67 

51 

90 

88 

18 

22 

49 

15 

87 

44 

15 

58 

18 

8 

96 

5 

628 

124 

38 

128 
162 
81 
2 
2 
111 


1 


5 

s 


e 

< 


1 Bruce 


771 
1,559 
2,238 
404 
263 
249 
485 
640 

58 

99 
221 

78 
136 
169 

74 
240 

78 

23 
410 

82 

6,478 

746 

188 

1,008 
695 
407 
14 
-83 

1,075 


406 

738 

1,201 

207 

119 

126 

228 

825 

31 

55 

104 

37 

65 

91 

30 

122 

34 

12 

229 

18 

2.715 

872 

92 

602 

813 

211 

8 

43 
526 


865 

821 

1,082 

197 

144 

123 

207 

316 

27 

44 

117 

86 

71 

78 

44 

118 

44 

11 

181 

14 

2.768 

874 

96 

506 
282 
196 
6 
40 
649 


582 

981 

1,288 

216 

104 

128 

286 

290 

82 

45 

124 

40 

94 

90 

51 

148 

44 

5 

231 

15 

8,079 

382 

106 

482 

847 

249 

4 

49 
499 


69 
60 
58 
53 
40 
51 
54 
45 
55 
45 
56 
55 
69 
53 
68 
60 
56 
22 
56 

^ 

51 
56 

^*l 
58 

61 

29 

59 

46 


145 

480 

789 

92 

50 

59 

102 

224 

9 

25 

46 

14 

86 

20 

19 

73 

10 

6 

71 

10 

2,520 

212 

66 

411 
143 


106 

296 

879 

45 

88 

28 

48 

116 

9 

25 

25 

6 

17 

17 

18 

18 

13 

1 

46 

•8 

1,107 

148 

81 

187 
74 
76 
2 
17 

244 


174 

818 

421 

67 

63 

48 

62 

101 

8 

13 

28 

22 

19 

27 

8 

87 

14 

3 

83 

6 

922 

113 

26 

203 
164 

64 
5 

37 
184 


168 
278 
112 

68 
58 
106 
87 
14 
14 
27 
14 
27 
47 
19 
47 

111 

8 

286 

106 

31 

118 
47 


"12 
12 
15 
2 
5 
27 
24 

"46 

2 

"i4 

'"7 
6 

"ie 
43 

6 
16 

5 


771 

1.559 

2.233 

404 

263 

249 

435 

640 

58 

99 

1^ 

136 

169 

74 

240 

7» 
23 
410 
32 
5.47H 
746 
188 

1.008 

595 

407 

14 

83 

1,075 


771 


2 Garleton 


1.559 


8 KnneT ... 


2,233 
404 




5 Grey 


268 


6 Hastings 


249 


7 Huron 


43S 


8 Kent 


640 




58 


10 Lanark 


99 


11 Leeds and Orenville 

12 Lennox&Addfngton 
18 Lincoln 


221 
73 

136 


14 Middlesex 


169 


16 Norfolk 


74 


16 Kortbumberland ... 

17 Ontario 


240 

78 


18 Peel 


28 


19 Perth 


41C 


20 Peterborough 

21 Pre8cott<b Russell.. 

22 Renfrew 


32 
6.47f 

74( 


28 Simcoe 


18S 


24 Stormont, DundasA 

Glengarry 

25 Waterloo 


1.0« 
59.' 


26 Wellington 


100 


8 


40: 


27 Wentworth 

28 York 


3 
4 
30 




8$ 


29 Distrlcto 


1,07} 






Totals 


17,761 


8,960 


8,801 


9.886 


55 


6,181 


3.080 


8,236 


2,915 


2.081 


269 


17.761 


17.761 






Cities. 
1 Belleville 


879 
836 
384 
870 

1,712 
734 
784 
153 

5,866 
852 
234 
319 

6,297 
799 
108 


189 
176 
188 
182 
870 
401 
384 
88 

2,853 
192 
120 
162 

2,734 

895 

49 


190 
160 
146 
188 
842 
333 
400 
65 

3,008 
160 
114 
157 

2.563 

404 

54 


246 
227 
284 
291 

1,200 
517 
601 
106 

8,776 
256 
190 
286 

8,608 

560 

69 


65 
67 
70 
79 
70 
70 
77 
69 
64 
78 
81 
74 
68 
70 
67 


68 
59 
87 
54 
485 
146 
144 
26 

63 

87 

1,853 

188 
18 


62 

60 

54 

66 

261 

116 

197 

17 

1.493 

83 

28 

53 

674 

145 

15 


65 

83 

46 

101 

300 

156 

157 

84 

1,159 

68 

62 

55 

1,229 

220 

21 


72 

74 

86 

80 

332 

169 

126 

40 

991 

72 

43 

48 

1,137 

166 

26 


112 




379 
336 
384 

734 
784 
153 

5,856 
852 
234 
319 

5,297 
799 
103 


X71 


2 Brantford 


70.... 
621.... 


.S3< 


8 Chatham 


33^ 


4 Guelph 


69 

227 

147 

160 

36 

620 

. 92 

58 

76 

669 

80 

23 


*i67 

.... 
83 

235 


37' 




1,71 


6 Kingston 


73 


7 London 


7s 


8 Niagara Falls 

9 Ottawa 


16 
5.85 


10 8t Catharines 

11 St. Thomas 


35 
23 


12 Stratford 


31 


13 Toronto 


5,29 


14 Windsor 


79 


15 Woodstock 


10 






Totals 


17,76? 


8,983 


8,779 


12,117 


68 


4,m 


3,264 


8.«6 


8,461 


2,601 


425 


17.762 


17.76 







1906 



EDUCATION DfePARTMENT. 



31 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
nriooe bnncbes of inetraction. Maps, etc. 



I 



a 
3 

s- 



a . 5 ( a 



:§ 



I 

I 

G 

a 



c 



§ 



.ill! 



I Map* and 
prizes. 



5 



6 I 



B 

9 



I 



55 



II 



'. X122 

i "242, 
• CI 



m 
n 

1$) 

160' 
T4 

s 

375i 

32; 

m 

651 
IS 



5 571 
3 .... ■ 
3 562i 



8101 
1.325' 

277i 
196 
172 

SK3| 

52, 

80'.. 
149 

58'., 
117 
13»: 

42 
192 

78 

17., 
290 

19 

2,876 

416' 

188' 

4» 
400; 

31-; 

3M: 



m 249 
SS 227 
»i 334 
,? 870 
1712 1,658 
437 



1 '^li 



2»l 

7» 466 



784 

66 

4,044, 

m 

234 
319, 



545 

548 

1,312 

170 

174 

29 
263 
105 

58 

-isi, 



205 
32 
1.330 
425 
145 

276 
389 
280 



103 



HW 10,275 7.161 



879 



334 
370 

1,712 
734 

784, 
153 

4,324 
348 
234 
319 

5,297 1 
799 1 
103 



516 
816 
1,223 
2^ 
183 

161 

273 

835 
38 
55 

151 
63 
97 

132 
42 

147! 
65 
15« 

259 

19 

2,285 

443! 

181 

484| 

363 
325 

14 
287 



162 
251 
437' 
112 

72 j 

tie! 

15o" 

149 

IH, 

12 

«9- 

ie» 
<^. 

lO 

2H 

5 

XI .^ 

13 

2«e 

16T 

3& 

1.1.1 
165 
X33 

4 
40 



334 

510 

613 

1901 

1061 

1121 

209! 

174; 

321 

361 

114i 

271 

641 

91, 

34| 

109i 

351 

13 

190 

13 

1.171 

206 

56 

174 
251 
174 



241 
920 
160 
125 

83 
149 
149 

32 

23 
140 

41 
136 

85 

19 
106 

35 

3 

162 

13 
953 
281 
175 

136 
116 
254 



4i 
108 



4 
112 



9,251; 2,849 5,149j 6,006 



184 
22Vl 
193! 
314: 
1.712 
437 1 
784 
lOO 
4,240 
265 
234, 
319, 
3,944; 
799 
103 



l'.W8' 13,462 15,890( 13,«55 



112 

70 
147 
149 
612 
816 
160 

45 
599 
121 

96; 

761 
904 

80 

23 



184 


184 


144 


227 


193 


147 


149 


250 


665 


1,032 


316 


199 


286 


286 


45 


45 


2,628 


3,067 


164 


267 


96 


234 


124 


319 


2,041 


5,297 


246 


• 799 


* 49 


108 



3,410 7,830i 12,456 



645 

956 

1,408 

377 

77 

156 

2S2 

363 

68 

66 

196 



601 45 



136 
190 



12: 11 



150, 

78f 



13' 

281 



299i 



1,046, 
347, 
1451 



472 
232 



7,8?2 



379 



334 

370 

1,712 

734 

784 



3,400 
362 
234 
319 

6,297 



103 



14,018 



46; 14 

35! 42 

61 
1 

20' 13 

51 5 

8! 8 



349 252 



92 



240 



235 



50 



2a5 



567| 368 



45 



85 



43 



43 



251 



50 



235 



348 



117 



501 50 



15 



235, 235 



368< 292 300 



122 
132 

77 



17 

8 
158 
51 



925 



266 



611 
122| 
202' 

58' 
51 1 
41; 
68 
81 
16i 
i5 
41 i 
13 
12 
45 

8 

39 
13 
11 
55 

6 

334 

70 

13 

95 

58 
.%5 
6 
15 
80 



1,694 



7 

10 
30 

116 
35 
35 
10 

210 

10 

8 

22 

308 
22 
11 



2661 864 



15 



13 
28 
51 



4 


.... 




2 


6 


6 


5 




1 


24 


1 


"io 


•i 


"'4 


1 


.... 


1 


6 


'6 


"u 


1 




40 


99 


7 


31 


1 





22 
15 
10 



34 



122 367 



1 




3 




8 


24 


7 


.... 


23 


■'i8 


3 




1 




1 





50 



16 
'24 

82 



32 



THE REI^ORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Towna. 



1 Alexandria , 

2 Almonte 

8 Amherstburg 

4 Aniprior 

5 Barrie 

6 Berlin 

7 BrockvIUe 

8 Cobourg 

9 Cornwall 

10 Dundas 

11 Fort Frances 

12 Fort William.... 

18 Gait 

U Goderlch 

15 Hawkeebury .... 

16 ^ngeraoU 

17 Lindsay 

18 Mattawa 

19 Newmarket 

20 North Bay 

21 Oakvllle 

22 Orillia 

23 Oabawa 

24 Owen Sound .... 
26 Paris 

26 ParkhiU 

27 Pembroke 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough . . . 

80 Picton 

81 Port Arthur 

82 Prescott 

83 Pr&ston 

84 Rainy River 

a3 Rat Portagc(Kenoni) 

86 Renfrew 

37 St. Mary's 

88 Sandwich 

89 Samla 

40 SaultSte. Marie....l 

41 Seaforth 

42 Steelton 

48 Sturgeon Falls . . 

44 ?udbury 

45Thorold 

46 Trenton 

47 VankleekHill... 

48 Walkerton 

49 Wallaceburg 

50 Waterloo 

61 Whitby 



Totals . 



Totals. 

*1 (bounties, etc . 

2 Cities 

8 Towns 



4 Grand totals, 1904... 

5 Grand totals, 1903... 



6 Increases.. 

7 Decreases . 



8 Percentages 



47,807 
47.117 



690 



ROMAN CATHOLU 
II.— Table G.— Attendance, Pupils in variou 




21.179 
23,886 



23.6281 29.9201 62.58! 14.057' 8.3601 9,484i 8,6261 6.676 
23.281 29.538 62.69 14,878i 7.782 9.3241 8.128 6,190 



343 



6C8i 160 398, 886 



814 47.8071 47.W 

815 47,1 I7i 47.1 : 

l__l 



690" 6! 



•I- 



60.68 49.42, 



68, 29.40 17.471 19.841 17.83 13.76' 1. 



lOOl 



♦In incorporated villages included with Counties, etc., there were 2,669 pupils, with an average daily attendaiu 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 




r-rr^[^;d^ir^e : 1st. Part I. 982 



Part II, 509 ; 2nd, 446 ; 3rd, 411 ; 4th, 272 ; 6th, 49 



34 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I.— Table II.- 



CoUegiate Institutes. 



9 c. 

886 03 

I *1,121 69 

t3,134 84 

♦1,312 84 

1,148 36 

•1,816 65 

942 10 

♦11,260 46 

♦992 26 

♦1,261 26 

1,035 88 



12 Guelph ♦1,198 08 

18 HamDtou ♦So.sgi 16 

14 IngersoU 1 1,010 35 

16 Kingston 12,594 02 

Ifi T.indsftv ' ♦: 



A Aylmer , 

2 Bame 

8 Betlin 

4 Brantf ord . . . , 
6 Brocks ille .., 

6 Chatham 

7 Clinton 

8 Cobourg .... 

9 CoUlngwood , 

10 Gait 

11 Goderich 



Receipts. 









>t 








c 




fl 




o 




O 


s 


IS 


t 


1 


•*3 


& 


flS 


o 


!s 


■a 




s 


hJ 


^ 



s 

a 

t 

1 
■a 



$ c. 

1,604 27 
1,908 62 
2,376 48 

*i ',450 '66 
3,29» 68 
1,646 08 I 
1,914 76 
942 26 
1,930 37 
IJM 26 

672 91 



16 Lindsay ' ♦1,235 61 

17 London tl,648 70 

18 Morrisbuig ♦1,064 22 

19 Napanee ♦I.ISI 42 

20 Niagara Falls ♦l.HO 57 

21 Orillia ♦1,135 36 

22 Ottawa ! ♦1,421 S8 

28 Owen Sound • ♦1,267 93 



39 



Perth 

Peterborough 

IRenfrcw 

Kidgetown 

St. Catharines 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Seaforth 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

ToronU) fHarbord). 
Toronto f Jameson ) . 
Toronto (Jarvis) ... 
Toronto Junction. . . 

Vankleekhill 

Whitby 



41 Windsor . . . . 

42 Woodstock. 



.Totals.. 



924 51 
♦1,297 62 
tl.l92 30 

975 89 
♦1,289 62 

930 04 
♦1.361 27 
♦1,282 51 
♦1.012 75 
f2,254 46 

958 14 

♦1,380 95 

♦1,339 20 

♦1,345 16 

1,055 07 

♦945 94 

817 97 

1.278 59 
♦tl,731 60 



1.342 87 



2,264 63 



3,641 20 

2,700 00 

973 58 

1,285 36 



2,865 43 
1,297 06 



1,522 87 I 
2,225 80 I 



1093 31 
2,022 17 
1,945 03 
1,700 09 
1,300 00 
1,644 18 



58,554 65 



675 82 I 
2.304 71 I 
1,372 34 

1.200 00 
1,829 32 



9 c. 

1,660 00 
1,80C 00 
21,148 86 
7,900 00 
6,300 00 
6,320 00 
S.6G0 00 
2,500 00 
8,100 00 
3.600 00 
2,800 00 < 

6,067 28 
26,543 28 I 
4,271 00 I 
6.000 00 
4,064 89 
24.486 37 
2,420 86 
2,800 00 
6,000 00 
2.500 00 
J3,331 00 
4,153 00 

4.386 54 
7,000 00 
2,450 00 
1.400 00 
6.678 17 
2,600 00 
7.046 83 
5,490 64 
1 900 00 
OiSOO 00 
2.700 00 
16,912 52 
16,402 01 
19,900 91 
6.(a5 00 
1,400 00 
2,300 00 

8.194 36 
4,638 19 



I c. 

1,071 60 
1,860 00 
1.732 54 
2,881 95 

' 1,943 "73" 

927 20 

736 60 

1,259 26 

2.229 50 
1.680 00 

480 85 
5,083 50 

776 25 
4,916 Oft 
1,653 50 

5.230 00 



PL, 






74 00 



1,434 60 
10.835 66 
2,481 00 

227 50 

2,192 50 

36 75 

922 50 

85 00 

1.073 25 

2,443 60 



l,22t> 10 
3,423 30 
1,145 00 
3,796 00 
2,372 00 
2,939 25 
2,a50 00 
21 50 
387 25 

76 00 
1,926 50 



9 c. 

66 00 
631 69 
274 00 

1,147 f2 
806 80 

2,007 95 
172 64 
965 97 
393 79 
878 52 

2,688 06 

562 46 
2 00 

940 24 
1,316 40 

115 00 

692 03 
4.045 86 
2,020 15 

83 73 I 
1,172 69 ' 
1,853 16 I 
3.045 88 

2.=)6 16 I 

1,389 05 ' 

2,105 13 ■ 

1,453 44 I 

1,697 8;^ ! 

106 68 

126 77 ! 

ei09 62 

2,233 97 i 

«>7 47 

120 88 I 

113,938 00 

50 00 I 

80 00 1 

469 32 

438 46 ' 

148 •52 I 

2,007 34 



S c. 

5,277 80 
7,316 80 
28.666 71 
18,242 51 
9,705 16 
13,884 01 
7,287 02 
7,367 69 
6,687 56 
9,799 64 
9.238 18 

8,981 67 
37,619 94 
8.340 71 
14,826 61 I 
9,333 63 ' 
32,067 10 
11,172 14 , 
8.725 57 I 
8,227 88 I 
7,528 01 I 
27,441 70 
13,813 24 I 

7,090 76 ' 

11,879 17 I 

7,307 05 

6,977 13 

g?650 62 

6.803 28 

13.000 54 

9,327 80 

8.076 91 

14,335 23 

6.568 20 

26,027 47 

20.163 21 

24,265 32 

nO.885 21 

5.110 61 

5.026 18 

12.755 29 
10,125 61 



3.650 00 
.5.5fi3 24 
7.295 «X» 
8.896 32 
7.2«i tW 
8.SX.'S (w 
4.. 33.5 7.^ 
.5.43."^ 00 
4,4.s7 l>0 
7,.")7iJ 4.1 
5 40.> 00 

6,945 09 
19.511' 1.=. 

5.610 00 
11.9W 33 

6.747 n 
23,0^4 .T<) 

6,5K> 39 
- 5.2.5S i\:^ 

6,105 (H) 

5.333 vi 
20,3,'J5 00 

9,680 00 

4.910 00 
H.093 70 
6.010 W 
4,7^ 90 
7,;UiO 0(1 
4.629 01 
10.22U OK 
7.219 » J 
4,091 97 
f<.444 73 
5.070 «)<) 
20.:J-=H-. (H) 
lo,S67 iK) 
18.s;»9 Ott 
6..S^S M) 

3.73-^ :;3 

4.199 25 

8,087 4(; 
7,S2U 0<» 



66,176 45 1 286.790 70 75.532 52 



43,761 35 ' 520,814 67 350.785 i*9 



♦ Grant for Cadet Corps included. t Grant for Technical Education included. 

§ Grant ($4,600) for Normal College included. J Statistics for preceding year except Legislative grant. 



3a K 



1!N» 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



36 



AM) HIGH SCHOOLS. 
rinandal Statement 



,1 

«a 



• c. 



9 SIS 80! 



11 iO 



r ifli 36,. 

• 4M53 

i "164 63 

:. 70 00 

2 ^66 



? U«00. 



26» 

2> 75 
£* TO 
3.^50 



n S3 87 
I 



Expenditure. 



^ 




a 


III 


al 


iig 




type 
and 
cati 




S '^ 




Hn 


tas-a 




ISH 



•-i 
111 



e 

s 

1 

I 



Balances. 



Chargefl per year. 



S c 



« c 



4 500 Qo; 


33 83 

94 25 

81 87 

114 49 


27 12 

70 98 

1,486 56 







« 1072 74 


406 57 


432 25 



G49 02 

15 65 

350 81 



52 97 
734 60 
148 65 
159 09 
450 96 



712 78 
212 75 
46 85 
180 19 
124 50 

253 72 



142 92 
209 62 
151.91 
196 43 
667 60 
113 23 

303 Ois 



61 85 
248 29 
174 05 
405 65 
173 52 

24 50 

78 61 

6 20 

204 66 

50 59 

26 12 



$ C. 

1.085 66 
1.296 88 
8,245 02 
3.186 09 i 
2,421 48 . 
1,758 75 

725 08 
1,080 07 
1,171 62 
1,640 93 

955 74 

1,715 38 
17.273 19 I 
2.519 09 I 
2.033 01 j 
1,178 35 ! 
4.843 16 

465 62 ' 
1.177 32 
1.449 58 I 
1,218 01 I 
5,281 78 , 
1,634 46 



I C. 

4,796 61 
7,024 85 
27.200 66 
12,696 90 
9,705 16 
13,555 31 
6,137 13 
6,825 19 
6,673 29 ; 
9,407 22 
6,H36 05 



$ C. 

481 19 

291 95 

1,466 05 

545 61 

"'328"76' 

1.149 89 

542 .V) 

14 27 

392 42 

2,402 13 



i flO : res. Form I, $5. 

110. 
lilO. 
• Res. $10 ; oon-res. $16. 

$5. 

City $6 ; CJounty $10. 

- -- 110. 



Res. $7.50 ; non-res. 



$10. 



8.981 57 . 




37,519 94 


8.339 59 


1 12 


14.339 72 


485 79 


8.814 62 


519 01 


31,764 67 


292 43 


6,831 9« 


4.340 16 


6,670 07 


2,065 50 


7.949 76 


278 12 


6.824 20 


703 81 


27.441 70 . 




11.478 28 


2,334 % 



425 87 
127 46 
414 61 ' . 
2«7 47 I. 

446 08 I 



352 41 
36 52 



37 94 

551 13 

191 06 

1,515 00 

1,262 70 

1.733 51 

314 03 

79 80 

48 79 

1.189 36 : 
216 08 i 



230 35 

116 29 
41 Vi 

154 39 

172*46 
.56 46 
330 47 
131 43 
214 07 
46 20 

'65 70 ! 

117 25 I 



1,100 40 
2,685 47 
1.166 58 
l.ti62 51 
1.898 08 

H40 60 
2.104 03 
1,725 .58 

H43 17 I 
4,885 89 
1,234 49 
3.765 32 
2.768 ho 
2.952 84 
l.h21 12 i 

i,o:« m 

TJ2 52 

.3.048 90 
1.791 73 



6,3:19 60 

11,879 17 

7.260 47 

6.607 39 

9.612 69 

5,757 11 

13.000 M 

9,061 49 

.5,617 23 

14.(Ki2 94 

6.4y5 .55 

26.ir27 17 

20.K4 21 

24.2»i:> SI 

10,132 09 

5.U61 H6 

.5,016 76 

12.7.55 29 
9.445 01 



7.51 16 



46 


.58 


34i9 


74 


37 


93 


46 


17 



266 31 

2.458 ftS 

Ti'l 29 

72 fv) 



75:^ 12 
4.5 7.5 
9 42 



Co. $10 ; others $14. 

Res. $5. $7 $10 : Co. $6, $8, $10 ; non-K.<(. 

$8, $10, $12. 
City free ; Co. $10 ; other Cos. $20. 
Res. F. I $2.50; other F's. 810. non-res. S20 
$7..50. 
Res. $5 to $35 ; non-res. $20 to $35. 

?7.50. $10. 
ity and Co. $10 ; others $30. 
Free. 

Town and Co. free ; others -f 10. 
Free. 

Town $5 ; others $10. 
Rex. $..J0, $25 : non-res. $45. $50. 
Res. $8. «12; Co. $10; adj. Co. $10 ; others 

$12. $15. 
Co. ?6 : non-ros. $16. 
Res. $10 : non-res. $2.5. 
Res, free ; non-reH. $15. 
Town $6 : ('o. $10 ; non-res. $10. 
Res. free : non-res. $16. 
Re.s. $.5 ; others $10. 

H'.S.D. 1 year free ; Co. $10 ; others $30. 
Free . 

$6 : $8 ; $10. 
$10. 
Form I. town,Jree ; others $10. 

^;: ^I"-!': ^.^I' ^il \ $6 extra to rhiMrenof 
6- 15- 2l' 27 / Jion-ratepayers. 
$1*0 : $15. 

Province free ; others $10. 
F. 1 free ; H. S. D. $6 ; Co. $6.7.5. 

(Uhorh $10. 
Fr^e. 
Res. S7..50 : non-res. 810. 



r jji IS 13.918 42 7,06-1 8«5 ; 97,4W) 21 496.378 m 24,43»» 01 9 free ; ;W fee. 



».3»*, of this sum, overdraft for the three Toronto Collegiate Institutes. 



36 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
I.— Table H.— Financial 



High SchooU. 



1 Alexandria 

2 Almonte 

3 Arnprior 

4 Arthur 

6 Athena 

6 Aurora 

7 Beamsville 

8 Belleville 

9 Bowman ville... 

10 Bradford 

11 Brampton 

12 Brighton 

13 Caledonia 

14 Campbellford .. 

15 Carleton Place. 

16 Cayuga , 

17 tChesley 

18 Colbome 

19 Cornwall 

20 Deaeronto 

21 Dundas 

22 Dunnville 

23 Button 

24 East Toronto . . . 
26 Elora 

26 Essex 

27 Fergus 

28 Forest 

29 Fort William... 

30 Oananoque 

31 Georgetown 

32 Gleneoe 

33 GravenhuTSt — 

34 Grimsby 

35 Hagersville 

36 Harriston 

37 Hawkesbury ... 

38 Iroquois 

39 Kemptville 



40 Kincardine 

41 Leamington , 

42 Listowel , 

43 Lucan 

44 Madoc 

45 Markham 

46 Meaford 

47 tMidland 

48 Mitchell 

49 Mount Forest 

60 NewburKh 

51 Newcastle 

52 Newmarket 

63 Niagara 

54 Niagara Falls South . 

55 North Bay 

56 Norwood 

57 Oakville 

58 Omemee 



Receipts. 



I 



$ c. 

637 54 
704 88 
601 04 
*663 41 
686 13 
616 16 
472 95 
811 76 
776 75 
557 66 
845 91 
468 93 
572 34 
665 58 
684 53 
556 91 



459 98 
841 27 
629 98 
*696 66 
♦712 19 
604 52 
412 78 
542 80 
t9f»08 
570 14 
617 33 
969 64 
669 52 
601 20 
597 25 
977 46 
433 71 
619 02 
606 86 
589 50 
712 35 
744 34 

737 92 
709 52 
666 36 
654 24 
563 26 
681 47 
814 22 



635 08 
*765 02 
537 93 
475 38 
637 01 
432 27 
5iS2 56 
1.009 60 
»(>30 51 
544 97 
453 05 



S 

I 






9 c. 

723 87 

704 88 

601 04 

1,026 41 

1,717 29 

700 00 

580 00 

405 00 

776 75 

688 58 

2,000 00 

909 64 

1,538 94 

935 14 

684 58 

1,803 97 

1.000 00 

511 00 

2,709 37 

1,268 48 

1,046 66 

2,285 02 

1.498 79 

412 78 

816 80 

1,500 00 

570 15 

1,360 12 



919 52 
639 56 
710 69 



559 44 
2,897 60 

662 44 
1,766 36 
1,910 00 

250 00 

1,278 93 

1.390 94 

800 00 

867 17 

987 26 

1,530 00 

1,903 07 



800 00 
1,421 16 
1.655 27 
635 37 
782 00 
490 00 
778 52 



f.08 66 
544 97 
453 05 



I iS 



I 



2.073 75 

2.189 21 

1,600 00 

425 30 

1,252 00 

850 00 

685 00 

4,167 14 

2,200 00 

600 00 

1.400 00 

850 00 

933 00 

2,017 69 

2,553 00 

650 00 

100 00 

1.349 60 

3,487 20 

2.150 00 

900 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

1,300 00 

800 00 

1,500 00 

600 00 

500 00 I 

2.324 45 

1,966 44 

1,334 69 

80O 00 

600 00 

220 00 

600 00 

1,500 00 



1,799 96 
1,784 81 



I 



219 60 
129 00 
894 65 
411 25 
648 00 



232 75 

348 00 i 

725 00 I 

1,232 00 . 

48 25 

75 50 I 

460 40 ! 

121 00 ; 



242 00 I 



188 00 I 
626 00 



1,399 00 
496 00 
449 50 
8 60 
407 75 
391 00 



104 OO 
795 50 
663 50 
4'22 83 



868 25 



2,041 01 



.799 00 


1,196 00 1 


2.400 00 


%3o ; 


1.400 00 


1,107 76 


7tX) 00 


1.118 00 1 


700 00 


657 10 j 


800 00 


1.563 00 1 


1.500 00 


802 50 ; 


1,000 00 


106 50 


1,600 00 


774 50 


1.400 00 


(>S4 00 , 


5^)0 00 




950 00 





800 00 


1,011 80 : 


550 00 




2.100 00 




5,400 00 


(V» 0«) 


:.141 28 


584 00 ; 


2,020 00 


4J5 50 


725 00 


174 00 



9 c. ; 

1,234 88 
425 33 

1,384 38 
69 07 

1,228 03 , 
637 98 
459 55 



1,069 21 
369 30 
352 97 
251 24 
444 63 
94 13 
770 72 
680 34 



1,661 99 

3,188 21 

193 61 

289 48 

784 42 

897 10 

81 68 

19 46 

464 39 

727 91 

920 42 

18 Oi« 

37 00 



843 00 
179 45 
974 88 
856 84 
7,313 03 
734 58 
795 72 
6 10 

854 90 
209 36 
141 93 
124 04 
311 72 
638 74 
115 92 
9.926 00 
366 85 
345 20 
310 87 
48 00 
686 84 
169 64 
606 00 
10,890 40 
621 75 
41 00 
23 00 



4,670 04 
4.243 80 
4,315 46 
3,078 84 
5,294 73 
8,352 14 
2.147 50 
5.616 65 
5 170 71 
2,930 54 
5,830 88 
2,528 06 
3,564 41 
4,172 94 
4,813 78 
3.701 22 
1,342 00 

3.972 57 
10.226 06 

4,429 97 
3.558 80 
4,781 63 
4,899 41 
2,703 24 
2,628 56 
4.428 02 
2.775 95 
8,788 87 
3,312 09 
3.695 48 
8.870 95 

3.614 44 
2,179 74 
2,188 03 

4.973 46 
10,960 58 

3.090 44 

5.218 03 
4.826 26 

4,866 75 
4,806 12 
4,116 05 
3,463 45 

3.219 34 
5,213 21 
6,186 71 

11.032 50 
4.176 38 

4.615 38 
3.054 07 
2,108 70 
3.917 65 
1.641 91 
4.067 08 

15,360 00 
3.58<i 20 
3.566 44 
1,828 10 



S 

i 



f c. 

2.684 00 
3.270 00 
2,442 77 
2,261 91 
3,364 34 

2.176 00 
1,440 00 
4,646 00 
3,842 55 
2.115 00 
4.706 56 
1.750 00 
2,200 00 
3,214 40 
8.3S0 00 
2,300 00 

750 00 
1.590 00 
4,710 99 
2,679 87 
2,625 6ti 
2,989 80 
2,738 05 
1,946 00 

2.177 50 
3.247 50 

21 76 
2,350 00 
2,102 00 
2,748 31 
2.546 50 
2.042 33 
1,493 00 
1.300 00 
2,393 84 
2,883 55 
2,051 50 
3.210 00 
3.828 04 

3,524 08 
3.a')6 00 

2,900 no 

2,473 00 
2.296 15 
8.600 00 
3.424 27 
880 00 
2.550 00 
3,070 46 
2,300 00 
1.250 00 
2.636 25 
1.310 26 
1,919 08 
2,613 83 
2,171 98 
•2.400 00 
1.500 00 



♦ Grant for Cadet Corps included. t School established in 1904. J Including grant for Technical Education. 



im 



' EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



37 



HIGH SCHOOLS,— Continned. 
SUtement — Continued . 



Expenditure. 



e 

I 



I^C 






IPl 



0^ ! 



eg. a 



n 



11 

Isi 



Charges per year. 



I 



* c 



.S4 68 




486 09 
536 G4 
536 65 
713 34 
553 S2 
457 00 
303 21 
912 13 
942 44 
3«0 00 
724 72 
286 S2 
942 85 
958 54 
6«8 12 
523 a*) 
34 02 , 
451 91 ' 
1.290 00 . 
915 70 I 
851 18 , 
605 89 , 
615 84 I 
200 03 I 
311 23 
570 57 ' 
442 38*1 
740 02 
454 75 i 

819 11 . 
6:« 27 

1/298 a5 

663 64 

176 H5 

2,221 41 

2,015 56 

820 44 
M3 &5 
656 14 

931 96 
466 96 ' 
792 65 
892 00 
66 29 I 
768 98 ' 
1,280 «.« i 
167 31 
'M6 89 , 
902 M ; 
459 74 ' 
221 00 
828 62 
183 55 
301 06 
490 28 
494 61 
578 68 
328 10 



S c. 

3,292 01 
4.240 06 
3.091 95 
3.078 H4 
4.006 39 

2.788 90 
1.821 60 
5.616 65 
4.819 54 
2.536 75 
5,616 46 
2,084 90 
3,286 08 
4,l?i 94 
4.065 62 
2.961 37 

1.223 33 

2.224 64 ' 
6,365 76 ! 
3,681 63 I 
3,520 25 I 
4,781 63 
3,402 39 
2.300 » 
2.554 63 
4.146 96 
2.650 62 
3.260 02 
2.572 30 I 
3.695 48 
3.370 95 
3.377 13 
2.179 74 
1,524 97 
4,652 74 
6.605 84 
2,871 94 
4,117 61 1 
4,826 26 

4,579 54 i 
3.931 '29 ! 
3.957 12 i 
3,410 00 I 
2.749 46 I 

4.789 53 ' 
4,705 22 
2,894 02 
3.973 12 
4,389 11 
2.908 03 
1,633 00 
3.917 65 
1.594 47 
2 ♦»2 83 

15.240 95 
2.975 .52 
3,566 44 
1.828 10 



1,378 03 

3 74 

1,223 51 



1,288 34 
568 24 
325 90 



351 17 
393 79 
214 42 
4U 16 
278 88 

'"'748'i6 

739 85 

118 67 

1.747 93 

3.860 29 

748 34 

38 55 

'i;497 62' 
402 71 
73 98 
281 06 
125 33 
528 85 
739 79 



237 31 

"'663 06 
320 72 

4.344 74 
218 50 

1.100 42 



287 21 
874 83 
158 93 
53 45 
469 88 
423 (i8 
430 49 
8.138 48 
203 26 
2-26 27 
146 04 
475 70 



47 44 


1.434 25 


119 05 


610 r>8 





Res. $1 ; Co. and others $6. 
Res. free; non-resident $10. 
ifio. 

Res. free; Co. 95; others $10. 
$10. 
Free. 

Res. free: others $25. 
Form I $4 ; F. II $6 ; others $7.50. 
H. S. D. Form I free ; others $10. 
SIO. 
Free, 

Free; other Co's $4.50. 
H. 8. D. $6; Co. free. 
Res. free ; Co. $5 ; others $10. 
Free. 
$10. 
Free. 
Free. 

I Res. free; others SIO. 
■ Form I free ; Town $9.60; Co. $10. 
I Free. 
;$10. 

Res. and Co. $10; others riO. 
Res. $5 : non-resident $10. 
Free. 
,H. S. D. free ; others, $10. 

I Free. 

I Res. free; Co. and non-resident ^5. 

I Form I $7 ; others $10. 

|$10. 

\ Form I $5 : others $10. 

Free. 

Free. 
$10. 

Free. 

Free. 

Res. free ; Co. $5 : non-res. $25 or 65^ of 

C*08t. 

H. S. D. $8; others $10. 
Co. free; non-res. $10. 
F. I, $7 ; others $10. 
$10. 

Res. $7 ; non-res. $10. 
S10» 

Town, first year $5 ; $8 ; others $10. 
H. S. D. $5; others $10. 
Res. $6; non-res. $10. 
,S10 : Form I free to res. 
Free. 
Free. 
$10. 
Free. 
Free. 

Froe ; Commercial course $12. 
^\. 

$0 ' $8 
H. S. b. free; others $10. 



38 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES ANI> 
I.— Table H.— Financial 



High Schools. 



Receipts. 



I 



c 

3 




i 



I 



1 



I 



84 



OrangcTille 

Oshawa 

Paris.. 

Parkhill 

Pembroke 

Petrolea 

Picton 

Port Arthur 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan 

Prescott 

Rat Portage (Keuora). 

RichmondHill 

SaultSte. Marie 

Simcoe 

Smith's Falls 

Smith ville 

Stirling 

Streeteville 

Sydenham 

Thorold 

Tillsonburg 

Toronto Technical . . . 



86 Trenton 

86 Uxbridge 

87 Vienna 

88 Walkerton . . . 

89 Wardsville . . . . 

90 Waterdown ... 

91 Waterford .... 

92 Watford 

93 Welland 

94 Weston 

95 Wlarton 

96 Wllliamstown 



1 Totals High Schools 

2 " Collegiate Institutes. 



9 c. 

798 83 
761 35 
624 40 
687 18 
714 50 
735 93 
841 12 

1.186 32 
448 31 
572 "23 
855 8H 

♦684 55 
425 78 
599 40 
988 00 
515 91 

1,052 50 
778 33 i 

681 16 ;. 
509 48 
515 46 ! 
445 22 1 
565 04 
551 53 ' 
616 48 ! 

1,620 00 I . 

648 51 I 
*677 09 I 
440 73 p 
746 19 I 
438 46 I 
499 29 
6a5 52 • 
671 37 • 

682 98 ' 
525 67 
599 86 ' 
612 97 ' 



1,100 00 I 

1,513 18 I 

624 40 I 

587 18 1 

714 50 , 

1,621 90 

2.405 00 I 



448 31 I 
791 18 I 
1,561 50 I 
734 55 
575 36 I 
406 73 I 



808 14 i 

I 

2,089 15 



685 00 
715 53 
1.150 00 
2,100 00 
6X9 41 
928 05 



3 Grand totals 1904. 

4 •' '• 1903. 



5 Increases . 

6 Decreases . 



7 Percentages . 



977 80 
828 20 
540 78 

1,190 95 
438 46 
899 29 

1.290 95 ! 

1,865 00 I 

1,705 21 I 
700 00 I 
713 25 . 
729 82 I 



» c. 

2,600700 
3.700 00 
I.SUOOO 
1,15000 
3,671 71 
3.200 00 
3,500 00 
2,300 00 

771 36 
1,000 00 
1,976 73 
1,335 86 

852!38 
2,(W) 00 
1,761 44 

300 00 
4,225 00 
1,H17 75 I 
3,312 59 < 

800 00 • 
1.652 28 I 

250 00 

i.ioo'oo'i 

1.300 00 
22,615 74 

3.219 47' 
1,300 00 

575 50 I 

2,300 00 

340 00 

450 00 

700 00 

700 00 ! 

1.800 00 I 

700 00 I 

1.100 00 ' 

2,(>58 01 I 



1,389 90 I 

584 25 I 

179 07 I 

892 75 I 



200 26 

145 90 

875 38 

589 68 

12 15 

2.815 34 I 

1,661 46 

39 05 

35 00 

I 



440 00 

1.010 00 

333 00 


211 80 
48 74 
578 70 



102 00 I 



6-28 25 

723 00 

16 UO 

• 225 50 


295 00 
198 50 
426 20 


280 00 
5,299 72 


724 29 

649"64' 

210 00 
344 00 




439 25 


463 66 
378 00 



79 09 I 
65 00 
213 32 I 
12 85 j 
58 71 
57 00 
881 78 
202 79 ' 
975 91 
205 17 
404 30 
128 51 
2,198 00 

223 00 
342 74 

678 66 

38K 40 

280 51 

373 08 

792 65 

1,713 5S 

1,415 98 

215 12 

l:45S 60 

6.744 10 



6,083 99 
6,704 68 
3.608 20 
8,806 79 
5.112 86 
8,373 17 
8.407 68 
3,525 87 
1,702 98 
3,015 21 
5,462 85 
3.666 66 
1.853 52 
8.267 22 
2.814 14 
2,465 62 

6.013 35 
4,759 94 , 
4.306 25 ' 
2.826 21 I 
8.381 06 I 

3.014 63 > 

3,2% 41 ; 

2.745 24 I 
3.253 04 
31,733 46 

5,068 81 
3,872 82 
2,235 62 
5,275 18 
1.707 46 
2.565 66 
3.389 12 
5.389 20 I 
\m4 17 I 
2.603 79 I 
4,249 71 
10.744 90 



62,244 84 I 
58.554 65 



92.095 92 ; 
56,175 45 I 



160.943 34 
286,790 70 



41.225 52 
75.532 52 



83.543 36 
43.761 35 



440.052 9K 
520,814 67 



120,799 49 
118.772 82 



148.271 37 
149.2h8 03 



447,734 04 
392.965 94 



116.758 04 I 127.301 71 
111.028 26 104,6S2 31 



9(J0,8<)7 «i5 
876.737 36 



2,026 67 ' 54,768 10 I 

1.016 66 ' I. 



5.729 78 , 22,622 40 84,130 29 



13.25 



4.238 00 
4.627 87 
2,770 00 
2,820 00 
»,8]3 67 
3.747 48 
4.750 00 
3,041 73 
1.400 00 
2.380 00 
4,485 ftS 
2,880 00 
1.350 00 
2,379 96 
2.200 00 
1,829 25 
2,»*4 62 
3.915 00 
3.677 ,S0 
1.630 00 
1,868 25 
1,477 50 
2,340 64 
1.800 00 
2.279 02 
21,915 96 

3,052 08 
2,949 35 
l.Ul 31 
3,SOO 00 
1.20O 00 
l,90O 00 
2,336 97 
2.826 50 
Z,0hO 00 
1.862 R5 
2,278 26 
2.610 75 



269.924 28 
350. 7S5 99 



620.710 27 
STl.^'iS 64 



49,151 63 



70.77 



* Grant for Cadet Corps include<l. 



19U5 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



39 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Om^iwierf. 
Statement — Omdvded. 



Expenditure. 




ChATgee per year. 



Town |9 ; others flO. 
17.50. 

Free ; Ck>. and non-re«. $10. 
$6: $8; SIO. 
Free. 
Free. 

Free ; non-res. |I0. 
Free. 
Free. 

Res. S6.50; others f 10. 
Co . free ; towns iind others 19. 
!7 50. 



3 *:>r2 10 

4 4R.ra 59 



83.780 20 
60.655 29 



Res. free ; non-res. 9^. 
Free. 

$10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Town free ; Co. $5 ; others $10. 

Free. 

$10. 

8.5. 

Res. $5 ; non-res. $6. 

Free. 

$6. 

Ist year, free : 2nd, $9 ; 3rd, $16 ; special, 

$2 per subject. 
Town free; Co $26.10. 
Res. $5; Co. $7.50. 
Free. 
$10. 

Res. $7.50; others $10. 
$6. 
Free. 

$10 ; Co. free. 
Free. 
810. 
$.5. 
Free. 

47 free ; 49 fee. 
9 free ; 83 fee. 

56 free ; 82 fee. 
54 free : 81 fee. 



j I :?» 51 
f, 



3.5U 76 5,248 62 1,301 86 , 61.005 38 23.124 91 2 free ; 1 fee. 



•I 



5.76 



2.56 



1-72 



19.18 



; 4Q.f»i free : 59.42|< fee. 



1 



Vfft per papil, enrolled attendance, $31.65 ; average attendance, $52.42. 



40 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. la 



COLLEGIATE INSTITl'TES 
IL — Table L~ Attendance, Pupils in the 



PupilB. 



Number of piiplH 



Collegiate Institutes. 



S 
g 

o 

I 

"So 

s 



' 1 

I a. 
■ 61 






9 


i\ 








& 


^ 


£ ' 


an 




i ' 


S 


^ 


'C 










&e 






c 


as 


"E 


» 


o 


PQ 



i I ; X 



I 1^ 
I .1 



1 Aylmer .*.... 


1 

94! 

145 
130 
169 
164 
198 

95 

69 
103 
140 
108 
13:S 
373 

71 
256 
141 
490 
134 
125 
104 
119 
397 
234 
101 
168 
105 
108 
132 
103 
217 
135 
104 
169 

80 
292 
201 
322 
147 

m 

60 
141 
126 


93 
143 
117 
215 
170 
257 

91 

94 
140 
147 
160 
189 
480 

89 
317 
164 
492 
134 
166 
185 
171 
306 
246 
118 
196 
155 
110 
2a5 
145 
282 
195 
110 
214 
101 
845 
240 
306 
157 
125 

87 
216 
212 


187 
288 
247 
384 
334 
455 
186 
163 
243 
287 
268 
322 
853 
160 
573 
305 
982 
268 
291 
289 
290 
703 
480 
219 
364 
260 
218 
337 
248 
499 
3:^ 
214 
383 
184 
637 
441 
628 
3W 
211 
147 
857 
> 338 


110 
166 
140 
237 
195 
266 
110 

89 
139 
169 
167 
182 
508 

94 
344 
168 
590 
168 
166 
164 
174 
410 
300 
142 
246 
155 
119 
178 
154 
309 
192 

i:s<» 

221 

128 

:«4 

262 
370 
175 
129 
90 
215 
201 


171 
262 
. 235 
304 
296 
438 
165 
152 
219 
243 
245 
294 
624 
150 
487 
296 
885 
247 
270 
260 
253 
555 
408 
210 
320 
242 
207 
314 
208 
481 
316 
181 
360 
180 
541 
410 
541 
289 
201 
140 
226 
312 


179 

288 
242 
871 
334 
455 
184 
163 
243 
287 
262 
322 
831 
160 
568 
3a5 
97J 
268 
270 
289 
272 
703 
469 
216 
364 
260 
218 
337 
240 
499 
330 
192 
378 
182 
635 
441 
621 
298 
208 
145 
335 
338 


183 
286 
244 
871 
384 
455 
184 
163 
243 
287 
262 
322 
881 
160 
54l> 
3a5 
971 
268 
287 
289 
272 
699 
468 
217 
364 
260 
218 
337 
240 
499 
327 
190 
378 
182 
636 
441 
621 
299 
208 
145 
118 
330 


162 
182 
155 
147 
296 
251 

78 
152 
134 
184 

85 
222 
261 
120 
385 
259 
885 
175 
184 
202 
220 
*41 
354 
180 
304 
203 
169 
814 
103 
352 
15.' 
135 
236 
152 
375 
362 
178 
284 

93 

80 
200 
312 


177 
197 
171 
158 
320 
290 
78 
152 
207 
262 
118 
132 
620 
160 
313 
259 
971 
20s 
ms 
231 

-r^i 

f«i 
399 
187 
364 
211 
190 
331 
216 
IW 
, 198 
190 
244 
156" 
193 
425- 
559 
216 
161 
140 
200 
838 


S9 


2 Barrie 


IK* 

84 .... 

146 .... 
127i.... 
I80I 

99 .... 

39 11 
100 ... . 

76 

95 ... . 
100 ... . 
:«e> .... 

40 

120 .... 

95 ... . 

:«3 .... 

151 .... 

w 

.Vn 

104 6 

H9 . . . . 

•192.... 

52i .... 

7r.'.... 
la) . . . . 

79; .... 
81 .... 
84), 

147 .... 
lis; 

.SI::: 

fws; 

17S! ... 

921.... 
17-2 .... 
10.},.... 

/••>' 

57 

91; 


8 Berlin 


4 Brantford 


5 Brockville 

6 Chatham 

7 Clinton 

8 Cobourg 

9 Colllngwood 

10 Gait 


U Goderlch 

12 Guelph 


It Hamilton 

14 Ingersoll 

15 Kingston 


16 Lindsay 


17 London 

18 Morrlaburg 

19 Napaiiee 


20 Niagara Falls 

21 Orlllia 


22 Ottawa 


28 Owen Sound 


24 Perth 

26 Peterborough 

26 »Renfrew 


27 Ridgetown 


28 St. Catharines 

29 St. Mary's 


30 St Thomas 


81 Sarnia 

32 Seaforth 

33 Stratford 

34 Strathrov 


35 Toronto (Harbord) 


86 Toronto (Jameson) 


37 Toronto (J arvls) 


38 Toronto Junbtion 


39 Vankleek HUl 


40 Whitby 

4x Windsor 

42 Woodstock 






Totals 


6,789 


8,088 


14,877 


8,865 


13,188 


14,673 


14,489 


9.678 


11,101 


4,720. 32 







* Statistics of preceding year. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



41 



AN-1) HIGH SCH0OLS._o,««„«.<i. 
*■«»«» wbiecfs, and Kxamination Resulta. 



iaifte 



•■'*»«»• bimnches of iiutructfon. 




I ' 3 

3 I 3^ 



£ 






I ^ 





___ 




15(v 


1 
21. 




176 


2 


4 


IW 


4 


40 


230{ 


12 


3 


246 


6 


6 


'277, 


48 


161 


157 


16- 


88 


122 


12, 


48 


1S9'. 




9 


134 


3 




nft' 


6 


1 


210; 


5 


2 


772 


8' 


21 


92! 


i 


M 


392' 


12 1. 




236| 


^i 


7 


T44i 


18! 


28 


218 


14 


70 


216 
IK7 




134 

198 



92l 

2 

98 

129 



98 
122 
101 

86 
296 
186 

95i 

48 
1521 

97, 

85i 

66, 
320; 

84 
112 

52 

28 
104 
134 
164 
120 
176 
198 

84 
196 

60 

78 
120 
106 
203 

95] 

6l 

187 

82 
249 
264 
401 
126 

88 
105 
121 
148 



5,592 



98 
136 
163 

83 
112, 

115; 

58i 

121 

821 

86" 

57; 

109 

211 

54 

104 

202 

324 

70' 

111] 

101 ' 

126' 

97, 

134; 

29 

57 

32 

65 

73 

75 

81 1 

AH 
13-2 

44, 
1081 
76 

131; 

64 
45- 
28 
39 
1171 



9| 
12| 



I 
II2L.. 
243 . 
163 . 
141 . 
300 
338 
172 
121 
139 
IIH 

132 .... 
172!.... 

46i;;.... 

129, .... 

1791 .... 

208 

330 

229 

233 

216 

174 ...., 

3S6 . . . . 

374 ...j 

132 .. 

7-2 
133 
154 
120 
239 
19' 
216 

7(; 

2ir>i.... 

175 

4451 
3821 
B3.V 
171! 
109; 

57 

74 
222 . . . . i 



I 
4,082 8,799 



98 
109 
1S6 
189 
207 
289 

57 
124 

97 
170 

96 
167 
344 

41 
147 
118 
628 

90 

95 
174 
110 
350 
168 

57 
243 
107 
115 
196 

68 
286 
109 
138 
205 

75 
•288 
340 
236 
141 

47 

80 
145 
138 



21' 6.964 



\ 



42 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the various 







Number of pupils in the various branches of instraction 


-'Oon. 








•a 


1 


i 


1 

1 
t 


Special Courses. 


Collegiate Institutes. 


3 


1 


1 

•0 


W 


1 
1. 

li 

< 


i 


1 Avlmer 


98 
129 
161 
164 
146 
289 

77 
124 

97 
120 
131 
175 
800 

41 
187 
118 
628 
110 
110 
205 
110 
407 
240 
103 
243 

97 
115 
195 

86 
236 
135 

94 
150 

75 
177 
265 
196 

98 

46 
100 
198 
130 






98 
46 
130 
167 
140 
196 
79 

i37 

106 
104 

80 
261 

75 

66 
108 
640 
113 
186 
169 

98 
492 
215 
154 


162 
288 
141 
838 

438 

176 
163 
219 
266 
240 
294 
720 
159 

366 

940 
280 
278 
260 
270 
690 
278 
209 








44 
125 
38 

48 
45 
114 
34 
28 
34 
41 
48 
40 
80 
30 

fl 

177 
110 
86 
34 
70 
34 
75 
26 
32 




2 Barrie 


89 
76 
86 
42 
137 

98 

48 
67 
76 
90 

113 
24 
97 
51 

165 
60 
80 

112 
49 
61 
40 


42 
44 
51 
42 
187 
68 
72 
48 
70 
20 
90 
16 
15 
99 
51 
90 
38 
47 
64 
68 
50 
35 










3 Berlin 


44 
86 
42 

137 
9 
98 
27 
64 
12 
90 
26 
5 
93 
35 

165 
38 


96 
77 


108 
73 


8 


4 Brantford 


23 


6 Brockville 












7 Clinton 








8 Cobourg 


45 






9 CoUingwood 




10 Gait 








11 Goderich 








12 Guelph 








13 Hamilton 

14 IngersoU 

15 Kingston 


309 
30 
143 


349 
43 




86 


16 Lindsay 




17 London 


298 


306 




18 MorFiSburg 




19 Napanee 








20 Niagara Falls 

21 Orillia 


87 















22 Ottawa 


36 
44 








23 Owen Sound 








24 Perth . . . 








25 Peterborough 


81 
62 
68 

123 
80 

124 
99 
31 
79 
37 
74 
82 
59 
62 
23 
20 

142 
61 


20 
47 
54 

.35 
7 

124 
56 
45 
60 
32 
80 
12 
47 
64 
23 

62 

44 











26 *Renfrew 


60 
64 

ios 

228 
69 
86 
80 
88 
439 
292 
328 
131 
78 
100 
333 
80 


101 
207 
333 
221 

t^ 

178 
588 
390 

^ 

200 
140 
325 
292 


75 

123 


ai 






27 Ridgetown 


• 


56 
42 
66 

129 
28 
49 

111 
35 
30 
39 
61 
19 
29 
15 
15 
7 




28 St Catharines.. .. . 








29 St. Mary's 

30 St Thomas .... 









61 
99 
31 
90 
10 








31 Sarnia 








82 Seaforth . 








83 Stratford 

34 Strathroy 


98 


118 




85 Toronto (Harbord) ... 

86 Toronto (Jameson) • 

87 Toronto (Jarvis) 
















1*40 
62 








38 Toronto Junction 








89 Vanklcek Hill 








40 Whitby 


80 
139 
61 








41 Windsor 






81 


42 Woodstock 


53 










Totals 


6,906 


2,908 


2,009 


6,369 


1,640 


2,108 


1.180 


997 


2,204 


147 



^Statistics of preceding year. 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



43 



HIGH SCHOOLS. — Continued, 

8abjectB and Examination Results.— Coniinw^d. 



ExAmlnation Resalts. 




I 

o 

e 



it 



i S 

i S 

|a 



St 

11 



8 

si 

ll 
H 

2 



SI 

Si 






1 "O 




SI 


ss! 


ss 


^•Si 


§1 

it 




B a a 




|oD 


?^^ 


i,rt >. 


b vt« 


i^lS 


^'Sa 




^s^ 
aS^ 


55 

1 


5?; 



!i S-l 



111 



M Ota 
55 



i5& 



11 . 
u . 
u 
II 

\^ 

IT 



3 
24 



as 



15! 

13| 

11: 

5 

10, 

15 
10 

13 
20 

15' 
3 
5 





..... 
7 




15 










2 
•2 


20 
21 



29 .. 
20!.. 
11, 
12 . 
9i. 

7:. 
35 

11 - 

15 . 

12 . 
1ft . 

t> . 
21 
19 
11 
21 

17 



a .. 




9. 


^ .. 




20t 


« .. 




8 


41 .. 




9 


4J .. 


t 


14 




I 


677 



1 



13 

11 
37 

9 



21 



20 



33 



304 



^^ 

» 24 
2 
9 
6 
4 
i 
13 
8 
7 
1 
ft 
7 
7 
6 
4 
16 
13 

r 

6 

r 

6! 
il: 

r 

6 

2; 
7 



3 

8 

6 

17 

10: 

"I. 

2 . 
6 
17 . 



3 

251 

1| 



lOi 



23 



82 . 
10 

8 . 

3. 



4 . 
23 . 



18 

13 

41 
4 

101 
1 , 
4". 

12' 

15 . 

Hi. 



13, 



22, 



8' 
111. 



10^ 
9|. 
9 

r 

2 . 

30,. 

20 

10 

6 
10 

1 



3 

1 . 
2, 
5 
3, 



1 . 

4 . 

10 . 

5 . 
8'. 
1 . 



2i 
18' 
12 
12 



402 



160 



150, 



3 
13 



48 



\ 



44 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
II.— Table I.— Attendance, Pupils in the 



High Schools 




Number of Pupils 



1 Alexandria 

2 Almonte 
8 Arn prior 

4 Arthur 

6 Athens.... 

5 Aurora 

7 Beams ville 

8 Belleville 

9 Bowman ville 

10 Bradford 

11 Brampton 

12 Brighton 
18 Caledonia 

14 Campbellford 

15 Carleton Place 

16 Cayuga 

17 Chealey 

18 CoR)ome 

19 Cornwall 

20 Deseronto 

21 Dunda.s 

22 Dunnville . 

23 Dutton, 

24 Ea.st Toronto 

25 Elora 

26 Onex 

27 Fergus 

28 Forest , 

29 Fort William 
SO Gananoque 

81 Georgetown 

82 Glencoe 

83 Gravenhurst 

84 Grimsby 

85 Hagersville 
36 Harriston . . 

87 Hawkesbury 

88 Iroquois 

89 Kemptville. 

40 Kincardine 

41 Leamington 

42 Li8towel 
48 Lucan 

44 Madoc 

45 Markham 
4fi Meaford 

47 Midland 

48 Mitchell 

49 Mount Forest 

50 Newburgh 

51 Newctistle. 

52 Newmarket 
58 Niagara 

54 Niagara I^'alls South 

55 North Bay 

56 Norwood 

57 Oakville 















■2 


>i 


g 


i 


1 


i5 


^ 


K 




1 


S 


1 


e 




« 


08 


"C 




U 


OQ 


•< 


123 


123 


37 


100 


a^ 


31 


88 


128 


44 


88 


88 


42 


190 


191 


95 


69 


69 


26 


56 


56 


36 


178 


255 


43 


80 


126 


51 


92 


94 


51 


158 


187 


68 


36 


36 


33 


76 


108 


42 


105 


112 


43 


42 


100 


37 


89 


93 


27 


GS 


70 


21 


44 


44 


28 


270 


292 


83 


112 


122 


4^ 


123 


123 


45 


116 


121 


37 


176 


216 


109 


85 


85 


10 


47 


79 


48 


84 


84 


86 


131 


142 


69 


83 


83 


42 


77 


77 


15 


109 


150 


50 



68 

64 

67 
114 
181 

34 

129 i 
222 
127 I 

90 ; 
113 : 

115 , 

60 
210 , 

94 

50 , 
106 1 
156 
155 ' 

60 
123 , 

16 

6.'> 

80 
110 ' 

81 



38 
42 
17 
13 
3S 
73 
18 
46 
103 
63 
50 
71 
76 
38 
87 
67 

8 
66 
62 
62 
20 
49 
20 

9 
•24 
58 
29 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



/ 



A\T> HIGH SCHOOLS,^Ccmiinued. 

subjects and Examination BeBallB.— Continued. 



te xbe -wmrUjoa branches of Instruction. 




8 
o 



I 



69 




68 


5 


132 


3 


130 


8 


192 


7 


95 


8 


36 




97 


11 


185 


6 


143 


2 


139 


27 


48 




108 


1 


137 


7 


146 


6 


56 


4 


49 


4 


61 




206 


14 


122 


11 


82 




98 


6 


216 


42 


85 




69 


7 


86 


16 


142 


11 


125 


8 


77 


2 


90 


2 


95 


8 


82 


6 


64 




84 




78 


6 


131 


14 


81 


5 


94 


12 


245 


20 


149 


7 


100 


8 


161 


18 


155 


21 


60 


4 


198 


30 


155 


15 


50 


3 


115 


1 


99 


8 


155 




50 




116 




86 




61 




46 




110 





83 





119 
61 
49 
28 

111 
51 
17 
85 

102 
92 

115 
26 
60 
58 
62 
39 



180 
87 
93 
43 
30 
77 
33 
70 
82 
70 
T2 
87 
35 
66 
32 
26 



67 
59 
77 
92 

112 
79 
41 

101 
32 

183 
82 
38 
51 
55 
82 



36 
56 
90 
120 
22 



I a 



g I s 



34 



H9 
103 
120 
121 
190 
93 
81 
72 
121 
112 
145 
56 
102 
61 
57 
60 
68 
66 
178 
73 
96 
83 
194 
79 
90 
123 
102 
95 
70 
75 
120 
90 
27 



53 
124 
215 
182 

80 
151 
144 

60 
210 
153 

37 

75 
140 
111 

40 

88 

33 

55 

57 
135 

56 I 



a 



75 
71 
43 



2 
33 



20 



93 



82 



76 



13 
48 
19 
84 
78 



58 
80 



74 



30 
78 
142 



55 
"4' 



3 
94 



62 
61 



32 



78 
91 
43 
88 
77 
34 
31 
94 
83 
46 



90 
31 



65 
48 
77 
51 
49 
16 
182 
42 
76 
84 
90 
48 
47 
84 

% 

60 
80 
92 
44 

43 
42 
66 
80 
41 
110 
142 
71 
55 
86 
73 
48 
70 
94 
19 
71 
62 
86 
20 
80 
15 
31 
7 

90 
82 



I 



37 

84 

25 

62 
128 

84 

21 

86 

32 

39 

56 

83 

95 

71 

90 

24 

11 

25 

17 

18 

63 

67 
216 

81 

42 

40 

65 

86 

28 

96 

14 

65 

16 
6 

56 

66 

50 
126 

76 

33 

55 

39 

95 

80 

80 

93 

45 

52 

57 

31 

15 

98 

20 

10 I 

19 I 

60 ; 

29 I 



-S3 



97 
97 
120 
123 
144 
93 
52 
86 
140 
97 
170 
47 
48 
82 
185 
85 
67 
45 
187 
122 
122 
122 
216 
83 
95 
45 
141 
68 
77 
88 
123 
97 
64 
45 
120 
123 
49 
96 
245 
142 
80 
69 
157 
50 
147 
112 
45 
131 
156 
104 
25 
99 
36 
26 
24 
125 
50 






46 



THE REPORT OF IHE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE. INSTITUTES AND 
II. — Table I. — ^Attendance, Pupils in the various 







Number of pupils In the yarious branches of instruction 


.-^Con. 




! 

M 

1 


t 


i 
1 

i 


i 


1 

t 


Special Courses. 


High Schools. 

• 


1 

1 


i 


1 
1 


1o 

II 

c 


tf 

< 


1 Alexandria 


83 
91 
43 

88 
77 
46 
83 
46 
SO 
86 

110 
36 
60 
73 

110 
66 
20 
16 

124 
77 
94 
73 
34 
62 
47 
60 
- 40 
50 
59 
71 
78 
29 
14 
52 
63 
45 
41 
93 
6o 

138 
47 
92 

123 
42 
19 
68 
94 

25 
95 
36 
54 
82 
96 
44 






88 
92 
43 
88 

115 
34 
33 
60 
80 
76 

110 


123 










1? 





2 Almonte 


80 


46 




36 






26 


8 Arnprlor , . . 






27 


4 Arthur 






180 










41 


6 Athens 


"• 












' 84' 


6 Aurora 


34 


20 




1 








26 


7 Beauisville 


1 










15 


8 Belleville 
















1 28 


9 Bowmanville 


6 
26 

48 


32 


76 
1 143 










•26 


10 Bradford 










49 


11 Brampton 

12 Brighton 

13 Caledonia 










191 












18 






50 












40 


14 Campbellford 


25 













15 Garleton Place 




95 








57 


16 Cayuga 












14' 


17 Chealey 






49 








16 


18 Colbome ... 






1 





28 


19 Cornwall 


60 


58 


108 
85 
94 


209 


1 


40 


1 


69 


20 Deseronto .... 




18 


21 Dunda.s 


35 
33 


35 


137 
128 


! 


8 






29 


22 Bunnville 










23 Button 




34 
62 








1 yyl 


24 Blast Toronto 










c 






16 


25 Elora 


.... 


3 


*" 










•24 


26 Essex 


60 
37 
50 


84 








60 




27 Fergus 












, 58 


28 Forest ... 
















1 34 


29 Fort William ... 


19 




77 
150 










4 


80 Gananoque 


8 


77 
78 
44 
47 
53 
63 
45 
41 
9X 
142 
70 




29 






24 


31 Georsretown 






14 


82 Glencoe 








1 • 








21 


83 Gravenhurst.. ... 


16 





i 4r 


1 








*>' .. . 


34 Grimsby 


1 








1-21 


35 Hasrersville 








1 








32 


36 Harriston 


50 






1 


7 







3;J 


37 Hawkesburv .. 






9 


38 Iroquois 


21 








1 




24 


39 Kemptville 

40 Kincardine 






' 




68 


; 48 

12 


46 


178 




48 






1 to 


41 Leamington 

42 Listowe) 








1 35 




92 
77 


155 
110 










! 50 


43 Lucan 


: 17 


29 










, 40 


44 Madoc. 











as 


45 Ma.rkhii.in 


50 
20 


10 
7 






1 


' 


67 


46 Meaford 


44 


146 
42 
133 




...1 




i 52 


47 Midland 








5 


48 Mitchell 






68 
94 
107 


! 






37 


49 Mount Forest 












M 


50 Newburgh 

51 Newcastle 


86 






1 






62 










17 


52 Newmarket 


85 

25 

27 

! ^ 


64 
25 
36 
30 


98 
31 
42 


I4« 
37 




28 
7 






27 


53 Niagara 


........ 




1( 
1 K 


5 


54 Niagara Falls South 

55 North Bay 

56 Norwood 






) 


1 


•■■] 




; 24 






1 




60 




58 


57 Oakville 


•21 


21 


. 


1 


1 


21 


21 











I!W5 



EOaCATlON DEPARTMENT. 



47 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Owetnwed. 

robjectg and Examination Results. — Continued. 



Exainination Results. 




10'. 
5'. 

LSI. 
4 - 



^i 


li 

1. . _ 


9 

-iij 


1 

6 ... 


1 


24 .. 

H ... 
In ... 


2 1 

4 

2 1 

4 

1 


2 


16 ... 

11 ... 









12 . 

3 . 

r. . 
1 . 

4 . 
1 

10 . 



48 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II.— Table I.— Attendance, Pupils in the various 



High Schools. 



Pupils. 



I 



58 Omemee 

59 Orangevllle 

60 Oshawa 

61 Paris 

62 Parkhill 

68 Pembroke 

64 Petrolea 

66 Picton 

66 Port Arthur 

67 Port Dover 

68 Port Elgin 

69 Port Hope 

70 Port Perry 

71 Port Bowan 

72 Prescott 

78 Rat Portaee (Keuora). 

74 Richmond Hill 

75 SanJt Ste. Marie 

76 Simcoe 

77 Smith's Palls 

78 Smithville 

79 Stirling 

80 Streetsvllle 

81 Sydenham •. . 

82 Thorold 

88 Tillsonburg 

84 Toronto Technical 

86 Trenton 

86 Uxbridge 

87 Vienna 

88 Walkerton 

89 WaidsTille 

90 Waterdown 

91 Waterford 

92 Watford 

98 Welland 

94 Weston 

95 Wiarton 

96 Williamstown 



1 Totals, High Schools 

2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes 



8 Grand Totals, 1904 , 
4 Grand Totals, 1908 



5 Increases . 

6 Decreases. 



7 Percentages . 



26 
83! 
85 
67 
75 
94 
72 
95 
24 
42 
48 
96 
68 
31 
44 
40 
58 
56 
81 
64 
86 
26 
24 
44 
33 
60 
810 
77 
66 
16 
76 
15 
58 
56 
80 
71 
32 
50 
50 






I 



5,929 
6.789 



34 

123 
94 
63 
90 
82 
93 

120 
56 
42 
37 

183 
58 
18 
67 
56 
48 
91 
89 

127 
44 
83 
25 
81 
40 
58 

290 
83 
94 
22 
80 
25 
69 
63 
96 

132 
45 
55 
55 



6.903 
8.088 



12,718 14,991 
11,988 13,734 



730 
45.9 



1.257 



54.1 



60 


37 


206 


118 


179 


121 


180 


80 


165 


106 


176 


87 


165 


97 


215 


122 



84 

85 
229 
111 

49 
111 

96 
106 
147 
170 
191 

80 

59 

49 
125 

73 
108 
600 
160 
160 

38 
156 

40 
122 
119 
176 
208 

77 
105 
105' 



B 

o 






40 
52 
50 

145 
63 
28 
57 
41 
50 
74 
90 

127 
51 
38 
36| 
81 
58 
66 

504 
95 
88 
20 
88 
23 
66 
76 

110 

126 
45 
64 
62 



192 
171 
123 
1441 
155 
158 
206 

80 

84 

85 
213 
105 

49 
105 

87 
106 
144 
1551 
186; 

781 

50; 

49 
125 

73 
108 
525 
186 
150 

38 
149 

38 
122 
106 
160 
169 

73 
105 
105 



12^832 

14,877 



7.865 11,881 
8,865, 13.138 



27,709 16,730 25,019 
25,722 16,317' 23,0" 



1,987 1,413 

r 



60.38 



Number of Pupils in the 



I 
I 

s 
S 



1 



201 

179 

180 

165 

176 

165 

215 

80 

35 

85 

229 

111 

49 

111 

96 

106 

147 

170 

191 

80 

59 

49 

126 

73 

108 

625 

158 

169 

38 

150 

40 

122 

115 

168 

201 

77 

105 

105, 






201 

179 

130 

155 

176 

165 

215 

80 

84 

85 

229 

111 

49 

111 

96 

106 

147| 

170 

191 

80 

69 

49 

126 

73 

106 

625 

158 

160 

88 

150 

40 

122 

115 

168 

201 

77 

105' 

1051 



I 






40 

154 

126 

65 

77 

163 

96 

151 

77 

49 

78 

213 

111 

241 

83! 

89 

76 

93 

185 

177 

48 

50 

82 

70 

62 

108 

820 

139 

141 

38 

108 

31 

117 

106 

60 

75 

611 

S^l 
741 



160 
179 
101 
99 
170 
77 
154 
77 
49 
78 
229 
111 
24 
87 
89 
106 
66 
135 
191 
60 
59 
32 
125 
64 
108 
820 
154 
159 
88 
103 
38 
122 
90 
108 
140 
61 
105 



12,625, 12,631! 
14,673' 14, 439 1 



9,336; 
9,678' 



10.419 
11,101 



27,298 27,070 
25,375, 24.885 



19,014 1 
15,239l 



21,520 
17,494 



1,950 1.928! 2.1851 3.775 4,026 



-I- 



90.651 98.51 97.691 68.62; 77.66 



44 

60 
16 
65 
21 
36 
41 
108 
61 
18 
37 
29 



4.422 
4,720 



9,142 

9,187 



32.99 



n 

1 



77 



106 



126 



320 



160 



168 



42 1,026 
32 968 



74 1,993 



.26 



7.19 



i^m 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



49 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— a>n«tnu^d. 

subj(>ct8 and Examination Results. — Continued. 



TArioos bnmches of Instruction. 









1 

1 


1 

i 
1 


1 


'S 
























■3. 
o 


tab 

a 


1 

■c 

< 


i 


t 




1 


a 


1 


1 


1 


>, 


1 


1 


3 


S 


!iM 


40 
154 


40 
120 


60 
194 


60 
202 


63 
196 


1 
19 


25 
143 


■ "33 


43 
164 








53 
94 


63 
127 




2t 


» 


12 


7 


6 


76 


M, 


158 


130 


174 


179 


179 


10 


98 


33 


126 


6 




, 139 


41 


179 




96 


61 


&S 


101 


123 


110 


110 


7 


36 


8 


63 


1 




65 


12 


97 




h6 


ti2 


87 


82 


154 


141 


116 


22 


69 


14 


94 


3 


4 


65 


47 


T7 




87 


(Si 


110 


99 


163 


173 


173 
164 


11 


129 




141 






78 


74 


80 




78 


lit 


96 


96 


158 


165 


7 


124 


i 


128 




119 


162 


64 




165 


44 


(A 


96 


178 


207 


177 
80 


138 


9 


132 


31 


163 




102 


116 


88 


90 




90 


«5 


M 


65 


80 


80 




75 


10 


75 


4 


25 


77 


66 


80 




77 


67 


68 


68 


84 


84 


84 




26 


7 


7r» 


3 


87 


87 


40 


60 




9J 


6K 


60 


60 


85 


82 


53 




30 


8 


77 


3 




49 


41 


78 




82 


e 


100 


100 


213 


184 


178 


i? 


96 


32 


164 


6 


83 


83 


61 


88 




48 


TO 


V& 


111 


100 


101 


83 


6 


64 


29 


61 


4 




84 


17 


63 




67 


7] 


24 


37 
82 


49 
107 


46 

111 


46 
58 


4 


31 
30 


6 


30 
61 






87 
36 


15 
24 


48 
63 




30 


72 




35 


66 


73 


84 
106 


56 
56 


89 
101 


96 
103 


96 
106 


5 


27 
66 


6 


69 
50 






86 
39 


14 
30 


26 
100 




50 


74 ■ 


1 




56 


75 


127 


130 


146 


147 


68 




46 




124 




72 


94 


25 


62 




98 


7«> 


12 


101 


154 


166 


120 


i6 


60 


25 


80 


4 




101 


69 


110 




101 


77 


177 


177 


186 


191 


191 


14 


138 


9 


160 


4 




177 


98 


191 




177 


7?^ 


48 


4S 
24 


' 78 
50 


80 
59 


63 
69 


2 
9 






63 
55 




48 
6 


27 
5 


64 

49 


48 
69 






79 


13 






24 


» 


32 
125 

71 
104 


32 


49 


45 


35 




35 


6 


45 




80 


30 
70( 


35 


45 




18 


SI 


70 
47 
91 


125 

73 

, 107 


125 
70 
107 


125 
70 
95 


4 


103 
62 
60 


12 


109 
63 
64 






16 
40 
60 


114 
90 




44 


8? 






47 


i<3 




76 


76 


71 


M 


200 
136 


525 
112 


1 525 
1 140 


320 

158 


175 
158 


36 

17 


450 
81 












150 
74 


150 

62 




870 


AS 


37 


136 






45 


112 


86 


141 


99 


1 150 


160 


96 


9 


68 


46 


105 


5 


77 


87 


119 


140 




68 


fil 


22 
94 


22 
94 


38 
139 


88 
150 


38 
118 


""ii 


2 
34 


'"*88 


29 
109 






22 
31 


16 
34 


38 
109 




22 


^ 


7 




47 


39 


38 


31 


40 


40 


40 




9 




27 


1 




31 


21 


34 




81 


» 


89 


117 


117 


122 


122 


6 


110 


10 


100 


6 




45 


25 


122 




45 


« 


82 


115 


110 


112 


88 


9 


37 


12 


104 


3 


47 


61 


92 


114 




61 


92 


li? 


116 
107 


156 
, 169 


164 
199 


104 
145 


12 
12 


60 
140 


10 
26 


164 
169 






60 
70 


83 

48 


166 

198 




60 


S3 


4 




61 


M 


62 


61 


72 


78 


41 


3 


36 


12 


50 


1 


25 


25 


13 


39 




26 


to 


68 


68 


> 93 


105 


105 


12 


12 


6 


90 


1 




68 


63 


12 




68 


96 


96 


92 


105 


106 


34 




65 




83 


3 


61 


51 


5 


105 




61 


1 


^A%b 


9.208 


11.814 


12,083 


9.974 


697 


6,639 


922 


8,955 


183 


2.595 


5,871 


4,956 


9,038 


165 


6,192 


: 


».36H 


10,429 


13.435 


13,060 


10.545 


1,062 


9,400 


2.362 


10.454 


464 


2,169 


6.592 


4,082 


8,799 


21 


6,964 


3 


1H.498 


19.632 


1 25.249 


25,143 


20,519 


1,7.59 


16,039 


3.274 


19,409 


637 


4,764 


11,463 


9,038 


17.837 


186 


13,156 


4 


l.%290 


17.580 


•23.246 


23.840 


17,873 


1,618 


14,522 


3,229 


18.881 


602 


298 


9.442 


6.214 


14,240 




11.296 


6 


3.2(A 


2,102 


, 2,003 


1,303 


2,646 



141 


1,517 


45 


578 


35 


4,466 


2,021 


2,824 


3,597 




1.860 






1 1 1 1 










i 








' 


«.74 


70.85 


91.12 


90.74 


74.05 


1 6.35 


57.88 


11.81 


70.04 


2.3 


17.19 


41.37 


32.61 


64.87 


.67 


47.47 



4E. 



50 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
IL— Table I . —Attendance, Pupils in the various 



Number of pupils in the various branches of 
Instruction.— Concluded . 



High Schools. 






Special Courses. 



I:? 






68 Omemee 

59 Orangeville 

60 Oshawa 

61 Paris , 

63 Parkhill 

6S Pembroke 

64 Petrolea 

65 Picton 

66 Port Arthur 

67 Port Dover 

68 Port Elgin 

69 Port Hope 

70 Port Perry 

71 Port Rowan 

72 Prescott 

78 Rat Portage (Kenora). 

74 Richmond HUi 

7ft Sault Ste. Marie 

76 Simcoe 

77 Smith's Falls 

78 Smlthville 

79 Stirling 

80 Streetsvllle 

81 Sydenham 

82 Thorold 

83 Tillsonburg 

84 Toronto Technical 

85 Trenton 

86 Uxbridge 

87 Vienna 

88 Walkerton 

89 Wardsville 

90 Waterdown 

91 Waterford 

92 Watford 

93 Welland 

94 Weston 

95 Wiarton 

96 Williamstown 



20 .. 

76 .. 

1S9: 

851 
87 1 
78!.. 
88 
84 

62, . . 
37!.. 
50 ., 
65i 
67 
87 
50' 
55 ., 
581., 
114: 
101 1 
1771 
27I 

24 . 
10 . 
70,. 
47 
711. 

370I 

90' 
22,. 
72, 
81' 

46. 
61. 
6O; 

25 ' 
421. 
51'. 



i 1 1 



1 c 



"§s ■ 
•no j 



37 



761. 
72 123 . 

20, 65 . 

80 77 



44 



165 



9(5, 
1071 
62' 
37. 
50 
54 



72 



37 



56 . 

55. 
5Sl. 
93|. 
101 

12s;. 
27. 



881. 

37i. 



57 . 
16 . 



12 1. 



24 

43 

41^ 

88! 

30 

70 88 

51 

15' 

Sol 

10 

S9I 

73 

IV 

24 



60 



10;. 



32 . 
70 . 

44|. 

71,. 
190!. 
112, . 

99 



15;. 
31 . 
32,. 
49 . 
30-. 
lf> . 
14,. 
451. 
17 . 
17 . 



158 . 



2i. 
23 . 



551 

"li' 



50 . 



I5I 



1 Totals, High Schools , 

2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes. 



8 Grand Totals, 1904 
4 Grand Totals, 1903 



6,428 
6,90t) 



1,896' 
2.908 



1.169 
2.009 



107 1. 
41 . 
42'. 
51'. 

5.227: 
6,3691 



11 . 

4S , 

2 . 

•23 . 

19 . 
42 . 

20 . 
4S,. 
2G . 
17 . 
2> . 
29 . 



2.989. 898 120 120 2,913 'n$ 
1,640 2,108, 1,180! 997 2.204 147 




4a E 



1W5 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



51 



HIGH ^HOOLS.— Continued, 

Kibjtt'tsand Examination Resulte. — Omdnded. 



Examination Results. 




]2 . 
5' 

6 . 

9 . 

1 , 
3 . 

5 . 

2 . 

6 . 
9 
8 . 



2 . 
4 . 

1 . 
6 . 

2 . 

y . 

10. 

2i. 



10 . 
8 



lOjp 
3 







1 


1 




1 


12 
5 ... 


3; 


"1 


8 


1, 


2 


3 ... 




1 


fi ... 






{\ 



11 

2 



9'. 
I2I. 



47 

23 



TO 



1,230 



4.44 



21- 



4* 
11 



4 

2' :; 

4 i 4 

3 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 



9 

l.H 



343 
304 



201. 
2/8 



21 
Ift; 



309 
402' 



4b i 
140, 



53 
160 



72 1 
loOi 



*i| 



170 



711 
089 



1.S81 
121 ! 



2. 33 1 



.13, 



.61 



22 



2.06 



24 i 
14 



30 

48 



213 
272 


222! 
26H 


38 
41 


78 
84 


1 1 


59 


46 


3j 


6 



.28 



52 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. -Table K.— 



Collegiate Institutes. 



1 Aylmer. B 

2 Barrie i B 

3 Berlin B 

4 Brantford B 

5 Brockville S 

6 Chatham | B 

7 Clinton ! B 

8 Cobourg i B 

9 Collingwood i B 

10 Gait I S 

11 Goderich l B 

12 Quelph 8 

13 Hamilton lB«feS 

14 Ingeraoll ! B 

16 Kingston B 

16 Lindsay | B 

17 London ' B 

18 Morrisburg I B 

19 Napanee I B 

20 Niagara Falls B 

21 Orillia ' B 

22 Ottawa S 

28 Owen Sound I B 

24 Perth | B 

25 Peterborough \ B 



26 IRenfrew 

37 Kidgetown 

26 St. Catharines... . 
29 St. Mary's 

80 St. Thomas 

81 Samia 

82 Seaf orth 

38 Stratford 

34 Strathroy 

86 Toronto (Harbord) 
36 Toronto (Jameson ) 

87 Toronto (Jarvis) . . . 

88 Toronto Junction . 

39 Vank leek Hill 

40 Whitby 

41 Windsor 

42 Woodstock 



Totals . . 



I I 

S !l 



l-.l 



fA 

2 
2 
3 
1 

4 

3 

^% 

12-5 

2 

3 



i..| 






664 
618 
668 
637 
818 
786 
681' 
770l 
643! 

1,103. 
708| 
994 

1,012 
696 
690 

1,238 
945! 
657 
944' 
753; 
60^1 

1,370 . 

1.401 
7371 . 
613| 
43o . 
653, 
631 
7101 
871' 
766' 
765| 
99ol 
976 

1,2101. 

1,6321. 

1.352' 
842 
♦i23 
631 
984 

1.088 



Equipment. 



S 

c 



t 



g 



250. 
835 
215 
100 
500 
120 
480 
IW 
180 
lOOl 
286i 

9o; 

I8O1 
390 
256 
560. 

185j 
2451 
315 
270; 



90 



320 



180' 
270 
140' 
450 
270 
180, 
450' 
180 



1401 

270 
180 



8811 
270' 



703 

726 

1,312 

878 

1,074 

1,541 

818' 

723' 

681 • 

1,147 

683' 

882 

1.546 

769 

689 

1.092 

2,900 

1,265 

931 

622 

763 

1,638 

1.825 

821 

886 

581 

1.099 

815 

692 

1.106 

716 

776 

1.154 

931 j 

2.1761 

2,2931 

1,1761 

8841 

731! 

5<;8| 

990' 
1.585' 



o 

3 

c 

s. 

OS 

a 

u 



s 

f 
I 






I 

"3 



140l 331 

136 > 5; 

116| 20| 

1081 27i 

187 10 . 

201 1 12 

1281 5 
123! .... 

96i 81 

67' 

71; 20 

1641 12 
25 



680 
1,730 



1.0001 . 



85 
90 
480 



Religious and 

other 

exercise*. 



4? t 



400 
'266 



121 
75' 



600, 
765, 

1,200! 
1,200: 
2.500: 
2.500, 

811 ! 



164|. 
63i 

no;. 
35 

231 
-200 
.V)7 
909 
231 



176 
50; 



149. 10 
173! 43; 

157' ^7i 

126 ~8i 

87 25i 
109j 681 

280 150 . 
122 20'. 
165 10; 
149 261 

70i 12!. 
143 47i 
135 18 

120 25, 

110 181 



600 

980 

800 
1,063 
1.800 



100 
46! 
700! 
140' 



560 



127 

138 



220; 261. 
116 28, 



900 
700 
700 
983 
1,380 
600 1 



:26i 

299i 
187i 

251 
1181 
2T8I 

1841 100 

25' 35 

267 500 

160' 



1751 
1551 



181 35I 
107 32I. 



380 
4,000. 
4,000| 
8,000 



90 

76 

84 

374 

248 

66 

117; 

106 

7101 

790 

200 



46 

115| 



31 
lOi 



1301 35 
161 15 



3,000: 

850 
3.0001 
2.000 



2361. 
209!. 
200 
180' 



200j. 
801 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

v\ 

r 1 

..: 1 
!• 1 

.. 1 

..: 1 



1 1 



19,35,9161 9,971 45.078' 5.697 962' 49.882 8,725; 2.817! 21 



40 



16 32 



♦Gymnasium is part of the main building. t Ivstimat4?d . J Stiitistics of preceding year. 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Cbntinwd. 
^OBeeUaneom Information. 



ifamber of papilEin-^ / ^°™^m£?''P^^ 



OecuiMition of Pareati. 



191. 




87. 


88 


62 


39 


101 


27 


60 


39 


98 


100 


156 


26 


82 


78 


131 


26 


164 


148 


98 


49 


37 


78 


50 


19 


&2 


61 


42 


8 


67 


79 


66 


12 


73, 


60 


122 


22 


89' 


105 


87 


32 


130 


68 


78 


27 


292 


119 


246 


96 


40' 


63 


45 


10 


177l 


72 


202 


85 


84l 


103 


67 


26 


3691 


174 


308 


110| 


42! 


133 


43 


24 


60 


119 


41 


36 


90 


56 


93 


29 


92' 


75 


59 


39' 


382: 


32 


131 


85 


122 


1?2 


109 


44 


43 


66 


78 


31, 


81 


52 


140 


52l 


81, 


73 


75 


111 


16i 


95 


28 


16 


llOi 


54 


87, 


17 


561 


108 


60. 


20 


180 


139 


135 


21 


9^) 


46 


103 


27 


45 


96 


51 


8 


114 


80 


107 


49 


44 


86 


32 


'22 


291,. 


• . . 


148 


113 


152. 


20 


16;j. 


45 


301 


26' 


170 


96 


109 1 


44 


89 


30 


15 


131 1 


•Ab 


9, 


30 


48 


41 


20 


ia5 


70 


143 


271 


108 


99 


54 


27. 



I I 

644 291 1,349 4,689: 3,460 4,068 1.541; 1,1 



V 



54 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 15 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES ANI 
III. — Table K . — Miscellaneoui 



High Schools. 



8 
I 

« 

a 






I 



1 Alexandria.. 

2 Almoin^ 

8 Amprior 

4 Arthur 

5 Athens 

6 Aurora 

7 Beainaville 

8 Belleville 

9 Bovmanville 

10 Bradford 

11 Brampton 

12 Brighton 

13 Caledonia 

14 Camnbellford 

It) Carleton Place 

16 Cayuga 

17 Chenley 

18 Colbome 

19 Cornwall 

20 Deaeronto 

21 Dundas 

22 Dunnville 

28 Dutton 

24 East Toronto 

25 Elora 

26 Essex 

27 Fergus 

'26 Forest 

29 Fort William 

30 Gananoque 

31 Georgetown 

32 Glencoe 

33 Gravenhurst 

34 Grimsby 

l>5 Hagersville 

o6 Harriston 

37 Hawkesbury 

38 Iroquois 

39 Kemptville 

40 Kincardine 

41 Leamington 

42 Listowel 

43 Lucan 

44 Madoc 

45 Markham 

46 Meaford 

47 Midland 

48 Mitchell 

4\t Mount Forest 

r>0 Newburgh 

f»l Newcastle 

[)2 Newmarket 

53 Niagara 

M Niagara Falls Sonth 

5o North Bay 

56 rCorwo* jd 

37 Oakvillc 



B . 

S 

B 

B 

S 

B I 

B I 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B , 

S 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B . 

B 

B 

B 

B 

S 

B 

S ' 

B 

B , 

B 

B 

i ' 

F 

B 

B 

B ; 

B 

B : 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B I 

B 

B 

B 

g I 

B 
B 
B 
B 



I 

a 



Ii 



1 
4 



2 

4 : 

IS 

2'.. 
3 ' 
1 ' 
2 

3^. 
4 



4 

3 . 

3 . 

2-.') 
2 

1 

5 



3 
2 



1 

2 . 
2 

lij 

v.. 






322'. 
952' 



71 • 



2(;8 



135 



951 



45 



325 

510, 

420| I 

310 

'3M 

554 ' 

329 ■ 

450 65, 

29«; 

4481 

311 

(>98l 

2181 

124i 

'2.59 ' 

518 315; 

346 1 

4701 
393 
2a5 
289 
2331 
380| 
2741 
3a5| 
180 
573i 
258 
373 
251 
208 
341 
14; 

133; 

641 50i 

309 1 

62oj 520 

323 

333 

315| 90 

105' 

244i 

3601 27(1 

8031 ; 

'2'M- 

4;i3 ' 

441 

219' ' 

22 4 i 177 
148 100 



35 



Equipment. 



X — 



iS 



3 

> 



359 . 

288 



35. 
300 



4.5:? 

449, 
351 
<y>5 
477 
459. 
287 
54>4 
514 
330 
610, 
319 
553, 
4721 
315i 
•3401 
• 2441 
309 
:i85 
394 
548 
.589, 
.525, 
279 
358' 
492 
244 
451 
214 
140 
371 
547 
387 
290 
.5:^4 

3:jo 

14|. 
1.211 1 
424' 
040 
419 
507 
Oa') 
387 
770 
513 
192 . 
429 
548 

3;j8 

378 

.V83 

170 

344, 

3101. 

290 

271 1 



85 

78 
89 

:-s 

•i'J 

09, 

70| 
174 

601 

SO 

67 

42,. 

33 

291. 

65 

241. 

72. 
109! 

r26' 
8«; 

109 
(>4' 
31 1. 
25 
43 1 
69 
76 j 
94, 
57 

.•308 
70 
.51 
59 
29 
54 
22 . 




142 

08 
92 
92. 
55 
731 
90 
55 
81 



64 
38 . 
NT . 
4(> 
74; 
K», 

41 ; 



10 .... 
8 


•■ <• 






1 




21. .....I. ::::::::::: 


... i 


8 1 


11 


41 


43 


25 


....1 



34 , 



40 . 



5 . 
12 . 

4 
20 . 
23 . 



210 
39 . 



50 . 



.)< 


1 1 


28 700 220 
9 


30' 1 
1 


21 




3i.. : . 





114 , 
10 . 

28 . 
50 . 
10 . 
28 . 



15'. 



.1 II 



2M' 



34,, 
32 . 



....' 15 
2.')0 42 



38 13 

7 1.2?50 239 



566: 



233 . 
10 . 



23 
10 . 
3 . 



21 . 
64 



301. 
1.200! . 



141..... 



1. 



•|- 



1- 

fc::l;; 

li 1 
1'....).. 
1 ...... 

r. ...'.. 

l! 

li 

1' 

1 ...... 

li 

1 

1 1 .. 
1I....1.. 
1....!.. 
1 . 
1 

r. 

1|. 
1' 
1 . 



1 ... 



lUOo 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— (bn/mu^d. 
I nf ormation. — Omt inued. 



Xomber of popils i n 



Number of pupils 
from 



Occupation of Pan 



1 '■ r 1 ■ 

^ S :^ 



.a 




^ 


>» 


» 


o 


o 




£ 


Q 


tc 


o 


a 


5 


•c 


c 


ca. 






ii 


S?*^ 
w « 


"i 


II 


S 
2 


S^ 


1 


•sf 


o 



37,. 

^? 
30 

So 
2ii 

21 .. 



4 

1:2 

8 



36 




JJ 


46 


14 


49' 


:i 


481 
151 


29 


33, 


40 


^i 


37 


9' 


571 


9 


'Jt:^i 


4 


Ifi,' 


3 


321.. . 


. - - 1 


69 


141 


34i 


Jl' 


*>. . . 


- - - ' 


34 


5 


77 
111 


42 


41 


7, 


35; 


17 




58 


11 





'J 

2 
11 

lOI 




5ft 
51 

55 

3», 
t>7 

54 ... 
54 

^ .. 

Ti AD 



19 

» 

12, 

20; 






H, 

















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56 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



CX>LLEG1ATE INSTITUTES AND 
III — Table K.— Miscellaneoue 



BlgbSehoola. 



« 



Equipment. 






Si 

•c 

S. 



I 



> 



Religious and other 
Exercises. 



I 

"2 



68 Omemee 

69 Orangeville 

60 Oshawa 

61 Paris 

62 Parkhlll 

68 Pembroke 

64 Petrolea 

65 Picton 

66 Port Arthur 

67 Port Dover 

68 Port Elgin 

69 Port Hope 

70 Port Perry 

71 Port Rowan 

72 Prescott 

78 Rat Portage(Kenora) 

74 Richmond Hill 

76 SaultSte. Marie.... 

76 Simcoe 

77 Smith's Falls 

78 SmithvUle 

79 Stirling 

80 Streetsville 

81 Sydenham 

82 Thorold 

83 Tillsonburg 

84 Toronto Technical. . 
86 Trenton 

86 Uxbridge 

87 Vienna 

88 Walkerton 

89 Wardsville 

90 Waierdown 

91 Waterford 

92 Watford 

9i Welland 

94 Weston 

96 Wiarton 

96 Williamstown 



1 Totals, High Schools 

2 Totals, Col. Institutes 



8 Grand totals, 1904. 
4 Grand totals, 1903. 



6 Increases.. 
6 Decreases. 



7 Percentages . 



B 
•B 

B ' 
B 
S&B 



2 

3 
8 



:^ 



2 

1 
1 



646 
260 
358 
316 
256 
403 
665 
297 
389 
241 
583 
288 



200 
142 
140 



i; 

...I 

ii 



90 
500 



60' 



350 



108 



65 



110 



180 



270 
204 
189 
113 
314 
654 
123 
195 
179 
354 
270 

235 

150' 1,700 

570l 

349! 84 

2761 

334; 180 
2281 

2ft5r 
342! 
334 100 

23H ; 

274: 6 

326; 
311: 



42131.367 6,417 
19::}5.916 9,971 



. I 61' 67,283 
. I 55 (50,479 



16,388 



. 44.2 . 



182 
59r 
4821 
5591 
500! 
496 
507 
663 
4341 
4431 
350 
584 
457 
229 
367 
411 
299 
224 
688' 
4951 
278t 
2911 
225 
316 
424! 
530' 
6,200 
354 
41 
269 1 
457 1 
223 i 
320 
410 
405' 
59S 
434 
308 

35S: 



57 
98 

108 

98; 

. 92: 

441 

118 
73 
23 
43 
95 
45 
44 

112 
53 
51 
35 

140 
61 
40 
42 
71 
37 
69 
84| 
25 
76 



601 



44; 



20 



50 
50 
100 



200 



ioi: 

-81: 



3 

2 

350 
7 



2.=> !• 



121: 

54' 

74 

58 

64. 
110, 

32 . 
105; 

53'. 

87 



10'. 
3 . 
33 . 
15,. 



47,. 

'is \ 



II... 



1... 





1 .... 
1 1 






1 

1 


1 



■ 




• • • 




















11 _ 












1 








. . . 





45,533 6,698, 1,560 3,616J 2,631 870! 40 
45,078 5,697| 962 49,882 8,725 2.817; 21 



90.611112,395 2..522 
83,14ri| 11,560! 1,942 



7,466| 835 580 



53.498 
55.314 



11,356 3,6871 61 
10,216 3,338i 62 



1,140 



349.. 



9:^; 261 '2T^ 
40 121 Iti 






.1331 :^8 

130< 36! 



4i: 
42 



95 
91 



3I 21 • 

96 27: 30 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Conduded. 



Information. — Concluded. 




58 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Table L. — Protestant Separate Schools. 



Statistics. 






& 



Number of Schools 

Receipts : 

Balances from 1903 

Government grants | 

Municipal grants & assessmts.l 
Other sources. I 



Totals 

Expenditure : 

Teachers' salaries 

School sites and buildings. 

Libraries, maps, etc 

Other expenses 



1 

$ c. 
6 13 
3 60 

80 24 
75 



90 62 



81 50 



It 

CO 08 



D 

Sz; 






oi P 



c 

QQ 

Pk 



5 
^ 



1 
$ C. 

122 63 

2 65 

850 00 

195 96 



1 

.$ 0. 
83 08' 
10 23: 

561 06 
80 00' 



1 ! 

$ c.| 
519 07| 

18 35t 
300 63l 

16 06, 



1 
$ c. 

3 53 

140 69, 

2,152 a5 

3 50' 



5 

$ c. 

734 44 

175 42 

3,444 78 

296 27 



671 24 734 37i 854 11 2,300 57 



250 OOi 



300 00 
129 50, 



300 00 



4,650 91 



• I- 



2 901 211 44 251 08 



Totals! 



Balances on hand 

Teachers : 

Male 

Female 

Certificates 



84 40 461 44 080 58: 405 97| 2,286 38 



35 25 
70 72 



1,647 38 

258 50 

5 00 

375 50 



6 221 209 80 53 79 448 14 



14 19 



Salaries . 



Pmnh : 
Tota\ number attending. 



Boys 
Girls 

Average attendance 

No. in Ist Reader, Part I 

" 1st *' Part II... 

*' 2nd •* 

** 3rd '* 

** 4th '* 

'* 5th " 

" Writing 

" Arithmetic 

** Drawing 

" Geography 

** Music 

** Grammar & Compsitn. 

'* English History 

" Canadian History 

' ' Physiology & Tmprce . 

" Drill & Calisthenics.. 

'* Bookkeeping 

" Algebra 

" Geometry 

" Botany 

" Agriculture 



1 
Temp. 

$156 00 



School houses ( bck. frame or log ) | Log 

Nunil)er of maps i 7 

Number of globes | 



1 
II 



1 
III 



1 
III 



1 

3 

1,1; 3, II 



$250 OOi $300 00, $300 OO'Male, 

I ; $675 00 

I 'Female. 

j $333 00| 



2,578 88 

388 00 

40 25 

911 «4 



3,918 77 



732 14 



1 

7 
1,I;4,II;2,III; 

1 Temp. 
Av. Male. 

$675 00 
Av. Female, 

$286 00 



34 
20 



36 ; 

18 I 



14 


18 


22 


19 


6 


8 


7 


'5 


8 


3 


10 


3 


3 


17 


34 

04 


36 



34 
34 
21 
34 
21 
3 
13 
34 
34 



36 
36 
24 



Frame 



21 



Brick 



23 
6 
17 
17 
36 



15 



Brick 



12 



232 

132 

100 

145 

61 

30 

40 

55 

43 

3 

232 

232 

232 

232 

74 

168 

46 

101 

46 

131 

3 

3 

3 

3 



Brick 



10 



319 

179 

140 

192 

82 

44 

51 

72 

65 

5 

316 

315 

315 

287 

116 

224 

60 

136 

107 

209 

6 

5 

5 

5 

38 



3B.,1F.,1L., 



42 



im 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



59 



Table M. —Report on Truancy 



Oiiee. 




Towns.- 





a . 




® £ 




■p 




II 




o ^ 


Con. ' c eo 


uS 


2§ 


^T3 



I ^ 

Id ^ 




4 
10 



Bellnnlle . . 
Brantford . 

Chatham ^ . - ^^ • 

(iuelph 5 

Hamilton 

Niijara Fallh. . 6 
>t. Catliarines. 1^ 
n. Thomas ... ^ 

Srratford 

'T.ronto 119 

Winfiior • • . 

WocKlstook - . . . . • • . 



Towns. 



•| 



.\lmonte , 

Amprior > . . . . 

Aylmer ; . . . . 

Birrie , . . . , 

Berlin 

Bowmanville. . . 6 

Brocknlle i . . . 

Carleton Place. 
Clinton . . 

Cornwall : 14 

Degeronto ■ 4 

Dundas 

Durham 

Ferena 

Fores-t 2 

Gait 

He?peleT 

Hnntsville 

LiniLav 1 

Mitchell 2 

Niagara 

OrilUa !... 



36 ! 
30 I 
48 , 
22 i 

160 
36 

163 

105 
49 

623 ; 

267 ! 
2 • 

I 

14 ' 

5 ' 
23 
15 

6 
20 
13 . 
15 

2 

6 
75 



17 
25 
10 
22 
375 
51 ' 
49 
59 1 
34 j 
57 I 
3 
80 



3 Peterborough.; 52 

6 .... 10 Petrolea i 7' 28 

Port Arthur. .|.... I 6 

2 Port Hope.... I....! 10 

67 7 Prescott. 

2 Preston 



1 1 

8 I 6 

5 : 5 

16 9 



Ridgetown 
. I St. Mary's 

. Sarnia 

. ^ Simcoe 

. ! Seaforth ' 

. Smith's Falls 

i Thorold 

I Toronto Jncn 



•I 



25 

5 I. 

23 . 

3 .. 

2 . 

8 . 

13 . 

10 ,. 



14 
2 
3 



Villages. 



10 

2 

8 

11 

20 

14 

81 

7 

27 



:!-26l 



11 

1 

3 : 

7 I 

4 1 
10 1 

101 



6 

60 

37 

11 

1 

2 

3 

4 

10 

101 



17 ' 14 



Ailsa Craig. . . 

Bayfield 

Bradford 

Campbellford. 

Delhi 

Drayton 

Elora 

6 .; Exeter 

12 |. Fort Erie .... 
42 j I Georgetown . . 

... I Glencoe 

. ..|! Point Edward 

'i Shelbume 

I 2 I Tara 

• I Tweed 

_ I Waterford. . . . 

' I Winchester. . . 



12 
3 
4 
8 
4 

30 



Totals . 



31 

?! 

10, 



7' 
8 



38: 3 
15:.... 

6.... 
10,.... 
10, ... . 
10' ... . 

2. 1 

4'.... 
11 1 

8i 3 



79, 
6. 



1 
2l 



5 
4 
3 
2 
6 

12' 

4 

10 

16 



386 2,250 1,387 



159 



1 .. 

..I 



10 



62 



148 



»-^iatirtics ol preceding year. 



60 



THE. REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Table N.— Report on Kindergabtens. 



Municipality. 



fe 


£ 


^ 


s 


1 


M 


S 


^§ 




*© 




p 


6& 


d 


o-S 


> 


^ 


5z 


iz; 


^ 


4 


9 


471 


169 


2 


7 


306 


122 


1 


1 


46 


13 


14 


18 


1,261 


503 


4 


4 


226 


132 


16 


30 


1,160 


385 


16 


27 


1,270 


444 


3 


4 


340 


114 


47 


122 


6,088 


1,865 


1 


2 


61 


39 


5 


6 


216 


177 


1 




87 


34 


1 




129 


49 


1 




64 


39 


1 




66 


34 


1 




82 


25 


1 




104 


33 


1 




148 


47 


3 




262 


93 


1 




77 


29 


1 




63 


43 


1 




90 


22 


1 




89 


31 


2 




202 


61 


1 


2 


66 


42 


1 


1 


68 


28 


129 


256 


12,021 

1 


4,573 



Cities : 
Brantford. 
Chatham . 
Guelph.. . 
Hamilton. 
Kingston . 
London . . 
Ottawa . . . 
Stratford . 
Toronto . . 



Towns ; 

Aylmer 

Berlin 

Cobourg 

Dondas 

Gait 

Hespeler 

IngersoU 

Listowel- 

Owen Sound 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Preston 

Simcoe 

Tillsonburg 

Toronto Junction 

Waterloo 

Welland.r 



Totals. 



Table O. — Report on Night Schools. 



Municipality. 



Merritton 

St. Catharines 
Toronto 

Totals . . . 




im 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



61 



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THE REPORT OF THE 



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63 






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64 



THE -REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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1903 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



65 



APPENDIX C.--INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS,. 
I.— List op Inspectors, 1905. 



Public School 
Inspectors. 



Jurisdiction. 



Ll Green, B.A 

T W. Standing, B. A... 
W 5. Dendenning 



T.LChifiholm, M.A 

•isrtH. Cowley, B A. . 

N; Liniel Gordon 

.''har Brown 

^LTilley,M.A.,Ph.D. 

^- km Atkin 



*!' Ift-nay 

:> 1 Maxwell, B. A., 
LIB, Ph.D 

^'^ Spankie, M.D 

I' -iMcDiarmid, M.D. 

^j^>\ floff 

^" H.Eurgess, B.A 

-' ^. CampbeU 

' ie Moses 

" ^le Phillips, B.A.. 

^ Dtacon 

'' ^1 Mackintosh 

• ■ 'J JohiLston 

-^TidRobb 



• t in Tom 

^^ W. H. G. CoUes .. 

-■-ertPark , 

f A. Barnes, M. A 



Algoma District; Towns of Brace Mines, 
Massey, Sault Ste. Marie, Steelton, Thes- 
salon 

Brant ; Town of Paris 

Bruce, East ; Towns of Walkerton, Wiar- 
ton ; Villages of Chesley, Tara 

Brace, West ; Town of Kincardine ; Vil- 
lages of Lucknow, Paisley, Port Elgin, 
Southampton, Teeewater, Tiverton 

Carleton ; Villages of Hintonburg, Ottawa 
East, Richmond 

Dnfferin ; Town of Orangeville ; Villages of 
Grand Valley, Shelbume 

Dundas ; Villages of Chesterville, Iroquois, 
Morrisburg, Winchester 

Durham and S. Monaghan Tp. ; Towns of 
Bowmanville, Port Hope ; Villages of 
Millbrook, Newcastle 

Elgin ; Town of Aylmer ; Villages of Dut- 
ton, Port Stanley, Springfiela, Vienna. . 

Essex, North (No. 1); Town of Sandwich 

j Village of Belle River 

Essex, South (No. 2) ; Towns of Amherst- 
>urg, Essex, Kingsville, Leamington 

Frontenac; Villages of. Garden Island, 
Portsmouth 

Glengarry ; Town of Alexandria ; Villages 

' of Lancaster, Maxville 

Grey, East ; Town of Thornbury , 

Grey, West ; Town of Owen Sound ; Vil 
lage of Chatsworth 

Grey, South ; Towns of Durham, Meaford; 
Villages of Dundalk, Hanover, Markdale 

Haldimand ; Town of Dunn vi lie ; Villages 
of Caledonia, Cayuga, Hagersville 

iHali burton, North-East Muskoka; South 
Nipissing, East Parry Sound ; Towns of 
Huntsville, Powassan 

Halton ; Towns of Milton, Oakville ; Vil- 
lagjBS of Acton, Burlington, Georgetown . 

Hastings, North ; Villages of Madoc, Mar- 
mora, Stirling 

Hastings, South ; City of Belleville ; Towns 
of Deseronto, Trenton ; Village of Tweed 

Huron, East ; Towns of Clinton, Seaforth, 
Wingham ; Villages of Blyth, Brussels, 
Wroxeter 

Huron, West ; Town of Goderich ; Villages 
of Bayfield, Exeter, Hensall 

Kent, East ; Towns of Blenheim, Both well, 
Ridgetown ; Village of Thamesville 

Kent, West ; City of Chatham ; Towns of 
Dresden, Wallaceburg; Village of Tilbury 

Lambton, East (No. 2); Town of Petrolea ; 
Villages of Alvinston, Arkona, Oil 
Springs, Watford 



Post Office. 



S. Ste. Marie. . 
Brantford . . . 

Walkerton... 



Kincardine . . 

Ottawa 

Orangeville . . 
Morrisbui^ . . 



Bowmanville 
St Thomas . . 

Windsor 

Windsor 

Kingston 



Maxville 
Meaford.. 



Owen Sound: 

Durham 

Caledonia ... 



Minden . . 
Milton ... 
Madoc ... 
Belleville 



Brassels . . 
Goderich . 
Chatham . 
Chatham . 

Petrolea . . 






1,500 00 
1,395 00 

1,643 37 



1,630 00 
1,740 00 
1,536 92 
1,308 00 

1,640 00 

1,798 50 

656 00 

1,550 84 

1,862 50 

1,165 75 
1,219 00 

1,581 33 

1,436 00 

1,358 90 

1,775 50 
1,528 08 
1,712 99 
1,253 00 

1,633 09 
1,667 29 
1,087 50 
1,728 33 

1,708 50 



* AlK» In^Kctor of R. a BiUngoal Schools in Essex and Kent 
5 K. 



t Appointed in 1905. 



66 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. ] 



List op Inspectors, 1905. — Coniiaued. 



Public Rchool 
Inspectors. 



D. D. Moshier, B.A., B. 
Paed 



F. L. Michell, M.A 

Wm Johnston, M.A., 
LL.B 



Jurisdiction. 



Post Office. 



Robert Kinney, M.D. 
T. A. Craig 



Frederick Burrows.. 
W. W. Ireland, B.A. 

*John McLaughlin . . 



P. J. Thompson, B.A. 
H. D. Johnson 



J. B. McDougall, B.A. . . 

H. Frank Cook, B.A... 
Albert Odell 



James McBrien 



John Waugh, B.A., D. 

Paed 

William Carlyle 



Rev. Geo. Grant, B.A... 

Allan Embury 

William Irwin, B.A 



J. Coyle Brown and*Ric- 
haixl Lees, M.A 



Lambton, West (No. 1); Towns of Forest, 
Sarnia ; Villages of Point Edward, Thed- 
ford, Wyoming 

Lanark ;Townfa of Almonte. Carleton Place, 
Perth, Smith's Falls ; Village of Lanark. 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 1); Town of 
Gananoque ; Villages of Newboro, West- 
port 

LcJeds and Grenville (No. 2); Village of 
Athens 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 3); Town of 
Prescott ; Villages of Cardinal, Kerapt- 
ville, Merrickville 

Lennox and Addington ; Town of Napanee ; 
Villages of Bath, Newburgh 

Lincoln; Town of Niagara; Villages of 
Beams ville, Grimsby, Merritton, Port 
Dalhousie 

Manitonlin Island, etc. ; Towns of Gore 
Bav, Little Current 

Mid(llesex, East ; Village of Lucan 

Middle.«ex, West ; Towns of Parkhill, 
Strathroy ; Villages of Ailsa Craig, Glen-: 
coe, Newbury, Wardsville 

Ni pissing District, etc. ; Towns of Cache 
Bay, Copper Cliff, Haileybury, Mattawa, 
New Liskeard, North Bay, Sturgeon 
Falls, Sudbury 

Norfolk; Town of Simcoe; Villages of Delhi, 
Port Dover, Port Rowan, Waterford I 

Northumberland ; Town of Cobourg ; Vil-', 
lages of Brighton, Campbellford, Col- 
borne, Hastings .' 

Ontario, North ; Town of Uxbridge ; Vil- 
lages of Beaverton, Cannington, Port 
Perry 

Ontario, South ; Towns of Oshawa, Whitby 

Oxford ; City of Woodstock ; Towns of In- 
gersoll, Tillsonburg; Villages of Embro, 
Norwich 

Parry Sound West, District ; Town of Parrv^ 
Sound ; Villages of Burk's Falls. iSund- 
ridge 

Peel ; Town of Brampton ; Villages of Bol- 
ton, Streetsville 

Perth ; Towns of Listowel, Mitchell, St. 
Mary's ; Village of Milverton 



Sarnia 
Perth . 



> 


1 = 


X 

7. 


ii 


K- 


z 


■■ . 


:><j=i 




>. 


Oy ;5 


i. 


u 


t>c-=^ 


^ 


-S 






& 


— . .M 


X 



Athens 

Brock ville — 

Kemptville . . . 
Napanee 



St. Catharines. 



Gore Bay. 
London . . 



Strathroy 

North Bay..., 
Simcoe 



W. J. Summerby. 

G. D. Piatt, B.A. . 
R. G. Scott, B.A. 



Cobourg . 



Prince Albert. 
Whitby ..,,.. 



Peterlwrough ; Villages of Havelock, Lake- 
field, Norwood 

Prescott and Russell ; Towns of Hawkes- 
bury, Vankleek Hill ; Villages of Cassel 
man, L'Orignal, Rockland 

Prince Edward ; Town of Picton ; Village 
of Wellington 

Renfrew ; Towns of Arnprior, Pembroke, 
Renfrew ; Villages of Cobden, Eganville 



Woodstock 

Orillia 

Brampton 

Stratford 



Peterboro 

Russell . . . 
Picton .... 
P 



1,440 

1,1)<A) 

1,425 
1,802 

1,2C) 
1,575 

l,4t>0 

tl,7«7 
1,518 

1,453 

1,5(>() 
1,695 

1,722 



1,304 
1,2S)3 



l,7:iO 

l,8(Mi 

i,4ii 

1,712 

1,425 

1,:^3H 
1,317 
2,ia5 



* Appointed in 1905. 



tSalaryi etc., of former Inspector. 



5a E. 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



67 



I. — LiBT OF Inspectors, 1905 — Coutiimed, 



Pnblic School 
Inspectore. 



Jurisdiction. 



C-Mnipin, M.A. 



K-v. Thc€5. McKee . 



k»l)ay, B.A. 



\ -Tictier Mc Naughton . 
J : a Ritchie 



J H. Knight. . 



W H. Stevens, B.A. 



Post Office. 






r. hjsPearce. 



f. W. ^heppard . 



Simcoe, North ; Towns of Barrie, Midland 
Orillia, Penetanguishene ; Village of 

Creemore 

Simcoe, Southwest ; Towns of Alliston, 
Stay ner ; Villages of Beeton, Bradford,' 

Tottenham 

. Simcoe, East, and West Muskoka ; Town 
of Graven hurst ; Village of Port Carling 

- Stormont ; Town of Cornwall 

. Thunder Bay and Rainy River Districts ; 
Towns of Fort Frances, Fort William, 

Kenora, Port Arthur, Rainy River 

. Victoria, East ; Town of Lindsay ; Villages 

of BobcaygeOn, Omeraee i 

. Victoria, West, and Southeast >Iuskoka ;i 
Town of Bracebridge ; Villages of Fene-; 

Ion Falls, Woodville [ 

. Waterloo No. 1; Towns of Berlin, Hespeler, 

Preston, Waterloo ; Village of Elmira. . . 

. Waterloo No. 2 ; Town of Gait ; Villages of 

A vr, New Hamburg 

; H. Ball, M.A I Welland ; Citv of Niagara Falls ; Towns of 

I Thorold, Welland ; Villages of Bridge- 
I burg, Chippawa, Fort Erie, Port Col borne 

i!' -t (ialbfaith I Wellington, North ; Towns of Harriston, 

' Mount Forest, Palmerston ; Villages of 

Arthur, Clifford, Drayton j 

Wellington, South ; Villages of Elora, Erin, | 

Fergus .•. ; 

Wentworth ; Town of Dundas ; Village of| 

Waterdown 

York, North; Towns of Aurora, New-I 
market; Villages of Holland Landing,' 

Richmond Hill, Sutton ■ 

U>..i Fotheringham York, South ; Towns of East Toronto, 

, North Toronto, Toronto Junction ; Vil- 
I lages of Markham, Stouffville, Weston, 

I Woodbridge ■ 

;: P. Hoag, B.A. 'City of I 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Prin. 

do 
City of 

K >'L MeaS, M.A -City of Windsor and Town of Walkervilie 

J ii-n Connollv Town of 



Barrie , 1,71» 00 

Barrie ! 1,690 00 

Orillia 1,091 75 

Cornwall 1,144 66 

Port Arthur... I 1,500 00 

Lindsay I 1,011 00 

1 

Lindsay t 1,737 32 



Berlin. 
Berlin . 



' 1,980 00 
{ 645 00 



J J.CTiig, B.A. 
v' H. Smith 



Welland 1,430 66 

i 

Mt. Forest.... tl,250 00 

Fergus \ 1,250 00 



i B. Davidson, B.A. 



Hamilton . 



'VL.Tvtler, B.A 

^'H. Ballard, iLA 

'^. <;. Kidd 

' B.Edwanl8, B.A 

.■ :.- C. Glashan, LL.D 

Ao-an Walker, B.A 

*!'. (\ Hetherington 

> >:iOfji, B.A.,D. Paed. 

* Kii*ell Stuart 

JiiiT!. L Hngh^ . . 

W F. Chapnuui 



Co. Model School, Citv of. 
do ao 



Newmarket 



Toronto 

Brantford . . . 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Kingston 

London . . 

Ottawa 

Peterboro' 

St. Catharines. 
St. Thomas . . . 

Stratford 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Windsor 

Brock ville 



Total 117,896 67 



1,463 50 
1,328 00 



1,627 40 
111,400 00 
600 00 
2,200 00 
1,400 00 
1,735 00 
2,400 00 
1,350 00 
tSOO 00 
1,200 00 
1,200 00 
3,500 00 
2,250 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 



* Appointed in 1905. 

t Salary of former Inspector. 

: For2nd half of 1904. 

. Salary of former Inspector and Principal of Public Schools. 



68 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



List of iMSFxcrom, 1905— Ci>n«2uded. 



• 

other Inspectors. 


Poet Office. 


Salary, 
1904: 


Travelling 
expenses 


Total. 


— 


Separate School InspecUm: 
Wm. Prendergaat, B A 


Toronto 

Peterborough . 
London 

Clarence Creek 
Windsor 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 


1 c. 

1,700 00 
1,700 00 
1,700 00 

1,700 00 
t625 CO 

1,600 00 

1,860 00 

2,750 00 
2,750 00 


$ c. 

206 16 
515 55 
425 85 

^ 272 55 


$ c. 

1,906 16 
2,215 65 
2,125 85 

1,972 65 
625 00 

2,110 93 

2,500 40 

3,190 00 
3,200 05 


$ c. 


Michael O'Brwn 




John F. Power, M. A 




IriBpector of Bilingual SeparcUe Schools: 

Telesphore Rochon, B.A., (East). 
*D. Chenay, (West) 




Inspector of Technical Education : 
Albert H. Leake 


510 63 

650 40 

440 00 
640 05 




Oounty Model School Inspector .- 
John J. Tilley 




High School Inspectors : 
John E. Hodgson, M. A 




JohnSeath, ^[.A., TJi-D 




Total .! 








19,936 18 
137,rt8Z 85 


Grand total (all Inspectors) .... 





















* Also Inspector of Public SchoolB, 



North. 



t tl2S, Arreara of salarj. 



II. Diplomas for School Phbmisbs, 1905. 



Name of Inspector. 



L. A. Green 

T. W. Standing. 
R. W. Cowley . . 
Arthur Brown . . 
W. E. Tilley.... 
H. H. Burgess . . 

J. S. Deacon 

D. Robb 

J. Elgin Tom... 

Robt Park 

W. H. G. Colles. 



tin 1904. 



Jurisdiction. 



Algoma. . . 
Brant .... 
Carleton. . 
Dundas. . . 
Durham.. 
Grey, W. . 
Halton . . . 
Huron, E. 
Huron, W 
Kent, W . 
Kent, e. . 



has 

55 



2 

11 

t23 

tl8 

6 

17 

22 

26 

7 

49 

54 



Name of Inspector. 



Chas. A. Barnes . . 

D. D. Moshier 

R. Kinney 

F. Burrows 

P. J. Thompson.. . 

H. D. Johnson 

H. Frank Cook . . . 

Geo. Grant 

T. Pearce 

F. W. Sheppard... 

J. H. Smith 

D. Fotheringham . 



Jurisdiction. 



Lambton, E 

Lambton, W.... 
Leeds & Gren. No.2 
Lennox and Add 
Middlesex, E... 
Middlesex, W. . . 

Norfolk 

Parry Sound W 
Waterloo No. 1.. 
Waterloo No. 2 . 

Wentworth 

York, S 



— "2^3 



20 
18 
10 

1 
44 

8 

1 
10 
10 
12 
27 

7 



\m 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



APPENDIX ly.— RURAL PUBUC SCHOOL LIBRARIES, 1904-5. 

EvHj lural school board that has established a Library under the conditions of the regulations 
rmeiTes a grant, equivalent to half the amount expended for the year, but not exceed- 
ing $10. 







'1 


x^ 


aded 
for 
ed. 


^ 


lospectorate. 


Name of school (section number and town- 
ship) and amount expended for 
books recommendea, during 
the academic year. 


1| 

■it 

u g 
o'g 


U 

il 


Total amount expei 
during the year 
books recommend 


g 

i 

3 


Brant 


lA Brantfordj 20.82 ; 9 Brantford, 24.56 ; U. 
lOBrantford, 20.00 ; 12 Brantford, 30.00 ; 
16 Brantford, 20.00 ; 9 Burford, 20.00 ; 11 
Burfgrd, 14.25 ; 13 Burford, 20.01 ; 8 S. 
Dumfries, 3.89; 13 S. Dumfries, 15.00; 
U. 1 Oakland, 20.00 ; 6 Onondaga, 2.80. 


25 


5 


$ c. 

211 32 


$ c. 




97 97 


Brnce E 


■ 


2 

25 


11 


283 86 




BroceW 


7 Bruce, 22.18 ; 7 Culross, 22.19 ; 8 Culross, 
20.00; 9 Culross, 30.07; 5 Greenock, 
10.00 ; 1 Huron, 12.60 ; 5 Huron, 21.45 ; 
8 Huron, 20.46 ; 11 Huron, 20.00 ; 15 
Huron, 24.91 ; 5 Kincardine, 20.00 ; 8 
Einloss, 30.00 ; 4 Saugeen, 30.00 


121 30 


Cirkton 


8 Fitzroy, 20.00 ; 3 Gloucester, 6.26 ; 4 Glou- 
cester, 20.00; 9 Gloucester, 27.12; 20 
Gloucester, 10.35 ; 25 Gloucester, 10.00 ; 
12 Goulbum, 13.60 ; 4 N. Gower, 20.00 ; 
1 Huntley, 33.00 ; 5 Huntley, 23.00 ; 1 
March, 20.00 ; 1 Mariborough, 20.00 ; 6 
Marlborough, 20.00 ; 11 Osgoode, 20.00 ; 
12 Osgoode, 20.00 ; 1 Torbolton, 12.00 ; 
3 Torbolton, 20.00 ; 3 Nepean, 18.25.. . . 


37 


6 


333 47 


155 17 


DaSerin 


SMelancthon, 18.50; 13 Melancthon, 21.66; 
14 Melancthon, 18.97 ; 17 Mono, 15.00 ; 
1 Mulmar, 20.25 


16 


3 


94 38 


46 23 


Doadas 


3 Williamsburg, 20.00 ; W and 1 Williams- 
burg, 21.01; 10 Matilda, 20.00; 18 
Matilda, 10.00 ; 2 Winchester, 20.00 ; 5 
Winchester, 30.00 ; 8 Winchester, 18.00 ; 
20 Winchester. 10.00 ; 1 Mountain, 20.00 ; 
6 Mountain, 6.45; 12 Mountain, 5.00 ; 
14 Matilda, 10.00; 17 and 24 Williams- 
buigh, 20,00 


16 


11 


210 46 






99 72 




3 DarUngton. 7.00 ; 16 Darlington, 8.00 ; 18 
Darlington, 10.00 


6 


^ 


25 00 


12 50 


Egin 


2Aldborough, 20.00; 3 Aldborough, 25.00; 
4 Aldborough, 20.00; 5 Aldborough, 
25.00 ; 6 Aldborough, 25.00 ; 8 Aldbor- 
ough, 15.00; 9 Aldborough, 20.00; 10 
Aldborough, 5.20 ; 11 Aldborough, 23.00; 
12 Aldborough. 15.00 ; 14 Aldborough, 
20.00 ; 1 Bayham, 16.16 ; 2 Bavham, 
50.00; 4 Bavham, 15.18; 5 Bayham, 
10.35; 9 Bayham, 4.05; 11 Bayham, 















70 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



APPENDIX "D.—Contimied, 



Inspectorate. 



Name of school (section number and town- 
ship) and amount expended for 
books recommendea, during 
the academic vear. 



Elgin. — Coftx. 



Essex N . 

Essex S . , 

Frontenac 



12.80: 12 Bavham, 7.75; 14 Bavham, 
22.52; 16 BaVham, 14.53; 17 Bayham, 
10.00; 18 Bavham, 10.00; 23 Bayham, 
31.39 ; 1 Dunwich, 15.04 ; 2 Dunwich. 
20.00 ; 3 Dunwich, 10.36 ; 4 Dunwich, 
15.00 ; 5 Dunwich, 8.00 ; 6 Dunwich, 
20.00 ; 7 Dunwich, 11.48 ; 9 Dunwich, 
10.00 ; 10 Dunwich, 11.85 ; 13 Dunwi«h, 
26.03; 14 Dunwich, 15.00; 15 Dunwich, 
7.50 ; 16 Dunwich, 10.00 ; 5 Dorchester 
S., 20.05 ; 7 Dorchester S., 11.20 ; 8 Dor- 
chester S. , 20.00 ; 10 Dorchester S., 7.60 ; 
11 Dorchester S., 20.00; 1 Malahide. 
3.88 ; 3 Malahide, 20.00 ; 5 Malahide, 
20.00 ; 6 Malahide, 29.63 ; 7 Malahide, 
20.20; 8 Malahide, 1.62; 9 Malahide, 
15.00 ; 13 Malahide, 9.08 ; 14 Malahide, 
8.00; 15 Malahide, 15.00; 16 Malahide. 
6.10; 18 Malahide, 20.00; 21 Malahide, 
1.38; 22 Malahide, 21.32; 23 Malahide, 
10.00 ; 1 Southwold, 3.00; 2 Southwold, 
8.60; 3 Southwold, 20.00 ; 4 Southwold, 
4.60; 6 Southwold, 9.00; 7 Southwold, 
20.00 ; 8 Southwold, 20.00 ; 9 So'ithwold, 
10.00; 11 Southwold, 2.11; 12 South- 
wold, 7.62 ; 13 Southwold, 5.15 ; 14 
Southwold, 3.30; 15 Southwold, 15.00; 
17 Southwold, 2.66 ; 19 Southwold, 3.70 ; 
20 Southwold, 20.00 ; 3 Yarmouth, 6.35 ; 
4 Yarmouth, 12.58 ; 6 Yarmouth, 20.90 ; 
7 Yannouth, 20.00 ; 8 Yarmouth, 11.00 ; 
9 Yarmouth, 5.32 ; 13 Yarmouth, 12.00 ; 
17 Yarmouth, 10.10 ; W. 18 Yarmouth, 
20.00 ; E. 18 Yarmouth, 20.00 ; N. 18 
Yannouth, 20.00 ; 23 Yarmouth, 11.00 ; 
24 Yarmouth, 11.00; 25 Yarmouth, 
21.60 ; 27 Yarmouth, 16.50 

3 Maidstone, 34.21 ; 6 Sandwich S., 27.07 . . 

11 Colchester S.. 4.29 ; 5 Gosfield S., 11.97 ; 
2 Mersea, 10.r)2 

2 Bedford, 20.00 ; 9 Bedfonl, 20.00 ; 1 Clareo- 
don & Miller, 20.00 ; 13 Clarendon ik Mil- 
ler, 20.00; 1 Hinchinbrook, 20.00; 1 
Kingston, 20.00: 3 Kingston, 10.00; 11 
Kingston, 20.00; 14 Kingston, 30.00; 
7 Loughboro, 20.00; 1 Olden, 20.00 ; 4 
Oso, 10.00 ; 5 Oso, 20.00 ; 6 Oso, 28.00 ; 7 
Oso, 20.00 ; 4 Palme rston & Canonto, 
20.00 ; 5 Palmerston and Canonto, 20.00 : 
4 Pittsburg. 20.00 ; 9 Pittsburg, 26..S0 ; 3 
Portland, 10.00; 5 Portland, 20.00; 11 



u 


3 


•SI . 


5 






m. 




%%. 


f.^ 


ount e 

the 

ecomu 


3^ 


3'" 


!'i 




62 


II 

si 

s — 


otal am 
during 
books r 


c 
C 

o 


J?; '>^. 


H 


^ 






$ c. 


^ 



105 
3 



50 

1 



1,250 44 
61 28 

26 78 



\ 



584 
20 

13 



m5 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



71 



APPENDIX Y^.— Continued. 



iLspectorate. 



r^6 B 



Name of school (section number and town- | 
ship) and amount expended for 
Dooks recommended, during 
the academic year. 



^irvy. E 

I'ifVT. W 

<T>-V.'S 



Portland, 20.00; 12 Portland, 28.00; Bj 
Storrington, 20.00 ; 8 Wolfe Island, 20.00 ; ' 
9 Wolfe Island, 20.00 ; 4 Wolfe Island, 
10.00 



12 Euphrasia 



1 Derhy, 20.00 ; 3 Derby, 8. 93 ; U. 2 Derby ' 
& Svdenliam, 14.90; U. 10 Sydenham, ! 
1100 ; U. 15 Sydenham, 20.00 .\ . . , : 



fLiidiniand 



5Egremont, 18.55; 6 Egremont, 20.20; 7 
Eeremont, 10.00 ; 10 Egremont, 20.00 ; 10 
Glenelg, 27.00; 4 Normanby, 21.55 ; 9 
Normanby, 20.00 ; 14 Proton, 8,75 

3 Walpole, 20.56 ; 11 Walpole, 11.91 ; 3 Rain- 
ham, 10.00; 7 N. Cayuga, 10.29; 11 N. 
Cayuga, 15,00 ; 5 S. Cayuga, 10.00 

T:ii:iHirton,etc.. 3 Minder, 19.87; 1 Harbum, 49.00; 6 Mon- 
mouth, 8 00 ; U. 2 Stisted, 21.87 ; 2 Stist- 
ed, 39.55; 4 Brunei, 30.10 ; 7 Chaffey, 
14.00 ; 2 Laurier, 28.25 ; 4 Stisted, 9.45. . I 

^^^^ 4 NelPon, 6.83 ; 10 Esquesing, 21.53 ; 9 Tra- 
falgar, 20 00 

H^^^ings, N 13Madoc, 12.27 ; 14 Madoc, 14.00 ; 2 Madoc, 

18.00 ; 7 Madoc, 14.15 ; 16 Rawdon, 21.05; 
7 Rawdon, 18.17; 13 Rawdon, 21.83 ; 8 
Rawdon, 20.00; 14 Rawdon, 20.18; 4 
Rawdon, 23.50 ; 6 Rawdon, 20.55 ; 3 Raw- 
don, 23.00 ; 20 Rawdon, 20.00 ; 17 Raw- 
I don, 20.00 ; 6 Monteagle, 15.08 ; 1 Tudor, 
20.03; 8 Tudor. 21.00; 5 Tudor, 16.8:^ ; 
1 Carlow, 17.46 ; 2 Carlow, 17.33 ; 5 Car- 
low. 20.00 ; 1 & 3 Huntingdon, 29.00 ; 2 
& 5 Huntingdon, 18.00 ; 4 Huntingdon, 
15.00; 10 Huntingdon, 20.00; 4 Dun- 
gannon, 16.00 ; 3 Elzevir, 20.00 ; 3 Mar- 
mora, 17.01 ; 5 Marmora, 20.00 ; 10 Mar- 
mora, 10.40 



if-i-sting?, S. 
Hnmn, E 



-Q ri 



S be 




3 Grev, 5.50 ; 4 Grey, 18.10; 9 Grev, 4.25 ; 
11 Grey, 9.00; U. 4 Grey, 10.00; 7 Howick, 
8.00; 1 Hullett, 8.00; 3 Hullett, 23.02 ; 
8 Hullett, 20.00 ; 1 Morris, 14.90 ; 5 Mor- 
ris, 20.60 ; 6 Morris, 10.00 : 4 Tucker- 
smith, 20.00; 9 Tuckersmiih, 10.00; 2 
Turnberry, 15.58 



751 



11 



29 



11 



c. $ c. 



75 83 37 91 



146 05 68 66 



77 76 38 59 



559 84 269 86 



196 95 96 66 



72 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 



APPENDIX D.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Huron, W. 



Kent, E. 



Kent, W. 



Lambton, E. 



Lambton, W... 



LAnark 



Name of school (section number and town- 
ship) and amount expended for 
books recommended, during 
the academic year. 



4 Ashfield, 20.00 ; 6 Stanley, 13.00 ; 14 Stan- 
ley, 20.00 ; 5 UsbOme, 10.00 ; 6 Usbome, 
20.60 ; 7 Usborne, 20.60 ; 11 E. Wawan- 
osh, 20.59 



12 Camden, 16.00 ; 2 Harwich, 20.00 ; 3 
Harwich, 22.50; 6 Harwich, 20.00; 7 
Harwich, 12.00 ; 10 Harwich, 25.00 ; 11 
Harwich, 20.00 ; 12 Harwich, 10.00 ; 16 
Harwich, 20.00 ; 1 Howard, 20.00 ; 2 
Howard, 10.00; 3 Howard, 20.00; 11 
Howard, 6.50; 12 Howard, 5.00; 14 How- 
ard, 7.00 ; 2 Orford, 20.00 ; 2 Orford, 
'(1904) 20.00 ; 5 Orfoni, 15.00 ; 7 Orford, 
25.00 ; 9 Orford, 20.00 : 10 Orford, 22.50 ; 
* 3 Zone, 10.00 ; 4 Zone, 10.00 ; 5 Zone, 
18.00 

1 Chatham, 21.10; 7 Chatham, 10.00; 8 
Chatham, 20.00 ; 10 Chatham, 20.00 ; 13 
Dover, 25.00 ; 10 Raleigh, 5.00 ; 14 Ral- 
eigh, 14.00 ; 12 Raleigh, 10.00 ; 2 Rom- 
ney, 5.00 



6 Dawn, 30.03 ; 7 Dawn, 14.92 ; 10 Dawn, 
7.61 ; 11 Dawn, 25.69 ; 13 Dawn, 2.75 ; 14 
Dawn, 28.74 ; 17 Dawn, 24.58 ; 19 Dawn, 
28.75 ; 3 Brooke, 30.10 ; 7 Brooke, 30.00 ; 
8 Brooke, 11.52; 9 Brooke, 15.97; 12 
Brooke, 20.00; 13 Brooke, 27.35; 15 
Brooke, 20.10; 18 Brooke, 15.05; 23 
Brooke, 30.15 ; 1 Warwick, 5.00 ; 2 War- 
wick, 17.38 ; 5 Warwick, 15.47 ; 6 War- 
wick, 15.04 ; 8 Warwick, 20.10 ; 10 War- 
wick, 15.44 ; 16 Warwick, 19.00 ; 20 
Warwick, 15.06 ; 4 Enniskillen, 28.14 ; 5 
Enniskillen, 20.86 ; 8 Enniskillen, 24.66 ; 
11 Enniskillen, 14.04 ; 17 Enniskillen, 
20.00 ; 18 Enniskillen, 30.07 ; 23 Ennis- 
killen, 17.06; 2 Euphemia, 31.56; 3 
Euphemia, 14.96 ; 4 Euphemia, 21.90; 5 
Euphemia, 73.00 ; 10 Euphemia, 20.23. . 

24 Sombra, 13.10 ; 3 Moore, 7.60 ; 7 Plymp- 
ton, 5.75 ; 11 Plympton, 10.00 ; 8 Bos- 
anquet, 19.80 ; 9 Bosanquet, 11.00 ; 13 
Bosanquet, 10.58 

4 Bathurst, 12.00; 5 Bathurst 10.00; 12 
Bathurst, 10.00; 5 Beckwith, 30.00; 
6 Beckwith, 4.00 ; 2 Dalhousie, 10.00 ; 
11 Drumraond, 20.00 ; 13 Drummond, 
20.00 ; 10 Lanark, 10.00 ; 8 Montague, 



-I 

II 

d2 



17 



37 



49 



37 



10 



»4 



525 



14 



37 



la's 

11 



g> 



I 

a 

> 
o 
O 

s 



» c. 



124 79 



61 



393 50 



130 10 



189 



62 



802 28 



77 as 



318 



38 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



73 



APPENDIX -D.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Name of school (section number and town- 
ship) and amount expended for 
books recommended, during 
the academic year. 



Lanark.— Q>n. 



Leds and Gren- 
r,lle,No. 1... 

Leie<i?and Gren 
VilleNo. 2.... 



Lf<dsand Gren- 
Tille, No. 3... 

LauMxandAdd- 
ington 



8.00; 10 Ramsay, 12.00; 11 Ramsay, 
11.00 ; 15 Ramsay, 20.00 ; 1 N. Sher- 
brooke, 19.00 ; 2 S. Sherbrooke, 10.00. . 

1 Leeds and Lansdowne Rear, 10.00 



Lincoln , 



7 Front of Yonge & Escott, 20.00 ; 2 Eliza- 
bethtown, 20.05 ; 4 Elizabeth town, 
10.00 ; 5 Elizabethtown, 21.00 ; 7 Eliza- 
bethtown, 10.50; 20 Elizabethtown, 
20.00 ; 21 Elizabethtown, 10.00 ; 8 Kitley , 
6.47 ; 10 Kitley, 10.00 ; 11 Kitley, 20.00; 
15 Kitley, 10.00 ; 4 AVolford, 22.00 

24 Augusta, 11.62; 27 Edwardsburg, 5.90; 
8 Oxford, 10.00 

1 2 Ealadar, Anglesea <& Effingham, 37.85; 
18 N. Fredericksburg, 15.88 

1 Louth, 20.00; 2 Louth, 20.00; 3 Louth, 
20.00 ; 6 Louth, 20.00 ; 7 Louth, 20.00 ; 
U. 2 Clinton A 3 Louth, 20.00; U. 3 
Clinton & 4 Louth, 20.00 ; 1 Grantham, 
20.22 ; 4 Grantham, 20.00 ; 5 Grantham, 
20.15 ; 8 Grantham, 20.00 ; 2 Grantham 
& 8 Louth, 20.00; U. 3 Caistor, 20.00; 
6 Caistor, 20 . 00 ; 8 Caistor, 20 . 00 ; 2 Gains- 
boro' 20.00 ; 3 Gainsboro' 21 .35 ; 6 Gains- 
boro' 19.64; 7 Gainsboro' 20.00; 4 N. 
Grimsby, 18.40 ; U. 5 N. Grimsby, 31.60 ; 
13 N. Grimsby, 20.00; 9 S. Grimsby, 
21.00; 12 S. Grimsbv, 20.00; 10 S. 
Grimbsy, 20.52; 1 Clinton, 20.00; 4 
Clinton, 20.00 ; 5 Clinton, 20.00 ; 6 Clin- 
ton, 20.37 ; 2 Louth & 1 Clinton, 20.00; 
U. 5 Clinton, 20.00 



Middlesex, E... 



Middlesex, W... 



X-.nolk 



12 Biddulph, 20.00 ; 2 Dorchester, 20.00 ; 
12 Dorchester, 15.00; 1 McGillivray, 
14.00 ; 18 McGillivray, 16.00 ; 10 Niss- 
ouri W., 22.23; 5 Nissouri W., 13.54; 
7 Westminster, 15.61 ; 10 Westminster, 
20.00 ; 19 Westminster, 10.48 ; 23 West- 
minster, 29.53 

r. 142 Adelaide and W. Williams, 15.85 ; 
4 Ekfrid, 16.60; 11 Ekfrid, 10.00; 5 
Lobo, 10.00; 7 E. Williams, 11.07; 
4 Metcalf, 10.00 

3 Townsend, 8.00; 4 Townsend, 4.50; 8 

' Townsend, (1904), 10.24 ; 2 Windham, 

14.00 ; 12 Windham. 7.00 : 1 Middleton, 



^2 



•^a 



^ a 

hi 



E ^ 



23 

12 



19 
10 
15 



42 



24 



13 



22 



^ ID S 

cjq o 

3^i 



T3.0 



% C. 

206 00 
10 00 



180 02 
27 42 
53 73 



633 25 



10 



190 39 



73 52 



^ 
fl 



o 

O 

I 



* c. 

98 00 
5 00 



88 48 
13 71 
17 94 



309 02 



89 31 



36 75 



74 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX "D,— Continued, 



Inspectorate. 



, Name of school (section number and town- 
ship) and amount expended for 
books recommended, during 
the academic year. 



Norfolk. — Con. . . 



N orthumberlartd 



Ontario, N. 



Ontario, S. 



Oxfoi-d , 



Peel. 



Perth 



14.35 ; 2 Middleton, 5.84 ; 3 Middleti»n, 
16.00 ; 8 Houghton, 11.00; 11 Hough- 
ton, 10.14 ; 2 Walsingham, 20.00 ; East 
19 Walsingham, 5.00 ; 6 Chariotteville, 
8.90 ; 8 Chariotteville, 16.00 ; 14 Char- 
iotteville, 8.40 ; 18 Chariotteville, 10.00 

7 Hamilton, 30.00 ; 11 Hamilton, 20.00 ; 2 & 

3 Brighton and Cramahe, 20.00 

1 Brock, 20.00; U. 4 Brock, 20.00; U. 5 
Brock, 20.00 ; 5 Brock, 20.00 ; 6 Brock, 
20.00 ; 7 Brock, 20.00 ; 13 Brock, 20.00 ; 

1 Mara, 20.00 ; 2 Mara, 20.00 ; 3 Mara, 
20.00 ; 4 Mara, 20.00 : 6 Mara, 10.00 ; 
8 Mara, 20.00 ; 10 Mara, 20.00 ; 1 Rama, 
20.00; 2 Rama, 20.00; 4 Scott, 29.13; 
5 Scott, 20.00 ; 6 Scott, 20.00 ; 8 Scott, 
20.00 ; 9 Scott, 10.00 ; 5 Thorah, 20.00 ; 

2 Uxbridge, 20.00 ; 8 Uxbridge, 20.00 ; 

7 Uxbridge, 20.00 

7 Reach, 10.00 ; 10' Reach, 4.53 ; U. 5 E. 
Whitbv, 12.22 ; U. 4 E. Whitbv, 10.00 ; 

4 E. Whitby, 20.00; 6 Whit"by, ^-^^ 

U. 4Blandford, 20.50; 12 Dereham, 52.00; 

11 E Niesouri, 12.08; 9 S. Norwich, 
30.00 ; 13 S. Norwich, 28. 10 ; 2 N. Oxford, 
20.00; 3E. Zorra, 10.03; 7 E. Zorra, 
75.00 ; 9 E. Zorra, 30.00; 13 E. Zorra. 
31.15; 8 E. Zorra, 28.75; 4 E. Zorra, 
7.50 

3 Caledon, 19.20 ; 6 Caledon, 20.00; 12 Cal- 

edon, 21.40; 14 Caledon, 20.00; 5 Chin- 
guacousv, 23.60 ; 26 Chinguacou^v 24.00; 

5 Toronto, 27.20 ; 6 Toronto, 20.25 ; 15 
Toronto, 39.50 

4 Blanshard, 20.13 ; U. 15 Blanshard, 20.00; 

3 Downie, 20.00; 4 Downie, 50.00; 6 
Downie, 25.00; U. I N. Ea8tho])e, 10.00; 

4 N. Easthope 24.80 ; U. 6 N. Easthope, 
25.00 ; 9 Ellice, 20.00 ; 9 Ellice, 20.00 ; 
1 ElmR, 20.00; U. 1 Elma, 23.50; 3 
Fnllarton, 20.00; 6 Fullarton, 20.00; 

8 Logan, 20.45 ; 4 Mornington, 20.19 ; 

12 Mornington, 32.00 ; V. 13 Morning- 
ton, 20.00 ; 3 Wallace, 20.00 ; 4 Wallace, 
20.00 




Pinerboro' 2 Smith, 13.23 



26 9' 



169 37: 84 68 

I 

70 00, 30 00 



59' 6 489 13 240 00 



8 6i 63 18 31 59 



14' 8 345 11 104 80 



14 



215 15. 89 (JO 



I 
44, 15 

5 



451 07 195 00 
I 
13 23| 6 «1 



mb 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



75 



APPENDIX D.— Continued. 



I Name of school (section number and town- 
I ship) and amount expended or 
Inspectorate, books recommended, during 

the academic year. 



pTt-«cott and' 
Ki^ell 1 Caledonia, 11.65 ; 5 Caledonia, 20.00 ; 8 

Caledonia, 1.54 ; 10 E. Hawket-burv, 

20.00 ; 2 W. Hawkeebury, 10.00 ; 5 VV. 

Hawkefsbury, 10.25 ; 7 AV\ Hawkesbury, 
I 10.00 ; 3 Longueuil, 20.00 ; 1 N. Plantag- 

enet, 17.50 ; 4 S. Plantagenet, 20.00 ; 9 I 
I Clarence, 20.00 ; 15 Clarence, 10.00 ; 2 

Cumberland, 3.10 ; 3 Cumberland 20.36. 
! 7 Cumberland, 18.65 ; 12 Cumberland, 
' 5.00 ; 3 Russell, 19.50 

i'riw&iward.. 4Athol, 20.00 ; 5 Hallowell, 23.00; 5 N. 

Marvsburgh, 20.00 ; 6 N. Marvsburgh, 
I 20.00 ; 1 Sophiasburgh, ?0.30 ; S'Sophian- 
, burgh, 39.85 ; 10 Sophiasburgh, 9.00 ; 

11 Sophiasburgh, 20." 



l>:ii^^f 1 Admaston, 6.88; 5 Admaston, 14.33; U 

Admaeton, 10.30 ; 8 Bromley, 10.15 ; 
2 Brudenell, 26.00 ; 3 Pembroke, 20.00 ; 
1 Rops, 20.00 ; 8 Ross, 20.93 ; 2 West- 
meath, 21.18 ; 11 Westmeath, 40 00 




Mi3«kofca 



.3Me<lont€, 20.00; 10 Oro, 46.93; 4 Oro, 
I 10.00 ; 1 Orillia, 33.00 ; 5 Orillia, 10.56 
I 15 Orillia, 20.00 ; 3 Medora, 40.00 



^^rie. .V 5 Tiny, 37.14 ; 3 Flos, 30.87 ; 8 Sunnidale, 

20.00 ; 3 Vegpra, 20.00 

".«.e, S.W....i 10 Innisfil, 32,50; 6 Tecumseth, 31.75; 8 

I Tecumseth, 35.25 ; 11 Tecumseth, 33.50 

19 Tecumseth, 30.00 

r- TDont ; 4 Osnabruck, 23.04 ; 12 Osnabruck, 5.35. . . . 

rioriaE j3 Emilv, 19.45; 13 Emily, 20.00; 1 Ops, 

' 5.25 ; 9 Ops, 20.00 

r.toria W. and 



^E..Magkoka. 



V\'a.vrloo No. 1 . 
■^'aitriw No. 2. 



1 Mariposa, 20.00 ; U. 4 Mariposa, 19.S)0 ; 5 
Mariposa, 17.00 ; 6 .Mariposa, 20.00 ; 16 
Mariposa, 25.84; 17 Mariposa, 8.30; 21 
Mariposa, 10.00 ; 1 Eldon, 18.54 ; 4 
Eldon, 10.00 ; 5 Eldon, 30.00 ; 8 Eldon, 
20.00 ; 6 Fenelon, 20.28 ; U. 1 Laxton 
& Sommerville, 20.00 ; U. 1 Bexlev & 
Sommerville, 1.80 ; 2 Draper, 15.00* .. . 



20 N. Dumfries, 10.04 ; 4 Wellesley, 8.00; 
J 16 Wellesly 17.18 



14 



33 



16 

1 



•3 

I 
2 

3 



if 

189 77 80 82 



180 49 
108 01 

163 00 
28 39 

64 70 



256 66 



35 22 



60 28 
40 00 

50 00 
12 67 

32 34 



120 27 



17 61 



76 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 



APPENDIX Y^.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Welland 

Wellington, N... 
Wellingtons.... 

Went worth 



York, N. 



York S.... 
Manitoulin. 



Nipiseing N . . 
Parry Sound. 



Rainy River and 
Thunder Bay.. 

R. C. Separate' 
Schools, West. I 



Name of school (section number and town- 
ship) and amount expended for 
Dooks recommendea during 
the academic year. 



1 Minto, 23.04 ; 13 Peel, 355. 



1. W. Garafraxa, 15.00; 6 W. Garafraxa, 
20.00 

6 Ancaster, 12.16; 10 Ancaster, 20.00 ; 13 
Ancaster, 20.00 ; 18 Ancaster, 10.00 ; 3 
Barton, 15.00; 5 Beverlv, 2.90: 8 
Beverly, 20.05 ; 13 Beverly, 5.60 ; 15 
Beverly, .20.32 ; 1 Binbrook, 1.00 : 6 
Flamboro E., 26.00 ; 2 Flamboro W., 
14.00 ; 4 Flamboro W., 10.00 ; 6 Flam- 
boro W. 10.14 ; 9 Flamboro W, 24.15 ; 
1 Glanford, 20,30 ; 3 Gianford, 11.50 ; 
4 Glanford, 5.50 ; 6 Saltfleet, 20.00 ; 9 
Saltfleet, 11.00 

2 Georgina, 18.50 ; 3 Geomna, 14.05 : 4 

Georgina, 10.05 ; 5 Georffma, 20.00 ; 5 N. 
Gwillimbury, 6.45 ; 6 N. Gwillimbury, 
6.58 : 7 N. Gwillimbury, 10.00 ; 7 E. 
Gwillimbury, 8.76 ; 6 King, 5.00 ; 6 King 
7.60: 7 King, 11.74; 9 King, 10.35; 
10 King, 7.00 ; 11 King, 5.12 ; 16 King, 
20.00 ; 3 Vaughan, 5.00 ; 5 Vaughan, 
7.30 ; 6 Vaughan, 12.47 ; 15 Vaughan, 
3.76 ; 18 Vaughan, 10.00 ; 19 Vaughan, 
15.80 ; 20 Vaughan, 11.80 ; 1 Whit- 
church, 10.10 ; 4 Whitchurch, 9.50 ; 7 
Whitchurch, 6.00 ; 9 Whitchurch, 5.60 

3 and 24 Etobicoke and York, 10.00 ; 5 Scar- 

boro, 13.00 ; 9 Scarboro, 15.40 



1 Snider and Creighton, 10.00. 



Chapman, 11.00 ; 1 Humphrev, 20.00 ; 
1 Lount, 12.00 ; 1 Mills, 36.87 ; 3 Mc- 
Dougall, 10 00; 6 McDougall, 20.03: 
1 McKellar, 20.00 : 6 McKellar, 20.00 ; 
3McMurrich, 12 00; 4 McMurrich, 12.00; 
U. 2 Pringle, 30.00: 1 Wallbridge, 
20.00; U.l Wilson, 20.12 

5 Lash, 20.19 

12 Peel, 10.00 ; 1 W. Wawanosh, 2.40 ; 7 
Sandwich S., 10.00 ; 5 Raleigh, 6.48 ; 4 
Biddulph, 4.52 ; 4 Maidstone and 2 
Rochester, 31.80; 1 Hay, 20.00; 1 Carrick 






1 

5 
25 



I, 

II 

S3 

525 



32 



31 

20 
2 

1 



$ S C3 

,- C o 



I 



^ 
^ 



$ c. 



26 59 



35 00 



11 
17 



12 



279 62. 134 



22 

1 



253 53 

38 40 



126 
19 



10 00 



13 

1 



244 02 
20 19 



la^ 

IC 



1905 



EDLTCATION DEPARTMENT. 



77 



APPENDIX D.— Concluded. 



IiBpectonte. 



Name of school (section number and town- 
ship) and amoant expended for 
Dooks recommended, during 
the academic year. 



and Culroes, 18.00 ; 7 Sydenham, 5.25 
2 Maidstone, 13.37 ; 14'Carrick, 20.00 
1 McKillop, 6.13 ; 6 Raleigh, 10.00 
9 Downie, 18.00 

£ C. Separatel 
?ehQob,Ceiitiali 4 Asphodel, 6.40; 5 Percy, 6.17; 1 York 10.00 

i.. C Sepaiatel 



Totals, 1904-5. 

Totals, 1903-4. 

Increases . 




20 

3 

1 

1,231 



458 



1 = 1 



I c, 

175 95 
22 67 



11,641 86 
8,1»5 70 
»,446 15 



I 

I 



5 



$ c. 

82 06 
11 28 



5,265 80 
3,656 41 
1,609 39 



78 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 1 



APPENDIX "E.— CONTINUATION CLASSES, 1904-5. 



Inspectorate. 



Brant 



Bruce E.. 
Bruce W. 



Carleton 



Dufferin 
Dundas . 

Durham . 
Elgin . . . 



Name of Principal 
and Degree ; also 
Assistant when 
he gives full time 
to (Continuation 
Class work. 



Arthur E. Green 

D. A. Welsh 

W. J. Jolly 

Miss A. A . Langs . . . 

Margery Amy 

K. Cora Misener 

Alton M . Sheppard . 
Royden J. Fuller — 
Truman W. Kidd .. 

Donald Ross 

D. L . Strachan 

Jos. Stalker 

Thos. Keenan 

Jno. Thos. Kidd 

Elgin F. Collins .... 
Bruce F. Howson . . . 
Winifred E. Milne. . 
Minnie McNaughton. 
H. Stanley Sanderson 
Margaret McCharles . 
Margaret H. Welsh .. 

Wm. H. Sharp 

Muriel Payne 

Mary Ardley, B. A. . . 

Manon White 

Li la Macdougall 

Clara Parr 

Nellie Croskery 

H. W. Brownlee, B.A 

Samuel Acheson 

A. J. Kerr 

Margaret Taylor 

Wallace Pettapiece. . 

Ernest Worlev 

John B. Wallace 

Ernest Howes 

Miss M. Ellis 

T. E. Langford, M.A 
Miss De Cou, B.A.. 
B.E.Thackeray, B.A 

W. G. Bain 

Marjorie McNichol . . 

Wm. Heath 

Burton C. Taggart . . 

Geo. H. Steer 

Horatio Loucks 

Frank Anderson 

Gideon 0. Barclay . . 

Eli Robinson 

Esther Bates 

D . Hampton 

Edward Aiitchell 

Hanna Staples 

E. S. Willwms 

Henry Wing 

Geo. Stewart 

E. W. McKone. ... 
J. W. Brown 






^a 



Name of School. 



ClaH? of 
School. 



•S ' A B C 



c 



4. 8S. Dumfries. 

li TBrantford .. 

l|l6 Brantford 

li20 Brantford 

1 

1 

3 



14 S. Dumfries 

6 Onondaga 

14 Carrick 

Paisley Village. 



J6 1 
3:...' 
S ...' 

4 ..., 

5 ... 
4|...! 
81...; 

47 1 



Southampton Village 
Tees water Village . . . 

Lucknow Village 

Tiverton Village 

7 Bnice 

12 Culross 

10 Huron 

8 Kinlosa 

4 Culross 

5 Greenock 

1 Huron I 

8 Huron 

lOKinloss 1 

8 Fitzroy 

7 Goulbum 

3 N. Gower 

1 Nepean 

11 Osgoode 



Hintonburgh 

12 Goulburn 

Richmond Village 

9 Gloucester 

6 N. Gower 

3 Huntley 

15 Osgoode 

5 Gloucester 

18 Osgoode 

Shelbume Village 

Grand Valley Village.. 
2 Melancthon , . . ; 

5 Melancthon 

17 Mono 

Winchester Village. . . 
Chesterville Village . . 

12 Winchester 

U.18&1 Williamsburg 
2 Winchester 

6 Mountain , 

22 Mountain 

Millbrook Village . 

5 Manvers 

15 Manvers 

5 Aid borough 



6 Aldborough 

Springfield Village. 

10 Aldborough 

9 South wold 



26 
44 
48 
11 
6 
6 

llj 
5 
4 
ft 
4 
4 
7 
23 
18 



18 



16 1 



1 



48 1; 

13 

21' li. 

17 1;. 



/ 

7 

10 

8! 

6 

5 

351 



20i 1 

4 

3 

4 
46 
25 
35 

4 

4 

5 

5 
33 

5 

3i 



25' r 

25 1 
24 
10 
10 



1 ... 
1 ... 



m 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



79 



APPENDIX E.— Continued, 



Inspectorate. 



! Name of Principal 
and Degree; also 
Assistant when 
he gives full time 
to Continuation 
Class work. 






•Jlttgam-. 



I'^tE. 



T4^-i'w R. A, Catherwood. . . 

I J. C. McLennan 

JGeo. Dale 

E. P. Lewis 

iGeo. Priddle 

|Libbie Mcljcnnan. . . 

Frank Amoss 

Mamie Sanders 

|D. Clunas 

^*»^x N Nellie Moynahan . . . 

^^'^ Ilsabella Butterworth, 

I B.A 

Maud McLav 

J.W. Rymal, B.A... 

Fred. J. Voaden 

J. H. Madill 

jW. J.Elliott 

f ■ J^^^nac |m . Aylesworth, B. A. 

iMrs. Kevelle 

. - . Elizabeth McLennan, 
B.A 

Wm . B. McEwan . . . 

jR A. A. McConnelL 
. • • Thomas Gowan 

iChaa. E. Stuart 

J. Ashlev Bailie 

'''^)^^ jThoB. Allan 

I Lena M. Forfar, B.A. 

Agnes Johnston 

J. A. Magee.. 

]Jas. S. Rowe 

N. C. Mansell 

' A . D . Carmichael . . 

|W. J. Blakeston 

iRobt. A. Thompson. 

, . iMarv Spence 

rP^ •: A. B. Cooper 

"^'■"^and Dawson F. Aiken... 

J. L. Mitchener, B.A. 

Margaret Kenney . . . 

Alice Martin 

T^tta Curtis 

Margaret Johnston. . 
Halibditon, etc. ... A. C. Bernath 

.Geo. R. Coombs 

Geo. W. Dominey . . 

. IW. I. Hodges 

^•^'"D W. F.Inman 

Daisy Taylor 

W. H. Stewart 

Milly Dingman 

F. T. Richardson... 
W. J.McClenahan.. 

'Miae M - Murray 

'MissM. Chapman.. 
iMiss G . Featherstone 
ij. D. Williamson... 



Name of School. 



Class of 
Si'hool. 






o 

1^. 



Port Stanley Village. . ; 

llSouthwold 

11 S . Dorchester j 

7 Yarmouth I 

18 Bayham 

14 Dunwich | 

21 Malahide 

18 Yarmouth 

21 Malahide 

6 Sandwich, S 



6 
5 
9 
6 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
11 



4 Tilbury, W 



Amherstburg Town . . . 
Kingsville ** 

2 Colchester, S 

9 Colchester, S 

3 Portland 

7 Portland 



3ll 1 



261 

6', 

6i. 
131, 

«', 
3 , 



4' Maxville Village . 

12 Charlottenburg . . . 

I^ncaster Village. 

Thornbury Town . 

3 Euphrasia 

2'l3Collingwof>d. 
9 



•| 



Durham Town 

Durham Town 

Durham Town 

Hanover Village 

Markdale " 

5 Artemesia 

U. 12 Artemesia 

Dunda!k Village 

2 Bentinck 

14 I^gremont 

4)hatk worth Village. . . 
10 Walpole 

3 Walpole 

1 Walpole 

2 Walpole 

1 Rainham 



lilO Seneca. 



Huntsville Town . 

Powassan Town... 

2 Machar 

6 S. Himsworth 

Milton Town 



Acton Village . 



Burlington Village. 

3 Nelson 

2 Esf^uesing 

1 Naspagaweya 

9 Trafalgar 

15 Trafalgar 



32 
11 
4 
6 
5 
3 
81 



24 

24 

16 

.7 

8 

3 

3 

9 

28 

18 

6' 

3 

3 

3 

20 

10 

6 

4 

43 

31 

4 
3 

5! 

51 
61 



C D 



1 . 
1,. 



1 














"i 
"i 


1 






1 








1 






V 






1 








1 
1 
1 
1 




















1 










1 


i 










1 

1 

... 














1 


"i 






1 . - 








1 


1 






1 












1 






















.. .i... 





80 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX E.— Continued. 





Name of Principal 
and Degree; also 
Assistant when 
he gives full time 
to Continuation 
Class work. 




d 


Name of School. 


i 


Class of 
School. 


Inspectorate. 


A 


B 


C 


D 


Hastings N.| 


Robt. Weir 

Lillv Moffat 

A. E. Thrasher 

Arthur M.Ward.... 

Adam Kiernan 

John M. Bell 

M. W. Mott 

Ethel Gowpel 

Bernard Collins 

Wm. O'Brien 

I. H. Cameron 

Ethel 0. Scott 

A. H. MuBgrove 

Gordon Manning . . . 

Gilbert Summers 

J^hn Hartlev 

Chester L. Edy 

Thas. G. Shillmglaw. 
Laura A, Shannon . . 
Wm. H. Downey . . . 

A. McAlliPter 

Ernest Robertson . . . 

Melvin Kevs 

F. T. Bryans 

Robt. J. Beatty 

Louis C. Fleming . . . 
Annie Dorrington . . 

W. J. O'Brien 

Wm. McKav 

Chas. A. Tibbutt.... 

Fred. Ross 

R. F. Stelck 

Geo. W. Shore 

Claude Bluett 

Silvia Seel 


1 
IT 
II 


4 

1 

1 


Marmora Village 

2 Carlow 


7 
3 
6 
6 
9 
18 
6 
4 
4 

5 
64 

103 

31 

7 

I 

6 
9 
5 
3 

I 

74 

15 
12 
10 
10 
5 
8 
5 
5 
4 
3 
5 
6 
3 
5 
3 
4 
3 
9 
6 
4 
7 
4 
5 
8 
3 
3 
7 
8 
4 






r... 
1 


Hastings S 


7 Sidney 


1 .-- 


III! 1 


1 8 HnncrprfnTfi 


1 
1 
1' 






Ili 1 29 Tvpndinfloa 






II 
II 
II 

III 

III 
I 

III 
II 

III 

I 

II 

III 

II 

II 

I 

II 


5 
2 

1 
1 

I 


Tweed Village 

12 and 14 Thurlow 

15 Thurlow 


1 










1 




16 Hungerford 








1 




20 Hungerford 


i 
1 

1 

... 






1 


Huron E 


Brussels Village 

Wingham Town 

Blyth Village 

Wroxeter Village 

7 Howick 








9 
4 
















2 
2 

1 
2 
2 
1 




1 
] 

1 






9 Tuckersmith 

11 Grev 






17 Howick 












3 HuUett 












II' 2 

iii; 1 


8 Hullett 












6 McKillop 












III 
II 

I 
J. 

T 

• 11 

11 


1 


5 Morris 






•■ 


] 




1 
8 

3 
9 


5 Tuckernmith 

Exeter Village 

Hensall Village 

8 Ashfield 




Huron W 


1 










1 


i 






II 1 
III 3 


4Ashfield 

7 Hav 


1:... 
1 




11 1 

Hi 3 


6 Stanlev 


1 




5 Stephen : 


1 

1 






III 
III 


1 
1 


7 Wawanosh 










Minnie J. Durnin . . . 

Nina Kilpatrick 

T. M. Gordon 

C. M. Augustine 

G. Crawford 

J; C. Stothers 

H. R. Ijong 


3 Ashfield 






III! 1 


6 Ashfield 












II 
11 

HI 

111 
II 

III 
I 

III 
II 
11 

!i 

III 
11 
II 

III 

HI 
III 

I 
II 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


11 Ashfield 

16 Ashfield 






















1 Colborne 




i : 




7 Colborne 










2 Colborne 










Kathleen Swann. . . . 


5 Goderich 










Geo. Baird 


1 Stanlev 




Jas. Cameron 

Jas. Delgaty 

Jennie Musterd 

W. H. Johnston 

M. Botterill 

R. M. McLennan . . . 

Peter Go wans 

D. McDougall 

J. Elgin Currie 

W. J. Taylor 

J. M. Brown 

M. A. Bailie 

L. Milne 


1 
1 
I 
1 
2 
2 
1 

9 

\ 

1 


4 Stanley (South) 

4 Stanley (North) 

10 Stanlev 
































14 Stanlev 












1 Stephen 












16 Stephen 












5 Usborne 






6 Usborne 












16 Wawanosh 










3 Wawanosh 










4 Wawanosh 










1 
1 


17 Wawanosh 










11 W^awanosh 









m 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



81 



APPENDIX E.—CofUinued. 



Inspectorate. 



Name of Principal ! £ 

and Degree; also ^ ig j 

Assistant when |'3 g I g i 

he gives full time 1 c S ^ ! 

to Continuation ! S "£ 

Class work. i^o 
2 



Name of School. 



Class of 
School. 



<2 



o 



B 



C, D 



S^:tE.... 



kt,W. 



6e. 



A. A. Merritt 

H. H. Kelly, B.A... 

C. A. Milburn 

J. G. Cameron 

Milton McCordirk . . 

Lydia Broad bent 

Siurgare.t Scurrah . . . 

Flora Campbell 

W. J. Fletcher 

Maigaret Smith 

E. S. Stephenson. . . . 

Dougald Graham 

Lizzie Noack 

Morley Wilkinson . . 

J. C. Black 

Rosa Lee 

Richard Smith 

Sara Armstrong 

jFred Dodson 

I Florence Buchan 

.Frank Ferj^uson 

Norma Will son 

Frank White 

Mary McCuUy 

Jas. Newkjrk 

Annie Blue 

Lila Gregory 

E. U. Dickenson,B. A. 
Isabel Duff, B.A... . 

G.A. Miller...' 

Roberta Fox 

1. 8. McAUum 

Hattie Hutchinson . . 

Gordon Stewart 

Ca«3ie M. Hill 

Berta Robinson 

E. L. Elliott 

Wm. S. Bell 

Roger Hutchison 

Lizzie Wilson 

Kate B. McDonald.. 

W. C. Dainty 

Annie Hutchison . . . 

Mar^ret Rowe 

Game Rowe 

Jessie Hall 

Ada Wrong 

Jennie Richardson.. 

;Mae Quarrie 

Katha Johnston 

j Jessie Feriguson 

J. W. Bennie 

I Isabel Robertson 

[Sne M. Lewis 

Carrie Lynch 

Libbie Cruickshank. 
Ida Norton 



I 

II 
I 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

III 

III 

II 

III 

II 

III 

II 

II 

I 

II 

II 

III 

III 

III 

III 

II 

II 

III 

III 

I 

li 

i| 

1' 

II 

III! 
Hit 

III 

III: 

II. 

II 

III 

II 

II 

II 

III 

II 

II 

II 

III 

iir 

II 

II 

II 

III 

III 

in, 

nil 

I 

I 



Blenheim Town 

Bothwell Town 

eOrford 

Thamesville Village 

3 and 4 Orfonl 

4 Harwich 



33 

47. 



3f 1 



8 Camden 
6 Harwich . . 

li 8 Harwich. . 

1|10 Harwich. . 

Ill Harwich.. 

1112 Harwich.. 
l!l3J Harwich. 

I 10 Howard .. 

II 2 0rford ... 
1 7 0rford.... 
ij 9 0rford.... 
l! 5 Camden .. 
1,10 Camden... 
1| 7 Howard .. 
1;12 Howard .. 

11 13 Howard 
1 



2i Harwich 

3 Harwich 

9 Harwich 

14 Harwich 

Iil6 Harwich 

lOj Wallaceburg Town. 
I Walla<eburg Town . 

8 Dresden 

Dresden 

3 Tilbury Village 

1 7 Chatham 

1 11 Dover 

1 7 Raleigh 

1 12 Raleigh 

2 U.5 Raleigh 

1 U.6 Raleigh 

1 3 8. Tilbury, E 

2 5E. Tilbury, E 

1 ; 1 Romney 

4| 4 Romney 

1 4 Chatham 

l[ 6 N. Chatham 

1. 6S: Chatham 

1 8 Chatham 

1 11 Chatham 

1 18 Chatham 

1 4 Dover 

1 12 Dover 

i 

i; 

1! 
ll 

i; 

V 



3U. Raleigh 

2 E. Tilbury E 

3 M. Tilbury E 

4 Tilbury E. 

3 Ronmev 

Oil Springs Village . . . 
Oil Springs Village. . . 



7*. 

6 . 
12 . 
10 . 

6 . 

6. 

5 . 

6'. 

9 . 

4 . 

3 . 
4:. 
4i. 
4. 
3.. 
4' 

4 . 

II: 

70: 
45 



?i- 



41 
24 . 

7;., 



1 .. 



ll- 



30... I 1 

5,. ' 
111. 

5 . 

7'. 
10. 

8,. 

6'. 



6 
9, 

4|...! 

5; 

3 

3 

3 

4 

3 

3 

4 

3 
35 



.1. 



li... 
1:... 
ll... 
ll... 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 



82 



THE REPORT OF IHE 



No. 11 



APPENDIX }S..—C(mUnued. 



Inspectorate. 



Lambton, E. — Om. 



Lambton, W. 



Lanark ^. 



Leeds <fe Grenville 1 



Leeds &. Grenville 2 



Leeds & Grenville 3 

Lennox & Addng'tn 
Middlesex E 



Middlesex W. 



Name of Principal 
and Degree; also 
Assistant when 
he gives full time 
to Continuation 
Class work. 



F. Tanton 

Annie Eccles 

Jas. J. Wilson 

D. H. Harrison 

F. Casselman 

Mary C. Campbell. . 
J. D. Williamson. .. 
Maud Brightwell. . . 

Neil Mcl^n 

Christena Gray 

Geo. Cowie 

Robt. Dodds 

N. J. Kearney 

Robt. Beatty 

Mim*a Ellis 

Mrs. E. J. Foley . . . 
J. W. Forrester . . . 

Ida Paul 

Anna Walker ...'.. 
W. E. Hume 

A. Morton 

L. Earle 

B. Collinson 

Wm. Leadbeter . . . 

Mabel Greer 

Geo. E. Scott 

Nina Buell 

Hattie A. Holmes . 

Vina Cauley 

Stanley Weightman 
Geo. Weedmark . . . 
Robt. E. McLaughlin 
R. H. Hutchison. . . 
0. Mowat Perry . . . 

Flora McCoU 

Edith Stanley 

Hughena Elliott . . . 
Minnie S. Molland . 
Lillian Braithwaite. 

Clarence Flint 

Minnie Brown 

Mary Bell 

Jno. A. McNaughton 
Clark C. Warren . . 
W. G. Robinson . . 

C. J. Bradley .... 

Melvin Payne 

Carrie J. Lee 

Jennie McPherson 

Lewis Pavne 

Effie McEachren.. 
Geo. F. Copeland . 

Jas. E. Cowie 

Edna Stewart 

Jessie Blair 





t 


-■§ 


^ 


1 


5- 

o 


I 


^ 


I 


6 


T 




II 


2 


II 


2 


III 


\ 


II 


1 


II 


2 


II 


1 


II 


3 


II 


1 


II 


2 


III 


1 


II 


2 


II 


5 


II 


4 


II 


2 


III 


2 


II 


2 


III 


1 


I 


4 


II 


3 


II 


2 


III 


2 


III 


1 


II 


2 


II 


1 


1 


2 


II 


1 


II 


2 


I 


6 


II 


6 


II 


2 


I 


3 


III 


2 


II 


1 


II 


1 


II 


1 


II 


1 


III 


1 


II 


1 


II 


1 


II 


1 


II 


2 


II 


1 


II 


2 


II 


2 


II 


1 


II 


1 


n 


1 


II 


1 


I 


1 


11 


1 


III 


1 


II 


1 


II 


1 



Name of School. 



Alvinston Village . . 
Alvinston Village . . 

17 Enniskillen 

5 Euphemia 

8 Warwick 

23 Brooke & Moea 

18 Moore 

2 Samia 

Wyoming Village . . 

9 Moore 

7 Sombra 

17 Sombra 

Thedford Village 

Lanark Village . . . : 

4 Pakenham 

12Bathur8t 

11 Drummond 

11 Ramsay 

U. 7N. Elmsley.... 

Weetport Village . . 

' Newboro Village . . 

5 S. Crosby 

6 Bastard 

13 Leeds Rr 

4 Front of Yonge 

22Kitley 

7 Elizabethtown 

26 Elizabethtown 

U Kitley ' 

Mernckville Village 
Cu^inal Village . . . 

15 Edwardsburg 

Bath Village 

2 Kaladar 

10 Westminster 

5 Biddulph 

9 & 19 Dorchester .... 

7 London 

8 London 

6McGillivray 

1 W. Nissouri 

18 & 21 Westminster . . 
4 N. Dorchester 

17 N. Dorchester 

U. leCaradoc&Ekfrid 
15 Caradoc 

10 Lobo 

4Ekfrid 

13 W. Williams 

11 Caradoc 

U. 8 Ekfrid 

8 Lobo 

U. 9 Lobo 

IE. Williams 

U. 7 E. Williams . . . 



P4 



^ 



32 
11> 



5 
4 
4 
13 
5 
5 
3 
3 
3 
3 
57 
52 
4 
4 
3 
3 
20 
4 
3 
3 
3 
5 
5 
4 
3 
3 
41 
18 
8 
29 
5 
7 
3 
4 
6 
5 
5 
6 
4 
5 
7 
22 
10 
6 
5 
5 
3 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4 



Class of 
School. 



B 



6a £. 



m 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



83 



APPENDIX E.— Continued, 



Inspectorate. 



Name of Principal 
and Degree; also 
Assistant when 
he gives full time 
to Continuation 
Class work. 






Name of School. 



Oh 



Class of 
School. 



B 



.\VTf)lk. 



.^onhiifflberland 



C'nario N. 



CbtirioS. 



Oiford.... 



hei. 



f^terboK 



Thos. J. Hicks 

Ida Christmas 

L. E. Fierheller.... 

J. A. Irwin 

Wm . Bowden 

MisB J. Overbaugh . 
H. A. Marshall .... 
Mies M. McCurdy. . 
Marv Bain 

E. J'. Wethev, B.A. 
Arthur A. Mason . . 

Geo. Sharpe 

R. J. Johnston 

J, Givens 

Wm. Fallowdowne. 
Clarisa Paterson . . . 
Martha Cameron . . . 

May Mitchell 

Minnie Chambers . 

Jessie Walls 

Florence Shain 

Henry Hart 

Ernest Middleton . . 

Ida Amott 

Alex. R. McDonald 
W. Flummerfelt . . . 

Fannie Gray 

Arvella Real 

H. E. Ricker 

W. J. Dunlop 

M. A. Aldridge .... 

F. Robinson 

P. H. Hendershot . 
M. Alberta Robinson 

C. W. Milbum 

Chas. Garth waite . . . 

M. B.Hugill 

John M. Scott 

H. C. Brannian 

L H. Woodrow 

E. H. Damude 

Marv E. Ireton 

Evelyn Augustine. . . 
A. M. Burchell 

C. F. Ewera 

W. E. Wilson 

Stella L. Gregory . . . 
John A. Westman . . 

Edith A. Oliver 

J. Edgar Christie . . . 
Donald A. Norris . . . 

Samuel Sample 

R. Hall Cowie 

Harvey Elliott 

Thos. Hutchison 

Lawrence F. Brogden 
Sidney W. E. Hill . . 

D. L. Somerville .... 



II 

11 

IJ 

1 

III 

III 

II 

III 

III 

I 

III 

III 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

III 

III 

III 

II 

II 

II 

III 

III 

II 

II 

III 

I 

I 

I 

II 

II 

II 

I 

II 
II 
II 
II 
III 
II 
II 
II 
I 

II 

II 

I 

II 

III 

III 

II 

II 

II 

III 

II 

III 

I 

II 



2 6 Chariotteville 

ll W. 19 8. Walsingham 

2:11 Windham 

4; Delhi Village 

2 

1 



19 TowuFend 

5 Houghton 

5 Middleton 

11 Houghton 

9 Windham.. 

2 Percy 

22 Cramahe 

12 Percy and Seymour. 
Cannington Village 
Beaverton V^illage . . 

13 Brock 



14 Brock 
2 Mara. 
8 Mara. 
1 Rama. 
8 Scott . 

5 Scott . 

6 Brook 
10 Brock 

1 Mara . 

6 Mara . 

215 Pickering 



6 E. Whitby 

11 Reach 

Norwich Village 

U. 13 E. Zorra 

Embro Village 

24 Blenheim , 

U. 3 N. Norwich . . . . 

11 Blenheim 

U. 21 Blenheim 

6 S. Norwich 

5 Dereham 

U. 21 E. Nissouri.... 

12 Dereham 

10 E. Zorra \ 

U. 3 W. Oxford 

6 E. Nififlouri 

2 N. Oxford 

Bolton Village 

15 Caledon 

8 Caledon 

15 Chinguacousjr 

Milverton Village . . . 

8 Dow^nie 

4 N. Easthope 

lOElma 

3 Fullarton 

U. 4 Fullarton 

2 Logan 

4 Morningtou 

8 Mornington 

I^kefield Village ... 
Havelock Village 



8 
7 
9 

14 
7 
5 
4 
3 
5 

42 
5 
3 

11 

17 



6 

4 

5 

4 

5 

4 

3 

42 

20 

10 

10 

10 

14 

24 

13 

5 

5 

5 

6 

4 

4 

4 

39 

7 

6 

4 

25 

4 

7 

7 

4 

5 

5 

3 

3 

12 
10 



84 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX ^.—Continued, 



Inspectorate. 



Peterboro. — Con, . 
Prescott & Russell 



Name of Principal 
and Degree ; also 
Assistant when 
he gives full time 
to Continuation 
Class work. 



\Vm. G. Armour. 

Roy F. Fleming . 

A. Mav Sparling. 

C. M. 'feowe 

W. L. Summerby 

Evelyn F. Marston. 
Prince Edward Miss H. Ma<iSteven 

J. E. Benson , 

Edgar Adams 

J. $1. Roote 

MissC. Clarke 

F. B. Clarke 

M. Y. Williams . . . . 

: Miss M. Browne 

J. K. Osborne 

iJas. Hooper 

Miss A. E. Colli vier. 
Renfrew G. D. Ralston 

;Walter A. Black . . . . 

Robt. Robinson 

I A. A. McQuarrie 

I Ida Lacy 

Winifred Cull 

Linnie Donegan 

Chas. Gorman 

Thos. Costello 

Norman Bothwell . . , 

Marv I. Lett , 

Wm. J. O'Dair 

Simcoe, E 'Miss S. Day , 

J. A. Gillespie 



^-2 

Ij 



Simcoe, N . 



Simcoe, S.W . 



K. C. Morrison 

Edmond Moon 

W. A. Spottswood. . . 
KathrvnMcKee, B.Al 

Ira K. Clark | 

Matthew Johnstone.: 

Thos. Hindle ! 

J. A. Speers, B.A 

iNellieBell j 

Walter L. Richardson 
Dora M. Richardson. > 

Wm. L. Kidd | 

Albert Mills ! 

Thos. Elliott, M.A.. 
Magdalene De La- 
Mater 

George A. Clarke 

John A. Gibb 

J. P. Cowles 

Herbert E. Johnson. 

Neil A. Christie 

Geo. Sutherland 

jJohn M. McGuire... 

Bertha Rogerson 

Robert Little 

r. J. Colquette 

Thos. Irwin 

Chas . Deering 



Ill 

ii! 

11 

III 

iir 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

I 

III 

II 

III 

III 

III 

I 

II 
II 
II 
ii; 

III; 

III 
iir 

DiRt.l 

III 

11 

11 

III 

H, 

1l 
111, 

^]: 

1 

IJ 
II 

I 
II 

1 
II 

1 
II 

] 

I 

1 

in 
III 

II 
III 

II 

II 
ml 

II 

HI! 
II 
II 



Name of School. 



2 4 Otonabee 

3 2 Russell 

2 2 Cumberland 

2 Rockland Village... 
2 5 Cumberland 

1 1 E. Hawkesbury . . 

2 Wellington Village 

1 2 Ameliasburgh 

1 6 Ameliasburgh 

1 11 Ameliasburgh 

1 3 Athol 

2 7Hallowell 

2l7Hillier 

1 7 Ameliasburgh 

1 13 Ameliasburgh 

1 1 1 S. Mary sburgh 

l|l2 Sophiasburgh 

4[ Epanville Village . . . 
2| 5 Bagot 

3 Cobden Village 

2 7 Westmeatb 

1 3 Admaston 

1 1 Algona South 

1 1 Bromley 

1 3 Bromley 

1 2Brudenell 

1 2McNab 

1 2 Wilberforce'. 

1 4 Ross 

1 12 Medonte 

4 7 Medonte 

2 4 Oro 

2: 6 Tav 

412 Tay 

4 ^ 

4 

1 

2 

7 



Pi 



o 



Class of 
School . 



Creemore Village 

5 Flos 

3 Sunnidale 

9 Vespra 

AUiston Town 

Alliston Town 

Stayner Town 

Stayner Town 

Beeton Village 

Beeton Village 

Tottenham Village.. 



Tottenham Village . 

5 Essa 

Essa 

7 Essa 

_ 10 W. Gwillimbury. .. 

2| 3 Nottawasaga 

2114 Nottawasaga 

2ll0 Essa 

If 3 Innisfil 

11 6 Innisfil 

2i 5 Notlawaeagii 

II 5 Topsorontio 

2il0 Innirtfil 



4 
8 
6i 

lo; 

3 

4i 
8 
7 
6 
9 
7 

12 

10" 

7 

5 

6 

4 

30- 

13 

12, 

10- 

5 

61 

31 

41 

4 

3 

A 

5 

5 

6 

7 

6 

6 

18 

14 

7 

9 

96 

39 

29 

54 



32 

16 
11 
15 
10 

6 . 

5'. 

6 . 
5 . 

7 . 
6. 



BCD 



\"'\' 



1 . 
1 . 
1 . 
1 . 
i;. 
i|. 



1 ... 

1 ... 

1 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



85 



APPENDIX "E.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Name of Principal 
and Degree ; also 
AssiBtant when 
he gives full time 
to Continuation 
Class work. 



NE'oe.S.W.-Con. 



I rmont. , 



Vb'ria, E. 



£ Mngkoka. 



^^iierloo, No. 1 . . , 
Waterloo. No. 2 . . 



'•^MUnd . 



^■^iington, N.... 



Wellingtons.. 



^ffltworth.. 



Kate O'Hara 

Ijennie Fife 

Robt. Campbell... 

Mabel Steele 

Edward C. Ay erst 

Ismav Preston 

Ernest Selby 

!Thos. Scott 

Chas. Asquith 

j Annie McCutcheon. . 
I>iar^ret Millichamp 

Nellie Taylor 

May L. Stewart 

Wm. T. Baker 

ArveUa Williams 

lA. M. Murday 

Geo . Wilson 

I Andrew R. Kidd.... 

Jas. Froats 

Edith M. Adams 

Gertrude R. Bigelow 

iWillis Sheets 

Margaret Mi Robb . . 

lEthelSkelton 

'Geo. S. Mattice 

'Chas. Ramsay 

iLillian McGeough . . . 

H. J. Case 

H. J. Soovell, B.A.. 
I Miss J. M. Robertson 

;C. H. Lapp 

J. A. McFadyen. . . . 

T. C. Birchard 

M. Wilson 

J. Corrigill 

I J. B. Pomeroy 

Elsie M. Allan 

iDavid Harper. ..'... 
•Aadrew T- Gillespie. 

D. W. McKay 

C. E. Hansel! 

E. W. Farr 

F. T. Harry 

Grace C. Barron 

J. H. Cunningham. . 
V. W. Rutherford... 

J. M. Yoke 

Jno. A. Gray 

Lizzie C. Hawken . . . 

J. T. Curtis 

T. O. McMahon 

Kobt S.Smith 

Ernest L. Fuller 

I. W. Hut8on,M.A.. 
W. I . Greenaway . . . 

SarahBlythe 

W. L. Elvidge 

Jas. Henry 

|W. W.Smith 

iCkarles H. Stuart . . . 



E 

3-1 W, 



Xame of School. 



PL4 



o 



Class of 
School. 



11 


1 


4 


11 11 1 


III r 2 


111 1 


3 


III I 


6 


III 1 


1 


111 


] 


5 


11 


]' 4 


III 


l! 7 


111 


1 


4 


III 


1 


19 


II 


1 


26 


III 


1 


2 


III. 


I'l 8 


Ill 


111 


III 


!■ 2 


II 


1 5 


II 


I 8 


I 


3; 3 


I 


3 


14 


I 


3 


4 


II 


2 


3 


III 


I 


15 


III 


2 


1 


II 


1 


9 


1 


5 




III 


I 


1 


I 


6 




1 


12 




I 






II 


2 


8 


III 


I 


5 


II 


2 




II 


2 




I 


6 




11 


2 


7 


II 


1 


4 


II 


2 


11 


III 


1 


22 


I 


5 




II 


5 




II 


2 


9 


II 


3 


11 


II 


2 


I 


8 


I 




1 


4! 


11 


3; 


II 


2 


7 


II 


2 


2 


11 


2 


12 


III 


1 


13 


I 


3 




I 


6 




11 


2 


9 


I 


2 


8 


II 


2 


6 


II 


2 


6 


HI 


2 


6 


II 


3 


5 



Adjala. . 
Essa ... 



Essa 

W. Gwillimbury . . . . . 

W. Gwillimbury 

Innisfil 

Innisfil 

Nottawasaga 

Nottawasaga 

Nottawasaga 

Tecumseth 

Tecumseth 

Tecumseth 

Tossorontio 

Tossorontio 

Tossorontio 

Finch 

Roxborough 

Osnabruck 

Osnabruck 

Osnabruck 

Osnabruck 

Osnabruck 

Bobcaygeon Village . . 

Ops 

Fenelon Falls Village . 

Bracebridge Town 

Bracebridge Town 

Mariposa 

Eldon 

U. IBexley 

Woodville Village 

Elmira Village 

Woolwich 

Wilmot 

Wellesley 

N. Dumfries 

Port Colbome Village 
Bridgeburg Village . . . 

Pelham 

Bertie 

U. 3 Pelham 

Palmerston Town 

Palmerston Town 

Drayton Village 

Clifford Village 

Peel 

Peel 

Maryboro' 

Peel 

Erin Village 

Consolidated School . . 

Eramosa 

Puslinch 

W. Garafraxa 

Erin 

Puslinch 

Ancaster 



3 
3 

4 

3| 
4I 

31 
3 
4' 

3i 
3, 

31 

4| 
41 

13 

14 

18 

7 

6 

7 

31 

3 

23 
53 

10 

5 

5 
10 
10 

6 

5 

8 

5 
22 
19 

8 
13 

6 
45 

33 
10 

7 
6 
8 
3 

26 

14 

13 

13 
9 
41 
5| 

13l 



B 



CD 






86 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 



APPENDIX "E,— Concluded. 



Ingpectorate. 



Wentworth. — Con 



Name: of Principal 
and Degree ; also 
Afisistant when 
he gives full time 
to Continuation 
Class work. 



York,lJSr. 



York, S. 



Algoma 



ManitouUn, etc. 



Nipissing, etc 

Parry Sound, W. 



Rainy River and 

Thunder Bay 

Windsor and 

Walkerville 

R. C. Bi-lingual 

Schools, East 

R. C. Separate 

Schools, East 



Fanny A. Twiss — 

Jas. E. Stewart 

Curtis Nelson 

Allan E. Wilcox.... 
V. Kenneth Greer . , 

firnest Bartlett 

Leonora Coughlin . 

Waldon Lawr 

A. A. Cameron 

Wm. Thorburn 

Edgar Hollingshead 

Walter Rolling 

Marion Rannie 

D. Hicks, B.A 

Jas Hand 

J. W. English 

D. M. Christie 

Wm. Argue 

Angus Cameron 

Robt. O. White 

R. D. Fleming 

Fred. H. Hurlburt . . 

Jane Lush 

Jno. G. Lowe 

W. M. Bradley 

A. W. Smith 

A. M. Currie 

W. R. Tracy 

John Hemphill 

P. F. McNaughton.. 

John Maxwell 

John C. Laing 

J. W.Walker 



R. C. Separate 
Schools, Central . 

R. C. Separate 
Schools, West . . . 



Totals, 1904-5. 

Totals, 1903-4. 

Increases 

Decrease 



Hugh A. Beaton . . 
Sr. St. Radegoude. 



Sr. Ernestine .... 
Sr. St. Andrew... 
Florence Corkery 
Lillian O'Reilly.. 



Jas. E. Jones 

Thos. P. Hart.... 
Sr. M. Ethelbert. 
Julia O'Connor. . 
And. M. Doyle. . 



Mary Troy 

Sr. M. Horteuse . . 

Nellie McAsey 

Margaret A. Lewis 






II 



III 
II 

III 



II 
III 



Name of School. 



6 Flamboro, W 

7 Flambopo, W 

2 Glanford 

3 Saltfleet 

7 Beverly 

3 Binbrook 

9 Plamboro, W 

13 E. Gwillimbury 

14 King 

6 Vaughan 

11 King 

23 King 

4 E. Gwillimbury 

Woodbridge Village. 
Stouffville 

1 Etobicoke 

Bruce Mines Town . . 
Thessalon Town 

1 Hallam 

Gore Bay Town 

Little Current Town. 

2 Araiginack . . . ; 

1 Hilton 

Sudbury Town 

Copper 'Cliff Town . . 
Sturgeon Falls Town. 
Parry Sound Town . 
Parrv Sound Town . 
Burk's Falls Town.. 

1 Chapman 

Sundridge Village . . . 

8 Perry 

Fort Frances Town . . 

Walkerville Town... 

15 Gloucester 



Eganville Village . . . 

West''»ort Village . . . 

Chesterville Village . 

7 Wolfe Island 



Mattawa Town 

3 Mara 

Amherstburg Town . . 

2 Ashfield 

9 Biddulph and 1 Mc- 

Gillivray 

1 W . Wawanosh 

13 Waterloo 

5 Glenelg 

6 Raleigh 






o 



6 
6 
9 
6 
3 
4 
7 
27 
19 
6 
4 
4 
4 

30 
7 
4 

36 

13 

3 

25 

12 

6 

h 

15 

14 

4 

59 

23 

10 
7 
6 

7 

15 



16 

32 

10 

5 

8 

3 

23 

10 

5 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Class of 

School. 



5,349 

4,598 
751 



B 



c r 



45 



138,1 



6 . 



118 
20 



1S06 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 87 

APPENDIX ^.—PROCEEDINGS FOR THE YEAR 1905. 
I. REGULATIONS AND CIRCULARS. 
Emfibe Day. 

Circular to Inspectors. 

Gentlemen, — This year "Empire Day," the day before "Victoria Day,'* 
faUj on Tuesday, May 23rd, and I invite your co-operation in having tJhe 
erent duly celebrated in all our schools. See Regulation 11 (2). It is desir- 
able that every suitable means should be adopted to" foster among the youth 
of oar country the best national sentiment. The subject is especially im- 
portant at a time when the British nation is at peace with the world, and 
vnen Canada is enjoying a large measure of prosperity due, to a giieat ex- 
tent, to the development of our resources and the growth of intellectual and 
moral aspirations among our people. The principles of patriotism fostered, in 
tlie minda of pur young people should be such as will cause them to have an 
mteDigent knowledge of those forces which have made the British nation 
*hx it is to-day. The nation has attained its present proud position because 
of its spirit of freedom and tolerance, its legal enactments, its regard for truth 
Md righteousness, and the strength it secures from its system of democratic 
rniemment. The pupils in all our schools should know something of the 
*Taditionfl of the nation, its power as a great civilizing agency, the dangers it 
ki« had to surmount, its struggles for freedom, and the main sources of its 
present world-wide power. The patriotism to be cultivated in our schools 
fioold be marked by intelligence, high moral principle, the emphasis placed 
wm good citizenship, and the recognition of the truths of Christianity. 

It might be well to follow some plan like the following in having "Em- 
pire Day" duly celebrated: — 

In the forenoon part of the time might be occupied by the teacher in 
faking up as his subject the British Empire, and discussing in a general way 
'^? bistory, its extent and resources, its institutions, its literature, and its 
iislinguished statesmen, authors, etc. The excellence of our responsible 
^cnn of government, and the privileges which all British subjects enjoy 
^loTild be brought before the pupils. Some account of the Canadian system 
^i gOTemment might' be given — Dominion, Provincial, Municipal, Educa- 
V^nal, etc. Reference might be made to some of the more prominent Cana- 
iiians of the past. Any lessons of the kind given should have in view the 
m and attainments of the pupils. 

In the afternoon the exercises, commencing at 2.30, should be such as 
^1 he attended by the parents and friends of the children. The programme 
might embrace patriotic recitations, songs, readings by the pupils, and ad- 
insses by trusfees, clergymen, and others. During the day the British flag, 
w Canadian ensign should be hoisted over the school building. With these 
ohjeets in view I trust you will give the necessarv directions to the teachers 
of schools in your inspectorate in order that "Empire Day*' may be duly 
ctlebrated in all parts of the Province. 

Toronto, April, 1905. 



88 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Summer Schools for Teachers, 1905. 

The Education Department has made arrangements for Summer Schools 
to be held at the Normal Schools, Toronto, Ottawa and London. The main 
purpose of the Schools is to give instruction in the following departments : — 

MamLol Training, 
, Household Science, 

Nature Study, 
Art. 

Classes will be organized so as to enable students (the preference being 
given to teachers) to take as many as convenient of these departments. Lec- 
tures will be given by specialists in the respective subjects. Any further in- 
formation required will be obtained by students after the classes are organ- 
ized. No fees will be required, and it may be presumed that the cost of 
books, etc., will be slight. The schools will be organized at 2 p.m., Monday, 
July 3rd, when all necessary information will be given. The session wiU 
continue for three weeks. Certificates of attendance will be awarded to those 
students who show satisfactory proficiency. 

Persons who desire to avail themselves of the privileges offered should 
make application at an early date (not to this i>epartment but) to the Prin- 
cipal of the Normal School they purpose attending. No special form of ap- 
plication will be needed. (A Summer School is also announced at the Mac- 
Donald Institute, Guelph, for which information may be obtained from the 
President). 

Toronto, April, 1905. 



Apportionment of the Legislative Public School Grant for 1905. 

The apportionment of the Grant to the several municipalities is based 
upon the latest returns of population for the year 1904 and the division bfe- 
tween the Public and Separate Schools on the average attendance of that 
year as reported by the Inspectors, Public School Boards, and the Separate! 
School Trustees respectively. 

While the Separate Schools will receive their portion of the Ghrant direct 
from the Department, that of the Public Schools will be paid, according to 
this schedule, through the respective county, city, town, and village treasur- 
ers. 

Under the provisions of Section 5 of "An Act respecting the Education 
Department, 1901/' the Education Department is empowered 'Ho appropriate 
out of moneys voted by the Legislature for Public and Separate Schools a 
sum not exceeding f5.00 for every school in which the Regulations of (lie 
Department as to equipment, ventilation, heating, lighting and the care of 
the premises generally have been complied with." 

Each County Inspector is therefor authorized to deduct from the appor- 
tionment of each township such an amount as will provide the sum of $5.00 
to be paid on his order to each Trustee Board that has complied with the 
requirements mentioned. 

Toronto, May, 1905. 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



89 



Public School Apportionment to Counties for 1905. 



1. COUNTY OF BRANT. 
Mmicipalitiee. Apportionment. 

Brantford $677 00 

Bnrford 481 00 

Dumfries, Sonth 294 00 

Oiklind 86 Oo 

ea ' 120 00 



Total $1,667 00 



2. COUNTY OP BRUCE. 

Alljemarle $163 00 

Amabel 330 00 

irran 284 00 

Brtnt 469 00 

Brace .: 327 00 

Cirrick 296 00 

Culross 220 00 

E^tnor 182 00 

E*ierslie 237 00 

(Greenock 260 00 

Heron 376 00 

Kincardine 323 OQ 

Kirloas 266 00 

Licdsay 46 00 

?^ Edinnnds 47 00 

Sasgeen 176 00 



Total $3,980 00 



3. COUNTY OF CARLETON. 

Ftzroy $296 00 

loacefiter 468 00 

rrcdboarn 291 00 

'^wer. North 222 00 

Hantlev 268 00 

March' 81 00 

Marlborough 174 00 



N^ 



fpean 



O^wde .. 
lorbolton 



487 00 
468 00 
114 00 



Total : $2,838 00 



4. COUNTY OP DUFFERIN. 

Aaaranth $342 00 

'^larafraxa, Eaat, 221 00 

Lcther, Ernst 202 00 

Meltncthon 396 00 

Mono 326 00 

Miilmnr 311 00 



Total $1,797 00 

5. COUNTY OP ELGIN. 

Aldborough $648 00 

Bayham 447 00 

I)wrfiester, South 186 00 

Dnnwich 376 00 

Malihide 424 00 

^athwold 411 00 

rannoath 648 00 



6. COUNTY OF ESSEX. 



Municipalities. 



Apportionment . 



Anderdon $183 00 

Colchester, North 225 00 

Colchester, South 329 00 

Gosfield, North 214 00 

Gosfield, South 266 00 

Maidstone 219 00 

Maiden 110 00 

Mersea 479 00 

Pelee Island 74 00 

Rochester 48 00 

Sandwich, Bast 73 00 

Sandwich, West 205 00 

Sandwich, South 132 00 

Tilhury, North 44 00 

Tilhury, West 194 00 



Total $2,796 00 



7. COUNTY OF FRONTENAC. 



Barrie 

Bedford 

Clarendon and Miller 

Hinchinbrooke 

Howe Island 

Kennebec 

Kingston 

Loughborough 

Olden 

Oso 

Palmerston and N. and S. 

Canonto 

Pittsburg 

Portland 

Storrington 

Wolfe Island 



$ 63 00 

152 00 

97 00 

143 00 

137 00 
291 00 
186 00 
127 00 
130 00 

114 00 
254 00 
232 00 
212 00 
96 00 



Total $2,234 00 



Total $2,939 00 



8. COUNTY OF GREY. 

Artemesia $382 00 

Bentinck 374 00 

Collingwood 384 00 

Derby 207 00 

Egremont 376 00 

Euphrasia 343 00 

Glenelg 264 00 

Holland 281 00 

Keppel 427 00 

Normanby 412 00 

Osprey 389 00 

Proton 356 00 

Sarawak 172 00 

St. Vincent.... 333 00 

Sullivan ' 359 00 

Sydenham 383 00 

Total $5,441 00 



90 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 1 



9. COUNTY OF HALDIMAND. 

Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Canborough $109 00 

Cayuga, North 182 00 

Cayuga, South 89 00 

Dunn 96 00 

Moulton 206 00 

Oneida 162 00 

Rainham 199 00 

Seneca 1^ 00 

Sherbrooke 42 00 

Walpole 453 00 

Total *1,727 00 

10. COUNTY OF HALIBURTON. 

Anson and Hindon $33 00 

Cardiff 73 00 

Dudley. Dyeart, Harcourt, 

Harburn, Guilford 117 00 

Glamorgan 66 00 

Livingstone 6 00 

Lutterworth 62 00 

McClintock ,6 00 

Minden 137 00 

Monmouth 64 00 

Nightingale 1 00 

Sherbourne 33 00 

Snowdon f4 00 

Stanhope o6 00 

Total $716 00 

11. COUNTY OF HALTON. 

Esquesing $394 00 

Nassagaweya 249 00 

Nelson , 310 00 

Trafalgar 396 00 

Total $1,349 00 

12. COUNTY OF HASTINGS. 

Carlow $86 00 

Dungannon ' 99 00 

Elzevir and Grimsthorpe 161 00 

Faraday 61 00 

Hungerford 416 00 

Huntingdon " 277 00 

McClure, Wicklow and "Bangor 116 00 

Herschell and Monteagle 202 00 

Madoc 368 00 

Marmora and Lake 173 00 

Mayo 59 00 

Rawdon 362 00 

Sidney 461 00 

Thurlow • 410 00 

Tudor and Cashel 104 00 

Limerick ^2 00 

WoUaston 94 00 

Tyendinaga 333 00 

Total $3,834 00 



13. COUNTY OF HURON. 

Municipalities. Apportionmen 

Ashfield $295 ( 

Colborne 201 { 

Goderich 270 < 

Grey 382 ( 

Hay 375 ( 

Howick 440 ( 

Hullett 309 ( 

McKillop 252 ( 

Morris 277 C 

Stanley 222 ( 

Stephen 432 ( 

Tuckersmith 261 ( 

Turtiberry 238 ( 

Usborne 258 ( 

Wawanosh, East 215 ( 

Wawanosh, West 224 ( 

• Total $4,651 ( 

14. COUNTY OF KENT. 

Camden $280 ( 

Chatham 569 ( 

Dover • 395 ( 

Harwich 539 ( 

Howard 324 ( 

Orford 323 ( 

Raleigh 483 ( 

Romney 221 ( 

Tilbury, East 356 ( 

Zone 128 ( 

Total $3,618 ( 

16. COUNTY OF LAMBTON. 

Bosanquet $330 ( 

Brooke 351 ( 

Dawn 409 ( 

Enniskillen 515 ( 

Euphemia 244 ( 

Moore 504 ( 

Plympton 402 ( 

Sarnia 229 ( 

Sombra 396 ( 

Warwick 348 ( 

Total $3,728 i 

16. COUNTY OF LANARK. 

Bathurst $265 i 

Beckwith 193 ( 

Burgess, North 37 ( 

Dalhousie and Sherbrooke, 

North 193 1 

Darling 79 < 

Drummond 227 ( 

Elmsley, North ia5 I 

Lanark 200 < 

Lavant 62 I 

Montague 227 i 

Pakenham 236 i 

Ramsay 250 i 

Sherbrooke, South 97 • 

Total $2,171 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



91 



17. COUNTY OF LEEDS. 
MaoieipAlities. Apportionment. 

Bastard and Burgess, South... ^16 00 

Crosby, North 122 00 

Crwby, South 166 00 

Eliubethtown 459 00 

Emslev, South 84 00 

Kitley 224 00 

Lf«ds tnd Lsnsdowne, Front... 315 00 
Le«d5 ind Lansdowne, Rear ... 354 00 

YiLge and Escott, Rear 139 00 

Yoage, Front, and Escott 274 00 

Total ?2,363 00 

i:. (i) COUNTY OF GRENVILLE. 

.43^nsta $425 00 

Kwrdsburg 404 00 

GoTer, South 90 00 

tiifofd, Rideau 303 00 

W3l:oni : 183 00 

ToUl $1,405 00 

:^ COUNTY OF LENNOX AND AD- 
DINGTON. 

Acjiphustown $63 00 

Atherst Island 91 00 

Ardesea, Effingham and Kal- 

>dir 155 00 

CiBiden, East 478 00 

I^cbijrh Abinger and Ashley... 125 00 

Erctttown 250 00 

F-^^iericksburgh, North 170 00 

Fr^ericksburgh, So\ith 107 00 

Bicfamond 264 00 

^Md 2 13 00 

Total $1,916 00 

19. COUNTY OF LINCOLN. 

C*istor $193 00 

'^«on 218 00 

Gainsborough (including $84 

>™rs) 333 00 

'TMtliam 224 00 

'nn^by, North 141 00 

'Hiisby, South 156 00 

I'lth 173 00 

•^Vra 202 00 

Total $1,639 00 

20 COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 

^*i«ide $224 00 

MMjih 187 00 

^«Tadoc 423 00 

Miware 176 00 

^n*«ter, North 410 00 

EKrid 295 00 

J^ 305 00 

London 944 00 

MeGilliTray 318 00 

^^pfealfe 177 00 

^«a 242 00 

>'raonri, West 312 00 

Westminster 522 00 

raianw, East 153 00 

ViUiams, West 152 00 

Total $4,840 00 



21. COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 
Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Charlotteyille $353 QO 

Houghton 224 00 

Middleton 298 00 

Townsend 445 QO 

Walsingham, North 239 00 

Walsingham, South 224 00 

Windham 349 OO 

Woodhouse 232 00 

Total $2,364 00 

22. COUNTY OF NORTHUMBERLAND. 

Alnwick $112 00 

Brighton 260 00 

Cramahe 273 00 

Haldimand 400 00 

Hamilton 435 00 

Monaghan, South 108 00 

Murray 311 00 

Percy 301 00 

Seymour 330 00 

Total $2,530 00 

22. (a) COUNTY OF DURHAM. 

Cartwright $207 00 

Cavan 290 00 

Clarke 423 00 

Darlington 449 00 

Hope 346 00 

Manyers 302 00 

Total $2,017 00 

23. COUNTY OF ONTARIO. 

Brock $398 00 

Mara 308 00 

Pickering 599 00 

Rama 149 00 

Reach 388 OQ 

Scott 247 00 

Scugog Island 58 00 

Thorah 144 00 

Uxbridge 302 00 

Whitby, East 310 00 

Whitby 248 00 

Total $3,151 00 

24. COUNTY OF OXFORD. 

Blandford $188 00 

Blenheim 491 00 

Dereham 426 00 

Nissouri, East 300 00 

Norwich, North 246 00 

Norwich, South 256 00 

Oxford, North 142 00 

Oxford, East 240 00 

Oxford, West 237 00 

Zorra, East 426 00 

Zorra, West 288 00 

Total $3,240 00 



92 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. ! 



26. COUNTY OF PEEL. 

Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Albion ?257 00 

Caledon 464 00 

Chinguacousy 442 00 

Gore of Toronto 91 00 

Toronto 692 00 

Total *1,836 00 

26. COUNTY OF PERTH. 

Blanchard $279 00 

Downie 282 00 

Easthope, North 253 00 

Easthope, South * 232 00 

Ellice 270 00 

Elma 444 00 

Fullarton 254 00 

Hibbert 179 00 

Logan 318 00 

Mornington 326 00 

Wallace 321 00 

Total $3,167 00 

27. COUNTY OF PETERBOROUGH. 

Anstruther $33 00 

Asphodel 191 00 

Belmont 216 00 

Burleigh 41 00 

Cavendish 16 00 

Chandos 94 00 

Douro 197 QQ 

Dummer 213 00 

Ennismore 96 00 

Galway 109 00 

Harvey 117 00 

Methuen 29 00 

Monaghan, North 106 00 

Otonabee 376 00 

Smith 319 00 

Total $2,1^ 00 

28. COUNTY OF PRESCOTT. 

Alfred $36 00 

Caledonia 108 00 

Hawkesbury, East 266 00 

Hawkesbury, West 174 00 

Longueuil 68 00 

Plantagenet, North 309 00 

Plantagenet, South 167 00 

Total $1,117 00 

28. (a) COUNTY OF RUSSELL. 

Cambridge $151 00 

Clarence 120 00 

Cumberland 322 00 

Russell 124 00 

Total $717 00 



29. COUNTY OF PRINCE EDWAB 

Municipalities. Apportionm^i 

Ameiiasburg $3 

Athol 117 

HalloweU 326 

Hillier 164 

Marysburg, North.. .^ 117 

Marysb'urg, South 146 

Sophiasburg 202. 



Total $1,403 

30. COUNTY OF RENFREW. 

Admaston $246 1 

Algona, South 113 

Alice and Eraser 243 

Bagot and Blythfield 185 

Brougham 62 

Bromley 146 

Brudenell and Lyndoch 158 

Grattan 217 

Griffith and Matawatchan 47 

Hagarty, Jones, Sherwood, j 

Richards and Burns 226 

Head, Clara and Maria 46 i 

Horton 165 

McNab 434 

Pembroke 101 

Petewawa 128 

Radcliffe 43 

Raglan 91 

Rolph, Wylie, McKay, Buchan- 
an 123 

Ross ? 230 

Sebastopol 79 

Stafford 105 

Westmeath 365 

Wilberforce and Algona, North 284 

Total $3,837 



31. COUNTY OF SIMOOB. 

Adjala $195 

Essa 480 

Flos 420 

Gwillimbury, West 261 

Innisfil :,... 416 

Matchedash 59 

Medonte 461 

Nottawasaga 553 

Orillia 440 

Oro 452 

Sunnidale 265 

Tay 640 

Tiny 379 

Tecumseth 361 

Tossorontio 1^ 

Vespra 308 

Total $5,882 

32. COUNTY OF STORMONT. 

Cornwall $596 

Finch 384 

Osna^bruck 564 

Roxborough 390 



Total $1,934 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



93 



32. (•) COUNTY OF DUNDAS. 

Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Matilda $401 00 

M-mntain 360 00 

Williamsbarg 436 00 

\Sinchester 401 00 

Total $1,588 00 

e (h) COUNTY OF GLENGAERY. 

Ckrlottenbnrg $632 00 

K-iyon 462 00 

'^-;AJter 411 00 

UxhA 425 00 

Total $1,830 00 

33. COUNTY OF VICTORIA. 

Wer $103 00 

tirira 82 00 

W:uii 63 00 

r<^a 331 00 

F > 242 00 

F--{on 267 00 

Iron, Dighj and Longford 87 00 

Vir.posa 466 00 

K'^ 263 00 

vcArrille 218 00 

V,.-5lam 219 00 

ToUl $2,330 00 

M COUNTY OF WATERLOO. 

^* sfries. North $226 00 

^mloo 720 00 

i^Vl^T 433 00 

?l3ot' 619 00 

fl^^Tich 462 00 

Total $2,369 00 

%5. COUNTY OF WELLAND. 

^^•^rti. : $384 00 

M^iind 117 00 

^' aberstone 309 00 

POam 293 00 

^'lEford 214 00 

7' rcJd 207 00 

^'■■zi^t 309 00 

^iTc-i^y 104 00 

Total $1,937 00 



36. COUNTY OF WELLINGTON. 

Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Arthur $260 00 

Eramosa 290 00 

Erin 363 00 

Garafraxa, West 262 00 

Guelph 264 00 

Luther, West 237 00 

Maryborough 337 00 

Minto 336 00 

Nichol 178 00 

Peel 379 00 

Pilkington 160 00 

Puslinch 340 00 

Total $3,386 00 

37. COUNTY OF WENTWORTH. 

Ancaster $429 00 

Barton 441 00 

Beverly 466 00 

Binbrook 142 00 

Flamborough, East 291 00 

Flamborough, West 341 00 

Glanford 174 00 

Saltfleet 401 00 

Total $2,676 00 

38. COUNTY OF YORK. 

Etobicoke $479 00 

Georgina 193 00 

Gwillimbury, East 398 00 

Gwillimbury^ North 177 00 

King 662 00 

Markham 689 00 

Scarborough 428 00 

Vaughan 602 00 

Whitchurch 388 00 

York : 1,377 00 

Total - $6,093 00 

39. DISTRICTS. 
Algoma, Manitoulin, Musko- 
ka, Nipissing, Parry Sound, 
Rainy Rirer, and Thunder 
Bay, including rural public 
and separate schools, but not 
any town or village named 
in this list $45,000 00 

Total $46,000 00 



APPORTIONMENT TO ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS FOR 1906, 
PAYABLE THROUGH THIS DEPARTMENT. 

^ =<^ol Sections. Apportionment. School Sections. Apportionment. 
A-.aU 10 $26 00 Alfred 11 20 00 


^ '*Ki . ... 3 21 00 


<f 




12 24 00 


6 21 00 


tl 




13 19 00 


7 (with 8, Plantagenet 

South) 9 00 


14 14 00 


(( 




16 24 00 


7 26 00 


Admaston ..... 




4 15 00 


• 8 60 00 


Anderdon, 2, 6 and 8 ( 
9 Sandwicl 


with 6 and 


9 26 00 


i W.) 29 00 


10 79 00 


3 and 4 17 00 



94 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. Ij 



School Sections. Apportionment 

Arthur 6 27 00 

10 32 00 

Ashfield 2 64 00 

Asphodel 4 21 00 

Augusta 16 16 00 

Balfour, 1 with 1 Rayside (Dis- 
trict of Algoma) 

Balfour, 2 (District of Algoma) 

Biddulph 3 8 00 

'' 4 31 00 

6 19 00 

9 (with 1 McGillivray) 11 00 
Bonfield, lA, IB, 2 4 (District 

Nipissing) 

Brant (with 3 Greenock) 2 13 00 

Brighton 1(15) 16 00 

Bromley 4 14 00 

6 28 00 

7 47 00 

Brougham 1 7 00 

Burgess, North 2 34 00 

" 4 13 00 

6 11 00 

Caledonia 3, 4 and 10 14 00 

" 6 (with 7 Plantagenet S.) 14 00 

10 18 00 

12 29 00 

13 16 00 

Cambridge 3 24 00 

4 26 00 

6 27 00 

6 and 7 42 00 

: 6 19 00 

" 14? 19 00 

Carrick 1 27 00 

(with 1 Culross)... 1 56 00 

2 21 00 

" (with 2 Culross)... 2 13 00 

4 31 00 

14 106 00 

Charlottenburg 16 47 00 

Chisholm and Boulter ... 1 (Nipissing) 

Chisholm 2 (Nipissing) 

Clarence 3 22 00 

6 82 00 

" 6 69 00 

8 36 00 

11 27 00 

12 17 00 

13 8 00 

14 21 00 

16 21 00 

17 24 00 

18 17 00 

19 19 00 

'* 20 16 00 

" 21 27 00 

Cornwall 1 16 00 

" 16 62 00 

17 18 00 

Crosby, North 7 3 00 

Culross (with 1 Carrick)... 1 68 00 

(with 2 Carrick)... 2 16 00 

Cumberland 10 7 00 

11 16 00 

13 18 00 

'< 14 26 00 



School Sections. ApportionmenI 

Dilke, 6 (District of Algoma) 

Downife 9 36 { 

Dover 3 57 ( 

7 29^ 

'' 9 28 1 

Dunnett and Rutter, 1 (District 

of Nipissing) 

Edwardsburg 2 5\ 

Ellice 1 12 1 

" 6 29 1 

7 18 1 

Ferris, 2 (District of Nipissing) 

3, 

*< 4 <€ ' 

Finch .! 6 58' 

Gibbons, 1 (District of Nipissing) 

Grant, 1 (District of Nipissing) 

Greenock, 3 (with 2 Brant) ... 67 

Glenelg 6 18 

V* 7 24 

Gloucester, 1 (with 3 Osgoode) 9 

" 4, 6 and 12 7 

" 14 28 

15 71 

17 16 

20 16 

22 8 

*' 25 96 

26 21 

Griffith, etc 3 15 

Hagarty 4 40 

12 48 

Haldimand 2 28 

14 12 

Harwich 9 26 

Hawkesbury, East 2 63 

4 17 

6 14 

" 7 99 

10 50 

'* ..» 11 30 

*' 12 12 

15 25 

" 16 13 

19 (to be 

portioned). 

Hay 1 13 

** 11 24 

Hibbert (1) 3 26 

" 2 (with McKillop and Logan) 43 

" 3 (with McKillop, etc.) 3 

Howe Island 1 IC 

*' 2 17 

'« 3 14 

Holland, etc 3 11 

Hullett 2 18 

Hungerford 14 (to be 

portioned). 

Keewatin, 1 (District of Algoma) .... 

Kenyon 12 S 

Kingston 8 25 

Lancaster 14 3S 

I^ochiel 11 2( 

" 12A 21 

12B 7C 

Logan (re 6 Ellice) i 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



95 



Sdiool SectioiiB. Apportionment. 

Longneail, Wert 2 21 00 

4A 23 00 

7 18 00 

LoQghboro' 2 9 00 

10 11 00 

Maidstone 1 43 00 

2 26 00 

" 4 (vith 2 Rochester) ... 22 00 

'' 8 (with 5 Sandwich S) 26 00 

Maiden 3A 34 00 

3B 24 00 

Mart 3 65 00 

Man* 3 49 00 

Marmora ^nd Lake 1 16 00 

Matavatchan 3 29 00 

Moore 3, 4 and 6 11 00 

Mornington 4 31 00 

McCillirray, 1 (with 9 Biddulph) 9 00 

M^KiUop 1 24 00 

• 3 (with Hibbert) 7 00 

• (2 Hibbert, etc.) 13 00 

M:Plierson and Kirkpatrick^ 1 

(District Nipissing). 

N>pean 7 26 00 

16 86 00 

Nickol 1 16 00 

Nxmanbv 6 11 00 

10 14 00 

'K^swde 1 14 00 

2(16) 12 00 

3 (with 1 Gloucester) 11 00 
Pipineau, 1 (Dist. of Nipissing). 
2 " '* 
2B " " 

P«I 8 22 00 

12 16 00 

?«CT 6 12 00 

12 (with 12 Seymour) ... 8 00 

Pteagenet, North 4 24 00 

7 18 00 

8 67 00 

9 27 00 

" 12 14 00 

PUaUgenet, South 4 60 00 

7 41 00 

7 (with 6 

Caledonia) 14 00 

PUitagenet, South 8 19 00 

8 (with 7 Afred) 7 00 

11 36 00 

12 (to be ap- 
portioned). 

Pcrtland 11 20 00 

Proton 6 19 00 

Sakigh 4 9 00 

• 6 26 00 

^ 6 16 00 

Hifsde, 1 (with 1 Balfour) Algoma ... 

PjcKmond 10 and 17 13 00 

^^«i3€ster, 2 (with 4 Maidstone) 23 00 

3 67 00 

6 62 00 

7 42 00 

9 and 14 36 00 

10 (with 11 Tilbury, N.) 11 00 

Rciboro' 12 72 00 

16 26 00 



School Sections. Apportionment. 
Russell, 1 (with 12 Winchester) 10 00 



4 

6 

7 

8 

13 

14 



18 00 
92 00 

20 00 
32 00 

21 00 
21 00 

123 00 

18 00 

19 00 
86 00 
46 00 
23 00 

26 00 

26 00 
29 00 
11 00 
26 00 
62 00 
17 00 
26 00 
38 00 



Sandwich, East 1 

2 

3 

4 

Sandwich, West 1 

4 

*' 6 and 9 (with 2, 

6, 8 Anderdon) 

Sandwich, South, 6 (with 8 Maid- 
stone) 

Sandwich, South 7 

Seymour, 12 (with 12 Percy)... 

SheflBeld ^. 6 

Sherwood 6 

Sombra 6 

Stafford 2 

Stephen 6 

Springer, 1 (Dist. of Nipissing) 
ri 2 *' ** 

« 3 it (< 



Stanley 1 22 00 

Sydenham 7 6 00 

Tilbury, North 1 76 00 

<i 2 32 00 

n 6 30 00 

<c 7 34 00 

" 11 (with 10 Rochester) 22 00 

Tilbury, West H 23 00 

Tilbury, East 1 H 00 

f* 3 15 00 

Tiny ". 2 102 00 

Toronto Gore 6 7 00 

Tyendinaga 18 J? 95 

^ ft 20 17 00 

. u 24 23 00 

a "* ..; 28 12 00 

30 16 00 

Vespra 7 4 00 

Waterloo 13 66 00 

Wawanosh, West 1 Jf 00 

Wellesley 5 18 00 

" 9 and 10 29 00 

it 11 76 00 

a ] 12 3 00 

Westminster 13 9 00 

Widdifield, 2 (Dist. of Nipissing) 

Williams, West 10 14 00 

Wilmot 15* 64 00 

Winchester 12 (with 1 Russell) 15 00 

Windham 8 66 00 

Wolfe Island 1 9 00 

2 13 00 

4 34 00 

7 12 00 

Woolwich 10 32 00 

Yonge and Escott Rear ... 4 10 00 

York 1 38 00 



$6,766 00 



96 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 1^ 



APPORTIONMENT TO CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES FOR 1905. 



CITIES. 



Public 
SchoolB. 



Separate 
ScdooIb. 



Total. 



Belleville 

Brantford 

Chatham 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Kingston • 

London 

Niagara Falls 

Ottawa 

St. Catharines 

St. Thomas , 

Stratford 

Toronto 

Windsor 

Woodstock 

Total 

TOWNS. 

Alexandria 

Alliston 

Almonte 

Amherstburg 

Arnprior 

Aurora 

Aylmer 

Barrie 

Berlin 

Blenheim 

Both well 

Bowmanville 

Bracebridge 

Brampton 

Brockville 

Bruce Mines 

Cache Bay 

Carleton Place 

Clinton , 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Copper Cliff 

Cornwall 

Deseronto 

Dresden 

Dundas 

Dunnville 

Durham 

East Toronto 

Essex 

Forest 

Fort Frances 

Fort William 

Gait 

Gananoque 

Goderich 

Gore Bay 

Gravenhurst 

Hanover 

Haileybury 



$ c 

775 00 
2,087 00 

940 00 
1,190 00 
5,772 00 
1,742 00 
4,364 00 

739 00 
3,664 00 
1,041 00 
1,277 00 
1,211 00 
23,293 00 
1,159 00 
1,065 00 



50,319 00 



62 00 


156 00 


262 00 


123 00 


277 00 


203 00 


255 00 


669 00 


992 00 


182 00 


97 00 


340 00 


345 00 


355 00 


885 00 


98 00 


75 00 


490 00 


272 00 


368 00 


821 00 


266 00 


303 00 


418 00 


222 00 


343 00 


264 00 


211 00 


377 00 


172 00 


192 00 


101 00 


594 00 


954 00 


460 00 


423 00 


87 00 


269 00 


232 00 


60 00 



232 00 


1,007 00 


253 00 


2,340 00 


211 00 


1,151 00 


278 00 


1,468 00 


1,135 00 


6,fW7 00 


471 00 


2,213 00 


645 00 


5,009 00 


108 00 


847 00 


3,924 00 


7,588 00 


265 00 


1,306 00 


167 00 


1,444 00 


258 00 


1,469 00 


3,870 00 


27,163 00 


501 00 


1,660 00 


66 00 


1,131 00 



12,384 00 



201 00 

"87 00 
139 00 
166 00 



107 00 
310 00 



255 00 

'i42 '66 
399 66 
"72*66 



I 00 

185 00 

61 00 

"6i'66 



62,703 00 



263 00 
156 00' 
349 00 
262 00 
443 00 
203 00 
255 00 
776 00 

1,302 00 
182 00 

97 00 
340 00 
345 00 
355 00 

1,140 00 

98 00 
75 00 

490 00 
272 00 
510 00 
821 00 
266 00 
702 00 
418 00 
222 00 
415 00 

264 00 
211 00 
377 00 
172 00 
192 00 
108 00 
779 00 

1,015 00 
460 00 
484 00 

87 00 
269 00 
232 00 

60 00 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



97 



APPORTIONMENT TO CITIES, TOWNS, and VILLAGES, 1906,— Qmtinued, 



TOW^S.— Continued . 



Public 
Schools. 



Separate 
Scndols. 



Totals. 



I c. 



Harriston . . . 
Hawkesbun'. 
lleapeler . .'. . 
Hanteville. .. 



Kincardine 

Kmgsville 

Leamington . . . 

Lindsay 

Listowel 

Little Current . 

Maseey 

Mattawa 

Meaford 

Midland 

Mitchell 

Milton 

Mount Forest.. 

Napanee 

NewLiskeard . 
Newmarket . . . 

Niapira. 

North Bay 

North Toronto . 

Oakville 

Orangeville 

Orillia. 



Oshawa 

Owen Sound. 
Palmereton. . 

Pkrkhill 

Paris 

Parrr Sound. 
Pembroke . . . 



Perth. 
Peterborough . . . 

PetTolea 

Pidon 

Port Arthur 

Port Hope 

Prescott 

Preston 

Kainv River 

Rat Portage 

Renfrew 

Ridget^wn 

Sandwich 

Sarnia 

SaultSte. liiarie. 

Seaforth 

^imcoe 

Smiih'g Falls . . . 

^tayner 

St^elton 

^^tuTjzeon Falle . - 

J^t. Mary's 

^^trathroy 

f*»idbury 

Thessalbn 



210 00 




64 00 


490 oO ! 


273 00 




266 00 




629 00 


63 00 1 


294 00 




194 00 




316 00 




638 00 


214 66 ; 


291 00 


1 


120 00 


(in town gt.) 


70 00 




.25 00 


i56 66 


276 00 




469 00 




229 00 




174 00 




268 00 




346 00 




144 00 




261 00 


29 66 


177 00 




271 00 


i65 66 


246 00 




189 00 


26 66 


291 00 




488 00 


134 66 


618 00 


54 00 


1,099 00 


67 00 


222 00 




137 00 


si 66 


380 00 


41 00 


332 00 




357 00 


293 00 


324 00 




299 00 


i42 66 


1,192 00 


509 00 


456 00 




381 00 


33 00 1 


569 00 


172 00 ; 


498 00 




259 00 


ii7 66 1 


243 00 


58 00 1 


171 00 


69 00 ! 


440 00 


110 00 1 


235 00 


156 00 1 


279 00 


1 


98 00 


140 00 ! 


000 00 


160 00 


734 00 


126 00 


211 00 


51 00 


369 00 




625 00 




138 00 




126 00 


79 66 


103 00 


153 00 


368 00 


46 00 


368 00 




115 00 


i46 66 


138 00 





$ c. 

210 00 
554 00 
273 00 
265 00 
682 00 
294 00 
194 00 
316 00 
852 00 
291 00 
120 00 
70 00 
175 00 
276 00 
459 00 
229 00 
174 00 
268 00 
346 00 
144 00 

290 00 
177 00 
436 00 
246 00 
209 00 

291 00 
622 00 
572 00 

1,166 00 
222 00 
168 00 
421 00 
332 00 
650 00 
324 00 
441 00 

1,701 00 
456 00 
414 00 
741 00 
498 00 
376 00 
301 00 
240 00 
550 00 
391 00 
279 00 
238 00 

1,060 00 
860 00 
262 00 
369 00 
625 00 
138 00 
205 00 
25(1 00 
414 00 
368 00 
261 00 
138 00 



7s. 



98 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Na 



APPORTIONMENT TO CITIES, TOWNS and VILLAGES, 190&,--C<mt.inuetl 



TOWNS.— Con. 



Thombury 

Thorold 

Tillflonburg ... . 
Toronto Junction . 

Trenton 

Uxbridge 

Vankleek Hill . . . 

Walkerton 

Walkerville 

Wallaceburg 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Whitby 

Wiarton 

Wingham 



Total. 



INCORPORATED VILLAGES. 



Acton 

Ai lea Craig. 
Alvinston. . 

Arkona 

Arthur. . . . 

Athens 

Avr. 



Bancroft. 
Bath. 



Bayfield 

Beamsville 

Beaverton 

Beeton 

Belle River. . . 

Blyth 

Bobcaygeon. . . 

Bolton 

Bradford 

Bridgeburg. . . 

Brighton 

Brussels 

Burk's Falls . . 
Burlington. . . . 

Caledonia 

Campbellford 
Cannington . . . 

Cardinal 

Casselman. . . . 

("ayuga 

Chats worth . . . 

( 'hesley 

(/hesteWille. . . 

Chippawa 

Clifford 

Cobden 

Coll)orne 

Creemore 

Delhi 

Dravton 



Public 
Schools . 



f c. 

102 00 
175 00 
253 00 
920 00 
326 00 
188 00 
89 00 
261 00 
274 00 
309 00 
373 00 
211 00 
248 00 
314 00 
265 00 



$37,373 00 



178 00 


84 00 


95 00 


69 00 


83 00 


107 00 


104 00 


90 00 


44 00 


62 00 


92 00 


102 00 


85 00 


"mob 


109 00 


77 00 


114 00 


158 00 


164 00 


147 00 


93 00 


146 00 


96 00 


299 00 


124 00 


142 00 


20 00 


106 00 


42 00 


209 00 


83 00 


85 00 


69 00 


97 00 


119 00 


80 00 


94 00 


96 00 



Separate 
Schools. 



Total. 



71 00 



110 00 

"iis 66 

114 00 
(in town gt.) 
58 00 
83 00 



32 00 



$6,781 00 



102 « 
246 (K 
25.S 0( 
920 0( 
436 0< 
188 0( 
202 a 
375 01 
274 01 
367 01 
456 « 
211 01 
280 01 
314 
265 



64 00 



65 00 



92 00 



30 00 



$44,154 



178 

84 

95 
69 

147 

107 

104 

90 

44 (1 

62 C 

92 C 
102 C 

85 ( 
65 ( 

l()o ( 
109 ( 
77 ( 
114 ( 
158 1 
164 ( 
147 ( 

93 I 
146 < 

96 i 
299 < 
124 
142 
112 
106 

42 
209 
113 

a5 

69 
97 
119 
80 
94 
96 



Wo 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



99 



APPORTIONMENT TO CITIES, TOWNS and VILLAGE, 190b,— Continued. 



INCORPORATED VILLAGES.— Con. 



te.kli 

I^Tj'T. 

r«Er.!ie 

B::i 

El 

fer 

Lrz 

l\^.T 

F.:.:<i Falls 

hrrs 

r.rL'if , 

krlfD kknd 

fc'Trt-'lTTl 

B:- 

&Ti:' Villev 

Br2.-W....; 

le-'»-^ille 

fc-.ri? 

Bs.rK.k 

Bhi-e:1 

fc* -n-i^T^ 

B>l£iliLDdiDg. 



Public 
Schools. 



Separate 
Sctools. 



Total. 



N»'^i Eigt... 

^.-T 

feEiiwa^d. 
c-c«th 

H ' olhome . 
r I»'Alhoasie. 

^Klzin 

r Perry 

lit KowaiL . . , 



* c. 

97 00 
105 00 

69 00 
165 00 

126 00 

71 00 
60 00 

194 00 
142 00 
176 00 

101 00 
29 00 

157 00 

102 00 

96 00 

110 00 

112 00 
53 00 

119 00 
95 00 

152 00 
48 00 

122 00 

146 00 

141 00 
101 00 

63 00 

111 00 

97 00 
119 00 

142 00 
118 00 

127 00 
06 00 

100 00 
114 00 

153 00 
104 00 

84 00 
182 00 
52 00 
67 00 
43 00 
57 00 

154 00 
150 00 

103 00 

101 00 
75 00 
78 00 

113 00 
107 00 

52 00 
33 00 

147 00 
84 00 

126 00 
lije 00 
160 00 

72 00 



I c. 

'5906 
"'2i'c)0 

"9*66 



42 00 



182 00 



33 00 



43 00 



02 00 

'24 06 

33 06 



$ c. 

97 00 
105 00 
128 00 
165 00 
147 00 

71 00 
60 00 

194 00 
142 00 
185 00 

101 00 
29 00 

157 00 

102 00 

96 00 
110 00 

112 00 
95 00 

119 00 

95 00 
334 00 

48 00 
122 00 

146 00 

141 00 
101 00 

63 00 
144 00 

97 00 
119 00 

142 00 
118 00 
127 00 

96 00 

100 00 
114 00 
196 00 
104 00 

84 00 

182 00 

52 00 

67 00 

43 00 

57 00 

154 00 

150 00 

103 00 

101 00 

75 00 
170 00 

113 00 
107 00 

76 00 
33 00 

147 00 
117 00 
126 00 
156 00 
160 00 

72 00 



100 



THE REPORT OF THE 



N< 



APPORTIONMENT TO CITIES, TOWNS and VILLAGES, l906.-'Qmclude<1 . 



INCORPORATED VILLAGES.— Con. 



Port Stanley . . . 

Richmond 

Richmond Hill 

Rockland 

Shelburne 

Southampton . . 

Springfield 

Stirling 

Stouffville 

StreetBville 

Sundridge 

Sutton 

Tara. 

Teeswater 

Thamesville 

Thedford 

Tilbury 

Tiverton 

Tottenham 

Tweed 

Vienna 

Wardsville 

Waterdown 

Waterford 

Watford 

Wellington 

Weston 

Westport 

Wmchester 

Woodbridge . . . 

Woodville 

Wyoming 

Wroxeter 



Total.,. 



Public 
Schools. 



$ c. 

69 00 
59 00 

77 00 
15 00 

144 00 
202 00 

52 00 

95 00 
141 00 

58 00 
48 00 
74 00 
82 00 

110 00 

96 00 
74 00 

70 00 
64 00 
66 00 

131 00 
40 00 
37 00 

71 00 
131 00 
154 00 

78 00 

145 00 
42 00 

147 00 
61 00 

59 00 
78 00 
52 00 



113,320 00 



Separate 
Scnools. 



$ c. 



142 00 



64 00 
3606 



12 00 
45 00 



11,082 00 



Totals 



69 1 
59^ 
71 { 

157 { 

144 I 

202 < 
52 i 
95i 

141 I 
58 I 
48! 
74 1 
82 I 

110 i 
96 I 
741 

134 
64 
66 

161 
40 
37 
71 

131 

154 
78 

157 
87 

147 
61 
59 
78 
52 



$14,402 



SUMMARY OF APPORTIONMENT FOR 1905. 



COUNTIES. 



Public 
Schools. 



Separate 
Schools. 



Tota 



1. Brant 

2. Bruce 

3. Carleton . . . 

4. Dufferin . . . 

5. Elgin 

6. Essex 

7. Frontenac . 

8. Grey 

9. Haldimand 

10. Hali burton 

11. Halton.. .. 

12. Hastings... 



$ c. 


1,557 00 


3f980 00 


2,838 00 


1,797 00 


2,939 00 


2,795 00 


2,234 00 


5,441 00 


1,727 00 


716 00 


1,349 00 


3,834 00 



I c. 



417 00 
470 00 



1,070 00 
172 00 
103 00 



95 00 I 



l,nl 
4,.^1 

Iwl 
2,9: 

2,4^ 
5,.> 
1,71 

1,3 
3,9! 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



, 101 



SUMMARY OF APPORTIONMENT FOR 190b. ^Omclnded. 



COUNTIES.— Con. 



Public 
Schools. 



Separate ' 
Schools. 1 



Totals. 



3. Hiirofl 

^ K»-Et 

1^^ Uibton 

KUcirk 

r Ls'ij and Grenville 

I\ Lcacox ftDd Addington 

f* Locoln (induding arrears for Gains- 

l.TO) 

JDIiddlesex 

L!f.w.lk .♦ 

t NfrJiQmberUnd and Durham 

C'Ttirio 

M-'ii-rd 

S.IM 



4,661 00 
3,618 00 
3,728 00 
2,171 00 
3,758 00 
1,916 00 



Sif-rii 

r. -V-erboroagh 

8^ Prw>tt and Rnseell 

S Ffece Edward 

I BrLfrew 

Vl ^Jiifoe 

t S:f Ti&«)iit, Dondas and Glengarrv . 

IS Vjctffia ' . 

HWateri-D 

^.Ttlland 

1^ Wdi'iagton ^. . . . 

r. ^tutwonh : . . 

► Y:rt 



Total. 



1,639 
4,840 
2,364 
4,647 
3,151 
3,240 
1,836 
3,157 
2,160 
1,834 
1,403 
3,837 
5,882 
5,352 
2,330 
2,359 
1,937 
3,385 
2,675 
5,093 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
iX) 
00 
00 
00 



; c. 

231 00 
217 00 
28 00 
58 00 
34 00 
39 00 



101 00 
55 00 
86 00 
55 00 

7*66 

200 00 

21 00 

1,946 00 



i A'«c,Qia 

' Ifsnitoalin. 
Mtiskoka . . 



Prfry Sound., 
^^ny River.. 

Tbaiider^y. 



Exclueiye of the] 
towns and villager, I 
which appear inj 
the general list. I 



$114,060 00 



43,000 00 



Total. 



$43,000 00 



GRAND TOTALS. 



^lE. 






114,060 00 

50.319 00 
37,373 00 

13.320 00 
43,000 00 



T'Jtals $268,072 00 



321 00 
132 00 
483 00 



276 00 



111 00 
"3806 



$6,766 00 



2,000 00 



4,882 00 
3,835 00 
3,756 00 
2,229 00 
3,792 00 
1,955 00 

1,639 00 
4,941 00 
2,419 00 
4,633 00 
3,206 00 
3,240 00 
1,843 00 
3,367 00 
2,171 00 
3,780 00 
1,403 00 
4,158 00 
6,014 00 
5,835 00 
2,330 00 
2,635 00 
1,937 00 
3,496 00 
2,675 00 
6,131 00 



$120,826 00 



45,000 00 



$2,000 00 



$45,000 00 



6,766 00 
12,384 00 
6,781 00 
1,082 00 
2,000 00 



$29,013 00 



120,826 00 
62,703 00 
44,154 00 
14,402 00 
45,000 00 



$287,085 00 



102 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The Revised Regulations. 
Memorandum. 



The Revised Regulations which were approved August, i904, will guide 
Inspectors and teachers regarding the courses of study and the requirement? 
for the Departmental examinations. In order to avoid some misconeeptionf, 
and save enquiries, the following explanations are given : — 

(1) Respecting the Senior Teachers' Examination, section 50 (4) governs 
for 1906, and section 47 thereafter. Sections 46 and 48 come into force for 
the Junior Teachers' and District Examinations of 1906. 

(2) No examination will be held in 1906 in the subjects of Part I, of the 
junior Teachers' or District Certificate course, but no candidate will be ad- 
mitted to any County Model School, or other training school, who does not 
furnish a statement from the Principal of the school attended, to the effect 
that the holder has satisfactorily completed the course prescribed for Part I. 

(3) For Part II., Junior Teachers' Examination, the course in Geometry 
will be Books 1, 2 and 3 with easy deductions; and the course in Geography 
will be that given in Appendix "A" of the Regulations. 

(4) Candidates who divide the Senior Teachers' Examination in 1906— 
as provided by Regulation 50 (4) — if they take Part I. must take Physic^ 
either with Part I. in 1906 or with Part II. at a subsequent examination. 
The course in Chemistry will be that given on page 72 of the Regulations. 
There will not be an examination in the subject of Mineralogy until 1907. 

Last year, copies of the Revised Regulations were furnished, on applica- 
tion, to all High, Public and Separate Schools for the use of the Principals. 
The Department has not a suflScient supply to furnish duplicate copies. 

Toronto, August, 1905. 



Departmental Regulations 
(Approved August, 1905.) 

Teat-Books Authorized for Use in Public Schools, High Schools, and Train- 
ing Schools, 

(Extept for Geometry, where the revised curriculum renders an additional 
work necessary, no change is made for the Schools from the books I 
authorized in 1904.) 

1. The text-books named in Schedule "A" shall be the authorized text- 
books for Public Schools. Pupils taking any optional subject in the Publi ' 
School course may use the text- book authorized in such optional subject, j 
The text-books in French and German are authorized only for schools where 
the French or German language prevails and where the Trustees, with the 
approval of tte Inspector, require French or German to J>e taught in addition 
to English. Text-books marked ''optional" shall be introduced into the PuV 
lic Schools only by resolution of the Board of Trustees. Books authorized 
in the Lower School of the High School course may be used by pupils taking 
the corresponding subjects of Continuation classes. 

2. The text-books named in Schedule "B*' shall be the only authorized 
text-books in High Schools and Collegiate Institutes for the cotirse of study 
prescribed in the Lower and Middle Schools. Books authorized for use tn | 
the Public Schools may be used in the Lower School and it is recommended 



)U5 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 103 



bt *o far as the Principal may deem desirable, these books be used for the 
nt year instead of the corresponding High School books. For the second 
^cial course or more advanced work in the Commercial department or for 
\chnical courses any books recoTnmended by the Principal may be used, 
in, the approved of the High School Board. 

3. The text-books named in Schedule ^'G" shall be the authorized text- 
iDob for Model Schools, Normal Schools and the Ontario Normal College. 
My such books shall be used hj the teachers-in-training as may be ordered 
iy :ie Principal. 

4. Any text-book used in any school before the 1st July, in 1905, and 
r'iUimenSed by resolution of the Trustees to be continued in use, shall be 
fceD«d as authorized in such school until further notice. The vertical or 
itt^ing copy books heretofore authorized, and published by the Rose Print- 
be Umpany, may be used in any Public School. 

5. For religious instruction, either the Sacred Scriptures, or the Scrip- 
tare Readings adopted by the Education Department, shall be used as pre- 
»iW by the Regulations of the Education Department. 

Public Schools. {Schedule A.) 

Fbt Reader, Part I., or A Modem Phonic Primer, Part I. (Mor- 

ang) or The Public School Phonic Reader, Part I |0 10 

First Reader, Part II., or Public School Phonic Primer, Part II., 

or A Modern Phonic Primer, Part II. (Morang) 15 

NH^ond Reader 20 

Third Reader 30 

Fourth Reader 40 

Hi?h School Reader 50 

hblic School Arithmetic 25 

Pablic School Algebra and Euclid 25 

Mlic School Geography, or Morang's Modem Geography 75 

'-^ Home and its Surroundings (for Junior Classes) 40 

E^'s Public School Geography 75 



Public School Grammar 2i 



fs Modem English Grammar 60 

I Public School History of England and Canada 30 

\ History of Dominion of Canada (Fifth Form) 50 

Duncan's Story of the Canadian People 50 

Weaver's Canadian History 50 

' Public School Drawing Course, each number 05 

I Public School Physiology and Temperance 25 

, Public School Copy Book 07 

Practical Speller 25 

Public School BookKeeping 25 

I Public School Agriculture 30 

I Mlic School Domestic Science (optional) 50 

^'^'^ii'English Readers. 

! First Reader, Part I 10 

I fiwt Reader, Part II 15 

I ^nd Reader 25 

I Third Reader 35 



10* THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



GermaU'English Readers. 

Ahn's First Oerman Book 25 

Ahn's Second German Book 45 

Aim's Third German Book 45 

Ahn's Fourth German Book 50 

Ahn's First German Reader 50 

High Schools and Collegiate Institutes. (Schedule B.) 

English. 

High School Reader 50 

The Principles and Practice of Oral Reading 50 

High School English Grammar T5 

Iligh School English Composition 50 

Elementary English Composition (Sykes) 40 

High School Composition from Models 75 

History and Geography. 

High Schoo] Geography (Cnase) $1 00 

Morang's Modem Geography 75 

High School History of England and Canada 65 

Wrong's "The British Nation" 1 00 

Myers' Ancient History — Greece and Rome — Canadian Edition... 75 

Botsford's Ancient History for Beginners (Morang) -.,. 1 00 

History of the Dominion of Canada — Clement 50 

. Mathematics. 

High School Arithmetic 60 

Arithmetic for High Schools, De Lury 60 

High School Algebra 75 

Elements of Algebra, McLellan 75 

Elementary Plane Geometry, Baker 50 

Geometry for Schools, Theoretical, Baker 75 

High School Euclid, J. S. McKay, or by A. C. McKay and R. A. 

Thompson (Books I., II., III., 50 cents) 75 

Classics . 

First Latin Book and Reader 1 00 

Primary Latin Book and Reader 1 00 

Hagarty's Latin Grammar 1 00 

White's First Greek Book 1 25 

High School Beginner's Greek Book 1 50 

Moderns. 

High School French Grammar and Reader 1 00 

High School German Grammar and Reader 1 00 

Science. 

High School Physical Science, Part I., 50 cents; Part II 75 

High School Botany, Part II 60 

High School Chemistry ....* 50 

Bookkeeping and Drawing. 

High School Bookkeeping 60 

Commercial Course in Practical Bookkeeping (Dickinson and 

Young) 40 

High School Drawing Course, each number 10 

Cadet Drill. 

High School Cadet Drill Manual (optional) 40 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 105 



Training Schools, (Schedule C) 

County Model Schools, 

School Management, Millar 1 00 

Methods in Teaching, Edited by Tilley 1 50 

Public School Physiology and Temperance 25 

New Psychology (Chapters 4, 5, and 6 omitted), Gordy 1 25 

Steps in the Phonic System, CuUin & Niven 50 

Elementary Phonetics, Burt 35 

Elementary Treatise on Arithmetic, Taylor 50 

Mental Arithmetic, McLellan & Ames 30 

Algebraical Exercises, Barnes 30 

Introdnctory Geometry, McLean 50 

A Guide to Nature Study, Crawford 90 

Normal Schools, 

Lectures on Teaching, Fitch 1 00 

School Management, Millar 1 00 

lilducational Etcformers, Quick 1 50 

Applied Psychology, McLellan 1 00 

First Tear at School, Sinclair 50 

High School Cadet Drill Manual 40 

Hints on Teaching Arithmetic, McLean 50 

Public School Domestic Science ! 60 

Ontario Normal College, 

Applied Psychology, McLellan 1 00 

Education, Spencer 50 

School Management, Millar 1 00 

School Management, Landon 1 50 

Educational Reformers, QuicK 1 50 

High School Cadet Drill Manual 40 

Physical Culture, Houghton 50 

Physical Education, MacLaren, Part II., sections II. and III. ... 2 00 

Teachers* Reading Course for 1906, (Schedule D,) 

History of Education, Eemp 1 25 

School Management, Dutton 1 25 

Birds and Poets, Burroughs 35 



I EXAMINATIONS, 1906. 

Presceibed Texts. 

I District Certificate, 

Bnglish: — 
I Goldsmith : The Deserted "V lUage. 

' Lonrfellow : The Old Clock on the Stairs, The Warden of the Cinque 

Ports, The Birds of Killingrworth, King I^obert of Sicily, The Skeleton in 
I irmour. The Ladder of St. Augustine, The Bridge. 



106 THE REPORT OF THE ^ No. 12 



Part II - — Junior Teachers. 
English, 

Coleridge : The Ancient Mariner. 

Wordsworth: Michael, Influence of Natural Objects, Nutting, Expos- 
tulation and Reply, The Tables Turned, The Solitary Reaper, Ode to Duty, 
Elegiac Stanzas, To the Rev. Dr. Wordsworth, "She was a Phantom of De- 
light," To the Cuckoo, The Green Linnet, "Bright Flower! whose home,'* 
To a Skylark, (''Ethereal minstrel! pilgrim of the sky!") Reverie of Poor 
Susan, To my Sister, "Three years she grew in sun and shade," September, 
1819, Upon tne same Occasion. 

The following twelve sonnets: 'Two voices are there," "Scorn not the 
Sonnet," "A flock of sheep that leisurely," "Earth hath not anything," "It 
is not to be thought of," "Fair Star of evening," "0 Friend! I know not," 
"Milton, thou shouldst," "When \ have borne in memory," "Brook! whose 
society," "Tax not the royal Saint," "They dreamt not of a perishable home." 

Shakespeare: Merchant of Venice. 
Latin : — 

Cornelius Nepos, Lives of Themistocles and Aristides; CsBsar, Bellum 
Gallicum, Bk. IV. (omitting Chap. 17), and Bk. V., Chaps. 1-23; Virgil, 
^neid, Bk. II. (1-505). 
Greek: — 

1906: Selections from Xenophon, Anabasis I., in White's First Greek 
Book, with the exercises thereon; Homer, Iliad VI. 
French : — 

Lamennais, Paroles d'un croyant, Chaps. VII. and XVII. ; Perrault, le 
Maitre Chat ou le Chat Botte; i3umas, Un nez gele, and la Pipe de Jean 
Bart; Alphonse DaudeT, la Derniere classe, and la Chevre de M. Sequin; 
Legouve, la Patte de dindon ; Pouvillon, Hortibus ; Loti, Chagrin d'un vieux 
forcat; Moliere, I'Avare, Acte III. sc. 5 (Est-ce a votre cocher . . . sous la 
mienne); Victor Hugo, Waterloo, Chap. IX.; Rouget de L'Isle, la Marsel- 
laise; Arnault, la Feuille: Chateaubriand, TExile; Theophile Gautier, la 
Chimere; Victor Hugo, Extase; Lamartine, TAutomne; De Musset, Trist- 
esse; Sully Prudhomme, le Vase brise; La Fontaine, le Chene et le Roseau. 

Labiche, le Voyage de Monsieur Perrichon. 
GerTnan : — 

Grimm, Rotkappchen; Andersen, Wie's der Alte macht. Das neue Kleid, 
Venedig, Rothchild, Der Bar; Ertl, Himmelsschliissel ; Frommel, Des eiserne 
Kreuz; Baumbach, Nicotiana, Der Goldbaum; Heine Lorelei, Du bist wie 
eine Blume; TThland, Schafer's Sonntacrslied, Das Schloss am Meer; Cham- 
isso. Das Schloss Boncourt; Claudius, Die Sterne, Der Riese Goliath; Goethe, 
Mignon, Erlkonig. Der Sanger; Schiller, Der Jungling am Bache. 

Baunmbach, Waldnovellen. 

Senior Teachers. 
English: — 

Coleridge : The Ancient Mariner. 

Wordsworth : Michael, Influence of Natural Objects, Nutting, Expostu- 
lation and Reply, The Tables Turned, The Solitary Reaper, Ode to Duty, 
Elegiac Stanzas, To the Kev. Dr. Wordsworth, "She was a Phantom of De- 
liorht," To the Cuckoo, The Green Linnet, "Bright Flower! whose home,** 
To a Skylark, ("Ethereal minstrel! pilgrim of the sky!") Reverie of Poor 
Susan, To my Sister, "Three years she grew in sun and shade," September, 
1819, Upon the same Occasion. 



im EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 107 



Tie following twelve sonnets: "Two Voices are there," "Scorn not the 
Sonnet," "A flock of sheep that leisurely,'' "Earth hath not anything," "It 
is not to be thought of," "Fair Star of evening," "O Friend! I know not," 
"Milton! thou shouldst," "When I have borne in memory," "Brook! whose 
society," "Tax not the royal Saint," "They dreamt not of a perishable 
kome." 

Shakespeare : Merchant of Venice, Henry V. 
Latin: — 

Cornelius Nepos, Lives of Themistocles and Aristides; Csesar, Bellum 
Gallicum, Bk. IV. (omitting Chap. IT), and Bk. V., Chaps. 1-23; Virgil, 
Jlneid II., Hues 1-505; Horace, Odes I. and II.; Cicero Pro Lege Manilla. 
Pru ilarcello. 
Greet : — 

Xenophon, Anabasis I. (Chaps. I.-VIIL); Homer, Iliad VI., Odyssey 
XXL ; Lucian, Charon ; Lysias, Contra Eratosthenem. 
French : — 

Lamennais, Paroles d'un crovant. Chaps. VII. and XVII. ; Perrault, le 
Maitre Chat ou le Chat Botte; Dumas, Tin nez gel^, and la Pipe de Jean 
Bart; Alphonse Daudet, la Demiere classe, and la Chevre de M. Sequin; 
Legouve, la Patte de dindon; Pouvillon, Hortibus; Loti, Chagrin d'un vieux 
format; Moliere, TAvare, Acte III. sc. 6 (Est-ce a votre cocher . . . sous la 
mieime); Victor Hugo, Waterloo, Chap. IX.; Rouget de L'Isle, la Marsel- 
laise; Arnault, la Feuille; Chateaubriand, TExile; Theophile Gautier, la 
Cliimere; Victor Hugo, Extase; Lamartine, I'Automne; De Musset, Trist- 
esse: Sully Prudhomme, le Vase brise; La Fontaine, le Chene et le Boseau. 

Labiche, le Vovage de Monsieur Perrichon; Merimee, Quatre Contes, ed. 
by F. C. L. Steenderen (Holt & Co.). 
German : — 

Grimm, Potkappchen; Andersen, Wie*s der Alte macht. Das neue Eleid, 
Tenedig, Rothchild, Der Bar ; Ertl, Himraelsschlussel ; Frommel, Des eiserne 
Kreuz; Baumbarh, Niootiana, Der Goldbaum; Heine Lorelei, Du bist wie 
eineBlume; TJhland, Schafer's Ronnfacrslied, Das Schloss am Meer; Cham- 
i^, Das Schloss Bon court ; Claudius, Die Sterne, Der Biese Goliath ; Goethe, 
Mipon, Erlkonig. Der Sanurer; Schiller, Der Jiingling am Bache. 

Baunmbach, Waldnovellen. 

Ezner-Eschenbach, Die Freiherren von Gemperlein. 

Wilhelmi. Fner muss heiraten. 

Benedix, Eigensinn. 

Note. — The texts in Greek, French^ and German, given under the head- 
ing Junior Teachers, are for Pass Junior Matriculants only. See Reg. 46 (2). 



Duties of Examiners. 

1. Each Examiner shal be required to discharge all duties pertaining to 
Ms office, and no duty which an Examiner is appointed to perform shall be 
delegated to another Examiner without the approval 6f the Educational 
Council. He shall uesignate all examination papers according to the course 
of study for which they are prescribed. 

2.— (a) The papers set for the Part II. Junior Teachers' and the Senior 
Teachers' examinations shall be adapted to the requirements of those desir- 
ing to become teachers. 

(h) The papers in all cases shall be within the limits of the courses of 
^udy and of the authorized text-books. 



108 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



(c) Each paper in a department shall be approved and signed by each 
Examiner in this department before it is submitted to the Board of Exam- 
iners for consideration. 

(d) Each Examiner shall submit to the Board of Examiners a syllabus 
of the answers to the questions on his paper, and a statement of the values 
which he proposes to attach to oach question and part of a question. The 
papers so prepared shall finally be revised by the board. 

3. The Examiners, in the case of the combined examinations of the 
Education Department and the University, shall be present at the beginning 
of the reading ox the answer papers. Each Examiner shall discuss with the 
Associate Examiners in his section the character of the answers required by 
the questions, and especially the value of incomplete or imperfect answers, 
so as to insure, as far as possible, uniform marking. In cases of differences 
of opinion on any point the decision of the Examiners shall be final. 

4. The Examiners shall make such reports as will enable the Council to 
settle the results of the examinations in accordance with the regulations of 
the Education Department and of the Senate of the University respectively. 

5. The Examiners, or such of their number as may be appointed for that 
purpose by the Council, shall consider all doubtful and special cases and re- 
port results to the Council. They shall read appeals and report the results 
to the Council. 

6. The Examiners shall report to the Council the pseudonyms of all 
Associate Examiners whose work appears to have been performed with 
marked carelessness or incapacity, or who have shown any substantial dis- 
regard of the instructions of the Council. 

7. In the prose papers in Classics and Modem Languages the vocabulary 
required shall be such as is found in the prescribed portion of text and text- 
book. 

Duties of the Registrar. 

9. The Registrar of the Council shall preside at all meetings oi the 
Boards of Examiners. All cases of dispute at meetings of the Boards -shall 
be settled by a majority of the Examiners. 

10. Duri g the reading of the answer papers the Registrar shall see that 
the instructions to Associate Examiners hereinafter mentioned are observed. 
He shall assign a pseudonym to each Associate Examiner and shall have 
power, in case of necessity, to transfer Associate Examiners from one seotion 
to another. 

11. He shall exercise a general supervision over sorting, numbering and 
otherwise preparing the envelopes containing the answers, so that the an- 
swers may be conveniently read by the Examiners and Associate Examin- 
ers; and, after the reading, he shall superintend the entering of the marks 
in the books by the clerks of the Department and the preparation of the 
books so that i»hey may clearly indicate the subjects in which candidates 
have passed or failed. 

12. He shall be present at the meeting of the Board or of any committee 
thereof called for the purpose of determining the results, and shall furnish 
all necessary information. 

13. He shall take the necessary steps in order that appeals may be read 
as speedily as possible in accordance with the instructions of the Councfl. 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 109 



Duties of Associate Examiners. 

14. The Associate Examiners shall be classified into sections according to 
the subjects of examination, and a chairman shall be appointed in each sec- 
tion by the Council. The chairman shall have a general oversight of the 
work done in his section, and shall see that the regulations are carried out 
and that the Tnarking is uniform. In the case of an emergency as in the 
absence of a chairman of a section, the Registrar shall appoint a chairman 
pro tempore. 

15. An Associate Examiner shall not have in hand more than ten papers 
at one tim^nor shall he have more than one envelope open upon his table at 
one time, except in cases of suspected copying, in which case he shall return 
each examination book to its proper envelope. As soon as an examination 
book is removed from its envelope the candidate's number should be placed 
on the front page of the book. The papers must be returned in the numer- 
icd order in which they are received. In cases of suspected copying the As- 
sociate Examiner shall note on the face of the envelope, "Copying, see No. 

, question ," and through the chairman of the section report the 

case at once to the Registrar. 

16. In the case of the papers in English Grammar, Literature^ and Com^ 
position, one mark shall be deducted for each mis-spelt word and one mark 
for each instance of bad English. At all examinations in Arithmetic, either 
arithmetical or algebraical solutions shall be accepted. 

17. In reading the answer papers each Associate Examiner shall mark 
distinctly in the left hand margin the value assigned by him to each answer 
or partial answer, shall place the total on each page at the foot of the mar- 
gin, and ent«r this total at the top of the next page; he shall place the result 
on the face of the envelope, indicating in the case of the papers in English 
Grammar, Literature and Composition, the deduction for mis-spelt words 
and incorrect English thereon, thus, e.g., Grammar, 80, — 2 sp., — 4 f . s., 
= 74. He shall also sign his pseudonym on the envelope of each paper ex- 
amined. 

18. Associate Examiners shall be in their respective places so that the 
reading may commence promptly at the time specified, viz., 9 a.m. and 2 
p.m., and no Associate Examiner shall stop work before the hours of closing, 
^z., 12 noon and 5 p.m., without reporting to the chairman of the section.. 

19. Associate Examiners shall refrain from all unnecessary conyersa- 
tion or other causes of disturbance and shall devote themselves strictly to 
the work of the examination ; they shall not at any time enter the rooms of 
otier sections unless when it is necessary to do so in entering or leaving their 
own rooms ; they shall keep a record of the papers read each day and shall 
report the results of their work to the chairman of their respective sections. 

20. The work is confidential throughout. Should the identity of an ex- 
amination centre or of any particular candidate be discovered by an Associate 
Examiner he shall report the fact without any delay to the Registrar of the 
Council, or, in his absence, to the clerk of committees, who shall change the 
Associate Exammer, or make such other arrangements as he may deem ex- 
pedient. 

21. The instructions herein contained so far as they relate to the exam- 
inations of the Education Department and matriculation into the Univers- 
i^, shall be subject to amendment from time to time with the approval of the 
Education Department and the Senate of the University. 



no THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Suggestions to Hioq School Pkincipals and theib Staffs in Connection 
WITH THE New Progbamme of Studies. 

Preparatory Note. 

During the past vear my corresponaence and other inspectorial duties 
■were so burdensome in connection 'with the introduction of the new pro- 
gramme of studies that, to economize time, I now put in the form of a cir- 
cular my views on some important questions, most of which are continually 
coming up for discussion. 

John Seath, 

Toronto, August 26th, 1905. {High School Inspector.) 

• Organization. 

The Departmental Memorandum of August, 1905 (circular 50), dra^ws 
attention to the requirements of the regulations which were approved in Au- 
gust, 1904. So far as concerns the Junior and the District Teachers' Non- 
professional Examinations, the regulations as to standard and subjects [Reg. 
43 (3), 46 and 48] will come into full force at the examinations of 1906, except, 
as stated in the circular, in the case of the (jreometry for the Junior and of 
Part I. for each of these examinations. In organizing for the coming year 
it is, therefore, important for the Principal to realize that the standard taa 
been raised, and that the course is now a fixed one, with a Latin bonus at 
the Junior. The District, Junior, and Senior Teachers' Examinations are 
now held, be it noted, solely to ascertain the qualifications of the candidates 
for a teacher's certificate, although, of course, they may be used as Leaving 
Examinations also; and it is not unreasonable to anticipate that, in settling 
the results, the interests of the Public Schools will hereafter be solely con- 
sidered. It is an open secret that, while the system of Leaving Examinations 
was in operation, allowances were made which would be unjustifiable under 
present conditions, and which have injured the cause of popular education 
in the Province. 

The Principal's certificate referred to in Circular 50 is defined by the 
last sentence of Reg. 50 (3). It should cover the Lower School courses in 
Book-keeping, Reading, Physics, and Chemistry, with at least one year's 
course in each of Art, Botany, and Zoology. As the regulations show, the 
one year's course in Art is for a whole school year, while the one year's course 
in each of Botany and Zoology is from Septepiber to November, and from 
April to the end of June. The details of such courses are at the discretion 
of the Principal, who will no doubt take into consideration the requirements 
of the future Public School Teacher. In the case of all candidates (including 
those who failed this summer) whose course has not yet covered all the sub- 
jects, the Principal might allow such pupils to go down to one of the Lower 
School classes when the subjects are being taken up. The same plan may, 
of course, be followed hereafter in the case of pupils who are ^t for the 
Middle School but who do not possess the required certificate as to compet- 
ency in the subjects of Part I. The resulting interference with their Middle 
School time-table is one for which the candidates, not the Principal, are re- 
sponsible, and the interests of the Middle School must not be allowed to 
suffer. For very evident reasons, however, such permission should be given 
only in exceptional cases. 

In some quarters the object and the scope of Beg. 89 (9) have not 
been appreciated. The object, it is understood, was to enable the Principal 
to resist more easily the pressure that would in many cases be brought to 



iy05 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. Ill 



bear upon him to continue in a congested 'Middle School time-table subjects 
and stages of subjects which properly belong to the Lower School. As to 
scope: Under the regulations, the Geography for the intending Public 
School Teacher, and the Arithmetic and Mensuration and the English Gram- 
mar for other classes of candidates may, where needed, be reviewed after 
March. A teacher's special course is provided in Arithmetic and Mensur- 
ation, and in English Grammar (See pp. 79 and 80*), which the Principal 
may have in the Middle School as often as he deems it expedient. And, 
further, unless the parent or guardian objects, the Principal may require 
other pupils to take these special courses. In view, however, of the ample 
Lover School provision in these subjects, the extremely moderate require- 
ments of University Matriculation, and, usually, the superior claims of 
other subjects of the course, it would be wise for the Principal to restrict 
this special teacher's course to the intending teacher. 

But these difficulties of organization are small compared^ with those 
which have hitherto confronted the Principal — the pressure of the Depart- 
mental and the University examinations with its train of evils; the unrea- 
sonable demands of department teachers; the inadequacy of staffs, due to 
congested attendance and the plethora of courses undertaken; and, lastly, 
the defective preparation of Entrance and Continuation Classes, the former 
being sometimes due to laxity at the examinations, and the latter, to the 
inconsiderate ambition of badly equipped and badly manned Public Schools. 
These are, undoubtedly, real difficulties; but nearly all of them may be 
gradually overcome by due liberality on the part of School Boards and, 
more particularly, by firm and judicious management on the part of Prin- 
cipals themselves. Like the wagoner in the fable, the local authorities must 
put their own shoulders to the wheel. The relation of the different grades 
of Continuation Classes to the High Schools requires, it is true, a better 
adjuEtment. Until this is made, concerted action on the part of all the 
Principals in a district, with the co-operation of the Public School In- 
spector, if that can be secured, should do much to simplify the situation. 

In the above enumeration of the Principal's difficulties, the so-called 
"multiplicity of subjects" has not been included. Experience will, un- 
doubtedly necessitate amendments in the regulations, and the progress of 
the Public and Model Schools will, in time, relieve the High Schools of 
responsibilities which are now forced upon them. But, having regard to 
oir present obligations, the new programme will compare favorably in its 
limitations with that of any other progressive country. ''There is no sub- 
ject upon it which could be safely omitted from a well rounded modern 
scheme of secondary education, or upon the omission of which even a major- 
ity of competent educationists would agree. It must be remembered also 
that, like the Public School programme, the Hicrh School^ one was made 
to last for a period of years, and that, accordingly, in some of its details, 
it assumes a condition of the general system which it will take time to pro- 
<lnce. "The house that is a-building is not as the house that is built.'' 
MnreoTer, the general advancement of education in this Province cannot 
1* kept back in order that weak but ambitious schools, whether High Schools 
or Continuation Classes, may attempt courses beyond their capacity. What 
is at fault is, not so much the number of subjects on the official programme, 
as the plethora of courses on many local ones, and a generally defective 
pvstem for organization. For the former, the locality is itself to blame. 
The latter is the direct result of examination pressure ; for, in most schools 
at present, all the subjects of a Form are taken up concurrently, with an 
apportionment of time determined mainly by their difficulty and their exam- 

"Exeepi where otherwise stated, the pages throughout are those of the new regulations. 



112 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



ination importance. Such a system of organization is both unnatural and 
unnecessary — unnatural because no one but a prodigy would adopt it in 
private study, and unnecessary, because, even under present conditions, 
better results can be secured in ia saner way. 

Experience in Ontario, not to speak of the general experience of other 
countries, has shown that better results would be secured if the following 
princiules were kept in view: 

(1) Not all the subjects prescribed for a form should be taken up con- 
currently. Subjects and. stages of subjects that involve chiefly the memory 
or mechanical accuracy cannot, of course, be so readily intermitted as those 
that involve the reasoning powers ; but even here this principle is, in many 
cases, measurably applicable. 

(2) The stress upon a subject should vary according to its character 
in the different stages of its development and to the pupil's advancement 
in it and the other subjects of the course. 

At present the pupil's energies are dissipated atnong too many subjects 
and he is dazed by the monotonous grind at the same subject year in and 
year out. Arithmetic, for example, he has uninterruptedly for nine or ten 
years. Concentration of energy and variety of subject matter would be of 
inestimable advantage to him in the natural and pleasurable development 
of his powers. The qualifications of the staff and the structural dij£culties 
of the time-table will, no doubt, often prove a bar to the systematic appli- 
cation of these two principles; but, as most teachers take more than one 
subject of a department, it should not be difficult at lea«t to improve the 
general situation. 

(3) Care should be taken to cultivate greater independence on the part 
of the pupil. It is no secret that, at present, there is altogether too much 
teaching, especially in the clasaes preparing for examination. With a 
better standard this fact would demonstrate itself every midsummer. The 
teacher should, accordingly, . exercise greater self-restraint; and, in parti- 
cular, study periods should be provided in all the forms. For such pupils 
in the larger schools, a separate room might also be provided under charge 
of one of the staff. It will take time for both staff and pupils to become 
used to such a system, but the training the pupils will thus receive in self- 
reliance should amply compensate the staff for the additional trouble it 
may involve*. 



•Owing to misappreheiiflion of Beg. 39 (9) in a oertein High School, neither the ArithmeUc 
nor the English Graiftmar was taken up this year in the Middle School untU after Maroh. 
Notwithstanding this, all the candidates at the Junior passed, and passed well, in these bhIh 
Jeots. The work had been well done in the Lower School, and was stressed after March The 
bearing of this statement and of those below (quoted from letters to me) will prove at lea^t 
suggestive, in view of the present difficulties of organisation. The four Principals concerned 
are both experienced and successful teachers. 

(1) "In Form I. I have never had Euclid. In Form II. I have had two periods. So many 
leave at the end of sue or two years, and so many are quite young, and incapable of connected 
reasoning, that I do not settle down to a serious study of the subject until the beginnincr of 
the third year. The classes then thoroughly enjoy the subject, and make very rapid proeress 
From the examination standpoint the results are satisfactory, the failures falling short of one 
a year for the past ten years. In Forms III. and IV. I have three 30-mlnute periods each a 
week. In Arithmetic I have three periods of 30 minutes a week in each of three Forma I 
II.. ard III. Much time is spent in grading the work for each year, the first two years beine 
devoted to a thorough course in Oommbreial Arithmetic and Elementary Mensuration, with 
systematic drill in work planned to secure accuracy in the machanical operations. This lat^ter 
feature I consider the most important in the two years' work, since annual experiments brins 
out the fact that not 5 per cent, of^the Entrance Glass can work ordinary examples in the 
four simple rules either rapidly or accurately. Taking one year with another, perhaps 5 ner 
cent, of the candidates, chiefly girls, fall in Arithmetic. ^ 

"In Algebra I have one 30-minute lesson a week in Form I., three in Form II . and four 
each in Forms HI. and IV. This, I think, is sufficient, except possibly with Form'lV There 
are practically no failures in Form III. Algebra; but perhaps 10 per cent, fail in the Senior 
Algebra (T do not mean 10 per cent, of those recommended, but 10 per cent, of all who writer 

"I feel quite saMafled that with students of Hieh Schools ages much time Is lost by treat' 
ing a part of a sublect exhaustively, and then giving it little further attention. Freouent re- 
views, with gradually increasing emphasis on the difficulties, leave the Students encouras^^ 
hopeful, aggressive, and prepared. * • 




l^ EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 113 



The following notes show in a general way how these principles may 
He applied : 

English Grammar should not be stressed at first. It wijl be enough 
if, at the end of the first year, the pupil knows well and has perhaps slightly 
amplified the course now prescribed for the Fourth Form of the Public 
Schools. (See definition and note on p. 59). On account of its use in con- 
nection with the other languages and wHh English Composition, English 
Grammar should be taken up as soon as the pupil enters, but it need not be 
continued throughout the whole first year. After the first year, the subject 
mijfht be gradually stressed as the pupPs reasoning powers develop, and 
the serious difficulties should be reserved for the greater maturity of the 
special Middle School course. (See p. 80 and p. 65, note). English Com- 
position should be stressed throughout the Lower School especially in the 
Srst year, being closelv connected with the practical side of English Gram- • 
mar. The subject should also receive systematic attention in the oral and 
written work of the other classes. (See pp. 66, 68, 69 and 70). English 
Literature should be stressed throughout the Lower School also during the 
irot year. The pupil usually needs to be trained to read intelligently. 
This habit the reading courses of the old Public School programme did not 
inculcate. The fault is remedied in the new one, but it will take time to 
Tork the cure. (See pp. 66, 69 and 70). 

History is largely a memory subject, at first. The essential facts, 
(kerefore, should be acquired when the memory is plastic. Even in the 
Lower School, however, it will serve a good purpose to vary the stress, 
ind even to intermit the subject. But History lends itself better to the 
latter mode of treatment in the later years when the pupil is able to ap- 
preciate the logical sequence of events and to work with- greater indepen- 

"^ do not iniend to change the namber of periods in Mathema*io8 in the Lower School. 

1 may add that in Junior Formi, corresponding to Lower School Glasses, I exact Tery 
A*]» hoice werk. I have an understanding with these classes that, if they enter into tha 
r«rakr class work with the same spirit, earnestness, and vim as they would on a base-ball 
Mid cr a tennis-court, the home-work exacted will be merely nominal. Last year with the 
i'jm jQst below the Junior Teachers and Junior Iffatric. I tried this throughout the yeir. and 
Reared the beet results I ever had. In Algebra we covered the work to the end of quadra ios; 
2 GoeUd, Books I. and II. with easy deductions; and in Arithmetic the full course outlined 
1« JvDior Teachers; and I think the average of the class for home-work for the three subjects 
wa^ined did not exceed half an hour daily. Of course, in Junior Teachers' work much more 
^a» ii neeessary." 

!2) 'During the past two years I took Middle School Geometry five spaces per week (35 
^nicfet) for the first five months of each year; then Ari hmetlc in these same five spaces on 
'•ki tiiae-table for the next four months; and in the last month I reviewed both Arithmetic 
tti ^eome ry. I feel confident that the success of the class has been greater by taking these 
>sbj#cti intermittingly than concurrently. 

"thir time-table (1904-190^) was constructed with five spaces (33 minutes) in the forenoon. 
After three months I cancelled all the subjec's in the first space on the time-table, and divided 
. w forenoon equally amongst the remaining four spares, and continued this for one week. 
Tbe ro'lnwlug week I cancelled all the subjects in the second place on the time-table, and 
Md«d *he tOT^no^n eaually among the remaining four spaoefl. Then I cancelled ^he subjects 
|b tV third, fourth, and fifth spaces In the same way. and began again with the first. This 
is^^'Md tbe morning spaces from 33 minutes each to 45. 40. 40, and 40 minutes, at the small 
'«t of firing some subjects a week's rest. About April 1st I res'im«»d ^he 33 minute spaces, 
^>4CMue the work had all been corered. and the shorter spaces ser^^-ed as well for review. 

\J\ "Our General School is organised into five Forms, with su>'-dl^«8loP8. tbe Fonrtb Form 
^tainfnf the candidates for the Junior. For two or fhree yc^rs we have tried the plan of 
utemitting for a time some of the subjects. We take Hist^ory during the first year, and then 
^ it imtil tbe Fourth Form is re'»ch«»d. Drawing is takpn e^ery day tlie first year, and 
aficnrards only advanced work for those needing it. Geoeraphy is taVen in tbe second year 
"^T. «T»d every day. Geometry Is beeun in the second vear, after tbe Geometrical Drawing 
J*«lrityear. Book-keeping and Commercial Tr«»ns'»ction8 is t"Ven in the second veir only. 
*o f-tnna] literature is taken the first year: Supplementary Reading is emphasised. German 



* }t^rm «n the Third Form. We have no Greek." 
"^e made these srranrements to 



. try to relieve the pressure and consequent dispersions 

'^''IMiif from the multinlio^ty of snbj^cts In e«ob vear. nvd ^e wonM not voluntarily ff^ hick 
}« the nsoa! arrangement of all the subieots all the ye^trs. Two hundred lessons In a sublect 
w ors yesr Is mueh better than the sime nnm>>er of lesa^ns anrc'd o^er two or tbr»e yc^rs. 

*1 ihAuM like to carrr our p1»n of intensive st^dv with intermissions further still, and I 
'•"^P* te be able to ove^eow* *>»• d«*'i'*«lt1ea in the wav. 

'^i'b vs. ODBtlnuation Pnpils coming in without proper preparation must go back to their 
P^9tr level in the unprepared subjects." 



114 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



dence. In the Upper School, indeed, the teacher's guidance is .needed more 
than direct teaching; for, there is hardly any other subject in which, at 
this stage, the pupil can do more for himself (See pp. 66, 69 and 71). The 
distinguishing feature of the High School course in Geography should be 
thp prominence given to its Physical side. Accordingly, the work for the 
first year should consist of an elementary course in the Commercial and 
Astronomical subjects, without burdensome details, and a mere introduction 
to the more difficult subject of Physical Geography. If taken throughout 
the whole year, this course should not consume more than a couple of periods 
a week, and should stress the Comnvercial and Astronomical parts more than 
the Physical. The second year's work, however, should be a stressed one 
in Physical Geography, introducing the present authorized High School 
text-book and reserving the more difficult portions to be taken up with the 
review after March in the Middle School. (See pp. 67, 81 and 82). 

As to Mathematics: Reference to pp. 66, 79 and 80 will show that the 
prescribed development of the course in Arithmetic is different from that 
in vogue under the old regulations. The change has been made, not only 
to meet the necessities of pupils in the general course, but to improve the 
department of Mathematics itself by securing due economy of effort. All 
classes of pupils now take together the Lower School Arithmetic, in which 
*Hhe processes and problems in the commercial work are such as find direct 
application in ordinary business life, in which accuracy, rapidity, and neat- 
ness of work are aimed at, and in which proofs of the more difficult formulse 
in Mensuration are not required." (See p. 66.) The serious difficulties 
of the subject need not be taken up with the pupil in the general course 
at any stage. Provision is made for their consideration in the special 
teacher's course in the Middle School. The great defect of the teaching 
in both English Grammar and Arithmetic has, in many cases, been the un- 
reasonable difficulties of the work of the earlier years — difficulties which 
can be overcome with far less effort at a later stage. Moreover, it must be 
borne in mind that our programme consists of courses of study, not of a 
collection of isolated subjects; and that the power ja pupil gains in the study 
of each is available throughout, especially in the study of those that are I 

correlated with it. From the conditions, Arithmetic should be stressed for ^ 

the greater part of the first year. Algebra being then taken for about a couple 
of periods a week and being thereafter the subject that is stressed. If, ! 

indeed, the Middle School course is a two years' one, as it is in some schools, ! 

both the Arithmetic and the English Grammar of the special course may be | 

intermitted for the whole or the greater part of the first of these years. I 

Hitherto, under the old programme, Geometry has often been omitted until I 

the second year or taken up after Christmas or Easter of the first. Owing 
to its character, the Practical Geometry might be taken up hereafter to- 
wards the end of the first year (See "Art Course" further on), and the rest 
of the course should certainly not be stressed until the Middle School. 

The languages involve so much memory work of an unfamiliar character 
that they must be stressed throughout, although, naturally, there will be 
varying stress and even intermittence in the components of the course in a 
particular language. As we are now situated, only Latin should be taken 
up at first, a short lesson a day being provided, if at all practicable. Oral 
work in French for a couple of periods a week should be provided as soon 
as the pupil has mastered the initial difficulties of Latin, the subject bein^^ 
stressed the second year and thereafter. At present, in the smaller schools. 
French is often not taken up until the second year, but it is then stressed from 
the first. Under ordinary conditions, German and Greek will begin the 



•"•5 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 115 



««ond year, being also stresred from the first, although, of course, the size 
the class may justify a reduction in the normal number of class-periods. 
Ime 18 an essential element of language culture, and, very generally, too 
htae tune is spent on the languages. But, until the character of the Uni- 
venity examination scheme changes, improvement can hardly be expected. 
Further on the Elementary Science and the Art and the Commercial 
inj^ • ^'^'l '"*^ ^t »~*ter length. It should be noted here, howevS 
» L « r *-^ M °^ \?-terniittence and varying stress have been observed 
« far as practicable m the construction of the course in Elementary Science 
Th« application m the case of the other Science subjects is of at W^ 
mhunportance as in the case of any of the subjects Sready dealt wfth 
T].« he^^S' w^^*^* ^°' Reading and for Physical Culture is prescribed. 

TiLt lit5^^r'«r„.f °^"^^°''''^*-°" '\^J««**- ^«'«^« *^« regulation 
Iti^tf' 1 I ^« attention was given them, and occasionally still the 

mmmum is reluctantly provided even where the conditions Lmand a 
P«ter apportionment of time. The Regulation in regard to ReadTn^ in 

£ 0?^^.?:''' '* L*r'' *° ^" ^"^ "PO'^ tl^o-^ schools the Swe? 
orm» of which are both numerous and congested. The proper remedv 
Werer, is an obvious one Moreover, it must be borne in miXSiaTS 
^i^ anT ^Sl *"^ .I*^«rl .Culture, to a large extend are motoTex- 
^■t?' 1 fequu-e f-"cial attention in the earlier years. Elementarv 
v.ence also belongs to the category of examination sJbjecis, and has "^ 
^^ly, a minimum prescribed. In the case of Art and of Book-keeninT 
.L. non-examination subjects, the work done is submitted fS-tspeS: 

^B^I^BtP^^^ to z^:s^ 
as^'i=9'M^^^^^^ 

eimtest^l ««m; • Not only does this save correspondence but it 

snwise enough to obiect to iht^ t,^^r.L\t i i ^^^^ *^® Board is 

'* .. i»d tie S it'SL'SPS »h,!z' ""*" "• °'"""'' *»"■■"' 

- % ™nW After iU «„i ^„"17„S iL'^Srbe'Xd""' 

(3) Teachers' meetings should be held reirularlv n« ti.- i.. 
"»»Me«ary to enlarge. At such meetings t?»P J' • , ^" V^^^^ i* " 
« poMible, the work of the dfffe^nt deSL™. J. ^.^ .correlates as far 
^iM measures to prevent overlpSre of w^rl' ' ^""^-'i ^'^ P^^icular, he 
^■^telv, too general and for SlSrstaff «of 7^ *^? ''^^''^ "' ""'«'- 
Ffom time tfl time the Pr,-T,nir;oi i ***"• °?* tl»e system, is responsible 

jaionof t^e^rbje^t^nXSert^?^^^^ ^- ?^-e« the 

•'«'« IS to hold the balance amouMt thp^ff . ^ °' ^" """t important 
-»« the inconsiderate «ealVZ?:Ul%tSnts.'''''*"'°*^ ^"'^ *" - 



llff THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Supplementary Reading. 

For many years, provision has been made for Supplementary Reading 
in English Literature, to extend the course in th« prescribed texts, which 
is too narrow for culture and which, moreover, is often injured by examin- 
ation considerations. The new regulations recognize two kinds of work 
in English Literature— the class work and the supplementary work. At 
present, no special texts are prescribed for the Lower School, except, of 
course, in the few schools which take up the work for District certificatea, 
in the Lower Schools, accordingly, the class-work is to be selected by the 
Principal; in the Middle and Upper Schools, it is practically prescribed 
bv the examinations; and the suppleinentary work throughout the schools 
is at the discretion of the Principal. If the selections have been properly 
made, the class literature will be of a more difficult character than the sup- 
plementary literature ; for, as a whole, the former is to be studied under the 
immediate care of the teacher. The supplementary literature, on the other 
hand, should, also as a whole, be read at home or as seat-work, and should, 
accordingly, be so graded in the different totma as to maintain the pupil*« 
interest throughout his course. 

Attention should be paid to the important notes to the definition and 
the development of the subject of English Literature on pp. 66, 69, 70, and 
71 of the new regulations. Tw# points in note 2, p. 66, in regard to the 
Lower School course are especially important : 

(1) "In each of the Forms, three or four books (both prose and poetry) should be 
read each year as Class-work. Part of such books should be read at home or during 
study periods, and reviewed in class with special reference to the more difficult paa- 
sages." 

Fnder this clause, the course might consist, for example, of Ivanhoe 
and The Lady of the Lake (or Evangeline), followed, if practicable, by The 
Merchant of Venice; and in the second year, of SUas Mamer, and a couple 
of the Idylls, followed, also if practicable, by Julius Ccesar, 

To some, such a course may aopear to be too extensive. It has not, 
lowever, proved to be so when a rational plan has been followed. We 
should be satisfied if the pupil understands the meaning of what he reads. 
With a svmpathetic and cultured teacher, the author may be trusted to do 
the rest. In the first year, the course would naturally begin with the prose. 
It should be taken up wholly in the class until the pupil is in a fair way 
to acquiring the habit of reading with the understanding. Then, still under 
the direct guidance of the teacher, part might be read at home or as seat- 
work, the pupil's difficulties and such others as the teacher thinks deserv- 
ing of attention being carefully considered in the subsequent class-work. 
There are not more important exercises, it may be added, in this connection 
than the systematic oral and written reproduction of what has been studied. 
In dealing with words, sentences and passages, the pupil is apt to overlook 
their bearing upon the context. As mental discipline, too, the exercises 
are of great value. 

(2) **Tf. ia further recommended that at the beginning of each school year a short 
Fist h'* mtme r rt for each Form, under a few heads, of such suitable works as may be 
obtained in the School. Public or other library and that each pupil be required to 
roRd ''Uiiii \\\ vear at least one under each head, in addition to those taken up in 
class." 

Here we have the provision for Supplementary Heading, the course in 
which might be introduced in the first year, as soon as the pupil has become 
accustomed to High School methods. Speaking generally, the Supplemen- 
tary Reading should be home or seat work, the pupil's difficulties being 
dealt with systematically in class, a^ in the case of Class literature. Oral 



im EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 117 



and written compositions might be based occasionally upon the Supple* 
menlary Reading also; but care should be taken not to make a task out of 
a course the object of which is the creation of a taste. 

The books for the Class literature in the Middle and Upper Schools are 
purchased by the pupils. They should be purchased by the pupils of the 
Lower School also; excellent editions are to be had at from 10c. to 25c. 
mh. (See Catalogue of 1902 and the Supplement of 1905). In some 
localities, the possession of the books is of advantage, not only to the pupils, 
bat to a wider circle of readers. 

Reference to the new programme will show that Supplementary Read- 
ing is enjoined in Geography, History, and Science, as well as in English 
Literature. To meet the difficulty of providing a sufficient supply of books, 
dp following plan has been followed in a number of schools, with most 
satisfactory results. Before each session, the members of the staff,, with 
tk catalogues of the Public and other local libraries (including, of course, 
tie High School library) before them, select therefrom a dozen or more 
snitable books for each Form under each of the following heads, the lists 
indicating where each book is to be found, and each pupil being required 
to read, during the ensuing school year, at least one from each list for his 
Fonn : 

I. Prose Fiction; II. Narrative and Dramatic Poetry; III. Biography 
and History; IV. Travels and Explorations; V. Popular Science. 

Modifications of such a plan may, of course, be desirable. As the 
pupil's taste develops, essays, etc., may be substituted for prose fiction, and 
p«e.ry of a subjective character may be added. Good translations of the 
Anrient and Modem Classics and other works likely to create a taste f«^r 
tip languages and their literatures, should also have a place, and it should 
fs tie duty of each teacher concerned to see that the interests of his depart- 
Mt are not neglected. The lists should be printed on slips, or inserted 
ip the annual circular of the school, or, at least, be kept on the Form bulle- 
tin board. And further, when commending its list to a Form, the teachers 
ionld make such a statement in regard to the general character of each 
Wik as will enable the pupil to make an agreeable selection. 

When the Public Library is not free, special arrangements may usually 
^ made with its Board to supply the schools ; and, for evident reasons, it 
^nld be to the interest of the locality to have at least the Principal ap- 
winted one of the members. Occasionally a public-spirited citizen has paid 
for the Library privileges enjoyed by the High School. In one or two 
'f)falitie8 already, as is now customary in the United States, the Library 
Bijard sends the necessary books in relays to the High School, and keeps 
:*« necessities in mind when making its purchases. From time to time, 
jI^o. Bets of half a dozen or so copies of suitable books should be added to 
•if Hi?h School library, especially in the larger and wealthier localities, 
and where the supply from the Public Library is defective ; for it is always 
^^ter, if at all practicable, to have the books directly under the teacher's 
•mtrol. Under this system of Supplementary Reading, the provisions of 
H^e. 43 (2), (g), may readily be complied with. The pupil should be al- 
;?»^ed to select the four works he will read; and if the tone of the school 
^] what it should be, few precautions will be necessary to enable the Prin- 
''ipal to give the necessary certificate to those who are candidates at a de^- 
partmental examination. 

Two other most important matters, here and there, still need atten- 
*wii. EsDeciallv in the Lower School, where the memorv is plastic and the 
lamination pressure is less .in evidence, the pupil should be systematically 
Tf quired to memorize and to recite appreciatively choice selections in prose 



118 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



and poetry. TKe selections should invariably be well worth storing in the 
treasure-house of the memory; but no more than a fair share of the pupil's 
energies should be expended on this part of the course. Oral reading has, 
also, for manv years, been a prescribed function of the course in English 
Literature. It is not necessary, be it noted, to have all the text read aloud; 
but it is necessary that what is read should be well read. 

Elementaky Science. 

Many of the objections urged against the Elementary Science course 
are due to inappreciation of present educational conditions, and a misap- 
prehension of its intended character. The Nature Study of the Public. 
Schools, the Elementary Science of the Lower School, and the Science of 
the Middle and Upper Schools are, it must be remembered, continuous 
courses. The Elementary Science course, accordingly, assumes, as it now 
stands, that the Nature Study course has been carried out; and, until it 
is, the former must be of a lower grade than it should be some years hence. 
It must also be remembered that, even when fully developed, the course 
will still be an elementary one. Some of the topics demand but a brief 
treatment; and the stress upon each of the others should be determined, 
in each school, by the mental disposition of the pupils, the material avail- 
able, and the prevailing industries of the district, conjoined with the con- 
sideration that the course is a two years' one. 

The notes to "Elementary Science," on pp. 67-68 of the Regulations, 
now quoted, in view of their bearing on what follows, give a concise but 
comprehensive outline of the general character of the work to be done : 

"The objects of the course are to train pupils in correct observation and 
deduction, to give in connection with the instruction in Geography, a fair 
knowledge of the world around them to those who will not remain at school 
more than a few years, and to lay the foundation for the more detailed study 
of each subject in the case of those who will continue the work into the higher 
forms.. The spirit of the Nature Study of the Public Schools should be 
retained, but the teacher should introduce a more systematic treatment of 
the subject, with such organization of the material as will lead to simple 
classification and generalization. The course should be correlated with 
Geography, Drawing, and Composition. 

"TJnder each of the subheads in Appendix B, iull details are given of the 
course, which is intended to be at least a two years' one. The order of the 
topics, however, is merely a suggested one- In Botany and Zoology, the 
extent and the character of the details are left to the principal and the 
teacher, and should be determined by the accessibility of the material and 
other local conditions. The courses in these subjects shall be practical 
throughout. Less attention should be given to the identification of plants 
than has hitherto been usual, and more to morphology, physiology, and 
ecology. When desirable, the agricultural applications of the subject should 
be emphasized. Each pupil should possess a good lens, and be taught how 
to use it. The compound microscope should be used regularly by the teacher 
for illustration. Approved methods of collecting and preserving botanical 
specimens and of keeping live animals suitable for study should be system- 
atically followed. Much of the practical work, especially the observations, 
will necessarily be done out of doors by the pupils alone, under the direction 
of the teacher, or by the pupils conducted by the teacher. The courses in 
Physics and Chemistry shall be as far as possible experimental, and the 
pupils should be encouraged to work at home and to prepare simple ap- 
paratus. 



IINK EDUCATION 1>KPARTMKNT. 119 



**Wlieii practicable there should be an Aquarium, and every school 
^houl(^ have an Arboretum and a Herbarium. A Museum consisting of 
specimens illustrative of the courses should also be established. The pupils 
should be encouraged to provide specimens from the locality. 

"Floras and Faunas should be provided in the library; also other works 
of reference, and the pupils should be encouraged to use them as supple- 
mentary reading, never as text-books or as substitutes for original work. 
Drawing and systematic written description should be required throughout 
the course, and the specimens should be dated and preserved in note books for 
comparison and inspection, the work being systematically supervised by the 
teacher. In none of. the Science classes shall notes be dictated by the 
teacher-Every pupil should keep a calendar of the dates of the unfolding 
of buds, the flowering of plants, and the first appearance of birds, insects, 
and other animals." 

Culture is the great object of both the High and the Public School 
course. Both method and matter are important; but the method is always 
tie more important. In the High School, however, the matter is more 
important and the course itself is less elastic than in the Nature Study of 
the Public Schools; for the necessities of the future citizen and of the 
Public School teacher must now be borne in mind. The Chemistry, be it 
noted, ia an unsystematized introduction to the subject, with a minimum of 
theory; the Biology, a more comprehensive course, is also unsystematized, 
^ith however, provision for an organized view at the close ; and the Physics, 
like the Science of the Middle and Upper Schools, is fairly systematized. 

For evident reasons, it is intended that, as a general rule, the time 
from September to November and from April till the end of June shall be 
ile?oted to Biology. The apportionment of time to e^ch of Boiany and 
Zoology, should, on the whole, be about the same; but from week to week 
it will depend chiefly upon the material available. No time is fixed for 
Chemistry. Its logical place, however, would be during March, and, if 
aeeesaary, part of February, at the close of the second year's course in 
Physics, to which, naturally, the winter months would be devoted • In 
schools where many pupils leave at the end of the first year, it would be wise 
:otake the Chemistry to suit this condition; for, while the course is an intro- 
•ittftion to the Middle School Chemistry, it deals with some common subjects 
of general interest and importance. In this case the subject should be re- 
viewed at the end of the second year. 

It is not intended that the topics of the Elementary Science course 
•hould he rigidly exclusive of one another, or be taken up in the exact 
'>rder in which they appear on the programme. It often happens that 
a^ts in regard to more than one topic may be learned from the study of 
ie same object. Questions in Physics and Chemistry often come up in 
onnection with Biology; and, during the courses in Physics and Chemistry, 
material in Biology is often developed in the laboratory. From time to 
*ime also, suitable material, available for various purposes, is brought in 
&v the pupils or gathered during the excursions. Such material should be 
Mt with at Ihe time; but, when the work is reviewed, it is more system- 
anc, and it will be found more convenient, to dq so by topics. In any case, 
■he broad, general principles are to be developed, and the teacher should sel- 
^ t and arrange the details accordingly. To the pupil this course may, for 
^me time, appear io be an unorganized one. It should never be so to the 
*<*apher. 

It should be noted also that the group of subjects, included under 
tiementary Science, is obligatory only upon the pupil in the general course^ 



120 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Bnd the candidate for a teacher's non-professional certificate. Many 
Principals, however, advise all the Entrance Class to take the subject for 
one year at least, as a useful means of culture, and until their future course 
has been settled- 

The following suggestions are the result of inspectorial observations 
during the past year : 

(1). The ordinary physical and chemical laboratories may be made 
to serve for. the four subjects of the Elementary Science course. Where 
at all practicable, however, it would be well to have a room reserved and 
specially fitted up for Biology. As has been pointed out above, a Herbarium 
and Arboretum, and a Museum are also indispensable, and some schools 
have already made a good beginning. There is no reason, either, why an 
Aquarium and a Terrarium should not be provided, except, of course, during 
the winter months, where the laboratory is not suitably heated. All this 
equipment should be the special charge of the Science Master ; but the pupils 
and the public should contribute to it as occasion may serve. In a few 
years, indeed, the school may thus become a bureau of information of great 
value to the district. The school should also communicate, from time to 
time, with the Geological Survey at Ottawa, the Agricultural Department 
at Toronto (and Guelph), the Experimental Farm at Ottawa, and the 
Science Departments of the Universities, both to secure their periodical 
publications and to consult them when they can supply needed information. 

(2). As the definition shows, the Elementary Science is observational 
and experimental. From the nature of the course, a class text book cannot 
be used in Biology ; and, if the work is properly done, one will be unneces- 
sary in Physics and Chemistry also. Books, however, should be constantly 
in use by the pupils for reference and for supplementary reading. In view 
of our experience, the method of the class work in Physics and Chemistry 
should present no difficulty if the object of the course is kept in view. In 
Biology, a subject largely new in character, the main feature should be 
the regular class discussions. In addition, and connected therewith, there 
should be other exercises suggested by the ingenuity of the teacher; as, for 
example, simple questions for investigation out of school hours, proposed to 
the class or to individuals; discussions prompted by the pupils themselves; 
essays on various topics with illustrative drawings; collections by in- 
dividual pupils of classes of plants and animals. A few excursions 
should be provided for each Fall and Spring during school hours or 
on Saturdays. To permit of these in school hours, the class periods should b« 
arranged so that the Upper School Science classes may be at work 
in the laboratory during the teacher's absence. For these excur- 
sions, it is indispensable that instructions be given the class before 
leaving the school as to what special points they are to attend to, 
what materials or phenomena they are to look for, and what particular 
locality they are to investigate. Without such system, very little demon- 
stration can be made in the woods and the fields, and what should be one 
of the most valuable features of the course will become a wasted opportun- 
ity. A written report of his work should afterwards be required from each 
pupil, and the material collected and the observations made should be dis- 
cussed as part of the subsequent class exercises. Some science masters 
place a book upon the teacher's desk in each of the class rooms concerned, 
in which pupils record from day to day any observations they may have 
made. Although, no doubt, crude at first, these observations are useful and 
stimulating? for class work. Other teachers again, devote part of Monday's 
lesson to the discussion of observations made by the pupils during the pre- 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 121 



ceding week. The amount of wood-lore which the pupils of rural schools 
possess and are able to collect is often surprising. 

Xext to the class discussions, the most valuable part of the work is the 
preparation of accurate notes by the pupils. For this a special book, not a 
mere scribbler, is indispensable.* The firat step in the class work is to teach 
ik pupils what to record and how to record it : when he begins he can neither 
metliodize nor discriminate. Until the class are able to put their work down 
in reasonably good form it should be written in rough note books, and after 
indiTidual criticism by the teacher should be copied in the regular note 
hooka. After a month or so the pupil will probably be competent to omit 
die intermediate stage in the work of recording ; but it will be many months 
before he can dispense wholly with the teacher's guidance in the work of 
di«oriminrfting. Unnecessary assistance must, however, be carefully avoid- 
ed, and, in particular, notes must not be dictated by the teacher. The notes 
lill, of course, deal only with the main points; they should be simply an 
intelligible record, whose main object, apart from the training gained in 
making them, is to enable the pupil to review his work. It will sometimes 
happen, of course, that the work in connection with a topic cannot be syste- 
matized and recorded until the observations have been completed ; but, as a 
general rule, the record should be made as promptly as possible whether in 
tie class or at home or at their seats depending upon circumstances. 

As a means of expression the value of Drawing can hardly be over- 
estimated. In many respects it is far superior to word description, and it 
slould be employed wherever suitable- The Drawing, however, must in- 
"uibly be a rigidly accurate reproduction of the object. 

i3). The first duty of the teacher of Elementary Science (:md of Physi- 
cal Geography) is to make himself well acquainted with his environment — 
^tt the resources, the physical character, and the economic requirements 
of the surrounding district. It is not putting the case too strongly to say 
tiat. for the Biology in particular, the teacher's environment is his best 
text book. The better his scholarship, the better will be his teaching ; but, 
if lie relies upon mere book knowledge, he will signally fail to accomplish 
the object of the course. He should be able to tell the pupils where they 
n^ get material and to direct and correct their observations, although not 
^ith them on the spot. 

(4) Before beginning his work, knowing the conditions and the number 
of lessons at his disposal, the teacher should make a tentative apportion- 
ment of so many lessons to each topic, subject, in Biology in particular, 
to necessary readjustment as 'his work proceeds. He should himself keep 
a note-book in which to record, from day to day, the work he has taken up 
m claFs. In Biology, of course, the material will vary in different localities, 
aDil, from year to year in the same locality ; but there will be on the whole 
a ^neral consistency of development. With such a note-book, the teacher 
can methodize his work as well as economize his time. As has already been 
pointed out, the order of the topics is at the discretion of the teacher. It 
would be well, though, for the inexperienced to follow in a measure the 
order of the syllabus until they are able to strike out for themselves. 

Another matter of prime importance : Throughout the whole course 
tie teacher must supervise the work in the pupils^ note books. Without 
?nch supervision, note taking by juniors is practically worthless. This 
means slow progress at first, but it is work that will pay in the end. 



" At date of wrftinir The Charles Chapman Co., Tiondon, Ont., and The Oopp, CHrk Co., 
To-oBto hare anpplied such note booki. The former enpply also loose leaf soribblers. which are 
mt«D{led to saTe the teacher trouble in handlingr the first draft. 



122 THE REPORT OF THE • No. 12 



(5) In Elementary Science, as in the other subjects of the High School 
course, regular oral and written examination should be held on the preced- 
ing work, to test not only the pupil's knowledge of fadts but his power to 
reason. The promotion examination at the end of the Lower School course 
should include this department, and the Principal's certificate for Part I, 
should take into account the Science Master's report of this promotion 
iKamination and of the work in the note-books a^ well as the other class 
exercises. 

(6) In accordance with what has been already said, the text-books the 
teacher needs most for the course in Elementary Science are those that 
will help him to become familiar with his environment. The High School 
Reference list of 1902, with the Supplement just issued, contains a full list 
of modem works in Science, and the descriptive notes thereto will help the 
teacher in making a selection for both the pupil and himself. The following 
will be found suitable as a small library in Elementary Biology for his own 
use : 

For General Biology : Coulter's Plants; Atkinson's Elementary Botnny; 
Spotton's Botany, Part I.; Jordan, Kellogg and Heath's Animals; Cotton's 
Descriptive Zoology; Thompson's Study of Animal Life. . 

For Agricultural Applications; Percival's Agricultural Botany; James' 
Public School Agriculture; Birkett, Stevens and Hill's Agriculture for Ber 
ginners; Roth's A First Booh in Forestry, The first of these text books, 
probably the best "Applied Botany" we have, is a comprehensive treatise; 
the others will suggest work of an elementary character. 

For Class- work: Pepoon, Mitchell and Maxwell's Studies of Plant Life; 
Walter, Whitney and Maxwell's Studies of Animal Life; Colton's Practical 
Zoology; Boyer's Elementary Biology. These text books suggest the.gen<- 
eral character of class work, but the treatment of the subjects is too advanced 
for the Lower School; no minute dissection should, be attempted. Besides 
valuable discussions and useful information about plants and animals, the 
following contain practical suggestions in regard to class work, which are 
nearer our present stage of advancement, in the first year of the course at 
any rate : Silcox and Stevenson's Modern Nature Study; Lochhead's Outlines 
of Nature Studies; Hodge's Nature Study and Life; Dearness' The Nature 
Study Course. 

For guidance in Practical Work : Muldrew's Nature Study Collection; 
Colton's Teachers' Manual; Ganong's The TcfLching Botanist; Eugene 
Smith's The Home Aquarium; Hemen way's How to Make School Gardens; 
Brown's The Taxidermists Manual ($1.25, Putnam's Sons). 

For identification and Classification: In addition to the preceding 
works, the teacher must possess or have access to Floras and Faunas, a 
sufficient supply of which should, at any rate, be in the High School library. 
The following are sugges'ted, but, of course, a more comprehensive selection 
may be made from the Reference Catalogues of 1902 and 1905 : Doubleday, 
Page & Co.'s The Nature Library, in 10 vols.; Spotton's Botany, Part II. ^ 
(The Flora);. Muldrew's Sylvan Ontario; Keeler's Our Native Trees; Com- 
stock's Manual for the Study of Insects; Mcll wraith's Birds of Ontario; 
Chapman's Color Key to North America Birds; Merriara's Birds of the VilU 
age and Field; Everman's American Food and Game Fishes.* 



* For details as to character and prices, see the High School Reference Oatalogue of 1902 
and the Sapplement of 1905. 



}«05 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 123 



Note, — ^Ward's Natural Science establistment, 76-1G4 College Ave., 
fiochester, U.S., furnishes Colleges and Schools with every kind of Natural 
History collections except Botanical specimens and Insects. No Canadian 
house of its character has yet been established. The Chas. Chapman Co., 
London, On*t., furnishes Botanical, Entomological and miscellaneous sup- 
plies for practical work (labels, insect boxes, trays, etc., etc.) 

Commercial Course. 

Under the old regulations much energy was uselessly expended upon 
Bookkeeping. Pupils generally were put into Bookkeeping because a com- 
prehensive course in it was supposed to be necessary to all classes of citizens, 
and sometimes because they were not otherwise engaged when the subject 
was being taught those intended for business. As a matter of fact, the 
knowledge of commercial . transactions the ordinary pupil needs may be 
readily acquired in connection with Commercial Arithmetic. A well taught 
commercial course affords, it is true, good mental discipline; but the pupil 
who is not intended for business should get his discipline from the subjects 
that are of immediate importance to him. Tha^t system of organization is 
best which best utilizes the pupil's energies. Under the new regulations- 
the Bookkeeping Course on p. 68 is obligatory for teachers' certificates only, 
▼hile on pp. 73-74 a special course in commercial work is provided for those 
who wish Jt. 

The minimum amount prescribed for Part I of the non-professional 
Junior and District Teacher's certificates is given in the note to the course 
on p. 68. As the note also points out, the sets prescribed are H;o be the first 
work done in these sets, note copies of preliminary drafts. This means, be 
it carefully noted, that, before the pupil begins the three prescribed sets, 
he shall have had ample preliminary training. In accordance with the 
?cheine of organization already advocated, the course in Bookkeeping should 
be an intensive one of about six months, from, say, January to the end of 
June of the first year. When, however, as is sometimes the case, there is 
not outride pressure for commercial work in the first year, the course might 
with advantage be postponed to the second. Then, owing to previous train- 
ing and greater maturity, the pupil can accomplish the work with less 
difficulty and in a shorter time. Moreover, with ^this organization, no 
special provision will be needed for those who enter at the second year 
without having completed the work. 

In some of the special courses, heretofore too little aH;tention has been 
paid to Stenography and too much to Bookkeeping and Business Papers on 
the one hand; while, on the other, the subjects of general culture have not 
been stressed enough. General adaptability is an indispensable adjunct of 
technical knowledge. The intelligent business man, it is well known, 
prefers to the so-called business graduate the high School pupil who has 
heen well trained, and who, in particular, is a good speller and ready reck- 
[>Qpr, and can write a good hand and compose a good letter, even if his course 
in Bookkeeping has not been a very extensive one. Moreover, the number 
▼ho, on leaving school, are entrusted with the account books of an import- 
ant business is very small indeed. The difference between the commercial 
courses of the business College and those of the High School should be the 
emphasis the High School places upon a good general education. In schools 
where the commercial classes are not segregated from the others in the first 
year, all might take together at least the subjects that are common [see Reg. 
^ (4) and (6)]. In this year the subjects of general culture should receive 



124 THE REPORT OF THE No. a2 



Bpecial attention, ihe stress J)eing afterwards transferred to the subjects of 
the commercial course. Indeed, in the first year, the Bookkeeping for the 
Junior Teacher's certificate would be ample even for the commercial section. 
No school at present has a commercial course of more than two years. In 
the note at the foot of p. 74 provision is made for one extending over three 
years. In our cities, at least, it should soon be practicable to have such 
a course. Two years of High School training is too little for the business 
Mian of the future. 

Akt Coubse. 

Heretofore, practically no special equipment or accommodations have 
been provided for the department of Art, although, obviously, its efficiency 
depends upon these as much as does the department of Science. In the 
larger schools a commodious and well-lighted room should now be sert apart, 
furnished with suitable desks and presses, ample blackboards, and water 
supply and at least one sink. Here, too, the walls should be adorned with 
good reproductions of the best pictures (See under ''School Decoration" 
below). The influence of artistic surroundings in the 'Art-room, in parti- 
cular, cannot be overestimated. When a separate room is not available, one 
of the ordinary class-rooms should meet the foregoing requirements as far 
as practicable. In such class-rooms care should be taken when water-color 
work is to be done to have water in individual cups or glasses, so provided 
that no tim^ shall be lost either at the end or the beginning of a lesson : 
an additional ink-well in each desk would meet the case conveniently. A 
set of drawing models of wood or painted tin should be purchased for the 
teacher's use, with vases and casts of various artistic objects; and each pupil 
might himself have a set of type models from which to do his drawing. 
The sphere, hemisphere, ovoid and spheroid must, of course, be turned from 
wood, but the reeft may be easily made of cardboard or stiff manilla paper. 
On this subject, as, indeed, on many others, the teacher will find helpful 
suggestions in Nos. 1 and 2 of the drawing-books authorized for the old 
course. Blank drawing books should, of course, be used now, the teacher 
himself supplying the exercises. 

When properly carried out, the old course had some practical value 
besides its educational value as hand and eye training. To these the new 
course is designed to add some aesthetic culture. We cannot, it is evident 
secure complete efficiency at first; this department, in particular, is one of 
slow growth at best; but we may gradually improve the situation. 

As to the order of the subjects : Some teachers prefer to take all the 
first year in an elementary way, completing the course the second. Others, 
again, prefer to take the elementary course in part the first year, carrying 
over the rest to the second year. The plan to adopt will naturally depend 
upon the time-allowance for the department. From its nature, Drawing 
should, it is evident, be stressed the first year, seat-work being provided as 
far and as soon as practicable ; and less class-work and more seat-work should 
be done the second. In the first year the subjects might be taken in the 
following order: Drawing from '^Models" (the term includes all kinds of 
''objects"); Memory-drawin<? (under the old regulations known as "object- 
drawing"); the principles of Freehand Perspective, the subject, however, 
being taken ut) as needed with the Model and Memory Drawing and ex- 
tended a little thereafter; Inventive Illustrative Drawing; Ornamental 
Desicrn, introducino" Practical Geometry and its application to Design. 
Orthographic and Isometric Projection (merely the elements) might be de- 
ferred to the second year, except where Manual Training is taken up; and> 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 125 



in such schools, the Ornamental Design might be taken in the second year. 
Light and Shade and Color will, of course be used whenever applicable 
to the subjects of the department of Art. 

For economy, as well as for purely educational reasons, it is most 
important that the principle of correlation, which is a leading feature of the 
new programjne, should be observed throughout the Art course. The most 
effective work will, accordingly, be done if the Science-master teaches Draw- 
ing also; or being himself proficient in the art (as. every Science-master 
»hould be) works in close harmony with the teacher of Drawing. This 
principle applies, it is manifest, with at least equal force, to the Practical 
Geometry of the course in Designing and the Introductory Geometry of the 
aew Mathematical course. 

Although color work has been prescribed for the Public Schools since 
last September, it will evidently be some years before even a majority can 
do satisfactory work, with this vehicle. In most localities, indeed, the 
Public School work even with pencil has been unsatisfactory. It would be 
▼ell, therefore, to devote as many as may be needed of the early lessons 
to practice with rectangular and circular models in light and shade. The 
papil may thus be set on the way to acquiring the habit of accurate drawing 
—a habit of th^ utmost importance and one which he is less likely to acquire 
if he begins with irregular objects. He should then be carefully taught 
the use of brush and color. Thereafter, in the Spring and Fall, he can 
use his pen, pencil, and brush in Botany and Zoology aa well as in 
the ordinary fields of Art. In Winter the same plan should be followed 
▼ith Physics and Chemistry. 

The preceding remarks deal, of course, with the Drawing pijBscribed 
on p. 68 of the Bei^ulations — ^the course which is obligatory only for a tea- 
cher's non-professional certificate and for pupils in the general course, but 
which, on account of its culture value, deserves, for a year at least, the 
same consideration in the organization as has been recommended above for 
ihe Elementary Science. For some years, the special Drawing course on p. 
SO can be taken in only a few of the larger Collegiate Institutes, and in most 
of such schools only when competent teachers can be procured. The atten- 
tion of the teacher of Drawing is accordingly drawn to the course for Art 
Specialists. Circular No. 2, which defines it, contains a list of works of 
reference, and others will be found in the Eeference Catalogue of 1902 and 
in the Supplement just issued. For the convenience of the teacher in the 
ordinary course, the names of the works which will be found most service- 
iUe are given here : 

For Model Drawing: Light and Shade, Cross, fl.OO, Ginn & Co,, Bos- 
ton; Color Study J 60c., the same author and publisher. 

For Memory Drawing, Freehand Perspective, and Inventive Illustra- 
tive Drawing: Text hooks of Art Educatiorty Prang; New Drawing Course^ 
Vaughan, in four parts, 2/6 each, Nelson & Son, London, Eng. 

For Ornamental Design : Color Study , Cross ; Design and Making of 
Pafferns, Hatton, 5/, Chapman & Hall, L^ don, Eng.; Science and Art 
Drawing (complete Geometrical 'course), Spanton, 10/, Macmillan Co.; The 
Bases of Design and Line and Form, Walter Crane, 6/ each, Geo. Bell & 
Sons. 

For Orthographic Projection: Mechanical Drawing, Cross, Ginn & Co., 
Boston. Practical Plane and' Solid Geometry, Rawle, 1/6. Simpkin, Mar- 
shall & Co., London, Eng. Science and Art Drawing, Spanton. 

For Isometric Projection : Science and Art Drawing, Spanton. 



126 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



School Libraries. 

No part of the school equipment is more important than the Library. 
There is no field of human enterprise in which the man who uses a library 
has not an advantage over the one who does not> and the school is the place 
where he should acquire the habit. Besides, the use of the High School 
library is the indispensable concomitant of the independent work which the 
new regulations enjoin. In this connection, two matters are of prime im- 
portance^ — the character and the situation of the reference books. Occasion- 
ally, some of the books are at present better adapted to the use of the adult, 
and the library is inconveniently situated. In the selection of the books 
the necessities of the junior pupil should be borne in mind as well as those 
of the senior; and the books themselves should always be readily accessible, 
and need not all be kept in the same room. The general reference books 
might be kept in a special room or in the Principal's room, of which the 
senior pupils should have the freedom during their study periods. Some- 
times, however, the reference books most in use are, with advantage, kept 
on reading stands in the main hall. But the special reference library of 
each department would be more serviceable if in the class-room where ^t 
is most in demand. Manifestly, when a reference book is needed, it should 
be close at hand, flere it is well to emphasize the fact that 'the Education 
Department has just issued a Supplement to the Reference catalogue of 
1902. No book has found a place in either catalogue the value of which 
has not been attested by competent authorities. Teachers may, therefore, 
make their selection from either with confidence in its reliability. 

Teat-Books. 

Since the issue of the list of 1904 some additional High School text- 
books have been authorized. . Two in particular deserve special considera- 
tion : Baker's Theoretical Geometry for Schools and The Principles and 
Practice of Reading. The former has been prepared for the use of the 
forms that will go up for the University Matriculation and the Teachers* 
non-professional examinations of 1907; for the new courses in Geometry 
come into full operation in both the Middle and the Upper Schools after 
the examinations of 1906. Many of the selections in The Principles and 
Practice of Reading are suitable for the Literature class and may be so used 
also ; but the book has been prepared especially for the classes in Oral Read- 
ing, and experience has shown that the Reading lesson loses much of its 
freshness if the selections have already been used for another purpose. 
Oral Reading is subsidiary to Literature teaching, and the meaning of the 
passage is the first and an indispensable step in the Reading lesson; but 
the main object of the Literature lesson is the cultivation of taste, while 
that of the Reading lesson is the effective rendering of the author's mean- 
ing. These objects are best secured in the earlier stages, at any rate, when 
the main object in each case is kept steadily in view. We should have 
correlation without confusion. The plan of The Principles and Practice 
of Reading is an excellent one, and, if properly used, the book will do much 
to liorhten the teacher's labour and make his work more effective. 

In par. 2, of the authorized text-book list, the following is emphasized : 

"Books authorized for use in the Public Schools may be used in the Lower School, 
and it is recommended that, so far as the Principal may deem it advisable, these bcokii 
be used for the first year instead of the corresponding High School books!" 

The recommendation applies to the Public School text-books in Arith- 
metic, English Grammar^ History, and Geography. These books are seldom 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 127 



if ever completed in the Public Schools, and, for economic reasons, should 
be used the first year in the High Schools. With such additions as the 
competent teacher will supply, they contain ample material for the period. 
A change in text-books should be made only after due deliberation and only 
with a new class ; and the responsibility for advising the School board on 
the subject Revolves on the Principal and not on his assistants, although, of 
course, the judicious Principal will seek their advice when their interests 
are affected. Keasonable notice should also be given by the Principal to 
the local bookseller, of any changes to be made in the text-books used in 
the High School. It has sometimes happened that desirable changes have 
been delayed in order to enable him to get rid of stock he has on hand. 
Sometimes, on the other hand, he has been treated with scant consideration. 

Temporary Certificates. 

Beg. 37 (2) reads as follows : 

"If, after da& advertiBement, a Hi^h School Board is unable to obtain a legally 
qi&liSed assistant, a tempprary certificate may be ppranted by the Minister of Educa- 
JOQ for the current half year to a suitable person on application to the Board.'' 

When the occasion arises, it will be proper for the Principal to point 
ui to his Board that the application of a legally qualified teacher whose 
non-professional certificate includes the work to be done, is entitled to ac- 
^Unce, no matter what may be its grade ; and that a temporary certificate 
aast be secured under the regulation, before the person without the legal 
'plification can be appointed. If a board desires a higher qualification 
than that available under its first advertisement, it is open to it to advertise 
again, offering a larger salary. On its failure, after reasonable efforts, to 
iecore the kind of teacher it wants, a printed form will be sent on applica- 
non to the Deputy Minister, to be filled in with such a statement as will 
enable the Minister to dispose of the case with due regard to both the locaj 
snd the general interests. Reg. 35 (4) provides the Department with the 
QeaiiB of enforcing its decisions. The scarcity of teachers which, it ^s 
il'e^, has become acute in some departments, makes Reg. 37 (2) of more 
importance now than heretofore. The existing stringency, however, is not 
^iolly attributable to this scarcity. The salary question, it is well known, 
iMie important element in the situation. Competent teachers will remain 
it tieir nositions and competent teachers will return to the ranks if ade- 
quate inducements are offered them. 

School Decoration. 

In irrading the accommodation special importance is now attached to 
^hool Decoration [See Reg. 149, (5) and (7)]. Not only should suitable 
'olor schemes be adopted for calsomining or papering the halls and class- 
rj^jms, but the walls (including, of course, those of the Assembly room) 
mvii be decorated with good pictures; and casts, vases, and other oma- 
apDts should be provided. After 1905, Grade I. will, accordingly, not be 
r.vpn the halls or the class-rooms which are bare of ornament or unsuitably 
Wired. In the present condition of most of the schools of the Province, 
n vould be unreasonable to expect paintings (and the chromolithograph is 
'^'Idom good) ; but good photographs (especially carbons), etchings and en- 
mTingfl mav be bought at moderate prices, and, in the matter of casts 
m Tases, the form is of more importance than the material. Quality is 
?«re to be desired than quantity; all the Education Department expects 
«^ that each school shall, from year to year, make a reasonable effort to 



^•;;^r 



128 THE REPORT OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. No. 18 



comply with the requirements. Very generally, as is well known, we have 
good substantial school buildings, and grounds that are by no means dis- 
creditable. We should now make an organized effort to improve the in- 
teriors. To this end the Literary Society and the Graduating Class may 
be expected to contribute, not to speak of public-spirited citizens. In the 
words of U. S. Commissioner Harris, our pupils should have "not merely 
the piety of the heart, but the piety of the intellect that beholds truth, 
the piety of the will that does good deeds wisely, the piety of the senses 
that sees the beautiful and realizes it in works of Art." 

On p. 63, Section XIV. of the High School Reference Catalogue of 
1902, will be found suggestions on the subject of School Decoration. No 
more useful book has been published on the subject than Burrage & Bailey's 
School Sanitation and Decoration (fl.SO, D. C. Heath & Co., Boston). 
Every school library should have a copy and every School Board and Prin- 
cipal should consult it. 



II. Oeders in Cottncil. 

Mr. John S. Mercer granted a certificate as specialist in Manual Train- 
ing. Approved 27th January, 1905. 

Miss Lucy Cumming appointed Instructor in Sewing at the Ottawa 
Normal and Model Schools, the appointment to date from 1st November, 
1904. Approved 27th January, 1905. 

Graduates of McGill University, Montreal, who have pursued certain 
courses and fulfilled conditions prescribed by 51 of the Regulations of the 
Department to be granted non-professional standing of Specialists. Ap- 
proved 27th January, 1905. 

Miss Margaret F. McLeod granted a Second Class Certificate. Ap- 
proved Slst January, 1905. 

Holders of Second Class certificates awarded by the Province of Mani- 
toba may be granted interim certificates for Ontario, and holders of other 
certificates granted by said Province mav be recognized as having com- 
plied with the non-prof espional requirements for District certificates for 
Ontario. Approved 10th March, 1905. 

Honor Graduates of 'I'oronto University in the courses detailed to be 
granted non-professional Specialist standing in such courses. Approved 15th 
March, lOOi. 

Mr. John McLaughlin appointed Inspector of Schools for Manitoulin 
Island, and the Islands adjacent thereto, the Island of St. Joseph and the 
Townships of Rutherford and Carlyle in the District of Aliroma. Approved 
28th April, 1905. ^^ 

Nine certificates to teach Household Science granted. Approved 6th 
June, 1905. 

Honor Graduates of McMaster University in the courses detailed to 
be granted non-professional Specialist standing in French and German. 
Approved 14th June, 1905. 

Miss Janet Wilson granted a certificate to teach Household Science 
Approved 8th July, 1905. 

Mrs. Miriam Williams Brown appointed Instructor in Reading in the 
Normal and Model Schools, Toronto, said appointment to take effect from 
the 1st day of September, 1905. Approved 12th July, 1905. 



m EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 129 

1_ 

Certificate to teach Household Science in the Niagara Falls South High 
School granted to Miss Eliza S. Fitzgerald. Approved 9th August, 1905. 

List of Text-books authorized. Approved 9th August, 1905. 

Grants payable to Continuation Classes of the various grades specified. 
ApproTed 18th August, 1905. 

Miss Nora Lefurgey granted a Second Class certificate. Approved 
\ii\ August. 

Minister of Education, pending the final decision of the Courts on the 
question of the qualification of the Christian Brothers, authorized to grant • 
at the request of Separate School Boards temporary certificates to members 
ofrelifrious orders. Approved 14th September, 1905. 

Miss Jean Laidlaw appointed Lecturer in Kindergarten Principles in 
the London Normal School, the appointment to date from 1st September, 
1905. Approved 15th September, 1905. 

Miss Grace C. Leroy appointed Clerk and Stenographer for the Toronto 
Xormal School, appointment to date from 1st September, 1905. Approved 
M September, 1905. 

Miss Annie M. Delaney appointed Clerk and Stenographer at the Ot- 
tawa Xormal School, the appointment to date from 1st November, 1905. 
Approved 4th October, 1905. 

Appointments to the Educational Council made. Approved 8rd Novem- 
f«r, 1905. 

Mr. Clarkson James appointed Clerk and Private Secretary to the Minister 
of Education, said appointment to take effect on and from 1st December, 1905. 
Approved 15th November, 1905. 

Mr. Thaddeus William Henry Leavitt appointed Inspector of Public Lib- 
raries., said appointment to take effect on and from 1st November, 1905. Ap- 
ved 15th November, 1905. 

Certificates (twenty-one) to teach Household Science granted. Approved 
15th November, 1«05. 

Certificates (two) to teach Household Science granted. Approved 15th 
November, 1905. 

Mr. David B. Lattey granted an Interim Second Class certificate valid for 
two years Approved 20th December, 1906. 

Miss Helen Holland appointed Teacher of Household Science for the Ottawa 
Normal and Model Schools, the appointment to date from 1st January, 1906 
Approved 22nd December, 1905. (Subsequently resigned.) 

High School estaolished in eastern part of City of Toronto, commonly 
Giown as Riverdale. Approved 29th December, 1905. 



9e. 



130 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 22 



. APPENDIX a— FREE TEXT BOOKS IN RURAL SCHOOLS, 1905. 



Inspectorate. 



Middlesex, W 

Perth 

Rainy River and Thunder 
fiay 

Renfrew 

Totals 



Name of school (section number and 

township) and amount expended 

for text books. 



Total 

amount 

expended. 



$ c. 



10 Lobo, 6.20 ; 6 E. Williams, 14.52 ". 20 72 



IBlanchard, 7.57; 6 Downie,6.96; SDownie, 
5.87 



1 Paipoonge, 10.65. .*. 
10 Raglan, 6.45 



7 schools 



20 40 

10 65 

6 45 



Total 
amount of 
Legisla- 
tive aid. 



$ c. 
10 36 

10 21 
5 32 
3 22 



58 22 29 11 



im EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 131 



APPENDIX H.— PUBLIC AND FREE LIBRARIES. LITERARY AND 
SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS, UTC. 

Rbpoet op T. W. H. Leavitt, Inspectoe of Pxtblic Libraeies, Scientific 
Institutions and Liteeabt and Scientific Societies RjscEiviNa a 
Shake of the jlegislative Gbant, in the Province of Ontario, foe 
THE Tear Ending 31st December, 1904. 

Owing to the resignation of Dr. May, Superintendent of Public Lib- 
raries, etc., on November 1st, 1905, my report is principally statistical; the 
retiring Superintendent not having fuxnished me with the necessary data 
upon which to base an estimate, specific in its character, of the progress made 
by the Public Libraries and Scientific Institutions which he had visited 
and examined during the year. 

The following Public uibraries, Literary and Scientific Institutions, 
dc. were inspected during the year 1906: — 

Algonquin, Ancaster, Athens, Atwood, Avonmore, Ayton, Beachville, 
BeDeville, Berwick, Bracondale, Brighton, Brockville, Brussels, Burk's Falls, 
linilington^ Cargill, Colbome, Cornwall, Crysler, Depot Harbor, Deseronto, 
Drayton, Dundas, Emsdale, Elgin, Ethel, Fergus, Finch, Hamilton, Ham- 
ilton Literary and Scientific Association, Hawkesbury, Harriston, Hunts- 
riUe, IngersoU, Kearney, Lancaster, Listowel, London, Maitland, Markham, 
Mraitton, Newboro', Oshawa, Octawa Field Naturalists' Club, Ottawa Lit- 
erary and Scientific Society, Ottawa French-Canadian Institute, Ottawa St, 
Patrick's Literary Association, Ottawa University Scientific Society, Palmers- 
ton, Parry Sound, Penetanguishene, Pinkerton, Port Elgin, Port Hope, Port 
^wan, Prescott, Speedside, Sprucedale, Trenton, Unionville, Vankleek Hill, 
Watford, Walkerton, Walkerville, Waterdown, Westport, Wyoming. 

The following Libraries did not report for the year 1904 : — 

Addison, Angus, Baden, Badjeros, Bancroft, Battersea, Baysville, Bee- 
ton, Belmont, Berwick, Binbrook, Bloomfield, Bognor, Brougham, Bruce 
Mines, Burritt's Rapids, Cheltenham, Cold Springs, Copper Cliff, Crysler, 
Dawaon, Duart, Dufferin (Clanbrassie P.O.), Dundalk, Dundela, Enterprise, 
finch, Flesherton, Fordwich, Forks of tEe Credit, Freelton, Gore Bay, Gor- 
ne, Hastings, Havelock, Highgate, Hillsburg, Holland Centre, Holyrood, 
Inglewood, Inkerman, Kars, Kearney, Keswick, Kinburn, King, Kintore, 
linwood. Lion's Head, Lome Park, Manitowanrng, Maitland, Maxville, 
Maxwell and Feversham, Mono Centre, Mono Mills, Moose Creek, Morewood, 
Honnt Brydges, Jiiunster, Nairn Centre, Napanee Mills (Strathcona P.O.), 
i'ewbury. North Augusta, Oil Springs, Ophir, Ottawa, Perth, Poland, Pow^ 
asaan, Primrose, Queensviile, Hosemont, Rosseau, Shallow Lake, Sprucedale, 
Sondridge, Tamworth, Thornton, Trout Creek, Tweed, Vandorf, Vars, Vio- 
let Hill, Waterford, Watson's Comers, Webbwood, West Lome. 

The following Libraries were incorporated during the year: — 

Deer Park, Frankford, Kerns (Milberta P.O.), South Mountain, Schoca- 
berg, Speedside, Sturgeon Falls, Walkerville. 

Libraries closed: 

Algonquin (books transferred to Public School trustees), Tilbury EiA 
fValetta P.O.)j (books transferred to Tilbury Public Library), Vienna (bo^jka 
tianifened to High School trustees. 



132 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



The following table shows the locality of every Public and Free Library 
in the Province on the Ist December, 1905 : — 



Fbee and Public Libraries. 



Counties and 
^ Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 

Addington Camden , East. 

" Enterprise. 

" Napanee Mills (Strathcona 

[P.O.) 

•' Newburgh. 

*' Tamworth. 

Yarker. 

Algoma Bruce Mines. 

" Chapleau. 

" Goulais Bay. . . .1 

** Marksville. 

*' Nairn Centre. , 

** Ophir. 1 

" Port Arthur. 

*' Rat Portage (Kenora). 

'' Sault Ste. Marie. 

" Schrieber. 

" Thessalon. 

*' Victoria Mines. 

" Webbwood. 

Brant Brantf ord. 

" Burford. 

" Glenmorris. 

" New Durham. 

*' Paris. 

" Scotland. 

" St. George. 

Bruce Bervie. 

" Cargill. 

** , Chepstow. 

" Chesley. 

'' Eljnwood. 

" Glamis. 

" Hepworth. 

" Holyrood. 

" Kincardine. 

" Lion's Head. 

" Lucknow. 

*' Mildmay. 

" Paisley. 

" Pinkerton. 

" Port Elgin. 

*' ,... Ripley. 

» " Riversdale. 

*' Southampton. 

*' Teeswater^ 

" Tara. 

" Tiverton. 

" Underwood. 

*' Walkerton. 

" Westwood. 

*' Wiarton. 

Carleton Carp. 

'* Dawson. 

** Kars. 

" Kinburn. 

" Manotick. 

•• Metcalfe. 



Counties and 
Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 

Carleton Munster . 

North Gower. 

Ottawa. 

" Richmond. 

Dufferin Glen Cross. 

Grand Valley. 

" Honeywood. 

" Melancthon. 

** Mono Centre. 

*' Orangeville. 

I ** Primrose. 

" R(^emont. 

** Shelburne. 

Violet HiU. 

Dundas Chesterville. 

" Dundela. 

'' Inkerman. 

*' Iroquois. 

" Matilda (Iroquois P.O.) 

'* Morewood. 

'* Morrisbnrg. 

" South Mountain. 

" ...Winchester. 

Durham Bowmanville. 

" MiUbrook. 

Orono. 

'/ Port Hope.' 

Elgin Aylmer. 

" Bayham. 

** Dutton. 

" .Tort Burwell. 

" Port Stanley. 

** Rodney. 

" St. Thomas. 

" Shedden. 

'* Sparta. 

'* Springfield. 

'* West Lome. 

Essex Amherstburg. 

" Comber. 

*' ....Essex. 

" ffarrow. 

" ....Kingsville. 

'' Leamington. 

" Pelee Island. 

" Walkerville. 

" Windsor. 

Frontenac Battersea. 

'^ Garden Island. 

' * Harrowsmith . 

" Kingston. 

** Mississippi. 

*' Sy3enham. 

Wolfe Island. 

Glengarry Lancaster. 

" Maxville. 

" Williamstown. 

Qrenville Burritt's Rapids. 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



133 



Free and Public Libbabieb. — Continued. 



Comities and 
Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 



Counties and 
Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 



GrenTiDe (0'(m.)Cardinal. 

" Easton's Corners. 

" Jasper. 

" Eemptville. 

" Maitland. 

" Merrickyille. 

" North Augusta. 

" Oxford Mills. 

" Prescott. 

" Spencerville. 

Grey Ayton. 

•' Badjeros. 

Bognor. ' 

" Chatsworth. 

" Clarksburg.^ 

" Dromore. 

" Durham. 

Dundalk. 

" Fleeherton. 

Holland Centre. 

" HoUtein. 

•' Kemble. 

Efanover. 

" Lake Charles. 

Markdale. 

" Meaford. 

" Maxwell and Feversham. 

" Owen Sound. 

" .....Priceville. 

Shallow Lake. 

" Singhampton. 

" Thornbury. 

Hiliburton Haliburton. 

" Minden. 

Haldimand Ciiledonia . 

Canfield. 

" Cayuga. 

" Cheapside. 

" Dufferin (Clanbrassil P.O.) 

" Dunnville. 

" Hageraville. 

" Jarvis. 

" Nanticoke. 

Victoria (Caledonia P.O.) 

" York. 

Hahon Acton. 

" Burlington. 

" Georgetown. 

" Milton. 

" Oakville. 

3«*ing8 Bancroft. 

" Belleville. 

" Deseronto. 

" Frankford. 

Madoc. 

" Marlbank. 

" Stirling. 

" Trenton. 

„ " Tweed. 

Soron Auburn. 

" »...Brucefield. 

" Blyth. 



Huron Brussels. 

" Clinton. 

** Dungannon. 

•' Ethel. 

" ..X Exeter. 

" Fordnich. 

" Goderich. 

** Gorrie. 

'' Hensall. 

** Molesworth. 

" Seaforfh. 

'* St. Helen's. 

" .Walton. 

" Wingham. 

" ,...Wroxeter. 

Kent Blenheim. 

'* Bothwell.* 

" Chatham. 

" Dresden. 

'* Duart. 

*' Highgate. 

" Tilbury. 

" Ridgetown. 

'* Romney. 

" Thamesville. 

'* Wallaceburg. 

'* Wheatley. 

Lambton Arkona . 

" Aberarder. 

** Alvinston. 

" Brigden. 

" .....Bunyan. 

" ."...Copleeton. 

'* Forest. 

" Inwood. 

" ....Oil Springs. 

" Petrolea. 

** Point Edward. 

" Sarnia. 

" Thedford. 

" Watford. 

" Wyoming. 

Lanark Allan's Mills. 

" Almonte. 

" .....;... Carleton Place. 

** Dalhousie. 

Elphin. 

*' "....Lanark. 

" Maberley. 

'» • ....Middleville. 

** Pakenham. 

" Perth. 

" Poland. 

" Smith's Palls. 

** Watson's Corners. 

Leeds Addison. 

" Athens. 

" Brockville. 

" Elgin. 

** Gananoque. 

" Mallorytown. 

" Newboro'. 



134 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Free and Public LTBRKSJEB.-^ontinued. 



Counties and 
Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 



Counties and 
Districts. Cities, Towns and Village 



Leeds {Con.) ...Westport. 

Lennox Odessa. 

" .....Napanee. 

Lincoln '...Abingdon. 

" Beamsville. 

" Caistorville. 

*' '. Grantham (St. Catharines 

" Merritton. [P.O.) 

" Grimsby. 

" Niagara. 

" Smithville. 

" ...St. Catharines. 

Manitoulin Cockburn Island. 

*' Gore Bay. 

" Little Current. 

" Manitowaning. 

Middlesex Atlsa Craig. 

" ' Belmont. 

** Coldstream. 

'* Dorchester. 

" ...... GlenooS, 

" ...... Komoka. 

" London. 

*' Lucan. 

" Melbourne. 

Mt. Brydges. 

" Newbury. 

Parkhill. 

'' StratKrov. 

" ......Wardsviile. 

Muskoka Bracebridge. 

" Baxsville. 

*' Gravenhurst. 

" Huntsville. 

" Port Carling. 

" .....Severn Bri<^e. 

Ni-iseing Copper Cliff. 

'* Haileybury. 

'' Kerns (Milberta P.O.J 

'' North Bay. 

" Sturgeon Falls. 

" Thornloe. ^ 

Norfolk Bloomsburg. 

" Delhi. 

'' Port Dover. 

" Port Rowan. 

" .Simcoe. 

'' Waterford. 

North umberPd Brighton. 

" . . .Campbellford . 

" ...Cobourg. 

" ...Cold Springs. 

" ...Colborne. 

'' ...Fenella. 

'* ...Gore's Landing^. 

/' ...Warkworth. 

Ontario Beaverton. 

" ....Brooklin. 

" Brougham. 

" Cannington. 

" Claremont. 

" Oshawa. 



Ontario Pickering. 

** Port Perry. 

" Sunderland. 

" Uxbridge. 

" Whitby. 

" ...*.. ...Zephyr. 

Oxford Beach ville. 

" Drumbo. 

" ,...Embro. 

" '...Harrington. 

'* Ingersoll. 

*' Kintore. 

'* ....; Plattsville. 

'* Norwich. 

" Otterville. 

" .^Princeton. 

'* Tavistock. 

" Tillsonburg. 

** Thamesford. 

" Woodstock. 

Parry Sound... Bur k*s Falls. 
" ...Callender. 

" ...Depot Harbor. 

'' ...Emfidale. 

" ...Kearney. 

" ...Parry Sound. 

" ...Powassan. 

*' ...RoBseau. 

" ...South River. 

" ...Sprucedale. 

*' ...Sundridge. 

" ...Trojut Creek. 

Peel Alton. 

" Belfountain. 

" Bolton. 

" Brampton. 

" CAledon. 

" Cheltenham. 

" Claude. 

" Forks of the Credit. 

** Inglewood. 

" Lorne Park. 

" Mono Road. 

" Mono Mills. 

'* Port Credit. 

" StreetsviUe. 

Perth Atwood. 

" Listowel. 

" Milverton. 

" Monkton. 

. '' Mitchell. 

** ...Shakespeare. 

" St. Mary's. 

" Stratford. 

Peterborough ..Hastings. 

" ...Havelock. 

...Lakefield. 

** ...Norwood. 

" ...Peterborough. 

Prescott Hawkesburv. 

" Vankleek Hill. 

Prince Edward Bloomfield. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



135 



Frbb and Public Libbasies. — Continued. 



Counties and 
Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 



Prince Edward Picton. 
Rainy RiTcr. . . . Dry den . 

" ...Fort FrancM. 

Renfrew Admaston. 

" Arnprior. 

" Bimnfltown. 

" Cobden. 

" Douglas. 

" Forester's Falls. 

" Pembroke. 

' Renfrew. 

" White Lake. 

Russell Russell. 

" Vars. 

Stonnont Avonmore. 

" Bemrick. 

" Cornwall. 

" Crysler. 

Finch. 

" Moose Creek. 

" Newington. 

Wales. 

SijDcoe .-..AUiston. 

" Angus. 

" Barrie. 

" Beeton. 

" Bradford. 

" ....Coldwater. 

v-Collingwood. 

" Cookstown. 

" Creemore. 

Elmvale. 

•' HUlsdale. 

" Lefroy. 

" ......Midland. 

' OriUia. 

" Penetangnishene. 

Stayner. 

.Sunnidale (New Lowell 



I Thornton. 

" Tottenham. 

' «*ori8 Bobcaygeon . 

" Cambray. 

" Fenelon Falls. 

Kinmount. 

[[ Kirkfield. 

" Little Britain. 

Lindsay. 

;; Manilla. 

I] Norland. 

I' Oakwood. 

Omemee. 

'' Woodville. 

«iterloo Ayr. 

....Baden. 

" Berlin. 

Elmira. 

" Floradale. 

;; .....GaR. 

" ...Hawkesville. 

" Hespeler. 

Linwood. 



[P.O.) 



* Counties and 

Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 

Waterloo New Dundee. 

'* New Hamburg. 

" Preston. 

" Waterloo. 

'* Wellesley. 

Welland Bridgeburg. 

Fonthill. 

" Fort Erie. 

*' Niagara Falls. 

" Niagara Falb. South. 

*' Port Colborne. 

" Ridgeway. 

Tho.rold. 

Welland. 

Wellington Alma. 

Arthur. 

" BelfTOod. 

" CliflFord. 

" Drayton. 

" Elora. 

" Erin. 

*» Ennotville. 

** Fergus. 

" Glen AUap. 

" Quelph. 

" Harriston. 

♦' ...... ^illsburg. 

" Morriston. 

' " Mount Forest. 

*' Palmerston. 

'* Rockwood. 

" Speedside. 

Wentworth Ancaster . 

" Binbrook. 

*' Dundas. 

'* Freelton. 

" Hamilton. 

" Mill Grove. 

" Lynden. 

" Saltfleet (Stony Creek 

'* Waterdown. ' [P.O.) 

York Aurora. 

" Braoondale. 

** Deer Park. 

** Don. 

*' East Toronto. 

" Highland Creek. 

'* Islington. 

'^ Keswick. 

'* King. 

" Maple. 

" Markham. 

'' Mount Albert. 

'* Newmarket. 

" Queensville. 

" Richmond Hill. 

" Scarboro'. 

" Schomberg. 

'* Stoufifville. 

'^ Thornhill. 

'* Toronto. 

" Toronto Junction. 



138 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Frkb and Pvblio LwRAKaa.— Concluded. 



Counties and 
Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 


Counties and 
Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 


York (jOon.) Unionville. 

** Vandorf. 


York Weston. 

" Woodbridge. 



The above list may be classified as fol- 
lows : — 

Public Libraries reporting 264 

Free Libraries reporting 133 

Public Libraries not reporting 74 

Free Libraries not reporting 14 



Public Libraries incorporated since 
1st December, 1904 



8 



Totals 493 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 137 



I. PUBLIC LIBRARIES (NOT FREE). 

The following extracts are taken from the annual reports for the year 
ending 31st December, 1904. (For details see Table A). 

1. Classification of Public Libraries Reporting. 

Public Libraries with reading rooms 90 

Public Libraries without reading rooms 174 

Total 264 

2. Public Libraries — Receipts and Balances on Hand. 

The total receipts of 264 Public Libraries was f 67,685 66 

Balances on hand 6,434 75 

3. Public Libraries — Expenditure. 

The total expenditure of 264 Public Libraries was |51,250 91 

4. Public Libraries — ^Assets and Liabilities. 



of 264 Public Libraries |389,244 95 

Liabilities of 264 Public Libraries 9,179 95 

5. Number of Members in Public Libraries. 

264 Public Libraries have 32,303 members. 

6. No. of Volumes in Public Libraries and No. of Volumes Issued. 

Number of volumes in 264 Libraries 504,963 

Xumber of volumes issued in 264 Libraries 757,191 

7. Reading Rooms in Public Libraries. 

90 Public Libraries reported having reading rooms. 

KLibiaries reported having periodicals for circulation. 

105 Libraries subscribed for 2,108 newspapers and periodicals. 



138 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 1 



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146 THE REPORT OF THE No. 1{ 



II. PUBLIC LIBRAEIES, FEEE. 

The following extracts are taken from the annual reports for the yea 
ending 31st ijecember, 1904. (For details see Table B). 

1. Classification of Free Libraries Reporting . 

Free Libraries, with reading rooms 90 

Free Libraries, without reading rooms 43 

Total : • 133 

2. Jbree Libraries — Receipts and Balances on Hand. 

The total receipts of 133 Free Libraries was |162,075 11 

Balances on hand 8,490 05 

3. Free Libraries — Expenditure. 

The total expenditure of 133 Free Libraries was f 153,585 06 

4. Free Libraries — Assets and Liabilities. 

Assets of 133 Free Libraries |l,005,2ir 66 

Liabilities of 133 Free Libraries 104,744 OT 

5. Number of Readers in Free Libraries. 
133 Free Libraries report having had 147,182 readers. 

6. No. of Volumes in Free Libraries, and No. of Volumes Issued. 

Number of volumes in 133 Free Libraries 648,815 

Number of volumes issued in 133 Free Libraries 1,750,042 

7. Heading Rooms in Free Libraries. 

90 Free Libraries reported having reading rooms. 

92 Free Libraries subscribed for 3,848 newspapers and periodicals. 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



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1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 151 



Phopoetionate Ntjmbee of Volumes in Public Libraeies. 

Libraries with less than 250 VoluTnes, 
Bloomsburg, Glen Cross, Speedside, Walkerville. 

Libraries with over 250 and less than 500 Volumes, 

Abingdon, Caistorville, Callander, Chepstow, Cockbum Island, Depot 
Harbor, Elphin, Gouriais Bay, Haileybnry, Harrowsmith, Hawkesbury, 
Honeywood, Inwood, Komoka, Lefroy, Maberley, Matilda (Iroquois P.0.)> 
5ewboro', Jt'akenLam, Pelee Island, Price ville, Victoria Mines, Westport, 
Wolfe Island. 

Libraries with over 500 and less than 1,000 Volumes, 

Allan's Mills, Ancaster, Ayton, Bayham, Beachville, Bracondale, Brig- 
den, Bmcefield, Bunyan, Bumstown, Canfield, Cobden, Dalhousie (McDon- 
iii'E CorneiB P.O.), Dromore, Dryden, East Toronto, Elgin, Elmwood, Fen- 
ella, Forester's Falls, Glamis, Gore's Landing, Haliburton, Hanover, Har- 
nnirton, Hawkesville, Hillsdale, Holstein, Jasper. Maple, Marlbank, Marks- 
Tille, Metcalfe, Middleville, Millgrove, Molesworth, Mount Albert, New 
Durham, New Dundee, Newington, Norland, Otterville, Port Burwell, Port 
Dover, Biversdale, Severn Bridge, Smithville, South River, Spencerville, 
Srirling, Suimidale (New Lowell P.O.), Sydenham, Thomhill, Thomloe 
(New Liskeard P.O.), TJnionville, Vienna, White Lake, Winchester, Tar- 
ter, York. 

Libraries with over 1,000 and less than 1,500 Volumes. 

Admaston, Auburn, Avonmore, Beaverton, Bridgeburg, Cambray, Carp, 
Ckrkaburg, Copleston, Creemore, Don, Dorchester, Douglas, Drumbo, Eas- 
toa's Clomers, Emsdale, Ethel, Fort Frances, Glen Allan, Harrow, Hep- 
▼orth, Eemble, Lakefield, Lynden, Mallorytown, Melandthon, Melbourne, 
ilinden, Mississippi, Monkton, Morriston, Odessa, Omemee, Orono, Oxford 
ilills, Petrolea, Plattsville, Port Carling, Port Stanley, Richmond, Ridge- 
^ay, Rodney, Saltfleet (Stony Creek P.O.), Scotland, Shedden, Thornbury, 
Vankleek Hill, Wales, Walton, Wardsville, Warkworth, Waterdown, 
Zephyr. 

Libraries with over 1,500 and less than 2,000 Volumes, 

Alma, Alvinston, Athens, Atwood, Belwood, Bervie, Blyth, Caledonia, 
< amden East, Cayuga, Chapleau, Cheapside, Chesterville, Colborne, Cold- 
^iream, Coldwater, Comber, Cookstown, Delhi, Dresden, Dungannon, Dut- 
lon, Elmvale, Hensall, Highland Creek, Islington, Kemptville, Kingsville, 
Kinmount, Lanark, Leamington, Little Current, Madoc, Manotict, North 
power, Norwich, ' Oakwood, Pickering, Pinkerton, Port Credit, Port Col- 
CTjnie, Princeton, Ripley, Rockwood, Russell, Schreiber, Shakespeare, 
^prini^dd, Stayner, St. Helen's, Sunderland, Thamesford, Tilbury, Til- 
Wry East (Valetta P.O.), Wellesley, Westford, Wheatley, Williamstown, 
Woodbridge, Wyoming. 

Libraries with over 2,000 and less than 2,500 Volumes, 

Acton, Ailsa Craig, Alliston, Arkona, Beamsville, Belfountain, Bob- 
<^aygeon, Bolton, Bothwell, Bracebridge, Bradford, Brooklin, Burford, Burk's 



152 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Falls, Canningion, Cargill, Chesley, Erin, Floradale, Glenmorris, Grantham 
(St. Catharines P,.0.), Hagersville, Iroquois, Lake Charles, Little Britain, 
Lncan, Merritton, Mildmay, MiUbrook, Milverton, Nanticoke, Newburgh, 
Newmarket, North Bay, Norwood, Palmerston, Parkhill, Parry Sound, Pem- 
broke, Port Perry, Port Rowan, Shelbume, Sparta, Tara, Thedford, Thessa- 
Ion, Tiverton, Tottenham, Trenton, Wallaoeburg, Woodville. 

L/ibraries with over 2,500 and less than 3,000 Volumes.' 

Amprior, Aurora, Burlington, Chatsworth, Claremont, Claude, Dunn- 
ville, Glenfcoe, Elmira, Essex, Fonthill, Fort Erie, Georgetown, Grand Valley,. 
Gravenhurst, Kirk£eld, Lucknow, Markdale, Manilla, Meaiord, Midland, 
Mono Eoad, Morrisburgh, New Hamburg, Port Arthur, Romney, Sault Ste. 
Marie, Streetsville, Tillsonburg, Underwood, Victoria (Caledonia P.O.), 
Watford. 

Libraries with over 3,000 and less than 3,500 Volumes. 

Aberarder, Amherstburg, Arthur, Ayr, Bowmanville, Brighton, Brus- 
sels, Deseronto, Drayton, Ennotville, Huntsville, Jarvis, Lancaster, 
Listowel, Markham, Merrickville, Mount Forest, Picton, Point Edward, 
Port Elgin, Richmond Hill, Walkerton, Weston,* Whitby. 

Libraries with over 3,500 and less than 4,000 Volumes. 

Almonte, Blenheim, Caledon, Clifford, Cobourg, Cornwall, Durham, 
Fenelon Falls, Forest, Gananoque, Hespeler, Lindsay, Milton, Oakville, Or- 
angeville. Rat Portage (Kenora P.O.), Renfrew, Ridgetown, Smith's Falla, 
Tavistock, Teeswater, Thamesville, Toronto Junction, Welland, Wiarton! 
Wingham. 

Libraries with over 4,000 and less than 5,000 Volu/mes. 

Alton, Aylmer, Barrie, Brampton. Cardinal, Campbellford, Carleton Place, 
Clinton, Exeter, Goderich, Grimsby, Harriston, Ingersoll, Kincardine^ 
Mitchell, Napanee, Orillia, Os'hawa, Paisley, Port Hope, Samia, Seafortb^ 
Southampton, St. George, Stouffville, St. Mary's, Wroxeter. 

Libraries with over 5,000 and less titan 6,000 Volumes. 

Belleville, Collingwood, Em.bro, Fergus, Garden Island, Kingston, Owen 
Sound, Penetanguishene, Prescott, Scarboro', Simcoe, Thorold. 

Libraries with over 6,000 and less than 8,000 Volumes. 

Berlin, Chatham, Dundas, Gait, Niagara, Niagara Falls, Paris, Preston,. 
Stratford, Strathroy, Uxbridge, Waterloo, Woodstock. 

Libraries with over 8,000 and less than 10,000 Volumes. 

Flora, St. Catharines, St. Thomas. 

Libraries with over 10,000 and less than 20,000 Volumes. 

Brantford, Brockville, Guelph, London, Peterborough, Windsor. 

Libraries with over 20,000 and less than 30,000 Volumes. 

Hamilton. 

Library with over 100,000 Volum,es. 
Toronto. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 163 



Ontario Society of Artists, 

The tkirty-third Annual Report of the Society gives the following facts : — 

The thirty-second Annual Exhibition was opened February 19th, 1904, 
by Hifl Honour the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. The Exhibition con- 
tained 238 works in all, of which 130 were oils, 96 water colors and the 
remaining 12 were in the classes of sculpture and design. 

The two pictures selected by the Society at the Annual Meeting, in 
accordance with the annual grant of fSOO.OO from the Provincial Govern- 
ment, were as follows : — 

**Coming Storm." J.'W. Beatty. fttOO.OO. 

"The Day is Done." F. M. Bell-Smith. $100.00. 

The pictures selected by the Guild of Civic Art from the thirty-second 
Exhibition, and which were chosen by them to complete the spending of the 
GoTemment Grant for this purpose, were as follows : — 

"October.'' W. E. Atkinson. 

"Newfoundland Stream." W, Smith. 

"Bretonne." George Chavignaud. 

"Sunset Glow." F. H. Brigden. 

The Provincial Art Gallery at the Normal School was re-hung. An 
Eilibition of the Society of Arts and Crafts was held in the Art Gallery. The 
Canadian Catholic Union held an Exhibition of religious pictures in the same 
rlace. The Architectural Eighteen Club also held an Exhibition. 

The management of the Canadian National Exhibition was placed in 
lie hands of the Society ; the exhibit contained 141 oils, 64 water colors and 
25 other works of Art. 

The Central Ontario School of Art, which is affiliated with the Society, 
i carrying on its work, but the City and Government support is inedaquate. 

The Evening Life Class meets regularly twice a week and the average 
attendance is good. 

LITEEART AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 
1. Hamilton ScientifiQ Association, 

The Association consists of a General Association and four branch 
anions, namely. Biological, Geological, Astronomical and Photographical. 

During the year the Executive Council held ten meetings at which the 
principal papers read were : — 

Eclipses. Prof. De Lury. 

Chemistry applied to Industry. C. B. Fox, B. A. 

Probable Course of Evolution in Plants (illustrated). J. B. Turner, M. A. 

The Conquest of Wild Canada (illustrated). Prof. S. P. Coleman, M. A 

Pompeii. Prof. G. W. Johnston, B. A. 

Formation of Coal Beds and Life of Coal Forming Age (illustrated). W 
A. Parks, Ph. D. » « v / ^ 

Origin of Banking in England. Stuart Strathy. 

The Association reports a large increase in membership, and its financial 
position is improving. 

The Astronomical Section reports 15 meetings; and two of its officers 
^ere selected by the Dominion Govenlment to take part in the ''Eclipse'' 
«pedition to Labrador. 

The Biological Section has been very successful, some of its members 
Having discovered several plants. 



154 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The Geological Section has been enriched by the addition of several 
valuable speoimens euid collections. 

Several additions have been made to the Museum. The Camera Club 
forwarded a complete set of plates to the American Lantern Slide Interchange. 

2. The Ottawa Literary and Scientific Society, 

The membership of the Society shows a slight decrease, but the receipts 
from members' fees increased by $50.00. A donation of |200.00 was received 
from Mr. John Manuel, one of the Life Members. Nearly 250 volumes were 
added to the Library by purchase and gift. The issues of books aod maga- 
zines were : — 

Books and bound Magazines, 3,910. 

Unbound Magazines, 1,325. 

The Lecture Course was highly successful and the attendance larger than 
in former years. 

The programme was as follows : — 

Inaugural Address. 

Elements of Strength and Weakness in the Modem State. The President 
W. D. LeSueur. 

Some British Political Leaders. Sir Louis Davies, K. C. M. G. 

The South Seas (illustrated). Dr. Otto Klotz. 

Prehistoric Man (illustrated). Prof. A. B, Macallum, Ph. D. 

Songs of the Old Regime. G. A. S. Gillespie. 

The Egyptian Campaign of 1882, as seen by a Young Canadian (illus- 
trated). Major C. F. Winter. 

Photography in Natural Colours (illustrated) . J. S. Plaskett, B. A. 

Some Words about Food. A. McGill, B. A. 

Whaling Industries. Prof. E. E. Prince, F. R. S. C. 

A New Method of Distributing Acetylene. E. A. LeSueur, B. Sc. 

3. Ulnstitut CanoMen-Francais D'Ottawa. 

This Institute was founded in 1852. It is the only French Literary 
Society assisted by the Ontario Government. Unfortunately a recent fire 
crippled it financially and impeded its work. 

Since the disaster the Quebec Government made a grant of |100, ancj 
also donated some valuable books. A promise of books from the French Gov- 
ernment has also been made. Aided by the Insurance, |1,952, repairs have 
been made, new furniture secured and a piano purchased. The .reading room 
is now supplied with 22 French and English papei^ and the Library is being 
gradually replaced. 

During the winter months the Institute went to considerable expense in 
securing popular lecturers from a distance. The attendance at these enter- 
tainments was large and the programme included several literary treats of 
the highest order. 

4. St, Patrick's Literary and Scientific Association, 

The number of members in thig Association decreased during the year. 
The Report of the Librarian shows that only 406 books have been issued. 

A series of free lectures were given in Association Hall. The Programme 
was as follows : — 

The Formation of Mountains. Dr. Daly. 

Social Settlements. W. McKenzie King. 



"'^T 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 155 



Industrial Conditions. Samuel Gompers. 
Gaelic Literature. Dr. O'Boyle. 
John Philpot Curran. E. P. Gleeson, B. A. 
^ English Literautre. Martin GrifSn. 
The Land Settlement Question. D'Arcy Scott. 
Biblical Exegetics. Dr. Van Beeelaer. 

5. TTie Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club. 

The Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club reports a membership of 265,, of 
which 29 new members were added during the past year. . 

The programme of winter soirees included : — 

Address. J. F. White. 

Short Popular Talker on the following subjects : — 

Mammals. Messrs. Prince, Low, J. M. Macoun and Ballantyne. 

Geology. Messrs. Ellis, Ami, Chalmers, Dowling and Keele. 

Entomology. Messrs. Fletcher, Harrington, Gibson and Young. 

Zoology. Messrs. Prince, John Macoun, Halkett and Odell. 

Ornithology. Messrs. Kingston, E. F. G. White, Eifrig and W. T. 
ilacoun. 

Prograawme for the Annual Meeting, 

Ferns of tbe Ottawa District. T. E. Clarke. 

Botany. Messrs. Sinclair, John Macoun, Fletcher, Campbell and 
Attwood. 

Report of Botanical Branch. 

Excui^sions. 

Sub-excursions were held in the early summer to Beechwood, Blueberry 
Point, Beaver Meadow and RockliflFe. 

Two general excursions were held during the season : one to Casselman, 
Ont., the other to Chelsea, Que. A feature of these trips was a short address 
on the work of the afternoon. 

Volume XVIII of the Ottawa Naturalist contains 227 pages, with five 
plates. The following are among the papers which appear in this volume : — 

The Canadian Species of Trocholites, Dr. J. F. Whiteaves. 

Warbler Songs and Notes. Rev. G. Eifrig. 

The Evening Grosbeak. Rev. C. J. Young. 

The Grasping Power of the Manus of Ornithomimus altus. L. M. Lambe. 

Some Canadian Antennarias. E. L. Greene. 

Relationship Between Weather and Plant Growth. Dr. C. Guillet. 

Nesting of Some Canadian Warblers. W. F. Kells. 

The White Pelican of Manotick. Dr. J. F. Whiteaves. 

On the Squamoso-parietal Crest of two Species of Homed Dinosarus from 
tlie Cretaceous of Alberta. L. M. Lambe. 

The Mountain Bluebird of Manitoba. N. Criddle. 

The Food Value of Certain Mushrooms. Prof. F. T. Shutt. 

New Brunswick Warblers. W. H. Moore. 

Description of a New Genus of Rugose Corals from the Silurian Rocks 
of Manitoba. J. F. Whiteaves. 

The Flora of the Peace River Region. J. M. Macoun. 

The British Association President's Address. Prof. E. E. Prince. 

Discovery of Eggs of the Solitary Sandpiper. Walter Raine. 



166 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Summer Warblers in Compton. L. M. Terrill. 

Th« Winter Fringillidae of New Brunswick. W. H. Moore. 

Landslide on the Lievre River. Dr. A. E. Barlow. 

Canine Intelligence. Sir James Grant. 

New British Columbia Rosaceae. E. L. Greene. • 

Some of the Rarer Plants of Wellington County. A. B. Klugh. 

The valuable series of Nature Study articles, edited by Dr. James 
Fletcher, have been distributed among teachers throughout Canada. This 
work of the highest importance, aa Nature Study is deservedly receiving 
increased attention in the Public Schools. 

The Geological, Ornithological, Botanical, Entomological and Zoological 
Branches report a most successful year. 

6. The Scientific Society of the University of Ottcuwa. 

Owing to the destruction of the University of Ottawa by fire, this Society 
not only lost a very valuable library and many scientific appliances, but also 
rooms in which to conduct investigations. In consequence the members 
decided to attend the meetings of the Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club in the 
Normal School Reception Hall, until such time as the University should be 
rebuilt. 

During the year the Society expended for scientific books $130.00, and 
a small sum for photographic supplies. 

7. The Royal Agronomical Society of Canada. 

During the year there were 24 meetings of the Society. The papers and 
lectures were as follows : — 

(1) Astronomy and Physics of 1903. President's Address. 

(2) The Beginnings of Astronomy. Prof. A. Baker. M.A. 

(3) Electricity and Magnetism. Dr. C. I. Kelly. 

(4) Astronomical Chalk Talk. John A. Paterson, M. A., K. C. 

(5) The Sun-dial and its Lessons. J. E. Maybee, M. E. 

(6) The Work of Newton. Prof, A. T. DeLury, M. A. 

(7) The Sequel to Newton's Discoveries. Prof. A. T. DeLury, M. A. 

(8) Speculations on the Evolution of Solar and other Stellar Systems. 
Prof. A. T. DeLury, M. A., • . 

(9) The Relation of Philosophy to Ancient and Modern .Theories of 
Cosmogony. Prof. J. Watson, M. A., LL. D. 

(10) The Planetesimal Hypothesis. Prof. A. P. Coleman, Ph. D. 

(11) Stellar Motions. A. F. Miller. 

(12) Man's Place in the Universe. J. R. Collins. 

(13) Solar Activity. Prof. Louis Leon. 

(14) The Paris Lunar Photographs. D. J. Howell. 

(15) Some late results in Astrophysical Research. W. B. Musson. 

(16) An Evening at the Observatory. 

(17) Review of Summer's Work. 

(18) The Shelbume Meteorites. Prof. DeLury and Prof. Walker. 

(19) Review of some recent Observations of the surface markings of Mars 
and other Planets. J. R. Collins. 

(20) The Diffraction Spectrum, with Experiments. C. A. Chant. 

(21) Eclipses. Prof. DeLury. 

(22) Biographical Sketches. Miss E. A. Dent. 

(23) Recent Lunar Photography. D. J. Howell. 

(24 Some recent Experiments with Reflected Light. C. A. Chant. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 167 



8. The Canadian Section df the Society of Chemical Industry. 

At the second Annual Meeting, held in Toronto, March 25th, 1904, the 
chairman stated that the session had been one pf unusual interest, as, for the 
first time, meetings had been held in Montreal and Ottawa. He also pointed 
out that full success could only be realized by holding meetings in different 
parte of the Dominion. 

During 1904 the following papers were read and discussed: — 

The Sugar Beet in Canada. Frank T. Shutt, M. A., F. R. S. C. 

The Softening of Hard Waters for Purposes of Boiler Supply. A. 
McGiU, B. A. Sec., F. E. S. C. 

A Note on the Fractional Condensation of Air, with a View to the Com- 
mercial Production of Oxygen. E. A. Leseur, B. A. Sec. 

Experimental Investigation of Certain Problems in Water Treatment. 
A. McGiU, B. A. Sec. 

Decomposition of Benzine at High Temperatures. G. W. McKee. 

The Section reports a list of 114 members. 



9. The Canadian Institute. , 

The fifty-sixth Annual Report of the Institute shows that twenty-two 
meeting were held during Session. 

Twenty-four papers were read as follows : — 

Science and English Law. The President. 

Recent Work in Immunity. Prof. Mackenzie. 

Principles of Insurance. Arthur Harvey. 

Causes of Indian Famines. Bey. J. T. Sunderland. 

Chemical Industries of Canada. Prof. Lang. 

Medical Inspection of Schools. Dr. Hodgetts. 

Forestry Problems in Canada. Dr. Clark. 

Old Testament Science. Dr. McCurdy. 

Finsen, His Life and Work. Dr. Dickson. 

Architecture of China, Corea and Japan. H. B. Gordon. 

Iroquois Beaeh. Prof. Coleman. 

Scope and Methods of Sociology.. W. Houston. 

Dragon Flies. Dr. E. M. Walker. 

Pan-Islamism. Dr. R. Davidson. 

Toleanic Origin of Petroleum. Eugene Coste, M. E. 

Civic Improvements. Q. P. Hynes. 

Silver and Cobalt Ores- of Tamiscaming. Prof. Miller. 

Folk-lore of the Hebrews. Prof. Murison. 

Food of. the Canadian Lumberman. Prof. Ellis. 

After Images. Dr. A. H. Abbott. 

The Novel as a Guide to Conduct. Prof. Keys. 

The Greology of Trinidad, fi. Lechmere Guppy. 

Absorption of Fat in the Intestine. G. E. Wilson. 

Meteorological Fore-casts. E. F. Stupart. 

The Librarian reports : — 

Donations to Library, 120. 

Periodicals and volumes loaned, 1,189. 

Exchanges received from 515 Societies, 2,347. 



158 THE REPORT OF THE No. 1^ 



10. Wellington Field Naturalists' Club. 

This Club reports that meetings have been held regularly throughout the 
year. On an average two papers have been read and discussed each even- 
ing. 

Among the most important papers were the following : — 

Some Fishes of the Eiver Speed. T. Barlow. 

The Genus Aster in Wellington County. A. B. Klugh. 

The Canada Porcupine. W. H. Muldrew. 

The Frogs of Wellington County. T. G. Jarvis. 

The Short-tailed Field Mouse. A. A. Davidson. 

The Conifers of Wellington County. T. J. Moore. 

Specialization in the Study of Natural History. A. B. Klugh. 

Observations on some Mammals. S. Beattie. 

Some Mosses of the vicinity of Guelph. V. W. Jackson. 
I Botanical Observations in the Mid-winter. E. J. Colgate. 

The Genus Solidago'in South-Central Ontario. W, Herriot. 

The Star-noaed Mole. A. A. Davidson. 

The Sequence of Plumages and Moults of the Black-throated Green 
Warbler. A. B. Klugh. 

The Mammalia of Northern Wellington County. Allan Brooks. 

Several excursions were held in which valuable field-work was done. 

HISTORICAL SOCIETIES. 
1. Ehsex Historical Society, 

This Society was paid a grant of $100.00. ^The formal organization of 
the Society was completed January 19th, 1905. At subsequent meetings held 
the following papers were read : — 

The Early History of Essex County. Francis Cleary. 

Various papers on loeal subjects. Miss Kilroy, Miss Barr and Mr. F. 
Cleary. 

The Ontario Historical Society met at Windsor, and its members were 
entertained by the local Society. During the meeting a trip was arranged to 
Amherstburg, where the citizens of that historic town gave the guests a cordial 
welcome. 

The membership of the Society numbers 91, and the private contribu- 
tions, up to July 11th, amounted to $85.00. 

2. London and Middlesex Historical Society, 

This Society was paid a special grant of $100.00, and reports that eight 
regular monthly meetings were held during the year. 

Valuable facts relating to pioneer life were collected and arranged, 
prizes having been offered through the Public Schools for such material. 

The following pioneer papers were read : — 

Col. Talbot by Judge Hughes. 

The Settlement of Lobo. J. D. and Dr. CI. T. Campbell. 

Duncan McKenzie. Mrs. Ohan. 

Reminiscences of Richard Stevens. Mr. McQueen. 

Early Militia of Canada. Mr. McQueen. 

Recollections of William Percival. Miss Burgess. 

Laura Secord. Dr. Wolverton. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 159 



History of Union Jack. Miss Priddis. 
Settlement of Canada's Boundaries. Mr. McVicar. 
Addresses were delivered as follows : — 
Relics of Early Days. Mr. Matheson, of Lucan. 
Work of tlie Archivist. Mr. Fraser, Toronto. 
Aboriginal Characteristics. David Boyle, Toronto. 
Gifts of books and geological specimens were secured through Mr. C. F. 
Colwell, Ottawa. 

3. Lundy^s Lane Historical Society, 

This Society received a grant of |200.00. 

The historian of the Society, Lieut.-Col. Cruikshank, issued part IV of 
LiaTaluable "Documentary History of the Campaign on the Niagara Frontier 
in 1812-14.'' This volume embraces the battles of Stoney Creek, Beechwoods, 
or Beaver Dams, and Black Rock. It also contains a valuable map. A 
?eroiid edition of Queenston Heights was also published. Through the exer- 
tions of the Society a handsome granite monument has been erected by the 
Government of Canada on the Battle Grounds at Fort Erie. A full inscrip- 
Tion has been prepared by the historian of the Society, ^ich will be made 
m two bronze tablets, and placed 6n the shaft. The Soceity has devoted 
special attention to the collection and publication of historical documents. 
Lient.-Col. E. Crookshank is the author of the following: — 

The Battle of Lundy's Lane. 

The Battle of Queenston Heights. 

The Fight in the Beechwoods. 

The Story of Butler's Rangers. 

Dnunmond's Winter Campaign. 

The Documentary History of the Campaign on the Niagara Frontier, 
ni IT parts. 

The following works, published by the Society, are also in print. 

The Story of Laura Secord. Mrs. S. A. Curzon. 

Memento of the Unveiling of the Monument on Lundy's Lane. W. 
Kirby. 

the Annals of Niagara. W. Kirby. 

Niagara 100 Years Ago. Miss Camochan. 

A Century Studv. Rev. E. J. Fessenden. ' 

Brief Account of Battle Lundy's Lane. Sir R. H. Bonnycastle. 

Accounts of re-interments of remains of soldiers of 1812, found in 1891 
and 1893, with addresses on each occasion. 

4. Niagara Historical Society. 

A grant of |100.00 was given this Society. A second edition of The 
Taking of Fort George, was issued and a new publication, Reminiscences of 
Sii^ra, printed and distributed. 

During the year the following papers were read : — 

An Historic House. Janet Camochan. 

Extracts from Early Travellers in Niagara. Janet Camochan. 

P. E. Loyalists. Rev. A. Sherk. 

Several valuable contributions were received, including : — 

Michigan Historical Society, 27 vols. 

Documents from the Dominion Archives, Ottawa. 

Hevolving case for photographs. Hon. Richard Harcourt. 

Old Flags, Lincoln Militia. 

Scrap Book, Manuscripts, etc. Mrs. Thompson, Toronto. 



160 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



5. The Ontario Historical Society, 

The Ontario Historical Society continues to exercise a wholesome in- 
fluence by way of fostering the establishnieQ.t of Local Societies, of which 
there are now twenty-eight. With two exceptions all these are affiliated 
with the Provincial Society. The last to organize was that of Thamesville, 
and is known as the Tecumseh Historical Society. 

One of the most active local societies is that of Niagar^i-on-the-Lake, if 
we may judge from the amount of valuable printed matter published. 

In mai^y cases the local societies have been the means of collecting and 
preserving written and printed material which would otherwise have been 
lost, and in consequence matters of local history are no longer regarded as 
being of little account. There are numerous private collectors who have 
acquired material of much local or general interest. As it is extremely 
desirable that material of this kind should be preserved, the Ontario His- 
torical Society will gladly pay the cost of transmission on anything that may 
be forwarded to it, either by post or express, which may have any bearing 
on local or Provincial History. 

< The last Annual Meeting was held at Niagara-on-the-Lake, and was 
well attended by most of the County and City organizations. It is not im- 
probable that the next Annual Meeting will be held at CoUingwood, where the 
Huron Institute has been lately organized. 

6. The Women's Canadian Historical Society of Toronto, 

This Society received a grant of $100.00. Nine meetings of the Execu- 
tive Council and six regular meetings were held. At the latter the following 
papers were read: — 

Fiscal Reform as relating to Canada. By Mrs. H. C. Osborne. 

A Chapter on Acadia. Lady Edgar. 

Early Travellens in Upper Canada. M. Agnes FitzGibbon. 

The French Royalists of the Oak Ridges. Miss Teefy. 

Chateau Papineau. Miss Sara Mickle. 

Quaker Settlements in Upper Canada. Miss Jean Graham. 

The Development of Canadian Art, Divided into two papers, the second 
being illustrated by a volume of original water color drawings by the late 
Mrs. Jamieson, loaned by Mrs. James Bain. By Mrs. Wellesley Holmsted. 

Canadian Wild Flowers. Mrs. Agnes FitzGibbons (now Chamberlin). 

A Trip to Newfoundland. Miss Josephine MacCallum. 

Extracts from an Officer's Diary at Plattsburg. Original lent by Mrs. 
S. G. Wood. 

An open meeting was held in the hall of the Toronto Conservatory of 
Music, at which a paper on the late ''Hon. Joseph Howe; His Life and 
Work,*' was given by Mr. George Morang. 

Three hundred and fifty copies of Transaction No. IV have been printed 
and distributed. 

The following donations were received : — 

Report of the unveiling of the monument commemorating the first claim 
of Great Britain to the American Continent, from Mrs. Chamberlin. 

An old Log-Book of the vessel Snowflake, Commander, Sanderson Brown, 
1821, (with notes on the early settlement in Canada, Township of Georgina, 
by the commander), from Mrs. Seymour Corley. 

Life of Lord Elgin, by Sir John Bourinot, from Mr. Morang. 

Canadian Annual Review. J. C. Hopkins. 



m EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 161 



The Algonquin Manabozoho and Hiawatha. J. C. Hamilton. 

The History of Goat Island. Dickson Patterson. 

Sketdi of Island of Orleans. Dr. Bowen. 

Landing of the Popham Colony. Mrs. Chamberlin. 

Reprint of ^'Canada and the Treaty Making Power. Thomas Hodgins. 

Two pamphlets on the sites of Huron Villages in Simcoe County. A. F. 
Hunter. 

Miniature flag-staff (naval) from wood taken from hull of frigate Law- 
Mice, Six James Yeo's flag-ship, 1813. 

7. Women's Wentworth Historical Society. 

Government Grant, f 100.00. 

It received fifteen new members during the year. 

The indebtedness of the Society has been consideraby decreased. 

in anniversary tea was held at the battlefield (Stoney Creek) October 
:^fld, 1904, at which His Honour Lieutenant-Governor Clark and Mrs. Clark 
T^re present. 

8. Wentworth Historical Society. 

Government grant, f 100. 00. 

It published Vol. IV, Journals and Transactions of the Society, con- 
'iim^ nineteen valuable illustrations. 

Mr. H. H. Robertson, the First Vice-President, collected data regarding 
ii ^vemment building, which once stood on Burlington Beach, called the 
King's Inn, and burned by the United States forces in 1813. 

Mrs. John Rose Holden gathered many interesting incidents and facts 
gjrding Joseph Brant, the Brant Tract and Brant House. 

The following papers were read and published : — 

An Imperial Preference. Justus A. Griffin. 

The Brant Family. Mrs. John Rose Holden. 

First Agriculture Society in Wentworth. H. H. Robertson. 

Gore District Militia, and the Militia of West Lincoln and West York. 
? H. Robertson. 

The Geonre Hamilton Burial Plot. Agnes Hamilton Lemon. 

Historical Comment on the Origin and Development of some of the Laws 
• ' ^Ltario. Charles Lemon. 

Militia Rolls of 1812. Justus A. Griffin. 



11 E. 



162 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX I.— REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN OF THE EDUCATION 

DEPARTMENT. 

To the Hon. R. A. Pynb, M.D., M.P.P., 

Minister of Education for the Province of Ontario : 

I Lave tlie honour to submit herewith the report on the Library of the 
Education Department for the year 1905. 

In the following table a record is given of the number of books loaned 
during the years 1896-1905 to the students of the Normal and Model Schools, 
and to the teachers and other persons. 

The books are not loaned for a longer period than two weeks except 
in special cases. 

Comparing the number of books loaned in 1905 with those loaned in 
1904 there is a decrease of 800. In explanation of this difference I beg to 
state that owing to the longer term of the Normal School the students have 
more spare hours for study, and in preference to taking books home they 
study and make notes from them in the Library. Much more of this work 
might be done greatly to the comfort of the students if, in some way, pro- 
vision could be made for a reading or study room in connection with the 
Library. 

The students and other users of the Library are to be commended for 
their careful handling of the books. It is self-evident that the books that 
are in disrepair are in that condition through long continued use rather than 
from indifferent usage. 



Books given out in 
thejnonth of — 




January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

Septemlx^r 

October 

November 

December 



Totals 8,680| 



Year. 

1896.. 
1897.. 
1898.. 
1899.. 
1900.. 
1901.. 
1902.. 
1903.. 
1904.. 
1905.. 



Number and Subjects of the Books Purchas'ed in the 

Volumes. 

495 

476 

533 

.315 

275 

164 

304 

218 



409 
486 



8,3V>H 7,5;0S 6,iMH 



Years 1896-190:); 
Subjects. 



Education, 

Science, 

Literature, 

Art, 

Text-books, 

Miscellaneous. 



As will be seen from the following table considera))le additions hav< 
been made to the important subjects of Pedagogy, Science, (Political Econ 
omy, etc.) and Industrial and Domestic Science. 



11a E. 



m EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 163 



There is a decided falling off in tbe departnunt of Fiction. This is to 
k regretted, but it was unavoidable as the vote for tlie purchase of books 
nas too limited. We have most of the standard works, and while they are 
read very freely, the teachers naturally look forward to an acquaintance 
Tirl the writings of the best of our present day authors. Teachers ought to 
be encouraged in every way to read, and a liberal supply of the best books 
from the pen of the leading authors will do much to bring this about. To 
be able to look forward to reading an interesting and instructive book each 
week-end would act as a stimulus to the students-in-training to concentrate 
ieir whole energies upon their studies during the time they have to spend 
in the lecture rooms. Th^re are few things that exert a happier influence 
a^n one's life than the reading of a genuinely meritorious book — a book 
with the elements of refinement in it — and I am sure me students of the 
Xormal School, after reading such a book, will enter with much heartiness 
into the feeling of Thomas a Kempis when he said '*I have sought for rest 
everywhere, but I have found it nowhere, except in a little corner, with a 
little book.'* 

The number of Books Purchased in 1901-1905 was as follov,- : 

Subjects. ' 1901 j 1902 ' 1903 | 1904 I 1905 



P'ligogT I 29' 40 1 7, 18! 30 

^m-e (Political Economy, Anthropology, etc.) I 8 i 11 i 3 10 ' 32 

py.jeophy and Ethics 12 1 9^ H 17 13 

laJOftnal and Domestic Science i 2 1 S . 6 ' 24 j 66 

^-etiy I 1 1| 10 13 j 5 

r^tjon and Practical Life 5 1 9 19 1 79 37 

^teriture 3 ; 46 ! 35 92 | 70 

^It-Books 1 32, 45; 27 I 37 i &4 

M^ellaneous (Histor\% Biography, Reference Workn). ... 72 1 102 ' 61 84 119 

literal History and iJature Study 1 ' 33 27 ' 20 , 25 

^^^ ". \ ; 1 15 I 15 5 



Totals 164 i 304 218 , 409 ! 486 

L '_ '_ __ 

The following table shows a marked decline from last year. The large 
smber of text -books received then included those published by two leading 
English firms: 

Number of Books donated to the Library 1898-1905 : 

i 1898 , 1899 ' J9()0 ' 1901 , 1902 1903 , 1904 , 1905 

r^iMJfrf.k:* I 49; 74 <>.■) Ill 41 144 349 95 

-VL-vllantHiU" 7 13 , 54 Ho 16 37 

Totals I 49 74 72 124 95 23*) 365 1 132 



Newspapers and Magazines Received during the Years 1900-1905: 



VM)() V.m 1<)02 VM)'.] 1!H)| i liK)5 



\r 



:vr(>f daily ami weekly newypajHTs iji'ceived. . . ^'i ^*1 ; ss s\) lOM 12() 
^iiiitifT of ma*iazine.« and other pori()di('als re(*oive(l l<>i) 1m2 lOn 111 1»4 98 

Totals 1 sd in:; 1 ss l'oi i i>03 224 



164 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



1893 I 1894 



Books, Ma^a^ines, etc., Bound during the Years 1893-1905 

1902 1903 



109 



M6 



1895 



t 



141 



1896 



1897 ! 1898 ! 1899 1900 



98 



99 90 ' 94 37 



1901 



83 71 



1904 ' 1905 



81 I 45 



Official Reports on Education in different Countries received during 
1902-1905: . 



Great Britain and Ireland 

Various Provinces of the Dominion . . . 
Australasia- 
Victoria 

New South Wales 

South Australia 

Western Australia 

Queensland 

Tasmania 

New Zealand 

Other British Possessions : 

Mauritius 

Cape of Good Hope 

Natal 

Jamaica 

Cape Town 

Barbadoes 

British Guiana 

Hong Kong 

Transvaal 

Various States of the American Union 
Miscellaneous : 

Brazil 

Argentine Republic 

Uruguay 

France 

Germany 

Portugal 

Switzerland 

Italy 

Mexico 

Japan 



1902 



43 
42 

5 
3 
1 
1 



1903 1904 



63 
45 



1 
29 

1 
1 

1 
1 



18 



59 
31 

2 
3 

1 
1 
2 
2 



54 

3 
12 



2 

1 

1 

12 

.1 

1 



1905 



26 
31 

4 

" 3' 
1 



10 



81 



1 
65 



2 

6 

29 

1 



Totals 



248 



10 
5 
4 

1 

2 

2 

16 



1 
55 



263 



3 
2 

2 

10 

2 



217 



160 



Miscellaneous Pamphlets Received in 1902-1905 : 



From various Countries 

From the Dominion of Canada and its Provinces 

Totals 



I 
1902 1903 1904 | 19a5 



75 
74 



149 



65 
53 



118 



12 
27 



46 



39 



53 



During the past year all the books in ^e Library have been thoroughly 
cleaned and the Library itself renovated. It is now, for the first time ii 
several years, in a perfectly sanitary condition. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 166 



Tour kind permission to allow the installation of the electric light into 
the alcoyes of the Library — ^which were very dark after 3 o'clock in the after- 
noon — is very much appreciated by the staff and the teachers-in-training. 
The difficulty encountered for so many years of reading the titles and get- 
ting information from the books is now happily at an end. 

A large collection of legal texts were disposed of last summer to a city 
Law Book publisher, and the money realized was expended in purchasing 
new books in several subjects of study. 

The following is a list of the books added to the Library during the 
paet year, 486 of which were purchased and the balance donated. 

Pbdagoqt. 

The Professional Training of Teachers in the United States, by G. W. A. Luckey. 

The Logical Basis of Education, bv J. Welton. 

Infant Schools, their History and Theory, by D. Salmon and W. Hindshaw. 

The Principles of Education, byT. Raymont. 

Notes on German Schools, by W. T. Winch. 

The Teaching of Biolof^ in the Secondary Schools, by F. E. Lloyd and M. A. Bigelow. 

Fundamentals of Child Study, by E. A. Kirkpatrick. 

The Possibility of a Science of Education, by S. B. Sinclair. 

A New School Management, by Levi Seeley. 

Onr Schools, their Administration and Supervision, by W. E. Chancellor. 

Education and the Larger Life, by C. H. Henderson. 

Pedagogues and Parents, by Ella C. Wilson. 

The Supervision of Country Schools, by Andrew S. Draper. 

Edncation in the United States, by Nicholas Murray Butler, 2 Vols. 

The Trend in Higher Education, by W. R. Harper. 

The Infant School, its Principles and Methods, by J. Gunn. 

Economy in Education, by Ruric N. Roark. 

Preparation of the Child iPor Science, by M. E. Boole. 

Common Sense Didactics, by Henry Sabin. 

Elementary Schools, by W. Foxley Norris. 

A Primer of School Method, bv Dexter and Garlick. 

School Teaching and School Reform, by Sir Oliver Lodge. 

School Organization, by S. E. Bray. 

The Psychology of Child Development, by Irving King. 

Special Method in Arithmetic, by Charles A. McMurray. 

Special Method in Language, by Charles A. McMurray. 

An Introducation to the Study of Geometry, by A. J. Pressland. 

In Loco Parentis, by Rev. Marshall G. Vine.' 

Science (Political Economy, Anthropology, bto.) 

The Work of the Digestive Glands, by J. P. Pawlow. 

The Early Care Men, and The Tree Dwellers, both bv Catherine Dopp. 

Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations, by Hector Macpherson. 

Archaeology and False Antiquities, by R. Munro. 

The Vault of Heaven, by Richard A. Gregory. 

Astronomy for Amateurs, by Camille Flammarion. 

R. A. Proctor's Works:— 

Li^ht Science for Leisure Hours. 

Mvths and Marvels of Astronomy. 

Other Suns Than Ours. 

Our Place Among Infinities. 

Other Worlds Than Ours. 

Pleasant Ways in Science. 

Rough Ways made Smooth. 

The Expanse of Heaven. 

The Orbs around us. 
Economic Studies, by W. Bagehot. 
The Elements of Banking, by H. D. Macleod. 
Principles of Political Economy, by John Stuart Mill. 
Barthquakes. by Clarence E. Dutton. 

A Rhort History of Coins and Currency, by Lord Avebury. 
A First Conrse of Chemistry, and A First Course of Practical Science, each by J. 

H. Leonard. 



166 'I HE lU-PORT OF THE No. 12 



Modern Tariff History, by Percy Ashley. 

The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, by Charles Darwin. 

The Hygigne of the Schorl, by W. F. Barry. 

Primitive Culture, by Edward B. Tylor, 2 Vols. 

Man and Class, a Survey of Social Divisions, by W. J. Ghent. 

Astronomers and their Observations, by Lucy Taylor. 

Health at School by Clement Dukes, M.D. 

A Text-book of Sociology, by J. Q. Dealey and L. F. Ward. 

Philosophy and Ethics. 

The Practice of Self-Cultur^, by Hugh Black (2 copies). 

Moral Education, by Edward Howard Griggs. 

An Outline of a Bible School Curriculum, by George W. Pease. 

An Introduction to the Bible for Teachers of Children, by Georgia L. Chamberlain. 

A Struggle for Life, Higher Criticism Criticized, by Rev. John Langtry. 

A System of Logic, by John Stuart Mill. 

Duty, by Samuel Smiles. 

Man and His Environment, by John P. Kingsland. ^ 

Religious Teaching in Schools, by Helena L. Powell. 

The Children's Book of Moral Lessons, by F. J. Gould. 

A Teacher's Handbook of Moral Lessons, by A. J. Waldegrave. 

A Philosophical Introduction to Ethics, by W. R. B. Gibson. 

The Laws of Health, by Dr. Nabarro. 

Industrial and Domestic Scisncb. 

Education of the Wage Earners, by Thomas Davidson. 
Works by Paul N. Hasluck : 

Casseir^ Cyclopedia of Mechanics, 3 Vols. 

The Handy Man's Book. 

Practical Graining and Marbling. 

Practical Draughtsmen's Work. 

Practical Staircase Joinery. 

Engraving Metals. 

Electric Bells. How to make them. 

Bamboo Work. 

Photographic Cameras, etc. 

Optical Lanterns, etc. 

Bookbinding. 

Bent Iron Work. 

Photography. 

Wood Finishing. 

Mountins; and Framing Pictures. 

Decorative Designs. 

Building Model Boats. 
Stained Glass Work, by C. W. Whall. 

Industrial Education in the 16th and 17th Centuries, by George Unwin. 
Trades Unions, by Geoffrey Drage. 
Modern Industrialism, by Frank L. McVey. 

Light and Shade with Chapters on Charcoal Drawing, by Anson K. Cross. 
Clav Modelling for Schools, by Anna M. Holland. 
A Manual of Clay Modelling, by Mary L. H. Unwin. 

Brushwork Studies of Flower, Fruit and Animals, by Elizabeth C. Yeats. 
Color Studv. a Manual for Teachers and Students, by Anson K. Cross. 
Science and Art Drawing, by J. Humphrey Spanton. 
Complete Perspective Course, by J. Humphrey Spanton. 
i^rohitectu^al Drawing, by C. F. Edminster. 
Blackboard Drawing, by F. Whitney. 
Geometrical Drawing and Design, by J. H. Spanton. 
The Principles of Design, bv E, A. Batohelder. 
Drawing for Printers, by Ernest Knaufft. 
A Practical Handbook for Drawing for Modern Methods of Reproduction, by Charles 

G. Harper. 
Nelson's Blackboard Drawing, bv Allen W. Seaby. 
Nelson's New Drawing Course, by J. Vaughan. 
Design, An Exposition of the Principles and Practice of the Making of Patterns 

by Richard G. Hatton. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 167 



Das Gewerbliche Fortbildings und Fachschulwesen in Deutschland, by Franz Richter. 

Seat Work and Industrial Occupations, bv M. L. Qilman and E. B. Williams. 

Manual Training Woodwork, by George Ricks. 

Manual Instruction in Woodwork, by G. Wood. 

Woodwork (The English Sloyd). by S. Barter. 

Wood Carving, by Charles G. Leland. 

Carpentry Workshop Practice, by Charles F. and George A. Mitchell. 

Xelson's Woodwork for Schools in Parts 1, 2, and 3, the same complete in one 

volume, by J. Wallace. 
Basket Work of all kinds, and Practical Metal Plate Work, each, by ^aul N. 

Haslnck. 
Diplomatic and Consular Reports on the High, Technical and Industrial Schools 

of Germany. 10 Phamphlets in oil. 
Technical Education in Evening Schools, by Clarence H. Creasey. 
Bacteriology and the Public Health, by George Newman. 
Infection and Immunity, by George M. Sternburg. 

Poetry. 

Poems of Christina Rossetti, by Wm. M. Rossetti. 

London Lyrics by Frederick L. Lampson. 

Emerson's Poems. 

Les Aspirations-Poesies Canadiennes. W. Chapman. n 

The Karthlv Paradise, a Poem bv Wm. Morris. 

f^helley*s Pcetical Works, bv Thomas Hutchinson. 

Paradise Lost, by John Milton. 

Rubaizat of Solmon and other Poems, by Amanda T. Jones. 

Canadian Born, by E. Pauline Johnson. 

Fiction and Praotigal Live. 

Little Folkb of Many Lands, by Lulu Maud Chance. 

Hours in a Library, by Leslie Stephens. 

The White Companv, by Conan Doyle. 

Micah Clarke, by Conan Doyle. 

Emma. "j 

Xorthanger Abbey. I 

Sense and Sensibility, r by Jane Austen. 

Pride and Prejudice. 

Mansfield Park, ' 

A Ladder of Swords, by Gilbert Parker. 

The Prospector, by Ralph Connor. 

Pathfinders of the West, by A. C. Laut. 

Sir Toady Lion, by S. R. Crockett. 

The Westerners, by Stewart White. 

The Lure of the Labrador Wild, by Dillon Wallace. 

5e Sithidafe"" Romance, } ^^ Nathaniel Hawthorne. 

Adventures among Books, by Andrew Lang. 

Carrots, Just a Boy, by Mrs. Molesworth. 

Traits and Stories of tho Irish Peasantry, by W. Carlton. 

No Ambition, by Adeline Sergeant. 

Works of Andrew Lang : 

The True Storv Book. 

The Red True Story Boo)t. 

The Blue Poetry Book. 

The Animal Story Book. 

The Red Book of Animal Stories. 

Sun-Babies, or Studies of Child Life in India, by Cornelia Sorabzi. 
Fort Amity, by A. T. Quiller-Couch. 
Memories Grave and Gay, by John Kerr. 
The Making of the Canadian West, by R. C. McBeth. 
The Bravest of the Brave, by Captain Charles de Langlade. 
The Blazed Trail, by Stuart Edward White. 
The Rig:ht of Way, by Gilbert Parker. 
Seats of the Mighty, by Gilbert Parker. 
Mooswa, by W. A. Fraser. 

Jean Mitchell's School, by Angelina W Wray. 
Thanksgiving, — Memories of the Day: Helps to the Habit, by William Adams. 



168 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Literature. 

Harrard Studies in Classical Philology, Vol. 16, 1904. 

Cassell's National Library (New Series) 57 Volumes, embracing the works of George 
Eliot, Sterne, Shakespeare, Browning, Carlyle, Dickens, Goldsmith, John- 
son, Thackeray, Tennyson, Poe, Scott. Emerson, Burns, Bunyan, Sheridan, 
Macaulay, Hawthorne, Walpole, Southey, Addison, Milton, Byrcn, Bacon, 
Moore, Walton^ Hakluwt. Socrates, Burke, Boccaccio and Lamb. 

Bell's Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. 

Bmerson's Essays, 3 Vols. 

Goethe's 'Faust, translated by Bayard Taylor. 

Wagner's Parsifal, as retold by Oliver Huckel. 

The English Poets, by T. F. Ward, 2 Vols. 

Classical Echoes in Tennyson, by Wilfred P. Mustard. 

The Georgics of Virgil, by Lord Burchclere. 

The Essays and the New Atlantas, by Francis Bacon. 

A First View of English Literature, by Moody and Loyett. 

Longman's Class-Book of English Literature, viz. : 
Paradise Lost. 
The Man Born to be King. 
The Lady of the Lake. 
The Lay of the Last Minstrel. 
Macaulay' s History of England. 
The Story of the Glittering Plain. 
Marmion. 

A Legend of Montrose. 

Tales of King Arthur and the Bound Table. 
Jyanhoe. 
The' Talisman. 

Text-Books. 

A New Geography on the Comparative Method, by J. M. D. Meiklejohn. 

The Students Geography, by George Gill. 

Chemistry, Inorganic and Organic, by E. L. Bloxam. 

The Principles of Inorganic Chemistry, by Wilhelm Ostwald. 

Elementary Algebra. Parts 1 and 2, by W. M. Baker and A. A. Bourne. 

Cassell's Physical Educator, by Eustace Miles. 

The 'Council' Arithmetic for Schools, by T. B. Ellery, Parts 1 and 2. 

High School Geography, by G. A. Chase. 

Geographical Library of Travel, 24 Numbers, embracing Canada, Australia, Mexico. 
Alaska, Japan, China, Phillipines, London and Liverpool, Ncrth and Soutli 
Germany, Spain and Portugal, Switzerland, Italy, Belgium and Denmark. 
France, Puerto Rico, Norway, Russia, Cuba, Hawaii, Holland, Scotland. 
England and Wales. 

The Principles and Practices of Reading, Canada Publishing Company. 

Introductory Latin Grammar, bv E. W. Hagarty. 

Commercial Course in Book-keeping, by Dickenson and Young. 

A Canadian History for Boys and Girls, by Emily P. Weaver. 

MacMi Han's New Globe Readers, parts 1 and 2. 

MacMillan's Picture Arithmetic, parts 1 and 2. 

Stories from Natural History, by R. Wagner. 

The Landseer Object Lesson Readers, 8 Volumes. 

High School French Grammar and Reader, by Frasor and Squair. 

High School History, by Buckley and Robertson. 

Arithmetic for High Schools, by A. T. De Lury. 

High School Algebra, by Robertson and Birch ard. 

High School Euclid, by McKay and Thompson. 

New Primary Latin Book, by Robertson and Carruthers. 

First Greek Book by J. W. White. 

Beginner's Greek Book, by J. W. White. 

High School German Grammar and Reader, by VanderSmissen and Eraser. 

New Primary Latin Book, Part 2, by Carruthers and Robertson. 

T. Nelson & Son's publications, London, England, viz. : Composition Books, Sup- 
plementary and Royal Crcwn Readers, Royal Atlas, St. George History 
Readers, Royal Windsor History Readers, Literature Readers, The World 
and Its People. Geogranhical Readers. 

Summary of Canadian Commercial Law for Schools and Colleges, by W. H. Anger. 

Elementary Pure Geometry with Mensuration, by E. Budden. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. t69 



Plane Geometry, Practical and Theoretical, by J. S. McKay. 

A First French Song Book, by Kirkman and Morgan. 

Biographical History Reader^ by A. B. Lees. 

Macmillan's Globe Geographical Readers. 

Regional Greography, Europe and the Mediterranean, by J. B. Reynolds. 

The Conncil History Reader, Story of London, by G. E. Mitton. 

Beginner's Trigonometry with Logarithms, by M. S. David. 

Manaal of Drill and Physical Exercises, by Thomas Chesterton. 

Chemical Statics and Dynamics, by J. W. Mellor. 

Text-Book of Physical Exercises, by Carter and Bott. 

Senior Country Reader, Parts 1, 2, and 3, by H. B. M. Buchanan. 

Studies and Questions in Book-keeping, and Worked Studies and Questions in 

Bcok-keeping. both by A. Nixon. 
Introdnctory Phvsiology and Hygiene, by A. P. Knight. 

High School Physical Science, Part 1, revised edition, by Merchant and Fessenden. 
The Story of the English People for Beginners, by John Finnemore. 
Elementary Plane Geometry, and Geometry ror Schools (theoretical), both bv 

Alfred Baker. 
Introdnction to Analytic Geometry, by Smith and Gale. 
Commercial Geography, by Cannett Garrison and Houston. 
School Boom Exercises for Thanksgiving and Christmas, by Ella M. Powers. 
High School Elementary English Composition, by F. H. Sykes. 
High School Ancient History, by P. V. N. Meyers. 
High School Euclid Books. 1 to 3. by McKay and Thompson. 
High School Chemistry, revised edition, by W. S. Ellis. 
High School Primary Latin Book, by Robertson and Carruthers. 
High School Chemistrv. authorized edition, bv Knight and Ellis. 
High School Cadet Drill Manual, by W. B. Munro. 

High School Physical Science, Part 1, revised, by Merchant and Fessenden. 
Tales from Herodotus, by G. S. Farnell. ' 

Cornelius Nepos, Vol. 1, Greek Lives, by H. Wilkinson. 
Homer's Odyssey Books, 19 to 24, by W. W. Merry. 
Lnciani Somnium Charon, with English Notes, by W. E. Hertland. 
Lysiae Orationes XVT. by E. S: Shuckburgh. 
Ciceronis Orationes XIV, selencted. by R. Klotz. 
Freiberren Von Gemperlein, by Ebner Eschenbach's. 
Baombach Waldnovellen, by Dr. Wilhelm Bernhardt. 

Einer Muss Beiraten — ^Wilhelmi, Ergensinn Benedix, by W. H. VanderSmissen. 
Le Voyage de Monsieur Perrichon, par Eugene Labiche. 

Quatre Contes de Prosper Merimee with Notes, by F. C. L. Van Steenderen. 
A Note Book of Experimental Mathematics, by Godfrey and Bell. 
Practical and Theoretical Geometry, Part 1, by A. H. McDougall. 

MlSCELLANBOrS (HiSTOBT, BlOGRAPHY, REFERENCE, Etc). 

The Talbot Regime, of the first half century of the Talbot Settlement, by C. O. 

Ermatinger. 
Robertson's Landmarks of Toronto, Vol. 4. 
A History of the War of 1812. by James Hannay. 
Readings in European History, by James H. Robinson. 
History of Western Europe, by James H. Robinson. 
World's best Histories. 32 Vols., embracing Japan, China, Russia, Gormany, 

United States, England, Canada, Ireland and France. 
Pen Pictures of Early Pioneer Life in Upper Canada, by a * 'Canuck." 
The Story of the County of Dundas, from 1784-1904, by J. Smith Carter. 
Wolfe and Montcalm, by Henry Raymont Casgrain. 
Canada in the Twentieth Century, by A. G. Bradshaw. 
Little Arthur's History of England, by Lady Callcctt. 
The Fight with France for North America, by A. Q. Bradley. 
Political Annals of Canada, by A. P. Cockburn. 

The Great Events by famous Historians, B. C. 5,867 to A. D. 1905, 20 Vols. 
Efcsentials in Englisfe History, by A. P. Walker, and A. B. Hart. 
Ciimberland's History of the Union Jack. 
Adam Smith, by F. W. Hurst. 
Life of General Brock, by Lady Edgar. 
Idle of Shakespeare, by Alfred Ewen. 
Life of Samuel de Champlain, by Narcisse E. Dionne. 
Thomas Moore, by S. Gwynn. 
Sydney Smith, by G. W. E. Russell. 



170 THE REPORT OF THE No. li 



Chatham, by Fredrick Harrison, 

Jean Bourdon (French) par L'Abbc Auguste Gosselin. 

La Famille D'Trumberry de Salaberry. par Pierre-Georges Roy (French). 

Life of Andrew Marvel, by Augustine Birrell. 

The Earl of Elgin, by George M. Wrong. 

Mackenzie, Selkirk and Simpson, bv George Bryce. 

Sir Oliver Mcwat. by C. R. W. Biggar, 2 Vols. 

Six Great School Masters, by F. D. How. 

Canadian Almanac, 1905. 

Canadian .Catholic Directory. 1905. 

Dictionary of Prose Quotations, by Anna J. Wood. 

Murray's New English Dictionary, Vols. 6, 7, 8. 

Baedeker. Italy Hand-book for Travellers. 

Canadian Year Bcok. 1905. by Alfred Hewett. 

Canadian Annual Review. 1902. by J. Castell Hopkins. 

Who's Who, 1905. by A. & C. Black. 

Annual Financial Review fOr 1904, with Appendix. 

The Canadian Annual Review of Public Affairs, for 1904, by J. Castell Hopkwi^ 

The Statesman's Year Book, 1905. 

The St. Louis Exhibition, by H. P. Fletcher. 

German Statistical Year Book. 1904. 

Debrett's Peerage an«i Baronetage. 1905, illustrated. 

Addre.«?ses and Proceedings of the National Teachers' Association, 1904. i 

Scientific American Book, by A. A. Hopkins and A. R. Bond. 

History of the Royal Grenadiers, bv Captain E. James Chambers. 

Mental Diseases by Dr. Daniel Clarke. 

Canadian Politics, bv J. Robert Long. 

The Nile, in 1904. bv Sir Willinm Willocks. 

*'Torontonians as we seeen Em." 

Pcole's Index to Periodical Literature. ,,5,0 j 

Classified Guide to Technical and Commercial Books, by E. Greenwood. 

Alumni Souvenir of the University of Toronto and affiliated Colleges. 

The Journal of the Royal Sanitary Institute. Londcn, Eng. ^ ^ _ , ,_, 

Annual Report of the Medical Officers of the late School Board for London (Kng. 

Report of the Inter-departmental Committee on Physical Deterioration,- London 

Eng. 
Torontonensis, 1905. tit j.x ci -i-v. 

Physical Deterioration, its cause and the cure, by A. Watt Bmitn. 
American Librarv Association Catalogue, 1904. 
United States Catalogue of Books, in Print, to 1902. 
The Cumulative Bcok Index, 1903-4. 
The Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature, 1900-4. 
Diarv of Samuel Pepsy, by G. Gregory Smith. 
The First Crossing of Grennland, by F. Nansen. 

Memiors of Life at Oxford and Elsewhere, F. Meyrick. Hallam et a 

Sketches on the Old Road through France to Florence, by A. H. Ualiam. ex. a 
River, Road and Rail, by Francis Fox. 
The Lighting of School-rooms, by Stuart H. Kowg. 

Natural History and Nature Study. 

House Garden and Field, by L. C. Miall. 

Stories of Animal Life, by Charles F. Hodder. ^ ^ .^ „ 

Short Stories of Our Shy Neighbors, by Mrs. M. A. B. Kelly. 

Trees, Parts 1 and 2, Buds and Leaves, by H. M. Ward. 

How Nature Study should be Taught, by E. F. Bigelow and others. 

Manual of the Trees of North America, by Charles S. Sargent. 

The Flower Garden, by Ida D. Bennett. 

Roil Inoculation for Legumes, bv George G. Moore, two copies. . ^ „ 

Winner's in Life's Race, and Life and Her Children, both by Miss A. B. Buckley. 

The Kinship of Nature, by Bliss Carman. 

Bird Life and Bird Lore, bv R. Bosworth Smith. 

Nature Studies, by R. A. Proctor. 

Familiar History of Birds, by Edward Stanley. 

Out of Doors, by Rev. J. G. Wood. 

Strange Dwellings, by Rev. J. G. Wood. 

The Culture of Trees in Pots, by J. Brace. 

Fertilization of Orchids, by Charles Darwin. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 171 



Vegetable Mould and Earthworms, by Charles Darwiu. 
The Face of Nature, by Rev. C. T. Ovenden. 
Mushiooma, Edible, Poiaonous Etc., by George F. Atkinson. 
Flowers and Ferns in their Haunts, by Mabel Osgoode Wright. 
According to Season, by Frances Theodora Parsons. 

Art. 

The Old Masters and their Pictures, by Sarah Tytler. 

Hals Great Masters iv Painting and Sculpture, by Qerald S. Davis. 

The British Isles, depicated by Pen and Camera, with a series of colored Plates. 

The Wallace Collection at Hertford House, by A. L. Baldry. 

A Short History of Art, by Julia B. BeForest. 

In order to still further reduce tlie pressure upon our shelves and get 
additional space for further accessions, the following material was trans- 
ferred to Alex. Eraser, M.A., Provincial Archivist, February 1905. 

MiKellftneous Government Reports 140 

Oi-J Atlases 3 

AoEoal Reports of various Institutions 260 

Miscellaneous Departmental Reports 70 

Legislative Papers 30 

Matkipal Returns, Voters lists, etc 40 

Iinnicration Literature 60 

Northern Ontario pamphlets 20 

(itr and Town Directories 40 

Pimphlets (British and U.S.A.) 167 

Bri:i<li Treaties , 1 

P&cr Law Commissioners, British ^ 

Pn&Fshers' Catalogues 76 

Akanacs Canadian and American 40 

Ofneral Statistics, France 6 

\tv .'South Wales Reports 12 

LirT OF French Canadian Books Transferred to Alex. Fraser, M.A., Provincial 

Archivist, March, 1905. 

Misnon du Missisipi en 1700-1861. 

Captivite Parmi les Onneiouts en 1690-1-1864. 

Dussieux's Canada, 1862. 

Lajoie's Catcchisme Politique. Civil Government, 1861. 

La Rues Canada. History, 1875. 

Turcotte's L'ile D'Orleans. History, 1867. 

Martel's Droit Canadien, 1877. 

Faucher's Choses and Autres, Literature, 1874. 

Michelant's Relation Oris^inale, Jacques Cartier Voyages, 1534. 

Michelanta Jacques Cartier. Voyages, 1534. 

Original Relation de Jacques Cartier, 1535-6. 

Voyages dn Prince de Galles an Amerique, 1860. 

Ungevin's Canada, Descriptive. 1855. 

Journal Jesuit Missionaries, 1646-1668. 

Umoine's Album du Touriste, Quebec, 1872. 

Lareau*s Melanges, Historique Litteraires, 1877. 

D'Ouvra^es Sur L' Histoire. Canada, 1837. 

Weld's Voyages au Canada, Vols. 1, 2, 3, 1795-7. 

Soirees Canadien nes, Literary. 1861. 

Bibliotheque dn Code Civil. Quebec, 1871. 

Les Natchez. Chateaubriand, Vols., 1, 2, 3. 4, 1830. 

viger Vs Bothier-Law Cases, 1827. 

Dionne's Oiseaux du Canada, Natural History, 1883. 

MArthy's L'Ancient Dro du Canada Dictionaire, 1809. 

Montigny's Cathechisme Politique. 1878. 

J^'n^l'er dn Peuple, Reflections, 18o6. 

U Hontan Nouvelle France. Vovages, Vols., 1, 2, 1683. 

j^eret s French American, In Italian, 1761. 



Campe'sla Decouverte de L' Amerique, Vols.. 1, 2, 3 1798. 
^ harlevoix's Journals, Indian History, 1721-22. 



172 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Theodat's Pays des Hurons, Voyages, Vol. 1, 2. 

Tache's Union Federale, Essay, 1858. 

Garmeau's L'Histoire du Canada, 1858. 

Tasse's Canadiens de L'Ouest. Vols. 1, 2. 

Talche's le Canada Essay, 1855. 

Estat de L' Eclise ,en Canada, 1688. 

Soirees Canadiennes, Literary, 2 Vols., 1862, 1863. 

Ursulines de Quebec, Historical, Vols., 1, 2, 1864. 

Theodats Histoire du Canada, Vols. 1, 2, 8, 4, 1686. 

In addition to the foregoing, certain volumes relating to French inter- 
ests, published in French, were transferred to the Bureau of Archives to be 
disposed of in exchange for papers and books bearing on the history of On- 
tario, and I understand have been used for that purpose by the Provincial 
Archivist. 

List of Reports, Magazines, Newspapers etc., transferred to Alexander 
Fraser, M.A. Provincial Archivist in March, May and June, 1905. 

"Events" 1902. Incomplete. 

Gold Resjion of Nova Scotia, Report of Dr. T. Sterry Hunt, F.R.S.,^ (1868). 

Report Delegates apoointed to Negotiate for the Acquisition of Rupert's Land and 
the Northwest Territory, (1869). 

Return to House of Commons of Reports of Superintendents of Roads from Thunder 
Bay to Fort Garry on the Red River, (1870). 

Papers in referfince to Bank Note Contract, (1897). 

The Monthly Review, 1900, 1 volume. 
^ The Monthly Review, 1901, 10 volumes (Oct. and Nov, missing). 

The Monthly Review, 1902, 7 volumes. 

The Monthly Review, 1903, 5 volumes. 

The Monthly Review, 1904, 1 volume. 

The Outlook, 1898, incomplete. 

The Outlook, 1899, incomplete. 

The Outlook, 1900, incomplete. 

The Outlook, 1901, incomplete. 

The Outlook, 1902, incomplete. 

The Outlook, 1903, incomplete. 

The Literary Dig^, 1902-3, incomplete. 

Saturday Rieview (London, Eng.), 1903-4, incomplete. 

Rebellion Record, 1860-1-2, incomplete. 

Montreal Herald, 1901-2-3-4, incomplete. 

Hamilton Spectator, 1900-1 -2-i>-4, incomplete. 

Ottawa Free Press, 1901-2-3-4, incomplete. 

Hamilton Times, 1900-1-2-3-4, incomplete. 

Kingston British Whig, 1900-1-2-3-4, incomplete. 

Christian Guardian, 1902-3-4, incomplete. 

Dominion Presbyterian, 1902-3-4, incomplete. 

The Presbyterian, 1902-3-4, incomplete. 

The American Agriculturist, 1902-3, incomplete. 

Canadian Churchman, 1902-3-4, incomplete. 

Welland Tribune, 1902-3-4, incomplete. 

The Farming World, 1902-3-4, incomplete. 

The Weekly Sun, 1900-1-2-3-4. incomplete. 

The Canadian Baptist, 1902-3-4, incomplete. 

The Catholic Register, 1902-3-4, incomplete. 

United Canada, 1903-4, incomplete. 

Canadian Freeman, 1903-4, incomplete. 

Catholic Record, 1903-4, incomplete. 

Manitoba Free Press, 1902, incomplete. 

Dominion Dental Journal, 2 numbers. 

Canada Lancet, 1 number. 

Canadian Journal of Medicine and Surgery, 1902-3-4, incomplete. 

Dominion Medical Journal, 1902-3-4, incomplete. 

Irish Industrial Exhibition, World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904. Parts 1, 2, 3. 

Canada German Calendar, Berlin, 1905. 

World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, Catalogue of School Appliances, etc., 
Ontario, 1893. 



1W6 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 173 



Calendar Ontario Ladies' College, Whitby. 1885-6. 1874-5, 1891-3. 

The Snnbeam, published at* Ontario Ladies' College, Whitby, Dec., 1885. 

Cakadar Weatern University College,. London, Ont., 1884-1883. 

Medical Department of the Western University, London, 1884. 

Announcem^t Alma Ladies' College, St. Thomas, 1883-4, 1884-5, and 1885-6. 

The Prairies of the Western States; their Advantages and Drawbacks. By Charles 
Lisdsey, Toronto, 1860. 

North American Notes and Queries, 1900 and 1901, incomplete. 

Hiniites oi proceedings of School Boar.d, for London, England, 55 volumes. 

Appendix to the Beport of the School Management Committee of School Board 
for Laidon, England ; 19 volumes. 

Commissioner's Report concerning Charities in England, 38 volumes. 

"Lidies* Magazine and Canadian Home Journal," 1902 and 1903, incomplete. 

Ciiudian News and New Brunswick Herald, Aug., 1856, to Dec, 1857. 

Jan. 1858, to Dec., 1858. 

Jan., 1859, to Dec. 1859. 

Jan., 1860, to Dec, 1860. 

*' " Jan., 1861, to Dec, 1861. 

Jan., 1862, to June, 1862. 

" " Jan., 1866, to Dec, 1866. 

" *' " " Jan., 1867, to June, 1867. 

" July, 1867. to Dec, 1867. 

*' " *' *' Jan., 1868, to Dec, 1868. 

*' ** " Jan., 1875, to Dec, 1875. 

Toronto Nation, Jan., 1874, to Dec, 1874. 

Toronto Nation, 2 volumes, Jan., 1875, to Dec, 1875. 

Toronto Church Herald 2 volumes, 1872. 

The Church Herald, Jan., 1873, to April, 1873. 

The Builder^ Jan., 1873, to Dec, 1873. 

Ttie Builder, Jan.. 1873, to June, 1873. 

The Builder, Jan., 1874, to June, 1874. 

Tbe Builder, Jan., 1875. to June, 1875. 

New York Christian Intelligencer, Jan., 1874, to Dec, 1874. 

Kew York Christian Intelligencer, Jan., 1875, to Dec, 1875. 

London (Bng.) Methodist Recorder, Jan., 1873, to Dec, 1873. 

London (Eng.l Methodist Recorder, Jan., 1874, to Dec, 1874. 

London (Eng.) Methodist Recorder, Jan., 1875, to Dec, 1875. 

Hie Rock (English), Jan., 1873, to Dec, 1873. 

The Rock (English), Jan., 1874, to Dec, 1874. 

The Rock (English) Jan., 1875, to Dec, 1875. 

Xev York Musical Review, 18584;9. 

The EconomiBt, Toronto, 1897-8-9, 1900-1, incomplete. 

Canadian Architect and Builder^ 1896-7-8-9, 1900, incomplete. 

Canadian Preshyterian, 1896-7, incomplete. 

Winnipeg Nor'Wester, 1896, incomplete. 

dnreh Record, Toronto, 1900-1, incomplete. 

Erangelieal Churchman. 1889 1896-7-8-9. 1900. incomplete. 

Christian Guardian, 1890-1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9, 190ai. incomplete. 

Pr«byfcerian Review, 1896-7-8-9, 1900-1, incomplete. 

Canadian Baptist, 1891-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9. 1900-1. incomplete. 

The Canadian Journal, 1852-3-4-5, incomplete. 

Edncational Weekly, 1885-6-7, incomplete. 

Canada School Journal. 1887, incomplete. 

Edncational Journal, 1887, incomplete. 

P(n)nlar Educator, 1888-9, 1890-1-4-6-6-7-8-9, 1900, incomplete. 

American Primary Teacher, 1891-5-6-7-8-9, 1900, incomplete. 

PaWisher's Circular, 1897-8-9, 1900. incomplete. 

Canadian Freeman, 1896-7-S-9, 1900-1, incomplete. 

Educational Times (English), 1886-7-8-9, 1891-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9, incomplete. 

Popular Science News, 1898-9, 1900, incomplete. 

PriT'ter and Publisher, 1901, incomplete. 

Teacher's Institute, 1897-8-9, 1900, incomplete. 

The Nation, 1899, complete. 

Scliool Bulletin. 1891-5-6-7-8-9, 1900, incomplete. 

Worid Wide, 1901, incomplete. 

Canadian Bookseller, 1898-9. 1900-1, incomplete. 

Bookseller and Stationer, 1896-7-9, 1901, incomplete. 

Toronto Truth, 1897-8, incomplete. 



174. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Schoolmaster (English), 1894-5-7-8-9, incomplete. 
Church Chronicle, Toronto, 1863-4-5-6-8-9, incomplete. 
United Canada, 1896-7-8-9, 1900-1, incomplete. 
The Week, 1896, 1894, 1896, incomplete. 
Canadian Church Magazine, 1896-7-9, 1900-1, incomplete. 
Catholic Record, 1897-8-9, 190^-1, incomplete. 
Catholic Register, 1896-7-8-9, li^OO-1, incomplete. 
Montreal Weekly Witness, 1897-8-9, 1900, incomplete. 
Saturday Night, 1900, 1901, incomplete. 
Bookseller (English). 1894-5-6-7-8-9, incomplete. 
Welland Tribune, 1898-9, 1900-1, incomplete. 
British Empire Review, 1899, 1900-1, incomplete. 
Britannia, 1897-8-9, incomplete. 
Publisher's Weekly, 1897-8-9, 1900, incomplete. 
The Nation, 1897-8-9, 1900-1-2, incomplete. 
Science, 1892-4-5-6-7, incomplete. 
The Citizen, 1898, incomplete. 

University Extension World, 1893, 1894, injcomplete. 
Dominion Presbjrterian, 1899, 1900-1, incomplete. 
Canadian Practitioner, 1890-1-6-8-9, 1900-1, incomplete. 
Canadian Journal of Medicine and Surgery, 1897-8-9, 1900-1, incomplete. 
Dominion Medical Monthly, 1894-6-6-7-9, 1900-1, incomplete. 
Home and Foreign Record, 1863-4-5-6-8, 1870-1, incomplete. 
Miscellaneous collection of French pamphlets, etc., 21 parcels in all. 
One parcel German Miscellaneous Pamphlets, 
r The Weekly Colonist, August, 1852, to Dec., 1855, complete. 
The Church (Toronto), Vol. 14, 1851-2, complete. 
The Church (Toronto), 1853-4. (Incomplete, 1853.) 
Toronto North American, 1852-3-4-6, incomplete. 

Toronto Patriot, 1845, 1849, 1850, 1851, incomplete. 1852 and 1863 complete. 
Hamilton Ga25ette, 1847-8-9, 1850-1-2-3-4-6-6, incomplete. 
Christian Guardian, 1861 incomplete, 1852-3-4 complete. 

The following books were transmitted to Mr. Eraser, Provincial Ar- 
chivist, to be placed on the shelves of the. Bureau of Archives, for safe keep- 
ing for the Education Department, and are not to be disposed of except 
upon the direct order of the Minister of Education. 

Canadian Law Times. Vols. 9 to 18. 1889 to 1898. 

Upper Canada Queen's Bench Reports, Vols. 1-46, 1845-82, (2 copies each of Not. 
35, 36, 37, 38 and 39). 

Upper Canada Common Pleas Reports, Vols. 1-32, 1852-83. 

Upper Canada Law Journal, Vols. 1JL2 (New Series), 1865-76. 

Ontario Appeal Reports, Vols. 1-13, 1878-87. 

Ontario Reports, Vols. 1-13, 1882-7. 

Grant's Chancery Appeal Reports, Vols. 1-23, 1850-1876. 

Upper Canada Law Journal, Vols. 1-10, inclusive, 1855-64. 

La Themis, Vols. 2 to 5 inclusive. 

Supreme Court Reports of Canada, Vols. 22-24 inclusive. 

La Biblioth^que dn Code Civil, Quebec, Vols. 5-9, inclufiive. 

Lower Canada Jurist, Vols. 1 to 18 (12 and 14 missing). 

Chancery Reports, Vols. 24 to 29 inclusive (1877 to 1883). 

Canada Law Journals. 1877 to 1900 inclusive (1899 and 1900 unbound). 

Local Courts and Municipal Gazette, Vols, 1 and 2. 

Local Courts and Municipal Gazette, Vol. 3. 

Local Courts and Municipal Gazette, Vols. 4 and 6. 

Local Corrts and Municipal Gazette, Vole. 6 and 7. 

St. Alban's Raid Trial, 1865. 

State Trials, Lower Canada, Vols. 1 and 2 (1839). 

Upper Canada Error and Appeal Reports, Vols. 1, 2 and 3, Grant, 1846 to 1856. 

Respectfully submit ted, 

HENRY R. ALLEY, 
Librarian. 
301 h Dooember, lOOe'^. 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



175 



APPE^'DIX J. ADMI38I3N OF CANDIDATES TO CoLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HiGH ScHOOLS. 



Colleffiate Institvicj^. 



Aylmer 

Birrie 

R-rlin 

Br»ntford 

Brockrille 

Charbaji 

C;;at)n 

Ccboirg : 

CoDingTro")d 

Gilt 

iif'i^^nch 

Gifeph 

HiJiilton 

kijirsoll 

KD25ton 

Lhd-^y 

Locdon 

M-rri^burg 

Nipanee 

N'j^sra Falls 

iKli^l 

(►rLa 

C^en Sound 

hnh 

P-terborongh 

B-afrew 

fii^ptown 

it. Catharines 

- Mary's 

i|!. Thomas 

hmiA ^ ' 

S^forth 

^-a^fnni 

^nthroy 

Lronto (Harbord St.) 

(Jameson Are.) 

" (Jarvis St.) 

T'-rto Junction 

ViakJeekHUl 

^2itbv 

^Jdior ., 118 

^^dstock 180 

High Schools. 

A'eiandria Ill 

•iioDte 61 

.^nprior 59 

Arkir 80 

A*bens 98 

A-rora , 71 

B^mwrille , 34 

B^rlleTiIle 171 

H. jTinaii ville 56 

I' ^Jord 36 

xiritnpton 75 

f']^^ 37 

' i'^o'-.ia 59 

^' 'p'H-Ilford 81 

^^ir^ton Place 81 

^'^iga 39 



Entrance 1* 


Ixaniina- 


tion, June, 1905. 


Examined. 


PaB^^ed. 


96 


62 


137 


86 


179 


139 


234 


170 


142 


107 


199 


' 153 


64 


49 


77 


68 


82 


63 


146 


116 


72 


52 


126 


90 


612 


464 


132 


91 


208 


. 174 


92 


71 


396 


323 


74 


13 


106 


65 


98 


91 


495 


443 


96 


64 


, 202 


145 


96 


64 


179 


95 


115 


81 


50 


31 


69 


64 


131 


92 


162 


113 


138 


84 


70 


64 


169 


108 


111 


66 


495 


338 


267 


165 


499 


321 


103 


57 


69 


33 


85 


70 



137 



42 
37 

48 
47 
58 
46 
17 
144 
43 
30 
3.5 
34 
41 
59 
50 
9.5 



176 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



High SchooU. — Continved 

Chesley 

Colborne 

Cornwall ■ 

Deseronto 

Dundas 

Du nnville 

Dutton 

East Toronto 

Elora 

Essex 

Fergus 

Forest 

Fort William 

Gananoqne 

Georgetown 

Glencoe 

Gravenhurst » 

Grimsby 

Hagersville 

Harriston 

H awkesbury 

Iroquois 

Kemptville : 

Kenora (Rat Portage) 

Kincardine 

Leamington 

Listowel 

Lucan 

Madoc , 

Markham 

Meaf ord 

Midland 

Mitchell 

Mount Forest .* 

Newburg 

Newcastle 

isTewmarket 

Niagara 

Niagara Falls South 

North Bay 

Norwood 

Oak ville 

Omemee 

Orangeville 

Oshawa 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Pembroke 

Petrolea 

Picton 

Plantagenet 

Port Arthur 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan 

Pr escott 

Richmond Hill 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Simcoe 

Smith's Falls .'.*.*.*.'; 

Smithville 



Entrance Examina- 


tion, June, 


I9a5. 


Examined. 


•Pa&»eil. 


45 


38 


25 


18 


119 


/ / 


17 


lo 


48 


32 


74 


51 


52 


48 


50 


40 


36 


27 


67 


12 


64 


40 


57 


36 


33 


30 


76 


29 


46 


32 


67 


38 


72 


57 


30 


24 


53 


14 


27 


20 


36 


17 


69 


32 


64 


30 


38 


22 


75 


45 


51 


28 


82 


56 


94 


56 


42 


19 


129 


78 


44 


28 


37 


25 


89 


70 


45 


40 


66 


58 


31 


!22 


48 


34 


17 


14 


28 


24 


37 


lo 


43 


32 


53 


40 


43 


24 


68 


42 


70 


59 


51 


42 


74 


50 


127 


96 


62 


40 


125 


59 


38 


19 


35 


32 


26 


*>o 


44 


a5 


69 


61 


51 


34 


35 


27 


76 


51 


64 


5G 


77 


5^ 


98 


4<; 


54 


34 


42 


U 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



177 



High Schooh. — Continued. 

Stirling 

Streetenlle 

Sydenham 

tliorold 

TiDsonbarg * 

TTcoton 

Cxbridge 

Vienna 

Wilkerton 

Wardsrille 

Wtterdown 

Waterford 

Watford ! 

Welland .' 

We?ton \ 

Wiarton 

WiUiamstown : 

Other Places. 

Aberfoyle 

Acton 

Alliston 

Alrinaton 

\meliasburg 

Aaherstburg 

Ancaster 

Angus 

Apdey • : 

Arkona f 

Ashon :• 

AoferiUe 

Aronmore 

An 

Bailieboro' 

Bancroft 

Bith 

Bearerton 

B«ton 

Befle RiTer 

BfrhnoBt 

Betkany 

Binbrook 

Blackstock 

^obeim 

Blind River .' 

Blyth 

Wteaygeon \ 

Bolton 

Bothwefl 

BowesFiBe 

Bracebridge 

Bridgeburg 

Brigden 

Brnsgels 

Barford 

B'ire^srille 

Bark's Falls 

Bsrlington 

Bnrritt's Rapids 

Bjng Inlet 

Oaonington 

fardinS ^ 

12 E 



Entrance Examina- 


tion, June, 


1905. 


Examined. 


Passed. 


50 


25 


25 


16 


81 


49 


37 


36 


70 


64 


66 


46 


74 


50 


49 


16 


68 


40 


30 


23 


37 


21 


84 


46 


78 


43 


61 


38 


54 


41 


47 


41 


46 


. 22 


33 


18 


33 


30 


67 


43 


59 


26 


20 


8 


41 


12 


43 


16 


21 


6 


3 


3 


33 


18 


13 


9 


33 


15 


66 


22 


27 


22 


21 


17 


33 


13 


42 


25 


29 


14 


26 


20 


20 


12 


26 


16 


14 


11 


44 


35 


37 


24 


78 


63 


14 


7 


29 


22 


22 


9 


36 


9 


51 


37 


14 


11 


50 


24 


22 


18 


23 


12 


87 


74 


42 


24 


19 


13 


31 


22 


28 


22 


9 


7 


10 


7 


49 


81 


39 


18 



178 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Other IHacex. — <. bntw ueth 



Carp 

Castleton 

Cataraqui 

Chapleau 

Charleston , 

Chatsworth 

Chesterville 

Churchill 

Claremont 

Clifford - 

Cobden 

Comber 

Cookstown 

Copper Cliff 

Courtwright ..^ 

Crediton 

Creemore 

Crossbill 

Cumberland 

Delhi 

Delta 

Dickinson's Landing 

Dorchester Station '. :, 

Drayton 

Dresden 

Drumbo 

Dryden 

Dundalk f 

Dungannon ' ^ 

Durham 

Bganville 

Eglinton • 

Blmira 

Elmyale 

Embro 

Emo 

Erin 

Exeter 

Fenelon Falls 

Finch 

Fingal 

Flesherton 

Florence 

Fordwich 

Fort Frances 

Fou rn ier 

Galetta 

Glen Allan 

Gore Bay 

Grand Valley 

Guelph Consolidated School 

Hairs Bridge 

Hanover 

Harrow 

Hastings 

Havelock 

Hensall 

Highgate 

Hillsdale 

H intonburgh '. 

Horning' s M ills 

Huntsville 

Irish Creek 

12a E. 



Entrance Examina- 


tion, June, 


1905. 


Examined. 


Pasfed 


21 


Ifi 


13 


9 


43 


25 


2 


2 


28 


10 


26 


19 


52 


13 


33 


23 


17 


15 


19 


12 


45 


3S 


25 


9 


36 


32 


11 


i 


18 


9 


30 


23 


17 


6 


25 


20 


38 


24 


61 


26 


32 


9 


30 


15 


66 


33 


54 


42 


69 


5S 


16 


13 


8 


5 


45 


27 


44 


24 


70 


3S 


56 


51 


32 


22 


31 


22 


40 


19 


23 


17 


11 


I 


43 


27 


39 


34 


55 


30 


63 


18 


66 


27 


30 


24 


32 


8 


20 


19 


6 


5 


9 


4 


24 


* 22 


10 


• 10 


28 


12 


34 


11 


17 


10 


9 


8 


33 


23 


15 


10 


24 


20 


16 


14 


29 


16 


30 


20 


27 


17 


56 


32 


U 


Y2 


.<.^ 


o; 



iwr-v-. 



1903 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



17& 



Otit er PiarcK — Ctnithitu'd. 

Janetville 

Janeville 

Jarris 

Kars 

Keene 

Eeewatin 

Kilmaurs j 

Kimberley 

Kingsrille 

Kintail 

Kirkfield 

Lakefield 

Lanark 

Lancaster 

Laurel 

Lion's Head 

Little Cnrrent 

Little Britain 

London East 

Lncknow 

MajB:netawaii 

Manitovaning 

Manotick 

Markdale ._ 

Marmora 

Marksrille 

Marshrille ; 

Marsnlle 

Mattawa ...^ 

Mamlle 

Meriyale 

Merlin 

Merrickrille 

Metcalfe 

Mildmav 

Millbrook 

Milton 

Milverton 

Miflden 

Moorefield 

Mount Albert 

Moont Hope 

Moaotain Station 

Nenstadt 

N'erboro' 

New Hamburg; , 

N[ew Liskeard 

North Augusta 

N]orth Gower 

North Lancaster 

Norwich 

oakwood !!!!!!!!!!;;!!!!!;! 

^Hl Springs 

Orono 

Ottawa East !!....!!......!!! 

Otterrille 

Paisley ".' ...'V^'.^^'"'*"'.^"V 

Pakenham 

Palmerston 

Parrv Sound ." \ 

Pelham S. S. No. 2 '.''*".*.'.'.',"*.'.'.'.*.'.*'."*. 

P*Retan<yuishene 

PUitsTille !.!!!!. 



Entrance Examina- 


tion, June, 


19a5. 


Examined. 


Passed, 


4 


3 


9 


2 


31 


20 


12 


12 


25 


23 


18 


11 


8 


3 


15 


9 


29 


20 


34 


17 


15 


8 


52 


39 


54 


35 


24 


13 


12 


6 


10 


4 


17 


■ 7 


18 


8 


135 


86 


36 


26 


22 


13 


12 


7 


23 


21 


40 


25 


20 


11 


6 


3 


26 


20 


4 


4 


21 


13 


56 


27 


17 


9 


45 


32 


32 


15 


26 


23 


20 


10 


31 


24 


91 


58 


63 


46 


23 


12 


7 


4 


21 


15 


20 


7 


24 


8 


23 


14 


41 


12 


33 


22 


8 


6 


14 


2 


26 


22 


29 


8 


44 


24 


24 


12 


41 


24 


16 


14 


13 


12 


13 


11 


54 


34 


24 


14 


23 


18 


60 


32 


20 


17 


39 


34 


30 


20 



]80 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Other Placeit, — Cimttnued^ 

« 

Port Colborne , 

Port Dalhousie : 

Port Stanley 

Powassan 

Princeton -. 

Q u eensY ille 

Rainy River » 

Randewick » '. 

Richard's Landing : 

Richmond 

Rideauyille 

Ridgeway 

Ripley 

Rockton 

Rockwood 

Rodney j 

Rosemount 

Roseneath , 

Russell 

St. George 

St. Helen's 

Sandwich 

Schomberg 

Schrieber 

Selkirk 

Sharbot Lake .^ 

Shelburne .' 

Southampton 

South Indian 

South Mountain 

Sparta 

Spencerville 

Springfield 

^tayner 

Stony Creek ^ 

Strabane 

Stittsville 

Sturgeon Falls >.. 

Sudbury ; 

Sutton West 

Tam worth 

Tara '...^^^^'"'^^^^^^'. 

Tavistock , 

Taylorville 

Teeswater 

Thamesville 

Thedford ''*'.' 

Thessalon 

Thornbu ry 

Thorndale 

Tilbury .'.".V.V.".V.'.".'.V.'.V.V.".V.'.V. 

Tiverton 

Tottenham 

Tweed ."^.^1V".'.V.''/.'.V^*^.V*.^.V'^ 

Uptergrove 

Varna ; 

Vernon 

Wallaceburg !.!......"..!.!.....!.! 

Warkworth .1!.........!..!.....!!!!.. .! .. 

Waubaushene 

Webbwood . 

Wellington 

West Lome 



Entrance Examina- 


tion, June 


1905. 


Examined. 


Passed. 


26 


23 


69 


29 


20 


10 


61 


39 


18 


13 


23 


14 


6 


1 


5 


4 


14 


3 


23 


18 


21 


20 


24 


17 


40 


23 


38 


18 


32 


21 


28 


23 


20 


12 


16 


12 


30 


18 


12 


10 


25 


15 


55 


30 


22 


14 


12 


7 


30 


20 


36 


19 


41 


22 


22 


18 


26 


15 


24 


5 


12 


1 


29 


16 


33 


15 


70 


52 


40 


28 


22 


15 


21 


14 


23 


14 


24 


12 


39 


16 


43 


28 


20 


5 


23 


14 


9 


6 


41 


29 


67 


31 


25 


9 


31 


15 


60 


27 


20 


16 


46 


26 


15 


9 


30 


*>»> 


49 


4(^ 


28 


19 


18 


14 


6 


5 


46 


39 


40 


29 


53 


27 


20 


6 


28 


11 


27 


26 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



181 



Entrance Exaniina- 

Other Places.— Contimied tion, June, 19 05. 

Examined. Fashed, 

West Osgoode *. 12 9 

V«tport Separate School 35 13 

Winchester 60 ' 11 

Wheatley 18 13 

Wilkesport 18 8 

Wingham 54 45 

Wolfe Idand 25 9 

Woodbridge 26 17 

Woodnlle 20 10 

Wooler 20 17 

Wroxeter 17 15 

Wvoming 28 19 

Zephyr 18 14 

Zurich 27 16 

Summary. 

CoUegiate Institutes 6,997 5,016 

High Schools 5,807 3,804 

Other Places 7,491 4,611 

Grand Total 20,295 13,431 

ComparUon with June, 190 J^. 

Increase , 521 

Decrease 1,201 



182 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



APPENDIX X.— THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OX- 
TARIO INSTITUTION FOR THE EDUCATION OF THE BLIND, 
BRANTFORD. 

Being for the Yeae Ended 30th September, 1905. 

Hon. R. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., Minister of Education: 

Sir, — I have the honor to transmit herewith the Thirty-fourth Annual 
Report upon the Institution for the Education and Instruction of the Blind, 
at Brantford, for the year ended 30th September, 1905. 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

H. F. Gardiner, 

Principal. 
Brantford, October, 1905. 



The Institution for the Education of the Blind. 

In presenting the thirty-fourth annual report of the Ontario Institution 
for the Education of the Blind, I beg to refer to the appended reports of the 
Literary and Musical examiners, Mr. S. F. Fassmore and Mr. W. E. Fair- 
clough, respectively, who have given in detail their opinions* of the work 
done by the teachers during the year, and of the results accomplished. Mr. 
Fassmore found among the blind pupils ''intellects as clear and minds in- 
cited by as lofty ideals as are possessed by any other persons;" he credits the 
pupils with ''earnestness and application," and their teachers with "faith- 
ful perseverance and sympathy," while further commending the "order, 
discipline and deportment of the pupils." He did not look for perfection 
and he did not find it, but his enthusiastic language indicates that he was 
more than satisfied with what he found. There is no attempt in the Institu- 
tion to produce a few "show pupils" to excite the amazement of visitors, 
and allow them to carry away the impression that the brightest and best are 
fair samples of the whole. On the other hand, the teachers understand the 
necessity of giving most attention to the mediocre and the dull, and some- 
times they have to wait long for encouraging results. Mr. Fassmore' s sug- 
gestions about the teaching of Latin and the adoption of another spelling 
book will be carried out. Mr. Fairclough did not find the pupils' work at the 
organ as good as their piano work, but he expresses satisfaction with the 
records of 0. I. B. pupils in the Toronto College of Music examinations and 
he has a good word for the vocal class. When he sums up by sayini? that the 
general "results obtained compare favorably with those of other teaching 
institutions where the pupils have all their faculties," no more could be 
asked or expected, for in the study of music, as in everything else, the blind 



IJOo EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 183 



pupil labors at a disadvantage in comparison with the pupil who can see, and 
the teacher's work is correspondingly onerous. 

ka will be seen by the Physician's Report, pupils and teachers enjoyed 
exceptionally good health throughout the year, which fact was a cause of 
devout thankfulness and aided greatly in the production of recorded results. 

I have embodied in this Report not merely the record of the 
year's operations in connection with the school and its surroundings, but 
alflb information gleaned from the reports of Blind Institutions in the United 
States, and from various other sources, which may be found useful in the 
improvement of the Ontfirio Institution, and which will be instructive to 
members of the Legislature and others interested in the welfare of the blind. 
While there is competition among the different Institutions in the endeavor 
to excel, there is no spirit of monopoly or idea of secrecy. Every plan that 
has been tested and found good is made public for the general benefit, and the 
flattery of imitation is invited. Thus one learns from the experience of all. 
lease in point: The idea of providing workshops or "homes" for the adult 
blind has been suggested from time to time -in Ontario, and has been ttied in 
Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, as well a3 in several European countries. The 
.New York Legislature is making inquiry into this subject by means of a 
special commission, and the first report of that commission, of which a sum- 
mary will be found in these pages, is nearly as useful and instructive to the 
legisators at Toronto as to those at Albany. The problem of enabling the 
Mind to earn a living and making them independent of assistance is yet un- 
solved. 

' The attendance at the Ontario Institution is practically unchanged, not- 
withstanding the discovery of quite a number of children in the Province 
wflo should be enrolled a^ pupils. It takes protracted argument to bring 
many parents to a state of mind in which they are willing to entrust their 
aiflicted children to the care of strangers. On the other hand, care and firm- 
tesa have to be exercised to keep out of the Institution persons who, on ac- 
count of imbecility, incorrigibility or advanced age, are undesirable as pupils, 
and for whom their friends would like to use the Institution as an asylum. 
There is another class, eligible in every respect, except that they have no 
friends to stand in loco parentis, to provide clothing and travelling expenses, 
to take care of them during vacations, and to receive them at the end of their 
ichool life. In the State of Washington, legislation has been enacted which 
throws the responsibility in such cases upon the county councils, which were 
probably as slow there as here to take voluntary action involving expense. 

The transfer of the control of the Institution, at the beginning of the 
palendir year, from the Provincial Secretary's Department ^o the Depart- 
ment of Education was accomplished without friction or difficulty. Among 
other beneficial effects of the change, we may now hope that the public will 
be educated up to a knowledge that the Institution for the Education of the 
Blind ia not a **Blind Asylum," but a school. 

Attendance. 

The total registration of pupils in the session of 1904-05 was 122, as 
against 121 in the session of 1903-04; at the opening on September 28th, 1904, 
there were 104 pupils as compared with 103 at the opening of the preceding 
se-sion; at the close 107 as compared with 109. Of the fifteen pupils who 
»ere present during a part of the session, but did not remain until the end, 
one (male) was taken home tecause his mother missed his company, two 



184 



THE REP6rT of the 



No. 12 



(males) were averse to work, three (males) left to obtain employment, one 
(male) became ill, one (male) was taken away ty his parents who were remov- 
ing to England; two (females) did. not return after the Christmas holidays, 
one (female) became homesick after a few dstys in the Institution, and four 
(females) went home on account of illness. 

Of the 107 pupils who were present at the end of the session, there were 
forty-seven males and sixty females. 

The number of pupils in attendance at the opening on September 27th, 
1905, was 107, as compared with 104 at the corresponding date in 1904, and 
107 at the closing of the school term on June 21st, 1905. Of those in attend- 
ance at the end of the last term, 85 have returned; six former pupils, who 
were not here at the close of last term, have come back, and sixteen new pupils 
have been enrolled. The absence of the twenty-two who have not returned 
18 thus explained : — 



Graduated. 



In piano-tuning 

In inuaic (artists' diploma A.T.C.M.) 
III literary class (one in industrial) . . . 



Other causes. 



To secnre Employment. 
Domestic requirements. 
Temporary detention . . . 



Male. 




Total. 



I 



14 



Of those classified as temporarily detained, three returned to their 
classes early in October, 

The ages of the new pupils are as follows : — 



Males. 



Thirty-eight years 
Seventeen years, a 

Fifteen years 

Fourteen years 

Twelve years 

Eleven years 

Ten years 

Nine years 

Seven years 



12 



Females. 



Thwty-one years. 

Twenty years 

j Nineteen years. .. 
Eighteen years... 

Sixteen years 

Fourteen years.. . 
Thirteen years. . . 

Ten years 

Six years 



10 
12 



22 



The male pupil aged 38 was re-admitted after a few weeks' absence at 
the close of the last term. 



]m EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 185 



A casual reading of any recent report of this Institution might lead to 
the inference that the attendance nas decreased during the last score of years 
more than it really has. The reports being made to cover the year ending 
September 30th^ the figures of attendance in the tables at the end of the book 
necessarily include all the pupils of one term and the new pupils of the next 
tern, because the school opens, after the long summer vacation, a few day? 
iffore September 30th. Thus, while there were actually 122 pupils enrolled 
k the session of 1904-05, the enrollment for the year from October 1st, 1904, 
ij September 30th, 1905, was 141. Similarly, the maximum attendance at any 
one period in the ^e-^-n'ii of 1881 was 179, and total enrollment in that session 
^as 189, though the attendance for the year from October 1st to September 
Mistabulatedat201. 

Tiere is gratifying reason to believe that blindness is not so prevalent 
IS formerly, when the physicians and nurses were less well informed and per- 
laps less careful. But there is another reason why the attendance at the On- 
tario Institution for the Blind reached its maximum more than a score of 
jears ago. The Institution was opened for the reception of pupils in 1872. 
Fnr the next eight or ten years new pupils were steadily added, but very few 
left the school. At the end of that period, and ever since, about as many have 
tiished their course each year, and gone away, as have been enrolled as new 
rapils. At the present time there are probably thirty children of school age 
^iih defective sight in the Province who ought to be in the school, but whose 
;'i:reiits for various reasons will not consent to send them. The policy of the 
Department, based upon the experience of the last thirty years, is to discour- 
^ the admission of adults, except under very exceptional circumstances. 
Had that been the policy twenty years ago, it is doubtful if the attendance 
then would have been larger than it is now. 

Looking jFOR New Pupils. 

Acting in co-operation with Principal Mathison, of the Institution for 
tip Education of the Deaf and Dumb at Belleville, and with the permission 
"^the iead of the Department, we sent out in the month of March, to the nine 
tljoQBand school teachers and township clerks of Ontario, copies of the Cana- 
dm Mute, containing illustrated articles descriptive oi the two Institutions, 
also envelopes containing circulars and addressed postal cards, requesting 
infftrmation concerning children of school age with defective sight or hear- 
1^. Xearly 2,500 of the postal cards were returned, most of them stating 
'hi no blind children could be found, some expressing sympathy and admira- 
tion for our work, and about 76 giving the names and addresses of possible 
pupils. To all of these, letters were sent, with application blanks enclosed, 
t "geher with pamphlets about the school, and in several cases personal visits 
^ere made by members of the staff. 

It would have been far more satisfactory if a larger proportion of the 
*^her8 had responded, as it takes a deal of correspondence and not a little 
time to convince some parents of the advisability of sending their- children 
*o a sohool like this. I gratefully acknowledge the kindness of those who 
promptly made inquiries and conveyed to Qie the required information. 

Home Training. 

In my correspondence with parents, and in my visits to the homes of blind 
children, I have found great reluctance to let the children leave home, not 



186 THE REPORT OF THE x\o. 12 



mere infants only, but children of ten to fifteen years old being considered 
too young to go among strangers. This idea, based upon parental love and 
anxiety, is natural and entitled to respect, but it is the duty of the parent, 
and not that of the child, to reason the matter out, and to decide that it is 
better to suffer the wrench of separation than to have the child grow up in 
ignorance. When the child approaches manhood or womanhood, it will na- 
turally dislike to go into classes with infants, and the lost years cannot be 
recovered. I recited in last year's report a number of things which blind 
childriBn might be taught with advantage at their homes before coming to 
school, and as this subject is of great importance, I quote from the Boulder, 
Montana, Rocky Mountain Leader the following article by Max W. Voss on 
Home Training for the Blind : — 

**It has only been within the past few generations that the education of 
the Blind has been considered a necessary feature in completing the educa- 
tional system of the world. Previous to this period the position of the blind 
as regards the social and industrial world was one of degradation, neglect and 
obscurity. Homer and Milton, though ranking pre-eminently in advance of 
their age, were not sufficient factors to interest their Governments in advanc- 
ing the conaition of the blind, and it was left for a modern civilization and 
a later generation to lay the foundation of this great work. To-day every 
representative nation of the globe and nearly all the States of our Union have 
equipped the most modern and up-to-date schools for the blind. Gradually 
but surely the teachers of this profession are increasing the courses prescribed 
in the curriculums of these schools, until they now are placed on an equal 
basis with -^e best High Schools of the country. 

"The work is advancing, and yet at times it is seriously retarded by the 
lack of training before entering the schools. The physical development of a 
norn\al child is the result of a natural growth and it begins with the earliest 
efforts of the child and continues until the body reaches maturity. As an 
infant it creeps for the object it desires, and as the Umbs grow stronger it 
does what it sees others do. Its action is the result of imitating. 

"The problem with which we have to deal is of quite a different nature and 
requires a more complicated method for its solution. The child deprived of 
one of the five senses necessarily demands a greater amount of attention than 
one in possession of all his faculties. This training or development should 
begin at home and the members of the family should consider themselves 
directly responsible for its growth. If a child is backward, then teach him in- 
dependence and self-reliance. From the earliest possible period he should 
be taught how to dress himself and also the use and care of clothing. The 
latter is a fact sadly neglected among the blind. He should be taught the 
proper use and care of the seven handicraft tools, such as the hammer, the 
saw, the rule, etc. Whenever an occasion of playing with other boys in the 
rougher out-of-door games presents itself, he should never fail to avail him- 
self of this opportunity. The girls should be taught how to sew, both by hand 
and machine, to cook, to wash dishes and set tables, and to do all of the do- 
mestic forms of housekeeping. The child should be taught how to dance, so 
that the body may become agile, supple and graceful. I believe every blind 
child should be taught the art of dancing. I may of course be criticized for 
advocating this theory, but if dancing were taught with the view of strength- 
ening and beautifying the body, time could not be more profitably spent than 
in this work, notwithstanding the different ideas or opinions some of the 
learned men of the day may have in regard to this subject. 

"But the physical training of a blind child is not alone sufficient to assure 
a successful career. A sound mind in a sound body was the theory of the 



19U5 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 187 



Old Greeks and that theory holds good down to the present time. There is a 
mistaken belief, among the parents of these children, that becaude of their 
blindness their every whim and caprice should be gratified without regard to 
tie injury that may result from this treatment, a mistaken love that should 
he guarded against. Train them to be independent and self-reliant, and when 
lacked by common sense there can be no greater stimulant for success. Too 
fltien we find among the pupils of our schools those who are weak both in mind 
and body, a result due wholly to a neglect in their early home training, — 
boys and girls who are o;f no practical benefit to society and who in time will 
become burdens to the state. This is a fact to be deplored, and when we be- 
lieve that from the same material might have beeil made young men and wo- 
mea who would be an honor to their families, a credit to the community and 
a 'cnefit to society, too much attentioli cannot be given to the early home train- 
zzol the blind. The home is the kindergarten of the world and the mother 
is the teacher.'' 

Changes in Staff. 

Mr. J. A. Hayter resigned his position as Instructor in Piano Tuning on 
Ikember 31st, 1904, on account of ill health. Mr. Thomas Usher was ap- 
T'iiated to succeed him. ' ' 

Mr. T. Truss resigned his position as Trades Instructor on May 1st, 1905, 
!o take effect on August 1st succeeding. At the time of writing the position 
hs not yet been filled. 

Mr. George A. Ramsay was appointed Supervisor of Boys and commenced 
Li' Juties in that capacity on October 1st, 1905. 

Examinations. 

The annual examination of the literary classes was conducted by Mr. 
Niinoel F. Passmore, Classical Master in the Brantford Collegiate Institute, 
^iio j?pent five full days among the pupils, four of which were devoted to the 
Elimination. Mr. Passmore's report is appended, and attention is also drawn 
tr- ais remarks at the closing concert, elsewhere reported. While embarrassed 
jy hi* iinfamiliarity with the methods of teaching the blind, Mr. Passmore 
V^me deeply interested in the work he was called upon to inspect, arid his 
r^ioTX shows an intelligent comprehension of the difficulties, as well as a 
JTatifying appreciation of the successes, of the teachers. I would suggest 
•t:rtt, when it is possible to do so, the same examiner should be appointed for 
St Ifast three consecutive sessions. In that way a better idea of comparative 
ircgress can be formed. 

MusicAi. Instruction. 

For the fifth time Mr. W. E. Fairclough, of the Toronto College of 
llTL«io. acted as examiner of the pupils in Music, of whom he found fifty re- 
ffiaiaing at the close of the session, several having been called away bv ill- 
Sfs? and (ft her causes before the examinations began. His report will be 
fooikd on another page. The Toronto Globe of April 14th, 1905, contained 
*ie following reference to the performance in that city of the graduate of 
'SLi rear : 

"A very interesting piano recital was given in the Hall of the Toronto 
<"ollege of Music last evening by Miss Mary Williams of the Ontario Institu- 



188 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



tion for the Blind at Brantford. Though quite without the precious gift of 
sight, Miss Williams succeeded in giving a creditable rendering of a long 
and difficult programme, including such numbers as the Schubert Impromp- 
tu, Op. 142, No. 2; Schumann's 'Nachtstuck/ Chopin's 'Berceuse,' and Im- 
promptu Op. 29, and Beethoven's Sonata, Op. 27, No. 2 ('Moonlight'), be- 
sides several other compositions by RafiE, Nevin, Pierne and Liszt. The per- 
formance of piano classics pf such a character, with not only a beautiful 
clearness of tone and touch, but in a manner displaying taste and intelligent 
conception of the works under her attention, must h^ve been very gratifying 
to the friends of Miss Williams, and to her teacher, Mr. Ernest A. Hum- 
phries, the Musical Director of the Institution for the Blind. The assisting 
performers were Miss Alvina Springer of Quelph, pupil of Dr. Torrington, 
and Miss Josephine Sheppard, of the School of Expression, both of whom 
delighted the audience with their selections." 

The following is the list of successful 0. I, B. pupils in the Toi-onta 
College of Music examinations, June, 1905 : — 

Associate Toronto College of Music (A.T.C.M.), First Class Honors. 
Miss Mary Williams. 

Third Year Piano, First Class Honors, Miss Hester Pouting. 

Second Year Piano, Second Class Honors, Miss Grace Eight. 

Second Year Piano, Second Class Honors, Miss Anna Victoria Thomson. 

Second Year Piano, Pass, Herbert Treneer. 

First Year Piano, First Class Honors, Miss Ethel Peterson. 

First Year Piano, Second Class Honors, Charles Duff. 

First Year Piano, Second Class Honors, George Skinkle. 

Fir&t Year Piano, Second Claims Honors, Albert Fall. 

First Year Piano, Second Class Honors, Cameron Allison. 

Second Year Theory, First Class Honors, Miss Mary Williams. 

First Year Theory, Second Class Honors, Herbert Treneer. 

Entertainments. 

The entertainments by and for the pupils were as numerous and popu- 
lar as usual. The following report of the Christmas Concert appeared in 
the Brantford Expositor of December 21st : 

*'The popularity of the Christmas concerts at the Institution for the 
Blind was evidenced last evening in a marked way by the attendance of a 
very large audience, who filled the institution hall to the doors. That 
such a number of people should go such a distance on so stormy an evening 
must be accepted by those in charge of the concert as a very great compli- 
ment. The hall was gaily decorated with flags and wreaths in a most 
effective Christmas style, and formed a bright setting for the interesting 
work of the very apparently bright and happy pupils. 

''In welcoming the friends to the school, Principal Gardiner also ex- 
tended a hearty invitation to them to visit the institution during school 
hours instead of at times when the work of teaching was not fti progress. 
He also reminded the audience that though the programme was largely com- 
posed of musical numbers, still music was but One branch of the institution 
work, and that the common school education necessarily received first at- 
tention, as is required in any school for young people. 



1909 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 189 



''The programme, whicli was composed of bright numbers throughout, 
md possessed the added virtue of brevity, no encores being allowed, was 
a follows : 

^n — ^'Christmas Offertory" Jules Gsison. 

Mart Macdonald. 

B^citation— '*Six Little Turkeys*' t 

Mart Cunbo. 

Pin JNing — * 'Vesper Bells" Bonheur. 

Choral Class. 

ftino Duet — **Christmas Happiness" Mendelssohn. 

Herbert Trbneer and Charles Duff. 

Bc»ration — **Our Christmas" 

"WiNiFRKD Davison. 

Pur.oSolo— '*Valse Brillante" Op". 34, No. 1 Chopin 

Hester Pontinq. 

r^cPart Scaur— "The Angers Gift" , Cotsford Dick, 

Choral Class (Girls). 

U' Pianos — *'The Dragon Fighter" Hoffman. 

VicTORLA Thomson and Grace Kay, Alice Sticklby and Catharine Curry. 

B^rration— *'\niile Shepherds Watched their Flocks by Night" 

Irene Fox. 

Pi-~ N>ng — "Song" from "Love's Labor's Lost" A'ei?tn. 

Choral Class. 

Puu Solo— (a) "Love Dream" No. 3 TAszt. 

(b) "Impromptu" Op. 29 Chopin. 

Mart William^. 

B*?itition — -'The Little Maid's Sermon" 

Ethel McQuade. 

Irthfin— '"O Gladsome Light" from "Golden Legend" Sullivan. 

Choral Class. 

<H-er*ure to 'Jlosamunde' " Schubert. 

PiftDo. — Mart Williams and Gertrude Coll. Hester Pontino. and Grace Kight. 

Organ — Mary Macdonald. 

God Save the King. 

'In an array of numbers covering such a wide range it would be almost 
inipoiiible to select any of superior excellence. The recitations were all 
jiarked by that distinctness of enunciation and characteristic attention to 
j^wal inflection which is always a feature of these concerts. In the musical 
[nunbers especial mention might be made of the work of Miss Mary Mac- 
tic>nald at the organ, and of the brilliant performance by two small boys, 
[Ibsters Treneer and DufiP, of their piano duet. The concerted pieces were 
libo delivered in a manner which apparently delighted the audience, the 
mmng number, Schubert's Overture to Rosamunde, rendered by five girls 
m two pianos and the large pipe organ, being unquestionably the crowning 
^fort of the evening. 

I "The singing of the choral class is possibly the most entertaining fea- 
pre of institution concerts, and last night they very ably maintained their 
^endid reputation. The work of the class is especially remarkable for 
pod tone, spontaneity of attack and attention to phrasing and shading; 
mtir work last night would compare most favorably with the best trained 
Aoirs, and was notably excellent in their rendering of a ''Song" from 
rLove's Labor's Lost," by Nevin, and ''0 Gladsome Light," by Sir Arthur 
kilivan. 

"'In fact, the whole concert was remarkable for its excellence and 
Wifhtness, and reflects great credit upon Principal Gardiner and his able 
te^i'tanta," 



190 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The Christmas Tree entertainment was held on December 26th, and 
it was thus described by the newspaper next day : 

**The pupils at the Ontario Institution for the Blind, who were unable 
on account of distance or other considerations to spend the holidays with 
their friends at their homes, enjoyed a Christmas Tree entertainment last 
night. The concert decorations had been left up in the Music Hall from 
last week, and the good i taste of Mrs. Kirk, Misses Lee and Haycock was 
fihown in the arrangement of the ornaments and presents on the tree. First, 
an impromptu concert programme was given, consisting of piano solos by 
Herbert Treneer, Irene Fox, Grace Kight and Mary Hicks; mouth organ 
solo by John McDonald; violin solo by Alex. Forbes; songs by John Mc- 
Donald, Anna Mulligan, Matilda Sauv^, Joseph Boudreault, Ovila Daniel 
— the last two in French; recitations by Harry White, Orville Frayne, Roy 
Goldie, Marie Sprengel, Ethel Squair, Harriet Hepburn, Nellie Catling 
and Beatrice McCannan. All did well, but especial applause was given 
to the little ones who made their first bow before an audience. The dis- 
tribution of the gifts followed, and all seemed highly delighted with what 
Santa Claus had brought. Several friends of the pupils and teachers hon- 
ored the occasion with their presence." 

On March 9th the pupils were favored with a visit from the Canada 
Club, of Brant Avenue Methodist Church, accompanied by the pastor. Rev. 
^Mr. Harvey. The Club members debated the question, /'Resolved, That 
a continuance of the policy of Free Trade is not in the interests of Britam."^ 
The debaters on the affirmative were Messrs. Doherty, Matthews, Hartley 
and Durkee, while those who upheld the negative were Messrs. Ranson, 
Wood, Williams and Davies. The judges decided in favor of the negative. 
Before and after the debate, which was most interesting, several of the 
pupils gave musical selections, and at the conclusion cake an4 coffee were 
served by the matron and her staff in the dining room. The Principal 
thanked the young people for their visit, and he remarked that he had often 
wondered why the good people of the city were so seldom moved to do any- 
thing for the entertainment of the pupils, until it had been suggested to 
him that perhaps they were waiting to be invited. He would be glad ta 
have many such visits. 

On March 18th Messrs. James F. Egan and Fred. Jenkins, of Hamil- 
ton, who had been singing on the previous evening at the St. Patrick's So- 
ciety concert in the city, made an informal visit to the institution and de- 
lighted the pupils with their songs. They promised to repeat the visit, 
bringing with them other capable musicians. 

On March 27th the Principal, on the invitation of the Young Men'^ 
Union — an organization of pupils for mutual improvement — gave a lecture 
in the music hall on ''Ontario Place Names." William Ryan acted ts 
chairman. 

The so-called Willow Concert was held on April 18th. Mr. Humphries 
manipulated a phonograph kindly loaned for the occasion by Mrs. B. C. 
Bell, the result being very amusing. 

On May Ist the Young People's Society of St. Jude's (Church of Eng- 
land) church gave an entertainment to the pupils. Rev. Rural Dean Wright 
occupying the chair. There were vocal solos by Misses Wright, Miss M. 
Raymond, Miss C. V- Williams, Messrs. F. H. Adams and W. Scace; duets 
by Misses Wright and McKay, and by Misses Raymond and McKay; piano 
and organ selections by Misses Xichol, Raymond, McKay and others — an 
admirable programme throughout. The visitors partook of refreshments* 



«r77 



1*W5 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. I9l 



and spent a social half hour in the teachers' parlor after the concert, and 
promised to come again. 

On May 16th the Young Men's Union of the Institution gav*' an enter- 
tainment, with Mr. John Gray in the chair. This Society admits to its 
membership all male pupils over fifteen years of age, and its programme of 
recitations, dialogues and vocal and instrumental music was prepared without 
assistance from the teaching -staff. The result was quite satisfactory. 

Closixg Concebt. 

The closing concert of the session took place on the evening of -fun** 
l^th. It was thus reported by the Brantford Courier : 

" 'Better than ever' was the verdict of the large audience that filled 
tiie music hall of the Ontario Institution for the Blind last night, to listen 
t(. the concert given by the pupils in connection with the closing oi the 
sftf^ion. The Principal welcomed those who had come out on such a warm 
evening to testify their interest in the welfare a^d progress of the pupils, 
aod he spoke at some length on the work that had been accomplished Jur- 
is? tie year, and of the plans for improvement in the future. There Lad 
Wn no dangerous illness, an'd, with the blessing of ^ood health, pupils and 
teachers had been able to do hard and steady work, without which the 
i!istitution would fail of its intention. He spoke of the transfer of control 
'f the Institution from the Provincial Secretary's Department to the De- 
partment of Education, and regretted the inability of Hon. Dr. Pyne, the 
Hisister of Education, to accept the cordial invitation that had been sent 
t': him to he present. Not only on account of the concert, and to meet the 
M people of Brantford, would he have been glad to have the Minister 
cf Education present, but he also had an idea that if the Minister saw for 
liinself the beauty of the Institution grounds in leafy June he would think 
trice before consenting to have the grounds mutilated. In his (the Prin- 
■ipal's; interviews and correspondence with the head of the Education De- 
partment, he had received every assistance and encouragemnt, for which 
i? felt grateful, and he also had occasion to thank the friends in Brantford 
^fiohad entertained the pupils in various ways, thus relieving the monotony 
''f their lives and putting them in closer touch with the world. He hoped 
*bit the relations between the school and the city would be even more in- 
timate and cordial next year. 

"The conduct of the programme was then handed over to Mr. Hum- 
pines, the musical director, under whose n^anagement the various numbers 
^^at off very smoothly- Notwithstanding the oppressive heat the audience 
Iwened most attentively to the performance of the pupils, and rewarded 
them with liberal applause. It had been, very evidently, the ambition 
^*he musical department to present as many novelties as possible, and this 
feire was realized in a most successful manner. Several of the selections 
^ere quite new to a Brantford audience, and at least one number, the final 
j^ncerted piece, *Pomp and Circumstance,' by Sir Edward Elgar, had never 
»rii previously performed in Canada in the form presented. Solo num- 
Jfr* were the exception, only two appearing on the lengthy programme; 
wth of these, however, are entitled to special remark for the splendid man- 
Jiw c.f their performance. These were the Wely 'Offertoire' for the organ, 
p^ved by Miss Hester Ponting, evidently an organist of most promising 
a-'ilitT. and the Concerto in E Flat Major, by Mozart, for piano with or- 
^,^fjral accompaniment. By the playing of this Concerto, Miss Mary 
*^^'iani8 completed her arduous course for the degree of Associate of the 



192 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Toronto College of Music, and to say that she acquitted herself with excep- 
tional credit would-be but mild praise. 

**Dr. Torrington conducted the orchestra, which was augmented by 
the pipe organ, and he was delighted with the clear playing of the soloisf, 
and the precision with which she took up the piano parts after the orchestral 
Hutti/ 

''The i^inging of the Choral Class is always a delightful feature at the-se 
concerts, and Monday evening the chorus seemed to be fully up to their 
old-time standards, though much of the vocal material was of recent acqui- 
sition. One selection must be given special mention, namely, the Dutch 
Lullaby, 'Wynken, Blynken and Nod,' by Nevin. This was a decided 
novelty, including a soprano obligate solp and a four-hand piano accom- 
paniment, and was sung with beautiful tone and expression. 

"Four recitations were presented by as many junior girls, who cer- 
tainly acquitted themselves with splendid credit to their teachers. The 
audience very apparently appreciated the clearness of the reciters' enun- 
ciation, and their power of vocal genuflection. Miss Irene Fox, in 'The 
Volunteer Organist/ probably made the hit of the evening as far as the re- 
citations were concerned. 

"Following is the programme in its entirety : 

Organ— '^Offertoire'' WeJy. 

Hester Ponting. 

Part Son«— "Evening Song'' Franz Aht. 

Choral Class. 

Recitation — **Rover in Church*' Anon. 

Gertrude James. 

Military March— "Parade Review" Englemann. 

Three Pianos — Horace Valiant and George Skinkle, Cameron Allison and 
Albert Fall, Charles Duff and Fred. Johnston. 

Part Song— '* Wreathe Ye the Steps to Great Allah's Throne" (from "Paradise . 

and Peri") Schumann. 

Choral Class (Girls). 

Two Pianos— "Slavische Taenze" Dvorak. 

Mary Macdonald and Hester Pontino. 

Recitation— "The Builders" Longfellow. 

Beatrice McCannai*. 

Part Song— "AmonK the Lilies" Czihvlka. 

Choral Class. 
Piano with Orchestra— '*Concerto in E Flat Major," "Andante" and Allegro"... 3fo2ar<. 

Mary Williams. 

Part Song— "Light as Air" (Faust Waltz) Gounod. 

Choral Class. 

Recitation — "Grumble Corner and Thanksgiving Street" Anon. 

Emma Rooke. 

Concerted— "Overture to 'Tancredi' " Bowint. 

Pianos — Eva Johnston and Matilda Sauve, Herbert Treneer and Thomas Kennedy. 

Organ — Mary Williams. 

Part Song— "Wynken, Blynken and* Nod" (Dutch Lullaby) Nevin. 

Choral Class. 

Recitation— "The Volunteer Organist" S. W. F«w». 

Irene Fox. 

Concerted — "Pomp and Circumstance" (Military March) Elgar. 

Pianos — Anna Thomson and Catharine Ccrry, Alice Sticklby and Graob 

Right, Grace Kay and Gertrude Coll. 

Orgarj — ^Mary Macdonald. 

God Save the King. 

"At an appropriate interval the Principal introduced Dr. F. H. Tor- 
rington, Director of the Toronto College of Music, who spoke in terms of 



\m EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 193 



higi commendation of the success of the pupils, as shown by their exam- 
ination papers and the examiner's notes, which Mr. Fairclough had per- 
mitted him to see, and he said his pleasure in visiting the O.I.B. increased 
as the years rolled round. It did him good to find men and women in ear- 
nest in their work, not sparing themselves, but being anxious for results, 

'*Dr. Torrington then presented to Miss Mary Williams, of Toronto, 
lie graduate of the year, her well-earned diploma, A.T.C.M., and gave 
ier special praise for her splendid playing a few weeks ago in recital at 
tie College of Music in Toronto. He also presented to their earners the 
tDllowing certificates of progress : 

First year piano, first-class honors — Ethel Peterson. 

First year piano, second-class honors — Charles Duff, George Skinkle, 
Albert Fall, Cameron Allison. 

Second year piano, second-class honors — Grace Kight, Anna Victoria 
Tiomson; Pass, Herbert Treneer. 

Third year piano, first-class honors — Hester Pouting. 

First year theory, second-class honors — Herbert Treneer. 

Second year theory, first-class honors — Mary "Williams. 

"At the conclusion of the programme Rev. W. H. Harvey, of Brant 
Avemie Church, took the floor and, in a few hearty words, expressed his 
pirasnre and satisfaction with the achievements of the pupils, giving special 
^jmmendation to the performances of Miss Williams on the piano and or- 
gan. Mr. S. F. Passmore, Classical Master in the Brantford Collegiate 
Itstitnte, followed Mr. Harvey, saying that he had lately had occasion to 
nsit the Institution for the Blind, and he could assure those not familiar 
»iih the work of the Institution that the literary work was done with as 
fflnch thoroughness as the work in music, which had just been exemplified. 
rpjin the kindergarten up every class had interested ^im. 

"Sir. Gardiner thankfully acknowledged the kind words that had been 
^oken, and the audience dispersed after singing God Save the King." 

The attendance of friends from the city at the formal entertainments 
^ven by the pupils is all that coujd be desired or accommodated. The 
eatmainments given to the pupils by the Young People's Societies of St. 
hies and Brant Avenue churches were highly appreciated, and it is hoped 
tiat the example thus set will be followed by other city societies and choirs, 
fid by individuals possessed of musical or oratorical talent. Such inci- 
<leiits make a pleasant break in school routine, the pupils gain instruction, 
tie spirit of emulation is excited, and the extension of their acquaintance 
^th seeing people cannot but be beneficial. 

The Adult Blind. 

In last year's report I presented a number of opinions on the establish- 
ment of industrial homes for the adult blind, and as this question is still 
iiiiettled, the following iteins will add to the stock of information of those 
merested : 

The blind Postmaster-General and Political Economist, Right Hon. 
Henry Pawcett, addressing about two hundred blind persons and their friends 
at South Hackney, in 1884, a few months before his death, said : "Every day 
I live, the fact becomes more strongly impressed upon me that by far the 
freatest service that can be rendered to the blind is,. as fat" as possible, to 
enancipate them from the depressing feeling of dependence, and this can 
Whe done by enabling them, as far as practicable, to live the. same life as 
fishers live, cheered by the same associations, brightened by the same hopes, 

13 E 



194 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



flharing the same joys With regard to those Who become blind iu 

after life, the one thing which, above all others, I wish to enforce is, do 
noji take them away from the joys and pleasures of home life, do not keep 
them in the walls of institutions, do not congregate them together, but let 
them live as far as possible with those who can see/' 

The Batavia, N.Y., Daily News of Feb. Ist contained this summary 
of the report of a special committee appointed by the New York State Leg- 
islature: ''Albany, Feb. 1. Dr. F. Park Lewis, of Buffalo; Lewis Buffett 
Carll, A.M., of New York; and 0. H. Burritt, A-M., of Batavia, composing 
the special commission created by a law of 1903 to investigate the condition 
of the adult blind in this State and to report on the expediency of the estab- 
lishment by the State of industrial training schools or other institutions, 
will present its report to the Legislature to-night. Dr. Lewis, who is pre- 
sident of the Board of Managers of the State School for the Blind in Bata- 
via, is president of the commission; Professor Carll, who is blind, and is a 
noted educator, is vice-president; and Professor Burritt, who is superinten- 
dent of the State School for the Blind in Batavia, is secretary. The office 
of the commission is in Batavia. 

''It is evident on glancing at the report that the commission has not 
been idle, as its findings and recommendations cover 86 typewritten pages, 
and a perusal of these pages, convinces the reader that the commissioners 
have discharged their duties in a thoroughly conscientious, exhaustive and 
able manner, and have done work which will be of great value. The com- 
mission held seven meetings; studied and analyzed the United States census 
of the blind taken in 1900; studied the New York City list of blind pen- 
sioners; has caused a personal visitation to be made of about one-sixth of 
the entire blind population of the State, besides calling for expressions of 
opinion from about 1,000 more; has had correspondence with all county 
superintendents of the poor in the State and with all institutions for the 
blind in the United States and Canada, and with many abroad ; has given 
one formal and two informal hearings to the blind and their friends, and 
has had correspondence and conferences with the chairman of the Massa- 
chusetts commission recently appointed for the same purpose. The com- 
mission has also, through one or more of its members, personally visited 
all public and private institutions for the blind in this State, the Connecti- 
cut Institute and Industrial Home for the Blind in Hartford, the Columbia 
Polytechnic Institute for the Blind in Washington, D. C, the Pennsyl- 
vania Working Home for Blind Men and the Industrial Home for Blind 
Women in Philadelphia; the St. Joseph's Home for Blind Females in Jer- 
sey City, N.J., the Perkins' Institution for the Blind in Boston, Mass., the 
Maryland School for the Blind in Baltimore, and the Pennsylvania Institu- 
tion for the Blind in Philadelphia. 

"It was concluded by the commission at the outset that if it would ac- 
quire the knowledge necessary to enable it to make wise recommendations, 
it must first ascertain, so far as possible, what was the general condition of 
the adult blind in the State, and, second, what public or private measures 
had already been adopted either in this State or elsewhere to improve the 
condition of the adult blind. The succeeding pages of the- report show 
conclusively that the members went about their task intelligently and sys- 
tematically, and thaif during the seven months of their official career they 
have performed a vast amount of labor which is bound to result in great 
benefit to the unfortunate people for whose sake it was done. Detailed and 
interesting reports regarding visits paid to people in their homes and to 
public and private institutions, formal and informal conferences and cor- 

13a £. 



1995 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 195 



respondence are given in the report, and there are a number of valuable 
statistical reports covering various phases of the work. 

' 'Conclusions arrived at by the commission are as follows : The blind 
of the State are in general very poor, and usually have as their nearest re- 
latives persons who are not in good financial circumstances. At least 65 
per cent, of them are too old to acquire and follow any industrial occupa- 
tion,' while another and unknown proportion are physically or mentally un- 
sound. In the case of many who are sound long enforced idleness has 
tiestroyed the desire to work, and it would require time to overcome their 
indolence. Most of the blind, especially the women, do not travel far 
aW, hence they must live near their work, or it must be taken to them. 
Hie adult blind of Greater New York apparently are better , situated than 
those of the rest of the State, and do not evince any particular desire for 
State assistance, but a more thorough investigation might show these seem- 
ingly favorable conditions to be in reality no more advantageous than those 
wkich prevail in other localities. As a result of a personal visitation to 
nearly 1,000 blind, and correspondence regarding them, it was found that 
aanyof the blind, especially wome^, are comfortably cared for in the homes 
of relatives or friends, and it would seem unwise to place such in induistrial 
Umes. Experience here and abroad indicates that workshops for adult 
blind men are better than industrial homes. Many adult blind under 
existing conditions bejcome wholly or practically self-supporting. The 
experience of many blind men who have endeavored to follow some trade 
learned at schools for the blind proves that while the product of their labor 
TooJd probably be of sufficient value to afford them comfortable support 
tie time consumed in selling it prevents them from gaining support. Adults 
id children should not be trained in the same institution or under the same 
management. Some form of manual training for boys should take the place 
of tie industrial training now given in schools. Attempts to combine 
-dustry and charity in the same establishment and under the same manage- 
mt have proved in every instance to be, at best, financial failures. While 
^5e giving of pensions is the simplest method of aiding those who require 
financial assistance, it is, in many instances, unwise and demoralizing. 
^ith all the deductions previously made, there are still many adult blind 
^to are capable of being taught and of following some trade, for whom 
Joitable provisions should be made. 

' 'Recommendations made by the commission are as follows : Thei work 
'5^ personal visitation should be completed for the blind of the entire State. 
Provision should be made for the industrial training of blind persons over 
*1 years of age, and, to that end, in Buffalo, there should be established, 
tentatively in a rente4 building, one industrial school or school-shop, and 
^ soon as possible manual training should replace the industries now fol- 
lowed in the State School for the blind in Batavia. The blind should be 
enabled to sell their products to State and municipal institutions. Measures 
siould be taken to determine the causes of existing blindness and such 
preventive measures should be employed as will tend to lessen future blind- 
Be^ in the State. 

'To carry out its recommendations the commision asks that a perman- 
f-tt commission be established and it submits the draft of a bill creating such 
a commission and outlining its objects. This bill provides for the appoint- 
ment of a commission of three persons, each to serve three years, without 
'*«>nipengation, but to receive allowances for actual expenses. It is further 
PJ^onded that the commission shall complete the work of investigation begun 
^y the special commission, aid worthy adult blind persons by finding em- 



196 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



ployment for them at home or elsewhere, to furnish material, tools, etc., 
to the value of not exceeding |200.00 to any one individual, and to establish 
an exchange for marketing the products of the blind- Provision is made 
for the establishment and supervision by the commission of one or more 
industrial training or shop schools. For the year ending December 31, 
1904, in addition to the unexpended balance in the treasury of the special 
commission, the sum of $8,500.00 is appropriated by the bill for the w(Jrk of 
the permanent commission. 

* 'There was appropriated for the expenses of the special commission 
the sum of |3,000.00. The commission reports that it expended |1,468.70, 
leaving a balance of |1,531.30." 

The Kind of Education the Blind Require. 

In my report a year ago, considerable space was devoted to the consid- 
eration of the problem of suitable and remunerative employment for the 
blind. The responsibility of those intrusted with the education of the 
blind is prima facie greater than that of those who teach pupils possessed 
of 'sight. The latter, even if deaf and dumb, can choose from a wide range 
of trades, professions and employments, and a plain living can always be 
obtained by the unskilled labor of a sighted man who has health and 
strength. The occupations open to a blind man are few in number, and in 
hardly any of them can he hope to do as well as his sighted competitor. 
He must be taught in school to do something that has a money value, and if 
possible a situation must be found for him when he ceases to be a pupil. I 
mentioned last year that Mr. W. B. Wait, Principal of the New York 
City Institution for the Blind, took strong ground at the St. Louis Conven- 
tion against teaching trades in Blind Schools, affirming that the blind youth 
should be given the same kind of education as their seeing brothers and 
sisters, and then left to find their vocations. Mr. Michael Anagnos, Dir- 
ector of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 
contends in his last Report that ''Liberal Education is the Need of the 
Blind," using the following line of argument : 

"By reason of their infirmity the blind are seriously handicapped in 
the race of life- The visible world is annihilated for them, and they are 
plunged into perpetual darkness, which limits the sphere of their activity 
within narrow bounds and disables them from the pursuit of most of the 
occupations in which their fellowmen are engaged. They are cut off from 
some of the higher privileges of the race and are obliged to toil against a 
flood of difficulties. True, certain manual employments, in which the work 
of the human fingers is still in use, remain open to them ; but these are few 
in number and eagerly appropriated by seeing competitors. Briefly stating 
their case, we may say that the blind meet with mighty obstacles in what- 
ever they undertake to do with their hands, especially in those manufac- 
turing enterprises in which machinery is extensively used- Consequent- 
ly they are shut out entirely from the wide field of varied industries, into 
which innumerable clear-sighted reapers put their sickles under circum- 
stances infinitely more favorable to themselves than those surrounding the 
sightless laborers. 

''These facts make it evident that it is worse than useless to insist upon 
carrying on in our schools for the blind the plan of educaH:ion which was 
adopted for them at the time of their establishment, and in which the 
learning of handicrafts and the ability to work at ordinary trades were 
among the principal features and formed the objective point. We must 
bear in mind that a radical change has occurred in recent years in our in- 



\m EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 197 



dasirial, economic, social and business arrangements. Tlie old order of 
things has vanished and has been succeeded by a new one, which is alto- 
gether different from its predecessor. We have passsed from an individual- 
istic to a collective type of civilization and have entered upon an era in 
which sordid selfishness is conspicuous and the thought of others is buried 
in eternal oblivion. We live in a peculiar age in which an ardent devotion 
to unrighteous mammon is transformed into a sort of idolatrous worship 
and the craving for the vulgar display of wealth and for keeping up with 
the procession of pleasure-seekers amounts to madness. We have entered 
upon a period of rapacity and absorption in the pursuit of gain, in which 
the moral sense is threatened with paralysis, while heartless operators and 
unscrupulous magnates of trusts carry on with impunity the sinister process 
of gaining absolute control of the sources of supplies that are indispensable 
to human life and comfort. We are in the midst of merciless times, in which 
there is no solicitude nor charitable regard for the needs and rights of the 
weaker members of society and in which the strife for exisrtence is made 
iarder than ever. 

"If we consider carefully how the different classes of society are affectfed 
by these unusual and, to some extent, unnatural developments, we can 
easily see that the blind are placed at a greater disadvantage than those 
whose sight is unimpaired. Indeed, they are the principal sufferers ; for 
thile they are utterly unable to join any of the immense manufacturing 
companies or financial combinations for lack of capital or of assets of any 
kind, they are at the same time debarred from participating in great in- 
•iustrial occupations and mechanical trades carried on upon a large scale 
ca account of their inability to handle the complicated machinery, which 
constitutes the principal force and main feature of all such enterprises. 
Tnder these conditions they can hardly hope to succeed in obtaining 
remunerative employment in ordinary workshops ; nor is it possible for them 
tn come into competition anywhere with seeing craftsmen, for, if they 
attempt to do so, they are Jiable to be pushed aside by the latter. 

"Thus the obstacles, which hinder almost all persons bereft of the 
TL^nal sense from engaging advantageously in handicrafts or from seeking 
to obtain employment in factories, are insurmountable, and no expedients 
nor devices of any sort can remove or lessen them. Hence, in our efforts to 
'-pHft the blind and equip them adequately to fight the battle of life success- 
Wly, there is only one course left for us to pursue, and that is to change 
iont and let *the bricks fall down and build with hewn stones.' We must 
persist no longer in wasting our means and exhausting our forces by trying 
'0 sail our bark against strongly adverse winds or to penetrate impenetrable 
Wiers- We must follow the path indicated by reason and com- 
mon sense and turn our attention in a direction which promises to pro- 
hpt better results and is more hopeful than the old one. In other words, 
*^1 our efforts should be devoted to the development and cultivation of the 
t^in. This should be made the principal object of our work. Instead of giving 
a prominent place to handicrafts and endeavoring to teach several of them at 
^ great expense of both money and time, we must strive first and above all 
to increase the intelligence of our pupils, to awaken their insight and to 
strengthen their judgment, upon which their fortune depends. We must 
'''iltivate their minds in a thorough manner and make these batteries of 
thought, which, according to Emerson, is the seed of action and the means 
of shaping one's career. We must give them perfect knowledge and mastery 
"f their own inner selves and inculcate in them the spirit of self-reliance 
and independence and those elements of character which are indispensable 



198 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



for success in life. All ouy energies should be brought to bear upon these 
points. It is only through the adoption of a broad scheme of education like 
this that we can hope to put down the bars which separate the blind from 
ordinary society. 

''These considerations have led us to pay increased attention to the 
cultivation of the mental faculties of our scholars and to make this the 
primary principle and basis of our work. Accordingly our plan of education 
has been entirely reorganized or reconstructed on a broader and firmer 
foundation than that of the past and has been brought up to such a degree of 
completeness as to keep abreast with the times and to meet fully the demands 
and special requirements of the children and youth who attend our school. 

''This system as it is now stands is very comprehensive in its scope 
and far-reaching in its influence. It does not confine its work within tlie 
narrow limits of giving to the blind an elementary knowledge of the ordiniiry 
branches of study and of teaching them fiome music and one or more simple 
trades, but goes far beyond this. It aims to reach every faculty of the 
students and to develop every side of their natures — intellect, conscience as 
an active element of character, the sense of honor, the love of industry, the 
ability to devise and to do and the desire for independence. 

"By this system of education we hope to produce men and women of a 
fine type, strong, hardy, self-reliant, brave, enterprising, discreet. We 
purpose to make them capable of reasoning and judging, of thinking and 
planning, of deciding and executing. We trust to be able to inspire them 
with the ambition of becoming active, interesting, valuable members of 
society rather than recipients of charity, which in some instances might be 
disguised in the form of manual occupations or industrial opportunities. 
Lastly, we intend to train them to use their powers intelligently and skil- 
fully and to enable them to put themselves in as many relations with their 
fellow-men as they possibly can. 

"In devising or adopting ways and means for carrying on the work 
of the school in accordance with the best and most approved methods, wc 
never lose sight of the fact that education is a dynamical and not a mecha'^i- 
ical process and that it is of the utmost importance to make a close unif>n 
between the intellectual life and the deeper foundations of the character 
of our scholars. 

"Having become firmly convinced that the destiny of the blind rests 
entirely upon the breadth of their intelligence and the strength of theii 
character, we are earnestly laboring to provide for our pupils such advant- 
ages and opportunities as will enable them to gain these inestimable qualities. 
For the attainment of this end we leave nothing undone. While we paj 
due heed to the valuable lessons taught by the history of pedagogy and 
bring within the reach of the children and youth entrusted to our care th< 
experience of the past and the best products of the human mind, so that thej 
may profit by these, we try at the same time to give them a broad view oj 
the world about them and to make them responsive to all that is vital in th^ 
thought and life of to-day. For it is from the ranks of persons educated 
and trained in this way that will come the strong men and women, who wil! 
serve both as examples to their fellow-sufferers and as active agents it 
leading these to a higher plane of social dignity, moral excellence an< 
economic success." 

Labor Conditions. 

The ideas presented by Mr. Anagnos, based upon the experience of man; 
years, are entitled to the greatest respect. There is room at the top ; but ii 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 199 



every school — ^for the blind or for the seeing — ^there are many pupils whom 
no amount of training can qualify to fill high positions in professional or 
commercial life. Unless these earn a living with their hands, they will not 
eani it at all. What provision is made, under the Anagnos system, for the 
dull ones? The late Mr. H. L. Hall, Superintendent and Financial Agent 
cf the Pennsylvania Working Home for Blind Men, wrote a dozen years ago 
that ' u should be as far as possible the aim of institutions for instruction 
or education of the blind to send out the least possible number of graduates 
«ho will be compelled to make their living at a handicraft. It should be 
Either to show them other avenues to independence, to teach them business 
methods and customs, and give special training in anything for which an 
aptitude is shown." This is the conclusion of a man who had made a life- 
itndj of methods to make the blind self-supporting. In his paper read at 
tie Columbian Exposition, Mr. Hall said : 

"It is, of course, a truism to say that nothing has more constantly or 
earnestly engaged the attention of friends of the blind than the search for 
some trade or calling in which they could engage with a fair chance of self- 
npport. One industry after another has been brought forward, tried and 
tbrown aside; bead-work, mats, baskets, ropes, brushes, nets, miattresses, 
^ith a long list of other things, have been attempted, and at some places 
cne or other has been pronounced fairly successful, while at others it '*s 
reported as a failure. Is this from inherent defectiveness in the blind? 
Is it from changed conditions of labor? It goes without saying that a blind 
xan will not be as dexterous in the use of tools, or in manipulating a piece 
of work, as he would be with the possession of sight. It is also true that 
iaititutions will sometimes judge of a trade by the financial results to them- 
selves. Now it is a difficult thing to enforce in an institution workshop 
tnesame rigid discipline that exists, as a matter of course, in outside fac- 
tcries. The pupil, as a rule, is engaged in work for only two or three hours 
h the day, and there is a not unnatural tendency to look on this time as 
a relaxation from mental labor rather than a training for the important 
'•'■•rk of life. 

'*The vacations, necessary though they be, are a loss to the workshop, 
-ti a serious hindrance to the future workman, and finally, just as he be- 
comes skilful with his hands, it is time to graduate, and give his place 
to a new-comer. Necessarily, therefore, the work in an institution shop is 
en the average that of learners, or apprentices, and the value of the goods 
m the market will correspond. Instead of there being any surprise that a 
fair balance sheet in an institution workshop shows a loss, it would be a 
latter for great surprise if it did not. Education always means expense. 
I* is also an -acknowledged fact that the whole tendency of modern times 
ii toward centralized labor. Town after town, and city after city, can be 
Jiamed which are practically huge factories, whose product floods the coun- 
^, and has swept out of existence the groups of individual craftsmen who 
^hj years ago were found in every country town and village. Our hats 
aatl shoes, carpets, stockings, furniture and crockery come from one or 
ether of these large establishments, and the individual workman is at a 
freat and increasing disadvantage. How can this changed condition of 
liW be met by a man whom we admit to be defective ? 

''There are two distinct classes of the blind : The first consists of those 
bf>m without sight, or who have lost it in early childhood. To those, blind- 
R^, although acknowledged as a defect, is a natural condition, they have 
fained no knowledge from sight, and have, therefore, nothing to unlearn. 
Experience has come to them unconsciously, and judicious training has 



200 THE REPORT OF THE No, 12 



given their other senses a quickness and delicacy that almost compensate 
for sight, and to their mental faculties, especially memory, a wonderful 
strength and tenacity. This class is the special province of institutions for 
the education of the blind. It is for them to develop these minds, supply 
them with material, discover latent possibilities, train and discipline their 
powers, and where a special aptness is found, to give such special instruc- 
tion as will best qualify them for the pursuit in life indicated. From this 
class come the lawyers, ministers, musicians, mathematicians, teachers, etc. 
— ^men occupying honorable positions for which their fitness has been dis- 
covered, and whose lives show that blindness is not an insurmountable 
barrier to a man of determined purpose, but even of this class, the larger 
number have nothing to distinguish them mentally above their fellows, and 
must look forward to support themselves in some other way. Is that way 
necessarily in all cases manual labor? This is a question that can be an- 
swered only by the institutions themselves. In our day the tendency in all 
kinds of business is towards specialization. Large manufacturers are mak- 
ing one class of goods, business firms are known as agents for a single kind 
of ware. In workshops men spend their lives making one pattern of wheel, 
salesmen are selected for their knowledge of a particular line of goods. 
Oenerally the ^all-around' man is being pushed aside, for the reason that 
he cannot be equally good in all departments, and business will make no 
allowance for mistakes. So, too, new trades, as they may be called, are 
coming forward and finding a footing in our modern civilization. Is it 
not possible for a young blind man with proper training at the institutions 
to find a place which he can fill? There are special lines of business call- 
ing for quick and delicate senses, such as the preparation of perfumes or 
the art of coffee-blending. Might not a blind man become an expert tea- 
taster, and earn more thousands than the average mechanic does in hun- 
dreds? Travellers say that in Japan all massageurs are blind men, and 
earn a livelihood even in that cheap country. There is a report in news- 
papers that this experiment has been lately tried in England with satis- 
factory results, and it might be taken up here also. One would think that 
the delicate sense of touch would peculiarly fit them for this business, and 
their infirmity would be not at all to their disadvantage. Especially would 
such be the case with blind femsjle massageurs, dealing with their own sex, 
for the business can be learned ^d practiced fully as well by a woman as 
by a man. These are merely given as illustrations, that have presented 
themselves, and would, of course, be practicable only in the larger cities, 
but a close and intelligent inquiry may find other nooks and corners of 
special work which could be filled satisfactorily by a blind man, and where 
knowledge, energy, a good address and perseverance are the requisites. 

** After all that can be done, it is clear that the large majority even 
of graduates of institutions must earn their bread by manual labor, but 
every one who takes up and successfully carries on some other business 
becomes a stimulus to those who are still looking forward to their entry 
into the active world. 

'^The second class of blind men consists of such as have lost sight later 
in life, after dependence upon it has become a habit. Whether lost by 
disease or accident, they find a diflSculty in supplying its place by touch, 
and rarely become reconciled to their disability. They form the large 
majority of blind workmen. Of course, among them are some with mental 
as well as physical qualifications which enable them not only to become 
good workmen, but, with a little training added to their own knowledge of 
the world, to qualify themselves for more responsible positions; but the 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 201 



Tery large majority of those men can look forward to nothing except man- 
ual labor for support, and even there they are at a disadvantage. Probably 
ninety per cent, of those blind from accident have been laborers, — ^men 
employed in coal or iron mines, operatives in blast furnaces, rolling mills, 
etc.— -who have earned their living by main bodily strength, and have no 
aptitude for anything else. They have rarely thought intelligently even 
about their work, but have merely obeyed orders from their foreman; such 
men at any trade where dexterity in fingering is called for are awkward 
and incompetent. 

"Of the working blind, then, that is of those who depend upon manual 
labor, there are what might be called three grades: 1st, graduates from 
institutions who are not fitted for a profession or some higher form of busi- 
ness; 2nd, such as have lost sight in adult life, and may have considerable 
mental and physical aptness; and 3rd, the large majority of those adult 
blind, who are hopelessly slow both in thought and movement. Now to 
name any trade at which every one of this body of men, so differently quali- 
5ed, could achieve independent self-support, is clearly an impossibility. 
Wlat the first grade might do without difficulty would be embarrassing 
to the s^ond, and entirely out of the question with the third. In one of 
our large magazines, a few years ago, the fact was mentioned that a young 
blind man had taken up the business of cleaning and repairing watches, 
ind had built for himself a paying trade. The writer naively wondered 
why special attention was not given in institutions for the blind to this kind 
oi business, as peculiarly adapted to their delicacy of touch. Now we can 
all understand how the pupil of an institution, with trained senses and a 
natural bent for mechanics, may become a skilful watchmaker; but can 
anyone even dream of a horny-handed miner, or a laborer accustomed to 
leare at rocks with a crowbar, taking a watch in hand for repairs? Yet 
the trade that is best for the blind as a class must be one at which all the 
Wind can make their living, and the lowest grade of workmen can learn 
and practice. 

"Such a trade, therefore, must be simple, and the machinery in con- 
nection with it not complicated. It must be for a staple article, 'some- 
thing in general and constant demand. To set a blind man or woman at 
making bead-work is purely waste of time. It must be such as to allow 
the largest margin of profit to labor, and therefore a trade that requires two 
^r three distinct operations is better than where there is but one. It should 
be near its supply of material, and must be near its market. It would be 
contrary to sound business principles to set up a rope-walk on a western 
prairie, and it is as injudicious to introduce a trade into an institution so 
placed that the local demand will not absorb the product, or for a blind 
2ian to learn some craft which is not called for by the people among whom 
h^ expects to live. It should be subject to the least possible competition. 
Competition will always exist, but in one business it will be limited to 
our own country, while in another it extends over the whole world. Last- 
ly, the demand should be uniform, so that the workmen should be steadily 
employed. A business that is dull at one time and under high pressure 
at another is not good for a blind man to learn. As a rule he cannot afford 
^0 pile up stock for a future demand. These appear to be necessary con- 
fliiions for a trade that can be advantageously taken up by the blind, and 
tie question remains, which of those actually taught best fills these con- 
ditions? It is hardly possible for any one person to pronounce authorita- 
pTely whether a given trade or business is or is not good for all places, or 
is fact for any point, except that which he himself occupies. Every city 



202 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



has its own business horizon, and an industry that at one place is fairly 
profitable may have no existence at another, ^ few hundred miles away. 
The practice, therefore, of introducing a tradfe among blind men in one 
institution, solely because it has been successful at another, is open to 
criticism. Are the conditions at both places the same? Is there the same 
demand, the same cost of material, the same value in the market? An 
institution in one of our largest cities, in a special report prepared some 
years ago on the subject of labor, stated that mattress-making had been 
there maintained successfully for thirty-four years. But that city has an 
immense hoto-l demand and almost as large a call from its steamship trade. 
The success of this particular employment at such a place is no sufficient 
reason for its being taken up where similar advantages do not exist. The 
vital question is not what trades can be learned by blind men ; but at which 
can they have the best chance of making a livelihood, or the nearest ap- 
proach to a livelihood, at the least possible cost to others? And now, what 
one of the handicrafts taught the blind will fill the conditions of the most 
satisfactory trade, as defined above? 

''The plaiting of straw as covering for bottles, etc., requires a delicacy 
of touch which makes it unfit for the adult blind, and the profit to labor 
is absurdly small. 

* 'Basket-making is open to the same objection to a less extent so far 
as touch is concerned, but foreign competition keeps the price so low that 
a blind workman could succeed only in some country place where a supply 
of willow might be gotten very cheaply, and a demand existed for packing 
fruit or vegetables. 

*'The weaving of carpet rags was once a valuable industry. Domestic 
and foreign factories are now filling our country with their product, not 
so good in quality, not so durable as the old rag carpet, but infinitely sup- 
erior in appearance, and at not greatly increased cost. 

"Brush-making was some years ago the favorite handicraft in Ameri- 
can institutions, but it is one in which the competition is almost ruinous 
to labor. The stores are selling foreign-made tooth brushes with bone 
handles and fairly good bristles, which have passed through two or three 
hands, and paid duties in addition, and the retail price is ten cents. The 
blind workman must, therefore, confine himself to the common run of goods, 
where he can work more quickly, and here he is met by machine-made 
brushes as good as his own, and at a price which leaves him in the large 
cities little, if anything, for his labor. 

"Cane-seating of chairs is another trade that can be favorably men- 
tioned, or rather, it should be qualified as the re-caning of chairs. In the 
factories where the first work is done, it is in the hands of experts, and 
the wages are so low as to put competition from the blind entirely out of 
the question. The re-caning of chairs, after seat and back wear out, gives 
a fair profit, and may be practiced to advantage away from the factories. 
The competition is small, there is no machinery of any kind; the material 
is not expensive, so that the profit to labor is comparatively large, and a 
blind man, in the smaller towns, may do well if he can join some other trade 
with it. This would be almost necessary, as the demand for re-caning is 
not steady, and there would be much idle time. 

"Mattress-making should be classed among trades for the higher grades 
of blind workmen. As a business it is irregular, and sometimes excessive 
in its demands. 

"The making of corn brooms can be learned quickly and all there is 
of it can be done by blind men. There are three operations, so giving a 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 203 



large margin of profit to labor. An expert, and even the average work- 
man, can master all these, and, with facilities for selling, support himself 
at his home; and there is no blind man so slow or awkward who cannot 
learn quickly two, or at least one, of the operations, and so contribute to 
his own support in a factory where the work is specialized. The demand 
is steady, there is no idle time the year round, and no competition outside 
of our own country." 

It will be observed that Mr. Hall mentions massage as a suitable oc- 
cupation for some blind men and women. In March, 1904, I received a 
letter from Mr. Arthur Martineau, of New York, an ex-pupil of this insti- 
tution, asking for a recommendation to be used in connection with the study 
d massage. Nothing was heard directly from him, except a grateful ac- 
ktowledgment of the receipt of the testimonial, but I subsequently received 
from Dr. B. E. McEenzie, Senior Surgeon of the Toronto Orthopedic 
Hospital, a copy of the following paper on 

The Employment of the Blind for Massage.* 

{Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, April 27th, 1905). 

The object of this article is to stimulate interest in supplying the blind 
^ti another profitable means of livelihood, massage. 

I am not going to take up your time by quoting a mass of statistics in 
^rder to show you how many people in the world are blind and so unable 
10 support themselves, nor do I intend to expound either the theory or the 
Practice of massage, but what I do wish is to give you a brief outline of 
he work which has already been accomplished in training blind masseurs, 
and to suggest a few ideas, so that some of you may be interested to help. 
I had planned to have at this meeting a blind man whom Mr. Hall- 
(•^k has been kind enough to teach massage, so that he could show you 
practically how expert and skilful a masseur a blind man can become, even 
ihr a comparatively short and impe feet training. Unfortunately, how- 
^^w, this man, in whom Mr. Hallbeck and I have been interested, is in 
Canada, sick. I shall, therefore, give you a brief summary of some of the 
.'Halts of teaching massage to the blind in other places and then relate the 
Eiaia facts about his teaching, and tell you how expert he has become. 

Many if not most of the efforts directed toward utilizing blind people 
I ■: giving massage iave naturally been stimulated by the custom, which 
Cis existed in Japan for a great many centuries, of employing blind mas- 
^nrs. There, the blind have enjoyed a special protection and indulgence 
jrom the emperor. They have been exempt from taxation ; they have 
K-med a sort of guild. Practically all the massage employed in Japan is 
PiTfn by the blind. Most of them learn massage when quite young. There, 
ajery complete treatment is within the means of a jinrikisha man or or- 
^i^ry laborer. A treatment costs a European ten to twenty sen. The 
E^^urs can be found in almost any street of a town and summoned to the 
r^Ron s house, or their services secured at various depots, or at the large 
li^'^pitals and clinics. 

Although this universal custom of employing massage by the blind 
la Japan has existed for a great many hundred years, comparatively few 
^ell-or^ized attempts have been made in other countries. Most of such 



204 TH^ REPORT OF THE No. 12 



attempts have been made in quite recent years and a few of them have baea 
reasonably successful. 

In Bussia, A. V. Goustowsky (Congres International pour Tamelior- 
ation du sort des aveugles a Paris. August, 1900, quoted in Zeitschrift 
fuer Diaetetische und Physikalische Therapie. 1902. Band v. Heft 2.) 
mentions that at the time of writing (1900) the only school in Europe where 
the blind were taught massage was in St. Petersburg. In this school the 
pupils were taught anatomy, physiology and massage technic. 

Dr. V. Naedler, director of the Alexander-Marien Blind Asylum for 
Children at St. Petersburg, has also attempted to have appropriate blind 
pupils taught. He regards two years as necessary for the study, and con- 
siders it advisable to teach the pupils another occupation as well. Their 
teacher is a medical student who became blind when studying medicine, 
went to Japan, and learned massage within two years. 

Mrs. Z. I. Vengu6rofE began teaching massage to the blind in St. 
Petersburg, May, 1903. She selected a young girl who was born blind, who 
learned so quickly and became so adept that Mrs. Vengu^roff was encour- 
aged to continue her work with the blind. At the time of publication of 
her article, (quoted from her pamphlet, page 16, on the "Enseignement 
du massage -aux aveugles," 1904,) there were eleven blind pupils at the 
school. Apparently her results have been very satisfactory. Her exhi- 
bition of photographs of the blind pupils at work evoked considerable inter- 
est last year at the Congress in Paris. 

"The 16th of May, 1903, I was called to a blind patient who had a 
fracture of the arm. The plaster being removed, I began massage. After 
having had a long talk with my patient I asked myself if it were not pos- 
sible to give the blind the possibility of learning massage, in order to make 
them able to help their fellowmen. I went to the Curator of a Blind Insti- 
tution and expressed my intention. Soon after a young ffirl. Miss B., came 
to me and expressed a desire to learn massage. Miss S. was born blind, 
but the difficult task that she undertook was facilitated by the extremely 
developed feeling that she possesses, a feeling that we who see find almost 
supernatural. After having once been present at the dissection of a corpse 
Miss B. was able the second time to distinguish the different organs, the 
muscles, etc. As to the bones of the skull and the face, she could show 
the very smallest, and astonished the examiners by her answers. The press 
says of this case as foUews: 'Yesterday at the school of massage founded 
by Mrs. Z. I. Vengu6roff took place the first examination of the pupils 
finishing their course of studies. The pupils knew anatomy and physiol- 
ogy exceedingly well and skilfully performed the practical massage at the 
Infirmary of the school. The inspector especially noticed the detailed and 
judicious answers of a blind pupil, her explanations of anatomical prepar- 
ations, and her technical knowledge of massage. Evidently this specialty 
may help those unfortunate creatures to work for their own and for others* 
benefit.' As to the technical ability of this blind pupil, I always heard 
the patients in speaking of her say, *0h, madam, do not deprive us of our 
blind angel. They are not hands, but the balm of life.' As to her accuracy 
and her interest in her calling one would wish these qualities were as well 
developed in thousands of masseurs and masseuses with sight. My first 
experiment having succeeded so well, I have now eleven blind pupils at my 
school. I have still noticed that the blind possess an astonishing capacity 
of guessing the sensibility of the patients. Having made different experi- 
ments on a patient suffering from neuralgia in the face, I found that the 
blind pupil after only three or four trials could soothe the pain. Not only 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 206 



do I think, I am convinced, that massage executed by the blind possessing 
so subtle a feeling will give the best results, and the pains taken by their 
masters will be recompensed by the consciousness of having done a good 
deed." 

In Sweden, the home so to speak of massage, less encouraging results 
are recorded. Professor Nycander (Goetenborg) (Zeitschrift fuer Diaetet- 
L^ie und Physikalische Therapie, 1901-1902, page 124,) attempted to teach 
the blind or partly blind for about six years, but without much success. He 
found it difficult to instruct them in the elementary anatomy and physiol- 
ogy, because he had no text-books with raised letters. 

I bave not found any later or more encouraging accounts from Sweden. 

A Monsieur Stier, (Troisieme Congres National d'Assistance publique 
et de bienfaisance privee, Bordeaux premier au 7 Juin, 1903. "Assistance 
et Education des Enfants Aveugles," par M. Albert L6on) a blind man, 
itadied massage in a private hospital at Bordeaux for about a year, and then 
settled in Paris, practising there under the patronage of the * 'Association 
Valentin Hauey pour le Bien des Aveugles." He became very successful 
and was highly recommended, receiving as m,uch as twenty francs for a 
single treatment. He died suddenly a few months ago. 

The Association Valentin Hauey sent me an illustrated postal card 
lowing a number of different ways of employing the blind. One of the 
iHastrations was of a masseur giving massage. 

Major J. Batignon, in a short article in Le Journal de Medicine de 
Bordeaux, Nov. 22, 1903, No. 47, page 755, appeals for interest in the sub- 
let, and quotes some of the results obtained in Brussels. ^ 

A free school has been started there by a Dr. Daniel. At this school 
intli massage and medical gymnastics are taught to appropriate blind per- 
lons. A committee of six gentlemen, some of them physician*, recently 
examined a small class of these pupils and pronounced their work excellent. 
'Troisieme Congres National d' Assistance publique et de bienfaisance privee, 
Bordeaux premier au 7 Juin, 1903, page 13.) 

In Denmark, Dr. Moldenhawer, in the King's Blind Asylum at Cop- 
enliagen, has attempted the instruction of the blind and has had some suc- 
Cfse. The course of instruction requires about ten months. 

In Austria, a woman was taught by Dr. Kofranyni in Bruenn. After 
four months' instruction and a certain amount of practice she found a situ- 
ation in an institution and managed to earn about four hundred marks a year. 

In Germany we find several isolated attempts, none of which are very 
ftriUng, except in Leipzig. There, Dr. E. Eggbrecht, in 1899, began 
instructing the blind in massage, and some of his experiences and results 
are worth attention. In the first place he attempted to instruct them both 
theoretically and practically, quite as thoroughly as if they had had sight. 
He selected twenty-four persons, six women and eighteen men. Thirteen 
of these completed their course, four women and nine men. In selecting 
tie pupils he chose those twenty years of age or older, who were energetic, 
patient, not nervous, and affected by no other difficulty such as tabes, tumor, 
weakness, or paralysis. A pleasant appearance was required and the eyes 
^ere concealed by a pair of smoked glasses. He naturally attempted to 
»lect persons of good muscular develonment, with strong hands, soft fingers, 
and a fine sensitive touch, which had already been trained and developed 
in some other occupation. The pupils were required to keep their hands 
and nails perfectly clean. They were first instructed in the elementary 
laets of anatomy and physiology. A text-book for nurses and masseurs 
^as transposed into raised type. The skeletal parts were explained while 



206 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



the pupils felt the bones directly; and afterwards the living model, one of 
the class, was employed to apply their knowledge. The muscular system 
Was studied first from plaster models and then upon the living body. The 
circulation and heart, nervous system, joints and other parts were studied 
from papier mache models. After several months the pupils were suffi- 
ciently trained to be able to undertake practical massage. They were shown 
the various movements upon their own bodies and then made them them- 
selves with the instructor guiding their hands. He also had them give him 
massage while he corrected their manipulations. Active and passive move- 
ments were also taught. Dr. Eggbrecht was struck by their dexterity and 
by the fine sensitive touch which they possessed. In all they received about 
seventy-five hours of instruction before they began their practice upon real 
patients. They then went daily to various clinics and there massaged sur- 
gical, neurological, and gynecological patients. At the end of four months 
they became quite expert and gave complete satisfaction to both patient 
and physicians. 

The effect of the massage upon the blind persons was excellent; they 
stood the exertion very well, gained in weight and strength, and developed 
a great interest in their work. The solution of the problem, whefe and how 
they were to obtain regular employment, has not been so easy. The author 
emphasizes the importance of having a blind masseur connected with each 
of the various clinics, hospitals, gymnasia, baths and other institutions, of 
having a certain place in a town where the patients can come to the masseur 
for his treatment, and of having telephone calls to a central bureau when 
massage at people's houses is desired. He speaks also of the advisability 
of supervision over the calls for the masseuses. 

It is in Great Britain that the most perfectly organized attempt has 
been made to provide for the education, and more especially for the sub- 
sequent maintenance, of the blind as masseurs. There have been numerous 
individual attempts recorded, some more and some less successful. On the 
2l8t of May, 1901, an Institute for Massage by the Blind was incorporated 
in London. The enterprise has already successfully trained a number of 
blind people, just how manv I have not learned. At present they are in 
need of more financial help in order to secure a permanent central bureau, 
where the blind masseurs may practice their treatments, where some of 
them may reside, and where calls for their services may be received and 
responded to. Dr. J. Fletcher Little, who has personally superintended 
their teaching, informs me by letter that almost all the women whom he 
has taught have done well, but that greater difficulty has been experienced 
in regard to the men, and that but few of the latter are now self-support- 
ing. In vol. 2, No. 6, of The Blind, April 20, 1904, Dr. Little published 
an article embodying his experience. He says the Institute needs more fin- 
ancial help, and appeals for special interest in individual masseurs by 
groups of ladies and gentlemen, so that they may obtain, more regular em- 
ployment. He regards a three to six months' course long enough to fit 
them for this occupation, and considers them then capable of competing 
with those who see. 

Turning now to America we find that in Boston there are two blind 
women who have been successful in their efforts at massage. One of them 
is not entirely blind; the other, Miss S., lost her eyesight at the age of t«n. 
From the age of thirteen to twenty she resided at the Perkins Institute, 
where she was thoroughly well grounded in elementary science, anatomy 
and physiology. She paid sixty dollars for twenty class lessons in mas- 
sacre (with seeing pupils) and also took a course in regulation gymnastics 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 207 

/ 



and another in medical gymnastics. She subsequently instructed nurses 
in massage at the Danvers Insane Hospital. Dr. Page, the superintendent, 
speaks of her work in the highest terms. She has worked for several years 
twice a week at the Out-Patient Department of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, under Dr. James M. Jackson. She now gives corrective gymnas- 
tic instruction at the Perkins Institute three times a week and finds that 
she can give, without over fatigue, from three to five treatments a day to 
patients at their homes, receiving two dollars per treatment. She works 
about eight months a year, and says that she is stronger than when she 
began. She thinks that people at first are apt to be rather prejudiced 
against the blind, but that later on they seem to overcome this prejudice. 
Sbe thinks the general training is very important and that it is better for 
rlie Mind to be trained in classes with seeing nupils. Miss S. is, of course, 
a remarkably bright woman and would have succeeded in any work she 
undertook. 

Mr. E. E. Allen, principal of the Pennsylvania Institution for the 
Instruction of the Blind at Overbrook, Pa., informs me that eight of his 
pupils have been trained in massage either at the Polyclinic or at the Ortho- 
iiedic Hospital in Philadelphia. I wrote to the pupils and obtained replies 
from seven of them. 

(I) E. L. C, twenty-five years old, blind at eight, from an injury. 
Entered Philadelphia School for the Blind at ten, took a literary course, 
piano lessons, and learned three trades. Spent six months at the Ortho- 
r-edic Hospital and began to practice massage at Cambridge, Ohio, May, 
1!X>2. Nine-tenths of his work he does at patients' houses, and except for 
tie first visit requires no guide. Is earning about f 100 a month. 

(II) H. L. McD., recovered his eyesight four months after finishing 
lis course of massage at the Philadelphia Orthopedic Hospital. Is now a 
r.cfessful masseur. 

(III) G. C. R., age twenty-six, blind at the age of twenty-three. 
Studied four months at the Orthopedic Hospital in Philadelphia and settled 
sii months ago in Hartford, Conn. Is now paying about half his expenses. 

(IV) W. J. N., age twenty-nine. Lost his eyesight at the age of 
twenty-six, just before graduating from Jefferson Medical School. Studied 
massage for three .months and began massage in Philadelphia, February, 
M2. Has been self-supporting for over a year and has also taught mas- 
sage and electrotherapy. He employs a boy as a guide. 

(V) J. S., blind at the age of thirteen. Began to study massage in 
^ptember, 1903. Took three months' private lessons. Last winter was 
reasonably successful. Goes to patients' houses sometimes with and some- 
times without attendance. 

(VI) W. W. L., became blind at the age of eleven. Studied in Phila- 
(ielphia, worked both in hospital and outside for three years with the help 
of a friend who is a masseur. Was reasonably successful at massage, but 
^ent into business and has been fairly successful in business. 

fTII) E. W. E., has a little vision in one eye, enough to get about com- 
fortably. Studied at the Polyclinic and the Orthopedic Hospital in Phila- 
'ielphia for three months. Practiced for three months at the German Hos- 
pital, settled at Williamsport, and did fairly well. Has since moved to 
^Vasbington, D. C. 

In New York I have been able to* find an account of only one person, 
3 Miss P., who studied and practiced massage for a short time here. She 
?ave it up, for what reason I am unable to learn. 



208 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



My own limited experience is about as follows : I applied to the sup- 
erintendent of the New York Institution for the Blind, some three years 
ago, in order to find the appropriate blind people to teach. He suggested 
my searching some of the charitable blind institutions of New York City 
and I did so. I was unsuccessful in finding a suitable pupil at the Blind 
Asylum upon Blackwell's Island, and I then interviewed some seventy or 
more individuals from a list of the blind poor who receive a small yearly 
allowance from the city. Among these people I was unable to find a single 
person who was both willing and, in my opinion, fitted to start the occupa- 
tion. I had already consulted Mr. Axel C Hallbeck, a masseur who has 
been very successful here in New York, and in April of last year he sent 
me Mr. Arthur Martineau, a French Canadian, thirty-six years of age, 
blind for about ten years, fairly well-educated, intelligent, formerly a 
bank-note engraver. After a week of preliminary trial, Mr. Hallbeck was 
convinced that he could be taught, and gave him daily one or two hours 
in lessons and practice for two months, until the twentieth of June, when 
he began actual practice in the wards at the New York City Hospital upon 
Blackwell's Island. I quote Mr. Hallbeck's account of his instruction : 
* 'While teaching him at my home, I always had some of his male relatives 
present, who were the material for work. At first I taught him general 
massage by doing the manipulations myself and having him put his hands 
on mine. After he had mastered the general massage I taught him local 
massage for special purposes. While teaching local massage, the greatest 
difficulty I experienced was to make him confine himself to the necessary 
region. I used to make him place his right hand as the upper limit for 
massage and the left hand as the lower limit. We applied massage for 
imaginarv cases; for instance: False anchylosis, sprains, muscular rheu- 
matism, lumbago, neuralgia, constipation, etc. At the same time I ta^ughthim 
anatomy and physiology, at least the most necessary points for him to 
know. I taught him the form of the skeleton, excepting the inner cranial 
bones ; I taught him the construction of the joints with ligaments and car- 
tilages, also about one hundred muscles and the principal motor and sensory 
nerves. In regard to physiology I explained to him the process of the diges- 
tion, the circulation of the blood, and the function of the nervous system. 
When he came to the City Hospital, after having practiced with me one 
or two hours every day, during two months, he commenced real work and 
soon attempted as many as nine cases every day. He treated patients of 
hemiplegia contracture, of tabes, of neuralgia, of progressive muscular 
atrophy, of dyspepsia,^ constipation, muscular rheumatism, lumbago, gout, 
sprains, false anchylosis, stiff joints, etc., in great varieties. As the house 
physicians can testify, Mr. Martineau was very useful and successful in 
many cases, and I believe that, as an assistant to a physician or surgeon and 
working according to their instructions, ifr. Martineau will be of great 
value as a masseur.*' 

Dr. A. G. Bennett, (Philadelphia Medical Journal, Yol. I,' No. 10, 
March 5, 1898, p. 426,^ in a paper read before the New York Medical Asso- 
ciation in October, 1897, brought out an interesting point from his cor- 
respondence with the directors of a number of the blind asylums throughout 
America, namely, the very small percentage of blind people who are self- 
supportincr. The figures he quotes are at such variance that it seems hardly 
worth while to read them, but an especially suggestive fact is that a much 
smaller proportion of blind women are able to support themselves than 
blind men. This would seem to add some importance to our idea of em- 
ploying them in massage, because, as is quite evident from the few instances 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 209 



which I quote, the women have been especially successful. Dr. Bennett 
also urges the importance of one or more blind masseurs in all hospitals, 
dispensaries, sanatoria, insane asylums, private retreats, gymnasiums, 
Turkish baths and the like. 

In what I have already quoted, I believe that I have covered, or at 
least suggested, most of the essential points in the difficulties of teaching 
the blind massage. I only wish to emphasize the very special importance 
of a most careful selection of the person who is to be taught, since upon 
that the success of the project will most intimately depend. This selection 
can, of course, be made only by teachers in blind asylums, who are thorough- 
ly interested in the plan and in perfect sympathy with its aims. The great 
necessity of a thorough fundamental training, in order that the blin;d 
masseurs may be quite as intelligent and well trained as seeing masseurs, 
is a point which cannot be too thoroughly emphasized. 

The compensation which the blind masseur should receive for his ser- 
vices in private practice is a detail which I do not feel can be decided off- 
hand. In many more or less novel business undertakings the most efficient 
plan to introduce the business is to underbid the other competitors. There 
is one thing to be considered, and that is, a great many patients who are 
unable to pay large fees would employ massage, and very gladly, if the 
expense were less. 

The necessity for a guide if the masseur is to go about from patient 
to patient is also a detail which would depend entirely upon the individual 
and the place where he was located, as you may well judge from the ex- 
iiEplea which I have quoted. My own idea of the special utility of the 
olind as masseurs is, however, that they should be employed largely in 
stationary places, such as clinics, hospitals, bath resorts, gymnasiums, san- 
atoria, and the like. There, at least, they are quite as independent of 
^comotion as the seeing masseurs. 

Xo doubt, as Miss S., of Boston, writes, nervous people, the class of 
r-atients who are especially apt to require massage, might feel a certain 
"epugnance to employing blind people, and might quite naturally be made 
Eore nervous than before the treatment. Tou will note, however, that 
Jlijs S. mentioned that this difficulty usually vanished after the first visit. 
Moreover, this is a point upon which custom would undoubtedly alter most 
Drejudices. 

In one country, Japan, the blind have a practical monopoly over mas- 
sage. There, massage is cheap and within the means of all classes. The 
blind are protected by the government, self-supporting and contented with 
their lot. This condition has persisted for centuries. 

In four countries, Bussia, Belgium, England and Germany, we have 
r^ad of well-organized and reasonably successful attempts to teach selected 
Kind people massage. 

Here in America, the only definite series of attempts in this direction 
^hich I have been able to learn have been made by Mr. Allen; but there 
15, it seems to me, very strong reason for expecting renewed and more per- 
sistent efforts. I am presenting this communication to the New York 
Academy of Medicine merely in the nature of a preliminary report, in the 
hope that further information and assistance may be forthcoming ; in the 
hope that a well-planned scheme may be devised for providing suitable blind 
people with instruction in massage and for furnishing a practical organi- 
zation, so that they may obtain continuous employment after they have 
learned; in the hope that you, the physicians to the various hospitals, dis- 
pensaries, sanatoria, and homes in New York, may be sufficiently interested 

Me. 



210 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



in the problem to find places in some of these institutions for blind mas- 
seurs to work and prove their efficiency, and in the hope that some of the 
directors or superiutendents of blind asylums may see this communication 
and select appropriate blind people for instruction. 

I have purposely refrained from expressing any personal views as to 
the selection of appropriate candidates for such instruction, because it 
seemed to me the few hints which I have incorporated from England and 
Germany are much more suggestive than any I might make myself. In 
closing let me tell you how thoroughly appreciated by patients with the 
chronic ailments at the New York Hospital, were the services of this blind 
masseur whom Mr. Hallbeck was kind enough to teach for me, and how 
keenly many of them missed his services when he left the institution. You 
are all too well acquainted with the value of massage in such ailments to 
wan ant me in emphasizing its utility. I only wish to beg of you to give 
this matter your attention and your co-operation whenever in the future 
an opportunity occurs to further its accomplishment, and so gain the satis- 
faction of having aided some poor blind person to become an active, useful, 
interested, occupied and, best of all, independent individual. 

HiGHEB Education. 

This report I read to the pupils, assembled in the Music Hall. Many of 
them had known 'Mr. Martineau during his term in the Institution, and 
they were deeply interested in the story of his success, and also in Mr. Hall- 
beck's statement of the course of study taken by Mr. Martineau. From this, 
and also from the requirements of another pupil who proposed to take a course 
in Osteopathy at the College in Kirksville, Missouri, it was suggested that a 
class in physiology might be usefully added to the 0. I. B. curriculum, 
though the number of pupils possessing the physical and other qualifications 
for success in these lines is not large. 

In the fall of 1904 a pupil of the 0. I. B. entered another school to pre- 
pare for an Arts course in the University. Subsequent communication with 
him made it appear that his path might have been made easier if he had 
had some instruction in Latin while he was here, and it is probable that that 
language will be taught during the current session. The West Virginia 
Tablet, in reviewing the 0. I. B. Eeport of last year, says: "They attach 
great importance to the substantial primary education in the Ontario school, 
and seem not to have pushed very far into the mere accomplishments. The 
strength of the staff would seem to indicate that the courses are limited by 
preference rather than necessity. The American schools generally push the 
intellectual training farther, and, I am pleased to think, with no disadvan- 
tage.'' 

Hugh Buckingham, formerly a totally blind pupil of the California In- 
stitution, is now in his Sophomore year in the State University, and has 
faken a leading position as debater, which argues well for his future success 
in the law, which he intends to follow as a profession. This leads the writer 
of the Biennial Report of the California Institution to say "that for the 
blind we must try to prepare our pupils for those employments where brain 
work is demanded rather than hand work. It seems hardly necessary to 
defend this statement. In these days of sharp commercial competition and 
when the machine plays so large a part in what used to be handicrafts, the 
blind man who tries to get a living by manufacturing, except as employer, is 
at a disadvantage. There is no sentiment in business. The dealer buys 
where he can buy cheapest and with the largest profit to himself, and the 
consumer follows his example. 

14a E. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 211 



**Bnt I am glad to say that there are many occupations where the edu- 
cated brain, plus energy and perseverance, can overcome the handicap of 
blindness. Besides music-teaching and piano-tuning, which are arts rather 
tlian trades, there are many small business ventures, solicitorships, middle- 
men between producer and consumer, book and insurance agents, newspaper 
Tenders, and many other occupations which offer opportunity for the exercise 
of business tact and energy. Many of our boys are working this field with 
Bucceas. 

"And yet there will always be a percentage of the blind who will need a 
helping hand. Some lose sight in adult years, and find it hard to adjust 
:liemselTe8 to new conditions. Some lose heart in the struggle for existence, 
and give up the fight. Some have no initiative, no capacity for business ; 
tiey are willing to work, but don't know how. They ne^d executive direc- 
n'oQ and skill, and public assistance to eke out the difference between earn- 
ings and support. To supply this deficit working homes for the adult blind 
kve been established in various States, and are serving a most beneficent 
pnrpose." 

LlBRA&IES. 

The following books have been procured for the Teachers' Library : 
University Collection of the World's Great Classics, 30 vols. 
America, Notes on North, 2 vols. 
Annals of the Parish, John Gait. 
Book of Days, 2 vols. 

Brock, Life of Sir Isaac, by F. B. Tupper. 
Canada, Life in, Canniff Haight. 

Canada, Statistical Account of Upper, Robert Gourlay, 3 vols. 
Canadas, the, John Gait. 
Canadians, Celebrated, Morgan. 
Composers, Famous, 2 vols. 
Dancing in all Ages. 
Dictionary of Thoughts. 
Edward the Black Prince, 2 vols, 
i^ngland, irictorial History of, 8 vols. 
English History, Half Hours of. 
English Literature, 2 vols. 
George the Third, Life of. 
German Dictionary. 
Gonld, Joseph. 

Hynms, History and Development. 
Italian Dictionary. 
Literature in Letters. 
MackemBie, William Lyon. 
Music, Phases of Modem. 
Music, the Story of. 
Poets, Lives of the English, 2 vols. 
Prima Donna, the, 2 vols. 
Rebellion, the other Story. 
Southey's Poems. 
Spectator, the. 

^tory of Mv Life. Helen Keller. 
SulliTan, Sir Arthur, Life. 
Veteran of 1812. 
Wagner, Richard. 



212 THE REPORT OF THE No. 1! 



White Chief of the Ottawa. 

Wfld North Land. 

Blindness and the Blind, Levy. 

Achievements of the Blind, Artman. 

The St. Lawrence, Dawson. 

Barnard's Journal of Education, 2 vols. 

MacGeoghegan's History of Ireland. 

European Languages, Murray, 2 vols. 

Applied Psychology, McLellan. 

First Latin Book, Henderson. 

High School Bookkeeping. 

Physiology and Hyfyiene. 

Practical Physiology. 

, The following have been added to the Pupils' and Circulating Lili 
raries : — 

(In Line Type.) 

Eneass Magazine, 12 vols. 

Story of Siegfried. 

Cfiildren's Fairy Book. 

Cyr's Interstate Primer and First Reader. 

Pickett's Gap. 

Stories for Little Readers. 

Through the Farmyard Gate. 

Wild Animals I Have Known. 

Turner's First Reader. 

Longfellow's Birthday. 

Odysseus, Hero of Ithaca. 

The Pilot. 

Gods and Heroes. 

Selections from Ruskin. 

Sesame and Lilies. 

Paul and Virginia. 

In Memoriam. 

George Eliot, Biographical Sketch. 

Freeman's History of Europe. 

(In New York Point.) 

Christian Record, 14 vols. 

Progressive Course, 2 pamphlets, 15 vols. i 

Rational Spelling Book. 

Word Primer. 

King Richard III., 2 copies. i 

Pioneer History Stories. 

Napoleon, 2 vol$. , 

Second Jungle Book. j 

Leading Facts in French History. 

Life and Writings of Addison. 

Walsh's New Primary Arithmetic. 

Joy's Arithmetic Without a Pencil. 

Maine Woods, 2 vols. 

Mozart — Prout. 

Foundations of French. 



IMS EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 213 



Six Select Stories. 

Daphne. 

Pioneers of France in New World, 2 vols. 

Golden Age. 

How to Knit and Crochet. 

The following Catholic J)ook8 were donated for the use of pupils and 
subscribers to the circulating library by The Xavier Free Publication Society 
for the Blind, 27 West Sixteenth street, New York : — 

(In New York Point.) 

The Bible and its Interpreter. 

Consoling Thoughts of St. Francis de Sales, 2 vols. 

The Following of Christ, 3 vols. 

Golden Sands, 4 vols. 

Hail Full of Grace, 2 vols. 

The Heart of Jesus of Nazareth. 

Leading Events in the History of the Church, 3 vols. 

Life of Christ, 2 vols. 

Little Lives of Oreat Saints, 2 vols. 

Mary in the Work of Kedemption. 

The Sacrifice of the New Law. 

Selections from Cardinal Newman, 2 vols. 

Spiritual Pepper and Salt. 

Wayside Tales, 4 vols. 

What Christ Eevealed. 

Workings of the Divine Will. 

Who and What is Christ? 

Catechism. 

A large quantity of old books — the accumulation of years — was sent to 
the bindery, and brought back in condition to ensure a new term of useful- 

The cost of books for the blind, purchased at Louisville or Boston, is 
leavy, and it is worth considering whether an effort should not be made to 
include book-making among the employments of the senior pupils. Blind 
ostitutions in the United States get many free books under the provisions 
cf the let of Congress of 1879, entitled "An Act to promote the Education 
d the Blind," which, of course, has no application outside the boundaries of 
tie Union. The extent of the home market in the States makes the problem 
simpler there than here. Thus Mr. J. H. Freeman, Superintendent of the 
Jacksonville, Illinois, Institution for the Education of the Blind, says in his 
Eeport that in the printing department "not only do we work for the benefit 
ff our own pupils and graduates, but we are supplying a demand for music 
citable for the blind throughout the country. To illustrate the etxtent of 
^ila demand I would mention that more than 300 orders for sheet music 
prjited by us were received during the last school year from 17 institutions 
for the blind and individuals throughout the country, 33 different States be- 
nig represented by our customers. We are now publishing annually more 
niusic for the use of the blind than any other institution or printer in the 
^orld. Primarily we publish it for our own pupils, but we are very glad to send 
^lieiinigic to outside parties at cost. In addition to sheet music we also print 
and sell to outside parties) certain text books and books fitted to supplement 
tip school branches. The demand for these works is growing and we are 
eonpfantly making additions to our catalogue. At the present time it con- 



214 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



tains the names of 70 publications printed by us. In order to do this print- 
ing necessary for publishing the music and the books found in our catalogue, 
our printer — ^a blind man — ^has stereotyped nearly 17,000 brass plates, which 
we safeguard in a tlreproof vault. From the number of applications we receive 
from different parts of this country, it is very evident to us that pur literary 
and musical contributions contribute very materially to the intellectual ad- 
vancement not only of our own pupils, but to the sightless in this and other 
States.'' 

In China the pr Jucts of the blind printer's labor are available for the 
use of sighted readers, and the market is therefore practically illimitable. 
Rev. W. H. Murray first i^ivented the system of Numeral Type with Braille 
dots as a basis, and then connected the dots by straight lines for sighted 
readers. Miss C. F. Gordon-Cumming makes the following statements at 
page 100 et seq. of her book descriptive of Mr. Murray's invention and its 
results : — 

"Another very important point is that in the new type most of the work 
is done by the blind students in school, all correcting of proofs is done on 
the spot, and the cost of a complete Bible, with the 'tones' and aspirate of 
each word perfectly rendered, will be about one-third that of a similar book 
produced alphabetically by specially-trained sighted compositor^ and proof- 
readers. 

"Mr. Murray considers that it is now fully proved that the new type is 
not only the easiest conceivable form to read and write, but that it is by far 
the cheapest to produce. 

"Best of all, it promises a solution of one of his gravest problems, in the 
provision of almosi inexhaustible stores of remunerative occupation for the 
blind, as compositors, printers, binders and teachers. 

"He has done his best to teach them certain trades, and has found his 
pupils very successful in making doormats and coarse matting for passages, 
while the women learn knitting and sewing mattresses and pillows. Various 
other work has been tried, such as shoemaking (the Chinese cloth shoe re- 
sembling a shapeless boat). The latter, however, has not proved successful. 

"And, indeed, as regards making them self-supporting by instruction in 
any of the usual industrial arts, Mr. Murray despairs of the blind ever be- 
ing able to compete against the legions of sighted Chinese who already over- 
crowd the market for basket and cane work, knitting, weaving, etc., and who 
would inevitably undersell the produce of the blind. Even in England, what 
would become of their industries apart from hearts in sympathy and open 
purses to helpP 

"So it appears that embossing, stereotyping, and bookbinding, piano and 
harmonium tuning and teaching, knitting, and matmaking are the most 
promising industries of the class usually considered suitable for the blind, 
and that their employment must lie chiefly in literary and musical work. 
They also write out books of embossed manuscript music, which they stitch 
and bind very decently. 

"A friend, who had seen how many blind men in Japan earn their living 
by massage, suggested that Mr. Murray should introduce this as a profes- 
sion^ but he finds that the Chinese do not use it, at least not in North China. 

"Though there seems so little hope of the students in the Blind School 
becoming self-supporting by ordinary industries, they are unwearied in their 
exeriions on behalf ox their sighted brothers and sisters." 

Mr. Murray thus describes his hive of busy blind bees at their work : — 
"With ihe exception of two, who are making rope doormats, two boys who are 
at the Braille stereotype, one reading, and the other punching at his dicta- 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 216 



tion. making the brass sheets from which the embossing is done for blind 
readers, and some who are retuning the piano, all hands are busy preparing 
looks for sighted readers; boys or girls are composing or distributing; the 
Ihine&e scholar is reading proof sheets; one man is preparing the papier- 
mac lie with which to take a mould ; another is boiling the zinc to pour on to 
• tkei moulds ; two men are at the press, printing the Gospels ; two are in the 
iHif, printing the London Mission Hymnal. 

"One of the boys has just finished tuning the shop piano. He has re- 
placed a wire that snapped, and also all the felts and flannels. The latter 
was supplied by tearing an old red flannel garment into strips, while my last 
year's felt slippers were likewise turned to account. 

**Two girls at a time work part of each day as compositors. They work 
in this way : the first girl reads with one hand on her Gospel in raised type 
:or the blind, while with the other hand she lifts the two types representing 
Bch word in the type for the sighted, and hands them to the second girl to 
:L«t in the form for printing. Thiis the two blind girls work till a paragraph 
is finished. Then the second girl reads from the type just set up (of course 
; is all reversed, but to the blind this is just as easy to read, as their every- 
hj writing with punctured dots is all written backward, and when taken off 
he frame has to be turned over, and then is right for the reader). While 
cue girl reads, the other follows with her finger on the Gospel in the raised 
Braille type, and so checks any mistake. 

*'In this way we have set up and printed 100 copies of smaller Epistles; 
TfiH copies of the Gospel of St. Matthew; 400 copies of St. Mark; 400 copies 
:St. Luke; 1,200 copies of St. John as far as the 10th chapter; 1,400 sheets 
:f reading exercises ; 100 hymn-books, all for the use of sighted persons, and 
now ready for distribution as the demand arises. 

''We have had the 408 sounjls of the syllabary arranged according to our 
pnoier, and lithographed, making four pages in large type of about half an 
nil in size. These are stitched in the form of a book, and are supplied to 
l^rjiners. A large number of these are now in use, and I have sent them to 
lij^ionary friends who wished to study the lessons. So our school this year 
bas been like a wholesale publishing house. And if all could see the joy 
^ li h lights up the blind faces to find themselves both useful and important, 
I think that from the Emperor downward all would give us their sympathy 
iBd help. All the pupils have had a trial as compositors, distributors and 
:TOnfreader8, each has had a sighted pupil to teach, and all feel the utmost 
tSdence in their prospects of success as teachers. This, indeed, has already 
"^nso amply proved that all theoretical objections should now be silenced." 

Exchange List. 

Desiring to obtain all the available information of value to the blind 
-id to those interested in their welfare, I mailed copies of the thirty-third 
iimiial report of this Institution to the following schools, with the hope that 
^Heir directors would reciprocate by sending their reports to me : — 

^rhool for Blind, Boulder, Montana, TJ.S. 
Wiool for Blind. Lansing, Michigan, U.S. 
Institution for Blind, Indianapolis, Ind. 
M. Anai^nos, School for Blind, South Boston, Mass. 
Institution for Blind, Jacksonville, 111. 
Institution for Blind, Nebraska City, Neb. 
School for Blind, Baltimore, Maryland. 
Institution for Blind, Kansas City, Kansas. 



216 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Academy for Blind, Macon, Georgia. 

School for Blind, Janesville, Wisconsin. 

Institution for Blind, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Institution for Colored Blind, Austin, Texas. 

School for Blind, Ogden, Utah. 

Institution for Blind, Staunton, Virginia. 

School for Blind, Faribault, Minn. 

Institution for Blind, Cedar Springs, South Carolina. 

Institution for Blind, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

Institution for Blind, Columbus, Ohio. 

W. B. Wait, Institution for Blind, New York City. 

Institution for Blind, Overbrook, Penn. 

School for Blind, Gary, South Dakota. 

Institution for Blind, Jackson, Miss. 

School for Blind, Romney, West Virginia. 

Institution for Blind, Vancouver, Washington, U.S. 

Institute for Blind, Salem, Oregon. 

School for Blind, Nashville, Tenn. 

Institution for Blind, Pittsburg, Penn. 

iilind Institution, St. Augustine, Florida. 

Institution for Blind, Talladega, Alabama. 

Institution for Blind, Berkeley, California. 

College for Blind, Vinton, Iowa. 

Institution for Blind, Louisville, Kentucky. 

School for Blind, Batavia, New York. 

Institution for Blind, Austin, Texas. 

School for Blind, St. Louis, Missouri. 

School for Blind, Fort Gibson, Indian Territory. 

Academy for Blind, Talladega, Alabama. 

School for Blind, Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

School for Negro Blind, Talladega, Alabama. 

Institution for Blind, Hartford, Connecticut. 

School for Blind, Little Rock, Arkansas. 

Institute for Blind, Stockport, Eng. 

Royal Victoria Asylum for Blind, 79 Northumberland street, Newcastle 
on-Tyne, Eng. 

Institution for Blind, Clarendon street, Nottingham, Eng. 

Catholic Blind Asylum, 59 Brunswick road, Liverpool, Eng. 

Yorkshire School for Blind, York, Eng. 

Institution for Blind, South Hill Place, Swansea, Wales. 

Institute for Blind, Glover street, Preston, Eng. 

Association for Blind, 28 Berners street, London, Eng. 

School for Blind, Norwich, Eng. 

Society for Blind, Darlington street, Wolverhampton, Eng. 

School for Blind, Manchester road, Sheffield, Eng. 

Institution for Blind, North Hill, Plymouth, England. 

Gardner's Trust for Blind, 1 Poets' Comer, Westminster, London, S.W 
England. 

British and Foreign Blind Association, 206 Great Portland street, Loi 
don, W., England. 

National Institution for lilind, Dublin, Ireland. 

Koyal Normal College for the Blind, Westow street, Upper Norwoo* 
S.E., London, England. 

Asylum for Blind, Infirmary road, Cork, Ireland. 



m EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 217 



Hetherington's Charity for Aged " Blind, Christ's Hospital, Newtrate 
street, London, E.C., England. 

HensLaw's Blind Asylum, Old Traflford, Manchester, Eng. 

Asjimn for Blind, Queen's road. Park street, Bristol, Eng. 

Sckool for Blind, Hardman street, Liv-erpool, Eng. 

Association for Blind, North Parade, Bradford, Eng. 

Institution for Blind, Albion street, Leeds, Eng. 

Institution for Blind, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Eng. 

Asylum for Blind, Eastern road, Brighton, Eng. 

Ulster Society for Education of Blind, Belfast, Ireland. 

Blind Institution, Kingston Square, Hull, England. 

Institute for Blind, Glossop road, Cardiff, Wales. 

Institute for Blind, 81 Castle street, Inverness, Scotland. 

Institution for Blind, St. David's Hill, Exeter, Eng. 

London Society for Blind, Upper Avenue road, Eegent's Park, London, 
X.W., England. 

Blind School, Nicolson street, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Home for Blind Children, Goldsmiths' Place, Kilburn Priory, London, 
S.W., England. 

School for Blind, St. George's Fields, Southwark, London, S.E., Eng- 
land. 

Institution for Blind, Magdalen Green, Dundee, Scotland. 

Asylum for Blind, 102 Castle street, Glasgow, Scotland. 

School for Blind, Sydney, Australia. 

School for Blind, Melbourne, Australia. 

School for Blind, Oporto, Portugal. 

School for Blind, Lisbon, Portugal. 

School for Blind, Milan, Italy. 

School for Blind, Naples, Italy. 

School for Blind, Madrid, Spain. 

School for Blind, Grenada, Spain. 

School for Blind, Prague, Bohemia. 

School for Blind, Lintz, Austria. 

Sfhool for Blind, Vienna, Austria. 

School for Blind, Leipzig, Germany. 

School for Blind, Munich, Germany. 

"^'hool for Blind, Dresden, Germany. 

School for Blind, Berlin, Germany. 

School for Blind, Soissons, France. 

Srhool for Blind, Marseilles, France. 

School for Blind, Paris, France. 

School for Blind, Brussels, Belgium. 

School for Blind, Antwerp, Belgium. 

From quite a numbei: of these Institutions reports have been received; 
•^ra others have come courteous acknowledgments, with a few newspaper 
i^Tiewg, of which the following is a sample : — 

"The Thirt-'^-third Annual Eeport of the 0. I. B. is before me. It has 
?^ine features that have not been seen by me for a long time, if ever. I note 
^lat the Principal, Mr. H. F. Gardiner, has incorporated with his report on 
'He present needs and state of his school an extensive collection of excerpts 
from the reports of various American institutions, and from the proceedings 
'jf the Association of Instructors of the Blind, bearing on the topic he dis- 
*^*i»«ed so wisely at St. Louis last summer, which he publishes also with the 
^^port under consideration ; together with the discussion which followed the 



218 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



reading of the paper. This feature Inakes the present a very valuable docu- 
ment, and the subject thus treated will have the advantage of reaching more 
persons than would be likely to be reached by the proceedings of the meeting 

itself. .... I 

"The modesty of Principal Gardiner in giving credit to his teachers and 
officers for the signal success of the school during his first year of service 
betrays a sagacity scarcely to be expected of so young a man in the work. 
He reveals unconsciously to the initiated how very largely that success has 
been secured by the gentle pressure of the guiding hand. He shows plainly 
that he is not to be swept from a sound conservatism by the spasms of nov- 
elty that sometimes sweep over the country and carry everything that is 
movable with them. 

"The.matter that seems to rest with most weight on the Principal's heart 
is the question of affording to his pupils a means of livelihood that they and 
their friends can depend on when the school days are over and the boys and 
girls as men and women take up the real burden of life. He notes with some 
apparent misgivings that are not to be wondered at, that two of the great 
American Institutions have repudiated the trades in their shops and substi- 
tuted manual training under the theory, and what else I cannot certainly 
say, that youth in the schools is the time for acquiring the mere principles 
of knowledge, and that the practical application ought to be secured in the 
ordinary way by substantial apprenticeships after the school days are past. 
The theory is sound, but the practice is at least questionable and uncertain. 
No one trade will suit all pupils, and no one boy will suit all trades ; but the 
right boy with the right trade, and sense and address enough to work it, will 
succeed at any trade, and New York and Boston have proved it over and over 
again. Still, it must not be forgotten that the wisdom of the school must be 
shown in arranging for those who have to be helped to success. The others 
will take care of themselves. The homely wisdom of Sir Roger de Coverley 
commends itself at all times, 'There is much to be said on both sides of the 
question.' 

"The Institution is taking the Toronto College examination for its prom- 
ising music pupils, and thus giving them a very handsome advantage, as 
Mr. Wait has long been doing for his pupils of both the music and literary 
part of their courses in his school." 

Farm, Grounds and Buildings. 

No new buildings were erected during the year, but a considerable sum 
was expended upon necessary repairs, and similar expenditure will be needed 
for some time, as the buildings are now over thirty years old. The teachers' 
and officers' parlor was tastefully refurnished during the vacation, the usual 
repairs were made in class-rooms and corridors, and some needed changes 
were made in the plumbing. 

A plan to improve the heating system is under the consideration of the 
Public Works Department. 

A larere quantity of road material has been drawn from the pit and used 
to good advantage upon the grounds. 

The appropriation for trees was not available in time to be used this 
year. 

Three thousand square feet of cement walk was constructed, the plan 
being to replace the most badly worn portions of the board-walk with cement. 

The planting of willows near the river, to prevent the washing away of 
the gravel bank, was undertaken on a small scale, but the cuttings did not 
thrive. An experiment will be made with poplar or silver maple. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 219 



A plot of ground was graded and sodded for lawn-bowling by the em- 
ployees of the Institution. 

fiain was abundant during the growing season and the farm crops were 
unusually good ; wheat, oats and corn above the average ; roots, with the ex- 
ception of potatoes, good ; apples scarce, and the quality poor. An attempt 
was made in the spring to graft winter apple cuttings upon the summer apple 
trees, the latter being proportionately top numerous. Another experiment 
was the use of nitro-culture with a bushel of clover seed, the microbes being 
applied by Prof. F. C. Harrison of the Bacteriological Department of the 
Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph. Although the results were not as 
wonderful as those descri,*b€d ia the Century Magazine of October, 1904, 
tiey were positive enough to warrant further experiment on the same line. 

Visitors. 

ilany visitors continue to come to the Institution on Saturdays, or after 
stool hours on the other days of the week. They are welcome from Monday 
Eorning till Friday afternoon, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., when 
ie classes are in session jind the Visitors' Attendant and the teachers are on 
Liad to explain the work done. But it seems like a waste of time to show 
:ropIe through empty rooms, when a little forethought on their part would 
aaie it possible to exhibit something really interesting for their inspection. 
C'f course there is no objection to pupils' parents taking advantage of cheap 
fires to spend a few hours with their ciiildren on public holidays. 

I have again to thank the city ministers who held special services in the 
Music Hall on Sunday afternoons. 

H. F. Qabdineb, 

Princijpal. 
Brantford, October, 1906. 

Physician's Report. 

Eon. R. A. Ptke, M.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario : 

SiE, — I have the honor to submit my annual report as Physician to the 
Ontario Institution for the Blind. 

The past session has been an unusually healthful one among both oi- 
i-ials and pupils. The pupils came from home for the year's work in an 
inuanally fit condition and maintained this, with very few exceptions, 
throughout the term. 

The female side of the houde has always been the most troublesome. 
Girls develop coughs and colds, become anaemic, etc. The cause of this, it 
appears to me, is due partly to natural susceptibility, but largely to the lack 
of a proper room for recreation and relaxation. After classes, girls are found 
sitting about in their dormitories reading or knitting, because they have no 
other room where they can go. The lack of this proper accommodation, to- 
gether with the existing high-pressure system of heating, gives rise in many 
cases to unnecessary discomfort and avoidable diseases. 



220 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Another serious and unsanitary feature is that there is no sick-room or 
luspect-room on the girls' side. Contagious diseases cannot be properly 
g^uarded against on this account. 

Trusting that these minor wants may appeal to you sufficiently strong, 
and that your liberality may correct what in my opinion are serious matters 
to those placed under our charge, 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

J. A. Mabquis. 
Brantford, 19th July, 1905. 

Oculist's Report. 

To Hon. R. A. Ptne, .M.B., 

Minister of Education : 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit my Report as Oculist to the Ontario 
Institution for the Blind. 

Five years ago I examined all the pupils then attending the Institution, 
going into the eye conditions pretty thoroughly, and preparing a rather ex- 
haustive report, classifying these conditions. Each succeeding year my ex- 
amination was more particularly of the new pupils, and in one of my subse- 
quent reports I believe I advised an examination of all the pupils, with a 
classified report on the disease conditions, after an interval of a few years, 
when in fact a sufficient number of new pupils should have come in to show 
some effect on those classifications. In this report you will find the results 
of the examination of all tne pupils again tabulated similarly to that of five 
years ago, rendering comparisons easy. 



Number of pupils examined 

New pupils, examined for first time 




Females. 



59 
9 



Total. 



Ill 
21 



Divided into five classes. 



I. Without perception of light in either eye . 
II. With perception of light only, in one eye. . 

III. With perception of light only, in both eyes 

IV. With limited objective vision in cne eye. . . 
V. With limited objective vision in both eyes. 



Males. 



18 

4 

6 

14 

10 



52 



Females. 



6 
9 

10 
8 

26 



59 



Total. 



24 
13 
16 
22 



111 



In the last class on3 girl and two boys are included who were found to 
have sufficient vision to render them ineligible for admission. 



]m 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



221 



Diseases causing 

eaci:— 



blindness, number of cases, and percentage affected by 



l>puc Atrophv 

0]»hth<iimia Neonatorum 

(attract (Congenital and Lamellar) 

Irprv of one eye followed by S}Tnpathetic Ophthalmia in 

the other '. . / 

Injon by powder explosions 

hmiy by other means 

Iniriilia and Coloboma 

htervctial Keratitis 

fieimiis Pigmentosa 

Ik^t-nerated eyes, cause unknown 

Kerauiglobufl 

E^ractive errors 

MuTophthalmus 

1. iaian 

Brain Fever 

' ndeveloped Optic Nerves 

inira-Uterinft Keratitis 

varlet Fever r 

iVuinonia 



Males. 



10 
\) 
8 

6 
5 
2 
3 



Fe- 
males. 



13 

13 

8 



Total. 



52 



23 
22 
16 

8 
5 
3 
5 
5 
4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Per- 
cent. 

20.7 
19.8 
14.4 

7.2 

4.5 

2.7 

4.5 

4.5 

3.6 

3.6 

2.7 

2.7 

1.8 

1.8 

1.8 

.9 

.9 

.9 

.9 



59 



111 



It might be noticed that the first three diseases on the list are respon- 
siUe for sixty-one cases, over half of the total. 

The majority of the pupils with Optic Atrophy were affected at birth or 
b early childhood ; while in a few it was due to injuries, mainly to the head, 
received later in life. 

As usual, Ophthalmia Neonatorum stands high as a causative factor in 
tie blindness of the Province. In most cases it has left very little sight to 
ie unfortunate children ^Tjecause of th^ great destruction it so frequently 
au^es in the organ. 

The Cataractous pupils have nearly all had one or both eyes operated on 
n± rather indifferent results. Naturally, if the results had been as bril- 
1 ant as they are in uncomplicated Cataract cases, these pupils would be get- 
ting their education elsewhere ; but the trouble is that many of these Cata- 
racts have been successfully removed only to find other serious defects. 

Injuries to one eye followed by Sympathetic Ophthalmia in the other : 
-It is a difficult thing to persuade a patient or his parents that it is better 
^0 sacrifice a badly injured eye by having it removed than to take the chance 
of logmg the sight of both eyes by Sympathetic Inflammation in the other. 
Ttis fact accounts for this deplorable clt^ss. 

Injuries by powder explosions were all in male pupils, and all but one 
file to accidents in mines. 

In all the cases of Interstitial Keratitis there is evidence of inherited 
f^mlis, and these all females. Only one other case of syphilis was detected, 
^hich was in a girl with Optic Atrophy. 

Four pupils have eyes too degenerated to reveal the cause, and did not 
inow themselves what the primary trouble had been. 

Two of the cases of Refractive Errors are of such a nature that glasses 
benefit }mi little, while the third gets normal vision with properly fitted 
glasses, and was reported ineligible. 



222 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



During the past year a few cases required treatment, including opera- 
tions where found necessary or where there was promise of improving the 
vision ; these latter gave very gratifying results. 

Ear troubles required some attention, but there was nothing of a seriouB 
nature. 

My sincere thanks are due to Principal Gardiner for his courteous as- 
sistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. C. Bell. 

Brantford, 15th September, 1905. 

Literary Examiner's Report. 

Hon. R. A. Pyne, 

Minister of Education : 

Sir, — In submitting the report of my examination of the literary depart- 
ment in the Ontario Institution for the Education of the Blind, it gives me 
pleasure to state that there is much to commend, little to criticize. 

The education of the youth of our country is a subject of paramount 
importance, which, however, becomes more involved and somewhat perplex- 
ing when considered in relation to the blind. In this class we find intellects 
as clear and minds incited by as lofty ideals as are possessed by any other 
persons. Such being the case, the question may with propriety be asked, 
how far the senior work of a literary character should extend. At present 
good work is done in English Grammar and Literature, but interest in this 
branch would no doubt be increased, and a more thorough and rational grasp 
of the language be obtained, if Latin were added to the curriculum. The 
knowledge of this subject would enable some to prosecute more advanced 
study,- and eventuallv even to matriculate in a university. 

While this Institution is intended for the education of the pupils, a vis- 
itor may obtain a good deal of instruction and have many erroneous views 
corrected. Many a parent would be amply repaid for the time taken in visit- 
ing the classes at work by the valuable object lessons received in patience, 
perseverance and sympathy. One cannot fail to be impressed with the earn- 
estness and application of the pupils on the one hand, and the faithful per- 
severance and sympathy, on the other hand, on the part of the instructors. 
From the kindergarten, classes, where the little ones receive their elementary 
ideas, to the senior pupils in mathematics and literature, the same spirit of 
faithful work is manifest. The order, the discipline and the deportment of 
the pupils are excellent. 

In the matter of text-books the only change I would recommend is that 
a Canadian edition of the Speller be adopted in place of Blaisdell's Speller, 
a work published in the United States. 

The work of the various classes during the four days' examination held 
from June I3th to 16th inclusive will appear in the following detailed state- 
ment : — 

Mr. W. Wickens* Classes, 

Arithmetic. — Simple problems in fractions. In this class there were 
eight boys and eleven girls, the majority of whom showed marked ability, 
no less than five receiving full marks. The lowest was 34 per cent., the 
average being 78 per cent. This is certainly a bright class. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 223 



Geography. — ^England and Ireland. The class consisted of ten boys and 
thirteen girls. The answers showed much variety of merit ; many were ex- 
cellent; some were poor. The marks assigned were from 20 per cent, to 100, 
the aTerage being 69. ^ 

Reading. — There are three divisions in this class, the work of the seniors 
being the selected poem "Horatius at the Bridge," in point print. The sec- 
ond division used the Fourth Reader, in point print; and the third division 
the First Keader, also in point print. In the senior division of thirteen 
pnpils the marks averaged 75 per cent., ranging from 60 to 85 per cent. In 
the second division of three pupils the marks were 60, 75 and 100 per cent. 
In the third division of five pupils the marks ranged from 40 to 80 per cent., 
averaging 54 per cent. 

Writing. — Short extracts of prose and poetry from dictation, using cap- 
ital letters, punctuation marks, etc. This writing is in point print. Twelve 
pupils in the class; work very creditable. Marks were from 34 to 100 per 
cent., one pupil receiving the latter mark; average 71 per cent. In addition 
to the twelve pupils mentioned, there were two others whose writing was in 
pencil. They received 60 and 80 per cent. 

Bible Geography and History. — Eleven seniors and six juniors, all boys. 
The pround covered was the history of the Jewish nation to the end of the 
•Xd Testament. The marks, generally, were high, ranging in the seniors 
from 67 to 100 per cent., with an average of 82; and in the juniors from 75 
to 100 per cent., averaging 90. 

Spelling. — Two divisions of boys. The seniors have Part III. of Blais- 
iell's Speller; the juniors, embossed Speller. In the senior class ol fourteen 
the marks ran from 50 to 100 per cent., with an average of 88; in the class 
of six juniors from 50 tp 100 per cent., average 83 per cent. 

Mr. Roney's Classes, 

Arithmetic. — This is a promising class of 17 junior pupils with varying 
ages and degrees of merit. The work covers Addition, Subtraction and Mul- 
nplication to 20 times 20. It is somewhat novel to hear a child of nine 
jears of age repeat 14 times 16 and 14 times 17 as readily as 8 times 9 or 11 
times 12. The marks ranged from 50 to 100 per cent., with an average of 84 
per cent. 

English Grammar. — ^Limits, the parts of speech and the analysis of sim- 
ple sentences. The class contains nine boys and fifteen girls. Some have 
^one poor work, but many of them very good. In ranking such pupils one 
must take into consideration the size of the class and the varying attainments. 
l^e pupil being French, can speak very little English and the progress in 
*m case must necessarily be slow. Marks ranged from to 100 per cent., with 
an average of 64 per cent. 

Geography. — Canada and Ontario, map and book work of the Public 
^hool Geography. This is a good class of juniors, two boys and nine girls. 
The ground has been well covered. The average of marks given was 94 per 
cent. 

Beading. — This class of six boys and seven girls uses Embossed Readers 
1m II., and III. As junior pupils they have made very satisfactory pro- 
?r^s3. Average marks, 79 per cent. 

Writing.— This division of six boys and fourteen girls is the senior class 
'•n pencil writing. This subject may perhaps be considered the most valu- 
able in the curriculum, and is one that requires great patience and persever- 
ance. Th- ma'-ks varied from 35 to 75 per cent., with an average of 60 per 
cent. 



224 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Miss Walsh's Classes. 

Arithmetic. — Limits, Compound Bules, Sharing, Measurements, Paper- 
ing, etc.. Fractions, Four Simple Rules. In this class of four boys and seven 
girls, the marks ranged from 15 to 88 per cent., with an average of 47. 

English Gramniar. — Definitions, Indicative Mood, Parsing Simple Sen- 
tences. This class of seven boys and fifteen girls gave evidence of excellent 
training with corresponding results, the average being 91 per cent. 

Geography.— Limits, Definitions, Map of Ontario. This class was made 
up of thirteen boys and ten girls, some very young. Several received full 
marks, the average being 82 per cent. Great efficiency has been attained. 
The dissected map is very valuable in teaching the relative positions of 
counties and the physical features of the various sections. The pupils find 
very little difficulty in dissecting the map and putting it together again, 
thereby gaining a lasting knowledge of the Province as a whole and of each 
portion in particular. 

Heading. — ^Four senior pupils and five juniors. Good work is done. 
The seniors, who use the Fourth Reader, averaged 75 per cent., and the 
juniors, who use the Third Reader, averaged 81 per cent., the average for the 
class being 79 per cent. 

Writing. — The number in this junior class is seven, and the work con- 
sists of capital and of small letters, as well as simple words, with the use of 
the pencil. For a junior class the results are good; average of marks, 69 per 
cent. 

Object Lessons. — In this class of twenty-seven young pupils, the study 
of spices and fruits is made very interesting. The scholars enter very heart- 
ily into the consideration of the growth and uses of such articles as cloves, 
cinnamon, ginger, etc., as well as the manufacture of pottery, porcelain and 
other useful things. Some received very high marks, and others a low rating, 
as might be expected from such a mixed class, the average being 59 per cent. 

Bible History. — The class examined consisted of eleven Roman Catholic 
children, mostly girls. The work was the twenty-first to the twenty-eighth 
chapter of Acts, and the parables and miracles of St. Luke's Gospel. The 
marks assigned averaged 78 per cent. 

Spelling. — In this class nine Roman Catholic children were examined 
on Blaisdell's Speller, with creditable results, two obtaining full marks, the 
average being 74 per cent. 

Miss Gillin's Classes. 

Arithmetic. — The work includes the Multiplication Table to twenty times 
twenty ; weights and measures, definitions and simple problems. There were 
five boys and seven girls in the class and the average marks assigned were 
52 per cent. 

English Grammar. — This is a good class of six senior pupils. The an- 
swers were clear and to the point, showing a grasp of the work which em- 
braced the history of language in general, with particular reference to Eng- 
lish, and also False Syntax, Parsing and Analysis. One pupil received full 
marks, the average being 76 per cent. 

Geography. — ^Limits, the United States of America, Central America, 
South America, and the West Indies. This class of five boys and eight girls 
has covered the prescriLid ground accurately. There was considerable vari- 
ety in the grading of the pupils, the marks ranging from 25 to 100 per cent., 
two receiving perfect marks, the average being 71 per cent. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 225 



Writing. — A junior class of six boys and eleven girls. The work is done 
with pencil and consists of letters and short words. The average, 42 per 
cent., apparently low, is good considering the ages and attainments of the 
pupils. 

English History. — Reigns of George III., George IV. and William IV. 
This is a particularly bright class, composed largely of seniors, five boys and 
nine girls. The work is well done. Marks ranged from 63 to 100 per cent., 
averaging 90 per cent. 

Canadian History. — ^The pupils in this class are the same as in English 
History and have covered the ground well, extending from the War of 1812 
to the present t^me. The marks ranged from 38 -to 100 per cent. ; average, 85. 

English Literature. — This class would do credit to any institution of 
learning. Although the ground covered is extensive, the work has been ex- 
cellently done, embracing English literature from the Restoration to the be- 
ginning of Queen Victoria's reign, Canadian writers from Judge Haliburton 
to the present time, and a history of Canadian Universities. In addition to 
This Shakespeare's play, King Lear, was studied critically. The pupils dis- 
played marked ability in delineating characters represented in this tragedy 
and their apt quotations were quite refreshing. King Lear is by no means 
the easiest of Shakespeare's plays to read, a fact that renders the examina- 
non passed by the pupils exceedingly creditable. The marks varied from 
59 to 100 per cent., with an average of 90 per cent. 

Bible Geography and History. — The portion studied included the books 
of Daniel, Ezra, Esther and Nehemiah. Good work is done in this class of 
*hiee boys and twenty girls, advanced pupils, the marks assigned averaging 
S9 per cent. 

Spelling. — Parts III. and IV. of Blaisdell's Speller. This is a promis- 
ing class of twenty-four girls. Marks from 63 to 100 per cent. ; average, 92 
per cent. 

Miss Lee's Classes, 

To a visitor there is as much to interest in these kindergarten classes as 
In the highest. One cannot but seriously ponder in the presence of such 
pupils — mere children, it is true, but for all that the coming men and wo- 
men. The foundation of education is here laid; how important that it be 
thorough and true. 

Great interest was shown in the work, which is of a varied character — 
5ewing, bead-stringing, cutting and matching, weaving, etc., as well as mak- 
ing models in clay. These exercises are varied by singing,' in which most of 
tie children enter heartily. ^ 

In addition to the kindergarten branch, the pupils were examined in the 
following literary subjects : — 

Arithmetic. — ^Limits, Addition, 1 to 13; Subtraction, Multiplication to 
Svp times. In this class of nine boys and seven girls the marks assigned 
were from 10 per cent, to 100, with an average of 81 per cent. 

Reading. — Some are just learning the letters and the teaching is indi- 
vidual. Class of eleven boys and eight girls. Marks, 40 per cent, to 95; 
sTfrajre, 79. 

Bible Geography and History. — A class of nine boys and seven girls. 
Tlie pupils were examined on the names of the Books of the Bible and on 
Psalms I., XIX., XXIII., CIII, CXVll., and answered very well. The 
darks assigned averaged 90 per cent. 

Spelling. — ^Limits, simple words of two syllables. Some pupils were so 
Toun^ that they were not beyond words of two letters. Average of marks, 
91 pel cent, in a class of eleven boys and seven girls. 
15 E. 



22t) THE REPORT OF THE So, 12 



Miss Haycock^ s Classes, 

Spelling. — This class of fifteen ' girls passed an examination in words 
found in the first twenty-three pages of Gage's Speller, and the result was 
very satisfactory, the majority of the pupils gaining perfect marks, the av- 
erage being 97 per cent. 

Bible Ireography and 'History. — The pupils, fifteen girls, passed a very 
creditable examination on Bible History from Genesis to the Division of the 
Kingdom, one obtaining full marks, the rest from 50 per cent, to 90, with an 
average of 77 per cent. 

Miscellaneous. 

In addition to the writing exercises of the classes previously mentioned, 
seventeen samples of typewriting were presented. One of these was free 
from mistakes of any kind, and some others were nearly perfect. 

This concludes the report of the examination in literary branches, but 
there are other studies prosecuted by the pupils under the direction of the 
instructors previously mentioned, the results of which I was requested to 
examine." Subjoined is a brief report: — 

Miss Haycock's pupils exhibited some very fine work in wool, linen and 
silk, the finish of which was excellent. From house-slippers to jackets, with 
table mats and other useful articles, the samples deserved the highest com- 
mendation. 

Miss Lee has a class of six girls whom she instructs in Plain House- 
keeping, Care of Kitchen, Theory of Proper Diet, and Practice in Cooking, 
which must prove of great practical value. 

Classes are conducted by Miss Loveys in Sewing and Netting; by Miss 
Cronk in Bead-work, with Miss Hepburn — a pupil-teacher — as assistant, and 
Miss Burke in Knitting and Sewing, all of which will be of much beiiefit in 
after life to those so ably instructed. 

In Physical Culture Mr. Honey has classes, some for boys and others 
for girls, all of which are attended by good results. Mr. Roney has proved 
himself a successful instructor in this department. 

In conclusion, I beg to acknowledge the courtesy extended to me by Prin- 
cipal Gardiner and the Faculty, and to give expression to the great pleasure 
and profit I have derived in the discharge of my duties as examiner. 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, • 
Your obedient servant, 

S. F. Passmoke. 
Brantford, July 3rd, 1905. 

Report on Musical Instruction. 

Hon. R. A. Pyne, M.D., 

Minister of Education : 

Sir, — I beg to submit my report on the musical instruction given at the 
Ontario Institution for the Blind, Brantford. 

The examination was held on June 6 and 7, 1905, and, as in former 
years, was conducted under the following heads : Theory of Music (including 
Harmony, Counterpoint and Musical History), Piano, Organ and Vocal 

15a E. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 227 



Class. Specimens of the work in T)iano-tiinin^ were also heard. As this was 
my Hfth year to visit the 0. I. B., the pupils, for the most part, were i\o 
strangers to me, nor I to them. We met as friends and the examination pro- 
ceeded pleasantly. Fifty pupils are studying music, aud each one (except 
three who could not be examined because of illness), was heard separately. 
All of the pupils study the piano, six the organ, and eleven musical theory. 
Ten of the pupils tried the piano examinations of the Toronto College of 
Music this year. These candidates were heard by me, as one of the exam- 
kers of the College, and the results are embodied in this report. 

The course in Piano Playing at the 0. I. B. is a well graded one. Dur- 
m the last few years many pupils have passed through and graduated with 
(ii?tmction. There are five grades, each subdivided into Classes A, B, and C. 

In grade I. (the lowest) there are eight pupils in Class A, four in Class 
h, and six in Class C. The young beginners in Class A are being carefully 
tiught; two of them are particularly bright and 'promise well, four o|her8 
si'W fair talent, and the remaining two are slower. A good feature in con- 
D^jtion with this class is that nearly all of these pupils have a good touch^ 
anoBt important matter, which speaks well for the care the teachers take 
-.th pupils at this stage. Of the four pupils in Class B, two are fair and 
Le others slower. In Class C are six pupils ; one shows talent and is doing 
iij-ely, three are fair, and the other two, adults, show some musical feeling, 
bit have no technique. 

In the second grade there are seven pupils in Class A, one in Class B, 
od three in Class C. One of the pupils in Class A promises well, two are 
tiir, and the remaining four slower. 'The single pupil in Class B does fair 
*'rk: she has a quick ear. In Class C are three pupils; one shows decided 
talent and should become a good musician ; another passed the first examina- 
*F'!i of the Toronto College of Music ; the third was found to be weak and 
Lai a bad touch. 

There are fifteen pupils in grade HI. ; five in Class A, seven in Class B, 
ad three in Class C. Of the five pupils in Class A, four of them tried with 
5!ifress the first examination of the Toronto College of Music, one with first 
''lass honors, and the other three with second class honors; the other pupil in 
^tis class plays fairly well. In Class B are seven pupils; two passed the 
*eci.nd examination of the College of Music, one with first class honors ; an- 
^Ur plays extremely well; three fairly well: the last was 'very weak with a 
kni touch. Of the three pupils in Class C, one passed the second year Col- 
eee of Music examination with second class honors : another does fair work ; 
file third plays quite well. 

In grade IV. are five pupils, two of whom were ill and could not be 
i'='ard. Of the other three, one passed the third examination of the College 
'■'f Music with first class honors; another passed the second examination with 
^ond class honors: the third does fair work. 

Miss Mary Williams, who is the single pupil in the fifth or highest 
mde, has this year obtained the Artists' Diploma of the Toronto College of 
Ifn^ic. She is an accomplished pianist, and a first-rate example to those 
r :dents who are striving for graduation honors. 

The six pupils in the organ' class do only fair work. They seem to re- 
gard the organ as a mere second study and do not give this instrument the 
3tt«»ntion it deserves. The organ playing generally was weak. 

Miss Moore's pupils in Musical Theory are divided into two classes, A 

•w^nior), and B (junior). Papers in Harmonv, Counterpoint, and Musical 

History were set for the senior class, and in Harmony and History for the 

ymiOT class. The pupils in Class A obtained an average of 75 per cent, of 



228 THE REPORT OF T>IE No. 12 



the marks in Harmony and Counterpoint, and 89 per cent, in History; and 
the pupils in Class B obtained an average of 72 and 65 per cent, on the two 
subjects. Also, in the Toronto College of Music examinations for the year. 
one of the senior pupils passed the second examination in Theory, and one 
of the junior pupils the first examination. This is a very satisfactory show- 
ing. The percentages ranged from 41 to 92, and individual pupils did re- 
markably well. 

The Choral Class, of some forty' voices under Mr. Humphries' direc- 
tion, sang NevinV setting of Eugene Field's ''Wynken, Blynken and Nod." 
The rendering was spirited and gave evidence of much painstaking care in 
its preparation. This class is,- no doubt, of great help in the singing at the 
morning devotional exercise, when the hymns used are sung with life and 
spirit. 

The class in Piano Tuning, which is now under Mr. Usher, maintains 
.the high standard of previous years. The tunings examined were perfectly 
satisfactory. 

A comparison of this year's examination of the Musical Instruction 
given at the 0. I. B. with thai of previoiis years shows that there is no de- 
terioration in the character of the work done. Speaking generally, the results 
obtained compare favorably with those of other teaching institutions where 
tlie pupils havb all their faculties; and Mr. E. A. Humphries and Misses 
Moore and Harrington deserve much credit for what they accomplish. 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 

Tour 'Obedient servant, 

W. E. Fairclough. 
Toronto, August 12th, 1905. 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



229 



ONTARIO INSTITUTION FOR THE BUND. 



Statistics for the Year ending 30rH September, 1905, 
I. Attendance. 



Male . Female . 



inradance for portion of year ending 30th September, 1872.. 

for vear ending 30th September, 1873 i 

1874 



KTta 

Lrren 

fbLneen 
JpcTteen 
fifteen 



years. 



1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 



1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 



20 
44 
66 
89 
84 
76 
91 
100 
105 
103 
94 
88 
71 
86 
93 
93 
94 
\^ 
95 
91 
85 
90 
84 
82 
72 
76 
74 
77 
77 
72 
68 
67 
68 
67 



14 
24 
46 
50 
64 
72 
84 
100 
93 
98 
73 
72 
69 
74 
71 
62 
62 
58 
69 
67 
70 
64 
66 
68 
69 
73 
73 
71 
67 
66 
70 
64 
66 
74 



IK Age of pupils. 



No. 1 



2 
2 
5 
7 
8 
4 
8 
9 
13 
10 
4 



Total. 



34 

68 
112 
139 
148 
148 
175 
200 
198 
201 
167 
160 
140 
160 
164 
155 
156 
167 
164 
158 
155 
154 
150 
150 
141 
149 
147 
148 
144 
138 
138 
131 

i:^ 

141 



Seventeen yearn. . . 

Eighteen '* .. , 

Nineteen " .. 

Twenty *' .. 

Twenty -one " .., 

Twenty- two ** ... 

Twenty-three " .. 

Twenty-four ** ... 

Twenty-five " ... 
Over twenty-five yearR 

Total 



No. 



10 
8 
5 
7 
4 
8 
4 
3 


20 



141 



230 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



III. — Nationality of parents. 



No. 



American ^ I 2 

Canadian ^ I 72 

English 24 

Irish 18 

Italian 1 



No. 



German 7 

Scotch 1 16 

Unknown [ 1 

I 

Total , 141 

I 



IV.— Denomination of parents*. 



No. 



Congregational 2 

Baptist 8 

Disciples 1 

Episcopalian | 38 

Methodist i 33 . 

Evangelical Association 1 



No. 



Presbyterian .... 
Roman Catholic . 
Salvationist 



Total 



30 

25 

3 



141 



v.— Occupation of parents*. 



Agents 

Bricklayers 

Blacksmiths 

Butcher 

Carpenters 

Clerk 

Civil engineer 

Contractor 

Cooper .. . . 

Cook 

Carriage-builder 

Conductor 

Cabinetmaker 

Drover 

Electrician 

Farmers 

Firemen 

Foreman 

Gardeners 

Government officers , 

Gentleman 

Hostler 



No. 



2 
3 
2 

1 
6 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
38 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 



No. 



Laborers , 31 

Lawyer 1 

Manufacturer 1 

Machinists j t 

Merchants I 1 

Millwright ' 1 

Painters j * 

Printer I 1 

Plumber 1 

Policeman ! 

Shipper i ! 

Shoemakers 1 

Railway employees' ' 

Repairer * 

Tanner 

Tailors 

Teacher | 

Teamsters . '. j 

Weavei 

LTnknown 

Total ! 14 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



231 



VI. -Cities and counties from which papils were received during the official year ending 

30th September, 1905. 



t 



1 



Countv or citv. 



^ I 

111 I 



County or citv. 



I>:'trict of Al^mA ' 2 

« ::y of Belleville i 

< j^Dtv of Brant 

C;.v of Brentford ' 1 



C 



1 



1 



in.ty of Bruce 
•' Carleton 

• Dufiferin. 

Dundas ... 

Durham i 1 ... 

" Elgin I 2 1 

Essex 2 I 4 

Frontenac [•. . . 

Glengarry : 1 , 1 

Grenville' 1 

Grey ! 1 *? 

iGiielph , . . . 1 

ityof Haldimand 

Haliburton 

• Halton |... !... 

r.f Hamilton .....' 8 



1 i 



i^; 



• \u.f Hastings 

Huron 

'f Kingsston 

nry of Kent 

I^mbton 

Leeds 

Lanark 

Lennox ■ 

Lincoln 

if London . . . 

•v of Middlepex 4 

' ' of Muskoka i 



2 



District of Nipissing 

County of Norfolk .'. 

*' Northunibei land . . . 

*' Ontario 

City of Ottawa 

County of Oxford 

Peel 

'* Perth 

*' Peterborough 

" Prince Edward 

Prescott ' 

" Renfrew I 

" Russell 

City of St. Catharines 

** St. Thomas 

** Stratford 

County of Simcoe | 

*' Stormont * 

City of Toronto | 

County of Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland ' 

" Wellington I 

AVentworth 

York ! 

*Quebec | 

*North- west Territory , 

Manitoba 

British Columbia i 

District of Parry Sound 





1 
1 

6 . 












9i 1 






1! 


3 



2 i 

3 i 

W 

1 
1 ,, 



1 . 



10 
2 
1 



15 



Total . 



* On Pay men U>. 



25 
2 

1 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
3 



67 78 ' 141 



-' rii-?= and counties from which pupils were received from the opening of the Institution 
till 30th September, 1904. 



Count V or citv. 



I ^ 



County or citv. 



-. H 



'*'' t of Algoma ^ . 5 

■ ' t Belleville ' 8 

• -f-v of Brant 7 

' V t Hnmtford \i) 

< itv.;f Bruce 9 

Carleton 2 

Diifferin 2 

Dandas 8 

Hurhara 4 

Elgin 7 

Efssex 11 

Frtmtenac 5 

Glengarry S 

Grenviile i 2 

<irev. ' 9 

'I' tijiielph 4 



4 


9 


1 


i 


7 


14 


10 


20 


11 
1 


20 


1 


8 


8 





4 


8 


« 


18 


20 


81 


2 


7 


1 


9 


2 


4 


12 


21 


8 


7 



II 



County of Ilaldimand 

Halton 

City of Hamilton 

County of Hastings 

*'' Huron 

City of Kingston 

County of Kent 

*' * Lambton 

" Leeds 

" Lanark 

'* Lennox 

*' Lincoln 

City of London 

Dih'trict of Ni])issing 

County of Mifldlcscx . . . . 
District of Muskoka 



P^ 


lu 


fS 


4 


5 


9 


r» 


8 


9 


18 


19 


32 • 


.) 


5 


10 


12 


10 


22 


7 


i 


11 


10 


{] 


16 


IS 


r> 


2:^ 


18 


4 


17 


2 


4 


(> 


4 


1 


5 


8 


8 


6 


10 


<) 


19 


5 


8 


8 


9 


12 


21 


8 




8 



232 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



VII.— Cities and counties from which pupils were received from the opening of the Institution 

till 30th September, 1905. —Continued. 



County or city. 



County of Norfolk 10 

** Northumberland 5 

'* Ontario 7 

City of Ottawa 17 

County of Oxford 7 

Peel 2 

Perth i 5 

" Peterborough ! 12 

" Prince Edward I 6 

" Prepcott I 4 

Renfrew 8 

Russell 3 

Citv of St. Catharines I 2 

"*' St. Thomas 3 

'* Stratford 3 

County of Simcoe ! 11 



19 
U 
16 
19 
18 

3 
14 
17 

8 

4 
14 I 

4 I 

5' 

^1 
4 I 

21 : 



County or city. 



County of Stormont 

City of Toronto 

County of Victoria 

" Waterloo .... 

" . Welland .... 

" Wellington.. 

Wentworth . 

York 

♦Province of Quebec . . . 
♦North-West Territory . 

♦United States 

♦British Columbia 

♦Manitoba '. 

District of Parry Sound 



Total 459 349 808 



) 


S 1 




. 






'IS 


g ' 


3 


s 


PC4 


^ 


5 




5 


57 


41 1 


98 


8 


2-! 


10 


10 


4 1 


14 


6 


4 1 


10 


10 


8 ' 


18^ 


8 


9 ! 


17 


18 


16 , 


34 




1 1 


5 




4 


5 






I 




.... 


1 




.... 


1 







1 



* On payment. 



Vlll. — Cities and counties from which pupils were received who were in residence on 

30th September, 1905. 



County or city. 



District of Algoma 
City of Belleville.. 

County of Brant 1 

City of Brantford « 2 

County of Bruce I 1 

" Carleton |.... 

'* Dufferin , 

*' Dundas 



3 
o 
H 



1 1 



Durham . . 
Elgin .... 

" Eesejt 

** Frontenac 

" Glengarrv 

Grenville I....! 1 

Grev I. ...I 1 

City of Guelpfi 1 1 

County of Haldimand | 1 

Haliburton j.... 

Halton [........ 

City of Hamilton ; ' 3 

County of Hastings. 



Huron 2 1 

City of Kingston 1 1 I . . . 

County of Kent I 2 ! 2 

" Lambton 5 : 1 

Leeds , 1 ... 

Lanark ' 

** Lennox |. .. 

" Lincoln 

City of I^ndon 

City of Woodstock , 1 2 

County of Middlesex , 2 

District of Mnskoka i . . . 

" Nipippine 2 ' 2 



31 



County or city. 



I 

S ' 1 

<^ 1 fc 



County of Norfolk I 1 4 

" Northumberland . . . | 2 i . . . . 

Ontario 1 I .... 

City of Ottawa I 2 ' 2 

County of Oxford I ' 1 

Peel 1 .... 

Perth 1 ! .. 

'* Peterborough 1 | 1 

*' Prince Edwanl . . 

" Prescott 

" Renfrew 

" Russell I 

City of St. Catharines I I 

" St. Thomas 

" Stratford 1 2 

County of Simcoe 1 2 

" Stormont ! . . 

City of Toronto 7 

County of Victoria 1 

Waterloo 2 

Welland ... 

** Wellington I j ... 

'* Wentworth '' 2 

York I 1 ' 1 

British Columbia j ... 

Quebec ' ... 

Manitoba ... 

District' of Parry Sound 1 

' * Rainy River 1 1 

North- West Territorie.*? ! . . . . 3 



o 



Total . 



4 
2 

1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 



12 


19 


. . . . 


I 




2 


1 


1 



I t 

.1 51 56 107 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



233 



Ontario Institution for the Education of the Blind, Brantford, Ont., Canada. Maintenance 
Expenditures for the year ending 30th September, 1905 ; compared with preceding year. 



Item. 



Service, 



30th September, 1904. 
Average attendance, 107. 



30th September, 1905. 
Average attendance, 109. 



Total Ex- 
penditure, 
1904. 



Medicines, Medical Comforts 

Butcher'a Meat, Fish and Fowls 

Flour, Bread and Biscuits 

Batter and Lard 

General Groceries j 

.Fniit and Vegetables | 

■Bedding, Clothing and Shoes. , . . 

Fuel— Wood, Coal and Gas 

light— Electric and Gas 

Laundry Soap and Cleaning 

Fomiture and Furnishings 

Farm and Garden — Feed and 
Fodder, Jtc 



Repairaand Alterations. 



Advertising, Printing, Stationery, 
&c 



Books, Apparatus and Appliances 
Miscellaneous, unenumerated . . 

Pupils* Sittings at Church 

Bent of Hydrants 

'^'ater Supply 

jSalaries and Wages 



$ c. 
156 14 

1,582 29 
378 07 

1,021 98 

1,323 45 
167 44 
410 69 

3,964 86 
760 07 
301 57 
571 80 

890 20 
992 06 

563 19 
600 05 
873 17 

2oaoo 

160 00 

246 73 

17,820 16 






S 6c 



32,973 92 



$ c. 

1 45 
14 78 

3 53 

9 55 
12 37 

1 47 
3 84 

37 5 

7 10 

2 82 
5 34 

8 32 

9 27 

5 26 
5 61 
8 16 
1 87 

1 49 

2 31 
166 55 



308 17 



Total Ex- 
penditure, 
1905. 



c. 

2.7 

28.4 

6.8j 

18.3: 

I 

23.7 

2.8| 

7.3 

71.2 

13.6 

5.3 

10.2 

I 
16. i 

17.8 

10.1 

10.8 

15.71 

3.5 

2.8 

4.4 

320.2 



592.6 



& ! X So 

>4 ^ 



c 
54 09 

1,424 28 
524 78 
978 25 

1,447 99 
120 79 
416 61 

3,626 09 
752 48 
232 37 
642 06 



$ c. 

49 
13 06 

4 81 

8 97; 

13 28; 

1 17t 
3 82 

33 26 

1 
6 81 

2 13 
5 



636 49| 5 83 
852 01 7 88 



754 43 
644 30 
804 75 
100 00 
160 00 
309 45 
17,674 72 



32,155 92 



6 91 
5 91 

7 37 
91 

1 46 

2 83 
162 isi 311.8 



c. 

.9 
24.7 

9.2 
15.3 
25.5 

2.1 

7.3 
63.9 
12.7 

4.5 
11.3 

11.2^ 
15.1 

13.3 

11.3 

14.1 

1.7 

2.1 

5.^ 



295 01! 567.^ 



30th September, 1906. 



Certified, W. N. H0S81E, Bursar. 



234 l UK RlirORT OF Tm- ' No. 12 



APPENDIX i— REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT AND PRIN- 
CIPAL OF THE ONTARIO INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAF AND 
DUMB. 

Belleville, 30tli September, 1905. 

Hon. R. a. Pyne, M.p., 

Minister of Education, Toronto Ont. 

Sir, — I have the honor to present the thirty-fifth annual report of this 
Institution for the year ending the 30th of Sep'tember, 1905. 

Under the Education Department. 

The placing of the Institution under the Education Department has 
occasioned a great deal of gratification to the educated deaf throughout the 
Province, as well as to the pafents and friends of deaf children. Since its 
establishment thirty-five years ago, until the latter part of 1904, the Insrti- 
tution has been for greater or lesser intervals in charge of nearly every 
govermental departmen't — except the proper one — but for many years past 
it has been administered by the Hon, the Provincial Secretary, in conjunc- 
tion with the asylums; prisons and charitable institutions. That the deaf 
and ^cheir friends were dissatisfied with that arrangement and classification 
does not imply any lack of efficiency in the administration nor in the 
character of the work accomplished. On the contrary, the Institution has 
always been accorded the most generous recognition and support by 
the Minister-in-charge, for the time being, and by the Government and Legis- 
lature as a whole, and the progress made and the work accomplished probably 
could not have been any greater or better even had it been from the first, 
as was I understand intended by the late Dr. Ryerson, under the Education 
Department, The cause of complaint w^is entirely a sentimental one, but 
none the less real and justifiable on that account. It was linju^t to the deaf, 
and detrimental to their interests, that they should be officially classed, and 
therefore always associated in the public mind, with the criminal incorrig- 
ible and mentally defective classes. The reports of the Institution, although 
issued separately in the first instanci^, were incorporated with those of the 
asylums and prisons, and when the Inspector came to inspect the Institution 
he left here to make his official visit to the jail usually the same day. This 
was not only humiliating to the deaf, but it also tended to prejudice them 
in the opinion of the public, and still further handicapped them in their 
efforts to obtain a livelihood in competition with hearing people. The 
injustice of this classification became still more marked in view of the 
easily demonstrated fact that the deaf, instead of possessing any exceptional 
affinity for the criminal and mentally defective classes, are, on the contrary, 
above the average of hearing people in probity of character and amenability 
to good influences. In no public school in the Province can there be found 
a brighter or better conducted lot of boys and girls than those who have 
filled our halls in the past or who are here now. Our graduates, with very 
few exceptions, are honest, 'industrious citizens. It will be easily under- 
stood, -therefore, how anxious the educated deaf have always been to have 
removed from thom the stigma of inferiority necessarily resulting from 
their former classification with idiots and criminals. Frequent requests by 
the deaf for a change were unheeded and recommendations made in my 



im EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 235 



former reports passed by. Dr. Jessop, M. P. P., first broached the matter 
in the Legislature and it will readily be believed therefore that the transfer 
of the Institution to the Education Department by the then Provincial 
>etTetary, the Hon. J. R. Stratton, a year or two afterwards, was hailed 
with delight by the deaf and their relatives and friends ^all over Ontario. 
Uiider the old regime we all tried to do our duty and it was generally ad- 
iLitted that our Institution has done, and is doing an excellent work for 
the deaf. We know, however, how far short we come of realizing our ideals 
dial attaining to the highest possible efficiency. We trust that we shall be 
jpuired on to more earnest efforts in the future and aspire to greater success, 
under the added stimulus and inspiration of the fact that the Institution 
cow forms a recognized, and by no means unimportant part, of the Educa* 
liobal System of Ontario. 

Teachers' Examination. Questions. 

The written examination that was held at the close of the last session 

?ill always stand out prominently in the history of this Institution as the 

:m one held after its transference to the Education Department. In 

T'i r to appropriately mark this auspicious change, and to establish a record 

ji the beginning of the new era to which in after years we may refer, and 

'LA will serve as a standard by which we may be able to guage our progress 

i: the years to come, I have deemed it advisable to include in this report 

■ 191)5 a copy of the examination questions given last June to the pupils 

.;he classes in the various grades in the Institution. These will also be 

'- pful in enabling you and the officers of your Department to become con- 

'^r-aiit in some degree with the character and scope of our work and in 

limg all who are interested in ihe education of the deaf to compare and 

jritrust our work at the Institution with that done in the Public Schools. 

.Le word ''contrast" is used advisedly, and with a specific purpose; for, 

'^lile it is true that we endeavor in our curriculum to cover nearly the 

' u* ground as is included in the public school course, it is also true that 

: method of instruction, and the main pedagogic principles which under- 

r our work, of necessity differ very radically from those of hearing 

-'«'ls. I wish to strongly emphasize this diflerenee, for, unless it is kept 

- view, it will be impossible for any one to either understand or appre- 

.*e the work of educating the deaf. . The main work of the public school 

e.n hers is to convey instruction to the pupils, and to develop their intellects 

^' these means; and the chief purpose of their examination questions is to 

*^v the extent to which the pupils have remembered and digested the facts 

^-'! information imparted. In contrast with this, the most important fea- 

in? of the work of educating the deaf is the necessary prominence given to 

liP teaching of the elementary forms and principles of language. The 

>"^on for this is obvious. When a hearing pupil enters school he already 

•> at his command a copious vocabulary and sufficient acquaintance with 

-f' ordinary forms of expression to enable him to give clear and correct- 

"eranre to his thoughts, and to understand whatever is said to him. All 

he teacher has to do is to build upon this large and substantial foundation; 

•'1 such language work as is taken up in the way of elaboration and refine- 

ri^at. The deaf child, on the contrary, when he enters school, does not 

' if'W a solitary word of the English language, and the great task that con- 

-Vm»g his teacher is to aid him in gaining a sufficient knowledge of and 

• I'iliiy in the use of langimge to enable him to ex])ress himself with reason- 

jLe correctness and comprehend what is said to him in written or printed 



236 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. iJ 



form. It is quite impossible for any one not engaged in this work to form 
any adequate conception of how difficult, and sometimes seemingly hopeless, 
a task this is. There is no other way to acquire facility in the understanding 
and correct use of language except by constant practice. This every hear- 
ing child unconsciously gets from its infanjcy up, and this the deaf child 
never gets to an even approximately equal degree. The one is absorbing 
language every day of its life; the other, till the day he enters school, 
dwells apart in a wordless region, and what language he obtains after he 
begins his school life is acquired by slow, painful, laborious effort, and at 
the best is as a foreign tongue to him. We all know how difficult it i* 
even for a well-educated foreigner to become sufficiently familiar with th& 
idioms of the English language to be able to express himself correctly, 
although he is aided by a knowledge of his own cognate tongue, and i* 
acquainted with the general principles of language construction and oracular 
expression. All of these same difficulties confront the deaf child in his- 
efforts to master the intricacies of language, to which must also be added 
immaturity of intellect, initial ignorance of any form of linguistic expres- 
sion, and the limited amount of practice that it is possible for him to pbtain 
by the means at his disposal. If after four or five years' hard work at 
school, a deaf child has as extei^sive a vocabulary as a hearing child has 
at six years of age, and can express himself with equal facility and correct- 
ness, he ha^s done remarkably well indeed. These considerations will give 
some faint idea of the great difficulty that besets the teaching of the deaf. 
When the hearing child begins his school course he already possesses an 
extensive medium for the acquisition of knowledge, as well as the sense of 
hearing, through which both language and knowledge are chiefly obtained. 
The deaf child has neither the language nor the sense of hearing; and this 
double lack is what presents the chief difficulty in our work, and demon- 
strates the justness of our contention that a deaf child should remain at 
school for several years longer than a hearing child if he is to be expected to 
Teach the same educational status. And these same considerations will suffice 
to explain the radical difference between the character and intent of the sub- 
joined examination papers, and those such as are usually given to pupils 
in the public schools of the Province. 



TEACHERS' EXAMINATTON QUESTIONS. 



First Grade Pupils Juniors. 

Manual Alphabet for the Deaf. 



Questions. 



What is your name? 

How old are you? 

Vhere do you live? 

How long have you been here? 

Who is your teacher? 

Do you like school? 

How are you? 

"What color are your eyes? 

How many robins did you see? 

What day is this? 

Do you love Miss Ross? 

Are you happy here ? 

How many eggs can you eat? 

Do yon like mice? 



Is Mr. Mathison kind? 

Will you be glad to go homeT 

Can you skip? 

Do you love your mother? 

^Tiat do you want? 

How old is Mr. Madden? 

Is Miss Dempsey industrious? 

Where do I live? 

Can you write? 

Do you like to smell the flowers? 

Is Mr. Campbell thin? 

What color are my eyes? 

Are you lazy? 

Do you like oranges? 

Can you jump oflf the cabinet?' 

Can you swim? 



im 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



237 



Teachers' Examination 

VcThs and Ptepositions taught, ' 

Ban to | 

from I 

out of 

into 1 

around \ 

\\'alk€d to 

from 

out of 

into 

around 

Hopped to 

from 

out of 

into 

around 

Took off 

out of 

from 

off 

Pat on 

into ;. 

under 



S«t on 

nnder ... 
Stood on .... 

under 

Jumped on 

off 



Threw 



over 



to 

out of 
into .... 
under . 



on 



Palled down 



up 



off 



Sharpened with 

Shook with 

Wiped with .... 

Combed with ... 

Wrote on with 

in with . 

Bowed to 

Gaye to 

Ate 

Broke 

Drank 

Folded 

Kissed 

Opened 

Read 

Shook 

Shot 

Tore 

Toaehed 

Unfolded 



Actions, 

T kissed Muriel. 

l^rusciUa shook bands with ±2Llen. 

Eva read a book. 

I pu^. my watch into my pocket. 

Ada drank' the water. 



Questions. — Co'Atinved. 

Muriel gave her letter to me. 
Isabella shut a door. 
I threw a crayon out of a window. 
Marie ran to Mamie. 
Dorothy pulled Marie off a window-sill. 
Alma sat on the floor. 
Evelyn combed her hair with a comb. 
Janet folded the newspaper. 
Florence opened my watch. 
Annie tore her dress. 
Ellen wrote on her slate with a slate- 
pencil. 
Mamie bowed to Annie. 
I sharpened a lead^pencil with a knife. 
Druscilla jumped on the mat. / 

Eva ate two biscuits. 
Ada sat under the large desk. 
Muriel took her ball out of her pocket. 
Mamie took off her boots. 
Isabella jumped off a chair. 
Jailet shut her eyes. 
Florence wiped her face with her apron 
Mamie unfolded the duster. 
I took the books out of the cabinet. 
Alma touched a picture. 
Annie opened her mouth. 
Evelyn threw the knife into the basin. 
Ellen shut the windows. 
Dorothy smelled the flowers. 
Annie stood on the stool. 
Florence wrote in her book with a lead- 
pencil. 
Druscilla folded her arms. 
I put the boxes under a small desk. 
Mamie ran into the room. 
Isabella threw the keys under the cabi- 
net. 
I ate an orange. 

Janet put a crayon into my mouth. 
Ada broke the pointer. 
Dorothy pulled up a blind. 
I put Muriel on a window-sill. 
Eva broke her slate. 
I put Ellen under the large desk. 
Ellen bowed to Evelyn. 
Evelyn sharpened a slate-pencil. 
Muriel kissed her doll. 
I wrote on a large slate with a crayon. 
Annie kissed Eva. 
Eva jumped over the pail. 
I took my watch out of my pocket. 
Druscilla tore a newspaper. 
Mamie walked from Janet. 
Ellen walked around an arm-chair. 
Isabella touched her 'nose. 
I wiped my nose with my handkerchief. 
Alma shook Florence. 
Janet hopped out of the room. 
I threw a ball to Dorothy. 
Muriel combed my hair. 
I gave an orange to Muriel. 
Florence took the pens out of the box. 
Marie -read her letter. 
Evelyn wiped the small desks with the 

duster. 
I threw the erasers out of the door. 
Dorothy put the basin on my head. 



238 



THE REPORT QF THE 



No. 12 



Teachers'. Examination Questions. — Continued. 



Supply Adjectives. 



man. 
ball, 
cow. 
watch. 

pig. 

girls. 

window. 

flower. 

horse. 

book. 

lady. 

potato. 

milk. 

baby. 

dress. 

bed. 

doll. 

hat. 

chair. 

boy. 



Supply Nouns. 

A clean 

The hot 

A rude 

A kind 

A sly 

A warm 

The cross 

A pretty 

A selfish 

The industrious 

A beautiful 

A small 

The happy 

A good 

A white 

A sorry 

A fat 

The green 

A proud ....r 

The lazy 



Kast. 
North. 
South. 
West. 



Directions. 



Numeration. 



12 
44 
16 
100 
50 
91 
28 
17 
32 
85 
10 
13 
65 
90 



21 
46 
78 
5 
69 
80 
16 
99 
11 
52 
34 
14 
92 
22 
87 
25 



Nineteen 

Forty 

Sixtj'-six 

Tewnty-one ... 

Seven 

Fifty-three .... 

Eighteen 

Thirtv-five .... 

Forty-two 

Nine 

Fifty-six 

Seventy-seven 

Sixty 

Twenty-eight . 
Thirty-nine ... 

Six 

Forty-two .^.... 

Ten 

Ninety-three .. 

Four 

Eighty-nine ... 

Fifteen 

Twenty-nine .. 

Sixty-five 

Two 

Fifty-four 

Thirty 

Eighty-six 



Notation. 



Articles of Food : Potato, cheese, bread 
onion, butter, honey, apple, meat, cab 
bage, sausage, biscuit, chicken, pud 
ding, orange, tomato, cake, duck, pie 
fish, corn, gravy, egg, turkey, beet 
bun, syrup, STigar, water, milk, tea 
coffee, soup. 

Natural Phenomena: Rain, lightning 
wind, snow, sky, sun, cloud, moon 
thunder, hail, rainbow, frost-, star, ice 

Divisions of Time : Afternoon, day, even 
ing, forenoon, hour, month, morning 
night, noon, 'week, year. 

Officers: Dr. Pyne, Mr. Mathison, Dr 
Goldsmith, Miss Ross, Mr. CJochrane 
Miss Chisholm', Miss Dempsey, Mr 
Keith, Mr. Nurse, Miss Bates. 



im 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



23& 



Teachbbs' Examination Questions. — Continued. 



Tearhers: Mr. Coleman, Mr. Denys, Mr. 
Balis, Miss Templeton, Mr. Stewart, 
Mr. Campbell y Miss Linn, Mrs. Ter- 
rill, Miss Bull, Mr. Forrester, Mrs. 
Balis, Miss James, Mr. Ingram, Mr. 
Madden. Miss Gibson, Miss Cross, 
Miss Gowsell. 

Ihp of the TTeefc : Friday, Monday, Sat- 
urday, Thursday, Sunday, Wednesday, 
Tuesday. 

A'f<f( fives: New, beautiful, good, red, 
obedient, rude, well, cold, black, dis- 
obedient, kind, square, dry, cross, 
strong, bad, stubborn, pink, 'sick, sel- 
fish, bold, weak, old, grey, small, hot, 
polite, yellow, sly, large, clean, fat, 
white, sweety thin, tall, lazy, dark, 
wise, blue, warm, fast, light, proud, • 
wild, silly, green, short, pretty, clever, 
dirty, wet, sorry, slow, vain, sour, in- 
duistrious, round, happy, brown, pur- 
pie, big, long, saucy, nice. 

Firis of the Body : An arm, a tooth, a 
forehead, a nose, an ear, a hand, a 
knuckle, a foot, a cheek, a side, an 
elbow, a leg, a thumb, a face, a neck, 
a finger, a mouth, a back, a wrist, a 
chuQ, the hair, a lip, a head, an eye, 
a knee, a tongue, a toe, an ankle, a 
chest, a shoulder. 

Aniwah: A cat, a sheep, a monkey, a 
ct^lt, a puppy, a cow, 9 l%mb, an ele- 
phant, a mouse, a giraffe, an ass, a 
kangaroo, a fox, a squirrel, a rat, a 
buffalo, a seal, a rabbit, a frog, a goat, 
a zebra, a calf, a dog, a lion, a pig, 
& bear, a tiger, a hog, a kitten, a 
horse. 

'^•■jfrU: A doll, a chair, a newspaper, 
a ball, a blind, a cup, a handkerchief, 
3 hat. a broom, a bed, an umbrella, 
a fan, a mat, a picture, a wheel-barrow. 



a ring, a duster, a door, a trumpet , 
a pen, a gun, a window, a rocking- 
horse, a box, a pin, a cradle, a desk, 
a book, a pointed, a slate, a lead-pen- 
cil, a drum, a cabinet, dolls, chairs^ 
a shelf, a key,'* an eraser, a comb, 
a clock, a ladder, a girl, a coat, a 
letter, a boy, a flower, a man, a light- 
house, a top, a watch, a hoe, a trunk, 
a bag, a crayon, a baby, an apron, 
a basin, a lady, an arm-chair, a pipe, 
a nest, an axe, a plate, a slate-pencil, 
a house, a spoon, a boat, a dress, 
shelves, keys, a knife, a car, a table, a 
towel, a kite, a bell, a pail, a pump. 

Counting. 
XXXXXXXXXX X—11. 
0000000000000000000000 0—23. 
111111 1—7. 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

X X— 31. 

00000000000000000000a 

00000000000000000000 
0—44. 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

X X— 16. 

oooooooooaooooooooooo 

0000000000000 0-35. 
XXXXXXX^i X— 9. 

000000000000000000 0—19. 

Birds : A bat, a canary, a robin, a goose, 
a sparrow, an ostrich, a peacock, an 
owl, a parrot, a chicken, a turkey, a 
hen, a duckling, a duck, a gosling. 



First Grade Pupils. — Jt^niors. 
Manual Alphabet for the Deaf. 



Questions. 

What is your name? 

How old are you ? 

Where do von live? 

Where do I live? 

What is my name? 

Who is your teacher? 

Who is the Superintendent? 

Who is the Matron? 

Are you happy. 

Are you hungry? 

Are you tired? 



12. How are you? 

13. How lont; have you been at school?" 

14. When will you go home? 

15. What day is this? 

16. What day was yesterday? 

17. What will to-morrow be.^ 

18. What month is this? 

19. What was last month? 

20. What will next month ho? 

21. What year is this? 

22. What was last year? 

23. What will next year be? 

24. W^hat season is this? 



240' 



THE REPORT OF^HE 



No. 11 



Teachers' Examination Questions. — Continued. 



Verbs: Ran, sat, lay, stood, walked, 
hopped, jumped, knelt, gave, struck, 
kicked, shook, opened, shut, locked, 
unlocked, folded, unfolded, wrote, read, 
broke, tore, drank, ate, laughed, cried, 
touched, pushed, pulled, showed, looked, 
took, put, brushed, wiped, cut, washed, 
butoned, unbuttoned, threw, combed, 
swept. 

Prepositions: In, on, to, into, out of, 
off, at, over, with, from, behind, un- 
der, around. 

Actions. 

Charles Earl washed his hands in a bas- 
in, and wiped them with a duster. 
Robert Eric Shaw swept the floor with 

a broom. 
Earl A. Smith brushed his boots with a 

bootbrushi 
Farley Fountain jumped over a pointer. 
Arthur GeUneau took off his coat, and 

put it on Farley Fountain. 
Mr. Ingram took off his cuffs, and put 

them on Charles Dorschner. 
Percy * Smith took three slate-pencils, 

three lead-pencils, and three inkwells 

out of the large desk, and put them 

into the cabinet. 
Charles Dorschner took two crutches off 

the cabinet, and carried them around 

the room. 
Charles Roy McCallum unbuttoned his 

coat, and took it off. 
Charles Roy McCallum put on his coat 

and buttoned it. 
Mary Lorentz took off her apron, she 

folded it, and put it under an arm- 
chair. 
Beatrice Parker wrote on a large slate 

with a crayon. 
Winnifred Barnett took a rag out of a 

box, she tore it, and threw it on the 

floor. 
Martha Granger opened the door, and 

walked out of the room. 
Eddie Fishbein stood behind a large 

slate. 
Mr. Campbell took his watch out of his 

pocket, he looked at it, and showed 

it to Mr. Ingram. 
Miss Templeton wiped the desks with a 

duster. 
Earl A. Smith and Charles Dorschner 

hopped around the room. 
Charles Earl read a newspaper. 
Mr. Ingram combed his hair. 

Adjectives. 



Supply NounB. 



A good 
A bad . 



A hot .... 
A cold ... 
A new ... 
An old . 
A fat 

thin .. 

wet ... 

dry .... 

nice ... 

nasty . 

pretty 
An ugly . 
A sweet . 
A hard .. 
A sour .. 
A soft ... 
A round . 
A sick ... 
A deep .. 
A cross .. 



A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



kind .... 

large .... 

small ... 

lodfe 

short .... 

strong .. 

weak ... 

lazy 

sly 

clean .... 

brave ... 

dirty .... 

timid ... 

wide 

A narrow . 
A high .... 

A low 

A tidy 

An untidy 

A fast 

A slow 



Supply Adjectives. 

A horse. 

A bear. 

A potato. 

A pie. 

A book. 

An slate. 

A man. 

A woman. 

A day. 

A towel. 

A cake. 

medicine. 

A peacock. 

An frog. 

A candy. 

A plum. 

A stone. 

A muff. 

A ball. 

A calf. 

A hole. 

.\ dog. 



1909 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



241 



Tbachers' Examination Qvbstions. — Continued. 



Supi>if/ Adjectivea. — Con. 

ji father. 

^ elephant. 

A fly. 

j ladder. 

ji screw. 

i lion. 

i lamb. 

.\ girl. 

A mouse. 

A collar. 

h boy. 

\ floor. 

A girl. 

A sheet. 

A ruler. 

A church. 

A bench. 

.1 room. 

Ad woman. 

A squirrel. 

A cow. 

! Color. 

Supply NounM, 



' A yhite . 
A Uack .. 
\ !ro¥n 
\ I'iae .., 
A pink ... 
A green . 
A^f^y ... 
A T?llow 
A r«i .... 



Supply Adjectives. 



snow. 

ink. 
.... ass. 

sky. 

ribbon. 

grass. 
.... jacket. 

batter. 
tongU3. 



Arithmetic. 

^ritein words: 111, 300, 1.000. 100, 10, 
1 0. 89, 515, 736, 909, 18, 666, 720, 

'A 

^rite in figures: Nine hundred and 
^ighty-seTen, eight hundred and sev- 
^DtT, eeven hundred and nine, six 
"Jndred and seventeen, five hundred, 
fonr hondred and three, thirty-eight, 
twelve, one hundred and ten, none. 

% 0--. 

13>10- 

ICE. 



8^1^ 


3 + 6=r 


24-4 


6-^6- 


0+0--= 


l-f5 


94-9=^- 


44-5-- 


24-8 


5+2- 


64-2= 


74-7 


1+9= 


9+-0= 


24-1 



Parts of the Body: Head, face, fore- 
head, nose, chin, mouth, beard, tongue, 
chest, back, stomach, neck, throat, 
ankles, feet, heels, toee, legs, knees, 
thighs, shoulders, elbows, arms, wrists, 
hands, thumbs, lips, fingers, eyes, ears, 
cheeks, sides, hair, veins, blood, bones, 
heart, chin. 

Articles of Furniture : A bed, a chair, 
a rocking chair, a cabinet, a cot, a 
lamp, an armchair, a cupboard, a sofa, 
a picture, a curtain, a clock, a stove, 
a mirror, a bookcase, a screw, a blind, 
a bureau, a washstand, a piano, a 
bath, a table, a sideboard, a bench, a 
shelf, a cradle, a desk. 

Persons: A man, a woman, a girl, a boy, 
a baby, a lady, a father, a mother, a 
sister, a brother. 

Articles of Clothing : Cap, hat, bib, boot, 
cuflF, tie, muff, veil, coat, vest, pants, 
shirt, collar, braces, glove, button, 
dress apron, ribbon, jacket, garter, 
belt, scarf, blouse, handkerchief, stock- 
ing, pinafore, overcoat, sock, bootlace, 
rubber, pocket. 

Articles of "Hardware : Knife, fork, spoon, 
hinge, hasp, kettle, bell, key, file, plow, 
saw, awl, stove, basin, iron, rake, axe, 
scissors, screw, wrench, saucepan, 
horseshoe, scales, dustpan, corkscrew, 
oilcan, lantern, hammer, anvil, spade, 
hoe. 

Objects in the Class-room: Floor, door, 
map, pen, pin, book, knife, brush, 
broom, slate-pencil, lead-pencil, news- 
paper, abacus, duster, crayon, crutch, 
letter, picture, desk, slate, ruler, rag, 
wall, box, glass, large desk, large 
slate, cabinet, basin, crayon, pointer, 
ceiling, eraser inkwell. 

Animals: Cat, dog, rat, bat, pig, cow, 
ram,. ass, fish, horse, foal, calf, camel, 
goat, kid, sheep, lamb, frog, lion, tiger, 
bear, fox, deer, zebra, mouse, kitten, 
seal, elephant, weasel, rabbit, squirrel, 
monkey, kangaroo, crocodile, puppy, 
fl.V. 

Birds: Hen, cock, duck, owl, wren, 
chicken, peacock, sparrow, robin, bird, 
eagle, parrot, swan, hawk, vulture, 
goose, pigeon, turkey, ostrich. 

Plurals of: Man, woman, baby, lady, calf, 
puppy, kitten, sheeo. ox, ass, fox, box, 
notato, tomato, cabbage, peach, cherry, 
knife., bench, watch, leaf, loaf, orange, 
dress. 



242 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Teachers' Examination Questions. — Continued. 



Articles of Food : Pudding, porridge, 
vinegar; mustard, pepper, salt, biscuit, 
meat, fish, ham, hash, grapes, pie, tea, 
coffee milk, water, soup, lemonade, 
wine, peach, lemon, orange, cherry, 
nut, plum, bread, butter, cheese, syrup, 
toast, jam, currant, potato, carrot, on- 
ion, beet, currant, beans, blackberry, 
strawberry, gooseberry, raspberry, 
banana, pineapple, cabbage, melon, 
com, apple, pear, cake, peas. 

Natural Phenomena: Rain, snow, ice, 
wind, hail, frost, cold, cloud, thunder, 
lightning, rainbow, air, the sun, the 
moon, the sky, a star. 

Divisions of Time : Morning, minute, 
month, noon, hour, year, afternoon, 
day, night, week. 

Directions,: North, south, east, west. 



The Seasons: Spring, summer, autumn, 
winter. 

The Days of the Week : Sunday, Mon- 
day, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 
Friday, Saturday. 

The Months of the Year: January, Feb- 
ruary, March, April, May, June, July, 
August, September, October, Novem- 
ber, Decern bd". 

Words : Rockingchair, lighthouse, grind- 
stone, steampipe, electric light, wheel- 
barrow, whistle, whisk, pump, pail, 
pipe, towel, match, urn, anchor, an- 
vil, album, bottle beads, basket, thim- 
ble, trumpet, oar, net, hammer, fence, 
nest, umbrella, gate, globe, gridiron, 
inkwell, whip, workbox, violin, vase, 
valise, rope, fishing-rod, rose, raxor, 
harp. 



First Grade Pupils. — Seniors. 



Questions. 

1. What day is this? 

2. What month is it? 

3. Do you like summer? 

4. Was it very cold last winter? 
6. Who made the snow? 

6. Is it warn; now? 

7. Are you glad you will soon go home? 

8. When will you come back to school? 

9. Do you like school? 

10. What is your teacher's name? 

11. Where is your home? 

12. Have you a brother? 

13. Can you add and subtract? 

14. How long have you been in school? 

15. JTas a boar a tail? 

16. AVhat make honey? 

17. Whose uncle gave her a bag of candy ? 

18. Are there many flowers here? 

19. Did you go to Belleville last Satur- 

day? 

20. Shall I give a new pen to you? 

21. How old are you? 

'29. Afny I see your book? 

23. Who was very sick last winter? 

24. Which girl do von like the best? 

25. What color is the grass? 

26. Am I tall? 

27. Can you climb a tree? 

28. Have you seen birds' nests in the 

trees ? 

29. Will it rain to-day? 

30. Is this a beautiful place? 

Imu gunge Exercises. 

Daily News Items. 
Action Writing. 

16a E. 



Incorporation. 

1. After. 

2. Before. 

3. Often. 

4. Sometimes. 

5. Perhaps. 

6. Always. 

7. Remember. 

8. Every day. 

9. Ran away. 
10. Last night. 

n. This afternoon. 

12. Sweet. 

13. A bunch of grapes. 

14. Looked. 

Que.stions. See above. 
The Lord's Prayer. 
The Child's Prayer. 
A Letter. 



Parts of the Body. 



1. I have 
15. 



Parts of Animals and Fowls. 

1. A has long horns. 

2. A has ugly humps. 

3. A has a strong trunks 

4. A has sharp teeth. 

5. A has a small bill. 

6. A has large antlers. 

7. A has a long neck. 

8. A has bright eyes. 

9. A has long ears. 

10. A has U curly tail. 



im 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



24 



Teachebs' Examination Questions. — Continued. 



P<irh of Aitim(tU and Foirlt. — Con. 

11. A has a bushy tail. 

12. A has no tail. 

13. A has fins. 

14. A has an ugly snout. 

15. A has a long mane. 

10. A has an udder. 

ir. A has large paws. 

IS. A has sharp claws. 

Y.K A has small wings. 

•3'. A has long legs. 

-I. A has heavy hoofs. 

— . A has a long beard. 

'-'^> A has two strong hands. 

-4. A is covered with 

scales. 
-' A is covered with 

feathers. 
>' A is covered with 

fur. 
27. A is covered with 

wool. 
-? A is covered with 

hair. 



Questions by Pupils. 



1. Am 

2. Are 

3. Can 

4. Did 

5. Do 

'I Save 

:. How 

5.1a 

?. ^Vhat 
1" Who 
i: When 
'-. Where 
U. Whose 

14. Will 

15. May 

Parts of Objects. 

'. Jane broke the of her 

comb. 
-. John sat on of th^ table 

and swung his feet. 
3/Charles held the of a pin 

between liii> teelli. 

4. ^Vnnie palled thread thru the 

of a needle. 

5. An angry boy kicked the 

of a chair. 

6. Mary looked at the of 

the clock. 
'. Maggie broke the of a 

tea-pot. 
^< Some horses pulled a wagon by its 



'^ Harry poured ink from the 

of a bottle. 
10. A baby stood at the of its 

cradle. 



Adjectives. 



1. 
2. 
3. 



The sun is to-day. 

The trees are now. 

Bessie picked many flowers 

last summer. 

4. Yesterday Cora ironed her 

apron. 

5. This afternoon Jane, will sew her 

dress. 

6. Albert got a suit of clothes 

in his box last Christmas. 

7. Some birds made a 

nest in a tree. 

8. Lila gave a piece of 

candy to Violet. 

9. Miss Dempsey made a 

dress for Mary last month. 
10. My home is a place. 



Colors. 



1. The flag is 



and 



10 



2. Now the grass is 

3. Last winter the snow was 

and cold. 

4. The roses are prettiest. 

5. My hair is ....i and my eyes 

are 

6. George's sister sent him some 

oranges. 

7 ink is in one bottle and 

ink is in the other. 

8. Florence wrote on her slate with a 

crayon. 

9. The grass is , the sky is 

, and the clouds are 

to-day. 

I like best. 



Pronouns. 



1. Edmund pulled boots off 

feet. 

2. Clara took hat off 

head. 

3. Harry was bad and mother 

whipped 

4. John pushed Charles and 

fell down and hurt knee, 

cried. 

5. A cow kicked Albert and 

Irickod 

6. Herbert took some raspberries from 

a box and ate 

7. Bessie's uncle gave some 

candy, gave some to 

and T thanked 

8. Cora cut fingernails with 

penknife. 

9. Mr. Keith took handker- 

chief out of pocket and 

wiped nose with 

10. Jane threw some cold water on Mag- 
gie and chased and 

slapped 



^44 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Teachers' Examination 'Questions. — Continued. . 



Numbers, 
Notation. 

4386 

296 

926 

7030 

65 

Numeration. 
Twelve. 
Two thoasand. 
Four thousand and two hundred and 

eighty-one. 
Seventy-two. 
Four hundred and sixty. 

Cardinal and Ordinal. 
88th. 

Thirteenth. 
1st. 

Twenty-fourth. 
lOth. 

Sixty-second. 
83rd. 
Twelfth. 
40th. 
Seventieth. 

Currency. $ c. 

Seven dollars and twenty-four cents. 

Sixty-three cents. 

Nineteen dollars and seventy-five cents. 

Forty dollars. 

Four cents. 

.01c. 

$6.00. 

,15o. 

$28.70. 

$11.25. 

Addition. 



4,236 


78 


9 


7,420 


526 


4-f8 


1,046 


20 


2 


328 


931 


6-fl 


2,831 


34 


3 


422 


104 


9-h7. 


1,401 


14 


6 


6,104 


211 


Il-h5 




— 


1 




733 


3-f-8: 






— 






6+4 



Simple Problems. 

1. Mary picked 243 strawberries, Maggie 

picked 330, Annie picked 125 and 
Lila picked 84 ; how many did they 
pick altogether? 

2. Harry put 64 apples into one barrel, 

John put 85 into another, Edmund 
put 70 into another, and George 
put 92 into another; how many 
apples did they put into themP 

3. Jane gave 8 nuts to Cora, 9 to Bessie, 

6 to Florence, and 3 to Clara ; how 
many nuts did she give to themP 

4. Herbert found 12 hen's eggs in a nest, 

Albert found 7 in a barrel, Charles 
found 5 in the barn, and George 
found 4 in an old box; how many 
eggs did they find? 



5. Florence washed 24 plates at noon, 
Maggie washed 32 in the evening, 
and Jane washed 40 after break- 
fast; how many plates altogether 
did they washP 

Subtraction. 
2483 752 94 374 40 10 20 U 
1460 611 80 261 6 7 3 4 



5260 
5210 



397 
161 



248 
124 



75 
5 



364 

204 



80 
2 



Simple Problems. 

1. John had 5 apples, he ate 2; how many 

remained P 

2. Bessie saw 7 birds on the ground, 4 

flew away; how many stayed? 

3. Lila bought 12 oranges, she gave 6 to 

her sister ; how many did she keep r^ 

4. Cora had .25c., she gave .10c. to Mias 

Ross; how much did she keepP 

5. Harry's father picked 2684 cherries, 

he gave away 1452; how man J 
cherries were left? 

Miscellaneous. 

Names of the Days. 
Names of the Months. 
The Seasons. 
Divisions of Time. 
Natural Phenomena. 
Form, Quantities, etc. 

1. A team of 

2. A dozen 

3. A couple of 

4. An ear of 

5. A bunch of 

6. A barrel of 

7. A slice of 

8. A pail of 

9. A piece of 

10. A pair of 

11. A bucket of 

12. A glass of 

13. A box of • 

14. A pitcher of 

15. A. pan of 

16. A loaf of 

Plurals. 

1. A man. 

2. A child. 

3. A baby. 

4. A woman. 

5. A knife. 

6. A calf. 

7. A foot. 

8. A leaf. 

9. A mouse. 

10. A deer. 

11. An ox. 

12. A cherry. 

13. A puppy. 

14. A tooth. 

15. A watch. 

16. A dress. 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



245 



Teachers* Examination Questions. — Continued. 
Second Grade Pupils Juniors. 



Arithmetic. 

Write in words: 346, 1392, 604, 3670, 
55, 13th, 90th, 100th, 1000th, 62nd. 

Write in figures : Two hundred and six- 
teen, five thousand six hundred and 
ninety-one, thirty-two, two thousand 
and five, six hundred and seventy, firsts 
seventy-third, eightieth, one hundred 
and fortieth, sixty-serenth. 



Addl3d4 
426 
7365 
538 



^mi 3S7209 
Take 182673 



3627 
853 

1236 
745 



4360 
236 

8754 
267 



785415 
37093 



Arithmetic. 

Problems. 

1. In an orchard there are 13 peach-trees, 
75 appl^trees, 24 pear-trees, 86 
cherry-trees, and 6 plum-trees. 
^?f ?*ny trees are there alto- 
gether? 

2 Bachel has 65 cents, Ida 26, Alice 77, 
Mary 50 and Diana 6. How many 
cents hare all? 

^ i lady had 97 cents. She bought a 
book for 86 cents. She found 16 
cents. How many cents had she 
then? 

^ A fanner had 84 sheep. He sold 26. 
He bought 36. How many sheep 

. had he then? 

'-'■ William had 64 cents. He earned 80 
cents. He spent 25 cents. How 
many cents had he then? 

Actions. 

I You are waving your handkerchief. 

^. Ion waved your handkerchief. 

3. Wesley is washing his face. 

4- He washed it. 

5. Winnie walked to the window. 

5 Yon are wiping your eyes. 

Q £ "*"* ^' whipping a horse. 

5 The man whipped it. 

'. Mr. Bums is working in' the printing 

office. 
j'J. Mr. Nurse worked in the store. 
in L ^^^ ^ watching the birds. 
]l ^ fox watched the birds. 
w. You nnwound the string. 
1* William untied his tie. 



15. Gerald tried to lift the cabinet. 

16. You are teaching us. 

17. You taught us yesterday. 

18. You threw a ball to Walter. 

19. You turned round the blackboard. 

20. Violet is standing on the chair. 

21. She stood on it. 

22. A duck is swimming in the water. 

23. A duck and a dog are swimming in 

the water. 

24. A duck, a dog and a deer are swim- 

ming in the water. 

25. They swam in the water. 

26. A man is shooting some birds. 

27. The man shot some birds. 

28. Dorina is sitting on the chair. 

29. She sat on the chair. 

30. You are sharpening your pencil. 

31. You sharpened it. 

32. You are squeezing a sponge. 

33. You squeezed it. 

M. Miss Dempsey is sewing a dress. 

35. You sewed Tom's coat. 

36. Y^ou shook hands with Carrie. 

37. You are reading a book. 

38. Yon read it. 

•39. A boy is riding on a pony. 

40. A man is rowing a boat. 

41. He rowed it. 

42. You peeled an orange. 

43. You are rubbing your hands. 

44. You rubbed them. 

45. Tom is brushing his coat. 

46. Mary is carrying a book round the 

room. 

47. She carried it round the room. 

48. A. horse is drinking some water. 

49. The horse drank some water. 

50. A rabbit is eating a leaf. 

51. The rabbits are eating the leaves. 

52. The rabbits ate the leaves. 

53. A man is emptying a wagon. 

54. Miss Ross filled a glass with water. 

66. A bird is flying. 

56. You unfolded your handkerchief and 
wiped your eyes. 

67. You took your keys out of your poc- 

ket and unlocked the desk. 

68. You gave a knife to Olive and she 

thanked yon for it. 

69. You sealed a letter and put it into 

your pocket. 
60 You took a picture out of the desk 
and showed it to us. 

61. Alice rolled a cent on the floor and 

Ida picked it up. 

62. Otto made a box and gave it to you. 

63. Rachel lost a cent, looked for it and 

found it. 

64. William led a horse to the barn and 

fed it. 
05. Diana got a letter from home and 
read it. 



246 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Teachers' Examination Questions. — Continued. 



Questions. 

1. What is a horse? 

2. Is it a strong animal P 

3. Can it draw a heavy load? 

4. How many hoofs has it? 

6. Are they hard or soft? 

6'. What has it on its hoofs? 

7. What are they made of? 

8. What is its skin made into? 

9. What are its hoofs made into? 

10. Is the horse a useful animal? 

11. How many horns has a cow? 

12. Has it a long or a short tail? 

13. With what is its body covered? 

14. What does it eat? 

15. What does the cow give us? 

16. What is milk made into? 

17. What color is it? 

18. What is the cow's flesh called? 

19. What are its horns made into? 

20. Has your father any cows? , 

21. What does the sheep- give us? 

22. Is it a large or a sma^l animal? 

23. Into what is the wool made? 
*24. What is the sheep's flesh called? 

25. Is mutton good for us? 

26. What is a young sheep called? 

27. Has your father any sheep? 

28. W^ould you like to have a pet lamb? 

29. What are your stockings made of? 

30. What does a shepherd do? 

31. What is a herring? 

32. Name some other kinds. 

33. Is the herring a large fish? 

34. What are its gills for? 
36. What are its fins for? 

36. Where does a fish live? 

37. Could you live in the water? 
H«. Who catch herrings? 

39. Have you seen a robin? 

40. Which bird do you like best? 

41. Is the robin a nice bird? 

42. What color is its breast? 
4.^. How many wings has it? 

44. What are its wings for? 

45. Are its claws sharp? 

46. AVhat is its nest made of? 

47. Where does it build its nest? 

48. Does the robin stay here in winter? 

49. What is that? 

50. What kind of knife is it? 

51. What is a knife for? 

52. How many blades has my knife? 

53. What are they made of? 

54. What is the handle made of? 



55. How much did the knife cost? 

56. Can you sharpen a knife? 

57. Howr 

58. Do you like that picture? 

59. What do you see in it? 

60. What ■ is the boy doing ? 

61. Where is he going? 

62. How does he. look? 

63. Why? 

64. To whom will he give the rabbits? 
f^5. Will she be glad to get them? 

66. Where are they? 

67. How many are there? 

68. Are they living or dead? 

69. When is your birthday? 

70. How long have you been at school? 

71. What kind of day is this? 

72. Is your father living? 

73. What does he work at? 

74. When will you go home? 

75. Will you be glad to see your friends 

again ? 

Miscellaneous Language. 

Write the Months and the Seasons. 
Write 10 Articles of Furniture. 
Write plurals of : scissors, woman, mouse, 
water, knife, daisy, box, ox, deer, lily. 



A box of .. 
A piece of 
A pair of .. 
A cup of . 
A ball of ... 
A bottle of 
A jar of ... 
A bag of .. 
A sack of .. 



Supply Nouns. 



Elliptical. 

1 put clothes into trunk. 

You read letter. 

A boy cut finger with a knife 

Mary sewed dress. 

A rabbit ran into hole. 

We shall meet friends in summer 

Mr. Campbell and you rode on 

bicycles. 
Mr. Ingram and Mr. Nurse read 

newspapers. 
The boys and girls enjoyed ....'. — dinner 
Some birds are building nests 

Description of Picture. 

The Lord's Prayer. 



Second Grade Pupils. — Seniors. 



Mental Arithmetic. 

; 1. 7 }6|8f9i5|4-f 9-6+3. 

2. 35—8—9—4. 
' 3. 26-8+9—7-6 ^ 8 ;-3. 

4. A man had 7 twenty-five cent pieces. 

» How much money had he? 



5. How many more days are there i 

this month? 

6. How many months are there in 1 

years. 

7. How many days are there in 8 weeks 

8. A man had 6 fifty cent pieces. Ho^ 

much money had he? 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



247 



Teachebs' Examination Questions. — Continued. 



Mentnl Arith tn^ic . — Con, 

Ill A man had $1 and he bought a hand- 
kerchief for .17. How much motiey 
had he then? 

11. If 1 cow cost $25, how much will 5 

cows cost? 
1*2, How many fingers have 9 boys? 

12. A boy bought a slate for .08, 6 slate- 

pencils for .03. a book for .09, 3 
oranges for .06, a copy-book for 
.10, and 3 lead-pencils for .04. 
How much did he spend? 
" How many articles did he buy? 

:•- K^27. 

16 If a man paid .50 for 1 book, how 

moch would he pay for 6 books? 
ir. A boy had .50. He bought a tie for 

.10 and a handkerchief for .09. 

How much money had he then? 
IB How much did he spend ? 
I? If 1 pig cost $12, how much would 

8 pigs cost ? 
f :-4^8^9+64-7-hl04-8-f4-r3. 

Written Arithmetie. 

: 7469^86:^^ 9374^98-^^04374- 9514-f-'e874 

-3768-U41744-95. 
: ^■?i18776l9400a37l4 
-1T96786470967869 
;i i46S4-77l4— 3898— 974-2163-4978. 
4 r)l(^- $19.84 -r $168 —$216.95 — $3.17 

' A farmer had 378 sheep, another had 
&42 sheep, another had 76 sheep, 
another had 879 sheep, another 
had 316 sheep, another had 272 
sheep, another had 538 sheep, an- 
other had 674 sheep, and another 
had 97 sheep. How many sheep 
had they? 
t How many farmers were there? 
* How many sheep had the third, fifth ' 

and eighth farmers? 
^ How many days are there in Janu- 

i try, April, June, August and Oc- 
tober? 

^? How many days are there in 12 years. 

') A man had 416 chickens. He killed 
B4, sold 129, gave 12 to his son, 
bought 286, and a fox stole 37. 
How many chickens had he then? 

1' A man bought a carpet for $58.46, 
a table for $17, a stove for $35.26, 
a pictare for .36, 19 chairs for 
S86.42, a bed for $8.96, a bureau 
for |17, and a washstand for $9.16. 
How much did he spend? 

12. How many articles did he buy? 

J^' How much did the table and chairs 
cost? 

If 7^0249061784x9. 

^' A man had $300. He bought 15 sheep 
for Sl.35.49, and earned $73. How 
much money had he then ? 



16. If 1 horse cost $86.47, how much 

would 8 horses cost? 

17. Write in words: 1,760, 384, 6,000, 

2,006. 8,600, 709, 2,608 and 2,584. 
Also $96.84, $700.29, $3,000, $6.01. 
.82, $7,604.56. 

^ Language, 

1. Write compound or complex sentences 
containing the following: Afraid, 
raised, ceUar, about, behind, in 
front, under, over, against, before, 
after, between, counting, this, 
that, these, thc^se, lent, funeral, 
cemetery, to rain, to bleed, bleed- 
ins> got up, a long time, each 
other, home, planted, woods and' 
piece of 

2. Write questions beginning with do, 

does, did, will, is, am, are, was, 
were, what, who, where, why and 
how, and answer them. 

3. Write about the picture of the child- 

ren on the sea shore. 

4. Write the Lord's Prayer. 

5. Write news. 

Questions. 

1. What church do you go to? 

2. Who is your minister? 

3. What do you do after you. get up? 

4. WTiat do you do after supper? 

5. How many chiraren has your father? 

6. How many sons has he? 

7. How many daughters has he ? 

8. Who are his sons? 

9. Who are his daughters? 

10. Who is his wife? 

11. Who is your teacher? 

12. Who was your teacher last year? 

13. Who do you think will be your teacher 

next year? 

14. How many meals do you eat every 

day? 

15. Name them. 

16. Did you have your breakfast? 

17. What did you have for breakfast? 

18. Where did you eat it? 

19. When is Easter? 

20. When is vacation? 

21. Where do you go in vacation? 

22. How many months are there in sum- 

mer? 

23. Name them. 

24. What month do you like best? 

25. Why? 

26. What are the fourth and tenth 

months ? 

27. Name the autumn months. 

28. What was the month before last? 

29. What will the month after next be? 
^0. What was the day before yesterday? 

31. What will the day after to-morrow 

be? 

32. What was the year before last? 



248 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. l; 



Trachbbs' Examination Quest^ns. — Continued. 



Questions, — Con. 

33. What will the year after next be? 

34. How old is King Edward? 

35. Where does he live? 

36. When did you have a holiday? 

37. When is King Edward's birthday? 
• 38. When is Dominion Day? 

39. Where is the engine-room? 

40. Where do you sleep? 

41. What is your bed covered with? 

42. What is the parlor wall covered with? 

43. What is it made of? 

44. What is the lawn covered with? 

46. Where is the lawn? 

'46. Where is Mr. Cunningham? 

47. How is he? 

48. What is he? 

49. What does he make? ^ ^ , ,« 

60. Who is between Spray and Ethel? 

61. Who is in front of Maggie? 

62. Who is behind Gregory ? 

63. Where do the girls iron the clothes? 
6^1. Where is Mr. Peppin? 

66. What is he? 

66. How are you? 

67. W^hen do you get up? 

68. When do you go to bed? 

69. When is Hallowe'en? 

60. What is your porridge made of? 

Questions on a Story. 

1. Where does Mrs. Mills live? 

2. What does she do? 

3. Is China near here? 

4. How long is she in a ship? 

6. Are there many deaf children in 
China? 

6. How many schools for the deaf are 

there? 

7. What did she show us? 

8. What did she tell us? 

9. What kind of writing is the Chinese? 

10. Are Chinese beds like ours? 

11. What do they have for a pillow? 

12. Do they make slates in China? 

13. Where does Mrs. Mills get her boys' 

slates? 

14. Is the United States near here? 
16. What do they make in China? 

16. Do the people like girls? 

17. What do they sometimes do with deaf 

girl babies? 

18. What are Chinese windows* made of? 

19. What do they put on the paper ? 

20. Can they see through the paper? 

21. Can the light come through it? 

22 What grows in China? 

23 Would you like to live in China? 
24. What country do you like best? 

Questions on Bible Stories. 

1. Were the people always good after the 
flood? 



£;. What kind of man was Aliraham? 

3. What did Gk)d teU Abraham to do? 

4. Where did Abraham go? 
6. Who was Abraham's wife? 

6. How many sons had heP 

7. What was his son's name? 

8. How many sons had Isaac? 

9. What were Isaac's sons' names? 

10. How many sons had Jacob? 

11. Which did Jacob love beat? 

12. What did he give Joseph? 

13. How did Joseph's brothers feel? 

14. What did they want to do? 

16. What were Joseph's brothers doing 

16. Where were they? 

17. How did Jacob feel? 

18. What did Jacob do? 

19. Were Joseph's brothers glad to 9( 

him? 

20. What did they do? 

21. Whom did they see? 

22. What did they do? 

23. Who bought Joseph? 

24. Where did the merchants take J 

seph ? 

25. What did he become? 

26. W^hy did Joseph's brothers go 

Egypt? 

27. Did Joseph forgive his brothers? 

28. Where did Jacob and his sons go 

live? 

Miscellaneous. 

1. Write the names of fifteen trades ai 

professions. 

2. Write the names of fifteen rooms. 

3. Write the names of ten articles in 

parlor. 

4. Write the names of ten articles in 

kitchen. 
6. Write the names of ten articles in 
dining-room. 

6. Write the names of ten articles in 

bed-room. 

7. Write the names of fifteen kinds 

food. 

8. Write the names of ten kinds 

meat. 

9. Write the names of ten kinds 

fruit. • 

10. Write the names of ten kinds 

vegetables. 

11. Supply quantities: A 

bread, a of oxen, a 

of horses, a of hay, a 

of eggs, a of lem^ 

ade, a of w»iter, a 

tea, a of pills, a 

medicine, and a .. of pins 

12. Supply adjectives: 

(1) A boy buried a bird. 

bird sat on the tree a 

looked at him. 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



24» 



Tbachx&s' Ezaminatiok QuBsnoNS. — Continued. 



MifceUaneous, — Om. 

(3) 1 Iftdy left the Institution. Some 

girls liked her, and they were 

she went away. Some other girls 
did not like her, and they were 
she went away. 

(3) It was raining. A girl wore 

her rubbers. A ....f .... girl did not 
wear hers.. 

(4) A wagon cannot pass another wagon 

on a road. It can pass it 

on a road. 



(5) A boy studied his lessons. He be- 
came a man« Another boy 

did not study his lessons. He 

became a man. 

13. Write the past negative and possessive 
forms ef the following verbs: 
Knelt, slapped, lay, caught, 
bought, thought, knew, pitied, 
shone, led, struck, taught, carried , 
losti whipped, laid, blew, flew, 
bled, forgot, quarrelled, wound, 
left, fought, struck, had, lit, stud- 
ied and swam. 



Third' Gradb Pxtpils. — Juniobs. 



Geography. 

1. What is the earth? What shape is 1 

it? How far is it through the j 
earth, and how far is it around it? i 3. 

3. Where does the earth get its light 

and heat? Is the sun as large as ' 
the earth? Is the moon as large 3. 

as the earth ? I 

3 Name the continents. Which is the ' 4. 
largest continent and which is the 
smallest? 

4. Define cape, gulf, isthmus. 5. 

5. What is a city? Name some cities 

I in Ontario. 6. 

6. Which is the largest city in Ontario? 

In Canada? In the world? 7. 

r. What is an ocean ? Name the oceans. 

8. What ocean is south of Asia? What 8. 

ocean is west of America? What 
continents are south of the Arctic 
ocean? What ocean Js between 9. 

Africa and America? 10. 

9. Who is Governor-General of Canada ? { 

Where does he live? I H. 

10. What is an island? Which is the 

largest island in the world? .12. 

11. In what continent is Japan ? In what 

continents is Russia. 1 13. 

12. What is a lake? Name fourjarge 

lakes between Canada and the 
United SUtes. 

13. In what hemisphere do^yon live? In j 14. 

what continent? In what country ? i 

In what province ? In what county? 15. 

14. What is a river? What river flows , 

through Belleville, and where does ( 

it empty? | 16. 
1-5. In what county is this Institution ? 

In what township is it? | ^7 

16. What bay is south of the Institution? ■ 

What county is on the other side 
of the bay? 

17. Is Ottawa as large as Belleville? Is 

Ottawa as large as Toronto? ^°' 

18. What is the capital of Ontario? Of 

Canada? Of the British Empire? ! 

19. What country is south of Canada? 19. 

What continent is east of Europe? 

20. Who rules over the British Empire? 20. 

Who is our Queen ? 



Artisans. 



What does a shoemaker do? Name 

some materials which he uses. 
Who make men's clothes? Who make 

women's clothes? Name some 

kinds of cloth. 
What trades are taught here? What 

trade are you learning? 
What does a farmer do? When does 

he sow wheat? When does he sow 

oats? 
Who works with leather? With iron? 

With wood? 
Who build brick houses, and who 

build frame houses? 
What does a gardener do? Name 

some kinds of vegetables. 
Name some kinds of fruit that grow 

in Canada. Name some kinds that 

do not grow in Canada. 
Who uses an awl, a trowel, a plane? 
What is bread made of? What is 

bread called before it is baked? 
What are chimneys built of? Why 

are they not built of wood? 
What is an auger, a rasor and a 

hammer used for? 
What are houses built of? What is 

this Institution built of? What 

kind of a house does your father 

live in? 
What does a butcher do? Name some 

kinds of meat. 
What does a dressmaker sew with? 

What does she wear on her finger 

when she sews? 
What does a blacksmith do? Name 

some tools Which he uses. 
What does a dressmaker cut cloth 

with? What does a tailor cut 

cloth with? What does a shoe- 
maker cut leather with? 
What are the covers of books made 

of? What are the leaves made of? 

What is one side of a leaf called? 
What are horse-shoes, dust-pans and 

chairs made of? 
Who teaches printing, shoemaking, 

and dressmaking here? 



60 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No; 12 



Teachers' Examination Questions. — Continued 



Mental Arithmetic, 

1. John has 24 apples, James has 37 and 

William has 46. How many apples 
have all thre§? 

2. Sarah has 9 cents and Rosana has 6 

more than Sarah. How many cents 
have both? 

3. A boy^ad $1.25. He paid $0.30 for 

a book and $0.40 for a tie. How 
much money had he left? 

4. A girl had $1. She bought 5 lbs. of 

candy at $0.12 a lb. How much 
money had she left? 

5. A farmer had 15 geese. 6 died, he 

killed 4, he bought 9, he sold 7 
and a fox caught 3. How many 
geese had he then? 

6. In a class there were 19 boys and 17 

girls. How many pupile were 
there in the class? 

7. In a school there were 60 pupils. 35 

of them were boys'. How many 
girls were there? 

8. How many days are there in 32 weeks, 

omitting Sundays? 

9. How many meals do you eat in 3 

weeks ? 

10. A room is 8 feet long and 7 feet 

wide. How far is it around the 
room? 

11. George had 24 cents and Joseph had 

four times as many as George. How 
many cents had both? 

12. How many weeks are there in 6 

years? 

13. How much are 6 lambs worth at 

$4.85 each ? 

14. A man bought a ring for $6.50 and 

sold it for $9.15. How much did 
he gain? 

15. If a printer earns $2.60 a day, liow 

much will he earn in a week, 
omitting Sunday? 

16. If a boy earns $9 a week, and spends 

$5 a week. How much will he save 
in a year? 

17. A merchant bought 24 watches at 

$14 each and sold them at $9 each. 
How much did he lose? 

18. A girl got 67 marks in geography, 

75 in mental arithmetic and 59 in 
incorporations. How many marks 
did she get altogether? 

19. How many days are there in 4 weeks 

and 5 days? 

20. A girl bought 6 oranges at 4 cents 

each and 5 bananas at 3 cents each. 
How much did she pay altogether ? 

Written Arithmetic. 

1. Make out the following bill : 364 lbs. 
of tea at $0.45 a lb., 257 lbs. coflFee 
at $0.34 a lb., 64 gallons of syrup 
at $1.25 a gallon, 56 dozen eggs 
at $0.27 a dozen, and 15 barrels 
of apples at $1.85 a barrel. 



2. If a man earns $64.80 a month and 

spends $12.76 a week, how much 
will he save in 14 years? 

3. A butcher had 149 sheep. He sold 

36 of them at $7.40 each, 64 at 
$8.60 each, 14 died, and he sold the 
rest at $9.7$ each. How much did 
he get altogether? 

4. Annie had ^7.80, Sophie had three 

times as much i^s Annie, Nettie 
had $4.30 more than Sophie, Rose 
had $19.75, Pearl had as much as 
Annie and Rose together less $3.40, 
Barbara had twice as much as 
Nettie plus $6.76, Clara had $3.20 
less than Pearl, and Arlie had four 
times as much as Barbara and Rose 
together, less $3.60. How much 
had all eight? 
6. A merchant bought 642 yards of car- 
pet at $1.65 a yard, and sold it 
at $2.40 a yard. How much did 
he gain? 

6. A man sold 246 bushels of wheat at 

$0.85 a bushel, 347 bushels of peas 
at $0.62 a bushel, and 437 bushels 
of barley at $0.54 a bushel. With 
the money he bought 34 tons of 
coal at $6.75 a ton, 47 gallons of 
coal-oil at $0.64 a gallon, and 3 
colts at $97 each. How miich 
money had he left? 

7. If a teacher pays $3.76 a week for 

board, how much will he pay in 6 
years ? 

8. A man earns $3.60 a day and gets 

$24 a month from his father. He 
pays ^16.26 a month for rent, $7.40 
a week for provisions, $12.60 a 
month for clothes, and $380 a year 
for other expenses? How much 
will he save in 5 years, omitting 
Sundays and 9 holidays each year? 

9. A drover bought 32 sheep at $6.70 

each, 24 sheep at $7.20 each, and 
65 calves at $5.40 each. He sold 
the sheep at $7.60 each, 34 calves 
•at $4.80 each, and the rest at $5.90 
each. JIow much did he gain? 
10. A farmer had $800. He bought 26 
lambs at $3.60 each, 24 sheep at 
$6.70 each, and 35 pigs at $9.80 
each. He sold 56 tons of hay at 
$8.60 a ton, 17 loads of straw at 
$3.40 a load, and 25 cords of wood 
at $6.80 a cord. How much money 
had he then? 

Miscellaneous Questions. 

1. What is this Institution? Why do 

you come here? 

2. How is the Institution heated? Ho« 

is it lighted? 

3. What is the Institution biiilt of I 

What is its roof covered with ? 



11106 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



251 



Teachers' Examination Questions. — Continued. 



MiM-dlaneom (/ueitiioiuf. — Co//. 

4. Xame the resident teachers of the 

Institution. Name the non-resi- 
dent teachers. 

A^liat city is near the Institution? 

What town is a few miles west of 
hereP What town is east of Belle- 
nlle? 

1-. Wliat rirer runs through Belleyille? 
How many bridges are there across 
the riyer in BelleTille? What are 
they called? 
'. How do people generally cross the 
bay in the winter? How do they 
cross in the summer? What kind 
of a bridge is the bay bridge ? 
?. How is coal sold? Coal-oil? Wood? 

Cloth? 
). How far is it from Belleville to To- 
ronto? 

1} Xame some domestic animals. Name 
some wild animals that live in 
Canada. Name some wild animals 
that do not live in Canada. 

.1 What is a word made of? What is 
a sentence made of? How many 
letters are there in the alphabet? 

1:'. What teachers take study-duty on the 
.boys' side? What teachers take 
study-duty on the girls' side ? What 
teachers take chapel-duty? 

1 . Why can you not lift a piano ? Why 
can you not touch that bell? 

\'- Name some metals. Wliich is the most 
useful metal? 

Ix In what months are the days longest 
and shortest? Which is the short- 
est month? In what month is 
Christmas ? 

Vy Name some kinds of birds. Name 
some kinds of trees. 

ir. What is maple-sugar made from ? How 
b it made? 

\\ Xame some animals that eat grass. 
Name some animals that eat flesh. 

Vi How does sugar taste? How does a 
lemon taste? How does medicine 
generally taste? 

^y-^ Name some things we drink. Name 
some things we eat. Name some 
things we eat with. 

Illustrative Questions. 

I. 

Ti illustrate the comparison of adjectiyes. 

1- Is the Atlantic ocean as large as the 
Indian ocean? 

1 Is the large desk as heavy as the 

table? 

5. Who is the tallest boy in this class P 
4. Is this Institution as comfortable as 

your home ? 



6. 

7. 



10, 



Who is the most industrious pupil 

in this class? 
Are oranges as good as bananas? 
Which is the warmest season? 

8. Can a horse run as fast as a dog? 

9. W^hich do you think is the most useful 
animal ? 

Is this building as high as the hos- 
pital? 

11. W^hich do you think is the most 

pleasant season? 

12. Is a rose as beautiful as a lily? 

13. Is Belleville as large as Toronto? 

14. Is Belleville as large as Trenton? 

15. Do you think the Japs are as brave 

as the Russians? 



II. 



To illustrate the use of titlieTy neither, 
both. 



1. Did you have either bacon or eggs 

for breakfast? 

2. Is either your father or your mother 

deaf? 

3. Is Mr. Forrester either deaf or 

dumb? 

4. Is either Mr. Denys or Mr. Madden 

married ? 

5. Did either Mr. Mathison or Mr. Keith 

come to this room yesterday? 

6. Did it either rain or hail last night? 

7. Can you either add or multiply? 

8. Did either Annie or Sophie go to 

church last Sunday? 

9. Would you like either your father or 

your mother to meet you at the 
station ? 
Do you know either The Lord's 
Prayer or "God save the King?" 



10 



; III. 

To illustrate the use of any, no, some, 
none, etc. 

1. Have you any money? 

2. Has Mr. Campbell any children? 

* 3. Has Mr. Cunningham any children? 

4. Did you have any cake for supper last 
evening ? 

6. Did you see any orioles this morn- 
ing? 

6. Did any of the boys play football 

yesterday ? 

7. Did you buy any candies on Satur- 

day? 

8. Did you get any letters yesterday? 

9. Did any of the pupils go to the Cath- 

olic church last Sunday? 
10. Did any of the pupils go to the Meth- 
odist church last Sunday? 



252 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Thachbbs' Examination Quisxions. — Continutd. 



IT. 

To illustrate the use •£ never, often, 
sometimes, always, generally, seldom, 
etc, 

1. Do yon ever get letters from home? 

2. Do you ever have mistakes on your 

slate P 

3. Does Mr. Mathison ever come to this 

room? 
j4. Does Miss Boss ever come to this 

room ? 
6. Do you ever read the Bible? 
6. Do you ever say your prayers before 
you go to bed? 
' 7. Do you ever have meat for breakfast 
here? 

8. Do you 'ever have meat for dinner 

here? 

9. Do you ever have cake for supper? 

10. Have you ever been in Mr.. Mathi- 

son' s house? 

11. Does it ever rain in January? 

12. Does it ever snow in July? 

13. Do the boys ever play football here? 

14. Do the girls ever play hide and seek? 

15. Does Miss Ross ever let the girls go 

for a walk? 

Elliptical Sentences. 

1. Mary lost book, looked for 

but could not 

find 

2. John lost keys, looked for 

and found 

3. We lost pens, looked for 

but could not find 

4. I lost hat, looked for 

and found 

5..Some boys lost caps, 

looked for but could not 

find 

6. I sitting on my chair pow. 

7. Thomas studying his lesson last 

evening. 

8. We writing our examination 

now. 

9. The boys playing football yester- 

day. 

10. George not talking now. 

11. Some pupils going to church 

next Sunday. 

12. We letters from our parents. 

13. A girl a letter to her sister. 

14. A boy got some money his father. 

16. A girl sent a present her mother. 

16. This room is the dining-room. 

17. The study-room is the dormitory. 

18. Clara sits Annie and Edgar. 

19. The girls wash the dishes dinner. 

20. Mr. Keith told a boy to 

21. Miss Ross told a girl that 

22. A boy told a girl about 

23. A boy read in a newspaper about 



24. We eat our supper six o'clock. 

25. We stay in school in the forenoon 

twelve o'clock. 

2($. A boy had ten nuts and he gave 

of them to a girl. 

27. Mary picked apples and she ate 

both of them. 

28. A boy bought and gave some of 

it to his sister. 

29. A girl bought and she ate all of 

them. 

30. James bought figs and he ate 

six of them. 

Incorporations. 

Every day, last month, next year^ were 
playing, was writing, will be going, 
a few days ago, in a few days, some- 
times, never, often, perhaps, in front 
of, behind, above, did so, at noon, one 
of the, none of the, all of the, before 
breakfast, after supper, each, every, 
largest, taller, as long as, more indus- 
trious, most obedient, told to, 

told that, to stop, allowed, en- 
joyed, some of them, some of it, both 

of them, one the other, one-an-. 

other the other, two of them ... 

the others. 

Write The Lord's Prayer. 

Write the National Anthem. 

Write some news. 

Ask twenty questions. 

Describe a picture. 

Language Exercises. 



Prefix the proper forms of the verbs see^ 
feel or hear to the following sentences. 



A cow was eating the grass. 

The wind was blowing hard a few 
days ago. 

I am correcting the pupils' papers 
now. 

A bad girl was pounding on her deak. 

A man was cutting the grass in front 
of the hospital with a lawn-mower. 

The pupils are writing their examin- 
ation now. 

Some boys played baseball last week. 

An angry boy was stamping on the 
floor. 

Tt was thundering a few days ago. 
10. Some boys were planting potatoes two 

or three weeks ago. 



1. 
2. 



4. 
5. 

6. 

7. 
8. 

9. 



l^ 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



253 



Tkachbrb' Examination Questions. — Continued. 



II. 



TVrite the following sentences, changing 
ihe Utter clause into the negative 

fonn: 



and 



he 



I. A lady yisited the Institution 
she came into this room. 

'2. A man fished in the bay and 
canght some fish. 

3. A boy saw a bird's nest and he stole 

•the eggs out of it. 

4. A girl went out of the room and 

£ot the door. 
.\ A boy bought a lot of candies and 

he gare some of them to his sister. 
V A boy chased a squirrel and he killed 

it.' 
r A girl cut her finger and she cried. 
^ Miss James was sick and she went 

to bed. 
V. A gentleman met a lady and shook 

hands with her. 
' A girl made some lemonade and she 

gare some of it to Miss Dempsey. 

III. 



f rite the following sentences, changing 
that to about: 

'.. Mr. Coleman told a boy that he saw 
a large steamer on the bay. 

- Nettie told Rose that she got a letter 

from home last week. 
^^ Joseph told Pearl that he went to 
Belleville last Saturday. 

- Mr. Forrester told us that he shot a 

bear a few years ago. 
' Mr. Stewart told us that a girl killed 
a baby in Toronto. 



6. Miss Bates told Miss Ross that a 

little girl was very sick. 

7. Some girls told me that they went for 

a walk to the cemetery. 

8. The nurse told Mr. Mathison that a 

boy fell down and broke his arm. 

9. I heard that some boys stole a store 

out of Mr. Wheeler's boat-house. 
10. A boy told a girl that he found a 
bird's nest in the grass. 

IV. 

Write the opposite of: Came, shut, lost, 
drop, into, from, on, above, behind, 
yes, bought, sweet, large, slow, rich, 
dear, obedient, dull, sick, hard, intel- 
ligent, weak, young, new, dead. 

V. 

Write the past of: Stand, fly, go, is 
writing, see, saw, has, are playing, 
find, meet, think, wear, cut, buy, study, 
am talking, drive, have, lose, sell, 
teach, drink, forget, leave, carry. 

VI. 

Change the following verbs into the cor- 
responding negative form : Gave, 
writes, sew, went, obeyed, was study- 
ing, walks, stand, to go, must come, 
can run, sees, rode, play, is talking, 
put, loves, bought, to work, am look- 
ing, curls, wash, teaches, drove, break. 

VII. 

Write 15 nouns, 16 verbs, 15 adjectives, 
15 prepositions, 15 pronouns. 



Third Qradb Pupils.— -Seniors. 



Mental Arithmetic. 

Simplify 8X8+8— 2X5-f 6. 

'' 12X12+6X3+8. 

" 6X9-^4—8X6+7—6. 

" 7X3+4X6+8-4. 

" r2X3— 75c. 
A woman had 17 hens. She killed 

10 of them. How much are the 

rest worth at 25c. each ? 

Junes had $16 and he bought 3 books 

at $3 each. How much money had 

he left? 
Henry earned $1.10 a day and spent 

50c. a day. How much did he 

save in 7 days? 
I paid $3.50 for a pair of boots and 

fl.25 for a pair of gloves. How 

maeh more did I pav for the boots 

than for the gloves? 



10. A merchant bought 9 hats at $2.60 

each and sold them ^ for $24.50. 
How much did he gain? 

11. John bought 4 oranges at 5c. each, 

and some candies for 45c. How 
much more did he pay for • the 
candies than for the oranges? 

12. A boy bought 3 lead-pencils at 4c. 

each, and 2 other lead-pencils at 
6c. each. He sold all of them at 
5c. each. How much did he ^ain? 

13. James bought 3 scribbling books at 

2c. each and 4 other scribbling 
books at dc. each. He sold all of 
them for 25c. How much did he 
gain? 

14. How many more wheels have 3 bug- 

gies than 4 bicycles? 

15. Mary had 8 stamps. Jane had 4 

times as many as 'Mary less 3 
stamps. How many stamps had 
Jane? 



254 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. M 



Teachers' Examination Questions. — Continued. 



Written Arithmetic. 

1, Find the omitted addend : 
743586 
209753 



522903 
684762 
723998 
357862 
473964 
682073 

5196495 

2. Add the following numbers and prove 
your work by subtracting each ad- 
dend from the sum : 

74968 
^ 32705 

68403 

72569 

38276 

40732 

89685 



3. Multiply 782906 by 8742 and prove 

your work. 
4; An agent bought 145 books at $3 

each and sold them for $362.50. 

How much did he lose? 

5. A grain merchant bought 5070 bushels 

of oats at 39c. a bushel. He paid 
$1879.64 in cash. How much has 
he yet to pay? 

6. A woman bought 16 yards of cloth at 

28c. a yard and 19 pounds of but- 
ter at 21c. a pound, (a) How much 
more did she pay for the cloth than 
for the butter? (b) How much did 
she pay for both? 

7. A drover bought 25 cows at $27.50 

each and sold them at $35 each. 
How much did he gain? 

8. Mr. Smith bought 12 piejs at $15.20 

each; 18 pigs at $14.75 each, and 
16 pigs at $15.72 each. He sold 
all of them at $16 each. How 
much did he gain? 

9. A man's farm was 1425 yards long 

and 742 yards wide. He built a 
board fence 6 boards high around 
it. How many yards of boards did 
he use? 

10. A farmer sold 14 cows at $37.50 each. 

With the money he bought 6 horses 
at ^7o each. How much money 
had he left? 

11. A grocer bought 50 pounds of tea at 

30c. a pound ; 60 pounds at 35c. a 
pound, and 75 pounds at 32c. a 
pound f He sold 145 pounds of it 
at 36c. a pound and the rest of it 
at 34c. a pound. How much did 
he gain? 



12. Mr. Jones bought 54 acres of lani 
at $75 an acre. Mr. Smith bougls 
47 acres of land at $85.60 an Acn 
' (a) How many acres did both buy? 

(b) How many more acres did Mr. JoM 

buy than Mr. Smith? 

(c) How much more did Mr. Smith pa 

an acre than Mr. Jones? 

(d) ,How much did both together pa 
for their land? 

(e) How much more did Mr. Jones pa 

for his land than Mr. Smith? 

Incorporation. 

Incorf)orate the following words inj 
sentences : 
I 1. Some of it. 
|- 2. Some of them. 
I 3. Often. 
; 4. Never. 

5. Every day. 

6. No. 

7. Sleepy. 

8. More untidy. 

9. Each. 

10. Every. 

11. Either. 

12. Neither. 

13. Both. 

14. Sometimes. 

15. Not any. 

16. A pair of. 

17. Her gloves. 

18. Are not "writing. 

19. Uglier. 

20. Much. 

21. A lot of. • 

22. Her. 
^3. Its. 

24. Him. 

25. Me. 

26. A few. 

27. Have. 

28. Permitted. 

29. To-day. 

I 30. In a few weeks. 

! 31. Saw. 

I 32. Youngest. 

33. Perhaps. 

34. Swept. 

35. Broke. 

36. Went. 

37. Came. 

38. Rained. 

39. Cannot climb. 

40. Will not go. 

Miscellaneous Questions. 

j 1. When will your next birthday 
I How old will you be then? 

2. How did you come to the Institnl 

last fall? Why did you come h^ 

3. Where is yoi-r home? Is it easi 

west of here? What kind of h( 
do you live in at home? 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



255 



Teachers' Examination Quesiions. — Continued. 



UMIumous Qt'e-^tit/Ui'.— Oju. 

I. Ic your dormitory a large room? 

How many beds are there in it? 
. In which room do you eat your meals ? 
Is it a8 large as your dormitory ? 
Did you ever eat your dinner in 
this class-room? 
. How many windows are there in this 
Institution? What is a window 
for? 
. How many teachers are there in this 
Institution? How many teachers 
are there in this class-room? 
. Did you ever write a letter to your 
friends at home? How much does 
a postage stamp for a letter to 
your home cost? 

Did you ever lose any money ? Have 
you any money in your pocket 
now? 

How many electric lamps have v(e in 
this class-room ? How can we light 
them? When do we light them? 

Whose birthday was Victoria Day? 
When is our King's birthday?. In 
what month does your birthday al- 
ways come? 

Do you sleep well at night? Who 
sleeps near you? 

How many seasons are there in a 
year? How many months are there 
in each season? In which season 
do we have much snow? 

T^lien will yon go home? Who do 
you think will meet you when you 
get home? 

In which month does New Year's 
Day always come? When is New 
Year's Day^ 

What church do your parents attend ? 
Is it far from your home to the 
church? Did you go to church 
when you were at home last sum- 
mer? 
'.'How many horns has a cow? Did 
you ever see a sheep that had 
horns? 
Iv I? there a clock in this class-room? 
What is a clock for? W^hat do I 
f^rrv in my pocket to tell the time 
with ? 
- What are trees good for? 
-^ Tfll me the names of some wild ani- 
mals. 

Elliptical Fientences. 
^ A little girl's father here to 

8€« her. He gave oranfre 

to her and she him for it. 

2. There are slate-pencils in a 

box in the larce desk. 
^ ^ think .pnpil in the Institution 

will be glaS to go home on the 

of June. 
^ of the bovs in this class-room 

have hats on their heads now. 



5. The boys wore caps over- 

coats when they were shovelling 
snow last winter. 

6. I do not know who is the man 

in the world. 

7. I saw a cat watching a bird. It tried 

to catch but it flew away. 

8. Three men and a lady were in a store. 

men was selling some things 

to and the other men were 

talking to each other. 

9. I met a poor man a few days ago. 

He had not money. I was 

sorry for him and I him 

ten cents. 

10. A book is not as as a piece of 

paper. 

11. Henry got a photograph from 

his sister. He was very glad to 

get it. He will thank her for 

when he writes a letter her. 

12. A little girl told me that she expects 

her father mother to 

meet her when she goes home. 

13. A boy found a henr's nest in a hay- 

mow in the barn. There 

five eggs in it. He put in 

his hat and carried them into the 
house. 

14. There two electric-lights in this 

class-room. They burning 

how. 

Artisans. 

1. Who teaches shoemaking, carpenter- 

ing and barbering here? 

2. Who makes bread? What is it made 

of? W^hat is it called before it is 
baked ? 

3. What docs a blacksmith do? What 

is the room in which he works 
called? What does he work with? 

4. W'ho make clothes for men and boys? 

W^ho make clothes for women and 
girls? What are clothes made of? 

5. What is a farm? What does a farmer 

do? 

6. Who takes care of a garden? Name 

some tools which he uses. Name 
some kinds of flowers. 

7. With what does a farmer generally 

reap his grain? What does he 
clean it with? Name some kinds 
of grain. 

8. What are conches, sofas, and bed- 

steads used for? Who make them? 

9. Wliat is food? How is it cooked? 

What is the room in which food is 
cooked called? • Name some kinds 
of food. 

10. Who uses saws, planes, augers and 

hammers. What are they used for? 

11. What does a butrher do? What is 

the room in which he sells meat 
called ? 



266 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



TEA0HBB8' Examination Qubstions. — Continued. 



Artinaii*. — CV/w. 

12. Who build stables and barns? What 

are they used for? 

13. Name some tools which a cabinet- 

maker uses. 

14. Name some kinds of cloth for men's 

and boys' clothes. 

15. What are chairs, dressers, and tables 

made of? What are they used for? 

16. Who uses flour? What is it made 

from ? 

17. What are newspapers printed on? 

Where are they printed? What 
does a printer use? 

GeoQraphy, 

1. What is geography? 

2. Of what does the surface of the earth 

consist? Name some of the land 
divisions of the earth. Name some 
of the water divisions. 

^. On which continent do we live? In 
which country do we Jive? In 
which province do we live? 

4; Who is Earl Grey? Where does he 
live? 

5. Where is Canada? Where is the 

United States? Name four large 
lakes between Canada and the 
United States. Which of them is 
near here? What is a lake? 

6. What is a sea? Is a sea as large as 

a lake? 

7. What is a bay? What bay is near 

here? What lake is it a part of? 

8. Name the continents in the Eastern 

Hemisphere. 

9. What is an ocean? Which of the 

oceans is not in the Western Hem- 
isphere? What ocean is west of 
this continent? 

10. What are the people who live in 

Canada called? 

11. What is a canal? What canal is near 

here? About how far is it from 
here? What does H connect? 

12. What is a harbor? Name four har- 

bors near here. 



13. 



U, 



16. 
17 
18. 



19 



20 



What is a pond? Is a lake as large 

as a pond? 
What is the capital of Canada? What 

is the capital of Ontario? Name 

some of the cities in Ontario. What 

is a city? 
16. Who is our king ? What empire does 

he rule over? 
Who is the Premier of Canada ? Who 

is the Premier of Ontario? 
What is a town? What town is 

about ten mines from here? 
Which is the largest city in the 

world? Which is the largest city 

in Canada? 
What is an island? Which is the 

largest island in the world? To 

whom does it belong? In which 

hemisphere is it? , 
Define a cape, a^ strait, a stream, a 

hill, a swamp, a valley, a coast, a 

continent. 

Language Exercise. 

Mary saw a dog on the road when she 
was going to the city last Saturday. 
She was afraid of it. 

Re-write the above making the following 
changes : 

(1) Change ''Mary'' to "John." 

(2) Change ''Mary" to "Mary anc 

John." 

(3) Change "a" to "two." 

(4) Change "last Saturday" to "nexl 

Saturday." 
(6) Change "Mary" to "Mary and I.' 

Asking QuestionM 

1. Ask ten general quMiont. 

2. Write ten requests. 

3. Ask five questions about "A Dog." 

Miscellaneous. 

1. Write some news. 

2. Write our National Anthen. 

3. Write The Lord's Prayer. 

4. Describe the picture about "The Blacl 

smiths." 



Fourth Grade Pupils. 



Mental Arithmetic. 

How many months in 9 years and a 
half? 

There are 63 sheep and pigs in a 
field. 29 of them are sheep. How 
many more pigs than sheep? 

How many pigs? 

A boy sold 4 pairs of chickens at 85c. 
per pair. He received a four- 
dollar bill in payment. How many 
chickens did he sell? 

How much did he get for them? 



6. How much change did he giveP 

7. A boy pays 9c. for each xne&l an 

40c. for his bed for a week. Ho 
much does his bed cost in a month 

8. How much does his meals cost in tv 

days? 

9. How much do they cost in a week? 

10. How much does he spend in a week 

11. How many more meals will you e^ 

until you go home? 

12. How manv meals have you eaten th 

month? 



'ZZ.- 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



267 



19. 
¥i 

21 J 



Teachers' Examination 
Mentai Arithmetic. — Con. 

13. A boy bought 3 dosen and a half 

bananas for half a dollar and sold 
them at 2c. apiece. How many 
bananas did he buy? 

14. How much did he get for fiyeP 

15. How much did all cost ? 

16. How much did he get for all ? 

17. Find bis gain or loss. 

18. A girl paid 90c. for a straw hat and 
veil. The hat cost 65c. How much 
less did the veil cost than the hat P 

How much did the veil cost P 

How many minutes in four hours and 

tbree quarters? 
A woman had 9 f owis and she raised . 

six times as many plus 5. How 

many had she then P 
£'. How many did she raise P 
tl How many had she at first? 
24 A boy paid 43c. for a cap and 16c. 

less for a pair of braces. He gave 

the clerk 45c. How much change 

did he get? 
2d flow much did the braces cost ? 
IS How much did he spend? 
r James is 18 years old. When was 

he born? 
*5 A boy has a dime, a quarter and four 

cents. How much must he earn 

to have half a dollar? 
? Hflw many more minutes in an hour 

than hours in a day? 
3r How many more fingers than thumbs 

have, nine boys? 

Slate ATtthmetic. 

I A man gets a salary of $69.00 per 
month. He pays $9.00 per month 
for rent, $14.00 monthly for 
clothes, $4.65 weekly for groceries, 
S6-90 monthly for fuel, $2.40 week- 
ly for meat, and $7.25 monthly for 
other things. 

4. How much can he save yearly? 

^ How much does he earn yearly? 

f How much does he spend yearly? 

fi How much does he pay for rent in 
half a year? 
" A drover bought 13 sheep and a yoke 
of oxen for $296.00. He paid $10.95 
each for the sheep. How much did 
the oxen cost? 

ri How much did all the sheep cost? 

"I How many oxen did he buy? 

ii How many animals did he buy?' 

e' How much did four sheep cost P 
- A dry-2oods merchant bought 9 webs 
of cloth, each measuring 38 yards 
at 115.00 per web, and sold at 46c. 
per yard. 

i\ Find his gain or loss. 

'h'How many yards did he buy? 

'^^ How much did he get for all P 

'i> How much did all cost? 

'^ How much did one web measure? 

17 E. 



Questions. — Continyed. 

(f) How much did one web cost? 

(g) How much did he get, for one webP 
(h) How much did he gain or lose on 

one web? 
(i) Why did he gain or lose? 
4. What will it cost for bread from Feb. 
9th to Nov. 14th, taking 8 loaves 
a day at 12c. per loaf? 

(b) How many days? 

(c) How many loaves? 

(d) How much will it cpst in Feb. P 

(e) How many loaves will it take in 
Nov. ? 

6. A drover bought 14 head of cattle at 
$17.00 per head, 16 others at 
$18.00 per head, and 14 others for 
$265.00. He sold the whole lot at 
$19.00 per head. 

(a) Find his gain or loss. 

(b) How many cattle did he buy? 

(c) How much did all cost? 

(d) How much did he get for all? 

(e) How much did he get for five? 

6. How many seconds in April? 

7. A farmer'jB wife sold 7 pairs of ducks 

at 98c. per pair, 9 rolls of butter 
each weighing 5 lbs. at 18c. per 
lb.« 8 cakes of lard, each weighing 
6 lbs. at lie. per lb.; and a turkey 
for a dollar and a quarter. She 
received in payment a hat for two 
dollars and a half, a parasol for 
78c. less than the hat, a jacket 
for as much as the hat and the 
parasol together, three pairs of 
gloves at 35c. per pair, and the 
balance in cash. 

(a) How much money did she get? 

(b) How much did she get altogether? 

(c) How mnch did she get in trade? 

(d) How many fowls did she sell? 

(e) How many lbs. of lard did she sell? 

(f) How much did she get for one roll 
of butter? 

8. Express in Roman numerals^ 986, 

640 and 1905. 

Express in figures: XCIX, CMLV 

and CDLX. 

9. A man has nine thousand and forty 

dollars. He gives three hundred 
and five dollars and nix cents to 
each of his seven children and to 
his wife as much as three children. 

(a) How much has he left? 

(b) How much do all the children get? 

(c) How much does his wife get? 

(d) How much does he give away alto- 
gether ? 

(e) How much has he at first? 

10. A and B started to walk toward each 
other, the former goini? 28 miles 
a day. and the latter 23 miles a 
day. After walking 6 days they met. 

(a) How far apart were they? 

(b) How far did they go in ona day? 

(c) How far did each go? 



258 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Teachers' Examination 
Geography. 

1. Give four divisions of land and three 

of water. 

2. What is land nearly and entirely sur- 

rounded by water? 

3. Define an ocean, and name the lar- 

gest. 

4. ^ What oceans are west and east of 

Africa? 

5. What continent is this and what 

oceans are west, east and north of 
, it? ^ 

6. What is low, wet land called? 

7. Dfefine a river and name one. 

8. Give the continents in the Eastern 

Hemisphere. 

9. Name the countries in North Amer- 

ica. 

10. What country is this and what is its 

capital? 

11. How many provinces in Canada and 

name them? 

12. How is Canada bounded on the south 

and west? 

13. How many cities in Ontario, and 

name those east of here? 

14. Name the most western province. 
" Whore is Niagara river? 

16. How aro l^ake Michigan and Lake 

Huron connected? 

17. Give the county town of each of 

the following: Simcoe, Dufferin, 
Algoma, Leeds, Durham, Front en- 
ac, Haldimand, Essex, Nipissing, 
and Bruce. 

18. In what county is each of the follow- 

ing : London, Oraneeville. Owen 
Sound. L'Orignal. Milton, Hamil- 
ton, Goderich, Picton, Lindsay, 
and Ottawa? 

19. Give the peninsulas in Ontario. 

20. Name the counties on Lake Erie. 

MisceUaneous O'uestions. 

1. By whom are you taught? 

2. WTiy do you come to school? 

3. What are you learning? 

4. How many marks did you get in the 

last paper? 
6. What is the name of the paper pub- 
lished here? 

6. How often is it published? 

7. What is the price of it? 

8. Name the two chief newspapers of 

Ontario. 

9. How ofton are they published? 

10. Give the two chief railways of Can- 

ada. 

11. How many senses are there, and 

name them? 

12. How many kinds of words are there, 

and name them? 

13. Give three adverbs and four pro- 

nouns. 

14. What are the people living in Eng- 

land, Scotland, Ireland, France 
and Italy called? 

17a E. 



19. 
20. 



Questions. — Contin ued. 

' 15. What are many bees, dogs, birds, 
horses, and people together called? 

16. What is animal food? 

17. What is vegetable food? 

18. How are meat, milk, bread, potatoes, 
wood and coal sold? 

What is the price of eggs now? 
How much does butter cost? 

21. What is the price of milk? 

22. How are paper and envelopes sold? 

23. How many pounds in a ton? 

24. Why is the horse called a beast of 
burden ? 

25. What is a beast of prey, and name 
one? 

Lang^mge. 

1 Ask and answer twelve questions. 
2. Twelve items of news. 

Incorporation. 

Words. 

1. Namely. 

2. Steadily. 

3. Heartily. 

4. Except. 

5. Until. 

6. Since. 

7. Do so. 

8. Postponed. 

9. Has invited. 
10. None. 

Phrases. 

1. By and by. 

2. Not sure. 

3. Lots of. 

4. Her own fault. 

5. Pay attention. 

6. At a distance. 

7. At hand. 

8. Take pains. 

9. In hiemory of. 
10. A sign of. 

Composition. 

Write a letter to a friend. 

Give an account of Saturday, Sunday or 

Monday. 
Describe a picture. 

Grammaticnl Exercises. 
Change to the Passive Voice. 

1. We must write our lessons thought- 
fully. 

2. A boy sprained his ankle a few days 
ago. 

3. The birds have built their nests on 
the trees. 

4. Niagara River connects Lake Erie and 
Lake Ontario. 

5. He has caught a string of fish. 

6. People do not shoot deer now. 

7. Perhaps we will* have an excursion 
after the examinations. 

8. She can make a dress for herself. 



.905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



259 



Teachers* Examination Questions. — Continueil. 



)liinge to the Present, Perfect and Fu- 
ture. 

The wind blew the trees last week. 
!. A cat caught a mouse, teased, killed 

and ate it. 
I Mr. Balis said grace at dinner. 
I. A farmer shot two weasels in his barn 

a few days ago. 
I Somebody stole a stove out of Mr. 

Wheeler's boat-house. 
5 I saw the wares and white-caps on the 

bay lately. 
r. A lady made ham sandwiches for a 

picnic last summer. 
S Dr. Goldsmith gave some medicine to 

a sick girl a week ago. 



Change to Plural. 



creek, 



I He has eaten his breakfast and will 

eat his dinner soon. 
• A small stream is called a 

brook, rill or riyulet. 
3. 1 saw a girPs book on the floor. 
i A little child falls downstairs but does 

not hurt itself. 
■' A boy plays ball with another one. 
^ She lends a book to another girl. 
'. An l^hmus connects land but a strait 

connects water. 
S A child goes an errand for its mother. 

Cite the opposite of: Wide, deep, dear, 
^i»ays, freezing, give, scold,' forget, 
'3 front of, and above. 



' Give the Past-Participle of : Am, have, 
give, take, throw, steal, invite, seek, 
tear and kneel. 
Give the corrosponding adverbs for : Ea.sy, 
pretty, awkward, clumsy, heavy, late, 
beautiful, hearty, careful and careless. 

, Elliptical Sentences. 

I 1. A girl lost her book , looked for 

it but could not find it 

2. We go to school every day Sat- 

urday and Sunday. 

3. There are four seasons spring,. 

summer, autumn and winter. 

4. A girl broke a cup and Miss Ross told 

her to 

I 6. We must in school. 

6. The girls to the city 

lately and perhaps they 

again before they go home. 

Time Lesson. 

1. What is the face of a clock called? 

2. Wliat is the short hand called? 

3. What is meant by A.M. and P.M.? 

4. What are noon and midnight? 

5. How many minutes in three-quarters 
; of *an hour? 

6. How many hours in half a day? 

I 7. Name the longest and shortest days. 

I 8. Where and when does the sun rise and 

; set? 

1 Six questions describing the time. 



FiiTH Grade Pupils. 



Mental Arithmetic. 

1 A carpenter earns 12 dollars a week. i 1. 
How long will it take him to earn I 
'2 dollars? j 

- A box contains 3 bushels. How many 

boxes will hold 36 bushels? . 2. 

3 When flour is 7 dollars a barrel, how 
manv barrels can I get for 63 dol- 
,lars? 3. 

^ If 4 sheep cost $16, what will 9 sheep i 

cost? I 4. 

•^ If 4 men earn 12 dollars a day, what 

will 7 men earn? 5. 

A hoase was bought for $1,200, and 
wld for $1,500. The gain was ' 
shared by 6 persons. How much 6. 

did each one get? ! 

A* 15 cents a yard how much calico ; 
could 1 buv for 300 cents? I 

i T paid 32 dollars for 8 cords of wood. 7. 

How mnch was that a cord ? , 

Ose man can dig a ditch in 66 days. 
How long would it take 6 men to 1 
dijF it? 

If four horses eat 12 tons of hay in 8. A 

8 months, how many tons will 6 
horses eat in the same time ? 



Practical Arithmetic. 

Willie bought 8 chickens at 14 cents 
each, and sold them to gain 24 
cents on all. How much did he 
get for each? 

How many pairs of stockings at 9 
cents a pair should be given for 3 
geese at 63c. each? 

A man bought 4368 eggs at 15 cents 
a dozen. What did they cost him ? 

If 16 nien earned $116.10 a week, how 
much did each man earn per day? 

How many cows worth $28 apiece 
should be given for 17 horses at 
$112 each? 

A man sold 7 cows at $57 each, and 
23 pijrs at $7 each. With the money 
received he bought 28 sheep. What 
was the price of each sheep? 

Find the value of 1800 pounds of 
wheat at 86 cents a bushel, 850 
pounds of oats at 34 cents a bushel, 
and 480 pounds of barley at 67 
cents a bushel. 

miller put 125 barrels of flour into 
some 25-pound bags. How many 
bags did he use? 



260 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Teachsrs' lixAMiNATiON QUESTIONS. — Continued, 



Practical Arithmetic. — Con 

9. When barley is worth 76 cents a 
bushel, a man exchanges 25 bushels 
for 5 pigs. How much less than 
$6.00 was each pig worth? 
10. If 24 cows cost 662 dollars, how much 
would 17 cows cost? 

Grammatical Exercises. 
. (a) Incorporation. 

Very tired, handsomest, very smart, not 
very well, wise, sorry, proud, tough, 
a long time ago, swiftly, get ready, 
soundly. 

(b) Change to Passive Voice: — 

1. Men dig salt out of salt-mines. 

2. Men also get salt from sea-water and 

8&.lt— wells 

3. We use salt to season and preserve 

4. Chemists make medicine from salt. 

5. I put salt on snow to melt it. 

(c) Change to Active Voice. 

1. Sugar is made by men from sugar- 

cane, sugar-beets, and maple sap, 

2. Rubber is obtained by Indians from 

the sap of rubber trees. 

3. Much ivory is got from the trunks of 

elephants by hunters. 

4. Ink is made by chemists from iron, 

acids and nut-galls. 

6. Medicine is made by chemists from the 

stomachs of swine. 

(d) Ask three questions each with 
"Why,*' "When,'' "Who." 

(c) Write ten lines of news. 

Miscellaneous Questions. 

1. Name some common metals. 

2 Which is the most useful and plentiful 

metal? 

3 What is cast-iron? Names, 

4. What is wrought-iron? Names. 

5. What is steel? Names. 

6. What is farming? , 

7. What do farmers work with? 

8. What is an orchard? A forest? 

9. Name some Canadian forest trees. 

10. How large is a cord of wood? 

11. From what plants is cloth made? 

12. Name some things made of linen. 

13. What is clothing made of? 

14. What is money made of? 



15. Name the Canadian money? 

16. How much is a hundred-weight, a 

ton, a barrel of flour, a barrel of 
pork? 

17. W^hat does a bushel of wheat, oaU, 

barley or corn weigh? 

18. What grains grow in Canada? 

19. Where does most wheat grow? 

20. What is a calm, cyclone, rain, snow, 

ice? 

21. Where does tea grow? CoflFee. 

22. Where does flax and wool come 

from? 

23. Where do we get salt? 

24. Where do we get cork? 

25. Where do we get indiarubber? 

26. What animals give us furs? 

27. What does liquor do to men? 

28. Is it healthv to drink much lienor? 

29. What will May 24th be? 

30. 'WTiat will you do on June 21st? 

,How'll you feel? 

Geography. 

1. What and where is Canada? 

2. Bound Canada? 

3. What is the population of Canada? 

4. What is the capital of Canada? 

5. What mountains in Canada, and 

where are they ? 

6. Name 6 cities in Canada outside of 

Ontario. 

7. Name 4 large lakes in Canada. 
8 Name 4 large rivers in Canada. 

9. What lakes and rivers separate Can- 
ada from the United States? 

10. Name the Maritime Provinces, and 

why are they so called? 

11. Name the provinces and their capi- 

tals. 

12. What is the commercial metropolis 

of Canada? 

13. Who is the Premier of Canada? Gov- 

ernor^General ? 

14. What is said about Ontario? 

15. What is the population of Ontario? 

16. What separates Ontario from Que- 

bec? 

17. What does Ontario produce? 

18. Name some fruits of Ontario. 

19. What large towns in Ontario? 

20. Name the cities in Ontario. 

21. Name some mineral products of On- 

tario. 

22. Name 6 large rivers in Ontario. 

23. Where are (1) The Sault Ste. Marie, 

(2) The Welland, (3) {The Murray, 
and (4) The Rideau Canals? 

24. Name the chief bays around Ontario. 

25. What is the capital of Ontario? 

26. Wliat is a Parliament ? 

27. Who are Premier, Provincial Secre- 

tary, and Minister of Education 
of Ontario? 



jp* ^r^ ' . 



Tj^^: 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



261 



Teachers' Examination Questions. — Continued. 



Natural History. . IC. 

What is Natural History? What is * !''• 

"Nature?" 

How is Natural History divided? 18. 

Names. II). 
What belong to the three kingdoms? 

Wliat kingdom do we belong to? ^0. 
How do we differ from other animals? 

What are domestic animals? ^I- 

What are carnivorous, graminivor- ^2- 

ous, and ruminant animals? ^^• 

What are beasts and birds of prey ? ^'^• 
What are cattle? What are cattle 

usually called? 25. 

Which is the best beef? 26. 

What are mutton and tallow? 27. 

What are butter and cheese made of ? 28. 

Who take care of sheep? Where are 29. 

sheep kept? 30. 
What is swine's flesh called? 
What are male, female, and young 

swine called? ! 



What is the lion called and why? 

What are rodents? Name a few ro- 
dents. 

What are aquatic birds? Name some. 

What do we call male and young 
ducks ? 

What do we call male and young 
geese ? 

What two kinds of fish are there ? 

Name some fresh and salt-water fish. 

What are reptiles? Name some. 

Which are the largest and strongest 
reptiles ? 

Name 6 classes of animals. 

Name some winged insects? 

Name some wingless insects. 

What are insects? 

Which is the largest quadruped? 

Which is the largest animal? 

Composition on Selected Subject, 



Sixth Grade Pupils. 



Geography. 

1. When and by what Act was Confed- 

eration formed ? 

2. Name the Provinces first federated. 

3. When was Manitoba admitted into 

the Dominion? British Columbia? 
Prince Edward Island? 

4. What tw« new Provinces are soon 

to be created? 

5. What is understood by the ^'Banner" 

Province? What was its former 
name? What and where is its 
capital? 

6. For what is Ontario noted? 

7. What is meant by Lower Canada? 

8. For what is Montreal noted? 

9. Name the Maritime Provinces, stat- 

ing how the inhabitants are chiefly 

employed. 
10. Name two large rivers ©f Canada, two 

islands, two canals, two railways. 
li. What and where are the following : 

Bruce, Chaleur, Dawson, Pelee, 

Saguenay, Bras d'Or? 
1'2. What day do we keep in honor of 

Confederation ? 
13. What is the population of Canada? 

The area? 
li What about the soil, scenery and 

climate ? 

Canadian History. 



What is Canada? 
discovered it? 



Where is it? Who 



2: What country occupies the other half 
of North America ? When was this 
continent discovered ? What 

countryman was Columbus? 

3. Since when has Canada been a British 

colony? By what treaty was it 
permanently ceded? 

4. When was the Battle of the Plains 

fought? Who were the contending 
generals? Who won? 

5. When was the Constitutional Act 

passed? What was it for? 

6. When did the First Parliament of 

Upper Canada meet? What was 
one of its first acts? 

7. When and by whom was Quebec 

founded? Montreal? Kingston? 
London ? 

8. Who was Donnacona? Kirke? Brock? 

Laura Secord? 

9. When had we war with the United 

States? What caused it? Name 
two battlefields of that war. How 
long did it last? By what treaty 
was it concluded? 

10. When was the Canadian Rebellion? 

What did the people want? By 
what Bill was Responsible Govern- 
ment granted? What city became 
the capital after the union ? 

11. When was Queen Victoria born? 

How long did she rule? When did 
she die? 

12. When was King Edward in Canada? 

Why did he come here? Over how 
many people does he rule? What 
is he often called? 

13. Are you proud to be a Canadian? 

Say why. 



262 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Teachers' Kxamination Questions. — Continued. 



Natural History. 

1. Name the three kingdoms in nature.* 

2. What do you call b^ies which have 

life? No life? 

3. Which is the noblest work of God? 

How so? 

4. How many senses has man generally ? 

Name them. 
J5. How many species of known animals 
are there? Of birds? Of insects? 

6. J^ame the king of beasts, of birds, the 

largest land animal, water. 

7. What animal lows? Bleats? Howls? 

Koars ? Trumpets ? 

8. Name a flower, a fruit, a mineral, a 

tree, an insect, a fish. 

9. WTiat bird hoots? Cooes? Screeches? 

Caws? Crows? Gobbles? Chucks? 

10. Name an amphibious animal, a beast 

of prey, a ruminant quadruped, 
a talking bird? 

11. What has the Creator shown in all 

His works? 

12. How can man prove his gratitude for 

God*s special benefits to him? 

Mental Arithmetic. 

1. If 4 lbs. of meat cost 48c., what will 

9 lbs. cost? 

2. A gallon of maple syrup is worth 

80c. What is that a pint? 

3. Two boys caught 30 fish. One caught 

6 less than the other. Each? 

4. Mary spoke twice in 16 minutes. 

How often in one hour? 

5. I gave two boys 60c. Each time one 

got 2c. the other received 3c. How 
much had each? 

6. What will half a barrel of flour be 

worth at 3c. the pound? 

7. How many steps of 2 ft. each in 100 

yards ? 

8. Two men earned $60. One, earned 

4 times as much as the other. 
Each? 

9. A sheep cost $10, a cow twice that and 

a horse five times as much as the 
cow. All? 

10. John has 3 brothers and 6 sisters. 

How many children in his family? 

11. How many quires in 72 sheets of 

paper ? 

12. After spending half of his money, 

Willie had $1.50 left. How much 
had he at first? 

Written Aritlunetic. 

1. $19.50 bought 3 tons of coal. How 

much is that for 36 tons 1,000 lbs. ? 

2. A man's salary is $1,180 a year. He 

spends $16 a week. How much 
does he save in two years? 
.3. A man sold 288 sheep for $2,520, by 
which price he gained $2 on each. 
What did one sheep cost? 



4. How many telegraph poles are there 

in 70 miles of line, the poles being 
4 rods apart? 

5. A grocer paid $49.60 for two barrels 

of molasses and found that the 
cost was 8c. a pint. How many 
gallons were in each barrel? 
C. A case containing 36 doz. oranges wm 
bought for $7.20, and sold at the 
rate of 8 oranges for 22c. How 
much was gained on it? 

Temperance. 

1. What is temperance in all things 

called ? 

2. If a man drinks what will be the 

result? ** 
3 Name a strong drink, a malted li- 
quor, a natural beverage. 

4. "VMij do we teach temperance to you? 

5. What is the effect of alcohol on the 

system ? 

6. What does Solomon say of drink? 

7. Have we Prohibition in Canada? 

What is Prohibition? 

8. If you had a friend who drank, what 

wov.ld you say to him? 

9. What is said of the Ancient Romans? 

10. WTiere, when and on what occasions 

was wine used at first? 

11. Do you think you will ever acquire 

the habit of drinking? 

12. WTiom will God assist? 

Incorporation. 
Carefully, particularly, anywhere, no- 
where, for it, te them, however, never- 
theless, of whom, of which, too much, 
too little. 

General Conversation. 
' 1. How has your health been this term? 

2. How do you think you have done? 

3. W'hat were your subjects of study? 

4. Why did you not go to a Public 

School? 

5. When was this Institution founded? 

How is it supported? Who is the 
Minister in charge? 

6. How many> Institutions for the deaf 

are there in Canada? Where are 
they located? 

7. How do you express your thoughts? 

8. What alphabet do we use here? Who 

invented the Manual alphabet? 

9. When one uses correct language, 

what do we say? 

10. How many languages are there in the 

world ? 

11. By how many people is English spok- 

en? 

12. How long does it take a deaf mute 

to acquire an education ? 

13. If you met with uneducated mutes 

of school age, what would you say 
to them? 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



263 



Teachers' Examination Qvestiovs.— Continued. 



fiaiffti^ OmriTMitlnu. — (^m. ^ 23. 

14. How do you expect to put in your 

summer? " 24. 

\h. Do you think you will earn money? 2o. 

What should one do with his 

money? 26. 

l»i What do yon call a man who spends 27. 

everything? One who will not 28. 

spend anything? 
ir. How do you purpose to make your 29. 

living ? 
!?. Do yoii like Canada? Give reason. 30. 

Where did your forefathers come 

from? 31. 

1? Over how many people does King 32. 

Edward rule? Who represents 

him in Canada? 33. 

i\ Wliat is the emblem of our country? 

Of England? of Ireland? Of Scot- 34. 

land? of France? 
C] Wliat country lies to the south of us? i 3-5. 

TSTio is their President? What is I ;3C. 

their population? Their capital? ' 
~ What two countries are still at war? 37. 

What is the war about? 



Name the Czar of Russia, the Mikado, 
a Japanese General, a Russian Gen- 
eral. 

Do you like to see war? Say why. 

When had we our last trouble in 
Canada? 

Was that a civil or a foreign war? 

When will a country prosper? 

Name the six great military powers 
of the world. 

Which has the largest navy? The 
second largest? 

If you had not come to school, could 
you have answered these questions P 

Who generally get on in life? 

If a man drank, would he likely suc- 
ceed? 

Where do you intend to live after 
you are through here? 

If you answer all this correctly, what 
will it show? 

What will you do with your papers? 

If you pass a good examination, how 
will your friends feel? 

To whom must we look for health, 
and success in all our endeavors? 



Seventh Grade Pupils. 



Mental Arithmetic. 15. 

1 A lot 2800 feet around is 600 feet 
wide. How long is it? 

2. .V lot is 150 feet wide and twice as 16. 

long. How many feet around it? 

3. What part of the year is past at the . 

end of October? | 

■I. What part of a bushel of wheat is 45 I 17. 

lbs? I 

* How many days from May 5th to 18. 

Dominion Day? 
' It 3 eggs cost 4c., what will 3} dozen 

cost? 
■ What will 9i lbs. of cheese cost at | 19 

12c. a pound? 
V What will 12 lbs. of beef cost at 

12fc. a pound? 20. 

• If 3J lbs. of butter cost 60c., how 

much is it a pound? 

' If 3 men can cut 48 cords of wood in 21. 

8 days, haw many cords can 5 
men cut in 12 days? 

'.1 A man arrived at home the day be- 22. 

fore Christmas after an absence of 
87 davR. When did he leave home? 

'- How much can a man earn in the 23. 

months of May, June and July at 
SI. 25 a day, deducting 12 Sun- 
days? 

^^ A boy spent 4-7 of his money and had 24. 

9c. left. How much had *he at 
first? 

'i4 How many yards of carpet, 3 feet 25. 

wide, will be required for a room 
30 feet long and 18 feet wide? 



A man spent i of his money in May, 
1-6 of it in June, and i of it in 
July, and had 55c. left. How 
much had he at first? 

How many pickets 3 inches wide and 
set 3 inches apart will be required 
for a fence around a lot 170 feet 
• long and 130 feet wide? 

What will 6 lbs. 12 oz. of butter cost 
at 24c. a pound? 

Find the value of 3 piles of lumber 
each containing 1200 boards 10 feet 
long and 6 inches wide at $40 a 
1000 feet. 

What will it cost to plaster a ceiling 
30 feet long and 18 feet wide at 
5c. a square yard? 

How many revolutions will a wheel 
8 feet in circumference make in 
running 3J miles and back? 

What will it cost to dig a cellar 27 
feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet 
deep, at 30c. a cubic yard? 

How many cords of wood in a pile 
80 feot*lpng, 8 feet hight and 4 
feet wide? 

A woman had 6 pounds of butter. 
She sold 4 lbs. at 27 \o. a pound, 
and the balance at 24 Jc. a pound. 
How much did she get for all? 

Draw a line 11? inches long, and di- 
vide it into two equal lengths, 
marking the length of each. 

Draw a line 10^ inches long and di- 
vide it into four equal lengths, 
marking tlic length of each. 



264 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 13 



Teaohers' Examination QvE8TiovB,^Jontinv4id, 



Mental . I rtthmHir . — Con- 

26. Draw a 6| inch square. 

27. Draw a parallologram 7} inches long 

and one-half as wide. 

Slate Arithmetic. 

1. What will the lumber cost for a side- 

walk 2\ miles long and 5 feet wide 
at $30 a thousand feetP 

2. A railway section is 6 miles long and 

99 feet wide. How many acres 
does it contain? 

3. How much would the lumber cost at 

$40 a 1000 feet for a 4-board fence 
along both sides of the above rail- 
way section, if the boards are 10 
feet long and 6 inches wide P 

4. A boy spent 2-5 of his money in May, 

4-9 of the remainder in June, 7-10 
of the remainder in July, and had 
30c. left. How much had he at 
first? 

5. Write and analyze a question to prove 

the one next above. 

6. A bin is 16 feet long, 6 feet wide, 

and 4 feet deep. How many bushels 
will it contain? 

7. It takes 1236 steps 2 J feet long to 

walk around a lot 650 feet wide. 
How long is it? 

8. A man height 8| lbs. of tea at 60c. 

a pound, 9 lbs. of coffee at 33ic. 
a pound, and sugar at 3|c. a 
pound, paying $9.15 for all. How 
many pounds of sugar did he buy? 

9. Henry Smith in Belleville, on May 

15, 1905, sold a farm to John 
Brown for $4800, receiving f of the 
money down, and taking a note for 
the balance at 90 da vs. 
Write : (1) A receipt, and (2) the note. 

10. What will it cost for gravel at 16c. a 

cubic yard to gravel a road 9 feet 
wide for a distance of 2* miles if 
the gravel is put on 6 inches doen ? 

11. If 6 lbs. 10 oz. of butter cost $1.69, 

what will 9 lbs. 4 oz. cpst?^ 

12. A collar 32 feet long and 16 feet wide 

has 3 inches of water in it. How 
many gallons of water are in the 
cellar ? 

13. Find the total cost of the following : 

6 bushels 35 lbs. of wheat at 84c. a 
bushel; 8 bushels, 17 lbs. of oats 
at 48c. per bushel; 9 bushels 18. 
lbs. of barley at 64c. a bushel; 12 
bushels 24 lbs. of rye at 49c. a 
bushel. 

14. A room is 45 feet lone:, 27 feet wide 

and 12 feet high. What will it cost 
t o plaster the walls and ceiling at 
5c. a square yard? 
(5. Tom alone can do a work in 6 days; 
Dick alone in 9 days; and Harry 
alone in 18 days. In what time 
can they do it if they work to- 
gether ? 



16. What will it cost to paper the walls 

of a room 42 feet long and 27 feet 
wide, if it is 12 feet high, with 
paper 18 inches wide at 20c. a roll 
of 12 yards, deducting 8 strips for 
doors and windows? 

17. Find the value of a crop of wheat 

cut off a field 847 feet long and 
640 feet wide, if the yield is 36 
bushels per acre, and the price is 
85c. a bushel? 

18. What is the rate of speed per hour 

of a train that passes a telegraph 
pole every 3 seconds, if the poles 
are 198 feet apart? 

Language Exercises. 
Incorporations^ Ellipses, Etc. 

1 proposed to to , 

and agreed. 

2 proposed to to , 

but declined on account of 



3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 

9. 

10. 

11, 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 

16. 
17. 

18. 

19. 

20. 
21. 

22. 



asked how long it took 

to , and said 

broke up 

broke down 

broke into 

broke out of 

a letter asking how 

was geting along .^ 

and said that 

would go if had money 

enough. 
and said that 

would have gone if had 

had 

asked how long it would 

be till 

asked how long it had 

been since 

if nothing happened to 

prevent it. 
A man punished for 

by 

.' and said **not 

yet.*' 

As soon as 

but refused to 

do it. 
but was disap- 
pointed. 
told not 

to or might 



but said that 

didn't do it. 
would have been 

if had 

not 

would not have been 

if had 



23 but 

taken. 
24. If there were no ... 



was mis- 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



266 



Teacbibs' Examination Qubstions. — Continued, 






Ijinguage Exerc.he*, — Om. 

and never re- 
turned. 

and never re- 
turned it. 

to prevent 



.to protect. 



from 

A woman her baby upon the 

bed, and she down beside it. 

Some boys were down upon 

the grass watching the masons 

brick. 
A river and overflowed its 

banks. 
A boy early in the morning 

and the flag. 

A balloon in the air. (Future). 

A balloon in the air. (Past). 

A balloon in the air. (Habit- 
ual). 

in a few days. 

for a few days. 

asked when, and 

said (Past). 

asked when , 

and said (Future). 

asked 

when ;ind said 

(Habitual). 
and the result was 

that 

and the cause was that 



14. 
47. 



and said that 

didn't have any. 

and said that 

didn't have it. 

said that trade was 

and learned it in 

said nOy but would have 

gone if 

said yes, would go if 



asked which ... 

would rather do; or 

r be 

I ffo 

I eat — 

would rather \ see — 

j read — 

I have — 

I live — 

asked why 

and said because 



than 



for, 



..asked. 



. .what 



and 



.said 



says that when , 

he (Future). 

says that when she , 

she (Past). 

says that when he , 

he (Habitual). 



used to but... 

doesn't do it now. 
didn't use to 

but does it now. 

said: *'So am I." 

said: "So will I." 



61. 
62. 

63. 

64. 

65 said: "So do I." 

said: "Neither am I.'* 

said: "Neither do I.'* 

said: "Neither will I.'* 

a new one. 

new ones. 

71 to keep it. 

72 to take care of it. 

73 to stop talking. 

74 stopped to talk. 

75. Before , he 



66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 



76. After she 

77 before he 



78. ..'. after she 



Language Exercises. 

Changing from Narrative to Colloquial 

Form 

1. A man told his son not to walk on the 

track or he might be killed. 

2. A boy went into a photographer's 

rooms and told the photographer 
that he wanted him to take his 
photograph. The photographer 
asked him what size he wanted, and 
he said that he wanted cabinet 
size. 

3. A man told his wife that he was going 

to Montreal the next day, and 
asked her if she wanted him to 
bring her anything, and she said 
no, she didn't need anything. She 
asked him when he thought he 
would return, and he said he 
thought that he would return the 
next night. 
Write the following Letter. 

4. On the 10th of May, 1905, John Smith 

in Belleville wrote a letter to his 
father in Toronto acknowledging 
the receipt of his letter contain- 
ing money, which he sent him the 
day before, and thanked him for 
it. He said that his health was 
good and he hoped that his was 
the same, and that they were all 
well at home. He said that he was 
busy preparing for the examina- 
tion, and he hoped that he would 
pass well. He said that the time 
was passing rapidly, and he would 
soon see them all again. He asked 
how his little sister was getting 
along at school. He said that he 
had no more. to add, and he would 
bring his letter to a close. He told 
him to give his love to all at home. 



266 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Teachers' Examination Questions. — Continued. 



Changing to Narrative Form. 

1. A hoy: "I sold my old bicycle and I 

bought a new one/* 
His mother: "How. much did you get 

for your old one, and how much 

did you pay for the new one?'* 
The boy: **I got $5 for the old one, 

and I paid $20 for the new one." 
His mother: "How do you like your 

new one?** / 
The hoy: "1 like it very muc^. It is 

a better one than the old one was.** 

2. Jones: "How are you; I am glad to 

see you. When did you come to 

town?** 
Smith: "I am well, thank you. .1 

came last night.** 
Jones : "Did you leave vour family 

well?** 
Smith : "Yes, they are all well except 

my youngest son who has a bad 

cold.** 
Jones: "How long will you be here?** 
Smith: "I think I yrill be here till 

• to-morrow.*' 
Jones: "I will be glad to have you 

call and see us before you leave.*' 
Smith: "Thank you; I will if I can.'* 

3. Belleville, Ont., 

May 12th, 1905. 
Dear Mother: 

I am pleased to write a letter to 
you to-day. I* am glad to inform 
you that I am well, alid I hope that 
this letter may find you Hie same. 
It will not be long till school closes, 
and I will soon see you all again. 
I suppose that my father and 
brothers ar^ busy on the farm now. 
Did my little sister receive the 
present I sent her? How is she 
getting along in school? I hope 
that you are well of the bad cold 
you had when you wrote to me 
last. I have nothing more to add. 
Give my love to all at home, and 
keep a lar^e share for yourself. 
Your loving son, 

John Brown. 

Change from Active to Passive. 

1. John struck James. 

2. A man told his son to go to school. 

3. A man took his son to school and told 

him to be a good boy. 

4. A boy asked a policeman what the 

Judge did to a thief, and he said 

that he sent him to jail for six 

months. 
6. Some burglars entered a house and 

stole many valuable articles. 
6. If a man had not jerked a boy off the 

track the train would have run over 

and killed him. 



7. A brass band frightened a horse and 
it ran away, upset the buggy, threw 
out a boy and broke his arm. 

Change from Passive to Active. 

1. A cat was chased. 

2. A boy's boots were repaired. 

3. A girl had her photograph taken. 

4. A boy Was thrown ^nd his leg was 

brqken. 

5. A boy was struck by a base ball and 

he was badly hurt. 

6. A boy was struck by a runaway horse 

and badly injured. He was car- 
ried home by a policeman, and the 
doctor was sent for. 

7. The pupils were asked what should be 

done to a room if the air in it was 
foul, and they said that the win- 
dows should be raised and the room 
ventilated. 

Subjects to Write About. 

'. Vacation. 

2. History of "Myself.** 

3. Our Institution. 

4. Our country. 

6. Our daily work in the Institution. 

6. Food. 

7. Christmas. 

8. A railway trip. 

9. King Edward VII. 

10. Thanksgiving Day. 

11. Good Friday and Easter. 

Miscellaneous Compositions. 

1. An offer. 

2. A proposal. 

3. A promise. 

4. A warning. 

5. A threat. 

6. A command. 

7. A request. 

8. An apology. 

9. An excuse. 

10. A complaint. 

11. A rumor. 

12. A reprimand. 

13. A preference. 

14. A punishment. 

15. An exclamation of joy. • 

16. An exclamation of sorrow. 

17. A charge and a denial. 

18. A cause and a result. 

Letter Writing. 

1. A note to the doctor. 

2. A note of invitation. 

3. A note accepting an invitation. 

4. A note declining an invitation. 

5. A note asking information. 



6. A note asking advice. 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



267 



Teachers' Examination Questions. — Cotiduded. 



IjetLr Wrtthuj. — (on. 

;. A notice of a meeting. 
8 A letter of introduction. 
9. A note asking to be met. 
111. A letter subscribing for a newspaper. 
:i. A notice of change of address. 

12. A letter of congratulation. 

13. A letter of condolence. 

14. A letter applying for a situation. 
'' A letter of acknowledgment. 

16. A letter asking for a certificate of 
character. 

Canadian History. 

1 VMiat distinguished member of the 
Koval Family visited Canada in 
1860. and what is his rank now? 

•2 Tell the difference between a civil 
war and a foreign war, and give 
an example of each. 

3. GiTe the cause of the war of 1812. 

4. Write a note on General Sir Isaac 

Brock. 

l Write a note on the Duke of Rich- 
mond, and tell what progress Can- 
ada made during his rule. 

6. When and for what purpose was the 
Earl of Durham sent to Canada? 

'. Write a note on Lord Sydenham. 

5. What was the cause of the rebellion 

in ia36-1837? 
?. Tell what you know of the Elgin 
Riots. 

Ifi Write a note on the Fenians. 

11 Tell what xou know of the Riel Re- 
bellion. 

15 W>at was Ottawa formerly called, 
and when did it become the capital P 

13. What is the form of Government in 
Canada, and of what does it con- 
sbt? 

-4 When* were Canadian soldiers sent 
to fight three years ago, and what 
was tbf result? 

15 Mention the names of some prom- 
inent men in England and in Can- 
ada 

Geography. 

1 Of what does Great Britain consist ? 

1. Through what waters would a vessel 
pass in sailing around Great Brit- 
ain from London 'and back? 

3. Of what does the British Isles con- 
sist? 

4 Of what does the British Empire 
consist? 

5. What is the difference between a 
colony and a dependency? 



6. Name the principal British colonies 

and dependencies throughout the 
world, and tell where they are. 

7. What exports do we send to Great 

Britain, and what imports do we 
get in return? 

8. Name some chief cities in England, 

and tell for what they are noted. 

9. Name the capital and the chief com- 

mercial city in Scotland. 

10. How are England and Scotland sep- 

arated ? 

11. Name the provinces in Ireland and 

the chief city in each. 

12. How could you go from Belleville to 

Vancouver, B. C, by an all land 
route, and how by an all water 
route? 

13. Name the chief American cities that 

lie on the great lakes. 

14. What and where is the capital of the 

United States? 

15. Where are the West Indies, and what 

are the chief products? 

16. Through what waters would a vessel 

pass in sailing around the world 
from Montreal and back by way of 
Gibraltar? 

17. What are the chief occupations of the 

people in South America? 

18. From what countries do wo get the 

following : Sugar, tea, rice, mo- 
lasses, cheese, tobacco, coal, iron, 
silver, gold, diamonds, dye-woods, 
spices, cutlery, silk, linen, ivory, 
and tropical fruits? 

19. What two nations are now engaged 

in war; where are they, and what 
is the capital of each? 

20. What and where are the following: 

Cuba, the Amazon, Liverpool, the 
Horn, the Andes, the Thames, the 
Solway, Yukon, the Golden Gate, 
Ulster, the Wash, Erie, Chicago, 
the Mississippi, Belle Isle, Paris, 
Brazil, the Ottawa? 

Temperance. 

1. What is a drunkard, a moderate 

drinker, a total abstainer? 

2. Which of the abpve three is it always 

safest and best to be, and why? 

3. What is it in spirituous liquors that 

makes them injurious? 

4. What is alcohol? 

5. Name the liquors that contain alco- 

hol. 
(]. How do spirituous fiquors injure the 

human system? 
7. What is it always best and safest to 

do when invited to take a drink 

of spirituous liquors? 



268 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The Combined System — Pure Ohalism. 

In previous reports the characteristics and relative merits of the Pure 
Oral and Combined Systems of instruction have been fully discussed, and it 
is needless to traverse the same ground again. The facts are that not twenty 
per cent, of the deaf can ever learn to articulate with reasonable distinctness 
bv the pure oral or any other method, not ten per cent, ever become success- 
ful lip-reaaers even under the most favorable conditions, and not one in a 
hundred is able to follow a speaker when addressing a number of people from 
a platform a short distance away. We regret that this is so, and. wish most 
heartily that it were possible to accomplish what the oralists claim; but 
there is no use shutting our eyes to demonstrated facts or striving to accom- 
plish impossible feats. No' stronger proof of the failure of pure oralism to 
"restore the deaf to society" is to be found than the testimony of the edu- 
cated deaf themselves; and it is no exaggeration to say that at least ninety- 
five per cent, of them, even those educkted under the pure oral system, are 
strongly in favor of the Combined Method — ^which simply means a method 
which rejects all faddisms and dreamy idealisms, and which uses all avail- 
able means with the one practical object in view, of giving to the pupils such 
intellectual equipment and training as will best fit them to attain the high- 
est degree of prosperity and happiness in life. The attitude of a large ma- 
jority of the teachers of the deaf on this continent relative to the Combined 
System is well known and their position has been time and again endorsed 
with practical unanimity by the educated deaf themselves throughout Can- 
ada and the United States. To this testimony I desire to add that of the 
deaf in Great Britain, as expressed at the Ninth Biennial Congress of the 
Deaf and Dumb Association, which was held last July. In his opening ad- 
dress the President of the Congress dealt largely with the question of meth- 
ods of instructing the deaf. He held that the Combined System was the 
best, an^ said he would like to see an inquiry by the Board of Education into 
the practical rpsults of the Oral Method. He did not hesitate to say that in 
the majority of cases to try to educate all the deaf and dumb by means of the 
Oral Method was a cruel waste of time; the progress was too mechanical, 
and such instruction did little to expand the intellect. The public needed to 
be told that the pupils educated in pure oral schools were by no means *'re- 
stored to society," but were too often doomed to a greater social isolation 
than those trained according to the Combined System, which used all meth- 
ods and rejected none. Subsequently the following series of resolutions 
were unanimously adopted by the Congress: — 



We, the members of the British Deaf and 
Dumb Association in Congress assem- 
bled at Windermere, in the County of 
Westmoreland, England, this fourth 
day of July, 1905, while recognizing 
and annreciating to the full extent all 



We resolve therefore: 

''I. That the educated deaf feel it their 
duty and privilege to discuss and pass 
judgment upon all questions afPecting 
the education of deaf children, inas- 
much as interests vital to their hajjpi- 



methods of educating the deaf, deplore | ness and success in life are involved, 

and condemn €he narrow and short- i and as the adult deaf, by reason of 

sighted policy pursued by those teach- | their daily personal experience are the 

ers who seek to educate all deaf > best judges of the success or failure of 



children by the Pure Oral Method 
alone. We are firmly and unalterably 
in favor of the Combined System, which 
adapts the method to the pupil, and 
not the pupil to the method. 



the method by which they were edu- 
cated, they feel that they are justly 
entitled to claim for their well-consid- 
ered 'opinion the full weight of author- 
ity." 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



269 



'II. That to those deaf who have never 
acquired speech through the medium of 
the ear, speech as represented by the 
motions of the lips and mouth is a 
sign language, and that those oral 
teachers who decry the conventional 
language of signs and manual alphabet 
are guilty of an inconsistency.*' 

"III. That the Oral Method, which, with- 
holds or discourages the use of the 
manual alphabet and the language of 
signs, robs the deaf of their birth- 
right." 

"IV. That those champions of the Oral 
Method who have been carrying on a. 
warfare, whether openly or secretly, 
against the use of the language of 
signs by the deaf are no true friends 
of the deaf.*' 

T. That in our unanimous opinion that 
it is the duty of every teacher of the 
deaf, no matter what method he or she 
uses, to have a working command of the 
manual alphabet and the sign lang- 
uage." 

'VI. That it is the opinion of this Con- 
gress that the highest educational in- 
terests of the deaf require an increased 
ratio of deaf teachers possessing the 
requisite intellectual and moral quali- 
fications." 



'VII. That the practice of those oral 
teachers who through deliberate mis- 
representation influence the parents of 
pupils to deprive their children of the 
benefits of association with their fel- 
lows, calls for the severest condemna- 
tion, as it is opposed to the true hap- 
piness and well being of the deaf.*' 

''VIII. That in Tiew of the persistent 
policy of ultra-oralists by entertain- 
ments and 'living exhibits* to mislead 
and prejudice the uninitiated public 
against all other methods, we recom- 
mend to the deaf the advisability of 
holding public entertainments and of 
circulating such literature as may tend 
to remove tlie wrong impressions the 
public may have formed and which will 
make manifest the advantages of the 
combined system over the pure oral 
method.** 

"IX. That this Congress extends its 
greetings and encouragement to our 
brethern in America and on the Con- 
tinent who are struggling for a more 
rational and humane system of educa- 
tion and hopes their noble efforts will 
be crown ad with success and finally 

"X, That the spirit which establishes and 
cultivates fraternal and beneficial or- 
ganizations of the deaf be encouraged 
and commended.*' 



Convention of Instructors of the Deaf. 

The seventeenth meeting of the Convention of American Instructors of 
tie Deaf (including Canada) was held at Morganton, N.C., on July 7th to 
loti, 1905, and it was a most enjoyable and helpful gathering. I had the 
pleasure of representing this Institution. This Convention meets every third 
year, and its purpose is ^o give those able to attend an opportunity of dis- 
enssing matters relating to the work of educating the deaf, and endeavor, by 
an interchange of views and a comparison of experiences, to eliminate or 
lessen as many as possible of the dijfficulties peculiar to deaf-mute instruc- 
tion, and to try to devise, if possible, yet more perfect methods'. Among the 
s^ibjects discussed were the following: — "English from the Beginning," 
"foundation Work in Arithmetic," ''Technical Training for the Deaf," 
'^)nie Fruits of a Long and Rich Experience in the Class-room," "Garden- 
ing for the Deef," "What the Domestic Training of our Girls Should be," 
"Industrial Training," and many others. It will be seen that the subjects 
are all of a very practical character, and as the discussions were participated 
in by many of the most experienced and successful instructors of the deaf 
on the continent, they cannot fail to prove of very great helpfulness to all 
rho were privileged to hear them; and, as a verbatim report is published, 
fvery teacher, whether present or not, will be able to have the benefit of the 
views advanced and the conclusions arrived at. It would be difficult to over- 
estimate the value and importance of these periodical gatherings of so many 
teackers of the deaf in elevating their ideals, renewing their zeal, perfecting 
their methods, giving them a truer estimate of both their opportunities and 
responsibilities, imbuing them with greater incentives to excel, and infusinj? 
in them new" inspiration and enthusiasm for the noble work in which thev 
are engaged. High and Public school teacher? tave frequent opportunity 



^70 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



of exchanging views and discussing methods with teachers from other 
schools, and no one doubts that they thus gain a broader outlook and a deeper 
insight into their,work, and that increased efficiency must result. This privi- 
lege is denied to most teachers of the deaf except on rare occasions, hence spe- 
cial necessity and utility of these triennial conventions. As always happens 
' at these gatherings, the value and necessity of signs was one of the subjects 
most warmly discussed, and there seemed to be an increased tendency to 
recognize that they are essential to best improrvement and highest welfare of 
the deaf, a majority of even the pure-oralists admitting that on some occa- 
sions and for some purposes signs are helpful and even necessary. The su- 
periority of the Combined or Eclectic System of Education, also, seems to 
have been so amply demonstrated and to have become so firmly established 
that it is now scarcely ever questioned, even by those who still adhere to the 
Pure-Oral System ; and on this occasion no effort was made to formally chal- 
lenge its supremacy as has been done at former conventions. 

Attendance at the Institution. 

It will be noticed elsewhere in this report that the attendance at this In- 
stitution during the current session is somewhat less than that of previous 
terms. For this there are several reasons. In the first place, there were a 
number of pupils of low mental capacity that had been allowed to remain 
here much longer than the regular term, in the hope that their dormant 
faculties might awaken to greater activity, but in most cases this hope ha* 
not been realized. All of these, and a few others who were not capable of 
benefiting by a longer stay at the Institution, were not allowed to return. In 
the second place, a larger number of pupils than usual had completed their 
course in class-rooms and shops, and have now gone out to take their place 
in the activities of life. We have done for them all that our facilities and 
opportunities will permit, and we trust that abundant happiness and pros- 
perity will crown all their days. In addition to these, there were, I regret 
to say, an unusually large number of pupils whom we expected to return, and 
who should have done so, but who have been kept at home to help their 
parents. In one or two cases this may have been necessary because of fam- 
ily troubles or aflBictions, but in most instances it \p quite without justifica- 
tion, and cannot but, result in life-long injury to the children. Doubtless 
the scarcity of laborers and the current high wages have been controlling 
factors in producing this regrettable result. To these three classes must be 
added eight pupils whose parents have moved to other provinces, and who, 
therefore, could not be allowed to return. The losses, forty-eight pupils who 
were with us last year not being with us this session, due to this unusual 
combination of circumstances, have been to some extent made good by 
thirty-six new pupils, but these were not sufficient to bring the attendance 
up to that of last year. It might be added that for many yeafs the attend- 
ance at the Institution was abnormal, because each year, in addition to the 
natural number of young children who entered school, there was a consider- 
able number of older boys and girls — some of them, in fact, young men and 
women — ^who should have come many years before, but for various reasons 
had not done so. That period in our history is now pretty well past, and 
from this time on, with some isolated exceptions, the number of new pupils 
each year may be expected to remain at the normal level. This, for a few 
years, may result in a smaller average attendance than that of the last de- 
cade, but in course of time the rapid growth and development of New On- 
tario, and the consequent great increase in the population of the Province, 
will doubtless again brincr the attendance up to the utmost limits of the 
capacity and resources of the Institution. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 271 



Industrial Departments. 

Our boys and girls who were engaged in the Industrial Departments last 
session, did very well indeed. In nearly every case, anxiety to improve and 
make tlie most of the time in the Departments was quite noticeable, and the 
progress made, satisfactory. 

Manual Training. — During the session twelve hoys received instruction 
in this department, all of whom have made good use of their time and pro- 
:ted by the training here afforded. As in previous years it has been the aim 
of tiie instruction to secure neat, accurate, . well-finished work, and to de- 
velop in a very practical way the hand ana eye. No presence is made of 
leaching carpentry, though teaching the names of tools and their operations, 
as Tj ell as their care and how to use them, forms part of the scheme. Their 
use is taught in the making of a prepared list of useful articles such as dove- 
tailed boxes, mallets, axe-handles, etc. The class is comprised of first, sec- 
ond, third and fourth year pupils. No matter what occupation the boys '*re 
likely to follow hereafter, their experience in the Manual Training Room 
^ill help them materially. 

Domestic Science Classes, — The work generally was satisfactory, keen 
interest being manifested by the pupils during every lesson. Their conduct 
was excellent. During the class-work pupils 'were led to think and decide 
for themselves. All new work was copied in books to be used for future 
reference. 

The teacher reports as follows: — Class 1. A class of ftix girls completed 
riie third year's work. During the year the practice work consisted of bread- 
making, cooking of meats and fowls, making of soups, cooking of vegetables 
ii. various ways, and the review of marmalade. Instructions were given in 
idnuing of vegetables and fruit, jelly making, cooking of fish, making of hdt 
jnd cold desserts, ices, pudding sauces, meat and fish sauces, cooking and 
planning of meals for the sick as well as other useful knowledge in home 
Lursing was taught. These pupils also' had practice in laundry work. Clasa 
2. A class of nine girls completed the second year's course, but had fewer 
practice lessons than formerly. Bread-making, study of meat and cooking 
of the same, making of cream soups, planning and serving of a dinner, care 
of kitrhen and dining-room were taughL Class 3. A class of eight girls re- 
ceived instructions in the cooking of fresh and dried fruits, cereals, vege- 
TaWes, cooking of eggs in various ways, combining of milk and eggs as in 
rustjirds, the cooking of bacon, care of the dining-room, planning and cook- 
ing of a breakfast as well as serving it completed their year's work. Class 4. 
These girls have very little language and have to depend upon their mem- 
ories. This makes the work very slow for them. During the session two boys 
fTom the bake-shop received instruction once a week in cake-making, pastry, 
fancy rolls, and some simple cooking. 

Sev}ing Class — Boys. — Class 1 received instruction once a week, the 
jarious stitch forms being received as well as practical work done. These 
boys kept their coats and vests in repair. The interest manifested was en- 
couraging, while the work done by them was neat. Class 2, a class of small 
boys, had one lesson a week. In this class the teaching was not uniform, 
n^n^ to the difference in ability. Those who were ready to advance were 
allowed to do so. Habits of cleanliness, order and personal neatness were 
encouraged. 

Tie boys in the printing office, shoeshop, bakery, carpenter shop and 
barber shop all did well, and some of those who were in these departments 
last session, who did not return, are filling good positions outside. Three 
or four who ought to have come back for further instruction, were kept at 
home, very much to our regret. 



272 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Our Publicity Effort. 

Our Publicity Effort of March last, in connection with the Institution 
for the Blind, gave us an idea of the number of deaf children of school age 
in the Province whose parents had not made application for their admission 
here. Ten thousand special circulars and return postal cards were sent 
to teachers of common, separate and high schools, newspaper editors and 
others. From them we learned the names and parents' addresses of twenty- 
six deaf children under seven years of age, eighty-eight from seven to nine- 
teen, over nineteen and no age mentioned, eighteen, — in all one hundred 
and thirty-two. Application papers and other printed matter concerning 
the Institution and its advantages were mailed to the parenta and a number 
of the children admitted as pupils this session, nineteen are to come next 
year and in time others will be sent. We are indebted to all who were 
appealed to for prompt and kindly responses to our request for information. 

Farm and Garden. 

Our farming operations. this year are not quite as satisfactory as we 
could desire. The potato crop on which we rely to a great extent for our 
needs, was an utter failure and instead of having 800-900 bushels of potatoes 
as we usuallv have each year, some forty bags or sixty bushels rewarded our 
efforts. All through this section on clay land there was a potato rot and 
we did not escape. Our hay crop was a bountiful one and the oats yielded 
an unlimited quantity of straw but only a half crop of oats. The root crop 
such as mangolds, carrots, turnips, etc., gave us good returns. Our general 
garden truck was less than in former ye^irs. Mr. John Moore who was 
gardener and farmer for nearly ten years, resigned on account of ill health ; 
he was a faithful, industrious and capable man in every respect. Mr. J. 
Hess filled the olace until a few days ago when Mr. Wm. Forge assumed 
the duties of the position. 

Changes in the Staff. 

There have been a few changes in our staff during the year. Miss 
Caroline Gibson, a valued teacher of Articulation and Lip-reading for nine 
years resigned to be married and the position was filled by the appointment 
of Miss Agnes A. Gibson, who graduated from the Northampton Institu- 
tion Normal Department in June last, and who comes to us most highly 
recommended. Mr. M. J. Madden, owing to the reduction of the number 
of classes, resigned to go into business in Tennessee, U. S. Mr. G. G. 
Keith, Supervisor of Boys for a number of years, retired to enjoy a well- 
earned rest; Mr. W. S. Minns takes his^place. Miss M. L. Stratton, hos- 
pital nurse, left us for a more lucrative and responsible position in the 
Butterworth Hospital, Grand Rapids, Michigan, for which she is eminently 
fitted; she is succeeded by Miss F. E. Bates, who was one of our efficient 
and stalwart helpers during the trying and serious epidemic here i;ti 1903. 
Miss A. G. Chisholm is now stenographer and clerk in my office and a most 
capable assistant she is, in succession to Miss J. Austin who resigned to 
get married with the best wishes of all with whom she was associated. 

Miscellaneous. 

The sreneral health all through the session was very good considering 
the large number of children in residence. The physician's report refers 
more particularly to this matter. 

The Ontario Deaf-Mute Association, composed principally of graduates 
of this Institution, will hold its tenth meeting here in June, 1906, in re- 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. ' 273 



sponse to an invitation extended to the members by tbe Hon. the Proyincial 
Secretary, then Minister-in-charge, last year. 

The clergymen of the city visi^t the pupils belonging to the various 
denominations regularly and their ministrations have been very helpful to 
all concerned. Those on our permanent visiting list are : Rev. Canon 
Burke; Bight Rev. Monseignor Farrelly, V.G. ; G. W. Beamish (English 
Church); Rev. A. H. Drumm; Rev. R. S. , Laidlaw, B.A. (Presbyterian 
Church); Rev. J. P. Wilson; Rev. R. H. Leitch, Rev. Geo. Brown (Metho- 
dist); E«v. Father Twomey; Rev. C. H. Emerson (Baptist). 

Sir William 'Mulock, of the Dominion Government, has very kindly 
opeiied the Post Office service to capable deaf mute young men and four are 
now engaged on trial. If they are successful others may secure places 
later on. The commencing pay is small and a number of our graduates who 
would have succeeded without a doubt whatever, declined to make applica- 
tion as they were earning from $10 to |18 a week in their present avoca- 
tions. 

During the session two deaths occurred, one a little boy about eight 
rears of age named Percy Pierce, of Paris, from a severe attack of tonsilitis 
to which he was subject before coming to the Institution. The other was 
a large boy, twenty-two years of age, one of our best young men. He was 
bathing off the wharf early one morning just before school closed, and must 
haTe taken cramps and was drowned r In both these cases the parents were 
promptly notified and they have the sincere sympathy of all at the Institu- 
tion in the great loss which they sustained. 

Much needed improvements in the buildings were made during the 
summer, under the • direction of the Department of Public Works. A 
thorough renovation of the chapel would add to its attractiveness. Metal 
'filings and new hardwood floors in n^any places ar« desirable and necessary. 
A new and larger steam engine is wanted for the laundry machinery. The 
conservatory ought to be overhauled and partly rebuilt. A request for the 
fore^ing and other requirements will be submitted to you in the near future. 

We had 213 pupils in residence on the 30th of September. The Institu- 
tion opened on Wednesday, September 20th, and all the children, some from 
as far west as Sault Ste. Marie, arrived at the Institution safely. Officers 
and teachers reported promptly and business, commenced on the morning 
of the 2l8t. A number of parents with new pupils favored us by coming 
to the Institution with their children. We ^ere extremely glad that they 
aid so as they could see how their children were placed and judge how they 
are likely to be cared for. We would like the parents of every child in the 
Institution to visit us at some time or other. 

^ Officers, teachers and employees are alj deserving of commendation for 
auties faithfully performed. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

R. Mathison, 

Sup't and Principal. 

Physician's Report. 

Hon. Dr. R. A. Pyne, 

itinister of Education, Toronto, Ont, 

Sir,— I have the honor to present to you, herewith, the Annual Medical 
Report of the Ontario Institution for the education of the Deaf and Dumb, 
BelleTille, for the year ending 30th September, 1905. 

J r5 E 



274 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The session just closed has been a favorable one. While there was 
considerable sickness every week, yet most of it was of a mild nature so 
that but little time has been lost from school. 

Close watch is kept over every child for the first two or three weeks 
after school opens, fearing the outbreak of some contagious disease. How- 
ever, when they get settled down to regular work, sleep, exercise and diet 
the general health much improves. 

Early in many sessions septic soie throat becomes quite prevalent but 
is quite amenable to treatment and is of short duration. Anaemia, colds, 
minor accidents, discharging ears, dyspeptic affections and constipation are 
common diseases of every session. 

Several cases of abscess and jaundice and one very severe case of ery- 
sipelas occurred during last school term. On the Tth of December, Miss 
McMillen, a domestic, had an attack of hemiplegia and was sent to our 
City Hospital but died in a few days. In April three cases of diphtheria 
occurred and one death, that of Percj' Pierce — death came very early from 
heart failure. We also had four cases of ring worm and one of mumps, 
but thanks to our facilities for isolation, these diseases were readily cut 
short. Just as the school was closing a very regrettable and unfortunate 
accident took place. Contrary to the rules of tl^e Institution, some of the 
larger boys went bathing very early in the morning and one of them was 
drowned. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Tour obedient servant, 

P. D. Goldsmith, M.D., M.R.C.P, 

, . Examiner's Report — 1905. 

Hon. Dr. R. A. Pyne, 

Minister of Education, Toronto , Ont. 
■ ^ 

Sir,— I have the honor to report as follows, regarding my examination 
of the Literary Classes of the Ontario Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, 
Belleville : — 

General Scope and Course of Study. 

The Curriculum, or Course of Study, is divided into seven grades. 
The first grade, or work of the first year embraces the study of the : — 

Manual Alphabet. 

Nouns. The objects in use in the class room; parts of the body, house fur- 
niture; most common animals; names of persons; divisions of timer 
as day night, morning, evening, noon; directions, as east, west, 
north, south; natural phenomena, as cloud, hail, snow, rain, etc. 

Number. Singular and Plural of Nouns tiiught. 

Adjectives^ Common, as good, bad, old, etc. Color, etc. 
Numerals, as one, two, three. 

Conjunction. **And''. 

Pronouns. 1st, 2nd and 3rd persons, singular. 

Verbs.—Ho express simple actions, using the words with which thev ar€ 
familiar. 

Notation. Counting to 500 by objects. 

Penmanship. 

18a E. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 275 



The Second Grade embraces ; — 

A thorough review of the work of the FirH Grade. 

Suhstantivea. Articles of furniture, and parts of the body of quadrupeds, 
birds, fish, etc- Names of articles of every. day use. 

Adjectives. Qualitative, as high, low, beautiful, etc. A, an, the same. 
Cardinal and Ordinal. Demonstrative, as this, that, etc# Posses- 
sive, as my, her, etc. Form and dimension, **a piece of." 

?mwuns. Personal Pronouns, as taught. 

Xtrh. Actions relating to objects the names of which are known to the 
Dupils. Present, progressive, past tense. 

(jrommar Exercises. Simple and compound actions described. 

Arithmetic. Simple addition and subtraction — practical examples. Mental 
addition and subtraction. Express a number consisting of four 
figures. 

The Third Grade embraces a study of: — 

Suhtantives. The different classes of artisans, the articles made by each, 
their use, etc. 

Arithmetic. (Simple). Addition and subtraction, multiplication, tables* 
Mental addition and subtraction. Miscellaneous Questions. 

Grammatical Exercises anct Composition. Description of Pictures, Questions 
and Answers by Pupils, Letter Writing. Simple Eliptical Sen- 
tences. 

fjeography. Divisions of land and water. 

AtJjertives. Verbs and Conjunctions. (Incorporation). Regular compari- 
sons with **more" and **most''. Distributives, each, every, either, 
neither. Present, Past, Past Progressive and Future Tenses **0r" 
and */Nor". 

Penmanship. 

The Fourth Grade embraces: — 

Arithmetic. Addition, Subtraction and Multiplication with simple practi- 
cal examples. Roman Numerals to 1>000. Time Lessons. Mental 

Addition. Subtraction and Multiplication. 
Language. Temperance Notes. 

Changing from Active to Passive Voice. 

Common Verbs. 

Object Lessons. 

Talks and Stories. 

Incorporation of different kinds of words. 

Simple Eliptical Sentences. 

Letter Writing; questions asked and answered by pupils. 

Describing what was done on certain days. 

Tenses, Present, Past, Future, Perfect, Present and Past Progres- 
sive. 
Geography. Divisions of land and water. Counties, chief towns in each 

County. Cities of Ontario. 
"enmanship. 

The Fifth Grade embraces : — 
^^^''graphy. Definitions— Divisions of Land and Water reviewed. Pro- 
vince of Ontario, Counties, Cities, County Towns. Chief Towns 
and Physical features. General Idea of the Dominion of Canada. 



276 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Arithmetic. Review work completed thoroughly, with Division. 
Simple Analysis. 
Reduction — Canadian Money. 

Mental Arithmetic, Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and Di- 
vision. 

Grammatical Exercises, Language Lessons, 

k-ndi^ Composition, Pronouns, Adjectives, Adverbs and Common Con- 
junctions (Incorporation). 
Changing from Active to Passive Voice. 
Object Lessons. 
Natural History. 
Miscellaneous Questions. 
Temperature and Hygiene. 
Letter Writing. 
Questions and Answers by pupils. 

Penmanship, 

The Sixth Grade embraces the study of: — 

Arithmetic,' Simple Rules, with Practical Examples. 

Reduction, Canadian Money, Advoirdupois Weight, Long, Dry, 

Liquid and Time Measures, and Miscellaneous Table Mental Arith- 
metic. First four simple rules and analysis. 
Gramatical Exercises and Composition. Incorporation of different words 

embracing different parts of speech. 

Sweet's Lessons, No. 4. 

Temperance Notes. 

Letter Writing. 

General Conversation. 

Object Lessons. 

Questions and answers by Pupils. 

Dictation in Sign Language to be reproduced in writing. 
Geography. Definitions. 

Divisions of Land and Water, 

Dominion of , Canada; physical features; exports; where found, and 

where probably sent; imports, where from. 
Canadian History. Gfeneral Events. 
Penmanship. 

The Seventh Grade embraces : — 

Arithmetic. Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, Division and Analysis 
of Fractions, Simple Interest, Square and Cube Measure, Promis- 
sory Notes, and Accounts. 

Language and Composition, Incorporation of words and phrases. 

Changing from Narrative to Conversational form and vice- versa 

(using inverted commas). 
Changin** simple Sentences into Compound and Complex. 
Writing Notes and Letters from sign dictation. 
Temperance Notes. 
Letter Writing. 
Reproduction by Dictation and Sign Language. 

Canadian History. From 1812 to the present time. 

Geography. The United vStates, New Mexico, West Indies, Central Amer- 
ica, South America and the British Isles. 

Penmanship. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 277 



Teachers and Their Teaching. , 

The staff consists of seventeen teachers, nine ladies and eight gentle- 
men, all highly qualified, specially trained and thoroughly competent for 
their work. They invited thorough inspection and examination of their 
metliods of teaching, and of the results of their efforts. I am thoroughly 
satisfied that their efforts to do their best, with the pupils under their charge, 
are sincere. Every teacher appeared most energetic and anxious concerning 
the pupils, and invited criticism of methods with the object of increasing 
efficiency. I could find no fault with any teacher. 

Two teachers are engaged in the special work of teaching Articulation. 
Every child admitted, that is capable of instruction in this branch, be- 
comes a member of the Articulation Class. I was surprised at the result. 
Many pnpils, who, when they entered the Institution, could not utter one 
vord, are now able to speak and recite intelligibly. Pupils answer ques- 
tions in Geography in this way, and recite familiar pieces quite as well as 
Bome children of the public schools. 

Pupils and Their Wark, 

The puoils number 225. 107 boys and 118 girls. These pursue their 
studies of the different Grades in 15 separate Class Rooms. I examined 
all the pnpils of all the Grades and was impressed with the excellent order 
and discipline in every room. The pupils seem to have the sympathy of the 
teachers and show a desire to learn. All were neatly attired. Sickness, 
apparently, is entirely absent — ^not one pupil being absent for that cause. 
The pupils seemed delighted with my efforts to interrogate them and were 
most anxions to perform the tasks assigned to them. The work done by 
the pupils was well done. I found the Penmanship particularly good. 

Rooms and Accommodotions . 

The rooms are clean and well kept, though many of them are rather 
7. S]ate black-boards are used throughout, and the walls are decorated 
nth various pictures and objects such as the teachers can make use of to 
convey language lessons to pupils. I observed the children in their study 
rooms and in all parts of the building and grounds at different times, and 
found them quite agreeable with one another and very careful not to injure 
the premises or annoy other occupants. The oversight and care of the 
pupils in and out of school hours seemed to me to b^ quite satisfactory. 

Tradc^^j Etc, 

Printing. A regular Printing Office is part of the equipment of this Insti- 
tution. It is presided over by a practical and competent printer. 
In this shop are ten pupils, one working all day and .the others 
three hours a day. The character of the work of this Department 
ranks as excellent. The various forms for reports, etc., required 
in connection with the work of the Institution are printed here ; 
also the neat semi-monthly paper. 

^hoe-Shp. Four pupils work all day in this room, and ten for three hours 
under the instruction of a practical man. 

Urpenfer Sfcop. Six pupils work in this shop for three hours a day making 

R , lumiture and doing repairs of a useful nature. 

carber-S/iop. Six pupils devote attention to this shop. 



278 THE REPORT OI^ THE No. 12 



Bakery and Meat (Hooking, Three boys are engaged all day under a regular 
baker and meat cook. 

Sevring Room. This important department is under the direction of Miss 
Dempsey. Eight pupils are engaged at work here all day and in 
the afternoon about thirty-five girls are taught generjal sewing. 
There is also a class in fancy work, taught by Miss Bull. Twenty- 
five girls spend two afternoons each week at this work. 

Manual Training, This work is conducted by Mr. Forrester, who was 
specially trained in Sweden and vScotland. Twelve pupils take 
this course for six hours a week, and the work done will compare 
favorably with that of other Manual Training Departments in 
connection with other schools. 

Domestic Science, There are three classes of nine girls each, and two classes 
of boys who take up sewing. In addition to the regular work of 
this class, the larger girls learn ironing in the Laundry, and are 
taught practically, domestic work in the Institution. In the 
Domestic Science Class the pupils are taught to cook vegetables, 
make various kinds of soups, how to lay the table, the care of linen 
etc. 

Government and General Managevvent, 

Permit me to say that I approve the placing of this Institution under 
the Department of Education. It has been for years inspected and examined 
annually by Public Sr.hool Inspectors, and the subjects taught are those 
of the Public School, plus the special language of the Deaf and* Dumb. It 
is, therefore, a part of the School System of the Province and is properly 
governed through the Department of Education. 

The various teachers and officials were civil, court epus and kind to 
me, and assisted me. in every possible way with my work of inspection and 
examination. 

No special mention i^ required, but I could not conclude this Report 
without Darticular mention of the efficient and kind Superintendent and 
Principal, Mr. E. Mathison, M.A. He was made for the office. He ^s 
at work night and day. This work is his life's work and he sacrifices much 
of his leisure and pleasure of life in order to add to the efficiency of the 
Institution. The pupils all regard him most affectionately and show him 
the greatest respect. He keeps in touch with every child here, and as long 
as possible after the child leaves, (See the published ' 'Extracts from letters 
of Graduates and Ex-pupils"). 

He seems thoroughly to realize the importance and highly benevolent 
nature of his work — the reclaiming of these poor, unfortunate and in many 
respects, helpless children from their world of mental darkness where many 
of them would be lost, or become burdens on the Province, and possessing 
them with a language, denied them by nature, and thus enabling them to 
create and express their thoughts and become highly intelligent, and useful 
men and women, capable of earning honest livings for themselves and their 
dependents. 

I send you herewith, a tabulated statement of all the pupils in the 
various classes and departments of the Institution showing the marks made 
during their examination. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Tour obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) W. Spankie, 

Public School Inspector. 
Kingston, Out., June 8, 1905. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 279 



Examiner's Report — 1904. 

T. F. Chamberlain, Esq., M.D., 
Inspector of Asylums, Toronto. 

Deae Sir, — Acting upon your instructions, I went to Belleville and 
conducted the Literary Examination of the pupils in the Institute for the 
Deaf and Dumb, commencing work on the morning of June 2nd. 

I began with the Articulation Class under the present charge of Miss 
Annie Mathison, in the absence of the regular teacher, Miss Caroline Gib- 
wn, through illness. The twenty-seven pupils at present enrolled in this 
class are divided into six sub-classes, No. i comprising first year pupils, 
while those in the remaining sub-classes ' range from two to eight years in 
attendance. The teacher gave them an exainination in the work laid down 
for them in the Course of Study, consisting of drill in articulation ; names 
of days, months, people; easy questions, numbers in hundreds; stories; and, 
in the senior classes, the cities and towns in Ontario ; stories with questions 
about them; conversations between pupils and teacher; writing from dic- 
tation; oral reading. It is to be observed that the object aimed at is not, 
as in other classes, to convey knowledge, but to tr^in the pupils in oral 
language expression, and as far as possible to lead them to talk. All new 
pupils arriving at the Institution are given a trial in the Articulation Classes, 
and if they show some facility, the instruction is continued, so that these 
classes are made up of pupils from all the other classes. Even when clear 
enunciation is not secured, the training is beneficial from physiological 
considerations. A teacher as a supply is always at more or less disadvan- 
tage, particularly with a class of this kind, but Miss Mathison is an ex- 
perienced and skillful teacher of Articulation, possessing great tact, and 
a sympathy that secures the co-operation of the children, and teacher and 
children acquitted themselves most creditably. A number of these pupils 
read orally very nicely. 

The other class in articulation is under the charge of Miss Florence 
Cross, and has an enrollment of twenty-eight pupils. These are also 
divided into six sub-classes- The Course of Study is much the same as 
in the other class, with the addition of commands, and the Lord's Prayer. 
The pupils showed facility in word building, using combinations of con- 
sonants or vowels as bases. I noticed both in this class and in Miss Mathi- 
^on's a readiiiess, even an eagerness, to try to articulate, which was in marked 
<'ontrast to the classes of ?leven years ago when I visited before. At that 
time, the pupils seemed to dread trying to utter sounds, .and the effort 
seemed to be, painful to them. I notice also in both classes an absence of 
high shrill pitch of voice so common amongst deaf who talk — the tones are 
Mter modulated. This indicates not only kindness in treatment, but skill 
in the training. Miss Cross seems to be proficient in the knowledge of the 
subject she has to teach. It goes without saying that the examination in 
the Articulation Classes has necessarily to be done by the teachers them- 
selves so as to show the methods, devices and results. The work of all the 
teachers in the Institution is arduous enough, but it is particularly so in 
these classes, and the nervous strain is great. 

It may be premised in reference to the other classes, that the Primary 
—in fact almost the sole object, with the juniors, is not to give instruction, 
bat to eonstruct. practically to create, a medium of communication between 
the children and the outer world — to unlock the prison doors of their silent 
environment, and to furnish them with language, sign language, both natu- 



280 THE REPORT OF THE \o. 12 



ral and arbitrary, or where possible, spoken. The first steps are exceeding- 
ly slow and difficult, and the process differs from ordinary teaching in the 
following respect— the firt;eps are isolated, very slightly related, and the 
knowledge acquired is not for a considerable time any help to gain further 
knowledge. It is only in the senior classes that the amount of language 
gained begins to be available for self help, self advancement. Therefore, 
the examination of these children mufirt; be strictly along the line they have 
been taught, and must not go beyond the vocabulary of the class. For these 
reasons, at the close of the session, each class is subjected to a rigorous 
examination by the teacher in charge, alid the Course of Study, the exam- 
ination papers, and the answer papers, together, with an individual report 
upon each pupil, are submitted to the Superintendent, and by him laid 
before the Departmental Examiner, who then gives each class an examina- 
tion upon the various subjects of the course. A comparison of these last 
results with the submitted papers enables me to say with confidence that 
the marking given by the respective teachers has been very close, that they 
have been careful to be **just before being generous,'* and that in no case 
was the standing awarded, as shown by the accompanying Institution Re- 
port, too high. 

Mr, Madden^ s Class. Here are twelve pupils whose ages run from seven 
to ten years: this is' the first year in the Institution and of course in the 
class for five of them; five others have been two years, and three others for 
three years in the class. Some of the pupils have made a very high stand- 
ing, and two of the new ones a very low one. The standing, for a junior 
class, is good, being 63J per cent. In addition to the subjects, of a course, 
tests were given in writing numbers, in which the pupils showed consider- 
able facility. Mr. Madden is a graduate of the Institution, and being 
himself a deaf mute, is all the better able to understand .and overcome the 
disabilities under which his pupils labor. 
, Mr. Ingram's Class. The children in this class are of cheerful dis- 

position, ready for work, and anxious to do their best. This is the first year 
in the Institution for five of the class, the most of the rest having been here 
and in the class for two years. Mr. Ingram is a thorough teacher, and 
has made a good year's record. Two of the first year pupils have made a 
superior standing, and with one exception, all have done well. The class 
average, and I think the marking moderate, is 73 per cent. 

Miss James' Class. Here are the youngest and brightest ''little tots" 
in the Institution. Of the thirteen in this class, five are only seven years 
of age; eleven of them have been in the class but one year, and seven but 
one year in the Institution. This class has suffered more severely from sick- 
ness than any other. Miss James is an excellent teacher of the deaf, and 
she has done exceedingly well under most discouraging circumstances. 
Some of the punils stand very high ; three are very low, but considering the 
unfavorable conditions, the average 60 per cent, is an excellent showing. 

Mrs. Balis' Class. Twelve out of the seventeen in this class are girls. 
The individual standing of this class is very uniform, none high, and but 
one low, and the class average, 70 per cent., is excellent. No pupil has 
been m the class more than a year, and the average time in the Institution 
IS but a little over two years. Good work has been done here. Mrs. Balis 
IS a conscientious, hard working, successful teacher, always ready to help 
m everything of interest or to the advantage of anything connected with 
the Institution. 

Mrs. Terrills* Class. This is a special class. Some are weak mentallv,' 
two are twenty-three years old; two are twenty-four; one is twenty-seven! 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 281 



and all these were up in years before entering the lAstitution^ Owing to 
these circumstances, the teaching has to be individual. It is probably the 
moirt trying class of all, requiring very great patience, persistence, tact, 
kindness and endurance. The standing obtained under these conditions, 
Ti) per cent,, is excellent indeed. These pupils do not take ''signing*' but 
•spelling" only. 

Mr. Forrester's Class, Two features are distinctive here — ^fine black- 
Isoard work, and progressive descriptive language exercises based upon pro- 
gressive picture stories, thus developing observation and language. The 
pupils have been in this class but one year. Nearly all the pupils in the 
class were absolutely correct in the Working of the examples given in arith" 
metic. The individual standing is very uniform, the lowest being 53 per 
ft'nt. the highest 77 per cent, and the class standing, closelj' marked, 70 
per cent. Mr. Forrester is a capital draughtsman, and this greatly assists 
Lim in his work. 

Miss BulVs Class. Here is less uniformity in individual standing, the 
.owest being 49 per cent, and the highest 95 per cent. The class standing, 
IJ per cent., is good. Here we begin to see a wider vocabulary, admitting 
cf more varied classes of work, and training in use of plurals, and past 
ind progressive forms of verbs is begun. Three pupils in this room show de- 
cided taste in drawing. It is a pity that means could not' be devised to give 
item special training in this line with a view to their future means of liveli" 
hood- Several of the pupils of this class were absent from lesdons for con- 
siderable periods during the session owing to sickness, otherwise, no doubt, a 
;ull better standing would have been secured. 

Miss Linn's Class. These pupils have been in this class a year only. 
Both teacher and children are systematic and quick in work and movements. 
Mi58 Linn can write down figures, and good ones, on the blackboard, faster 
iiiL any other t-eacher I ever saw^^ Most of her class can add up a column 
t figures more rapidly than most pupils in the fourth form of the public 
^•.liools, and they are speedy and accurate in subtraction and Inultiplication. 
Tie literature of easy reading lessons is taken up here. The slate work 
is generally fine. There is some diversity in the individual standing of 
tte Dupils, but the class average is good — 71 per cent. 

Mr. Stewart's Class. This class, E. and class F., are about the same 
grade. The pupils are rather below average in ability. There has been 
ciore lost time during the session from sickness, in this class than in any 
.'tier except Class L. One of the pupils was absent seventy days. All 
•hese pupils are first year pupils of the class. Notwithstanding the draw- 
'^cks, the class average, 70 per cent., shows the good result of a year's 
fiithful intelligent training. In Mr. Stewart's detailed written report 
upon each member of the class, he sizes up accurately and succinctly their 
fiaiacter and attainments, and shows that he has a clear idea of methods 
and aims. 

Mr, Campbell's Class. (F). As has already been remarked, this and 
^ie preceding class may be considered sub-divisions of one grade pupils 
are promoted from both rooms to Class D., those that fail to make promo- 
tion from Class E. being transferred to Class F., so that although none of 
tie pupils h^ve been in this room more than a year, some of them have 
been two years in .this grade. At first sight, this might seem an advantage 
to Class F., but then it must be remembered that the pupils who failed 
to be promoted were likely not the brightest ones, consequently it is pro- 
bable that at the beginning of the year, there was little difference as to the 
capabilities of the two classes, and the class averages of the two do not 



282 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



differ materially at the close of the year. Excellent work has been done 
here. Mr. Campbell is a strong teacher, and is apt in methods, and thorough 
in his training. The work of the pupils is particularly neat and accurate. 
The individual standing is uniform, and the class average is 72 per cent. 

Miss Tempi eton^s Class, Here are an enthusiastic, hard working teacher 
and a bright, well-trained class.* Nearly every pupU does neat work and 
good work. Many of them have high marks and they deserve them, and 
the class average is 79 per cent., a high standing, but not higher I think 
than has been earned. The pupils have been in this class but a year, but 
have been in the Institution long enough to acquire a fair vocabulary, and 
so to admit of a wider rftnge of study. A noticeable feature here is the 
cultivation of language, orally and then in writing, by a discussion of cur- 
rent local happenings under the heading of ''News.'' Another feature is 
teaching the time of day by means of a clock face. It is a good class, and 
Miss Templeton has the trained skill and ability to make the most of it. 

Mr. nails' class.. , This has not been an easy class tot make a record with. 
More than half the class is composed of pupils who have been transferred to 
this room from the Second Grade below, in order to maintain the balance 
of numbers and they were therefore ill-prepared to take up the work. Some 
of them are poor workers, and hard to manage, and thus Mr. Balis' task 
is a hard one. Part of the class is weak in arithmetic, but it is to be con- 
sidered that the Course of Study is two Grades higher than in the room 
they loft. The style and method of work are very fine, and they show that 
the teacl-or has paid great attention along these lines. In other subjects 
the pupils stand well. The class average, 69 per cent., is better than could 
have been expected. 

Mr. Denys^ Class. We now have reached a room in which the broader 
acquisition of language permits a wider range of subjects, and one where 
a longer time is required for examination. The Course of Study includes 
the Geography of the Dominion, Canadian History, easy lessons in Natural 
History ; Mental and Slate Arithmetic, including practical questions in the 
four rules; ellipeHcal sentences; temperance, and general conversation in 
writing and by "spelling"; and letter writing. The features noticeable 
in this class are neatness of writing, and accuracy in answering. Very 
nearly 80 ner cent, of all the answers in my examination of this class were 
absolutelv correct, and among the tests was one requiring them to assigpi 
events to thirty-one different dates in Canadian History. The boys here 
are manly, and they pay uncommonly close attention to personal neatness 
and tidiness, the best, I think, in the Institution. The girls are lady-like, 
'polite and intelligent. The class average is, as might be expected, very 
hisrh, 82 per cent. This is the first year for all of them in this class. Mr. 
Denys has been so long in the Institution that no more need be said than 
that his whole soul is in his work, and the spirit that animates him may 
be gathered from the quotation that prefaces his Report to the Superintend- 
ent : — 

''Serve thy generation, 
Ev*»n thoueli swiftly may fade thy name. 

He who loves his kind 
Performs a work too great for fame." 

Professor Coleman's Class. This is the highest class in the Institution, 
and of course the graduating one. The pupils have the best command of 
languacre, Ihe greatest range of subjects, and are given the most severe tests 
in their exJiniination. In addition to the subjects of the preceding Grades, 
may be mentioned : - direct and indi^»f3ct narratioir ; difficult changes of con- 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 283 



iiruttion; formal composition; and bills and accounts. The answers to 
[W.J of the questions that I gave necessitated the writing of a large number 
i.f ^reograpbical names. The pupils gave full answers to these, and difficult 
rhnugh they were, a misspelled word very rarely occurred. All the work 
T^ neatlj done, and better writing than some of these pupils presented, 

1 Lever saw in any school. Three members of this class obtained 100 per 
ml at the final examination and from my tests, I feel assured that they 
Tm justly entitled to that standing. If the work of two exceptional cases 
W omitted, the class average would be 82 per cent., a very high standing 
mM, The boys in this class are also manly and tasty in dress, being 
iKond only to those of Mr. Denys' class, and the girls are all that could 
k desired as to deportment and attention. Professor Coleman is most 
p-aiLJtaiLking, careful and efficient, his great aim being to train the pupils 
to *hini, and that he has been successful in this, the results and the 'orig- 
hiliTv and correctness of the answers fully demonstrate. Perhaps noHeach- 
>: in the Institution is more happy in the success of his pupils than is Pro- 
fc%>r Coleman. 

In aU the classes the greatest attention is paid to neatness and correct 
spelling, to accuracy in number work, and to good writing. Sickness was 
wr;. prevalent during the session and seriously interfered with the progress 
cf ^flme classes. 

The Industrial Departments. 

Domestic Science Rootti. This is under the management of Miss Hattie 
H. Gowsell, a graduate of the Hamilton Normal College of Domestic 
'^i'-nce. Here thirty girls are trained not only how to cook, but how to 
mage all the details of kitchen and dining-room. Plain and fancy cook- 
ix, pickling, canning, preserving, management of ranges and kitchen uten- 
ai':care of table ware aj^d linen; care of groceries; how to make tea, coffee, 
ttJ cocoa; how to save remnants, etc., engage the attention. They are 
■^xeht to be exact and methodical; to maintain scrupulous neatness; the 
t^]^r arrangement of the table; how to serve. The training here given 
ti^e ''daughters of silence" in household duties is second in importance 
t' no other instruction given in the Institution. A visit to this depart- 
it^^nt would be a revelation to many house-keepers. The advantage in the 
^' of health and comfort in the future homes of these girls cannot be 
•=^iaiated. Miss Gowsell is not only mistress of this branch of science, 
1»* Ae knows how to teach it to her pupils, and at the same time to incul- 
*-te habits of observation, comparison, accuracy, neatness and economy, 
fcr nothing is allowed to go to waste. Miss Gowsell has also a class of 
"isteen boys whom she trains in sewing, patching, etc. These are small 
V'Tn and their dexterity, in hemming, back stitching, button-hole making 
•iBt! patching is surprising. The patching is turned to practical aorount 

2 'onnection with pupils' clothing. The samples of their work showed that 
p^i\ attention is given to accuracy of fitting and matching of stripes and 
f^'nrs. Besides the immediate practical usefulness, care is taken to ascer- 
tain what pupils show enough natural skill to warrant their being taught 
tiilorinsr. 

Manual Training, This department is under the charge of Mr. T. C. 
F'.rrMer, and as yet it comprises only working in wood. It is surprising 
tlH'nuniher of articles that the boys in this class manufacture. Industrial 
«^i?n forms part of the course of instruction and working plans, drawn 
t' -'ale, are insisted upon before any article is begun. Accurate joining 
a^'l perfection of finish are exacted. Nothing but the very l)est workman- 



284. THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



ship will be accepted by the teacher, and the pupil must try and try again 
until the character of the work meets these requirements. There are twelve 
boys in this class, and there are benches fully equipped* for each. The care 
and management of tools are welL taught. Some very delicate and skill- 
ful work may be seen here. 

I venture to suggest that the whole time of a teacher might be devoted 
to this important feature of the training given in the Institution, and that 
a turning lathe, and scroll, might with advantage be added to the equip- 
ment, even if operated only by foot power. It would give a wider range 
of work, and more chance for the development by the boys of inventive- 
ness and dexterity in ornamental art. 

The .Shoe-shop. Here the boys are taught to patch and to make boots 
and shoes, and instructed in the qualities and prices of materials. Qood 
material, food workmanship, honest work is the rule. The needs of the 
- pupils in the Institution call for considerable of the work of this class. 
Each boy after having completed his training, is furnished with an outfit 
and upon leaving the Institution, is in a position to earn a livelihood. Mr. 
Morrice is in charge of this department. 

The Barber-shop, is in connection with the shoe-shop, for reason that 
the deaf can very conveniently and profitably carry on both these lines of 
business in combination. 

The Printing Office, The Mute, the official organ of the Institution 
is printed here, and such jobbing as is required in connection with the 
school is done. The office is very far from being a sample of the ordinary 
printing office, for everything from machinery to floor, is scrupulously clean 
and in order, and one would suppose that one or two printers* ^Hmps" 
wbuld be required to keep things in such neatness. Mr. Bums, who is '*n 
charge is training ten boys in ''the art preservative". It can easily be 
understood that practice here aids in the literary training of these boys. 

The Bakery. The various forms of the ''staff of life" required in the 
Institution are made here, under the charge of Mr. Cunningham, and ad- 
vantage is taken of the extensive equipment to teach some of the boys the 
baking business. ^ It is needless to say that as in every department of the 
Institution, the boys, while being taught to turn out an excellent quality 
of bread, buns, etc., are incidentally taught to be orderly, neat, systematic, 
and exact. 

Dress-making and Millinery. Miss M. Dempsey, who is Girls' Super- 
visor, has charge of this department, one of the busiest and liveliest of all. 
Measuring, cutting, fitting, and makinar of apparel for girls, and to some 
extent for boys, are some of the operations carried out in this room. Nine 
girls work all day here, and sixty-one spend two hours each day, and most 
of them show great taste and skill in their work. Miss Dempsey's duties 
are varied and extensive, and make heavy demands upon her time and 
patience, but she is competent, cheerful, genial, a general favorite, and 
her room is a favorite calling place for other girls than the operatives. 

Fancy Work Department. This is under the charge of Miss Mary iSnll, 
f*nd the number and variety of the articles made are astonishing and ^ive 
one a high idea of the taste and inventiveness of the girls of the class, and 
of the ability and skill of the teacher. 

In conclusion, I may say that some one must spend some ti^e in the 
Institution in order to appreciate the uncommon administrative ability, 
tact, discretion, and wise discipline, exercised by the Superintendent. In 
such a large establishment, with such a diversity of interests, with such 
a large staff, with so many pupils peculiar in their dispositions, and mental 



9(}o EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 286 



ftainmentsy only special ability, and long experience could maintain eflS- 

ent and liannonioiis working by all the different elements. Thorough- 

*ss, accuracy, and neatness are ruling principles throughout the Institution. 

Tlie necessity for increased accommodation is very evident. Some 

t«-»ms are too small, and more rooms are needed. There is little doubt 

Lat there are many deaf mutes in the country that would be sought out 

.^d given the benefit of instruction, were there more room for them. 

I have to thank Superintendent Mathison especialljr, and every officer 

.r.-i every member of the staff for assistance in making an examination 

1( rough and impartial, and for personal kindness that made my stay with 

Vm most pleasant. "Although not within the scope of my instructions, 

i may be allowed to refer to the admirable way in which the Matron, Miss 

^0^, discharges the duties of her responsible position, and to express my 

l^pr^iation of the care and attention given to my personal fcomfort while 

pt the Institution''. I must also thank Mr. Eeith, the efficient Supervisor 

IJ BoTs. for courtesies and information in connection with the Industrial 

pppartments. 

I have the honor to be, 
^ Tour obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) Arthur Browjt, 

Inspector of Public Schools. 
June 13, '04. 




288 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE SINGLE HANI) ALPHABET. 










1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 









288 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No.^ 



THE SINGLE HAND ALPHABET. 










1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



289 




28S 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 




1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



289 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 

lOTAL NUMBSB OV PUFILS IN ATTENDAKCB FROIC OCTOBEB IST, 1904, TO SbFTEMBEB 30tH, 

1905. 

Males 130 

Females 138 

Total '. 268 

CorXTIB3 FBOM WHICH THE PUFILS IN RESIDENCE FROM OCTOBER IST, 1904, TO SEPTEMBER 

30th, 1905, CAME: 



Counties. 


Male. 


Female . 


Total. 


Ck>untie8. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


A>>sm?i 


I 

4 

12 

2 


4 
2 
7 
4 
1 
2 
2 
5 
1 
4 
2 
6 
3 
6 
2 
1 
6 
1 
4 
2 
1 
3 
5 


1 

5 

6 
11 
16 

3 

2 

4 
12 

8 

9 

3 
11 

5 

9 

2 

3 

8 

3 

5 

3 

5 

6 

7 

1 


Northumberland 

Norfolk 

Nipiflsing District 

Ontario 

Oxford 


1 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

'■*2 
3 
5 
7 
4 
4 

'"'3' 
4 

1 

1 

4 

17 


1 
2 

4' 

2 

1 

' 5" 

3 
3 
5 
2 
1 
4 
2 

2 

5 

22 


2 


iirant 


4 


Brait 

1 irirfion 


1 
1 


Iinrhani 


5 


[''jferin 


Peel 

Parry Sound District. . 
Perth 


3 


L-rln 


2 
7 
2 
5 
1 
5 
2 
3 


1 


Es«x 


?, 


?rrhnrpnafj . ... 


Peterboro 


8 


' rrtT 

'iWagUTv 


Prescott and Russell . . . 
Renfrew 


8 
10 


Hastings 


Simcoe 


9 


3ilibwton 


Stormont and Dundas. . 
Thunder Bay District. . 
Victoria 


6 


Hnron 


1 


Hilton 


7 


Hiliimaad 


2 
2 
2 

1 
1 
4 
3 
2 
1 


Waterloo 


6 


JC-at 


WelUnd 


1 


Ljaibton 


Wellington 


3 


liimln 


Wentworth 


9 


linark 


York 


39 


Lesiioxand Addington. . 
Mcskoka DistricL . 


Total 




130 


138 




Kddlesex 


Grand Total . . 




'jrpnville 


268 




1 









AoB OF Pupils. 



Ace. No. 

6 1 

7 9 

8 18 

9 20 

10 13 

11 13 

U 13 

13 29 

14 26 

IS ; 16 

16 18 

1: . .. 27 



Age. • No. 

18 13 

19 14 

20 8 

21 11 

22 6 

23 3 

24 3 

25 3 

26 3 

29 1 

Total "268 



19E. 



290 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



NUMBER OF PUPILS IN ATTENDANCE EACH OFFICIAL YEAR SINCE THE 
OPENING OF THE INSTITUTION. 




From October 27th, 1870, to September 30th, 
iBt, 1871, 
1872, 
1873, 
1874, 
1875, 
** ** 1876, 
1877, 
1878, 
1879, 
1880, 
1881, 
1882, 
1883, 
1884, 
1885, 
1886, 
1887, 
1888, 
1889, 
1890, 
1891, 
1892, 
1893, 
18<)4, 
18^)5, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 



1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



64 
97 
130 
145 
155 
160 
167 
166 
164 
162 
164 
165 
158 
156 
168 
161 
151 
156 
153 
159 
166 
158 
162 
158 
160 
173 
164 
167 
161 
152 
157 
147 
140 
137 
130 



Female. Total. 

t 



36 
52 
63 
76 
83 
96 
104 
111 
105 
119 
132 
138 
135 
130 
116 
112 
113 
109 
121 
132 
130 
127 
136 
137 
135 
137 
128 
138 
132 
130 
143 
141 
143 
134 
138 



100 
149 
193 
221 
238 
256 
271 
277 
269 
281 
290 
303 
2i« 
286 
284 
273 
264 
265 
274 
291 
296 
285 
29^ 
295 
2^tS 
310 
292 

:m 

2*.H 
282 
300 
288 
283 
271 
268 



TOTAL NIJMBER OF PUPILS SINCE THE OPENING OF THE INSTITUTION. 
OCTOBER 27th, 1870, TO SEPTEMBER 3(>riT, 1905. 



Number of boys admitted . 
Number of girls admitted . 



761 
591 



1,352 



1905 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



291 



COCNTIEB FBOM WHICH PUPILS WERE ORIGINALLY RECEIVED FROM 
OCTOBER 20rH, 1870, TO SEPTEMBER SOth, 1905. 



Coantitfs. 


Male. 


Female. 


Totel. 


Countiee. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


AkmnriH , 


5 
22 
22 
42 
17 

3 
14 
18 
12 
27 

7 
34 

5 
32 

5 

7 

26 
21 
12 
22 

3 
12 

9 

30 

13 

1 3 


6 
10 
18 
22 

9 

3 
12 
22 

6 
24 

2 

29 

. ^2 

30 

11 

4 
23 
18 

9 

6 

9 
12 

7 

20 
11 

2 


11 
32 
40 
64 
26 

6 
26 
40 
18 
61 

9 
63 

7 
62 
16 
11 
49 
39 
21 
28 
12 
24 
16 
50 
24 

5 


1 

Northumberland 

Warwick, P.Q 


13 


12 
1 
1 

14 

16 

8 

2 

14 

9 

10 

1 

17 

24 

10 

1 

11 

19 

4 

16 

17 

56 

1 


25 


Brant 


1 


Brace 


Monk, P.Q 




1 


rarieton , 


Ontario 


22 

17 

7 

4 

30 

.13 

22 

6 
17 
29 
18 

"u" 

18 
6 
20 
26 
67 


36 


rhrhjwn . , , 


Oxford 


33 


i^oiferin 


Peel 


15 


Rr:n .. . 


Parry Sound District . 
Perth ... 


6 


L*ex • 


44 


FTnntennc 


Peterboro 


22 


'iTtf 


Presoott and Russell. . 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 


32 


'-.engarry 


7 


HistmgB 


34 


Hiliburton 


Simcoe 


63 


Hsron 


Stormont, Dundas 

Thunder Bay District . 
Victoria 


28 


Hilion. 


1 


Haldimand 


23 


KtrLt 


Waterloo 


37 


LimbU)n 


Welland 


10 


l;tr^rt 


Wellington 


36 


L^i«an<i Grenville 


Wentworth 


43 


lifiMjin 


York 


113 


Lennox and Addington . . 
MiL^koka 


Westmoreland, N.B.. 
Restigouche, P.Q 


1 
1 


v. rf-.ik 


761 


591 


1,352 


N:ri<t!iM District 





Cause of Deafness. 



Xhcmss 6 

Axident 12 

id^oids : 1 

Aiaction of the ears 21 

Bronchitis 6 

Baling 2 

Birns 2 

CaUrrh 9 



Canker 

Cerebro-cpinal meningitis 

Cholera ...! 

^•icken pox 

CoM 



1 

26 

1 

1 

61 

Congenital 533 

Cot^estion of the brain 48 

Diphtheria 9 

I>r5entery 2 

l>rank carbolic acid 1 



Ecsema 
Falls 



2 

27 



F'Ter, Rheumatic 1 

Ferer, Bilious 6 

Ferer, Brain a3 

Ferer, Intermittent 2 

Ferer, Scarlet 88 

F^rer, Spinal 23 

Ferer, Malarial 2 

Ferer, Typhus 6 

FeTCT, Typhoid 11 

Ferer. undefined 27 

Fits ; 16 



Gathering of the ears 10 

Gathering of the head 9 

Inflanmiation of the brain 16 

Inflammation of the ears 6 

Inflammation of the lungs 5 

Inflammation of the pulmonary 

organ 2 

Inflammation of the spinal organ... 3 

LaGrippe 9 

Measles 47 

Mumps 7 

Paralytic stroke ] 

Ricketts 1 

Sunstroke 1 

Scabs 1 

Scrofula 1 

Scald head 4 

Sore throat 4 

Shocks 6 

Sickness, undefined 36 

Spinal disease 3 

Swelling of the neck 2 

Teething 18 

Vaccination 7 

Water on the brain 17 

Whooping cough 9 

Worms 145 

Cases undefined and unknown 9 



Total 



.1,352 



292 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Date of Deafness Afteb Bikth. 



Under one year 181 

Between one and two years 162 

Between two and three years 140 

Between three and four years 72 

Between four and five years 45 

Between five and six years 31 

Between six and seven years 16 

Between seven and eight years 16 

Betwen eight and nine years 3 

Between nine and ten years 10 



Between ten and eleven years 6 

Between eleven and twelve years ... 21 
Between twelve and thirteen years 3 
Between thirteen and fourteen years 4 
Between fouHeen and fifteen years 2| 
Unknown at what, age they lost their I 

hearing, but not born deaf 140| 

Congenital 519 

Total 1,3521 



Relationship of Parents. 

First cousins 66 Not related ^j^il 

Second cousins 31 

Third cousins 24 

Distantly related 27 Total 



Unknown ^ 

1,35^ 



Number of Deaf Mute Families Represented. 

3 families containing 5 ...,. 16 1,032 families containing 1 1,0 

3 families containing 4 12 ' 

31 families containing 3 93 

100 families containing 2 200 



Total 1,355 



Minister of the Government in Charge : 
Hon. Dr. R. A. Pyne. 

Officers of the Institution : 

R. Mathison, M. a Superintendent and Principal. 

Wm. Coohrane Bursar. 

P. D. Goldsmith, M. D Physician. 

Miss M. Ross Matron. 

TecLchers : 
D. R. Coleman, M.A. (Head Teacher). Mrs. J 



P. Dbnys. 
James 0. Balis. 
W. J. Campbell. 
George F. Stewart. 
T. C. Forrester. 
H, L. Ingram. 

Miss Agnbb A. Gibson. 



G. Terrill. 
Miss S. Templbton. 
Miss Mart Bull. 
Mrs. Sylvia L. Balis. 
Miss Georgina Linn. 
Miss Ada James. 

Teachers of Articulatiom : 

Miss Florence Cross. 



Teacher of Fancy Work; 

Miss Mart Bull. 

Teacher of Manual Training : 

T. C. Forrester. 

Teacher of Domestic Science: 
Miss Hattib H. Goswell. 

Miss A. G. Chisholm Stenographer and Clerk, 

Wm. Ntjrsb Storekeeper and Associate Supervisor. 

W. S. Minns Supervisor of Boys, etc. 

Miss M. Dempsbt Seamstress^ Supervisor of Girls, etc. 

Miss Florence E. Bates Trained Nurse. 

John T. Burns Instructor of Printing. 

Alex. Morriob Master Shoemaker. 

Chas. J. Peppin Engineer. 

John Dowrie Master Carpenter. 

D. Cunningham Master Baker. 

Farmer and Gardener : 
James Forge. 



im 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



293 



List op Pupils in the Ontario Institution of the Deaf and Dumb for the Year ending 
Sbptsmbee 30th, 1905. with the Post Office Addresses. 



Counties. 



P. O. Address. 



Oounties. 



P. 0. Address. 



AlgoToa : 
Barker, Sara Isabel. San It St«. Marie. 

Beatty, Rachel Bruce Mines. 

Dalgieish, Elizabeth. Sault Ste. Marie. 
Orr. Helen Mary Gore Bay. 
Zinke, Charles Steelton. 

Hostvayte, John F.Paris. 

Johnston, Anetta ... Brantford. 

Mitchell, George L.. Brantford. 

Lloyd, Rath Gladys.. Brantford. 

Pierce, Percy Earl... Paris. 

Smith, William R....Tuscarora. 
Btmc€: 

Gerolamy, £dnaM....Tara. 

Green, Mary Annie... Chesley. 

Green, James Chesley. 

Eomph, Spray Kincardine . 

Lobsinger, Alex Mildmay. 

Lorents, Mary Mildmay. 

Marray, Joseph Langside. 

Schwalm, Mary Milomay. 

Weiler, Diana Mildmay. 

Yager, Jeanette Chesley. 

Tiger, Norman Chesley. 

Mdon: 

Chaine, Joseph Hintonburg. 

Cammings, Bert City View. 

Em, James Elign...Carp. 

Gtorreau . Telesphore. Ottawa . 

Green, Minnie May .'.Diamond. 

Green, Thomas John. Diamond. 

Gaothier, Alfred ....Hintonbarg. 

Groulx, Achil Clarkston. 

GfoqIx, Welde Clarkston. 

Hoband, Gerald B... Ottawa. 

Henanlt, Charles ...Ottawa. 

Brigham, Thomas L.Ottawa. 

Larocqne, Roeanna... Ottawa. 

Pairent, Sophie Ottawa. 

Shaw. Rchert Eric... Ottawa. 

White, Mary I Ottawa. 

IhrKam : 

Brooks, Effie M Solina. 

McMillan, Joseph I.Newcastle. 

Sheckleton, Alfred ...Burton. 
r>-i|f rin : 

Aldcom, Barbara ...Corbetton. 

Granger, Martha . . . Honey wood . 
link: 

Bailer, Henry Ridgetown. 

Carpenter, Lena M... Rodney. 

Paal, Edward, G....St. Thomas. 

5hq)ley, May Clachan. 

Bain, Olive Windsor. 

Bertianme, Marilda..Tecumseh. 
BertManme, Lionel. . Tecumseh . 
Berthianme, Dorina.. Tecumseh. 

Bain. Josephine Windsor. 

Unglois, Louis Windsor. 



lEssej:: — Con. 

Meloche, Edmund ... Amherstburg. 

Penprase, Ruth Elmstead. 

; Penprase, Alfred ...Elmstead. 

Petrimoulx, George.. Riyer Canard. 

I Walker, Achille St. Joachim. 

> Front enac : 

I Barnett, Winnif red.. Sydenham. 

I Barnett, Gerald Sydenham. 

I Watts, Darid Henry. Kingston. 
j Grey : 

■ Brown, Mary Louisa. Chesley. 
Brown, Thomas H....Markdale. 
Dand, William T. ...Lady Bank. 

Fleming, Daniel Craigleith. 

Johnston, Bertha ...Owen Sound. 

Eindree, Earle Owen Sound. 

McGuire, Lily Holstein. 

Scott, William W. ...Keldon. 

Wilson, Janet B Harkaway. 

Goetc, Gregory Owen Sound. 

Glengarry : 

Gordon, Daniel C. ...Bridge End. 

Gordon, Mary Jane. .. Bridge End. 
' Gordon, Annie M. E. Bridge End. 
Hastings : 
, Courneya, Mary A....Bogart. 

Famham, Leona ...Canifton. 
] Hough, Ethel Viola. . . Holloway . 
I Herman, Nina Pearl. Stirling. 

I Nelson, Ethel Belleyille. 

I Edward. Mary Ann Boulter. 
I Smith, Percy Deseronto. 

Smithj Earle A Deseronto. 

■ Young, Arthur Madoc. 

Young, Fred Madoc. 

Ward, Albert Bdw... Stirling. 

, Halliburton : 

\ Eastman, Alma May . Kinmount. 

j Gray, Violet South Lake. 

I Otto, Charles Haliburton. 

Rooney, Francis Kinmount. 

"JiVhistie, Many Jane.Minden. 

Hwroni 

Anderson, Harrey ...Dungannon. 

Cole, Amos B Clinton. 

Cole, Mabel Clinton. 

Balkwell, Clara Exeter. 

Doubledee, Lena Belmore. 

Sours, Gladys Clinton. 

Thompson, Beatrice Dungannon. 

Thompson, Arthur... Dnnp;annon. 

Young, Clara E Londesboro. 

Halt on : 

Hartley, Clara Milton. 

James, Mary T Campbellrille. 

Haldimand : 

Forrester, Harry Dunnville. 

Young, Rosetta ...:.. Dunnrille. 

Forrester, Asa Dunnville. 



294 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



LiBT OF Pupils in thb Ontario Institution op thb Deaf and Dumb, etc. — Oontinufd. 



Counties. 



P. 0. Address. 



Counties. 



P. O. Address. 



JK.&nt : 

Chevalier, William ...Tilbury. 

Gibson^ Winnifred ...Dresden. 

Gibson, Maggie ......Dresden. 

Neville, Mamie Dresden. 

Parker, Beatrice Dresden. 

Toll, Nova Rose Ridgetown. 

Thibeault, Mary ......Fletcher. 

Wilson, Herbert ......Chatham. 

Lanthton: 

Breault, Gertie Sarnia. 

Jennings, Frank Forest. 

Moore, George H Forest. 

Lanark : 

Blake, Frederick ...Almonte. 

McGregor, Ruby Almonte. 

Pollock, Bessie Appleton. 

Lincoln : 

Fretz, Cora Grimsby. 

Hoare, Ethel M St. Catharines. 

Heaslip, Myrtle Wellandport. 

McCready , Aletha . . . Caister Centre . 

Swick, Amos Beamsville. 

Lennox and Addington: 

Dopking, Carrie IMoscow. 

Hartwick, James Napanee. 

Hartwick, Archibald. Napanee. 

Meeks, Esley Napanee. 

McAdam, Wesley ....Tam worth. 
MusJcoha District : 

Allen George Uffington. 

Croucher , John Huntsville. 

Dierks, Caroline Kilworthy. 

Ireland, J^ouis Bracebridge. 

Russell, Alice Dorset. 

Stowater, Belle Byng Inlet. 

Leeds and Grenvillt: 

Countryman, Harvey. Prescott. 
Middlesex : 

Conrscey, Jane Viola.Lucan. 

Fishbein , Sophie .... London . 

Pishbein, Eddie London. 

Porter, Annie Newbury. 

Russell, Mary Bell...Ail8a Craig. 

Ryan, Charles Lucan. 

Laugheed, Annie E... London. 
Norfolk : 

Boomer, Duncan Windham Centre. 

Cole, Rosa ...• Bookton. 

Earl, Charles Blayney. 

Franklin, Sarah J.... Clear Creek. 
Northumberland : 

Bellamy, George .Wicklow. 

Chatten, Elizabeth. . . Brighton. 
Nipissing District: 

Dorschner , Charles. . . Mattawa. 
Ontario : 

Quigley, Walter Oshawa. • 

Oxford : 

Brown, Florence Woodstock. 

Cone, Ben j amen Woodstock. 



Oxford: — Con. 

Garner, Esther 

McFarlane, Mona .., 

Pipher, Celia 

Peel : 

Duke, Ettie 

Curry, Duncan 

Zimmerman, Candaoe 
Perth: 

Harris, Carl 

Robertson , Stewart . . 
Parry Sound District : 

Veitch, Elizabeth 

Prescott and Bu^sell: 

Gelineau, Arthur ... 

Hughes, Myrtle 

Hughes, Iva 

McLaren, George D... 

McLaren, John Chas. 

Simpson, Alexander.. 

McDougall, Elsie 

McDougall, Peter ... 
Peterhoro : 

Charliebois, Walter... 

Kennaley, Winnifred. 

Lawson, Lila 

Lawson, Violet 

O'Brien, Gerald 

Harper, Madeline ... 

Harper, Marion 

Tretheway, Roy ...<».. 
Renfrew : 

Cuddy, Edward 

Derochie, Caroline.... 

Derochie, Clara 

Bruss, Henry 

Lacombe, Joseph 

Marquardt, Gustave. 
I Reilley, Mary 

Rhemus, Herman .. 

: Smith, Edward S 

I Tracey, John 

i Simcoe : 

Boyle, Mary T 

Graham, Victor 

Gannon, Ellen 

Hall, Ewart 

Nelson, Florence 

Paddison, Thomas .. 

Tudhope, Laura 

Carefoot, Seymour .. 

Hamilton, Alma 

Stormonty Dundas: 

King, Joseph 

Lalon'de, Emma Ida.. 

Legault, Mary ... 

Tackaberry, Ernest... 

Loper, Cyril 

Morton, Floyd 

Thunder Bay District 

Burke, Elsie 



IngersolL 
, Eastwood. 
Woodstock. 

Sleswick. 
Burnlumithorpe. 
. Palgrave. 

Mitchell. 
Stratford. 

Spence. 

Pendleton. 
.Tread well. 
Treadwell. 
Spring Hill. 
Snring Hill. 
Elclwards. 
. Grant. 
Grant. 

, Peterboro' . 
.Peterboro'. 
Peterboro' . 
Peterboro' . 
Peterboro' . 
Peterboro' . 
PiBterboro' . 
Gooderham. 

BrudenelL 
Arnprior. 
Arnprior. 
Pembroke. 
Arnprior. 
Hardwood Lake. 
Pembroke. 
Strathtay. 
Renfrew. 
Pembroke. 

Midland. 
Collingwood. 

Phelpston. 

Midland. 

Marchmount. 

Elmsdale. 

Orillia. 

Collingwood. 

Everett. 

South Lancaster. 

Cornwall. 

Cornwall. 

Cornwall. 

Morrisburg. 

Newington. 

Port Arthur 



m 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



295 



Lct OF Pupils in the Ontabio rNsriTunoN of the Deaf and Dumb, etc. — Concluded. 



Counties. 



P. O. Address. 



Counties. 



P. O. Address. 



rifiorio: 
Fountain, Herbert. . . Coboconk. 

Fountain. Farley C!oboconk. 

JeweQ, Ena Manilla. 

Rutherford, Emma...Fenelon Falls. 

Sipe, Thomas AUsaw. 

Whitworth, Florence. Lindsay. 
Windriffl, Ri{a ^ Dongola. 

Cherry, Ida P Preston. 

HigeD, William Berlin. 

M,Edwin New Hamburg. 

Walter, Jno. T. Hawkesrille. 

Martin, Absalom ....Waterloo. 

Golds, Margaret New Hamburg. 

ITrflittffton: 

Clark, Adeline Guelph. 

MacLachlan, Wm. ...Mount Forest. 
Sraemer, Johanna ...Glen Allan. 
IFeiiitcortli : 

Carter, Stella Bartonville. 

Depew, Georgie Hamilton. 

GiDam, Walter Grimsby. 

Gilliam, "Wilbert Grimsby. 

Maas, Annie Hamilton. 

Saimon, Albert Hamilton. 

Taylor, Joeeph Dundas. 

Etherington, Mabel... Hamilton. 
GuDuno, Gertie Hamilton. 

Tossell, Harold Niagara Falls. 

M: 

May, Helen Toronto. 

Bowman, Ellsworth... Newmarket. 
Brown, Frederick ...Toronto.' 
Brown, Lily Toronto. 



I Buchan, Drucilla ...Toronto. 
I Buchan, Alexander... Toronto. 

Buchan, Jno. P. A.Toronto. 

Brown, Daisy Toronto. 

Best, Olive Toronto. 

Burley, William Toronto. 

Cunningham, Martha. Toronto. 

Curtis, Lilian Toronto. 

Cratchley, Mabel ....Toronto. 

Chestn ut , Arlie Toronto . 

Elliott, George Toronto. 

Ellis, Wesley Earle.. Cobalt. 

Ensminger, Maggie... Markham. 

Fleet, Ellen Toronto. 

^ Haslitt, Dorothy Toronto. 

Haalitt, Evelyn Toronto. 

Haditt, William Toronto. 

Holbrook, Agnes East Toronto. 

Henderson, Clara ...Toronto. 

Johnson. William Swansea . 

Kelly, James Toronto. 

Kennedy, Muriel H.Toronto. 

Law, Theodore ..........Toronto. 

Lawson, Frank Toronto. 

Mason, Myrtle Toronto. 

McCaul , Alexander . . . Toronto . 

McCallum, Boy Strange. 

Noble, Edgar Toronto. 

Peacock, Ada Toronto. 

Pinder, Clarence Davenport. 

Shannon, Anne Islington. 

Stevens, Grace Toronto. 

Wilson, Arthur Toronto. 

Watson, Muriel Toronto. 

Marks, Jennie Toronto. 



296 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Statement of Cost per Pupil, September 30, 1905. 



Heading of Expendfi^ure 



Total Exp. 
year ending 
Sept. 30, 1904 



Yearly Cost 

per pnpll 

Sept. 80, 1904 



Weekly Cost 

per pupil 
Sept. 90. 1904 



Total Exp. 
year endiDsr 
Sept 80, 1905 



Yearly Cost 

per pupil 
Sept. SO. 1905 



Weekly Cost 

per pupil 
Sept. 80, 1905 



Medical Dep*t 

Butcher's Meat, Fish. 

Flour 

Butter and Milk 

General Groceries 

Fruit and Vegetables. 
Bedding and Clothing 

Fuel 

Light 

Laundry 

Books and Apparatus. 
Printing, Postage, etc. 

Furniture , . . . 

Farm 

Repaiis 

Sewage Works 

Water 

Miscellaneous 

Salaries and Wages. . . 



$1,079 

3,227 

1,1»4 

2,431 

2,631 

684 

878 

6,539 

1,017 

667 

449 

835 

419 

662 

873 

366 

900 

697 

25,313 



4 55 
13 62 

5 04 

10 26 

11 10 
290 
3 70 

27 69 



4 

2 

1 
. 3 

1 

2 

3 

1 

3 80 

2 94 
106 81 



29 
82 
90 
53 
77 
75 
68 



09 

26 

10 

20 

21 

06 

07 

53 

08 

05. 

04 

07 

03. 

05 

07 

03 

07 

06 

05 



$50,860 80 $214 60 $4 13 |$ 51,433 95 $229 61 



$ 393 

3,189 

1,439 

2,409 

2,670 

803 

689 

6,773 

1,018 

788 

409 

885 

671 

964 

1,212 

384 

900 

1,097 

24,730 



1 75 

14 24 

6 42; 

10 75! 

11 92' 
3 59! 

3 08i 

30 24t 



551, 

52; 

83 

95 

00 

31 

41 

72 

02 

90 



110 41 



03 

27 
12 
21 
23 
07 
06 
58 
08 
07 
04 
08 
06 
09 
10 
03 
08 
10 
2 12 



U 42 



Average No. of Pupils 1903-04 237 

Annual Cost '* ' '* $214 60 

Weekly ** " J" 4 13 



Average No. of Pupils 1904-05 224 

Annual Cost " " $229 61 

Weekly ** " 4 42 

Certified correct. 



M. COCHRANE, 

Bvrmr. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Education 



Province of Ontario 

FOR THE YEAR 

1905 



PART 11. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO. 



w 



TORONTO : 

Pnted «Dd Publiihed by L. K. CAMERON. Pimter to the King's Most Excellent Majefty. 

1906. 



^ 



WARWICK BRO'S & RUTTER, Lihitbd, Printebb 
TORONTO. 



iv. . THE REPORT OF THE No. IJ 



Deputy Minister of Education for Ontaiio, 1890-1905. 

The death of Mr. John Millar, Deputy Minister of Education, was 
an event so much regretted in educational circles as to call for some 
reference in the official records of the Department, as well as some expres- 
sion of appreciation of the work he was so assiduous in performing. Mr. 
Millar's relations with the teaching profession were those of a friend and 
counsellor. This was well shown in his administrative position when he 
championed the cause of his underpaid professional brethren. He ad- 
vocated throughout life the imparting of character before knowledge- 
Christian culture before erudition. In his work ** Canadian Citizenship," 
he says : ** To teach children grammar, chemistry, etc., without teaching 
them that passions uncontrolled, impulses unrestrained, and appetites 
unregulated, are sure to bring irretrievable ruin, is to omit the best training 
of citizenship." 

He was ever considerate of others, as all with whom he was 
associated in official life or otherwise could testify, and many found in him a 
friend of alert sympathies and never failing unselfishness. His deep de- 
votion of many years to his duties has left high traditions connected with 
the office of Deputy Minister of Education. 

Mr. Millar was born in Ireland in 1842, and while only a few months 
old he came to Canada with his parents, who settled in the Township 
of Brock, in the County of Ontario, and it was in one of the public 
schools of that township that he received his elementary education. 
When seventeen years of age he received a certificate of qualification as 
teacher, and he began to teach in one of the rural schools of the township. 
At the completion of the term for which his certificate was valid, he 
attended for one session the Toronto Normal School, and was awarded a 
Second Class Grade A certificate. After attendance for the succeeding 
session he obtained a First Class Grade A certificate. In the following 
two years he taught in the Township of Barton, in the County of Went- 
worth, and for the next five years in the schools of the City of London. 
During this latter period Mr. Millar became an extra-mural student of the 
University of Toronto in the Faculty of Arts, and after attendance for a 
short period at University College he received the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts from the University of Toronto in 1872. In 1870 he was appointed 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 

Assistant Master in the St. Thomas High School, ot which he became 
Principal in 1875. Under his management it underwent such development 
that it was raised to the rank of Collegiate Institute. While serving as 
its Principal, he acted as Principal of the Pubic Schools of St. Thomas. 
He prepared himself also for special service in connection with the pub- 
lic schools by obtaining qualification as a Public School Inspector. 

Mr. Millar's energies brought him into a wider field. He took a very 
deep interest in educational problems, and because of his experience in 
these he served two years as Chairman of the High School section of the 
Ontario Teachers' Association, and was twice elected to represent the High 
Schools of Ontario in the Senate of the Provincial University, serving in 
that capacity four years (1884-1888). 

It was, one may say, on account of his wide experience in teaching in 
the Public and High Schools, of the Province, as well as because of his 
capacity to deal in an executive way with educational matters, that he was 
in 1890 appointed by the Provincial Government Deputy-Minister of 
Education, in succession to the late Mr. Alexander Marling, who died in 
' that year. From that time his work was official and executive, but he 
! >pent his holidays each year in mastering the details of some new problem 
in education, and for this purpose went on several occasions on tours of 
inspection of educational institutions in the United States. The results of 
these investigations were presented in the form of reports to the Minister 
of Education, some of which were published. Among these may be 
ramed : " The School System of the State of New York " and ** Technical 
Education ; A Visit to the Schools of Massachusetts, and Opinions on the 
Subject." He served in 1895 as Vice-President of the Dominion Educa- 
tional Association, and was in 1904 elected President for the meeting to 
lake place in 1907. 

Mr. Millar during his service as Principal of the Collegiate Institute 
annotated several editions of the English Classics selected for the High 
school curriculum. After his appointment as Deputy Minister he con- 
tinued his literary work, and in 1893 appeared **The Educational System of 
the Province of Ontario," which he had prepared for distribution at the 
\\ Grid's Fair of Chicago of the previous year. He was the author of 
"School Management" (1896), which is authorized for the teaching 
profession of the Province ; of ** Books : A Guide to Good Reading," 
which appeared in 1897, and also of ** Canadian Citizenship," which was 
published in 1899. 



vi, JHE REPORT OF THE No. 



Mr. Millar was married twice, his first wife, Miss Susaii Dingle, of 
Barton, dying in 1889. His second wife, Kate, daughter of the late Neil 
McCallum of the Township of North Dorchester, survives him. He was 
an active member of the Methodist Church, and took a strong interest in 
its work, being a member of the Official Board of Central Methodist 
Church, Toronto. 



IS** EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



vii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

PART II. 

__ _ PAGE. 

Thb Rittenhousb School — Illustrations. 
ArpEXDixM. — Manual Training and Technical Education. 

Report of the Inspector 297 

Appendix N. — Statistics of County Model Schools, 190o ., 304' 

AiFEfDix O.— Provincial Norm.%l and Model Schools; Ont.4Rio Normal College. 

I. Provincial Normal and Model Schools, Toronto: 

1. Staff of Toronto Normal School, students admitted 308 

2. Staff of Provincial Model School, Toronto; number cf pupils 308 

II. Provincial Normal and Model Schools, Ottawa: 

1. Staff of Ottawa Normal School; students admitted 308 

2. Staff of Provincial Model School, Ottawa; number of pupils 309 



III. Provincial Normal School, London: 
Staff; students admitted 

IV. Ontario Normal College: 

Staff , 



309 



> 309 

Students admitted «.-. 

ip?E.xDix P.—HiGH School Cadet Corps, 1905 3jq 

APPENDIX Q. SxrPBRANNUATED TUACHBRS, 1905. 

1. Allowances granted during 1905 gjj 

2. Sum&ary for years 1882-1905 gj, 

A.PEXDix R.-Rrport of the President of the School of Practical Science 312 

Appendix S.— Report of the President of the University of Toronto 315 



319 
324 
326 



Addendum A.~Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Arts 

Addendum B.— Report of University College 

Addendum C. — Victoria University 

Addendum D.-Trinity College, Faculty of Arts, 1904.5 Q97 

Addendum E— Faculty of Medicine 

Addendum F.... Applied Science and Engineering HI 

Addendum (i...The Library _ ^^ 

Addendum H.— Biological Museum .. ^^ 

333 

333 



t^t!^r J-^orandum Regarding Geological and Minerai;>gical Museum 



Addendum K.— University of Toronto Studies 

334 



Addendum L.-Marine and Lacustrine ^BioTJgical Stat io^^^ ^ 



viii THE RElPORT OF THE No. 12 



Addendum M. — Financial Statement : 

I. Faculty of Arts 335 

II. Medical Faculty 342 

III. Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering 344 

Addendum N. — List of Papers and Works by Members of Faculties and Re- 
search Students, for the year 1904-1905 34o 

Appendix T. — ^List or Certificates Issued by the Department, 1906, etc. ' 

1. Inspectors' Certificates 349 

2. High School Principals and Specialists ; 349 

3. High School Assistants and Specialists 349 

4. Summary of Public School Teachers* Certificates 350 

5. First Class Certificates 350 

6. Second-Class Certificates 351 

7. Kindergarten Directors 353 

8. Certificates in Domestic Science 353 

9. Certificates in Manual Training 353 

10. Temporary and Extended Certificates 3-54 

11. Professional Examinations 354 

Appendix U. — Members of the Educational Council, and Boards of Examiners; 
Lists of Associate Examiners; and High School Principals 
and Assistants: 

I. Members of Educational Council, 1905-1906 35-5 

II. Boards of Examiners, 1906 355 

III. Associate Examiners, 1905 356 

lY. Principals and Assistants of Collegiate Institutes and High ^Schools, 

January, 1906 *. 358 



190§ EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. ix 



THE RITTENHOUSE PUBLIC SCHOOL. 

The Rittenhouse Public School, illustrations of which appear herewith, is Union 
School Section No. 1 Township of Clinton and No. '2 Township of Louth. It is 
in a pretty location, three-quarters of a mile from Jordan Harbour on Lake 
Ontario, and one mile from Jordan Station on the Grand Trunk Railway. 

The school buildings was erected in the year 1890 and owes its existence 
chiefly to the generosity of Mr. M. F. Rittenhouse, now of Chicago, but formerly 
a pupil of the old stone school, which the present building displaces. While on a 
visit to the home of his youth in the above year, Mr. Rittenhouse conceived the 
idea which resulted in the erection of a school building with internal equipment 
and outside surroundings that are truly models of neatness, beauty and practical 
utility. 

The premises are very tastefully laid out, and include two ample play 
grounds for summer, and an open air. skating rink and toboggan slide for winter. 
Native and imported trees and shrubs have been set out. and beds of flowers and 
a fountain beautify the front. 

The school is probably the best equipped rural school in Canada. - It has an 
excellent concrete basement and winter play room for small children, and is heated 
by a hot water furnace . The school room is provided with the latest and best 
^inglc desks ; its floor is covered with linoleum and its walls artistically hung with 
pictures. In one wing to the south is the library of over two thousand volumes, 
including the Encyclopaedia Britannica, books of art, and the leading English and 
.^erican magazines. The wing to the north is used as a museum, in which may 
be seen specimens of the plants, insects and minerals of the district. 

Immediately in front of the school and across the road is Victoria Hall ; 
attached to it is the caretaker's residence and to the north a driveway and sheds 
for horses. Victoria Hall stands on a plot of two acres, mostly wooded ; the 
building, together with its land and equipment, was also the gift of Mr. 
Rittenhouse. The hall is used for school entertainments, and for public lectures, 
and to assist in securing good talent for these latter the benefactor has provided 
!or an annual grant. 

The hall has a seating capacity of six hundred, is equipped with opera chairs, 
a large stage with fixture, a piano and a good projection lantern. It is heated by 
steam and lighted by acetylene gas. Water is supplied to the school, the hall, 
and the grounds by means of a gasoline pumping engine at the lake. 

The cost of this public hall, its surroundings and equipment has been over 
sixteen thousand dollars. Attached to the hall, on the south side, is a conservatory 
for the care of flowers in winter, and to provide nature study material for the 
p'jpils. Plans are also in preparation, by Mr. -Rittenhouse, for the improvement 
of the walks and of the road from the lake to the Grimsby line, and for the 
introduction of school gardening. 

A very interesting object lesson is here given that may be the inspiring cause 
of many other localities being similarly benefited by men of wealth and public 
spirit. 



i 




I 

t 



REPORT 



OF THE 



MINISTER OF EDUCATION 

For the Year 1905. 



PART IL 

APPENDIX lA— MANUAL TRAINING AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

Report of the Inspector. 

H.N. R. A. Pyne, M. D., K p. P., 
Minister of Education, 

Education Department, Toronto, 

Sir, — ^I have the honour to submit herewith my fiith annual report on 
Manual Training, Art Instruction and Technical Education as carried on in the 
diooli of this Province during the year ending December 3Ist, 1906. 

It was written of old " of making many books there is no end," and if the 
t:)pi" books" were changed to read "reports" it would be just as true. On 
tfe subject many reports have been presented to the Education Department in 
ism past, but what they have accomplished, what notice has been taken of 
tltm, and what effect they have had it would be diflScult to discover. Of these 
i?p«3rta the chief are : 

"Schools of Technical Science " — Hodgins and Machattie 1871 

"Technical Education " —Ross 1889 

"Technical Education" — McEvoy ., 1900 

"Technical Education " —Millar 1899 

*' Manual Training " — Seath 1901 

" Learning How to Do " — Bengough 1902 

"Domestic Science " — Hoodless 1899 

Reports of Inspector of Technical Education, 1901-2-3-4. 

All the above have been printed and published, but as far as practical 
iJ^Kcaiion have not received the attention the importance of some of them 
feerves. This is presented with the hope that it will meet a better fate and 
ikat neither apathy, indifference nor mistaken economy will prevent earnest 
BHi«der%tion of the suggestions made. '^ 

As the subjects under my charge are still in the process of introduction and, 
rtere introduced, of development, it will be neither possible nor desirable to 
ivoid repeating observations that I have previously made, and the necessity for 
bing this will exist until their purpose is understood, their benefits appreciated, 
wd their adoption general. Thirty-five Manual Training centres are now 
stablished as follows: Toronto (7), Ottawa (JO), Guelph(3), Brockville, Alvin- 
fton, Cornwall, Woodstock, Kingston, Brantford, Essex, Renfrew, Cobourg, 
BaniiJton (2), Berlin, Ingersoll, Stratford and London. Preparations are being 
lED. [n] [297] 



298 THE REPORT OF THE No, 12 



made to install a department for this work at Gait, St. Thomas, Owen Sound 
and Sault Ste. Marie, which centres it is hoped will be in active operati($n at the 
re-opening of the schools in September, 1906. 

Tweniy-five centres, in which Household Science is tau^rht, are aided by 
the Department. These are situated as follows: Toronto (9), London (2), 
Hamilton (3), Guelph (3), Ottawa, Renfrew, Berlin, Stratford, Brantford, Wood- 
stock, Belleville, Kingston. ^ 

The organization of the school is much simplified where these two depart- 
ments are taken together, as both boys and girls are thus provided for. 

The basis of a thoroughly practical education is the Kindergarten. '*As 
the child is father of the man, so the Kindergarten is father of the Manual 
Training School. The Kindergarten comes first in the order of development 
and leads logically to the Manual Training School. The same principle under- 
, lies both. In both it is sought to generate power by dealing with things in 
connection with ideas. Both have common methods of instruction and they 
should be adapted to the whole period of school life and applied to all schools." 

The next step from the Kindergarten is the Art and Constructive Work, 
which was placed in the curriculum in August, 1904. I am of opinion that the 
inclusion of these subjects in the course of study marks one of the greatest 
reforms that have taken place in our educational system in many years, though 
it will 'probably be long before their influence will be generally admitted and 
recognized. It is obvious that the history of these nractical subjects in the 
Public School repeats that of every reform movement. It is natural that they 
should be looked upon as unnecessary and undesirable innovations by those 
who feel that the old methods are good enough and that what was good enough 
for the parents is good enough for the children. 

"Whatever has been shall be, 
As did the fathers so do we." 

It is likewise natural that these new methods should receive scant welcome 
from those who are wedded to the use of the old. Notwithstanding all this, 
these subjects are gradually being adopted wherever the qualifications of the 
teacher admit of him successfully teachmg them, and whenever adopted, they 
are received with enthusiasm by the children and later by the parentis. Much, 
however, remains to be done before every child in the Province has the oppor- 
tunity given to do some practical work, the doing of which will bring into play 
those powers by which he or she will in later years have to earn a livelihood. 

All students now graduating from the Normal Schools have such a course 
in constructive work as will enable them to suc^sessf ully teach these subj«*ct8, but 
there are many teachers employed in the schools of the Province who have not 
had the advantage of this training, and something should be done in order to 
help these in this newer work. Some steps, which suggest themselves, are as 
follows : 

1. Centres of Instruction, to be held during the evenings or on Saturdays, 

might be established in the larger towns for the teachers of the 
neighborhood. 

2. More attention should be given to these subjects in the various Teachers' 

Institutes throughout the Province — in the way of practical demon- 
strations of the methods of teaching this work, rather than academic 
discussions on its advantages. 

3. Bulletins might be issued by the Department such as are issued by 

various educational bodies in the United States. These would describe 
methods, material, courses, principles, etc., to be followed in the adop- 
tion of the work. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 299 



4. Several libraries of the most helpful books should be formed by the 

Department and circulated amongst the teachers through the medium 
of their Institutes. These could well be accompanied by a short 
explanatory pamphlet. 

5. Three months' courses should be established at the Macdonald Institute 

for the purpose of instructing teachers in Primary Manual Training, 
and inducements should be offered to them to take up the work. 

The purpose of education has been said to be the making of good citizens. 
Before a man can become a good citizen he must be capable of doing two things : 

(I). Earning a livelihood for himself and those dependent upon him ; and 

(2). Performing some useful service to the community in which he lives. 

Ninety-five per cent, of the boys and girls in our schools will probably have 
&,earn their livelihood by the work of their hands, and our curriculum in view 
of this fact shonld have some concern with the life to be lived by the pupil 
i.Ter leaving the four walls of the school room. This ideal of educational effort 
i^ pTS'lually coming to be accepted by the most progressive nations. In our 
•^ Province 56.98 per cent, of the children attending the schools are receiving 
D-?ir education in rural districts, and consequently the kind of education given 
ia the rural school becomes of great importance. Practical work of some kind 
crnther should have a recognized place in all these schools. This is as necessary 
to the boy and the girl in the rural school as it is to the pupil in the town 
•cioL Of course the rural child has greater opportunities of doing things 
r^nd the hoase and on the farm than the town boy, but, what is needed is a 
"V^fffmafeic course of well ordered practical work, combining in perhaps equal 
|r:ponions, two elements, the educational and the utilitarian. In the home 
^h the utilitarian aspect predominates to the exclusion of the educational. 
Ten obstacles seem to stand in the way of the general introduction of hand 
Tork mto the rural school : 

1. The inability of the teacher to take up these newer branches ; and 

2. The general opinion of the section that education is a matter of books 

only^ and that time devoted to ajiything else is wasted and mis-spent. 
The first of these difilculties will gradually be removed by the steps which 
Kte hieing taken in all our normal schools to train the teachers in these newer 
n^jtcts, and by the adoption of such steps as have been suggested above. The 
HBoval of the second also lies very largely in the hands of the teacher. The 
sscher who thinks his (or her) duties ended directly the schoolroom door is 
jiei], has not yet reached the right conceptiqn of his duties. The school 
h aid be the centre of the social life of the community, and it is part of the 
doer's work to educate the parents and ratepayers of the section. The people 
L^i eilacation as much as the children, and the teacher has it in his. power to 
L^w the parents not only the educational value of the handwork and the part 
\ Us played in the development of the race, but also its after effects in practical 
i?^. and he should lay stress upon the fact that the man who only knows but 
tonot " do " is but a dione in the hive. 

The Agricultural Department of this Province has achieved much success 
▼ the adoption of up- to date business methods in spreading right ideas of, and 
Sfe? necessity for scientific-practice in agricultural operations. The travelling 
wry school adopted in some Provinces is a prominent example. I can not see 
% some of the same business sense could not be applied to educational affairs, 
travelling Manual Training and Household Science Siihool could do good 
fork, not only in explaining to the parents by striking object lessons the place 
B^ purpose of these subjects, but also in giving practical instruction to the boys 



300 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



and girls of the Province. Such a school could be located in a suitable district 
for say one year and then moved to some other locality. Many sections which 
do not now understand the educational and practical significance of Manual Train- 
ing and Household Science would be thus induced to take them up. 

The moulding and training of public opinion along right lines in educa- 
tional matters is or should be part of the function of any Department of Educa- 
tion. During the year large public meetings have been addressed in Cornwall, 
St. Catharines, Sault Ste Marie and Ottawa, and arrangements have been com- 
pleted to deliver nearly one hundred illustrated lectures in various parts of the 
Province during 1906 on " Practical Education." It is hoped by means of these 
lectures to show what other parts of our own Province are doing and also to 
inspire enthusiasm, interest and discussion from what other countries have to 
show us. We have talked long and enough on these subjects, and it is thought 
by exhibiting, through a powerful lantern, actual photographs of the schools, 
equipments and work of other nations that a " divine discontent " may be 
aroused and the people incited to follow the example of the United States, 
Germany and Japan and " invest " their money in educational effort 

Though considerable progress has been made in the introduction of Manual 
Training and Household Science into the Public and High Schools, yet beyond this 
we have accomplished little in the way of real Technical Education. Manual 
Training is not strictly Technical Education, but bears the same relation to it as 
the alphabet does to literature. These subjects have a strong utilitarian element 
yet their distinctive aim is educational and only secondarily utilitarian. In the 
School of Practical Science, the School of Mines and the Ontario Agricultural 
College we have institutions of the highest technical grade, but we have as yet 
no efficient feeders to these schools. We need two new types of schools — 
Agricultural High Schools and Technical High Schools. Numerous examples 
of these are to be found across the border and will well repay careful investiga- 
tion. At various suitable centres Agricultural High Schools should be estab- 
lished. These would have preparation for rural life as their objective point and 
prepare in some degree for the higher work of the Agricultural College. The 
American Manual Training High Scnool which is a type we could weU 
adapt prepares students for industrial pursuits by a parallel course of academic 
and practical instruction — the one helping the other. One such school in the 
States has adopted the following for its motto : — 

" Hail to the skilful cunning hand 
Hail to the cultured mind, 
Striving for the world's command 
Here let them be combined.*' 
Such a school should 
(1.) Offer three or four year courses for those boys and girls whose bent 

is industrial rather than academic, and 
(2.) Have a well thought out plan of evening classes for those engaged at 

the trades during the day. 
We have no Technical High School in this Province, for the one to which 
that name is attached is, for reasons which need not be here specified, totally 
unfit to bear the name. Boards of Trade, Manufacturers' Associations and 
Labour Organizations are taking great interest in these subjects, and all are 
becoming convinced that our industrial future depends very largely on these 
educational facilities being offered. That the people will avail themselves of 
these educational opportunities is shown by the astonishing success of those 
American Correspondence Schools, which profess to give instruction in technical 
subjects. It is estimated that $1,500,000 is annually paid out of this Province to 
the most successful of these schools in the States, owing to the fact that no 
facilities exist in our own Province for obtaining the necessary instruction— 



1505 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 301 



iastnictiou which will have a direct bearing on the amount of wages received 
at the end of the week. The report of the Mosely Commission accentuates this 
^troDOfiy, and the organizer of that Commission is showing his opinion of the 
practical nature of American education by sending his two sons to Technical 
School? in the United States. Probably, the nation that has made the greatest 
progress along these lines in recent years is Japan. In that country, according 
to a late official report, there are 869 Technical Schools, and the Japanese 
auribute a great part of their success among the nations of the earth to their 
enlightened educational policy. The aim of Technical education is to effect a rise 
b the level of intelligence and efficiency among all on whom our industries 
dr;pend,in the confidence that this will mean to the workmen increased wages and 
increased power of adaptation to the changes which so often dislocate our 
bdastriesL And we must keep in view the fact that the interests of all are 
tidly concerned in the maintenance of a high standard of excellence conong 
tbtse on whom may depend our power to maintain a place in the markets of the 
T.'M and the very subsistence of a large portion of our population. The 
iiplovers of labour throughout the Province could encourage the spread of 
Mnical Education by giving preference to those who are making an effort to 
■rtain it, and by granting privileges in the way of time or bonus to those of 
'Jieir employees who are attending classes for their own improvement, and 
DciaeDtally for the benefit of their employers. Some Ekiglish manufacturers 
allow the young men employed by them to reach the factory one or two hours 
kterin the morning if they have been attending an approved Technical class the 
evening before, while others have established classes within their own works, and 
c-ffer increased wages to all those successfully taking the courses offered. 

In the educational and general literature of the past twelve months, the 
^cestion of trade schools has received much attention. In the United States 
ir necessity for their establishment has been repeatedly urged. It is neither 
ymhk nor desirable for us to adopt the educational systems or the type of 
vr^^ois existing in any foreign country, but from all of them we may get sug- 
gestions that will help us to settle our own educational problems according to 
\XT own peculiar requirements. Regarding the success of Trade Schools in 
ijenn&ny, Governor Douglas of Massachusetts says : 

" The method of conducting trade schools in Germany and the thoroughness 
of the education are the best in ^he world. Germany saw the need of such 
schools many years ago. Trade schools were organized, graduates sent out, and 
the efeet was so marked on the industrial situation that other countries were 
ittraeted by the progress made, and finally realized that Germany was distanc- 
ill;' them in excellence of her manufactured goods. Germany with her technical 
^X)ls and army of educated workers, heis demonstrated that great economic 
pnociple that finer and better goods can be manufactured at a less cost than by 
Bceducated and unskilled labour. Throughout the empire of the Kaiser, trade 
^jols are to be found in all the cities, towns and large villages. New factories 
■fe springing up everywhere and Germany is increasing her export trade 
vonderfally. In Berlin, as well as in most German cities, trade schools for 
tKjemakera, tailors, carpenters, metal workers, masons, etc., are being conducted 
vit^ friendly relations with the labor unions, and in many cases the boards 
\i inspection have upon them members of trade unions." 

There can be little doubt that the immense strides Germany has taken in 
>opplying the world's markets are in no small measure due to this pDlicy. The 
ifgent need of consideration of this question is well set forth by Governor 
^coglas, thus : 

Trade schools have been made necessary to the community by the great 
thaoges that have taken place in the last generation in processes ot production. 



302 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Formerly the master ^ave time to the young men in order to bring them up in 
his business. He could give his personal attention to the young man, who was 
accordingly apprenticed to him to learn the trade. The system of apprentice- 
ship properly belonged to a condition of production where the young man could 
meet his employer and be taught. Under the present system of production it is 
impossible for the employer to give personal care to the young man who wishes 
to learn a trade. 

"The apprenticeship idea cannot mieet the requirements of the present 
factory system. It has been outgrown. We must find a broader, larger way to 
assist the young man who desires to learn. The school for the many who may leam * 
at once must take the place of the master who formerly taught his apprentices. 

" The specialization by which one worker learns but a minute part of the 
whole process in manufacturing any commodity tends to narrow his capacity 
and prevent his obtaining a complete knowledge of his art. The extent to 
which the present factory system has limited the range of the workman can 
only be appreciated by those who have given the matter careful examination ; 
but it is undoubtedly true to-day, and each year is becoming more true, that the 
introduction of machinery, supplanting hand work and a i^eneral knowledge of 
the business, and introducing in place of it a special knowledge of one minute 
part, has caused a weakness in our industrial sj^stem which should be properly, 
compensated for. " 

So important is this question now considered m the State, that a Commis- 
sion has been appointed to investigate the whole subject of practical education 
and its relation to the industries. There can be hardly any doubt that tbere is 
a demand for instruction which shall qualify both directly and indirectly for 
the mechanical trades. Various manufacturing interests are constantly impres- 
sing upon our educational authorities the fact that they are suffering from the 
absence of training which will fit our youth for them. This need has been kept 
in the background owing to our great wealth of natural resources, the importa- 
tionof skilled labour, and foreign competition being shut off by means of a protec- 
tive tariff ; but the need is real and vital, and during the past few years it has 
begun to assert itself. We were once a purely agricultural people, but are 
rapidly becoming a nation of manufacturers. When we compare our almost 
total lack of this training, with the scientific organization of instruction in 
Germany, the wonder is that so much has ^een accomplished industrially, and 
we must be impressed with the danger of neglecting to provide this training 
for the future. The report of the Mosely Commission, lately sent to the United 
States, is full of convincing arguments of the necessity of this instruction for 
any nation'that aspires to achieve an industrial position among the nations of the 
earth, and the organizer of that Commission shows the faith that is in him by 
sending his two sons to American Schools. 

Closely connected with Technical Education, if not actually a part of it, 
are the subjects of Art, Design and Mechanical Drawing. Every manufacture 
depends in vsome way or other on an adequate knowledge of these subjects. A 
New York firm of bootmakers pays a man $5,000 a year for the designing of 
shoes. Six years ago, there were in this Province half a dozen Art Schools 
so called; last year there were three, and this year there are two, both 
of which are tottering to their fall through inability to meet modem requirements 
owing principally to the lack of adequate financial support. The Province has 
surely arrived at a stage in its development when it can support a properly 
equipped and efficiently taught Provincial Art School. The mistake has be^n 
made in the past of frittering away our energies on half a dozen small and ineffi- 
cient school-efforts which, if concentrated on one, would have achieved success and 
have accomplished something for the industrial development of the Province, 



m EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 303 



The Macdonald Institute which has been established by the Provincial 
Government for the trainins: of teachers in Manual Training, Hou**ehold Science 
and Nature Study should be better known to and more widely used by the 
the teachers of the Province. A bonus has been ofiFered to teachers taking up 
Nature Study with beneficial results, and this practice could be well applied to 
iknual Traiaiog — particularly primary Manual Training or Constructive work. 
feeuf the crying needs of the Public Schools to-day is teachers who can take 
op the newer work of the curriculum. A three months* course for this work 
ioold be established at the Institute, and a small bonus offered to suitable 
teachers as an inducement. A Certificate should be granted by the Department, 
ml Boards of Education throughout the Province should be willing to pay a 
higher salary to those teachers holding it. It is, at present difficult to see where 
teachers are to be secured for the newer centres that are being opened in Sep- 
Wnikr unless some such inducements are offered teachers to encourage them to 
tak-^op the work. The plan of granting a degree to properly qualified teachers 
rirh the necessary academic qualifications as is done at Columbia University, 
u 1 as is now done in connection with Household Science, is worthy of con- 
<i-ration. In the Provincial Museum we have an excellent institution which 
kk admirably with the records and relics of the past. But we need in the 
Pr.N-indal Museum, which shall have for its object the growth of the present 
vt\ the development of the future, an industrial museum which would show 
ir development of machinery from its first conception to the masterpiece of 
(•xiaj ; methods of manufacture from the raw product to the finished article ; 
tbr conservation of energy and the development of power ; all of which would 
ijmnth towards stimulating thought and ingenuity along industrial linea Such 
nii^ams form an integral part of many of the highest technical institutions in 
timnany. 

Two years ago \ very successful exhibition was held in Toronto consisting 
•i classes at work in Manual Training and Household Science. These classes 
ftt^ vi:»ited by many thousands of people and excited much interest. It is a 
pwLt to be considered whether a permanent educational building should not be 
^td in the Exhibition grounds for the purpose of demonstrating the value of 
ii< training to the people who provide the sinews of war, for efficiency of 
edDcation depends very largely on adequate expenditure. 

During the year I have carried on correspondence with many tea^chers in 
fc Province on Construction Work, answering their queations and removing 
fcir difficulties. Letters have also been received from South Africa, Australia, 
St» Zealand, Japan and many parts of the United States, making enquiries 
ikot the work we are doing. These have been answered giving all information 
K»>ible. 

As Tiequests have continually been received during the past two years for 
ftformation concerning books on Practical and Technical subjects considerable 
ifiit* was spent in preparing such a list for publication by the Department as a 
«fctin. Over five hundred books have been carefully examined and four 
na.ire'l included in the list submitted to you. Each book has been briefly 
tecribed in order that the teacher in search of a book may have something more 
^go by than a mere title. 

This report is somewhat shorter thau usual owing to the immense' amount 
I work entailed by preparation for the practical carrying out of my lecture 
ttr throughout the Province. 

Thanking you for the great help and encouragement you have given me 
I my work 

I am yours obediently, 
OHOKTo, February, 1906. ALBERT H. LEAKE. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



305 



MODEL SCHOOLS, 1905 








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•♦ 


1 K 


170 


150 


160 


160 


8 


8 


4 


4 


6 " 


6 " 


J iiidiv 


f «« 


194 


150 


150 


85 


4 


4 


4 or 5 


4 or 5 


5 •' 


6 " 


< "• 


<l 


160 


300 


300 


65 


9 





4 or 5 

V 


4 or 5 


6 ** 


6w'ksA 

2 days 

6 weeks 


■) 1 


<< 


160 


300 




65 


10 


7 


2 


2 i6 '' 


5 1 " 


! " 


156 


150 


160 


130 


4 


4 


3 or 4 


3 or 4, 6 " 


7 ' 




' r 


' <( 


163 


150 


250 


90 


9 


7 


3 or 4 


3 or 4 6 '' 


7 * 




H 




1 <* 


150 


150 




126 


46 


17 


1 


1 


4 " 


7 * 




9 


AUdav 


1 " 


175 


150 


150 


75 


4 


4 


3 or 4 


3 or 4 


6 *' 


6 ' 




J' 4 


<< 


(< 


450 


150 


150 


160 


20 


18 


4 


4 


2 *' 


6 ' 




f <» 


1 << 


171 


150 


150 


165 


7 


7 


4 or 5 


4 or 5 


6 " 


6 * 




if 1 


ti 


270 


150 


150 


150 


12 


12 


3 


3 


6 '* 


6 * 




13 1 


** 


120 


150 


150 


50 


8 


5 


6 


2 


4 •* 


6 ' 




14 " 


<t 


169 


150 


150 


150 


6 


5 


5 


5 


6 " 


7 ' 




1-5 ' '* 


(< 


166 


150 


150 


• 110 


6 


5 


5 


5 


6 •* 


6 ' 




K 


<< 


203 


150 


150 


40 


12 


6 


2 


2 


6 ** 


7 ' 




ti 


it 


168 


150 


150 


135 


11 


11 


5 


5 


6 ** 


6 * 




> 2 1 " 


(< 


650 


160 


150 


130 


12 


9 


26 


26 


3 days 


7 * 




1> 


(< 


171 


160 


150 


80 


14 


12 


3 


3 


5 weeks 


7 * 




/I , 


i( 


144 


160 


150 


115 


7 


7 


3 or 4 


3 or 4 


6 ** 


6 ' 




;'l 1 


<4 


230 


150 


160 


160 


46 


42 


3 or 4 


3 or 4 


6 '' 


6 * 




^ I '< 


(( 


90 


150 


160 


115 


20 


12 


2 


2 


5 ** 


7 * 




5 ! 


<< 


146 


150 


102 


190 


10 


9 


4 


4 


2 *^ 


4 ' 




3* ' 


<( 


275 


150 


250 


95 


6 


6 


3 or 4 


3 or 4 


4 " 


4* ' 




5 


<« 


160 


150 


150 


75 


9 


7 


3 


3 


6 ** 


7 ' 




» . .... " 


4« 


164 


150 


200 


70 


7 


6 


8 or 4 


3 or 4 


6 " 


6 ' 




i: 11 


(< 


205 


150 


150 


55 


2 


2 


5 or 6 


5 or 6 


7 " 


8 ' 




4 :AUdavJ 


C< 


158 


150 


150 


105 


7 


7 


4 


4 


6 " 


6 • 




if 


(( 


<i 


175 


150 


150 


160 


8 


7 


3 or 4 


3 or 4 


7 ** 


7 ' 




$' 1 




«< 


250 


150 


160 


126 


10 


8 


3 or 4 


3 or 4 


6 •* 


6 ' 




Ji 


All day 


<< 


186 


150 


175 


90 


7 


6 


3 


3- 


6 " 


7 ' 




fi 


. it ^ 


<< 


153 


150 


160 


130 


5 


6 


5 


5 


7 " 


8 ' 




B 


<( 


<< 


170 


150 


160 


80 


10 


8 


2 


2 


7 " 


7 ' 




tl 






296 
168 


160 
300 


160 


146 
75 


12 
13 


12 

8 


3 
3 


3 
3 


5 " 

6 " 


7 * 
6 ' 




5 2 


AUday 




15 


*. ^ ; 


<< 


180 


160 


m 


150 


10 


10 


3 or 4 


3 or 4 


7 " 


7 * 




r. 


(< 


C< 


140 


160 


160 


56 


8 


8 


3 


3 


5 " 


5 * 




« 


(< 


<< 


200 


160 


300 


120 


15 


15 


2 


2 


6 " 


6 * 




» " . 


(• 


173 


150 


150 


60 


6 


6 


3 or 4 


3 or 4 


6 *' 


6 * 




4ft " ; 


c< 


210 


160 


150 


110 


7 


7 


3 or 4 


3 or 4 


6 '* 


6 * 




€ . " 


(« 


150 


160 


150 


210 


9 


9 


6 or 6 


6 or 6 


5 ** 


6 * 




fi 1 . 


<4 


187 
80 


160 
300 


160 


160 
60 


11 
10 


11 
10 


5 
3 


5 
3 


5 ** 

6 ** 


5 ' 

6 * 




fi 


Alldav 




H .. 




<< 
«4 


165 
232 


150 
150 


ieo 

160 


145 
120 


9 
9 


8 
8 


3 or 4 
3 


3 or 4 
3 


6 " 
6 " 


6 ' 

7 * 




fi 


All day 




« .. 


<( 


612 


160 
150 


160 
150 


210 
50 


29 
9 


29 

9 


•3 

lor 2 


3 

lor 2 


6 " 
6 " 


6 * 
6 * 




C 


Ail dky i 


162 




« 


11 


261 


150 




75 


12 


11 


15 


15 


2 " 


5 ' 




fr " i 


It 


200 


150 


iso 


100 


11 


11 


3 


3 


6 " 


6 ' 




» " 1 


tt 


211 


150 


450 


95 


4 


4 1 4 or 5, 4 or 5 


3 " 


7 * 




a ... : 


t< 


180 


a50 


150 


60 


9 


9 2 i 2 


2 ** 


6 ' 




B .. . " 


tt 


109 


150 


150 


80 


5 


6 ! 3 or 4i 3 or 4 


5 " 


6 • 




8 3: " 


tt 


199 


150 


150 


70 


7 


7 ; 4 i 4 


6 «' 


7 * 




A 


tt 


166 


150 


150 


125 


10 


10 2 or 3 2 or 3 5 " 


6 ' 




» I 


i( 


tt 


3O0 


150 


150 


105 


30 


20 1 2 2 


6 *' 


8 • 




16 . 


1 


10,873 


18,850 


$8,327 


$6,075 


.... 


• ' 



310 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. IJ 



Students Admitted, Session 1905-06. 

Male 45 

Female 125 

Total 170 



APPENDIX P.— HIGH SCHOOL CADET CORPS, 1905. 



Name of School. 



Arthar 

Barrie 

Brantford , 

Brockville 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Dand£^ 

Gait 

Groderich 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Ingersoll 

Lindsay 

London 

Morriflbuiig 

^ount Forest 

Napanee 

Newmarket 

Niagara Falls 

Orillia 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound 

Peterborough 

Ridgetown 

St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Seaforth 

Strathroy 

Toronto : 

Harbord 

Jameson 

Jarvis 

Public Schools, Toronto 

Jessie Ketchum 

Dufferin 

. Ryerson 

Givens Street 

Wellesley Street 

Parkdale 

Uxbridge 

Vankleek Hill 

Woodstock 

Total 



Ea 

8""* . 

|8S1l 



Drill. 



42 
39 
47 
30 
44 
27 
28 
42 
40 
53 
40 
41 
39 
35 
39 
38 
43 
31 
31 
40 
50 
50 
44 
41 
37 
57 
44 
43 
42 

48 
38 
46 

52 
50 
50 
45 
53 

50 

40 
41 
43 



1733 
41 Corps 



Very good 

Good 

Very good 
Very good 

Good 

Good 

Very good 

Good 

Very good 
Very good 
Very good 
Excellent. 
Very good 
Very good 

Good 

Excellent. 
Very good 

Good 

Good 

Very good 
Very good 
Very good 

Good 

Good 

Very good 
Excellent. 

Good 

Very good 
Very good 

Excellent. 
Very good 
Very good 

Good 

Good 

Fair 

Fair 

Excellent. 

Good 



Good 

Godd 

Excellent. 



Remarks of Militia GIB 
cere on the Efficiencv 
of the GorpH. 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
, Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
SatisfactorV 
Very satisfactoiy 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Very satisf actoiy 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 

Very satisfactov^ 

Satisfactory 

Satisfa^jtory 

Satis&ctory 

Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 

Satisfectory 
fNot satisfactorr a^ | 
-jgards the condition 
(the arms 

Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 



190S 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



311 



Beck Shield Competition, 1905. 

Colonel J. Peters, D. 0. C, Military District No. 1, reported as follows : 
The following is the list of the scores made by the various High Schools and 
Collegiate Institutes in the shooting competition for the shield presented, by the 
Hon Adam Beck : 

Score. Average %. 

St. Thomas 160 80 

Seaforth 143 71 .5 

• Sarnia 130 65 * 

Strathrov 13a 65 

London ". 113 66 . 5 

Ingersoll 120 ' 60 

Mt Forest 118 59 

Arthur 118 59 

Gait 102 51 

Ridgetown 98 49 

Qoderich and Guelph were entered in the competition, but did not shoot. 
Sergt Rappel,of the St. Thomas Collegiate Institute Cadets, won the $10.00 
prixe donated by Mr. Beck for the highest individual score. 



APPENDIX Q.^SUPERANNUATED TEACHERS. 

(Continued from Report of 1904). 

* 1. Allowances Granted during 1905. 



"53 



Name. 



Age. 



Post office. 



Years 

of 
Service. 



Allow- 
ance. 



1139 
1110 

1141 
1142 
1143 
1144 
1145 
1146 
1147 



Bckert, William D 

Lodlow, John 

Heydon, William H 

Telfer, John 

Ward, Henry 

Waterson, John A 

BofiB, John 

Hicks, David 

Stuart, William 

tWightman, Greorge Easton . 



71 
49 
59 
60 
60 
60 
70 
63 
55 
66 



London 

Centre Augusta 
Charlemont . . . . 

Newbury 

Thomhill 

Kemptville 

Hamilton 

Woodbridge . . . 

Aldershott 

Essex 



54^ 

28 

25 

10 

32 

23^ 

47 

26i 

^5 



$ c. 
379 50 
168 00 
150 00 

65 50 
224 00 
164 50 
329 00 
a85 50 
245 00 
248 50 



2. Summary for Years 1882-1905. 



Tear. 



1897 

m. 
m 



Number of 
teachers 
on list. 



422 
454 
456 
424 
407 
898 
392 
388 



Expenditure 
for the year. 



$ c. 
51,000 00 
58,295 33 
63,750 00 
62,800 33 
64,244 92 
63,267 43 
64,259 75 
62,663 65 



Gross 
contributions 
to the fund. 



$ c. 

13,501 08 

1389 00 

1,313 50 

847 00 

1,073 50 

996 00 

934 75 

545 00 



Amount 

refunded to 

teachers. 



$ c. 

3,660 10 
3,815 80 

786 86 
620 27 
722 78 
470 25 
987 48 
940 15 



^ teachers' subecriptions were withdrawn from the fund during 1906. 
*^ the sum of $4 ia deducted from each Superannuated Teacher's allowance, as subscription 
& the fond, the payments were $4 less in each case than given in this list. 
tAlbwanoe conimencee with 1906. 



312 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX R. 
ANNUAL REPORT OF SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL SCIENCE. 
To the Hon. R A, Pyne, M.D., LL.D,, M.P.P., Minister of Education. 

Sir : — I have the honour to submit the animal report of the School of Prac- 
tical Science for the year 1905. 

The calendar year not being conterminous with the academic "year, this 
report will cover the second term of the academic year, 1904-05 and the first 
term of the academic year, 1905-06, except when otherwise stated. 

The number of students in attendance was an follows: 



In the Regular Departments. 



I Year. 
II Year 

III Year . 

IV Year. 
Occasional 



2nd Term 
Session 1904-05 



201 

137 

75 

47 

3 



I Ist Term 
Session 19054)6. 



159 

108 

35 





463 



538 



Students of the Faculty of Arts taking instruction in Applied Chemistry, 
Assaying, Surveying and Drawing, 14 

The fees for the academic year, 1904-05, were $33,758. 

Of the above amount $2,783 were paid to the Bursar of the University of 
Toronto for instruction in Mathematics and Biology, under the authority of an 
Order-in-Council, dated Feb. 3rd, 1905; $1,638.40 to the Examiners of the 
School for the Session 1904-05, under the authority of an Order-in-Council, 
dated Feb. 3rd. 1899, and the remainder, $29,336.60, to the Honorable the 
Provincial Treasurer. 

The number of regular students who presented themselves for examination 
at the annual examinations of the academic year 1904-05 was four hundred and 
eight. Of these three hundred and twenty-one psussed. 

The number of candidates who graduated was fifty-three. The total 
number of graduates to date is five hundred and twenty-three. 

The following statement shows the geographical distribution of the 
graduates now living : 



* 


Number, 


Percentage. 


Canada 


386 

111 

11 


76 


United States 


22 


Other countries 


2 








508 


100 



05 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 313 



The Dumber of graduates who proceeded to the degree of B.A.Sc. at the 
liversity examinations of 1905 was forty-seven. The total number of gradu- 
3 who have received the degree of B.A.Sc. is one hundred and eighty-six. 

Eifjhteen graduates have received the degree of C.E., two the degree of MLE. 
lining Engineer), four the degree of M.E. (Mechanical Engineer), and three 
e degree of RK.in the University of Toronto. 

The regular departments of instruction are : 

1. Civil Engineering. 

2. Mining Engineering. 

3. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. 

4. Architecture. 

5. Analytical and Applied Chemistry. 

6. Chemical Engineering. 



GENERAL. 

Statistics of Cost, Attendance, etc., for Session 1904-05. 

fkres and Maintenance $69,058 84 

^Paid into Provincial Treasury 29,336 60 

innnaal cost to Province 39,717 24 

m of Teaching Staff 33,259 00 

■ber of Students 482 

nber of Instructors 35 

>K per Student $ 82 00 

bije Salary of Instructor 950 00 

N Expenditure on Buildings and Equipment from 1877 to end 

yf 1905 621,795 00 

The salaries of the professors and lecturers are too small ; they should not 
'fess than those paid in the Faculty of Arts. 

Tde number of instructors in the higher grades should be increased. The' 
ik of instruction is suffering on account of the large number of students in 
JT of the classes. In large classes the attention of students is easily diverted 
I the lecturer is subjected to undue nervous strain. The remedy is sub- 
i^on of the classes and additions to the number of professors and lecturers. 

Chemistry avd Mining Building. 

^ork has been carried on during the whole of the present session (1905-06) 
k Chemistry and Mining building. The equipment of the Milling laboratory 
1 yet fully installed. 

Owing to various causes the ventilation system of this building is not yet 
Irking order. 

Enginep.rin^ Building. 

11 the space vacated in this building by the removal of certain departments 
\ Chemistry and Mining building has been taken up by the extension of 
maining departments. 

I fED. 11.) 



314 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



/•y^ure Exienaions, 

Within the last ten years the number of students in attendance has 
increased five-fold. Within the last four years the number has doubled. The 
attendance for the session 1905*06 is 53t. The gradual increase of the work in 
each department will soon render it necessary to replace the present three yean 
coui^se by a four years' coarse. The effect of this on the attendance may best be 
shown Dy comparing the present attendance (1905-06) with an estimate of the 
attendance if the three years' course were replaced by a four years* course. The 
present attendance is as follows : First year, 235 ; Second year, 159 ; Third yesr, 
108 ; Post-Qraduate year, 36 ; total, 538. If a four years' course were in exist- 
ence the attendance would probably be: First year, 235; Second year, 159; 
Third year, 108; Fourth year, 95 ; Post-Qraduate year, 40; total, 637. The 
effect of the change would be to force the majority of the third year men to 
return for their fourth year. At present no such compulsion exists, as the fourth 
year is post-graduate and purely optional. 

With the present building accommodation it is impossible to carry on a 
four years' course. The work in the fourth year at present is greatly in- 
commoded on account of want of space and in all the years the classes are too 
large. 

For these reasons new buildings should be provided without delay. On 
account of steam, heat, noise, vibration, dirt, etc., it is advisable that separate 
buildings be erected for certain classes of work. All the buildings should be 
near each other and should be heated and lighted from a central station. 

In the design of the buildings provision should be made for the probable 
increase in the number of students, and in the subjects of study, the estimate 
covering at least the next ten years. 

The buildings to be erected are the following six, viz. : 

1. Electrical Engineering. 

2. Thermodynamics and Hydraulics. 

3. Central Station. 

4. Strength of Materials, Machine Shop. 

5. Cement, brick, stone, etc., tests. 

6. Surveying, Architecture, Drawing, etc. 

The buildings 1, 2, 3. should be erected with as little delay as possible. 
The site of the present engineering building could then be utilized for part of 
the space required for the buildings 4, 5, 6. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. QALBRAITH, 

PrincvpaL 
Toronto, February, 1906. 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



315 



APPENDIX &— REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO. 

I His Honor the Hon. Wiluam Mobtimer Clark, 

Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario. 
IT IT PLEASE Your Honor: 

I have the honor to submit the following report 
r the year ended June 30tb, 1905: 

The Teaching Staffs 

The following is a tabular statement of the numbers engaged in teaching 
tring the year in the faculties named. These numbers include the Arts staffs 
University College, Victoria College, and Trinity College: 





Arts. 


Medicine. 


Applied 
Science. 


nkmih and Aflsociate Prof eBSOTB 


55 
26 
39 


44 
12 
40 


T 


ssrer? and Demonstrators 


9* 


tn^tarii and other AflRistantfi 


11 






" 


120 


96 


27 



SrunxMTB IN Abtb, Mbdiciks and Applied Scisncb. 

ArU. 

(1) B. A. Course: 

Begnlju' 1010 

Oooisional 144 

Graduate 35 

(2) Ph.D. Coarse 20 

Medicine, 



1209 



Regular ... 
iJccasional. 



622 
30 



Applied Science. 



Regnkr 478 

Occasional 5 



Students nr Affiliated Gollboes. 

Ontario Agricultoral College : Regular Students 785 

Boyal Golieee of Dental Sorgeons 143 

<hitario College of Pharmacy 140 

Toronto Coniaervatory of Music (proceeding to the degree of Mus. 

Bac.) 4 

Haoiilton Conservatory of Music ( proceeding to the degree of 

Mus. Bac) 2 



652 



48$ 



1074 

8418 



316 THE REPORT OF THE No. 



Candidates Examined. 

Arte 1332 

Ph.D 1 

Medicine 678 

Law 30 

Applied Science and Engineering 455 

Pedagogy 3 

Agriculture 30 

Dentistry 107 

Pharmacy 50 

Music ^ 484 

Physical Training 2 

Household Science 16 

Commercial Course 3 

3189 

Degrees Conferred. 

LL.D. (Hon.) 7 

Ph.D X 

MA 58 

B.A 183 

M.D. (Hon.) 1 

M.D 3 

M.B 115 

M.D., CM : 57 

LL.B 13 

D.C.L 3 

B.C.L 3 

D.D.S 62 

B.A.Sc 42 

M.E 1 

E.E 1 

B.S.A 30 

Phm.B 46 

625 



Diplomas and Certificates. 

Engineering 46 

Local Examinations in Music 390 

Licentiate in Music 2 

Physical Culture 2 



Researcb Work. 



439 



In several of my previous reports I have emphasized the importance d 
search ; and I am gratified to report that in this respect considerable progd 
being made both in the numbers of students and in the character of the i 
done. In order, however, to complete the organization of such work it is, i 
opinion, indispensable that ^the scheme should be extended without delay- 
to include the remaining Arts departments, viz. : Classics, Modern Langij 
and History. It would be desirable also, in my opinion, to encourage stu! 
in the prosecution of research, by offering scholarships or fellowships, as i 
practice in the leading universities of the United States. 

A list of publications by members of the various faculties or by advj 
students will be found in the Appendix. 

For report of the general Editor of the " University of Toronto Studies 
Addendum K. 



1905 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 317 



Special University Lectures. 

The usual course of Saturday popular lectures was delivered in January 
and February by Dr. W. H. Drumraond, Rev. E. A. Wicher,' Dr. James 
Fletcher, Right Kev. P. T. Rowe, Mr. Clyde Fitch, Dr. A. H. Abbott and Pro- 
fessor A B. Macallum. 

The Library. 

from the report of the Librarian, which is appended, it will be seen that 
the total accumulation of books in the Library since the destruction of the 
former Library by fire in 1890, now amounts to 80,937 and upwards of 21,000 
pamphlets. The number of volumes added during the year was 8.292, of which 
103 were presented to the Library. I desire to repeat here what I stated in my 
yi report with regard to an increase in the annual appropriation for the pur- 
diase of books, and to point out further that increased accommodation both in 
the reading-room and the stack-room has now become a necessity and cannot 
much longer be delayed. 

I 
New Buildings. 

The building for Applied Chemistry, Mineralogy, Geology and Mining, the 
erection of which was begun in 1902, heis been completed since the date of my 
bt report, and the departments mentioned are tiow installed therein. 

Daring the session 1904-5 a building known as Queen's Hall was opened 
BE residence for the women students of University College. The success of 
the residence was so immediate and so marked that steps were taken during 
the sommer for the erection of a considerable addition, which at the date of 
■riting has already been completed and occupied. It contains thirty-nine rooms 
hr students, a large dining-hall, and the necessary bath-rooms, kitchens, and 
itter accommodation. The cost, exclusive of furnishing, was $28,000. 

Satisfactory financial arrangements having been completed for the erection 
)f the new Convocation Hall, work on the building was begun in August of 1905, 
lad at the time of writing the walls are almost completed and the steel frame 
'the roof has been placed in position. This hall will accommodate about 2,000 
IGSODS, and its cost is estimated at SI 60,000. 

Plans for a new buildking for the use of the department of Physics are in 
wr<e of preparation and are at present almost completed. It is expected that 
ke building will be ready for occupation at the begfinning of 1907. In general 
tnit will resemble the new Medical Building. Two large lecture-rooms for 
iperimental lectures constitute a special feature. It will