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Full text of "Seventeenth Annual Report of The National Farm School November, 1914"

SEVENTEENTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF 

The National 
Farm School 

FARM SCHOOL BUCKS COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA 



NOVEMBER, 1914 




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H 
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Officers of the National Farm School 

1914—1915 



President 

JOSEPH KRAITSKOPF 

4715 Pulaski Avenue, Germantown. 

Vice-President Treasurer 

HARRY B. HIRSH ISAAC H. SILVERMAN 

Executive Secretary 
A. H. FROMENSON 
407 Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia. 

LOCAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, President. HARRY B. HIRSH, Vice-President. 

I. H. SILVERMAN, Treasurer. A. H. FROMENSON, Executive Secretary. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

(Having served consecutively for ten years) 

ADOLPH EICHHOLZ I. H. SILVERMAN S. GRABFELDER 

ABRAHAM ISRAEL MORRIS A. KAUFMANN ARNOLD KOHN 

HOWARD A. LOEB SIMON FRIEDBERGER 

ELECTED TRUSTEES 

(Term Expires 1915) (Term Expires 1916) (Term Expires 1917) 

HART BLUMENTHAL ALBERT J. BAMBERGER HERBERT D. ALLMAN 

HORACE HANO W. ATLEE BURPEE HARRY B. HIRSH 

ALFRED M. KLEIN HARRY FELIX LEON MERZ 

ISAAC LANDMAN DANIEL GIMBEL LOUIS NUSBAUM 

BERNARD SELIG JOS. N. SNELLENBI'RG GEORGE WHEELER 

NATIONAL AUXILIARY BOARD 

LOUIS I. AARON Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DANIEL ALEXANDER Salt Lake City, Utah 

Mrs. JULIUS ANDREWS Boston, Mass. 

HENRY BEER New Orleans. La. 

I. W. BERNHEIM Louisville, Ky. 

HARRY CUTLER Providence, R. I. 

NATHAiN ECKSTEIN Seattle, Wash. 

HENRi FRANK Natchez, Miss. 

MAURICE FREIBERG Cincinnati, Ohio 

BERNARD GINSBURG Detroit, Mich. 

A. HIRSHHEIMER LaCrosse, Wis. 

ADOLPH LEWISOHN New York City 

JACOB M. LOEB Chicago. 111. 

LOUIS NEWBERGER Indianapolis. Ind. 

J. E. OPPENHEIMER Butte, Mont. 

E. RAAB Ri : hmond, Va. 

ED^V. E. RICHARD Mobile, Ala. 

ALEX. SANGER Dallas, Tex. 

LOUIS SCHLESINGER Newark, N. J. 

SIG. SICHEL Portland, Ore. 

SIGMUND SONNEBORN Baltimore. Md. 

DAVID STERNBERG Memphis, Tenn. 

MORRIS WEIL Lincoln, Neb. 

HARRIS WEINSTOCK Sacramento, Cal. 



THE FACULTY 



Joseph Krauskopf, D. D., President. 

John Hosea Washburn, Ph. D. (Gottingen), 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, Director 
William H. Bishop, B. Sc. (Mass. Agricultural College), 

Professor of Agricultv/re, Superintendent of the Farms 
Walter F. Fancourt (Kew Botanical Gardens, England), 

Professor of Horticulture 
P. H. Prouty, B. S. (Mass. Agricultural College), 

Instructor in Physics and Mathematics 
George Eaton, Jr., Assistant Professor in Agriculture 
Mrs. Charles Nightingale, Instructor in English 
Lydia Prichett Borden, Instructor in Biology and Natural Science 
Wesley Massinger, V. S., Professor of Veterinary Science and Farm Hygiene 
Miss Hetty Abraham, Matron 
Mrs. Josephine Loeb, Assistant Matron 
Harman Kraft, Foreman, Home Farm 
Howard F. Young, Foreman, Schoenfeld Farm No. 3 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Finance Committee Supply Committee 

Harry B. Hirsh, Chairman Hart Blumenthal, Chairman 

Herbert D. Allman Adolph Eichholz Adolph Eichholz Harrj' B. Hi,rsh 

Budget Committee House Committee 

Alfred M. Klein, Chairman Leon Merz, Chairman 

Hart Blumenthal Harry B. Hirsh Jos. N. Snellenburg Howard A. Loeb 

Leon Merz Bernard Selig 

Harry Felix Horace Hano Property Committee 

Committee on Curriculum BERNARD Selig, Chairman 

Louis NusBAUM, Chairman ^- ^- Bamberger Simon Friedberger 

■^- ^^; "^^^/r^'^-J^r- T WH Bishop Graduates Committee 

Alfred M. Klein Isaac Landman ^ „, . 

George Wheeler ISAAC LANDMAN, Chairman 

Hart Blumenthal Harry B. Hirsh 

Admission Committee 

Morris A. Kaufmann, Chairman Farm Products 

Isaac Landman Bernard Selig Daniel Gimbel, Clmirman 

J. H. Washburn Alfred M. Klein Harry Felix Samuel Grabfelder 

Committee on Schoenfeld Farms 

Harry Felix, Chairman 

Leon Merz Daniel Gimbel 

LADIES' EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOCAL BOAED 

Mrs. E. B. Schoneman, Chairman Mrs. Jos. Guckenheimer, Treasurer 

Mrs. Harold C. Krauskopf, Secretary 

Mrs. A. J. Bamberger Mrs. Adolph Eichholz Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf 

Mrs. Isadore Baum Mrs. Martha Fleisher Mrs. M. F. Langfeld 

Mrs. Max Berg Mrs. Simon Friedberger Mrs. Henry Rosenthal 

Mrs. David Berlizheimer Mrs. Harry B. Hirsh Mrs. Mever Schamberg 

Mrs. Hart Blumenthal Miss Frieda Jonas Mrs. I. H. Silverman 

Mrs. B. B. Bloch Mrs. David Kir.schbaum Mrs. Meyer Syole 

Mrs. C. Davidson Mrs. A. ]M. Klein 

Honorary' Surgeon to the School, Sidney L. Olsho, M. D., 

220 S. neth St:, Phila. 
Honorary Dentist to the School, L. I. Bernstein, D. D. S., 

1901 N. .32d St.. Phila. 
Honorary Oculist to the School, J. Chas. Knipe, M. D., 2035 Chestnut St.. Phila. 
Accountant to the School, Alfred M. Gross, 406 Mutual Life Building, Phila. 



*THE NEW EXODUS— AND AFTER" 

Address by Rabbi Jos. Krauskopf, D. D. 
President and Founder of The National Farm School 

AT FARM SCHOOL, PA., OCTOBER 18, 1914 

An institution like The National Farm School, which is today 
celebrating its seventeenth anniversary, has not had the time to 
make history. Yet, short as has been the period of our existence, 
our years have been crowded with troubles and joys. Our joys are 
beginning now, but, in the years now happily gone, there were trou- 
bles enough, some of them disheartening to the point of deep dis- 
tress. Our undertaking was new. Few realized its value. The 
prophets of failure were many. And they not merely prophesied 
disaster, but also made their dire prophesies real by refusing their 
own aid and encouragement, and by discouraging others from 
coming to our support. Many a month's end found The National 
Farm School with empty treasury, yet with debts that had to be 
met from private purse. 

There were misrepresentations that could not be explained 
away, because those who made them stubbornly closed their eyes 
to all proofs to the contrary. The misrepresentations gained wide 
currency, and no words of ours, either by pen or mouth, could over- 
take them. 

We were charged with wasting the small pittance that we man- 
aged to scrape together for the launching and maintenance of the 
institution : 

(1) By trying to teach Jewish boys a trade for ivhich they 
were totally unfitted by nature. 

In vain our reply that Jews were farmers at the very begin- 
ning of their history; that when they lived a national life, in an- 
cient Palestine, they were an agricultural people; that it was only 
when they were driven from the soil by overwhelming Roman 
armies, their lives restricted to the meanest vocations by the cruel 
laws of the countries in which they sought refuge, that there began 
that abnormal transformation into city-dwellers of a people whose 
everv tradition, whose every custom and every instinct, were at 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



one time redolent with the aroma of field and orchard, of hill and 
dale. 

(2) We were charged with duplicating already existing insti- 
tutions. 

In vain, for a time, our answer, corroborated by National and 
State authorities, that The National Farm School is one of the few 
institutions of its kind in this country, if not throughout the world 
where young men, for the most part foreign-born or sons of foreign- 
ers, hailing largely from our congested cities, possessing little more 
than a grammar school education, if as much as that, many of them 
insufficiently acquainted with the English tongue, are none the less 
thoroughly grounded in our institution in practical and scientific 
agriculture, and equipped for successful careers in that most use- 
ful sphere of human endeavor. 

(3) We were charged with extravagance in the operation of 
our institution; that we were lavishing too much money on our 
students. 

To this our answer was, and is contained, in the testimony of 
the exacting Auditors of the State of Pennsylvania; in the careful 
analysis of all of our expenditures, and of our possessions in farms,^ 
live stock, implements, buildings, an endowment fund, all to the 
amount of one-quarter of a million dollars. This analysis wdll be 
embodied in our Year Book, showing how every cent of our funds 
is spent, showing that we educate, board, lodge and clothe our 
students, free of all charge to them, and at a cost to us of about 
one dollar per day per student, a cost analysis such as few institu- 
tions have the courage to make public, and which has won praise 
for us from charity federations and philanthropy experts. 

Our answer is in the spartan simplicity of our entire plant, in 
our overcrowded dormitories, in the woefully inadequate kitchen 
and dining hall, originally designed for but 25 students, and now 
compelled to provide for 100 permanent students. Let those who 
doubt come here when they will, and see for themselves. The tes- 
timony of their own observation will be the most convincing answer. 

Our answer, furthermore, is in the scrupulous watchfulness of 
our Board of Directors and Ladies' Auxiliary Board, and in the 
devotion of our salaried officers. To cite one instance, our Execu- 
tive Secretary volunteers his resignation for fear that in these 
troublous times he would be a financial burden instead of a finan- 
cial help to us. 



TlIK NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



But there were joys, too, sufficient to compensate for all we 
had to endure. 

We had the joy of the gradual growth and the gathering around 
us of those who saw the work eye to eye with us, who believed in 
it, and who gave us the strength to continue our efforts; the lamented 
Max Schoenfcld, of Rorschach, Switzerland, who added three farms 
to the one on which we made our modest beginning; that saintly 
woman of blessed memory, Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank, of Balti- 
more, whose contribution to our Endowment Fund annually defrays 
the cost of two students at the School; Mr. Jacob H. Schiff, of 
New York; Mr. Nathan Snellenburg, of our city; Mr. Louis Aaron, 
of Pittsburg, and many more. The generous State of Pennsylvania, 
too, has come to our aid by erecting for us a small dormitory, and 
by making an annual grant of money towards the support of 
Pennsylvania students, irrespective of creed, for it must be dis- 
tinctly remembered that ours is a non-sectarian institution. 

We have the joy of the success of our graduates. Eighty-three 
per cent, are in agricultural pursuits, 30 of them working their own 
farms ; some of our graduates are at the heads of other agricultural 
schools carrying our work beyond our boundaries to thousands whom 
we could not otherwise reach. Some have been called into the ser- 
vice of our beloved country to teach the American farmer better 
methods for obtaining more bountiful harvests. Some have ob- 
tained important positions as managers of agricultural estates. 
Some are specializing in dairying and greenhouse work; others in 
fruit and stock raising; others are veterinary surgeons and land- 
scape gardeners. We do not include in this figure the very large 
number who have taken but a partial course of studies at our 
school ; many of whom have likewise made a signal success of their 
calling. Our figure — 83 per cent. — represents the graduates who 
have made use in full measure of the training they received at The 
National Farm School. What is the percentage of those who grad- 
uate from various professional schools throughout the country and 
who follow that vocation for which they receive training? We 
doubt whether any other school, of even the highest rank, and train- 
ing men for the so-called higher pursuits, can show a better per- 
centage. The students who stay but a short while do not enter 
into our calculation of achievements, though they add materially 
to our expense. With 100 permanent students, w^e had 37 addi- 
tional this year, who came to us, mainly, to get some rudimentary 
knowledge of agriculture which they might immediately utilize, and 



THE XATIONAL FAKM SCIIOOh 



others, with whom we were obliged to part, owing to their lack of 
the qualities necessary for the successful pursuit of agriculture. 

AVe have the joy of witnessing the spread of the "Back to the 
Soil" propaganda, in which we were among the pioneers. Through- 
out this broad land men are turning their thoughts and their vision 
away from the city and toward the country, from office and count- 
ing room and factory and store, from all the artificialities and 
shams of modernism to the fields and their simplicity and truth. 

In consequence, we are now confronted with a much larger 
waiting list of eager, ambitious 3"oung men than we can possibly 
admit. With our present facilities our student-roll far exceeds our 
capacity. We feel that the work done here is so great, so tremen- 
dously important, that we have the right to appeal for aid to all 
who are alive to the significance of our enterprise and to its bear- 
ing on the future. Not to aid The National Farm School, but the 
nearly 300 young men w^ho are clamoring for admission, and the 
hundreds, yes, thousands, more who are to knock at our doors in 
the years to come. 

IT IS NOT AN INSTITUTION— IT IS A CAUSE THAT 
MAKES THIS APPEAL, THAT CALLS FOR YOUR CO-OPER- 
ATION, FOR YOUR SUPPORT. 

W^e have the joy of seeing a colonj^ of Jews fleeing from the 
ghettoes of New York and Philadelphia to the desolate prairie of 
Utah, and there, under the efficient guidance of graduates of The 
National Farm School, vindicating our contention that, given the 
opportunity, given the proper leadership and instruction, the Jew 
can and will be a successful farmer. Clarion (significant name 
for a Jewish agricultural colony in America) has passed beyond the 
experimental stage. Our graduates, the early tutors of the pioneers, 
have been able to leave the colony to work out its own destiny, 
while they advance themselves, according to their own bent, in their 
chosen career. Only a few days ago my heart was gladdened by 
word from an impartial and constant observer that each one of the 
52 Jewish families at Clarion is self-sustaining and beginning to 
meet his obligations to the generous State w^hich is dealing so lib- 
erally with them. I cannot refrain at this time from expressing 
my gratitude to the w'hole administration of the State of Utah for 
the hospitality shown to these refugees from the American Mizraim, 
and to the presidency of the Mormon Church for its unsolicited 
gift of $500 to the colony towards its synagogue fund, and to the 



TLIK NAT ION AT. FAEM SCHOOL 



Jews of Salt Lake City who are directing the Utah Colonization 
Fund. 

But the greatest joy of all we experience today, when we may 
recount what has been accomplished during the year of my absence 
from this country, when, for the most of the time, I was as far 
removed from the institution as the other side of the globe. 

Too often have our detractors or doubters said that The 
National Farm School is a one-man institution. Just as often has 
it been said that it was maintained out of regard for him, and. that 
his departure from earth would sound the death-knell of the in- 
stitution. 

And what is the testimony of this past year, during which I 
could do hardly anj^thing for the institution? 

That it w^as the most prosperous in the history of The National 
Farm School, witnessing a reduction in its deficit, important 
improvements in its buildings, the largest sale of its farm 
products, the largest student roll in its history. One of the hap- 
piest days I have ever experienced, one that will long remain among 
my most joyous memories, is the day I visited the school for the 
first time after my return, and feasted my homesick eyes on the 
marked improvements that had been made. My heartfelt thanks 
are due to the officers, the Board members, and the faculty who 
made this happiness possible for me. 

The past year has proved, beyond all question, that its Presi- 
dent may pass away, and also the present Board, but The National 
Farm School will survive, must survive, because it is one of the 
most needed institutions in the realm of constructive philanthropy. 
Yea, hospitals and asylums, colleges and even churches, all of these 
may disappear, but an institution like this will and must remain. 
As long as human feet tread this earth, so long will there be human 
bodies to feed, and so long as food shall be a necessity, so long will 
an institution like this which teaches man how" to draw upon the 
sources of nature for his sustenance be a necessity. He who be- 
lieves that no skill, no knowledge, but mere brute energy is all that 
one needs to draw from the soil its rich harvests is ignorant of the 
very rudiments of agricultural science and of the problem of feed- 
ing the masses. 

Greatly as The National Farm School was needed in the past, 
yet far greater wall be the need for it in the near future. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



One of the results of the present war, which is wrecking a con- 
tinent, will be the great impoverishment of the nations. This wil' 
be attended by a decrease of the luxuries, which in its train will 
bring about the decline of industrialism. The decline of industrial- 
ism will lead, yea, force the people "Back to the Soil." And when 
the people go "Back to the Soil" those will best succeed who have 
been trained in the "science and practice of agriculture." And they 
who have gained this "science and practice," as it was and will be 
imparted to them at The National Farm School, will need it and 
use it even more for others than for themselves. 

We are on the verge of the largest immigration in the. history 
of our people. From war-riven Europe they will flock hither by 
the hundreds upon hundreds of thousands as soon as the avenue? 
of escape are opened. When they come here what will w^e do with 
them? Shall we repeat the colossal blunder of the early 80's? 

To make even the most serious mistake once is unfortunate, 
but pardonable. To make the same serious mistake twice would 
be a crime. 

When the first refugee rush overwhelmed the small American 
Jewish community, there w^ere few who knew how to grapple 
with the situation, and our resources were even less than our knowl- 
edge. We know the consequences of that mad rush from the 
pogroms in Darkest Russia. Today the American Jewish com- 
munity is armed with knowledge and resources. It has ample 
warning of what is impending. 

What is our plan of action? 

Are we to permit greater congestion than alreadj^ exists in the 
tenement-house districts of all our large cities? 

Are we to double and treble our relief institutions? 

Are we to build dozens more of tuberculosis sanatoria? 

Are we to increase the number of reformatories? 

OR ARE WE TO PROFIT BY THE LESSON OF THIRTY 
YEARS AGO, AND LEAD OUR PEOPLE TO THAT VOCA- 
TION FROM WHICH THEY HAVE ALL TOO LONG BEEN 
BARRED? SHOULD WE NOT NOW BEGIN TO TAKE 
THOSE MEASURES WHICH WILL LEAD OUR PEOPLE 
"BACK TO THE SOIL?" 

The present war rages fiercest in Austrian and German Poland 
— in what someone has called "Jewish country"; — its weight rests 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



heaviest and its havoc makes greatest demands upon the Jews. 
Seven million six hmidred and fiftj' thousand Jews dwell in misery 
where the shock of Russian, Austrian and German arms is greatest 
—6,000,000 in Russia, over 60,000 in the Balkan States. Over 350,000 
are cannon fodder in the Czar's armies. Hundreds of thousands are 
deprived of even those wretched opportunities in trade and industries 
wdiich were not yet denied them three months ago. Hundreds of 
thousands of Jewish women and children have parted with their 
bread-winners — most of them forever — for a cause they do' not 
understand, and w'hich is not theirs. Slaughter, devastation, rapine, 
pillage, ruin — this is today the Jewish lot throughout the whole of 
war-ridden Europe. Aj^e, and even in Palestine, seat of hope for 
so many Jews, where, in ever increasing number, the Jewish agri- 
cultural colonies were flourishing, even there the back-wash of the 
debacle is felt. 

"Whatever the outcome of the war, on whose banner the bird 
of victory may rest at last, the Jew will lose. 

"Well may we say with Rabbi Hillel of old: "Im ain ani li, mi 
li" — If we will not be for ourselves, who will be for us? If we 
will not help ourselves, who will help us? 

In whose fair promises shall we have faith? 

Shall we pin our trust upon Russia? May we accept, at par, 
the promises made now when she stands in sore need of Jewusli 
manhood, of Jewish valor, of Jewish blood? Promises, which, know- 
ing she would not keep, she was too shame-faced to make in 
definite terms and through authoritative sources. What valuation 
can we set upon the left-handed promises of that despotism which 
broke its publich'-made promises at The Hague to submit to it 
for arbitration its international quarrels, which broke its promise 
of free speech to its own Douma and prohibited it from granting 
the least relief to its Jews, which violated the pledges of larger 
liberties which it made to Jewish battle-scarred soldiers at the close 
of the Japanese war? Can we hope for any alleviation of condi- 
tions in a land which has given to the world the names Kishineff, 
Gomel, Siedlice? What are we to expect from a despotism which 
tortures an innocent B e il i s in a vain effort to prove true the 
monstrous falsehood of the blood accusation? 

Optimistic and special pleaders have had much to say recently 
about the benign influence that England will exert over her ally in 
the Jews' behalf. Much as we should like to believe this, we fear 



in THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

that here, again, the wish is father to the thought. Just prior to 
the outbreak of the war, a consistent anti-semitic canipaign was 
being waged in the famous "Thunderer" The London Times, which 
made hibored arguments to justify Russia's anti-Jewish policy. The 
efforts of public-spirited men, Jews and non-Jews, to have Great 
Britain take the same attitude on the passport question as was 
taken by our noble republic, were opposed by Sir Edward Grey. 
England has one of the most drastic immigration restriction laws 
that has ever been written into the statutes of any civilized country. 

Will England influence Russia, or w^ill Russia influence England? 
I am reminded of the scion of a German-Jewish family, whose 
speech was tinged by a decided Yiddish accent. The father, des- 
pairing over his son's "Jargon" sent him off to a village where 
was not a single Jew, there to acquire a perfect German accent 
About a year later, the father went to visit his son, and as he 
entered the village and spoke to the natives he was horrified to 
discover that they all "jargoned." The lad's personality was 
stronger than that of the simple peasants', and had impressed itself 
on them. May not England's association with Russia in the 
realm of "Welt-politik" cause it finalty to assume toward the Jews 
the "speech" of Russia? 

We need not discuss the attitude of the other nations. We 
know that Germany is the birthplace of "philosophic" anti-semitism ; 
that Austro-Hungary, shamming liberality, boycotts many of its 
Jews to the point of starvation. But, after all, six million Jews 
live in Russia, and the bulk of the impending immigration will 
be from Russia. 

This must be clear to all by now — that, as soon as the walls of 
steel are down, the rush will begin. We must be prepared to deal 
with the situation. We must prepare for it now, while we still 
have the time. 

If we permit an even larger congestion than that with which 
our large cities are now afflicted, the restrictionists, who are eager 
to slam the doors of this country in the faces of the millions who 
want to make this wonderful countr}^ their home and the home of 
their children and children's children, will prevail. If that dreadful 
calamity befalls, we shall have only ourselves to blame, because in 
the moment of opportunity we lamentably failed. 

The Jew is wanted here. Nay, more, he is needed! And there 
is room for him, not in the big cities, not in the tenement houses, 



THE NATION AL FARM SCHOOL 11 

not in the sweat-shops, but upon the millions of acres sighing for 
human caress, and ready t-o respond richly to human effort. 

There need be no fear that An:erica lacks the room, though we 
are conscious that American cities are already overcrowded. Large 
as our immigration has been in recent years, so vast is our country 
and so sparse our population that, were as large a number as was 
admitted last year to be admitted every year, for the next two 
centuries, even then would the density of our population, per square 
mile, be far below that of European lands at the present day. 

England has 428 people to every scjuare mile. Austria 320, 
Germany 213. — the United States has but 22. AVhile Pennsylvania 
has 140 persons to the square mile, Oregon, "Wyoming, Idaho, and 
Nevada together do not average one person. "Were the United 
States to be settled in anything like the density of European lands, 
it could hold and support a population equal to that of Europe, Asia. 
Africa, and Australia combined. The State of Texas alone is 
larger than the whole of the Austrian or German empire, and while 
Germany is obliged to support a population of 60,000.000, Texas 
with its more than 250,000 square miles, has to provide for but 
3,000,000. Were all the arable land of Texas to be cultivated, its 
harvest would equal the principal crops raised in all the rest of the 
United States. Were all the 250.000.000 acres of idle farm lands in 
the United States to be cultivated, we could feed and clothe and 
shelter the population of all the earth. 

There is, therefore, little danger of our being overcrowded. 
"With all the cry about the millions of immigrants, who of us has 
been crowded out. whose wages are less, whose mode of living poorer. 
in consequence of this immigration? Has the cry for labor in the 
South and West, the cry for farm hands all over the land, the cry 
for domestics in our homes, grown less? Has not the scarcity of 
labor rather increased, because of the opening up of new territories, 
the entering upon new enterprises, the enlarging of old industries, 
all made possible by the large influx of immigrants? 

The terrible plight of our brethren on the war-racked con- 
tinent is beginning to stir us all. Movements are afoot for raising 
tremendous sums of money for the relief of their distress. These 
movements must have our whole-hearted support — every dollar 
raised, no matter how large the sum, will hardly suffice for the 
great need. 

But, we shall be acting in statesman-like manner, we shall rise 
to the heights of our opportunity, only if. side by side with our 



12 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

relief measures, we set apart a separate fund, as large as that for 
relief, to purchase land whereon to establish Jewish agricultural 
colonies — and these colonies maj^ be in Palestine as well as in 
America — and for the training of young Jewish men to take the 
refugees in hand, lead them "Back to the Soil" and guide, direct and 
teach them to become successful agriculturists — as successful as 
were our forefathers. 

This would be the safest, wisest plan of all — a plan redounding 
to the greatest welfare of our people and of all mankind. This is 
the plan for which The National Farm School stands. This the 
great cause to which it is dedicated. Nothing short of the restora- 
tion of the Jew to the soil — nothing short of this great contribution 
to progress, will content us. 



Hence our appeal 



Make it possible for The National Farm School to so expand 
its work, to so increase its facilities, its farm lands, its dormitories, 
its school and farm buildings, that it may go from ''Strength to 
Strength," serving, not hundreds, but thousands, not a limited few, 
but the whole people. 

The National Farm School is eager to be the chief agency of 
American Jewry for the weal of Israel, for the weal of our blessed 
Republic, for the weal of all mankind. 

Friends! Jews of America! The National Farm School is at 
your service. Take it! Utilize it! Strengthen it! Better it! 
Enlarge it! Make it worthy of you, and the work it is doing will 
do for you! 



THE NATIONAL FAKM SCHOOL 13 

REPORT OF THE ACTING PRESIDENT 

1913_1914 

Harry B. Hirsh. 

A year ago today we gathered here to celebrate our Harvest 
Festival. Promment in the exercises on that day was a stirring 
address by our President, just departing for a world pilgrimage, 
entitled "A Light Amid the Encircling Gloom." How prophetic 
were these words in view of the calamitous events now shaking the 
Old World and civilization to its very foundations. A gloom, in- 
deed, thick and impenetrable as a fog has enveloped the lives and 
hopes of millions of our brethren abroad. With saddened hearts 
we celebrate today, and yet there is much cause for rejoicing. We 
welcome back our President, invigorated and rejuvenated. A har- 
vest of harvests has come to crown the efforts of those working in 
and for this School. But a few weeks ago, every tree and plant 
on these grounds bent beneath the weight of luscious fruit and suc- 
culent vegetable. 

In a review of the year's work, there is cause for congratula- 
tion at the splendid progress of The National Farm School. Our 
greatest crop has been that of keen, healthy boys. Every nook and 
cranny of the School is filled with them, and they overflow to Farms 
Nos. 1 and 3. A hundred strong and getting stronger every week. It 
marks a new page in our history. The instruction and care of the 
larger number has necessarily taxed our facilities, faculty and 
finances. Notwithstanding, the production of our farms has at- 
tained a new maximum, as our Director's report will show. Our 
financial condition, as evidenced by our Treasurer's report, has 
also improved, and the upkeep of our buildings and plant has not 
been neglected. Briefly summarized, the cash sales of the year 
from our farms, orchards and nursery has increased from_ $10,500 
in 1913 to $11,262; the foodstuffs supplied to the boarding depart- 
ment from $2,450 to $2,935; the live stock, poultry, etc., over 10 
per cent. Our Endowment Fund has increased from $92,160 to 
$95,507; the deficits in the Main, and Schoenfeld No. 3 Main- 
tenance Funds have both been substantially reduced. This 
has been accomplished through many small donations and a num- 
ber of contributions to our Endowment, Life Membership, and 
Maintenance Funds, all of which we gratefully acknowledge. 

A much needed addition to our chemical laboratory with a 
school room for 50 boys has been built and equipped. A new heat- 
ing plant for that building and the chapel has been installed. In 



14 THE >;AT10XAL FARM SCHOOL 

the mtiin building, the social hall has been converted into a dining 
room. A new hot water heating plant and pantry sinks have been 
installed. A new engine and power washing machine have been 
pro\'ided for our laundry. All of our buildings, including Farm 
House No. 1, have been renovated and painted inside and out. New 
spraying apparatus for our trees, new incubators and house for 
chicken raising, new orchard wagons and other minor equipment 
have been provided. 

Our barns have been placed in the most modern and sanitary 
condition, and a ver}^ flattering commendation of our dairy plant 
plant by the Pennsylvania State Board was recently given to our 
Director. Our lands, forests, live stock, and equipment have been 
kept in a high state of efl&cienc}'. The health and morale of the 
student body has been excellent. The faculty has been augmented 
by Miss Lydia Pritchard Borden, teacher of biology and librarian, 
and Mr. J. L. Malcolm, assistant in agriculture, both of Pennsyl- 
vania. Sorrowfully, we have to add, the year has not been entirely 
one of gain. The death of Barnett Binsw^anger, one of our Directors 
and ardent workers, came early in the year. This great loss to 
our cause was dwelt upon at our June meeting. 

There were a number of interesting gatherings on these grounds 
during the year. Prominent among them was our spring festival 
on June 7th, participated in by a large number of our friends and 
patrons. Addresses bj^ prominent educators, scientists and men of 
affairs made a noteworthy program. One hundred and seven me- 
morial trees were planted and special tributes were paid to Barnett 
Binswanger and a number of other men and women whose lives 
enriched humanity. Twenty-five festive trees were also planted. 
During the year, talks to our boys were given by men con- 
nected with the public schools of Philadelphia, and Newark. 
N. J. ; by lecturers from one of our large Western colleges and the 
University of Vienna, and by the editor of a prominent Philadel- 
phia paper. Visits of inspection to the institution were made by 
a number of officials of the United States Agricultural Department; 
by the Pennsylvania State Agricultural and Orchards Departments; 
by the head of a technical college in New Zealand, who plans to 
establish a farm school there. The United States Department of 
Agriculture recommended him to follow the plan of The National 
Farm School. There were also visits from the heads of other farm 
schools; from a member of the new Palestine Commission, and 
finally, the Federation of Jewish Farmers of America held their 
;mnual Field Dav here on August 18th. So much for our year. 



T!IK NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



The Hellman Farm Endowment Fund is now available for the 
purchase of another farm in a suitable locality. We must have the 
means, liowever, of equipping it. With this provision, we can place 
two or three of our graduates on it next spring to operate, either on 
a lease or profit-sharing basis. Give us also today the means for 
enlarging our faculty, for building a proper domestic hall for 
housing our help and feeding our boys; a central light, 
heat and power plant to take the place of the scattered and 
wasteful units that require much fuel and many attendants, and 
with a proper maintenance fund, we will bring our enrollment of 
permanent students next spring up to 150. We can open, too, a 
summer school and can camp on these grounds an additional hun- 
dred young men, giving them short courses in poultry raising, 
dairying, truck gardening, horticulture, etc. After four or five 
months spent in this vigorous outdoor life, we will send back to 
you a hundred wage earners, invigorated in mind and body. 

The end of this war will bring new and heavy burdens to our 
cities. Thousands will flock to this land of hope and promise to 
find a refuge from their grief and oppression. We can meet that 
situation only by hastening that larger development of this school, 
which will come from a federation of the efforts, on modern socio- 
logical lines, of all those who are now working singly and slowly 
through other schools, agricultural aid, single tax, vacant lot and 
kindred societies, for the occupation of our land by our city poor. 
With a co-operation and consolidation of these labors and resources, 
the goal of our own efforts, viz., the fulfillment of the prophecy 
pronounced on these grounds some years ago, by a former Governor 
of Pennsylvania, when he stated, "I see in my mind's eye a thou- 
sand boys gathered on these grounds to study farming," may be 
attained. Hand in hand with that development some man or group 
of men will measure this problem in its true dimensions, and part 
of the moneys that now flow in a steady stream to our libraries, 
colleges and missions will be diverted to this agricultural aid fed- 
eration. Then The National Farm School will fill the great func- 
tion for which it was founded, and no deserving man will then ask 
in vain for a piece of ground to cultivate and support his family on. 

In turning back to our President the task that has temporarily 
been entrusted to me, I cannot refrain from again expressing my 
deepest gratitude and thanks to my fellow Directors and Execu- 
tive Staff, Ladies' Auxiliary Board, Dr. Washburn and his asso- 
ciates, our matrons and help, for their enthusiastic and efficient 
labor in our cause. The year's w^ork. thanks to them, has been one 
of progress and splendid results. Any institution might well be 
proud of an organization such as ours. 



16 THE NATIONAL FARM SrilOOL 

WHAT THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL HAS 
ACCOMPLISHED 

I. Landman, Chairman, Graduates' Committee. 

Out of 138 graduates, 115, or 83 per cent., are following agri- 
culture. 

29 own farms which they and their families are cultivating. 
33 are farm managers. We instance only: 

Harry Rich, General Manager, America Sumatra Tobacco Co., 

Weatogue, Conn. 
Harry Weinberg, Wm. Tausig Co. plantations, Palestine, Tex. 
The rest are managing private estates, farms and plantations 
throughout the country. 
23 are variously engaged, stock breeding, dairying, orcharding, 
etc. 
4 helped launch the successful Jewish colony at Clarion, Utah. 
It is generally recognized that this colony, which was estab- 
lished in 1911 and recruited from tenement house dwellers 
in New York City and Philadelphia, would have failed ut- 
terly without our boys, who are engaged as follows: 
Benjamin Druckerman, Gardener, Central Park, N. Y. 
David Friedman, Specializing, Utah Agricultural College. 
Joseph Miller, Field Director, Park Commission, Salt Lake 

City, Utah. 
Morris Salinger, own farm, Iowa. 
8 are instructors. Among them: 
Bernard Ostrolenk, Director of the Agricultural Department, 

State High Schools of Minnesota. 
Samuel Rudley, Instructor of Gardening, Philadelphia Board 

of Public Education. 
Jacob Taubenhaus, Assistant Chief Plant Pathologist, Dela- 
ware Agricultural College. 
Meyer Goldman, Instructor in Agriculture to the children of 

the Jewish colonists at Norma, N. J. 
Charles Horn, Assistant Superintendent, Philadelphia Vacant 
Lot Cultivation Association. 
14 specializing in higher branches: horticulture, arboriculture, 
animal breeding, etc. 
1 Rural Health Officer— Morris Colton, Cumberland, Md. 

1 Chief Entomologist — Maurice Mitzmain, Veterinary Corps,' 

U. S. Department of Agriculture, Philippine Islands. 

2 Doctors Veterinary Medicine— Israel Wallman, Bureau of 

Animal Industry, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Indian- 
apolis, Ind., and Benjamin Chodesh, Gap, Pa. 

"TIF 




— 5-0) 



. <U ,— , i. 



THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 17 

THE GRADUATION 

March 3, 1914 

Fourteen graduates of The National Farm School received 
diplomas for the Fall course of three 3'ears, on March 30, 1914. 
They were: 

Henry Blume, Leo Ginsberg, Jacob Easkin, 

Oscar Charen, George Heeker. Joseph L. Eosenthal, 

Albert Fi-ied. Edwin A. Johnston, Eudolph E. Schuldt, 

Aaron J. Friedman, Wni. J. MeCracken, Frederick H. "Weigle, 

Hyman "Wolf, Bernard Zweighaft. 

Two-year certificates were awarded to: 

Samuel Kerner, Samuel Lasker, Jacob Sehutzbank, 

Julius Ulman, Aaron Woolwich. 

A one-year certificate in orcharding was granted to David 
Jaffe, who had come to the School to specialize in that branch, and 
Louis I. Helfand was charged v\-ith the management of Schoenfeld 
Farm Xo. 1 the coming year. 

Eleven of those named departed at once to begin work in their 
chosen fields, among them, Julius Ulman, to co-operate with the 
faculty of the George School in teaching agriculture, and Samuel 
Lasker, to become agricultural instructor at the Orphan Home, 
Providence, R. I. George M. Heeker won the right to take the 
extra one-5*ear past-graduate coiuse at the School, and Aaron J. 
Friedman entered the State Agricultural School of Pennsj'lvania to 
specialize in horticulture. 



THE SPRING EXERCISES 

J'jne 7. 1914 

For the first time in the history of The National Farm School. 
Dr. Joseph Krauskopf. its President and Founder, did not partici- 
pate in its spring exercises, which were held at the School on Sun- 
day, June 7th. Nevertheless, the attendance was up to the usual 
standard. Mr. Harry B. Hirsh, the acting President, presented 
Frederick J. Shoyer, Esq., of Philadelphia, who presided and in- 
troduced a splendid array of speakers, most of them prominent in 
the movement of agricultural development, and including Prof. 
Kenyon A. Butterfield, of the Massachusetts State Agricultural 
College, and a member of the Roosevelt Country Life Commission, 
as well as the commission investigating farmers' co-operative credit 
societies in Europe; Hon. Bristow Adams, of the L'nited States 



18 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Forestry Service, and Prof. Frank P. Bj'e, lecturer on the Economics 
of Agriculture of the University of Pennsylvania. 

The addresses of these gentlemen were strong pleas for the 
development of the science of agriculture, for the sake of the future 
welfare of America. They all agreed that the lack of exact knowl- 
edge was impairing the ultimate value of American farming and 
was a tremendous factor in raising the cost of living. 

One hundred and five memorial trees were consecrated. Mr. 
EarL Barnes paid a special tribute to the late Joseph Fels, philan- 
thropist and single tax advocate, in whose memory a tree was dedi- 
cated. Mr. I. H. Silverman extolled the memory of Harry M. 
Nathanson, one of the young leaders of Philadelphia's mercantile 
life. A special tribute to the memory of the late Barnett Bins- 
wanger, who had been a member of the Executive Board of The 
National Farm School, and prominently identified with all the lead- 
ing philanthropies of the city, was uttered by Clinton 0. Mayer. 
Rabbi Isaac Landman extolled the memories of Louis L Aaron, of 
Pittsburg; Bertha Rayner Frank, of Baltimore, and Ellen Phillips 
Samuel and Mrs. Elias Wolf, of Philadelphia. 

Twenty-five festive trees were dedicated, marking many joyous 
events. Prizes were awarded to a number of students of the School 
for excelling in various endeavors. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The fifth annual meeting of the Alumni Association was held 
on Sunday, October 19, 1914, at The National Farm School. 

There were present about twenty-five graduates, coming from 
various sections of the country. Others forwarded letters expres- 
sing their loyalty and interest in our association. Reports were read 
by the secretary, Charles Horn, of the endeavors and successes of 
the many graduates. 

He stated that eight alumni have completed college courses in 
advanced agriculture. Some have graduated as horticulturists, 
veterinarians, and in other branches of agriculture. 

Of the 29 on their own farms, 15 are located within a short 
radius of the school, and are thus enabled to make further use of 
its advantages. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: — 

President, James Work, '13. 

Vice-President, Edward Schlesinger, '12. 

Secretary and Treasurer, Charles Horn, '06. 



THE >^aTIONAL farm SCHOOL 19 

THE SUCCOTH PILGRIMAGE AND SEVENTEENTH 
ANNUAL MEETING 

October 18. 1914 

About seven hundred people went by special train from Phila- 
delphia, on Sunday morning. October 18,, 1914, to attend the Suc- 
coth Pilgrimage and Seventeenth Annual Meeting of The National 
Farm School. Several hundred others who came from adjoining 
towns were in the gathering that welcomed Rev. Dr. Joseph Kraus- 
kopf back to the institution after his year's tour of the world, when 
he rose to read his annual message "The New Exodus and After," 
printed in another part of the Year Book. 

The principal speaker was Dr. Harry Friedenwald, of Balti- 
more, Md., Honorary President of The Federation of American 
Zionists, who spoke on the Jewish agricultural colonies in Palestine. 

"The earlier attempts failed, but the failures furnished lessons 
and finally led to success, "said Dr. Friedenwald. "The difficulties 
were many and great. The land had been neglected for centuries, 
and made desolate by destruction of the forests. The methods of 
agriculture of the natives was most primitive. The early settlers 
were unlearned in agriculture and entirely ignorant concerning the 
peculiarities of the land on which they had settled or the sort of 
cultivation for which it was adapted. And to these resulting diffi- 
culties almost insurmountable in themselves, there were added the 
most malignant forms of malarial fever which killed the settlers or 
robbed them of their strength, and hostile and half-civilized neigh- 
bors who menaced their lives and their property. That Jewish 
colonies in Palestine survived and grew in number and in size 
during the last thirty years is evidence that the desire of Jews to 
return to the culti^-ation of the soil of Palestine is still strong in 
spite of almost two thousand years of banishment from the land; 
but it is also evidence of the endurance, the fortitude, the courage, 
the hopefulness and fitness of the colonists. 

"The young men are splendid horsemen and good marksmen. 
But it is not only their physical side which has become vigorous and 
strong. They are intelligent and skillful in their work; interested 
in improving their methods and advancing their colonies. But I 
admire them more still because of their high moral qualities, their 
independence of thought, their strong sense of aiding in a great 
national rebirth, their hopeful outlook. These men have been in- 
spired by that impalpable spirit of the land, — which truly makes 
it a Holy Land to him who feels that it has been sanctified by the 



20 THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 

lives of our forefathers, our prophets and our saints, of our heroes 
and our teachers. And these men have been tempered by an ex- 
perience of hard and earnest labor, by overcoming difficulties that 
seemed insurmountable, — by facing dangers with courage. There- 
were colonies in which the pestilential fever carried off one member 
of a family after another, and yet the survivors remained steadfast. 
There were mothers who lost one child and another, and yet 
possessing that courage greater than on battlefields, refused to 
leave. A colonist of R-ehoboth, a man whose friendship I esteem 
most highly, told me how in the early days he and a comrade and 
their families lived together and fought together. His friend was 
killed by Bedoins. He stood his ground and cared for his own and 
his comrade's family, and he has achieved success. The hardships 
which the early settlers endured make thrilling stories of courage 
and of faith. It was their fearlessness that won for the Jewish 
settlers the respect of the natives. 

Reports were submitted by the Acting President, Mr. Harry 
B. Hirsh; the Treasurer, Mr. I. H. Silverman; the Director, Dr. 
John H. Washburn; Prof. Bishop, head of the Agricultural De- 
partment; Prof. Fancourt, of the Horticultural Department, and 
by Miss Hetty Abraham, the Matron. 

After the distribution of prizes to the students, the annual 
election was held, resulting in the re-election of Dr. Krauskopf, as 
President; Harry B. Hirsh, Vice-President; Isaac H. Silverman, 
Treasurer, and Leon Merz, Dr. Louis Nusbaum and Dr. George 
Wheeler, associate superintendent of the public schools of Phila- 
delphia, as Executive Board members to serve three years. 



FEDERATION OF JEWISH FARMERS 

Jewish farmers from all over America attended the first annual 
Field Day and picnic held by the Federation of Jewish Farmers 
of America, at The National Farm School, on August 18th. There 
were addresses by agricultural experts, and the farmers visited the 
different departments of the institution, inspecting the modern 
methods of intensive farming in operation there. 

The lecturers were Rabbi I. Landman, Prof. J. H. Washburn,. 
Prof. W. E. Fancourt, Prof. W. H. Bishop, and G. Eaton, Jr., all 
of The National Farm School faculty. The farmers were guests 
at a picnic given in their honor. The Federation comprises 65 
local organizations throughout the United States, and Bucks 
County, Pa., where the School is located, is considered to have 
one of the most effective. 



THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 21 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

For the Year ending, September 30, 1914 
Isaac H. Silverman, Treasurer, 

During the nine years that it has been your Treasurer's privi- 
lege to serve The National Farm School, he has never submitted 
his annual report with so much pleasure as he offers the financial 
statement for the past year. 

We show practically no increase in our indebtedness and, at 
the same time, an increase in the cost of operating the School, which 
means that the receipts have kept up with the increased expen- 
ditures, due to the increase of our students from 112 to 137. We 
are to congratulate ourselves on this condition, because it indicates 
that the country at large is awakening to the importance of the work 
of The National Farm School and is standing by it and its cause. 

The report shows that it cost us $39,588.57 to maintain the 
School this j^ear, as compared with $36,662.73 in 1913, a difference 
of $2,925.84. For this extra cost of less than $3,000 we have in- 
creased to 100 the students permanently in the School, as compared 
with 83 in 1913, and have given 37 students partial instruction, 
compared with 29 in 1913. Part of this increase in maintenance 
went to the increase of our faculty, necessitated by the larger num- 
ber of students, and the rest of it into foodstuffs and farm sup- 
plies. 

The financial statement shows that the School property has 
been kept up to its highest efficiency by the expenditure of $3,146.38, 
and improvement to the herd of $332.80. 

Our dues and donations have increased from $9,909.85 last 
year, to $12,925.34 this year. Through the efforts of the Executive 
Secretary, with the co-operation of the office propaganda, we ob- 
tained the further sum of $8,283.48. 

These increases indicate the efficiency of our propaganda, and 
though it is true that this is an expensive item, it is an absolute 
necessity, in order that the Jews of America shall be helped to 
realize the tremendous usefulness of our institution. Our experi- 
ence during the past few years indicates that as our propaganda 
spreads and makes its increasingly favorable impress, the response 
will be so generous that the percentage of cost will become an ever 
dwindling item. 

Our Endowment Fund has increased, during the past year, by 
$3,346.76, and now totals $95,507.07. The manner in which our 



22 THE IvATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 

Endowment Fund is invested is shown in the report. The income 
from farm products has increased from $5,771.50 to $6,811.69, the 
best proof of the efficient cultivation of our farms. 

In addition to the $10,000 from the State Board of Charities 
of Pennsylvania, and the $8,500 from the Philadelphia Federation 
of Jewish Charities, our contributions are gleaned from 17 differ- 
ent federations throughout the country; the individual lodges of 
12 different benevolent orders; 26 religious schools in different 
cities, and from individual contributors in 310 cities in 42 different 
States. 



GENERAL FUND 

Deficit, October 1, 1913 $7,202.60 

INCOME 

Interest on Investments $4,274.86 

Sale of Farm Products 6,811.69 

State of Pennsylvania 10,000.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities (Philadelphia) 8,500.00 

Dues and Donations 12,925.34 

Memorial and Festive Trees 935.48 

43,447.37 

— $36,244.77 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Kitchen Utensils $84.02 

Horticultural Department 410.89 

Spraying 103.22 

Nursery 60.74 

Beds and Bedding 88.71 

Brooms and Brushes 39.40 

Conveyance 1,185.15 

Dry Goods 1,943.81 

Fuel 2,203.52 

Groceries 2,087.71 

Ice 8.68 

Insurance 933.63 

Interest 113.89 

Ldghting 557.62 

Painting 352.83 

Printing and Stationery 582.04 

Plumbing 481.77 

Provisions 5,204.08 

Rent 287.04 

Repairs 212.24 

Educational Supplies 586.82 

Farm Supplies 7,322.37 

Medical Supplies 150.70 

Salaries— Matron 1,164.12 

Officers 2,184.82 

Teachers 7,101.98 

Wages 3,223.69 

Sundries 536.14 

Taxes 350.50 

Library 186.44 

$39,748.57 

IMPROVEMENTS TO PLANT 

New Wing on Laboratory $1,011.03 

Power Washing Machine Plant 256.28 

Changes in Buildings 581.08 

New Sink and Hot Water Connections in Household 220.00 

Painting of Buildings 608.50 

Key Bitting Machine 20.00 

Enlargement of Poultry Plant 120.53 

Improvements to Barn and Outbuildings 196.76 

Power Spraying Apparatus 275.00 

$3,289.18 



THE MATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 23 

IMPROVEMENTS TO HERD 

Live Stock $300.00 

$300.00 

EXTRAORDINARY DISBURSEMENTS 

Repayment of Loan to Girard Trust $2,000.00 

Sehoenfeld Farm No. 3 185.46 

2,185.46 

$45,523.21 

'^ $9,278.44 

PROPAGANDA 

RECEIPTS 

General $8,283.48 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Spring and Fall Exercises $366.43 

Year Book 230.87 

Commission 540.85 

Executive Secretary, Special Canvasser and Literature 5,091.00 

6,229.15 

$2,054.33 

$7,224.11 

RECAPITULATION 

Due Students' Deposit $1,226.86 

Due Endowment Fund 5,997.25 

• $7,224.11 



ENDOWMENT FUND 

Bank Balance, October 1, 1913 $4,448.39 

RECEIPTS 

Bequests — 

Nathan Herrmann, New York City $1,000.00 

Mrs. Ferdinand Westheimer, St. Joseph, Mo 100.00 

Simon Zweighaft, Philadelphia 237.50 

Isaac Van Baalen, Detroit, Mich 100.00 

Martha Kohn, Philadelphia 200.00 

1,637.50 

Life Memberships — 

Joseph Michaels, Rochester, N. Y $100.00 

Sol. Hirsh, St. Joseph, Mo 100.00 

Mrs. A. Silberstein, Dallas, Texas 100.00 

Gustav Freund, Chicago, 111 100.00 

Jos. Block, Chicago, 111 100.00 

Mrs. H. Kempner, Galveston, Texas 100.00 i 

S. Phillipson, Chicago, 111 100.00 

Phillip Whitlock, Richmond, Va 100.00 

Edward Mandel, Chicago, 111 100.00 

Samuel Levi, Terre Haute, Ind 100.00 

M. Schwartz, Indianapolis, Ind 100.00 

Mrs. Louis Mosenfelder, Rock Island, 111 100.00 

1,200.00 

Memorial Donations- 
Mrs. Barnett Binswanger, Philadelphia, in memory of her husband. 150.00 

Repayment, account Mortgages — 

2130 S. 10th St $1,200.00 

1323 N. 7th St 3,000.00 

4,200.00 

Repayment of Loans — 

Sehoenfeld Farm No. 3 1,350.00 

$8,537.50 

$1^,985.89 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Purchase of Securities, Commission, Interest, etc $12,726.07 

Bank Balance, September 30, 1914 $ 259.82 



24 



THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 



INVESTMENTS 

1st Mortgages, 5.4%— 323 N. Sixth St $3,000.00 

323 Washington Ave. and rear League St 2,500.00 

2008 S. Tenth St 2,000.00 

611 Lombard St 2,000.00 

1035 South St 5,000.00 

S. E. Cor. Marshall and Oxford 3,000.00 

2106 W. Norris St 3,000.00 

601 Dickinson St 4,000.00 

709 S. Eighth St 2,000.00 

N. E. Cor. Chester Ave. and 55th St 6,000.00 

60 N. 54th St 1,800.00 

964 N. Second St 4,.500.00 

4170 W. Poplar St 2,000.00 

1411 N. Wanamaker St 1,400.00 

N. W. Cor. 32d and Berks Sts ; 4.000.00 

611 Pike St 1,200.00 

305 S. Sixth St 2,700.00 

822 South St 5,500.00 

5y2%— 1816 N. Marshall St 1.800.00 

515 Wolf St 1.400.00 

6 %— 224 N, Ohio Ave.. Atlantic City 3,500.00 

2871-73-75 Tulip Street 1,500.00 

Market St. "L" 4's 5,000 00 

P. & R. 4's 2,000.00 

Wisconsin Central, 1st, 4's 2.000.00 

P. R. R. Convertibles, 3i^% 5,000.00 

E. & P. 4's 4,200.00 

Participation Bond Mtg. Trust Co., St. Louis, 5% 100.00 

Lehigh Valley Centrals 1,000.00 

Lakeshore R. R lioOO 00 

New York City 6's 4i50o!oO 

Schoenfeld Farm Xo. 3 650.00 

The National Farm School 5.997^25 



■ $95,247.25 

$95,507.07 
The undersigned has examined the books of The National Farm School for the 
year ending September 30, 1914, and found them correct in all details. 

ALFRED M. GROSS, Public Accountant. 



COST ANALYSIS FOR 1914 



Mainte- 
nance 



Educa- 
tion 



ADsriNis 
tration 



Conveyance 

Farm Supplies 

Food Supplies 

Horticulture, Nursery and Orchard 

Interest, Insurance, Taxes 

Light, Heat and Ice 

Medical Supplies 

Plumbing, Painting and Repairs 

Printing, Stationery, Books 

Rent 

Sundries 

Salaries, Matron 

OflScers 

Faculty 

Wages 

Domestic Supplies 



Cost per Student 



$207.52 



$161.02 
207.52 



Cost per Student for Maintenance and Education 

Cost per Student for Maintenance, Education and Administration 
100 STUDENTS @ $397.48 = $.39,748.57 



$1,015.87 




$169.28 




$7,322.27 


7,291.79 




574.85 




1,398.02 

2,769.82 

1.50.70 

1,046.84 
















L102.90 


252 50 




287 04 


536.14 
1,164.12 












2,184.82 




7,101.98 


3,223.69 
2,1.55.94 










, 


$20,752.93 


$16,102.00 


$2,893.64 



$28.94 

368.54 
$397.48 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 25 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

John H. Washburn, Ph. D. 

The Student Body: During the past year 137 young men 
have received instruction at our institution. Of these, 18 have 
graduated, receiving either diplomas or certificates. At the pres- 
ent time there are 92 pupils at the institution. 

The past year has been one of progress along all lines of work. 
Each department seemed to develop its resources and used its en- 
ergies more efficiently in imparting instruction. 

Our student body has grown so rapidly during the past few 
years that all our class rooms are entirely inadequate. They are 
not large enough to accommodate our increased number of pupils. 
The lecture room in our chemical laboratory was much too small 
for the Freshman Class, and the Board of Managers have increased 
the size of the building more than 40 feet, making it the largest 
class room of the institution. It will be used during the coming 
year not only for recitations, but as a study room in the evening. 
The room has been furnished with 50 individual desks, and the 
wall space covered with slate blackboards. The laboratory has 
been furnished with a steam heating plant. 

The class room in the main building having proved too small 
to accommodate either our Junior or Freshman Classes, we have 
removed the 24 desks and replaced them with settees. But the 
room is still too cramped, and it is hoped that another class room 
will be provided during the coming year. 

The dairy class room has been furnished with desks, some of 
them new, and the balance of the desks removed from the main 
building class room. This furnishes a recitation room capable of 
seating 45 pupils, and is used for our Junior and Senior Classes. 

We are crowded everywhere. Our chapel is hardly large 
enough to accommodate the full student body and faculty. We 
will soon have to provide for larger chapel accommodations. 

Our course of instruction has been eiu-iched during the past 
year by the establishment of a Biological Department. Miss Lydia 
Prichett Borden has been appointed head of the department. 

Miss Borden takes a great interest in the development of her 
department, and has given systematic instruction in physiology, 
hygiene, botany and zoology, with special emphasis on entomology. 
The pupils have manifested a lively interest in the entomological 
work, studying the life history of our useful and harmful insects. 
In their laboratory work they have developed many of these in- 



26 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

sects from the egg to the adult moth, studying their changes in life 
and observed their peculiarities, habits, etc. They have made a 
very useful collection of plants and insects. This instruction, to- 
gether with the instruction in insecticides, is of utmost importance 
to the young farmer. 

Miss Borden has done most efficient work in the library. Dur- 
ing the year the books have all been recataloged, reshelved, and 
card catalogs of both index subjects and authors have been pre- 
pared, which has added greatly to the efficiency of the library. 

At this point I would like to express our appreciation of the 
funds given to the School from year to year by Mr. Harry L. Stern 
and his sisters, of Philadelphia, for books to be placed in the Lina 
Stem Alcove; to Mrs. Henrietta Bash and family, of New York. 
City, for books to be placed in the Sadie Bash Alcove; for the col- 
lection of books sent us by Mr. Leon Merz, Philadelphia, taken, 
from his own library; to the Jewish Publication Society, of Phila- 
delphia, which sends us copies of the books it publishes, and also to 
Mr. W. Atlee Burpee for subscriptions to a large number of the 
leading weekly and monthly papers and magazines for the library. 

The class room work at the institution has been increased dur- 
ing the year. For the first time in our existence we have been able 
to have class room instruction each morning in the week through- 
out the whole summer. This is due to the increase of our student 
body, which gives us more help. The Senior Class has been study- 
ing compass surveying and leveling, the Junior Class has been in- 
structed in chemistry, and the Freshman Class has had instruction 
in theoretical agriculture and farm .arithmetic. 

An attempt was made by our School Governor, Mr. Philip H. 
Prouty, to conduct an agricultural practicum for the Freshman 
Class. The class was divided into six sections. Each section de- 
voted one-half of the afternoon to practical agricultural instruction, 
such as harnessing one, two, three or four-horse teams, taking apart 
and putting together different classes of harness, learning the proper 
care of horses, how to drive, the use of different plows, cultivators, 
harrows, grain drills, and the manipulation of many unusual farm 
implements. The instruction met with considerable success, but 
on account of his many duties he was unable to give the project 
as much time as we hope he will be able to devote to it another year. 

Faem Work: The instruction in practical work on the farm. 
has been better than in previous years. The Home Farm is better. 
We are raising better crops. There is a marked improvement in. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 27 

all of the Schoenfeld farms. This enables us to have better mate- 
rial for instruction and illustration. Our dairy herd has materially 
improved. The sanitary conditions in the old barn have been im- 
proved by complete remodeling and putting in modern stanchions. 
The horse barn at Schoenfeld Memorial Farm No. 3, and the barn 
at Schoenfeld Memorial Farm No. 1 have been remodeled. 

The farm work has been under the efficient direction of Pro- 
fessor Bishop, assisted by Messrs. Kraft and Malcolm at the Home 
Farm, and by Mr. Howard F. Young, the foreman of Schoenfeld 
Memorial Farm No. 3. 

It is a matter oj great satisfaction that the care of our dairy 
herd has been such that The National Farm School has been al- 
lowed, as a result of a recent inspection by the Pennsylvania State 
Live Stock Sanitary Board and the State Board of Health, to ship 
raw milk to the city of Philadelphia, thus eliminating the necessity of 
Pasteurizing our milk. We were given a rating on our sanitary 
arrangements of 90.6, and the physical condition of our herds, as 
a result of the tuberculin and other physical tests, was marked 100. 
This shows remarkably efficient work for student work, which de- 
mands the constant employment, in rotation, of many helpers who 
are entirely devoid of any previous agricultural training. 

Our nursery has given additional opportunity for instruction, 
and our orchards have developed during the past year so that all 
of the boys have had opportunity to work in them. Some days we 
have picked over 700 baskets of peaches with our student help. 

The Crops: The crops for the year have been abundant, 
although some of them have suffered materially in quality and 
quantity on accoimt of the unprecedented dry weather for three 
months during the growing season. The crops for the year were 
as follows: 190 tons of hay, 230 bushels rye, 12 tons rye straw, 300 
tons corn silage, 11,000 bundles corn stover, 1,250 bushels com, 500 
bushels potatoes, 50 tons mangels, 20 tons cabbage, 160 bushels 
onions, 25.000 ears sweet corn, 600 bushels apples, 200 bushels pears, 
125 bushels carrots, 130 baskets lima beans, 613 bunches asparaguS; 
6,000 baskets peaches, 40 cords wood, 1,223 pounds poultry, 150 
pounds ducks, 908 dozen eggs, 100 head of pigs, 144,000 quarts milk 

It is obvious that the care and harvesting of these crops means 
an immense amount of work, collectively, for our student body. 
Individually, however, the student is not overworked. He per- 
forms less than seven hours of labor per day from June to October, 
and about three hours per day from October to May. 



28 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

The variety of our productions is so great that it teaches the 
young men to become practical farmers along most lines of agricul- 
ture. The most important thing of all is that it teaches the pupils 
to be self-reliant, responsible, and emphasizes the necessity and 
importance of industry. No young man can become a successful 
farmer until he has developed himself into a good worker and care- 
ful thinker. Our theoretical instruction teaches why we do various 
operations and teaches our pupils to observe. The practical work 
tests, the value of the instruction given and gives familiarity to its 
application. 

The majority of the above-mentioned crops are raised for the 
maintenance of our Dairj'" Department and the horses used in the 
farm operations; and the boarding department. 

Poultry Department: The Poultry Department has given 
better instruction during the past year than ever before, and the 
returns from our flocks have justified the enlargement of this 
branch, both from an educational and profitable standpoint. 

The pupils assigned to the department have shown an unusual 
interest and have acquired considerable skill in their work. We 
have built an incubator cellar, with a feed room over it, with ample 
feed bins, remodeled the old brooder and hen houses, built a new 
hen house for 250 laying hens. The brooder house has been 
equipped wdth two IMcKay and one Hall brooders. We are in- 
stalling a 1,500-egg Hall incubator heated bj' hot water. These 
additions have enriched our material for instruction very consid- 
erably. The class in poultry culture has opportunity to observe 
the care and manipulation of all operations connected with the 
poultr}^ plant. We have not tried to develop a large number of 
breeds. On the Home Farm we are raising exclusively Rhode 
Island Reds; at Schoenfeld Farm No. 1, Whit« Leghorns, and at 
Schoenfeld Farm No. 3, Barred Rocks. Mr. Eaton, our instructor 
in poultry culture, takes his classes to the poultry shows, where 
they have an opportunity to study the best specimens of the many 
different breeds. With members of his classes he has visited many 
of the successful commercial poultr^^ plants in the vicinity. 

Horticultural Department: The Horticultural Department 
has continued its good work during the past year. Many shrubs 
have been added to the nursery. In Mr. Fancourt's report it will 
be seen that he has made additions in this line of work. He has 
improved the greenhouses by making a number of necessary re- 
pairs. The care of the vegetable garden, the greenhouses and the 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 29 

nursery during the past year has never been better. His cash sales 
have amounted to over $800, and in addition to this the produce 
furnished to the Boarding Department and nursery stock and green 
plants used in the ornamentation of the school grounds, gives a 
total of over $1,700 worth of produce for the year. 

ScHOENFELD MEMORIAL Farms: The farms will be reported on 
elsewhere by the Chairman of the Schoenfeld Memorial Farms 
Committee. The educational value of both Farm No. 1 and No. 3 
is very great. At Farm No. 1 the boys have the opportunity to 
do things more for themselves than on any of the other farms. 
At Schoenfeld Farm No. 3 they have had the opportunity to ob- 
serve a farm conducted more as a commercial enterprise than the 
School farm, which is almost entirely devoted to educational work. 
The dwelling house at Farm No. 1 has been used during the year 
as a dormitory; as many as 18 pupils at a time have lived in the 
farm house. These boys are under the charge of the foreman of 
Farm No. 1. 

The Household: The health of our pupils, to which our 
matron, Miss Hetty Abraham, has given great care, has been uni- 
formty excellent. They show the effect of regular and abundant and 
healthful food. We are deeply indebted to the Jewish Hospital, 
of Philadelphia, for its excellent care of our pupils in case of acci- 
dents and sickness. The condition of our dormitories is excellent, 
but they are overcrowded on account of our additional pupils. Our 
culinary department, in charge of Mrs. Josephine N. Loeb, has 
done wonderful work in their cramped quarters. The greatest cry- 
ing need of the institution is a domestic hall where we can have 
ample accommodations for the increased number of pupils. The 
work is now being done in a kitchen which was intended for the 
care of 25 pupils. 

The cash receipts for the year from all the farms is $9,932.30. 
To this w^e add $2,027.90, sales from the peach orchard. The total 
cash receipts being $11,960.20. Produce to the value of $3,111.43 
has been supplied to the Boarding Department, making a total value 
of produce raised of $15,071.63. 




30 THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT REPORT 

Prof. W. H. Bishop. 

On the whole, this season has been a very favorable one. The 
very rainy and cloudy weather of July made it difficult to properly 
cure the hay crop, so its quality will be lower than for many years. 
It is the "off year" for apples, and that crop is smaller than last 
year's. The increased number of boys has enabled us to cultivate 
a larger area under an intensive system. While dairying is our 
most important interest, and under the conditions which exist in 
this locality should continue to be, yet the farms produce on a 
commercial scale about fifteen crops. T^ese crops afford oppor- 
tunity for giving the boys instruction in the handling of a wide 
variety of interests. 

The Horticultural Department (in its greenhouses) grows con- 
siderable quantities of several crops. So it is probable that not less 
than twenty or twenty-five different kinds of crops, varying from 
calla lilies to pigs, are here produced on a commercial basis. In 
addition to this, the kitchen garden produces about a dozen kinds 
of vegetables. 

To give a yet wider acquaintance with useful vegetables and 
flowers, each student in the lower classes has a garden in which he 
grows a prescribed assortment of plants. The nursery, with its 
stock of ornamental shrubs and trees, and the greenhouses, with 
their bedding plants grown in quantity for sale or for ornamenting 
our grounds, as well as keeping many individual species for illus- 
tration, offers opportunity for the observing and ambitious student 
to become acquainted with more than one hundred sorts of culti- 
vated plants. Upon graduation he should be familiar with the 
propagation and cultivation of all these plants and with the prepara- 
tion for market of many of them. 

In the Agricultural Department the larger part of the time of 
the instructors is given to the teaching of those simple fundamental 
farm operations usually learned by a farm-bred boy before the age 
at which our students come to us. 

During his first two years the student is trying to become 
familiar with farm language, farm sights and sounds, and to get 
a working knowledge of the various operations by which he is sur- 
rounded and a part of which he is. In the Senior year he is ex- 
pected to give more time to questions connected with the general 
management of the farm labor and animals, and to become some- 
what proficient in most of the varied operations of the farm. In 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 31 

fact, it is in that last year that he has opportunity to become a 
''farmer;' increasing his skill in all the luork of the jarm and then 
being called upon to instruct the lower classes in farm work, to, 
himself learn more thoroughly the best methods of doing the work. 
Since last year's report there has been no radical change in 
the progress and plans of this department, although we are making 
more use of our Senior Class in the supen'ision of work. 



HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT REPORT 

Prof. W. F. Fancourt. 

When, some seventeen years ago, Dr. Krauskopf put in opera- 
tion his long cherished plan of The National Farm School, no 
thought could be given to the finer points of agriculture or to that 
l)ranch which we dignify under the name of horticulture. 

Indeed, it was only five years since when Dr. Krauskopf and 
his cousin, Mr. Nathan Krauskopf, of Stamford, Conn., together 
with Mrs. Samuel Strauss, of Philadelphia, contributed funds that 
^ave the first impetus to the department over which I am in charge. 

Nursery: In the establishment of the nursery, the good lady 
^nd the gentlemen whom I have named, built, or rather, planted bet- 
ter than they knew, for not only has it proved to be a source of rev • 
cnue, more profitable, perhaps, than a like acreage devoted to farm 
crops, but has also contributed largely to the attractive features of 
the grounds. The several thousand young trees that were planted 
last year in the Arboratum adjoining the nursery have uniformly 
done well, so well that we are offering a portion of these in our 
vcatalogue this fall. 

The arch dedicated to the memory of the late Mr. B. A. Feine- 
man, of Kansas City, is now covered with the Japanese vine, and 
has added xery much to this picturesque feature. 

Greenhouses: Our greenhouses have maintained, indeed, they 
have beaten former records. Many thousands of plants were prop- 
agated for the summer decoration of the grounds, and quite a con- 
siderable sum of money was received for the surplus products, as 
will be shown at the end of this report. I may say that we have 
made several permanent improvements by the transfer from the 
Nursery of hedge and other plants, i. e., a hedge has been planted 
at Farm No. 1 and Farm No. 3, as well as around Pennsylvania 



32 THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 

Hall, and many shrubbery have been planted in different quarters 
of our campus. 

Vegetable Garden: Since we have raised the number of our 
students to 100 it has been necessary to increase the area devoted 
to the growing of vegetables for their sustenance. It gives me 
pleasure to report, that the addition to Laboratory Building has pro- 
vided us at last with a cellar, well fitted for the preservation of 
fruits and vegetables during the winter months. 

Individual Gardens: As the number of our students has 
increased so has our individual gardens multiplied. This year they 
numbered 79, being given to the members of the Freshmen and 
Junior Classes. I have never known keener competition in this 
work among the students. The $25 that Dr. and Mrs. Krauskopf 
give annually in prizes for this pleasing contest could not be better 
bestowed. I have been rendered valuable assistance in much of 
my garden work by our GoATrnor, Prof. P. H. Prouty. 

I want to express my gratitude to our respected member of 
the Board of Directors and kind neighbor, Mr. W. Atlee Burpee, 
who has given us much encouragement in our work and has always 
given to our students the fullest pri^dleges of the Fordhook Farms 
and Trial Grounds. Few" schools possess such advantages as are 
given to ours by Mr. Burpee. 

Memorial Trees: More than one hundred memorial and 
festive trees were planted last spring. They have done exception- 
ally well. I wish that some of our patrons, who had trees planted 
some four or five years since, could see the wealth of fruit they 
have produced this year. For the festive trees we could have 
nothing more effective than is the Catalpa Bungeii. 

The cash sales of this department in the past fiscal j^ear were: — 

From the Nursery $238.40 

From Greenhouses 534.10 

From Garden 59.28 

Total Cash Sales $831.78 

Transferred from the Nursery to locations 

on Farms, etc., valued $74.50 

Greenhouse plants, valued 114.00 

Vegetables, supplied boarding house 715.19 

$903.69 

Grand Total $1,735.47 



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THE JSATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 



33 



B 



Farms Donated 

In memory of Flora Schoenfeld, 

by her husband. Max Schoenfeld, 

of Rorschach, Switzerland. 



I. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 1 

40 acres, in the Spring of 1904. 

II. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 2 

38 acres, in ttie Spring of 1905. 



# 
# 



# 

m 



III. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 3 

163 acres, in ttie Fall of 1907. 

These farms all adjoin the original tract of 
Farm School land. 



By Henry Hellman, New York City 

50 acres, in Polk County, North Carolina; to be sold and the money 
devoted to the development of The National Farm School. 



34 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Buildings Donated 



I. Theresa Loeb Memorial Green House, 

In memory of Theresa Loeb, Ogontz, Pa., by family. 
Erected 1898. 



II. Ida M. Block Memorial Chapel, 

In memory of Ida M. Block, Kansas City, Mo., by 
her husband and family. Erected 1899. 



III. Zadok M. Eisner Memorial Laboratory, 

In memory of Zadok M. Eisner, Philadelphia, Pa., 
by his wife. Erected 1899. 






IV. Rose Krauskopf Memorial Green House, 



In memory of Rose Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Pa., by 
her children. Erected 1899. 






V. Dairy, by Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Aaron. 

Pittsburg, Pa. Erected 1899. 

VI. Adolph Segal Hall, 

Containing Library, Lecture Hall, Administration 
Offices and Dormitories, by Mr. Adolph Segal, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Erected 1906. 



VII. Frances E. Loeb Vegetable Forcing Green House, 

In memory of Frances E. Loeb, by her husband. 
Erected 1908. 



VIII. Louis I. Aaron Ice House, 

In honor of his 70th birthday, by Mr. Louis I. Aaron, 
of Pittsburg, Pa. Erected 1911. 






THE XATIOXAL FARM SCHOOL 



35 



Permanent Improvements 



I. Lake Archer Rosenthal 

In memory of Archer Rosenthal, Philadelphia, Pa. 
by his brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Rosenthal, built in 1908. 

II. Ehse Binswanger Nursery 

In memory of Elise Binswanger, Kansas City, Mo., 
by her grandson and granddaughter, planted in 1909. 

III. Samuel Strauss^, Jr., Division of Nursery- 

Rhododendrons and Roses in memory of Samuel 
Strauss, Jr., Philadelphia, by his wife, 1910. 

IV. ' Feineman-Binswanger Memorial Arch 

In memory of Mr. B. A. Feineman and Elise Bins- 
wanger, by Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, 1912. 

V. The Washburn Pergola 

By John Hosea Washburn, Director of The National 
Farm School, 1912. 

VI. Bertie Gans Ochs Flag Pole 

In memory of Bertie Gans Ochs, Philadelphia bv 
Mr. Adolph S. Ochs, of New York, 1913. 



^ 



SUNDRY DONATIONS OTHER THAN MONEY 

Jewish Publication Society, Philadelphia — Number of volumes for library. 

Friedman, B. C, Philadelphia — Matzos. 

Fleishman, Morris, Philadelphia — Sleigh. 

Miller, Abe, Chicago. 111. (N. F. S. graduate)— Bulbs. 

Burpee, W. Atlee, Philadelphia — Subscriptions to papers and magazines for library. 

Burpee, "W. Atlee, Philadelphia — Seeds for farms and garden to value of ?100. 

Schamberg, Mrs. Meyer, Philadelphia — Rubber piano cover. 

Merz, Mrs. Regina, Philadelphia — 153 volumes for library. 

Maneschewitz, Jacob, Cincinnati, 0. — 100 lbs. matzos. 

Skidelsky, S. S., Philadelphia — Carnation plants. 

Wolf Bros., Philadelphia — Large quantity of envelopes. 

Blumenthal, Mrs. Hart, Philadelphia — Two dozen bath towels, china and tea pot. 

Needlework Guild of America, Philadelphia Branch— S7 useful articles. 

N. F. S. Sewing Circle — Spreads, sheets, pillow-cases, laundry-bags, face, bath, roller 

and kitchen towels. 
Powers, Weightman, Rosengarten Co., Philadelphia — Medical supplies. 
Schoneman, Mrs. R. B., Pniladelphia — Sewing supplies. 
Wolf, Mr. and Mrs. A. B., Philadelphia — Uniform and cap. 
Dill & Collins Co., Philadelphia — Glazed paper used in this Year Book. 
Jessup & Moore, Philadelphia — Paper for this Year Book. 
Price, Thos. W., Co., Philadelphia — Cover-paper for this Year Book. 
"Chicago Israelite," Chicago, 111. — Free subscription. 
"Jewish Criterion," Pittsburgh, Pa. — Free subscription. 
"Jewish Exponent," Philadelphia — Free subscription. 
"Jewish Review and Observer," Cleveland, O. — Free subscription. 
"Jewish Voice," St. Louis, Mo. — Free subscription. 
"Western Fruit Grower," St. Joseph, Mo. — Free subscription. 
Samuel J. Bunford, Philadelphia — Free subscription to "Popular Electricity." 
Snellenberg, N. & Co., Philadelphia — Loan of flags and bunting for decoration. 
Raab, Mrs. Julia, Philadelphia — Book for library. 
Hackenburg, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. B., Philadelphia — 120 for dinner to the studen i, ;n 

celebration of golden wedding. 



36 THE NATIONAL FAEM SC^HOOL 

What some of the Graduates of the National 
Farm School are doing. 

Aarons, Harry, Downsman, Wis. — Cultivating his own farm ("Sunnybrook 
Farm"). 

Amrum, Philip, Franklin Fark, N. J. — Trucking. 

Anderson, Victor, Sanatoga, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Atkatz, Joseph, care of F. T. Stryker, Highlands, N. J. — Farm manager. 

Berg, Henry, East Mansfield, Mass. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Blackman, Morris, Philadelphia. — Chemicals. 

Borovick, George, Chicago, HI. — Pharmacist. 

Blume, Henry, Wilmington, Del.^ — General agriculture. 

Brodie, Samuel, Berkeley, Cal. — Specializing, University of California. 

Brown, Benj., Covington, Ky. — General farming.* 

Capek, Thaddeus S., Stamford, Conn. — Dairying. 

Charen, Oscar, County Line, Pa. — Betz Farm, Bonair Station. 

Chodesh, Benj., Gap, Pa. — Doctor of veterinary. 

Coltun, Max J., Cumberland, Md. — Health officer. 

Crohn, Lawrence W. — Truck farming in New Jersey. 

Druckerman, Benjamin, New York City — Gardener, Central Park. 

Einstein, Sylvan D., Easton, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Epstein, Abraham, E. F. D. No. 3, Stamford, Conn.— Dairying on rented farm. 

Erde, Herman W., E. Lansing, Mich. — Attending Michigan State Agricultural 
College. 

Feldman, N., Philadelphia — Specializing in veterinary science at University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Fereshetian, Martin, Meadville, Pa. — Specializing at college. 

Fleisher, Max, Vineland, N. J.- — Superintendent of dairy. New Jersey Train- 
ing School. 

Frank, Harry, Jr., care of S. Ettinger, Tinley Park, 111. — Poultry farm man- 
ager. 

Fried, Albert, Vermillion, Ohio — Managing farm. 

Ginsberg, Leo, Jamison Corner, Pa. — Farming. 

Glantz, Emanuel, Danboro, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Goldberg, Benj., Mohegan Lake, N. Y. — General agriculture. 

Goldman, Jos., Eockford, 111. — Dairying. 

Goldman, Meyer, Norma, N. J. — Instructor in elementary agriculture to chil- 
dren of Jewish Colony. 

Gordon, Abe, Eochester, N. Y. — On his own farm. 

Green, Meyer, Elizabeth, N. J. — Civil Engineer. 

Plalbert, M., Erie, Pa. — Farming. 

Harrison Beryl, Grimes, Iowa — On his own farm. 

Hausmann, Samuel, Ellensville, N. Y. — On his own farm. 

Helfand, Louis I. — Post-graduate work at School, in charge of Schoenfeld 
Farm No. 1. 

Hecker, Geo. M., Chestnut Hill, Pa. — Eose growing. 

Heller, Chas. J., Amherst, Mass. — Head of Department of Market Gardening, 
Massachusetts State Agricultural College. 

Hirsch, Harry S., Lyons, 111. — On his own poultry farm. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 37 

Horn, Charles, Philadelphia — Assistant Superintendent, Philadelphia Vacant 
Lots Cultivation Association. 

Horn, Irving, Philadelphia — In business. 

How, W. Walter, Philadelphia— Clerk. 

Ibaugh, George W., Middleport, Pa. — Farm superintendent. 

Jaffe, David — Post-graduate work at School. 

Johnston, Edwin A., Chestnut Hill, Pa. — Poultry and swine raising. 

Kahan, Jacob, Eushland, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Kahn, Carl H. — On cotton plantation in South. 

Kaskin, Louis, Morristown, N. J. — Farming. 

Kravet, Lewis — Post-graduate work at School. 

Krinzman, Philip, Elizabeth, N. J. — Cultivating his own farm, 

Kysela, Eudolph, Denver, Colo.^In business. 

Landsman, Harry, Yonkers, N. Y. — On dairy farm. 

Lasker, Samuel, Interlaken, N. Y. — Farming and fruit. 

Lauchman, Wm., Goldsboro, N. C. — Farm manager. 

Lebeson, Harry, Columbus, Ohio — Attending Ohio State College. 

Lebeson, Herman, Columbus, Ohio — i^ttending Ohio State College, ' 

Leehner, Samuel, Perkiomenville, Pa. — Farming. 

Leff, Isador, Novelty, Ohio — Cultivating his own farm (Ivermoot Farm). 

Leib, Louis, Washington, D. C. — Manager of dairy company. 

Leiser, Monroe, Eagle Lake, Fla. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Lenik, Benjamin, E. F. D. 37, Mendota, 111. — General agriculture. 

Leon, Marcus, Des Moines, la. — In business. 

Levin, Julius N., Situate, E. I. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Levinson, Julius, Aurora, HI. — Greenhouse work. 

Lipschutz, Nathan, Eider, Baltimore Co., Md. — Farm manager. 

Lubin, Harry, Philadelphia — With Chestnut Tree Blight Commission. 

Major, Edward. — Specializing, Cornell University. 

Malish, M., Philadelphia — Dairy business. 

Margoliuth, Aaron, Minneapolis, Minn. — General agriculture. 

Michaelson, M., Indianapolis, Ind. — Manager, National Tree Surgery Company. 

Miller, A., Chicago, lU.^Seeds and floriculture business. 

Miller, Joseph, Salt Lake City, Utah — With Park Commission, 

Minkowsky, J., Lake Elmo, Minn. — Farming. 

Mitzmain, Maurice, B. A., M. Sc, Philippine Islands — Entomologist, Veter- 
inary Corps, Philippine Islands Department of Agriculture. 

Monblatt, Alex., Chicago, 111. — In business. 

Morris, Max, New Orleans, La. — Treasury of land company. 

Moskovitz, Morris, Neshaminy, Pa. — On his own farm. 

Naum, Harry, Nassau, N. Y. — Farm manager, Working Men's Circle Sani- 
tarium. 

Norvick, Jacob, Philadelphia — In business. 

Ostrolenk, Bernard, Canby, Minn. — Director, Agricultural Department, State 
High School. 

Ostrolenk, Lewis, Gloversville, N. Y. — Dairying. 

Packer, Benjamin, Chicago, 111. — Farm manager. 

Peyser, Sol., New York City. — Attorney. 

Putterman, M., Columbus, Ohio — Specializing, Ohio State University. 



38 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Ratner, Henry, Nonistown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm (Valley Brook 

Farm) with brother, 
Ratner, Jacob, Norristown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm (Valley Brook 

Farm) with brother. 
Ratner, Joseph, Detroit, Mich. — Farm manager. 
Eedalia, Lewis, Mays Landing, N. J. — Orcharding. 
Rich, Harry, Weatogue, Conn. — General manager, Tobacco Plantations of 

American Sumatra Tobacco Company. 
Rochlin, S. S., Mohegan Lake, N. Y. — Stock raising. 
Rock, Louis, Philadelphia — In business. 
Rose, Leonard, Milwaukee, V7is. — Studying chemistry. 
Rosenberg, N., Rome, N. Y. — General agriculture. 
Rosenberg, Sam'l M. — On farm near Philadelphia. 
Rosenfelt, Maurice, Philadelphia — Florist. 
Rosenthal, Jos. L., Lanoka, N. J. — Farming. 
Rudley, Samuel, Philadelphia — Instructor in gardening and in charge of 

beautifying public school grounds for The Board of Public Education. 
Salinger, Morris, Grimes, Iowa — Cultivating his own farm. 
Sehlesinger, Alphonse, New Orleans, La. — In business. 
Schmookler, M., Wynnewood, Pa. — Estate manager. 
Schuldt, Rudolph E., Little Silver, N. J.— Nursery manager. 
Schulman, Harry, St. Louis, Mo. — Assistant manager, Traffic Department, 

Missouri-Pacific Railway Company. 
Schutzbank, Jacob, Freehold, N. J. — Father's farm. 
Serber, D., Land Title Building, Philadelphia — Attorney. 
Serlin, Wm. J., Detroit, Mich.— In business. 
Silver, Chas., Monroeville, N. J.— Cultivating his own farm. 
Sobel, Isidore — On farm in New York State. 
Sobel, Sol., Ridgewood, N. J. — Farm manager. 
Snowvice, Wm., Bridgeton, N. J. — On his own farm. 
Sparberg, Geo. L., Oshkosh, Wis. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Speyer, Aaron, R. F. D. No. 3, Painesville, Ohio — Cultivating his own farm. 
Stabinsky, Julius, Atlanta, Ga.^ — Dairying. 
Stern, Isaac, New York City — Manager, machine company. 
Taubenhaus, Jacob, Newark, Del.— Assistant Chief in Department Plant 

Pathology, Delaware Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Wallman, Israel, Indianapolis, Ind. — Bureau of Animal Industry, U. S. Dept. 

of Agriculture. 
Weightman, Benj., Tampico, 111. — Farm manager. 
Weigle, Fred'k H., Newton, Pa. — Farming. 
Weinberg, Harry, Palestine, Texas — In charge of tobacco plantations of Wm. 

Taussig Tobacco Company. 
Weiss, Harry, Philadelphia, Pa. — Agricultural instructor, Jewish Foster Home. 
Wiseman, J. H., Pittsburgh, Pa. — Instructor in gardening. Board of Public 

Education. 
Witkin, Abraham, Penllyn, Pa. — Horticulture. 
Wolf, E. H., Philadelphia — In business. 
Woolwich, Aaron, Reading, Pa. — Greenhouse work. 
Woodwich, Morris, Rutledge, Pa. — Farming. 
Work, James, Narberth, Pa. — Nursery work. 
Zalinger, Bernie A., Chicago, El. — Florist. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 39 

THE GRADUATES' AID FUND 

The Graduates' Aid Fund, founded by Mr. William Volker, 
of Kansas City, Mo., has for its object the building up of a fund, 
the interest of which is to be devoted to extending loans to such 
of the graduates of The National Farm School who shall establish 
themselves on farms of their own. 

Contributions have been received from: 

William Volker, Kansas City, Mo $150.00 

A. W. Benjamin, Kansas City, Mo 100.00 

Henry Hellman, New York City 200.00 

Barnett Binswanger, Philadelphia 50.00 

Adolph Eichholz, Esq., Philadelphia 50.00 

Benjamin Finberg, Philadelphia 50.00 

Hart Blumenthal, Philadelphia 50.00 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SCHOENFELD MEMORIAL FARMS COMMITTEE 

Harry Felix, Chairman. 

It is extremely unfortunate that this report cannot be submit- 
ted this year by the former Chairman of the Schoenfeld Memorial 
Farms Committee, the late Barnett Binswanger. It is, however, 
with pleasure and gratification that the sixth annual report of the 
Schoenfeld Farm No. 3 is presented to j'ou, the details, as to Nos. 
1 and 2, having already been presented to you, — a pleasure all the 
more keen since it can be said that the result of the sixth year of 
the farm is due to the excellent executive work of the late Mr. 
Binswanger and the co-operation with him of the Director and the 
manager of the farm, shows an excellent result in actual cash made 
of $748.77. 

To report to you as to the various activities of the Schoen- 
feld Memorial Farms Nos. 1, 2 and 3, would be to again present 
to you the report that has already been given to you by the Di- 
rector and by the head of the Agricultural Department. 

It might be as well to remark at this time, however, that the 
farm itself has been increased in value by not less than $300.00 
during the past year, by reason of the tiling and draining of 
meadow land. This throws into cultivation eight acres of land, 
which, prior to this time, was bringing practically no income. 



40 THE ISaTIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

The further increase in the value of the real estate, by reason 
of improvements made in the horse barn and instructor's house, 
must also be noted, as this increase is an item shown on the books, 
but not noted in the statement of cash made. It is mentioned in 
order that you may understand that in this report, so far as cash 
is concerned, no notice is taken of such improvements. 

Many thanks are at this time given to the other members of 
this committee for the aid afforded in the administration of the af- 
fairs of this farm. 

FARM No. 3— FINANCIAL STANDING 

October 1, 1913 to September 30. 1914 

Gain 

Sale of Farm Products $4,450.39 

Inventory, September 30, 1914 2,797.00 

Interest on Bank Deposits 1.5.74 



$7,263.13 



Loss 

Fuel 4.92 

Wages 720.00 

Board of Extra Help 313.83 

Medical Supplies 5.00 

Eepairs 55.43 

Farm Supplies (Including Inventory of September 30, 

1913, $3600.60) 5,415.18 



6,514.36 
Net Gain, September 30, 1914 $748.77 



ACTUAL FINANCIAL STANDING 

Assets 

Cash $336.45 

Live Stock 2,368.70 

Eeal Estate 15,000.00 

Implements 743.75 

Inventory, September 30, 1914 2,797.00 

$21,245.90 

Liabilities 

Due Endo\\-ment Fund 650.00 



Net Worth _ $20,595.90 

Capital Account $19,84/. 13 

Net Gain, 1914 748.77 

$20,595.90 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 41 

DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT REPORT 

Hetty Abraham, Matron. 

The enrollment of a Freshman Class in March, numbering 65 
students, increased the household in its various departments 
to its extremest capacity. We have had to turn the Assembly 
Hall, a very important room to give up for this purpose, into an 
annex dining-room, seating 50 students. 

The addition of a root cellar under the laboratory school room 
extension has met a long-felt accommodation for the storing of our 
winter supplies such as potatoes, apples, fruits, vegetables of various 
kinds, barrels of sugar, molasses and vinegar. The pantry has been 
improved by the installation of better arrangements 'for this par- 
ticular work and the hot water system, in the cellar of Main 
Building, has been extended and enlarged. In the laundry, too, a 
larger washing machine has been installed, more in keeping with 
our present needs. As the institution grows so the necessities 
multiply. 

We can boast again of the excellent health of so large a house- 
hold, but are much indebted to the Jewish Hospital for the care 
taken of two special cases, these students having been returned to 
the School in the best of health. 

The kitchen garden has supplied the means for large quantities 
of canning, preserving, pickling; the orchard for peaches, pears 
and grapes. 

A number of donations to this department, recorded elsewhere, 
are gratefully acknowledged, but the work of the Ladies ' Auxiliary 
of The National Farm School in replenishing the linen room supplies 
with 492 useful articles, deserves special mention. 



REPORT OF THE LADIES' BOARD OF THE 
NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL, 1913-1914 

(Mrs.) Rosa B. Schoneman, Chairman. 

" Meetings were held once a month from September to April, in- 
clusive, at which ways and means were discussed whereby the 
Ladies' Board might be helpful to the Executive Board in matters 
concerning improvements at the Farm School, the comfort of the 
students, and in many other directions. Thanks are due the offi- 
cers, as well as the ladies on the different committees, for the good 



42 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

work they have done, and I hope that I may count on their interest 
during the coming year. 

Sewing Circle 

The Sewing Circle met on the first and third Thursday from 
November to April, inclusive, and although the attendance might 
have been larger, enough work was done to make a good showing on 
the shelves of the linen room at the Farm School. 

Through the kindness of the ladies of the Board and an ap- 
propriation granted by the Executive Board, as well as other dona- 
tions, we were able to bu}^ material for the following articles: 
78 sheets. 213 face towels. 

147 pillow cases. 20 roller towels. 

34 laundry bags. 2 ironing board covers. 

We also sent out to the Farm School: 

36 bed spreads. 25 yards of table oil-cloth. 

120 bath towels. 3 large laundry baskets. 

18 bureau scarfs. 
All necessities for the sewing room, such as cotton, needles, tape, etc. 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

EMERGENCY FUXD 

Dr. 

1913— September 25th, Balance on hand $84.06 

October 4th, Voucher 7568 70.00 

1914 — January 14th, Voucher 7858 35.00 

April loth. Voucher 8131 35.00 

$224.06 

Cr. 
1913— December 10th, N. Snellenburg & Co.— bill November 29, 

1913 $1 .35 

1914— January 13th, B. B. Block— bill December 27, 1913 13.50 

January 27th, S. S. Garrett & Co.— bill January 22, 1914 7.20 

February 26th, John T. Stanley— bill February 13, 1914 9.75 

March 28th, N. Snellenburg & Co.— bill March 20, 1914. . 6.50 

June 4th, Fagley & Halpen— bill May 15, 1914 ' 2.50 

June 8th, N. Snellenburg & Co. — bills from November 4, 

1913, to April 1, 1914 104.50 

June 24th, S. S. Garrett & Co.— bill June 1, 1914 13.16 

August 31st, Gimbel Bros.— bill April 30, 1914 5.00 

September 1st, Balance on hand 60.60 

224.06 

1914— September 1st, Balance on hand, $60.60. 

ladies' auxiliary fuxd 

September 1, 1914 — Cash on hand $37.85 

(MRS.) MINNIE C. GUCKENHEIMER, 

Treasurer. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 43 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

POST-GRADUATE CLASS 

HELFAND, L. I Philadefphia, Pa. 

JAFFE, DAVID Philadelphia, Pa. 

GRADUATING CLASS— March 2, 1914 

BLUME, HENRY El Paso, Tex. 

CHAREN, OSCAR Philadelphia, Pa. 

FRIED, ALBERT Vermilion, O. 

FRIEDMAN. AARON Philadelphia, Pa. 

GINSBERG, LEO Pittstown, N. J. 

HECKER, GEORGE Philadelphia, Pa. 

JOHNSTON, EDWARD Lansdowne, Pa. 

McCRACKEN, WM. J Philadelphia, Pa. 

RASKIN, JACOB New York, N. Y. 

ROSENTHAL, JOSEPH .• New York, N. Y. 

SCHULDT, RUDOLPH Newark, N. J. 

WEIGEL, FRED Philadelphia, Pa. 

WOLF, HYMAN New York City 

ZWEIGHAFT, BERNARD Alliance, N. J. 

CERTIFICATES 
(Students who left on graduation day, with two-year certificates.) 

KERNER, SAMUEL Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LASKER, SAMUEL Providence, R. I. 

SCHUTZBANK, JACOB Freehold, N. J, 

ULMAN, JULIUS Savannah, Ga. 

WOOLWICH, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

SENIOR CLASS 

BAUTMAN, ISRAEL Newburgh, N. Y. 

BURTON, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

DAVIDSON, SAMUEL , Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

GEORGE, HOWARD Philadelphia, Pa. 

KASKIN, LOUIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

KLEIN, ELMER '. Cleveland, Ohio 

LIGHT, PHILIP Newark, N. J. 

NUSSBAUM, CHARLES Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROSS, HENRY Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SELIGMAN, MARTIN F Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SEMEL, MAX New York, N. Y. 

SHOR, HARRY New Y'ork, N. Y. 

JUNIOR CLASS 

ABRAMS, CHARLES Philadelphia, Pa. 

BILLIG, SAMUEL New York, N. Y. 

BOONIN, LEON Philadelphia, Fa. 

CITRON, HYMAN '. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DORFMAN, SAMUEL New York, N. Y. 

DRUCKMAN, MORRIS Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DUBLIN, SAMUEL Brooklyn, N. Y. 

EHOODIN, ABRAHAM Cincinnati, Ohio 

ELLIS, ROBERT Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ELLNER, JOSEPH New York, N. Y. 

EZRIN, BENJAMIN Philadelphia, Pa. 

PALKOWITZ, ISIDORE . . . . ; New York, N. Y 

FELDMAN, ARTHUR Everett, Mass. 

FEINBERG, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

FLEISHMAN, LEON .Philadelphia, Pa. 

GOLDFINE, BENJAMIN .New York, N. Y. 



44 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

GOLDMAN, JACOB St. Louis, Mo. 

GOLDSTEIN, JACK .Cleveland, O. 

GOLDSTEIN, RAY Atlantic City, N. J. 

HANTCHAKOW, PINCUS New York, N. Y. 

HARKAVY, MORRIS New York, N. Y. 

HELLMAN, SIMON New Orleans, La. 

KALLEN, SAMUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

KESSELMAN, BENJAMIN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

KLEVANSKY, ABRAHAM Reading, Pa. 

KRIVIN, DAVID Brooklyn, N. Y. 

LERNER. MANUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

LEVINTOW, ARTHUR Philadelphia, Pa. 

LIEBLING, JULIUS New York, N. Y. 

MAGRAM, NATHAN New York, N. Y. 

MOREINIS, WILLIAM New York, N. Y. 

OXENHANDLER, ISAAC New York, N. Y. 

ROBB, BENJAMIN New York, N. Y. 

RUBINOFF, LOUIS Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SCHWEITZER, HYM AN Cleveland, Ohio 

SELECTER, MEYER Philadelphia, Pa. 

SHAPERA, SOLOMON New York, N. Y. 

STAMEN, HARRY Chelsea, Mass. 

TOOR, CECIL J Philadelphia, Pa. 

WADE, BENJAMIN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WOLF, JESSE Philadelphia, Pa. 

WOLPSON, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

ZACK, HARRY New York, N. Y. 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

ADLER, SOLOMON New York, N. Y. 

BARNETT, MAXWELL Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BELOFSKY, SIMON New York, N. Y. 

BERGSTEIN, SAMUEL : Mobile, Ala. 

BERMAN, PETER Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BOWERS, THEO. S Philadelphia, Pa. 

BRENNER, MORRIS Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BURGER, SAMUEL : Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CAMEN, ABRAHAM Baltimore, Md. 

CANTOR, NATHAN Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

COHN, CHARLES Philadelphia, Pa. 

COOPER, LOUIS New York, N. Y. 

CREMENETSKY, ABRAHAM Media, Pa. 

DONCHIN, SOLOMON Newark, N. J. 

DRUCKERMAN, JOSEPH New York, N. Y. 

ERDE, SAMUEL New York, N. Y. 

FISCHLOWITZ, V. K St. Louis, Mo. 

FRANK, ABRAHAM New York, N. Y. 

FRANK, MEYER New York, N. Y. 

FRANKEL, KARL New York, N. Y. 

GINZBERG, NAHUM New York, N. Y 

GOLDBERG, LOUIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

GOLDSTON, ABRAHAM Cleveland, Ohio 

GOLUB, NATHAN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

HABER. EDWARD Cleveland, Ohio 

HAIKEN, JOSEPH Brooklyn, N. Y. 

JACKSON, CHAS. A Philadelphia, Pa. 

JACOBS, ALEXANDER H Philadelphia, Pa. 

JACOBSON, CLARENCE Portsmouth, Va. 

JAFFE, HARRY New York, N. Y. 

KAHN, JOSEPH Allentown, Pa. 

KASSELMAN, MAX Alliance, N. J. 

KAUFMANN, MATTHEW Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Till-] NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 45 



KELTZ, ISRAEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

KOSIIOWSKY, CLARENCE Easton, Pa. 

LIEBERM AN, AARON Houston, Texas 

AL^LLOY, BENJAMIN Philadelphia, Pa. 

MANIS, ELIAS New York, N. Y. 

M ELTZER, LEO Chelsea, Mass. 

MEYER, MAX Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

MIRIN, HYMAN New York, N. Y. 

PECH, EMANUEL Newark, N. J. 

POPKIN, ISIDORE Brooklyn, N. Y. 

RADLER, ABRAHAM Newark, N. J. 

REID, 2d. WM. L. Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROSENZWEIG, DAVID New York, N. Y. 

ROZET, ISIDORE Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHANNON, SAMUEL S New York, N. Y. 

SCHULZE, JULIUS Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHWARTZ, ABRAHAM N Greensboro, N. C. 

SEGAL, JULIUS M Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SHAPIRO, ISAAC Baltimore, Md. 

SIEGEL, HENRY Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SMITH, BENJAMIN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SPIEGEL. MILTON New York, N. Y. 

STEIDEL, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

TABOLSKY, LOUIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

WAGNER. CHARLES R., JR New York, N. Y. 

WILENSKY, MORRIS New York, N. Y. 

WOLFF, SAMUEL St. Louis, Mo. 

YOFFE, VICTOR Philadelphia, Pa. 



FESTIVE TREES 

Planted in Spring of 19 J 4, in honor of 

Beth-EI Religious School, South Bend, Ind. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Bing, South Bend, Ind., Golden Wedding, October 21, 1913. 

Samuel Kahn Blumenthal, Philadelphia, Birth, October 23, 1913. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Dilsheimer, Philadelphia, Fifteenth Wedding Anni- 
versary, June 14, 1914. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lehman Ellerman, Philadelphia, Golden Wedding, February 28, 
1914. 

Beatrice Eschner and Isaac Landman, Philadelphia, Betrothal, July 26, 1913. 

Leonard Geis, Philadelphia, Confirmation, June 11, 1913. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome L. Grant, Philadelphia, Wedding, October 2, 1913. 

Edward Hirsh, Philadelphia, Confirmation, June 11, 1913. 

Lucien I. Katzenberg, Philadelphia, Birth, August 1, 1913. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bertram F. Kline, Wheeling, W. Va., Wedding, April 20, 1913. 

Gilbert Kraus, Philadelphia, Confirmation, June 11, 1913. 

Rabbi and Mrs. Isaac Landman, Philadelphia, Wedding, September 3, 1913. 

Mildred Babette Louer, Chicago, 111., Confirmation, April 19, 1914. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Daniel Myers, Philadelphia, First Wedding Anniversary, 
June 2, 1914. 

Ruth Madeline Press, Philadelphia, Birth, November 15, 1913. 

Evelyn Rosenberg, Philadelphia, Confirmation, June 11, 1913. 

Theresa Saxe, Chicago, 111., Fifty-ninth Birthday Anniversary, May 6, 1913. 

Nathan Schoenfeld, Philadelphia, Confirmation, June 11, 1913. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Silverman, Philadelphia, Golden Wedding, April 26, 1914. 

Dorothy Belle Simon, Alexandria, La., Birth, December 4, 1913. 

Maxwell Sobel, Philadelphia, Confirmation, June 11, 1913. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius L. Teller, Philadelphia, Wedding, January 7, 1914. 

Fred Wolf, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pa., Birth, January 2, 1914. 

Lucile Pauline Wurmser, Chicago, 111., Confirmation, June 11, 1913. 



MEMORIAL TREES 

Planted in Spring of 1914, in Memory of 



LITTLE ROCK, ARK. 
Mandlebaum, Anna 

LOCKBFORD, CAL. 
Bruml, Henry J. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
King, Mina 
Marx, Elias Simon 

LIGONIER, IND, 
Selig, Mrs. Joseph 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
Frank, Bertha Rayner 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Van Baalen, Isaac 

ST. JOSEPH, MO. 
Westheimer, Mrs. Ferdi- 
nand 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
Werbelovsky, J, H. 

NEW YORK CITY 
Prey, Emanuel 
Frey', Emma 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
Cauffman, Joseph 
Cauffman, Mary 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
Marshall, Jacob 
Stolz, Regina 

CHILLICOTHE, OHIO 
Schaehne, Moritz 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 
Fruhauf, Emma Reiter 
Fruhauf, Fanny Reiter 
Hessberg, Daniel 
Reiter, Sarah 
Sugenheim, Hanna 
Wolf, Jacob 

Wolfstein, Jennie Ranso- 
hoff 

BRADFORD, PA. 
Greenewald, Jos. C. 

CATASAUQUA, PA. 
Reis, Louisa I. 



JENKINTOWN, PA. 
SilbLTman, Max 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
Aarons, Solomon 
Adams, Adam C. 
Asher, Emanuel 
Belber, Mindel 
Belber, Moses 
Belber, Sarah 
Berg, Max 

Binswanger, Barnett (by 

the Board of the School) 

Binswanger, Barnett (by 

his grandson) 
Bloch, Jacob 
Borkon, Samuel 
Brunhild, Leopold 
Dryfoos, Fanny 
Dryfoos, Henry 
Ermann, Fannie 
. Fels, Joseph 
Gerschel, Bertha 
Gueterman, Henry 
Harberg, Joseph 
Heyman, Benj. A. 
Heyman, David 
Josephson, Anton 
Kahn, Solomon 
Krauss, Albert S. 
KrauES, Moses 
Langsdorf, Babette 
Langsdorf, Jacob 
Levy, Alex. 
Lowenstein, Dora M. 
Mailert, Adeline 
Mailert, Augustus 
Marquis, Isaac 
Metzger, Minnie 
Meyer, Rose A. 
Meyerhoff, Julia Kleeblatt 
Meyerhoff, Louis 
Meyers, Rose 
Meyers, Samuel 
Meyers, Samuel A. 
Nathanson, Fannie 
Nathanson, Harry M. 
Nathanson, Nathan 
Olsho, Jacob 
Oppenheimer, Max 
Propper, David 
Reis, Max 
Rosenberg, Marcus 
Rosenberg, Mina 
Rubenstein, Michael 
Samuel, Ellen Phillips 
Sondheimer, Babette 



Stein, Isaac 
Strassburger, Carrie 
Strassburger, Francis 
Strouse, Michael 
Walker, Rebecca 
Wertheimer, Henry 
Wilson, Simon 
Winolander, Henrietta 
Wolf, Mrs. Elias 
Zellner, Grace Aguilar 
Zineman, Louis 
Zineman, Theresa 
Zineman, William B. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 
Aaron, Mrs. Louis I. 
Sunstein, Cass 

DALLAS, TEXAS 
Frank, Joseph 
Silberstein, Asher 

FORT WORTH, TEX. 
Friend, Henry M. 

GALVESTON, TEX. 
Kempner, Harris 

SAN ANTONIO, TEX. 
Mayer, Ferdinand 
Mayer, Jetta 
Moritz, Emma 
Moritz, Samuel 

SAN DIAGO, TEX. 
Cohn, Martha 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
Caro, Rabbi Victor 

MAINZ, GERMANY 
Hirsch, Joseph 

NEUSTADT A/D 
HAARDT, GERMANY 
Mayer, Anna 

WORMS, GERMANY ■ 
Wolf, Babette 

AMSTERDAM, 
HOLLAND . 
Voorzanger, Judic Yetta 
Voorzanger, Solomon L. 



To THE Sailors and Marines Who Fell at Vera Cruz 



TllK NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 47 



LEGACIES AND ENDOWMENTS 

Money received in legacies is placed in the Endowment Fiuni. 

1895 — In memoriam Jacob Tuck and wife, bv their children 

Philadelphia '. $1,000.00 

1899— Carolyn Parent Nirdlinger. Philadelphia 500.00 

1903— Jacob H. Hecht, Boston, Mass 500.00 

1905— Moses Lichten, Philadelphia 500.00 

1906— Marx Wineland, Frostberg, Md 500.00 

1907 — Frances Seligman, Philadelphia (for Bernard and 

Frances Seligman Library Alcove) 200.00 

" Fannie Houseman, Philadelphia (in memory of her 

son, Arthur Ballenberg Houseman) 100.00 

' ' Edward Popper, Greenville, Texas 100.00 

' ' Samuel W. Goodman, Philadelphia 200.00 

' ' Fannie Simon, Philadelphia 50.00 

' ' Isaac Sailer, Philadelphia 500.00 

1908— Leah Bernheimer, Mobile, Ala 100.00 

' ' Eleanore Samuel, Philadelphia 343.29 

' ' Solomon Blumenthal, Philadelphia 250.00 

1909— Moses H. Stern, Philadelphia 500.00 

' ' Esther Sailer, Philadelphia 78.05 

" Eebeeca Haas, Indianapolis, Ind 100.00 

' ' Blanche Loeb, New York .' 1,000.00 

1910— Anchel Rosenthal, Philadelphia 500.00 

' ' Abraham Lipman, Pittsburgh, Pa 500.00 

" Henrietta Morgenroth, Louisville, Ky 500.00 

" In Memory of Milton L. Snellenburg, by his Father. . 2,000.00 

1911— Samuel Baldauf, Oskaloosa, Iowa 300.00 

" Max Bamberger, Philadelphia 5,000.00 

' ' Harriet B. Labe, Philadelphia 100.00 

" Adolph Leberman, Philadelphia 100.00 

1912 — Annie M. Ferguson, Pittsburgh, Pa 100.00 

' ' Mina Friedman, Chicago, 111 100.00 

' ' Benjamin Kahn, Philadelphia 200.00 

" Louis Lowenthal, Rochester, N. Y 500.00 

' ' Levi Stern, Philadelphia 1 00.00 

" Abraham Weiler, Columbus, Ohio 200.00 

1913— Leopold Keiser, Buffalo, N. Y 500.00 

" Estate of Sophia Rothschild, Summitville, Ind 100.00 

' ' Cass Sunstein, Pittsburgh, Pa 100.00 

' ' Estate of Samuel Woolner, Peoria, 111 500.00 

1914 — In Memory of Barnett Binswanger, Philadelphia, bv 

his Wife 1 50.00 

Martha Wertheimer Kohn, Philadelphia 200.00 

Nathan Herrmann, New York 1 ,000.00 

Isaac Van Baalen, Detroit, Mich. 100.00 

Mrs. Ferdinand Westheimer. St. Joseph, Mo 100.00 

Simon Zweighaft, Philadelphia 250.00 



48 THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 



The follonnng is a list of legacies and end oiv merits to 

THE FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES 

OF PHILADELPHIA 
and is published here as required of constituent institutions. 

1902 — Mrs. Carrie Hamberg, in memory of her hus- 
band, Isaac Hamberg $100.00 

1902 — Children of David Ettinger, in memory of 

their father 100.00 

1903 — Mrs. Alice Hagedorn, in memory of her hus- 
band, John J. Hagedorn 5,000.00 

1903 — Herman Jonas Bequest 7,500.00 

1903— Mrs. Carrie Hamberg (additional) 100.00 

1903— Ernst Kaufmann Bequest 2,000.00 

1904 — Mrs. Carrie Hamberg (additional) 100.00 

1904 — Augustus Marks, in memory of his wife, Vir- 
ginia Marks 50.00 

1904 — Augustus Marks (additional) 10.00 

1905— Augustus Marks (additional) 300.00 

1905 — Sigmund Roedelheim Bequest 500.00 

1905 — Mrs. Carrie Krieger, in memory of her husband, 

Samuel Krieger 1,000.00 

1905 — Wm. Krieger, in memory of his father, Samuel 

Krieger 100.00 

1905 — Herman B. Blumenthal Bequest 2,000.00 

1905 — S. M. and M. S. Fridenberg, in memory of 

Esther, wife of S. M. Fridenberg 1,000.00 

1906— Augustus Marks (additional) 140.00 

1908 — Mrs. Fannie A. Leberman Bequest 500.00 

1908— Isaac Herzberg Bequest 3,000.00 

1909 — Simon and Rosa Fleisher Endowment (by their 

children) 5,000.00 

1909 — D. "Frank Greenewald, in memory of his mother, 

Sallie Gimbel Greenewald 2,000.00 

1909 — Adolph Weyl, in memory of his wife. Rose Weyl 50.00 

1909— Herman Loeb Bequest 3,000.00 

1909 — Henry Rothschild Bequest 1,500.00 

1910 — The Milton L. Snellenburg Fund (Endowed 

by his father, Nathan Snellenburg) 2,000.00 

1911 — Simon Bacharach Bequest 200.00 

1911— Adolph Weyl (additional) 50.00 

1911 — Mrs. Florence Liveright, in memory of her son, 

Benjamin Kahn Liveright 500.00 

1911— Albert M. Nusbaum Bequest 1,000.00 

1911 — Esther Bacharach Bequest 200.00 

1911 — Abram Herzberg Bequest 500.00 

1911— Leon Cans Bequest 5,000.00 

1911 — Charlotte Harburger Bequest 200.00 




H 



6 _ 



6 ^ 



o -a 
^ _ 



V en 
I g 



u. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 49 



1911 — Meyer Fraxk Bequest $200.00 

1911 — Adolph Weyl, in memory of his grandchild, 

Ruth Weyl Bernheimer 25.00 

1912— Joseph Rosskam Bequest 1,000.00 

1912— Adolph Weyl Bequest 100.00 

1912 — Martin Frank, in memory of his parents, Leon 

and Mathilda Frank 500.00 

1912 — The Simon and Esther Bacharach Endow- 
ment, by their children 1,500.00 

1912 — Gustav Bacharach Fund 50.00 

1912 — Leah Abeles Goldsmith, in memory of her 

brother, Simon Abeles 500.00 

1912— Meyer Seidenbach Bequest 1,000.00 

1913 — Julius Siedenbach Bequest 1,000.00 

1913 — Sigmund Heilbron Bequest 400.00 

1913— Emanuel Rubel Memorial 900.00 

1913— Mrs. Henry Schwarz Bequest 100.00 

1913 — Mrs. Hannah Hoffman, in memory of her son, 

Alexander Hoffman 100.00 

1913— Morris Pf^lzer Beqiiest 5,000.00 

1 914— Isaac Blum Bequest 250.00 

1914 — Mrs. Gabriel Hirsh, in memory of her husband, 

Gabriel Hirsh ] ,.500.00 

1914 — Henry Jonas Bequest 2,000.00 

1914 — Marcus Katz Bequest 100.00 

1914 — William Kaufman Bequest 5,000.00 



Special Donations to the Endowment Fund of 

THE Federation of Jewish Charities of 

Philadelphia 

1912 — Benjamin Wolf, upon his fiftieth birthday $5,000.00 

1913— The Children of Mrs. Elias Wolf, in honor of her 

eightieth birthday 2,500.00 

1914 — The Children of Elias and Amelia Wolf, in their 

memory 25,000.00 



50 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Scholarships and Prizes Endowed 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

1908— "WM. S. RAYNER SCHOLARSHIP." The 
income of $5,000 contributed to the Endowment 
Fund by his daughter, Mrs. Bertha Rayner 
Frank. 

1908— "DR. SAMUEL L. FRANK SCHOLAR- 
SHIP." The income of $5,000 contributed to 
the Endowment Fund by his wife, Mrs. Bertha 
Rayner Frank. 

PRIZES 

1907— "THE HERBERT T. HYMAN PRIZES." 

The interest of $150 donated by Mrs. Bernard 
Sluizer, in memory of her son. 

1908— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the Endow- 
ment Fund by Harry Louchheim, of New York, 
in memory of his father. 

1908— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the Endow- 
ment Fund by Mrs. Louis S. Eliel, in memory 
of her father. 

1910— "THE ANCHEL ROSENTHAL PRIZES." 
The interest of a bequest of $500 to the Endow- 
ment Fund. 

1911— "THE HARRIET B. LABE PRIZE." The in- 
terest of a bequest of $100 to the Endowment 
Fund. 

1914— "THE MARTHA AND DAVID KOHN 
PRIZES." The interest of a bequest of $200 to 
the Endowment Fund, by Martha Kohn. 

1914— "THE BARNETT BINSWANGER PRIZES." 
The interest of a contribution of $150 to the En- 
dowment Fund by Mrs. Barnett Binswanger, in 
memory of her husband. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 51 



PRIZES TO STUDENTS 

The appeal made to friends of the school to contribute money 
prizes for efficiency in the various departments of the school, 
has been answered, to so pleasing an extent, that, during the 
past year, $330.00, in cash, were awarded to the students at the 
School for proficiency, effort and improvement. The money for 
these prizes is contributed as follow^s: 

"The Herbert T. Hyman Prizes." The interest of $150.00 
donated by Mrs. Bernard Sluzier, in memory of her son. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of $250.00 
contributed to the Endowment Fund by Harry Louchheim, of New- 
York, in memory of his father. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of $250.00 
contributed to the Endowment Fund by Mrs. L. S. Eliel, of Phila- 
delphia, in memory of her father. 

"The Anchel Rosenthal Prizes." The interest of $500.00 
bequeathed to the Endowment Fund. 

"The Harriet B. Labe Prizes." The interest of $100.00 
bequeathed to the Endowment Fund. 

"The Martha and David Kohn Prizes." The interest of 
$200.00 contributed by Martha Kohn. 

"The Barnett Binswanger Prizes." The interest of $150.00 
contributed by Mrs. Barnett Binswanger. 

Mr. Samuel Grabfelder, Philadelphia (annual) $25.00 

Mr. Geo. F. Hoffman, Philadelphia (anmial) 25.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf. Philadelphia (annual) 25.00 

^lT. Louis Loeb, New York, in memory of his wife (annual) . . 25.00 

Mr. Joseph Potsdamer, Philadelphia (annual) 25.00 

Mr. Max Berg, Philadelphia (annual) 30.00 

Mrs. Gabriel Blum, Philadelphia, in memory of her sister 

(annual) '. 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Hart Blumenthal, Philadelphia, in memory of 

their son Ralph (annual) 10.00 

Mrs. Sol Blumenthal. Philadelphia, in memory of her husband 

(annual) 10.00 

Mr. David Kirschbaum, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mr. Moe Lieberman, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mr, L L. Marks, Chicago, in memory of his son (annual) .. . 10.00 

Mr. I. H. Silverman, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Siuberg. Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mrs. D, Berlizheimer, Philadelphia (annual) 5.00 

Mr. Samuel D. Lit, Philadelphia (annual) 5.00 

Mr. A. Miller, Chicago 5.00 

Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, Philadelphia (annual) 5.00 

Mrs. Max Oppenheimer. Philadelphia, in memory of Hulda 

Oppenheimer (annual) 5.00 

Mr. George C. Watson, Philadelphia (annual) 2.00 

Mr, John H. Ansley, Philadelphia 2.00 

Mr. Samuel Henges, Philadelphia 2.00 

Mr. A. K. Schroeder. Philadelphia 2.00 

' ' The Simon Wilson Perpetual Prize. ' ' bv his daughter. Miss 

Rose Wilson. Philadelphia ." 2.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



LIFE MEMBERS 



One payment of $100.00, one time, into the Endowment Fund 



ALABA]\IA 

Mobile 

*Bernheimer, Mrs. L. 

CAI;IFORNIA 

Bakersfield 

Cohn, C. 
San Francisco 

Gunst, M. A. 
Hellman, Isaias W. 
Meyer, Mary Jeannette 
Neustadter, Mrs. J. H. 
Eosenbaum, Mrs, C. W. 
Samson, Mrs. Rudolph 

DIST. OF COLUMBIA 

Washington 

Berliner, Emile 

ILLINOIS 
Champaign 

Kuhn, Caroline L. 

Kuhn, Florence L. 
Chicago 

Bauman, Mrs. Edw. 

Block, Joseph 

Frank, Henry L. 

Frennd, Gustav 

Greenebaum, Moses E. 

Joseph, L. 

Mandel, Edwin F. 

Mandel, Mrs. Emanuel 
*Mandel, Leon 

Phillipson, Samuel 

Reitler, Chas. 

Stettauer, Mrs. D. 
Peoria 

Woolner, Mrs. Miriam 
S. 

Woolner, Seymour A. 

Woolner, Mrs. W. B. 

Woolner, W. B. 
Rochelle 

Hilb, Emanuel 
Rock Island 

Mosenfelder, Mrs. Louis 

INDIANA 
Indianapolis 

Schwartz, Martin 

Ligonier 

Straus, Isaac 
Straus, Jacob 
Terre Haute 

Levi, Simon 

* Deceased. 



IOWA 
Dubuque 

Slimmer, A. 
Sioux City 

Wise, Mrs. Chas. 

KENTUCKY 

Owensboro 

Shorten, J. D., 

LOUISIANA 

New Orleans 

District Grand Lodge, 

No. 7, L O. B. B. 
*Newman, Isidore 
Newman, Mrs. Henry 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 

Cohen, Mendes 
*Rayner, Wm. S. 

Reinhard, Samuel E. 
*Strouse, Isaac 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

Hecht, Mrs. Lina 
Rawitser, Fred 
Shuman, A. 

MICHIGAN 
Detroit 

Schloss, Seligman 

MISSISSIPPI 

Natchez 

Frank, H. 

MISSOURI 

St. Joseph 

Hirsch, Sol. 
*Westheimer, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ferdinand 
Westheimer, Samuel 
St. Louis 
*Rice, Jonathan 
Stix, C. A. 

NEW JERSEY 

Newark 

Schlesinger, Louis 

NEW YORK 
Brooklyn 

Kalvin, Mrs. Henry M. 
Buffalo 

Winkler, Mrs. R. S. 
New York City 

*Abraham, A. 
Bernheimer, Miss 
Rosie 



Blumenthal, Geo. 

Budge, Henry 

Goodhart, Philip J. 

Guggenheim, Wm. 

Hays, Daniel P. 

Heinsheimer, Alfred 

■ M. 

Hermann, Ferdinand 

Kaufmann, B. 

Krauskopf, Mary G. 

Lewisohn, Adolph 
*Mack, Jacob W. 

Marshall, Louis 

Meyer, Wm. 

Morganstern, Albert 
G. 

Salomon, Wm. 

Silberberg, G. 

Sidenberg, G. 

Warburg, Felix M. 

Warburg, Paul M. 

Wollman, Henry 

Wollman, Wm. J. 
New Rochelle 

Ladenburger, Mrs. 
Theo. 
Niagara Falls 

Silberberg, Bertha 

Silberberg, Isaac L. 
Rochester 
*Lowenthal, M. 

Michaels, Joseph 

Silberberg, M. 

Silberberg, G. 

OHIO 
Cincinnati 

Block, Samuel 
*Klein, Samuel 

Lowman, Leo. J. 

Meis, Henry 
^Reiter, A. 
*Sturm, Simon 

Columbus 

B'nai Israel Sister- 
hood 
Lazarus, Fred'k. 
Lazarus, Ralph 
Miller, Leopold 
Zion Lodge No. 62, 
I. O. B. B. 
YoungstOAvn 
Theobald, Mrs. C. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Altoona 

Kline, Henry S. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



53 



LIFE MEMBERS— (Continued) 



Langhorne 

*Bi-ansou, I. L. 



Philadelphia 

Betz & Son 

Bloch, B. B. 

Blum, Ralph 
*Blumenthal, Herman 
*Blumenthal, Sol. 

Byers, Jos. J. 

Clothier, Isaac H. 

Fleisher, Martha S. 

Grant, Adolph 

Harrison, C. C. 

Hagedorn, Mrs. Alice 
*Jonas, Herman 

Kaas, Andrew 

Kaufmann, Morris A. 

Kayser, Samuel 

Krauskopf, Harold 

Langfeld, A. M. 

Levy, Sol. 

Lit, S. D. 
*Merz, Daniel 

Merz, Mrs. Regina 

Manko, L. H. 

Morris, Chas. E. 

Morris, Effingham B. 

Muhr, Jacob 
*Pepper, Dr. Wm. 
*Pfaelzer, Simon 

Raab, Mrs. Julia 

Reform Congregation 
Keneseth Israel 
*Rorke, Allen B. 

Rosenberg, Grace 

Rosenberg, Walter J. 

Rosenberg, Walter I. 

Schloss, Mrs. Herman 

Schoch, Henry R. 

Sternberger, Samuel 

Silberman, Mrs. Ida 



Silverman, I. H. 
*Snellenburg, J. J. 

Snellenburg, Nathan 

Snellenburg, Samuel 

Swaab, M. M., Jr. 
*Teller, Benj. F. 

Teller, Mrs. B. F. 
*Teller, Joseph R. 

Trautman, Dr. B. 

Wanamaker, John 
*Weiler, Herman 

Wolf, I., Jr. 
*Zweighaft, Simon 

Pittsburgh 

Aaron, Marcus 
Browarsky, Max 
Cohen, Aaron 
Cohen, Josiah 
Dreifus, C. 
*Frank, Samuel, by his 
son, Ed. K. Frank 
Guckenheimer, Isaac 
Hamburger, Philip 
Hanauer, A. M. 
Kaufman Bros. 
Rauh, Marcus 
Rauh, Mrs. Rosalie 
Weil, A. Leo 

TEXAS 

Dallas 

Sanger, Alexander 
Sanger, Mrs. Phihp 
*Silberstein, A. 
Silberstein, Mrs. A. 

Fort Worth 

Levy, Sam 

Galveston 

Kempner, Mrs. H, 
Lasker, M. 



VIRGINIA 

Lynchburg 

Guggenheimer, Mrs« 
Max 
Norfolk 

Ladies' Hebrew Be- 
nevolent Asso. 
Richmond 

Millhiser, Gustave 

Millhiser, Mrs. Clar- 
ence 

Raab, E. 

Whitlock, Philip 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 

Galland, Bonham 
Galland, Mrs. C. K. 
Gottstein, Meyer 
Gottstein, Rebecca 
Lang, Julius C. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Wheeling 

Horkheimer, Mrs. B. 
Solomon & Rubin 
Weil, J. 



FOREIGN 

ENGLAND 

London 

Meyer, Arthur 

SWITZERLAND 

Rorschach 

*Schoenfeld, Max 



Contributions by Federations of Charities 



Philadelphia $8,500.00 ' 

Pittsburgh 500.00 

Kansas City 350.00 

Memphis 300.00 

New Orleans 274.00 

Des Moines 262.50 

Indianapolis 200.00 

Milwaukee 150.00 

Youngstdwn 150.00 

Little Eock lUO.OO 



Fort Wayne $100.00 

Mobile 100.00 

Montgomery 100.00 

St. Paul 100.00 

Nashville 75.00 

Toledo 50.00 

El Paso 50.00 

Shreveport 30.00 

Yieksburg 25.00 



Deceased. 



54 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 

For the Year ending September 30, 1914 



ALABAMA 
Alexander City 

Herzfeld, Mrs. Julia $25.00 
Benton 

Cadden, J. J 5.00 

Birmingham 

Adler, Ike 10.00 

Adler, Morris 25.00 

Blach, Max 5.00 

Congregation Eman- 
uel 5.00 

■ Marx, Otto 10.00 

Pizitz, Louis 5.00 

Rich, David 5.00 

Spiro, S 5.00 

Demopolis 

Goldman & Stern ... 5.00 
Livingston 

Tannenbaum, B 5.00 

Mobile 
Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities ... .100.00 
♦♦Bernheimer, Mrs. L. 
Frohlichstein, N. H. 5.00 

Hess, Henry 5.00 

Montgomery 
United Hebrew 

Charities 100.00 

Pake, L. J 5.00 

Weil, Mrs. Emma L. 5.00 
Selma 

Adler, J. C 3.00 

Blauner, I. 5.00 

Kahn, Nathan 5.00 

Ladies' Hebrew 
Benevolent Soe'y.. 10.00 

Lehman M. M 2.50 

Liepold, Jake 5.00 

Schuster, B. J 10.00 

Tuscaloosa 

Morris, Geo 5.00 

Wetumpka 
Hohenberg, M. & Co. 5.00 

ARIZONA 
Tucson 
Jacobs, L. M 10.00 

ARKANSAS 
Fort Smith 

Apple, 1 5.00 

Cash 2.00 

Kaufman, Henry 5.00 



Langfelder, L 5.00 

Nakdimen, I. H 10.00 

Nathan, Natnan 5.00 

Ney, Rudolph 5.00 

Saunders, L. A 5.00 

Tilles, Sam 5.00 

Wolf, Ben 5.00 

Helena 

Seelig, B 10.00 

Solomon, Louis 2.00 

Little Rock 

Baumgarten, Mrs. R. 5.00 

Magazine Circle 6.00 

Marianna 

Lesser, Morris 5.00 

Pine Bluff 

Altschul, B 5.00 

Altschul, Morris 5.00 

Weil, Chas., Supply 

Co 10.00 

CALIFORNIA 

Bakersfield 
*Cohn, C. 

Cohn, C 5.00 

Fresno 

Einstein, L. & Co. .. 10.00 

La Jolla 

Lieber, W. S 5.00 

Lieber, Mrs. W. S. .. 5.00 

Lockeford 

Bruml, Mrs. H. J.... 10.00 

Los Angeles 

Bibo, Jos 5.00 

Brownstein, D. J. ... 10.00 

Cohn, Kaspare 10.00 

Goldstein, M. H 5.00 

Hecht, Rabbi S 2.00 

Hoffman, Hugo, Est. 5.00 

Kingfbaker, Mrs. C. 5.00 

Levi Co., Simon 10.00 

Loew, J 10.00 

Louis, H. M 10.00 

Meyer, Alex 10.00 

Murphey, Mrs. J. L. 5.00 

Newmark. Harris ... 10.00 

Newmark, M. H. ... 5.00 

Newmark, M. R. •. . . 5.00 

Nordlinger, L. S. ... 10.00 

Norton, Isaac 5.00 

Roos, Jacques 10.00 

Seligman, Carl 5.00 

Oakland 

Jonas, Abraham 5.00 



Sacramento 

Bonnheim, A lO.OC 

Cohen, Isidor 25.0C 

Klaber, Mrs. Herm.. 5.00 

San Diego 
Blockman, A 25.00 

San Francisco 
Abrahamson, Hugo.. 5.00 
Anspacher, Philip ... 10.00 
Arnstein, Ludwig ... 10. CO 

Aronson, A lO.OO 

Bachman, Mrs. S. ... 5.00 

Bibo, Jos 5.00 

Bloom, Samuel 5.00 

Boas, Judah 10.00 

Brandenstein, Edw.. 10.00 

Brenner, Gus lO.OO 

Cahn, M. A 5.00 

Dinkelspiel, J. S. ... 5.00 

Esberg, A. 1 10.00 

Fries, Wm 5.00 

Gellert, Isaac 5.00 

Gerstle, Mrs. Han- 
nah 5.00 

Greenebaum, Jacob.. 10.00 
Gunst, Morgan A. .. 10.00 

*Gunst, M. A. 
Haas, A 25.00 

*Hellman, Isaias W. 

Hellman, I. W 25.00 

Hirschfelder, Dr. J. 

5.00 

Ickelheimer, S. 5.00 

Jacobi, J. J 10.00 

Kaufman, Wm 5.00 

Koshland, M. S 25.00 

Lachman, Henry ... lO.OO 

Levison, J. B 10.00 

Levy, Emile 10.00 

Levy, Jules 10.00 

Lilienthal, J. W. ... 10.00 
Metzger, Louis 10.00 

*Meyer, Mary Jea- 
nette 

*Neustadter, Mrs. J. 

H. 
Newman Bros lO.OO 

*Rosenbaum, Mrs. C. 

W. 
Rosenberg Bros. & 

Co 25.00 

Sahlein, Mrs. Henry 5. CO 

♦Samson, Mrs. Ru- 
dolph 
Schoenberg, Louis .. 10. 00 



*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



THE ^ATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



55 



CALIFORNIA 




San Francisco (Con.) 




Schwabacher, L. A.. 


5.00 


Schwabachor, Mrs. 




Louis 


10.00 


Sloss, Mrs. M. C 


5.00 


Son, Mrs. A. A 


10.00 


Spiegl, L. M 


10.00 


Walter, Clarence R.. 


10.00 


Wangenheim, H. ... 


10.00 


Weinstock, Harris . . 


25.00 


San Rafael 




Herzog, S. K 


5.00 


Lichtenstein, B. H. . 


10.00 


Stockton 






5 00 


Frankenheimer 




Bros 


10 00 


Levy, M., & Bro. ... 


10.00 


Stein, I. F 


5.00 



COLORADO 
Denver 

Goldsmith, Herman. 5.00 
Kubitsbek, Henry .. 10.00 
Mayer, Leopold 5.00 

CONNECTICUT 
Hartford 



Title & Rich 5.00 

Wieder, Moritz 5.00 

Wise, Isidore 25.00 

Meriden 

Bush, Alex 5.00 

New Haven 

Abrams, Jacob 1.00 

Adler, F. M 10.00 

Adler, Max 10.00 

Chase, I l.OO 

Freedman, Isidor ... 10.00 

Ginsburg, H 1.00 

Heller, Louis C 5.u0 

Herz, Leo H 5.00 

Johnson, J., & Sons. 10.00 

Kafka, A., & Co. ... 5.00 

Kleiner, Chas 5.00 

Lander, Abraham . . . 3.00 

Levin, 1 1.00 

Lonsky, Benj 3.00 

Mann, M., & Bro. .. 5.00 

Mendel, Adolph 10.00 

Newman, J. J 25.00 

Perlroth, A 3.00 

Pickus, J. D. 1.00 

Potter, L 1.00 

Rogowski, Mrs. A. 

B 5.00 

Rosen, L 1.00 



Aishberg, Edwin . . . 


5.00 


Rosenbluth, L. M. .. 


5.00 


Blumenthal, I. R. . . 


25.00 


Rubin, J. H 


3.00 


Eisner, Solomon ... 


5.00 
10.00 


Stock B 


1.00 


Fox, J. L 


Ullman, I. M 


10.00 


Goldberg, A. D 


5.00 


Ullman, J. H 


5.00 


Goldschmidt, L. S. . 


10.00 


Ullman, L. M 


10.00 


Goodman, Jos 


25.00 


Wall, Isidore 


1.00 


Greenberg, Leon . .. 


5.00 


Zunder, Albert 


10.00 


Haas, Benj. L 


10.00 


Stamford 




Haas, H. P 


5.00 


Stokes, Rose Pastor 


5.00 


Hartman, A. & S. . 


10.00 


Waterbury 




Hartman, E. M. ... 


10.00 


Chase, Isidor 


5.00 


Hartman, Gustave . 


10.00 


Weatogue 




Kaplan, David 


5.00 


Rich, Harry 


10.00 


Kashman, Isaac ... 


2.00 






Kashmann, Ben 


10.00 


DELAWARE 




Kashmann, S. S. . . 


10.00 


Seaford 




Katzenstern, M. ... 


5.00 


Greenabaum, E 


5.00 


Katten & Son 


10.00 


Van Leer, Chas 


5.00 


Knock, L. S., & Co 


5.00 


Wilmington 




Levin, Dr. Herman. 


5.00 


Levy, Morris 


5.00 


Lyon, Bernard 


5.00 


Moses Montefiore 




Lyon, Felix 


5 00 




5 00 


Mayer, Jerome 


3.00 


Wilson, Jas. H 


10.00 


Myers & Gross 


10.00 






Older & Rosenthal . 


5.00 


DIST. OF COLUMBIA 


Olds & Whipple ... 


25.00 


Washington 




Opper, F. C 


25.00 


Behrend, Amnon ... 


5.00 


Rapaport, B 


5.00 


Behrend, R. B 


5.00 


Rome, Louis, H. . . . 


5.00 


♦Berliner, Emile 




Schwartz, Geo. B. . 


5.00 


Berliner, Emile 


100.00 


Silver Bros 


5.00 
5.00 


Blout I L 


5 00 


Simon, G. A 


Blumenfeld, Mrs. M. 


5.00 



Cohen, Mrs. Edw. . . 


10.00 




5.0O 


Fellheimer, M 


5.00 


Goldenberg, M 


25.00 


Hahn & Co., Wm. . . 


5.00 


Hecht, Alex 


20.00 


Heilprin, G. F 


10.00 


Hillman, Joel 


5.00 


Hopfenmaier, Lewis 


10.00 


Kann, Sigmund 


5.00 


Lansbergh, Jas 


5.00 


Lauchheimer, A. H. 


5.00 




2.00 


Luchs, Leopold 


5.00 


Lyon, Simon 


5.00 


Oppenheimer, Gus... 


5.00 


Rich, M. M 


3.00 




2.00 


Sondheimer, J 


5.00 


Wallerstein, Mrs. G. 


1.00 


Washington Hebrew 




Congregation 


5.00 


Weser, Mrs. Fanny 




B 


10.00 


FLORIDA 




Jacksonville 




Hirschberg, Julius.. 


lO.OO 


Pensacola 




Elkan, M. J 


5.00 


Friedman, Alex 


5.00 



GEORGIA 
Albany 

Brown, S. B 10.00 

Atlanta 

Haas, Leopold, Jr... 3.00 

Hebrew Benevolent 
Congregation 10.00 

Kutz, Max 10.00 

Trounstine, L. J. ... 5.00 
Eastman 

Herrman, Mrs. J. D. 5.00 
Sandersville 

Cohen, Louis 5.00 

Savannah 

Falk, D. B 10.00 

Myers, Lee Roy 25.00 

West Point 

Hagedorn, P 5.00 

IDAHO 
Boise City 
Ladies' Judith Mon- 
tefiore Soc'y 5.00 

ILLINOIS 
Athens 

Salzenstein, C. S. .. 5.00 
Champaign 

Kaufman, J. M 5.00 

*Kuhn, Caroline L. 
*Kuhn, Florence L. 



*Lif£ Member. 
•♦Deceased Life Member. 



56 



THE NATfONAL FARM SCHOOL 



ILLINOIS 

Chicago 

Aaron, Mrs. B 10.00 

Apt, Henry E 5.00 

Adler, Mrs. D. K. .. 5.00 

Alschuler, Samuel.. 5.00 

Alter, Jacob 5.00 

*Bauman, Mrs. Edw. 

Baumgarden, B 10.00 

Becker, A. G 25.00 

Becker, Benj. V. ... 10.00 

Becker Bros. & Co. 5.00 

Becker, S. M 10.00 

Belson, David 5.00 

Bermond, H. D 5.00 

Berolzheimer, C. P. 5.00 

Binswanger, Jacob.. 20.00 

Birkenstein, David.. 10.00 

Birkenstein, Harry.. 10.00 

Birkenstein, Louis. . 25.00 

Block, E. J 10.00 

*Block, Jos. 

Block, L. E 10.00 

Block, P. D 10.00 

Born, M., & Co 10.00 

Brenner, Nathan ... 10.00 

Burger, Anton 5.00 

Buxbaum, E 5.00 

Conheim, Max 5.00 

Davis, Abel 10.00 

Davis, Dr. H. 1 10.00 

Davis, James 5.00 

Eisendrath, H. J. .. 5.00 

Eisendrath, Louis . . 10.00 

Eisendrath, S. J. ... 5.00 

Eisendrath, Wm. B. 10.00 

Eisenstaedt, Isidore. 10.00 

Eliel, H. J 10.00 

Elkan, Henry 10.00 

Ellbogen, M 10.00 

Engelhard, B. M. ... 10.00 

Englander, M 10.00 

Ettleson, S. A 10.00 

Finn, Jos. M 10.00 

Florsheim, Simon .. 10.00 

Fogel, Mrs. Fannie. 5.00 

Foreman, Edwin G.. 10.00 

Foreman, Oscar G. .. 10.00 
*Frank, Henry L. 

Frankenstein, W. B. 10.00 

Freis, Roy 25.00 

♦Freund, Gustav 

Friend, Henry 25.00 

Gatzert, August 10.00 

Gimbel, Chas. A. ... 10.00 

Glass, Mrs. M 5.00 

Gleck, L 25.00 

Gottlieb, H. A 5.00 

Greenbaum, Selig . . 5.00 

Greenebaum, Elias.. 10.00 

Greenebaum, H. N. . 5.00 
*Greenebaum, Moses E. 



Greengard, Harry . . 10.00 

Grossfeld, S. E 5.00 

Gutwillig, E 10.00 

Haas, Chas 25.00 

Harris, Mrs. S. H... 5.00 

Hart, Mrs. Harry .. 10.00 

Hartman, Jos. S. ... 10.00 

Heiman, Marcus 10.00 

Hershkowitz, Max . . 5.00 

Herst, Frank 5.00 

Hexter, Stephen .... 10.00 

Hillman, Edw 5.00 

Horwich, B 10.00 

Hyman, Cora B 5.00 

Hyman, Jos 10.00 

Isaiah Temple 10.00 

*Josepn, L. 

Kahn, Julius R 25.00 

Kanter, 1 5.00 

King, Chas 15.00 

Kirchberger, R. S... 10.00 

Kirchberger, W. A.. 10.00 

Klee, Abe 10.00 

Klee, Max 10.00 

Klee, Simon 10.00 

Klein, H. A 10.00 

Klein, S 5.00 

Kohn, S. A 5.00 

Komaiko, S. B 10.00 

Kraus, Adolph 5.00 

Kuppenheimer, Jonas 50.00 

Kuppenheimer, L. B. 10.00 

Lieberman, I. K. ... 5.00 

Liebman, A. J 10.00 

Linick, Adolph 10.00 

Lipson, I. B 5.00 

Loeb, Jacob M 25.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Jacob M. 5.00 

Loewenthal, B 10.00 

Loewenthal, Julius.. 10.00 

Loewenthal, J. Y. . . 10.00 

Lower, Miss M. B... 10.00 

Lurya, 1 10.00 

*Mandel, Edwin F. 

*Mandel, Mrs. Eman- 
uel 
**MandeI, Leon 

Mandl, Sidney 10.00 

Meyer, A. W 25.00 

Meyer, A. C 10.00 

Meyer, Isaac 10.00 

Michaels, Jos 10.00 

Mildenberg, M 10.00 

Moos, J. B 10.00 

Morris, Louis 10.00 

Nast, Samuel 10.00 

Neuman, Louis 5.00 

Newman & Gach ... 5.00 

Newman, Jacob 25.00 

Orschel, Mrs. Isaac. 5.00 

Philipsborn, M 10.00 

*Phillipson, Samuel 



Pick, Richard 10.00 

Pike, Adolph 5.00 

Regensburg, Henry.. 5.00 

Reinach, A. A 5.00 

Reis, Benedict 5.00 

*Reitler, Chas. 

Richter, Simon 5.00 

Rieser, Herman .... 5.00 

Rose, Edward 50.00 

Rosenbaum Bros. . . 50.00 

Rosenthal, Jas 10.00 

Rosenthal, Mrs. Ju- 
lius 5.00 

Rosenthal, Lessing.. 5.00 

Rosenwald, M. S. .. 10.00 

Roth, Dr. Y. J 5.00 

Rothschild, M. M. .. 10.00 

Rubovits, Toby 5.00 

Samuels, Benj 5.00 

Samuels, Caesar ... 10.00 

Samuels, Max 10.00 

Schaffner, Jos 10.00 

Schanfarber, Rev. 

Dr. Tobias 5.00 

Schiff, B. J 25.00 

Schmaltz, J. H 10.00 

Schnadig, Jacob 10.00 

Schuham, Sam 5.00 

Schwabacher, Morris 10.00 

Silberman, Adolph.. 25.00 

Silberman, F 10.00 

Sommer, Chas 10.00 

Speyer, Mrs. Etta M. 5.00 

Stein, Adolph 10.00 

Stein, Ignatz 10.00 

Stein, Philip 10.00 

Stein, Sam 5.00 

Stern, Mrs. H. B. .. 2.00 

Stern, Max 5.00 

Stern, Sam 25.00 

Stern, Samuel 10.00 

*Stettauer, Mrs. D. 

Stolz, Rev. Dr. Jos. 5.00 

Straus, A. S 5.00 

Straus, Leo 25.00 

Straus, M. L 10.00 

Straus, S. J. T 25.00 

Strauss, Aaron 10.00 

Taussig, M 10.00 

Thorsch, Victor 5.00 

Weil, E. R 5.00 

Weil, 1 25.00 

Weil, J. E 5.00 

Weinstein, Wm 5.00 

Weiss & Benjamin.. 10.00 

Winter, E 10.00 

Wolfner, Rudolph .. 5.00 

Wollenberger, Herm. 10.00 

Woolf, Morris 10.00 

Wormser, Leo F. . . . 10.00 
Galesburg 

Jewish Aid Society.. 5.00 



*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



57 



ILLINOIS 

Mendota 
Lcuik, Benj. H 

Moline 
Grossman Bros. 

Cloak Co 

Mayer, E 

Sklovsky, Max 

Peoria 

Bennett, C. M 

Bloom, J 

Bloom, N. T 

Braverman, A 

Chic Mntg. Co 

Citron, D. M 

Cohn, Max 

conhaim.'s 

Field, J. W 

Goldstein, H. M. ... 

Gordon, M. W 

Kahn, Mrs. Rosa .. 
Lelimann & Co., A. 

Levinson, I. J 

Newman, M. G 

Nusbaum, I 

Oppenheim, A. B. . . 
Oppentieim, L. S. . . 

Schradski, A. 

Scliradski, A., Co. .. 

Straus, E. A. 

Strauss, Herman . . 

Szold, Estlier 

Wachenheimer, J. . , 
Wolfner, Wm. F. . . 
"Woolner, Adolph Jr 

Woolner, B. S 

*"Woolner, Mrs. Miri 

am S. 
*Woolner, Seymour, 

A. 
♦Woolner, Mrs. W. B, 
*Woolner, W. B. 

Rochelle 
*Hilb, Emanuel 

Rock Island 

Brady, C. S 

Greenblatt, M 

Morris & Lewis . .. 
Mosenfelder, A. . . 
Mosenfelder, Mrs. 

Louis 

♦Mosenfelder, Mrs. 

Louis 

Levi, Mayer 

Lewis, Simon 

Rosenfield, C. D. . 
Simon, L 

Washburn 
Fuiks, Jacob 



INDIANA 
Angola 

j^^QO Stiefel, Mrs. L. C. 3.00 

Attica 

ijevor, L. S 2.50 

Columbia City 

10.00 Ladies' Hebrew Be- 

5.00 nevolent Soc'y . . 5.00 

5.00 Evansville 

Berman, 1 2.00 

Bernstein, D. S. ... 5.00 

gJIJ Bitterman, A 10.00 

Bitterman, Tbeo. .. 5.00 

^' „ Brentano, August .. 5.00 

,■ „ Brentano, Nestor .. 5.00 

o-OO 

. „, Davidson, Mrs. 

J-:" Robert 5.00 

;.. DeJong, Max 10.00 

,^„^ Eicliel, Jacob 5.00 

^:-Z Bichel, L. P. 5.00 

:-2 Frey, P. W 10.00 

J^'Z Gans, Mrs. H. S. . . 5.00 

2^0 ^'^°^' ' '■'' 

„ Gans Mose 2.00 

r' Goldman, M 1.00 

-Z The House of Gross 5.00 

l-Z Fine, Philip 3.00 

J".:: Fisher, L. B 2.00 

Jq-qJ Hammer, Sol 5.00 

.' Hebrew Ladies' Be- 

^Z nevolent Soc'y ... 25.00 

_■ . Heimann, Abraham 5.00 

"•JJ Horn, E 5.00 

Ichenhauser Co. ... 10.00 

Kahn, Chas. S 50.00 

^^°: Kahn, Isidor 5.00 

.iZ Kahn's, S., Sons .. 5.uO 

°- " Levy, Henry 10.00 

Loewenthal, Harry 5.00 

Mannhelmer, R. ... 10.00 

Newman, E. J 2.00 

Paul, Ben 2.00 

Ravdin, M 5.00 

Rosenthal & Gun- 

berts 5.0O 

Salm Bros 5.00 

Shevitz, Mike 2.00 

Strouse, Abe 15.00 

Trockman, J 3.00 

: Tugendrich, 1 5.00 

^I'Z Weil, Emil •. 10.00 

Weil, Jacob L 2.00 

25 00 ^^"^ Wayne 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 100.00 

Ackerman, Abe 10.00 

^- Baum, Jos 5.00 

Freiburger, Herman.. 5.00 

f.ll Freiburger, Jos. ... 5.00 

Freiburger, Leopold 10.00 

Greensfelder, Miss 

3.00 Mollie LOO 



Lehman, Ben 5.00 

Lehman, Isidor 5.00 

Levy, Ben 5.00 

Nathan, Julius 5.00 

Rothschild Bros. .. 5.00 
Stiefel, Mrs. Louis 5.00 
Goshen 

Salinger, Nathan .. 5.00 
Hammond 

Wolf, Leo 10-00 

Huntingdon 

Lauferty, D. E 10.00 

Indianapolis 
Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 200.00 

Messing, Rabbi 

Mayer 2.00 

Newberger, Louis . . 10.00 
♦Schwartz, Martin 

Somers, Chas. B. .. 5.00 
Kendallville 

Keller, L. J 5.00 

Kokomo 

Levi, J. S 5.00 

La Fayette 
Jewish Ladies' Aid 

Soc'y 5.00 

Loeb, J. Louis 5.00 

Ligonier 
Ackerman, Ferd. .. 5.00 

Greenebaum, S 5.00 

Hebrew Ladies' Ben. 

Soc'y 10-00 

Henoch, Sol 10.00 

Hess, M 5.00 

Jacobs, Eli ''-OO 

Jacobs, Meyer 5-00 

Loeb, Mrs. M 5.00 

Loeser, Leo 5.00 

Mier State Bank .. 25.00 
Mier, Mrs. Sam. .. 5.00 

Schloss, Simon 5.00 

Selig, Jos 5.00 

Selig, Milton 5.00 

Selig, Sam 5.00 

♦Straus, Isaac 
♦Straus, Jacob 

Straus, Jacob 35.00 

Straus, Simon J. ... 10.00 
Mount Vernon 
Ladies' Temple 

Soc'y 5.00 

Muncie 

Hene, M 5.00 

Portland 

Weiler, Morris 5.00 

South Bend 

Adler, Max 100 

Bing, Mr. and Mrs. 

Joe 10-00 

Burke, J 5.00 

Civalsky, Ira 1-00 



♦Life Member. 
♦♦Deceased Life Member. 



58 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



INDIANA 




South Bend (Continued) 


Cronbach, Rabbi A. 


.. 5.00 


Frankel, M. I 


5.00 


Freuden stein, M. B 


5.00 


Grossman, S 


5.00 


Kann, M. F 


1.00 


Kaplan, Hyman ... 


2.00 


Livingston, Abe .. 


2.00 


Livingston, Max . . 


5.00 


Livingston, Meyer . 


3.00 


Marks, Henry 


2.00 


Mayerfeld, A. R. . . 


1.00 


Moore Leo 


5.00 


Spiro Sam 


10.00 


Soutli Bend Safe Co 


2.00 


Unger, Sidney 


5.00 


Wetzstein, Mentor . 


5.00 


Summitville 




Warner, childi'en of 




Anna in her mem- 






15.00 


Terre Haute 




"Anonymous" 


5.00 


Arnold, Mrs. A. ... 


5.00 


Bernheimer, Dr. H 




L 


5.00 


Blum.berg, Max 


10.00 


Brown, Louis 


5.00 


Feibelman, E. ' 


5.00 


Frank, Mrs. Augusta 


2.00 


Frank, Theo. P ... 


10.00 


Goldberg, Ben 


5.00 


Goldman, B 


5.00 


Goldman, D 


1.00 


Goldptine, S. J 


3.00 


Hammel, Max J. . . 


5.00 


Hebrew Ladies' Aid 




Society 


15.00 


Herz, A 


10 00 


Joseph Sons, M. ... 


5.00 


Kaplan, Rev. Dr. J. 




H 


5.00 


Kleeman Dry Goods 




Co 


5 00 


Kohn Bros 


. 5.00 


Lederer, Julius 


10.00 


Less, Maurice 


10.00 


♦Levi, Simon 




Levin Bros 


20.00 


Levinson, N. G. ... 


5.00 


Mack, Miss H. S. . . 


2.00 


Petersdorf, Sig 


10.00 


Rubin, N. M 


3.00 


Seligfberger, Mrs. 




L. M 


2.00 


Shatsky Bros 


5.00 


Silberman, Louis . . 


10.0ft 


Silverstein Bros. ... 


5.00 


Smith, J. B 


3.00 


Strouse, Alfred 


5.00 



Strouse, Jonas 5.00 

Uffenheimer, L 5.00 

Werbner Bros 5.00 

Wolf, Carl 5.00 

Wabash 

Hyman, Louis L. .. 5.00 

IOWA 

Charles City 

Hecht, Jos 10.00 

Davenport 

Adler, E. P 10.00 

Albert & Raphael... 5.00 

Deutsch, Jos 5.00 

Landauer, Moritz . . 5.00 

Morltz, Simon 5.00 

Moritz, Sol 5.00 

Ochs, John, Sons 

Co 5.00 

Petersberger, Isaac 5.00 

Rosenthal, M lO.uO 

Scharff, H. E 2.50 

Segelbaum, A 5.00 

Silberstein Bros. ... 5.00 

Decorah 

Bear, Ben 5.00 

Des Moines 
U n i t ed Jewish 

Philanthropies ..262.50 

Brody, Abraham ... 5.00 

Brody, Meyer 5.00 

Cohen, M 5.00 

Cohen, M. H 10.00 

Davidson, S. and 

Bros 15.00 

Frankel, A 10.00 

Frankel, Mrs. B. .. 10.00 

Frankel, M 10.00 

Frankel, N 10.00 

Friedlich, I. and A.. 15.00 

GinFberg, L 5.00 

Goldman & Cobacker 

Co 20.00 

Joseph, S. & Sons . . 10.00 

Lederer, Mrs. Emma 25.00 

Mandelbaum, J 10.00 

Mandelbaum, M. ... 25.00 

Mandelbaum, S 15.00 

Marks, R 5.00 

Oransky, L 5.00 

Rosenfield, M 10.00 

Samish, M 25.00 

Sheuerman Bros. . . 25.00 

Sheuerman, L 10.00 

Schloss, M 10.00 

Stern, Mrs. M 10.00 

Wilshenski, N. M... 25.00 

"Wolf, E 10.00 

Younker, L. M 10.00 

Younker, M 10.00 

Dubuque 

*S!immer, A. 



Keokuk 

Weil, J. B 5.00' 

Oskaloosa 

Rosenblatt, Aaron.. 5.00 

Sioux City 

Davidson Bros. Co. 25.00 

Degen, Maurice 10.00 

Dryfoos, S 5.0O 

Fribourg, A. L 5.00 

Gallnsky, A. S 10.00 

Galinsky, H 10.00 

Home Furniture Co. 5.00 
Jewish Ladies' Aid 

Soc'y 10. OO 

Kalish Bros 20.00 

Levitt, Thos. 1 5.0O 

Newman, J 2.50 

Orkin Bros 5.00 

Pill, Max 5.00' 

Rosenstock Bros. ... 5.00^ 

Schulein, Sig 10.00 

*Wise, Mrs. Chas. 

KANSAS 
Leavenworth 

Ettenson, Mrs. 

Henry 5.00 

Woolfe, B. B 5.00 

iVlcPherson 

Strouse, J. & Son.. 5.00 
Pittsburg 

Schlanger, A. H. ... 10.00 
Salina 

Stiefel, Moses 5.00 

Stiefel, S 5.00 

Topeka 

Snattinger, M 5.0O 

KENTUCKY 

Bowling Green 

Crista!, Sam 5.00 

Nahm, Mrs. Sam .. 5.00 

Danville 
Lyons, Sam and 

Henry 5.00 

Lyons, Samuel 10.00 

Lexington 

Shane, Miss R. 5.00 

Speyer & Sons 5.00' 

Wolf, Simon 5.00 

Louisville 

Bernheim, B 50.00 

Bernheim, Frank D. 10.00 

Bernheim, I. W. ... 50.00 

Bernheim, Lee S. . . 10. OO 

Blum, S 5.0O 

Brooks, Mrs. Marie.. 5.00 

Ehrmann, Hilmar .. 5.0O 

Plarsheim, A. B. . . 10.00 

Flarsheim, M. H. .. 10.00 

Gutman, H. J. & Co. 5. 00' 

Haas, Sam 5.00- 



*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



r)'.> 



KENTUCKY 

Louisville (Continued) 

Hess, Mrs. B 5.00 

Hyman, Jacob 5.00 

Isaacs Bros 5.00 

Kaufman, Henry .. 5.00 

Levy, Sol 5.00 

Roth, Albert S. .... 10.00 

Sabel, M. & Sons .. 10.00 

Sachs, Edw 5.00 

Selligman, Alfred .. 5.00 

Sloss, Stanley E. .. 5.00 

Straus, Benj 10.00 

Straus, Mrs. Herman 5.00 

Trost Bros 5.00 

Maysville 

Merz, Mrs. A. L. . . 5.00 

Merz, Eugene 5.00 

Merz, Millard 5.00 

Owensboro 

Hirsch, A 10.00 

Rosenfeld, Mrs. A. 10.00 
♦Shorten, J. D. 

Paducah 

Cohen, Ike 3.00 

Dreyfuss, Mrs. Sol. 100.00 

Fels, Mrs. E 5.00 

Friedman, Herman.. 10.00 

Keller, John M 10.00 

Marks, M 5.00 

Steinfeld, M 2.00 

Tick, S. 1 3.00 

Weil, Mrs. Jeanette 5.00 

Weil, H. & Sons 5.00 

Shelbyville 

Samuel, Leopold ... 5.00 

LOUISIANA 
Alexandria 

Gehr, Gus 5.00 

Ginsberg, B 10.00 

Jackson, 1 1.00 

Jackson, S 2.50 

Kaufman, I. J 2.50 

Lehman, Miss A. . . 1.00 

Levin, Joe 2.00 

Mann, Dan E 5.00 

Manus, Harry 2.50 

Nachman, W. B. ... 1.00 

Peterson, Wm 2.00 

Posner & Fried 5.00 

Pressburg, H. H. ... 1.00 
Rothstein, Rabbi, L. 

J 5.00 

Sackman Bros 5.00 

Simon, A. E 20.00 

Simon, H 5.00 

Simon, Mr. and Mrs. 

H. L,. 10.00 

Simon, S 10.00 

Weil, Ben 5.00 



Weinberg, M 2.50 

Weiss & Goldring .. 10.00 

Jeanerette 

Wormser, M. & C... 5.00 

Monroe 

Baer, 1 5.00 

Gross, Mrs. F 2.50 

Meyer, Sol 5.00 

Titche, Chas 5.00 

New Orleans 
Jewish Charitable 
and Educational 

Federation 274.00 

Hart, Mrs. M. J. ... 10.00 

Kohn, Jos. ....• 5.00 

Lowy, Max 5.00 

Mayer, Wm lO.OO 

Neugass, Mrs. Edw.. 5.00 
*Newman Mrs, Henry 
Newman, H. & C, 

Ltd 25.00 

**Newman, Isidore 

Stern, Maurice 25.00 

Plaquemine 

Uhry, H., & Bros. .. 2.50 

Shreveport 
Federated Jewish 

Charities 30.00 

St. Francisville 

Teutsch, R 2.50 

St. Rose 

Levy, A 5.00 

MARYLAND 
Baltimore 

Adler, Chas 5.00 

Adler, Simon C 5.00 

Adler, Mrs. S. J. ... 2.00 

Ambach, Henry M.. 5.00 
Benesch, Isaac, & 

Sons 20.00 

Bernheimer, Ferd. . . 5.00 

Bluthenthal, A 10.00 

Burk, Fried & Co... 5.00 
Cohen-Adler Shoe 

Co 10.00 

Cohen, Miss Bertha. 5.00 
*Cohen, Mendes 

Cone, Dr. Claribel... 5.00 

Cone, Fred. W 5.00 

Deiches, Wm 5.0O 

Drey, Elkan 10.00 

Bilan, Abraham 5.00 

Eisenberg, 'Abraham 10.00 

Engel, Jacob 10.00 

Epstein, Jacob 5.00 

Fox, Robert 5.00 

Frank, Solomon 10.00 

Goldenberg, Julius.. 10.00 
Goldenberg, Mrs. R. 

H 5.00 

Goldschmid. Mrs. R. 10.00 



Goldsmith, Jacob & 

Bro 10. 00 

Gottschalk, Jos to. 00 

Gottschalk, Levi .... 10.00 

Greenbaum, Leon E. 10.00 

Greif, Leonard 5.00 

Greif, Simon 5.0O 

Gutmacher, Rev. Dr. 

A -"..on 

Gutman, Louis K... 5.00 
Hamburger Bros. & 

Co 5.00 

Hamburger, M. J 5.00 

Hanline Bros lU.Oo 

Hecht, Emanuel ... 25.00 

Hecht, Mrs. L. A... 10.00 

Hecht, M. S 5.00 

Hochschild, Max ... 10.00 

Hollander, M 5.00- 

Iseman, M. H 10.00 

Katz, A. R 10.00 

Katz, Meier, 5.00 

Katz, Mrs. Zadock.. 5.00 
Kaufmann, Louis & 

Sons 5.00 

Kemper, David 5.00 

Kohn, Benno 5.00 

Kohn, Louis B 5.00 

Kraus, Henry 5.00 

Lauchheimer, S. H. 5.00 

Lauer, A. C 5.00 

Lehman, Judah 5.00 

Leopold, Isaac 5.00 

Levy, Alfred 10.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. 

Julius 25.00 

Levy, Wm 10.00- 

Likes, Lena 5.00 

Mandelbaum, S 10.00 

Nusbaum, Max 10.00 

Oppenheim, Eli 10.00 

Oppenheim, I. M. . . 5.00 
Pollack, Mrs. Han- 
nah 5.00 

Rayner. Albert W... 5.00 
**Rayner, Wm. S. 
*Reinhard, Samuel E. 
Rosenau, Rev. Dr. 

Wm 5.00 

Rosenberg, Simon . . 5.00 

Rosenthal, Samuel.. 10.00 

Rothholz, Bros 5.00 

Rothholz, J 5.00 

Rothschild M 5.00 

Rothschild, S 10.00 

Samuels, Morton ... 25.00 

Schloss Bros. & Co. 15.00 

Sonneborn, Henry .. 50.00 

Sonneborn, M. S. ... 5.00 

Sonneborn, S. B. ... 25.00 

Strouse, Ben 10.00 

**Strouse, Isaac 



♦Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



61) 



T!I1<] NATIONAL IWRM SCHOOL 



MARYLAND 
Baltimore (Continued) 
Strouse, Mrs. Ma- 
thilda 5.00 

Strouse, M. 1 5.00 

Thalheimer, Sam'l.. 10.00 

Ulman, Nathan 5.00 

Van Leer, Milton . . 5.00 

Walter, M. R 10.00 

Weinberg, A. 1 10.00 

Weinberg, Mrs. Ce- 
cilia 5.00 

Wertheimei- Bros. . . 5.00 

Westheimer, H. F... 10.00 

Westheimer, M. F... 10.00 

Wiesenfeld, Jos 10.00 

Wyman, Maurice . . . 5.00 
Cumberland 

Rosenbaum, Simon.. 5.00 

Rosenbaum, Susmau 5.00 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

Agoos, L 10.00 

Agoos, S. L 5.00 

Baer, Louis 10.00 

Demelman, L. E. ... 5.00 

Fox, Isidor 5.00 

Frank, Meyer 10.00 

Gold, Samuel 5.00 

Goodman, Mrs. Sam. 5.00 

Green, Jos 2.00 

Hailparn, Miss 

Julia 5.00 

*Hecht, Mrs. Lina 

Hillison, H. M. & Co. 5.00 

Joseph, A 5.00 

Koshland, A 5.00 

Koshland, J 5.00 

Peavy, G. 1 5.00 

Ratshesky, A. C. ... 5.00 
*Rawitzer, Fred 

Scheinfeldt, Solomon 10.00 

Schoener, Jos. Z. Y. 5.00 

Schwartz, H. & Co. 5.00 
*Shuman, A. 

Ziegel, I. 5.00 

Brookline 

Andrews, Julius ... 5.00 
Kaffenburgh, Mrs. 

Isaac 5.00 

Roxbury 

Van Noorden, E. . . 30.00 
Springfield 

Blaustein, J 5.00 

Ehrlich, Moses 5.00 

Isenberg & Co., H. 25.00 

Kramer, Paul 5.00 

Lasker, Henry 5.00 

Waltham 

Bayard, Harris 5.00 



Worcester 

Grodberg & Hirsch.. 5.00 

MICHIGAN 
Alma 

Pollasky, M 5.00 

Bay City 

Greenberg, K 1.00 

Charlotte 

Vomberg, M. 5.00 

Detroit 

Brown, Jacob 5.00 

Cohen, S. R 5.00 

Fechheimer, H. M. 5.00 

Goldberg,. Isaac 10.00 

Goldman, A 5.00 

Goldstein, H. J 10.00 

Heineman, S. E. .. 5.00 

Helfman, Harry ... 5.00 

Kahn, Albert 10.00 

Krolik, Henry A. .. 10.00 

Levy, Chas 5.00 

Levy, Mrs. Wm. K. 5.00 

Marx, Mrs. B. I. ... 5.00 

Musliner, L. S 5.00 

Parish, Joseph 2.00 

Peritz, 1 5.00 

Rosenfield, Monroe 5.00 

Rothman, E. M. ... 5.00 

*Schloss, Seligman 

Siegel, Benj 5.00 

Sloman, Eugene 10.00 

Wineman, Andrew.. 5.00 

Wineman, Henry . . 5.00 

Wineman, 1 15.00 

Wolfe, N. 5.00 

Hawks 

Horwitz, Harris ... 5.00 

Lansing 
Jewish Woman's 

Aid Soc'y 5.00 

Petoskey 

Rosenthal, Alick .. 5.00 

Saginaw 

Heavenrlch, Max .. 5.00 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Moses, D. K 10.00 

MINNESOTA 

Austin 

Hirsh, Geo 10.00 

Bemidji 

Berman, Miss Leah 5.00 

Chisholm 
Chisholm Dry Goods 

Co 5.00 

Frisch, L. S 5.00 

El Queeno Cigar Co. 5.00 

Rath, Louis 5.00 

Sapero, S 5.00 

Duluth 

Abrahamson, W. M. 5.00 

Beckman, Ben 5.00 



Bennett, Harris 5.00 

Bergstein, L 3.00 

Billstein, Wm 5.00 

Casmer, Henry 5.00 

Cook, B. J. 10.00 

Cook & Gittelson ... 5.00 

Cook, Julius 5.00 

Cook, Meyer 5.00 

Friedman, Ben 5.00 

Freimuth, L 10.00 

Garon, 1 5.00 

Gidding, J. M. & 

Co 5.00 

Hammel, Louis 5.00 

Josephs H. Y 5.00 

Kanody, Emanuel . . 2.00 

Klein, E. A 3.00 

Kriss & Rose 3.00 

Levin, S. 1 5.00 

Levy, M. G 5.00 

Loeb, Louis S 25.00 

Loeb, Samuel 10.00 

Meyers, C. P 5.00 

Moskowitz, Sam ... 1.00 

Greek, L 5.00 

Oreckovsky, J-, 410 

Lonsdale Bldg 5.00 

Oreckovsky, J., 530 

W. Superior St. .. 3.00 

Oreckovsky, Max .. 3.00 

Polinsky, A. H 5.00 

Sattier, J. B 5.00 

Selig, J. Leon 5.00 

Shapiro, M. P 10.00 

Sher, B. 5.00 

Siegel, J. D 5.00 

Silberstein & Bondy 10.00 

Singer & Rine 5.00 

Weinberg, Jos 5.00 

Zalk, Louis 5.00 

Eveleth 

Ellis, Samuel 5.00 

Mesberg, Geo 5.00 

Perlman, H 5.00 

Rabinowitz, H 5.00 

Sax, Solomon 5.00 

Shapiro, Max 5.00 

Hibbing 

Bloom, Hy 5.00 

Hallock, Chas 5.00 

Keller Bros 5.00 

Levinson, S 5.00 

Lippman, B. M 5.00 

Nides, M. D 3.00 

Osherman, M. E. . . 3.00 

Rogalsky, M 5.00 

Sachs, A 5.00 

Wolfe, L 2.00 

Woolfan, E. S 2.00 

Minneapolis 

Adelsheim, E 5.00 

Apt, L. C 5.00 



♦Life Member. 
♦♦Deceased Life Member. 



THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 



61 



MINNESOTA 
Minneapolis (Continued) 

Bearman, A. N 5.00 

Bearman Bros 5.00 

Blumenkranz, E. M. 5.00 

Bresler, J C 10.00 

Cohen, M. L. & Co. 5.00 

Davis, H. J 5.00 

Davis, J. M 5.00 

Eisler, Adolpla 25.00 

Friedman Bros 10.00 

Gradwohl, B 10.00 

Green, H. H 5.00 

Gross, A. M 5.00 

Gruenberg, Mrs. J. 

H 10.00 

Harpmann, J 5.00 

Harris, M. H 5.00 

Hartman, J. H 5.00 

Heller, B 5.00 

Heller, Mrs. A. H. 5.00 

Jacobs, B 10.00 

Kronick, M. J 10.00 

Kurstin, M A 5.00 

Moss, Chas 5.00 

Re©s, Julius 10.00 

Robitshek, Jos 5.00 

Rosen, Jos. A 10.00 

Schanfeld, J. H. ... 5.00 

Stromberg, A 5.00 

Tankel, M. L 5.00 

Taussig, Sigmund . . 5.00 

Vehon, H. H 10.00 

Weil, Isaac 10.00 

"Weiskopf, Henry ... 5.00 

Weisman, Wm 5.00 

St. Paul 
Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities ....100.00 
Virginia 

Cohen, Louis 5.00 

Latz Bros 5.i.d 

Lavick, Jas. F 5.00 

Levin, B. D 5.00 

Levis, Max 5.00 

Lippman, Sam 5.00 

Mesberg, John 5.00 

Milavetz, Ben 5.00 

Milovetz, S 5.00 

Nathanson, H. J. . . 5.00 

Roman, Joseph 5.00 

Shanedling Bros. . . 15.00 

Simon & Schibel ... 5.00 

MISSISSIPPI 
Brookhaven 

Cohn Louis 10.00 

Cohn, David Z 10.00 

Greenville 

Goldstein, Nathan . . 10.00 
Kosciusko 

Lowenberg, A. A. . . .50 



Lowenberg, G 1.00 

Lowenberg Mrs. L. 1.00 

Meridian 

Loeb, A 3.00 

Lyon, A. J 5.00 

Moskovitz, A 5.00 

Threefoot, H. M. .. 10.00 

Natchez 
*Frank Henry 

Frank, Henry 5.00 

Zerkowsky, Isaac . . 1.00 

Vicksburg 
Associated Jewish 

Charities 25.00 

Ladies' Hebrew Ben. 

Asso 10.00 

Laudenheimer, Dav. 5.00 
Laudenheimer, Dan 5.00 
Laudenheimer, Na- 
than 5.00 

Lyons, Walter 5.0O 

Yazoo City 
Wise, H 10.00 

MISSOURI 
Kansas City 

Benjamin, Alfred . . 500.00 
Benjamin, Alfred 

(annual) 50.00 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 350.00 

Levy, Family of 

Isaac 10.00 

Meyer, L 5.00 

Louisiana 

Michael Bros 5.00 

St. Joseph 

Binswanger, I. J. .. 5.00 

Binswanger, Simon.. 5.00 

Block, Ellsworth ... 10.00 

Block, Mrs. Fannie 10.00 

Block, Harry 10.00 

Block, Samuel 10.00 

Ehrlich, Wm. H... 10.00 

Feltenstein, David.. 5.00 

Handler Bros 5.00 

Hassenbusch, Sam'l 10.00 

Hirsch, Sol 5.00 

*Hirsch, Sol. 

Hirshhorn, A. S. .. 5.00 
Lowenstein, Mrs. 

Walter 5.00 

Newburger, Bern- 
hard 5.00 

Phillip, Ben 5.00 

Schloss, M. A 2.00 

Siegel, Lewis 5.00 

Westheimer, B. S. 10.00 

Westheimer, D. P. 5.00 

Westheimer, E. F. 10.00 

Westheimer, S. F. 5.00 



**Westheimer, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ferd. 
♦Westheimer, Samuel 
St. Louis 

Ackerman, Leopold.. 10.00 

Baer, J. A 10.00 

Bowman, Samuel .. 10.00 

Bry, Nathan 10.00 

Drey, Mrs. A. L. . . 5.00 

Frohlichsteiu, S. H. 5.00 

Fuller, Aaron 10.00 

Glaser, Julius 10.00 

Goldman, A. D. ... 10.00 

Goldman, Harry . . 10.00 

Goldman, 1 10.00 

Hirsch, Herman . . . 5.00 

Landau, A 25.00 

Levis, Leo 10.00 

Levy Miss Rebecca 20.00 

Lippman, Jos. M... 5.00 

Littman, M 10.00 

Marx, E. J 5.00 

May, David 25.00 

May, Morton J 10.00 

Mayer, Herman 5.00 

Nathan, Emil 10.00 

Renard, Louis 10.00 

**Rice, Jonathan 
Rice, Mrs. Jona- 
than 100.00 

Schoen, Mrs. I. L. 5.00 

Seelig, S 5.00 

Shoenberg, Moses.. 25.00 

Singer, Adolph 5.00 

Singer, J. W 5.00 

Sommers, David . . 10.00 
*Stix, C. A. 

Stix, Ernest W. ... 5.00 

Stix, Wm 10.00 

Straus, Mrs. Han- 
nah 10.00 

Swope, Maier 5.00 

Waldheim, A 10.00 

Wolf, Dr. Alex. S. 5.00 
Tipton 

Cohn, Rosalie 5.00 

Butte MONTANA 

Linz, Mose 5.00 

Meyer, W 5.00 

Oppenheier, J. E. 25.00 

Great Falls 

Wertheim, Nathan.. 5.00 

Missoula 

Leiser, Miss Esther. 10.00 

NEBRASKA 
Lincoln 

Fogelson, H 2.00 

Friend, Morris 5.00 

Ksensky, S. A 5.00 

Mayer, Chas 5.00 

Mayer, H. L 5.00 



*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



62 



THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 



NEBRASKA 
Lincoln (Continued) 

Mayer, S. D 5.00 

Pepperberg, Julius lu.OO 

Sandlovicli A. S. .. 5.00 

Schlesinger, H. ... 10.00 

Seelenfreund, Wm. 5.00 

Simon, Beu 5.00 

Weil, M 10.00 

Omaha 

Gluck, Israel 5.00 

Kirschbaum, L. and 

N 10.00 

Levy, M 10.00 

Novelty Co 5.00 

Rosenthal, B. & H. lu.OO 
Seligsohn, Mr. and 

Mrs. Elken 10.00 

NEW JERSEY 

Camden 
Blank, J. Z 5.00 

East Orange 
Back, Albert 5.00 

Montclair 
Hirsh, Mrs. Sam- 
son 5.00 

Newark 
Bamberger, Louis.. 10.00 
Foster, Rabbi Sol... 5.00 

Fuld, Felix 25.00 

Goetz, Jos 5.00 

Michael, Chas 5.00 

Michael, Oscar 5.00 

Plaut, Moses ...... 5.00 

*Schlesinger, Louis 
Stein, Mrs. C. S. . . 5.00 
Straus, M. & Sons.. 5.00 

Paterson 
Holzman Silk Mfg. 

Co 5.00 

Kantor, S 5.00 

Kitay, H. B 5.00 

Rogowski, M 5.00 

Phillipsburg 
Xie, Alice 5.00 

Plainfield 
Xewcorn, Wm 5.00 

Somerville 
Mack, Alex. W. .. 5.00 
Mack, Mrs. L. C. .. 5.00 

NEW MEXICO 
Albuquerque 

Ilfeld, Louis 5.00 

Las Vegas 

Ilfeld, Chas 5.00 

Rosweli 

Jaffa, Mrs. X 5.00 

Santa Fe 

Hersch, Mrs. Jos... 5.00 



NEW YORK 
Albany 

Congregation Beth 

Emeth 25.00 

Sporborg, Mrs. H. 

J 5.00 

Steefel, Jos. L 10.00 

Waldman, L. I. ... 10.00 

Binghamton 
Hirschmann, S. J. 10.00 

Brooklyn 

Blum, Edw. C 10.00 

Jaffee, L. J 5.00 

Joachim, C. J 10.00 

*Kalvin, Mrs. Henry M. 
Kalvin, Mrs. Henry 

M 15.00 

Kaufmann, Mrs. 

Sara 2.00 

May, Daniel 1.00 

Rothschild, S. F. ... 10.00 
Sternau, S 5.00 

Buffalo 
Block, Mrs. Jos. . . 10.00 
Boasberg, Emanuel 5.0O 
Brozman, N. H. .. 1.00 
Fleischmann, Simon 5.00 

Jacobson, S 5.00 

Reiser, August 5.00 

Maisel, Louis 5.00 

Spangenthal A. ... 5.00 
Warner, Nellie B. 10.00 

Wile, Herman 5.00 

*Winkler, Mrs. R. S. 
Winters, A 10.00 

Delhi 
Stern, Aaron 5.00 

Elmira 
Council of Jewish 
Women 5.00 

Far Rockaway 
Eiseman, Mrs. Sam 5.00 

Herkimer 
Schermer, Benj. ... 1.00 

Mount Vernon 
Mann, Leon 10.00 

Newburgh 
Stroock, Jos. lo.ou 

New Rochelie 

Grant, Adolph 10.00 

*Ladenburger, Mrs. Theo. 

Niagara Falls 
Silberberg Bros. .. 5.00 
*Silberberg, Bertha 
*Silberberg, Isaac L. 
Silberberg, M. L. .. 5.0O 

Olean 
Marcus. H. W. .... 5.00 

Rochester 

Adler, Abram 10.00 

Adler, Isaac 5.00 

Adler, Mrs. Lewis 5.00 



5.0U 
5.00 
5.00 
25.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

20.00 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 



Adler, Solomon . 

Bakrow, Mrs. J. 

Benjamin, A. E. 

Cauffman Family 

Katz, Abram J. 

Kirstein, Mrs. J. E 

Kochenthal, Marcus 

Lowenthal, Geo. 
**Lowenthal M. 

Mannheimer, Ike 

Meyers. M. M. 

Michaels, Jos. . 
♦Michaels, Joseph 

Miller, Wm. 

Present, Philip 

Rosenberg, Mrs. 

Rosenberg, Mrs. 
*Silberberg, G. 
♦Silberberg, M. 

Stern, Isaac 5.00 

Stern, Morley A. ... 

Weil, S. M 

Weil, Mrs. S. M .. 

Wile, Mrs. Carrie.. 

Wile, Julius M. ... 

Wile, Simeon 5.00 

W^ile, Sol 10.00 

Schenectady 

Lichtenberg, 

Chester 10.00 

Sheepshead Bay 

Cahn, Mrs. Cecelia 5.00 
Syracuse 

Eisner, Henry 5.00 

Levy, T. Aaron ... 5.00 
Warrensburgh 

Baumann, J. P. ... 
New York City 
**Abraham, A. 

Adler, Max 

Alexander, A. A. . . 

Alexander, Leo 

Alland, Maurice . . . 

Armstrong, Paul . . 

Auerbach. Louis . . 

Austrian, Mrs. J. 

Bash, Mrs. Henri- 
etta 

Bauer, Abram 

Beer, Mrs. J 

Behr, Pauline 

Beller, Mr. and 
Mrs. A 

Benjamin, Eugene 
S 

Benjamin, M. W. . . 

Berl, Miss Blanche 

Berliner, S 

Bernheim, Isaac . . . 
*Bernheimer, Miss Rosie 

Berolzhelmer, Emil 25.00 

Bijur, Nathan 10.00 



5.00 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
10.00 
5.00 

20.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 

10.00 

lO.OO 
10.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 



*Life Member. 
♦♦Deceased Life Member. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



63 



NEW YORK 
"Mew York City (Con.) 

Bing, A. M 10.00 

Bloomingdale, H.C. 10.00 

Bloomingdale, 1. I. 10.00 
Bloomingdale, Mrs. 

J. B 10.00 

Blum, Jos. A. 10.00 

*BlumenthaI, Geo. 

Blumgart, Louis .. 5.00 
Bookman, Mrs. 

Jacob 5.00 

Bookman, Est. of J. 10.00 
Borg, Misses Elsie 

and Edith 30.00 

Brand, Herman 50.00 

Breslauer, A 5.00 

Brill, 1 5.00 

Buchman, Julius . . 10.00 
♦Budge, Henry 

Busch,, J 1.00 

Buttenwieser, J. L. 10.00 
Centennial Lodge, 

No. 763, F. and A. 

M 10.00 

Cohen, Max 10.00 

Cohn, Salo 5.00 

Conheim, Herman.. 10.00 

Cowen, Moses 10.00 

Danenbaum, Chas.. 5.00 

De Boer, David H... 5.00 

Dreyfuss, Ludwig.. 10.00 

Einstein, J 10.00 

Eiseman, Mrs. Sam. 5.00 

ElEberg, Mrs. R. ... 10.00 

Erlanger, A 25.00 

Estricher, Henry . . 5.00 

Falck, Harry 5.00 

Fauer, Philip 5.00 

Fechheimer, C 5.00 

Felsenheld, E 10.00 

Fleischer, Nathan.. 5.00 

Fleishman, Marco.. 10.00 

Frank Bros 10.00 

Frank, Mrs. A. B... 10.00 

Frankel, D. J 5.00 

Friedman, Sol., & 

Co 10.00 

Friend, A. S 10.00 

Fuerst, A. F 5.00 

Fuerst, W. F 5.00 

Glass, Henry 10.00 

Glazier, Mrs. S. W. 25.00 

Goldberg, D 3.00 

Goldberg, Isaac 10.00 

Goldenberg, S. L. . . 5.00 
*Goodhart, Philip J. 

Goodman, A 10.00 

Goodman, Edwin ... 10.00 

Goodman, Edw. B... 10.00 

Gottheil, Paul 5.00 

Gotthelf, Edward B. 5.00 



Greonhut, J. B 50.00 

Grossman, Emil .... 5.00 

*Guggenheim, Wm. 

Guinzburg, A. M. .. 10.00 
Guinzburg, Col. H. 

A 25.00 

Guinzburg, Victor .. 25.00 

*Hays, Daniel P. 

Heavenrich, Julius . 1.00 

*Heinsheimer, A. M. 

Heller, L., & Son .. 10.00 

Hendricks, Mrs. C... 10.00 

♦Hermann, Ferdinand 

Hess, Selmar 10.00 

Heyman, Samuel ... 10.00 

Hilder, Moritz 10.00 

Hirsch, Adolf 5.00 

Hirsch, C. J 5.00 

Holzman, Ascher ... 10.00 

Holzman, S. L 5.00 

Horkheimer, B. S... 5.00 

Ikelheimer, Ida 5.00 

Iserson, A. S 5.00 

Jacobson, H. H 10.00 

Janowitz, Julius .... 25.00 

Jellenik, Felix 10.00 

Jonas, Wm 10. OO 

Kahn, Leopold 10.00 

Kahn, Louis 5.00 

Katz, Eugene 10.00 

Kaufman, Julius ... 10.00 

*Kaufmann, B. 

Kaufman, H. M 10.00 

Kaufman, Mrs. H. M. 10.00 

Kayser, Julius 10.00 

Klein, Mrs. B. F. .. 5.00 

Klein, Wm 10.00 

Kleinert, Mrs. I. B.. 15.00 
Klingenstein, M r s. 

Chas 5.00 

Knopf, Samuel 5.00 

Kohlman, Chas 10.00 

Kohnstamn, Leo. 

Edw. & Jos. ■ 25.00 

*Krauskopf, Mary G. 

Krower, Louis 10.00 

Ladenburger, Theo.. 25.00 

Lang, Gabe 5.00 

Langstadter, Misses 

Rosetta & Esther. 25.00 

Lauterbach, Edw.... 10.00 

Lehman, H. H 10.00 

Lehman, Mrs. Mayer 25.00 

Leaventritt, David.. 10.00 

Levi, Mrs. L. N 5.00 

Levine, E. J 10.00 

Levine, J. Clarence. 25.00 

Levor, Gustav 10.00 

Levy, Eph. B 5.00 

Levy, Morris 5,00 

Levy, Sylvan 5.00 

*Lewisohn, Adolph 



Lewisohn, Mi«aes A. 

and 1 25.00 

Lewisohu, Sam A. .. 10.00 

Liebmann, Mrs. C... 5.00 

Lilianthal, Mrs. C... 6.06 

Lipper, Artnur 10.00 

Loeb, A. M 5.00 

Lceb, Emil 5.00 

Loeb, Louis 25.00 

Loewenstein, Herm. 5.00 

Lorsch. Henry 10.00 

Louchheim, H. F... 10.00 

Lubin, David 10.00 

Mack, Fred A 10.00 

**Mack, Jacob W. 

Mack, Marc H 10,00 

Marcuse, A. J 5.00 

Marks, Sig 5.00 

♦Marshall, Louis 

Mautner, Julius .... 10.00 

Mayer, David 10.00 

Mayer, Max W 10.00 

Mayer, Otto L 10.00 

Mendelsohn, Sig. ... 10.00 

Meyer, Harrison D.. 20.00 

*Meyer, Wm. 

Mishkind, Isidor 5.00 

Modry, 1 3.00 

*Morganstern, Al. G. 

Morgenthau, Gus. L. 10.00 

Morgenthau, Henry. 10.00 

Moses, Mrs. B 10.00 

Moses, Rev. Dr. I. S. 5.00 

Naumburg, Elkan . . 50.00 

Ochs, Adolph S. ... 25.00 

Oppenheimer, P. H.. 10.00 

Oppenheimer, Z. H.. 10.00 

Ottinger, Marx 10.00 

Peierls, Siegfried ... 10.00 

Pfeiffer, Isaac 10.00 

Reiter, Leon M 5.00 

Rich, M. P 5.00 

Rich, Mrs. S 10.00 

Rosenbaum, A. A. . . 10.00 

Rosenbaum, Selig . . 25.00 

Rossbach, Jacob .... 10.00 
Rothschild, Est. of 

Jacob 5.00 

Rothschild, Louis .. 10.00 

Rothschild, L. F. .. 10.00 
Rothschild, Mrs. 

Wm 10.00 

Sachs, Harry 25.00 

Sachs, Louis 10.00 

Sachs, Samuel 25.00 

Sadler, Leo 5.00 

Saks, Isadora 5.00 

♦Salomon, Wm. 

Samuels, J. 10.00 

Schaffner, Abe 5.00 

Schiff, Isaac 5.00 

Schiff, Jacob H 100.00 



*Life Memb-^r. 
♦♦Deceased Life Member. 



64 



THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 



NEW YORK 

New York City (Con.) 

Schiff, Mortimer L.. 300.00 

Schoenfeld, David .. 25.00 

Schoenfeld, Mrs. D.. 5.00 

Scholle, M. J 5.00 

Schweitzer, Mrs. B.. 5.00 

Seasongood, A. J. .. 10.00 

Semiel, Bernard 5.00 

Shaff, Carl 5.00 

Shiman, David 10.00 

Slirier, Samuel 5.00 

Siclier, D. D 10.00 

*Sidenberg, G. 

Sidenberg, Henry . - 5.00 

Sidenberg, Richard.. 5.00 

Siff, Moses L 5.00 

*Silberberg, G. 

Silver, S. L 5.00 

Silverberg, A. S. ... 25.00 

Simon, A. L. & L. L. 5.00 

Simon, R. B 10.00 

Simons, Isaac 5.00 

Sloss, A. M 10.00 

Sondheim, Max 5.00 

Speyer, Jas 10.00 

Spiegelberg, Wm. .. 10.00 

Stein, Abraham .... 10.00 

Steinam, Abraham.. 10.00 

Steiner, David 10.00 

Steiner, Jos 10.00 

Steiner, Sam. S 10.00 

Steinhardt, Henry .. 10.00 

Stern, Alfred 5.00 

Stern, Benj 10.00 

Stern, Leo 5.00 

Stern, Leopold, 68 

Nassau St 10.00 

Stern, Leopold, 142 

W. 14th St 5.00 

Stern, Meyer 10.00 

Stern, Nathan B. .. 10.00 

Sternberg, Fred 5.00 

Stiefel, Mrs. Sam. .. 5.00 

Straus, Percy S 25.00 

Strauss, Chas 25.00 

Strauss, D. R 10.00 

Strauss, Ignatius ... 5.00 

Stroock, L. S 5.00 

Stroock, R. L 5.00 

Strouse, Mrs. Eli ... 2.00 

Sulzberger, Cyrus . . 5.00 

Sutro, Lionel 5.00 

Sylvester, Jas 5.00 

Tanenbaum., L., Sr.. 10.00 

Temple Beth-El 5.00 

Toch, Henry M 5.00 

Toch, Maximilian . . 10.00 

Tuska, Benj 10.00 

Uiland, Abraham ... 5.00 

Ulmann, Bernard . . 10.00 

Ulmann. C. J 10.00 



Veit, B 5.00 

Vollter, A 5.00 

Vorhaus, J., & Sons 5.00 

Vorhaus, L. J 5.00 

Wallach, Nathan ... 5.00 

*Warburg, Felix M. 

*Warburg, Paul M. 

Weil, Dr. Isaac 5.00 

Weil, Max 10.00 

W^einberg, A. 10.00 

Werner, Adolph 10.00 

Wertheim, Jacob ... 10.00 

Wile, Edwin W 20.00 

Wineburgh, Jesse . . 5.00 

Wolfe, S. Herbert .. 5.00 

Wolff, A. L 10.00 

Wolff, Lewis S 10.00 

Wolff, Wm. E 5.00 

*Wollman, Henry 

*Wollman, Wm. J. 
Wollman, Wm. J. .. 10.00 
Woolf, Morris L. ... 25.00 
Wormser, Mrs. Isi- 
dore 10.00 

Younker, Herman .. 10.00 

Zeckendorf, Louis . . 5.00 

Zinke, Isaac L 10.00 

NORTH CAROLINA 
Charlotte 

Oppenheimer, Leon. 5.00 
Durham 

Kronheimer, B. F. .. 5.00 
Goldsboro 

Weil, Leslie 5.00 

Weil, Sol 10.00 

Greensboro 

Cone, Ceasar 10.00 

Statesville 

Hebrew Ladies' Aid 

Soc'y 5.00 

Wilmington 

Jacobi, Mrs. J. N... 5.00 

Solky, J. M 5.00 

NORTH DAKOTA 
Fargo 
Stern, Max 5.00 

OHIO 
Akron 

Akron Schwester 

bund 5.00 

Archbold 

Hirsch, Henry 10.00 

Bellaire 

Blum, Mrs. Henry.. 5.00 

Blum, Isaac 5.00 

Bluffton 

Wise Bros 5.00 

Canton 

Stern, Mrs. Max 5.00 

Stern, Miss Mary . . o.OO 



Chillocothe 

Schachne, J. R 10.00 ' 

Schachue, I'.ichard.. 10. UO 

Cincinnati 

Ach, Samuel 5.00 

Berman, O. A 5.00 

Bernheim, E. P. ... 5.U0 

Bettman, Levi lO.Oo 

Bettman, Bernhard. 5.00 

Bing, Mrs. I. M. ... 10.00 

Bloch, Abe 5.00 

Block, Jos. E 5.00 

Block, Leon 5.0o 

*Block, Samuel 

Brown, B 5.00 

Dreifus, D. S 5.00 

Eichberg, Harry 5.00 

Elsas, Lew 5.00 

Englander, 1 5.00 

Fox, Henry 5.00 

Fox, Solomon 20.00 

Frank, Miss Pauline 5.00 

Freiberg, Abr 10.00 

Freiberg, Bernard . . 5.00 

Freiberg, H. A 5.00 

Freiberg, J. Arthur. 5.00 

Freiberg, Joseph . . . 10.00 

Freiberg, J. W 10.00 

Freiberg, M. J 25.00 

Freiberg, S. J 5.00 

Fries, Gus R 5.00 

Furst, Jos 10.00 

Goldsmith, Hugo ... 5.00 

Guggenheim, Eli ... 5.00 

Hahn, Henry 5.00 

Hessberg, Mrs. Dan. 5.00 

Huttenbauer, Emil.. 10.00 

Johnson, D. 1 10.00 

Jonap, ri 5.00 

Kahn, E. Sons Co... 5.00 

Kaufman, Lee 5.00 

Klein, Jos. D 10.00 

**Klein, Samuel 

Klein, Samuel 10.00 

Krohn, I. M 5.00 

Krohn, Louis 5.00 

Lefkowitz, Chas. ... 5.00 

Levy, H. M 5.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Louis ... 5.00 
*Lowman, L. J. 

Magnus, J. A 10.00 

Marks, L. V 5.00 

Marx, Louis 10.00 

May Bros 5.00 

Mayer, Mrs. L 5.00 

*Meis, Henry 

Meis, Nathan 5.00 

Meiss, Harry 5.00 

Meiss, Leon 5.00 

Mendel, Henry 10.00 

Miller, E. L 5.00 

Ottenheimer, Jacob.. 5.00 



*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 



65 



OHIO 

Cincinnati (Continued) 

Peyser, S. D 10.00 

Phillips, G. J 10.00 

Plaut, Aaron 5.00 

Pollak, Emil 10.00 

Pritz, C. E 5.00 

Pritz, S. E 5.00 

*Reiter, A. 

Rheinstrom, Sig. ... 5.00 

Rosenthal, Sam 10.00 

Rosenthal, W. H. .. 5.00 

Rothschild, Lester.. 5.00 
Seasongood, Est. of 

Alf 10.00 

Seinsheimer, Mrs. S. 5.00 

Shohl, Chas 5.00 

Silverglade, M 5.00 

Smith, Mrs. J. J 2.00 

Stark, Dr. Sigmar .. 10.00 

Stein, Hugo 10.00 

Stern, Max 10.00 

Stix, Mrs. Fanny ... 5.00 

Straus, Samuel 10.00 

**Sturm, Simon 

Thurnauer, C. M. . . 5.00 

Trager, I. N 5.00 

Trager, Mrs. Isidore 10.00 

Trager, J. G. 5.00 

Trost, S. W 10.00 

Troy, Ernst 10.00 

Ullman, Adolph 5.00 

Waldner, Adolph ... 5.00 

Wertheimer, Em. .. 10.00 

Westheimer, L. F... 5.00 

Westheimer, M. F... 10.00 

Winker, Eli 5.00 

Winkler, Mrs. 1 5.00 

Wolf, Mrs. Jacob ... 5.00 

Wolfstein, Jesse — 5.00 

Wyler, I. A 5.00 

Cleveland 

Braham, L. A 5.00 

Dauby, N. L 5.00 

Daughters of Israel. 5.00 

Eisenman, Chas. ... 5.00 

Forchheimer, B 5.00 

Gries, Rabbi M. J... 10.00 

Gross, Sam'l 5.00 

Halle, Mrs. Manuel. 10.00 

Hartman, Sam'l 5.00 

Hays, C. J 5.00 

Hays, Jos 5.00 

Hexter, K. W 5.00 

Joseph, Isaac 10.00 

Joseph, Sig 5.00 

Landesman, Ida 10.00 

Lowenstein, Ben ... 5.00 

Mahler, B 10.00 

Marks, M. A 5.00 

New, Benj 5.00 

New, Harry 5.00 



Newburger, E.N... 5.00 

Peskind, Dr. A 10.00 

Shlesinger, H. 5.00 

Shlosinger, Sig 5.00 

Stearn, Abraham ... 10.00 
Weil, S. D 5.00 

Columbus 

Basch, Jacob 5.00 

*B'nai Israel Sister- 
hood 
*Lazarus, Fred 

Lazarus, Fred 100.00 

*Lazarus, Ralph 
*Miller, Leopold 

Schonthal, Jos 10.00 

Weller, Miss Amy . . 5.00 

Crestline 
Reder, Jake 5.00 

Dayton 

Ach, F. J 10.00 

Daneman, Mrs. J. .. 1.00 
Lessner, Adam 5.00 

East Cleveland 
Gottdiener, H 5.00 

Hamilton 
Kahn, Bertraud B... 5.00 

Kahn, Felix 5.00 

Kahn, Lazard 2.50 

Lima 
Michael, N. L. 5.00 

IVlarion 
Council Jewish 

Women 5.00 

Hershberg, H. L. ... 10.00 

iVIt. Vernon 
Meyers, Mrs. Max .. 5.00 

Plymouth 
Spear, Mrs. Sol 5.00 

Sandusky 
Kaplan, Samuel 5.00 

Springfield 
Jewish Ladies' Aid 
Soc'y 5.00 

Tiffin 
Gottlieb, Jos 5.00 

Toledo 
Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 75.00 

Landman, Otto 5.00 

Wooster 
Freelander, Mrs. I... 5.00 

Youngstov\/n 
Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities 150.00 

Eisenberg, B. R. ... 3.00 

Frankle, M 5.00 

Friedman, J 1.00 

Grossman, Dr. J. B. 5.00 

Hain, M. 2.00 

Hartzell, S 1.00 

Hirshberg, B 5.00 

Kobacker, Harry ... 2.00 



Levy, C. M 2.00 

Livingston, C 2.00 

Livingston, M 2.00 

Lustig, Jos 2.00 

Moss, B. M 2.00 

Moss, D. M 3.00 

Printz, B. H 5.00 

Rapport, H. T 5.00 

Rosenbaum, M. J. .. 2.00 

Schwartz, 1 1.00 

Stern, B 3.00 

*Theobold, Mrs. C. 
Zanesville 

Starr, A. E 5.00 

OKLAHOMA 

Ardmore 

Baum, Henry 5.00 

Wertheimer & Daube 10.00 

Bartlesville 

Bachrach, A 5.00 

Bartlesville Salvage 

Co 5.00 

Born, M. H. 5.00 

Brin, Leopold 10.00 

Degan, H 25.00 

Madansky Clothing 

Co 5.00 

Sanders, W. M 5.00 

Schuman, J. M 5.00 

Zofness Bros 5.00 

Enid 

Herzberg, A 2.50 

Temple Emanuel 

Cong 10.00 

Woolf, H. B 5.00 

Muskogee 

Cohn, Albert 5.00 

Jakowsky, Mike 5.00 

Miller, T 5.00 

Rosendorf, I. L 5.00 

Rygel, Joseph 5.00 

Saloskin, 1 5.00 

Sondheim, Saml. ... 25.00 

Sondheimer, A. S. .. 25.00 

Oklahoma City 

Barth, Sol. 5.00 

Bloch Bros 5.00 

Eugleman, A. D. ... 5.00 

Gans, A. 1 5.00 

Gerson, Harry L. . . 5.00 

Goldstein, Louis 5.00 

Hamburger, Isaac . . 10.00 

Herskowitz. Max, Est 5.00 

Hoffman, H. R 5.00 

Kapp, Hugo 10.00 

Levy Bros 10.00 

Levy, I. B 5.00 

Myer, Joseph 5.00 

Paul, G. A 5.00 

Schwarz, Wm 5.00 



*Life Member. 
♦♦Deceased Life Member. 



66 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma City (Con.) 

Temple Ladies Aid 

Soc'y 5.00 

Weis, Fred G. 5.00 

Wolff, D 5.00 

Okmulgee 

Franke, D. U 5.00 

Josephson, A 5.00 

Kahn, Mrs. Henry.. 5.00 

Leman, A 5.00 

Mayer, S 5.00 

Sapulpa 

Goodman, C. 1 5.00 

Katz Dept. Store .. 5.00 

Kaufman & Mayer.. 5.00 
Tulsa 

Beren, J 5.00 

Borochoff & Kuns- 

man 10.00 

Dreyfus Bros 5.00 

Greenberg, Dr. Max 5.00 

Jankausky, Simon.. 5.00 

Kahn, Julius 5.00 

Lewkowitz, L. D. .. 5.00 

Lyons, L 5.00 

Madansky Clothing 

Co 10.00 

Oil Field Supply Co. 5.00 

Olsan, Louis 5.00 

Pollack, Benj 5.00 

Producers' Supply 

Co. 5.00 

Reedman, Wm 1.00 

Spitzer, Paul A 5.00 

Travis, M. M 10.00 

Travis, S. R 10.00 

Warner, S 5.00 

OREGON 
Portland 

Boskowitz, A 5.00 

Cohen, David Soils.. 10.00 

Goldsmith, R 10.00 

Lang, M 10.00 

Lesser J. , 5.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Elisa ... 10.00 

, Neustadter Bros. ... 25.00 

Shemanski, J 10.00 

Swett, Z 5.00 

Weinstein, N. & S.. 5.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 

Heinz, Maurice 5.00 

Herrman, S. M 2.00 

Hess, Chas 5.00 

Hess, Max 3.00 

Hoffman, Sol 5.00 

Kline, Chas 5.00 

Samuels, A 10.00 



Altoona 




*Kline, Henry S. 




Ambrldge 




Landau, Mrs. S. H.. 


5.00 


Berwick 




Schain, Jos. M 


10.00 


Bethlehem 




Reis, Louis 


5.00 


Braddock 




Katz, Leo. A 


5.00 


Bradford 




Greenewald, D. C. .. 


5.00 


Greenewald, Mrs. D. 




c 


5.00 


Carlisle 




Berg, Miss Selma . . 


10.00 


Chester 




Levy, Moses 


1.00 


Coatesville 




Braunstein, Isaac . . 


5.00 


Marcus, Jacob 


5.00 


Doylestown 




Shoemaker, H. J. . . 


5.00 


Easton 




Hellman, Israel 


5.00 


Hochmann, I. B. ... 


1.00 


Mayer, B. D 


2.00 


Mayer, Jacob 


5.00 




5.00 


Ralph Bros 


5.00 


Ralph, Herman 


5.00 


Rosenfelt, L. 


3.00 


Sherer S 


5 00 


Elkins'Park 




Brunhild, Mrs. L. . . 


25.00 


Erie 




Schaffner, Abraham. 


5.00 


Schaffner, Morris . . 


5.00 


Sobel, Isador 


5.00 


Warner, Edgar W... 


10.00 


Harrisburg 




State of Pennsyl- 




vania 10,000.00 


Claster, H. C 


5.00 


Cohen & Son, S. E. 


5.00 


Goldsmith, Jos 


5.00 


Jacobson, A. S 


5.00 


Jacobson, D. R 


5.00 


Jacobson, M. E 


5.00 


Kaufman, D. S 


10.00 


Kuhn Sol 


5.00 


Miller & Kades 


5.00 


Strouse, Benj 


5.00 


Strouse, Wm 


5.00 


Hazelton 




Benjamin, David ... 


5.00 


Friedlander, M 


5.00 


Jenkintown 




Silberman, Mrs. N.. 


5.00 


Silberman, Mrs. M.. 


5.00 


Johnstown 




Rothstein, Myer 


10.00 



Kittaning 

Einstein, J. R 5.00 

Lancaster 

Cohen, E. M 5.00 

Hecht, Mrs. Henri- 

ette 10.00 

Hirsh, Mrs. Augusta 5.00 

Hirsh, Monroe B. . . 5.00 

Moss, S. R 5.00 

Rindskopf, H. J. ... 3.00 

Rosenthal, Morris . . 5.00 

Siesel, Samuel 5.00 

Weill, Henry 5.00 

Langhorne 

**Branson, I. L. 
Luzerne 

Freedmau, Max 5.00 

McKeesport 

Friedman, Henry .. 5.00 
New Castle 
Feuchtwanger, Mar- 
cus 5.00 

Oil City 
Brounschonger, M., 

Jr 10.00 

Pittsburg 
Federation Jewish 

Philanthropies ..500.00 
*Aaron, Marcus 
Aronson, I. Leonard 5.00 

Benswanger, E 5.00 

*Browarsky, Max 
Cerf, Miss E. K. ... 5.00 
*Cohen, Aaron 
*Cohen, Josiah 
*Dreifus, C. 
Floersheim, Berth- 
old 5.00 

**Frank, Samuel 

Goldsmit, Louis 5.00 

*Guckenheimer, Isaac 
*Hamburger, Phillip 
*Hanauer, A. M. 
Hirsh, Mrs. Herman 10.00 
*Kaufman Bros. 
Kaufmann, Isaac ... 10.00 
Kaufmann, Mrs. 

Jacob 25.00 

Kaufmann, Nathan 5.00 

Lipman, H. M 5.00 

Raphael, Ralph I. .. 5.00 
*Rauh, Marcus 
*Rauh, Mrs. Rosalia 
Kaskel, Solomon ... 10.00 

Stadtfeld, Jos 5.00 

Sunstein, Mrs. Cass 50.00 
*Weil, A. Leo 

Weil, A. Leo 25.00 

Wolf, Mrs. Fred. ... 10.00 
Wolf, Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred 10.00 



*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 



67 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Pittston 

Brown, Albert 

Pottstown 

Mosheim, S. 

Weitzeukoru, iMorris 
Reading 

Baer. I 



10.00 



l.UO 
5.UU 



5.00 

Bash, Wm 5.uO 

Epstein, Justus 3.00 

Goldman, E 00 

Schweriner, S. S. . . 10.00 
Sondheim, Jonas ... 5.00 

Weil, Morris 5.00 

Whiteson, Mrs. I. . . 5.00 
Scranton 

Blau, A 10.00 

Feld, Jacob 3.00 

Finkelstein, 1 5.00 

Frank, Saml. H. . . . 5.00 

Goldsmith, Sol 5.00 

Goodman, N. G 5.00 

Heinz, Bernard 5.00 

Kaplan Bros 5.00 

Kleeman, Oscar 5.00 

Krotosky Bros. 10.00 

Levy, K 5.00 

Levy, N. B 5.00 

Levy, N. M 5.00 

Moses, B 5.00 

Newman, A. 5.00 

Oettinger, Louis ... 5.00 
Oppenheim, J. E. .. 10.00 

Phillips, Geo 5.00 

Raker, D. M. 5.00 

Rice, Alfred 10.00 

5.00 
3.00 



5.00 
5.00 



2.00 



250.00 



He- 



Roos, Dr. E. J. 
Schwartz, A. . . 
Young Men's 
brew Ass'n . 
Shamokin 

Gelb, W. B. & Co. 5.00 
Slatington 

Rice, S. M 5.00 

Tamaqua 

Livingstone, Mrs. L. 5.00 
Titusville 

Berwald, H. P 10.00 

Uniontown 

Rosenbaum. Mrs. L. 10.00 
Wilkes-Barre 

Coons, Jos. S 

Lazarus, H 

Long, Mrs. Dora . . . 
Marks, Mrs. L. U. 
Society for care Jew- 
ish Orphans and 
Friendless Chil- 
dren of Lucerne 

County 

Stern, Harry F. ... 
Strauss, S. J 



5.00 



5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 



100.00 
5.00 
5.00 



Williamsport 
Goldeuberg, C. N. & 
Co 5.00 

York 

Lebach, Mrs. Lena.. 3.00 
Lehmayer, L. R. .. 5.00 
Lehmayer, Mrs. N. . . 10.00 
Wilhelm, Mrs. J. T. 1.00 

Philadelphia 
Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities ...8,500.00 
Adams, Mrs. Rosa S. 5.00 

Asher, A. L 15.00 

Baird, J. E 10.00 

Baum, Saml 5.00 

Beckman, S 10.00 

Berg, Mrs. Max and 

Miss Lottie 

Bernstein, M. 

*Betz & Son 

Blank, Mrs. H 

Bloch, Mr. and Mrs 

S. L 

*Bloch, B. B. 
*Blum, Ralph 
**Blumenthal, Herman 
Blumenthal, Mrs. 

Jacob 5.00 

**Blumenthal, Sol. 
Borkon, Mrs. Carrie 

Bronner, Henry 

Bronner, Mrs. Hen- 
ry, Mrs. Max S. 
Leopold, Mrs. 
Abram Rosenberg 
Brown, J. Howard.. 
'Byers, Jos. J. 
Calwell, Chas. S. .. 
^Clothier, Isaac H. 

Delaney & Co 

Dilsheimer, Mr. and 

Mrs. Ferd. 10.00 

Dryfoos, M 20.00 

Elkish, Mrs. Louis 5.00 
EUerman, Mr. and 

Mrs. Lehman 5.00 

Epstein, Mrs. E. ... 5.00 

Brmann, Jacob 2.00 

Feustman, M. M. .. 5.00 
Field Day Com. of 

Judaie Union 10.00 

*Fleisher, Martha S. 
Fleishman, Chas., 
Howard and Janet 5.00 

Fuguet, Howard 10.00 

Gans, Mr. and Mrs. 

Aaron 55.00 

Geiger, Mary S 10.00 

Gerschel, M 10.00 

*Grant, Adolph 
Gueterman, Sidney.. 2.00 



*Hagedorn, Mrs. Alice 
Harberg, Mrs. J. ... 5.00 

♦Harrison, C. C. 

Heebuer, Saml 5.00 

5.00 



5.00 
5.00 

20.00 



10.00 
10.00 

10.00 
25.00 
10.00 



10.00 
10.00 



25.00 
5.00 



10.00 



5.00 



Heidelberger, Chas. 
Herzberg, Mrs. Wal- 
ter 

Herzsteiu, Morris . . 
Heyman, Mrs. David 
Heymann, Family of 

Fannie, in her 

memory 

Himeles, Mrs. David 
Hirsh, Mrs. Gabriel 
Isenberg, Flora M... 

Jacobs, Mrs. S 

**Jonas, Herman 
Josephson, Mrs. 

Julia 10.00 

*Kaas, Andrew 

Kahn, Morton 10.00 

*Kaufmann, Morris A. 
*Kayser, Samuel 
Klinordlinger, A. . . 
Kohn, Jerome and 
Herbert and Claire 
Kohn Brownstine 
*Krauskopf, Harold 
Krauss, Mrs. M. ... 

Landman, Rabbi and 
Mrs. Isaac 

Lane, David H 

Lang, Mrs. Gabe . . 
*Langfeld, A. M. 
*Levy, Sol. 
*Lit, S. D. 

Loeb, Hortense H. .. 

Lowenstein, I 

Mailert, Miss Hen- 

riette 10-00 

*Manko, L. H. 

Marquis, Mrs. I. .. 

Marshall, Jacob ... 
**Merz, Daniel 
*Merz, Mrs. Regina 

Meyer, Jacob R. . . 

Meyers, Arthur I. . 



10.00 



20.00 

20.00 

5.00 
45.00 
10.00 



5.00 
5.00 



5.00 
5.00 



10.00 
5.00 

Meyers, Chas 15.00 

Meyers, Mrs. F 5.00 

Moore & White Co. 5.00 
*Morris, Chas. E. 
♦Morris, Effingham B. 
*Muhr, Jacob 
Myers, Mrs. Yette.. 5.00 

Nachod, J. E 5.00 

Norris, Dr. Geo. W. 5.00 

Olsho, Dr. S. L 10.00 

Oppenheimer, Mrs. 

Carrie 20.00 

Oppenheimer, Mrs. 

S 5.00 

Ostheimer, Wm. J... 5.00 



*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



68 



THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Philadelphia (Continued) 
**Pepper, Dr. Wm. 

**PfaeIzer, Simon 

, Press, Mrs. A 10.00 

Propper, Mrs. S. J. 10.00 
*Raab, Mrs. Julia 
Raff, A. Raymond .. 5.00 
♦Reform Congrega- 
tion Kenesethi Israel 
Reinlieimer, Mr. and 

Mrs. SamI 10.00 

**Rorlce, Allen B. 
♦Rosenberg, Grace 
♦Rosenberg, Walter I. 
♦Rosenberg, Walter J. 
Rosenthal, Harry .. 10.00 

Rothschild, S 5.00 

Rubin, Mrs. Jos 10.00 

Samuel, J. Bunford 15.00 
"Schloss, Mrs. Herman 
♦Schoch, Henry R. 

Schwacke, J. H 5.00 

Sharp, S. S 10.00 

♦Silberman, Mrs. Ida 
Silberman, Mrs. Ida 25.00 
♦Silverman, I. H. 
Silverman, Mr. and 

Mrs. M 10.00 

♦*Snellenburg, J. J. 
♦Snellenburg, Nathan 

Snellenburg, N. 500.00 

♦Snellenburg, Samuel 
Sondheimer, Family 

of Babette 5.00 

Springer, E 5.00 

Stamm, Jos 5.00 

Stein, Miss Sallie .. 5.00 
Stern, Family of 
Mrs. Lina, in her 

memory 30.00 

Sternberger, Mrs. 

John 10.00 

♦Sternberger, Samuel 
Strouse Mrs. M. ... 5.00 
♦Swaab, M. M., Jr. 
♦♦Teller, Benj. F. 
♦Teller, Mrs. B. F. 
♦♦Teller, Jos. R. 

Teller, Julius L. 5.00 

♦Trautman, Dr. B. 
Voorzanger, Miss R. 2.50 
♦Wanamaker, John 

Weil, Jacob 90.00 

♦♦Weiler, Herman 

Weiss, 1 15.00 

Wells, Geo. B lO.OO 

Weyl Bros 10.00 

Wilson, Morris R. 5.00 
Winelander, Max . . 5.00 
Wolf, Edwin, Jr. ... 10.00 



♦Wolf, I.. Jr. 
*^Zweighaft, Simon 



RHODE ISLAND 
Pawtucket 

Shartenberg, J. S. . . 5.00 
Providence 

Bernkopf, David 5.00 

Cutler, Col. Harry.. 10.00 
Dimond, L. & Sons. 

Inc 5.00 

Fox, Jos 10.00 

Gertsocov, M 5.00 

Silverman Bros. 10.00 

Wachenheimer, 
Harry 5.00 



SOUTH CAROLINA 
Florence 

Sulzbacher, S. I. .. 10.00 
Rock Hill 
Friedheim, Julius .. 5.00 
Friedheim, Samuel.. 100.00 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Frank, L. 1 10.00 

Frank, S. H 1.00 

Goodman, H., Jr. .. 5.00 

Rosenheim, W 5.00 

Shoenig, Abe 2.00 

Silverman, N. M. . . 5.00 

Slabosky, A. 3.00 

Clarksville 

Adler, M 10.00 

Knoxville 

Rosenthal, D. A 5.00 

Memphis 
Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities .. . .300.00 
Binswanger, M. S. 5.00 
Coleman, Mrs. Han- 
nah 5.u0 

Haase, Chas. J 10.00 

Roth, Louis 5.00 

Nashville 
Bernstein, Phil, and 

Clarence, Jr 10.00 

Cohen, R. and A. .. 10.00 

Hirsch, Sam 10.00 

Jacobus, J. M. .'.... 5.00 

Labeck Bros 5.00 

Levy Sam, & Co. . . 10.00 
Lieberman, Loveman 

& O'Brien 5.00 

Loveman, Adolph . . 5.00 

Loveman, D 10.00 

Loventhal, Lee J. . . 5.00 
Lusky, Mrs. J. C. . . 5.00 
Rich, Schwartz & 
Joseph 5.00 



TEXAS 
Beaumont 

Block, 1 5.00 

Deutser, B 5.00 

Goldstein, Dr. L. .. 2.50 
Ladies' Benevolent 

Soc'y 10.00 

Levy, Leon R 5.00 

Perlstein, H. A 10.00 

Corpus Christ! 
Gugenheim & Cohn 5.00 
Gugenheim, M. A. .. 5.00 

Hirsch, Jos 5.00 

Lichtenstein, M. & 

Sons i... 5.00 

Weil, Chas 10.00 

Crawford 

Marks, M 10.00 

Dallas 
Adler, Dr. H. T. .. 5.00 
Baron Bros. Milli- 
nery Co 10.00 

Burk & Co 5.00 

Cohn, Maurice . 5.00 

Dreyfuss, G 5.00 

Dreyfuss, Sol 5.00 

Eppstein, E. & Co. 25.00 
Freshman, Sam. . . 5.00 

Goettinger, Max 5.00 

Goldsmith, Isidore . . 5.00 

Goldstein, A. 10.00 

Harris, Mrs. A 10.00 

Harris, Leon A 5.00 

Hexter, J. K 10.00 

Hexter, V. H 10.00 

Hyman, Abe 10.00 

Israelsky, Ike 5.00 

Kahn, E. M 25.00 

Kahn, J 5.00 

Kramer, Arthur 5.00 

Kramer, Irvin L. ... 5.00 
Landauer, Horace . . 5.00 

Levi, Chas. G 5.00 

Levy, Henry 5.00 

Liebman, Morris ... 5.00 

Liebman, R 10.00 

Linz, Albert 5.00 

Linz, Clarence 10.00 

Linz, Simon 5.00 

Lipsitz, Louis 5.00 

Lorch, Ike 1 5.00 

Mayer, Sigmund . . . 5.00 

Metzler Bros 5.00 

Metzler, Jake 10.00 

Michalson, L. A. . . 5.00 . 

Miller, I. A 2.50 

Mittenthal, H. S. & 

Co 10.00 

Meyers, Seymour .. 5.00 

Ortlieb, Max 5.00 

Pike, Edgar L 5.00 

Pollak, R 5.00 



♦Life Member. 
♦♦Deceased Life Member. 



THE NATIONAL rAR:\[ SCHOOL 



69 



TEXAS 

Dallas (Continued) 

Ueiuhardt, Louis . . 5.00 

Reinliardt, Sidney . . 5.00 

Roseubaum Bros. . . 10.00 

Roseufleld, Max J. .. 5.00 
*Sanger, Alexander 

Sanger Bros 5.00 

♦Sanger, Mrs. Pliilip 

Scheline, H. S. .... 5.00 

Silberstein, Mrs. A. 100.00 

♦•Silberstein, A. 
*Silberstein, Mrs. A. 

Sonuenttieil, Dan ... 10.00 

Swope, Jos 10.00 

Titclie, Edward 5.00 

El Paso 
Jewish Relief So- 
ciety 50.00 

Aronstein, S 5.00 

Mathias, A 5.00 

Ravel, E 5.00 

Ravel, Jos 5.00 

Weiss, J 5.00 

Ft. Worth 

August, A. 5.00 

Bath, Felix P 10.00 

Braun, Mrs. H 10.00 

Brann, A. D 5.00 

Brown, D 5.00 

Brown, Dan, Jr. 5.00 

Brown, Isidor 5.00 

Chanowsky, J 5.00 

Council Jewish 

Women 5.00 

Davidson, Sam 25.00 

Eppstein, M. L 25.00 

Friedman, Mrs. A... 5.00 

Friend, Alex. M. ... 5.00 

Greenwald, M. W. .. 5.00 

Heinz, Chas 5.00 

Keene, D. H 5.00 

Kramer, Alvin 5.00 

Lederman, H 5.00 

Levine, H 5.00 

Levy Bros 5. 00 

Levy, D 5.00 

*Levy, Sam 

Loewenthal, M. L... 5.00 

Marx, Herman 15.00 

Mayer, J 15.00 

Mayer, Max K 10.00 

Rosenthal, M 5.00 

Seligman, Oscar 5.00 

Simon, Arthur 2.50 

Weixel, Mone 5.00 

Weltman, Mrs. L. .. 2.00 

Galveston 

Block, Julius 5.00 

Brock, Moritz 5.00 

Cohen, Robert L .. 5.00 

Epscein, Maurice .. 5.00 



Fellmau Dry Goods 

Co 10.00 

Kempner, D. W. ... lO.uO 
*Kempner, Mrs. H. 

Kempner, L H 10.00 

Lasker, E. 10.00 

*Lasker, M. 

Neethe, John 5.00 

Samuels, E 5.00 

Stern, Morris 5.00 

Ullman, J. L 10.00 

Ullman, N 10.00 

Houston 

AUtrey, R. L 25.00 

Kiam, Ed 10.00 

Lyons, I. A 1.00 

IVIexia 

Nusbaum, Jos 10.00 

IVIidland 

Halft, Henry M 10.00 

Mineola 

Bromberg, I. G. 5.00 

Palestine 

Maier, S 5.00 

San Antonio 

Berman, 10.00 

Blum, Mrs. Fannie.. 5.00 

Cohen, A 10.00 

Dalkowitz Bros. Co. 5.00 

Frank Bros 5.00 

Frank, L. Saddlery 

Co 5.00 

Halff, Jae 5.00 

HalfE, Mrs. M 25.00 

Halff, Mrs. S 25.00 

Holzmark, Mrs. 

Theresa 5.00 

Joske, Ales 10.00 

Mayer, Children of 

Ferdinand & Jetta 40.00 
Oppenheimer, Her- 
bert M 15.00 

Oppenheimer, Julius 5.00 

Oppenheimer, J. D. 10.00 

Oppenheimer, M. L. 10.00 

Peck, Mrs. L. P. ... 10.00 

Sanger, M. M 5.00 

Welti, Jake 10.00 

Zadek, G 5.00 

Texarkana 

Heilbron, L 5.00 

Tyler 

Bruck, S 5.00 

Gill, A 5.00 

Goldstein & Brown 5.00 

Goldenternek, A. ... 5.00 

Lipstate, J 5.00 

Meyer, Jacob 5.00 

Wadel, B 5.0O 

Victoria 

Apple Mr. 5.00 

Dover. Mr 5.00 



Bettin, Max 5.00 

Dreyfus, Benj 5.00 

Ladies' Benevolent 

Society 5.00 

Potash, M. L 5.00 

Simon, A 5.00 

Sinsheimer, Mrs. L. 

L 5.00 

Wertheimer, C. A. .. 5.00 

Waco 

Archenhold, S 10.00 

Emanuel, L 5.00 

Lipsitz, Mr 5.00 

Meyer, H 5.00 

Sanger Bros 25.00 

Wohlberg, Manuel .. 1.00 

UTAH 
Salt Lake City 

Baer, Adolph 5.00 

Jewish Relief Soci- 
ety 5.00 

Rosenblatt, N 10.00 

Sweet, Leon 5.00 



VIRGINIA 




Harrisonburg 




Bloom, Bernard ... 


5.00 


Oestreicher, S 


1.00 


Lynchburg 




*Guggenheimer, Mrs. 


Max 




5.00 


Norfolk 




Cohen, B. E 


5.00 


Hecht, Jacob 


5.00 


Hirschler, E 


5.00 


Hornthal, Mrs. C 


5.00 


*Ladies' Hebrew Be- 




nevolent ASEO. 




Spogat, J. W 


5.00 


Richmond 




Binswanger, H. S 


5.00 


Bin swan ger, M. I 


5.00 


Galeski, Dr. S 


5.00 


Hutzler, H. S 


5.00 


Kaufmann, I 


5.00 


Levy, Arthur 


5.00 


*Millhiser, Mrs. Clar 


ence 


Millhiser, Mrs. Clar- 




ence 


5.00 


Millhiser, Bmanue 


1 5.00 


♦Millhiser, Gustave 




*Raab, E. 




Raab E 


5.00 


Thalheimer, M. G.. 


5.00 


*Whitlock, Philip 




Roanoke 




Sessler, Rabbi M. . 


5.00 


Staunton 




Strauss, I. G 


5.00 



♦Life Member. 
♦♦Deceased Life Member. 



70 



THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 



WASHINGTON 




Rice, Albert M. ... 


5.00 


Mahler, Mrs. Edw 


5.00 


Everett 




*Solomon & Rubin 




Mahler, Jacob 


5.00 


Hochstadter, Bern- 




Sonneborn, M 


5.00 


Marks, Harry 


5.00 


ard 


5.00 


*Weil, J. 
Wolf, Leo 


5.00 


Miller, Morris 

Nathan, Harry 


5.00 


Seattle 


5.00 


Dellar Jos. 


5.00 


WISCONSIN 




Newald, M. D 

Polacheck, Arthur . 


10.00 


Eckstein, Mrs. 


5.00 


Nathan 


10.00 


Appleton 




Polacheck, Louis .. 


5.00 


Frauenthal Bros. . . 


10.00 


Marshall, L. J 


5.00 


Polacheck, Phil. .. 


5.00 


*Galland, Bonham 




La Crosse 




i'oss, Benj 


5.00 


♦Galland, Mrs. C. K. 




Ansche Chesed Con 




Rosenberg, J. H. . 


10.00 




25.00 


gregation 


5.00 


Schoen, G. B 


5.00 


Gottstein, M. & K. 




*Gottstein, Meyer 




Bloom, Bernhard . 


5.00 


Schuster, Bertha . . 


5.00 


*Gottstein, Rebecca 




Goldish, A. M 


10.00 


Schuster, Chas. ... 


3.00 


Guthman, Otto 


5.00 


Hirschheimer, A. . 


25.00 


Tiefenbronner, E. . 


10.00 


*Lang, Julius C. 




Natenshon, L. & Co 


5.00 


Ullman, Leo 


5.00 


Loeb, Sam S 


10.00 


Milwaukee 




Superior 




Moyses, Ben 


10.00 


Federated Jewish 




Cohen, J. L 


5.00 


Weinberg, Mrs. L... 


2.50 


Charities 


150.00 


Holzberg, A 


5.00 


Tacoma 




Aarons, Lehman . . . 


5.00 


Josephs, S. Y. Co.. 


3.00 


Feist, Theo 


5.00 


Alberberg, Adolph . 


5.00 


Lasky Bros 


5.00 


Jacob, Meyer 


5.00 


Breslauer, A. Co. . . 


10.00 


Marcus, C 


3.00 


Kaufman, H. A 


10.00 


Cohen, Mrs. Gertrud 


e 5.00 


Newman, L. S. ... 


5.00 


Ladies' Montefiore 




De Wolf, J. B 


10.00 


Schwartz, S 


2.00 


Society 


5.00 


Eckstein, Henry . . 


5.00 


Shapiro, Geo 


2.00 






Eckstein, S. A 


5.00 


Siegel, A. & E. ... 


5.00 


WEST VIRGINIA 


Elzas, S. Z 


5.00 


Solomon, Leon 


5.00 


Bluefield 




Frledlander, M. 




Weingartern, I. ... 


5.00 


Heller, Mrs. P. S... 


5.00 


Knitting Co 


5.00 






Charleston 




Goldman, David ... 


5.00 


CANADA 




Baer, Ben 


5.00 
5.00 


Goldman, M. L. .. 
Gottschalk, S. W. . 


5.00 
5.00 


Toronto, Ont. 

Scheuer, Edmund . 




Frankenberger, Max 


5.00 


Clarksburg 




Greenwald, Oscar . 


10.00 






Levy, Ben 


5.00 


Heller, B. E 


5.00 


ENGLAND 




Parkersburg 




Heller, Simon 


5.00 


London 




Nathan, Mrs. Ben . . 


5.00 


Housman, A. Edw. . 


5.00 


*Meyer, Arthur 




Wheeling 




Jung, Herman 


5.00 


FRANCE 




Bloch, Sam. S 


5.00 


Jung, Simon 


10.00 


Paris 




*Horkheimer, Mrs. B. 




Landauer, Max . . . 


10.00 


Shoenberg, L. D. . 


25.00 


Horkheimer, Mrs. 




Leubusher, Theo. . 


10.00 






Morris 


15.00 
5.00 


Levi, Rev. Chas. . 
Litt, Miss Bessie . 


5.00 
10.00 


SWITZERLAN 
Rorschach 


D 


Kline, Simon 




Isenberg, Israel .... 


5.00 


Mahler, Chas 


10.00 


**Schoenfeld, Max 





ALABAMA 
Birmingham 

Birmingham Lodge, 



Huntsville 

Ezora Lodge, 236 . . . 
Mobile 

Beth Zur Lodge, 84. 
Montgomery 

Alabama Lodge, 299. 

Emanuel Lodge, 103. 



BENEVOLENT ORDERS 
Contributing Lodges 

Independent Order B'nai B'rith 





ARKANSAS 




Sacramento 


f5.00 


Helena 

Aaron Meyers 

Lodge, 159 

Pine Bluff 

Phoenix Lodge, 279.. 


10.00 
5.00 


Etham Lodge, 37 ... 

San Francisco 

Cremieux Lodge, 325 

Golden Gate Lodge, 

129 


5.00 






CALIFORNIA 




CONNECTICUT 
New Haven 


5.00 


Stockton 




Horeb Lodge, 25 ... 




Hope Lodge, 126 


5.00 


Stamford 


5.00 


Oakland 




Jacob B. Ullman 


5.00 


Oakland Lodge, 252. 


5.00 


Lodge, 685 



5.00 



10.00 



25.00 



5.00 



*Life Member. 
**Deceased Life Member. 



THE NATIONAL FAEM SCHOOL 



71 



COLORADO 
Colorado Springs 

Colorado Springs 

Lodge, 523 5.00 

Denver 

Denver Lodge, 171.. 10.00 
Trinidad 

Trinidad Lodge, 293. 5.00 

DELAWARE 
Wilmington 
Wilmington Lodge, 

470 10-00 

DIST. OF COLUMBIA 
Washington 
Argo Lodge, 413 .... 5.00 



MICHIGAN Cleveland 

Kalamazoo Cleveland Lodge, IG 10.00 

Mishan Lodge, 247.. 5.00 Dayton 

Esehol Lodge, 55 ... 10.00 



GEORGIA 

Albany 

Micah Lodge, 707 ... 10.00 
Columbus 

Columbus Lodge, 77 5.00 
Savannah 

Joseph Lodge, 76 ... 5.00 

ILLINOIS 

Lincoln 

Liberty Lodge, 294.. 5.00 
Peoria 

Progress Lodge, 113. 25.00 
Springfield 



MINNESOTA 
Minneapolis 
Minneapolis Lodge, 
271 

MISSISSIPPI 
Columbus 
Joseph Herz Lodge, 
181 

MISSOURI 
Kansas City 

Kansas City Lodge, 

184 

St. Louis 
Eben Ezra Lodge, 



Columbus 
*Zi(in Lodge, 62 
^„ „. Youngstown 

Mahoning Lodge, 339 10.00 



OKLAHOMA 
Oklahoma City 

Oklahoma City 
Lodge, 539 10.00 



2.00 



10.00 



OREGON 
Portland 

Theo. Herzl Lodge, 
314 



10.00 



47 1000 Bradford 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Missouri Lodge, 22.. 
Springfield 
Springfield Lodge, 
717 



5.00 



MONTANA 
Butte 
Baron D e H i r s c h 
Lodge, 420 

NEW MEXICO 



Ernes Lodge, 67 5.00 Alburquerque 

Albuquerque Lodge, 

INDIANA 336 

Fort Wayne 
Emek Beracha 
Lodge, 61 25.00 



5.00 



5.00 



Bradford Lodge, 745 5.00 
Homestead 
Homestead Lodge, 

586 5.00 

Lancaster 
Lancaster Lodge, 

228 10.00 

McKeesport 
McKeesport Lodge, 

573 10.00 

Scranton 
Amos Lodge, 136 ... 5.00 



KANSAS 
Leavenworth 

Sholem Lodge, 78 ... 

KENTUCKY 
Lexington 
Lexington Lodge, 
289 



LOUISIANA 
Alexandria 

Rebecca Lodge, 240. 
New Orleans 
Bnai Israel Lodge, 



5.00 



5.00 



5.00 



.00 



East Las Vegas 

J . E. Rosenwald 

Lodge, 545 10.00 

NEW YORK 
Albany 

Gideon Lodge, 140 . . 
New York 
Edward Everett 

Lodge, 97 10.00 

Hebron Lodge, 5 ... 
Henry Jones Lodge, 

79 

Jordan Lodge, 15 . . 
Manhattan Lodge, 

156 10.00 Tyler 

Edward 



TENNESSEE 
Memphis 

Memphis Lodge, 35. 
Nashville 
Maimonides Lodge, 
46 



10.00 



5.00 



TEX.A3 
El Paso 

El Paso Lodge, 509.. 10.00 
5 00 Galveston 

Zacharias Frankel 

2.00 Lodge, 242 10.00 

10 00 San Antonio 

Edar Lodge, 211 .... 5.00 



District Grand 

Lodge, 7 

*D i s t r i c t Grand 

Lodge, 7 
International Lodge, 
500 



"Washington 
19 


Lodge, 


10.00 


10.00 zion Lodge, 


2 


10.00 


Plattsburg 
100.00 Joel Lodge, 


118 


5.00 


' Rochester 

Zerubbabel 
53 


Lodge, 


10.00 



10.00 



MASSACHUSETTS 
Holyoke 

Holyoke Lodge, 728.. J 



*Life Member. 



OHIO 
Cincinnati 

The Cincinnati 

Lodge, 4 10.00 

District Grand 



L a s k e r 
Lodge, 347 5.00 

UTAH 
Salt Lake City 

B. F. Peixotto 
Lodge, 421 10.00 

WASHINGTON 
Seattle 
Hildesheimer Lodge, 

503 5.00 

Rainier Lodge, 627.. 5.00 
Tacoma 



Lodge, 2 100.00 Tacoma Lodge, 741.. 25.00 



72 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Fox River Lodge, 
209 lO.uU 

Milwaukee 

Isaac Lodge, 87 5.00 

Gilead Lodge, 41 5.00 

Independent Order 
B'rith Abraham 

COLORADO 
Denver 

Pride of Denver 
Lodge, 333 5.00 

CONNECTICUT 
New Haven 

Columbus Lodge, 61 5.00 
New London 
Pride of New Lon- 
don Lodge, 466 ... 5.00 
Norwich 
Independent Norwich 

Lodge, 309 1.00 

Torrington 
Torrington Lodge, 
326 1.50 

GEORGIA 

Atlanta 

Georgia Lodge, 493.. 5.00 

ILLINOIS 
Chicago 
Pavelocher Lodge, 

612 5.00 

Dr. Geo. Sultan 

Lodge, 307 10.00 

INDIANA 
Indiana Harbor 

Ezra Lodge, 434 2.00 

Indianapolis 
Zion Lodge, 221 .... 5.00 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 
Benjamin Szold 

Lodge, 211 5.00 

Ahron Friedenwald 

Lodge, 323 5.00 

MASSACHUSETTS 
Attleboro 
First Attleboro 

Lodge, 442 5.00 

Boston 
Knights of Liberty 

Lodge, 271 5.00 

L o r (J Beaconsfleld 

Lodge, 554 2.00 

Brockton 
Pride of Brockton 
Lodge, 273 3.00 



Cambridge 
Cambridge Lodge, 

198 2.00 

Worcester 
Sons of Maccabeas, 
579 5.00 

MISSOURI 
Kansas City 
Berry Dantzig 

Lodge, 499 5.00 

Star of Kansas City 
Lodge, 424 5.00 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 
Manchester 
Granite State Lodge, 

181 5.00 

Hillsboro Lodge, 392 5.00 

NEW JERSEY 
Elizabeth 

Elizabeth Lodge, 676 10.00 
Morristown 
Morristown Lodge, 
375 1.00 

NEW YORK 
Brooklyn 
Pride of Brooklyn 

Lodge, 467 10.00 

Elmira 

Berger Lodge, 388 .. 3.00 
Kingston 

Kingston Lodge, 321 5.00 
New York City 
Roumanian Ameri- 
can Lodge, 83 3.00 

Syracuse 

Samuel Lodge, 241.. 5.00 
Utica 
R s c e Conkling 
Lodge, 364 2.00 

OHIO 
Cleveland 

G. E. Lessing Lodge, 
37 5.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 
McKeesport 
McKeesport Lodge, 

447 5.00 

Philadelphia 
Dr. Theo. Herzel 

Lodge, 183 5.00 

"Victor Hugo Lodge, 

299 5.00 

Hyman Lodge, 75 . . 10.00 
Pittsburg 
Pittsburgh Lodge, 

359 5.00 

Pottstown 
McKinley Lodge, 283 5.00 



South Bethlehem 
S. Bethlehem Lodge, 
'iz4 5.00 

RHODE ISLAND 
Providence 
Hope of R. I. Lodge, 

549 3.00 

Pn^e of R. I. Lodge, 

124 3.00 

Providence Lodge, 

214 5.00 

South Providence 

Lodge, 328 5.00 

TENNESSEE 
Chattanooga 
Chattanooga Lodge, 
449 5.00 

VIRGINIA 

Newport News 
Virginia Lodge, 195. 5.00 

Order B'rith Abraham 

CALIFORNIA 
Los Angeles 
Los Angeles Lodge, 
414 5.00 

COLORADO 
Denver 

Queen City Lodge, 
113 5.00 

CONNECTICUT 
New London 
New London Lodge, 

295 5.00 

South Norwalk 
South Norwalk 
Lodge, 185 5.00 

ILLINOIS 
Chicago 
Bnei Ephraim Lodge, 

172 5.00 

Oriental Lodge, 193. 10.00 
La Salle 
La Salle City Lodge, 
317 5.00 

INDIANA 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis Lodge, 
230 5.00 

MAINE 
Saco 
Independent of Bidd- 

ford Lodge, 367 ... 5.00 

MARYLAND 
Baltimore 
Rigar Lodge, 83 .... 5.00 



THE ^•ATI()NAL FARM SCHOOL 



MASSACHUSETTS NEW JERSEY BrEdford 

Roxbury Elizabeth Wm. Pcnn Lodge, 

A li a V a t h Achim Pride of Elizabeth M.". 5.00 

Lodge, ITi 2.1)0 Lodge. 271 2.ri0 York 

Perth Amboy Abi' Trattner Lodge, 

MINNESOTA First Perth Amboy Itw 10.00 

Minneapolis Hebrew Mutual Aid 

-Minneapolis City Lodge, 200 10.00 WISCONSIN 

Lodge, i;:! 5.00 Woodbine Sheboygan 

Woodbine Lodge, 67 5.00 Sheboygiin Hebrew 

NEW HAMPSHIRE Lodge, 78 5.00 

Manchester NEW YORK 
Manchester City Elmira 
Lodge, 2I!4 5.00 Elmira Max Nordau Independent Order- 
Lodge, 281 3.00 Free Sons of Israel 

NEW YORK G'en Falls ILLINOIS 

Elmira Anshe Sholoni Lodge, Chicaao 

Limira City Lodge, 219 5.00 District Grand 

-'- "-'^ Lodge, 2 25.00 

OHIO 

OHIO Youngstown CONNECTICUT 
Lorain Federal Lodge, 170.. 10.00 ^^^^ ^^^^^ 

Lorain Lodge, 502 .. 2.00 j^^^ ^^^^^ Lodge, 

Youngstown PENNSYLVANIA ^g j, 0^ 
Bne Moses Lodge. Greensburg 

209 5.00 Greenrburg Lodge, WISCONSIN 

194 ^-'^ Milwaukee 

PENNSYLVANIA Philadelphia Cream City Lodge, 

Pittsburgh Grand Lodge 100.00 go " 5 00 

Allegheny County B. P. Miller Lodge, 

Lodge. 296 5.00 2 10.00 

Scranton Ponevyezh Lodge, Order Knights of Joseph 

Scrantou City Lodge, 43 ■ 5.00 ILLINOIS 

4" ^00 Wilkes-Barre Chicago 

o^^r^r. ,o, «.,r. Diamond City Lodge, 

RHODE ISLAND 13.5 5.00 ^,,^ ^^ ,,0 

Providence 

Providence City RHODE ISLAND MISSOURI 

Lodge, 143 5.00 Providence g^ Louis 

Rhode Island Lodge, Friendship Lodge, Jonathan Rice Lodge, 

213 5.00 188 5.00 ^^^ ^0.00 

Star of R. I. Lodge, ^^ . ' . , 

Kaiser Franz .Joseph 

^■°° Independent Western Lodge, 110 2.00 

TEXAS Star Order PENNSYLVANIA 

°^"3= ILLINOIS Philadelphia 

Alexander Kohut Chicago Baron Ginsburg 

^°^^^- ^'^'^ °-^° New Star Lodge, 30 10.00 Lodge. 40 10.00 

Pittsburg 

WASHINGTON q^,q Abr. Goldfaden 

^^^"'^ Canton Lodge, 80 5.00 

Seattle Lodge, 460.. 5.00 " '\ _, 

Stark Lodge, 129 ... 5.00 

Steubenville Independent Order 

Independent Order J< hudah Hamnchby p^.^^ g^^j^^ ^f Judah 

B'rith Sholom Lodge, 131 5.00 ^,p,^VORK 

Youngstown NEW YORK 

COLORADO Youngstown Lodge, New York City 

Denver 136 5.00 Justice Lodge, 26 ... 10.00 

Harmony Lodge, 155 10.00 

PENNSYLVANIA PENNSYLVANIA 

DELAWARE Philadelphia Braddock 

Wilmington Germantown Lodge, Moses Ben Amram 

Delaware Lodge, 141 5.00 218 5.00 Lodge, 158 15.00 



THE NATIONAL FAR:\I SCHOOL 



Independent Order 

United Hebrews 

of America 

MASSACHUSETTS 
Brockton 
Pilgrim Lodge, 45 .. o.Oo 

Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Pittsburg 
;Montefiore Lodge. 
794 I'l.'io' 

Workmen's Circle 

CONNECTICUT 
Wallingford 
Brancli 472 1.00 



GEORGIA 
Savannah 
Branch 383 



1.00 



NEW JCRSEY 
Hoboken 
Branch 19s l.uO 

NEW YORK 
Brooklyn 

Branch ij .3.00 

Rochester 

Branch Tl 5.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Pittsburg 
Branch 45 5.00 

LADIES' LODGES 

Independent Order 
True Sisters 

CONNECTICUT 
New Haven 
Jochebed Lodge 4.. 5.00 



NEW JERSEY 
Newark 
Hulda Lodge, 5 .... 

NEW YORK 
Albany 

Abigail Lodge, 3 

New York City 

Balhia Lodge, 10 ... 

Hadasah Lodge, 8 . . 



..00 



10.00 



5.00 
5.00 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Philadelphia 
B ' n o t h Jeshurun, 
Lodge, 2 10.00 

Independent Order 
B'rith Abraham 

MISSOURI 
St. Louis 
Leah Ladies' Lodge. 
5 2.00 



Contributions Received 

ALABA.MA 
Anniston 

Beth El $4.30 

ARKANSAS 

Pine BluflE 
Anshe Emeth 5.55 



from Religious Schools 

LOUISIAXA 
I Alexandria 

I Gemilnth Chassodim 

New Iberia 

Gates of Praver 



CONNECTICUT 
Hartford 

Beth Israel 



10.00 



FLORIDA 

Jacksonville 

Abavath Cliesed 2.00 

ILLINOIS 

Chicago 

i^aiah Temple 10.00 

Temple Sholom 10.00 

Peoria 
Anshai Emeth 10.00 

INDIANA 
Fort Wayne 

Achiluth Ve.sholom 5.00 

South Bend 

Beth Ei 5.00 

IOWA 

Davenport 

B'nai Israel 2.00 

KENTUCKY 

Henderson 

Adath Israel 14.50 

Lexington 

Adath Israel 3.50 



MISSISSIPPI 
Vicksburg 

Anehe Chesed 



MISSOURI 
St. Joseph 

Aiiatli Joseph 

NEW YORK 

Buffalo 

Forget-Me-Xot Club. Tenijde 
Beth Zion 

OHIO 
Bellaire 

Bellaire Temple 

Piqua 

Anshe Emeth 

Toledo 

Shomer Emoonim 



PENNSYLYANIA 

Scranton 

Madison Avenue Teinjde . . 

TENNESSEE 
Knoxville 
Beth El : 

TEXAS 

El Paso 

Temple Mt. Sinai 

WISCONSIN 
Milwaukee 

B 'ne Jeshurun 



5.00 
7.00 

7.00 

5.00 

10.00 

^^^?, 

2.00 
5.00 

7.50 

6.60 
10.00 

15.00 



Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, D. U., President I. H. Silverman, Treasurer 

4715 Pulaski Avenue, Philadelphia 605 Land Title Bldg., Philadelphia 

Abraham H. Fromenson, Executive Secretary 
407 Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia 



lMpmbrrsl|ip nf aii)F National iFariu ^rljiml 

I, the undersigned, being in sympathy with the object of ''The 
National Farm School" — the training of lads in the practice and 
science of agricukure, for agricuUural callings — do hereby agree to 
subscribe as one of the Maintainers of the institution, the dues of 
a Life Member ($100.00) Patron ($25.00) Supporter ($5.00) 
Friend ($50.00) Member ($10.00) 

Name 

Address 

Date . 



note — Underscore the class of membership you wish to join. Life Membership 
calls for but one (the first) payment. Make check payable to THE NATIONAL 
FARM SCHOOL. 



JForm nf Upgary ta Slir Naltntial iFarm ^rI|ool 

'7 give and bequeath unto The National Farm School, Bucks 

County, Pa., near Doylestozvn, the sum of dollars, 

free from all taxes, to he paid to the Treasurer, for the time being, 
for the UrSe of the institution." 



iForm flf imaf 

ON REAL ESTATE OR GROUND RENT 

"I give and devise unto The National Farm School, Bucks 
County, Pa., near Doylestown {here describe the property or ground 
rent), together with the appicrtenances, in fee simple, and all policies 
of insurance covering said premises, whether fire, title or otherzvise, 
free from all taxes." 



AN APPRECIATION 

The following letter. ontirel>' unsolicited, attests 
the high character of our work: 
"My Dear Mr. Gutekunst: 

"PIea.se ac ept my sincere thank.s for the photo- 
graph.s you have made of me, and which have ju.st 
reached me. They are certainly a magnificent likeness, 
and well attest the fact that the hand that has de- 
lighted Philadelphia with its art for the past half cen- 
tur.v has not yet lost its cunning. 

"Trusting" that kind Providence may spare you to 
us and to your art yet many a year in health and good 
cheer, I am 

Very appreciatively yours, 

"JOS. KRAUSKOPF." 

F. GUTEKUNST, 7! 2 Arch Street and 1700 North Broad Street 




JACOB REED'S SONS 

Men's and Boy's Wear: Clothing 
Furnishings: Hats: Custom Tailoring 
Uniforms: Liveries and Automobile 
Apparel. 

1424-1426 CHESTNUT STREET 
Philadelphia 



WALNUT AT THIRTEENTH 
PHILADELPHIA 




EUGENE G. MILLER, Manager 



GEUTING'S 

'Superior*' Slippers 



In Cloth of 

Gold or 

Silver 




Specially dyed Silver Satin, $5.00 
Satins, all Shades - - $3.75 

GEUTING'S 

THE STORE OF FAMOUS SHOES 

1230 Market St. 




CRANE'S 



IS ABSOLUTELY 
PURE 



Store, Tea Room and Order Department 
13th and Sansom Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 
Only 2 blocks from either Broad Street 
Station or Reading; Terminal 



ICE 
CREAM 



Main Office: 23d Street below Locust 



Crane's Ice Cream costs more than others — there is a reason. 



DIAMONDS PEARLS 

PRECIOUS STONES 

Rare and unusual Jewels mounted 
in original and unique settings. 



J. E. CALDWELL & CO. 

902 CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 SURPLUS $1,250,000.00 

The Commonwealth 
Title Insurance and Trust Company 

Chestnut and Twelfth Streets 
PHILADELPHIA 



PAYS INTEREST ON DAILY BALANCES 

INSURES TITLES TO REAL ESTATE 

RENTS SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES $3 TO $100 

TAKES ENTIRE CHARGE OF REAL ESTATE 
ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRATOR. GUARDIAN AND TRUSTEE 
WILLS RECEIPTED FOR AND KEPT WITHOUT CHARGE 

WE INVITE YOUR BUSINESS 

DIMNER BEEBER, President JAMES V. ELLISON, Treasurer 



b\AN[Om5 
AND PEAfeL3 

For m5>gnitude a^nd richnejj \h\j 

Collection of DiajTzoizd^. Pcorb, 

Q^izd other Gemj 

jwp^sjcj &Ey previouj efforu 
of \\z\s hou^e 

Th.e DcLSigi? ^^Rd 

Cr5-ft5iT2a.njhip of the 

MouRtingj dre raosl beo^uUful 

Bailey BMfi56(BiDDLE(Q 

Chejtrzut Jtreet, Phikdelphie> 



INCORPORATED 1876 



The Real Estate Title Insurance and Trust Co. 

of Philadelphia 
523 Chestnut Street 

Across from Independence Hall 

The Oldest Title Insurance Company in the World 

Capital, [full paid] $1,000,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, [earned] nearly $1,400,000 

Member of the Clearing House 
State and City Depository 

Insures Titles Executes Trusts Becomes Surety 

Receives Deposits Rents Safe Deposit Boxes 

EMIL ROSENBERGER, President 



THE USE OF BEER — 

A Forceful Aid to *True'' Temperance 

The United States is a country of wonderful endurance, and 
tremendous power of recuperation. 

The American people can be depended upon to intelligently and 
sensibly dispose of all agitations, when their attention is once suffi- 
ciently aroused and rightly directed. 

A close study of conditions surrounding our personal and 
governmental liberties has created for our people broader education, 

with decided enlightenment on the proper use and not abuse of 

all things that make our lives really and truly temperate. None less 
has been the study on the part of individuals, and this is particularly 
true of the present generation, who fortunately insist upon knowing 
for themselves the "truths" of every condition. 

This fact, combined with the real, "true" temperance w^ork on 
the part of the brewers of this country, in their open and above- 
board advocacy of the temperate use of beer, is best told in these 
lieures : 

68,000,000 BARRELS OF BEER 

were consumed by the people of the United States in the 

calendar year of 1913 — and this was more than one-half 

of the beer brewed in the entire world. 

Will you deny that the United States holds a dominating influence 
among the powers of the world? 

And -will you deny the influence of the people of the United 
States, as directed and recognized commercially, scientifically, pro- 
fessionally, physically, mentally and financially? 

"Figures prove many facts" which otherw^ise are often left to 
guess or question, and because of this we present some "w^orth- 
studying" figures: 

"The total revenue collected by the United States for 

1912 was $691,000,000, in which is included $311,000,000 

produced by import duties." 

Did you know this? Here's some more — 
"In 1913 the tax on fermented and distilled bever- 
ages furnished $222,000,000. 

"This $222,000,000 is one-third of the total revenue 

of the United States or three-fourths of the expense 

of maintaining the entire United States army and navy 

or the combined cost of pensions, care of Indians and 

interest on the public debt, and then leaving a balance for 

other purposes." 

Think it over — carefully. 

These figures offer decidedly concrete evidence of the real 
importance of the brev^ring industry, and v^'hat it means to our people 

but more than that, w^hen 90,000,000 of people consume in the 

limited period of twelve months 68,000,000 barrels of beer (or a 
like quantity of any given pure food product) there is some concrete 
reason to believe that it must have qualities w^orthy of recognition. 

"Beer is a veritable pure food" its makers are real, true tem- 
perance advocates. Beer used temperately and regularly has alvvrays 

been and is a proved health pure food in the most digestible form. 

The severest test of the use of beer will prove its decided advan- 
tages as a tonic for producing better appetite, steadier nerves and 
sounder sleep. 

Form the good habit of drinking "Beer" with your evening meal 



F. A. POTH & SONS, Inc. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



WHEN BETTER AUTOMOBILES ARE BUILT 




WILL BUILD THEM 



Factory Branch 



235 North Broad St. 



As Philadelphia Leads the World So 



H ARDWICK & M AGEE COMPANY 



Lead Philadelphia in the Manufacture of 

Rugs and Carpets 

The high standard of our well-known weaves 
has been uniformly maintained for years and 
today we enjoy the confidence and respect 
of the best houses throughout the country. 
FORTY SIZES OP RUGS IN STOCK 

SPECIAL SIZES IVIADE TO ORDER 

HARDWICK & MAGEE COMPANY 

Successors to Ivins, Dietz & IVlagee 

RETAILERS 
^v OF ALL STANDARD FLOOR COVERINGS 

1220-1222 MARKET STREET 






Perfection? No, 
But— 

As near perfection as is humanly 
possible — this is our aim in rendering 
gas service. 

Our consumers can help. Free 
and frank suggestions as to how we 
can more nearly approach the goal of 
universally satisfactory service are 
welcomed and given prompt attention. 

The United Gas Improvement Co. 



HOSKINS 



904-906 

CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



Printing Office Furniture 

Engraving Filing Devices 

Stationery Cutlery 

Blank Books Kodaks 

Loose Leaf De1>ices Leather Goods 

^ Largest and most Complete Stock in Philadelphia 
^ Factory and Printery on the Premises 



COMMERCIAL STATIONERS 
and OFFICE OUTFITTERS 



FURS 



=0F THE=^ 
BETTER GRADE 




THEO. F. SIEFERT 

1426 WALNUT STREET 



L. BLANK & SONS 

(Incorporated) 

CONFECTIONERS 

ICE CREAM, CAKES. JELLIES, 

FROZEN FRUITS, WATER ICES, 

FANCY FRUITS, STUFFED 

DATES 

1024-26 Chestnut Street 

Philadelphia 
Special attention to telephone orders: 

IMPORTER 

HATS 

GOWNS 

CORSETS 

FURS 




JUNGMANN'S 
BEEF, WINE AND IRON 



TAILORED SUITS 
732 CHESTNUT STREET 



HENRY J. WALTER 

Secretary of Building Associations 

Fourth F!oor Bailey Building- 
1218 CHESTNUT STREET 



PENNA. KNITTING MILL 

16TH AND CALLOWHILL STS. 

"New Kind of JEWELRY STORE" 
I. PRESS & SON 

IMPORTERS AND CUTTERS OF 

DIAMONDS 

N. W. Cor. Chestnut and 8th Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA 



50 



FULL PINTS, 
C NONE BETTER 



Jungmanns Drug Store 

FOURTH AND NOBLE STS. 



THE HASTING & McINTOSH TRUSS CO. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 
Hard Rubber, Elastic and Leather- 
Covered 
TRUSSES 
Sole Maimers of the Celebrated 
DR. McINTOSH NATURAL 

UTERINE SUPPORTER 

For Home and Export Trade 

Abdominal and Uterine Supporters, 

Shoulder Braces. Crutches 

Elastic Hosiery and 

Body Belts 

912 WALNUT ST., PHILA., U. S. A. 



O. FUHRMANN 

Vienna Ladies' Tailor 

1507 NORTH FIFTEENTH STREET 

FACTORY, BURLINGTON, IOWA 

MISSISSIPPI PEARL 
BUTTON COMPANY 

Salesroom, 1017 Arch Street 

PHILADELPHIA 

p. LAUBER 

LINSK & BASS 

Manufacturers of 

CHILDRENS' & JUNIORS* 
DRESSES 

Broad and Wallace Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



S. HOWELL 



CORBIN CABINET 
LOCK CO. 

52 N. SIXTH STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
Factories, New Britain, Conn. 

Frank Poehner 
CAFE 

FINE BAKERY ICE CREAM 

CONFECTIONERY 

1232-1234 Columbia Ave. 

Parties and Weddings Catered for 
Reasonably 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

206-216 QUARRY SlKtti 

PHILADELPHIA 

Carpenter work. Shelves and fix- 
tures a speciality. Jobbing in all its 
brandies. 

Cor. Bread, between Second and 
Third, Race and Arch Streets 



David Weber 



Theo. Greenwald 



Imitation Typewritten Letters 

$1.00 Per 1000 Up. Tliey Bring Results 
THE RIGHTQUICK 

Publicity and Addressing Bureau 

1314 ARCH STREET 
Telephone, WALNUT .SS^O 
"The Best Work, but Lower Prices'' 



BODENSTEIN & 
KUEMMERLE, Inc. 

CHAIRS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



THE MANUFACTURERS 
NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL. $500,000 

Surplus and Undivded Profits 
$423,911.94 
William H. Heisler, President 

Samuel Campbell, Cashier 

F. Fairlamb, Asst. Cashier 

Your Business solicited and will be 
well cared for 

MALLALIEU & CONREY 

JOBBERS 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 

AND 

SUPPLIES 

GASOLINE ENGINES 

1816 MARKET STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

PHILADELPHIA FARMERS- 
SUPPLY COMPANY 

1918 MARKET ST., PHILA. 

Osborne Harvesting Machinery 
and Tillage Implements 

20th Century Manure Spreaders 
All supplies for Farm, Garden 
and Dairy 



K. A. Knoblauch & Son 

READING 

TERMINAL 

RESTAURANT 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



IHE 



ROSENBACH GALLERIES 



Colonnade Hotel 



RYAN'S 

Theatre Ticket Offices, Inc. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

MAIN OFFICE 
The BELLEVUE-STRATFORD 

Phone, Locust 1200 

Both Telephones 

THE ANTIQUE SHOPS OF 

J. M. WINTROB 

918-26 PINE STREET 
Philadelphia 

Rare Old Pieces, Oddities 

Skillfully Reproduced 

M. J. DALTON CO. 

CIGAR IMPORTERS 

111 South 13th Street 

Cor. 5th & Chestnut Street 

Philadelphia 



Philadelphia 

Manufacturers' Mutual 

Fire Insurance Co. 

COMMERCIAL TRUST BUILDING 

Philadelphia 

EDWIN I. ATLEE. President 



PRINTERS 

and 

Compilers of Trade Lists 



Howe Addressing Company 

208-210 S. FOURTH STREET 



F. BRECHT'S SONS 

CIGAR BOX MANUFACTURERS 

109-113 N. Orianna Street 

Philadelphia 



.,xx,^^i.joirri ruAKL 
BUTTON COMPANY 

Salesroom, 1017 Arch Street 

PHILADELPHIA 

p. LAUBER 




JNSK_^^BASS 
HENRY R. HALLOWELL 
& SON 

Hot House and Imported Fancy 
Fruits 

The Real Estate Trust Co. Bldg. 
Broad and Chestnut Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 



ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS 



1211 Arch Street 



BOYERTOWN BUILDING 



Powrers-Weightman-Rosengarten Co. 

EDW. G. MURRAY & CO 

No. 9 BANK STREET 



Both Phones 

WILLIAM MEYER 

Steam Pacl^ing Box Manufacturer 
206-216 QUARRY STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

Carpenter work. Shelves and fix- 
tures a speciality. Jobbing in all its 
branches. 

Cor. Bread, between Second and 
Third, Race and Arch Streets 



David Weber 



Theo. Greenwatd 



DAVID WEBER & CO. 

PAPER BOX MAKERS 

Corrugated Paper 

Corrugated Bottle Wrappers 

Corrugated Shipping Cases 

Folding Boxes, Bottle Boxes and Metal 
Edge Boxes 

N. W. Cor. Fifth and Locust Sts. 



J. G. GRIEB & SONS 

Wholesale Shoes 
and Rubbers 

531 MARKET STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



THOMAS H. WILSON 



Manufacturer of 



Fine Worsteds 



1420-1432 N. HOWARD ST. 



PHILADELPHIA 



1833 



SautB* iFitrs 

NOW IN OUR 81ST YEAR 



1914 



UP-TO-DATE AND EXCLUSIVE STYLES IN 
FINE FURS 

WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION 

DAVIS' FUR SHOP 



1120 CHESTNUT STREET 



NEXT TO KEITH'S 



PHILADELPHIA 




The Integrity Title Insurance 
Trust and Safe Deposit Co. 



S. W. Cor. 4th & Green Sts., Philadelphia 

Capital Stock, Full Paid $500,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 1,194,425.71 

Deposits 4,358,677.64 

BANKING DEPARTMENT 
Receives money on deposit, subject to 
check on sight, allowing 2 per cent, interest. 
Rents boxes for safe Iveeping of valuables in 
burglar and fire-proof vaults, for $3.00 and 
upwards. Letters of Credit and International 
Checques for Travelers issued, available 
everywhere. 

SAVING FUND DEPARTMENT 
Open from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 
Monday to 7 P. M. Saturday to 1 P. M. 
3 per cent, interest allowed on deposits 
TITLE AND REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 
Examines and insures titles to real estate. Collects rents, dividends, interest, etc. 
Money loaned on mortgage and mortgages for sale. Attends to all details pertaining to 
buying, selling and conveying of real estate. 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 

Transacts all Trust Company business and acts in the capacity of executor, adminis- 
trator, guardian or Trustee, taking entire charge of estates. All valuables received for 
safe keeping. Wills receipted and kept in safe boxes without charge. 



OFFICERS 

President 
GEORGE KESSLER 
First Vice-Pres. 
PHILIP SPAETER 

Second Vice-Pres. 
PHILIP DOERR 

Sec. and Treas. 
HERMAN WISCHMAN 

Trust Officer 
PHILIP E. GUCKES 

Title Mgr. 
THEO. E. KNAPP 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



George Kessler 
Philip Doerr 
Fred'k Orlemann 
C. G. Berlinger 
Philip Spaeter 
Wm. H. Rookstool 
Albert Hellwig 
John Greenwood 



Geo. Nass 
C. J. Preisendanz 
Daniel W. Grafly 
J. Edwin Rech 
A. P. Kunzig 
Chas. W. Miller 
Wm. G. Berlinger 
Chas. Strickler 



Jacob Kramer 

I. P. Strittmatter, 

M. D. 
J. McGliun 
Gustav A. Kirchner 
A. F. Schoenhut 
Philip E. Guckes 



Bie iBpamtrn aprprltrn Sputerl) 



AT THOMMEN'S 
The joy of eating something Better than Good 

Finds rich fulfillment in every Luncheon or Dinner in 
every one of our many Styles of Cakes and Pastries. 

Our Japanese Cake, orientally mellow, rolled, in roasted Almonds and 
filled with Butter Cream differs from all other Cakes you've ever tasted. 

Our Honey Webb Cake with a layer of Vanilla Custard is the Cake 
Par Excellence, 45c. 

Only Place for such Delicacies 

1700-1702 CHESTNUT STREET 



BEL.L PHONE, WALNUT 21-67 



OSCAR HAY 

LADIES' TAILOR 

AND 

HABIT MAKER 

821 CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 




Ever stop to consider what sort of place your clothes are in when 
you send them to the cleaners? 

When you send them to us, you can rest assured they are in the 
hands of sanitary experts; no time or expense was spared to develop in 
Philadelphia a Cleaning Establishment with all the latest sanitary features 
found in a similar establishment in this country or abroad. 

A. F. BORNOT BRO. CO. 

S. E. Cor. 17th and Fairmount Avenue 

12th & Walnut Streets 1535 Chestnut Street 

1714 N. Broad Street Broad & Tasker Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 

''Phone us — Poplar 608'' 



The Fur and Millinery Shop, Inc. 

1423 WALNUT STREET 

BELL PHONE. SPRUCE 25-66 PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 



THE NEW HOTEL HANOVER 

CLAUDE M. MOHR, Manager 

Arch and Twelfth Streets, Philadelphia 

Newly Furnished Throughout European Plan Music in Cafe 

Rooms, without bath, $1.00 per day and up 

Rooms with bath, $1.50 per day up 

Running Hot and Cold Water and Telephone in Every Room 

Table d'Hote Dinner, 50 Cents, 1 2 to 8 P. M. 

Special Table d'Hote Dinner, $1.00, 1 2 to 8 P. M. 

Cuisine and Service Unexcelled 



BEYOND COMPETITION 

BAILEY'S PURE RYE 

For the Use of Gentlemen who can Appreciate a Perfect 
Flavor and Aroma Combined with all the Requisities 
Necessarj^ to Assist Convalescents When Recommended 
by a Physician. Fully Matured and Bottled. 

HUEY & CHRIST 

1308 ARCH STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

1762 1915 

Oscar A. Fow & Son 

MEATS 

STALLS: 
1234-42 Reading Terminal Market 

ARCH STREET FRONT 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION PHILADELPHIA. 





BOILERS 
For Heating by Steam, 
Hot Water and Vapor 



THE H. B. SMITH CO. 

1225 ARCH STREET 

PHILADELPHIA..P-A.. ._ 



MENLO Round Boiler 



THE EIGHTH NATIONAL BANK 

PHILADELPHIA 

ESTABLISHED 1864 

Capital ......... $275,000.00 

Surplus ......... 850.000.00 

Undivided Profits Less Expenses and Taxes Paid 207.775.46 

WILLIAM J. MONTGOMERY, President 

SAMUEL BELL. Jr.. Vice-President 

CHARLES B. COOKE. Cashier 

JOHN D. ADAIR, Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 
Samuel Bell. Jr. Samuel T. Kerr 

Robert Carson Robert S. Irwin 

Frank Buck Theo. F. Miller 

Wm. J. Montgomery 



N. CRAMER & SONS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CLOAKS AND SUITS 
1427 VINE STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

ALEX WOLFINGTON'S SON 

BUILDER OF AUTOMOBILE BODIES 
8-14 NORTH TWENTIETH STREET 



PHILADELPHIA 



Henr> Bell, President 

Henry K. Walt, Vice-President 

Freeman S. Hunsberger, Treasurer 

BELL, WALT & CO., INC. 

Wholesale Boots, Shoes and 
Rubbers 

28 North Third Street 



O. K. ADDRESSING CO. 



BETZ BUILDING 



CARNWATH, BELL & CO. 

Steam Packing Box Manufacturers 

6 1 3 and 6 1 5 Cherry Street 
608 and 610 Quarry Street 



"elephone 



PHILADELPHIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

BIBERMAN BROS. 

Manufacturers of 

Wash Dresses 

240 MARKET STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
Established 1885 

IGNATIUS HAAZ & BRO. 

Manufacturers of 

Sample Cards and Sample Books 

404 TO 412 BROWN STREET 

Market 1403 Telephones Park 477 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



Bell Phone, Market 899 

Keystone, Main 170 and 36-36 

Eldwin J. Schoettle Co. 

Paper Boxes and Mailing Tubes 
237 North Sixth Street 

PHILADELPHIA 
Cable Address, "Minaret Phila." 

GEO. S. COX & BRO., Inc. 

MINARET MILLS 

Manufacturers of Hair Cloth 
Cambria and Ormes Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 

COMPLIMENTS 

ISADORE ROSENBLUTH 
CARL S. GROSS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



D. ATLAS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Dr. ELLIS LEVY 



HOFFMAN-CORR MFG. CO. 

Ask Your Dealer and insist on having 

your Awnings made from 

HOFFMAN GOLD MEDAL BRAND 

AWNING STRIPES 

Largest Rope and Twine House in the 

World 

CONTRACTORS TO THE 

GOVERNMENT 

Philadelphia New York 

312 Market St. 150 Duane St. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Wilkinson Bros. & Co., Inc. 






Frank H. Stewart Electric Co. 

Electrical Supplies 
37 and 39 N. Seventh Street 

Old Mint Building Philadelphia 




MADE IN PHILADELPHIA BY 

Chas. W. Young & Co. 
EZRA LEVINSON 

Wrapping Paper, Envelopes, Paper 
Bags, Twines, etc. 

26 SOUTH FIFTH STREET 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bell and Keystone Phones 



WM. R. DOUGHERTY 

Carpenter and Builder 
1608-1610 Sansom St.. Phila. 

JOBBING WORK OF ALL KINDS 
ATTENDED TO 

HARRY R. RUST 

Manufacturer of 
Interior Hardwood Fittings, 

Office and Store Work 

Fine Furniture, Wood Mantels, 

Steam Saw Mill 

724 and 726 Ludlow Street 

41 North Hutchinson Street 

BOTH PHONES 

Let Us Estimate on Anything 

EDWARD FAY & SON 

Contractors and Builders 

2 South Mole Street 
Philadelphia 



MARGOLIN & BLOCH 



203 SOUTH FIFTH STREET 



BERGER BROS. CO. 

Tinners' Hardware and Roofers' 
Supplies 

237 Arch Street. Philadelphia 



Society has Selected 
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT 

AT DANSE DE DANSELAND 

Many of the most prominent Jewish people can be seen on our perfect 
dancing floor. The Orchestra is without doubt the finest in the State. Danse 
de Danseland keeps open house every evening, and its patrons are the best. 

TWENTIETH ST. AND MONTGOMERY AVE. 

$2,000,000 

1f\Af\Q patrons have more than the above amount on 
deposit here. 

The Northwestern Trust Company 

RIDGE AND COLUMBIA AVENUES 

WILLIAM FREIHOFER, President 




NATIONAL CASKET COMPANY 



NEW YORK, 345, 347 Broadway BOSTON, 67 Chauncey St. 

CHICAGO, 605 Medinah Temple 

CatUn Si OInmpanjr 

YARNS 

128-130 CHESTNUT STREET PHILADELPHIA 

Cops, Skeins, Cones, Tubes and Warps 



THE TENTH NATIONAL BANK 

OF 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

1645 NORTH BROAD STREET 

CAPITAL. $200,000.00 SURPLUS, $100,000.00 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



President 
\A/ALTER SCOTT 



Vice-President 
CHARLES CLASS 



Cashier 
JOHN F. BAUDER 



In War or Peace 



"ARISTOCRAT" 

and 

"CLASS & NACHOD LAGER' 

are Always Good 




THE CLASS & NACHOD BREWING CO. 

PHILADELPHIA 




BOTH PHONES 



George L. Sipps 

CARPENTER, BUILDER AND CONTRACTOR 
912 LOCUST STREET 



WITHOUT 
SENTIMENT IN 

BUSINESS 
THERE WOULD 

BE 
NO PROGRESS 

EXCELSIOR LAUNDRY CO. 



""PHE aims and purposes of a business should 

reflect more than monetary gain. There's 

satisfaction in work well done, there's a 

religious reward for your best effort The 

house with the ability to do and deserve, 
resolving to give a dollar's worth for a dollar, 
can't help but succeed today. 



19th and 
Montgomery Avenue 

— WILL TREAT YOU RIGHT — 



Both Phones or Send Postal 



Genuine "PHILADELPHIA" 

THE LAWN MOWER STANDARD SINCE 1869 




'GRAHAM" All Steel 



For over 44 years the 
"Piuladelphia" Mowers 
have maintained unchal- 
leng-ed supremacy 
amongst Lawn Mower 
Manufacturers. We are 
the originators of A LI- 
ST EEL Mowers, Styles 

"A" & "GRAHAM" 

All Knives Vanadium 
Crucible Steel 

IS Styles HAND and 6 
styles HORSE, all of the 
Highest Urade. 

For Catalog and Prices 
Address 



The Philadelphia Lawn Mower Co. 

THIRTY-FIRST AND CHESTNUT STS., PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 



THE PEN-DAR CONSUMER 

A New and Safe Idea 
Made entirely of Galvanized Wire and Iron, 
almost indestructible, used for Burning Waste 
Paper and other combustible material ; also a neat 
Basket for Waste Paper, Leaves, etc. 

No. I, 20 in. diameter X 30 in. high $3.00 

No. 2, 1 7 in. diameter x 25 in. high 2.00 

No. 3, 14 in. diameter x 2! in. high 1.80 

No. 4, 12 in. diameter x 18 in. high 1.50 

We also manufacture Wire Cloth, Wire and 
Iron Work, Wire Garden Furniture, Trellis and 
and Flower Bed Border, Lawn and Poultry Fenc- 
ing and Gates. Everything in Wire and Iron. 

PEN-DAR LEAF RACKS wmM'^^^-nmr 

Used on wheelbarrows with removable WlroM'^v^'m'^ ' ' 
sides, for gathering leaves, cut grass and \^4yN^SS)y(^'*3! 
rubbish; capacity, 10 bushels; made of gal- Vm 
vanized wire, bolted to a wooden case. 
Price (not including wheelbarrow), $4.00. 
Ask for Catalog of w^hat you may want. 
MANUFACTURED BY 

Edward Darby & Sons Co., Inc., 233'& 235 Arcfk 





Bell Phone 



Keystone Phone 



AUGUST GEIGER 

Heating and Contracting Engineer 
Steam and Hot Water Heating 

1 1 4 North Sixth Street 

PHILADEL^'HIA, PA. 
Telephone 

CONKLING-ARMSTRONG 
TERRA COTTA CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Architectural Terra Cotta Work 

PHILADELPHIA 

Office: Builders' Exchamge 

PHILADELPHIA 
BANK AND OFFICE PARTITIONS 

John E. Sjostrom Company, Inc. 

Cabinet Makers 
1719 N. Tenth Street 

PHILADELPHIA 

BOYERTOWN BURIAL 
CASKET CO. 

Bronze, Metallic, Hardwood and 

Cloth-covered Caskets, Robes 

cind Linings 

PHILA., PA. BOYERTOWN, PA. 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

WILLS-JONES-McEWEN 
COMPANY 

MILK— CREAM 

SPECIALTIES: 
CERTIFIED, NURSERY. RED CLO- 
VER BUTTERMILK 
New Plant. Finest Sanitary Dairy in 
this Country 
COME SEE US 
Germantown Delivery 



The Vulcanite Paving Co. 

Land Title Building Philadelphia 

General Contractors for Reinforced 
Concrete Construction, Asphalt, 
Mastic Waterproofing, Insula- 
tion, Belgian Block 
Asphalt Block and Vitrified Brick 

Paving 

Asphalt, Mastic and Cement Floors 

our Specialty 



Estab. 1883 



Both Phones 



Merchants' Parcel Delivery 

STEWART & GRAHAM, Proprietors 

Packages delivered to all parts of 
the city at lowest rates. Special ar- 
rangements made with business houses 
of other cities for delivery of packages 
in Philadelohla and Camden. 

1010-1014 RACE ST., PHILA. 



Both Phones 

Novelty Gas and Electric 
Fixture Co. 

Show Room and Factory 
S. W. Cor. FIFTH AND GREEN Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



''Above All" 



BOLD CIGAR— 5c 



MINERAL SPRINGS 

INN 

Willow Grove, Pa. 



R. A. HEYMANN & BRO. 
REAL ESTATE 



1500 LAND TITLE BUILDING 
SIXTH NATIONAL BANK 

N. W. Cor. SECOND AND PINE STREETS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

JOHN P. WILSON, President 

DANIEL BAIRD, Vice-President 

JAMES C. SUTTON, Second Vice-Pres. 

WILLIAM SALTER, Cashier 

Compliments of 

M. Haber & Co. 



Disinfectants and Disinfecting Appliances 

Houses Scientifically Fumigated 

WE ARE EXPERTS IN THE LINE 

WEST DISINFECTING CO., Inc. 

The largest manufacturers of Disinfectants and Disinfecting 
Appliances in America 

Main Office and Laboratory, New York 

Philadelphia Office - - - 1303 Race Street 

CHARLES AUERBACH, Manager Both Phones 



JOSEPH S. KEEN. Jr.. President and General Manager 

GEORGE M. BUNTING. Vice- President and Treasurer 

H. BAYARD HODGE. Secretary and Asst Treasurer 

WILLIAM H. ROTH. Assistant Secretaiy 

American Pipe and Construction Co. 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 

112 North Broad Street Philadelphia 

J. W. LEDOUX. Am. Soc. C. E.. Chief Engineer 

JAMES H. DAWES, General Superintendent Construction Dept. 

HAROLD PEROT KEEN, Gene.'-al Supt. Operating Department 

Charles I. Kent. President William L. Guenther, Vice-President 

Leon Rosenbaum. Treasurer and Secretary 

J. JACOB SHANNON & CO. 



S Mill, Mine, Railroad, Builders, ^^ ^744 

MARKET STREET/ 



and Contractors Supplies, ^ philada. 

SHANNON&COi 

Eouipment/ 



CYALE) 

HARD WA R E Hardware and Equipment 

1744 Market Street 1744 
B. HOOLEY & SON 

SILK MANUFACTURERS 

435-439 NORTH BROAD STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



Asa W. Vandegrift. President. Nelson M. Vandegrift, Vice-President 

F. W. Hudtwalcker. Secretary and Treasurer 

Keystone and Bell Telephones 

Sheip & Vandegrift 



INCORPORATED 



LUMBER AND MILLWORK 

Poplar, Bass, Chestnut, Oak Planing, Re-Sawing, Moulding 

Nos. 814 832 N. Lawrence St. Philadelphia 



Columbia Avenue Trust Company 

Broad and Columbia Avenue 

Capital Paid in $400,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (earned) . 500,000.00 

PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

SYL: A. LEITH, President WM. ALLEN, Vice-President 

WM. A. CARLILE, Secretary and Treasurer 

When Dissatisfied with Your Work, try 

FORREST LAUNDRY 

1221-23-25 Columbia Avenue 

Lace Curtains and Floor Linens a Specialty 

BOTH PHONES 
TELEPHONE CONNECTION 

OSWALD LEVER CO. 

INC. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

"^fegr/otLTextile Machinery 

For COTTON, WOOLEN and SILK 

Lehigh Avenue and Front Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

Firth & Foster Company 

DYERS AND FINISHERS OF PIECE GOODS 

We are specially equipped for Fine All-Wool and Silk and Wool 
Mixed Fabrics 

"BRIGHT COLORS— SUPERB LUSTER" 



McNichol 

Pavmg and Construction 
Company 

General Contractors 



1923 CHERRY STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

GOLD SEAL BEER 

BREWED BY THE 

CONTINENTAL BREWING CO. 

MADE FROM THE VERY FINEST 
QUALITY OF MALT, AND THE 
BEST GROWTHS OF HOPS - - 

BREWERY 

TWENTY-FIRST ST. AND WASHINGTON AVE. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Bridal Gifts, Handsome Pic- 
tures, Artistic Framing 
of Pictures 




This entire building used in supply- 
ing Maule's Seeds direct to our cus- 
tomers. 

W. HENRY MAULE. Inc. 
Seedsmen 
Twenty-first and Arch Streets. 
CatalogTie free 



OTTO SCHEIBAL 



Philadelphia. Pa, Art Shop 



20 N. Ninth St. 




COMPLIIMENTS OF 



ROSE MFG. CO 

PHILADELPHIA 



ASHER'S 

S. E. Cor. 22d and Walnut Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA 

Swimming and Dancing School 

OPEN ALL YEAR 

All the latest and modern dances in 
class and private lessons. Ball Room, 
Banquet Room, Reception Rooms, can 
be engaged: especially adapted for 
weddinps and receptions. Instruct. on 
in swimming all year for ladies, gen- 
tlemen and children daily. Swimming 
party nights. Tuesday evening, with 
dancing: Saturday evening only, swim- 
ming. Apply to 

Mr. SYDNEY S. ASHER 

or 

Mr. RUDOLPH CALMANN, 

Manager 



/^\ 


|Z:^x 


f m 




I m 


f \\\ \ 


I gM 


V\\ 


w 


■ w 


x^ 


__JJ/ 


Klosfit 


are made with 


"V" 


shape elastic 


gusset 


over each hip 



I KLOSFIT PETTICOAT | 

Needs No Alteration 

Thousands of Well-Dressed 

Women are Wearing the 

"KLOSFIT" Petticoat 



because it is the most perfect fitting petticoat ever devised and real 
petticoat comfort was never realized until the coming of the "Klosfit" 

To the Woman who desires to be w^ell-gowned the 

Klosfit is an absolute necessity 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS 



WRIGLEY'S 
BIG 10 
CLEANER 
BETTER 
CLEANER 
BIGGER CAN 
AT ALL 
GROCERS 



Electrical Work 
of Every Description 

INSTALLED 

OR 

REPAIRED 

We also have a stock of 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

AND SUPPLIES 

If your residence is not wired for 

Electric Lighting, we can wire 

without damaging your 

walls or floors. 



Albert Gentel, Inc. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

1503 Columbia Avenue 
4466 Germantown Avenue 

PHILADELPHIA 



L. A. Pdtteiger, Pres., H, B;iehrach, Sec'y 
E. C. Hainley, Treas. 

Potteiger & Hainley 

INCORPORATED 

Painting of the Better Kind 

PAINTING CONTRACTORS 

1829 Filbert Street 

Estimates furnished PHILADELPHIA 

E. Leonard Weisgerber 

PHARMACIST 

BUSY CORNER 
Broad and Rockland Streets 

Logan, Phila. 
Phone, Wyoming 2484 



H. Toggweiler 

HEATERS, RANGES, ROOFING 

3120 Ridge Avenue 

THE-MAN-ON-THE-SPOT 




CHARLES W. RUETER 

Everything in Real Estate 
1703 TIOGA STREET 



S. W. Goodmaoi Company 

PRINTERS 

321-323 Cherry Street 

PHILADELPHIA 

CHARLES GROSS 

PASTEURIZED 
MILK and CREAM 

2123 Westmoreland Street 

PHILADELPHIA 

J. SELLERS PENNOCK 

SANITARY PLUMBING 
AND HEATING 

S. E. Cor. Seventh and Filbert Sts. 
For Cood Things to Eat, go to 

WILSON 

BRANCHTOWN. PHILADELPHIA 



FENN 

DRUOS 

Broad and Columbia Avenue 



The YEAR BOOK was printed by 
The WALTHER PRINTING HOUSE 
Third St. and Girard Ave., Phila. 



THE BEST 
SEEDS, PLANTS, BULBS 

Catalogue Mailed Free 

HENRY A. DREER 
714 Chestnut Street, Phila., Pa. 

FOUNDED 1850 

FINNEY & SON 

Granite and Marble 

Monuments 

529-531 N. TWELFTH STREET 

12TH and SPRING GARDEN STS. 

Philadelphia 

HEBREW LETTERING A SPECIALTY 

Bell Phone. Filbert 29-49, 29-50 

Keystone Phone, 38-35, 38-36 

H. D. REESE 

Dealer in the Finest Quality of 

Beef, Veal, Mutton, Lamb 
and Smoked Meats 

1203 FILBERT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



SACKS BROTHERS 

1228 Cherry Street 



CHRISTIAN PFAFF 

WHOLESALE 

Wine and Liquor Dealer 

S. E. Corner 

Passyunk Ave. and Catharine St. 

PHILADELPHIA 
Both Phones Established 1849 

Joseph P. Wilde 

Importer of 

CHEESE, DELICACIES and FANCY 

GROCERIES 

Commission Merchant 

825-827 North Second Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Reading Terminal Market and Cold Storage 

1118 ARCH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

LARGEST MARKET IN THE WORLD 

Foods of Quality at prices no higher than you pay for inferior goods 
■elsewhere. 

SELECTED FARM PRODUCTS FROM FOUR STATES 

Geo. H. McKay, SupL 



^a 



EMANUEL ASHER & SON 

Undertakers 

AND - 

Embalmers 

1602 DIAMOND STREET PHILADELPHIA 

BELL PHONE— DIAMOND 838 KEYSTONE PHONE— PARK 979 

Atlantic City, 1619 Pacific Avenue 



'BELL 570 
PHONES, COAST 328 



The entire building, 1602 Diamond 
Street, is now devoted to the business, 
and is at the disposal of our patrons for 
the care and burial of the dead. Fun- 
erals can be held at the parlor at any 
time. 



Residence, 1814 Erie Ave. ^tioga 3239 






Bell, Poplar 896 TELEPHONES Keystone, Park 67-71 

Bell, Poplar 89 7 
Bell, Poplar 3369 A 

NEVER CLOSED 

Haag Stable Company 

Limited 

SIXTEENTH STREET, BELOW DIAMOND 

Philadelphia 

UP-TO-DATE EQUIPAGES 

OPERA BUSSES BRIDAL COACHES VICTORIAS 

CABRIOLETTE HANSOMS BROUGHAMS CUT UNDERS 

COACHMEN IN FULL LIVERY 

ESTABLISHED 1855 

Thomas Delahunty 





Marble 


Granite 


Works 





Underground Vaults and 
Mausoleums a Specialty 

3811 to 3821 Ridge Ave. 

Opposite 
North Laurel Hill Cemetary PHILADELPHIA 



State Charter, 1834 National Charter, 1864 

THE DOYLESTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Capital $105,000.00 

Surplus $105,000.00 

Undivided Profits 145,000.00 

250,000.00 

Deposits 1,1 37,000.00 

JOHN M. JACOBS, President JOHN N. JACOBS, Cashier 



W. H. SWARTLEY 

Manufacturer of Cider and Vinegar 
Cor. State and West Streets 

p. O. Box 412 DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

MILTON REED 

Watches, Clocks, Jewelry and 
Silverware 

DOYLESTOWN, PENNA. 
Repairing a Specialty 

"GET IT AT PEARCE'S AND IT 
WILL BE RIGHT" 

SAMUEL R. PEARCE 

Pharmacist 
Hart Building, Doylestown, Pa. 

JOHN DONNELLY 

"Sunshine" Stoves, Ranges, 
Furnaces 

HOT WATER AND STEAIVl 
HEATERS 

poylestown, Pa. 



WM. A. PAXSON 

STATIONERY, SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

AND LEGAL BLANKS 

DAILY AND SUNDAY NEWSPAPERS 

DELIVERED 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



AUSTIN B. BENNER 

General Merchandise 

COR. ASHLAND & CLINTON STS. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 
Both Phones 

Both Phones 

WHEN IN DOYLESTOWN 
BE SURE AND VISIT 

ELY'S PURE FOOD STORE 

15 South Main Street 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

WM. P. ELY & SON 

Dealer in 

READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING FOR 

IVIEN, BOYS, CHILDREN; GENT'S 

FURNISHING GOODS, HATS, 

CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 

Opposite P. & R. Depot 

DOYLESTOWN 



DOYLESTOWN TRUST COMPANY 

CHARTERED 1896 

Authorized Capital, $250,000.00 

Paid in Capital, $125,000.00 

Surplus, $130,000.00 



DAVID D. NYCE 

Contractor and Builder 

Estimates furnished on all kinds of 
Buildings, Frame. Brick, Stone, Ce- 
ment and Iron Structural. Also all 
kinds of Mill Work. 

239 DECATUR STREET 

Phone 175 Y DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

THOMAS F. CALLAHAN 
Practical Plumber 

GAS FITTING, ETC. 

PLUMBERS' SUPPLIES 
STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING 

MAIN STREET 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 
Bell Phone 

C. Louis Siegler, D. D. S. 

21 NORTH MAIN STREET 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 
Established 1882 

Frank J. Gerlitzki 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Wood Work 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

JAMES BARRETT" 

Dealer in 

PAINTS AND OILS, CEMENT, 

TERRA COTTA PIPE, HORSE 

CLOTHING, AND A FULL 

LINE OF HARDWARE, 

ETC. 

Corner Main and Ashland 

DOYLESTOWN 



Bell Phone 

WYNNE JAMES 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

REAL ESTATE 
Bargains in Farms always on hand 

HART BUILDING 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Long Distance Phones 

MONUMENT HOUSE 

J. G. MITCHELL, Proprietor 
MAIN STREET 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Bell Phone 1S6-A 

David L. Gehman 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

Harness and Blankets 

REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE 

279 WEST COURT STREET 

DOYLESTOWN 
Bell Phone 184-A 

EMIL PEITER 

Bakery and Confectionery 
Pure Ice Cream 

Opp. Masonic Hall 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



EXECUTES TRUSTS 



PAYS INTEREST ON DEPOSITS 



INSURES TITLES 



Bucks County Trust Company 



AUTHORIZED CAPITAL, $250,000 



PAID-IN CAPITAL, $125,000 



SURPLUS, $190,000 

HUGH B. EASTBURN, President and Trust Officer 

GEORGE WATSON, Vice-President and Asst. Trust Officer 
THOiVIAS ROSS, Second Vice-President 
T. O. ATKINSON, Treasurer 

GEO. H. MILLER, Assistant Treasurer 

HARRY C. GARNER, Assistant Secretary 



Doylestown, Pa. 



THE FOUNTAIN HOUSE 

Doylestown, Bucks Co., Pa. 

FRANCIS C. IVIIREAU 

The Fountain House 
Livery 

at DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Both Phones 



DANIEL G. FRETZ. 

Proprietor. 



H. B. Rosenberger 

COAL, LIME, 
CEMENT, HAY 

WEST ASHLAND STREET 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Randall's 
Hardware Department Store 

Main St. and Oakland Ave. 

Builders' Hardware, Mechanics' Tools 
and Supplies, Housefurnishing Goods, 
Cutlery and Stationery, Sporting 
Goods, Wall Paper, Paints and Var- 
nishes, Farm Equipments and Garden 
Supplies. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Both Phones 



Estabhshed 187 



R. L. CYLMER 

Department 
Store 

36, 38 and 40 West State Street 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Plumbing, Steam, Hot Water and 

Warm Air Heater Work 

General Repairing and IVlachine 

Shop 



Both Phone.s 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Michael A. Rufe 

(Formerly Rufe Bros.) 
New Location, Taylor Street, 
Between Main and Pine Streets 



Jos. Windholz 

Bell Telephone 



Thos. F. Courtney 

Estimates Given 



Windholz & Courtney 

PAINTING and PAPERHANGING 

PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, ETC. 
Stuckert Building 



Main Street 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Established 1872 Bell Telephone 

Factory on Pehb'e Hill 

Wallace Dungan 

Manufacturers of 

PHOSPHATES AND NEATS 

FOOT OIL 

Dead Animals Removed at Short Notice 

Hides, Tallow, Sheep and Calf Skins 
Bought at IVIarket Price 

Residence 484 (Viable Avenue 

DOYLESTOWN. PA. 



D. J. H. DOUGLAS 



H. A. TIBBEN 



DOYLESTOWN GARAGE 

Agents for Oakland, Chevrolet Cars 



57 W. COURT STREET 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



BELL PHONE 110 



ROYALSILK CO 



Manufacturers of Broad Silks 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



ALWAYS THE BEST 

M. Silberman & Son 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats 
and Furnishings 

605 and 607 WEST AVENUE 

JENKINTOWN, PA. 



W. N. GOODWIN 

General Hardware 

308 YORK AVENUE 

JENKINTOWN, PA. 



HENRY S. BEIDLER 

Coal, Flour, Grain, Feed, Clover 

Seed, Timothy and Agricultural 

Implements, Fertilizers, Lime, 

etc. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



H. R. GEHMAN 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

Harness, Saddlery, Collars, 
Whips, Blankets, Etc. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 
Bell Phone 



ROYAL PALACE HOTEL 


Compliments of 


Cottages and Casino 


P. S. Sharpless Co. 


ON THE BEACH 


Fancy Table Butter and Cheese 


Atlantic Citv. N. J. 


Evaporated Milk 


OPEN ALL YEAR 


813-819 N. Eleventh Street 


S. HANSTEIN - Proprietor 


PHILADELPHIA 



THE JEWISH EXPONENT 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE 

Representative of Jewish Institutions and welcomed in the Jewish 

Home 

Published Every Friday Subscription Price, $3.00 Per Annum 

Philadelphia Office, 608 Chestnut Street 

Baltimore Office, 1 20 Aisquith Street 



RALEIGH HOTEL 

Ocean End, St. Charles Place 



ATLANTIC CITY 



Booklet and Rates on request 



H. J. DYNES 



WILLIAM GORDON 

MEATS, PROVISIONS 



1214 Atlantic Ave. 



1701 Passyunk Ave. 



ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 



PHILADELPHIA 



Abbott's Alderney Dairies 

1317 Memorial Avenue 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

JACOB MANDERY, Manager Phone 615 



We make a Specialty of CERTIFIED MILK AND CREAM 
Hotel Guests and Cottagers given special attention 

All Bottles Sterilized before using 



COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 



Jesse Shulman & Co. 

DRESSES 

12 and 14 WEST 32d STREET NEW YORK CITY 



M. WEINSTEIN & CO. 



CLOAKS AND SUITS 



151 W. 30th Street 



New York 



Weltman, Pollack & Co. 

CLOAKS AND SUITS 

35 West 33d Street 

New York 



FARM JOURNAL 



Gittelman's Sons 



AARON CANS 



WM. STEELE & SONS 
COMPANY 



R. E. W. W. 



T. W. SPARKS 

121 Walnut St. 



JONATHAN RING & SON 

Incorporated 

Hancock and Montgomery Avenue 







D)^ 





<i 



Tranntoini A^ao annd Wa§(Liiini©iralaini(dl Site 



North Penn Bank 



Twenty-ninth and Dauphin Streets 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



2 per cent interest on check accounts on balances of $100 or over. 

3 J/2 per cent interest on saving fund accounts. 
Every courtesy extended consistent with safe banking. 
Your account is solicited. 



LOUIS H. MICHEL, President. 



R. T. MOVER, Cashier. 



KEYSTONE PHONE, PARK 51-49 D BELL PHONE, TIOGA 74-20 

MURRELL F. DOBBINS 

LIMOUSINES 

AND TOURING CARS 

TO HIRE 

Germantown Avenue and Westmoreland Street 

1130 Westmoreland Street 

Philadelphia 

AUTOMOBILES REPAIRED 
Stanley Steamers a Specialty STORING AND HIRING 



\V AM POLE'S 

FORMOUID 

(Antiseptic Solution) 
A CONCENTRATED, BUT HARMLESS ANTISEPTIC 



FORMOLID, properly diluted, may be used with perfect freedom 
in the treatment of diseased or inflamed conditions of the mucous membrane 
of the mouth, nose, throat, etc., and as a lotion in the treatment of cuts or 
other abrasions of the skin. 

Excellent as a mouth-wash or gargle. 



PREPARED SOLELY BY 

HBINRY K. WAMPOUrB <& CO, 

— Incorporated— 

MANUFACTURING PHARMACISTS 

PHILADELPHIA,. PA., U. S. A. 




17 LECTRIC Light, after all, is but a 
*— ' small part of the convenience and 
comfort the wired-for-electricity home 
affords; there are numerous electric 
task-savers available which lift heavy 
burdens from the house'vsrife. 

Electric Table Cooking suggests magic — ^it's 
so quick, clean, convenient and economical. 
Dainty, appetizing breeikfasts and luncheons 
can be easily prepared on electric cooking uten- 
sils without cluttering up the kitchen. For 
the after-the-theatre bite and other informal 
occasions, good things to eat — electrically 
prepared — mean added cheer and sociability. 





2?ggPHllADElPH!A ( jJH) ElECTRIC(pi1PANY