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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (July-Dec. 1926)"

COMPLETE RADIO PROGRAMS, FOR NEXT WEEK, IN THIS ISSUE 







#5.00 PER YEAR 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, JULY 3rd, 1926 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



LOS ANGELES 




" H Qintward Hound" 



FROM THB PAINTING BY 
ill IRLBS HENRY OR A NT 



Mr. ( Irani waa the "Offi- 
cial Artist of the Ameri- 
ca n N a vy" During Its 
Australian Cruise 
I .as) Year. 



One Hundred and Seventeenth Half Yearly Report 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 



SAVINGS 



COMMERCIAL 



INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th. 1868 



One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 



MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



JUNE 30th, 1926 
Assets — 

United States Bonuo, .>.iiic, Municipal aqd Other Bonds and Securities 

(total value $32,175,45S.33>, standing on books at $29,083,453.99 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first mortgages 68,704,330.53 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities 1,648,422.64 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices (value over $1,860,000.00), 

standing on books at 1.00 

Other Real Estate (value over S70.000.00), standing on books at 1.00 

Employees' Pension Fund (value over $557,000.00), standing on books at 1.00 

Cash on hand and checks on Federal Reserve and other Banks 9,994,268.56 



Total $109,430,478.72 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $105,030,478.72 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,400,000.00 



GEO. 



Total $109,430,478.72 

TOURNY, President A. H. MULLER, Vue-President and Manager. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 30th day of June, 1926. 

(SEAL) O. A. EGGERS, Notary Public. 



A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE- QUARTER (4M) Per cent per 
annum was declared, Interest COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED 

QUARTERLY, 

AND WHICH MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Deposits made on or before July 10th, 1926, will earn interest from July 1st, 1926. 



.;, ,_, :..7„ 3; ..., ...;..-.- _... _..■;._:.■.- 



m 




f' 'have you a- — » 
avorite Sport? i 





Also 

Pacific 

Coast Fares 

Reduced 

Long limits ; 
Sti ipi '\ ers. 



LOW 

FARES 

EAST 



Reduced round trip tickets m>1i1 
laily until September IS; ^ood 
Stopovers. 



until ( )ctober 31. 



Make Reservations Now 
for Any Date 

Choice of four commanding transcon- 
tinental routes to the east. Go one 
way. return another if you wish. 

Send or call today for complete in- 
formation about service and fares to 
your eastern destination. Tickets and 
steamer reservations to foreign lands. 

Ask about the new 
"Circle Tnnr of the United Suites" 



Southern Pacific Limes 



65 Geary Street, Or Phone Suiter 4000 
Perry Station T "' rii Streel SUlif 



^i 



s^ 




Ert«blUh«d July 20, l&M 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1884 to 1925. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street, .Pan Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: .Street & Co., 30 Cornhlll, E. C 

London. England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $6.00. Foreign, one year, {6.00. Canada, one year. J6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, JULY 3, 1926 



No. 27 



Altitudes and Attitudes 



By Eleanore F. Ross 



The beautiful lake, one of many which the hoary old 
Sierras have adorned themselves with, like gleaming jewels 
donned in a moment of frivolity, was beginning to reflect 
the colors of the afterglow. 

Only too soon, the rose would change to mauve, to dark 
blue, to dull gray, and night would drop its bejeweled cur- 
tain over the mountain peaks. 

And still the Loud Speaker talked on. 

The members of the community had gathered, as was 
their wont, on warm evenings, on the porch of the hotel, not, 
apparently, to watch the changing waters of the lake, but 
to discuss the day's happenings, and to exchange bits of 
gossip regarding various and sundry. A few of the must 
ambitious had wandered off. and were following the circling 
line of the lake, or were climbing the It ill down which the 
little river plunged, to enjoy the beauty of moonlight on 
wildly roaring water falls. 

But I was tired, and I wanted to sit still and dream, and 
the Loud Speaker continually broke into my reverie in a 
most distracting manner. 

The Loud Speaker, who was an undertaker, and his family 
considered themselves; quite obviously, as belonging to the 
socially elect. The nose of the wife of the Loud Speaker 
was generally in the air far more than Nature herself bad 
intended it to be; she knew she was much, much above the 
Traveling Salesman and bis wife, and somewhat higher, 
also, in the social scale, than the University Professor and 
his frau. As for the social status of the Stenographer, the 
Secretary, the Nurse, the Office Manager and the Horse 
Breeder, compared to her own — "Well, my dear, it is amaz- 
ing bow these clerks will push their way into things!" 

She eyed the Editress askance, quite at a loss bow to 
pigeon-hole this puzzling woman, who paid not the slight- 
est attention to her. and went about enjoying what she bad 
gone there to enjoy,- -Nature unadulterated. When the 
bond Speaker plunged in'o a tirade against different existing 
evils, anil related many incidents of the good work which social 
settlements were carrying on. be rode his hobby to the 
death, foi no on,- se med inclined to argue against him. 

"I If course." 1 remarked once, to the Secretary. "He is not 
used to having people talk back, in his line of business' 

The Secretary giggled behind the branch of laurel with 
which she was fighting off the ever prevalent mosquitoes. 
* * * 

The Horse Breeder rather interested me. Although 
dressed almost always, in breeches, riding boots and a man s 
hat, she for some strange reason still stuck to a thin hank oi 
hair, instead of having it bobbed, and wore it in a knot the 
i a walnut, at the hack of her head; the last remnant 
of femininity which she allowed herself to cling to. _ Hut 
she raised horses for the Tia Liana races. —that intrigued 



The Office Manager was an efficient looking, motherly 
woman, who petted the little Secretary with whom she 
shared an apartment, when in town. They had rented a 
tiny shack on the shore of the lake, and came to the hotel 
for meals. These two, with the Nurse and myself, formed 
a quartette always ready for a good hike, and the hotel 
guests found us an attractive group, with almost always 
something interesting to relate upon our return. 

I nicknamed the Nurse the "Cheer Leader," for no mat- 
ter how weary we became in making a certain point, she 
was always sure that it was "only a few steps more," and 
took to the mountain trails like a chamois. 

Afterwards I learned that she had taken goat gland in- 
jections before her visit to the mountains, and decided to 
emulate her operation when next I left for the wide open 
spaces. 

The Stenographer was generally conspicuous by her ab- 
sence. Every day, sometimes twice a day, that young 
creature would take to the woods or the stream or the lake, 
with a different man each time. 

I looked at her curiously. As far as I could judge, she 
never opened her mouth to say anything. I never heard 
any sort of an expression or impression from her lips. She 
was pretty, though, and had strange, furtive eyes, and a 
red. too red, mouth, always parting in a smile, and disclos- 
ing white, even teeth. 

"1 am wondering if she has come to the conclusion that 
it is better to keep your mouth closed and seem a fool, than 
to open it and remove all doubts." I remarked to the Horse 
Breeder who happened to sit near me; "What do the men 
see in her?" 

The Horse Breeder, who enjoyed single blessedness, snorted 
and ihrew hack her bead, rather like one of her own pets, I 
fancied. 

"Men?" she exclaimed fiercely; "Men! Do you suppose 
men are looking for brains?" 

* * * 

Two dear old lathes were busily chatting behind me, tell- 
ing each other of the different effects they had already felt 
from Iheir sojourn among the mighty and everlasting hills. 

■| feci -o drowsy like, all the time." one was saying plain- 
tively; "I can hardly keep my eyes open." 

"Its the altitude, my dear." answered the other. 

"Hut I never felt more peppy in my life." remarked a little 
oil man. who was smoking "to keep away the mosquitoes." 
1 can hardly sleep at all. at night, somehow. And my appe- 
tite is something fierce!" 

"I haven't eaten enough to keep a bird alive," came from a 
dark corner "Seems as if I never want to look at food again !" 

"It's the attitude !" came back, like an echo, fro manother cor- 
ner of the porch. 

(Continued on Page 1TI 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 3, 1926 




The men, who by virtue of their inventive or organizing 
ability, give us that control, are our benefactors. 



The outcry against grade crossings is 
Grade Crossings already rising, owing to the recent deaths 
which have occurred at such places. 
There is no doubt that we have tried our best to obviate 
the grade crossing evil by the installation of danger signals 
and safety apparatus, perhaps on a greater scale than else- 
where, but the fact that the grade crossing is a fruitful cause 
of trouble and death. 

It is very easy to say that grade crossings should be abol- 
ished. Reformers are always so ready with the magnifi- 
cent gesture! But there are 15,000 such crossings, includ- 
ing spur tracks, which pass over city streets. There is not 
enough money available to eliminate all these. < In the 
other hand, the chief engineer of the transportation division of 
the railroad commission says that the highways and rail- 
ways must be separated. He wants a special fund raised 
by special taxation, which would aggregate the sum of 
$25,000,000, and thinks that all of this would be required to 
make the necessary changes. 

There are cheaper ways of getting at the problem in a 
temporary fashion. For example, it was estimated that 
permanent improvements of this kind would cost, for a cer- 
tain district in the South, about $18,000,000; whereas, tem- 
porary improvements would only run to $4,000,000. But 
the municipalities involved would not expend even that 
small amount. 

There is the difficulty. Men make a great outcry about 
the evil of such a social solecism, for grade crossings are 
nothing else than that, nowadays; then, when they have to 
foot the bill, blandly refuse to meet the issue. 

Of course it must be admitted that the greater part of the 
loss of life at grade crossings is merely a matter of human 
stupidity. 



The Merced Irrigation district $16,- 
Power Development 000,000 hydroelectric project has been 
put into operation, with the help of 
the President, who pressed the button at Washington and 
started the machinery. A wire direct from the foot of the 
Exchequer dam, which is the main storage unit of the en- 
terprise, rendered this presidential participation possible. 

The dam is the highest and one of the largest in the Uni- 
ted States. It rises above the bed of the river to the height 
of 330 feet and contains concrete to the extent of 396,000 
cubic yards. It is expected to bring into the district an an- 
nual revenue of $500,000 by private sale. 

Of course, the ultimate success of the enterprise will de- 
pend upon the manner in which it is conducted and it will 
be interesting to see how far a district such as that which 
has inaugurated so important a piece of machinery, will be 
able to make use of it. Last week we pointed to the great 
power-distributing system of the Pacific Gas and Electric 
Company, which has proved beyond an)' power of contra- 
diction, its ability to deal with public utility, in a satisfac- 
tory fashion. 

It is a great thing to have the development of power, 
predicted in the enterprise at Merced. It is an addition to 
the wealth of the community, to be hailed with satisfaction. 
Wealth, in the sense of power over material nature for the 
benefit of mankind, is the great desideratum. We need it. 
We can only advance in so far as we have that control over 
material objects. Unless we control them, they control us 
and there is no liberty in that. 



We are getting a little weary of the 
Superstitious Dignity attempts of courts to. magnify their 
office and to claim a certain "bene- 
fit of clergy" of their own, which places them above the 
ordinary run of people and makes them minor divinities. 
The Alfred Lindsley case in Eureka is the last manifestation 
which we have had of that sort of thing. It may be con- 
ceded that Lindsley tried, ineffectually, by his newspaper, 
to interfere in the trial of a case in which he was defendant 
and made efforts to influence the jury, through the columns 
of hi> paper. For this he was sentenced to 1000 days in 
prison in default of payment of a fine of S2000. 

The courts have refused to interfere and the Governor 
has refused an application for a pardon, quite in accordance 
with his usual method in such applications. So there will 
be a long term for Alfred Lindsley. Not knowing him. we 
have no feelings in the matter and assume that it is all 
right. 

But nearly three years imprisonment in default of the 
payment of a fine which, presumably, he cannot raise, for 
the offense of hurting the dignity of a court, is going a little 
strong. If our judges are to become so important we shall 
have to procure some trappings of office, ermine or rabbit 
skins or peacock's tails or something of that sort. We shall 
have to say "Me Lud," gently and humbly, and bow in ec- 
static reverence. It is all right, we repeat, but it has its 
funny side, particularly, when you look at our judges. They 
don't look capable of carrying so much reverence. 

If the Bar Association acquires the powers which it has 
been trying to secure, and if our judges are to maintain 
the exalted ideas of importance which possess them, we 
shall live under a regime of juristic tyranny. Our judges 
could not sustain the pose. Just look at them ! 



There has been a great deal of dis- 
Blue Sky Legislation cussion over the decision of the fed- 
eral District Court of Idaho, passing 
on the constitutionality of the Blue Sky law of that state. 
That law is about the same as our own and the upholders 
of the paternal system which prevails here, are greatly en- 
couraged by the decision. But there is a world of differ- 
ence between the principles laid down by the Idaho District 
Judges and the practice in vogue in this state. 

The court says among other things, in connection with 
the law which imposes certain requirements upon insurance 
companies: "what valid reason can be assigned for denying 
the public like protection against visionary schemes of op- 
timistic promoters of investment enterprises, which, though 
they may present attractive exterior appearances to the un- 
sophisticated investor, are beneath the surface so funda- 
mentally unsound that disaster is only a question of time." 

Very well. That sounds very fine, but we are still of the 
opinion that, short of absolute fraud and premeditated 
scoundrelism, which is always punishable by the criminal 
law. the ends of society and the advance of civilization are 
best achieved by sticking to the old American doctrine of 
liberty. 

It places the decision as to the feasibility or otherwise 
of a proposed corporate activity, in the hands of men who 
are like most other men, but, being bureaucrats, are even 
more timid and less imaginative than other men. These 
men strangle enterprise. Our corporation commission, if 
it had been presented with the plans of the original corpora- 
tion as started by Mr. Ford, would have killed it without 
mercy, and the Ford enterprises would have been impossible. 

Today the corporation commission drives good firms out 
of this state and is an effectual obstacle in the way of de- 
cent but ambitious corporate effort. There is nothing new 
in this; political bureaus are incurable. 



July 3, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



There has arisen in Oakland a condition, 
Color Trouble which will arise again and again, and which 
may lead to trouble in the future, if there 
is not some care taken and some sagacity used. It seems 
that a building contractor in Oakland, having been disap- 
pointed in getting accommodation in the matter of money 
advances, took the step of paying off his scores by selling 
some property of a markedly good grade, in proximity to 
the property of the firm with which he had had trouble, 
to Orientals. He also puts out signs that he was ready to 
sell this good property irrespective of color. 

There was some trouble not long ago wth respect to a 
colored man buying a piece of property in a most exclusive 
part of Piedmont. There was a near riot about it. There 
is a constant friction over this question. 

The same matter agitates the country in other places. 
In Detroit, a few months ago, a negro doctor of wealth and 
high professional standing, bought a house in a select dis- 
trict. A mob stormed the house. There was shooting and 
a man in the mob was killed. The doctor was tried for mur- 
der. Darrow defended him and got a hung jury on the first 
trial and a verdict of acquittal on the second trial. Darrow 
rightly regards that verdict as one of the triumphs of his 
career. Chicago has been the scene of many race riots 
which have arisen from the same causes. Negroes have 
been moving into better houses and the resentment has been 
intense. 

The gain in wealth on the part of the colored people, is, 
of course, the reason for the change in condition. Some of 
them, increasing numbers in fact, make money. They want 
to use that money, like the rest of us, to get more worldly 
comfort and consideration. In that fact, lies their certainty 
of ultimate triumph, for money carries with it a certain 
force which maintains its possessor. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



The pronounced movement of the people 
Wets Win Again against the Volstead Act grows more 
and more intense as the months go by. 
It is as if there was a release from the fears which have be- 
set most of the people. Now they feel free to raise their 
voices and to cast their votes as they see lit. The Minne- 
sota Republicans have nominated distinct prohibition modi- 
fication candidates. The modification candidate fur one 
of the congressional districts has ousted, at the Republican 
primaries, an old and respected congressman, who has repre- 
sented the district for four terms. 

Even the ordinary press, which was 50 Opposed to the 
full reporting of the views of those who were critical ol 
the prohibition stand, will now open its columns to free 
debate, some of which even transcends the limits of what 
would have been called good citizenship, only a short time 
ago, 

For example, there has been a discussion in some of the 
Hearst papers between Senator Borah and President I lad- 
ley. The latter came out with a strong defense of nullifica- 
tion, as a means of destroying an unpopular measure with- 
out revolution. Senator Borah shuddered at the very idea 
of nullification. And. to tell the truth, we do not follow 
President Hadley to the limit. If we say that men only 
individually nullify a law of which they do not approve, by 
individually refusing to obey it and taking the risk, we think 
that we have said something which cannot he contradicted. 
but will bear the test of actuality. I'm that is very differ- 
ent from organizing to nullify a measure by a popular move- 
ment. The ultimate result upon the measure may be the 
same, hut the latter has rather an ominous flavor of sedition. 

The method naturally taken by the individuals seems 
more satisfactory 



Sixty-three per cent of the world's telephones are in the 
United States. In Europe 90 per cent of telephones are 
government owned. 



Chummy Braves 

Evangeline — "Do the Indians have any distinct social 
groups?" 

John — "Sure, haven't you heard of the Indian Clubs? — 
Sour Owl. 

* * * 

The Masculine Protest 

Mother — "Nonsense, Willie; of course you will have your 
hair cut." 

Willie — "I will not. It's too feminine." — Allston Recorder. 

* * * 

One on "Central." 

"Well, I've just had sweet revenge," said the shoe dealer 
to the student who had just come into the shop. 

"Revenge! What do you mean?" 

"That young lady who just walked out of this shop is a 
telephone operator, and I gave her the wrong number." 
— Punch Bowl. 

* * * 

George's Handicap 

"Children," said a teacher, "he diligent and steadfast, and 
you will succeed. Take the case of George Washington. 
Do you remember my telling you of the great difficulty 
George Washington had to contend with?" 

"Yes. ma'am." said a little boy. "He couldn't tell a lie." 
— East Grinstead Observer. 

* * * 

Bathing Under Difficulties 
Agent — "How do you like your electric washer?" 
Lad) — "Not so good. Every time I got in the thing those 
paddles knocked me off my feet." — Allston Recorder. 

Six-Cylinder Coats 

Society news says: "While some came in Tuxedos others 
walked." — Rutgers Chanticleer. 

* * * 

So Sorry 

Helen Wills Recovering; Lenglen Expresses Regrets. — 
Headlines in the San Francisco Bulletin. 

A Prehistoric Barnum 
Noah (landing) — "Now, one of you help me get these 
animals out and the other get out the handbills." — Allston 
Recorder. 

* * * 

Swat the Songster 
A film is to be made on the life of a mosquito. Some- 
thing on the lines of "lie Who Gets Slapped," we suppose. 
— London Opinion. 

* * * 

The Flowing Bowl 

Music Critic (to Sweet Young Thing i — "I low did you 
like the barcarolle at the musicale last night?" 

Sweet Young Thing — "I didn't stay for the refreshments. 

Mr. Cleff."— Life. 

* * * 

First Aid 
An elderly gentleman was observed acting rather ner- 
vously in a department store, and the floor-walker ap- 
proached him. 

"Anything I can do for you. sir?" 
"I have lost my wife." 

"()h. yes. Mourning goods two flights up." promptly 
tided the floor-walker. — Atlanta Journal. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 3, 1926 



' • 



Pleasure's Wwd 




OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

lorn Moor>e- 




Reserved Seats for 
Cinema Productions 

NOW comes the word that soon we 
shall be able to secure reserved 
seats at motion picture theaters. 

This announcement follows in the 
line of advanced ideas in accord with a 
movement in the cinema industry to 
produce better and better pictures un- 
der better and finer conditions. 

Those at the head of film art theaters 
are giving special consideration to the re- 
served seats plan in the hope of lur- 
ing many people who stay away from 
motion picture houses because of the 
jams and the long waiting lines. 

According to announcements made 
by those allied in the film industry, 
there will be a chain of super-art mo- 
tion picture houses, reaching across the 
continent. 

Each of these playhouses, reaching 
across the continent. 

Each of these playhouses will include 
some special lure to patrons in offering 
comfort and conveniences as well as 
offering productions of the camera art. 

Joseph M. Schenck and Sid Grau- 
man are named as leaders in these ad- 
vanced ideas. 

* * * 

Bohemian Grove Play 

"Truth," a stage adaptation of an al- 
legorical legend written by George 
Sterling, will be the name of the an- 
nual Bohemian Club play to be given 
in the famous Bohemian Grove on the 
night of Saturday. July 31st. 

Music for the production was writ- 
ten by Domenico Brescia. W. H. Smith, 
Jr., will direct the performance, in 
"which Charles Bulotti and Austin 
Sperry will have the leading roles. Ac- 
cording to the custom of these world- 
renowned Bohemian Grove plays, all of 
the roles, including the female role, 
will be taken by members of the Bo- 
hemian Club. 

Crown Prince Adolphus Gustavus of 
Sweden may be present at this year's 
production, according to authentic an- 
nouncements. 

* * * 

Columbia 

Margaret Anglin and Blanche Bates, 
two of the greatest luminaries on the 
stage, will co-star at the Columbia the- 
ater, beginning their engagement on 
Tuesday evening. Julv 6. with a double 
bill. 



By "Jingle" 

Miss Anglin will appear in the come- 
dy entitled, "Caroline," from the pen 
of W. Somers Maughan, who wrote 
"The Circle." and on the same pro- 
gram will appear Miss Bates in the 
one-act play, "Peg, the Actress." 

This remarkable opportunity of see- 
ing these two brilliant stars of the stage 
world comes as a rare privilege to lo- 
cal theater-patrons. 

The vehicles chosen for each actress 
seems to be exactly right for the two 
plays, fur though different in text, they 
are wondrously alike in that the vein 
of genuine humor is precisely suitable 
to the characterizations essaved. 

* * * 

Curran 

Louis O. Macloon brings the lively 
musical comedy "Tip-Toes" to the Cur- 
ran theater for its western premiere 
on Monday night. This colorful and 
tuneful offering, with a popular score 
by the internationally famous George 
Gershwin, and a book by Guy Bolton 
and Fred Thompson, is the most costly 
and ambitious production that Mac- 
loon has ever made in the west. 

Featured in the production will be 
four leading favorites of Broadway — 
Eddie Buzzell, Eddie ("Sunkist") Nel- 
son, Ona Munson and Charles Howard. 
There are eight other principals and a 
supporting chorus of forty. 

Arthur Kay is in charge of the large 
jazz orchestra which will accompany 
the musical offering. George Gershwin 
has not been content to write one of 
two distinct song hits in this work ; he 
has at least six striking special num- 
bers that will be hummed and whistled 
here for many months to come. "Pat- 
sy" will end its long run of seven weeks 
at the Curran theater Saturdav night. 

* * * 

Wilkes 

"Nancy." featuring Nancy Welford 
will be at the Wilkes theater for this 
week, only. 

The Clifford-Schwartz musical come- 
dy has been drawing large audiences 
ever since it started and the favoritism 
of the musical comedy as well as the 
dainty little star and the other princi- 
pals will continue, no doubt, to fill the 
Wilkes as long as this fascinating musi- 
cal play cares to remain. 

Nearly every patron of the "Nancy" 
performances conies out of the theater 
whistling, bumming or singing "Lov- 
ing You :" "Nancy" and other melo- 



dies which linger within the mind. 

Miss Welford is seen in the finest 
part she has ever played, even surpass- 
ing her superb "Nanette," according to 
many well known critics. A cast of 
notables who assist in dispensing' the 
artistry of the musical comedy include 
Rex Cherryman, who receives many 
ovations; Lou Archer, Jane Darwell, 
Iva Shepard, Maude Truax, Betty Gal- 
lagher, Nancy Carroll and George 

Guhl. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"The Show Off," a clever comedy by 
George Kelly, with Louis John Bar- 
tels in the role he created when the 
play was first presented at the Play- 
house. New York, is on the stage at 
the Alcazar theater. Sunday, for a lim- 
ited engagement. 

Henry Duffy has brought Battels 
from the East in order that San Fran- 
cisco may see this amusing comedy 
just as it was staged on Broadway. 
Bartels has been seen in the character 
role heretofore, only in New York, Chi- 
cago and Boston. Guy Dennery, also a 
member of the original cast, has been 
brought from the East for this attrac- 
tion. 

Are you familiar with people who 
like to show off, and who are never 
so happy as when building up their 
own importance? Well, it is an indi- 
vidual of this kind around whom the 
play centers. 

The supporting company will be ex- 
cellent, we are assured by Duffy. 

* * * 

President 

"Love 'Em and Leave 'Em," a spark- 
ling comedy, is to have a third week at 
the President beginning with the Sun- 
day matinee. Not for months has the 
President theater had an attraction so 
popular with the amusement-loving 
public. Broadway will be seeing "Love 
'Em and Leave 'Em" in the 23rd week, 
while San Francisco is enjoying the 

third week of this offering. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

Fannie Brice will head the big new 
bill at the Orpheum theater on the sec- 
ond week of the new Saturday opening 
day policy, offering a program of hil- 
arious and typical Brice hits, written 
especiallv for her by Ballard MacDon- 
ald. 



July 3, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ROYAL 

Polk nr. California 



Pictures 



ON THE STAGE 



ALCAZAR I "The Show Oil" 
O'Farrell nr. Powell ( Louis John liartels 


COLUMBIA I "Y 8 "™' *° B ¥-° . a ." d J"."" 1 *" 
70 Eddy 1 S l " Caro!, " e and Pe B> 
) the Actress" 


CURRAN I "Tip Toes" 
Geary nr. Mason f Musical Comedy 


PRESIDENT I "V ove ' Em ", nd 

»" A ""•*'■ , Hen^Dulry^arce 


WILKES I "Nancy" 
Geary at Mason f Nancy Welford 


VAUDKV1LLK 


GOLDEN GATE ( Independence Week Program 
G. G. Ave. & Taylor ( Edna Kcllog, Prima Donna 


ORPHEUM ( Fannie Brier, Headliner 
O'Farrell & Powell f Frank DeVoe, "1926 Humor" 


PANTAGES(NEW) I "Why Girls Go Back Home" 
Market at Hyde J —Picture.— Palsy Ruth Miller 


PORTOLA I .. , ... _. . 
Market near 4th ( Vaudeville-Pictures 


LNION SCtUARE ( Vaudeville-Pictures 
O Farrell nr. Powell C 


WIGWAM ( ,, , .„ „, , 
Mission and 22nd ( Vaudeville-Pictures 


ON THE SCREEN 
DOWN TOWN 


CALIFORNIA I "Cof» Pajamas"— Ricardo 
Market at 4th f Corte/., Betty Bronson 


\ Buck Jones. "The Cowboy 
CAMEO C und the Countess." Colleen 
Market o|in. Gth f Moore in "Affinities," Wed- 

' ncsduy to Sundny. 


CAPITOL \ "Pieces of China." Isaac 0. 
Ellis nr. Market ) "P D ™ Travelogue Pielure- 

\ Special Prologue. 


CASINO ( Pictures 
Ellis and Mnson 1 


Market^ Jones St. \ ''FlMClMtta* Youth" 


imperial ( "Variety" 
Market bet. ill 1.-71 h f 


LOEW'S WARFIELD ( "Paris" — Charlie liny 
Market at Taylor 1 nntl .liiaii Crawford 


ST. FRANCIS I "The Mldnlisht Sun" 
Market bet. oth-Oth f Laiirn La Planlc 


RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS 


ALEXANDRIA ( staJSHSK, H 

t , , tWit , t Iirn .Hock nnd 

Geary and ISth j Hto B»w« 


/ Pictures 
COLISEUM } Mill I'rimklyn nnd 
II. i.i.ni A lllh Ave. ) His Hand 


II in. Ill ( 

HnlKlit at Cole ( Pictures 


HARDING ( Picture. 
Dlvlsadero at Hayes l Eddie llnrkno* and 
Orchestrn 


IRVING ( 

IrvhiK lit lr.lh Ave. j Pictures 


MAJESTIC 

Mission between Pictures 
20th nnd 21st 


METROPOLITAN i 

I'nlnn nr. Fillmore f Picture* 


NEW 11 MHO V I _, 
llnllmn • Mth Vve. j Pictures 


NEW FILLMORE ) 

Fillmore near Ellis r Picture- 


HCW MISSION \ 

Mission nr. 22nd i Pictures 



SPECIAL ATTRACTION 

SEQl'OIA NATIONAL PARK. Fourth of July 
Celebration. Tulare County Posts of the 
American Legion. Allen Blxby, State Com- 
oander, Priaciiial Speaker. 



This will probably be Miss Brice's 
last appearance in vaudeville or musi- 
cal comedy for quite a while as she en- 
ters upon her new career as a dramatic- 
artist beginning Labor Day in New 
York. 

Marjorie White, one of the White Sis- 
ters, has formed a partnership with Ed 
Tierney, and will be seen at the Or- 
pheum in song, dance and comedy of- 
ferings. 

Frank De Voe, of musical comedy 
fame, will remain over for a second big 
week presenting a new edition of his 
"1626 Humor in 1926 Way" with the 
aid of Eddie Willis at the piano. 

* * * 

Loew's Warfield 

"Paris," a vivid mystery drama of the 
French underworld, comes to the War- 
field Saturday for a week's engagement. 
"Paris" was directed for Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer by Edmund Goulding, from 
the original story written by him. 

Charles Ray and Joan Crawford head 
a notable cast. Ray is seen as an Am- 
erican tourist in search of thrills and 
romance, who, by a strange chance, is 
enmeshed in an Apache plot that re- 
sults in complications both thrilling 
and comical. 

"Alice in Wonderland" is the "Idea" 
offered by FanchoD and Marco for the 
stage presentation. In this idea all 
the story-book characters come to life. 
Tweedle-dee and Tweedle-dum are 
played by Florence Lewis and Adele 
Kellogg; Claire Holloway and De Lor- 
ing are also featured, — the latter being 
-eon as Humpty Dumpty; Zilla Simp- 
son, a dramatic soprano with a won- 
derful voice, plays the Queen, and 
Little Vera La Vonna, the child prima 
donna, makes an ideal Alice. The Sun- 
kist beauties appear a> playing cards 
in the act. 

Walt Roesner and hi< Super-Soloists 
will entertain with another of their 
popular musical programs. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Independence Week, which is being 
observed in all theaters operated by the 
Orpheum Circuit, will be celebrated at 
the Golden < i;i t e next week. A strong 

bill is headed by "California's < Iwn" 
popular song writer and vaudeville 
star. Ernest R. Ball, who will present 
a vaudeville musical, in which he is a-- 
sisted by a group of girl musicians. 
Edna Kcllog, late star of the Metro- 
politan Opera company; and Mildred 
Carroll, pianist and soprano, are among 
the featured girls. Popular songs of 
the day. many being Mr. Ball's own 
compositions, make up the act. 



"Wee" Georgie Wood, little English 
dramatic star, is a feature of the new 
bill. Will and Gladys Ahearn, the for- 
mer a cowboy and an adept at spin- 
ning a rope, will present their original 
oddity, "A Spinning Romance." The 
picture feature will be "The Road to 
< llory," featuring May McAvoy, Les- 
lie Fenton, Ford Sterling and Rock- 
Iifife Fellowes. 

Special Independence Week features, 
the usual short films and music by 
Grace Rollins Hunt, organist and 
Claude Sweeten's Golden Gate orches- 
tra fill out the bill, 

* * * 

Granada 

"Fascinating Youth," with all new 
faces on the screen, will be the Gran- 
ada attraction starting Saturday. The 
actors in this picture are all graduates 
of the class of Famous-Players-Lasky 
school for motion picture stars. They 
were taken to Saranac Lake, New 
York, and there directed in this pic- 
ture by Sam Wood. 

On the stage will be a "St. Louis 
Hop" contest, with cash prizes to the 
winners. The Synco-symphonists and 
Don Wilkens supply "the musical at- 
tractions, which are always a feature 

of the Granada. 

* » » 

Cameo 

Buck Jones, in the William Fox pic- 
ture, "The Cowboy and the Countess," 
will be on the screen at the popular 
Cameo theater, Sunday, July 4, for a 
run of four days. The new policy of 
two changes weekly, with screen feat- 
ures starting on Sundays and Wednes- 
days, is now prevailing. 

Colleen Moore, the screen celebrity, 

with John Bowers playing opposite, 

will be seen on the screen for three 

days, starting on Wednesday, July 8, 

in "Affinities," a real farce comedy, 

with a laugh assured throughout the 

entire photoplay. 

"* * * 

Imperial 

"Variety," with Emil Jannings, the 

star, will be the big screen attraction 
at the Imperial, this photoplay having 

it- first show Jul; here and the second 
showing of any place in the United 
States. The picture has been rated as 
so magnificent that it occupied a speci- 
al place on the Paramount program. 

(Continued on Page 14 1 



• 



you pay no more a 



flESTFLOWEIg 




THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 3, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Los Gatos Pageant 
Lures Many Notables 

EACH year the pageant given, out-of-doors, in Los Gatos, 
attains a height of unsurpassed perfection. 

Historical in value, picturesque and romantic, colorful 
and dramatic, these pageants are known throughout the 
land as events commanding literary attention and com- 
munity interest. 

Hundreds of people from many parts of the nation, gath- 
ered at Los Gatos, Friday and Saturday nights of last week, 
as they have been doing for eight consecutive years, to 
witness the pageant. 

This year's production added another triumph to the 
credit of Los Gatos towns-people, for practically every citi- 
zen took part. 

Wilbur Hall wrote the pageant, "La Senora de Los 
Gatos." the theme of which was based on a Spanish story 
and the fateful meeting of lovers' shadows on a chapel wall. 

Action introduced into the plot follows the efforts of 
many suitors to blend their lives into that of the heroine's. 
But, according to the romantic legend, "the Lady of the 
Cats" did not find her true mate until the shadows upon the 
chapel wall merged perfectly. 

* * * 
New Technique 

New stage technique was achieved at this year's pageant, 
by the use of a sheet of spray, illumined by colored lights, 
interposed during intermissions. The spray formed a com- 
plete screen between the audience and the stage, and not 
only created an illusion, but was complete in its purposes. 

Startling beauty prevailed throughout the entire produc- 
tion. The wedding scene was especially lovely. It was 
followed by a grand ball with senoritas and gay attendants 
dancing to the rhythm of amorous music and castanets. 

The period of California in 1822 was reflected in costumes 
and scenes and over the entire setting swayed and surged 
the influence of Spanish romance. 

* * * 
Notables Take Part 

Many prominent people essayed the leading roles. 

Kathleen Norris, celebrated novelist, played the character 
part of a ranchero's wife. Mrs. Norris always takes part 
in the Los Gatos pageants and often hastens home from 
abroad in order to prepare her costumes and to learn her 
roles. 

Charles G. Norris usually takes part, too, but this year 
Mr. Norris occupied a box, with celebrities from the liter- 
ary, art and the musical world as his guests. 

"A magnificent performance, splendidly portrayed and 
one of the most colorful and finished productions in the his- 
tory of Los Gatos pageantry" was the universal verdict 
pronounced by those fortunate enough to have been among 
the hundreds upon hundreds of interested spectators. 

* * * 
Major-General Morton 
Entertains At Los Gatos 

More than one hundred and fifty guests were entertained 
by Major-General and Mrs. Charles Gould Morton at their 
country home in Los Gatos last Saturday afternoon, when 
a tea and garden party was given, in honor of General Tames 
McRae, commandant of the 9th Corps Area and Mrs. McRae. 



Presidio residents and a number of civilian friends of both 
Major-General and Mrs. Morton were among the guests, 
many of whom motored down for the memorable occasion. 

Mrs. Niles Trammel, daughter of Mrs. Morton, assisted 
her mother in extending the courtesies of the delightful 
affair. Mr. and Mrs. Trammel returned from the East a 
few days ago in time for the week-end garden party. They 
have taken up their residence again in San Francisco, to 
the delight of their many friends. 

* * * 

Countess Nicolai and 
Senor Monsalve Betrothed 

Friends of the beautiful Countess Florenza K. De Zaruba 
Nicolai and Senor Don Carlos J. Monsalve, Vice-Consul of 
Peru, were delightfully informed and pleasingly surprised 
when, at a brilliant gathering in the gold ballroom of the 
Fairmont Hotel, last Saturday evening, announcement was 
made of the engagement of Countess Nicolai and Senor 
Monsalve. 

Betrothal cards of the distinguished couple were handed 
each guest upon entering the ballroom. Mrs.Rosetta Baker 
was hostess at the notable gathering and received in her 
usual gracefully cordial manner, friends from the circles 
of the Consulates, the musical and the literary world, as 
well as society folks, were in the receiving line. 

Countess Nicolai. known and highly esteemed by a host 
of prominent people in Europe, South America and in the 
United States, was a picture of regal loveliness as she 
stood beside her fiance, welcoming the invited guests. 

She wore an exquisite gown of white satin and gold lace, 
embroidered in pearls and crystal beads, with a throw of 
royal blue and gold about her shoulders. A coronet of 
Jewels was worn in her hair, pearls, amethysts, garnets and 
the topaz being wrought into a gorgeous band. A cor- 
sage of orchids was worn on her bodice, completing her ele- 
gant attire. 

Regal in bearing, with that unmistakable attitude of "one 
to the manner born," Countess Nicolai has also a gracious 
manner and a wholesome friendliness toward her friends 
of many nations and many climes. 

Senor Monsalve occupies a high place as the Vice-Consul 
of Peru. Many of" his own people attended the betrothal 
ball to pay tribute to him and to his chosen bride. 

* * * 

Distinguished Folks 

The Honorable R. Rixrath, Consul-General of Peru and 
Mrs. Rixrath of New York, stood in the receiving line at 
the reception given in honor of the betrothed. 

Hon. Prosper Reiter, Consul of Luxemburg, and Mrs. 
Reiter, Mr. and Mrs. Martial Davoust, Mrs. Emilie Blanck- 
enburg, Mr. and Mrs. D. C. de Harte, Mrs. Henry Morti- 
mer Hastings, Mr. and Mrs. Clayton C. Sauter, and Mrs. John 
Payne were in the receiving line. Mr. Clem T. Reese as- 
sisted Mrs. Baker in the hospitalities, which included dancing. 

Mrs. Rosetta Baker wore a lovely gown of white chiffon 
crepe, beaded with pearls and rhinestones. She wore a cor- 
sage of orchids and lilies of the valley. 

* * # 

Tahoe Scene of Many Gayeties 

Lake Tahoe is the Mecca for social events, this season, 
with additional lure of splendid hotel accommodations, 
lively sports, something happening "all-the-time" and a 
charm of restfulness and Nature's own gorgeous splendor 
to make a magnificent climax. 



July 3, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Spinning over the lake in the luxurious 
motor boats or the fast-sailing yachts, and fish- 
ing or rowing, every visitor to Lake Tahoe has 
a new and thrilling diversion each day and each 
hour of the day. 

Air. D. M. Linnard whose lovely motor boat 
"Marjorie," was the center of admiration, car- 
ried many a friend and guest to the Tavern. 
The Herbert Fleishhacker speed-boat, "Wa- 
shoe," is the pivot of pleasure on the lake, with 
its freight of prominent San Franciscans. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Fay, Mrs. A. B. 
Munger, Mr. and Mrs. K. C. Ingram, Captain 
Creighton Cartlidge, Helen Shugrue, Georgia 
Ruth, Frank C. Taylor were recent Lake Tahoe 
guests. 

Mr. John S. Mitchell, the brilliant executive 
of the D. M. Linnard chain of hotels, was one 
of the most popular and distinguished guests 
at Lake Tahoe, when the formal opening of 
the Tavern took place. Aqua-planing, horse- 
back riding, swimming, golf and tennis, as well 
as motor boating' and hiking, are recreations 
and attractions recently introduced by the 
Lake Tahoe people. 

Harry Fair recently broke ground for his handsome new 
summer residence at Lake Tahoe, making an auspicious oc- 
casion of the event. Mr. and Mrs. J. E. French, Mr. A. B. C. 
Dohrmann and Milton Esberg were Tahoe guests this past 
week. 

Mrs. Eleanore Ross, poet and editor, spent her vacation 
at Fallen Leaf Lake, where the well known writer found 
inspiration for some new creative work as well as enjoying 
her rest and the wonderful beauties of Nature. 

* * * 
Engagement Announced 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Martin announced the engagement 
of their daughter, Miss Eleanor Martin, to Mr. John B. Cas- 
serly, eldest son of the late John B. Casserly anil Mrs. Cas- 
serly of San Mateo. 

At a handsomely appointed luncheon given in the Martin 
home, in Burlingame, Saturday, in celebration of their twen- 
ty-fifth anniversary, Mr. and Mrs. Martin gave out the for- 
mal announcement of their daughter's engagement. 

Miss Martin is the granddaughter of Mrs. Eleanor Mar- 
tin, for whom she is named. Mrs. Martin has long been 
the social dictator of San Francisco and one of the best be- 
loved women of the community. Her brother was formerly 
Governor Downey, an important political and financial fig- 
ure of early California. 

The charming young bride-to-be is a granddaughter also 
of the late Mrs. Scott and Henry T. Scott of shipbuilding 
fame, and now one of the first executives of the Pacific Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company and the Mercantile Trust 
Company, and also closely associated with the Crocker in- 
terests. 

* * * 

At a dinner dance given Saturday evening at the Daniel 
Crosby home in Piedmont by Miss Virginia Crosby, an- 
nouncement was made of the engagement of Mi^s Eleanor 
Brann and Clarence Tucker Williams. Mr. ami Mrs. Walter 
Scott Brann are sending out cards announcing the interest- 
ing news to their large circle of friends. 

Miss Brann. who is the >ister of the Misses Margaret and 




HOTEL CANTERBURY 
750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



Olive Brann. attended Miss Ransom's and 
Miss Bridges school, following this with two 
years at college in the East. She is a mem- 
ber of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Newton Woodworth of Berke- 
ley, had the pleasure of entertaining Sir Aub- 
rey and Lady Briscoe last Wednesday evening. 
Mr. and Mrs. Woodworth visited at Coghurst 
Hall, the Briscoe estate in Sussex, last sum- 
mer. The British visitors are motoring through 
the country. From here they will go East to 
Virginia, later to Florida, and will return to 
California for the winter. They may possibly 
build a shooting lodge or country home in the 
mountains. 

* * * 

Hosts Before Concert 

Mrs. Cyril Tobin entertained at luncheon at 
their home in San Mateo, later taking their 
friends to the Philharmonic concert on the 
grounds of the Hillsborough School. Mr. and 
Mrs. Tobin's guests were Mr. and Mrs. Milton 
Bugbee and Mrs. Charles Brown. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gayle Anderton also entertained before the 
concert, their guests being Mr. and Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz 
and Mr. and Mrs. William Duncan. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Ruben B. Hale who make their home at The 
Fairmont Hotel entertained a few friends informally at din- 
ner on Thursday evening, in honor of their son-in-law and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Field of Long Beach, who 
have been their house guests for a few days. The table 
was centered with a large basket of roses and brilliant hy- 
drangeas of harmonizing shades. 

* * * 

Mrs. Arthur Brock Waltz of San Francisco and Mrs. 
Clarence Bittner of Sacramento were joint hostesses at a 
handsomely appointed Bridge Luncheon, given in the Grey 
Room at the Fairmont Hotel on Friday. June 25. The af- 
fair was given in honor of Miss Margaret Elizabeth Leach, 
whose engagement has recently been announced to Mr. 
Cecil Guy Calden Jr., both of Piedmont. The table had 
for ornamentation banks of roses, gladiolas and delphinium, 
with quantities of feathery fern, tall flame color candles in 
silver candlesticks completing the decoration. Cards were 
enjoyed during the afternoon. Twenty-six ladies were in- 

vited to meet the complimented guest. 

* * * 

Lieut. Frederic Albert Sax age, U. S. Army, and Mrs. 
Savage, are at the Fairmont Hotel where they will remain 
until they leave for Xew York, from which point they will 
sail on the S. S. "ANC( IN" August 10th. for Camp Galliard, 
Panama, where Lieut. Savage will be stationed. 

Admiral S. S. Robison, Commander in Chief of the U. S. 
Navy has joined Mrs. Robison at The Fairmont, where 
thev will make a short visit. 

* * * 

Farewell Luncheon 

Mrs. Maria Laiolo, was hostess at a handsomely appointed 
luncheon given last week in the Grey Room at the Fair- 
mont hotel, in honor of her graduation and as a farewell, as 
she will leave shortly for a year in Europe where she goes 
to finish her musical studies. The oval table was centered 
(Continued on Page 18) 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA Maria. CALIFORNIA 

On the Coa«t Highway Halfway Brlwren San Franri»ro and Lot Antrim 

An Inn of I nmuat E\crllrnr< 

W~ir* or writ* for mrrrotioas on your mrxt trip touth 



■] r 



i i 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

t!50 Rum fa Street, Between Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEX, Proprietor 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 3, 1926 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




How Many Agree? 
""pvISCOVERED," the world's most 
-L/ wonderful and efficient radio re- 
ceiving set! A three tube set, located 
up in the wilds of California, which 




C. J. Pennington 

logs any station, any time. However, 
the amusing part of this assertion is that 
no other set can duplicate this set's per- 
formance in the same location, with the 
same aerial. ''"•^•"•^•^■^■•wi 

It differs not what make of receiver 
is in competition, they do not, accord- 
ing to the teller of this tale, bring in 
what this particular set will reproduce 
on the loud-speaker. 

Bunk! Pain and lots of it; Some 
time ago we heard ' a tale practically 
the same. We ventured out to the 
man's home to investigate, and the eve- 
ning we were there, something was 
temporarily wrong, for, all we heard 
was a couple of local stations and they 
both came in at the same time. 

A few days after that incident, an- 
other party called to tell us how won- 
derful Mexico was coming in. We 
dashed over and Mexico proved to be 
a local station broadcasting a Spanish 
lesson. 

We have heard many distant sta- 
tions, but we maintain that distance for 
the most part is freakish, like our re- 
cent electrical storm. 

For instance, some nights we log 
KFI easily; other evenings, all we get 
is KFI's carrier whistle. At times. 
KOIN, Portland, Oregon, is logged, 
and it is impossible at the same time to 
hear K.GW, also located in Portland, 
and a more powerful station. 

The same applies to Seattle. We 
hear KTCL and are unable to hear the 
other stations which we know are 
broadcasting. One evening we were 
surprised by hearing Chicago very 
clearly, but that reception was with- 
out either aerial or ground connection 



to the set. Another time we thought 
we had Honolulu, but that turned out 
to be Denver broadcasting a football 
game taking place in Honolulu. 

We could recite scores of such in- 
stances where it is a case of reaching 
out with the imagination rather than 
reaching out with the set. 

It has now been some time since we 
listened to our first receiving set. and 
we have heard many of them since ; 
but, to date we have yet to hear a broad- 
cast receiver which will bring in a real 
distant station consistently and do a 
good job of it. 

Broadcast reception, up to the pres- 
ent, is local, and this means any sta- 
tion west of Denver, which, by the 
way, requires an exceptionally good 
set to log. 

So, whenever you hear what wonder- 
ful results are being obtained consist- 
ently on any receiver, remember that 
the party telling the tale has either a 
very elastic imagination or, he is an 
extraordinary fabricator. 
* * * 
More Power 

In order to provide still greater pow- 
er from the storage battery receiver, 
without the need for alternating cur- 
rent supply, there is now introduced 
the new UX-171 radiotron. 

This tube is said to be capable of 
supplying a large volume of undis- 
torted output to the loud-speaker, and 
it is intended for use only in the last 
stage of an audio-frequency amplifier. 

The UX-171 tube ma}' be operated 
from a six-volt storage battery through 
a 5 or 6 ohm rheostat, or it may be op- 
erated from a five-volt alternating cur- 
rent. 

The maximum plate voltage of the 
lube is 180-volts. The "C" battery 
should be 40.5-volts for the full 180- 
volt plate voltage, with corresponding- 
ly less "C" voltage for lower-plate volt- 
ages. 

So powerful is the output from the 
UX-171 when operating at its full ca- 
pacity, that it is necessary to put a 
transformer or choke and by-pass be- 
tween the tube and the loud speaker. 

The purpose of the transformer is to 
insulate the loud-speaker from the high 
voltage used on the plate of the tube 
and thus keep the high potential with- 
in the cabinet which houses the set. 



Lecturer says a man never forgets 
the days he has spent on a farm. And 
that may be the chief obstacle in the 
way of the back-to-the-farm movement. 
— Arkansas Gazette. 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO — 428.3 

Sunday. July 4 

'.' . I :. to 10:45 a. m. — Undenominational and 
non-sectarian church service. 

10:45 a. m. — Weather forecast, general in- 
formation. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Ke- 
en ;, t in n Park of the baseball game. 

5:00 to 0:00 p. m. — Organ recital by Marshall 
W. Miselman. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Orchestra under the direc- 
t i i hi of Waldemar Lind. 

6:30 p. m. — Baseball scores, amusements and 
general information. 

6:35 to 8:35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Orchestra. 

8:35 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

Monday, July .1 

7:00, • :30, vim a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, and general 
Information. 

!2:im i n — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing: weather and market reports. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:30 to 3:30 |). m. — Matinee program. 
'3:30 to 3:40 p. m. — Fashion Notes. 

3:40 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chest i a. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

B:00 in 9:00 i> in. — Studio program of patri- 
otic music. 

:i:iiii to 10:00 p. m. — KFI and KPO. broadcast- 
ing simultaneously. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe Orches- 
tra. 

TueNday, July 

7:iii>, 7:3n. 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market re- 
ports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing: weather and market reports. 

l:iin tn 2:00 P ni. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. in. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
en ;u ion Pal k of the baseball game. 

4:30 t" :.:::" p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 0:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

0:15 in 0:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, market reports. 

6:30 i" 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra; Waldemar Llnd, 
directing. 

7 mi to , :::" p. in. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

v in nun [». in — Sui.lin i'fnc:r;i in. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program featuring the 
harmony team. Gypsy and Marta. 

10:30 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

Wedni'Mdny. July 7 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market re- 
ports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing: weather and market reports. 

i _ p. in — Fairmonl it 1 Orchestra 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Rc- 
creation Park of the baseball game. 

4:80 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, market reports. 

0:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra: Waldemar Lind. 
ilii . eting. 

7 tu 7:80 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:3» to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

vmi t,, 9:00 p. m. — Program by the Atwater 
Kent Artists. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program for the Club 
Farallon. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra: Waldemar 
Llnd. director. 

Thursday, July 8 

7:00, 7:30, S:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market re- 
ports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing: weather and market reports. 

l :00 tu 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball game from Recreation Park. 

4:80 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

0:15 to 0:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, market reports 



July 3, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



Radio Program for Next Week 



6:30 tr> 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra; Waldemar Lind, 
director. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:3Q to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe Dance 
Orchestra. 

Friday, .Inly 

7:00, 7:30. 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

] :30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market re- 
ports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing: weather and market reports. 

12:4ri p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:4 5 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball game from Recreation Park. 

4::;n to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — .Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, market reports. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra under the direc- 
tion of Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:10 p. m. — "Sports-on-the-Air." 

7:10 to 7:20 p. m. — Business and investment 
talk. 

7:20 to 7:25 p. m. — Chamber of Commerce talk. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

9:10 to 9:20 p. m. — Book review. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

Saturday, July 10 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market re- 
ports. 

12. uo noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing; weather and market reports. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball game from Recreation Park. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

6:15 to 6.30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, market reports. 

6:30 to 7:20 p. m. — Orchestra; Waldemar Lind, 
director. 

7:2u to 7:30 p. m. — Talk on real estate. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Program by the Mandarin 
Cafe Orchestra. 



"Jake 'n Alec," 
S:30 to 1:00 a. in. — Dance music from the Bal- 
conades Ballroom. 



KFRC— CITY OF PARIS DRY GOODS CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO— 270.1 
Sunday, July 4 

6:30 p. m.— "The Stage and Screen." 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Monday! July ■"■ 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Household hints. 

i:80 to 5:30 p. m. — Dance music. 

5:30 In 6:30 p. m. — A. F. Merell and his Stamp 

Club. 
6:30 p. in- — "The Stage and Screen." 
6:80 to 7:00 p, m. — Jo Mendell and his Pep 

Band. 
7:oo to 7:30 p. m. — Goodfellow's Ad Period, 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Around the Camp-Fire 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m.— KFRC Hawallans 

Tm-Ndny. July H 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Mac and his Gang 1 . 

8:30 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen." 
8:30 i" 7:oo p, m. — Program of popular 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — tlo.xlf elluw's Ad pel 

B to 9:00 p. m, — stu.iin program. 

! to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music from Bal- 

conadea Ballroom, 
'Wednesday, July 7 

id 00 to 11:00 a, m, — Household Hints. 
6:0-0 to 6:00 p. m, — Dance music, 
6:00 to 6:80 p m.— Goodfellow'a Ad Period. 
6 30 p. m.— "Tiie Stage and Screen." 
6:80 to 7:30 p. m. — -Mac and his Gang, 
8:00 i" B:10 p, m, — Talk "Health and 

8:10 to 0:00 p, in. — Concert by KFRC Sym- 
phony Orchest ra, 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m, — Studio program. 

10:00 to IS p, m. — Dance muBlc from the 

i ta Ico n. i dea I la 1 1 1 oom. 

Thursday, July s 

6 8 i SO p. m. — Mac and his Oang. 

8:"80 p. m. — ,, The Stage and Sere* 

8:30 to 7:00 p. in. — ':t0 Minutes Before the 

Mike." 
7:00 to ?:80 p. m. — Goodfellow'a Ad Period 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Program. 
8:80 to 10:00 iv m — ■ Dance music from Bal- 

conadea Ballroom, 
Friday, July » 

10 p. m. — Goodtellows Ad Period. 

6:30 Pi m.— "The Stage and 
«::>> to : so p. ni — Mac and his (?ang. 
8 00 to 9:00 p m, — KFRC Little Symphony 
Orchi 

00 p. m, — Studio program. 
10 OQ to l l:O0 p. m, — Dance music from Bal- 

• m 
Sntu*-dn\, July lO 

p. m, — Mac and his G 
7:'»0 p. m — "Th- 

10 p, m. — Ooodfellowa Ad Period 
10 p. m— KFRC Request Twins, 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 
Sunday, July 4 

2:30 to 3:00 p. m.— Sunday School. 
3:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Church service. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Evening service. Special 

Choir Numbers. 
Monday, July 5 
12:15 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading by R. J. 

Craig, Pastor. 
Tuesday, July « 

12:15 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
"Wednesday, July 7 

12:15 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
2:45 to 3:45 p. m. — Divine healing service. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Thursday, July 8 
12:16 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading by R. J. 

Craig, Pastor. 
Friday. July 

12:15 p. m. — Scripture reading. 
Saturday, July 10 

12:15 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Sunshine hour. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 



KGO- 



-GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 
OAKLAND— 361 
Sunday, July 4 

11 :00 p. m. — First Baptist Church service. 
3:30 p. m. — Vesper service, Grace Cathedral. 
7:25 p. m. — Weather Bureau report, 
7:30 p. m. — First Baptist Church service. 
Monday, July 5 

7:15 to 7:30 a. m. — Health Training Exercises. 
7:46 a. m. — Health Training. 
sir. to 8:30 a. m. — Health Training. 
8:30 a. m. — "Daily Strength." 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:00 noon — Time Signal. 
12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports, 
1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 
1:37 p. in. — S. F. Stock reports. 
1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
3:00 i" 1:00 p. m. — Talk from American Art 
Bun-a U, 

5:30 to S:00 p. m. — KGO Kiddies' Kiub. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dinner concert 

6 :65 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m.— Wen i her Bureau report. 

; :06 p m Baseball scores 

7:08 i> m. — S, F, Produce, Grain, Cotton and 

Metals. 
7:16 p. m.— N". v. Stock rep ng), 

7:23 p in SI r Stock reports (closfn 
8:00 p. m.— Educational program— music and 

sp< a kers. 
8:06 i>. m. — O. w. Holmes, Bpeaker, 
8:25 p. m. — wilda Wilson Church: B 

English." 

g ,ii p m — Ihirrv I„ Todd. 

9:16 p m — "Symposium on the New Educa- 
tion." 

9:30 p m. — Speaker from Extension Division, 
University of < Jalifornla, 

Tm-Ndny. July II 

. !ih Training ESxi 
Health Ti . 

:. m — Health Training. 

,,, i tallj Strength." 
10:46 to ii Literary Hi 

11:30 a, in. to 1:00 p m. — Luncheon concert 

12 30 p m. - Weather Bureau repoi 
i 30 p. m— X. V Stork repi 
i ■::; p. m. s F Stock reports. 
i is p, n i Weather Bureau repi 
to Q :.:. p. m, ■ i ' 

6 66 p. m, — News It 

■i report 
m. — Baseball b< 
7:08 p m. s I" Produce, ■ I " and 

Metals 
T i,. p m . — N. Y St. -ok reports (closing), 
p m — s. k stork reports (closing). 
g" : 00 to 9:00 p. m. — Eveready program. 
g : Q0 The PUgrlma Hour 

midnight — Dance music. 

Wrilnriiln*. Jul? ~ _ 

7 i :, , ilth Train I n( 

Health Training. 

m. — Health Training. 
m.— "Daily Strength." 

10:46 to 11:10 a ni - - Literary Hour. 

— Luncheon concert. 
?nal. 
I 2 |q ,, m — r S Weather Bureau reports. 
. m __\ v Stock reports. 

1 37 p m 

|.4I ,, m— Weather Bureau reports. 

deleine Darby, soprano. 
p m — »p 01 ral Jackson. 

D. m. — Dinner concert. 
. m. — N< ws 

Bureau n pi 

in and 



7:16 p. m. — N. Y. stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

Thursday. July 8 

7:15 to 7:30 a. m. — Health Training- Exercises. 

7:45 a. m. — Health Training. 

8:15 to 8:30 a. m. — Health Training. 

8:30 a. m. — "Daily Strength." 

10:45 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. .Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m, — Weather Bureau reports, 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — George W. Ludlow, "Friend 

to Boys." 
6:55 p. m. — News items. 
7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 
7:08 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 

Metals. 
7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing.) 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Vacation program. 
9:00 p. m. to 12:00 midnight — Dance music. 
Friday, July 1) 

7:15 to 7:30 a. m. — Health Training Exercises. 
7:45 a. m. — Health Training. 
8:15 to 8:30 a. m. — Health Training. 
S:30 a. m. — "Daily Strength." 
10:45 to 11:10 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m, — Luncheon concert. 
12:00 noon — Time Signal. 
12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
1 :30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 
1 :37 p. m. — >S. F. Stock reports. 
1 :42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Auction Bridge Matinee. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — KGO Radio Girls. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:55 p. m. — News items. 
7:03 p, m. — Weather Bureau report. 
7 :06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 
7:08 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 

Metals. 
7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
7 :23 p. m, — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 
Saturday, July 10 

7:15 to 7:30 a. m. — Health Training Exercises. 
7:!-" a. m, — Health Training. 
8:16 to 8:30 a. m. — Health Training. 
8:30 a- m . — "Daily Strength." 
10:46 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 
11:30 a. m, to 1:00 D. m. — Luncheon concert. 
i _' 00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — V S. Weather Bureau report. 
12:83 ii. m, — N. V. Stock Market reports. 
12 10 p. m. — 3. F. Stock Market reports. 
8:00 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. "Week- 
ly sp-.i-t Review ." 
8:10 to 9:00 p. m. — Leo J. Meyberg Company 

program. 
9:00 i" 9 80 p. mi. — Arthur S, Garbett in a 

musical talk. 
9 30 to 10:00 p. m. — Tupper & Reed present 

F':ink Sheridan, actor, 

10:00 p. m. i.. 12:30 a m. — Dance music. 



KNX-L A. EVENING EXPRESS 
LOS ANGELES — 337 

nniiy Bxcepl Sunday 

i m. — KXX Morn in ir Gym. 

v mi :t m, — [nspli a1 lonal talk. 

i in. — Time signnls from Washington, 
n C. 

.1 m, — Radio sh..p|ijnu news, 

■ ;i. m. — Town i i 

i in — Household Economics Dept., Bve- 
1 : Friday ;■ nd Saturday. 

m, — Lelghton'fi a rcade Cafeteria Or- 
t ra . 

mi, — The P..>.<k Worm. 
i in — Ma rkei repo 
5:30 p. m. — Leigh ton's Arcade Cafeteria Or- 
chest i ;i. 
f 50 ,, tn — The Town Tattler. 

B IS i' m. — W F. Alder Travelogue 
♦; : ^ i » p. m. — At water Kent orchestra, 
Sunday* Jul* • 
10:00 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church. 

] ram. 

1:00 p m. — City Park Board musical 

ram. 
p m. — Cinema ("hit -chat. 

—First Unitarian Church. 
p m — Circle Theater Symphony. 

n, — 1st Presbyterian church of Holly- 
wood. 

: — Feature program. 
Wonday, Jul? B 

m. — Little i 

hold Minis. 
m. — Blue Monday Frolic. 
... p ni — F< rram. 

p m. — Courtesy program. 

m — I.. W. Stockwell Company courtesy 
_ '-am. 

p m. — Courtesy program. 
p, m. — Feature program. 

11:00 p. m. — Hotel Ambassador; ' 

anul ' Srove orchestra, 
Tiie>.cln>. Jaly 

m — Mother .- H 
in. — Feature program. 






12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 3, 1926 



Radio Program for Next Week 



7:45 p. m. — Talk on Health. 

S:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Hotel Ambassador, Ray West's 
Cocoanut Grove orchestra. 

Wednesday, July 7 

3:00 p: m. — Musical readings. 

4:00 p. m. — Talk on care of children. 

7:00 p. m. — Feature Program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Edgewater Ciub of ,Panta Monica. 

11:00 p. m. — Hotel Ambassador Ray West's 
Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 

Thursday, luly 8 

11:00 a. m. — Nature talk. 

2:00 p. m. — Paul D. Hugon, handwriting ex- 
pert. 

7:00 p. m. — Feature Program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — ^Courtesy program. 

11:00 p. m. — Hotel Ambassador Ray West's 
Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 

Friday. July ft 

10:30 a. m. — "Proper Foods and How to Pre- 
pare them." 

2:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

4:00 p. m. — Boy Scouts' Musical Program. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Main Event from Hollywood Le- 
gion Stadium. 

11:00 p. m. — Hotel Ambassador Ray West's 
Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 

Saturday, July 10 

3:00 p. m. — Town Crier of the Day. 

4:45 p. m. — Joyce Coad, Metro-Goldwyn-May- 
er star. 

7:00 p. m. — Stories of Insect life. 

7:15 p. m. — Announcement of Sunday services. 

7:30 p. m. — Feature program. 

8 :00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Hotel Ambassador Ray West's 
Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Hollywood Night. 



KFI- 



-EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 
LOS ANGELES — 467 



(Copyright 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc.) 
Sunday, July 4 

10:00 a. m. — Morning Services. 

11:00 a. m. — Third Church of Christ, Scientist. 

4:00 p. m. — Vesper Services. 

6:30 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:45 p. m. — Music Appreciation Chat. 

7:00 p. m. — Jim, Jack and Jean Trio. 

8:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital. Dan L. 

MacFarland. 
9:00 p. m. — Badger's Hollywood Californians. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra, 
.Monday, July 5 

6:45 to 7:00 a. m. — Health Training Exercises. 
f:15 to 7:30 a. m. — Health Training. 
7:45 to S:00 a. m. — Health Training. 
8:00 to 8:30 a. m. — Daily Strength. 
5:30 p. m. — A'arsity Ramhlers, direction of 

Wallace Dish man. 



6:00 



6:30 
6:45 
7:00 
8:00 
9:00 
M. 



-KFI Nightly Doings. 
-KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
— Eugenia Whisenaut. 
p. m. — George Wilder Cartwright. 
p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians. 
p. m. — Varied Program. 

p. m. — Program presented by the Walter 
Murphy Motors Co.. featuring Virginia 
Flohri. soprano. Broadcast simultaneous- 
ly by KFI, and KPO. 
10:0(1 p. m. — Program by Meiklejohn Bros. 
Tuesday, July 6 

■n. — Health Training Exercises, 
m. — Health Training, 
m. — Health Training, 
m. — Daily Strength. 
-Rendezvous Ballroom Orchestra. 
-KFI Nightly Doings. 
-KFI Radio Travel Guide.. 
-Art Mt-yF-r, baritone, 
m. — KFI Radiotorial Period, 
m. — Virginia Ballroom Orchestra. 
-Screen Artists' Quartet. 
-Scotch Program. Cowie's Juve- 
nile Bag Pipe Band. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club. 
"Wednesday, July 7 

6:45 to 7:00 a. m. — Health Training Exercises. 
7:15 to 7:30 a. m. — Health Training. 
7:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health Training 
S:30 a. m. — Daily Strength, 
m. — Don Warner's Orchestra, 
m. — KFI Nightly Doings, 
m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide, 
m. — Don Warner's Orchestra 
m. — E. C. D. Price "Gossip." 
m. — Popular Program, 
m. — Nick Harris. Detective Stories. 
Ray Canfield. ukele artist. 
8:00 p. m. — Program by tin' California Petro- 
leum Corporation: Virginia Flohri. soprano; 
Robert Hurd, tenor. 
9:00 p. m. — Song Recital by Claribel Patten 

Wallace: 
10:00 p. m. — Program arranged by Charles 



6:45 


to 


7:00 


7:16 


to 


7:30 


7:46 


fo 


8:00 


8:00 


to 


8:30 


t>:8(l 


P. 


m. — 


K:0() 


p. 


m. — 


6:15 


P- 


m. — 


6:30 


P- 


m. — 


6:4h 


P- 


m. — 


1 :00 


p. 


m. — 


«:illl 


p. 


m. — 


9:00 


P. 


m. — 



8:00 


to 


5:30 


P. 


6:0(1 


p. 


6:15 


p. 


6:30 


p. 


6:45 


p. 


7:00 


P- 


Y:3U 


p. 



Beauchamp. 
Thursday, July 8 

6:45 to 7:00 a. m. — Health Training Exercises. 

F:15 to 7:30 a. m. — Health Training. 

. :45 to S:00 a. m. — Health Training. 

8:00 to 8:30 a. m. — Daily Strength. 

5:30 p. m. — Theron Bennett's Hollvwood Foot- 
lifters. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Theron Bennett's Hollywood Fool- 
lift..! s. 

6 :4. r > p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 

7: ii ii | j. m. — Program by Paul Roberts and 
Leslie Adams. 

8:00 p. m. — Old Timers' Program. Si Darling 
& Co.: Adie Lucien. yodeler. 

9:00 p. m. — Giand Opera Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Patrick -Marsh Orchestra. 

Friday, July » 

6:15 t" 7:0(1 a. m. — Health Training Exen i-<> 

7:15 I" 7:30 a. m. — Health Training. 

7:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health Training. 

8:00 to 8:30 a. m. — Daily Strength. 

5:30 p. m. — Program arranged by Eugene Bis- 

cailuz. 
6:00 ]>. m. — KFT Nightly Doings. 
6:15 p. m.— KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Program. 
6:45 p. m. — Burr Mcintosh, 
7:oo p. m. — Knights of the Notes. 
8:00 1 1. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital. 
9:00 p. rn. — Program of Hawaiian M uslc. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Ballad Hour. Emma 

Kimmel, soprano. 
Saturday, July 10 

6:45 to 7:00 a. m. — Health Training Exercises. 
7:15 to 7:30 a. m. — Health Training. 
7:1', to 8:00 a. m. — Health Training. 
8:00 to 8:30 a. m. — Daily Strength. 
5:30 p. m. — Matinee Program. 

m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 
in.— KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
m. — -Herbert Porg, pianist, 
m. — KFT Radiotorial Period, 
in. — Al Wesson and his Orchestra, 
m. — Angelus Trio. Howard McKee. 

baritone. 
9:00 p. m. — Popular and Varied Program. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club. 
11:00 p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic, until 

2:00 a. m. 



6:00 


P 


6:15 


p 


6:30 


P 


6:45 


P 


i :0ii 


P 


8:00 


P 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 
Sunday, July 4 

9:i)0 a. m. — International Sunday School Les- 
son. 
4:30 p. m. — Sacred songs. 
Monday, July 5 

10:00 a. m. — Hour of Ministry. 
tf :30 p. m. — Children's Bible story hour. 
6:45 p. m. — Bible reading. 
7 :00 p. m. — Vesper Service. 
Tuesday, July (I 

8:00 p. in. — One hour of musical concert. 
Wednesday, July 7 
10:00 a. m. — The Hour of Ministry. 
6:30 p. m. — Children's Bible story hour. 
6: 15 I-, m, — Bible reading. 
7:00 p. m. — Vesper Service, 
8:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Friday, .luly 1> 

lii:0li a m. — Hour of Ministry. 
6:30 p. m.— Children's BibU' story hour. 
7:00 p. in, — Vesper service. 
8:00 p. m. — Sacred musical hour. 
Saturday. July 10 

10:30 a. m. — Chi'dren's Church broadcasting. 
6:30 p. m. — Big Down Town Mission. 



KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS, 

OAKLAND— 240 
Sunday, July 4 

9:46 io 10:15 a. m. — Bible Lecture bv Prof. 

E. G. Llnsley, 
11:00 a. m in ij:;<i p. m . — Church Service. 
,:!,, t . . \< i;, j,. m — Church Service. 
Monday, .Inly .% 
9:00 t r. !>;.:n a. m— Prayer Service bv Rev. 

E. L. Spaulding-. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Phoppng Hour. 
vim in lo:0il i>. m. — Program. 
Tuesday, July fl 
9:oo in u-?.u a. m.— Prayer Service bv Rev. 

G, W. Phillips. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 

Wednesday, July 7 

9:00 in 9*30 a. m. — Prayer Service bv Rev. 

G. w. Phillips. 
7 00 m 7:30 p. m.— Shopping Hour. 
Thursday, July 8 
9:00 to 930 a. m.— Prayer Service by Rev. 

'■. W. Phillips. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Shopping Hour. 
8:00 To looo p. m. — Program. 
I'rldny. July n 
9:00 to 9:20 a. m.— Prayer Service by Rev. 

E. L. Spaulding. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 in 10:00 p. m. — Program. 
Saturday. July 10 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Prayer Service by Rev. 

E, L. Spaulding. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAK- 
LAND— 509 
Sunday, July 4 

Silent. 

Monday, July 5 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Thirteenth Community 

Wight program. Petaluma, Cal. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Protective Order of Lake 

Merrltt Ducks. 

Tuesday, July II 

■ m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

-Silent after 7:30 p. m. 

Wednesday, July 7 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 in 9:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

9:00 io 10:00 p. m. — Fourteenth Community 
Night. Lodi. Cal. 

Thursday. July s 

8:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:oo to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Silent after 7:30 p. m. 

Friday, July II 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

l :00 in 7 :30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 io 9:45 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:45 "■ 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 

Saturday, July 10 

3:00 p- m. — Baseball. 

7:00 in 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Silent after 7:30 p. m. 



-Organ recital. 
-Vaudeville entertainment. 
-Dance music by Cole 



KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN, PORT- 
LAND — 491.5 
Sunday* Juy 4 

1 0:26 to 12:00 noon — Morning services. 

7 .:)*) tn :t :0(i p. m. — Evening services. 

9:00 m 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 

Monday, July 5 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12:80 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

»i:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert: baseball 
scores. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.- 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.- 

10:00 to 12:00 p. 

Me Kirov's danC6 orchestra. 

Tuesday, July H 

10:00 i" 11:30 a. m, — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

2:00 to 2:30 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

'• no to _7 "<i p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 30 m 7:4". p. m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

■S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

10:00 to I2:0o p. m. — Dance music. 

Wednesday. July " 

10:00 m 11:30 a. Itl, — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12 30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert; baseball 

scores. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, market and po- 
I ire reports. 

s mi t,, •i.iiii p. m. — Concert. 
9:00 io 9:20 p. m. — Concert of instrumental 

and vocal music. 
Thursday, July 8 
10:00 in 11:80 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 
6:00 t<. 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert; baseball 

scores. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, police and mar- 

ket reports. 
7 : I ."i to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 

V2d to 10:00 p. ni. — Vaudeville program. 
in mi to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music by Cole 

McElroy's orchestra. 
Pi Iilay. July 
i to 11:30 a. m. — Women's daily dozen, 

music, weather report, household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 
-':oo t<, 3:oo p. m. — Women's Matinee, talks, 
lectures and music. 
i!:0(i tn 7:oo p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, police and mar- 
ket reports. 
6:00 tn o.oo p. m. — Concert of vocal and in- 
strumental music. 
10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Weekly frolic of the 

Keep Growing Wiser Order of Hoot Owls. 
Snturtlay, July 10 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12-30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 
G:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Concert; baseball 

scores 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 



KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO., 

SEATTLE— 384.4 
Sunday, July 4 

11:00 a. m. to 12:30 p. m. — Church Services. 
7:15 to 8:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 



July 3, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



8:00 to 9:15 p. m. — Evening service First 
M. B. Church. 

9:15 to 10:45 p. m. — Orchestra. 

Monday. July 5 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — Stock Exchange quota- 
tions. 

0:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer Studio 
Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Tuesday, July G 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — Stock Exchange quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time .Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Orchestra directed by 
Henri Damski. 

1 H p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Wednesday, July 7 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — Stock Exchange quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

7:30 to 8:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — studio program. 

Thursday, July 8 

11:30 to 12:00 a. m. — ."What to prepare for 
tonight's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — Stock Exchange quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Orchestra directed by 
Henri Damski. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer pre- 
senting weekly meeting of the "Keep Joy 
Radiating Order of Bats." 

Friday, July 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — stock Exchange quotations 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to fi:05 p. m. — Baseball s *ea. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports, 

8:80 in 10:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer Studio 
Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to U:ini p. m.— Studio Program. 

Saturday. July 10 

11:30 (o is ii — "What to prepare tor to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

'■in io 6:00 p in. — Stock Exchange quotations 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

i: mi io il 05 p. m. — Basel. .ill Scores. 

8:06 lo i; ]n p. m. — Weather reports 

8:80 io 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

i ii mi |i in — Time Signals 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 
— 322.4— (Mountain Time) 

Sunday. .Inly 4 

10:66 n in — s.o vice of First I'nllarlan so- 

ctety ot' i i.n\ er. 
8:80 p. in — Studio concert in- .\OA choristers 
I mi p. in- Open-air concert, Denver muni- 

olpal band. 
Mond07 a Jul? .-> 
6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert, Brown Palac 

String orehi 

10 p. in. — Sandman's hour. 

00 p. m. — Instrumental program, 
8:16 p m SI udlo program 

Tuesday, .lull H 

Hi", a. m.— Weather, -rts. stocks 

m.u-k, is, livestock and pri 
i i p. m, — Organ recital by Clarence km - 

Holds 

3:30 p. m. — Matin. -e for lo 

4:00 p. in. — Culinary hints. 

4:15 p. in. — Fashion review 

p m — Organ recital by Marjorie Nash 

6:00 p. nv — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins, 

6:30 p. in. — Pinner concert, Brown Palace 
String orchestra 

p. m. — Farm question box. 

Wednesday. July 7 

11:46 a in. — Weather, road reports, slocks, 
markets, livestock and produce, 

13:16 p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds, 

4:30 p. in — Organ recital by Marjnrie N.i*h 



6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert, Brown Palace 
String orchestra. 

7:30 p. m. — Book of Knowledge. 

8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 

8:15 p. m. — Studio program. 

Thursday, July S 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
maikets, livestock and produce. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:00 p. m. — Culinary hints. 

4:15 p. m. — Fashion review. 

4:30 p. m. — Organ recital by Marjorie Nash. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert, Brown Palace 
String orchestra. 

Friday, July I* 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
maikets, livestock and produce. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:(in i>. m. — Culinary hints. 

4:15 p. m. — Fashion review. 

4:30 p. m. — Organ recital by Marjorie Nash. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

6:30 |). in. — Dinner concert. Brown Palace 
String orchestra. 

7:311 p. m. — Preview of International .Sunday 
School lesson. Rev. William O. Rogers. 

8:0li ii. m. — Open-air concert, Henry Sachs, 
director. 

Saturday, July lo 

11:15 a. ill. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets and livestock. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 



An Unconscious Infringement 

The Van Home Company, of Frank- 
lin, Ohio, have had called to their at- 
tention, something which appears to 
he an infringement on an Adapted Mo- 
gul 5VCX power amplifier tube which 
they have recently manufactured. 

This tube is distinctive in that it has 
a permanent adapter carrying four 
binding posts fur the purpose of allow- 
ing thr addition of additional "B" and 
"('" voltages direct to- the tube, there- 
in doing away with any necessary 
change in the set wiring. 

It is thought that this manufacturer 
adopted this construction and entered 
upon the manufacture of this style of 
tube through lack of knowledge of the 
Van Home patent and without intent 
to infringe. Notice has been given 
them that claims for patents on the 
adapted idea have been allowed and 
that The Van Home Company antici- 
pate, at an early date, the issuance of 
United States ]iatent to them. 

It i- the intention of The Van Home 
Company to proceed thereunder to 
maintain their exclusive rights and 
manufacture radio tubes embodying 
the patented featu; 



At the Elder Gallery 
Irving Pichel will read the Pulitzer 
prize play. "Craig's Wife' by George 
Kelly, in the Paul Elder Gallery. Fri- 
day morning. July 9th, at 11 o'clock. 
"Craig's Wife," by the author of "The 
Torch Hearers" and "The Show-Off." 
deals with the hard selfishness of a 
woman, whose intense prigishness 
reaches a high point and causes de- 
struction of the home. It was awarded 
the Pulitzer prize for the best play pro- 
duced in 1926, 



On Friday morning of the week fol- 
lowing, Pichel will give a survey of 
Contemporary American Comedy, deal- 
ing particularly with George Kauff- 
man and Marc Connelly. 



HARMONIC CALIBRATION 
By C. H. Campbell, 1IV 

When an accurate standard is avail- 
able, the usual method of calibrating 
a wavemeter for shorter wavelengths 
is to make several smaller inductances 
for the meter and calibrate them by 
harmonics. 

Several ways of doing this have been 
suggested but the writer believes that 
the method presented here is the least 
liable to an error of any of them. 

First disconnect the antenna and 
counterpoise from the transmitter and 
reduce the plate voltage ; then carefully 
tune the transmitter to the lowest wave 
to which the standard is calibrated. Ad- 
just the receiving set to twice this 
wavelength and check with the wave- 
meter to make sure it is really twice the 
wave. If the transmitter has been 
tuned to 100 meters, it will be operat- 
ing on the second harmonic of 200 me- 
ters. The oscillator emits many other 
harmonics and it is important to know 
which one the receiver is tuned to or 
the results will be inaccurate. Take a 
reading from the transmitter using the 
wavemeter with one of the new induct- 
ances, for the first point of calibration. 
Lower the wavelength of the transmit- 
ter two or three meters and follow the 
harmonic down by readjusting the re- 
ceiver to a lower wave and measure its 
wavelength. 

The transmitter is tuned to half this 
value so a reading is taken from the 
transmitter, using the new inductance, 
for the second point of the calibration 
curve. Do this all the way down to the 
lower limit of the coil — the more read- 
ings taken, the smaller the chance for 
an error. Plot the calibration curve on 
graph paper and then this can be used 
as a standard to calibrate another coil 
for a lower range. 

Recently, the writer accurately cali- 
brated a wavemeter from 100 down to 
15 meters, using this method. 

* * * 

Radiotorial Comment 
(from "Radio") 
The failure of most listeners to hear 
European radio stations during this 
year's tests demonstrated that such at- 
tempts are still too far ahead of the 
times. Direct reception of such ultra- 
long distances has to contend against 
too many natural and unnatural phen- 
omena to be generally successful until 
the radio art has been greatly im- 
proved. 

Yet plans are already being made to 
(Continued on Page 14) 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 3, 1926 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 

Emil Jannings and Lya de Putti, two 
of the greatest European cinema celeb- 
rities, head the list of principals. The 
scenes are laid in the theater with the 
festival at the Wintergarden in Berlin, 
one of the elaborate settings. The chief 
personages in the photoplay are a pair 
of acrobats and a star of the company. 
More than 1,000 extras are in the 
scenes. * * * 

California 

"Cat's Pajamas," a frisky comedy, is 
the California theater screen attraction 
with Ricardo Cortez and Betty Bron- 
son playing the emotional lovers and 
the beloved Theodore Roberts in the 
"old man" role. 

Independence Day features will char- 
acterize the entire program, with speci- 
al musical features by Max Dolin and 
his orchestra. There will be illustra- 
tive patriotic songs and violin solos by 
Dolin on the excellent musical bill. 

Lieutenant Commander Byrd's flight 
over the North Pole, the dramatic 
screen log from the top of the world, 
and scenes showing Byrd's . jump-off 
with his plane from Spitzbergen to the 
North Pole and back, are film features 
of this program. 

Capitol 

"Pieces of China," the Isaac C. Up- 
ham photoplay, which records a year 
spent in the land of the Great Dragon, 
was given its world premiere last Fri- 
day night at the Capitol theater and 
has been drawing crowds ever since. 
It is too valuable a picture to miss. 

Upham has made six trips to the 
( Irient since 1910, bringing back, each 
time, memories of the remarkable 
scenes he saw and which he desired to 
share with others. Last year he made 
a tour of Cathay with a Chinese camera 
man, traveling more than 10,000 miles 
in the land of mystery, taking pictures 
everywhere he went. 

This picture is preceded by a pro- 
logue written by Moon Kwan, entitled. 
"The Giant's Sword," in which is told 
a Chinese legend. Liu, the Chinese 
giant appears in the prologue. 

Walter Anthony, former dramatic 
critic of the Chronicle, wrote the titles 
for this picture. 

Pantages 

"Miss Personality" with nine others 
who have passed the screen tests, will 
appear in a Fashion Revue at the Pan- 
tages theater, Saturday. These ten 
girls are the ones who will take part 
in the new motion picture, "Finnegan's 
Ball," to be filmed at San Mateo. Sev- 
eral other specialty artists and models 
will take part in the "Miss Personality 
Revue." 

There will be original music songs 
and dances created by Nat Vincent and 
Blanche Franklyn. 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 13) 

repeat the tests next year. The pro- 
moters deem that the tremendous 
amount of free publicity given in the 
newspapers is worth more than the ac- 
tual success of the trials. They seem 
to overlook the fact that the adverse 
reaction of such publicity on a disap- 
pointed public does radio more harm 
than good. Throughout America there 
were one thousand people who did not 
hear Europe for every one who did. 

Furthermore, exaggerated claims as 
to the ability of certain kinds of sets to 
get Europe reflected against the adver- 
tising of more truthful manufacturers 
and indirectly brought discredit upon 
an industry which allowed such state- 
ments to pass unchallenged. Public 
confidence in radio has especially been 
undermined by claims published in 
parts of the country where there was 
little likelihood of European reception 
under the best of conditions. 

Those who know the limitations of 
radio realize the unfavorable effect of 
raising expectations which are improb- 
able of fulfillment. They recognize the 
fallacy of selling radio sets on the basis 
of their ability to g;et extremely long 
distance. Radio, whether in California 
or Kalamazoo, is best sold on the merits 
of local reception and anv undue em- 
phasis upon the possibilities of long 
distance reception today is detrimental 
to the best interests of the industry and 
of the public. 

Nevertheless the public wants and is 
entitled to the benefits of international 
kinship which radio is capable of pro- 
moting. Every listener gets a thrill 
out of hearing programs which origin- 
ate four or five thousand miles away. 
This natural human desire to roam can 
be satisfied in either of two simple, 
practical ways without interfering with 
the stnv-at-homes. 

Both methods involve the retrans- 
mission of European radio programs 
from some favorable location alone the 
Atlantic seaboard. One method, bv 
wire interconnection of a chain of sta- 
tions across the continent, would al- 
low everv owner of a set whether a 
humble crystal or an elaborate multi- 
tube outfit, to eniov this novel sensa- 
tion without depriving others of their 
entertainment. 

The other method, bv radio transmis- 
sion from an Eastern to a Western 
station should satisfy the most ardent 
DX fan. These stations, if necessary, 
could be assigned temnorarv wave- 
lengths which would not interfere with 
the wavelengths used bv Euronean sta- 
tions. Persons unable to get direct re- 
ception would then have a fair chance 
to hear the re-broadcasting. 




EUROPE 



On the new famous "O" steamers 
you are sure of utmost comfort-" 

cabin or tourist third cabin 
Cabins containing single and two 

beds. Spacious promenade 

decks, ballroom, gym and other 

special features 

Sailings Saturdays 

from New York 
Cabin class from #145.00 

Tourist from #95.00 

oAlso direct sailings from Pacific 

Coast via Panama Canal 

CRUISES: 

Norway • South America 

Mediterranean 

Second great African cruise leaves 
New York, January, 1927 

Complete information & literature 

Royal Mail Stearr Packet Company 

570 Market St.. San Francisco 

or Local Agent 



ROYAL 

MAIL 

-ITHE COMFORT ROUTEr- 
SInce 1839 




ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

The MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COM- 
PANY, location of principal place of business, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Nol Ice is hereby given that at a regular 
meeting of the Directors held on the 8th day 
of June, 1926, an assessment of one-half cent 
per Share was levied upon the Issued capital 
M"«k uf the corporation payable Immediately 
in legal money of the United States, to the 
Secretary, at the office of the company. Room 
2 15 Monadnock Building, San Francisco, 
Calif. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 16th day of July, 1926, 
will be DELINQUENT and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment is made 
BEFORE, will be SOLD on Wednesday, the 
18th day <>( August, 1926, to pay the delin- 
quent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY, Secretary, 
245 Monadnock Building, 

San Francisco, Calif. 



The microphone is mightier than the 
megaphone. — Milwaukee Journal. 

You can say one good thing - for 
money. It talks only when it's leaving. 
— Lincoln Star. 

There are two causes of cussedness: 
(1) poverty, and (2) prosperity. — Dav- 
enport Times. 



July 3, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

Coast to Coast With the Panama Pacific Line 

Among all sea trips offered the public, the Coast to Coast 
voyages of the Panama Pacific Line, from one side of the 
American continent to the other, may be considered unique. 
They are carried out by ocean liners, and are wonder cruises 
of more than 5,000 miles, or 2,000 miles longer than the 
voyage to Europe — filled with scenes of unusual charm to 
engage the interest of the traveler. 

The voyages of this service are for the most part in placid 
seas and under cloudless skies. The ship's course is always 
near the land. The high, blue mountain ranges of the Pa- 
cific coastline, the palm-fringed strands of coral islands and 
keys, tropic peaks tipped in cloud, old Spanish cities, and 
finally the sandy beaches of the eastern seaboard, follow 
one another in the dissolving scenes of an entrancing pan- 
orama. 

On every voyage the ship pierces the serried spine of the 
Continental Divide at the Isthmus, and also calls at gay and 
colorful Havana. For days one steams in brilliant sun- 
shine over sparkling waters of cerulean blue ; for nights one 
is under the spell of the star-gemmed splendor of southern 
heavens, or of the witchery of tropic moonlight. 
Voyage of Varied Thrills 

It may be said in all truth that the voyage of the Panama 
Pacific Liner is one of vivid, lasting impressions. Foreign 
life, strange and fascinating, is seen on the way. At the 
Panama Canal the traveler gets a glimpse of both modern 
and ancient Isthmus architecture, in new Balboa and old 
Panama City. In making the passage of the Canal, which is 
best seen from the vantage point of the liner's high decks, 
one receives a genuine thrill. 

No single engineering feat of modern times has made 
such great changes in transportation as the Panama (anal 
It has linked the Pacific and the Atlantic in :i flowing road. 

open to the ships of the world, cutting the distance by water 
between California and New York from about 13,000 miles 
to about 5,200 miles. 
A ship entering the canal From the Pacific end follows a 

seven-mile channel at sea level to the Miraflores Locks, by 
which she is lifted to Miraflores Lake, a mile long, The 
Pedro Miguel Lock-- then raise her into the approach to 

Gaillard (Culebra) Cut, which is 85 feet above sea level and 
6.97 mills long. Passing through this, the ship traverses 

Gatun Lake, which is 20.55 miles long. The three Gatun 
Lock- each 1,000 feet long, next lower the -hip 85 feet to 
sea level, and a six-mile channel, which leads past Colon 
to the Atlantic c Icean. 

From the Panama (anal the ship- of the Panama Pacific 
Line ponced direct to 1 lax ana. Here their Stay is long 
enough to permit an auto lour around (he city, a most at- 
tractive place, with its houses of soft pink and blue, 

narrow picturesque business streets, it- venerable cathe- 
dral, its broad esplanades, its big hotel- and its friendly 

cafes -and everywhere it- laughing people, talking a patois 
of lisping Spanish that sounds strange to American 

From Havana, the remainder of the v O) age to New York 

seems short. The ship has the current of the Gulf Stream 
with her. Coastwise snipping is seen, and usually the New 

Jersey beaches are in view for some time before the High- 
lands <>f Navesmk and Sandy Hook arc - guardians 

of the gateway to Xcw York barb 

Combination circular tours beginning and ending at any 
point in the United States , r Canada and including a ■. 
age one way by a Panama Pacific steamer from California 
to New York, or the reverse, may be arranged through any 
office or agencN • <: the Panama Pacific line. Rail joun 
afford a choice of various routes, with liberal -top,. vers. 
Pa-- g : Panama Pacific liner may lie engage! before 

Mtinued on Pagi 



CUNARD 

Channel Service 



New York 

to 

England and France 

by CABIN SHIPS 



Caronia 
Carmania 
Cameronia 
Lancastria 

Alaunia 

ASCANIA 
AUSONIA 



For Full Particulars Apply to 

CUNARD AND ANCHOR LINES 

Or Local Agents 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1*71 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general oAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Suiter 2342 






16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 3, 1926 



Finance 



THE fact that the airplane is going on the map, appears 
from the meeting of the Society of Automotive En- 
gineers. It has been holding a session with respect to the 
technical management of air craft which seems to be pav- 
ing the Wi v for" the greatest development of that branch of 
transportation. They have imported experts from Europe 
on all-metal construction and such matters. Why should 
Europe lead us in air craft? 

* * * 

—California is to receive $1,089,386 as its share of $7,500,- 
000 appropriated by Congress for the development of roads 
within and immediately adjoining the national forests. This 
will lead to the construction of major roads and also minor 
roads and trails; 139 miles of the former and 178 miles of 

the latter. 

* * * 

— The P. G. and E. and the farmers are working together 
in the Stanislaus River district. 150 employees of the P. G. 
and E. are driving a tunnel through the granite making a 
way for the erection of a big hydroelectric plant. The farm- 
ers are building a dam for the Oakdale and South San 
Toaquin irrigation districts. The irrigation districts will 
"sell their impounded water to the P. G. and E. "Ain't science 

wonderful ?" 

* * * 

— After a very complete investigation it has been de- 
cided that gas-cooking is the most economical. The aver- 
age cost of the preparation of a meal by gas is three cents. 
The result is that the volume of gas cooking has doubled 

in the last ten years. 

* * * 

— The warrants that are being issued in the cases of the 
carpenters' violence and attacks upon non-union men are 
quite satisfactory, but there is a difference between issuing 
a warrant and securing a conviction. There will be all sorts 
of trickery and devices used to prevent these men from get- 
ting their deserts. 

* * * 

— Harvey M. Toy has presented a report showing that 
there has been an expenditure by the Highway Commission 
of $1,620,300 on the peninsula of San Francisco. The Sky 
Line Boulevard has been carried forward from Half Moon 
Bay to La Honda Road. The Bay Shore Highway is to be 
pushed forward. 

* * * 

— California Farm Bureau Federation is attempting to 
meet the fact of the development of the state, industrially, 
by an agitation against the recognition of this fact, politi- 
cally, by a redistribution of political power. This is a 
condition which will have to be met, and is an incident not 
only here, but throughout the world of the struggle between 
the urban and rural populations. 

* * * 

— Lord Rothermere, as a result of his investigations into 
employment in the United States, says "The economic wel- 
fare of the United States is based more than anything else 
upon the fact that she has 29,000,000 horsepower of elec- 
tric power established in her factories, a force that is esti- 
mated at the equivalent of 290,000.000 workers. 

* * * 

— The bond market is strengthening rapidlv and all 
along the line there is an upward development. The ex- 
perts are satisfied that the doubtful corner of a few months 
ago has been satisfactorily turned and that prosperity will 
be practically permanent. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY I0TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidat ions with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1926 

Assets $109,430,478.72 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,400,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over 557,000.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PAKK-I'RESI DIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haicht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER {A l A) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Dp Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITV, MEXICO. 

San Francisco OHlcc: 450 California Street 
BRlt'E HEATHCOTE IV. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 

MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2244 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS - AUDITORS — COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C. P. A. 
Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, Slow 
Accounts ; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYoung Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



W. W. HEALEY 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

208 Crocker Baildlng- (Opposite Palace Hotel), San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 391 



July 3, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



ALTITUDES AND ATTITUDES 

(Continued from Page 3) 

The rosy mauve had turned to blue, the blue to gray ; the 
lake looked like a sheet of silvery glass; a few belated beams 
from the sun still lingered on the topmost peaks of the Sierras, 
with their ledges streaked with glistening snow, and upon the 
spires of the pines that clothed their sides. All the beauty and 
pageantry expressed in this region of peaks and lakes, and 
rushing streams, had passed unnoticed before "eyes that saw 
not, and ears that could not hear." 

Night had come. 



SUMMER RESORTS 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 



(Continued from Page 15) 
the traveler leaves home. The complete journey thus may 
be planned weeks or months ahead. 

On each ship there is a considerable variation in fares, 
according to the accommodation selected. The "Finland" 
carries first, second and third cabin passengers; the "Man- 
churia" and "Mongolia" first and intermediate. The fare 
in each class is moderate and covers the cost of meals and 
berth. 



RAZOR BLADES BY THE MILLION 

Sheffield, England, that original home of the best steel 
manufactured in the world, has turned its attention recent- 
ly to the making of millions of safety razor blades, and has 
adopted mass production as a method in operation at the 
great Fitzwilliam Works of Darwin & Milner, Ltd., at 
Tinsley, where an output of about a million blades a week, 
of patent cobalt steel, has already been achieved. 

It is not by any means the only direction in which this 
city of steel has shown its capacity for adapting itself to 
the needs of the new day, for others spring readily to the 
mind, but it is the latest, and perhaps the most remarkable. 
That Sheffield, which in the past made "Long" razors for 
almost the whole world, should now equip itself for pro- 
ducing — not in single thousands, but in multi-millions — 
the blades that are used with the popular "safety," is a 
characteristic piece of enterprise. 

It is estimated that the world's production of Safety 
razor blades now averages about six million blade- daily 
The whole of this output has hitherto been manufactured 
from Carbon Tool Steel material, with a definitely limited 
standard of efficiency. 

The adoption of patent cobalt high-speed Steel in place of car- 
bon steel for safety razor blade- establishes an entirel) new 
standard of efficiency and reliability and does away with 
that element of luck associated with all other production-.. 
These patent cobalt high-speed blades are marketed under 
the brand "Darwin." 

Their efficiency, and the greater ease, comfort, certainty. 
and incomparably longer life raises them to a level previous- 
ly unattainable and even un thought of. 



Airplane Patrol Resumed 

Airplane forest patrol was again male possible this year 
by a special appropriation of $50,000 by Congress. Planes will 
be supplied li\ the U. S. Army, and 1st Lieut. Lloyd Harnett 
of Cnssy Field, Presidio, San Francisco, has been detailed to 
act as technical advisor and liaison officer. Pilots an 1 mechan- 
ics have been selected from specially qualified officers and en- 
listed men of the Air Service reserve corps. 



Manifestly Impossible 



"I knew an artist once who painted a cobweb on the ceil- 
ing so realistically that the maid spent hours trying to cret 
it down." 

"Sorry, dear. I just don't believe it." 

"Why not? Artists have been known to do such thi 

"Yes. but not maids!" — London Opinion. 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

WHY? 

It's the Water and the Table 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 
tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN 

Acua Caliente, Sonoma County, Calif. 
or see Peck-Judah 



El Dorado Hotel 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Mushrooms" 

Clean Rooms, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

Viiil Sonoma County'i Famous Resorts and Mineral (Warm Water) Swimming 

Tanks From This Hotel 

Rales Exceptionally Reasonable 

Telephone 110 



FETTERS HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete highway open. Famous medicinal baths. Masseur 
in attendance. Healthful mineral waters; swimming pool. All 
amusements. Excellent table. Hotel steam heated. Cottage accom- 
modations. Bates, $18 up. Write George Fetters, Mgr., J. F. 
Green, Ass't. Mgr., or Peck-Judah. 



L- ALILIN It V ILL A. CARL STEFFEN; PROP . 

French and Italian Dinners — Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

4 Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



The Lodge at Saratoga 

1 nilcr Now Mnnngemcnt 

Specializing Dinner Dances Saturday and Sunday Nights 
The Most Modern and Sanitary Mountain Hotel in America 

Open the Year 'Round. Among the Pines and Redwoods. 

Wider Roads. American Plan. Moderate Rates. 

Greatly Improved 

Owned and Operated by John A. Evans Corporation. Los AngeMs 
Phone Hempstead 2101 

TllllM Ifl H. DOUGHERTY. Mgr.. Saratoga. Calif. 
I'honr-M Sarnlopa SO and ltt3 



"POP" McC RAY'S 

One Mile North of Cloverdale on Redwood Highway 

DANCING IN DINING ROOM AND 

CLUB HOUSE 
SWIMMING IN RUSSIAN RIVER 

Jellies, Jams and Mustard Pickles Always on the Table 

i 
.......-■....--.. t 



IS 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 3, 1926 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 
with a large mound of flowers and each guest received a 
corsage bouquet. During the afternoon a delightful pro- 
gram was given by the members of the party, and the host- 
ess sang several numbers in a pleasing manner, showing 
great promise for her future career. Miss Laiolo was as- 
sisted by her mother Mrs. Antonia Laiolo and her aunt. Mrs. 
Louis Giannone, those accepting her hospitality were: 
Misses Georgia Hawkins, Louise Petersen, Aida Orselli, 
Tosephyne Balk, Gladys Grandi, Dorothea W'yatt, Alia Cra- 
vero. Constance Keo'han, Cora Sellier, Zelda Campagnoli, 
Appaline Brown, Elsie Marianetti, Flora Pagliughi, Inez 
Carbone, Edith Pence. Gertrude Galli, Henrietta Leino. 
Gladvs Finney, Edith Scott, Aurora Cravero, Jewel l'errin, 
loan Nourse, Annette Lua, Doris Bayne, Edith Bright. 

* * * 

At the Hollywood Plaza 

Dan Sayre Grossbeck. well-known artist of Siberian no- 
madic life'and whose paintings of the colorful ports of Rus- 
sia have aroused unusual attention in international art 
circles, is at present stopping with Mrs. Grossbeck at the 
Hollywood Plaza Hotel in Hollywood, California. 

* * * 

E. R. Christensen, well known Chicago exhibitor, will in 
the future make his home in Hollywood. With Mrs. Chris- 
tensen. he is stopping at the Hollywood Plaza Hotel. He 
is to have charge of the Snub Pollard producing unit of Art- 
class Pictures. 

* * * 

Marc Connolly, au'hor of "Beggar on Horseback" and 
other successful' plays, and Lawrence Stallings, author of 
'■What Price Glory" are on the coast and stopping at the 
Hollywood Plaza Hotel. Connolly will write for M. G. M- 

and Stallings for Famous. 

* * * 

Edward Laemmle, Universal director, and nephew of 
Carl Laemmle, Universal's president, will live at the Holly- 
wood Plaza Hotel this summer during the absence of Mrs. 
Laemmle in Europe. 



San Francisco Stomgt! Company r»»«? s? 

STORAGE 

MOVIMi. PACKING. SHIPPING 

/ ■ SUITER >/«... HYDE » lEAVEHWORTH SIS. 



XL 






I Mil GEARY ST. ~T~~ TEL. GKAYSTOXE 4260 

Metal Work Apper- 
I. -lining: to Automo- 
biles — Oxy- Acetylene 
Welding — Black* 
■ml thing* 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



9 

— WATSON _ 

StabilatorS 



In a Stabilated Car — You Motor 
Relaxed and Arrive Refreshed. 



MADSON & RICHARDS 



ClUl -n.si: 2100 



I In. "i |i.-i .ii.-.S 

Pacitic Avenue at V w Ness, Sam Fbahcuco, Calo*. 



Hotel Whitcomb Has 
Many Notable Guests 

Prominent guests at the Hotel White, .nib the past week in- 
cluded Madame Inez Venutti, of Finnic, Italy. Madame Ve- 
nutti is the widow of the late Hugo Venutti, prominent in 

political and financial circles in Fiume. 
* * * 

The Seven Arts Club 

"Trails and Trials of the Desert" was the subject which 
the famous cartoonist, James Swinnerton, spoke upon, at 
the Seven Arts Club, last Wednesday evening, and whith he 
illustrated in his deft and inimitable manner, with crayon 
drawings, before a large and enthusiastic audience, in the 
beautiful home of the Seven Arts on Van Ness Ave. 

Mr. Swinnerton is one of those rare personages who are 
so innatelv and instinctively comical that be ha> only to 
begin a sentence to start a crowd laughing, and his talk on 
different characters whom he had met in the "Chuckwala" 
Desert, kept his audience in merriment all through his dis- 
course. * * * 
The Hillcrest Club 

Mr. Dan Sweeney, another famous cartoonist of San 
Francisco, spoke before the Hillcrest Club, in its picturesque 
mansion at the top of Russian Hill, last Tuesday night, on 
the "Ruins of Angkor" in a more serious vein, illustrated by 
lantern slides. 

Those who have been the guests of this Club appreciate 
the fact that its programs are always of value and interest, 
and the surroundings themselves, are an inspiration for 
beauty lovers. 

After the program, dancing was indulged in by the mem- 
bers of the Club and their guests. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE I'OUR f'.VUS WASHED AMI GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Kates: UTiv per .lay; *".."»0 per month 

PHONE I H WTJGLAS 243 

*lv Floors for Serviee mill Sloriice of Automobiles 



{ LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry Alt Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 



\T CA1 

P»m( ami I 'r.i n I, I i m Street: 



•KT gas station 

Sun 



'raiieim-n, Cnllf. 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

i:*i:ihiixiie.i 1804 
The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclns .1084 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 






July 3, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

LAKE COUNTY is forging ahead in 
the race of touring and vacation dis- 
tricts. Long shunned hy motorists who 
preferred smooth roads to scenic beauty, 
is is now in a position to offer a combina- 
tion of the two. There are already three 
excellent graded ami graveled roads lead- 
ing into this county from the south and 
west. From Calistoga to Middletown the 
road leads over a shoulder of Mt. St. 
Helena, passing a short distance from the 
scene of Stevenson's story, "The Silver- 
ado Squatters." From Hopland the high- 
way runs to Lakeport, the county seat. 
This is perhaps the most spectacular en- 
trance into the county, for as the car tops 
the crest of divide between Mendocino 
and Lake counties, there suddenly bursts 
upon the view the expanse of Clear Lake. 
thr largest fresh water lake entirely with 
in the limits of the State, with its guard- 
ian peak, Mt. Konockti, towering on the 
south shore. 

Another entrance is from just north 
of Ukiah to Upper Lake. This leads past 
the picturesque Blue Lake- with their nu- 
merous resorts and is a part of the Ukiah 
io I ahoe I [ighway which is being rapi Uy 
developed. 

In the interior of the county many of 
the roads, which connect points of impor- 
tance, have been taken over by the State 
lor maintenance and are now in I 
lent condition. 

Practically the entire shore of the 1 
has been subdivide 1 and most of the lots 
are already sold. This will insure a large 
Summer population for this count- 
tins makes the demand for good roads 
imperative. 

A new entrance to this county from the 
east is now in course oi construction by 
the State, lust east of the County Line. 



two branches of this road, one from 
Rumsey in the Capay Valley and one 
from Williams on the Pacific Highway, 
unite to lead into the Lake region traf- 
fic from both east and north. 



Federal Aid in Southern California is 
being applied to develop a comfortable 
entryway from the east into the Los An- 
geles area, according to Ben Blow, Field 
Secretary of the National Automobile 
Club. The work under plan is from Vic- 
torville through Barstow to Daggett 
where the Arrowhead Trail diverges 
from the National Old Trail. 

The length of the stretch under con- 
struction is 44 miles and the funds al- 
lotted amount to $350,000, about $8,000 
per mile, which will supply a good gravel 
section on the Barstow-Needles entry in- 
to Southern California. The traffic on 
this road is already heavy, as daily stages 
run from Salt Lake to Los Angeles. 

In this section of California also bids 
will be called for in the near future for 
paving the .Mountain Springs grade, 
about 24 miles west of El Centro on the 
San Diego- Yuma Highway. Construc- 
tion work on this line is expensive as the 
country is very rocky; the estimated cost 
for grading in one section being $50,000 
pn' mile. 

To the east of El Centre three con- 
tracts are under way. and by the end of 
1926 practically all of the desert section 
will be paved, supplanting the old plank 
road in the -and dunes and a surface 1 
upplie 1 to Yuma. In the dune area 
the road grade i- being raised to the i;.ii- 
eral level of the dunes and the design is 
of such a nature as to prevent blown sand 

from lodging on the pavement, the slopes 

being oile 1 to prevent wind erosion. 

In its general alignment, the new road 
follows the line of the Ail-American Ca- 
nal. Its completion will mark the de- 
velopment of the first surfaced road to 
the state line to In- supplied in Southern 
California. The new line will serve Riv- 
erside and San Bernardino through its 
connection with the state highway, which 
trends north on the west siile of Salton 
Sea. Bids have been let on this line for 
a six and one-half mile section between 
Westmoreland and P.rawley. which will 
complete the surfacing of the Los \n- 
1 '.raw ley line. 



He — Would you be very angry if I 
bugged j 
She — Angry! I should be simply 

furious! How dare you su^gc-i such 
a thing! If you try anything like that 
I'll never - ; ou again, and be- 

sides, this isn't a good place anyhow 
— La Vie Parisienne. 



Interconnection of ; JW er systems 
in California proved to be an economic 
factor, resulting in greater distribution of 
power when and where needed. 

Thru interconnection, California Power 
Companies have been able to pool their 
power supplies for the benefit of the en- 
tire state. 

This interconnection makes possible the 
delivery of hydro-electric power during 
dry seasons into sections that would be 
without power or dependent on expensive 
steam generated power. 

The business initiative and enterprise 
of these companies continually aid state 
development. 

Since 1913 the average per capita cost 
of living increased 65%, while the aver- 
age cost of electricity decreased 8%. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



p-G-and 



"FAClriC SEBV1CE" 




Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




-the better ttgeb- 




GEO. \V. CASWELL 

■utter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 
IXlO.Ono rnpi were Kerred at the Panno 
Paclfle International Exposition 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 3, 1926 



•>®J$<fif 



«S\J, 



'*&• 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



«*,£ 



<&• 



«8\»' 




PROMINENT physicians from all over the 
State of California, were guests of Dr. E. 
Chipman at the Marin Golf and Country Club 
when the physicians of the Northern California 
Golf Association played off their monthly 
tournament. 

The medical men had two motives in view ; 
the first was to tune up their old soup bones 
in readiness for the annual North versus South team match, 
which is set for next month at Del Monte. 

Secondlv, they were anxious to cop some of those won- 
derful trophies that Dr. Harry Alderson. the chairman of 
the tournament committee, had on exhibition. 

Judging by the way the seventy medicos shot golf over 
that sporty Marin club course, it was quite evident that 
the boys meant business. 

Ed Butler, chief surgeon from the San Francisco Emer- 
gency Hospital, won the capital prize, a case of ink. 

Dr. LeRoy Brooks, the leading surgeon from St. Luke's 
Hospital, and the greatest little match player in this neck 
of the woods, copped the low gross honors. Dr. Harry Al- 
derson, who played with Dr. Brooks, said the St. Luke's 
chief shot golf like Hagen at his best, for Brooks went round 
m 77. 

Dr. Wilhelm Waldeyer, the big chief from the Mount 
Zion Hospital, was the low net winner in the Class A di- 
vision. Dr. Waldeyer should have done much better, but 
had his mind on a dinner engagement, and was afraid of 
his wife. 

Dr. E. Pierson, president of the Medical Golf Associa- 
tion, and Dr. A. H. McNulty, that peppery little golfer from 
the French Hospital, tied for first prize in the B division. 
Each had a 72. Somebodv said that that was Doc Mc- 



Nult 



y s age 



Everyone was glad to see that Dr. Herbert Moffitt came 
through and won. Dr. Moffitt would be an exceptionally 
fine golfer, but like many of his fellow medicos, has not 
much time to practice. However, he had a fine net card 
of 72, while Dr. Richard Tomlinson, member of the fuss) 
foursome at Lakeside, shot one of his best games and won 
a cup for himself. 

Dr. Ed Butler was the only player to win a double event. 
Dr. Ed grabbed the medal honors in the B class, so went 
home with two cups. "We hope he'll soon be able to fill 
them. 

Dr. Al Rowe. and Dr. Homer Woolfrey, had the best net 
card for the twosome of the day with 146. 

The Army and Navy golfers fell down woefullv. Dr. 
Longabaugh and Dr. Leachman, from Yallejo, were never 
on the fairway, but they played beautifully in the rough. 

Dr. James Eaves, the founder of the Medical Golf As- 
sociation, who held the championship for over ten years, was 
conspicuous by his absence. Dr. Jim is a great golfer who 
is invariably listed among the winners. 

Dr. John Sperry and Dr. Herbert Gunn also failed to 
show up, which spoiled the tournament of some real compe- 
tition. 

Dr. Al Spalding got rather fussy. He claimed that everv 
Spalding ball on the course was his. 

Dr. Hans Barkan, the Crown Prince and Oculist De Luxe. 
ought to have his optics fixed ; he couldn't locate the fair- 
ways. 

Dr. George Pierce destroyed both scenery and golf balls. 
Dr. Pierce was slicing them up in great shape. 



Dr. Frank Chandler may wrap his club arond his neck 
when he drives, but he's equally as good a player as he is 
a surgeon. 

Mrs. Phyllis MacKillop, secretary to Dr. Harry Alderson, 
notified the doctors in good time, and sixty responded and 
had a wonderful time. 

* * * 

Thirty judges and lawyers enjoyed the hospitality of Al 
Skaife and Walter Shelton, when they played off their 
monthly golf tournament at the California golf and country 
club, and although the entry was rather small, still the play- 
ers enjoyed a wonderful time. Charlie Haswell, Arnold 
Lackenbach, and Walter Shelton landed in a tie for top 
honors with cards of 89. The play-off will be settled when 
the judges and lawyers hold their next meeting at the Beres- 
Ford Country Club next August. 

Christopher Bradley, the leading orator in the association, 
had the distinction of winning his own cup with a net card 
of 74. The cup wasn't on exhibition, but Chris says its a 
peach. It ought to be, if what Chris claims is true, for he 
^ays he ponied up two hundred eagles for it. 

The banquet which followed was in keeping with all the 
previous meetings, and some of the boys who didn't show up 
so well in the golf game, certainly gave some wonderful 
talks. 

* * * 

Bill and Art Newhouse, gave a dinner to twelve of their 
golfing friends at their home, the Huntington apartments, 
the occasion being a surprise party to their brother Hugo, 
who celebrated his fortieth birthday. 

Hugo got the kick of his life when he entered his apart- 
ment to find such a wonderful reception from his admiring 
friends, who showered him with a splendid collection of 
gifts. Among those present were Judge T. I. Fitzpatrick. 
Judge Fred Tyler, Judge Cashin, Nat Messer, Charlie Good- 
win, Joe Loughrey, Jesse Rosenwald, Dr. Frank Sheehy, 
the three Newhouse boys, Art. Bill and Hugo, and Fred 
Blair. 

* * * 

The usual heavy list of entries is anticipated for the 
Fi lurth of July ( iolf Tournament at the Santa Cruz Golf and 
Country Club. July 3, 4, 5, This is one of the big events of 
the golf season at Santa Cruz, and also attracts a large 
number of women golfers as well as men. 

Qualifying rounds will be played Saturday, July 3, with 
match play Sunday, July 4. and semi-finals and finals on 
Monday, July 5. 

Special social activities at the Casa del Rey Hotel will 
feature this Fourth of July tournament. 



The Bride's Perquisite 

A prominent film star was being married 

"So." said the bridegroom, "we are agreed. On Monday 
morning at nine o'clock we visit the registrar. After that 
we go to the church and then you are my own dear wife. 
Have you anything to say about the arrangements?" 

"Only that the film rights will, of course, belong to me." 
— Berlin Lustige Blaetter. 

* * * 

On the Side Lines 
"My ole man's a poet now." observed Mrs. Raggs proudly. 
"Well, mine won't do a lick o' work neither." replied Mrs. 
Taggs. — American Legion Weekly. 



fuly 3, 1926 



THIi SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



21 



Traffic Survey Committee Organized 
San Francisco lias undertaken a business-like solution of its 
traffic problem. The San Francisco Traffic Survey Committee, 
a group of citizens interested in eliminating traffic waste and 
hazards, has been organized to act as an administrative body. 
Robert I. Bentley, president of the California Packing Cor- 
poration, is chairman of the committee. 

Organization of another group of citizens representing all 
interests in the city to act as an advisory body is now under 
way. The traffic survey committee recently conferred with 
Dr. Miller McClintock, nationally known traffic engineer, 
with a view to undertaking a survey to determine conditions 
and map out the engineering features of traffic control. 

The California State Automobile Association is represented 
on the San Francisco Traffic Survey Committee by H. J. 
Brunnier, chairman of its Highways Committee, who has been 
named a vice-chairman of the traffic survey committee. Chair- 
man Bentley and Milton H. Esberg are two other Association 
directors who are members of the committee as representatives 
of commercial and industrial interests. 



Federal Aid Measure Passed 

Congress has passed and President Coolidge has signed the 
Federal Aid Appropriation Bill. From the standpoint of the 
twenty million car owners of the country, the most important 
piece of legislation enacted by the present Congress was this 
measure passed by the Senate on June 11. To the western 
states the enactment of this measure into law was of extreme 
importance. Upon it rested the continued development of the 
Western Empire in which the Federal Government holds title to 
thousands of acres of unoccupied land not subject to taxation 
by the states. 

To the American Automobile Association and the California 
State Automobile Association is due a large part of the credit 
for the continuation of the Federal aid principle. The A. A. A. 
enlisted the active support of its eastern affiliated clubs and the 
California State Automobile Association undertook, at the 
instigation of the parent body, the organization of the western 
clubs. Through the splendid co-operation received by the 
two organizations from the 810 motoring organizations now 
affiliated with the A. A. A., an educational campaign \\a~ 
waged in Washington culminating in authorization of ap- 
propriations of $165,000,000 for Federal aid in highway 
construction during the two fiscal years 1928 and \' l 2' 1 I M 
this sum California will receive approximately Si. 500,000 
annually for expenditure "ii major highways; $680,000 for 
each of the two years for road construction within it- Na- 
tional forests; and $345,000 for the building of forest roads 
»nd trails used primarily for administration and fin 
tectioii purposes'. *" 

The outstanding feature of the campaign in the Senate 

was the overwhelming support developed for the Federal 

aid principle on final roll call. The record shows that sixty- 
three Senators were favorable to the passage of the bill, 
while only six were opposed to it. The vote in the House 
was e\ en mure conclusive. 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think tlmt a vigorous brushing once or twice a day in 
taking very good care of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine, A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 333 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Self Cleaning Bridges: 

Poreelain Work and Roofless Plates 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 



i. 



Manufacturers of 

RIVETKD STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

PLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 



San Francisco, Calif. 
444 Market Street 



Los Angeles, Calif. 
5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



You'll be proud of your Laundry 
when you try us 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
250 Twklkth St., San Francisco 'Phone Market 916 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Sprint*" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

22°. Clara Slrrrt---Carfirl<! 844 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Snfu frr..r,l t.v ham! Only—Stfttl < tiled For and CM^rc-d 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



i Ihyftnn and ( Ininini 



>R3 Po t Sikfii 

In \ 1* l-H Hull 1 



Sam Fr*>«-i?co 
ove Franklin 2510 




RARE BOOKS 

EARLY EDITIONS 

Autographs Bought and Sold 
JOHN HOWELL 

*W Po«x Snin, S»* rmuKUCB, Calif. 



An English lord, a guest at an American hunting lodge, 

heard an owl hoot. 

Eng. Lord — What's that noise? 

American — It's an owl. 

Eng. Lord — Yes. I know it's an owl, but what's owling: 
— Exchange, 



MADE TO ORDER ON LY L 

r JhosXKeaf Shots r ThosU(en( 

^HIKIl/ Night Robes MuRl^ 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
J5 Khrny Stueet Phone Kuin S7M i ! 239 Post Street 



Mak- 

GEORGE HARGENS OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tlllmann I'lacr. ni Ml Grant \veniie 

The Home of the Booh Lover 

ks — First Editions — fine Bindings 
■s from '/■ Root, hforrell, etc, of London 

■i missions in London Executed , 
ka and Libraries Purchased 
Phone Krnrn< 5811 



I Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 



at 



PAUL ELDER'S 

ANT' PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 



San Francisco. Calif. 



22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 3, 1926 




l? m PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

. Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



-; 



PHONES: 

San Francisco— 
West 7I»3 



liu r liimiiim' 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS anil WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Pont Street nt Grant Avenue 

San PrnnclMco, Calif. 

Colt and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 

San Mateo Counties 



Palo alto Office: 
818 EMERSON ST. 



SAN MATEO— Ph 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

526 California St. (and Branches), 
San Francisco 

For the quarter year ending June 30th, 1926, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four ami one-uuarter t4%) per cent per an- 
num on all deposits, payable on and after 
July 1st, 1926. Dividends not called for are 
added to the deposit account and earn inter- 
est from July 1st, 1926. Deposits made on or 
before July 10th, 1926, will earn interest from 
July 1st, 1926. 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Secretary. 



Humboldt Rank. 783 Market St., near Fourth; 
Bush and Montgomery branch, Mills Bldg. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1926, a 
dividend nas been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on savings de- 
posits, payable on and after July 1, 1926; 
dividends not called for bear interest from 
July 1, 1926; money deposited on or before 
July 10, 1926, will earn interest from July 1, 
1926. H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 



Anglo-California Trust Company, (Savings 
Departments) Main Bank, Market and San- 
some Streets; Branch Banks: 101 Market 
Street, Market and Ellis Streets. Market 
and Jones Streets, Fillmore and Geary 
Streets. Third and Twentieth Streets. Mis- 
sion and Sixteenth Streets. Geary Street 
and Twentieth Avenue. 

For the half-year ending June 30, 1926, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate 
of POUR AND ONE-QUARTER (1*4) PER 
( JENT per annum on all savings deposits, 
payable on or after Thursday, July 1st, 
1926. Dividends not called for are added 
to and bear the same rate of interest as 
the principal from July 1, 1926. DEPOS- 
ITS MADE ON <>R BEFORE JULY 10, 1926, 
WILL EARN INTEREST PROM JULY 1, 
1926. LOUIS SUTTER, 

V ice-President and Cashier. 



Hank of Italy. Head Office and San Fran- 
cisco branches — For the half-year ending 
June 30. 1926, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four ( 4 > per cent per annum 
on all saving deposits, payable on and after 
July 1. 1926. Dividends not called for are 
added to and bear the same rate of interest 
as the principal from July 1, 1926. Savings 
deposits made on the first business day of 
any month (or on or before the tenth day 
of January. April, July and October) will 
earn interest from the first of that month; 
deposits made after said date will earn in- 
terest from the first of the following month. 
SAVINGS DEPOSITS MADE TO AND IN- 
CLUDING JULY 10. WILL EARN INTER- 
EST FROM . ULY 1. 

JAMES A BACIGALUPI. President. 



Italian- \nierlenn Rank, S. E. corner Mont- 
gomery and Sacramento Sts.; North Beach 
branch, corner Columbus ave. and Broad- 
way; Columbus branch, corner Montgomery 
and Washington Sts. — For the Tr&lf year 
ending June 30, 1926, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four and one-uuar- 
ter (4%) per cent per annum on all sav- 
ings deposits, payable on and after July l, 
1926. Dividends not called for will be 
added to the principal and bear the same 
rate of interest from July 1, 1926. De- 
posits made on or before July 10, 1926, will 
eain interest from July 1, 1926. 

A. E. SBARBORO, President. 



When the party managers agree in 
their large-minded way that they're 
going to ignore petty differences it 
means that they're going to dodge the 
main point, it possible. — Ohio State 
Journal. 



"Did you hear that a man was mur- 
dered in the street last night for his 
money?" 

"Yes — but luckily he had no money 
on him at the time." — Dorfbarbier 
(Berlin). 




N w CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office nnd Works 1825 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7813 
Branch Office: 700 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 
Phone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 

Tailor 



Opposite Olympic Club 



527 Post St., San Francisco 
Phone Prospect 9316 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 

EXCHANGE 

Phone GnrHeld 3852 504 Market St. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^ 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The Citv's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

jOc, 75c, $1.00 35c, 50c, 75c S1.00.S1.50 a la Cacte 
Dancing 7 :IJ0 p. in. to 1:00 a. m. 

363 Sutler Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

special parties arranged 

headquarters for theatrical people 

Hattie MoofER Minnie C. Mooter 



£& 



^onor5 



145 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 




dud- 



7 

Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 t'> 2:30 

and tea from 3 to 5 

Exclusive use oj room for t In/' dinners. 

334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 



| CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

| Try Our French Dinners, $1.50— Also a la Carte 

j Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private dln- 

I ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



0'FnrrrU .in,l 

Larkin Si-. 



BLANCO'S 



Phaaa 

n« ft ion 



L 



Lunehton (11 ;.lo i< 8 p, i 
W«k Daj 



$ .:s 
_ 1.50 



fh.r \t„,n Ihmng ROOM utll !••■ < 



No VUHoi Should Irjir the CUj ^ tih- 
..iii Dining in thf Ftaml Cafi 

in Amrtirt i 

i 

>n Sunday* •luring thr mmmrr mnnlht I 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

1KI Third Avrniir. S\\ MATKO 



Featuring Southern Cooking j 
Open From 
11 :S0 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. 
5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSBD iv\ BR1 MOlfD \i 

Hnlf lllork. from Highway 






Uncle Tom's Cabin ! 

Restaurant 

ill'IN s M V M TO II M r M 
I NS1 RFASSI II I 1 l-IM 

ClRI I.IIIMI »RI'T 
FWlMrfe ol C ; ,l.lcn l...lc P.rW C.'ino 



Announcement 




Singleton's AU^IJ (Eat 
CLUB INN 



Now Serves a Delicious 
Five-Course 

DINNER 75c 

Also 
Fried Chicken, Steaks, 
Chicken Pot Pies in Cas- 
serole, Etc., a la Carte. 





ICE CREA/%, 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



GrayMooe 
MOD 31(11 3Jl>! 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building. Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



L 



Jhe Charm 

ofVAR}ETY+s 

From Art Salon to 
Eskimo's Igloo — 
from Halls of Fame 
to Rogues' Gallery 
— the fascinating 
pictorial section of 
The Sunday Chron- 
icle deals with 
every subject under 
the sun. 

You will find entertainment that never 
palls in the ever - changing galaxy of 
pictures presented in the beautiful 

Suniiau (Ehrmttri? 

ROTAGRAVURE 




An Investment of Over 



One Hundred Million Dollars in United States, State, 
County and Municipal Bonds 

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 
Head Office (San Francisco) and Branches 

Bank of Italy 



SAVINGS 



RESOURCES 



First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate {144,397,732.41 

Other Loans and Discounts :>!i. _'!>>;. I I , ;i:, 



COMM 

JUNE 

%2 13,69 1,180.36 



ERCIAL 
29, 1926 



TRUST 



United Stales Bonds and Certificates "f 

Indebtedness % 91, 907, 2 15.1 5 

State. County and Municipal B.mds 19,616,386.95 

Other Bunds and Securities 12,069,648.90 

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank 921,000.00 



TOTAL I'. S. AND OTHER SECURITIES 

Hue Erom Federal Reserve Bank.... $ 19,250,699.06 

Cash and Hue from Other Banks 28,868,022.62 



TOTAL CASH AM' \>VK FROM BANKS 

Banking Premises, Furniture, Fixtures and Safe De- 
posit Vaults (Ninety-eighl Banking 'Wires in 

Sixty-five California Cities' 

Other ileal Estate Owned 

Customers" Liability Under Letters of Credit and 

Acceptances - 

Cnterest Earned on Bonds and Loans.. 

Employes' Pension Fund 'Actual Value $244,869.25) 

standing- on the Books at 

Other Resources 

TOTAL RESOURCES $430,856,533.69 



124,61 1,281.00 


48,118,721.58 


7,755,702.95 

s:'m.8.:.vI'.' 


2,588,892. 1 l' 
3,078,897.11 


1.00 

li;s."l V7S 



Savings Deposits Made to and Including July 10, 1926 
Will Earn Interest From July 1, 1926. 

Number of Depositors, 611,688 




The NEW 
HOLLYWOOD PLAZA 

HOLLYWOOD'S most modern hotel; exclusive — 
luxuriously appointed. Conveniently situated in the 
heart of this famous city, it is the center for all activities. 
20 minutes from Los Angeles — 20 minutes from the beach. 
You'll thoroughly enjov your stav here. Rates: Rooms 
with hath. $2.50 up. 

Hotel Bus Meets Trains 

HOLLYWOOD PLAZA HOTEL 

Vine St., South of 'Ioli.vwood Boulevard 



LIABILITIES 

DEPOSITS: Savings J264.575.099.19 

I lommercial 126,638,292.68 

Dividends Unpaid 

Discount Collected but not Earned 

Letters of Credit and Acceptances 



CAPITAL PAID IN t 20,000,000.00 

SURPLUS in, Til". I'll". 'in 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 2,342,807.16 

INTEREST EARNED 8,078,897.11 

(On Bonds and Loans — Uncollected) 

[NVESTE1 ' CAPITAL 

(Including Interest Earned) 



$391, 213, 391. S2 

810,650.60 

89. 27!', lis 
2,621,607.42 

(894,734,829.42 



36,121,70 1.27 



TOTAL LIABILITIES $430,856,533.69 

All charge-offs, expenses and interest payable t" end of half-year 



have been deducte 



above statement. 



STOCKHOLDERS AUXILIARY CORPORATION 

(The Capital Stock of this Corporation is owned share for share by 

the stockholders of the Bank of Italy I 

Invested Capital, $10,958,154.82 



THE COMBINED CAPITAL INVESTMENT of both 
Corporations is in excess of 

$47,000,000.00 



SAIL TO NEW YORK 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and 
GAY HAVANA, en route 




Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropica 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail liner with 
levan neTer-lo-be-forgottcn visits ■•bore al picturesque and historic ports — Man* 
ucillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La LlberUd, Salvador; Corinto, 
Nicaragua. Two dajri [D the Canal Zone; see llie great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, 
Cristobal ami historic old Panama, 

Ever) cabin on a Panama Moil liner is an oulside one; eaeh has an electric fan, 
ami Ihere is a comfortable lower lied for every passenger. There is an orchestra for 
dancing; deck games and sporlt and sail water swimming lank. The Panama Mail is 
world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The rm.1 is less than S Q a day for minimum first-class passage, including bed and 
meals 00 -learner. Co East by Panama Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 
as little as B3S0. (This price does not include berth and meals on trains.) Panama 
Mail liners leave San Francisco and New York approximately every 21 days. Vaca- 
tion sailings from San Francisco, July 24; from Los Angeles, two .lays later, West- 
ward from New York. July 10th, July 31st, \ugu-l Z8tfa. 

Far illustrated booklet* anil further detail) "»k any steamship 
ur ticket agent or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 



US S. SPRING STREET 

LOS ANGELES 



■2 PINE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



10 HANOVER SOI ARE 

NEW YORK 



COMPLETE RADIO PROGRAMS, FOR NEXT WEEK, IN THIS ISSUE 




#5.00 PER YEAR 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 




SATURDAY, JULY ICth, 1926 




LOS ANGELES 




O Q n 



I — 



Club J a riil I on 



,"r«f',n . imf-rtvi mi mi t-i S.it h rantfe, kra-k. Jmn 

kraJf tk fiuil.iiMij nntrmti k.i- knn . 

l.lM.ljr, : ~ ■ s i '»;.!■. ft' kill if l/i .lull fit Jr. tkr .lUtrm- 

ini-ttaton ctmmii J>r*mi R. ft kitr, Hawk k. WfKrwilt, I)', .htkur RrmrJittr, 

/, M. h... J. ff. Skimmrr, Dr. ./. J. Wm.it vieri, Frank J. 

KHmm. /'. '.i / s*J .://*•» // -uh C 'lr.lt lorn . . 
kmvr kftn •frmrj im ikr Sknrt Bm'tltitnf. 



DISTINCTION! 



^ect-COMFORT! 

"" '.. "V" 

ECONOMY! 



With. 



These three features com- 
bined with many other attrac- 
tions, including excellent meals. 
form a combination of hotel 
service difficult to equal. 



Make your next 
stay at the 
famous 





RATES 
Per Dav 
slnilc 
European Plan 

120 rooms with running 
water $2.50 to $4.00 
220 rooms with bath 

3.50 to 5.00 
160 rooms with hath 

6.00 to 8.00 
Double. 4-00 up 



Alio a number of Urge and beautiful room* and 
mites, tonic in period furnishing! with grand pi- 
ano, fire place and bath, $10 up. 



Large and well equipped 

Sample Room* 

RAT1CHO GOLP CLUB 
available lo all sucsts 

Please wrice 

/or booklet 

HAROLD E. LATHROP 



^Kj^^ 





PeCiw&d 

NEWS 

afthe 

Worlds 



Worshipers at Pagan 
temples — languorous 
maidens of tropical 
islands — tribal dances 
in murky jungles — 
carnivals in Old- World 
capitals — fire — flood 
— revolution ! 

Among all climes and 
peoples are found the 
entertaining pictures 
for The 

iXlu *?ai $ranrtaro (LlirontrD 

kOTAGRAVURE 





f' have you a- — ■ 
avorite Sport? 

-At Feather River Inn 

the alluring day* <>1 -.[x>rt may be 
.i^ vincd j\ your choice lu^gcst*. 

— finest mountain go/j 

tn tin west. 
— iptCt.ll tournament events. 



Ncwljr com] ' '• '■■ -niLi-tv 

each rn. .ii. 



inc\ Mil i 
WALTER ROUNSI \ll 



^-^ 



eStner 



BLAIRSDEN. CALjIFOR 
PLUMAS COUNTY ^ . I_, » r ^ r 




SAILTO NEW YORK 



1 



See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and J 
GAY HAVANA, en route 




Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



Panama Hail Linen tr. Specialty Buih for Service in the Tropin 

TWENTY-EIGHT <la>- of purr delishl aboard ■ palatial Panama Mail liner with 
.r\rn tir\ rr-ln-hr-forciilli-n \i-il- a-lntrc at |>ioHirc.i|Ur and historic portt — Man- 
■anillo, Mexico; San Jote de Guatemala; La l.ib.-rlad, Salvador; Corinlo, 
Nirarui-ua. Two days in the Canal Zone; -re the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, 
I ristobal and historic old Panama. 

I »erj Clblll OH a Panama Mai! liner i« an ouUide one; each has on electric fan, 
.■ml there i- ■ comfortable lower bed for every pastenger. There is an orchi -Jr. i for 
■ l.iii' in- . ilrck gomei and upon* ami -all watrr swimming lank. The Panama Mail in 
unrhl-fumnuft for its food and lervice. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 



The <•..-! i- lets than j" a day fr 
iral- on -trainer. Co Ea-I l,\ Pan 
. Mile a. i3jf). (Th 



mum fir-l-cla-s pa-*ace, including bed and 
Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 



nirai- on -iramer. «..o r-a-i o\ ranama .Man anu return ny ran (or vice versa J lor 
a- little a- S3j0. I Thin price dori not include berth and hm-.iI on trains.) Panama 
Mill linen leave San Francisco ami %r« York approximately every 21 day*. Vaca- 
linn laUingl fr. m Sao l-ranri-r... JuK 21: from Loi Avngeln, two dav- later. U.-l- 
ward frum New York. July 10th, July Slst, fcugusl 28th. 



For illustrated booltlrt* 



nI further <!<■ 
I ofent or ut 



PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 



548 S. SPRING STREET 

LOS ANGELES 



2 PINE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



in HANOVER SQUARE 

NEW YORK 




EH»MI»h«d July 20. I&tt 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr from 1884 to 1926. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street, San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. PostofRce as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C 

London England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00, Foreign, one year. $6.00. Canada, one year. $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.. JULY 10, 1926 



No. 28 



A Plea for Beauty 



By Eleanore F. Ross 



Radicals are laughted at by conservatives, and conserva- 
tives are scorned by radicals; but both factions are needed in 
the general scheme of tilings. Radicals originate movements 
and social reforms which seem to the conservative to be "the 
stuff that dreams are made of," but undaunted, they ride their 
particular hobbies furiously, and eventually the conservatives 
are impressed by something or other in the radical's plea, and 
the law or amendment is passed, greatly modified, to he sure. 
but still holding some of the original meaning stressed by the 
radicals. 

* * * 

Years ago, nature lovers first emphasized, through books 
and other propaganda, the value of leaving roadside-, national 
parks and public play grounds, etc., as much a-- possible, m 
the condition in which they were first found, lor shrubbery, 
vines and trees are a protection against wash-outs, in the case 
of highways. — looking at it from a practical standpoint, — and 
forests, es everyone knows, arc ram producers; so. aside from 

merely a beauty lover's attitude, their arguments were sound. 



must he considered. The beautiful Redwood Highway, curv- 
ing up the Coast, from Sausalito to ( irant's Pass. Oregon, is 
a livng example of what can he done from a practical engineer- 
ing standpoint, added to an appreciation of natural loveliness. 
This Highway, curving in and out among redwoods which 
have stood since King Solomon's time, taking a turn here, a 
turn there, s, > that not one of these wonderful giants should he 
sacrificed, will become more famous as time goes on, until it 
will rank among world travelers, with its own peculiar ami 
inimitable qualities, with the Apian Way, of Italv. 
* * * 
In instancing huge office buildings, or apartment houses, 
which can he either hideous monstrosities looming on the skv 
line of a city, or architectural fabrics of grace and light, we 
call to mind the Telephone Building, that structure whose 
beauty is so apparent that its immediate appeal is universal. 
Another structure with obvious loveliness in all its lines, is the 
apartment house on Sacramento and .Mason streets, opposite 
the Fairmont, the later, though correct in its massive dignity, 
indicative of an earlier and less appealing architectural period. 



Still, the nature lovers fell under the ban t<\ "cranks" in their 
own special line, and were called "impractical" b\ prosaic 
utilitarians. The stretch of ground between the road and the 
property owner's fence, was scraped bare, whenever and where- 
ever road building operated, and forests have been devastated 
in a criminal and absolutely unnecessary manner, re-forestation 
until recently, in America, being an unpractieed art. 

* * * 

"Commercial" or "practical" people cherish the idea thai 
Utility and beauts are an impossible combination. Ibis idea 
is especially prevalent amongst Americans, and even a Euro- 
pean tour in cities where practical enterprises are worked out 
in a harmonious and picturesque manner, has not proved a very 
comprehensive lesson, in most cases. And still, it these same 
people c-'uU\ only analyze their admiration for European 
municipalities and European things in general, they would 
u di e that it is really a fundamental love of beaut} which an- 
nually draws the fortunates who can travel on the Continent 

frequently. 

* * * 

Gradually, the plans and schemes of nature lovers, or beaut) 

lovers are taking effect, and the opposition of utilitarians i~ 
steadils losing ground, except, of course, where common sense 



Certain precipitous streets of our city have been lately 
beautified, by zigzag curves, bordered with parkways, instead 
of the Usual ugly straight up and down formation; and the sig- 
nificant practicability of these alterations stands out prominent- 
ly, in the fact thai these particular streets are now negotiable 
by automobiles, where heretofore only pedestrians could use 
them. Lombard street, between Hyde and Leavenworth, Val- 
lejo street, between Jones and Florence I'lace. and between 
Taylor and Mason streets, and Greenwich Terrace, are only 
a few that I can now recall, but the; all register their differ- 
ent pleas tor beauty. 

* * * 

There are numerous small streets or alley ways which could 
be transformed into picturesque byways, if the residents could 
he awakened to a sense of the value of color in our <lail\ 
rather drab, and monotonous lives. 1 have been told that all 
the houses in certain districts in London boast window boxes 
riotous with flowers, in season. Here, in San Francisco, where 
anything will grow, given half a chance, window boxes are 
Conspicuous by their absence. Is laziness at the root of this 
if beauty' The landlord who beautifies his property is 
the wise landlord. Beaut) is always practical, always remun- 
erative: but until this truth seeps into the gray matter of people 
in general, it will be a world that is on!) beautiful in sp 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1926 




But who knows the place of the feehle minded in the great 
scheme of things? Who is brave enough or hold enough to 
say that he can forbid the perpetuation of life? 



William AlU-n White, clever as he is. has 
Liberty at Stake made in a few words the best analysis of 
the prohibition movement in Collier's, 
lie says, i.i effect, that the question is not a moral question. 
that it is purely an economic one, that modern machinery 
and the saloon don't go together, that the industrialists 
found that they had to have machinery going steadily, that 
therefore they made drink so expensive and hard to gel 
that the matter is solved from the economic point of view. 

On the other hand, there are many people, generally of 
the superior classes, who do not see the matter as an econ- 
omic matter, who did not suffer from alcoholism and who 
are deprived of their liberty. This class he says is in re- 
bellion, and thereupon be seems to imply that that superior 
class should give up its personal idiosyncrasies for the econ- 
omic advantage. 

It will be noted that the argument is a perfect one from the 
soviet standard of reasoning. There are no such things 
as liberty and individual taste, according to that doctrine ; 
all liberty must be merged in the mass. Whatever is econ- 
omically to the advantage of the mass, must be submitted 
to by each one of the population. 

But that is not the American doctrine. The American 
doctrine holds that each of us is entitled to life, liberty and 
the pursuit of happiness. There is more than an economic 
question involved ; there is the question of freedom of ac- 
tion, and it would be a very bad day for America should tin- 
citizens decide to lie down, as a whole, in face of any legis- 
lation which invades and destroys that liberty. 

It is the wanton aggression of the prohibition move- 
ment, with the tyrannical attempts at enforcement, that 
constitute the basis of intelligent revolt. 



The Commonwealth Club of this city 
Commonwealth Club is one of the most important of all 
Contributions our activitities. It is almost the one 

organization which tends to combat 
the extreme localization and parish patriotism to which we 
are particularly prone. It might almost be called the only 
real center of genuine modern culture in the city. 

For instance, the Commonwealth Club has lately been 
turning its attention, or rather, the attention of one of its 
sections, to Eugenics, and the result is a brochure of very 
considerable value in the consideration of what is a very 
pressing and quite difficult matter. Here one can get some 
light upon matters which have bothered most of us. quite 
a little, in our consideration of crime or poverty or such 
kindred evils which haunt us. 

We learn that from one to four per cent of all children 
are mentally deficient, which makes a large number, taking 
into consideration the size of the population. There is a 
problem which has to be met and made the best of. How 
can it be handled? Again the report of Dr. George < >rdahl 
comes to our aid — we find feeble mindedness to be about 
sixty per cent hereditary, twenty-two per cent disease or 
accident, and eighteen per cent unknown. The moron 
shows eighty-two per cent defective heredity. Therefore 
the solution of a great deal of the problem appears to lie 
in the fact thai mental defectives should not be allowed 
to pass on their defects to the future. 

The pamphlet is so fascinating that we can only refer to 
it; otherwise, we should be tempted to quote almost all 
of it, and we sincerely advise our readers to try and get it. 
Of course, the social expert says. "Stop the feeble minded 
from being parents!" It looks a very reasonable thing. 



We have had all sorts of agitation on the 
Turn About question of Chiropractics. As for the thing 
itself, it may be the quackery which those 
Opposed to it declare it to be. But it is one of the curious 
iacts of medical practice that methods, which at one time 
have been the object of ridicule, become in the course of 
time quite respectable. Homeopathy and osteopathy have, 
each in their turn, been subject to the ridicule of the learned, 
but each, in time, has acquired a certain degree of standing. 

Apart from all discussion as to the relative values of 
curative systems, a funny case occurred in southern Cali- 
fornia just recently. A regular practicing doctor undertook 
to give treatments in chiropractics to patients. Evidently, 
there must have been enough demand for the new practice 
to warrant his taking it up as other doctors have taken up 
psycho-analysis in some form or another. So, he set merrily 
to work to coin shekels out of a system universally con- 
demned by the medical fraternity. 

The chiropractors on their part, did not receive this new 
addition to their ranks with any enthusiasm. They did 
not burst into paeans of praise on account of the regular 
professional thus adopting their system. On the contrary, 
they were angry. The State Hoard of Chiropractic Examin- 
ers brought charges against the doctor and had him arrested 
and tried for practicing chiropractic, without a chiropractor's 
license. The trial took place and the chiropracticing physician 
was dismissed, and the court thereupon ruled that a doctor of 
the regular school had a perfect right, if he saw fit. to engage 
in the practice of chiropractics. 

Considering the fact that there has been a vehement war 
waged against the system by the regular medicos, it would seem 
incumbent upon them to take some action in the matter. 



We have been on the whole quite 
The Narcotic Question skeptical as to the narcotic agita- 
tion. So much has been said and 
written about it that we took the line that the narcotic ques- 
tion was. like the "white slave" agitation of a few years ago. 
rather a product of a diseased sensationalism than an actu- 
ality. 

There seems unfortunately, however, no reason to doubt the 
results of federal enquiries which appear to establish the fact 
that there is a notable increase in the use of narcotics in this 
country, particularly among the young. We should have been 
inclined to associate this with prohibition, were it not for the 
fact that tlu- age of the new addicts makes it unlikely that the) 
would have abstained from the use of narcotics, bad light al- 
coholic refreshment been available. The fact is there. It seems 
to resl upon the rather staggering and disgusting discover;. 
that the profits in the retailing of the drug are so heavy as to 
induce corrupt and unnatural men and women to engage in the 
pursuit of gain by ruining the youth. 

The India government has awakened to the wrong which is 
being done by the dissemination of mischief breeding drugs 
among the young and will allow no opium to be sold at pri- 
vate sale or to be exported during a period of ten years. The 
effect of tins prohibition of the drug should become manifest 
in that lime. 

It must be said that there has been much exaggerated talk 
about the effect of the drug upon orientals who have grown 
accustomed to its use. On the other hand, no words can he 
to,, strong for the denunciation of the sale of the dreadful 
thing to boys and girls of our own community who thus ac- 
quire a hideous and ruining vice. 



Is there a point at which amateur athletics 

Athletic Prowess cease to develop, a point beyond which 

the technical skill required removes the 



July 10, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



pfayer from the ranks of amateur, although the game is 
played without any money rewards? It is an interesting 
question. 

Amateur athletics, like all amateur pursuits, are not followed 
for anything but personal pleasure and the acquiring of a cer- 
tain degree of agility and health, so as the better to follow the 
main purposes of life. Is. an amateur who devotes his time per- 
sistently to the following of his favorite game an amateur in 
the real sense of the word, although he does not play for money 
rewards ? 

This comes from the report that one of our great American 
golf-players has repor ed himself as disgusted with the British 
players who preferred to "lose as gentlemen" rather than to 
work bard so as to acquire a conspicuously high degree of 
technical skill at the game. We have our opinion that in all 
probability, judged from a broad human standpoint, the in- 
dignation of our fellow countryman is misplaced. We think 
that most likely, from the cultural standpoint, at least, those 
men who followed the game for the sake of recreation were 
perfectly justified in refusing o put into it an amount of thought 
and energy which should go into their life-work, of which golf 
was merely the concomitant and not the master. 

We all remember the story of Herbert Spencer and the 
billiard player, who, according to the philosopher, showed such 
a diabolical skill that it was evidence in itself of a mis-spent 
youth. There is a great deal in that point of view. A game, 
after all, is only a game to an amateur, whereas, to a profes- 
sional, it is a means of livelihood. There is a limit to the 
gentlemanly pursuit of a game by an amateur and that limit is 
reached when the game demands more than recreational at- 
tention. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



During the last drive for the 
Community Chest Reform Community Chest we took n 

rather critical attitude, which 
brought us a certain amount of ill will, While we approved 
of the main objects of the Chest and regarded the concen- 
tration with a certain degree of approval, we felt that there 
were very obvious defects in the management. The rest 
of the citizens, to a great extent, agreed with us and, as a 
result, the amount contributed fell largel) short of the re- 
quired sum. 

Now we see that the organization itself has profite 1 by tin- 
criticism and there is a new organization scheme designed to 
save expenditure and to make the work much more effective. 
The amalgamation of the Community Chest and the Council 
of Social and Health Agencies into one organized body, will go 
a lung wav to achieving the results aimed at and we are glad to 

see that such amalgamation has received the approval of the 

directors of both organizations. 

William 11. Crocker, president of the Community Chest, 
has stated that the purpose of the amalgamation is to bring 
about greater economy and simplicity in dealing with the prob- 
lems of the city and to create also a greater and closer co- 
operation between the donors and the social workers who carry 
out the remedial work of organized charity. 

Mr. Crocker has hit the nail on the head. This co-operation 
is the crying need, of our present organize I charity movement. 
We need that the gifts of our donors should be well adminis- 
tered and thai social workers who are no more immune to pro 
fessional faults than the rest of us. should learn to administer 
the funds economically and satisfactorily. We need to be as- 
sured that the poor, not institutions, are to be the real bene- 
ficiaries. 



lohn L. McXah heads the San Francisco committee for 
Chief Justice William II. Waste for the Supreme Curt, ac- 
cording to announcement made yesterday. "1 he list of vice- 
presidents includes the names of two former justices oMhe 
Supreme Court besides many prominent leaders in san 
Francisco jcivic life. 

Campaign headquarters have been established in Room 
408 Crocker Building. 



In order to prevent secret treaties, why not employ wo- 
men as diplomats? — Florence (Ala.) Herald. 

Since the war, people no longer use substitutes for food 
except at afternoon teas. — Peoria Star. 

* * * 

The adjective in "cheap politics" doesn't refer to what it 
costs the taxpayer. — Palatka (Fla.) News. 

* * * 

Another disadvantage of being fat is that you seem to 
be pouting when you're being dignified. — Vallejo (Cal.) 
Chronicle. 

* * * 

Matrimony is a good thing. A man who is raising a family 
isn't raising what Dante saw. — Brockville (Out.) Recorder. 

Eventually the only unused timber in America will be 
the political platform. — Publishers Syndicate (Chicago). 

* *■ * 

We read of a new roller-skating rink, "capable of seating 
2,000 people," probably intended only for beginners. — Flo- 
rence (Ala.) Herald. 

*■■*-■# 

America's chewing-gum bill in the last year was $90.- 
000,000, exclusive of the cost of gasoline necessary to re- 
move it from the trousers. — Detroit News. 

* * * 

By killing their latest victim near a cemetery, the Chi- 
cago gangsters are beginning to show some consideration 
for the overworked morticians. — St. Louis Star. 

* * * 

Mrs. Ruth Bryan < )wen came out second in a Florida 
contest for Congress; thus keeping up a charming family 

custom. — The New Yorker. 

* * * 

Speaking of variety, there is the story you tell friends 
about the smash-up, and the one you tell when you trade 
the car in. — La Grange (Ga.) Reporter. 

* -s * 

To win in a primary these days a candidate must be a 
chameleon that looks wet to the wets, dry to the drys, like a 
friend of the fanner in the country and like a friend of the 
consumer in the cities. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

* * * 

"Fifty years from now," says Booth Tarkington. "the 
skirt as an article of women's apparel will have disappeared 
entirely." Will it take that long to go the little that re- 
mains of the journey? — San Francisco Bulletin. 

* * * 

The Crown Princess of Sweden admits that she considers 
the most interesting sight about New York the silken legs 
of the women. What a beautiful unanimity of thought 
there must be in the royal family. — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

Why They Are So Savory 
Little Boy (after learning about Lot's wife) — "Mummy, 
is all salt made of ladies?" — Punch. 

* * * 

Oscar's Careless Way 
Suspensions of automobile licenses announced from the 
office of the State Motor Vehicle Bureau at Montpelier are 
of i '-car N — , for an indefinite period because he has been 
charged with careless and negligent driving in running over 
his wife. — Vermont paper. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1926 




Pleasure's Ww 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

_ 75m Moore. 




Is California a 
Real Theater Hub? 

SOME "lie said, nut long ago, that 
California was getting to be a the- 
ater hub. 

Heath Cobb made such a statement 
at a Shrine luncheon, lecently, and told 
the assembled men that here in this 
state had been organized and devel- 
oped many theatrical companies achiev- 
ing national fame. 

As Pacific Coast producer, his word 
has weight. 

He cited as examples: "Abie's Irish 
Rose;" "Topsy and Eva;" and "White 
Cargo" among others, adding that af- 
ter their success here, they had regis- 
tered high in eastern theatrical fields. 

Wilkes 

Pauline Frederick, the beautiful and 
brilliant star, will appear at the Wilkes 
theater, Monday evening. July 11, in 
Sidney Howard's play : "Lucky Sam Mc- 
Carver." 

John Cromwell, who created the role 
in which he will apear, has also staged 
the play. It is a fascinating, intriguing 
romance which begins in a New \ ork 
Night Club. 

The charming star has a convincing 
and commanding characterization and 
portrays with skill the part in which 
she has scored great success. 

Supporting Pauline Frederick, are 
Howard Nugent, Charlotte Granville, 
Eugene Bordon, Claire de Brey, < Hat 
Hvtten, John Merkyl. Frank Elliott 
and Cyril Weld. 

* * * 
Curran 

"Tip-Toes," another Louis O. Mac- 
loon musical coined}- has captured the 
town. The opening night of Monday 
last registered the first showing of this 
sparkling musical hit outside of New 
York. 

Macloon has been transporting Broad 
way to (ieary street of late — with some 
of the best musical comedy offerings 
of the season and San Franciscans have 
manifested their gratitude by packing 
the theaters. 

Lively entertainment, extravagantly 
and luxuriously staged, with four come- 
dians heading the company and twen- 
ty-five well trained boys and girls mak- 
ing up a glorious chorus, are included 
in "Tip-Toes" the present Curran at- 
traction. 

It has been said that Macloon spent 



By "Jingle" 

some $50,000 on the settings, the cos- 
tumes and the production. The state- 
ment is surely not an exaggerated one, 
for "Tip-Toes" is all that has been pro- 
claimed for it in every way. Don't miss 
the Curran this week. You'll like 

every bit of it from start to finish! 
* * * 

Columbia 

Margaret Anglin and Blanche Bates. 
two of the greatest stage stars today 
and both prime favorites with every 
Californian, as well as with seasoned 
theater goers, are giving us a marvel- 
ous treat. 

These two remarkable actresses op- 
ened their dual appearance at the Co- 
lumbia theater last Tuesday night. Miss 
Anglin appearing in "Caroline" by W. 
Somerset Maughan. author of "Rain;" 
and Miss Bates taking the leading role 
in a one-act comedy, "Peg, the Act- 
ress." 

Monday night the noted women stars 
will appear in Bernard Shaw's comedy. 
"Candida." with Miss Anglin playing 
the title role and Blanche Bates appear- 
ing as "l'rossy." 

Another week's schedule is an- 
nounced as containing the Sardou 
comedy. "Divorcons" with Miss Bates 
taking the character part of Cyprienne ; 
and the Shaw production. "Man of 
Destiny" staring Margaret Anglin as 
the masquerading Lady. 

Brilliant audience of the literati and 
society folks from many parts of the 
State have greeted the famous act- 
resses in the unusual co-starring here. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

Louis John Bartels is making a de- 
cided impression at the Alcazar in his 
original role at the Henry Duffy the- 
ater in that amusing comedy. "The 
Show ( iff." Bartels has proved an un- 
disputed drawing-card to the popular 
O Farrell street play house and is 
packing the theater. No wonder, for 
the play is decidedly funny, clever and 
interesting. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

There will be an all-new bill in sup- 
port of Fannie Brice for the week which 
begins with the Saturday matinee, with 
such stars as Gordon Dooley and Mar- 
tha Morton presenting new comedy- 
songs and dances; Wally Sharpies who 
invites every one to "Smile Awhile" 
with his company of artists including 



Al Creen, Jack Hughes, Beatrice Gay, 
Lillian Gordone, Eva Knapp and Kath- 
ryn McLaughlin ; Dollie and Billie, sis- 
ters, the two American girls from Eng- 
lish music halls, in comedy, singing 
and talking; "The Littlejohn's." a team 
of Americans who have been scoring 
abroad in "Displaying Jewels;" Fern 
Redmond and 11. Wells in something 
different; and the team of Arthur and 
Darling, will complete this enticing bill 
of vaudeville variety. 

* * * 
President 

"Love 'Liu and Leave "Em," the story 
of two sisters, both employed in the 
same department store, their romances 
and their experiences, continues to at- 
tract large audiences at the Henry Duf- 
fy theater, the President, on McAllis- 
ter street near Market. 

Isabel Withers, Betty Laurence, Wil- 
liam Rainey and Kenneth Daigneau, 
head the competent cast and present 
their characterizations with such smooth 
skill and artistry that the play is a 
constant delight. Besides, there is just 
a barrel of fun in this wholesome come- 
dy. 

* * * 

Warfield 

"The Wilderness Woman" which 
comes to the Warfield for a week com- 
mencing Saturday, July 10, will feature 
the San Francisco star, Aileen Pringle. 
in one of the most unusual characteriz- 
ations of her screen career. 

Lowell Sherman plays opposite Miss 
Pringle and Chester Conklin is a prin- 
cipal. It is a story of the amusing ad- 
ventures of an Alaskan miner and his 
daughter. Laughter and thrills are 
well divided. 

In the first part of the picture, Miss 
Pringle appears dressed in mail-order 
garments of 1903. Her out-of-Style at- 
tire is immensely amusing. Then, lat- 
er, she appears in wonderful creations 
of a Parisian modiste. 

* * * 

State Presentations 

( )n the stage at the Warfield this 
coming week, the Fancbon and Marco 
offering is the third annual Radio Idea. 
Actual broadcasting is done from the 
stage — there is no speaking over the 
footlights — all being through a micro- 
phone. Another popular program will 
be given by Walt Roesner and his 
Super-Soloists. 



July 10, 1926 



rHESAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

»EXT WEEK 



ROYAL { 

Polk nr. California ( 



ON THE STAGE 



ALCAZAR I "The Show Off" 
O'Farrell nr. Powell ( Louis John Bnrtels 


COLUMBIA ' Margaret Anglin*Blanche Bates 
70 Eddy | "Candida" 


CURRAN t ••Till Toes" 
Geary nr. Mason ( Musical Comedy 


PRESIDENT I "V"»t' E Em" d 
McAllister nr Mkt. f Henry Duffy™ arcc 


WILKES I Pauline Frederick 
Ueary at Mason ( .'Lucky Sam McCarver" 


VAUDEVILLE 


UOLDEN GATE ( '" Smith and Charley Dale. 

G. G. Ave. & Taylor f - - „ "f dl '" ers - 

) Frank De Vnc — Earl and Bob. 


ORPHEUM I Fannie Brice. Headliner 
O'Farrell & Powell f All New Bill 


PANTAGES(NEW) ( Vaudeville and 
Market at Hyde j GeorKes Carpentler 


PORTOLA ( _ , ,,, „, . 
Market near 4th j Vaudeville-Pictures 


UNION SQUARE ( Vaudevllle-PIcturea 
O'Farrell nr. Powell ( 


WIGWAM I „ . ,„ „, . 
Mission and 22nd t Vnudevllle-Pletures 


ON THE SCREEN 
DOWN TOWN 


CALIFORNIA ( "Yellow Finger." 
Market at 4th ( Max Dolin and OrcheHtra 


. "The Nut-Craekcr." Snn. to 
CAMEO ( Thurs., and Harr) Langdon in 
Market opp. 5th i "Remember When." "Cheek- 

' ered Flag," Thurs.. Sat. 


CAPITOL | ' ,Tn « Wandering Jew," One 

Fills nr. Market ( Ws* Only. Rndolnh and 
) Joseph Shildkraut. 


CASINO I Pictures 
Ellis and Mnsou ( 


GRANADA ( "Good and Nnuahty" 
Market at Jones St. \ Poln Netrri 


IMPERIAL ( Emil Janning.-Lya de Putti 
Market bet. eth-Tth j "Variety" 


LOEWS WARFIELD I "Wilderness Woman* 1 
Market at Taylor C Alleen Prlnirle 


ST. FRANCIS I "The Flaming 
Market bet. 5tb-6th f Frontier" 


RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS 


J Pictures 
ALEXANDRIA I Ben Blnck and 
Genry and lStb. J HI, B n „,| 


J Pictures 
COLISEUM } Milt Franklyn and 
Clement & Kth Ave. ) His Band 


HAIGHT ( Pictures 
Hnlirtat at Cole j Pictures 


n timiM 1 Pictures 
DKi.adero at H.ye. \ B *"^l5.™ ^ 


IrVingatlotbAve. J W«t-»« 


MAJESTIC 

Mission between Pictures 

•2nih and 21st 


METROPOLITAN I Picture. 
1 nlon nr. Fillmore J 


NEW BAl.llO V Picture. 
11.11.... « SSth Ave. f Picture. 


NEW FILLMORE ( 

Fillmore near Ellis i Picture. 


NF.W MISSION ( 

Mission nr. 22nd ( Pictures 



California 

"Yellow Fingers," Gene Wright's 
novel of the Malay Archipelago, is now 
playing at the California. 

Olive Borden plays the girl, who, 
when she learns that she is a half-caste, 
turns all native, to become the wild 
dancing beauty of the tropical isle. 
Max Dolin will conduct the California 
Orchestra in a series of musical pre- 
sentations. A new and distinctly novel 
number will be the first of a series of 
song pictures, "Songs of Ireland." 

* * * 
Imperial 

"Variety," a picture of the show 
world, continues its run at the Imperial. 

Emil Jannings, Lya de Putti and 
Warrick Ward have the leading roles 
in the remarkable photoplay and con- 
stitute the triangle on which its plot is 
based. Jannings and Ward are part- 
ners in a trapeze act in which Ward 
makes dizzy somersaults to his part- 
ner's hands. Miss de Putti is Jannings' 
wife in the story. This is truly one of 
the outstanding film productions of the 
year. 

Harry Langdon is also on the pro- 
gram in his first full length comedy, 
"There She Goes." 



Golden Gate 

Heading the Golden Gate bill this 
week are Joe Smith and Charles Dale, 
Hebrew comedy actors appearing with 
the Avon Comedy Four. Their act is 
an abbreviated musical comedy in five 
scenes that takes the audience from 
"The Battery to the Bronx." 

( >n the screen there is "The Boob," 

a comedy drama, featuring Gertrude 
Olmstead, George K. Arthur, Joan 

Crawford, and Charles Murray. 

The Two 1 [arlequins are clown acro- 
bats and gymnasts who mix comedy 
with their clever feats. Claude Sweet- 
en and his orchestra and Grace Rollins 
Hunt with an organ solo, complete the 
program, in addition to the short film 
Features and news of the hour. 



Cameo 

The popular motion picture house on 
Market street, where the Came., is 
screening two changes of photoplays a 
week, will offer for the four days, start- 
ing Sunday, as its next picture. Samuel 
S. Hutchinson's production, "The Nut- 
cracker." with Edward Everett Hor-j 
ton the star, and Mae Busch playing 
the heroine. ; 

"The Nut-Cracker" will run Sunday < 
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday am," 
a- an additional attraction the theater. 



is offering, also, Harry Langdon in 
his hilarious photoplay, "Remember 
When." 

"The Checkered Flag" will be 
screened Thursday, Friday and Sat- 
urday, with Elaine Hammerstein the 
star supported by a cast including Wal- 
lace MacDonald, Lionel Belmore, Rob- 
ert ( )ber, Peggy O'Neil and Lee Shum- 
way. In this picture, Miss Hammer- 
stein portrays a girl who risks her life 
to save the fortunes of the man she 
loves even though he believes her guil- 
ty of a crime she did not commit. 

* * * 
St. Francis 

"The Flaming Frontier" will be 
shown at the St. Francis theater, be- 
ginning on Saturday. There is an army 
of men and Indians in this photoplay, 
directed by Edward Sedgwick. 

Scenes in this picture depict the war- 
fare of redmen and whites and its 
screen showing commemorates the 
battle of Little Big Horn, at which 
General Custer and many of his brave 
men were sacrificed in the savage In- 
dian encounters. 

* * * 
Granada 

Tola Negri, in "Good and Naughty," 
will be the next attraction at the Gran- 
ada theater in a story filmed from Av- 
ery Hopwood's lively farce. The allur- 
ing 1'ola is said to have a particularly 
suitable character part in tbis picture. 

Tom Moore plays opposite Miss Ne- 
gri and Ford Sterling has an important 
role. Malcolm St. Clair directed the 
photoplay with its splendid settings 
and sustaining cast. Jack Partington 
will present "Talking to the Moon" as 
one of the excellent stage attractions 
with a number of specialty artists ap- 
pearing in conjunction with Don \\ ilk - 
rns ami the Synco-Symphonists. 

* * * 
Capitol 

"The Wandering Jew" will be 
screened at the Capitol theater begin- 
ning Sunday. July 11. with Rudolph 
and Joseph Shildkraut. the stars in a 
dramatic photoplay, depicting an in- 
cident in the life of Dr. Theodore Herzl. 
I The picture is scheduled for the one 
ITweek. 

(Continued on Page 14) 



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THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Will the Prince of Wales 
Wed the Princess of Spain? 

The question uppermost in high society just now appears 
to be: Will the Prince of Wales marry Infanta Beatrice, 
Princess of Spain? . 

Newspapers in Paris, as well as those published in Spain, 
have time-to-time announced the imminent engagement, 
stating that King Alfonso and the Queen are discussing the 
marriage with King George and Queen Mary. 

Perhaps, by the time this issue of the News Letter is 
off the press, the world at large may know whether or not 
the marriage of the Prince of Wales and the Princess of 

Spain is to be. 
r * * * 

London Fetes 

The social season in London is in full swing. 

Marlborough House, long in preparation for the London 
season, has been beautified and it is said there never was a 
more magnificent staging of society events. 

The Prince of Wales is being assisted by Princess Mary 
in entertaining and it is said that there are no less than 
fifteen royal hostesses in London who are taking part in 
the social season. 

Princess Mary Lascelles gave the initial event at Crewe 
House, the town residence. The Princess Royal, Princess 
Louise and Princess Arthur of Connaught have presided at 
their town houses, entertaining royally. 

Lady Patricia Ramsay, well known as "Princess Pat," has 
been entertaining extensively. Then, too, Princess Be- 
atrice entertains frequently. Lady Maud Carnegie and 
Dowager Marchioness of Milford have presided at beauti- 
ful society events, adding to the London season of this 
year's brilliancy and distinction. 



Distinguished Guest Accorded 
Great Tributes 

The rousing welcome and its attendant events given in 
honor of Major-General Umberto Nobile, designer and 
pilot of the dirigible Norge, included cheers and "Bravos" 
by his countrymen. 

The noted visitor who piloted the dirigible to the North 
Pole and back again last May under the leadership of Cap- 
tain Roald Amundsen, was the guest of honor at a large 
banquet given by the Italian people of this city, Dr. An- 
tonio Rosset, Italian Consul of San Francisco presiding at 
the feast staged in the famous Italian quarter. 

Dr. Rosset presented Nobile a gift from the Italian ad- 
mirers of the celebrated navigator, amid a veritable storm 
of cheers, vivas and salvos. An ovation seldom known 
followed the presentation. 

Mayor James Rolph Jr. and Mrs. Rolph gave a delightful 

reception at their home on San Jose Avenue, preceding the 

banquet for Major-General Nobile, by his great admirers of 

the Italian colony. 

* * * 

The presence of Major-General Umberto Nobile in our 
city created considerable interest socially, although he was 
so busily engaged accepting official invitations that with 
one exception he had no opportun ity to be the guest of the 
fashionable set. 

Major-General Nobile is regarded as quite the most ro- 
mantic figure that has paid a visit to San Francisco in many 



moons. Although he designed the Norge and piloted it 
over the North Pole, he is most unassuming in manner, 
after the nature of all great men or women. 

* * * 
Garden Event for Noted 

Norge Visitor 

Mrs. George Armsby gave a memorable garden party 
and tea at the Armsby home in Hillsborough in honor of 
Major-General Nobile. Invitations were hurriedly sent out 
and the event was delightfully informal and charming. 

Tea was served oa the terrace of the exquisite country 
home and most of the afternoon was passed out-of-doors. 
Some of the guests in attendance were : Messrs. and Mes- 
dames Templeton Crocker, William H. Crocker, Walter S. 
Martin, George A. Newhal!, Frederick McNear, Joseph 
Oliver Tobin, Cyril Tobin, Raymond Welch. 

* * * 

Mrs. Mortimer T. Babcock was hostess at an attractively 
arranged luncheon on Thursday at the Fairmont Hotel, in- 
viting a group of friends to meet Mrs. C. M. Mills of Roches- 
ter, New York, her house guest. 

The table decorations were carried out in red, white and 
blue flowers in honor of the Fourth of July Holiday, the 
place cards were hand-painted flags and favors in keeping 
with the occasion were given each guest. 

The members of the party included in addition to the 
hostess and complimented guest : 

Mrs. Warren Lee McEvven, Mrs. Reginald Austin, Mrs. 
Anna Lanfenberg, Mrs. T. Park Jacobs. Mrs. Anne Ries 
White, Miss Jean Parker McEwen. Mrs. Earle Clemmens, 
Mrs. T. H. Gl'asford, Mrs. K. A. Stillson. 



Ccuntess and Fiance Receive 
World-wide Congratulations. 

Congratulations from distinguished people from many 
parts of the world are reaching the beautiful Countess Flo- 
renza K. de Zarubi Nicolai, formerly of Paris, and Senov 
Don Carlos J. Monsalve, Yice-Gmsul of Peru, upon the an- 
nouncement of their engagement. 

The reception and betrothal party given at the Fairmont 
Hotel 1)}- Mrs. Rosetta Baker in honor of the prominent 
engaged couple was the occasion for a brilliant gathering. 

In the receiving line with Countess Nicolai and Senor 
Monsalve were Mrs. R. Rixrath, wife of the Consul-Gen- 
eral of Peru; Honorable Prosper Reiter, Consul of Luxem- 
burg and Mrs. Reiter; Honorable Edmundo Solorzano Diaz. 
Consul General of Nicaragua, and Mrs. Diaz and Mr. and 
Mrs. C. L. Faflin Jr.. Messrs. and Mesdames Martial Da- 
voust, Emilie Blanckenburg, Clayton C. Sauter. D. C. de- 
Harte, and Mesdames Henry Mortimer Hastings, John 
Payne. 

Assisting Mrs. Baker in the courtesies of the betrothal 

reception and ball were: Mr. and Mrs. William B. Poyner, 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Silva, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hauser and 

Mr. Clem T. Rees. 

* * * 

Brilliant Gathering 

More than three hundred members of the Delta Zetas 

sorority gathered at the Fairmont Hotel this past week for 

their national convention. Mu Chapter of the University 

of California acted as hostess for the convention. 



July 10, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Founded in South 

Though by no means entirely Southern in 
its affiliations, the Delta Zeta sorority was 
founded at Miami University, Fla., in 1902, 
and gained its early strength in the South. A 
large proportion of the delegates arriving yes- 
terday were from the South. There are now 
forty-seven active chapters widely scattered 
through the South, Middle West and Pacific 
Coast. 

An elaborate Chinese banquet with oriental 
atmosphere prevailing and dishes of the choic- 
est cuisine known to the orientals was a novel- 
ty of the convention. The Terrace Room of 
the Fairmont Hotel, which lends itself to ar- 
tistic decoration of many designs and motifs 
was used for a setting and the effect was not 
only gorgeous but the last word in Oriental 
luxury. 




Local Committee 

An efficient local committee directed the con- 
vention, for while the purposes of the Delta 
Zeta convention were profound and direct in 
procedure, yet a schedule of festivities along fascinating- 
lines had been prepared for the national delegates. 

The local committee comprised: Mrs. Margaret Pope 
Fraser, Mrs. Helen Wetzel Pearce, Mrs. Geraldine King 
Thompson and the Misses Winona Jones, Helen Bell, Edith 
Daseking, Ileen Taylor, Grace Hutchinson, Nancy Web- 
ster, Alice Nelson, Martha Leary, Dorothy Morton, Ger- 
aldine Warford and Martha Kate Powers. 

National officers presiding at the notable convention 
which made record for supremacy of thought and sincerity 
of assemblage included : Mrs. Julia Bishop Coleman, presi- 
dent, Loveland, O. ; Mrs. Anne Simmons Friedline. vice- 
president, Colorado Springs, Colo.; Mrs. Edith Wilson 
Thoesen, secretary, Boulder, Colo.; and Mrs. Myrtle Graet- 
er Malott, treasurer, San Antonio, Tex. 

The charm and beauty of the cultured delegates made 
deep impression upon the community, for the young women 
gave glowing evidence of their Sorority ideals and the reai 
purposes for which they were assembled. 

Seldom has this city, center of numerous world-wide 
events, furthered a more brilliant gathering than the recent 
convention of Delta Zetas, during their National assemblage 
at the Fairmont Hotel on lovely Nob Mill. 



Week-End Parties 
Add Much Gayety 

Del Monte and Pebble Beach were gayer than ever over 
the Independence Day week-end. practically every cottage 
and private home being the scene for festivities. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmunds Lyman have been hosts to friends 
continuously since taking possession of their new Pebble 

Beach home. Others who have been entertaining arc Mi- 
ami Mrs. Harry Hunt, Mr. and Mrs. George Gordon Moore 
and Mr. and Mrs. Atholl McBean, 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilder Bowers, who returned from a vaca- 
tion at the Flvcasting Club near Tnnkce. left for Del Monte 
for another jaunt 

The Misses Mary and Margaret McCormick are at Car- 
inel, and Mrs. Alden Ames is how established at Carmel for 
a month. 



HOTEL CANTERBURY 
TSO Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria. California 

On Ihr Const Highway Halfway B'twren San Franfi.ro and Lo. An«elr> 

An Inn of Inuiual Excrllfnc* 

Wire or Mfiie lor rcteriationa on your net trip south 



Wawona appears to be one of the favored 
spots for summer holidays this year. 

Among those at the big trees resort for a 
few days or longer are Mr. and Mrs. William 
Burd, who motored to the resort ; Mr. and Mrs. 
John N. Wilhoit, Mr. and Mrs. Garret McEn- 
einey, who are at Wawona with their niece 
and nephew, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Teague of 
Santa I 'aula; Colonel and Mrs. Charles E. 
Stanton and Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Moore and 
Miss Marion Moore. 

* * * 

Country clubs have been a lure over the holi- 
days, and gatherings either at the club houses 
for the day or the week-end caused a general 
exodus to out-of-door places. 

A golf tournament at the Burlingame Coun- 
try Club, and the dedication of the new pool 
at the Menlo Club attracted society folks "over 
the Fourth." 

< )ne of the largest of these events was staged 
at the Burlingame residence of Mr. and Mrs. 
George Kleiser, who gave a barbecue to more 
than two hundred friends. 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz of San Mateo, gave an 
OUt-of-door supper party Sunday evening to a number of 
friends, providing special entertainment features. 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Flood, who make their home at the 
Fairmont Hotel, motored to San Diego last week, to pay a 
visit to their son Mr. ( Irmond Flood and his wife at their 
San Diego home. 

Closely following the announcement of the engagement of 
Mrs. Catherine Traynor Johnson of Piedmont and Mr. How- 
ard Charles Page, official of Standard < )il company of New- 
York, at a beautiful luncheon given at the Fairmont Hotel, 
came their we Iding, which took place last Saturday in the home 
of the bride. The newly welded went directly to Del Monte 
for a brief stay, intending to go to New York and then to Eu- 
rope on an extended honevmoon. 

The luncheon at tlie Fairmont was a lovely affair, with the 
tables handsomely decora'.ed with two bank> of flowers at 
either end ami dainty cards announcing the happy news. Guests 
include I : Mesdames Charles Stuart Wallace. (I. II. Corse Jr., 
Thomas Traynor, Paul Gripper, Florence Williams Loser, 
Lloyd Franklyn Brown Sawyer, Thomas Traynor Jr.. May- 
belle Mitchell ile Nio, Katberine Eggleston Holmes. Roy Stein- 
er, J. E. W'ieder. W. E. Mcl.ellan. Helen Williams. Jack Dil- 
lon, Grace Leland and Misses Marion Traynor, Margaret 
Wie ler ami Jeanette Traynor. 

* * * 
Spcrts at Feather River Inn 

The tournament of special golf events at Feather River Inn 
i> already under way on the Inn course, which is considere.1 
the finest mountain gi If course in Western America. 

Fishing in Gold Lake is another of the popular -port diver- 
sions at the Inn this season. 

A. B. Soroni ami II. Silverman, who yearly are champion 
anglers of the Inn colony, have had exceptional success already. 
tin- season, 

Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Pardovi are among the enthusiastic golf- 
er-, entered in the tournament. 

Prominent families, who have taken chalet- for the season, 
(Continued on Page 18) 



l! 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

:. ii 1'usli Street. Between Powell and Stockton. San FrancUro 
Telephone Suttel 
HOWARD T. BI.ETHEN. Proprietor 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1926 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




New ideas are always acceptable in 
the radio world and improvements in 
receiving sets are being made all the 
time that tend to better conditions ma- 
teriallv. 




C. J. Pennington 

But it is a distinctly new experience 
to find among radio advertisers one 
who is willing to donate an hour's pro- 
gram each week and insist upon the 
announcer making only the most limiteil 
use of his name. The firm of Wright, Al- 
exander & Greeley, investment bank- 
ers, with main offices in the Pershing 
Square Building, Los Angeles, and 19 
offices throughout the Pacific coast, i> 
the first to set a precedent in a genuine 
musical program in addition to giving 
the public information regarding in- 
vestments that is designed to assist 
them in the choice of the must sound 
securities. 

Too Much at Times 
Radio listeners as well as radio sta- 
tions are aware that there is a tendency 
among business concerns to remind 
the public that they are indebted to 
Such and Such a Company for a cer- 
tain program. This fact is reiterated 
in some cases as many as seven or 
eight times during an hour. This ten- 
dency of advertisers has, in a measure, 
gone a long way toward spoiling what 
otherwise would have been a verv fine 
musical hour. 

It is gratifying, therefore, to have a 
company giving a musical program and 
a talk insist that the announcer shall 
mention its name only at the beginning 
and at the end of the program. It is 
the writer's judgment that this comp- 
any has established a precedent that 
will be followed by many others in the 
future. 

Only Best Talent 

It is obviously impossible for any 
single company "to broadcast through- 
out the day and evening — seven days 



a week — and give to the public a char- 
acter of entertainment that is interest- 
ing and entertaining. 

Radio stations are operated at enor- 
mous expense, and it is necessary to 
sell half-hour and hour programs to 
various companies. In this manner the 
radio stations can give to listeners the 
finest form of amusement and informa- 
tion. 

The day of the amateur donating his 
services is over, and radio stations are 
now seeking the highest paid singers 
and entertainers. 

Each succeeding week's program 
.sees an important change for the better 
and radio is becoming more and more 
an important factor in culture and edu- 
cation. 

Look this Over 

A new 110-volt tube known as the 
"Lestron." operating from either alter- 
nating or direct current without the 
use of a transformer, and completely 
eliminating the A. C. hum, has been 
developed. 

The use of this tube in a receiving 
set eliminates both "A" and "B" bat- 
teries, having the combined features of 
rectifier, detector, oscillator to radio-fre- 
quency amplifier. It can be used as a 
power amplifier having an amplifica- 
tion factor of 8. 

The tube has a metallic base which 
is used as a fifth connection to the tube 
known as a cathode, and is used to con- 
trol the electronic emission in the tube. 
A plate voltage up to 200 volts may be 
applied to the tube, without danger of 
ove - heating. 

The cost of operating the tube is said 
to be about one cent per hour for a five 
tube set. The life of the tube is estim- 
ated to be the same as the present 
tubes which operate from batteries. 



Another New One 
A new A-C Dayton receiver has been 
placed on the market incorporating 
second stage tuning. This stage per- 
fo-ms as though there were two sets in 
the cabinet. 

Where conditions require sharp se- 
lective tuning, the first stage tuning is 
adjusted and then the second stage is 
brought into phase. This compensates 
for the differences in aerial, tubes, bat- 
teries, interference and other factors 
which may exist between actual oper- 
ating conditions in the owner's hands 
and conditions under which the set has 
been tested and balanced in the labora- 
tories. 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO — 428.3 

Sunday* July 11 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Non-sectarian church ser- 
vice. 

10:45 a. m. — U. S. Weather forecast, amuse- 
ment and general information. 

2:45 p. m. — Piay by play broadcast from Re- 
creation Park of the baseball game. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

0:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Orchestra. 

6:30 p. m. — Baseball scores, amusement and 
general information. 

6:35 to s:35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

S:35 to 10:00 p. in. — Rudy Seiger's Fairmont 
I lotel Orchestra. 

Mondayi July l'J 

7:00. 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises 
given by the V. M. C. A. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, amuse- 
ment and general information. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
[ngr; weather and market reporta 

1 to 2:00 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Fairmont 

Hotel Orchestra. 

2:30 to 3:30 p. m. — Matinee program by Kane's 
I- iawaiians. 

3:3ii to 3:40 p. m. — 'Breath ,,f the Avenue" 
fashion notes. 

3:4" to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chesti a. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 8.-30 p. m. — .Stock market quotations, 

baseball semes, market reports. 
>'> 3ii t,. , ::ii p. m. — Orchestra, 
7:00 to 7:::o p. m, — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

8 "ii In 0:0" p. m. — Orchestra. 

9 .3" in 10:00 p. m. — Program. 

10:00 I" 11:"" P. m.— orchestra. 

Tuesday, July l'.i 

7:00, 7:80, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, market 
reports, etc. 

12:"0 noon — Time signals; weather and mar- 
ket reports. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Fairmont 
Hotel Orchestra. 

2:43 p. m. — Broadcast from Recreation Park 
of the baseball game 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:3" to 7:"li J), m. — Orchestra. 

7:0" to 7:3" p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Fairmont 

Hotel Orchestra. 
B "" lo 0:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
0:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 
1":' 11:"" P in. — Palace Hotel Ki.se Room 

I lance Orchestra. 
Wednesday. July 14 

7:00, 7:3". 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

Hi 3" a. m. — C, S. weather forecast, market 
reports, etc. 

12:0(1 noon — Time signals; weather and mar- 
ket reports. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Fairmont 
Hotel ' irrhest ra. 

2:1". p. m — Broadcast from Recreation Park 
of the baseball game. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
ch.es! i a 

3:3" to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

8:15 in 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations 
baseball scores. 

6:3" to 7:"" p. m. — Orchestra. 

7:"" to 7:30 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Fairmont 
Orchestra. 

vim 1.. 9:00 p. m. — Pri gram 

oil" to 10:00 p. m. — Program for the Club 
Farallon. 

1":"" I" 11 p. m. — Orchestra. 

Thursday, July lli 

7:"0. 7:30. 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — V. .S. weather forecast, mark,: 
reports, amusement and general informa- 
tion, 

12:00 noon — Time signals; weather and mar- 
ket reports. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Fairmont 
Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Broadcast of the baseball game 
from Recreation Park. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market Quotations, 
baseball scores. 



July 10, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



Radio Program for Next Week 



6:3(1 to 7.00 p. m. — Orchestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Fairmont 

Hotel Orchestra. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program for the George 

\V. Caswell Coffee Company, featuring the 

KPO String Quartet. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance Orchestra. 
Friday. July 1« 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 
10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, market 

reports, etc. 
12:00 noon — Time signals; weather and mar- 
ket reports. 
12:45 p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club 

luncheon. 
1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Fairmont 

Hotel Orchestra. 
2:45 p. m. — Broadcast of the baseball game 

from Recreation Park. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 
5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 
6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 

baseball scores, market reports. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra. 
7:00 to 7:10 p. m. — -"Sports on the Air." 
7:10 to 7:20 p. m. — Business and investment 

talk. 
7:20 to 7:25 p. m. — Chamber of Commerce talk 

on "Industrial San Francisco.'' 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Ko.se Kn 

Dance Orchestra. 
9:10 to 9:20 p. m. — Book Reviews. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra. 

Saturday. July 17 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 p. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, market 
reports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals; weather and mar- 
ket reports. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Fairmont 
Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Broadcast of the baseball game 
from Recreation Park. 

4:80 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, market reports. 

6:30 to 7:20 p. m. — Orchestra. 

7:20 to 7:30 p. m. — Talk on Real Estate. 

S:00 tn 12:00 p. m. — Orchestra. 



KFRC— CITY OF PARIS DRY GOODS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 270.1 

Sunday. July 11 

6 ;80 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen." 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance Music, from Bal- 

conadi'S Ballroom. 
>l»nday, July I- 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Household Hints 

1:80 to 5:30 p. m.— Dance music. 

5:30 to 6:80 p, m. — A. F. Merell and his Stamp 

Club. 
6:3o p. m. — '"The Stage and Screen." 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Jo Mendel! and his Pep 

Band, 

7:00 i" 7:30 p. m.- I '. (fellow's Ad P 

8:00 In !*:(>>> p. m. — Around the Camp Kir.-. 
9:00 (n 9:80 p. m.— KFRC Hawaiian*. 
Tuesday, July 18 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Ma.- and his Gang 

t; :3o p. in. — "Ttir Stage and Screen. 

6:80 i" 7:00 p m, -Program of popular songs. 

; :00 t<> ::ai p. m. — Goodfellow'a \.i P 

8:00 to 9:80 p m. — Studio prop ram 

9:80 i" n :00 p. m. — Dance music. 

AWdnrNday. July 14 

inii 00 a. m.— Household Hints 

"i :oo in i; ;00 p. m.--i lance music 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Goodf el low's Ad Period. 
H::to p. m. — "Thr Stage and Screen.*' 
6:80 to I :30 p m Mac and his Gang. 
8:00 i" sin p mi — "Health an.) Safety." 
8:10 to 9:00 p m. — Concert by KFRC Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 
■ to i" 00 p m.— Studio program 

Thursday, Jul* 15 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m, — Ma.- ami his <lunK. 

•• 80 p. m. — "Tii, Stage and Screen. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

; 00 i o 10 p m — Qoodfellow's am Period 

to p. m. — Popular program 
S 80 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance music 
Friday, July n 

i; in. to 6:30 P m.— Q Ifellon - Ad Period 

p m. — "The stak.-' ami Screen." 
- 7:30 p m.— Mac and his Gang. 
i ■ 9:00 p in — KFRC Symph 
tra. 
9 in. tl , io:00 p. m — Studio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance m 

Snfiirtlny. Jul? IT 

8:00 to 7:00 p. m.— Mac and his Gang 
p. in.- - "Tii.- Stage and Screen.*' 
7:00 to 7:30 p m. — Goodfellowa Ad Pel 
8:00 to 8:80 p. m.— KFRC Request Twins 

"Jake n Alec." 
8:30 to 1:00 a nv — Danoe music 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 

Sunday* July 11 

5:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Silent. 
Monday, July 12 

9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Silent. 

Tuesday, July IS 

9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

.Solos. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Solos. 
Wednesday. July 14 
9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Solos. 
2 :00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Solos. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Silent. 
ThurMday, July 15 
9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Solos. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Solos. 
Friday, July HI 
9:00 to 11:30 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Solos. 
2 :00 to 4 :00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Solos. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Silent. 
10:00 to 11:30 p. m. — Herrings. Silent. 
Saturday, July 17 
9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Solos. 
L' :oo to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Solos. 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 

Sunday, July 11 

2:30 to 3:00 p. m. — Sunday School. Lesson 

text. 
3:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Church service. 
8:00 io 10:00 p. m. — Evening service. 
Monday* July lis 

12:16 p. m, — Daily Scripture reading*. 
Tuenday, July 13 

i 2 : i .". p. m. — l tally Scrl pi ure reading. 

s.'iui iu io:nii p. m. — studio program of sacred 

n umbers 
\\ ednesday, July 14 

12:15 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
2:ir. to 3 16 p m.— Divine healing service. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — studio program. 

Thursday, July 1.1 

12:16 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading 1 . 

Friday, July Ml 

12:16 p. m.— Daily Scripture reading. 

8 00 to i p. m.— studio program of sacred 

IIUII: b 

8:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sunshine hour. 
Salai day. July 17 

Dal)} Scrip! lire reading. 

KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS, 
OAKLAND— 240 

Suniln*. July II 

!■ i;, in la t,~. a m. — Ilihh- L- 
ii oo ;, in {.. 12:30 p. m. — Church Service. 
; i :, i.i 9:16 p. m.— Church Service. 
Monday^ July 13 

m ,.. go a ill. — Prayer Service hy Rev, 

i i Spaulding. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Houi 

to 10:00 p m. — Studio Program. 
Tuesday, Jui> t:t 
■. a. i i m. — Prayer Service bj 

«; W. Phillips. 

t0 p Shopping Hour. 

10:00 p. m — Studio Program. 
\\ edaeaday. Jui> 14 

■i mi to 9:30 a m. — Prayer Service by Rev. 
.; w Phillips. 

;. in —Shopping Hour 
Tauraday. Jui> 15 

'•na i.. 9:30 a m — Prayer Service by Rev. 
<; w Phillips. 

i.. (t:iG i>. m — Lecture Hour — 'Keep- 
ing Well '■ 

p. m, — Shopping Hour. 

Program. 
Pi May, Jul? i« 

m. 
E. I. Spaulding. 

p m. — Shopping Hour. 
.,, 10:00 p. m. — Studio Program, 
gatarday, Jalj i" _ 

m —pr.iv. r Service by Rev 

i: I. Spaulding. 
T .... i,. pint: Hour. 



-Prayer Service by Rev. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO- 
OAKLAND— 361 

Sauday, Jul? 1 1 

-First Pi ■ - Church ser- 

■• lakland). 

m, — Concert by Bern s Little 

phony Orchestra, Hotel Whitcomb, San 
Franc 

:her Bureau reporL 
p_ m __ r 'j r? t Pr. shyterian Church ser- 

i Oakland!. 



-Luncheon concert. 



Art 



9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert by BenVs Li*tle 

Symphony Orchestra, Hotel Whitcomb, ,fan 

K ran cisco. 
Monday, Jul?' l'Z 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m.- 
12:oo noon — Time Signal. 
1 2 :30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 
1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 
1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
:::00 to 4:00 p. m. — Talk from American 

Bureau. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — KGO Kiddies' Klub. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 

Symphony Orchestra, Hotel Whitcomb. San 

Francisco. 
6:55 p. m. — News items. 
7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
7 :06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 
7:0S p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 

Metals. 
( : 1 1> p. m, — N: Y. .Stock reports (closing). 
7:2H p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 
8;00 p. m. — Educational program; Italian 

Opeia Airs. 
S:05 p. m. — Fred C. Brosius, Federal Horti- 

eultui al Board: Serenade Sen timen tale. 
S:25 p. m. — Wilda Wilson Church: Harp ot* 

Love ( Fanchez) — Am phi on Trio. 
8:50 p. m. — Dr, David P. Barrows: "United 

States Government; Abendlied (Schumann). 
9:15 p. m. — "'Symposium on the New Edu- 
cation." Scherzo (Schubeit), Amphion Trio. 
0:30 p. m. — "Famous Dogs in Fact and Fic- 
tion." La Sena (Kilenyi) — Amphion Trio. 
Tuesday, July IS 

1 0:45 to 1 1 ;30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
I 2 nit noon— Time Signal. 
12:30 p, m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 
1:3' p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 
1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
6 :00 to <i:f>5 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 

Symphony Orchestra. Hotel Whitcomb, San 

Francisco. 
6:55 p. m. — News items. 
7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
7:06 i'. m. — -Baseball scores. 
7 :08 p. in. — s. I-". i'i oduce, Grain. Cotton ami 

.Metals. 
7:16 p. in. — N. V. Stock reports (closing). 
7:23 p. m. — .S. P. Stock reports (closing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — f^veready program ; San 

Toy." a Chinese musical comedy. 
9:00 in 10:00 p. m. — The Pilgrims' Hour. 
|0:0a to 12:on p. m.— -Nance music. 
Wednesday, July 14 

10:45 to 11:80 a. m. — Literary Hour." 
11:80 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
1 2:«in noon — Time Signal. 
12:80 p. m. — I' s. Weather Bureau reports. 
1:30 p. m. — N. V, StOCh reports. 

1 :'-7 p. m, — s. f. stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

3;00 t.. 1:00 p. m. — The Romano Studios. Anita 

Romano, steel guitar soloist. 
" I. m.— "For instance," General .lack sou. 
columnist. 
6:00 t.. 6:66 p. m, — Concerl by item's Little 
Symphony ■ Ircnestra, Hotel Whitcomb 
p. in — News items, 
p in — Wea t lot i lures u report 
in — Baseba n scores. 
7 Of p. m. — s. F, Produce, Grain, Cotton and 

Metals. 
7:16 p. m. — N V. Stock reports (closing). 
; 2 I p in. — S. F. Stock reports (closing t. 
l'hii'Miln>. July IS 

m — "Literary Hour." 
i m, to 1 - ,,(l p to -Luncheon con. 

noon — Time Signal. 
12:30 p. m — Weather Bureau reports 
1 (0 p in. — X. V. stock reports. 

p m — S I". Stock reports. 

i u p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — "Friend to Bo 
6:00 to 6:56 p m.— Concerl by items Li i tie 
Symphony ' nrchestra. Hotel Whitcomb. 
p. m — News i lems. 
7 >>:; p. m —Weather Bureau report 

m — Baseball scores. 

: 08 p. m — s F Produce, Grain, '""tt< n 

.Metals. 

7 16 p, m — N y, Stock reports (closing). 

p n, — S F StOCk reports (closing). 

acatlon program: Tour- 
ing information Ramon Oden Hawaiian 
The WOW Male Trio in Vamp- 
tv e Si 

)0 p, m — Dance music 
Pi Iday, Jul* in 

10:45 to 11:10 a. m — Literary Hour" 
11:10 a m. — Homfm.'ikinK Talk. 

to 1 "" p m. — Luncheon concert. 

— Tim- 1 Sic; 

; , m — Weather Bureau report? 
l :30 p. m. — N. Y Stock reporta. 
1:87 p. m. — S, F. Stock reports. 
:i ni —Weather I 

■ ' □ m,— Frona Simon Sou - 
ano. 

p m — KGO Radio Girt?. 

; — Concerl by B**m"p Little 
Symphony ' h-cheal ra Hnp>i WhitonmK 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1926 



Radio Program for Next Week 



6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:0S p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

Saturday, July IT 

10:45 to 11:30 a. m. — '"Literary Hour." 

11:30 a. m. — to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

L2:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — U. S. Weather Bureau report. 

12:33 p. m. — N. Y. Stock Market reports. 

12:40 p. m. — S. F. Stock Market reports. 

4:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra, Hotel Whitcomb. 

8:00 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. "Weekly 
Sport Review." 

S:10 to 9:00 p. m. — Program. 

9:00 to lo:0o p. m. — Concert by Western Pa- 
cific Band. 

10:00 p .m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance music, Hotel 
Whitcomb Band. 



McSpadden. 

7:15 p. m. — Announcement of Sunday ser- 
vices. 

7:30 p. m. — Feature program. 

t):00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Hotel Ambassador Ray West's 
Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 



KNX— L. A. EVENING EXPRESS 
LOS ANGELES — 337 
l>uily Kxeept Sunday. 

7:30 a. m. — KNX Morning Gym. 

8:00 a. m. — Inspirational talk. 

8 :55 a m. — Time signals from Washington. 
It. C 

i':iin a. m. — Radio Shopping News. 

10:00 a. m. — Town Crier Morning Message. 

10:30 a. m. — Household Economics except Fri- 
day and Saturday. 

12:00 m. — Leigh ton's Arcade Cafeteria Or- 
chestra. 

1:30 p. m. — Tlie Book Worm. 

4:55 p. m. — Market reports. 

5:30 p. m. — Leighton's Arcade Cafeteria i 'i - 
chestra. 

6:00 p. m. — The Town Tattler. 

fi:15 p. m. — W. F. Alder Travelogue. 

6:30 p. m. — Atwater Kent orchestra. 

Sunday, July 11 

10:00 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — City Park Board musical 

program. 

4 :30 p. m. — Cinema Chit-chat. 

6:30 p. m. — Hollywood Unitarian Church. 

i :00 p. m. — Concert Orchestra.. 

S:00 p. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

llonday. July 1U 

3:00 p. m. — Town Crier of the Day. 

4 :00 p. m. — Helen's Household Hints. 

4:3d p. m. — Blue Monday Frolic. 

7:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

7 :30 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

i Mm p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

1 1 Mm p. m. — Hotel Ambassador; Ray West's 
Cocoanut Grove orchestra. 

TiteNdny. July 13 

2:00 p. m. — Music and educational talks. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

«:4. r . p. m. — Talk on health. 

k no p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Edgewater Club, Santa Monica, 
by remote control. 

1 1 :00 p. m. — Hotel Ambassador, Ray West's 
Cocoanut Grove orchestra. 

Wednesday, July 14 

3:00 p. m. — Musical readings. 

4:00 p. m. — Talk on care of children. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

S:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

:i:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Edgewater Club at Santa Monica 
courtesy program. 

11:00 p. m. — Hotel Ambassador. Ray West's 
Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 

Thii-Kday, July 15 

11:00 a. m. — Nature talk, courtesy. 

2:00 n. m. — Paul l>. Hugon, handwriting ex- 
pert. 

7:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

■ oo p. m. — Feature program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Edgewater Club at Santa Monica 
courtesy program. 

11:00 p. m. — Hotel Ambassador Ray West's 
Cocoanut Grove Orchestra 

Friday. July 1« 

10:30 a. m. — "Proper Foods and How to pre- 
pare them." 

2:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

4:00 p. m. — Boy Scouts' Musical Program. 

7:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Broadcasting from Hollywood 
Legion Stadium. 

1 1 00 p. m. — Hotel Ambassador Ray West's 

('ocanur Grove Orchestra. 
Sa'urday, July 17 

3:00 p. m. — Town C-ier and his pals. 
4:4o p. m. — Joyce Coad, Metro-Goldwvn star. 

resume of her screen work. 
1:00 p. m. — Stories of insect life by Harry W. 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 
Sunday, July 11 

9:00 a. m. — Exposition of the International 
.Sunday School Lesson. 

4:30 p. m. — One hour of sacred songs. 

Monday. July 12 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian ministry. 

Tuesday. July 13 

t< :30 p. m. — Children's Bible story hour. 

6:45 p. m. — Bible reading. 

7:00 p. m. — KFUS Gospel Radio Vesper Ser- 
vice. 

8:00 p. m. — One hour of musical concert. 

Wednesday, July 14 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian ministry. 

8:00 p. m. — One hour of sacred songs. 

Thui Ndiiy, July 15 

tJ:30 p. m. — Children's Bible storv hour. 

fi:45 p. m. — Bible reading. 

7:00 p. m. — KFUS Gospel Radio Vesper Ser- 
vice. 

Friday, July 1« 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

K:00 p. m. — Studio program: health questions. 

Saturday, July 17 

10:00 a- m. — One hour of Children's Church 
in oadcasting. 

6:30 p. m. — Regular radiocast of the Big 
Down Town Mission. 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAK- 
LAND— 509 

Sunday, July 11 

Silent 

Monday. July 12 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to in mi p. m. — Protective Order of Lake 
Me**ritt Ducks. 

Tuesday. July 13 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

i Mm to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast 

Silent after 7:30 p. m. 

Wednesday. July 14 

::iu p. m. — Baseball. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 

i :0u to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Fifteenth Communitv 
Night program. Watsonville, Cal. 

Thu xday, July 15 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Silent after 7:30 p. m. 

Frtda). July 10 

3:00 p. m. — Bast-ball. 

■ Min to 7:3o ]). ni. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:45 p. m. — Special program. 

9:45 to ln:::(i p. m . — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra* 
Sw u; dry. July 17 
3:00 ;>. m.- Baseball. 
7:on i., 7:30 i>. m. — News broadcast 
Silent after 7:30 p. m. 

KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN, PORT- 
LAND^ — 491.5 
Sunday. July 11 

10::'.-, I,. 12:00 noon — Morning services. 
-:30 p. m. to 9:00 p. m. — Kvening services. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert: weather reports 

and baseball scores. 

^•inday, July 12 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— The Town Crier; music. 

weather report, etc. 

1 1' 3ii to 1 :30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert; baseball 

score;;. 

■ 30 to 7:45 n. m. — Weather, market and po- 
nce i .-ports. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertain- 
ment. 

10:00 to 13:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tut-Nday, July 13 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — The Town Crier: music 
weather report, etc. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

2:00 to 3:30 p. m. — Women's Matinee, talks 
lectures and music. 

«:0fl to 7:on p. m . — Dinner Concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. in. — Children's program. 

i:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, market and 

lice reports. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Rducational program. 

10:00 to 12:00 n. m. — Dance music 

WcdneNduy. July 14 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — The- Towne Crier; music, 
weather report, etc. 

19-30 to 1-30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert; baseball 

scores. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice n ports. 
*:00 to 0:00 p. m. — Concert, courtesv. 
9:00 to 9:20 p. m. — Concert. 



id po- 



Thurxduy. July 15 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — The Town Crier; music, 
weather report, etc. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert; baseball 
scores. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, police and mar- 
ket reports, etc. 

i :45 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 

S:20 to ?0:00 p. m. — Vaudeville program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Friday, July lfl 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — The Town Crier; wo- 
men's daily dozen, music, etc. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

T : : : 1 1 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, police and mar- 
ket reports, etc. 

vmo to 9:00 p. m. — Concert. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Weekly frolic. 

Saiin day, July 17 

in oo to 11:30 a. m. — The Town Crier; music, 
weather report, etc. 

12:3ii to l:3o p. m. — Concert. 

5:00 to 7MKI J), m. — Dinner Concert: baseball 
scores. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 



KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 
LOS ANGELES — 467 

(Copyright 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc.) 
Sunday. July 11 
'|| 00 a. m. — Morning Services. 
4 Mm p. m. — Vesper Services. 
6:30 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 
ti:45 p. m. — Music Appreciation Chat. 
7:oo p. m. — Jim. Jack and Jean Trio. 
8:00 p. in. — Aeolian Organ Recital, Dan L. 

WacFarland. 
9:00 p. m. — Badger's Hollywood Californfans 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra. 
>londay, July 12 
" :30 p. m. — Varsity Ramblers. 
ilMXl p. m. — KFT Nightlv Doings. 
6*15 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
6:30 p. m. — Art Meyer, baritone. 
6:45 p. m. — George Wilder Cartwright on 

"The Constitution." 
7:00 p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians. 
'•Min p. no, — sv mi -classical program. 
9:00 p. m. — Program presnnted by the Walter 

M. Murphy Motors Co. 
liiMio p. m. — Program by Melklejohn Bros. 
Tuesday, July l.'t 

5:30 p. m. — Rendezvous Ballroom Orchestra 
'Mm p. m. — KFI Nightlv Doings. 
6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Program. 
6:45 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 
i ;00 p. m. — Virginia Ballroom ( >rchestra. 
v :00 p. m. — Screen Artists' Quartet. 
9 00 p. m.— Truth Tyler Plock. pianist. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club. 
Wednesday. July 14 

5:30 p. m. — I ion Warner's Orchestra. 
•; mhi i,. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 
i:i". p. ni. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
6:30 p. m. — Don Warner's Orchestra. 
«:J5 p. m. — E, <\ D. Price "Gossip 
7 nn p. m. — Alice VTlegand, soprano. 
7:30 p. m. — Nick I lair is, detective stories. 
8:00 p. m. — Program by California Petroleum 

Corporation of California and the Ventura 

i loncert Orchestra. 
9:00 p. m. — Varied program. 
10:00 p. m. — Program. 

I Mm rs.l.-i \ . July ITi 

5:30 p. m. — Theron Bennett's Hollywood Foot- 
lifters. 

B:00 p. m. — KFI Nightlv Doings. 

6:16 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Theron Bennett's Hollywood Foot- 
lifters. 

6: 15 p. in. — KFI Radiotorial Period, 
i :0(t p. m. — Knights of the Notes. 

8:00 p. m. — Program. 

9:00 p. m. — Varied program. 

10:00 p. m. — Patrick-Marsh Orchestra. 

F' Idny. July mi 

5:30 p. m. — Venice Ballroom orchestra. 

i; mi p. m . — KFI Nightly Doings. 

0:15 p. m. — KFI Raio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Program. 

fi:4-" p. m — Burr Mcintosh, "Cheerful Phil- 
osopher." 

7:00 p. m. — Semi -classical program. 

S:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital. 

9:00 p. m. — Program of Hawaiian Music 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Ballad Hour. 

Saturday, July 17 

5 ;30 p. m, — Shelley Players orchestra 

R:00 p. m. — KFI Nightlv Doings. 

6:16 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

0::;ii p. m. — Vest Pocket Program. 

6:45 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 

7:00 p. m. — Al Wesson and his Orchestra, 

8:00 p. m. — Angelus Trio. 

ft:00 p. .m. — Pay Canfleld. ukelele artist 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club. 

11:00 p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. Until 
2:oo a. m. 



July 10, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



KFWB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY. 
WOOD— 252 

Sunday, July 11 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Peggy Mathews, Blues; 
Bill Hatch's Orchestra. 

Monday, July 12 

4:45 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m, — Program featuring Bill 
Blake. 

S:00 to S:10 p. m. — News Items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Ra- 
nuel Nieto. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Program featuring Julius 
H. Phillips, tenor. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Tut'Mduy. July 13 

4:15 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News Items. 

8:10 to 8:40 p. m. — Program featuring Es- 
ther White, popular songs. 

8:40 to 9:10 p. m. — Ann Grey, blues; Julius H. 
Phillips, tenor; Bill Hatch's Orchestra. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Art Pabst, songs to banjo 
ace.; Esther White, popular songs. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Wednesday* July 14 

4:45 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:ui» p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

. ;Hii to 8:00 p, m. — Program; June Parker, 
blues. 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News Items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p, m. — Program featuring Esther 
White, popular songs. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Ann Grey, blues; Ashlej 
Sisters, lima and Thelma. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

ThurHilny. July 15 

6:00 to 7:00 p. in. — Pontine Six Dinner Hour. 

8:00 to 8:io p, m. — News Items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Peggy 
Mathews, blues. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. in. — Program featuring Es- 
ther White. 

10:10 to II 00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Friday, July in 

6:00 to 7:00 p, m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

7:on tn 8:00 p. in— 1'rnni ;im Featuring String 

Trio. 
8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News Items 
8:10 to 0:10 p. m, — Program featuring Raquel 

Nieto. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — The International Trio: 

BUI Hatch's Orchestra. 
10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Broa Frolic 
Saturday* July 17 

6 to 7:00 p. in — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

8:00 to 9:00 i> m, — Peggy Mathews, blues; 

Bill Blake, tenor. 
9:00 to 10:00 p, m —BUI Match's I trchesti b 
10:00 t.. 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros Errollc 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 
— 322.4 — (Mountain Time) 

Sunday, July 1 1 

10:60 a, mi Service of First Church <-r Christ, 
Sclent 1st) i mm vii 

8;3Q p. m. — Studio concert . Little Symphony 
"i chest ra. 

8:00 p. in- Open-all concert, Henry Sachs, di- 
rector 

Wmiriny. July i: 

11:46 :i in Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce, 

i ■' 16 p i ..hi recital by < Jlar< no* 

nolds 

1:80 p. mi Ori an recital by Marjorie Nash, 
p mi Dinner concert, Howard Tlllotaon, 
<i h eel or, 

in - Sandman's houi 

v :"" p, m.— Instrumental program. Pcneuer- 
man's < toloi ado "t on< 

8:16 p m Special burlesque pi "train 

Tarndari Jul* i.t 

11:46 a. m.— Weather, road reports, stock a 
markets, livestock and produce. 

18:16 p. in — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 

p m.— -Matinee for housewives, 

1:00 p. m.— Cool culinary hints 

1:16 p. m. — Fashion review 

1:30 p. in .■-•iruiin recital t>> Marjorie Nash 
ks, m.tr k«is livestock, pro- 
duce and new b bullel ins 

p. m. — 1 Mum Howard Tlllot . 

son. director, 
7 :o |v m.— Farm question box. 
\\ edaesday, .inly n 
11:46 a. m. -Weather, road reports, - 

markets, livestock and produce 
12:16 n, m.— Organ recital bs Clarence Rey- 
nolds, it 
4:30 p, m.— Organ recital t'\ Nash. 
t DO p. nv— Storks, markets, \i> estock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

uncll talk 
in.-- 1 'inner concert. Brown Palace 
String orchestra. 

« of Knowledge program. 



S:00 p. m. — Instrumental program by Scheu- 
ermann Colorado orchestra. 

8:15 p. m. — Studio program, presented by the 
Puhlic .Service company of Colorado. 

Thursday, July 15 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:00 p. m. — Cool culinary hints. 

4:15 p. m. — Fashion review. 

4:30 p. m. — Organ recital by Marjorie Nash. 

ti:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert, Brown Palace 
String orchestra. 

Friday, July lit 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 

3:80 p. m. — .Matinee for housewives. 

4:00 p. m. — Cool culinary hints. 

1:15 p. m. — Fashion review. 

1:30 p. m. — Organ recital by Marjorie Nash. 

'1 :0(i p, m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

6 :30 p. m. — Dinner concert. Brown Palace 
String orchestra. 

7:30 p, m. — Sunday school lesson. 

8:00 p. m. — Open-air concert, Denver muni- 
cipal band. 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets and livestock. 

12 1 ■", p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 



KFOB— BURLINGAME, INC.— 226 
TucMdny, July lvt 

B:00 to 12:00 p. m. — studio program Featur- 
ing Miss Mary Burns, soprano, .Miss Ann 

Burns, pianist; M. G. McClinton will talk 

• in Peninsula Highways; Open House Enter- 
tainers, ifi by Miss Patsy; Dance Orches- 
tra. 

ThtiiNdn.v, July 15 

1 hii to 12:00 p. m. — Mary MacMurtrir in the 

Children's Book Hour: Studio program 
featuring G. H. Hubert and Mrs. Earl 
Steinbeck; Miss Inez Jamieson and The 
ii<, ot owls Dance Orchestra: Dance Or 
chest i a. 

Sit tut dn.i . Jul j- 17 

v mi i.i 1 2:00 p. m. — Studio program wit li 
M iss Betty Stuart, pfanlste, and Eugene 
..ill. tenor: Accompanist, Miss Ethel 
\ li. n : 1 >;i nee ' Orchestra. 



San Francisco Chamber Music Society 
Announcement tliat music lovers <>f 

San Francisco are to have their annual 

series <>t' Chamber Music concerts as 
usual during the coming season has al- 
read) mel with enthusiastic acclaim. 
Mr. Elias Ilecht. founder of the Cham 
her Music Society of San Francisco, 
will be honorary member of the now 
committee of Sponsors composed of 

Mrs. \Y. B. Bourne, Mrs. J. B. Casser- 
K. Mr. Sidney Ehnran, Mr. John 
Drum, and Mr. Noel Sullivan, under 
whose patronage the Fociety will con- 
tinue. The Quartet, itself, will be 
known hereafter as the Persinger String 
Quartet, comprising in its personnel: 
Louis Persinger, violin, Louis Ford. 
\ iolin, Nathan Fire-tone, viola, and 
Walter Ferner. violoncello. 

Three musicians of international re 
pute will be engaged as assisting ar- 
tists. 

\< a stimulus to the purpose of per- 
petuating the Chamher Music Society 
Francisco, it i> proposed to sub- 
scribers that each subscription entitle 
the holder to membership in the 
ciety for one year. Naturally, it is de- 
sired that the membership he increased 
to a point where there will he no doubt 
as to the permanent establishment of 
the organization. 



EUROPE 

On the new famous "O" steamers 
you are sure of utmost comfort- 
cabin or tourist third cabin 
Cabins containing single and two 

'beds. Spacious promenade 

decks, ballroom, gym and other 

special features 

Sailings Saturdays 

from New York 

Cabin class from #145.00 
Tourist from #95.00 

oAlso direct sailings from Pacific 

Coast via Panama Canal 

CRUISES: 

Norway • South America 
Mediterranean 

Second great African cruise leaves 
New York, January, 1927 

Complete information 6V literature 

Royal Mail Stearr Packet Company 

570 Market St., San Francisco 

or Local Agent 



ROYAL 

MAIL 

-iTHE COMFORT ROUTEr- 
S1NCE 18 3 9 




tSSKSBMBHT NOTICE 

The MINI-: UAL DEVELOPMENT COM- 
PANY, location of principal place of business. 
3a i Francisco, Calif. 

Notice la hereby given that at a regular 
meeting of the Directors held on the 8th day 
• >( June, Ivlf, an assessment of one-half cent 
per share was lerled upon the Issued capital 
st-.ok <-f the corporation payable immediately 
in legal money "f the L'nited States, to the 
iry. at the office of the company. Room 
146 Monadnock Building. San Francisco. 
Callt 

Any stock on which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 16th day of July, 1926, 
will tie DELINQUENT and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment Is made 
tRE. will he SOLI- on Wednesday, the 
August. the delln- 

'tuent assessment, together with COStS Of ad- 
vertising and expense of sale. 



M J. SEELY. Secretary. 

Monadnnck Building. 
San Francisco. Calif. 



Scientist has disc ov ere d a \« »latile 
fluid that becomes lifeless and inert in 
the presence of alcohol. There's your 
foolproof automobile fuel. — Arkansas 
Gazette. 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1926 



WELLS FARGO BANK & UNION TRUST CO. 



Statement of Condition 

At the Close of Business June 30, 1926 (Not Including Trust Funds) 



Resources 

Loans and Discounts $69,475,309.59 

loam on Real Estate 11.-t73.772.82 S 80.949.082.41 

United States Securities 13,591,673.75 

Other Bonds and Securities _ 19.341,908.20 

Slock in Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 420.000.00 

Customer? Liability Tor Foreign and Do- 
mestic Credits and Acceptances 3,418,773.39 

Bank Premises. Furniture and Fixtures...- . 3,388,906.02 

Cash on Hand and with Federal Reserve 

Bank of San Francisco S13.509.926.38 

Cash with Other Banks 10,274,981.25 



Liabilities 

Capital $ 9,000.000.00 

Surplus 5,000,000.00 

Undivided Pro6ts _ 3,049.334.12 S 

Foreign and Domestic Credits and AccepI- 

Billx Payahie with Federal Reienre Bank 



23.784.907.63 
1149,895,251.40 



nk Accept 
ment 
Reserved for Taxes 
Other Liabilities 
Demand Deposits 
Savings Deposits 



Sold with Our Endorse- 



{00.496.141.52 
3S.146.192.4S 



8.585,130.36 
7.300,000.00 

745,057.11 
300,033.10 
273,362.74 

H1S.642.333.97 



$149,895,251.40 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1 ^ 

City and County of San Francisco f 

F. I. RAYMOND, Cashier of Wells Fargo Bank & Union Trust Co.. being duly sw 

mutters contained in the foregoing report of conditions and thai every allegation, staten 

to the best of his knowledge and belief. F. I. RAYMOND, Cashier. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 6th day of July, 1926. O. A. Eggers, Notary Publ 
San Francisco. COR RECT— Attest : A. Chrisleson 



ys he has a personal knowledge of the 
alter and thing therein contained, is true 



for the City and County of 
VanSicUen, H<-nr> Roienfeld. 



A. Chrisleson 
W. E. Creed 
Charles J. Deering 
S. P. Eastman 
Sidney M. Ehrman 



W. P. Fuller, Jr. 
W.J. Cerslle. 
C. R. Graham 
Charles W. Haas 
Edwrd H. Heller 



Directors: 

I. W. Hellman 
Wm. F. Herrin 
Timothy Hopkins 
Frank B. King 
H. C. I.ar-h 
Dr. Hartland Law 



F. L. Lipman 
Geo. T. Marye, Jr. 
A. H. Payson 
George A. Pope 
Henry Rosenfeld 



Jacob Stern 
Wm. H. Talbol 
F. W. VanSicklei 
James E. Walsh 
John I. Waller 



Wells Fargo Bank and Union Trust Co. 

Two Offices: 

Market at Montgomery & Market at Grant Ave. 

San Francisco 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 
Pantages 

Georges Carpentier. former Euro- 
pean heavyweight champion, all-round 
athlete, French ace, millionaire, man of 
fashion, debonair "favorite of women" 
will head the program at Pantages the- 
ater beginning Saturday. He is re- 
garded as one of the extraordinary at- 
tractions of vaudeville. Carpentier will 
be seen in a work-out at each perform- 
ance at Pantages. 

Pantages is also offering on its bill, 
the Russian Master Singers, in native 
songs, assisted by Juanita Bard, San 
Francisco dancer, "discovered by Kos- 
loff" who taught her secrets of the Rus- 
sian dance. 

Sydney Styne, "nut" comedian ; Flo- 
rence Seeley and company; O'Donnell 
and McKenna, comedy duo; and Jap- 
anese athletes are on the bill. 

Tom Mix and Tony appear on the 
screen in "My Own Pal." 

Joe Roberts and his merry mad mu- 
sical gang provide entertainment. 

At the Elder Gallery 
Irving Pichel, who has been delivering 
a series of Friday morning drama talks 



and readings, will give a survey of Con- 
temporary American Comedy on July 
16th, at 11 o'clock, in the Paul Elder Gal- 
lery. Pichel will speak specially con- 
cerning George Kauffman's "The But- 
ter and Egg Man," and "Marc Connel- 
ly's "The Wisdom Tooth." 



Tennis at Casa del Rey 
With Helen Baker and six other 
leading senior women stars definitely en- 
tered, the success of the first annual Casa 
del Rey women's invitational tennis tour- 
nament on Saturday and Sunday, July 1 
24-25, is assured. 

This tournament has been sanctioned 
by the California Lawn Tennis Associa- 
tion and invitations have been limited to 
the best women players of the State. 

In addition to Miss Baker, the follow- 
ing stars have signified their intention of 
competing on the Casa del Rey Courts on 
July 24-25 : Mrs. Golda Meyer Gross, 
Miss Edith Cross, Miss Ruth Fjerem, 
Miss Dorothea Swartz, Miss Ila Wilcox, 
and Miss Marjorie Postlethwaite. 

First matches in the tournament will 
be played Saturday afternoon, with semi- 
finals on Sunday morning and finals on 
Sunday afternoon. 



Aladdin Studio 

A list of events of social interest at 
the Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room, in 
Sutter street, during the past week. 
was headed by the luncheon and recep- 
tion given by Misses Hattie and Minnie 
C. Mooser in honor of the fifty-fiftb 
wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. 
Samuel Mooser, their mother and 
father, and Mr. Mooser's eighty-fifth 
birthday. 

Scores of friends of the venerable 
couple greeted them during the after- 
noon. Mrs. George Mooser, of New 
York, their daughter-in-law, and Miss 
Georgia Mooser, their granddaughter, 
made the journey from New York es- 
pecially to be present at the reception. 
George Mooser, the well known New 
York theatrical producer, was unable to 
come west because of a production he 
is now staging. 

Saturday Mrs. Alice McLane enter- 
tained at luncheon at the Sutter street Tif- 
fin Room for a group of young women 
who were in San Francisco from the 
F.ast to attend the convention of Kappa 
Alpha Theta sorority. 



July 10, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

Cruising Around the World by the S. S. Belgenland" 

No happier choice could lie made of a ship in which to make 
a world cruise than that of the Belgenland. Counted among the 
first nine of the Atlantic's passenger liners in point of size ; 
powerful and steady, with the proven reputation of heing a 
wonderful sea-hoat ; with generous breadth of decks and hav- 
ing every last device for comfort, the Belgenland fully merits 
the designation of a liner de luxe. 

Of 27,200 tons register, the Belgenland is 697 feet long, and 
78 feet broad. She has turbine engines, triple screws, and is 
an oil-burner — the use of oil fuel eliminating the soot, dust and 
cinders inseparable from the use of coal. 

In her deck arrangements the ship is ideal for cruising. Her 
promenade deck ( "A" ) is enclosed with broad panels of glass 
that can be readily lowered to a point permitting a clear view 
of the sea from one's steamer chair. At night this deck fre- 
quently is used as a ballroom, and when decorated with colored 
electric globes and flags presents a charming appearance. 

( Ither features of the vessel relating directly to recreation 
are as follows : 

Two large and well equipped gymnasiums. 

An indoor swimming pool, with Turkish bath attached and 
two outdoor pools, the largest on any ship, and a deck tennis 
court, and space for various sports. Three verandah cafes, 
available for refreshments, table games or dancing. A Japa- 
nese tea garden, for dining and dancing. 

In her public rooms the ship presents an appeal to varied 
tastes. Forward on the promenade deck there is a drawing- 
room, for restful quiet, fitted with wide-armed easy chairs, and 
having an open hearth. In the center id' the ship is the lounge, 
extending from side to side. It has wide bay windows, a big 
fireplace, a library, recesses for writing, broad sofas and many 
comfortable chairs, and tables for games. This is the social 
center of the ship — a most livable, attractive apartment. 

A few steps beyond the lounge is the smoking-room. The 
walls are paneled in richly tinted cedar in < 'Id English style, 
and there is a fireplace with lire-dogs of fretted brass. 

Beyond the smoking-room is a well-furnished verandah, an 
airy, though sheltered room, with green latticed walls. 

Standing at the service end of the restaurant, one gets a 
wonderful vista of a modern steamship interior. Next forward 
of the restaurant, ami separated from it by a specially designed 
glass screen of small panes as clear as crystal — he only one ol 
its kind on a ship — is another apartment which, like the restau- 
rant, extends the full width of the ship, an I of generous length. 
This is the reception hall, or ballroom, designed for the com- 
1 1 ol .ind pleasure of those who love conversation, a cigarette, a 
concert or dancing after dinnei 

Small tables predominate in the Belgenland' S restaurant. 
' hit of a total of 390 seat-* in the main dining hall, ISM are at 
tWO-seated tables. The remainder are al foil r-Sea ted and sjx- 
scalel tables. Connected with the main room are private din- 
ing-rooms 

The lloors are covered with softl) colored linoleum of har- 
monious patterns, that deadens sound and adds a warm note of 
color to the interior. 

Practically all the staterooms on "1!" deck are intercommuni- 
cating. No less than thirty-two have private baths and eight 
have private sitting-rooms as well. Of the total suites on the 
ship, eleven have private sitting-rooms. Various combinations 
of suites with private sitting-room, private dining-room and 
hath can he arrange 1. There arc also several suites that have 
combination, or ci nvcrtible sitting-rooms and heir 

The walls and ceiling- of all staterooms are tinishe 1 in lustre- 
less white enamel, which with hangings m rose and other soft 
colors gives a light and cheerful effect Practically all rooms 
are lilted with beds of special design an 1 construction, of ma- 
hogany or other line w Is. 



CUNARD 

Channel Service 
New York 

to 

England and France 

by CABIN SHIPS 

Caronia 

Carmania 
Cameronia 
Lancastria 

Ala uni a 

ASCANIA 

Ausonia 



For Full Particulars Apply to 

CUNARD AND ANCHOR LINES 

Or Local Agents 



"1 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8C DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 18"! 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general cAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1926 



Finance 



T 



HERE is an effort to combat some of the vices of under- 
writing by the completion of an agreement by the San 
Francisco managers to follow strictly the provisions of the 
Chart of Ethics of the National Association of Life Under- 
writers. It is an attack upon the "outlaws" of the business. 
More and more it becomes apparent that, with the develop- 
ment of big business, lines of conduct become more sharply 
drawn. Big business is a great moral force. 

* * * 

— Talking about the underwriting of life policies. — Roy R. 
Henderson, who is president of the committee to investigate 
and prevent malpractice in the writing of life insurance poli- 
cies, says : "Ninety-eight per cent of all life underwriters trans- 
act their business according to ethical standards. But the 
other two per cent can do, and do a great deal of destructive 
work in unsettling the mind of policy holders as to the inestim- 
able advantage of maintaining whatever insurance they have." 

* * * 

— There is a well organized campaign now against the laps- 
ing of policies. The president of the Connecticut Mutual Life 
holds that fifteen per cent is as high an average of lapses as 
there should be under normal conditions. This strikes us as a 
little high among the class of people who have shown enough 
intelligence to get into insurance at all. A full inquiry into 
the reasons of lapsation would be advantageous. 

* * * 

— The second half of the year has started very auspiciously 
and there is every prsopect of a continual development. The 
downward tendency of prices appears to have been arrested. 
There has also been a very marked renewal of buying and it 
is generally agreed that the amount of manufactured goods in 

stock is quite light. 

* * * 

— Nowhere else in the world, says the P. G. & E., is hydro- 
electric power so cheap and so commonly used as in California. 
It is cheap because of our falling water, and perhaps more 
than ever, because of the ability and progressiveness of our 
power companies. We are civilized in the highest sense. The 
use of electric power is the chief determining factor of modern 
civilization. 

* * * 

— The "Inside Track," the organ of the Market Street Rail- 
way Company employees, has frequently some very suggestive 
notes showing the tendency of the company in manners and 
general conduct to the public. Thus a line instructor in a re- 
cent number, says : "Always give a kind and civil answer to 
any question that may be asked, no matter how silly it may seem 
to you." 

* * * 

— There is to be a new 750 h. p. motor with control for 
Mason and Washington cable station. This will give a source 
of additional power for this station and will be a very valuable 
adjunct. There is no sign of slacking with this company, al- 
though the birds of prey sometimes croak ominously. 

* * * 

r — The Travelers has entered the contest between the New 
York Life on the one hand and the Pacific Mutual Life and 
the trust division of the California Bankers' Association on the 
other. The point of dispute is the legality in California of the 
income trust agreement used in connection with New York Life 
policies. The trust forms of the New York Life brought about 
the contest. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 



INCORPORATED FEBRUARY tOTH. 1868 



COMMERCIAL 



One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1926 

Assets $109,430,478.72 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,400,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over 557,000.00 



MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haieht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL, BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 



Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Europe doesn't like "The Big Parade," but it did in 1918, • 

New Britain Herald. 




The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid In Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITi'. MEXICO. 

San Franctaco OIHce: 430 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COUITHAKD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. J 

MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 2244 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS - AUDITORS - COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C. P. A . 
Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, Slow 
Accounts ; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYoung Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



W. W. HEALEY 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

20S Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel), San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 391 



July 10, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



CLUB FARALLON 

Club FaraHon, to be erected on Sutro Heights, San Fran- 
cisco, is meeting with the most gratifying success in its 
campaign for life members, Mr. Justice B. Detwiler, its 
president, states. 

Over seven hundred prominent San Franciscans, togeth- 
er with many Peninsula residents, have joined the club and 
for the past week invitations have been sent with a view 
to securing the second quota of memberships. Three thous- 
and memberships are to be sold and the management is of 
the opinion that these can easily be secured within three 
months. In three weeks time the club life memberships 
raised from $300.00 to $400.00. The project is being financed 
in part through the selling of memberships on a graduating 
scale of charges, which admit early members at a consider- 
ably less figure than 'those who join after the building op- 
erations are under way. 

Miller & Pflueger are the architects and the building con- 
tract has been awarded to Lindgren & Swinerton. Actual 
construction is to commence, according to program, on 
October 1st, and the grand formal opening will be on June 
1st of next year, it is predicted. 

The Club affords many attractions, the unique features 
being the provision for enjoyment for all members of the 
family. There are to be separate card rooms, billiard rooms 
and turkish bath department with its tonsorial adjunct for 
the men, and there will be women's turkish bath depart- 
ment with the beauty parlor connection, thus affording 
the women any necessity required. There are to be hand- 
ball courts, tennis courts, and a putting green. 

The plans provide for four restaurants — an Old English 
Grill, where absolute quiet and no confusion of any char- 
acter will reign supreme, and to contrast thi> will be the 
grand view roof garden for dinner and supper dances where 
celebrated orchestras will rotate. There will be the Pic- 
cadilly Coffee Shop situated in the basement of the Club, 
where the finest of short orders will be served at modest 
cost. To satisfy those desiring atmosphere and color will 
be the old time "before the hire" type of cabaret situated 
at a discreet distance from the club proper, yet on the club 
premises, where gaiety and revelry with much Bohemian 
spirit, though refined, will hold full sway. 

The swimming tank, which will be fashioned after the 

famous European resorts, is of regulation size and will be 
supervised under the latest scientific methods insofar as 
sanitation is concerned. This will be one of the lew tanks 
on the Pacific Coast which will comply with respect to di- 
mensions, for the holding of all officially competitive aquatic 
sports. 

In addition to the features above mentioned, there is to 
be an observation lounge two hundred feet in length, com- 
manding an impressive view of the Pacific. In addition 
there are to be two hundred guest rooms, one hundred of 
which are to be reserved for permanent guests and one hun- 
dred for the accommodation of those who desire to spend 
the week-end at the Club. 

Memberships are secured through invitation only and 
names are selected with discriminating care. The Invita- 
tion Committee consists of Jerome B. White, Hugh K. Me- 
Ivevitt. Dr. Arthur Beardslee, Sylvester I. McAtee. J. H. 
Skinner. Dr. A. I. Minaker. Frank J. Klimm. Percy V. 
Long. Daniel I. Murphy, Justice B. Detwiler. Walter I". 
Trefts, Alton w. Edwards, and Dr. Alfred Roncovieri. 



Here It Is Again 

A nervous passenger on the first day of the voyage asked 
the captain what would be the result if the steamer should 
strike an iceberg while it was plunging through the fog. 
"The iceberg would move right along, madam." the cap- 
tain replied courteously, "just as if nothing had happened." 
And the old lady was greatly relieved. — Tid-Bits. 



SUMMER RESORTS 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

WHY? 

It's the Water and the Table 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 
tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN 

Acua Calienie, Sonoma County, Calif. 

or see Peck-Judah 



El Dorado Hotel 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Mushrooms'* 

Clean Rooms, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

Vi»it Sonoma County'* Famous Resort* and Mineral {Warm Water) Swimming 

Tanks From This Hotel 

Kale* Exceptionally Reasonable 

Telephone 110 



FETTERS HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete highway open. Famous medicinal baths. Masseur 
in attendance. Healthful mineral waters; swimming pool. All 
amusements. Excellent table. Hotel steam heated. Cottage accom- 
modations. Rates, $18 up. Write George Fetters, Mgr., J. F. 
Green, Ass't. Mgr., or Peck-Judah. 



LALILIN 1 L V ILL. A CARL STEFFEN: PROP . 

French and Italian Dinners — Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

4 Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



The Lodge at Saratoga 

I ndfr Efvft Mnnneement 

Specializing Dinner Dances Saturday and Sunday Nights 

The Most Modern and Sanitary Mountain Hotel in America 

Open the Year 'Round. Among the Pines and Redwoods. 

Wider Roads. American Plan. Moderate Rates. 

Greatly Improved 

owned and Operated by John A. Evans Corporation, Los Angelas 
Phone Hempstead 2101 

TIIOM \% R. DO! 'GIIERTY. Mgr., Saratoga. Calif. 
I'honrN Saratoga SO and 163 



"POP" McCRAY'S ] 

One Mile North of Cloverdale on Redwood Highway 

DANCING IN DINING ROOM AND 

CLUB HOUSE 
SWIMMING IN RUSSIAN RIVER 

Jellies, Jams and Mustard Pickles Always on the Table { 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1926 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 
include Mr. and Mrs. Wm. H. Woodfield Jr., and their daughter 
Gloria, Dr. and Mrs. J. F. Pressley and their children, who will 
spend the entire summer, and Dr. and Mrs. Rene Bine and 
their family. 

* * * 
Mrs. Beckman Hostess 

To Friend Traveler 

Mrs. William Beckman, a world traveler, who has written 
many books on her traveling experiences and philosophical sub- 
jects, will give a dinner party at the Hotel Stewart, Saturday. 
July 10, in compliment to Mr. and Mrs. John Donovan, who 
have just returned from a round-the-world tour of nearly two 
years' duration. 

The dinner is also a compliment to her nieces. Miss Marce- 
line Armstrong from Jacksonville, Illinois, and to Miss El- 
merna Bush of Sacramento. Each of Mrs. Beckman's nieces 
will participate in the dinner program, which is to be of a 
musical nature, under the direction of Mr. Harold S. Mac- 
Dougall. 

The after-dinner music, mixed with skits of travel and wel- 
come bits of verse from the guests, is to be a sort of home 
gathering commemorating the return of the travelers as well 
as recalling a jaunt of eighteen months which Mrs. Beckman 
made with Mrs. Donovan. The two traveled through twenty- 
two different countries alone, all of which was described in 
Mrs. Beckman's book. "Backsheesh," now out of print. 

The guests invited to be present are: Messrs. and Mesdamo 
Tohn Donovan, F. X. Moore, Edwin Clark, George O. Davis, 
Don Kinnebrew, Miss Marceline Armstrong, Miss Elmerna 
Bush, Miss Rosalie Harrison. Miss Alice Marsh. Mrs. Allison, 
wife of Captain Allison. Mr. Frederick Pease, Mr. Harold 
S. MacDougall. 

Mrs. Beckman is well known in literary circles. She is the 
author of "Thoughi-Stitches From Life's Tapestry," her latest 
book, "Unclean and Spotted From the World"; "Beckie's Book 
of Bastings"; "Memory's Potlatches," and other books in addi- 
tion to "Backsheesh," in which she has written the memorable 
story of her travels in company with her honor guest, Mrs. 
Donovan. 

* * * 

The following San Franciscans stopped at Santa Maria Inn 
during the past week: Mr. and Mrs. R. M. J. Armstrong, Mr. 
and Mrs. Francis W. Leis, Miss Helen Stine, Mr. John Mc- 
Leod Stine, Mr. Oliver C. Stine, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. H. Lent, 
Miss Elizabeth Lent, Judge Thomas J. Lennon, Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. C. Murdoch, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. James Madison, Jr. 



THE OLYMPIC 

SEATTLE 
finest and Largest Hotel in the Pacific Northwest 




Frank W. Hull, Manager 





1140 GEARY ST. J^ TEL. GRAYSTONE 42CHI 

Metal "Work Apper- 
( :i i n i n u to Automo- 
biles — Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding — Black- 
■mltMngi 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



_ WATS ON _ 

StabilatorI 



In a Stabilated Car — You Motor 
Relaxed and Arrive Refreshed. 



MADSON & RICHARDS 



Graystone 2100 



(Incorporaledj 

Pacific Avenue at Van Ness, San Francisco, Calif, 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE VOIR CARS WASHED AXD GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates: :'..",«• per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 

LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 



at CAI 

inlvlin Street! 



►BT GAS STATION 

San Frani'lrtcn, Calif. 



Gravstone 130 Open Day and Night 

SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

Si. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Wm. Saunders 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established ISO I 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

853 TEHAMA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 3084 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



" 



July 10, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

TI I AT "1926 will be the greatest year 
California lias ever known from an 
automobile touring standpoint," is the 
declaration of the Touring Bureau of 
the- National Automobile Club, which 
has routed more Californians to the 
east over one or another of the various 
cross-country highways than ever be- 
fore, and at the same time lias served 

more incoming eastern automobile tour 
ists at its various information bureaus 
than in any previous year. 

The great progress which has been 
made in cross-country road develop 
inent in the different states is respon 
sible for this increase in travel : 

improvement in Nevada' having reached 

such a Stage of improvement as to 
make possible an easy and fasl trip. 

especially on the Victory Highway, 

where trips from Lovelock to Salt Lake 
City in twelve hours and Reno to Well- 
in ten hours, speak volumes for the 
Victory Highway. 

Across Utah and Western Colorado 

toward Denver on the Victory High- 
way, road development in l"J.s took 
of many of the bad stretches, while 

across Wyoming toward Cheyenne on 

the Lincoln Highway, what is practical- 
ly a boulevard has been provided with 
guard rails, permanent bridges and cul- 
verts and mile after mile of fast grav- 
el roads. 

For the timid or inexperienced driver 
the Lincoln Highway through Wyom- 
ing anil across the Rockies is the rec- 
ommended route, the crossing of the 
continental divide on this line being 
about three thousand feet less in ele- 
vation than the Victory Highway line, 
the scenic route over Berthoud Pass, 
west of Denver. 



Tourists crossing Wyoming on the 
Lincoln Highway frequently pass over 
the continental divide without know- 
ing that they are doing so, for the ter- 
rain there is a bald, treeless, rocky 
plateau, utterly devoid of that rugged- 
ness which is associated with the Rock- 
ies and is to be found on other cross- 
country lines; hence, automobile tour- 
ists from Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa and 
other flat countries are routed by this 
line, which today is having the heaviest 
burden of traffic it has ever known. 

Contributing to the westbound flow 
of automobile touring traffic is the de- 
velopment of a paved road across Mis- 
souri and into Kansas on the Victory 
Highway line, a stretch of pavement 
reaching west from St. Louis for about 
350 miles — the longest stretch of pav- 
ing west of the Mississippi River, and 
the only crossing of that great mud 
belt in Missouri and Iowa, which has 
for years barred automobile tourists in 
the eastern states from the west. 

Advices from the Victory Highway 
Association in Topeka, Kansas, and 
the Lincoln Highway Association in 
Detroit, to the National Automobile 
Club, tell of a greatly increased de- 
mand for cross-country routings and, 
reflecting this condition, more foreign 
licenses are to lie seen upon California 
highways than in any previous year. 



Government funds amounting to 

alu- nt $1,200,000 derived from various 
sources, will be expended in developing 
iorest roads and trails in California 
during 1926, according to data supplied 
to the National Automobile Club by the 
Forest Sen ice. 

About $100,000 has been allotted to 
the Yuba Pass highway : $50,000 to the 

Mendocino Pass road in Mendocino 
county, while the Truckee-Tahoe road 
has been granted $150,000. The Savv- 
vers Bar and Cecilville road in the 
'Klamath Forest will get $25,000 for 
improvement and lesser road projects 
are provided for in the Trinity Nation- 
al Forest, where the South Fork Moun- 
tain Road will be improved. The Stan- 
islaus National Forest will get funds 

on the Dorrington-South Grove road. 
The Fit River-Happy Camp road in 
Modoc County will get county money 
to the extent of $5,000, and the Bunch 
Crass Valley road in the Lassen Na- 
tional Forest in Siskiyou is also being 
taken care of. 



Cherchez La Femme 

;m. after being driven into the cold 
world to earn a living, was keeping a res- 
taurant. 

"Have you any sjiare ribs'" asked a 
patron, glancing over the menu. 

"No." replied the rir-t man. sadly. "A 
woman named Eve came along and took 
the last one I had." 



A State Commission regulates rates 
and service of Public Utilities in California. 

Hydro electric companies come under the 
jurisdiction of this Commission. 

Rates are fixed and service details estab- 
lished after open public hearings and after 
the Commission has taken the advice of its 
own experts — engineers, lawyers, statisti- 
cians and economists. 

Rates in California are low. 

Service is a model for the rest of the 
United States. 

Since 1913 the average per capita cost of 
living increased 65%, while the average cost 
of electricity decreased 8%. 

Since 1913 the average per capita cost 
of living increased 65%, while the aver- 
age cost of electricity decreased 8%. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



PG 



.and 




"VACiriC SECT1CI" 

Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




"ibe better it ^eb 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

utter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1300,000 rup« were aen-ed at the Paaaa 

Ptrllf Interaafloaal Expoaltloa 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1926 



•*5vX/s* 



"*\$ 



ys» 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



-&M, 



Jff 



«■*,' 



4U* 




Mrs. 

Frank Sheedy, 

winner 

of the 

Menlo Golf 

and Country 

Club 

annual 

invitational 

tournament. 



Women's Tournament 

THE Menlo Golf and Country Club's annual invitational 
tournament, just concluded, was one of the most success- 
ful the women ever held. 

Although the entry list was not as large as in former years, 
still the standard of golf and the extra hole matches cause 1 
lots of excitement. 

For the first time Mrs. Frank Hooper, who acted as cap- 
tain in the absence of Mrs. Forbes, who is in Europe, decided 
to make all flights of eight, instead of the usual sixteen. 

This idea proved very successful as the championship flight 
brought together a real representative gathering of women 
golfers, including Mrs. William C. Van Antwerp, a former 
State and present Northern California champion; Mrs. Rob- 
ert A. Roos, also a former Northern champion ; Mrs. Frank 
Sheedy, city champion and the ultimate winner of the tourney ; 
Miss Barbara Lee. the Stanford Co-ed; Mrs. A. B. Swiner- 
ton ; Mrs. Harry Braddock; Mrs. W. C. Haaker 
Sutro, last year's winner. 

From the moment the tourney commenced 
end of surprises. 

Mrs. Van Antwerp defeated Mrs. Swinerton, the medalist, 
in the opener; Miss Lee easily accounted for Mrs. Haaker; 
Mrs. Braddock fell an easy victim to Mrs. Sheedy; while Mrs. 
Roos won a close match "from Mrs. Sutro. 

I '.ut il was in the second round that some real thrilling golf 



mer- 
and Mrs. Emil 

there was no 



was played. Miss Lee surprised everybody by eliminating 
Mrs. Van Antwerp one up, while Mrs. Sheedy defeated Mrs. 
Roos at the nineteenth hole. 

This left Miss Lee and Mrs. Sheedy to fight it out for the 
crown. Mrs. Sheedy won. but not until she had to use all 
her strategy and tact to get away with the decision. 

Mrs. Frank Hooper, who engineered the tournament, de- 
serves a heap of credit for the admirable manner in which 
she handle 1 the affair; and in addition, Mrs. Hooper made a 
charming hostess, every one having a wonderful time. 

The final results were : 

First flight — Mrs. Frank Sheedy — d — Miss Barbara Lee at 
the 19th. 

Second flight — Mrs. Frances Schroth — d — Mrs. ( ',. Davis 4-3. 

Third flight — Miss Leonora Armsby — d — Mrs. I. S. Lil- 
lick, 4-3. 

Fourth flight — Mrs. Spencer Buckbee — d — Mrs. W. W. 
Boardmann, 4-3. 

* * * 

Men's Tournament 

The Menlo Chili's men's annual invitational golf tourna- 
ment proved to be one of the most representative gatherings 

of amateur golfers that ever assembled at any of these clas-ii 
events. One hundred an 1 fifty of the elite of golfdom face 1 
the s'arter, and from the moment the tourney started until tin- 
last put was sunk, there were no end of surprises mingled with 
the highest standard of golf. 

Gerald Bol 'emann, the real Valentino of the links, who hails 
from the Crystal Springs Country Club, upset the old gag tha! 
a medalist never wins a final. ( ieral 1 never let up for one mo- 
ment once the tournament started. He le 1 the field as medal- 
ist with a smar. card of 72. several strokes ahead of his nearest 
opponent. 

When the match play starte 1 Sun 'ay. May 20th. he playe I 
golf the equal of which has never been seen in these parts in 
years. His defeat of George "Scotty" Mullin, one of the top- 
notchers from Lakeside, when he bea' him 6-5. was only an 
example of what was to follow, as he next took the measure of 
George Nickel, the champion of Burlingame, who has pre- 
viously beaten Boldemann in the finals of the San Mateo 
championship, played over the Burlingame course last month. 
The Crystal Springs star was always the mas er of the situa- 
tion, winning handily. 

Boldemann's next opponent was Bobby Coleman, who is a 
member of the Menlo club, and had won the club's invitational 
a couple of years back, when he defeated George Ritchie in the 
finals. 

The defeat of Colemann was a big surprise to his many fol- 
lowers, as he had been listed among the eli'e of golf for main 
years, and had held the Northern California championship on 
one occasion. 

But the best of them all looked alike to Boldemann. for he 
won a splendid match at the l'Hh hole, one of the most popu- 
lar holes at the club. 

The finals brought together two past masters of the game of 
golf in Boldemann and E. P.. "Togo" Osborne, a former 
Junior State and Lake Merced champion. This match was 
played over 36 holes and the wise ones thought Osborne stood 
a good chance to gather in another title since he had given 
George Ritchie, the favorite, his walking papers, defeating his 
clubmate at the 20th hole, after trailing the little Olympian 
for nineteen holes. 

But the wiseacres were fooled once more, as Boldemann 
really played his best golf against "Togo." Although Gerald 



lulv 10, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



21 



olf as 
lie al- 



onl) led two up on the morning round, still lie set a splendid 
mark with a 68, which included four birdies of five holes. 

<)n the final 18 holes, Boldemann simply went wild. Os- 
borne didn't stand a chance, as the big hoy just waded through 
"Togo" like a fish through the water, "the match ending at 
the olst hole, with Boldemann a winner 6-5. 

Outside of the championship flight, Presiding fudge T. I. 
Eitzpatrick played the feature match of the whole tournament. 
The Judge never played better golf in his life than he did when 
he defeated Edwin M. Eddy, the president's cup winner in 
the Northern. All we hope is that fudge Fitzpatrick will win 
his flight as well at the next election. 

Felix Kahn, the big contractor is quite as big in 
he is 'in his business. No matter where Felix enters 
ways gathers in a tropin'. 

The tournament was admirably handled by lirace Carter 
and Bobby Coleman, with Paul Fay, chairman of the enter- 
tainment committee. Paul made a wonderful host. 

I 'aid Merger, the steward at the club, satisfied the most fas- 
tidious. 

Following are the list of winners : 

First flig-ht — Gerald Boldemann. 

Second flight — C. D. Woods. 

Third flight — Charlie Gracier. 

Fourth flight — Judge T. I. Fitzpatrick. 

Fifth flight — Al Jacobi. 

Sixth flight — Frank G. Drum. 

Seventh flight — Felix Kahn. 

Eighth flight— J. B. Watson. 

Ninth flight — Ross Faxon. 



Mussolini's Foes May Leave Italy. — Headline. They are 
certain to if he finds out who thev are. — Nashville Banner. 



A Pleasant Surprise 
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Brown (Miss Elizabeth Reaves) will 
be interested to learn that they have a son who was born in 
a New York hospital Monday afternoon. — Knoxville (Tenn.) 
paper. 

* * * 

Promotion 

"Of course," said the bachelor girl, "I am lonely, but I 
am afraid marriage would be out of the frying pan into the 
lire." 

"It is more likely," answered Miss Cayenne, "to be out 
o f the chafing-dish into the gas-stove." — Washington Star. 

A Hero's Symptoms 

Lady — "I think there is something so romantic about a 
night watchman." 

Watchman — "Yer right, ma'am, it settles in me pore ol' 
legs sometimes till I can't 'ardly walk." — Picked Up. 

* * * 
Johnny on the Spot 

"I beg your pardon," said the charity solicitor, as she 
came into the store, "but would you care to help the Work- 
ing ( iirls Home?" 

"Certainly," said the unmarried clerk. "Where are they?" 
— Progressive Grocer. 



Swimming Contest at Santa Cruz 
The next big event on the calendar of swimming events 
at Santa Cruz will be the P. A. A. men's senior champion- 
ships July 17-18. Ten of the best men swimmers on the 
Pacific Coast will take part in these race. 

The feature event of the affair will be the 440-yard 
swim for the senior men's outdoor championship. The 
tank events in the Casino Plunge will include a 50-yard 
free style, 100 yard backstroke, --<> yard free style and a 
4-man relay. 



SHORTRIDGE SHOULD BE RETAINED 
Thomas F. Finn, sheriff of San Francisco county, and long 

an outstanding figure in Republican politics, was OUl toda> 
with a statement declaring his reasons for giving active sup- 
port to the candidacy of United States Senator Samuel M. 
Shortridge for the Republican nomination o succeed himself 
The statement follows ; 

"Sam Shortridge has won the right t" ask the voters to re- 
tain him in office. He has won the right by simple devotion 

to the duties of Ins office and by his unremitting efforts to 

promote and safeguard the interests of all of California in con- 
nection with the tariff, the immigration act, and other national 

legislation affecting this state. 

"He has, furthermore, been untiring m his attention to the 

multitude of requests received .it Ins office in Washington from 

citizens and groups in all parts of the state seeking his inter- 
cession in their behalf at the capital in connection with matters 
affecting them. 

"No citizen, no matter how trivial Ins plea, has failed to 
receive prompt and complete attention from Senator Short 
ridge, lie has been a 'working senator ' 

"The record o\ Senator Shortridge during his first term in 
office, coupled with the prestige and influence he has attaint- ' 
with the Coolidge administration, present an argument for bis 
re-election that cannot be ignored. 1 am confident that the 
voters ^'i the entire state will recognile the value Senator 
Shortridge has been and can continue to be to all of California 
and that they will give him an emphatic victor) at the |«>lls 
on August 31." 



^_^ MADE TO ORDER ON LY 

•sSBJIF s^tl ^ijjjF 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 



25 Kearny Street 



Phone Kearny 3714 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

-nit* PriiJ [.* hand Onl* - "m.,1. Called For and DtttVMl 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



l\ \ iiimmi Horn 



Paritian Ifx-tnt on-f ( Irantnt 



StN F»«icl)CO 
I'hi.m Fra*kli* 2510 




RARE BOOKS 
f uu KDrrraa 

Autographs Bought and Sold 
JOHN HOWELL 

414 Po«t STiifrT. *«^ Fm^rivo. Cai.it. 



M.t h 
GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

>n. 1 Tlllmann I'Urr, at £11 (innf Avenar 

Th.- Home "f til- Bo 
Rare n.. ( >ks — Fit - — Fine Bindings 

- fr<-ni Zachnsdorf, Root, MorrelL etc.. of London 

Commissions in London F.\- 
Single Honk? and Purchased 

I'hnne Kearn? r.s n; 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

ami PAUL ELDER'S UBRART 

239 Post Street San Francisco. Calif. 



22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 10, 1926 




I**'* J V.'l.liJE 



Se PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 



i_1 j j - r^ r* t i o n e r to show 



you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
4t First Street, San Francisco 



I 

L 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



San Francisco 
West 703 



Iturlingamc 

478 



Phone Svtteh 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

{Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS anil WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

209 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 

San Maleo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST, 818 EMERSON ST. 

Phone : phone : 

KEARNY 644-645 PALO ALTO 315-J 

SAN MATEO— PHONE I254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 

FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 

Points Twice Daily 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

526 California St. (and Branches), 
San Francisco 

For the quarter year ending June 30th, 1926, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four and one-quarter (4%) per cent per an- 
num on all deposits, payable on and after 
July 1st, 1926. Dividends not called for are 
added to the deposit account and earn inter- 
est from July 1st, 1926. Deposits made on or 
before July 10th, 1926, will earn interest from 
July 1st, 1926. 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Secretary. 



Humboldt Bunk, 783 Market St., near Fourth; 
Bush and Montgomery branch. Mills Bldg. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1926, a 
dividend nas been declared at the rate of 
Tour (4) per cent per annum on savings de- 
posits, payable on and after July 1, 1926: 
dividends not called for bear interest from 
July 1, 1926; money deposited on or before 
July 10, 1926, will earn interest from July 1, 
1926. H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 



\ ng \>.~* :i li for n i.i Trust Company, ( Savings 
Departments) Main Bank, Market and San- 
some Streets; Branch Banks: 101 Market 
Street, Market and Ellis Streets, Market 
and Jones Streets, Fillmore and Geary 
Streets. Third and Twentieth Streets. Mis- 
sion and Sixteenth Streets, Geary Street 
and Twentieth Avenue. 

For the half-year ending June 30, 1926, 
a dividend lias been declared at the rate 
of FOUR AND oXK-gUAliTER < 4 H > PEK 
CENT per annum on all savings deposits, 
payable on or after Thursday, July 1st, 
1926. Dividends not called for are added 
to and bear the same rate of interest as 
the principal from July 1, 1926. DEPOS- 
ITS MADE ON OR BEFORE JULY 10, 1926, 
WILL EARN INTEREST FROM JULY 1, 
1926. LOUIS SUTTER, 

Vice-President and Cashier. 



itiiuk of Italy. Head Office and San Fran- 
cisco branches—For the half-year ending 
June 30, 1926, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum 
on all saving deposits, payable on and after 
July 1, 1926. Dividends not called for are 
added to and bear the same rate of interest 
as the principal from July 1, 1926. Savings 
deposits made on the first business day of 
:uiy month (or on or before the tenth day 
of January, April, July and October) will 
earn interest from the first of that month; 
deposits made after said date will earn in- 
terest from the first of the following month. 
SAYINGS DEPOSITS MADE TO AND IN- 
CLUDING JULY 10, WILL EARN INTER- 
EST FROM ; ULY 1. 

JAMES A BACIGALUPI. President. 



Italian-. \meriean Rank. S. E. corner Mont- 
gomery and Sacramento Sts. ; North Beach 
branch, corner Columbus ave. and Broad- 
way: Columbus branch, corner Montgomery 
and Washington *Sts. — For the half year 
ending June 30, 1926, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four and one-quar- 
ter (4'4) per cent per annum on all sav- 
ings deposits, payable on and after July 1. 
Hi-';. Dividends not called for will be 
added to the principal and bear the same 
rate of interest from July 1, 1926. De- 
posits made on or before July 10, 1926, will 
earn interest from July 1, 1926. 

A. E. SBARBORO, President. 



Assurance Doubly Sure 
"Glad to see you getting in on time 

these mornings, Mr. Slowe," said the 

manager. 

"Yes, sir, I've got a parrot now." 
"A parrot. What for? I advised you 

to get an alarm clock." 

"I did, sir, but after a few mornings I 

g<>t used to it. and it failed to wake me. 

So I got a parrot and now when I retire 

I hang the alarm clock over his cage. 

It wakes the parrot, and what the bird 

says would arouse anybody." — Boston 

Transcript. 




N. w CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



L 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 
Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing— Repairing— Altering 
and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 
Each Order 

Ollice and Works 1825 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7013 
llrnnch Office: 7«0 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 
Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 

Tailor 



Opposite Olympic Club 



527 Post St., San Francisco 
Phone Prospect 9316 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 

EXCHANGE 

Phone Garfield 3S52 564 Market St. 



DBH 



CAFE MARQUARD 

AojoiNimi Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^ 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, $1.00 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carle 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. in. 

363 Suiter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 



Hattie Moo: En 



Minnie C. Mooser 



£& 



"anor5 



145 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
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FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
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"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
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"7 



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A CRAIG KENNEDY 
"Picture Strip"/ 



THE famous scientific detective 
of the fiction world will make 
his appearance in The Chronicle on 
July 26th. 

Moving through a daily "picture- 
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series of haffling mysteries. Watch 
for the tirst mystifying adventure, 
starting July 26th, in The 



Ban iftranrtBro 




WL TO NEW YORK 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and 
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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1884 to 1925. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street, San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postofflce as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhlll, E. C 

London. England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year. $5.00. Foreign, one year. $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JULY 17, 1926 



No. 29 



Nursing a Grudge 



By Eleanore F. Ross 



He opened his note hunk, and drew out a check; a very 
shabby, time-worn check, drawn for twenty-five dollars. 

He had been telling me of a friend who had borrowed 
this money from him many years ago, and then, when he 
himself was in need, and had asked for a loan, the "friend" 
(who was at that time, quite prosperous) had turned him 
down cold. 

The returned check lay in his hand, the mute evidence of 
a disagreeable memory that was continually re-lived, the 
material object on which bitterness nourished. 

Now, this man is a really fine man ; open hearted, open 

handed, well bred, jovial, popular, and yet he had allowed 

a trivial incident of this sort to spoil many moments of 

his life which might have been employed in numerous 

pleasurable ways! He had been busily nursing a grudge 

that should have been forgotten and lost in the shuffle of 

life's cards. 

, * * * 

The old maid (becoming almost as extinct these days 
as the dodo) in nine cases out of ten. has been "disappointed 
in love;" some hard-hearted brute has loved her and left 
her; she has given her maiden heart to an unworthy lover, 
who failed to appreciate it. So. henceforth, she categories 
all men as unfeeling wretches, and perchance in her young- 
er days may have refused proposals of marriage— or other- 
wise—which would have, at least, brought some color and 
romance into her drab existence. 

She has her prototype in the bachelor, who has drawn a 
water and tire-proof covering around his cardiac region, 
and defies anything in the shape of the eternal feminine 
to pierce it with smiles or wiles, simply for the reason that 
in his salad days, or later, hi- sweetheart didn't live up to 
her word. 

Then there are the widows and widowers, whose one ex- 
perience in marital woes ha- s.mred them on Hymen lor 
the rest of their natural lives. They are the deepest im- 
biber- of wormwood; the strongest of all fortified mor- 
tals against the little god whose darts bring SUCH exquisite 
pain. They "feed fat the ancient grudge" as the immortal 

William puts it. until the Thing they nurse waxes more 
and more vigorous and gradual!} devours all their joy-in- 
life. 

* * * 

1 know a woman, old. now. and feeble, who allowed an 
"ancient grudge" to not only ruin her own life to a great 
extent, but to evilb influence those around her. 

Talented, witty, a woman of courage and endurance, she 
harps continually on one string.— her deceased husband's 
faults and peccadillos. 



Her children were forced to listen to tales of their father's 
misdeeds from morning until night, in their childhood look- 
ing askance at their unconscious progenitor as at some 
monster. Only the common sense of years and experience 
taught them that he was, to all appearances, a very mild 
mannered, money producing gentleman, who apparently 
lived only to indulge his wife and family in the many lux- 
uries they demanded. Later on, he failed in business, and 
"retired" to Honolulu, leaving enough money in land and 
currency to support his brood for several years, if the head 
of the house had used judgment or any sort of business 
sense. But the small fortune was dissipated by foolish 
speculation, and the family eventually came to want. 

Now, of course, the man was to blame for having left his 
unhappy home; no doubt about that; he should have stuck 
by them through thick and thin, as the mother did ; but one. 
at least, of his immediate descendents, in later years, 
couldn't find it in her heart to condemn his action. 



This woman forgot, in her obsession, the many pleasures 
she had received through the efforts of this man. who had. 
more or less, turned into a money making machine to ful- 
fill the desires of his family. She only recalled his defi- 
ciencies, instead of whatever fine qualities he might have 
possessed. 

She wearied her children with a recital of his faults, and 
incapacitated herself in many instances for business or 
pleasure, for nursing a grudge is one of the most destruc- 
tive of emotions. 



Possibly, "trying to get even" originated with the Italian 
Vendetta; with those fiery children of the Sicillian coast. 
to whom "revenge" is the sweetest word in their lexicon, 
and who have made almost a religion of this form of venge- 
fulness. It is a quality which should be eradicated from the 
characters of thoroughbreds, no matter from what country 
they hail. 



Nations go to war for "ancient grudges;" race hatreds 
'reed in the slimy waters of bitter memories; all sorts of 
crimes are committed because of the fact that some-one 
want- to "get even" with some-one else. Look into your 
hearts, and see if. brooding there, lies a determination to 
"get back" at some foe for the wrong he has done you; 
grasp this coiled snake eating out your vitals, and throw 
i! from you, before it has absorbed your very life, itself! 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1920 




Then we need new standards of morality, for the old idea 
if individualistic ethics is obsolete. 



Under the new management of the 
Market Street Railways Street Railways there is now a 
much closer approximation to the 
ideal of management of street car lines than anything we 
have hitherto had in the city. Persistence in the pursuit 
of the policy already begun will result in a very great ad- 
dition to the street travel facilities of the city. 

There is a new spirit among the employees. We note 
particularly an eagerness to please which we have hitherto 
missed, a readiness to assume tasks on behalf of passengers. 
which, strictly speaking, cannot be reasonably expected of 
the men, but the volunteering of which by them adds great- 
ly to the comfort and confidence of the public. 

Several improvements have been made in the cars them- 
selves, tending to make them more easily distinguishable 
and thus adding again to the comfort of the public, and. 
with consequent very notable effects upon public sentiment 
with respect to the lines. 

One feels almost instinctively that there is a capable and 
forceful power conducting affairs. And when a closer ex- 
amination of the actual factors at work is made there is in- 
stant discovery that the instinctive feeling is well justified 
by actuality. One learns that, behind the contacts with the 
public, is a management just as thoughtful and careful about 
the needs of its own men as it is of the needs of the public. 

This brings the present management right up to the best 
standards of modern service. It has seized the distinctive 
principle which actuates all high class modern service cor- 
porations, a desire to do fairly by the public and its own 
employees. 



If any amount of talk will 
The Eternal Crime Question ever solve a sociological prob- 
lem, such as crime, we are on 
the highroad to a morality transcending the dreams of the 
saints, for every pulpiteer and barnstormer has his views 
as to the reason for the existence of crime as well as his 
panacea. 

Among all the people that have talked, however, one 
gentleman, in particular, who is at present a member of the 
Faculty of the University of California Summer Session 
and who occupies the important position of state crimin- 
ologist of Illinois, has made the most practical and sug- 
gestive comments. 

The causes of crime, on a large scale lie in three main de- 
fects of social life today. First, the inability, so far, of 
people to regard law as something which belongs to them ; 
most people think of it as shut up in books, that law is to be 
kept in .books and only pulled out under stress of circum- 
stance. People do not look at laws, as living rules, made by 
themselves and to be obeyed by themselves. There is much 
need for education on that point. 

Then there is the point, which we have always insisted 
upon in these columns, and which may be stated as the un- 
certainty of punishment. It is not the amount of the pun- 
ishment which is the main thing; it is the certainty of pun- 
ishment to follow transgression of law. Once it is learned 
that technicality and shystering will not help, we may 
consider the main cause of crime abolished. At present, 
there is always a gambler's chance, sufficient to tempt ad- 
venturous men, of no moral force, to try it out. Make 
punishment sure and we shall only have morons as crimin- 
als and the penalty of 'Crime will largely be a matter for the 
physician and the psychologist. 



The British General Strike, which was of 
Clearing the Air such magnitude that we note that capi- 
tal letters are generally used in mention- 
ing it, may have been a failure and certainly was such from 
the point of view of the militant trade unionist. It has, 
however, done one thing of transcendental importance, it 
has killed, for this generation at least, any idea that the 
general strike is an effective weapon in the arsenal of labor in 
a modern state. 

Our view, which we declared from the beginning, that the 
general strike is a revolutionary method and has no efficacy, 
except as a revolutionary adjunct to a great mass movement 
has been completely borne out. As one recent writer puts it — 

"The general strike is essentially a revolutionary weapon, 
which can be successfully wielded only by leaders who have 
revolutionary aims, and are willing to stick at nothing to 
achieve them. In this case, neither followers nor leaders 
had the smallest idea of revolution or of challenging in any- 
way the authority of Parliament, and so the fiasco was pre- 
doomed. The general strike has been shown to be not a 
dangerous weapon, at all, unless and until there already ex- 
ists a revolutionary majority in the country in which it i~ 
to be used. And since there are ballot boxes in every mod- 
ern country, its actual value may be considered as nil." 

The general strike must be accompanied by violence in 
order to succeed. What about the sporadic violence to which 
we are being subjected in this city? There is no ethical or 
political content in it. It is well known that it cannot win 
anything and that there is nothing to win. The strikers, 
who are pursuing the road of violence in our midst, are 
common criminals and should be dealt with accordingly. 
The methods lead us nowhere. 



Charity is a much abused word. Love, 
Human Charity on the other hand, has come to have such 
a sentimental content that the substitu- 
tion of it for the misused Greek derivative is always at- 
tended with some degree of unsatisfactoriness. What we 
want is a word which will connote that reasonable svm - 
pathy which it is incumbent upon us as human beings to display 
for other men and women more unfortunately placed than our- 
selves. 

We are driven to comment on the lack of such a term by 
the fact that it has been found impossible to get an initia- 
tive measure upon the ballot for November, looking to the 
appointment of a commission for the blind, to take over and 
put on a modern basis the work for the blind which is now 
done by the State itself. The reason that the initiative was 
not possible is because there were not enough people here 
to take a sufficient interest to sign the petition. That fact 
is in itself the most damning indictment of present day ma- 
terialism which we have met. It is incredible that our citi- 
zens, the richest people in the world, should have fallen 
down in a matter so urgent. We prefer, for our own peace 
of mind, to think that the measure failed owing to the lack 
of a reasonably sagacious method of advocating it. 

It is in no sense a charity measure, using the term in the 
sense of giving something for nothing. It embraces the 
idea of giving the blind of our state the fullest recognition 
and assistance, and in addition strives for the prevention of 
blindness, as far as possible. As for the latter of the two 
objects, nothing need be said. Everyone will agree that 
the prevention of blindness is not only a social advantage, 
but from every humanitarian standpoint it is a social ne- 
cessity. 

The blind are not helpless. Given reasonable opportuni- 
ty, they always produce an unanticipated amount of ahilitv 
and leadership. Some of our great men have been blind. Lei 
us help their cause in the next legislature. 



July 17, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



The cases that some lawyers will cook up 
Queer Lawyers are most astounding. It would seem as if 
the festive pursuit of the nimble dollar 
brings out all the latent agility and twisting of what is 
known as the most torturous of all callings. But there are 
limits beyond which one would think that even a lawyer 
could not go. 

For example, there is the question of seizure on the high 
seas. Of course, there has been a dispute between lawyers 
as to whether the three mile limit was good for foreign ships 
that tried to land forbidden alcoholic liquids. There was 
good reason for difference of opinion there. Three miles 
constituted the distance to open sea, according to the old 
law, beyond which the country owning the adjacent coast 
has no further jurisdiction. 

But why three miles? Obviously, because when that 
limit was fixed, it was regarded as the extreme to which a 
cannon shot could be propelled by human ability. The de- 
velopment of ballistics has made three miles ludicrously in- 
adequate and so the limit has been increased to twelve miles. 

Now, the case with which we began this article was one 
in which an American ship, (American, mind you), a rum 
runner was caught beyond the twelve mile limit. There- 
upon, some lawyer was bold enough to claim that there 
was no legality in the seizure. But it was an American 
ship and, being such, was liable at any time and in any 
place to the laws of its own country. This should have 
been too obvious to discuss and yet time and strength were 
taken up in the discussion. 

One wonders about the mentality of the person who could 
gravely handle a case like that. It is remarkable that the 
Court of Appeals should have looked at it seriously. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



It seems quite likely that the publi- 
Uniform Traffic Code cation given to the report of the 

American Bar Association will have 
considerable weight in helping to secure what we have al- 
ways regarded as really a modern necessity, that is. the 
standardization of rules and signals throughout the country, 
which will make the conduct of motor vehicle traffic so 
much safer than at present. 

We are inclined to the belief that the saving in accidents 
will not amount to as much as the proponents of the unfica- 
tion measure anticipate. They think that it will make a 
saving of seventy-five per cent of the total number of ac- 
cidents. F.vrn where the local rules are well understood 
and followed, we do not get any such extra saving of loss as 
would seem to be here intimated. We may. however, be 
wrong. Right or wrong, there is no question of our most 
complete approval of the movement towards unification 
and of our entire sympathy with the attainment of a sensible 
code to he operated all over the United States. 

We must have either uniform state laws or a federal law. 
Frankly, with our prcdclectious in Eavor of local self gov- 
ernment. we are highly in favor of the former solution. We 
doubt if the actual making the plan into law. by way of the 
state legislature-, would take any longer than would trying 
to get a federal measure through the murkiness of political 
intrigue which so deadens movement in Washington. We 
are distinctly of the opinion that regulations are more readi- 
!\ obeyed when they proceed from the will of the people, lo- 
cally legislated and enforced. There is always a certain 
fascination to the untrained in the idea of a strong central 
government enforcing decrees. We prefer local self gov- 
ernment even in so universal a matter. 



A motorist has admitted running over the same man 
twice. The time has evidently come when there aren't 
enough pedestrians to go round. — Eve. 
* * * 

The only time the average wife listens to what her hus- 
band has to say i< when he talks in his sleep.— Judge. 



John Bull naturally hates a Red flag. — Wall Street Jour- 
nal. 

"Soviet Back to Capitalism" — headline. It was either 
that or back to the wall. — Norfolk Virginian-Pilot. 

* * * 

We need some heavyweight literary luminary to advise 
us whether Blondes Prefer Gentlemen. — Arkansas Gazette. 
$ $ $ 

An old-fashioned American is one who can recall when 
it was predicted that the teachings of Coue would injure 
the practise of physicians. — Louisville Times. 

* * * 

Unostentatiously and little by little, the horse has been 
superseded by the motor until now there are only 4,152,000 
more horses on American farms than there were in 1900. — 
Detroit News. 

* * * 

Whether or not the youth of today is better or worse than 
that of yesterday, or just about the same, it is possible that 
in both cases room for improvement was not, and is not 
being, exhausted. — Charleston Mail. 

* * * 

The big political spenders of the Keystone State might 
have known that the time was coming when Uncle Sam 
would have to take his Penn. in hand. — Norfolk Virginian- 
Pilot. 

* * * 

The confessions magazines are explaining to half the 
world how the other half lives, but they're not explaining 

why. — \rkansas ( iazette. 

* * * 

Lloyd George has declined all those cordial invitations to 
get out and stay out. He seems to feel that the British un- 
employment situation is bad enough as it is. — The New 
Yorker. 

* * * 

John D. Rockefeller is said to give his employees a new 
dime for every addition to their families. Advocate- of 
birth control are becoming greatly alarmed. — Judge. 

* * * 

"You had some fre-h shrimps here last week." began the 
purchaser. "Now — " 

"Yes, ma'am," interrupted the market man apologetical- 
ly, "but I fired both of 'em." — American Legion Weekly. 

* * * 

Suzanne Lenglen's skill with the racket is equaled only by 
her skill in raising one. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

* * * 

A new thought speaker says that people should live to be 
150 vears old Not some people. — American Lumberman. 

* * * 

Well, well ; four out of five have it, and this may be what's 
the matter with the law's teeth. — Rockford Star. 

* * *. 

Another masculine prerogative that no woman wants i- 
to he called "veteran" of anything. — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

It's hard to believe in a corn surplus, when you hear a 
wet telling how manv stills are operating. — Anderson (Ind.) 

Herald. 

* * * 

In parts of Burma a man's wife may be seized for debt. 
Burma, however, is a long way away. — Judge. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1926 




'LEISURE'S W^ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ Tom Moore. 




Stage Attractions 
Too Good to Miss 

SAN FRANCISCO theaters, this 
week, have much to offer in the 
way of high class entertainment. Prac- 
tically all tastes may find something 
suitable and satisfying. 

Make up your mind what you want, 
drama, musical comedy, cinema produc- 
tions, vaudeville, thrilling photoplays 
or a laugh fest. Then, look over the 
week's calendar — and you will find 
whatever is your inclination. 



Columbia 

Blanche Bates and Margaret Anglin, 
two luminaries of today's stage, are at 
the Columbia theater, playing on the 
same program. 

Last week, Miss Bates and Miss 
Anglin appeared in "Candida," the 
George Bernard Shaw comedy revived 
in San Francisco after a long period — 
some twenty years, it seems. 

The production marked the anniver- 
sary month of the playwright's birth- 
day and was presented especially at this 
time partly for that reason, and, part- 
ly because there was a big demand for 
the corned}'. 

Margaret Anglin played the titular 
role in "Candida" and was the artist 
that she ever is — as the subtle wife. 
Blanche Bates played the part of 
"Prossy," the typist, and kept up the 
merry humor of the role, instilling into 
the character part much of her own in- 
imitable artistry. 

[. R. Tozer was the clergy. Ronald 
Teller and Clifford Walker were other 
principals giving strength and virility 
to the presentation. 

The first appearance of Margaret An- 
glin and Blanche Bates in this city, 
this season, gave us a rare treat, in- 
deed, with Miss Bates starring in "Peg, 
the Actress" and Miss Anglin appear- 
ing in W. Somerset Maugham's "Car- 
oline." 

Oh, how fine a privilege it was to 
see these two actresses in two such 
fascinating plays. They were superb! 
Their vehicles were splendidly chosen 
— and we were afforded "a memory." 



Greek Theater 

Margaret Anglin will appear in "El- 
ectra" at the Greek Theater, Saturday 
evening, July 24, supported by Olive 



By "Jingle" 

i Hiver, who will play the part of Cly- 
temnestra. 

Ralph Roeder will take the role of 
Orestes, son of Agamemnon, coming 
from Paris just recently to appear in 
this production of "Electra" at the re- 
quest of Miss Anglin. 

Irving Pichel, well known dramatic 
critic, playwright and actor, will ap- 
pear in the classical production in the 
part of the guardian. 



Wilkes 

"Lucky Sam McCarver," the drama 
by Sidney Coe Howard, is the vehicle 
in which Pauline Frederick is making 
her stage return before San Francisco 
audiences. 

The drama is thoroughly modern. It 
deals with a man who possesses the 
Midas touch. Yet the action of the 
story hinges about the girl portrayed 
by Miss Frederick. Analagous as it 
may seem, the title role is a secondary 
part played by John Cromwell, who 
created the part in New York. 

Among the others who played in New 
York and who are now supporting Miss 
Frederick are Olaf Hytten, Charlotte 
Granville and Howard Nugent. 

Over twenty players are in the cast. 

The drama has been sumptuously 
mounted bv Louis O. Macloon. 



Curran 

"Tip-Toes" starts out merrily upon 
its third week at the Curran theater, 
with Ona Munson the feminine star. 
and Eddie Buzzell, Eddie Nelson and 
Charles Howard, the comedians. 

There are enough rhythmical songs 
to catch one's fancy and keep one hum- 
ming the melodies for days. 

Lillian Albertson staged "Tip-Toes" 
and introduced some new ideas in col- 
or-blending. The yachting scene was 
particularly attractive. The drapery 
effects are a delightful relief from the 
old-time sets, fast disappearing from 
the best staged acts. Sammy Lee di- 
rected the dancing, in which well 
trained boys and girls give something 
intricate and new. 

Making small-edition classics out of 
jazz was the job of George Gershwin 
and he succeeds in his musical notions, 
especially in the music of sprightly 
"Tip-Toes." 



Alcazar 

George Kelly's comedy. "The Show 
( )IT" goes into its third week at the 
Alcazar theater with the performance 
Sunday night. This clever comedy 
drama has delighted amusement lovers. 

Louis John Bartels and Guy D'En- 
nery, two members of the original cast, 
and Jean Oliver, who played the lead- 
ing feminine role in the Last, form a 
nucleus around whom Henry Duffy 
built a company of Broadway players. 



President 

"Love 'F.m and Leave 'Em," original 
comedy by George Abbott and John A. 
Weaver, begins its fifth week at the 
President theater with the matinee next 
Sunday afternoon. 

Isabel Withers does most of the 
merrymaking in the play. It is her slo- 
gan of "fool 'em and forget 'em" and 
"Love 'I'm and Leave 'Em" that gives 
the title to the play and attracts the 
mi is1 attentii >n to it. 

Mamie Walsh, the character played 
b\ Miss Withers, becomes philosophi- 
cal only after her sister Janie vamps 
her swetheart. In the end the young 
man comes back. 

Betty Laurence is attractive as the 
selfish, carefree sister, and Kenneth 
Daigneau does splendid work as the 
fickle young man. It is a cheery play 
and contains unusual character-. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

Fannie Brice, comedienne, remain- 
over for another week at the Orpheum, 
as a headliner. breaking her own rec- 
ords for drawing power to this theater. 
Miss Brice is offering this week new 
songs, and comedy in her inimitable 
manner. 

Following her closing week at the 
Orpheum. Miss Brice will leave vaude- 
ville going from here to Los Angeles 
for a short engagement and then di- 
rectly to New York, wdiere she will ap- 
pear on Labor Day as a dramatic star 
in her new show. "Fannie." under the 
management of David Belasco. 

An "International Dance Sensation" 
will be presented by Carl Hyson and 
Peggy Harris, who come from Paris, 
where they had an engagement at the 
Claridge, Cafe de Paris, Moidoire Say- 
og Club, Casino de Paris and at the 
Paroquette Club. They have brought 



July 17, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ON THE STAGE 



ALCAZAR ( "The Show OB" 
O'Farrell nr. Powell \ Louis John Rartels 


COLUMBIA 1 „ .,._.. 

70 Eddy I Margarel AiiglinrBlanche Bale* 


CURRAN ( "Tip Toes" 
Geary nr. Mason ( Musical Comedy 


PRESIDENT 1 "Love 'Em and 

McAllister nr Mkt. ( Lea A e ..?'™^ 

J Henry Dully Farce 


WILKES t Pauline Frederick 
deary at Mason ( »"Lucky Sam McCarver" 


VAUDEVILLE 


GOLDEN GATE ( Har ry Carrol, song writer and 
G. G. Ave. & Taylor f produrer. Mme. Ann Codee. 
J r rench comedienne. 


ORPHEUM ( Fannie Brice, Headliner 
O'Farrell & Powell ( Carl Hyson, Peggy Harris, 
) Parisian dancers 


PANTAGES (NEW) ( Karyl Norman, ihe Creole 
Market at Hyde f Fashion Plate 

) Vaudeville — Pictures 


PORTOLA i _, , __ 

Market near 4th ( Vaudeville-Pictures 


SS? OW ,! <lU i. RK .. J Vaudevllle-Pietures 
O Farrell nr. Powell f 


WIGWAM ( ., ... „, 
Mission and 22nd f Vaudeville-Pictures 


ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 


CALIFORNIA ( "The Mystery 
Market at 4th f Club" 


Harry Cnrev in "Driflin' Thru" 
CAMEO ( Sun., Mon.. Tur«., Wed. 
Market opp. 5th t Jar<|uc]inc Logan in "WaarN 
) For Wivoi," Tliur... Fri., Sal. 


CASINO Pictures 
Ellis and Mason i 


giianada ( "l i> in Mabel's 
Market at Jones St. f Itoom" 


IMPERIAL ( "Nell Gnyn" 
Market bet. 6th-7th j Dorothy Glsh 


LOEWS WARFIELD ( •■!.■>» .-J Mary" 
Mnrket at Taylor ( „ Ucsslc Love 

\\ lllllllll llflllll'M 


ST. FRANCIS I "The 1'lnmlnK 
Mnrket bet. 5th-0th ( Frontier" 


RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS 


. . .^ v » *.-a-in* a / Pictures 
ALEXANDRIA U( . n |lljl( . k nnd 

Geary and ISth j Ills Hand 


I Pictures 
COLISEUM J Mill Franklyn and 
Clement A: llth Ave. ) Orchestra 


HAIGIIT ( „, . 
Ilalsbt at Cole j Picture. 


HARDING ( 

Dlvlsadero at Hayes 1 ■ "ctures 


IRV1M. ( . 
Irving at 15th Ave. ( Pictures 


MAJESTIC 

Mission between Pictures 

20th and 21st 


METROPOLITAN I „.,,_,_ 
1 nlon nr. Fillmore ^ Pictures 


M-.w BALBOA „■ ... , 

llaltma « asth Ave. j Picture. 


NEW FILLMORE ( 

Fillmore near Kills . Picture. 


\F.W MISSION ( 

Mi..lnn nr. 22nd ( Picture. 


ROYAL I 

Polk nr. California ( Picture. 



the Paroquette Club orchestra with 
them to assist in their dances. 

Others on the Orpheum bill include 
the Le Grohs, in a pantomimic novel- 
ty: Margaret McKee, announced as the 
"California Mocking- Bird"; El Cota 
and Beatrice Byrne in "Something Dif- 
ferent" ; and a trio of entertainers, Mul- 
roy, McNeece and Ridge in "Whirls 
and Steps." 

* * * 

California 

For those who prefer thrills and 
comedy in their entertainment, the 
California this week offers "The Mys- 
tery Club." Matt Moore, Mildred Har- 
ris, Warner Oland and Charles Puffy 
are the stars. 

This picture was filmed from "Crimes 
of the Armchair." by Arthur Somers 
Roche, and deals with a wager made by 
members of the club that they could 
commit a crime undetected. They pro- 
ceed to carry out their wager and cre- 
ate considerable mystery and hilarity 
in the course of their adventures. 

Max Dulin and his orchestra provide 
the musical entertainment which is a 
distinct feature of the California the- 
ater. 

* * * 

Warfield 

Alice Hegan Rice's "Lovey Mary." 
sequel to her "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cab- 
bage Patch" has been adapted for the 
screen, and is the coming attraction 
at the Warfield commencing Saturday. 
July 17th. It is a Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer production and the featured 
stars are petite Bessie Love and Wil- 
liam Haines. 

An excellent cast is seen in support 
of the principals. — Mary Alden is Mrs 
Wiggs and Vivian Ogden is Miss Hazy, 
the part she played so successfully in 
the stage presentation. Others included 
in the large ca-t are Russell Simpson. 
Martha Mattox, Sunshine Hart, Rosa 
Gore, Eileen Percy and Jackie Combs. 
King Baggott directed the production. 

Fanchon and Marco offer as the stage 
presentation, their "Aztec Idea." a stu 

pendous spectacle. An old temple con- 
stitutes the setting, bringing an atiim-.- 
phere of ancient Aztec times, with a 
sudden shifting to the dances and songs 
iday. 
Walt Roesner has prepared a special 
score which will be played by him and 
the Super-Soloists (luring the screen- 
ing of "Lovey Mary." 

* * * 
Golden Gate 

The Inior Orpheum house, this com- 
ing week, will offer as a star attrac- 
tion. Harry Carrol, popular Broadway 
composer and producer in a program 
of songs and novelties. 

ming direct from engagements in 
Germany and France. Mile. Ann Codee. 
French comedienne, will appear in spe- 
cial -,,ng offerings, with a number of 



artistic French selections on her bill. 
Jack Merlin, comedian and card manip- 
ulator, will give an original comedy 
novelty, in which he is assisted by Lois 
Evans and volunteers from the audi- 
ence. 

"Hell's Four Hundred" is the screen 
feature, starring Margaret Livingston 
and Harrison Ford, Pathe News, 
Aesop's Fables and short reels being 
also screened. 

Harry Hyler and Yolande St. Clair, 
xylophones and "The Great Tiler," 
ventriloquist, are other stage attrac- 
tions. Claude Sweeten and his Golden 
Gate orchestra in an overture and an 
organ recital by Grace Rollins Hunt 
round out the week's program. 

* * * 
Pantages 

Karyl Norman, the Creole Fashion 
Plate, known to vaudeville audiences 
as a female impersonator, is at the Pan- 
tages this week. 

He comes to San Francisco with a 
new act, new gowns and gorgeous scen- 
ic settings. 

Norman is jumping across the con- 
tinent for this engagement. He and 
Carpentier are the first two of several 
international celebrities booked for the 
Pantages this summer. 

* * * 
Granada 

"Up in Mabel's Room," adapted from 

the AI Wood's stage farce, is the pres- 
ent attraction at the Granada. It was 
made into a picture by Al Christie and 
was directed by E. Mason Hopper. 
Marie PrevOSt, Harrison Ford. Phyllis 
Haver, Harry Myers and Arthur Hoyt 
have the leading roles. 

The stage act accompanying this pic- 
ture is "Steppin 1 High." a stage and 
fiance revue. 

* * * 
St. Francis 

"The Flaming Frontier" is the con- 
tinued attraction at the St. Francis. 
Like "The Covered Wagon," it is a 
film of civilization's westward trek. 

General George V. Custer, in bis 

fain. his "Last Stand" at Little Big 
Horn, is portrayed with historical ac- 
curacy. 

Dustin Farnum as General Cu- 
Ann Cornwall as pretty Hetty Stand- 
wood and George Fawcett, who por- 
inUnued on Page 22 I 



-e,you pay no more * 



fiESTFLOWEJg 




Trr.Vbooqr'.TnoumsdOsiden.' 

224-226 Gaitl %«. lei Keorrr, 4975 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 192'j 





ocier 





By Antoinette Arnold 



American Girls 
Pride of Nation 

HAVE you heard any one say recently? "What on earth 
is our present generation coming to?" 

If so, tell him at once about the Delta Zeta Sorority. 

For, if ever there has been a direct and convincing reply 
to such, old cyncial questions, it was the hundreds of girls 
who met in national conferences last week at the Fairmont 
Hotel, assembling in the interests and purposes of the Delta 
Zeta Sorority. 

Brilliant, refined, modest, thoroughly business-like, with 
an attitude of cordiality and friendliness toward all with 
whom they came in contact, the Delta Zetas registered a 
standard of womanliness than which we have had no more 
splendid examples. 

Thev were not only good to "look upon," with their 
frank, open countenances, clear eyes and refreshingly love- 
ly faces, but in many, many ways did they give evidence of 
.American heritage. 

Modern in every way, up-to-the-minute, if you please ; 
but with an unmistakeable charm of repression, rather than 
"over-expression." 

They had poise, refinement, grace! 

Their innate qualities of stability were brought into 
prominence by the manner in which they deported them- 
selves during the entire week's conferences. They all seemed 
to have simething really worth-while to do. And. they 
started no reforms. 

They were too busy attending to sorority affairs — and 
that implied helping each and every one within their rank 
and file. 

"Up to date?" Yes! Decidedly! 

"Fashionable?" Rather, but modestly gowned, with ex- 
quisite taste exemplified in their costuming. 

"Bobbed hair?" Practically, every one! 

Sweet, charming, alert, full of the vigor of life — but, oh. 
the law of repressions they thoroughly understood, adding 
power and strength to their womanhood. 

"What fine wives these girls will be." declared a promin- 
ent visitor, as he watched eight hundred girls pass in review 
into the Fairmont conference rooms. 

"What wonderful mothers they will be," interposed an 
editor as he analytically observed them all. 

Just then, three of Delta Zetas girls came up to where 
we were and inquired almost simultaneously : 

"Please tell us where your best book-shops are that we 
may select something pretty for our kiddies — " 

Had we, inadvertently discovered, the secret of their 
charm? For some, at least, of those lovely, loveable sorori- 
ty girls, already were mothers. Others, too, we also dis- 
covered, were married, or just "going to be." 



* * * 



Dinners and Happiness 

That happiness and dinners are correlated is no new- 
idea, but it was certainly made evident in the recent events 
given at the Fairmont when the Pan-Hellenics were lavish- 
ly entertained by the Delta Zeta national sorority. 

The dinner was one of the outstanding social features 
of the convention, with the spirit of friendliness and service 
characteristic. 

Miss Elizabeth Eader of the Chi Omega sorority was the 
principal speaker at the Wednesday evening banquet ex- 



tending greetings from the Berkeley sororities to the vis- 
iting college and alumnae members. Nineteen of the Pan- 
Helenic and honor groups were represented at the reciproci- 
ty event. 

Mrs. Julia Coleman, grand president of the Delta Zetas 
who presided over the conferences, responded to Miss 
Fader's tributes in a scholarly address interspersed with en- 
comiums of San Francisco's hospitality. 

Miss ( trace Hutchinson, of Mu Chapter, was chairman 
assisted by Mrs. Guy H. dale and Miss Virginia Vail. Miss 
Margaret Fish. Miss Virginia Balleyseus and Mrs. T. B. 
Wheaton presented the musical program. The banquet 
rooms and the tables were elaborately decorated with bril- 
liant gold the color scheme. 

* * * 
Berkeley Girl Honored 

Miss Winona Jones of Berkeley was the only western 
girl elected to office at the national conference of the Delta 
Zeta sorority which closed its convention Saturday. 

Mrs. J. R. Friedline of Colorado was chosen for the lead- 
ership as grand president. Miss Lois Higgins of Dallas, 
Texas, was elected vice-president; Mrs. Fannie Putcamp 
Smith of New York was named secretary and Miss Winona 
Jones, Berkeley, was named the treasurer. 

A Spanish fiesta closed the first California convention 

of the Delta Zeta national sorority with the terrace r r. 

of the Fairmont gaily decorated for the occasion. 

Following the five-day conclave attended by hundreds of 
delegates from every state in the Union, the several groups 
dissembled in an auspicious way. 

Forming little coteries, with representatives from their in- 
dividual localities, the Delta Zeta girls, stood in the lobby 
of the Fairmont Hotel and sang college songs with an oc- 
casional "yell" for their Alma Mater and a final ensemble 
chorus number in tribute to "California." hostess state of 
the pleasant and profitable conferences. 

* * * 
Children's Circus 

Children of the Menlo Park Club who have been in the 
habit of participating in the annual Circus for the benefit 
of the Convalescent Hospital at Menlo added more laurels 
to their own achievements and added, too, a handsome sum 
to the convalescent fund. 

Miss Ethel Schwabacher was queen of the event, and 
took part in all the entries. The big parade around the 
tanbark led by the queen was a delightful sight. Each child 
maintained a certain attitude in keeping with the part es- 
sayed. In fact, the youngsters astride their Shetlands were 
inimitable equestrians prouder of their animals than of them- 
selves. Rowena Dunphy. Marybeth and Byrne Pike were 
surprisingly clever with their reins and rode their ponies 
with skill. 

Walter and Thomas Sullivan and young Billy Thorning 
set a swift pace for their competitors. Jean Stinton rode a 
handsome pony. 

Amy Bowles was a winsome winner at the Kiddies Cir- 
cle with Clarence Walter the favored ringmaster who put 
them through their paces. 

* * * 

The handsome new swimming pool was officially dedi- 
cated last Saturday as part of the annual riding circus of 
the Menlo Park Circus Club. 



July 17, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



For quite a number of years this annual 
sporting event has served as a means for re- 
plenishing the funds of the Convalescent Hos- 
pital where children may have proper care, 
rest, food and attention during convalescing 
periods. 

These circuses are a society event, in as 
much as the families of Society folks are ac- 
tively represented. 

Preceding the circus a number of luncheons, 
barbecues and out-of-door repasts are staged 
by society. Then there are also a number of 
dinners, banquets and picturesque suppers to 
increase the festival spirit and its purposes. 

A gymkhana was held last Monday evening, 
also the yearly picnic supper, an inseparable 
factor of the circus. On this occasion Miss 
Evelyn Taylor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Au- 
gustus Taylor, was hostess to: Misses Peggy 
Roeding, Katherine Doyle, Heath Hamilton, 
Carol Laphan, Dorothy Roeding, Edith Cham- 
berlain, Peggy Gregory, Mabel Wilson. 

Messrs. Thomas Magee III, Thomas Parker. 
John Deahl, Lewis Lapham, Frank G. Drum. 
Scales, Mark McCann Jr., Charles McCormick 
liam Taylor. 

Miss Eleanor Weir also entertained a group of young 
friends, including: Misses Alice Eastland, Eleanor Simp- 
son, Harriet Holbrook, Dorothy Harrison, Happy Ham- 
ilton, Betty Downey, Elsie Faxon. Messrs. Walter New- 
hall, Edward Haas, Kenneth High, John Lee, Robert 
Sutton, Boyd Weir, Heber Tilden. Kirk Clagstone, Mari- 
on Harnes. 

* * * 

Some of the society people who entertained on the oc- 
casion were Mr. and Mrs. C. R. McCormick, Mr. and Mrs. 
Warren Spieker, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Walter. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernest Stent, Mr. and Mrs, Walter Stctthciiner and 
Mr. and Mrs. William Roth. 

( )n the committee with Mrs. Ernest Stent, who was 

chairman for the affair, were: Mesdames Eli Weil. Roger 
Lapham, William Weir, Charles Bransten, Warren Spiek- 
er, John (1. Sutton. C, K. McCormick, Augustus Taylor, 
W.J'. Roth. 

Clarence Walter, ringmaster at the circus, was assisted 
by John Lapham, John Sutton anil Charles Dunphy. 



Children who took pail in the Menlo Park Kiddies' Circus in- 
clude, Miss Ethel Schwabacher, the queen, and the Misses ( arol 
Lapham, Evelyn Taylor, Dana Dunphy, Happj Hamilton, Ber- 
nice Roth, Jean Lapham. Ruth Hinton, \im Bowles, Eileen Sul- 
tan, Rowena Dunphy, Carol Bransten, (.race Hamilton, Lur- 
linc Roth, Florence McCormick, Eleanor Weir, Barbara 
Thompson, lane McCann, Enid Sultan. Julie Lapham. 
Barbara Weinstock, Carol Lansburg, Marybeth Pike. 
Betty Shortlidge, Edna Papham, lane Spieker. Sibyl Cor 

yell. Masters Lawrence Harris Jr.. Robert Harris. Albert 
Schwabacher. Mark McCann Jr., Joseph Ross, Ferdinand 
Stent. Charles Montagne, Frederick Michael. Walter Sul- 
livan, Larry Lansburg, Krnest Sultan Jr.. Alexander Casey, 
Melvin Frche. Thomas Sullivan. Billy Thorning, Albert 
Lansburg, James Hart. Alan Michael, Nathaniel Messer Jr. 




HOTEL CANTERBURY 
750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 
Vernon 
r„ Wil- 



Averill-Crimmins Wedding 

The wedding of Miss Mary Bradley Averill 
to Mr. Martin Lalor Crimmins, son" of Mrs. 
Evan Williams of -San Francisco and of Col- 
onel Martin Crimmins, U. S. A., which took 
place in New York, Wednesday, July 7, was 
witnessed by a number of prominent San Fran- 
ciscans. The ceremony took place at the 
Church of St. John the Evangelist at Lake Ma- 
hopac. and was followed by a wedding breakfast 
at Longmead, the summer home of the bride's par- 
ents, Colonel and Mrs. Nathan K. Averill, Edward 
Curtiss Crimmins of San Francisco was his 
brother's best man. Miss Ada Averill was maid 
of honor. 

* * * 

Ambassador and Mrs. Robert Woods Bliss 
have closed their home, The Oaks, at George- 
town, near Washington, where they have been 
passing several weeks, and are on their way for 
California, where they will meet the Crown 
Prince and Princess of Sweden, with whom 
they passed much time in the East. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bliss will visit the old Bliss home in 
Santa Barbara during their stay in this State. They will 
return to Sweden at the end of this summer, when Am- 
bassador Bliss will resume his diplomatic duties. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Sutro and their family were at the 
Plaza in New York for a short visit before sailing Saturdav 
on the Leviathan for Europe. Dr. Benjamin Ide Wheeler 
departed on the Berlin last Wednesday for Germany and 
will pass the summer on the Continent. 

* * * 

Nancy Buckley gave a reading from her books "Laughter 
and Longing" and "Wings of Youth" Thursday evening 
before the members of the Women's City Club. Several 
of Miss Buckley's lyrics that have been set to music by 
Francisca Vallejo (Mrs, C. D. McGettigan) were featured 
on the musical program. By special request Miss Bucklev 
read "Alien." the lyric that won the Blanden poetry prize. 

Miss Buckley recently returned from a sojourn abroad in 
company with her sister. Mary. 

* * * 
Peninsula Country Club 

Many prominent society people were present at the open- 
ing of the Monterey Peninsula Country Club, a supper 
dance being part of the celebration. 

Some of the San Franciscans in attendance were: Messrs. 
and Mesdames :S. F. B. Morse, J. C. Berendsen, L. C. White. 
R. W. Martindale, F. A. Warner. C. W. Byrnes, George 
Rapp, F. D. Cornell. Valentine Treat. Fred A. Burner, I 'li- 
ver J. Williams, F. L. Jackson. 

Among those from < lakland were: Messrs. and Mesdames 

S. E. Jackson. C. F. Jarvis, W. D. Pigeon. Charles Orr. 

Salinas residents at the opening were: Messrs and Mes- 
dames: D. L. Hughes, D. A. Madaira, A. C. Hughes. I. C. 
tett. 

Among the Carmel residents who attended, were: Messrs. 
and Mesdames: M. I. Murphy. A. B. Sampson. 

From Monterey were present: Messrs and Mesdames: 
Allen Griffin, Carmel Martin. C A Kiernan. F.d |. Burns, 
M. W. McMenamin. 

Among the Pacific Grove residents at the opening, were: 
(Continued on Page 14 1 



SANTA MARIA INN 

S wt \ Maria. C u IFORN1 \ 

On ihr GMri Hinh*.a» Hatf*n* B*lw**n San Francnco ami L«« An**l*< 

An Inn of I timutl E^f^Ucnrr 

Wirr or writ* for r#*«r r of hmj o* yomr nrxt trip mmiA 



COLONIAL HOTEL 



({.'it lln*h Street, Between Powell and Stockton. 

Telephone Sutter 3580 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprleto 



San FmnHurn 



1.0 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1926 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




Give Farmers the Air 

A REQUEST that all broadcasting 
stations in the United States be 
ordered into silence for 10 days, "in or- 
der thai the drouth in the Middle West 




C. J. Pennington 

may be broken," has been received by 
\V. D. Terrell, chief radio supervisor 
of the department of commerce. Con- 
trary to the belief advanced recently 
in France that "radio is causing too 
wet weather," the writer of the unusu- 
al request stated that he and many of 
His fellow farmers in Nebraska are con- 
vinced that too many radio waves have 
wrecked their crops for this vear. 

The above is a clipping taken from the 
daily press, which goes to show how 
little the general public as yet reallv 
knows about ra'lio, but perhaps it is to 
be excused for its ignorance, due to 
the fact that radio is yet in its infancy. 

Perhaps if those farmers had studied 
past history they would have discovered 
that there have been many drouths, 
years before radio was discovered. Yet 
there seems to be no other object on 
which to put the blame for the dry 
spell, and as radio is now quite popu- 
lar, it offers as good an outlet for their 
pent up feelings as anything. The 
farmers assume that in accusing radio 
as a wrecker of crops they will at least 
get some attention. 

This coming winter, when the snow 
is four feet deep in Nebraska and the 
blizzards are raging through the coun- 
try now being visited by a drouth, we 
presume these same farmers will take 
up the howl that too many radio waves 
a-e the cause of the whole situation 
and try and stop the broadcasting sta- 
tions. 

Which calls to mind that broadcast- 
ing is being blamed for many things. 
which it is not responsible for and the 
sooner these people who must have an 
excuse for unpleasant situations, keen 
still, the better for radio in every way. 



A New Condenser 

A new type of die-cast variable con- 
denser has been introduced. The rotor 
and stator blocks are two complete 
castings, respectively, which form the 
main structure. An alloy of aluminum, 
copper and silicon is used to produce an 
accurate surface. Straight line fre- 
quency is obtained through tapered cir- 
cular segments without the usual off- 
set plates, which are used by many 
manufacturers to obtain this result. 
< Inly twelve parts are used in the com- 
plete condenser, the cubic contents of 
which are about one-half that of other 
condensers of the same capacity. In 
this condenser the inter-leaving blades 
rotate pa allel to the axis of the con- 
denser and differ from other conden- 
sers in that respect. 

A novel shaft construction is em- 
ployed and cone bearings substituted 
for cylindrical bearings. One of the 
bearings is of semi-floating type, held 
under spring tension to compensate 
for any wear on the bearings. The ad- 
vantage of this construction is that no 
"end play" or "side play" will be no- 
ticed when the knob is turned, no mat- 
ter how long this condenser is in ser- 
vice. 

* * * 

Watch Your Set 
The self-evident maxim that a re- 
ceiving set should be properlv ser- 
viced cannot be stressed too often. Af- 
ter money, care and time have been 
put forth to broadcast a fine program, 
loose connections, poorly seated tubes, 
faulty insulations or any one of a num- 
ber of easily remedied defects in a set 
will prevent good reception. When- 
ever the pleasure of radio reception be- 
gins to pall, a radio expert should be 
called in to look your set over. The 
loss of radio appetite may be due to a 
fault in the set rather than in the pro- 
grams offered, which is generally of 
uniform quality. 



A new 110-volt tube known as the 
"Lestron." operating from either alter- 
nating or direct current without the 
use of a transformer, and completely 
eliminating the A. C. hum, has been 
developed by Adolph Peters. 

The use of this tube in a receiving 
set eliminates both "A" and "B" bat- 
teries, having the combined features of 
rectifier, detector, oscillator to radio- 
frequency amplifier. It can be used as 
a power amplifier having an amplifica- 
tion factor of 8. 

(Continued on Page 13) 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO — 428.3 
Sunday, July IK 

11:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Undenominational and 
non-sectarian church service. 

10:45 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, amuse- 
ments and general information. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
c eation Park of the baseball game. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Organ recital by Marshall 
\v cliselman. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Orchestra under the direc- 
tion of Waldemar Lind. 

6:30 p. in — Basel. all scores, amusement and 
general information. 

6:35 to s ::ia p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chesti a. 

8:36 to 10:110 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orches- 
tra. 

Monday, July in 

7:00, 7:30, B:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises, 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, amuse. 
ment and general information. 

1 - :<"' noon — Time signals and Scripture read. 
ing. weather forecast and market report 

12:10 to 1:00 p. m. — Cllfl Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:0a to 2:0n p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

- : :: o to 3:30 p. m. — Matinee program. 

3:30 to 3:40 p. m. — Fashion notes. 

3:40 to .~,:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert or- 
chestra. 

5:30 i" 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
haseba l ! scoi es, mai kel i eport. 

6:30 to 7:ini p. m. — Orchestra under tin- direc- 
tion of Waldemar 1-lnd. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — .Studio program. 

,i no to 10:00 p. m.— KFI, and KPO, San Fran- 
cisco broadcasting simultaneously a pro- 
gram originating in the KFI studio. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe orches- 
tra. 

Tuesday. July 20 

7:110. 7:311. 8:00 a. in. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — I - . S. weather forecast, market 
reports, amusement and general informa- 
tion. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing, weather forecast and market reports. 

12:10 t" i p. m. — Cllft Hotel Concert Or- 

chest ra, 

1:00 '" -'nil p. in. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast from He- 
c. cation Park of the baseball game. 

1:30 I" 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:16 p. 

6:16 to 6:30 p. 

ball scores. 

6:30 to 7:n0 p. m. — Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar l.i.ul 

. en to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

' t" 9:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe Orchestra 

9:00 to 1ii:oii p. m.— Program featuring the 

harmony team. Gypsy and Malta. 
i i i" 11:00 p. m. — ciift Hotel Dance Oi 

cliestra. 

Wednesday. July 21 

7:00, 7:80, veil a. m. — Dally dozen exercises. 

10:3" a. m. — rj. S. weather forecast, market 
reports, Amusement and general informa- 
tion. 

12:00 i ii — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:10 to 1:00 p. m. — Ciift Hotel Orchestra. 

1:00 to 2 p. in, — Fairmont Hotel h.-slra 

2:4., p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
creation paik of the baseball game 

i:2ii to 5:80 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra, 

6:30 t" i:. I.', n. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — stock market quotations, 
basi ba II scores. 

ii:::u to 7:l"l p. m. — Orchestra. Waldemar Lind 
directing. 

" to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

s i" '■ p. m. — Program by the Alwat.r 

Kent Artists. 

nun t,, iii:iin p. in.— studio program. 

10:00 to 11:0(1 p. m. — Orchestra. Waldemar 

Lind. director. 
Thursday* July 22 

7:00, 7:30, B:00 a. m. — Dally dozen exercl 
10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, market 
o pons, amusement and general Informa- 
tion. 
12:00 noon— Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 



-Children's hour. 

— Market quota ' ions, base- 



July 17, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



Radio Program for Next Week 



12:10 to 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball game from Recreation Park. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m, — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, amusement and general 
information. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra; Waldemar Lind 
director. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — .Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program, featur- 
ing Mrs. Anthony Silva. soprano. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe Dance 
Orchestra. 

Friday. July 23 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 'a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, market 
reports, amusement and general informa- 
tion. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:10 to 12:45 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

12:45 p. m.~ Talk from Commonwealth Club, 

1:80 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball game from Recreation Park. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Conceri Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stork market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:10 p. m. — "SportS-On-the-Alr." 

7:10 to 7:20 p. m. — Business and investment 
talk. 

7:Jo t.. 7:2;"! p. m. — Chamber of Commerce talk. 

8:00 t"> 9:00 p. m. — Studio program, 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel I >ance ■ lr- 
chestra. 

!I:10 to 9 :2(l p. m, — Bonk Review. 

10:00 lo 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind, 

Saturday i July 24 

70ii 7:30, 8:00 p. m. — Daily dozen exercises 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, markel 
reports, amusement and genera] informa- 
tion, 

12.00 noon — Time signals and Pcrlptun to 
Lng. 

12:10 to i :00 p. m. — Clifl Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. , ^ . 

1:00 to 2:oo p m. — Pairmonl Hotel Orchestra, 
1 !.- p. m. — Play by play broadcast ol it" 
baseball game from Recreation Park, 

1:80 to r.::'.n p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chesti a. 

i;:ir, in 6:80 p m, — stock market tatlona 

baseball scores, market reports. 

8:80 to 7:20 p. m. — Orchestra; Waldemar Lind, 

director, 
7:20 to 7::'.0 p. m —Talk or tats. 

B;00 to 12:00 p. in. - rah nia Cafe i Irchestra. 



6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Harry Ross. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Goodfellow's Ad Period. 

S:0G to 8:30 p. m. — Popular program. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance music from Bal- 

conades Orchestra. 
Friday. July 2S 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Goodfellows Ad Period. 
6:30 p. m. — "The Stage and .Screen." 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — KFRC Little Symphony 

Orchestra. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — "L'Enfant Prodigue" — A 

short opera for three voices. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music from Bal- 

conades Ballroom. 
Saturday. July 24 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Mac and his Gang with 

Mac's Junior Orchestra. 
7:00 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen." 
7:0il to 7:30 p. m. — Goodfellows Ad Period. 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — KFRC Request Twins 

".lake 'n Alec." 
s::!l) to 1:00 a. m. — Dance music from Bal- 

conades Ballroom. 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 
Sunday. July IS 

2:30 to 3:0n p. m.— Sunday school. Lesson 

Text. 
3:00 to 5:00 f . mi.— Church service. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. in. — Evening service from the 

Temple. 
Monday* July Ml 

12:16 to 12:30 p. m, — Daily scripture reading. 
Tuesday* July 20 

12:15 to 12:30 p. m.— Daily Scripture reading. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m, — Studio program of sacred 

numbers, 
Wednesday! July 21 

12:15 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
3:00 to J: 00 p. m, — Divine healing service. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — .Studio program of sacred 

numbers. 
Thursday, July 22 

12:16 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading 

Friday, July 2;t 

12 15 to 12 30 p. mi. — Dally serlpture reading 

:; mi to 1:00 p. m. — Sunshine Hour. 

B:00 to 10:00 p. m, — Studio program of sacred 

numbei s, 
Saturday, Jolj 21 
12:1B to 12:80 p. m. — Dafly Scripture, 



KFRC— CITY OF PARIS DRY GOODS CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO— 270.1 
Sunday, Jurj 18 

6:30 i>. in. — 'The Stage and screen 

in mi to 12:00 p. m, -Dane* music from Hal- 

conades Balli oom, 
Monday, Jnli 18 

i n.nu to ii 00 a. m. — Household Hints 

i so to -' 80 p i" i >ance music. 

6 .: 1:30 p, m - \ P, Merell and bis Stamp 

Club 

8;S0 p m . ■ "The Stage and Screen and Po- 
lice Reports. , , 
,; so to 1 00 p "i ro Mendell and ins pep 

Kami 

7 (mi to T 30 p m i loodfellow*s Ad P 

8;00 to 0:00 p m Ground the Camp Fire 

wit h Mac. 

8:00 to B*.S0 p. m.- KFRC Hawalians. 

Tuesday, Jul* M 

B:30 to 6:80 p m M ! bis Gang 

p m — -Tbt- Stage and Sc< i 
G 30 [Q lMI R m.— Fred McKinley, p< 

.. P m .. •Goodfellow's Ad Period 
v on to 8 SO p. m, — Studio program featuring 
i ■ i a ■ 1 1 h ca West. 

n p. in --Pane, music by Balcon- 
ades Orchestra. 

Wrdnrnilnj. July 21 

10 on to 11 ;00 B m — I IoU! i hold Hints 
■ 

R oo tn 6 30 p m.- <■ (fellow's \d Period 

,, ni — "The State and SCI 
•; so to 5 30 p, m Mac and his Gang. 

s 10 p m . — Talk, "Health and Safety. 
ncerl by KFRC Little 

Sv»iM>ho, ; -. 

to 10:00 p. m Studio Program. 
10:00 to 12:00 p w -Man,.. Music by Baloon- 

Ihnrvlm. Jul? 22 

5 30 to 8:30 p. ni. — Mao and his Gang, 

« -m p m _. *Thp Rt«g<» and So i 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO- 
OAKLAND— 361 

Sunday, July is 

n oo a m.— *Flrsl Congregational ' hurch s< i - 

i ' p* m — Vesper set ■ ■ ■ Cathedral, 

San Franc , ,... 

p m —Concel t bs Bern s Little 
■ atra 
ni - Weatht r Bureau report 
T is p m , — First Congregational Church ser- 

i hy Items Little 
Sj mphony ( »rch< 

Monilni. Jul? I" 

I m. — Luncheon concert 

11. ll. 
12 so p 111 — Weathi i ' porta 

p m . — N. v stock repi 
, 57 p m __g F Stock reports 
ll" p m. — Weather Bureau ret. oris 
g no ,,, i -on p m -Edward n w Hi y. planlal 
p m _KGO Kiddles' Kluo. 

■ cerl by Bern b Lltti. 
Symphony 

p m _ News Items. 

w , ,,th- r report 

produce, Grain, « -non and 

.M ■ 

- 

(closing) 
,•00 p m — Educational program. 
: Hnmann. speaker. 

-'' '' . 

; I'"'' „ 

. m.— "Symposium <>n th.- N.-« i 

• ik.r 

1 "' ""' "'" m --I-l.-rary Hour.- 

n, m. — Lunoheon concert. 
gnal. 
ther Bureau reports. 
porta 
- 

, ... 
.; 00 to 6:! ' Uttl * 

Symphony Orcti 

■> report. 

on and 

k report? (closing). 
It reports i closing*. 



8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Eveready Program. 
9;00 to 10:00 p. m. — The Pilgrims' Hour. 
Wednesday, July 21 

9:00 to 10:45 a. m. — Opening session. Inter- 
national Convention of Lions Clubs, Civic 
Auditorium, San Francisco. 

10:45 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — U. S. Weather Bureau reports. 

1 :30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1 :37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — -Weather Bureau reports. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Billy Martin, ten-year-old 
saxophone artist. Ruth Wambold Parks, 
soprano. 

5:30 p. m. — "For Instance." General Jackson, 
columnist. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Tattle 
.Symphony Oi chestra. 

R;5fi p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

i :0R p, m — Paspball scores. 

7:08 ii. m.— S. F. Produce. Grain. Cotton and 
Petals. 

7'1R p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F Stock reports (closing). 

P:ft0 p. m. to 12:00 midnight — Remote oon- 
t- ol p**og-am, International Convention nf 
Lions Clubs, Civic Auditorium, San Fran- 

cisco. 
Thn-Md-y. July ^2 
10:4K to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11-30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 

l?-nn noon — Time Signal 

1 " "ii p. tn. — W eat he- Bureau reports. 

i -SO p. m. — N". V. S'oc'' reports. 

1 :37 p. m. — S F. Stock reports. 

i i" ,, m — Weather Riireau rppo^ta 

:, en ro >'■ "" p. m — "Friend to Boys." 

ro-i i,, ,;■-,-, n . m. — Conceri by Bern's Little 

Pvmphony Orch*»st' a. 

■' '■'• p. m. — News Items, 

OS ,, m. — Weather Bureau report, 

; n« p, m -- ''.:i qohn m scores 

7:0* n. m, — s. i-v Produce, Grain, C 

v i-l;i Is. 
7;1fi p, m. — N*. V. Stock reports (closing i. 
: ':: n, m.- S P. Sto»k reports (closing). 
- on io 9:00 p m — VncnM^n Drogram 
•' mi p. in. io 12:00 midnight— Dance music 
P- 1'«%. J»«iv 23 

' m - ", i,. |1:10 • in — "Literary Hour." 
' i ' " a. in. — Homemaklng Talk 
' i -<i a in. to i :(!<> d. m. — Luncheon concert. 
■ ■■ ftfl noon -^'m** Signal. 
i - -a p. in _ \v< :it !•.-* Pureau reports. 
i ■ " n ,, i . v y s' . .<•!,- rennrtq 
1 "" •• ni - >-' F, Stork reports, 

1 ' " i. m — \\'e;i | 1 I | ■ i . :i u r , | , . , r ( s 

nn to t:0ft n. i" — Fdw|n Helnsnhn, baritone 

^• : ,-[. . . i i. . ,i. s"<>- r no 
r "., ,,, ,-. no p. m — KOO RndJo <- ; -N 
.-, (>m i,, >:-.-, t. rn — Conceri by Bern's Little 
. . 
i , -■ -.•'■• items, 
''OS r p R»re*iu report, 

poll scores 
. in - s I" Produce, Gra In, ' !otton anil 
Metals. 
■i« I. m- v i islngV 

~ i- sr ■ - ■'■ ■ . -mii'v. i closing). 

,.. |,. i :> in ,„:,).,;.. hi — I'.-mntf 

• --op' iptf.»- t .:i ' •■•i\< i Convention of 
u-i Itorlum. 

^-«*..rilT» . .I.-U \1 I 

<•• • - i ,, ll ::n ■. m — "Lit ..-:i--v Hour." 

1,. i -no n m — Luncheon con 

no 1 n — 'Hp^p c, ep'»l. 
I' s w 

„. ?*■< — ft, V «»r.ek ,f T-k<*t reports. 
K P*ni»k M"ket rpports 

i »n Little 

Qv«**Dhnny r»»pii 

:, ,,, _ \\', ,fi,, ■ Pii-»au r-'e.-t 

ni fro*" iti- 

i Convention o( Lions Cluhp 
.-m. 
p m to i " n a. m. — Dance music 



ami 



KFUS — GOSPEL RADIO. OAKLAND— 256 

"iiP'lny. Jul* 18 

m, — International Sunday School Les- 

m. — One hour of sacr»-d songs 
w l-». Jul> l» 

m — The hour of Mini 

Tnr«.«l«y. Jal» \i** 

ni — Th*> ChMdr-n's Rlbl* Story Hour 
p. m — Bible reading — Modern Tr 

p ni — Gospel Radio V 

hour of musical 

" . .ini-»rti >. -inl> ji 

R m — The hour -f Ch 

•ntc* 
T^»--»ll^J. July 22 
■ 

rn Tr«n*l» 
f i << n . 

pes. 
Irld»v. Jnlv '^3 

— The hour of Christian Mil 
c-rsm. 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



July 17, 1920 



Natuiday. July 24 

10:00 a. m. — One hour of Children's Church 

broadcasting. 
6 :30 p. m. — Regular radiocast of the Big 

Down Town Mission. 



KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS, 
OAKLAND— 361 
Monday. July 19 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Prayer Service. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Piano solos, Lillian Brandt 
Wright, pianist. 

Tnesday, July 20 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Prayer Service. 

7:00 to 7:30 j m. — Shopping Hour. 

>*:0U to 9:00 p. m. — (Part 1) Instrumental 
Trio — Mary Pasmore, violin: Dorothy Pas- 
more, cello; Eva Garcia, piano. 

U i-dni mI:iv, July 21 

9:ii0 to 9:30 a. m. — Prayers service led by 
Rev. Geo. W. Phillips. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

Thitrsil.-iy, July 22 

9:00 to 9:S0 a. m. — Prayer Service. 

5:00 to 6:1 5 p. m. — Lecture Hour. "Keeping 
Well." 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to Hi;00 p. m. — Alameda Kiwanis Male 
Quartette. 

Friday, July 23 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Prayer service. 

7:0li i<> 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

' ihi to 10:00 p. m. — Old time favorites — Bar- 
ber Shop Ballad Quartette. 

Sntu day, July 24 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Prayer service. 

7:00 tit 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 



KFWB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY- 
WOOD— 252 
Sunday, July is 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Peggy Mathews, Blues; 
Albeit Keglovich, 13 year old violinist. 

Monday, July 19 

4:45 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

*»:00 to 7:00 p. m — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Program featuring Bill 
Blake. Tenor. 

S:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News Items. 

5:10 tit 9:10 p. m. — Program, featuring Ra- 
<iuel Nleto. 

l:in to 10:10 p. m. — Program featuring Juli- 
us H. Phillips, tenor. ?, 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Tuesday, July 20 

4:45 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

.":on to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

. -mii m 7:30 o. m. — Program featuring Peggy 
Mathews, blues. 

B:00 to S:10 p. m. — News items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Dan 
Gridley, tenor. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Peggy Mathews, blues; 
Julius H. Phillips, tenor; Bill Hatch and 
his Orchestra. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Wednesday. July 21 

4:45 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

':00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

7;00 to 8:00 p. m. — Program featuring Esther 
White, popular songs. 

8*00 to 8:10 p. m. — News items. 

v:io to 9:10 p. m. — Julius H. Phillips, tenor; 
June Parker, blues; Bill Hatch and his Or- 
chestra. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — June Parker, blues; Art 
Pabst, songs to banio accompaniment. 

10:10 to 1.1:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Thn-Nd-y. July 22 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

R:00 !•• 8:10 p. m. — News Items. 

R:10 to s -40 p. m. — Program featuring Ann 
Grey, blues. 

8:40 to 9:10 p. m. — Ann Grey, blues; Edward 
No vis. baritone; Bill Hatch and his or- 
chestra. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Program featuring Peggy 
Mathews, blues. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

F-lilay. July 23 

'■on to 7:oo p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

7:00 to 8:00 n. m. — Program presented featur- 
ing June Parker, blues. 

ft-00 to 8:10 p. m. — News items. 

K:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Rao,ue] 
Nieto. 

910 to 10:10 p. m. — 'Program. 

'0-10 to ll:Oo p m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Saturday, July 24 

r oo to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

S:00 to 9:Oo p. m. — Program, Peggy Mathews, 
hlues: Bill Blake, tenor. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Ann Grey, blues: Bill 
E'ukf, tenor: Bill Hatch's Orchestra. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 



Monday. July 10 

7 00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Fourteenth Community 
Night program. Broadcast by citizens and 
musicians of Salinas. Cal. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Weekly meeting of Pro- 
tective Order of Lake Merritt Ducks. 

Tuesday. July 20 

-1:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Wednesday, July 21 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — -Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:0o p. m. — Educational program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Special program, broad- 
cast through the Hotel Oakland. 

Thursday, July 22 

:::00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Friday, July 2.'t 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

R:00 to 9:45 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:45 to 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 

Saturday, July 24 

3:00 ji. m, — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KGW— MORNING OREGON1AN, PORT- 
LAND— 491,5 

^nnilaj, Jill'* IS 

10:25 to 12:00 noon — Morning services. 

"■30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Concert by the Chevrolet 
Symphony Orch*-stra. 

"onday. July Itt 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m.— Conceit. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. in. — Dinner concert : baseball 
scores. 

F:30 to 7 :4a ". m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

7:J5 to 8:°" o. m. — Address. A Service the 
Westerner <';i" Render His West." 

B:00 to 9:0" n. m. — Organ recital. 

900 to 10:"0 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 

1 0:00 to 1 2:00 o. m, — Dance music by Herb 
WI* > Cloef*'P C : nderella Roof orchestra. 

Tuesday, July SO 

10:00 to ]i-3n " m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12:30 to 1:3(1 p. m. — Concert. 

2:00 to 3::*o p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

•••00 to 7:oo p. in. — Dinnpr concert. 

7 00 to 7:30 n. m. — '"'hi'd-en's program. 

7:30 to 7:J5 p. m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

8-00 in 10 00 p. m. — Educational program. 

io:oo i,, 12:00 o. m. — Dance music. 

^'ednesilav. July 21 

10:00 to 11-30 a, m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12-30 m 1-30 i.. in. — Concert. 
6:00 to 7:o0 p m. — Dinner concert; baseball 

sco' es 
7:30 fo 7:*." o. m. — Weather, market and po- 

lic- reports. 
RO0 to 9:^n ,, m — Concert. 
9:00 in 9:20 p. m. — Concert Of instrumental 

and vo^al mus'C 
Thi'-sfiHy- J"'y 22 
lit on t„ n-30 a m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12-SO to i -:'0 d. m — r *oncert. 
fi:0o t>. 7:00 p, m. — Dinner concert: baseball 

scores. 
7 '''I to 7:45 i> m.— Weather, police and mar- 
ket nn" ts 
7 '5 to S"0 p. m. — L°Ctu-e. 
1 I'" lo 10-01 p ni. — Vaudeville nrogram. 
io-oo to i?-00 n. m. — Dance music. 
'' l'-y. Jply 23 
10:00 to 11 -30 a. m. — Women's nflllv dozen. 

music. vfMthe" report, household helps. 
i*>-20 to 1*30 p. m. — r-uncert. 
' 00 io :' or, p ni — Women's M»tl nee. 
p-no io 7:00 p. m. — ninnfr conc*»**t. 
7:30 to 7-J." n, m. — Weather, police and mar- 
kef r*-n'-'ts 
'•on to ft-nn p. m — Concert of vocal and in- 

••♦-uri-iep ">l music. 
10-30 to 12:00 p. m. — We^ly rrnltc n f th«* 

Keep Crowing Wiser Order of Hoot Owls. 
Sf<tM-day. Ji»lv 24 
io-oo tn ii-30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

household h-lps. 
»?-so to i-?o p. m. — Concert. 
fi;00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert; baseball 

scares. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dancp music. 



11:00 a. m. — Temple Baptist Church. 

4:00 p. m. — Vesper Services arranged by Fed- 
erated Church Musicians. 

6:30 p. m. — KEI Nightly Doings. 

6:45 p. m. — Music Appreciation Chat. 

7:00 p. m. — Jim, Jack and Jean Trio. 

8:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital. 

9:00 p. m. — Badger's Hollywood Californians. 
Mert Denman and his Uke. 

iO.'QO p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra. Dolly 
MacDonald, soloist. 

Ilundny, July !!► 

5:30 i). m. — Varsity Ramblers, direction of 
Wallace Dish man. 

6:00 p. m. — KP1 Nightly Doings. 

6:15 j*. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. in. — George Wilder Cartwright. 

7:00 p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians. 

S:00 i). m. — Semi -classical program. 

9:00 p. m. — Walter M. Murphy Motors Co. 
Marie Caselotti-Chico De Verde Russian 
Quartet. 

l o:00 p. m. — Program bv JUelkleJohn Bros. 

Tuesday. July 20 

5:30 p. m. — Rendezvous Ballroom Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nlghtlv Doings. 

6:16 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 \>. ni. — Edna Cooke and Billle Henderson 

B:46 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 

i :00 p. m. — Virginia Ballroom Orchestra. 

8:00 p .ni. — Screen Artists' Quartet. 

9:00 p. m. — Ernest It. Ball, composer, & Co., 
w i t h Edna Kellogg, .soprano. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club. 

W«dneNday, July 21 

5:30 p m — Don Warner's orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p. in. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. in. — Don Warner's Orchestra. 

6:45 p. m. — E. C. D. Price "Gossip.'' 

7:00 p. m. — Popular Program. 

7:30 p. m. — Nick Harris, detective stories, 

sun p. m. — Program by California Petroleum 
Corporation. 

9:00 p. m. — Varied program of popular music. 

10:00 j). m. — Program arranged by Charles 
Beauchamp. 

Tliurxday. July 22 

5:30 p. in. — Theron Bennett's Hollywood Foot- 
lifters. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightlv Doings. 

6:15 p. m. — KFI Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. in. — Theron Bennett's Hollywood Foot- 
lifters. 

R:4G p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 

7:00 p. m. — Duncan Sisters & Co., from "Top- 
sy and Eva." 

s;00 p. m. — Program arranged bv Robert 
Hurd. 

9:00 p. m. — An hour of semi-classical music. 

10:00 p. m. — Patrick-Marsh Orchestra. Betty 
Patrick, SOlolBt 

Frldny. July 2tt 

5:30 p. m. — Program arranged by Eugen'- Bis- 
cailuz. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Paula Meeks. 

6:45 p. ni. — Burr Mcintosh, "Cheerful Philoso- 
pher." 

7:00 p. m. — Leslie Adams, whistler. 

7::to p. m. — Felipe Delgado. Media Hora Es- 
panola. 

8:00 p m. — Aeolian Organ Recital. Dan L. 
MacFarland at the console. 

9:00 p. m. — Program of Hawaiian Music by 
Ha iry Decker. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Ballad Hour. Emma 
Kim m el. 

Saturday, July 24 

5:30 p. m. — Shelley Players orchestra, with 

Maria Evarts. 
•'•oo p. m . — KFI Nlghtlv Doings. 
.; i:, p. m . — KFI Radio Tiavel Guide. 
fi:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Program. 
,; :J5 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 
T ;00 p. in. — Knights of the Notes. Waltei 

Ho? ague, director; Paul Roberts, soloist 
R00 p. m. — Angelus Trio. 
9 oo p, m, — P'ogram by Robert Hurd. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club. 
11:00 p. m.— KFI Midnight Frolic. 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAK- 
LAND— 508.2 
SMndny, July 1* 

Silent 



KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 

LOS ANGELES — 467 

'Copyright 19?5 by Earle C. Anthonv. Tnc.1 
S"T»riay, July 1« 

10:00 a. m. — Morning Services. 



KNX— L. A. EVENING EXPRESS 
LOS ANGELES— 337 

l)r>tly Kxcept Sunday. 

7:30 a. m. — KNX Moaning Gym. 

8:00 a. m. — Inspirational talk and morning 
prayer. 

8:55 a. m. — Time slernals. 

9:00 a. m. — Radio Shopping News. 

io-oo a, m. — Day's Mornine Message. 

10:30 a. m. — Household Economics Dent. 

12:00 m. — Leighton's Arcade Cafeteria Or- 
chestra. 

1:S0 p. m. — Thf Rook Worm. 

1 55 p. m. — Market reports. 

5:30 n. m. — Leigh ton's Arcade Cafeteria Or- 
chestra. 

fi 00 p. m. — The Town Tattler. 

■■:' 5 p. m. — Travelogue. 

»':30 p. m. — Atwater Kent orchestra. 

SMndny, July 1H 

1000 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of 
Hollywood. 



July 17, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



12:30 p. m. — Paul Flnsteins Concert Orchestra. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — City Park Board musical 

program. 
4:30 p. m. — Half-hour Cinema Chat. 
6:80 p. m. — First Unitarian Church. 
7:00 p. m. — Circle Theater Concert Orchestra. 
S:00 p. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
Monday. July 1ft 
3:00 p. m. — Little Jean. 
4:00 p. m. — Household Hints. 
4:30 p. m. — Blue Monday Frolic. 
7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
7:30 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
10:00 p. m. — -Courtesy program. 
11:00 p. m. — Ray West's Cocoanut Grove Or- 
chestra. 
Tuendny, July 30 
2:00 p. m. — Mothers' Hour. 

m. — Courtesy program. 

-Talk on Health, 
m. — Courtesy program, 
m. — Courtesy program. 

—Henry Halsted's Orchestra, 
-Ray West's Cocoanut Grove Or- 



7:00 p. 

7:45 p. 

8:00 p. 

9:00 p. 

10:00 p. 

11:00 p. m 
chestra. 

WeilneHday, July 21 

3:00 p. m. — Musical readings. 

4:00 p. m. — Talk on care of children. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

11:00 p. m. — Ray West's Cocoanut Grove Or- 
chestra. 

ThiirMdny. July lili 

11:00 a. m. — Nature talk. 

2:00 p. m. — Handwriting expert. 

7:00 p. m. — Organ recital by Fred Scholl. 

S:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Courtesv program. 

10:00 p. m. — Henry Halsted's Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Ray West's Orchestra. 

Friday. July 23 

10:30 a. m. — "Proper Foods and How to pre- 
pare them." 

m. — Women's Clubs musical program, 
in. — Boy Scouts' Musical Program. 
-Courtesy program. 

S:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Broadcasting the main Event 
from Hollywood Legion Stadium. 

1 1 :00 p. m. — Ray West's Orchestra. 

Suliir.ln } . July 24 

3:0(1 p. m. — Town Crier of the Day and his 
pals. 

I:4f> p. m. — .Joyce Cond. resume of her screen 
work. 

7:00 p. m. — Stories of insect life. 

7 :1 5 p. m. — Announcement of Sunday ser- 
vices, 

7:30 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

*:oo p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m, — Ray West's Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Saturday night frolic. 



2:00 p. 
4:00 p. 
:00 p. 



KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO. 

SEATTLE— 384.4 
Nmidny, July IN 

tl:00 a. m. to 12:30 p. m. — Church Services. 

7:45 to 8:00 p .m. — Organ reoltal. 

S:00 to 8:15 p. m — Kvening service First 

M. B, Church. 
8:16 in ID:46 p m. — < trcheal ra 
llondny. .Jul? ill 
11:80 to 13:00 m. — 'What to prepare for to- 

night's dinner.'" 
18:00 m. — Time Signals. 
B:4fl to 6:00 p. m. — Stock Exchange quota 

tlons. 
6:00 p. in. — Time Signals 
6-00 to 6:06 p. m. — Baseball *r.>res. 
6:05 to t; : i n p. m.— Weal her reports. 

t 80 i" 10:00 p. m — Post Intelligencer Studio 

Progi am. 

10 00 p. in. — Time Signals 
Tumdny. July "_t» 

1 1 :30 to 18:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner.' 

l J 00 in Tim. Signals 

to i "" p. m — studio program. 
8:40 to 8:00 p. m.— Stock Kxehange quota- 
tions. 

. p, m , — Time Signal*. 

,: i hi !,. 6:08 p. m.— Baseball scorea 
m. — Weather reports 
S:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Orchestra directed by 

Henri Damskl. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
v* edaeaday* July 21 

to 18:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner" 

i ; oo m.— Time Signals 

8:40 to 6:00 p. m. — Stock Fxchange quota- 
tions. 

\6:00 p. m.— Time Signals. 

i •■ ('-'","> p. n 



6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

7:30 to 8:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

S:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Thursday. July 22 

11:30 to 12:00 a. m. — "What to prepare for 
tonight's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to fi:00 p. m. — Stock Exchange quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

S:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Orchestra directed by 
Henri Damski. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer pre- 
senting weekly meeting of the "Keep Joy 
Radiating Order of Bats." 

Friday, July 23 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Stock Exchange quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

S:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer Studio 
Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio Program. 

Saturday, July 24 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — -"What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — Stock Exchange quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:80 to 10:00 p. m. — .Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 
—322.4 — (Mountain Time) 

Sunday. July IS 

11:00 a. m. — Service of Augustana Lutheran 

church, Denver. 
6:30 p. m. — Studio concert by KOA choristers. 
8:00 p. m. — Open-air concert, Denver municip- 
al band. 
>l • > n d a y , July 1ft 
111.'. a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks. 

markets, livestock and produce. 
1 :: : 1 .'. p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 

nolds, 
4:30 p. m. — Organ recital by Marjorie Nash 
6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert, Brown Palace 

String orchestra. 
7tS0 p. m. — Sandman's hour. 
8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program by Bcheu- 

ins Colorado orchestra. 

8:16 p. m. — Studio program, presenting the 

k< i a players in a historical play. "Border 

Li nee, in four acts. 
TueMilay, July 20 

111". ;i. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce, 

[3:16 p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds, 

8:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives, 

i p iii. — Culinary hints. 

1:16 p. m. — Fashion review. 

, :;,, p m . — Organ recital by Marjorie Nash 

i> m.— Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 

QUCe and news bulletins. 

p m . — Dinner concert, Brown Pal act- 
string orchestra. 

p in —Farm question box. 

Wrdnetulny, July 21 

11:46 a m —Weather, road reports, stock.* 
markets, livestock and produce. 

,, n , — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds, 

1:80 p m. — Organ recital by Marjorie Nash. 

, ; oo ,, „,. — siocks markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

6:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. Brown Palace 
Suing orchestra. 

7:80 p. m — Rook of Knowledge 

g.QO p m . — Instrumental program by Scneu- 
erman's Colorado orchestra. 

m — Studio program of miscellaneous 
musical offering 

Thu* Hd*y. Jul? 23 , . 

11:46 n m. — Weather, road reports. StOCRS, 
markets, livestock and produce. 

18:16 p. ni. — Organ recital by Clarence Toy 
nolds. 

t 30 i' m. — Matinee for housewives. 

, ,,.> p ni — Culinary hints. 

^ 16 p. m. — Fashion review. 

, so p m — Organ recital by Marjorie Nash. 
g:00 p m ._Stocka markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 
* j; p. m .— United Press weekly sports re- 

Kr ,n* p ni — Dinner concert. Brown Palace 
String orchestra. 

Friday. Jul> ^t , , 

11-48 a in —Weather, road reports, stocks. 
markets, livestock and produce. 

p m . — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nold* 



3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

1:00 p. m. — Culinary hints. 

■I :15 p. m. — Fashion review. 

4:30 p. m. — Organ recital by Marjorie Nash. 

ti :00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. Brown Palace 
String orchestra, 

7:30 p. m. — Preview of International Sunday 
school lesson. 

S:00 p. m. — Open-air concert, Denver munici- 
pal band. 

Saturday. July 24 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets and livestock. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 10) 
The tube has a metallic base, which 
is used as a fifth connection to the tube, 
known as a cathode, and is used to con- 
trol the electronic emission in the tube. 
A plate voltage up to 200 volts may be 
applied to the tube without danger of 
overheating. 

The cost of operating the tube is said 
to be about one cent per hour for a 
five tube set. The life of the tube is 
estimated to be the same as the present 
tubes which operate from batteries. 




EUROPE 



On the new famous "O" . 

you are »ure of utmost comfort — 

cabin or tourist third cabin 
Cabins containing single and two 

beds. Spacious promenade 

decks, ballroom, gym and other 

special features 

Sailings Saturdays 

from New York 

Cabin class from #145.00 
Tourist prom #95.00 

cAUo direct tailing* from Pacific 

Coast ria Panama Canal 

CRUISES i 

Norway ■ South America 

Mediterranean 

Second great African cruise leave* 
New York, January, 1927 

Complete information cV literature 

Royal Mail Stearr Packet Company 

570 Mtrket St.. San Francisco 

or Local Agent 



ROYAL 

MAIL 

nTHE COMFORT ROUTti 
SINCE 18 3 9 




14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1926 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

Messrs. and Mesdames : B. F. Sowell Jr., C. S. Olmstead, 
B. F. Sowell Sr., L. E. M. Cosmey. 

* * * 
Vice-Consul of Peru 

Host at Tea Party 

Senor Don Carlos J. Monsalve, Vice-Consul of Peru, was 
the host at a tea party given last Saturday afternoon at the 
Palace Hotel in honor of Mrs. Frank Freyer of Peru, a 
noted lecturer and distinguished personage. Mrs. Freyer 
is the wife of Commander Freyer, U. S. A., and is leaving 
shortly for Washington to join Commander Freyer. 

Countess Florenza Nicolai, fiancee of Senor Monsalve, 
was a complimented guest on this occasion her recent en- 
gagement announcement to the Vice-Consul of Peru being 
quite the most talked-of event recently in social circles. 

Menlo Park Country Club 

The first of the series of subscription dances arranged for 
members of the younger set on the peninsula took place last 
Friday evening at the Menlo Park Countiy Club, where 
more than a hundred sub-debutantes and young men en- 
joyed a gay evening. 

The chaperones were Mrs. Augustus Taylor, who ar- 
ranged the series, Mrs. Roger Lapham and Mrs. Charles 
McCormick. The club was attractively decorated, and ex- 
cellent music kept the youngsters happy until a late hour. 

Preceding the dance Mr. and Mrs. Charles McCormick en- 
tertained a few of the young people at dinner. 

Santa Maria Inn 

The following people stopped at the Inn during the week 
of Monday, July 5 to Monday, July 12 : Mrs. E. O. McCor- 
mick, Mr. E. O. McCormick, Jr., and party all of San Fran- 
cisco ; Mr. and Mrs. John Tonningson, San Francisco; Mr. 
and Mrs. E. W. Newhall, Jr., Miss Newhall, San Francisco; 
Mr. and- Mrs. John J. Mitchell, Jr.. and party in which were : 
Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Awl and daughter. Santa Barbara; Mr. 
Oliver Schaef, Santa Barbara; Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Zimmer- 
man, Chicago, Illinois; Mr. M. R. Sheriff. Chicago, Illinois; 
Dr. A. W. Cook, Chicago, Illinois. 

* * * 

Atherton Wedding 
Out of Doors 

Another beautiful out-of-doors wedding took place at Ath- 
erton July 11, when, amid flowering garden scenes, Miss 
Jean Stettheimer, young daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Stettheimer, became the bride of Mr. Paul Felix Warburg, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Felix Warburg of New York. 

The bride and the bridal party made their way down a 
long garden lane flanked with tall marble urns from which 
fell masses of feathery gypsophila. At the end of the aisle, 
by the side of a beautiful pool, was the altar, banked on 
three sides by an artistic arrangement of hydrangeas, white 
lilies, gypsophila and ferns. 

The bride, who is extremely pretty and petite, was a pic- 
ture in her bridal robes of white tulle. The skirt was bouf- 
fant and quite long. The closely fitting bodice was em- 
broidered in seed pearls. 

From the shoulders, gracefully hung a long court train of 
rose point lace, an heirloom in the Schiff- Warburg families. 
The veil was of filmy tulle, held by a wreath of orange blos- 
soms. The bride's bouquet was of white butterfly "orchids 
and lilies-of-the-valley. 

Mrs. Adler, matron of honor, was gowned in jade green 
tulle and chiffon trimmed in silver. Her hat was large ton- 
ing with the gown. She carried orchids. 

Wedding Supper Elaborate 

The wedding supper was served out-of-doors, the bridal 
table b«ing elevated a -little more than the other small 



tables seating the guests. The covering was a cloth of 
gold with table decorations of fruit and flowers. 

Tables seating the guests were covered with green chif- 
fon cloth and decorated with the season's blossoms in vari- 
ant hues. The entire setting was like a gorgeous painting. 

* * * 
Sports at Santa Cruz 

Al White, National diving champion, will appear on the 
big swimming program at Santa Cruz this week end. This 
is the word just received here by the Department of Events 
of the Santa Cruz Seaside Company. 

With both White and Eleanor Garatti on the bill as spe- 
cial attractions, the Santa Cruz meet will be one of the 
greatest swimming events of the year in California. 

Several P. A. A. championship events are included in the 
program, which consists of competitions Saturday night. 
Sunday afternoon and Sunday evening. There will be a 
440-yard ocean swim for the P. A. A. men's championship 
Sunday afternoon. This will take place in the ocean, op- 
posite the Casino. 

On Saturday night, Eleanor Garatti will attempt to break 
the record for the 100-yard distance in the Casino Plunge. 
Several of the fastest girl swimmers on the Coast will give 
her competition in this event. Helen Zabriskie, Adrienne 
Gibson and Gloria Sigliano are the swimmers who are ex- 
pected to race against the champion. There will also be 
a number of races for the men swimmers. 

Among the men swimmers who will compete in the 440- 
yard ocean swim will be: Lester Smith, former Olympic 
Club champion; Art Hargrave, who won the Junior mile 
swim at Healdsburg, and Paul de Silva, recent 220-yard 
winner at Santa Cruz. Frank Walton, also of the Olympic 
Club, and Walter Stevenson, Stanford swimmer, are also 
expected to compete. Leo Purcel. James Rice, and George 
Fisher are also expected to be on hand for the tank events. 



VACATION! 




Ask for 

"Outing 

Resorts" 

folder 




Low Fares 

— to most cities and summer play- 
grounds on Pacific Coast. Tickets 
on sale daily with 16-day or 3- 
mcnths limits. Plan your vacation 
to take advantage of these travel 
bargains. 

Reduced roundtrip fares to Los An- 
geles, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, Del 
Monte, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite, to the 
Pacific Northwest and to many other 
places. Fast, comfortable service daily. 



oiithern Pacific Lines 



Ferry Station 



65 Geary Street Third Street Station 
Or Phone Sutter 4000 



■M 



July 17, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

Seeing the World Aboard Dollar Liners 

The Dollar Steamship Line offers many unique advan- 
tages to travelers. It is the one steamship line affording 
continuous service round-the-world upon regular schedule. 

You can begin your world cruise from San Francisco 
anv week in the year. Dollar Liners depart for the Orient 
every Saturday. 

The Dollar Line schedule is notably flexible and con- 
venient, providing two-way service across the Pacific. All 
west-bound Dollar Liners voyage as far as Manila — each 
alternate liner continuing thence round-the-world, the others 
returning to the United States by way of Hong Kong, 
Shanghai, Kobe, Yokohama and Honolulu. 

If stop-overs are made -at any port of call, the journey can 
be resumed aboard splendid Dollar Liners similar to the 
others in accommodations and equipment. By using this 
service of the Dollar Steamship Line, you can book reser- 
vations ahead for all or any part of the passage. Upon 
setting out, there is no uncertainty about connections. 

On one-way tickets the return limit is 12 months; and 
on round-the-world tickets, 24 months. Thus, in those 
countries which you wish to see intimately, you can ar- 
range extensive stop-overs. 

It is a feature of the service of the Dollar Steamship Line 
that stops are made at the various ports during daylight 
hours. This enables you to spend the best time of the day 
in sight-seeing. While in port (except at New York) the 
ship serves as hotel for the through passengers, without ex- 
tra charge. 

The Dollar Line offers the only passenger route round 
the world on ships entirely American. 

This is the only steamship line in the world whose entire 
fleet is of new construction! 

These liners are all big, sturdy, oil-burning steamships — 
and the arrangement of all cabins amidships promotes 
smooth and comfortable sailing. 

Their accommodations are ultra-modern. All staterooms 
are outside rooms, and are furnished with elegance and dis- 
tinction. They have real beds, not berths: and these beds 
are fitted with luxurious coil springs and mattresses. The 
majority of the staterooms have private baths and showers. 

Well-ventilated, well-lighted, and equipped with electric 
fans, the staterooms on Hollar Liners are adapted to travel 
in the tropics. 

The decks are spacious and immaculate. They may be 
enclosed in glass as a guarantee of steamer-chair comfort; 
and for protection against the SUn, awnings are spread in 
southern latitudes. 

A club-like atmosphere of good fellowship prevails in 
the men's smoking-room. The library and writing-rooms, 
the garden tea-room and veranda cafe — all these are for 
your use and enjoyment. 

In the dintng-saloon, cuisine and service are of the best. 
Not only clo the chefs display unusual talent in their taste- 
ful art ; they also have at their command all the varied food- 
stuffs of the world. 

\s all Hollar Liners are fitted with complete refrigeration 
equipment, fresh fruits, vegetables and other produce are al- 
ways available — an important item of health assurance. 

You will he carefree, content, as you travel thus on lux- 
urious Dollar "President" Liners to and from the Orient, 
and round the world by ua\ of Egypt and the Mediterranean. 



The Height of Meagerness 
\V omen who went in bathing used to dress like Mother 
Hubbard. Now they dress more like Mother Hubbard's 
cupboard- -Tampa Tribune 



CUNARD 

Channel Service 



New York 

to 

England and France 

by CABIN SHIPS 



Caronia 

Carmania 

Cameronia 

Lancastria 

Alaunia 

Ascania 

AUSONIA 



For Full Particulars Apply to 

CUNARD AND ANCHOR LINES 

Or Local Agents 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8C DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general oAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Sutter 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1926 



Finance 



THE Sante Fe has received fifteen new powerful en- 
gines of the 3800 class to help handle the ripening 
fruits and crops. Each of these engines can haul a train 
of refrigerator cars a mile long. In all the twelve states 
traversed by the Santa Fe conditions for harvest are good. 
The wheat crop is particularly abundant. 

* * * 

— One of the queerest claims arising under the industrial 
accident commission rulings was that of a worker who 
claimed injuries for being bitten by a raccoon, kept in a 
market house for the purpose of exterminating rats. The 
claim that the injury arose out of the employment was sus- 
tained. * * * 

— Who would imagine that the development of the use 
of the auto would lead to a slump in the clothing industry, 
and consequently affect adversely the wool and textile in- 
dustries? Such seems to be the case. The purchase of 
cars on deferred payments produces a neglect in clothes, 
and the cessation of church going, due to Sunday motoring, 
reduces the demand for Sunday suits. The textile manufactur- 
ers are eager to meet this situation. 

* * * 

— Eighteen is the earliest age at which a driver can handle 
a car in any city of the State of New York, henceforth. 
Statistics have convinced the state motor vehicle depart- 
ment that drivers younger than that age, are either inclined 
to be reckless, or lack the faculty of quick thinking when 
an emergency may arise. 

* * * 

— One result of the alleged strike of carpenters is the in- 
flux into San Francisco of large numbers of non-union 
carpenters who will stay here and will unquestionably re- 
duce the rate of wages for carpenters very soon, for with 
the falling off in building operations due to the strike, there 
will be marked over-supply of labor in that field. 

* * * 

— One of the unexpected results of the development of 
auto travel, with the transportation of great numbers of 
city people to the open spaces, is the threatened extermina- 
tion of the clam on our beaches. The biologist of the State 
Fisheries Commission points out the destruction of clams is 
practically entirely due to the activities of tourists and ama- 
teur diggers, who are entirely ruthless in their pursuit ir- 
respective of the spawning age. 

* '* * 

— There has been no slump in the key industries during 
the past half year. Steel, building and automobile manu- 
facture have held their own. Steel buying has picked up 
and continues to be active ; building contracts show an in- 
crease of 10 per cent over a corresponding period of last 
year, and the production of passenger cars is about 2.3 
percent over what it was a year ago. 

* * * 

—It has been well noted that the building development 
proceeds, contrary to the anticipations of those who had 
considered it was founded upon the shortage caused by the 
war. But the new building development is founded more upon 
standards of living being raised and efficiency in business 
demanding the destruction of old office plants and the erec- 
tion of new ones. 

* * * 

— The government bond market is good reflecting the re- 
sults of the ability displayed in governmental finance which 
has resulted in the arranging for the pavment of $334,000,000 
of maturing certificates in June, out of current receipts and 
without the floating of new securities. This made all gov- 
ernment bonds move upwards. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY I0TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1926 

Assets $109,430,478.72 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,400,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $557,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Hafeht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4 ] ^) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




Brandt Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid I'p Capital *20,0IK),000 f20.000.000 Rcnerve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Huut'ht. FORE ION and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Franclnco Ofllcc: 1.1" California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. i 'I 1 1 I . I 1 1 V II I > 

Manager ANNt. Munager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 22+4 

THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS - AUDITORS — COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C. P. A. 
Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, Slow 
Accounts; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYoung Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

208 Crocker Balldlne (Opposite Palace Hotel), Son Franciac 

Phone Kearny 391 



July 17, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



TENNIS AROUND THE BAY COUNTIES 
By Lyman Foster Martin 

There have been thousands of dollars subscribed by 
Chambers of Commerce and there have been created or- 
ganizations whose sole purpose is to advertise California. 
This is no idle fancy. It has proved good business invest- 
ment. 

Now to one item that brings our advertising gratis. 

In the past, California, and particularly the Bay Counties, 
have been supplying the east, aye, the world with tennis 
champions. Maurice McLaughlin was the first to blaze 
across the tennis horizon. Then, there is the true and 
steady "Little Bill" Johnston, who is always up there doing 
his bit, giving "Big Bill" Tilden the hardest tussle of the 
season. The latest sensation, Howard Kinsey, in the tourna- 
ments at Wimbledon, has added no little to the prestige 
of San Francisco. 

What has gone before, was not merely a circumstance ; 
we cite the last inter-collegiate tournament held in the east, 
where two sons of California met in the finals ; Cranston 
Holman, of Stanford, and "Bud" Chandler, of the Univer- 
sity of California. Those who are "in the know" say that 
Chandler is the most likely candidate to usurp the throne 
of "Big Bill" Tilden. 

Then we have our Kinseys ; Helen Wills ; Helen Jacobs, 
the national junior champion; the Griffin family, "Peck" Mer- 
vyn, and Elmer, and many more, to keep the name of our state, 
and our city before the eyes of the world in press dispatches. 

Recently the Davis Cup Challenge Round (western di- 
vision) in which Japan defeated the Philippine Islands, was 
played at the Kezar Stadium in Golden Gate Park. This is 
the first tournament of world-wide importance that has 
ever been held here. 

What would be the cost of all this publicity in hard cash? 
As it has been given to us gratis, we are not too keenly 
appreciative. 

* * * 

At this time of the year must of Our home talent is in 

other climes, looking for more worlds l<> conquer. 

Helen Wills is satisfactorily recuperating from her opera- 
tion for appendicitis and will soon leave Tor home. Sin- 
intends to resume practice after her arrival for the wo- 
men's National Tournament in August, in which she 
will defend her title. 

Howard Kinsey is now playing in < iermany, with indifferent 
success. However, he did far better at Wimbledon 
than his most anient admirers could have desired. He 
and Vincent Richards reached the finals in the men's 
doubles. He was also in the finals of the mixed doubles, 
and fared admirably well in the men's singles. 

Bill Johnston will leave for the cast the latter part of this 
month, to play at Seabrighl and at Newport, in prep- 
aration for the national championships. 

Edward Chandler, Stow, Risso. and Harrison of the Uni- 
versity of California, are all playing in the east in vari- 
ous tournaments, (.'handler again won the national 
inter-collegiate championship. 

Sherman Lockwood, Cranston Holman and Lionel Ogden. 
the latter two representing Stanford University, are 
also in the east. 

Mrs. Ream Leachman, Miss Rose Marie Brunn and Wal- 
lace Bates, all of San Francisco, are playing at Vic- 
toria. B. C. 
Are San Franciscans maintaining their place in the tennis 

firmament? 
Well, rather. 



SUMMER RESORTS 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

WHY? 

It's the Water and the Table 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 
tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN 

Acua Camente, Sonoma County, Calif. 
or see Peck-Judah 



The oats crop. Crop Statistician West tells us. must have 
rain at once; the wild variety can get on a long time with- 
out water. — Columbus Dispatch. 



El Dorado Hotel 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Mushroom*" 

Clean Rooms, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

Viait Sonoma County's Famoui Renom and Mineral (Warm Water) Swimming 

Tanks From This Hotel 

Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 
Telephone 110 



FETTERS HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete highway open. Famous medicinal balhs. Masseur 
in attendance. Healthful mineral waters; swimming pool. All 
amusements. Excellent table. Hotel steam heated. Cottage accom- 
modations. Rates, $18 up. Write George Fetters, Mgr., J. F. 
Green, Ass't. Mgr., or Peck-Judah. 



^•ALilE-iN 1 £j V ILL. J\ <. ARL STEFFEN . PR op. 

French and Italian Dinners — Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

4 Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma -1F4 



The Lodge at Saratoga 

I'nder New >lnnnitrmenl 

Specializing Dinner Dances Saturday and Sunday Nights 
The Most Modern and Sanitary Mountain Hotel in America 

Open the Tear 'Round. Among the Pines and Redwoods. 

Wider Roads. American Plan. Moderate Rates. 

Greatly Improved 

Owned and Operated by John A. Evans Corporation, Los Angela! 
Phone Hempstead 2101 

THOMAS R. OOIT.HGRTV, Micr., Saratoga. Calif. 
Phones Saratoga 80 and 163 



"POP" McC RAY'S 

One Mile North of Cloverdale on Redwood Highway 

DANCING IN DINING ROOM AND 

CLUB HOUSE 
SWIMMING IN RUSSIAN RIVER 

Jellies. Jams and Mustard Pickles Always on the Table J 

t 

t 

i 



18 



THE. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1926 



The Mormon Choir 
The Mormon Tabernacle Choir — two hundred carefully 
selected, refined, cultivated voices, generally conceded to 
be not only the finest choral body in the West, but in all 
America as well, has been booked by Manager Frank W. 
Healy for special concert at the Civic Auditorium, San Fran- 
cisco, on Saturday night, July 31st, at 8:30. The Choir, 
which leaves Salt Lake City on July 23rd, brings two great 
musical personalities in Anthony C. Lund, conductor and 
Edward P. Kimball, organist. Assisting the Choir will be 
Leon G. Smith, baritone soloist and the Utah Chaminade 
Ladies Chorus of thirty voices. 



Campaign for Wm. Waste 

With "the holidays out of the way, the campaign to re- 
elect William H. Waste, Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court, is getting rapidly under way. Nomination papers 
are being circulated in ever)' county of the state and local 
committees are being organized everywhere. 

It is estimated that Justice Waste's nomination papers 
will carry over 13,000 signatures, more than double the num- 
ber necessary under the primary law. The San Francisco 
petition with 2800 names was filed Friday. 



George Kruger to Give Recital 

Five artist students will be presented by the well known 
pianist, Mr. George Kruger, at a piano recital at the Se- 
quoia Club Hall, 1725 Washington St. on Thursday, July 
22nd, at 8:15 p. m. An extensive program of classical se- 
lections will be given, including Chopin, Grieg, Liszt, Mos- 
kowski, Sinding, Debussy, etc., as interpreted by the fol- 
lowing: Lillian Coplantz, Albert Grimes, Viola Luther, Jo- 
seph Salvato and Norman Smith. 

Those conversant with the brilliant technique of Mr. Kru- 
ger, anticipate an enjoyable evening to be given by his 
pupils. 



A Happy Family 
New York housing report says that five persons can live 
in a two-room kitchenette apartment without bad effect. 
Before subscribing to this we'd like to see it tried on a 
test five, composed of Senator Borah, Mussolini, General 
Butler, Pussyfoot Johnson, and John Barleycorn. — Arkan- 
sas Gazette. 



The Reward of Toil 

"Yes," said the tall man, " I have had many disappoint- 
ments, but none stands out like the one that came to me 
when I was a boy." 

"Some terrible shock that fixed itself indelibly in your mem- 
ory, I suppose." 

"Exactly," said the tall man. "I had crawled under a 
tent to see the circus, and I discovered it was a revival 
meeting. — Boston Transcript. 



A Hurry-up Call! 

"By boss says he can't come, after all." said the plumber's 
boy. "But as it was a 'hurry-up' call he sent me." 

"But I never sent for any one," said the mistress of the 
house, rather puzzled. 

"Oh! then," the boy concluded, "it must have been the 
folks as was here before you moved in." 



Cold Logic 

To Elbert H. Gary, the head of the United States Steel 
Corporation, is credited the most apt reply to a question of 
stock value. 

"Do you think steel stocks will go up or down ?" a woman 
once asked him. 

"Yes," was the answer, "I think they will. They rarely 
stand still, and they can't go sidewise !" — Watchman- 
Examiner. 



Cut gmtr 'fie^air &£&■/ ! ', 

alemite m]-r 



EXPERT LUBRICATION HEM 
DRIVE , IN 



624 Van Ne«i Ave. t 

s'.f. 







CL. GHAVSTOM5 42«« 



Metal Work Apper- 
i a i ii i n k to Aulomo- 
bile» — Oxy-Acety lene 
W elding: — lllack- 
Nmlthlng;. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



W AT« O N 



StabilatorS 



In a Stabilated Car — You Motor 
Relaxed and Arrive Refreshed. 



MADSON & RICHARDS 



( Incorporated) 
P.\crric AvBHCB » 



Van Ness, San Francisooi Calif. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE VOIR CARS WASHED AXD GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rate*: 35c ner day; 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six FloorH for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 
Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco, Calif. 



Graystone 130 

SHERWOOD 



Open Dav and Night j 

GARAGE 



Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction ivilh 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Wm. Saunders 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1MI4 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

35S TEHAMA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 3084 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sis., 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



•July 17, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

THE Boulevard Stop sign is an ex- 
cellent means of reducing acci- 
dents at important intersections, pro- 
vided the warning thereon is oheyed. 
If the warning is not heeded and the 
law requiring vehicles to come to a full 
stop before entering or crossing a 
street post with these signs, is not rig- 
idly enforced, they become a distinct 
menace. Persons traveling along streets 
protected by these signs have a right 
to feel, when approaching a corner, 
that they will not be suddenly con- 
fronted by a car dashing out from a 
cross street and will govern themselves 
accordingly, A violation of the Stop 
law, therefore, is in the nature of a 
surprise and may lead to disastrous 
results. 

Users of protected streets should not 
be hoggish about it. At a time of heavy 
travel the stream should he brokl 
casionally to let the cross traffic 
through. It is impracticable to have 
an officer at every intersection, so when 
vim see a fellow marooned in a side 
street, slow down and give him a chance 

to pass. 

* * * 

The opening of the Tunnel Road be- 
tween the Tunnel and Bryant, makes 
accessible the trip to Mt. Diablo with- 
out any extra mileage. 

According to information received 
from the Mount Diablo Scenic Boule- 
vard Company, the two roads leading 
to the summit' of Mt. Diablo are in the 
best condition they have ever been. 
Parking space at the summit of the 
mountain has been increased material- 
ly and at the summit saddle, where the 
loop of the top begins, a huge space has 



been cleared which will accommodate 
several hundred cars. 

There are two roads to the summit — 
one from Danville and the other by 
way of North Gate and Walnut Creek. 
It is preferable to go up by way of Dan- 
ville and return via North Gate and 
Walnut Creek, as this provides the mo- 
torist with the greatest number of in- 
teresting aspects of the mountain itself 
and the surrounding country. 



Extensive improvement is expected 
in the condition of the Redwood High- 
way between Eureka and Crescent 
City. It is anticipated by the speed 
with which work is progressing on the 
approach of the new Klamath River 
Bridge, which was recently dedicated, 
that traffic will be able to use this 
bridge by the first of August, this year, 
or shortly thereafter. Rapid progress 
is also being made on the plank road 
across Big Lagoon, which, when fin- 
ished, will eliminate the 3.5 mile detour 
which has been in effect for such a long 
time. 

Excellent progress is being made by 
the State of Oregon on the Roosevelt 
Highway, which extends from Crescent 
City north along the coast to Marsh- 
field, Oregon. It is anticipated that this 
work will be completed in about a year 
The road crosses three large rivers, 
the Winchuck, the Chetco and the 
Rogue River, and will prove a mecca for 
the angler, as excellent fishing is avail- 
able in any of these streams. The high- 
way follows the coast line and every 
turn of the road brings forth more beau- 
tiful scenery. 

* * * 

The road from San Anselmo to Al- 
pine Lake, thence to the Ridge Crest 
Boulevard is now open to traffic and 
will remain so, according to informa- 
tion received by the Touring Depart- 
ment of the National Automobile Club 

This road has been closed to traffic 
for the past several months and during 
that time it has been widened so that 
it is now twenty-four feet wide the en- 
tire distance. ' With one exception, 
there are no grades to exceed 11 per 
cent, and the exception is one short 
steep pitch which will run to about 14 
per cent, but can be negotiated without 
any difficulty whatever. 

This now makes it possible to drive 
to the top of Mt. Tamalpais over an ex- 
cellent gravel road, wide enough at all 
places for two cars to pass, and with 
easy grades. This is one of the most 
ic trips in the Bay District and can 
be easilv made in one day. 

The Ridge Crest Boulevard is a toll 
road, but the charge of 50c for the ma- 
chine and ZSc for passengers, with a 
minimum charge of $1.00 is small com- 
pared with the enjoyment to be derived 
from the trip. 



The People of California regulate 

public utilities through a State Commission. 

Rates, service and finances come under 
the jurisdiction of this Commission. Its or- 
ders and decisions are based on the studies 
of experts— engineers, statisticians and econ- 
omists. 

Regulation coupled with the inventions, 
economies and foresight of the power Com- 
panies insure fair rates and good service. 

Rates in California are low. 

Service is a model for the rest of the 
United States. 

Since 1913 the average per capita cost of 
living increased 65%, while the average cost 
of electricity decreased 8%. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



PG 



.and 




"FACiriC SfcBVlCI" 

Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




•the better it geb- 



|e»2!P*l 



GEO. XV. CASWELL 

utter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1.800.000 cop* were ser-red at the Pimd 
Paelflr lateraatloaal Exposition 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1926 



^gysys*- 



Wf- 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



-§J£ 



o/S** 



■*&.' 



<«•«fS ,,, 




E 1 



DDIE TWIGGS once more came into his 
own when partnered with Ed Cahill in 
the four-ball-best-ball handicap tournament on 
Independence Day at Lakeside, when they won 
in a walk from George Sleight and Billy Gil- 
mour the Harry Lauder of the links. 

Twiggs and Cahill were the two scratcli men 
of the tournament, but the speed they showed 
in the four rounds of play was far too fast for any other 
team entered. 

Sleight and Gilmour did some mighty clever work pre- 
vious to meeting Twiggs, the ace of the club, and Cahill, 
who played his best game under the direction of the Lake- 
side star, but the old saying, "class will tell." 

Bob McGahie, the big barrister, and Ed McAllister, a 
very promising youngster had to step on the gas to gain a 
decision at the nineteeth hole against two of our famous 
dentists, Dr. J. J. Pfiester and Dr. E. D. Keefe. 

Bob and Ed had a four hole lead at the tenth in the finals, 
and it looked as if they had the match all sewn up, but the 
fighting tooth carpenters got real mad and went after Bob 
and his partner in great shape taking three holes in a row 
and eventually squared the match at the eighteenth hole, 
and had it not been for McGahie sinking a birdie four on 
the 19th probably they might have been going yet. 

* * * 
Rowan a Winner 

R. W. Rowan won the independence day golf tournament 
at the California Country Club on the Baden course, by de- 
feating Charlie Brown rather handily in the finals. This 
tournament, like the opening event, attracted a very fine 
entry considering that many of the players were out of town 
over the holidays. 

Dr. C. H. Whitley, one of the guiding spirits of the club, 
was the medalist, and although the doctor didn't win the 
tournament, he made it quite interesting for some of them, 
as he took one of his oponents to the 20th hole before of- 
fering his congratulations. 

However, Charlie Brown, who eliminated the doctor, 
landed in the finals, but Rowan was too much for him. 

Bill O'Donnell, who is practically a novice, won the sec- 
ond flight. 

Bill has only played in three tournaments in his life, and 
has won two of them. Langdon Boyle, the famed attorney, 
was Bill's opponant in the finals and he gave him a good 
run for honors, but the conqueror of Cliff Woodland couldn't 
stand the gaff and lost gracefully. 

Charlie Simpson defeated F. Atherton in the third flight, 
and Bill Powers won from J. H. Hanson in the fourth flight! 

The tournament was admirably handled by Studebaker 
Johnson, and Bill O'Connell, both forfeiting their chance 
to play to lend their services to the tournament. 

* * * 
Australian Capitalist to Visit City 

Sidney Meyer, the Baron Rothchild of Sydney, Australia 
in a letter to Bill Taylor, the president of the' California 
Club, states that he is on his way to London, England, and 
will stop off at San Francisco long enough to renew his 
acquaintance with the members of the Burlingame and Cali- 
fornia Clubs, of which he is a member. 

Bill Taylor and Jim Polk are both life long friends of 
Meyer and each time the John Wannemaker of Australia 
makes his semi-annual trips to the old country, he always 



finds time to stop off in the city and play golf with Bill and 
Jim. 

Meyer is a very enthusiastic golfer and although he has 
never won any world's championships, still, he has done 
much to encourage the sport. 

Meyer has donated a $1000 perpetual trophy to the Cali- 
fornia (iolf Club, to be competed for annually, and hopes 
to be in the city next month when the cup is competed for. 

They say that Sidney Meyer belongs to more golf clubs 
than Carter has pills. He holds memberships in every im- 
portant city in the States. England and Scotland, as well 
as a score or more in his own country. 

Meyer used to get a big kick out of playing with Arthur 
East of the Lake Merced Club, each time he came to town. 
Arthur taught him all he knew about golf when East lived 
in Australia. 

Now Meyer takes a keen delight in separating a few long 
greens from Jim Polk and Bill Taylor, the banking golfer. 

* * * 
Ad Club's Tournament 

The Pacific Coast Advertising Club held their first an- 
nual golf championship at the Lake Merced Country Club, 
when forty players from the various cities on the coast par- 
ticipated, and although the entries did not come up to ex- 
pectations, still George Palmer, general chairman, Fred 
Weeks, handicapper and official starter, and Norman Rush- 
ton, chairman of the day, were very enthused over the in- 
augural meeting, as it helped cement a better feeling among 
its members. 

Frank Deloit, a Southern entry, won the championship 
with a medal round of 83, which entitles him to the silver 
vase donated by Hastings and Company. Jack Kennedy, 
one of the real stars from Lakeside took second honors, am! 
a Novak club as a prize. Gerald Boldeman finished third 
and won the Thomas E. Wilson trophy. 



Deloit Wins Ad Club Title 

It was rather unfortunate that Charlie Helganz score 
didn't go on record. Charlie is a former State funior Cham- 
pion, and also the Junior Marathon runner, and is con- 
sidered one of the fleetest long distance runners on the 
Coast. He^ finished sixth in the Bulletin's cross-city race 
last New Year's day, and to be disqualified after shooting 
the best score of the day on the ground that his boss, Louis 
Honig, did not register him before the tournament, was 
rather unfair to the boy as the officials accepted his entry 
and all was jake until he romped home a winner, with a 
card of 79, four strokes ahead of Deloit. 

We think it was a great injustice to the boy, as he is 
about the cleanest and most popular all-round athlete in 
California today. 

Bill Lucas won the low net honors of the day with a card 
of 89-15-74. Tom Doane, second, 109-34-75; Roy Kibbee, 
the actor, was third with 76. Miss Brownie Reed won the 
woman's championship from Miss H. Saunders by ten 
strokes. 

This match was played on the Ingleside course. 

Chairman Norman Rushton was overstocked with tro- 
phies so decided to present the three high gross men with 
mementos of the occasion : Arthur Towne, who counted 
them all 143, first ; Ned Schmeer, counted a lot of them, sec- 
ond ; Lou Clark won the box of candv for missing a lot of 
them, third. 



Inly 17, 1926 



THKSAN FRANCISCO NKW'S LETTER 



21 




S, S. West Nilus; 

First of the 
Pacific-Argentine- 
Brazil 
Line Fleet 
to Carry 
Passengers 



McCormick Steamship Company 

The regular passenger service between Pacific Coast 
cities of the United States and Argentina, Uruguay and 
Brazil directly via the Straits of Magellan, will be estab- 
lished by the McCormick Steamship Company with the sail- 
ing of the S. S. West Nilus from San Francisco, .August 10th. 

For a person on the Pacific Coast desiring to go to 
Buenos Aires it is now necessary to take a long tiresome 
trip across the country, perhaps wait in New York for the 
date of sailing and then take steamer for South America. 
With the Pacific. Argentine Brazil Line, sailings will be 
made from San Francisco directly via the Straits of Ma- 
gellan to Buenos Aires, Montevideo and Brazil. The time 
in transit will be much less than by way of New York and 
will also be much more economical. 

The sailing time of the vessels is approximately thirty- 
four weeks from San Francisco to Buenos Aires via the scenic 
Straights of Magellan route and by returning via the Pana- 
ma Canal the ships will have circumnavigated South \iu- 
erica. 

The great appeal of this service will be to the Commer- 
cial traveler who desires quick transportation to The Ar- 
gentine, Uruguay and Brazil and to the tourist who desires 
to tour the continent of South America in a new way. 



GOLF 

(Continued from Preci'dinK Page) 
Golf Luncheon 

Mrs. George E. Ebright, wife of Dr. Ebright, gave an 

elaborate luncheon recently at the Mcnl.. Country llub dur- 
ing the time the women held their Invitational Women's 
Golf Tournament. Sixteen guests sat at the prettily dec- 
oratcd table. 'The united guests were: Me>damcs Allen 
Weeks, Roy Bishop. William Houghteling, Philip Paschel, 
Dan Volkman, Evan Williams, Walter Kamm, Robert Mil- 
ter, Archibald Johnson, Kent Chandler, Edwin Eddy, Er- 
nest McCormick, Ernest Stent. Charles McCormick, Russell 
Sladc and Alfred Swinnerton. 

At Feather River Inn * * * 
People of social prominence registered at Feather River 

Inn. during the past week, with the arrival of the party of 
Mr. and Mrs. I. |. Mitchell (formerly Lolita Armour) of 

Santa Barbara, 

Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell coming west from Chicago, with 
a party of friends, which included Mr. and Mrs Karl Zim- 

mermann of Chicago. Mr. Rothwell M. Sherriff of t 

and Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Awl and their .laughter of Santa 

Barbara, left the tram at Reno, where they were met by 

their motor cars and motored to Feather River Inn for a 

two days stay, later leaving by motor to continue their 

iouruev to Santa Barbara. 

* * » 

Prominent golfers who were entered in the tournament 
over the week-end on the Inn course included Mr. and Mrs. 



Joseph Tynan, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Yount, Mr. and Mrs. 
George R. Chambers, G. S. Nelson and G. M. Haynes. 

Golf at Coronado 

Major Colin G. Ross, secretary of the Coronado Country 
Club, Coronado Beach, California, has made the announce- 
ment that the third annual A. B. Spreckels Amateur Golf 
Tournament will be played at Coronado August 25 to 28 
inclusive. As in previous years, the winner will receive 
outright one of the most beautiful trophies placed in com- 
petition in exclusively amateur golf tournaments anywhere 
on the American continent. The 1926 trophy is to be an 
exact duplicate in design and workmanship of the big, 
beautifully etched silver punch bowl provided by the late 
Mr. A. B. Spreckels, nationally known sportsman of San 
Francisco, won in August, 1924 by William Hunter, and 
the second trophy won August 30, 1925 by Allen Moser. 
The principal trophy is valued at approximately $1,000.00. 

Additional prizes include gold medal for low score in 
the qualifying round, and attractive prizes for the winner 
and runner-up in each flight and for winner of defeated 
eights in all flights. 

MADE TO ORDER ON LY 

X JhosEKent Shirts y lhosEKeni 

^UIF £S»L ^IHF 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 



25 Kearny Street 



Phone Kearny 3714 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

SnHl Pmivd by hand Only---Suit« Called For and Delivered 



583 l - <i t Srum 
In Virginia Hotm 



MME. M. S. E. LEE 

f'ariiinn l>\rinp and Cleaning 



Sam Francisco 
Phone Franklin 2510 




RARE BOOKS 

EARLY EDITIONS 

Autographs Bought and Sold 
JOHN HOWELL 

434 Po^t Stweft, S»s F**\<i>ro, Calif. 



M;ik i i home :ii 

GEORGE HARGENS OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. - I ■ lltnnnn I'lnrr. nl - ( I <>rnnt Vvfnof 

Th*' Horn*- of the Rook I, over 

Rare Hooks — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zaohnsdorf, Root, Ifforrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in I ■ cuted 

Single Rooks and Libraries Purchased 

rio.ro- Krnrny BSlfl 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

\M • PAUL Ki.t>i:ii s UBRARS 
! 239 Post Street San Francisco. Calif. 




22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 17, 1926 



***!»* 



PIONEER 




■p.^.U'.'l = ILJJ = MJ.l;H: 



The 

Name 
on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 Flrnt Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



1 



PHONES: 

San Francisco— 
West 703 



Hurling: ame 

478 



| Phone SUTTEB 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Pont Street at Grant Avenne 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 

San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 EMERSON ST. 

Phone ■. 

Palo Alto 31,5-J 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way- 
Points Twice Daily 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 
trays Senator Standwood, her father, 
are admirably suited for their parts. 
Hoot Gibson is the pony express rider. 

John Van, tenor, is featured in the 
prologue. 

Andrea Setaro has arranged the mu- 
sic score of melodies of fifty years ago. 

* * * 
Imperial 

This week the picturization uf "Nell 
Gwyn," the world famous love story 
of the same name, is being shown at the 
Imperial. 

The famous affair of pretty Nell of 
Dairy Lane, who vamped her way into 
a king's heart, has been faithfully re- 
produced for the screen. 

Nell Gwyn is an intriguing romance 
of England's popular actress and her 
royal suitor. Prince Charles, who later 
became King Charles II. 

Dorothy Gish has the title role and 
Randle Aryton has the role of the mer- 
ry monarch. 

"Egged On," a comedy of original 
situations, supplies the laughter on the 

program. 

* * * 

Cameo 

Harry Carey in "Driftin' Through," 
comes to the Cameo theater Sunday 
for a run of four days, with the well 
known screen star and his burro, ap- 
pearing in a series of western adven- 
tures. Fiery action and romance are 
found in this lively picture of old-time 
miners and prospectors. 

"\Yages For Wives" will be screened 
Thursday. Friday and Saturday, with 
Jacqueline Logan, the heroine and Mar- 
garet Livingston, ZaSu Pitts, Creigh- 
ton Hale, Claude Gillingwater, Earle 
Fox, David Butler, and Dan Mason in 
the cast. 

This picture was filmed from the 
John Golden stage play "Chickenfeed," 
and features Jacqueline Logan in the 
character part of a young woman who 
stirs things up generally in the village. 

Domestic tangles from an unusual 
viewpoint, and eventual releases from 
the troubles, add comedy and thrills to 
the storv. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
The MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COM- 
PANY, location of principal place of business, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular 
meeting of the Directors held on the 8th day 
of June, 1926, an assessment of one-half cent 
per share was levied upon the issued capital 
stock of the corporation payable immediately 
in legal money of the United States, to the 
Secretary, at the office of the company. Room 
245 Monadnock Building, San Francisco. 
Calif. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 16th day of July, 1926, 
will be DELINQUENT and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment is made 
BEFORE, will be SOLD on Wednesday, the 
ISth day of August. 1926, to pay the delin- 
quent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY, Secretary, 
245 Monadnock Building, 

San Francisco. Calif. 




N W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 
Each Order 
Otllce and WorkH 1825 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 

Phone ProMpect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 



Tailor 



Opposite Olympic Club 



527 Post St., San Francisco 
Phone Prospect 9316 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 

EXCHANGE 

Phone Garfield 3852 564 Market St. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoininu Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

«£/= REVUE ^^ 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 



Announcement 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The Cily's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

jOc, Toe, $1.00 35c. SOc, 75c S1.00.S1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 |>. in. to 1:00 a. in. 

363 Suiter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 

HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 

Hattie Moosbr Minnie C. Mooser 



145 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



r-" 

i 




~ i 

^jUm. Caroline Jones 

cAii^A Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 | 


! 


1 


p&'M 1 )^ UJ and tea from 3 to 5 

llli/t 1 FJ5e* Exclusive use of room for club dinnerii 

JJJJl^- 334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 

................... ..............4 


[ 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating: 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Karroll ami 
Larkin Si.. 



BLANCO'S 



Cr«T«t« 



Luncheon (11:30 ti 2 p. m.) S .:;» 

Dinner. \\<fk Daj' I. SO 



biloi Should i ■ ■ •• tii. i,n \v iil. 
■mi Dining m ilir Flnosl i'af* 

in Vmrrira 



Our Main Dtntnii Kttotti uiti hr rtnu-ri Ml >umfrii > •lurmc f/ic | 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

98 Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



Ing Southern Cooking 

Open From 

SO a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4:30 to S:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED Bl rin HONDAI 

Half BlOOk I r.un MiLili»a* 



S&. 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 
ut'i \ a .»p \ \i to n «•> iv m 

i NSI RPASSGD a i-im 

C \RL I.FOM1 ARDT 
fnrmnt, „/ C.l.lrn t.tW Paril 



I 
I 
I 

i 

I 
I 
t 




Singleton's 



Alley dat 

CLUB INN 



Now Serves a Delicious 
Five-Course 

DINNER 75c 

Also 
Fried Chicken, Steaks, 
Chicken Pot Pies in Cas- 
serole, Etc., a la Carte. 





ICE CREAf 

CANDY 

PASTRY 



t CALIFORNIA STS. 
Grayilone 
3100 3101 31112 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think tluit n vigorous, brushing once or twice n day is 

taking very g i care of them. Broablng is only n part of the 

process. Many thing! can hup pen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist cim take cjire of. Have your teeth examined. 
They m:iy not lie us sound ns you imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do nut wall for (he iiclu'. Wntch your teeth and gums. 
Th it i- are b ii in t rou hies tltnt will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your sums bleed? Call In today 
it ml l ii Ik it Ol er. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking aya- 
tem blocks off nil nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy). San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Oarfleld ME 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions! Crowns) Self dcantns RrldpeM: 

Porcelain Work i Roofless Plates 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHF A SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 



980-82 Flood Boildinc, Powell and Market Sts . 
Phone Garfield 5394 



San Francisco 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

M'lnuftiriurrrt of 

Hl\ BTED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PE If STOCKS, 
111 NES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTAt KS, ETC 



Baa Francisco, t'nilf. 
1 1 1 Market Streai 



f,i»- \ ngeleo, Calif. 

r 17 Santa Ke Avenue 



Shirts and collars laundered so men are 
proud to wear them. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. ! 

"Thi> Recommended Laundry*' i 

j~>n Twelfth m~ >\n Fuuiciscq *Phoi<i M\nr.i.T 916 f 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

H.utU-i at ihr >pr,* t ,- 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

' latl -trc-l -f.arfirld A44 




© 6 n 



£Y#^ yarallon 

Proposed $1,750,000.00 civic improvement for San Francisco beach. Justice B. Det- 
wiler heads the project. Miller & Pflueger are the architects. Building contract has 
been awarded Lindgren & Swinerton. Heller, Ehrman, White & McAuliffe are the 
attorneys. The invitation committee comprises Jerome B. White, Hugh K. McKevitt, 
Dr. Arthur Beardslee, Sylvester J. McAtee, J. H. Skinner, Dr. A. J. Minaker, Dr. 
Alfred Roncovieri, Frank J. Klimm, Percy V. Long, Walter E. Trefts and Alton W. 
Edwards. Club Farallon executive offices have been opened in the Shreve Building. 



COMPLETLKAUIUPKUGRAMS^UKINLXI WLLJL,1W 1 HIS ISSUE 
I ' I: 




#5.00 PER YEAR 



lNCISCO 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAT 



, JULY 24th, 1 



UKDAY, JULY 24t 



.OS 



LOS ANGELES 




Be Sure it is a Frigidaire! 



Thvn <•■ ■> mi/, r.inite of 
Ftlgidaim buttt compdlt 
itith mrtnl cabinet, 
in n/iif. Dneot /m.v( ii nh 

l>nr, ./.nil ' ■ 

l.'U H 
■ , '.',mn of 

nniit for butafttfton »n iA# 
MiJard rtidfc- 

• n fen 

/.o.ft. DrtWon *ns F>{ffaf* 

mi\ A^ />iif • hmnl on 
fftr {.UK ,/.(.i r . .( r .». 
mrnl p/<in 



T1IKRK are now more than rw »» hundred 
thousand nsers <»f Frigidaire Electric Re- 
frigeration. Vnd these nsers are telling 
their friends ami neighbors thai Frigidaire has 
brooghl to their homes and places of business 
a measure <>f convenience and economy un- 
equaled l»> anything thej have ever known. 

> on h iv e heard <»f Frigidaire of the con- 
stant* dependable and economical -en ice it 
renders, •>( the belter waj in whiefa it keep- nil 

DEI i 0-1 IGHT COMPANY. 



foml*. of the convenience of the ice ii makes 
and ilir desserts ii freeaes. 

Von are probablj thinking note of electric 
refrigeration f»r your <>w n home. B«- sure, 
when you do lm> that you pel a genuine Frigid- 
aire. Look f«»r the name itself- youTJ find it on 
every r rigidaire. Ii identifies the product of 
the Genera] Motors. It i- your assurance that 
yon «ill enjoy the combined advantages which 
only Frigidaire can give. 
Dept. / 14, \lw roN, Ohio 



Subsidiary of General Motors Corporation 




ELECTRICS REFRIGERATION 

BE SURE IT IS A FRIGIDAIRE— PRODUCT OF GENERAL MOTORS 



B71 MISSION STREET 

-\\ II! \\( [S< (I 

IXM Gl VS oil! 



Delco-Light Co. 



NEW ELKS' Bl ILIUM. 
OAKLAND 

I \KF.SIDE 8631 



DISTINCTION! 

Perfect- COM FORXl 

^ECONOMY 

These three features com- 
bined with many other attrao 
tions, including excellent meals, 
form a combination of hotel 
service difficult to equal. 

Make your next 
stay at the 
famous 





Also a number of large and beautiful 
suites, some in period furnishings tvi 
ano, fire place and bath, $10 up. 



Large and well equipped 
Sample Rooms 



RANCHO GOLP CLUB 
available to all guests 



HAROLD E. LATHROP 
Manager 




120 rooms with running 
water $2. SOto $4.00 
220 rooms with bath 

3.50 to 5.00 
with bath 
6.00 to 8.00 
Double. 4.00 up 




Low Summer Rates 

at 

Hotel Del Coronado 

American Plan 

Swimming, Buttling, Fishing, Dancing, Golf, Tennis 
Motoring, Riding 

THE A. B. SPRECKTLS 

AMATEUR GOLF TOURNAMENT 

AUGUST 25-28 

For magnificent $1,000.00 trophy and attractive prizes in all 

flights at Coronado Country Club. 

$5.00 Entry Fee 

Coronado literature and reservations 
may be made at San Francisco Agency 

L. E. Carlile, Agent 2 Pink Street 

Douglas 5600 

Mel S. Wright, Manager 
CORONADO BEACH. CALIFORNIA 



f^^' have you a< 
avorite Sport? 







nn 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIHIII IIII Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Ill> 



BLAIRSDEN. CAPIFOR 
PLUMAS COUNTY **" i ""'V ^ ^ 



SAIL TO NEW YORK 1 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and 
GAY HAVANA, en route 




Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



Panama Mail Liners -Ire Specially Built for Service in the Tropics 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail liner with 
icven never-to-be-forgotten vuili uhorc at picturesque and historic ports — Man* 
-anillo, Mexico; San Jose dr Guatemala; La Libcrtad. Salvador; Cnrinlo, 
Nicaragua, Two days in the Canal Zone; see the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, 
Cristobal ami historic old Panama. 

Every cabin on a Panama Mail liner i* an outside one; each has an electric fan, 
and there i- a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. There is an orchestra for 
dancing: deck game, and spurt', and -alt water swimming lank. The Panama Mail is 
world-famous for it- fooil and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, including bed and 
meals on steamer. Co East by Panama Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 
a- little as 1350. (This price does not include berth and meals on trains.) Panama 
Mail liners leave San Francisco and New York approximately every 21 days. Vaca- 
-"'"'- Irnii, San Kranri-.rn, July 27; from Los Angeles, one dav later. West- 
ward from New York, July 31st. August 28lh. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
or ticket agent or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 



L 



548 S. SPRIN'C STREET 

LOS ANGELES 



2 PINE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



10 HANOVER SQUARE 

NEW YORK 




Ert.Mlititd July 10. !•» 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1884 to 1926. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street, ,San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postofflee as second-class matter. London Office: .Street & Co., 30 Cornhlll, H. C 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JULY 24, 1926 



No. 30 



SAFETY FIRST 



By Eleanore F. Ross 



It has been an accepted fact, more or less, that women 
are essentially of a conservative inclination ; men of a de- 
structive nature. 

I say this in the face of an anticipated general outburst 
of indignation from all my readers of masculine gender ; and 
in particular, from my esteemed employer. 

Women foster and produce human life, and cherish it, 
after production ; men bring about wars, and slaughter it. 

Nine-tenths of the women of the world deplore war ; nine- 
tenths of the men advocate it. 

Women, as yet, have not invented anything in the way 
of destructive weapons or life-destroying machinery ; men 
have invented all the different methods of annihilation. 

The ordinary boy stones the dog or cat; the ordinary 
girl rushes to its rescue. 

Men cut and slash and blast each other in battle ; women 
nurse the maimed and wounded back to life. 

* * * 

What would seem to bear out this argument, at least, lo- 
cally, is the record which women have made in the Cali- 
fornia Public Safety Conference, an organization whose in- 
ception is feminine, and was brought into being by the 
women's division of tin- California Development Associa- 
tion. This organization now has the endorsement of the 
American Legion, California branch; State Congress oi 
Parent-Teachers Association ; the California State Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs ; and the Peace Officers' Association 

of the State. 

* * * 

But stop, look, listen! 

As far back as the year 1912, the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany organized a Safety movement, consisting of twenty 

safety committees, one general committee, fourteen division 
committees, 3 general shops ami stores committees. 

These COmitteeS have regular meetings, at which time 
suggestions for further safe-guarding the lives of employees 
and passengers are submitted by the different members, and 
voted upon, and medals are awarded those who put forward 
the cleverest and most practicable ideas. 

* * * 

California Chosen for Big Demonstration 

Other great organizations which have shown a keen in- 
terest in the momentous question of conserving lite, are 

the Pacific Gas ami Electric Company; Fresno hire De- 
partment; i les Fire Department; the Pacific Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company; Associated Oil Company: 
ni California I ; the Standard ( HI Co. : Califor- 
nia Inspection Rating Bureau; United States Bureau of Mine-: 



the Industrial Accident Commission of California ; Engels Cop- 
per Company; the Women's Safety League; Boy Scouts of 
America; the American Red Cross; the San Francisco Po- 
lice Department; the "Pacific Safety Engineer"; the Society 
of Safety Engineers of California, and the aforesaid Cali- 
fornia Public Safety Conference. These are the principal 
participants, but all over the United States, this movement 
is gaining strength and interesting private firms, business 
houses, shops, stores, and factories. 

The United States Bureau of Mines has selected San 
Francisco as the place for holding the 1926 meeting, after 
the effective work of California has been closely examined, 
and the award to this city was, in a measure, in recognition 
of the great progress made by California mines and indus- 
tries in safety work. 

The week of August 30th to September 4th has been des- 
ignated as San Francisco Safety Week, when the Interna- 
tional Mine Rescue and First Aid Contest is held, under the 
supervision of Secretary Herbert Hoover and the United 
States Bureau of Mines, co-operating with the Society of 
Safety Engineers of California. 

i )ne thousand miners and other industrial workers, trained 
to be expert in caring for injured persons, will participate 
in the largest meet of its kind held in the United States. 
The contests will be held in the Civic Auditorium, and rep- 
resentative mine rescue teams will come from the mines of 
Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma, Tennessee. New 
York. Ohio, Missouri, Indiana. Alaska and California. A 
wonderful trophy, the goal of miners in all parts of the Uni- 
ted States, will lie awarded. 

* * * 

Safety Means Profit 

It is an old saying that "Corporations have no body to 
kick; no soul to save," but e\en the most selfish and greedy 
employer of today is awakening to the truth that the better 
he treats his employees, the better work they will perform; 
the happier he makes them, the greater the urge to bring 
success to his business: the more safety devices he installs 
in his work shop, or office, or factory, the less expense he 
will have, ultimately, in the up-keep of his establishment. 

The old world is growing Letter: no matter what funda- 
mentally selfish motive might have been instrumental in 
bringing about safety method-- throughout the country, — 
we can overlook everything but the comforting knowledge 
that safety devices have come to stay; that the word safety 
looms large across the industrial horizon; that gradually me- 
chanical aids to preserve human life will create a spiritual sym- 
pathy between employer and employee, between n 
and man ! 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1926 




This prohibition law is a madness which 
Prohibition Idiocy may bring us into international trouble 
sooner or later. It destroys respect for 
the law at home and is a complete solvent of any personal 
dignity which we might, nationally speaking, be supposed 
to have. We have now sent General Andrews, prohibition 
enforcement chief, to Britain to make a begging request 
and to ask a favor which no self-respecting people can or 
should ask of another. It is a good thing that we are doing 
this with a country which has so much in common with 
ourselves and so nearly approximates our own in history 
and system that it, at least partially, understands. 

The idea is no less than to allow American ships, not only 
properly commissioned and thoroughly disciplined ships of 
the regular navy, but revenue cutters, to stop British ships 
and search them for liquor on the high seas. That is an 
enormous favor to ask. How great it is you may judge by 
the fact that even on the streets of our own cities the federal 
courts have said that we cannot stop and search the cloth- 
ing of a person for liquor except on a properly executed 
search warrant, for cause. 

We know how strenuously Britain has upheld her posi- 
tion on the sea. We know what legends and what heroisms 
in her history have clustered round this fact of liberty on 
the high seas. We are asking her to lay aside all that his- 
tory and all that glory, that we may be able to execute a 
law which the vast majority of our people consider to be 
evil and stupid. 

And curiously enough British statesmen are courteous 
enough to listen to our request and to proffer their co-opera- 
tion. That is very gratifying, but it is none the less humili- 
ating to have to beg for such consideration. 



The State's finances are getting to the place 
Getting Dizzy where something must be done to stay the 

unceasing multiplication of charges against 
the citizens connected with the operations of the govern- 
ment. That this is so must not be held as a matter of ac- 
cusation against the administration. It is no fault of the 
present government at all. Prior to its advent the cost of 
administration had been mounting and no government under 
the present method of politics could have done any better. 

But when this State gets a bonded debt of $609,549,227.82, 
as appears from the report covering the fiscal transactions 
of the year ending June 30, just issued by State Controller 
Ray L. Riley, something should be taken in hand. The 
comparative figures are even more staggering than the plain 
statement. Thus, there is an increase in expenditure to June 
30 of this year $76,349,975.66 over that of the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1925. 



This represents an expenditure more than five and a 
half times as great as that of 1911. But the assessed value 
of non-operative property, which is liable for the interest 
and redemption of bonds, has increased only a little more 
than one and a half times its value. The bonded debt, as 
Mr. Riley points out, is 10.5 per cent of the total of non- 
operative property, as compared with 4.2 per cent in 1911. 

It is notable that in this increase of bonded indebtedness 
the cities seem to have been more conservative than the 
counties; the bonded indebtedness since 1911 of the cities 
has increased 330 per cent ; of the counties, 905 per cent, 
and of the state, 1650 per cent. 



A new sort of motion appears to have seized 
Remarrying the judges on the question of remarrying. A 
local candidate for re-election here had some 
rather clever publicity the other da}', upon the question of 
marrying people who had been married already oftener 
than he thought proper. He was very pious on the matter 
and refused to tie a lady again, whom he had himself untied 
upon three previous occasions. Of course, it was his priv- 
ilage to refuse the wedding and the fee. But the moral is 
not so clear. 

If he did not marry the offending party to the man who 
was joyously headed for another disaster, would he guar- 
antee that the lady in question would not go on her whirl- 
ing way without the formality of marriage? Of course not ; 
for such a denoument would not make either for public de- 
cency or for the stability of the community. It is obvious- 
ly better to allow her to gratify her variable tastes within 
the law, as long as she can find partners, than to indulge out- 
side of the law. 

On the other hand, a Chicago jurist, who finds himself 
troubled with qualms of a similar nature, is in favor of a 
law which will prevent one person from having more than 
two divorces ! He has the theory that a person who had 
had two divorces has shown himself to be unsuited to the 
matrimonial state. Of course, that is not true. He may 
marry a fourth party who will reduce him to such a condi- 
tion of enjoyable placidity that all thoughts of wandering 
will cease. 

This notion of judges that they can lay down rules [or 
the mating of people had better be dispelled. There are two 
views of marriage; the one that proclaims it to be an in- 
dissoluble sacrament, to be made a means of grace, through 
the path of self sacrifice, and that which declares it to be a 
contract, practicably revocable at the will of the parties, 
under the control of the law. The latter is the accepted 
view and judges should accommodate themselves accord- 



The American Plan rests upon the 
The American Plan Declaration of Independence to the ef- 
fect that all men have the right to 
life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, the last term being 
held to mean that human beings may pursue gainful occu- 
pations without let or hindrance. 

A person has unquestionably the right of choice a.- to 
whether he will or will not join a union. There is no legal 
compulsion upon him to become a member and there can 
be no justification in members of unions preventing nun 
who are not members, from earning a living. 

This is the broad basis of the American Plan and from 
any angle, either of justice or expediency, it is a fully de- 
fensible doctrine; indeed, nothing can he said against it, 
which will bear examination. 

The unions, on the other hand, endeavor to gain a mon- 
opoly of employment and to refuse the right of work except 
to such men as come under their rules anil acknowledge their 
jurisdiction. In other words, the unions emleavor to create ■ 
a monopoly in labor which will enable their chiefs to dictate 
the life of the community and to impose their will upon the 
manufacture of commodities. 

The American Plan does not differentiate between union 
and non-union men. It gives work equally to those who 
are combined, as to those who prefer not to be in combina- 
tion. It is entirely just and plainly American. 

No doubt, the lines are more blurred than this, some- 
times. No doubt, there are occasions when, in the heat of 
conflict, the distinctly moral note is a little blurred. But it 
must be said that on the whole, the foregoing is a fair an- 
alysis. On the other hand, recourse is had to brutality and 
bitter animosities, which disturb the peace and upset social 
life. 

The American Plan stands as a bulwark against organ- 
ized savagery. 



July 24, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



The English speaking world on 
The Question of Strikes both sides of the Ocean, to say no- 
thing of the more remote sections 
of it in South Africa and Australia, is girding itself for 
battle on the strike question. We know what happened in 
Britain. Here, that is in this country, as well as in this sec- 
tion, we are engaged in a struggle against the arbitrary use 
of power in the control of labor against the interests and 
the convenience of the public. 

The Consolidated Railroad Workers of Greater New York 
are in conflict with the community as to their right to 
strike. The courts have issued the injunction usual in 
such cases and the railroad workers have decided to ignore 
the injunction. This brings them into conflict with the 
law of the State, just as the British strike did with the 
British workers. It will be interesting to watch the out- 
come. 

There is no dougt that, as far as the jurisprudence of the 
two countries is concerned, precisely the same rule prevails. 
A man has the right to strike ; that is, to cease work, for 
no reason or for any reason, which appeals to him at a given 
time. Such is the rule. But the question now is, whether 
such a rule can be allowed to prevail under the circum- 
stances which control industry and the life of a modern 
community. 

The action of a small group of men may inflict damage 
upon the rest of us, utterly incommensurable with the bene- 
fit which such a group may gain by striking. If we are 
a. community, these things must be taken into account. If 
the communial loss outweighs the gain which the improve- 
ment of the condition of certain workers may bring about, 
such strikes must be prevented in some way. Of course 
they can be stopped by force, but that is not enough. Some 
way must be devised which will stand upon ethical grounds. 
There is a problem for a statesman. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



It was our good fortune to see. 

Sensible Holidaymakers last week-end, how serviceable the 

automobile may be for family 

pleasure and how much real and well balanced joy can be 

had from its use. 

This was in Marin County, far from the main avenues of 
traffic, in the country that lies between the sea and the 
wooded hills beyond San Geronimo, a lovely land which we 
traversed as far as Inverness. 

The main highways were thronged with vehicles. The 
slowing up of a car in front halted a long procession and pro- 
fanity and impatience broke out from the halted rear. One 
would have thought that it was of enormous importance 
that the rate of speed should be maintained and that there 
should be no delay in pushing forward to the desired des- 
tination, which was, as regards most of the drivers, prac- 
tically nowhere. It did not help matters that the irritating- 
ly delaying car was occupied by a Japanese family which 
was proceeding slowly in order to enjoy the scenery. 

I uit a wax from the highroads, where the lanes wound 
through the trees, it was very different. Here and there 
was a car parked by the roadside and from the bushes which 
hid the streams came sounds of mirth and merriment. One 
coul, 1 peep over the edge and see family groups in camping 
attire or in bathing suits As we passed the little church 
of St. Cecilia, in San Geronimo, with its beloved pastor, 
Father Leo. the crowd at devotions stretched far beyond 
the porch into the field, a crowd of family tourists, whose 
cars were parked about the church and who had evidently 
been camping over Saturday night. 

It was all very pleasant and showed the motor vehicle at 
its besl as a civilizing and cultural agency. 



A pedestrian these days is safe only when he is riding. — 
Helena Independent. 

The "b" in debt is silent, but presumably it was stuck 
there to supply the sting. — Fergus Falls (Minn.) Journal. 



Buy gas cheerfully. Think of the great philanthropies 
your money makes possible. — Huntington (111.) Herald. 

* * * 

Why howl if aliens shoot up the natives? That's the way 
the first settlers got established. — Vincennes (Ind.) Sun. 

* * * 

Dr. Mayo, the famous surgeon, declares walking is good 
exercise. It certainly exercises the wits. — Asheville Times. 

* * * 

A trusty has escaped from the Iowa prison farm at Fort 
Madison, evidently seeking farm relief. — Omaha World 
Herald. 

* * * 

Asterisks are those little stars the author sprinkles 
through the novel where the reader is expected to use his 

own judgment. — Detroit News. 

* * * 

Conservatively, there'll be about three national politicians 
to one college lad laboring in the grain belt this summer. — 

Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

You seldom see a married genius. The explanation is 
that nobody else can love him as much as he does. — Pub- 
lishers Svndicate (Chicago). 

* * * 

Now and then one sees an absent-minded young thing, 
hurrying to the office, who is healthy on only one side of her 
face. — Goshen (Ind.) Democrat. 

* * * 

Oliver Wallop, an American ranchman, is returning to 
England, where he will become the Earl of Portsmouth. And 
lose his Wallop. — American Lumberman. 

* * * 

What France wants is a Minister of Finance who can pay 
the nation's debts without spending anv money. — Toledo 

Blade. 

* * * 

Don't spank the child if she puts on a tantrum, and may- 
be she will turn out to be a great tennis champion. — Detroit 

News. 

* * * 

A golf ball is that small indented object which remains on 
the tee while a perspiring citizen fans it vigorously with a 
large club. — Detroit Xews. 

* * * 

Prison reformer declares that putting a criminal in prison 
will not make him better. Well, at least it makes the world 
better. — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

Some practical forms of farm relief are visible along the 
highways where farming families have gone into the gas- 
oline, oil and refreshment business. — South Bend Tribune. 



Henry Ford has denied the rumor that he intends to re- 
tire to a peaceful country cottage. Thanks to his efforts 
there isn't one. — Punch. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1926 




|>LE/ISURE'S WW 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore- 




Greek Theater Tonight 

IT IS not over-enthusiasm on the part 
of the dramatic critic to say that 
the entire state of California takes keen 
interest in stage events at the Greek 
Theater in Berkeley. 

Imposing, picturesque and thrilling" 
in the very nature of presentation, the 
Greek Theater arouses one's sense of 
the aesthetic and stimulates the imagin- 
ation to a degree seldom reached under 
a roof. 

Tonight, Margaret Anglin will ap- 
pear in one of her most famous roles, 
"Electra" at the Greek Theater, Satur- 
day, July 24, for which she has been 
making special and intensive prepara- 
tions. 

The "Electra" of Sophocles, accord- 
ing to the Plumptre version, has ever 
been Miss Anglin's favorite Greek 
tragedy. She has taken the title role 
four times at the Greek theater and has 
appeared on the same stage eight times 
in Greek tragedies. 

So, shall we see something more 
markedly a polished production than 
ever before, for Miss Anglin's pen- 
chant for perfection is pronounced and 
she knows no other standard by which 
to reckon her work. 

* * * 
Visited the Places 
Of Ancient Plays 

"When I was in Greece three years 
ago," Miss Anglin said recently, "I was 
in Corinth where Medea lived, and 
while in Mycennae, which Agamemnon 
ruled, I saw Aulis, from a distance." 

Miss Anglin made two years' inten- 
sive study of "Electra," reading Homer 
and marking all references pertaining 
to Electra or Orestes. 

"I read everything I could on the 
period in English," declared the famous 
actress, "and each time found that it 
lead on and on to something still more 
alluring and profound." 
* * * # 

Last summer Margaret Anglin played 
"Electra" in St. Louis at the new For- 
est theater appearing on ten successive 
nights before some thirty thousand 
people. 

Columbia 

"The Texas Nightingale" will be pro- 
duced here for the first time Monday 
night, July 26, at the Columbia theater, 
with Blanche Bates appearing in the 



By "Jingle" 

titular role and Margaret Anglin in a 
type of character entirely new to her. 

This play follows the two weeks' run 
of "Candida," which has had such a 
rousing reception here with these two 
stage celebrities appearing together, in 
the George Bernard Shaw comedy. 

The new play is also a comedy in 
which Blanche Bates plays the part of 
a fiery, dashing Nightingale of artistic 
temperament. 

Emelie Melville will have an import- 
ant role and Ralph Roeder has the char- 
acterization of a musical genius. 

The co-starring again of Miss Bates 
and Miss Anglin in "The Texas Night- 
ingale" affords San Francisco theater 
patrons another cherished opportunity 
in which to see these stage luminaries. 

♦ !)S % 

Curran 

Eddie Buzzell and Ona Munson, 
sweethearts of the stage in "Tip-Toes," 
who were really married in San Fran- 
cisco this past week, are attracting 
more admirers to the Curran theater 
than ever. Eddie Nelson and Charles 
Howard, who support the musical com- 
edy with their added brilliancy and 
clever antics, are other principals in 
the sensational hit. 

"Tip-Toes" continues to charm with 
its lilting music, beautiful dancers, pret- 
ty girls, well-trained choruses and its 
sprightly story which never lags a 
minute. 

Latest Parisian fashions are worn by 
the girls and some of the dance figures 
are well worth the price of admission 
alone. 

* * * 

Wilkes 

Pauline Frederick in "Lucky Sam 
McCarver" continues at the Wilkes 
theater fur another week, closing her 
engagement on the thirtieth. 

Miss Frederick has a splendid chance 
in this drama. San Franciscans have 
the opportunity of seeing the favorite 
star on both the stage and the screen 
this week. 

Louis O. Macloon staged this drama 
in his usual discerning way and has 
made a magnificent mount of the play, 
never, however, stepping aside from 
the sincerity of requisites. 

* * * 
President 

"Love 'Em and Leave 'Em" the 
comedy still playing at the President 



theater, seems to be more and more 
popular, equaling "The Best People" in 
its appeal and record at the box office. 

The clever farce begins its sixth week 
at the matinee next Sunday afternoon. 

Isabel Withers has the leading role 
in this lively comedy drama and is so 
free with her slang that one wonders 
how the charming girl can place so 
many tongue twists. She 'is an adept 
at repartee with a brilliant "come back" 
for every twit and tangle. 

William Rainey, just lately returned 
from New York, has an important role 
and wins fresh laurels for his dramatic 
work. 

Those wdio have been unable to see 
"Love 'Em and Leave "Em" will find 
another chance offered them this week 
at the President. 

* * * 
Alcazar 

"The Show Off," George Kelly's hil- 
arious comedy, with Louis John Bar- 
tels, the star, is still packing the Al- 
cazar theater. People like to laugh and 
they like -till better to have good cause 
for their laughter, and, so they are fill- 
ing to capacity the Alcazar, where "The 
Show Off" continues on its merry way 
of four weeks. 

Henry Duffy provided a Broadway 
cast in producing this comedy, giving 
us the chance to hear Bartels laugh — 
and to listen to some remarkably clever 
dialogue. Duffy also provided a beau- 
tifully staged production. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

Ruth Chatterton in vaudeville — a 
rare chance to see this charming star, 
and one may find Mis- Chatterton this 
week at the Orpheum, where she ap- 
pears as the headliner in a charming 
sketch entitled : "The Conflict." 

This is the first and only vaudeville 
appearance in San Francisco that this 
famous young Broadway star will 
make, her hooking being for the one 
week only. Ralph Forbes supports 
Miss Chatterton in the sketch written 
by Vincent Lawrence. 

Nicola, an conjurer of American 
birth, who has mastered many tricks of 
the ( Irientals, will be one of the >pecial 
Orpheum attractions. He spent twen- 
ty-six years in Europe, Asia and Africa, 
where he learned the sorcerers' art, us- 
ing mati) r of their mysteries in his per- 
formances. 



July 24, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ON THE STAGE 


ALCAZAR I "The Show Off" 
O'Farrell nr. Powell I Louis John Bartela 


COLUMBIA t "The T.xa. Nighlins.le" 

70 Eddy f J? 1 "" 1 " ?*'? 
J Margaret Aoglin 


CURRAN ( "Tip Toes" 
Geary nr. Mason i Musical Comedr 


PRESIDENT ( "Love »Em and 

McAlliMter nr Mkt. f __ LeQ ,? e J 2 ™ 

) Henry Duny Farce 


\\ ILK KS . Pauline Frederick 
Geary at Mason t 'Lucky Sam McCarver" 


VAUDEVILLE 


GOLDEN GATE L "Smile Awhile" with 
G. G. Ave. & Taylor ( Wally Sharpies 


ORPHEUM I __.. „. „ 
O'FarreU <S Powell f Ruth Chatterton 


PANTAGES (NEW) ( Whirlwind Skater, 
Market at Hyde J George O'Brien on Screen 


PORTOLA I ,, , „, „, „ 
Market near 4th f Vaudeville-Pictures 


UNION SftKARE { Vaudeville-Pictures 
O'FarreU nr. Powell f 


WIGWAM ( „ .„ „, . 
Mission and 22nd t Vaudeville-Pictures 


ON THE SCREEN 
DOWN TOWN 


CALIFORNIA I "Her Honor. Ihe 
Market at 4th ( Governor" 


r- a ... 1 "Down to the Sea in Ships," 
< vim. ii ( Sull 1o Wed . ..p,|.„ „[ 

Market onp. 5th J Pleasure," Wed. to Sat. 


CAPITOL ( „ ........ 

Ellis nr. Market [ "Slums of Berlin" 


GRANADA ( "Manlrap" 
Market at Jones St. 1 "Ray. of Sun.hme 
1 on the itage 


IMPERIAL ( 

Market bet. «ch-7lb i "Nell Gwyn" 


LOEWS WARFIELD I „,. .... „ 
Market at Taylor f " q hc ™ tae <■«> 


ST. FRANCIS I ..„-_ „, steel" 
Market bet. Ml.-.in, I Men of Steel 


RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS 


ALEXANDRIA I "Mile. Modi.lf." July 24 lo 
Geary and ISth ( „ . „,.„ B ,„ k 1Ild H|J „, nd 


COLISEUM ( " T1,r Kir *' Vssr," Fri. and 
Clement A 0th Ave. t Sal.; "Danrine Mother.." San. 

) to Tne.. 


II VII. in I „,.,_,_ 

Ilalght at Cole ( Picture. 


HARDING ( 

Dlvlsadero at Hayes 1 Pictures 


IRVING ( "Grand Durhr,* and die 
IrvlriK n< 1.1th Ave. ( JfsMar." Sal. sad Sua.; "Mm 

J Commandment." Men., Tne*. 


MAJESTIC 1 "What Happened lo Jene.. 
Mission between ) Sal.; "Irene." Colleen Moore. 

20th and 21st I Sun.. Moo.; 


HKTHOPOLITAN ( "Amenean Venn.." Sal., Fa* 
I'nlon nr. Flllniore 1 l.anphier; "Oul.ide Ihe taw," 

I Saadsy. 


NEW BALBOA { 

Balboa A SSth Ave. > Pictures 


\KW FILLMORE ( '' l "'• £" Married." Sal ■ 
1'lllmore near Fills ( J*"" . Th " ' , M > »■»* 
1 Vlon.. Tuei.. Hed. 


\F.>V MISSION v Same Proaram, a. 
Mission nr. 22nd l \e« r'.llmore 


royal I ""r/ j M * k tr-** s **- ; 21" 

Polk nr. California ( *? U *t*\. i'' T ' T """ V_, 

| Eagle. Moo.. Tue*.. Wed. 



Ledova, danseuse, brings a dancing 
number in which she will be aided by 
Leon Varkas and Joseph Napolitano 
with the Atcherban Gypsy Quintette. 

Other features include Hal Jerome 
and Gloria Gray in "Hoos Hoo," a 
mirthful skit ; Charles Olcott with some 
of his own songs ; on his program ; 
"Hamtree" Harrington and Cora Green 
in a comedy offering ; and "The Young- 
ers, in "A Study in Art." 



Golden Gate 

Wally Sharpies, comedian and pro- 
ducer in bits of comedy with "Smile 
Awhile," heads the bill for the Golden 
Gate theater, "The Junior Orpheum," 
this week. Bert Kalmar and Harry 
Ruby wrote the lyrics and the music 
for this act, which includes a cast with 
Jack Hughes, Beatrice Gay, Lillian 
Gordons, Eva Knapp and Kathryn Sul- 
livan participating. 

"The Love Doctor," a comedy sketch 
features Frank Dobson. 

The plot deals with a lonely man who 
inadvertently invades a summer camp 
tenanted by pretty girls. Action is 
lively and comical. Violet Follie, Lois 
Stone, Eve Wendt, Stella Bolton are 
the girl. 

"High Steppers" is the screen feat- 
ure, starring Mary Astor, Lloyd 
Hughes and Dolores Del Rio. Edwin 
Carewe produced the story for First 
National. 

Rich and Adair, comedians; Margar- 
et McKee, called "California's Nightin- 
gale," singer and whistler; and the Del 
( Irtos, Ernesto, Mingie and Jose, Span- 
ish dancers complete the list of acts. 

Grace Rollins Hunt, organist, and 
Claude Sweden's orchestra complete 
the attractions. 



Warfield 

•■The Wise Guy," a First National 
Picture, directed by Frank Lloyd, will 
be the screen feature at Loew's War- 
field for the week beginning Saturday. 
[uly 24, with James Kirkwood, Betty 
Compson, Mary Astor and an all-star 
cast. 

The story concerns a charlatan, trav- 
eling with a medicine show, who leaves 

off selling patent medicine to preach 
the gospel. Eloquent, convincing and 
powerful, the preacher holds his audi- 
ences spellbound, while his confeder- 
ates go through the pockets of his con- 
gregation. 

Finally, however, the man succumbs 
to t lie spell of his own words, and face 
to face with death and love, falls on his 
knees, praying fervently and sincerely. 
It is a powerful photoplay in some re- 
spects. 

lames Kirkwood plays the part of 
the Wise (iuy. Betty Compson and 
Mary Astor each have appropriate 
roles. Mary Carr and George F. Mari- 



on are a religious old couple who stand 
by the charlatan. George Cooper is in 
the cast. 

Fanchon and Marco will present as 
this week's "idea" a return engagement 
of the Welch Glee Men upon popular 
demand. This choral organization of 
fourteen male singers were a sensa- 
tion when heard here before. Their 
appearance at the Warfield is an- 
nounced as their last before sailing for 
England. Walt Roesner and the Su- 
per-Soloists provide the musical pro- 
gram. 

* * * 

Imperial 

"Nell Gwyn" is in its second week 
at the Imperial theater. Dorothy Gish 
is admirably cast in the title role, as it 
gives her ample opportunity for the dis- 
play of her piquant charms in the cos- 
tumes of the time of King Charles II. 
The play itself has withstood the acid 
test of time but might have been writ- 
ten for Miss Gish. 

Included in the cast are Randle Ayr- 
tan, as King Charles, and Juliette 
Comptancis, as Lady Castlemaine. 

* * * 
Pantages 

The Three Whirlwinds, a trio of for- 
mer Chicago boys, are skating this 
week at the Pantages theater. They 
are Harry Avers, Frank W'isner and 
Buddie Carr. who have skated togeth- 
er ever since they were youngsters, and 
are said to have developed into unusu- 
al artists on rollers. 

George < ('Brien, son of Chief of Po- 
lice O'Brien, will claim the screen this 
week in the photoplay, "Hustling for 
Cupid." This picture contains the 
I'eter B. Kyne story, packed with ac- 
tion and lively romance. 



California 

I '.inline Frederick is here in person. 
She is also here on the screen, where 
she will have the title role at the Cali- 
fornia theater in "ller Honor the Gov- 

erm ir." 

Miss Frederick has the part of an 
older woman in the picture with the 
older woman's desires and ambitions. 
This is a heavy drama which calls for 
the capabilities of a real actress, in 
which a mother is torn between love 
i Continued on Page 14) 



fiESTFLOWE^ 



THcfctto <f* THouanad Osrdanj <p 

224-226 (nan.*** Tel Kearny 4975 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Summer Days Encourage 
Out-of-Door Events. 

THIS year, more than ever it seems, society has staged 
its smartest events out-of-doors. 
Beautiful peninsula homes, charming country estates, 
lovely and commodious country club houses, have been the 
lure for many memorable affairs during the past week. 

Pebble Beach, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Hotel Del Monte, with 
its rebuilt luxuries, are favorite society headquarters and 
settings for some of the most elaborate events. 



Menlo Country Club 
Setting for Luncheon 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Faxon and their daughter, Miss Flo- 
rence, are among the many society folks who have been 
making the Menlo Coutry Club their home during the sum- 
mer season. 

The beautiful redecorated and remodeled club house of- 
fers excellent opportunity for social events, one of the most 
recent of which was given by Miss Florence Faxon in comp- 
liment to Miss Geneva White, who with her father, Mr. 
Burrell White, left Monday for their eastern home, Lake 
Placid, fashionable colony of New York. 

Miss Faxon's guests at the Menlo Country Club included : 
Mesdames Cluft Landborg, Alexander Isenberg, Oliver 
Dibble, Jr., Henry Todd, William Cannon, Browning Smith, 
Edward Harrison and the Misses Helene Landborg, Vir- 
ginia Murphy, Dorcas Jackson, Kathryn Chace, Kathryn 
Montanya, Florence Loomis and Mary Baldwin. 

* * * 
Menlo Treasure Hunt 

Miss Betty Downey was hostess at a treasure hunt given 
last week at Menlo Park, entertaining a number of the 
younger set as her guests. Following the exciting treasure 
hunt, a supper was served at the Downey home in Menlo. 

Miss Eleanor Weir and Mr. Heber Tilden were the lucky 
finders of the hidden treasures. Those who were guests 
included : Misses Dorothy Burns, Eleanor Wolf, Elsie 
Faxon, Eleanor Simpson, Marianne Casserly, Grace Hamil- 
ton, Alice Eastland and Messrs. Mark McCann Jr., Boyd 
Weir, John Shortlidge, William Taylor, Heber Tilden, Ed- 
ward Haas, Taylor Pillsbury and Robert Sutton. 

* * * 
Miss Taylor's Guests 

-Miss Evelyn Taylor entertained at the Menlo Circus Club, 
having many of the sub-debutantes and young gentlemen 
of the peninsula set as her complimented guests. They in- 
cluded : Misses Dorothea Roeding, Peggy Gregory, Carol 
Lapham, Heath Hamilton, Peggy Roeding and Messrs. Wil- 
liam Taylor, Erbest Scott Jr., C. R. McCormick Jr., Lewis 
Lapham and Val Scales. 

* * * 

Mrs. Spencer Beebe 
Guest of Honor 

Mrs. Spencer Beebe, (nee Roberta Haynes) of Piedmont, 
was the guest of honor at a charming bridge luncheon given 
by Miss Mildred Scott at the Marin Golf and Country Club 
last Wednesday. 

Guests were: Misses Dorothea Renebome, Ann Langdon 
MaryE. Purcell, Ora Brooks, Dorothy Sharp. 

A linen shower was presented Mrs. Beebe, whose wed- 



ding took place two months ago, and in arranging the lovely 
event for her friends the charming hostess included the 
"shower." 

* * * 

Stephens' Dinner 

Mr. and Mrs. Redmond Stephens gave a dinner party last 
Thursday evening at the Burlingame Country Club, in 
honor of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hill Vincent. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Leib entertained in honor of the 
\ incents the following evening. 

* * * 

Mrs. James A. Folger Sr., is building a beautiful country 
home at Carmel-by-the-Sea. 

* * * 

Mrs. E. N. Van Bergen, whose country estate is in the 
Santa Clara Valley, has moved to the Fairmont Hotel, 
where she is passing a few weeks. 

* * * 

The wedding day has been named by Miss Aileen Mcin- 
tosh, who will become the bride of Mr. William Hillman 
on August 14, at the home of the bride's parents. 

Mrs. Kenneth Mcintosh will attend the bride as matron 
of honor and the brother of the bridegroom will be best 
man. 

* * * 

Mrs. Thomas H. Williams is visiting at Pebble Beach as 
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Harwood, who have taken 
the Vincent place for the summer. Miss Beatrice Williams, 
who has been at Carmel, joined her mother at Pebble Beach'. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Torney and their children have 
been spending a few weeks at Donner Lake. 

Mrs. Wakefield Baker of San Anselmo, one of the favor- 
ites of bay cities society, is in British Columbia, where she 
is enjoying a holiday of two weeks. 

* * * 

J. Francis Murray has been host at Del Monte to a num- 
ber of his friends at dinner parties and special out-in-the- 
open events at the famous hostelry. 

* * * 

Mrs. Louis A. Schwabacher and her daughter, Miss Mar- 
jorie Loewe, who have been spending vacation days in Yo- 
seinite Valley, are now at Del Monte for a season. Miss 
Loewe hastened home from Yosemite in order to be the 
bridesmaid at the Warburg-Stettheimer wedding last week in 
Atherton. 

* * * 

Author Takes Impromptu 
Plunge in Russian River 

Isabel Rogers Stradleigh, author of "Pomara" now run- 
ning in serial form in the "Sunset," makes no claim what- 
soever as a swimmer, and yet in an emergency, she found 
herself suddenly practicing the art of swimming. 

It all happened while the brilliant writer, with her hus- 
band, Mr. Gilbert Low Stradley, prominent San Francisco 
banker, was on a week-end vacation along the Russian 
River. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stradley attempted to cross the swiftly 
flowing river in a frail canoe and had almost reached the 
other side, when the magazine story writer, elated over the 
scenery, raised her hand in enthusiastic ejaculation. 

Presto— right up side down, went the little canoe. 



July 24, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Both Mr. and Mrs. Stradley received a 
drenching. It was all so unexpected and Mrs. 
Stradley never knew that she could swim ! But 
she certainly put over some stalwart strokes, 
and with her clothes on, too, and with the aid 
of her husband, reached the river bank — none 
the worse for her canoe spin — except the soak- 
ing of her frock and the loss of her chapeau. 
But what was that — when one discovered that 
swimming was so quickly an acquired art? 

Mrs. Stradley has been the feted guest at a 
number of society events since her return from 
Del Monte, and since her Russian River so- 
journ. 

Needless to add — the clever author has had 
to repeat to her friends just how it all hap- 
pened — and Isabel Rogers Stradleigh has a fas- 
cinating manner in telling tales. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andre Dossans have returned 
from their honeymoon trip south and are now 
at home to their friends. Mrs. Dossans was 
Miss Margaret Daly previous to her wedding, 
which took place at the French Catholic 
Church, June 16, with Father Bouve officiating 




Rates 

A recep 
tion and breakfast followed at the Fairmont Hotel. 



HOTEL CANTERBURY 
750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
From $2.50 per day 



Garden Club 

The recent visit of National Garden Club of America has 
been the incentive for a local organization composed of so- 
ciety women, whose love of flowers and the bcautification 
of their homes amounts to ardent attention 1.. their garden 
growths. 

But these society folks are not only bent on improving 
their own lovely gardens; they want, in addition, to encour- 
age all San Franciscans who have a garden to cultivate flow- 
ers and to make the city a real bower of blossoms and flow- 
ering shrubs. 

That urbanites can have flowers as well as those who 
live in rural districts, is a proven fact, according to tin i ,;n 
den Club. 

Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor, whose love of 11. 
is proverbial, has been chosen president of the new Garden 
Club. She has called a meeting for September 14. when the 
new organization will be officially launched. 

The list of officers who will direct procedures of tin- Gar- 
den Club are : 

Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor, president: Mrs. I ( 
Wright, first vice-president; Dr. Emmet Rixford, second 
vice-president; Mrs. Joseph IX Grant, third vice-president; 
William H. Crocker, treasurer; Robert Mitchell, assistant 
treasurer; Mrs. Marie Hicks Hcaly. secretary ; Mrs. Gaillard 
Stone y, corresponding secretary. 

On the board of directors are: Messrs. Philip Van Home 
Lansdale. Ashton Potter, Thomas Magee, Macondray 
Moore. Frederick W. Bradley, Louis F. Monteagle, Marcus 
Koshland. Joseph S. Tobin, William Mein. Robert Mitchell. 

Misses Lottie Woods. I. aura McKinstry, Ida Bourne. 

* * * 
Lions Greeted Gaily 

San Francisco has put on her best bib and tucker to greet 
the famous Lions Club, which held their tenth annual in- 
ternational convention tA Lions in the Civic Auditoi'um. 
Wednesday. Thursday and Friday and continuing on 

SANTA MARIA INN 

Swu Maria. California 

On th» Caatl Hifhwa? Halfway Brtwtcn San Frann>c» and L** Anf*'** 

An Inn of I'no.aal Extrlltaf* 

Wirt aw «ar#« /nr r«a«rra*iona <w» yemr nntf trip l am t h 



through today, Saturday, July 24 under aus- 
picious supervision and direction. 

The international conclave was preceded by 
the seventh annual convention Monday and 
Tuesday in the Auditorium of the Fourth Dis- 
trict of Lionism. comprising California, Ne- 
vada and Hawaii. 

Our streets have been decorated with hand- 
some flags and banners with "Welcome" flut- 
tering in our western winds ; and cordiality pre- 
dominating throughout assembly halls. 

The insignia of the Lions has adorned the 
banners which fall in streamers from the tall 
lamp posts all along Market Street. 

The American Flag is used abundantly in 
the decorative scheme and the Union Jack. 
British flag, alternated all along the street with 
the Stars and Stripes. The colors have added 
a. festive spirit to the notable occasion, and as- 
sembly halls have been made sprightly with 
the lavish decorations. 

Forty Kansas Lions in a special train were 
the vanguard for the delegations, running into 
four figures and estimated approximately as 
something like 10.000. A caravan of automobiles brought Lions 
and their Lionesses from Southern California. 

Donald Muir. Governor of Kansas, has been a notable 
visitor, heading his state as a delegate. 

"Building Better Citizens" was the slogan sent by wire 
from Benjamin F. Jones, president of Lions International 
for the convention, to Manager Unmade, and the text has 
followed the tenor of their way. according to those in au- 
thority. 

Parker L. Jackson, retiring president of the San Fran- 
cisco Lions Club, carried on the initial events and has un- 
tiringly worked for the splendid success of the convention. 

Exhibits from every section of California vied for favor 
with those from many parts of the nation during the Lions' 
conclave and created no end of interest and considerable 
amazement. Something like $15,000 has been spent on the 
exhibition by the San Francisco committees alone. 
* * * 

Delegates attending the convention included: District 

Governor Franklin < >. King- of Orlando and a large repre- 
sentation from Georgia, Mississippi and Louisiana, as well 
as the Florida contingent, 

Arthur C. (all. District Governor of Indiana, led a large 
delegation, including District Governor Elect William W. 
French who arrived here in a special train. 



Many Speak 

When the fourth district convention met Monday morn- 
ing the principal speakers were Rev. Ilarold ("Jack" I Kelley of 
San Pedro, Edward Rainey, executive secretary to Mayor 
James Rolph Jr.; Parker L. Jackson, retiring president of 
the San Francisco Lion- Club II. Hart, past presi- 

dent of Long Beach Den: Ray L. Riley, director of Lion-' 
International: Herb K. llargrave. Fresno Den ; Jack Riley. 
district governor; Don Parce, Berkeley Den; Art Faris. 
Richmond Den. and W. L. Stevens of Los Angeles. Hazel 
Landers Hummel of Beverly Hills led the community sing- 

i Continued on Page 18) 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

ant* Itu-h Street. n.Mv».-«r. !•..*■.< H and Stockton, San FraatrUco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T BLETHEN. Proprietor 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1926 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




Too Many Stations 

RADIO in the past five years has 
grown to be a tremendous busi- 
ness, and today one rarely enters a 
home which is not equipped with a re- 
ceiving set of some make. Perhaps the 




C. J. Pennington 

set is turned on only once or twice a 
week; nevertheless, it is there, and 
when something worth while is on the 
air which is of interest to the set own- 
er, it is always used. 

At the present time, more than 500 
broadcasting stations are on the air, 
and as many more clamoring for a place 
in the ether. Every available wave- 
length under the present popular wave 
band, is being used, the majority being- 
used by several different stations. 

Take all the wavelengths from 200 
up to 300 meters, and then count the 
number of broadcasting stations in the 
bay district alone, using a wavelength 
between those figures ; is there anv 
wonder that broadcasting is in a state 
of chaos? 

A person living in San Francisco 
cannot at the present time, tune in a 
station under 300 meters between the 
hours of 8:00 and 10:00 p. m. and en- 
joy the program, for the reason that 
so many little dinky stations are broad- 
casting and begging for attention, the 
majority of their programs being not 
worth the effort of tuning in, let alone 
the few cents it costs to operate the set. 

Congress has indeed made a grave 
mistake by not passing a severe ruling, 
controlling broadcasting stations which 
would limit each section of the country 
to a certain number of stations. 

With the present jumping of wave 
bands by stations, it is hard to fore- 
tell just what the outcome will be. 
However, Ave live in hopes that a rul- 
ing will be made which will take about 
two thirds of the present stations in 
the bay district off the air. and es- 
pecially those who have failed to co- 



operate with the other stations and the 
listening public. 

Pacific Radio Exposition 

Radio audiences of the West are to 
have an opportunity of meeting with 
their favorite artists of the air at the 
coming Pacific Radio Exposition, to 
be held here in the auditorium August 
21st to 28th. 

This was disclosed in an announce- 
ment made here by the Pacific Radio 
Trade Association, under whose direc- 
tion this third annual showing of the 
radio industry is to be held. The plan 
calls for special programs at the expo- 
sition by the various stations during 
which their most popular artists will 
make personal appearances. The pro- 
grams are not to be broadcast from the 
exposition hall. 

At first it was planned to give an 
entire day to a single station, in which 
to stage individual programs at both 
the afternoon and evening sessions. 
The flood of requests received by the 
management, however, indicates that 
the days will probably have to be bro- 
ken up in order to accommodate all of 
the stations desiring to show their ar- 
tists. 

Applications have been received even 
from distant stations, indicating the 
wide range over which the radio artists 
spread their following. As far as is 
known, this is the first time at any radio 
exposition in which an effort has been 
made on such a large scale to present 
personally the popular figures in the 
programs of the leading stations. 

The schedule of days for the various 
stations is to be announced as soon as 
the committee in charge is able to ac- 
commodate the station requests to the 
limited period of the exposition. Much 
keen competition is said to be devel- 
oping between the stations and their 
respective artists to present the most 
interesting programs. 

Many other novel arid unusual feat- 
ures are being arranged for the exposi- 
tion, wdiich is America's first showing 
of the season and which those in charge 
declare will be second only to those of 
New York and Chicago. 
* * * 

Broadcasters Ask Dillon to be 
Dictator 

On July 14, San Francisco Bay broad- 
casters, at a meeting called under the 
auspices of the Pacific Radio Trade 
Association, requested Col. J. F. Dil- 
lon, U. S. Radio Supervisor, to con- 
tinue to assign wavelengths and other- 
( Continued on Page 13) 



1:00 to 2:00 p. 
2:30 to 3:30 p. 
3:30 to 3:40 p. 
3:40 to 5:30 p. 

chestra. 
5:30 to 6:15 p. 
6:15 to 6:30 p 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 428.3 
Sunday, July 25 

£t:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Church service. 

10:45 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast from He- 
creation Park of the baseball game. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Organ Recital by Marshall 
W. Glselman. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Orchestra under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

6:30 p. m. — Giving baseball scores, amuse- 
ment and general information. 

6:35 to 8:35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

8:35 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orches- 
tra. 

Monday, July 2d 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. s. weather forecast. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing: weather forecast and market reports. 

12:10 to 1:00 p. m. — Cllft Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra, 
m. — Matinee program, 
m. — "Breath of the Avenue." 
m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 

m. — Children's Hour. 
m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, market report. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra under the direc- 
tion of Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 111:110 p. m. — KFI and KPO, broad- 
casting simultaneously. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe Orchestra. 

Tuesday, July 27 

7:00. 7:30. 8:00 a. m. — Dally dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, market 
reports. 

12:011 noon — Time signals and .Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:10 to 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
creation Park of the baseball game. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, market report. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

r:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

? : SS t0 9:00 p - m - — Mandarin Cafe Orchestra. 

9:00 to 10:110 p. m.— Program, featuring the 
Harmony Team, Gypsy and Malta 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Cllft Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

AVedneNduy, July 28 

Vn°1\ " ::i "' S:0fl a ' m - — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. s. weather forecast, market 
reports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:10 to 1:00 p. m. — Cllft Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
creation Park of the baseball game 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, amusement and general in- 
formation. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra; Waldemar Lind 
directing. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

. :30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program by the Atwater 
Kent Artists. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra; Waldemar 
Lind, director. 

Thursday. July 20 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, market 
reports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read 
ing. 

12:10 to 1:00 p. m. — Clifl Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball game from Recreation Park. 






July 24, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



Radio Program for Next Week 



4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:16 to 6:30 p. m. — iStock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra; Waldemar Lind, 
director. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe Dance 
Orchestra. 

Friday, July 30 

i :00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, market 
reports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:10 to 12:45 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

12:45 p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball games from Recreation Park. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. ■m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, market reports. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra under the di- 
rection of "Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:10 p. m. — "Sports on the Air." 

7:10 to 7:20 p. m. — Business and Investment 
talk. 

7:20 o 7:25 p. m. — Chamber of Commerce talk. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

9:10 to 9:20 p. m. — Book Review. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

Saturday, July 31 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — IT. S. weather forecast, market 
reports, amusement and general informa- 
tion. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:10 to 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:4 5 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball game from Recreation Park. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores, market repoi 1 8. 

6:30 to 7:20 p. in. — Orchestra; Waldemar Lind, 
director. 

7:20 to 7:30 p. m. — Talk on Real Estate. 

7:30 to S:()0 p. m. — DX, 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program by U. S. Army 

Band. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — KFT and KPO, D] 
lasting simultaneously. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance i >i 

chest ia, 
12:00 i>. m, to 1 :00 a. m. — Cablrla Cafe Oi 

chestra. 



-Household Hints. 

i >;i n. . music by Palm 



f MCerell ami his Stamp 

■ i i •.. 



KFRC— CITY OF PARIS DRY GOODS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 270.1 

Sunday, July 2,1 

6:30 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen." 

t i to 12:00 p. in. — Dance music from Bi I 

conades. 

Holiday, July 2ft 

10:00 to 11 -00 a. m. 

1:20 to 5:30 p. m.- 

Garden Pour. 
5:80 to 6:30 p. m. — A. 

Club. 

8:80 p. in. -"The Stag* and Screen" 

lice Reports, 
8:30 i" t oo p. m. — Jo Men dell and Ms Pep 

Hand, 

r*:00 io 7:30 p m. — Qoodfellow's A.d Period 
8:00 to 9:00 p m, — Around the Camp Fire 

9:00 to 9;30 p m. — KFRC Hawaii 

TiiCMrtny, Jul? '-7 

5 80 i" 6:80 p m, —Mac and his Gang 
8:80 p m.— "Th.- Stage and Screen" and Po- 
lice Reports. 

00 p, m, Fred McKinles In popular 

sou ■ 

7:00 to i 30 ei m. — Good fellow' a ad Period 

m.- si udio prog 1 1 
B on to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music i>\ >'.. 

ari-'s Orchi 

Wcdm-silnj . Jul? -1 

to 1 1 :00 a m. — Household * I 

,. p in — Good fellow's A -i r 
6:30 p m — "Tin- Stage and £ nd Po- 

lice Reports 

■ lang 
son i,. s io p m.— Mrs. D, E. F. ESaston, Talk 

"Health and Safi 
8:10 t>- 9:00 p. m. — Concert by KFRC Little 

phony Orchestra 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m, — Studio Program featuring 

1 >oroih\ i 'lut er, m. ,.-s -i 



Thursday, July 20 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6:30 p. m. — ."The Stage and Screen" and Po- 
lice Reports. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Harry Rose. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Goodfellow's Ad Period. 

S:00 to S:30 p. m. — Popular program. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance music from Bal- 
conades Orchestra. 

Friday, July 30 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Goodfellows Ad Period. 

6:30 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen" and Po- 
lice Reports. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m.— KFRC Little Symphony 
Orchestra. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio Program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music from Bal- 
conades Ballroom. 

Saturday. July 31 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m.— Mac and his Gang. 

7:00 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen" and Po- 
lice Reports. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Goodfellows Ad Period. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

8:30 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance music by 
Walter Krausgr ill's Orchestra. 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 

Sunday, July 25 

3:00 p. m. — Sunday school lesson. 

3:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Church service from the 

temple. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Evening service from the 

Temple. 
Monday, July 2<t 

12:15 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
Tuesday* July 27 

12:15 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — studio program of sacred 

numbers. 
Wednesday. July 27 

12:15 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
::-no [,, i:0O p. in. — Divine healing service. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program of sacred 

numbers. 
Thursday, July 2!» 

12:15 to 12:30 p. m.— Daily Scripture reading. 
Friday, July 30 

12:15 to 12:30 p. m, — Daily Scripture reading. 
3:00 to -1:00 p. m, — Sunshine Hour. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program of sacred 

numbers. 
Saturday* July 31 
1^:1". to 12:80 p, m.— Daily .Scripture reading. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 

Honda? . July 26 

! to Ll:80 a. m. — Vocal and Inst rumen tal 

Select Ions. 
2 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Se l ec I i 1 1 1 1 s 
TurRday, July 27 
9:00 to 11:80 a, m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Selt ctlons 
2:00 to 1:00 p. m, — Vocal and Ins tr mental 

Selecl Ions. 
\\ ednesday, July 28 
9 00 to ii 80 a. ni. — Vocal and Instrumental 

■ ! 

' I DO p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Selecl ions. 

I Innsdiiv. Jnl) ^1» 

9 no | ( . i l : :;o n. in.- Vocal and Insl rumental 

Selecl 
2:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

&< led io.is. 
Friday, July 80 

ii 80 a. in — Vocal and Instrumental 
Seieci 
8:00 to 1:00 p m - Vocal and Instrumental 

Selections. 
Saturday, Jul 3 ■'•* 
9:00 to 11:80 a m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

■ 
8:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 
Ions, 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE. OAK- 
LAND — 508.2 
Monday. Jul? '-'" 
7:00 i" 7:80 p. m. — News broa< 

- idle program. 

: meeting of the 

Protective Order of Lake Merrltl Ducks, 
Tneaday. July S7 

ball. 
i m, — News broadcast. 
W rdaeaday. July 2ft 
■ ball. 
p m. — Alio ns Athletic club or- 

■ 
i p, m. — Educational program 

m — Fifteenth "Community 
grht." 
rimraday. July 20 

-Baseball. 

■ : m. — X*'" s br« . ■ 



Friday, July 30 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

S:00 to 9:45 p. m. — Special program. 

9:45 to 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or 

chestra. 
Saturday, July 31 
3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 
OAKLAND— 361 
Sunday, July 25 

11:00 a. m. — Calvary Presbyterian Church 
service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

7:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:35 p. m. — Calvary Presbyterian Church ser- 
vice. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

Monday, July 20 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Meredith Harris, contralto; 
Raymond Smith, accompanist. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — KGO Kiddies' Klub. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7 :03 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:0S p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. .Stock reports (closing). 

r:23 p. m.— S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

8:00 p. m. — Educational program — music and 
speakers. 

8:05 p. m. — L. A. Barrett, speaker. 

8:25 p. m.— "Better English." 

8:50 p. m. — Senator Sam Shortridge. 

9:16 p, m. — "Symposium on the New Educa- 
tion." 

9:30 p. m. — Emma MeCall, speaker. 

Tuesday, Jurv 27 

L0:.45 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

1 2:00 noon — Time Signal. 

1 - :30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m.— N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — iR F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

8:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

6 IE i' m —News items. 

7:03 p. in.— Weather Bureau report. 
7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 
7:03 p. m. — s. F. Produce, drain. Cotton and 
Metals, 

7:lti p. ni— X. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 
■ 00 to 9 00 p m. — Eveready program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — The Pilgrims' Hour. 
Wednesday) July 2k 

1" 15 to 11:80 .i. m. — "Literary Hour." 
i! 10 a, m. t" l:n0 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

l I 00 i n — Time Signal. 

i IC p m i S Weather Bureau reports. 
1 :30 p. m. — X Y. Stock reports. 
1:87 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

t 12 p in — w.-ather Bureau reports. 

I to : an p m —Knickerbocker Trio. 

■■ Io 4:00 p. m. — (Berkeley i speaker. 

m.— "For Instance." General Jackson, 
mnlst. 

8 aa i., <; 56 p. m . — Concert by Bern's Little 

Symphony < >reh< 

in — X"-\vs items. 

•_ .<>'■'■ p m — Weather Bureau report. 

7:08 p nv — S. P Produce, Grain, Cotton and 

.lis. 

i> m — X. V. Stock reports (closing). 
in- S F Slock reports (closing). 

Tanmday, .luiv so 

H>:I7. tO 11:80 a. m, — "Literary Hour." 

a m. to i;0d p. m. — Lunchi 

12:00 no. .a— Time Signal. 

;• ru — \V' :i mi reports. 

1:30 p. m— X Y. Stock reports. 
p, in — S. F Stock reports. 

in — Weather Bureau reports. 

p. in. — Knickerbocker Trio, 

irge W. Ludlow. "Friend 
■"VS." 

.. .; 55 p ni — Coi Bern's Little 

Symphony ( 'rohestra. 
m — Xews items. 

-Weather Bureau report. 

7 ".; p, in — Baseball sc 

7 "^ p. in — S F Produce. Grain. Gntton and 

Meti 

p m. — X. Y. Stock reports (closing) 
in -S F. Stock reports (closing), 
ii program. 
10 midnight— Pance musir 
Friday. Jnh w 

n. — "Literary Hour." 

11:10 a m, — Home making Talk. 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



July 24, 1926 



11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

32:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 



:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 
i:37 p. m. — S. F. .Stock reports. 
1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio. 
3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Bruce Cameron, tenor; 

Mrs. Bruce Cameron, accompanist. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — KGO Radio Girls. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 

Symphony Orchestra. 
6:55 p. m. — News items. 
7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 
7:0S p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 

Metals. 
7:16 p. m. — N. Y. .Stock reports (closing). 
7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 
Saturday, July 31 

10:45 to li:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — U. S. Weather Bureau report. 
12:33 p. m. — N. Y. Stock Market reports. 
12:40 p. m. — S. F. Stock Market reports. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio. 
4:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 

Symphony Orchestra. 
8:00 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. Weekly 

Sport Review." 
S:10 to 9:00 p. m. — Program (Oakland Studio). 

Concert by String Quartette. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Harmony Four (ladies* 

quartette.) 
10:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance music. 



KNX-L. A. EVENING EXPRESS 
LOS ANGELES— 337 
Daily Except Sunday 

7:30 a. m. — KNX Morning Gym. 

S:00 a. m. — Inspirational talk and morning 
prayer. 

8:55 a. m. — Time signals. 

9:00 a. m. — Radio .Shopping News. 

10:00 a. m. — The Day's Morning Message. 

10:30 a. m. — Household Economics Dept., Eve- 
ning Express except Friday and Saturday. 

12:00 m. — Arcade Cafeteria Orchestra. 

1:30 p. m. — The Book Worm. 

4:55 p. m. — Market reports. 

5:30 p. m. — Arcade Cafeteria Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — The Town Tattler. 

6:15 p. m. — W. F. Alder Travelogue. 

6:30 p. m. — Atwater Kent orchestra. 

Sunday, July 25 

10:00 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

4:00 p. m. — Roberts Golden State Band. 

4:30 p. m. — Half hour Cinema chat. 

6:30 p. m. — Hollywood Unitarian Church. 

7:00 p. m. — Circle Theater Concert Orchestra. 

8:00 p. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

Monday, July 20 

3:00 p. m. — Little Jean. 

4:00 p. m. — Household Hints. 

4:30 p. m. — Blue Monday Frolic. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

7:30 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

11:00 p. m. — Cocoanut Grove orchestra. 

TueMday, July 27 

2:00 p. m. — Mothers' Hour. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

7:45 p. m. — Talk on health. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Henry Halsted's Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 

Wednesday, July 28 

3:00 p. m. — Musical readings. 

4:00 p. m. — Talk on care of children. 

7:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

8 :00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Henry Halsted's Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 

ThurNdny, July 2ft 

11:00 a. m. — Nature talk. 

2:00 p. m. — Paul D. Hugon, handwriting ex- 
pert. 

7:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Henry Halsted's Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 

Friday, July 30 

10:30 a. m. — Talk on "Proper Foods and How 
to Prepare them." 

2:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

4:00 p. m. — Boy Scouts' Musical Program. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

S:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9 :00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Broadcasting the main Event 
from Hollywood Legion Stadium. 

11 :00 p. m. — Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 



Saturday, July 31 

3:00 p. m. — Town Crier of the Day. 

4:45 p. m. — Joyce Coad, giving a resume of 
her screen work. 

700 p. m. — Stories of Insect life. 

715 p m. — Announcement of Sunday ser- 
vices of the leading Los Angeles churches. 

7:30 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

8:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Saturday night frolic. 



blues 



KFWB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY- 
WOOD— 252 
Sunday, July 25 

9:00 to 11:00 p. in. — Peggy Mathews, 
singer; Bill Hatch and his Orchestra. 
Monday, July 2(1 

4:45 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

7:3(1 to 8:00 p. m. — Program featuring Edward 

Novis, Baritone. 
8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News Items. 
8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Dan 

Gridley, Tenor; Ashley Sisters. 
9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Program featuring Ra- 

fiuel Nieto, Coloratura Soprano. 
10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 
TueNday, July 27 

4:45 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Program featuring Edward 

Novis, baritone; Esther White, popular 

songs. 
8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News Items. 
8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Julius H. Phillips, tenor; 

June Parker, blues; Bill Hatch and his Or- 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — June Parker, blues; Bill 

Hatch and his Orchestra. 
10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 
Wednesday, July 28 

4:45 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
r,:iin t<i 7:fHi p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 
s:0fi ].. V10 p. m. — News Items. 
S:10 to 8:40 p. m. — Program featuring Bill 

Blake, tenor; Ann Grey, blues. 
S:40 to 9:10 p. m. — Ann Grey, blues; Bill 

Blake, tenor; Bill Hatch's Orchestra. 
9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — June Parker, blues; Art 

Pabst, and his Banjo. 
10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 
Thursday. July 29 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 
8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News Items. 
S:10 to 8:40 p. m. — Program. June Parker, 

blues. 
sin to 9:10 p. m. — Dan Gridley, tenor; Bill 

Hatch and his Orchestra. 
9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Program featuring Ra- 

quel Nieto, Coloratura Soprano. 
10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 
Friday, July 30 

G:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 
7:oo to 8:00 p. m. — Program featuring Art 

Pabst and his Banjo. 
8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News Items. 
8:10 I" 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Esther 

White, popular songs. 
9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Art Pabst, and his banjo; 

Bill Hatch and his Orchestra. 
lo:io to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 
Saturday, July 31 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — June Parker, blues; Bill 

Hatch and his Orchestra. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Julius H. Phillips, tenor; 

Bill Hatch and his Orchestra. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Ann Grey, blues; Bill 

Hatch and his Orchestra. 



KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 
LOS ANGELES— 467 
(Copyright 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc.) 
Sunday, July 25 

10:00 a. m. — Morning Services. 

4:00 p. m. — Vesper Services arranged by Fed- 
erated Church Musicians. 

6:30 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:45 p. m. — Music Appreciation Chat. 

7:00 p. m. — Jim, Jack and Jean Trio. 

8:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital, Dan L. 
MacFarland. 

9:00 p. m. — Badger's Hollywood Californians; 
Mert Denman and his Uke. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra; Dolly 
MacDonald, Blues ,Singei\ 

Monday, July 2<[ 

5:30 p. m. — "Varsity Ramblers, direction of 
Wallace Dish man. 

6:00 p. m.— KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Program. 

6:45 p. m. — George Wilder Cartwright, "Con- 
stitution of America." 

7:00 p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians. 

8:00 p. m. — Semi-classical program. 

9:00 p. m. — Program presented by the Walter 
M. Murphy Motors Company; Program of 



Folk Music with Virginia Flohrl. Broad- 
cast simultaneously by KFI and KPO. 

10:00 p. m. — Program by Meiklejohn Bros. 

Tuesday, July 27 

530 p. m. — Rendezvous Ballroom Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

615 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Alice Wiegard, Soprano; Edna 
Cook and Billie Henderson^ 



— KFI Radiotorial Period. 
DO. — Virginia Ballroom Orchestra, 
m. — Screen Artists' Quartet. 
m. — Dramatic Play in one Act, "Saff- 
by Carey Wilson, starring Patsy Ruth 



6:45 p. 
7:00 p, 
s : tin i. 
9:00 p. 

ron," 

MilR.. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club 
WedneHday, July 28 



5:30 

6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:4 5 
7:00 
7:30 
8:00 



p m.- — Don Warner's Orchestra, 
p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
Pt m . — Don Warner's Orchestra. 
p. m . — E. C. D. Price "Gossip." 
p. m. — Popular Program, 
p. m . — Nick Harris, detective stories, 
p. m. — -Program by California Petroleum 
Corporation; Cal. Pet. String Quartet; Paul 
Roberts. 
9:00 p. m. — Program arranged by Robert 

Hurd. 
10:00 p. m. — Program arranged by Charles 

Beauchamp. 
Thursday, July 20 

5:30 p. m. — Theron Bennett's Hollywood Foot- 
lifters. 
6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 
6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
6:30 p. m. — Theron Bennett's Hollywood Foot- 
lifters. 
6:45 p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 
7:00 p. m. — Duncan Sisters & Co., from "Topsy 

and Eva-" 
8:00 p. m. — KFI Drama Hour. 
9:00 p. m. — Classic Hour. 
10:00 p. m. — Patrick-Marsh Orchestra. Betty 

Patrick, soloist. 
Friday, July 30 

5:30 p. m. — Kenneth Morse and his Venice 
Ballroom Orchestra. 

m. — KFI Nightly Doings, 
m.— KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
m. — Betty Polo, Pianist, 
m. — Burr Mcintosh. 

m. — Song Story with Virginia Flohri. 
m. — Aeolian Organ Recital. Dan L. 
MacFarland. 
9:00 p. m. — Varied Program of semi-classical 

and classical music. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Ballad Hour. 
Saturday, July 31 
5:30 p. m. — Shelley Players orchestra, with 

Marta Evarts. 
6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 
6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
6:30 p. m. — Anita Holt. Violinist. 
6:45 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 
7:00 p. m. — Knights of the Notes. Walter 

Sprague, director; Paul Roberts, soloist. 
8:00 p. m. — Angelus Trio. 

9:00 p. m. — Associated Packard Dealers' Pro- 
gram; Grand Opera Program; Maurtne 
Over. Broadcast simultaneously by KFI and 
KPO. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club, featuring 

Radioland's most prominent stars. 
11:00 p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. 



6:00 


P- 


8:1b 


p. 


K:H0 


p. 


6:45 


p 


7:00 


P- 


8:0(1 


P 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 

Sunday. July 25 

9:00 a. m. — International Sunday school les- 
son. 

4:30 p. m. — One hour of sacred songs. 

Monday, July 20 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

Tuesday, July 27 

6:80 p. m. — Children's Bible Story Hour. 

6:45 p. m. — Bible reading. 

7:00 p. m. — Vesper Service. 

8:00 p. m. — One hour of musical concert. 

Wednesday, July 28 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

vou p. m. — One hour of sacred songs. 

ThurNdny, July 20 

6:30 p. m. — Children's Bible story hour. 

6:45 p. m. — Bible reading. 

7:00 p. m. — Vesper Service. 

Friday. July 30 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

8:00 p. m. — Studio program; health questions 
received either by mail or phone will be 
answered. 

Saturday, July 31 

10:00 a. m. — One hour of Children's Church 
broadcasting. 

6:30 p. m. — Regular radiocast of the Big Down 
Town Mission. 



KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN, PORT- 
LAND — 491.5 

Sunday, July 25 

10:25 to 12:00 noon — Morning services. 
7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert by the Chevro- 
let Symphony Orchestra. 



July 24, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



Monday, July 26 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert; baseball 
score's. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — "Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, July 27 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

2:00 to 3:30 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — 'Dance music. 

Wednesday, June 28 

10:00 to 11 :30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert; baseball 
scores. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 9:20 p. m. — Concert of instrumental 
and vocal music. 

Thursday, July 2» 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert; baseball 
scores. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — "Weather, police and mar- 
ket reports. 

7:15 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 

8:20 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Friday, July 30 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Women's daily dozen, 
music, weather report, household helps. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee, talks, 
lectures and music. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — "Weather, police and mar- 
ket reports. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Concert of vocal and in- 
strumental music. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Weekly frolic of the 
Keep Growing Wiser Order of Hoot Owls. 

Saturday, July 31 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Concert, hnsi-hull 
scores. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 



KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO., 

SEATTLE— 384.4 
Sunday, July 2K 

11:00 to 12:30 a. m. — Church Services from 
First M. E. Church. 

7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8:00 to 9:15 p. m.— Evening Services First 
M. E. Church. 

9:15 to 10:45 p. m. — Orchestra under direc- 
tion of Henri Damskf. 

Monday, July 20 

11:80 to 12:00 m. — Post Intelligencer talk. 
•'What to prepare for tonight's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Pacific Standard Time Signals, 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — Stock quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Standard Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:06 p. m. — Baseball >=•■■•■' 

B:0G to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

B;S0 to 10:00 i>. m. — Post Intelligencer Btudlo 
i ' >gram. • 

in 'Hi p. m. — Standard Time Signals 

TiiCMriiiy, July 27 

ii 10 to 12:00 m. — Post Intelligencer talk. 

"What to prepare for tonight's dinner.*' 
11:00 m. — Standard Time Signals. 
5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — Stork quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — .Standard Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball si 

6 :0G to 6:10 p. m . — W ea t h er reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

p. m. — Standard Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio Program. 

Wednesday, July 28 

i 12:00 m. — Post Intelligencer talk. 

"What to prepare for tonight's dinner." 
i ' m. — Standard Time Signals. 

1 p. m. — Musical program, 
to 6:00 p. m. — Stock quotations. 
6:00 p. m. — Standard Time Signals. 

16 p. m. — Baseball scores 
7:30 to 8:80 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Standard Time Signals 
10:00 to 11.00 p. m. — Studio Program. 
Thur-diiy. Jnly 20 

1 1:30 to 12:00 m. — Post Intelligencer talk. 
"What to prepare for tonight's dinner." 
m. — Standard Time Signals 

I p. m. — Stock quotations. 
6:00 p. m. — Standard Time Signals. 
6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 



6:0a to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Standard Time Signals. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer pre- 
senting weekly meeting of the "Keep Joy 
Radiating Order of Bats." 

Friday, July 30 

11:30 to 12:00 m— Post Intelligencer talk, 
"What to prepare for tonight's dinner." 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — Stock quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Standard Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores, 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer Studio 
Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Standard Time Signals. 

Saturday, July 31 

11:30 to 12:00 p. m.— Post Intelligencer talk. 
"What to prepare for tonight's dinner." 

12:00 p. m. — Standard Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — Stock quotations. 

t>:00 to 6:10 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:00 p. m. — Standard Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — ,Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Standard Time Signals. 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 

—322.4 — (Mountain Time) 

Sunday, July 25 

11:00 a. m. — Service of August ana Lutheran 
church. 

5:30 p. m. — Organ recital; Augustana Luther- 
an church. 

6:30 p. m. — Studio concert: vocal solos and 
string quartet. 

B :iio p, m. — Open-air concert. 

Monday, July 20 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert, Brown Palace 
String orchestra. 

7:80 p. m. — .Sandman's hour. 

s :(iii p. m, — Insl ru mental program. 

8:16 p. m. — Studiu program. 

TiioKday, July 27 

11:15 a, m.— Wea (her. road reports, stocks, 
markets, Livestock and produce. 

12:16 p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 
:n p. m. — M.itinee for housewives. 

4:00 p. m.— Culinary hints. 

l:lf. p. m. — Fashion review. 

0:00 p. m.— Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins.- 

B > p, m. — Dinner concert, Brown Palace 
String orchestra, 

7;:in p. m. — Farm question box. 

\\ edneaday, July 2s 

i i i.- a. m - -Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce. 

recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds, 

6:00 i' m. -Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce ami news bulletlna 

8:87 p. ru -National Farm Radio Council 
talk. 

M m.— Dinner concert. Brown Palace 
Siring orchestra. 

m- Book "f Knowledge. 
vao p. m. — Instrumental program. 
B:1S p, m. — Studio program. 

Tkantay. 9wti 2» 

i i |6 .i mi — \\ ". ather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce. 

m.-— Organ recital by Clarence Ray- 

8:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

m. — Culinary hints. 
1:16 p. m. — Fashion review. 

m , — stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duCS and news bulletins. 
g : jf p ni -l'n i ted Presa weekly sports re- 
view. 

m. — Pinner concert. Brown Palace 
string orchestra. 
Friday. July 30 
114.'. a. m. — W« ather. road reports, stocks, 

markets, livestock and produce. 
12:16 p. m.— - Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 

ni. — Matinee for housewives. 

i oo p. m. — Culinary hints. 
1:16 p. m. — Fashion review. 
6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, 
duce and news bulletins. 

m. — Pinner concert, 
String orchestra. 

m. — Preview of International Sunday 
iol lesson, 
v on p. m. — Open-air concert. Denver munici- 
pal band. 
Saturday, July .11 

: , n , — Weather, road reports, stocks. 
markets and livestock. 

r , m —Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 



livestock, pro- 
Brown Palace 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 10) 

wise regulate radio broadcasting dur- 
ing the lack of governmental authority 
to do so. This action was deemed nec- 
essary for the protection of the listen- 
ing public, because of the failure of 
Congress to pass needed legislation. 

A resolution of confidence in his abil- 
ity and a pledge to abide by his de- 
cisions, which was agreed to by all 
present, is being sent to all Pacific 
Coast stations with the request that it 
be signed as authority for Col. Dillon 
to proceed. 

* * * 

Salt, added to water in proper pro- 
portions makes an exceptionally good im- 
provement in conductivity for "grounds" 
especially were rods and pipes have 
been driven into the earth for use with 
radio receivers. 

* * * 

A new type of radio tube known as 
CX-300-A, using alkali vapor as a fill- 
er, has been placed on the market. No 
change in wiring or circuit design is 
necessary to use this tube, although 
some slight improvement will be no- 
ticed if the grid return is changed and 
connected to the negative filament. 

The CX-300-A is said to be well 
adapted for service in regenerative re- 
ceivers, because the tube is designed to 
go into and out of oscillation very 
smoothly. The combination of high de- 
tector sensitivity and smooth regenera- 
tive action makes this tube useful in 
short wave receivers where radio fre- 
quency amplification is less effective, 
according to the manufacturer. 



A Prophecy 
In the Twentieth Century war will be 
dead, the scaffold will be dead, hatred 
will lie dead, frontier boundaries will 
be dead, dogmas will be dead ; man will 
live. He will possess something high- 
er than all these — a great country, the 
whole earth, and a great hope, the 
whole heaven. — Victor Hugo. 

* * * 

Co-operation is the earliest of man's 
social discoveries, the one that has 
served him beyond all others in making 
material progress. — Calvin Coolidge. 

* * * 

If you have knowledge, let others 
light their candles at it. — Margaret Ful- 
ler. 

* * * 

When you think the door to a suc- 
cessful future is closed against you, the 
ivory knob that holds it shut isn't on the 
door. — Kodak Magazine. 

* * * 

"How old would a person be who 
was born in 1898?" 

"Man or woman?*' — Oklahoma 
Whirlwind. 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1926 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 

for her son and duty to her position. 

The picture throbs with dramatic 
situations. 

Carol Nye plays the part of the son. 

In conjunction with the feature photo- 
play, "The Elegy." a Walter Lang story 
will also be shown, with its little tragedy 
dealing with a boy violinist whose dog 
was taken away from him. 

Max Dolin has added some special 
musica. entertainment for the cinema 
attractions. He will be heard in violin 
solos and lead his orchestra in musical 
interpretations. 

* * * 

St. Francis 

"Men of Steel" is the new screen at- 
traction at the St. Francis, with Milton 
Sills appearing as the star, who is cred- 
ited with having translated the R. G. 
Kirk story for the silver screen. This 
photoplay follows the run of "The 
Flaming Frontier." 

Doris Kenyon is the heroine of the 
picture, with Mae Allison, George Faw- 
cett and Victor MacLaglen in the cast 
as supporting principals. 

The picture contains comedy angles 
with Fawcett as an old sea captain, and 
Frank Currier playing the character 
role of a steel magnate, creating a lot 
of fun as old cronies. 

The story commences with mine 
scenes in the regions of Dakota and 
sweeps with rapid events of love, crime, 
jealousy and desire, to the palatial 
home of an Eastern steel magnate. It 
is well staged. 

* # # 

Cameo 

"Down to the Sea in Ships" starts a 
three days' run at the Cameo theater 
Sunday with Clara Bow and Raymond 
McKee appearing in the lead. The pic- 
ture starts on Sunday and continues 
on the screen until Wednesday when 
it will be followed by "Palace of Pleas- 
ure." with Betty Compson and Edmund 
Lowe the stars. 

The Cameo is showing some of the 
best pictures of the season and with 
this week's attractions provides un- 
usual entertainment with the two pic- 
tures filling the week's program. Both 
photoplays have intense action, thrills, 
dramatic romance and the urge which 
keeps interest alive. 

Betty Compson takes the heroine role 
in "Palace of Pleasure," which deals 
with a royalist leader sought by the 
Portuguese Government, who abducts 
and weds an actress, who afterwards 
saves his life. Miss Compson has an 
admirable character part. 

Hoot Gibson will be seen in "The 
Man in the Saddle," said to be one of 
his best pictures, during the week be- 
ginning July 31 and continuing a run 
of seven days. This picture has just 
been released by Universal and is rated 



as a thrilling story, giving Gibson un- 
usual chances for his skill. 

* * * 
Granada 

"Mantrap," filmed from a Sinclair 
Lewis novel, is this week's lure to the 
Granada theater, with three screen lu- 
minaries essaying the principal roles. 
Clara Bow, Ernest Torrence and Percy 
Marmont. 

The picture is splendidly staged with 
out-of-door scenes and elaborate set- 
tings vieing with the cruder locale, 
where simple people led their peaceful 
and trusting lives. The escapades of 
the little minx are full of surprises and 
feature Miss Bow in another memor- 
able role. 

"Rays of Sunshine" is the stage at- 
traction for the week. The act will 
feature the return to San Francisco of 
"The Foursome," and the local debut 
of Peggy Bernier, who comes direct 



Capitol 

"The Slums of Berlin" will be given 
its American premiere at the Capitol 
theater, Saturday night, July 24, and 
comes as a European film, based on 
caricatures by Professor Heinrich 
Zille. 

Walter W. Kofeld, well known mo- 
tion picture exploiter, who has but re- 
cently returned from Europe, has 
brought the picture to this coast. He 
has the idea that Americans would ap- 
preciate European pictures of unusual 
character and will show the local pub- 
lic this particular picture as an ex- 
ample. 

Professor Zille is a student of social 
conditions, whose drawings are popu- 
lar in Europe. These drawings are 
now made into scrips for the screen 
and are said to be something out of the 
ordinary. 



The Elder Gallery 

Miss Edith Coburn Noyes will give a 
reading of Child Verse selected from 
the poems of E. V. Lucas, A. A. Milne 
and losephine Preston Peabodv, in the 
Paul" Elder Gallery, July 30th, at 11 
o'clock. 

Miss Noyes, director of the Edith 
Coburn Noyes School of Boston, is giv- 
ing a series of Friday morning drama 
talks and readings in the Paul Elder 
Gallery. August 6th, she will read "A 
Bill of Divorcement," by Clemence 
Dane, and August 13th, "Young Wood- 
ley", by John Van Druten. 



Celebration for Shortridge 
When the "Padre" arrives from the 
South, at 9:30 Monday morning, the 
Ferry Bldg. will be the scene of a big 
demonstration for our Sam Shortridge 
will be aboard, fresh from three weeks 
visit to the southern part of the state. 




EUROPE 

On the new famous m O" steamers 
you are sure of utmost comfort- 
cabin or tourist third cabin 
Cabins containing single and two 

beds. Spacious promenade 

decks, ballroom, gym and other 

special features 

Sailings Saturdays 

from New York 

Cabin class from #145.00 
Tourist from #95.00 

o/ilso direct tailings from Pacific 

Coast via Panama Canal 

CRUISES: 

Norway • South America 

Mediterranean 

Second great African cruise leaves 
New York, January, 1927 

Complete information & literature 

Royal Mail Steatr Packet Company 

570 Market St., San Francisco 

or Local Agent 



ROYAL 

MAIL 

-1THE COMFORT ROUTEp 
SINCE 1839 




in the interests of his campaign for re- 
nomination on August as U. S. Senator. 

Senator Shortridge's heart will un- 
doubtedly be warmed by the plaudits of 
the crowd, as he is swept along in the 
parade up Market Street to his head 
quarters in the Crocker Bldg. Here is 
what one of his admirers says of him : 

"I have first hand knowledge of Sen- 
ator Shortridge's service in the inter- 
ests of California, ... of his standing 
and influence with his contemporaries." 



A Best Seller 

He had been looking over the birth- 
day cards on the counter for some time, 
when the saleswoman suggested: 
"Here's a lovely sentiment, 'To the 
ony girl I ever loved.' " 

"That's fine," he said, brightening. 
"I'll take five — no, six of those, please." 
— Western Christian Advocate. 



The principle of the crawl stroke used 
by swimmers has been applied to motor 
boats. It has been applied to motor 
buses for a long time. — Humorist. 



July 24, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

High Lights On Cruising 

There are so many Cruises around the World, to the Med- 
iterranean and the West Indies during the coming Season, 
that I think it would he apropos to give a few useful hints 
on what to do upon arrival on the Steamer. 

After you have been at sea about twenty-four hours you 
begin to take an active interest in your fellow ship-mates. 
Prior to that, you have been concerned with such important 
matters as unpacking and stowing yourself away in your 
Cabin, with things put just where you want them. 

First, you have reserved your seat in the dining room for 
meals. (This is a very important matter, and I think a 
friendly tip should be given to those who do not know the 
customs of a de luxe Cruise.) On the first night out from 
the home port, it is usual to sit where you like at dinner ; 
few people dress and the meal is an informal affair. After 
dinner the Chief Steward comes back to the Saloon usually, 
and with a huge plan of the tallies before him, allots places. 
After having placed yourself at a congenial table, half your 
troubles are at an end. 

You then stroll about the decks, observing other people 
and you will see the young, the old, the plain and the beau- 
tiful. You will be drawn irresistibly towards this person 
and repelled, possibly, by that. But again, if you are a wise 
traveler you will check that fraternising impulse for a few 
hours. It is exceedingly awkward, having prematurely 
plunged into a ship-board acquaintance at first sight, to 
withdraw altogether if the person bores you — and equally 
awkward for others to get rid of you in like case. But in all 
concourses 01 people, like attracts like, and in a very short 
time you will find yourself on terms with a dozen people. 
When the ship has been al sea a week, you probably will 
know a hundred. 

One of the chief charms about the mean Cruise is its 
democracy. You arc all traveling first class, and the per- 
son who occupies the de luxe stateroom, has no more ad- 
vantages than you, who perhaps share a cabin with another 
passenger on the lower deck. Nobody bothers about absurd 
introductions. 

Suggestions Regarding Clothing 

Ladies should take tenuis Frocks for deck tennis, etc., and 
a warm motor coat. Vbove all. a dust coal is required, for 
even when motoring abroad in a closed car on a hot day, 
the dust, especially on Italian roads, will percolate through 
anything. Horn-rimmed glasses with a tint in them are 
essential. The sun glare on deck and shore can cause bad 
head aches. Several evening frocks of the simplest kind are 

advisable, Dancing on deck is accompanied, usually, by 

dust from the French chalk they have to put down, and 
women know what this means. Take a fancy dress, for the 
fancy dress balls on board ire great affairs. People do 
not appear in elaborately expensive dresses, but the point 

is originality and picturesqueness, coupled with coolness. 
A heavy dress will cause discomfort on a hot Mediterranean 
night. 

Men require, roughlj speaking, the following: two or 

three pairs of flannels, a dinner jacket, plenty of dress shirts 

ami collars, las it is very hot dancing on board at times: a 

- coat for cold ni g, a cap. mackintosh. 

and a fancy .lies- ol some sort. 

There is always an excellent laundry on hoard, hut to- 
wards the latter part of the voyage they become very con 
gested with work, and are often obliged to refuse all further 
washing. 

A further article regarding "Cruising," will appear in 
next week's issue. 



CUNARD 

Channel Service 
New York 

to 

England and France 

by CABIN SHIPS 



Caronia 
Carmania 
Cameronia 
Lancastria 

Ala uni a 

ASCANIA 
AUS0NIA 



For Full Particulars Apply to 

CUNARD AND ANCHOR LINES 

Or Local Agents 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8C DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general cAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1926 




ONE effect, economically speaking, of the automobile, 
has been the revival of the country-town festival. A 
notable instance is that of the rodeo at Salinas, held this 
week. It is expected that at least 10,000 people will be at 
each meeting. But, curiously, the use of the automobile 
does not appear to have affected passenger traffic much, 
for the Southern Pacific is making great preparations to 

handle the crowds. 

* * * 

— We note "Finance and Trade Red Book," published a 
supplement to "Finance and Trade." It is an admirable 
little pamphlet, concerned with California banks, giving a 
wonderful amount of information and reliable knowledge. 
We have met nothing more useful of its kind in our ex- 
perience. 

* * * 

— There is no end to the improvement of the railroad 
transportation system. Our methods are so far ahead of 
those of the rest of the world that we might have seemed 
to have reached our limit. But here is the Southern Pacific 
putting on the tracks twenty-three new engines of the 
three-cylinder type. These will haul trains which formerly 
required two locomotives to move. 

— It is an ominous sign that Judge Golden, the police 
court judge, who was placed in such an unenviable position 
by his curiously injudicial remarks on strike violence, should 
have been supported by the carpenters' unions and the like 
for a position on the superior bench. It looks very much 
awry, and should have some attention at the hands of mem- 
bers of the bar. 

* * * 

— There is no question that our distribution system will 
bear looking into. The price of fruit and vegetables shows 
that. 

* * * 

—Sometimes we talk of confiscation as if it were some- 
thing quite unusual. But it is always going on. In France, 
today, the low value of the franc simply means that those 
who have accumulated money are obliged to part with it 
and that the property which they have painfully gathered, 
is being rapidly dissipated. 

* * * 

— "Finance and Trade" remarks very well, commenting 
upon the fears of people that depression will come: "The 
grain crop could fail in California, or any other crop, or a 
half dozen crops, without any serious harm, even to the 
people directly engaged in these crops, because there is 
enough wealth and activity in other lines, centered more or 
less in the banking system, to carry the weight of the whole 
organization, when things are very bad for some of its in- 
dividual groups." 

* * * 

—The British have been setting their brains to work 
since the war and have developed a patented cobalt high- 
speed steel which is declared to be rustless and stainless, 
and with a peculiarly good cutting edge. They are going 
after the razor blade industry in this country.' They are 
setting a quality standard and their prices will be higher 
than those of American goods with which they compete. 

* * * 

— The Railroad Commission has stated that within the 
next four or five years the requirements for traffic between 
the Oakland and San Francisco sides of the bav will require 
twenty boats an hour. - ■ ' 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY I0TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1926 

Assets $109,430,478.72 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,400,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $557,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haieht and Belvedere Streeta 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4}i) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




Supervision of C. P. A. 
Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, 
Accounts; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYoung Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



Book- 
Slow 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital S2O.000.000 (20.000.000 Reserve Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER GOO BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRl'CE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Aunt. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. { 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2244 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS - AUDITORS - COLLECTORS 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
20S Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel). San Franclaco 

Phone Kearny 391 



July 24, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



BENBOWS 
By Eleanore F. Ross 

Do you remember, when you were a child, how you loved 
to plan an ideal country estate? Your head, crammed with 
ideas filched from some romantic English novel, fairly 
teemed with enthusiasm for your subject, and the whole 
scheme, colored by your vivid imagination, when completed, 
resembled a dream of Fairyland. 

Here was a beautiful lake, bordered by shrubbery, with 
water lilies lying on its placid breast, and white swans float- 
ing on its surface. There a sparkling river wound its way, 
between green banks, with brilliant canoes paddling up- 
stream, or lazily drifting down ; here was a wide roadway, 
curving along between huge redwoods, with here and there, 
some house depicted, set a little ways back, and nestled 
in a mass of greenery, and in the lovliest spot of all, you 
chose to place your own home, where the most extensive 
view of the surrounding countryside could be found ; in a 
small and fertile valley, your farm and dairy found their 
situation, not too close to the main building of the estate, 
but easily accessible, nevertheless ; and far away from every- 
thing, and everyone, in the wildest depths of the mountains, 
you built your "hunting lodge," near the upper reaches of 
the river, where in still and shimmering noons, the timid 
deer would come with wary step, to drink, and then again, 
to quench their thirst, in pale and lonely twilights. 

Do you like the picture? Did you know that you can find 
just such an "estate," only 200 miles from San Francisco, 
three miles south of Garberville, in Humboldt County, lo- 
cated on the Redwood Highway, where beautiful Eel River 
winds in and out? This is "Benbows; that unexploited part 
of the country where the keenest follower of I>;iak Walton 
can be satiated. 

Benbows comprises a property of 3000 acres, situated at 
the confluence of the East and South forks of the Eel River, 
in the midst of the virgin redwoods and of beautiful Hum- 
boldt. 

A splendid golf course is now being laid out, each hole in 
itself being a picture and no two holes being similar, either 
in character or length. 

Miles of bridle paths and trails abound, for horseback and 
hiking; the lake affords swimming and boating; dancing 
may be indulged in ; there is unsurpassed fishing and hunt- 
ing, for deer and bear are to be found in the adjacent moun- 
tains. In short there is everything at Benbows. to suit the 
taste of those who love the comfort of city hotels, in the 
midst of wild and picturesque scenery ; for running water, 
baths, showers, are in every room, and the furnishings, dec- 
orations and service are equal to any metropolitan hostelry. 

The informal opening of Benbows took place last Satur- 
day evening, and announcement of its official opening will 
be found in the near future in these pages. 

Benbows may be reached from San Francisco via Sausa- 
lito, over the famous Redwood Highway, or night ami day 
Pickwick stages direct from Fifth and Market St<. to the 
door; or via Northwestern Pacific Railway, to South Fork, 
where, by appointment, a car will meet you. 



SUMMER RESORTS 



Plain English 

"Doctor, if there is anything the matter with me. don't 
frighten mc half to death l>\ giving it a long, scientific 
Just tell me what it i^ in plain English." 

"Well, sir. to be frank, you are lazy." 

"Thank you, doctor. Now tell me the scientific name 
for it. I've got to report to the missus." -Practical Medi- 
cine and Surgery. 



A Satisfied Customer 

"1 noticed that customer you just attended to didn't buy 
anything, yet he seemed pleased," said the eagle-eyed floor- 
walker. "What did he wish to see?" 

"Me. at eight o'clock tonight." replied the pretty clerk 
blushing. — Exchang 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

WHY? 

It's the Water and the Table 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 
tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN 

Acua Caliente, Sonoma County, Calif. 

or see Peck-Judah 



El Dorado Hotel 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaka With Mushrooms" 

Clean Rooms, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

Viiit Sonoma County'* Famoui Resorti and Mineral (Warm Water) Swimming 

Tanks From This Hotel 

Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

Telephone 110 



The Lodge at Saratoga 

Under New Management 

Specializing Dinner Dances Saturday and Sunday Nights 

The Moat Modern and Sanitary Mountain Hotel in America 

Open the Year 'Round. Among the Pines and Redwoods. 

Wider Roads. American Plan. Moderate Rates. 

Greatly Improved 

Owned and Operated by John A. Evans Corporation, Los Angelas 
Phone Hempstead 2101 

THOMAS R. DOUGHERTY, Mgr., Saratoga, Calif. 
Phonei Saratoga 80 and 103 



"POP" McC RAY'S 

One Mile North of Cloverdale on Redwood Highway 

DANCING IN DINING ROOM AND 

CLUB HOUSE 
SWIMMING IN RUSSIAN RIVER 

Jellies, Jams and Mustard Pickles Always on the Table 



FETTERS HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete highway open. Famous medicinal baths. Masseur 
in attendance. Healthful mineral waters; swimming pool. All 
amusements. Excellent table. Hotel steam heated. Cottage accom- 
modations. Rates, $18 up. Write George Fetters, Mgr., J. F. 
Green. Ass't. Mgr., or Perk-Judah. 



LA L 111 IN 1 t, V ILL A carl'Ite^fen; p?op 

French and Italian Dinners — Meals at All Hour, 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AG I" A CALIENTE 

4 Minutes Walk to Fetters Station. Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1926 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

Monday Luncheon at St. Francis 

Mrs. Eugene Lent, was hostess to a party of four, at the 
St. Francis, Monday, her guests being Mrs. Walter Martin, 
and Miss Eleanor Martin, who wore a frock of the popular 
blue and white polka dot design. With this she wore a large 
black straw hat ; Mrs. Thomas Joyce of New York, looked 
charming in a Chanel Model frock of blue cloth, made on 
straight lines with bandings of Chinese red and gold braid. 
To complete her costume, she wore a small black felt hat; 
Mrs. Ernest Folger, Mrs. Dalton Mann, Mrs. Robert Miller, 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNear, Miss Barbara Ballew, 
Miss Francisco Deering, Mrs. Mark L. Gerstle, in an at- 
tractive ensemble, the coat and the lower part of the dress 
being of black cloth; the blouse, made very long, was of 
pearl gray poplin, the front of which was embroidered in 
red and black wool. Her hat was a small affair made of 
felt, the only decoration on it being two small birds which 
were fastened to one side; Mrs. Washington Dodge, Mrs. 
John L. Thomas, Mrs. Walker Salisbury, Mrs. Cyril Tobin, 
Miss Leonora Armsby, Mrs. William Shuman. 

* * # 
At the Hotel Del Coronado 

Summer visitors at Hotel del Coronado include many 
San Franciscans who are enjoying the many social diver- 
sions of the seaside resort. A series of gay costume parties 
has been planned, the first of these, an Indian Ball, or "Pow 
Wow" taking place tonight (July 24). This will be fol- 
lowed by a Hawaiian Ball August 7, and later by a Sports 
Ball. 

Several attractive dinner and supper dances have been 
given during the week at the hotel and at the Coronado 
Country Club, among the latter being one at which Cap- 
tain and Mrs. John L. Kauffman entertained forty guests. 
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie H. Boothby were hosts at a beautifully 
appointed dinner, as were Commander and Mrs. Eugene 
Tricou, who entertained thirty members of the service set. 

* * * 
Santa Maria Inn 

The following people, all of San Francisco, have been 
guests of the Inn during the week of Monday, July 12th to 
Monday, July 19th : 

Miss M. P. Huntington, who was accompanied by Dr. 
and Mrs. Chester Moore. 

Commander C. C. McMillan and family. 

Mrs Charles P. Cutten, who had with her, her daughters, 
the Misses Ruth and Elizabeth. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Davis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Richards. 

Major and Mrs. Henry Terrill, of the Presidio of San 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Miller of Menlo Park and Mr. Sidney 
Miller of Burlingame, California. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. B. Robbins and daughter, Mrs. George 
Thierbach. all of Burlingame, California. 

Mrs. D. M. Swobe of Berkeley, who was accompanied by 
Mrs. Henry Boice of Pasadena. 

Captain W. W. Smith, U. S. Army. 

* * * 
At Santa Cruz 

In line with its policy to provide a continuous series of 
important sporting events for the entertainment of Santa 
Cruz visitors, the Casa del Rev Hotel announces that it 
will sponsor three big invitational tennis tournaments each 
summer. The first of these tournaments will take place this 
Saturday and Sunday, when eight of the leading girl tennis 
stars of the Pacific Coast will take part in a Senior Women's 
invitational tournament on the Casa del Rey Courts. This 
will be followed by a Senior Men's invitational tournament, 
restricted to the best men players in the State, August 21- 
22, and by a Junior invitational tournament in September. 
(Continued on Page 21) 




1140 GEARY ST 




I'EL. GRAVSTONE 42(10 



Metal Work Apper- 

i :i i a i ii u to Automo- 
bllcH — Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding — Black- 
Mniithlne. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



9 

^ WATSON _ 

StabilatorS 



In a Stabilated Car — You Motor 
Relaxed and Arrive Refreshed. 



MADSON & RICHARDS 



Giiaystosf. 2100 



(Incorporated) 

Pacific Avenue at Van Ness, San Fkancisco, Calif. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED A\D GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

RnteM: '■'-'•>■ per liny; sT.T.n per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

\T CAI.PF.T GAS STATION' 
Pont and Franklin SlrcetH San Franelnco, Calif. 



Graystone 130 Open Day and Night 

SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specially 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Win. Saunders 



TRUNKS - RACKS - BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVE. 



Chapel- 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
-771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



Arthur C. Thornton 

General InNiirnnee Phone Sutter :tl'« 

141i Snnsome Street. Room* .104-8011, San Frnncluco 



July 24, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

ONCE upon a time there was a man 
who was ambitious. He had cer- 
tain ideas about salesmanship and he 
was enthusiastic about California. So 
he embarked in the real estate business, 
lie sold redwood estates and city prop- 
erty; he sold ranches and farms. He 
told the world about the beauties of the 
ittle community in which he lived, and 
when a prospective purchaser entered 
his office, he led him to a vantage point 
along the paved highway where the 
observer looked out on a great canyon. 
Redwoods, the oldest of all living things, 
clad the slopes of the mountains and 
in the distance blue waters of the ocean 
might be seen. It was a vision "I 
beauty typically California^ and tour- 
ist and natives alike enjoyed the glory 
of the scene. 

After a while the real estate man 
came to look on this p.m. .ram. i as his 
own. Us beaut \ lie valued in dollars 
and cents and lie did not like to have 

anyone look out on the canyon with- 
out his permission. It was his birth- 
right, he argues, for it brought him 
business and he gradually came to look 
upon it merel) through the spectacles 
of barter and trade. 

< hie day lie called in a sign-painter 
and had a large hoard painted with his 

name ami business location. Then he 

hired another man to climb the tallest 
of the redwoods in the center of the 
panorama and install the advertise- 
ment. Now. he thought, when the 
world comes to look at m\ panorama 
of beauty it will sec m\ name and my 
business will increase an hundredfold. 
\ml the world came, but it did not 
linger to enjoy the scene for the har- 
tnony of beauty was no longer there. 
It only paused to wonder at the selfish- 
ness of mankind that could steal away 



overnight the inspiration that bad been 
built up through the ages. 

And then the man saw that he had 
sold his birthright for a mess of pot- 
tage. 

This is a true fable and its setting is 
laid in Santa Cruz county. The panor- 
ama of the little valley in that coast 
county, however, is not the only beau- 
tiful scene in California which has been 
marred by the bill-poster and the sign 
painter. The fundamental principle of 
all advertising is favorable suggestion, 
not unfavorable, and the ordinary citi- 
zen does not like to have an advertise- 
ment thrust at him in an annoying man- 
ner. 

Destroying the beauty of an inspir- 
ing natural scene for commercial pur- 
poses is taking away from your neigh- 
bor what rightfully belongs to him. 
The rights of property do not extend 
to an infringement on the rights of 
our neighbors and what is of general 
value to the community at large, should 
not be sacrified to the selfishness of an 
individual. 



Heavy Travel to Pacific Coast 

That 1926 will prove the greatest 
year ever recorded for motor tourists 
and campers is the declaration of Ben 
Blow, Field Secretary of the National 
Automobile Club, who cites the com- 
pletion of an all-weather road across 
Missouri as the controlling factor. 

"For about 200 miles west of the Mis- 
issippi River." says Blow, "there is a 
~.nl condition both in Iowa and Mis- 
souri which has operated, to send auto- 
mobile tourists toward the summer 
playgrounds of Michigan. Wisconsin 
and Minnesota, rather than toward the 
Rock) Mountains and Pacific Coast. 

"The tact that the roads of both Mis- 
souri and Iowa were practically im- 
passable alter the summer rains, was 
responsible for this situation. Since 
the completion of a surfaced all-weath- 
er road from St. Louis west across Mis 
sotiii. a great amount of tourist travel 
is being fed to the National < >ld Trail 

leading to Los Angeles, and the Vic- 
tory Highway leading t.> San Francisco, 
ami the record of 1925 when 3,000,000 
automobiles carrying 12.000.000 pas- 
rs spent approximately $24,000.- 
various summer playgrounds will 

be far out-distanced in 1926." 



lie .passionately) — I tell you my 
love for you is making me mad — mad — 
mad ! 

She (calmly) — Well, keep quiet 
about it. It's bad the same effect on 
my father— Answers. 



Wife— -This pudding is a sample of 
the new cook's work. What do you 
think of it ? 

Husband— I call it mediocre. 

"No, dear, it's tapioca."-- Answers. 



Nowhere else in the United States 

is hydro electric power so abundant, so 
cheap and so commonly used as in Cali- 
fornia. 

Hydro electric power is abundant in Cali- 
fornia because nature has given us moun- 
tains and rivers of falling water. 

It is cheap and commonly used because 
the inventions and economies of the power 
companies, coupled with State regulation 
of rates and service, have made it available 
for factory, home and farm. 

Rates in California are low. 

Service is a model for the rest of the 
United States. 

Since 1913 the average per capita cost of liv- 
ing increased 6S7r, -while the average cost of 
electricity decreased %%. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



p.Q.and 




-FAcmc stnvicr- 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




-ibe better it ^eb- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

utter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

l,SOO,000 cup* were nerved at (he Pa ran 
PaHflr Im frnaflnnnl F.xpoaltlna 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1926 



«&&£» 



JZ» 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



**M. 



JS*' 



«**.' 



VyiLLIAM "BILL" TAYLOl 



Bill Goodwin, 
the Energetic 
Golf Commis- 
sioner of the 
California Golf 
and Country 
Clnb at Baden. 



IVV dent of the California Club, and Bill 
Goodwin, also a director of this most popu- 
lar golf club, entertained forty Rotarians 
and their friends, when they played off their 
monthly golf tournament at Baden. 
[ Si The two Bills did their stuff in their hap- 

py customary manner, as George Cool, of 
Honolulu, Joe Cannon of New York, and 
Clarence Bumbacher of Philadelphia can 
testify. Their three guests from the differ- 
ent parts of the country said they never en- 
joyed such a game of golf and such hospitality as they re- 
ceived at the hands of these two big chiefs at Baden. 

The players were divided into two teams, captained by 
Bob Ohea, the big paraffine boy from the Lake Merced 
Club, and George Makins, the big butter and egg man of 
the west. Bob Ohea's team just nosed out Makm's aggre- 
gation by one point, and that point was won by Bob him- 
self, his total being 109 to 110 by Makins. 

The besl^ajtfl of f Jhe day was turned in by Joe Loughrey 
with an 8o. which ^as a splendid scofl^J^jfltt^riug that 
Joe was playing the course for the first time. 7\Iex McCarty, 
an old time Olympian, won his second cup for the second 
best low net of the day in the B division. 

Alex won't have such an easy time of it from now on, 
as the handicap committee will clip Alex' wings before he 
starts out next time. Gene Blum, who is one of the charter 
members of the San Francisco Rotary Club, won his first 
trophy in competitive golf, and Gene ought to feel very 
proud as he was up against a very good field of pellet shoot- 
ers. 

* * * 

Goodwin a Winner 

Charlie "Grandpa" Goodwin, as usual, carried off the 
guest's prize by a wide margin. Charlie is considered the 
greatest exponent of the game, for his age, in this neck of 
the woods, and no matter how fast the company is, "Grand- 
pa" is always there, too much so for a lot of the youngsters. 

Clarence Gumbacher, son of the past president of Ro- 
tary International, who has just graduated from Stanford, 
is some golfer himself, and probably would have been listed 
among the winners had it not been for the fact that his 
studies interferred with his golf game, but he hopes to get 
in form again when he returns to his home in Philadelphia 
next week. 

George Cool of Honolulu, who was a guest of Tom Doane 
of the Pacific Coast Paper Company, said that he had plaved 
hundreds of golf courses in different parts of the world, and 
thought that the California course was one of the best he 
had ever played on. That was identically what Joe Cannon 
of New York said. Joe not only said that it was the best 
course, but also stated that for true hospitality, Bill Taylor 
and the rest of the Rotarians, had the world beat. 

It was rather unfortunate that Henry Bostwick, the golf- 
ing president of the San Francisco Rotary Club, had to at- 
tend a meeting at Fresno, but Bill Taylor, president of the 
California Club, and past president of Rotary in Manila, 
filled Henry's shoes in great shape. 

Bill Goodwin, chairman, and Bob Matthey, vice chair- 
man, put the tournament over big, but what these two were 
lacking in good golf scores, they certainly scored a hit 
at the banquet that followed the tournament at the club; 



each in turn put over some snappy talks. Bob Matthey was 
appointed chairman of the entertainment committee for the 
Rotary Hi Jinks at Del Monte. 



Shrine Pote Popular 

The various golf courses between here and Alaska were 
given a severe test by the return of Ernest West, the Shrine 
pote, after an absence of three weeks. "Replace the turf," — 
that familiar slogan was wonderfully exemplified during 
Ernest West's peregrinations over the snow-capped North- 
west; otherwise, they would have resembled the French 
battlefields. 

Our dear friend was the recipient of a wonderful tribute 
through the concerted action of his various friends through- 
out the North, a prominent merchant in each city contribut- 
ing a golf club, after they had heard that Ernie had recently 
been stung with the golf bug. 

Eric Lange of Los Angeles gave a driver; Chester Rob- 
erts of Seattle, a brassie; Harry Mulcreavy of Victoria, a 
mashie ; J. W. Hoffman, chairman of the entertainment 
committee at Portland, a mashie niblic; Bob Fowler, the 
big New York Insurance hound, a jigger; Ernest Wakefield, 
American Consul of Prince Rupert, a Baffle iron ; Alex 
Frazer of Victoria, a niblic ; while Aron Holtz of Van- 
couver completed the set with a putter. 

So that our dear friend, the pote, wouldn't feel embar- 
rassed when he went on the course to play, Henry Bode pre- 
sented Ernest with a golf bag; Harry Thomson, a gross of 
golf balls, and Henry Claudius, with a set of rules, and a 
book of coupons for 100 golf lessons. 

Now when our illustrious potentate goes out to play, in- 
stead of asking the caddie for No. one, two, etc., he will 
daily mention the names of those prominent men by ask- 
ing for the, Roberts brassie, etc., thus paying a beautiful 
tribute to their kindly thought. From now on Ernie West 
is appropriately called the King of the turf at the California 
Club. 



Feather River Inn 

The golf tournament at Feather River Inn is still hold- 
ing the center of the amusement stage, with moonlight 
dancing and picnics as the diversion of the moment. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Emmet Hayden and Miss Margaret Hay- 
den and Mr. and Mrs. Angelo J. Rossi and Miss Rosamund 
Rossi are all summering at Feather River Inn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy H. Elliott and family of Berkeley have 
taken a cottage for the remainder of the summer at the Inn. 

San Francisco registrants include Mr. and Mrs. A. G. 
Luchsinger, Mrs. E. H. Luchsinger and daughters Anne 
and Polly, who have a chalet. 

Mrs. Page Taaffe. Mr. and Mrs. William Kauffman. Mr. 
and Mrs. I. R. Kissel and Miss Ruth Natusch are San Fran- 
ciscans at the Inn. 

Mrs. Charles W. Rosenbaum is now at Feather River 
with her mother Mrs. Aaron Schwabacher, who has been 
living at the Inn, since the early part of the season, having 
closed her apartment at the St. Francis for the time being. 
* * * 

In the 18-Hole Match Play handicap against par held on 
the Inn course over the week-end, David Livingston, San 
Francisco attorney won second place, losing to George R. 
Bury of Los Angeles, for first. 



July 24. 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



21 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 18) 

The Casa del Rev has offered a handsome perpetual silver 
trophy for the winner, and plans to hold this Senior Wo- 
men's invitational tournament annually. There is also a 
trophy for the runner-up in the coming contest. 

Santa Cruz boasts one of the livest Rod and Gun clubs in 
the State. Two important movements recently sponsored 
by the Santa Cruz Club were the offering of a $50 reward 
for information leading to the arrest and conviction of any 
one killing a doe or fawn, and a resolution proposing that 
all aliens violating State fish and game laws be deported. 



At the Aladdin Studio 

Rudolph Valentino, the Latin lover of filmdom, selected 
the Aladdin Studio, the Sutter street night club, as his play 
place when he visited San Francisco a week ago. 

Thursday night he led a gay party of theatrical people to 
the supper club, and led the dancing and hilarity for hours. 
He showed special interest in Elsie Peck and Reba Morgan, 
singers who were then appearing on the Orpheum stage, 
while he dismissed with a laugh, suggestions that he and 
Pola Negri were considering marriage. Valentino was in 
San Francisco to arrange for the exhibition of his forth- 
coming picture. 



Library Table 

To at last accomplish what he has wanted to do ever since 
he was a boy, — that is what James Oliver Curwood has 
created in his latest book, — "The Black Hunter ;" for Cur- 
wood, since his earliest writing days, has desired to write 
an historical romance, and this he has done, in this par- 
ticular brain child — a chronicle of that period depicting the 
English and French struggle for supremacy in the New 
World. 

That the "Black Hunter" really existed, is proven by a re- 
port of General Braddock, dated June, 1755. making casual 
mention of "an uncouth personage known as the Black 
Hunter," who had come to Braddock with ;i warning that 
foretold the English general's defeat. 

With conscientious care, the novelist has traced the le- 
gend that surrounds the mysterious messenger of disaster 
who played so strange a voir in those savage times, for Cur- 
wood is a frontiersman by nature, with a pioneer's love of 
elemental life, and it is not surprising that the day when 
all of explored America was a frontier should have taken 

possession of his Fancy, 

"The Black Hunter." by lames Oliver Curwood. to. 

mopolitan Book Corporation, New York. Price, S2.00 net. 



The Psychological Moment 

"Am dere anybody in de congregation what wishes prayer 
For deir Failin's?" asked the colored minister. 

"Yassuh." responded Brother Jones. "Ah's a spen'thrif', 
an' Ah throws mah monej 'round reckless like." 

"Ve'y well. We will join in prayer fo'Brotheh Joi 
jes' afteh de collection plate have been passed." American 
Legion \\ eeklv. 



Not a Candidate 

An Italian, having applied for American citizenship, was 
being examined in the naturalization court. 
"Who is President of the United States'" 
"Mr. Coofidge." 
"Who is Vice-President?" 
"Mr. Paw." 
"Could vou he President-" 

"No." 

"Why?" 

"Mister, you sense me. please; 1 vera bus) worka da 
mine." — Epworth Herald. 



A Canine Vegetable 

"Yes," the teacher explained, "quite a number of plants 
and flowers have the prefix 'dog.' For instance, the dog- 
rose and dog-violet are well known. Can any of you name 
another?" 

There was silence, then a happy look illuminated the face 
of a boy at the back of the class. 

"Please, miss," he called out, proud of his knowledge, 
"collie-flowers!" — The Progressive Grocer. 



Things Looking Up 

An old farmer sat on his back steps and moodily regarded 
the ravages of the flood. A neighbor pulled up in a rattling 
wagon. 

"Whoa!" yelled the neighbor. "Say, Jed, your hogs was 
all washed down the creek an' they're all dead." 

"How about Flaherty's hogs?" asked the farmer. 

"They're gone, too." 

"And Larsen's?" 

"Washed away." 

"Humph!" ejaculated the rustic, cheering up. "Taint as 
bad as I thought." 




RARE BOOKS 

EARLY EDITIONS 

Autographs Bought and Sold 
JOHN HOWELL 

434 Post Street, San Francisco, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tlllmnnn l*lnre, nt 241 i.nuii Avenue 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First I-Mitions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root. Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books nnd Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kenrny 6814 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL, ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



MADE TO ORDER ONLY 



'jhosEKeal Shirts x JhosEKetd 

^UIF N-"-- ^fflfilF 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 



25 Kearny Street 



Phone Kearny 3714 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suil. Prr.trd b* hind OnW-.-Suit. OrfM For and Del.Tered 



>as Po«t SntatT 
In \ imiMi Horn. 



MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parian* fhtring aotd < li^tnint 



*»i Fraxcik* 
Pmonj Fxankxin 251t 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

K.lahll.hrd ISM 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

ll.ll\M\ <TIIKKT. <IV FRWrlSCO 
Phnnt Douglaa 3064 



22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1926 




The PIONEER 



Name 



on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



San Francisco 
West 703 



Burlinframc 

478 



Phone Sutteh 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San Franc. nco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 

San Mateo Counties 



San Francisco Office 

875 FOLSOM ST. 

phone : 

Kearny 644-645 



Palo alto Office: 

818 EMERSON ST. 

Phone : 

Palo Alto 3I5-J 



SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



Safety Week in Santa Cruz 
Working towards the adoption of the 
proposed Uniform Traffic Ordinance 
which is being submitted by the Califor- 
nia Public Safety Conference to all cities 
of the state, and which recently formed a 
basis for a two-day conference of traffic 
officers in San Francisco, Santa Cruz has 
decided to hold a safety week and bring 
the proposed plan to the notice of every 
citizen of that community. This word 
was received from Mrs. Helen Holt, sec- 
retary of the Conference and director of 
the women's division of the California 
Development Association, which organ- 
ization is sponsoring the work of the wo- 
men of California in carrying on an in- 
tensive safety campaign throughout the 
state. 

Demonstration of outstanding dangers 
on the streets and highways will be feat- 
ures of the safety week program formu- 
lated by the committee at Santa Cruz dur- 
ing the past week ; cutting corners, jay- 
walking, driving on the wrong side of the 
road, passing cars in rounding blind turns, 
and carelessness in making grade cross- 
ings, will be duly enacted as warnings. 
Parades by school children and talks by 
traffic experts at various luncheon clubs 
and public meetings, will round out a 
highly interesting as well as educational 
program. 

"Safety weeks," it is stated by Mrs. 
Holt, "will be inaugurated in practically 
every city in California and it is hoped 
that the Uniform Traffic Ordinance will 
be adopted throughout the state as a re- 
sult of the work." 



"A shockin' coward my husband is 
I was telling 'im aff proper outside th' 
public library, when off 'e run inside an' 
stood near one o' them 'Silence' no- 
tices." — London Opinion. 



Mormon Choir 

The Mormon Tabernacle Choir of 
Salt Lake City, consisting of two hun- 
dred voices, one hundred and twenty- 
five of which are male, comes to San 
Francisco for one concert at the Civic 
Auditorium on Saturday night, July 
31st, at 8:30 o'clock under the local 
management of Frank W. Healy. In 
Mr. Healy's opinion this concert will 
be one of the outstanding music events 
of the summer in San Francisco and 
he is making preparation for a record 
attendance. 

The programs to be given by the 
Tabernacle Choir includes such num- 
bers as "Awake," the choral from 
"Meistersinger" by Wagner; the "In- 
flamatus" by Rossini ; "Build Thee More 
Stately Mansions" by Arthur Farwell ; 
"Sunset Trio" by Cadman ; "Let the 
Mountains Shout for Joy" and Massen- 
et's "Vision Fugutive," sung by J. H. 
Wood, basso. 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Ofllce and Works 11(25 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Ofllce: 760 Sntter street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bide.) 

Phone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 



Tailo 



r 



Opposite Olympic Club 



527 Post St., San Francisco 
Phone Prospect 9316 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 

EXCHANGE 

Phone Garfleld 3852 504 Market St. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoininu Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^ 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




The City's Most Distill. 

Luncheon Tea 



Oriental Show Place 

Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, $1.00 3Sc, 50c, 75c S1.00.S1.50 a la Carle 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 

HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 

M \ i i if MoosEn Minnie C. Mooser 



fcxeonorS 

145 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast. 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 76 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell :„„l Dl A fVI J* t\ ' B Phone 

Larkin St.. *-* *-t .^a, I ^ *-* V-r «J ...,„■ tiinii 

,, . , \.. ViallOt Sin. ill. I li-..,r ll.r l.lv With* 

1 ' " '" '" '< - f '" ' » ■»» I ... the Kinc.t Cf. 

Dinner, Wp.k D«] . 1.S0 in America 

Our Mum M.n.fiK ReWfl 1*111 '" ..'..>../ on Nnn-I'i.. tiurtng ihe summer month* 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

M Third Avenue. SV\ MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 
Open From 
11 :30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 
5:30 p. m. to 8.30 p m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Uiehvtny 



Announcement 



Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 



r- 






Caroline Jones 
Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 






and- * 


and tea from 3 to 5 
Exclusive use of room for club dinners. 


1 


334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 
.-........■■.--...------......, 




Singleton 's 



JUUu. (Eat 

CLUB INN 



Now Serves a Delicious 
Five-Course 

DINNER 75c 

Also 
Fried Chicken, Steaks, 
Chicken Pot Pies in Cas- 
serole, Etc., a la Carte. 





ICE CREAr%, 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



£ CALIFORNIA SIS 
Crajiton. 

3101 311,2 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day is 
tiikinu; very good care of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many thing" can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not he as sound as you imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the nehe. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your Iceth wore? Do your gums bleed f Call In today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks oil' all nerves and pnin. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield BSS 
SPECIALISTS — Extractions) CrowMj Self Gleaatns rirlilnen: 

Porcelain \\ iirk mill lloolle*** Plated 



I 

L 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Buildinc, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

V rtnii faclurrr* of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 
II. I UBS, GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS, ECTC. 

snn Francisco, Calif* 
i ii Market Street 



Loo A nReles, Calif. 
(9717 Santa Fe A venae 



Pleasing customers is our steady goal. 



! La Grande & White's Laundry Co 



1 




Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

IH'IA 8:00 A. M. TO Ufl P. M. 

I \-l Kl'\"l II I I 1-IM 

Carl Lsonh irpt 

Formerly of f.oXArn C.lr Park C.ino 



1 \ 



"Tin* Recommended Laundry* 1 
25(1 TWELFTH M.. Sam. I HiMiMii *Ph0ICB Mmikh 91C 

MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

H.mtrd m the Sprint*" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

I nm !■.■■! rsrSOU **4 




HOTEL SENATOR 

facing Qapitol park 
(fA hotel that is loved for its good cooking 

All rooms with private bath: single, $3 to $4; double 
(suites excepted), $4.50 to $6. 

CHARLES R. FRASER, Manager 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



<$* 



^ e 



ve t peoP 16 ta ^ abo 





f? 



Whatever people 
talk about — and 
many things they 
never dream of — 
appear in picture 
form every week 
in the beautiful 



^utibag (Elironirb 




"A Six-pointer" 



"Napa Dry" Ginger Ale 

Six Points That Recommend It: 

Point 1 — It blends perfectly. 
Point 2 — Sparkles like champagne. 
Point 3 — Handsome package — it graces any table. 
Point 4 — A joy in the sick room. 
Point 5 — Children, as well as adults, enjoy it. 
Point 6 — A delight to every sense — taste, sight and 
bouquet. 

Packed by 

NAPA SODA COMPANY 






Phone Market 117 



San Francisco, Calif. 



COMPLETE RADIO PROGRAMS, FOR NEXT WEIlR, IN THIS ISSUE 




#5.00 PER YEAR 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, JULY 31st, 1926 



ANGELES 



DEER HUNT 

Make 7 our Headquarters at 

"Pop" McCray's 

On the Redwood Highway 

Season Opens August First 





The Ole Swimming Hole After the Hunt 

Address McCrav's - Cloverdale 
Phone Cloverdale J F2 



Jl 




Grand Canyon National Pork 




Cvtftfcllahad July JO. 1*56 

SAN ^gp|« Co 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News .Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1884 to 192&. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street, .San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postofflce as second-class matter. JLondon Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhlll, B. C 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $6.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JULY 31, 1926 



No. 31 



FROM ONE THING TO ANOTHER 

By Eleanore F. Ross 



Traffic in This Spot 
A Law Unto Itself 

Now, I have nothing but admiration for the Traffic De- 
partment of the police force of San Francisco, and I par- 
ticularly like Captain Gleeson, though I doubt if he would 
ever remember me, but I do think that the intersection of 
Pine, Davis, Beale and Market streets, needs either a traf- 
fic officer or an automatic traffic regulator, or whatever you 
call those "Stop" and "Go" signs. It takes a mighty spright- 
ly person to dodge traffic at this point, and the wonder is 
that there aren't accidents every day in the week, for ve- 
hicles of all descriptions rush along here, and even the usual- 
ly well-behaved street cars go on their way. unrestricted. 
Something should be done about this. Cap'n. 
* * * 

Royalty vs. Achievement 

The newspapers are full of the arrival of the Swedish 
Prince and Princess, who are really a very pleasant ami af- 
fable couple, but when all is said and dune, their visit is 
not at all requisite to the well-being of our country, state 
or city, and now-a-days, any thinking person can estimate 
the importance, or rather, un-importance of Royalties. But 
whole pages were given up to adulation of this very ordin- 
al} looking, and no doubt very ordinary-minded man and 
woman, while very little could 1 tind in the aforesaid papers 
regarding our Samuel Shortridge, who arrived last Mon- 
day morning in town, and who has accomplished some 
very vital and significant issues that make for California's 
progress, during the last few years. 

Women Going Strong 

There are still a few cave nun who deplore feminine ex- 
ecutives in commercial, political, professional or artistic 
offices; thej should read the following figures, and realize 
that women are an uncontrovertible fact in all departments 
of the world',-, business. 

We have now more than 11,200 postmistresses. 

In Montana 5(> of the 56 county superintendents of schools 
are women, in Colorado 5-' of the 63, in Idaho 36 of the 44. 

in Wisconsin J" of the 71. in Wyoming 1" of the 23, it' 
Washington 21 of the 36, in North Dakota 64 per cent, in 
Oregon 44 per certt, in New Mexico 58 per cent, in Minne- 
sota 50 per cent In Utah, Iowa, Ohio, ami Indiana, the per- 
centages of county recorder offices tilled b> women are re- 
spectively SO, 56, and 25. the figures for I Ihio and Indiana 
being about the same. 

Two of our 48 states have elected women governors. Halt 
a dozen women have been secretaries of state. Ohio has a 
supreme court judge. W e have had women mayors recent- 
ly in seven states and several U. S. Congresswomen. 
* * * 

A Good Sport 

Many people will question and condemn Xed M. t.reen 
for his attitude as Prohibition Chief in San Francisco, for 
the liquor found in his rooms, for his wine parties, and al- 



leged misconduct while administrator of prohibition affairs, 
but at least, he is no "squealer" on his associates and friends, 
as one Butler of Monterey proved himself to be ; and no-one 
else will suffer for his sins, if he can help it ! Looking at the 
affair from the standpoint of one who is inexorably against 
the assinine farce called "Prohibition." I hereupon rise to re- 
mark that it is rather a pity all prohibition officers do not 
possess the sporting qualities of Mr. Green ! 

* * * 
The Commercial Circle 

The National Industrial Conference Board says, after an 
investigation of wages and prices in fifty countries: "The 
pay envelope of the average American workers will pur- 
chase more of the necessities and luxuries of life than that 
of any other workers in the world." Aside from all argu- 
ment regarding closed or open shops, it is a very short 
sighted employer who cannot realize the fact that highly 
paid employees mean, ultimately, profit to the manufactur- 
er, the commission man, the farmer, the merchant. Highly 
paid people spend money, as a rule, especially those in the 
trades. In addition to this truth, women are more and more, 
breaking into the held of paid labor, so doubling in many 
cases, the number of American workers. From this vast 
till, money flows back again into the very coffers from which 

it emerged. 

# * * 

Aimee McPherson 

The News Letter has refrained from commenting on the 
present mess in which Aimee Mcl'herson has involved her- 
self, for several reasons: chiefly because it has been quite 
impossible for any person or any publication to come to a 
correct conclusion regarding the whole affair; only the 
initiated can do that, the ••inner circle" which is always 
secreted behind organizations, or movements or fanatical 
religious sects; and also because we still cherish a certain 
chivalry towards women, a strong distaste for "kicking a 
fellow when he's down." And poor Aimee is certainly 
prostrate now, if she never was before. 

Xow we feel moved to lift our voice in her defense, rather 
than in condemnation, for the present prosecution has taken 
on the attitude of persecution, and the most stony-hearted 
must experience a thrill of pity for a woman who has so 
enmeshed herself in intrigue and scandal that she i- 
pelled to appeal to her supposed paramour to extricate her, 
and vindicate her good name. 

En passant, we admit our surprise at the space which our 
esteemed contemporary has given the last few weeks to this 
subject: at the position of censure which it has assumed 
against a woman because of her apparent penchant for sen- 
sationalism, when the fact that it has devoted pa| 
analysis of a case of which it can as yet. know nothing defi- 
nite, and has conspicuously advertised these articles, ex- 
hibits, on its own part, a love of the very quality it is 
demning in Aimee McPherson. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1926 




testifying in the Tea Pot Dome cases. Now, whatever we 
may think of those particular cases, nothing in connection 
with them could possibly be as harmful to the country as 
the sort of legislation we have outlined here. 



Americans who are in the midst of pros- 
Foreign Feeling perity will feel a certain sympathy with 
France and other European countries, 
who in their misery and perplexity, are using indefensibly 
bitter language towards the United States. The feeling will 
pass in the course of time and people will be sorry for the 
anger displayed against a country which has always been 
the friend and helper of the distressed in Europe. 

But we are not yet arrived at that point. There is no 
doubt that the French, who are feeling the effects of the 
decline of the franc, which is due quite as much to the un- 
wisdom displayed by the French ministries since the war 
as to anything else, are regarding the payment of the war 
loans with much indignation. There is a sentimentality con- 
nected with the matter, which took form in the procession 
of twenty thousand war victims, in spite of the ban of the 
government, against settlement of the loans by the United 
States of France upon the terms already agreed upon. 
Such a demonstration has naturally been accompanied by 
much emotional display on the part of the people in the 
streets, who have vented their feelings by verbal attacks 
upon visiting Americans. 

Under the conditions, the best thing is to wait in silence 
and without recrimination the results of the working of 
time. One of our statesmen, who should have known better, 
was ill-advised enough to suggest a boycott of France by 
American tourists. Such actions only tend to widen a 
breach which should never exist and which would be quite 
in contradiction of the spirit which has prevailed between 
this country and France from the beginning of our history. 

The whole matter is unfortunate. It does not appear that 
we are in any way to blame and we can only await the dawn 
of a better state of mind. 



There is something very unblushing in 
Where Are We? the way in which our essential liberties 
are being destroyed. As soon as an 
emergency arises, instead of treating the emergency as 
something to be triumphed over, within the limits of con- 
stitutional liberty, new attacks on the individual begin. If 
this continues, we shall soon have no America that the 
founders could recognize. 

Take, for instance, the law proposed to Congress to com- 
pel the attendance of witnesses in the Tea Pot Dome cases. 
Under its provisions, a person living in a foreign jurisdic- 
tion, who is notified to give testimony under an order issued 
by a Federal Court in this country, will be served with an 
order to show cause why he should not be punished for con- 
tempt in case of refusal. 

1 A'hen the order to show cause cames up, in the absence 
of the witness who has failed to testify, the court can issue 
an order directing the seizure of any of the property of the 
party, so adjudged in contempt, within the United States, 
to pay the judgment imposed by the court ; the only limita- 
tion appearing to be that the fine so imposed shall not ex- 
ceed $100,000. 

The meaning is very clear. It is the intention of Congress 
to confer upon the courts the power to confiscate the prop- 
erty of people who may have left the United States in order 
to avoid giving testimony. 

Of course, the idea is, as it is put, to "smoke out" those 
people who have left hte country for the purpose of not 



We note with a great deal of pleas- 
Criminal Carelessness ure that a conviction has been ob- 
tained in this State fur the throwing 
of a lighted cigarette into the brush from a traveling auto- 
mobile. 

The occasion, according to the report of the California 
District Forest Service, was in Siskiyou County. The con- 
stable apprehended four men who were riding in a car, from 
which a lighted cigarette had been thrown, which started 
a forest fire. They were fined $25.00. This is, we hope, 
only a beginning of a vigorous prosecution of those who 
are sufficiently careless to indulge in such infantile habits. 

It may seem a very slight offense to throw a lighted match 
or cigarette, and. in most cases and under most circumstan- 
ces, it would be so. But the magnitude and importance of 
a crime is a thing dependent to a great extent upon the cir- 
cumstances and social conditions under which the crime is 
committed and the probable consequences which may flow 
from the perpetration of the offence. 

Only a week or two ago the State was facing at least five 
fires of importance, which did great damage and which had 
originated in wavs similar to the case above cited. A few 
weeks ago. we saw a lovely countryside around Bolinas de- 
stroyed by the fire which had been carelessly started. Our 
lives, property and comfort depend upon the care exercised 
in the handling of fire in the country districts and fools that 
cannot exercise ordinary care must be taught the extent 
of their folly by punishment at the hands of the law. 

If we could only be sure of active constables and keen 
judges, a quick end would be made of the fire peril and the 
witless tourist might be made in one respect, at least, a 
decent citizen. 



The problem of men. as men, and 
The Human Problem women, as women, transcends all the 
other problems and makes solutions, 
based upon rational grounds alone, futile and absurd. By 
which we mean that some human emotion or passion comes 
along and upsets the schemes of philosophers and states- 
men, slaying reason without compunction. 

Here is a case in point. The Russians have tried and are 
trying in their way to solve the Jewish question, which has 
always been very sore in Russia, and which has been comp- 
licated by massacre and injustice time and time again. Ac- 
cordingly, the government set aside land for the Jewish 
people that they might take up agriculture. Now, the re- 
port is made on the best Jewish authority that the scheme, 
from which so much was hoped, will probably be a com- 
plete disappointment, because of the scarcity of land in the 
Jewish districts and the growing hostility of the peasants 
to the Jewish settlers. 

It is to the latter difficulty that we call attention. It 
was always maintained that hostility to the Jewish people 
in Russia originated with and was controlled by the autoc- 
racy, which, for political purposes, stirred up people against 
the Jewish people and organized pogroms. It was also 
urged that the hostility was also due to the fact that the 
Jews were not peasants and lived by trading and not by 
agriculture. Here, however, we have the ominous fact 
that Russian peasants, without any reason, without any- 
urging by the government, which is, as a matter of fact, 
very strong in the number of its Jewish administrators, 
have turned with hatred upon Jewish peasants who live as 
they do and are no better off than themselves. It is a very 
lamentable and dreadful fact and reflects no credit upon human 
nature. 



July 31, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Perhaps the agricultural mind is prone to these perver- 
sions for we, with our great industrial development, are 
mercifully free from such beastliness. 



There is a grave situation in Mexi- 
The Mexican Situation co, in the conflict between the gov- 
ernment and the Church. The op- 
position of the law against church property, which is sought 
to be imposed by the governmental forces, may require the 
use of the military and it is reported that armed forces are 
being mobilized for that purpose. 

The Mexican system of church government appears to be 
a hang-over from the old European methods which have 
been superseded in most modern states. The trouble is 
akin to that which arose between France and the church at 
the time of the dissolution of the Concordat, which upset 
the old arrangements. 

One complaint that the Mexican government has, which 
may or may not be founded upon fact, is that foreign priests 
have been fomenting ill feeling against the present Mexi- 
can government and that the act, which is to be enforced, 
which is in reality a constitutional provision hitherto al- 
lowed to sleep, is directed against the agitation on the part 
of ecclesiastical foreigners and also against the church hold 
ing of property which is not viewed with approbation by 
the governmental party. 

However that may be, it would appear as if the present 
Mexican government would stand to lose more than it could 
possibly gain by such a conflict. In struggles of this kind 
the heart of the common people is usually with the church, 
which comforts them when they are in trouble and which 
gives them social care, such as no government can ever give. 

Owing to the wisdom of our founders, we have been pro- 
tected from this sort of trouble and only the fanatics in 
our midst ever try to make an issue out of religion. 

Mexico is treading on dangerous ground and may short- 
ly be sorry for her lack of tolerance. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



It is very significant in the history 

Community Chest and of charitable effort in this city that 

Health Bodies at last the Community Chest and 

the Council of Social and Health 

Agencies has become a fact. .Much discussion has preceded 

the accomplishment of this, but the delay has not been in 

vain, 

The Council of Social and Health Agencies is an older 

body than tile Community Chest, having been organized ill 
1920, two years before the latur was created. It is com- 
posed of 137 agencies, 107 of which had taken out member- 
ship in the Community Chest. 

Under the arrangement perfected b) tin- conference held 
at the Commonwealth Club, the Community Chest will be 
the name to cover all the activities and the organization 
formerly known as the Council of Social and Health Agen- 
cies will be the department '<\ social work within thi 
lines of the larger organization. 

Morgan Gunst, the president of the Council, in advocat- 
ing tin- amalgamation, said: "This step will not onl} 
simplify the operation of the organization to which the 
citizens of San Francisco have delegated the task of financ- 
ing the city's social work, but it will make for much greater 
efficiency and economy in dealing directly with our social 
problems. 

Members of the board of directors of the Community 

Client, who were re-elected to continue a- council represen- 
tatives on the board are: Mrs. George Cameron, Selah 
Chamberlain, John S. Drum, Mr-. William Matson, Mr-. 
Henry S. Kiersted, I. B, Levison, Warren 11. McBryde, 
John II. McCallum. Mi-s I. aura McKinstry, Aimer M. New- 
hall, Rev. Charles A. Ramm, M. C. Sloss. Mrs. Sigmund 
Stem, Miss lohanna Volkmann and Or. Ray Lyman 
Wilbur. 



America needn't sneer. In this land there's many a dictator 

not vet two vears old. — Dubuque American-Tribune. 

* * * 

Kings are of no great importance these days, except to head 
processions. — Toledo Dlade. 

The standpatter is safe so long as the people wdll stand patter. 
— Wall Street Journal. 

The reason we have criminals is that there aren't enough soft 
jobs to go around. — Life. 

* * * 

Man wants but little here below, but he usually gets along on 
less. — Little Rock Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

Thus far we have not heard of any one paying his bills by air 
mail. — Boston Shoe and Leather Reporter. 

* * * 

A frenchman doesn't know when his wages will lose half 
their value over the week-end, but an American knows his will 
disappear. — Windsor Border Cities Star. 

* * * 

Rumor goes to the effect that Marshal l'ilsudski's mind is 
broken. The poor fellow probably tried to spell the names of 
his followers. — Nashville Banner. 

* * * 

A wealthy American is to attempt to swim the Channel this 
year. We understand that if he fails he will buy the thing and 
take it back home to practice on. — Punch. 

* * # 

Blamed if we don't believe Mussolini could put Prohibition 
over on the Italian people and make them like it. — Toledo Blade. 

* * * 

What the nations seem to want is enough armament to avoid 
getting licked by any nation having as much armament. — Wash- 
ington Post. 

* * * 

We heard of the sad case of a Scotchman who became en- 
gaged to a girl who became SO fat that he wanted to break oft 
the engagement. But the girl couldn't get the ring off so he had 

to marry her. — ludge. 

» * * 

\liout all the average European nation now likes about 
America i- Santa Claus. — New Bedford Time-. 

* * * 

The trouble with the franc i- that it goes down every time 
the French try to buy real money with it. — Dallas New-. 

* * * 

A republic is a place where you can't blame any particular 
individual when \< u're bossed. -Sherbrooke I One. I Record. 

* * * 

"< me < Hit of Six American- < Iwns an Auto" — headline. And 
one out of two owe- on one. — Norfolk Virginian-Pilot. 

* » * 

It i- probably useless to expect Europe to love us while it 
owes us so much money. It's agin natur. — St. Louis Globe- 
Democrat. 

* * * 

Henry Ford i- -aid to have done more for Prohibition than 
any other man in America. At any rate, he has made it mighty 
dangerous to -tart t' ward the gutter. — Judge. 

* * «' 

"I'm marry a pretty girl and a good cook." 

"You can't: that'- bigamy." 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1926 




>LE/ISURE'SW^ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

75m Moone. 




San Fiancisco Theaters 
Real Lure for Visitors 

MORE and more are San Francis- 
co theaters being recognized as 
lures for summer vacationers. 

Theater men, the most progressive 
of them, and their name is legion — 
have been the" first to take cognizance 
of this basic fact. They have given us, 
during vacation months, some of their 
best theatrical offerings. 

"There is always something good at 
the theaters, here," stated a noted visi- 
tor, "but your summer attractions have 
been so superlatively good that I won- 
der any one cares to leave your city." 

Look over the theater schedules, just 
this week and the past week, for in- 
stance. You will not be surprised, 
then, that many vacationers have been 
satisfied with week-end tours. 

They don't want to miss the theaters. 

On the other hand, many out-of- 
town vacationers come to San Francis- 
co from the interior cities, not only to 
escape the heat, but to go to the the- 
aters. 

Most visitors make a complete tour 
of our theaters. They do not feel that 
they have seen San Francisco unless 
thev have seen or heard all the plays, 
the musical comedies, or been to the 
movies. 

They have the same attitude of mind 
that most of us have on visiting the 
eastern metropolis, for we certainly 
feel that we have not been in New 
York unless we have paid many a visit 
to Broadway. 

San Francisco theaters are real lures 
for visitors. Yes, and it's because they 
are worth it that they have gained the 
confidence and patronage of theatrical- 
loving people from all parts of the 
land. 

And that means — the players, the 
producers, and the playhouses — as well 
as the patrons of theaters. 



* * * 



Columbia 

Blanche Bates and Margaret Anglin 
whose art registers anew with each 
consecutive performance here, will ap- 
pear at the Columbia theater in a new 
play this coming week, beginning Mon- 
day night. August 2. with Zoe Aikin's 
"Footloose." 

This play, which marks the fourth 
of the plays presented here by the com- 
bined appearance of Margaret Anglin 



By "Jingle" 

and Blanche Bates, follows "The Texas 
Nightingale" in which they both scored 
new triumphs as stars. 

Blanche Bates played the lady of 
moods and storms — and oh, how well 
she essayed her part and how convinc- 
ingly did she make us feel and know 
each tremor of the way. That is what 
Blanche Bates always does. She just 
carries one along with her — and one 
almost acts, too, in full sympathy. 

Her performance as Brasa in "The 
Texas Nightingale" was one of the 
most brilliant it has ever been our priv- 
ilege to see. What an abundance of 
joy she is giving us, her fellow San 
Franciscans. Memorable joy ! 

Margaret Anglin, matchless Margar- 
et Anglin, takes the role of the mother 
of the genius in the story and gave us 
a characterization which will linger in 
our minds always as one ray of future 
comparisons — no matter in what else 
we may see her again. 

Ralph Roeder played the part of the 
genius and played it in a manner that 
brought into the light every nuance, 
and every shade. 

J. R. Tozer gave us realization that 
he was appearing in his best vehicle 
since his first appearances here, and 
we were glad to have an insight into 
the excellence of his work. 

Emelie Melville received nothing 
short of an ovation from the audiences 
who know and love her so well. She 
look the role of an Irish maid and was 
really adorable, too. Harvey Stephens 
and Florence Walters merit commenda- 
tion for their effective work. 

The performance of last week's play 
was thoroughly and conclusively artis- 
tic — especially memorable being the 
farewell scene which somehow haunts 
our memories. 

We shall look with high favor for 
the treat of "Footloose." now. 

* * * 
Wilkes 

Pauline Frederick, who has been giv- 
ing us such splendid performances in 
"The Lucky Sam McCarver" will, this 
next week, starting on Monday night, 
appear in the brilliant "Madame X." 

Many who saw Miss Frederick in 
this past week's play declared it to be 
quite the most ultra-sophisticated play 
staged here in a long time. 

Others took the opposite view and 
made not so much of the play itself as 



the}- did of the actress. Whatever the 
concensus of opinion, it crystallizes it- 
self into one phrase, and that is: Miss 
Frederick is unmistakably a finished 
and subtle actress. 

Her technique on stage or screen is 
so far removed from anything that sav- 
ors merely of technique, that one gets 
a grasp on her artistry. It is her con- 
vincing subtlety. 

We look again with high anticipa- 
tion to the renewal of "Madame X." 



Curran 

"Tip-Toes." the ever popular musi- 
cal comedy continues to draw crowds 
to the Curran. 

A dozen Gershwin song and dance 
hits, with a chorus of forty girls and 
boys, are additional attractions sup- 
porting the stars. The songs are the 
kind that one whistles or sings while 
leaving the theater and finds the lilt- 
ing melodies ringing through the mem- 
ories for days. 

Beautifully staged and splendidly 
equipped in every particular, "Tip 
Toes" proves one of the season's best 
attractions and ranks among the musi- 
cal comedies as an outstanding produc- 
tion. 

* * * 
President 

"Love 'Em and Leave 'Em" is in its 
seventh week at the President. 

That of itself is announcement of 
praise. 

Duplicating its Broadway triumph, 
this sparkling comedy is proving even 
more popular than "The Best People." 
The play tells an absorbing story of 
department store life. Not only is it 
novel in idea and theme, but its dia- 
logue is unique. Advocates of good 
English would be horrified at Bert Les- 
lie's use of slang. But slang is slang- 
uage and makes us laugh and is the 
big lure of the theater. 

Miss Winters is doing capable work 
and is sharing acting honors with Het- 
ty Laurence and Kenneth Daigneau. 
There are a number of new faces in 
this production. In the long lisi of 
players are: Lillian Deane, William 
Rainey, Earl Lee, Frank Darien, Olive 
Cooper, John Mackenzie, Ruth Calla- 
han, Curt Baer, Claire Brandt and 
Stanley Ruhland. 



July 31, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NEXT AVEEK 



ON THE STAGE 



ALCAZAR ( 

O'Farrell nr. Powell f 



"The Show Off" 
Louis Joliu Bartels 



rOLUMBIA 
70 Eddy 



(. "Footloose" 

I Banche Bales-Margurel Anglirt 



GURRAN ( 

Geary nr. Mason f 



"Tip Toes" 
Musical Comedy 



PRESIDENT 
McAllister nr Mkl. 



"Love 'Em and 

Leave 'Em" 

Henry Duffy Farce 



WILKES I 

Geary at Mason f 



"Madame X" 
Pauline Frederit 



VAUDEVILLE 



GOLDEN GATE I Ed T j«™ey. Marjorie White, 



G. G. Ave. t-V. Taylor ( 



Blanche Sweet. 



"I he Far Cry," 



OKPHEUM L 

O'Farrell «& Powell f 



Pat Rooney, Marion Bent. 
Duri L)e kerekjarto. Royal 
\ iniitii-i Virtuoso. 



PANTAGES (NEW) ( 
Market at Hyde f 



"Countess Sonia," "Revue 
Saliricon," and Pictures 



PORTOLA I 

Market near 4th f 



Vaudeville-Pictures 



UNION SQUARE (. 

0'l''arrell nr. Powell ( 



Vaudeville-Pictures 



WIGWAM I 

Mission and 22nd r 



Change of Policy. Five Acts 
Vaudeville Daily. Changes of 
Programs 'furs, and Saturday. 



ON THE 
DOWN 



SCREEN 

TOWN 



CALIFORNIA 
Market ut 4th 



"Poker Faces." 

Edward Everett Hortan, Star. 

Max Dolin and < 1 1 1 1 in ii i .1 

Concert Orchestra, 



CAMEO 
Market opi>. 5th 



"Th 



Mail in the Saddle," 
All Week. Hoot Cihson. 



CASINO I 

Ellin at Mason st. r 



"Havoc," Sal.; "Hoaan's Al- 
ley," and "The Myslic, Sun., 
Mon.; "Phantom of the 
Opera," Tues., Wed.; "The 
Goose Woman" and "lnlro- 
iliiir Mi." Tliurs ., Eri. 



OKANADA ( 

Market at Joncn St. f 



"Tin- Love, of Ricardo," with 
George Beliaii in pereon, Kr- 

vue: "Nothing But 1 1 ■■ 
Slagc. 



IMPERIAL ( 

Market bet. (Ith-7th t 



"Son of the sheik," Rudolph 
Valentino. Prc-lea.c run of 

lln (in Inn- I tod engage- 

nient. 



LOEWS WAKFIELD ( 

Market at Taylor 1 



"The 1'enally," Lon Chancy. 

On ih<- Stage, Fanchon and 
Marco. "Gilded cm--. " Idea. 



ST. FRANCIS ( 

Mnrkt-t bet. .Mli-lith { 



Mm of Steel" 

Mil Sill-. 



RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS 



ROYAL 

Folk nr. California 



"Soak let Sable*," Claire 
u unl. I... Sat.f "The Fiahtlng 
Heart," George O'Brien, Sat.; 
"Don't," SaHj O'Neil. Sun.; 

'HevrrU ill l.r.nl.l.ilk. " Mini . 

Toe... Wed.; lln Deeil'l 

linn- . in 



He— Do you want to marry a 
eyed man ? 

She -No, win i 

"Then let me carry your umbrella." 
- Pittsburgh First. 

* * * 

Two can live as cheaply a- one but 
not as happil) . Jui 

* * * 
Scientifically registered, Niagara's 

roar measures seventy units. T 
the sort of thing that make- sergeant- 
majors grow purple with envy. — Hum- 



Alcazar 

Louis John Bartels and "The Show 
< Iff", a fast-moving comedy in which 
he is starred, will continue for a fifth 
week at the Alcazar, beginning with 
Sunday night's performance. Bartels 
is a comedian of unusual tricks to make 
one laugh. 

In the Alcazar play he is "the orig- 
inal talker de luxe." 

lie talks himself into trouble and he 
talks himself out again. He laughs 
himself in and out of amusing situations 
and the audience lives and moves and 
laughs in unison. 

"The Show-Off" was written by 
George Kelly and he might have had 
Bartels in mind when he created it for 
the New York actor fits snugly into 
the role and carries the characteriza- 
tion along the highway of merriment. 

* * * 
Warfield 

"The Penalty, " a weird story of the 
underworld, featuring Lon Chaney, is 
this week's attraction at the Warfield. 
Chaney enacts the role of a master hand 
of a band of crooks, who plans a raid 
on the United States Mint. An all star 
.;ist is in support of Chaney. 

Fanchon and Marco are presenting 
an extensive stage program this week 
called "Gilded Kisses." 

Every country has a different version 
of the kiss in this revue. Ada Broad- 
lient exemplifies Poland, Arline Lan- 
gan is the "Girl from Madrid," Valerie 
Wade represents France and Natalie 
Harrison is the girl of the Orient. Dor- 
niln Cn inker, "The Yankee Girl," ap- 
pears in the "Gilded Kiss Waltz." The 
w hole Idea is la\ ishlj costumed. 

Walt Roesner, hack from his vaca- 
tion, has prepared a surprise program 
for the Super-Soloists. 

* * * 
Pantages 

untess Sonia is being featured il ■ i ~ 
at the Pantages. She is appear- 
ing in an act entitled "Kcvue Satiri- 

con." 

lln act depicts life on the Volga in 
pre «ar Russia. Pictures of life, some 
poetic, some grim and others humorous, 
lUtlined in dance and song. The 
act is distinctly Russian, exotic and 
"different." i Nowadays anything that 
is Russian seems to be termed "ex- 
otic"! 

\lc\ Shearer, an American dancer. 
supports Sonia. 

In addition there is the regular 
ille program. 

* * * 
California 

A young San Francisco boy, modest, 
sincere, full of the vigor of creative 
work, found himself the center of praise 
this past week, and all unsought, for 
this hoy. author of "Elegy," a gem of 
the screen, has that innate spark of 
sty. 



Nevertheless, when San Franciscans 
discovered that Andrew L. Stone, Jr. 
was the author of the stirring two reel 
drama, they were eager to let the bril- 
liant writer know how proud were 
friends and colleagues. 

"Elegy" is written around the life 
of a little boy fiddler and his dog. The 
story is simple and appealing, with 
many a heart tug. ft tells, in a new 
way, the influence of music upon the 
souls of men and women, both good and 
bad, and reveals the direct stirrings of 
emotions under the music's spell. 

That so young a man as Andrew Ly- 
sander Stone Jr. could produce any- 
thing so superlatively fine in theme and 
tenor speaks well for standards he has 
established for himself. 

Max Dolin gave "Elegy" special mu- 
sical settings and played the violin 
solos in scenes where a boy star is 
shown playing his favorite instrument. 
The Massenet number was used in the 
scenes. 

If you ever want to see a beautiful 
child's profile be sure to see Phillipe de 
Lacey in Andrew Stone's "Elegy." It 
has been said that his profile surpasses 
any other child's face, in this particu- 
lar position, ever filmed in Hollywood. 
Another story is to the effect that beau- 
tiful Phillipe tie Lacey, is the little boy 
Mary Pickford wanted to adopt. 

Tyrone Power and Gladys Brockwell 
an' principals in this exquisite two reel 
film. A little dog plays well his part — 
and it is a part essential to the theme 
and plot. 

Young Andrew Stone Jr. intends to 
keep right on producing novel films. 
Mr writes hi- own scenarios, directs 
and transacts the entire business of his 
studii '. 

i Continued on Page 14) 




Originality 

Frightens the Old Fashioned 

It Pleases 
The Modern Advertiser 

l.rt Mr Writ I Your .HJirrtisemrnts, 
Publti ily or Salrs Lrltrrt 




^you pay no more a 

WROWEJg 




1Ke%ks3 </• Tnoraaaad Oardera 

224-226 Gain A»»» lei Kearny 4975 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Royal Visitors 

SOCIETY extends sincere homage to Crown Prince 
Gt.stav Adolf of Sweden and to his Princess, Louise. 

Royal visitors are they, in every sense of the word, and 
royal, indeed, has been every tribute accorded them. 

From every heart, as well as from the sense of privilege 
and opportunity, has resounded a sincere: "Welcome," 
here. 

Dignified, auspicious, sumptuous as many of the nation- 
wide affairs in their honor have been, none have transcended 
in genuine hospitality, tempered with social prominence, 
those of this western land. 

San Francisco has rejoiced in the privilege of greeting 
the Crown Prince of Sweden and his Princess, and has pre- 
sented events typical of the western metropolis in welcom- 
ing its notable visitors. 

Civic ceremonies have been of splendid proportions and 
significance. Public events have been of excellent plan and 
program arrangement, and every participant has had a con- 
tributory place. 

It has all been one beautiful program with Royalty the 
motif of each succeeding affair and a host of people aiming 
to make their sojourn memorable. 

* * * 
Crocker Mansion Sojourn 

of Royalty 

The William H. Crocker mansion in Hillsborough was the 
home of the Crown Prince and Princess Louise during their 
visit here. 

Society, the peninsula set, and the social contingency 
from Piedmont and bay counties, including Marin, have 
been vying with pleasant rivalry in extending their pro- 
verbial hospitalities. 

Prince Adolf is the honor guest of the Bohemian Club 
this week-end at their famous Bohemian Grove, near Rus- 
sian River, where their annual play is being produced. 

While the Crown Prince is being royally entertained in 
that peerless place. Princess Louise will be feted Saturday 
by the San Francisco Center, in conjunction with the 
Daughters of the British Empire and the Utile Dulce Club, 
an organization of Swedish women, at an elaborate luncheon 
to be held in the Colonial ballroom of the St. Francis Hotel. 

An unprecedented demand for cards has been made at 
Center headquarters and ever)' effort is being made by those 
in charge to make the affair not only typically noteworthy 
but distinctive in tone and tenor. 

* * * 
Gracious Women 

Welcome Princess 

Gracious women will extend feminine hospitalities and 
write: "Welcome" in letters of California gold. 

Mrs. C. E. Wallerstedt, wife of the Swedish Consul- 
General, and Mrs. Gerald Campbell, wife of the British 
Consul-General, head the reception committee. 

Miss Ruth Allison Turner, the brilliant president of the 
San Francisco Center; Mrs. Abel William Johnson, presi- 
dent of the Utile Dulce Club; and Mrs. Florence M. C. 
Johnstone, Regent of the Daughters of the British Empire, 
Sir Francis Drake, Chapter, are the three executives under 
whose supervision today's splendid luncheon is to be given. 



Dr. Reinhardt Speaker 

Dr. Aurelia Henry Reinhardt, president of Mills Col- 
lege and National President of the American Association 
of University Women, will be the principal speaker at the 
luncheon given in honor of Princess Louise. Dr. Reinhardt 
is universally recognized as the most brilliant orator of the 
West in University circles, or, for that part, in any circle of 
women. Her pure diction, her mastery of the English lan- 
guage and her magnificent manner of address, place Dr. 
Reinhardt at the head of the list of women orators. 



Her Royal Highness, Louise Alexandria Marie Irene. 
Crown Princess and Duchess of Scania, is the second wife 
of the Crown Prince of Sweden, his first wife being the 
sister of the famous Princess Pat of Connaught. Before 
her marriage on November 3. 1923, to Crown Prince Gustaf 
Adolf, the Princess was Lady Louise, Mountbatten. She- 
is the daughter of Prince Louis of Battenberg, ranking ad- 
miral of the British Navy. 

He dropped his Herman title and was crea'ed Marques 
of Milford Haven by King George of England, according 
to authentic information, imparted at tenter headquarters. 

The Princess' mother is Princess Victoria of Hess,-, sister of 
the late Empress Alexandra of Russia and daughter of Princess 
Alice, said to be Otieen Victoria's favorite child. 



California flowers carried greetings of local Swedish women 
to the Crown Princess of Sweden when her royal highness 
left the Oakland Mole for San Francisco. Yellow roses and 
blue delphinium, carrying out the national colors of Sweden, 
tied with the American national colors, made up the bouquet 
that Mrs. Abel Johnson. President of the Utile Dulci Club. Mrs. 
Sven II. Svenson, Mrs. M. J. Holmes and Mrs. Waller J. Mat- 
son, presented in behalf of their countrywomen. 



Scarf to Be Princess' Gift 

A scarf, handwoven, such as generations of Swedish 
maidens made on their looms years ago. will be formally 
presented to Princess Louise, upon the occasion of her visit 
here. 

The color is a delicate peach shade and was designed and 
made here at the studios of Mr. and Mrs. Axel C.ravander, 
whose little daughter. Miss Ulla Anna Christine Gravander, 
will make the presentation to the Princess, at the St. Francis 
luncheon. 



May Fete the Queen 

If Queen Marie of Roumania comes to San Francisco dur- 
ing her American visit this Fall. San Francisco women 
may again undertake to entertain royalty. 

It is quite probable, say they who seem to know, that 
Queen Marie and her daughter, the Princess Ileana, may 
include the western coast in her itinerary. Queen Marie 
sails for New York about September 3rd, and it is well 
known here that she is intensely interested in California 
and this part of the world. 

While no direct announcement as to her visit has been 
imparted, still the society women and the leaders of prom- 



July 31, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



inent organizations are anticipating another 

visit, soon, from the royal heads of Europe. 

* * * 

Mrs. William Randolph Hearst, wife of t 
publisher, and Mrs. William Young, wife of 
Judge Young, have returned from a two 
months' trip abroad. Mrs. Hearst brought 
with her a new acquisition for her kennel of 
Kerry Blue Irish terriers, which she purchased 
from the Earl of Kenmare. 

The animal, "Kenmare Peggy," has won 
prizes at every European competition held 

during the past year. 

* # * 

Hearst Buys Castle 

Mrs. Hearst stated that the principal object 
of her recent visit to Europe was to visit the 
castle in Wales which Mr. Hearst had bought. 

"This castle," stated Mrs. Hearst, "is one 
of the two left standing after the invasion of 
Cromwell. It was built about 1150, during the 
time of William the Conqueror. It is now be- 
ing reconditioned." 

Mrs. Hearst is now en route to California, 
where she will join her husband and their sons at their 
beautiful ranch near Paso Robles. 




HOTEL CANTERBURY 
750 Slitter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



Tlie younger set at Menlo enjoyed the second of the 
series of subscription dances given at the Country Club 
this summer. The dances were arranged by Mrs. Augustus 
Taylor, and the membership list includes practically all of 
the junior group on the peninsula. 

Preceding the dance a number of dinner parties took 
place. One of these was given by Mrs. Silas Palmer, the 
guest of honor being Mrs. Palmer's young house guest. 
Miss Manuelita Boldt of Santa Barbara. Other guests in- 
cluded : Misses Isabelle Wheaton, Heath Hamilton, Nancy 
Merrill, Katherine Deabl, Kathleen Pringle ; Messrs. John 
Deahl, Albert Shumate, Harold Wingate, John Stine, Tay- 
lor Pillsbury, Palmer Wheaton. 

* * * 
Helen Wills Now Being 
Showered With Attentions 

Miss Helen Wills, the lovely California tennis champion, 
"loved around the world," is being showered with atten- 
tions since her arrival from abroad. Miss Wills passed the 
past week-end with friends on Long Island. 

She was lunching with a party at the Ritz in New York 
a few days ago, looking very smart and attractive in a 
biege gown made with long, straight blouse and full skirt, 
with a small felt hat to match. 

Miss Wills plans a visit with Mrs. Harvey II. Bundv 
next month as the guest of her California friend, who was 
the former Miss May Sutton, champion tennis player some 
years ago. She may take part in the tennis tournament in 
Massachusetts and later spend a few weeks with Mrs. 
Bundv at her home near Nahant, Mass. 

* * * 

Venetian Night Lures Society 

Lake Tahoe, the setting for the picturesque "Venetian 
Night" annual, attracted many society people from all parts 
of the State last week, with hundreds of visitors from all 
over the world among the prominent guests. 



Summer residents opened their homes to 
friends, making of the affair a gala occasion, 
with proverbial hospitality prevailing. 

Tahoe Tavern was the setting for many of 
the most attractive dinner dances and supper 
parties, where gay little groups of fashionables 
were assembled. Lovely gowns worn by the 
society women, with exquisite colorings the 
vogue, made a picture of beauty and charm. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kendrick were among 
those who entertained friends over the week- 
end at the "Venetian Night" event. Others 
entertaining were Mr. and Mrs. Heasley Fair, 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip T. Clay, Mr. and Mrs. 
William A. Magee, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lilen- 
thal and Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Victor. 



Honeymooners Return 

Mr. and Mrs. George Dewey Nereim have 
returned from their honeymoon and taken pos- 
session of their new San Francisco home. 

The bride, who was Miss Beatrice Aimee 
Bethune, is the only daughter of Mr. George 
Angus Bethune, former State geologist, and the niece of 
the late Lady Howland of Toronto, Canada. 

The bridegroom, George Dewey Nereim, whose former 
me was in Chicago, has settled in business in this city. 
Their wedding, which took place on May 25th at Trinity 
Methodist Church, was a pretty affair, with the Rev. Alfred 
J. Case officiating. Mrs. Kearce Fahy was matron of honor 
and Miss Doris Smith of Oakland was the bridesmaid. 
Little Jean Harrison was the dainty flower girl. 

Mr. Angus Young Bethune was best man at his brother's 
wedding. Mr. Kearce Fahy and Mr. Edward E. Escalle 
were the ushers. 



h 



For Southern Belle 
Miss Phyllis Haver 



of Los Angeles was the sues* of 



honor at a luncheon given at the Fairmont Hotel on Thurs- 
day by Mrs. Joseph White. Those invited to meet the 
complimented guest were Miss Beatrice Norton, Mrs. 
Frank C. Caughtery. Mrs. William J. Gray, Jr., Miss Freda 
Heinrichs. Mrs. John C. Brackline. 

* * * 
Twelve Entertained. 

Mrs. Harold Louderback entertained 12 friends at tea in 
the Palm Court of the Palace Monday, July 12th. 

* * * 
For Returned Traveler 

Mr. and Mis. Walter R. Jones gave a dinner dance at the 
California Golf Club on Thursday evening, July 14th. Miss 

Elizabeth Myrick, who has recently returned from a six 
months' tour of the Orient, was the in>e>t of honor. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. James Walton of Philadelphia have been 
making their home at the Fairmont for 10 days. They are 
on their honeymoon, and after a short visit at Del Monte 
will return to the Fairmont again for an indefinite stay. 

* * * 
At Del Monte Lodge 

Mr--. Charles Templeton Crocker of San Mateo is spend- 
ing several days at Del Monte Lodge, Pebble Beach. She 
(Continued on Page 171 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Swta Maria, California 

Oti tile C»Ul Hml)w*> H»tr»«T Brture.i San FrmncWo ami ! ... \n.rlr 

An Inn o( Inmuil Evf^llcnrc 

Wire or \rriie for rr*rn rrfinn* on your n»xt trip tottlh 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

CM Hush street, Between Powell mil stoekton. San Fraarlsro 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T BLETHEN-. Proprietor 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31,- 1926 







RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 


aPftSfl 



Pacific Radio Exposition 

AS an indication of the widespread ad- 
vance interest in the third annual 
Pacific Radio Exposition to be held here 
August 21st to 28th, the Pacific Radio 




C. J. Pennington 

Trade Association reports that it has 
received orders from dealers in Central 
and Northern California for 48,000 re- 
duced price admission tickets. 

This is an admission form designed 
to afford the dealer an opportunity of 
offering his customers and prospects a 
half-price ticket. Along with this an- 
nouncetnent the Pacific Radio Trade 
Association states that it has received 
responses from approximately 200 deal- 
ers from Oregon to Mexico accepting 
the association's offer of a season pass 
to the exposition and an invitation to 
attend what will be, it is said, the big- 
gest radio event of the season west of 
Chicago. 

The association is seeking to arrange 
special reduced fares with the railroads 
in answer to a large volume of inquiries 
received from various sections. It is 
the belief of those in cnarge that the 
coming show will break all records, 
not only from the standpoint of attend- 
ance, but from the comprehensiveness 
of the exhibits. 

All of the side halls and corridors of 
the exposition auditorium are being 
used to accommodate the demands of 
the exhibitors who include all of the 
leaders in the manufacture and distri- 
bution of radio sets and accessories. 



Nine new radio set models designed 
for the 1926-27 season and based upon 
the Hazeltine and Latour patents have 
been introduced by the Freed-Eisemann 
Radio Corporation. The engineers of 
the company have developed a uni-con- 
trol method of tuning whereby five con- 
densers are tuned by one dial. 



The eight-tube set employs the neu- 
trodyne circuit, consisting of four 
stages of tuned radio frequency, detect- 
or and two stages of audio frequency 
amplification, with two tubes parallel 
in the second audio stage for fine quali- 
ty of reproduction and increasing vol- 
ume. Any type of power tube can be 
used in the last audio stage, as pro- 
vision is made for necessary plate volt- 
age and "C" battery. 

Each radio frequency stage, the de- 
tector and audio amplifiers are totally 
shielded. The heavy metal compart- 
ments are separate, each acting as an 
independently shielded container. The 
detector is shielded with extra metal. 
The detector is also separately shielded 
from the audio stage, so that there is 
no coupling between these two stages. 

In order to get the maximum ampli- 
fication per stage and perfect neutral- 
ization at all frequencies, each radio 
frequency tube and its associated neu- 
tralizing condenser is enclosed in a 
copper compartment, which shields the 
tube itself from the remaining ele- 
ments of the circuit. 

The set can be used with either a 
self-contained loop, supplied with the 
set, or with an antenna. 

The four-tuned radio frequency 
stages with the loop circuit — five cir- 
cuits in all — are uni-controlled. The 
tuning of the entire receiver, including 
the loop, is done with only a single 
control. A specially designed loop is 
used. It has two separate windings. 
One winding is tuned simultaneously 
with the four radio frequencv stages, 
and the other is arranged and con- 
nected in such a way as to neutralize 
the antenna effect of the loop. This 
method is said to give an extremely 
sharp directional effect and greater 
freedom from interference from electri- 
cal disturbances, such as those from 
telephone line noises, motor hums and 
street car operation. 

The uni-tuning control is in the form 
of a bakelite disk which through a ver- 
nier gear mechanism operates a gold- 
plated rotary drum bearing a pre-cali- 
brated wavelength scale. The one con- 
trol accomplishes ten adjustments 
which would ordinarily have to be made 
if the set was not un-controlled. 



"A man appeared at a police station 
and said : 

"Oh. in regard to the watch which I 
reported was stolen yesterday, I have 
since found that it is not lost at all." 

"You are too late," replied the super- 
intendent, "the thief has been arrested." 
— Der Gotz (Vienna). 



Radio Program 

for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 428.3 

Sunday, Anuusi l 

9:45 to 10:46 a. m. — Undenominational and 
non-sectarian church service. 

10:45 a. m. — CJ. s. weather forecast. 

2:45 p. ni. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
creation Park of the baseball game. 

5:00 I" 6:00 p. m, — Organ recital by Marshall 
w Giselman. 

6:00 to 6:30 i». m.— Orchestra under tin- direc- 
tion of Waldemar Lind. 

6:30 p. tn — Baseball scores, amusement and 
greni ra i Inl ormation. 

6:35 i" 8:85 p. ni. — Palace n l Concert Or- 
chestra. 

8:3 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

Monday, August '1 

7:00, ?:30, 8:00 a. m.— Dally dozen exercises. 

In 30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

l:;:"" noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:; 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 

CheSt ra. 

i i" 2:00 p. m.— Fairmonl Hotel Orchestra. 

2:30 to 8:30 p. ni. — Matinee program. 
3:30 in 3:40 p. in- — Fashli ites. 

3:10 to 5:30 p. m. — Hah..'. Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5 id to 6:15 p. in. — Children's hour. 

i: [5 in 6:30 p. in. — Stock market quotations, 

baseball scores, markel report. 
6:30 to 3 :00 I i Chi SI i :i under the din c- 

tlon of Wa Idema r Lind, 
7:00 to 7:30 p, m. — Fairn Hotel Orchestra 

i :::•! In 8:00 p. ni. — 1 IX. 

f en p. in. — Studio program. 

1 111:1111 p. in. — KF1 and KPO, broadcast- 
ing 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 It usly. 

I" mi to 11:00 p. in, — Mandarin Cafe Orchestra. 

Tueitday, \iimisi :: 

7:30, 8:00 a, m. — Daily dozen exercises 

10:30 a. in. — Weather forecast, market reports, 
amusement a nd general informs tlon, 

13 mi noon Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12 10 10 1 mi ,, ,,, — Clifl Hotel C01 n Or- 
chestra. 

1 i»' 10 -'mi p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Orchi 

2:45 li. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 

baseba II garni a i Recn a I ion Park. 

5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel C01 it Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

G 15 lo 6:30 in m — Stock market aviota I Ions. 

basi ball scores, 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra, Waldemar Lind, 
director. 

7:imi to ?::!« p. m. — Fairmonl Hotel Orchestra, 

7 8:00 p. 111.— OX. 

9:00 p. in. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 111:1m p. m — studio program, 

1 i" 1 1 :"" p. m.— Palace Hotel i >ai i ir- 

chestra. 

Wednesday, August 4 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises 

10:30 a. in — Weather forecast, market re- 
ports, amusement and general informal ion 

12:00 noon — 'rime Signals ami Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:30 10 1:00 p, m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

I o 2:00 p. in. — Fairmonl Hotel Orchestra. 

.' 1:. p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
creation Park of the baseball gam.-. 

1 3 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert or- 
chestra. 
5:30 to 6:15 p. 111. — Children's hour. 

: 15 in 6:30 p. m. — stock markel quotations, 

baseball scot.s, 

,; 3 7:iiii p. in, — orchestra, Waldemar Lind 

In eeting. 
7:00 to 7:3ii p. m. — Fairmont Hold Orchestra 

; 10 i" 8:00 p. in.— nx. 

s:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program by the Atwater 

k >ii 1 Arl isi s, 

' "" I" lilaiii p. m.— Studi" program. 

' ' i" 11:00 p. m.— Orchestra, Waldemar 

Lind. director. 
Thursday, tiuruat r. 

7:00, 7:80, 8:00 a, m. — Daily dozen exercises. 
30 .1 m.— Weather forecaE 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12 "11 lo 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concerl Or- 
chestra. 
1 '»' to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra 
: 16 p. in. — Play by play broadoasl of the 
baseball games from Recreation Park. 
30 (o 5:30 p. ni. — Palace 11 1 Concert Or- 
chestra. 



July 31, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



11 



5:31) to 6:15 p. m.— Chldren's hour. 

6:16 to 6:30 p. m. — Baseball scores, market 
report of the California Fruit Distributors. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra, Waldemar Lind. 
director. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program, 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe Dance 
Orchestra. 

Friday. August 

7:00, 7:30, S:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U, S. weather forecast, market 
reports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:45 p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball games from Recreation Park. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:10 p. m. — ".Sports on the Air." 

7:10 to 7:20 p. m. — Business and investment 
talk. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:10 to 9:20 p. m. — Book review. 

9:20 to 10:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra, direction of 
Waldemar Lind. 

Saturday. August 7 

7:00, 7:30, 8: 00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast, market re- 
ports, amusement and general information. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of thi j 
baseball games from Recreation Park. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:20 p. m. — Orchestra, Waldemar Lind. 
director. 

7:20 to 7:30 p. m. — Talk on real estate. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe Dam.* Or- 
chestra. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 



KFRC— CITY OF PARIS DRY GOODS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 270.1 

Sunday* AugiiHt l 

6:30 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen." 

10:00 to 12:0ii p. m. — Dance music from Bal- 

conades Ballroom. 
Monday. August - 

10:00 tn 1 1 :00 a. m. — Household Hints, 
1:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Dance music by Kin Roth's 

Palm Garden Four. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — A. F. Merell and bis Stamp 

Club. 

6:30 p. in. — "The Stage and Screen" and Po- 
lice Reports. 
6:30 lo 7:00 p. m. — Jo Mendell and bis Pen 

Band. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Goodfellows A.I Period. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Around the Camp Fire with 

Mac, 
9:00 to 9:30 p. m, — KFRC Hawaiian a 

Tticttdny, AiirurI 3 

5:30 i" 6:80 p. m. — -Mac and his Hang:. 

6:30 p. m, — "The .Stage and Screen." 

6:30 t.. 7:in> p. ra.— Fred McKlnley, 

7:oo t<> 7:80 p. m. — Goodfellow's Ad Period. 

son to 9:30 p. in. — Studio program. 

Wednesday! August 4 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Household Hints. 

6:80 p. ni. — "The Stage and Screen." 

6:80 to 7:30 p. m. — Mao and his Cang. 

8:00 to B:10 p. m. — Mrs. n. e. k. Easton. Talk 

"Health and Safety." 
8:10 to 9:00 p. m.— Concert by KFRC Little 

Symphony Orch< 
9:oo to in:oo p. m.— Studio program. 
i" DO i,. i :■ i m. — Dance music by Bal- 

conades Orchestra 

Thut-Kdfty. August 5 

10 to 6 50 i' mi M.u' and his < ta i 
6 SO p m ■■ i'iu s; :::■ and Screen. 
6:80 to 7:0<i p. in. — Harry Rose, 
7:00 to 7:80 i>. m, — Qoodfellows Ad Period. 
9 no to s so i» m.— Popular program. 

I SO L0 00 p, m,— Dance music from Ikil- 

conades Ballroom. 

Fl idny. VukunI <t 

iv m — "The Stage and Scr' 

1 p. m. — Mac and his Gang 

\ n.> ,, tie Symphony Or- 

es! ra. 
9:00 to ii>:00 p, m. Program of trios 
famous op i 



Saturday, August 7 

6:00 tn 7:00 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 
<:0o p. m. — "The Stage and Screen." 
?:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Goodfellows Ad Period. 
S:00 to S:30 p. m. — Popular songs program, 
S:30 to 1:00 a. m. — Dance music from Balcon- 
ades Ballroom. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO— 220 
Monday, August - 

9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

selections and Dance Music. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

selections and dance music. 
Tuesday. August S 
9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

and dance music. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

and dance music. 
"Wednesday, August 3 
9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal, Instrumental and 

Dance Music. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal, Instrumental and 

Dance Music. 
Thursday, August 5 
9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal. Instrumental and 

Dance Music. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal. Instrumental and 

Dance Music. 
Friday. August C 
9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal, Instrumental and 

Dance Music. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal, Instrumental and 

Hance Music. 
Saturday, August 7 
9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

and Dance Music. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

and Dance Music. 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 
Sunday, August 1 

2:30 to 3:00 p. m. — Sunday school lesson. 
::on to 5:00 p. m. — Church service from the 

tempi.-. 
8:00 in I0:oo p. m. — Evening service from the 

Temple. 
Monday, August 2 

12:15 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
Tuesday, August H 

12:15 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program of sacred 

numbers. 
"Wednesilny. August 4 

12:15 to 12:30 p. m. — -Daily Scripture reading. 
3:00 i" 1:00 p. m. — Divine healing service. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program of sacred 

numbers. 
Thursday* August .". 
12:1B to i_;:ii p. m, — Daily, Scripture reading. 

I'rlday. Aii(iiisl II 

12:15 to 12:^o p. m,— Daily Scripture reading. 
3:00 i,, i hi. ,,. m , — Sunshine Hour, 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program of sacred 
numbers. 

Saturday. August 7 

12:15 (o 12:30 p. m.— Dally Scripture reading. 



Sunday 

i :00 



KFWI— RADIO BROADCASTING, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 250 
Aim list 1 

a mi p, m. — studio program, 
s DO i" 9 :00 p m from Chi I 

Science Church 

9:00 to io p, m. — John Wolohan's Callfor- 

n la ns. 

i I to 12:00 p m, — Paul ECelli's Trovatore 

i m chestra, 
Monday. August - 

U Si UdlO I'll 

R 80 i" 7 ."ii ],. ni.--- Roach's On 

DO to - 30 p m — Pr igram, 
B on i.. !' po i». m, — Studio program. 

m. — < >ne hour with Coffee 



i 'nil Keiii's Trovatore 



I — Studio pri 
-» lay lord Wllshlre, l -• 
jam. 
—Johnny Wolohan's 



I to 10:00 p. 

I >:tns 

to i - 00 p 
Orchestra. 
Tuesday* \ugu»i .1 

B:u0 to 8 80 p. 

p. m- 
9 00 t" 10:00 p. ni.- 
m.- 
rornlana 
\\ edaeadaj . nienni t 
1 00 i.. 8:00 p. m — Impromptu studio program. 

*'. :30 to 7:im p o ra 

, 9;00 p. m — Old Tim.- Flddl 
9:00 to 9:20 p. tn. — Program with Al P 
and Clem Kennedy. 

9:80 p. m. — P ogram. 

- Meeting. 

1 | 00 to 1 :»».' :i m .— Paul Kelli's Tr 

Orch< 

Thur*dn> . \iieiiHt S 

1 1 

■ 
K- Idny. August d 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m, — Imnromptu stud) 

to p m,— Popular Ball 



8:80 io 9:00 p. m. — Gaylord" Wllshlre Lecture 
9:00 lo lo:0o p. ra , — Bruce Cameron Lecture. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Paul Kelli's Trovatore 

Orchestra. 
Saturday, August 7 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— John Wolohan and his 

Californians. 
L2:30 to 3:00 a. m. — Pajama Party. 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAK- 
LAND— 509 
Monday, August '2 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

S;00 to 9:00 p. m. — Sixteenth "community 
Night" program, Broadcast by citizens and 
musicians of Santa Rosa, Cal. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Meeting- of Protective Or- 
der of Lake Merritt Ducks. 

Tuesday, August 3 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Wednesday, August 4 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

«:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Special program. 

Thursday, August 5 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Fl iday, August Ii 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

S:00 to 9:45 p. m, — Studio program. 

9:45 to 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 

Saturday, August 7 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 
Sunday. August t 

9:00 a. m. — International Sunday School les- 
son. 

4:30 p. m. — One hour of sacred songs. 

Monday. August 2 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

Tuesday* August 3 

6:30 p. m. — Children's Bible Story Hour. 

6:46 p. m. — Bible reading. 

i :00 p. m. — Vesper Service. 

Wednesday) August 4 

10:00 a. tn. — Tin- hour of Christian Ministry. 

I ni' p. m. — One hour of sacred songs. 

' liursday. August ." 

fi:30 p. m, — Children's Bible Story Hour. 
' "i p. m. — Bible reading. 

7:00 p. m. — Vesper Service. 

i Iday, August o 

10 no a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

1 mi p. m,— Studio program; health questions 
answei i 6 

Saturday, \ugu«t 7 

10 ii" a. m. — One loan of Children's Church 
broadcasting. 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC. DENVER 
— 322.4 — (Mountain Time) 

Sunday. August 1 

U:00 ;i m. — Service of First Baptist church. 

tO i' ni - — I >rga n recital. 

tO p m —Studio concert by KOA choristers. 
B DO p io- Concert, Denver municipal band. 

Monday. Aimusi '2 

a in — Wea ther, road reports, stocks. 
markets, livestock and produce. 
12:1 ". iv ni — ' Irgan recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 

Slocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce a mi news bullet ins. 

in — i ilnner concert, Brown Palace 
String orchestra, 

p, m — Book of Knowledge program. 

■ on |» m.— Program t>y Scheuermann Color- 
ado orchestra 

■ ; program, 
Tuesday, \uen*t :i 

ii IE -a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks. 

mark i >k and produce. 

noon— Special program from I'cnver 
municipal auditorium. 

-Mai Inee for housewives. 
4:00 p, m. — Culinary hints. 
ri' p, in — Fashion review. 

i. m — Si ocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
bulletin, 
m.— Dinner concert. Brown Palace 
■ 
- in — Farm o^iesi inn ! 

Wednesday, \iikiih1 4 

11:46 i. m — Weather, road reports, st< 

mark- k and produce 

12:16 p. m — Organ recital by Clarence 

in — st ■ irks, markets, livestock, pro- 

■■'i'^rins. 
m — I >inn- i- concert, Howard Tillot- 
■ 

m. — YVvnken. Blvnken and N'od tim.-. 
u mental program by 3* 
(••man's i ■ orchestra. 

•* «1j.i program. 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1926 



Radio Program for Next Week 



Thursday, August 5 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce. 

12:15 p. m. — Org-an recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

1:00 p. m. — Cool culinary hints. 

4:15 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6 :00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

6:27 p. m. — United Press weekly sports re- 
view. 

li:30 p. m. — Dinner concert, Howard Tillotsun. 
director. 

Friday, August \\ 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce. 

12:15 p. n. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:00 p. m. — Culinary hints. 

4:15 p. Ti. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock pro- 
duce bulletins. 

6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert, Howard Tillotson, 
director. 

7:30 p. m. — Preview of International Sunday 
school lesson. 

8:00 p. m. — Denver municipal band. 

Saturday* Auprux* 7 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets and livestock. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital by Clarence Rey- 
nolds. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 
OAKLAND— 361 

Sunday, August 1 

11:00 a. m. — First Methodist Episcopal Church 
service. 

4 :00 p. m. — Vesper service, Grace Cathedral. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

7:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau report, 

7:35 p. m. — Address by H. R. H., Crown Prince 
Gustaf Adolph of Sweden. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

Monday. Vu.n-u.-i - 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

5:30 t<> 6:00 p. m. — KGO Kiddies Klub. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:0S p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

8:00 p. m. — Educational program — music and 
speakers. 

8:05 p. m. — O. W. Holmes, Market Inspector. 

8:25 p. m. — Senator Sam Shortridge. 

8:50 p. m. — "Better English." 

9:15 p. m. — "Symposium on the New Educa- 
tion." 

9:30 p. m. — Dr. Bartley C. Crum, speaker. 

Tuesday, Au^unt 3 

10:45 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bu-eau reports. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trades Association 
and members. 

G:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

0:56 p. m, — N^ws items. 

7:U3 p. ni.- -Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m.~— Base ball scores. 

7:08 p. m. — S. F. Produce. Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. .Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

8:0" to 9:00 p. m. — Evereadv program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — The Pilgrims' Hour. 

Wednesday, August 4 

10:*5 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11:30 a. m. to 1 :00 n. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — U. S. Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

2:00 to 3:00 p m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 
and members. 

5:30 p. m. — "For Instance," General Jackson, 
columnist. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

f!:55 p, m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 



7:08 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain. Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

Tim* sday, August .*» 

10:45 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. in, — N. Y. Stock reports 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:12 i). m. — Weather Bureau re]) oils. 

2:00 to 4:iio p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 
and members. 

5:00 to 6:l)l( p. m. — HenvKe W. Ludlow, "Friend 
to Bovs." 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra, 

t ; : r> r» p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:08 p. m. — S. F. Produce. Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

8:00 to 9:im p. m. — Vacation program. 

:):iiii p. m. to L2:00 midnight — Phil Lampkiu's 
Musical Bears. 

Friday. August it 

10:45 to ll:lii a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11:1(1 a. m. — Homemaking Talk. 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concerl 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F .Stock reports. 

1:4 2 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

2:00 to 3:0(1 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 

5:30 to 6:o0 p. m. — KGO Radio Girls. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:08 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain. Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing 1 ). 

Satnrday a August " 

l ii:45 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — l". s. Weather Bureau report, 

12:33 p. m. — N. V. Sto.-k Market reports 

12:40 i'. m.— S. F. Stock Market n -ports. 

2:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 
and members. 

Liiii to r>:3ii p. m. — Concerl by Bern's Little 
Symphony i 'rchestra, 

8:00 p. in. — Weather Bureau report. "Week- 
ly Sport Review." 

8:10 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m. — Arthur S. Garbett in a 
musical talk. 

9:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Instrumental Selection — 

The Serenaders. 

10:00 p. m. to i:iii) a. m, — Dance music. 



KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS. 
OAKLAND— 302.8 
Sunday, August 1 

9:45 to in :15 a .m. — Bible Lecture. 

U:oo a. m. to 12:30 p. m. — Church Service, 

7:15 t'i 9:15 p, m. — Church Service, 

Monday. August '2 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m, — Praver Service. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

7:oo to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to iii:0ii p. m. — Program. 

TueNday, August :t 

s :30 to 9:00 a. m, — Praver Service. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 

Wednesday, August 4 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer Service. 
9:o0 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
B:O0 to 8:30 p. in. — Lecture Hour. 
7:00 to 7::'.n p. m. — Shopping Hour 

Thursday, August .*> 

S:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Praver Service. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

5:4 5 to G:15 p. m. — Lecture Hour, "Keeping 

Well." 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 

Friday, August G 

8:30 to 9:1)0 a. m. — Prayer service, 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
7:00 to 7:3o p. m. — iShopping Hour. 
S:0o to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 

Saturday. August 7 

S:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer Service. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 



KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN, PORT- 
LAND — 491.5 
Sunday. August 1 

10:25 to 12:00 noon — Morning services. 
T.::n io 9:00 p, m.— Evening services. 
9:iid to lti:0o p. in, — Concert. 
Monday, Aiicusi i 

1 ii mid to 11 :30 a. in. — Musk-, weather report, 

household hel ps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m.— Concert. 

6 to 7:00 p. ni. — Dinner concert. 

7:111) to 7:30 p. m. — KGW Movie Club. 

t::ii to 7:45 p, m. — Weather, market and po- 
l ice reports. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 

10:00 io i2:fni p. m. — Dance music. 

Tueadny, August 3 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12 :i" to 1 :::<) p. m. — Concert. 

2:00 to 3:30 p. m, — Women's Matinee, 

6: 7:00 p. m. — I 'inner concert. 

7:00 io , ::;n p, m. — Children's program. 

7:30 io 7:45 p, m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

x : mi to 10:00 p. m. — Education program. 

ln:0o io 12:00 p. m- — Dance music 

Wedneflday, \ugtist 4 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12 I i ■:" p, m. — Concert 

6;00 io 7:oo p. m.- — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:15 p. m.— Weather, market and po- 
lii . reports. 

8:00 io 9:on p. m. — -Concert, 

Thursday, \iikus1 .*> 

io:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps, 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:00 io 7:un p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, police and mar- 
ket reports. 

7:45 io 8:00 p. m. — Led ui e 

B 20 to i 1-- in — Vaudeville program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

!<■• Iday, AiipinI it 

u to ii:S0 a. m. — Women's daily dozen, 

music, weather report, household helps. 

1 2 :30 io 1 :30 p. m.— Conci rl 

2 00 io :|_ : iiii p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

i; ;(im to . nu p. in, — I tinner eon cert. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, police and mar- 
ket reports. 

8:00 i" :i :O0 p. m ! Joncerl of \ ocal and in- 
strumental music. 

in 30 i o 12:00 i'- m. — Weekly frolic of the 
Keep i \r>>\\ ■ i nu Wiser Order of Hoot Owls, 

Suttirtlii.*, AiiuiinI 7 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — M uslc, weather report, 

household helps. 
i a 30 I- l :30 p. m. — Concei t. 

i; : mii I., t on p rn. — i 'in ner i lerl . 

10 on to 12:00 p, m.- — Dance music. 



KFWB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY 
WOOD— 252 
Sunday, Aimnst I 

11:00 P. oi — PeggJ Mathews, I. 



lUe 



Bill i latch and his Orchestra. 

Monday. August - 

i i :, to ."> :00 p. m. — i tome Econom ics 

5 ii" io 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. to — Pontlac six Dinner Hour. 

( ;00 io vim o. tn. — Program featuring Ed- 
ward Novis. 

S:00 to 8:io p. m, — News Items. 

8:10 io 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Dar 
'It idley. tenor. 

9:10 to io:in p. in. — Program featuring Eta- 
uuel Nieto, < loloraturs Soprano. 

10 10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Pros. Frolic. 

Tuettdny. August li 

i:i."> to 5:00 j). tn.— Home Economics. 

5 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

G to 7:<m p. m. — Pontlac Six Dinner Hour. 

7:00 to s:oo p. m. — Program featuring Esther 

While, popular sours. 
son (., s:tn p, m. — News Items. 
SIM to 0:10 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his Or- 

chestra. 

J» : 1 Io lii:lll p. in. — June Parker, blues 

in in to ll:iiM p. in, — Warner Pros. Frolic. 

UnltlfNilny. AiiBUNt 4 

i i:, io 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

5:00 lo 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

fi:(io to 7:00 p. m — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

7:00 io 8:00 p. m. — Prog ram featuring Pill 

l Hake, tenor. 
8:00 to s.10 p, m. — News Items. 

8 10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program. 

9:10 to lo:10 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his or- 
chestra. 
10 in to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Thursday. AuguNt ~ 

6 nil (,. 7:iiu p. m.— Pontlac six Dinner rlojur 
S no to 8:10 ]'. m. — News Items. 

H : i ii to £i:lo p. m. — Program feat u ring Tune 
Parker, blues. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Program, Peggy Math- 
ews, blues. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

i'Vidoy. Augiurt <t 

fi 00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 



July 31, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



7:00 l" 8: (Hi p. m. — Program featuring June 

Parker, blues. 
8:00 i<> 8:10 p. in. — News linns. 
S:10 to 9:10 p. m.^Program, Esther "White, 

popu la i' song's. 
9:10 t<> 10:10 p, m. — Esther White, popular 

songs, 
10:10 to 11:00 p. in. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 
Saturday, August 7 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 
B;00 !<> 9:iio p. m. — Bill Hatch and his or- 

Chesti a. 
8:00 i" 10:00 p. m. — Julius H. Phillips, tenor: 

Esther White, popular songs. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Art Pabst, and his banjo; 

Bill Hale h an d his orch es t ra. 



KNX— L. A. EVENING EXPRESS, 
LOS ANGELES— 337 
Daily Except Sunday 

7:30 a. m. — KNX Morning Gym. 
S:ii(> a. m. — Inspirational talk and morning 
prayer. 

8 :55 a. m. — Time signals. 

9:00 a. m. — Radio Shopping News. 

I n :00 a. m. — The Day's Morning Message. 
1 0:30 a. m. — Household Economics Dept. 
12:00 m. — Arcade Cafeteria Orchestra. 
1:30 p. m. — The Bookworm. 

4: no p. m. — Market Reports. 
5:30 p. m. — Arcade Cafeteria Orchestra. 
6:00 p. in.- — The Town Tattler. 
6:15 p. m. — Travelogue. 
6:30 p. m. — At water Kent orchestra. 
.Sunday, August 1 

10:00 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood. 

2:00 to 4 :00 p. m. — Musiea I prom am, 

4:30 p. m. — Half hour of Cinema chat. 

6:30 p. m. — First Unitarian Church. 

i :00 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 

8:00 p. m. — .1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood.. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

Monday, August 2 

3:00 p. m.— Little .lean. 

4:30 p. m. — Blue Monday Frolic. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

7:30 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

8:00 p. m, — Courtesy program, 

9:00 p. m.— I Jourtesy program. 

10:00 p. in — Courtesy program, 

11:00 p. m. — Hay West's Cocoanut Grove or- 
chestra. 

Tuesday) August it 

2:00 p. m.- — Mothers' Hour. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program! 

7 :-l 5 p. m. — Ta 1 k on health. 

tj ;00 p. m. — < 'oiu'i esj program. 
8:00 p. m, — Courtesy program. 
10:00 p. m. — Henry Halsted's Orchestra. 
11:00 p. m. — Kay West's Cocoanul Grove Or- 
chestra. 
Wednesday, Vimuxt 4 
3:00 p. in.-- M usica i read i tigs, 
4:00 p. m. — Talk on care of children. 
7 : t'H p. m. — Courtesy program, 
8:00 p. m.- — Courtesy program, 

|| ;()|l ii. ni. I 'oil I'l rsv 1 O i . g 1 ; i 11 1 

10:00 p. m. — Henri Halsted's Orchestra. 
11:0 Op. m. — Ray Wests Cocoanul Grove Or- 
chestra. 
Thursday* August '* 

11:00 a. in. — Nature talk. 

fl :lin p. in. — I la n«l u rit i rig < \perl. 

7 :0n p. m. — ( >rga n recll a I. 

B imp |». mi —i Jourtesy program. 

ii :iui to i a ;00 p. in. — « !ouri es* prog i am 

i n. mi p. m — 1 lenry Halsted's < >i chesl i a 

I I :no p. m — Ra j \\ est's Cocoanul Grovt 0: 
chesl ra. 

Ki tday, AntiiiNi <; 

10 80 a, in.- "l 'ropei Foods and I low to Pn 

pare them." 
■_• :iiu p. in. M uslca l prog ra m. 
i nil p, in. --i toy Seoul s' musica i program 
7 :00 p. m.— Feat ure proi 
B 00 p ni - -Courtesy prog ra m. 

9 00 p. m. -' 'on rl esy progi am 

1 "n p, ui. — i lourl ram 

n mi i> in -Raj v i . ■ i ■ i ■ Grove Or- 

ihesl ra. 

Katurday* \imusi t 

3 mi p .ni tmu n Crlei ol th( Da ! a nd his 

■■ 
1:45 p m : i ■ ■■■ ■ ■ ■ 

her screen work. 
; oo p m EM cries 
7 ; i r» p. m.— -Announcement of Sundaj ser- 

\ ;■ s of the leading Lob Ai 
: so p. m ■ am. 

90 p. n ■ am, 

i' Con ram 

i 0:00 p. m trove Or- 

ohes 

11 :00 P. m,-Snlni -la\ night 



6:30 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:46 p. m. — Music Appreciation Chat. 

?:00 p. m. — Jim, Jack and Jean Trio. 

8:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital — Dan L. 
MacFarland. 

9:00 p. m. — Badger's Hollywood Californians. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra — Bill Hen- 
nessey, Director; Dolly MacDonald, blues 
singer. 

Monday, August 3 

5:30 p. m. — Varsity Ramblers, direction of 
Wallace Dishman. 

0:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Program. 

6:45 p. m. — George Wilder Cartwright, "Con- 
stitution of America." 

7:00 p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians. 
Jackie Lucas, blues singer. 

8:00 p. m. — Popular Program. 

9:00 p. m. — Program by Walter M. Murphy Mo- 
tors Co. — Pryor Moore Orchestra; Olga Stef- 
fani. Contralto. Broadcast simultaneously 
by KFI and KPO. 

10:00 p. m. — Program by Meiklejohn Bros. 

Tuesday. August 3 

5:30 p. m. — Matinee Program. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:1.5 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Betty Polo, Pianist. 

i; : 1." p. m. — KFI Radio torial Period. 

7:0(1 p. in. — Virginia Ballroom Orchestra. 

8:00 p. m. — Screen Artists' Quartet. 

9:00 p. m. — Reeves Boyd. Flutist. 

L0:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club. 

Wednesday, August 4 

5:30 p. m. — Don Warner's Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6 :30 p. m. — Don Warner's Orchestra. 

6:45 p. m. — E. C. D. Price "Gossip." 

7:00 p. m. — Westerland Trio. 

7 :30 ]). m. — Nick Harris, detective stories. 

8:00 p. m. — Program by California Petroleum 
Corporation Calpet String Quartet — Virginia 
Flohri, Soprano; Robert Hurd, Tenor. 

9:00 p. m. — Varied Program. 

3 0:00 p. m. — Program arranged by Charles 
Beaucbamp. 

Thursday, August 5 

5:30 p. m, — Theron Bennett's Hollywood Foot- 
lifters. 

6:00 p. ra. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

0:15 p. in.— KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Theron Bennett's Hollywood Foot- 
liftei s. 

6 : 'in p. in. — Radiotorial Period. 

7: nn p. in. — Duncan Sisters and Company — 
from "Topsy and Eva." 

snn p. m. — KFI Drama Hour. 

9:00 p m. — Leslie Adams, Whistler. 

L0:00 P in. — Patrick-Marsh Orchestra — Betty 

i ';i | rick, Soli lisl . 
Friday, Vuguiit *• 

5:80 p. in. — Eugene BlscaHuz. 
6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6 15 p. m.— KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — lOdna Cook and Billie Henderson. 

ii : 15 p. m, — Bun Mcln i osh, 

7:00 p. ni. — Anita Holt, Violinist. 

; 80 p, in. — Felipe DelgadO — Media Mora Es- 

panola. 
8:00 p, "i —Aeolian Organ Recital, Dan L. 

MacFarland. 

p, ni. — Pat O'Neal, Bariton. Cray T. 

Samson. 

in nn p, ni Packard Ballad Hour. Tom Mc- 
Laughlin. Leslie Adams. Paul Roberts. Em- 
in.. K initio I, Lou Parker. 

Saturday. August 7 

p. in.— sheii. \ Play era orchestra, 
\I.m i .i Eva rts. 

p. ni. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6 i b P in kci Radio Travel Guide. 
,. Dp , M - Vesl Pockel Pei lod. 
p mi —KFI Radiotorial Period. 

00 p m —Paul Roberts, Tenor. 
x 00 i' m.— Angelus Trio. 
9:00 p i aslc Hour. 

Packard Radio Club 

p ni -KFI Midnight Frolic. 



with 



-Church Services from 



KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC.. 
LOS ANGELES— 467 
(Copyright 1926 by ESarle C Anthony, 

Sunday, Iukum < 

g er , 

.. m - Thti i Cnn 



KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO- 
SE ATT L E— 384.4 
Sumlny. \iiuh«( l 

80 p. in.— 
Flrsl M E, Church 

8:00 p in. — <n-£an recital. 
vim i,. 9:16 p. ta. — Evening Serrlcea First 
m l-:. Church. 

0:46 p- ni. — Orchestra under direc- 
tum of Henri Darnski. 
m..m.i;i«. kvaroat - 

11:80 to 12:00 m, — Post Intelligencer talk. 
Whai to prepare tor tonight's dinner." 
Standard Time Signals. 
1 p m. — Stock Exchange quotations. 
- Ddard Time Signals, 
i tasebal] scores. 
: —Weather reports 

Post Intelligencer Studio 
I ■am. 
p, ni — Time Signals. 



Tuesday, August 3 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Tme Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Wednesday. August 4 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

3:00 to 4 :00 p. m. — Musical program. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

7:30 to 8:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Thursday, August 5 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time .Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time .Signals. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer pre- 
senting weekly meeting of the "Keep Joy 
Radiating Order of Bats." 

Friday, August 6 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

(Continued on Page 22) 




Low Summer Rates 



at 

Hotel Del 
Coronado 

American Plan 

Swimming. Boating, Fishing, Dancing, Golf, 
Tennis, Motoring, Riding 

THE A. B. SPRECKELS 

AMATEUR GOLF TOURNAMENT 

AUGUST 25-28 

For magnificent $1,000.00 trophy and attractive 

prizes in all flights at Coronado Country Club. 

$5.00 Entry Fee. 

Coronado literature and reservations 
may be made at San Francisco Agency 

L. E. Carlile, Ace nt 
2 Pinf Street- Douglas 5600 

Mel S. Wright. Manager 
CORONADO BEACH. CALIFORNIA 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1926 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued Irom Page 7) 

Edward Everett Horton starring in 
"Poker Faces", is the new picture at 
the California this week following the 
Pauline Frederick photoplay of "Her 
Honor the Governor." 

The California theater last week gave 
screen productions which set criterions. 
We shall indulge in laughter, there, this 
week it seems, with Laura La Plante, 
and George Seigman supporting Hor- 
ton. 

* :|: # 

Cameo 

Hoot Gibson starring in his latest 
screen triumph, "The Man in the 
Saddle," will occupy the screen at the 
popular Cameo theater on Market 
street for seven days, starting its run 
on Saturday, July 31, and running 
through Friday of the following week. 

This picture is brim full of action, 
daring action, thrilling episodes and 
magnificent scenery. Gibson is shown 
as the daring hero with hairbreadth es- 
capes over many dangerous passes. Ro- 
mantic angles follow the plot, with its 
virile theme and masterful encounters. 

The popularity of Hoot Gibson and 
the strength of the picture itself is the 
basis for its long run at the Cameo, 
following the thriller "Down to the Sea 
in Ships," which was a feature of last 
week. 

Tom Mix in "My Own Pal" is a com- 
ing attraction and will occupy the 
screen for four davs. 



dangers as well as its resulting opera- 
tions shown under the direction of au- 
thentic directors. 

Victor McLaglen has an important 
part in this picture. He stands six feet 
three and is one of the tallest men on 
the screen. A car of special size had 
to be secured for the star for one of 
the automobile scenes in which he 
drives an automobile. He was at one 
time, chief provost marshall at Bag- 
dad. All fight fans know McLaglen 
as a fighter of the prize ring. 

Andrea Setaro's music score is a work 
of description. The prologue featur- 
ing Frederick De Bruin, baritone, is 
an effective steel mills setting, with the 
vocalist heard in the selection : "Invict- 
us." 

* * * 

Imperial 

The Imperial theater this week cre- 
ated considerable stir along Market 
street screen row with the initial pre- 
view on Friday of Rudolph Valentino's 
"The Son of a Sheik," sequel to the 
other Valentino photoplay. 

The pre-view engagement is said to 
be the first of the kind ever held here 
and follows closely the personal ap- 
pearance of Valentino, who visited San 
Francisco this past week. 

Back to the role of a desert lover, 
Valentino, will be recalled as having 
created a sensation in his earlier char- 
acterization as "The Sheik." E. M. 
Hull, author of that picture, is again 
the author of the new film. 



Ill 



EUROPE 

On the new famous "O" steamers 
you are sure of utmost comfort- 

cabin or tourist third cabin 
Cabins containing single and two 

beds. Spacious promenade 

decks, ballroom, gym and other 

special features 

Sailings Saturdays 

from New York 

Cabin class from $145.00 

Tourist from $95.00 

qAUo direct sailings from Pacific 

Coast via Panama Canal 

CRUISES: 

Norway ■ South America 

Mediterranean 

Second great African cruise leaves 

New York, January , 1927 

Complete information & literature 

Royal Mail Stearr Packet Company 

570 Market St.. San Francisco 

or Local Agent 



ROYAL 

MAIL 

-ITHE COMFORT ROUTEr- 

SlNCE 1839 



Granada 

George Beban, in his latest film char- 
acterization and with two reels of the 
picture enacted by Beban and his com- 
pany on the stage, is the attraction 
booked for the Granada. 

Beban's picture is called "The Loves 
of Ricardo" and is unique m that the 
story was written and directed by him. 
He plays its leading character and also 
is the star of the stage interpolation in 
which the whole picture company ap- 
pears with him. 

The engagement in San Francisco is 
a pre-release engagement. Except for 
one other appearance made by Beban, 
the picture has had no snowings, and 
will not be presented again after the 
week's Granada engagement until Be- 
ban and his company open their tour of 
the Publix theaters, starting in New 
York. 

# * * 

St. Francis 

"Men of Steel," starring Milton Sills, 
continues at the St. Francis. Mae Alli- 
son, Doris Kenyon, George Fawcett 
and Frank Currier are supporting stars. 
Miss Kenyon takes the sweetheart role. 

Scenes depicting a steel mill in actual 
operation, are features of this stirring 
photoplay with industrial-life and its 



Orpheum 

One of the vaudeville attractions of 
the year will be at the Orpheum next 
week when the international dancing- 
star, Pat Rooney opens in his latest 
song and dance revue "A Rooney 
Romp." A group of dancing girls in- 
cludes the Misses Muriel Stryker, Ani- 
ta Nieto, the Van Joyce Sisters and 
Mildred Burns. The annual visit of 
dancing Pat and his gang of merry- 
makers is always an event. 

A second feature offering honors is 
the appearance of Duci De Kerekjarto, 
royal violin virtuoso. 

The supporting show is headed by a 
trio of standard Orpheum acts. Among 
the most popular will be Donald Kerr 
and Erne Weston in their dancing skit 
"Stepping In Society," assisted by 
Dorothy Sierre and Benny Ryan. Wil- 
liam Frawley and his partner are light 
comedy and song stars who have pro- 
duced, "Something New." 

Jimmy Lyons is a monologist come- 
dian who was last seen on the Coast 
in the George Choos production "Land 
of Fantasie." Davis & Pelle, with their 
"Equilibristic Marathon" and the Paul 
Paulson Trio, round out the program. 



At Paul Elder's Gallery 
An exhibition of the work of the adult 
classes and children's summer class of 
the Cravath School of Sculpture will 
be held in the Paul Elder Gallery for 
two weeks, beginning August 3rd. A 
complete Noah's ark will be one of the 
features — a product of the children's 
class, where work is in interesting con- 
trast to that of the adult class. 



Miss Edith Coburn Noyes, of Bos- 
ton, for her third Friday morning pro- 
gram, will read Clemence Dane's "A 
Bill of Divorcement," in the Paul El- 
der Gallery, Friday, August 6th, at 11 
o'clock. This is a problem play, in the 
old fashioned sense. It was first pub- 
lished by the Reandean Company at 
the St. Martin's Theatre. It is dis- 
tinguished by clever and characteristic 
dialogue, the emotional situations that 
are really poignant, and altogether it 
is an exquisite psychological observa- 
tion. Miss Noyes is director of the 
Edith Coburn Noves School of Boston. 



lulv 31. 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

CRUISING IN THE MEDITERRANEAN 

At every Port, in the Mediterranean and elsewhere, you 
will be importuned by itinerant hawkers to buy every sort 
and kind of article. Most of it is exported from England 
and Germany. There will, of course, be a certain amount 
of genuine native work amongst the heterogeneous collec- 
tion — about five per cent. 

Being very canny, you will no doubt beat the persuasive 
man down to a little more than the half of what he asks, 
and you will think you have done very well. But so has 
he. For invariably he adds 100 per cent to his asking price 
to American tourists. 

Everywhere on the Continent you will be asked to look 
through marvellous field glasses marked "Zeiss." They 
are "Zeiss" glassed, exported from Germany in great num- 
bers under the Reparations Scheme. Their brilliance and 
range of vision is, as you will see for yourself, remarkably 
good. They will be "XS" magnification. The dago vender 
will ask $60.00 to $70.00. After a wealth of bargaining and 
vituperation, and walkings away with a don't-care shrug on 
your part, you will get him down to $25.00. He will demur 
frantically — and then, calling upon Heaven to witness how 
the faces of the poor are ground by the American, he will 
accept. And you will, with a great effort, restrain the 
smile of gratification from appearing on your face: You 
hand them back to him to polish the lenses and put them 
in the case for you. You will never see them again. 

He has a dozen pairs of glasses slung on his shoulder, 
all looking alike. He is a prestidigitateur. He unslings an- 
other case from his shoulder turning half aside from you to 
do so, talking volubly the while. You have been looking 
through I he show pair. You probably do not test them again 
until you are safely (from his point of view) on board. 

This is where the ladies are victimized. Beautiful amber 
necklaces, deep in color, scintillating, heavy, perfect in 

shape: "the genuine article, Signorina iee, take them in 

your hand -put them on." (This In Naples especially). 
They are asking a frightfully low price "to yon; only do 
not tell anyone, or I lose my license." 

You linger them sceptically. They can't be real. "But 
yes, on the grave of my mother ; See!" 

And he applies the >ure test. A piece of paper, lie rubs 

a bead on your coat sleeve. It picks up the paper magnet- 
wise — "voila!" You succumb, convinced. You are getting 
something marvellously cheap. Bui that particular bead. 
known well to him, is the oiih real piece of amber on the 
string. The rest are —well, glass. 

The "Genuine Old" Spanish Shawl 
Beware oi these purchases al Barcelona, Naples, Algiers, 
Gibraltar, Algeciras, etc. The "Rock Scorpions" at Gibral- 
tar especially are past masters at this flourishing trade. 

i Inlj the experts, and tin \ are lew enough, can tell, of 
COUrse, But there are three guiding principles of an ele- 
mentary nature. \n old shawl from Spain lias a frii 
the same material as the I he shawl. It is not sewn 

on. The fringe is very heavj and long. The embroidery 

is the same front and back. And there is a "feel" about an 
antique shawl that they cannot get into modern machine- 
i en silk. 
The one comparative certainty of swindle is if the man 
asks y ( i a nd comes down, after argument, to s 

Then >\>' not buy. unless you are content with a Paisley or 
Nottingham imitation. A good old Spanish shawl can 
seldom he picked up for less than $100.00 anywhere, un- 
less the vendor is unaccountably hard up. which is seldom 
the i 

(Continued en rag.- 



CUNARD 

Channel Service 



New York 

to 

England and France 

by CABIN SHIPS 



Caronia 
Carmania 
Cameronia 
Lancastria 

Ala uni a 

ASCANIA 
AuSONIA 



For Full Particulars Apply /o 

CUNARD AND ANCHOR LINES 

Or Local Agents 



-— » 
-*1 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8C DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general oAgent 

5AA Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1926 




AMONG the many interesting and vital discussions, for 
which the Commonwealth Club has become famous, 
there has been none of greater significance than that deal- 
ing with the water supply of this State. It appears that the 
accumulated dry years, four in number, have wiped out the 
former surplus rainfall of 29 inches, and the State will now 
have to get along on the future rainfall. 

— Is there any real way in which we can get rid of bad 
drivers? Upon the rational solution of this problem there 
are dependent many economic and financial problems in- 
volving insurance and the saving of vital energy. 

— The Southern Pacific will inaugurate automobile ferry 
service between San Francisco and Alameda, beginning 
August 14th. It will be started as a half-hour service and 
will give automobilists, wishing to reach San Francisco 
from points south and east of Oakland, a choice of routes 
and greater frequency of service. 

* * * 

— The Southern Pacific Development Department, in a 
recent article on how to determine the speed of trains, 
says : "A more accurate knowledge of speed may be gained 
by-counting the time, in seconds, between mile posts spread 
along the right-of-way. With 60 seconds between posts, it 
is obvious that the train speed is 60 miles per hour. At 145 
seconds, the speed will be 24.8 miles; at 120 seconds, 30 
miles-; at 90 seconds, 40 miles ; at 80 seconds, 45 miles," and 
so on. This should end many smoking car discussions. 
~ - *- * * - 

— The Byllesby Management, which is now conducting 
the Market Street Railways, in its recent magazine, "Byl- 
lesby Management." says: "We believe to the Louisville 
Gas and Electric Company goes the honor of being the first 
public utility to own and operate its own airplane. It ap- 
pears that the plane is used chiefly for making aerial surveys 
which are proven to be of greater value than ordinary sur- 
veys and only require a fraction of the time of ordinary 
surveys." 

* * * 

— One of the most significant statements with respect to 
municipal ownership is that made by Halford Erickson, as 
follows: "When a municipality pledges all of its taxable 
property, credit and tax-levying power, as security for the 
capital obtained for the acquisition and operation of public 
utilities, it assumes great and costly risks. Utilities so 
owned and operated, are seldom paying." 

* * * 

— The effect of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company's 
method of dealing with problems of water storage is mani- 
festing itself in the increasing values of California land, due 
to the development of irrigation. More irrigated acres are 
being annually added. There are now in California 1,000,000 
acres of land irrigated by gravity flow and about half that 
number of acres irrigated by pumped water. 

* i ;Jc 

4-In ten years the connected horse-power in agricultural 
motors m this State has increased from 50,700 to 192,832 
The increase is sufficient to constitute the basis for a prac- 
tical change in civilization. It represents, in ten years, more 
than five hundred years of older European development 

* * * 

— The extent to which the cannerv industry is involved 
nowadays appears from the fact that the Southern Pacific 
moves as many as five hundred cars per night to canneries. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 



INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1868 



COMMERCIAL 



One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1926 

Assets $109,430,478.72 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,400,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $557,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haicht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 



Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2244 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 «20.000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG. ; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND. ■ ORE. ; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITV. MEa.Ii O. 

San Francisco Oflice: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif, \ 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS - AUDITORS — COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C. P. A. 

Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, Slow 
Accounts ; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYoung Buii.dinc, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Bmldlne (Opposite Palace Hotel), San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 391 



July 31, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

is supervising the construction of her new home, a beautiful 
villa, Byzantine in type, designed by Mr. George Washing- 
tun Smith of Santa Barbara. The building is of Travertine 
marble, brought by boat from Italy. Mrs. Crocker had as 
her guests for the week-end Mrs. Eugene Murphy and Miss 

Marion Zeile. 

* * * 

Open Lake Tahoe Home 

Mr. and Mrs. John Drum have opened their place at Lake 
Tahoe, where they will spend the remainder of the summer. 
They recently returned from the East and Europe, and their 
sun, Mr. John Drum, Jr., who has been at an Eastern pre- 
paratory school, is with them. 

* * * 
Mrs. Harvey Hostess 

One of the enjoyable social affairs of last week was the 
luncheon on Tuesday at which Mrs. Joseph Balentine Har- 
vey presided as hostess at the Fairmont Hotel. The honor 
guest was Mrs. P. L. Jackson. 

* * * 
Back From New York 

Mrs. Florence Hopkins Cowdin and her son, Cheever 
Cowdin Jr., returned Wednesday from New York, where 
they made a short visit. They are at their apartment at 
Stanford Court. Before they went East, Mrs. Cowdin and 
her son and Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hopkins spent a fort- 
night at the Hopkins place at Boca in the high Sierras. 

* * * 

Among distinguished guests at the Fairmont are Judge 
and Mrs. Abel E. Blackmar of New York, who will remain 
in the city for an indefinite visit. 

Society Reception 

Society lias planned a brilliant reception fur the Crown 
1'rincess to lake place Saturday afternoon in the drawing 
rooms of the Woman's City Club, on Post Street. 

Groups of representative women from the board of gov- 
ernors of the Women's City Club and the board of govern- 
ors of the English Speaking Union arc sponsoring the not- 
able affair. 

With the distinguished guests in the receiving line at 
the reception will be Christine de Ruetersward, Lady in 
Waiting to the Princess; Mine. Mils de Rudebeck, wife of 
the Master of the Household of Crown Prince ( iustaf Adolf ; 
and Mrs. R. W. Bliss, a personal friend of the Crown Princ- 
ess. 

The receiving group comprises Hon. and Mr-, (icrald 
Campbell. Dean and Mr-. Charles Mills Gayley, Or. and 
Mrs. Reginald Knight Smith. 

Hon. Carl I*. Wallerstedt, Consul General of Sweden and 
Mrs. Wallerstedt and Mr. and Mrs. William 11. Crocker, 
head places of distinction at this reception. The receiving 
representatives include: Mesdames Joseph 1). Grant, A. P. 
Black, Milton Esberg, Marcus Koshlarid, II. I.. Terwilliger, 
William Palmer I. ma-. Cleaveland Forbes, Louis !•'. Mont- 
eagle, Franklin K. Lane, Parker Maddux, Harry Staat- 
Moore. Paul Schaupp, 1 ; . 'I". Nutting, Edward Rainej ami 

Dr. Adelaide Brown; Mi-se- Violet Sidney, Mabel Pierce. 
Ida Bourn, Irene Ferguson, Clara Taft, Julie Hevneman. 
Marie I I lunham ; and Messrs. Robert Mitchell. T. I. Swift. 
Charles C. Moore. Captain Frank Harrison Ainsworth. 

* * 

At Hotel Del Coronado 

The next of the costume affairs to take place at Hotel 
del Coronado will be a Hawaiian Ball. August 7. having 
been decided upon a- the date. A number of dinner partie- 
aie being planned for the evening, both at the hotel and in 
Coronado. by members of the seaside colony. 
(Continued on Page isi 



SUMMER RESORTS 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

WHY? 

It's the Water and the Table 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 
tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN 

Acua Caliente, Sonoma County, Calif. 

or see Peck-Judah 



El Dorado Hotel 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Oar Specialty — "Steaks With Mushrooms" 

Clean Rooms, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

Vint Sonoma County*! Famous Renorti and Mineral (Warm Water) Swimming 

Tank* From Thii Hotel 

Ratei Exceptionally Reaionabla 

Telephone 110 



The Lodge at Saratoga 

Under New Management 

Specializing Dinner Dances Saturday and Sunday Nights 
The Most Modern and Sanitary Mountain Hotel in America 

Open the Year "Round. Among the Pines and Redwoods. 

Wider Roads. American Plan. Moderate Rates. 

Greatly Improved 

Owned and Operated by John A. Evans Corporation, Los Angelas 
Phone Hempstead 2101 

THOMAS II. DOUGHERTY, Mjfr., Saratoga. Calif. 
I'honrs SnrnloB-n HO and 163 



"POP" McC RAY'S 

One Mile North of Cloverdale on Redwood Highway 

DANCING IN DINING ROOM AND 

CLUB HOUSE 
SWIMMING IN RUSSIAN RIVER 

Jellies. Jams and Mustard Pickles Always on the Table 



FETTERS HOT SPRINGS 

New concrete high* a > OpSsL Fantoiu medicinal bath?. Masseur 
in attendance. Healthful mineral sralcts; swimming pool. Ail 
amu>emeni-. bccllcfll lable. Hotel Meant heated. Cottage accom- 
modation*. Rale*, $18 up. Write George Fetters, Mgr., J. F. 
Green. Ass'l. Met., or Peck-Judah. 



I^ALIEjIN 1 L VILLA (ARI srTFFEN . PROP 

French and Italian Dinner*— Meal* at All Hoars 

Modem Rooms—Private Cottages 

ACl'A CAI IFNTE 

4 Minute* Walk to Fetter* Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone So no at* 4F4 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1926 



SOCIETY 

(Contnued from Page 17) 
Among the week's diversions have been several boating 
and aquaplane parties, beach picnics, a treasure hunt and 
an evening of "theatricals," the guests providing the enter- 
tainment. 

Weekly putting contests on the miniature golf course 
of the hotel have been attended with keen interest. 
* * * 

At the Whitcomb 

Lieutenant Forrest Ivanhoe, U. S. N., with Mrs. Ivanhoe 
and their small daughter arrived in San Francisco on board 
the steamer Wilhelmina, from Honolulu and are at the Hotel 
Whitcorub awaiting Lieut. Ivanhoe's orders from the Navy 
department as to their next station. 

Lieutenant J. N. Skillman, U. S. N., and Mrs. Skillman are 
also at the Whitcomb Hotel awaiting orders, after a stay in 
Honolulu. 

Among the prominent guests stopping at the Whitcomb 
Hotel are Dr. and Mrs. E. F. Sidler, of Switzerland. Dr. 
Sidler was guest lecturer at the University f California this 
summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. J. McBrearty have returned to their 
apartment at the Whitcomb Hotel, after several weeks stay 
in Los Gatos. 

Lieutenant Frank Lewis, U. S. N., and Mrs. Lewis, of New 
York City and Washington, D. C, are domiciled at the Whit- 
comb Hotel. Lieut Lewis is retiring from the Navy, and he 
and Mrs. Lewis plan to make their future home on the Pacific 
Coast. 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

(Continued from Page 15) 

It is significant of the highly organized condition of mod- 
ern travel today to reflect that a ticket can be bought across 
a counter which will, without any further effort on your 
part, transport you to the glamour and romance of the East, 
if your mind has become stultified with the drabness of the 
West ; It will take you to the sun and serenity of the South, 
if you have become chilled and depressed in the North; to 
the keen, invigorating climates of the Northern capitals if 
you have wilted under tropical temperatures ; it will bring 
vividly before your eyes the splendours and the dramas of 
past ages, of the absorbing atmosphere of which the imper- 
sonal print of history has only given you a vague impres- 
sion. It will show you a diversity of creatures who appear 
strange, and customs that seem stranger ; the beauties of 
Nature that cannot be described ; and the works of men 
whose artistry remains a monument to their great names. 

But the deepest impression of all when you return is the 
realization that only by a study of other countries can you 
properly appreciate your own. 



Summer Symphony 

The Summer Symphony is a success ! 

The first symphony of the first season of the summer series 
was given last Tuesday night before one of the most enthusiastic 
audiences ever found in our Civic Auditorium, general utility 
grand opera house and concert hall. 

Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Conductor of the Detroit Symphony 
Orchestra, was the conductor and the applause which he re- 
ceived mounted to the heights of an ovation. 

Right here, it is well to speak of the rousing address given by 
the famous Joseph S. Thompson, president of the Summer 
Symphony Association, who came down from the Bohemian 
Grove especially to open this summer series. Thompson made 
one of his typically scintillating speeches and imbued the vast 
assemblage with some of his own high hopes for continuance 
of the symphony in this city during the summer months. 

Tschaikowsky's Symphony No. 5. in E Minor, the second 
selection of the pragram, was greeted with positive cheers from 
the music lovers and started stage calls for the conductor and 
the entire orchestra. 




1140 GEARY ST. 




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Mctul "Work Apper- 
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AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



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Relaxed and Arrive Refreshed. 



MADSON & RICHARDS 



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CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
RAVE lOCR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rntes: 35c per liny: $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service iind Storage of Automobiles 



LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 j 

LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

GAS STATION 

San Francisco, Calif. 



AT C M.l'i: 
Post and Franklin Streets 



Graystone 130 Open Day and Night 

SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Wm. Saunders 



TRUNKS - RACKS - BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 

EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVE. 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



Arthur C. Thornton 
General Insurance Phone Sutter 

142 Snnsome Street, Rooms 304-300, San Frnnelseo 



fitly 31, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

PADDLE your own canoe, swim, 
dive, slide, row, hike or just amble 
about and enjoy yourself — that's the va- 
cation doctrine along the Russian River 
from Healdsburg to Jenner-by-the-sea. 
The river district is one of the most 
popular of all California's vacation 
lands. It offers a variety of attractions, 
and time never rests heavily on your 
hands when you can respond to the 
whims of the moment. 

Up with the sun for a dip in the river, 
an invigorating horseback ride to the 
summit of Mount Jackson, where you 
may look out on seven counties, a 
ramble through the age-old inhabitants 
of the Armstrong grove of redwoods, 
an afternoon canoe-ride along t ho wind- 
ing stream and an evening around the 
bonfire, make up an enjoyable program 
for the day. 

There arc scores of resorts along the 
Russian River and accommodations 
range from luxuriously furnished cab- 
ins to camp grounds and tent life on 
the banks of the stream. The principal 
costume is a bathing suit b) da) and a 
blazing sport suit for the hours in camp. 
The sun is on the job all the time, but 

the nights arc cool and the highway 

that leads into the heart of the resort 
is all that is to be desired. 

Small wonder, then, that this dis- 
trict appealed to the little hand of Rus- 
sians who came from Alaska in search 
Of a place of opportunity on the Cali- 
fornia coast. Over at Fori Ross you 
will find the ruined barracks and the 
old Greek church that recall the visit 
of the emissaries of the Czar, portions 
of which have been restored. 

The Russian settlement was deter- 
mined on in 1806 following the visit 
of Re/ano\ to the Spanish authorities 



at San Francisco, a visit which led to 
one of the most romantic of adventures, 
a betrothal to the daughter of the 
Commandante, a fatal ride across the 
bleak wastes of Siberia for the sanction 
of the Czar, and years of waiting on 
the part of the bride-to-be. The story 
has been told in Bret Harte's poem and 
in a novel by Gertrude Atherton. The 
Russians first located on the river, to 
which they gave their name in 1811 and 
left California about thirty years later. 

You will find one of the most delight- 
ful of the State's redwood groves with- 
in a five minute drive of Guerneville. 
Armstrong grove, comprising some five 
hundred acres of giant trees, is owned 
by Sonoma County and preserves hun- 
dreds of perfect specimens of Califor- 
nia's Big Tree. "The Circle," an open 
space about one hundred feet in dia- 
meter surrounded by huge living col- 
umns, would have been the delight of 
the druids of the old world. The uni- 
formity of the growth results in an ef- 
fect unique among the redwood groves 
of the State. 

The Bohemian grove, the domain of 
the Bohemian club of San Francisco, 
is 280 acres in extent and is located a 
few miles from Monte Rio. The grove 
is closed to the general public, except 
by invitation from members. The an- 
nual "encampment" of the club, now 
being held, and which covers a period 
of two weeks, takes place in midsum- 
mer, preceding the Saturday nearest the 
full moon around the first of August. 
The annual "high jinks" dates back to 
1X7X and the first of the grove plays 
was produced in 1Q02. • 

Mount Jackson, one of the higl 
of the peaks of the Russian River dis- 
trict, is reached by an excellent horse 
trail and otters one of the most umpir- 
ing of panoramas on a clear day. From 
its summit may be seen Mt. lleclroti. 
Mt. Tamalpais and Mt. Diablo, and the 
cities of Petaluma, Santa Rosa. Ilealds- 
burg and Sebastopol laid 'Hit like 
squares of a great checkerboard. To 
the west the ocean ma_\ be seen with 

its continuad parade of coastwise ship 
ping. 

The Russian ri\cr rises in the foot- 
hills of Mendocino count) south of 
Willitts and Bows almost due south 
through Redwood valley past Capclla. 
Ukiah, llopland and Healdsburg, along 
the main line of the Redwood Highway. 
lust south of Healdsburg. the river 
turns westward and flows through the 
heavil) forested canyons of the coast 
range to the sea. At Jenner-by-the- 
sea, where the battle of currents and 
tide has built up a great sand bar and 
formed an island, the river spreads 
i ut over a large area, a lake of beaut \ 
reflecting the trees and foliage that 
grow to the very rim. 

A tour of the scenic wonderland of 
i Continued on Page 



Public Utilities —including hydro 
electric companies — are under strict regu- 
lation in California. 

Rates are fixed and service is supervised 
by a State Commission. 

Rates are based on cost of service, which 
means cost of materials, cost of labor, cost 
of money and taxes. 

Rates in California are low. 

Service is a model for the rest of the 
United States. 

Since 1913 the average per capita cost of 
living increased 65%, while the average 
cost of electricity decreased 8%. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



p.Q.and 



"FACinC SEBV1CI" 




Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




-the better tt^eb 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

utter 6SS4 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

i.noo.ooo cup* were served at ike Pi»>*i 

radAr International F.xpoaftloa 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1926 



•^WJZ- 



'e*» 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



<*& 



c/S<- 



«3V 



&#• 




A 1 



LTHOUGH the Lake Merced Club mem- 
■ bers won a close decision from the Cali- 
fornia Club men in their first home-and-home 
team match which was played on the Merced 
course, still the boys from Baden made it in- 
teresting just the same. 

The great disappointment among the visitors 
was the defeat of three of the lead-off teams, as, 
on paper, they looked to have the edge, but that is what makes 
golf so interesting — the uncertainty. 

Clare Griswald, the champion of the club, paired with Irving 
Steiner, started the fireworks by administering a clear knock- 
out to Al Darbee and John Biglow. the first pair up. This 
seemed to unnerve Captain Walter Shelton and L. H. Jarneche. 
as Dr. LeRoy Brooks, captain of the home guard and Henry 
Goldstone grabbed off a couple more. 

Then Edgar Linder and Larry Van Wyck fell in line with 
three more. Dr. Wilhelm Waldeyer and Fred Frisk were the 
first pair of visitors to get on the score board when they beat 
the leading pair from Merced, Grandpa Goodwin and Dwig'ht 
Goodspeed. This seemed to spur the Baden boys on, for Dr. 
C. H. Whitley and Lincoln Wilson, the Bulletin's southpaw 
golf champion, collected three more from President "Bru" 
Brunnier and Teddy Lees Jr. But that was about as far as 
the Californians could get. 

Bill O'Conner, the chairman of the tournament committee 
at Baden, and Herb Bennett, tried hard, but they had to ac- 
knowledge the loss of one point to E. H. Edwards and Ernest 
La Fleur, the prince of collar men. 

Elmer Holland, the clubs pro., surprised everybody by col- 
lecting a couple from Carl Nagel, the visiting pro., thus ending 
a perfect day's golf. 

Tomorrow the Californians hope to reverse matters when 
they meet the Merced Club on their own course. 



Mrs. Sylvain Potter Sets Record 

The open day for women golf members of the Northern Cali- 
fornia Golf Association attracted 137 players from the various 
clubs in the state, who played 18 holes of golf on the California 
Club's new courses at Baden. Miss Alice Knowles was chair- 
man of the day. Mrs. Joe Costello, captain of the woman's 
annex at California, acted as hostess in her most gracious 
manner. 

Mrs. Costello forfeited her chance to play in order to assist 
and welcome the ladies as they entered the club. Mrs. John 
Corkery and Mrs. John Madeson were also on the reception 
committee. After the game lunch was served and later the 
women played bridge on the beautiful sun porch. 

There were seventy -two women who entered the day's golf 
and although there were representatives from all over the 
state, some of the ladies were so charmed with the course that 
their scores didn't interest them in the least, with the possible 
exception of Mrs. Sylvain Potter, the San Jose woman cham- 
pion, who proceeded to set a new course record of 49-40-89, 
just five strokes better than what Mrs. Alfred Flock and Mrs. 
liruce Adams had made the preceding Tuesday. 

Mrs. Potter's card was all the more remarkable on account 
of her wonderful finish of 40, on the last nine holes, which is 
by far the hardest nine to score on. 

Among the other winners were : Mrs. Vernon Nittinger, 
Orinda; Mrs. W. C. Hoaker, Crystal Springs; Mrs. George H. 
Muffin, Olympic Club. 



Navi Wins Caddy Title 

Joe Navi, one of the must popular Italian caddy boys at 
Lakeside, won the fourth annual caddy championship at Lake- 
side, when he defeated Caesar Whell in the finals by 8-7, for 
36 holes of golf. Navi played the most consistent golf of any- 
one of the sixty-four boys who entered, even though he didn't 
capture the qualifying round. Ths was left to Roy Garvinta, 
Harry Stafford's pet packer. 

Roy modeled the course in 78. and was the only player to 
crack the eighty mark, while -Joe Navi fill two strokes short. 
But from there on, Navi played real championship golf and 
no one even gave him a game with the exception of Charlie 
Schick. This kid positively refused to lie down until the 20th 
hole was reached. 

This match was the best contested of all the tournament. 
Navi had to spot Schick four up and he got on even terms at 
the tenth hole; but Schick was far from being beat as he held 
the new champion even up to the eighteenth, where each had a 
birdie, and to show that was no fluke, they duplicated on the 
nineteenth, and Navi had to make a par on the twentieth to 
win the match after Schick had over-driven the green. Navi 
shot a 74 in tin'-, match, two over par and made another 74 the 
following day in the finals against Ceasar Whell. 

Eddie Twiggs, who has taken a keen interest in the cadd} 
boys at Lakeside, thinks that Navi is destined to become one 
of our great golf players. Eddie ought to know, as he is con- 
sidered the peer of them all at the ( llympic Club. Charles Sul- 
livan, the caddy master, too. deserves a deal of credit for the 
part he has always taken in making these hoys a credit to their 
profession. Charlie always acts as a lather and a guardian to 
the kids who pack for you the year round. 

Following is a list of donors anil winners — 

Roy Garavinta (medalist I Locker Room 328, cup. 

Joe Navi (champion I. Eddie Twiggs, cup. 

I '.illy Warden. Joe Nederost, cup. 

Harry Martin. Tiv Kreling. cup. 

Ed Martin, Phil Beckert, trophy. 

Caesar Whell, Spalding, trophy. 

Andy Rucker, Wright ami Ditson, trophy. 

Dick Gazzano, St. Mungo, trophy. 

Harry Clark, Rufus Klawans, tropin-. 

The Olympic Club, Dr. Floyd Russell, Ed Abbott, Charlie 
Bransten, Oscar Boldemann, Louis Ghiradelli, Nam Stafford. 
John Tait and Harry Failer, all donated toward a purse, which 
will be put into merchandise orders and divided among the 
caddies. 

* * * 

Golf at Santa Cruz 

A putting contest on the Casa del Rey putting greens, Sunday 
afternoon, August 1. is the next event 'on the Santa Cruz sport 
calendar. It will lie open to guests of the Casa del Rej and 
members of the Santa Cruz Colt and Country Club. Several 
prizes have been offered for the best men and women putters 
by the Casa del Rey management. 

* # * 

Deer will be plentiful in the Santa Cruz area tins season. 
according to Deputy State Fish and Game Warden E. V. 
Moody. Already guests of the Casa del Key and local nimrods 
are getting ready for the opening of the deer season, Aug. 1. 

* * * 

I Mi a recent trip up Hear Creek and along the summit to the 
Glenwood Highway, Moody reported seeing three large bucks. 
Still more recently he visited the Ben Lomond mountains ami 
saw six bucks in one day. 



July 31, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



21 



OVATION TO SHORTRIDGE 

Prominent business and professional men and women, 
leaders of the bench and bar, joined with labor officials and 
members of the clergy in welcoming- United States Senator 
Samuel M . Shortridge, on his return to San Francisco this 
week in the interest of his candidacy for re-election. Sen- 
ator Shortridge was given a big' public ovation on his ar- 
rival at the ferry and was escorted by a decorated automo- 
bile procession to the St. Francis Hotel, where he spoke 
briefly to a throng in the lobby. He expressed his eagerness 
to meet the voters and present his record as the basis of his 
candidacy for renomination and re-election. 

Senator Shortridge was introduced to the crowd at the 
hotel by Colonel Mortimer W. Sellers, state commander of 
the United Spanish War Veterans, who said in part: 

"Speaking from the viewpoint of organized labor and of 
the ex-service man, I want to say that the ex-service man 
and his dependents owe Senator Shortridge a debt of grati- 
tude for what he has done for them, and that organized 
labor owes him a similar debt for his many acts in the Sen- 
ate in behalf of labor." 

Senator Shortridge was an honored guest at a public 
luncheon tendered him by the citizens of San Francisco 
at the Palace Hotel on Thursday. Hundreds of prominent 
men and women were in attendance and greeted Senator 
Shortridge with enthusiasm. Among those present were : 
Mark L. Requa, William H. Crocker, Louis R. Lurie. Mrs. 
D. E. F. Easton, Marshal Hale, Mildred J. Pollock, Walter 
McGovern, Andrew F. Burke, Charles S. Howard, John L. 
McNab, Thomas F. Finn, William F. Humphrey and How- 
ard M. McKinley. 

Senator Shortridge spoke in part as follows : 

"Returning to California after some six years spent in 
her service, I am filled with added admiration for our great 
commonwealth. I return after the adjournment of Congress. 
Manifestly it was my duty to remain there until the close 
of the session, for there was pending a proposed legislation 
vitally affecting California. I remained there until the work 
was clone and I return grateful for the opportunity 1 have 
had to be of some service to our state and nation. . . . 

"... I am a protective tariff man and if there be any 
state in the Union that is vitally interested in upholding tar- 
iff duties, that state is California. I warn the people of this 
state that we must fight to hold what we have achieved and 
I shall continue as a member of the Senate Finance Com- 
mittee to make that light. 

"As a member of the Naval Affairs Committee 1 have 
Striven to bring about adequate appropriations to improve 
our harbors from a national defense standpoint and. of 
course, adding to our commercial importance. Our Grand 
Fleet practically for all time to come will remain in Pacific 
waters, not that we fear any nation, but because prudence 
dictates. 

"We have closed the doors of the Pacific to Oriental im- 
migration and the battle for that was around the amendment 
I offered in the Senate. The doors are closed to i Iriental 
and Japanese immigration and those doors shall be kept 
closed. 

"All soldier legislation has had my support. All meas- 
ures designed to help the struggling man and woman, the 
boy and girl who are working from the ground up. as 1 did: 
all legislation affecting human labor, the tariff, reduction of 
taxes, and all treaties which have had for their purpose 
peace on earth, all have had the approval of my heart, my 
conscience, and my vote, and 1 shall appeal to my friends 
of the Republican party and the people at large for ap- 
proval." 

Lighting System at Santa Cruz 

Santa Cruz now has one of the most modern and up-to-date 
street lighting systems in the state. The last of the old style arc 
[ights wen- removed yesterday and replaced with new modern 
street lighting units. Out of town visitors have commented 
on the improved lighting conditions throughout the city. 



It is interesting to note that with the passing of the old arc 
lamps much interference with radio reception will be eradicated. 
The investigation conducted here some time ago by Fred Love- 
joy and A. Wolfe, of the U. S. bureau of navigation revealed 
the fact that the arc lamps were a source of interference to 
radio reception, and local radio fans will be glad to learn of the 
removal of this trouble. 



Fire 



Accident 



Automobile 



Carl N. Corwin Co. 

General Agents 

201 Sansome Street Royal Insurance Building' 

Phone Garfield 5610 



Casualty 



Health 



Surety 



r- ■ 


—■"—- — — - — — -— ---■■--■■■ m ■ -■■»■. — — ■»-■■■■■■,,—- — —. 




i 


| EARLY EDITIONS 

j Autographs Bought and Sold 
.} JOHN HOWELL 

Jff 434 Post Strict, San Fkancisco, Calif. 

■ ■ ■ ---.. »- ------■--..-,.---,--4 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tiilmnnn Plaee, nt 241 Grant Avenue 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Koot, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL BLDBR'B LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



MADE TO ORDER ON LY 

'/hofjyfen/ Shirts * Ih'osLKeat 

^HIBIF ■£?£- ^HIF 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 



25 KlARNY Street 



Phone Keakht 3714 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

-int. Prf«»rd br h»nd Only.- -Mn < *HmJ For and Dr1iT«r«d 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



*&3 Po*T $TWC*T 

!<* \ ulimi Hotel 



Ptwtstan Iryrmg and Ct* 



Sax Pkamcssc* 
Psora Fran cu* 2Slfl 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Fatabllahrd MM 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

3S3 TEHAMA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 
Pkonr Dnilu 3084 



22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 31, 1926 




He PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
show 



J:lkJJ:Bi M iM:H f tioner tc 
lillM.iyildlihH you sam pies. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street. San. Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES: 

San Francisco — Bnrlingome 

West 793 478 



Phone Surrm 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

{Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

209 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 

San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 Emerson St. 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 

FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

(Continued from Page 19) 

the Russian river is one of the most in- 
teresting excursions offered to Califor- 
nia motorists. Almost every outdoor 
sport may be enjoyed, the scenery is 
delightful and there are many histori- 
cal landmarks that recall the story of 
the early period of the state. 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 13) 



-Musical program. 

. — New York Stock quota- 



3:00 to 4:00 p. m.- 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer Studio 
Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Saturday. August 7 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — Talk, "What to prepare 
for tonight's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

S:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. 44809. Dept. No. 10 

Estate of CARRIE H. FARRELL, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
Phil C. Katz, administrator of the estate of 
CARRIE H. FARRELL, deceased, to the cred- 
itors of and all persons having claims 
against the said decedent, to file them with 
the necessary vouchers within four (4 ) 
months after the first publication of this no- 
tice, in the office of the Clerk of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for 
the City and County of San Francisco, or to 
exhibit them with the necessary vouchers 
within four (4) months after the first publi- 
cation of this notice to the said administra- 
tor, at his office, room 920 Phelan Building, in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State 
of California, which said last-named office the 
undersigned selects as his place of business 
in all matters connected with said estate of 
CARRIE H. FARRELL, deceased. 

PHIL C. KATZ. 

Administrator of the estate of CARRIE H. 
FARRELL, deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, California, July 27, 
1926. 

HENRY F. BOYEN, 

Attorney for Administrator. 5t 



DELINQUENT SALE 

Mineral Development Company, location of 
principal place of business, San Francisco, 
California! Location of works, Homboldt 
County, Nevada. 

NOTICE: There is delinquent upon the fol- 
lowing described stock on account of assess- 
ment levied on the 8th day of June, 1926, the 
several amounts set opposite the names of 
the respective shareholders, as follows: 
No. No. 

Names Cert. Sh ares Amt. 

Lottie Archibald 26 300 $1.50 

B. F. Benner 268 200 1.00 

Horace W. Benliam 280 200 1.00 

Stanley A. Dembny 267 200 1.00 

Clayton W. Hogston 272 200 1.00 

D. G. Jones 276 200 1.00 

F. R. Kistler 266 934 4.67 

Lacey, Aleen Miss 273 200 1.00 

Retekevicus, Ben 270 200 1.00 

Clyde M. Smith 237 200 1.00 

Solie, R. A 271 200 1.00 

Augustus Sinn 269 200 1.00 

G. E. Wockenfuss 233 200 1.00 

Arthur W. Wilson 245 200 1.00 

And in accordance with the law and order 
of the Board of Directors, made on the 8th 
day of June, 1926, so many shares of each 
parcel of such stock as may be necessary will 
be sold at public auction at the office of the 
company, Room 245 Monadnock Building, San 
Francisco, California, on Wednesday, the 18th 
day of August, 1926, at the hour of twelve 
o'clock noon of said day, to pay the delin- 
quent assessment thereon, together with cost 
of advertising and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY, Secretary. 

245 Monadnock Building, 681 Market Street, 
San Francisco, California. 




■ •TllLltHU !•'• 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Ofllce and Works 1025 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 
Branch Ofllee: 780 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 

Phone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 

Tailor 



Opposite Olympic Club 



527 Post St., San Francisco 
Phone Prospect 9316 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 

Phone GarBeld 3852 504 Market St. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUEn^ 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, $1.00 35c, SOr, 75c S1.00.S1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. 

363 Sutler Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

special parties arranged 

headquarters for theatrical people 

Hattie MoosEn Minnie C. Mooser 



£Xfcanor«S 

145 Powell Street 
San Francfcco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



Caroline Jones 
Luncheon is served from 1 1 :30 to 2 :30 
,__- . , . _, and tea from 3 to 5 

^^QR^JaI ] A> Exclusive use of room for club dinners. 

& <?i£d/V^ 334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 

CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 




Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating: 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell ami 
l.nrkin Sis. 



BLANCO'S 



Luncliron (11:30 I. g p, ml $ .75 

Dinner, Week Dni 1.50 



I'hnne 

<ii' t..iir ainn 
No VUitoi Should I Mvt thi Citj With- 
out Dining in llie Final ("afe 
tn America 



Our Main Dininii Room will bfl .'»*.. I »i SunOS/fl daring the 



nth* 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

OS Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking- 
Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 
5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidavs 
4:30 to S:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Hlcbnay 




ll-Mui Hoi -[ 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEH IM \. M TO 11 M IV M. 

1 NSI RPV--1 II I I l-INF 
I Mil 1 KOMI IRDT 

P o i M W fr o/ Col.lrn Catr Tjrk ' 



Announcement 




Singleton's ^[{^ (ftaj 
CLUB INN 



Now Serves a Delicious 
Five-Course 

DINNER 75c 

Also 
Fried Chicken, Steaks, 
Chicken Pot Pies in Cas- 
serole, Etc., a la Carte. 





ICE CREAMv 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



' POLK I CALIFORNIA STJ 

Grajgtone 

) 31111) 310] 3 1c: 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some Hi ink that a vigorous li rushing- once or twice a day is 
talcing very kiiikI care of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process* >inn> things can hapi>en to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not he as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
troiihlc; do not wait for the nelie. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are mini troubles that w ill destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? l>o your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking* sys- 
tem blocks oil' all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone OarflcM S8E 

Self Cleaning Bridge*: 



SPECI vi.ixts — Extraction*; Crown 

I'linil.-i in Work mill lln 



iIIchn Plulrs 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

• < of 

R1VBTBD STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 
III MES, <■ mSHOLDERS, S.MOKEST IvCKS. ETC. 

I<on Aneeles, ( nlif. 
."717 Snnla Fe Avenue 



SSJi l-'mnrivn. Calif. 
I II Mnrkei Mreel 



i I 



Why deny yourself the best when it 
costs no more? 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"Th:- Recommended Laundry * 
250 Twelfth Sr- Sam Fbawcisco Those Market 916 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

1 " Bottled at t h •• >pr, it ft" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 



22-> Ckra Sir. 



' . .H.rl.i U4 



5^/LTONEWYORK 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and 
GAY HAVANA, en route 



1 




Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



Panama Mail Linen Are Specially Built for Service 
TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight 



i the Tropics 



aboard a palat 
icturcsqu 



Panama Mail liner with 
and historic ports — Man* 
Libertad, Salvador; Corinto, 
the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, 



T 1 
ieven never- to-bc-forgol ten viBits ash( 
zanillo, Mexico; San Jose dc Gual. 
Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone; se 
Cristobal and historic old Panama. 

Every cabin on a Panama Mail liner is an outside one; each has an electric fan, 
and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. There is an orchestra for 
dancing; deck games and sports and salt water swimming tank. The Panama Mail is 
world-famous for ils food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, including bed and 
meals on steamer. Co East by Panama Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 
as little as £350. (This price does not include berth and meals on trains.) Panama 
Mail liners leave San Francisco and New York approximately every 21 days. Vaca- 
tion sailings from San Francisco. July 27; from Los Angeles, one day later. West- 
ward from New York, July 31st. August 28th. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
or ticket agent or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 



548 S. SPRING STREET 

LOS ANGELES 



2 PINE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



10 HANOVER SQUARE 

NEW YORK 




Also 

Pacific 

Coast Fares 

Reduced 

Long limits ; 
Stopovers. 



LOW 

FARES 

EAST 



Reduced round trip tickets sold 
daily until September IS; good 
until October 31. Stopovers. 

Make Reservations Now 
for Any Date 

Choice of four commanding transcon- 
tinental routes to the east. Go one 
way. return another if you wish. 

Send or call today for complete in- 
formation about service and fares to 
your eastern destination. Tickets and 
steamer reservations to foreign lands. 

Ask about the new 
"Circle Tour of the United Suites" 






Southern Pacificlines 



6j Geary Street, Or Phone Sutler 4000 



~N= 



9^ 




Jhe fascination of 
PICTURES 

Beauty! Mystery! Novelty! Drama! The 
delightful pictures in the Rotagravure of The 
Sunday Chronicle portray subjects to appeal to 
every human emotion. 

Be sure to see this beautiful pictorial section — 
the 



ROTAGRAVURE 

of The 

g>an $tmxt\Bttt (tthrtftttrle 




"A Six-pointer" 



"Napa Dry" Ginger Ale 

Six Points That Recommend It: 

Point 1 — It blends perfectly. 
Point 2 — Sparkles like champagne. 
Point 3 — Handsome package — it graces any table. 
Point 1 — A joy in the sick room. 
Point 5 — Children, as well as adults, enjoy it. 
Point 6 — A delight to every sense — taste, sight and 
bouquet. 

Packed by 

NAPA SODA COMPANY 



Phone Market 117 



San Francisco, Calif. 












COMPLETE RADIO PROGRAM.' l Ok NkXT WLLk, ■ . I HB USSJUt 




#5.00 PER YEAR 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 




SATURDAY, August 7th, 192( 



RE-ELECT 

MRS. JULIUS KAHN 

(FLORENCE P. KAHN ) 
For 

CONGRESS 

Fourth District 

I \ < : I \I 1! E !\ T 
Primar} Election, Tuesday, tagiul :il. 1926 



LOS ANGELES 





1. Typical forest service bridge across small stream. 2. Trail in the Angeles Forest. 3. Road in the Plumas Forest. 
4 anil 6. Bridges spanning the Klamath River. 5 and 8. On the Mount Wilson Trail. 7 '. Construction scene in tin- 
California Forest. 9. A view on the Yuba Pass Highway. 10. A forest road near Echo Lake, in the El Dorado Forest. 




Elttfclifthad >-i-. 20. 16S6 



NEwsfialEliTE 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 



T 

J 
Teleph 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., AUGUST 7, 1926 



No. 32 



FROM ONE THING TO ANOTHER 

By Eleanore F. Ross 



"There are a thousand opportunities, now, for every 
man," says Henry Ford; "where a generation ago, there 
were a thousand men to every opportunity." Henry must 
be thinking of little "Lizzies." instead of opportunities. 

* * * 

But when he says: "There can be no 'standard wage.' 
The very idea of a standard wage presupposes that inven- 
tion and management have reach their limit," we agree with 
him. A standard wage would smother ambition, also, and 
bring men down to one dreary level. 

* * * 

Unionism is one of the worst throttlers of ambition. No 
matter how one man exceeds another in speed, or ability, 
he must limit himself to his neighbor's mediocrity, and re- 
ceive no more for his work than does his brother. 

* * * 

Not only is carelessness among campers and autoists de- 
stroying our forests year by year, but it is effacing some 
of California's oldest landmarks, towns and buildings that 
date back to the gold rush days. A heavy penalty placed 
on anyone caught in the act of throwing lighted cigarettes 
or cigars or matches amongst inflammable material of any 
kind, might have a good effect. 

* * * 

The other day I watched a good sized rat, busily seeking 
what it could devour under the chairs of a movie picture 
theater. Now. neither mice nor rats alarm me, and it ap- 
peared quite harmless enough,- a sort of scavenger profit- 
ing by people's untidyness. 

But 1 could imagine the panic which might have ensued 
if some other woman had discovered the addition to the audi- 
ence ; the shrieks, the fighting for exit, the crushing, pos- 
sibly, of human bodies, all brought about primarily, by the 
general sloppiness of the public, who bring nuts, cookies. 

candy into amusement houses, and munch greedily, to the 

disgust of anyone at all sensitive. These sort of people 
should be stopped at the door, and compelled to rheck their 

lunches. 

* * * 

That reporter, who through an interview with one of the 1 
[. P. Morgan partners, learned that General Motors would 
boom, and phoned the news into his office, but failed to 
take advantage of the tip. was as lacking in imagination as 
another reporter we beard of lately, who, sent to write up a 
wedding, came back to headquarters and informed his edi 
tor that there was nothing to write about. 

"Why not?" he was asked. 

"The groom didn't show up." was the reply. 

* * * 

Elmer Sherrill, dean of men at the University of Arizona, 
comes out broadly, with the statement made to the Palo 
\l-o Kiwanis Club recently, that the faculty of the present 



public school system, monopolized as it is, by women, is 
making a "misfit" of the boy, and further says that "until 
the public schools pay high enough salaries to attract the 
men teachers in the right numbers, the Nation will continue 
to have this problem." 

Now, we have not noticed that the ordinary boy is a 
"misfit" to any great extent ; nevertheless, it would seem 
as if Prof. Sherrill's deduction is a logical one. Men, surely, 
have more understanding and sympathy with boys, — wo- 
men with girls ; and when I remember the hectic times my 
teachers used to spend, trying to regulate obstreperous 
young males, it strikes me that such an arrangement would 
be welcome to pedagogues of the feminine gender. Divide 
the sex into different class rooms, and give the boys men 
teachers, and the girls women. 

* * * 

As aviation embraces commerce more extensively in the 
future, airports will become a greater problem for munici- 
palities and the country in general. The Regional Plan As- 
sociation, in conjunction with the Federal government, has 
been making a study of this question and is trying to solve 
it'locallv. bv proposing the building of an elevated airplane 
landing platform over and adjacent to the piers immediately 
south of the Ferry building. 

With all due respect to tile aforesaid Association, the S. F. 
News Letter would like to suggest that instead of this lo- 
cation, the top of Telegraph Hill be used as the most con- 
venient and practicable position in the city for an airport. 
A glassed in. observation compartment could be built be- 
neath the airplane platform, with hangars underneath, and 
as Telegraph Hill i^ in the heart of the city, and yet, also 
near the water, we believe there could be no situation more 
available or usable than this, for commercial purposes. 

The city owns this spot, and such an enterprise would 
lUtif) a place that is at present more or less of an i 

sore. 

* * * 

As women find themselves more and more compelled, by 
circumstance or inclination, into the maelstrom called "busi- 
ness." they gradually discover themselves developing that 
quality which heretofore men monopolized, — common or 
"horse" sense. 

Such a quality our Mrs. Julius Kahn possesses in abund- 
ance. She does not argue the question of Prohibition from 
the standpoint of what she would wish Prohibition to be, 
but from what she herself has observed, and knows to be 
the true conditions surrounding this most futile and foolish 
amendment. Her stand on this problem alone, should con- 
vince people that she has a sound and practical mentality, 
and that her future administration will be founded on the 
nmon sense that has gained for her in the past, a deep 
nect and affection from her masculine contemporaries 
at Washington. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1926 




its main issue, and is devoutly and devotedly dedicated to the 
work of improving the ethical standards of their fellows, 
the dominant sentiment appears to have been one of com- 
plete approval for the stand of the candidate. 



Justice Frederick A. Houser of the Los An- 
A Fine Stand geles District Court of Appeal has recently 
come out with a statement which should be 
historical. It deals with these abuses of power and govern- 
mental espionage, which are beginning to be such a problem 
in our social life, against which this paper has consistently 
fought. 

He says: "If the constitution must be violated in the ar- 
rest of a bootlegger, it is better that the arrest be not made. 
The law must be enforced by legal means and police place 
themselves on the same basis with criminals when they 
violate one law to enforce another." 

There is the truth in a few poignant words, which carry 
actual conviction to any self-respecting American who real- 
ly loves his country and its institutions. The fundamental 
law, in which, as citizens, we live and move and have our 
being, is the great thing. No violation of that fundamental 
law should be tolerated, for any excuse whatever; no mat- 
ter how bombastic the plea for the violation of the consti- 
tution may be. 

As Judge Houser puts it : "One of the strongest impres- 
sions which I received in my first law studies was the great- 
ness of the American constitution and the importance of 
strict adherence to its dictates. It is a holy thing. It is 
bigger than the man, it is bigger than the law enforcement 
agent." 

There is the matter clearly put. We are an orderly people 
and the basis of our orderliness is our constitution, without 
which we should be a mere rabble. 

The constitution must be upheld, even against the police 
when they try to violate it, and it must be also upheld, in 
spite of all political consequences, against those who as- 
sault the freedom to labor without being interfered with. 

We are grateful for Judge Houser. 



Bravery is a quality in political representa- 
To the Point tives which is frequently noticeable for its 
absence. It is one of the scarcest of political 
virtues for the whole life of a politician, which for the most 
part consists in pleasing as many people as possible, is not 
conducive to its development. We are, therefore, all the 
more glad to note that, in Mrs. Florence ['. Kahn, we have 
a representative who does not shrink from maintaining her 
opinions. 

In the First Congregational Church of this city, before 
an audience consisting of energetic and faithful church 
people, she told, without faltering, her belief that the Vol- 
sted Act, as it stands, should be modified. She said: "I am 
for law enforcement, but before we can have that, we must 
have an enforceable law." she was called upon for her po- 
sition on the prohibition question and said : 

"I believe in temperance and I am bitterly opposed to the 
return of the saloon. But I do not believe that temperance 
or any other virtue can be legislated into people. I am 
bitterly against the return of hard liquors, but I do believe 
that a modification of the Volstead Law, to the extent of 
permitting of the manufacture and sale of light wines and 
beer, would bring about a more satisfactory state of af- 
fairs." 

This was a fine, straight statement for a candidate to 
make, in a church, on the eve of an election, and there are 
none too many of those seeking votes who would have had 
the courage to make it. But it was received with deafen- 
ing applause. Even among the group which makes morality 



The agitation against the World Court 
The World Court lias attained such dimensions that it is 
perplexing those statesmen and others, 
who have been caught in the swirl of sentimentality and are 
endeavoring in some way or other to make a common plat- 
form, upon which they can stand with the rest of the world. 

The opinion of Hon. James D. Phelan, formerly U. S. 
Senator for this State is very much to the point in this 
matter. A few years ago. Senator Phelan, for he was then 
at Washington, came out as the champion of the ideas of 
President Wilson with respect to the League of Nations. 
He was. as a matter of fact, the personal representative of 
the President in the West in that regard. He spoke ably in 
favor of the League and showed on its behalf that energy 
and conspicuous ability, which he has always shown in 
everything that he has undertaken. 

But it became obvious that the nation would have none 
of the League of Nations, as offered by the President. 
Rightly or wrongly, we are of the opinion that any such 
European entaglements would make rather for our detri- 
ment than for our good. And Mr. Phelan was defeated for 
the Senate, no doubt largely on account of his stand on the 
League of Nations. 

Now he comes out against the World Court. Being 
naturally a gentleman, sincere and honest, he states what 
his convictions are, after a visit to Europe, brought about by 
the situation as it appears to him there. He has come to 
the same conclusion, as the result of his visit, as the bulk 
of the citizens of this country seejn to have come to, in- 
stinctively, namely that there is no chance of us working 
in harmony with the European nations and that it is for 
the best interest of both parties that we preserve a dignified 
and friendly independence. 



Friend W. Richardson is a candi- 
Friend W. Richardson date for governor to succeed him- 
For Governor self. There can be no question, in 

the minds of those who have 
watched his course during his incumbency, as to his ability 
and fitness for the office. During a long period of years the 
State has had no such opportunity to congratulate itself as 
upon the way in which the present governor has conducted 
its affairs. 

Succeeding to office at a time when the disturbances, so- 
cial and financial, due to the close of the World War, pre- 
sented many problems which called for the most careful 
and able administration, he rose to the occasion and has 
given the State an example of carefulness, faithfulness and 
ability, which will stand as a model for a long time. Natur- 
ally, at the close of a long period of control there will be 
those who are offended by his administration. Criticism 
and envy sit close to power and if the Governor had made 
no enemies he would have but ill succeeded in his work. 

Still even those enemies are bound to admit that on the 
whole he has well accomplished the purposes which he set 
out to fullfil and has given the State those things which he 
set out to do. Thus, there is no doubt at all that the whole 
administration of this great and growing community is a 
much better and more health}- state than ever before. This 
fact alone should weigh against much rhetoric. There has 
never, during the whole of the administration, been the least 
charge of favoritism or graft. 

Law and order are respected among us as never before. 
Pardon, which was formerly at the bidding of prominent 
political and social people, is now kept as the prerogative of 
the head of the State and is never exercised except under 
conditions which logically warrant it. 



August 7, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



We are very glad to note that William H. 
A Good Officer Nicholl, probation officer, is holding on to 

his position and will not be displaced. 
There has never been any question as to the ability and 
integrity of this man, who has made the operation of his of- 
fice a matter of which the city can well be proud. The only 
trouble with him was that time, which gets away with 
everything, apparently had him by the ankle and was drag- 
ging him under. He was seventy years of age and, if not 
disqualified, ought to have been, according to the ideas of 
those who wished to dispose of him. 

But, though time is omnipotent, it varies in the effect 
which it produces upon the individual. Now, time had but 
little effect on William H. Nicholl. He was seventy, but 
he did not feel seventy or anything like it and so decided 
to put up a fight for his work. For, to men like him, work 
is a necessity, and the kind of work in which nature and 
experience have made him proficient was more, than usual, 
a necessity to this particular man. 

So the matter went into the court, and the question of 
the charter provision, which limits the age of service ap- 
plied to him, was in debate. It is true that he was paid out 
of the city funds, but his attorney argued successfully, that, 
although this was the case, he was, in reality, a county 
officer and that therefore the charter provision did not apply 
to him. 

Judge Parker was sufficiently impressed by the argu- 
ment to decide in his favor. So, William H. Nicholl is 
still probation officer and we hope will continue to be so, 
as long as he has the strength and the courage to hold the 
position. 

Age limits should always be regarded with discretion, 
for th£ effects of age are varied. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



We are now at the beginning of a contro- 
Bridge the Bay versy upon the proper settlement of which. 

it is not too much to say, that the whole 
of the future of this city to a great degree depends. We are 
being hemmed in ; our population is increasing and our 
wealth developing, and, in order that proper opportunity 
should be given for both wealth and population, we must 
have greater freedom of movement. 

The bay, which is our pride and our glory, is also under 
present conditions an impediment to that development 
which we require and prevents that rapidity of movement 
and accessibility to other and growing centers which are 
imperative. 

The bay must be bridged. The question which has been 
discussed from every angle, has received but one answer 
and that is that the bridging of the bay is a requisite and es- 
sential preliminary to our natural development. That being 
the case, there would seem to be nothing to do but to make 
arrangements for the necessarj bridge construction. 

The War Department has. however, ruled that no bridge 
can be built over the bay north of Hunter's Point, and that 
is too far south to provide the necessary rapid transit. 
There is an application pending before the War Department 
to secure a change in that ruling. Just when a dei 
was expected on that point, the \avy Department inter- 
vened and threw its influence against the bridge. There- 
is also local opposition on the part of the ferry transporta- 
tion companies who would view the erection of a bridge 
with some apprehension. This latter is probably unneces- 
sary, as there is little doubt that the erection of proper 
bridges would so stimulate general trade that the ferries 
would not suffer. 

The chief thing appears to be that we should convert 
the War Department and the Navy Department to our point 
of view, and that will take some effort. 



There are two sides to everything. This is especially true 
of a penitentiary. — Winston-Salem Journal. 



A New York judge has ruled that a hearse is a pleasure 
vehicle. Some courts have a distorted idea of what constitutes 
a good time. — New York Sun. 

* * * 

It is said it is difficult to induce the Filipinos to live within 
their incomes. Americanization appears to be making progress 
there. — Pittsburg Gazette Times. 

* * * 

"Farmers want relief from Congress," says a headline. 
That, we believe, makes it unanimous. — Wichita Price Current. 

Amundsen and Byrd proved conclusively that they could fly- 
over the Pole in less time than it takes them to tell about it. — 

Life. 

* * * 

This department awaits with feverish expectancy the news 
that the President has caught an electric eel. — New York Sun. 

* * * 

"Man, eighty, returns home for first time in half century," 
says a Heral I headline. The article doesn't say. but we trust 
he was successful in matching the sample. — El Paso Times. 

* * * 

For that matter, the political world makes a beaten path 
to the door of the fellow who has a little better grade of clap- 
trap. — Newcastle Courier. 

* * * 

President Coolidge has refused to discuss the tish which he 
caugh recen'.ly, and now we know the man's silence isn't a 

* * * 

Uncle Sam is rounding Up and deporting Unfit aliens. What's 
d gentleman thinking of? 1'' es he want to make a regu- 
lar Chicago out of Europe? — Nashville Banner, 

* * * 

Somel ody telN us that 2 per cent of the people do the world's 
thinking. And judging by the think- we reckon about three- 
fi urths of that 2 per cent would d'> more good by going to 
work. — I [ouston Post-1 hspatch. 



Any buy may become President, but if he wishes to become 
a senator he had better begin to save early. — Pittsburgh Gazette 

rimes. 

* » * 

Fran Ludendorff has obtained a divorce, and we suppose that 
lighting for the old warrior is over at last. — Houston Post- 
1 'ispatch. 

* * * 

British sporting trophies are assuming dental aspects — com- 
te might say. with a succession of Yanks. — Casper 

Wyo. I Herald. 

* * * 

If President I - fishing luck keeps up. he will have 

something nifty to tell Congress in his fall message. — Winston- 
Salem lournal. 

* » » 

A sheik is a young man who can keep his seat in a street 
car and flirt with the girl who is standing up. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1926 




>LE/1SURE'SW4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ 75/77 Moor-e- 




Have Yon Been 
To Our Theaters? 

"TTAVE you been to our theaters, 

±1 Mr. and Mrs. Visitor?" 

"If not, then you've not really seen San 
Francisco, for our theaters are as much 
a part of our city life as our thorough- 
fares, our business places and our pal- 
aces." 

The statement is not an exaggerated 
one, for more and more are San Fran- 
cisco theaters achieving high recognition 
in the estimation of noted visitors. 

Bankers may prate of incomes and 
prosperity, but a true register of any 
city's prosperity may be obtained by its 
theater-life. 

Educators may talk of extensions and 
buildings, but it is the thermometer of 
the theater which conveys a true condi- 
tion of educational values and their ten- 
dencies. 

The theater is a record of community 
vitality. 

The theater is a tonic, too, which pro- 
pels the virile things of life and makes us 
eager to join a happy throng of toilers. 

Go to our San Francisco theaters, ye 
visitors, or you have not really seen our 
City by the Golden Gate, nor estimated 
the tone and tenor of its personnel. 

* * * 
Columbia 

Blanche Bates and Margaret Anglin 
conclude their engagement at the Colum- 
bia theater next week with the produc- 
tion of "The Riddle- Woman." 

This announcement carries with it a 
strain of regret for we positively revelled 
in the productions which have been pre- 
sented at the Columbia, co-starring these 
two actresses. 

"Footloose" will be played for the last 
time this week, making the second week 
of their engagement in this Zoe Akins 
emotional drama. There will be a mati- 
nee today, Saturday, August 7, with the 
great cast supporting the two stars. 

Margaret Anglin and Blanch Bates kept 
the audiences at the Columbia this past 
week tense and intensely absorbed in their 
dramatic work, with the presentation of 
"Footloose," the fourth of their com- 
bined starring dramas. 

Can a death scene be gorgeous? 

It certainly can, according to the archi- 
tecture of this play and the manner of its 
masterful interpretation by the artists in 
the compelling vehicle. 

Ralph Roeder merits his share of praise 
for he was convincingly subtle and bril- 



By "Jingle" 

liant at all times. Clifford Walker con- 
tributes much to the play, and Olive 
Oliver put dramatic meaning into her 
characterization. Florence Walters and 
Ronald Telfer played their roles up to 
the standards set for them. 

The Anglin-Bates engagement con- 
cludes Saturday, August 14, when the 
last night of their present play, "The Rid- 
dle-Woman," will be produced. 

* * * 
"Rain" Again 

Jeanne Eagels, the famous star in 
"Rain." will return to the Columbia, giv- 
ing those who were not able to see enough 
of her, another opportunity of doing so. 

Her return is part of her vacation plans 
and provides the splendid chance of see- 
ing this artist again in the play in which 
she has made a startling success. 

* * * 
Wilkes 

"Madame X." the present vehicle for 
Pauline Frederick is drawing large audi- 
ences to the Wilkes theater, where Louis 
O. Macloon is achieving additional tri- 
umphs with his superior productions. 

The staging of this well known play 
has been under the supervision of Lillian 
Albertson, who has used scrupulous care 
and searching veracity as to details. Lav- 
ish settings increase the strength of the 
play. 

The large cast of principals and the ex- 
tras in "Madame X" make the production 
of commanding importance. The well 
known thespians who appear with Mi^s 
Frederick in her characterization of the 
title role are John Merkyl, Frank Elliott, 
Olaf Hytten, Eugene Borden, Howard 
Nugent, Claire Du Brey, Edward Woods 
and Clark Gable. 

This engagement of Miss Frederick is 
limited to the two weeks schedule. 

* * * 
Curran 

"Tip-Toes." the popular musical 
comedy will remain at the Curran the- 
ater this week, only, so that those who 
have not yet heard this exquisite pro- 
duction should avail themselves of the 
opportunity now. 

Eddie Buzzell, Ona Munson. in their 
roles of lovers are not only convincing 
in their particular character parts, but 
they both sing and dance delightfully. 
Ona Munson is deliciously charming — 
and you've said it! 

Eddie Nelson and Charles Howard 



are the other two luminaries who make 
up the quartet of musical comedy lead- 
ers. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

Continued interest in the sparkling 
play vvdiich Henry Duffy is offering pa- 
trons of the Alcazar, makes "The Show 
Off" more and more popular. This 
contagious comedy-drama now enters 
its sixth week at the theater on O'Far- 
rell Street. 

Louis John Bartels is master of the 
situations in his inimitable character- 
ization of "The Show Off" and once 
having seen him in the George Kelly 
comedy, one can never forget his taunt- 
ing and laughable interpretations. Bar- 
tels' own laugh is a gloom-dispeller — 
it is a tonic worth the taking. 

* * * 
President 

"Love 'Em and Leave 'Em" has al- 
ready classified itself in the record- 
making long runs in this city, wdnere it 
bids fair to equal if not to surpass "The 
Best People" which had such a long 
season of popularity, too, at the Presi- 
dent. 

Breezy, snappy, full of vigor and 
pleasantries, this comedy written by 
John Y. A. Weaver, poet and literary 
critic and George Abbott, actor and 
playwright, has caught the public's ad- 
ulation and held it, too. 



Greater Movie Season 

"Greater Movie Season," a movement 
that is nation-wide, having the approval 
aid assis ance of Will Hays and his 
powerful organization will, this year, 
be inaugurated on Saturday, August 
seventh, with auspicious observances 
in all of the down-town motion picture 
houses. 

"Money has been poured out, in un- 
ceasing streams, and almost unbeliev- 
able sums, and now the time has come 
to show the result of the months of 
work and thought to the public, to win 
reward or disapproval." 

"Greater Movie Season" each year, 
means greater photoplays. The mo- 
tion picture palaces are placing great 
credence on the final status of the sil- 
ver sheet which annually soars to here- 
tofore unattained places in the estima- 
tion of producers, theater owners and 
patrons of motion pictures. 



August 7, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 



NEXT 


WEEK 


ON THE STAGE 


ALCAZAR 

O'Karreil nr. Powel 


i 


"The Show Off" 
Louis John linrtela 


COLUMBIA 

70 Eddy 


{ 
1 


"The Riddle-Woman" 
lllancne Untes 

Muigaiet Anu'lin 


CURRAN 
Geary nr. Mason 




"Tin Toes" 

Musltul L'onu'dy 


PRESIDENT 
McAllister iir Mkt. 


1 


"•Love 'Em and 

Jbeuve 'Aim" 

lien. > uuiij Farce 


WILKES 

Gea.y at Mason 




"Madame X" 
Pauline Jb'iederick 


VAUDEVILLE 


GOLDEN GATE 
G. G. Ave. iV Taylor 


L 

S 


Nicola. Mystic 
"The Snorting Lover" 


ORFHEUM 

O'* arieil A: Powell 


I 


Nick Lucas 
"Crooning; T.oubadour" 


PANTAGES (NEW) 

tlillhCI HI 11J1U- 




Doliy Kay 
Vaudeville 


PORTOLA 
Rluikct near 4tli 




Vaudeville-Pictures 


UNION SQUARE 
O 1< arrell ur. Powell 


( 


Vaudeville-Pictures 


WIGWAM 

Mission and 22nd 


L 

S 


Vaudeville-Pictures 


ON THE 

DOWN 


SCREEN 

TOWN 


CALIFORNIA 
Market at 4in 


L 


"The Old Soak" 

Jean llr.S t 

Mux Uoiin music 


CAMEO 
Mnrket onn. 5th 


i 


"iuy Old Pal," Tom atlx* 
Sn.. ko 'lues.; "1< ree to 
Love," C 1 n r n How, 
Yi eti. to b rl. 



CASINO 

Elils at Mnson St. 



GRANADA 
Market at Jones St. 



"LlghtnlnV Jay Hunt. 
Sul, •* T u c Auction 
lllock") "The Uieath of 
Scandal." Sun. and moil. 

"CioHics ^ ■ lue Pl- 

rate" and "i:lassified"j 
'lues, and Wea«l "The 
I one n» nnd Ivellys," 
'I lim ■ nnd Krl. 

"Vou Never Iv n o w 

Women," Florence VI- 
dt»r. Stage Vet. "t |l In 
tue Clonus." 



IMPERIAL ( "Son of Hie Sheik" 

Market net. «th-7«h ( Iliidol|ih Valentino 

LOEWS WARLIELDI •Hnllllns llutlcr." Hus- 

Mnikrt n« Taylor ( il ' r l "« 1 "' llmrlcs 

iMii.k.i ill layior ff ln „„,„,, t ..|. 



ST. FRANCIS ( 

Market liet. Slh-Olh ( 



•Men of Sleel" 
Mlllon Bills 



RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS 



ROYAL 

Polk nr. California 



"The Still Alarm." Sat. 
1 "The I. ndy « ho Lied," 
( Sun. "Mike." >luii. — 3 

' dni», 



A few months ago some one told 
Jenny Becker she had a nice profile, 
and she's been living sideways ever 
since. — Farm and Fireside. 



"Madame is not at home, she's at 

the cemetery." 

(Paris). 
"At the grave of a relative?" 
"No, in her own."— Le Pele-Mele 



Baron Heads 
Movie Fete 

Big screen companies are offering the 
public the benefit of enormous expendi- 
tures with the opening of the present 
Greater Movie Season. 

Edward B. Baron, general manager 
of the Publix Theaters in San Francis- 
co, is at the head of the celebration of 
Greater Movie Season beginning Sat- 
urday, in San Francisco. 

This year's Greater Movie Season 
marks the thirtieth year since the first 
flickering film was placed on the screen. 

"Within a comparatively short time," 
said Mr. Baron in his office at the Gran- 
ada theater, "we have watched the mo- 
tion picture industry grow until now it 
ranks fourth in America's list of great 
enterprises." 

Granada 

The Granada is offering "You Never 
Know Women," starring Florence Vi- 
dor, as the opening picture for Greater 
Movie Season. 

Nearly all of the action takes place 
back stage of a New York Theater, dur- 
ing the presentation of a troupe of Rus- 
sian artists. Lowell Sherman and Clive 
Brook are in the cast supporting Miss 
Vidor. 

The stage presentation of Jack Part- 
ington is "Up in the Clouds." It is said 
to strike a new note in elaborate stage 
acts. 



California 

Jean Hersholt in "The Old Soak," 
Don Marquis' famous comedy hit, is 
now playing at the California. 

The story deals with a loveable, 
gentle old man whose weakness for 
drink earns him the contempt of his 
family and friends. How this gentle 
old toper turns into a creature ot iron 
and nerve, turns the tables on his 
scheming friends and saves his son and 
family from disgrace, earns the admira- 
tion of an entire community, and makes 
a laughing stock of those who for years 
persecuted him forms the highlights of 
the film. 

Max Dolin is conducting the Cali- 
fornia Orchestra and is also heard in 
a solo number. 



Pantages 

Those who like their music "blue" 
should go and hear Dolly Kay this 
week at the Pantages. Miss Kay has 
gained an enviable reputation on Broad- 
nav and on phonograph records as a 
blues singer. Some of her latest num- 
bers are : "So Is Your Old Lady," "Let's 
Talk About My Sweetie," "Hello Alo- 
ha." and "Then You'll Know That 
Spring Is Here." 

There are numerous other vaudeville 
acts. 



St. Francis 

"Men of Steel" is now in its third 
week at the St. Francis. 

Milton Sills, the college graduate, 
who vitalized he-man roles is once 
again proving that cauliflower ears and 
broken noses are not necessary adorn- 
ments in portrayals of manhood. 

* * * 
Cameo 

Tom Mix starring in "My Own Pal," 
occupies the screen at the Cameo the- 
ater for four days starting on Satur- 
day. Then, on Wednesday of this 
coming week, a three day showing of 
"Free To Love" will be the Cameo of- 
fering with Clara Bow and Donald 
Keith the stars. 

Tom Mix fans should delight in his 
newest screen offering for in addition 
to Tony, the player has in his support 
a clever little girl and a talented white 
dog. 

The story carries the plot more than 
many of the Mix pictures and is packed 
with exciting action. 

* * * 
Imperial 

There has been much discussion as 
to which has the greatest drawing pow- 
er to the movies, the title of a well- 
known book or play or the name of 
some illustrious star. 

If the past week's performance of Ru- 
dolph Valentino in "The Son of the 
Sheik" can be taken as a criterion, the 
palm must be awarded to the star. 

The story? 

Well, there's Rudolph Valentino! 
(Continued on Page 14) 



CLUB 

Auto Service Co. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 
For All Occasions 
Day and Night 

City Sightseeing - - - $3.00 per hour 

Shopping 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxicab Rates 

PROSPECT 5 85 Post St. 

4000 San Francisco 



^youp*y 



no more 



'** 






TV*»3B <jr*« Taosssad Osrdsn,' V 5 

224-226 (wwl Vs. VI Kearny 4975 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Royal Simplicity 
Charms Everyone 

SOCIETY'S feted guest of true royal heritage, as well 
as Crown Princess to Sweden's throne, charmed and 
fascinated everyone with her graciousness — her realness, 
her unalloyed womanliness. 

Full of appreciation over ever)' courtesy extended her, 
this Princess from England, and her adopted land, gave out 
so much herself, in the way of hospitality, that our people 
were immediately fascinated ! 

It was a delight to her her exclaim over the beautiful 
things she discovered, right under our very eyes. She 
seemed to find lovely things — everywhere! 



Brilliant Reception 

The reception arranged in honor of Princess Louise Al- 
exandria Marie Irene, Crown Princess of Sweden and Duch- 
ess of Scania, on Saturday last, at the Woman's City Club, 
was more of a success than anyone had anticipated. 

Standing in line in the drawing room of the beautiful new 
club house. Her Royal Highness took the hands of assembled 
guests, and seemed to be happy about it, too. 

It was a regal reception in every turn of the phrase. 

It was delightfully democratic, as well. That, perhaps, is 
the secret of its sway. 

Everyone was "perfectly at home." 

Groups of society women identified with the activities of 
the famous National League for Women's Service, now 
resolved into the noteworthy, and none the less famous 
Woman's City Club, were in the receiving line at the re- 
ception held in honor of Princess Louise. 

Members of the board of governors of the Woman's City 
Club and the board of governors of the English Speaking 
Union sponsored the event. 

Christine de Ruetersward, Lady in Waiting to the Prin- 
cess : Mine. Nils de Ruderbeck, wife of the Master of the 
Household of Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf ; Mrs. Robert 
Woods Bliss, wife of the United States Minister to Sweden ; 
Mrs. William H. Crocker, hostess to her Royal Highness, 
were in the receiving line. 

Airs. Carl F. Wallerstedt, wife of the Consul General of 
Sweden; Mrs. Gerald Campbell, wife of the British Consul 
General, headed reception committees. 



The Princess took tea in the Woman's City Club with the 
Board of Governors of the English Speaking Union in their 
lovely Colonial room where officers presided over a beau- 
tifully decorated table of Sweden's colors, yellow and blue.- 

Mrs. Gerald Campbell, wife of the Consul General of 
England ; and others, in this representative group, were of- 
ficers of the Woman's City Club. 

Dean and Mrs. Charles Mills Gayley, Dr. and Mrs. 
Reginald Knight Smith were in the receiving group. 



Return From Lake 

Mr. and Mrs. Hillyer Brown have returned from Lake 
Tahoe and are at their home on Twenty-fifth Avenue. They 
have been at the Tahoe cottage of Dr. and Mrs. Phillip 
King Brown. 



Mrs. Devereux, Hostess 

Mrs. William G. Devereux gave a tea in San Mateo re- 
cently, her guests being the mothers of a group of children 
invited to the Devereux home in celebralion of the birth- 
day of Master William Devereaux, Jr. 

The guests at the handsome affair included : Mesdames 
William W. Crocker, Horace Hill, Edmunds Lyman, An- 
drew Carrigan, Jr.; Arthur Brown Jr.; Arthur Chese 
borough, Corbett Moorly, Reginald Jenkins and Fentress 
Hill. Children who were entertained by Master Devereux 
at his birthday party were: Misses Mary Devereux, Peggy 
Hill, Coralia Carrigan, Sylvia Brown, Rosita Jenkins, Cyn- 
thia Hill, Genevieve Lyman, Victoria Brown, Anne Moody, 
Angelica Hill; Masters Horace Hill Jr.; Bob Cheseborough, 
David Hill, Bill)' Crocker, Douglas Moody, Courtney Jen- 
kins. 

* * * 

Mrs. J. Rupert Mason gave a luncheon this past week at her 
home in Lake Street, to a number of friends. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. George Thierbach were the guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle at their Pebble Beach home 
recently. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. William Payne gave a picnic luncheon at 
their Woodside home last week in compliment to Captain 
and Mrs. Arvid Croonquist who have come here quite re- 
cently from Camp Lewis. 

* * * 

Luncheon Party 

Mrs. Louis D. Mead was hostess at a luncheon given at 
the Fairmont Hotel, Friday, entertaining a number of 
guests. Mrs. Mead has taken possession of her new com- 
munity apartment on Broadway. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Black are receiving congratulations 
on the arrival of a son in their home. Mrs. Black was the 
former Miss Katherine Stone. 

* * * 

Mrs. Austin Sperry and her mother, Mrs. Walter Smith, 
have returned to their home after a pleasant sojourn in 
Monterey. 

* * * 

Polo Match 

The San Mateo polo teams will play an exhibition match 
Saturday, August 7, on the Menlo Circus Club's polo fields. 
The members of the two clubs are taking part in this event, 
which is attracting large contingencies of society. 

* * * 

Mrs. Frank Cooper of Los Angeles is the guest of her 
daughter, Mrs. Gloucester Willis, at Palo Alto. The Willis 
family have taken a house there for the summer and will re- 
main for a few more weeks. 

* * * 

Mrs. J. Eugene Freeman left for New York City last 
Tuesday to visit her daughter, Mrs. Charles E. Stevens, on 
Long Island. 

* * * 

Mrs. Stanleigh Arnold and her children ; Mrs. Millen 
Griffith and her family; and Mrs. Harold Arnold and the 
Arnold children are at Lake Tahoe where they are occupy- 
ing the Kent cottage. 



August 7, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Visiting Friends 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Perry Francis are visiting 
friends in San Francisco for a few days and will 
then depart for their eastern home. Perry Fran- 
cis is the son of David R. Francis of St. Louis, 
former ambassador to Russia. 
* * * 

Charming Debutante Is 
Incentive for Society 

Miss Geraldine Bliss, the charming debutante 
of society, will be the guest of honor at a luncheon 
to be given Sunday, by Mr. and Mrs. Warren 
Spieker at their home in Woodside. 

Miss Bliss will also be entertained Saturday 
evening at a dance to be given in the Menlo Park 
Country Club at which the hosts will be Mr. and 
Mrs. Bliss Rucker. 



Girl to be Bride 
Of Navy Officer 

Miss Camille Guittard, daughter of Mrs. Hor- 
ace Guittard. will be the bride of Ensign Frank 
Sommer Timberlake, U. S. N., at the Guittard 
home on Pacific Avenue, on the evening of 
August twenty-fourth, the ceremony taking place at nine 
o'clock. 

Miss Guittard has been the center of a number of society 
affairs since the announcement of her engagement. 

Miss Laura Coffey gave a delightful bridge party for her 
on August fifth and Miss Elizabeth Atkinson also gave a bridge 
tea for her this week. 

Miss Louise Nichols and Miss Virginia Mantou entertained 
recently for Miss Guittard. 

* * * 
Golf Club Scene of 
Beautiful Event 

Miss Guittard, the bride-to-be will be the honor guest at a 
large luncheon to be given at the San Francisco Golf and Coun- 
try Club on August tenth when Miss Dorothy Harrison will 
be hostess. 

Miss Eleanor Birmingham, the charming and talented daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Lillian Birmingham. contral'O singer of renown, 
will be hostess at a delightful tea in compliment to Miss Camille 
Guit'ard. 

The events following, which arc planned in compliment to 
this favorite of society, include a luncheon by Miss Emily Wil- 
son at her home, anil a luncheon at the Woman''; Athletic Club 
with Miss Helen Hammersmith, as hostess. 



Menlo Club Party 

Mrs. Silas Palmer gave an attractive luncheon at the Menlo 
Country Club for Mrs. McMillan. The guests were: Mes- 
dames Samuel Pond, Ernest Stent. Marry Williar. Van Vlack, 
Bishop, Grayson Dutton, William Watt, Fred Magee, Alex- 
ander Field, George Boardman, Horace Pillsbury, Russell Self- 
ridge, Daniel Volkman, Duane Bliss, ( harles K. Harley, Frank- 
Fuller. Andrew Griffin, Nathaniel T. Messer; Mrs. Zane and 

Miss Florence Sclhv. 

* * * 

Miss Alma Jacobs, the young writer, wdio makes her home 
with her mother at die Fairmont lintel, has just returned from 
a visit in 1 os Vngeles. Miss Jacobs is at work on a novel anil 
went to the sou. hern city for a brief vacation. 




HOTEL CANTERBURY 
750 Sutter Street 



Miss Alyce Mills, wdiose home is in Hollywood, 
is here with her mother, Mrs. Grace Mills, mak- 
ing their home for the present at the Fairmont 
Ho'.el, where they have both been the incentive 
for a series of teas and receptions. 

* * # 

General Carol F. Devol, U. S. A., retired, and 
Mrs. Devol, who have been visiting relatives in 
Missoula. Montana, return to there Menlo Park 
home this week. 

* * * 

Wedding Day Announced 

Miss Margaret Bentley and Mr. Stuart Hell- 
man will be married on Saturday, September 4th 
at the home of Mrs. Charles Bentley on Pacific 
Avenue. 

Mr. Hellman has been passing the past week 
at Bohemian Grove, where he took part in the 
annual play. 



San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



SANTA MARIA INN 

S INT \ Maria, C u iform \ 

On ihe Coafl Highway Halfway Between San Franei, co and Lo» Anaele* 

An Inn of Cnu.ual Fyeellenee 

Wirtr or write for resrrroiians on your n*rt trip south 



Mr. and Mrs. James H. Shelton are enter- 
taining their sister, Mrs. Charles H. Pasmore 
and her daughter, Miss Marie Emily Pasmore, 
of St. Louis, at the home in Berkeley. 
* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. George R. Chambers have returned from a 
trip to Feather River. 

Honor Guest 

Grace Sanderson Michie (Mrs. Gordon Michie) was the 
honor guest at a delightful luncheon given last Tuesday at 
the Bellevue Hotel by "The Woman Pays Club" of which 
Mrs. Michie is the newly elected president. 

Mrs. Michie is the well-known scenario writer whose cre- 
ations of the screen have attracted nation-wide interest. 
She is now just completing another scenario, which will 
soon find its way upon the silver sheet. 

Gracious and lovable, as well as brilliant and of unusual 
literary ability, the young scenario writer is a general favor- 
ite in whatever circle she is identified. 



Mrs. Henry Carlisle was hostess at a delightful tea given 
at her home on Green street last Friday, with Mrs. Cassell 
Aubyn as honor guest. 

* * * 
Tea to Friends 

Mrs. Harold Louderback, wife of Judge Louderback, pre- 
sided over a handsome tea party given last Thursday in the 
Palm Court of the Palace Hotel in compliment to a number of 
her friends. 

fudge and Mr^. Louderback returned quite recently from 
a trip to Nevada and Lake Tahoe. where Mrs. Louderback 
was the center of a number of brilliant affairs given in her 
hi 'in ir 

* * * 

Mrs. Robert McMillan has returned to the Woman's Ath- 
letic Club from \\ oodside, where she was the house guest of 
Mr. and Mrs. Silas Palmer. She will remain in this city 
for a few months before returning to her New Orleans 
home. 

Mrs. McMillan was Miss Leotine Blakeman of this city. 
(Continued on Page 17 1 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

(ISO Rush Street. ReHveen Powell and Stockton, San FrinHaco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1926 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




The Golden Rule for Churches 

RADIO broadcasting is in a terrible 
state of affairs since the government 
has failed to hold control over the as- 
signing of wavelengths. The situation 




C. J. Pennington 

is very disgusting, the way in which 
station owners have taken advantage 
of the present situation to seemingly 
further their own interests. Evident- 
ly from all reports, none of the stations 
pirating wavelengths are bettering 
themselves. And if the pirates in the 
bay district have any idea they are be- 
coming more popular, they should by 
all means learn what the listening pub- 
lic thinks of them. 

In looking over the old 1912 law, 
there is a part of it which has not been 
questioned, and is still construed to be 
in effect. It reads as follows: "That 
every license granted under the pro- 
visions of this act for the operation or 
use of apparatus for radio communica- 
tion shall prescribe that the operator 
thereof shall not wilfully or malicious- 
ly interfere with any other radio com- 
munication. Such interference shall be 
deemed a misdemeanor, and upon con- 
viction thereof the owner or operator, 
or both, shall be punishable by a fine 
of not to exceed $500 or imprisonment 
for not to exceed one year, or both." 

Reports indicate that there are likely 
to be cases which, sooner or later, may 
bring another severe test for what re- 
mains enforceable of the old 1912 law, 
and perhaps again land it in the courts. 

Apparently the only stations around 
San Erancisco to do any pirating are 
those owned by churches or those af- 
filiated with churches. Perhaps the old 
law could be brought to bear on some 
of these. But then, we are desirous of 
learning why it is that only stations 
owned or affiliated with the churches 
are the only ones to do any pirating. 
Can't the churches put their messages 
over, without annexing something 



which does not rightfully belong to 
them? 

If the daily religious messages must 
be delivered, why not deliver them on 
the wavelength assigned and not pilfer 
some other wavelength? This pilfer- 
ing does not hurt those owning selec- 
tive sets, but then, there are many not 
fortunate enough to be so well 
equipped ! 

It might be a good idea for such pi- 
rates to abide by their own teachings, 
and to remember the Golden Rule. 



Pacific Radio Exposition 

The first public demonstration on the 
West coast of radio's latest marvel, the 
transmission of photography, is to be a 
feature attraction of the third annual 
Pacific Radio Exposition to be held here 
in the auditorium, August 21st to 28th. 
This announcement was made here by 
the Pacific Radio Trades Association, un- 
der whose direction the exposition is to 
be held. 

The instrument, known as the Radio 
Pictograph, is one of only four in service 
in the world. The others are in Honolulu, 
New York and London. This form of 
radio service has only been in operation 
for a few weeks, but during that time has 
made remarkable strides in photographic 
transmission of not only portraits and 
scenes but of checks, signatures, code and 
other facsimile documents. 

The transmission of the average photo- 
graph requires about forty minutes and 
arrangements are being made that the 
actual reproduction may be viewed by 
hundreds of visitors to the exposition. It 
is planned to send photographs daily from 
Honolulu and New York. 

Through the operation of this display 
alone the Pacific Radio Exposition will be 
in constant daily touch with big world 
events which will be recorded and trans- 
mitted photographically to the exposition 
building. 

With the opening of the exposition just 
one month off, officers of the Pacific 
Radio Trade Association are enthusiastic 
over what promises to be one of the big- 
gest radio events of the year. The ex- 
position is the first of a series throughout 
the country that will usher in the new 
radio season. It will be the industry's 
first oppor'unity of showing new models 
and this alone has brought the San Fran- 
cisco exposition into national attention. 

The demands for space indicate that it 
will shortly be over-sold. The array of 
exhibitors represent the outstanding lead- 
ers in the manufacture of receivers, loud 
speakers and o'her accessories. 

(Continued on Page 14) 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 428.3 

Sunday, August 8 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Undenominational and 
non-sectarian church service. 

10:45 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
creation Paik of the baseball game. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Organ recital by Marshall 
W. Giselman. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

6:30 p. m. — Baseball scores, amusement and 
general Information. 

6:35 to 8:35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

8:35 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

Mondny, AugUNt 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:?i> to 1:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:30 to 3:30 p. m.— Matinee program. 

3:30 to 3:40 p. m.- — Fashion notes. 

3:40 to 5:30 p. m. — Orchestra, Cyrus Trobbe, 
director. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 n. m. — Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fal-mont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.-DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— KFI and KPO broadcast- 
ing simultaneously. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Mandarin Cafe Orches- 
tra. 

Tiiesdny. \ntnsi 10 

7:00. 7:30. 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market reports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
in g. 

12:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
creation Park of the baseball game. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. 

6:15 to 6:20 p. 
bal scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orch^sfa, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — F»'dy Seiger's Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:rn p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

MVdneM'lny. Augunt 11 

7:00. 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Dally dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market re- 
ports. 

1200 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 n. m. — Pudy Seiger's Orchestra. 

2:45 p.m. — Plav bv nlay broadcast f*-om Re- 
creation Park of the baseball game. 

4:30 tn 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6-30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:?a to 7-no p. m. — Orchestra, Waldemar Lind, 
directing. 

7:00 to 7-30 p. m. — ^udy Seiger's Orchestra. 

7-30 to S:0Q p. m.-DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program by Atwater Kent 
Artists. 

9-on to 10:00 n. m. — Studio program 

10:0n to 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra, Waldemar 
Lind director. 

Thn^mlnT, Amrtiftt 12 

700. 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Dally dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

1200 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12-io to 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 p m. — Rudv Seiger's Orchestra. 

2:J5 p. m. — Play by plav b-ondcast of the 
baseball games from Rec-eatlon Park. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 



-Children's hour, 
m. — Market quotations, base- 



August 7, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



Radio Program for Next Week 



5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra, Waldemar Lind 
director. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Budy Seiger's Orchestra. 

7:30 to S:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio prog! am. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe Dance 
Orchestra. 

Friday, August 13 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market re- 
ports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:45 p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — P t ay by play -bi oadcast of the 
baseball game from Recreation Park. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Market quotations, base- 
ball scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:10 p. m. — ".Sports on the Air." 

7:10 to 7:20 p. m. — Business and investment 
talk. 

7:20 to 
talk. 

7:30 to 

8:00 to 

9:00 to 
chestra. 

9:10 to 9:20 p. m. — Book review. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

Saturday, August 14 

7:00, 7:30, S:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market reports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Orchestra. 

2:4 5 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball game from Recreation Park. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:20 p. m. — Orchestra, Waldemar Lind, 
director. 

7:20 to 7:30 p. m. — Talk on real estate. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— DX. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Orchestra, Billy Long di- 
rector, with Maurice Gunsky, tenor. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 



7:30 p. 

:00 p. 
9:00 p. 
10:00 p. 



-Chamber of Commerce 

m. — DX. 

m. — Studio program, 
m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 



KFRC— CITY OF PARIS DRY GOODS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 270.1 

Sunday, August S 

6:30 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen." 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music from Bal- 
conades Ballroom. 

Monday, August 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Household Hints. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Dance music by Palm Gar- 
den Four. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — A. F. Merell and his Stamp 
Club. 

6:15 to 6:45 p. m. — Jo Mendell and his Pep 
Band. 

6;*>n n m — "The Stage and Screen" and Po- 
lice Reports. 

6:30 In 7:80 i». m. — "60 Minutes of Songs and 
Smiles." 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Around the Camp Fire 
with Mac. 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m — KFRC Havaiians. 

Tuesday. AugUNt 10 

5:30 to 6:4ii D, m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6:30 p. m — "The Stage and Screi n" md Po- 
lice Reports. 

6:30 to 715 p. m. — "60 Minutes of Songs and 
Smiles," 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m — KFRC Radio Movie Club. 

Miri to 9:80 p. m. — Studio program, 

9:30 to ti no n. m. — Dance music by Balcon- 
ades Orchestra. 

WiMliteKilnv. AugUNt 11 

lO'OO to 11:00 a. m — Household Hints. 

5:80 to 6:30 p m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6:30 p m. — The Stage and Screen" and Po- 
lice Reports. 

6:?* 1 *o 7 30 p. m. — "60 Minutes of Songs and 
Smiles," 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — Talk. "Health and Safety." 

s:io to 9:00 p m.— Concert by KFRC Little 
Sv tnph on y Oroh estra. 

9 00 to 10:00 p. m— St udln pro£r<*am. 

10:00 i. m. — Dance music by Balcon- 

ades Orchestra, 

Thursday AuRUMt 12 

6'30 to 6:30 rv m — Mac and his Gang. 

8;80 p. m — "The Stage and Screen" and Po- 

Reports. 
6:30 to 7S0 p. m. — "60 Minutes of Song and 

Sen U< 
8:00 to S:30 p m. — Program by the "South O' 

Market Boys." 



8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance music from Bal- 

conades Ballroom. 
Friday, August i.t 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6:30 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen" and Po- 
lice Reports. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — "60 Minutes of Songs and 
Smiles." 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m.— KFRC Little Symphony 
Orchestra. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance music from 
Balconades Ballroom. 

Saturday, August 14 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6:30 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen" and Po- 
lice Reports. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — "60 Minutes of Songs and 
Smiles." 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Popular songs program. 

S:30 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance music from 
Balconades Ballroom. 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS, INC., 

SAN FRANCISCO— 250 
Sunday, August S 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Studio program with Rudie 
Swall, tenor. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Christian Science Services. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program with 
Sadye Tichner, soprano. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Paul Kelli's Orchestra. 

Monday, August 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Gladys La Marr in popu- 
lar songs. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Amphions Dance Orches- 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program with Irene Smith, 
soprano. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — One hour at Coffee Dan's. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Paul Kelli's Or- 
chestra. 

Tuesday, August 10 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Popular songs. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m, — Popular ballads. 

8:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Gaylord Wilshire Lecture. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — .Studo program with Ruth 
Resnick, pianist. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — John Wolohan's Califor- 
nians. 

Wednesday. August 11 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Studio program with Sadie 
Woodside. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Half hour of popular songs. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Roach's Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m. — Al Pearce and Clem Ken- 
nedy. 

9 -30 to 11:00 p. m. — Meeting of the Tom Cats. 

11:00 P. m. to 1:00 a. 'm. — Paul Kelli's Or- 
chestra. 

Thursday, August 12 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Cowell Dein and his banjo. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The After Dinner Boys. 

8:00 to i>:00 p, m. — Ray Towle's Dance Or- 
chestra. 

0:(io to 10:00 p. m. — Bruce Cameron Singers 

10:00 to 11:00 p. 
Chestra. 



Roseland Dance Or- 
John Wolohan's Cali- 



11:00 to 12:00 p. 

foi nians. 
Pi Iday, August 13 

100 to 200 p. m. — Studio program. 

i. 6:30 P, m. — Lou Hmmel and Del Perry. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Studio program with 

i lance Orchestra 
- 00 to B:30 p. m. — Half hour of ballads. 

SO to 9:00 p. m. — Gay led Wilshire Lecture. 
ooo to 10:00 p. m, — Saxophone Band. 
in oo to 11:00 p. m. — Roseland Dance Or- 

ch( st ra- 
il i to 1:00 a. m — Paul Kelli's Orchestra. 

Snuirdny. August 14 
g on to 10 00 p. m. — Studio p-oE'sm. 
10:00 to 11-00 p. m. — Paul Kelli's Orchestra. 
SO p. m. — John Wolohan's Califor- 
nians. 

to 3:00 a. m— Pajama Party. 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TFMPLE, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 

Sundnv, tugunt 8 

to 3 oo p. m — Sunday school lesson. 
3:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Church service from the 

Temple. 
S:oo to 10:00 p. m. — Evening service from the 

Temple. 
Monday. Ivmwl f* 
12:10 to 1-30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 

Tm**d-*y. \uanst 10 

m — DnPv sc-lpture reading. 
p m. — Studio program. 

V'HnMilnT. Augliftt 11 

12 io to 18:30 p. m — Pally scrlntnre riding. 
|:«n to J:»0 p. m — Dlv'n* healinc service. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 



Thursday, Aupu.it 12 

12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Dally scripture reading. 
Friday, August 13 

12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Dally Scripture reading. 
3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Sunshine Hour for the 

shut-ins. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Saturday, August 14 
12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily .Scripture reading. 



KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS, 
OAKLAND— 302.8 
Sunday, August 8 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Bible Lecture. 

11:00 a. m. to 12:30 p. m. — Church Service. 

7:45 to 9:15 p. m. — Church Service. 

Monday, August 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer Service. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 

Tuesday, August 10 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer Service. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m.— Shopping Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Chopping Hour. 

Wednesday, August 11 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer Service. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Lecture Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 

Thursday, August 12 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer Service. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

5:45 to 6:15 p. m. — Lecture Hour, "Keeping 

Well." 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 
F'Jdny, August 13 
8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer Service. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 
Saturday, August 14 
8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer Service. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 
OAKLAND— 361 
Sunday, August 8 

11:00 a. m. — First Methodist Episcopal Church 

service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 

Symphony Orchestra. 
T 80 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
7:35 p. m. — First Methodist Episcopal Church 

servlci 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 

Symphony Orchestra. 
Monday, August fl 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m, — Luncheon concert. 
12:00 noon — Time Signal. 
i SO p m, Weather Bureau reports. 
1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 
1:87 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 
1:42 p. m.— Weather Bureau reports. 

6:00 p. m — KGO Kiddies' Klub. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 

Symphony Orchestra. 
» , ,, n, — \, ws items. 
7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
7:06 ■ Baseball - 1 ■ 

7 :(•>■ p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain. Cotton and 

Metals. 

I. m. — N. T, Slock reports (closing). 
p. m. — S. F. Slock reports (closing). 
S:00 p. m. — Educational program — music and 

iters. 
8:05 p. m. — C*. L. Hill, speaker. 

p m.— Chief Justice William H. Waste. 
S:50 p. m. — "B*M it-r English." 
9:16 p. m. — To be announced. 
9:30 p. m. — John D. Barry. 
I in mImi . Angunt 10 

10:45 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

1 noon — Time Signal. 
1230 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
1:30 p. m. — X Y. Stock reports. 
1:87 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 
1:49 p. m — Weather Bureau reports. 
2:00 to 4:00 n m — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 
and members. 
6:00 to 6:56 n. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 
m. — News items. 
7:08 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores, 
7:0<; r>. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 

Metals. 
7:11 p. m. — X. Y. Stock reports (closing"). 
p. m, — S. F. Stock renorts (closing). 

8 00 to 9 oo p. m. — Evereadv program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— The Pilgrims' Hour. 
Wednesday, August 11 

10:45 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

a, m. to 1:00 n m — Luncheon concert, 
noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — U. S. Weather Bureau reports. 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1926 



Radio Program for Next Week 



1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 
1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock lepoits. 
1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 
and members. 
5:30 p. m. — "For Instance," General Jackson, 

columnist. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 

Symphony Orchestra, 
6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:0S p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

Thursday, August 12 

10:45 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bui eau reports. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 
and members. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — "Friend to Boys." 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7 :03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:0S p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. in. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Vacation program. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Phil Lampkin's Musical 
Bears. 

Friday, August 13 

10:45 to 11:10 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11:10 a. m. — Homemaking Talk. 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Sock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

2:00 to 3:00»p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 
and members. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — KGO Radio Girls. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:08 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

Saturday. August 14 

10:45 to 11:30 a. m. — "Literary Hour." 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — U. S. Weather Bureau report. 

12:33 p. m. — N. Y. Stock Market reports. 

12:40 p. m. — S. F. Stock Market reports. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 
and members. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

8:00 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

8:10 to 9:00 p. m. — Program, "In a Persian 
Garden," Song Cycle from "Rubaiyat of 
Omar Khayyam." 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m. — Philharmonic Society pre- 
sents Arthur ,S. Garbett. 

9:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Instrumental Selections 
— Valencia Trio. 

10:00 p. m.to 1:00 a. m. — Dance music. 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAK- 
LAND— 509 
Monday, August 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Weekly meeting of the 
Protective Order of Lake Merritt Ducks. 

Tuesday, August 10 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast 

"Wednesday, August 11 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Special program. 

Thursday, August 12 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Friday, August 13 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

S:00 to 9:45 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:45 to 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 

Saturday, August 14 

3 00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 
Sunday, August S 

9:0U a. m. — &unday School lesson. 
4:30 p. in. — One hour of sacred songs. 
Monday, August U 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 
Tuesday, August 10 

6:30 p. m. — Children's Bible story hour. 
6:45 p. m. — Bible reading. 
7:00 p. m. — Radio Vesper Service. 
\\ t clnestlay, August 11 

Hi:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 
E 00 }>. m. — One hour of sacred songs. 
Thursday, August 12 

6:3U p. m. — Cniidren'a Bible Story Hour. 
G : i :. p. m. — Bible reading. 
7:00 p. m.— Radio Vesper Service. 
F" iday, August 13 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian .Ministry. 
S:00 p. m. — Stodio program. 
Saturday, August 14 

10:00 a. m. — One hour of Children's Church 
broadcasting. 



KFI- 



INC, 



4:ii0 
6:30 
6:4 5 

7:()(l 
.S:iM> 



EARLE C. ANTHONY, 

LOS ANGELES— 467 

(Copyright 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc.) 

Sunday, August S 

10:u0 a. m. — L hurch services under direction 
of L. A. Chuich Federation, 
m. — Vesper Sei'Vlci B. 
m. — KP] Nightly Doings. 
rn. — Music Appreciation Chat. 
n. — Jim, .lack and Jean Trio. 
m, — Aeolian Oigan Recital, Dan L. 
MacFarland. 

9:00 p. m. — Bob Bottger and his Venetian 
Dance Orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra — Dolly 
MacDonald. 

Monday, August 

5:30 p. m. — Matinee Program. 

6:00 p. m. — KF1 Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Tiavel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Fiances Voll and Geo. O'Hara. 

6 : ! ■"■ p. ni. — Geo) ge Wilder Cai twright. Talk 
on "The Constitution of the United States." 

7:00 p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians. 
Jackie Lucas, blues singer. 

8 :00 p. m. — Classic Hour. 

9:0(1 p. ni. — Prog i am presented by the Walter 
M. Murphy Motors Co. — Elsa Zelinda Foley. 
Soprano. B- uadcast simultaneously by 
KFI and KPO. 

10:iio p. m. — Piogram by Meiklejohn Bros. 

Tuesday, August 10 

5:30 p. m. — lhp O iginal Victorians Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Tiavel Guide. 

6:30 p. m.— The Original Victorians Orchestra 
and Betty Palo. 

6:4."i )). m. — Dr. John T. Miller — Human Nature. 

7:00 p. m. — Virginia Ballroom Orchestra — 
Park Sisters. 

8:00 p. m. — Grand Opera Program — Virginia 
Flohri. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club. 

Wednesday, August 11 

in. — Linn Wai ner's Orchestra, 
m. — KFI Nightly Doings, 
m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide, 
ni, — Don Warner's O: chestra* 
m. — E. C. D. Price "Gossip." 
m. — Westerland Trio, 
m. — Nick Har> is, detective stories. 
ni, — Program by California Petroleum 
Corporation — Calpet Orchestra. 

9:00 p. m. — Albert Biyant, Tenor. 

10:00 p. m. — Progi am arranged by Charles 
Beauchamp. 

Tlmrsiin>, August 12 

5:30 p. m. — Th^ron Bennett'* Hollywood Foot- 
lifters. 

6:00 ]>- m.-KFl Nightly Doings. 

6:16 ].. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. ni. — Theton Bennett's Hollywood Foot- 
lifters. 

6:46 p. m, — Radio torlal Period. 

7:oo p. m. — R:.<liu Boys' Oi chestra and Geo. 
O'llana. 

\ on p. m . — KFI Drama Hour. 

9:00 p. m. — P cgram of semi-c'assical music. 

10:00 p. m. — Patrick-Marsh Orchestra — Betty 
Pal rick, .Soloist. 

Friday, August 13 

5:30 p. m. — Kenneth Morse and his Venice 
Ballroom Oi chestra. 

6:0u p. m.— KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p. rn, — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Carol Maier, Mexzo Soprano. 

6:45 p. m. — Burr Mcintosh, "Cheerful Philoso- 
pher." 

7:00 p. m. — Garcia's Califoria Serenaders. 

S:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital. Dan L. 
MacFarland. 

9:00 p. m. — Classic Hour. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Ballad Hour — Tom Mc- 
Laughlin. 

Saturday. August 14 

5:30 p. m. — Sheley Players orchestra, with 
Marta Evarts, Millie Hart Teate and Jack 
B ady; Kenrn-th P>ice; Joe Haggerty. 

6:00 p. m.— KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 



5:30 


p. 


6:00 


p. 


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P- 


G::m 


P. 


fiMb 


p. 


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p. 


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P. 


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6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 

6:45 p. m. — KFI Radiotoiial Period. 

7:00 p. m. — Billy Cox ad his Orchestra — Paul 
Roberts, Tenor Soloist. 

S:00 p. m. — Angel us Quartet — Gretchen Gar- 
rett, Soprano. 

9:00 p. m. — Classic Hour. 

loon p. m . — Packard Radio Club. 

11:om p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. 



KNX— L. A. EVENING EXPRESS 
LOS ANGELES— 337 

l>aily Except Sunday 

7:30 a. m. — KNX Morning Gym. 

S:00 a. m. — Inspirational talk and morning 
prayer. 

1 .'■". a. m. — Time signals. 

9:00 a. m. — Shopping News. 

Hi on a. in. — The Day's Morning Message. 

10:30 a. m — Household Economics except Fri- 
day and Saturday. 

12 in m, — Arcade Cafeteria Orchestra. 

1;30 p. m. — The Book Worm. 

1:55 p. rn. — Market reports, 

5:30 p. m. — Arcade Cafeteria Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — The Town Tattler. 

6:16 p. m. — Travelogue. 

6:30 p. m. — Atwater Kent orchestra. 

Sunday, August S 

i a m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

1:00 p. m. — Roberts' Golden State Band. 

i ,;;'i i > . ni. — ]);iir hour of Cinema chat. 

6:30 p. m.— Hollywood Unitarian Church. 

7:00 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 

8:00 p. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

Monday, August 

3:00 p. m. — Little Jean. 

4 :30 p. m. — Blue Monday Frolic. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

, :30 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

11:00 p. m. — Cocoanut Grove orchestra. 

Tuesday* August 10 

1 :oo [i. ni. — Mother s" Hour. 
, .on p. m, — Courtesy program. 
, 16 ]>■ rn, — Talk on health. 
8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program, 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
i 00 p, M i.. Henry Halsted's Orchestra. 
11:00 p. m. — Cocoanut Grove orchestra. 
Wednesday, August 11 
3:00 p. m. — Musical readings. 
4:00 p. m. — Talk on caie of children. 
7:00 p. ni- — Feature program. 
8:00 p, m. — Courtesy program, 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
i'i:iiii p. no. — Henry Halsted's Orchestra. 
ii w p ni. — i '. .c. ..i nut Grove Orchestra. 
Thursday, August 12 
I i t»0 a. m. — Nature talk. 

-no p. m. — Paul D. Hugon, handwriting ex- 
pert. 
7:00 p. m. — Organ recital by Fred Pcholl. 
8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
11111 to 10:00 p. m. — Feature program, 

10:00 p. mi. — -Henry Halsted's Orchestra. 
11:00 p. m. — Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 
Friday, August 18 

10:30 a. m. — fr. p<r Foods and How to pre- 
paid them." 
2:00 p. in.— Mo si en 1 program. 

i p. rn.— Boy Scouts Musical program. 

, p. m. — Feature program. 

8:00 I-, m.— Courtesy program. 

:> p. rn. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — rnurt'-sy pi ogram. 

l i .'"> p. m. — Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 

Saturday, Aiimmt 14 

3 p. m. — Town C' ler of the Day. 

4 : 1 r. p. m. — Joyce Coad. 

Tun p. m. — Stoi ies oi insect life. 

7:15 p. ni.~ Announcement of Sunday services. 

, 30 i'. m. — Courtesy program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. in.- — i 'ocoanut Grove Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Henry Halsted's Orchestra. 



Art 



KFWB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY- 
WOOD— 252 

Siimliij, August S 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — June Parker, blues; 
Pabst and his banjo. 

9:00 and 10:00 p. m. — News Items. 

Monday, August I> 

4:45 to 6:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:0o p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

7:0o to 8:00 p. m. — Program featuring Bill 
Blake, tenor; June Parker, blues. 

R:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News Items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program, featuring Raquel 
Nieto. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Program featuring Ash- 
ley Sisters, Irma and Thelma in harmony 
numbers. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 



August 7, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



Tuesday, August 10 

4:45 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

. 00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

8:00 to S:10 p. m. — News Items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Bill Hatch's Orchestra. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Art Pabst and his banjo. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

i:4"> to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

6:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Piogiam featuring Julius 
H. Phillips, tenor; Esther White, popular 
songs. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring The 
Dare Sisters. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Edward Novis, baritone; 
Esther White, popular songs; Bill Hatch's 
Orchestra. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — News Items followed by 
Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Thursday, August 12 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert, 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News terns. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Ed- 
ward Novis, baritone. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Program featuring Ra- 
quel Nieto. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Friday, August 13 

6:00 to 7:0U p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News Items. 

S : 1 n to 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Ray 
Kellogg and Bill Hatch, violin and piano. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — June Parker, blues; Ju- 
lius H. Phillips, tenor; Bill Hatch and his 
orchestra. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Saturday, August 14 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his or- 
chestra. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Esther White, popular 
songs; Bill Hatch and his orchestra. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 



KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN, PORT- 
LAND— 491.5 
Sunday, August S 

10:25 to 12:00 noon — Morning services, First 
Presbyterian Church. 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m, — Concert. 

Monday, August 

10:00 to 11:80 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p, m. — KGW Movie Club. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

9:00 to 1-0:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, August 10 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 
2:0n to 3:00 p. m.— Women's Matinee. 
6:00 to 7:oo p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program, 

7:30 to 7 : 4 T» p. in. — Weather, market nnd po- 
lice reports. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m, — Dance music. 

Wednesday, AiigiiNt 11 

in: no to 11:30 a m. — Music, weather n 
househou Id helps. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m.— Concert. 

8:00 to 7:00 p. m, — Dinner concert 

7:30 to 7:15 p. m.— Weather, markef and po- 
lice reports. 

8:00 to 8:00 p. m.— Concert 

Thursday, \imn*t i ■_■ 

in mi to ii :30 a. in. m lisle, w eather i 
household helps, 

i ■ !o 1:30 p. m. — Cmio.-i i 

6:00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner con* ■ i I 

7:30 to 7:46 p, m, — Weather, police and mar- 
U e I i - ■ S 

7:46 to s 00 p. ni. — Lecture, 
8:00 to 8: U) p m ■ a audevlll 

1 1> 00 to 12:00 p. m. — i lam i 

Friday. August 18 

10:0(1 to m, — Women's daily dor.cn. 

music, weather report household helps. 
12:80 to 1:30 p. m. — Concert. 

: - iQ p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

6:00 to 7:00 p m. — Dinner conc< 

to 7:46 p. m. — Weather, police and mar- 

■ 
B 00 i" 9 00 \y m. — Con< : i»d in- 

strumental mus 
L0:80 ■ m, — Weekly frolic of the 

i Order of Hoot Owls. 

Saturday . Vuuust it 

weather report, 

household helps, 

•cert. 
' l >> p, m. — Dinner concert 
10 p. m, — Dance music 



KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO., 
SEATTLE— 384.4 

Sunday, August 8 

11:00 to lii:30 p. m. — Church Service from 
First M. E. Church. 

7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

S:00 to 9:15 p. m. — Evening Service First 
M. E. Church. 

9:15 to 10:15 p. m. — Orchestra under direc- 
tion of Henri Damski. 

Monday, August » 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather leports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer .Studio 
Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Tuesday, August 10 

11:30 to 12:00 p. m.— "What to prepare for 
tonight's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

S:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Wednesday, August 11 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

7:00 to S:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance Music. 

Thursday, August 12 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball Scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m— Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m — Post Intelligencer pre- 
senting weekly meeting of the "Keep Joy 
Radiating Order of Bats." 

Friday. August 1a 

I I :n to 12'00 m — "What, to prepare for to- 

night's dinner." 

12:00 m.— Time Signals. 

3:00 to 4 :0n p. m.— Musical program. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tin ns. 

6:00 p. m — Time 

6:00 to 6:06 p. m. — Paseball scores. 

6:0G to 6:10 p. m,— Weather reports. 

30 to 10:00 p. m. — Tost Intelligencer Studio 
1 ' ^gram. 

1000 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Saturday, August 1-4 

II 80 to T' 00 m — "Whal to prepare for to- 

t'S d] PITT." 

i o(j m — Time Signals. 

5:40 I i' ■ i-rk Stock quota- 

iions. 
fl 10 p. m — Time Signals. 

B tiF, p. m — B<isebfl n s< 
■ ' 10 p m — Weather reports, 
B 10 to 1 0:00 p ra ■ Studio program. 
i p. m. — Time Signals. 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 

— 322.4— (Mountain Time) 

Suntln?. Kuuust B 

First Baptist Church, 
p, ni. — Organ recital. 
8:00 p. m. — Open-air concert, municipal band. 
>lomln> . Aueii«.t !> 
n |G irts, stocks. 

mark ick and produce. 

12:1 6 p, tn — ■ _ 

3, mn ••kets, livestock, 

dUCO and news bull* 

p m. — Dlnnei 

p, m, — Sell ' for children. 

see p m. — Instrumental program. 

8:15 p m. — G gram, Minstrel Show. 

Tuesday. Aukum 10 

I in — \\ ■ * reports, stocks, 

mark nd produce. 

1:16 p. m- Ital. 

• housewives. 
i m. — Culinai 
m. — Fashii 

m, — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 



6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 p. m. — Farm question box. 

Wednesday, August 11 

11 :4 5 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 

markets, livestock and produce. 
12:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 
6:00 p. m. — Stock, markets, livestock, produce 

and news bulletins. 
6:27 p. m. — National Farm Radio Council talk. 
6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 p. m. — Wynken, Blynken and Nod. 
8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 
S:15 p. m. — Studio program. 

Thursday, August IS 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4 :00 p. m. — Cool culinary hints. 

4:15 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

6:27 p. m. — United Press weekly sports re- 
view. 

6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

Friday, August 13 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce. 

12-15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:00 P. m. — Cool culinary hints. 

4:15 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 p. m. — Preview of International Sunday 
school lesson. 

8:00 p. m. — Open-air concert, Denver munici- 
pal band. 

Saturday, August 14 

11:4 5 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets and livestock. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 




Low Summer Rates 

Hotel Del 
Coronado 

American Plan 

Swimming, Boating, Fishing, Dancing, Gulf, 
Tennis, Motoring, Riding 

THE A. B. SPRECKELS 
AMATEUR GOLF TOURNAMENT 

AUGUST 25-28 

For magnificent $1,000.00 trophy and attractive 

prizes in all flights at Coronado Country Cl>> 

$5.00 Entry Fee. 

Coronado literature and reservations 
may he made at San Francisco Agency 

L. E. Carlile, Agent 
2 Pine Street-Douglas 5600 

Mel S. Wright, Manager 
CORONADO BEACH. CALIFORNIA 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1926 



*Mk4k 



*emt* 



re duc ed iate 

round trip tickets 

on sale daily 



Atlanta, Ga $113. SO 

Atlantic City. N. J.. 153.34 

Baltimore, Md 145.86 

Birmingham, Ala,... 102.86 

Boston. Mass 157.7C 

Buffalo, N. Y 124.92 

Cedar Rapids, la... 85.95 

Chattanooga, Tenn.. 107.48 

Chicago, 111 90.30 

Cincinnati, Ohio.... 110.40 

Cleveland. Ohio.... 112.86 
Colo. Spgs., Colo... 67.20 

Dallas, Texas 75.60 

Dayton, Ohio 109.50 

Denver, Colo 67.20 

Des Moines, la. 81.55 * > 

Fort Worth. Tex... 75.60 
Galveston, Tex..... 78.00 

Indianapolis, Ind... . 103.34 
Kansas City, Mo... 75.60 

Louisville, Ky 105.88 

Memphis, Tenn 89.40 

Minneapolis, Minn.. 91.90 

Montreal, Que 148.72 

New Orleans, La... 89.40 

New York City «137.88 

New York City 1S1.70 

Oklahoma City, Ok. 75.60 

Omaha, Nebr 75.60 

Philadelphia, Pa *134.50 

Philadelphia, Pa.... 149.22 

Portland. Me 165.60 

Providence, R. I.... 157.76 

Quebec, Que 160.02 

Sioux City, la. 79.80 

St. Louis, Mo 85.60 

St. Paul, Minn..... 91.90 

TulsS, Okla 75.60 

Washington, D. C. 145.86 

AND MANY OTHERS 
Return Limit October 31st 
* Return limit 30 days. 




£xU 



lHatvey 
meal sendee 
©the Indian 
detouroare 

exclusive Saab re 
travel features 
Stop of and visit if rand 
Canyon JtationalParK en route 

Santa Fe Ticket Offices 
and Travel Bureaux 

601 MARKET ST. 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 7600 

FERRY DEPOT. SAN FRANCISCO 



Originality 

Frightens the Old Fashioned 
It Pleases 

The Modern Advertiser 

Let Me Write Your Advertisements, 
Publicity or Sales Letters 

Address: E. Ross, 268 Market Street 
Room 101 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
(Continued from Page 7) 
Golden Gate 

The Great Nicola, master-magician, 
is to head the big new bill at the Gold- 
en Gate for the week beginning Satur- 
day matinee. Nicola will be at the 
Golden Gate theater for one week only 
which will mark his last appearance in 
San Francisco this year. 

Dollie and Billie, sisters, and who are 
called two English girls from America, 
will have a distinctive program of sing- 
ing, dancing and comedy. Jimmy Ly- 
ons has an unusual offe;ing and Davis 
and Pelle, do an equilibristic marathon. 

On the screen will be Conway Tearle 
in "The Sporting Lover." 
* * * 

Second Summer Symphony 

Last Tuesday night at the Exposition 
Auditorium, we were afforded a second 
Summer Symphony under the magic ba- 
ton of Ossip Gabrilowitsch, the noted di- 
rector from Detroit. 

The audience's approval of the num- 
bers and the enthusiasm which gave voice 
to their sentiments made history again 
and registered something greatly to the 
credit of these symphonies with which 
we are now being favored. 

Perhaps it was surprising that some- 
thing apparently new could be drawn out 
into the realms of realization in Beeth- 
oven's Fifth Symphony as it was played 
last Tuesday. We feel indeed grateful to 
the conductor whose well sus'ained man- 
nerisms, graceful and polished, made us 
know that "a leader may be in every 
sense the musician to the innermost soul 
of him," giving us, at every turn of the 
musical emotions, expression to the law 
of repression as well as drawing out mu- 
sical strength and force. 

Gabrilowi:sch has given us much for 
which we, who really love music and all 
I hat music portends, shall ever be eternal- 
ly grateful. 

Alfred Hurtgen and Giulio Minetti, 
both of whom have proved their mettle 
as conductors, will direct the third con- 
cert of the series next Tuesday night. 

RADIO 

(Continued from Pagre 10) 

_ While numerous broadcasting sta- 
tions throughout the country are tak- 
ing advantage of the recent Depart- 
ment of Justice's decision that the 
Federal government is without authori- 
ty to regulate broadcasters, station 
KPO intends to abide by former rul- 
ings of the Department of Commerce. 
KPO will continue to serve the best in- 
terests of the public by remaining on 
its assigned wavelength and power. 

That is indeed satisfying news, with 
so many of the broadcasting stations 
pirating wavelengths and changing 
their power, until it is now difficult to 
fo-etell just how many stations one 
will receive on the same wavelength. 



Re-elect Shortridge 

Encouraging reports are being re- 
ceived daily by Frank C. Tracey, north- 
ern California campaign manager for 
United States Senator Samuel M. 
Shortridge, from those who have been 
watching the Senator's present tour 
through the San Joaquin and Sacra- 
mento valleys in the interest of his 
campaign for renomination and re-el- 
ection. 

At many of the towns visited the 
candidate has been asked to address 
meetings and his declarations regard- 
ing protection of California industries 
by the tariff, are eliciting hearty re- 
sponse. 

The tariff question is a most vital 
one in the farming sections being visi- 
ted, and Senator Shortridge's warning 
that an organized assault is to be made 
at the next session of Congress on this 
legislation, upon which practically all 
California industries depend for pro- 
tection, is being met with a determina- 
tion to combat it. 

Personal reports from Shortridge re- 
veal him to be pleased at the warm 
friendship and interest being evinced 
on all sides on his present tour. 




EUROPE 



On the new famous m O" steamers 
you arc sure of utmost comfort- 
cabin or tourist third cabin 
Cabins containing single and two 

beds. Spacious promenade 

decks, ballroom, gym and other 

special features 

Sailings Saturdays 

from New York 
Cabin class from #145.00 

Tourist from #95.00 

cAlso direct sailings from Pacific 

Coast via Panama Canal 

CRUISES: 

Norway - South America 
Mediterranean 

Second great African cruise leaves 
New York, January, 1927 

Compute information & literature 

Royal Mail Steatr Packet Company 

370 Market St., San Francisco 

or Local Agent 



ROYAL 

MAIL 

-1THE COMFORT BOUTEr- 
SINCE 1839 




August 7, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

THE SACRED MOUNT OF ORTA 

The Sacred Mount of Orta is one of those delightful sur- 
prises that the wanderer off the main lines of travel has the 
luck to hit on now and again. 

The little town, hardly more than a village, although it 
has a quaint old Town Hall and its own coat of arms, lies 
on the eastern side of the Lago d'Orta, and is separated 
from fashionable Stresa and Baveno by the ridge called 
Monte Mottarone, (4,892 feet). 

It consists mainly of a pretty little piazza" open on the 
side next the lake, one long narrow street and a few villas. 
Opposite the piazza, about a quarter of a mile away, is the 
quaint island of San Giulio, with its ancient church founded 
by St. Julius in 379, in which the body of the saint is still 
shown to the faithful. 

The charms of the place are its comparative seclusion, as 
no rail or road passes through it ; the absence of noise and 
dust; its cheapness, and above all, its Sacro Monte, and 
the innumerable beautiful walks on the hills on both sides 
of the Lake. 

The "Sacred Mount" is a wooded hill stretching out into 
the Lake and rising to a height of 355 feet above it. On the 
upper portion of this hill, twenty chapels, a monastery, and 
a large church were erected mostly in the sixteenth century 
in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, each chapel containing a 
scene from his history in painted life-size figures of "ter- 
racotta" with a background on the walls and sometimes on 
the ceiling painted "al fresco." 

From the piazza of the town one ascends slowly up a 
broad cobbled pathway, sheltered by hornbeam and chest- 
nut, to the entrance of the sacred enclosure. We are now 
on a fine level terrace overlooking the town, with a beauti- 
ful view of the lake and island, and of the mountains sep- 
arating us from Varallo and the Val Sesia ; at the end of this 
terrace is the first chapel in which is represented the birth 
of St. Francis, who is shown lying like his Saviour, in a 
manger. 

After the Saint's death, his Order spread rapidly and be- 
fore very long the whole district opened its arms to the 
Franciscans: Locarno, Cernobbio, Pallanza, Domodossala, 
Sesto Calende, Ancona, Novara and Varallo, all had monas- 
teries of the Order, and as early as 1770 the Sacred Mount 
of Orta was quite complete and in the same style as it now 
is. 

The life story of St. Francis of Assisi is one of the most 
fascinating of any of the early saints. He was the son of 
a rich merchant, Pietro Bernardone. His youth was wild, 
but at the age of twenty-four his thoughts turned to a re- 
ligious life, and he began to attend lepers and to give all he 
had to the poor. Confined as a madman, despoiled by rob- 
bers and ridiculed by his friends, he was joined by some 
"little brethren" who retreated with him to a chapel on 
Monte Subasio close to Assisi, around which they lived in 
cells. He founded his Order in 1209, and died at Assisi on 
October 3rd, 1226. His love of beasts and birds, whom he 
called his "little brethren and little sisters," is well-known. 

This year is the seven hundredth anniversary of the death 
of St. Francis, and there will be great doings at Assisi ; little 
Orta also will have its celebration on a smaller scale. 

Signor Mussolini is expected also, and he has quite re- 
cently written and published a circular letter to all Italians 
living out of Italy, urging them to take part in the com- 
memoration of the Saint, who, born some 1,150 years after 
the death of Our Lord, was perhaps more like his Saviour 
in character and in the events of his life than any other Saint. 

Mussolini in this letter said that Italy had given to the 
world the most sublime of all poets — Dante ; the most dar- 
ing of all navigators — Columbus; the most profound think- 
er of all artists and scientists — Leonardo da Vinci; and the 
most holy of all Saints — St. Francis. 



CUNARD 

Channel Service 
New York 

to 

England and France 

by CABIN SHIPS 



Caronia 
Carmania 
Cameronia 
Lancastria 

Alaunia 

ASCANIA 
AUSONIA 



For Full Particulars Apply to 

CUNARD AND ANCHOR LINES 

Or Local Agents 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8c DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1S71 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general cAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1926 



Finance 



TABLE grapes for Eastern markets are moving two weeks 
earlier than last year and already many hundreds of cars 
have reached their destination according to C. J. McDonald, 
superintendent of perishable fruit service for the Southern Pa- 
cific Company. The first table grapes came from the Fresno 
district. 

* # * 

■ — The Forest Service is alarmed over the fire situation. Up 
to July 30 it suppressed 160 fires caused by smokers and over 
50 fires started by campers. In the federal forests, smoking has 
been prohibited, with a great saving in fire losses. This rule 
may have to be extended to the state fores' s. A continuance 
of recklessness producing fires may lead to the exclusion of the 
public from national forests. 

* * * 

— H. A. Mason, secretary of the League of California Mu- 
nicipalities before the municipal section of the Commonwealth 
Club said that up to date ITetch Hetchy had cost $46,000,000. 
San Francisco has about $9,000,000 in hand, which will bring 
the water to the Oakdale portal and will need $20,000,000 more 
to bring it to Crystal Springs. The total debt to get a complete 
water system is beyond the bonding capacity of the city, but a 
municipal water district could bear the load. 



— Hawaii is oriental by reason of its population, says C. N. 
Kurokawa, educational secretary of the Pan Pacific Union of 
Honolulu. Out of 250,000 population, 170,000 are orientals 
and out of the 170,000 110,000 are Japanese. The Japanese 
now take part in all the business clubs and other institutional 
affairs of the islands. 

* * * 

— Plans for placing in operation a 63 hour train between San 
Francisco and Chicago, late this fall, have been worke 1 out in 
San Francisco at a conference of executives of the Southern 
Pacific, Union Pacific and Chicago Northwes'ern railroads. 
Not only will the present scedule be reduce 1 by five hours as 
announced in April, but an addi ional train beLween San Fran- 
cisco and Chicago wll be placed in service. 

* * * 

— Bancltaly's half year report shows that this corporation 
is managed with much more financial ability than is generally 
to be found. Dividends paid, including that of Tuly 1st, 
amounted to $2,184,000 in addition to the April 10 h stock divi- 
dend of 25 per cent, which had a cash value of $10,000,000. 
Net profits, after normal dividend requirements and reserves 
had been established for the six months, totalled $5,259,314.12. 

* * * 

— The bonded indebtedness of the state government, of all 
forms, totalled $609,549,227 at the close of the fiscal year 1925-6, 
an increase of $76,349,975, as against the previous fiscal year! 
and an increase of 549 per cent of bonded indebtedness since 

* * * 

— The Golden Gate Ferry is admittedly among the company 
of really sound enterprises. This is mainly due to the excellent 
management of A. O. Stewart. Now, the Golden Gate Ferries, 
Incorporated, has gone further along the road of prosperity ' 
by allying to its directorate such men as S. P. Eastman of 
the Spring Valley and Milton H. Esberg, whose ability in the 
world of finance is very generally recognized. 

* * * 

_ —We are gradually and indeed rapidly obtaining a foothold 
in South America, as appears from the fact that our invest- 
ments there now total more than four billions. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY I0TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1926 

Assets $109,430,478.72 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,400,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $557,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

IIA1CHT STREET BRANCH Haisht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Uiloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4*i) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid I n Capital S20.000.000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

.All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATIOS. OVER 000 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.: SEATTLE. WASH.: MEXICO CITl, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 Cnllfornla Street 
Illtl l 10 HEATHCOTE IV. J. COILTHAHD 

.nnnjiper ANKt. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Dlrr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Piion'e Douglas 2244 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS - AUDITORS - COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C. P. A. 
Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, Slow 
Accounts ; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYounc Buii.dinc, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 ■ 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palacs Hotel), San Francisco 

Phone Kearny "ill 



August 7, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 
At Hotel Whitcomb 

Drury Lane at the Hotel Whitcomb was the setting for 
an elaborate dinner party Saturday evening given by Dr. 
and Mrs. Harry Ryberg, in honor of the eighty-fifth birth- 
day of Mrs. Ryberg's mother, Mrs. A. A. Logstrup. 

During the evening, the announcement of the engagement 
of Miss Bebe Nemitz to their son, Harry Ryberg, Jr., was 
made. Covers were laid for twenty guests. 

* + ♦ 

Professor Tor Jonson and Mr. Talbe Johansen, of Dyti- 
shoen, Sweden, are among the distinguished guests at the 
Hotel Whitcomb this week. They have been sent to this 
country by their government as special emissaries to study 
American forestry in the Northwest, and arrived in San 
Francisco in time to attend the reception given in honor of 
Crown Prince Gustav Adolf and Princess Louise of Sweden. 

Mrs. Louise Allen Hansen was hostess to the bridge club 
of which she is a member, at luncheon in D/ury Lane, at the 
Hotel Whitcomb on Thursday. The table was atractively 
centered with flowers and following the luncheon Mrs. Hau- 
sen took her guests to the Roof Garden for cards. 

* * * 
Santa Maria Inn 

The following people were guests at the Inn during the 
past week: Mrs. Charles P. Cutten and daughters Miss 
Elizabeth and Miss Ruth Cutten all of San Fiancisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Warren of San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. Casper M. Brown of San Francisco, who 
were accompanied by Mrs. M. J. Brophy and daughters, 
Miss Claire and Miss Sabina Brophy, all of Piedmont, Calif. 

Mrs. J. A. Bacigalupi and family of Los Gatos. 

Mr. William Randolph Hearst of San Simeon. 

Dr. and Mrs. W. H. Strietman and family of Oakland. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. A. Ellis of Alameda who were accom- 
panied by Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Ellis, Miss Ruth Evelyn Ellis, 
and Miss Jean McLaughlin, all of Alameda. 

At Hotel Del Coronado 

Interesting social affairs of the week were the luncheons 
and dinners given as farewell courtesies to Captain and 
Mrs. David Sellers. The Rose Room at Hotel del Coronado 
was the setting for one of the mosl attractive oi these 
fairs when Mr. and Airs. ( ',. Aubrey Davidson entertained 
with a dinner Wednesday night. A luncheon party at 
which Mesdames Willet S. Dorland, (I. Fred Henking 
Fred M. Gazley were hostesses, and a dinner given by Mr. 
and Mrs. William 11. Sallmon, were among the events of 
the week. 

The hotel has been the scene of several pre-nuptial par- 
ties given in honor of Miss Evelyn Dupee, daughter of Slr>. 
Florence Kennetl Dupee, whose marriage to Lieutenant 
George L. Castera of Alameda will he an event of early au- 
tumn. 

* * * 

At Feather River Inn 

The fishing in the Feather River Country is better this 
season than ewer and is improving everj day. as the si 
advances. 

George A. Webster, Dr. L. D. Bacigalupi and Jerry Bur- 
elle (guide at Feather River Inn) have been tryii _■ 

Lake and are reporting back to the Inn at night with 
the limit catch of trout. 

Dr. F. W. Callison of San Francisco. Frank King, of the 
Wells Fargo Bank, and George Bury of Hollywood are fish- 
ing daily in Uiass Lake. 

Mr. and Mrs, Leonard E. Wood, of Presidio Terrace. 
with their family have taken a cottage at the Inn for the re- 
mainder of the Season. 

The Howard Brickells have returned to the Inn for a 
md visit of the season. 



In a recent insurance fraud case a witness who had been 
an unwilling patty to the fraud was being closely examined 
by the attorneys for the company. 

"You were with him when he had his life insured last 
June, were you not?" 

"Yes, sir." 

~\\ hen he died two weeks later, didn't it strike you that 
it was rather peculiar?" 

"Well, I shouldn't wonder it did. I remember thinking 
to myself he must have had a pull with the company." 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

WHY? 

ICs the Water and the Table 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 
tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write lor booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN 

Acua Caliente, Sonoma County, Calif. 

or see Peck-Judah 



El Dorado Hotel 

SO.XO.UA, calif. 
The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Our Specially — "Stents* Wit fa Mu*hroniii»" 
Clean R»«.mv, cieui, Linen, Clean Everything 
Vi»il Sonoma Courtly'* Famou* Hesorlt ami Mineral (Warm Water) Swim 
Tank, Pram Tlill Hotel 

Ratci Exceptionally Reasonable 

Telephone 110 



"POP" McCRAY'S 

One Mile North of Cloverdale on Redwood Highway 

DANCING IN DINING ROOM AND 

CLUB HOUSE 
SWIMMING IN RUSSIAN RIVER 

Jellies, Jams and Mustard Pickles Always on the Table 



CALIENTE VILLA ES"»fc£^ 

Fremh and Italian Dinners Meals ai All Hours 

Modern Roomj 'Private Collages 

M.[ A CAI It ME 

I Minnies \Talk in Felteri Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sono.m v U4 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. ISth and 19th Sts.. 

Market '"'4 



Arthur C. Thornton 

Genernl ln«urnnrr Phone SvttCff '■'•'-<> 

I '-J «ir..,.nie si'ort, H,..mu 801-31 1 , Sun FrnnrNro 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1926 



RICHARDSON FOR GOVERNOR 

Expenditures by the state for education increased 58 per cent 
during the past four years, from $73,096,932 under Governor 
Stephens to $115,714,805 under Governor Richardson. It 
should be remembered, however, that the amounts of money 
the state shall spend for education from year to year is large- 
ly beyond the control of the legislature or the governor. Sec- 
tion 6 of Article 9 of the state constitution, adopted by the 
people in 1920, acts automatically to increase educational ex- 
penditures by the state and neither the governor nor the legis- 
lature can either reduce or increase such expenditures. Such 
power rests solely with the people and any change would in- 
volve an amendment to the constitution. 

The :hief items of increases during the past four years are 
as follows: Superintendent of Public Instruction, $430,966; 
Vocational Education, $365,135 ; Elementary Schools, $24,067,- 
693; Secondary Schools, $7,808,520; University of California 
(bo.h branches) $7,148,508; Teachers' Colleges and allied 
schools, $1,348,852. 

Fortunately, due to Governor Richardson's "Business in 
Government" administration, the state has been able to meet 
all its obligations and still has in the state treasury at Sacra- 
mento an unpended and unpledged balance of over $10,000,- 
000. 

All fair minded citizens, incidentally, will realize the utter 
falsity of the allegation by opponents of the administration that 
Governor Richardson is "starving the schools of the state." 



Sentiment in favor of Governor Richardson's re-election is 
gathering momentum in the northern section of the state and 
now is overwhelming in Nevada County, according to D. W. 
Roberts, business man of Grass Valley, who visited the Gov- 
vernor's local campaign headquarters to report on the situation 
in that county. 

"Among the business men and thinking people, the senti- 
ment for the Governor is practically unanimous. I don't hear 
anything about the opponents of Richardson, so can't say which 
of them is strongest." 

* * * 

William R. Dickinson, Los Angeles oil man and southern 
California orange grower, told San Francisco friends of Gov- 
ernor Richardson that Los Angeles county is going to give the 
Governor a tremendous vote on August 31. 

"If you folks in San Francisco get the vote out and roll up 
a majority for the Governor as big as we are going to give 
him, there will be nothing to the fight," said Dickinson, who 
is a member of the Governor's executive committee in Los 
Angeles. Dickinson returned recently from a trip to Eu- 
rope, but has been home long enough to sound out senti- 
ment in the south, he says. 



The Dahlia Society of California 

The quest for a blue dahlia, the heretofore unattainable 
goal of all dahlia fans, is still being pursued in San Fran- 
cisco and the bay city gardens by would-be exhibitors at 
the coming dahlia show at the Palace Hotel, beginning Aug- 
ust 26. All colors of the rainbow, from deep lavender to 
pure red and yellow, through all the gamut of orange, cer- 
ise, with an occasional pure white bloom, are shown in the 
enormous collection of dahlias originated in and about San 
Francisco, the world center of their culture. But never a 
blue one, although every gardener who grows seedlings 
watched every new bloom for the precious shade. 

The nearest to the cerulean flower is a blue lavender, with 
only a little of the persistent red mixed with its pure azure. 
Several of the local experts are very mysterious when the 
possibility of a blue dahlia being shown at the coming ex- 
hibit is mentioned, but no one has as yet announced the 
long hoped for accomplishment. 





TEL. GRAVSTOSE 4200 



Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automo- 
biles — Oxv-Acetylene 
Welding — lllitk- 
smitulng. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



9 

_ WATSON _ 

StabilatorS 



In a Stabilated Car — You Motor 
Relaxed and Arrive Refreshed. 



MADSON & RICHARDS 



Craystone 2100 



(Incorporated) 
Pacific Avenue at Va 



Ness, San Francisco, Calif. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rate*: i'.r.r per day; 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 

LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 



Pom and Franklin Streets 



AT CALPET GAS STATION 



Snn Francisco, Calif. 



Graystonel30 Open Day ap<l Night 

SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Win. Saunders 



TRUNKS - RACKS - BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVE. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

Sterling Anderson, Mgr. 
Three Blocks from S. P. Depot 
Cor. Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing, Oiling. Greasing, Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline i Oils Sundries 



August 7, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
Nntlonnl Automobile Club 

THINK when you motor through the 
forests of California of the privi- 
lege that is yours ! Think what it would 
mean to he deprived of this great scenic 
vacation land which is nature's gift to 
you. You would not wantonly destroy 
your own home or that of your neighbor; 
neither would you throw away the sav- 
ings which you have accumulated through 
the years. Yet many a man who would 
not do these things openly will toss a 
lighted match into the shrubbery along 
the road as he drives, or fling a lighted 
cigarette or cigar stub into the dry brush 
to smoulder and spark until il springs into 
life and sets out on its work of destruc- 
tion. 

This year's record of fire waste in the 
forest areas is deplorable and it will bring 
drastic regulation that will inflict punish- 
ment on the innocent as well as the guilty, 
warns the National Automobile Club. 
Just for a moment's carelessness, a single 
thoughtless action on the part of an indi- 
vidual, the whole motoring public may 
suffer. But the forests of the state must 
be preserved even though the smoker and 
the camper arc kept out. 

From Mrs. Colbum, author of "The 
Kingship of Mount Lassen." conies the 
following translation of a poster placed 
on the trees of Spain : 

To the Wayfarer 

Ye who pass by and would raise your 
hand against me, barken ere you harm 
me. 

I am the heat of your hearth on the 
winter nigh's. 

I am the friendly shade screening you 
from the summer sun. 

My fruits are refreshing draughts quench- 
ing your thirst as you journey on. 

I am tiie beam that holds your house: the 
board of your table, the bed on which 



you lie; and the timber that builds your 
boat. 

I am the handle of your hoe. the door to 
your homestead, the wood of your cra- 
dle, and the shell of your coffin. 

I am the bread of kindness and the flower 
of beauty. 

Yc who pass by listen to my prayer : Harm 
Me Not!!! 



Toll Road to Muir Woods 
The completion of the new toll road 
from Mill Valley to Muir Woods and 
to the Coast makes accessible to auto- 
mobiles one of the most beautiful sec- 
tions of Marin County, according to the 
National Automobile Club. Heretofore 
it has been practically impossible to drive 
to the entrance of Muir Woods, automo- 
biles not being allowed in the Woods 
proper, and it has been necessary to reach 
there either by train or to hike from Mill 
Valley. 

The toll road, on which construction 
was started last February, and which was 
completed several weeks ago, is in excel- 
lent condition. The roadbed has an av- 
erage width of 24 feet and on the narrow 
turns has been widened to fifty-eight feet, 
which gives ample space not only to turn, 
but to pass other cars. The average grade 
is seven or eight per 'cent with a maxi- 
mum grade at one point of fifteen per 
cent. Many cars make the entire trip in 
high gear. 

The road winds out of Mill Valley, 
with its many homes nestled on the hill 
sides, and passes the old mill from which 
the town derives its name. It is 2.2 miles 
from Mill Valley to the summit, where 
the toll house is locate 1. Here the very 
nominal toll of 50c for each additional 
passenger, is collected. It is l hen 1.8 
miles to the entrance to Muir Woods and 
to the point where the new road branches 
off and continues through Frank Valley, 
joining the Dipsea Highway near Big 
Lagoon. The read from Muir Woods to 
the coast is a wide gravel road with no 
grades and is in splen li 1 condition. The 
toll collected at the summit toll gate en- 
title* the car to continue from Muir 
Is to the Dipsea Highway. In other 
words, there is but one toll collecte 1 for 
the entire road. Cars entering from the 
western en' ranee pay toll at the western 
toll gate which is locate I right at the junc- 
tion with the read to Stinson Beach. 



At Paul Elder's 



"Young Woodley," by John Van 
Druten, one of the recent dramatic suc- 
cesses, will he read by Miss Edith Co- 
burn Xoyes in the Paul Elder Gallery, 
Friday morning, August 13th, at 11 
o'clock. "Young Woodley," is a de- 
lightful come 'y. with tine perception 
oi human values, simple as to story 
and with the attributes of Greek trage- 
dy, so grim, yet real is the fate meted 
out to Young Woodley. 



Picture a city the size of Denver, Colo- 
rado, or Portland, Oregon, moving into 
northern California. Well, that's what 
happened last year. And yet, no one had 
to go without or wait for electric power. 
_ Thru a progressive, effective and effi- 
cient development program, this company 
has electric energy, at low rates, available 
in advance of the needs of the territory 
served. 

The people can always depend on this 
company to give a maximum service at a 
minimum cost. 

"Nowhere is power so cheap 
as in California." 

Since 1913 the cost of living increased 
65% while the cost of electricity decreased. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



P-G-5**. 




•PACIFIC SEBVICZ" 

Owned - u^cited - Managed 
by Californians 




-the better itgets- 




GEO. \V. CASWELL 

-utter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 
1300,000 cup* wrr* wrvrd at thr panin 
Pacific International Expoaltloa 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1926 



WJf» 



«^9i:j5* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



*sdk 



ij§* 



■*W 



.&*• 



PRANK SMITH 

of the White House who 

was elected President 

of the 

Down Town Merchants' 

Golf Association. 



PERHAPS never in the history of Golf in San Francisco has 
there been such enthusiasm shown as when eighty members 
of the Men's Wear Golf Association assembled at Lake Merced 
golf and country club to play off 
their initial golf tournament. From 
jt T^ 4 the moment they arrived at the 

^T^ \ club to the time they left, the 

JK \ prominent wholesalers and retail 

JM <5»k / business men had the time of their 

sweet lives, the whole party resem- 
bling one big family. Competitive 
jealousy never entered their minds 
— nothing but good fellowship 
abounded. 

The players arrived in time for 
luncheon at the club, at which time 
the election of officers took place. 
Joe Harris proposed Frank Smith 
of the White House and everyone 
to a man gave Frank a rousing 
cheer when he was elected to of- 
fice for 1926-27. Ernest La Fleur, 
the collar and cuff man of Cluett- 
Peabody's, who was chiefly instru- 
mental in organizing the associa-. 
tion, was made handicapper ; Al Onkeles the Van Heusen collar 
king, treasurer, and Joe Harris, secretary. 

When the boys appeared on the lawn to pose for the moving 
picture man they outclassed anything we had ever seen in nifty 
dressers. 

George Wenzel, of Los Angeles, upheld his reputation of 
being six months ahead of the styles. 

This gathering wasn't considered a real tournament affair, 
it was merely to get the boys to become bet'er acquain'ed, and 
judging by the way they mingled it proved an unqualified suc- 
cess. But to make it a little interesting, President Frank Smith 
donated a trophy for a Blind Bogey event which was won by 
Prentice Burtis by one flop of the dice, after a triple tie with 
Miles Leary and Al Onkeles. 

Ernest La Fleur and Meyer Woods, two members of the 
host club, were the real heroes of the day. Each shot the course 
in 86, at the Merced club, but unfortunately did not win any 
medals. 

* * * 

Frank Smith Presided 

The banquet, which followed the tournament which was held 
at the Merced club, was attended by upwards of eighty mem- 
bers of the world's greatest fashion kings. President Frank 
Smith acted as toas'master and after he had thanked the boys 
for their loyalty in appointing him their president, he turned the 
meeting over to Al Onkeles and take it from me, Al was one 
hundred per cent chairman. 

The only regrettable incident to mar the evening's entertain- 
ment was that Ned Green didn't show after the boys had sent 
him a special invitation to at' end. However, we had Robert C. 
Linton Cronbach, vice president of G. T. Hawkins, Northamp- 
ton, London, England ; Edgar Bibas, Jack Swift's partner from 
Paris, and Jack Smith of Los Angeles, brother of Frank Smith, 
the president. 

* * * 

Al Onkeles a Marvel 

Chairman Al Onkeles made the best chairman that ever 
swung a gavel. Al had the boys standing on their ear with his 
witty remarks as he presented the trophies to the successful 
winners. Prentice Burtis, gneral manager of Hale Brothers, 



copped the principal trophy which was donated by President 
Smith. Miles Leary of the City of Paris, took second honors. 
Everyone was wondering how Hales could stay open with 
Prentice Burtis, Bob McKim, San Francisco manager, Neil 
Petrie, sales manager and Plerman Shalif all out doing their 
stuff and the end of the month sale on. 

With the Emporium it was different, as Charlie Steiner is in 
Europe, so the boys took a day off. There was Ned Lipman, 
George Wollenberg, Jim Slim, Westley Hare, and Bruce Mc- 
Donough ; but none of the gang got in the head lines. 

When Al Onkeles got down to real business to distribute the 
trophies, he first called on Nat Broger, of Fashion Park, to 
show cause why he didn't play in the tournament. Nat said 
that his store was so conges' ed with cusomers he couldn't make 
the grade. If Nat can get away with that he has it on Aimee. 
However, Nat told a few good after dinner stores, at which he 
is an adept. The one on Joe Harris was a kick. Nat said Joe 
had three letters after his name: R. G. A. — rottenest golfer in 
America. 

Sylvan Bemstern, the Silk Prince, president of the Far West- 
ern Travelers' Golf Association, also told of what golf had 
done to cement good friendship among the wholesale and retail 
men from coast-to-coast. After Berger's and Bernstern's talk, 
Onkeles had the floor once more and proceeded to hand out the 
various prizes. 

Ernest La Fleur got a case of ink. Ernest said it would come 
in handy to sign all the checks. Frank Ross, considered to be 
the world's greatest talker, got a Victrola. 

Oscar Wolf because of his love to play in the traps, was 
presented with a rat trap. 

George Wenzel, a box of blocks so that he can build himself 
a home in Los Angeles. 

Westley Hare a wheel barrow to help him pack off the divots 
he takes on the course. 

Jack Swift, a can of tea, so that he can always tee up. 

Ed Munroe, of Bullock and Jones — the temperamental golfer, 
a sweeper to help him clean the green. 

Ed Blum, of the Knox Shop, a box of ties, donated by Jack 
Swift. 

The hosts at the banquet were: Frank Smith, Oscar Wolf, 
Maury Samter, Al Onkeles, Lyl Nathan, George Wenzel, Joe 
Harris, and Ernest La Fleur. 



News From Santa Cruz 

An unusually large number of deer hunters registered at 
the i asa del Rev for the opening of the deer season. Pros- 
pects fur deer hunting are unusually good in the Santa 
Cruz area this year, it being necessary to go only a few 
miles from the Casa del Rcy Hotel in order to reach the 
heart of the best hunting grounds. Many hunters brought 
their dogs along for the opening day. 

So as to guard against forest or brush fires, starting 
through carelessness, all hunters have been advised by 
Deputy Game Warden Ed V. Moody to be careful in start- 
ing camp fires and putting them out. 
* * # 

In addition to Eleanor Garatti and Al White, Alvin Kal- 
lunki, noted Athens Club diver, will also take part in the 
next big swimming meet at Santa Cruz, August 14-15. 

This will be a P. A. A. championship affair, with ten of 
the best girl swimmers of the State on hand to compete in 
the 880-yard ocean swim, as well as in the tank events, 
which will be held in the Casino Plunge. This will be the 
biggest swimming meet of the season at Santa Cruz. 

(Continued on Page 21) 



August 7, 1926 



THE SAN FRANC1SO > NEWS LETTER 



21 



RE-ELECT JUDGE JOHN J. VAN NOSTRAND 

JUDGE John J. Van Nostrand is a candidate for re-election 
to the office of Judge of the Superior Court at the coming 
primary election to he held Tuesday, August 31st. 

Judge Van Nostrand was horn in San 
Francisco in 1875; is a graduate of the 
public schools in this city, and received 
his degree from the Hastings College of 
Law in 1896. In 1902 he was elected Jus- 
tice of the Peace for a term of four years, 
was re-elected to the same office in 1906. 
and in 1908 was elected Superior Judge, 
being returned to that position six years 
thereafter by the highest vote on the 
ticket. 

Judge Van Nostrand for more than 
seventeen years past, in addition to his 
regular court work, has handled all cases 
involving mental unsoundness, inebriety 
and drug addiction, to which branch he 
has devoted careful and comprehensive 
study. Many hundreds of persons com- 
mitted by him have since been reclaimed in the various institu- 
tions, and are now useful and respected members of society. 




Judge John J. 
Van Xostrnnd 



SANTA CRUZ 
(Continued from Page 20) 

The next tennis tournament on the Santa Cruz program 
will be one between the Fresno Tennis Club and the Santa 
Cruz team, which will be held on the Casa del Rev courts 
on this coming Sunday, August X. 

The Fresno Club is sending over all its leading stars to 
meet the best players on the Santa Cruz Team. 



Gasoline Tax Initiative Measure 

With the filing to date of 90,365 validated signatures with tin- 
Secretary of State, the initiative measure providing for a one- 
cent increase in the gasoline tax to complete the cons! ruction 
of California's state highway system has definitely qualified for 
a place on the ballot at the November election. 

The signatures filed to date represent only a partial return 
from the various counties, according to an announcement made 
today by the campaign committee of the California State Au- 
tomobile Association and 'he County Supervisors Associa- 
tion of California, which are jointly fostering the highway 
financing measure. 

Filing of signatures will be continued throughout this week 
and it is expected that the total will lie brought up to 1 15.000 by 
/Vugust 1 with every county in the state represented, the cam- 
paign committee announced. 

The initiative measure will place before the voters a proposal 
to increase the gasoline tax one cent for a period of 12 years to 
finance the completion of the California highway system. The 
money thus raised, together with Federal aid funds, will pro- 
vide ihe California Highway Commission with more than $10.- 
000,000 annually. 

H. J. Brunnier, chairman of the Highways Committee of tin- 
State Automobile Association announced today that this meas 
ure will make available sufficient money to complete the state 
highway system on an adequate basis, which, according to the 
best estimates obtainable, will require $123,000,000. 

* * * 

"1 hear ScroogS has quit the sausage business 
"Yes, he's retired; he plays golf now." 

"What made him take Up golf?" 

"Says he just can't keep away from the links " 

* * * 

"What's become of that big dog you had!'" 

"1 shot him." 

"Good heavens! Was he mad:" 

"Well, he didn't seem any too well pleased ." 



"Go away from here, you souse! You're ringing at the 
wrong house." 

"Nothing like it, old top; you're shouting out of the 
wrong window." 



Fire 



Accident 



Automobile 



Carl N. Corwin Co. 

General Agents 

201 Sansome Street Royal Insurance Building 

Rhone Garfield 5610 



Casualty 



Health 



Surety 




RARE BOOKS 

EARLY EDITIONS 

Autographs Bought and Sold 
JOHN HOWELL 

43-1 Post Street, San Francisco, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. - Tillmann Plnoc, :i i 2-41 Grant Avenue 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Hare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf. Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kenrny Tt.SIG 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



MADE TO ORDF.R ONL^ 



'JhosEKenf ^" RTS 'IhosEKent 

^BffiE? -Sfss. ^BW 

Large Assortment of Imported /' abrics 



J 5 Kearny Strift 



Piionf Kfarny 5714 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

-mi. Prr..r.) bj hjru) Oolj—SvMj < ' *W*<\ Fnr and D«D¥W«tl 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



1F..1 Pot Mi.ii i 

Is YlRf.lM* Until 



Parittmt IHrmt ami (Unnint 



<4i Frt.xruco 
I'iiom Fkankli* 2510 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

r.lnlili.h.'.l im 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

SKI TEHAMA ITIIKKT, <tv FIUM I*' " 
Phone Donstna MM 



22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 7, 1926 




„ h £rre PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 



•iivrrTTtrerT mi-gr ^°u n s e aUi°e S show 
BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



San Franciscc 
West 7»3 



Barlingame 

478 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

[Formerly toillt Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

209 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 

San Maleo Counties 



CISCO OFFICE 

875 FOLSOM ST. 



Palo alto Office? 
818 EMERSON ST. 



SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



Cool-headed Bill 

"Bill was sure cool headed, I guess, 
when his apartment building burned last 
night. He said he smoked a cigarette 
while he was dressing and after he'd got 
his shirt and tie on he decided he didn't 
like the tie, so he changed it for another." 

"Yeh? Well I was there, and I saw 
Bill come out. If he was so darned 
cool, why didn't he put on his pants?" 
— "Business." 

* * * 

"Now don't flare up, Mother," said 
Johnny as he touched a match to his 
mother after soaking her in kerosene. — 

Judge. 

* * * 

Specifications 

Woman shopper: "Show me the 
most comfortable chairs you have. I 
want a nice easy chair for my hus- 
band." 

Salesman: "Morris?" 

Shopper: "No, Jacob." — "Business." 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
No. -I 1809. Dept. No. 10 

Estate of CARRIE H. FARRELL, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned. 
Phil C. Katz, administrator of the estate of 
CARRIE H. FARRELL, deceased, to the cred- 
itors of and all persons having claims 
against the said decedent, to file them with 
the necessary vouchers within four (4) 
months after the first publication of this no- 
tice, in the office of the Clerk of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for 
the City and County of San Francisco, or to 
exhibit* them with the necessary vouchers 
within four (4) months after the first publi- 
cation of this notice to the said administra- 
tor, at his office, room 920 Phelan Building, in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State 
of California, which said last-named office the 
undersigned selects as his place of business 
in all matters connected with said estate of 
CARRIE H. FARRELL, deceased. 

PHIL C. KATZ. 

Administrator of the estate of CARRIE H. 
FARRELL, deceased. 

Dated. San Francisco, California, July 27, 
1926. 

HENRY F. BOY'EN, 

Attorney for Administrator. 5t 



DELINQUENT SALE 

Mineral Development Company, location of 
principal place of business, San Francisco, 
California* Location of works, Homboldt 
County, Nevada. 

NOTICE: There is delinquent upon the fol- 
lowing described stock on account of assess- 
ment levied on the 8th day of .Tune, 1926, the 
several amounts set opposite the names of 
the respective shareholders, as follows: 
No. No. 

Names Cert. Shares Amt. 

Lottie Archibald 26 300 $1.50 

B. F. Benner 268 200 1.00 

Horace W. Benham 280 200 1.00 

Stanley A. Dembny 267 200 1.00 

Clayton W. Hogston 272 200 1.00 

D. G. Jones 276 200 1.00 

F. P.. Kistler 266 934 4.67 

Lacey. Aleen Miss 273 200 1.00 

Retekevicus, Ben 270 200 1.00 

Clyde M. Smith 237 200 1.00 

Solie, R. A 271 200 1.00 

Augustus Sinn 269 200 1.00 

G. E. Wockenfuss 233 200 1.00 

Arthur W. Wilson 245 200 1.00 

And in accordance with the law and order 
of the Board of Directors, made on the 8th 
day of June, 1926, so many shares of each 
parcel ot such stock as may be necessary will 
be sold at public auction at the office of the 
company, Room 245 Monadnock Building, San 
Francisco. California, on Wednesday, the 18th 
day of August, 1926, at the hour of twelve 
o'clock noon of said day, to pay the delin- 
quent assessment thereon, together with cost 
of advertising and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY, Secretary. 

245 Monadnock Building, 6S1 Market Street, 
San Francisco. California. 







N. W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Olllce and Works 1025 Mission St. 

Phone Market 781:1 
Branch Office: 700 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 

Phone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 

Tailor 

Opposite Olympic Club 



527 Post St., San Francisco 
Phone Prospect 9316 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 

Phone Garileid 3S52 504 Market St. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

*y REVUE «\§», 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, $1.00 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carle 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 

HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 

Hattie Mooser Minnie C. Mooser 



£feanorfr 



145 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast. 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea. Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



^rw 


Caroline Jones 


^Efj^%L 


Luncheon is served from 1 1 :30 to 2 :30 


'*> and.** 


and tea from 3 to 5 
Exclusive use of room for club dinners. 


334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'F.rrell an 
l.aitni SIS. 



BLANCO'S 



Luncheon (11:30 tt 2 p. m.).. 
Dinner, Week Dayi 



$ .75 

1.S0 



N,> VlritOI Should LmT( the City With- 
out Dining in the Ptnwl Cafe 
in America 



Our Main Dining Room will he closed on Sunday* during the summer month* 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

03 Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 
Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 2;00 p. m. 
5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Highway 



&&£*. 



U-MlLE H*U«E 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

open 8:00 a. m. to ii m p. m. 
unsurpassed cuisine 

Carl Leonhardt 

Formerly of Golden Cale Park CbDbM 



A nnouncement 




Singleton 's 



Allnj (Eat 

CLUB INN 



Now Serves a Delicious 
Five-Course 

DINNER 75c 

Also 
Fried Chicken, Steaks, 
Chicken Pot Pies in Cas- 
serole, Etc., a la Carte. 





ICE CREAMV 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



•jtii.toiir 
Unit 31(11 3lli2 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 



Snn KrnncKco. < nllf. 
144 Market StTCCfl 



"The Reromniended L;iundr>" 



250 Twelfth M.. Sah Krwcisco 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Sprint*" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

22° Clara Street — Garfield M4- 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day la 
taking very good care of them. Brushing '« only a part of the 
process. Many things can hnppeu to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take enre of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not he ns sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster thnn 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed f Call In today 
anil talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks on" all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone t.nrflcld :■::."■ 

SPBCI (.LISTS — Kxtractlonst Crowns! Self Cleaning Bridges: 
Poreelnin Work ami Roofless Plntes 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts , San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



I 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Mmmlmtmrwi o/ 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, I I "l.\ KIITS. PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 

I. on \ nu'li'v Calif. 
."717 Sntita l> Avenue 



This is a Laundry for up-to-date folks 

| La Grande & White's Laundry Co. j 



'Phone Market 916 



SAIL TO NEW YORK 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and 
GAY HAVANA, en route 



1 




Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropii 



TWENTY-EIGHT days of nu 
icvcn ncver-to-be-forgoltcn \ 
zunillo, Mexico; San Jos 
Nicaragua. Two days in the Can 
Cristobal and historic old Panam; 

Every cabin on a Panama Mail liner 
and there is a comfortable lower bed fo 
dancing; deck games and sports and salt 
world-famous for ils food and service. 



delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail liner with 
Is ashore at picturesque and historic ports — Man- 
de Guatemala; La Liberlud, Salvador; Corinto, 
Zone; see the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, 



an outside one; each has an electric fan, 
every passenger. There is an orchestra for 
rater swimming tank. The Panama Mail is 



Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, including bed and 
meals on steamer. Co East by Panama Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 
as little as $350. (This price does not include berth and meals on trains.) Panama 
Mail liners leave San Francisco and New York approximately every 21 days. Vaca- 
tion sailings from San Francisco, July 27; from Los Angeles, one day later. West- 
ward from New York, July 31st, August 28th. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
or ticket agent or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 

10 HANOVER SQUARE 

NEW YORK 



x*.^v iniin 



DISTINCTIONL 

*iflfllg 



'Perfects 



COMFORT? 



With. 



ECONOMY! 



These three features com- 
bined with many other attrao 
tions, including excellent meals, 
form a combination of hotel 
service difficult to equal. 



Make your next 
stay at the 
famous 




548 S. SPRING STREET 

LOS ANGELES 



2 PINE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



RATES 

Per Dav 
slnolc 

European Plan 

120 rooms with running 
water S2.50to$4.00 
220 rooms with bath 

3.50 to 5.00 
160 rooms with bath 

6.00 to 8.00 
Double, 4.00 up 



Also o number of large and beautiful rooms and 
suites. 60me In period furnishings with grand pi- 
ano, fire place and bath, $10 up. 



Large and well equipped 
Sample Rooms 



RAMCHO GOLP CLUB 
available to all guests 



m^_ 



HAROLD E. LATHROP 

Manager 




II 



■JNbvelty 

Quaint customs of other lands and other 
peoples — queer head dresses of tribes 
who wear little else — strange and enter- 
taining pictures gathered from all parts 
of the earth are shown every Sunday in 
The Chronicle Rotagravure. 

Make it a point to see this delightful 
pictorial section every week. Have The 
Sunday Chronicle delivered to your 
home. 



Bun IFratiriBm 



dUjwmfrte 

ROTAGRAVURJ 







"A Six-pointer" 



"Napa Dry" Ginger Ale 

Six Points That Recommend It: 

Point 1 — It blends perfectly. 
Point 2 — Sparkles like champagne. 
Point 3 — Handsome package — it graces any table. 
Point 4 — A joy in the sick room. 
Point 5 — Children, as well as adults, enjoy it. 
Point 6 — A delight to every sense — taste, sight and 
bouquet. 

Packed by 

NAPA SODA COMPANY 



Phone Market 117 



San Francisco, Calif. 



il 



COMPLETE RADIO PROGRAM FOR NEXT WEEK, IN THIS ISSUE 



#5.00 PER YEAR 



FRANCISCO 






PRICE 10 CENTS 
LES 



Re-EIect 
i hii:m) \vm. 

RICHARDSON 

GOVERNOR 

tin hiw iirromiillNhmcnt tit 

Economy and Efficiency 
Law and Order 



Jl 




Re-elect 

SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 

REPUBLICAN 

United States Senator 
for All California 




EslaMUhtd July 20. l&M 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco .News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

jr., from 1884 to 1925. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street, San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhlll, E. C 

London. England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $6.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year. $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. AUGUST 14, 1926 



No. 33 



FROM ONE THING TO ANOTHER 

By Eleanore F. Ross 



The Retail Jewelers' Association is going to push the 
idea of wedding rings for the fingers of married men. Well, 
we know some Benedicts who already wear nose rings. 

* * * 

There are always two kinds of people in the world. The 
drudges and the dreamers, the plodders, and the pioneers. 
and the drudges laugh at the dreamers; the plodders scoff 

at the pioneers. 

* * * 

An unemployed man is an out-of-work customer. He 
cannot buy. An underpaid man is a customer reduced in 
purchasing power, lie cannot buy. Business depression is 
caused by weakening purchasing power. Purchasing power 
is weakened by uncertainly or insufficiency of income. The 
cure of business depression is through purchasing power, 
and the source of purchasing power is wages. — From "To- 
day and Tomorrow" by Henry Ford, 

* * * 

The Hoard of Public Works is having a vacation with 
the rest bf folks; but their vacation dates hack a long, long 
time. The condition of empty lots, and certain streets in 
the apartment house district is disgraceful, a- well as dan- 
gerous. Lots arc strewn with papers, sacks, rags. etc.. ami 

the grass is as dry a-- tinder. It only needs a carelesslj 
dropped match or cigare te butt lo start a conflagration, 

which could easily assume the proportions of the Ewing 
Field lire, when practically every tire department in the 
citv had to lie called out to combat it. anil which was started 
by a lighted cigarette dropped into drj grass 

* * * 

Disease and rat-, will be the obnoxious result, in the 
opinion of Dr. \\ illiam Hassler, Citj Health I M'ticcr. of the 
disposal of garbage by the till and cover method, which 
has been proposed h\ Supervisors McSheehy ami Stanton, 
and which will make the tide land- along the water front 
.i dumping ground for all sorts of refuse. The citizen- 
concerned .ne bttterl) against it. and yet such a proposition 
mav pass into effect. We have an incinerator for burning 
garbage, but it appears that it i- not being used, very ex- 
tensively, i ,' is being transported down the pen- 
insula and clumped into the tidelands along the shore. This 
is a state of affairs that "smells up to Heaven." so to speak. 

* * * 

The) were two flappers, in the lobby of the Fairmont, 
with the latest "floppy" hats, jeweled garters, very much in 



evidence, and well, — those were the most conspicuous ar- 
ticles of their apparel. Their pretty painted faces almost 
met under the broad brims, so much engrossed were they 
with their subject of conversation. The last-minute styles, 
the most recent "sex novel," the craziest dance? Not at 
all! These two little flapper Mamas were so busy talking 
of their babies, so prideful of their different achievements, 
that they were perfectly oblivious to the curious glances 
cast in their direction ! 



Although it is her sensible stand on the subject of Pro- 
hibition which seems to be the most prominent plank in our 

Mrs. Julius Kahn's Campaign platform, she has accomplished 

other good work; in particular, helping to secure new Federal 
buildings for San Francisco, and certain much needed im- 
provements on San Francisco bay work, included in the 
riv ers and harbors bill. 

Mrs. Kalin in her advocation of the light wines and beer 
measure, impresses one as being absolutely sincere in her 
belief that modification of the 18th amendment to this ex- 
tent, tends toward the solution of the Prohibition question 
She dee- not conform her thoughts or action to suit her 
constituency; she thinks independently, for herself, and event 
ually, for the good of the community which she represents. 

A big and broad sincerity seems to be the forceful quality 

of her administration. 



Thee is such a thin- a- certain departments in city gov- 
ernment being too zealous in their official actions. We have 
in mind the unnecessary space taken up for "No Parking" 
sign-. There i- no doubt of their ncce-sitv before freight 
elevators thai operate continually, or before hotel, office 
building and store entrances: but epiite often, the owners 
or manager- of nd other building-, apportion off 

too much -pace for themselves, — ome times the entire length 
of a building, — and the autoist i- greatly embarrassed there- 
by. 

He is particularly inconvenienced in tin- regard, before 
the Telephone Company's building on Bush street, where 
it is impossible at times, to leave one'- car. when paying a 
bill. The whoe-ale florist- along this street are especially 
greedy for space, although their activities only last during 
a short period in the morning. The Auto Association and 
the National Automobile Club should take up this matter 
seriously. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1926 




We have often had occasion to call 
The President Is Right attention to the peculiar ability 
which the President seems to have, 
by nature, by which he can go directly to the truth and state 
it simply and profoundly. Whatever may be said by bis 
enemies, this gift is unquestionably his. It is, moreover/ 
such a gift as is seldom the possession of an inferior person, 
but is, on the other hand, the mark of the highest talent. 
The power of seeing and telling the truth is indeed the 
mark of genius in affairs of state and is a quality which few 
other than geniuses have possessed. 

This is all with reference to the statement made by the 
President in his speech in honor of the fiftieth anniversary 
of the admission to citizenship of the State of Colorado. 
Said the President: "The nation is inclined to disregard, al- 
together too much, both the functions and duties of the 
state." These functions the President insists are "much 
more than subdivisions of the federal government." 

There is no doubt at all that the power of self-govern- 
ment is one of vast significance to the development of the 
country and that the steady encroachment upon these pow- 
ers by the federal government tends seriously to weaken 
the nation, by breaking down that local self-government. 
As the President says: "Local self government is something 
to be maintained undiminished and guarded with jealous 
care." 

It is just for that reason that we have always viewed 
with a great deal of antipathy, all those movements which 
tend to federal legislation on such matters as prohibition, 
child labor and the like. That sort of legislation is an en- 
deavor to break down local self government and should be 
resisted. It is the kind of legislation which fails to pro- 
duce good results, for it is for the most part an effort to 
inflict upon communities legislation for which the}" are 
unsuited. 



In Mussolini and Mellon we get 
Mussolini and Mellon two antithesis in modern life; the 
representative of that new dictator- 
ship which is taking possession of so large a part of Europe 
and the representative of that democracy which, on this 
side of the Atlantic, tends to be more and more democratic 
and which constantly tries to substitute direct legislation 
for the representative system which we derived from our 
ancestors. 

The two of them met at Rome and the future reader of 
history will be greatly interested in the association of two 
men, who, although in practical life apparently far apart, 
are in reality very close together. 

Mussolini, the poor boy who graduated, through the so- 
cialist party and out of it, into being one of the greatest 
individual leaders of the time and who shares with Lenin 
the reputation of being one of the most implacable and un- 
deviating statesmen of history, on the one hand; Andrew 
W. Mellon, a very rich man, who has always been in pos- 
session of great wealth to which, by his own ability, he- 
has made great additions, on the other hand. They an- 
as far different in manner as in their antecedents, for where- 
as, Mussolini, even in private conversation, maintains that 
driving force which has landed him at the top of the Italian 
nation, our fellow-countryman is urbane and, his friends 
say, almost shrinking in the quietness and self-effacement 
with which he masks his power. 



But the two have a comradeship of craftsmanship which 
appears to transcend differences of race and language. They 
are both economists. Both are concerned with the devel- 
opment of finance and with the material prosperity of their 
respective peoples. Mussolini is trying to make a very 
poor country richer and better placed. To that end he im- 
poses all sorts of hardships on his people, even giving them 
black bread, as in war time. Mellon adds prosperity to 
prosperity. 



There is something in mere size which, 
Grotesquely Large after a while, becomes ridiculous. You 
notice it in giants. Up to a certain 
point the height and breadth of a man are impressive. Be- 
yond that point they become ludicrous. 

Of that sort is the fact that pracically all of 40,000 people 
violated the motor act of California in the first half of this 
year and paid fines, according to the report of the law en- 
forcement campaign of the Division of Motor Vehicles. 

The campaign, which was conducted along the lines laid 
down in the law enforcement policies of the division, re- 
sulted in the arrest, during the short period of six monhs, 
of 27,888 persons for reckless driving and speeding. It is 
to be noticed that convictions for these offenses constitute 
70 per cent of the total number of arrests in the drive made 
for the enforcement of the law. They totalled nearly 2000 
more than last year, during the same period. 

The rest of the infractions are quite interesting in their 
respective numbers ; violation of rules of the road, 4665 ; 
poor or glaring lights, 2226; plates, 883; mufflers, 1929; 
operators' cards, 553; miscellaneous, 1531. 

Violations outside of cities and towns amount to 20.725. 
The State traffic officers are responsible for practically all 
of the arrests. 

While there is every reason to congratulate ourselves 
upon the fact that the motor vehicle department is making 
a really earnest endeavor to grapple with the many prob- 
lems involved in the vast numbers of motor vehicles, the 
number of arrests and convictions slightly disturb's one's 
faith in the commonsense of people as a whole. 



Now that there is election time coming along 
Go Easy and there are numerous candidates for judicial 
office, it might not be a bad thing to call their at- 
tention to what Ave must consider very recent abuse of the 
contempt powers of the courts. 

We do not think that it can be contended at all that there 
is any increase in contemptuous criticism of the the courts; 
indeed, there is less now than ever there was. It is not 
so many years ago that there was no hesitation in saying 
of the courts what one might think of them in the matter 
of their attitude; and frequently even less hesitation in say- 
ing to the court, precisely what might be the opinion of a 
fellow citizen who found himself in hot water. 

Now, we hold no brief for the apparently disorderly con- 
duct which frequently marked judicial proceedings and 
which was the object of much criticism on the part of 
foreign visitors. Much of that disorder arose from the 
neighborliness and democracy of those days, when all the 
neighbors were well acquainted and the judge had no sacro- 
sanctity . 

But while we are in favor of orderly courts and decent 
behavior, we are not at all satisfied with the present and 
growing tendency of the courts to punish for contempt and 
so to deprive the person charged of the benefit of trial by 
jury and such other constitutional safeguards. To sav. as 
a court in Indiana did the other day, that the truer the 
charges against the court, the greater the contempt, and to 



August 14. 1S26 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



punish, as contempt, charges, the truth of which are ad- 
mitted, strikes us as the very dregs of tyranny and quite 
incompatible with the decent administration of justice in 
the courts. 



Samuel M. Shortridge, in the United 

The Career of States Senate, has been in every way 

Senator Shortridge distinctly a credit to the State, and 

should without any question lead to 

his re-election to the same office. 

A United States Senator is possessed of greater power 
and dignity than almost any other person in the world. 
Never, since the days of Rome, has any office, whether in 
a monarch)- or republic, carried with it the implications of 
power which are implied in the office of United States 
Senator. So great has our strength grown and so grand 
has the scale of our national operations become that a 
Senator at Washington can profoundly influence the affairs 
of the world for good and evil. 

It may be positively said that the whole work of Samuel 
M. Shortridge has tended in the direction of greater national 
glory and at the same time, of better conditions at home. 
The measures for the well-being of the country, which the 
Republican party has forwarded, have received his unhesi- 
tating and loyal allegiance. He has supported the adminis- 
tration, thoroughly and undeviatingly. His unfaltering 
labor and steady persistence have always been at the call 
of the President and the leaders of his political party. 
Whatever may be our personal political predilection, it is 
undeniable that the present administration, under President 
Coolidge, has brought to us a degree of prosperity which 
no country has, within the scope of written history, enjoyed. 

And as for the interests of our State of California, which 
a United States Senator can do so much to aid or mar. there 
is no doubt of the able and effective work which Senator 
Shortridge has done and can do. He should be re-elected 



We are in possession of a good group of judges 

Our Judges in the Superior Court in San Francisco and 
those who arc present incumbents arc by all 
odds the best successors to themselves. 

The Bar Association, which i- the advisory and watch- 
ing organization of local lawyers and which exercise- a 
healthy and growing influence upon bar affairs. i„ unquali- 
fiedly on the side of the judges hereafter set forth and has 
recommended very strongly their election. There should 
lie no hesitation about supporting them. They should be 

given an unqualified victory at the poll- at the Primary 

Election, for there is no reason at all why the expense of 
a general election and all the wear and tear of it should be 

dragged out, when we have such excellent and practiced 

material ready at hand. 

The civic clubs and improvement associations also en- 
dorse the action of the liar Association anil are a unit in 
support of these men. This fact speaks volumes fur their 
probil\ ami general standing. Judges come into contact 
with humanity not at its best, and under conditions which 
tend to arouse oil passions and the creation of stealthy 
hatreds. It is a notable fact that the business world, which 
mosth is concerned in litigation of one kind and another, shoul 1 
so earnestly, independent of their own gains or losses, support 
these particular candidates. 

They are Harold Louderback, Daniel C. Deasy, Walter 
Perry Johnson, E. P. Shortall, John J. Van Nostrand, Tim- 
othy 1. Fitzpatrick. and Frank H. lhinne. 

Of these, some have been connected with our local civic 
life on the legal side for many years. Some have graduated 
from the police court and are now state-renowned for -a- 
gacil\ and learning. Walter Perry Johnson is. however, 
the student and scholar among them, as they all would agree. 



Governor Richardson holds the unique 
Campaign Lies position of a state official who has been 
attacked on the grounds of his economy 
ni handling the affairs over which he presides. As a rule, 
federal, state, county and municipal officers have been taken 
to task for the extravagance with which they have used the pub- 
lic's money. The "pork barrel" has been, since the inception of 
government, a political institution held up to general scorn, and 
upon which all sorts of abnormal and unpleasant conditions 
have been blamed. 

Now comes a cautious, shrewd, economic statesman, who 
objects to being a witness to the pathetic sight which has here- 
tofore been prevalent in the State's political circles, — the 
squandering by officials, committees, organizations, bureaus, 
etc., of public moneys. 

Especially has Richardson been held to account because of 
Ins attitude on educational matters, and he has been accused of 
"leveling a broadside at education in his inaugural address," by 
more than one public instructor. 

It might be well to publish this "broadside" more exten- 
sively in the time that will elapse before election, so that people 
may know just wdiat it consists of. and judge for themselves 
whether or not our Governor is handicapping the public in- 
s ruction system of California. 

The following excerpts are from his maiden speech as head 
of the State, given before a joint session of the Senate and 
Assembly on January 9th, 1923: 

"The education of the youth of the State is one of the mosl 
vital matters, an I while California ranks high in educational 
standards, it should he our endeavor to have it rank still higher. 

. . . The people are ivilling to contribute liberally to education 
because it promotes better citizenship, but they are not willing 
to have their money squandered. . . . Extravagance in edu- 
cational matters has n ,n riot during the past few years. This 
budget shows an increase of $8,618,627.60, or 23 per cent, in 
lite past two years. Politicians in the guise of educators have 
squandered the people's money with a lavish hand and have 
denounced advocates of thrift as enemies of education. 

\ great political oragnication has been built up which has 

cost the people an immense sum. hut has added little to the 
value of education given School children. The laws have 
been cunningly amended so that supervisors, school hoards 
and boards "I education have little control OVeT the expendi- 
ture- of school monej and hence can not check extravagance. 
The people are loud in their protest as indicated hv hundreds 
of complaints received by me, hut they are unorganized and 
unable lo cope with the schemes of certain political educators. 

"The expenditure of school money in this State must be put 

on (i business basis and the schools must not only teach, but 
practice, thrift. Educators should be left in control of edu- 
cational matters, bill sound business men should be in control 
of expenditures." 



A Judge on the Bench should poa- 
A Man of Experience si-ss a wide knowledge of men and 
women, especially of their junior 
year-, for childhoi d is the impressionable age. when character 
is being formed, and the surroundings, training and treatment 
during this tender period have an inera licable effect upon the fu- 
ture adult. 

\ man who ha- been in the public service in various line-. 
in particular, in educational service, i- a man who must have 
gained a fair intuition regarding human impulse- and emotions 

Such a man i- Judge Langdon, who taught school in his 
earlier vears. as a stepping f jurisprudence. 

and his identity with public education led to his election a- 
Superin endent i - San Francisco and appointment 

later on, as President of the Sate Board of Education and 
meml>er oi the Fresno Normal School Board. 

Taking up the law. he was elected District Attorney and. 
after serving two terms .be removed to Stanislaus County 
oattwut on Paee 2\ i 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1926 




'LEISURE'S WW 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ 73m Moore, 




Big Cinema Productions 

ECHOING, as it were, the effects of 
Greater Movie Season, conies the 
definite announcement that the picture, 
"Ben Hur" will be screened here soon. 

A well known editor in speaking of 
the moral effect of biblical films, has 
classified the thrilling story written by 
General Lew Wallace in the category of 
the biblical productions now stirring 
the country. 

Ralph Pincus of the Columbia The- 
ater, where this picture will be shown 
states that "Ben Hur" is to be screened 
at the Eddy Street playhouse on Sep- 
tember 6, Labor Day, its initial appear- 
ance in San Francisco. 

"While Ben Hur is mostly a story 
of the Bible, it is aided by the intro- 
duction of a fictional hero. It is in- 
spirational in tone, beautiful in thought 
and thrilling in action." 

* » * 
Columbia 

Jeanne Eagels comes back to the Co- 
lumbia theater in her famous charac- 
ter part in the drama of "Rain," next 
Monday night, August 16, upon popu- 
lar demand, it would seem. 

This return engagement of the fam- 
ous star brings also the announcement 
that the same cast which supported her 
before, will be in the play upon its re- 
appearance. 

This production will be here for the 
one week only, according to present 
booking, so that those who wish to see 
the remarkable characterization of 
Sadie Thompson may just "be re- 
minded." 

Curran 

"Cradle Snatchers," another Louis 
O. Macloon production, will be the at- 
traction of the Curran theater starting 
Monday night. August 16, with an ex- 
cellent cast of funsters headed by Helen 
Bolton of New York. 

This hilarious farce comes to San 
Francisco from the eastern metropolis. 
where it has had a one year's run at 
the Music Box theater. Its presenta- 
tion at the Curran will be the fist since 
it has left New York. 

The limited engagement of this 
sprightly play, with its gorgeous set- 
tings and elaborae costuming, will un- 
doubtedly mean, "packed houses" as 
"Cradle Snatchers" is regarded as one 
of the funniest plays of the season. 



By "Jingle" 

Alcazar 

"The Show < >ff" continues at the Al- 
cazar as another of the record-making 
Henry Duffy stage attractions, with 
Louis John Bartels of the original New 
York cast in the title role. 

Just to hear Louis Bartel laugh is 
enough to dispel the blues of any one. 
It is an out-of-the-ordinarv laugh and 
while high and loud sounding, rather 
fascinates and stirs one. instead of get- 
ting on the nerves. 

* * * 
President 

"Love 'Em and Leave 'Em" has al- 
ready registered three months of suc- 
cess and bids to run still longer at the 
President theater on McAllister street 
near Jones. Isabel Withers and Betty 
Laurence have the leading feminine 
roles. Kenneth Daigneau. William 
Rainey, Earl Lee and Frank Darien 
are featured in the splendid cast. 

One of the funniest episodes of the 
play, which by the way is thoroughly 
sprinkled with laughter, comes at al- 
most the end of the second act. It in- 
cludes a dice game and some particu- 
larly funny situations. 

* * * 
Capitol 

The Capitol is to be re-opened this 
week as a house of musical coined}-. 
Lee Morrison, the Xew York producer, 
has had the Ellis Street theater entire- 
ly re-decorated for his opening, using 
black as the predominant color. 

The sombre shade has been a popu- 
lar color for theaters in London for 
quite awhile, but this is the first time 
that it has been used in this country to 
our knowledge. 

"Music Hall Revue" will be the open- 
ing attraction. It is a Will Morrissey 
production. The cast incudes nine lead- 
ing players from the East with a local 
chorus of unusual vocal training. 

* * * 
Imperial 

Rudolph Valentino is still packing 
them in at the Imperial. 

It is customary for picture houses to 
be filled from seven in the evening until 
nine, but the Imperial has been packed 
from early afternoon until late at night, 
ever since Rudolph came to town in 
"The Son of a Sheik." 

Aside from his love-making, Valen- 
tino, in this picture gives evidence of 
his horsemanship, of which the star, 



himself, is particularly proud. Vilma 
Banky is his leading lady. 

Valentino will occupy the Imperial 
screen another week. 



St. Francis 

"The Marriage Clause." a drama of 
the stage and its people is the week's 
attracion at the St. Francis theater. An 
all-star cast essays the principal roles 
including Billie Dove, Francis X. Bush- 
man with Warner Oland and Grace 
Darmond in support. 

.Milton Sills, doubling his fame for 
his dramatic work in "Men of Steel," 
lias filled the St. Francis to capacity, 
up to the final screening of this excel- 
lent photoplay in which Sills has ap- 
peared to such splendid advantage. 

* * * 
Pantages 

The I'antages theater is this week of- 
fering a diversity of attractions. Tom 
Brown, with the Six Brown Brothers, 
are the headliners. 

Brown has a band of fourteen pieces, 
which intrigues with its popular music, 
but the piece de resistance is the saxo- 
phone sextette composed of the Six 
Brown Brothers. This group of mu- 
sicians has done a great deal toward 
making the saxophone a popular instru- 
ment. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

The Orpheum Theater, with its gen- 
eral appeal to real lovers of excellent 
vaudeville, has a number of outstand- 
ing features on its bill for this week. 

Headline attractions set the pace for 
the balance of the program. Helen 
MacKellar, who is bringing her own 
company of players from New York, 
in a condensed version of her stage suc- 
cess : "The Mud Turtle" heads the bill. 
Mario Yalle, operatic baritone, of 
[lie San Carlo Opera Company, will 
be heard in a joint recital with Eric Zar- 
do, the concert pianist, presenting a big 
musical attraction. 

Ilughie Clark, the jolly rotund sing- 
ing comedian, wdth Tommy Monacos 
Orchestra, will have a colorful band of- 
fering called "Past and Present." Al- 
len ('aim and Charles Gale, with their 
company, including Jean De Mar, Elin- 
or Faron and Lillian Fields, will be 
seen in "A Rhinestone Revue." The 
Diehl Sisters, two San Francisco girls, 



August 14, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ON THE STAGE 



ALCAZAR I "The Snow Off" 
U'Farrell nr. Powell J L„uis John Barrels 


O'APITOL, ) "Music Hall Revue" — 
Kills ur. Market ( Musical Comedy Open- 
) ins August lu. 


COLUMBIA I "Rain" 

70 Eddy j Jeanne Eagels 


CURRAN I "Cradle Snatchcrs" 
Geary nr. Mason j Dramatic Comedy 


PRESIDENT I " I '° vc ' E ,^ n ?, nd LeaVe 
McAllister nr Mkt. f H enry Duffy Farce 


GVa L ry a? Mason } Cto.e« this week 



VAUDEVILLE 



GOLDEN GATE 
G. G. Ave. & Taylor 



I Donald Kerr, Effie 
(. Weston, Co- Headlining 
f with Mile. Marguerite 
J and Frank Gill. 



ORPHEUM 
O'Farrell & Powell 



) Helen MacKellnr, head 

*■ !■_.._ 11 ..,-:.. Valla nn. 



liner. Mario Valle, op- 
eratic baritone. 



PANTAGES(NEW) { Tom Brown, Six Brown 
Market at Hyde ( ? ro * h * TS ~ Saxophone 
) Sextette. 



PORTOLA 
Market near 4th 



Vaudeville-Pictures 



UNION SQUARE { VnndeviUc-rictures 
O'Farrell nr. Powell ( 



WIGWAM 

Mission and 22nd 



Vaudeville-Pictures 



ON THE SCREEN 
DOWN TOWN 



1 "The Lone Wolf Rc- 
CALIFORNIA I (urns," llert Lytell — 
\i„ rkit at 4th I Dune Dove. 



Market at 4th 

CAMEO I 

Market opp. Bin \ 



"The Trap" 

Lon Chancy and 

Irene Rich 



J Popular Pictures 

J Changed three t«— 
) per week 



S A ? IN P». .„„ a. ( ChnnBcii three limes 

Ellls at Mason St. i 



GRANADA I 

Market at Jones St. | 



"Fine Mnaners" 
Gloria Swanson 



IMPERIAL t "Son of the Shclk" 

Market bet. 6th-Tth J Rudolph Valentino 

LOEWS WARFIELDl "Into Her Kingdom" 
Market at Taylor f Corinne Grlllllh 



ST. FRANCIS 
Market bet. 5tk-6th j 



. ..The Marriage Clanae*' 

I lllllic Dove 



Frniicis X. llushiiinii 



RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS 

ROYAL I " ( Da «" Harold l.lnvil. 
Polk nr. California ( " l '? 1 " noiies." Madge 
) llclliimy. Saturday. 

Heavenly 
Clara — \\ hy did Nora insist oil being 

married in an aeroplane; 

Cora — Well, she's SO conceited that 

she thought no man on earth was g 1 

enough for her. — Sydney Bulletin. 

* '* * 

"Jazz is a wearisome and irritating 
reiteration of cacophonic imbecility,' 
says Mr. Lionel Berlyn. It is danger- 
ous, though, to stand directly in front of a 
trombone player and tell him this. — 
Humorist. 



will be back home next week, and with 
Mr. MacDonald, will be seen in "Ar- 
tistic Comedy." A big "surprise turn" 
is announced for next week at the Or- 
pheum. 

Golden Gate 

Every day crowds of people clamor 
to gain admittance to the Golden Gate, 
the Junior Orpheum, where the same 
management presents programs at- 
tracting the big audiences. Both the 
( irpheum and the Golden Gate have 
been drawing full houses and the pres- 
ent week bids fair to keep up the pace. 

Vaudeville numbers and musical of- 
ferings, motion pictures and organ and 
orchestra accompaniments make the 
playhouses really unique in their pre- 
sentations. 

Donald Kerr and Effie Weston are 
co-headliners this week with Mile. Mar- 
guerite and Frank Gill. Kerr and Wes- 
ton present a revue and the other pair 
give Spanish dances. 

"Stop, Look and Listen" is the pic- 
ture with Larry Semon, the star in one 
of his rapid-fire comedy dramas. The 
picture is packed with fun. 
* * * 

Loew's Warfield 

"Go to the Warfield and you will al- 
ways see a good show" is a common 
phrase, because, forsooth, it is true ! 

Corinne Griffiith will be the star at 
the Warfield this week, in a First Na- 
tional picture, "Into Her Kingdom" 
filmed from the story by Ruth Comforl 
Mitchell, known in private life as Mrs, 
Sanborn Young, wife of United States 
Senator Young. The famous author 
has written many novels, short stories 
and a bonk of poems and everything 
that she writes is distinguished for its 

wholesomeness and its great human 
qualities. 

The vogue for "Night Clubs" which 
has swept the country, has been the 
inspiration of this week's Idea which 
Fanchon and Marco oiler as the stage 
presentation. Rudy Danillo, pupil of 
Louis Graveure, with a tenor voice of 

unusual musical sweetness and charm. 
is the feature. Eunice I lealev and Mac 

Johnston arc other featured perform- 
ers. The sixteen Sunkist Beauties pro- 
vide a background for the idea and 
when the curtain rises are seen danc- 
ing with the boys in the orchestra with 
the popular Walt Roesner appearing as 
"manager" of the Night Club. 

This idea, according to the Warfield. 
has been arranged as a tribute to the 
late Luther Burhank. famous flower 
wizard. Models representing different 
flowers parade and pose beneath his 
picture. 

The success of last week's picture. 
"Battling Butler," starring Buster 
Keaton placed the ascendency of the 
frozen-faced comedian higher than ever 
in the scale of popularity. 

(Continued on Page 14) 



Sylva for Justice of the Peace 

.Manuel F. Sylva has thrown his hat 
into the ring, for the office of Justice of 
the Peace, and his candidacy is creating 
almost as much 
interest as any of 
the major political 
campaigns. 

Mr. Sylva, who 
is a practicing at- 
torney, has for 
years devoted his 
time to the civic 
betterment of San 
Francisco, for he 
is an indefatigable 
worker in organ- 
izations which 
tend towards mu- 
nicipal progress 
(, and improvement. At the present time 
he is secretary of the Eureka Valley Pro- 
motion Association, Vice-President of 
the Central Council of Civic Clubs, a 
member of the Castro Parlor. Native Sons 
id" the ( iolden West and of the San Fran- 
cisco Bar Association. He has also 
served ten years in the military depart- 
ment with honor. 

I lis recently organized campaign com- 
mittee has headquarters at 810-811-812 
Liberty Bank Building, and consists of 
some very prominent and respected citi- 
zens of San Franciso >. 




Manuel F. Sylva 



Sunday School Teacher — What 
wrong did the sous of Jacob commit 
when the) sold their brother Joseph ? 

Little Soil) They sold him too 
cheap. — Answ ers. 



CLUB 
Auto Service Co. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 
For All Occasions 
Day and Night 

City Sightseeing- - • $3.00 per hour 

Shopping 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxicab Rates 

PROSPECT ^ Post st . 

4000 San Francisco 



jcycni pay no more* 

Wflowei§ 



224,226 Gam** Tel Kearny 4975 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Society Folks 
Still At Fesorts 

CALIFORNIA resorts still lure society. 
\ugust, pleasant as July, in many of the summer 
places and resorts, bids fair' to retain its distinction as a 
vacation month. 

The opening of the local schools has of necessity called 
many back to town, but with the week-end exodus and the 
events at country cubs, the social era is still very much m 
swing. 

Many predict that the coming Fall ,and \\ inter seasons 
are to be unusually gay and festive this year. 

Others, already in the vanguard of society events, have 
announced their' luncheons, bridge parties, supper dances 
and out-in-the-country festivities. 

Club houses down the peninsula have been the Mecca 
for outstanding society events this summer and their popu- 
larity increases with the staging of each delightful affair. 

It is so delightful in the country. The club houses are 
so exquisitely and competently equipped for society affairs. 
And, it is such rare fun to entertain on the verandas and in 
the breakfast rooms or dining rooms overlooking the lawns. 

A "bid" to a country club house is always looked upon 
with favor and the motor trips down the peninsula or across 
the bay always carry the lure of expectancy. 

So, 'with house parties, hotel supper dances, country 
luncheons and bridge teas, one may well wish for more days 
in the calendar year. There are not going to be enough 
hours in the day, nor days enough in the week — to permit 
acceptance of all that society favors and plans. 

That is universal opinion — and one's book-of-engagements 

verifies the verdict. 

* # # 

Returns From Tour 
Midnight Sun Land 

Mrs. P. A. Morbio, who recently completed a tour through 
the fjords of Norway and Sweden, and the Land of the Mid- 
night Sun, has gone to England to stay indefinitely. 

Miss Alberta Morbio is now located here, where she is 
studying in an advanced course in nursing. She came into 
considerable fame, quite to her surprise, — for modesty is 
her virtue, — when, during the Grenfell relief expedition, 
she cared for the families in Labrador, during the terrific storms 
of last year. 

Miss' Morbio was entirely cut off from communication 
with the outside w^orld for months, administering to those 
who needed care. Her heroic work was the occasion for 
unfaltering praise from the medical professions and the 
laity alike. 

The people of Alaska and Labrador still talk of the beau- 
tiful girl and her heroism. 

Mme. de Maillv and her son. Bobbie, have taken an apart- 
ment in town for the winter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carlo Morbio and Mme. de Maillv have just 
returned from Brockway, Lake Tahoe. where they spent several 
weeks. 

i SANTA MARIA INN 



Santa Maria, California 



On the Coast Highway Halfway Between San Francis, 
An Inn of Unusual Excellence 
Wire or write for reservations on your next 



i and Log Angeles 
ip south 



Home Luncheon 

Mrs. ]. Rupert Mason gave a luncheon at her home in 
Lake street for Mrs. Clayton Dinsmore, who has arrived 
here from New York and is visiting her father at the Fair- 
mont Hotel, where he and his daughter. Miss Elsie Jacobs, 
make their home. 

Mrs. Mason's guests included Miss Irma Clayburgh, Miss 
Lea Calegaris, and Mesdames . Frederick Vincent, John 

Thomas, Benjamin Smith, John Wilson. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard E. Wood have taken a cottage 
on the grounds of Feather River Inn, where they expect 
to remain for the balance of the summer. 

Regatta Attracting * * * 

Yacht Owners Here 

The presence of the United States Fleet and the big an- 
nual Pacific Coast championship yachting regatta is attract- 
ing state-wide attention. The yacht meet is scheduled for 
next week with the Mayor's citizen committee and the Pa- 
cific Interclub Yacht Association, co-operating in elaborate 
preparations fur this event. 

Admiral S. S. Robison is due to arrive here, Friday, 
August 20. He is bringing into port for the last time on 
the West Coast for many months in the passing, the entire 
fleet nf sixty-two ships with a personnel of 23,500 men and 
2.500 officers. 

Society men and women, prominent citizens from the en- 
tire west coast, are eagerly anticipating the regatta, with 
its attendant festivities which opens on Saturday, of next 
week, August 21. 

* * * 

Speed Boats Owned By Millionaires 
In the Elaborate Fete 

Many prominent business men, whose names are well known 
in millionaire circles, are taking keen interest in the regatta. 

The regatta itself is sponsored by twenty-five yachting clubs 
of the Pacific Coast, from P>ritish Columbia to San Diego. 
Fourteen of these clubs will be represented by entries in either 
the power or the sail races. 

Speed boats from Lake Tahoe and the fastest "R" craft 
from Victoria, Vancouver, Seattle and the South are to be 
included in the entries. 

The fleet is to participate on a large scale in the regatta. 
San Francisco, especially all along the Marina, and from the 
highest hill tops, is to be elaborately decorated for the event. 

Night In Venice * * * 

A "Night in Venice" is to be one of the spectacular and 
alluring scenes of the yachting regatta. 

In addition to interclub events, in which many prominent 
society folks are interested, there will be a day given over to 
the younger generation and the children with a view to in- 
teresting them in water sports. 

Mrs. Henry Cohn entertained at a luncheon last Thursday 
in honor of her sister, Mrs. Jack Grossman and her niece. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

fl."10 Itnvti street, Between Powell and Stoekton, San Franelpsco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



August 14, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Miss Sylvia Rosenstock of New York and Mi- 
ami. Tables prettily decorated with pink roses 
and dahlias seated the guests. 

They were: Mesdames John Daneman, Albert 
Wechler, Louis Epstein, C. A. Leighter, Morris 
Cohn and the Misses Irene and Louise Colin. 

* * * 

Mrs. Wallace W. Shaw has returned to her 
home in Chicago after visiting her (laughter, Mrs. 
Dean Arnold, in Burlingame. Mrs. Arnold's sis- 
ter. Miss Ressie Shaw, arrived in Burlingame a 

few days ago. 

* * * 

San Franciscan Weds 
Southern Belle 

Dr. Rudolph P. Jacobsen, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Xels Jacobsen of San Francisco, last week wedded 
Miss Fern Nelle dishing, daughter of Mrs. 
Emma Cushing of Los Angeles. 

The wedding took place in the Little Church 
of the Flowers at Glendale. The bride was at- 
tended by Miss Vera May Cushing. as her maid 
of honor. Mr. Carl Jacobsen, brother of the 
bridegroom was best man. 

* * * 

Mrs. (irace Gorman is en'ertaining this week, her mother. 
Mrs. Thomas Frick of Denver, who spent some time in Holly- 
wood before coming to this city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Richard 




HOTEL CANTERBURY 
750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



week visiting their 
geles. 



if this city are spending a 
daughter, Mrs. Henry Beeson in Los An- 



Countess Feted Guest 

Countess Florenza K. de Zarnla Nicholai, the fiancee of 
Senor don Carlos J. Monsalve, was the feted guest at a charm 
ing tea given last Wednesday at the St. Francis Hotel. Mrs. 
D. F. Neville the gracious hostess. 

The Countess looked beautiful in her gown of rich silk and 
lace with a picture hat of the latest mode. She wore exquisite 
orchids as a corsage. 

Table decorations were exceptionally original and attractive. 
At one end of the long table seating the guests «.'^ a miniature 
church with a lawn spreading From the church door to the curb, 
where stood a miniature laxic.il> ostensibly awaiting the bridal 
party. 

Dolls dressed to resemble the bride, the bridegroom and all 
of their attendants were in processional formation. 

This artistic bit of work was the original idea of Miss 
Madaline Miller, who carried out the plan in detail The cert 
lerpiecc of the table was a basket of pink roses and ferns to 
which was fastened a bow of pink tnlle and a large wedding 
ring. I 'ink and green ribbons led from tin centerpiece to the 
place cards. 

Among those present were Mesdames Prosper Reiter, Charles 
IVahodv I luff, J. Trussell. Kmilie Blanckenberg, Clayton Saut- 
6T, I. Wendt, Jason Meilson, M Ludwig, William Hamilton. 
James Isherwood, Moffatt, McKay, Franklin. Thrift. Lisberg- 
er. Louise Melvin. E. B. McXear. Lillian Leonhart. and Mes- 
dames G. E. Miller. Trumbo McLean. Oliver Dupont, Joseph 
Cote. George Cabaniss, Graves Liller. A. Seibrecht, T. Take- 

tomi. Martial DavoUSt, David Scott. lames King Steele. Peter 
Cook, B, A. Laird, D. E. F. Easton A. J. Silva, J. Paul Smith. 
George McGowan, Miio Abercrombie, and the Misses Madaline 
Miller. Maxine Seibrecht. Peggy Steele. Nan Gould and 
Miss McKay. 

* * * 
Engaged 

An engagement of interest to San Franciscans is that ot 
Miss Sybil Veronica Stewart and Mr. James Taylor Thayer. 

Their marriage will take place August 20th. at the hoc 
the bride's sister, Mrs. 1 R. Knox in Los Angeles. 



Luncheon for New Yorker 

Mrs. Jack Barman Jr. was hostess at a de- 
lightful luncheon given at the Fairmont Hotel 
las: Saturday in compliment to Mrs. Phillip Shat- 
ter mid Mrs. William Elkins, her sisters, of Man- 
hattan I leach, who are her house guests. 

Mrs. Shatter and Mrs. Elkins, both formerly 
live 1 here. The gues's at the luncheon were Mes- 
t'ames: Harry Stern. Herman Snyder, Fred 
Adrllestone Bowerman, Philip Diamond, Sol. 
Friedenberg, Peter Williams, A. Goodman, R. 
Van Jones. Celia Arendt. S. Gold, Jack Addle- 
stone, Marcus Grenadier, Joseph Granat, Mayer 
Licht, Miss Aide Gonzales. 

Betrothal Tea 

( hie of the social even's of the last few weeks 
wa . the betrothal tea given in honor of Miss Vir- 
ginia Robbins at the Fairmont Hotel. 

Mi s Robbins. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam- 
uel I''.. Robbins of Sutter Creek, is one of the 
most popular favorites of her set. She is a 
member of one of the old California families 
and is much -ought in social circles. 
The marriage of Miss Robbins and Mr. Thomas Larke Jr.. 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Larke Sr.. of Burlingame will 
he an even' of this Saturday. August 14. 

The tea table- a 1 the betrothal tea. to be so soon followed 
by the wedding, repre-ented a rose garden outlined with a 
hedge of dainty ferns. Favors of corsage bouquets were given 
the guests who were the Misses Hazel Rea, Louise Knoph, 
Kathleen I'lannigan. \ngela Glynn, Mary Fagundes, Kalher- 
ine Maher. Gladys Vaughn, Lena Joan Salvimina. Anna Pratt. 
Florence McGuire, Marigene Lyons, and Esther Ranlett. 



( (scar Welsh 
yacht, "I hifting 
hi- departure to 

and Mesdames 
Lynch, Eleanor 



!r.. entertained last week-end on board his 
The affair was a dinner dance given prii 

[onolulu. vmong those present were: Messrs. 
Blair Dodson. Oscar Welsh; Misses Margaret 
Kennedy, Patricia Pearce, Anna Tobin, Eliza 

beh O'Connell, Lima lessen Edna Corcoran, Lillian Bianchini; 

Messrs, Oscar Welsh Jr.: Stanley McCurdy, Philip Sheridan. 

George Emerson, Arthur Hancock, William Whitman. George 

Whittel. Virgil Mathers. Robert Lingston. 



Garden Wedding 

Another garden welding took place recently down the pen- 
insula, the scene of a number of recent bridal bowers. 
(Continued on Page 17 1 

THE OLYMPIC 

51 \TTI.I 
Finest and Largest Hotel m the Pacific Northwest 

. V 



E 



I 



Kuwk W Hill Manager 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1926 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




Time Will Make Correction 

AS there is now no control of broad- 
casting by the government, inter- 
ference may be caused by relatively low 
power stations, in view of the fact that 




C. J. Pennington 

the carrier wave extends far beyond the 
range of modulated transmission. If a 
low power transmitter attempts opera- 
tion on the same frequency or wave- 
length used by a distant higher pow- 
ered station, reception difficulties will 
develop. Which accounts for the pres- 
ent whistle that is ever present on cer- 
tain stations that have recently pirated 
another wavelength. The only correc- 
tion possible is to wait until Congress 
arrives at some conclusion, after which 
we all hope to listen in peace once more. 
# # * 

Pacific Radio Exposition 

The first radio convention ever held 
in the west is scheduled to .take place 
in conjunction with the third annual 
Pacific Radio Exposition to be held 
here August 21st to 28th. 

The convention is to be held under the 
auspices of the Pacific Radio Trade Asso- 
ciation which is also sponsoring the ex- 
position. It will attract to the meeting 
and the display some of the biggest 
figures in the radio industry, it is said. 
One of the principal speakers will be 
A. T. Haugh, president of the Radio 
Manufacturers' Association and vice- 
president of the King Quality Products 
Company of Buffalo, N. Y. 

A constructive program for the ad- 
vancement of radio is to mark this ini- 
tial convention. All of the problems 
of the radio from the standpoint of the 
manufacturer, jobber, dealer, the broad- 
cast station and the owner will be dis- 
cussed. The theme of the meeting will 
be the improvement of radio in all its 
aspects. 

The exposition is to be used by the 
convention as a visual demonstration 



of the radio industry of today. Accord- 
ing to the Pacific Radio Trade Associ- 
ation more than 400 exhibits have now 
been contracted for with approximately 
90 per cent of the space sold. The ex- 
hibits will include the latest models of 
practically all of the outstanding man- 
ufacturers of radio receivers and ac- 
cessories. 

Dealers, jobbers, manufacturers and 
manufacturers' representatives from all 
sections of the west have sent in their 
reservations for the big convention-ex- 
position event, the first showing of ra- 
dio for the new season anywhere in the 
United States. This together with the 
popular interest already evidenced by 
the public gives assurance of the most 
successful display of its kind ever held 
in this section, it is said. 



A New One 

A forerunner of the new model re- 
ceivers designed and built by the Ameri- 
can Bosch Magneto Corporation has been 
placed on the market under the trade 
name of Amborada-RS 27. It is a 
seven-tube receiver using a balanced 
bridge circuit, completely shielded, en- 
closed in a cabinet made of walnut and 
black woods. 

The Amborada has no panel, multi- 
plicity of dials or sliding door familiar 
to the ordinary receiving set design. 
On its front side are the centralized 
tuning and volume control knobs. 
Above and in the top table surface is 
a flush window through which the new 
"Line-o-Light" dial system of station 
finding is viewed. Below and hidden 
behind doors is space for all power ac- 
cessories, including "A" battery, power 
unit and charger. 

A translucent, drum-type scale is ac- 
curately calibrated in wavelengths, and 
from the under side of the drum a sharp 
line of light is thrown across the scale, 
lighting up the exact wave to which the 
set is tuned. 

Five condensers, each tuning a unit 
in the radio frequency amplifier, are 
mounted with their shafts end to end. 
The coupling between condensers al- 
lows for minute differences in shaft 
alignment. Counter-balances facilitate 
tuning the condensers. 

The receiver is equipped with a mas- 
ter rheostat for the adjustment of all 
tube filaments to the proper potential 
When the set is installed the rheostat 
is adjusted and never needs further at- 
tention. A power switch provides com- 
plete control of the power accessories, 
including batteries, eliminator and 

(Continued on Page 14) 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO — 428.3 
Sunday, August 15 

9:45 to 10:45 a, m. — Undenominational and 
non-sectarian church service. 

10:45 a. m. — Weather forecast, amusement and 
general information. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
creation Park of the baseball game. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Organ recital by Marshall 
W. Giselman. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Orchestra, Waldemar Land 
director. 

6:30 p. m. — Baseball scores, amusement. 

6:35 to 8:35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

8:35 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

Monday, August 16 

7:00, 7:3d. 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

ln:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. Weather forecast. 

12:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 
-Matinee program. 
-Palace Hotel Concert Or- 



-Children's hour. 

—Stock market quotations, 



1:00 to 2:00 p. 

2:30 to 3:30 p. m.- 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m.- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m.- 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orches- 

7:30 to S:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Organ recital by Uda Wal- 
drop. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— KFI and KPO broadcast- 
ing simultaneously. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. in. — Mandarin Cafe Orchestra. 

Tuesday, Angust 17 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market reports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:10 to 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Orchestra. 

1:00 tn 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:4") p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
creation Park of the baseball game. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:15 to (l;: n >it p. m. — .Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 n. m. — Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program featur- 
ing Gypsy and Marta. and the KPO Trio. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

Wednesday, August 18 

7:00, 7:30, S:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

ir»:nn a. m. — Weather forecast, market re- 
ports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast from Re- 
creation Park of the baseball games. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra. Waldemar Lind 
directing. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program by the Atwater 
Kent Artists. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra, Waldemar 
Lind director. 

Thursday, August 10 

7:00. 7:30. 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market re- 
ports. 

12:00 rrnon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

l: in p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball games. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 



August 14, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



Radio Program for Next Week 



to 6:15 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra, Waldemar bind 
director. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program by Kane's Ha- 
waiians. 

L0:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe Dance 
Orchestra. 

Friday, AuKiiHt 24) 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 a. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market reports. 

18:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing-. 

12:45 p, m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. in. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

8:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball games. 

1:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

,".:::ii to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind. 

7:00 to 7:10 p. m. — "Sports on the Air." 

7:10 to 7:20 p. m. — "Business and Invest- 
' talk. 
7:30 p. m. — Chamber of Commerce 



ment,' 
:20 to 

talk. 
:30 to 



:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:66 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

9:10 to 9:20 p. m. — Book review. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Waldemar Lind, 

Saturday. AtiRUNt ill 

7:00, 7:30, 8:00 p. m. — Daily dozen exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast, market re- 
ports. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

2:45 p. m. — Play by play broadcast of the 
baseball games. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — .Stock market quotations, 
baseball scores. 

6:30 to 7:20 p. m. — Orchestra, Waldemar bind 
director. 

7:20 to 7:30 p. m. — Talk on "Real Estate." 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Cabiria Cafe Orchestra. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 



KFRC— CITY OF PARIS DRY GOODS CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO— 270.1 
Sunday, August I." 

6:80 l>. m. — "The Stage 
'~:00 p. 



;i nd 

-i iance 



music from Ba i - 



icon to 12 

conndes Ballroom. 
Mimdny, August 10 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Household Hints, 
1:3d to 5:30 p. m. — Dance music. 
r>::io t<> 6:3ii p. m. — A. F, Merell and ins Stamp 

Club. 
6:30 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen" 

lice Reports, 

•Jo m endi i and 



p. 



8:80 to 7:30 

Band. 
S:(10 to 9:00 p. 

with Mac. 
Tuesday. tugus 
5:80 to 6 """ 



,! the « 



and Po- 
hfs Pep 

imp Fire 



Mac and hie Gang. 



Bal- 



Mac 



8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — KFRC Little Symphony 

Orchesra. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Saturday, August -I 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6:30 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen" and Po- 
lice Reports. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — "60 Minutes of Songs and 
Smiles." 

8:30 to 1:00 a. m. — Dance music from Bal- 
conadea Ballroom. 



:3o p, m. — "The Stage and Screen" and 
lie i te ports, 

:S0 to 7:15 p, m, — Fred McKlnley 
LG to 7:30 p. m. — KFRC Radio Movie Club A 
8:oo to 9:30 p. m. — Studio pro r gam 
9:80 to 11:00 p. m.— Dance music by Walter 

KrauSgrlU'a Orchestra. Jj 

Wednesday* August 18 

10:00 to 1 1 :00 a m. — Household Hints 

5:80 to 8:30 p m. — Mac and his Gang. 

8:80 p. m. — "The Stage and Screen" and Po- 1 

lice Reports, 
8:30 to 7:30 p. m. — David Kane, Hawi 

Steel Guitai Soloist 
B:00 to 8:10 p m.— Talk. "Health and Safety. 1 
s.i (i in 9:00 p m. — Concerl by KFRC Little 

Symphony ( h chi 

I to ucnit p. m. — Studio program. 

to 12 00 p. m — I >ance n 

Thurxdil? . lugUKt 11* 

6:311 to 6:30 p. m. — Mac and his c, ; .i 

e so p m - -"The Stage and So - n" and Po- 
lice Reports. 

10 p. m. — Harrj B 

s 00 to s 80 p. m. — studio Program. 

B;30 to 10:00 p. m.— Dance music from 
conades Ballroom. 

Krldn>. \iiiiiisi _*» 

5:30 to ,; :30 p. m — Mac and 

will enter an "Endurance contest," 

,;■■:,! Pi m.— "Th< Stage and Screen." 
lice Reports. 

Smiles." 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS, INC., 

SAN FRANCISCO— 250 
Sunday, August IS 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Studio prorgam. 

8:00 to 0:00 p. m. — Services bioadcast from 
First Church of Christ Scientist. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Paul Kelli's Orchestra. 

Monday, August m 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu studio program. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. rn.— Root. C. Beddome singing 
old-time numbers. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Hie Parker and Gladys 
La Marr. 

8:00 to H:(i0 p, m. — Studio program featuring 
Helen Irene Wilson, soprano. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — One hour at Coffee Dan's. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Roseland Dance Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Paul Kelli's Or- 
chestra. 

Tuesday, August 17 

l m 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu studio program. 

i; mi to 6:30 p. m. — Bob Beddome singing old- 
I ime numbers. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m, — "Oats" De Lay, Carl Winge 
and Frank Gibney. 

8:00 to 8:S0 p. m. — Louis Donato singing pop- 
ular ballads, 

': : ;;n to 9:00 p. m. — Gaylord Wilshire Lecture. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program, 

in: (10 to 12:()(i p. m. — John Wolohan's Cali- 
fornia IIS. 

Wednesday. August is 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu studio program. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Bob Beddome singing old- 
time numbers. 

6:30 to 7::i(i p. m. — Chart, s King singing pop- 
ular numbers. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 9:20 p. m.— Sadie Woodside and John- 
nie O'Brien. 

9:20 to 9:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:80 to 11:00 p. m. — Tom Cal Meeting. 

11:00 i>. m.to 1:00 a, m. — Paul Kelli's Orehes- 
i ra 

Thursday. Vumisi lit 

1:00 to 2;00 p. m. — Impromptu studio pro- 
gram, 

6;00 to 6:30 p m. — Boh Bedd i singing old- 
time numbers. 

i; .:: t so p, "i -- George Taylor and Cowell 

i iein, 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m ■ R« i - and piano 

8;30 to 9:00 p m — -Halt" hour of populai n 

9; o L0 00 p m. — Bruce Cameron 

u\ no to 11 :00 p. m. — Etosi land i irchestra 

11:00 to 12 p m — Paul Kelli's Orchei 

i • iday. lugust -*» 

i mi to ' 00 I' oi impromptu si udio program. 

6 00 to ii ■'■" p in Bob !•• d.loin. 

■ inn nun b ,,. , 

5:30 to 7:30 p. m, — Al Pearce and waiter 

Smith oflei Ing populai 
s oo to ••■■'■ (, p m. — Ben Llpston singing . 
lai ballads 
. ; .. g mi p m - i iaylord Wllshire i 

.. i p program. 

1(1 on to ii l *' 1 P " ! ■ l: "- 'and i >an< i 

■■ I I'M 

I | oo p -Paul k. His I irches- 

Ira. 
N:»1lirdn>. tafCUM 21 

■ 

m, — John Wolohan s Call- 

1 



-•■»>o Minutes of Sonj 



K JB ii L1VS BBVNTOW A BOMS CO w 9AS 

Kit iN CISCO — SSO 
Hoaday. lagual 16 

— Vocal, Instrumental and 

. 4:00 p. m. — Vocal, instrumental and 

■■ 

Tuesday, lagual i" 

Rnnmrr schedule' 

- vooal, Instrumental and 

I 'an. M . , j 

•cal, Instrumental and 

W rttnodn? . \iiuu*< l fi 

-Vocal, Instrumental and 

l tance Mus , , 

cal. Instrumental and 

Thursday, lujcast '" 

■ 

—Vocal, Instrumental and 



Friday, tu^nst -o 

9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal, Instrumental and 

Dance Music. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal, Instrumental and 

Dance Music. 
Saturday, August 21 
9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal, Instrumental and 

Dance Music. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal, Instrumental and 

I iance Music. 



KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS, 
OAKLAND— 302.8 
Sunday. AiiKuwt 15 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Bible Lecture. 

11:00 a. m. to 12:30 p. m. — Church Service. 

7:45 to 9:15 p. m. — Church Service. 

Himday, Vuuusi 10 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer Service. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

T:iin to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping- Hour. 

i On to m:00 p. m. — Program. 

Tmsday, AugUNt 17 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer Service. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p, m. — Shopping Hour. 

Wednesday, August IS 

8:80 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer .Service. 

9:00 to 9:80 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Lecture Hour. 

7:ini to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping: Hour. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 

Thursday, AuRust IP 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Prayer Service. 

ii.iki in 9:30 a. m. — Shopping- Hour. 

r.:K> to 0:15 p. m. — Lecture Hour, "Keeping 

Well/' 
7:00 to 7 ::n p, til — Shopping Hour. 
.vim to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 
Fi Iday, tugust -o 
8:30 to '.!:()(i a. m. — Prayer Service. 
9:iiii to 9:30 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
7:110 to , :30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
vim to li):iio p. m. — Program. 
.Saturday, tiitust 21 
8:30 to 9:00 a. m.— Prayer Service. 
:i mi to 9:80 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 
Sunday. \ueUNt 15 

9:00 a. in- Exposition of the International 

Sunday School Lesson. 
I :30 p. m. — * in.' hour of sacred songs. 
V on day, AtifiiiHt IfE 

1 .. m. — The aour of Christian Ministry. 

Tuesday. August 17 

t: :;<i p. m, — Children's Bible story hour. 
<;!.". p. m. — Bible reading 

m.— Vesper Service. 
Wednesday, \%*i£. i* 

. in — The hour of Christian .Ministry, 
y i»n p, in — One hour of Bacred songs. 
Ttaaraday. \ucu*t 10 

,. p ni. — Children's Bible story hour. 
6:46 p. m. — Bible reading 

m.— -Vesper Service. 
Friday, \uku*«i ao 
10:00 a nr^Tti.- hour of Cristian Ministry. 

m. —studio program. 
Sa tnrdas . Iiajnmaf -I 

10:00 a. in. — One hour Children s Church 

to oadcasl ing. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 
OAKLAND— 361 

Sunday. iBglK IS 

, m ^_i-'irst Bap1 ist Church service. 

i ,,,i p. pi — -Vesper service, ' Irace < Cathedral. 
6:30 i,, 7 "" p. m.— Concerl by Barn's Little 
Symphony « 'rchi 

P ni — Weather Bureau report. 

,, ni— Kirst Bap 1 1 81 Church service. 

1:00 to i p m — Concert by Bern's Little 

bony < Irch 
Haaaay, \uc"*t id 

til to l "" p. m. — Lunche<»n concert 
Ime Signal. 
,. m — o/ea 
,„ _n y Stock reports; 
p m. — s. F st."k reports. 
re n m — w.ather Bureau reports. 

p m — KGO Kiddies' Klub. 

ncert by Bern s Little 

Symphony Orchi 

m. — New a items. 
., m . — Weather Bureau report. 

m. S. F Produce. Grain. Cotton and 

p m — N Y Stock reports (closing). 
stork reports (closing 
m — Educational program — music ami 
leers 
p, m. — it. W. J. Stewart 
; . m — Leroy R. Goodrich, 
m — -Better Enlgish." 
m — chats About New Bo 
m — Mr> Guy K. Farrington. speaker. 

Tii«-.dn>. lac*al 17 

B m to 1 :00 p m. — Luncheon c--i 
noon — Time Signal. 

ther Bureau reports. 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1926 



Radio Program for Next Week 



1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 D. m. — s. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 
and members. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:0S p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Eveready program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — The Pilgrims' Hour. 

Wednesday, .August 18 * 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time .Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — U. S. Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:31 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 
and members. 

5:30 p. m. — "For Instance," General Jackson, 
columnist. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:08 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. .Stock reports (closing). 

Thursday, August 10 » » 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Association 
and members. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — George W. Ludlow, "Friend 
to Boys." 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p .m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:0S p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — & F. Stock reports (closing). 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Vacation program. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Phil Lampkin's Musical 
Bears. 

Friday, Aimust 20 

11:10 a. m. — Homemaking Talk. 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time Signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio, pre- 
sented by Pacific Radio Trade Asociation 
and members. 

•>:30 to 6:00 p. m. — KGO Radio Girls. 

6:00 tn 6:55 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

7:0$ p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton and 
Metals. 

7:16 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:23 p. m. — S. F. .Stock reports (closing). 

Saturday, August 21 » 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:00 noon — Time SIngal. 

12:30 p. m. — U. S. Weather Bureau report. 

12:33 p. m. — N. Y. Stock Market reports. 

12:40 p. m. — S. F. Stock Market reports. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Knickerbocker Trio. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little 
Symphony Orchestra, Drury Lane, Hotel 
Whitcomb, San Francisco. 

8:00 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

S:10 to 9:00 p. m. — Program, Instrumental .Se- 
lections. 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m.— Arthur S. Garbett in a 
musical talk. 

9:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Popular program. 

10:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance music. 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAK- 
LAND— 509 
Holiday, August 1G 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — "Community Night" pro- 
gram. Broadcast by musicians and citi- 
zens of Stockton, Cal. 

Tuesday, August 17 

3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Wednesday, August 1H 

3:00 p. m. — Bapeball. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 



7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational Program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Special program. 
Thursday, August 
3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
Friday, August 20 
3:00 p. m. — Baseball. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:45 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:45 to 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 
Saturday August 21 
3:00 p. m. — Baseball, 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KFI- 



-EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 
LOS ANGELES-^67 

(Copyright 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc.) 
Sunday* August 15 

10:00 a. m. — Church Services under direction 
of L. A. Church Federation. 

11:00 a. ni. — Temple Baptist Church. 

4:0ii p. m. — Vesper Services arranged by Fed- 
era tod Church Musicians. 

6:30 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:45 p. ni. — Music Appreciation Chat and 
Father Ri card's Sun Spot Weather Fore- 
cast. 

i :O0 p. m. — Jim, Jack and Jean Trio. 

8:ii0 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital. Dan L. 
MacFarland at the console. 

9:<ju p. m. — Bob Bottger and his "Venetian 
Dance Orchestra — -Mert Denman and his 
Uke. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra. Bill 
Henri esy Director. Dolly MacDonald, Solo- 
ist. 

Monday, August Hi 

5:30 p. m. — Matinee Program. 

6:00 ]>. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 P. ni. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Program. 

6:45 p. m. — George Wilder Caitwright. Talk on 
"The Constitution of the United States." 

7:00 p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians. 
Jackie Lucas, blues singer. 

8:00 p. m. — Classic Hour. 

9:0u p. m. — Program by Walter M. Murphy 
Motors Co., Los Angeles, and Stanley W. 
Smith, Inc., San Francisco, presenting Vir- 
ginia Flohri. Soprano; Robert Hurd, Tenor; 
Gamut Male Quartet; Hollywood String 
Quartet. Broadcast simultaneously by KFI, 
Los Angeles, and KPO. San Francisco. 

10:00 p. m. — Prorgam by Meiklejohn Bros. 

Tuesday. August 17 

5:30 p. m. — The Original Victorians Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p, m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — The Original Victorians Orchestra 
and Betty Palo. 

6:45 p. m. — Dr. John T. Miller — Human Na- 
ture Around the World. 

7:00 p. m. — Virginia Ballroom Orchestra — 
Park Sisters. 

8 :mi — .Screen Artists' Quartet. 

9:00 p. m. — Robert Hurd, Tenor; Leslie Adams, 
Whistler and Pianist. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club. 

Wednesday* August i* 

5 :30 p. m. — Don Warner's Orchestra. 
-KFI Nightly Doings. 
-KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
-Don Warner's Orchestra. 
m. — E. C. D. Price "Gossip." 
-Westerland Trio. 

r:30 li. m. — Nick Harris, detective stories. 

8:00 p. m. — Program by California Petroleum 
i I orp oration — Calpet Orchestra. 

L0:00 p. m. — Prorgam aranged by Charles 
i teauchamp. 

Thursday, August 10 

5:90 p. in. — Tht-ion Bennett's Hollywood Foot- 
lifters. 

6:00 p. m._KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:15 p. m.—KFI Radio Travel Guide, 

6:80 p. m. — Theron Bennett's Hollvwood Foot- 
lifters. 

*'■ ;4 ". |». m. — Radio tnrial Period. 

i :00 )'. m. — Radio Buys' Orchestra and Geo. 
"Mara. 

8:00 p. ni. — KFI Drama Hour. 

9:00 p. m. — Classic Hour. 

I P. m. — Patrick-Marsh Orchestra — Bcttv 

Patrick, Soloist. 

Friday, August 20 

m. — Eugene Riseallu/.. 
m. — KFI Nightly Doings, 
m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
m. — r-arnl M;ii.-r. .Mezzo Soprano, 
m. — Burr Mcintosh, "Cheerful Phil- 
osopher." 

7:00 p. m. — Luis Merrier, Basso-contante. 

7:30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado — Media Hora Es- 
panola. 

8:00 p. m. — Aeolian "rgan Recital. Dan L. 
MacFarland at the console 

9:00 p. m. — Classic Hour. 

10:00 p. m.~ -Packard Ballad Hour — Gretchen 
Garrett, Soprano. 

Saturday. August 21 

5:30 p. m — Shelley Players orchestra, with 
Marta Evarts, Millie Hart Teate and Jack 
Brady: Kenneth Price; Joe Haggerty 

6:00 p. m.—KFI Nightly Doings. 






p. 


m. 


0:15 


li. 


m. 


6:30 


p. 


m. 


li : 4 5 




m, 


7:00 


P. 


m.- 



5:30 i'. 

6:00 p. 

iVl."! p. 

6:30 p. 

6:45 p. 



6:15 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Program. 

6:45 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 

7:00 p. m. — Billy Cox and his Orchestra — Paul 

Roberts, Tenor Soloist. 
S:00 p. m. — Angelus Quartet. 
9:00 p. m. — Varied Program, 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club, featuring 

Radio favorites. 
11:00 p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. 



KFWB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY- 
WOOD— 252 
Sunday, August 15 

9:00 t<i 11:00 p. m. — June Parker, blues; War- 
ner Bros. Syncopators. 

Monday, August 10 

4:45 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

5:00 in 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

<;:<hi t-. 7:ihi p. m. — Pontiac Six Dinner Hour. 

7:00 to S :no p. m. — Program featuring Bill 
Blake, tenor; June Parker, blues. 

8:00 t<> 8:10 p. m. — News items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Ra- 
il uel Nieto; coloratura soprano. 

!i :10 lo 10:10 p. m. — Program featuring Dan 
Gridley, tenor. 

10:10 i" 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

TnMday, August 17 

4:45 to 5:00 p. m. — Home Economics. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

•■::00 to s ; l rt p. m. — News items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m.— Bill Blake; Esther White: 
Kill I hitch's orchestra. 

0:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Art Pabst and his banjo; 
Bill Match and his orchestra. 

lii:io to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Wednesday, August 1H 

1:1.". tn fi:00 P- m. — Home Economics. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

B:00 to 7:00 p m. — Regular Pontiac Hour. 

7:on to S:00 p. m. — Program featuring Julius 
H, Phillips, tenor. 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News items. 

8:10 t'> 9:10 p. m.— Program featuring The 
Dare Sisters. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his or- 
chestra. 

10:10 to 11 :00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Thui *dny. \ugust 10 

6:00 to 7:iiii p, m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News items. 

S:lo to 9:]ii p. m. — Program featuring Edward 
\o\ is. baritone. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Program featuring Ra- 
quel Nieto. 

10:10 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Friday, August 20 

6:00 to 7:00 p. in. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

R:Q0 in 8;l0 p. m. — News Items. 

S:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Ray 
Kellogg and Bill Hatch, violin and piano. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Bill Hatch's orchestra. 

10:10 to 11:00 ])- m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Saturday* August 21 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

B:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Bill Hatch and his or- 
chestra. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Esther White, popular 
songs: Bill Hatch and his orchestra ; Ju- 
lius H. Phillips, tenor. 

10:00 to ll:oo p. m.— Warner Bros. Frolic. 



KNX-L A. EVENING EXPRESS, 
LOS ANGELES — 337 
Dally E&xcept Sunday 

7:30 a. in. — KNX Morning Gym. 

8:00 a. m. — Inspirational talk and morning 
prayer. 

1 ;55 ;i. m. — Time Signals. 

l .i :00 a. m. — Radio Shopping News. 

10:00 a. in. — The Day's Morning Message. 

10:80 a. m. — Household Economics except Fri- 
day and Saturday. 

12:00 m. — Arcade Orchestra. 

1:30 p. ni. — The Book Worm. 

1:55 p. m. — Market reports. 

"i ;;u p. in. — Arcade Orchestra. 

fi:00 p. m. — The Town Tattler. 

i; : 1 '• p. m. — Travelogue. 

6:30 P- m. — At water Kent orchestra. 

Sunday, August ITi 

10:00 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood. 

2:00 to 4 :00 p. m. — Musical program. 

1:30 p. m. — Half hour of Cinema That. 

6:30 p. m. — First Unitarian Church. 

7 :00 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 

8:00 p. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

Monday* August id 
00 p, m. — Little Jean. 

4:30 p. m. — Blue Monday Frolic. 

7:00 p. in. — Courtesy program. 

7:30 p, m. — Courtesy program. 

R :00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p, m. — Courtesy program. 

1.0:00 p. rn. — Courtesy program. 

11:00 p. ni. — Ray West's Cocoanut Grove or- 
chestra. 

Tuesday. August 17 

L':<ni p. m. — Mothers* Hour. 

4:00 p. m. — Radio Matinee. 



August 14, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



13 



8:00 p. 
4:00 p. 

-;IMI p. 



7:00 p. m. — Courtesy prorgam. 

7:46 p. m. — Talk on health. 

viiii p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p, m. — Edgewater Club Orchestra. 

Wednesday! August 18 

2:00 p. m. — Walter Butterly, baritone. 
-Musical readings. 
—Talk on care of children. 
—Feature program. 

8:00 p, m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 p. m. — Edgewater Club Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Ray West's Cocoanut Grove Or- 
chestra. 

Thursday. August 1ft 

11:00 a. m. — Nature talk. 

2:00 p. m.- — Paul D. Hugon, handwriting ex- 
pert. 

2:30 p, m. — Reading by Edward Murphey. 

7:00 p. m. — Organ recital by Fred Scholl. 

S:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Edgewater Club Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Ray West's Cocoanut Grove Or- 
chestra. 

Friday, August 20 

10:30 a. m. — "Proper Foods and How to Pre- 
pare them." 

2:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

4:00 p. m. — Boy Scouts' Musical Program. 

7:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

11:00 p. m. — Ray West's Cocoanut Grove Or- 
chestra. 

Saturday, August 21 

3:00 p. m. — Town Crier of the Day. 

1:45 p. m. — Joyce Coad on her screen work. 

7:00 p. m. — Stories of insect life. 

7:15 p. m. — Announcement of Sunday services. 

7:30 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Ray West's Cocoanut Grove Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Saturday night frolic by KNX ar- 
tists. 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 
Sunday, August 15 

2:30 to 3:00 p. m. — Sunday School Lesson. 
3:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Church service from the 

Temple. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Evening service from the 

Temple. 
Monday, August 10 

12:ln to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
Tuesday, July 17 

12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — studio prorgam. 
Wednesday* August IS 

12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
2:30 to 3:30 p. m. — Divine healing service. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Thursday. July 1ft 

12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture. 
Friday, August 20 

12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture. 
3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Sunshine Hour for the 

shut-ins. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Saturday. August 21 
12:10 to 12:80 p. m. — Dally Scripture, 



KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO- 
SEATTLE— 384.4 
Sunday. August 15 

11:00 to 12:30 p. m. — Church Services from 
First M. K. Church. 

7:46 to 8:00 p. m.- — Organ recital. 

8:00 to 9:15 — Evening Service First M E 

Church. 
9:15 to 10:45 p. m. — Orchestra under dlrei 

of Henri Damski. 
Monday. August 10 

11:80 to 12:00 p. m, — "What to pi 
tonight's dinner," 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quo ra- 
tions. 

i;:ou p. m. — Time Signals. 

iiiiio t.. 6:06 p, m, — Baseball scores. 

R;06 to 6:10 p. m, — Weather reports. 

B:80 to 10:00 p. m. — Post Inteligencer Studio 
prog ram 

1000 p. in. — Time Signals 
TutvHdn> . August 17 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare 
night's dinner." 

i 2:00 ro — Tim.- Signals. 

5 10 to 6:00 P. m.< — New York quotations. 

6:00 t>. m. -Tlmi Signals. 

i, QO to 1:06 p I ■ all scores. 

B:06 to 1:10 n W gather reports, 

to 10:00 »'. i». — Studio program. 
1 ]>. in, — Time Siirnals. 
W eilncNday, \iigu-< t g 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night s dinner." 

Signals. 
f,:oo to 4:00 p nv— Musical program. 
5: |0 to 6:00 p m. — New York Stock quotations 



0:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

7:30 to 8:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance Music. 

Thursday, August 11) 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer pre- 
senting weekly meeting of the "Keep Joy 
Radiating Order of Bats." 

Friday, August 20 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:80 to 10:00 p. m. — Post Intelligencer Studio 
Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Saturday. August 21 * ' 

11:30 to 12:00 m. — "What to prepare for to- 
night's dinner." 

12:oo m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 To 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:0o p. m. — Time .Signals. 

B:00 to 6:05 p. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 
— 322.4 — (Mountain Time) 
Sunday. August IB 

11:00 a, m. — Service of Montview Presbyterian 
church. 

5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8:00 p. m. — Concert. Denver municipal band. 

Monday, August 10 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports, stocks, 
markets, livestock and produce. 

12:15 p. m, — Organ recital. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulli U ns. 

6 ;30 p. ni.— i m inn r oi mcerl , 

7:30 p. m. — Self expression for children. 

s:iio p. m. — Instrumental program. 

B:1G p. m, — studio program musical offei 

Tuesday. Angus! 17 

11:15 a. m, — Weather, road reports, 
markets, I Ives took and produce. 

12:16 p. m.- — Organ recital. 

I 30 p. m. — Matinee tor housewives. 

1:00 p. m. — Cool culinary hints. 

1:16 p. m.- ! lew. 

p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins. 

■ ■ ■ l' m, — I 'inner QQQCerl . 

7:30 p. ni. — Farm question box. 

Wedmeadny. \imu*« lfl 

11:46 ;i m.— weather, ports, stocks. 

markets, livestock and produce, 

12:15 i toltal. 

i; 00 p. m.- — Btocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
flue* ;t nd news but letlns. 

6:30 p '■■' Dinnei : nc 

m, — Wynken, Blynken and Nod 
mental program. 

s L6 p. m. — Special studio program. 

Thursday. August 1» 

ii 16 a m — \\ oad reports, 

mark* ock and produce. 

12:16 p. m. — Organ recital 

knee tor housewlvea 
ints. 

1:16 p, m. — Fashion review-. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, pro- 
duce and news bulletins: 

,-, j: p, „i — Weekly sports review. 

6 80 p. m. — ] 'iicert. 

Friday, L«fu1 -<> 

11:46 a, ni.-\v eat her, road r« i ■ 

markets. 

Organ recital. 

nee for housewl 
culinary hints. 
1:16 p. m. — Fashion review. 
,; QO p, ni — StO< ks, markets. li\ ■ - 
duce and news bulletins, 
r concert. 
m , — Dinner concert. 

of International Sunday 

sson. ._-_■•. 

rt, Denver municipal band. 

Stfunln?, Viitiu-iT SI 

U:46 a m.— Weather, road reports, stocks, 

markets and livestock. 
18:16 p m — Organ recital. 



stocks. 



KGW— MORNING OREGON1AN, PORT- 
LAND — 491.5 
Sunday* August 15 

10:25 to 12:00 m. — Morning services. 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 

Monday, August 1« 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — KGW Movie Club. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 

Tuesday, August 17 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

2:iii) to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

0:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 

7:30 to 7:46 p. m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Wednesday, August IS 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

G:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, market and po- 
lice reports. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Concert. 

Thursday, August 10 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

6:00 to 7:0(1 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7;3i) to 7:15 p. m. — Weather, police and mar- 
ket reports. 

7:15 to S:0D p. m. — Lecture. 

N:(H> to 9:40 p. m. — Vaudeville program. 

Friday! August 20 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Women's daily dozen, 
music, weather report, household helps. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

0:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather, police and mar- 
ket reports. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Concert of vocal and in- 
strumental music. 

Saturday. August -I 

] n mi to 11:30 a, no. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

6:00 to 7 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

in un to 12:00 p. m.~ hance music. 




Low Summer Rates 

Hotel Del 
Coronado 

American Plan 

Stcimminf, Boating. Fishing. Dancing, Golf, 
Tennis, Motoring, Riding 

THE A. B. SPRECKELS 

AMATEUR GOLF TOURNAMENT 

AUGUST 25-28 

For magnificent $1,000.00 trophy and attractive 

prizes in all flights at Coronado Country Clu>- 

$5.00 Entry Fee. 

\nait literature and reservations 
may he made at San Francisco Agency 

L. E. Cahlile. Agent 
: Pise Street-Douglas 5600 

Mm S. Wright, Mavaceh 
CORONADO BEACH, CALIFORNIA 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1926 



Aeast* 



22 

reduced rate 



75.60 
78.00 
103.34 
75.60 



round trip ticket f 

on sale daily 

Atlanta, Ga.. $113.60 

Atlantic City, N. J.. 153.34 

Baltimore, Md 145.86 

Birmingham, Ala.... 102.86 

Boston, Mass. 157.76 

Buffalo, N. Y 124.92 

Cedar Rapids, la... 85.95 

Chattanooga, Tenn.. 107.48 

Chicago, 111. 90.30 

Cincinnati, Ohio.... 110.40 

Cleveland, Ohio 112.86 

Colo. Spgs., Colo... 67.20 

Dallas, Texas 75.60 

Dayton, Ohio 109.50 

Denver, Colo 67.20 

Des Moines, la..... 81.55 < 
Fort Worth, Tex. 
Galveston, Tex... 
Indianapolis, Ind.. . 
Kansas City, Mo... 

Louisville, Ky 105.88 

Memphis, Tenn, .... 89.40 

Minneapolis, Minn.. 91.90 

Montreal, Que 148.72 

New Orleans, La... 89.40 

New York City '137.88 

New York City 1S1.70 

Oklahoma City, Ok. 75.60 

Omaha, Nebr 75.60 

Philadelphia, Pa....»134.50 

Philadelphia, Pa.... 149.22 

Portland, Me 165.60 

Providence, R. L... 157.76 

Quebec, Que. 160.02 

Sioux City, la...... 79.80 

St. Louis, Mo. 85.60 

St. Paul, Minn..... 91.90 

Tulsa, Okla 75.60 

Washington, D. C. 145.86 

AND MANY OTHERS 
Return Limit October 31st 
* Return limit 30 days. 




Cedl 



iHuwy 

meal service 
©the Indian 
detour ©ate 

exclusive SamaFe 
travel features 
Stop off and wit Qmnd 
Canyon National Parjcentviae 

Santa Fe Ticket Offices 
and Travel Bureaux 

601 MARKET ST. 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 7600 

FERRY DEPOT, SAN FRANCISCO 



Originality 

Frightens the Old Fashioned 

It Pleases 

The Modern Advertiser 

Let Me If rite Your Advertisements, 
Publicity or Sales Letters 

Address: E. Ross, 268 Market Street 
Room 101 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 10) 

charger. These are located in a closed 
compartment and are accessible for ad- 
justments or replacements. A single 
movement of a convenient power 
switch cuts oft" with one movement the 
batteries or eliminator and connects the 
charger to the "A" battery. 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
(Continued from Page 7) 
California 

"The Lone Wolf Returns" is the 
coming attraction at the California the- 
ater, beginning Saturday, August 14, 
with Bert Lytell the star and Billie 
Dove playing the sweetheart. 

Max Dolin and his orchestra are al- 
ways one of the biggest drawing cards 
of the California theater, and this week 
their musical program has several out- 
standing features. The violin solos of 
Max Dolin, alone, are worth the price 
of theater admission. 

News of the world and short films 
are additional attractions, with always 
a comedy feature for full measure. 

* * * 
Cameo 

Lon Chaney and Irene Rich co-star- 
ring in "The Trap," is announced by 
the Cameo management for a run of 
seven days beginning on Saturday, 
August 14, with Chaney appearing in 
one of his greatest starring roles. 

Northwest romance set amid beauti- 
ful scenery with thrills and dramatic 
action part of the photoplay, the attrac- 
tion is rated as even greater than "Out- 
side the Law." 

A smashing climax is an outstanding 
feature of this picture with the cinema 
celebrity presenting some of his best 
work in a great character role. The 
popular Market street playhouse will 
offer, also, as a Tuesday night attrac- 
tion, Eddie's Advershow, an unusually 
clever entertainment. 

Every Wednesday night as "Try- 
out" is held in which several amateurs 
may compete. Five acts are on this 
program. 

* * * 

Granada 

The latest Gloria Swanson produc- 
tion, "Fine Manners," and her first un- 
der the banner of Paramount, is the 
screen attraction this coming week at 
the Granada. 

This photoplay is adapted from an 
original screen story by James Ash- 
more Creelman, and is said to give Miss 
Swanson one of her best oportunities 
for dramatic work. 

Eugene O'Brien plays opposite the 
heroine in one of his splendid charac- 
ter roles. This time he is a social young 
blade who wants the igrl to take a cor- 
respondence course in etiquette. She 
does. The change in the girl and what 
takes place afterwards affords an un- 
usual twist in plot theme. 



Royal 

The Royal theater on Polk street at 
California is offering some special 
screen attractions this coming week, 
beginning with Saturday, August 14, 
with Harold Lloyd the feature in "I 
Do" and Madge Bellamy and Jane No- 
vak and Charles Jones the stars in 
"Lazy Bones." 

Anna Q. Nilsson and Huntly Gordon, 
co-starring in "Her Second Chance" 
are the features on Sunday, in a thrill- 
ing picture of race track life. 

"The Bat," filmed from the mystery 
story and stage success holds the screen 
from Monday until Thursday. Robert 
McKim, a San Francisco star, Jack 
Pickford, Jewell Carmen and Louise 
Fazenda are the screen celebrities in 
this startling mystery photoplay. 

Corinne Griffith starring in "Madem- 
oiselle Modiste" will be seen Thursday 
and Friday with Norman Kerry play- 
ing opposite. The picture contains the 
world renown operetta with magnifi- 
cent settings as a background for the 
story. 




EUROPE 



On the new famous "O" steamers 
you ore sure of utmost comfort-' 

cabin or tourist third cabin 
Cabins containing single and two 

beds. Spacious promenade 

decle, ballroom, gym and other 

special features 

Sailings Saturdays 

from New York 

Cabin class from #145.00 
Tourist from #95.00 

cAtso direct sailings from Pacific 

Coast via Panama Canal 

CRUISES: 

Norway • South America 

Mediterranean 

Second great African cruise leaves 

New York, January, 1927 

Complete information Of titeraturt 

Royal Mail Stcarr Packet Company 

570 Market St., San Francisco 

or Local Agent 



ROYAL 

MAIL 

nTHE COMFORT ROUTEr- 
Since 18 3 9 




August 14, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



IS 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 
NORTH AFRICAN MOTOR TOURS 

The inauguration of these tours a few seasons ago of- 
fered something quite unique in troubleless touring and 
opened up all the allurements of the Orient and the land 
of Sunshine, even for the most inexperienced of travelers. 
Since then many extensions have been made to the remot- 
est spots in North Africa. The entrancing Land of Islam 
is most thoroughly visited and journeys once occupying 
many months can be performed in the course of a few weeks, 
yet without hurry or worry and always under conditions of 
perfect comfort. 

The traveller, in the course of these tours, of which there 
is a varied selection, visits the golden sands of the Sahara 
desert and wanders amidst its palm-clad oases, passes through 
mighty, green-clothed mountains of Kabylia and Kroumiria, 
skirts the snow-capped peaks of the Atlas range, is at one 
moment in the depths of gorges as beautiful as they are 
impressive, and a little later is travelling through beautiful 
plains luxuriant with orange trees and tropical vegetation. 
He in turn visits the wondrous native cities, such as Fez, 
Marrakesh, Taza that once most forbidding of sacred cities, 
Biskra, the Garden of Allah, with its celebrated dancing 
girls and wonderful park. The imposing vestiges of Ro- 
man civilization, even more extensive than those of Pompeii, 
and Rome are explored. 

Antiquarians and students of the past history of the world 
will find unique opportunities of seeing the extensive ruins 
of Timgad, Volubilis, Tipaza, El Djem, Dougga, and of 
Carthage the once all powerful, above the beautiful Bay of 
Tunis. The traveller sees the turbulent manhood of a doz- 
en different races, each with its own peculiar customs and 
costumes and dwellings, and from morning till night new 
sensations are experienced. Even into the night the ro- 
mance continues, for at certain chosen spots the Company 
has erected open-air camps, provided, of course, with proper 
hotel beds, bathrooms, etc., and there the tourist may sleep 
under the incomparable African skies without experiencing 
any of the discomforts usually associated with camping. 

Until a comparatively few years ago these delights were 
only possible to the experienced traveller with unlimited 
time and money at his disposal. Now all hindrance has 
been entirely removed and it is as simple a matter to travel 
in comfort the whole distance between, the Lybian border 
of Tunis and the Atlantic-washed shores of Morocco as it 
is to make a tour through the English countries. 

Family parties with children may now travel without the 
slightest trouble or embarassment to spots once inacces- 
sible. The former difficulties arose almost entirely from a 
lack of proper roads, shelter fit for Europeans, and suit- 
able food supplies. During the War the French Govern- 
ment constructed a network of splendid roads — particularly 
in Morocco — thus rendering possible for the first time, easy 
communication between the seaboard and the great native 
cities of the interior. Some 8,000 miles of perfect roads are 
now available. 

The Compagnie Generale Transatlantique, with its pow- 
erful organization and its numerous Steamship services, was 
quick to foresee trie unique possibilities of motor transport 
on the splendid new roads to open up these marvellous 
countries. There remained the difficulties of shelter and 
food supplies .uid these were overcome by the erection by 
tin- Company ''i a series of hotels. There are at present 2.^ of 
these hotel.-- — styled "Hotel Transatlantique." They re- 
main under the direct control of the Company and offer 
every home comfort to tourists. The culinary arrangements 
are in the hands o\ experienced Chefs from the best Paris- 
ian restaurants. No matter where he may be. the traveler 
will rind both the outer and the inner man well looked after. 
At Fez the Company has acquired the palace of a former 
Grand Vizir and here its tourists are lodged and regaled 
amidst the original native surrounding 



CUNARD 

Channel Service 



New York 

to 

England and France 

by CABIN SHIPS 



Caronia 
Carmania 
Cameronia 
Lancastria 

Ala uni a 

ASCANJA 
AUSONIA 



For Full Particulars Apply to 

CUNARD AND ANCHOR LINES 

Or Local Agents 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8C DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED I8"l 



ERNEST F. RIXON, Qeneral oAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1926 




THE Standard Gas and Electric Company, one of the prop- 
erties of the Byllesby Engineering and Management Com- 
pany, the company so efficiently managing the Market Street 
Railways ?t present, has issued a very wonderfully printed and 

illustrated pamphlet. 

* * * 

—It appears that the Standard Gas and Electric Company 
is one of the largest groups of public utility companies in the 
United States controlled and operated by one company. Fur 
the year ending December 3Lst, 1925. the combined gross earn- 
ings' of the affiliated utility companies embraced by it were in 
excess of $137,000,000. and combined assets as of that date 

exceeded 5900,000,000. 

* * * 

— lames B. Duffy. General Passenger agent of the Santa Fe. 
says that he expects the new fast train operated between Cali- 
fornia, Texas, Chicago. New Orleans and the East, together 
with the six passenger trains daily, will greatly influence travel 
so that the biggest movement of tourists on record will be the 
result. Tine system, as now evolved, will save a day each way. 
Two days en route and three nights on the train will cover the 
distance from the coast to Chicago. 

* * * 

— Tlie July trading in mining stocks in the San Francisco 
Stock Exchange was the lowest on record, but the trading in 
industrial securities was the highest for the year. To'.al value 
of industrials exchanged was $743,572,110. 

* * * 

— "It takes a fast railroad train seven seconds to pass a 
crossing," says R. J. Clancy, assistant to the general manager of 
the Southern Pacific; "and yet 1784 automobilists were killed 
at grade crossings in the United States last year. There should 
be only one rule for motorists — 'Stop and let the. train by'." 

* * * 

— A local taxpayer has commenced suit in the State Su- 
preme Court to compel the Board of Supervisors to apply all 
of the surplus earnings of Hetch Hetchy power towards debt 
charges on the 1910 issue of Hetch Hetchy bonds. The Board 
of Supervisors had set aside a portion of the surplus revenue 
for the construction of a transmission line from Newark to 

San Francisco. 

* * * 

— There is to be a traffic survey of San Francisco. It is com- 
pute! that the annual loss to the United States through traffic 
accidents is $600,000,000. and there is an additional loss due 
to congestion of SI. 400,000.000. This means a loss of $20 per 
capita on the entire population. 

* * * 

— It has been well said that "City streets and inter-city high- 
ways are most emphatically a vital part of a modern community 
development, commercially and otherwise, and any movement 
to expedite safe and quick transportation over them should 
meet with unqualified public approval." 

* * * 

— Damage suits against union carpenters growing nut of 
attacks upon American Plan carpenters now total $130,000. 
The latest suit against the unions and their officers was filed 
by i '•. E. Baldridge, who was slugged and beaten up last May. 

* * * 

— The insurance companies are profiting by the trouble in 
San Francisco labor circles. The Underwriter's Report, for 
example, says: "In times of unemployment, unrest, riot and 
civil commotion, insurance must be worth several times the 
premium in financial protection and mental security." 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY I0TH. 1668 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1926 

Assets $109,430,478.72 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,400,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $557,000,00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

1IA1CHT STREET BRANCH Haiftht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4 '4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 



HEAD OFFICE: 
I'siiil I n Capital $20,000,000 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



TORONTO, CANADA 

s211.l100.iHHl Reserve Fund 
All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, EXG ; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.: MEXICO CITV, MEXICO. 

San FrnneUco OHIce: 4ZtQ Californin Street 
BRUCE HKATHt'OTE W. J. COVLTHARD 

.Manngrer Assi. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 22+4 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS -- AUDITORS — COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C. P. A. 
Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, Slow 
Accounts ; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYoung Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Duildlng; (Opposite Palace Hotel), Snn FrnncUco ♦ 
Phone Kearny 391 ( 

** 4 



August 14, 192o 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

Miss Harriet Oliver, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank S. 
Oliver, was the bride, plighting her troth to Mr. Leslie Har- 
ber Peter Jr., on the evening of Saturday, July 31, in the 
Ng Tong Gardens adjoining the home of the bride in Los 
Altos. 

Before a candle-lighted altar, draped in silver and banked on 
either side with masses of white lilies and gypsophilia, the cere- 
mony took place, the Rev. Thomas D. Landels, pastor of the 
Los Altos Union Church, officiating. 

The bride's path from the door of her home to the marriage 
altar, was lighted by eight bridesmaids, each carrying a lighted 
candle. 

Rose petals were strewn in her pathway by little Marjorie 
Carpenter of Berkeley. A formal aisle led between bands of 
silver ribbon held by the eight ushers. Frank S. Oliver walked 
with his daughter, whose bridal gown was of white taffeta 
and tulle with a yoke and bertha of rose point lace. 

Miss Elizabeth Smith of Los Angeles, was maid of honor, 
wearing a gown of pink and blue changeable taffeta, made in 
the period style. Eight bridesmaids were gowned in taffeta 
and lace. They carried garlands of flowers. They were Misses 
Mary Denny of Los Altos and Miss Patricia Nauman of San 
Francisco, in gold colored gowns ; Miss Josephine Franklin of 
Santa Barbara and Mrs. J. S. Green of Oakland, in green, 
carrying festoons of white lilies; Miss Elizabeth Pattiani of 
Piedmont and Miss Gladys McLeod, attired in orchid and lav- 
ender shades. 

Miss Marian Chaquette of Palo Alto, and Miss Elizabeth 
Meyers of Los Angeles, wore rose colored gowns and carried 
pink gladioli and sweet peas. 

The little flower girl was dressed in orange taffeta and Mas- 
ter Robert Newton Lynch Jr., was in white satin uniform arid 
acted as page to the bride. 

* * * 

Ushers' Attire 

The men of the bridal party wore luxedns and white flan- 
nels. They were Mr. Edward E. Wells of < Oakland, who acted 
as best man to the groom; Harold Bumbaugh of Burlingame; 
Ellsworth Barnett of Santa Rosa; Norris F. James "t Palo 
Alio; David F. Brown of Oakland; Howard William Noack 
of Oakland; Kenneth C. Hardwicke id' San Francisco; Jack 
W'iggin of Palo Alto, and Everel Young of Sacramento were 
the ushers. All of them arc Stanford University men. with 

the exception of Mr. Noack, who i^ a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of California. 
Wedding Music * * * 

The wedding music was supplied by Miss < )rrie Young, Miss 
Grace Hendricks and Willard Young, 

After the ceremony a reception u,i- held in the gardens. 

Mrs. Peter is a graduate of Stanford with the class of '-<> 

and belongs t" the Delta ' lamma Sorority. Her maid of honor 
and all her bridesmaids are her sororit) sisters. 

Mr. Peter is the son of Mr. and Mrs, Leslie 11. Peter of 
Oakland. He received his degree from Stanford a year ago 
and his fraternity is Alpha Kappa Lambda. He i~ connected 
with the Hank of llah in San Francisco. He has prepared 
a home for his bride in Burlingame. 

* * * 
Pretty Wedding 

( hie of the prettiest weddings of the summer season was that 
of Miss Minna Siegel. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Simon - 
and Mr. Louis M. Tuller. son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Tuller 
of Palestine, on Sunda\ evening. August 1. at S o'clock, in the 
Red Room of the Fairmont Hotel. Rabbi Herman Li 

read the marriage service in the presence of a large number of 
relatives and friends. 

Reception * * * 

After the ceremony and reception a wedding supper was 
served. Mr. and Mrs. Tuller will spend their boneym 
Honolulu and make their future home in San Francis 



Fallen Leaf Lodge 

The Ideal Tahoe Resort 

Located on Fallen Leaf Lake. Five miles from the State 
Highway. In the Center of a Wonderland of Mountains, 
Lakes and Streams. 

Comfortable rooms, Tents and Cottages — with and with- 
out Private Bath; and Famous Dining Room Service 
Combine to make the Lodge a Popular Vacation Spot. 

MRS. W. W. PRICE 
Fallen Leaf P. O., Lake Tahoe, Calif. 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

WHY? 

It's the Water and the Table 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 
tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN 

Acua Caliente, Sonoma County, Calif. 
or see Peck-Judah 



El Dorado Hotel 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Muahrooma" 

Clean Room*. Clean Linen. Clean Everything 

Viiil Sonoma County '• Famom Rciorti and Mineral (Warm Walor) Swimming 

Tank. From Thit Hole) 

Rain Eiceplionaliy Rcaionabla 

Telephone 110 



"POP" McC RAY'S 

One Mile North of Cloverdale on Redwood Highway 

DANCING IN DINING ROOM AND 

CLUB HOUSE 
SWIMMING IN RUSSIAN RIVER 

Jellies. Jams and Mustard Pickles Always on the Table 



CALIENTE VILLA ^fe*-* 

French and Italian Dinners — Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms Private Cottages 

AG I A CALIENTE 

i Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, Sonoma County, California 
TfeUPHOm SoifOMJ 114 



Chapel- 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

i71 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



19th Sts. 



] 



Arthur C. Thornton 



(.em-r.il InKDmnoe Phnnr Patter 31W. 

II- San^nnir Str«*«-t. Hnorni rtoi-.tmJ. Sun Krnntl.ro 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1926 



Aladdin Birthday Party 

The Aladdin Studio, the popular tiffin room and night 
club in Sutter street, will celebrate its sixth anniversary 
Thursday, August 19, by the gayest festival in its history. 

Six years ago the Aladdin opened as a quiet tea room in 
Post street. Growing popularity soon made necessary a 
move to the present quarters at 363 Sutter street, where the 
Aladdin developed into San Francisco's first night club, and 
became a nationally known gathering place for theatrical 
people. Its national repute as a gathering place of refined 
bohemians, and the fine example of Chinese art furnished 
by its decorations, as well as the shops which are con- 
ducted in connection with the dining room, have made the 
Aladdin much sought by tourists and visitors to San Fran- 
cisco. 



Dahlia Society 

The eleventh annual Dahlia Show will be held at the 
Palace Hotel, August 26, 27 and 28. for which elaborate 
preparations are being made. 

Carl Salbach is president of the Dahlia Society of Cali- 
fornia, under whose auspices the show will be staged, as- 
sisting officers of the Society and prominent people from 
the entire state, participating. 

William Kettlewell of San Mateo; Robert McWhirter, 
San Francisco, R. Vincent of White Marsh, Maryland, hon- 
orary vice-president ; T. A. Burns, honorary vice-president, 
San Francisco; F. D. Pelicano and H. T. Hennig of this 
city are officers of the Society. Directors include Mrs. 
E. W. Lymbery, Mrs. Jessie Seal, Miss Aimee Hodgens, 
Curtis Redfern,' G. A. Nieborger, A. Harris, A. T. Shulte, 
J. W. Davis. 

A new dahlia named after the Crown Princess of Sweden 
will be on exhibition at this Dahlia Show. More than 7,000 
varieties are to be exhibited at the coming event. 



In Europe they're putting peace on a war basis. — Toledo 

Blade. 

* * * 

Public officials are first sworn in and then cussed out. — 

Wall Street Journal. 

* * * 

France keeps looking for recipes when what she needs is a 
receipt. — American Lumberman. 

* * * 

Chicago plans the highest twin towers in the world. As 
isles of safety? — New York Evening Post. 



RE-ELECT 

MRS. JULIUS KAHN 

(FLORENCE P. KAHN) 

CONGRESS 

Fourth District 

INCUMBENT 

Primary Election, Tuesday, August 31, 1926 



"CUT THIS OUT" 



This Coupon entitles Mr 

to FREE Inspection and Minor 
Adjustments of Hydraulic Four "Wheel 
Brakes. 

WAGNER ELECTRIC CORPORATION 
457 Ninth Street Telephone Market 1188 San Franctseo 




TEL. GRAVSTONE 42tt« 

Metal Work Apper- 
mining to Automo- 
biles — Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding — Black- 
N nil thing. 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 




^ WATSON _ 

StabilatorX 



In a Stabilated Car — You Motor 
Relaxed and Arrive Refreshed. 



MADSON & RICHARDS 



Gray stone 210U 



( Incorporated; 

Pacific Avenue at Van Ness, San Francisco. Calif. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Hales: 35c per dnyj 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobllea 



LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 

LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 
Post and Franklin StrcetH San Francisco, Calif. 



Graystone 130 Open Day an4 Night 

SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of ¥m, Saunders 



TRUNKS - RACKS - BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVE. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

Sterling Anderson, Mgr. 

Three Blocks from S. P. Depot 
Cor. Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing, Oiling. Greasing, Washing and Polishing 
Gasoline : Oils Sundries 



August 14, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

TH E man who smokes helps to 
build roads in Mexico as well as 
the man who drives a car. Mexico will 
soon have a splendid system of federal 
roads connecting with the main routes 
along the southern border of the United 
States. 

A tax of a fraction under six cents a 
gallon has been levied on gasoline and 
the entire proceeds from the tobacco 
taxes have been set aside for road con- 
struction. The total amount available 
for highway work will be six million 
dollars a year. 

At the present time the motor car 
registration in Mexico is approximate- 
ly 25,000, most of which are owned and 
operated in and about Mexico City, but 
road improvement throughout the re- 
public will result in the opening up of 
a great market for American cars and 
accessories. 

License fees are collected by the 
states at the present time and are placed 
in the general state fund. Some step- 
may In- taken in the near future to set 
aside this money for highway construe 
tion. 

A highway commission of three 
members has been appointed and the 
initial plan contemplates the construc- 
tion of over thirteen hundred miles of 
road. 



Macaulay, besides being something 
of a poet and essayist and historian, 
was one of the most famous good roads 
boosters in his day. It was Macaulay 
who wrote. "Of all inventions, the al- 
phabet and printing press alone excep- 
ted .those inventions which abridge dis- 
tance have done most for the civiliza- 
tion of our species." 



Macaulay went further than merely 
to urge the construction of roads. He 
suggested a means of financing the 
highways of England through the im- 
position of taxes which would meter 
the use of the roads. 

If Macaulay were alive today, he 
would probably be a leading exponent 
of the gasoline tax. "That a route con- 
necting two great towns," he wrote, 
"which have a large and thriving trade 
with each other should be maintained 
at the cost of the rural population scat- 
tered between them is obviously un- 
just." 

* * * 

Improvements along the Victory High- 
way, which has been compared to 
the Appian Way, the most famous 
highway of the Roman Empire, as well 
as road construction within the state 
of California, has increased public in- 
terest in methods of highway construc- 
tion as well as highway finance. 

The old Roman roads were peculiar 
for their straightness, passing almost 
in a direct line between two determined 
points. In addition to this they were 
massive and durable. 

According to inscriptions on the an- 
cient monuments as well as reports of 
writers in the early age of Rome, the 
general method of construction em- 
ployed by the Roman Highway Engin- 
eers was as follows : The highway line 
having been laid out, two trenches were 
dug along each side of the road. The 
width of the road was between thirteen 
to seventeen feet. The ground was 
then dug out to secure a foundation 
and the road was then tilled or graded 
to the required height, sometimes as 
high as twenty feet. The paving was 
usually of small -tone-, second, a layer 
of broken stone cemented with lime; 
third, a laser of broken brick or pottery 
mixed with clay and line, and, last. 
gravel and lime or a -olid stone sur- 
face made of rock cut into squares and 
fitted together. The Roman roads were 
usually four feet thick. 

\ftcr the fall of the Roman Empire. 
these roads which had been used for 
hundred- of yen- were neglected but 
highways which were built in 312 B. C. 
were in excellent condition 800 years 
later and broad enough for two car- 
riage- to pass. In spite of the traffic 
of many ages, not a stone was dis- 
placed and the road was remarkably 
smooth. Many of these old Roman 
roads have been excavated and re- 
opened and are in use to this day. 



Astronomer (to his young wife) — 
.atulations. my dear. This is your 
birthday, and I -hall have a great sur- 
prise for you to-night! 

Wife— What is it? 

"At eleven-thirty tonight there will 
be a total eclipse of the moon!" — Dorf- 
barbier i Berlin i. 



New accounts comparable to a city 
the size of Denver, Colorado, or Portland, 
Oregon, were added to our books last year. 
The growth this year will be greater. 

Joining with the people of northern Cali- 
fornia, we welcome this progress and pros- 
perity. 

We pledge our faith in the future of the 
State by investing large sums for power 
developments now under way on the Pit, 
the Bear, the Mokelumne, and the Stanis- 
laus Rivers. We will have available, 
plenty of power at low rates for the new 
homes, factories and farms that are being 
established. 

"Nowhere is power so cheap 
us in California." 

Since 1913 the cost of living increased 
65%. Electricity DECREASED. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



p.Q.and 



"rAcinc sebvici" 




Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 



?!1-S2fi 




GEO. W. C4SWILL 

utter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1,HOO.OOO cups were ■erred at Ike Piimi 

Paetne lateraatloaal Exposition 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1926 



s&J&jtir 



**& 



ye» 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



'"SVsSfi, 



^f 



-^J 



THE next important golf tournament on the annual cal- 
endar will be the Olympic Club's woman's champion- 
ship, which starts at the Lakeside Course Monday, August 
23, and continues until Friday of the same week, when the 
finals will be played. 

For many years this tournament has provided some of the 
best golf that has ever been put up in competition in these parts. 

Mrs. Louis Bacigalupi, the wife of that eminent physician, 
Dr. Louis Bacigalupi, is the present title holder, and a very 
worthy one at that, due to the fact that Mrs. Bacigalupi holds 
three championship records at the present time, a feat that 
has never been equalled by any other golfer in the State. 



Mrs. Louis 

Bacigalupi, 

the 

Olympic 

Club's Golf 

Champion, 

who will 

defend 

her title 

at Lakeside 

next week 




Mrs. Bacigalupi is the holder of the Lake Merced woman's 
championship ; also the 72 hole medal title holder at the same 
club, in addition to being the present champion of the Olympic 
Club. Th doctor's wife won the last honor by defeating Mrs. 
Harding Brann in the finals last year, but Mrs. Bacigalupi had 
to set a new course record of 86 to accomplish the feat. 

Mrs. Brann played better golf last year than she had ever 
done before. 

Her match with Mrs. McClelland, when she went to the nine- 
teenth with hole for a win, was a very clever piece of work. 

Mrs. H. J. McClelland, who had held the Olympic Club's 
championship for the years of 1923-24, lost to Mrs. Brann in 
the early rounds of match play; but there was a time at the 
Olympic Club that Mrs. McClelland was invincible. However, 
since Mrs. Bacigalupi. Mrs. Brann, and Mrs. William Gilmour 
have taken to the game seriously, things have changed consid- 
erably; in fact, Mrs. Gilmour was the runner-up to Mrs. Mc- 
Clelland twice, and once when Mrs. Phil Wand won the first 
championship of the club. 

However, Mrs. Gilmour has been medalist on one or two 
occasions, and her success in several events around the bay 
counties' tournaments stamps her as among the best women 
golfers in the bay and peninsula region. 

Mrs. George Mullin and Mrs. George Acton, the peppery 
little golf captain at Lakeside, are also two very polished 
golfers. 

Mrs. Mullin has always been up among the top-notchers and 
plays very delightful golf, but somehow her efforts have not 



materialized, although she has won many clever matches, both 
on her own course and away from home. 

With .Mrs. Acton it is different. Since taking over the cap- 
taincy of the club. Mrs. Acton is too conscientious to win any 
titles for herself. 

All Mrs. Acton thinks about is the other women, proof of 
which she demonstrated at Lincoln Park this week, during the 
woman's city championship, when she assisted on the tourna- 
ment committee, along with Mrs. Joe Costello, another Olym- 
pian. 

Mrs. Aeon's heart and soul is to look out for the other fel- 
low. Both Mrs. Acton anil Mrs. Costello forfeited their chance 
to play in the citv championship in order to superintend the 
tournament. 

Although Mrs. Joe Costello has been a member of the ( )lym- 
pic Club for a number of years, her heart has always gone out 
to the California Club, at Baden, where she is the captain. 

Mrs. Costello and Mrs. Acton are two very popular person- 
ages and no matter what they attempt in woman's golf, it is 
hound to be a qualified success. 



State Championship at Del Monte 

Following right on the heels of the Olympic Club champion 
'hip tournament, the California golfers will hie themselves to 
Del Monte to participate in the annual State golf championship. 

Sports Manager Darsie L. Darsie. the popular comptroller at 
Del Monte, is confident that a record entry will be received, as 
many of the leading golfers of the State and Pacific Northwesf 
are anxious to play over the beautiful Monterey Peninsula 
Forest new golf course. 

In previous years, accommodation at the Del Monte Hotel 
has always been taxed to the limit, but with this vear two new 
hostelries have been built which will give ample accommoda- 
tions. 

Among the leading men golfers who are expected to compete 
are: George Von Elm. the present title holder; Frank Dolph, 
last year's runner-up; John J. Mcllugh. a winner in 1923; H. 
Chandler Eagan. former national champion; the two Ritchie 
brothers, George and James, conceded to be the two greatest 
brother golfers in America: Dr. O. F. Willing, Captain Bullock 
Webster, and scores of other golfing celebrities from all over 
the State. 



Mr. R. M. Barthold, Jr.. has just been welcomed into the 
famous Canada Dry Hole-in-One Club, accomplishing this 
feat while playing on the Lincoln Park (jolf Course, Wed- 
nesday, July 28th. 

* * * 
At Feather River Inn 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard E. Wood, of Presidio Terrace and 
their family are Spending the remainder of the summer at 
leather River Inn. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Young and Mrs. D. A. White of San 
Francisco are at the Inn. 

Prominent guests from southern California are Mr. and 
Mrs. George S. Edwards, Mrs. John S. Edwards and Miss 
Mary Edwards, of Santa' Barbara. 

The M. K. I '.ranch family of Sacramento are among the 
valley people, who are summering at Feather River and art- 
registered at the Inn. 



August 14. 1926 



THE SAX FRAN( ISO > NEWS LETTER 



21 



A MAN OF EXPERIENCE 

(Continued from Page 5) 

where he engaged in general practice. He became identified 
with banking and mercantile interests, serving as president 
of two banks. He also engaged in farming and qualified as a 
"dirt farmer." 

The public service again claimed him when he was elected 
Superior Judge of S'.anislaus County. From this position he 
was elevated by appointment to his present post of Presiding 
Justice in the Appellate Court. 

Judge Langdon enjoys an unusually wide range of personal 
friends who are rallying to his support in his present candi- 
dacy, which is for one of the two terms ending in January next. 

He is a native son. born in 1873 on a farm in Alameda Coun- 
ty, where his father settled in 1858, after an overland journey 
from Illinois. 



Mark Hopkins Hotel 

An innovation in hotel construction in the West is to be 
undertaken at the new Mark Hopkins Hotel in San Fran- 
cisco in the finishing of the interior walls of all rooms and 
corridors in finest of unbleached muslin. Fifty thousand 
yards of this canvassing material, about one-third of the 
yearly output of the large mill in Massachusetts, where it is 
manufactured, will be used. 

Work of canvassing the walls has already started and will 
continue for four months. More than one hundred men will 
eventually be engaged to finish the painting and decorating 
so that the hostelry will be ready for a gala opening night on 
December 1, this year. 

Cost of the splendid Mark Hopkins will total $4,200,000. 
according to George D. Smith of the Canterbury Hotel of 
San Francisco, owner of the Mark Hopkins. Situated on 
the crest of Nob Hill and towering more than a hundred feet 
above the Fairmont Hotel, the Mark Hopkins commands an 
unexcelled view of San Francisco Bay, the Golden Gate with 
the hills of Marin County in the background, the Pacific 
Ocean and the hills and dales of Northern California. 

Beautiful mural decorations for the Mark Hopkins ball- 
room are now being painted by Maynard Dixon and Frank 
Van Sloun, two of California's foremost artists. The paint- 
ing's will depict the history of California, real and allegor- 
ical, down to the days of the early American pioneers. "The 
Lure of California Gold," will be the theme running through 
the entire set of murals. 



Casa del Rey Apartments 

Work on the new Casa del Key Apartments is being 
pushed forward as rapidly as possible, and this wonderful 
new Santa Cruz housing unit will be available for use this 
fall. 

The new court is <nie of the most important development 
projects to be started in this city, and marks another step in 

the expansion of Santa Cruz as a year-around playground. 

The building follows Mediterranean architecture with the 
Spanish and Italian motif. It will have an exterior finish of 
cement plaster, with red terra cotta roofing, i Irnameni 

of specially colored tile will decorate the main tower of the 

structure. Entrances to two of the courts are on the ovean 
side, with the entrance to the third court on West brook 
Street. 

I i lil of the best men tennis players of the State will take 
pari in the next Casa ''el Rev invitational toumami 
Santa Crn/. Saturday and Sunday. August 21-22. according 
to announcement made today 1\\ the Department of i 
of the Casa del Key. 

Among the noted racquet wielders who will be seen in ac- 
tion on the Casa del Rev courts on this occasion will be: 
Herald Stratford, Wallace Rates. Herbert Suhr. Ray Casey, 
Howard Kinsey. Clarence Griffin, Elmer Griffin and Mervyn 
Griffin. 



MANUEL F. 

SYLVA 

FOR 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 

(Five to be elected) 

Headquarters: 810-811-812 Liberty Bank Building 
948 Market Street Tel. Douglas 2974 



Fire 



Accident 



Automobile 



Carl N. Corwin Co. 

General Agents 

201 Sansome Street Royal Insurance Building 

Phone Garfield 5610 



Casualty 



Health 



Surety 




RARE BOOKS 

EARLY EDITIONS 

Autographs Bought and Sold 
JOHN HOWELL 

434 I'o'i Street, San Fbancirco, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tlllmann Place, at 241 Grant Avenue 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny TiNIO 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

ASM. PAUL FXI'K.K'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



MADE TO ORDER ONL* 

'/flOf.EAen/ Shirts * ItlOsEKf>tti 

^WW "2HS- WF 

Large Assortment of Imported fabrics 



25 Kuutirr Strfet 



Phone Kfakny 3714 



r-- - - ------- 






Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 


Pra 


• •*<] b* hind Only- 


-uit. CaD«d For and DaJrvaraJ 




MME. M. 


S. E. LEE 


5*3 Po*t St«ih 


S*M FuiftKO 

Prows Fuulii 2510 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

MB TKHAMV HUR, st\ FRANCISCO 
Pkone Dons'*' 30S4 



22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 14, 1920 




PIONEER 



The 
Name 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 



■ ■ MhHiij.iJ^n r t j ° n e r l ,° 8how 

+± LM\-\,m *^^m ,,uj— ■ ^ you sam ples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



"1 



San Frnnelnco 
West 703 



Iturlingamc 



Phone Suite* 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 

San Mateo Counties 



San Francisco Office; Palo alto office: 

875 FOLSOM ST. 818 EMERSON ST. 

Phone : PH' 

y 644-645 Palo Alto 315-J 

SAN MATEO — PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



At the Elder Gallery 
Lulu Vollmer's "Sun-Up," an Ameri- 
can folk-play, rated as among the ten 
best dramas of the season in 1924. will 
be read by Miss Edith Coburn Noyes, of 
Boston, in the Paul Elder Gallery. Fri- 
day morning, August 20th, at 11 o'clock. 
The critics pronounced it a masterly play, 
comparable to the best offerings of the 
Russian players. 

An exhibition of etchings and charcoal 
drawings by Cornelius Botke, of Carmel, 
formerly of Chicago, will open in the 
Paul Elder Gallery, Monday, August 
16th, and will continue for two weeks. 
The keynotes of Mr. Botke's drawings 
are the rugged cliffs and gnarled old cy- 
presses of the Monterey coast — handled 
in a strong, bold manner. In addition 
to the Monterey subjects, there is a col- 
lection of about twenty pencil drawings 
of European scenes from northern France 
and Holland, among which, especially 
noteworthy, are the drawings of windmills 
centuries old. 



Advice Wanted 

"Can I see the Secretary of Agricul- 
ture?" 

"Well, he is very busy, madam. 
What was it you wanted to see him 
about?" 

"About a geranium of mine that isn't 
doing very well." — Louisville Courier- 
Journal. 

* * * 

Our idea of the prize chump is the 
business man who told his wife that he 
had the fastest stenographer in the 

city! 

# * * 

Doctor — Did your wife say anything 
lie fore she died? 

The Widower — Yes, she talked un- 
interruptedly for fifty years. — Answers. 

"I admire a man who says the right 
tiling at the right time." 

"So do 1 — particularly when I'm 
thirsty." — Tit Bits. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
NO. 44SG0. Dept. No. 10 

Estate of CARRIE H. PARRELL, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
Phil C. Katz. administrator of the estate of 
CARRIE H. PARRELL. deceased, to the cred- 
itors of and all persons having claims 
against the said decedent, to file them with 
the necessary vouchers within four (4) 
months after the first publication of this no- 
tice, in the office of the Clerk of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for 
the City and County of San Francisco, or to 
exhibit them with the necessary vouchers 
within four (4) months after the first publi- 
cation of this notice to the said administra- 
tor, at his office, room 920 Phelan Building, in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State 
of California, which said last-named office the 
undersigned selects as his place of business 
in all matters connected with said estate of 
CARRIE H. FARRELL, deceased. 

PHIL C. KATZ, 

Administrator of the estate of CARRIE H. 
FARRELL, deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, California. July 27. 
1926. 

HENRY F. BOYEN, 

Attorney for Administrator. 5t 




N. W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 
Each Order 
Oillce and Works 1625 Mlnaloo St, 

Phone Market 791S 

Branch Office t 700 Sntter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 

Pbone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 

Tailor 



Opposite Olympic Club 



527 Post St., San Francisco 
Phone Prospect 9316 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 

Phone Garfield 3852 504 Market St. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

*&> REVUE ^ 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, SI. 00 35c, 50c, 75c 
Dancing 7 :00 p. i 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 

Hattie Moo i h Minnie C. Mooser 



SI. 00, $1,50 a la Carte 
. to 1:00 a. m. 



UfcanorS 

145 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast. 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 




and. 



Caroline Jones 

Li nch^on is sewed from 11:30 to 2:30 

and tea from 3 to 5 

Exclusive use of room for club dinners. 

334 Sutti;r St. Douglas 7118 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants" lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 76 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



Announcement 




Singleton's ^Uj>ij (ftgj 
CLUB INN 



Now Serves a Delicious 



Five-Course 

DINNER 75c 

Also 
Fried Chicken, Steaks, 
Chicken Pot Pies in Cas- 
serole, Etc., a la Carte. 





ICE CREAr% 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that n vijiorouM hriisli iuc once or twice a day Is 
taking very utmii cure of them. Brushing is only n part of the 
process. Many thin cm rnn happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist rnn tnke care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not lie an sound nx von imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There arc Kiim trouble** that will dentroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth wore? l>o your Rtinu bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will eonl nothing- My nerve blocking nys- 
tem hlockw nil all nerve* and pain. It will itlenNe you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

•THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy). San Francisco, Calif. 

I'hnnr (.nrll.lil MS 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions! Crown. i Self Cleaning Bride?.: 

I',>nil:i in Murk run! ltimlli-*s I'LHis 



O'F.rr.ll ami 
Laikui Sis. 



BLANCO'S 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12. 1-5 

980-82 Flood Biiildinc Powell and Market Sts, San Francisco 

Phone Gakfiei.d 5394 



Lunrlircin (11:30 li 2 p. m.) 

Dinner, WVok Day 



...I .75 

... 1.S0 



I'llOIIC 

i.' I'-tiuir MOO 

ili.i SI Ill I. rair ihr Cil» U ill) 

ill Oiiiiii. in lb. Kinrtl CU. 
in Amrrira 



f>iif \tnui Dining Rnam iiill tif r-'uovl <m Si,,i.Ih>, ,inri,i« ihr 



NO A H'S 
ARK 

»H Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 
Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 
5 :30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to S:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED BVBR1 MONDAY 
Half llloek from Highway 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturer, of 

KM i;ti:i» STBBL PIPE. TAJffKS, n i.\ RRTS, PB Iff STOCKS. 

FI,IMi;v QA8HOI DBR9, 9JNOKBBT »< K9, in 

I. on America, Calif. 
"17 Santa IV Avenue 



Snn I rnn. is. n. Calif. 

1 1 1 Market street 




ir* « 



L 



U Mm Ho, .» 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN 8:00 A. M. TO II M P. M. 
I \SI BPASSED il ISIVE 

I »KI I tONHARDT 
Fo'mtrty of Golilrn Clr Park Ca«mo 



You'll get more than "value received" here 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. j 

"Tli ■ Recommended Laundry" 

2">ii Twelfth St.. >\v nuni ;-' 'Phone Market 916 j 

....-.............------.-.-.-■■■■■.-..-.■■■4 

MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 
•RnttlrA at thf Smrtmpf 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

IS Tiara >lf «■*■(■ -i.arfii-M M4 | 



!S;HL TO NEW YORK 



See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and 
GAY HAVANA, en route 




Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Servia 



i dir Tropic 



TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail liner v.,ii, 
even never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and historic ports — Man- 
zanillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala: La Liberlad. Salvador; Corinlo, 
Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone; see the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, 
Cristobal and historic old Panama. 

Every cabin on a Panama Mail liner is an outside one; each has an electric fan, 
and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. There in an orchestra for 
dancing; deck games and sports and tall water swimming tank. The Panama Mail in 
world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than S9 a day for minimum first-class passage, including bed and 
meals on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 
as little as $350. (This price does not include berth and meals on trains.) Panama 
Mail liners leave San Francisco and New York approximately every 21 days. Vaca- 
tion sailings from San Francisco, July 27; from Los Angeles, one day later. West- 
ward from New York, July 31st, August 28lh. 



For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
or ticket agent or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 



548 S. SPRING STREET 

LOS ANGELES 



2 PINE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



10 HANOVER SQUARE 

NEW YORK 




Lower Fare 

now effective to the east and to 
most places on the Pacific Coast 

Plan your journeys to take advantage of the his 
reductions in summer roundtrip fares. Travel by 
train; save money, time and energy. Xote these 
examples of low fares from San Francisco, Calif. 



TO THE EAST 

Chicago $ 90.30 

Denver 67.20 

Kansas City 75.60 

Memphis 89.40 

New Orleans 89.40 

New York 151.70 

Philadelphia 149.22 

Tickets on sale daily; eoo4 until 
October 31. 



TO PACIFIC COAST POIIVTS 

Los Angeles $22.75 

Del Monte 6.00 

Lake Tahoe 13.25 

Portland 36.00 

Yosemite 20.25 

Ticket, on ..ale Jail? : 16-tl»y limit. Al.ii. 
season lickels wild 3-montbs' limil. Pro- 
portionalc reduction! lo many other 
places. Fast, safe, comfortable service al 
convenient hone. 






Southern Pacific 



65 Gear> Slreel 
Or Phone Sutler 4000 



Tliinl Street Station 






^ ' J. 



'f 




Whatever people 
talk about — and 
many things they 
never dream of — 
appear in picture 
form every week 
in the beautiful 



§>un&ag (Ehromclp 

IRntngratwr*? 




"A Six-pointer" 



"Napa Dry" Ginger Ale 

Six Points That Recommend It: 

Point 1 — It blends perfectly. 
Point 2 — Sparkles like champagne. 
Point 3 — Handsome package — it graces any table. 
Point 4 — A joy in the sick room. 
Point 5 — Children, as well as adults, enjoy it. 
Point 6 — A delight to every sense — taste, sight and 
bouquet. 

Packed by 

NAPA SODA COMPANY 



Phone Market 117 



San Francisco, Calif. 









^UMrJLC 1 H KA.L/1U rKUUK AlV15,r UK l\£. A 1 WLL\, 11M 1 tt!3 OOUL 




#5.00 PER YEAR 



CISCO 



SATURDAY, August 21st, 1926 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



LOS ANGELES 



STOP** rlVA IT! 




1927 Chandler 



Will Arrive August 29th 



The Season's greatest 
ZMotor 'Value 



Astounding Price Reductions 



H)an G !^ess at Sacramento 



CITIZENS 

OF SAN FRANCISCO! 

A Message from the Bar Association: 

THIS IS A DIRECT PUBLIC APPEAL TO THE MEN AND WOMEN 
VOTERS OF THE COMMUNITY MADE BY THE LEGAL FRATER- 
NITY OF SAN FRANCISCO REPRESENTED IN THE BAR ASSO- 
CIATION. 



At the election to be held cm August 31st, candi- 
dates arc to be selected for mam offices, including 

the judiciary. The election of a sound and seasoned 
judiciary is of paramount importance to the com- 
munity and every individual within the community. 
It is in order that this important truth be not lost 
sight of in the multiplicity of other candidates and 
issues that this appeal is made. 

The San Francisco Bar Association is composed 
of the majority of the lawyers of San Francisco 
men and women of the legal profession in whom. 
individually, at some time, possibly every reader of 
these words has had occasion to repose a confidence 
or entrust the protection of a legal right. 

// would reasonably seem that through the mem- 
bership of the Bar Association, daily appearing in 
the various courts, a responsible judgment should be 
reached with respect to the judicial capacities and 
attainments of the individual jurists comprising the 
bench of oar city who arc again candidates foi 
election. 

I'.y the constitution of the Bar Association pro- 
vision is made for a secret membership ballot limited 

to judicial office holders within the city and county. 

Such a ballot has been taken by the Association. 
There are eleven aspirants for the eight vacancies to 
be filled on the Superior bench. The eight candi- 
dates who received the highest number of votes 



comprise the official ticket of the Bar Association. 
There are four justices of the peace seeking re- 
election. They were the highest four in the balloting 
and likewise comprise the ticket of the Bar Asso- 
ciation. 

Hopeful, therefore that the judgment of the 
legal fraternity of San Francisco represented in the 
P.ar Association, may be given due weight in your 
consideration of judicial aspirants, the Bar Asso- 
ciation presents its ticket for these positions as 

li ilk iws : 

FOR JUDGES OF THE SUPERIOR 
COURT 

James G. Conlan (Justice of the Peace) 

Daniel C. Deasy (Incumbent) 

Frank H. Dunne (Incumbent) 

T. I. Fitzpatrick (Incumbent) 

Walter Perry Johnson (Incumbent) 

Harold Louderback (Incumbent) 

J. J. Van Nostrand (Incumbent) 

E. P. Shortall (Incumbent) 

FOR JUSTICES OF THE PEACE 

A. T. Barnett (Incumbent) 

Frank T. Deasy (Incumbent) 

Frank W. Dunn (Incumbent) 

Thomas F. Prendergast (Incumbent) 



SAN FRANCISCO BAR ASSOCIATION 

CAMP \ll.\ COMMl'fTEE 

ALBERT A. ROSENSHINE, Chairman STERLING (Mill 

WARREN OL.NEY, JR. I. in is FERRARI 

< . .1. (.01. 1) I, I, I. |.;| STACK CI I.I.I \ \\ 

WALTER A. IlliVW PAIL I'. FRATESSA 

"llJllii T. Ill llllARl) BERT SCHI.ES1NGER 

JOHN O'GARA I'AIIIM mill. VII 10 

WILLIAM U. SIMMONS A. P. DESSOlSI.AVI 

I'Elld v. LONG 




EfUbllahad July 20. 1056 

SAN F^CISc^ 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1884 to 1925. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street, ,San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postofflce as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 C'omhill, E. C 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., AUGUST 21, 1926 



No. 34 



FROM ONE THING TO ANOTHER 

By Eleanore F. Ross 



And now comes the parade of the "he beauties" which 
was held last Tuesday at Presidio, a prize for the hand- 
somest private being offered. The sexes seem to be chang- 
ing places ! 

# * * 

Efforts are being made to close the doors of the Sesqui-Cen- 
tennial Exposition at Philadelphia, on Sundays — the only day 
on which the bulk of the working classes can attend. We had a 
vague idea that this Exposition was in commemoration oi the 
birth of Freedom for the United States of America! 



The investment in gulf clubs in the United Slates is esti- 
mated at $730,000,000/ The annual dues to golf clubs in this 
country is approximately $165,000,000. When, therefore, we 
win a golf match in Europe, we should not plume ourselves 
too much, since we invest so much more. 



The other day our good looking head of the traffic po- 
lice came in to see us in connection with stationing a cop 
at the intersection of Davis, Pine and Market streets, one 
of the most hazardous spots along our main artery. I had 
called his attention to this fact previously. 

He says he is going to place a cop or an automatic traf- 
fic regulator there, just as soon as the Board of Supervisors 
release their grip on traffic matters. The Board, it seems, 
not con cut with the regular worries of their particular pro- 
vince, show a keen desire to extend their activities to the Traf- 
fic Department of the S. I-. police, and have a say in traffic 
affairs. 

1 1 they expended their superfluous energy in cleaning up 
this city, it would l>c a good work accomplished! 



The strangler is still free, still pursuing his devilish course 
of assaulting and throttling defenceless women. In all cases, 
his victim was in the act of showing him some vacant apart- 
ment. We would advise women who have house vacancies to 
protect themselves with firearms of some kind, in lieu of the 
detective force of the state ever catching this murderer. 

* * * 

At this writing, \ alentino's condition is still critical. P 
he should succumb, the movie world will have lost one ol 
its greatest actors. People in general and men, in particular. 
were rather apt to joke upon what they called the "sex ap- 
peal" of the Sheik, but those who are sensitive to artistry, 
susceptible to spiritual expression, know that it was not so 
much personal magnetism in Valentino, as a sort of soul- 
ful and subtle sympathy that attracted the fair sex so pow- 
erfully, something manifest oi the spirit, not of -ex. 



One amusing incident is connected with the wonderful 
record-breaking swim across the Channel by Gertrude 
Ederle. A dignified newspaper in London prepared an edi- 
torial on the very day of the Ederle feat, which was to be 
published the following morning. It was a calm and schol- 
arly editorial commenting on the futility of competitive 
athletics for women, on the ground that they must ever re- 
main athletically inferior to men, and the worst part about 
it was that the news of the Xew York girl's triumph came 
too late for the editors to kill that untimely preachment! 



"Do you remember," asked a friend of mine just lately, as 
we stood marooned on a safety | ;,i station, waiting for a 
car that would carry us to a distant part ..f the city; "Before 
the Fire, when different cars were painted different colors? 
For instance, the Castro cars were ivory colored, the Haight, 
red, the Hayes, green, and so on? It was an easy job to 
pick your car, then, from out the long line on Market Street ! 

"Most of us live in ruts; we go along certain streets, 
daily; take the same car daily; eat at the same restaurant 
daily; and when we turn out of these ruts, we are often at 
a loss, 

"So when, by chance, we have occasion to catch street 
cars that we are not familiar with, we stand as we are now, 
in a hazardous position, cars flying by on one side, autos at 
the other, while we strain our eyes to see if our particular 
car is coming. 

"Now, if the cars were painted different colors, (colors 
that did not clash, but harmonized I how much simpler it 
would lie for us ! 

"This is fundamentally, a grey city, and delicately tinted 
cars would make a pretty picture, a relief from the general 
dullness, moving along the King'- Highway.' I mean 
pastel shades, which do not show dust as these gloomy dark 
car- do. And, of course, so that it would not be an ex- 
travagant undertaking, the painting could be done as needed, 
and the color adopted for good. What do you think"" 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 21, 1926 




believed in democracy and the Constitution, and had no 
patience with later developments towards the denial of 
civil liberties and an autocratic regime. He was a fine 
specimen of what a judge should be and his death is a 
social loss. 



As the election approaches, it 
Our Choice for Washington is time that the men and 

women who are the source of 
political power in this country, should make up their minds 
with respect to the candidates win mi they wish to be their 
spokesma l at the national capital. 

In the present state of the country, which is enjoying a 
degree of prosperity that has seldom, if ever, come to any 
group of people in human history, there is no doubt that the 
political party, which has carried that prosperity to its present 
high pitch, and whose policies have been and will constantly 
be more necessary to the maintenance of it, should be kept in 
power. The President should be upheld and all his plans 
faithfully carried out. 

Under such conditions it becomes very essential that the 
proper persons should receive the Republican nomination in 
order that the President may be fully supported and that, 
locally as well as nationally, we may receive the full benefit 
of the present era of prosperity and well-being among all classes 
of citizens. 

In San Francisco, there are two candidates who should have 
the full and enthusiastic support of all who desire the main- 
tenance of the present conditions. One of them, candidate for 
Congress in the Fourth District, is Mrs. Florence P. Kahn, 
concerning whose ability and bravery we have had opportuni- 
ties of comment, on more than one occasion. She is able, ener- 
getic, a fine fighter, a loyal San Franciscan, and almost reck- 
less in her integrity. She should be supported. 

Samuel M. Shortridge. U. S. Senator, candidate for re- 
election, is a faithful and able supporter of the President, a wise 
and capable statesman, and without doubt the most effective 
and conservative representative that we could have in thai 
august body which presides today over the destinies not only of 
this country but, in a measure of the world. 



Thomas J. Lennon, Justice 
The Death of Justice Lennon of the Supreme Court of the 

State, and candidate for the 
position of Chief Justice, passed away in his sleep on the 
afternoon of August 14th, suddenly, and quietly. His death 
appears to have been due to physical exhaustion produced 
by his efforts in his campaign. 

In the passing of Justice Lennon the State loses a faith- 
ful servant and the courts of the State are deprived of an 
able jurist, whose integrity and ability were beyond ques- 
tion. His death shocked the whole community, which has 
shown marked appreciation of his work on behalf of his 
native State. 

Justice Lennon passed through all the grades from the 
Superior to the Supreme Court and was elected to each po- 
sition that he sought, with marked signs of the approval 
and recognition of the people. He was Judge of the Su- 
perior Court of Marin County, which position he took in 
succession to F. M. Angellotti, who became Chief Justice of 
the State, and who resigned that position to become chief 
counsel for the Western Pacific. 

His record as Superior Judge was marked by conspicu- 
ous ability and he became, in turn, presiding Justice of the 
District Court of Appeals for this district, graduating there- 
from into the State Supreme Court. 

His later days were marked by his criticism of the fact 
that, owing to appointments, the personnel of the State Su- 
preme Court was slipping out of the control of the people. 
He was an old fashioned American of the highest type, who 



It appears to be very evident that 
The Mexican Struggle there will not be the violence and 
tumult connected with the Mexi- 
can church and state dispute which were anticipated, but 
that the matter will be terminated in the way in which all 
such disputes have been hitherto terminated: namely, by a 
recognition on the part of the church that its powers are best 
exercised apart from temporal affairs, and on the part of the 
state, that the ethical power of the church is in many ways 
superior to any merely worldly authority. 

One thing has appeared very evident, however, in the 
course of this struggle, which, in spite of various reports 
of disturbance has been on the whole, exceedingly temper- 
ate, considering the questions involved, and that is the 
fact that the threatened boycott has not really been very 
effective. 

It will be remembered that the boycott was intended to 
place the secular authority in a very bad position, by the 
refusal of good church people to buy anything but neces- 
saries. The effect of this was regarded with apprehension 
by many of the business people in the cities, and, now that 
the returns are in, it appears that their apprehensions were 
really unnecessary, for it does not seem as if the boycott 
had really had any great economic effect. 

This does not mean that it has not been obeyed and that 
the church has not a great following. What it does mean is 
that the church is most strong among the country people 
and the Indians, who have not the wherewithal to buy any- 
thing but necessaries and who cannot do without those. 

The same thing has happened in Mexico as everywhere 
else ; the power of the church is among the peasantry and 
the growth of modern cities tends to the diminution of its 
pi wer. 



The building industry on the coast 
The Building Industry shows a healthy condition; yet 
there are very evident signs that 
the extraordinary building conditions which have prevailed 
for the last few years, have reached a culmination, and we 
may reasonably look for Mime recession of the tide. Tak- 
ing the coast, as a whole, there is an increase of 12 per cent 
for July of this year, over the comparable figures of lulv 
last "year, making a total of about $47,000,000. 

But there is a falling off of 4 per cent as compared with 
June, which is the normal decrease due to the seasonal in- 
fluences. California shows a slight gain, but not nearly as 
notable as British Columbia, Idaho and Oregon, where the 

I in which struck us long ago, only just seems to have 

made its impression. 

The most notable thing about the whole report is the 
fact of the impressive recovery of Los Angeles, the July 
record of permits for that city being the largest and repre- 
senting 44 per cent of the California total reported from 56 
cities, and 30 per cent of the total reported from 93 cities; 
and an increase of 41 per cent over the building figures 
for that city during July of last year. Seldom has there 
ever been so dramatic a resurrection. 

On the other hand, the permits of building in Oakland 
have fallen about 44 per cent below that of July of last year, 
this being the lowest lulv figure Oakland has shown since 
1922. 

Taking all together, it may be safely said that, as far as 
the building industry is concerned, which is, of course, a 
key industry here, the prospects are excellent and there are 
clear signs of a steady and reliable development. 



August 21, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



There has been an effort on 
Page's Memorial Scholarships the part of well-meaning and 

anxious citizens, both of this 
country and Great Britain, to endeavor to arrive at a com- 
mon understanding with regard to world matters, so that 
the chances of conflict may be minimized. It is a great 
idea, hut whether it will ever be anything more, remains to 
lie seen. 

Cecil Rhodes had some such notion in mind when he 
founded the scholarships under which certain young Am- 
ericans and citizens of the British Commonwealths over- 
seas should visit Oxford and there get some ideas of the 
underlying culture of the Anglo Saxon race, if there is such 
a race, a point on which there seems to be considerable 
doubt. In accordance with this program, we have sent 
several groups of young men over, some of whom have 
won considerable distinction in the old school. 

Now, Walter Hines Page has endeavored to still further 
broaden this notion by providing f or a young Englishman 
of promise and recognized mental ability to come here for 
the purpose of obtaining a knowledge of our culture to the 
end that he may the better instruct Englishmen at home 
in the point of view of Americans. Under the terms of this 
provision, we have at present a young English newspaper- 
man in this city pursuing this course of study. 

Of course, on the sentimental side, nothing can be pos- 
sibly said against the idea. It is all to the good that the 
two main springs of English-speaking life and power should 
understand one another. Unfortunately in practical life, the 
thing does not work. Our life is too complex. There are 
too many elements that go to the making of the viewpoint 
of our people for an outsider ever to grasp them. One can- 
not get any fundamental ideas about us. for we have no 
fundamental basis. As Kipling says, we are more engaged 
with the instant need of things. 



In advocat- 
John J. Van Nostrand For Superior Judge ing the re- 
election of 
Hon. John J. Van Nostrand as Superior Judge for this City 
and County, we are engaged in a work which is not only 
pleasing to ourselves, but is of the utmost value tn the com- 
munity. In such a civilization as ours, where, in the ulti- 
mate, the law is the determinant and all controversies are 
destined for judicial decision, the possession of a strong, 
learned and experienced judge is a great asset. 

Fur man_\' years Judge Van Nostrand has presided ever 
a department of the Superior Court in our City Hall. He- 
is one of the veterans of our judicial corps and is endowed 
not only with a natural sagacity, without which the ablest 
judge tries in vain, but with that experience, without which 
even genius itself is powerless amid the intricacies and 
perplexities of litigation 

Practically a generation has enjoyed the benefits of the 
knowledge and learning of Judge Van Nostrand. He is 
genial and kindly. Even under bard conditions, he has the 
quality of being able to maintain a cheerfulness and urban- 
ity which are greatly to the benefit of litigants in his court 
and which produce an atmosphere of earnest good will, hard 
to find in the ordinary law-mill. 

He has the art of keeping good discipline in his court 
without that sometimes irritating pomposit] which less well 
equipped jurists assume to cover their weaknesses 

He knows the law. I lis opinions and decisions stand very 
high with the courts of appeal. He deserves and possesses 
the confidence of bis fellow citizens. 



There is a distinct effort being made to put farming on 
a business basis and to apply to it the knowledge and expert 
skill which other industrial callings require. It will he a 
long job. but it really involves civilized lite. 



Economy and efficiency, law and order, 
Accomplishments of go hand-in-hand, during the adminis- 
Governor Richardson tration of Governor Friend Win. 
Richardson. His regime has practi- 
cally eliminate 1 the old-time squandering of the public's moneys 
through "special" appropriations, which were nothing, more 
or less, than the political schemes of "pork barrel" manipula- 
tors. The political machine of the State has almost entirely 
lost its power, since Richardson has been at the helm of State- 
affairs. 

And yet the wheels of progress have not stopped; on the 
contrary, many new improvements in various departments have 
been accomplished, which we will cite briefly : 

The Institute for the Blind, at Berkeley, had fallen into a 
state of disrepair. No new building- had been erected since 
1911. Governor Richardson immediately appropriated $25,- 
000 for repairs, and $90,000 for a new building for blind girls. 
which was dedicated last year. 

At San Quentin, a cell block, which had been standing for 
14 years unfinished, is now being completed at a cost of $168, 
000. Numerous o'her improvements have been installed by 
the wardens at both prisons. 

\ new institution for the feeble-minded is being built near 
Pomona, the initial cost being $468,000. Every state hospital 
has had new buildings to keep up with the increase in popula- 
tion, and to replace those which are obsolete. 

The State Labor Bureau, during the period 1922-1924, col- 
lected $858,163.85 for wages which had been wrongfully with- 
held from employes, an increase of 90.6 per cent over the pre- 
vious period. 

The Industrial Accident Commission has transacted a large 
increased volume of business without loss of efficiency, effect- 
ing a saving of over $300,000 during the l l >-22-24 budget. 

During Governor Richardson's administration $115,714,- 
805.33 has been expended on educational work, in comparison 
with $73,096,932.72 under the previous administration. 

The California State Highway Commission, under the Gov- 
ernor's regime, has built new highways on the State's six major 
interstate connections at an expense of nearly $8,000,000. 

The surplus in the San Francisco Harbor Improvement 

Fund, three years ago was $500,000. With the practi 

economy and business methods, immense improvements have 

been made and the surplus has been piled up to $1,700,000. 
Pier 45 will be constructed at the foot of I [yde Street, being the 
largest port terminal ever designed for the Port of San l-'ran- 

cisco. 

During Governor Richardson's administration. S4.000.000 
has been appropriated to agriculture, and he has approved no 
less than r~ bills directly affecting agriculture. 

In March. 1''25. Richardson sent the following message to 

the Legislature, regarding equitable division of the wan 
the Colorado River : 

"The waters of the Colorado River can be conserved by 

dams. . . . Not only the needs of the Imperial Valley demand 

action, but the future development of parts of Imperial, River- 
side. San Bernardino and Los Angeles counties depend upon 
the conservation and storage of the waters of this great 
river. . . ." 

Businesslike methods in the Motor Vehicle Department have 
saved $3,316,865.91 over the amount allowed by law for the 
operation of the department. 

In spite of the greatly increased work, the State Railroad 
Commission has reduced expenditures for the past three years 
in the amount of $283,035.31. 

Statistics are as a rale, uninteresting things. But these tig- 
ven above, are very eloquent in what they convey to the 
mind of a public which has been led by numerous insinuations 
to believe that Governor Richardson has economized the work 
of various departments to the extent of negligence. And fii/- 
urcs don't lie. 

(Continued on Page 17) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 21, 1926 




>LEj4SURE'SWW 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURES 

_ lorn Moore, 




Pathos and Laughter 
«T AUGHTER and pathos are to the 
i_/ drama what light and shadows 

are to the canvas of the painter," said 
some wise wag, and he certainly knew! 

For to laugh without having a tear 
put into the theme somewhere along 
the line, is to make a farce of things sub- 
lime or to belittle the strength and 
value of genuine fun. 

That's what one can find at the Hen- 
ry Duffy theaters — the Alcazar and the 
I 'resident. 

"The Show Off" is still the Alcazar 
offering now entering its eighth week 
and not a seat left unsold. That's where 
the laughter and pathos are to be found. 

"Love 'Em and Leave 'Em" is the 
President's stage presentation full well 
along on the third month of its run at 
the McAllister play house. Tears and 
laughter, with liberal sprinkling of 
each variety are part of the lively plot 
which offers abundant slang phrasing 
so fascinating that one hunts and lis- 
tens for the new words which pop into 
place at rapid-fire pace. 

Many theater-goers have seen these 
Duffy plays over and over, for they cer- 
tainly are worth repetition. 

* * * 
Curran 

"The Cradle Snatchers" as a comedy 
in three acts, by Russel Medcraft and 
Norman Mitchell, produced by Louis 
O. Macloon and staged by Lillian Al- 
bertson. claims the Curran theater. 

Quoting from a local critic, we find 
this: "In case somebody still thinks 
'Cradle Snatchers' is a domestic com- 
edy, a sort of 'hand that rocks the 
cradle' sort of thing, let that innocent 
lie disabused. 

"It is a potpourri of indelicacies. It 
is full of shocks." 

Still another brilliant local writer 
adds this: "Cradle Snatchers' keeps the 
audience laughing. The Broadway bit 
scores at the Curran." 

To all of which we would supple- 
ment the version : "Yes, and all of that 
and more." "Cradle Snatchers" does 
keep those who hear and see the funny 
things of the sprightly play, laughing — 
and there is plenty to create laughter. 
Florence Auer, Helen Bolton and Grace 
Travers, starring. 

It is the story of three wives, not 
young, wlin endeavor to admonish their 
neglectful spouses by stepping out with 



By "Jingle" 

youngsters, college boys. Naturally 
the action is peppy, full of puns and 
punsters. 

Arthur Rankin. William Eugene, 
Norman Peck, Phillips Smalley, Charles 
Coleman, (iordon de Main and Dorothy 
Dehn are principals. 

* * * 
Columbia 

leanne Eagels, in her famous charac- 
terization of Sadie Thompson, a role in 
which she has appeared for many con- 
secutive years, still draws crowds to 
the Columbia, wdiere "Rain" is being 
played on Miss Eagels' return engage- 
ment. 

In these columns we have commen- 
ted and commended so frequently the 
high standard of dramatic work pre- 
sented by this famous star, that repe- 
tition would seem unnecessary, but. if 
there be any one among you who have 
not yet seen "Rain" as it is interpreted 
by Miss Eagels and her company, you 
have still something rare in store. 

Orpheum 

Julian Eltinge. the foremost portray- 
er of fads and fancies of the fair sex, 
will head the big new bill at the Or- 
pheum theater, starting with the mat- 
inee on Saturdav, limited to one week. 
only. 

Svlvia Breamer, the well-known mo- 
tion picture star, with William J. Kel- 
Iv, will be seen in a hilarious skit called 
"The Boob." 

Thrills, chills, screams and chuckles, 
abound in "Haunted" a burlesque re- 
vue of all the recent Broadway mystery 
play successes. 

Edith Clifford, popular comedienne. 
is bringing a number of new songs with 
her, she will be assisted at the piano by 
Miss Marion Carr. Mario Yalle, the 
operatic baritone and Eric Zard. the 
concert pianist, who are offering a 
short recital at the Orpheum, will re- 
main over for a second big week. Doro- 
thy Murray and Earl La Vere, in "Don't 
Say Anything;" and Page and Class in 
their new novelty, will complete the 
show. 

* * * 

Capitol 

The opening of the newdy decorated 
Capitol theater on Ellis street by Will 
Morrissey, who presented last Monday 
the initial performance of his Music 
Hall Revue, registered success. 



There are plenty of good numbers in 
the musical revue to start with. Danc- 
ing girls coming, coming and coming 
until one wondered "how many"; 
clever comedians, blonde ukelele play- 
ers, singers and strollers carried out 
the typical New York Winter Garden 
Show as predicted in the "ads." 

Eddie Borden, Walter Weems, Eddy 
and Dolores, Midgie Miller and her 
beauty chorus, with at least forty pret- 
ty girls, make up a gala company, all 
of whom perform creditably. 

During the run of the Music Hall 
Revue there is to be only one matinee 
each week and that will be on Wed- 
nesday. An innovation will be the mid- 
night performance, to be given on Sat- 
urday, at which features will be added 
to the regular performance. 

* * * 
Golden Gate 

William Desmond, screen star heads 
the new bill at the Golden Gate theater, 
beginning Saturday, in a comedy sketch 
written by Ethel Clifton. Desmond 
comes directly from the Hollywood 
studios, where he has just completed 
a picture for Universal. Mary Mclvor 
and a cast of capable players support 
Desmond in the sketch entitled: "The 
I Hide Bandit." 

Pablo De Sarto. international violin- 
ist, assisted by Alfred Calzin at the 
piano, will offer a program of selected 
classical and semi-classical numbers. 
Hugllie Clark, the rotund songstress, 
comedian and orchestra leader, with 
Tommy Monaco's orchestra, brings a 
jazz band novelty. 

Comedy songs and eccentric dancing 
features are combined in "A Rhinestone 
Revue" staged by Allen Calm and 
Charles Hale, assisted by a trio of 
pretty girls. — Jean De Mar. Elinor Far- 
(iii and Lillian Fields. 

"Pals First," Edwin Carewe's latest 
production, will be the screen attrac- 
tion for First National, starring Llovd 
Hughes, Dolores Del Rio and Alec B. 
Francis. 

Claude Sweeten's Golden Gate or- 
chestra will be heard in their splendid 
musical programs with Grace Rollins 
Hunt at the organ. 

* * * 

Loew's Warfield 

"The Waning Sex," a Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer picture, starring Norma 



August 21, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ON THE STAGE 



ALCAZAR ( "The Show Off" 
iilurrell nr. Powell j Louis John Unrtels 


CAPITOL { "Music Hall Revue" 
Kills nr. Market i IHuMleal Comedy 


COLUMBIA I "Rain" 

70 Eddy , Jeanne Eagels 


CURRAN i -The Cradle Snatel.ers' 
Geary nr. Mason j Social ( oi.iedy 


WILKES C Closed this week 
Geary at Mason I 



VAUDEVILLE 



I.III.IIK.V GATE 



I 



William Desmond, 
Headline!" 



OKPHEUM 
O'FarreU & Powell 


1 


Julian EltinRe, 

Head liner, 
FanioiiN Female 

1 in personal or 


PANTAGES (NEW) 
Market at Hyde 




Harry Can'j in Person 

St a jure and Screen 


PORTOLA 
Market aear 4th 




Vaudeville-Pictures 


UNION SQUARE 
O'Farrell nr. Powell 


( 


Vaudeville-Pictures 


WIGWAM 

>l Isslon and 22nd 


I 


Vaudeville-Pictures 


ON THE 
DOWN 


SCREEN 
TOWN 



] "The w ho it- Town's 
CALIFORNIA I Talking." Mix Dolln 

Market at 4th j mid His Or.lnslrn. 

"The Fighting BuCka- 

roo." lluck Jones. Sal. 
...unn I *«» Wed. Then from 

^ AMfc -° W ed, to sa t.. "T he 

Market oun. 5th ) Combat," HoUSC Peter*. 

Wanda Haw ley. 

" "What Pool* Men" and 

"S |i e e d." SB t H rilay. 
( \slMi I "Ships of SOUU" and 

UIINat Mason St. ( "The Keek less Sex, 

' Sun. "The Iron Horse. 

Tues. and V* ednesda.v. 

Git AN ADA I "Her Bin; Nbrut*' 

Market at Jones St. \ Lanra La Plantc 

IMPERIAL ( "The Black IMrale" 

Market bet. 0th-7th f DoQKjIas Knirhanks 



LOEWS \\ ARPIBLdI 
Market nt Taylor ( 



■The \\ aulas Bex"' 

Norma Shearer 
< onrad \ nisei 



st. prancis ( " ri "- > : ,*; rr. '." ".*>.>*,'." ■■ "-" 

Market bet. 5th-8th f Fr»ii,l» \. lhi.hin.il 

RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS 

••The Pare That 

Thrills." Sal. "The 

ROYAL ( Plastic Itf," I liirn 

Polk nr. California f Bow. "The Sen Boast." 

' Hon*. Toco*. Wed., John 

llltrr> Inure. 









"The 1 


Oal llnl tn 1 inn." 


Ill\ IM. 




1 


Sal. "' 


'he NoB'StOp 


Ir. InK ill 


l.Mli Vie. 


I 


I'llulil. 


' Sun. " 1 he Sen 






Beast," 


Mnn.. Tile*.. 



Kindly ( lid Dear to careless pedes- 
trian who has stepped into a coal-hole 
—Only one leg? There's sixpence for 
you, my poor fellow. But really, you 
know . you ought not to be sitting about 
on that cold pavement! -Passing Show. 



Shearer, and adapted for the screen 
hum the stage success by Frederic and 
Fanny I latton, is announced as the 
screen feature at the Warfield com- 
mencing Saturday, August 21. Sup- 
porting- the dainty little star is seen 
Conrad Nagel as her leading man, and 
Mary McAlister, George K. Arthur and 
others. It was directed hy Robert 
Leonard. 

Mary McAlister plays the role of a 
shrewd little flapper-vamp. It is a well 
balanced comedy, which justifies the 
predictions made for Leonard as a di- 
lector after he made "Dance Madness." 

The Fanchon and Marco Idea for the 
stage presentation is the "Don Barclay 
and Sunkist Beauties Revue." Don 
Barclay, the star, is the well known 
comedian of the Ziegfeld Follies. Jack- 
son Murray, tenor, is also featured. 
Being the first appearance of the Sun- 
kist Beauties in some time, each girl 
will do a specialty number. Another 
noteworthy musical program will be of- 
fered by Walt Roesner and the Super- 
Soloists. 

Pantages 

Harry Carey, the famous stage star, 
will appear in person as the headline 
attraction this coming week at Pan- 
tages theater. His performance on both 
the screen and before the footlights 
will introduce the kind of high enter- 
tainment for which he is well known. 

A group of llopi Indian basket weav- 
ers will accompany Carey to the city 
anil will weave baskets in the Pantages 
lobby as a feature of the program. 



California 

The screen feature for this week at 
the California is the picturizatiou of 
the comedy. "The Whole Town's Talk- 
ing." written by John Emerson and 
Anita LoOS 

The cast includes Edward Everett 
Morton. Virginia Lee Corbin, Trixie 
Friganza, ( 'tis Harlan. Dolores Del Rio 

and many others. 

Vs an added attraction Eleanore 
Twohig, Miss San Francisco of 1926, 
will appear on the stage. Next week 
she i- leaving for Atlantic City where 

she will compete for the crown of Miss 
America. 

Max Dolin will present one of hi- at- 
tractive concerts 

* * * 

Granada 

The Granada has selected a comedy 
lor this week's attraction. 

Laura I. a Plante, Lee Moran and 

Mack Swain are the funmakers in the 
picture, which is entitled "Her Big 
Night." 

The story is that of a shop girl who 
unexpectedly is forced to take the place 
of a famous motion picture star. Part 
of her duties consists of taking over the 
-tar- many amours. During this hec- 



tic night she is in possession of two 
husbands, three sweethearts and a press 
agent. 

Jack Partington will present another 

elaborate stage attraction. 

* * + 
St. Francis 

"The Marriage Clause" dealing with 
backstage life continues at the St. Fran ■ 
cis theater with Francis X. Bushman, 
Billie Dove, Warner Oland the stars. 

Dramatic situations and an appeal- 
ing heart interest are to be found in 
this picture, which contains a strong- 
climax. The story has to do with a 
noted stage director and his love for an 
actress. 

The musical score for the picture has 
been carefully prepared with an impres- 
sive prologue part of the program. 
Short subjects are on the bill with com- 
edy films part of the features. 

Imperial 

Douglas Fairbanks starring in his 
colored filmed photoplay, "The Black 
Pirate" is the screen lure at the Im- 
perial theater. 

This picture is an original story of 
the seventeenth century written by El- 
ton Thomas, with scenes of the South 
Seas, where the Spanish pirate created 
terror along the mainlands. 

Billie Dove plays the heroine. 

A fleet of twenty-eight ships, includ- 
ing eleven large vessels and seventeen 
-mall boats, wen- especially construc- 
ted for this picture. 

It is done entirely in color. 

\ special prologue has been arranged 
for the Imperial presentation of "The 
Black Pirate" with a music score b\ 
Ray Paige. 

* * * 

Cameo 

The popular Cameo theater at 934 
Market street is this week screening 
Buck bines with Sally Long. Lloyd 
Witlock and Frank Rice in "The Fight 
ing I'.uckaroo," beginning Saturday. 
August 21. A bucking horse doing un- 
usual pranks, a great chase and thrill- 
ing scenes are included in the story. 
This picture i- on the screen four days. 

"The Combat." with House Peters 

and Wanda Hawley the -tar- come- to 

the screen on Wednesday. August 2?. 

for a run of three days. The picture 

(Continued on Page 14) 



^y™ ?a,y ™ more \ 



BESTROWElg 




THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 21, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Polo Matches Favored 
By the Fashionables 

PENINSULA society has reveled in the polo games 
lately. 

The match played on August 7, at the Menlo Circus Club, 
drew the fashionables from many parts of the state. The 
competing teams were all members of the San Mateo Polo 
Club, chosen to test their skill against one another tor the 
formal opening of the new polo fields. 

The personnel of contestants comprised Mr. Kenneth 
Walsh, Mr. George Pope Jr., Mr. Carl Beal and Mr. Hugh 
Drury on one team; and Mr. Richard Schwerin, Mr. Ross 
Ambler Curran, Mr. William W. Crocker and Mr. Will Te- 
vis ]r., on the other team. 

Society's clientele filled the grand-stands with its gala 
background, while the smartly gowned femininity made a 
picture of charm and loveliness — also, supplying the en- 
thusiastic spur which made the game more fascinating. 

* * * 
Buffet Luncheon 

Mr. Alexander Hamilton and Mr. Charles Dunphy were 
hosts to the visiting players at a buffet luncheon, given 
previous to the polo tournament. This was a stag affair 
out-in-the-open on the grounds of the Circus Club. 

Wives of the polo players were guests of Mrs. Ross Am- 
bler Curran at a picnic given Saturday near Menlo Park. 
They included: Mr. and Mrs. George Leib, Mr. and Mrs. 
John C. Burgard, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Watt Miller. Mr. and 
'Mrs. Archibald Johnson, Mrs. Robert Hayes Smith, Mrs. 
Alexander Hamilton, Mrs. Cvril Tobin, Mrs. Kenneth 
Walsh. 

Mr. Douglas Alexander, Mr. Paul Fagan and Mr. Rudolph 
Spreckels were guests. 

* * * 

Society Present 

Society was decidedly present at a picnic luncheon of the 
Menlo Club Saturday, those in attendance being Miss Jennie 
Blair, Mrs. Mountford Wilson, Mrs. Rennie Pierre Schwer- 
in, Mrs. Thomas Eastland, Mrs. Arthur Hooper, Mr>. Evan 
Williams, Mrs. Charles McCormick, Mrs. Stewart Lowery, 
Mrs. Warren Spieker and Mrs. Augustus Taylor. 



Dinner Dance 

Mr. and Mrs. Bliss Rucker were hosts to a number of 
the younger society set at a dinner dance given at the Men- 
lo Country Club in compliment to Miss Geraldine Bliss. 

Guests of the Ruckers were Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Hitch- 
cock, Mr. and Mrs. Clift Lundborg, Mr. and Mrs. William 
A. Magee Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Jerd Sullivan. Mr. and Mrs. 
Warren Spieker. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gay Hooker Jr., Mr. 
and Mrs. Russell Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Richard McLaren, 
Mr. and Mrs. Coy Filmer, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Walsh, 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Page Mailliard. Mr. and Mrs. John 

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Hoyden, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Madison, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hugh I'orter. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Harrison. 

Count and Countess de Pins. Mr. and Mrs. James A. Fol- 
ger Jr., Miss Frances Stent, Miss Alice Moffitt, Mrs. Mary 
Baldwin. Mrs. Thomas Joyce, Mrs. Gerald Herrmann, Miss 
Elizabeth Mcintosh, Miss Margaret Bentley, Miss Eliza- 
beth Magee, Miss Dorcas Jackson, Miss Francesca Deering, 
Miss Adrienne Sharpe. Miss Julia Adams, Miss Isabelle 
Wheaton, Miss Claudine Spreckels, Miss Harriet Walker. 
Miss llelene Lundborg and Miss Frances Ames were so- 
ciety guests. 

* * * 

Charming Gowns 

Miss liliss Rucker appeared at the Polo games in a 
striped sport dress with light jacket and snug fitting sport 
hat to match. 

Mrs. Jerd Sullivan wore a pleated skirt with light over- 
jacket of copious sleeves and carried a handsome bag of 
light colors with vertical lines and figured center. 

Mrs. Warren Spieker was attired in a smart sport dress 
high in the neck, with a round collar edged with lace, fas- 
tened with a cameo brooch. Her skirt was finely pleated 
and her light shoes matched her chapeau. 

When she watched the polo matches, Mrs. Kenneth 
Walsh wore a light dress with full skirt and over jacket, 
edged with a graceful jabot. Her shoes and hat corres- 
ponded in tone. 

Mrs. Archibald Johnson wore a becoming hat of larger 
proportions than most of the sport models. 

Miss Eleanor Weir had on a flowered crepe de chine 
frock, adorned at the throat and waist line with loops of 
plain crepe, matching the band at the hem of her skirt. Her 
hat was a jaunty sports model. 

Miss Grace Hamilton and Miss Frances Stent, two popu- 
lar society debutantes, wore smart sport dresses with light 
sweater over-blouses and hats slightly brimmed. 

Miss Clara Bransten was for the most part in her attrac- 
tive equestrienne attire, with high boots and a belted in 

blouse. 

* * * 

Burlingame fashionables. Menlo Park. San Mateo and 
Woodside society folks participated in the luring polo 
events, many of the handsome affairs of the past week being 
in compliment either to the wives of the polo players, or to 
the members of the team. 

* * * 
Lady Ravendale Motif 

Of Society Gathering 

Lady Ravendale was the guest of honor at a dinner given 
last Tuesday by Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hays Smith. Guests 
were Mr. and Mrs. Templeton Crocker, Mr. and Mrs. Jo- 
seph Oliver Tobin. Miss Helen Crocker, Mr. Monroe Rob- 
inson of New York, Mr. Francis Burrall Hoffman of New 
York. Mr. Samuel F. B. Morse, Mr. Paul Fagan and Mr. 
Douglas Alexander. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

050 Itttsti street. Between Powell and Stockton, San FranelMco 

Telephone Sutter 3580 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



August 21, 1926 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



* * * 

Lady Ravendale was Lady Irene Curzon un- 
til the death of her father, when she inherited 
the Barony of Ravendale. 

She is considered one of the brilliant figures 
in the social realm in London. The second 
daughter of the family, Mrs. Oswald Mosley, 
was Lady Cynthia Curzon. 

The youngest daughter, Lady Alexandra Cur- 
zon, was last year married to Major Edward Met- 
calfe, equerry to the Prince of Wales. 

* * * 

Baroness Here 

Baroness Jan van Eck arrived in this city from 
her home in New York, and left almost immedi- 
ately for the Tillman country place at Aptos. 

She was formerly Miss Agnes Tillman of San 
Francisco. 

The Baron van Eck is expected here this week. 
He and the Baroness plan to spend at least a 
month in California before returning to their 
home in the East. 

# * * 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marye gave a luncheon 
last Sunday at their Burlingame home, where Mrs. William 
Hinckley Taylor and Miss Lily O'Connor were week-end 
guests. 

The luncheon guests were Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreck- 
els, Mrs. Rennie Pierre Schwerin, Miss Flora Doyle, Admiral 
Alexander Halstead, Mr. Knox Madden and Mr. Benjamin 
Raykor of New York. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Angel Elizalde are en route to San Fran- 
cisco from their home in Manila. They will spend a few 
weeks at the Fairmont Hotel. Mrs. Elizalde was Miss 
Marie Spreckels of San Francisco. 

Mrs. J. J. Elizalde, mother of Mr. Elizalde, will come 
from Los Angeles to greet the young couple upon their 
arrival here. 

Wedding Days * * * 

The wedding of Miss Isabelle Bangs to Air. Roalfe Rah- 
man, was an event in society which took place at high noon, 
Grace Cathedral, on August 10, Dean J. Wilmer Gresham 
officiating. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Bangs 
of Fort Bragg'. The groom is the son of Mis. Emma Kali- 
man of this city. 

Miss Alberta Bangs was her sister's only attendant at 
the wedding and wore a gown of embroidered apricot georg- 
ette, will a large picture hat to match. 

The bridal costume was of white satin with net flou