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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (Jan.-June 1926)"




Christmas Number 






San Francisco News Letter 






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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 18S4 to 1925. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 225 Montgomery St.. San Francisco, California. 

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Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., JANUARY 2, 1926 



No. 1 



gambling 

WITH E. FARRAND ROSS 



Holiday Manners 

In this fast and furious age, the gentle art of manners is 
not practiced as it was in our grandmothers' time; most of us 
are so engrossed in our professions or vocations that we have 
little leisure for the social amenities which tend to make life 
so much more pleasurable and endurable; the daily grind has 
a way of eliminating everything that is not absolutely essen- 
tial to its operation And so. day by day and year by year, 
we find ourselves less and less inclined to "waste time" in 
acquiring the graces that marked the old, courtly days, even 
in business. 

The return of Yuletide and its attendant holidays demon- 
strates only too plainly that politeness, instead of being a "waste 
of time" is a time saver. All during the past few weeks, 
people treated each other with a courtesy that was surprising 
as well as pleasing, even the tired clerks in most of the shops 
were patient and painstaking, when at other seasons these 
same ribbon girls and necktie men assume a bored in 
ence that is very irritating to the hurried shopper. I >nc noticed 
this attitude in the highways and byways of the city. also. 
Lame old ladies were helped up onto the sidewalks; blind 
men were guided carefully through the traffic; even stray dogs 
were given the astonishment of their live- by unaccustomed 
pats from the passers-by. The daily difficulties of life in gen- 
eral were smoothed over, and felicitated by a universal feel- 
ing of kindness that should last throughout the year. 

We might append the gentle art of manner- to our New 
Year's resolutions! 

Giving Up a Career 

i 'no hear- wise remark- about "a woman, of course, should 
not give up a career when she marries any more than a man!" 
And then the speaker goes on to say that "Literary or artistic 
or musical women should go on with their work after mar- 
riage, but it is a shame bow business women keep their po- 
sitions even after marriage, taking them away from single 
women who really need work!" 

These oracles forget that a business career is just as im- 
portant to some women as a literary or a musical or an 
artistic career is to another, and that you cannot curtail the 
actions of me class and allow the other to fulfill its desires. 
Very often, also, a young married couple work together in the 
hope that comfort and a certain amount of independance can 
be secured in middle age. if they both put their shoulders to 



the plow in youth, and whose affair is that, anyway, but their 
own ? 

No one could appreciate a home and children more than 
the present humble writer, no one appreciates the fact more 
than the Rambler that the greatest thing in the world is love, 
and a home, and the right sort of a companion, but he realizes 
that the world is a changing world; that conditions govern- 
ing men and women are changing the most of all; that the 
unrelenting Fates, like Macbeth's witches, are forever stir- 
ring the caldron, mixing and turning, and that out of this 
weird mass that confronts us. seemingly unexplicable and 
deplorable, some sort of order and happiness is sure to come. 

Should Married Women Work? 

It was (Hive Schreiner who made the statement in her book 
"Women and Labor." that men had taken women- occupa- 
tion- from the home- into the factories, and that as a natural 
sequence, women had followed their avocations. Spinning, 
weaving, dress-making, fruit preserving, canning, pickling, — 
all the varied dutie- of the old-time domicile, are now being 
accomplished outside of the home, and in a much better and 
more sanitary manner, at that. The steam table of the delica- 
tessen shop is fast taking the place of the old cook-stove in 
the famil) of the working or clerical class, and unless a wife 
i- bearing children, she must, of a necessity, find time hang- 
ing heavily upon her hand-. 

Since Eve, most foible- and failures of married life are 
blamed upon the gentle -ex. She is accused now. of neglect- 
ing her home, and "soldiering" on her life job. The woman 
i- held responsible for apartment house life of today, with 
owded condition-, it- discomforts (when the heat isn't 
going i and its general un-homelike atmosphere. Women are 
told that they "want things too easy." when it is a ca-e of 
the landlord wanting every inch of his ground to pay! 

Treat many changing conditions have brought about the 
fused" home. Like war. you can lay it to no one par- 
ticular cause, but to a great many different reasons. In the 
beginning i'i this modern feministic movement, some man 
"welched" on his position of supporting some woman, and 
the woman, thrown into the maelstrom of the business world, 
adjusting herself painfully to her new existence, finally dis- 
1 in it certain privileges and pleasures that were lacking 
in the old life, and eventually took to it as a fish to water. 
Her sisters have followed suit, and the feminine parasite of 
yester-year is becoming as extinct as the proverbial dodo. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 2, 1926 




Needless to say. this is the method which we favor and 
which the President favors. Wealth is not increased by 
placing burdens on the producers of wealth, but by encour- 
aging them. 



We wish all the world a glad new 
A Happy New Year ye'ar. and more especially do we 
wish it to the City and County of 
San Francisco, and to our own group of readers. 

There is every prospect that our wishes will be realized. 
Few years have dawned under pleasanter auspices. Pros- 
perity has smiled upon us in the year that is gone and there 
is no reason to suppose that its face will be turned against 
us in the \ 7 ear that is coming. On the other hand, the pros- 
pects are finer and more encouraging than hitherto. 

Our city has taken great stride- forward. The sign- of 
the development are obvious. Creat. and ever greater, 
buildings rise, to show the growth of our commerce and the 
wealth which is growing in our midst. There is no unem- 
ployment, worth mentioning; the bank returns are almost 
phenomenally good ; the insurance companies report an 
ever increasing clientele; the savings banks are almost 
uniquely prosperous. Never, perhaps, in the history of the 
world, has there been a time or place more completely abun- 
dant in material possessions. And with it all, there is a bet- 
ter tone in the midst of our people and a higher form of 
living. The arts are prospering and, particularly in music, 
we have made great local strides. 

< )ur position as a port has much improved. As the Orien- 
tal trade increases, our position will grow even more im- 
portant. In the course of time, trade with the Orient will 
rival that with Europe. When that happens we shall take 
our position as the leading port of this continent. 

There is still much to be done. The development of the 
city and the welfare of our people demand the greatest saga- 
city and honesty on the part of our civic and industrial 
leaders. But, step by step, we are accomplishing our des- 
tiny and the coming year will send us another step forward 
in our splendid career. 



Every year sees us improving the 
Wealth Production means of the production of wealth. 
Whether it be in agriculture or 
manufacture, in transportation or in wireless, the best brains 
of the world are devoted to taking measures for the pro- 
duction of ever greater stores of wealth, and the most keen 
intellects are directed to bringing that wealth mure and 
more into the hands of the people as a whole. 

That is the American idea. It can be differentiated Erom 
the so-called revolutionary idea very clearly. The latter 
seeks to make the poor better off by the destruction of the 
well-to-do. The American plan tries to make everybody 
better off by the creation of more and more wealth, so that 
everybody can have a proportionate share of that newly 
created wealth, the share of each depending upon his own 
ability and energy. The one idea places a penalty on in- 
dustry and ability; the other stimulates ability and indus- 
try, and thus adds to the sum total of human happiness. 

How that works out locally is very evident this Xmas. 
The head of the Salvation Army in this city reports that 
this Xmas there are very few people in need of help and 
that never in his experience has there been a higher stand- 
ard of well being, or as high a standard, as al the present 
time. 

This well being comes from the creation of new wealth, 
in which all grades in the population have shared and from 
which the)' have all benefitted. This is the American way. 
It is the way that makes for peace and continual prosperity, 
which builds up the people as a whole and which contains in 
itself the germs for future growth and greatness. 



There is much talk about the World 
The Wcrld Court Court, which appears to have received 
the conditional sanction of the Presi- 
dent and to have become a measure of the administration, 
as far as our part in the organization is concerned. 

There is a difficulty connected with the proposed arrange- 
ment, which proceeds from the fact that we are not a mem- 
ber of the League of Nations and the proposed court is 
nothing if not an instrument of the League. We are un- 
alterably opposed to joining the League and taking a share 
in responsibilities which are not ours. The President is 
in accord with that determination and his conditions with 
respect to the World Court are intended to prevent us be- 
ing involved in disputes with which the League of Nations 
is concerned. 

The Treaty of Locarno, which is the last British triumph 
and which, at first sight, carries with it implications of 
peace, gives great impetus to the World Court idea. Of 
course, with the idea itself, there is little fault to find. As 
an obvious matter of fact, it is more reasonable and more 
civilized that men should agree to judicially determine the 
rights ami wrong- of international disputes, than that they 
should proceed to kill one another and to plunge whole com- 
munities into misery by war. 

But there are concrete facts behind all the abstractions of 
the World Court idea. The nations over there are still 
unsettled and are still at outs. We must avoid being drawn 
into any of the European troubles even if we seem to be 
backward in our concepts of human progress. We have had 
our les-i in. 

< if course, the fact that the President favors the notion 
i- a great recommendation. He is a cautious person and 
will see that we are protected. 



There is much curiosity as to how 
Russian Recognition long we are to be the sole nation 
of importance which does not rec- 
ognize Russia. Senator Borah is on the warpath in this re- 
gard and seems to have made his mind up that the time 
has come when it is to our interest to get in with the rest 
in recognizing the Russian Soviet Republic and getting 
what commercial and other advantages we can out of the 
reci ignition. 

O il. W. X. 1 [askell and James I ' { '■< n 'drich, former gover- 
nor of Indiana, both members of the American Relief Ad- 
ministration in Russia, have joined with Senator Borah in 
urging that Russia be given a chance to justify its claims to 
reci ignition. 

Before there can be any Russian recognition it is just as 
well to realize that there are certain obligations and condi- 
tions, which must be honestly carried out. These are at 
least; Cessation of "red" propaganda in this country; steps 
towards the funding of the Russian debt to the United 
State-; reimbursement to Americans for confiscated prop- 
erty. With these conditions undertaken and conscien- 
tiously performed, there should no longer be any particular 
reason why Russia should not be placed in such a position 
that full diplomatic relations can be opened. Short of that, 
however, the matter cannot be even considered. 

Colonel Haskell has been making a very complete survev 
of Russia during the last year. He says that while he 
totally disagrees with the fundamental principles of the 
Soviet regime, he finds that the government is well estab- 
lished and that there is a very distinct progress in economic 
and industrial affairs. He thinks that recognition would 
be for the advantage of both governments economically. 



Tanuarv 2, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



3 



Mr. Goodrich is of the opinion that the communist regime 
cannot in the long run maintain itself against the pressure 
of the peasants. He thinks that America is totally immune 
to any communist propaganda and that economic results 
are all we need care for. 

We have had this Xmas again an 
Prohibition Frenzy . .example or many examples of the 
stupidity and gross dishonesty of 
the Volstead Act. There has not been a family of sufficient 
means in this city this season, that has not had the alcoholic 
refreshment which human experience has made practically 
inseparable from social pleasure. Only in the homes of the 
less well off has that been missing. 

Of course, this may have been the purpose of the act. It 
may have been the intention of those who passed this meas- 
ure that the well-to-do should have the alcoholic liquors, 
and that those who could not afford the prohibitive prices 
of the bootleggers should have none. It may easily have 
been intended that people who can afford champagne should 
have champagne, but that those to whom a little claret or 
beer would have meant added pleasure and exhilaration, 
should be forbidden such indulgence. 

Whatever may have been intended, we know what hap- 
pened. We know that there has been furtive sale and de- 
livery of alcoholic liquor to a greater extent than ever be- 
fore, in defiance of the law and to the civic detriment; that 
people have been again driven to underhand and degrading 
subterfuges, in order to conceal their attempts to satisfy a 
natural and quite harmless desire ; that there is a ramified 
and very extensive conspiracy to defeat the hated law, 
and that this conspiracy is bad fur the government and is 
destructive of loyalty, hut will continue while the occasion 
is there. 

We also know that corruption in enforcement cir< les do 
not diminish and. if the law is bad for the masses of the 
citizens, it is destructive of the loyalty and virtue of many 
of the government officials. This again will have conse- 
quences too nasty to contemplate. 

There is only one way out of the dilemma; to make such 
changes in the law as are right. 

The case of E. A. Hutching.-. 
known generally a- "•Big 

Hutch," is an interesting inci- 
dent m the interpretation of the parole law. This person 
was a swindler, a bunco Steerer and confidence man. who 
had man) crimes of a particularly disgusting character, 
against him. lie was convicted of buncoing a man called 

|. B, Morris out of $51,000 and sentenced to serve an inde- 
terminate sentence of from one to ten years, which \vi< 
afterwards definitely >ct at seven ami a half years. 

This man was paroled by the Prison Board on August 8, 
1925, and allowed to go to New York to work for the Ameri- 
can Press Association, but be does not appear to have 

had any work with that concern. The Prison Board did 

not notif) the District Attorncv of Los \nyelcs County of 
their intention to parole and the latter raised a loud outcry 
over the matter. This brought the affair to the attention 
of the GovemOT, who thereupon, revoke I the parole of 
HutchingS and sent his private secretary to New York to 
see that lie is extradited and brought back to serve tl 
of his lime. This is an attempt on the part of the 
to override the decision of the Board "i State 1'rison Din 
whose powers in the matter of paroles seem to be very fully 
stated in the law. 

When we turn to the matter of extradition, the chances 
of the return of HutchingS to this state on extradition 
papers, does not seem any too probable. It docs ni I 
as if he were a fugitive from justice, as he is out of the state 
on the express permission of the State Board >M Prison Di- 
rectors, i n a parole granted, apparently regularly by t' 
ernmcntal authority charged with the granting of par 



The Case of "Big Hutch' 



THE OPEN AIR MARKET 
By John G. Brayton 

WHAT a wonderful place a small town market is! There 
is one by the court house square where the old horse 
rails, no longer in use since the automobile has come, re- 
mind of the good old days when folks had plenty of time 
and living costs were not high. Color and light ami shade 
are abundant, with a new picture every few feet and with 
every change of the sun. 

Here, where the trucks back up and the drivers arrange 
their wares on boxes and boards or on patent frames that 
fold for handiness, are to be found, "Paint-It-Yourself" auto 
paint, potatoes, nuts, carrots, apples, oranges, grape fruit, 
onions, shoe strings, celery, patent awls, beets, cauliflower, 
lettuce, spinach, grapes, sandwiches, olives, honey, red 
apples — like the cheeks of the girl who is selling them — 
holly berries, Christmas wreaths, chickens, live and dressed, 
lemons, cider raisins, Christmas trees, fruit in jars, dried 
fruit, home-made candies, eggs, pumpkins, rhubarb, cabbage 
plants, endive, candied fruit, geese, rabbits, dressed pork, 
flowers, birds in cages. Chinamen, men, women and chil- 
dren and firewood and gold fish. 

And here you find a great deal of good old homeliness in 
the meaning of homelikeness. There is plenty of real 
homeliness, too, for contact with the elements makes for 
simpleness and ruggedness. Much bandying goes back and 
forth in the best of nature. Introductions are scarcely 
needed, for these people are sprung from races that in their 
earliest civilization were simple and trusting and hospitable. 
Anglo-Saxons, who retain the ancient traditions of hailing 
the stranger pleasantly and entertaining him as though be 
were one of their own people. 

The extremes of modernness appear here and there, where 

iimg folks gather. The girls with short skirts just 

icxering the fringe of their bloomers, the youths with latest 

comb-backs and ties, stand for progress. But this is all 
veneer, for they exchange the same old puns and witticisms 
honored by their grandparents. As, she. "Oh, I missed my 
mouth." he. "Well, you hadn't OUghta; it reaches from ear 
to ear." They laugh, though the exchange is very coarse 
and plebeian. And when the mothers mingle with the 
children, the unnaturalness of the youngsters' manners and 
appearance is accentuated by the sallowness and apparent 
exhaustion of the elders. 

These old people look as if they had been robbed of a 
great deal, had been betrayed, in spite of \\ ordsworth's 
assurance that Nature never betrays those who put their 
trust in her. There can he little doubt that agricultural co!- 
with their scientific training, will do away with much 
of this effect of the old order of farming, when a man who 
had failed at everything else could still scratch a living from 
oil. Farming is a big business. ri very big business, a 
scientific occupation, one that calls for brains ;i s strong and 
well trained as bodies must he. 

The casual observer cannot help sensing all this in the 
open air markets. For. while the progressive farmers use 
auto trucks and modern machinery, it sometimes looks as 
Ait it were against their will: that they would rather 
drive to town with horses and take all clay to make an hour's 
trip. The world i- going by many people these day.s. while 
many more are gasping for breath and trying to keep on. 

But we forget all that in the presence of market's glamor. 
The colors and savors and odors are such as no human in- 
genuity can reproduce or imitate. The prevalent pleasant- 
ness and honesty speak volumes for the stability of the best 
qualities in the human animal. No new order of living can 
quite do awav with the old truth of simplicity or warmth of 
heart. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 2, 1926 




'LEISURE'S WW 



OBEY NO 1V/9/VD BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moor>e- 





Curran 

IF you enjoyed "The Bat," "The ( a1 
and the Canary" or any other of the 
many mystic plays which have been 
produced in 
the last few 
years, by all 
means go to 
see the thril- 
ler at the 
Curran Thea- 
ter. "The < ior- 
illa." which 
opened at this 
Theater lasl 
Sunday eve- 
ning. 

it is replete 
with thrills, 

Kntlierlne Schwartz a nd laughs. 

No funnier characters have been seen 
in years than Lon Hascall and Harry T. 
Shannon as Mr. Mulligan and Mr. Gar- 
ritv. the two detecktuffs. who keep the 
audience in an uproar throughout the 
progress of the plav . 

It would never do to tell you what to 
expect when you go to see this plav. for 
half the fun lies in the unexpectedness of 
the thing. There are darkened stages, 
uncanny shadows, skeletons, a gorilla, 
said to be a man-killer. — in fact, every 
known device to give you a thrill, L em- 
ployed. 

The house was packed the opening 
night, and judging from the hilarious 
laughter and shrieks of terror from the 
audience, was enjoyed to the Utmost. 

The cast is a well-picked one, and 
all of the members do their work well. 



Wilkes 

"All For You" which opened at 
the Wilkes on Christmas night, bids fair 
to be a record breaker. 

William Gaxton is starred in the pro- 
duction, and has a great comedy role. 
Madeline Cameron, graceful and beauti- 
ful, is one of the outstanding features in 
the show. Petite little Nancy Welford, 
who danced her way into favor with "No, 
Xo. Nanette" again captures her audi- 
ences in this piece. 

Ted Doner of the famous dancing 
family is the other featured player in 
the production. He will be remembered 
from his splendid work in "Lady lie 

G 1." Eddie Allan, the "india rubber 

man" does some marvelous eccentric 
dancing, and the Ten Dancing Rockets, 



(Conducted by Katherine Schwartz) 

are another unit in the large company 
now appearing at this theater. 



St. Francis 

"The Wanderer" is enjoying great suc- 
cess at this theater. It is estimated that 
a test .comprising over 12? people was 
made, before the final selection of the 
cast. William Collier, Jr.. plays the title 
role. Kathryn Hill plays Naomi; Ernest 
Torrence and Kathryn Williams also ap- 
pear in the cast. 

* * * 
Golden Gate 

The Colden Gate fur the first week 
of the New Year has a treat in store for 
its patrons. George McKay and ( Ittie 
Ardine will present a sketch called "The 
Night Watchman;" l'atti Moore and her 
song and dance revue will offer unusual 
entertainment. She is assisted by Ar- 
thur Bard and Bud and Buddy, assisted 
by the Domino Entertainers. 

Brosius and Brown call their turn the 
"Brainless Wonders;" theirs is a clever 
juggling act. — the Juggling Nelsons; Mr. 
and Mrs. Jimmy Barry will present a 
skit written by Jimmy Barry, entitled 
"The Scandals of Hensfoot Corners;" 
Larry Meehan and Gertrude Newman 
will be seen in "Broken Promises." 

The screen feature is "Passionate 
Youth" featuring Pauline Garon and 
Bryant Washburn and an all star cast. 

Claude Sweeten and his orchestra, and 
Grace Rollins Hunt will provide the 

music. 

* * + 

Orpheum 

The Orpheum is offering an all-new 
after-holidaj program for the week, be- 
ginning tomorrow afternoon, and there- 
will be a generous amount of various 
kind of entertainment, 

Heading the program will be vaude- 
ville's youthful producers, Jeannette 
Hackett and Harry Delmar, present- 
ing their filth annual revue, which is 
a riot of color, music, and girls, with 
a large supporting cast, including Edna 
Charles, Jean Carroll, Irene Griffith, 
Margie Hallick, Edna Morris, Helyn 
Miller. Priscilla Thompson, Helen 
Bradley, Gladys Miller, Hilda Morgan, 
William Downing, Al Beschetti and 
Jules Shankman. The title of their of- 
fering is "The Dance Club" and is one 
of the most pretentious offerings ever 
presented by these two clever produc- 
ers. 

America's premier piano quartette, 



Jerry and her baby grands, with Ger- 
trude Valliere as the directress, will 
otter one of the outstanding novelties 
of the season in their "Bits O' Dream 
-Music." 

There is comedy galore on the bill, 
with such well-known funsters as Bert 
York and Ed Lord, in "Two Gentle- 
men. Nevertheless;" Murray and Alan. 
"Jesters of 3,000 Years Ago;" jack 
King and < ieorge Beatty in "Artistic 
\.pple Sauce;" Frank Davis and Adele 
Darnell in "Birdseed ;" the Du Ponts in 
"A Study In Nonsense;" and the Three 
Golfers in "Putting a Comedy Novelty 
i >ver." All these will lend their tal- 
ents to make the program a huge suc- 
cess and one that will properly usher 
in the first week of the New Year. 

* * * 

Loew's Warfield 

F'or the coming week the Warfield 
offers an unusual feature picture. "The 
Splendid Road" directed by Frank- 
Lloyd. It depicts a story id' early 
California life. The stars are Anna Q. 
Nilsson. Lionel Barrymore, Robert 
Frazer, Marceline Day, Pauline Garon 
and a strong supporting cast. 

( in the stage will be seen another un- 
usually beautiful presentation of Fan- 
chon and Marco. This "Idea" is called 
"Roses" and the beautiful Sunkist 
Beauties depict various types of the 
queen of (lowers. — the (. liina Rose, the 
Rambler, the American Beauty, etc. 

Rosencr and his men have a fine pro- 
giam to accompany both the stage pic- 
ture and the screen feature. 

* * * 
California 

At the California the feature this 
week is sure to cause comment, — 
"Bobbed Hair," with Marie Prevost 
and Kenneth Harlan in the stellar 

r< iles. 

* * * 

Granada 

Another picture featuring Richard 
Dix called "Women Handled," is the 
attraction at this theater for the com- 
ing week. There are surprises galore 
by the orchestra under the direction of 
Yerne Buck. 

* * * 

Imperial 

Charlie Chaplin's comedy-drama, 
"The Gold Rush" continues to play to 
packed houses, and no wonder, for it 
is the best work ever done by Chaplin. 

It is said to be a symbolized life of 



January 2, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

MRXT WKRK 



ALEXANDRIA \ pictures 
Geary and 18th ( 


alcazar | "Song and Dance Man" 
O'Fnrrell nr, Powell ( Henry Duffy Players 


CALIFORNIA ( "Bobbed Hair" 
4th and Market ( Marie Prevost 


CAMEO ) 

»3« Market St. ( "Western Pluck" 


CAPITOL ( "Kosher Kitty 

Ellis nr. Market f Kelly" 


CASINO 1 

Mason and EIIU J Pictures 


CASTRO j 

429 Castro St. f Pictures 


Robert Mantell and 
COLUMBIA f Genevieve Hamper in 
' Repertoire 


CURRAN ) .,_. _ 

Geary nr. Mason f "The Gorilla" 


Egyptian I Pictures 


^ D . EN ^ TE . \ Vaudeville 
G. G. Ave. & Taylor ' 


granada ( Richard Dix in 
khig Market St. ( "Women Handled" 


HAIGHT 1 

Haieht at Cole J Pictures 


IMPERIAL 1 Charlie Chaplin in 
1077 Market St. t "The Gold Rush" 


LOEWS WARFIELD ) .,_. _ . ... _ 

888 Market St. j The Splendid Road" 


MAJESTIC ) 

Mission between <■ Pictures 
20th and 21st J 


METROPOLITAN J 

2055 Union St. j Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 
1220 Fillmore 
NEW MISSION 
2550 Mission 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM I 

O'Fnrrell * Powell J Vaudeville 


PANTAGES I , . 
Market at Mason < Vaudeville 


POMPBII 1 Pictures 
Next to Grnnadn \ 


PORTOLA 1 _, 

770 Market St. ) Pictures 


PRESIDENT I 

Market * McAllister \ "Thank-U" 


ROYAL 1 

ir.2ft 1-oikSt. ( Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS { „ Th . ^ 

065 Market St. \ The Wanderer" 


SITTER | 

Sntterand Stelner ( Pictures 


union skuare ( Pictures and 
O'Farrell nr. Powell ( Vaudeville 


wilkes "AM For You" 
(Mary and Mason ( 


WIGWAM 1 

Mission and 22d Pictures 



< ONCKR I > 
Ssn l-'rnnritro Synap l i oB y Orrhe*ttrn — -»,»,- 
day nftrrnnon 2:4.".. 1'iirrnn Theater. 



the screen star, — his life from the days 
of obscurity up to the present. 

* * * 

President 

"Thank-U." John Gulden's comedy 
success and the greatest play of its 
kind since "Lightnin'," is splendid en- 
tertainment, and Mr. Duffy is surely to 
be congratulated on haing obtained an 
actor of such sterling merit as John D. 
O'Hara for the role of the village par- 
son, the part in which he starred 
throughout Australia for many months. 

"Thank-U" is a play of village folk 
and is full of sweetness, happiness, 
and the joy of living. As usual. Duffy 
has succeeded in gathering together a 
splendid company, well able to enact 
the various roles in a capable and ar- 
tistic manner. 

Leneta Lane in the chief feminine 
role is delightful. Kenneth Daigneau 
in the role of the rich young man does 
some very good work. Indeed, every 
one of the cast are to be commended 
upon their work in this play. The 
cast includes May Nannary, Francis 
Fraunie. Earl Lee. Harriet McGibbon, 
Helen Gilmore, Olive Cooper, Frank 
Darien, Robert Reid, Charles Edler, 
William Abram and John Mackenzie. 



Cameo 

Next week at this popular little 
theater will be seen Bob ^cord in 
"Western Pluck," another thriller. < >n 

the Stage there i> a minstrel show, 

Milo's Minstrels, with end-men. inter- 
locutor, and all the rest. 

* * * 
Alcazar 

"The Song and Dance Man," George 

M. Cohan's American dramatic coined), 
starts on it-- fourth week tonight at the 
Ucazar. This new play has pi 
to be a veritable triumph here, with 
Henry Duffy in the title role, and Dale 
Winter and William Davidson in im- 
portant characterizations. Miss Win- 
ter and Duffy are both doing splendid 
in roles entirely different from 
any in which they have so far appeared 
here. William Davidson i- splended 
as the theatrical producer, and William 
Macaule) .1- .1 detective, and Betty 
Laurence as a boarding house keeper. 
likewise aid in the fun. Others in the 

fine Cast are Day Man-on. Doroth) Le 
Mar. John Junior. Ray L. Royce, 
Henrj Caubisens, Marie Sorrille and 
Hen Harris. 

* * * 

Capitol 

"Kosher Kitty Kelly" which might 
well be named the sister piece to 
"Abie's Irish Rose," opened at the 
Capitol on Christmas Day to a large 
audience. 

There are some very clever lines, and 
very catching music. In this connec- 



tion, we must speak of the tine or- 
chestra assembled for this production. 
The musical hits of the show are 
"Dancing Toes" and "Kosher Kitty 
Kelly." 

Virginia Marvin, a petite little miss, 
does some clever dancing in the part 
of Kosher Kitty. Marion Aye, remem- 
bered from her part in "White Col- 
lars," doesn't have much to do as Rosie 
Feinbaum, but does it well; Billy Bur- 
ress carries the comedy as Ginsburg, 
the delicatessen store keeper. ( tthers 
in the cast are Mattie Hyde, Mildred 
Beverly, Nell Harding, Freddie Pierce, 
Frederick Green, Hobart Furman, Carl 
Kroenke, Charles Rowan and Rosa 
Radel. 

* * * 

A Pianist of Unusual Powers 
Frank Moss, the pianist whom the 
local press has praised highly, Ray Brown 
of the Chronicle stating that he "is as 
worthy of a hearing as many a transient 
pianist who comes here heralded by care- 
fully deleted press notices from New 
York," will give an all-Bach program on 
the evening of January 4th, in Scottish 
Rite Auditorium. 

Eugenia Liezbinska, danseuse, will he 
include I in tlii- program, interpreting the 
"English Suite." Tickets are on sale at 
Sherman. Clay & 1 1 1. 

1 Continued on Page 161 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 2, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Greetings, New Year! 

HELLO. '26! Happy New Year. 
What have you in your treasure 
man 



trove 



for mortal 
? Health, happiness, success, prosperity, good-will. 
peace and other good gifts? < »h. we are not modest in mak- 
ing our requests" We want plenty, and much of it. That is 
the way with mortals. New Year. 

But, judging by the past, and. forsooth, how else can we 
judge— you, too, 'are going to be overly generous and (ill 
our lives to the brim with choicest bounty and blessings. 

Salutations. New Year! Farewell, '2?\ With grateful 
hearts we acknowledge your gifts to humanity. Yours has 
been an indulgent part and richly have you showered your 
beneficence upon us. And, when history shall have been 
written anew. 1925 will stand out prominently as a signi- 
ficant year and the world will henceforth bow in deference 
to those great projects and world-wide benefactions re- 
corded on the annals of the past year. Adieu, 1925 and take 
with you our lasting gratitude ! 

Across the lines of our pages, today, appears a new fig- 
uration. 1926. We welcome the year already initiated with 
high hopes, securely expectant in our outlook upon still 
better, bigger and finer things. 

If there is one word we may adopt for its accomplish- 
ment let's adopt it here and now — WORK. 

W-O-R-K, the noble word which carries a full-freighted 
train of thought toward definite achievement, and lands 
somewhere ! 

Who, among us, can doubt the efficacy, the potency, and 
— the pleasure of this powerful agent. WORK. 

It is really the lever which lifts commonplace things into 
the sun and focuses the attention of the world. Work has 
made the year just past a glorious one. and now even a 
more resplendant one is here to test our sincerity and our 
worth. 

Greetings, .Yew Year! And a merry, happy Hello! 

* * * 
Dr. and Mrs. Jordan 
Entertain Friends 

Dr. and Mrs. David Starr Jordan are entertaining a family 
group at Serra House, their campus home for the holidays. 
The party includes .Mr. and Mrs. Knight Jordan of San 
Francisco and their children; Mrs. Jessue Knight of Provp, 
Utah; Harold Jordan and Eric Jordan; Dr. and Mrs. Na- 
thaniel Gardner of Berkeley, the latter of whom was Miss 
Jordan ; Dr. Jordan. President Emeritus of Leland Stan- 
ford Jr. University and Mrs Jordan are two of the best 
loved and honored of University people, the fame of Dr. 
fordan reaching to all parts of the world, where the illustri- 
ous man is known for his scientific work and his great con- 
tributions to tin' world of letters. a> well as for the phil- 
osophy which permeates all of his great achievements in 
many fields. 

The Jordan home is the center of scholarly events 
throughout the whole year whefe the lovely hostess ex- 
tends with her famous husband the hospitality for which 
they are known throughout university circles, 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

030 UumIi Street, net-wcen Powell and Stockton, San FrnnolNCO 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLBTHEN, Proprietor 



Society women and active social workers contributed 
liberally to the Christina- fund of the Stanford clinic, when 
more than 500 stockings were filled with gifts for the con- 
valescent children of the Stanford Home at Menlo Park. 

Entertainment for the children consisted of the singing 
of Christmas carols, sleight-of-hand performers and a visit 
from a convincing Santa Claus. 

A recent wedding in Stanford University Memorial 
Church took place last Sunday evening when Miss Sara 
Edith Woerner, Stanford '22, became the bride of Mr. Har- 
old Frederick Lynn. '23. The ceremony was performed by 
Dr. 1). Charles Gardner, Chaplain of Stanford University. 
Miss Mildred Johnson of Berkeley, cousin of the bride 
played the wedding march. Miss Ann Henry of l'orterville 
and Miss Helen Payne of San Francisco were the bride's at- 
tendants. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry B. Arnold spent the Christmas holi- 
days with Mr. and Mr-. Harry B. Arnold Jr., in Sacramento, 
where young Harry Arnold 111 assisted in acting as host 
to his father's people. The Arnold home was artistically 
decorated in Yuletide symbols with a beautiful tree the cen- 
ter of the delightful family gathering. Dr. and Mr-. Arnold re- 
turned to their home in < lakland on Monday. 

* * * 

The many friends of Marie Hughe- Macquarrie received 
word that she was spending the holidays in Chicago, where 
the famous young harpist and her ensemble of artists arc- 
appearing in the presentation originated by the brilliant 
young San Francisco musician. Mrs. Macquarrie left thi- 
city for a brief sojourn in Xew York, but so popular has 
she become and so artistic are her harp numbers that she 
has been besieged by managers throughout the east for 
concerts which will keep her away from San Francisco for 

probably a vear at least. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Norris and Mr. and Mrs. Wallace 
Irwin are among the prominent people of the book world 
who participated in the Magic City, a bazaar for charity in 
Xew York last week. Kathleen Norris presided at the book 
booth, where autographed copies of her novels were -old. 
Ethel Barrymore added materially to the charity fund from 
sales of perfume at the booth where she presided, Diana 
Manners was also one of the successful saleswomen, her 
supervision of antiques netting a handsome sum for the bene- 
ficiary. 

Noted artists also have participated in this charity event. 
Howard Chandler Christy and Penrhyn Stanlaws being 
among the painters, sketching patrons of their booth. 

Mr.-. Vincent Astor and Mrs. Stanhope Nixon took an 
active part in the bazaar at the ( irand Central Palace for the 
benefit of a popular charity. 

* * * 

Mrs. F. L. Topping, wife of Captain Topping of Fort 
Scott, is one of the most popular of the Army Post's young 
hostesses. She is the mother of two lovely children. 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 
Telephone Sutter 8130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



January 2, 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Dr. Anne Nicholson sent a Christmas mes- 
sage from New York, where she is spending a 
few weeks following her great work in the 
Council at Washington, D. C. She will re- 
turn to the Capitol City soon. 

* * * 
Society Smartness 

Winter modes are so attractive and smart 
that comment seems perfectly in place, es- 
pecially when Society dons wraps and gowns 
of splendor. 

Mrs. Templeton Crocker, who came to town 
from her peninsula home was particularly 
charming recently in a raspberry red velvet 
coat trimmed with narrow bands of beaver. 
She wore a fetching hat of almond shade felt. 

Mrs. F. Henshaw, who has but recently re- 
turned from Europe, appeared at a luncheon 
where she entertained a group of eight friends 
in a coat of the color of ashes of roses. It was 
trimmed with bands of fox with collar and 
cuffs to match. 

Mrs. Andrew Welch, a great favorite in so- 
ciety was so attractive a few days ago in her 
silk crepe frock of biscuit shade over which she wore a 
fur wrap and small felt hat to match. 

Mrs. Charles Brendon Brady was lovely in an ensemble 
of black cloth with an over blouse of cloth of silver, with 
which she wore a smart close fitting hat of black velvet 
with an ornament of silver. 

Mr. and Mrs. Antoine Borel and their children arc now 
established at their San Mateo home, after being abroad 
for more than a year. The old Borel home in Switzerland, 
the Chateau de Gorgier, was the scene of a family gathering 
where Antoine Borel's brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and 
Mrs. Louis Bovet are now living. 

* * * 

Hon. James D. Phelan, former United State- Senator, 
was again host to a group of of friend- at his country place, 
in Saratoga, with Miss Helen Wills, the tennis champion 
and ferry Strathford the honor guests. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Fish have announced the en 

men t of their daughter. Miss Frances Cecilia Fish to Mr. 
Garth L. Young of Portland, Oregon. The wedding date 

has not yet been declared. The bride to be i- a great favor- 
ite in college circles and in Palo Alto where Mr. and Mrs, 

Fish make their home. 

* * * 

Taylor Pillsbury was host .u a dinner party given re- 
cently, entertaining Miss Evelyn Taylor as guest "' 
honor and a host of young people who later attended the 
dance given by Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Taylor for their 
daughter at the San Francisco Golf and Country Club. 

Young Pillsbury has just arrived from the Fast, where he 
has been attending school. 

* * * 

An interesting event in New York recently was the 
luncheon given by Mis. Clement Tobin at one of the 
fashionable restaurants for her debutante daughter. Miss 
Ailecn Tobin. Mrs. Tobin and her daughter now make 
their home in New York with Mr. and Mrs. E. 1. De Sabla 
on Park Vvenue, Mrs. Herbert Paym nest at the 

luncheon. Others present included a group of the leading 




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Fir* or *rrii« for 



mmmi •» yomr ■•«! mp *»•'« 



debutantes ami members of the social group, 
such as: Misses Cornelia Ruppert, Dorothj 
Havemeyer, Patricia Mallinson, Huguette 
Clark, Victoria Freylinghausen, Jean Van 
Yoorhees Banks. 



The marriage of Miss Helen Marye and 
Captain William D. Thomas of the air ser- 
vice, U. S. N., will be an important event of the 
new year in Washington society. Mr. and 
Airs. George T. Marye announced the engage- 
ment last week and the young couple are being- 
entertained at many affairs. Miss Marye is 
very popular in the younger set of Washington 
and has many friends in New York, where she 
frequently visits Miss Marjorie Oelrichs, who 
has just returned from a visit to the Marye 
home. 

I )( interest here is the marriage of Miss 
Martha Herrere and Pedro Lopez De Moid, 
which took place in Guatemala last month. 
The wedding united two old Spanish families, 
one of which. Me Moro, is well known in San 
Francisco. 
Mr-. De Moro is the (laughter of one of Guatemala's 

former Presidents; he is a banker and coffee planter and 

is rated one of the most influential men in Central America. 
I >e Moro is a grandson of the late Captain Frank De Moro, 

a San Francisco pioneer. Alberto De Moro, an uncle, is 

still living here. 

* * * 

Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor extended her hospitality 
at a luncheon given in her home on Broadway this week 
entertaining in compliment to Mr. Bruce Kelham. Vmong 
those present were Miss Cynthia Boyd, Miss Dorothy Mein, 
Mis- Harriett Brownell, Miss Evelyn Taylor, Miss Bar- 
bara Pond. Miss dementia Lewis. Miss Evelyn Lansdale, 
Mr. Thomas P. Bishop, Mr. Decker McAllister. Mr. Albert 
Boardman, Mr. Thomas Breeze |r.. Mr. Larry Draper and 
Mr. Taylor Pillsbury. 

* * * 

\li-s Dori- Badly was hostess recentlj to a group o! 
young girls at the home of Dr. and Mrs. E. Edward Baillj 
and was followed by a lovely dancing party given in the 
Woman's Athletic Club. 



Mr. and Mr-. John Clark Burgard gave a charming din 
ner party at their San Mateo home last week, the guests 
being Mr. and Mrs. Xion Tucker. Mr. and Mrs. Ross 
Ambler Currafi. Mr. ami Mrs. Lawrence McCreery and 
Mrs. Corbett Moody. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNear gave a large dinner 
party followed by a dance at the San Francisco Golf and 

Country Club la-t Monday night. Scotch favors and dec- 
orations were the motif of the delightful event which in- 
cluded an entertainment of Scotch music, readings and 
other pleasing compositions included on the divertimento. 

* * » 

Mi-- Eunice Lehmer, the daughter of Dr. and Mr-. Der- 
rick Norman Lehmer. i- a great favorite in the colic, 
of the University of California. She is a talented young 
lady ami often accompanies her illustrious father in his 
Indian lore 

* * * 

and Mrs. Milton Lsberg and Milton Esberg, Jr.. will 

tin over the week end at their home in Ross, where 

friends will join them in New Year's festivities. The Es- 

ifornia f"r a visit to the East, plan- 

d weeks in Xew York. 

niinued on Page 13) 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 2, 1926 



•4&&J&' 



"&££<&» 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



*&£&&> 



"■2WWS** 




c 



Olympic Club Members Entertain Caddy Boys 

'HARLIE SULLIVAN, caddy master at 

Lakeside, was the happiest man in San 

Francisco Tuesday evening, when he led his 

band of caddy boys to their annual banquet at 

the ( (lympic Club. 

There' were 225 of the greatest specimens of 
young America you ever saw: English, Irish, 
Scotch, Italians. Indians. Russian-. Germans and 
Poles with a sprinkling of French thrown in. 

Charlie not only has the greatest bunch of caddies, but he- 
has some of the most accomplished young kids you could ever 
wish to see. There was Jack Dillon, the champion caddie boy, 
along with ten other members of the Dillon family. Jack Navi, 
and his brother Ike. the latest importation from Italy, Cadilac 
Buckley, Texas Pete Robinson, who has been packing clubs 
for the last 30 years and is acknowledged to be the world's 
greatest bull slinger. Cezar Mills, the best little ball hunter 
in the club, Willie Mendold. the classy Indian hoy. and a score 
of kids who were real entertainers. •'Indian" Willie sings like 
Al Jolson and from what we heard of him he's making a mis- 
take packing clubs, he ought to be on the stage. 

Archie Block is another polished youngster, who shakes a 
wicked hoof. Archie can dance the Charleston on his ear as 
well as warble like a canary. 

I '.ill Duffy's caddy band was a scream. There was "Skinny" 
Hansen, the violinist; "Beans" Griffin, who knocks chunks out 
of the trombone, and also does some clever song hits: "Red" 
Kennedy, when not playing the piccolo, recites, and Archie 
Drucker. Judge Fitzpatrick's favorite caddie. Archie is some 
reciter himself and his rendering of "Dangerous Dan Met irew" 
was a pip. 

After the hoys had received a Christmas present of a pair 
of shoes and a new dollar bill and necktie they all sat down 
and did justice to turkey and cranberry sauce with lots of 
trimmings on the side. 

This whole affair was made possible by the untiring efforts 
of Judge Tim Fitzpatrick and his co-director. Frank Foran, 
with Louis Stewart, chairman of the Golf Committee; Sam 
Whiting and Eddie Heeler were also on the job. 

* * * 

Sullivan Presented With an Auto 

To show their appreciation for the wonderful services ren- 
dered by Charlie Sullivan through the many years that Charlie 
has acted as caddie master at Lakeside, the members clubbed 
together to buy Charlie a Cleveland sedan, which was pre- 
sented to him as a Christmas box from his admirers at the 
club. 

When we talked to Charlie on Christmas Day he said that 
he was afraid to go to sleep for fear he would wake up ami 
find it was only a dream 

Sullivan wishes to express to all the members his sincere ap- 
preciation for their generosity and kindness. 

* * * 
Caddie Problem Solved 

When the California Country Club opens up its new home 
at P.aden next spring, it will introduce to the golfing public 
of California a system in handling caddies that has no equal in 
the state. For many years, the caddie problem has been one of 
the greatest points connected with the golb clubs. 

The question of who make the best boys to pack your clubs 
has been a sore one. but Dr. Wilhelm Waldeyer. one of our 
foremost medical men and one of the most devout boosters for 



the welfare and the uplift of the youngsters, has come forward 
with a plan. This plan was approved by the directors of the 
California Club and it unanimously elected the doctor chairman 
nf the Caddie Committee at the new California Club at Baden. 
Dr. Waldeyer offered some well thought out ideas when he 
suggested at the meeting that the boys have a steam-heated 
rest room all their own with a shower attache;!, where the) 
can procure at cost, a hut meal at lunch time. There is to be 
plenty of golf literature which will enable them to study up 
the etiquette of a caddie toward the man or woman for whom 
he is caddying. 

Also they shall have a yard fitted up with a practice net and 
a putting green, and there are to be three captains appointed 
to act as policemen of their division, who will make a monthly 
report on the conduct of the boys to the caddie master. 

It was also suggested that a tax of ten cents be charged 
t.i the account of each player ever day he plays and the pro- 
ceeds be put in a fund for the hoys and when the honor roll is 
called at the end of each year each boy shall be rewarded ac- 
cording to his record. 

Men Too Hard on Caddies 

The great fault among most men is that they don't treat 
fairly the boys who begrudgingly pack their clubs for them. 
They blame them if they make a bad shot, in fact, some of 
them think they are just a hunch of dumbbells. The fact is 
that some of the youngsters are boys from good families, who 
beat it to a golf club just to pick up a stray dollar after school. 

If some of the men would only stop to ihmk what an amount 
of good they could do by treating the buys as if they were hu- 
man what a difference it wotdd make among the kills. They 
would be glad to see you win and would do all they could to 
help you win your game. 

Fellows. let me give you a little advice : Never do to a 
strange hoy what you wouldn't like a stranger to do to your 
liny. If you keep that thought in mind you will always find 
that any caddie in the world will pull for you. 

* * * 
Boisson Model Man 

Clarence Boisson, the popular caddie master, is one of the 
best masters of that position we have at any club around the 
bay. Boisson has the respect of all the hoys and there isn't a 
youngster among the 100 kids who pack clubs that wouldn't 
go to the bat any old time he a-ks them. 

Boisson is also a genius in instructing the boys in the art of 
swinging a mashie; one of the boys lie has developed is. without 
doubt, the best golfer of his age among all the buys of the baj 
region. "Red" Veurek is the kid. "Red" has run out of com- 
petition at the club — one of the best performances this young- 
ster made was when he defeated Fddie Green in the finals for 
the caddie championship, shooting a in., live stroke-, under par. 

There are several other boys who are making good, in par- 
ticular Mickey McCarthy and Jack Mazza. Boisson expects 
all the kids will go with him to the new club where the\ will 
he treated like little gentlemen. 



Strictly Honest 

"I told him he was a brute, and returned all his beastly 
presents." 

"And what did the wretch do?" 

"Sent me a dozen boxes of face powder in return for what 
he had taken home on his coat!" — Svdnev Bulletin. 



January 2. 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



S&, 



By Josephine Wilson 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events In men's and 
women's organizations. 




A 



jnSEPHIlE 
WILSON 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 

NOTHER announcement relative to San 
. Francisco's place in the line of achieve- 
ment is recorded by the recent authoritative 
statement that San Francisco is regarded as the 
future theatrical center. 

In his speech before the Press Club last 
Saturday, Norman Hackett stated that big- 
producers have their eye on San Francisco 
as a future for all productions in this country. 

"San Francisco's dramatic reviewers are fair and square," 
said Mr. Hackett in his notable address. "They give the 
actor all the co-operation possible. They are dignified in 
their criticisms." Me spoke also of the ruthless criticism of 
New York reviewers and attributed some of the stage fail- 
ures to their severity. 

The Press Club entertained "The Best People" company 
at a dinner dance given in the historic club rooms on Sutter and 
Powell streets, the entire cast of the popular company being 
present. The affair was typical of the noteworthy events 
given by the Press Club, when noted men and women from 
all parts of the world are entertained by the distinguished 
members of this prominent organization. 

* * * 

The San Francisco Chronicle in an editorial of Monday 
called attention to the list of stage celebrities who were 
native San Franciscans or who had received their early 
training here and embraced in this listing such' famous 
Stage people as Mary Anderson. Sibyl Sanderson. Lotta 

Crabtree, John McCullough, David Belasco, Maude Adam-. 
Nance ( ) 'Neil and Blanche Bates. 

"An atmosphere stimulating to the artistically inclined 
and an audience with the gifts ol appreciation which Mr. 
Sbubert and Mr. Robertson declare we r should 

make an idea! producing center," States the Chronicle, in 
quoting a line or two. 

* * * 

The Sierra Club honored Dr. and Mrs. James K. Morgan. 
two of its most prominent mountain climbers who are plan- 
ning a trip abroad. The party complimenting Dr. and Mrs. 
Morgan was given at the home of the Misses Mary and Vi- 
olet Pollock. \mong those present were: Mr. ami Mrs 

William Bowen, Mr. and Mrs. Orwell Logan, Mr. and Mrs. 
II. I. Braunton, Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Drew. Mr. and Mrs. 
\\ . K. Webber. Mr and Mrs. James De Fremery, Mr. and Mrs. 

A. E. Neuenberg, Miss Christmas Moody, Miss Winifred Lans- 

dell, Miss Ada Smith. Miss Wanda Bernhardt, Miss Helen 
Meloy, Miss Ann I'emland. Miss Alice Meussdorffer, Mi" 
Carolyn Nelson, Miss [sabel Wilkie, Miss Mary Wilkie. Miss 
Maren Vune, I \. \bcel. !•".. S. McElligott, Dr. E. C Barks. 
Dr. W. <>. Wyatt, A. A. Duhme, Charles Delany, S. M. Ha- 
lett, Max Anfcngcr ami Kenneth Goody. 

* * * 

Thousands of interested San Franciscans were received 

by the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company on Thurs- 

afternoon when the beautiful new building was open 

for inspection. 

District Manager T. F. Delury headed the local official- 
dom in extending the courtesies ami gave to manv inquisi- 
tors valuable information concerning the growth and de- 
velopment of the large concern. The reception was held in 
(Continued on Page 13) 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

The California Club, of which Mrs. Anita Phillips is 
the president, has issued a calendar of events for the present 
month which inaugurates the new year with a number of 
splendid programs. Mrs. Marie Pernau Walsh, is the chair- 
man of the program committee and first vice-president of the 
California Club. 

On Tuesday, January 5, will be held the "Founders' 
Breakfast," an event of outstanding significance and one 
which promises, this year, to eclipse all former occasions 
of the kind. Reservations have been coming in to the club 
with such rapidity that it is fair to predict an overflowing 
auditorium in the attractive club house on Clay Street. 

By the way, it is opportune to speak of this vine-covered 
club house where California Club members hold all of their 
meetings, and which has become the center of women's 
activities. The club bouse, itself, is attractively placed and 
many new additions have been made since the presidency 
of Mrs. Phillips and her regime. Cosy rooms with easy r 
chairs, an inviting reception and guest room, reading rooms, 
a sun-room with its wicker chairs and then the large well- 
arranged auditorium, all have known the touch of artistry 
and fresh paint, new draperies and upholstery until the 
California Club bouse stands out as a criterion for women- 
built club centers alluring, attractive and commodious. 

"The Masqueraders" will be presented by club members 
at the Founders' Breakfast. Mae Frances O'Keeffe and 
Margaret Mary Turner being the principals in the play. 
Vocal solos will be sung by Mrs. Phillip V. Aaronson, one 
of the sweetest and lovelies! singers of our city. The play, 
"Hearts — A (lame for the World and His Wife." will in- 
troduce as players a group of talented women wdio have 
earned high reputation for their work. They are Mrs. 
Joseph Lawless, Mrs. Flynn, Mrs. Edward J. Morser and 
Mrs. Henry Hastings. 

Mrs. Cecil Moss will be heard in a group of violin solos 
at the breakfast, completing a program of excellent offer- 
ings with Mrs. Marie Pernau Walsh acting as chairman 
and Mrs. Phillips presiding genius of the day. 



Edna Wilson Becsey, the brilliant young writer who has 
just been elected president of the Sacramento Branch of the 
California Writers' Club, is planning a splendid session of 
organization to take place in the Capitol City soon. 
Mrs. Becsey is the presiding officer of the first branch to 
lie established by the California Writers' Club and has al- 
readv launched her group of writers into a season of ac- 
tivity. 

An elaborate dinner was given recently at the Senator 
Hotel in Sacramento with Harry Noyes Pratt, local president 
of the California Writers' Club, the honor guest and speak- 
sion. Prominent citizens of Sacramento as 
well as noted authors, artists and musicians were seated 
with the president and her executives. 



"Mamma, when we were in the city papa took me to a 
with ladies dressed in stockings clearup to their 
necks." — Wisconsin Octopus. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 2, 1926 



Finance 



A STRONG protest has been made by the Chamber of Com- 
merce against a railway proposal to establish a charge of 
$3.50 per car for the switching of all less than carload freight 
at all stations in California. Seth Mann represented the local 
shippers at the hearing in the matter before the State Railroad 

Commission. 

* * * 

— Plans are being initiated for holding the fourth annual con- 
vention of the Pacific Foreign Trade Council in San Francisco, 
March 4 to 6, inclusive. The slogan is "Pacific Coast Unity for 

World Trade Expansion." 

* * * 

— There is to be a great Japanese business show in 1926. San 
Francisco concerns are asked to send their posters to a poster- 
show exhibit. 

* * * 

— The Grain Trade Association of the Chamber of Commerce 
this year gave a fine Christmas celebration and festival for or- 
phan boys and girls. It is an annual event of the association 
and, with the exception of the war period, has been running 
uninterrupted!)' for twenty-five years. 

* * * 

— Lumber interests on the Pacific Coast will not be much af- 
fected by the federal order to prohibit the movement of all five- 
leafed pines from the state. The restrictions do not go -to 
dressed lumber -and peeled logs, such as piles and power poles. 

* * * 

— Canadian duty stamps can "be purchased at the Canadian 
Bank of Commerce and a good deal of the inconvenince of cus- 
toms procedure on entrv of goods into Canada thus eliminated. 

* * * 

— California Industrial Accident Board has decided that de- 
pendents of a citizen who was killed while acting on a sheriff's 
posse are entitled to industrial compensation. Four thousand 
dollars was thus awarded for the death of N. H. Rader, wdio 
was killed in a conflict between the sheriff's posse and boot- 
leggers at Moss Landing. 

* * * 

— Gains in life production by agents of the Travelers, dur- 
ing the special ten weeks' testimonial drive, showed 32 per 
cent ahead of the same period last year. Group insurance 
made a notable showing during this drive. 

— A. D. F. Reynolds, former manager of the Fidelity Mutual 
Life at San Francisco, and later general agent for the com- 
pany at San Diego, has been appointed manager of the West 

Coast Life at Stockton. 

* # * 

— The work on widening the Walnut Creek branch of the 
scenic boulevard has made considerable progress and the com- 
pletion is in sight. 

* * * 

— Class 1 railroads had fewer cars in need of repair lately than 
at any time since 1924, February. This is in spite of the fact 
that the number of cars loaded with revenue freight this year 

has been the greatest on record. 

* * # 

— At Auburn, California, this year, the local Rotarians passed 
through the trains, sang carols and made gifts of toyon berries 
to the passangers. 

— The work of railroad employes has been safer this year 
than at any other time in history. The record for safe handling 
of passengers has enormously improved during the last three 
years. In 1904 one employe out of 357 was killed ; now one 
is killed out of every 1164. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks In California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1925 

Assets $102,232,604.33 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,100,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 479,081.25 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haipcht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



San FranciMco Ofllee: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE 
Manager 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walte W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 2244 



y IhosEKeni 

'SAW 



MADE TO ORDER ONL\ 
Shirts 

Pajamas 
Night RoBts 






The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE!: TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid 1 n Capital *20,000,000 «2O,00O,00O Reaerve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 



450 Cnllfornia Street 

W. J. COULTHARD 
Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacture™ of 
RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS. PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES. GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 
San FraneiMco, CalU. Los Angrelen, Calif. 

-144 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



January 2, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

The Forest Hill home of Mr. and Mrs. E. \V. Kennedy 

was the scene of a combined housewarming and Yuletide 

party a few days ago. Members of the Camera Club were 

special guests at the delightful affair which included a 

dinner party and dancing. 

* * * 

Mrs. Marshall C. Harris, president of Cap and Bells Club, 
has issued the club bulletin for January, with an opening 
program announced for January 7, with Mrs. J. B. Hatcher 
chairman of the day. 

Mrs. Parker Maddux will be the speaker of the day 
nil the subject of "Peace on the Pacific." Piano solos will 
be played by Dorothy Wines Reed and Leila Neilsen Druhe 
will sing a group of French songs with Miss Wines at 
the piano. * * * 

The Business and Professional Women's Club opened 
their new club rooms at 447 Sutter Street last Tuesday 
night with fun, music and entertaining features. Dr. Susan 
Harris Hamilton is president of the Club ; Ida J. Lord, 
vice-president, Alice Jones, secretary; Lydia Johnson, treas- 
urer; and Ada H. Brace is the auditor. 

"Smile," says Dr. Hamilton, "smile, if you have to 
take a series of facial calisthenic exercises before your mir- 
ror every morning. Learn to smile by going among smil- 
ing people. Read humorous books and periodicals and cul- 
tivate the habit of seeing genuinely funny situations." 

Dr. Hamilton is so genuinely genial herself and always 
lias a regular smile for every one that anybody is fortunate 
indeed to find her recipe for smiles — although we are in- 
clined to surmise that Dr. Hamilton's smiles are just the 
big over-flow from her big generous-spirited heart and the 

natural outcome of her own radiant nature. 
* * * 

Miss Louise Dohrmann was hostess to a group of friends 

this week at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred- 
erick Dohrmann, in Washington Street. The evening was 
spent in games of bridge and niah jongg. 

PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG EVENTS 

(Continued from Page 1 1 I 
the company's new twenty-six story building which cove.rs 
more than one million square feet of floor -.pace. The build- 
ing has ost $4,000,000. It is devoted solely to the use of 
various departments of the telephone company and houses 

nearly two thousand employees. 

In speaking of the development .if the telephone company, 
Manager Delury said in part: "When tin- telephone com- 
panj was first organized in this city there were but 178 
customers listed in its one page directory. The increase in 
the number of telephones in service since that time has 
been steady and in accord with the city's expansion and 
progress, until there are now approximately 21.1.000 tele- 
phones used in San Francisco, or 28.8 telephones for every 

100 inhabitant-.'' ■ 

Redwood Highway Luncheon 

As Mendocino County's feature of the Redwood Highway 
Day Luncheon program to be staged bj the Re Iwood Highwaj 
and Down Town Associations in San Francisco on January 
7th. the "Redmen from the Redwoods" will appear in full 
tuni ling to Robert Austin, director of the Rcdu 

I lighwav Association, 

This troupe will be made of native Indians t <\ the Ookaya 
tribe, according to Austin. They will portray the wildness that 
characterized the Re I wood Highway Empire in years gone by 
—until the coming ^i the "paleface" and modern civilization. 

How wild and still comparatively undeveloped this rich terri- 
. is will be demonstrated by the presence of these Indians 
and their pageantry. They will be followed by prominent 
speakers and features which will bring out and emphasize the 
tremendous future development possibilities of the Redwood 
Highway Empire, according to Clyde Edmondson, manager. 



LIBRARY TABLE 



We have had the good fortune to look over an auto- 
graphed copy of "Oxford Observations," by J. Ainsworth 
Morg-an, an American, who gives one the impression of hav- 
ing striven valiantly to be, in this vivid description of an 
English institution, as unprejudiced as an American could 
be, under the circumstances. 

The author describes the feeling existing in general be- 
tween Americans and Englishmen, as follows : 

"As much as the right sort of Englishman regrets that 
any of his countrymen should be unpopular anywhere, so 
does the right sort of American deplore the fact that his 
fellowmen should be looked upon with contempt by other 
men and especially by Englishmen. 

"The only difference between the two targets for con- 
tempt is that the American, who is unpopular with the 
Englishman, looks upon the Englishman who dislikes him 
as merely being devoid of the power of appreciating the 
great ; while the Englishman, who is disliked by the Ameri- 
can, merely smiles with self-contentment, because so long 
as he appreciates himself, it matters little what another 
paltry person, especially a blasted American, thinks of him. 

"These may sound like the same sentiments, but they 
differ in that the American of this type thinks himself to 
be great because of being an American, while the English- 
man knows himself to be perfect because of being himself! 
Which of these two i- the worse, is left to the national dis- 
cretion of the individual." 

Each chapter takes up a phase of college life at Oxford, 
and brings vividly to the reader the life of an English or 
American boy at this famous old University. 

"Oxford Observations." J. Ainsworth Morgan. Fred- 
erick II. Hitchcock. New York. Publisher. 



New Portion of Highway Open 
As a fitting finale to the road program for the year 1925, 
the "neck of the bottle" at the northern end of the Red- 
Highway i- to be broken, according to word received 
by the Redwood Highway Association from C. H. Purcell, 
District Engineer of the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads in 
Portland. 

The advice- state that the new road from Adams Station 
to the i hregon line in California will be formally opened 
for traffic on December 21st. The opening of this new 
wide river-level road, with easy negotiable grades and 
minimum curves, it was pointed out. will eliminate the notorious 
•n Mountain Grade." which has caused adverse criticism 
of the condition of the Redwood Highway in the past. 

The notorious "Gasket Mountain Grade" from Crescent City 
to Adams Station was eliminated some months ago with the 
opening of the new wide Patick Creek Road — also a river-level 
highway. 

Ihi- new portion of the Redwood Highway will connect 
with Oregon's improved portion direct to Grants Pass. Ac- 
cording to official- of the Redwood Highway Association, this 
completes one of the most important units in the entire length 
of the Redwood Highway. 



The manuscript of Scott's Antiquary sold recently for $10,- 
000. It brought $200 when sold 93 years ago. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 2, 1926 



Tiffin Room Attracts the Talented 

The Aladdin Studio, that softly lighted, Bohemian-spirited. 
rendezvous for people who are on the look-out for "something 
different." is attracting members of the dramatic, musical and 
literary circles of San Francisco, who find a congenial atmos- 
phere in this particular tea room, and who meet and discuss 
the many subjects of interest that engross them, as they would 
in the homes of some of their special friends. 

Just recently the entire cast of the "Student Prince." which 
has had such a successful run at the Curran. were entertained 
at a midnight Christmas dinner in the Aladdin Studio. Yule- 
tide jollity was the feature of the evening, and dancing and 
songs helped to make up a most delightful evening. 



There is no legal control of the practice of medicine in 
China. 



Though the fox fights a trap until 
little or no attempt to free himself. 



leath, the lynx makes 



Last year eighteen cities with populations of 100.000 or 
more had death rates due to typhoid fever of less than 2.0 
per 100,000. 



Baron Gerard de Greer, of Sweden, reads the earth's ages 
and former temperatures and climate by studying differences 
in thickness and color of the layers of clay. 



On some of the many islands that extend from the main 
Hawaiian group for 1,300 miles, practically no vegetation 
grows. 



Tbe population of "inner London" is declining while that 
nf "outer London" continues to grow. 



A new type of incubator which heats the eggs from tbe top 
as the hen does, has proved more successful than tbe old type 
where even heat is applied. 



Lmpedocles spoke of the various bodies nature bad given 
him. He was a shrub, a bird, a fish, and lastlv Empedocles. 



In Oregon one may be lined from $25 to $75 for throwing 
away between May 15 and October 1. "any lighted tobacco, 
cigars, cigarets. matches, firecrackers or other lighted material, 
on any forest land, private road, public highway, or railroad 
right of way within this state." 



A memorial window lias been dedicated in historic Calvary 
Episcopal Church in Fletcher. North Carolina, in memory of 
"Bill Nye," American humorist. 



Tbe Cumberland Presbyterian, of Nashville, suggests that 
in tins time of attack on the Bible by agnostics it is good policy 
for Christian congregations to place a few copies in the pews, 
and offers good ones at half a dollar each. 



Lake Tahoe and Truckee will be the magnet attracting 
many society folks fur the week end, where winter sp. irts 
are in vogue with skating, toboganning and sleighing the 
favorite pastimes. Among those who have journeyed to 
the high Sierras to participate in the revels of the 'snow- 
clad fields are Dr. and Mrs. [oseph George Brady, their 
daughter. Miss Eileen Brady and Mr. William Tyson. 

Mr. Robert Tyson, fiance of Miss Bradv. wil join them 
at Lake Tahoe. 



LARKINS DUCO 
Has Lustre 

Combined with lustre, it possesses a durability that 
is amazing. Be sure of a good job. 

Prices reasonable 

LARKINS & CO. 

First Avenue at Geary Street 



TRADEMARK. ^ 

MM Motor Oils 




W 



HEN You see Valvoline on the barrel, 
it is the same as "Sterling'* on Silver. 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 

122 Center St., Los Angeles 



462 Bryant St., San Francisco 




Metal Work Apper- 
taining' to Automo- 
biles — Oxy- Acetylene 
Welding — Black- 
smithing. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Kates i 35c per dny; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service ami Storage of Automobiles 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel). San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 391 



902 Bush (cor. Taylor) 



DENMAN GARAGE 

A convenient location for club members 



Pro i peel 956 



January 2, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

SAFE DRIVING IN 1926 

RESOLUTIONS are good things 
to make around this time of the 
year, provided we carry them out. A 
motorist who resolves to drive with 
greater care and vigilance during the 
twelve months ahead is taking a step 

in the right direction, hut such a reso- 
lution in itself is only a background 
for his actual conduit on the highway. 

The "A. 1'.. C." of safety is "Alw ay- 
Be Careful." Such a lesson, ii carried 
out by the rank and file of motorists. 
would result in a saving of life and 
limb and would render the highways of 
the nation as safe as the sidewalks. 

The root of all evil as it applies to 
accident lie- in selfishness, in a disre- 
gard for the rights of others. A ped- 
estrian is entitled to just a- much 

courtesy from a motorist as he receives 
from his fellow pedestrians. The Gold- 
en Rule may he applied in motoring to 

excellent advantage. The man who 

drives his car without a sense of his 
personal responsibility or who delights 
in frightening pedestrians or other 
motorists by his antics at the wheel 
has no right to the use of the high- 
ways; he is a menace to public safety 
ami hi- privileges should he revoked. 

Form the habit of observing the law 

ami it will soon become as easy as 
shifting the gears on the car. A boule- 
\ard stop should he observed JUSt as 
carefully if there isn't a car or pedes- 
trian in sight as if the street were 
crowded with vehicles and people. If 
you form the habit of obeying the law. 
it does not become a burden to you 
in its observance. 

The man who makes a habit of giv- 
ing signals when changing the direc- 



tion of his motor vehicle often hnds 
himself signalling a turn on a moun- 
tain highway far from civilization. 
That's the type of driver who rarely 
has an accident ; he knows the A. B. C. 
of safety and he has learned his lesson 
so well that it has become automatic. 
Make your safety first resolution, 
but be sure you carry it out. 



Road Work on Pacific Highway 

Work on the Pacific Highway be- 
tween Redding and Dunsmuir is pro- 
gressing rapidly, according to a report 
received by the National Automobile 
Club from H. S. Comly. Division En- 
gineer of the California Highway Com- 
mission. 

The contract from Halfway Creek 
to Dog Creek is rapidly nearing com- 
pletion. The northerly three and one-half 
miles and the two miles from Salt Creek 
bridge to Pollock have been completed, 
and these portions accepted. On the re- 
mainder of the work, all the base 
OUrse rock is down, except in the big 
cut at Salt Creek summit. Excava- 
tion at the big cut should be completed 
in about three weeks and the rock on 
the entire contract by February 1. 

The Charley Creek Bridge, now 
under construction, is progressing very 
well and is about seventy-five per cent 
complete. The contract for the Doney 
i reek bridge has not yet been let. 
Traffic still uses the old road at both of 
these points. 

The only inconvenience suffered by 

traffic on the entire job. is the short 
stretch at the Salt Creek summit cut. 
Due to slide-, we have recently had a 

little difficulty in keeping the detour 
at the summit cut open for traffic. 

However, the mam road through the 
cut is travelable, and when the detour 
is closed by slides, traffic is diverted 
through the bit; cut. and to date, there 
has been no serious delay; in fact, the 
only traffic delay to date has been the 
large stages, which, due to their size, 
thought it inadvisable to attempt to travel 
the detour during one night when a few 
small slides were encountered. ( In 
this occasion, the -tai;e was tied Up 
approximately eight hours. 

The Highway Commission has en- 
deavored to anticipate, all possible 
troubles ami it is not expected that 
traffic will suffer any serious incon- 
veniences during the entire winter. 
\fter the contract is completed, a 
Steamshovej will be available for im- 
mediate use in case any further slides 
are encountered on the new road dur- 
ing the winter. 



tin one morning early in the beginning 
of the school period in St. I nis. about 
two pedestrians in the neigh- 

borhood oi public schools found "A.B.C." 
painted on those crossing- most frequent- 



ed by children trudging With (shining 
morning faces "merrily to school." 

Thus began an actively forwarded 
safety first campaign in which the St. 
Louis Automobile Dealers' Association 
took an active part, and various other 
organizations joined until practically 
(Continued on Page 16) 



?<2i77 cor o/)era/ed\^ 
Jhuf rp/iable 
c/iauffeurs 
u//to fJtorou<f/i/y under- 
stand (heir Lus/ness 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 




Phone Groystone 270 

162ft Pine Street 

Sun Franclaco 



«4MpW 




(Swells 

^^IjAHONAl CRIST 

(offee 



-the better it geb- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 101? 

Telephone Direct 

tXMi.iMm cup* w««c nerved at the Pan; 

Paelflr International Exposition 






16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 2, 1926 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 
Columbia 

Beginning Monday evening, January 
4 Robert Mantell, assisted by Gene- 
vieve Hamper will be seen in reper- 
toire. This is Mantell's farewell tour, 
and he is presenting the following 
plays: Mondav "Richelieu;" Tuesday, 
"Hamlet ;" Wednesday Mat., "As You 
Like It;" Wednesday Eve., "King 
Lear;" Thursday Eve., "Hamlet;" Fri- 
day, "Macbeth;" Saturday Mat., "Mer- 
chant of Venice;" Saturday Eve., 
"Richelieu." 



Following this engagement, will be- 
gin a season of opera at this theater, 
opening Monday evening, January 11. 
The opera is under the direction of 
Gaetano Merola, and the first opera to 
be presented will be Fay-Yen-Fah, 
written by Joseph Redding and 
Templeton Crocker. 

During this engagement the follow- 
ing operas will be presented: "Rigo- 
letto," "Lucia di Lammermoor," 
"Tales of Hoffmann," and such stars as 
Joseph Schwarz, Giovanni Martino, 
Lucy Berthrand, Rene Maison, Ed- 
mon'd Warnery, will be seen. 



Paul Elder Notes 
Arthur C. Pillsbury, naturalist and of- 
ficial photographer of Yosemite National 
Park, will lecture in the Paul Elder Gal- 
lery. Saturday afternoon, January 9th, 
at 2:30 o'clock, on his latest scientific ex- 
periments in photographing the marvels 
of wild flower life as seen through a 
microscope. Motion pictures, depicting 
what has hitherto been invisible to the 
human eye — the secret life of wild flow- 
ers, their births, loves, deaths — will be 
shown for the first time and also the 
exquisite color reel that has been hand- 
colored in Paris. 

* * * 

The Paul Elder Gallery announces an 
exhibition of rare Mezzotints, line en- 
gravings, stipples and lithographs for one 
week, beginning Thursday, January 7th. 
The rare decorative prints, views, por- 
traits to be shown are the work of such 
celebrated masters as Bartolozzi-Kauff- 
man, Bartolozzi-Bunbury. Brver-Kauff- 
man, Earlom-Cipriani, Freeman-Ruck, 
Joseph Barney and others. Among the 
decorative prints are The Flower Girl. 
Lady in a Watteau Hat, Shakespeare's 
Tomb and others. The view : s include 
The Hudson, Niagara, The Tower of 
London, and others. The portraits are 
of literary and historic personages, both 
English and American, including Blake, 
Chaucer. Pope. Washington, Samuel 
Johnson and others. 

* * * 

A series of Saturday morning story 
hours and appreciation book talks is to 
be given in the Paul Elder Gallery each 



Saturday forenoon at 11 o'clock, under 
the auspices of the Boys' and Girls' Book 
Room by Miss Sadie Hoffman. Miss 
Hoffman, who has as background four 
years' experience as children's librarian 
and studies in Europe, has made several 
very successful recent appearances in San 
Francisco. Her program will be arranged 
to interest the older boys and girls as 
well as the little ones. There will be no 
admission charge and an invitation to all 
who are interested is cordially extended. 
The series will begin Saturday. Jan- 
uary 9th. 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

(Continued from Page 15) 

every school child in St. Louis knew 
the dangers incident to careless cross- 
ing of streets. 

At one of the main traffic intersec- 
tions in St. Louis, a bierlike pyramid 
was raised and on this a small white 
coffin was placed without a single 
vyord or phrase to emphasize its mean- 
ing which made it doubly impressive. 

Supplementing this safety campaign, 
automatic traffic control signals have been 
widely placed throughout St. Louis until 
a decrease in the number of traffic ac- 
cidents has been registered due to the 
actively forwarded "Always Be Care- 
ful" campaign, which says to even- 
child on his way to school, "A. B. C." 



With the beginning of the touring 
season of 1926. California-bound trans- 
continental highway tourists will begin 
to flow westward in increasing num- 
bers. 

During August. 1925. 87,000 people 
visited the Cody Memorial Museum on 
top of Lookout Mountain, west of Den- 
ver, which can be reached only by au- 
tomobile. In 1926 the road from the 
Cody Memorial Museum to Califor- 
nia, which is route No. 40, the Victory 
Highway line, will be in better condi- 
tion than ever before and undoubtedly 
a great increase in automobile tourist 
traffic will develop as a result of the 
combination afforded by improved 
highways leading to California and the 
huge advertising campaign plit for- 
ward by Califomians, Inc. 



Clark's Cruises 
One hundred and twenty-eight days 
on a "floating palace," which lakes you 
around the world; with stopovers at 
New York, Havana. Panama Canal, 
Los Angeles, Hilo, Honolulu; twenty- 
five days in Japan and China, Peking 
included; Manila, Java, Singapore. 
Burmah. option of eigliteen days in 
India, Ceylon; three days in Cairn. 
Jerusalem, Athens, Naples, Monte Car- 
lo, Cherbourg! The very names of 
these spell the glamour of foreign 
"ports of call ;" of narrow, colorful, 
odorous streets in Eastern cities; of 



strange, alien faces and customs ; of 
all that goes toward making a "round 
the world" trip fascinating. 

Communicate with M. T. Wright. 
Gen'l Agent, American Bank Bldg., if 
interested. 



It was in Delmonico's that salads of 
chicken and lobster first made their ap- 
pearance, that chicken a la king and lob- 
ster Newlwrg were invented, that French 
fried potatoes, Russian dressing and ter- 
rapin were first served in New York, and 
that minute steak was invented by Edwin 
Gould. 



"Why did you hand the boy in the 
cloak room such a big tip when he 
gave you your coat?" 

"fust look at the coat he gave me." 
—fit Bits. 

DIVIDEND NOTICES 

The San Francisco Bank 

-i. California St. (and Branches, San Fran- 
cisco. For the quarter year ending December 
31, 1925, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four nml one-Quarter (4'/i) per cent 
per annum on all deposits, payable on and 
after January 2, 1926. Dividends not called 
for are added to the deposit account and earn 
interest from January 1. 1926. Deposits made 
on or before January 11. 192G, will earn inter- 
est from January 1, 1926. 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Secretary. 

Italian-American Bank 

S. E. corner Montgomery and Sacramento 
sts.: North Beach branch, corner Columbus 
Ave. and Broadway; Columbus branch, corner 
Montgomery and Washington sts. — For the 
half-year ending December 31, 1925, a divi- 
'I. nil has been declared at the rate of four 
anil onc-<iunrter 44"/i > per cent per annum on 
all savings deposits, payable on and after 
January 2. 1926. Dividends not called for will 
be added to the principal and bear the same 
rate of interest from January 1. 1926. De- 
will earn interest from January 1. 1926. 

A. E. SBARB0R0, President. 

Humboldt Bank 

Ts2 Market Street, near Fourth: Bush and 
Montgomery Branch. Mills Bldg. For the half 
year ending December 31. 1925, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of four (4) per cent 
per annum on savings deposits, payable on 
and after January 2. 1926. Dividends not 
called for bear Interest from January- 1, 1926. 
Money deposited on or before January 11. 
192*1, will earn interest from January 1. 1926. 
H. C. KLEVESAHL. Cashier. 



Bank of Italy 



Head Office and San Francisco branches. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1925. a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four i4> per cent per annum on all savings 
I, posits, payable on and after January 2. 
L926. Dividends not called for are added to 
and bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from January 1. 1926. Savings de- 
posits made on the first business day of any 
month (or on or before the 10th day of Janu- 
ary. April. July and October) will earn inter- 
est from the first of that month; deposits 
made after said date will earn interest from 
the first of the following month. 

JAMBS A. BAOlC.ALUPr. President. 

The Hibernia Savings and 
Loan Society 

Main office, corner Market, McAllister and 
Jones sis.; Mission office, corner Valencia and 
22,1 sts. — For the half-year ending December 
31, 1925, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all de- 
posits, payable on and after January 2. 1926. 
Dividends not drawn will he added to depos- 
itors' accounts, become a part thereof, and 
will earn dividends from January 1. 1926. 
Deposits made on or before January 11. 1926, 
will earn interest from January 11. 1926. 

E. J. TOBIN. President. 



January 2, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



Mr. Blabbitt on The New Year 






SINCE this is not only the second of January but the sec- 
ond day of the New Year, a few words on the subject 
will not be amiss, even though they may miss their mark. 

Apropos to the customary greeting of "Happy New Year" 
let us compile a little classification of more original well 
wishes for various types of individuals. Here are a few you 
may be able to use in your business of selling your goods, 
personality or services. 

To the Florida real estate promoter say, "A Sappy New 
Year." 

To the colored population's dice shooters, "A Crappy 
New Year." 

To the very young girls of the modern age, "A Flappy 
New Year." 

To knockers, old and young, "A Rappy New Year." 

To chorus girls looking for sugar papas, "A Pappy New 
Year." 

To those suffering from insomnia, "A Nappy New Year." 

To writers on the far eastern problem, "A Jappy New 
Year." 

To petters, "A Lappy New Year." 

To stenographers and telegraphers, "A Tappy New- 
Year. " 

To photographers, "A Mappy New Year." 

To hatters, "A Cappy New Year." 

To politicians, "A Yappy New Year." 

To jealous wives and husbands out to get the goods, "A 
Trappy New Year." 

And others tun numerous t>> mention, although just as 
useful. 

New Year's Day and ensuing ones find quite a number 
of people making resolutions brought about directly by bail 
effects accruing from celebrating not wisely but too well. 
Some of these persons arc temporarily suffering from loss 
of appetite, si^ht and feeling. This condition i> an out- 
growth of the present drought and a lack of reliable oases 
in the vast stretches of the San Francisco desert, parched 
by law and strewn with bottles and thousands of bones 
Spent to purchase their contents. 

As matters stood on New Year's Eve, a reveler had three 
alternatives for passing this once hilarious night of nights: 

lie might cither go to bed, go to a hotel or cafe or to a 

private home. The younger generation almost invariably 

chooses the bright lights where there is loud music, food 
and dancing — for a price. The older boys and girls, to 
whom the passing years arc more or less of a tragedy, liriiif;- 

ing hack memories of wilder times, always seek out the 
homes of generously inclined friends and acquaintances 

where liquor ma\ be found and made use of. Each of 
these types is satisfied after a fashion by its choice, and 
each afterward- i- acutely conscious of certain drawbacks 
to the mode of entertainment pursued. 

For instance, at a house party made up of married couple-, 
with a single man and woman or two thrown in for 
measure, too much liquor invariably causes family rows 
which arc ea»\ to get into and hard to yet out of, i >ne fel- 
low will kiss another fellow'- wife, and one man's wife 
may kiss another man. All is hunky-dorj until some one 
or other gets riled up. Then, such being the case, those 
present are always let into family secrets and feu 
ancient vintage and none too delectable flavor. In 
of catastrophe- of this nature the party i- usually put on the 
skids, for everyone else fear- beini; yanked up for the same 
offenses. The moral is. of course, "Do your kissing i 
12:60 and 1 o'clock, preferably with your own wife or sweet- 
heart. 



As to New Year's resolutions, we have nothing to say, ex- 
cept that they should only be made in connection with 
those things you do not care to do, or in saving your time 
and money. What is the use of swearing off something 
you like? It invariably causes more profanity and, after 
all, we differ little from one New Year to the next. 



WIGS and TOUPEES 

Of my make defy detection, because I make them ven- 
tilated and porous and from the purest, finest human 
hair. 

G. LEDERER 

561 Sutter St., Between Powell and Mason Sts. 
San Francisco, California 

Firm Established 1866 



!We promise to please you 
La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 



! 



250 Twelfth St., San Francisco 



'Phone Market 916 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the". 

VALLEY of the MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Mushrooms." 

Clean Ruomi, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

Vml Sonoma Counly'i Famout KeaorU and Mineral (Warm W*;#r) Swimming 

Tank* From Thii Hotel. 

Rale* Ecrplionally Reatonahle. 

Telephone 110 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

I") I )KRIII A SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12. 1-5 

980-82 Flood BUILDING, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



AGU A C ALIENTE SPRINGS--- Why? 

It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions Radio-active, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
mine pool Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN, Agua Calcente, Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



Hand OnW----u.L Called For and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



Par man Dvetnf end Clumtnf 



SW Fojt SrKMT 
l» Veki*u Boti 



Sak Fuhcik* 
hu»ajaj 2511 



J. SPAULDING & COMPANY 

The Or i* met Pioneer Carpet Clemnert 

L<ta*li.«hib 1*64 

01d#*t and Large* I Etlabltthmml on the Pacific Coait 

m No Hay Connected! Tah Any Other Finn liing Naaaa of ?P ATI-DING 

K1 T t H»n» M«ur- Pnom Docclas 30M 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 2, 1926 



DRINK 

WIELANDS BREW 

WITH YOUR MEALS— IT HELPS 

Order by the case from your grocer 

Established 1868 

ain Office, 240 Second Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 671 




PIONEER 



The 

Name 
on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther It be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
rinter or sta- 



^|^ printer or am- 

^IV.gTfffrSSmTCir Urs e a r mpies 9h ° W 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1865 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES I 
San FrnnclHCO — Burlln^anie 

Went, 703 478 



■- 

Phone Suttkb 3278 


Wm. Herbst & Company 

{Formerly with Shrevc & Company) 


Clockmakera and Watchmakers 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 


200 P«.si Street ni Grant Avenue 
Sun PrunelHco, Cnllf. 


Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 
and San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 EMERSON ST. 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



It is said that conjurers are not par- 
ticularly popular in Scotland. They 
generally want to borrow something. — 
Humorist. 



Why He Was Late 

"You are an hour late this morning', 
John," said the farmer to the new 
helper. 

"Yes. I was kicked by a horse on my 
way here." 

"That oughtn't to have detained you 
an hour, John." 

"Well, you sec, governor, he kicked 
me the other way." — Happy Mag. 



Because her husband spent all his spare 
time at the radio trying for DX, a Min- 
neapolis woman was granted a divorce 
and custody of her two children. 



Sheboygan, Wisconsin, has the largest 
i lerman population of any city in the 
United States. Twenty thousand of 
Sheboygan's thirty-three thousand per- 
sons are of German descent. Green Bay 
has a German population of 7.000 and 
Appleton is nearly fifty per cent German. 

Christopher L. Sholes, inventor of the 
first practical typewriter, said in the early 
days of typewriting: "I feel that I have 
done something for the women, who have 
always had to work so hard This will 
enable them more easily to earn a liv- 
ing." 



"A kingdom of knowledge is greater 
than a kingdom of arms" — Chinese Em- 
peror Ho-Ti, A. D.. 114. 



According to Dr. A. D. Irnms, of Eng- 
land, 450.000 species of insects have now 
been found and described by entomolo- 
gists. 



Pueblo Bonito women of ancient New 
Mexico nmged their cheeks with brick- 
red rouge, dug from the thin lenses of 
compact clay underneath the sandstone 
cliffs. 



Chicago school children of today readi- 
ly passed an examination given them 
from tests their grandparents failed in 
fifty years ago. This proves that despite 
curriculum complexities of today they 
are better arithmeticians than their for- 
bears who held rigidly to the three "R's." 



A white cross at every point in the road 
where an accident resulting in death has 
occurred is erected on Ohio roads. Some 
bad railroad crossings have as many as a 
dozen such markers. 



There is no evidence that bees can 
hear, though their sense of smell is strong- 
ly developed. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office anil Works 1)12.'! mission St. 

Phone Mnrket 7913 

Branch Office; 700 Sutter St. 

(Hotel Canterbury Bide.) 

Phone Prospect "8-15 

Work Called For and Delivered 




N W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




NEW ORLEANS 

To better serve ourmany friends and patrons 
over '300,000.00 has been expended in recon- 
struction and rekliilit ation to maintain this 
famous hostelry as 

One of America's Leading Hotels 

The iaige well ventilated hi^h ceilinf>rooms 
have been retained and modernized^-- 1 '' 

ACCOMMODATINC OVER 1000 GUESTS 

Send ^'Descriptive Hotel folder: 

Illustrated Mai-di-GrdS Piigram for the asking 

Alfred S.Ajvier ANoCaitd. 

N EW ORLEAN 8 . LA 
-■^Tidm Offices of aUHunsporuticn line! in lobby 




WHERE TO DINE 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

Tho City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, $1.00 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00,$1.50 a la carte 
Dancing 7:00 P. M. to 1:00 A. M. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 




ICE CREAf% 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day is 
taking very good care of them. Brushing is only a part of ' the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist cnn take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore; Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Self Cleaning Bridges; 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



Stc Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 




Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2: JO 
and tea from 3 to 5 



334 Sutter St. 



Douglas 7118 



QfeanorS 



I Se 



445 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast. 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50— Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la cartel. Private din- 
ing: rooms for banquets and parties, seating 76 to 100 people. 

441 Pine Street 




O'Fsxrell 

Lark in Sri 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 |). m.) J .75 No Vltltoi Should Lean thr Cilj With* 

Sunday Luncheon 1.00 out Dining ■» ihr Pineal Cafe 

Dinner, Week Dayi _ $1.50 in America 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays 1.75 

DANCING SUNDAY EVENINGS 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

03 Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooki 

Open From 

11 :30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4 :3Q to S 30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVF.nY MOM)A\ 

Hnlf rtlock from Hich^n? 



=1 




i 

t — 



ll-Vm Hoi ?i 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN 1-00 A. M TO 11 M P. U. 

UNSURPASSED CUBira 

Carl Leonhardt 

formerly of 
C.old.n Gilt Park Canna 






For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic. 



— * I 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

nportations from Zachnsdorf. Root, Morrell. etc.. of Lon 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 6816 



RARE BOOKS 

EARLY EDITIONS 

John Howell 

[MFOHTBH, t'l 111 ISHBH 

N..w open for bnaineai at our new lo. 
131 Po*t Stmbt, S*n Francisco 




Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 



\>n I'M I. ELDER'S l inn mm 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



DR. B. W. HAINES 

DENTIST 
Elkan Gunst Building 



323 Geary at Powell 
San Francisco 



Hours: 9 to 4 
Telephone Douglas 2949 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.. 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Sprmet" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 



130 Clara 5ir*et- -Garfield 841 



2fe PiCiURfD 

NEWS 

ofthe 




Worshipers at Pagan 
temples — languorous 
maidens of tropical 
islands — tribal dances 
in murky jungles — 
carnivals in Old- World 
capitals — fire — flood 
— revolution ! 

Among all climes and 
peoples are found the 
entertaining pictures 
for The 

Slir i*an Jnninaro Cllirnmrli 

KOTAGRAVURE 





Their watchword is smiling courtesy. — This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 

tf RATES— <Ver Ttay, single, European Wan 
120 rooms vfth running water 92.50 to 94.00 



The center 
for Theatres 
'Banks, Shopi 

'Please -write 
for 'Booklet 



220 rooms wiih bath 
160 rooms with bath 



5.50 »o 5.00 
6.00 to 8.00 



Doubt*. $4.00 up 

Also a number of large and beautiful rooms and 
suites, some in period furnishings with grand piano, 
fj fire place and bath, flO 00 up. 

LARGE AND WELL EOUIPPED SAMP! E ROOMS 

r%4^CH0 QOLF CLUB] 
L available to all guestsJ 

HAROLD E. LATHROP 
SMana%er 



it 



HOTEL 



ALEXANDRIA 

I Los Angeles 



Telephone 
Garfield 6973 




RatoiVorb 



Above 
Grant Ave. 



lI7" 



Established 189? 

361 Sutter Street 

nnHATEVER the design and color, there 
LXJ is always a distinctive individuality in 
Coulter's Genuine \iv^\ Furniture, besides the 
regular stock on display we 
make-to-order Reed Furni- 
ture to suit your require- 
ments at a very modest 
price. 



Estimates 
Invited 




! 

i 


Golden 


Gate 


Ferry 




Co 


mpany 






S 






WINTER SCHEDULE | 




Effective October 1 


1925 ! 
i 






s 


! 
! 




Leave Sausauto 


Leave San Francisco j 




5:00 a. m. 

6:00 a. m. 

6:30 a.m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:00 p. m. 




5:30 a.m. j 
6:30 a.m. j 
7:00 a.m. ; 
Every Half < 
Hour Until ! 
10:30 p.m. | 


j 


Then 




Then 




11:00 p.m. 

12:00 p.m. 

1 :00 a. m. 




11:30 p.m. | 

12:30 a.m. i 

1:30 a.m. j 




Saturday 


s and Sundays 


Only ! 




2:00 a. m. 




2:30 a.m. \ 


ON 


SATURDAYS, 


SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 


j 


There will be extra trips if traffic warrants. 1 


La.o. 

•rPresid 


Stewart 

ent 




Harry E. Speas 1 
/ice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. j 




PEGGY 
CHAMBERLIN 

One of the stage beauties in the 

Ftrnihon and Marco Revue at 

Lons/i H'arfield. 



An investment of over 



One Hundred Million Dollars in United 
States, State, County and Municipal Bonds 



CQNDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 
Head Office (San Francisco) and Branches 

Bank of Italy 



SAVINGS 



COMBIERCIAI 



December 30, 1925 



RESOURCES 



First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate..$1 36.358,966.78 

Other Loans and Discounts 92,434.099.67 $228,793,066.45 



United States Bonds and Certificates 

of Indebtedness $ 93,572,560.11 

State, County and Municipal Bonds.... 13,834,619.88 

Other Bonds and Securities 13,566,709.74 

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank 705,000.00 



TOTAL U. S. AXD OTHER SECURITIES 

Due from Federal Reserve Bank $ 17,492,971.88 

Cash and Due from Other Banks 42,377,726.01 



TOTAL CASH AXD DUE FROM BANKS 

Banking Premises, Furniture, Fixtures and Safe 

Deposit Vaults (Ninety-eight Banking Offices in 

Sixty-five California Cities ) 

Other Real Estate Owned 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit and 

Acceptances 

Interest Earned on Bonds and Loans 

Employes' Pension Fund (Actual Value $224,074.09) 

standing on the Books at 

Other Resources 



121.678,889.73 



59,870,697.1 



7,246 
805 



1,634 
2,684, 



124 



112.11 
,987.45 

.332.21 
917.70 

1.00 
582.47 



TOTAL RESOURCES .....$422,838,587.01 

LIABILITIES 

DEPOSITS: Savings $273,175 260.32 

Commercial 116,257,981.12 



Dividends Unpaid 

Discount Collected but not Earned 

Letters of Credit, Acceptances and Time Drafts.. 



CAPITAL PAID IN $ 17,500,000.00 

(On March 15, 1926, the Paid in Capital 
will be $20,000,000.00 

SURPLUS 9,000,000.00 

(On March 15, 1926, the Surplus will be 
$10,700,000.00) 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 1,789,255.20 

INTEREST EARNED 2,684,917.70 

(On Bonds and Loans — Uncollected) 



$389,433,241.44 

708,751.25 

88,089.21 

1,634,332.21 

$391,864 414.11 



INVESTED CAPITAL 

(Including Interest Earned I. 



30,974,172.90 



TOTAL LIABILITIES $422,838,587.01 

All charge-ofts, expenses and Interest payable to end of half-year 
have been deducted in above statement. 



STOCKHOLDERS AUXILIARY CORPORATION 

(The capital stock of this corporation is owned share for share by the 

stockholders of the Bank of Italy I 

Invested Capital, $9,200,605.42 



On March 15, 1926, the Combined CAPITAL INVESTMENT 
of both Corporations will be over 

$46,500,000.00 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS, 601,370 

Savings Deposits made to and including January 11, 1926, 
will earn interest from January 1, 1926 



STATEMENT 



of the Conditii 



and Value of the Assets and Liabilities of 



The Hibernia Savings and 
Loan Society 

Hibernia Bank 

Main Office: Market, McAllister and Jones Streets 
Mission Office: Twenty-second and Valencia Streets 
Geciry Street Office: Geary Street and Tenth Avenue' 

Dated San Francisco, December 31, 1925 



ASSETS 

1 — BONDS OF THE CJNITED STATES ($11,000,- 
000.00), of the State of California and 
the Counties. Cities and School Districts 
thereof ($18,708,642.09), of the State of 
New York ($894,000.00), of the Slate of 
Nevada ( $lilli,oilo.llll I. of the State of Ore- 
gon ($61,000.00), of the County of Lane, 
Or. (J2IHI, Him. inn. of the County of Doug- 
las, Or., ($147.(1011. of the County of 

Bergen N. .J.. ($100,000.00), of the County 

of Jackson, or., ijsi, , of the County 

of Clackamas. Or.. ($73,950.00), of the City 
of New York ($1,139,000.00), of the City of 
Cleveland, Ohio, ($106,000.00), of the City of 
St. Paul, Minn.. ($100,000.00), of (lie City of 
Jersey City, N. J.. ($50,000.00), of the City 
of Portland, Or.. ( Jr.O.Oini.iiu t. of (he ei(y of 
Dayton, Ohio. ($25,000.00), (lie actual yiilue 
of which is ...$33,132,174.38 

2— MISCELLANEOUS BONDS comprising Quasi- 
Public Corporation Bonds and Real Estate 

Mortgage Bonds I $2.(14 "..llllll. (Ill I . the actual 

value of which is 1,997,762.80 

Total Actual Value $35,129,937.18 

3— CASH ON HAND S.863,5 I 4. 2 I 

4— PROMISSORY notes and (he debts thereby 

secure. 1. the actual value of which is 42,874,220.62 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing 
Contracts, owned by said Corporation, and 
the payment thereof is secured by First 
Mortgages on Real Estate within this State, 
and the States Of Oregon, Nevada, Wash- 
ington and Utah. 
5— PROMISSORY NOTES ami the debts thereby 

secured, the actual value of which is 186,088.00 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing 

Contracts, owned by said Corporation, ami 
the payment thereof is secured by pledge 

of Bonds and other securities. 
6— (a) REAL ESTATE situate in (he County of 
San Mateo in this State ($15,000.00), and 
in (he State of Nevada ($60,000.00), the 

actual value of which is 75.ooo.oti 

(I.I THE LANDS AND BUILDINGS in which 

said Corporation keeps its offices, the ac- 
tual value of which is 1,081,848.19 

TOTAL ASSETS ...$83,110,638.28 



LIABILITIES 

l— said CORPORATION OWES DEPOSITS amount- 
ing to and Ho- actual value of which is $76,510,448.47 
2— RESERVE FUND o.iiiio.lsa.Ti; 



TOTAL LIABILITIES $83,110,638.28 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

By E. J. Tobin, President 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

By R. M. Tobin, Secretary 
State of California \ 

City and County of San Francisco i '*' 

E. J. Toliin and R. M. Tobin, being each duly sworn, each for 
himself says: That said E. J. Tobin is President and that said R. 
M. Tobin is Secretary of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY , the Corporation above named, and that the foregoing 
statement is true. 

E. J. TOBIN, President. 
R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 5th day of January, 1926. 

CIIAS. T. STANLEY, 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California. 




EsUMUhtd July JO, ItM 



Art Mm WwmmJmmKmm Ml Ju Jtv 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Jjetter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1884 to 1926. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 225 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postofflce as second-class matter, London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, B. C 

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Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., TANUARY 9, 1926 



No. 2 



gambling 



With E. FARRAND ROSS 



We hold nothing but admiration for the accomplishments 
of materia medica ; we take our hats off to the martyrs who, 
in their operations, have given up their lives so that the lives 
of the human race may become more enjoyable and safe ; 
but we sometimes wonder if certain of these zealous ones do 
not defeat their own ends, and in the enthusiasm of their ef- 
forts, swerve aside from their real purpose. 

For instance, in the case of Dr. C. H. Barlow of New 
York, who, after being successfully treated for pulmonary 
tuberculosis some years ago, "deliberately contracted in 
order to save a Chinese patient's life," returned to the field 
i if his first adventure with death, and there began a study of 
the "fluke," an intestinal parasite which claims countless 
victims in China. 

It was a problem how to get the flukes over to America, 
as the doctor was hampered by the lack of laboratory equip- 
ment and facilities in the < irient. So be isolates the germs 
from the body of a patient, puts them into a tumbler of 
water and drinks them down ! 

lie tells no one of this, on bis return to America, not even 
his wife, but allows the flukes to multiply in bis body, and 
then presents himself at the Johns Hopkins University, tells 
his story to the amazed experts, "who gladly helped him 
to free his body of the parasites and to make a careful study 
of them." 

But Why Not a Padded Cell? 

Xow all this appears as the quintessence oi heroism to 
the layman, but it also appears to be the height of careless- 
ness and thoughtlessness of the thousands ifi people with 
whom he was associated during the period of time when the 
flukes were "multiplying in his own body." Humans who 
have been bitten so deeply with martyrdom microbe should 
inform the world in general of their peculiar maneuvers, so 
that they can be properly isolated and set apart from the 
rest of their fellow men. who surely are in danger from a 
person who is so impregnated with bacilli as Dr. Barlow 
must have been. 

And as for his wife, well, we are of the opinion that a man 
of Dr. Barlow's make-up should not possess one at all ! 



A Woman of Sense 

There are three women members of Congress who are in 
favor of the modification of the Volstead Act, and our Mrs. 
Julius Kahn is one of the three. She believes that "the evils 
attendant upon the Volstead Act as now enforced, are far 
greater than any that could possibly follow its modifica- 
tion to the extent of permitting manufacture and sale of 
light wines and beers." 

Here is a woman rich in years and experience of human 
nature, who has the courage to speak her own convictions; 
who has kept an open and observing mind and who has not 
coincided with those narrow-minded and blind members of 
the fair sex who persist in looking at the world through the 
wrong end of the opera glass. 

* * * 
Away With Somber Stockings! 

The Rambler hears through various of his feminine 
friends that dark-colored hose is prescribed by Dame Fash- 
ion, and that a number of feminine legs are now clothed 
with black or gun metal stockings. He deplores this fact in- 
tensely. ts there anything prettier, he wants to know, than 
a gleaming pair of well-shaped nether limbs in pale cham- 
pagne or flesh, or silver gray-colored hosiery? Don't these 
said legs look chastely clean and fascinating in well-laun- 
dered hose of the above and myriad other colors? Contrast 
them with somber-hued hose, and see if he i^n't right! 

* * * 

Mussolini's Mandates 

< Hir Italian dictator across the water, under sunny south- 
ern skie<. evidently believes that the world is made for Mus- 
solini. He is beginning to imitate, in some respects, that 
madman who set the whole world aflame not so very long 
He would like to compel all Italians to remain under 
tlie rule of the mother country for the rest of their natural 
lives; that is. no matter in what country they have emi- 
grated, they should not take out naturalization papers, but 
should eventually, after making all the money possible in 
their adopted country, return to the sunny shores of Italy, 
with their accumulated wealth, so to speak, tied up in their 
socks. Fine for the Italians and for Italy, but rather an im- 
position on the country to which they emigrate! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 9, 1926 




We are so accustomed to the 
New Year in the Country noise and tumult of the new 

year celebration in the city, that 
we Overlook the fact that very large and ever-increasing num- 
bers of people leave the city and its glamor to celebrate in the 
country. All Thursday afternoon, December 31st. the stream 
of machines down the Peninsula was incessant. 

indeed, the current was hardly interrupted beyond San Jose. 
To Gilroy the procession went along in orderly fashion and 
beyond there divided, some going by way of the San Juan 
grade, to Monterey. Carmel and the Highlands, others towards 
Santa Cruz and the coast. It was an orderly, family crowd 
of people: well to do. dignified, on the whole, well in hand, 
prosperous and happy. Few places could show the equal of 
it. and certainly no other country in the world could begin 
in compare with such a procession in any respect. 

To Carmel went many, but the little town hardly seemed 
to notice them. Houses hidden in the trees received many ; 
the Pine Inn and the Highlands took others, and others again 
went to Del Monte and Pebble Beach. The quiet of Monterey 
and Carmel was remarkable. It was as well ordered as a 
palace. It is very evident that our democracy is learning good 
manners and that with the advent of wealth is also coming, 
as usual, the possession of grace and the polite arts. We 
hardly know yet what people we are building up. and how high 
a place in human history we are going to attain. But the 
lesson of New Year's Eve was not lost on more than one 
European observer who watched the phenomenon with in- 
terested and almost incredulous gaze. 

Naturally Carmel had to be peculiar at all costs and spread 
out for the delectation of its people that most harrowing of all 
modern plays: "All God's Chillen Got Wings." as if the beauty 
and satisfaction of the place itself had to be corrected somehow. 



Railway Age, publishing 
The Southern Pacific President its annual statistical num- 
ber, has taken up various 
aspects of the railroad question and has, among others asked 
Wm. Sproule, President of the Southern Pacific for his views 
on the present situation and the future immediate development 
of the transportation industry. 

The views of Mr. Sproule are of the greatest importance to 
us in California, for we are dependent for our prosperity, to 
a most impressive degree, upon the sagacity and the ability 
with which the affairs of that great corporation air conducted. 
The progressiveness and the intelligence of the Southern Pa- 
cific are of the greatest importance to our citizens. 

Mr. Sproule considers that the prospects for railway traf- 
fic in 1926 are very encouraging and there are no factors pres- 
ent which would be likely to cause any misgiving-, on that point. 
In the course of the next year, the colossal improvements which 
the railroad has undertaken and has been carrying out during 
the two years last past, as we have pointed out from time to 
time in this paper, will be practically completed. This will 
put the Southern Pacific in the most favorable position for the 
successful handling of freight and passenger traffic. 

The fruit industry appears to engage the attention of Mr. 
Sproule most closely. Thus he declares that the Southern 
Pacific is putting out more orders for increase in motive 
power, and the Pacific Fruit Express is putting in an order for 
5,000 new cars. In this latter concern the Southern Pacific and 
the Union Pacific are each half-owners. 

Mr. Sproule is very strong upon the point that federal in- 
terference, by the passing constantly of new laws and em- 
barrassing the situation by new rules, is very disturbing to le- 



gitimate business. The principle of arbitration in dealing with 
disputes between the employes and the company has his ap- 
proval. • 

There is a very curious apathy 
Our Own Landing Field in the fact that San Francisco 

does not own a landing field for 
aviation purposes that can be made available in the inter- 
ests of business and national progress. We have before 
this called attention to the matter, but, as a whole, even 
the San Francisco press seems to be curiously careless in 
this regard. This fact however, may easily have a detri- 
mental effect upon our history and may retard our devel- 
opment to a greater extent than appears at a careless first 
glance. The landing field employed now is at Concord. 
This town is one hour and forty minutes from San Fran- 
cisco, and that lime must be reckoned on the time to de- 
liver mail by air. whatever the direction it comes from, 
for such mail has to lie landed at Concord. Now. the de- 
velopment of the U. S. air mail service is making this 
Concord matter rather ridiculous. The United States air 
mail will make a four hour service from Los Angeles and 
six hour service from Portland as well as seven and a half 
hour service from Seattle. But we must arid the hour and 
forty minutes from Concord, thus greatly increasing the 
time of delivery. It is so silly on the face of it, that trans 
continental mail should be able to traverse three thousand 
miles in thirty-four hours and then that we should have to 
wait practically an hour and a half for the same mail to 
limp painfully over the last thirty miles. 

There is more involved in this, however, than the mere 
delivery of mail. The air service is only in its infancy 
and its childhood on this side of the world is so very back- 
ward. But it will, by no means, always be so. It will not 
be long before we are matching Europe in the transporta- 
tion of passengers over long distances by air route and 
when that time comes we shall lose heavily if we do not 
have a proper landing place in this city. Here is a chance 
for forward-looking men. 



It is not to be supposed that any great 
Luther Burbank number of young men or women star) 

ing life would pick upon Luther Bur- 
bank as the man whom they would care more to imitate and 
whose achievements would mean most to their youthful 
imaginations. And yet they would make no mistake if 
they would contemplate with quiet thought just what such 
a man means to his country and the world, and the almost 
incalculable benefits which he confers upon mankind. We 
are forgetful apes for the most part, we humans, and per- 
haps we shall not, in the future, remember, as we should, 
this man who has done so much for us and whose deeds 
will abide whether we remember or not. 

All this is introductory to the statement that Luther 
Burbank has perfected a new group of flowers and plants. 
as the result and culmination of a long series of experi- 
mentations last year. The camassia. produced by him after 
twenty -six years of laborious effort, is a blue flower trained 
from a swam]) plant, possessed of very great beauty and re- 
sembling a blue tulip. Then there is the rainbow teosinte, 
produced from the rainbow corn. This teosinte grows 
eight feet and bears eight to fourteen ears on each stalk. 
Then come the new "torch lilies" to bloom readily and rich- 
ly even in cold climates, offering to tired humanity another 
store of beauty and color. In addition there are further 
developments of the zinnia and a larger and more irides- 
cent variety of the Shasta daisy. Then come great im- 
provements in the gladioli and asters: eight new gladioli 
with new and wonderful coloring and beauty heretofore un- 
known. 

It may not seem very much to the young and thoughtless, 
all this wealth of observation and experiment, with these 
results of color and beauty. But to those of us who know 
life and who realize how much we are dependent at times 



January 9. 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



upon that very intangible thing which we call beauty, and 
how far we are refreshed by mere color, the achievements 
of our Santa Rosa Wizard become as accomplishments of 
the most striking importance to the human race. 

We have practically a new 
The New Supervisorial Broom Board of Supervisors. It is 

very conscious of its pres- 
ent virtue and has more good resolutions than the average. 
The first thing with a new year resolutionist is to make 
new rules. So the Board has made new rules. These new 
rules are for the most part in the direction of what they 
call "'liberality'' and "democracy." Now, we are very much 
convinced, as good Americans, from our cradle, that liber- 
ality and democracy are very fine ideals towards which 
we should all work. But we are by no means sure that they 
are good methods for transacting business. 

Formerly, by the old rules, ten votes could cloture a de- 
bate and bring a foolish and aimless discussion to a proper 
and dignified "ending. Now, it will take a two-thirds ma- 
jority to suspend the rules, whenever it shall be necessary 
to do so, in the interest of good business and the rapid and 
intelligent transaction of public affairs. Of course, this 
rule just means more talk, and whether more talk will help the 
Board of Supervisors to satisfactorily perform its duties in 
the premises is again another matter. 

Perhaps a more serious and important change is the taking 
of the control over the budget from the hands of the finance 
committee. The new rule provides that each of the other 
standing committees is to be placed in actual charge of the cor- 
responding department of the city government ; thus police and 
fire departments, will come to the police and fire committees 
on all matters of budget and legislation. This again appears 
to complicate the situation without giving that which it pre- 
tends to give. We must admit that we are the advocates of 
simplicity in the administration of finance in particular. 

But there is one fine thing that has been done, in the inter- 
locking of committees, which deal with closely related sub- 
jects. That is a decided and welcome step in advance. 



The Lure of Farming 

By John G. Brayton 



Now and again a man does 
A Well Deserved Honor work, thinking that he is beyond 
notice ami sometimes half-regret- 
ting that he has cast his lot where bis work is apparent- 
ly so little recognized. Then conies the revelation that be has 
in it been working in the dark, after all. hut that, unknown to 
him, the real world that counts has been watching and that 
his deeds are known where they should he known. 

Such recognition we are happy to say has come to l)r 
William C. Hassler, city health officer of San Francis 

man of singular ability and must unusual fineness i>t soul. 
The physician has been chosen as the mot capable and besl 
qualified health officer in the United Stan- to represent the 
nation at the International Health ('.inference to he held in 
London, February 22 to April 3. 

Dr. Hassler was name 1 by General Hugh S. Cummii \ 
the United States Public Health Department, which is in it- 
self evidence of the way in which the work of our health of- 
ficer has been watched and is a testimonial of the highest gra le. 
For the conference to which he ha- been selected, as a delegate, 
is no ordinary affair. It has been called by the League of 
Nations and is devoted to municipal health and sanitation. 
There will be fourteen nation-, represented by their health of- 
ficers, the most conspicuously able of their profession in the 
world and among these will be, as the sole delegate from this 
count i . 'i health officer, Dr. Hassler. Togo, of course. 

he will have to get leave of absence from the board of super- 
visors; and the board will be proud to give it. 

In this recognition not only is Dr. Hassler honored, but we. 
as a community, are marl- r special motive. I- or it is 

no small honor to have as the bead of our public health de- 
partment, a man whose qualifications enjoy world-wide recog- 
nition. 



TI P told us of his farming experience as we sped toward the 
plant on the company's truck. Tip was back at painting. 
He and his friend had determined to make an honorable ges- 
ture before the world ; to gather to themselves certain dignity 
in the way of farming. 

The raw land cost them $160, the acre. There were no gas 
or water mains in the street for them to tap. No mail box 
down the street, no movie around the corner, no street cars, 
no fire alarm box, no police station — just land, electricity and 
telephone (if they wanted it) and plenty of elbow room. They 
put clown a part payment on the land and set to work, whistling 
merrily, to fence in twenty-three acres of the valley, with the 
intention of carving out an ornament to civilization. 

Through the first winter they labored, putting down a well 
with proper cement piping for irrigation, plowing, planting 
trees and hoping the thick fog of five weeks duration would 
clear away. This cold, penetrating ground fog got on them. 
No sun all day for week after week. No discouragement 
bothered them ; but this fog — it was different. They planted 
broom corn between the little trees and went on with their 
work. 

All through the summer they kept at it, even when the ther- 
mometer went to one hundred and fourteen in the shade — 
and no shade. They got a little cash from the broom com 
and went on into the next winter. 

Six weeks of fog; thick, constant, penetrating. All day 
long the automobiles passed on the highway with their head- 
lights burning. ( )n two separate Sunday evenings it cleared 
cm nigh to show the pale disc of the sun, which quickly dis- 
appeared, frightened by the faintness of the shadow it cast. No 
clothing they put on warmed them against this chill. No 
cheerfulness they conjured up could outlive these shadowing 
clouds. The next summer they planted melons and small 
garden truck between the trees and sold the produce from a 
booth at the highway side. In these days a dime was as big to 
them as a dollar to the average man. It cost them $20 a 
month to pump the wa'.er for irrigation — and the well was 
lowering. In the ball the holder of the trust deed descended 
on them and foreclosed. 

In this neighborhood, where the world's largest fig and 
peach orchards lie, extending in all direction- as far as the 
eye can see. they failed. It takes too great an initial invest- 
ment for the average man. Tip says. Too many years pass 
before there is any return from the trees; five and six years 
lor some fruits, ten for others. And by that time the market 
may be changed entirely. 

Tip was worthy and industrious, the success of his labors 
might have been of lasting benefit to the community and the 
state, but he had to surrender. The place is still there with 
the little house, and the trees are growing; but not so well as 
they would have if Tip could have seen to their care. There 
i- something wrong in this system; such men as Tip should 
have help from the state, for in the long run the state benefits 
greatly. 

Tip says now he knows how to beat the farming game. He 
will gather enough cash to establish himself safely, forty or 
fifty thousand dollars, and will lend it to the other fellow at 
a good rate of interest. Then he will lie back and live in ease. 

"Yes. and you will do the same thing as you failed in just 
as sedh as you earn the first payment again," he was told. 

"Sure." he said with a fine light in his eyes, "and this time 
I shall plant Santa Rosa Plums." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 9, 1926 




Pleasure's W^nd 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

_ Tom Moore, 





JANUARY offers much entertain- 
ment to the music-loving public of 
San Francisco. Beginning Monday eve- 
ning with the 
A merican 
premiere of 
two San 
Franciscans' 
opera, "Fay 
Yen Fah" at 
the Columbia, 
and a week of 
repertoire of 
well-liked op- 
eras at this 
theater, there 
follows in 
quick succes- 

Kallierlne Schwarti sion concerts 

on the Elwyn Concert Series, the Oppen- 
heimer series, as well as the fine conceits 
given by the San Francisco Symphony 
orchestra. 

Such brilliant artists as Benno Moisei- 
witsch. pianiste, Sousa and his famous 
band, Mme. Sigrid Onegin, famous :on- 
tralto and others, will be here. 

Last week, the sixth pair of concerts 
of the San Francisco Symphony was fea- 
tured by the excellent work of Kajetan 
Attl, solo-harpist of the organization, 
playing the concert-stuck by Pierne ; Mr. 
Attl displayed a technique and clearness 
of tone which brought out all the possi- 
bilities of this beautiful instrument. The 
feature of the "pop" concert at the audi- 
torium last night was the brilliant playing 
of Mishel Piastro, guest artist in the 
Symphonie Espagnolc. 

At the fifth popular concert tomorrow 
at the Curran Theater there is offered a 
splendid program, including numbers by 
Schubert. Guiraud, Glazounow, Dukas, 
(irieg and Kreisler. 

* * * 
Curran 

"The Gorilla," Ralph Spence's tri- 
umph of fun and mystery has registered 
a great hit at this theater, where it enters 
into the third week of a limited engage- 
ment. 

There is a splendid cast, including such 
old favorites as Lon Hascall and Harry 
T. Shannon, who create many laughs in 
their respective roles as detectuffs ! They 
are ably assisted by Elizabeth Carmichael, 
John Stokes. Wilbur Cox. Bert Kay. Ju- 
lian Noa, Thomas Bell, famous animal 
actor, Jack C. Gray. Carl Rosa and Ralph 
Theadore. 



(Conducted by Katherine Schwartz) 

Alcazar 

"The Song and Dance Man," the com- 
edy-drama written by and starred in by 
George M. Cohan for an entire year in 
New York, has been entertaining San 
Francisco for a month past and s'arts on 
its fifth week at the Alcazar next Salur- 
dav night. Henry Duffy, who has given 
this city so many theatrical good things, 
is producing this offering in his usual 
sumptuous style, and appears in the title 
role. 

Duffy gives his accus'omed sterling 
performance and Dale Winter is her 
usual attractive self as the heroine. Then, 
by way of added talent, Duffy has 
brought to us William Davidson, whose 
work as the theatrical magnate stands out 
as particularly brilliant. Davidson is the 
sort of actor who is equally popular with 
] latri ms of both sexes. 1 le gives a strong. 
\irile portrayal of the ideal producer, the 
man at the head of show business, who 
considers both players and public. David- 
son is cleverness itself and be has already 
assembled a large following here. 

There are many interesting features of 
the play which is filled with appealing 
situations and well punctuated with 
laughter. The four acts was absorbing 
t.i the onlooker and the character work 
< if the players has come in for much 
commendation. Besides Davidson the 
principal fun making is done by John 
Junior. William Macauley. and Betty 
Laurence. Macauley will be remembered 
as having been featured in "The Best 
People" in its long run at the President 
Theatre. The complete cast includes: 
Dorothy LaMar, Kay L. Royce, Day 
Manson, Marie Sorrifle, Henry Caubi- 
sens and Be'n 1 lands. 



President 

"Thank-U," John Golden's amusing 
comedy with all of the gentle humor that 
made "Lightnin' " so popular, continues 
as the President attraction for a third 
week, starting with the matinee next Sun- 
day. With its fifteen characters, all con- 
tributing to the merriment, this very 
worth while offering combines a full 
measure of entertainment with other in- 
teresting features. 

John D. O'Hara, as the kindly vil- 
lager with nothing hut pleasant thoughts 
of his fellow men, has the principal role. 
He radiates happiness and contentment 
and is always doing something for some- 
body. Then there arrives a niece from 



Paris to stay with him. She is an Amer- 
ican, but she has been so long in France 
that die has affected some of the ways 
of thai country and brings with her some 
of its latest style creations. The result 
is startling. The gossips begin their 
deadly work and the whole town is in an 
uproar. 

Leneta Lane appears as the girl in the 
case. She is youthful and care free and 
has sufficient grit to overcome the obsta- 
cles that are placed in her way. In this 
role .Miss Lane is at her best. Kenneth 
Daigneau, new here, plays opposite her 
in fine style and Francis Fraunie, an- 
other newcomer, is great in a comedy 
character part. Earl Lee also adds to 
the fun by a mirthful characterization. 
The cast includes : Olive Cooper, Har- 
riet MacGibbon, William Abram, Charles 
Edler, George Webster, Frank Darien, 
Helen Gilmore, Robert Reid and John 
Mackenzie. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

There is a great bill scheduled for the 
Golden Date next week, headed by En- 
sign \1 Moore and his Jack Tars in a 
jazz band de luxe. "Sonny" Hoey, ec- 
centric dancer, steps through several 
lively numbers and Tiny, Jackson, Fred 
\ gt and Bill Price contribute to the fun. 

Another important feature on the bill 
is the picture. "The Knockout," featur- 
ing Milton Sills. The setting is the lim- 
bere 1 wilds of Canada, and the action 
typical of the red-blooded men of the 
lumber camps. Lorna Duveen, a new 
screen find, plays opposite the star. 

"The House Builders" is another clever 
act played by Willie. West and McGinty, 
European stars who came to America as 
features in the Ziegfeld Follies. 

Ed Lowrv, distinguished monologist 
and comedian, returns with a clever line 
of chatter; Broomstick Elliott and Babe 
La Tour bring their riotous hokum com- 
edy hit, "My Daddy": Murray and Alan 
offer "Jes'ers of 3000 Years Ago"; Miss 
Ziegler and partner mix skill and thrills 
in an equilibristic offering. 

An added feature of next week's bill is 
a championship Charleston contest, the 
preliminaries of which '"ill he held at 
both evening shows beginning on Mon- 
day with the finals booked for Friday 
evening at the first show. 

* * * 
Cameo 

Another thrilling western is offered at 
the Cameo this week, with "Hoot" Gib- 



January 9, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NRXT WF.RK 



Alexandria ). Pictures 

Geary and 18th ( 


alcazar | "Song and Dance Man" 
o'l-nrreii nr. Powell J Henry Duffy Players 


CALIFORNIA ) "The Road to 
4th and Market \ Yesterday" 


CAMEO | Hoot Gibson in "Ari- 
836 Market St. f z °na Sweepstakes" 


CAPITOL / "Kosher Kitty 
Kills nr. M arket f Kelly" 


CASINO I 

Mason and Ellis ( Pictures 


CASTRO ) 

429 Castro St. j Pictures 


) S. F. Grand Opera Co. 
COLUMBIA \ in Repertoire 


CURRAN ) .,_. - 

„ „ l "The Gon a" 
Geary nr. Mason r 


EGYPTIAN ( Pictures ■ 


golden gate 1 Vaudeville 
G. G. Ave. A Taylor ( 


GRANADA ( "The American Venus" 
1008 Market St. \ with Fay Lanphier 


haight ( Pictures 
Haight at Cole J 


IMPERIAL { Charlie Chaplin in 
1077 Market St. f "The Gold Rush" 


loews WARFIELD ( "The Black Bird," 
1)88 Market St. r Lon Chaney 


MAJESTIC ) 

Mission between v Pictures 

20th and 21st J 


METROPOLITAN J 

2055 Union St. ( Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 
1328 Fillmore 
NEW MISSION 
2550 Mission 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM I ., . ,,, 
O-Farrell* Powell J Vaudeville 


PANTAGES I ., . ... 
Market at Mason J Vaudeville 


pompeu 1 Pictures 
Next to Granada ) 


PORTO LA ( „, . 
770 Market St. ) Pictures 


PRESIDENT 1 ..„ 
Market * MeAlllster J 1 nank-U 


ROYAL ( _. . 
1529 Polk St. J Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS | "Moana" 
805 Market St. ' 


SUTTER 1 

Sutter and Stelner \ Pictures 


UNION square l Pictures and 
O'Farrel 1 nr. Powell \ Vaudeville 


WILKES "All For You" 
Geary and Mason \ 


WIGWAM | 

Mission and 22d i Pictures 



CONCERTS 
San FimmelMO symphony Orchestra. Sundaj 
afternoon. B|45, turrun Thenter. 

vi minim M 

Sunday nfternoon. Jnitiinrv 1(1. Mine. One- 
sin, eontrnlto. 

Friday. Saturday nnd Sunday, January IS, 
HI and IT. Sousn and Ills llnnd. 

Thursday evening. January 1 I. Pernio 
Mnlseiivltsrh. pianist. 



son in the leading role, entitled "The 
Arizona Sweepstakes." There is a good 
musical program also. 

* * * 
California 

The screen version of that splendid 
story, "The Road to Yesterday" begins 
today at the California. Max Dolin had 
an elaborate prologue to accompany the 

picture. 

* * * 

Loew's Warfield 

The Warfield today, will be the scene 
of the world premiere of Lon Chaney' s 
new picture, entitled "The Black Bird," 
a story of London's interesting Lime- 
house district. The theme of this play 
is not unlike that of "The Unholy Three," 
and Chaney is said to have a part greatly 
similar to the one he played in "The 
Miracle Man," — he is a thief and a crook 
by night and a bishop by day. 

The stage presentation by Fauchon and 
Marco is an "Idea" called "Memories of 
Victor Herbert" in which Patricia Ra- 
hozza and Suzette are featured. Waiter 
Roesner has prepared a musical program 
in keeping with the title. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

There is an unusually good bill at this 
theater, beginning this week. Kitty Doner 
of the famous dancing family of thai 
name is the headliner. She is doing a 
male impersonation in her act, said to 
lie the best ever seen here. 

Ruth Rove, comedienne of sym 
lion, also offers an unusual number; one 
of the big features of the bill is an all- 
star revival of Gus Edwards' "£ 
Days," featuring- fifteen of his boys and 
giris; Muriel Kaye will he seen in a 
clever act called "In Pant-eland." with 
six principals and a team of the famous 
English Rocketts. 

Another feature act is that of the 
Italian clowns. Fortunello and Circillino; 
Gaston I 'aimer, the French humorist, has 
a clever line of talk; the Six Sarattos, 
European gymnasts and Ed and Jennie 
Rooney, aerialists, furnish the acn 
turns. 

* * * 

Wilkes 
"All for You" with a large cast of stars 

ami a large beauty chorus, starts on the 
third big week tomorrow at this theater. 
There is some catchy music, extremely 
line settings, and in this Wilkes has again 
found another big winner of the Stan lard 
of "No, No, Nanette" an 1 others of this 

type. 

* * * 

Capitol 

"Kosher Kitty Kelly." companion piece 
to "Abie's Irish' Rose." is attracting much 
attention at the Capitol Theater. Billie 
Burress carries the burden of the cc>inedy 
work as the Jewish delicatessen store 
keeper; Mildred Beverly does a fine bit 



of character work as Sarah Fienbaum. 
the others in the cast are Maryon Aye. 
Virginia Marvin, Mattie Hyde, Hobart 
Furman, Carl Kroenke and others. 

* * * 
St. Francis 

Doing an enormous business, "The 
Wanderer" goes into a third week at the 
St. Francis. The story is based on the 
prodigal son, and carries a tremendous 
theme. It is interpreted by a well-chosen 
cast, including Wallace Beery, Ernest 
Torrence, Greta Nissen, William Collier, 
Jr. and Kathlyn Williams. 



Imperial 

Don't miss Charlie Chaplin's latest pic- 
ture. "The Gold Rush" now being shown 
at the Imperial Theater. It is quite the 
best thing he has done. There are such 
crowds that it behooves one to go early 
in order to get a good seat. 

# * * 
Granada 

Much interest is evinced in the first 
showing here of the play "The American 
Venus," featuring Fay Lanphier, now 
known as "Miss America." Verne Bucke 
and his synco-symphonists have another 
of their elaborate stage acts in prepara- 
tion for the week. 



Paul Elder Notes 
Madame E, E. Scheyer, distinguished 
art critic and collector, who is now visit- 
ing the Unite 1 States, will speak in the 
Paul Elder Gallery, Saturday afternoon. 
January 16th at 2 :30 o'clock. Her sub 
ject will be: "What is Impressionism. 
Expressionism, Futurism, Cubism? 
Have They foundation in Art?" Mad- 
ame Scheyer, who is the authorized rep- 
itative of "The Blue Four." a dis- 
tinguished group of artists, exponents of 
rn art. of the State Guild of Arts 
and Crafts. Weimar, will give a fresh 
i Continued on Page 16) 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 9, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Our Mayor Says: 

«QAN FRANCISCO is in the greatest period of advance- 

>J nient she has ever known !" This was the New Year's 
proclamation made hy His Honor James Rolph, Jr., Mayor 
of San Francisco. 

Who is there among us not willing and eager to welcome 
the view taken by the chief magistrate of our wonderful 
city? Who. among us. does not thoroughly agree with 
Mayor Rolph? We all most heartily reiterate his contem- 
plations and shout lustily our sincere belief in the Mayor's 
stalwart statements. 

"The greatest period of advancement" means tremendous 
strides, in order to keep apace with the progress of the past ; 
but, even so, San Franciscans are equal to it; and. besides, 
the whole wide world has been shouting "Bravo" at us a 
long, long time, and predicting magnificent attainments. 

Optimistic, yes? But optimism has been our avowed 
baptism and we glorv in its blessings and its definite re- 
sults. 

So, with Awe deference to Mayor Rolph for hi-- proclama- 
tion on the very first day of this new year, we enthusias- 
tically ascribe ourselves: "On hand — to do. and to co- 
operate" that San Francisco may rise to meet the "greatest 
period of advancement she has ever known." 



"We celebrate the beginnings of things, not their end- 
ings, and the New Year is ushered in with happiness be- 
cause it is the birthday of all humanity," quoting from the 
NewYear's editorial of the San Francisco "Chronicle." 

"The old year, indeed, deserves the respectful homage of 
his successor and heir. The wilderness of many disputes 
has been cleared for 1926, the path to continuing prosperity 
made straight by the labors of 1925. 

"The treasures the new year finds in its lap are of the old 
year's gatherings and the wisdom that guides its steps had 
been learned from the ages." 

The philosophy expressed in the "Chronicle's" editorial 
under the caption "New Year Here With Arms Full of Hap- 
piness and Prosperity," from which we have quoted a line 
or two, permeates the ranks of western society. 

January finds leading men and women of this western 
commonwealth voicing with candor the prosperity our great 
newspaper of the Pacific Coast lias denned finds them, also, 
keyed up to the highest pitch of enthusiasm. 

* * * 

Society i? keenly concernd over the American premiere 
of the opera, "Fay Yen Fab," Monday night, January 11. 
at the Columbia Theater. 

This will mark the first time in the history of San Fran- 
cisco that an opera by an American composer and author 
is given its American premiere here with the original cast 
of a European presentation. 

Templeton Crocker and Joseph Redding, known in Bohe- 
mian Club circles for years, and before whose members at 
the Grove play the operatic numbers, first beard, now con- 



stitute the notable "Fay Yen Fab." will be accorded high 
homage by society. The success of the opera which critics 
state records the first real ( friental music set to an oriental 
theme, has already spread from Monte Carlo throughout '.he 
musical world. 

But royal as was the initial presentation of the Redding- 
Crocker opera in Europe when crowned heads were in at- 
tendance, the San Francisco production will, beyond doubt, 
excel in interest the fame already scored. 

"Fay Yen Fah" will be characterized by Mine. Lucy 
Berthrand, a singer of distinction in histrionic powers and 
voice qualities. She has an attractive personality, and is 
especially suited to essay the role of the heroine. 

Rene Maison, tin- French tenor, who will appear several 
times during next week's opera season, will sing in the 
Kedding-Crocker opera. 

The man whose incomparable leadership and musical 
mastery has brought rare distinction to San Francisco opera, 
Gaetano Merola, is sponsoring the present opera season. 
I lis name is synonymous with success, for will the highest pro- 
ductions only is Merola associated. I lis superior under- 
standing, his intelligence and his superlative musicianship 
are qualities which travel the high road of triumphs and 
bring prestige to all with whom he is allied and to those 
operas which resound to the direction of bis magical baton. 

Splendor and gorgeous array will characterize the atten- 
dance at the opera, for society rejoices in doing its part, and 
dons its best and smartest attire for such magificent perfor- 
mances. As the opera is to lie staged at the Columbia The- 
ater, theatrical gowning is encouraged and luxurious adorn- 
ment the dominant note. 

* * * 

Many of the ('rocker kinfolks are journeying here, or 
have already reached San Francisco, for the American pre- 
miere of "Fay Yen Fah." Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Alex- 
ander and Mrs. Jennie Crocker Whitman have arrived from 
New York for the opening night. 

Mr. Templeton Crocker, the author of the opera for which 
Mr. Joseph D. Redding wrote the music, is a brother of 
Mrs. Whitman. As it so happened, neither Mrs. Alexander, 
aunt of Templeton Crocker, nor his sister, Mrs. Whitman, 
were in Monte Carlo when "Fay Yen Fah" was first pro- 
duced and so did not have the opportunity of hearing it, 
there. Their journey to this coast is for the expressed pur- 
pose of seeing it in the city where the Crocker family have 
lived and in which they have been a component part of its 
culture and its progress. 

A number of brilliant society affairs are to be given in 
compliment to the Crockers. Mrs. Alexander, who was Miss 
Harriet Crocker of San Francisco, has not been here for 
more than three years and many of her society friends are 
eager to extend her the hospitalities of their homes with 
the additional opportunity afforded, this time, of honoring 
Templeton Crocker whose opera is the topic of conversa- 
tion, everywhere throughout society's realm. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

flao Bush Street, Between Powell and Stockton, Snn FrnnclNCO 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 
Telephone Sutter 0130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



January 9, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



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JPaper Chase 

From opera to paper chase is perhaps an 
editorial jump. But so deeply has society been 
immersed in the sportive festivities of the pen- 
insula paper chase this past week, that not to 
dwell upon it would be a lapse of memory and 
an oversight. 

The Burlingame and the San Mateo smart 
set took more than kindly to the exhilarating 
sport and staged a paper chase this past week 
which made for some astonishing records as 
well as providing colossal sport. 

Mr. Richard M. Tobin, who has but very 
lately returned to the West for a short sojourn 
from the Hague, where he has been the official 
ambassador from the United States, is the one 
responsible for the renewal of the paper chase. 
Ideal winter weather prompted the spirited 
play which covered acres of ground along the 
peninsula reservations and on private estates. 

Elaborate functions at the polo club house 
either preceded or followed the paper chase 
with breakfast, luncheon and teas exquisitely 
prepared for the participants. 

Some of the most enthusiastic guests and 
contestants in the glowing sport include Mrs. Cecilia 
Tobin Clark, Miss Mary Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Weather- 
wax. Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Gregory Parrott, Mr. and Mrs. George Leib, Mr. and Mrs. 
Cyril Tobin. Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Johnson, Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard McCreery, Mrs. Corbet! Moody, Richard 
Schwerin and Mr. Will Tevis, Jr. 

Society Leader Essays Politics 

Mrs. Richard Derby, the former Ethel Roosevelt, is tak- 
ing an active part in politics at Oyster Bay. New York, 
where Dr. and Mrs. Derby make their home. Mrs. Derby 
has just been appointed chairman of a sub-committee of 
the National Crime Commission. 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt and Mr. and Mr-. 
Archie Roosevelt and their children spent the holidays 
with Mrs. Roosevelt, Sr., at her home in Oyster Bay, where 
Dr. and Mrs. Derby and their children joined them -in 
the gathering of the famous Roosevelt family. 
Betrothal Announcement * * * 

A charming announcement party was given last Mon- 
day in the Fairmont Hotel when the betrothal of Miss 
Millicent Elston and Mr. Verne Thrall was proclaimed 
on attractive cards attached to corsage bouqui 

A luncheon in the Venetian dining room of the Fair- 
mont seated the guests, including relatives of the bride- 
to-be from New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles. 
An exquisite center piece of roses and heather adorned 
the center of the round table, with streamers running to 
the place cards designating the seats .if the guc-ls. 

The pretty surprise (for no one even guessed that the 
luncheon was to be an announcement party, was an- 
nounced on hand-painted cards, the artistic work of the 
fiancee. \ "CaStle of Dreams" with tower- of variant 
es and lengths which visualized the future of the be- 
trothal pair, was u-ed as the motif of the announcement 
cards. 

Miss Elston is the daughter of Mr- George B. Elston 

I the late George B, Elston and the sister of Virginia 

Elston, a talented young lad) of this city and now of Los 

SANT ARMARIA INN | 

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Angeles. John J. Elston of the Fairmont Hotel 
and one of the most popular hotel men of the 
West, is a brother of the brilliant young bride- 
elect. Miss Elston is a graduate of the Boston 
Conservatory and has for some time been iden- 
tified with the dramatic circles of Boston, New 
York and San Francisco, where her characteri- 
zations of famous poems and scholarly pro- 
ductions have gained her high recognition in 
the dramatic world. 

Mr. Verne Thrall, a prominent business man. 
is the son of Mrs. T. A. Martin of Seattle and of 
the late Mr. Franklin W. Thrall. 

The invited guests at the announcement 
party included Mrs. A. W. Scott, who sent 
loving greetings to the charming hostess. 
Those attending the memorable affair were 
Mrs. Josephine Wilson, Mrs. W. D'Egilbert. 
Mrs. E. S. Beatie, Mrs. Leo Kaufmann, Mrs. 
Henry L. Walters, Mrs. W. P. Collins. Mrs. 
John D. Shaw from Stockton. Mrs. James 
Glassford, Mrs. Robert L. Jackson, Mrs. 
Charles d'Aqrim, Miss Gladys Reston, Miss 
Frances I. Phelan of Stockton. 
C. Smith and Miss Fannie A. Elston, both of 
Mi-s Elston's aunts from New York, were spe- 
atj.be lovely engagement luncheon and sat with 
Miss Millicent Elston 



»>• or *nrif« <m 



r«i«*r«wu on ja o r i 



Air- R. 
whom are 
cial gue-ts 

Airs. George B. Elston, the mother, 
was assisted in welcoming her guests by her young sister. 
.Miss Virginia Elston, whose charming personality quite 
captivated the guests at the delightful affair. 

* * * 
Engagement Announced 

Aliss May Sackett of Berkeley, announced her engage- 
ment to Air. Richard Preston at a bridge luncheon given at 
the Fairmont Hotel last Tuesday. The honor guests at the 
luncheon were Miss Alarjorie McCallum and Aliss Jessie 
Mott. Aliss Sackett is the daughter of Air. ami Airs.' J. E. 
Sackett. She graduated from the University of California 
ainl is a member of the Chi < Imega sorority. Mr. Preston 
is the -on of Dr. and Air-. A. C. i'reston of Oakland, lit- 
is a member of the Sigma Xu fraternity. 

* * * 

.Mr. and Alls. I .onion Alicliie have returned from Holly- 
wood, where the prominent producer. Air. Alicliie anil his 
famous wife. I trace Sanderson Alicliie. have completed the 
film for Mrs. Michie's latest photoplay. The picture which 
will give a new version of life in the South Seas is being 
made by the world renowned producer. Edgar Lewis, with 
whom Airs. Alicliie worked constantly during her IIollv- 
Wi K id s. .j< ■urn. 

Airs. Michie gave an address this week before the ( lak- 
land Civic Center Club on the ".Movement for Better Mo- 
tion Pictures." Chester Rowell was the other speaker on 
this noteworthy occasion, attended by leading citizens from 
the bay cities. * * * 

Air. and Mrs. Milton Fsherg gave a delightful house party 
tin- past week entertaining a number of young people at 
their Alarm County home. Guests at the Esberg week-end 
party included Aliss Kathryn Chace, Aliss Dorcas Jackson. 
Ali-s t Hive Watt. Aliss Doris Fagan, Ernest Esberg, Milton 
rg, lr . Stanley Barnes. The Esbergs are well known 
their charming home affairs. 

* * * 

Miss Genevieve Davis, daughter of Airs. Lola Davis and 

a member of one of the pioneer families of Santa Rosa, was 

married on January 2 in Sydney, Australia to James L. 

a well-known business man of Australia. The bride 

is an accomplished musician and met her husband while 

on a concert tour 

I Continued on Page IS I 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 9, 1926 



•SOUS" 



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JO" 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



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Notable Events Made by 
Famous Golfers During 1925 

HERE is nothing that stands out so 
prominently in golfdom as the splendid 
work achieved by Herbert Fleishhacker, presi- 
dent of the park commission, and William F. 
Humphrey, president of the Olympic Club. 

These two loyal public-spirited men have 
done more for the city and the Olympic Club 
members than any other two presidents could 
ever hope to do. when they gave us Harding Park course 
and the new $600,000 clubhouse at Lakeside, which is con- 
sidered the most luxurious country club home in America. 

* * * 

William Taylor, president of the California Golf Club 
has made a name for himself as a financier that will be 
handed down in history. Taylor is a banker by profession, 
but his work in handling and financing the California Club's 
new home at Baden has no parallel in the history of golf. 

The good judgment and foresightedness possessed by 
Taylor was shown when he and his co-directors purchased 
400 acres of land, built an 18-hole course and a $150,000 
clubhouse, having a closed membership of over 400 male and 
200 women members with close to 100 on the waiting list. 

Although the California Club members will not officially 
open up their new course at Baden until April 1 to 26, they 
are in the happy position today of having over $100,000 in 
the bank with all bills paid. One of the chief reasons that 
the directors were able to put this gigantic proposition over 
was that they had the co-operation of all the old members 
of the California Club on their side. Everyone worked as if 
it were his own home he was building and that is why they 
have one of the greatest golf lay-out in the State today. 

* * * 

Champs and Near Champs That Made Good 

George Ritchie's work during the past year was far ahead 
of any other amateur in the North. During the year just closed. 
George set several course records, besides winning two of the 
biggest golfing events of the season. One of his notable 
achievements was when he shot Lincoln Park course m 63 
mad* during the Bulletin's second annual championship tourna- 
ment, which he also won from a record field of 665 players — 
the largest entry ever recorded in the world. 

Ritchie's second success was when he was medalist a! fhe 
Sacramento State Fair initial golf tournament, and also the 
winner of the tournament, winning the Thousand Dollar Chal- 
lenge Vase, and a $250 cup for his medal round of 71. 

Later George set new records on the California Club at 64. 
and a splendidly played 66 at Lakeside. 

lames A ("Babe") Ritchie. George's younger brother, who 
won the first Bulletin championship at Lincoln Park the year 
previous, although he lias not been playing much golf since he 
stepped into the business world, still was able to capture the 
Sacramento Municipal Championship fur the second time in 
succession. 

The big feature of his second win was that he never allowe I 
his opponent to win one hole during the final plav. "Babe" 
Ritchie also holds the Sacramento Municipal course record 
of 66. 

* * * 

Ed Bogle, a tall youth from Oakland, won the Harding 
Memorial amateur golf championship during golf week, when 
the Park Commissioners threw the course open free of charge 
to all players in the northern part of the state. 



Two thousand two hundred and twenty-six golfers took part 
in the play. George Ritchie again showd his superiority as a 
medalist and won setting the course record at 71, one under par 
and this figure has stood the test of over 10.000 golfers without 
being broken. 

Ritchie won his way to the finals, but he was so cock-sure 
nf winning that he allowed l'.ogle to get a two-hole lead on 
him, which he couldn't overcome and lost. 

l'.ogle met Russ Conroy, the professional champion in the 
final test, for the city open championship. Conroy won the 
distinction of meeting Bogle by shooting a 74 during the medal 
round when thirty-one members of the Northern California 
golf association competed for the title. 

Mrs. Frank Sheedy of Lincoln l'ark retained her title as the 
San Francisco woman golf champion for the second time in 
a row. Mrs. Sheedy has proven that she is one of the best 
woman golfers that has ever been developed in San Francisco. 

Mrs. Sheedy also says she owes most of her success as a 
golfer to Dolle. the professional at Lincoln Park, claiming 
that her instructor is the best posted man in the profession. 

* * * 
Mrs. Lengfeld Stars 

A strange state of affairs happened during the initial invita- 
tional golf tournament held at the Beresford Golf and Country 
Club when Mrs. Louis Lengfeld. captain of this popular penin- 
sula club won her own tournament. 

Mrs. Lengfeld was very reluctant in playing in the tour- 
nament, where she was acting as host to fifty-five of the 
leading lady golfers in the land, but her many friends per- 
suaded her to join in the week's sport, which opened up 
Nov. 16-20. Mrs. Lengfeld not only entertained her guests 
in the most royal fashion, but she also excelled in playing 
her very best brand of golf, especially in the finals when 
she met Mrs. Frank Sheedy, who was a big favorite to win 
the honors. 

Mrs. Lengfeld proved one thing; that she is a real go-get- 
ter, for after losing the first two holes, she actually won 
five in a row. and eventually won 4-3, a truly remarkable 
performance. 

* * * 

Robert "Bob" Hunter, one of the greatest and most popu- 
lar amateur golfers in the state of California today, won 
the senior championship at the Burlingame golf and coun- 
try club, when he defeated Dr. C. H. Walter in the finals 
by one stroke. 

Bob, as we all know, has been one of the leading lights 
in golfdom for over twenty years. He has traversed both 
continents on several occasions and has always been will- 
ing to impart his knowdedge to his friends. 

As a golfer he has few equals, and whether it be George 
Yon Elm or Bobby Cruikshank. neither one has got a cinch 
bet if ever they take him on. as he is just as liable to break 
par on any course as they are themselves. 

* * * 
Three Great Southpaws 

Perhaps never in the history of golf have southpaws cut 
such a prominent figure in championship events as Paul T. 
Carroll, the champion of the Presidio Club; John G. Levi- 
son. champion of the Beresford Country Club; and Lincoln 
S. Wilson, champion of the California and title holder of the 
Northern California Left-handed Golf Association. 

This seems a very unique distinction for three local men to 
hold the championship of their own clubs. Carroll played re- 
markable golf last year. He started the New Year well by 
(Continued on Page 13) 



January 9, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



£&. 




THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



By Josephine Wilson 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events In men's and 
women's organizations. 




PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 

PRESIDENT COOLIDGE has been ex- 
tended an invitation to visit the Bohe- 
mian Club and to attend the annual play 
given at the Bohemian Grove in the spring 
of 1926. The invitation was extended to 
,os,rmv. the President by Mr. Avery McCarthy, a 
wii-son prominent member of the Bohemian Club 
during his recent visit to the White House. 

According to announcements already made that the Presi- 
dent would visit the Pacific Coast next summer, officials 
of the Bohemian Club have been planning an exceptional 
reception and festival at the Grove in honor of the Presi- 
dent of the United States, Secretary of Commerce Herbert 
Hoover, makes an annual pilgrimage from Washington in 
order to be present at the yearly event staged by the Bo- 
hemian Club. 

In presenting his invitation to the President, Mr. Mc- 
Carthy, a Los Angeles member of the club, was accom- 
panied by Senator Tasker L. Oddie of Nevada. 

"Clerks must treat the public with utmost courtesy," ac- 
cording to Registrar J. H. Zemansky, who has issued his 
directions to field deputies in their rounds for securing the 
registration of voters. Zemansky places the figures at 200,- 
000 in registration, before the time of the next election. He 
urges permanent registration, declaring that the state would 
save half a million dollars by the system. 

Every citizen who would vote at any election this year 
must register again as the old registration has expired. 
Many campaigns will be conducted by organizations, par- 
ticularly by the women's clubs in securing voters' registra- 
tion, according to statements made on Saturday when a 
delegation of women headed by Mrs. Edward F. Glascr was 
the first to sign their names on the registration rolls. 

* * * 

W. H. Crocker, president of the newly merged Crocker 
First National Bank and Crocker First Federal Trust Com- 
pany returned to San Francisco the early part of this week 
from his trip abroad. 

"The principal force now prevalent in all European coun- 
tries," stated Crocker upon his return "is a desire to win 
back some of the commercial ground lost during the World 
War. With Europe working unitedly for commercial de- 
velopment, the United States may now look for some com- 
petition in foreign trade." 

The prominent San Francisco bank president was clearly 
optimistic in regard to conditions in this country and stated 
that there was" every indication for continued prosperity. 

Probably one of "the secrets Crocker revealed to his 
friends which brought him congratulations among the golf 
enthusiasts, was that lie had made a hole-in-one while 
playing in England, an achievement in golf parlance which 
i> the ambition of all good golfers. 

* * * 

Phil C. Katz, the newly elected public administrator has 
been almost as busy receiving congratulations from his 
host of friends as he has been with his official duties. Prob- 
ably no man whose name appeared on the ballot was more 
splendidly honored than Katz. who may readily count hi? 
staunch friends and adherents by the thousands. 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

THE Pacific Coast Women's Press Association of which 
Mrs. Ina Bradstreet Weston is the president, will pre- 
sent a program devoted to poetry on Monday, January 11, 
in their club rooms, 1725 Washington Street. 

Ina Coolbrith, poet laureate of California, will be the 
honorary chairman of the noteworthy day. Two of Miss 
Coolbrith's poems, "Meadow Lark" and "In Blossom Time," 
which have been set to music, will be sung by Alicia Scott 
with Mrs. Arthur Franklin Williams at the piano. The first 
poem mentioned was set to music by the famous composer, 
Mrs. H. H. A. Beach, and Adelaide Needham wrote the 
music for "Blossom Time." 

In addition to these poems taken from Miss Coolbrith's 
boom, several of her latest unpublished poems will be read, 
one upon popular request, being the poem Miss Coolbrith 
wrote for the Diamond Jubilee and which is regarded as 
one of her masterpieces. 

George Sterling, the famous California poet, will be the 
honor guest. He will give two readings, "The Pathfinders," 
an unpublished poems, and one act from the dramatic poem, 
"Lilith." Sterling is a lifelong friend and admirer of the 
poet laureate and with world renowned writers attributes to 
Miss Coolbrith a high place in the realm of poetry where 
illustrious names have brought fame to California. 

The program for Monday includes other numbers of 
scholarly distinction, "Wet 'Beaches" by George Sterling 
and "Hills of Iris" from the dramatic poem, "Rosamund" 
by Sterling, and which has been set to music by Laurence 
Zenda, who will present the number in her group which in- 
cludes "Mediatrix" and "Hidden Garden." 

'Cello numbers will be played by Cedric Search, who will 
give a solo selection and play the 'cello obligato to "Holy 
River of Sleep" by Sterling. 

* * * 

"Our Youth and the Spirit of Today" was the topic of an 
address delivered yesterday at the California Club rooms, 
1750 Clay Street by Prof. Paul S. Cadman, A. B., LL. B.,as- 
sistant professor of economics at the University of Califor- 
nia, before members of the San Francisco Council of Catho- 
lic Women of which Mrs. William O. Butler is the presi- 
dent. The next meeting of the council to which members 
may invite guests will be held on Thursday, January 21 
at 3 o'clock, when a song recital will be presented by Miss 

Lina Palughi. 

* * * 

Mrs. I. B. Hatcher was chairman of the social day of 
Cap and Bells Club, which inaugurated the events of the 
new vear held in the California room of the Fairmont Hotel. 
Mrs. 'Marshall C. Harris, president of the club, received the 
guests, assisted by her executive staff. The splendid pro- 
gram comprised piano solos by Dorothy Wines Reed, a 
group of French songs by Leile Xeiisen Druhe, mezzo so- 
prano with Dorothy Wines Reed at the piano. 

Mrs. Parker Maddux of the San Francisco Center and 
a member of the International Committee on Foreign Rela- 
who has just recently returned from Honolulu where 
she was the only woman official delegate, gave an illumi- 
nating address on "Peace on the Pacific." A large gather- 
ing of prominent members and guests greeted the speaker. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 9, 1926 




CROCKER First National Hank and Crocker First Federal 
Trust Company issue a statement of conditions showing 
combined resources of $118,139,568.51. There is a surplus 
of $2,925,000, undivided profits of $1,208,704.18 and deposits 
amounting to $98,657,105.36. 

There are, in the nature of assets, U. S. Bonds and certifi- 
cates amounting to more than 18 million dollars, and first 
mortgage loans on real estate approximately 12 and one-half 
millions of dollars and cash and sight exchange more than 23 
and one-half millions of dollars. 

The condition and development of this concern is a matter 
of first class importance in the development of this community. 

* * * 

— William H. Crocker has been chosen president of the 
Crocker First National Bank, First National Bank of San 

Francisco and First Federal Trust Company affiliated with 
the latter. James F. Fagan was elected executive vice-presi- 
dent: F. G. Willis was elected vice-president-cashier. 

* * * 

— The merger of the Crocker First National Bank, the First 
National Bank of San Francisco and the First Federal Trust 
Co., is a matter for congratulation. It means a vastly improve 1 
concern with greater potentialities and is a financial happening 

of first rate importance. 

* # * 

— The San Francisco Rank report- total assets of -^l 1 '/ ,232,- 
609.22. There are reserve and contingent funds amounting 
to $3,250,000.00 and the condition of these funds is that they 
have been created for the purpose of additional security to de- 
positors against losses. A notable feature of this bank is the 
Employees' Pension Fund, which is over $525,000. This bank 
has four subsidiary branches in this city. It develops its in- 
terest system on deposits so as to compute interest on deposits 

monthly and compounds quarterly. 

* * * 

— General Frank L. Hines, director of the United States 
Veterans Bureau, recommends that holders of term insurance 
policies issued by the government through the Federal War Risk 
Bureau to soldiers and sailors in the World War, be given an 
additional live years in which to convert to a permanent plan 
of insurance. * * * 

— The Wells Fargo Hank and Union Trust Co., publishes 
its report showing total assets of $149,312,552.29. There are 
savings deposits in this bank aggregating $34,701,197.03. The 
showing is excellent and the statement published is not inclu- 
sive of trust funds. Cash on hand and with the Federal Re- 
serve Bank of San Francisco amounts to $15,629,799.16. 

* * * 

— The Bank of California, which also includes branches 
in Portland, Seattle, and Tacoma, shows a total of assets 
amounting to $122,137,735.31. In cash and sight exchange 
there is the amount of $27,390,434.14. Deposits amount to 
$85,577,159.19. This bank makes another demonstration of 
the prosperity of the year which has just gone. It is authorized 
to act as trustee, executor and administrator or in any fiduciary 
capacity permitted by law to banks and trust companies. 

* * * 

—-The year has proved conclusively, at least as far as its 
period is concerned, that bank stocks are thoroughly safe and 
profitable investments. Every one of the banks is in a pros- 
perous condition : indeed in remarkably anil distinctively bril- 
liant shape. 

This has been demonstrated particularly in the case of the 
Bank of Italy, where the earnings amounted to $53 per share. 

* * * 

—Since the inauguration of the policy of making housing 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1668 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1925 

Assets $107,232,609.22 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,250,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over 525,000.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission am] 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. nn.l 7th Ave. 

IIAIOI1T STREET liUANCII ll.uclil and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloo St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONZ-QUARTER (4\£) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



s.-iii FranciHCO Ofllce: 

BRUCE heathcote 
Manager 




The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid In CnnHnl .■S-n.onii.iHiii «20.000,000 Renerve Kunil 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL, BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER G00 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW STORK; PORT- 
LANK, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 



450 California Street 

W. J. COt'LTHARD 
AhmI. Maunder 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walte W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Douclas 2244 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturer* of 
HIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS. CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC, 
Snn Francisco, Calif. Loh Angelet*, Calif. 

-14-1 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



i 



MADE TO ORDER O NJ.Y 

^W? »-*- ^sbif 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



January 9, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



loans on low priced dwellings and apartment houses six years 
ago, the Metropolitan Life has lent $343,786,819 for this pur- 

posi and has provided accommodations for 95,994 families. 

* * * 

— Insurance agents start the new year with new tools as 
Follows — non-medical insurance, the salary allotment plan and 
a new policy premium reduction paid up at sixty-five. The 
salary allotment plan contemplates the insurance of groups 
of employees. Premiums can he paid monthly and deducted 
by the employer From the salary. 

* * * 

— The Bank of Italy has opened a llayes-Divisadero branch, 
with P. A. Pinkel as manager. 

* * * 

— Pacific Gas and Electric Company has been authorized by 
the Railroad Commission to use $464,105.40 derived from the 
sale of preferred and common stock, to reimburse its treasury 
in part for uncapitalized expenditures. The same company 
has also applied to the Railroad Commission for power to 
issue and sell 50,000 shares of common stock at $100 per 
share and use the proceeds to reimburse its treasury and fin- 
ance uncapitalized expenditures amounting to $26,875,925.74. 

— The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society has issued its 
statement of the condition and value of its assets and liabilities. 
The excellent condition of this old established institution is 
worth noting. The total assets aggregate $83,110,638.23 and 
the amount of $33,132,174.38 of these assets consists in bonds 



GOLF 

(Continued from Page 10) 

winning both the medal and finals of the New Year tourna- 
ment at Del Monte, besides his own club event. John Levi- 
son is probably the peer of all the portsiders in this glorious 
state. Ik- has been identified with the San Jose, P.eresford, 
and Presidio chilis for a number of years and has won and 
has held the championship at each of the three clubs. 



Crocker First National B 

\M> 

Crocker First Federa 
Montgomery and 


ank of San Francisco 

Trust Company 
Post Streets 


STATEMENT OF 
RBSOI H 

1 'n.rl. 
N;it lona 1 Hank 

Loans and I ilscounta 

*l !.:::< 
V. S. Bonds and 

Certificates 12,271,098.78 
Other Bi ads and 

Securities 2.617,368.19 
First Mori 

ns on Real 


CONDITION 

IBS 

t !rocker Flrsl 
Federal Trust 

S,93s 
6,96:: 

12.47 : 

""0.00 

86.057.51 
■ :,133.99 


~ 0> Combined 
f 47.299.12S.16 
18,210,028.04 
8,480.564.83 

12.173.080.40 


Building;, Furni- 
ture and Flxtui 
Custo bill t y 

in 1,7*8 
tal Stock In 

■ , i, ■ '•■ --.'is 

* 'ash and Sight 
Kxchanga 


3.747.365.39 

r.62.97 

"00.00 
294.807.56 

.933.86 


887.6:: 

1 1 Mill II 

Capital 1 


11.-,. 17 
11 » 

1 11.31 


\56S.51 
• 000.00 


Credit Hiid 


1,208.704. IS 

S.800. 568.56 

2.96 1 


(s 


761.10 
1*7.11 

ss. 6:,:. io5. 35 


887.633. 153. 34 


J30.506.U5.17 


811$. 139,568.51 



Chocolates 

of 
Distinction 



For Those 

Who Search the 

Highways and 

Byways for the 

Unusual 



m 



Jht> Latticed onxranoe 
Known Throughout the World . _ „ .. _, n . 

(77TO SAUNTER into the 
\J/ Kratz Shop is to ex- 
perience one of the 
most enchanting of travel- 
adventures. 

From this cheery and invit- 

Ting abode come those super- 
iie World's most creations ... Krat/ Choco . 

Unique Chocolate Shop , .... 

lates— with that incompara- 

276 POST ST., S. F. b i e delicacy of flavor which 

Near Union Square • .i 

causes connoisseurs the 

Phone SUTTER 1964 

world over to marvel ! Ob- 
tainable nowhere else, a 
Kratz giftbox embodies the 
essence of San Francisco's 
fascination. 



Exclusive Gift Packages 



No. 1— $4.00 
No. 2— $8.00 



No. 3— $15.00 
No. 4_ $ 20.00 



All Charges Prepaid 
Delherx Guaranteed 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 9, 1926 



Si- -'-_.-_ .-- -- :-■"- S:- ----- - '-'-■'-.-- . - -. . - — -1 - --. . o ■ ■ .; /. i. - . S^ii2)^M 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Half Yearly Report 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

326 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

DECEMBER 31st, 1925 

Assets — 

United States Bonds and Notes, State, Municipal and Other Bonds and 

Securities (total value $31,687,708.66), standing on books at $28,858,649.92 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first mortgages 66,976,545.00 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities 1,490,108.77 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices (value over $1,830,000.00), 

standing on books at 1.00 

Other Real Estate lvalue over $100,000.00), standing on books at 1.00 

Employees' Pension Fund (value over $525,000.00;, standing on books at 1.00 

Cash on hand and checks on Federal Reserve and other Banks 9,907,302.53 

Total $107,232,609.22 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $102,982,609.22 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,250,000.00 

Total $107,232,609.22 

GEO. TOURNY, President A. H. MULLER, Vice-President and Manager. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of December, 1925. 

(SEAL) O. A. EGGERS, Notary Public. 

A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4/4) per cent per 
annum was declared, Interest COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED 

QUARTERLY, 
AND WHICH MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 

Deposits made on or before January 11th, 1926, will earn interest from January 1st, 1926. 





TEL. FRANKLIN 3085 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automo- 
biles — Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding — Illnek- 

MiiilLim;. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



LARKINS DUCO 
Has Lustre 

Combined with lustre, it possesses a durability that 
is amazing. Be sure of a good job. 

Prices reasonable 



"I! 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Units: 35c per day; 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel). San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 391 



LARKINS & CO. 

First Avenue at Geary Street 



~^- . . t .■ i ■". 



» ■ ■ *y , » ■ ■» ■ ' ■ " ¥■ > 



L 



902 Bu»!> ffor. Taylor) 



DENMAN GARAGE 

nt location for club members 



January 9, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

THE San Francisco Bay District met 
and shook hands with the great Sac- 
ramento Valley over at Antioch the other 
day. The first of the bridges which will 
mean so much to the development of 
travel in central California was officially 
opened at 12:01 a. m. on January 1, when 
Ben Blow, field secretary of the National 
Automobile Club and general manager of 
the Victory Highway Association, drove 
a Nash car over the structure and broke 
the red, white and blue silk ribbon which 
barred traffic as little Mary Klatt, daugh- 
ter of the vice-president of the Ameri- 
can Toll Bridge Company smashe 1 a bot- 
tle of champagne on the iron girder that 
stretched across the lift span. 

With the completion of ibis bridge the 
most important link in the Victory high 
way between Sacramento and Oakland 
has been supplied and the Contra I 
County Board of Supervisors is busily 
engaged in paving the highway connect- 
ing the south bridge approach with their 

existing county system. 

t in the Sherman Island side of the 

bridge a road district has been organized 
to provide a paved highway connection 
with the Sacramento County highway 
system at the Rio Vista bridge. This 
stretch of road involves the construction 
of a bridge across Three Mile Slough. 
The abutments for tin-- new structure are 
in and the bridge itself, now doing duty 

at the north end of Grand Island, is to 

be barged down the Sacramento River 
within a short time and placed in its new 
location on the Victory highway. 

From Sacramento down the Sacra- 
mento River to the location of the new- 
bridge, the highway traverses one of the 
most prolific agricultural areas in the 



United States, passing Rio Vista, across 
the Sacramento River in Solano County, 
one of the oldest towns in California 
founded before the discovery of gold in 
California under the name of Brazos del 
Rio, the Arms of the River, and now one 
of the most modern and beautiful of the 
little cities of California. 

To the north of Rio Vista are vast 
fields and orchards of rich alluvial soil 
protected by high levees from overflow 
and warmed bv the sun into vast yielding. 
More than $30,000,000.00 of fruit ship- 
ments and $5,000,000 of asparagus pass 
through the marts of Sacramento each 
year. 

From the Sacramento River some of 
the finest salmon in the world are taken. 
This river is also important as one of 
the nation's most important navigable 
sections, the total annual freight borne 
now being close to 2,000,000 tons. 

A fine concrete highway connects Rio 
Vista with Sacramento and this road is 
a winding way of many curves, low nest- 
ling orchards on one side; the river on 
the other and in blossom time the ever- 
fragrant breeze is laden with nature's 
perfume. 

Splendid vistas of the river are pre- 
sented at every turn and all the variety 
of water borne traffic that commerce may 
supply or pleasure demand passes in re- 
view between the high levees which hold 
the river in bounds. 

The stretch of the Victory highway 
between Sacramento and Oakland, made 
effective by the Antioch Victory highwa) 
bridge was selected by Ben Blow and 
Harvey M. Toy in ]'<22. when Toy was 
a director of the \ ictory Highway Asso- 
ciation. Back .of tlii- selection was a 
definite de-ire on Toy's part to show the 
California bound tourist a new land not 
duplicated elsewhere in the United State-. 

From Sacramento, where Sutter- I 
one of the most dignified building 
American his'ory i- to be found, the Vic- 
tor) highway line d. un the river 
the \nti"(di bridge an I into Contra 
County is full of interest, taking the tour- 
ist through one of the famous English 
walnut producing sections of California, 
through Antioch, I'it-luug and Concord 
and thence through the tunnel to the vast 
panorama of San Francisco flay. 

The most important problem in de- 
veloping the Victory highway line be- 
tween Sacramento and San Fran 
was the crossing of the San Joaquin 
River and here the problem has been 
' by the Antioch "Victory High- 
way" bridge. It is a huge structure 
ing about $2,000,000.00, 4639 feet long, 
21 feet wf'e between curbs with a clear 
span of 270 feet between piers which 
stand in 40 feet of water. 

With the lift raised, a clearance of 13? 
feet is supplied, equal to that afforded bv 
the Brooklyn bridge over the East River 
at New York, and in years to come when 



this bridge has paid for itself it is to be 
turned over to the Contra Costa and Sac- 
ramento counties to become a part of that 
great highway which binds these coun- 
ties into closer unity and brings the East 
into closer touch with the West. 



(Qqcfl car of>era/ed\^ 

bj/ r<?l/ah/<? 

Chauffeurs 
who tftorouort/j/ under- 
stand their £us/ftess 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 





-the better it geb- 



fc»2EP<>| 



GEO. H. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

i,s,m,.(mm> r„|,-« were aerred at the Panama 

Paclrlc International Kxpoaltloa 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 9, 1926 



PAUL ELDER NOTES 
(Continued from Page 7) 

and vital interpretation of early Renais- 
sance and modern art and vividly dem- 
onstrate the important place in our pres- 
ent day existence of the ultra-modern art. 
The lecture will be illustrated with ster- 
eopticon slides. 

* * * 

An exhibition of graphic art— etch- 
ings, woodcuts and lithographs by "The 
Blue Four," Feininger, Jawlensky, Kan- 
dinskv and Paul Klee, will be shown in 
the Paul Elder Gallery for one week, be- 
ginning Monday, January 18th. The 
members of this celebrated group ac- 
claimed the foremost exponents of mod- 
ern art, are men of mature age from 50 
to 60 years, one of whom is an American, 
one a German and two are Russians. The 
name "The Blue Four" suggests their af- 
finity with the contributors to the noted 
pre-war art publication, "The Blue Horse- 
man," and spirituality, which is the sig- 
nificance of the color "blue." 



The Denishawn Dancers 

Completing a twenty-five day en- 
gagement at the Imperial Theater, 
Tokyo, Ruth St. Denis, Ted Shawn 
and the Denishawn Dancers have left 
Japan after a most triumphant terpsi- 
chorean experience, which the Japan- 
ese press look upon as the most signi- 
ficant art event in the history of the 
country. 

These dancers went to Japan hop- 
ing to present their work to the Japan- 
ese in such a manner as to arrest their 
attention and claim their sincere sym- 
pathy, but they did not anticipate the 
enthusiasm, the appreciation and the 
penetration that was given them by 
critics, audiences and fellow artists. 

Miss St. Denis and her Company 
spent every morning studying Japan- 
ese dance technique with Kochiro Matsu- 
moto, Japan's greatest actor-dancer, and 
Madam Fujima, his wife, who bears 
the name of the famous Fujima School 
of Dance. 

Pages could be written of the cour- 
tesies extended by private citizens for 
dinners, geisha parties, special dance 
performances to the Denishawn Dan- 
cers, the Japanese realizing that this 
tour of Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn 
was a research expedition as well as a 
series of professional engagements. 

Theaters of all kinds were visited 
by invitation, and the art of the dance, 
w'hich is so thoroughly guarded in Jap- 
an, was made an open book to Deni- 
shawn. 



"Give me one friend, for peace or war 
Ami I shall hold myself well-blest, 

And richly compensated for 
The cussedness of all the rest." 



SOCIETY 
(Continued from Page 9) 

La Gaiete Cotillion 

The fourth dance of the La Gaiete 
Cotillion series of which Mrs. Rosetta 
Baker is the gracious hostess, will be 
given this evening in the Gold Bail- 
room of the Fairmont Hotel at half . 
after eight o'clock. ff 

Mrs. Baker's dances are becoming 
more and more an essential element of[ 
San Francisco's social life, and a very 
enjoyable one at that. Although the 
dress at these balls is very formal and 
elegant, the spirit of the participants 
is full of a kindly camaraderie that is 
pleasant and refreshing. 



Mr. and Mrs. William M. Steven- 
son, their daughter, Miss Dorothyt 
Stevenson, Mrs. George Mitchell andy 
Miss Phyllis Fay will leave January! 
20 for New York and Europe. They! 
will travel abroad for three months. 

Mrs. George Stevenson gave a bridget 
party on last Tuesday as a farewell tol 
Miss Dorothy Stevenson, and also tol 
Miss Mary Elizabeth Beedy, who wil 
leave for France this month. 



During her visit to Pebble Beach 
over the last week end. Mrs. Cecilia 
Tobin Clark arranged a golf tourna- 
ment for women. She gave the cup 
and marked the scores, assisted by 
Miss Marion Hollins of New York. 
There were twenty women in the 
tournament. 



.Mrs. Charles Stetson Wheeler will 
return this week from Missoula, Mon- 
tana, where she spent the holidays with 
her daughter, Mrs. Walter McLeod 
and .Mr. McLeold. Later she will go 
East. 



Lieutenant, Mrs. Frissel 
Return From Honolulu 

Lieutenant and Mrs. Duncan Fris- 
sel have returned from Honolulu and 
are stationed at the Presidio. Mrs. 
Frissel was Miss Louise Porter of this 
city, a daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Lang- 
ley Porter. Dr. and Mrs. Porter are 
spending the winter in Rome and Miss 
Mary Bernice Moore is with them. 



Mrs. Jennie Crocker Whitman, who 
will arrive from New York on Sunday, 
will go to Pebble Beach before she re- 
turns to the East and will make ar- 
rangements for the new house she will 
build there. The plans have been 
drawn and the residence will be on the 
eighteenth fairway of the golf course. 



The Nicest Business 
"Lunch in Town 




DIVIDEND NOTICES 



The San Francisco Bank 

526 California St. (and Branches. San Fran- 
cisco. For the quarter year ending December 
31, 1925. a dividend has been declared ;ii the 

l" ! four ami oiic-quiirter i4'A) per cent 

per annum on all deposits, payable on and 
after January 2. L926. Dividends not called 
for are added to the deposit account and earn 
interest from January 1. 1926. Deposits made 
nil or before January 11, 1926, will earn inter- 
est from Januaiy 1. 1926, 

WM. D. NEW HOUSE, Secretary. 



Italian-American Bank 

S", E. corner Montgomery and Sacramento 
sis.: North Beach branch, corner Columbus 
Ave. and Broadway: Columbus branch, corner 
Montgomery and Washington sts. — For the 
half-year ending December 31, 1 i* ii .*">. a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of four 

iind one-uunrter 1 4 \\ ) per cent per anntn 

all savings deposits, payable on and afti 
January 2. 192G. Dividends not called Tor will 

he added to the principal and bear the B 

rati- ,.f Interest from January 1. 1926. De- 
will earn Enteresl i' January l. 1926. 

A. E. SBARBORO, President. 



Humboldt Bank 

is:: Market Street, near Fourth: Bush and 
Montgomery Branch, Mills Bldg. For the half 

year i adlng Dec n 31 [925, a dividend has 

been declared at the rate of four (4) per cent 

per annum on savings deposits, payab] 

inn! after January 2, 1926, Dividends not 
called for bear interest from January l. 1926. 

i' 'i da] 'i mi or before January 11, 

1926, will •-.iin interest from January i L926 
II. C. KI.NVESAIIL, Cashier. 



Bank of Italy 



ii'. id Office and San Francisco branches. 
For the half-year ending December 31. 1925, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four lit per cent per annum on all savings 
Leposits, payable on and after January 2, 
1926, Dividends nol called for are added to 
mil bear the same rate of Interest as the 
principal from January 1. 1926. Savings de- 
poslts made on the first business day of anv 
month lor ..n or before lie- 10th day of Janu- 

ary, April. July ami October) will earn Inter- 
est from the first of that mouth: deposits 

made after said dale will earn Interest fr 

the first of the following month. 

JAMES A. BACIGAXUPI, President. 



The Hibernia Savings and 
Loan Society 

Main office, corner Market, McAllister and 
-Tunes sis,: Mission office, corner Valencia and 
22d sts. — For the half-year endinc l'ecemher 
.11. 192r,. a dividend his been declared at the 
rate of four 14) per cent per annum on all de- 
posits, payable mi and after January ". 1926 
Dividends not drawn win be added to depos- 
itors' accounts, become a part thereof, and 
will earn dividends from January l. I92»:. 
Deposits made "n or before January 11, r.>2i;. 
will earn interest from January II 

E. J. TOBIN. President. 



January 9, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 




THERE'S something about a cold that just stays with 
you, and even haunts you for weeks after it has osten- 
sibly been bidden a fervid if not fond adieu. Probably the 
worst of all is a cold in the head, which makes food taste 
like burnt cabbage, and tobacco smoke like the last stray wisps 
from the back yard bonfire. 

The newspapers are full of advice on how to keep from get- 
ting colds, but offer little constructive criticism of those who 
seem to derive so much pleasure from spreading them in 
street cars, on trains, in waiting rooms and in our so-called 
clown town canyons of business. Editors are that way. They 
will tell you to eat plenty of vegetables, when most of them 
are out of season, and to sleep out of doors, when the ma- 
jority of us live in apartments, far removed from the open 
spaces, and are treated to plenty of draughts from elevator 
shafts, and believers in the open door policy. 

What editors lack in genuine medical knowledge they make 
up for by hiring expert diagnosticians, so-called, to describe 
the common symptoms of maladies to which humans are, it 
is alleged, subject. After reading a few paragraphs of such 
stuff, a fellow has to be of pretty stolid countenance to come 
through the ordeal, unflinching and undismayed. 

It seems that a hot mustard-water foot bath still reigns su- 
preme as the cheapest and most uncomfortable way of check- 
ing the common cold, which causes several billions of dollars 
to be lost to doctors and hospitals every year. Next in im- 
portance comes the hot lemonade, with a stiff proportion of 
whiskey or brandy. Since neither of the latter two ingredients 
are now available, tbe old hot toddy lias been going by the 
boards. The questionable liquor now doled oul by gentlemen 
of ill-repute makes a man wonder if, alter all, it isn't better 
to wake up with the same cold than to nol wake up at all. 
Lastly come all the ancient remedies taken from the loi 
old ladies, when ladies really grew old. These consisl of onion- 

juice, made with sugar and slowlj cooked oi the back of the 
base burner; little pink pills that the doctor prescribi 
some one of tbe family thirt) years back, aspirin and quinine. 
There are others — far too main to mention. 

It is interesting to read now and again oi Mine one or other 
who has never had a cold in \u< <<v her life. It i- also inter- 
esting to know that tbe art of lying gracefully ant forcefully 
lias not become a losl ar.. hm i- -homing improvement in 
some respects, 

There are a number oi things that are diffii mIi to accomplish 
when afflicted with a cold in tin- head or a tickle in the t! 
The hardest, perhaps, is to make love; die second hardest to 

keep the nose iroin getting red. and the (bird most difficult is 

to remember bow you Fell before you had one. 

Sometimes we rather envy those Fortunate plutocrats who 
can afford a trip to Florida. Down there colds go under tbe 
guise of haj fever, for red noses can grow where 
flourish quite healthily. However, if we had nothing to do 
but sell sea-bottom lot- and pitch hi -. we might nol 

he troubled with colds eii 

As matters stand, a cold i* interfering dreadfully with tbe 
composition of this article. Rather than make matters worse, 
the writer i- going to retire and put in practice every remedy 
of which be has ever beard — may the best one win! Selab ! 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MAS< i.\ 

Phone Prospect 61 

«^REVUE^ 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 



WIGS and TRANSFORMATIONS 

Also toupees of my make can be worn day or night, 
because I make them ventilated and porous, from the 
finest and purest hair. 

G. LEDERER 

561 Sutter St., Between Powell and Mason Sts. 
San Francisco, California. 

Firm Established 1866 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the-* 

VALLEY of the MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks JT'ii/t Mushrooms " 

Clean Ruomi, Clean I. inert. Clean BvtfJ thing 

\ nit SOTMM*. Cannt^'l Pavou RcMrti ami Miner* I (Warm W«ietJ Swimming 

Tank* From Thi» Hotel. 

Rate* Exceptionally Reaionnlile. 

Telephone 110 



Health and Cleanliness first 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 



250 Twelfth St., Sah Francisco 



'Phone Musket 916 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

SaHa PreMed Bv Hand Only -Suil. Called For and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Partita* Dyeing and Cleaning 
»W Post *r*x>rr S*n ItouKlMo 

In \ UK. I MA HOTIX 



Prtowi Fumun 2310 



AGUA C ALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 

It's the water and the table — Now dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions Radio-active, hot sulphur water luh hatha and swim- 
ming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. h. COR- 
CORAN, Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. 



J. SPAULDING & COMPANY 

Thr Original Pionr*r Carpet Cl+anerg 

f 'TUUKHtD 1164 

Oldett and Large*! Ettablithmen! on the Paeifte Co-aat 
No Van Connected With Any Other Firm liing Nam* af SPAL'LDINC 
3S7 TlHiot M«W7- Phrm Docclas MM 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 9, 1926 



WIELANDS BREW 

WITH YOUR MEALS— IT HELPS 

Order by the case from your grocer 

Established 1868 

Main Office. 240 Second Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 671 



The PIONEER 



Name 

on a l>»»x of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
et-, menns rom- 
plete satis fac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 

utt-mntHii^ ^-ir ^u n 3a^?es. ho, * 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 




TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES I 
Han Francisco — liurllnKame 

Went, 7»» 478 



P/ione Sutter 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

Clockmakers and Watchmakers 

CHIME, ANTIQUE ANL) COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

209 PoNt Street at Grant Avenue 

San FrnnclMCO. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



816 EMERSON ST. 



SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



Advice on Planting 

One hears so much nowadays and 
reads so many articles about Perennial 
Borders that it is well worth one's while 
to plan during this month for the selec- 
tions one wants to arrange in the gar- 
den and all Perennials planted before 
the New Year will give an abundance 
of spring blossoms. Many can be 
started now from seed in the open 
ground and thinned out as they get too 
thick as Go letia. Hollyhock, Foxglove. 
Snapdragon, Lupine, Sweet William, 
Columbine, Alyssum, Candytuft, and 
many others. 

For plants to set out this month one 
can get winter blooming stocks, Can- 
terbury Bells, Wallflower, Gillardia — 
the new Jubilee-Pentstemons, Geums, 
Oriental Poppies, Pinks (Dianthus), 
Anemone, Japonica, Phlox, Delphi- 
nium, Michaelmas Daisy, Thalictruin, 
Scabiosa, Verbena. 

All of the above can now be sep- 
arated, placed in better locations to 
give color combinations, or if you have 
found a plant has not thrived as well 
as it should, try transplanting it, re- 
working the soil ; give it more sunshine 
or more shade. Foxgloves and Co- 
lumbine love shade. Gillardias and 
Michaelmas Daisies love the sun. From 
most of these there should be a con- 
tinuous blossoming period all through 
the summer on the Pacific Coast and 
it is possible even in a small garden to 
have flowers at all times for the house. 

While the planting of shrubbery is 
the essential frame as it were for the 
house and keeps the gardens here in 
the West from the barren look even 
through the winter, do not forget a 
garden means flowers, and a gardener 
who cannot raise flowers is like the 
keeper of a model poultry farm whose 
hens do not lay. 

Often persons, who have large well- 
kept homes and a gardener, say that 
there are never any blossoms for the 
house. I would not have a gardener 
who could not raise flowers for my 
home and to keep the garden bright. 

Anemones should not be moved from 
a shaded position and resent trans- 
planting. 

For low border plants Aubretia and 
Primula Malacoides are very free 
winter bloomers and the little blue 
Viola is a perfect joy all winter long. 
The apricot color and the yellow Viola 
are not so hardy nor such good bloom- 
ers. — From the "Home Designer." 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Ofllce and Works inn Mission St. 

Phone Market 71)13 

Branch Otllce: 780 Suiter SI. 

(Hotel Canterbury Bids:.) 

Phone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 




*,U,MU '... 



N. w CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




NEW ORLEANS 

Nm>^t%rb 

To better serve our many friends and patrons 
over '300,000x10 has been expended in recon- 
struction and rehabilitation to maintain this 
famous hostelry as 

One of America's Leading Hotels 

The large well ventilated high ceiling rooms 
have been retained and modernized'*''™' 

ACCOMMODATING OVER 1000 QUESTS 

Soul lor Descriptive Hotel Folder: 

Illustrated Mardi-vrasftigram for the asking 

Alfred S.Ajvier andCoului. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA 

■"VTid.n Offices ofallTtansporutianlinefialooby 




I 



WHERE TO DINE 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, 51.00 35c. 50c, 75c $1.00,51.50 a la carle 

Dancing 7:00 P. M. to 1:00 A. M. 

363 Sutler Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

special parties arranged 
headquarters for theatrical people 
hattie mooser minnie c. mooser 




ICE CREAf% 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 




and. 



334- Sutter St. 



£Xeanor\5 



L 



445 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast. 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



l: 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2: JO 
and tea from 3 to 5 



Douglas 7118 



CAMILLA'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants" lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing' rooms for banquets and parties, seating 1 75 to 100 people. 



O'Farrell and D f A ]\I €~* €^% * ^ n,0,,c 

Larkin SU. *-■ *-*^"^ 1 ^ ^^ V-T %J Franklin 9 

Luncheon ( 11 :30 lo 2 p. m.) $ .75 No \ i'ltnr Should Lmti thl CttJ W,t), 

Sunday Luncheon 1.00 nul Dtnbl| bo Iftf. Kinr., Cal> 

Dinner, Week Days ..._ $1.50 in America 

Dinner, Sumlaya and Holidays 1.T5 

DANCING SI NDA1 i- \ \ NINC8 



NO A H'S 
ARK 

f»3 Third Avrnur, BAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cook lop 
Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m 
5:30 p. m. to 8:S0 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
t :30 to 8:50 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVKHV MOMJA1 
Half Ittnck from Highway 



»H 



1* Mm Hovu 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

Dm «<H> A. H. TO 11 M P. U. 

1 n50rfas3ed ci 1sine 
Carl Leonhardi 

formtrhr of 
Golden C.te Park Cafio. 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigoroux brushing once or twice a day is 
taking; very good care of them, Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There nre gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed f Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks on: all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; < tonus: Self Cleaning Bridges; 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plntes 



SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic. 



DR. B. W. HAINES 

DENTIST 
Elkan Gunst Building 

323 Geary at Powell Hours: 9 to 4 

San Francisco Telephone Douglas 2949 



St. Mary's Academy 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



.Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HAkGEN S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tlllmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Hume of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf. Root. Morrell, etc.. of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



• Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

A>D PHI. BJLDBR'S LIBRARY 

1 239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.. £ 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Battled at itie Sprtnts" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

23* Clara Thial Ciiishl 844 



J\fovdly 

Quaint customs of other lands and other 
peoples — queer head dresses of tribes 
who wear little else— strange and enter- 
taining pictures gathered from all parts 
of the earth are shown every Sunday in 
The Chronicle Rotagravure. 

Make it a point to see this delightful 
pictorial section every week. Have The 
Sunday Chronicle delivered to your 
home. 



Ban iFranrisra 



ROTAGRAVURE 




winter 

exclusion 

Pares 

to many points 

Save 
moneys 

Week-end tickets, on 
sale Friday, Satur- 
day and Sunday- 
s-day return limit. 
Season tickets, on 
sale daily— return 
limit 90 days. 

For full information, 
ask— 

Southern 
Pacific 



Ferry Station Third Street Station 

65 Geary Street 

Or Phone Sutter 4000 



OUR AIM FOR 1926 

To render a dependable service — 

To the greatest possible number of 
people — 

Thru a liberal extension policy, 

And always at the lowest possible 
cost consistent with the class of 
service rendered. 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 




"PACIFIC SERVICE" 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 



i r 



Golden Gate Ferry 
Company 

S 

WINTER SCHEDULE 

Effective October 1, 1925 



Leave Sausalito 

5:00 a. m. 

6:00 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

Every Half 

Hour Until 

10:00 p.m. 

Then 

11:00 p.m. 

12:00 p.m. 

1 :00 a. m. 



Leave San Francisco 

5:30 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

7:00 a. m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:30 p.m. 

Then 

11:30 p.m. 

12:30 a.m. 

1 :30 a. m. 



Saturdays and Sundays Only 
2:00 a.m. 2:30 a.m. 

ON SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

There will be extra trips if traffic warrants. 



A O. Stewart 

President 



Harry E. Speas 

Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



V AUTO SHOW- Jan. 30 to Feb. 6, incl. 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 16th, 1926 




$5.00 PER YEAR 




OXE 

FORTY 

N EW 

MONTGOMERY 

STREET 



.\ < n Coast Division 
Pacific Telephone and 
Telegraph Building. 
Sun Francisco, i ali ' . 




Reached 

■via 
Golden Gate 

Ferry 

Font of Hyde St. 

San Francisco 



Scenes 
Along the 
Redwood 
Highway 

Sec Page 1? 

Sec Page 16 




ElUblWitd July tO, IBM 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1884 to 1925. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 225 Montgomery St., San Francisco. California! 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postofflce as second-class matter. London Office: .Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, ?5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 16, 1926 



No. 



gambling 



With E. FARRAND ROSS 



Mrs. Grundy 

Like the "old man of the sea," Mrs. Grundy fastens on 
the necks of a good majority of the people of all countries, 
as soon as they are able to toddle, and there she stays until 
they "shuffle off this mortal coil." 

In all their thoughts, in all their deeds, she is the control- 
ling power. Never do they take a step forward, never do 
they contemplate a change in their daily routine, without the 
idea back of their actions: "What will 'they' think of this?" 
("They" in this case,- being that nosey old lady, "Mrs. 
Grundy.") 

Generous impulses are often stifled ; the entertainment of 
some enterprise, business or social, is stopped almost before 
its birth; any alteration of one's personal regime is cast aside, 
because of what "people might say;" the whole happiness ol 
some soul is wrecked, for the reason that the weak human 
being has not the courage of his convictions. 

In almost all such cases the people in question are of small 
importance in the world in general ; are given to introspection, 
self-analysis, to such an extent that they lose all sense of pro- 
portion and originality, and are so self-centered, so afraid 
of the opinion of that tiny circle in which they move, that the 
knowledge of the world's perfect indifference to their actions. 
never seeps into their cramped intelligence. 

You will find that people of this sort seldom if ever, "make 
their mark" in history, for the reason that their timidity holds 
them back in the big procession of life. They arc hag-ridden 
by Mrs. Grundy to their grave-. 

* * * 
Beauty Shows 

There are certain car lines in our good gray city, certain 
streets, that can boast of "beauty shows" at some hour or 
other, every day in the week. Come down town on the Cali- 
fornia and' Hyde street cars, around 8:30 till 9:00 o'clock. 
A. M. and watch the furred and feathered femininity make 
their entrance and exit. 

Here conies a veritable daughter of the Emerald Isle, brown 
locks, red cheeks, eyes with a spark of Irish tire still left in 
their depths, through generations of American-born anci 
(blue Irish eves, "put in with a dirty finger." > with that soft. 



indescribable Celtic charm about her that always makes its 
appeal to the susceptible. 

You find yourself looking into the great brown orbs of an 
unmistakable "daughter of the Dons." proud, slightly arched 
nose; curved, generous mouth; creamy olive skin; small, well- 
set ears, and an erect carriage, all unconscious of its haughty 
source ! 

Here is Variety! 

Your glance passes on to the blonde maiden beside her: 
here is the perfect English type. — peachy skinned; curved 
mouth, with its short upper lip; blue eyes, dark lashes, curl- 
ing yellow hair, and an atmosphere about her that someway 
takes your fancy into green English tiebls. quiet English lanes; 
comfortable, jolly country squires. 

"Gretchen" then claims your attention. Rather slow-mov- 
ing, stolid, is this fair lady, with her wide dreamy eyes of 
China blue : pale skinned, with short, stubby nose, and ashy- 
gold hair, arranged in "doughnuts" over her ears; an almost 
Oriental calm breathing from her presence. "Dutch or Ger- 
man descent." you tell yourself, and picture her forebears trot- 
ting along by some windmilled lane, or picturesque canal, in 
their clumsy wooden clogs. 

And "La lielle France" throws you a sparkling glance, and 
over in the corner of the car a Japanese Lily s'ares at you 
out of piquantly slanting "Windows of the soul." 

The All-round American 

Here and there you can pick out a certain beauty that is 
typically San Franciscan: that is. typical as regards her groom- 
ing, her clipped hair; her well-shaped legs and feet, her air 
of unconscious sophistication, if you know what I mean! But 
out of this galaxy of loveliness it is most difficult to choose 
any one of these pretty business girls, and say : "Now here 
is the real, dyed in the silk. Calif ornian !" For a harbor town 
lias an appeal for all sorts and conditions of men. from all 
parts of the globe, and these young creatures, with their inde- 
pendence, their good clothes, their charm are the descend- 
ants of peoples born under many flags. 
» * * 

" If this cold weather keeps up." says my friend, the ele- 
vator man. "We'll all be dancing the Cbarle- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 16, 1926 




The tide has begun to run fast against the 
The Tide is Volstead Act and all the ignominious and 
Running debasing activities which have formed part 

of its administration. People are getting to 
be more outspoken in their condemnation and the evil done 
by the officious and unpatriotic system of espionage and 
corruption employed by the government agents is ceasing 
to terrorize. 

We note that Mrs. Kahn, our congressional representa- 
tive, has shown rare initiative and courage in the expression 
of her views which will find a very ready echo among her 
constituents and endear her to the liberty-loving people of 
this city. She speaks with lashing scorn of the supporters 
of the act who desire to have every rule of decency and 
American manhood destroyed, that they may enforce their 
will upon the community. She says that they want per- 
mission to lie and to trespass, to violate the age-old privil- 
eges of our people, as members of the Anglo-Saxon race, 
with its traditions of orderly government and the protection 
of the rights of the individual man, is a right which they 
claim. Our courts, or, rather, those of our courts which 
have not yielded to the shameful clamor, have had to up- 
hold the rights of the individual in this community against 
the attacks of the members of a government sworn to obey 
the constitution. 

And more than this privilege of destroying the fabric of 
the law these Yolsteaders clamor for money. They are 
always wanting money and more money to enforce the 
law ; then they take money and more money from the boot- 
leggers not to enforce the law. There never was such a 
shamelessly greedy crew. Year by year their demands upon 
the treasury for law enforcement grow greater. Year by 
year enforcement grows more and more ludicrous and we 
are driven to the position of seeing our most treasured con- 
ception of honesty in administration flouted and betrayed. 

It is a great satisfaction that not only our congressional 
representative but two other congresswomen are taking 
issue with the administration of the Volstead Act. 



Of course the fundamental underlying 
A Non-Voting idea of our government is that it is one 
Republic by the people, in which the people them- 

selves take part and for which they dis- 
play enthusiasm and eager partisanship. But the reality 
is very different from the ideal and we are fast becoming 
a country of non-voters. How long a republican govern- 
ment can stand up against the apathy of its own citizens is 
a matter of concern. At any rate, this non-participation in 
the affairs of the community is bound to bring with it its 
own penalty. 

That the evil is a real one is apparent on the best autho- 
rity. They are now preparing the great register of voters 
for the next election. Citizens register, but they do not 
vote. This is again a very puzzling condition of things. 
Why should one trouble to register and again not trouble 
to vote? Our registrar of voters, J. Harry Zemansky, sa\> 
that one may be able to register eighty per cent of the quali- 
fied voters, but that not more than fifty per cent will record 
their opinions at the polls. 

The evil is comparatively new. Twenty-five years ago, we 
are told, ninety per cent of the registered voted. Why? 

The reasons given are numerous. Mr. Zemansky thinks 
that the fact that election day is a holidav is a deterrent fac- 



tor and that many people leave town rather than stay and 
vote. But, as a matter of fact, election days are not much 
recognized as holidays. The offices, with the exception of 
the public offices, run as usual, and the great masses of man- 
ual workers are not affected by the fact of election holidays 
in the courts and public offices. The evil is deeper. 

F. Dumont Smith, chairman of the American Bar Asso- 
ciation, says that the decay of party politics, party organi- 
zation and party responsibility is the most determining 
factor in the new state of affairs. We are inclined to agree 
with him. The primary election laws and such legislation 
proceeded upon hypothesis that the people as such were 
vitally interested. That hypothesis is a fallacy. 



The World Court controversy is now 
The World Court at a point where the feelings and emo- 
tions of the community are aroused and 
partisan expressions are the order of the day. All sorts of 
foolish criticisms are therefore current and the perspective 
of the matter is in danger of being lost. For example, com- 
plaint is made that certain rich people, conspicuously Mr. 
Bok, are using money for the purpose of propaganda in 
favor of the World Court. The complaint has no basis.- 
They are quite entitled to use their funds for any legitimate 
purpose and it would be impossible to sav that the World 
Court is not a legitimate proposition. 

On the other hand, the protagonists of the World Court 
are by no means careful in their animadversions and en- 
deavor to convey the impression that those who are opposed 
to the Court are opposed to the progress of humanity and 
the development of the spirit of good will among nations. 
This is equally foolish, with the foregoing complaints on 
the other side. ( Ine may be dead against war, quite in favor 
of the pacific determination of disputes between nation;., 
a convinced advocate of arbitration, and still be against the 
World Court. 

There is on the part of many Americans, we think en- 
tirely justifiably, a very pronounced opinion against being 
involved in matters with other nations which might lead 
either to alliances or conflict. We are. we think, self-sustain- 
ing; we have no ax to grind ; we desire no property not our 
own ; we have no part in the racial hates and national tradi- 
tional quarrels of Europe. Perhaps, therefore, there is no 
need for us to take part in any co-operation with European 
nations which might endanger our autonomy. 

There is the question. Let the World Court advocates 
convince us. if they can, that we are running no risks to 
our security in dabbling with the matter. The debate should 
be maintained on a high plane. 



The decision of the United States 
Supreme Court and Supreme Court, which held that 
Community Tax there was no rebate of income cax, 

upon the ground that community 
property is not common property in the State of California, 
has fallen with great force upon the legal profession and 
the financial interests of this state. The court held that 
women had only an "expectancy" in the community prop- 
erty. This is a conclusion which is very vehemently con- 
tested here. 

Since the decision, there has been a rapid development of 
events, as a result. Senator Shortridge presented to the 
Senate Finance Committee, during the consideration of the 
new revenue bill, his own plan to amend the bill to remedy 
the situation, by having Congress permit the Treasury to 
recognize for taxation purposes the eight states where com- 
munity property laws are now effective. Commissioner 
Blair ordered an investigation of the law in the eight com- 
munity property states with the view of withdrawing the 
privilege they have all enjoyed with the exception of Cali- 
fornia, in filing separate returns by husbands and wives. 



January 16, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Assistant Attorney-General Willebrandt declares that the 
decision will have a similarly adverse effect upon the col- 
lection of estate taxes in California and other states. It is 
said that the other community property states, except Cali- 
fornia will be obliged to pay over millions to the government 
in back income taxes. 

There is no question that the decision is one of the most 
far reaching in the history of the country, in recent years, 
at least. Some, if not all, of our best lawyers here are con- 
vinced that the interest of the wife in community property 
is no mere expectancy, but that the interest is very definite 
and immediate. It will be interesting to see if the court 
grants a rehearing. 



The Farthest Promontory 

By John G. Brayton 



There is to be a Senate enquiry into 
Belated Foolery the action of the Department of Justice 
or, rather the inactivity of that body, 
in not prosecuting the Aluminum Company of America 
under the anti-trust act. This sounds like an echo from the 
dead past. We thought that we were all agreed that the 
trust, taking it by and large, was a distinct social gain and 
that the whole world, our own country in particular, is bet- 
ter and richer for the organization of that American prod- 
uct, known as the trust. 

To proceed against this particular trust is nothing more 
or less than an attack upon the Secretary of the United 
States Treasury. Mr. Mellon is one of the greatest of living 
financiers and has done more than any one else for the re- 
habilitation of the finances of the country, after the war 
and the re-establishment of, not only normally, but excep- 
tionally, prosperous conditions in the United States. Happy 
is the country that can boast of the possession of such a 
man in its time of need. 

But all this does not count in politics. Mr. Mellon is a 
rich man. He is the aider and abettor of rich corporations. 
He has built up great institutions which have, in their turn, 
brought wealth and security to the country. That is enough 
to make him an object of dislike to many people. There are 
those of such distorted and wry minds that they cannot 
view with equanimity the possession of more than ordinary 
ability on the part of any one. The fact that Mr. Mellon is 
a financial and industrial organizer of peculiarly di's'.in- 
guished rank, marks him off as a person to be attacked and 
calumniated. 

And, with regard to this Aluminum Company, which is 
the trust complained of, there is no doubt at all that under 
the guidance of Mr. Mellon it has secured for this country 
the practical control of aluminum, an achievement which 
should count for a great deal in the eyes of any sensible 
American. 



We have the utmost sympathy 
A Conscientious Bar with and approval for the move 

that has been lately made by the 
Inwycrs of San Francisco to so establish their profession 
that most of the criticism, now directed against those who 
follow it, will be obviously and palpably wrong and unjust. 
We have, therefore, approved of the various devices which 
have from time to time been employed to purge the pro- 
fession of undesirable elements and insure a fair and up- 
right bar. 

All that is very well. On the other hand, zeal for a clean 
bar should not bring about injustice nor cause attorneys 
to be disbarred for offenses, which are not moral offenses 
and which are not detrimental to the community. In fact. 
there should be the greatest care used to protect the attor- 
ney who espouses unpopular causes and who, by virtue 31 
his advocacy of people or idea* which are under the con- 
demnation of the public, exposes himself to financial 'oss 
and sometimes to persona] danger. 

(Continued on Page 13) 



"\ X 7"E HARDLY know yet what people we are building up, 
V V and how high a place in human history we are going to 
attain." — Editorial, News Letter, January 9. 

A sentence full of suggestion ! A theme for epic poets ! 

Westward, ever Westward has been the trend of civilization. 
From a period far beyond earliest recorded history, driven on 
by an Urge not even yet understood, man has sought higher and 
better ways of living. Westward from somewhere in Asia, 
perhaps, westward at least from the direction of Asia, wave 
after wave of human life has swept, carrying or destroying all 
before it. And each succeeding tide was more advanced in the 
arts than the last. 

The crushing or rooting up of an established people and the 
supplanting of it by another was nothing to the Power that 
gave the thrust. The establishing and destroying of religions 
went on with a sure and relentless force, each new form being 
better than the last. Westward, ever westward ! 

Nothing stopped these people. No desert, no height or peak, 
no stream or sea, could more than halt them temporarily. Cities 
were established only to be destroyed, temples were erected only 
to be cast down, faiths were inculcated only to be discarded. 

Men thought it was desire for wealth that led them to the 
discovery of the Xew World; they believed it was a mastering 
love of liberty that fixe 1 them on the coldest and least inviting 
shores of that land. Men believed they were seeking gold 
when they toiled across the plains, through hardship and peril 
to the most beautiful region of the greatest of continents. They 
did not know it was the irresistible Impulse speeding them on 
toward the ultimate purpose. 

Now, on the last promontory of this mainland the flood of 
human life has come to pause. Only earth's farthest sweeping 
sea lies between this people and the cradle whence their life 
is believed to have Sprung. The globe has been almost circled. 
In the path is to be found the best product of tireless and rest- 
less energy ; cities, nations, civilizations. But these are all ma- 
terial ; something spiritual is to be desired. 

Facing westward and on tiptoe, impelled still more strongly 
by the cumulative force of the ages, stand the inhabitants of 
the coast. Well may it he said that we do not know what people 
we are building up! These people are different — not a Chosen 
People, hut different. This divergence has been noticed. Emo- 
tional, capable, confident, these men are equal to anything. 

The present unrest is spiritual, wistful. There is no form of 
enlightenment in the belted world that is satisfactory. All 
that has been done must he destroyed and replaced with some- 
thing better. What shall it he? It must take on a more spirit- 
ual form, whatever it is. 

America's mission has only been guessed at; it has nowhere 
nearly been fulfilled. And this mission will he accomplished by 
a very few of the millions dwelling here. Like the army of 
Gideon, these few will he chosen by test and trial. They will 
arise in the West. 

The part that commerce plays in this great affair is very im- 
portant. Men believe they are carrying on business for the 
-ake of business when, in fact, they are acting as tools in the 
hands of an Omnipotent Will for the accomplishment of a 
desired end. Commerce may lead the Californians to Asia and 
thev may be confident they are going for the sake of commerce, 
but that is only a small consideration. The Westerners will 
occupy Asia to plant a supercivilization on the very soil of the 
birthplace of their ancestors. For it is a law that those who 
do not use the land they occupy to the fullness of its resources 
will lose their rights to those that will do so. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 16, 1926 



« ■ t 



Pleasure's Ww 




OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore, 





Columbia 

SAX FRANCISCO once more prove 1 
"she knows how" in every sense of 
the word, when Monday evening 
at the C o- 
1 n m b i a the 
most brilliant. 
largest and 
most fashion- 
able audience 
turned out to 
honor two of 
her "Native 
Sons," Charles 
Tempi eton 
Crocker and 
Joseph Red- 
ding at the 
American pre- 

Knluerine Schwartz miere of their 

opera "Fay Yen Fah." 

The house itself offered as brilliant a 
spectacle as the gorgeous stage. The wo- 
men were attired in beautiful gowns and 
wore magnificent jewels, while the men 
provided a splendid background in their 
conventional evening dress. 

The authors were offered a wonderful 
tribute at the end of the second act. and 
seldom has one seen such beautiful floral 
tributes as went over the footlights to the 
cast. 

This opera was first written for a Bo- 
hemian Club Jinks in 1917. Last year, 
it won instant success when presented 
at Monte Carlo. The story is based on 
the mythology of old China, and the 
theme of the opera is that love is omnipo- 
tent against any power of evil. It carries 
a beautiful story, and has a universal ap- 
peal. 

The settings were gorgeous, with the 
most elaborate costumes. Joseph 
Schwartz, the distinguished Russian bari- 
tone, was the Fox God. and did himself 
very well. Rene Maison, French tenor, 
had the star part as the lover, and lived 
up to his every opportunity. He has a 
voice of wide range and sang beautifully. 

Lucie Berthrand, tiny French prima 
donna, did very well, considering her 
youth, and has a winsome personality, 
which captured the audience at once. 
Giovanni Martino, the basso, sang ad- 
mirably with line dramatic effect, in his 
role of the viceroy. 

The music is quite Wagnerian in style, 
with some lovely haunting melodies, par- 
ticularly the love theme. The Ballet of 
the Lilies was a perfect poem, as was also 
the Poppy Ballet. There was splendid 



(Conducted by Katherine Schwartz) 

work done by the chorus, well trained by 
Giuseppe Papi, and Merola had his or- 
chestra well trained also. 



The French Theater 

La Gaite Francaise, San Francisco's 
unique French play house, which re- 
sumed its sixth season last week, will 
again repeat this Wednesday and Friday. 
its new comedy success, "Chateau His- 
torique." a comedy by Bisson, the well 
known author of "The Surprises of the 
Divorce." This comedy, presented very 
entertainingly by a clever cast, headed by 
Andre Ferrier. and amid one of the most 
gorgeous settings ever seen here, has 
packed to capacity the newly redecorated 
French playhouse and will continue to be 
given each Wednesday and Friday ol 
this month with a special matinee Satur- 
day, Jan. 30th. On account of the Season 
of Opera, the other two matinees will be 
omitted. * * * 

Golden Gate 

I Ine of the biggest shows of the cur- 
rent season is announced for this theater 
next week, the headline atraction being 
"The Dance Club." 1 [any Delmar and 
Jeanette Hackett's fifth annual vaude- 
ville revue, containing some fifteen people 
in the act. A second beautiful act is that 
of Jerry and her Baby Grands, known all 
over the world as America's premier 
piano quartette. Four white baby grands 
played by beautiful girls in quaint old 
fashioned costumes make a great hit. 

Eddie Clayton and Frank Lennis are 
nut comedians with ability to win hearty 
laughs in a sketch called "A Sundae in 
London;" Billy Shone, formerly a well 
known monologist, and now teamed with 
Louise Squire, beautiful model and songs- 
tress, have a novel offering calle 1 "Lobbie 
Follies;" Jack King and George I'.eatty 
have a nonsensical turn known as "Ar- 
tistic Apple Sauce;" The Duponts, danc- 
ing jugglers, please with a "Study of 
Nonsense.' 1 

The screen feature is "The Scarlet 
Saint." featuring Alary Astor and Lloyd 
Hughes. There will he the usual short 
films and a concert by Claude Sweden's 
orchestra, and Grace Rollins Hunt at the 
organ. * * * 

Granada 

Next week the Granada offers "What 
Happened to Jones," a screen adaptation 
of George Broadhurst's farce, and star- 
ring Reginald Denny. 



California 

This theater offers the first showing of 
the sensational picture "Havoc," a story 
of love and war. George O'Brien. San 
Francisco's own star and son of Chief of 
Police Daniel J. O'Brien, has his most 
important role so far in this picture. 
There is a strong supporting cast. Alia 
Burgess, prima donna, who made her de- 
but last week with Max Dolin's orchestra, 
remains over for a second week. 

* * * 

Capitol 

Following "Kosher Kitty Kelly," which 
cli ses at this theater tonight, will be seen 
the great UFA picture in a return en- 
gagement. "Siegfried." Those who did 
not see this picture when it played here 
he fore, should not miss this opportunity 
of seeing it now. 

* * * 

Loew's Warfield 

A comparative newcomer to the screen. 
although already well known, is Dorothy 
Sebastian, regarded as one of the most al- 
luring figures in lilmdom, and who is 
starred in the new offering at the War- 
field the coming week. "Seven Wives." 
Those who have seen pre-views of the 
picture say that Dorothy stands out prom- 
inently in the starry galaxy, which for a 
newcomer is glory enough! 

This is a highly diverting comedy with 
a must unusual supporting cast. Blanche 
Sweet. Li is Wilson. Ben Lyon. Diana 
Kane. Sam Hardy and others. 

t In the stage the presentation will be 
ano'.her gorgeous revue staged by Fan- 
chon and Marco, featuring the sensa- 
tional dancers, The Berkoffs. It is called 
"Arabesque," a Persian fantasy, and be- 
sides the ballet will he seen the Simon- 
dette Sextette, the Sunkist Beauties and 
Walt Roesner and his soloists. 

International films and a comedy round 
out a strong program of splendid enter- 
tainment. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

The International singer of songs. Miss 
Nora Hayes, "our own Nora," returns to 
the ( hpheum for a brief engagement he- 
ginning tomorrow matinee. She will be 
seen in her latest program of delightful 
comedy, smart songs, ami balladry. She 
is said to be more entrancing than ever 
before. 

Hughie Clark and company offer "Past 
and Present." with the assistance of Tom- 
my Monaco's Orchestra, a group of tal- 
ented musicians, foe Keno and Rosie 



January 16, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

VTOXT W'ERK 



ALEXANDRIA \ pictures 
Geary and 18th ( 


ALCAZAR | "Song and Dance Man" 
O'Fnrrell nr. Powell ( Henry Duffy Players 


CALIFORNIA I „ u „ 
•llh and Market S "avoc 


cameo | Jack Dempsey in 
»3« Market St. ("Manhattan Madness" 


CAPITOL / "Sienfried 
Ellin nr. Market f Siegfried 


CASINO I 

Mason and Ellis ( Pictures 


CASTRO I 

429 Castro St. ( Pictures 


/ S. F. Grand Opera Ct 

COLUMBIA < in Repertoire 


I URBAN ) .,_. _ 

Geary nr. Mason r The Gorilla 


EGYPTIAN ( Pictures 


golden GATE ( Vaudeville 

G. G. Ave. * Taylor [ 


GRANADA 1 "What Happened to 
1011(1 Market St. ( Jones" 


"*,,"* Pictures 
Hnlglit at Cole \ 


imperial I Charlie Chaplin in 
■077 Market St. j "The Gold Rush" 


LOEWS WARFIELD / 

»88 Market St. , "Seven Wives' 


MAJESTIC 1 

Mission between Pictures 

_(H li and 21st j 


METROPOLITAN I 

2or.r> Union St. i Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 

1:1211 Fillmore 
NEW MISSION 
lirifiO Mission 



Pictures 



ORPHEITM 1 ;, , ... 

OFarrell* Powell ( Vaudeville 


PANTAGES ( 

Market at Mason ( Vaudev.lle 


POMPBH ( Pictures 
Next to Grnnndn \ 


PORTOLA I 

771. Market St. j Pictures 


I'lllOSIDENT 1 

Market A McAllister ) "Thank-U" 


ROYAL I 

1:120 Polk St. ( Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS .iMna-." 
1.65 Market St. . Moana 


BUTTER 1 

Sutter and Stelner j Pictures 


UNION Mil 1111 j Pictures and 

ll'Farrellnr. Powell ( Vaudeville 


wilkes "All For You" 
Geary and Mason I 


WIGWAM 1 

Mission and 22d Pictures 



CONCERTS 

Clirrnn Thriller, — Mimln? Afternoitn 2:1.*. 
*»«n KrnnrUrn V mphnti * iirearstra. 



Green, great favorites here, will be seen 
in "A Hilarious Hodge Pudge;" the Wil- 
son Brothers, Frank and Joe, known the 
country over as "The American Yodlers." 
have a skit called "The Lieutenant and 
the Cop." These hoys were policemen 
in several of the large Eastern cities. 
Ruth Roye, comedienne of syncopation 
remains over for a second hig week, of- 
fering several new numbers ; Les Ghezzi, 
two clever equilibrists, are strong, force- 
ful and courageous; Edwin George has 
a skit called "A Comedy of Errors," 
and ihe Kiewnings will he seen in "An 
Aerial Sensation." 

* * * 
Alcazar 

(ieorge M. Cohan's latest laughfest, 
"The Song and Dance Man." starts to- 
morrow on its sixth week at the Alca- 
zar Theater, with Henry Duffy in the 
role of "Happy Farrell." the ambitious 
entertainer of vaudeville's small time, in 
which he has scored such a hit. 

Miss Winter, as always, is delightful. 
She looks and acts the part of the hard 
working performer, and she gets her 
chance to shine. As a magnate of the 
show business, William Davidson is de- 
serving of all the good things thai can he 
said of him. He is the center of 'he fun 
with William Macauley, Hetty Laurence 
and John Junior aiding him handsomely 
in keeping the audience good natured. 

Duffy has given the play a very capable 
company, inclu ling Dorothy Le Mar. Daj 
Man on. Ray L. Royce, Marie Sorrille 
Henry -Caubisens and Ben Harris. 

* * * 
President 

"Thank-U," the intensely human come- 
dy with Ji hn 1). ( > Mara in the most im- 
lortant role. i> the delightful attraction 
at the President Theater. Tomorrow 
• the fourth week of its run. 

This play has been aptly called the 
anii n plaj to Frank Bacon's classii . 

Iltnin' " I •'] Lira is delightful as 

the n ' pastor of a small village 

flock : I cue a Lane has the principal fem- 
inine role, that of an American girl reared 
in Paris, and transplanted to the atmos 
phere of a small town. 

ere is much gentle comedy, and the 
author, Winchell Smith, has given us a 
gr up of interesting characters, all well 
pi rtrayed by the cast selected by Henry 
Duffy, which includes Francis Fraunie. 
Kenneth Daigneau, William Abram. 
Helen Gihnore, Earl Lee. (dive Cooper, 

_..■ Webster, Charles Ldler. Frank 
I 'arien. Harriet McGibhon, Robert Reid, 
May Xannary and John Mackenzie. 

* * * 
Curran 

begins the la>t week 
of the popular e gagement of Ralph 
lelightful travesty, "The Gor- 
illa." at the Curran Theater. 

At every performance the hig audiences 

sit breathless, while amazing incidents 

ted before them, from the time 



the curtain is lifted on the first act, until 
the final curtain. 

Lon Hascall and Harry T. Shannon 
as the two "detectuffs," assisted by a 
line cast, are extremely funny, making 
the audience laugh with delight at their 
antics. 

* * * 

Wilkes 

"All For You" continues to delight 
the patrons at the Wilkes Theater, with 
William Gaxton in the star role. 1 le has 
a whimsicality all his own, and he is well 
aided by a very fine cast headed by petite 
little Nancy Welford, Madeline Camer- 
on and Ted Doner, of the famous danc- 
ing family. The sensational dancing of 
the famous English Rockets is another 
strong attraction, and there is a fine chor- 
us, well trained. 

(Continued on Page 18) 



Paul Elder Notes 

An illustrated lecture "The Truth 
\hout the South Seas" by Frederick L. 
Washburn, of the University of Minne- 
sota, will be given in the Paul Elder 
( rallery, Saturday afternoon, January 
23rd at 2 :30 o'clock The flood of ro- 
mantic literature about this faraway 
country in the lonely Pacific makes 
Mr Washburn's frank talk most timely 
and refreshing Following the lecture, 
a first showing will be made of moving 
pictures taken by Mr Washburn dur- 
ing his recent tour of this "Land of 
palms, ringed 'round with foam," and 
also of many beautiful colored slides 
made from original photographs 
' * * * 

An exhibition of etchings, woodcuts 
and lithographs by a distinguished 
group of European artists of the State 
Guild of Arts and Crafts, known as 
"The Blue Four." will open in the Paul 
Elder Gallery, Monday, January 18th. 
and continue for one week The col- 
lection affords a very valuable exhibit 
of the work of exponents of modern 
art — the picturing of moods and im- 
pressions, motion and light 

^you pay no more,g 



BESTFLOWEIg 




TTielibto y« Thousand Oardens' 

224-226 Gram- Ave. lei Kearny 4975 



Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

On fkC F.riKt of the HrrkHrr Hills 

BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
Set in a beautiful twenty-eight -acre 
park between Perk Hey and Oakland. 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 16, 1926 






Scintillating: Society 
Participates in Opera 

MAGNIFICENT as may be the opera in theme or pre- 
sentation ; glorious as may be the stars who sing their 
character roles; or brilliant as may be some particular occa- 
sion, there is always a contributing part which adds ma- 
terially and artistically to its substantial success. That scin- 
tillating part is society. 

San Francisco, famed for its hearty espousal of all that 
is superlatively artistic and scholarly ; and known through- 
out the musical world for an appreciation of opera and celeb- 
rities ; San Francisco, this week, has lived up to its reputa- 
tion with society's participation. 

The opening night of the opera season with which we are 
gloriously blessed, set a criterion for the following events. 
The fashionable of San Francisco, Burlingame, the penin- 
sula and the bay cities, radiantly essayed their roles and 
dressed up for the occasion. 

What a handsome array of prominent people and fashion- 
able personages! 

On their side of the footlights, society folks held to tradi- 
tion ! The beautiful women, the handsome gowns; the 
luxurious attires, the furs, the wraps, and all accessories. 
It has been a feast for the eyes, and pronounced, anew. S m 
Francisco — in opulence — city of music lovers and celebri- 
ties. 

* * * 

"Fay- Yen-Fah" took us by storm! 

We knew it would, but we didn't quite know all. The 
book by Templeton Crocker, the music by Joseph Redding, 
the American premiere in San Francisco, California. Those 
were the terms repeated on the lips of thousands who heard 
"Fay-Yen-Fah." 

Lucy Berthrand, in her role of the heroine, captivated 
San Francisco, as she has captivated thousands upon thou- 
sands before. Rene Maison, her luver in the three-act 
opera; Joseph Schwartz;, who essayed the "Spirit of Evil"; 
Giovanni Martino, the viceroy, and Edmond Warnery, the 
man who sang the part of tutor, registered something more 
than they know within the memories of San Francisco 
opera devotees. Famous singers we have heard, but some- 
how these people gripped us firmly! 

We are proud of the opera, prouder still of Mr. Crocker. 
Mr. Redding; and oh, gratefully proud of Gaetano Merola 
of the undaunted soul — the man who gives us — OPERA! 

Blanche Upright, the noted novelist, whose popular hooks 
find their way upon the screen to delight the world, has 
been a visitor, this past week, in the city of her early news- 
paper days. 

Mrs. Upright is completing her latest book, "The Altar 
of Friendship," which will, no doubt, like all her other well- 
known novels, become a stage production and later a cinema 
presentation. Every one who knows the charming and bril- 
liant writer of "True-to-Life" never has anything but a 
word of happiness fur her. It is because Blanche Upright 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

030 Hush Street, Between Powell and Stockton, Snn Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLBTHEN. Proprietor 



By Antoinette Arnold 

has so much happiness to impart, that she attracts rays of 



sunshine, no doubt. Author of "The Valley of Content," 
"The Losing Gain," "Half a Chance," "Pleasure Mad," this 
famous novelist is probably one of the best loved of all our 
San Francisco writers. 

She and her husband, Mr. Louis Upright, have a mag- 
nificent home in Hollywood, where they are as popular 
among the literary folks and the big producers in filmland 
as they are here in the city which claims Blanche Upright 
its "product." 

In a recent declaration concerning Hollywood and Holly- 
wood people, Mrs. Upright asserted ardent belief in motion 
picture people whose mythical "wildness" she attributed to 
imaginary people. 

Blanche Upright, is ever an ardent supporter of people 
and things in whom she believes — that is one of the character- 
istics which permeates her books, her stage plays and her 
stories of the screen. "It is a principle with Blanche," so 
say her friends, "because she, herself, lives the life of noble 
heartedness and close application to an ideal." 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Drum, Mr. and Mrs. George Pope, 
Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron, Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. 
Martin, gave a supper dance at the St. Francis following 
the night of the first opera. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Crocker, Mrs. Crocker Whitman, 
Mr. Prescott Scott and Mr. Gurney Newlin gave a dinner 
party in honor of Mr. Templeton Crocker and Mr. Joseph 
Redding on the night of their opera, "Fay-Yen-Fah." 

* * * 

Others who entertained were: Mrs. Adolph Spreckels, 
who had for her guests, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander de Bret- 
ville. Miss Alma Spreckels and Miss Dorothy Spreckels and 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Lowery, who were with Mr. and Mrs. 
George Leib. 

Mrs. Tobin Clark entertained during the opera for Miss 
Marion Hollins of New York, Miss Helen Chesebrough, 
Admiral Alexander Hatsted. Mr. Richard Tobin and George 
Sterling. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch engaged two boxes for the 
opera entertaining friends at dinner and supper parties. 



International Luncheon 

One of the outstanding events of the season will be the 
International Luncheon to be given at the Fairmont Hotel 
under the auspices of the Unity Club of which Mrs. Perley 
Andrew Young is the president and which includes in the 
personnel of its membership the wives of hotel proprietors, 
managers and hotel apartments. 

Elaborate preparations are being made for this event 
which takes place Thursday, January 28 at 12:30 o'clock. 
Official representatives of many countries will be honor 
guests and give addresses on themes of special selection. 
They include: Santos Goni, consul-general de la Repubiica 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 
Telephone Sutter 0130 Under Management CARL, S. STANLET 



January 16, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Argentina ; Marcus G. Huidobro, consul du 
Chile; Patrick Coppinger Gerant, du consulat 
de France ; Dr. Kurt Ziegler, German consul- 
general ; Jose Y. Seminario, consul-general Del 
Equador ; Ernesto De La Guardia, Jr., consul 
of Panama ; A. S. Klu, consul-general of Guate- 
mala ; Dr. Koling Yih, Chinese consul-general ; 
B. J. Gratama, secretary, Holland-American 
Chamber of Commerce, all of win mi have ac- 
cepted the invitation extended to he present 
and to address the assemblage. 

"International Relations" will be the sub- 
ject of an address by Rev. William Rader, and 
a program of attractive musical numbers will 
be presented by the president who, with as- 
sistance of her committees, aims to make this 
International Luncheon something superla- 
tively splendid and significant. 

Tables will be decorated in the colors and 
flags of the countries represented and each 
hostess presiding over the table will be relied 
in a costume of the nation she features. 

Mrs. Perley Young, as Columbia will pre- 
side over the American table with the honor 
guests, consuls and representatives of other countries. 

Purposes and plans of the Unity Club arc to create a 
feeling of camaraderie among the wives of hotel proprietors 
and managers and to establish a department for the study 
and the encouragement of travel. "Lines of Travel and 
Travel Development will be subjects discussed during our 
present year," stated Mrs. Young, the capable and energetic 
young president, who enjoys her responsibilities with en- 
thusiasm. 

Many prominent people from the San Francisco, penin- 
sula and bay cities and from Fresno hotel circles have 
already made reservations with Mrs. Young at the Turpin 
Hotel on Powell Street, where she is receiving the name- ol 
those desiring to attend the International Luncheon. Vc- 
cording to official announcements, these reservations will 
close on Tuesday 26. two days before the luncheon. The 
tables have already almost reached their full quota, so popu- 
lar is the delightful event which is original in design and 

presentation. 

* * * 

Mis. William Beckman, author of "Thought Stitches 

From Life's Tapestry," was the honor guest at the literary 
session held Friday afternoon in the California room of the 
Fairmont Hotel, when her book was reviewed by Josephine 
Bartlett of the San Francisco "Chronicle." 

Tin- California author was made the recipient of many 
congratulations on her latest book which introduces whole 
some philosophy in the humorous style for which Mrs. 
Beckman is famed. She is a world traveler and the author 

of seven books, including "Backsheesh," "Unclean and 
Spotted From the World." "Beckie's Book of Bastings," 

"Memories Potlaehcs," "Adventuring in Memory Laud-" 

and "Impressions of the Court of Ages." 

Mrs. Beckman Was for many years a leader of society and 
literary circles in Sacramento, where she was the lirsi 
dent of the famous Tuesday Club of which she was a 

founder. 

She was president of the Northern District, I aliforma 

Federation of Women'- Clubs, a prominent member of the 

Saturday Club and a director of the Crocker Museum of 

Sacramento. She is the widow of William Beckman. who. 




HOTEL CAXTEBIIIHV 
7."p0 Slitter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
.ates: From {2 50 per day 



during his lifetime was one of the most promi- 
nent bankers of the state. 

A chair for the study of the English language 
and literature has been established by Mrs. 
Beckman at the University of California for 
which she contributed $100,000 and which has 
since then increased in valuation by invest- 
ments. Mrs. Beckman is a prominent member 
of the League of American Pen Women. 

* * * 

Those who attended the recent meeting of 
the San Francisco center are still discussing 
the lecture given by Anna Louise Strong, 
whose magazine articles upon Soviet condi- 
tions have appeared widely in the United 
States. 

* * * 

Judge Jeremiah Sullivan gave a memorable 
home party at his residence on Pacific Avenue, 
where he brought together a number of rela- 
tives. Mrs. Bernard Breeden, the daughter of 
the Hon. Jeremiah Sullivan, and Mr. Breeden 
assisted him in the hospitalities. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Mariv CALIFORNIA 

On ih. » „,.l tluh«*B? Half-n HMw*m S«n Fr*nri«r* «nd ' •• <"«•!'• 
An Inn «f I naiual Eirallenc* 



Mrs. Herbert Hoover and her son, Allan, are at the 
Hoover home in Palo Alto for a short sojourn. Mrs. 
I toover plans to spend a month on the campus at Stanford 
University. 

Wedding Bells 

A pretty wedding uniting prominent California families 
took place on New War's day in the Union Church at Sara- 
toga, when Mis- Lucia Plant of Palo Alto became the 
bride of Mr. George Colby of Berkeley. The bride is a 
Stanford graduate. She was attended by her sister, Miss 
Catherine Plant and Miss Georgia Edwards of Los Gatos. 
The best man was Charles VV. Dickenson of Stanford. Mr. 
Henry L. Plant, an uncle of the bride, gave her away. 

I pon their return from their honeymoon the young 
couple will make their home in Oakland. 

* * * 

The engagement of Mis- Lillian Swanson to Mr. Mervyn 
I) Silberstein of San Francisco is announced. The engaged 
couple are prominent in the activities of Ye Beare Familye. 
an organization of young musicians and artists of which 
Mr. Silverstein has l>een the president for more than six 
Miss Swanson, a pretty, charming young lady is 
i 'lie of the most popular of the artistic set. where she and 
her husband-to-be have been leader- at many delightful af- 
fair-. * * * 

San Francisco friends this past week received word of the 
splendid success attending Hail Beverly as a dancer in 
"Mayflowers." She i- the daughter of Mrs. ims-, wife of 
Commander Goss, L". S. W.and has taken the name of Bev- 
erly because of her grandfather, the late Dr. Beverly Cole 
of this city. Mi-s Beverly ami her mother have an apart- 
ment in Xew York. 

* * * 

A delightful dinner party was given by Mr. and Mrs. 
de Latour recently at their Scott Street home com- 
plimenting Count and Countess Galcerand de Pins. Mr. 
and Mrs Dixwell Hewitt. Mrs. J. S. Tobin and Henri de ia 

Chapelle. 

* * * 

Luncheon in Private Car 

Dr. Russell C. Ryan and Mrs. Ryan, accompanied by 
Mr-. Frank M. Ryan and Mr. Robert Calquhoun, have iust 
returned to their home at the Fairmont Hotel, after a de- 
lightful visit at the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Clark of 
Calexico. Thev were honor guests at several affairs during 
their southern visit, among them being a luncheon given 
i Continued on Page Hi 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 16, 1926 



J, 



■^.aws* 



^wjs* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



J$» 



-Sls^WS* 




Notable Events Made by 
Famous Golfers During 1925 

A FEW impressions, and resolutions set forth by the golf- 
ing Rotarians at their New Year's luncheon : 
President Matt Harris, acting mayor of Atherton and na- 
tionally known orator, presided. Matt pleaded 
so hard to keep the charity offerings at par that 
he even got a dollar from Johnny Crowe, the 

Scotchman. 

* * * 

Matt introduced Frank Foran and Joe Tynan, 
two baby members and directors of the Olym- 
pic Club : Frank responded in his usual cus- 
lupuiar presl- tomary manner, but Joe made nis record 
ancisco speech, which lasted one second: "I thank 
itntnry Club, vim." * * * 

Alvin Bern hard, fresh from his Epsom Salt mine, felt in 

good trim and parted with five fish. 

* * * 

Perry Cumberson told how his firm resolved to liquidate. 
Perry said that the stockholders claimed he didn't play 
enough golf, so he quit business. 

* * * 

Sidney Schwartz, president of the Stock and Bond Ex- 
change, and the fastest human on a cinder track in his day. 
hoped that he wouldn't lo-e any speed on the course. 

* * * 

Bill Goodwin, the purveyor of little Fords, hopes that his 
golf score will be cut to the normal price of his jits. 

* * * 

Arnold Foster. Joe Tynan's side kick at the Bethlehem steel 
work-., accompanied Joe at the luncheon but he wasn't called 
upon; Joe delivered an eloquent speech. 

* * * 

Johnny Crowe says that they have had to build the highways 
\vi''er and longer to make room for the Buick cars Bob Thomp- 
son sold last vear. 

* * * 

John Spohn claims it's easier to put Carnation than a golf 
ball in a cup. 

* * * 

Charlie Wiel radiographed his Xew Year's greetings 
From Paris. Charlie left for a two years' trip around the world. 

* * * 

Benjamin Franklin Blair was one of the birthday babies who 
coughed up fixe bones for being born in January. That is really 
nothing to what they hook him for at Lake Merced. 

* * * 

Tom Delury, the telephone magnate, promised to give us 
better service. We hope he keeps his word. 

* * * 

"Snowshoes" Pete Gerhardt says that his slobber shop 
worked so well 'round Christmas that he donated twenty dol- 
lar- to tlie Rotary fund. 

* * 

Bill Larkin says he's still topping them on Geary Street. An-- 
tin Sperry arrived in time from the Hawaiian Islands to lead 
the choir. 

* * * 

Charlie Brandenberg hopes your Kro-Flite will always fly 
true. 

* * * 

Harry Bostwick of the P. G. and E., intends to step on the 



gas when he meets Milt Anderson. Harry says that Milt is 
some trailer. 

* * * 

Stanley Prior, the sail maker, hopes he won't bump into any 
rough going. 

* * * 

Jim Patrick, the rubberman. puts his stamp of approval on 
the party. 

* * * 

Charlie Trippler has promised to watch the cash register 
while Matt Harris plays golf. 

* * * 

Charlie "Ironside" Stewart hopes to regain the laurels he lost 
at Del Monte last year. 

* * * 

Charlie Culver, the Rotary cop, intends to roll off a Few 

pounds. 

* * * 

Bob Donahoe. the cigar baby, has promised to fumigate the 
course with his black Havana. 

* * * 

Mike Savanah. of Paragon fame, will set the new fashions 
on the links. 

* * * 

Max Summer will run him a close second. 

* * * 

Charlie Melrose will furnish the ice as usual. 

* * * 

Carl Eddy, the spiceman, says he's going to infuse a lot of 
pep into his game this vear. 

* * '* 

Capt. Jack Stolz lias offered to build an elevator shaft for 
the 17th at Merced. 

* * * 

Ernest La Flcur is banking on winning a title this vear. 

* * * 

Halsey Manwaring has promised to attend at least six 
meetings during 1926. 

* * * 

Sam ("Grandpa") Burtchaell hopes to celebrate the arrival 
of his fiftieth grandchild. 

* * * 

Jul Sergeant, the artist, promises not to inflict his wares on 
the course. Jud is some divot digger! 

* * * 

I >ick Costello has promised to make his debut at the next 
Rotarv golf meet if Tom Delury will show. 

* * * 

Rudy Habernicht. the glassman. is sure to cut a big figure, 
especially in the rough. 

* * * 

"Topsy" Davis, the sardine king will try to can a few. 

* * * 

Frank Garby will decorate the course with lighting fixtures. 

* * * 

Harold Cossitt claims he can reproduce anything — even a 
lost ball. 

* * * 

Dr. Howard Dignan says he's going to start the New Year 
right by cutting down his score. 

* * * 

Charlie Bulotti, and his famed quartette, will keep harmony 
i n the course. 

if'ontinued on Page 13) 



January 16, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



■as* 



By Josephine Wilson 




[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events In men's and 
women's organizations. 




u 



JOSEPHINE 
WILSON 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG 
EVENTS 
OCAL musicians and music lovers in 
/general are eagerly welcoming the an- 
nouncement that Lieutenant-Commander John 
Philip Sousa, will write a new march dedi- 
cated to San Francisco. The announcement 
made by Selby C. Oppenheimer followed 
a telegraphic advice from the great march 
king, who said : 
"If my inspiration equals the greatness of the city of 
San Francisco I hope to dedicate a march for your city." 
The news came as a significant bit of musical history, for, 
according to authorities, it was here in San Francisco, that 
the famous composer and band master started his career 
as an independent leader following his retirement as band- 
master of the United States Marine Corps. 

Brilliant Assemblage 

The annual dinner of the San Francisco Bar Association 
held this past week attracted more than two hundred mem- 
bers of the local order and about twenty members of the 
national association, who were special guests. Beverly L. 
Hodgehead, president of the San Francisco Bar Associa- 
tion, presided at the noteworthy event. Former United 
States Senator Chester I. Long of Kansas, headed the dele- 
gation of guests and delivered the principal address at the 
annual gathering. Former Governor Charles S. Whitman 
of New York, a member of the executive committee, was 
a speaker. 

In his address, the Hon. Chester Lung emphasized the 
preservation of individual liberty and the preservation' of 
local self-government as two main issues of the present 
time. He opened his brilliant address with reference to 
the judicial council plan adopted by ninny state- and then 
delved into the subject of "Liberty With Government." 

The distinguished speaker reviewed the history of various 
constitutional amendments up to and including the twen- 
tieth or child labor amendment. In concluding his address, 
Senator Long said: "Liberty will abide here if we main- 
tain our dual nation. It will disappear when we destory the 
even balance between state and national government." 

Governor Whitman's address was directed principally 

to the bulwark of the law as the chief protection of the 
people against the criminal. He advocated the turning on 
the searchlight of publicity on all crime, and aroused pub- 
lic opinion and a determination for law enforcement, lie 
urged the Bar of America to united effort toward law en- 
forcement. 

Other prominent guests at the Bar Association annual 
dinner included: W. P. McCraekcn. Jr. of Chicago; Major 
dgar B. Tolman, of Chicago: Josiah Marvel. Wilmington, 
Delaware; G, E. Xewlin, Los Angeles: F. A. Brown. Chi- 
cago; fesse \. Miller. He- Moines; W, M. Ilargest. Harris- 
burg. Penn; A. C. Paul, Minneapolis, Henry U. Sims. Birming- 
ham, Ala.: Horace T. Tenny. Walter Eckert, E. Warren Ev- 
erett and E. A. Zimmerman. Chicago. 
* * » 

Dr. H. J. Webber, head of the division of sub-tropical 
horticulture, gave an illuminating account of his work in 
South Africa this past vear when the annual conference of 
(Continued on Page I4i 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

MISS ESTHER PHILLIPS, the San Francisco attor- 
ney, who has just been appointed Assistant United 
States Attorney to succeed Miss Alma M. Myers, resigned, 
is receiving the congratulations of a host of ardent friends 
and clients. 

Miss Phillips is a graduate of the law department, Uni- 
versity of California, where she was an honor student. She 
is well known in university circles; and in many prominent 
women's clubs, where she has been an esteemed member. 

She has been assigned to duties in the civil division of 
the federal prosecutor's office and was sworn into office be- 
fore Federal Judge Partridge, the first part of the year, 
Monday, January 4. For a number of years, Miss Phillips 
has been a member of the law firm of McCutcheon, Olney, 
Mannin and Green. Her appointment to her present office 
was supported by Dean Orrin Kip McMurray of the Uni- 
versity of California. 

Mrs. Anita Phillips, president of the California Club, Mrs. 
Marie Pernau Walsh and the executive staff in general 
are receiving congratulations over the success of the 
Founders' Day breakfast, held last week in the California 
Clubhouse 1750 Clay Street. 

Round tables, decorated with prevailing warm colorings 
of the season, seated the two hundred and more members. 
Little corsage bouquets, made of handkerchiefs deftly ar- 
ranged, were used as place cards. Mrs. Phillips presided at 
the luncheon and congratulated the members upon their 
succession of progressive activities and the flourishing con- 
dition of the club. Miss Hill, one of the earliest members 
of the club and a founder, sat at the right of the president. 
Telegrams from absent members were read at the luncheon. 

Mrs. E, L. Baldwin, a former president, and Mrs. Howard 
C. TibbitS, a past president, were honor guests and re- 
ceived ovations from the members. 

The California Club program comprised the presentation 
of a play, "The Masqueraders," with Margaret Mary Tur- 
ner and'Mae Francis O'Keeffe the talented players. Mrs. 
Phillip V. Aaronson was the vocal soloist. 

"Hearts— a Game for the World and His Wife." intro- 
duced a number of clever players, all members of the club, 
including Mrs. Joseph Lawless, chairman of the dramatic 
department. Mrs. Edward J. Morser, Mrs. Flinn and Mrs. 
nry Hastings, who is a member of the State Board of 
Education and a prominent member of the club. Mrs. Cecil 
Mi iss plaved a number of violin solos. 

"The Race Between Education and Catastrophe" will be 
the topic of a lecture by Dr. Stanley Rypino on Tuesday, 
Januarv 19 at 2 :45 o'clock, under the direction of the Edu- 
cation Department of the California Club, Miss Elizabeth 

Hill the chairman. 

* * * 

Mrs. Parker Maddux was the honor guest at the last 
meeting o\ Cap and Bells Club, when she presented an ad- 
dress on "Peace on the Pacific," before an appreciative and 
receptive audience. Mrs. Maddux has made a deep and 
profound study of the subject, which she imparts with illu- 
minating clearness and definite review. As an official rep- 
resentative to the conference held in Honolulu, Mrs. Mad- 
dux gained much valuable information on the subject of 
(Continued on Page 14) 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 16, 1926 




THE Cuba Foodstuff Record, published in Havana, shows 
that that island purchased $300,000,000 worth of goods in 
1D24. This makes quite a market in the island of Cuba and 
has led to the monthly publication of the paper above named. 

It will give a full account of trade in Cuba. 

* * * 

—The Board of Supervisors is considering a new ordinance 
to create a Hetch Hetchy operative fund, required by the char- 
ter to provide proper financial control of the municipal power 
utility The decision as to whether the supervisors will put 
a valuation of $8,000,000 or $21,000,000 on the power utility 

has a bearing on this vear's budget. 

* * * 

The "City," issued by the San Francisco Bureau of Govern- 
mental Research, savs: '"One of the chief arguments for the 
development of the power project in advance of the water sys- 
tem, has been that benefits will accrue from the sale of power 
which will ameliorate the cost of debt-charges against the water 
utility." * * * 

A writer in "Business," speaking of the effects of the one 

crop, cot' on. on the economics of the South says: "The mer- 
chant, the doctor, the lawyer, the manufacturer and the laborer 
jeally become cotton farmers — as much as the chat) who drives 
the little brown mules down the cotton rows. If the crop is 
good and the price favorable, those in town do well ; if the boll- 
weevil or the drought cuts the crop or the price is too low, the 

balances are all in red." 

* * * 

— The Pacific Gas and Electric Company, according to Frank 
A. Leach, Jr., vice-president and manager of the company is 
entering 1926 with a program of extension of service at the 
lowest cost consistent with the class of service rendered. This 
company intends to expend 2? million dollars on construction. 
This includes a dam and intake of Pit Xo. 4, fifth of the string 
of the company's Pit River plants, and the building and equip- 
ping of a new power plant of 36,000 horsepower capacity at 
Melones on the Stanislaus, the generators of which will be 
run with water purchased from the (Jakdale and South San 
Joaquin irrigation districts. 

— The going out of business of the William Clufi firm of 
wholesale grocers due- away with an institution which has 
done high-class business here for the last forty-seven year-. 
The firm is unusually healthy, financially. The explanation is. 
that numerous stockholders died, and their stock coming into 
the hand- (if heirs, who are not residents of the state, the latter 
have no interest in keeping things up. 

* * * 

— The national death rate is placed at 11.9 per thousand .if 
the population. These figures cover the entire registration. 
Heart disease is the chief cause of death, showing a rise, pro- 
portionately U> former years. The same is true of cancer. 
Tuberculosis, on the other hand, shows marked decline, owing 
to the war made upon it of late years. The heart statistics 
are very vital factors in the economic well-being of the com- 
munity.' as men are lost thereby at the height of their produc- 
tive and financial powers. 

* * * 

— The Penn Mutual is going on a very intensive campaign this 
year. J. B. Duryea, general agent, has been collecting the 
agents and placing a program of work before them. 

* * * 

— We note among the bonds offered for sale by Bradford 
Kimball and Co.. those of the Imperial Irrigation District and 
the Merced Irrigation District, due in 1947 and 1957 re- 
spectively. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY I0TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1925 

Assets $107,232,609.22 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,250,000.00 

Employees* Pension Fund over 525,000.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission .-mcl 21st Streets 

PARK-I'UESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

IIAICHT STREET BRANCH Hnight unci Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St, 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONl£-QUARTER (4J/Q per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTE W. DeRR, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 2244 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up C'nnHnl *20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San FrnnciHco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE I1EATI1COTE W. J. COUI.THARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

11 nnufncl li rrr-. of 
HIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 
Son FrailCl«CO* Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Snnta Fe Avenue 



MADE TO ORDER ONLY 

rfiosEKenl p s ™ TEasEKad 

^Hffil^ NIGHT-ROBES ^HlHlky 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



January 16, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



EDITORIAL 

(Continued from Page 5) 

There is no doubt that such men in the long run are an 
actual social asset and make, on the whole, for the well be- 
ing of society and the development of group conscience. To 
penalize counsel for the sins of their clients is to strike a 
blow at the very basis of our legal system. 

The foregoing is suggested by a recent case. A certain 
lawyer, having been disbarred, has been reinstated by the 
District Court of Appeal, upon the ground that his dis- 
barment was the result of his unpopularity and that such 
"crimes" as he committed were political crimes. Two of 
the judges of the court are of that opinion. One judge sees 
no difference between political and other crimes. But the 
difference is obvious. Political "crime" does not by any 
means impute moral delinquency and short of moral delin- 
quency no attorney should be disbarred. 

GOLF 

(Continued from Page 10) 

After George Habernicht arrived at the Marina from his 
flying trip, the gang all said that it was like his golf game ; up 

in the air as usual. 

* * * 

Frank Klimm vows he'll improve his golf game or bust. 
Frank usually shoots them 100 yards up and 20 feet long. 

* * * 

Arthur Smith, the Yellow taxi baby, put in a phoney handi- 
cap but his meter showed a double O. 

* * * 

George Leathurby, the hurdy-gurdy champion, will play 
Crystal Springs to try and tune up a bit. 

* * * 

Pete Gerhardt expects to trim Jud Seargent's whiskers. 

* * * 

Harry Maxfield expects to discover gold while visiting the 

rough. 

* * * 

Frank Kleversahl, the Humboldt banker, will check u|> on 

Bill Greenfield's score. 

* * * 

Lester Morse says he hopes to discover a lot ol new speci- 
mens as he's usually in the rough. 

* * * 

Bob Matthey claims that DuPont is the best explosive to get 

you out of a trap. 

* * * 

Joe Loughrey claims lie won't play for kids any more as he 

lost the last at Merced. 

* * * 

Angv Thomas, of Eberhanl Faber fame, 
\t sixty-one, is selling pencils just the same. 

* * * 

Frank Klimm. of the Board of Public Works, has promised 
to cut up the course and keep it in good shape. 

* * * 

Charlie Graham will be out shoo'ing pop dies to second base. 

* * * 

Hob Weber, as usual, will donate prizes from his own store. 

* * * 

Dave Harris, the electrical whiz, will introduce an illumi- 
nate. 1 ball, 

* * * 

Johnny Crowe claims that he represents the largest tire fac- 
tory in the world. Johnny was always known to stretch a 
bit. * * * 

Perry Cumberson writes all his promises in a little book, so 
he won't forget them and he always "keeps the book." 

Dizzy Davis : "I had a date with a professional mind- 
reader last night." 

Duffy: "How did she enjov her vacation?"— Arrow. 



THE AGONY OF THE 
PERFECT GUEST 

By Kitty Parsons 



VISITING at its best is always a terrific strain on all 
parties concerned ; on the disposition of the hostess and 
on the digestion of the guests ; on the equilibrium of the 
servants and on the good behavior of the children of the 
house. There may be visiting assets of course, but the lia- 
bilities usually far exceed them. 

There is such a long suffering individual as the perfect 
guest ; only she herself can tell you the agony that she en- 
dures, that she may be spoken of in awe-struck tones by 
those who have had her in the house ; for of course it is in 
their eyes that she is truly perfect and never in her own. 
For when all is said and done, she must have a very dis- 
agreeable existence in reality. 

The lot of the perpetual visitor is a hard one to endure and 
yet some people spend the better part of their lives week- 
ending and summering with their friends. The inconven- 
iences are many and the marked advantages few and far 
between to the gentle onlooker. 

The perfect guest must pack her clothes in a small space, 
usually mussing them so hopelessly that she is obliged to 
spend several hours repressing them after her arrival. Then 
she gets in a stuffy train and worries most of the journey 
because she is not sure whether anyone will be at the sta- 
tion to meet her. If no one comes, and she cannot find a 
taxi, she staggers along beneath the weight of her baggage, 
cursing inwardly that she ever left home and mother. 

When she finally arrives at her destination, this super- 
guest must immediately place herself in the hands of her 
hostess — without a struggle. She must go places she does 
not want to go, do things she does not want to do and eat 
things she hates or which give her indigestion. She must 
sit up when she longs to go to bed and go to bed when she 
has no desire to sleep. She must smile when the children 
of the house arouse her at 5 a. m. by jumping into her bed. 
She must listen by the hour to people who bore her beyond 
words, walk when she wants to ride and ride when she is 
pining for exercise. She must see plays she has seen before or 
which she never would have seen anyway, always remaining 
silent and enthusiastic to the bitter end. 

All this she must do and a great deal more, if she wish 
to receive the perfect appellation. In fact she must make 
an amiable door mat of herself, to the glory of mankind and 
the satisfaction of her hostess. And she must never shDW 
by so much as the quiver of an eyelash that she is not hav- 
ing the time of her life. 

Most uuest- manage to get along very nicely on a long 
\isit by bringing very few clothes of their own and borrow- 
ing lavishly from the choicest stock of their hostess. But 
the perfect guest is barred from any such privileges and can 
never indulge herself in such pleasant and profitable variety 
of wardrobe. She must carry her own extra coats and hats 
and wear her own little old gray shawl, without a murmur. 
But one of the most important of all her qualifications is 
the freedom with which she tosses about her precious lucre; 
being a paying guest in a hotel is frequently far less expen- 
sive than being a perfect guest in a private home. She must 
.its tor her hostess and all the dear little children 
and she must never forget the ever present and often nu- 
merous servants, no matter what they do not do for her. 
Pay as you enter and pay as you go, might well be her given 
motto. If. however, she should visit in the servantless 
home, she may spare herself in tips but not in labor, for in 
order to be thoroughly welcome she must force herself to 
do what would at least be the equivalent of two perfect 
maids. i Continued on Page Hi 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 16, 1926 



THE AGONY OF THE PERFECT GUEST 

(Continued from Page 13) 

Always her hand must be ready to loosen her purse 
strings for the benefit of those whom she visits. She must 
pay for the taxis when her hostess leaves her pocket book 
at ' home, and must never forget to remunerate the dear 
children if they pick up her handkerchief or carry her eye 
glasses from an adjoining room. And when the precious 
little ones cast their eyes upon a new toy which they covet, 
she must buy it with a forced smile and laugh raucously 
when they stamp on it five minutes later. 

She must finance her hostess when she runs out of funds, 
and with a jest on her lips refuse to accept repayment. But 
most agonizing of all, she must pay for her own long dis- 
tance telephone calls and supply her own postage stamps, 
without a struggle. And pay up her just debts like a busi- 
ness man instead of a visiting lady. In fine, she must learn 
to spend money like water, as if it did not hurt, and as if a dol- 
lar were a mere drop in a bucket that was already well run- 
ning over. 

Then after she has done all this perhaps you may wonder 
what may be her reward. Why, to hear someone say to 
her : "My dear, Mrs. Lummix tells me you are simply a 
perfect guest." After a few years of constant repetition of 
this kind, she may smile serenely in the happy thought that 
after all, the good die young. 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

by Mr. and Mrs. Clark in the special car of Mr. Piatt, vice- 
president and general manager of the Union Pacific Rail- 
road of Salt Lake City. Among others present were General 
M. H. Sherman and Harry Chandler, and many prominent 
in social and financial circles of the south. 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

(Continued from Page 11) 

international peace, and with earnestness of purpose she 
enters into the discussions typical of a profound thinker 
and leader. 

Musical offerings last Thursday at Cap and Bells were of 
a high standard, including piano solos, delightfully played 
by Dorothy Wines Reed. She also accompanied Leila Neil- 
sen Druhe, who charmed the audience with her songs. Mrs. 
Thomas Alexander East, the first vice-president, presided at 
the meeting. 

PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG EVENTS 

(Continued from Page 11) 

Agriculture Extension Service was held last week at the 
University of California. Dr. Webber described the horti- 
culture of South Africa, dwelling upon the citrus and de- 
ciduous fruit productions. 

Dean K. D. Merrill, in his reviews, spoke of problems of 
the College of Agriculture, covering as it does a state larger 
than a considerable group of New England and North At- 
lantic states. 

Forty-two counties of California now have the agricul- 
tural extension service, according to the authentic reports. 
The workers are paid by the United States Department of 
Agriculture and the University of California, while offices, 
automobiles and expenses are provided by the counties in 
which they work. These workers include farm advisers, 
assistants, club leaders and home demonstration agents. 

H. C. Carr of the First National Bank of Porterville, ad- 
dressed the conference, making a definite urge in his ad- 
dress for more personal attention by the farmers to their 
farming operations. 

W. J. Norton, specialist in illustrative material, told the 
conference of the success of the Farm Center exhibits in 
Stanislaus County. 



Nothing Changed 

An undergraduate at Cambridge University, contrary to 
regulation, was entertaining his sister, when they heard 
someone on, the stairs. Hastily hiding the lady behind a 
curtain, he went to the door and confronted an aged man 
who was revisiting the scenes of his youth. 

( Ibtaining permission to look around, he remarked : "Ah, 
yes, the same old room." 

Going to the window, he said: "The same old view"; 
and then, peeping behind the curtain, "The same old game!" 

"My sister, sir," said the student, indignantly. 

"Oh. yes," continued the visitor, "the same old story." 



LARKINS DUCO 
Has Lustre 

Combined with lustre, it possesses a durability that 
is amazing. Be sure of a good job. 

Prices reasonable 

LARKINS & CO. 

First Avenue at Geary Street 




1J40 GEAR1 


ST. ^ 






TEL. FRAP 

Metal Wo 

talnlng to 

»^ bilea — Ojj 

]!jj^ Welding 


hl.l.MlliV. 

rk Apper- 
A ii 1 " in o- 

-Acetylene 
— lllack- 

WORKS 


tdflU 


Njp 


W 


AUTO 


FENDER 


AND 


RADIATOR 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Ratem 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Antomobl.es 



W. W. HEALEY' 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel). San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 391 



902 Busli (c 



DENMAN GARAGE 

A convenient location for club members 



l'roiptcl 9S6 



January 16, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



U 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

THE history of transportation is one 
of the romantic stories that lie with- 
in the domain of truth. Preserved in 
bas-relief on ancient coins, in painting 
and sculpture, outlined on vases as old 
as the Pharaohs and the epoch of Baby- 
lon, the history of transportation is the 
more remarkable in that the most rapid 
progress in this important phase of life 
has been within the last twenty-five years. 
The Automobile Show is the mark of 
the progress of civilization to a stage 
Where luxury and comfort are not only 
for the favored few. but are broadcast 
throughout the world. Within the last 
few months we have seen the Oriental 
boolie and his balanced load disappear 

and the light truck and llivver take his 
place. Manx a limousine graces the gar- 
age of the rich Chinese merchant, many 
a man who never rode before is now 
driving about his coach and four in the 
Shape of a gasoline driven vehicle. 

It is too bad that the record-- are SO 
dim in the early days that we of the pres- 
ent day cannot do full homage to that 
ingenious man who first invented the 
wheel. For the wheel has played the 
greatest role in the advance of transpor- 
tation and "it Still i- an important element 
in this age of speed. 

Transportation starts with the primal 
man dragging his -led loaded with his 
possessions from place to place Then 
i genius and the wheel offered new 
possibilities for travel and transport. The 
chariot was popular in Egypt, in Greece 
and Rome. But the expense of keeping 
up a horse limited its use to the wealthy 
s. Some did not like the jolting of 
the chariot over rough e-ountry and the 
liter. the shoulders of slaves, 

vied in popularity with the open chariot. 



In the Middle Ages the litter was com- 
bined with the chariot to form a four- 
wheeled vehicle, often enclosed. Early 
in the nineteenth century we find the 
steam carriage coming into vogue, but 
legislation held back its progress. Every 
steam carriage in England was required 
to have a runner ahead to announce the 
coming of the boiling behemoth and six 
miles an hour was its maximum of speed. 
The gasoline vehicle dates from the noisy 
nineties, but its rapid progress awaited 
the development of methods of manufac- 
ture and the standardization of parts. 
The last decade has seen more improve- 
ments and an almost perfected machine, 
prepared for all kinds of weather and able 
to stand a great deal of abuse. 



Safety Alphabet 

is Authority you should respect 

is the Bumper, you should not neglect 

is for Crossings you always should 

heed 
is the Danger, attendant on speed, 
is the Emphasis placed on discretion, 
is the Fault that becomes an obsession 
is for Gas Fumes you must not inhale 
is the Horn which never should fail 
is the Instinct the new driver lacks 
is the Judge who says "Fifty Smacks!" 
is the Knock which tell something is 

busted 
is for Lights, see they're always 

adjusted 
is for Motor Cops, they are your 

friends 
is for the Narrow Road, sound horn 

on bends 
is for (id. a supply you should carry 
is the Puncture you hate like ( >ld 

I tarry 
is for Quiet in Hospital Zone-, 
is for Reason, which saves broken 

bones, 
is for Signals, you always should give 
is for Traffic Rules, obey them and 

live 
is for Uniform Courtesy and care 
is for Vigilance everywhere 
is for Windshield which must be kept 

clear 
is the Unknown that most of us fear 
is for the Youngsters, away from 

them draw- 
is for Zeal in obeying the law. 



The Redwood Highway Banquet 
Money was the motif of the banquet 
given by tlie Redwood Highway Ass 
Bon, the Down Town Association and 
other civic and county organizations, at 
the St. Francis Hotel, last Friday, Har- 
vey M. Toy presiding as chairman ami 
toastmaster. 

Toj stated that the sum of $11,000,000 
was needed to carry on the construction 
of the Redwood Highway, and that the 
Slate's road treasury was like "Old 
Mother Hubbard's cupboard," quite bare 
of funds, instead of f 

He also told his audience that the State 



of Oregon intends to spend so much 
money for good roads that he was 
ashamed to announce the figures, in the 
face of California's lack of lucre for its 
highways. He ended by appealing to those 
(Continued on Page 16) 



~)ach car ojberaf<>d\g£ 
6y rpliah/e 
c/tauffeurs 
w/io f/ioroucf/t/y under' 
Stand (ne/'r Jbus/ftess 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when usingr 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 




Phone Grnystone 27 

1«2» Pine Street 

Sou Franctnco 



«MP« 




-the better it gob- 




GEO. \V. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.8O0.0OO cup* were aerved at tae Panama 

Pacific International Exposition 



16 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 16, 1926 



The Redwood Highway 

By Clyde Edmondson 
Manager-Secretary Redwood Highway Association 



Publicity and Advertising Plans of 
Redwood Highway Association 

The Redwood Highway Empire of- 
fering as it does, every conceivable re- 
creational facility and scenic attraction, 
lends itself to wonderful treatment in the 
matter of designing advertising and pub- 
licitv which will create, divert and at- 
tract a larger volume ot tourists, vaca- 
tionists and prospective settlers over the 
Redwood Highway. 

This "Redwood Highway Empire" is 
destined to be one of the outstanding 
play-grounds of the West, as well as the 
best known main-line named highway 
anywhere — because of its giant Redwood 
forests alone. Do you know that you 
may ride through over one hundred miles 



ami reach Mr. Brown and Mr. Smith in 
the East, Northwest, in the South, or in 
foreign ports, before they leave on their 
proposed trip to the Pacific Coast. We 
will place in their hands folders and 
maps of the Redwood Highway. We 
will call attention to the Redwood High- 
way through the medium of publicity in 
the newspapers, and specially prepared 
illustrated articles in national vacation 
and outing magazines, as well as through 
other sources. 

llefore any itinerary N written to the 
Pacific Coast, we hope to have various 
travel bureau agents, railroad, steam- 
ship and Mage-line ticket agents so sold 
on the idea 'if including the Redwood 
Highway in Pacific Coast routings that 





=PT"Mnii, f ,„r„,,7 ft} UL 

GOLDEN GATE FERRY 
■ I i I I | I 



"** 



One of (lie new Guillen Gale Ferry slenmers. the "Hurry I-:. Speus.' 



of giant Redw 1 Trees without leaving 

the main Redwood Highway ? 

The territory bordering the Redwood 
Highway in Northwest California and 
Southwest Oregon offers the finest and 
sportiest hunting and fishing to be found 
anywhere. It is veritably the "anglers' 
and nimrods' paradise," although few 
people realize it. 

Furthermore, in addition to the vaca- 
tion and sport element, there are rivers, 
streams, lagoons. Indian Reservations, 
whaling stations, marble caves, lakes ri- 
valing those in Switzerland, petrified fi ir- 
ests, and innumerable other points of in- 
terest, all concentrated in this one great 
Empire of the Redwood Highway. 

We now have wonderful transporta- 
tion facilities through the Redwood 1 ligh- 
wav. The Northwestern Pacific Rail- 
road offers first-class day and night rail 
service. Pickwick's Redwood Highwaj 
stages and all connecting stage lines of- 
fer equally fine transportation. All the 
ferry companies offer the finest trans- 
portation between San Francisco, in par- 
ticular the Golden Gate Ferry, and the 
Redwood Highway; which has given, 
since its inception, the very finest ser- 
vice, in every way. 

We plan to get at the soufte of travel. 



they will recommend the Redw 1 trip to 

their various patrons. 

In other words, we ,xre planning t" 
build up a tremendous "personal sales 
organization" among those who control 
traffic, including not only the ticket and 
travel agents at points mentioned, but 
also the information clerks handling tour- 
ing bureaus for automobile clubs through- 
out the country, and through hotel clerks 
— at least must of those on the Pacific 
Coast. 

A general folder is in process of prep- 
aration showing standard trip itineraries 
over the Redwood Highway by auto- 
mobile, train, or stage. Also in this 
folder will be included a description of 
the very fine hotel and resort accommo- 
dations; and a treatise on fishing and 
hunting. These folders will receive a 
wide distribution. 

These are hut a few of the advertis- 
ing plans we now have in mind. 

In San Francisco, to take care of all 
inquiries and to handle the traveler on 
arrival, we hope to establish a complete 
free Redwood Information Bureau which 
will dispense complete information re- 
garding trips and tours in the Redwood 
Highway Empire, agricultural, industri- 
al and commercial opportunities, etc. It 



will write complete itineraries free of 
charge ; make all necessary hotel and 
other reservations, and will offer every 
possible assistance in making pleasurable 
the trip over the Redwoud Highway. 

Itineraries will be written to all points 
of interest on the entire Pacific Coast, 
using the Redwood Highway as an "op- 
erating base," or main-line artery be- 
tween California and the Pacific North- 
west. 

By co-operating in the matter of ex- 
change prospect lists with the various 
Chambers of Commerce in the Empire, 
and a defini'e system of follow-up, we 
plan to cinch the sale of every possible 
trip oxer the Redwood Highway. 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

(Continued from Page 15) 

present to see that at least $12,000,000 
annually for new construction be made 
available by an initiative measure. Upon 
which Supervisor Warren Shannon 
pledged San Francisco to every effort 
toward an early completion of the scheme. 
Each of the eight counties comprising 
the Redwood Highway Empire, as well 
as representatives from Oregon were 
manifested by enthusiastic orators who 
advanced various stunts and advertising 
suggestions, to further the movement, 
and if faith and belief in a subject will 
firing about its fruition, then the banquet 
in question should accomplish wonderful 
results for its worthy cause. 



Ornithological Note 
We bear of a pair of robins that have 
nested within a few feet of a black- 
smith's anvil. Their extraordinary in- 
telligence told them that to nest on 
the anvil itself would be to risk having 
their eggs smashed. — Lemon Punch. 

ANNUAL MKBTING 
tiik joshi a hi;xuv mux works 



The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works will 
be held at the office of the corporation, No. 75 
Fremont Street, San Francisco. California, on 
Tuesday, the 9th day "f February, 1926, at the 
hour "l" In o'clock a. m.. for the purpose of 
electing a Board of oirectors to serve for the 
ensuing year, and the transaction of such 
Other business as may come before the meet- 
in i-'. 

CHAS. C. GARDNER. Secretary. 
Oltice: 7." Fomont Street. 
San Francisco, California. 



The Nicest Business 
Lunch in Town 




San 
Francisco 



lanuarv 16, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



THE SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, 
FLOWER LOVERS' CLUB 



THIS Club was organized February 21st, 1919, with 
22 charter members. After six years of ceaseless ac- 
tivity it now (February 21st, 1925) numbers approximately 
1400 members. Its meetings are held every second Wed- 
nesday at 2:30 p. m. throughout the year. At these meet- 
ings discussions of many phases of flower culture are par- 
ticipated in by those present. Lectures and talks are en- 
joyed occasionally. 

In consideration of the practical work of the club in 
demonstrating the results that may be obtained in flower 
culture in this county, the Chamber of Commerce very ap- 
propriately co-operates with the club by furnishing it with 
halls for its meetings and shows. Occasionally a meeting 
is held at the residence of some member who has some par- 
ticular flowers that are of general interest. 

About seven shows are held each year beginning with 
a midwinter show in the middle of January, followed by 
a daffodil show in March, an iris show in April, a rose 
show in May, a midsummer or gladiolus show in July, a 
dahlia show in September and a chrysanthemum shew in 
November. All shows arc free to the public. 

The club was organized to promote the planting of flow- 
ers about the homes of the citizens of Santa Clara County. 
That its activities will extend more and more into the realms 
of shrubs and tree planting seems to be assured. 

The officers of the club are: A president, a vice-presi- 
dent, a secretary, a treasurer and one communit) vice-presi 
dent for each community in the county with >ix or more 
members. There are now nine community vice-presidents. 
Two branch clubs are now organized. The president of 
each club becomes automatically a community vice-presi- 
dent and all members becomes members also of the county 
club, which, however, dues not prevenl their independent 
action in holding meetings and sales in their own com- 
munities. 

There are no dues or fees charged to members, Revenue 
for running expenses, show equipment, etc., is obtained by 
holding annual sales of flowering plants, shrubs and bulbs. 
Such stock is contributed by the members or sold on com- 
mission from nurseries. In addition to providing the money 
for the club's use, a large number of plant-, shrubs and 

bulbs are annually sold and therefore, planted for the beau- 
tification of many homes. 

For six years the president has been Mr. Horaa G. Kees- 
ling who year after year has been re-elected to his office. 

The meetings ate every other Wednesday afternoon, 
summer and winter, and the club takes no vacation. With 
the co-operation of all lovers of flowers and general beauti- 
lication their greatest aim is to make Santa tiara County 
the leading county in the -talc for roses. They place great 

importance on good varieties and those not subject to mil- 
dew and various rose diseases They join with the Fed- 
erated Women'.-. Clubs in the desire t" scatter California 
popp} seeds as well a- other wild flower seeds when on a 
picnic or a trip through the country. 

After six years trial, it seems that the plan of this or- 
ganization would work in other communities of California. 

From "1 tome Designer." 



The doctor applied his stethoscope to the young - 
boy's heart. 

"Does angina pectoris trouble you at all?" he asked. 

"No," said the clerk, "but Dolly Green does, a lot.' — 
Toronto ( ioblin. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wii.kes and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^ 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 



WIGS and TOUPEES 

Also transformations, are made from the purest and 
finest hair, ventilated and porous. You can sleep in 
them. 

Mrs. Lederer in charge of gentlemen's wig department. 

G. LEDERER 

561 Sutter St., Between Powell and Mason Sts. 

Firm Established 1866 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the*. 

VALLEY of the MOON 

Our Specially —"Steaks With Mushrooms." 

Clean R«om», Clrun Linen, Clean Everylliing 
Viall Sonoma Cowiljr'i Famoiu Kctnrl* and Mnirrnl (Warm W..er) Sw 
Tank* From Thii llolel. 

Ratei Except ion ally Reasonable. 

Telephone 110 



J. SPAULDING & COMPANY 

Thm Original Pioneer Carpal Cleaner* 

r HBUIIIKB 1864 

HI, If. i and I arcp.i I itaMiihmcnt on Ibe Pacific Coait 

tt'e Are in No Way Connected With Any Olher Firm Liing Nana mt SPAULDING 

337 Tkhama Ptrt.et— Phom Douglas 3084 



We have served customers generation after generation 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

'"Tlii* Krenmmcndrd Laundry" 

230 Twelfth St.. Sw Francisco Thome Mvrket 916 



f ■ 

p 


arisian 

Soiu Piwd 


Dyein 

Rv Hand Onl?~ 

MME. M. 


g 

Mill 

S. 


and 

Called For 

E. LEE 


CI 


eaning 


iti 
b 


Po»t >tm»t 
Vucima Hotel 


r«i» 


D)..r 


g and Cleaning 


Pao. 


■ Piuutsua 2310 



AGU A C ALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 

Ifs the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
ming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
i CORAM, Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 16, 1926 



WIELANDS BREW 

WITH YOUR MEALS— IT HELPS 

Order by the case from your grocer 

Established 1868 

am Office, 240 Second Street, San Franeiico, Calif. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 671 



-0***^, 

«- _' ^ 




- ]a,i-ij^'MiJj : aj-rjJ:H 



EL PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There ts a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

r 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES I 

Sun Francisco — llurllnuii 

»i-k(, 7»:i 478 



Phone SurrEF 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

{Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

Clockmalcert and Watchmakers 

CHIME. ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

20D IV.m Street at Grant Avenue 

San PranclHco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 
and San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 Emerson St. 



SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way- 
Points Twice Daily 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
(Continued from Page 7) 
St. Francis 

"Moana" a tale of the South Seas, is 
a record of life in the tropics. It is a 
story of active, joyous life, vivid and gay 
and weaves a spell of romance on its 
audience. There are plenty of thrills, in- 
cluding the snaring of a wild hoar and 
the capture of a giant tortoise. 



Imperial 

The Imperial reports packed houses as 

the rule for "The Gold Rush," Charlie 

Chaplin's latest, and in many respect, his 

best picture. 

* * * 

S. F. Symphony Orchestra 

Last Sunday there was a large audi- 
ence present, in spit of the unusual cold 
weather, to hear the fifth popular con- 
cert of the San Francisco Symphony Or- 
chestra. It was a delightful program, 
and every number was encored to the 
echo. 

Sunday will be the second concert of 
the Seventh Pair of Symphony concerts. 
Haydn's Symphony in D Minor, "The 
Clock" will be presented for the first 
time ; as will also the Dance Rhapsody 
by Delius ; memorial selection will be 
given for Emmanuel Siegfried Heller in 
Strauss' Death and Transfiguration. 



Elwyn Concert Series 

A splendid large audience greeted the 
eminent Russian pianist. Benno Moisei- 
witsch, at the Auditorium last Thursday 
evening. 

The next attraction will be Margaret 
Matzenauer, prima donna of the Metro- 
politan Company, who will be heard here 
on February 15th. Madame Matzenauer 
is known not only as one of the reigning 
divas of opera, but also as a foremost 
figure of the contemporary concert stage. 
Of splendid physique, she posseses one 
of the most phenomenal of voices. 

Since coming to America in 1911, at 
the request of the Metropolitan Opera 
Company, where she scored a sensational 
success as Amneris in "Aida," <he has 
won distinct triumphs wherever she has 
been heard. 



(.1 um.i < Homi ii 



S. A. I.OVEJO* 



i ..,, i,.'M 2024 



1 

The Homer System | 

BOOKKEEPING— COLLECTIONS 



Installment, Current Dttinqueat Accounts, Legal Aid, 

iuditaSystmmi, Financial Statements, Income Tax 

Reports. Botikkeepinf (Part Time Service) 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

iillii-c and Works 1025 Mission St. 

Phone Mnrket 7913 

Brunch Ofllce: 700 Sutter St. 

I Hotel I :m l.rliuiy 111. Ik. ] 

Phone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 




n. w. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




NEW ORLEANS 

No»StJ%trfo 

To better serve our many friends and patrons 
over 'joo.oooi3ohas been expended in recon- 
struction and rehabilitation to maintain this 
famous hostdry as 

One of America's Leading Hotels 

The large well ventilated h^ ceding rooms 
have been retained and modeiTiize3-»=»- 

ACCOMMOn/aiNC OVER 1000 GUESTS 

Send far Descriptive Hotel Folder: 

Illustrated MardHnas Program Sir ihe asking 

Alfred S . Aivier. and Co..ud. 

N EW ORl-EAN 8 . LA 

^Ticket Offices of all TrjnsTwmaan line in lobby 




I)t Ydi KG Hi iliiin 



WHERE TO DINE 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

SOc, 75c. S1.00 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00,S1.50 a la carte 
Dancing 7:00 P. M. to 1:00 A. M. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 
HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 




ICE CREApt\ 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 





^P^». Caroline Jones 




uPy/T^B Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 1 : iO 


jl 


fflBJ! \wt anc ' tea f rom 3 to 5 
*;££%* 334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day In 
taking very good care of them. ISruMhing In only a part of the 
process. Many thing* can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as Mound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble} do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gnms. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed? Call In today 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Self Cleaning ItriUs.s: 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic. 



St. Mary's Academy 



£feanoi\5 



L: 



445 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast. 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 






CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50— Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p, m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



OFarrcll and RI A W f O ' ^1 FhMl 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. nt.r. $ .73 No Victor Should Leave the Cilv \lilh- 

Siinday Luncheon 1.00 oul Dining m the Finest Cafe 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 in America 

Dinner. Sunday* and Holiday* 1.75 

DANCING Si \n.U L\ r KINGS 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

93 Third Avenue. SW MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 

11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

5:30 p. m. to 8. SO p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 

Half Itloek from IILchvrny 



X&L. 



U-Mu Hoc.i 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

open 1:00 a. m. to 11*0 p. u. 

i >sl rpassed cuisine 

Carl Leonhaidt 

formerly of 
Golden Cat. Park Ciiwf 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



Make yourself at homa at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 TUlraann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root. Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



• Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained J 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAIL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

J 239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. J 




GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
| Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 
San Ftancisco. Phone Market 64 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Spring." 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

239 CUrm Street- -Garfield 8+4 




Jhe Charm 

of VARIETY* 



From Art Salon to 
Eskimo's Igloo — 
from Halls of Fame 
to Rogues' Gallery 
— the fascinating 
pictorial section of 
The Sunday Chron- 
icle deals with 
every subject under 
the sun. 

A ou will find entertainment that never 
palls in the ever ■ changing galaxy of 
pictures presented in the beautiful 



§itnia£ QHprimtrl? 

ROTAGRAVURE 



JLK'RING 1926 we- will carry 
the heaviest demand for service 
in our history — with an effi- 
ciency never before equalled. 
Our aim is to keep service 
available in advance of the 
needs of the territory served. 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 




"PACIFIC SERVICE* 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




Their watchword is smiling courtesy. — This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 

tf RATES— Ter'Day, single, 6uropean Wan 



The trniir 
for thtatrrt 
<Bankt, Shopt 

TUait wilt 
far booklet 



120 room* with running wait 

220 room-. M,h bath 

160 rooms with bath 



312.50 to M.00 
5.50 lo 5.00 
6.00 to 8.00 



Doublr. $4.00 Up 

Also a number of Urge and beautiful roomi and 
Miiin, some in period furnishing* *viih grand piano, 
fire place and bath, S10 00 up. 



LARGE AND WELL EOUIPPED SAMP! E ROOMS 

[CRA^CHO GOLF CLVET\ 

L available to all guestsJ 



I guestsJ 

HAROLD E. LATHROP 

£Manaxrr 



nfr 



HOTEL 



ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles 



Golden Gate Ferry 
Company 



WINTER SCHEDULE 

Effective October 1, 1925 



Leave Sausalito 

5:00 a.m. 

6:00 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

Every Half 

Hour Until 

10:00 p.m. 

Then 

11:00 p.m. 

12:00 p.m. 

1 :00 a. m. 



Leave San Francisco 

5:30 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:30 p.m. 

Then 

11:30 p.m. 

12:30 a.m. 

1:30 a. m. 



Saturdays and Sundays Only 
2:00 a.m. 2:30 a.m. 

ON SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

There will be extra trips if traffic warrants. 



A. O. Stewart 

President 



Harry E. Speas 

Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



^trrO SHOW- Jan. 30 to Feb. 6, incl. 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



$5.00 PER YEAR 




John Gilbert as "Jim 
Epperson, "n>i American 
Doughboy , and Renee 
Adorec.as" Mclisande," 
the French girl, in k inn 
I Idor's production of 
" The Big Parade. "com- 
ing Jan. 24th to the 
II ilkes Theater. 



America's Most Beautiful 

AUTO SHOW 



JAN.--FEB. 

30 to 6 



EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

Geo. Wahlgreen 

(^Manager 
Auspices 

Motor Car Dealers' Association 

of San Francisco 

Paul Whiteman 

HIMSELF 

AND HIS ORCHESTRA 



The Latest 1926 Models on Display 




EfUbtlrtid July SO. IW6 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr from 1884 to 1926 Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 225 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. 

TeieDhone Kearny S357 Entered at San Francisco, California. PostofBce as second-class matter. London Office: .Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C 

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Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 23, 1926 



No. 4 



gambling 

With E. FARRAND ROSS 



Prohibitions 

A certain inborn trait among a goodly number of Ameri- 
cans, probably inherited from our New England ancestors, 
restrains us too often in expressing our real emotions, our 
real admirations, our real "honest-to-God" selves. This in- 
hibition, heaven be praised, is less developed (if one can 
speak of an inhibition as being developed!) in Califormans 
than in the easterners and middle westerners that I have 
met ; but the fact is that the Federal government, functioning 
generally, under the influence and people of its environment 
(which is eastern) is taking back into its own hands so 
many of our "personal liberties," and laying upon us so 
many prohibitions, we tremble at the outcome as visua- 
lized, and mentally conjure up a back-boneless race of auto- 
matons, probably in some sort of hideous uniform, and 
quite possibly, answering to numbers, instead of names. 

A Beauty Cult Is Needed 

There is a narrow-minded, Puritanical bunch of "re- 
formers," whom some writer designates "the Invisible 
Few," who are only too apparently influencing the "visible 
many." This has been demonstrated most conspicuously in 
the futile Volstead Act, which has been the cause of increas- 
ing crime, instead of decreasing it, which was one of its 
much heralded motives; and another flagrant case may be 
cited in the silly prosecution regarding the teaching of evo- 
lution in public schools, which took place not SO long ago, 
in a Tennessee town. 

Have you been unfortunate enough, I wonder, to meet 
many "reformers" of this class? 1 do not mean people who 
want to reform in a large-hearted, humanitarian way; peo- 
ple who believe that bringing beauty and happiness into 
thousands of homes, is the best reform to be instituted on 
this old globe. I mean the picayunish. petty, one-cylinder 
(and that cylinder with a screw loose, somewhere) folk, 
the "nosey" folk, always on the watch for some ignominious 
fall to come to their neighbors, people who, having fright- 
ened and repressed their own natural feelings into insen- 
sibility, are possessed with the desire to Force their repres- 
sions upon others. 
"Glooms" 

L>ne finds an expression of this in old women who >it in 
chimney corners, figuratively sneaking, who have no pos- 
sible way of viewing life as it is, and who mumble foolishly 
about "Prohibition being a wonderful thing for the 'rising 
generation — ' " (the "rising generation" meanwhile with a 
flask on its hip!) Old women who deplore the beautiful. 
free ami easy, health-giving garb of the modern woman, 
as "indecent." as compared to the dress of the "good old 
days," when women padded their hair, their hips, their 
busts, and repressed their waists until it is a miracle that 
they ever had any organs left intact. 



J | Metaphorically speaking, there are too many of these 
| 'old women-men" in the Congress of our government; men 
of the Sunday school teacher type ; long-faced — the kind 
of men that David Grayson portrayed in his "Friendly 
Road." Do you remember? 

He is sitting on the bank of a rippling stream, one lovely 
Sabbath, in the hills, and worshipping God through the 
untouched and undesecrated beauty of the country side, 
and he is approached presently by a long, lank, sad looking 
individual, dressed in black, who apparently is harboring 
some devastating grief, and who turns out to be the village 
parson. 

"What's the matter?" asks David Grayson of this gloomy in- 
dividual, "Is God dead?" 



Reforming the Clock 

I have been trying to find out, to the best of my ability, 
the object or advantages of the Daylight Saving plan, which 
has been proposed by members of the Stock Exchange as 
an initiative measure to place before the voters of Califor- 
nia, and in my peregrinations around the city have asked 
various and sundry good citizens their opinions of this prop- 
osition. 

He is a prosperous and practical business man, and when 
I questioned him anent the above, he answered: "Why 
it will save gas and electric power, of course!" 
I pondered this. 

"If you get up an hour earlier in the morning, that is to 
say, when it is still dark, you will have to light up, won't 
Mm?" I asked. "You will be using gas or electricity an 
hour more in the morning, than in the evening, that's all." 
"It will give men more time to work in their gardens, after 
they come from the office," replied the next person I ques- 
tioned. 

"All right for suburbanites, perhaps," said I. "But the 
tired city worker has no garden to work in." 

"Well, he can play golf, then," answered my friend. 
"What do I think of the Daylight Saving?" exclaimed the 
pretty business girl, scowling slightly under her tight little 
felt hat. "I think its the bunk! It just means to us work- 
ing girls, an hour earlier to hop out of bed! Why not let 
us off at four o'clock every day during the summer? There's 
some sense to that!" 

Xot very satisfying, eh, what? I will just add that if the 
powers that be put this through, should the people in gen- 
eral veto it. at least let us hope that it will be a Federal 
law ; otherwise, it will be anything but a /im^-saving scheme.. 
Imagine what a lot of calculating it must take, when some 
communities put it into effect, and others refuse to change 
the faces of their time pieces! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 23, 1926 




In a few days now there will be a 
The Community Chest direct drive made upon the busi- 
ness and other institutions of the 
city as well as upon the private homes, for the support of 
the '■community chest" so-called. There will be, unfortu- 
nately, a considerable amount of pressure employed and a 
great deal of indirect threatening, with some bullying, which 
seems to have been a legacy from the late war in the get- 
ting of Liberty Bond subscriptions. We do not raise any 
great objection to that, as such methods are quite insepar- 
able from a public collection, supported by public en- 
thusiasm. 

We have no objection, either, to the principle of the com- 
munity chest. We realize that pooled charities are better 
than a congeries of individual charities. We know from com- 
mon experience that it is better to have a considerable sum 
under intelligent direction than to have a number of peddling 
little sums that are expended hither and yon. without 
knowledge and without any plan. So. as far as principle 
is concerned, we are with the community chest. 

What is bothering us is the way in which it works out. 
We understood that the community chest would meet the 
matter of street-begging by providing for the relief of beg- 
gars. But it does not so act. A man meets us on the street 
and begs. We cannot tell him where he can get a free meal, 
for the community chest does not let us know. We cannot 
endure to let the man go hungry. We paid the community 
chest to rid us of that pain. We pay twice. 

Again, the community chest promised that it would look 
after cripples and such people, who offend the sensibilities 
and make life miserable. But the lame still sell on the 
streets, the blind still play mournful music, the disfigured 
still leer at one through bandages. We cannot endure it. 
We pay twice again. 

There is something wrong about the community chest, 
something quite unsatisfactory. 



Citv Attorney John L. O'Toole has 
Municipal Economy advised that $1,400,000 Hetch Hetehy 
revenue cannot be included in the 
city's general fund for budget-items in the present fiscal 
year. This has come to the finance board of the supervisors 
as a decided blow, and so they have been skirmishing to 
meet the situation. The upshot is that the finance com- 
mittee has put up to the board a list of items amounting to 
$2,141,000. from which the board will be asked to designate 
special items of expense to be deducted in order to meet 
the power-revenue deficit. 

Chairman of the finance committee. James B. McSheehv. 
says that the city auditor will not honor any expenditure 
which might be made within the $1,400,000 deficit. There 
is no doubt about the correctness of this attitude in view 
of the advice of the city attorney. Then the question arises. 
as to what items are to be eliminated. 

We cannot say that we are really sorry that this has hap- 
pened; rather the contrary. We have always been stick- 
lers for reasonable economy in the government of the city, 
(not for penuriousness nor inadequate expenditure i. such 
as becomes a city of our size and dignity. But we always 
have taken the position that public expenditure should be 
as well guided in municipal affairs as in any well-conducted 
business. And now an opportunity has come when the ex- 
penditure can be carefully examined and restrained within 
reasonable limits. 

That does not mean that school improvements should be 



stopped. On the other hand, money spent in schools, prop- 
erly conducted, is in the long run money saved. Neither 
does it mean that there should be any strangulation of street 
improvement, for streets are the arteries and veins of our 
municipal life. 

But it does mean that expenditures must be carefully 
watched and discreetly indulged in. This will mean great 
saving without frugality. 



Judge Charles Burnell has 
The Parole Question Again come out with a severe attack 

from the bench of his court on 
the parole system. He sentenced a defendant to imprison- 
ment in the County Jail of Los Angeles rather than to San 
Quentin, upon the ground that it would be a more severe 
sentence. He said: "I will not send a man to San Quentin 
because he will do more time at the County Jail than he 
would in prison. If he goes to San Quentin the chances 
are the prison board will lose no time in turning him loose." 
Referring to the Prison Board, the irate jurist remarked: 
"If that bunch of politicians want to turn them loose, I 
am powerless to prevent it. The bigger the crook, the more 
he seems to be favored in this manner." 

This attack on the part of the court ha- produced natural 
irritation among members of the Prison Board, one of 
whom -ays that the jurist is badly informed, and uses the 
short and ugly word. 

We have always taken a stand in favor of the parole-law, 
because we are convinced that on the whole the operation 
of the law has been successful and that it is better even to 
err on the side of humanity, than to take an implacable at- 
titude with respect to criminals. 

But this stand i- predicated on the assumption that 
paroles will be given with discretion and that the Prison 
Board will not allow -ocial or political motives to play any 
part in its decisions. And, we may say at once, that latterly 
we have by no means felt certain that improper motives have 
not played an irregular part in the decisions of the board. The 
"Big Hutch" case is by no means reassuring, and there are 
other cases which bear upon their face, at least, extrinsic evi- 
dence of the operation of motives which should have no part 
in the operation of the parole law. 

Not to be captious, we have an idea which is rapidly be- 
coming a certainty, that there are powers and influences oc- 
nally at work in the operation of the law. and that 
these powers and influence- are on the side of those who 
have sufficient social or political backing. 



1'olitics are proverbially unsatisfactory, 
Weird Politics they are also peculiar. It is one of the 
marked characteristics of politics in action 
that they produce results which are not only unanticipated 
but altogether incapable of being anticipated. Hence the 
element of uncertainty which has always attracted men of 
romantic disposition to the pursuit of politics. 

Taking the matter of airplane-flying, for example; given 
planes ami flyers and practically the same territory, one 
would think that two branches of the government, using 
airplanes, would produce practically similar results. But 
such is not the case. Two governmental organizations 
using planes and men. give us different results, so that one 
marvels at the difference. 

for example, the army and navy use planes. Result — ac- 
cidents occur, men are killed, the service is discouraged, 
complaints are made that flyers do not get fair play, one 
distinguished officer is disciplined for urging a new form 
of air organization, the whole matter is in confusion and 
--in' thing very like scandal cn-uc-. 

Again, the post office uses planes. Result — men carry 
mail day after day without accident, without complaint, 
without dispute and the mati steadily and regu- 

larly as a good clock. There are practically no losses. The 



January 23. 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



mail has carried 6,000,000 pi minis through the air and lias 
travelled 10.000.000 miles during 1925 and has lost one life. 
The post office flyer has to work on schedule time and he 
keeps his schedule through all sorts of weather. The post 
office has built up a corps of flyers, of excellent discipline 
and skill. It has mapped its routes and marked them, it 
has made driving an airplane about as safe as driving a 
truck. 

There is no doubt about the facts. What about the 



Constitutionally there should he a re- 
Reapportionment apportionment of senatorial and as- 
sembly districts following the last cen- 
sus, and as yet no steps have been taken to that end. They 
should be begun. The legislature has met three times since 
the census and no progress has been made in this very im- 
portant matter. The reason is obvious. It lies in the politi- 
cal struggle between the urban and the rural districts ; but 
that is no valid reason for not obeying the law. 

The cities cannot be brought into line and the country 
fears loss of power. San Francisco would lose votes in pro- 
portion to Los Angeles, and the country would markedly 
lose by the growth in relative importance, of the more im- 
portant centers of population. Unless these differences are 
so modified that some sort of an agreement can he reached, 
the State will be without its reapportionment for growth 
since the last census. 

The same set of facts is obvious, also, in matters, re- 
lating to the federal congress. The swing of people from the 
rural districts into the cities has caused the same sort of 
reaction throughout the country as wc have noted in this 
state. Older localities have lost population; newer states 
have gained it. The western seaboard has grown in im- 
portance and, naturally, the older states are nol pleased to 
play a subordinate role. 

We should have a greater representation in Congress 
than we now have. It is of essential importance thai we 
realize this representation, for we never know when we 
may have to insist upon the result of our growth and our 
increased wealth. 

If the present method of reapportionment does not 
fy sufficiently for us to get results from it. then surely some 
method should be devised. Reapportionment both for the 
state and nation has become a crying necessity. The con- 
stitution provides for it and it is our right. 



It is very seldom that two 
Our Strong Representative weeks running any representa- 
tive of ours in Congress should 
provoke our anient admiration and express approval. But 
such is the case with Mrs. Florence Kahn. our congression 
al representative, who is showing a force and individuality 
which few of our congressmen appear to po 

Last week she was strong on the prohibition question 
and came out without any hesitation for a light wine and 
beer amendment to the Volstead Act. This week she has 
come out in favor of the immigrant. She is agitating for 

permission to husbands of American citizens t" enter the 
country, irrespective of the quota, and has proposed an 
amendment to the immigration act to that effect. 

There is no doubl that the law at present has been the 
!i for man} injustices. The wives of American citi- 
zens arc allowed in. independent of the quota, and there 
not seem to he any justification for not applying the 
^anie rule to the foreign husbands ><i American wi> 

Mrs. Kahn goes a step further than this, for she is in 
favor of the parents of American citizens being put also in 
the non-quota class, as well as the husbands, wives and 
minor children of aliens in this country, who have declared 
their intention of becoming America! 

These proposals do her credit and it adopted will abolish 
the scandalous dislocation of the family caused by the 
ent application of the law. \\ c are heartily with her. 



Art Shows and Bill Boards 



By John Brayton 



HAVE you ever come out of an art gallery, worn ragged 
mentally with trying to appreciate the Art (capital A) 
of some master mind with a penchant for misrepresenting 
disgustingly fat female nudes, and then met with a poster 
on the board advertising a country resort or a railroad trip? 
And have you breathed a sigh of relief, though a bit shamed 
inwardly, and told yourself that here was something you 
could understand? And have you analyzed that sigh and 
the relief it expressed? 

Now, don't tell a soul where you got this, but the simple 
truth is that the poster represented more art than all the 
drawings that tortured you in the gallery. We are not 
speaking here of all art exhibits: we are treating of some 
shows that are forced upon us as Art. The poster must pass 
the scrutiny of a board of well-paid and thoroughly trained 
artists before it can make its appearance, for there is a con- 
siderable price involved. And because of this financial 
consideration, this scrutiny is more penetrating than many 
paintings could bear. The commercial aspect is import- 
ant. Thus the final product is artistic. Oh, that there 
were some strong power with a huge club to curb the fury 
of many of our so-called artists! 

How many a time and oft we have been lured to the gal- 
lery by the critic only to he disappointed! This critic per- 
son seems to he lacking in feeling and respect toward us, 
for more than once he calls upon us to worship at the shrine 
of some newly discovered genius — wdio would benefit the 
world vastly more by putting in his time painting barns. 
It is highly desirable, of course, that individual expression 
be encouraged and fostered ; hut it is greatly to he regretted 
that this must he done at SO great annoyance to the public. 
If only commerce could enter here with her exacting stand- 
ards there would he less eye strain for the people to under- 
go. If the reward of commerce — and it is an intrinsic one, 
could be withheld until these standards are met there 
would he fewer explosions "i genius to alarm us. 

It is becoming recognized generally that commerce in 
America is going far toward making an American art. All 

we need do is to recall the advertisements and posters of a 

few years back to catch the idea. Thos< ol I "day are much 
superior; many of them are works of art. The persons 
who decry the influence of commerce on art are not think- 
he matter through. Commerce is one of the greatest 
influences for civilization and advancement, and the Old 
World would do well to look to her artistic laurels when 
rides America as that "basely material nation." 

insiders the audience, and this is an import- 
ant detail. The inspired young lady who jumbled words 
together for the mere sake of sound without thought to 
their significance, may have produced a kind of poetry; 
hut her audience failed to grasp the idea and her efforts 
edly fell flat. What we are accustomed to seems 
good to us until we can he convinced there is something 
better to he had. And wc are not easily stampeded. Commerce 
cannot affbl therwise than consider the audience. 

It is difficult to separate lite and art and commerce. It 
en asserted that commercial periods produce artis- 
Ihe literature of the Elizabethan period of F.ng- 
land — pattern for all time! — flowered from an intensely ac- 
tive commerce. When a nation business spirit 
i: fall- into artistic decay. ( Uir American business is top- 
ping the world and invading tbos e old countries that taught 
ns our trades. Is it not reasonable, then, to look forward 
to an all-surmounting :rt for this, our young, 
rous, restless and business-like country? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 23, 1926 




>LMSURE$W4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

_ Tom Moor>e. 





Wilkes 

SAN FRANCISCO is at last to have 
an opportunity of seeing "The Big 
Parade," conceded by everyone who 
has seen it, 
to be the suc- 
cess of the 
decade, when 
it opens at 
the Wilkes 
Theater to- 
morrow eve- 
ning with a 
large orches- 
tra and spe- 
cial score un- 
der the able 
direction of 
CI ar en c e 

■Catherine Schwartz West, the 

musical director, sent on from New 
York for this occasion. 

There is an interesting story in con- 
nection with this great picture, as to 
how it happened to be sent on tour as 
a "road show." When J. J. McCarthy, 
the astute New York showman, who 
handled such road tours as the notable 
successes, "The Birth of a Nation," 
"Intolerance," "Way Down East." 
"The Covered Wagon." and "The Ten 
Commandments," was in Los Angeles 
last summer to view the making of 
"Ben Hur," he happened to be in the 
projection room when two reels of 
"The Big Parade" were being screened. 
He viewed the first reel in a detached 
manner, but when the second reel was 
being shown, he came to life with a 
start. Turning to Marcus Loew of the 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer corporation, he 
asked the name of the picture. "\\ e 
have about decided to call it 'The Big 
Parade,' " answered Mr. Loew, "but that 
title may be changed later on, as we 
have just started making the picture." 
McCarthy became enthusiastic, and 
made the statement, that if the picture 
was carried on with the same deft 
touch, and the heart interest main- 
tained, it would prove to be the best 
thing since "The Birth of a Nation." 
He met King Vidor, the director, prais- 
ing him highly on his craftmanship, 
and predicting that if he kept on as 
he had started, he would have a world 
beater. 

Mr. Loew, at first, was a bit skepti- 
cal as to the advisability of withdraw- 
ing "The Big Parade" from the ordi- 



(Conducted by Katherine Schwartz) 

nary channels of presentation and turn- 
ing it into a two dollar road show, but 
McCarthy's judgment has invariably 
been one hundred per cent in such mat- 
ters, and so the verdict finally was, "Go 
ahead." 

The rest is history. "The Big Pa- 
rade" was presented at the Astor The- 
ater, New York in November, and its 
success was enormous from the start ; 
it is still showing there to capacity 
houses. Showmen, newspapermen and 
others of seasoned judgment predict 
that "The Big Parade" will stay in 
New York for two years at least. Im- 
mediately following the New York pre- 
miere. McCarthy organized road com- 
panies as fast as possible, and it is now 
showing in Philadelphia, Chicago, Bos- 
ton, Detroit, and last week it opened in 
Washington, D. O, where a distin- 
guished audience, including President 
Coolidge, the entire cabinet, members 
of the diplomatic corps and foreign cor- 
respondents were present. In every 
place it has scored an immense suc- 
cess, and created a sensation, and 
praise for it has been unanimous. 

Much praise goes to J. J. McCarthy 
for his marvelous ability in being able 
to discern a "winner." 



S. F. Symphony 

Haydn's Symphony in D Minor. 
"The Clock," occupied a distinctive 
part of the program of the seventh pair 
rif symphony concerts at the Curran 
Theater last week. This is one of the 
oldest, as well as one of the best of the 
Haydn symphonies, overflowing with 
melodies, and containing a beautiful 
four part counterpart harmony, which 
Alfred Hertz, who is undeniably a 
lover of the old masters, conducted in 
a particularly sympathetic manner. 

A Dance Rhapsody by Delius, which 
opened the second part of the concert 
was a distinct contrast from the old to 
the new — beautifully orchestrated with 
a view to bringing out that which is 
best in a modern symphony orchestra. 

Strauss' beautiful tone poem, "Death 
and Transfiguration" was played as a 
memorial tribute to Emanuel Siegfried 
Heller, one of the founders of the San 
Francisco Symphony, and its warmest 
friend. It is too bad that this beautiful 
thing should have been played without 
one word of applause, but that same 
lack of applause was due to the deep 



feeling apparent throughout the large 
audience which attended these con- 
certs, and not from any lack of appre- 
ciation on the part of its hearers. 

Curran * * * 

Tomorrow evening at the Curran, 
Kolb and Dill, two names synonymous 
with laughter, will open in their latest 
fun concotion, "Pair o' Fools," a new 
musical comedy from the pen of John 
Emerson and Anita Loos, with a lilting 
musical setting by Arthur Freed. An 
ever welcome Kolb and Dill chorus, an 
array of beauty, talent and captivating 
dance, the whole flanked by orchestral 
strains which will live long in memory, 
combine to make this, their latest ve- 
hicle, a great hit. 

Reports from the Northwest state 
that the house has been sold out before 
the company had even reached the 
town. — the news having traveled ahead 
that Kolb and Dill had the best show 
they have been seen in for years. 

There is a splendid cast in support 
of the two popular stars, including May 
CloVj Julie Blanc and others. 

* * * 
Alcazar 

"Little Jessie James," a musical com- 
edy with a bright galaxy of players for 
the principal roles, and a fast-stepping 
chorus of "beautiful bobbed hair 
bandits" opens at the Alcazar tomor- 
row evening. 

This is Henry Duffy's second ven- 
ture into the musical comedy field, and 
those who viewed "Irene," with its 
record run of ten weeks last summer, 
will want to be sure and see this of- 
fering. 

Dale Winter will have the title role, 
and she will again be heard in some of 
the catchy musical numbers. A new- 
comer to the cast, but well known to 
San Franciscans is Lorraine Sands 
Mullins; Roy Purviance is the tenor; 
Phil Tead the juvenile; William David- 
sun. Betty Laurence, William Mac- 
auley, Florence Roberts and Dorothy 
LeMar are all cast acceptably. 

* * * 
President 

"Dancing Mothers," sensational com- 
edy of the current season in New York, 
opens at the President tomorrow after- 
noon with one of San Francisco's fa- 
vorite actresses, Florence Roberts, in 
the principal role. 

A cast of unusual excellence has been 



January 23, 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

\K\T WFI'K 



ALEXANDRIA 

Genry nnil ISth 


1 

( 


Pictures 


ALCAZAR 
O'Farreil nr. Powrll 


I' 

1 


'Little Jessie James" 
Henry Duffy Players 


CALIFORNIA 
4th and Market 


i 


"His People" 


CAMEO 

»:ifl Market St. 


1 

s 


Jack Hoxey in 
"Two-Fisted Jim" 


CAPITOL 

Bills nr. Market 


\ 


"Siegfried" 
A UFA Picture 


CASINO 
Mason and Ellis 


\ 


Pictures 


CASTRO 

429 Castro St. 


\ 
( 


Pictures 


CURRAN 
Geary nr. Mason 


1 
s 


Kolb & Dill in 
"A Pair o' Fools" 


EGYPTIAN 


\ 


Pictures 


GOLDEN GATE 
G. G. Ave. <& Taylor 


s 


Vaudeville 


GRANADA 
111(1(1 Market St. 


X 
[ 


Tom Mix in 
"The Best Bad Man" 


HAIGHT 
Haleht at Cole 


( 
f 


Pictures 


IMPERIAL 

1077 Market St. 


f 


Charlie Chaplin in 
"The Gold Rush" 


LOEWS WARFIELD 
1)88 Market St. 


X 


Bill Hart in 
"Tumbleweeds" 


MAJESTIC 
Mission between 
20th and 21st 


X 
s 


Pictures 


METROPOLITAN 
2055 Union St. 


I 


Pictures 


NEW FILLMORE 
1320 Fillmore 
NEW MISSION 
2550 Mission 


} 


Pictures 


ORPHEUM 
O'Fnrrell * Powell 


I 


Vaudeville 


PANTAGES 
Mnrket lit Mason 




Vaudeville 


POMPEII 

Next to Grnnada 


f 


Pictures 


PORTOLA 
770 Market St. 


X 


Pictures 


PRESIDENT 
Market A McAllister 


X 

\ 


"Dancing Mothers" 


ROYAL 
IBM Polk St. 


X 

1 


Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS 
005 Market St. 


1 


Peggy Hopkins Joyce 
"The Skyrocket" 


SUTTER 

Satter and Stelner 


1 


Pictures 


UNION SO.UARE 
O'Farreil nr. Powell 


I 


Pictures and 
Vaudeville 


WILKES 

Geary and Mason 


1 
f 


"The Big Parade" 


WIGWAM 

MNslon and 22d 


1 

( 


Pictures 


CONI BRT9 

t'nrrnn Thenter — Sunday nfti-rnonn -:4.*.. Snn 
Frnuol<(cii s> m |t1wtn> Orchestra. 



"What's the difference between a 

n and an old-fashioned kiss?" 
"About live minutes." — Clarion. 



selected by Mr. Duffy for this produc- 
tion. Leneta Lane will be seen in one 
of the most interesting parts she has 
portrayed here. Frederic Vogeding, 
leading man for Lenore Ulric in Kiki, 
will be seen in an important part; Ken- 
neth Daigneau is also featured. Others 
in the company are Francis Fraunie, 
Earl Lee, Olive Cooper, Helen Gill- 
more, John Junior. Maylian Mercereau, 
Eloise Keeler, Richard Ehlers, and a 
host of others. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

Heading the bill for a second big 
week is the ever popular Nora Bayes, 
who will present several entirely new 
numbers, as only she can do. Since 
her last appearance here, Miss Bayes 
has been traveling from London 
throughout the continent, jumping here 
directly from London. Louis Alter and 
his wife assist her at the piano. 

Powers' Dancing Elephants, the 
same troupe that created such a sen- 
sation here last year, are another big 
feature on the bill. These wonderfully 
trained animals are said to be the most 
intelligent of their species, performing 
their difficult stunts with great ease. 

Ben Meroff, clever comedian and his 
new organization called "The High 
1 Fitters" is also featured; George 
Watts and Belle Hawley, she of the 
beautiful face and figure, present 
"Laughs Coated with Melodies"; Rich 
Haves and "bis valet" have a novelty 
turn of the highest order; the Les 
Ghezzis, equilibrists, have been re- 
tained for another week, promising 
several new stunts. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Benny Leonard, famous lightweight 
boxing champion, headlines the bill at 
thi- theater for the coming week, ap- 
pearing in a --ketch called "The Pro- 
fessor," in which he is assisted by 
Charles Leon and a strong supporting 
cast. 

Yal and Ernie Stanton, the English 
boys from America, are prime come- 
dians always being great favorites 
lure, ami present a new act called 
I nder Your Flat." said to he their 
funniest 

Tom Bryan and Lillian Fairchild 
bring "Billboard Steps," a speedy dan- 
cing act. in which they are assisted by 
Lvnn Bruno: Gaston Palmer, a jug- 
gler of great talent, as well as a clever 
monologist, is al<o on the bill; Keller 
Sisters and Lynch, well-known phono- 
graph artists, have a clever act ; Ed and 
Jennie Rooney, aerialists, call their of- 
fering "Up in the Air." 

The screen feature is the first show- 
ing here of "The Fighting Heart." with 
San Fran vn George O'Brien 

in the star role, assisted by Billie Dove 
and a notable cast 



Loew's Warfield 

William Hart will be seen in a brand 
new play called "Tumbleweed," begin- 
ning tomorrow at the Warfield. Many 
people are curious to know why the 
play was named "Tumbleweed." 

Here's the answer ; During the set- 
tling of the Cherokee Land Strip be- 
tween Kansas and Oklahoma way back 
in '89, the cow punchers had to seek 
new fields and pastures, because the 
cattle barons on the strip were forced 
to move and the cattle were dispersed. 
Hal G. Evarts, author of the story, says 
the cowboys referred to themselves as 
"tumbleweeds" because they were con- 
tinually on the move, and pointed with 
disdain to the lowly squash anchored 
to its vine till somebody cut it loose for 
cooking purposes. Here is their song: 
"I never cease my roamin' 

I'm always hard to catch; 
But the "punkin" stays forever, 
In the same ole garden patch." 

On the stage Walt Roesner will play 
his own "Evolution of Jazz," contain- 
ing the much discussed number "Rhap- 
sody in Blue" by Gershwin. Roesner 
is using in this act a Duo Art piano 
playing the Gershwin record. Fanchon 
and Marco present the famous Fords, 
called "The Four Fords," assisted by 
Sherry Louise Marshall in "A Music 
Box Revue." As an added feature, 
Angelus Babe, famous colored Charles- 
ton dancer will entertain also. 



Granada 

The Granada is featuring a "3-s'tar" 
show the coming week, starting today. 
Tom Mix in "The Best Bad Man" is 
the screen feature, while Mack Sen- 
nett's newest comedy, "Wide Open 
Spaces" with Ralph Graves, will be an- 
other important offering. On the au- 
tomatic stage will be the 1926 edition 
of "Twenty Minutes at Coffee Dan's." 
(Continued on Page 15) 



x>you pay no more,* 



BEST FLOWER 




TMbloey. Thousand Ooideta' 

224-226 GianlUvt lei Kearny 4975 



Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

On the Edge of the Berkeley HI1U 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
Set in a beautiful twenty-eight-acre 
park between Berkeley and Oakland. 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Franc isc- Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 23, 1926 






"Stepping Out" 

B( >STON correspondents of the daily press are accredited 
with the statement that handsome young John Cool- 
idge, son of President and Mrs. Coolidge, emulates the 
Prince of Wales in his tendency for social diversions. 

Why not? There is certainly nothing startling in the an- 
nouncement that a line, stalwart young American boy 
should like society. There certainly is nothing out-of-the 
way about that young boy's desire to dance, to go to parties, 
to entertain a pretty young miss. In fact, it is the most 
wholesome and natural thing in the world for a full fledged 
young chap to do. And so we're glad that young John 
Coolidge is giving evidence of his fondness for society — 
that means he is going to keep his head; Now doesn't it? 

The Prince of Wales is dearly loved for his manly attri- 
butes, for his human, his natural, boy-like interest in the 
world and the activities of the world. In fact, the Prince 
of Wales has friends, real friends, not just because lie is 
heir to the throne of England, but because he is so delight- 
fully human and close to the world of a living and breath- 
ing humanity. 

Let's honor this stalwart young son of the President of 
these United States, for with the stability of character 
which is his heritage, and the mental balance which is his 
by right of inheritance. Mr. John Coolidge is going to find 
a lot of real, genuine joy in discovering friends who rejoice 
in him not only because he is the son of the President, hut 
also because he is a true, radiant-hearted young man who 
wants to find his measure of happy enjoyment in the social 
life of the greatest nation on the face of the earth. 

All honor to this student of Amherst and may his "step- 
ping out" be accompanied by the best wishes of real friends 
who will assist in his natural and wholesome happiness. 

Peninsula Lures 

So many alluring affairs have engaged society among 
the peninsula set within this past week, that it is difficult 
to fasten one's thoughts on any one outstanding event. It 
has just been one delightful lure after another, particularly 
out in the crisp open air. 

The "paper chase" seems to be the most popular and 
striking diversion among the social set just now, and the 
thrill of it all, the novelty of the activity, and really the 
health-giving glow of it all, make it one of the most popular, 
if not the most engrossing, of all the present moment gay- 
eties. 

The riding luncheon given during the past week in com- 
pliment to Miss Mary Clark, when the charming Mrs. \\ il- 
liam Bowers Bourn entertained at the San Mateo home of 
the Bourns, "Filoli" was not only a memorable gathering, 
but it had its quota of little novelties too. 

To begin with. Miss Clark, herself, is the incentive for 
enthusiasm and all the paper chasers were heartily in attune 
with everything. Guests at the riding luncheon included: 
Mrs. Celia Tobin Clark and Miss Mary Clark, Mr. and Mrs, 
Cyril Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. Corbett Moody. Mr. and Mrs. 

COLONIAL HOTEL 

030 Bush Street, Between Powell find Stockton, San Franctaco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHER Proprietor 



By Antoinette Arnold 

William Gregory Parrott, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Tobin, 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence McCreery, Miss Katherine Kuhn, 
Mr. Richard Tobin, Mr. Richard Schwerin and Mr. William 

Tevis, Jr. 

* * * 

Studio Surprise 

Another San Mateo function given this past week which 
took on the glamour and charm of novelty, was a studio 
surprise party given by Mrs. Gerald Williamson, who en- 
tertained in honor of the birthday of her husband, and also 
of the birthday of Mr. Edward H. Clark, Jr., which happens 
to fall on the same day. 

Tacking boxes served as chairs for the guests in a room 
arranged like a studio. A cake-walk skit was part of the 
evening's spontaneous pleasure. Informal supper service 
added to the novelty of the merry event. 



"See America" Slogan 
Of Notable Luncheon 

Six specific purposes are outlined by the Hotel Women's 
Unity Club, of which Mrs. Perlev Andrew Young is the 
president. All of these purposes will be definitely presented 
at the annual luncheon of the organization when the mem- 
bers gather for their International Day on Thursday, Jan- 
uarv 28, in the Terrace Room of the Fairmont Hotel at 
12:30 o'clock. 

The primary object, "to create a better understanding and 
a more friendly and social feeling between the women of 
the bay cities hotel fraternity," finds its paramount pur- 
pose to be that of co-operation with the Chamber of Com- 
merce and the "See America First" movement. 

Diplomats and consuls will be guests at the International 
Luncheon when the hostesses will, in returning compliment, 
decorate their various tables with the color schemes and 
the insignia of the various countries represented. They 
will also wear the costumes of the different nations. The 
president is to appear in her costume of Columbia. 

Mrs. John Zeeman, who is acting as chairman of the re- 
ception committee, will have charge of the French table 
and wear the costume of France, all her guests, also wear- 
ing the costumes of France. Mrs. Florence Lombard, who 
owns the Commodore Hotel, also the Hotel Lombard, which 
opened this week, will preside over the Holland table. Mrs. 
O. L. Becker will have a table done in the colors of Spain. 

The Chinese table will be presided over by Mrs. Henrv 
Barker, and Mrs. James Flannery will also 'have an elab- 
orate table decorated in the Chinese designs. Mrs. Carl 
Gardner will preside over one of the tables. Mrs. W. L. 
Rothchild will have the Swedish table and announces a 
great "surprise" for her decorative scheme. 

Mrs. George Wilson, secretary of the Unity Club, will 
have the Japanese table and Mrs. M. A. Snider will be 
hostess at the German table. An Esperanto table will be 
one of the unique schemes of this unusual luncheon with 
Brewster Ames and his daughter in charge. Mrs. SteUa 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 
Telephone Sutter «130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



fanuary 23, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Vought will be the singer, and Re\ 
Racier the principal speaker. 



William 



HOTEL CAN 

7.10 Sllttei 



Consuls Will Attend 

Many consuls will be honor guests at the 
Hotel Women's Unity Luncheon, which will 
bring- together both men and women identified 
with the hotel fraternity, Thursday. January 

2S at the Fairmont. 

* * * 

Vocal Numbers 

Mme. Stella Vought, the vocalist of this de- 
lightful luncheon of hotel people, will be heard 
in a group of songs, "The South Winds Are 
Blowing," Densmore; "When I Was Seven- 
teen," Swedish Folk Song with Miss Jean Do- 
rothy Rouse at the piano. 



Clark Ball Attracts 
Folks From Pebble Beach 

Mr. and Mrs. George Gordon Moore and 
Mrs. Helen Hobbs, who attended the beautiful 
Clark Ball, have returned to their home at 
Pebble Beach, where many of the smart set 
from the Monterey peninsula are guests over the week-end 
for interesting gatherings in the lovely home of the Moores. 

Mr. and Mrs. Moore gave a dinner party at the San Mateo 
Club, entertaining Mr. and Mrs. Fentriss Hill, Mir. and Mrs. 
Gregory Parrots Mr. ond Mrs. Arthur Brown. lr., Mr. and 
Mrs. Corbett Moody, Mr. William S. Tevis, Jr. and Mr. 
Gordon Tevis and Mr. Lansing Tevis. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Lorenz Avenali gave a dinner party this 
week at their attractive Russian Hill home. 

* * * 

A luncheon party will be given by Mrs. Charles Deering 
at the Francesca club rooms on Sutter Street, Thursday. 
lanuary 28, in compliment to friends, some of whom have 
recently returned from abroad 




'ititniiRY 

Street 



San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



* * * 

given at the Fairmont Motel, Friday, 



A tea was given at the Fairmont tiotei, fnaay, for the 
guarantors of the Greater San Francisco Conservatory "I 
Music, of which Mr, Ernest Bloch is the artistic director 

and tlie Misses Ada Clement. Lillian Hodghead, assistant 

directors. 

* * * 

Mrs. George Harry Mtendell entertained at luncheon in 
her home in Pacific Avenue and later took her guests to 
the San Francisco Symphony. 



* * 
gave a charming luncheoi 



Mrs. R. P. Merillion gave a charming luncheon at her 
home last week, her guests afterwards going \<> the bridge 
party at Hotel Whitcomb. Mrs. Eustace Cullinan, Mrs. 
Paul C. Butte and Mrs. W. Harold \\ ilson were the lunch- 
eon guests. 
Dr. Jordan's Birthday 

The seventy-fifth birthday of a great man in California. 

Dr. David Starr Jordan, lias attracted the attention of p 
nent personages throughout the entire world. For Dr. Jor- 
dan is a great man. a man of magnificent intelligence, bul 
in addition to the master mind which has long made him 
an outstanding example of linn purpose and stability of 
character, brilliancy of intellect and supreme activity, he 
is also an inspiring guide to those who in their turn shall 
follow him. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

S wr v Maria, Cai ifornm 

<)•, ihr Ctm» Hi«hw«T H«lf««» (!'<»'•" S«o NMlM and I »• An«#ln 
An Inn of I noiual Excellent*. 

»■«■# or uritf for r*»«rr«M>iu ©n y**' "*«* "•» »»•*•* 



At his home on the campus of Leland Stan- 
ford, Jr. University, Dr. David Starr Jordan 
was literally showered with telegrams of con- 
gratulation from various parts of the world 
on Tuesday, his birthday. But with all these 
praiseworthy briefs from admirers in all lines 
of human endeavor, the "grand old man" of 
Stanford, was as full of new plans and future 
activities as if he was just starting out on life's 
journey instead of just rounding his seventy- 
fifth birthday. 

Dr. Jordan was president of Leland Stanford 
Junior University from the time of its founda- 
tion in 1891 until his retirement in the year 
1913. During that time he created a world- 
wide reputation for literary achievements and 
for all other branches of scholarly work. 

The home of Dr. and Mrs. Jordan is the 
scene of some of the most memorable gather- 
ings of distinguished personages on the Stan- 
ford campus, where their hospitality is pro- 
verbial. * * * 
Family Joins in Celebration 

The family of the noted educator. Dr. David 
Starr Jordan and Mrs. Jordan, presided over the birthday 
celebration, quiet and dignified as it was, with an atmos- 
phere of felicitations prevailing throughout, last Tuesday 
night, where intimate friends of the Jordan family gathered 
to I'.ii honor to the president emeritus. Dr. and Mrs. Na- 
thaniel Dartner and Mr. and Mrs. Knight Starr Jordan 
vcix .if the family group. Mrs. Dartner is the eldest daugh- 
ter of Dr. and Mrs. Jordan. Their other son was detained 
in Mexico on professional duties but is expected at the Jor- 
dan home this week, when another big family gathering 
will be held as a post celebration of the birthday of the 
noted naturalist and educator. 

* * * 
Mr. and Mrs. Michie 
Entertain Literary Folks 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Michie entertained a coterie of 
writers at their charming home in the Russian Hill district 
last week, their guests including many prominent people 
nf the bay and peninsula cities. The Michie home is famed 
for the cordiality of the hosts and those who are of the num- 
ber included at their delightful "home" events always 
erly welcome the bidding to Mr. and Mrs. Michie's. 

Last week's guests included Mr. and Mrs. Fenwick 

Holmes, both of whom are well known in the lecture field. 
Mr. Holmes ha> just returned from a tour of eastern lit- 
erarj centers where he gave lecture- on psychology. Kath- 
I ggleston Holme--, the brilliant fiction writer is now 
completing her eighth novel, Mr. and Mrs. Malanmth. the 
latter of whom is Joan London, talented daughter of Jack 
London, Mr .and Mrs. Ray Mjarshall, now of this city. Mr. 
Marshall being a well-known newspaper editor recently re- 
turned from the Orient; Barrett Willoughby. author of 
"Rocking Moon." Mr. and Mrs. Mateo Mezquida, the lat- 
ter of whom is Anna Pdake Mezquida. well-known poet, 
author and short story writer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Nunan were guests. Mrs. Nunan. 
US as the "petite princess of the piano," Mr. Nunan 
of the editorial staff of the "Examiner." Mr. and Mrs. L. 
Young i Anna Young, prima donna I. Mr. and Mrs. 
\\ . Harold Wilson of local literary circles: Mr. and Mrs. 
F. Ellis Miller, prominent in society circles of Piedmont. 
Mr. and Mrs. Pari Ennis, Mr. F.nnis of the editorial staff of 
'Bulletin," Miss Helen Ennis of the "Chronicle." Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter Jones, Miss Geneve Shaffer, writer, trav- 
el realtor. Mr. Lund, prominent in university circles, 
were all guests at the Michie supper party where literary 
themes were topics of the evening's fascination. 
I Continued on Page 14 1 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 23, 1926 



•^Slyf* 



-^JS* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



*&Xj&> 



"®J$Jif 




How the Judges and Lawyers Stacked 
Up When They Met at the Presidio 

HARRY STAFFORD asks why should he 
play golf with the judges for nothing, 
when he gets paid for talking to them ? 



Cy Appell showed up with a pair of number 
twelve shoes. (Cy ought to be able to do a Charleston 
with those immense gunboats). 

* * * 

Percy Henderson is sore at Colonel Griffith. 

* * * 

Judge Harry McKenzie, who wrote the songs and lyrics 
for Billy Jaxton's show, says training the chorus keeps him 
too busy. 

* * * 

The American Legion always knows a good golfer ; that 
is why they presented Judge Fitzpatrick with a flag. 

* * * 

Louis Ferrari is a sea lawyer; he handles cases off ship;;. 

* '* * 

Bill Manaton says when Archie Treat can golf like he 
toast-masts, he can plav Marin in par. 

* * * 

Harry Stafford was granted a postponement. The ten Eng- 
lish rockets are all for vou Harry ! 

* * ' * 

Judges Fitzpatrick and Graham were happy last Friday 
when Mother Machree Sales the River Shannon. 

* * * 

Hall Ross of San Mateo, suggested that no speeches be 
made. Hall said the "Bull" would be carved at the table. 

* * * 

Hugo Newhouse got so excited when he discovered that 
he was third low net, that he had to get a shoe horn to put his 
hat on with. 

* * * 

Charlie Hasswell said the reason he didn't win was because 
he couldn't get a proper stance. His shoes weren't mates. 

* * * 

Dave Livingstone had a legitimate alibi. Dave mistook the 
guide posts for the flag, but they were on the wrong fairway. 

* * * 

Walter Shelton apparently doesn't belong to the union. He 
was caught digging in a sand trap after the five o'clock whistle 
blew. * * * 

Bill Gleeson, from Oakland, got off to a bad start ; the jockey- 
lost his whip. * * * 

Joe Hyman was so greased up that he slipped away from the 
gang- * * * 

Dick Shannon puts everyone out of step when he plays. Dick 
sings that refrain, "Oh, Baby." 

* * * 

Ed McCurdy, the San Mateo nightingale, didn't show. He 
got winged on his way up. 

* * * 

John Barratt claims they ought to have all lady jurors. New- 
house says the only place to have them is at Jack's. 

* * * 

E. B. Spofford says no matter how rotten you play you can 
have a handicap to match. 



Judge Graham made a motion to strike out, but was over- 
ruled. John Barratt said the only place the judge could strike 
out was in a bunker. 

* * * 

Charlie Brennan wouldn't play with Jim or Jim with Charlie. 

Hugh McKevitt played like a peasant. He turned in a card 
of 124, less 10 pounds off for weight. 

* * * 

Judges Frank Deasy and Jim Conlan were barred on the 
ground that the justice of the peace is not a lawyer. 

* * * 

John Barratt left word at his office that he was in the Su- 
preme Court, but we saw him at the 14th tee. 

* * * 

Ralph Duval of the P. G. and E. 

Cleaned up the boys with his ready-made tee. 

* * * 

Hugo Newhouse claims he is the low net lawyer. So is Pala- 
dini among the fishermen. 

fudge Graham sang his song en- 
titled. "The 80 and 90 Players Make 

Over 100 With Me." 

* * * 

Some say they play in 80, 

And some in 90 too; 

However when they play with me 

Their game is not so true. 

fliey hook and slice and pull and 

top 
And in the cup the ball won't drop. 

* * * 

Stafford and Ferrari got sore when 
the fog lifted and didn't show any- 
thing. They wanted to take a crack 
at the judges. 

Juder Thomnt* F. Graham * * * 

The world's greatest 

reconciler. Billy McMalion, the tailor-lawyer, 

wore a checker vest so that he could keep check on himself. 

When Percy Towne heard that Jim Brennan would be there 
he left for Los Angeles. 

* * * 

Stafford says : The only time any judge speaks to Louis 
Ferrari is when they shout "fore" on a golf course. 

* * * 

Chief Dan O'Brien says he is going to look over the next 
tournament very carefully. 

* * * 

John Barratt said Judge Fitzpatrick should probate the Pre- 
sidio golf course. 

* * * 

Louis Goodman said he never knew there were so many traps 
on a golf course. 

* * * 

Bush Finnell, who arrived in time from the Fiji Islands, 
via Del Monte, shot his bolt on the 19th hole. 

* * * 

Ralph Robinson, the champion handball player from Spok- 
ane, volleyed them all over the lot. 

* * * 

Lawrence Livingstone forgot his horse, but the pace he set 
burnt up the course. 

(Continued on Page 13) 




January 23, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



AS*. 



THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



&& 



By Josephine Wilson 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events In men's and 

women's organizations. 




J. n 



JOSEPHINE 
WILSON 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG EVENTS 

r HERE is considerable interest and 
many congratulations surrounding 
James Rolph III, over the recent announce- 
ment that he has been reappointed as editor- 
in-chief of the "Blue and Gold," year book of 
the University of California. Young Rolph 
was the former editor of the prize number 
of "Blue and Gold," which in 1925 won the 
first honors among college publications. 
James Rolph 111, succeeds Joseph G. 
Murphy and his selection as editor-in-chief at this particular 
time, is especially important for the new year book will re- 
quire unusual skill and adaptation. The son of Mayor and 
Mrs. Tames Rolph of San Francisco is not only one of the 
most popular and highly respected of the college students at 
the University of California^ but he has balance of mind, a 
vision of far-reaching scope and is rated as one of "fair- 
minded" and big-thought men of the fraternity. 

We shall look with keen interest for the issue of 1926, 
when the "Blue and Gold" will again claim the attention of 
publishers throughout the world. "James Rolph III, is 
just like his dad, in his exceptional understanding of people 
and important things," say his constituents, who always 
add, "Look, what a wonderful mother he has too. He has 

heritage, that boy." 

* * * 

For the fourth time, Harold L. Zellerbach has been 

elected to the presidency of the Young Men's and Young 
Women's Hebrew Association. Vice-presidents are, Mrs. 
M. S. Koshland and Joseph Leo Hyman. A. Katschinski 
is the treasurer. With due appreciation for his work dur- 
ing the past four years, Mr. Harold Zellerbach was accorded 
an ovation by his associates and those with whom he has 
carried on the extensive work of the Hebrew Association. 
The success of the association and its far-reaching influence 
in the community was made the topic of the evening's dis- 
course and the pleasant and encouraging subject for con- 
sideration. Congratulations were made to all of the execu- 
tives for their excellent co-operative work. 

* * * 

America's influence in the commercial affairs of Europe 
was the subject of an address given before the Foreign 
Trades Club this past week by the Hon. R. M. Tobin, minis- 
ter to the Netherlands. The luncheon held in the rooms of 
the Commercial Club was attended by prominent men from 
the bay cities. 

"The Dawes plan," said Tobin. "has put Europe on its 
feet. Never have 1 seen a more hopeful spirit than that 
which now prevails." The plan which provides for the 
French evacuation oi the Ruhr, was quoted as responsible 
for this prevailing condition and the Locarno pact cou!d 
not have been perfected unless the Dawes plan had first 
the way, according to the speaker at the Foreign 

Trades Club. 

* * * 

General Manager McCains of the Market Street Railway 

w i 11 have for his assistant, Frank J. Linforth. according to 

announcements made a few days ago. The new appointee 

has been superintendent of employment in the company be- 

(Contimied on Page 13) 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 

LAUREL HALL CLUB, of which Mrs. John G. Jury is 
the president, is claiming the attention of local club- 
dom with the high standards of their programs, their his- 
torical studies and the criterion established by their anni- 
versary affairs. 

This is the first club of San Francisco, historically, and 
takes the name of "the oldest club" from the date of its 
formation. Readable books, current events, and other in- 
teresting data were discussed at the meeting held on Wed- 
nesday of this past week at the Fairmont Hotel. Mrs. 
Charles Harley Frost was the chairman. 

"Marvelous California and Its Possibilities for Develop- 
ment" was the significant subject ably presented by Mrs. 
Jury, the president, who has but lately returned from a long 
tour of European centers of culture. Her comparative ref- 
erences and her keen observations made the subject one of 
increased interest and renewed zeal on the part of Cali- 
fornians. 

Miss Christine Hart, a former president of Laurel Hall, 
was assigned the subject, "California, Past and Present," 
with special stress placed on future California. Vocal and 
instrumental solos were given under the direction of Mrs. 
Charles B. Lamp with Miss Lillian Clark and Lester Schivo 
the soloists. The reception committee of the day included, 
Mrs. A. G. Stoll, Mrs. H. L. Dewey, Mrs. John Farnham, 
Mrs. John S. Gray and Mrs. M. R. Parnell. 

Mrs. I.. A. Peiffer, one of the most prominent members of 
Laurel Hall and also an officer of the club and the League 
of American Pen Women, has a number of friends as her 
guests at the noteworthy day. The Laurel Hall Club is 
planning a memorable anniversary breakfast on February 
2 at the Fairmont Hotel, when club executives from sister 
organizations will be honor guests and who will partici- 
pate in happy memories of their splendid club and the 
progress it has made under its able executives. 

* * * 
Dramatic Event 

The dramatic section of Cap and Bells Club is planning 
a noteworthy presentation of "She Stoops to Conquer" under 
the supervision of Mrs. Edward J. Morser. chairman of the 
section with the president of the club, Mrs. Marshall C. 
Harris, directing the reception of members and the many 
uur-ts expected for this outstanding event. 

Each year the Cap and Bells' dramatic section has a dra- 
matic evening and so closely touching the professional life 
of the theatrical world are these events rated, that they 
claim the attention of the entire bay region. This year's 
event, which takes place next month will be held in the St. 
Francis Hotel. 

Rehearsals have been under way for some time and as 
the cast includes many of the most talented members of 
Cap and Rells. there is every reason to expect a splendid 
presentation of the play chosen for the dramatic evening. 
The Cap and Bell orchestra. Mrs. J. A. Kuykendall, chair- 
man, will contribute its part of the musical program. 

» * * 
Card Party 

One of the largest card parties of the season will be given at 
Thursday. January 28, at the Fairmont Hotel, under the 
direction of Mrs. f. E. Gilson, and according to the number 
(Continued on Page 



12 



SAN FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 23, 1926 




THE Federal Power. Commission has approved the 
transfer to the Pacific (.as and Electric Company of a 
license for the development of water-power projects on the 
upper reaches of the Mokelumne River. 

* * * 

"It is safer to travel than to stay at home." said R. J. 

Clancy, assistant to the general manager of the Southern 
Pacific Company in announcing that the Pacific lines ol the 
company are entering their seventh consecutive year with- 
out fatality to a passenger in a steam rail accident. 

* * * 

— Traffic exports predict a great increase in tourist travel 
for the Pacific Coast in 1926. Better equipment and ser- 
vice as well as increase in population and greater skill m 
organizing, arc given as reasons for the anticipated increase. 

* * * 

—The railroads of the United States had ten new records 
to their credit in 1925. These include amount of freight, 
distance traversed, number of cars and amount of taxes. 
It was the greatest showing made in history. 

* * * 

— The oil companies of California have done magnifi- 
cently this year. It is the best year since 1919 and. for 
most! the best year in their history. Some of the oil com- 
panies doubled their earnings in the year and the great ma- 
jority show large advances. 

* * * 

—The raise in rates of the Key System has produced great 
feeling across the Bay. but the Railroad Commission says: 
"We estimate that the additional annual revenue necessary 
to so secure public confidence as to attract this amount oi 
investment capital (.fo. 000 ,000) will not be less than 

100." 

* * * 

— January has so far been one of the greatest reinvest- 
ment months in history. There is a very excellent market 
for bonds with few i-sucs to supply the demand. 

* * * 

— A notable feature of recent bond transactions i^ the ex- 
tent to which California municipal bonds are attracting 
the attention of Eastern houses. There is close bidding 
for these bonds, a- a recent offering of Los Angeles bonds 
clearly shows. There L pending an offc-ing oi 
San Francisco School bonds and an issue of $1,000,000 

Hetch Hetchv bonds. 

* * * 

— The Western Pipe and Steel Company of California 
has been greatly extending its activities. Its plant at Phoenix 
produces water-pipe, storage tanks, galvanized tanks, smoke 
stacks, irrigation gates, gas holders, trailer dump bodies 
and a full line of screens for rock-crushing plants. It is a 
wonderfully equipped concern. 



— Automobile stocks gained 105 points in 1925 
lost 3l i.4 points 



ind then 



— In a recent address at Santa Rosa Luther Burbank 
made the following wise remarks: "Those who would legis- 
late against the teaching of evolution should also legislate 
against gravity, electricity and the unreasonable velocity 
of light, and also should introduce a clause to prevent the 
si oi i! i telescope, the microscope and the spectroscope 
or any other instrument of precision which may in the fu- 
ture be invented, constructed or used for the discovery of 
truth." 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1S2S 

Assets $107,232,609.22 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,250,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over 525,000.00 

MISSION RRANCII Mission and 21st Streets 

PAHK-I'UESIOHI BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

II Aid IT STREET RRANCII Ilaicht nnd Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH Wot Portal Ave. and Ullon St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at f .he rate of 

FOUR AND ONJ:-QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




'JhosEKeal 



MADE TO ORDER ONM 

Shirts 

Pajamas 

Night Robes 






The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid t 1> Capital S-II.OIMUKIO $20,000,000 Hchth- Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL, BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE HATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THKU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco omce: 450 CnllCornin Street 
BRUCE IIEATHCOTE W. J. COUI.THARD 

Mnnnccr Asm, Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walte W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 2244 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 
RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, < I I.VERTS. PENSTOCKS. 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 
San Francisco, Calif. Lou Ann-elcn, Calif. 

Ml Market Street r>717 Santa Fe Avenue 



Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
Zi K> arny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



January 23, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



GOLF 

(Continued from Page 10) 

Someone said that Charlie McLaughlin alwaps kept his eve 
on the ball. They were mistaken, it was the ready-made tees 
he was watching. 

* * * 

Louis Goodman said after looking over the Presidio course, 
he was glad they made sand'traps out of the divots he made. 

I ,ouis Ferrari, the Italian banker-lawyer, said one of the pay- 
ing tellers got arrested. His approach to the green was very 
good. 

* * * 

Courtney Moore claims that the only birdie Harry Stafford 
ever shot was in a five cent shooting gallery. 

* * * 

Cy Appell is gaining weight ; he eats with Colonel Griffith 
every day. 

* * * 

Billy McMahon was proud of his sartorial appearance, but 
not of his game. Bill is the Beau Brummel of Presidio. 

E. L. "Dit" Heyes said he should have won again ; but after 
taking 12-13, he blew up completely. 

Judge Graham, after acting as toastmaster at the banquet, 
brought the meeting to a close by singing his favorite song 
"What Has Become of Sally." The boys gave the judge a rous- 
ing cheer. 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG EVENTS 

(Continued from Page 11) 

ginning his work for the company as a conductor on the 
Fillmore Street line. lie was formerly a captain of con- 
stabulary in the Philippine Islands. 
* * * 

San Francisco Council, No. 615. Knights of Columbus, 
have their twenty-fourth anniversary banquet and enter- 
tainment in Knights of Columbus Hall, 150 Golden Gate 
Avenue with many prominent members in attendance. Ad- 
dresses and plans for the new fiscal year were presented be- 
fore the organization. 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 
(Continued from Page 11) 

of reservations already made, this event will probably be 
the record party of the season in point of numbers and in- 
teresting adjuncts. The chairman is being aided by promi- 
nent members who have taken an active part in the base 

hospital work and the maintenance of a room for the war 
veterans at Palo Alto. 

* * * 

Art Studies 

Mrs. William D, Shea directed a day devoted to the study 
of pottery last week, when members of the art section, spent 

a memorable afternoon in the studios of Messrs. Jahani- 
vich and Olsen, 2840 Baker Street. Mis. Bertha Stringer 
Lee, noted artist, aided in receiving the members and thejr 
guests. A brilliant talk was given at this meeting by Man- 
uel I'".. Jahanivich on "Pottery" and the guests were shown 
how pottery is made. 



— We note the following from the annual report of the 
Los Angeles Slock Exchange: "A stock exchange is one o( 
the most essential units in the financial structure of civilized 
nations, and a peculiarly sensitive and intricate piece ol 
mechanism, indispensable for the convenient buying and 
selling of securities, in an orderly manner impossible to lie 
efficiently or economically in any other way." 



Ave, Rex Americanus 

By Otto E. A. Schmidt 



THE warm mid-December sunshine lay like a golden 
benison on a placid bay and a smiling land. Above 
the northern portal of the new sub-way that carries the 
traffic of the Embarcadero across the throbbing end of San 
Francisco's main artery, nooning idlers dallied, indolently 
plying the splintery toothpick as first aid to an overworked 
digestive economy. While some merely lolled about, smok- 
ing, others hung over the parapet to watch the ever-chang- 
ing panorama in the sunken approach to the tube. On the 
one hand an endless stream of vehicles appeared swiftly 
dropping down, down, as they approached — like well- 
handled planes settling to earth — to disappear beneath the 
onlookers' feet, while on the other side of the dividing rail 
black masses rapid-fired forth from the cavernous opening- 
like the proverbial bat out of hell. 

"Makes me dizzy," drawled one of the spectators, "I 
wanna hang onto my goulash an' pie an' Java for a while 
longer," and he turned his back on the giddy spectacle. 

The new viewpoint presented to the qualmish speaker's 
eye a scene better calculated to assure the tranquil assimila- 
tion of his luncheon. The bridge that projects the norther- 
ly sidewalk of Market street across the Embarcadero to the 
second story of the Ferry Building carried a '"thin waver- 
ing line" of strolling wayfarers while a scant fringe of loiter- 
ers festooned its high netted railing. Like slow heart-beats 
of commerce the yawning arches of the terminus below 
leisurely spewed their sporadic crowds as the ferries brought 
over the passengers of successive trains ; swooning street 
cars gently swung their empty shells around the wide- 
spreading loop the while their humble rivals, the jitneys, now 
tenantless, brooded tier after tier, three and four abreast, 
in the somnolent warmth until the magic touch of patron- 
age should waken them to their normal state of furious ac- 
tivity. 

All was peace and serenity ; the terrific rush and jam and 
scurry of the morning and evening hours was suspended 
and the splendidly curving water-front drowsed away in 
its daily noon-time siesta. 

Suddenly the lumbrous air vva> split by a weird cry that 
rose from gutteral depths to the dizziest peaks of sound 
and back like the shriek of a lost soul given to the torture. 

"Fire!" cried Smith, "sonic guy dropped a '111111' on a 
wooden clock. I guess." An incipient interest appeared in 
the eves of the idlers as they scanned the visible horizon 
of "the front" from south to north. But no black smoke or 
leaping flames greeted their gaze. 

lin the horrible distortion of sound broke on their 
tingling ears, but this time it appeared duller as though 
softened by distance or muffled by thick walls. "Ambu- 
lance!" quoth Jones, "stevedore fell* down a hatch or some- 
thin'." But to their straining sight no black mass of ex- 
cited humanity disclosed the locale of one of those sad 
tragedies that occasionally occur, alas, in the marts of a 
great city. 

( Ince more the terrifying scream, closer, louder, more 
eerie. "Black Maria!" cried Robinson to the now excited 
crowd, "betcha they 'knocked over' another bootlegger." 

This time the location of the sound was clearly evident. 
"In the tunnel'" shouted Brown. With one accord the 
agitated multitude crowded to the parapet and leaned over 
in breathless expectancy. As the echoing sounds came 
the moaning and wailing and shrieking grew louder 
and faster and more furious until a very cascade of soul- 
affrighting noise assailed their quaking se: 

And then — from that somber, traping orifice issued forth 
vereign majesty. American Boy, nonchalantly riding his 
bike and working his screaming siren for all it was worth. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 23, 1926 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

At the Hollywood Plaza Hotel 

Mr. Eugene Stern, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Stern, 
pioneer residents of Hollywood, was married recently in 
San Francisco to Miss Emma Walbeck of the bay metropo- 
lis. Mrs. Elsa Jacoby, a sister of the groom, Mr and Mrs. 
Harold Stern and Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Stern came to San 
Francisco for the wedding. Mr. Stern and his son own 
the new Hollywood Plaza Hotel in Hollywood and have 
other valuable holdings in the southland. 

Allan Dwan, Lasky director, is stopping at the Hollywood 
Plaza with his brother. Dr. Dwan. Nils Chrisander, actor 
and director from Sweden, who was leading man with Pola 
Negri in her first four European pictures, is stopping here. 
Other well-known picture folk at this hotel are : Benny Zied- 
man, Warner executive ; Betty Gardner, Lasky writer ; F. Hugh 
Herbert, M. G. M., scenario writer ; Ralph Spence, playwright 
and author of "The Gorilla," now playing coast theaters ; Larry 
Hughes, writer ; Ralph Cedar and Walter Lang, directors ; Allan 
Hart Simpson, formerly famous as the Arrow collar model, who 
is now to star in the films; and Charlotte Bird, Lasky star, 
Gertrude Livingston, Mildred June, Dorothy Dunbar, Mar- 
tin Fredericks and other players. Adele Whitely Fletcher, 
editor of Movie Magazine recently stopped at the Holly- 
wood Plaza when she came West on business and she was 
entertained in Hollywood by Mrs. Antonio Moreno, Ruth 
Roland. Corinne Griffith and other stars. 

James Rolph III , of San Francisco was a recent visitor 
at the Hollywood Plaza Hotel. Other recent arrivals in- 
clude the following golfers who competed in the $10,000 
Los Angeles open tourney. They were: Ian JVIacDonald 
of Modesto ; John Black and Dave Trufelle of Wichita. 
Kansas; Paul Dozier, J. D. Whiting and Sam Whiting. 
Arthur East and Alfred Nagel of San Francisco; Leslie 
Davies of San Rafael; F. M. Connoly, Galesburg, Illinois; 
Joe Mozel, Marysville ; Arthur Brooks, San Jose ; Joe No- 
vak, Berkeley ; Earl Fry and F. R. McDonald of Oakland ; 
F. M. Osbourne of Boulder, Colorado; Dave Ayton and 
D. L. Black of Vancouver and Phil Taylor of Victoria. 

* * * 

Mrs. Jeanette L. Boynton, Mrs. Aymer L. Knights and 
Miss Mary T. Wright sail from New York January 30th 
for a tour of the Mediterranean countries, returning in May. 

* * * 

Among the people of note who have been guests of the 
Santa Maria Inn recently are: 

Mrs. Henry St. Goar, Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Tousey of San 
Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. Allen of Los Angeles; 
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Saunders of Santa Cruz ; Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank BufFum of Oakland, and Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Mat- 
thews of Berkeley. 



Nephew of Mark Hopkins Passes 
At the family residence, 2099 California Street, Edward W. 
Hopkins, nephew of Mark Hopkins, passed away last Tuesday 
evening. Mr. Hopkins was one of the founders of the Cen- 
tral Pacific Railroad, and succeeded his uncle as treasurer of 
the railroad company; in recent years he was president of the 
Union Ice Company, and was a leading clubman, being a mem- 
ber of the Pacific Union, Bohemian, University, Olympic, 
Menlo Country Club and San Jose Country Club. 

He was an active participant in the organization of various 
banks in San Francisco, being director of the Bank of Califor- 
nia, and having served for a time as vice-president of the Mis- 
sion Bank and the Mercantile Trust Company. He was born in 
St. Clair, Michigan, in 1848, and was a descendant of a long 
line of distinguished New England ancestors. He leaves a 
widow, Mrs. Helen Thompson Hopkins, and three daughters, 
Mrs. Augustus Taylor, Mrs. Stewart S. Lowery, Mrs. J. 
Cheever Cowdin and one son, Samuel Hopkins. 



Golden Gate Ferry Estuary Offer Wins 
As an emergency measure the Railroad Commission of 
California today granted permission to Harry Speas, vice- 
president and general manager of the Golden Gate Ferry 
Company, to operate a ferry service between Alameda and 
Oakland to transport passengers and automobiles that have 
been using the Webster Street bridge, which collapsed re- 
cently when it was rammed by a steamship. 

Rates to be charged on the ferry are 5 cents for individ- 
ual passengers, 10 cents for motorcycles, 15 cents for autos, 
20 cents for trucks and 20 cents a ton for freight. 



LARKINS DUCO 
Has Lustre 

Combined with lustre, it possesses a durability that 
is amazing. Be sure of a good job. 

Prices reasonable 

LARKINS & CO. 

First Avenue at Geary Street 




Metnl Work Apper- 
taining to Automo- 
bile* < — Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding — lilnck- 
Jtmlthing. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

HriUs: 35c per dayf 97.SO per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 24 3 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobile* 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel), San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 391 



DENMAN GARAGE 



902 Buih (eor. Taylor) 



I convenient location for cttib members 



January 23, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

THE license plate distribution from 
the offices of the National Auto- 
mobile Club at 362 Pine Street, has 
been a great help to motorists in the 
downtown district. Thousands of mo- 
torists secured their new licenses at 
the club headquarters, without the 
necessity of standing in line, this being 
a free service of the club to the motor- 
ing public. 

* * * 

The National Automobile Club will 
be represented at the automobile show, 
which opens in the Civic Auditorium, 
January 30, supplying touring informa- 
tion to the general public. The new- 
reductions in automobile collision in- 
surance available to members of the 
National will be explained by experts. 
The club booth will be located in the 
accessory section on the second floor. 

* * * 

The blossom season is already at 
hand. Last week a rancher from the 
Santa Clara Valley brought into the 
office of Californians, Inc., a spray of 
blossoms, the first of the year and the 
first rain will bring many a tree into 
bloom that marks the advent of the 
touring season. 

Tours in search i<i blossoms arc in- 
teresting at this time of the year, espe- 
cially when the tang of the winter is 
still lingering in the air anil the snow 
covers the mountain tops. 

The almond trees are the first to 
break into blossom and in the warm 
belts, which arc sheltered from the cold 
winds, blossoms may be found in quan- 
tities within the next ten days. The 
best places to look for early blossoms 
are the Calaveras district, east of San 



Jose, the district about Saratoga and 
certain portions of Sonoma County. 
Napa County is also an early blossom 
district as well as Contra Costa and 
lower Alameda Counties. Cherry blos- 
soms will be out soon in the Vaca Val- 
ley on the road to Sacramento. 
* * * 

The Automobile Show 

With the Spring just 'round the corner, 
Where the budding blossoms blow, 

When the Open Road is calling, 
Comes the Automobile Show. 

There's a store of health and pleasure 
There's a wealth of beauty rare, 

There's the key to Nature's bounty, 
In those sparkling coaches there. 

You can vision purling rivers 

And the mountains towering height 

The eternal snows of Whitney 

And the cloud-wreathed Shasta's 
might. 

You can sense the fragrant odor 

Of the cedar and the pine 
Or the wild flower-spudded meadows 

From the rolling hill's incline. 

See the Highways of the Giants, 
Redwood groves that ages span, 

Mlighty links of forest beauty, 
With the days of primal man. 

Here the dreams of bygone ages 
By the hand of genius wrought, 

Tribute to the men who made it, 
Masterpiece of human thought! 

With the Spring around the corner, 
Where the budding blossoms blow, 

When the Open Road is calling. 
Von should see the Auto Show. 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
(Continued from Page 7) 
Cameo 

The feature at this theater the com- 
ing week i^ lack Hoxey in "Two- 
Fisted Jim" and Hal Lloyd's "I Do." 
There is a splendid enlarged orchestra 
under the direction of Edgar Roem- 
held with special features on the stage 
twice a week. 

* * * 

Paul Whiteman 

Paul Whiteman and his famous band 
will be one oi the leading attractions 
at the Tenth Annual Pacific Automo- 
bile Exposition, opening here late in 
January, for an eight-day engagement. 

* * * 
St. Francis 

Another world premiere was given 
here when Peggy Hopkins Joyce's new 
picture was shown here last night, 
"The Sky Rocket." This is the first 
production of the internationally fa- 
mous beauty. The picture was dW 
rected by Marshal Xeilan. 



Imperial 

Charlie Chaplin's masterpiece, "The 
Gold Rush," has been shown to over 
150,000 people and still plays to packed 
houses. Everyone should see this pic- 
ture. 



(Qacn car o/jera/ed\^ 

bj/ reliable 

chauffeurs 
u/fo /Aoroudft/y under- 
stand (heir business 





This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using 


W 


1 


■ our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 


A 

T 



Phone Grayatone 270 
\\V2\\ Pine Street 
Sou Frnnclaco 


A 


T 





^U^s 




-the better itgeb 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 101? 

Telephone Direct 

1.SOO.OOO caps ware aerred at the Panama 

Pacific International Expoaltlon 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 23, 1926 



The San Francisco Auto Show 



Facts and Figures About 
San Francisco Auto Show 

Dates — January 30 to February 6th 
inclusive. 

Auspices — San Francisco Motor Car 
Dealers' Association. 

Manager — George Wahlgreen. 
Place — Exposition Auditorium, San 
Francisco. 

Music — Paul YVhiteman, "King of 
Jazz" and his 28-piece orchestra, direct 
from New York. (Only appearance in 
California this year). 

Decorations — Specially designed by 
staff of artists to uphold reputation of 
San Francisco as having the most 
beautiful auto show in the world. 

Motor Display — Latest models of all 
the big automobile manufacturing con- 
cerns. 

Exhibits — Shipped direct from New 
York or duplicates of the spectacular 
New York Auto Shop displays. 

Accessories — Complete showing of ac- 
cessories and motor trucks in the base- 
ment and on the second floor of the 
Auditorium. 

Admission Price — No increase in 
prices over last year. Admission in- 
cluding tax, 75c. Reserved seats in the 
balconies may be purchased for after- 
noons and evenings for 50c additional. 
This is an innovation that will be wel- 
comed by the footsore thousands who 
throng the displays and will welcome 
an opportunity to view the spectacle 
from above and listen to the White- 
man music. 

Special Railroad Rates — The South- 
ern Pacific has announced special 
round trip rates to San Francisco dur- 
ing the big motor display. 

Hotels — Hotel men advise that res- 
ervations for rooms be made in ad- 
vance. They prophesy the largest out 
of town attendance in the history of the 
automobiles shows here. 

With the Tenth Annual Pacific Au- 
tomobile Show less than two weeks 
away, the eyes of the western motor 
trade are focused on San Francisco for 
what will undoubtedly be the biggest 
motor display ever held west of Chi- 
cago. 

With the San Francisco s h o w 

dates set at January 30th to February 
6th, the same as the Chicago show and 
over two weeks earlier than ever be- 



fore, the importance of the local dis- 
play is much greater than heretofore. 

It means that coast dealers will have 
the same chance of seeing the new 
models and receiving the new trade 
gossip as the dealers of the Middle 
West and that they can attend trade 
meetings here, view the new offerings 
of the industry and place their orders 
for the coming year without traveling 
three to five days into the heart of the 
Middle West in the blizzard and zero 
weather which generally ushers in Feb- 
ruary in that section of the country. 

The earlier show dates, the fact that 
nearlv all of the big factories are dup- 
licating their New York exhibits at the 
San Francisco display and the enthu- 
siasm of the big distributors in calling 
special trade meetings for the show 
week, have combined to make the show 
outlook better than ever before, from 
the trade standpoint. 

Greater interest by the public and an 
increasing attendance is also indicated. 
Reports from the New York show in- 
dicate that record breaking crowds 
were in attendance at that display. In- 
terest of the fans in the improved 
models that are being offered by many 
of the factories and the fact that seven 
new cars or new designs of old makes, 
will be shown here for the first time at 
the show will undoubtedly make for a 
new high attendance record. 

Decorations, always a feature of the 
San Francisco show, will again be a 
headline feature of the tenth annual ex- 
hibit. George Wahlgreen. veteran 
show manager and decorative wizard 
has been working with a corps of ar- 
tists, decorators and designers to make 
this year's show even more beautiful 
and more spectacular in lighting and 
decorative effects than these that have 
preceded it. It is freely predicted that 
this city will again win the distinction 
pi having the most beautiful show in 
America. 

An outstanding feature of the auto- 
mobile shuw will be its music. Paul 
Whiteman, outstanding national figure 
and one of the foremost musicians of 
the world has been engaged at a re- 
puted stipend of $25,000 to play for the 
show. Me comes direct from New 
York, the scene of his latest triumphs 
and leaves directly after the close of 
the auto show for Florida, where he 
will play at one of the famous Florida 
hotels for a remuneration that makes 
a king's ransom look small. 



At Paul Elder's 

An Hour With the Poets, by Clio 
Lee Aydelott, will be given in the Paul 
Elder Gallery, Saturday afternoon, 
January 30th. Mrs. Aydelott's pro- 
gram will include : "The Prince of 
Sleep," by Walter de La Mare; "The 
Rose in the Garden," by Austin Dob- 
son ; "One Heart, One Face and One 
Name," by Father Ryan ; "The Music 
of the Winds," by Northrup, and other 
selections. As a pleasing and artistic 
background, there will be musical ac- 
companiments consisting of adapta- 
tions from the music masters. 



Darkened Theaters a Menace 
The President's Council of the 
Northern California Districts of the 
California Federation of Women's 
Clubs is a forum for discussion and nut 
a body empowered to legislate for the 
clubs which they represent, according 
to the decision of the meeting at the 
Bank of Italy Auditorium Friday of 
last week, in San Francisco. The de- 
cision was made following a discussion 
of a possible resolution directed to Will 
C, Hays about the lighting of moving 
picture theaters in order to stop the 
lni~Mhle evils that arise in darkened 
theaters attended by young people. 

"It was the influence of the Fed- 
erated Clubs that made the Juvenile 
Court nf San Francisco possible and it 
is part of their duty to further that 
work in every way possible." was the 
dictum of Mrs. E. R. Baldwin, referee 
(if the Juvenile Court of San Francisco, 
who was the principal speaker at tin- 
meeting on Friday. 

"Club women may aid through a 
thorough understanding of the law, and 
development of a sense of civic respon- 
sibility toward youth," said Mrs. Bald- 
win. 



\ \ M \I. MEETING 
THE JOSH1 A BKNDI IRON WORKS 



Tin- regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works will 
be held at the office of the corporation. No. 75 
Fremont Street, .San Francisco, California, on 
Tuesday, the 9th day of February. 1926, at the 
hour of 10 o'clock a. m.. for the purpose of 
electing a Board of Directors to serve for the 
ensuing year, and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meet- 

CHAS. C. GARDNER, Secretary. 
Office: 75 Fremont Street. 
San Francisco, California. 

The Nicest Business 
Lunch in Town 




San 
Francisco 



fanuary 23, 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



u 



Mr. Blabbitt on Dancing 



THERE are two kinds of dancing' — graceful and other- 
wise. The Charleston is to be included in the latter 
class for various reasons, the principal one being, perhaps, 
the fact that, so far, the writer has been unable to master 
more than one or two steps — these poorly. There are just 
as many sour grapes in Charleston as in San Francisco, 
though fewer good dancers. The "good" may be taken as 
you wish. 

A person able to dance the fox trot with variations and 
the waltz with innovations used to be considered somewhat 
desirable by the better looking and more lively young ladies 
at balls, dances or plain struggles. Men, up to a few months 
ago, had little trouble piloting their partners around the 
floor and, in consequence, experienced a minimum of fatigue. 
Dancers in those days seldom accidentally kicked one in 
the knee or thigh as they now do, the ankle or calf being 
the usual limitation. 

Tilings are different at present and a girl becomes quite 
bored with the lout who is either too awkward or consider- 
ate to kick up, shake and weave in the approved Charles- 
rbnian manner. Many a fellow's evening has been spoiled 
by the advent of some adept youth and maiden, who pride 
themselves in their versatility and do not hesitate to show 
it. Within a few minutes, you can wager safely, one-third 
of the couples will be trying the same thing with more or 
less, mostly less, success. Inasmuch as women are sup- 
posedly much more brilliant than the average man in such 
matters, male wall-flowers are the result. Since posies 
have petals, and petals form at the posies' tops, and Charles- 
ton dancers have clever pedals, one may naturally deduce 
that some people have brains in their feet. 

One of our richest Americans lately took up a voluntary 
campaign to bring old fashioned dances back into vogue. 
If he spends enough money he may get them into Vanity 
Fair and Physical Culture, too. It is to be doubted whether 
he will be successful in this entirely laudable enterprise. 
You know it is much more difficult to turn out condensed 
dancing lessons than to manufacture automobiles for the 
masses. The popular theory in this regard serins to be "A 
lesson a day will keep the fox trot in sway" so far as the 
polka, schottische, lancers and Virginia Keel are concerned. 
Vpropos to the latter thought, there are more reels caused 
by prohibition than could be attributed to this most ro- 
mantic state in the Union, in a million years. 

Our hotels used to In- maintained principally for sleep- 
ing purposes. Today they are devoted to dancing, synco- 
pated music and convert charges. The tunes to which the 
more fortunate dance are purchased at so much per bat 
the average modern youngster spends more per bar than 

his daddy used to. Not that hotels are patronized wholly 

b\ the younger set. There are plent) of settees wh 
quite a kick out of just watching and panning trippers of 

tailed light fantastic. It takes pisi >,, man} shots, how- 
ever, to get even these people on thi Bo Fallen arches 

are no draw -back to dancing in the modern flat-footed man- 
ner. 

Well informed writers on our daily papers tell ti- 
the wall/ is coining back into favor. If this is true, we must 
i] a general hegira of elders to such palace- of 
amusement as are s'ill retained. Most of die grandp 
will ni ise flappers to waltz with, in spite of their 

continual harping about the girls of yesterday. They for- 
get that they leave the latter either at home or watching 
the bottles at their tables. Times have changed and will 
continue to change. Please note, in passing, that one can't 
change time in dancing without .stepping on some one or 
other's foot. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wii.kes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^ 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 



WIGS and TRANSFORMATIONS 

Also toupees of my make can be worn day or night, 
because I make them ventilated and porous, from the 
finest and purest hair. 

G. LEDERER 

561 Sutter St., Between Powell and Mason Sts. 
San Francisco, California. 

Firm Established 1866 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the*** 

VALLEY of the MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Mushrooms" 

Clean Rooms. Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

Vfell Sonoma County's Famous Resorts and Mineral (Warm W«.er) Swimming 

Tank* From Tl.ii Hotel. 

Rates Eicc[Mionolly Reasonable. 

Telephone 110 



J. SPAULDING & COMPANY 

The Original Pioneer Carpel Cleaners 

BvwuauD 1864 

Olilf-t and Largest Establishment on the Pacific Coast 

We Are in No Way Connected With Any Other Firm Using Name of SPAULDING 

337 Tehama Street — Phone Douglas 3084 



Economy from every angle 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Reroininrnded Laundry" 
250 Twelfth St., San Francisco 'Phone Market 916 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suits Pressed Rt Hand Onlv-Mnl* Called For and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



Position Dyeing and Cleaning 



S83 Post Slant 
It VflKBtla Hotil 



J-av Fb»nci-co 
Phom FusMtiis 2iln 



: 



AGU A C ALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 

It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions. Radioactive, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
mini: pool. Fireproot hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN. Agua Caliente. Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 23, 1926 



WIELANDS BREW 

WITH YOUR MEALS— IT HELPS 

Order by th» case from your grocer 

Establishes 1868 

Main Office, 240 Second Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 671 



ft.. PIONEER 

on a box of ortlCf 
stationery, whe- 
ther It be typo- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There Is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
rt ... ,.K .-. ™ 



you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1866 
41 First Street, San Francisco 




TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A 8oft Water Laundry) 



PHONES: 
San Francisco— liurllnnnme 

West. 793 478 



Wm. Herbst & Company 

{Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

Clockmakers and Watchmakers 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AiNU COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Pont Street at Grnnt Avenue 

San Frnnclnco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



818 EMERSON ST. 



Palo Alto 315-J 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



Exhibit of Painting 

At the Hotel Claremont Gallery in 
Berkeley is being shown a collection of 
paintings which should delight that 
portion of the public which finds little 
pleasure in the extreme radicalism 
which has been rampant. The direc- 
tor, Harry Noyes Pratt, believes the 
time ripe for a return — not to the ex- 
treme of conservatism — but to that 
middle ground which holds the best of 
the old and the new. There are a few 
examples of the Academician, as well 
as a few of the more abstract things of 
the Ultra-modern, but the majority of 
the canvases shown meet with the ap- 
proval of the painter and of the pub- 
lic. They are within the comprehen- 
sion of the mass. 

Dominating the gallery is a large 
painting by M. Hibi, "African Wilder- 
ness." This young Japanese combines 
quite successfully the elements of Ori- 
ental and Occidental art in this lion- 
ess whose eyes glow with watchful 
flame. Close by hangs a large land- 
scape by Douglas Fraser. This Val- 
lejo painter is not as well known as he 
should be, and as he will be. His 
handling of the misty atmosphere of 
summer is most successful. Calthea 
Vivian shows a typically colorful 
group of trees. Ferdinand Burgdorff 
is represented by his large "Bay of 
Carmel," and from the art colony about 
Monterey come also Armin Hansen, 
Edith Maguire and Myron Oliver, all 
with adecmate examples of their work. 
MacLeod Batten displays one of her 
unusual and powerfully decorative ef- 
fects. Rowena Meeks Abdy has a 
large watercolor, rich in beauty, her 
"Main Street in Old California," to- 
gether with several smaller things, 
gem-like in quality. Helen Forbes 
demonstrates the latent power of water- 
color in her "Cloudy Weather," pos- 
sibly one of the best among the many 
good things. 

Others showing are G. Piazzoni, 
Ralph Stackpole, Wm. Gaw, L. P. 
Latimer, Tilden Dakin, H. N. Poole, 
Laura Adams Artner, DeNeale Mor- 
gan, Hal Boyd, A. W. Best, Frederick 
S, Lamb, Phillips Lewis and Isabelle 
Percy West. 

The Gallery has been opened by the 
hotel management and made a perman- 

Geouce C. Homfk S. A. Lovejoy 

CurScId 2024 

The Homer System 

BOOKKEEPING— COLLECTIONS 



Installment, Current Delinquent Accounts. Legal Aid, 
Audits-Systems, Financial Statements, Income Tax 
Reports, Bookkeeping (Part Timo Service) 



Dt; Yoinc BviLDiNb 



ent feature of the unique hostelry. It 
is open to the public each afternoon, 
including Sunday, from two to five. 

GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 
Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Ofllce mid Works 1025 Mission St. 

Phone Market Tin:: 

Branch Olllce: 700 Sutter St. 

(Hotel Canterbury Bide.) 

Phone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




NEW ORLEANS 

Nra>St€liarb 

To better serve ournuny friends and patrons 
over s 3oo.ooooohas been expended in recon- 
struction and rehabilitation to maintain this 
famous hostelry as 

One of America's Leading Hotels 

The large well ventilated high ceiling rooms 
have been retained and modernized^*'-*'*' 

ACCOMMODATING OVER 1000 OUESTS 
Send fa'Descviptive Hotel folder; 

lIlusti-jted.Mai-di-Liasl'n^r.imteriJiCdslang 

Alfred S . Ajvier ANDCa.Lid. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA 

^Ticket Offices of all Tunspcrtition line in lobby 




WHERE TO DINE 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, S1.00 35c, 50c. 75c S1.00.S1.50 a la code 
Dancing 7:00 P. M. to 1:00 A. M. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

special parties arranged 
headquarters for theatrical people 
hattie mooser minnie c mooser 




ICE CREAr% 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



POLK t CALIFORNIA ST5 

Cravitone 

3100 3101 3102 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous bruHhuig once or twice a day is 
latins very Rood care of them. Bruxhlne is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as y,ou imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed f Call in today 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem bloeks off all nerves and palu. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Self Cleaning Bridges; 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



St. Mary's Academy 



SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 




Caroline Jones 



Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 



^aiS^ 334 SuTTER St - 



and tea from 3 to 5 

Douglas 7118 



£&& 



445 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea. Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

03 Third Avenue, SAN 1IATEO 




O'Fflircll and O f A M (~* f^% * G Phone 

Larkin Sli. *-* " ■"• * ^ ~ ^-* "^ Frankl.n 

Luncheon (HjM io 2 p. m.) ? .75 K« Viriloi Should Um th* City WMh- 

Sundaj Lonohton 1.00 out Dining tn ihr Fin?<l Cafe 

Dinner, Week Days.. „ $1.S0 in America 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays 1.75 

DANCING SUNDAY EVENINGS 



Featuring Southern Cooking 
Open From 
11:30 a- m. to 2:00 p. m. 
5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
1:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CL09KD EVERY MONI1AV 
llnlf Block from Highway 



14-Mn.x Hoist 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OrEN SflO A. m. to 11*» p. u. 

unsurpassed cvisix1 

Carl Leonmardt 

formerly of 
r.oMrn Cat. Palm Colin. 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic. 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tlllmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — Flrot Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 6816 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtaintd 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PACT. ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



«■■»--- 


DR. 


B 


W. 


HAINES 






! 






DENTIST 






j Elkan 


Gunst Building 












323 C 


eary at Powell 








Hours 


9 to 4 


San 


Francisco 






Telephone 


Dougl 


as 2949 
------ 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Sprinft" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

239 Clara Stllrt ClfftH »44 



T 



m 



2fe ftCiut&D 

NEWS 

of the 




Worshipers at Pagan 
temples — languorous 
maidens of tropical 
islands — tribal dances 
in murky jungles — 
carnivals in Old- World 
capitals — fire — flood 
— revolution ! 

Among all climes and 
peoples are found the 
entertaining pictures 
for The 

@hr $an Jranrtsro (Sbrontrti 

KOTAGRAVURE 



±o be of 

greater service — and 
serve well — is the 
desire of every Paci- 
fic Service employee 

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 




"PACIHC SERVICE" 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 



-126 




winter 

excursion 

Fares 

to many points 

Save 
moneys-, 

Week-end tickets, on 
sale Friday, Satur- 
day and Sunday- 
s-day return limit. 
Season tickets, on 
sale daily— return 
limit 90 days. 

For full information, 
risk— 

Southern 
Pacific 
Lines 

Ferry Station Third Street Station 

65 Geary Street 

Or Phone Sutter 4000 



Golden Gate Ferry 
Company 

S 

WINTER SCHEDULE 

Effective October 1, 1925 

S 



Leave Sausalito 

5:00 a.m. 

6:00 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

Every Half 

Hour Until 

10:00 p.m. 

Then 

11:00 p. m. 

12:00 p.m. 

1 :00 a. m. 



Leave San Francisco 

5:30 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

7 :00 a. m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:30 p.m. 

Then 

11:30 p.m. 

12:30 a.m. 

1:30 a.m. 



Saturdays and Sundays Only 
2:00 a.m. 2:30 a.m. 

ON SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

There will be extra trips if traffic warrants. 



A. O. Stewart 

President 



Harry E. Speas 

Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 






AUTOMOBILE SHOW NUMBER 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



$5.00 PER YEAR 






■EP^- ! 





mouncemtnt Xational Automobile Club. Page 33 




%J\ever did statuary or painting convey man's 
creative genius more magnificently than the 
Duesenberg Exhibit at the Auto Show yj 



^O 



Lloyd S. Johnson Company 

Duesenberg and Auburn Distributor 

Van N i;ss at Jackson 



J-) L) j±j i^) £iLi J 



r-J - i~j r J 

lb -Li kr 1 



THE ORIGINAL STRAIGHT EIGHT 




ElUMMad July JO. IU* 

SAN P§tg?«*!So 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News .Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1884 to 1925. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 225 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.. JANUARY 30, 1926 



No. 5 



The ^Automobile Show 



By E. V. WELLER 
National Automobile Club 



MUSIC, color, and a thousand dancing lights ! Crowds, curious crowds, talkative crowds, buying 
crowds! Motor cars, rainbow hued. gorgeous limousines and jaunty pleasure vehicles, power- 
ful trucks, the wings of trade! Accessories, a whole floor full, cigarette lighters, safety devices, 
horns, camping equipment, oils and polishes, — the catalogue is infinite. 

On the lower floor of the Civic Auditorium, in San Francisco's Civic Center, the latest mechanical 
masterpieces are arrayed in a brilliant setting. On the floor below are machines of business and of 
transport. On the floor above are the things that make motoring safer and more comfortable. And. 
on all three floors you will find a clamorous eager throng; the society belle and the business man, the 
doctor and baker, the man of affairs and the laborer, all intent upon viewing as in a great museum the 
triumphs of the automobile manufacturer. 

The Automobile Show is typical of the present generation as the things on display are the prod- 
ucts of this generation. It is a festival in honor of the Cod of Invention. It is a social as well as an 
economic event. The love of comfort and luxury is innate within all of us. The desire for speed and 
power is part and parcel of our characters. Here, at the Automobile Show, we may satiate ourselves 
on these important elements of the life of today. 

Xot a small part of the interest centers in the musical program put on by the King of Jazz. Paul 
Whiteman. Xot a small portion of your time will be given over to the enjoyment of listening to the 
music of today by a music master who knows the harmonies of the twentieth century and who knows 
how they should be played. There's a wonderful purchasing power in the lilt of jazz. The dealers 
exhibiting at the show will find automobile selling easier when the customer is engaged in the intrica- 
cies of the Charleston. 

( ieorge Wahlgreen, master of ceremonies, predicts a record attendance. Chester X. Weaver, presi- 
dent of the Motor Car Healers' Association, predicts an exhibition far ahead of anything that the Pa- 
cific Coast has ever known, and. as for me. 1 venture the prediction that you will be highly delighted 
with exhibits with music and with the colorful setting of Oriental design, whether you go to buy a car 
Or for entertainment's sake. The show's the thin- 1 That's what Hamlet would say if he were solilo- 
quizing nowadays. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



lanuary 30, 1926 



The San Francisco a lS(e'WS Letter depicts to its readers a number of the 

popular models of motor cars which will be on exhibition at the 

Civic Auditorium, from January 30th to February 6th 




C'OURTRSV T. W. IF WITT CO. 



lannan 3ft 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




COURTESY J. W. IE WITTCOMPWV 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Tanuarv 30. 1926 




COURTESY OF DOS' l.EE 



January 30, 1926 



SAN FRANl [SCO NEWS LETTER 




COURTESY EDWARD LOWE MOTORS CO. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30. 1926 



The Rickenbacker 

Super Sport Sedan Roadster. 

$'5450.00 delivered at San Francisco. 
The fastest stock car in America. A 100- 

H. P. (guaranteed ninety miles per hour. 
The sensation of the New York Automobile 

Show. 





Rickenbacker 

Six-cylinder, live-passenger Sedan. 
Price, $2395.00, delivered at San Francisco. 

Custom-built Chassis. 

Custom-built Body. 
Built up to a standard, not down to a price. 



Rickenbacker Eight-cylinder Seda/i. 
Price, $2845.00, delivered at San Francisco. 

Custom-built Chassis. 

Custom-built Body. 
Built up to a standard, not down to a price. 







p* 


■r. 


^^■^■^■■■■^ 


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Rick i n hacker stx-cyiindcr Coupe-Sedan. 
Price, $1975.00, delivered at San Francisco. 

Custom-built Clin* sis. 

Custom-built Body. 
Built up to a standard, not down to a price. 



The Rickenbacker Sales Company 

Distributors 

1 1 55 Van Ness Ave. 

San Francisco. California 






lanuary 30, 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




THE JORDAN LINE 
EIGHT PLAYBOY 

Everybody knows that the Jordan 
Playboy started the roadster craze all 
over again in this country. 

It was built for red-blooded Americans 
who never groiu old. 

It dominated its field — and of course 
was imitated. 

But there has always been something 
distinctive about the Playboy. Something 
in its lines — something in its charm — 
something in the way it carries itself 
along the road which makes it the leader 
among the style sport cars of America. 

Now it is lighter— with a Line Eight 
motor — ample flowing power. A little 
smaller. A little more compact. Easier 
to handle. Easier to park. Turns around 
on a dime. 

The Playboy delivered San Francisco. 
$1995.00 fully equipped including 4 
wheel hydraulic brakes, front and rear 
bumper, spare tire, lube and tire cover. 



THE JORDAN LINE 
EIGHT SEDAN 

Imagine the lightest, most agile motor 
car of its size you ever drove with Jor- 
dan quality — Jordan dependability — Jor- 
dan speed — Jordan good looks — and at a 
price lower than has ever been placed on 
a Jordan enclosed car. 

A Line Eight motor of course. Jordan 
experience has proved that the tight- 
cylinder is the choice of people 0/ good 
judgment and good taste. 

The body is all-steel, and patented. 
It's more quiet, with less rumble — all 
one strongly fabricated piece. 

The Sedan delivered San Francisco, 
$2190.00 fully equipped including 4 
wheel hydraulic brakes, front and rear 
bumper, spare lire, tube and tirt I 




Chase-Morrill Com p ami 

Van Nes> >( Sutter— Phone Prospect 17 

Distributors of 

JORDAN AUTOMOBILES 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30, 1926 




COURTESY LLOYD S. JOHNSON 



January 30, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




m 



: ■- 



Junior Eight Coupe. 
$2635.00 at San Francisco. 

A closed model 10 flic ft has been added to the 
line with most appealing requirements to the 
lovers of sport. Built by Locomobile Com- 
pany of America. 



Junior Eight Sedan. 
$2635.00 at San Francisco. 

For cross-country or town use this model 
lends itself to maximum comfort for those 
concerned. Built by Locomobile Company of 
America. 





Model "00" COURTESY LOCOMOBILE COMPANY OFCM-IFORMA 

The netc Locomobile enclosed drive is truly a 'tiasterpiece of Luxurious Transportation. 
Severe low attractive bodies mounted » a chassis equal to any occasion 



10 



s.W" FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30. 1926 




COURTESY Fl.IXT MOTOR CO. 



fanuary 30, V>2(< 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




COURTESY OF H. 0. HARRISON CO. 



12 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30, 1926 




WILLYS -OVERLAND FINE MOTOR CARS i 
RBoye: prices F.o.6. 5R<N Fl?flNCISCO 




COURTESY OF OVERLAND KNIGHT SALES CO. 



/ 



January 30, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 




COURTESY CHEVROLET MOTOR CO. OF CALIFORNIA 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30, 1926 




COURTESY nRIKR-RdlllSISS i/UMI' W> 






|;imi..rv 30, 1026- 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 




COtHTFSY OF tlOW ARD U'TOMOBII-E CO. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30, 1926 




COURTESY STAR MOTOR CO. OF CALIFORNIA 



[amtan 30, 1926 



SAX FRAN. [SI <) NEWS LETTER 



17 




IS 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



lanuarv 30, 1926 



THE TENTH ANNUAL IS THE TOP NOTCH 



By Eleanore F. Ross 



TODAY marks the opening of the Tenth Annual Pacific 
Automobile Show at the Civic Auditorium. 
Cp goes the curtain today, on as beautiful a motor car ex- 
hibition as San Francisco ever staged, and when you say that, 
you sav a mouthful ! 




Kleibtr Brougham, five-passenyer, fully equipped $2350, S. /•*. 

Every year the show seems to eclipse the last ; every year 
the new models far surpass the old; every year the decorations, 
the lights, the interested throng of spectators, the whole atmos- 
phere of the exhibit seem more brilliant than the preceding 
years; and every year society and its followers demonstrate 
their approval inure s'.rongly, by greater numbers and in- 
creased enthusiasm. 

Not only is the interest increased tremendously on both the 

part of the motor car dealer- and distributors, but the interest 
of the public throughout the whole northern section of Cali- 
fornia has been aroused by this most important event in 
motordom. 

Then, too, a big musical event is scheduled in the form of 
Paul Whiteman's orchestra, for Mr. Whiteman is the foremost 
exponent of jazz in the United Sta'es and is an outstanding 
leader in his own particular art. I [is orchestra boasts 28 pieces 
and is paid (so it is whispered) the largest sum ever received 
by any orchestra in the country for it- week of music at the 
Auditorium. 

For weeks pas:, expert workmen in their line have been la- 
boring to transform the interior of the great building into a 
huge show room with its decorated displays of America's finest 
nic tor car offerings. 

The manager of the bit; -In vv, Ge irge Wahlgreen, made the 
statement this week, tin' the ('ecorative an! lighting effects 
will surpass a l| former efforts in motor -hows and will demon- 
strate the fact mere clearly than ever, thai San Francisco's au- 
tomobile expositions have no peer. 

The Most Spectacular Show 

Even t< the absolutely unini dated in motor wisdom, the per- 
son who does not know the difference between a differential 
and a radiator cap. there is a lure in the long, shining lines of 
an elegant -e Ian, or the sporty shape of a roadster, and a dream 
is evolved in a son ,,f subconscious way of the kind of auto- 



mobile one will drive when be can afford it! For the Auto- 
mobile Show is a creator of many a "pipe dream" that some- 
times conies true ! 

Today, the show is the thing! 

Downtown hotels are crowded with visiting motor chiefs 
and in Automobile Row the voice of the salesman is silent. 

1 is -aid that never were such wonderful values as are to 
be found today at the Auditorium, and never such a range of 
price- an 1 styles, from the lowest-priced car to the automobiles 
thai sell in liie ten thousand- dollar class and higher: from the 
open models of the four-cylinder makes to the luxurious ap- 
pi in ed limousines that boast eight cylinders under the hood; 
every machine in the huge show rooms has something new. 
something novel to interest the eyes of the prospective car 
i wner. 

d he how from a motorcar standpoint is the most spectacu- 
lar that has ever been staged in this ci'y or on the coast. Xew 
cars newer before seen here make their debut today. New 
mo 'el. onl\ introduced at Xew York two weeks ago an 1 being 
shown lor the lirst time at Chicago today, make their appear- 
ance at the same time in San Francisco. 

The advancing of Ihe show dates was a move that nette ' San 
Francisco equal attention with the great national show cities 
of Xew V'ork and Chicago ami serves to emphasize the im- 
portance of this city as an automobile distributing point 

\ hurriel preview of the show last nigh 1 revealed many fea- 
tures of interest to the general public. The prices on most 
cars are lower than they were a year ago. The quality ap- 
pointments and special fitments on all closed cars, regardless 
of price, are most noticeable and the observer wonders bow- 
it has been possible to bring down prices on these cars in the 
face of rising material and labor costs, while at the same time 
improving them to the extent that these cars have been im- 
pi'i ived. 

In decorative ami lighting effects Manager George Wahl- 
green has again set the pace for the rest of the American auto- 
mobile show managers. It is easy to see that this show will 
again he the most beautiful exhibit in America in l''2<>. 

Motor Trade Experts Enthusiastic 

Wahlgreen has put forth every effort to make this tenth an- 
nual exposition one that will live long in the memory of Pa- 
cific Coast motor fans and one that will attract hundreds of 
dealers from all coast points to the city for the event. 





■ B^ffi'^TCJ 




B^r 



Kleibi r Coupe, four-passi nger, fully equipped $2475 



Januarj 30, 1926 



SAX FRAN( [SCO NEWS LETTEE 



19 



Members of [lie show committee of the Motor Car Healers' 
Association who have co-operated heartily with Wahlgreen, de- 
clare that never before has so great importance been attached 
to the San Francisco display and as a result of this enthusiasm 
on the part of the trade, scores of trade meetings have been 
scheduled by automobile men for the week of the show. Fac- 
tory executives will come here expressly for the purpose of 
attending the exposition and being present at the sessions which 
have been planned. Dealers and distributors from all Pacific 
Coast points will be on hand to at end the meetings and to give 
their views on conditions as they find them in their territories. 

This is the first time in the history of the San Francisco show 
that i's dates coincide with those of the Chicago show, so it is 
expected that both events will reflect to the keen eyes of motor 
trade experts the buying tendencies of the automobile public 
for 1926. 

Several manufacturers are sending their la'.est models here 
to make their debut before the Pacific Coast motoring public 
as well as the dealers and distributors who attend the show. 
It is declared that this is the reason why so much interest has 
been aroused in tra'e circles concerning the exposition. 



Facts and Figures About 

Tenth Annual Pacific Automobile Show 

Dates — January 30 to February 6th, inclusive. 

Auspices — San Francisco Motor Car Dealers' Association. 

Manager — George Wahlgreen. 

Place — Fxposition Auditorium, San Francisco. 

Music — Paul Whiteman, "King of Jazz," and his 28-piece 
orchestra direct from New York. (Only appearance in 
California this year). 

Decorations — Specially designed by Staff of artists to up- 
hold reputation of San Francisco as having the must beau- 
tiful auto show in the world. 

Motor Display — Latest models of all the big automobile 
manufacturing concerns. 

Exhibits — Shipped direct from New York or duplicates 
of the spectacular Xew York auto show displays. 

Accessories — Complete showing of accessories and motor 

t ticks in the basement an. I on the second fl. x >r of the Audi- 
torium. 

Admission Price — No increase in prices over last \ear. 
Admission including tax 75c Reserved scats in the bal- 
conies may he purchased for afternoons and evenings for 
50, additional, ddiis is an innovation that will he welcomed 



by the footsore thousands who throng the displays and will 
welcome an opportunity to view the spectacle from above 
and listen to the Whiteman music. 

Special Railroad Rates— The Southern Pacific has an- 
nounced special round trip rates to San Francisco during 
the big- motor display. 

Hotels — Hotel men advise that reservations for rooms 
he made in advance. They prophesy the largest out-of-town 
attendance in the history of the automobile shows here. 



The Mctor Industry 

The New York Automobile Show has been declared as hav- 
ing had the most successful attendance record in the history of 
big automotive events; and now the automobile men have 
turned their thoughts and directed their attentions towards the 
next two big motor events.— the Chicago motor car display and 
the Pacific automobile show, both of which are national in im- 
portance. 

Numerous advices indicate that the motor industry has en- 
tered on its greatest year. Outstanding manufacturers and 
trade leaders are of the opinion that the next few months will 
find the great motor car manufacturing industry at its peak. 
Already factories are planning their biggest productions, and 
expansion programs are being freely discussed. 

Said the Master of the shi iw, .Mr. Wahlgreen, a few days ago : 

"We are confident that we will have the most pleasing dis- 
play from an automotive standpoint that has ever been seen 
at a San Francisco motor car display. With plans now per- 
fected for the big show, we have sold all available space for 
the passenger car display and the accessory and truck depart- 
ment will undoubtedly he over-sold before the end of this 
wee '^. 

"Theatrical men assure die --how committee that the secur- 
ing of Paul Whiteman an 1 Ins orchestra is a great asset to the 
shi u Fn in the standpoint of interest and that ihis superb music 
in connection with the finest display of motor cars ever shown 
on the coast is certain to attract the biggest crowd in the his- 
tory of coast automotive displays." 



Registration Closes 

With the fiscal year of the Division of Motor Vehicles 
changed to correspond with the calendar \ ear, motorists 
have less time this year than he.etofore to secure new 
license plates for their cars. 




Willys-Knight M '70" Six-cylin 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30, 1926 




Stutz — New vertical eight two-passenffer coupe by Brewster. 

Total height is only seventy inches. SO that hotly is 

fire inches nearer ground 

January 30 is the dead line this year. After that dale motor- 
ists whi have not applied for their 1926 blue and while plates 
will he required to pay a 100 per cent penalty, a doubling of the 
So registration fee for ordinary passenger cars ad the higher 
fees for commercial vehicles and trucks. 

Continuing the service which it has furnished for several 
years, the California State Automobile Association is again issu- 
ing plates for passenger cars to its 60,000 members in Northern 
and Central California. "Phis service which is given without 
charge eliminates delays waiting in line anil troublesome cor- 
respondence for members of the Association. Plates are be- 
ing issued from the general headquarters in San Francisco and 
from all of the twenty-tour district branches except the one lo- 
cate 1 at Sacramento, the headquarters of the Division ol Motor 
Vehicles. 

While the Association cannot issue plates direct to the owners 
of commercial vehicles and trucks, members may present their 
applications for plates for such vehicles at Association offices 
and they will be received and forwarded to the Division of 
Motor Vehicles at Sacramento. 



Thousands Receive Plates 

Already thousands of members 
advantage of tb 



f the Association have taken 

distinctive service, and extra clerical help 

ffices has facilitated the work of issuing new 



in the vani MS 
plates. 

It is not necessary to present tlie pink certificate of owner- 
ship for renewal this year, unless a change in legal title is in- 
volved. Where a change in legal title merely involves the re- 
lease nf a former legal owner, the Association can i-sue plates 




knotty problems members may have in connection with their 
renewal registration. 

In presenting the white certificate of registration which is 
used as a form of application, the motorist should take care 
in see that the address on the certificate is his present address 



Garford Type K Is De Luxe Coach. Fifteen Passengers. is specially 
designed, from the efficient, six-cylinder engine, unequalled in power 
and pick-up for motor coaches of this capacity, to the hag gage compart- 
ment in the rear. It is exceptionally tow-hung, handsome, comfortable 
and reliable. For additional information see it at Garford Factory 
Branch, Eighth and Howard streets. Phone Market 520. Heavy Duty 
Trucks and Motor Coach Chassis. 

upon presen'ation of a properly signed certificate. However, 
if there is a transfer of legal title to a new legal owner or a 
transfer of the registered ownership involved, the transaction 
must go through the Division of Motor Vehicles. Ilnwever. 
Association representatives in every office who are familiar 
with the registration procedure are in a position to solve any 




A special Parlor Car model Fageol Safety Coach in de luxe tour 

service between San Francisco and Los Angeles. The conch seats 

IS passengers, and is fitted with every luxury known in motor cars. 

including reclining back chairs and ice water. 



in order that the new certificate which is sent by mail will reach 
its proper destination. 

1 ifficials of the Division of Motor Vehicles expect twice as 
many delinquent applications this year as last A\\^ to the chang- 
ing of tlie deadline from March 1 to January 30. They estimate 
dial penalties will total 8100,000. 

Members of the Automobile Association can avoid such pen- 
alties by taking advantage before January 30 of the convenient 
service of the Association furnished in twenty-four cities which 
practically blanket Northern and Central California. 

When placing their new number plates on their car. mo- 
torists are advised to attach them in accordance with the 
provisii in i >i the law. 




Lynch Is Sons have stand/prized on Sterling Equipment throughout. 
Picture shows Model E. II'. No. 23. 



/ 



ranuary 30, l l »2n 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



21 




PHOTO BY MOULIN 



Briiliil Veil I nils. Yosemiti Valley, California. 

The Motorist'-. Paradise. 



?2 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Tanuarv30, 1926 




There is no doubt that we are making 
A Building Code progress toward what is becoming a 
necessity in this rapidly growing part 
of the world, a definite and well considered building code, 
which will be of uniform application and which will deliver 
us from the carelessness of shoddy construction anil the 
swindling of building for mere appearances. Building in- 
spectors from most of the important centers in Northern 
California have already met and the first tentative steps to 
a movement of such importance are being taken. 

Twelve of the largest cities of the Pacific coast in various 
states have already stated their intention of adhering to such 
a code as may be drawn up by the inspectors and making 
it uniform. 

The suggestions at the first meeting were necessarily 
quite technical and dealt with problems of construction of 
wood-joist, brick-walled buildings, frame construction of 
buildings, regulations for buil 'ings according to use and 
occupancy, and. what is verv important indeed, means of 
egress and ingress with relation to public buildings 

"Flic accidents which have occurred recently in San Fran- 
cisco and more particularly the terrible collapse of a grand- 
stand at Pasadena during the rose festival, have turned the 
attention of professional inspectors more closely to the mat- 
ter of buildings. It is felt and with much reason, that under 
any rational and properly correlated system such an acci- 
dent as the San Francisco one or that at I'a adena. would 
never have occurred and it is more or less a disgrace to the 
citizenship that it should have occurred. This happy-go- 
lucky way of dealing with the lives of the public belongs 
to a more infantile and less responsible time and has no 
place in a community which now ranks among the first in 
the world. 



The wife's right to the community 
Ccmmunity Property property is now a very burning 
question in the state ami carries 
with it implications in taxation which amount to many mil- 
lions of dollars. We have already discussed the attitude of 
the Supreme Court of the United States in the Robbins case, 
where it was held that the wife's interest was merely an ex- 
pectancy, and that her portion of the community property 
i oul I not lie separate'l from that ol her husband for purposes 
of taxation. 

The same question has rome up again in Los Angeles, It 
is true that this later manifestation has not yet shown itself 
beyond the Sune ior Court, but it is a beginning. A case- 
was brought, clled Frances Fee Stewart vs. her husband 
E. A. Stewart, for the purpose of determining the inte est of 
the wife in the community p-operty, under the California 
law. The wife brought suit to establish her iucrest in and 
to a certain five-acre ranch. Judge Stephens held that the 
wife had a "vested community interest." 

The Supreme Court of the United States held that the 
wife did not have the right to file separate income tax re- 
turns, as the California community property law only gave 
her an expectancy. Now, we have a flat decision that the 
law gives her "a vested community interest." The matter 
will have to go to the Supreme Court of the State where it 
is expected that a rapid decision will be reached and the 
matter settled. The Supreme Court of the United States 
has held that the California decisions have nowhere held 
that the wife had a "vested right." but that the rights were 
only "expectant." — this referring to the possible division of 



the estate through divorce or in the event of the death of 
the husband. 

If separate returns can be filed as a result of the decision 
of our Supreme Court that the right is vested and not a mere 
expectancy, it will result in great saving to California tax- 
payers, by reason of the surtax. 

Meanwhile the matter is in the greatest confusion. 



( Gradually but certainly the national 
A Menace to Morals surveys which have been under- 
taken by various social and pub- 
lishing bodies for the purpose of determining the effect, 
physical and moral, of the operation of the Volstead Act 
are coming in. These reports are, one and all, to practically 
the same effect. They show a wddes-spread dissatisfaction 
with the law and a con'empt for the enforcement of the law 
which is really quite dangerous to a democratic government. 
It is a curious thing that people who call themselves be- 
lievers in popular government should have imagined that 
they were able by a mere fiat to place a yoke upon the 
shoulders of the masses to cbive them. They have done 
more to discredit that unity between people and govern- 
ment than anything which has ever occurred in our history 
before. They have made it obvious that merely getting a 
majority in the legislatures and terrorizing the community 
will not compel free men to obey laws which they know to 
be vicious and which rest upon no foundation, other than 
political chicanery. There is no tyranny to our knowledge 
which woul I have so senselessly affronted the intelligence 
and the feeling of the mass. The results are obvious. The 
mass refuses to obey and so-called popular government is 
flouted by the people who are supposed to be the origin and 
support of its power. 

The moral effect of this upon the country in general is 
very bad. We all agree upon that point. Anything that 
differentiates between the popular wish and the governmen- 
tal power in a detnoc acy is in the extreme degree verv dan- 
gerous. It teaches people to flout the power of the govern- 
ment and. since the government in that last analysis rests 
upon the people, the flouted government begins to rest 
Upon a select class of paid janissaries. That is happening 
now. The janissaries demand to be armed and paid and 
=o the vicious circle is almost complete. 



Corporation O mmissioner Daugherty 

A Swindle in Marks has issued a warning against the 
new form of fraud in Ge-man mark 
transactions. These are based on a misrepresentation of 
the application of the German revaluation law to holdings 
of pape -mark bond., especially post-war bonds. 

There F a concerted movement on the part of the New 
York S'o k Exchange and the German language newspapers 
in t'd- erupt v t . co-opera c- with the S'ate Department 
of Corporations in a warfare against the swin Her- who are 
usitv; the mails All the respectable agencies a e busy try- 
in" to warn prospective purchasers, numbers of whom will 
doubtless be taken in, in spite of all precautions to the con- 
trary. 

The warning of the State Commissioner is to the effect 
that certain firms throughout this country are p omoting 
'he sales of German securities by the representation that 
both pre-war and post-war bonds will be revalued on the 
basis of 15 per cent or more of their face value. This is not 
true, for there bonds may only be revalued at a fraction of 
that aim unit. 

An instance is given ol a United German mortgage bond 
on 1923 with a face value of 10,000.001) mark-. It would ap- 
pear from the statements of the swindling firms that 15 per 
cent of the face value of that bond could be realized, and 
would be computed in relation to the amount on the lace 
of the bond. This is not so. The revaluation law savs that 



January 30, 1926 



SAX" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



23 



computation is to be made on the gold mark valuation of the 
build, which would amount to 273 gold marks for each 10,- 
000,000, and this as you will see at once, is a horse of quite 
another color. 

These bonds, then, are practically valueless and we are 
to be congratulated Upon having- an alert and conscientious 
corporation commissioner to put us on our guard. Never- 
theless, some will be stung. 



A Winter Morning From a Car Window 

By John Brayton 



Conditions are again shaping them- 
Chinese Unrest selves in China for conflict. The 
armies of Chang appear to be trying 
the offensive again and, as these armies are considered, 
with ample justification, to be armies which support the 
"imperialistic" powers, the nationalistic elements are mass- 
ing themselves for what may be a world-conflict, in the 
last analysis. 

It would appear as if there were trouble brewing over the 
Eastern Railroad which is now practically in the hands 
of the Soviet government. The latter took it over, as a 
legacy, from the Tsaristic government, which had con- 
structed it mostly as a strategic road. There is no doubt 
that the road is of importance to the military situation, 
for it has acted as the artery for the transmission of sup- 
plies to (ieneral Feng, who is the nationalist leader. Me 
is supposed to be friendly with the Soviet government 
and, as a matter of fact, does get his supplies, to a great 
extent, from that government. This is mostly, however, 
because, as he is distant from the coast, he finds it impos- 
sible to get supplies in from overseas as the foreign gov- 
e mnents who aid Chang, and more particularly the Jap- 
anese government, interfere with the delivery of the war 
supplies. Such as he gets, therefore, come mostly through 
Russia and by the Siberian and Eastern railroads. 

But there is no reason to draw the inference that Feng 
is- a communist. On the contrary, he treats the idea .if 
communism or bolshevism of any shade in China with 
the most utter contempt. lie dismisses the notion of a 
Chinese communistic state as utterly chimerical. lie is 
a nationalist. As there have been at times in European 
historv, statesmen who have striven for national identity 
and unity, so does Feng strive for Chinese unity and na- 
tionality. The war is one concerning the independence 
of China, a great question. 



The sentence imposed upon Colo- 
The Mitchell Verdict nel William Mitchell by the court 
martial that tried him for criti- 
cal attacks upon the administration management of the air 
force, has gone through the first reviewing board. 

The board of review, which is composed oi officers of the 
War Department, that is to say, law-officers of that depart- 
ment, has approved the sentence of live years suspension 
and forfeiture of pay, and has now passed the matter along 
to the judge-advocate-general of the army for transmissi* n 
in the Secretary of War, wh I in turn has given the matter into 
the bands of the Pn iident ; the fin lings have been approved by 
the 1'resi 'ent. and Michell will be given one-hall his salary, 
instead of forfeiting the whole amount. 

In the meantime, the work of Colonel Mitchell is making 
headway. Secretarv of War. Davis, is submitting a bill to 
Congress providing fur changes to meet the criticisms "I 
Colonel Mitchell. This bill follows closely the recommen- 
dations of the Mi rrow air-craf- board and. though it 
not meet the full demands - f Colonel Mitchell, it will prob- 
ably go a long way towards reducing the discontent among 
the flv ers. 

Thus, we get the usual spectacle of the man who did the 
work getting the punishment and the rest of us the benefit, 
which seems to be quite in accordance with things as they 
are. 



Tl I EY are pruning trees and vines in the country. Frost 
is king there now. Wonderful sketches could be made 
of the frost-covered weeds; but fruit farmers are not sketch 
artists. Their interests lie in more concrete lines. They 
blow their nails these cold dawns while they make toward 
the orchard, the pruning shears tucked under the arm. 

To the confirmed commuter this is a strange race of men. 
They all seem to have plenty of time. They do not fear 
the train, do not run to catch it ; they wave their hands in 
a friendly way and let it go by. Not one of them sits on his 
front porch, taking his coffee and toast there for fear he 
might miss the train and be late at the office. In a leasurely 
manner they drop down the road while their dogs chase 
jack rabbits through the vineyards in a hopeless though en- 
ergetic way. These dogs know they cannot catch the jacks, 
but they hunt them anyway, for, like their masters, they 
have time to follow idle impulses. 

Beautiful smoke wreaths rise in the distance as the red 
ball of the sun comes unhurriedly over the mountain. Spicy 
scents of burning twigs penetrate the closed cars when we 
stop at the cross roads for the lady with the basket of eggs. 
If your powers of scent be at all educated you can separate 
these different odors and says "that is peach," or "they are 
burning prune clippings here." or "That smoke is certainly 
l ii m i grape cuttings." 

And these men know how to prune. Even though you are 
city bred and have no closer acquaintance with trees than 
the fruit markets give you, yon know this is real trimming. 
The appearance of the trees tells the story. There is some- 
thing finished and artistic in the way they stand after the 
shears have been applied. They arc like slender ladies, very 
graceful and well bred. And the vines along the trellis 
wires — see them before and after and you would say a bar- 
ber had been along with his clippers and razor, so smooth do 
they h ink. 

Down alternate rows go two dignified horses in a most 
deliberate manner drawing an incinerator by a long chain. 
This is a crude iron pot on iron wheels. Into this the men 
pile the cut branches to burn as they move up and down 
the field. 

This is not toil : it is contented work. Though there is no 
present remuneration from it. the matter is looked upon as 
i.ne in a chain of very profitable duties. ( If the resources 
i,l California, fruit is one of the greatest and vies well with 
nil as an export. The advantage, of course lies toward fruit 
culture, for its production is near inexhaustible and where 
u modifies the landscape it is on the side of beauty. 

The traveler takes great interest in this business of prun- 
li i- evident that from their very youth trees and vines 
are trained in the wav they should go. it i- a delight to 
sigh! a well-kept orchard where the trees arc all much alike 
in shape, all branching from within a foot of the ground. 
all pruned year after year in such a manner as to keep the 
fruit within reach of pickers on the ground. And here a 
peculiaritj appears. Where the orchard me i nee 1 a step 
ladder they use one with only one supporting leg. We city 
people, wlii i live in a realm of paved streets and side walks 
ire accustomed to find stepladders with two back support- 
ing legs. But here the ladder has only one. Whether this 
is because the ladder stands better in the rough ground, or 
some facetious primer cut off the other leg and so set a 
fashion, or whether some old ancestor ladder lost its leg 
and persuaded all other ladders to sacrifice theirs the same 
way there are no statistics to show. But the ladders are 
ust as safe as those with more h E 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30, 1926 





ocier 





By Antoinette Arnold 



Princeton "Huddle," 
Latest Adopted Fad 

THE Princeton "huddle" is becoming quite the fashion 
and one of the latest adopted fads. 

We (or at least some of us), had our first view and intro- 
duction to the "huddle" and its purposes at the '25 football 
games in tin* Memorial Stadium, University of California, 
when the California team met the "Huskies" from Wash- 
ington. Then, we saw more of the huddle system at the 
big game between LJ. C. and Stanford. 

We had been used to hearing the calling of secret numerals 
at the football games and so when the huddle system was 
used we (this same, some of us) were inclined to wonder 
what it all meant, and thought, at first, that it was Washing- 
ton's own. Now, it seems that the heroes of Harvard and 
Yale cleverly used the system some time ago. 

The "huddle" in a football game. 1 might herein inscribe, 
means the getting together of the football players who Stoop 
in a huddle, putting their heads close Up to one another and 
decide what move to make next in their contest. In other 
words, they huddle in conference instead of calling out 
the secret numbers for their play. 

Fashionable adaptation of the "huddle" according to the 
ethics of eastern society, now implies the getting-together 
of congenial groups for special events and society affairs. 

The smart set use the term and give a huddle which may 
include a few intimate friends for tea, for luncheon or for 
an afternoon at bridge. It has many pleasant ramifications. 
Sometimes, the huddle is a large affair including a long list 
of friends who may be invited to a dinner dance, a reception, 
or an announcement party. The term has numerous pleas- 
ing avenues and has seemingly quite departed from the 
Webster definition of "huddle" : a confused crowd ; a tumult. 

A huddle today is something fascinating and pretentious 
and may offer any number of surprises or punts, in foot- 
ball phraseology. 

* * * 

Some of the fashionable hotels have introduced a "huddle" 
salad, the delicious ingredients of which is the secret of their 
chefs. 

The "jazzy huddle'' is also on the dancing floor, so we have 
been authentically told. Four or five couples huddle and 
then break into some of the new steps; sometimes it is the 
glamoured Charleston, sometimes it is the revived three- 
step, or some other improvised dance of the moment con- 
tributary to the huddle. 

Yes, there is largely something new under the sun, or 
at least something has a new name — and that is the pro- 
pelling line which makes society and its constituents alive 
to happy impulses of the hour and keenlv alert to make 
artistic adaptations of trustful terms. 



Colonel and Mrs. William M. Morrow were hosts at a 
dinner given past week in compliment to Major and Mrs. 
George Beach of Letterman Hospital and to Colonel Willis 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

030 Biiah Street, Between Powell and Stockton, San FrancUco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLBTHEN, Proprietor 



L'line and Lieut. C. B. Lee of the 30th Infantry and Mrs. 
Lee. 

* * * 

Engagement of Miss Roper 

And Mr. Eric Jordan Announced. 

Stanford circles are happily discussing the recent an- 
nouncement of the engagement of Miss Elizabeth Roper 
and Mr. Eric Jordan, youngest son of Dr. and Mrs. David 
Starr Jordan. 

They are to be married on February 6 in the Stanford 
Memorial Chapel, the shrine before which so many campus 
romances reach their zenith in the marriage vows. Dr. D. 
Charles Gardner, university chaplain, will read the cere- 
mony. Miss Margaret Roper will be her sister's maid of 
honor. Knight Starr Jordan will be his brother's best man. 

The bride-to-be is a Stanford graduate and both her 
parents graduated from the same university. Her father 
received his degree in engineering in lX9f> and her mother, 
who was Miss Annie llervev. graduated witli the class of 
1897. 

Miss Roper majored in education and has been a leader 
in many student activities identifying herself with the 
"Chaparral," the humorous college monthly in which many 
of her original drawings and articles appeared. She is a 
member of Alpha Phi Sorority. 

Eric Jordan, graduated in zoology and is now on a scien- 
tific expedition off the coast of Mexico. Like his distin- 
guished father, he is a member of the Delta Upsilon fra- 
ternity. 

* * * 

Miss Bostwick Is Little 
Queen at Beautiful Party 

Seldom, if ever, has there been a prettier or more charm- 
ing party in society's realm than the lovely affair given by 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rice Bostwick in honor of their daugh- 
ter, Miss Florence Bostwick. which took place last Friday 
evening at the Palace Hotel. 

Miss Bostwick was a veritable little queen and so gracious 
and charming that everyone sounded her praises through- 
out the entire evening with even more than the customary 
courteous demeanor. She looked as sweet as a flower, 
although a certain dignity of manner and address are part 
of her personality. 

The Gold ballroom of the Palace was adorned with the 
blossoms of early spring, giving a lightness of touch to the 
atmosphere and inspiring the company with its buoyancy 
and lure. Supper parties at the dance were seated at small 
tables all decorated differently. There were three hundred 
guests. Exquisite place cards told them where they were 
to "huddle." 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Bostwick entertained some of their friends 
at one of the large tables, their guests including Dr. and 
Mrs. Edward N. Short, Messrs. and M-esdames Harry Hunt. 
Frank Bostwick, Le Roy Ryone, Halsey Manwaring, Her- 
bert Colebran of Denver and Mrs. Jessie Kerrigan. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 
Telephone Sutter 0130 Under Management CARL S. STANLBT 



January 30, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



25 




HOTEL ( WTICR1UTRY 

75U Sutter street 

Sail Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



Miss Eleanor Morgan gave a dinner at the 
homo of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Horace W. 
Morgan on Washington Street, to a group ol 
her friends who afterwards attended the dan- 
cing party of Miss Most wick. 

Picturesque Plan Carried 
To Successful Fruition 

Purposeful and picturesque was the plan pre- 
vailing throughout the entire program of the 
elaborate luncheon given on Thursday of this 
past week at the Fairmont Hotel by the mem- 
bers of the Hotel Women's Unity Club of 
which Mrs. Perley Andrew Young was the 
presiding genius. 

Seldom, if ever, has a group of women enter- 
tained so many of the consuls and consul-gen- 
erals as those who assembled as the guests of 
the Unity Club when their "International 
Luncheon" was the motif. While making much 
of the scenic advantages of America, the mem- 
bers and the guests eagerly learned of other 
countries and the beauties and historical scenes 
there. 

Mrs. Young was dressed in a magnificent robe represent- 
ing Columbia, while seatetl before a magnificent American 
flag, the flags of the different nations adorned the center 
of the table, in compliment to the representatives as honor 
guests. 

Mrs. John Zeenian and her guests all attired in costumes 
of the French court, sat at the French table, elaborately 
decorated with flowers and streamers. Miss Margaret Mary 
Fennelly, of Notre Dame, the pianist, whose numbers delighted 
the guests, wore a handsome French costume. Mrs. I. A. 
Baldi presided at the table designating Ireland and was par- 
ticularly admired For her costume carrying out in detail the 
land she represented. Mrs. Mary E. Roberts represented 
Argentine and wore a beautiful lace gown of blue and white. 
Mrs. A. L. Mulpeler bad a Mexican table and was attired 
in a handsome dress of Mexican coloring. 

( Ither tables which aroused admiration were those of Mrs. 
George Wilson, secretary, who bad the Japanese table. Mrs. 
Henry Marker of the Key Route Inn. who ba.l the Chinese 

table and Mrs. James Flannery, who presided over the 
Chinese table with its gorgeous colorings and draperies, 
Mrs. W, 1.. Rothschild's Swedish table was very clever and 
Mrs. Rothschild appeared in a prett\ costume. Mrs. Florence 
Lombard had the charming Holland table, with its quaint 
appeal and decorative scheme. 

Mine. Stella Nought delighted the audience with her song 
selections and the little girls who danced received plaudits 
of praise, llenerietta Schwartz and Florencita t hare/ be- 
ing the little charmers. 

* * * 

Society and Motors 

Society will actively appreciate and participate in the automo- 
bile show this year of 1926 as societ) ever has tlone in the many 
periods of displays of milady's car. 

With her own ideas about just what kind of a car she wants, 
and with certain color schemes and accommodations as to the 
latlv's favorite cars, no one knows more definitely than does 
the dealer himself, who. now-a-days, reckons considerably with 
the lady of the household. 

Husband may pay for the car. iii course. But, after all. it 
is wife who finally makes the decision just what car to buy. 



While the man of the household may argue about 
the "kind of an engine," a car has. the woman by 
his side usually inquires more about the looks, the 
simplicity of handling the car, and a thousand 
other queries to actually make the man pause and 
ponder. 

So when automobile shows are at hand, so- 
ciety invariably makes itself known and really 
stages a little style show all of its own in attend- 
ing the annual displays. This, too. the dealers 
know full well, and so, this year it is safe indeed 
to predict that there will be more and more hand- 
some machines appealing to the girl or to the 
matron in the smart set, than ever in all the great 
progress of the industry. 

Society will he there — at the show, with the 

handsomest attire of the season adding beauty, 

enthusiasm, youth and charm — to the resplendent 

*. array of machines we are even more curious now 

to see, to praise and to buy! 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria, California 

On lb* Cuil H,ih»« T Halfway Balwaao San Frirciiw and I •• Aafalaa. 
Ad Inn of Cnoaaal Exeallaoca. 



fat «r iar*a /• 



-vatfaaiM an r°w *«at "*P aeml*. 



At the Aladdin Studio 

Theatrical night at the Aladdin Studio, which 

is every Wednesday, has attracted the attention 
of San Francisco society, which turns out in great numbers to 
see the celebrities of the stage. Last Wednesday evening, Belle 
Bennett, famous screen star, direct from her triumph in "Stella 
Dallas," was honor guest. Among the society people who were 
present were: Tallant Tubbs, state senator, host to a party of 
friends, including Miss [Catherine Kuhn, recent queen of the 
Manli (Iras; Kenneth C Beaton (K.C.B.), famous newspaper- 
man, Dave I'heiinig and Dave Murray with their brides, and 
Ernest Morrison of the Granada Theater, who entertained a 
party of friends. 

The California Spring Blossom and Wild Flower Associa- 
tion is planning its annual exhibition of early spring blossoms 
in the new Women's City Club Building on Post Street. 
Although the evenl does not take place until April 7 and 8, 
the members are holding sessions preparatory to the noteworthy 

affair. Mice EastW 1 and her club executives are ably at 

labor on the schemes which, they state, will excel in many ways 
all their preceding endeavor-. 

* * * 

Mis. 1-'.. I. Butterfiel'd, president of To Kaloti. held several 
outstanding meetings this months, principal among them being 
die book review of "Dear I'.rutus" by Rev. Walter John 

Sherman. 

* * * 

Mr. C. Templeton Crocker was elected president of the Cali- 
fornia 1 listorical Society at their formal meeting this past week. 
Mr. Crocker will be supported by a board of officers consisting 
of Robert I-'.. Cowan. ('. (>.<;. Miller. Sidney M. Ehrman, vice- 
presidents, and T. W. Hubbard, secretary-treasurer. Directors 
include Messrs. Anson S. Blake, Boutwell Dunlap. Charles L. 
Camp, Francis 1'. Farquhar, George I'. Lyman, E. J. Molera, 
tail 1. Wheat. 11 P. B. Soule, D. IT. Troy and Helen Troop. 



The Perfect Repartee 

"What would your wife say if she knew you were out 
with me?" 

"Why don't you ask her? She's over there in the corner 
with your husband." — Brown Jug. 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 

It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions. Radioactive, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
ming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN, Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. 



26 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30, 1926 



\CJ2= #!=€-/' 



Pleasure's Ww 




OBEY /VO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ 75/77 Moore- 





Curran 

IT wmld be a dull season that did 
not bring to us those prime fun- 
makers Kolb and Dill, and iliis year 
they have a 
r o 1 1 i ckin g 

g 1 show. 

They were 
given a n 13 al 
welconi e 1 m 
their open- 
i n g night, 
and there is 
every indica- 
tion that 
p a c k e d 
houses will 

Kntlierlne Si-linnrlz ] )t > the rule 

during their engagement here. 

As usual. Kolb and Dill are the 
whole show,— and the large audience 
mcked with glee at their antics. It is 
good Ui see Julia Blanc hack with the 
comedians once more. She always 
gives a splendid characterization of 
whatever role she essays, and her part 
in this show just suits her. May Cloy 
as the moving picture queen is delight- 
ful : she wears some gorgeous gowns, 
and 1 know her stunning ermine wrap 
was the envy of every woman present! 

George Cunningham is certainly a 
good picker of girls. The chorus is 
lovely, — Mich pretty girls, and how 
they can dance! Whatever you do. 
go and see Kolb and Dill and Julia 
Blanc, assisted by the beauty chorus 
dance the Charleston! It is great. 
Charles Cunningham does some clever 
<lancing too. 

The stars have gathered 'round them 
a splendid cast which includes: Doris 
Duncan, prima donna; Jackson Mur- 
ray. Fay Tempest, Clay Hill, Stanley 
Mack and Thomas Hayes. 



S. F. Symphony 

The sixth popular concert given at 
the Curran Theater was featured by 
the appearance of Leonid Bolatine, 
assistant concert Meister, as soloist. 
He is one of the newer members and 
comes to US from the tutorship of the 
famous pedagogue, Leopold Auer. He 
played the Glazounow A Minor Con- 
certo in a masterful manner and dis- 
played splendid technique. 

The Charpentier Suite, Impressions 



(Conducted by Katherine Schwartz) 

of Italv. was a most enjoyable closing 
number and a novelty at these con- 
certs. The popular Ivanow, "In the 
Village," in which the English horn 
and viola did such excellent work, was 
repeated at the noisy insistence of the 
audience. The ( »verture to Martha 
and the Sowerby arrangement of the 
old delightful dance tune. "Money 
Musk" completed an enjoyable pro- 
gram. 



Loew's Warfield 

Refilming a picture that has been a 
success several years ago. i- much 
more dangerous than transferring a 
stage play to the screen. So says Hen- 
ley, who directed "The Auction Block" 
the Rex Beach story, for the Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer interests. 

Charles Kay is featured in this new 
version of "The Auction Block" sup- 
ported by Eleanor Boardman with a 
large cast. Charles Ray has a large 
Following of loyal fans who will be 
glad to see "the small town boy who 
made the big town famous," come back 
once more to the screen. 



St. Francis 

"The Skyrocket" is a most admir- 
able vehicle for Peggy Hopkins Joyce 
which is now playing at this theater. 
It is one succession of gorgeous gowns 
and luxurious settings, and has a very 
good story. Miss Joyce runs the ga- 
mut of emotions in this picture. She 
is a beautiful creature and acts with 
realism. Owen Moore and Earl Wil- 
liams are the supporting players and 
Gladys Hulett does good work in the 
role of Lucia. 



Cameo 

The feature at the Cameo for the 
coming week is "Camille of the Bar- 
bary Coast" with Mae Busch and 
Owen Moore in the leading roles with 
a large company of talented players. 



Alcazar 

Well 1 Dale Winter and her bobbed 
hair bandits have simply captured the 
town ! What a wow of a show "Terry" 
lias given us in "Little Jessie James"! 
From start to finish it is a line produc- 
tion. There is a peppy chorus and be- 
lieve me, they can dance! Dale Win- 
ter is a winsome, captivating little ban- 



dit, and as "Jessie James" from < )ska- 
loosa she won everybody's heart. 

Betty Laurence has a delightful role 
and her exit at the end of the first act 
i- a world beater. Lorraine Sands Mul- 
lin is in splendid voice and does some 
very nice work. Dorothv Le Mar and 
Florence Roberts are pleasing in their 
respective roles, and oh! the gorgeous 
gowns they do wear in this show! 

When I read on the program that 
\\ illiam Davidson was going t.. sing a 
song. I couldn't imagine him doing it. 
but when he sang "The Blue Bird" he 
was simply great. Roy Purviancc has 
a tenor voice of very pleasing quality 
and is excellent, playing opposite to 
Miss Winter. Phil Tead the juvenile 
is splendid in the role of Tommy and 
gets many laughs for his comedy. Wil- 
liam Macauly has a g 1 part, and 

makes the most of it. 

Harry MacFayden the director. Kav 
mond Midgley who staged the dances 
and Harry James and his splendid or- 
chestra are to be congratulated upon 
the result of their efforts. 



California 

"The Masked Bride." Mae Murray's 
picture of Paris life, opens at the Cali- 
fornia today. Miss Murray plays the 
part of a Paris dancer, idol of the cafes. 
who becomes enmeshed in an Apache 
plot that endangers the life of the man 
she loves. Francis X. Bushman, R03 
D'Arcy, Basil Rathbone ami others are 
in the cast. Max Dolin will play se- 
lections from "The Merry Widow" and 
as his violin solo "Villa." 



Granada 

Adolphe Menjou in "The Grand 
Duchess" comes to the Granada this 
week. The leading role i- portrayed 
by Florence Vidor. It is a light com- 
edy ami should make splendid enter- 
tainment. 

"Five Rooms ami a Bath" is the title 
of the stage production. Verne Buck 
and his men will be on hand with a 
new program of songs and music. 



Imperial 

Rudolph Valentino in "The Eagle," 
his first production since his associa- 
tion with Douglas Fairbanks, Mary 
1'ickford and Charlie Chaplin, is the 
new feature at this theater. This play 
is a decided departure for Valentino. 



January 30, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ALEXANDRIA \ p }Ctures 
ficnry and ISth \ 


ALCAZAR } "Little Jessie James" 
O'Farrell nr. Powell ( Henry Duffy Players 


CALIFORNIA / „_... ., ,_,_..„ 
4«h and Market \ "The Masked Bride" 


CAMEO | "Camille of the Bar- 
»:t« Market St. f bery Coast" 


CAPITOL 1 "Treasures of the 
Ellis nr. Market i" Vatican" 


CASINO 1 

Mason and Ellis j Pictures 


CASTRO J 

•129 Castro St. f Pictures 


curran ( Kolb & Dill in 
Geary nr. Mason < "A Pair 0' Fools" 


Egyptian f Pictures 


GOLDEN gate ( Vaudeville 
G. G. Ave. <& Taylor ( 


GRANADA I „ The Grand Duchess" 
IIMin Market St. ( 


haight I pictures 
lliiiKht nt Cole ( 


IMPERIAL ( Rudolph Valentino in 
1077 Market St. f "The Eagle" 


LOEWS WARFIELD 1 .._. . 

,.__ „ , l "The Auction Block 
1188 Market St. i 


MAJESTIC 1 

Mission between ; Pictures 

20tl>nnd21st J 


METROPOLITAN ( 

20.15 Union si. ( Pictures 


NEW FILLMORE j 

|:<2(I Fillmore . . 

Pictures 

\EW MISSION j 
ur.r,0 Mission t 


ORPHEUM I W,„,.«„|||« 

O'Farrell * Powell ( Vaudeville 


PANTAGES ( .. .„... 

„ , , . „ ( Vaudevi e 

Mnrket at Mason J 


1'OMPEH Pictures 
Next 1o Granada \ 


PORTOLA 1 _. , 
771. Market St. | Pictures 


president 1 Florence Roberts in 
Market A McAllister \ "Dancing Mothers" 


ROYAL ( 

ISM Polk St. ( Pictures 


ST. francis '. Peggy Hopkins Joyce 
085 Market St. * "The Skyrocket" 


SITTER 1 

Sutter and Stelner \ Pictures 


UNION SQUARE 1 Pictures and 
n-Farrell ar. Powell \ Vaudeville 


wilkes 1 "The Big Parade" 

Geary and Mason f 


WIGWAM 1 

Mission and 22d ( Pictures 



They say he never looked handsomer, 
and that the play is full of action. Yil- 
ma Banky plays opposite the star. 
There is a strong supporting- cast. 

President 

"Dancing Mothers" the four act 
comedy sensation which, through the 
foresight of Henry Duffy, San Fran- 
cisco is privileged to see simultan- 
eously with Chicago and London, 
starts on the second big week of its 
engagement. 

Duffy has given us a most elaborate 
production. There are twenty speak- 
ing characters in the cast, and three 
changes of scenery in the four acts. 
Interest centers in four central charac- 
ters, each assumed by a player of 
proven ability. 

Florence Roberts, well known and 
beloved by the older theater-goers of 
this city, Leneta Lane, vivacious, mag- 
netic and charming actress, Frederik 
Vogeding, clever actor, and recently 
leading man with Doris eKane and 
Lenore Ulric, ami Kenneth Daigneau, 
young and brilliant player, have the 
principal roles. 

The scenic features are most elabor- 
ate and the roof club of the second act 
is lavishly presented. Every member 
of the supporting company has been 
well selected. The large cast include-- 
Helen Gilmore, fohn Junior, Francis 
Fraunie, Olive Cooper, Earl Lee. Rich- 
ard Ehlers, Eloise Keeler, Maylian 
Mercereau, Marie Sorrille, Richenda 
Stevie, John Mackenzie, Norvell 
Thompson, Gait Bell and Frank Alex- 
ander. 



CONCUR I ■> 
Ctlrrnn Thcnlrr — Minilil? ittHlHI -:4.".. S:in 

Pranelaco Symphom Oreaeatra. 



Golden Gate 

Four headline attractions are the of- 
fering at tilt— popular theater the com- 
ing week. "Danceland," a beautifully 

Staged SOng and dance act, -tarring 

Muriel Kaye, supported by Mildred 
Burns and a host of others is one. 

Florrie Le \ ere. assisted by the 
popular -"ug composer, Lou Hand- 
man, offer "Celebrities" a pot pourri 
mg and dame in which -he imper- 
sonates many -tar- of the musical suc- 

The Four Diamond- also have a 
clever song and dance number, sure to 
be one of the big hits of the bill : Bert 
Yorke and Ed Lord, hokum comedy 
artists, will offer "Gentlemen Never- 
theless"; Edwin George, well known 
ler, returns with his popular nov- 
elty "A Corned) of Errors" and the 
Kiewnings are serial stars who special- 
ize in thrills. 

The screen offering is "The Circle" 
an adaptation of the Broadway stage 
success of the same name. Eleanor 
Boardman i- -tarred with a large sup- 
porting cast. Short films and music 
featured by Grace Rollins Hunt, or- 
ganist and* Claude Sweeten and his 
splendid orchestra complete the bill. 



Orpheum 

Miss Nora Bayes has been persuaded 
to remain over for the third and posi- 
tively final week at the Orpheum 

(Continued on Page :S7) 

The Nicest Business 
Lunch in Town 



AT 
Singleton's 

ALLEY 
CAT 

22 
BELDEN 
PLACE 

San 
Francisco 




/fajf 



Chocolates 



of 

Distinction 



Fur those who search the 

highways and byways for 

the unusual. 



276 Post Street 

Between Stockton and Grant Avenue 
near Union Square 

S \\ Francisco 
Phone Sutter 196+ 

The 1 1 'orld's Most Unique 
Chocolate Shop 



^you pay no more^ 



fiESTFLOWEgg 




"Tfielfcdoo o/a Thailand Ondena' 

224-226 Giani Ave. Tel Kearny 4975 



Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

On <be Edge of the Berkeley HUla 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
Set in a beautiful twenty-eight-acre 
park between Berkeley and Oakland. 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30, 1926 



"&J&J9* 



"&£&&•' 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



-5*J*y&- 



«&&*» 




T 



IE writer offers a few illustrated hints 
on salesmanship, how to improve your 
business capacity whilst playing a round of 
golf with a prospective buyer. 
Foreword 
Si range to say, the ancient game of golf 
finds its prototype in many ways in the va- 
rious angles of the selling game. Starting at 
the first "tee" your hopes are elevated upon the tee of pros- 
pect and uncertainty. You have a clear "fairway" before 
you, studied with "hazards" of all kinds. "Bunkers," "sand 
traps." "lakes." and "rough" all exemplified by the varioed tem- 
peraments of the buyers. Like in golf the objectives are the 
same, namely, the final "holing out" in a few strokes 
as possible. Likewise, the success of selling lies in how 
straight and true you can perform your task and as a finality 
carry away the trophies in the form of substantial com- 
mission checks. 

The Approach 
In approaching a business prospect with the object of 
getting more of the long "green" should you find yourself 
"stymied" by ai competitor make a "dog-leg play" around 
another aisle and wait until he has had his "second shot." 
After he "picks up." approach cautiously. Don't look for 
"distance." as this is a deceptive hole and requires several 
delicate "strokes" of policy. In this play do not keep your 
head down. (The buyer may not be able to recognize you). 
Don't "putter" around, ['lav straight for the "hole" and 
see that every "shot" counts. If you find yourself in the 
"rough" don't take NO for an answer, liive him a good 
argument and you will find yourself in a "fairway" to an 
• irder. 

Teeing Off 
In approaching a lady buyer put your weight flatly upon 
both feet. Bring your right arm out straight, bend your 
elbow, inclining your hand toward your hat. Remove same 
gracefully and in making the "downward stroke" bring your 
hand holding hat to a position at your right side, shoulders 
erect, facing the buyer. Relax your face with a tendency 
to smile and you are liable to overcome the "bogey" that 
she is a tough customer. 

Timing 
In quest of business, it is a good thing to "time your 

stroke." (let to the first "tee" g 1 and early before "the 

course is congested." as the early hours are more likelv 
to find your buyer able to concentrate on your proposition, 
which is all important in the selling game. The early bird 
catches the worm and the earlv player finds the most "lost 
balls." 

Out of the Sand Trap 
If you have the proper sand in your makeup, you do not 
have to trap your prospect by untruth. Play the game 
straight and pin your buyer down to real facts and you will 
have results "par" excellence. 

The Drive 
If the buyer is a large user of merchandise, it is often ad- 
visable to have a "good drive" handy to show him. 

Stance 

In taking your "stance" before a prospective customer, 
try to be natural. Don't drop your left knee. It is a bad 
"stroke" of policy to be ungraceful. 

Pivot 

In taking leave, "pivot" on your right foot with a slight 
turn at the waist line. Bring your left foot in same position 



as your right, facing the door, which will give you perfect 
"direction" in making exit. Don't say aloud what you think. 
It may disturb the next player. Learn to lose a hole with 
good grace. 

Make Every Stroke Count 

In waiting on your customer, play out every hole. Make 
every stroke of the pencil count. 

If he is a number taker, pick up the ball and "concede 
the hole" to him and declare it no contest. ( Itherwise you 
will only "top" the transaction with disappointment. Good 
players in the game of business rarely mention their score. 
As in golf, their reputation usually precedes them. 
Slicing, Hooking and Pressing 

If you should get a good slice of a buyer's business, don't 
be avaricious. "Don't press" too much, for you may get 
the "hook" and find yourself eliminated from the game. 
Chip Shot 

It frequently happens in making a succession of perfect 
shots, you at last reach the "green" only to find yourself 
"stymied" by a ball called confirmation. This is often over- 
come in golf by making a "ship shot" over the ball and 
into the hole. In the business game this is not advisable, as 

it is i r business to go over the head of the huye\ Take 

your medicine and in future avoid those kind of trans- 
actions. 

Replace Turf 

The expression "replace turf" suggests to the traveller to 

leave things as he finds them. In other words "don't write 

telephone numbers on the wall and don't tabulate your sales 

on the sample table." It might discourage your competitors. 

Handicap 

Don't "handicap" yourself and the buyer with too much 
irrelevant conversation. Play straight for the pin, other- 
wise, it has a tendency to congest the business course and 
is unfair to faster players. 

Hole in One 

If your competitor makes a "hole in one" applaud him. 
Show that you do not think you have a monopoly on the 
world's brains. 

Silence 

Don't continually shout "fore" without provocation. 
Everyone is entitled to his place in the sun and because you 
are a better player in the business world is no reason why 
everyone should let you go through. 
The Caddie 

Don't carry your own clubs. Engage a caddie. It is a 
cheap investment. Nothing belittles a man more in the 
eyes of a customer than l>> approach him laden down like 
a truck horse. Reserve your brain and energy for the finer 
points of the game. 

Don't misquote your score. It is no disgrace to be turned 

down by a buyer. 



An unusual series of lecture-recitals will begin on Mon- 
day afternoon, February 1st. when Edgcumb Pinch'on, the 
celebrated English essayist, critic and lecturer, will deliver 
the first i if his group of lectures, entitled "The Son- of 
the Body," a critic on the dance. Mr. 1'inchon will be as- 
sisted by Elise Dufour of the Dufour School of Rhythm of 
New York and London and by her artist pupil, Lugenja 
Liczbinska. Polish danseuse. 

These lectures will be held every Monday in February at 
3:45 in the studio. 317 Shreve Building and are under the 
management of Lulu J. Blumberg. 



January 30, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



29 



Advantages of Membership 

of Auto Service Plus 

(1) Gasoline, 2 cents below the market price per gallon. 

(2) Washing car, $1.00 reduction. (Regular price, $2.50 to $'3. 00). 

(3) Greasing car, $1.00 reduction. (Regular price, $1.50 to $2.50). 

(4) lO'/r reduction on oils. 

(5) Tow service free. (Radius city limits). 

(6) Tire service free. (Radius city limits) . 

(7) Vulcanizing punctures, 25 cents, maximum, 50 cents. (Regular 
price, 75 cen's). 

(8) 20% reduction on accessories. 

(9) 109r reduction on all standard tires. 
(10) 24-hour service. 



Telephone 

Prospect 

114 





Geo. W. Moore 

Owner 

and 

Manager 



Auto Service Plus Co. 

Most Complete Super Service Station on the Pacific Coast 
Van Ness at Ellis, San Francisco 



Their watchword is smiling courtesy. — This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 

tf RATES— Ter 'Day, single, European Wan 



The center 
for Theatres 
'Banks, Shops 

Ttease 'write 
for booklet 



120 rooms with running water • 52.50 to fA.OO 
220 rooms wiih bath • - - 3.50 to 5.00 
160 room! with bath - • 6.00 to 8.00 

Double, $4.00 up 

Also a number of large and beautiful rooms and 
suites, some in period furnishings with grand piano, 
fire place and bath, $10 00 up. 



LARGE AND WELL EOUIPPED SAMPI E ROOMS 

T^A^CHO GOLF CLUB] 
L available to all guestsJ 



HAROLD E. LATHROP 
^Manager 



if, 



HOTEL 



ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles ».., 



Motor Down — You' II Enjoy the Week-End at 




3\(ow Open the Entire Tear 



n-sii 



GOLF - TENNIS 



Dinner Dance Every Saturday Evening 

SWIMMING - SCENIC DRIVES 



- FISHING 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30. 1926 



inance 



IT IS with great regret that we note the death of Tom C. 
Grant former manager of the Pacific Coast Department 
of the North British and Mercantile. He was one of the 
pioneers of the insurance business on the coast, entering 
business in San Francisco sixty years ago, 1 le was 85 years 
old, a native of Charleston, Ma-s. 

* * 

— Tlie number of tires in cotton lias led to the rule in 
Arizona that smokers engaged in picking get safety matches. 
The attempt to prevenl cigarette smoking by pickers was 
rendered futile by tin- objections of the Mexicans, who 
would not pick without their tobacco, ami Mexican labor 
i- essential in the Arizona cotton industry. 

* * 

— The California Supreme Court has ruled that a work- 
man meeting death in an automobile accident, while travel- 
ling at a higher rate of speed than tile law allows is guilty 
of will fid negligence anil his dependents are not entitled 
to indemnity under the compensation law. 

■:= * 

— ( in- of the most amazing happenings of late is the fact 
that the regents of the University of L'tah have asked per- 
mission to take out an insurance policy on the institution 
for $200,000 against explosion damage, threats having been 
made by radicals to destroy the buildings. 

* * 

— "No property of the State of California can be insured 
against the risk of damage or destruction by lire except the 
state printing office." says John II. Kiordan, deputy attor- 
ney-general, in an opinion to the Stale Board of Control, 
Presumably, he is correct, and it makes a pretty commen- 
tary upon the commonsense of some of the legislation under 
which we stagger. 

* * 

— The value of gold, silver, copper, lead and zinc produced 
in California in 1925, according to the estimate of |. M. 
Hill, of the Bureau of Mines. Department of Commerce, 

as $22,893,500 a decrease < >\ S44.1 .37. compared with the 
value of metals produced in 1924. There was a decrease in 
the production of gold, silver and copper and considerable 
increase in the output of lead and zinc. 

* * 

■ — Extension of the automatic train-control system C be- 
ing made by the Southern Pacific on the line from Tracy 
to Fresno. It has been inspected and approved by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. It is impossible for an 
engine-man to run past a signal unless he makes indication 
that he has observed the signal by adjusting the mechanism 

of the stop de\ ice in the cab. 

* * * 

—The United States Circuit Court of Vppeals for the 
Fifth District has held that, notwithstanding the fact that 
a clause in a policy provides that after one war the policy 
will he incontestable, still the company ha- the right to con- 
test a double indemnity clause. 

* * * 

— Wholesale charges of murder of Osage Indians by 

white men for the sake of insurance money are being probe.]. 
Several Indians worth from two to five million-; apiece have 
been found in the ( Isage hills with a bullet or knife wound, 
a- the sole mean- of death. Insurance people are pointing 
to these murders, a- -bowing the danger of granting policies 
to people with onl) a financial interest in the insured. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY I0TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1925 

Assets $107,232,609.22 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,250,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over 525,000.00 

MISSION' BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

I'AKK-I'HEMDK) BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

IIAK.ll I -Mill BRANCH II ,i c |„ and Belvedere Streets 

WEST I'OKTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St, 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ON£-QUARTER (4J£) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 

I'll id I n Capital *2u.000.000 S20.00O.UO0 Reaerve I unci 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THItU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG. ; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

Son FrnnciKco Ofllce: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COCLTHARD 

Mnnnecr Assi. Manager 



, 

Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and I 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance j 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walte W. Derr, Manager 

105 -Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



1 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Doucla3 224+ 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 



Manufacturer* t 

RIVETED STEM, PIPE. TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS. 
FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 

San PranciBco, t'nlif. Los Ajifcelea, Calif. 

r,717 Santa Fe Avenue 



III Mnrkc-t Street 



MADE TO ORDER O NLY j 

f <snF n, p -r obis ^ihhif i 

Large Assortment of Imported fabrics 
25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 j 



January 30. 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



31 



THE BRAVE and THE FAIR 



By Josephine Wilson 



[NOTE: This department will publish, each week, the most distinctive events in men's and 
women's organizations. 




rvr 



,I(1SI!P"ive 
WILSON 

were typical 



PROMINENT MEN AND THEIR BIG EVENTS 

R. P. A. YOUNG was unanimously re- 
elected to the presidency of the Cali- 
fornia Hotel Association at the delightful 
dinner dance given last Thursday night, 
when the new roof garden and lounge room 
of the Gift I Intel was formally opened. 

Mr. Young officially opened the auspicious 
event and presided as toastmaster of the oc- 
casion. His brilliant remarks, his well 
chosen theme and the manner of his address 
if the executive whose efficient work has 
again placed him at the head of this group of prominent 
Califo nia hotel men. Hundreds of hotel people from all 
parts of the siate with their families and Special guests filled 
to capacity the handsome new rooms of the Gift and the 
ballroom had to be pressed into service for the accommoda- 
tion of the guests. 

In his apartment at the Hotel Turpin. yesterday. Mr. Young 
stated that the hotels of California were anticipating in- 
creased business for there was every indication of much 
travel during the present year. "Plie president of the Cali- 
fornia Hotel Association was accorded a hearty ovation by 
his constituents at the close of bis address and placed in 
tb" executive position with a splendid corps of officers. They 
include: George 1). Smith, first vice-president; II. \Y. Lake, 
secmd vice-president; Albert Loeb, secretary; \Y. E. Smith, 
treasurer. The executive committee comprises Messrs. 
Henry Barker, lb Dickinson, Crank N. Harper, Kirk Harris, 
George W. Hooper, W. C. Jurgens, J. \Y. FJannery, J. L. 
Flanagan, |. Levingston, Albert 1. Loeb, George I). Smith, 
W. I'-. Smith, John F. Shea. I'. A. Young, John Zeeman, Carl 
Stanley, Charles Hamilton ami II. W. Lake. Mrs. Emily 
Li mg is on this committee. 



Dr. Fletcher Harper Swift, of the college of education. 
University of California, received the announcement this 
past week of bis appointment as the California member ol 
the western regional committee of the Carnegie Corpora- 
tion for the Selection of fellows and Scholars in Arts. 

This is the second highest honor ever conferred upon a 
University of California professor, according to those who 
keep such information under close surveillance. Ten West- 
ern states are represented on the Carnegie commitee; these 
include California, Colorado, Utah, Oregon, Montana. Ne- 
vada, Arizona, New Mexico. Idaho and Washington. 

"Dr. Swift has been a member of the i alifornia faculty 
for several years, and is regarded as one of the outstanding 

figures in the field of education in the West." states a promi- 
nent contemporary. 

* * * 

The California idee Club is planning to tour Europe dur- 
ing the summer vacation period, according to announce- 
ments made bv the director, who adds thai the repertoire 
Cdce Club is to be re-varnished and placed in a shining 
Condition for the tour. It is -aid that there will be many 
classical and semi-classical selections on their pi. • 
grains. I'hev certainly should please, for their voices and 
their manner of presentation are ringing SUCC< • 
ntlnned i>n Page K) 



WOMEN AND THEIR ACTIVITIES 
Sunshine Society 

MRS. FRFD BENNETT, the first president and founder 
of the Golden ('.ate Branch of the National Sunshine 
Society, was the honor guest at a most delightful reception 
given on Monday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Maude V. 
Anderson, on Nineteenth Avenue, when a large number of 
her friends called to pay tribute to the beloved past-presi- 
dent. 

Mis. Vallejo, president, of the Sunshine Society, headed 
the receiving line at the handsome affair with a group of 
active members and chairmen of the philanthropic under- 
takings, assisting her. The lovely home of Mrs. Anderson 
was beautifully decorated in honor of the gracious founder 
and former president. 

* * * 

The Bertola Assembly of California will give a reception 
and luncheon honoring the club editors of the San Francisco 
daily papers on February 11. at the noon hour, in the Fair- 
mont Hotel. Mrs. E. R. ( I'Donnell, president of the Assembly 
and Mrs. William II. Urmy, secretary, are in charge of the 
event, and the entire plan being one method for expressing 
their appreciation t< . the talented women of the local press. 

* * * 

Channing Auxiliary will hold its Founders' Day on Feb- 
ruary first, with Mrs. I;. R. Keith the hostess and Mrs. 
A. L. Hart presiding at the tea. Greetings from past-presi- 
dents will be offered and early reminiscences of the early 

sixties be given bv Rev. Charles W. Wendte, founder of 
the auxiliary. Mrs. barker S. Maddux will precede the 
bounders' Day tea with her lecture on current events. 

* * * 

Members' Day was auspiciously observed on Monday at 
the St. Francis Hotel by members of the Soroptiinist Club, 
with talks and music given over entirely to the members 
whose birthdays occur in the month of January. 

* * * 

Kappa Alpha Thct.i, a national women's college sorority 
held it- Founders' Day luncheon last Saturday at the Gift 
Hotel. Mrs. Hiram T. Hall directing the program, an in- 
teresting feature being the Theta dance presented by Miss 
Mary Silva Wiles of Beta chapter. 

* * * 

Mis. Hamilton Riggins, chairman of the department of 
civics. California Federation of Women's Clubs, is further- 
ing the present movement among the women t • > enforce all 
driver- of automobiles to carry insurance. 

* * * 

Dr. Mariana Bertola, president of the California Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs, was royally received in Washing- 
ton. D. C, according to constituents returning from the 
capital. Dr. Bertola went to Washington to attend the 
meeting of the General Federation. 

* * * 

The Sierra Club held an interesting meeting on Tuesday 
when Dr. Saxton T. Pope was the speaker, on the subject of 
"Hunting Big Game in Africa." Dr. E. C. Parks presided 
and many prominent women were among the inter 

listeners. 

minueil on Pas. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30, 1926 



Mr. Blabbitt on Automobiles 



N( )W that the Auto Show is with us again and, according 
tu indications, will roll to a new victory with several 
score motors furnishing the power, a few words on the 
subject, from an unbiased spectator would not, perhaps, be 
amiss, ^\"c irtls are cheap, and automobiles are not. Some- 
times a fellow may sell the former when he couldn't begin 
to turn over the latter — this is one of those instances. 

The present show has some really remarkable features 
other than the good-looking and often magnificent cars on 
display. There is Paul Whiteman and his orchestra. His 
polite jazz should make the most parsimonious motorist 
forget the price of rubber quite as much as Mr. Whiteman 
can afford to. 

There is always a certain glamour attached to a showing 
of the latest motor cars that submerges the mechanical as- 
pect of the exhibition in a maze of day dreams, on the part 
of visitors. A new automobile, like a spry young colt, ra- 
diates a gingery feeling that makes a veteran driver long 
for the open road and the surge of power of a clean, vibrant 
— but not vigrating — motor. The lustre of the sparkling, 
brand-new bodies reflects the American love of beauty — and 
reacts quite forcibly on the more susceptible man's wallet 
— largely through his wife's reflex action as a particularly 
attractive creation is about to be passed by. 

A current opinion expressed by the majority of people 
who know anything at all about motor cars, is that all au- 
tomobiles must be pretty good nowadays or they wouldn't 
sur\ ive from year to year — in the face of healthy and ag- 
gressive competition. This is undoubtedly true. A certain 
personal element must enter into the ability of a horseless 
carriage to stand up to the promises its makers extend to 
their patrons. No machine, however expensive, will stand 
continued abuse without protest, and careful adherence to 
the rules of the game laid down in instruction books for 
drivers, must be insured before the best of the best of all 
classes can survive throughout the months of this year and 
next. 

At all auto allows you will encounter the knocker, who 
goes out of his way to put in a bad word or two for certain 
makes of cars, lie i-- usually a person who has never owned 
an automobile, or one who never buys a new car and prides 
himself on what is. in truth, an exceedingly elementary knowl- 
edge of mechanics, or someone who has never taken the 
trouble of even looking under the driver's -.cat to see what 
i> there. A human hammer-man is just as bad as a knock 
in an engine, only he can't be eliminated even when found. 
The least a fellow can do, on meeting one of these critters. 
is to introduce him to an owner of a car for which he seems 
to have an unusual antipathy. Nature will then take its 
course. 

Little time seems to elapse between one auto show and 
the next. Perhaps this is true because we are living in 
such a mad-cap age. The smell of gasoline, like the ozone 
of the high Sierras, is about as harmless a mean.-, of becom- 
ing intoxicated as we are now afforded. Motorized trans- 
portation has brought a new meaning to life in the west 
and the lure of the open mad lies but a little way ahead in 
vacation land. The writer assures the reader that he would 
much rather have it "Mr. Blabbitt in an automobile" than 
ditto "< in automobiles." 



w. 



E seek consumers' 
counsel and advice. . . Do 
not hesitate to offer sug- 
gestions, for the improve- 
ment of your service. 
Constructive criticism 
helping to make Pacific 
Service a popular service 
is always welcome. 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 




"PACinC SERVICE" 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 



I 4-126 






LARKINS DUCO 
Has Lustre 

Combined with lustre, it possesses a durability that 
is amazing. Be sure of a good job. 

Prices reasonable 

LARKINS & CO. 

First Avenue at Geary Street 




Metal Work Apper- 
taining to A ii tomo- 
bilen — Oxy- Acetylene 
Welding — 11 In ok - 
Hmlthingr. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



January 30, 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



33 



RADIO CABINETS 

LUNCH KITS 

AUTO TRUNKS 

INSTRUMENT KITS 



£ 



Covered cases of 

any description 

made to order 




RUST-PROOF DUST-PROOF WATER-PROOF 




VTI7.AKI1 Al TO Till Mi 

Prices from $5.00 to $500.00 



11I/.VIID LUNCH KIT 



Trunks for All Racks 
Racks for All Cars 



The Wizard Co. 

S. M. Waterman, Mgr. 
1432 Van Ness Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



1 



#11 11^1 fill 




,--' sss % <sr v ^ 



PCI llrll 




NATION 



DTOMOBILE 



CLUB 



Ask Your Insurance Agent 

or Call at 362 Pine Street. 

San Francisco. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30. 1926 



FOOTBALL 

FACTS AND FICTION 

By Dick Smith 



WHEN' the San Francisco Tigers trooped on the field 
at Kezar stadium last Sunday it did not take long For 
them to get the range of Harold E. Grange and his imme- 
diate associates. In the Chicago vernacular, the local boys 
knocked the visitors for a loop. All ibis is rather dull his- 
tory, coming as an anti-climax to the glorious amateur 
American football season that we have conie to prize so 
highly in the West. 

There was a certain atmosphere about the professional game 
of the Tigers and Bears that rather put the damper on any 
excitement a spectator might have worked up on his way out 
to the field. A few petty unsportsmanlike acts perpetrated 
by one member in particular, of the Bears, cinched the dis- 
favor of a large number of spectators on the already foot- 
ball wearv and. we suspect, disgruntle 1 boys from back East. 
Hard riding by the westerners made the old saddle rub until 
all the bruins were rather out of sorts by the time the gun 
popped, ending San Francisci - first professional classic — 
or primer — as you will. 

Grange evidently possesses none of that invaluable quality 
called, "showman's instinct." While we realize that the -tram 
of appearing in a dozen or so professional games on top of a 
strenuous college season must tell on him to a marked degree. 
he should, like a true actor, school himself to give the specta- 
tors their money's worth. Probably he would have, had it 
not been for the whale of a game put up by "Buck" Bailey 
and his seven-day wonders. < irange, when fresh, must cer- 
tainly be a wonderful player; hut when tired, he seems to 
lose that spark of something that has kept him on the All- 
American roll of honor for three straight years. 

The lion's share of the Tigers' glory must go to Wilson, 
Bradshaw and "Buck" Bailey. They made their breaks and 
beat in a game which they entered as under-dogs. None ol 
their sparkling play would have been possible bad it not been 
for the Tigers' splendid line, of which Bailey was a prime fac- 
tor — mainly because he did not have to keep bis eye on back- 
ing up weak positions in his wall of football brawn. More 
power to the men on the Tiger team, although we feel sort of 
downcast that such a crew of football men should be barred, 
for all time, from the amateur game. Money talks ami. in 
these davs, talks loud but. after all. no greenback or bag of 
shekels can make as loud a noise as a western crowd at an 
amateur football game — rooting for its heroes. 

Perhaps last Sunday's game will teach ibis year's sweet 
boy graduates something of what they may expect if they 
give up business and good berths on amateur teams for a 
bit of tinsel and a dash of fleeting glory. 



^Novelty 

Quaint customs of other lands and other 
peoples — queer head dresses of tribes 
who wear little else — strange and enter- 
taining pictures gathered from all parts 
of the earth are shown every Sunday in 
The Chronicle Rotagravure. 

Make it a point to see this delightful 
pictorial section every week. Have The 
Sunday Chronicle delivered to your 
home. 



Opening of Samarkand 

Friday of last week, the 22nd. the beautiful Samarkand 
Hotel at Santa Barbara, opened it^ doors to guests; the 
formal opening taking place the next day. Saturday, the 23rd. 

This hostelry, with its terraces, its exquisite garden, its 
lovely little artificial lakes, is more enchanting and dis- 
tinctive than ever, and its formal opening was an affair 
that scintillated with music, vari-colored lights, and beau- 
tifully gowned women. 

'When one knows that the Samarkand is "A Linnard 
Hotel," the fact is immediately realized that this appella- 
tion spells all that is superlative in service, surroundings 
and cuisine. 



s$an JFranrisw 



ROTAGRAVURE 

Golden Gate Ferry 
Company 

S 

WINTER SCHEDULE 



Effective October 1, 1925 



S 



Leave Sausalito 

5:00 a.m. 

6:00 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

Every Half 

Hour Until 

10:00 p.m. 

Then 

11:00 p.m. 

12:00 p.m. 

1 :00 a. m. 



Leave San Francisco 

5:30 a.m. 

6:30 a. m. 

7:00 a.m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:30 p.m. 

Then 

It :30 p.m. 

12:30 a.m. 

1:30 a.m. 



Saturdays and Sundays Only 
2:00 a.m. 2:30 a.m. 

ON SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

There will be extra trips if traffic warrants. 



A. O. Stewart 

President 



Harry E. Speas J 

Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. ( 
i 

■■■..-.......--..4 



lamiary MX 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



35 



WHERE TO DINE 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 7Sc, $1.00 35c, SOc, 75c $1.00,81.50 a la carte 
Dancing 7:00 P. M. to 1:00 A. M. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 
HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 




ICE CREA/%, 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w? 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think (hat n vigorous brushing once or (wive a day in 
taking very good cure of them. Ilrutthing: U only n part of the 
urocerm. Many tliincs can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teed* examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth soref Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve Mocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Gnrfleld 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Self Cleaning Bridges; 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



St. Mary's Academy 



SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 




Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



334 Sutter St. 



Douglas 7118 






L 



445 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parlies, seating 75 to 100 people. 

441 Pine Street Phone Kearny 468 

OTarrrll Mid DT A NT C* {*% » Q Pkni 

Urkin Sll. *-» 1-i *-%. 1 ^1 \^ V-J O Franklin <» 

Luncheon (11:30 i» 2 i>. m.) $ .:,'. No Vblloi Should Lun ih<- Cii» Wiih- 

Sund«y Luncheon 1.00 mil Dining in thr FbiMl Coo 

Dinner, Week Day* 11. K0 la Imafc* 

Dinner, Sundays and Holiday* ,., 1,75 

DANCING siNDAY EVENINGS 



NO A H'S 
ARK 

t.:t Third Aveane, SAN M VTBO 



Featuring; Southern Cooki 

Open From 

11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4:30 to S:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 

llnir Block from HUrhTmy 




14-Mn b Housb 



Uncle Tom's Cabin i 

Restaurant 

OPEN tM A.M. TO 11 KM P. H. 
INSIRPASSED CUISINI 

CiJU. Leonhardt 

formerly of 
Golden Cite Park Cm.inn 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic. 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 



Hours: 9-12, 1-5 
980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., 
Phone Garfield 5394 



San Francisco 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No 2 Tlllmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Itare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

poi 1st Ions from Zachnsdorf. Root. Morrell. etc.. of London 

Commissions In London Executed 

Sinprle Books and Libraries Purchased 

rhnne Kearny B8 1 6 



J Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained j 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

A>'D PAM, ELDER'S LIBRARY 

j 239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif, j 
r . ....... ■ • 

j DR. B. W. HAINES 



-|! 



DENTIST 



Elkan Gunst Building 
323 Geary at Powell 
San Francisco 



Hours: 9 to 4 
Telephone Douglas 2949 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., j 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at (A« Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

220 Clare Street— Garfield S44 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30, 1926 



Library Table 



West Winds 

A dignified and worthy effort on the part of a group of 
students of poetry, mostly local writers. Professional 
writers, teachers of English, professors of mathematics, 
makers of auto springs, sign painters, printers, are repre- 
ented here with many others who take time and leisure 
for writing. As a proof of the widespread interest in mod- 
ern poetry it is an excellent example. If it falls short of 
the high standards of enduring poetry — why, that is usual 
poet's luck. 

Where the greatest sincerity is shown, there, too often, is 
least craftsmanship. And where cleverness and finish are' 
evident is to he found a lack of that humbleness and devo- 
tion necessary to produce real art. 

But the hook is well worth reading more than once, fur 
the appeal of poetry too frequently depends on the mood 
of the reader. Derrick Lehmer and Mrs. Lehmer. Harry 
Noyes Pratt, George Sterling, Anna Kalfus Spero and many 
other well-known names are there. The delicate Katherine 
Sanders. Kate Q. Foster, John Brayton and the pure-spirited 
Claudius Thayer — these are names, not so well known, but 
wi irthy of mention. 

"West Winds"; Harr Wagner, publisher, San Francisco, 



"The Lone Hand" 

Joseph B. Ames, author of "Loudon From Laramie" and nu- 
merous other western stories of the more literate type, has made 
a sure place for himself in that ever fascinating field of fic- 
tion. "The Lone Hand" is a story of the West — the Wyoming 
cow country — in the wild, had days when every man of the 
plains was a law unto himself. 

Brand Larrigan, young, handsome, a bit of a dandy as to 
dress and accoutrement, riding always a coal-black stallion 
carrying a silver-trimmed saddle, and popular with the neigh- 
boring ranchers' daughters, is the victim of much jealousy and 
intrigue. 

Early in the story Larrigan is the object of a mysterious plot 
to "frame" him as a member of a band of outlaws operating in 
that section, the masked leader, a man of Larrigan 's build, hav- 
ing been seen wearing his clothes, and riding his black horse 
with the conspicuously trimmed saddle. Forced to flee a threat- 
ened lynching, Larrigan finds in a lonely line-camp gruesome 
evidence of the work of these marauders. 

He launches a lone campaign against the unknown outlaws 
and especially their leader, a masked enigma even to his own 
men. Then Larrigan discovers an almost unbelievable clew 
to the leader's identity which for a time seems likely to wreck 
the romance which weaves its way through the hero's adven- 
tures Further complications ensue and Larrigan works his 
way out of a situation loaded with danger of several kind^. 

"Tlie Lone Hand" is an exciting yarn, full of action, sus- 
pense and thrills, probably the best Mr. Ames has vet written. 
The Century Co. ?2.00. 



THE BRAVE AND THE FAIR 

(Continued from Page 31) 

Dr. Edward Meslin Hume, professor of history. Stanford 
University, was a speaker and honor guest at the weekly 
luncheon of the Commercial Club a few days ago his sub- 
ject for this discourse being, "The Big Things in Life." 
Mr. Fred D. Parr, president of the Parr Terminal Company, 
addressed the club on the theme. "East Bay Section of the 
Foreign Trade Club in California." 
* * * 

The Business and Professional Women's Club will hold 
a birthday dinner on February S for which elaborate prep- 
arations are being made. Dr. Susan Hamilton is the presi- 
dent. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^ 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 



WIGS and TOUPEES 

Ui my make defy detection, because I make them ven- 
tilated and porous and from the purest, finest human 
hair. 

G. LEDERLR 

561 Sutter St., Between Powell and Mason StS. 
San Francisco, California 

Firm Eilnbliihed 1866 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the-~- 

VALLEY of the MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Mushrooms." 

Clean Ruomi, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 
\ i»h Sonoma County*! Famoui ReaorU and Mineral (Warm W-.pri 
Tank. From Tin. Hold. 

Holei Exceptionally Reaionable. 

Telephone 110 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Units: 35c per tiny; 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 24 3 

Six Floorn for Service and Storngre of Automobiles 



Linen lasts longer when laundered by 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry"' 
250 Twelfth St., San Francisco 'Phone Market 916 J 



j... - ■ ----.......-...--.....-..--.-...< 


p 


arisian 


Dyein 


a 


and 


CI 


eaning 




Suit. Preued 


Ilv Hand 

MME 

Par titan 


Onl T - 

M. 

Dyeit 


fun 

s. 

f an 


Called For 

E. LEE 

d Cleaning 


and De 


ivered 




583 
in 


Post Sthe«t 
•'ikcima Hotel 










Pho 


Sam 


1" r!«- C |.(.n 

KLIN 2510 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER \ 

208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel). San Francisco j 

Phone Kearny 391 i 



DENMAN GARAGE 



902 Bush (cor. Taylor) 



A convenient location for club m«mb*ri 



January 30, 1926 

PLEASURE'S WAND 
(Continued from Page 27) 

Theater, where she is making the 
greatest hit of her career. She seems 
fo get younger and more charming 
every season, and she seems to enjoy 
her work more and more each appear- 
ance. She is assisted by Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis Alter, and is offering an entire 
new program the coming week. 

( )ne of the biggest laugh sensations 
of all times is Dr. Rockwell whose 
card reads. "Dr. Rockwell, Quack! 
Quack !" He is said to have the guar- 
anteed prescription that will cure all 
ills! 

The international Lightning Change 
Artist, Doc Baker, is another big fea- 
ture with a new revue in which he is 
assisted by Harriet Towne, Miller and 
Wilson and a host of girls. Jack 
Benny, popular monologist, returns 
With new laughs and quips. Charles 
Harrison and Sylvie Dakin with 
Benny Oakland offer a novelty of the 
highest order called "The Three of 
Us"; Reynolds, Donegan and Com- 
pany are an assembly of the World's 
Champion winners who offer a big 
New York sensation "1920 Revue"; 
Dan Stanley and Al Birnes are said to 
be "Two Bright Lights From Broad- 
way" ; the Merediths, Madelyn and 
Hoyt, have a number of dance special- 
ties. 



Wilkes 

Don't miss "The Big Parade." It 
must be seen to be appreciated, livery 
woman who sees it will applaud it. It 
is the best argument against war that 
was ever known. It depicts the stark 
horror of war, no matter who the par- 
ticipants may be. 

From start to finish this picture 
holds you. Its comedy is irresistible, 
and its pathos .grips you because ol 
its very humanness. < >ne moment you 
are laughing outright at the antics of 
the doughboys, and the next you are in 
tears at the sheer, useless tragedy of 
it all. 

The calm, deliberate wav in which 
the men, thrust suddenly into this hor- 
rible maelstrom, walked right into the 
very jaws of death, is a masterpiece of 
direction. The scene where Jim Ap- 
person captures a German soldier in 



'•' " HltWF.R V V. l.otEJOV 

C.arhrlil MM 

The Homer System 

BOOKKEEPING « 01 I n:Tio\s 



Inttoltmrnl, Current llrlinqurnt Anitunt*. Legal Aid. 

4m4UaS) films, Financial Statem+nt*. Irnome Tax 

Rrport*. Bookke+pm? {Part Tima Srrrk-*) 

Dc lfoi v.. Ht tiniNc >*s FkutCUM 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

the dug-out, only to find he cannot 
kill him, but offers him a cigarette in- 
stead, is a stroke of genius. 

Lawrence Stallings' masterpiece is 
human. He knew intimately of the 
things he wrote, and King Vidor has 
transferred it to the screen with a mas- 
terly touch which brings out the hu- 
manness of the story. It is indeed a 
great picture which these two men 
have given us. 

The three doughboys, happy-go- 
lucky buddies, thrown together by the 
war, from vastly different stations in 
life, are replicas of hundreds of dough- 
boys as I knew them, as anyone knew 
them in those stirring days of the 
great war. John Gilbert as Jim Ap- 
person, Karl Dane as Slim, and Tom 
O'Brien as Bull, comrades to the end, 
are wonderful ! 

And Renee Adoree ! One cannot 
speak too highly of her work in the 
role of Melisande, the little French 
peasant girl, in love with her Ameri- 
can "Jimee." 

The production is Al in every re- 
spect. The effects used in this picture, 
from the blowing of the first factory 
whistle to the rumbles of the great mo- 
tor trucks which carry the boys up to 
the front, make it most realistic. 

The score is splendid, and under the 
able direction of Clarence West, the 
well known musical director from New 
York, the orchestra enhanced in no 
small way. this soul-gripping, epochal 
picture. It is a picture that everyone 
should see. Don't miss it ! 



Second Great African Cruise of 
Royal Mail 

The Royal Mail liner "t >rca" sailed 
from New York on January 1 (| at 1 a.m. 
with a capacity li-t of passengers on the 
First » .tea' African Cruise. 

Now comes telegraphic advice that the 
Second Great African Cruise will leave 
Xew York in January, 1"27. and the " W- 
ttirias," the world's largest motor liner. 

recently built for the Royal Mail at the 
yards of I larland X- Wolff at Belfast, has 
been selected for the cruise. 

The "Astlirias" is of 32,000 tons dis- 
placement and has S-cylinder double-act- 
ing Diesel motors developing 20,000 h.p. 
on two shafts. The "Asturias" was built 
for the Royal Mad European South 
American service and is exceptionally 
well adapted for travel in tropical cli- 
mates. The suites are finished in Louis 
XVI style A luxurious ladies' bair dress- 
ing saloon ami Pompeiian swimming-bath 
with two tiers of dressing rooms and bal- 
cony are a few of the special features on 
this magnificent liner. 

( In the first cruise California and the 
Pacific coast we- well represented and 
it is expected that the second cruise will 
attract even a greater number on this 
unique cruise "i "3 days, covering 22.000 
miles, visiting the West Indies. Brazil. 



37 

Uruguay. Argentine. South Africa 
East Africa, Zanzibar, Kenya. Sudan, 
Egypt, Riviera and Europe, with optional 
tours to Victoria Falls, Rhodesia ami 
other interesting points. 



~)ctch coro/^eroted^A 
hy reliable 
Criaujfeurs 
u/ao morou<f/ily under- 
stand their Aus/ness 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 




Phone Grnystone 270 

1620 Pine Street 

Sun Franciaco 



^m^m 




-the better it geb 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 
1.SOO.OOO rapi w*re served at the Pan 
Pacific International Exposition 



38 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Tamiarv 3Q, 1926 



WIELANDS BREW 

WITH YOUR MEALS— IT HELPS 

Order by the case from your grocer 

Established 1868 

Main Office, 240 Second Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 671 



T ; a e me PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There la a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 




I TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES) 
Sun Irinu-isro— II url Ingram e 

Went. 703 478 



fhune SuTTQt 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

i formerly with Shreve & Company) 

Clockmakers and Watchmakers 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

UO» font Street at Grant Avenue 

San FranclMco. Calif. 



Call , 



id Deliver 



n San Francisco. Alai 
Mateo Counties 



iwfa 



875 FOLSOM ST. 818 EMERSON ST. 



SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

| San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



At the Elder Gallery 
A scintillating" review, "The Influ- 
ence of Women in the Life of Anatole 
France" will be given in the Paul Elder 
Gallery, Saturday afternoon, February 6, 
at 2:30 o'clock, by Beatrice Reynolds Kin- 
kead. Mrs Kinkead has recently returned 
from France, where she made a study of 
the life and works of the great French lit- 
terateur. ( In this occasion she will dis- 
cuss Brousson's recently published 
Boswellian memoir "Anatole France 

1 limself." 

* * * 

The Paul Elder Galleries will hang 
an exhibition of etchings to open Tues- 
day, February second. Four contem- 
porary etchers. Beurdelev. Anns. Orr 
and Logan, are to be represented with 
studies of scenes principally in France 
— villages, cathedrals, courtyards and 
other picturesque subjects. 



Medical Professor: "What is the 
first thing you would do if a patient of 
yours were blown into the air by an 
explosion ?" 

Medical Student: "Wait for him to 
come down." — Szczutek (Lwowl. 



First Youngster: Say do you be- 
lieve in the devil? 

Second: Xaw. It's just like this 
Santa Claus business; it's your father. 
— B. H. S. Torch. 



"Take care of your teeth." savs an 
advertisement. \\'e have nothing but 
scom for the careless person who 
leaves them smiling in the bathroom. 
—Cold and Black. 



Jimmie: "We've got a new baby 

down at our house." 

Elderly Neighbor: "How nice; am! 
did the stork bring him?" 

Jimmie: "Xaw. he developed from 
a unicellular amoeba." — Xutlev Attic. 



1926 



Pacific 



1926 



AUTO SHOW 

Paul Whiteman 

HIMSELF 

AND HIS CONCERT 
ORCHESTRA 

Jan 30 to Feb. 6 Incl. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



First Angel : "How did you get up 
here?" 

Second Angel. "Flu." — Toreador. 



! 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office mid Works 1025 Mission St. 

i' ii' Market 7018 

Drani'h Office: TOO Sutter St. 
(Hole! Canterbury lil.lt. i 

Phone Prospect :>s lr, 

Work Called For and Delivered 



! 




N. W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




NEW ORLEANS 

To better serve our many friends aid patrons 
ova- '300.00000 has been expended in recon- 
struction and rehabilitation to maintain this 
famous hostelry as 

One of America's Leading Hotels 

The large well ventilated high ceiling rooms 
have been retained and modernized^""--''' 

ACCOMM0DOTN0 OVER 1000 GUESTS 

Send fa'Descriptive Hotel folder: 

1 Iterated Mardi-Gras Pngram for the asking 

Alfred S.Ajyier. wuCaitd. 

NEW ORLEA1M S . LA 

"Micket Offices ol all Ttunsporution lino in lobby 




ranuary 30, 1926 



SAX FRANCISi O NEWS LETTER 



39 






MOHAWKS 

Co Farther/ 




CLASS 

QUALITY 

DURABILITY 




MM 

If you are interested in Real High Grade Tires — 
Then we recommend 

MOHAWK 
CORDS 

BALLOON OR HIGH PRESSURE 

A Plan You'll Like 

We have always held to the plan of selling tires 

and giving service that make our customers 

want to come back for more 



MOHAWK RlBBl.R. CO. e/NEW YORK 

AKRON. OHIO 
7 A 1 Bryan r Street, San 1-'r im is< <> 

INGERSOLL SALES and SERVICE CO. 

636 Van Ness Avenue s\\ FRANCISCO Phone Prospect 554 



40 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 30, 1926 



TRIPLELITE 



"Relieves your nerves on dangerous curves" 
The Daylight Light"-Does not "GLARE" -"DAZZLE" or "BLIND" 



/' its tttiy ear 
Easy to install 




Triplelite 

floods the road with a t'lt'tir, 

soft, tvliile light 



Throws light around corners — penetrates mist and fog— makes passing cars easy — 
lights up highway signs on both sides of the road— illuminates safety zones— excellent 
back-up light — wonderful camp light— self protection— make., night driving a pleasure. 

The SAFETY HOUSE, Inc. 



\ 1 57 Post Street 



"Automobile Safety Essentials" 

Sax Francisco, Calif. 

Official Headlight Adjusting Station No. 1316 



Prospect 860 



Ernest F Rixon 

Formerly San Francisco Manager of Thos. Cook & Son 

TAKES PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING THE 

OPENING OF HIS OWN OFFICES AND PLACES HIMSELF 

AT YOUR SERVICE FOR EXPERT TRAVEL 

INFORMATION TO ALL PARTS 

OF THE WORLD 



General Agent Pacific Coast 
Messrs. DEAN 8s DAWSON Ltd., Est. 1871 



FLATIRON BUILDING - 544 MARKET STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

SUTTER 2342 




Burly in build as a battleship, with all the 
buoyant riding qualities of an ocean liner — 

PENNSYLVANIA 
VACUUM CUP 



BALLOON TIRES 



Level the jumpy, bumpy, rutty roads to an 

easy-riding boulevard. 

Save the car from costly repairs by snubbing 

the shocks. 

And miles! — on and on into the thousands 

and thousands with nothing to bother with or 

worry about. 

We'd like mighty well to show them to you. 

PENNSYLVANIA RUBBER CO. OF AMERICA. INC.. Jeannette, Pennsylvania 

TANSEY-CROWE COMPANY. Distributors 

San Francisco. California 



Long Wearing — Sure Footed 




The ABC of Safety 



B 



THE CAUSE: The most common 
cause of automobile accidents is inability 
to stop in time. 

WHY? When the brakes are applied 
ordinary tires permit the car to slide or 
skid. 

THE REMEDY: Powerful gripping 
Keaton Non-Skid Tires insure a quick 
stop under all weather conditions and 
prevent accidents. 



On either wet or dry pavements the Sure-Footed 
KEATON NON-SKID will stop your car in a 
shorter distance than any other tire or anti-skidding 
device, chains included. 



'A Foot to Spare Will Avert 
Disaster" 



KEATON NON-SKIDS 



Made in San Francisco 



KEATON TIRE AND RUBBER CO., 398 Kansas St., S. F. 



Geo. S. Merwin Co. 

1946 Polk Street, cor. Pacific 

Phone Grayntune 711- 

Regan Tire and Repair Co. 
688 Turk Street, nr. Van Ness 

Phone Prospect «4H,% 

Gerard Battery and Tire Co. 
4600 Geary St., cor. 10th Ave. 

Phone Kverpreen -144 



Phone Hemlock 130 



Ingersol-Keaton Sales and Service 
Removed to 524 Van Ness Avenue 

Phone Prospect ri.%4 

Columbus Vulcanizing and Tire Co. 
704 Filbert, cor. Columbus Avenue 

Phone Kearny S7!)4 



Behrmann Tire and Rim Co. 
1375 Golden Gate Ave., nr. Fillmore 

Phone Walnut 2068 

Viaduct Tire Co. 

4298 Mission St., opp. Silver Ave. 

Phone Itnmlolph I i:;r, 

Oakland Rim and Tire Co. 

2811 Broadway, Oakland 

Phone LnkeNifle 1-41 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



LOS ANGELES 




MOHAWKS 

Co Farther/ 



\ 





CLASS 

QUALITY 

DURABILITY 



tin 



If you are interested in Real High Grade Tires — 
Then we recommend 

MOHAWK 
CORDS 

BALLOON OR HIGH PRESSURE 

A Plan You'll Like 

We have always held to the plan of selling tires 

and giving service that make our customers 

want to come back for more 



MOHAWK RUBBER CO. of NEW YORK 

AKRON, OHIO 
731 Bryant Street, San Francisco 



INGERSOLL SALES and SERVICE CO. 



524 Van Ness Avenue SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Hemlock 4774 




Ert.kll.Md July 10. ItU 

SAM FRANCIftB,,, 




TEH 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1884 to 1926. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 225 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postofflce as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., FEBRUARY 6, 1926 



No. 6 



; 




.i -• . 


-'V 




r 










<■<■•■■£■ 

■ , 








-: 


- 


J?: .41 












w* 


Si \ 


fH ." :? J 



^ L. 



Shrubbery, close-clustering trees and vines have 
transformed the Peninsula resilience of H. T. 
Scott into a veritable liozcer of greenery. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 6, 1926 




There is no doubt that the Mitchell 
The Mitchell Case ease has produced more indignation 
in this country than anything which 
has happened for many years. There has been a grievous af- 
front to American notions of I'air play. We gather from 
their actions that the court was not only unjust hut vin- 
dictive, and that is an accusation which can seldom be 
brought against any reputable body in the country. There 
seems to be nothing to do hut admit that the case ha- struck 
a blow at the prestige of the army, which it will have much 
trouble in overcoming. 

The vindictiveness lay in the sentence, which contem- 
plated that Colonel Mitchell should be kept in the service 
under a muzzle without pay or allowance for five years. 
The amendment of the President that he should be allowed 
half-pay did not help matters very much. Colonel Mitchell 
was to be held down and gagged, he was not to lie allowed 
to enter private employment and he could not discuss army 
affairs without permission. Out of this entanglement Colo- 
nel Mitchell broke his way by resigning. 

Xow. his resignation has been accepted. He might have 

profited by admitting his resignation to be for the "g 1 of 

the service." a deadly thing for an officer of high standing. 
whose work has been distinguished and whose martyrdom 
is brought about by his zeal for the good of the service. 

(if course, if Colonel Mitchell goes back to private life, 
he has a magnificent chance to prepare the public mind for 
the changes which he advocates. Meanwhile, we are not 
greatly concerned about him. He is able to look after him- 
self. But what about our army and the men who command? 
If we are to punish a man brave enough to speak, we -hall 
lie in the hands of a stupid ring. 



We are certainly being gov- 
Bureaucracy Triumphant erned, make no mistake about 

that. Formerly, we had a no- 
tion that we governed ourselves and that this country was 
the home of upstanding citizens, with bodies and brain- ca- 
pable of meeting the conflicts of life, without any govern- 
mental assistance worth Speaking of, except to keep the ring 
clear, and see that the fight was fair and let the best man 
win. 

That is all over. For good or for ill the government has 
taken us in hand and is administering to us the amount of 
pap which it thinks we should have to keep going; being a 
sort of general wet nurse and convinced that by a strict 
course of keeping our feet dry, and forbidding us things, it 
will turn us out into line governmental servants. 

We have had a lingering notion that this country was to 
be the home of upstanding American citizens, who made 
their own way. who were not aggressive a- against other 
people, but were ready and willing to maintain their own 
right-. We have disposed •.<{ that notion by our entr) into 
the World Court and have taken the position that we are 
just one of a group of nations and will take the orders 
of the rest. So much for the outside world. 

At home we are falling more and more into the hand- of 
the governmental bureaucracy. The Court of Appeal at 
Los Angeles has actually upheld the right of the Commis- 
sioner of Corporations to impose such restrictions as he- 
sees necessary in a permit to sell stock. 

We are well aware that the unregulated sale of stock in 
securities leads to fraud on the public and that the blue-sky 
law is. in a measure, necessary. But the powers placed in 
the hands of the Corporation Commissioner are too great. 



There is one thing sure, that slow 
Women of Britain as the British may be to take up new 
things, when they do take them up, 
there is no comparison anywhere with the vigor and 
strength with which they push their way. Take the posi- 
tion of women, for example. It is only yesterday as it were, 
that the position of women in Britain was a source of con- 
stant merriment among us and they were looked down upon 
as an inferior and abused sex. Today they have secured at 
least equality and are demanding their share of the highest 
honors. 

The Women's Freedom League has been pointing out 
that women do not get the titles and decorations which are 
theirs by reason of their achievements, and show that cer- 
tain viscounties, baronies, privy councillorships, knighthoods 
and other distinctions of that sort have been showered upon 
men while women have not had their share of them. They 
-how that this is not due to any lack of distinction and point 
out as worthy of decoration, Mrs. Alderton, Mayor of Col- 
chester, Mrs. Mercer, Mayor id" Birkenhead, Margaret Bond- 
lield and Miss W intringham. member- of Parliament, Annie 
Horniman, Sybil Thorndyke and Lillian Bayliss for the 
stage. Cicely Hampton, writer and speaker, Lucy Kemp- 
ton Welch, artist, Gertrude Bell, explorer, Commandant 
Mary S. Allen, organizer of women police, and Maud Roy- 
den, preacher. 

This is a very distinguished list and there is no doubt 
that every member of it is worthy of special note, and. if 
honor- are being distributed for social achievements tend- 
ing to the upbuilding and glory of the group, every mem- 
ber of this li-t ha- earned those honors and should have 
them. 

But think of the progress made by those British women 
since one of their agitator- threw herself to death under a 
race horse at the Derby to call public attention to their agi- 
tation ! 



Dr. Christian Gauss, dean of Prince- 
Volstead and the ton University, has come out with a 
University strong blast against the Volstead Act. 

lie is not alone in this, but is one of 
the great group of university heads, who find the task of 
bringing up young men under their charge greatly impeded, 
if not altogether rendered abortive, by the operation of this 
idiotic law. 

Dr. Causs says that repeal or modificati in of the present 
law is imperative in face of the conditions in the university. 
The general dry law is destructive. He says of the eigh- 
teenth amendment, that "it is lowering the morals in all the 
universities of the United States." Can one imagine a 
greater indictment against any act than the charge of lower- 
ing the morals of the youth of the land and that charge sup- 
ported by the testimony of one of the most important ex- 
ecutives in the teaching profession? 

"We cannot deny that the problem of drinking is a very 
serious one at Princeton, as at all other universities," he 
said. And yet, before this act went into force, the drinking 
problem was solving it-elf and the excessive use of intoxi- 
cants was frowned upon generally. 

"In the time when you men attended the university," he 
remarked "there were places where the student could drink 
a glass or two of beer without great injury to themselves. 
Today, if they want to drink (ami it is folly to say that they 
will not drink I, they must go to a type of place which, if we 
called a spade a spade, would be designated as a 'dive'. " 

There is the thing in a nutshell. The law makes out of 
what is a perfectly natural and harmless habit, a crime and 
shame! Men and places come into being to satisfy the 
desires which the law prohibits and dives and bootleggers 
are the logical consequence of the eighteenth amendment 
and the Volstead Act. 



February 6, 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Effects of Community 
Tax Decision 



The decision of the Supreme 
Court at Washington in the mat- 
ter of the California Community 
property tax is stimulating the 
Treasury Department to an offensive, in order to establish 
its position with respect to the community property taxes 
in Louisiana, Texas, Arizona, Washington, Idaho, Nevada 
and New Mexico. All the states have community property 
statutes. It is thought that the conditions are such that the 
government may gain greatly in taxes by reason of the de- 
cision in the California case. 

Secretary Mtellon is already trying to get the opinion of 
the Departme'nt of Justice as to the rights of the Federal 
government under the statutes of each of these states. The 
attorney-general is to be asked to advise the department 
as to whether the government can compel the payment of 
the Federal income tax levy by the husband on the joint 
income as a unit in those states, as it now can in California, 
and in those states where there is no community property 
law. 

The fact appears to be that legal opinion based on the 
decision in the California case is inclined to hold that all of 
these states will come under the California decision and 
that the government will be able to collect all moneys for 
taxes calculated upon the community property being treated 
as a unit. 

The stakes are enormous. It has been calculated that if 
the decision had gone the other way and if the Supreme 
Court had decided in favor of the separate taxation of the 
interests of husband and wife, the Federal government 
would have to restore to the State of California the sum 
of ,$77,000,000. It is calculated, also, that the money which 
the Federal government will receive from the payment of 
moneys due to it in taxation, if the rule applies to these 
other states, will amount to $250,000,000. 

Meanwhile, there is some doubt as to the method which 
tin- government will pursue in the collection of taxes on 
community property this year. 



The difficulty connected with 
Budget Paring Resented the limitation of local expendi- 
ture becomes very evident in 
the debates now being held with respect In the reduction of 
the local budget. All sorts of protests are pouring into the 
finance committee of the Board of Supervisors. 

The most vehement of these protests i- directed against 
the proposal to cut oul $50,000 Bernal cut appropriation. 
Timothy A. Reardon, president of the Board of Public 
Works, is the most eager opponent of this proposition. He 
maintains that it will be a serious mistake to -top the pur- 
chase of rights of way for the Bernal Heights project and 
that if the reduction is made, five districts, [ngleside, Sunny- 
side, the Amazon Tract and the Excelsior ami Ocean View 
districts, will all suffer. Then come other protestors, each 
of whom has his best scheme which he -co likely to suffer 
bv the application of any spirit of economy. Net. it there 

are economies to he undertaken, it i- very obvious that such 
Economies can onlj lie made at the expense ot some one's 
desired project. 

The objections to the limitations of educational work- 
rest upon a more secure foundation and have much more 
sympalln from ns. We take the position thai money spent 
on educational work, properly spent, of course, and not 
ed, is of itself an actual saving in many directions 
and we are glad to >ec that Supervisor Havenner assured 
the mothers who have made representations to the hoard. 
that necessan school building will not lie interferred with. 
In many places, school accommodations of this city reflect 
no credit upon us. When children have to go to school 
half-time because proper school accommodation is not pro- 
vided, it is by no means a good showing and doe- not tend 
to raise our position among the cities of the world. 



Amundsen to Give Lectures 

captain Roald Amundsen, who thrilled the world in May 
last by his attempted airplane flight to the North Pole, has 
arranged to revisit this country for a brief tour. In a stir- 
ring lecture entitled "( )ur Airplane Dash for the North 
Pole," on Sunday, February 14 at 2:30 p. m. in the Colum- 
bia Theater, he will relate the amazing story of his aerial 
expedition to the farthest North, and his miraculous return 
to civilization when all hopes of his safety had been aban- 
doned. This lecture will be illustrated throughout with 
remarkable stereopticon pictures showing the unprece- 
dented experiences of Captain Amundsen and his brave 
companions in the frozen Polar Sea, from which they 
emerged after a titanic struggle with the grim forces of na- 
ture. As an example of heroism and endurance their story 
has never been surpassed in the records of human achieve- 
ment. 

In addition to having discovered the South Pole in 1911, 
Captain Amundsen was the first navigator to sail around 
the north coast of America. In 1905 he took a vessel through 
the Northwest Passage to the Bering Straits and thence to 
the Pacific Ocean. At that time he also succeeded in re- 
locating the North Magnetic Pole. For the greater part 
of his life he has been constantly engaged in exploring vast 
areas of the Arctic and Antarctic, carrying on his work 
with a contempt of danger that has caused him to be termed 
a modern Viking. In the last ten years he has been hon- 
ored by every nation, decorated by distinguished societies, 
and hailed everywhere as the world's most famous explorer. 



Why Shouldn't We Have Prettier Homes? 

An all-kind providence gave San Francisco a rich setting 
of ocean, bay, hills and valleys and made flowers bloom all 
about it. It also gave her the poetry of old Spain and of the 
days of the Argonauts. It wasn't a city intended to have 
straight streets and rows of cement-front houses unrelieved 
1>\ tree-, but so it grew and since the fire has less trees than 
before. Its lingering character of early days was largely 
-wept away by the lire and prohibition perhaps did its part, 

for g 1 or ill. in closing some of the old cafes that were 

reminiscent of a delightful past. 

But the new i- now with US and it will not always be new. 
\\ hv continue to build houses on straight streets when 
there is Telegraph llill and till the lovely hills of the Mis- 
sion District, with warmer climate and with view- of bay 
and city quite unsurpassed? There are also the hills of the 
Sunset district, now inviting new home owner-, and some 
still in the Park-Presidio district, while the hills in the beau- 
tiful St. Francis Wood are already laid out with winding 
and garden-. 

Several - a coterie of congenial spirits in New 

York, declining to live always in cement-fronted mediocrity. 
went out in a shabby down-town district and built Sutton 
Place and made lovely gardens where there were old back- 
vards. The gardens -lope down to the east river, with trees 
and stone -cat-, arbor- and statuary and bra-- monkeys 
swinging from the tree-. Such property is often cheap to 
buy .and has character and great personal charm about it. 

( >ur Russian llill has been famous for years with its beau- 
tiful Livermorc garden and its artistic character. < >ne of 
the greatest charms of London is to be found in its little 
courts where people live in lovely garden- and houses with 
blue doors and green doors. They have perfect seclusion. 
while only around the corner are the busy marts of trade. 
owners of the houses hardly hear the rumble of the 
traffic and the bird- sing as undisturbed by their lily pools 
as they did in Kngland in the days of Chaucer. 

Such homes are less expensive than rows of cement-fronts 
ami it takes only a little imagination to have them. Why 
shouldn't we have more of them in San Francisco- Not 
only for the joy of possessing them, but because from the 
financial standpoint, they are well worth while. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 6, 1926 




San Francisco Symphony 

THE eighth pair of concerts by this 
great orchestra was featured by 
the appearance of Madame Liszniewska 
in the A Mi- 
nor Concerto 
for piano by 
S chu mann. 
San Fran- 
cisco music 
lovers have 
rarely heard 
this master- 
piece played 
better, and 
Madame Lis- 
zniewska 
showed her 
schooling 
and techuic 
which carried 
orchestra, and 




Kntherlnc Srhwitrt* 



in the heavy passages 
so distinctly above the 
in the phrasing of the beautiful melodies 
and cadenzas, which make this, Schu- 
mann's only concerto, such a favorite 
with concert pianists. 

Second in interest was Mr. Hertz's 
happy reading of the musical nonde 
script of Debussy, — "Iberia," Images 
No. 2. Mr. Hertz, conservative su- 
preme pedagogue that he is, seemed 
delighted to play with this revolution- 
ary number, that has worked its way 
into the classics and might safely be 
called the forerunner of the symphonic- 
jazz arrangements of which we hear 
so much today. Certainly Debussy 
used new traps, for his day, and if he 
were to write such a suite today, would 
still invent new ones. 

The Goldmark Symphony No. 1 
opened the concert, and the variety and 
musicianship of the five different move- 
ments, while destined to be a classic, 
is none the less orchestrated to please 
the layman as well as the professional. 
— Earl Schwartz. 

* * * 
Auditorium 

Madame Margaret Matzenauer. prima 
donna contralto of the Metropolitan 
I )pera Company, wdio appears with the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra in 
an all-Wagner program, next Wednes- 
day evening, will be heard in song re- 
cital on the Elwyn Artist series at the 
Auditorium, Monday evening, Feb- 
ruary 15th also. On her present tour, 
Madame Matzenauer is meeting with 
brilliant success. 



>LMSUi^$W4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore- 




(Conducted by Katherine Schwartz) 

The next attraction of the Elwyn 
Series will be the first performance of 
the San Carlo Grand Opera Company 
in gala opening with "Rigoletto," 
Thursday evening, February 18th. Ce- 
cilia Hansen, world-famed woman vio- 
linist, follows tlie San Carlo date ap- 
pearing here on the evening of March 
1, after which comes Roland Hayes, 
negro tenor, on March 23rd. 

Wilkes 

San Francisco has found out what a 
wonderful picture "The Big Parade" 
is a?- witness daily the long string of 
people who are buying tickets. 

One of the most beautiful bits of 
acting in the picture is the love making 
between Renee Adoree as the little 
French peasant maid, and handsome 
John Gilbert, her American "Jimmee." 
"Jimmee" tries to teach her to chew 
gum. but alas, she always swallows it. 
Then, after she and her family have 
been forced to leave their home and 
are seen in some of the later scenes, 
Melisande and her mother, plowing a 
devastated field, a close-up of Melis- 
ande sees her standing there dreaming. 
Somehow, you know she is dreaming 
of her American dough boy. Slowly 
she pulls a piece of American chewing 
gum from the pocket of her blouse and 
chews at it frantically — and finally 
pulls it out and snaps it, a la the Amer- 
ican youngsters anywhere! It is beau- 
tifully done, and expresses all the long- 
ing and the fear and worry that the 
little maid has for her lover, who has 
gone to the front, so she chews her 
gum ! 

The picture is brimful! of these lit- 
tle human, natural touches. It is wdiat 
makes it a great picture. 

* * * 
Curran 

If you haven't as yet seen those two 
prime fun makers. Kolb and Dill in 
their latest offering "A Pair o' Fools" 
do so by all means as tomorrow starts 
the third of their all two-short engage- 
ment here. 

The two comedians of course create 
all the fun making, but they are ably 
seconded by Julie Blanc and beautiful 
May Cloy as mother and daughter of 
the rich lumberman from Eureka! 
There is a good cast in support, and 
a bevy of beautiful young girls in the 
chorus who can sing and dance. Don't 



miss seeing Kolb and Dill and Miss 
Blanc dancing the Charleston. It is 
a riot! 

* * * 
Capitol 

One of the rarest things known, is to 
be seen in the picture now being shown 
at the Capitol. "Treasures of the Vati- 
can," when several episodes and close- 
ups give a view of the Pope. The pic- 
ture also shows the famous Raphael 
tor mis in which the frescoes are un- 
rivalled by and save those of Michel- 
angelo in the Sistine Chapel. 

This unique film was made possible 
through the ceaseless efforts of Dr. 
Vicneza Fago to secure moving pic- 
tures in many parts of the Vatican, to 
which the general public is never ad- 
mitted, and to which a select few, 
rarely gain admittance. 

* * * 
President 

No attraction in recent months lias 
caused so much enthusiasm as that of 
Henry Duffy's production which is 
now running at the President, "Dan- 
cing Mothers" with Florence Roberts 
in the leading role. There has been 
much discussion caused by the fact 
that Duffy has among his group of 
players, two Florence Roberts. One 
hails from the F.ast. and the other from 
the West. We were much amused the 
night we were there, to hear a violent 
argument over whether the two were 
one and the same person, and the par- 
ties involved in the argument were try- 
ing their best to figure out if it were 
the same person, how on earth she 
managed to make appearances in two 
theaters! Florence Roberts of the 
President in one of the principal roles 
has added to the interest in this offer- 
ing, and the fact that Duffy lias given 
it a stellar cast of players enhances its 

attractii in. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Miss Kitty Doner, late star of the 
musical comedy, "Lady Be Good" and 
America's foremost male impersonator 
heads the strong bill at the Golden 
Gate this week in a sketch called 
"Twenty Minutes in Paris." in which 
she is assisted by Eddie Fitzgerald, a 
pleasing and capable pianist. 

By special arrangement with the 
Greenwich Village Follies, in which 
they star yearly, Fortunello and Ciril- 



February 6, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LET I i 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ALEXANDRIA \ Pictures 
Geary and 18th | 


ALCAZAR } "Little Jessie James" 
O'Farrell nr. PoTrellf Henry Duffy Players 


CALIFORNIA ) „_. ,- „ .„ 

j.u i ». •_ i f "Three Faces East" 

4th and Market \ 


CAMEO J "The Man From 
938 Market St. J Red Gulch" 


CAPITOL I "Treasures of the 
Ellis nr. Market | Vatican" 


CASINO ] Pictures 

Mason and Ellis \ 


CASTRO ) _, , 

420 Castro St. J Pictures 


CURRAN ( Kolb & Dill in 
Geary nr. Mason ( "A Pair o' Fools" 


EGYPTIAN f Pictures 


GOLDEN GATE ( Vaudeville 
G. G. Ave. * Taylor ( and Pictures 


GRANADA 1 .. The Enchanted Hill" 
hmhs Market St. ) 


haight I Pictures 
lliilKlil at Cole J 


IMPERIAL \ Rudolph Valentino in 
1077 Market St. f "The Eagle" 


LOEWS WARFIELD ( „ Dance Madness ,. 
088 Market St. f 


MAJESTIC | 

Mission between ^ Pictures 
20th nnd 21st J 


METROPOLITAN ( 

aotiB Union St. ( Pictures 


NEW FILLMORE i 

1820 Fillmore I Pictures 

NEW MISSION J 

anno Mission ) 


ORPHEUM | Vaudeville 
O'Farrell * Powell J 


PANTAGES J Vaudev|||e 
Market at Mason J 


i-OMi'Eil . Pictures 
Next to Granada | 


PORTOLA Pictures 
770 Market St. j Pictures 


PRESIDENT I Florence Roberts in 
Market & McAllister ( "Dancing Mothers" 


ROYAL I „. , 

1520 Polk St. ( Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS ! "Behind the Front" 

065 Market St. ' 


SUTTER I 

Sutter and Stelner ( Pictures 


UNION SftUARE \ Pictures and 
O'Farrell Br. Powell \ Vaudeville 


WILKES 1 .. Tne Big Parade" 
Geary and Mason 1 


WIGWAM ) 

Mission and 22d ( Pictures 



CONCERTS 

Curran Theater. Sunday afternoon 2:45. San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra. Auditorium. 
Wednesday evening. February 10th. Madame 
Matzenauer and Symphony Orchestra in all- 
Wagnerian program. 



lino, famous Italians will present their 
famous acrobatic act "The Happy 
Hooligans." 

Joe Keno and Rosie Green return 
with their hokum comedy entitled "A 
Hilarious Hodge Podge"; George 
Watts and Belle Hawley will be seen 
in a fun-provoking song offering; Ger- 
ald Griffin, famous tenor at Covent 
Garden, London, will offer a pleasing 
program. Rex McGough is his pianist ; 
The Three Kiewings, aerialists, will 
thrill with their stunts. 

On the screen will be seen the first 
showing of Tod Browning's original 
story of "The Mystic." Aileen Pringle 
and Conway Tearle carry the leading 
roles. 

The usual short films will be shown 
and there will be musical numbers by 
Claude Sweeten and his men, and 
Grace Rollins Hunt at the organ. 

* * * 
Alcazar 

"Little Jessie James," a musical 
farce-comedy, rich and rare in its spicy 
situations and flavored lavishly with 
paprika of the red hot variety, begins 
its third week tomorrow evening. 
There is a talented array of principals 
and a peppy chorus of "bobbed hair 
bandits." It is a jolly offering, and the 
last word in jazzy entertainment. 

There is a real plot to the piece and 
some very tuneful numbers. Mirth is 
the kevnote of every situation, and 
there are some astonishing ones. 

Dale Winter in the title role is steal- 
ing the hearts of her many admirers in 
true bandit fashion. Roy Purviance, 
brought on from New York by Henry 
Duffv to play opposite her, has made a 
great hit with his singing and acting, 
He has a lovely tenor voice of pleasing 
quality. William Davidson continues 
his guild work, and he has become ex- 
tremely popular here and his singing is 
a scream. Phil Tead, a juvenile with a 
large following here some years ago. is 
having a reception at every perfor- 
mance, and Lorraine M'ullins' solo 
work is delightful. 

The chorus work, both in the songs 
and dances shows the careful training 
of Raymond Midgley, and the entire 
production's success is largely due to 
the efforts of the director. Harry Mac- 
Fa vden. 

* * * 

Imperial 

Vilma Banky, a few short 
months ago was merely a pretty girl 
in Budapest. Today -he is regarded as 
one of the most promising screen beau- 
ties in America, making fabulous sums 
of money, and attracting nationwide 
attention. In "The Fagle." Rudolph 
Valentino's new starring vehicle now 
playing at the Imperial. Miss Vilma 
plays the leading feminine role and act- 
ually "steals" the picture from the 
sheik king. 



St. Francis 

The St. Francis was the scene of an- 
other world premiere last night, when 
the first showing of one of the greatest 
of comedies was given, "Behind the 
Front." 

California * * * 

Henry Walthall, well remembered 
star of "The Birth of a Nation" and 
other big hits open at the California 
Theater today in "Three Faces East," 
in which he enacts the role of Sir 
George Bennet, British secret service 
head. 

There is a strong supporting cast, 
including Jetta Goudal, Robert Ames, 
Clive Brook and Edythe Chapman. 

Victor Herbert's popular "Babes in 
Toyland" will be the feature of Max 
Dol in's program. 

Granada * * * 

Today Peter B. Kyne's story, 
adapted for the screen opens at the 
Granada, "The Enchanted Hill," star- 
ring Jack Holt. The cast includes Flo- 
rence Vidor as co-star, George Ban- 
croft, Noah Berry, Mary Brian and 
Brandon Hurst. 

On the stage Verne Buck will be 
seen in his farewell week at this the- 
ater, as he is leaving for the Metropoli- 
tan Theater in Los Angeles. The title 
of the act is "Sultin' the Sultin'." 



Players Guild 

The SR( ) sign is out these week ends 
at the cozy little theater on Bush 
Street, where Reginald Travers is pro- 
ducing Liiiom with a fine cast, and it 
is a very much worth-while production 
in every way. 

* * * 

Loew's Warfield 

|a\ Kaufman, well-known New 
York columnist and fiction writer 
(Continued on Page 15) 

^you pay no more,* 

fiECTFLOWEl$ 

Tfio Vbto <f* Tnund Osidorj ' •? 

224-226 GantAwi. Tel. Kearny 4975 



Where to Spend Your Vacation 

Hotel Claremont 

Ob the Edge of the Berkeley 1IIIU 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

One of the largest hotels on the Coast. 
Set in a beautiful twenty-eight-acre 
park between Berkeley and Oakland 
Key Route service from the door to San 
Francisco. Family and tourist hotel. 
Reasonable rates. 



SAX FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 6, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



"Dolly Madison" Facts 
Foibles and Fancies 

S( iCIETY, generally, and 
vi\ ing "Dollv Madison" 



debutantes particularly, are re- 
foibles and fancies. 

The dainty mistress of the White House, whom the pop- 
ulace called "Queen Dolly," during that administrative per- 
iod when James Madison was President of the United 
States, was SO thoroughly a social leader, by way of charm 
and heritage, that some American girls in this day and age 
strive to emulate her fascinations. It is quite smart and 
proper, too. to imitate "Dolly Madison." 

In a remarkable book entitled, "Seventy-five Years of 
White House Gossip From Washington to Lincoln." Edna 
M. Colman has mirrored feminine traits and characteristics 
of "Dolly Madison" a- perhaps no other writer has ever 
done. Nils. Colman tells us in her book, what we want to 
knr.w about a fascinating and delicious bit of femininity. 
In other words, she lets us actually make friends with the 
wife of President Madison and that is one reason why so- 
ciety folks are reading, aloud, passages from this book. 

"Born, according to best authority, in 17o7, of an English 
lather and Irish mother and with a Scotch grandmother, the 
little Quaker girl inherited a gift of grace from each, which 
combined to give her. with the laughing eyes and winning 
-mile that great charm which made her the most popular 
mistress the White House has ever known." writes Mrs. 
Colman. 
Romance 

Xo wonder society is studying I lolly Madison! 

"Never a strict Quaker, for she loved pretty clothes too 
well, she was always gowned in the most attractive style. 
( Ine windy, icy day she sallied forth to market with her trim 
little feet and pretty ankles daintly shod in white silk hose 
and shining new high-heeled slippers with glittering 
buckles. A Lose bit of ice. an ankle turned on treacherous 
heel, a flash of lacy draperies and silk, and Dolly lay for a 
minute in the strong clasp of a strange man whose admiring 
glance was not wholly submerged by the sympathy he was 
expressing. The man was Madison, and after assisting the 
limping lad_\ home, be made haste to be presented properly 
and thereupon lost no time or effort in winning her hand, 
even enlisting the interest of Mrs. Washington in his cause 
and defying Aaron Burr and all Others to take her from 
him." 

Isn't that description of Mrs. Colman's deliciousl) ro- 
mantic? Read what the author -ays about her dress: 

"To the inaugural ceremonies at the Capitol when her hus- 
band was sworn in she wore a 'plain cambric dress with a 
long train.' The customary handkerchief about the neck 
was omitted, the dres- being plain to the extreme. Her 
bonnet was of purple velvet ami white satin with handsome 
white plumes. 
Inaugural Ball Dress 

"Her inaugural ball dress was rich enough to make up for 
the plainness of .the day dress." write> Mrs. Colman, "for 
it was a handsome long trained robe of light yellow or bull 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

690 liu-.li Street, Between Powell and Stoekton, San Frnnelweo 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



a Paris turban of the same material combined 
latin and a bird of Paradise. Her jewels were 



velvet with 
with white 
pearls." 

Mrs. Colman states, in her book, that Dolly Madison's 
special hobby was turbans, which she wore constantly all 
of her life. They were made of the finest material, match- 
ing her dresses, and cost her at the rate of one thousand 
dollars a years. "Another extravagance was her footwear. 
Still another costly fancy was her love of jewels of which 
she had a large variety." 

Card Games and Loo 

The author tells us that "card games were the pastime 
everywhere, loo being- the fad of ladies. Mrs. Madison 
eventually gave up card- anil expressed regret at ever hav- 
ing indulged in them. She dipped snuff and used rouge to 
the intense disgust of some ladies who remembered her 
Quaker origin. 

"Quite imposing were the New Year receptions" con- 
tinues the author who states that these receptions were 
great winter events at the White House and were intro- 
duced by President Madison to the delight of the people, 
adding that "Here, particularly, did Mistress Dolly shine." 

"She ruled her court with her charm, desiring to please 
and be pleased," the author tells us. "The embodiment of 
tact and courtesy, her rare memory for names and faces 
strengthened her popularity." 

Is it any wonder that modern society misses are reading 
the life of 1 lolly Madison? Some critically inclined person- 
age has told us that tin- lovely lady was not unlike the flap- 
per of our time. But to really understand more of her life. 
her brilliancy and forsooth, her dainty foibles and fancies 
i nr should read "Seventy-five Years of White House < iossip — 
From Washington to Lincoln." There is much valuable 
information in the book, unforgettable information. 
* * * 

Although Edna M. Colman wrote when she was 12 years 
old. she really began her literary work at seventeen as a fea- 
ture writer in New York. Her newspaper work continued as a 
member of the staff of the Washington "Times." In speaking of 
her work -In says "1 have interviewed over a thousand people — 

men and women — and covered every conceivable subject in my 
stories, which have found publication in all of the large 
newspapers of the country and in many of the leading maga- 
zine-." 

She wrote thi- I k, primarily to teach her own children 

a real understanding and love for their own country, "In 
order that their patriotism might never be undermined by 
alluring propaganda of agencies of foreign or domestic 
origin, that seek to belittle the principles and traditions of 
the L'niled Stall 

It i- a book one can use for campanionship. 

Edna M. Colman is national president of the League of 
American Pen Women with headquarters in the Shoreham 
Hotel. Washington. I). C, having been elected to this, the 
highest office within the province of the national Pen 






HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 
Telephone Sutter fllHO Under Management CARL. S. STANLEY 



February 6, 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Women, at their biennial convention of 1924. 
"She is one of the most beloved and highly 
esteemed writers of the nation," declare her 
corps of constituents. 
Dinner Party * * * 

Mrs. Joseph Sadoc Tobin entertained this 
week at a dinner party given in her home, later 
taking her guests to the French Playhouse ; 
those in her party were : Count and Countess 
Galcerand de Pins, Mr. and Mrs. George La- 
tour, Mr. and Mrs. Dixwell and Henri de la 
thapelle. * * * 

Countess Nocolai Honor Guest 

The beautiful Countess Florenza Nocolai 
was the honor guest at a musicale and recep- 
tion given this past week by Mr. and Mrs. Emil 
Blanckenburg at their home on Jackson Street. 
Mrs. Blanckenburg, an operatic singer, pre- 
sented the program with a number of artists 
contributing the numbers. The guests in- 
cluded Prosper Reiter, consul of Luxemburg 
and Mrs. Reiter, both of whom are well known 
singers. Other guests were: Messrs and Mes- 
dames H. B. Lister, J. F. Ham, Clayton Salter, 
Richard Abel, William McKay, Dr. H. Edward Castle, and 
the Mjisses Geneve Shaffer, Leila Saling, recently returned 
from New York. Alice Guthrie Poyner, Nan Gould, Mine. 
Pearl Ladd. 

Surprise Wedding 

Society was indeed "taken unawares" this past week 
(something that does not usually transpire) at the wedding 
of Mrs. Jennie Crocker Whitman and Mr. Robert Hender- 
son, which took place on the magnificent estate ol her 
brother, Templeton Crocker, in Hillsborough. 

Their engagement bad been announced only three days 
before the wedding of Saturday, January 30, and so "societj 
was not prepared for a ceremony so soon." 

In fact, the luncheon to which some of Mrs. Whitman's 
friends bad been invited was supposedly a betrothal party. 
Thev were somewhat confused, just for a minute, when the 
bridal pair, upon entering the room was introduced as "Mr. 
and Mrs. Henderson." The wedding had taken place a few 
minutes before the luncheon in the charming little church 
at San Mateo. St. Matthew's Episcopal Church, the Rev. 
Walter II. Cambridge officiating. 

Mrs. Whitelaw Reid, a relative of the bride's mother. 

Mr. Ogden Mills, Mr. William II. Crocker, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. W. Crocker, Mrs. \nsel Easton, Mr. Henry T. Sett. 
Mr. and M'rs. Walter S. Martin. Alexander Henderson, the 
young son of the bridegroom, were present at the wedding 
in the church. 
Charming Attire 

'Pbe bride wore an exquisite gown of cream lace and a 
small becoming brown hat and the famous pearl necklace 
which once so mysteriously disappeared but wa- later recovered 
She wore slippers of satin the same shade of her hat and 
can ud an arm bouquet "f orchids shading into the colors 
of her gown. 
New Home Planned * * 

Western society is delighted over the word that the bride 
anil groom are to remain here, and welcomed the announce- 
ment that as soon as they return from their honeymoon, Mr. 
and Mrs. Henderson will build a sumptuous home on the 
peninsula estate. 




HOTEL CANTKRBUnY 

750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

2S0 Rooms 
'.ates: From $2.50 per day 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria, Cai ifornia 

On tna C.*ut Hnjhwaj H«lf««T Rhw«mi S«n Frtnmno ud 1 «• Ab|«Im 
An Inn nf 1 nuiu»l F,f«ll«itf« 



W*» nr writ* for i 



Iuh on romr i 



Alter :i lew weeks Mrs. I lenderson expects 
to go lo Xew York to close up her affairs 
there, bringing back with her the three chil- 
dren, Mary. Fred and Tania Whitman, 
* * * 

Mrs. Henderson obtained a divorce from 
Malcolm Whitman in Paris last year. Whit- 
man was a millionaire New York merchant 
and, at one time, an amateur tennis champion. 

The marriage last Saturday of Malcolm 
Whitman and Miss de Vescovi in New York 
was celebrated, according to authentic ac- 
counts, on the estate of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Whitman, parents of the bridegroom. The 
new Mrs. Whitman was well known in New 
York as a concert singer, and prominent in 
musical circles. 



Elaborate Dinner 

The Spanish Court of the Mr. and Mrs. 
Andrew r Welch home on Broadway was the 
scene of a most attractive dinner party last 
Friday evening., when the complimented 
guests were Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Paschel. 
Small tables beautifully decorated in early spring blos- 
soms seated the honored guests, including Messrs and Mes- 
dames Hugh Porter. George de Latour, George T. Cameron, 
Kenneth Kingsbury, Henry F. Dutton, Harry Jenkins, Eu- 
gene Lent, Julian Thome, John F. Drum, Charles McCor- 
mick. foseph < ). Tobin, Latham McMullin. Mesdames Roger 
Lapham, Walter Dillingham. Harry McFarlane, Miss Jen- 
nie Blair and Messrs. James Wilder. Frank Madison. Colo- 
nel Harry Howland and the Hon. James I) Phelan, former 

United States Senator. 



Mrs. George Leib entertained informally at her home in 
Burlingame last Saturday in honor of Miss Jean Howard 
and her fiance, Mr. Thomas Page Maillard. 

* * * 

\n anniversary surprise party was given in compliment to 
Mr. and Mrs. W. R. \\ right on Saturday, last, in honor of 
their fifteenth wedding anniversary. Mr. Wright, well 
known in musical circles, sang a number of selections at 

this delightful affair. 

* * * 

Two noted music composers from Australia. Mr. and Mrs. 
\liivd Hill, are visiting this city. They have been entertained 
h\ Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Hertz, Messrs. Wallace Sabin and War- 
ren D. Allen. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. I da Waldrop are leaving shortly for a trip 
io Europe, expecting to be abroad for several months. Many 
farewell parties are being given in honor of this talented and 
rite couple" who may count their admiring friends by the 
thousands. Mrs. Waldrop sings divinely, and her husband. 
Ida Waldrop. San Francisco's municipal organist, is a com- 
1" iser, pianist and organist. 

* * * 

Mr-. Oscar Fembach. one of the most active of the directors 
of the Woman's Building Association, is receiving congratula- 
tions for the success of the large card party given at the Fair- 
mont Hotel, last Thursday as a contributary part toward a 
memorial In noring the late Mrs. John Mctealf. 

* * * 

Dr. Mariana I'.ertola was the honored guest at a luncheon 
at the California Club on Tuesday of the past week. Mrs. 
fi lin F. Phillips directing the affair. 

* * * 

Mrs. Alfred S. Klee, wife of the consul-general of Guate- 
is an attractive young matron, who has been considerably 
I at a numl rial gatherings. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 6, 1926 



-^iSk/S* 



"$\$£<&» 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



•sJfc 



J6* 



-«^«y«* 




o; 



|NE HUNDRED MEMBERS of the San 
Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange held 
their annual banquet and golf tournament at 
the Beresford Golf and Country Club last Sat- 
urday and although the weather was all against 
a golf tournament. Sidney Schwartz, president 
of the organization, and several of his com- 
rades weathered the storm, which was one of 
the worst that had visited the peninsula for years, and they 
played 18 holes of golf with the result that the president col- 
lected the event after putting a lot of water in the stock. 

President Schwartz and [rving Lundberg took on Emil 
Sutro and Edwin Perl, while Chappie De Wolf and Carl 
Seller entertained Ned Pond and Ed Pringle. 

President Schwartz proved to be a real mud horse, shoot- 
ing several par holes, and finishing off by making a double 
eagle on the nineteenth hole. This was too much for his 
brother-in-law. Emil Sutro, so be tried to take his revenge 
out on Gustave Schwartz, another member of the firm, but 
he met with the same result. Emil was so disgusted at be- 
ing humiliated that he picked up his war clubs and beat 
it to the city. 

Chappie De Wolf arrived in 
trip to the old country just in 
awful trimming. 

Chappie said he was glad he was able to give this 
dollar chaser the time of his life over 18 holes of 
heart-breaking golf. He said he pinched him so 
hard that the eagles squealed; while De Wolf was 
attending to Ed Pringle. Ned Pond was taking care 
of Carl Steber, hooking him for the last of the fam- 
ily plate. 

J. L. Osborne, the famous southpaw from Se- 
quoyah Club, issued a challenge to (ins Schwartz 
and Emil Sutro. that was accepted. 

1 Isborne and his brother "Togo" are open to take 
on the two big boys from Sutro and Co. for twenty 
shares of P. i i. and E. stock — the match was cemeted 
and will be played on the Beresford Golf and Coun- 
try Club's course next Sunday. 



the city from a six months' 
time to give Ed Pringle an 




Sidney 
Ij. Soliwnrt*. 

l*r«'Mitl c*nt 
of the 

San I r:.ii.K.'< 

Stork nnil 

II. .N.I 
I V" tuliii;. . 



Banquet Went Over Big 

After the players were thoroughly soaked on the course, 
they retired to the clubhouse, where they were entertained 
in a most lavish manner. 

The banquet and the thought put into the whole affair, 
which was so admirably handled by Ed Lyden, the ex- 
tremely popular manager of the Beresford Club was the 
most gorgeous and most sumptuous affair thaat one could 
ever dream of. The setting was the ballroom at the club, 
which was decorated to represent the jungle, ten tons of 
shrubbery covered the entire walls and ceiling with different 
colored lights bursting forth all over the place, while live 
monkeys, parrots and singing canaries flew or leaped around 
the forest. This novel scheme took the ingenious Ed Lyden 
and a corp of ten men just one week to accomplish, but Ed 
got as much kick out of it as if the party was given in his 
honor. * * * 

Splendid Orchestra 

Phil Sapiro and his famous orchestra furnished most of 
the music, which was specially written for the occasion. 
Phil was in a very happy mood and his work was greatly 
appreciated. 

Miss Reusch and her ballet of 50 beautiful dancing dolls 



put over some clever stunts, while Meredith Parker ren- 
dered some very fine song hits in his delightful tenor voice. 
The three famous Spanish serenaders also gave some classy 
selections on the mandolin and guitar. The big feature 
of the whole affair was that the party started out as a stag 
banquet, but when the dancing dolls got through with their 
program it became a masque party, the girls joining in and 
it was, "all for you." Everyone picked his own partner and 
the music and dancing went on until early morning. 

The Stock and Bond Exchange members ought to feel 
mighty proud of having two such capable members as Mil- 
ton Bremer and Harold Brayton in their organization. For 
it was Bremer. Brayton and Ed Lyden, manager of the 
Beresford Club, wdio engineered the whole affair, and those 
who were fortunate enough to have been there voted that it 
was without doubt the most successful partv ever pulled off. 
* * * 

Muscovites Move on Lakeside 

Golfers on the Olympic Club links at Lakeside had been 
wondering about the giant who had been roaming about the 
course. Echoes of a strange, strong language, sometimes 
violent, with occasional bursts of song from a tremendous 
bass voice aroused much curiosity as to the identity of the 
stranger. Finally, hearing a few strains of music familiar 
to thousands from the Volga Boat Song, the singer was 
recognized as the famous Russian basso, Chaliapin, 
who has been staying at the beautiful new club as 
a guest of Harold Pracht of Wiley B. Allen Co. 

Playing the Scotch game with a heavy Russian 
accent (not Bolshevik | Chaliapin has made himself 
very popular with some of the Olympians. 

Frank Foran, the genial secretary was inclined to 
be "Ritzy" when the great Russian added his 
glorious bass to Frank's dulcet tenor, in harmonious 
duet. 

Benno Moiseiwitsch, one of the world's greatest 
pianists and also a Russian, proved a surprise to 
several golfers who scoffed at the idea of an artist 
playing golf. 

I 'aired with Harold Pracht. he succeeded in separating 
Jim Black and Lawrence Lindsey from the price of a case 
of vodka. 

Since the visits of these artists, the Lakeside players are 
all practising the new Russian pivot on the tee. 



Realtors to Hold Tourney 

The San Francisco realtors will hold their semi-annual 
golf tournament at the California (iolf and Country Club 
with a four days' tourney March 3-4-5 and 6. This tourna- 
ment entitles all members and associate members to play. 

Hugo Ramacciotti is chairman of the affair, assisted by 
i iscar Turnbladt, W. 11. Manaton, Chic Chaqnette, Rosie 
Rosenstern, Leslie Burkes and Felix Kahn. 

Fred Blair is chairman of the tournament committee with 
Joe Loughrey as legal advisor. There will be flights of 
sixteen handicap, and trophies will be awarded to the best 
gross and low net scores, the winners and runners-up in each 
flight. A banquet will follow at the conclusion of the first 
day's play. Fill in your cards and mail a check for $5 to 
Hugo Ramacciotti. Mills Building. San Francisco as soon 
as possible. 



February 6, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 





KWSJJ 


RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 


<;-■_»';■■■ 





I NoTe — The San Francisco News Letier 
has added a new feature for the pleasure 
and benefit of its readers. It will print 



advance programs from the various radio 
broadcasting stations each ivcek, and will 
also run an article by a radio expert, ivho 



BROADCAST SCHEDULE FOR NEXT WEEK 



BLACK TYPE P. M.: LIGHT FIGURES A. M. 



TUBS. 



Vl'Ell. 



THl'RS. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO— 220 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:30 
8:00-10:00 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:30 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:80 
tt:OO-10:0O 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:30 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:30 
8:00-11:30 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:30 



KFRC— CITY OF PARIS— 270.1 



5:30- 7:30 
8:00-11 :0O 



10:00 
5:00- 7:30 
8:00- 0:30 



6:30- 8:00 

12:00-12:20 

r>:30- 7:15 

8:00-11:00 



0:30- 8:00 
10:00 
5:30- 7:30 
K:0O-12:0O 



6:30- 


S:00 


4:00- 


5:00 


5:15- 


7:::i> 


N:I8>- 


111:011 



6:30- 8:00 

12:00-12:20 

5:30- 7:30 

8:00-11:00 



6:30- 8:00 
4:00- 5:0O 
5:30- 7:30 
8:00- 1:00 



KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRONICLE — 428.3 



9:45-10:15 
10:45 
5:00- 0:00 
0:00- 0:30 
<l :30 

(i:35- 8:35 
8:35-10:00 



7:00-7:30-8 

10:30 

12:00 Noon 
1 :00- 1 :30 
1:30- 2:00 
2:30- 3:30 
5:15- 0:15 
0:15 
0:30 

0:40- 7:00 
7:00- 7:30 
8:00- iiiiMi 

0:00-10:00 
10:00-11:00 



7:00-7:30-S 

10:00 

10:30 

10:35 

12:00 Noon 
1:00- 1:30 
1:30- 2:00 
2:30- 3:30 
3:30- 4:30 
5:15- 0:15 
0:15 
0:30 

0:40- 7:00 
7:00- 7:30 
8:<M>- 0:00 
0:181-10:00 

10:00-11:00 



7:00-7:30-S 
10:00 
10:30 
10:35 
12:00 Noon 

l:0O- 2:00 

2:30- 3:30 

3:30 

5:15- 0:15 

0:15 

<;::»: 

0:4O- 7:00 
7:00- 7:80 
X:00- 11:181 
0:00-10:00 
10:00-11:18) 



7:00-7:30-8 

10:00 

10:30 

10:36 

I 2 Noon 

1:00- 2:18) 
2:30- 3:30 
3:30- 4:30 
5:15- 8:115 
0:15 
0:3O 

0:40. 
7 :18) 
8:00. 
0:00-10:00 

111:00-1 1 :<8> 



7 :00 

7:30 
0:O0 



7:00-7:30-8 

10:30 

10:35 

1 8:00 Noon 

12:45 
1:30- 2:(8> 
5:80- 0:181 
0:IO 

0:80- 7:00 
7:00- 7:10 
7:10- 7:20 
M:<H>- 0:00 
0:00-10:00 
»:I0- 0:211 

10:00-11:00 



7:00-7:30-8 

10:30 

12:00 Noon 
1:00- 2:00 
2:30- 3:30 
3:30- 5:30 
0:15 
0:30 
0:35- 7:30 
8:00-12:00 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO— 361.2 



Program loo late Cor puMh'niimi. 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS. INC.— 226 



10:00-12 in. 

1:181- 2:18) 
8:181-10:00 
10:181-12:00 



8:00- 0:18) 

0:00-10:18) 

10:181-11:18) 

11:18)- 12:18) 



8:18)- 11:30 



0:30-11 Mill 
11:18)- 1:01) 



10:00-12:1)1) 



8:18)- 0:OO 
0:00-10:80 
10:80-1 J ::n 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUN E— 508.2 



Program too ln <* 1 for pablleatlon. 



11 :00-12:3O 

KlOO- 0:00 
7:15-10:30 



in 30-1 l :80 
1 :30- 3 :18l 
BrtO- 0:30 
7:00-10:00 



KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO.— 384.4 

n>::«)-l l ::») I i i80- 8:00 
1:31). 3:00 j .".: lo- BlSO 



5:41)- 0:30 
7:00-10:00 



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: 1 : JO 1 


1:30- 3:00 


1 :30- 8l00 


1:30- 3:IM) 


5:40- 0:30 


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5: 111- 0:311 


8:3<>-ll>:IMI 


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7:IM--M):00 




10:80-12:00 


1 





KFOA— RHODES DEPARTMENT STORE — (54.3 



in JO 10 " 
12:30- 1:30 
3:00-10:18) 



10:00-10:30 10:00-1 

I2HM- l ::lo 18:80- 1 :3o 

3:0O- 0:30 :« :IH)-lt>:<H> 

7:I8)-U :IH) 



12:30- l::l» 
3:18). 5 :8I) 



1»: 1":30 

1 LJ ;<><>_ 1 :30 
3:18)- 0:SO 
7MMI-1 1 :OD 



KFI— EARL C. ANTHONY. INC.— 468.5 



Program too Inlr for i.iil.l.. in i 



KHJ— THE LOS ANGELES TIMES— 405.2 



Proa-ram :«»•» late lor poaltcattoa. 



KNX— L. A. EVENING EXPRESS— 336.9 



*r.»ur:tni im. late lor pabltcotloa. 



KFWB— WARNER BROS.. HOLLY WOOD— 25 2 
ProKrnm loo lale for iiuhltrn cioo. 



will give valuable advice to radio fans in 
regard to the purchasing and operation of 
radios. ) 

What Set Shall I Buy? 

ALMOST every radio publication 
on the market today has given 
that question a hearing. However, al- 
though they go into details to explain 
the different makes, they leave the be- 
wildered readers to choose for them- 
selves. 

The broadcasting of programs cre- 
ated such a demand lor sets that the 
radio companies were unable to sup- 
ply that demand, and a number of new 
manufacturers commenced to produce 
radios. The result was that a large 
quantity of poor quality radio sets were 
placed on the market. Some of the 
manufacturers were honest enough, 
but they lacked the actual manufact- 
uring experience. The dishonest ones 
did not hesitate to copy some well- 
known set, using parts of a poor qual- 
ity, and then placed their product on 
the market under a name somewhat 
similar to that of the genuine article. 
This sort of thing could not produce 
anything but a poor receiver. 

If every one was an expert on radio, 
there would be no doubts as to which 
particular set to purchase, but the ma- 
jority arc not versed in radio knowl- 
edge, although they do enjoy listening 
to the wonderful programs that are 
broadcast daily. At present develop- 
ments, many good radio sets are on 
the market, all having practically the 
same initial cost. Some buyers pur- 
chase a reasonably good set, but they 
make the mistake of selecting poor 
equipment to go with it, and no radio 
>et is any better than its loud speaker, 
tubes or aerial. 

No one can pay one or two hundred 
dollars for a radio set and then equip 
it with a S3. 50 loud -peaker and expect 
excellent reception : nor can the same 
set he supplied with cheap tubes and 
the user expect the same results that 
are obtained from first-class tubes. 

No aerial can be constructed in a 
haphazard manner and then bring in 
stations correctly. A radio set is a 
delicate instrument and should be 
used as such. When installing a radio, 
care should be exercised as to the 
equipment and how it is installed. A 
poor ground connection has been found 
responsible for a great many defects 
in radio reception. Details could be 
entered into explaining many reasons 
(Continued on Page 15) 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 6, 1926 




Till". American people bought a greater amount of life 
insurance in December, 1925. than at any preceding 
period of our history. Measured in terms of life insurance 
people were 20 per cent more thrifty in 1925 than in 1924. 

* * * 

— John Marshall Holcombe, for more than twenty years 
president of the Phoenix Mutual Life, died recently at the 
age ol 77 rears. 

* * * 

— Suggestions are being made that the state should com- 
pel a man on marrying to lake out a life insurance policy. 
Seeing that, even now, the marriage statistics arc declining, 
it would be dangerous to speculate on the effect of such a 
law upon the population question. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1925 

Assets $107,232,609.22 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,250,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over 525,000.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission nnd 21st Streets 

PARK-I'KESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

IIAICHT STREET BRANCH Ilnight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ON^-QUARTER (4 14) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



— The Southern Pacific Company is giving notice that 
the new Hotel Del Monte will be open on April 10th. There 
will be 100 rooms and baths and the main section includes 
many conveniences and luxuries, including are gallery, 
amusement rooms and children's play rooms. 

* * * 

— Herbert Hoover, in a recent statement issued by the 
U. S. Department of Commerce, says that at present there 
are governmentally controlled combinations in nine raw 
materials, Egyptian long-stapled cotton, camphor, coffee, 
iodine, nitrates, potash, mercury, rubber and sisal. These 
commodities will cost this country about $1,200,000,000 for 

1926. 

* * * 

— Attention is being directed to the problem of increasing 
the recovery of old rubber and the improved methods of its 
use. It may be that we shall be able to receive about 400,- 
000,000 pounds of old rubber per year. This does not have 
the value of new rubber, but great use car, be made of it. 

* * * 

— It is to be noted as an achievement of considerable 
merit that German currency has been maintained at par 
by resolute and capable management. In this connection, 
we note that there are representatives of the United States 
upon the board of the hank of issue to supplement the dis- 
tinguished efforts of the president of the Reichsbank, Dr. 
Horace Greeley Hjalmar Schlacht. 



— It must be understood that the pronounced credit ex- 
pansion of 1925 was almost wholly through loans secured 
by stocks and bonds. There was a great expansion of credit 
lor the purchase of stocks and bonds and a very moderate 
use of credit in regular trade and industry. 



— One noticeable fact about recent buying is that it is 
growing more and more to be of what is called the "hand- 
to-mouth" variety. The value of trade increases, but the 
purchases arc more numerous and less in quantity per pur- 
chase. Stocks are not accumulated. 
* * * 

—The prospect of gold imports this year is not as g 1 

as it was a year ago, for the favorable trade balance will 
not be as large. It shows marks of diminishing as Europe 
gets to work. But the most notable factor in this matter is 
the increasing amount which goo to Europe in the form 
of loans and which consequently lends to diminish our bal- 
ance. This is financially quite sound. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid I l> Capital V20.000.O0O «ZO,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL, BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG: NEW YORK: PORT- 
LAND. ORE.: SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Franclnco Offloe: 450 California Street 
lilt l I i; lit: \ l in ti I I: W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Aast. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walte W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Douclas 2244 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California j 

Manufacturer* ot 
RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS. CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 
Snn FranciHro, Calif. Loa Angelea, Calif. 

1+4 Mnrket Street r.717 Santa Fe Avenue 



MADE TO ORDER O NLY 

^ jjjjfy \ , i< i s mUKiv 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



February 6, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Id 



Travel Tid-Bits 

By Ernest F. Rixon 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, by popu- 
lar demand, is going to publish weekly articles dealing 
with travel to different parts of the world, which we are 
sure will be of considerable interest to our readers. 

Travel since the war has increased enormously, and it 
may interest Californians to know that over five thousand 
passports were issued at the passport bureau in San Fran- 
cisco during 1925. To give an idea of the growth of travel, 
we may mention that during this winter six cruising 
steamers have left New York for around the world cruises, 
namely: The "Empress of Scotland" of the Canadian Pa- 
cific, the "Carinthia" of the Cunard line, the "Laconia" of 
the Cunard line, the "Belgenland" of the Red Star line, the 
"Franconia" of the Cunard line, and the "Resolute" of the 
United American line. In addition to these cruises the Dol- 
lar line maintains a continuous service around the world, 
and these steamers are always heavily booked, showing the 
popularity of around the world travel. The Dollar line 
steamers are so arranged that one can remain over for two 
weeks or longer at any of the ports of the various countries 
visited. 

The Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, realizing that 
the traveling public required something new in cruises, sent 
the "Orca" this winter from New York to South America, 
thence to South Africa, returning via Egypt to New York. 
[This cruise was a great success and was booked to capacity. 
Announcement has been made of a second cruise next Jan- 
uary by the new steamer "Asturias." 

Steamers sailing to the Mediterranean ports have become 
exceedingly popular, as evidenced by the great number of peo- 
ple travelling this winter to Egypt. The Navigazione Gen- 
erate Italiana line and the Lloyd Sabaudo line maintain a 
service of express steamers superbly equipped between New 
York and Naples, and these steamers have become so popu- 
lar, that it is necessary to make reservations months in ad- 
vance. We would especially draw the attention of intend- 
ing travelers to make reservations whether crossing the Pa- 
cific, or crossing the Atlantic, as early as possible, as in 
many eases travelers have been disappointed owing to the 
fact that they have been unable to secure the accommoda- 
tion desired when they finally applied for reservations. 

There are man) cruises that will appeal to the travelling 
public this year, notably Raymond and Whitcomb's spring 
tour on the new Cunard steamer, the- "Carinthia," leaving 
New York, \pril 3rd, visiting Mediterranean ports, includ- 
n i Ireece; Thos. Cook & Son's cruise on the "California," 
leaving New York July 1st. for a summer Mediterranean 
cruise, including Egypt and the Holy Land, also the "Lap- 
land" of the Red Star line, leaving July 8th. Frank C. Clark 
; will also offer a wonderful summer cruise to the Mediter- 
ranean and Norway by the new Cunard steamer "Lan- 
castrian and the Raymond ami Whitcomb Company are 
■ offering a special Norway cruise leaving New York, June 
I 29th on the "Carinthia" also of the Cunard line. In addi- 
tion to these the Royal Mail Steam Packet Cdmpany operate 
| cruises of all description to Norway and the Midnight Sun. 
'The United American line around-the-world steamer 
"Resolute" will arrive in San Francisco on February 8th, 
I and will be leaving on February l 'th westward across the 
| Pacific, and it will be a wonderful opportunity tor San Fran- 
ciscans to visit tliis. steamer. A limited number of invita- 
tions will be issued and application should be made to Mr. 
T. 11. Jacobs, Pacific toast manager. United American 
Line. 574 Maiket Street 



An opportunity for Californians to travel through the 
canal on a direct steamer to England is offered by the Ca- 
nadian Pacific this year. The "Empress of Scotland," fin- 
ishing a cruise around the world will leave San Francisco, 
March 22nd, calling at Los Angeles, through the Panama 
Canal to Havana, spending four days in New York, where 
passengers can be provided with transfers, hotel accommo- 
dation, and meals at reasonable prices and arriving in Eu- 
rope April 20th. 

( We shall be glad to answer travel questions for you through 
these columns and welcome inquiries.) 



Free Cooking Schools 

All the modern methods of cookery will again be demon- 
strated during February at two Market Street furniture 
stores. Mrs. D. R. Withers, home economist of the Pacific 
Gas & Electric Company will give classes at the Sterling 
Furniture Company from 2 to 4 p. m. on February 1 to 5, 
inclusive and at the Ellis Market Furniture Company at the 
same hours from February 15 to 19, inclusive. Every house- 
wife in San Francisco is invited with no obligation on her 
part. 

The mechanics and art of modern cookery is pains- 
takingly explained by Mrs. Withers, whose ten years ex- 
perience with gas ranges fits her for the role of expert. You 
will be amply repaid for the time spent in her classes. Act- 
ual cooking, explanations, question answering and expert 
demonstration will help you iron out many of your kitchen 
problems. 

For your special benefit, Mrs. Withers if notified during 
your attendance at any class will gladly make arrangements 
to cook your special favorite at a later class. The ease with 
which many dishes are prepared and cooked on modern gas 
ranges will surprise you, and your own particular difficulty 
can be straightened out by Mrs. Withers in short order. 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8C DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general cAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2342 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 6, 1926 



The Automobile Show 

By E. V. Weller, Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 



"R 




AT-A-TAT-TAT goes the drum, rootle-tee-tootle the 
life!" If Robert Browning had ambled into the 
Civic Auditorium this week and looked over the automo- 
bile show he couldn't have 
evolved any better verse 
than that. Browning was 
the real instigator of our 
modern jazz, you know, so 
his description of a Roman 
carnival night ought to be 
in line with our ultra-mod- 
ern ideas. Browning wrote 
some things that critics 
have been trying to inter- 
pret unsuccessfully ever 
since. Even Browning him- 
self forgot what they were 
all about. But the line 
quoted above is eloquent 
testimony that our Victor- 
ian poet knew something 
about jazz and was a pretty 
E. v. weiier f a j r prophet of the automo- 

bile show of the twentieth century. 

Now, when the drum and the life were busy at the com- 
mand of one portly individual. Paul Whiteman by name, the 
crowd did not concern itself very much about things me- 
chanical or motors cars in general. But when Paul and 
his cohorts were silent, the crowd looked under hoods, tink- 
ered with lamps and carburetors and gears, played a few 
strident notes on the horn and then comfortably settled back 
into the upholstery to imagine itself out on the ( >pen Road 
watching the California scenic panorama with its multitudi- 
nous reels of infinite beauty flash by. 

Successful as a festival of beauty and color, successful 
as a stimulant to trade, successful in the development of 
interest in the motor car and the motor transport, the tenth 
annual Pacific Automobile Show passes into the historical 
file today as one of the best exhibitions of its kind the world 
has ever seen. The great eastern exhibits had no such mu- 
sical program as this; they were not housed as comfortably 
ni ir were the decorations to be compared with the pic- 
turesque motif of this western display. The motor cars 
composed the only point of resemblance between the East 
and the West in this year's show. 

The whole family was tickled pink with the gorgeousness 
of the vehicles and the colorful setting. Matron and maid 
sighed over the luxurious limousine with its mirrors and 
powder puffs and its cute little thing-um-a-gigs for milady 
who smokes. The business man disguised bis eagerness 
under a frown and looked wisely over the engine and the 
body (•instruction the while he harkened and nodded now 
and then to the palaver of the salesman. The college youth 
and his lady drank heavy drafts of joy in the inspection of 
the cut-away roadster with the loud stripes and the babes- 
in-arms struggled and howled for the horn button. It was 
a grand gorge of beauty, mates, and if wishes were automo- 
biles every one of the hundred and one cars on the floor 
would have been driven away on the first day of the exhibit. 
The automobile show really means a lot in our young 
life. You can feel the pulse of a nation's business in wan- 
dering around the aisles at this annual display of mechani- 
cal products. The thrill that comes with a new car is mag- 
nified a thousand times when you find cars on every side, 
machines for rich and poor, vehicles to meet every one's 



need and everyone's pocketbook. The public that conies to 
hear and to see is not the only element to feel the thrill and 
wax enthusiastic over the outlook ; the salesman and the 
dealer find in the automobile show a remarkable oppor- 
tunity for imbibing a spirit of optimism that lasts well into 
the spring season. Yes, even Paul Whiteman, behind the 
screen of his music, apart from those vehicularly inclined, 
must have felt a little of that enthusiasm exuded by the 
great throngs on the floor. At least, he played like it. 

Interest in things mechanical was more alive than ever. 

The cut-out chassis, the lecture rooms, the skeletons that 

brought out the anatomical peculiarities of this car and 

that, were a continual attraction. There was something 

(Continued on Next Page) 



LARKINS DUC0 
Has Lustre 

Combined with lustre, it possesses a durability that 
is amazing. Be sure of a good job. 

Prices reasonable 

LARKINS & CO. 

First Avenue at Geary Street 



Cuttymr '%epcur 3iCU/ 

ALEMITE m j , 



EXPERT LUBRICATION HERE 
DRIVE . irsj 



624 Van Nesi Ave. 
S.F. 




TEL. FRANKLIN 3085 



Melnl Work Apper- 
taining to Automo- 
biles — Oxy- Acetylene 
Weldlns — llln.k- 
Miulthtng. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Unii's: 35c per day; *7.!W) per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six I 'iinirs for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel), San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 391 



DENMAN GARAGE 



902 Bush (cor. Tnylor) 



A convenient location for club member* 



Proipeel 9S6 



February 6, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



IS 



almost morbid in the way the specta- 
tors crowded around to see the poor 
vehicles dissected. < >ne dealer sawed 
pne of his ears completely in half and 
the poor thing seemed to be costinually 
craning its neck about the auditorium 
in search for the rest of its anatomy. 
'•Twas a sorry sight. For ray part. I 
hate to be confronted with the "in- 
nards" of a motor car whether at an 
automobile show or out on the road. 
It's a skeleton that always belongs in 
the closet and most motor cars just 
like many people nowadays are bought 
and sold more on appearance than per- 
formance. 

A goodly percentage of the crowd 
visited the basement display of the big 
brothers of the passenger cars, busses 
and tractors, trucks and trailers. The 
vision of the motorized world of the 
future is incomplete without including 
this phase of the exhibit. That's how 
the young hopeful who lives out in the 
country will be enjoying the advan- 
tages of first-class schooling, that's 
how the great engineering projects of 
the state will be rushed to completion, 
that's how a great many of us will be 
traveling from place to place in the 
near future — these are important fac- 
tors of the transportation of the world. 
There were some boats downstairs to 
attract the aquatically inclined and 
some motors to carry along on an au- 
tomobile trip to drive the skiff up the 
stream from camp. But the most in- 
teresting of all the basement exhibits 
were the massive trucks and luxurious 
passenger coaches that gave the spec- 
tator a feeling of awe. 

Upstairs, there were a hundred and 
one displays of the things that make 
motoring more comfortable and safer. 
Moving exhibits, most of them were, 
everything from a wrench that knew 
every bolt and nut by name to horns 
with organ voices that played jazz 
almost as well as Paul, himself, on the 
main floor. The accessory exhibits 
were arranged in a circle around the 
mezzanine and the visiting public re- 
alized the circular part of it by the time 
they had gone the rounds. 1 came out. 
myself, with enough reading matter to 
last me the rest of my life, almost. If 
it was not quite as enlightening as a 
five-foot shelf of the world's best 1 
think, by spending an hour a day, as 
they say in the advertisements, 1 can 
probably pass an examination in a lew 
/ears that will give me the degree of 
bachelor of publicity. 

The observer at the show will be 
confronted by a few very interesting 
lusions, ,,ne ni which is a bit shop- 
worn. It's a bromide nowadays to re- 
mark on the prevalence of the closed 
car model but it was very much in evi- 
dence at the 1926 show, more so than 
it was last year. The motorist of to- 
day keens his weather eve open — in a 



closed job. Another observation is 
that a great many motorists know a 
little something about what makes the 
car go and what makes it stop. A 
point in engineering design on the in- 
side of the car may sell a prospective 
purchaser where a few years ago the 
inside of the car was a mystery to the 
buyer and, for that matter, to the sales- 
man and the dealer as well. 

Each year sees a greater amount of 
standardization in motor car construc- 
tion. You have to look a little bit 
closer at the name-plate on motor cars 
nowadays to know whether it is sell- 
ing in the thousand dollar class or five 
times higher. The low-priced models 
are smart looking affairs one and all 
and the high-priced cars haven't been 
marking time, either. They fitted in 
well with the Oriental rugs and the 
dignified salesmen in spick and span 
evening clothes. 

The automobile show of 1926 goes 
into the book as a success. The cars 
that were all shined up for the show 
will soon be skimming up and down 
California's highways in answer to the 
stridcntCall of the Open Road. The spring 
is just around the corner, you know; 
you can almost hear that medley of 
horns, playing Paul Whiteman's tunes 
on the Gypsy Trail, for this year will 
mark up a new record for automobile 
travel in California. The motorists of 
this state traveled over ten million 
miles last year within the borders of 
California and this year, if indications 
in evidence at the automobile show are 
any criterion, the record will be many 
miles higher. Let's go! 



China Society Will Hold Meeting 

The China Society of San Francisco 
will hold its monthly meeting next 
Tuesday evening, February the ninth. 
I hi subject for the evening will be 
"Chinese Humour." presented by Mr. 
Y. I'. Clowe, a forme:- resident in China 
for fourteen years in the consular serv- 
ice. The meeting will take place at 
573 California Street at 8:00. 

Chinese current events will be dis- 
cussed. 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
i Continued trom Page 7) 

wrote the story "Dance Madness" 
which is the feature picture at the 

Warfield beginning today. Leonard, 

one >>i the most consistently success- 
ful directors in the business has turned 
out a sensational entertainment feature 
in this picture. 

Claire Windsor and Conrad Xagel 
have done brilliant work in this fast- 
moving, syncopated comedy of honey- 
moon life' in Paris. ( laire Windsor 
has been widely heralded as the 
screen's most beautiful woman, and Con- 
rad Xagel is one of the most popular 
leading men on the screen. 



There will be another super idea of 
Fanchon and Marco's on the stage, and 
Walter Roesner and his orchestra will 
entertain with some entirely new and 
novel numbers. 

* * * 

Paul Whiteman 

While the auto show is marvelous 
and crowded nightly, the center of at- 
traction is Paul Whiteman and his 
wonderful band. The story of how this 
Denver lad came here, underwent 
many and varied experiences, and fi- 
nally got to New York, where he se- 
cured an engagement at the Palais 
Royal, reads like a fairy tale, but it 
isn't, and if you could get Paul in a 
corner and make him tell you about it, 
you would be sure you were dreaming. 
(Continued on Next Page) 

The Nicest Business 
Lunch in Town 




San 

Francisco 




-tie better it geb- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter £654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 
i.soo.ooo cup* were aerTed at the Ptom 
Paciflc iBte-raaftonal Exposition 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 6, 1926 



Paul is at the "Top of the World" now, 
but he still remembers dear old San 
Francisco, and San Francisco always 
welcomes him with open arms. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

Two notable stars share headline 
honors at the Orpheum this week — Henry 
Santrey and his orchestra and Miss 
Alice Lloyd. Santrey is one of the pio- 
neers in the jazz band field, and he 
manages to be always a step ahead of 
other organizations. For his coming 
engagement he promises several new 
and novel stunts. Miss Lloyd, who is 
making her first American tour in sev- 
eral years offers a program of her past 
and present song successes, which will 
recall fond memories to those who have 
ever witnessed a performance of this 
greatest of all singing comediennes. 
She will be assisted at the piano by 
Robert Hurly. 

Two of vaudeville's greatest fa- 
vorites are also on the bill, — Harry and 
Anna Seymour with breezy bits of 
mirth and melody; the Templetons, 
Mercer and James offer "Yes. We 
Have No Charleston"' assisted by a 
charming miss by the name of Adelaide 
Bendon and Charles Embler; Moore 
and Freed will be seen in a clever 
comedy number called "Spooning and 
Ballooning" ; William Bruck and his 
company will be seen in sensational 
risley and tramboline stunts ; Dr. Rock- 
well, the greatest laugh doctor the 
world has ever known is chasing away 
all the ills of the throngs that are at- 
tending the Orpheum daily, and he i; 
being held over for a second big week 
of side-splitting mirth; The Merediths, 
Madelyn and Hoyt, famous dancers, 
are also remaining for a second big 
week and will have a goodly amount of 
comedy injected into their offering by 
Dr. Rockwell. 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 11) 

why good sets fail to function prop- 
erly. 

The radio staff of the News Letter 
cannot publish the different makes of 
sets and equipment which they feel 
they can recommend, but we are con- 
ducting a department through personal 
letters addressed to the Radio Editor, 
The News Letter, 235 Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, California, to 
help any of our readers to make their 
selection. 

We feel that if we can be of any bene- 
fit to any prospective purchaser of a 
radio set and if we can help them to 
make their selection it will give us 
pleasure to be of service. 

* * * 
KFWI's 
Pajama Party 

How late will a radio fan stay up to 



listen to the programs picked out of 
the air? 

Tom Catton, president of the Radio 
Entertainments, Inc.. owners of the 
new San Francisco station, KFWI, 
thought he could find the answer when 
he inaugurated a "wee sma' hour" pro- 
gram of dance music last Sunday morn- 
ing. The jazz started rolling out En im 
the KFWI antenna at 1:30 a. m. "We 
will remain on the air as long as re- 
quests keep coming in for selections," 
Catton announced. 

It was 4 a. m., the jazz band was 
drooping with weariness, Catton was 
fatigued from announcing, and the tele- 
phone and telegraph wires leading into 
the studio were still hot with requests 
from listeners who desired to hear their 
favorite selection played. KFWI signed 
off a few minutes past 4. 

The program will be repeated every 
Sunday morning, at the same time. Be- 
cause so many fans wired in that they 
were listening to the program in their 
pajamas, the program will be known in 
the future as the "Pajama Party." 



Lectures by Pinchon 
"The Song of the Body" is the unique 
title for a series of four lecture-recitals 
that will be given by Edgcumb Pin- 
chon, the English essayist, critic and 
lecturer on Mondays in February at 
3:45 p. m. at the studio, 317 Shreve 
Building under the direction of Lulu 
J. Blumberg. 

The individual subjects for each lec- 
ture are: (1) "Ethics or Ecstasy?" (2) 
"Jazz — the Lost Genius, (3) "Bodily 
Rhythm and the Arts of the Stage," 
and (4) "The Rhythmic Life." Elise 
Dufour of the Dufour School of New 
York and London and her artist-pupil 
Eugenia Liczbinska. Polish danseuse 
will illustrate the lectures. Miss Du- 
four the creator of the natural rhythmic 
technique of the body maintains that 
"bodily rhythm is the foundation of all 
the arts of expression." The results of 
her work are now receiving the warm- 
est welcome in the art centers of the 
United States and Europe, where she 
maintains studios. She is now estab- 
lishing a school of this kind in San 
Francisco at 317 Shreve Building. 

Mr. Pinchon, the lecturer, is the au- 
thor of a number of essays, plays, 
stories and poems. He has contributed 
articles to many of the leading maga- 
zines and was staff contributor to the 
Editorial Department of the United 
Press. 



European Humor 

In a hotel at Partenkirchen, Ba- 
varia, a placard announces in large let- 
ters : "Tourists undertaking to climb 
the higher mountain peaks are respect- 
fully requested to settle their accounts 
in advance." — Denver Parrakeet. 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 
By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

THE California motorist is better 
off than the motor car owner in 
other parts of the world. He has a va- 
riety of places to go with a scenic, ro- 
mantic and historic attraction; he has 
a remarkable series of improved high- 
ways over which to travel, and he 
doesn't have to worry about mechan- 
ical trouble enroute. 

Protection for the motorist on the 
road dates from June 1st, 1924, when 
the National Automobile Club was or- 
ganized. It provides a roadside service 
to members without distance limita- 
tion; without annoying zone limits; 
tow service and a half hour of free me- 
chanical aid, tire change and free trans- 
portation of gasoline and oil. 

The high class of the service units 
of the club and the dependable service 
which they have rendered in the last 
vear caused the insurance companies to 
place the car protected by the emblem 
of the National in a preferred class. 
A National Automobile Club member 
enjoys a 20 per cent reduction on his 
mollified coverage policy and a 15 per 
cent reduction on his full coverage 
premium. 

Within eighteen months this club 
has built up a membership of 25,000 
and January set a new month's record 
for new applications. The club is co- 
operating with Chambers of Commerce, 
supervisors and civic organizations to 
promote travel in California and to 
improve traffic conditions. 

William Deans is the president of 
the club and Arnold Hodgkinson the 
general manager. Ben Blow, vice-presi- 
dent and manager of the Victory High- 
way Association, recognized as the 
leading authority on road building in 
America has recently been named as 
field secretary. Major James S. Greene 
is the chief engineer and W. E. 
Schoppe, superintendent of the club's 
Theft Bureau, which is the largest or- 
ganization of its kind in the world, 
operating in eight Western States, Ha- 
waii and Alaska. 

Detective Work Done 
By Club 

Recognized by the United States 
government as a potent force in the 
detection of crime, the Theft Bureau of 
the National Automobile club was 
commended for its great' assistance in 
the apprehension of Martin Durkin, 
the automobile thief and slayer. Dur- 
kin's whereabouts were discovered by 
a National Automobile Club operative 
by a tedious check of the files of the 
State Motor Vehicle Department. The 
information was wired to East St. 
Louis. Illinois and Durkin's arrest fol- 
lowed. 



February 6, 192(> 



SAX FRANCISCO NFAYS LETTEE 



17 



Mr. Blabbitt on Applesauce 



Driver: "Madam, I am very sorry I killed your dog. 
Will you allow me to replace him? 

Madam: "Oh, dear. This is so sudden."— Pitt Panther. 



APPLESAUCE used to be a staple article on the tables 
of the more unsophisticated Americans, and being a 
staple, it necessarily has two points in its favor. One, its 
taste ; the other, the fact that you do not have to chew it. 
So, with the advent of this delightful name into the realm 
of Yankee slang, the meaning hasn't changed. 

Pleasant sayings are much more valuable than famous 
sayings to the average person, because they flatter the per- 
son to whom they are directed, while famous sayings, which 
are the direct opposites of applesauce, flatter only the van- 
ity of their authors. Where a famous wise crack may live 
for ages, a graceful bit of banter lives but for the time it 
takes to say it, leaving - in its wake a blush, a flutter, some 
puffing and not a little gratitude. 

Please do not get the idea that the substance of apple- 
sauce is not sustaining, or that it is too ephemeral to be 
indulged in by the more dignified matrons and masters. If 
you ever have seen a bowl of old-fashioned applesauce, lib- 
erally sprinkled with cinnamon, and waiting quite calmly 
and coldly for the drop of the spoon that will send it on its 
way, you have a good idea of how substantial this creation 
of Eve's fruit may really be. If you are not too bound by 
the conventions and books of etiquette, you must know in 
how many ways applesauce may be utilized as a food. For 
instance, it may be spread upon bread, eaten with cottage 
cheese or sampled with cream. It is usually sweet, although 
sometimes the fruit of which it is made retains its tartness. 
even after cooking, so that a pleasing tang follows each 
taste. This remarkable product of American culinary art 
may, through wrong treatment and over cooking be made 
into an insipidly sweet mess, without body and. hence, lit- 
tle consistency. 

These rules apply quite as truly to verbal applesauce; for 
what's sauce for the goose in the kitchen should equally lie 
sauce for the grander in business and social duties, lust 
as you have to get under an apple's skin to gel the best out 
of it. so must you get under a person's hide, if such a word 
may be politely used, to make a friend I nit i if him. The i ml_\ 
point of difference is that where an apple must be cut to 
be made into sauce, a person must never he cut. lesl he 
think you are too saucy. The successful purveyor of apple- 
sauce should, therefore, go right to the core of hi^ SU 
vanity, and keep the pot boiling until the tiling is done. 

It used to be a young lady's custom to reply to a bit of 
pleasantry b) saying, "I >h, sir, you are but a flatterer!" The 
modern miss simply arches her eyebrows, and with a thrill 
and a smile, says quite simply, although not as simply as 

you might think. "Applesauce!" 

From all indications it seems that our slang phrases anil 
woids are rooted in something worth while. The roots con 
tinue while the fruit, apples, in this case, wither ami drop 
oft alter serving the purpose intended. 

In the interest of happiness, and the continuance of the 
elusive art of pleasantry, applesauce should be made a 
item of everyone's mental store. It need not be canned, for 
it never spoils and. hence, can be kept continually on tap. 
as long as there are those who relish a bit. now and then. 

Remember, everything went well with Little Red Riding 
until she said naively to the wolf. "What a big mouth 
yon have, grandma!" I.. R.R.I 1. had the wrong idea — she 
Wasn't old en. nigh to know the difference between real 
applesauce and synthetic. What self-respecting wolf 
wouldn't get mad at such a statement? 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining! Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

m^f REVUE ^ 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 



WIGS and TOUPEES 

Also transformations, are- made from the purest and 
finest hair, ventilated and porous. You can sleep in 
them. 

Mrs. Lederer in charge of gentlemen's wig department. 

G. LEDERER 

561 Sutter St., Between Powell and Mason Sts. 

Firm I ■ r .,!.[, |,,-,| 1866 



El Dorado Hotel 

Sonoma, Cal. 
The finest meals in the—* 

VALLEY of the MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks With Mushroom*." 

Clean Roomi, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 
ViiiI Sonoma Counly'i t'amnui Ketortt and Mineral (Warm W».rrl Sw 
Tanki From Thit Holal. 

Rale* Exceptionally Reaionabla. 

Telephone 110 



Right NOW is a good time to 'phone 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

4 *The Recommended Laundry* 1 
250 Twelfth St- Saw Francisco 'Phone Market 916 



r ■ ■ - 
P 


arisian 


Dyein 


£ 


and 


CI 


eaning 




Suit* Pret.ed 


B. Hind 

MME 


OnW-. 

M. 


>Ul1 

S. 


Called For 

E. LEE 


ind De 


■Tared 








Par man 


Dytmg and Cleaning 








su 


Po.t Stmt 












San 


FtA.VCISCO 


i- 


Vkpu Hotel 










Phu'i ra»* 


■UH 2S10 J 



| AGUACALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 

It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions. Radioactive, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
ming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN, Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 6, 1926 



WIELANDS BREW 

WITH YOUR MEALS— IT HELPS 

Order by the casa from your grocer 

Established 1868 

Main Office, 240 Second Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 671 



L OM»*. Name PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1865 
41 First Street, San Francisco 




TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES i 

Sun Francisco— Burllnfpanie 

WeK, 793 478 



Phone Sutter 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

Clockmakers and Watchmakers 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San Franc toco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Franciico, Alameda 
and San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 Emerson St. 



SAN MATEO— Phone 1251-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

j San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



"Do you find it hard meeting ex- 
penses ?" 

"Gosh, no, 1 meet them everywhere." 
— Pitt Panther. 



"I think the Charleston is awful." 

"I can't learn it either." — Brown Jug. 



"The crying need of our day is more 
handkerchiefs!" shouted the manufac- 
turer. — Denison Flamingo. 



My friend Dora is off again. She thinks 
that the hemlock is an attachment for 
a sewing machine. — Cornell Widow. 



American divorces are more or less 
cut and dried, so why not call them hay- 
widows? — Notre Dame Juggler. 

Big Hearted 

Prisoner — This is the end ! I go to the 
electric chair tomorrow. 

Sweetheart — Don't give up all hope 
yet, dear. I've brought you a pair of 
shock absorbers. — Oregon Orange Owl. 



Mother — Pet, what are you thankful 
for today? 

Pet — Oh, I'm thankful daddy gave me 
$5 when I didn't see him kiss nursie. 
— Vanderbilt Masquerader. 



Father (reading letter from son at 
college) — I'm a quarterback of the 
football squad now. 

Mother — Send him two bits to gei out 
of debt, Pa. — Texas Ranger. 



He — Haven't I seen you some place- 
before ? 

She — You do seem rather fresh in my 
mind. — Wisconsin Octopus. 



She laughs at his wit. 

But it's not from delight. 
He has not made a hit. 

She has teeth that are white. 
M.l.T. Voo Doo. 
Koncoct a klause kontaining Virginia. 
You have to pay more Virginia do for 
beer. — Colgate Banter 



"You should have seen Mabelle dance 
the Charleston last night." 

"Dance nothing! She was just standing 
there watching, and a June bug fell down 
her back." — .Michigan Gargoyle. 



Ckohck C Homkh 



' . I. 2024 



The Homer System 

BOOKKEEPING— COLLECTIONS 



Installment, Current Delinquent Accounts, Legal Aid, 

Audits-Systems, Financial Statements, Income Tax 

Reports, Baokke>ping (Part Time, Service) 



De Young Building 



San Francisco 



Absent-minded parson (to disconso- 
late widower) : "Well, Mr. Brown, 
how is your wife standing the heat this 
summer?" — Panther. 




GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Ofllce and Works 1S23 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7013 

Branch Ofllce: 7U0 Sutter St. 

(Hotel Canterbury Bids;.) 

Phone Prospect 8845 

Work Called For and Delivered 




N. W- CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




NEW ORLEANS 

Nen>St%rles 

To better serve ourmany friends and patrons 
over '300.00000 has been expended in recon- 
struction and rehabilitation to maintain this 
famous hostelry as 

One of America's Leading Hotels 

The large well ventilated high ceiling rooms 
have been retained and modernized'*' 1 *' 

AC00MM0OT1NG OVER 1000 GUESTS 

Seiidfa'Descriptive Hotel Folder: 

lllusa'dtedMardi-CrasPn^rainlortheasldni 

Alfred S.Aivier «™Co,itd. 

NEW OFU-EANS.LA 
■^-Ticket Offices of all Transportation lino in lobby 




, 




WHERE TO DINE 



Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Mosl Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c. 75c, $1.00 35c. 50c. 75c $1.00,S1.SO a la carte 
Dancing 7:00 P. M. to 1:00 A. M. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

special parties arranged 
headquarters for theatrical people 

hattie mooser minnie c mooser 




ICE CREAi% 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



t CALIFORMA STS 
GrayBtone 

3101 3102 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 




t)feanor.5 



I 445 Powell Street 
I San Francisco 



Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:50 
and tea from 3 to 5 

Douglas 7118 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast. 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50— Also a la Carte 



Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



J ing 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Fnrrell and R I A T\I ■("" C\ ' ^ pl "> n « 

LarkinSls. *-* *-• **■ * ~ ^-» V -' *-* Franklin « 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) $ .75 No Vi.ilor <honl.t Leave the City Wilh- 

Sunday Luncheon 1.00 out Dining in the Finest Cafe 

Dinner. Week Days _ $1.50 in America 

Dinner. Sundays and Holidays 1.75 

DANCING SUNDAY KVKN1NCS 



NO A H'S 
ARK 

11.1 Third Avenne, SV\ MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooki 

Open From 

11:30 a. m. to I 00 p. m. 

p m. to 8:30 p. m 

Sundays and Holidays 

4 .10 |o S:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED BVRB1' MONDAY 

Half 111... k from lllchnay 



=1 




UMu« Hoi.i 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

open 8:00 a. m. to 11 -00 p. m. 

i n5dkpasskd ct isine 

Carl Leonhardt 

formerly of 
Golden Gate Park Casino 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day is 
taking very good care of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you, 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Self Cleaning Bridges; 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic. 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



* Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

t>'D PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

| 239 Post Street 



San Francisco, Calif. J 



!•--■■• 

Elkan 

323 G 

San 

— — 


DR. 

Gunst Building 
eary at Powell 
Francisco 


B 


. W. HAINES 

DENTIST 

Telephone 


Hours: 9 to 4 
Douglas 2949 

........ ■ .< 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sta., 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Sprinet" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 



?3<s rijr. •Sir#n.-r.arfi*Id S 



^Novelty 

Quaint customs of other lands and other 
peoples — queer head dresses of tribes 
who wear little else — strange and enter- 
taining pictures gathered from all parts 
of the earth are shown every Sunday in 
The Chronicle Rotagravure. 

Make it a point to see this delightful 
pictorial section every week. Have The 
Sunday Chronicle delivered to your 
home. 



V>(omradeship 
reigns in this organiza- 
tion and is reflected in 
the service rendered. The 
employees are part own- 
ers — and service is given 
with a smile. 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 



§>an iFrattriarn 

(fttjnmtrb 




"PACIFIC SERVICE 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 



ROT AGRAVURE 

winter 

excursion 

*ares 

to many points 

Save 
money*— , 

Week-end tickets, on 
sale Friday, Satur- 
day and Sunday— 
16-day return limit. 
Season tickets, on 
sale daily — return 
limit 90 days. 

For full information, 
ash— 



Southern 
Pacific 



Ferry Station Third Street Station 

65 Geary Street 

Or Phone Sutter 4000 



Golden Gate Ferry 
Company 

S 

WINTER SCHEDULE 

Effective October 1, 1925 



Leave Sausauto 

5 :00 a. m. 

6:00 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

Every Half 

Hour Until 

10:00 p.m. 

Then 

11:00 p.m. 

12:00 p.m. 

1 :00 a. m. 



Leave San Francisco 

5:30 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

7 :00 a. m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:30 p.m. 

Then 

11:30 p.m. 

12:30 a.m. 

1 :30 a. m. 



Saturdays and Sundays Only 
2:00 a.m. 2:30 a.m. 

ON SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

There will be extra trips if traffic warrants. 

A. O. Stewart Harry E. Speas 

President Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 






- 



RADIO NEWS AN 



GR 



■■■■■ 



ABL1SI1EU JULY 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13th, 



194 




"#- 



GOLF 

Medicos and Dentists 

By Fred Blair 

RADIO 

(The B. T. "Counterphase" Six) 

By C. P. Pennington 

TRAVEL 

Special Trips for Spring 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

SOCIETY 

Valentine Parties, Etc. 

By Antoinette Arnold 

PROHIBITION 

Crimes 

By Eleanore F. Ross 

rtfr 

PLEASURE'S WAND 

By Katherine Schwartz 



n^rg^rarareg^ESrarftg: 






THE 




N B 



■? J , 



F 



© 



ORIGINAL ST RAIGHT EIGHT 




ihere is no better proof of 
Duesenberg supremacy than 
its owner group. Men who have "ar- 
rived." Level headed and distinguished . . 
outstanding successes. H Women who are lead- 
ers .. . in activities, clubs and social prominence. 
Families of faultless taste and judgment. 
*JSuch are the people who drive in Duesenbergs. They 
look for power, comfort and individual appearance. 1 They 

are not penny wise and pound foolish for they 

realize that altho Duesenberg does cost more it is a lifetime 
purchase and a dollar for dollar economy . . . . 

You are cordially invited to inspect the Dues- 
enberg models which aroused such favorable 
comment at the recent Automobile Show 



Lloyd S. Johnson Company 

Duesenberg and Auburn 
Van N f.ss at Jackson 










EsUMUfud July 10. I*M 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pac flc Coast. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.. FEBRUARY 13, 1926 



No. 7 



Prohibition ! Prohibition ! 



By Eleanore F. Ross 



Some time before war on the "Demon Rum" was started, 
one of my in-laws remarked that the liquor interests were 
for Prohibition. At that time, I came to the conclusion 
that he wasn't right in his head ; but recent events have 

shown me that he knew whereof he spoke. 

* * * 

"Prohibition is a wonderful thing- for the rising genera- 
tion," mumbles the old crone by the fire-place; and the 
"rising generation" winks at the bulge in its hip pocket. 

* * * 

In the Deficiency bill of the present Congress, to supple- 
ment funds now available, which was passed this week, an 
appropriation of $3,900,000 was included for new coast 
guard vessels for use against ruin runners. Why not put 
into commission the hundreds of vessels formerly owned 
by the U. S. Shipping Board, that are now rotting in various 
locations or being scrapped, and divide this sum among 
the dependents of men and women who have been murdered 
or blinded or otherwise incapacitated by the futile Volstead 

Act ? 

* * * 

Six soldiers killed and six made severely ill at Schofield 
Barracks, Honolulu, through drinking bay rum which con- 
tained (<7 per cent of wood alcohol, not labeled "poison." 
Some of that $3,900,000 might be appropriated for the 
widows and children of these men. 

* * * 

The 1'rohis' most important witness in the big New York 
rum round-up, Hans Fulirman. has been found murdered. 
Fuhrman was a nun runner up to last Summer, when he 
went over to the drys. Possibly he concluded that there 
was less trouble involved in the securing of "booze" as 
a Prohi than as a rum runner, and such a thing as his own 
murder never occurcd to him. Mrs. Fuhrman should apply 
for her share of that $3,900,000 

* * * 

Mos> Lauding is again in the limelight; now the scene 
of an attempt to kill William Sandholdt. whose name has 
been linked with the investigation of the "bootleg battle" 
of that burg, which look place last July, and resulted in the 
murder of an officer and two other person-. 

* * * 

Ned M. Green, head of the local Prohibition force, is criti- 
cized by 1'rohis at Washington for the reason that he has 
not "padlocked" big hotels and clubs in San Francisco. His 

defence is that he is "following the policy of common sense 
that the administration laid out" — whatever he may imply 
by that. The same universal policy, perhaps, that is car- 
ried ^<n in other phases of jurisprudence; that of letting the 



big robber go, and jailing the man who steals a loaf of 
bread. 

* * * 

The new "Action" in Congress, which would make every 
citizen a potential dry agent, will no doubt be welcomed by 
those who fully appreciate the prerogatives of the "Prohis." 

* * * 

Novel suit for divorce — man claims his wife won't give 
up the fascinating occupation of bootlegging, and when he 
urged her to give up her nefarious practice, she sent a shot 
alter him (pistol shot, we mean, of course) and then pro- 
ceeded to chase him to the family ranch, where he had taken 
refuge, and started to massacre the whole outfit. Prohibi- 
tion can't be beat when it comes to producing variety in the 
way of marital excitement. 



Representative Celler. Democrat from New York, intro- 
duces a Nationwide referendum on beer and light wines. 
Awfully suitable name for the chappie, eh. what? 

* * * 

A "definite plan for government control under a modified 
form of prohibition, designed to end the reign of the boot- 
legger and other evils," lias been proposed at Washington. 

Uncle Sam is beginning to find out that he must choose 
"the lesser of two evils," and the "lesser" in this case is 
a moderate allowance of liquor, rather than the continuance 
of bootlegging and moon shining, and their attendant crimes. 

* * * 

From the cultured city of Boston to the romantic shores 
of Marin, is a far cry ; but just the same, the Mayors of the 
"Hub" and of the pretty little town of Sausalito. are both, 
jusl now, involved in the same sort of "rum" affair. 

* * * 

Prohibition has become such a criminal farce that even 
"men of the cloth" have taken up the subject from their 
pulpits, and base denounced it for the failure that it is. 
Says Bishop Alexander Mann of the Episcopal Dioce 
Pittsburg: "Personally. I do not believe in the Eighteenth 
Amendment, and I think the Volstead Act is a very bad 
law. Prohibition cannot possibly be enforced. The law 
is resented by many persons, good and bad. who feel it an 
infringement." 

* * * 

"Prohibition! Prohibition) What crimes are committed 
in thy name!" as Madame Roland would say. were she be- 
ing haled into court, in these days of restrictions and in- 
hibitions. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 13. 1926 




"Plague cf Legislation" 



That was the admirable defi- 
nition of what is taking place 
in this country in the words of 
Henry S Ives, secretary of the Casualty Information Clear- 
ing House of Chicago, and a nationally recognized econo- 
mist, at a recent joint luncheon of the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce and the Commercial Club. 

Mr. Ives was speaking on "Government in Business. He 
said that this was a"jazz aye of laws." He pointed out what 
we are not in the habit of remembering that there are in 
this country 100.000 people whose business it is to make 
laws who arc "hands" in a "law factory." How could it be 
other than that we should suffer from a plague of laws, with 
all these people dependent for a living upon the turning 
out of a steady stream of legislation, go, id and otherwise, 
mostly otherwise? 

He was categorical on the subject of public ownership. 
"Government ownership simply means the substitution of 
a government deficit for private profits, for the government 
never created anything except wdiat private enterprise 
started." That is' an admirable statement of what is un- 
deniably true. 

But. as the speaker pointed out. the governmental owner- 
ship idea makes some headway, because business men are 
not a unit in opposing it. If there is a movement in the 
direction of governmental ownership of a business or a pub- 
lic utility, those business men who arc not themselves en- 
gaged in that business are quite ready to join in the cry for 
government ownership, even though they themselves would 
be utterly opposed to governmental ownership or control 
of the business which they are managing. 

Thus, the resistance to governmental control must In- 
organized and business men as a body must be convinced 
that it is necessary to oppose the entry of the government 
into business, whether in the form of the control of public 
utilities or in any other way. 



"The fact that every bootlegger would vote for continu- 
ance of the Volstead law is proof that it is not a good law. 
Understand me plainly. I do not believe in breaking any 
law, I believe in keeping the law. once it is passed, but I 
do believe tliat bad laws sin mid be modified. But as long as 
the law remains in force it should be kept. I think it should 
be modified and light wines and pure beer permitted fur 
public consumption." 

It would be difficult to make a better statement than that 
nr one more calculated to impress the community. It is 
gradually growing into the national consciousness that the 
law is a bad law and a tyrannical law. Such being the 
case, the Volstead Act cannot last. 



We have called attention 
The Volstead Act Shaking several times lately to the 

breaking up of the forces 
which succeeded in imposing the Volstead Act upon the 
community. The demoralization of thuse forces is growing 
more and more evident. For some reason or other, the pro- 
ponents of the prohibition movement were able to inspire 
a great amount of fear among public men. Politicians and 
clergymen positively shivered at the thought of incurring 
the hostility of the prohibition forces. Now that fear is 
passing. Our congressional representative, Mrs. Florence 
Kahn. has let the world and the prohibitionists know that 
she is not afraid. Now. the clergy are following 

It is interesting to note the way in which the statement 
of Dr. Empringham of the Episcopal Church has been re- 
ceived. The "prohis" claim that he has no right to speak 
for the social service department of church work. But there 
has been a notable rallying of distinguished clerics and lav- 
men to his side. But more notable than the average is the 
statement of Right Rev. Alexander Mann, bishop of the 
Pittsburgh diocese of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He 
said : 

"Personally 1 did not believe in the Eighteenth Amend- 
ment and I think the Volstead Act is a bad law. Prohibi- 
tion cannot possibly be enforced. The law is resented by 
many persons, good and bad, who feel it is a serious infringe- 
ment of personal liberty. 



We arc lucky to have Doctor Jordan still 
Doctor Jordan with us. His words of wisdom are worth 

while in this age and generation. The 
carefulness of the scientist is his, and, however the heathen 
may rage and the people imagine a vain thing, his mind 
works with precision ami his words fall with dignity and 
strength. Not that we, by any means, think he is always 
right, but courage is his and knowledge and epiietness, and 
that peculiar strength which comes with age and watch- 
ing the acts of men with sagacity and discrimination. 

lie comes out for the young. He believes in the young. 
He does not think that youth is going to the eternal bow- 
wows because it likes bright colors and loud noises and 
loves to leave the march for a dancing tling all to itself on 
the sidewalk or in a by-way of its own choosing. "Trying 
it out" he calls it, "acting like idiots." The word "idiots" 
in this sense carries with it something of the old ( Ireek 
meaning. of a person trying to lie himself, independent of 
the group. They will see the folly of this and fall into line, 
says the old scientist. And we hope he says it a bit regret- 
fully. 

This falling into line is necessary. The inarch must go 
on and it cannot go on. without some degree at least, of 
discipline and co-ordination. But how much, as a matter of 
fact, in our heart of hearts, we love those that get out of 
line a little! Read George Sterling's article on Joaquin Mil- 
ler in the recent number of the "American Mercury." and 
think how much better you like the old poet for his lapses 
f om the narrow path! When Dr. Jordan says that youth 
will be all right, we hope that he does not mean that all 
youth will take program. There is much joy in the con- 
templation of those who never take program, to whom the 
world and its glory are ever foreign, who have no liking 
for the prizes of life. We cannot read of Anatole France 
for example, becoming a member of the academy without 
a shudder of impatience that he should have taken program. 



The program which included a great 
Reduction of Taxes reduction in stir-taxes has come un- 
expectedly upon opposition at 
Washington. There was contemplated a total reduction in 
taxation which would amount to $352,000,000. Now there 
has arisen a militant minority, which is endeavoring to 
thwart the will of the President in all possible ways. 

Senators Norris. and C'ouzens, who are counted as Repub- 
licans, are in this group opposing the reduction. It is not 
astonishing to find Senator Shipstead of the Farmer-Labor 
Party of Minnesota, taking that attitude, and Democrats 
such as King of Utah and Walsh of Montana might be cal- 
culated upon as opponents. The latter two, indeed, had 
made themselves the authors of amendments raising the 
minimum surtax to 25 per cent and increasing the schedule 
gradually above the $100,000 income mark. 

1 1 i^ pointed out that the committee's surtaxes will give 
a 32 per cent reduction in taxes on incomes over $100,000; 
a 17 per cent reduction on incomes to $50,000 and only a 
10 per cent reduction on $30,000 incomes. The opponents 
of the measures of the government have drawn up a table 



February 13, 1926 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



5 



showing that on an income of $10,000, the reduction woulil 
only amount to $63.75 and on an income of $1,000,000 the 
reduction would amount to $188,516.25. 

It is obvious that the opponents of the governmental pol- 
icy are trying in this way to get the support of the small 
men and represent the interests of the small trader and 
manufacturer. The complaint is that this class is mulcted 
to the advantage of the greater and richer portion of the 
population. 

This might have been a good argument once but is' so 
no longer. The great sums which are released by the re- 
duction of the surtax are socially of very great value, as 
they find their way back into productive industry and add 
to the wealth of the community besides providing employ- 
ment. It thus becomes of paramount importance that they 
should be saved. 



We have recently called atten- 
Corporation Commissicn tion to the powers exercised by 

the Corporation Commission 
and the tremendous authority which it enjoys in this state. 
A recent report by Commissioner Edwin M. Daugherty 
shows the great scope of its activities and the wide ground 
covered by its operations in the year just past. 

Duiing the twelve months, a total of 5190 permits were 
granted to companies engaged in the issuance and sale of 
corporate securities after investigation by the Corporation 
Commission. This was out of a total of applications in 
number 5362. This, which would seem to be the chief ob- 
jective of the commission, is only a portion of it- « ork. 

Thus, it issued 10,546 agents' licenses ami 936 broker--' 
certificates. Applications of all kinds handled by the de- 
partment totalled 22.'-)o4 and the records show that there- 
were in addition 2474 miscellaneous orders issued. 

Now, for the punitive side of the operations of the com- 
mission: Four hundred and thirty-three permit- were sus- 
pended, and 121 application- for permits were denied In 
addition, revocation orders to the number of 1906 w ere 
made. These included 22?i< companies, 1787 agents and 
119 brokers. 

This will give some idea of tin position which tin- gov- 
ernmental bureau occupies and i- additional testimony to 
the fact of bureaucratic power, that bureaucratic power 
which we have so often regretted. It must be remembered 
that the decisions of this board are not made in accordance 
with the strict law- governing judicial proceedings ["here 
is a laxity about tin- method- which is appalling. The ex- 
aminations, which are preliminary to the deprivation of cor- 
poration property in it- capital b) the revocation of permits 
to sell stock or the deprivation of individual property by the 
revocation of a permit to follow the occupation of ai. 
or broker, are vcrv free and easy affairs, -tub a- no court in 
the land would t< 'lei ate. 

If we are to have a bureaucracy, let it be fair. 



The Community Chest drive is on 
The Community Chest again this year, a- it will be indefi 
nitely, and we cannot do otherwise 
than recommend our reader- to subscribe fi r the I best, to 
the best extent of which thej are capable. There i- no ilonb: 
about the value <<i the Community Chest idea, none at all. The 
accumulation of fun'- under one heal by responsible mem- 
ber- oi our social group i- an accomplishment of very con- 
siderable merit and has our complete approval and support. 

Hut we must register a tinst am < I e-ti- 

matcs as to what the Community Chest actually accomplishes. 
That it aid- worthy charities i- quite true: that it saves mono 
by preven ing rival organizations, which would otherwise exist, 
is also true; that it i- the beginning i I a new system of relief 
is probably true also. But it doe- m t do all that it- exponents 
say that it does, rim- our good an 1 able contemporary "The 



Recorr'er" say-: "By thus making one effort to secure funds 
for the city's charities, the people are saved from the annoy- 
ance of continual demands for money for charitable or phil- 
an'hropic purposes." 

But such is not the ca-e. We give to the Community Chest. 
most of us, in fact, a little more every year, but the demand 
for charitable purposes still continues. Beggars assail us in 
the stree , itinerant musicians pester us for alms, Christmas ami 
Thanksgiving come with no diminution of the old demands 
and we give quickly, as we give twice. 

Let us he candid about this. If the Community Chest is to 
lake in hand the relief of our in ligent poor, let it lake the job. 
Then if there are beggars and the like, let them be proceeded 
against by the law and our conscience will be at rest, because 
the Community Chest is providing for them. If the Community 
Chest does not provide for them, let it be understood that we 
give to that institution and at the same time carry the burden 
of private beneficence. 



"From Brighter Pens Than Ours" 

Senator Borah took dinner at the White House Tuesdav, 
but so far has found no fault with Mrs. Coolidge's house- 
keeping — Dallas News. 

* * ■■;■• 

The lucky woman who found a diamond in the Christmas 
turkey will be just about able, with a little economy, to pay 
the butcher. — Portland Oregonian. 

* ' * * 

Some people tell us that wild life is disappearing in the 
country. Our own observations lead us to believe that it 
is ju-t moving to the city . — Buffalo I'ost. 

* * * 

Constantinople telephone girls have gone on a telephone 
strike for higher wages. It must be pretty hard work to be 
a telephone girl in Turkey, where they probably have two 
harems on a part) linear- Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

* * * 

"< If radical magazines there is no end." savs "Time." On 
the contrary, every radical magazine has two — a front and 
a rear -and sometimes the) are so close together, you'd be 
surprised.— The New Yorker. 

* * * 

In the old days the -laughtei-boii-e- used to boast that 
every part of a pig wa- utilized except his squeal. Now- 
adays, the jazz bands are using even that. — New York 
American. 

* * * 

Ladies who went in bathing used to dress like Mother 
Hubbard. N'ovv they dre-s more like Mother Hubbard's 
. uphoard. Tampa Tribune. 

* * * 

Experiments conducted in the laboratory of the Univer- 
sity <>f Illinois have produced a one-eyed fish. This certainly 
represents progress if some other use has been found for 
the fish's other eve. Detroit News. 

* * * 

Th« Prohibition question has become so acute that we 
notice a m isposition among our prominent public 

servants who have got to run again to regard the World 

Court a- the paramount issue.— < Ihio State fournal. 

* * * 

It is -aid that Ireland i- now enjoying a Peace that she has 
never before experienced. The inhabitants are bearing up 
tinder it a- well a- can be expected. — Punch. 

* « * 

During excavation- at a busy We-t End street corner a 
male skeleton ha- been discovered in an upright position. 
To the last he probably thought that his wife would come 
out of the door -he went in by. I'unch. 

* * * 

The modern home today is supplied with everything 
cept the family. — Buffalo Pi 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 13, 1926 




>lmsureSW^nd 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore. 





Alcazar 

THE fourth week of the fleet and 
frisky musical farce-comedy, "Lit- 
tle Jessie James," begins at this popu- 
lar theater 
tomorr ow 
night. Lively, 
tuneful and 
funny to a 
high degree, 
this offering 
has quite 
taken the 
town by 
storm, and 
its melodious 
tunes are be- 
ing hummed 
everywhere. 

Knlherlne Schwnrtz Harlan 

Thompson wrote the book and lyrics 
for the show and he has created some 
laughable situations that are handled 
by the talented cast selected by Henry 
Duffy in splendid style. The musicby 
Harry Archer is very catchy, and the 
dancing of the "bobbed hair bandit" 
chorus is great. 

Dale Winter in the title role, cer- 
tainly proves her right to be called 
a comedienne. Her performance has 
a zest and happy-go-luckiness about 
it that endears her more than ever 
with her large following. Lorraine 
Mullins sings divinely in the part of 
Geraldine. Roy Purviance does some 
good work. Phil Tead, back here 
again after a long absence, is a big 
hit. William Davidson and his song 
are unusually funny ; Betty Laurence 
is an adorable soubrette. The others 
in the cast all carry their roles well. 

* * 
Curran 

Tomorrow starts the fourth and last 
week of the popular comedians, Kolb 
and Dill at the Curran Theater. These 
popular stars have been playing to ca- 
pacity audiences during their entire en- 
gagement here. Last Tuesday night 
the house was filled from pit to dome 
by the Shriners of Islam Temple, who 
turned out to see the boys in "A Pair 
o' Fools," one of the best vehicles they 
have ever appeared in. 

This play was written by John Emer- 
son and Anita Loos and affords excel- 
lent roles for both the "boys" to do 
their stuff. They even do the Charles- 
ton ! Julia Pilanc, always the finished per- 



(Conducted by Katherine Schwartz) 

former, is seen at her best in the role of 
the rich lumberman's wife. Beautiful 
May Cloy has a splendid part too, as 
the movie queen, and does it very well — 
the women simply rave over her gowns 
and wraps. I assure you ! 

There is a sprightly chorus and some 
very clever numbers. George Cunning- 
ham trained the chorus to perfection, 
naming them very appropriately the 
"Sweet Sixteen Dancing Girls." 

* * * 
Orpheum 

This theater presents for this week an 
all-new bill headed by the celebrated and 
ever-popular American tenor. John Steel. 
He has a voice of rare charm, and a 
most pleasing personality, and is one of 
the outs'anding figures in musical cir- 
cles today. He is assisted by Miss Mabel 
Stapleton. 

The Kelso Brothers, Joe and Harry, 
and their company, including Florence 
Darley and Maurie Kelly, offer "The 
Crazy Quilt Revue." which is a riot of 
laughter. Jean Boydell, one of the most 
popular comediennes known on the Or- 
pheum circuit as "The Unique Pepolo- 
gist." has some new song characteriza- 
tions, which she gives in her own inimi- 
table manner. 

Billy De Lisle and Company, assisted 
by Flo Carroll offer a hodge-podge of 
everything in the entertainment line : 
"( hitside the Circus" is the title of a skit 
woven around the life of circus perform- 
ers, and is said to be most unusual ; Fur- 
tell's Jungle I. ions, presented by Captain 
Louis Furtell is a thrilling animal acl ; 
Ray Hiding is a dancer out of the ordi- 
nary : Ernest Mack and Margie La Rue 
will complete the large bill with their 
whirlwind novelty, in which they fea- 
ture a swivel-neck twist. 

* - * * 
San Francisco Symphony 

The seventh popular concert was fea- 
tured by the two cello solos played by 
the excellent first 'cellist of the organ- 
ization, Michel Penha, who gave the 
"Waldesruhe" by Dvorak and the 
brilliant "Tarantella" by Popper; we 
sometimes wish fur a bit more power 
from Mr. Penha, but his technic and 
phrasing is all that could be desired — 
he is a great favorite at these concerts, 
and justly so. 

Popular numbers on the program 
were the better known Andante of 
Haydn's "Clock Symphony" and 



"Through the Looking Glass" by the 
eminent critic Deems Taylor. The 
Don Juan ( iverture by Mozart Prelude, 
"The Afternoon of a Faun," Debussy, 
and a Symphonic Poem by Sibelius, 
completed a most instructive and va- 
ried program. 

Tomorrow we are looking forward 
t<p hearing two novelties. Suite for or- 
chestra, No. 6 by Bach-Wood, and a 
Rhapsody by Weismann ; also the 
Tschaikowsky Symphony No. 4, F 
Minor. * * * 

A record audience greeted Madame 
Matzenauer and the Symphony Orches- 
tra last Wednesday evening at the Au- 
ditorium whep an all- Wagnerian pro- 
gram was presented. Madame Mat- 
zenauer did some very excellent work 
during the evening. Fspecial mention 
must be made of the splendid way she 
sang in the Prelude and "Love Death" 
from Tristan and Isolde, and also in 
the Immolation Scene from Die C.otter- 
dammcrung. Madame Matzenauer has 
a richness and volume of voice singu- 
larly suited to the trying Wagnerian 
mles. and with Mr. Hertz to accom- 
pany her we heard Wagnerian music 
at its best. In the Flying Dutchman 
Overture, Parsifal and Siegfried's Fu- 
neral Music, Mr. Ilcrtz gave us a read- 
ing of Wagner that very few conduc- 
tors are capable of giving. — Farl 
Schwartz. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Jackie Coogan in "Old Clothes," is 
said to be one of the most entertaining 
pictures this popular little star ever 
made. This is the feature picture at 
the ( ',< ilden ( late the c< tming week. Joan 
Crawford plays the leading feminine 
mle. The story is by Willard Mack 
and was adapted to the screen by lack 
Coi >gan, Sr. 

The vaudeville attractions for the 
week include Hughie Clark, the rotund 
funster and song interpreter, assisted- 
by Tommy Monaco's well-trained band 
of serenaders. 

Alice Lloyd, the noted English com- 
edienne is the big attraction for the 
week. Moore and Freed, comedians 
and musicians are also featured in a 
clever act called "Spooning and Bal- 
looning"; William Brock and his com- 
pany in a sensational Risley and Tram- 
poline attraction; Jean Southern, a 
pleasing and attractive singer and 



February 13, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 



MO.VT WF.F.K 



ALEXANDRIA 
Geary and 18th 


1 
( 


Pictures 


ALCAZAR } 

O'Fnrrell nr. Powell ( 


'Little Jessie James" 
Henry Duffy Players 


CALIFORNIA 
4th and Market 


! 


"The Gilded 
Butterfly" 


CAMEO 

li:i« Market St. 


s 


"Under the Rouge" 


CAPITOL 

IOIIIh nr. Market 


1 


"The Silk Bouquet" 


CASINO 
Mason and Kills 


1 


Pictures 


CASTRO 
429 Castro St. 


1 
( 


Pictures 


Cl/RRAN 
Geary nr. Mason 


I 
\ 


Kolb & Dill in 
"A Pair o' Fools" 


EGYPTIAN 


I 


Pictures 


GOLDEN GATE 
G. G. Ave. * Taylor 


( 
( 


Vaudeville 
and Pictures 


GRANADA 
10116 Market St. 


I 
( 


"The Song and 
Dance Man" 


HAIGHT 
llnlcht at Cole 


( 
( 


Pictures 


IMPERIAL 

1077 Mnrket St. 


1 

( 


"The Cohens and 
Kellys" 


LOEWS WARFIELD 
1188 Market St. 


( 
1 


"The Torrent" 



MAJESTIC 
Mission between 
20th and 21st 



Pictures 



METROPOLITAN 
20.'iR Union SI. 



Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 
i:i20 Fillmore 
MOW MISSION 

2K.10 Mission 



! 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM ( ., . ... 

..... ii .» .. ii ( Vaudev 1 e 

O Farrell * Powell \ 


PANTAGES I ., . .„ 

Market at Mason { Vaudeville 


I'OMPEII ' Pictures 

Next to Granada \ 


PORTOLA ( _. , 

77» Market St. 1 Pictures 


president 1 Florence Roberts in 
Market « MrAllister \ "Dancing Mothers" 


ROYAL ( 

IMS Polk St. { Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS ' "Behind the Front" 
IMMl Market St. ' 


SITTER 1 

Sutter and Stelner ( Pictures 


I'NION -hi mu ) Pictures and 
O'Farrell nr. Powell \ Vaudeville 


wilkes \ .. The Big pg ra< je" 
Geary and Mason \ 


WIGWAM ) 

Mission and 22d Pictures 



I IIM I UTS 

rtmi Thraler. tnnitnv Afternoon 2:1.%. *«a 

Krnnfi-r.i Symphony. 

\l 111 I (Hill H 

*l«<mls> Kxenlna. Fehrunrj 10: 

Mnilsmr llmirnnnrT 

Thursday February 1Mb. s s« Carlo Opi-rn 

l'oi«i»an> In rriierlolre. 



dancer, brings a brand new edition of 
her novel act, -"Girls Will Be Boys" ; 
Rich Hayes, the elongated juggler who 
excels in the art of pantomime comedy, 
returns with a new routine of tricks. 

The musical program will be given 
by Claude Sweeten and his orchestra 
with Grace Rollins Hunt at the organ. 

•t * * 
Wilkes 

"The Big Parade," the big road show 
picture now playing at the Wilkes is 
the main attraction theatrically these 
days. It is a big stirring drama of the 
war, done in a big way, and everyone 
should make an opportunity of see- 
ing it. 

The play is so human. Its dramatic 
action is natural. It is hard to say 
whether the beautiful love story or the 
soul-stirring battle scenes is the thing 
which stays with you. 

Renee Adoree as the adorable little 
peasant girl, must have lived the scenes 
which she depicts. 

Any mother who gave up a boy to 
go to the front will appreciate the 
agony of the mother in this picture. 

There are so many things one could 
pick out to write about, but one of the 
outstanding things' is the bit where 
the three doughboys turn in, dog-tired 
after a long march and forced "mani- 
ruring of a pig sty" before they can 
find a sleeping place. "Jimmee" (John 
Gilbert) has received a cake from his 
American sweetheart. 

The pantomime which occurs when 
he unwraps the cake, mouths water- 
ing, eagerness depicted on their faces, 
only to discover the cake is so hard 
thai they can't cut it with a bayonet 
is a master piece. The picture is just 
brimful of incidents like this, and that 
i> one of the great reasons why it will 
live forever in the memories of those 
who view it. 

* * * 
President 

"Dancing Mothers." the twentieth 
century comedy at the President, gives 
a picture of cafe life and the modern 
tendency to seek pleasure away from 
the family circle. Indeed, the roof 
club scent- shows a crowded Bohemian 
resort in the early morning hours with 
the couples leaving their tables to 
dance and the waiters hurrying to and 
fro. It is very realistic. 

Florence Roberts, ever popular in 
San Francisco, has a real artistic touch 
which adds greatly to the enjoyment 
of one of the most unique and mirthful 
plays of the season. The others in the 
very large cast handle their characters 
with skill and ease. 

* * * 
Cameo 

This week- feature at the Cam. 
"Under the Rouge" with Owen Moore 
and Elaine Percy in the leading roles. 




Walter Roesner 

In connection with the Warfield, and 
their splendid productions, mention 
must be made of Walter Roesner and 
his excellent orchestra. California has 
produced some of the greatest musical 
conductors — Paul Ash, who is a sen- 
sation in the East, after a phenomenal 
success here ; George Lipschultz, who 
is now playing to crowded houses in 
( >akland, after a long and successful 
engagement at the Warfield Theater 
in this city, and now Walter Roesner, 
who is a perfect exemplification of the 
new school of musical leaders. Now- 
adays, to have a thorough grounding in 
music, and lie able to wield the baton 
is not enough. ( )ne must be able to 
dance, to sing, in fact to lie an actor as 
well as a musician. All these arts are 
possessed by Roesner. who combines 
with it all a charming personality 
which, in the short time he has been at 
the Warfield, has won for him a host 
of friends and admirers. 



Imperial 

"The Cohens and the Kellys" is said 
to be one of the funniest pictures ever 
made, and opened at this theater yes- 
terday. It was adapted for the screen 
(Continued on Page lfii 

^you pay no more* 



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Where to Spend Your Vacation 

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On the Etlce of the Berkeley Hill. 

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Key I • fr«im Ihf : 

Fra nc i sco. Fa m i 1 y an hotel. 

Reasonable rates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 13, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



St. Valentine Pays His Visit Again, 
Creating Knots for the Present Year 

L( >VERS'knots, sweetheart games, sentiments and pulsa- 
tions of the heart have sway. For this is the hour pf St. 
Valentine! The beginning, ofttimes of life's old, old story 
that never, never can grow old — nor change, one whit, 
throughout the everchanging years. 

"All the world loves a lover" and thank goodness, with 
many modern skepticisms, lovers are with us yet. For that 
let us lie duly thankful! 

Have you received your valentine? 

If you have, then life has been good to you. Perha-ps it 
was from your dearest one. and that may be fiance, fiancee. 
"just-a-friend," or lucky-you. your valentine may be from 
husband or wife— the ones who value sentimental valentines 
more and more as years go gliding along. 

Perhaps, your valentine may he from a daughter or from 
a son. If so, how your heart throbs with pride, because 
you are remembered with tender words — remembrances! 
Dads and mothers both like their valentines. 

For don't you be misled and for one minute think that 
all the valentines are for the school boy and girl, the col- 
lege boy and his Jane or for the debutante or the "pair en- 
gaged," alone- Valentines have a sentimental force within 
the hearts and loves of old and young — not in the same way. 
of course, but they mean the same thing in the end. 1 know 
a husband who gave his wife a valentine today, it was a 
house and lot. a complete "surprise". It was his valentine'! 

I know, too, a mother who sent her absent children a 
"?adio," but it was a valentine, and a lacy, old-fashioned 
card was tied to the radio set. I happen to know very, very 
well a dad who set his son up in business today — it was his 
valentine! 

* * * 

No More Caricatures 

There are valentines and valentines. 

If you are in doubt about the continuance of the custom 
of sending valentines in this, our wireless, progressive age, 
make inquiry at the shops and you'll find that just as many 
valentines are being sold today, to young and old, as in 
those so-called days when your grandfolks received a 
"comic," which either made them laugh or made them ter- 
ribly, terribly furious. 

Caricatures are relegated to oblivion. Thank goodness! 
They have long ago been burned on the pyre of intolerance. 

In their place we find clever, humorous, clean-witted 
cards of amusement or with happy sentiments and "win- 
ning ways." 

* * * 

Flowers for Valentines 

Who can deny that flowers with their fragrance and their' 
beauty, a-e foremost in the list of lovely "remembrances" 

• m St. Valentine's. 

"Why wait until the final day in sending flowers to those 
we love?" asked a prominent society leader who has a 



l 



t 



COLONIAL HOTEL 



J ir.vi HiikIi sin-el. Between Powell and Stockton, San PrnnelH 

Telepl e Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETI7EN, Propi it-tor 



thoughtful trait of sending flowers, on many occasions, as 
many as she can find ; "I like my flowers this side of Jordan, 
and so I send them as valentines to relatives and friends, 
and let them have the joy of them." 

Look into the florist's windows, today, and select your 
valentines! Ypu will think that you 'nave stepped into Para- 
dise, for the blossoms this year seem to transcend in gor- 
geous beauty and variety all those of p-eceding years. The 
flowers are marvelous, and the florists' shops magnificent! 
* * * 

Engagement Announced 

Society is intensely interested in the announcement made 
i his past week of Miss Prudence Ponsonby of London to 
Mr. Hugh Tevis, son of the late I high Tevis of San Fran- 
cisco, and of Mrs. Cornelia Baxtcr-Tev is Toulman now of 
Paris. 

Miss Ponsonby comes of a distinguished English family. 
One of her cousins is Sir Frederick Ponsonby, Comptroller 
of the King's household. Another cousin is Arthur Pon- 
sonby, firmer Secretary of Foreign Affairs. Iler father 
was the late Captain William Ponsonby. She lives in Lon- 
don with her mother. 

While in America a short time ago, Miss Ponsonby visited 
a cousin, Commander Silgarth Evans, stationed in Florida. 
She was extensively entertained while at the Royal Pon- 
ciana Hotel. Palm Beach. 

Hugh Tevis is the grandson of the late Lloyd Tevis, and 
a nephew of William S. Tevis, Dr. Harry Tevis and Mrs. 
Frederick Sharon. After the death of his father, young 
Hugh Tevis went to Paris with his mother, spending most 
of his time there with visits to his grandparents, whose 
home is at East Hampton, Long Island. 



The Hon. Richard Tobin, American Minister to Holland, 
who visited California, bis home state, during the holiday 
season, has sailed from Xew York for The Hague, to re- 
sume bis i il'iicial duties. 



Celebrities: Entertained 

During; their short sojourn in San Francisco and the bay 
Aties. Miss Willa Roberts. Associate Editor of the 
"Woman's Home Companion," and Miss Label Conover, 
Style Editor, were entertained by writers of Northern Cali- 
fornia. 

An interesting and splendidly planned luncheon was given 
at the Hotel Claremont, Berkeley, under the joint auspices 
of the California Writers' Club and the Berkeley Branch, 
League of American Ten Women, for the two visiting 
writers. The plan and procedure of the scholarly event was 
presented in a distinctive way. 

W.nnen who have achieved distinction in various fields 
of endeavor made the addresses of the day telling in a 
two-minute speech the bight lights of their special work 
and the purposes of their definite activities. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 
rlephone Softer 0JSO Onder Management CARL s. STANLEY | 






February 13. 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Mrs. Derrick Norman Lehnier, president of 
the Berkeley Pen Women, presided at the 
luncheon with dignity and gracious considera- 
tion. Mrs. Harry Noyes Pratt was hostess of 
the noteworthy event and Dr. Mary Roberts 
Goolidge, director of the California Writers' 
Club and member of the faculty of Mills Col- 
lege, introduced the local speakers. Elise Du- 
four, writer and teacher of rhythmic expression 
and dancing, introduced the editors in a well- 
chosen address, paying tribute to the New 
York women of distinction. 
Prominent Speakers * * * 

Prominent speakers at the Writers' Lunch- 
eon were Dr. Olga Bridgman. psychiatrist ; 
Miss Violet Richardson, superintendent physi- 
cal education, Berkeley schools ; Mrs. Edith 
Tibbetts, Vice-President Camp Fire Girls; 
Mrs. May Cheney, Appointment Secretary of 
the University of California; Dr. Agnes Fae 
Morgan, head of the department of Home Eco- 
nomics, University of California; Miss Anne 
Wade O'Neill, field of political science; Miss 
Cora Williams of the Cora Williams Institute Rates 
of Creative Education; Miss Rosalind Keep, Mills College; 
Annie Little Barry, lecturer and prominent California Fed- 
eration Club leader; Katharine Browning Miller, play- 
wright; Mrs. Wilda Wilson Church, director of radio plays; 
Miss Alice Brainerd, Executive Secretary of Drama 
Teachers, California; Calthea Vivian, artist; Mrs. Beulah 
Mitchell Clute, maker of book plates; Victorine Hartley, 
supervisor music, Berkeley schools; Mrs. James Wales, 
President Political Science Club; Esther Birdsall Darling, 
author and member California Writers' Club; Mrs. F. Ellis 
Miller, President Oakland Civic Center; Mrs. Elizabeth 
Anderson, police woman of Berkeley. 

The committee in charge, headed by Mrs. Harry Noyes 
Pratt, Social Secretary and wife of the President ol the 
California Writers' Club, were Mrs. Frank K. Mott, Presi- 
dent of the Ebell Club; Miss Mary Bird Clayes, California 
Vice-President L.A.P.W.; Elise Dufour, writer and dancer; 
Camilla Kenyon, novelist; Gabrielle Woodworth, musician. 
Mrs. T. C. Dennett. Chairman of the Book Section. I lakland 

Civic Center. 

* * * 

Murray I. 

in ce 

affair 




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250 Rooms 
From $2.50 per day 



Reid. 



Rea Smith, a cousin of Mr. Deering's. The 

guests wee Mr. and Mrs. Harry II. Webb, Mr. 

and Mrs. II. \\\ Poett, Mrs. Ashton Potter. 

Mr. Jerome Politzer and Mr. Louis Mullgradt. 
# * # 

Beautiful Luncheon For 
Mrs. Whitelaw Reid 

One of the most beautiful luncheons of the 
social season was given this past week by Mrs. 
George A. Pope at her home in Pacific Avenue, 
in honor of Mrs. Whitelaw Reid of New York. 

Mrs. Reid has been spending the past month 
at her home in Millbrae, and ever since she 
came West has been the honor guest at any 
number of delightful affairs where her many 
friends have assembled to extend their heart- 
iest "welcome home." 

Those at the luncheon included Mesdames 
Jennie Crocker Henderson, Robert H. Smith, 
Edmunds Lyman. John S. Drum, Henry F. 
Dutton, Walter Dillingham, Fentress Hill, 
Charles T. Crocker. Harry Macfarlane. Ross A. 
Curran, Arthur Chesebrough and Miss Eleanor 
Goss, who came West with Mrs. Whitelaw 



Lieutenant and Mrs. 
tained friends at dinner 
niversarv. the charming 
Country Club. 



Royar recently enter- 
bration of their wedding au- 
ntie, given at the Mare Island 



British Vice-Consul Gives Farewell Dinner 

The British Vice-Consul and Mrs. C'vril II. lane gave a 

dinner party at the Fairmont Hotel last week in compli- 
ment to twelve of their friends. Mr. and Mr-. Cane are 

leaving shortlj for a vacation of six months in London. 

planning to return to this city in August. In respect to 

the late Dowager Queen Vlexandra, the dinner given by the 
\ ice-Consul and his wife was quite informal. 



Mr. and Mrs. Mil 


o Rowcll (nee Sessions) 


have taken a 


house at Palo Alto 


where they will spend 


the next few 


months. 







Mr. and Mrs. Frank Deering gave a dinner party at their 
home on Larkin Street last week in compliment to Mr- 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa M \ri \. C u iforki \ 

I RfehVCJ Hallvj 



L 



RrWrrrt >J: 

v.. imi «r ( Mtad Bn 

Nfi* for ff*r'i*tn>™» M ) 






Miss Mary McCone, who will be a bridesmaid at the wed- 
ding of Miss Maybelle Brawner and Mr. Paul Wood at St. 
Luke's Church, Saturday night, was hostess at a beautifully 
appointed supper dance at the Fairmont Hotel last Satur- 
day night. 

* * * 

Mrs. J. C. Flood gave a handsome bridge and luncheon 
at the Fairmont last Saturday in compliment to a number of 
her friends of the Novo Club The Gray room was a 
ture of loveliness with decorative scheme of early 
lib issoms. 



pic- 
spring 



Mrs. Ray Lv man 
I. eland Stanford. |r 
given by the di do - 
cine last Monday. 
Mehrtens and Mrs. 



Wilbur, wife of President Wilbur of 
University, was honor guest at a tea 

' wives of the Stanford College of Modi- 
Mrs. Walter Boardman, Mrs. Henry 

Karl Schaupp had charge of the event. 



Mrs. Alliert \\ Stokes presided over the convention of 
the City Federation of Women's Clubs in her official capa- 
city a,- President, which held an all-day session in the Fair- 
mont Hotel last Saturday. Dr. Mariana Bertola, State Presi- 
dent, recently returned from Washington. D. C, was an 
honor guest and speaker. Mrs. William Lee Sales. Presi- 
dent .it the district federation, embracing fourteen counties, 
and Annie Little Barry, the prominent parliamentarian, 
were special guests and -peakers. 

* * * 
Breaking the Ground for 
Their Club House 

With the realization of their fondest dream "coming true." 
thou.-and.- of eager club women in San Francisco and in 
Fad throughout the entire state, will participate in the 
"ground-breaking" ceremonies. Sunday. February 14, when 
the first shovelful of earth will be turned for the erection 
of the San Francisco Woman'- Building. 

Services will be held at 3 o'clock in the First Congrega- 
tional Church. Post and Mason Streets, followed by dedica- 
tion ceremi nies at the building site, Sutter and Mason 
Streets. Dr. James Gordon, pastor of the church, will be 
assisted in the ihu-ch services by Rabbi Louis I. Newman, 
who will deliver the day'- address. The Rev. Caleb S. S. 
Dutton of the First Unitarian Church will also participate in 
the church ceremonies. According t" official announcement. 
it is hoped that Archibishop 1'dward J. Ilanna will return 
ntinued on Page Up 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 13, 1926 



-&J&JZ* 



•S^JS* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



"&J&J&' 



-SOWS* 




T 1 

-1 e 



^HE medicos and the dentists of the North- 
ern California Medical and Dental Golf 
Association met in the annual golf team match 
at the Lake Merced Golf and Country Club last 
Friday, and although we had a deluge of rain 
for over a week, it cleared up sufficiently to 
bring together forty players to represent each 
profession and a very enjoyable day was spent 
on the world-renowned Lake Merced course. 

As a preliminary to the big event, the dental profession 
held their monthly handicap sweepstakes tournament. < Hit 
of the 40 players 'that signed up there were 30 that turned 
in the score cards which was a good percentage considering 
that the course was heavy and some of the boys' scores suf- 
fered. 

Dr. C. 1 J . Richards proved to be the best putter, for he 
was the only player who landed in the eighty street. Mis 
nearest competitor was Dr. J. Chalfant, wdio had an even 
90. Dr. Richards has shown on several occasions that he 
is destined to become one of Lakeside's leading dental 
golfers, as he has won several monthly events. 

In fait, he won the dental tournament the last time the 
den'.ists played over the Lake Merced course, and In 
won a flight in the Northern California handicap tournamerrt 
last August. If Dr. Richards keeps up this steady pace of 
winning he'll have no place to put them. 

Dr. Chalfant. who was the low net winner, scored eight 
more pulls to capture a trophy in the Class A division, but 
that was a very fair record considering that a lot of those 
star-tooth carpenters fell down. 

D . J. H. Conroy led the field in the B class, while Dr. 
C. A. Meek won ;the low net cups; that ended the program 
fo- the dentists. 

* * * 

Medicos versus Dentists 

The annual battle between the medical profession and the 
dentists, which is always decided with a team match, 
brought out forty players on each side and the way it was 
fought out was worthy of any previous contests held among 
the members of the Northern California Medical and Den- 
tal Golf Association. 

It was Dr. James Eaves, who in 1415 during the exposi- 
tion year, conceived the idea of Forming AMA Golf Associa- 
tion to which he was unanimously elected the first President. 

To show his appreciation to his fellow members, who 
elected him, he won the first championship, an honor which 
he held for several years. 

Since that time nearly every business and professional 
organization has formed a golf chapter of its own. all 
of which have proved a qualified success 

The judges and lawyers were the last to join the North- 
ern California Golf Association, when they held their initial 
golf tournament at the Lake Merced Golf Club. Thanks to 
the Directors of that Club, who have so graceouslv offered 
thei- cou-se, these different organizations can hold their 
tournaments and finish off the day with a banquet which"!! 
the most enjoyable part of the program. 

* * * 

Drs. Eaves and Walter Star 

Getting back to my original story between the medicos 
and the dentists, there were two familiar faces who headed 
the medical team: Dr. James Eaves and Dr. C. 11. Walter, 
two men with nationally known reputations. Dr. Eaves 
is a member of Burlingame. Claremont and the San Fran- 



cisco Golf and Country Club and has been a prominent fig- 
ure in California golf for over fifteen years; while Dr. 
Walter, who is partial to the Sequoyah Country Club, has 
held innumerable golf titles, including the Northern Cali- 
fornia championship. 

The two famed medicos were pitted against Drs. L. D. 
Heacock and J. C. I arc is, the pick of the dental profession, 
Inn no matter how the dentists pulled they were no match 
for Dr. Eaves and Dr. Walter, losing three ways. 

Drs. Eaves and Walter had a best-ball of 70, two under 
par. Dr. T. E. Bailly and Dr. A. II. McNulty were the first 
pair to arrive at the- clubhouse with one point, followed by 



Johnnie McHugh of the Lin- 
coln I' ark Golf Club, San 
Francisco , warming up at the 
crack of daiun on the target 
course on the grounds of the 
Hollywood Plaza Hotel in 
Hollywood, California. Mr. 
McHugh recently competed 
in tin $10,000.00 open golf 
tourney held in Los Angeles 
and was the youngest player 
listed in that event. He was 
th.- amateur runner up who 
played Con Elm and won 
one of the cups awarded dur- 
ing the tournament. 



Drs. Walter Schallcr and George Kinney with two. It 
looked as if the docto- s had a chance to grab a victory but 
Dr. T. L. Rogers anil Dr. C. R. Kruse. two of Berkeley 
Club's best bets upset the apple cart taking Drs. I-".. R. 
Best and R. Leachman down the line three ways. The same 
thing happened to Dr. Hans Barkan and Dr. Ed Barratt. 
However, Dr. Wilhelm Waldeyer, the big chief from Mount 
Zion Hospital and Dr. Leroy Brooks from St. 
Lukes collected a couple which helped considerably. Dr. 
Herman Schlagater and Dr. Harry Alderson were the first 
pair to gather the whole works, they did it so easily that 
Dr. A. W. Ward and Dr. S. W. Hussey didn't stand a 
chance. When Dr. John Sperry and Dr. Harold Brunn 
brought in three more points, which tied the score, the bet- 
ting was 2 to 1 that the medicos would win, and especially 
when Dr. Herbert Gunn and Dr. Sol Hyman put the doctors 
three points up, it looked like a cinch but the dentists proved 
goo.] finishers for they annexed three-three's in a row and 
won the decision by 19 to IS. 

This is the third meeting of the doctors and dentists, the 
dentists have won two and drawn one. It was rather un- 
fortunate that Dr. .Max Rothchild was reported absent. 
Dr. Max is a very busy man, dividing his time between Bur- 
lingame and his country home at Napa. Dr. Max is build- 
ing an lS-bole golf course in the center of his 1000-acre 
(Continued on Page 14) 




February 13, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




(Note — The San Francisco News Letter advance /'roc/rams from the various radio 
has added a new feature for the pleasure broadcasting stations each week, and will 
and benefit of its readers. It will print also run an article by a radio expert, who 



will give valuable advice to radio fans in 
regard to the purchasing and operation of 
radios.) 



Hi >\Y many times have you read a 
a radio advertisement with the 
words, "Coast-to-Coast Reception 
Guaranteed"? How many times have 
you purchased a radio with that sort 
of a guarantee attached thereto (verb- 
ally, not in writing) and then taken the 
set home to find that evidently the 
salesman meant from the coast of Se- 
attle to the coast of San Diego? This 



misinterpreted trans-continental busi- 
ness hurts radio more than it helps. 

At the present stage of development 
in radio no distance should be guar- 
anteed. This hurts sales by misrep- 
resentation. They do get distance oc- 
casionally, but how many nights out 
of the week will a person sit in front 
of a radio and log distance consistently? 
Not many! Then when one pro- 



BROADCAST SCHEDULE FOR NEXT WEEK 



BLACK T1PE P.M.I I.lfiHT FIGURES A.M. 



TUBS. 



Kit*. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO— 220 



r. ::io- «:30 



-10:46 

1:00- 2:30 
1:00-10:00 



3:00-10:45 9:00-10:45 9:00-10:45 
!:O0- 2:30 2:00- 2:30 2:00- 2:30 

8:00-10:00 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:3)1 
RlOO-11 :30 



9:0O-10:4E 
2:00- B:SC 



KFRC— CITY OF PARIS— 270.1 



(1:30- 7:30 
H:00-ll lOO 



>:00-11 :llll 
1:00- 7:30 
1:00- 0:30 



6:30- 8:00 

11:00 

12:00-12:20 
.->:30- 7:1." 
8:00-11:00 



6:30- 8:00 

10:00 

11:00 
5:30- 7:30 
S:QO-I2:PO 



K::so- s mi 
11 on 

4:00- 5:0O 
5:15- 7:30 
S:O0-lO:0O 



6:30- 8:00 
11:00 

12:00-12:20 

.-> :30- 7 :30 

8:00- I 1 :<M . 



6:30- 8:00 
11:00 
4:0O- 5:00 
5:30- 7 
H:00- 1:00 



9:45-10:45 
5:00-10:00 



00 

30 

on 

iOO- 2:00 

ISO- 8:80 

15- 7:30 
OQ-1 1 :OQ 



KPO— HALE BROS.' AND THE CH RONICLE— 428.3 

i;00 



7:00- 8:00 
10:00-10:36 

IS mi 

I :<><>- 2:00 
2:30- 1:80 
5:15- 7:30 
BlOO-1 1 -"it 



7:00- S:00 
10:30-10:36 
12:00 
I :(><>- 2:00 
2:30- 3:30 
5:15- 7:30 
K:00-11 :O0 



7:00- S:00 
10:00-10:36 
18:Q0 

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2:30- 4:30 
5:15- 7:30 
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7:00- 8:00 

10:30-10:36 

12:00 

12:45 

1:3(1- 2:0O 

5:30- 7:3» 

8:00-11 :00 



; nil- von 
10:30 

12:00 

l:O0- 2:1k 1 
2:30- 5 30 
0:15- 7:30 
X 4)0-12:00 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS, INC.— 226 



10:00-12:00 
1:O0- 2:OI> 
8:00-18:00 



lOO- 2:00 
1:00-12:00 



X :00- 1 :00 



2lOO- 3:0O | 
10:00-12:00 



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8:00- 



i:00 I 
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l :80 a.m 

Pajama 

Party 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE— 207 



2:30- 5:00 
8:00-10:00 



-.nn- si:, 
2:80- 8lS0 
8:00-10:00 



8:00- v 15 
2:3<>- 3:30 
8:00-10:00 



8:00- 

2:30- 



v 16 

3 :30 



8:00- 8:15 

2:3C>- 3:30 

8:0O- 10:00 



KFUU— MATHEWSON MOTOR CO, INC— 220 



10:15-11:1: 



10:45-11 i 6 

0:30- 7:30 

8:00 l i 



in 15-11 16 

0:30- 7:30 



in 16-11 16 

0:30- 7:3C 
8:00-10:00 



10:45-11 45 



10:15-11:46 
0:30- 7:3c 
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12-15- 2:00 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE— 508.2 



4:00- BlOO 
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8:00-10:80 



4:00- BlOO 
0:OO- 7:30 
BtOO-lOiOO 



4:00- 5:00 
7:00- 7:30 
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KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO.— 384.4 



10 so 1 1 :30 , 10:30-1 1 30 
1 :3c>- 3 KM I :30- 3 :Ofl 
5:4O-10:lM) 5:10-10:00 



1:30- XtOO 
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1 , .i-l 1 10 1:30- 3:01 

1:30- 3:00 ' .1:40-10:01 
5:40-10:00 



KFOA— RHODES DEPARTMENT ST ORE-^54.3 

10 00-1 10:301 10:00-10:30 1 4s00- BJJT 

12:80-1:30 12:30- 1:30 12:30-1:30 12:30-1:30 12:30-1:30 ":4S"lV°hI 

3:IMI- 5:30 3:00- 5:30 3 :IH>- 5:80 3:00- 5:30 3:00- 5:30 0:30-1 1 :Of 

7:0O-IO:OO BlOO- 0:30 7:00-10:00 OHIO- "1:31 



:0O-U :0O 



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KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC. — 167 
(Copyright IMS l>> Earle C Anthony, Inc. 



10:00 

4:00 
0:30-10:00 

IOlM 



10 16 

5:30- 0:OO 
0:15-10:00 
10:(M) 



5:30-10:00 
10:OO 



10:46-11 :06 | 
u DC 

5:30-10:00 
10:00 



5:30-10:00 
10:0(1 



10:45 

5:30-10:00 
I o :IH> 



5:30-11:00 
ll:Ofl- 



KFWB— WARNER BROS.. HOLLYWOOD— 252 



:..iiii- d:0o 11:00-12:15 

7:30-11 OMi 5:0«- OHIO 

N:|M>-10:00 



5:00- BlOS 
v:IM)-ll :00 



s:0O-ll iM 



r:in- 7:10 

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ceeds to show his next door neighbor 
what a wonderful set he has, the thing 
refuses to bring in anything farther 
away than 300 miles and even that 
comes in like a cage full of canaries and 
magpies. 

Why turn your dials to try and lo- 
cate some distant station that will fade 
out about the time one gets settled in 
the big easy chair? Tune in your set 
on a good local program, sit down in 
the easy chair and enjoy yourself for 
an evening's pleasure. That is what 
is called real radio reception. 

No one is proud of a set that howls 
so loud that it can be heard all over 
the neighborhood. They are merely 
the victims of misplaced confidence. 
Mam- a radio set works splendidly in 
one location and the same set refuses 
to do its best in another location. The 
reason is not with the set, but with the 
atmospheric conditions. When one is 
contemplating buying a set, he or she 
should not be misled by what some one 
else is doing. I lave a good set placed 
in your home on trial and do your own 
deciding. 

There is a thrill attached to sitting 
up half the night and listening in to 
some far-away station ; we all do that 
sooner or later, but when we do get a 
real distant station it quite often 
sounds like a bunch of alley cats en- 
gaged in a serenade on the back-yard 
fence. 

What the public wants is a radio that 
will produce good results from the sta- 
tions near at hand. And where can 
any one find better programs than 
those that go on the air every night 
right here in our own district. 

The B-T "Counterphase" Six 
Through the courtesy of the United 
Radio Supply Company. 693 Mission 
Street. San Francisco, the radio staff of 
the News Letter has been given the op- 
portunity of testing the new B-T 
"Counterphase" Six Radio Set, manu- 
factured by the Bremer-Tully Manu- 
facturing Co. 

This is a six-tube set of the highest 
class materials and workmanship, set 
in a hardwood case noted for its sim- 
plicity and richness of design. It is 
attractively lined with sheet copper for 
protection against near by interference 
(Continued on Page 161 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 13, 1926 




WE REGRET to note the death of Benjamin Waterfall, 
lcaling producer of the California Sate Life, who regu- 
larly accounted for $1,000,000 of personal business each year. 
He was found deal in his automobile, result of a gunshot 

woun 1. apparently suicide. 

* * * 

— The settlement of the estate of the late William Rocke- 
feller disclosed the fact that he had approximately S, J ) i').i H I 
investe 1 in the various Stan lard ( hi Companies, but $43,000.- 
000 in tax exempt securities. 

* * * 

— "The increase in taxation in California during the last 
fifteen years has been phenomenal and lias created a condition 
which is alarming." s says Rolland A. Vandegrift, director of 
re earch of the California Taxation Improvement Association. 

* * * 

— The items of expenditure which the Board of Supervisors 
of San Francisco has indicated it will abandon, are the expu-i- 
tion site i n. the Marina, the municipal garage and the munici- 
pal warehouse, which total $447,700. 

* * * 

— The bay division of the Helch I lelchy aqueduct will be 
completed by the end of this month, according to the City En- 
gineer This will increase present facilities to the extent of 
24 million gallons daily. Under an agreement between the city 
and the Spring Valley Water Company, the company is per- 
mitted to use the city's conduits to bring water stored in the 
recently completed Calaveras reservoir in Alameda County, 
to Crystal Springs reservoir, San Mateo. 

* * * 

— During the year 1''25 the Santa Fe Railway System 
handled 2,069,315 carloads of freight of which 1.052.544 cars 
were loaded on the company's lines, and 416.771 were received 
From connections. Of the total shipments, the Santa Fe 
handled 102,488 cars of fruit, vegetables and other perishable 
freight. Maintenance of cars and proper distribution are es- 
sential elements in a system of this sort. 

* * * 

— The Builders' Exchange of San Francisco regards the re- 
• em pri clamation of the union carpenters that they will not 
work with non-union men as a breach of the American Flan 
and will meet any effort to upset present arrangements with a 
campaign for the open shop. 

* * * 

— Bradford Kimball and Co. have announced that they are 
the exclusive agents in Northern California for the handling 
of "insured Mortgage Bonds and Certificates." These bonds 
and certificates are distributed by a nation-wide group of in- 
vestment hankers. 

* * * 

— The Federal Court has recently held that where damage 
i" cargo resul s fn m rain driven against it by the force of the 
win I. the wind, which is a peril of the sea. is the proximate 
cause. The o her side had contended that rain, being fresh 
water, was not a peril of the sea. 

* * * 

— School bond issue of March 1st, l'>23. lb the amount of 
$6,000,000 were sold this month to a syndicate headed by the 
Anglo-London- Paris Company for $6,329,340 and accrued in- 
terest thereon at date of delivery. 

* * * 

— The Hoard of Supervisors has appropriated $150,00 
of the County Road Fund toward the widening of the "bottle- 
neek" south of Colma on the peninsula highway. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1925 

Assets $107,232,609.22 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,250,000.00 

Employees* Pension Fund over 525,000.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH H.-hkIu and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONZ-QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

VValte W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Douglas 2244 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid l|i Capital K^d.lMlil.iKln *20,000,000 Renerve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, BNG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND. ORB.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San FranclMco Olllce: 450 Cnllfornln Street 
BRUCE in: vi iii (i i i: \\ . J. i in i/i ii mid 

Manager Aast. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

w.-iwt ICTURBRS Of 
RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

PLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 
.Sun PrnnclM Calif. I.oh AneeleM. Calif. 

444 ihirk.i Street r,7i7 Santa Fe Avenne 



MADE TO ORDER ONLY 






Shirts 

Pajamas 

Night Rob is 






1 



ii 



l.argf Assortment of I m port til Fabric 
5 Kearny Street Phone K.f\r\v 3714 



February 13, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Id 



Travel Tid-Bits 

By Ernest F. Rixon 



Through the Panama Canal to Europe 

INTENDING trayelers to Europe this spring, not in any 
particular hurry to reach Europe, will be well advised to 
travel on the new Cunard steamer "Franconia" leaving San 
Francisco, May 8th and Los Angeles May 10th, calling at 
Cristobal (through the Panama Canal) Balboa, Havana, 
and New York, remaining in New York for three days; the 
steamer after calling at Boston arrives in Liverpool June 
7th. The minimum fare, first class throughout, is $445, 
which rate includes shore excursions at Panama Canal ports 
and Havana. The "Franconia" is 024 feet in length has 
gross tonnage of 20,000 and displacement tonnage of 28,700. 

The "Franconia" is quite new, comfortable and luxurious 
and has given complete satisfaction to those accustomed to 
the best in travel. One of the most striking aspects of the 
"Franconia" is the lavishness of space devoted to the en- 
joyment of travelers. The beautiful sports arena which oc- 
cupies some 5000 square feet is really a floating stadium, as 
it consists of an immense swimming pool, with many in- 
dividual dressing rooms, as well as a large number of shower 
baths with all the latest appointments. ( In the right of 
the swimming tank is a full squash court running up 
through two decks, and on the left a gymnasium fitted with 
every kind of indoor sporting apparatus, and the entire 
stadium is in charge of an expert, in each separate depart- 
ment. 

Since the "Franconia" is primarily a cruise ship, even 
though she makes many transatlantic trips each year, her 
stateroom accommodations had to be, and were, meticu- 
lously thought out. I lot and cold running water makes the 
staterooms as adaptable to comfort as a room in the finest 
hotel. Generous dressing tables and wardrobes large 

enough to satisfy the n,eids of the most fastidious woman; 
any number of private bathrooms; little conveniences such 

as electric fans, and bedsteads with quilted satin fittings, 

instead of ordinary bunks all of these help to build up the 

outstanding personality of the "Franconia," which is re- 
garded by all who have traveled on her, in the affectionate 
spirit in which one regards a cherished abode. 

This ship will be completing a 'round-the-world cruise. 
and a number of passengers have intimated their intentions 
of staying over in California and traveling overland to .New 
York. There is therefore an opportunity to replace these 
with a limited number of through passengers from San 
Francisco and Los Angeles to Liverpool. Early application 

is therefore advisable and necessary, as desirable space is 
extremely limited. 

Some travelers may find the 
to their requirements and to 
recommend the Panama Mail 
line operates the "\ enezuela," 
lombo" from San Francisco to New York, calling 
Angeles Harbor, Manzanillo, Champerico, San Jose D« 
Guatemala, Acapnia. I. a Libertad, Corinto, Balboa, Cristo- 
bal and Havana, or the Panama Pacific Line which company 
operates the "Manchuria." the "Mongolia" and the "Fin- 
land." On account of the frequent sailings of the various 
lines from New York almost immediate connection can be 
made for European ports. 

Mam travelers may not wish to go through to New York 
and connection can lie usually made with a lay over of a 
day or two at the Panama Canal with the Royal Mail Steam 
Packet Company's famous "O" steamers for Spanish. 
French ami British ports. The Royal Mail Steam Packet 
Company also operate steamers (carrying a limited num- 



"Franconia" date not suitable 
these passengers we would 
Steamship Company, which 
the "Ecuador," and the "Co 



ber of passengers from San Francisco directly through the 
Panama Canal to European ports. 

In addition to the above United American Line, the Hol- 
land-American Line and the Johnson Line operate a regu- 
lar service between San Francisco and Europe. 

It is necessary to make immediate application for accom- 
modation as all steamers to Europe this season are already 
rapidly filling. 

Communications should be addressed to the San Fran- 
cisco News Letter or Ernest F. Rixon, General Agent, 
Messrs. Dean & Dawson, Ltd., 544 Market Street, San 
Francisco. 



France might reach deeper in her pockets if she didn't 
have a sword in her hand. — West Palm Beach Post. 
* * * 

It is reported that eggs are used in Armenia as currency. 
It must be a messy job getting cigarets out of a slot-ma- 
chine. — Punch. 



AT SINGLETON'S 

Albtj (Eat 

CLUB LUNCH INN 



A Nice Hot Business 

Lunch 
Delicious Sandwiches 
Tasty Salads 

A Wonderful Crab Louie 
Home-Made Pies and 
Good Coffee 

Lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 





Escorted and 
Indep endent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 18"! 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general oAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2342 



r„. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 13. 1926 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

from the Ea.st in time to give an address at the ground- 
breaking ceremonies. 

With the turning of the first spadeful of earth, Mrs. Ed- 
ward Dexter Knight, President of the association, will make 
the formal dedicatory address in behalf of the women 
builders. Mrs. Minna Gauley will act as master of cere- 
monies, assisted by Mesdames Charles Hawkins. D. E. F. 
Easton. Henry Sahlein and Mrs. Albert W. Stokes. 

Mrs. D. C. Heger, Chairman of the Building Committee 
and other members of the Board of Directors, will serve 
during the afternoon as an informal reception committee. 
An invitation has been extended the public to attend the 

ceremonies. 

* * * 

La Gaiete Cotillion 

Handsome little announcement cards of flaming red have 
been sent out by Rosetta Baker this week, calling attention 
to the valentine party which will take place on Saturday 
evening, February 13, in the Gold ballroom of the Fairmont 
Hotel, when this month's La Gaiete Cotillion will welcome 
the guests. 

Mrs. Baker, the genial hostess, aims to make this valen- 
tine's party exceptionally attractive with favors of hearts 
and other appropriate symbols of the sentimental season, 
used in the decorative scheme. 



GOLF 

(Continued from Page 10) 



estate, which is overlooked by a palatial mansion the "Crest." 

When completed the doctors will celebrate the opening with 

a golf tournament, this will be the only privately owned 

18-rfole golf course in California and Dr. Max Rothchild is 

looking forward to the opening celebration with much 

pride. 

* * * 

Banquet Big Success 

A successful banquet followed the tournament, there 
were sixteen who signed up to stay and sixty swapped yarns 
across the banquet board. Possibly this big attendance was 
the result of the big reputation that Mrs. Williams, the man- 
ager of the club has for preparing toothsome tidbits; what 
ever it was they all enjoyed themselves. 

The novelty of the evening was that there was no chair- 
man appointed so Dr. Herman Schlagater had a good chance 
to continue his speech of a year ago. Dr. Sumner Hardy 
gave an interesting talk on world tennis players. Dr. Hardy 
is a big booster for Helen Wills, thinks that she will win 
from Suzanne if they ever meet. Dr. Brooks offered 3 to 1 
they never will. Dr. Alfred McNulty was there with his 
hair parted in the middle and said never a word. Dr. DeArcv 
Quinn was the life of the party. At the stroke of twelve 
bells the doctors and dentists decided to call it a clay and 
everyone went home happy. 

At the Pebble Beach course on Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday, the Pacific Coast Plumbing Supply Jobbers held 
their annual golf tournament, and in spite of heavy rains, 
the course was in excellent condition and some very com- 
mendable cards were turned in. 

M. M. McElwaine of Seattle, proved to be the outstanding 
player in a field of 30 and won the qualifying round with 
a card of 78-4-74. while W. S. Babson of Portland was 
runner-up with a card of 92-17-75. 

The first sixteen men who qualified were as follows: 

McElwaine, Seattle 78 4 

Babson, Portland 92 17 

Mcllreevy, San Francisco 91 

Day, Sacramento 94 

Vance, San Diego 101 



Dalziel, San Francisco 103 

Durkee, Los Angeles 105 

Robertson, San Francisco 118 

Cruickshank, Seattle 113 

Goodmon, Los Angeles 113 

Geddes,. Los Angeles 116 

Baxter, Pasadena 113 

Hacker, Los Angeles 1 19 

Byrnes, Los Angeles 132 

Shinn. Los Angeles 134 

Boy n ton, Los Angeles 12c8 

FINALS 
FIRST FLIGHT— McElwaine (0) won from Day (4) by 

default. 

FINALS 
SECOND FLIGHT— Dalziel (0) defeated Durkee (0) 2 

and 1. 



18 


85 


18 


87 


30 


88 


22 


91 


22 


91 


25 


91 


20 


93 


24 


95 


30 


102 


30 


104 


22 


106 






LARKINS DUCO 
Has Lustre 

Combined with lustre, it possesses a durability that 
is amazing. Be sure of a good job. 

Prices reasonable 

LARKINS & CO. 

First Avenue at Geary Street 





TflL. FRANKLIN 398R 

il «-in I Work Apper- 
taining to Aatomo- 
blleH — Oxy-Acetyiene 
WeldlnK — lllnck- 
■mltMnff, 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates: 35c per day] 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floor* for Service and Storage of Automobile* 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

rocker llulldlnK (Opposite Palace Ho tell. Son FrnnclMro 

Phone Kearny 391 




DENMAN GARAGE 



loralion for cluli mrmhrr \ 



February 13. 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
Nntlonal Automobile Club 

NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CLUB 

IT IS not provincialism that prompts 
an admiration for the historical back- 
ground which belongs to California. It 
is rather the realization that human in- 
terest enters largely into the pleasure of 
touring. Europe has capitalized on every 
stick and stone about which any frag- 
ment of a story may be woven. The 
path of the continental traveler is over 
the well-beaten routes wb^ch history and 
romance have brought into the limelight. 
California has a great opportunity in 
making capital out of her Indian legends, 
her Mission era. the Bear Flag revolu- 
tion and the thrilling days of '49. 

The pageant is a most excellent way 
of bringing back the atmosphere of the 
early days. I lemet plans a Ramona pag- 
eant for April and it will bring thou 
of visitors from every part of the state. 
Helen Hunt Jackson's great novel has 
done a great deal to in crest the world in 
California. The Mission Ray of San Ga- 
briel is another attractive method of visu- 
alizing the history of the state. The Fi- 
esta in I .os Angeles, the Portola in San 

Francisco, the celebrations of the lions 
of Peralta in Oakland, all are great pub- 
licity features for California. Most of 
the residents of ibis state are not familiar 
with the background of history which 
California possesses and the tourist is 

always more interested in the human fac- 
tors in the upbuilding of the country than 
the scenic wonderlands so often featured 
by our propaganda writt 

Know California! Travel its storied 
routes prepared to find history and ro- 
mance wherever you go. Delve into the 
lore of California and you will find a 
greater delight in its scenic aspect 



i ioing touring? The season is already 
on in California. A few clouds in the 
sky, the dust all laid by the recent rains, 
the wild flowers already peeping out of 
the meadow grass and the atmosphere 
redolent of the approaching spring, you 
can find no better season for touring than 
now. The ground hog cast himself a 
good shadow on February 2, so it bodes 
well for the year's touring. 

Here are a few briefs that may sug- 
gest some objectives for. your early spring 
touring: 

One of the most scenic trips in the 
state is the San Marco road from Santa 
Ynez to Goleta. This road has recently 
been opened and is in good condition. 

The river route from Madera to Yo- 
semite Valley is passable to Oakhurst. 

The Raymond Road from Madera to 
Yosemite is open as far as Cedar Brook. 

The Mother Lode Highway is holding 
up unusually well under the recent heavy 
storms. The road from Jackson to 
Angels Camp via Mokelumne Hill and 
San Andreas is being traveled regularly 
and reported fairly good for this season 
of the year. While chains are not neces- 
sary on this road, it is good policy t< i 
have them along. The road from Angels 
Cam]) to Sonora is somewhat slippery 
but entirely passable. 

Contrary to reports which have been 
recently circulated, the new Merced Can- 
yon Road into Yosemite National Park 
is not open to automobile traffic. A nar- 
row advance trail was opened several 
weeks ago over which machinery and 
supplies have been moved forward. This 
has since been closed by blasting. The 
road beyond Briceburg is positively close I 
to traffic and will not lie opened until 
the highway is completed sometime next 
summer. 



Reconstruction Work on 
Redwood Highway 

Nearly six miles of additional re- 
construction work on the Redwood 
Highway in Sonoma I ounty was pro- 
vided for by the California Highway 
Commission, when it approved an ex- 
tension of the contract of J. P.. (ial- 
braith for the construction of a "seeond- 
Story" cement pavement from Santa 
Rosa northward to Mark West (.'reek, 
a distance of approximately ?.~ miles. 
The existing pavement will be widened 
feet and thickened. 

Galbraith is now completing the sec- 
tion from Mark West (reek to Healds- 
burg. and the extension of his contract 
will mean the continuation of the work 
southward as soon as weather permits, 
saving of two months' time by the 
elimination ><i advertising for bids is 
expected to result in completion of the 
section before the period of heavy sum- 
mer traffic. State Highway Engineer 
R. M. Morton reported. 



At the Elder Gallery 

Dr. Charles Upson Clark, formerly 
Director of the American Academy in 
Rome, and widely traveled, will give 
an illustrated lecture in the Paul Elder 
Gallery, Saturday afternoon, February 
20th at 2:30 o'clock on "France and 
Spain in Morocco." He will sketch the 
romantic history of Morocco and show 
pictures of its grim mountains and pic- 
turesque inhabitants. 

Dr. Clark's annual visit to San Fran- 
cisco and his scholarly and interesting 
pictures are pleasantly anticipated by 
many who have heard him. 



Each Saturday forenoon at 1 1 o'clock 
a Story Hour and Appreciation of 
Books for boys and girls is given by 
Miss Sadie Hoffman in the Paul Elder 
Gallery. Tlie programs are varied, 
sometimes including siereopticon slide 
travel pictures and illustrated visits to 
the art galleries of Europe. There is 
no admission charge. 



Old Lady — What was the score? 
Apple — Nothing to nothing. 
"Then I didn't miss anything!" 
— Boston Beanpot. 




-tie better it geb 




GBO. \V. ( \s\\ i i i 

Suiter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

l.HOO.lHMl rup- fVCTC served at (he Pana 
Pacific Internatlonnl F.*po*f t Itirt 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 13, 1926 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 
from Aaron Hoffman's famous stage 
play, "Two Blocks Away," and was di- 
rected by Harry Pollard for Universal. 
It is a story of New York's east side 
and centers mainly around a Jewish 
and Irish family residing there. The 
cast includes Vera Gordon, George 
Sidney. Charles Murray and Kate 

Price. 

* * * 

Granada 

Eddie Peabody comes to the Gra- 
nada lo replace Verne Buck, who goes 
to Los Angeles to appear at the Metro- 
politan Theater there. It is the plan 
of the new management at this theater 
to present Peabody in one of the most 
elaborate stage productions ever given 

here. 

* * * 

Loew's Warfield 

The attraction this week at the War- 
field is an important one, being no less 
than Vincente Ibanez' story "The Tor- 
rent." which has just finished in serial 
form in one of our newspapers. There 
is a splendid cast of players to inter- 
pret this powerful story, under the 
able direction of Monta Bell. Ricardo 
Cortez has the leading part, and 
Greta Garbo, the celebrated Swedish 
screen beauty, plays the leading femi- 
nine role. There are many thrills, one 
of the greatest of these being a sensa- 
tional flood which wipes away a Span- 
ish village with a daring rescue by 
Cortez. 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 11) 
and local broadcasting stations. For 
poor locations, or what is known as 
"dead spots," this is an ideal radio set. 

Instead of a three-stage amplifier, the 
manufacturers have added the sixth tube 
to the Radio frequency or to the part of 
the set where it is the most neele 1. The 
audio frequency or the loud speaker am- 
plifier is a two stage audio which gives 
sufficient volume for any needs. 

The reproduction is all any one can 
hope for in a radio set, either on distant 
or local broadcasting stations an 1 an un- 
surpassed reception will he received. The 
manufacturers, after two years of re- 
search and having overcome great diffi- 
culties, have produced the "toroid" or 
closed field inductances, which is per- 
fected for radio use. In the "Counter- 
phase" Six, these coils are employed as 
radio frequency transformers and are 
called the I'.-T Torostyle Transformer. 
They reduce local pick-up to a minimum, 
— inter-magnetic coupling and strav fee 1 
backs being eliminated entirely. 

The "Counterphase" Six employs an 
outside aerial to the best advantage. I low- 
ever, it reproduces well with an indoor 
antenna. It has four tuned circuits, each 



tuned with a condenser. There are two 
tuning dials which makes the handling 
of the set a very simple matter. In ad- 
dition to this, the set is equipped with two 
small trimmers (midget condensers I at- 
tached at the side of the condensers, 
which have the same effect as veneers. 
This makes the set very selective on any 
station. 

\'o trouble will be experience 1 with 
the "Counterphase" Six due to harmonics, 
or to stations coming in at the wrong 
settings of the dials, which is character- 
istic of some sets. 

The tuning is even more simplified by 
the addition of a unique mechanical ar- 
rangement of the dials eliminating back- 
lash entirely. The rotating pointer in- 
dicates wavelength readings, and all the 
pull and side strains on the condenser 
shifts are eliminated. 

The sockets are the B-T Universal 
Sockets and take the old Navy base tube 
as well as the new UX tubes. 

The condensers are the B-T Tandem 
condensers. They have an excellent de- 
sign with dual control from a single dial, 
with a shielding plate which prevents in- 
tercoupling between the stators. 

The transformers are well made from 
excellent materials and are capable of 
handling every note on the scale. 

In the "Counterphase" Six is a radio 
set that embo lies everything that one 
could desire. It has beauty of design. 
is a high-class piece of work in every de- 
tail and is a set that will give the best 
performance that it is possible to secure 
under the present broadcasting conditions. 
The Radio staff of the News Letter 
would be pleased to send further details 
regarding the "Counterphase" Six upon 
request. 

* * * 

< In Sun lay evening. February 14. 
Allan McQuhae, the celebrate 1 Irish 
tenor, will be heard over station KPO, 
m the Forty-first \twater-Kent Artists' 
program. I lis appearance is under the 
direction of Ernest [ngold, Inc., San 
Francisci >. 

* * * 

"Community Health and Safety Talks" 
are being given by Mrs. I). E. F. Easton, 
chairman of the Women's Division, Cali- 
fornia Development Association, as a 
weekly feature over KFRC at 5 o'clock 
everj Monday. 

I ler first talk which was given on Mon- 
day, February 8th was on the subject of 
"( Ten Windows." 



McCormack's Recital 
John McCormack's westward jour- 
ney thus far this season has been 
marked by encomiums from press ami 
public such as even he never before re- 
ceived. Competent critics and delight- 
ed audiences everywhere he sang have 
united in testifying that there has been 
no impairment of his vocal charm. 



"Since it was last heard here, the Mc- 
Cormack voice has gathered beauty, 
strength and sweetness" was the tribute 
recently bestowed by the Pittsburg 
"Telegram's" music expert, and it fairly 
reflects the opinion expressed by other 
reviewers. 

Booked by Frank W. Healy for a 
song recital the evening of March IS 
in the Exposition Auditorium, the pop- 
ular tenor will sing some songs which 
his public invariably demands and also 
which are less familiar to his San Fran- 
i isco admirers. 



The Wind Instrument Ensemble 

That a great interest in wind instru- 
ments has been awakened is apparent 
by the number of new works that are 
being written for this instrumentation 
and the number of new organizations 
of this kind that are being formed. 
Detroit is the latest city to add such 
an ensemble to its musical activities. 

The Wind Instrument Ensemble of 
San Francisco is the only one of these 
organizations that includes the piano 
as an integral part of its personnel and 
renders works written for wind instru- 
ments and piano in addition to those 
compositions for wind instruments 
alone. 

Lulu J. Blumberg, the manager of 
the organization announces an unusual 
and beautiful program for the next con- 
cert on Friday evening. February 19th 
in the ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel. 

The program will consist of the first 
American performances of Walter Gie- 
seking's Quintet for piano and four 
wind instruments and Th. Blumer's 
lovely Sextet in original theme with 
variations in suite form for piano and 
five wind instruments. Percy Grain- 
ger's Wanderlied or Walking-Tune will 
be among the works to be played. 
< Irainger, when he was in San Fran- 
cisco last year, asked that the Ensem- 
ble play his work. Klughardt's fine 
quintet for wind instruments alone and 
a duet for flute and clarinet with piano 
accompaniment will complete this rare 
program. 



Good As New 

Careful Buyer: "Why are they sell- 
ing their home?" 

Estate .Agent: "Why, they really 
have no use for it any more; they're 
away all day for work; they're at the 
pictures every night and after that thev 
dance till dawn."— B. II. S. Torch. 



"That must be a warm member you 
introduced me to last night. I asked 
her if I could take her home." 

"Yes?" 

"Ami she asked me wdiere my folks 
were." — Yellow Jacket. 



February 13, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



Mr. Blabbitt on Marriage 



Grocer — Don't you find that a l>al>y brightens up a house- 
hold wonderfully ? 

Woman Customer— Yes, we have the electric lights go- 
ing most of the time now. — Progressive Grocer. 



MARRIAGE as it is known today seems to make one of 
three things out of a man or woman — a jailer, a 
pace-maker, or a timeclock. The only enjoyable one of the 
three is the fourth. What it shall be depends upon a per- 
son's character, inclinations and hallucinations. 

Marriage usually originates with an inoffensive clerk in 
a county court house, who fills out blank licenses with neces- 
sary information for a small consideration. The chief virtue 
of this individual is that he gives his patrons no advice. 
Neither, usually does the person officiating at the subse- 
quent ceremony. Advice is a post-marital commodity often 
dispensed in wholesale lots to small retailers, who have 
no facilities for carrying it in stock, few dollars and very- 
little sense. 

There are as many kinds of marriages in the world as 
there are couples — mercenary marriages, love matches, box- 
ing matches, titular bouts, and just plain marriages. The 
latter type, perhaps, is most prolific in the production of 
that heart-depressant known as "married life." Nowadays 
this once prevalent ailment is very seldom fatal, due to the 
increasingly independent spirit of both sexes. There are 
probably" more walk-outs from the great American home 
yearly, than there are from the great coal mines of Pennsyl- 
vania. Miners wear torches on their caps, because where 
all is coal there can be no light. Both sides to the marriage 
problem feel that where there is nothing but bone there 
i an be no light either. 

Newspaper editors have fixed it so that, for from three to 
five cents, women can procure their daily dose of advice 
in love and its by-products, through the perusal of articles 
on both states of existence of the human animal - singleness 
or doubleness. 

Marriage has come to be the butt of jokesters, the sub 
ject of dry lectures and spicy talks, the cause for publication 
of numerous cheap magazines on its alleged problems, and 
the reason lor more battles than the Treaty of Locarno will 
ever prevent. Some immortal or unmoral person once called 
the wives of men "balls and chains." Xo longer does the 
witticism fit, for wives have turned the ball into a balloon 
and, on the slightest provocation, will cut the rope. Whether 
or not the latter hangs them all depends upon their view- 
point on life- on u hither ihcv get dizzy in the ascent, and 
on whether their parachute works. At any rate, the erst- 
while husbands arc due to get quite some Jolts when bal- 
last bags are dropped. with unerring aim. I Mten these bal- 
loon-lighteners are money bags, known in modern parlance 
as alimony. 

Single girls as a rule envy married women ; and vice versa, 
after some time has elapsed. Single men don't know what 
to think and married men can't think reasonably — s,, their 
wives saw Certain famous men had more than one wife 
at the same time, tor this procedure was sanctioned by their 
belief. Men and women of the present have more than one 
wife or husband at different times because of their dis- 
belief. 

But, withal, it would be just as silly to say there will be 
no more marriages as it is to sing that favorite old ditty, 
"It Ain't doing to Rain No More" in Florida, in the sum- 
mertime. Both rain and marriage are seasonal and this 
June will have its bumper crop as past Junes have had. The 
crop oi divorces varies with the temperature of American 
homes After all. marriage is somewhat <<i a picnic: and 
inst as insects persist in investigating picnic food. SO people 
joy snooping in marital affairs. Like walking, it is a 
cheap but dangerous pastime 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Ad.JOININO WlI.KES AND CuRRAN THEATERS 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^ 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
■ DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 



WIGS and TRANSFORMATIONS 

Also toupees of my make can be worn day or night, 
because I make them ventilated and porous, from the 
finest and purest hair. 

G. LEDERER 

561 Sutter St., Between Powell and Mason Sts. 
San Francisco, California. 

Firm Established 1866 



El Dorado Hotel 

SONOMA, i \ LIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Onr Specially — "Steaka with Hvahroomii*' 

I > LhMfi, dun Evarytblni 

Vbll - >' mi Connlj rt ind Mineral »ft jr „, ftiirri Swim 

Tank Fn m Thk Hot*) 

H.ir. ExcepltauD) Rcuentblt 

Telephone tin 



Scientific cleanliness is exemplified by 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
250 Twelfth .^t.. 5am 1 rvncisco Thong Market 916 J 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

-.■■!. l*rr..r,i B* Band Oal>— Sotb Called Pai a».) Dalivarad 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



f'a'itmn f'vinc aft ( Iranmt 



-mil i 
1 - \ l«< I U Until 



-IS } KIM |MO 

Pawn PaAna.ua 2310 



AGU A C ALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 



It s the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- f 

hfl Radio-active, bo, sulphur waler tub baths and swim- J 

i Firerrool note'. Write tor booklet. T. H. COR- { 

t CORAM. Agua Caliente. Sonoma County, or see PeckJudah t 



18 



WIELAND'S BREW 

WITH YOUR MEALS— IT HELPS 

Order by the case from your grocer 

Established 186ft 

Main OHice, 240 Second Street, San Francisco, Culif. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 671 



E,, PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
_ _ _ _ printer or sta- 

^■U'.'HinXITUni tloner^ to 



samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 FlrHt Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

"Our Airplane Dash for the 
North Pole" 

Captain R o a 1 d Amundsen, pic- 
turesque hero of the recent dash to the 
North Pole by airplane, will be in San 
Francisco to give one lecture on Feb- 
ruary 14, on Sunday, at the Columbia 
Theatre at 2:30 p.m. He will show 
moving pictures taken by his party 
within a few miles of the North Pole. 
This will be his only appearance in 
San Francisco. 

Honored hy the World 

On the return of the expedition the 
whole world united in paying tribute 
to Captain Amundsen, the fact being 
recognized that it was largely due to 
his dauntless courage and resourceful- 
ness that he and his companions had 
effected their escape from the grip of 
the Polar Sea. It was also •agreed that 
while he failed to reach the North Pole 
in an airplane, he had succeeded in 
making important observations, and in 
pointing the way for future aerial navi- 
gators. The first man, in fact, who 
reaches the Pole by air will simply fol- 
low where Amundsen has led. 

( In his way down the Norwegian 
Coast Captain Amundsen received a 
continuous ovation, and at Oslo, the 
Norwegian capital, his native city, he 
was overwhelmed with honors. Among 
the hundreds of congratulatory mes- 
sages that he received from all parts 
of the world were large numbers from 
his admirers in the United States. 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHOXES: 



Son Franc-lsco- 
West 7IK1 



lliirliim:.iii<- 



Phone Sutter 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

{Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCK.MAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

308 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



San Francisco Office 

875 FOLSOM ST. 

PrfONEi 



Palo alto Office: 

818 Emerson St. 



Kearny 644-645 Palo Alto 315-J 

SAN MATEO— PHONE 12S4-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

[ San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



Astronomical Lecture 

"The Solar System and the Planets" 
is the subject of an astronomical lec- 
ture by Dr. \Y. F. Meyer, Associate 
Professor of Astronomy in the Univer- 
sity of California, on Monday eveing. 
February 15th, in the auditorium of the 
Pacific (las and Electric Building, 245 
Market Street. The solar system is of 
special interest to us since our earth 
is one of its members. The planets 
are our nearest neighbors and if they 
are inhabitable, we will want to know 
about it. .Mars and Venus seem to be 
the most promising ones and special 
reference will be made to recent results 
obtained by astronomers from a study 
of the atmosphere and temperature of 
these planets. 



George C Homer s. A. T.oiej 

Garfield 2024 

The Homer System 

BOOKKEEPING— COLLECTIONS 



Installment, Current Delinquent Accounts, Legal Aid. 

AudittSyttemt. Financial Statements, Income Tax 

Report*. Bookkeeping (Part Timo Service) 



"1 



February 13, 1926 

Absent-minded parson (to disconso- 
late widower) : "Well, Mr. Brown, 
how is your wife standing the heat this 
summer?" — Panther. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Ofllce and Works 1025 MiHflfon St. 

Phone Market 71)13 

n rrni. I. OHIce: 7. in Sutter St. 

(Hotel Canterbury Bide.) 

Phone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 




N W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




NEW ORLEANS 

To better serve our many friends and patrons 
over 'joo.cooiw has been expended in recon- 
struction and rehabilitation to maintain this 
famous hostelry as 

One of America's Leading Hotels 

The large well ventilated lu^h ceiling rooms 
have been retained and modernized'*'--^ 

ACCOMMODATING OVER 1000 GUESTS 

Send fbi'Dcmmtive Hotel folder: 

HIusautcdMardH^Ph^ram for the asking 

Alfred S. Aimer, and Co.atd. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA 

"^Ticket Offices of all Transportation lino in lobby 



III ]fOI M. Bl ILNIVC 



S»n Francisco 





WHERE TO DINE 

Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place { 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, $1.00 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00,$1.50 a la cacle I 

Dancing 7:00 P. M. to 1:00 A. M. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE ! 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 




ICE CREA 

CANDY 
PASTRY 



^ l 



£ CALIFORNIA STS 
Craystone 
3100 310] 3102 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that n vigorous brushing: once or twice a day is 
taking very good care of them, Hrumhing; is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only n 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as jsou Imagine. A toothache means 
(rouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will eost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks oil all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and EMdy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Gnrfleld 335 

SPECIALISTS — F.itrartimis; Crowns; Self Cleaning Bridges; 

Poreelain Work and Roofless Plates 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 




Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



'A^Sd. 



334 Sutter St. 



Douclas 7118 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic. 









44R Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast. 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50— Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing: rooms ror banquets and parlies, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



OTnrr.ll and f> I A M f (~\ » C Phn„, 

Ink,,, Si.. ULlrtll V/V »J Franklin 

l.iinrlicnn |ll;.'lft t., '2 p. ml f .T.*> N.. \ i-rlm Sfcovtd Irjw lh* Cil* With 

Smnlny Luncheon 1.1*1 .,m llinina bo the Fmot C.f. 

Di i. Week l'i«- SI -SO In imrrira 

Dinner, Smul .■ > - end Rolideyi 1.7S 

n \M IM. *1 Mill l\ I N1NCS 

m T f~\ /• X" ft JPT Featuring Southern Cooking 

l\l \^/ UX. A A. *3 ll:»0a. m."to 1:00 p. m. 

v m. to 8:30 p. m 
/* Tf~% YS' Sundays and Holidays 

£A #»T #•! i 30 to s SO p m. only 

-^ A- -* V Jt 3L. 1 IIKI.II KVKItV llllMIll 

I M Thin! Avenue. S\\ HATBO llnlf llloek from MltnntlT 







14-Mixi Htu 'I 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OI'IN 8 1X1 A. M. TO 11:00 P. II. 

i ^surpassed cinsna 

Carl Leomiardt 

formtrh ./ 
Cldrn Cat. Park Caiina 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 



PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 
Hours: 9-12, 1-5 
980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., 
Phone Garfield 5394 



San Francisco 



I Make yourself at horn- at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 
The Home of the Book Lov.-r 
I Rare BookB — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

I Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root. Morrell. etc.. of London 
| Commissions In London Executed 

j Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

I Phone Kearny 6816 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtaint-d j 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAIL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif, j 



DR. B. W. HAINES 

DENTIST 
Elkan Gunst Building 
323 Geary at Powell Hours: 9 to 4 

San Francisco Telephone Douglas 2949 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.. 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

239 Chtra Jill* CllilH ft*4 



I 



I 



Close-ups of the Great 
and the Near-Great 



Meet them face to face in The 
Chronicle Rotagravure — the 
dramatic figures cf the world's 
news. 

Interesting people in all ranks 
of life — beautiful scenes from 
many lands — thrilling events of 
land, sea, and air — all are as- 
sembled in The Sunday 



§>att IFranriHrn 



A 



lT this season of 
the year, bills as a rule 
are higher due to longer 
lighting hours and more 
heating hours. 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 




(fttjroturte 



"PACIFIC SERVlCf 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 



ROTAGRAVURE 




Thetr watchword is smiling courtesy. — This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 

$ RATES— Ver 'Day, single, €uropean Wan 



The unlit 
for Theatres 
'Bankt, Shop* 

^Please •write 
for 'Booklet 



120 rooms with running water 
220 rooms wiih bath 
160 rooms with bath 



S2.50 to $4.00 
3.50 to 5.00 
6.00 to 8.00 



N 



Double $4.00 up 

Also a number of large and beautiful rooms and 
suites, some in period furnishings with grand piano, 
fire place and bath, $10 00 up. 



LARGE AND WELL EOUIPPED SAMPI E ROOMS 

[WUCHO QOLF CLUB] 

I available to all guestsJ 

HAROLD E. LATHROP 
Manager 



1# 



HOTEL/ 






ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles 



Golden Gate Ferry 
Company 



WINTER SCHEDULE 


EFFECTIVf 


October 

s 


1, 1925 


Leave Sausalito 




Leave San Francisco 


5:00 a.m. 

6:00 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:00 p.m. 




5:30 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:30 p.m. 


Then 




Then 


11 :00 p. m. 

12:00 p.m. 

1 :00 a. m. 




11:30 p.m. 

12:30 a.m. 

1:30 a.m. 



Saturdays and Sundays Only 
2:00 a.m. 2:30 a.m. 

ON SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

There will be extra trips if traffic warrants. 

A. O. Stewart Harry E. Speas 

President Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



%J 



INtWS AND PROGRAM 

ESTABLISHES JULY 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20th, 192 




Established 1897 

361 Sutter St., above Grant Ave. 
Garfield 6973 



J OR 28 years we have featured 
exclusively in manufacturing 
high-grade Reed Furniture, 
and specialties. 



A large assortment ot 
Imported Grass Rugs 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



We 

renovate 

Reed 

Furniture 

with our new 

Celluloid Finish 

Process. 

Will not peel, 

crack or 

chip. 




MOHAWKS 

Co Farther/ 




CLASS 

QUALITY 

DURABILITY 




If you are interested in Real High Grade Tires — 
Then we recommend 

MOHAWK 
CORDS 

BALLOON OR HIGH PRESSURE 

A Plan You'll Like 

We have always held to the plan of selling tires 

and giving service that make our customers 

want to come back for more 



MOHAWK RUBBER CO. of NEW YORK 

AKRON, OHIO 
731 Bryant Street, San Francisco 

INGERSOLL SALES and SERVICE CO. 

524 Van Ness Avenue SAN FRANCISCO Phone Hemlock 4774 




Ert.bll.htd July «0, 1554 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco -News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr.. from 1884 to 1926. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 225 Montgomery St., San Francisco. California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. PostorRce as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $6.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year. $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., FEBRUARY 20, 1926 



No. 8 



From One Thing to Another 



By Eleanore F. Ross 



Our Helen Wills is a good loser, and that is a splendid 
quality for a sportswoman or man to possess, and tends to-' 

ward future success. 

* * * 

When the Earl of Craven first spoke in derogatory terms 
of the woman who had been his mistress, he showed con- 
clusively what a "rotter" he was. 

* * * 

En passant, and apropos of the society fuss that Lady 
Diana Manners evoked in the Windy City lately, when she 
failed to appear at a reception given especially in her honor, 
we think she is not living up to her name. 

* * * 

"No jury means freedom"; this is the slogan of the Chi- 
cago No-Jury Society of Artists. We arc wondering what 
the society's definition of "freedom" is, in the face of the 

work of ultra modernists. 

* * * 

"The great Chaliapin is a good mixer." remarked Harold 
Pracht, manager of a well-known music store, the otrjer 

day. "lie was very friendly while here in this city, with 
'yours truly' and now he is hobnobbing with the Duchess 
of Rutland* mother of Lady Diana, in Chicago." 

* * * 

Col. William Mitchell is experiencing the usual fate of 
the advocate of a new movement, whether that movement 
be successful or a failure. In this instance, his revelations 
of the nation's weakness in air power ha- stirred the govern- 
ment to action, although the critic himself i- suffering for 

his temerity. 

* * * 

Dame Convention i> generally mosl inconsistent. 

instance, a woman mav invite a man to her home to dinner. 

with perfect propriety; bin everything necessary in the 
way of edibles; perform the task of getting up such a 
meal; extend her services to her guest during the consump- 
tion of the dinner, and clean up afterward-. But if she ask- 
thc man to supper at a restaurant, and pays for his share as 
well as for her own ; in the meantime appreciating the dainty 

service; without having the attendant responsibility of mak- 
ing the affair a success; and quite often, having this pleas- 
ure at a less cost than if she prepared the meal herself— 
then she is transgressing the laws of etiquette. 

* * * 

\ questionnaire being distributed among the voters of 
California, shows a Strong sentiment for light wine- and 
beers: so states William H. Metson, chairman ot the asso- 
ciation against the prohibition amendment. An empire state like 
California, should be capable of making its own laws. 
Surely each state understands its own peculiar needs in the 



matter of jurisprudence, better than a more or less remote 
and unsympathetic government at Washington. The pro- 
hibition question should be put up to popular vote by states. 

* * * 

Anita Whitney, who is an advocate of freedom in all 
its forms, now advocates marriage between "blacks and 
whites." People who preach doctrines of this sort, which 
are at loggerheads with existent laws made for the better- 
ment of the human race, are almost always selfish and 
utterly thoughtless of the sequence which their advocated 
actions would naturally bring about. In this case, if there 
were no legal penalties connected with the union of abso- 
lutely diametrical races, and white people and negros be- 
came promiscuous, there would be the offspring of such 
proceedings to consider, the happiness or unhappiness of 
which Miss Whitney apparently does not give a thought to. 

* * ' * 

A citizen wrote lately to a daily paper, regarding the 
colored race attending school with white children: "I re- 
cently sold my home at a loss, moved to another part of 
town so that my children could go to school where only 
white children were attending. I have been taught my 
lesson, and refuse to buy a home again, for fear such a con- 
dition should rise; now I can fold my tent like the Arab 
and move. 1 do not believe in negro slavery, but I don't 
believe in mixing the races, either." 

* * * 

Hardly a traveler who is cognizant of the strategic posi- 
tion of the Philippines, and who is desirous for the good of 
his own United States, will disagree with our Sam Short- 
ridge, who -ays: "Hold the Philippines!" Aside from any 
sign or symbol of the perennial war cloud that might even- 
tuallv grow "larger than a man's hand." we should con- 
sider the fact that these islands are under a progressive and 
beneficent rule, wherein exploitation (the usual detriment 
attendant on the governing of one race by another I has no 

place whatever. 

» * * 

Dr. Mariana Bertola of this city, president of the Cali- 
fornia Federation of Women's Club-, in a speech made to 
the members of the West Ebel Club in Los Angeles, cited 
the fact that we "put everything in the way of birth of 
American children of American families, yet our institu- 
tions take care o\ the foreign-born mother, free of charge 
when she cannot pay for service." She finished by saying 
that "all hospitals should have children's wards and ma- 
ternity wards." 

We might do well to emulate Australia's example, and 
appropriate a fund for the care of the expectant mother dur- 
ing her period of child bearing. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 20, 1926 




law, which may do much to develop the already growing 

public sentiment against prohibition. 



The case of Harry Court is a sad 
Hit-and-Run Penalty one. He is not a criminal in the 

ordinary sense of the word, as his 
counsel stated at the trial, vet he caused more misery than 
many criminals, and his punishment is greater than has 
fallen to the lot of manv worse men. One cannot say that 
the punishment is too severe or that Judge Buck of San 
Mateo, who pronounced the sentence, erred on the side of 
harshness. 

Harry Court killed a boy with his machine and ran away 
after hitting. He pleaded guilty to the two offenses, man- 
slaughter and hit-and-run. The judge sentenced him to 
indeterminate one to ten years on the manslaughter charge 
and to five years' imprisonment and a fine of $5000 on the 
hit-and-run charge. The two prison sentences may be 
served concurrently. Thus the sentence is not as long as 
it appears. 

It was necessary to make the sentence count as a warn- 
ing. There has been too much shilly-shallying about the 
matter of punishment for careless automobile driving. Too 
manv people have been killed during the past few years, 
needlessly and recklessly. Punishments, which on the face 
appeared' to be adequate, have been reduced by the parole 
board, before the tears were dry on the cheeks of the victim's 
family. The Hogan case in Oakland is one of the most 
discouraging of local cases, and has no doubt had a general 
bad effect throughout the state. It is pitiful that such 
punishments must be, inflicted, but there is no other way to 
protect life and limb. 

As for hit-and-run. — that is altogether inexcusable, and 
should be punished to the limit every time. 



The trouble with the dictator business is 
Mussolini Talks that it requires so much keeping up. As 
soon as a country is pacified by force and 
the dictator is established in his seat, just so soon the oppo- 
sition begins and agitation against the dictator arises. The 
only way that such opposition can be met is by diverting the 
attention of the people, in the first place by magnificence at 
home, and again by conflict, which requires the unopposed 
power of the dictator, for its successful conduct. 

Louis Napoleon, known as Napoleon III, called by Victor 
Hugo "Napoleon the Little," is a very typical example of 
the same sort of thing) as Mussolini is trying to do. He was 
elected president of the French Republic after the stormy 
revolution of 1848, and by a coup d'etat succeeded in mak- 
ing himself emperor. He was hailed with delight by the 
solid business interests, as a bulwark against revolutionary 
attacks which had grown into violence in the Paris dis- 
orders. He first set out to beautify Paris, during a career 
of chicanery and graft almost unparalleled in history 
When he got to the end of his tether in the matter of public 
improvements, he went to war, first, with some degree of 
success, against the Italians, then with utter ruin against 
( iermany. 

Mussolini talks about beautifying Rome. He says that he 
i> going to restore the glories of the Roman Empire and 
make Rome a great modern city. Then, looking around for 
new worlds to conquer, he sees Germany disarmed and help- 
less and proceeds to let loose; his eloquence in a provocative 
and disturbing way. He has the same flag-flapping rhetoric 
as marks nearly all adventurers of his type and talks gran- 
diosely about carrying the Italian flag beyond the Brenner 
Pass. All of which is not to edification. 



The churches are waking up 
The Churches and Volstead rather late to the questions 

involved in the prohibition 
affair, but they are waking with considerable force and 
spirit. Last week we called attention to the movement in 
the Episcopalian Church in favor of temperance as against 
bigoted volsteadism. This week we have to note an even 
stronger drive against the iniquity on the part of some im- 
portant members of the great Roman Catholic communion. 
It is rather strange that neither of these churches has moved 
in the matter before, for the whole prohibition matter puts 
them in a very hard position. Thus, both of the churches 
are sacramental churches, both use wine, with alcoholic 
content. To attack the morality of alcohol in itself is there- 
fore incompatible with a sacrament which employs alcoholic 
wine. 

Apart from that consideration, however, which is none 
the less vital. Very Rev. Monsignor William D. O'Brien, 
LL.D., in a recent publication, says that the Volstead Act 
will be repealed for the benefit of the masses of the people, 
"who are being poisoned and driven into lawlessness by an 
act of government, that was conceived in bigotry, brought 
forth while our red-blooded young men were in the trenches 
and is surviving only through the efforts of paid lobbyists 
and intolerant propagandists who would otherwise be out 
of a job." 

Cardinal Mundelein is the third cardinal of the same 
church to express his views on prohibition. He is very posi- 
tive in his opposition to the Volstead Act and says that the 
way to deal with it is to repeal it. This church movement 
is very significant of an undercurrent of opinion against the 



We have had an experi- 
Dr. Mabel Walker Willebrandt ence during the past 

week which would not 
onlv have been impossible to our fathers but which could 
hardly have been imagined by them. We have had a woman, 
an Assistant United States Attorney General, telling law- 
vers about the work of the office which she represents in 
Washington and about the work of the United States Su- 
preme Court. < )f course, this is not quite the first time; for 
we have produced here a woman U. S. District Attorney, 
who afterwards went into the office of the U. S. Attorney 
General at Washington. Dr. Willebrandt, however, is a 
person of such marked learning and distinction that her visit 
is a unique experience. 

That the importance of the guest was felt became ap- 
parent from the position of those who flocked to hear her. 
The Federal Circuit Court of Appeals, and other depart- 
ments of the federal judiciary, the State Supreme Court 
and minor courts of appeal, to say nothing of the lower 
courts and the most distinguished of local counsel, thronged 
to get her impressions. The women of this community, 
engaged in the practice of law, who have formed an organi- 
zation which they call Queen's Bench, were out in force. 
It was a triumphant occasion and justified completely the 
higher education and development of women along with 
men. 

Her comments on the justices who rule our destinies as 
a people were particularly happy and her references to 
fustice Holmes were well framed. She called attention to 
what is so often overlooked, the literary quality of the (..pin- 
ions of Justice Holmes, who combines a virile intellectual 
grasp with a carefulness and polish of diction, at eighty-six. 
We seldom go out of our way to pay tribute to a speech- 
maker, but on this occasion the matter was so notable and 
the personality of the speaker so engaging that we make 
an exception. 



February 20, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



The League of Nations is about 
Trying Out the League to face critical times. Hardly has 
the applause over Locarno died 
away than the mutterings of trouble among the nations 
which constitute the League begin again. To make things 
a little more involved also, Germany has asked for admis- 
sion to the body and that admission will not only be proof 
of the purging of her former sins, but will be another com- 
plication in the already tangled skein. 

It has always been more or less uncertain as to how far 
the mandates of the League would be respected, particularly 
when they came into contact with the ambitions and desires 
of the individual nationalities. It must be admitted that 
Mussolini, by his bald statement, has scandalized and 
frightened the more orderly and respectable representatives. 
Not that he said any more than all of them were thinking, 
but the very fact that he came out with the declaration that 
he would not obey the orders of the League in matters con- 
cerning Italy, is in itself a blow at the very foundations of 
the pact and has been so regarded in London. 

The fact is, that, there seems to be a sort of jockeying for 
position going on. There are evidently intrigues, and it is 
clear that Mussolini would never have ventured upon such 
provocative statements if he had not concealed support. 
These are the really troublesome things, not the mere state- 
ments and rhetoric of the politicians. 

When Germany gets into the League, if it lasts so long, 
we shall no doubt see the strings being pulled and the pup- 
pets beginning to move through the first steps of a new 
dance which can only end in new slaughter. 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 



Violations of the motor vehicle law are 
Careless Driving growing in number, not diminishing, as 

might have been reasonably expected, 
with the passing of time and the more general use of the 
automobile. Will H. Marsh, chief of the division of motor 
vehicles, takes very pessimistic view of the situation, which 
he considers "a disgrace to the motorists of California and 
a sad reflection on the upbuilding influences of civilization." 
To the suggestion that the greater number of accidents 
has arisen from the increased number of the machines i" 
use. the reply is crushing, as Mr. Marsh says: "The increase 
in the number of machines, which is only about nine per 
cent, does not justify this increase in violations." It would 
be hard to find anything to justify it. Perhaps some astute 
psychologist may suggest that in the auto we have a ma- 
chine which transcends average human development and 
that people, as a whole, have not grown up to it. And yet 
it must be conceded that the manufacturers have succeeded 
marvelously in constructing "fool-proof" vehicles. 

What to do about it is very puzzling. Mr. Marsh does 
not haVe much to suggest, except the old remedies of pun- 
ishment, consisting of long terms of imprisonment and 
heavier fines. This remedy seems to depend tor the most 
part upon the idiosyncrasies of the particular magistrate 
before whom the case is tried, and that is never satisfactory. 
There is something wrong about our attitude to the motor 
question. After all. driving a car is a test of mentality, at 
least to the extent of care required. A person driving a car 
without the degree of mental equipment necessary is a 
social menace and should not be allowed to operate a car. 
but should be stopped from operating one, as an incompe- 
tent. < >f course, accidents will happen, but the matter of 
speeding would he ended by such a course 



— Life insurance prospects in the Pacific States for the 
current year are unusually promising. This year's report 
is expected to outrank that of last year, which was phe- 
nomenal. Business conditions throughout the coast states 
are most promising. 



We gather from the trial that the only thing the flying 

force has plenty of is air. — Dallas News. 

* * * 

Ma Ferguson won't have school text-books in Texas say- 
ing that men are animals, and yet she insists that her po- 
litical enemies are swine. — New York Evening World. 

* * * 

The Prince of Wales, says a London dispatch, has a dread 
of becoming fat. He knows, probably, that the heavier they 

are the harder thev fall off. — Detroit Free Press. 

* * * 

It doesn't take much of a car, at that, to last some drivers 
a lifetime. — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

The man who tried his hand at something and failed 
might try using his head for a change. — Buffalo Post. 

* * * 

Our idea is that now is a noble time for a bachelor to 
announce for Governor of Texas. — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

Moscow says next tax law will relieve peasants. Pre- 
sumably of what they have left. — Wall Street Journal. 

* * * 

The really hard thing is to be able to say whether it is 
opportunity at the door or another demonstrator. — Detroit 

News. 

* * * 

The Navy rule nowadays seems to be three years afloat 
and three years on the witness stand — Detroit News. 

* * * 

Henry Ford is collecting old fiddlers. Probably wants 

an absolute monopoly on all the squeaks produced in the 

United States — Nashville Banner. 

* * * 

The latest from Florida is the announcement of a New 
Year's bullfight in Tampa. And there's a lot of it down 
there. — Detroit News. 

* * * 

All Columbus did was to discover America. Look what other 
people have done to it! — Winston-Salem lournal. 

* * * 

About the only thing the farmers aren't raising enough of 
now is farm hands. — Fl Dorado Tribune. 

* * * 

Supposing in I'M" we had said to Europe, "Sure, we'll come 

across — in about sixty-two years." — Detroit News. 

*' * * 

Minister calls Americans the most conceited people in the 
world. We thought SO, too, until we talked with the natives of 
.1 few other countries. — Philadelphia Inquirer. 

* * * ■ 

Scientist says that it is impossible for the human hair to 
turn gray overnight. Maybe so. But just wait until gray 

ies a popular color for human hair! — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

When Europe hears something fall it is usually either the 
Prince of Wales or the French Cabinet. — Florence (Ala.) 

Herald. 

* * * 

And so Americans are dollar chasers "' Well, can Europe sug- 
gest any other method of getting money enough to lend' — 

Wheeling Intelligencer. 

* * * 

'Why aren't there parking places for pedestrians;-'' ask- a 
motorist. He forgets our commodious cemeteries. — Punch. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 20, 1926 




measure's Wind 



OBEY NO \aIAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore. 





Katherine Schwartz 



Curran 

THERE is a prodigal magnificence 
about "Rose Marie" that much 
talked of lieht opera, which opens at the 
Curran Thea- 
ter, Monday 
evening, Feb- 
ruary 22. that 
almost \akes 
the ifinancial- 
minded be- 
ll o 1 d e r ' s 
breath away. 
There is 
seemingly an 
endless array 
of costumes, 
tasteful, col- 
orful, dazz- 
ling; there 
are platoons of chorus girls, tireless, 
graceful, beautiful, there are handsome 
sets and gorgeous draperies, and one 
of the most tuneful and brilliant scores 
that our theater has heard in a gen- 
eration. 

"Rose Marie" brings a new prima 
donna to the musical comedy stage in 
the person of Maria Snamshon, for- 
merly with the Royal Opera House 
in Budapest, Hungary, who has a voice 
of such quality as to place her at once 
among the one or two musical heroines 
whose voices are at least part of their 
fortune. 

She is supported by an array of tal- 
ent that is seldom seen in a cast out- 
side of a Broadway theater. 

Capitol * * * 

Kolb and Dill, in their successful 
comedy, "Pair o' Fools." will end their 
engagement at the Curran Theater to- 
night and then pack up and move to 
the Capitol Theater, where they will 
begin a short engagement tomorrow 
evening. Kolb ami Dill have proved 
such a hit in this new comedy of theirs 
that a four-week stay has proven to be 
all too short. In order to extend their 
engagement here it was necessary for 
these two funsters to cancel all other 
Pacific Coast bookings. Their stay at 
the Capitol, however, will be of short 
duration, for they are leaving shortly 
for Chicago for an extended run in 
one of the leading theaters of that city. 

* * * 
Auditorium 

Opera lovers here are just delighted 
to have the opportunity once more of 



(Conducted by Katherine Schwartz) 

hearing the San Carlo Opera Company, 
which opened last Thursday evening 
in a pretentious production of Verdi's 
"Rigoletto." 

There was much interest centered 
around all of the stars who have thus 
far made their appearance, but there 
was special interest shown by the many 
San Francisco admirers of Josephine 
Lucchese, the brilliant coloratura so- 
prano. 

There is a truly notable cast, much 
too long for our limited space, and a 
large chorus and ballet, and a sym- 
phony orchestra under the baton of 
Carlo Peroni, Italian conductor. 

Clara Jacobi sang last night, and to- 
day at the matinee will be heard Olga 
Kargau in "Madame Butterfly," "Tro- 
vatore." always so popular, will be the 
offering tonight. Tomorrow evening 
will be heard "Carmen," with Lorna 
Doone Jaxon in the title role. 

* * * 
St. Francis 

"Behind the Front," a "hilarious 
bombshell of laughter," as someone has 
said, is still packing 'cm in at the St. 
Francis. You'll laugh until you cry at 
this picture. It is shriekingly funny, 
and a sure tonic for the blues. Wallace 
Beery is immense in this picture, and 
made personal appearance at this the- 
ater last week. 

* * * 

Imperial 

"The Cohans and the Kellys," fol- 
lowed Valentino in "The Eagle," at 
this theater, opening yesterday. It is 
another of those "Abie's Irish Rose" 
plays, and concerns a family of Jews 
and Irish in the slums of New York's 
east side. 

* * * 
Cameo 

The attraction at this little theater 
for the coming week is another of those 
super-western stories starring Tom 
Mix. called "The Everlasting Whis- 
per." There will be a popular concert 
by the orchestra each day. 

* * * 
New Pantages 

The formal opening of the beautiful 
new Pantages playhouse takes place 
this evening at eight o'clock. There 
will be movie stars, actresses, directors 
and a splendid program has been pre- 
pared. 



The civic and military authorities 
will be represented and on the stage 
will be seen Will Morrissey and Midgie 
Miller, who are coming here direct 
from New York for the opening. On 
the screen Warner Brothers are pre- 
senting Syd Chaplin in his latest and 
greatest comedy sensation, "Oh, What 
a Nurse." 

* * * 

Columbia 

The Columbia reopened last Mon- 
day evening with a play by Alice Bar- 
ney, Xew York society woman, and 
Carl Miller, called "Passions," a story 
depicting the eternal struggle between 
good and bad passions of the human 
race. 

There is a splendid cast, and it is 
well produced. There are some very 
sensational lighting effects, and after 
a little while given to polishing it up 
a bit. we expect to hear more of this 
verv interesting play. 



S. F. Symphony 

The ninth pair of symphony concerts 
was featured by the splendid rendition 
of Tschaikowsky's fourth symphony in 
F minor; special mention must be made 
of the Scherzo and the splendid pizzi- 
cato work of the strings. 

Special mention must also be made 
of the concert master's, Mischa Pias- 
tro's violin obligato in Saint Saens Pre- 
lude to the Deluge; the concert was 
opened by the very interesting suite 
for full orchestra No. 6 by Bach-Wood. 
"A Night on the Bald Mountain," by 
Moussorgsky, closed a most interest- 
ing first part. 

* * * 

Granada 

Coming Saturday to the Granada is 
"The Girl From Montmartre," star- 
ring Barbara La Marr and Lewis Stone. 
( )n the Granada stage will be an all- 
girl production entitled "The Garden 
of ( iirls." 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Next week's bill at this popular the- 
ater is headed by Power's Dancing Ele- 
phants, Lena, Jennie, Roxie and Julia. 
For many years these famous pachy- 
derms have been an established attrac- 
tion at the New York Hippodrome. 
They tango, fox trot, waltz and also do 
the Charleston. George Power, trainer 



February 20, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



Auditorium 



'San Carlo Opera Co. 
\ in Repertoire 



ALEXANDRIA 

Geiirj- and ISth 



Pictures 



alcazar | "Little Jessie James" 

O'Fnrrell nr. Powell j Henry Duffy Players 



CALIFORNIA > . _ 

4th and Market \ A Do 9 s Llfe ' 


CAMEO | "The Everlasting 
036 Market St. j Whisper" — Tom Mix 


CAPITOL I Kolb & Dill 

Ellis nr. Market 1 "Pair 0' Fools" 


CASINO I 

Mason and Ellis ( Pictures 


CASTRO ( 

4ao Castro St. j Pictures 


Columbia \ ,,_ ,, 
70 Eddy ) "Passions' 


CURRAN { "Rose Marie- 
Geary nr. Mason ( 


Egyptian \ Pictures 


golden gate ( Vaudeville 
G. G. Ave. & Taylor ( and Pictures 


GRANADA I "The Girl From 
10U0 Market St. ( Montmartre" 


HAIGHT I Pictures 
lliiltthl at Cole ( 


imperial ( "The Cohens and 
1077 Market St. ( the Kellys" 


LOEWS wakfield ( Colleen Moore in 
1188 Market St. f "Irene" 


MAJESTIC ) 

Mission between ) Pictures 

20th and 21st J 


METROPOLITAN ( 

2055 Union St. j Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 
1320 Fillmore 
NEW MISSION 
2550 Mission 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM ( ., 

OKnrrell * Powell ( Vaudeville 


Pantages (New) X Vaudeville 
MM.-i.envenworth J vauaeviue 


POMPEII 1 Pictures 
Next to Grnnnda \ 


POHTOLA I „, . 
771. Market St. \ Pictures 


PRESIDENT ( Florence Roberts in 
Market A McAllister ( "Dancing Mothers" 


ROYAL ( 

1520 Polk St. ( Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS > "Behind the Front" 
ll«5 Market St. ' 


SUTTER 1 

Sutter and Stelner \ Pictures 


UNION SItVARE \ Pictures and 
O'Farrell nr. Ponrll | Vaudeville 


WILKES 1 " Tne B ig Parade- 
Geary and Mason \ 


WIUWAM ) 

Mission and 22d Pictures 


CONCERTS 

Cnrrnn Theater. Minilnv Aflrrini.ni. 2;45 
San t'min'ls.'ii *>m|thon>. 



of these clever animals exhibits them. 

A second feature of the new bill is 
the appearance of the Wilson Brothers, 
who are sensational yodlers of world- 
wide reputation. Their offering is 
called "The Lieutenant and the Cop." 
Charles Harrison and Sylvia Dakin, as- 
sisted at the piano by Benny Oakland, 
are bringing a musical comedy offering 
called "The Three of Us" ; Dan Stanley 
and Al Birnee will give an exhibition 
of dancing; the Reynolds Donegan 
Company, skating champions, will be 
seen in an unique act ; Martinet, the 
juggling clown, and his famous crow 
are also on the bill. 

The screen feature is "The Scarlet 
West," another epic picture, similar 
to "The Covered Wagon," featuring 
Clara Bow and Robert Frazer. 

Claude Sweeten and his orchestra 
and Grace Rollins Hunt, organist, will 
provide the musical program. 

Warfield 

"I — stands for Irene, the heroine chic, 

R — for romance, which gives life its 
kick, 

E — is for elegance of frock and dress. 

N — is for nifty, the film's full of cuties. 

E — stands for Erin, Colleen and her 

beauties." 
The press agent of the Warfield sent 
us this, announcing that an admirer of 
Colleen Moore's had left it at the box 
office. "Irene," SO popular on the 
speaking stage, comes in us at the War- 
field next week in the screen version, 
with delightful Colleen Moore in the 
title role. There is a large supporting 
cast. 

Fanchon and Marco will present 
"Ideas of a Garden Gate," said by the 
Los Angeles reviewers to have sur- 
passed anything these clever producers 
have ever done. Seen iii it are Dewey 
Barto. Ruth Waddell, Florence Cleve- 
land, Albert Maegillivray, Joey Ray 
and all the Sunkist beauties. 

* * * 
President 

"naming Mothers." that distinctly 
different and altogether unique com- 
edy of modern life, seems likely to 
equal the popularity of "The Best Peo- 
ple," which enjoyed such a long run 
here. 

Leneta Lane in the role of the flap- 
per daughter is doing the best work of 
her career in it. Florence Roberts is 
her own true sell as the mother who 
longs for the love she sees her husband 
and daughter wasting outside of the 
home, Kenneth Daigneau, as the bach- 
elor man of the world, and Fredrik 
Vogeding as the husband, are very 
happily cast. There is indeed an almost 
perfect cast provided by Henry Duffy. 
Edwin Curtis' able direction is Jeen 
on every hand, and the view of the 
roof club in the second act is a scenic 
treat. 



Orpheum 

Theodore Roberts, "the grand old 
man" of the screen, is making an tri- 
umphant return to the speaking stage 
via the Orpheum the coming week 
when he will appear in a powerful play- 
let written by William C. De Mille, 
called "The Man Higher Up." He is 
assisted by Hardee Kirkland, an artist 
of great abilities. 

Billy House, the popular singing 
comedian, who scored such a hit here 
last season, is returning with a comedy 
of love and lingerie called "Oh, 
Teddy." The musical comedy stars, 
Joe Weston and Grace Eline, will of- 
fer a number of character interpreta- 
tions ; "Amateur Nite in London" is 
the title of a great laugh hit given by 
a large company of typical music- 
hall artists ; John Steel, the celebrated 
American tenor, who has delighted large 
audiences all last week at this theater, 
is remaining over for another week. He 
is assisted by Mabel Stapleton, who 
in private life is Mrs. John Steel ; Ray 
Hiding and his clever dancing seal is 
also staying for a second week. 

* * * 
Wilkes 

We predicted when we saw the 
"Big Parade" on the opening night, 
that it would pack the house, — and 
that is just what it is doing at the 
Wilkes. A play so full of human ap- 
peal, with a story told in such a simple 
and natural manner, with such an ex- 
cellent cast, under such direction, could 
not but appeal to everyone. 

It is what is called in theatrical par- 
lance, a "big repeater," meaning that 
people go to see it again and again. It 
is - i in ] >1 %■ impossible to take it all in 
at one viewing. 

There has been much discussion as 
to whether the battle scenes were real 
or not. An interview with Tom Hodge- 
man, the manager of the production 
here, elicited the fact that many of the 
(Continued on Pagp 16) 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 20, 1926 






Less Hurry, More Charm 

tc '"T~ v O BE beautiful one must be unhurried," said La 
1 Marchesa Casati, the titled Italian beauty, who visited 
San Francisco recently. 

"American women dress as well as the women of Paris," 
she added, stressing the point that Americans sacrificed 
much of their charm hurrying. "There is too much hum- 
today. A shake of the hair" and as the interviewer of the 
"Chronicle" quotes, "a chemise, a hat, and she is dressed — 
the woman of today, she is like so many little birds on a 
fence — sparrows." 

La Marchesa Casati favors the hair, unbobbed. "To be 
beautiful one should have long hair — hair that takes time, 
care and attention to dress." 

She had a good word for the young girls of America, for 
which we greatly admire this titled lady. Her opinion that 
women of the world dress as much alike as so many loaves 
of bread, may or may not stir discussions among our debu- 
tantes who pride themselves, and rightly, on their originality 
and their distinctively smart modes. Paying compliments 
to the women of Spain, she is quoted as having said, "Only 
in Spain is woman colorful in costume, with flowers in her 
hair and a swing to her walk." 

Of the flapper. La Marchesa Casati is quoted as having 
said also: "They (flappers) never forget their manners." 
Which leads the critical to add that all young women are not 
flappers, nor are all debutantes in the classification generally 
attributed as "the flappers." 

The flapper is seemingly a much over-used word. De- 
fense of her finds an echo within the minds of sane and com- 
petent folks. But, on the other hand, every young girl with 
a fashionable length to her skirt and the latest bob to her 
hair, is not a flapper! 

She, our little miss of six- or seventeen, is one of the 
loveliest products of our land and comes under the same 
dignified classification as did her mother and her mother's 
mother and all her notable kin. 

* * * 

Gotham Society Dazzles 
Itself at Recent "Fete" 

"The Fete in the Gardens of Versailles was the most lav- 
ish costume ball ever given in New York City" say the re- 
viewers and eye-witnesses of the Beaux Arts Fete which 
took place at the Hotel Astor last week. 

"Thousands and hundreds of thousands of dollars were 
expended on fantastic costumes worn at the Gardens of Ver- 
sailles Fete." It is said that more than twenty-seven hun- 
dred of New York's smart set, operatic stars, artists, sculp- 
tors, ambassadors, prominent personages from many cor- 
ners of the globe, gathered at this sumptuous ball. Every 
one had to be in costume — that was "the first rule of the 
ball." 

Critics and reviewers state that many of the former grand 
balls of Gotham's society have been transcended in glory 
and splendor by this "Fete." 



By Antoinette Arnold 

"Even the famous private costume balls of the past: Mrs. 
Oliver H. P. Belmont's now historic event given when she 
was Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt ; the never-to-be-forgotten 
Bradley-Martin ball and all the others pale into insignifi- 
cance when compared with the great fete at the Astor," 
states "Cholly Knickerbocker" in her article Saturday. 
* * * 

Mr>. Willard, widow of the late Joseph Willard, former 
United States ambassador to Spain, is now visiting Mrs. 
Boylston Beal of San Francisco, and her daughter, Mrs. 
Mervyn Herbert in London. 



Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Payne have been spending some 
time in Paris, but took a "flying" trip over to America. They 
will soon start on a trip around the world, after going back 
t" Paris again on their honeymoon. 

* * * 

Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Long of this city are in St. Moritz 
for the winter sports and the social season there. 

* * * 
San Francisco Architect 

Gains Honors in France 

Mr. Arthur Brown. Jr., the San Francisco architect, who 
graduated from the Ecole des Beaux Arts in 1901, has been 
named to the Academie des Beaux Arts in Paris. He is a 
member of the Beaux Arts Society of the Societe des Archi- 
tectes Diplomes par le Gouvernement, a corresponding 
member of the Institut de France and a Knight of the 
Legion of Honor. 

* * * 

Mrs. Sydney Cloman is passing the winter at the Carlton 
Hotel in Cannes. Mrs. Cloman is well known in London 
embassy circles. Her late husband was former United 

States military attache. 

* * * 

Mrs. Ernest Macdonald of Monterey, Miss Anita Howard 
of I 'akland, and Mrs. Charles Bon and Miss Bon of Berke- 
ley, have been spending quite some time in Italy, making 
Florence their chosen spot for the past fortnight. 



Mr. and Mrs. Louis Monteagle are in New York, and 
were among the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Alex- 
ander at the charity ball. 

* * * 

Gertrude Atherton, famous novelist, was the honor guest 
at a reception and tea given at the old home of Colonel 
Roosevelt Oil Twentieth Street, New York. Mrs. James J. 
Walker, wife of the Mayor of New York, was a guest of 
honor of this occasion, other prominent people, including 
Lord and Lady Camoys. 

* * * 

Admiral and Mrs. C. X. Niblack of California, are now 
spending the winter season on the Riviera. 



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Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



IL 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

elephone Sutler B130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



February 20, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Rear-Admiral and Mrs. Luther E. Gregory 
were hosts recently at a dinner given in 
Washington, D. C, entertaining as thejr guests 
in their home, members of the naval commit- 
tee, who had made trips to the West last year 
and the year before on the S. S. Henderson 
and the Chaumont. Covers were laid for 
thirty-six at an elaborately appointed table. 
* * * 

Polo Season Lures Society 

Polo is the lure of peninsula society. 

At the Del Monte tournament, this week, 
the social register, itself, poured out its per- 
sonnel of fashionables who donned their smart- 
est attire and enthusiastically participated in 
the superlative sport. 

The presence of Lord Wodehouse at the polo 
matches was the incentive for a number of 
society affairs. The British nobleman is the 
house guest of Mr. and Mrs. George Gordon 
Moore, who now have the Jacks' residence. On 
the night of his arrival a dinner was given by 
the Moores in his honor. Their guests in- 
cluded Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hunt, Miss Marion Hollins 
and Mr. K. Hollins of New York, and Mrs. Helen Hobbs 
of Boston, a sister of Mrs. Moore's. 

* * * 

Del Monte and Pebble Beach have been the settings for 
a number of entrancing dinner and supper parties during 
the polo tournament. One of the outstanding events was 
given by Mr. William Leib in the Palm Grill of Del Monte, 
who entertained as his guests, Mr. and Mrs. Archibald 
Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, F. B. Morse, Mr. and Mrs. 
Cyril Tobin, M,r. and Mrs. Lawrence McCreery, Mr. and 
Mrs. Dickinson Bishop, Mr. and Mrs. William G. Parrott, 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Carpenter, Mr. George Pope. Jr., and 

Mr. Cliff Weatherwax. 

* * * 

The polo tournament attracted many well-known eastern 
devotees of the sport. Mr. and Mrs. James Shewan of New 

York are at Del Monte for the games. 

* * *" * 

Other prominent society folks who never miss the polo 
matches include Mr. George Pope, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Crocker — both Mr. Pope and Mr. Crocker being ex- 
pert players. Mrs. Lawrence McCreery. Mrs. Samuel 
Morse and Mrs. Byington Kurd arc always present when 
their husbands play. Mrs. Harry Hunt is always ready to 
applaud when her husband, one of the well-known polo 
players, appears on the lield. The Hunts entertain exten- 
sively at their lovely home at Pebble Reach. 

* * * 

Distinguished People Guests of Literati 

Distinguished speakers on literary themes will pronounce 
a noteworthy day to be given at the California Club, next 
Tuesday. February 23, in the clubhouse on Clay Street, be- 
tween Van Xess Avenue and Polk. 

The occasion will be an afternoon of literature given un- 
der the direction of the California Club of California with 
authors and musicians as honor guests. 

Katharine EgglestOD Holmes, author and lecturer of na- 
tional and international fame, will speak on the subject : "A 
Fiction Writer's Fact." and those who have heard this bril- 
liant writer, anticipate a memorable day. Mrs. Holmes has 




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appeared on the lecture platform of our largest 
cities. She has a delightful delivery, a most 
charming personality and in a scholarly and 
convincing way imparts her brilliant thoughts. 
Fenwick Holmes, noted psychologist, author 
ami lecturer, will give an address on "The New 
Vocabulary and Its Significance." Those who 
have studied the masterful articles and books 
by Mr. Holmes look forward with eager an- 
ticipation to the provilege of hearing his lec- 
ture at the California Club. 

Grace Sanderson Michie, scenarist, success- 
ful author of nine photoplays, which have been 
on the screen within the past few years as 
outstanding motion pictures of excellence, will 
address the California Club on "Better Motion 
Pictures." Mrs. Michie is head of the better 
picture movement and has written, produced 
and edited many superior motion pictures 
which command the attention of the industry 
as well as meriting the success which follows 
her work. Mrs. Michie has just finished a new 
motion picture of the South Seas, which will 
shortly appear on the screen and on which she 
devoted many months of careful and ceaseless preparation 
and study. She has also written the scenario version for 

Robert Keable's "Numerous Treasure." 

* * * 

Exquisite Poem Will Be Read 

"From Russian Hill," written by Eleanore Ross, and 
which by literary authority is said to be one of the finest 
poetical descriptions of San Francisco ever produced, will 
be read by Virgilio Luciani. This exquisite poem will be 
presented upon special request and the well-known editor 
and poet, Eleanore Ross, will be an honor guest. 

Virgilio Luciani will also read, upon request from the 
literary folks, poems of his own and will appear in costume 
for this event. Mrs. Portia Bradley has arranged a musical 
setting for this number of the program. 

Mizpah Nathan of Sacramento, a soprano singer of con- 
siderable renown, who recently appeared in the title role 
with the Symphony ( Irchestra of Sacramento, in a produc- 
tion of the "Erl King's Daughter," will be the contributing 
musical artist of the day. Mrs. Nathan will be heard in two 
groups of songs with Mrs. Phillip Aaronson at the piano. 

* * * 

Mrs. Beckman Honor Guest 

Mrs. William Beckman. whose latest book, "Thought 
Stitches From Life's Tapestry" was the motif of a recent 
literary day will be an honor guest at the California Club 
meeting when an excerpt from her book will be read. Mrs. 
Beckman is a prominent* member of the League of Ameri- 
can Pen Women, founder of the Sacramento Tuesday Club. 
and a director .if the Crocker Museum of the Capitol City, 
where for many year*, she was a leader in society. She is 
a world traveler and has written five books on her travels. 
Sparkling humor and wholesome philosophy permeate all 
her writings and make her work distinctive. Many of Mr*. 
Beckman's Sacramento friends will be guests on the literary 
day of the California Club. 

i -telle Margaret Swearingen, author of "Nickie, the Lit- 
tle Immigrant." and "Pickaninny" will be a special guest 
and SO will Fdna Wilson Becsey, president of the Sacra- 
mento Rranch of the California Writers' Club. Prof, and 
(Continued on Page 14) 



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i. .- ■-' 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 20, 1926 



"^J&Jf^ 



J*L 



-eoye- 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



-^9WS* 



~$\J$< ! &~ 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA golfers cele- 
brated a "wet" Lincoln's birthday; many 
of the tournaments scheduled had to be post- 
poned on account of too much liquid. 

The American Institute of Bankers were 
terribly disappointed at not being able to play 
off their annual golf championship, which 
should have been decided at Crystal Springs 
Golf Club. The elements didn't interfere with the mem- 
bers of the Lake Merced Golf and Country Club putting in 
a good da} - , however, diving around the course. Most of 
those who weathered the storm got a double drenching, 
especially the big four: Ernest La Fleur, Eddie Lees, Xat 
Berger and Leon Roos. Viewing these babies as they came 
off tlie course one would have thought they had been reared 
in Portland. Ernest La Fleur was ten pounds heavier when 
he came in than he was when he started out. Eddie Lees 
got so soaked that his trainer, Nat Berger, had to give him 
an alcohol rub to bring him to. Leon Roos intended to 
introduce the latest creations in masculine attire, but un- 
fortunately the storm played havoc with his new togs. Ben 
Blair, the recognized Beau Brummel of the club, also spoiled 
a perfectly new rigout. Ben should worry with two ward- 
robes full of them. 'Well, after the boys had gotten good 
and wet, both inside and out, 200 sat down to a specially 
prepared dinner which Mrs. Williams, manager at the club, 
had spent a lot of time and thought preparing and the way 
those members went at it was wonderful. There is one 
thing about the Lake Merced Club members whenever they 
set out to do anything, the splendid club spirit and har- 
mony that exists assures them of success. 

* * * 
Follies of Lake Merced 

After the dining room had been cleared, the Livingston 
brothers, Dave and Lawrence, presented a two-act playlet 
entitled the "Follies of Lake Merced." The cast included: 
Otto Rosenstein, Al Weil, Dr. Leroy Brooks, Lawrence 
Livingston, Nat Hawkes, Harry Fisher, Louis Goodman, Mel 
Nathan. Ernest La Fleur, H. J. Brunnier. Larry Van Wyck. 
Nat Berger, Ed Lees, Leon Roos. David Livingston and 
Al Lee. 

This play was a skit, full of criticisms and witicisms on 
the members of Merced, playing from the first to the eigh- 
teenth green. 

Xat Hawks, one of the most popular golfers at the club 
was the first to tee off. but Nat had a tough time pursuading 
a boy to caddy for him ; once he succeeded, he did a lot of 
stage stuff. Then Ernest La Fleur, the Arrow collar-man. 
considered the best dressed man in the club, who the boys 
claim has enough dough to choke a horse, steps up and socks 
one, but it got tangled up with the trees. 

Mel Nathan tried his hand, but made an awful showing. 
Louis Goodman followed La Fleur, so it was up to Harry 
Fisher, but the fat boy hit one so hard it landed in Dalv City, 
so Hawks and La Fleur won the hole. 

* * * 
President Tries to Show Authority 

Bru Brunnier called out for six caddies. Bru takes his 
driver, takes a vicious swing at the ball and breaks his club, 
which made the sixtieth he broke within a year. Larrv Van 
Wyck steps up and Bru, anxious to make a bet said: 10-10 
and 10." Larry said: "Who told you? I decide everything 
here; ain't I the president?" 



< )ne of the caddies pulled a good one when Nat Berger 
asked him what he was doing. The kid replied : "Hunting 
for tees." "Are you saving them?" "No, I give the good 
one to Leon Roos and the busted ones to Ed Lees." Harry 
Fisher and Louis Goodman had a tough time keeping from 
scrapping; only the fact that they were brothers-in-law 
saved them. 

( >tto Rosenstern pulled off some good and bad jokes, but 
the little fellow got away with it; his size saved him. 

Considering that this review was composed of members 
of the club, the singing by the famous quartette Ed Lees, 
Al Lee. Nat Berger and Louis Goodman would have done 
credit to the Orpheum stage. 

Sanford Hyams was the happiest man there. Sanford 
said he wished it would rain every Lincoln's birthday as it 
kept him at his office, where he sold $100,000 insurance. 

The Livingston boys deserve a lot of credit for staging 
such a splendid evening's entertainment, which was ap- 
preciated by two hundred members of the club. Louis Lurie 
was so impressed with the show that he offered Dave and 
Lawrence Livingston a six month's contract to play at the 
Wilkes Theatre. 

* * * 

Prominent Golfers Entertained 

Arthur Xewhouse entertained a party of friends at din- 
ner at his palatial home, the Huntington apartments, the 
occasion being in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Schmidt, 
who leave for an extended trip to London and Paris. 

.Mrs. Schmidt is the captain of the Presidio Women's 
Annex and a very fine golfer herself, while Mr. Schmidt won 
the President's Cup at the Arm) Post Club last month. 

While in England, they both expect to enter in several 
of the important tournaments, so it won't be at all sur- 
prising if we get a cable stating that either Mr. or Mrs. 
Schmidt have annexed a golf championship for themselves. 
Among the ,uuc-ts present were Judge and Mrs. |. F. Tyler. 
Dr. Louis and Mrs. Bacigalupi, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest L Sul- 
tan. Air. and Mrs. Peter Strauss and Fred Blair. 



Original Affair at Aladdin Studio 
Among the many unusual affairs taking place at the Alad- 
din Studio Tiffin Room at 363 Sutter Street, this week was 
a dinner-dance arranged by Mr. and Mrs. George T. Hamil- 
ton in honor of Mr. and Mrs. II. R. Dunlop on the thirtv- 
fifth anniversary of their wedding. At the stroke of twelve, 
Victor Pollak's Syncopating Band played the Lohengrin 
Wedding March, and the guests of honor were showered 
with blossoms as they marched down the dance floor of the 
Aladdin — transformed by the countless flowers into a fairy 
bower. 

Among the guests were : Dr. Dunlop Strickler, Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Schneider, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Abrams, Mrs. 
Fred Hunter, Mr. William Miles, Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Thom- 
son. Mr. and Mrs. Bryce Florence, Mr. and Mrs. Tames 
Hendyand Mr. and Mr-. F. A. Hilton. 



Grace Sanderson Michie has just finished her latest sce- 
nario, making a total of nine photoplays up-to-date. She 
has also just about completed the continuity for "Numerous 
Treasure," which will soon be upon the screen. Mr. Gordon 
Michie, her equally famous husband, is a motion picture 
producer and is also completing some new photoplays. 



February 20, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 





§f RADIO 

*fe°refSI By C. J. Pennington 








C. J. Pennington 



When You Buy Your Radio 

IN SELECTING a radio set a few 
minutes of extra time spent in making 
a close inspection will be for the benefit 
of the purchaser as well as for the suc- 
cess in operating the set. 

Two desirable qualities every radio set 
should possess are tone quality and the 
ability to tune in one station, excluding 
all undesired stations. It should be re- 
membered that tone quality is dependent, 
to a great extent, upon the loudspeaker, 
and that the satisfactory operation of the 
set is dependent upon local conditions. 
For example, a set may give excellent re- 
sults in one location and fail in another 



BROADCAST SCHEDULE FOR NEXT WEEK 



BLACK TYPE P.M.: LIGHT FIGURES A.M. 



TUBS. 



WED. 



THl'RS. 



Fitr. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., SAN FRANCISCO— 220 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:30 
8:0O-lO:00 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:30 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:30 
8 00-10:00 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:30 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:30 
8:00-11:30 



9:00-10:4: 
2:00- 2:31 



KFRC— CITY OF PARIS, SAN FRANCISCO— 270.1 



0:30- 7:30 
8:00- 1:00 



10:00-11:30 
5:1.1- 7:30 
8:00- 0:30 



6:30- 8:00 

11 :00-ll:30 

12:00-12:20 

5:30- 7:15 

8:00-11:00 



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6:30- 8:00 
11:00-11:30 
12:00-12:20 
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8 :00-l 1 ;30 



6:30- 8:00 
11:00-11:3 
4:00- 5:Of 
5:30- 7:3r 
8:00- 1:00 



KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRONICLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 428.3 



9:45-10:45 

10:45 

5:00-10:00 



7:00- 


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KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAI NMENTS, INC., SA N FRANCISCO— 226 



1 :(10- 2:011 
8:00-12:00 



1:00- :I:(>(> 
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I'"- 2:00 
10:00-12:00 



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1:30 a.m 

Pajamr 

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KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 207 



2:30- 5:00 
8:00-10:00 



8:00- 

2:30- 3:30 
8:00-10:00 I 



S Oil- S:1.1 
2 30- 3:30 
8:00-10:00 



8:00- 8:151 8:00- 8:15 

2:30- 3:30 2:30- 3:30 

I 8:00- 10:00 



KFUU— MATHEWSON MOTOR CO., INC., OAKLAND— 220 



10:45-11:45 



10:46-11:4", 
0:30- 7:30 
8:00 10100 



10:15-11:45 
0:30- 7:30 



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KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAKLAND— 508.2 



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KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO., SEATTLE— 384.4 



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KFOA— RHODES DEPARTMENT STORE, SEATTLE— 454.3 



in 00-10:30 

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7:00-10:00 



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12:30- 1:30 
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3:00- 5:30 



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0:00- 0:3O 

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4:00- 5:3'' 
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0:30-11:00 



KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY. INC., LOS ANGELES — 467 
(Copyright, 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc.l 



10:00 
11 :00 

4:0O 

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10:00 



10:45 

5 .10-10:00 
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5:30-10:00 
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KFWB— WARNER BROS.. HOLLYWOOD— 252 



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5:00-(tO(l 11:00-12:13 1 

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building or section of the city. However, 
the wiring is one of the most important 
parts of any radio set and should be in- 
spected carefully. Make sure that the 
wire is an extra good grade and that the 
soldering connections are practically per- 
fect. 

In the cheaper sets, if careful notice is 
taken, the prospective purchaser will dis- 
cover that practically all of the wire used 
in connecting the instruments together is 
an insulated wire of a cheap grade. The 
soldering connections on the cheaper sets 
are generally made in a very careless 
manner ; insulated wire in a radio set may 
be correct, but the wire should be a first- 
class product, preferably about size 14. 
The reason for this size of wire is that it 
keeps the resistance of the set as low as 
possible. 

Solder is not as good an electrical con- 
ductor as the wire itself and for that rea- 
son a set should be chosen in which the 
wiring has been carefully planned, so as 
to make the different leads of the set as 
long as possible without the necessity of 
a solder connection. 

Insulation on the wire is not neces- 
sary, and if bus wire is used for the 
wiring of a set it is placed farther apart, 
which eliminates the howls that are 
usually present in a radio set. 

Noises that are often laid to the "B" 
batteries or to outside interference are at. 
least one-half the time caused by a poor 
soldering job, and remember that the in- 
struments of any radio set may be the 
best make possible, but they cannot per- 
form to a good advantage if a poor grade 
of wire is used or if the solder connec- 
tions are not made correctly. 

Note — Other articles (Selecting a 
Radio) will be published from time to 
time in the News Letter. 



Bootlegging Radios 

Another of our great indoor sports, 
and this grand old U. S. seems to be 
blessed with plenty of such ! It appears 
that unless the American public can be 
stung with something illegal, they are 
not happy. Some fellow gets the bril- 
liant idea that he can place radio sets on 
the market, and forthwith buys a pair of 
pliers and a soldering iron, with a bootleg 
radio as the result ; an infringement on 
some patented hook-up under his own 
fancy nom de plume. 

Every one likes radio and every one 
feels that it is improving as time goes 

(Continued on Page 16) 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 20, 1926 




ONE of the pioneers of California's great hydro-electric 
industry died recently in the person of Romulus R. 
Colgate. This is the man after whom the Colgate plant of 
the Pacific Gas and Electric Co. was named. He was the 
grandson of the famous Colgate. He said: "I get more 
pleasure and satisfaction out of developing the country 
than I could possibly get out of any money it brings me." 
* * * 
— There is a movement among the farmers against mu- 
nicipal ownership of the P. G. and E. distribution system in 
San Francisco. This proceeds from the fact that publicly 
owned utilities are exempt from taxation and so the farm- 
ers are afraid they will have to pay higher taxes. There is 
quite a lot of reason in the fear. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY I0TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 192S 

Assets $107,232,609.22 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,250,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over 525,000.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-l'riESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. ond 7th Ave. 

HAICIIT STREET BRANCH llnicht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONZ-QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



— Stuart LI. Show has been appointed district forester of 
the California District U. S, Forest Service. He is a grad- 
uate of Stanford University and was trained in the Vale 

Forest School. 

* * * 

— The Department of Agriculture, through the Bureau 
of Public Roads distributed during 1925 a total of 14.214,750 
pounds of pyrotol in various states, to be used mainly for 
land clearing and for road construction. 

* * * 

— Julius H. Parmele, director of the Bureau of Railway 
Economics, states the results of railroad development dur- 
ing the past year to be: Heavy freight traffic; decline in 
passenger traffic ; virtual disappearance of freight car short- 
age ; higher level of operating efficiency; net operating in- 
come greater, but below a fair return on valuation and beli w 
a five per cent on property investment; rate of return on 
property investment less than in 1916. 

* * * 

• — The Fireman's Fund Insurance Company shows an in- 
crease in assets of $5,000,000. a gain in surplus of approxi- 
mately $1,150,000, and reserves of SI 5,000,000. as against 
$13,400,000 last year. On January 1st the Fireman's bund 
had assets of $30,191,341. unearned premium reserves of 
$15,994,324. net surplus of S5.727.590. and cash capital of 
$5,000,000. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 

I'nlil I i> Capital *20,OOO,0OO $20,000,000 lle.trve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK: PORT- 
LAND. ORE.: SEATTLE, WASH.: MEXICO CITY. MEXICO. 

San Francisco Ofllce: 4r.ii California Street 
Hit I i i: HEATHCOTE W. J. I 'HI I.TII \ II II 

Manager AsNt. Manager 




Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walte W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



— Among those who have been selected by political writers 
as a possible successor to George D. Squires, deceased, is 
State Insurance Commissioner, Charles K. Detrick. Mr. 
Squires was a railroad commissioner. Mr. Detrick was sec- 
retary to the railroad commission for some years and has 
been in his present office for less than a year. 

* * * 

— William G. Sproul, former Governor of Pennsylvania, 
says: "The business of insurance should be encouraged in 
every reasonable way. It is one of the most beneficent in- 
fluences in the country and it certainly stabilizes the nation's 
business." 

* * * 

— California is shown as the most severe sufferer from 
incendiarism in the 1924 tabulation of losses by the actua- 
rial bureau of the national board. Losses throughout the 
nation were $2,368,301. and California's loss alone was 
$512,409. 

* * * 

— Federal luxury tax records show that American women 
spent $750,000,000 in a single year for cosmetics and things 
of that sort. This sum exceeds the value of all the domestic 
electrical appliances in the whole country. 



L 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 2244 



| Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California | 



H INUtACTVRBRS OF 
RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, ! 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 
Sun fPranclaCOi Calif. Lou Angeled, Calif. , 
114 Market Slreet .1717 Santa Fe Avenue I 
■--------■■..-----...---..----■■------- A 



^^ MADE TO ORDER ON LY 

^IDBIF «£?&. ^m? 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 ( 



February 20, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Travel Tid-Bits 

By Ernest F. Rixon 



SEEING GREAT BRITAIN 

on the lines of 

THE LONDON & NORTH EASTERN RAILWAY 

VISITORS to Great Britain this year should not fail to 
see the wonderful cathedrals, as this can be done at a 
minimum of time and expense — for instance a first-class 
round-trip ticket from London to Aberdeen (Scotland), in- 
cluding Cambridge, Ely, Lincoln, York, Durham, Melrose, 
Edinburgh, the Trossachs, Glasgow, Grantham and Peter- 
borough is only approximately $60.00 and third class $40.00. 
The London and North Eastern Railway have recently 
published five beautifully illustrated booklets entitled: 
"Touring Britain" 
"Monuments of British History" 
"The Home of Golf" 
"Through Britain by the Flying Scotsman" 
and 
"Scotland" 
these can be obtained on application to Ernest F. Rixon, 
general agent, Messrs. Dean and Dawson, Ltd., 544 Market 
Street, San Francisco. 

May and June in Great Britain are two delightful months 
and travelers arriving in May will find the hotels are not 
so crowded as later in the season, and it is also much easier 
to secure desirable steamship accommodations the latter 
part of April and early May. 

Californians have, during the past few weeks, been look- 
ing forward to the tennis match between Helen Wills and 
Suzanne Lenglen — naturally we on this side wished Helen 
to win, but unfortunately on ibis occasion she lost after a 
very hard contest. Now that Helen has played Suzanne 
once she has a better knowledge of her play and we will not 
be surprised to see her win at Wimbledon this year. Now 
if you are going to be in England in June, do not fail to 
see the Wimbledon tennis championships and you will prob- 
ably see Helen Wills and Suzanne Lenglen in the middle 
court fighting it out for supremacy about the end of June. 
Let us get together and make up a party from California 
to "cheer" for our native daughter. 



Student Tours to Europe 

Student Tours are now firmly established in popular favor 
and the reason is not difficult to find. The extremely mod- 
erate cost of a trip by "Tourist Third Class" puts a tour to 
Europe within the reach of almost everybody — indeed it 
costs very little more than a vacation at home. 

The modern "Tourist Third Class" must not be confused 
with the old "steerage." To travel "tourist" today, means 
crossing the ocean on a huge steamer, the entire third class 
of which has been turned over to the exclusive use of stud- 
ents, teacher^, lawyers, doctors and similar congenial peo- 
ple. The strictest supervision is exercised by the steamship 
Companies so that none hut desirable people shall be ear- 
ned in the special "Tourist" sailings. 

rhe average round trip from Xew York to Europe Stud- 
ent Third Class is $155 and many of the tourist companies 
have, this year, published programs for Student Tours in 
Europe, prices ranging from S.W and up. from New York to 
Europe, and return, all expenses included. 

Complete information regarding Student Round Trip 
tickets can he obtained from the San Francisco News Letter. 



Harold says that all he wants is a chance to express him- 
self. Fine! Whereto? — Judge. 



CUNARD 

Channel Service 
New York 

to 

England and France 

by CABIN SHIPS 



Caronia 
Carmania 
Cameronia 
Lancastria 

Alaunia 

ASCANIA 

Ausonta 



For Full Particulars Apply to 
CUNARD AND ANCHOR LINES 



Or Local Agents 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8C DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general cogent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2342 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 20, 1926 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 
Mrs. Derrick Norman Lehmer have accepted invitations 
to be present, and Professor Lehmer will speak of his In- 
dian lyrics and the Indian lore of which he is a distinguished 
and recognized authority. 

Mrs. Marshall C. Harris will be the complimented guest 
at a bridge luncheon to be given on Wednesday, March 
31 in the Clift Hotel. Dr. Blanche Culver, Mrs. Norman 
Walter Hall, and Mrs. A. G. Stoll are the joint hostesses, 
for this delightful event. 



Mrs. Howard C. Tibbitts, president of the Presidents' 
Assembly, was the chairman of the social day program of 
Cap and Bells Club last Thursday when Janet Malbon, 
lyric soprano and contributing artist gave songs in costume. 
One of her songs was written especially for Miss Malbon 
and was heard for the first time last Thursday. She also 
gave a group of songs by resident composers with lyrics 
from California poets. This group was arranged as a play- 
let. A ballad written by Rudy Seiger was exquisitely given, 
Janet Nalbon impersonating the singer, Emlyn Lewys the 
pianist. 

Seldom does any local club have the opportunity of pre- 
senting so delightful and classical a program as that which 
fascinated Cap and Bells members and their friends at the 
Fairmont last Thursday. 



Miss Nancy Buckley, poet and descriptive writer, will be 
the literary guest of the literary section at the Cap and Bells 
meeting in March, Miss Buckley, author of "Laughter and 
Longing," and "Wings of Youth," is en route home after 
spending many months in Rome, Paris, London and other 
European cities. She was special guest at the New York 
Pen Women's meeting, and at national headquarters, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Miss Buckley and her sister, Mary Buckley, 
have been feted by literary folks all along their travels. 

Claremont Notes 

Mrs. B. M. Waterman was hostess to a small group of 
friends at a charmingly appointed bridge luncheon given 
at the Claremont Hotel last Monday, entertaining as her 
guests, Mrs. Frederick Hills, Mrs. Guv Young and Mrs. 
R. H. Gripp. 



The main dining room of the hotel, Friday, was the set- 
ting for a delightful luncheon given by Mrs. William Mason 
in honor of Mrs. George Mallison of New York, and Mrs. 
Anne Simpson, who formerly lived in Berkeley. Yellow 
was the color scheme used in the decorations. After lunch- 
eon the guests played bridge, the guests being Mrs. George 
Mallison, Mrs. Anne Simpson, Mrs. Jerome White, Mrs. 
H. Moffett, Mrs. M. H. Newell, Mrs. Ray Lovell and Mrs. 
George Emanuels. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Mitchell entertained a small group at 
an attractive table last Friday evening in compliment to 
Miss Julia Webb of Berkeley, and Mr. John Hanna of 
Texas, who have just announced their engagement. The 
guests were Miss Julia Webb. Mr. John Hanna and Mr. 
and Mrs. Carlisle Laughlin. 



Miss Claire Berge entertained a party at the dinner dance 
of the Hotel Claremont, Friday night. Others who gave 
dinner parties include Miss Katherine Bennett, Mr. F. H. 
Mantes and Miss Margaret Phillips, who entertained under- 
graduate members and friends of Alpha Gamma Deltas. 




AT SINGLETON'S 

Alleg <&at 

COFFEE INN 



A Nice Hot Business 

Lunch, 50c 
Delicious Sandwiches 
Tasty Salads 
A Wonderful Crab Louie 
Home-Made Pies and 
Good Coffee 




Lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 



LARKINS DUCO 
Has Lustre 

Combined with lustre, it possesses a durability that 
is amazing. Be sure of a good job. 

Prices reasonable 

LARKINS & CO. 

First Avenue at Geary Street 




Metal Work Apper- 
taining: to Atitorao- 
bllei* — Oxy-Acetylenc 
Welding — Illnck- 
MnilthluK. 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Ratest 3Bc per day; 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 24 3 
Six Floorn for Service and Storage of .Automobile* 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
20* Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel), Son Franclitco 

Phone Kearny 391 



DENMAN GARAGE 



902 Bush (cor. Taylor) 



A convenient localk 



Pro.pecl 956 



February 20, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

THE very rapid increase in num- 
ber of motor vehicles in the past 
twenty years has rather bewildered the 
brains of the mass of the people, and 
education along the lines of safety has 
not been able to keep pace with this 
increase. When it is remembered that 
for many hundreds of years prior to 
the nineteenth century there was very 
little change in the methods of trans- 
portation, and that the armies of Wash- 
ington and Napoleon traveled at about 
the same rate and with practically the 
same transport as did those of the 
Caesars, it is not to be wondered that 
the human mind, particularly the older 
mind, is slow to grasp the significance 
and danger attendant upon the enor- 
mous increase of motor traffic, says 
the Safety First Bureau of the National 
Automobile Club. 

Recent immigrants are apt to become 
confused by the numbers of motor ve- 
hicles on our streets. Remember that 
California alone has more motor cars 
than the entire German republicl Many 
agencies are at work throughout the 
country, each in its own way, endeav- 
oring to educate the people and to pro- 
vide belter means of accident preven- 
tion; but their efforts, as yet. lack co- 
hesion and uniformity. This will 
come in time, and the National Safety 
Council, working through its branch 
councils, is a step in the right direc- 
tion, as is also the National Safety Con- 
ference, which has for its object the se- 
curing oi uniform traffic laws through- 
out the country. 

Most drivers know how to drive safe- 
ly and are familiar with the traffic laws. 
but many of them continually take 
chances when they think they can "get 



away with it." Certain influences have 
been at work in this country within the 
past few years which tend to make the 
American citizen have less respect for 
the law than they formerly had. 

The traffic force, both city and high- 
way, is far too small, but even the small 
force which is now employed would 
be much more effective were it given 
proper backing. The average traffic 
cop is sincere in the performance of 
his duty, but as long as traffic viola- 
tions are handled by the police court 
and police judges are dependent on 
popular vote for their tenure of office, 
just so long will the majority of traffic 
law violators go unpunished. As an 
example of this is cited the record of 
a large eastern city. During 1925 
there were 27,248 arrests for traffic vio- 
lations. Of this number only 3815 were 
held for court, fined or imprisoned. The 
remainder were discharged by magis- 
trates. 

* * # 

From the Chamber of Commerce of 
Key West, Florida to the Chamber of 
Commerce of Boston, Mass.: 

"Offering our deepest sympathy to 
Boston and her sister cities and towns 
throughout New England and the 
snowbound Northwest, the city of Key 
West, through its Chamber of Com- 
merce, begs to extend to you one and 
all with open arms today a welcome 
to America's tropical playground, 
where the official thermometer stands 
at seventy and one-tenth in the shade 
with gentle invigorating breezes from 
the sea tempered by a sun that smiles 
from a cloudless sky." 

From the Chamber of Commerce of 
Boston (and that's the kick) to tin- 
Key West Chamber of Commerce: 

"Your sympathy is misplaced. That 
roar you heard today which you may 
have thought presaged a tropical rain 
was the Homeric laughter of the thous- 
ands of New Englanders and their 
guests from every clime who are find- 
ing rugged, glowing health and glo- 
rious contentment on the glistening 
white slopes of New England. Should 
you wish a blood-tingling thrill to vary 
climatic monotony, New England's 
portals are wide. Switzerland in sea- 
son, Florida in season, and New Eng- 
land anj time." 

Which leads again to the conclusion 
that California has the last laugh on 
Boston as well as our good friends 
down in Key West. For here you may 
ise your climate and revel in the 
snows of winter or bask in the balmy 
sunshine, paddle around on skis at 
Truckee or at Arrowhead or Yosemite 
and paddle around in the surf. On the 
way from the summer clime to the 
realm of winter you can enjoy a feast 
of oranges either in the citrus belt of 
Southern California, in the thermal 
zone of Porterville. or in the district 



that lies about Oroville. Variety in 
scenery, in climate, in life itself is, after 
all, the chief charm of California, and 
this varied program is offered every 
day in the year. 



Parties at the Bib and Tucker 

The Bib and Tucker Tea Room is 
especially adapted for giving of club 
parties and meetings at noon, the tea 
hour or in the evening, as it is large, 
airy and attractive, and the catering 
and service are always efficient and 
courteous. 

Tables for small private parties may 
be screened off, and so secure seclu- 
sion for those who desire it. 

This lunch room is now making a 
specialty of a vegetable plate, for peo- 
ple who do not care for meat at noon. 



World War Veterans are warned that 
the time is growing short for conversion 
of wartime term insurance to permanent 
forms and for the re-instatement of 
lapsed insurance. Time limits for both 
is fnly 2nd. 



The Poet — Dash it — I can't find that 
sonnet anywhere. Eustace must have 
thrown it into the fire. 

His Wife — Don't be absurd, Algernon. 
The child can't read. — London Opinion. 




-tie better it gob- 




GBO. \Y. (ASWELL 

Sutter $654 or Oakland 1017 
Telepb 

I.sihi.imh) riip<* «frp nerved at the Panama 
raclflr International Kxpnnllion 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 20, 1926 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 11) 
on. However, it takes the experi- 
menter to develop the improvements 
and the layman should not be misled 
by thinking that a bootlegger of a radio 
set is helping the industry. These pi- 
rates copy some standard set, and out- 
side of having a slight knowledge of 
how a radio should function, they are 
at a loss. Of course some will take 
exception to this statement, but it is 
true, nevertheless, that after producing 
the same thing over and over many 
times, even bootlegging in radio be- 
comes a habit. 

Upon entering one of these estab- 
lishments, it does not take long to cor-, 
ner the so-called wizard, inventor, or 
whatever it is he calls himself, and to 
make him admit that he is putting out 
an infringement on some patented 
hook-up. Does he pay royalties for 
this privilege? He does not; nor does 
he intend to, if it is possible for him 
to escape. This type of bootlegger is 
no better than any other type and yet 
he maintains that he is not making 
anything from his efforts. That being 
the case, why does he continue? Does 
anyone suppose that he is in this il- 
legal business, playing the Good Sa- 
maritan to a host of persons that he 
has never seen in his life before. Not 
likely! 

We have any number of sets coming 
on the market with fancy names, and 
coming from manufacturers that were 
not known before, jor coming from a 
source that is very hard to trace, and 
the unsuspecting buyer is under the 
impression that he or she is getting 
something new. What they are get- 
ting is just a mixture of one or more 
of the standard hook-ups. And as for 
standard hook-ups, there are only six 
circuits today. Every set on the mar- 
ket is a combination in some form of 
those six original circuits. So do not 
be misled into thinking that the rea- 
son you are getting what appears to 
be a good set cheap, that you are get- 
ting the best of the deal. Remember 
that you get only what you pay for, 
even to the extent of purchasing a radio 
set. Buy from a good reliable mer- 
chant and you can have no regrets. 
* * * 

Two new regular features have been 
added to the weekly programs of sta- 
tion KPO, San Francisco, both appear- 
ing on the Friday schedule. The first 
of these is a ten-minute book review by 
Harry A. Small, book editor of the 
"Chronicle," and the second "Sports 
on the Air,'' conducted by Harry B. 
Smith, sports editor of the "Chronicle" 
and dean of western sports writers. 
The book review goes on the air at 
7:10 p.m. while the sports feature, 
which includes interviews with local 



and visiting celebrities, begins at 9:10 

p.m., Pacific time. 

* * * 

William YVaiamau and James Harri- 
son, Hawaiian baritones will be heard 
over station KJBS on Monday night 
between the hours of eight and nine 
p.m. This is a treat for the radio listen- 
ers. Tune in. 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 

scenes are real, having been procured 
from the United States government by 
special arrangement. The rest were 
made somewhere in the vicinity of San 
Antonio, Texas. 

One really must see this picture to 
appreciate it. John Gilbert and his two 
pals, Renee Adoree and all the rest 
of the big cast are seen at their best. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"Little Jessie James," the musical 
comedy that steals your heart away, 
which Henry Duffy has staged with 
such a lavish hand at the Alcazar, be- 
gins its fifth week, Sunday evening. 
Harlan Thompson wrote the book and 
lyrics for this production. He has given 
it a real story of the farcical sort. It 
is spiced generously with paprika with 
slightly naughty situations, but there 
is nothing really offensive. 

The music by Harry Archer is par- 
ticularly tuneful and the melody of "I 
Love You," the principal song num- 
ber, runs through the two acts and 
keeps the audience humming it after 
the show is over. There is a snappy 
chorus of "bobbed hair bandits" and 
Dale Winter is delightful in the role 
of Little Jessie, one of the principal 
bandits, and she quite steals your heart 
away. William Davidson, Phil Tead 
and Betty Laurence, Lorraine Mullins 
and Roy Purviance, William Macaulay. 
Florence Robe-ts and Dorothy LeMar 
make up the balance of the excellent 
cast. 

* * * 

Henry Duffy 

Word comes to us from New York 
that the world premiere of Arthur 
Goodrich's latest comedy, "You Don't 
Understand," which appears at Henry 
Duffy's new theater in Seat'.le recently, 
was a tremendous success. 

Duffy, who is on the road with his 
great success, "The Song and Dance 
Man," sent Edward Curtis up to Seattle 
for (lie premiere. Norman Hackett wired 
that it was one of the greatest of com- 
e 'n-~. 



23rd, at 2:30 o'clock, and will illustrate 
her talk with stereopticon slides. 

This is the formal opening of an exhi- 
bition of drawings by Maynard Dixon 
and Ralph Stackpole in the Paul Elder 
Gallery for California Artists' Picture 
Week. 

* * * 

Inayat Khan. World-Famous Oriental 
Philosopher, Mystic Seer and Author, 
will deliver a lecture on "Man ; The Mas- 
ter of His Destiny," in the Paul Elder 
Gallery, Thursday afternoon, February 
25th. Dr. Khan delivere 1 an important 
series of lectures in San Francisco in 
1923, and has since then spoken in the 
Universities of Rome, Geneva, Berlin, 
Christiania and other important cen- 
ters. 



Marimba Band for Caronna Dance 

Down through the ages, comes the ma- 
rimba, ancient instrument of the sun- 
worshipping Aztecs, and used by them in 
their religious ceremonies. The marimba 
i- said to be the creation of the Count 
of Montezuma. Similar to the xylo- 
phone, but decidedly softer and sweeter, 
the marimba is capable of the most rhyth- 
mic syncopation, harmony and melody. 

San Francisco boasts of the largest 
school for the marimba and xylophone 
west of Xew York City, conducted by 
G. E. ("Doc") Willats in the Pantages 
Theater Building. Several marimba bands 
have been formed, and radio fans during 
the past few months have been delight- 
fully surprised when the band rendered 
their programs over KPO and KFRC. 

< >ne of Mr. Willats' bands will play 
for the dancing feet of the guests at Mme. 
Carolina's monthly dansants, which will 
take place. Saturday evening, the 27th 
at Sequoia Hall. 1725 Washington Street. 

Mme. Carolina's dances are always en- 
joyable, and the acquisition of this fasci- 
nating music will make this particular oc- 
casion doubly attractive. 



At the Elder Gallery 

Ma 'ame E. E. Scheyer, an auth rity 
on mo 'ern art, will lecture on "The Liv- 
ing Line as Man's Expression Through- 
out the Ages," in the Paul Elder Gal- 
lery, Tuesday afternoon, February 



First Bay Shore Highway Contract 

The use of $25,000 for a continuation 
of surveys on the Bay Shore Highway 
on sections from Broadway Station to 
San Jose was authorized today by the 
California Highway Commission, it 
was announced by Chairman Harvey 
M. Toy following a meeting of the 
commission at its offices in the State 
Building, 

At the same time the commission ac- 
cepted as completed the contract of 
I). A. Foley and Company of Los An- 
geles for the grading of the first sec- 
tion of the Bay Shore route, extending 
from South San Francisco to Broad- 
wa_\ Station, about 5.2 miles. A grade 
sixty feet in width has been completed 
across the tide flats on this section, the 
highway having been projected on an 
almost straight line along the shore. 

The funds for the survey work will 
(Continued on Page 18) 



February 20, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO .MEWS LETTER 



17 



Mr. Blabbitt on Antipathies 



A PERSON finds out before his brain is many years aged 
in the wood that what is cake for his neighbor is poison 
for himself. If he is the least bit sensitive to the little jokes 
life plays, he soon develops antipathies to this, that and the 
other thing which, at times, cause tragically funny situa- 
tions. 

An antipathy is a violent dislike for something that is 
constantly happening, or persists in confronting one. Its 
direct reaction is either violence or meek submission to the 
inevitable. Most human antipathies are caused by people 
who don't give a hang what anyone thinks, and proceed to 
put the belief into practice. 

Probably the greatest pest of all is the moron given to 
talking or making noise where quiet is requisite to his 
neighbors' comfort. Witness the case of the professional 
peanut and popcorn eater, who most enjoys carrying out his 
diabolical pastime in moving picture theaters, street cars 
and so forth. Probably nothing is so confoundedly ag- 
gravating as the persistent crinkling of a paper bag, the 
often noisy operation of chewing, and the aroma, if it might 
be called such, of food-stuffs in the process of being con- 
verted to practical use. 

America is, of course, known to be the melting pot of 
nations, into which immigrants are poured from other 
countries to remain the same as they always were. The 
antipathies produced by our heterogeneous population in- 
variably come to the surface of the molten mass and either 
pass off in clouds of hot air or are skimmed and poured in 
the immediate vicinity of those who don't like them. For- 
eign antipathies are often of a vegetable, or dietary nature 
and are executed with amazing sangfroid. Luckily the 
causes for dislikes of the foregoing nature frequent grand 
opera performances and street cars generally and, hence, 
cause the average man or women little concern. 

Domestic antipathies are of a more universal type, easy 
to find and hard to get rid of. Personally, the writer most 
dislikes people who are always in evidence or, rather, too 
evident. He has an antipathy for magazines that create 
sex problems while ostensibly pointing them out, tor the 
guidance of the younger generation; for those who do not 
believe that what is caper sauce for the goose i> the same 
for the gander; for cafeteria orchestras with pan and dish 
crescendo ; for convert charges ; for the manner in which 
prohibition is enforced and, among quite a few cither things, 
for those who believe Market Street t.> be representative of 
San Francisco. 

Whatever else may be said of antipathies, we shall have 
to give them credit fur staying with ns through thick and 
thin — and that is more than some friends will do. 



Picture Week 

The City and County Federation of Women's Clubs, will 
hold a "Picture Week," beginning today, and lusting until 
the 27th of this month: a week when the downtown busi- 
ness section of the city will become an art gallery for the 
general public. 

This has been successfully tried in eastern cities, hut it 
is the first affair of its kind to take place in San Francisco, 
when the public will have art brought to it. instead of being 
compelled to go in search o\ art. 

"( )wn an Original." is the slogan, and in many of the 
banks, service corporations and stores, original paintings 
and works of art by California artists will he exhibited. 

Mrs. Albert Stokes is president of the federation this year. 
and Mrs. Beatrice Judd Ryan is chairman of the art sec- 
tion for the vear. 



CAFE MARQUARD 



Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MAS< >.\ 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^ 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 



WIGS and TRANSFORMATIONS 

Also toupees of my make can be worn day or night, 
because I make them ventilated and porous, from the 
finest and purest hair. 

G. LEDERER 

561 Sutter St., Between Powell and Mason Sts. 
San Francisco, California. 

Firm Established 1866 



El Dorado Hotel 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Our Specially— "Stenks 'With AIunhroomN" 

Clean Rooms Clean Linen, Clean Everything 
Visit Sonoma County'* Famous Itenorts and Mineral (Warm Water) Swim 
Tanks From This Hotel 

Hale^ Exceptionally Reasonable 

Telephone 110 



Hollywood— Universal City 

Glendale — Pasadena 

Ventura — Santa Barbara 

Loa Angeles 



MOCO 



A beautiful automobile finish. Its beauty and gloss in- 
crease with use. 
The price is the lowest you will find for a dependable job. 
The saving in first cost is greater because of the short 
time you are deprived of the use of your car. 

GENE MORRISS 
Say AUTO PAINTING SYSTEM 



235 VALENCIA ST. 



PHONE MARKET 9040 



Your 'phone is our Branch Office 
in your home 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
250 Twelfth St.. San Francisco 'Phone Market 916 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Vrf'-d Br Hand Only -Suil. Called For and Drl.trrrd 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



f>> ftni nnif Clt-nnint 



,i8_> Pit-T StTIElT 

1> \ ntciMi Hoifi 



*o Fiumhi o 
Phoik F**-»xli«. 2J10 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 20, 1926 



WIELAND'S BREW 

WITH YOUR MEALS— IT HELPS 

Order by the case from your grocer 

Established 1868 

Main Office, 240 Second Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 671 




.PIONEER 



The 
Name 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 



samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES t 

San FraneiHco — 
Went 7113 



IIiirlliiKnmt- 
4TS 



Pliona Sitteh 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME. ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

201) Post Street nt Grant Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 
PHONE: 
IV 644-645 



Palo alto Office: 

818 EMERSON ST. 

Phone j 

Palo Alto 315-J 



SAN MATEO— Phone 12S4-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

| San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



The Passing of a Philanthropist 
Mr. James L. Flood, San Francisco 
millionaire and philanthropist, died 
Monday morning in his home at Menlo 
Park, after an illness of several months. 
He was sixty-nine years old and is sur- 
vived by his widow, Mrs. Maud Lee 
Flood ; a son, James Flood, and a sister, 
Miss Cora Jane Flood. 

Mr. Flood was born in San Francisco 
on February 21, 1857. He was the son 
of James C. Flood of Comstock Lode 
fame, from whom he inherited the for- 
tune amassed in the stirring days fol- 
lowing the discovery of the Comstock 
Lode, the development of which is 
linked with the "Big Four," James C. 
Flood, William S. O'Brien, John W. 
Mackay and James G. Fair. Mr. Flood's 
vast property holdings are scattered 
throughout California: in San Fran- 
cisco, he owned the Flood building on 
Market Street, the ground on which the 
Pacific building is erected, and the Gil- 
lette building on Market Street; in San 
Mateo County, he owned a 1200-acre 
estate on which he erected a $1,000,000 
mansion ; and in the south, he held one- 
half interest in the Rancho Santa Mar- 
garita which embraces more than 200,- 
000 acres in San Diego, Orange and 
Riverside counties. 

Mr. Flood was known for his sub- 
stantial gifts to charities, especially to 
San Francisco orphanages, where his 
large annual donations were much ap- 
preciated. He was active, too, in the 
business circles of the city : he was di- 
rector of the Wells Fargo Bank and 
Union Trust Company; president of 
the Flood Realty Company, and a di- 
rector of the California-Pacific Title In- 
surance Company. 

The passing of a man of his character 
and influence is an irretrievable loss to 
his friends, his city and his country. 



First Bay Shore Highway 
(Continued from Page 16) 

come from the Highway General Fund 
which was created by the original Bay 
Shore Highway Act of 1923 and into 
which the city of San Francisco has 
paid $500,000 as authorized by the 
Legislature, highway officials ex- 
plained. 



GfcORGE C, HoMEIt 



S. A. LovEjor 



i . M l.rl.l 2024 



The Homer System 

BOOKKEEPING—COLLECTIONS 



Installment. Current Delinquent Accounts. Legal Aid, 

Audits-Systems, Financial Statements, Income Tax 

Reports, Bookkeeping {Part Time Service) 



Dk YounC Building 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Olllce and Worka Mi::.-. Mission St. 

Phone Market 7013 

Branch Oftlce: 700 Sutter St. 

(Hotel Canterbury Olds;.) 

Phone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




NEW ORLEANS' 

To better serve our maty friends arid patrons 
over 'joo.ooo.oo his been expended in recon- 
struction and rehabilitation to maintain this 
famous hostelry £ 

One of America's Leading Hotels 

The large well ventilated high ceiling rooms 
have been retained and modernized-'*-*"- 

ACCOMMODATING OVER 1000 GUESTS 
Send fattecrrotivt Hotel folder; 

IHintiutt'dMardi-t.rasPngramk'rlhc asking 

Alfred S.Amer ANoCO-Ltd. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA 

■"Midtet Offices of all Tanspcrutian line; in lobby 




WHERE TO DINE 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, $1.00 35c, 50c. 75c $1.00,S1.50 a la carle 
Dancing 7:00 P. M. to 1:00 A. M. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 




ICE CREAf%, 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



=<Efe 



BREAKFAST 

POLK £ CALIFORNIA STS LUNCHEON 

Gr.y.tone DINNER 

5100 3101 '1"7 l**"^ i-^ »— »r» 



w 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day la 
taking very good care of them. Brushing; la only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as y,ou Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed f Call In today 
and talk it over. It will coat nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves) and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfleld 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Self Cleaning; Bridges; 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 




Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



334 Sutter St. 



Douglas 71 18 



i^feanorS 



445 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
pervice is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sti. 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) $ ,75 

Sunday Lunrlipon 1.00 

Dinner, Week D*JB.. ....... ..fl.SO 

Dinner, Sundays ami Holiday 1.75 

DANCING SUNDAY EVENINGS 



Phone 
Franklin ! 



isiior Should Leave the City With- 
nui Dining In the Ftaeel Cafe 
in America 



NO A H'S 
ARK 

W.1 Third Avenue, BAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 

11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. ra. 

5:30 p. m. to 8:S0 p. m. 

Sundays and Holtdayi 

1:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY HON DAT 

Half lllock from HIshTrar 



a» 



li Mm Hot'U 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OTEN « 00 A. M TO II 40 P. "• 

1 VS1 RrtSSED CtnsDfl 

Carl Leonhardt 

formerly of 
Coldrn Gale Park Caaina 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic. 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 539+ 



Make yourself at horns at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tlllmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

nportationa from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions In London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



* Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 



at PAUL ELDER'S 

AM) PAVI. ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



DR. B. W. HAINES 



DENTIST 



Elkan Gunst Building 
323 Geary at Powell 
San Francisco 



Hours: 9 to 4 
Telephone Douglas 2949 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.. 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the SprmgM" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

219 Clara TIMal CmiM S44 




e Charm 

of VAR}ETY+s 

From Art Salon to 
Eskimo's Igloo — 
from Halls of Fame 
to Rogues' Gallery 
— the fascinating 
pictorial section of 
The Sunday Chron- 
icle deals with 
every subject under 
the sun. 

You will find entertainment that never 
palls in the ever - changing galaxy of 
pictures presented in the beautiful 

Srniiag ffiijrtftttrl? 

ROTAGRAVURE 



W« 



'HEN it is cold 
outdoors you increase the 
heat indoors resulting in 
the use of more fuel. This 
added comfort affects 
your bills, no matter what 
kind of fuel used. 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 




"PACIFIC SERV1CZ" 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




Their watchword is smiling courtesy. — This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 



The ttnter 
for Thfatret 
'Banks, Shopt 

Tltost •write 
for ^Booklet 



j£ RATES— Ter Way, single. European <Plan 

120 rooms with running water • 52. ">0 lo S4.00 
220 rooms with bath • • - 3.50 to 5.00 
1 60 rooms with bath * - 6.00 to 8.00 

Doubt*. S4.00 up 



Alio a number of large and beautiful roomi and 
suites, some in period furnishing* with grand piano, 
fire place and bath. $10 00 up. 

LARGE AND WELL EOUIPPED SAMPI E ROOMS 

f^^CHO QOLF CLUET] 

L available to all guests J 

HAROLD E. LATHROP 

£Mona%tT 



lk 



HOTEL/ 



ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles *..., 



Golden Gate Ferry 
Company 



WINTER SCHEDULE 

Effective October 1, 1925 



Leave Sausalito 
5:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:30 a. m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:00 p.m. 

Then 

11:00 p.m. 

12:00 p. m. 

1 :00 a. m. 



Leave San Francisco 

5:30 a.m. 

6:30 a. m. 

7:00 a. m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:30 p.m. 

Then 

1 1:30 p.m. 

12:30 a.m. 

1:30 a. m. 



Saturdays and Sundays Only 
2:00 a.m. 2:30 a.m. 

ON SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 



A. O. Stewart 
President 



There will be extra trips if traffic warrants. 

Harry E. Speas 
Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



%~ KAU 1U 


INJbWS A.INU PK(^^^H 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 


Nc 


SAN FRANCISCO 1 I ^J"Tt ft_^ 

i mhIwiw > 


IT 

PRICE 10 CENTS 


^ m ~^~ m ^^ t ^J $ 500 PER YEAR 


I SAN FRANCISCO 


SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 27th. 192S ■■■■■ 




Romeo and Juliet a la pens- 
ant farmhouse. John Gilbert 
as the doughboy and Renee 
Adoree as M elisande in 
"The Big Parade," Kino 
lidor's production of Lau- 
rence Stalling s Story Metro- 
Goldwyn Mayer. 




The Lobby is flooded with light, through toned glai 
From the open court above 



HOTEL SENATOR 

facing Capitol park 

Scenic setting, solid comfort, nationally famous cookery. 

All rooms with private bath: single, 5 3 to 54; double 

(suites excepted), S4.50 to 5". 

CHARLES R. FRASER, -SKanegrr 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 




EsttblUtitd July SO, 1656 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco .News better and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr.. from 1884 to 1926. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 225 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postofflce as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhlll, E. C 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.. FEBRUARY 27, 1926 



No. 9 



From One Thing to Another 

By Eleanore F. Ross 



The world in general has no use for the idealist for the 
reason that the idealist is incomprehensible to the world in 
general. 

* * * 

Quite a few men seem to think that they can repay women 
for favors by love making. Some men are even too stingy 
for that ! 

* * * 

What a relief when we view a moving picture which 
doesn't end with the overworked kiss! "All the world" 
may "love a lover," but I don't believe that all the world 
loves to watch lovers kiss, all the time! 



Here is a saying we picked up, whose source was a femi- 
nine club meeting: "We are a respectable group of women 
who keep three jumps ahead of respectability, and then the 
world catches up and makes what we do respectable." Food 
for thought, eh, what? 

* * * 

Senator Borah, in his strenuous campaign against the 
entry of the United States into the World Court surely must 
have the backing of every fore-sighted, practical, 100 per- 
cent American ! More power to your elbow, Bill! 

* * * 

There seems to be no limit to the assininity connected 
with the Volstead Act. The question as to whether it was 
permissible under this Act to read a portion of Ge< >rge Wash- 
ington's notebook, containing a recipe for making beer was 
brought up by Attorney-General Sargent, at a dinner on 
Washington's birthday. 

* * * 

Aerial stunts performed by army aces in time of peace, 
almost invariably end in disaster. Conserve our "human 
files" tor times of stress, say we. anent the death of France's 
dare devil, I. con Collot, wiio was killed recently when try- 
fly his airplane between the base arches of the Eiffel 
Tower. 



Time was when the fair sex could bring a man's ardor to 
a climax by letting down her "crown of glory" ; at least, that 
is the impression we received from romantic novels. Her 
hair was always falling in a "gleaming mass over her 
shoulders." etc. What snare will she use now. in place of 
this, we wonder? 



Mr. James Swinnerton, creator of the fascinating little 
bears, and recently, of some quite wonderful works in oil 
paintings, and I were discussing modern art, the art which 
Cezanne (I am told) is guilty of having instituted. And 
Swinnerton, who believes in seeking the good in everything, 
found an excuse even for pictures a la Cezanne. "You know," 
he said, "They serve a purpose after all ; they make real 
pictures, in contrast, look so much finer!" 



A man sat inside a California Street car the other day, 
with a smoking cigar in his hand. He was not puffing at 
it, true, but the weed was throwing out quite a nasty smell- 
ing spiral of smoke, just the same. In spite of indignant 
glances that were thrown in his direction, the holder of 
the weed, unchidden by the conductor, seemed quite obliv- 
ious to the fact that there are still numerous women in the 
world who do not smoke, and quite a few men, and these 
men and women have a right to object to a smoky, smelly 
atmosphere in traveling vehicles. 

* * * 

A British rum ship raked by shots of U. S. cutter! More 
instances of this kind, and who can foretell the international 
complications, the international antagonisms, the interna- 
tional crises such affairs could bring about? Civil war in 
connection with the fool Volstead Act. "we have always with 
us"; let us at least draw a sale line when it comes to being 
»ed into the maw of international battles, all through 
a law- foisted upon us against our wills. 



We have just heard of a very wealthy American who 
spends most of his time traveling in Europe. He has en- 
dowed a certain orphan asylum in France with a munificent 
sum, although his philanthropies in his native land are 
conspicuous by their absence. He says frankly that he 
"dislikes America," and sighs for the "culture" of Europe. 

He is impregnated with that microbe which makes a fat 
living on Uncle Sam's nephews and nieces who think it 
clever to depreciate their own country, and extol foreign 
customs. The sort of people seem more "undesirable" 
to us than many an earnest alien, who tries to gain entrance 
into the "land of promise" in the hope that here they can 
find spiritual freedom and a chance to advance themselves 
by honest labor. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 27, 1926 




The two great problems of San 
San Francisco Problems Francisco bare been stated with 
• much intelligence to be those of 
traffic and transportation. Taking the latter of these first, 
it involves an object which this paper lias pursued with 
complete confidence for quite a long time, the unification of 
the street railway systems in such a way that the people 
may travel from one part of the city to another by the pay- 
ment of one fare. 

The application of the street car men for a raise in pay 
had to be denied upon the grounds that a deficit would be 
begun by the city if the request were granted. The city 
was wise in not making a deficit. At the same time, a raise 
in pay for car men would not have been unreasonable in 
view of general conditions. 

But there is much waste in the present broken up .-late 
of the street traffic of this city. It is true that we are main- 
taining a five-cent fare, which is unusual; but only a skilled 
accountant and cost engineer could tell at what cost such a 
fare is maintained and if. with the maintenance of that fare 
under the present conditions, fair play is being given to 
the municipal railroad system. 

And next to the transportation problem comes that of 
traffic. We are glad to see that one supervisor at least, Mr. 
Andrew J. Gallagher, is beginning to take an interest in that 
aspect of our municipal affairs. Some way must be devised, 
satisfactory to both pedestrians and motorists, by which the 
safety of the former and the convenience of the latter may 
be achieved. 

If Mr. Gallagher can come near to doing that, be will de- 
serve the highest commendations of our people. 

There is always a sort of sentimental in- 
Indian Relief terest in the well-being of the Indian and 
of late there has been much sympathy and 
active co-operation. Last November we had a group of 
very interesting Indians, from New Mexico, in the city, 
who were well treated by everybody and in fact became ob- 
jects of actual social solicitude. 

This feeling is natural. The Indian was once the undis- 
puted owner of the land here and we, who have dispi > - >ed 
him, feel, in spite of ourselves, certain conscientious respon- 
sibilities to him and certain regrets for terrible things in the 
past. For it must be frankly admitted that the behavior of 
the earlier comers to the Indian was inexcusably brutal. The 
Franciscan Fathers were the only people who could bring 
out the better points of the native and. assuredly, the only 
people who treated the aboriginal Californians with any- 
thing like decency. They were murdered, assaulted and 
disposed of with impunity. 

In addition to the wrongs actually inflicted upon the In- 
dians, their so-called relief has been a source of much po- 
litical corruption. It is doubtful if any department of the 
government has been so steeped in the coarest kind of poli- 
tics as has that department which has been assumed to 
look after the Indians. 

Now, however, the worst part of that system seems likely 
to be ended. There is a bill before Congress which will pro- 
vide that all federal funds for the relief of the Indian will 
be administered through the State Department of Health, 
Education and Public Welfare. 

Our representatives at Washington should be urged to 
support this measure and prevent duplication of expendi- 
ture on behalf of the Indian. 



One almost gets sick of the eternal commis- 
Tinkering sions which one after another file into ob- 

livion, leaving behind them the bad smell of 
futility. Now, the governor, who usually has a fair grasp 
of the fitness of things, has appointed another commission 
to go into the matter of criminal procedure in the state. It 
is only fair to state, however, that the commission was 
wished on the governor by the Legislature, which generally 
may be counted upon to add to the gaiety of things. 

The commission is to be appointed in order to devise a 
more rapid way of disposing of criminal cases and, the gov- 
ernor implies, for the speedy and more ready punishment 
if i iffenders. 

This is not the right way to approach the matters. What 
we are concerned with first is the doing of justice, real, sub- 
stantial justice. We do not want the guilty to escape and 
we most assuredly do not want the innocent to suffer. Any 
changes which will risk the safety and liberty of innocent 
people, for the sake of catching the guilty are bad ; they are 
poor jurisprudence and equally poor morals and threaten the 
slate ultimately with overthrow. An unjust legal system 
is worse than lynch law, which, with all its defects, has a 
justification in the passion of a mob, which an unjust ad- 
ministration of law in the courts can never attain. 

This talking about clever criminal lawyers getting away 
with the juries seems to be the merest whining. What is a 
court and jury made of that will let such a thing happen? 
What system could be devised to bolster up such weakness? 

The weakness of the present system lies in the system it- 
self and the dependence of judges upon the whims of the 
populace as well as the stupidity of juries. 



The cost of living is probably going 

Living Costs Fall down not only in this country but 

abroad, except in France, where the 

condition of the franc and the great amount of newly issued 

paper money tends to keep prices artifically up. 

Commodity prices in this country show marked signs of 
falling, there being a majority of falling price commodities 
over those whose price has risen. 

We get the same phenomenon in Britain, where prices 
have touched a lower level than at any time since 1923 and 
-how marked signs of continuing to fall, and in Germany, 
where conditions are pretty bad just now, the fall being still 
more evident. 

This means in plain language that the period of inflated 
prices is over, and that the period of regular competitive 
production is here again. Of course, prices have a long 
way to fall before they get back to the 1913 level, which was 
60 per cent below the present prices in this country and 63 
per cent below the present in Britain. But, except for 
those food stuffs which are, by reason of the comparative 
scarcity due to increase in population, higher than at former 
periods, we may expect to see falling prices in the near fu- 
ture, for the process once started is likely to proceed. 

What will be the effect upon wages? Naturally if the 
prices of products in the markets fall, the price of the com- 
modity, labor, must of necessity fall with them. It is to be 
hoped for their own sakes that working men will not in 
many cases repeat the blunder of the anthracite coal strike, 
which lost them so much in wages and gained them nothing 
at the end. 



The bread trust is beginning 
An American Industrialist to attract attention. There 

is already incipient baying 
on the part of the anti-trust hounds against the new devel- 
opment of capital in the baking industry. For us, we care 
not about combinations. The main thing is the production 



February 27, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



of a good commodity at a fair price. Any honest way in 
which that can he done is the right way. 

But the career of William B. Ward, who is the founder of 
the new organization, is worth looking into. It is charac- 
teristic of this country, for speed and certainty of rise. Four 
years ago he was the unknown head of two small baking 
companies. From some source, not so far revealed, he got 
sufficient financial backing to launch a nation-wide baking 
company, called United Bakeries Corporation, with a capi- 
tal of $50,000,000. A year later he managed to get the other 
Wards out of the original Ward Baking Company and 
greatly to increase its capital. Two years later the two 
concerns blossomed out into the Continental Baking Cor- 
poration, with a capital of $600,000,000. In less than a year 
after tha', Ward managed to tie up to this concern the 
General Baking Corporation, and reincorporate The General 
Baking Corporation of Maryland, with a capital of one 
billion dollars. Four months after that the Mammoth Ward 
Food Products was launched, with two billions capital 
stock. 

Now, the small people are crying "Food Trust." We shall 
see. The baking organizations will have to be judged, as 
all other economic organizations, by the social service ren- 
dered in quality and cost of commodities. These are the 
only tests worth while. 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 



From one of the most impor- 
Governmental Persecution tant of our local papers, we 

take the following excerpt: 

"We have in this country a government of tyrannical 
puritanical, pe"secuting, spying, keyhole-peeping, woman- 
baiting, man-hating, messing, interfering old fossils, stick- 
ing their blue noses into everybody's business." 

The article from which the above was taken is written 
with reference to the Cathcart case, which has produced SO 
much feeling and is likely to develop into a law case of 
importance. But leaving that matter on one side, there is 
no doubt that the adjectives applied to the group which as- 
sumes governmental functions in this country, arc exceed- 
ingly appropriate and come very near being an accurate 
summary of many disgusting and degrading governmental 
activities. 

This tendency to interfere in private matters, which arc- 
not by any means of public importance has always existed in 
the country and is no doubt due to the early village lite of 

the community. People in remote country districts arc very 
likely to busy themselves with the affairs of other people, for 
lack .if other means of satisfying their curiosity and bestial 
longings to inflict pain. These villages, though declining in 
imporiance, arc still very powerful politically. The politician 
comes from them with a mini already formed by the village 
life nf his youth. Moreover, personal matters of a gossipy na- 
ture are those which appeal most Strongly to the imagination 
of his \ tllage constituents. 

Hut more than anything else tending to degrade the govern- 
mental mind and to produce petty tyranny, is the prohibition 
amendment with its corollary, Volstead. 



Interesting Events in Denmark in 1926 

March 28-31- International Tennis Tournament. 

June 2 — Elsinore, the town of Hamlet, with famous Kron- 
borg (Aistlc. 500 years anniversary of granting of charter. 

June 5. 6 — International Motor Races on the beach of 
Fanoe. 

June 23, .'"—International sailing regatta. Copenhagen. 

Beginning of August — National Fair in Fredericia (Jut- 
land). 

Yes, dearie, the only substitute for brains is silence. 



Conservatism is a state of mind resulting from a good job. — 
Richmond News-Leader. 

* * * 

France is the real land of opportunity. There, sooner or 
later, every man gets a chance to enter the Cabinet. — Mil- 
waukee Journal. 

* * * 

People talk of nuisance taxes as tho there were some other 
kind. — Florence ( Ala. ) Herald. 

* # * 

"Men who get things done, shave daily." — Ad. This seems 
to dispose of Mr. Hughes, Poincare, King George and Santa 
Claus. — Detroit News. 

If only the days were longer, Hoover might handle several 
other Departments. — Roanoke World News. 

* * * 

Ah, well ; when the go-getters all go to Florida, the rest of 
us will have a better chance at home. — Tucson Citizen. 

* * * 

Don't be deceived by the weather prediction, "Partly cloudy." 
The other part is probably snow, hail, cloudburst and blizzard. 

— Detroit News. 

* * * 

Life isn't just one darn thing after another. It is just about 
a million darn things after a million others. — Columbia Record. 

* * * 

France Expected to Reopen Debt Parley Soon. — Headline. 
Let's hope that France has learned by now that it takes 
jacks or better to open. — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

That Rhinelander suit ought to be sent to the cleaner. — Vir- 
ginian-Pilot. 

* * * 

The motor-car will eventually drive people underground, says 
a traffic expert. It often does now. if it hits a man hard enough. 

— Punch. 

* * * 

I 'aim Beach has gone in for synthetic jewelry. Plate glass 
diamonds and paste pearl- are certainly in keeping with paper 

profits. — Wichita Lagle. 

* * * 

Arrests of coast-guard personnel for conniving with rum- 
runners indicate that some of the teeth in the Volstead Law 
are false. — Florence i Ala. ) Herald. 

* * * 

Another thing against war is that it seldom if ever kills off 
the right people. — Baltimore Sun. 

* * * 

And just a few years ago being knock-kneed was a misfor- 
tune instead of a dance. — Birmingham News. 

* * * 

Another paradox is that many climb to considerable heights 

by remaining on the level. — Florence (Ala. I Herald. 

* * * 

The radio industry i- in its infancy. That's why the darn 
things kick up such a racket when you have company. — Colum- 
bia Record. 

* * * 

Rubber prices mav soon be spelled with an o. — Virginian- 
Pilot. 

* * * 

Whether the pedestrian gets an even break depends largely 
on where he's hit. — Arkansas Gazette. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 27, 1926 




LEISURE'S WW 




OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ 75/7? Moore, 





Curran 

BEAUTIFUL girls, wonderful cos- 
tumes, gorgeous stage settings, a 
musical score clo^elv woven into the 
story. — well, 
it is hard to 
write about 
" Rose Ma- 
rie'' which 
came to the 
Curran, 
ipening last 
Monday 
night to an 
enthusiastic 
audience. 

There is a 
strong 1 story, 
and of course 

Kalherino SchnnrlK the S n S S 

that have been the hits in the play and 
preceded it by two years or more, were 
enthusiastically recognized and ap- 
plauded. Of these, the "Indian Love 
Call." "Rose Marie" and "Totem Tom 
Tom" are the outstanding numbers. 

Arthur Hammerstein has sent us a 
marvelous production, and special men- 
tion must be made of the view of the 
mountains and the valley for the 
Totem Pole Lodge scene, which is a 
marvelous bit of scene painting. The 
Totem Pole dance, in which the chorus 
wins the plaudits of the audience, is un- 
usual and novel, and indeed, the cos- 
tuming is wonderfully beautiful and 
artistic. 

Maria Shamson, the prima donna, 
has a voice of rare quality, and her 
vivaciousness and beauty enthrall her 
hearers ; Thomas Conkey is thoroughly 
satisfying in the role of the lover; and 
Arthur Cunningham, an old favorite 
here, is great in the part of Sergeant 
Malone. Sibylla Bowhan does some 
splendid dancing, with a technic and 
fire that are marvelous to behold. 
Betty Byron, petite and charming little 
soubrette, adds much to the pleasure 
of the audience, being delightful : 
Charley Sylber and she carry the bur- 
den of the comedy, and were instant 
hits with the large audience. 

The big orchestra, under the able 
direction of Fred Walz, played the very 
excellent musical score in a most artis- 
tic and satisfying way, and too much 
can not be said for the perfectly trained 
chorus of men and girls, who can both 
sing and dance. 



(Conducted by Katherine Schwartz) 

Loew's Warfield 

"The Devil's Circus." the first Amer- 
ican production under the direction of 
the Danish director, Benjamin Chris- 
tianson, opens at the Warfield today. 

Norma Shearer, Charles Emmett 
Mack, Carmel Myers. Claire Mc- 
Dowell. John Miljan, Joyce Coad. the 
latest child find in fihndom. and the 
popular trick dog. "Buddy." make up 
a very strong cast. 

It is a simple story, simply told, and 
therein lies its greatness. The play 
has melodrama, comedy and pathos, 
and it is well acted and directed. 

On the stage the presentation will 
bring to San Francisco, old and popular 
friends. Boyce Come. "The American 
Prince of Wales" is the star in Fan- 
chon & Marco's Idea. "Candle Light." 
Another favorite is Rose Yalyda, the 
two-voiced girl, star of the radio and 
a great favorite here. There will be 
new fares, too — Mildred Costello , a 
beautiful girl in Spanish dances. 
Arnold Grazier, a versatile dancer, and 
the ever-welcome Sunkist Beauties. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

A big carnival comedy is offered to 
the patrons of the Orpheum the com- 
ing week, when an all new bill of stage 
favorites gathered from all over the 
world, will present a program filled 
with beautiful girls and plenty of fun 
and comedy for good measure. 

Trini. Spain's foremost artist, and 
one of the world's most beautiful girls, 
heads the program in a new diver- 
tissement in which she is assisted by 
the South American troubadours, Daric 
Bersani and Charles Schneck. 

A pair of the best entertainers in 
the land, Ted and Betty Healy, will 
dispense fun and good cheer in the 
original Healy manner, the Stefane 
Mascagne Ballet, one of vaudeville's 
stupendous dance divertissements, with 
a large company of beautiful and tal- 
ented girls, including Klarna Pinska, 
a native of San Francisco, is also a 
featured attraction; Ted Doner, late 
of "Lady Be Good" and one of Broad- 
way's most popular juveniles, is also 
on the bill. 

A new feature is the engagement of 
the Royal Northwestern Police Band 
under the direction of Eddie Elliott; 
the Six Hassans, an aggregation of 
whirlwind wizards; Jerome Mann, ju- 



venile mimic in "Impersonations" com- 
plete the long list of artists. There 
will be another ever-popular after- 
piece, featuring a big carnival in which 
all the artists participate. 

* * * 
Golden Gate Theater 

Next week's bill for the Golden Gate 
is headed by Miss Ruth Rove, peppy 
delineator of ragtime ditties. Miss 
Roye is known as the "Comedienne of 
Syncopation," and her songs are all 
of the popular type and are given a 
new and distinctive interpretation. 

Jean Boydell, the "Unique Pepolo- 
gist," is the second unusual star on 
the bill, and returns to the Golden 
Gate this year with an entirely new 
act. Dan Stanley and Al Birnes, a 
couple of "fast hoofers," have a fine 
routine of new dance steps ; Billy 
House and Company in a comedy of 
love and lingerie called, "Oh, Teddy," 
are also on the bill ; an "Amateur Nite 
in London" is another feature, being 
a burlesque on the London music halls ; 
there is still another big act which has 
not been announced, but there is a 
surprise in store for theatergoers at this 
theater this week. 

On the screen will be shown "The 
Pace That Thrills," a new First Na- 
tional release starring Ben Lyon, Mary 
Astor and Tully Marshall, in what is 
said to be the fastest moving action 
film ever made, it includes a prize fight, 
a bull fight and a great automobile 
race. 

The usual short films and Claude 
Sweeten and his orchestra, with Grace 
Rollins Hunt at the organ, round out 
a program of unusual interest. 

* * * 
Columbia 

Beginning Monday evening, March 
1st, there will be a notable production 
given at this theater, where R. C. Whit- 
ney presents Julia Arthur in George 
Bernard Shaw's "Saint Joan" with a 
distinguished cast in support. 

* * * 
Auditorium 

The San Carlo Opera Company has 
made a new record in its engagement 
at the Auditorium this season. With 
such a coterie of brilliant stars, to- 
gether with a splendid chorus and or- 
chestra, there has been a record-break- 
ing attendance at each performance, 



February 27, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ALEXANDRIA } 

Geary and 18th ( 



Pictures 



ALCAZAR ) 

O'Farrell nr. PowellJ "Twelve Miles Out" 


CALIFORNIA ) „_. _. . -. 
4th and Market \ "The First Year" 


CAMEO ) "The Home Makers" 

> Alice Joyce and 
036 Market St. J Clive Brooks 


CAPITOL 1 Kolb & Dill 
Ellis nr. Market ^ "Pair o' Fools" 


CASINO 1 

Mason and Ellis J Pictures 


CASTRO J 

429 Castro St. J Pictures 


Columbia | Julia Arthur in 
"«» E «'«y I "Saint Joan" 


CURRAN 1 „ Rose Marje „ 
Geary nr. Mason f 


Egyptian f Pictures 


golden gate 1 Vaudeville 
G. G. Ave. & Taylor ( and Pictures 


GRANADA ( "Fifth Avenue" 
10«« Market St. ( 


iiaight I Pictures 
HntRht at Cole \ 


IMPERIAL ( "The Cohens and 
1077 Market St. ( the Kellys" 


LOEWS WARFIELD ( .- The De vil's CirCUS" 
088 Market St. ( 


MAJESTIC ) 

Mission between * Pictures 
20th and 21st ) 


METROPOLITAN ) 

2055 Union St. ( Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 
1320 Fillmore 
NEW MISSION 
2550 Mission 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM I ., . ... 
OFnrrell* Powell J Vaudeville 


Pantages (New) I Vaudeville 

Mkt.-Leavcnuoilh j 


pompeii j. Pictures 

TVext to Granatin \ 


PORTOLA I n . . 

770 Market St. | Pictures 


PRESIDENT 1 Florence Roberts in 
Market & McAllister ( "Dancing Mothers" 


ROYAL ( _. . 

1520 Polk St. ( Pictures 


ST. FRANCIS I .. 8ehind the Front" 
085 Market St. J 


SUTTER 1 _.. 
Sotter and Stelner | Pictures 


UNION SQUARE 1 Pictures and 
O'Farrell nr. Powell i Vaudeville 


wilkes 1 -The Big Parade" 

Geary and Mason \ 


WIGWAM J 

Mission and 22d ( Pictures 


CONCERTS 

Curran Theater. Sunday Afternoon 2:45. San 
Francisco Symphony. 



proving that San Francisco has many- 
lovers of good music. 

* * * 

Theater Arts Club 

The Theater Arts Club gave four 
one-act plays of much interest at the 
Players' Guild on Thursday evening. 
Under the direction of Talma Zetta 
Wilbur, the plays presented were "The 
Eldest," by Edna Ferber; "God 
Winks" by Katherine Sunderry Bur- 
gess ; "Not Such a Goose" by Eliza- 
beth Galey and "After Twenty-five 
Years" by O. W. Firkens. 

San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra 

The eighth popular concert was fea- 
tured to us by the "C" Minor Sym- 
phony of Reethoven ; it was wisely put 
on a "Pop" concert for from our mo- 
ments as a student, it was the cause 
of many whacks on the fingers and 
scoldings from the teacher : it is there- 
fore popular because it is correct, what 
student does not remember the correct 
chords; the correct rhythm; the old 
1, 2, 3, 4 which was simple enough for 
all to learn (?) yet difficult to play 
correctly. It must be done correctly 
as Mr. Hertz did it. 

Let us thank Mr. Hertz again for 
the Prelude to Lohengrin. The Menuet 
by Boccherini and Gavotte by Godard, 
were pleasant indeed to the ear and ' 
the "Marionette's Funeral March" is 
always delightful. 

* * * 
St. Francis 

"Behind the Front," continues to 
cause great waves of laughter at each 
performance. Wallace Beery is scream- 
ingly funny, and it is well worth your 
w bile to see this picture. 

* * * 
Imperial 

"The Cohens and the Kellys" is a 
merry play which is now showing at 
the Imperial Theater. It is full of 
sentiment, humor and fun. It i- well 
plaved, and delights the movie fans. 
It fills its mission, which is to amuse 
and entertain. 

* * * 

President 

"Dancing Mothers" is going into its 
six-h week at Henrv Duffy's popular 
playhouse on McAllister Street, the 
President, and shows no abatement of 
interest on the part of the public. The 
comedy has elements that appeal to a 
modern audience. It is jazzy and up-to- 
the-minute, and it pleases because it 
- a woman of forty rebelling at be- 
ing called an "old woman." and stepping 
out for herself, .'rawing all the beaux at 
her experienced beds, 

Florence Roberts has this role and re- 
vels in it. showing all her fine art in its 
performance. She looks beautiful, and 
acts with force and power. 



There is a splendid cast in her sup- 
port, each one of which is admirably 
cast. 

Capitol 

Kolb and Dill in their musical corned)-, 
"Pair o' Fools," begin the sixth week 
of their San Francisco engagement at the 
Capitol Theatre tomorrow night. The 
piece ran for one month at the Curran 
Theatre and so great was the success of 
the two funsters that it was necessary 
for them to cancel all other California 
engagements in order that they might re- 
main here in San Francisco. "Rose Ma- 
rie" was booked to open at the Curran last 
Monday night, hence their removal to the 
Capitol. 

The engagement at the Capitol will he 
of short duration as Kolb and Dill are 
booked to open at a leading Chicago the- 
atre in the near future 

sje s|e $ 

Alcazar 

"Twelve Miles Out," William Anthony 
McGuire's strange and amusing adven- 
ture, a play that is at the present time the 
talk of New York, will be given its first 
production outside of the metropolis at 
the Alcazar tomorrow evening. Henry 
Duffy, always tip-to-the minute, secured 
the Pacific Coast rights to this merry 
thriller as soon as it had been acclaimed 
a success on Broadway. It is one of the 
big triumphs of the season at the Play- 
house, New York, where it is now play- 
ing. 

It is promised for San Francisco that 
the production will be one of the most 
elaborate seen at this theater in some 
time. Duffy has obtained for one of the 
leading roles, Frank Sheridan, New York 
star of renown. Dale Winter and Wil- 
liam Davidson will also have splendid 
parts, and a very important role will be 
in the capable hands of William Ma- 
cauley. In addition to these players. 
Duffy has brought from Xew York, espe- 
cially for this offering, two talente 1 
actors, Harry J. Leland and Edward 
Lynch. 

"Twelve Miles Out" is the most start- 
ling, vivid and mystifying play imagin- 
able. It concerns the doings of boot- 
leggers and highjackers, and all of its 
three acts take place on a ship at sea. 

Others in the cast will be Phil Tead. 
William Abram. Frank Darien, Charles 

Edler and Patric O'Neil. 

* * * 

"The Big Parade" 
Those who have seen "The Big Pa- 
rade" at the Wilkes Theatre and patrons 
of the cinema who have not heretofore 
viewed this sterling attraction, are ad- 
vised to take advantage of the short time 
that this epic remains at the Wilkes, for. 
according to announcements that are 
deemed official, the entire organization 
will shortly make the parade to other 
climes. Portland, it is said i< scheduled 
I Continued on Page 16) 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 27, 1926 






San Francisco's Beauties 
Defined i 1 Memories' Lines 

SOCIETY folks, literary leaders, book devotees and their 
cultured constituents, in particular, are hunting eagerly, 
these days for poems, descriptive articles and historical 
books on' San Francisco. The present devotion to study of 
their native city is not a spasmodic fad as might at first 
be supposed, but it is an ardent and determined desire to 
thoroughly acquaint one's self with the natural beauties 
of this citv. 

At a literary gathering held in the California Llub home on 
Clay Street this past week, one of the outstanding poems on 
Sari Francisco was the motif of the scholarly event. 

This poem: "San Francisco From Russian Hill." written by 
Eleanore Ross, was delightfully read by Virgilio Luciani. poet. 
Requests for its repetition prompt us to print it in these col- 
umns in compliance with those whose social affairs offer study 
as well as transitory pastimes. 

For do not be misled and believe that society is engrossed 
in bridge to the lack of reading — or an appreciation of books. 
Society, on the other hand, sponsors creative work wherever 
it can rind the things it seeks as worth while and commemora- 
tive. 

The beautiful poem by Eleanore Ross: 

San Francisco From Russian Hill 
From my small roof-tree, perched upon the bill. 
Where sea winds pass unbidden o'er the sill, 
While shadows creep along the streets below, 

I watch the kindling of the afterglow. 

* * * 

The breath of throbbing mills is tossed on high, 
Like waving plumes upon the evening sky. 
But e'en the smoke from each dun fact' iry 
Holds some strange beauty that appeals to me ; 

For I can see the light strike 'gainst its swirl, 

And change it into opalescent pearl. 

* * # 

Like brown moths flitting in the Summer moon, 
The lateen sails steal from the still lagoon ; 
Long night must cover them upon the bay. 
They breast the swinging waxes as if in play. 

* * * 

Across the waters of a changing sea, 

Now chrysoprase, now lapis lazuli. 

Aglow as touched by some magician's wand. 

Rises the King of cloud-kissed Tamal land. 

* * * 

In darker times to cheer our smoke-seared sight. 
The torch that shone unceasing through the night. 
Still flashes warning to the ships that pass. 
From the grim battlements of Alcatraz. 

* * * 

Then fades the glow, and sea and sky grow dun. 
Night's hand wipes out the colors of the sun. 
That lone and distant bell, disconsolate 
Tells of the gray guest waiting at the gate. 



By Antoinette Arnold 

I see the evening breeze catch his white hair, 
And snowy beard, and fling them in the air, 
While one by one, against the dark'ning sea, 
(.learn out the lights of "Little Italy." 

* * * 

So, when the glow fades, and my day wanes late, 
Let me not fear the "Gray Guest at the Gate"; 
But let me meet him as a gracious host, 
Nor see in him the dread face of a ghost. 
Here in my little roof-tree on the hill. 
Where sea winds pass unbidden o'er the sill. 

* * * 

Society hastening to Del Monte and Monterey for the big 
polo tournaments and for the week-end visits over Washing- 
t' in 's birthday, presented a gala appearance at the famous hostel- 
ries in and around Pebble Beach and environs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence McCreery gave a number of festive 
affairs at their Pebble Beach home. Their house gues's were 
Mr. and Mrs. William K. Bowes, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence 
Bowes, Mi<- Katherinc I'.' wes and Mr. Richard Schwerin. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Shaw were at Pebble I'.each over 
the holiday week-end. 



Mr. and Mr-. Charles Holbrook, Jr.. went to Santa Barbara 
last week to attend the welding of Miss Esther Beebe Ham- 
mond and Mr. H. 11. Webb, Jr.. which took place February 20 
on the Hammond estate. Bonnymede, Montecito. 

* * * 

A party of society folks went to Yosemite Valley for the 
week-end and to indulge in the winter sports. Mr. and Mrs. 
Moren Tyron, Miss Barbara ami Audrey Willett were among 
the enthusiastic society folks who delighted in the snow games 
and winter's gaveties. 

* * * 

Mrs. Tcmpleton Crocker gave a number of social affairs in 
compliment to Mr. anil Mrs. Walter Dillingham and Mrs. Har- 
old Dillingham prior to their departure for Honolulu. 

* * * 

The Vittoria Colonna Club 

An unusually interesting program will he given by the 
Vittoria Colonna Club, of which Mrs. John Jaro is presi- 
dent, and Mrs. M. Cafferata is chairman, today, the 27th, 
in the Bank of Italy Auditorium. No. 1 Powell Street. 

After the regular meeting, which will take place at 2:15 
p.m., the following program will be given at 3:15 p.m.: 

Piano selection by Marie Becker and Francis Violich. 

Mr. Virgilio Luciani, poet and author, will recite a group 
of original poems, in both English and Italian, accompanied 
by Mrs. Portia Bradley at the piano. 

Mrs. J. C. Whelan will contribute several vocal selections, 
and the speaker of the day will he Mrs. Parker S. Maddux. 

The following comprise the reception committee: 

Mrs. F. Gastaldi. Miss O. Ottoboni. Mrs. A. B. Bianchi, 
Miss A. Toriggino. Mrs. L. Ferrari. Mrs. L. R. Podesta will 
serve tea. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

050 (lush Street. Between Powell and Stockton, San Franei 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLBTHEN, Proprietor 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Batter 6130 Under Management CARI, S. STANLEY 



February 27, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Mrs. John Merrill and Miss Camille Fatten 
were prominent among those who contributed to 
the Laurel Hall program at the Fairmont Hotel. 
Mrs. T. V. Cator and Mrs. L. A. Pfeiffer, the lat- 
ter of whom is a prominent member of the San 
Francisco Branch League of American Pen 
Women, as well as an executive of Laurel Hall 
Club, essayed leading roles in the presentation 
of Shakesperean characters at the anniversary 
breakfast of Laurel Hall Club. Mrs. M. C. Mc- 
Gurrin played selections on the Irish harp. 
* * * 

Mayflower Ball 

Isabel Likens Gates, well-known poet and short 
story writer of Washington, D. C, was a promi- 
nent author attending the Mayflower Ball given 
in Washington, D. C., last week under the au- 
spices of the Washington League of American 
Pen Women. 

Mrs. Gates wore the gown in which she was 
married 31 years ago and, according to those who 
saw this charming author she was one of the most 
attractive leaders of the ball. 

Some of the favorite dances of long ago were 
features of the Mayflower Ball, the lancers, the quadrille and 
the waltz as "it used to be danced" were fascinating measures 
of the ballroom. One of the innovations was the playing of 
Mr. Ford's prize "fiddler," who came from Massachusetts for 
the occasion, Mrs. Gates' "lady opposite" wore her grand- 
mother's wedding dress of 1842. 

The ladies taking part in one of the artistic quadrilles were 
all in green with yards of silk and graceful folds of "ye long 
ago" adding quaintness and charm. 

Mrs. H. S. Mulliken is the capable president of the District 
of Columbia branch, under whose direction the ball was given. 
All of the officers co-operated so heartily that the event was 
a great success, and historically, as well as artistically and fi- 
nancially, registered something superlatively fine and memor- 
able. 

* * * 

Isabel Likens Gates is the sister of Dr. J. \Y. Likens of San 
Francisco, whose home is on California Street. Airs. Gates 
has written a number of patriotic poems, one of which was read 
recently on Armistice Day in Washington at the sacred cere- 
monies. She also lead one of her own poems at Arlington and 
while Mrs. Gates was in San Francisco she was the guesl of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution and. upon request, 
read her poem on "The Flag" at the ceremonies held at the 
Palace of Fine \rts as part of their patriotic program, 

* * * 
Engagement Luncheon 

Mis. Harry Hush Magec gave a luncheon ;it her Pie 
home in compliment to Miss Margaret Bentley, whose engage- 
ment has been announced to Mr. Stewart Hellman, 

* * * 

Mrs. Charles Suydam gave a delightful party for Miss Rosa- 
lind Warwick, whose betrothal to Mr. Merrill Morsehead has 
been the incentive for any number of charming affairs recently. 

* * * 

Miss Olive Watt was the honor guest at a luncheon given 
last week by Miss Carrol Andrew, whose guests were Mrs. 
Eric t.auson, the Misses lean Howard. Elizabeth Sutton. Cyn- 
thia Body, Peggy Martin. Beatrice Horst. Drusilla Maltby, 
Kathryn Chace, Dorcas Jackson. Evelyn l.ansdale and June 
Clement. 




HOTEL OAXTERBURY 
750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



Two young California society girls have left 
for the East to study art, Miss Hildreth Meiere, 
daughter of Mr. Ernest Meiere and Miss Louise 
Janin, daughter of Mrs. Harry Mendell, have 
both gained recognition for their talent. Miss 
Meiere has become known for her skill as decora- 
tor and a painter of beautiful murals. She is 
now finishing murals for a church in Boston. 
* * * 

An interesting musical affair was given at the 
Commodore Sloat School under the direction of 
Miss Olive Bartlett, special teacher of music in 
the school. One hundred children from the upper 
grades took part in the Cantata, "The Childhood 
of Hiawatha." Ira Wilson wrote the music to 
Longfellow's poem and Miss Leora Shuck was 
the accompanist. The children were dressed in 
Indian costumes. Miss Estelle Carpenter, director 
of music in the public schools, has long been 
training the school children in this kind of work, 
helping them to appreciate the best in music as 
well as training their young voices to sing the 
parts they essayed with so much understanding 
and skill. The setting for the Cantata was the 
work of the school children, who made all of the posters, de- 
picting a forest. 

* * * 

Burlingame Dinner 
Dance for Visitors 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Verdier were bus's at an elaborate din- 
ner dance given last week in compliment to Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Chrysler of New York, the Rurlingame Country Club 
being the setting for the society event. 

Quantities of early spring flowers were used in the decora- 
tive scheme. Festoons of colored silks hung from the ceilings, 
blending in tone with the blossoms. Delicately tinted -.hells 
provided the table lightings with soft glows spreading over the 
motifs giving a fairly-like effect to the scene. 

The guest list comprise 1 the smart set of the peninsula and 
bay cities many of whom were visiting celebrities from the 
i coast and European centers. 

Those attending the delightful event included: Messrs and 
Mesdames: George M. Armsby, Thomas Eastland, Charles 
Blyth, Arthur Brown, Jr., Walter Hobart, George T. Cameron. 
Charles Howard Jr., Templeton (rocker, George Nickel, 1 1. W. 
I 1 ' ett. R. W. Salisbury, < ieorge ('. Thierbach, Cyril Tobin, E. J. 
Tobin, Mountford S. Wilson, Fentress Hill, J. Clark Burgard, 
Charles Howard. Linsey Howard. W. W. Crocker, F. 1'.. Hus- 
. W. McNear, William (i. Parro't, G. A. Pope, Robert 
II. Smith. Rudolph Spreckels, Joseph O. Tobin, Andrew 
Welch. Cliff Weatherwax, Adolph Sutro, Herbert Fleishhacker, 
Dr. and Mrs. Mas Rothschild, Captain and Mrs. Edward Mc- 
Cauley, Mrs. Tobin (lark. 

Misses: Margery Blyth, Evelyn Poett. Alice Hager, Alice 
Moffitt, Florence Welch, Adelaide Sutro, Claudine Spreckels, 
Eleanor Armsby, Katharine Kuhn, Marie Welch. Marjorie 
Fleishhacker. Margot Sutro. 

Messrs: James D. Phelan, Trescott Scott. William Tevi-. Jr., 
II. Fleishhacker. Jr.. William H. Crocker, George McNear. Jr., 

William S. Tevis. 

* * * 

Laurel Hill Literati 

Members ami guests of Laurel Hall Club, the first club of 
n point of organization period, were royally en- 
i Continued on Page 14 1 



SANTA MARIA INN 

S \\T \ M \RI \. C U.IFORVIA 

On lh» CoaM Highway Halfway Brtwr*n San Frantitco and L<w \»prlr 

\n Inn of I'niiMial Excellent* 

trr *r HTlM for re* err alto** on yonr next trip tnuth 



AGU A C ALIENTE SPRINGS--- Why? 

It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrac- 
tions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
minp pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN. Agua Caliente. Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah. I 
... 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 27, 1926 



•^a^ 



j 



-eoys* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



•S^JS* 



•SW&JS* 




H 



O. HARRISON, chairman of the Tenth 
■ Annual Auto .Men's Golf Championship 
tournament, which is scheduled to take place 
at Del Monte. March 5, 6, 7 is whetting up his 
appetite to kill some more big game when he 
encounters Charlie Howard, the Buick boss, 
lack French, the Dodge demon and Norman 
* be Vaux, who peddles the Star of cars. 

H. O. has just returned from a year's hunting expedition 
in the big jungles of South Africa, where he potted hun- 
dreds of lions, tigers, and many other wild animals, bill 
he says that's nothing to what he expects when he meets 
those three pillars of gasoline row in the open at Del Monte 
forest. 

They say that Harrison is a dead shot and can pot them 
from any distance according to Jack French. 

Last year he plucked so many tail fea'.hers out of Norman 
De Yaux that the famous Frenchman could hardly make the 
grade back to Oakland after the tournament. However, 
Norman is no quitter and will be on deck again fully forti- 
fied with several million francs, with which he will back up 
his opinion. 

Jack French never "Dodged'' an issue yet ; no matter how 
you get Frenchy he comes back for more. Jack says if he 
needs any assistance he will call on Jack Nelson, his star 
salesman and a former Princeton fullback. Jack is a bird 
when the game is tough. With Charlie Howard it's dif- 
ferent. Charlie delights to contribute a few thousand 
eagles each year, he says he gets more kick out of watching 
De Vaux, French and Harrison argue over a few hundred 
dollars than he does watching Kolb and Dill. 

Jack French will assist Harrison on the tournament com- 
mittee along with Frank Herman, conceded to be the 
world's greatest birdie shooter. 

* * * 
Buick Well Represented 

The Howard Automobile Company will be well repre- 
sented by Eaton McMillan. Bob Thompson, Phil Cornyn, 
and Charlie Howard, the big chief himself. Charlie Howard 
is offering 5 to 1 that McMillan cleans up the field. Eaton 
won his first auto golf title several years back and looks 
like a cinch to repeat. 

Bob Thompson, who has become a regular golf bug since 
he held the record for sales last year, is a sure winner in 
his flight, while Phil Cornyn, the old-time boxer is liable 
to do most anything. 

The famous foursome, Bill Hughson, Geo. Wahlgreen, 
Chester Weaver and George Plugoff, will be out doing 
their stuff. Although none of them are any Joe Kirkwoods, 
still they get a better gallery and make a better impres- 
sion especially with the thousands of devots they cut than 
anyone of the 200 that enter the tournament. 

* * * 
Rain Puts Jinx on Tourney 

Arthur Slee, the patent lawyer and president of the Civi- 
tan Club, and Chauncy Tramutola, Mussolini's right-hand 
man and president of the Exchange Club, who were to have 
locked horns in a golf team match at Lake Merced Golf 
Club, Friday, both got cold feet and called the match off. 
Both Slee and Tramutola are a pair of fighting barristers, 
but what they can do in golf nobody seems to know and 
their meeting had been looked forward to with much in- 
terest. However, these two famous officers of the bar in- 
tend to give a good account of themselves whenever the 



tournament is staged. Harry Hilp, chairman of the Civi- 
tan golf chapter, and Hugo Poheim, director-general of 
the Exchange Club, also got chills down the back when 
they saw a Scotch mist break over the city, advising all the 
members of their different clubs that the team match be- 
tween the clubs had been postponed as some of the boys 
were afraid of getting their feet wet and spoiling some of 
those classy golf rags that they had expected to spring on 
the boys. 

At all events, the state of affairs did not interfere with 
Sanford Hyams, past president of the Civitan Club, Marion 
Mayers, his business associate and the chief entertainer 
of the party, making up their own foursome. Hyams, who 
is considered Joe Kirkwood's only rival, selected lien Cator, 
while Mayers had Irving Steiner as a partner. 

Leon Saloman, Emile Heyman and Mark Sickel ma-'e up 
the other threesome. Hyams was rather lavish with his 
money since he wrote up one million dollars' worth of 
insurance last week, for he signed the check for lunch and 
showed the boys a bully good time, but this wily insurance 
baby had an underlying motive in his big heartedness, for 
once he got on the links he put the skids under his guests 
in a most unruly manner. He took everything in sight, he 
positively refused to play until he made his own handicap, 
then proceeded to wager five fish a hole and what he and 
Ben Cator got out of the deal was enough to buy several 
shares of P. G. and E. stock. Steiner and Mayers said after 
the match that they were no pikers and the same bet stands 
when the Civitan and Exchange Clubs meet next week. 

* * * 
Leon Salomon Stars 

Mark Sickel and Emile Heyman say that Leon Salamon is 
a second George Ritchie when it comes to playing par golf. 
These three played 18 holes and Salomon, showing his 
real club spirit, spotted each of his guests one up on each 
nine so that he would feel perfectly safe as they rounded 
the turn. Salomon had both four down and romped 
home a winner by several lengths, but Sicklen and Heyman 
got more than even after dinner at the club when they 
cleaned poor Salomon out of his belongings at bridge. 



Menlo Country Club Spending $100,000 

The Menlo Golf and Country Club are keeping up with 
the times when they found it necessary to revamp their 
club house at a cost of $100,000, according to Arthur Hooper, 
the president of this most popular peninsula club. 

The Menlo Club has been in existence for over fifteen 
years and is built in one of the most picturesque spots in 
California. 

The original memberships cost $100; today they are 
worth $1700; one was sold last week to Arthur Dodge at 
that price. The Menlo Club owns about 200 acres of the 
most up-to-date golfing property and an 18-hole course that 
has no equal anywhere in California. The membership is 
composed of 250 of the most influential business and pro- 
fessional men, most of whom are city men, who make Menlo 
their home in the summer season. The membership has 
been closed at 250 for several years and there are always a 
number on the waiting list. The club has quite a number 
of medical men enrolled in their membership list, including 
Dr. Ford Blake, Dr. Herman Schlagater, Dr. Ed Sho t- 
ledge and Dr. Winterberg. who, although they belong to 
several other clubs, prefer Menlo to any of them. 



February 27, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




KFI Explains the Remote Control 

ALTHOUGH the use of remote 
controls is now general through- 
out the United States, KFI, a pioneer 
in this development of the art of broad- 
casting, finds that few receptionists 
actually know what a remote control 
is or what equipment is necessary. 

A remote control designates any 
point of program origin outside the 
main studio itself. In the main studio 
the length of microphone line, from 



studio to control panel, may be less 
than twenty feet. A remote control, 
on the other hand, may involve lines 
of any length up to several thousand 
miles as in transcontinental telephonic 
broadcasting. To insure quality and 
prevent distortion, remote control 
lines, whatever their length, are care- 
fully balanced by delicate instruments. 
The equipment in use at remote con- 
trol points includes microphones and a 
remote control amplifier, with its neces- 



BROADCAST SCHEDULE FOR NEXT WEEK 



UhlCK Tl PK I*. M.i LIGHT FIGURES A. M. 



MOV. 



Fill. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., SAN FRANCISCO— 220 



9:00-10:45 
2 OO- 2i3fl 
SO'1-1 (1:110 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2 130 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:.10 
8 00-10:!K> 



1:00-10:45 
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KFRC— CITY OF PARIS, SAN FRANCISCO— 270.1 



0:30- 7:30 
8:00-12.00 



10:00-11:30 
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KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRONICLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 428.3 



9:45-10:45 

10-15 

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7:00- 

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12:00 

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KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS. INC., SAN FRANCISCO— 226 



10:00 
1:00- 2 
8:00-12 



11:00-11:30 
1:00- 2:00 
8:00-12:00 



11:011-1 1 30 
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1:1:110-12:11 1 1. 1:0(1- 2:00 

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Part 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 207 



2:30- r, 
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8:00- 8:151 

2:3(1- 3:3(1 

800- I0:O0 



KFUU— MATHEWSON MOTOR CO., INC., OAKLAND— 220 



8:00-10 30 



10:15-11:45 



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0-30- 7:30 
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10 IE 1 1 ' 1 5 
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KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO.. OAK LAND— 361.2 



11:00 

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7:15- 


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KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE. OAKLAN D— 508.2 

7T0O- 7:30 1 4:00-5 001 



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KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO.. SEATTLE— 384.4 



n on-iiiso 

5 OO. 0:00 
7:15 
10:30 



10:30-11:30 
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5:40-10:00 



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KFOA— RHODES DEPARTMENT STORE. SEATTLE— 454.3 



10 00-10:3(1 ' 

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KFI- 



-EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC.. LOS ANGELES — 467 
cM. 1925 by Barle C. Anthony, Ine.l 



10:00 
1 1 n-i 

4:00 

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10 00 



10:45 

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KFWB — WARNER BROS.. HOLLYWOOD — 252 



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sary adjuncts, to insure the program 
reaching the main control amplifiers 
with the qualities necessary for proper 
transmission. Operators at both panels, 
by means of potentiometers, maintain 
a volume of ?vrao-e mtensitv, as any 




(.'. J. I'rn nin^ Inn 



sudden increase may overload the 
transmitter tubes, actuate the safety 
devices, cut the power off and so take 
the station off the air. The use of the 
reunite control allows the broadcaster 
to present features that otherwise 
would not be available. It is interest- 
ing to note in this connection that in 
the simultaneous broadcasting of KFI 
and KPO, KFI, the point of program 
origin, acts as a remote control for 
KPl '. During this weekly joint broad- 
casting at least fourteen operators are 
necessary, six of whom are stationed at 
repeater points to check and maintain 
the quality and volume of transmis- 
sion along the five hundred miles of 
telephone lines between Los Angeles 
and San Francisco. 
Interference 

Every set owner has it to a certain 
extent, and it is getting so that 
unless interference is present in every 
radio set, something must be wrong. 
From observations most of the inter- 
ference could be eliminated. The 
greater part of this fault is man-made, 
and if man can produce interference. 
why can't he eliminate it? He can; 
but will he? 

The greatest detriment to the radio 
listener is the set that rebroadcasts. 
High tension wires, power plants, 
transformers and so forth have been 
adjusted until practically no interfer- 
ence is caused by them. The com- 
panies controlling such, are more than 
willing to make the proper adjustments 
if their attention is called to this mat- 
ter, but no action has been taken to 
stop the makin? or the sale of sets that 
rebroadcast. Why is this? Why do 
the powers that be continue to allow 
(Continued on Page 18) 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 27, 1926 



Finance 



CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY COMMISSION is calling 
for bids for reconstruction in Kern County, Monterey 
County, Los Angeles County and Stanislaus County. 

* * * 

— "In transportation efficiency there has been a tremendous 
improvement in the face of very difficult obstacles, such as radi- 
cal increases in cost of operation and great difficulty in obtain- 
ing credit," states Curtis L. Mosher, Chairman Executive 
Committee. Northwest Regional Advisory Hoard. 

* * * 

— The extensive advertising campaign of the Southern Pa- 
cific Company has received the commendation of the hotel in- 
dustry of California, the California Hotel Association having 
passed a resolution citing the railway as having performed a 
public service in carrving out this campaign. 

* * * 

— Theodore Roosevelt, in bis letter to John Eshleman, of the 
State Railroad Commission, said a wise thing which we are 
now only beginning to get the force of: "Your first task will 
be easy .... You will find it easy to reduce rates when 
they are too high, and you will find many rates are too high. 
Your real task will come later, when you have to do justice to the 
corporations and raise rates in spite of the popular clamor to 
lower them. The test of public regulation will lie the ability of 
public men to do that and to maintain popular confidence in 
doing it." Mark L. Requa notes this statement in his recent 
book "The Relation of Government to Industry." 

* * * 

— John N. Edy in addressing the Municipal Government Sec- 
tion of the Commonwealth Club, recentlv said, "Why is proper 
and business like public administration so rare? Simple be- 
cause so many men of right ideals and ability have gone into 
private rather than public service. 

— Politics a "science of government" is worth the best effort 
of the best men and politics, as it is usually played with mud 
and meat axes, is incompatible with the aspirations of decent 
people." All of which gets us nowhere, for the opportunity 
for career does not lie in the public service. 

* * * 

— A survey of petroleum refineries made by the Bureau of 
Mines, Department of Commerce, shows a total of 509 refineries 
in the United States on January 1st. Of these ?,~?2 refineries, with 
a capacity for treating 2,560,000 barrels daily were being op- 
erated, while 157 refineries with a capacity of 290,000 barrels 
daily, were shut down. In addition, two' refineries, of prob- 
able future aggregate capacity of 5000 barrels daily, were under 
construction. * * * 

— "In the last analysis the progress of ever)' nation depends 
upon the ton-mile cost of transportation" was" the assertion of 
Edward S. Jordan, president of the Jordan Motor Car Co. The 
raising of the standard of living, in his estimation, rests upon 
rapidity of the delivery of goods to markets and the redu tii n 
of the cost of such delivery. 

* * * 

— The general results for January and February, so far for 
this year are quite satisfactory, as regards general' trade. Un- 
filled orders of the United States Steel Corporation are in- 
creasing, which fact is eloquence of the promise of good times 

* * * 

— The total stock of gold and silver coin in the United States 
as shown by the census reports increased from $2,617 000 000 
to $4,278,000,000 in 1922 or by 65.5 per cent, which does' not 
do more than compensate for the loss due to the loss in pur- 
chasing power. That will come as a surprise to most people 
who think our stock of gold much increased. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVI NGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1925 

Assets $107,232,609.22 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,250,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over 525,000.00 

MISSION! BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-I'UEMDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAICIIT STREET BRANCH Hoight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONZ-QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walte W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Dp Cnnitnl *S0,0O0,0OO *20.000,000 Renerve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issui-d. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES, OVER 600 BRANCHES THHU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San FrnnclKco Oltlce: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COUI.THARD 

Manager Anni. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 224+ 



i Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS. PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 

San Frnm-ist-o, Calif. Lou AngeleM, Cnllf. 

4 It Market Street 5717 San In Fe Avenue 



^^ MADE TO ORDER ON LY 

r 76osJ£Eeil£ Shirts '"J/tOsUXsttf 

^UIF i£?K» ^UIF 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 



25 Kearny Street 

- — * 9 ■ »»^»— — — — 



Phone Kearny 3714 



February 27, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



\i 



Travel Tid-Bits 

By Ernest F. Rixon 



The Glorious Spanish Main 

WHETHER Queen Isabella pawned her jewels to en- 
able Columbus to discover the West Indies is a fruit- 
ful source for argument — but whether she did or no, need 
not prevent anybody from visiting these romantic islands 
in the old Spanish Main. 

The average person, whenever the Spanish Main is men- 
tioned, immediately begins to think of those fascinating 
stories of beautiful damsels helpless in the power of some 
swashbuckling buccaneer, or pictures to himself a company 
of luckless voyagers walking down a narrow plank to a 
watery grave, and experiences a pleasant thrill of adventure 
as he does so. 

Those dead and gone adventurers are entitled to our 
thanks for having invested the West Indies with a halo of 
romance, which, when added to the marvelous climate and 
natural scenic beauties, makes a voyage to the Caribbean 
one of absorbing interest. 

Generally speaking, the islands are more or less alike. 
Most of them have little pink, white and blue houses, rich 
luxuriant foliage, and a wild profusion of brilliantly colored 
sweet smelling flowers. The chief difference lies in the at- 
mosphere which the various nations who own the islands 
have impressed on their particular domains, and in the 
different types of architecture. 

At the mouth of Havana harbor stands that grim old 
sentinel, Mono Castle, about which many a dashing ro- 
mance has been woven. There is a beautiful cathedral, 
originally a Jesuit church, which at one time was supposed 
to contain the bones of Columbus, and the Cabanas Fort- 
ress, which cost $14,000,000 and took eleven years to build, 

Spanish is the language of Havana, and Spanish are the 
old side streets with their gaily painted houses and myster- 
ious shuttered windows. In the shops one may buy beauti- 
ful shell combs, Spanish shawls, hand-wrought lace and 
perfume. The best description of Havana, is that it is 
"glamorous." 

Martinique, the queen of tin- Caribbean, has it all 
the other West Indian islands, in that it provided the world 
with an empress — Josephine, Napoleon's first consort. In 
a little park, surrounded by seven tall palm trees 
a beautiful white marble statue of that hapless lady, com- 
memorating the fact. Josephine, however, was not t he only 
one to suffer in ibis lovely island. In 1902, St. Pierre, once 
the chief commercial city of Martinique, was destroyi 
an eruption of Mont Pelee. Thirty thousand people were 
killed and St. Pierre disappeared. The atrm Mar- 

tinique is entirely French, and entirely charming. The na- 
affect quaint old fashioned costumes an 1 bright col- 
ored fichus and turbans, while the ladies enjoy a world- 
wide reputation for | auty. 

tcao is a coral island off the coast of Venezuela, and 
is another seenicallv beautiful place. It has a distinct Dutch 
flavor, and the natives have adopted a Dutch manner of liv- 
ing. To add to the Hutch atmosphere, is a canal which in- 
tersects the capita] of Wilhelmstadt. The uses of this canal 
are not altogether apparent, and one suspects it is there for 
sentimental reasons only. 

For anybody interested in ostrich feathers, the-e is an 
ostrich farm in the interior, where the plumes may be 
bought for a comparatively small sum. Ostrich farming, how- 
ever, is no; carried on on a verv large scale. 



CUNARD 

Channel Service 



New York 

to 

England and France 

by CABIN SHIPS 



Caronia 

Carmania 
Cameronia 
Lancastria 

Alaunia 

ASCANIA 
AUSONIA 



For Full Particulars Apply to 

CUNARD AND ANCHOR LINES 

Or Local Agents 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8c DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, Qeneral cAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2342 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 27, 1926 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

tertained at the fortieth anniversary luncheon held last Wed- 
nesday in the Gold Ball Room of the Fairmont Hotel. 

Mrs. John J. Jury, president of the club, who has but re- 
cently returned from abroad, presided with gracious considera- 
tion at "the luncheon with many prominent women as honor 
guests. The occasion was markedly brilliant in tone and pur- 
poses. 

A pretty incident to the program was the impersonations of 
George and Martha Washington by little Frances ( ioich and 
Anne Schley, who took part in the American incident of the 
program. 

Many nations were represented by hostesses dressed in the 
costumes designated by the tables over which they presided in 
entertaining their guests. Presidents of sister organizations 
were feted at the anniversary luncheon. 

* * * 

Hypatia Devotees 

Mrs. Joseph R. O'Donnell. the charming executive of 
Hypatia Club, acted as the presiding genius of a distinctive 
anniversary breakfast given Wednesday at the Fairmont Hotel, 
the Gold Ballroom being the setting for the artistic event. 

A modern version of Sheridan's comedy drama. "The Rivals" 
was presented by members of the literary organization, which 
makes a point of careful study of plays and current literature. 
Mrs. Marie Weiss had charge of the dramatization, and in 
the cast were Mesdames J. J. O'Neill, H. S. Verney, Theodore 
Lenzen, W. W. Walker, George Ewers. L. A. Penniman, N. 
Lawrence Nelson, H. S. Shields, Leslie Norcom and Dr. Wini- 
fred Byrne. Musical specialities were introduced by Mrs. W. G. 
Grandeman. Mrs. George Ewers. 

Violin solos were played by Mrs. Cecil A. Moss with Mrs. 
Phillip Aaronson at the piano ; Mrs. Pauline Hildenbrandt 
played piano solos and other talented members contribute 1 mu- 
sically to the program. Spring flowers were used in profu- 
sion in the decorative scheme. 



Arrivals at Hollywood Plaza Hotel 

Prominent San Francisco people who have registered re- 
cently at the Hollywood Plaza Hotel, Hollywood, California 
are: Mr. Fred A. Greenwood, Mr. Alvah Raymond, -Mr. and 
Mrs. D. G. Hart and family, Mrs. Albert Frank. Mrs. A. L. 
Jacobi, Miss E. Wright, Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Francis, Mr. 
Irving L. Mayer, Mr. and Mrs. L. D. Hirschfeld, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. Morgan. 



Redwood Highway Reconstructed 

That the State of Oregon will have its portion of the 
Redwood Highway in negotiable shape for the coming tour- 
ist season, is expressed in communications received by of- 
ficials of the Redwood Highway Association from the Ore- 
gon Highway Commission. 

"Oregon will receive bids on six miles of reconstruction 
on the Redwood Highway north of Kerbv this month, and 
has under contract already eight miles of rock surfacing 
which will be completed this year," states a wire from Roy 
A. Klein, state engineer, "in addition, we are completing 
several bridges now under contract." 

An equally welcome communication was at the same time 
received by officials of the Association from William Duby 
chairman of the Highway Commission, which states in part : 

"By the opening of the 1926 season, the entire Oregon 
portion of the Redwood Highway will be in good condition, 
and we will endeavor to keep it in the best possible condi- 
tion during the season, so that traffic will not be inconven- 
ienced. Prior to 1925 there has been but little done on this 
road, and as a result, it will require 1926 and a portion of 
1927 to thoroughly complete the job." 




AT SINGLETON'S 

Albg (Eat 

COFFEE INN 



A Nice Hot Business 

Lunch, 50c 
Delicious Sandwiches 
Tasty Salads 

A Wonderful Crab Louie 
Home-Made Pies and 
Good Coffee 



rVE AB. NV 


TT 


1 1 


BELOEN 


ST. 


lv 1 


DNTCOMEKY™ 



Lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 



LARKINS DUCO 
Has Lustre 



Combined with lustre, it possesses a durability that 
is amazing. Be sure of a good job. 

Prices reasonable 

LARKINS & CO. 

First Avenue at Geary Street 





1140 GEARY ST. "\ TEL. FRANKLIN 3C8.1 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Antomo- 
IiIIch — Oxy -Acetylene 
Weldtne — lilack- 
smlthlug. 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 

CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Unit's: 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Flours for Service and Storage of Automobiles 






W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

Snn Francliico 



208 Crocker nuildlng (Opposite Palace Hotel) 
Phone Kearny 391 



002 Duih (cor. Taylor) 



DENMAN GARAGE 

nicnt location for club member* 



Prospect 956 



February 27, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

"The Other Fellow" 

He never signals when he stops, 

He always takes a chance, 
He passes cars upon the curves, 

At cautious folk he rants. 

He breaks the speed law every day, 
He scorns the safe and sane, 

He keeps his foot upon the gas 
In spite of fog and rain. 

He hogs the road and likes to pass 

With just an inch to spare. 
At cutting out and cutting in, 

He thinks he is a bear. 

He never will adjust his brakes 

Or see his lights are lit, 
For other drivers on the road 

He never cares a whit. 

The safety zone is such a bore, 

1 le thinks it is a fright 
That anyone should be allowed 

To walk— it isn't right. 

What's that you say ? You think it strange 
That I should raise this cry? 

The other fellow breaks the laws — 
But I'm the cautious guv. 



The Pacific Highway 

The Pacific Highway, extending prac- 
tically from Mexico to Vancouver, of- 
Fers one of the most interesting tours for 
all seasons of the year available to the 
motorist on the Pacific Coast. This high- 
way, which under the federal highway 
classification, is known as route Xo. 99. 
carries the tourist through desert, valley 
and mountain districts offering scenic 



attractions that include the orange dis- 
tricts of Southern California and its 
beach resorts, the raisin growing district 
of the San Joaquin Valley, the rich agri- 
cultural section about Sacramento and 
the Alpine panoramas of the northern 
counties. 

The Pacific Highway connects with all 
of the historic routes of eastern Califor- 
nia, the Mother Lode Highway which 
passes through the district made famous 
by Mark Twain and Bret Harte, the 
Auburn and Placerville routes to Lake 
Tahoe, the scenic highways that lead into 
the Yosemite Valley and pass under the 
very shadow of two of the great moun- 
tain peaks of California, Mt. Lassen, the 
only active volcano in continental United 
States and Mt. Shasta, the sentinel peak 
of the Oregon border, which is said to 
be the tallest mountain peak from its 
base in the world. 

Only a few miles north of Redding 
are yet to be paved to make this great 
automobile artery a paved concrete rib- 
bon the whole length of the state. These 
few miles have already been improved 
and graveled so that they offer no im- 
pedance to travel. 

The Pacific Highway, likewise, offers 
the way to one of the most attractive 
scenic regions of California which lies 
in the northeastern corner of the state. 
This includes the chain of lakes from 
Klamath Falls south, the lava beds which 
were the seating for the Modoc Indian 
war of the early days and the caves which 
offer subterranean panoramas as awe-in- 
spiring as many of those which are to be 
seen above the surface of the earth. This 
particular corner of California is a sports- 
man's paradise and the Pacific Highway 
is the logical route over which this will 
be reached. 

The Pacific Highway is the longest 
paved automobile route open to travel 
twelve months in the year. The impor- 
tance of this road will lie felt more and 
more as the transcontinental highway- 
bring an increasing flow of travel across 
thc continent into California. 



Exhibit of M. de Neale Morgan's Paint- 
ings. City of Paris Art Gallery 
Miss Morgan is internationally 
known for beautiful paintings of Cali- 
fornia scenes and the collection that 
she is exhibiting with the City of Pari*, 
has the rugged strength and precision 
for which she has received great praise 
and flattering press comments all over 
America as well as in Europe. It is 
indeed a pleasure to the City of Paris 
to have secured this beautiful and in- 
teresting exhibit for the many art 
lovers who frequent our Art Exhibi- 
This exhibit will, indeed, appeal 
to those familiar with the beauty of 
California's picturesque haunts. This 
exhibit will last until March 9th. 



We 



E have just passed 
thru that season of the 
year having the shortest 
days and longest lighting 
hours. Consequently your 
lighting bills are higher 



PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 




"PACinC SEHVICE- 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 



8226 



m 




NATIONAL CRES1 

(offee 

-the better it geti- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

l.SOO.000 cop* "ore *crvf(l at the Pa nan 
Tarlnc International Exposition 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 27, 1926 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 11) 
the hook-ups to be published of such 
sets' Why are patents granted for the 
manufacture of radios that will spoil 
some listener's pleasure? 

The majority of the present rebroad- 
casting by radio sets is caused by peo- 
ple that do not know how to tune their 
sets prop-rly. and this applies to many 
who have owned radios for a period ot 
time. Undoubtedly they were improp- 
erly instructed in the fi-st place, but 
with the present-day facilities for learn- 
ing to tune, that is no excuse for any- 
one to sit and try to bring in some dis- 
tant station that is just beyond the 
power of their sets. Maybe they do 
bring in that far-away station occasion- 
ally, but at the same time they realize 
that' they are ruining their neighbor's 
reception; still that does not seem to 
worry them. On the other hand, let 
some one cause their set to whistle, 
and the kick itself that they register 
can be heard for some distance. 

There is no grudge against any par- 
ticular make of set or hoop-up, but any 
radio that causes the neighbors' sets 
within a radius of forty blocks, to 
whistle and ruin their reception, should 
be taken to the bay and tossed in and 
its operator along with it. 

Why doesn't the listening public get 
behind a movement to do away with 
the rebroadcasting set? The writer 
would be only to happy to start and 
sign a petition for the passage of a 
law prohibiting the use of such radio 
sets. 

Let's get together. 

* * * 
The Mogul 5 V-C 

The current carrying capacity of the 
standard tube is limited. To attempt 
to obtain an increase in volume In- 
forcing a tube beyond its capacity 
causes distortion and results in a loss 
of reception and the complete loss of 
tone. If reception is to be natural and 
still produce more volume from the 
ordinary set, some means must be 
added to supply the necessary volume. 

In the past few months the power 
tube in the last stage of the audio fre- 
quency amplifier has become quite popu- 
lar, due to the fact that many owners 
of radio sets were not able to obtain 
enough volume with clearness from 
their sets. Naturally the addition of 
the power tube involves additional wir- 
ing of the set and is not easily done, 
especially if the set owner is not fa- 
miliar with just what to do and how 
to do it. 

Under recent developments anyone 
having a set employing wet batterv 
tubes, may have the power tube in the 
last stage without the slightest incon- 
vience of rewiring the set. This in it- 
self is an improvement and a great 
achievement. 



The Van Horn Company of Frank- 
lin, Ohio, saw need for some simple 
device and consequently has developed 
and recently placed on the market un- 
der the t:ade name of the Van Horn 
.Mogul 5 V-C, a power tube attach- 
ment, that can be put into any radio 
set using 5-volt tubes without the least 
change in the wiring of the set. 

This is made possible by the use of 
an adapter which is an attachment that 
contains the tube and takes care of the 
extra voltage required, independently 
of the regular voltage of the set. 

The Van Horn Mogul 5 V-C fits the 
standard socket and the extra voltage 
wires are attached directly from the 
extra battery required to operate the 
power tube, to the binding posts that 
are on the Van Mom adapter. It is 
a very simple operation to attach it 
and the results are the same as if the 
set is rewired for a power tube. 

To those that wish to incorporate the 

power tube in the last stage of their 

radio sets, this attachment will be 

found to be worth its cost to anyone. 

* * * 

Recept : on in San Francisco and the bay 
cities of the programs put on the air by 
station KFWI have been bettered from 
live to ten times since the replacement 
of the station's vertical fan-shaped an- 
tenna for a short, fiat vertical case an- 
tenna of the "T" shape, according to 
Ernest Wolcott, technical director of 
the station. 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
(Continued from Pag'/ 7) 

to see "The Big Para le" immediately 

folic wing the local engagement. 

That this wonderful photoplay has 
drawn crowde 1 houses during its San 
Francisco run, is sufficient evidence that 
the picture has merit; otherwise, no film 
spectacle coul 1 enjoy such huge patron- 
age fnr such a long stretch of time: this 
is especially evident when admission price 
is taken in i i c nsiderat : oti — $2.00 is the 
top price for "The I tig Parade" an 1 scats 
price 1 at that figure have been, as a rule, 
the first to -ell, thus bearing cait the old 
,-i 'age, "ne\ er mind the price, if the gools 
are there." And the goo Is are there in 
"The r.ig Parade." The picture has ro- 
mance, glory, laughs, a bit of tragedy, 
purity and sweetness and a high standard 
of story and execution. 
* * * 

McCormack's Recital 

That it is Foolish for any musical 
artist to complain of the radio as a 
menace to his prosperity is opined by 
John McCormack, the eminent tenor 
whom Frank W. Healv has booked for 
a recital the evening of Thursday, 
March IS, in the Exposition Audito- 
rium. He recently broadcasted from 
New York a short program to which 
eight million people "listened in," and 



in answer to the charge that such con- 
duct was likely to injure the music pro- 
fession he told a press interviewer: 

"Movies have not killed spoken 
drama, jazz has not eliminated the bal- 
lad and radio cannot extinguish either 
opera or concert. The human soul can- 
not be destroyed by an scientific in- 
vention, and the direct contact of per- 
sonality will always be supreme. More- 
over, with whatever faults it may now 
have, the radio is a mighty instrument 
for mass culture, and the coming gen- 
eration will be much better acquainted 
with good music than is the present 
generation — and this culture will spell 
opportunity for artists. In the radio 
there is a golden opportunity for be- 
ginners, a quicker road to recognition 
than the reigning favorites today ever 
had. 

"Radio has come to stay. The peo- 
ple want it and all the opposition in the 
world cannot stop it. So it is idle for 
any musical artist or any music pub- 
lisher to protest that the radio is hurt- 
ing his business. A more sensible 
course would be to bow to the situa- 
tion and make the best of it, always 
remembering that musical art will sur- 
vive the radio just as legitimate drama 
survives the movies. Art today is as 
personal as it was in the time of the 
Renaissance or in the brightest days of 
Greece." 



"The Charm of Spain" is the subject of 
an illustrated Travel talk by Dr. Charles 
Upsi n Clark, to be delivered in the Paul 
El ler Gallery, Saturday afternoon, Feb- 
ruary 27th, at 2:30 o'clock. Dr. Clark 
will give a scholarly survey of both 
em Spain and the Spain of Wash- 
ington Irving, ami will show a series 
of unusually beautiful colored views on 
the screen. 



Johntton-Ayres Moves to 
New Quarters 

The Pacific Coast swings forward to 
ever greater progress — more indus- 
tries, larger factories, bigger business 
— better advertising to support that 
1 lusiness. 

This progress is making necessary 
a definite program of expansion on their 
part — first, a close affiliation with a 
coast-wide chain of agencies; next, a 
stronger personnel through consolida- 
tion with Evans & Barnhill ; now, new 
quarters, to better house a complete 
advertising agency service. 

In the heart of San Francisco's busi- 
ness, the new offices of the Johnston- 
Ayres Advertising Agency occupying 
the entire second floor at 574 Market 
Street, affords their clients the conven- 
ience of a central location and permit 
their several departments — service, 
copy, production, research, media, sales 
promotion, art, etc., — to function with 
increased efficiency. 



February 27, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



Mr. Blabbitt on Little Things 



EVERY more or less gentle reader of this magazine has 
been told, at one time or another, that it is the little things 
in life that count. Some little things are big things, and some 
supposedly big things are in reality little things. It is a case 
of the bigger the smaller, and the smaller the bigger. That 
much we don't know. Whether this statement will have any 
effect on the enforcement of prohibition or not, we also don't 
know, as it is a comparatively small thing in proportion to the 
extent of the bootlegging industry. 

The little things he forgets to do, or not to do, are usually 
the impediments that trip up the best of burglars and the worst 
of poli'icians. Forgetting to put the cat out at night, a char- 
acteristic male practice, is a negligible thing in itself, but has 
been the cause of many family tiffs and unenviabfe situations. 
How much more serious it would be for a man to put himself 
out, and leave the pussy in. 

Now a common, garden variety of nail is not a formidable 
object in a proper setting, but it may turn out to be one of the 
most exasperating little things in the world when it is found, 
by an irate automobile owner, firmly embedded in a very sus- 
ceptible balloon tire ; and this is a very minor instance, too, 
since when a tire is punctured there is nothing lost but a little 
air and patience. What would the same fellow do if his wife 
were so generous as to give him the air? Bite his nails, we sup- 
pose. 

There are many little things in some families that the owners 
wouldn't get rid of for a great deal, and wouldn't give a penny 
to have more of. What is the answer, children? Correct! Go 
to the head of the class, and read a chapter aloud from the 
volume entitled "Berth Control" by the Pullman Company. 

Some day the scribbler of this column is going to compose 
a poem called "Little Things," in which thoughts of the na- 
ture of those outlined here will be set t<> music, much in the 
same way that a famous song writer of New York has done in 
broadcasting his matrimonial feelings. It is safe to say, in this 
connection, that we may look fur a bumper crop of blue bal- 
lads in the distant future — although we hope not. < retting back 
to the poem, this writer won't mind such a little thing as a 
publisher turning his brain child down at all. There i^ jusl 
as much material in a rejection slip as in a paper dollar, and 
sometimes the former is worth a lot more; anyway, n \< 
slips are not so soiled. 

Little things cause most of the worries of life, and if (here 
was no fuss and trouble, how uninteresting existence, especially 
in the United Stales, would be I \ mental jag has come to 
be about the only safe form of intoxication for Americans. ( >u 
the other hand, little things g, , farthest toward insuring happi- 
ness, especially when they are freelj given and taken. 

It might not, at this time, be amiss to determine what a 
"little thing" is. The definition, perhaps, would real as fol- 
lows: A little thing is an object or happening which isn't big. 
That should be clear enough lor anyone. 

There are some little things that aren't a bit satisfyi 
worthy of our acquaintance, to wit, the portions of food served 
at some restaurants; the minds of some men and women; hu- 
man pettinesses; and. among many other things, the alcoholic 
content oi mi idem beer. 

In waxing philosophic, the writer asks you to look out for 
the little tilings, and the big things will take care of then 

g things are little things grown up, an 1 the bigger they 
are. the harder they fall. 



It must be borne in mind that these Florida strawberries, sell- 
ing for three or four dollars a quart, are raised on land selling 
for about the same price. — Detroit News. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoinino Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^ 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 



WIGS and TOUPEES 

Of my make defy detection, because I make them ven- 
tilated and porous and from the purest, finest human 
hair. 

G. LEDERER 

561 Sutter St., Between Powell and Mason Sts. 
San Francisco, California 

Firm Established 1866 



El Dorado Hotel 

SONOMA, C1I.1F. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Our Specialty — "Steaks AVilh Mushroom*" 

i loan Room , < lean Linen, Clean Everything 

v i-ii - mi. i Counly'i Famou Reaoru and Mineral (Warm Water) Swim 

Taoki it Tin- Hotel 

R«i. i ceeptlenall] Reasonable 

Telephone 110 



Hollywood — i nlvemal City — Glendale — PiiMndenn 

\ rtiliim — Santa Hiirhnrn — I. its Anuclex 



MOCO 



v beautiful automobile flnii I auty and gloss in- 

witll use. 
The price is the lowest you will find tor a dependable job. 
The Baving in Brst cosl is greater because of the short 

time you are dl yOUI ear. 

GENE MORRISS 
Say AUTO PAINTING SYSTEM 



235 VALENCIA ST. 



PHONE MARKET 9040 



Our Service means less wear on your Linens 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
250 Twelfth St., Sin Fkancisco 'Phone Market 916 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

B> Hanrl Oafr— Sana Called For and Drlivered 



MME. M. S. E. LEE 



I •* rarer 

Is \ IBI.IMI HOTTI. 



. 



Pwoic Fa***xr« 2S10 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 27, 1926 



WIELAND'S BREW 

WITH YOUR MEALS— IT HELPS 
Order by the case from your grocer 

ESTADLISHED 1868 

Main Office, 240 Second Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 671 



^ne PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 




TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES: 
San FroneiHCO — 
West 703 



Burling: ame 

478 



I'hono Sutter 32TS 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

{Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CI,OCIvMAKEKS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

SOI) Post Street at Grunt Avenue 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 818 EMERSON ST. 



iy 644-645 Palo alto 315-J 

SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



The Bohemian Club Exhibit— Feb. 22 

to March 6 

By Eleanore F. Ross 

You catch your breath when you 
enter the gallery and glimpse the depth 
and beauty of James Swinnerton's 
"Trail of the Golden Moon." Its ap- 
peal is instantaneous, powerful, and 
I would say, universal, for all kinds 
and conditions of men and women must 
respond to a beauty so apparent, a 
beauty that does not have to be "ex- 
plained." 

Even the proximity of Labaudt's 
"Young Women in Marin County," 
(why wish them on Marin?) could not 
detract from the loveliness and depth of 
this golden moon arising amid the 
colorful desert hills. Here are peace, 
beauty and romance combined., 

Charles Grant's contribution is a 
reminiscence of his trip last summer 
to the Antipodes with the American 
fleet, as "official artist" and breathes 
forth the usual dynamic force that his 
sea pictures always possess, — great 
gray battleships being tossed on moun- 
tainous waves like mere cockleshells. 
The spirit of Storm is triumphant here. 

The mystery of "the black wharves 
and the slips" are here in Charles Dick- 
man's "Fishing Boats in Picardy"; the 
fascination of old weathered docks, 
small boats and their oftimes danger- 
ous journeys into ocean's "gray and 
melancholy waste," the reflection of 
lights in the tranquil water of the lit- 
tle harbor. We feel the sense of mys- 
tery, and a security that is, however, 
only transient. 

Exquisite daintiness, the very quint- 
essence of spring is wafted to us from 
Theodore \Yores' "Blossom Time. 
Saratoga." 

Gleb A. Ilyin, Russian artist, with 
whom we arc sorry to admit we are 
not familiar, has a masterpiece in his 
portrait of "Miss Carol Marion Cofer," 
the finish of which, and its delicate 
texture of satiny skin, gives you the 
idea that some one of the old English 
masters had stepped into our midst, all 
the more surprising when one realizes 
the hold that "modernism" has taken 
upon the gullible and novelty-seeking 
public of today. 



Noted Expert on South America 

Our South American continent has 
been for many years a land that allures 
not only because of its scenic beauty, 
but also for its natural resources, which 
need development through the chan- 
nels of finance. 

On Friday, March the 5th, Miss 
Annie S. Peck, world famous mountain 
climber, author and lecturer, will tell 
of the industries, living conditions, and 
opportunities for trade in the various 
countries of South America, at the Pal- 
ace Hotel at 8:15 p.m. This lecture 
will be illustrated by stereopticon 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Olllce and Work! 1(1^5 Mlnalon St. 

l'hone Market 7»13 

Branch Ofllee: 7(1(1 Sutter St. 

(Holel Canterbury Bide.) 

Phone 1'ios|m-.'( IIK-15 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Ckobce C. Homeh S. A. Lovejov 

CarfiHd 2021 

The Homer System 

BOOKKEEPING— COLLECTIONS 



Inttallmtnt, Current Delinquent Accounts, Legal Aid, 

tudlU-SfMtmiM, Financial Statements, Income Tax 

Reports. Bookkeeping {Part Timo Service) 



l)f Vtll SI, [J l ILDtVC 



San Francisco 



flESTROWERJ 




Trtr%dOB c/"a Thousand Gardens* 

224-226 Giant Ave, lei Kearny 4975 



views, and will be under the direction 
of V. Emerson. 

It will be followed by a musical pro- 
gram, tango dancing to a Spanish or- 
chestra, and will close with general 
dancing. 



WHERE TO DINE 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The Cily'8 Most Dintinrlive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 7Se, $1.00 35c. SOc, ?5c S1.00.S1.50 a la carte 
Dancing 7:00 P. M. to 1:00 A. M. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 

HATT1E MOOSF.R MINNIE C. MOOSER 




ICE CREAf%v 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



KE CALIFORNIA SIS 
Grayitone 

M100 3101 31l>2 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 

DINNER 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous bruMblng- onoc or twice n day la 
taking very Rood care of them. UrnMhtnR In only n part of the 
process. Many thlns;a can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentlat can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be ns sound on y>ou Imagine. A toothache meann 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gumti. 
There are com troubleu that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your riiiun bleed t Call In today 
and talk It over. It will coat nothing;. My ner\e blocking *»y*j- 
tem blocka off all nerves and pain. It will pleaae you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Self Cleaning: Bridges; 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 




I .. 



' 6 <md. 



Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



334 Sutter St. 



Douclas 7118 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominie. 



tXeanorS 



445 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing; rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



L 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



OTarrell anil Dl A M I*"" i~\ » Q Phone 

Larkin Sli. *■* *-• •*"* » ' V* V^ ej franklin » 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) f .75 Nn Vitiloi Shanld Leave the Cilj Willi. 

Suiulay Luncheon 1.00 oul Dining in Ihe Finr*t Cafe 

Dinner, Work Day? J1.S0 In Amrrira 

Dinner, Sunday, and Holiday* 1.75 

DANCING SUNDAY EVENINGS 



NOAH'S 
ARK 



j OS Third M in..-. S 



S \\ M \TI.O 



featuring Southern Cooking 
i ipen From 

10 ;. m !■• 8:00 p. m. 

p. ni. i.. 8:80 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

■ to 8:80 p. ni. only 

< LOSBD B3VBB1 HOND \\ 
II:, II Block fri-in II.Lzhwny 



&&d£*. 



U-Mltf Hnul 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

open 8:00 a. m. io 11 m p. u. 

imsl rpassed ci 1sini 

Carl Leonhaidt 

formwty ./ 
Celden Cat. Park Canna 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



Make yourself at home at 
GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tilltiiann Place, al 241 Crant Avenue 

Thf Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — Flrsl Edll Ions — Fine Bindings 

r tat ions from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., «<f London 

Commissions In London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phonr Kearny "ism 



J Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AMD PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 




GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
J Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. IStb. and 19th Sts.. 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 

MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"BoitieH at the Sprints" 



L 



Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 



<li-eH- -Catrfifld 844 



<J\fovdly 

Quaint customs of other lands and other 
peoples — queer head dresses of tribes 
who wear little else — strange and enter- 
taining pictures gathered from all parts 
of the earth are shown every Sunday in 
The Chronicle Rotagravure. 

Make it a point to see this delightful 
pictorial section every week. Have The 
Sunday Chronicle delivered to your 
home. 



§>an iFranriarn 

(EJpromrl? 




Their watchword is smiling courtesy. — This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 

tf RATES— Ter 'Day, single, European Wan 



The centrr 
for Thtalrrt 
Honkt, Shopi 

Wltatt "write 
for ^Booklet 



120 room* with running water 
220 rooms wiih bath 
1 60 rooms with bath 



52.50 to 54.00 
5.50 to 5.O0 
6.00 to 8.00 



Doublf. $4.00 up 

Also a number of Urge and beautiful rooms and 
suites, some in period furnishings with grand piano, 
"■ fire place and bath, $10 00 up. 

LARGE AND WELL EQUIPPED SAMPI E ROOMS 

WA^CHO QOLF CLUB] 
L available to all guestsJ 

HAROLD E. LATHROP 

SManagtr 



ty 



HOTEL/ 



ALEXANDRIA 

Loe Angeles «... 



winter 

excursion 

Fares 

to many points 

Save 
moneys 

Week-end tickets, on 
sale Friday, Satur- 
day and Sunday— 
16-day return limit. 
Season tickets, on 
sale daily— return 
limit 90 days. 

For jull information, 
ash— 

Southern 
Pacific 
Lines 

Ferry Station Third Street Station 

65 Geary Street 

Or Phone Sutter 4000 




Golden Gate Ferry 
Company 

S 

WINTER SCHEDULE 

Effective October 1, 1925 



Leave Sausalito 

5:00 a. m. 

6 :00 a. m. 

6:30 a.m. 

Every Half 

Hour Until 

10:00 p.m. 

Then 

11 :00 p. m. 

12:00 p.m. 

1 :00 a. m. 



Leave San Francisco 

5:30 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:30 p.m. 

Then 

11:30 p.m. 

12:30 a.m. 

1 :30 a. m 



Saturdays and Sundays Only 
2:00 a.m. 2:30 a.m. 

ON SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

There will be extra trips if traffic warrants. 

A. O. Stewart Harry E. Speas 

President Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



IJAU1U INIiW 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



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FROM ONE THING TO ANOTHER 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



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By KATHERINE SCHWARTZ 



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Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., MARCH 6, 1926 



No. 10 



From One Thing to Another 

By Eleanore F. Ross 



I am sometimes at a loss in filling my particular page; in 
catching that elusive and illusionary butterfly called "inspira- 
tion." I turn the pages of the panting press sheets, glimpse 
murder, accidents, scandals, calamities of Nature, all to no 
purpose, — the muse evades me. 

The last few days, with the heat modified, the air sparkling, 
the sky (in the afternoons) that lovely azure only seen, I am 
quite sure, in California, the flower vendors' stands bursting 
with blooms of all shades, the shop windows eloquent with 
colorful beauty ; little winds blowing into your face, fragrant 
with the throbbing essence of life (where, where do those little 
winds come from, that even the city streets fail to kill their 
freshness?) one subject persists, and only one — Spring! 

* * * 

I could write volumes on Spring just nowl that ever old, 
ever new season of beauty ; appearing with all the pathetic 
youth fulness of the crescent moon in pale green evening skies. 
I could chant the glories of a California Spring, than which no. 
other Springs in alien lands can compare I 

* * * 

I have heard easterners says: "You have no seasons here." 
But eastern nostrils are not responsive to the thousand odors 
of California Springs, if they can make such a statement; their 
eves are blind to the delicate shades of green on leaf and 

bough; on flower and foliage; on the g I, sweet smelling 

earth; and their ears are deaf to the myriad sounds that are 
heard only in Spring time. Yes, 1 could write volumes on 
Spring, — but 1 find thai two of my blessed writers have eulo- 
gized this theme, and 1 must discover Other matters to dis- 
course upon. 



Apropos nl what the tired business man finds entertaining: 
Out of fourteen lectures on different subjects (most of them 
of a serious nature*, given b\ the Commonwealth Club during 
1925, the second largest attendance registered on April 16th, 
when the Speaker took up the question. "What's the Matter 
With Moving Pictures-" Which might or might not be a 
significant commentarj . 

All too often have we had the bromide thrust down our 
throats that " \merica is a commercial country, no: an artistic 
one." Anent this accusation, we give the following figures and. 
statem, 

"More than $16,000,000 was given to the cause ot art dur- 
ing 1925, in Vmerica, either as cash gifts, smie of them for 
Specific purposes, or in buildings, works of art and other prop- 



erty. . . . New York City has been indisputably proved 
the greatest art market in the world, by events of the past year. 
Among the annual list of paintings sold at auction were the 
following: A Mauve, for $37,000; a Millet, $25,000; a Ber- 
nardino Luini, $19,000; a Rousseau; $19,000; a Corot, $17,000, 
and paintings bv Cilbert Stuart and Reynolds for $10,700 and 
$10,000 respectively. . . . 

"Each of thirty-three states in the Union possesses one or 
more museums or galleries of art. Every state save Nevada 
has one or more art associations or societies. 

Figures don't lie. 



There has been much ado in the press lately regarding our 
Luther Burbank and his beliefs and disbeliefs. One still 
runs across items of which he is the subject in eastern papers. 
Just recently a minister in Kansas was "unfrocked" because 
lie upheld certain statements Burbank had made on religion. 

Aside from the uncontrovertible fact that the contentions 
of any religious sect can never lie anything but suppositi- 
tious, why, to be inelegant, pick on a man for the reason that 
Ik- worships the beauty of Nature, and passes up the old ortho- 
dox worship? What is Nature but tlie expression of God? 
And if a man's life is given over to the purpose of develop- 
ing Beauty in her various forms, what can we find in this 
world, more God-like than such an existence? 



fudge Hen Lindsey, anent the present wild generation, ex- 
presses the opinion that we should indict the parents instead 
of the children. "At home." says Judge Lindsey. "We be- 
gin by telling little 'white lies' ; Johnnie hears them, and 
later on imitates them. 

"We must have instruction in the schools to prepare child- 
hood for parenthood. In the church we must mix a little 
biology with our theology. . . . We cannot save youth 
1>\ condemnation: we can equip them to sa>e themselves by 
proper example in living and by telling them the truth about 
problems of life." 

In this connection. I recall an incident that would tend 
to show up. not so much the lack of veracity on the part of 
parents as their negligence towards their offspring in some 
A child in my neighborhood is continually being left 
alone, while her parents go to parties, "movies," etc. She is 
a prettv little thing about fourteen years old. just budding 
womanhood, and just at the age when she should be 
especially guarded. 

What sort of a future, under these conditions, is there in 
store for this girl? Whose fault will it be. if she finds her 
way into the "primrose path''' 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 6, 1926 




does not end there. If, as a matter of fact, it turns out that 
a society can make more goods hetter under standardized 
system of education, education will he standardized, for 
it will be dictated by the will to live to say nothing of the 
will to power. Meanwhile, the individual suffers. 



There is no doubt that the bus is 
Extending Bus Lines again coming back into quite a de- 
gree of favor. We have noticed 
that in the outlying suburbs of Oakland there is quite a 
tendency to emploj the bus and whenever the question of 
transportation comes up in that city, reference is at once 
made to this way of dealing with the corporation which 
controls transportation in that city. 

The same idea seems to be coming along here, also. \\ c 
note that the Board of Supervisors, in taking up the matter 
of the extension of transportation facilities by the munici- 
palities, lias drawn attention to the possibility of so provid- 
ing roadways that the use of the rubber-tired bus can be 
effective. 

Supervisor Shannon has made a hobby of this and said 
that if the Duboce tunnel had been so paved for traffic at 
the beginning and not given over altogether to trackage, it 
might have been made an experimental ground for such 
experimentation with the rubber-tired bus. 

Europe has made great use of these buses and it may be 
argued that therefore they would be welcome here. But 
that conclusion evades a very important fact, and that is 
that the American will not put up with personal incon- 
venience, which the European takes as a matter of course. 
There is no doubt at all that for people using the car 
every day to go to work and back, the electric iar as we 
have it. is vastly more convenient and comfortable than 
any bus-contrivance so far given to the public. There is a 
great deal of difference between being packed into a plung- 
ing bus and stopped here and there, in the fashion that 
buses stop, and sitting at ease in a street car. reading in 
comfort. The idea may have something to it. but not so 
much as its authors imagine. 

The romantic notion that in this way the municipality 
could avoid paying for the Market Street system i- almost 
hectic. 



Or. Mainbridge, who is one 
Standardization in Education of the greatest of British 

educators and. perhaps, the 
best authority anywhere, on adult education, is visiting 
this part of the world to give a series of lectures at the 
State University and at the same time to talk to organiza- 
tions interested in adult education. 

He has been discussing the youth question and has ar- 
rived at the tentative conclusion, at least, that much of the 
so-called aberration of youth in this country at this time, 
is an instinctive revolt against the standardization which 
dominates education. 

We have always protested against this standardization, 
which does not seem to be much more than an effort on the 
part of educators to avoid the personal question in their 
dealings with their pupils. To that, however, the reply is 
made that under a standardized system of productii 
goods we cannot look to anything but a standardized sv-tem 
of education; that such a system is necessary in view of 
the economics of it: that it has its drawbacks, as has every 
other system, but that the advantages arc greater than 
the drawbacks. 

Dr. David Starr Jordan, however, does not take this point 
of view. He says in a recent letter to the News Letter: 
"I have no sympathy with the statement that the university 
has to produce a 'standardized intellectual product.' " 

There seems, therefore, to be an agreement between our 
veteran educator and the British exponent. Hut the matter 



The new tax reduction bill has be- 
The New Tax Act come a law and the President, with 
that characteristic New England care- 
fulness which will make his name proverbial in the historv 
of the country, remarked that he was afraid that the country 
would be short of money on account of the tax reduction. 
It is pretty well conceded that a continuance of unusual 
prosperity will be necessary to make the government come 
out even in the absence of that economy which is so much 
to be desired. 

Taxpayers earning more than $5000 a year are given two 
months' extension of time for riling income tax returns and 
the returns will consequently not be due to May 15. The 
reduction brings down income taxes to the lowest level 
since the war began, and does away with a number of mis- 
cellaneous levies, excise and occupational, which formed 
part of the war burden. 

The measure provides for a reduction of $3S7.000.000 
in the amount of taxes paid by the American people dur- 
ing this year, of which more than $200,000,000 is a saving 
to individual taxpayers on income tax. Under the new 
schedule a married man with two children would have to 
make $4,300 before he would be subject to income tax, 
and the lowest amount on which a married man would have 
to pay is $3,500. Normal rates are reduced from 2 to 1 ' _■ 
per cent on the first $1000. from 4 to 3 per cent on the 
next $4000, and from o to 5 per cent on the remainder. 

Surtaxes which ranged as high as 40 per cent have been 
cut to a limit of 20 per cent. 

1 >n the whole, the measure is satisfactory. Perhaps great 
enterprises should have had more consideration, but it was 
all that could be done and bears witness to the very satis- 
factory condition of the country within nine vears of mir 
entrv into the world conflict. 



I >ne would think that the legal 
Another Dry Outrage end of the dry campaign would 
soon learn enough to carry on their 
campaign within the law. They are a most self-righteous 
people, who eternally din into our ears that the law is 
something to be obeyed, and at the same time, more than 
any other group in the history of this country, (and it would 
be quite safe t<> add. or any other country), are flagrant 
and offensive in their defiance of ordinary legal decencies 

Take this one fact that there will have to be restored to 
its legal owners $2,400,000 worth of wine, held by the fed- 
eral authorities in California wineries, pending the outcome 
of libel proceedings. 

Judge Frank II. Kerrigan, of the United States District 
Court, dismissed the libel proceedings brought by the 
United States attorney against Francisco Yiocchi. owner 
of a winery at Cloverdale. The lawyer for Viocchi main- 
tained that 42,000 gallons of wine valued at S160.000 were 
bring held under improper proceedings. The claim was 
that search warrants should have been issued and the place 
raided by prohibition officers before libel proceedings were 
tiled. The court ordered the libel proceedings dismissed 
and the wine restored. It is estimated that more than 
700.000 gallons of wine in this state are being held under 
proceedings similar to those which the court has declared 
to be illegal. 

There is no doubt about the way in which the self- 
righteous upholders of the prohibition legislation will re- 
gard the act of the court, and we shall hear much of their 
abusive denunciation. The fact is. however, that the fa- 
natics break down every vestige of American liberty and if 



March 6, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



it were not that we occasionally have courts brave enough 
to stand for the law, we should rapidly find ourselves an 
enslaved and degraded community. From time immemorial 
we have learned that self-styled saints are hard task- 
masters. 



There has recently been a 
Race Segregation Decision California decision on a ques- 
tion which has at times ex- 
cited much bitterness and indignation at different places 
in this country, the question as to how far racial differences 
may be regarded under the Fourteenth Amendment to the 
United States Constitution. 

The board of playgrounds and recreation in the City of 
Los Angeles provided for race segregation in the use of 
certain swimming pools owned and used by the city. This 
segregation came up in a certain suit and Judge Hartley 
Shaw of the Superior Court of Los Angeles upheld the dis- 
criminatory provisions of the playground board. 

It seems to be a pretty close decision, for section 51 of 
Civil Code provides full and equal accommodations, facili- 
ties, and privileges of a certain list of places, among which 
are inns, theaters and bath-houses for all citizens within 
the jurisdiction of this state "subject only to the condi- 
tions and limitations established by law and applicable 
alike to all citizens." 

The court at Los Angeles rules that the provision of that 
section and the following section of the Civil Code do 
not apply and that a municipality making the segregation 
does not come within their provisions and states that the 
management of the swimming pools is a municipal matter 
and does not fall within the sections named. 

Whatever one may think of the reasoning, the result is 
quite satisfactory and the court is probably on very safe 
ground when it declares that there is no violation of the 
Fourteenth Amendment. ( )n the other hand, the provi- 
sions of the code seem hard to beat. It dues not appear 
that a municipality is entitled to disobey them, any more 
than an individual. Such regulations appear to be wise in 
view of the trouble which has arisen elsewhere on just this 
question. 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 



The fourth annual Pacific 
Coast Foreign Trade Meet- Trade Council is being held 

here from March 4th to 
March 6th. This is one of the most promising and impor- 
tant of recent local developments and contain- a promise 
of much value to the community. 

The speakers who address the council aie the most noted 
experts on foreign trade throughout the country and they 
present matters which have, Up to very recent times, been 
quite inaccessible to the inhabitants of the Pacific Coast. 
Leaders in industry ami business tell us jusl what are the 
immediate and future prospects of the Coast anil this state, 
as regards that great outlying foreign world on which we 
must depend for the consumption of our surplus. 

The business interests involved are among the most im- 
portant in the country and include merchants, manufac- 
turers, shipper-, importers, exporters, and agents and ex- 
perts of all kinds who have concentrated Upon the matter 
of foreign trade. 

Methods of approach to foreign peoples which have been 
heretofore ignored are described, the new methods which 
are being employed to win the trade of South America 
and which we have disregarded in the past are detailed. 

It would be quite impossible to exaggerate the impor- 
tance of this meeting. Little by little. Europe is recovering 
from the lethargy into which she was stunned by the war. 
She will soon be eagerly competing for trade in those ter- 
ritories which we have occupied so easily, during her tem- 
porary disability, and we shall find ourselves fighting to 
hold what we have gained. The work of the Pacific For- 
eign Trade Council will be of assistance and benefit. 



An Indiana man paid $500 for a bee, and there have been 
nights when we would have almost paid that for a certain 
mosquito. — American Lumberman. 

* * * 

It appears that Admiral-General Andrews is trying to get 
honest men for the Prohibition unit. But why corrupt an- 
other bunch of our citizens? — Columbia Record. 

* * * 

Folks who used to tell the conductor their children were 
six and entitled to half-fare now boost them up to sixteen 
so they can operate the family car. — Albany News. 

* * * 

Due to the uncertainty of their return alive, mountain 
climbers in the Alps are required to pay their hotel bills 
in advance. For the same reason bootleggers never extend 
credit. — The Thos. F. Pickerill Service. 

* * * 

• Scientists have about come to the conclusion that the 
mounds in the Middle West were built by the mound- 
builders. — Florida Times-Union. 

* * * 

In the old days all the money gravitated to New York, 
but that was before Florida was discovered. — Boston Post. 

* * * 

The next toll to be abolished from our roads is the death- 
toll. — Columbia Record. 

* * * 

"You," said Adam, "are the first girl I ever loved." That's 
the way it got started. — Peru (Ind.) Tribune. 

* * * 

It isn't a genuine boom if anybody buys real estate with 
the intention of keeping it. — Yincennes (Ind.) Sun. 

* * * 

Long life i- attainable through auto-suggestion — provid- 
ing the suggester keeps clear of the auto. — Wall Street 

fournal. 

* * * 

America i- fool's paradise, -ays a prominent European 
visitor. Mnvhe that is why so many of his fellow Euro- 
peans like to come over here. — Southern Lumberman. 

* * * 

Most of our common sayings are very old, and doubtless 
"You can't keep a good man down" was coined by the 

whale. — La Grange Reporter. 

* * * 

You don't get a sheepskin in the school of experience. You 

just have your own removed. — Debuque American-Tribune. 

* * * 

A man in Kansas City can lay 36.000 bricks a day. do 
out and read this to your hens. — Columbia Record. 

* * * 

Senator Borah has a positive genius for standing alone 
without being lonesome. — Cleveland Times-Commercial. 

* » * 

Being on the right track is correct. But if you just 
stop there you'll get run over. — Columbia Record. 

» * * 

Prosperous times: Those in which you pay instalment- 
on ten things instead of one. — Springfield State Register. 

* * * 

That North Pole must be a barber's pole. Every ex- 
plorer who goes near it has a close shave. — Columbia 
Record. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 6, 1926 




Pleasure's Ww 




OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Woone- 




S. F. Symphony 

FOR the tenth pair of symphony 
concerts, one can hardly imagine 
whom to feature. — Rrahms, or Deer- 
ing. Certain- 
ly Mr. Deer- 
ing must for- 
give us, if we 
say. Brahms' 
S vm phony, 
No. 2 in D 




Major, was to 
us. the fea- 
ture of the 
concert. We 
have so much 
to learn fr< >tn 
Brahms, — he 
is most ex- 

Knlherlne Srhwartz a c t i n g. YOU 

must be exacting to understand ami 
appreciate him. Mr. Deering as an in- 
terpreter of Rachmaninow, as a young 
American, certainly showed splendid 
schooling. 

The symphonic variations. "Istar," 
is a work of art, modern, in the su- 
preme, but most admirable. 

The last of the popular symphony 
concerts at the Civic Auditorium was 
featured by the appearance of Harold 
Bauer, — what a master! His technique 
rivals Paderewski's, his knowledge of 
music rivals Bach's and Beethoven's. 
his knowledge of the D Minor Brahms' 
Concerto is unquestioned. The great- 
est compliment I can pay him is, that 
all musicians have respected him be- 
yond question. — 12,000 men and women 
so greatly enjoyed his concert. 

Mr. Hertz knows Beethoven; we 
have heard him play the Symphony No. 
8 in F Major, — it is always a treat in 
hear him interpret Beethoven. 



Imperial 

The "Cohens and the Kellys" still 
l;<>iiil; strong at this house, a story of 
the East Side of New York, in the slum 
district, — lots of fun and humor. 

* * * 

St. Francis 

"Behind the Front," that delightful 
travesty on life in the trenches, fea- 
tured by Wallace Beery and a strong 
cast, is still packing 'em in at this the- 
ater. There is a fine musical program 
in conjunction with the picture. 



(Conducted by Katherine Schwartz) 

Elwyn Concert Bureau 

Cecilia I [ansen, the only artist in our 
humble estimation, who can follow in 
the footsteps of Kreisler (she must 
have absorbed some little part of his 
glon l. her program was featured by 
his interpretations of Beethoven, Gluck 
and Pugani, — her encores among the 
many which she so graciously gave, 
were programmed by Kreisler. whom 
we all love. She has everything tech- 
nique, strength of tone, interpretation 
and showmanship. Mention must be 
made of her splendid accompanist, Mr. 
Boris Zakharoff. 



Loew's Warfield 

"Just Suppose," with Richard Bar- 
thelmess in the role of the royal prince, 

comes to the Warfield next week. There 
are some sumptuous sets. Richard is 
nut the only prince in the picture, for 
there is a real prince in the cast . Rok- 
neddine Mirza Kadjar, a Persian of the 
bluest blood! 

Just for good measure Barthelmess 
has a beautiful new leading lady play- 
ing opposite him — Lois Moran. She is 
just sixteen, and her first appearance 
mi the silver sheet was in "Stella Dal- 
las." 

A. I'".. Thomas wrote the piece for 
the stage, and Mrs. V. E. Powell 
adapted it for the screen. There is a 
strong supporting cast, and the many 
followers of the popular Richard will 
no doubt llock to see him in his new 
offering. 

Fanchon & Marco present on the 
stage another of the gorgeous spec- 
tacles, entitled "Pirate Ideas." and 
Walt Roesner and his men will furnish 
the musical pn 'gram. 

* * * 
Golden Gate 

Heading the new bill announced for 
the (iolden < late the coming week, is 
Theodore Roberts, the famous char- 
acter actor of the screen. He is ap- 
pearing in William C. DeMille's bril- 
liant stage sketch, "The Man Higher 
Up," and it promises to be one of the 
treats of the season. Assisting Mr. 
Roberts is Hardee Kirkland, well- 
kin iwn dramatic star. 

A second big feature on the bill is 
the screen play, a screen picture of the 
stage success. "Lazybones" with 
Charles ("Buck") Jones in the featured 



role. There is a fine cast in his sup- 
port. 

"Amateur Nite in London." a bur- 
lesque on the old style entertainment 
ottered in the London Music Halls, is 
another feature; Ernest Mack and 
Margie La Rue will be seen in a whirl- 
wind skating act; Walter Ward and 
Ethel Dooley present a novelty com- 
edy act, "I Can Do That Too"; Jerome 
Mann, famous juvenile mimic will give 
his famous "Impersonations"; another 
act will also appear, but as yet it has 
not been announced. 

There will be the usual short reels 
and Sweeten's orchestra, and Grace 
Rollins Hunt will preside over the 
music. * * * 

Orpheum 

The King of Jazz, Ted Lewis, is 
coming to town and will be the head- 
liner on the bill for the coming week 
at the ( irpheum. Mr. Lewis has with 
him a captivating young miss, Bobbe 
Arndt, and she and his Musical Clowns 
are bringing a sensational act with 
them, direct from Europe, where they 
have been the rage. 

limmv Nerve and Teddy Knox, two 
great comedians are also on the bill, 
and with the assistance of Billie Beryl 
and Jelty Stunt, they will be seen in 
"Fantastic Frolics"; Jessie Maker and 
William J. Redford. musical comedy 
favorites appear in a delightful little 
skit called "Rolling Stones"; Tabor 
and Greene, "Two Dark Knights." are 
a riot wherever they appear; Louis 
I. on, Ion will offer character songs; 
Willie Mauss, the latest importation 
from Europe has a sensational offer- 
ing: Martinet and his famous crow 
from the New York hippodrome, com- 
plete an unusually fine program. 

* * * 
Columbia 

George Bernard Shaw's masterpiece 
is playing at the Columbia, with one 
of the best companies seen here in a 
decade. 

Julia Arthur is a marvelous actress, 
and she brings to the part true mag- 
nificence. Lynn Pratt, that splendid 
performer, gave a superb delineation of 
the suave and wicked Earl of War- 
wick ; Thomas Irwin and Philip Quinn 
do some fine work. Julia .Arthur in 
her portrayal of the life of Jeanne 
d'Arc, will long live in our memories, 
we do assure vou. 



March 6, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Amusements 



NEXT WEEK 

ALEXANDRIA J 

Geary and lSlh ( 



Pictures 



ALCAZAR 



O'Farrell nr, Powell ( 



I „ 



Twelve Miles Out" 



CALIFORNIA 
4th and Market 



l 



East Lynn 



CAMEO 

1)36 Market St. 


1 
i 


Chip of the Flying "U" 


CAPITOL 

Ellis nr. Market 


( 
1 


(Dark) 


CASINO 
Mason and Ellis 


s 


Pictures 


CASTRO 

■120 Castro St. 


I 
1 


Pictures 


Columbia 

70 Eddy 


1 
i 


Julia Arthur in 
"Saint Joan" 


OURRAN 
Geary nr. Mason 




"Rose Marie'' 


EGYPTIAN 


\ 


Pictures 


GOLDEN GATE 
G. G. Ave. * Taylor 


I 

! 


Vaudeville 
and Pictures 


GRANADA 
iihsis Market St. 


1 
! 


"Desert Gold" 


HAIGHT 
Milium at Cole 


1 
S 


Pictures 


IMPERIAL 
1077 Market St. 


t 
\ 


"The Cohens and 

the Kellys" 


LOEWS WABF1ELD 
1I8S Market St. 


( 
i 


Richard Barthelmess 
in "Just Suppose" 



MAJESTIC 
Mission between 
20th nnd 21st 



Pictures 



METROPOLITAN 
20R5 Union St. 



Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 
1320 Fillmore 
NEW MISSION 

2550 Mission 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM I 

O'Farrell Jt Powell ( 



Vaudeville 



Pantages (New) X Vaudeville 

Mkt.-Leavenworth j 



POHPBII ' 

Next to Grnnndn \ 



Pictures 



PORTOLA 

7711 Market St. 



Pictures 



president ( Florence Roberts in 

Market « MeAllister \ "Dancing Mothers" 



ROTAL 

I .-.20 Polk St. 



Pictures 



ST. FRANCIS 
mis Market St. 



"Behind the Front" 



SUTTER 

Sutter and Stelner 



Pictures 



I'NION «ll 1111 
O'Farrell nr. Powell \ 



Pictures and 
Vaudeville 



WILKES 

Geary and Mnson 



1 •• 



The Big Parade" 



WIGWAM 

Mission and 22d 



Pictures 



com in i 'S 

1'iirrnn Thrntcr, Similn? V f temn.m. 2:4.1. 
San FrIBel— a Sj in|»h«>ny Orrhestrn 



Wilkes 

There remains luit one more week in 
which to see that splendid picture, 
"The Big Parade," which starts on its 
last week at the Wilkes tomorrow eve- 
ning. 

Many people have viewed this pic- 
ture four or five times, and to those 
who have not as yet, seen it, we do 
implore you to go, for it will be some 
time again, before you will have an 
opportunity to do so. 

John Gilbert, Renee Adoree, Karl 
Dane and Tom O'Brien will live for- 
ever in the memories oE those who have 
seen their work in this picture. 

President 

"Dancing Mothers,"' an absorbing 
play of modern life with a notable cast 
of twenty headed by Florence Roberts, 
Frederick Vogeding, and Kenneth 
Daigneau, starts on its seventh week 
with tomorrow's matinee. 

San Francisco has turned out en 
masse to see beloved Florence Roberts 
once more, and the cast, one and all, 
is worthy of raving about. 

The play is the work of Edgar 
Selwyn and Edmund Goulding. It is 
well written with a profound under- 
standing of life in these modern days. 
There is splendid comedy running 
through the piece and it has been given 
a splendid setting, and the direction of 
Edwin Curtis is perfect. 

Alcazar 

"Twelve Miles Out" is a surprising 
play, — there is a strong undercurrent 
of tragedy throughout, which is mys- 
terious, rom'antic and, in spots, brutally 
truthful. William Anthony McGuire 
wrote it. and Duffy Iris provided some 
splendid settings for it. The last act, 
in particular. is especially intriguing, 
showing the deck of a sailing- vessel. 
with the wind bellying out the sails, 
sailors running up and down the rig- 
ging, etc. 

Dale Winter, in her part of the wife 
of a craven lawyer, shows remarkable 
depth of feeling and plays the part with 
a repression that is most gratifying. 
Frank Sheridan, the distinguished New 
York star, is marvelous in the role of 
the hi-jacking captain ; William David- 
son has a part that fits him to a T. 
and he and Sheridan make the most 
of their unusually strong roles. Wil- 
liam Macaulay has an important role 
and plays it well. The newcomers in 
the cast did very well. Ming Toy an 1 
his trained parrot are great, and Frank 
Darien, always the most dependable of 
actors, makes his part stand out with 
cameo-like distinctness. 
* * * 
Curran 

"Rose Marie." Arthur Hammer- 
stein's beautiful musical comic opera 



is a sensation, as is evidenced by the 
long line of patrons at this house daily. 

There is a beautiful story, tunes that 
are really musical, interpreted by a 
splendid orchestra, and the costuming 
and the sets are superbly beautiful. 

There is a splendid cast, and princi- 
pals and chorus alike are quite the 
best we have seen in a show of this 
kind for an ag-e. 



A Royal Scenarist 

Marie of Roumania, most famous of 
European queens since the era of Vic- 
toria, is to turn movie author. 

The celebrated royal author, noted 
as not only one of the world's beauties 
but as one of the most brilliant femi- 
nine minds in the Old World is to 
write an original story for screen pro- 
duction, and has also signed a contract 
by which all her previously written 
novels, stories and plays are to be avail- 
able for screen production. 

This arrangement, which is one of 
the most romantic as well as one of 
the most important deals in the history 
of the screen, was announced late yes- 
terday by Louis B. Mayer, who ar- 
ranged the contract by which the Rou- 
manian queen becomes a Metro-Gold- 
wyn- Mayer scenarist. 

Under the contract Queen Marie is 
to write an original play for immediate 
production, anl in addition the contract 
gives M. G. M. studios for a long-term 
period the exclusive rights under 
option to any additional story material 
bv the famous author. 



Interesting Dinner at Emerson 
Studio 

Next Thursday. March 11th, Mrs. V. 
Emerson will give another of her in- 
teresting dinners at her studio, 573 
California Street, the unique title of 
the occasion being "Writer's Cramp" 
Evening. 

Mrs. J. J. Connell, who has written 
numerous short stories, the majority of 
which deal with China, and also a 
great amount of verse, a series of 
is which she calls. "Mother Goose 
Nursery Rhymes of China," will be the 
guest of honor, and will discourse on 
Chinese themes. Only recentlv Mrs. 
Connell was offered $100by\the Chatau- 
qua Club, to appear before the mem- 
bers, and speak on the same subject. 

Among the notable people who will 
be p-esent on this occasion are: Mr. 
and Mrs. Julian Hawthorne. Mr. John 
Barry. Professor Eliot G. Meal 
Stanford University; while some of 
the lesser lights of literature include 
Mrs. Eleanore F. Ross. Messrs John 
Brayton of Oakland, and Virgil Lu- 
ciani. poet and author. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 6, 1926 






By Antoinette Arnold 



"Spring Is Here" 
Dame Fashion Says 

SUNSHINE and tield flowers, birds and bowers may tell 
us that spring is here— but Dame Fashion, dictator of 
the season's choice issues her mandate, and we know, no 
matter what says the weather clerk, that spring is here. 

More and more are modes of the hour becoming advance 
messengers of what the months proclaim. The strange part 
of it. too, is that favor tends toward the fashion-plates rather 
than toward what the calendars indicate. 

At any rate, spring fashions are here — and they are here 
with ravishing loveliness! 

Look into shop windows of San Francisco's smartest tho- 
roughfares, and judge for yourself whether or not there is 
a feast for the eye and, meditations for the pocket book. 

The wonder of it all is. not that there are so many and so 
great a variety of things, but that everything, singly and 
collectively, is'so marvelously and fascinating beautiful. 

"The time was." stated a well-known modiste, "when only 
the expensive and exclusive things seemed to be beautiful. 
But look — everything is beautiful now. and the modest 
purse needs only exercised taste, and beautiful attire is one's 

reward." 

* * * 

Simultaneous Unveiling 

i )ne year ago our leading merchants decided to stage a 
simultaneous unveiling of their style shops and when the 
magnetic moment arrived the innovation attracted men and 
women from many quarters of the land. 

The "Unveiling of the Latest Modes" was a pronounced 
success, a twelvemonth ago. And this week's repetition 
of the dramatic hour transcended in expectancy and surprise 
the style show of last year. Really, to quote from travelers 
far and wide. "The fashion show of our western metropolis 
is glorious !" 

* * * 

Welcome the Parasol 

According to fashion experts the parasol will again come 
into its own. This fascinating accessory, which adds ma- 
terially to milady's charm, is said to be quite smart. To 
which we all feel like rising up en masse, and exclaiming 
aloud. "Glory be!" For there is nothing which can so en- 
hance a woman's beauty, especially for daytime wear, as a 
parasol. 

Welcome the parasol — and, even in San Francisco, where 
it has been a stranger many years, the sunshade can find 
a very useful place, as well a^ a most fashionable place in 
society. 

* * 

Trains Bring Women Folks 
To View Our Fashion Shows 

According to authentic reports and statistical recount-. 
train loads have brought society devotees and fashionable 
folks from interior towns, cities and highlands for this year's 
fa-hion show. Hotels, also, give reports that many well- 



known leaders of social life in the capital city, Sacramento, 
and its environs, have come to see the fashion displays. 

"It is worth a journey from anywhere, just to see the San 
Francisco shops, and their fashion shows," exclaimed a 
member of one of Sacramento's wealthiest families. "New 
York, and l'aris. London and other centers of style, will 
have to present something superlatively fine and original 
in order to excel the beauty of this city's style display." en- 
thused the fashionable one. 

* * * 
Don't Forget the Flowers 

Side by side with the handsomest outputs of the silk and 
garment industries are the flower displays by this city's 
florists in their intention to keep pace with an announce- 
ment of spring. 

If you have never seen red and gold and purple amaryllis, 
go look into the windows of the florists along the fashion- 
able thoroughfares. The flowers are simply magnificent! 



Annual Horse Show 

< Oakland again stages an annual Hor>e Show, drawing to 
the < lakland Auditorium a contingency of society folks from 
the length of the land. The social register of the state seems 
to have just emptied its contents into the auditorium, wdiere 
the smartest gowns were worn by the leaders of society and 
wdiere both men and women admirers of the steed dress in 

accordance with the event. 

* * * 

Here are some of those who held boxes at the Oakland 
Horse Show: Mr:-. Louis Ghirardelli, Mr. and Mrs. (leorge 
Hammer. Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hamilton, Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Hanna. Mr. ami Mrs. Stuart 1). Hawley. Mr. and 
Mrs. Louis G, Henes, Mr. and Mrs. Irving 11. Ilcllman, Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward A. 1 toward, Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. How- 
ard, Mr. and Mr-. Herbert I 7 .. Hall. Mr. and Mrs. \Y. II. L. 
Nynes and Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Keenan, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. C. Jurgens, Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Kinney, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles C. Kennev. Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Knowles, Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph R. Knowland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edson F. Adams. Mr. and Mrs. George W. 
Baker. Brig.-Gen. and Mrs. 'David P. Barrows, Miss Maude 
Banks. Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Best, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Boc- 
queras, Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Brophy, Mr. and Mrs. 11. C. Cap- 
well. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Carlston. Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Cavalier, Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Cory. Mrs. Thomas Crel- 
lin. Mr. and Mrs. Wiggington E. Creed. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas \Y. Cushing, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil B. DeMille. Mr. 
and Mrs. Stanley Dollar. Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Edoff, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Cal Ewing, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Field, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry H. Fair, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Force, First Na- 
tional Bank. Mr. A. P. Fleming. 

* * * 
At Palm Beach 

Mr>. John Drum has been visiting Mrs. E. H. G. Slater 
at her villa. Casa Biela at Palm Beach. Several elaborate 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

«50 KuMh Street, Between Powell and Stockton, Son FrnnoiN 
Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



J L 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 
Telephone Sutter 8130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY , 



March 6, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



dinner parties have heen given by Mrs. Slater 
in compliment to Mrs. Drum, who plans to 
spend some time in New York City before re- 
turning to her Burlingame home. 

* * * 

Captain and Mrs. Erskine Bolst of San Fran- 
cisco gave a dinner in Monte Carlo recently for 
Lord Younger, previous to his return to Lon- 
don. Among the guests were Major-General 
F. J. Kernan, U.S.A., retired ; Sir John and 
Lady Prettyman Newman, Mr. and Mrs. 
Berr'vwall, Ladv Heath. Mrs. K. P. Lehr and 

Mrs. ( i. H. P. Belmont. 

* * * 

John Snow, of this city and Oakland, who 
has been travelling in Central European coun- 
tries, has been recently in Vienna, on his way 

westward. 

* * * 

Judge and Mrs. Marcel Cerf gave a tea with 
music in their apartment in Paris, in compli- 
ment to Mrs. Frank Vernon, nee Virginia 
Brooks. A number of folk songs of various 
countries was included in the program. Mrs. 
John McNear of San Francisco was one of the guests. 

* * * 

Mrs. William H. Crocker and her daughter. Miss Helen 
Crocker, are returning to their Burlingame home after their 
sojourn in New York and other eastern cities. 

Mr. Charles Crocker, whose engagement to Miss Virginia 
Bennett of Denver, has been announced, will remain in New 
York, and will enter business there. The wedding of Mr. 
Crocker and Miss Bennett will take place early this summer, 
according to announcements. 

* * * 

Mrs. Charles Bryan and Mrs. Frederick Cooper gave an 
elaborate luncheon at the Fairmont Hotel last week with 
forty guests seated at tables decorated charmingly in the 
first blossoms of spring. 

■:, * * 

The twenty-second anniversary breakfast of Cap and 

Bells Club will be held on Thursday. March 18, in the Gold 
ballroom of the Fairmont, For which elaborate preparations 
arc being made. Mrs. Marshall C. Harris, the gracious and 
popular president, will preside, and Mrs. Thomas Alexander 
East will present a program of music and other artistic 
numbers. The reception committee comprises Mrs. John 
Sylvester Pinney, Dr. Blanche Culver, Mrs. A. < \. Stoll, Mrs. 
Thomas J. Morton. Mrs. Norman Waller Hall. Mrs. Byron 
Hall, Mrs. Byron Hoffman, Mrs. Henry Mortimer Hastings. 
Mrs. Richard inland, Mrs. Warren 11. Lord and Mr-, 
Joseph Lawless. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Esberg and their son. Mr. Milton 
Esberg, Jr., gave a house party at their country home in 
Ross lasl week in compliment to Miss Barbara Sesnon. Miss 
tdabella Wheaton, Mis- Julia Adams and Mr. Frank Fuller 

and a few others. 

* * * 

Literature Invited 
Throngs of Folks 

The large audience of more than lour hundred book 
lovers, members <>\ the California Club and their friends 
who assembled at the prett) club house last Tuesday at- 
tested the value of a literary day. The auditorium of the 




El. CANTERBURY 
7.->0 Slitter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
ates: From $2.50 per day 



club house was packed and more chairs hail to he 
brought into the room for the accommodation 
of the literary devotees. 

Katharine Eggleston Holmes, author, short 
story writer and lecturer addressed the audi- 
ence on "A Fiction Writer's Facts," giving 
from out her storehouse of knowledge and ex- 
periences as an author many new ideas of 
writing. 

Grace Sanderson Michie, scenario writer and 
leader of the Better Picture movement, gave an 
illuminating address at the California Club, 
drawing graphic pictures of her own work, the 
motion picture industry and telling with a 
splendid understanding of photoplays in gen- 
eral, details of the profession. Mrs. Michie 
has a number of successful photoplays to her 
credit and has just completed a new picture 
which will appear upon the screen. She has 
directed, filmed, cut and captioned her own 
pictures and, now it is said by many in au- 
thority that this brilliant young writer will, 
before long, be as well known as a director as 
she is as a writer of scenarios. 



Composer Plays Own 
Seng on Literary Day 

Winifred McGee of Ceres, the well-known California com- 
poser, singer and organist, with over 100 compositions of 
her own, came down to this city last week to attend the lit- 
erary day of the California Club, and to play her own com- 
positions for the musical part of the program, 

A poem "( l Flag of < lurs." written by Anna Blake Mez- 
quida anil set to music by Winifred McGee, was sung on 
this noteworthy occasion by Helen Coburn Heath with 
Winifred McGee at the piano 

Mrs. William Beckman was an honor guest and in tribute 
to her, readings were given by Mrs. James Crawford, who 
selected lines from Mrs. Beckman's latest hook. "Thought 
Stitches From Life's Tapestry." 

, * * * 

Indian Lyrics 

Professor Merrick Norman l.ehmer of the University of 
California, an authority on Indian life, their songs and their 
legends, spoke before the California Club, illustrating his 
address with the songs of Indians which he is preserving 

on special phonograph records, 

Mizpah Nathan, soprano singer of Sacramento, was solo- 
ist at the literary program, with Mrs. Phillip Aaronson it 
tin- piano. Mrs. Nathan's exquisite voice charmed the San 
Francisco music lovers, her repertoire including operatic 
selections, ballads and descriptive numbers which she sang 
with musicianly understanding and perfect tone qualities. 



Edna Wilson Becsey, president of the Sacramento 
Writers' Club was an honor guest of the California Club 
literary day. 

Tribute was paid Fleanore Ross, poet and editor, whose 

poem. "San Francisco From Russian Hill" was read by Mr. 

Virgil Luciani, at the meeting and splendid recognition 

lited Mrs Ross for the beauty of her poetic lines. Last 

week's New- Fetter printed this poem. 

ntinued on Page Hi 



SANTA MARIA INN 

S \\T\ M \Rl \. C M IFORMA 



On il.p CMUl Hiftriv.»> Hall**at B HU M I >«n Franeuta tnd Lo« 
\n Inn of l/nmual EirrllMJCr 1 
W irr or MTU* for ffifnu/mnt «wi *wr nrxl trip south 



Angcln 



AGU A C ALIENTE SPRINGS- Why? 

It's the water and the table — New dance hall. Special attrae 
lions. Radioactive, hot sulphur water tub baths and swim- 
mine pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. T. H. COR- 
CORAN. Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, or see Peck-Judah 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 6, 1926 



«^9i!<^- 



-^9i!js* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



«*=£ 



<&» 



-S^^JS- 




Tl I E San Francisco Rotary Club held a 
successful golf tournament at the Lake 
Merced Country Club when fifty entered in the 
handicap medal play for several handsome 
pieces of silverware. 

Al liernhard. the Epsom Sails King- won his 
first trophy in Rotary competion. Al said the 
reason he did so well was that he had just 
visited his mines. 

Frank Foran, who had Colonel James Power as his guest. 
made the course in two better than Bernhard and won a cup 
for himself. 

Captain Jack Stolz also played a dandy game and copped 
the C class. Captain Jack has three cocktail cups; when 
he wins three more he'll have a set. 

The teams were captained by Mike Savanah of Paragon 
fame, and Bob Bremner, the ships chandler. Mike was too 
gorgeously attired to play golf; evidently he was bent on 
showing his latest creations in sport togs. However Brem- 
ner wrecked his aspirations as a leader as Bob's team won 
by a walk. 

George Leathurby, candidate for mayor of San Mateo, 
played the feature golf of the day. George is the star pellet 
shooter from the Crystal Springs Club, but when he took 
twelve on the first hole. Carl Eddy the chairman of the day, 
got his first real laugh out of George when he collected 
enough to pay expenses. 

Jim Patrick, the rubber stamp baby, put in an appearance 
after an absence of six months, but as usual he is long on 
form, but short on shots and after playing nine holes, he 
went back to work. 

The banquet following the tournament was well attended 
and a most enjoyable day was spent. 



Banquet at the California Club 

A. L. De Luca, one of the most popular members of the 
California Golf and Country Club, entertained twenty-five 
of his golfing friends at a dinner given at the club in honor 
of his cracking his previous record of 98. De Luca cut one 
stroke oft' that figure and felt so happy that he arranged a 
>econd dinner, which was attended by main- golfing celebri- 
ties, including Jack Percy, the noted attorney, Pill Larson, 
one of Thomas Edison's right-hand men. lingo I'oheim and 
Rod Guyette, all past presidents of the Mutual Business 
Club of which De Luca is a member. 

Fred Gomph, the very much alive secretary of the Cali- 
fornia Club, and Claud Alexander, the big banker secretary 
of the Mutual Club, each gave an interesting account of his 
secretaryship in a very colorful manner. Jack Percv acted 
as toastmaster and filled the position admirably. After the 
boys had enjoyed a most sumptuous repast, which was i -spe- 
cially prepared by Miss Gallagher, they adjourned to the 
card room. Among those present were Jack Percv. .Archie 
Duncan, K. R. Snooks. Otto Segler. Heinie Brown. Fred 
Gomph, Herb Bilsborough, Line Nelson, Andrew Nelson. 
Tom Doherty, Hugo Poheim, Bill Carson. Rod Guyette, 
Charlie Pittman, Claud Alexander. Al Sais, [Carl Nagel, 
O. A. Kellog, Studebaker Johnson, A. L. De Luca and Fred 
Blair. 

* * * 

The Mutual Business Club had its monthly golf ball hunt 
on the California Golf Club's Preserve last Thursday. Fifty 
members joined in the scramble for lost balls. 



Carl Thomson, the newest member of the club, who in pri- 
vate life is an importer of raw materials, pulled a raw one 

when he grabbed off the first prize in Class A with a net 7i. 

* * * 

"Grandpa" Charley Goodwin won the low net ith a 74 
when he played off a tie of the January tournament with 
lack W'halen anil Klmer "Veastfoam" Miller. Little Elmer 
could not make the ball rise out of the sand traps even with 
a niblick load of Fleischman's yeast. 

* * * 

M. G. West Company's representative gave the pill an 
awful "W'halen" but succumbed to the prowess of Grandpa 
Charley at the 18th. 

* * * 

.\l the Nineteenth hole Jack W'halen gazed upon the 
mashie-like countenance of Little Flmer Yeastfoam and was 
heard to murmur. "Yeast is yeast and west is west and ne'er 
the twain shall meet again on the links." 

* * * 

The Class P. Trophy was snatched by "Looie" Thynnes. 
while Milton "Collarbutton" Ellis, the dashing haberdasher, 
wrapped up the first prize in Class C. 

After winning the Class D Trophy, Herb Billsborough 
started in at the nineteenth to play nine more boles, but ran 
out of fruit juice. 

* * * 

F'rank Sutton looked over the real estate with a net 70. 
For this expert performance he will have his full name and 
family history inscribed on the Golden Gate Ferry Com- 
pany's Sterling Silver "Vessel." If his moniker is written 
there two more times he will receive a miniature replica of 
this cup about the size of a "schooner." Sounds like a 
Ferry tale. * * * 

Gerry Brooks and Courtenay Barter both came in with a 
75. but Gerry was just out of the hospital last June and 
Courtenay had added to his handicap by being married re- 
cently. * * * 

Link Johnson linked up with an 83, while "Kid" Kid well 
kidded himself along with an SO. "Kid" alibied that he 
would have made better headway if he had had more wind 
in his tires. The patent attorney rebutted that that was 
an inflated statement, irrelevant and immaterial, and had 
no bearing on the case. Pink says the "Kid" "drove" off 
the course and "skidded" along in the rough. 

* * * 

When that Wicked Wicker furniture magnate, Al F"er- 
reira turned in a gross ')'>. they laid him on a wicker daven- 
port so he would feel at home and come to. 

* * * 

Safety House Hick dubbed around in an 87 — net of course. 
Nobody flashed a stop signal on him and he went through 
three foursomes before he was finally stopped by an explo- 
sion shot executed by Steel Tank Ben Newsom. Norris 
thought the sun was a spot light and it blinded him. 

* * 

Chicken De Luca of poultry fame executed a 90. He was 
fresh from the slaughter house and covered with feathers. 
This tickled him — the feathers, not the score. 

* * * 

Jack Fllery bought a new driver from himself at whole- 
sale and tried it out for the first time. If anybody wants a 
brand new driver cheap, we know where you can get one. 
(Continued on Page 13) 



March 6, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




Selecting a Radio Rheostat 

WHEN purchasing a radio set it is 
an excellent idea to actually test 
the set in your home and give it a very 
careful examination to avoid future dis- 




appointments. One of the important 
things to he considered is the rheostat, 
which is a small instrument most gen- 
erally mounted on the panel board. It 
Ci nsisls of a resistance coil wound on 
some good material thai will stand heat. 
The purpose of the rheostat is to control 
the filament or "A" current that flows 
through a radio set. The control is ac- 
complished by a shaft through the center 
of the rheostat with an arm attached t" 
the shaft which comes in contact with the 
resistance coil. The movement of the 
arm controls the flow of the filament 

current. 

Rheostats can cause a great deal oi 
unnecessary trouble and thej should be 
carefully inspec e 1 before buying a ra lio. 
Practically all good radio sets are 
equipped with tirst class material, but it 
would not be amiss to make a close in- 
spection, and a few points about rheo- 
stats may help in your selection. 

I \. imine the resistance coil on the 
rheostat and if it is possible to move 
the wire with your linger, trouble will 
possibly he experienced later mi from 
short circuited turns. I'ho contact arm 

should fasten securely onto the shaft by 

a set-screw, and the end of the contact 
arm that makes contact with the resis- 
tance wire, should he SO adjusted that it 
will slide freely over the resistance wire. 

making a good contact at all points. 

In the use oi rheostats a good rule is 
to bum the filament or the light of the 
tube as low as possible an 1 still obtain 
prion. The safest method to 
follow is to turn up the rheostat until a 
hiss is hear', then turn the rheostat down 
until this hissing noise just disappears, 
and you have the most efficient point for 
the tube to operate best. 

Some set owners make the error of 



turning their rheostats on as far as pos- 
sible. This practice cuts out all of the 
resistance of the filament circuit, which 
shortens the life of the tube and also de- 
creases the volume of the output. 

Too much attention cannot be given to 
selecting a set with good rheostats, and 
to learning to adjust them to the proper 
point for the best possible reception from 
your radio set. 

Loud Speakers 

There are on the market today many 



different kinds and makes of loud speak- 
ers, such as horns, bells, cones, cabinets 
and so forth, each one, according to its 
manufacturer, better than the other and 
as every set owner realizes, the loud 
speaker is one of the most important ac- 
cessories of any radio set, especially 
where good reproduction is desired. 

On some sets one make of loud speaker 
has been known to perform better than 
some other particular make, and for that 
(Continued on Page 16) 



BROADCAST SCHEDULE FOR NEXT WEEK 



III, ICK Tl PE P. IH.i LIGHT FIGl RE8 A. M. 



I 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., SAN FRANCISCO— 220 



3:30- 0:30 



9:00-10:45 
2:00- 2:30 
8:00-10:00 



9:00-10:45 
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2:O0- 2:30 



9:00-10 
2:00- 2 
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KFRC— CITY OF PARIS, SAN FRANCISCO— 270.1 



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KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS, INC., SAN FRANCISCO— 226 



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Pajama 

Party 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 207 



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5:00 
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2 30- 3:30 
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2 30- 3:30 
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8:00- 8:15 
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2:30- 3:80 

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KFUU— MATHEWSON MOTOR CO., INC., OAKLAND— 220 



S 100-10:34) 



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KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO.. OAKLAND— 361.2 



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KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAKLAND— 508.2 



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KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO.. SEATTLE— 384.4 



5 CNI- 
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KFOA— RHODES DEPARTMENT STORE, SEATTLE— 454.3 



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12:30- 1:30 
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KFI— EARLE C. ANT 
(Copyright 192 



HONY, INC.. LOS ANGELES — 467 
by Earle C Anthony. Inc. 1 



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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 6, 1926 




PACIFIC Gas and Electric Company's I 'it River project 
is proceeding rapidly. Work is progressing on the big 
tunnel, diversion dam, flumes and foundation work. _ This 
sort of enterprise gives American engineering its distinct 
place. 



— Southern 
senger terminal 



Pacific has opened a $2,500,000 railway- pas- 
:il at Sacramento, with great ceremony, the 
governor and other notables being there in force. This is 
the wav m which our transportation corporations are adding 
to the glory and wealth of the state. The public spirit of 
these utility corporations is decidedly noticeable in these 

davs. 

* * * 

— Motive power has been increased by 30.84 per cent on 
the Southern Pacific since the road was turned back to 
private ownership. The sum of $19,202,118 has been spent 
on locomotives alone. This is due to the growing volume 
of freight with which the old type of locomotive could nol 
deal. More power, more speed, less risk, such are the 
achievement of the modern engineer. 



— The Highwav Commission is branching out into a mul- 
tiplicity of projects. Looking at the list which includes Del 
Norte on the one hand and Orange on the other we wonder 
how our pockets can stand it. till we realize that it mean- 
sheer economy. The convict camp, which has been highly 
successful, is to be maintained. 



— Carpenters talk about walking off their jobs on April 

1st, which is a fine day for that >ort of thing. Do they have 

a grievance? None, except that the non-union men have 

a chance to live. They must be tired of good pay and 

overtime. 

* * * 

— Western Pipe and Steel Co. has entered upon the manu- 
facture of Lock-bar steel pipe. Lock-har pipe has been 
found, over a considerable period, superior for efficiency, 
durability and strength, in the general run, to elei trie 
welded pipe. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1925 

Assets $107,232,609.22 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,250,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over 525,000.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

1IAIGHT STREET BRANCH Ilnipht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONZ-QUARTER (AH) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital *2u,0OO,O0O (20,000,000 Re.erve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL, BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES TH11U- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.: SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

Son Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRICK HEATHCOTE W. J. COIILTHARD 

Manager A.M. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walte W. Derr, Manager 

1U5 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



; — The Court of Appeal has decided in Los Angeles 
Count)- that the Industrial Accident Commission has no 
power to order paid to a general creditor or creditors of ar 
injured person, any part of an award made to an injured 
employee or his dependents. 

* * * 

— Expenditure of $5,173,735.00 for construction and main 
tenance in the San Francisco division of the Pacific Gas 
and Electric Co. for the year 1926 has just been approved 
by the company. 

* * * 

— Electro magnetic methods for prospecting were first 
adopted in 1907, but the main development was in 1921 
when Karl Sundberg, a Swedish mining engineer, began 
to experiment. They arc now being used in the United 
States. A current is causer! to flow into an ore body and 
the electro magnetic disturbances caused by it are noted. 



—-There is now quite a campaign for cotton insurance in 
California. The new crop in the state is already reaching 
very formidable proportions. There are 172,000 acres of 
cotton yielding a crop worth $12,980,000. ( alifornia pro- 
duces 351 pounds of cotton to the acre. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Douclas 2244 



11 INVFACTURSRS OF 



San Krancl.co, Crillf. 
4-14 Market Slrcet 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California ! 



! 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, | 
Fl,l >li:S, GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 



Lou AngreleM, Calif, i 

."iT17 Santa Fe Avenue t 

-------------...4 



^__^ MADE TO ORDER ONLY 

JflOsIZKeaf Shirts * JhosEKeBtt 

^ifly -Ess. -saw ! 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearny Strut . Phone Kearny 3714 \ 



March 6, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



la 



Travel Tid-Bits 

By Ernest F. Rixon 



The United States Lines 

It may not be generally known that the United States Lines 
are quite a factor in Atlantic steamship business. They are at 
present operating six steamers, the "Leviathan," and the 
"George Washington," as first-class steamers, that is, carrying 
first, second and third-class passengers, and the "America," 
"Republic," "President Roosevelt," and "President Harding," 
carrying cabin and third-class passengers only. 

The "Leviathan" is one of the largest and most famous 
steamers in the world, she is the flagship of the United States 
Lines, and her record from Cherbourg to New York is five days 
and twelve hours. She is noted for her luxurious appointments, 
such as, a Pompeiian swimming pool, winter garden, Louis XIV 
salon, and the fact that four times around B deck is one mile. 
She also possesses two of the best equipped gymnasiums on 
any ship on the Atlantic. 

The "George Washington" is another famous steamer having 
carried President Wilson to the peace conference during the 
war, also General Pershing on his many trips across the At- 
lantic. 

The "America" is the largest cabin steamer crossing the At- 
lantic, and a great favorite with ocean travelers. The "Repub- 
lic" is one of the best known cabin steamers and has accommo- 
dation for 600 cabin passengers. The "President Harding" and 
"President Roosevelt" have recently been converted into cabin 
Steamers and both of these ships have become famous during 
the past four months for spectacular rescues at sea. On both 
occasions the captain and crew have been decorated by the 
British and Italian governments, as well as our own. 

The "Leviathan" is a great favorite with the moving picture 
stars, having carried most of the best known in the moving pic- 
ture colony the last few years. She will sail from New York, 
March 20th on her second 1926 trip and on this particular trip 
she will carry well over 75 passengers from California. The 
"Leviathan is 990 feel long, 59,965 tons, and has an average' 
speed of 24 kno's per hour. She also is equipped with the mosl 
powerful radio of any vessel afloat, 

The United States Lines office here is under the direction of 

H. L. Dunwoodie, who is well known among shipping circles 
in the East, and although one of the youngest steamship man- 
agers in the country, be is well versed in steamship travel, hav- 
ing mai'e numerous trips to and from Europe. 

Information regarding United States Lines sailings will be 
promptly furnished by the San Francisco News Letter or by 
Ernest F. Rixon. 544 Market. San Francisco, Room 209. 



Several trans-Pacific steamship companies and transcon- 
tinental railroads have volunteered to distribute, throughout 

their respective systems, copies of the general "Redwood 

Highway Empire" folder, soon to be issued by the Redwood 
Highway Association. This is a direct result of the Red- 
wood Highway Day Luncheon of a few weeks ago, accord- 
ing to Clyde Edmondson, manager. 

This type of distribution is looked upon by the directors 
of the association as one of the most effective methods oi 
attracting and controlling the direction of travel to and 
through the Redwood Highway Empire. Other folder dis- 
tribution plans are well under way according to word re- 
ceived today. 



GOLF 

(Continued from Page 10) 

"Pants" Poheim wasn't satisfied with an 85, which is 
pretty good for a tailor. He won the last tournament with 
a net 68 and immediately sold himself an extra pair of 
trousers. If he wins again you will be able to buy pants at 
$1.75 a leg, seats free. 

* * * 

"Pete" Peterson, roofing expert, is another one of the 
newer members who shoots around in the eighties. The 
first game he ever played was in the eighties and that makes 
him old enough to know better. Always alert for business, 
he discovered a leak in one of the lockers before he left the 
club house. 

* * * 

After four months total abstinence from golf, Frank Tay- 
lor succumbed to the call of the niblick and mid-iron and 
showed up for the big hunt. While he was waiting to tee 
off, he sold two automobile policies and six dollars' worth 
of golf insurance. We hope Frank will play the game be- 
fore he works himself to death. 



Tom Doherty was right at home on the California links 
and promptly extinguished his opponent. Tom always 
makes a fellow feel put out. 

* * * 

The "Big Butter and Egg Man," Andrew Nelson, skim- 
med the milk of human kindness when he trimmed his own 
brother with a net 85. 

* * * 

Roy Staniford beat himself when everybody kidded him 
about the time he went duck hunting with Jack Ellery and 
shot up all the decoys and then shot a hole in the bottom of 
the boat. 



It looks as if we shall have to lend France more money 
so as to enable her to pay us what she owes us. — Cleveland 

Time- 



Escorted and 
Indep endent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8C DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, Qeneral cAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Sutter 2342 



SAX FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 6, 1926 



Library Table 



THERE is so much sound, practical business sense in the 
four volumes under the title: "The Handbook of Busi- 
ness Correspondence," written by S. Roland Hall, and pub- 
lished by the McGraw-Hiil Book Company, Inc. that it 
is a puzzling proposition to quote at length from any cer- 
tain section or volume of this complete and valuable set of 
books for the ambition- letter-writer, and still do justice 
to the author. 

(Notwithstanding the realization of this tact, we are 
quoting at random" from the first of these splendid volumes. 
which are, so apparently, "a liberal education" in themselves : 

"Good letters, like everything else, must be -old in a 
buyer's market. They must prove their own worth. But 
there is still another' side to the question. Corporations 
•iay not have souls, but they surely do have personalities. 
~"-at personality is revealed only through the medium of 
•■"Hers. It surely, then, is worth while to have this person- 
* ,: 'v an appealing one." 

"-"•re are some "don't-" in advising the good-letter-writer 
Msoirant. which the correspondence supervisor of the Penn- 
sylvania Rubber Company compiled: and which Mr. Hall 
quotes : 

"Don't be a beggar. Don't say everything in one breath. 
Come up for air. Disregard of this caution causes clumsy 
sentences. 

Don't be afraid of two many sentence-. It i- the long, 
clumsy one-sentence letter which bespeaks the amateur. 

Don't become stereotyped. Versatility is rarely a fault. 

Don't overlook the recipient of the letter: thinking of 
him in the light of the facts puts personality in what you 
write. 

Don't gush. YVe appreciate inquiries for our products. 
but we are not peddling pills. 

Don't use anything unessential to the clearness of the 
letter. Simplicity radiates courtesy and personality." 

"The Handbook of Business Correspondence," by S. 
Roland Hall. McGraw-Hill Book Co.. New York. 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 



At the Samarkand 

At a delightful little dinner party given at "Samarkand," 
Santa Barbara on Wednesda) evening last, the betrothal 
of two interesting parlies to Pacific Coast residents was an- 
nounced, the interested ones being Miss Agnes VVillumsen, 
of Pasadena. California, who until recently has been the 
private secretary for Mr. D. M. Linnard, President of the 
Linnard Hotel Interests, and the other being Mr. Alfred 
Killam Bennett, of Tacoma; Washington, General Manager 
of Linnard Hotel- north of San Francisco. Mr. Bennett has 
been located for the past several months at "The Winthrop." 
the new Linnard hotel in Tacoma. Washington, but since 
the first of the year he ha- been in Santa Barbara to reopen 
"Samarkand." 

* * * 

At the Hollywood Plaza 

Prominent San Francisco people recently registered at the 
Hollywood Plaza Hotel, Hollywood, California are: Mr. and 
Mrs. W li. Maltby, Mr. Norwood Chanman, Mr. W. II. Goi 
man, Mr. I.. A. Kutner, Mrs. R. R. Finnigan, Mr. and Mrs. 
S. B. Williams. Mr. and Mr-. P. J. Kemper. Mrs. S. Rosen- 
bluni. Mr. Albert Fraus. Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Lee. Mrs. Henry 
Gray, Miss Helen Wilson, Mr. Pridmore Wilson. Mr. and Mrs. 
P. M. Caroe, Mr. A. J. Plumenthal. Mr. R. P. Hyman, Mr. 
and Mrs. L. A. Douglas. 




AT SINGLETON'S 

Allaj (Eat 

COFFEE INN 



A Nice Hot Business 

Lunch, 50c 
Delicious Sandwiches 
Tasty Salads 
A Wonderful Crab Louie 
Home-Made Pies and 
Good Coffee 



Lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p 




LARKINS DUCO 
Has Lustre 



Combined with lustre, it possesses a durability that 
is amazing. Be sure of a good job. 

Prices reasonable 

LARKINS & CO. 

First Avenue at Geary Street 





TliL. FltAS ;ki,in 86SB 

>!elnl Work Apper- 
taining to Automo- 
biles — Osy-Aeetylene 

Wi-lilliin — lllnek- 
timlthlnK* 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

have: your cars washed and greased 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Ratex: 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 24 3 

Six Floor* for Service and Storage of Automobile* 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

^os Crocker Untitling (Opposite Palace Hotel). San Frnnclaco 

Phone Kearny 391 



M2 llu.li (eor. Tojlor) 



DENMAN GARAGE 



nt location for club , 



tlpUl 956 | 



March 6, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



IS 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
Nntlonal Automobile Club 

HAND in hand with the develop- 
ment of the passenger car and tin- 
great advance in highway development 
which has heen coincident with the pro- 
gress of the automotive industries, has 
been a tremendous gain in the motor 
transport field. 

In 1924, 10'-, of the motor vehicles 
produced in the United States were 
trucks. The output of commercial ve- 
hicles showed a higher proportion as corn- 
bared with passenger vehicles than in any 
previous year. 'The reason for this is 
the increased demand on the part of the 
country fanners for a quick method oi 
transport in order to take care oi the 
products of the farm as rapidly as pos- 
sible. 

In 1912, 22,000 motor trucks was the 
total produced for the United States an 1 
Canada as compared with 375,396 such 
vehicles produced during 1924 and ap- 
proximately 400,000 SUCh vehicle- in 
1925. 

The two big buying months of the 
for commercial vehicles arc March an 1 
October: the March purchase- may In- 
laid to the demand for movement of 
spring products and the October pur- 
chases for the farm products of the fall. 

In California 17,799 commercial ve- 
hicles were registered during 1925, 
8,783 of which were absorbed by the 
forty-seven northern counties and 
9,016 by the eleven southern counties. 
The majority of these purchases were 
the light trucks of popular make, de- 
signed for the transportation of less 
than one ton of freight. 

The motor truck is one of the most 
important of the cog- in the machine 
of commerce today. It has opened up 
a great domain on the Pacific Coast 



which was not fed by the railroads and 
has increased valuation of a consider- 
able proportion of state domain by sup- 
plying transportation facilities for pro- 
ducts raised in districts off the main 
shipping centers. 

In spite of the fact that the motor 
truck registration in California and in 
the Pacific northwest has shown a re- 
markable gain in the last few years, the 
future of the automotive industry in 
the west is said to be in the sale of 
commercial vehicles. 

The motor truck has not by any 
means taken away any great amount 
of freight shipment from the railroads, 
in spite of the fact that it would seem 
at first glance that this would be the 
case. ( >n the contrary, the increase in 
registration of commercial vehicles has 
resulted in an increase in freight ship- 
ments over the railroads, the short 
hauls being made by motor truck and 
the longer hauls by the railroads. 

In the cherry districts of the Vaca 
Valley the motor truck plays a con- 
spicuous part in the transportation of 
the fruit from the packing sheds to the 
freight stations. In the San Joaquin 
Valley the raisin growers have found 
the motor truck an indispensable aid 
in the shipment of the grape product. 
Likewise, in the citrus growing dis- 
tricts of Southern California and in the 
thermal belt near I Iroville, the small 
truck has proved a tremendous advan- 
tage to the orcbardist and farmer. 

The prophets of the industry predict 
a domestic truck market at least as large 
as ever before, owing to the fact that 
the agricultural region- have been able 
lo capitalize on their better financial posi- 
tion although the position of the farmer 
maj not be a- favorable as that of his 
city brother. 

In the farming districts of the middle 
we.-t. the fluctuating price- on farm pro 

ducts have a gi I o do with the 

increase • r decrease of motor truck buy- 
ing. In California, however, the equili- 
brium between the purchasing power of 
OlUltry and the city is preserve I to a 
larger extent on account of the variety 

iroducts winch the farm countie 
able lo pn ducc. 

The farmers and fruit growers in Cali- 
fornia are gn wing richer every year and 
a great deal of this increase in wealth may 
ttributetl to the I use of the 

mi i- i trans] ort fi r the marketing of 
crops. 



Di 



All in the Name 

The Song Writer— I have here, my 
dear sir. a song that is bound to suc- 
ceed. It tell- about the great, mighty 
Northland. It tell- of a sweet romance 
uniler the blazing Northern Lights. 

The Producer— What's its name? 

S. W. — "Love Light- of the North." 

Producer — Change that to "Mushing 
( in the Yukon." and I can use it.— Col- 
gate Banter. 



ivide your gas 
or electric bill by the 
number of days—of meals 
— of lighting hours, of 
baths, hours of heating, 
etc., tor which the service 
was used — you will be 
surprised how little each 
has cost. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 




"PACIFIC SERVICE' 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




©well's 

^-^KAHONAl CMS! 

(offee 

-the better it getf- 



Fc^SJpal 



CEO. W. CASWELL 

kland 1017 
» Telephone Direct 

IXHt.lHMl nips »rrr str^rd at thr Pan>mi 
I'aclflr Inter n ali it nal K span 1 1 ion 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 6, 1926 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 11) 
reason it has been necessary in the past 
to always select a speaker that was best 
suited to each individual radio set. 

Recently there arrived on the market a 
new speaker that has many fine qualities 
and is worthy of praise and also the con- 
sideration of anyone desiring a fine tone. 

This new speaker is known under the 
trade name of the "Teletone Cabinet 
Speaker," manufactured by the Teletone 
Corporation of New York City. It is 
built circular and possesses that clear out- 
standing tone that is absent in so many 
speakers. One outstanding feature be- 
ing freedom from the usual crackling 
noises that are so often evident in loud 
speakers. This is accomplished through 
its excellent construction. The Teletone 
is built like the violin, entirely of wood ; 




the interior of seasoned spruce and the 
cuter cabinet of highly polished walnut. 
There is nothing to get out of order 
and nothing to adjust, and the price is 
within reach of everyone. 



For Sale 

Seattle Home 

Eight-room Colonial Residence. Large 
Living Room. Dining Room, Breakfast 
Room and Kitchen. Four Bed Rooms. 
Tile Bath. Furnace and Garage. 
3406 East James St., Seattle, Wash 

C. A. RAY 

564 Market St., San Francisco 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 

EXCHANGE 

Phone Garfield 3N52 504 Market St. 



The Teletone Cabinet Speaker has been 
given a thorough try-out on many dif- 
ferent radio sets and in many locations. 
The result has been the same, a clear 
and mellow tone. It is indeed a wonder- 
ful loud speaker and one that anv set 
owner should be proud to possess. 



Those who criticise the gentlemen of 
the microphone generally known as an- 
nouncers, should take into consideration 
seme of the difficulties they meet with. 
How, for instance, would you like to an- 
nounce on a KFI program that "Martha 
Van Hoomissen-Chevallier will play 
'Tod and Verklaerung,' by Strauss, and 
accompany the 'Versunkene Glocke' by 
GretchnaninofF, sung by Antoinette 
Konorocharakoff ?" 



Do You Know "Moco"? 

Now is the time to think of dolling 
up your car for the coming season. 

When you think of paint, think of 
"Moco;" then go out lo Gene Morriss', 
23? Valencia St. and look over some of 
the jobs that are finished with this new 
process — it is very durable; a most beau- 
tiful automobile finish — and its beautv 
and gloss increase with use. 

The price is the lowest you will find 
for a dependable job and will surprise 
you. The saving in first cost is greater 
because of the short time you are de- 
prived of the use of your car. Take it in 
one day and drive it out the next. You 
can make no mistake in investigating this. 



At the Elder Gallery 
Dr. Alexander Kaun, of the Univer- 
sity of California, who has recently re- 
turned from an eight months' sojourn 
in Europe, will speak in the Paul Elder 
Gallery. Saturday afternoon, March 
13th at 2:30 o'clock, on his experiences 
during his recent ratnblings — of things 
and persons, art and life. 

Who can say which is more exciting, 
a Herculaneum bronze, a fragment from 
a nascent novel read by Gorky, a fresh 
canvas by Picasso, a Neapolitan crowd, 
parliamentary elections in Czecho-Slo- 
vakia, an interview with Minister Ra- 
dich in Beigrad, or talks with anony- 
mous Italians, Czechs, Ruthenians., 
Poles, Jews, Magyars and so on? 



All Off 

He — "Mary?" 

Voice — "Yes." 

"This is Jack. May I call tonight?" 

"Sure. Where will we go?" 

"Well, I wish we could stay home 

for I'm busted." 

"You've got the wrong number. This 

isn't Mary." — Penn Punch Bowl. 




TALLEST TOWER 
What engineers say will be the 
highest electric transmission 
tower in the world, is being 
erected by the Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company as a part of 
the new 220,000 volt power line 
now being built from the Vaca- 
Dixon Substation to Antioch. 
The tower will be located near 
Rio Vista and will be 459 feet 
high or about twice as high as 
the company's 17 story Gen- 
eral Office Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Piles will be driven 80 
feet for a foundation to the 
tower. 

Without a splice in the wires, 
six copper-clad steel cables will 
stretch from anchorage to an- 
chorage 7029 feet, nearly a mile 
and one-third across the Sac- 
ramento River and 8853 feet, 
more than a mile and two- 
thirds across the San Joaquin 
River. Supporting towers will 
be necessary to maintain the 
prescribed clearance height. 
There is to be a single un- 
broken span of 4135 feet over 
the Sacramento River and one 
of 3175 ft. over the San Joaquin 
River. The line will end three 
miles south of Antioch, where 
the company is building its 
Contra Costa Substation. 
With the new line operating 
at a world's record voltage, it 
will be possible to carry Pit 
River power to the industrial 
districts centering around 
Pittsburg and Antioch. 



March 6, 1926 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



Mr. Blabbitt on Spring 



"GROZIT" 



"W H 

> V tu 



EN in the spring- a young man's fancj lightly for LaWJlS and Garden* 

turns to thoughts of hive." A bit of sentiment from W "° ** " «* VJUIUCIIA 



the past, written, probably by a man past sixty. It is inter- 
esting to study this bald and we might say, rash statement 
from several angles — right and obtuse — carefully and with 
mathematical precision, of a type employed by women in 
the justly famous game of love. 

In considering the bright thought outlined in our opening 
sentence, we first must hesitate and determine the meaning 
of the component parts (component is a good word, remem- 
ber it, please). "When in the spring- — " that's a nice, clean 
thought, bringing to mind visions of pure, bubbling water 
eddying and swirling about the legs of a young man who 
must surely at this early season, shiver whether he wants 
to or not — and you can't much blame him when you stop 
to think that love often leads to a complete frost. Water is 
good enough in its place, but obviously, it is out of its proper 
element chilling our hero's legs. Water serves rather to 
quench than to inflame. 

Taking another angle, could the poet have meant the actual 
act of springing? Really, the whole statement has a gym- 
nastic trend or tendency which, if true, is quite refreshing. 
Let us see. "When in the spring .... lightly turns — " 
The whole thing points quite undisputably to the fact that 
the young man took a running leap, sprang, turned a sum- 
mersault and landed either on his head, heels or other parts 
of his anatomy. Love is like that with young men, they 
run, jump quickly, turn lightly, with heads alternately to- 
ward the sky and earth, and then flop like tired pigeons to 
the same firm ground from which they got their start. 
Whether or not the fellow suffers injury depends entirely 
upon the kindness of heart or nursing ability of the lady for 
which he tries to show off. 

Now we come to "a young man's fancy." A rather mis- 
leading phrase. Better should we say. "a fancy young 
man" since in the spring a fellow with any money at all i- 
nothing if not that. Really, a young man's fancy must turn 
to thoughts of clothes before he can give serious considera- 
tion to love; for without clothes or, rather, without clothes 
of the latest cut and design, he stands small chance of win- 
ning favorable glances from his lady fair. A good tailor 
has brought more than one romance to a successful conclu- 
sion, and many a poor tailor has losl on account <>f this very 
thing. 

Lastly, let's think about "thi nights of love." A sweet sub- 
ject when properly treated. Thoughts of love won't carry a 
man very far, even if he is a person of abnormal men! 
pacity in this direction, and most arc not. It takes more 
than thought to win the modem girl. Better to say, dances. 
candy, flowers, et cetera. We may safely discontinue fur- 
ther consideration of the matter by stating that to think •■! 
love is quite uninteresting, for a fellow must love to think. 

After this angular treatise, we arrive at the point from 
which we started and, after extracting the square root, have 
our answer — if there is anything square about love. 

\\ c could go on delving into intricacies of the family tri- 
angle, hut here every problem is different ami. hence, there 
is no set theorem. Safe to say. there is no right angle to 
such a figure. Most triangles of this nature are plain, un- 
adulterated tangles. 

The author of "When In the Spring" and SO on did us a 
good turn, though, for he summed up in a few \\ 
clean words, what a million writers since his time have 
found difficulty in expressing in several trillion innuendoes 
and indecent ones. 

Page the \ OUng man ! 

Fancy ! 



Pulverized Sheep Manure 

Many times as efficient as ordinary manure. Odorless, does 
not draw Hies, easy to handle, guaranteed free from weed 
seeds and foreign matter — racked in 100-pound bags. For 
your lawns, gardens, window boxes, potted plants, golf 
greens, orchards, vineyards. It is good for anything that 
grows. 

Ask your nurseryman, seed store or 
wood and coal dealer 

Pacific Manure Fertilizer Co. 

Main Office, 429 DAVIS ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone Kearny 1542 



El Dorado Hotel 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Our Speoinlly — "Stenk* With Mushrooms" 

Clean Roam% Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

\ i-il S>n»itt.i toM.ii- I mi mi- Ri'orit and Mineral (Warm Water) Swimming 
Tanks r >„„, Tin. Hotel 

It. ili- l.\re|ili.niiilly R r-iiMinablc 

Telephone 110 



Holly" ■ mmI — I nivrr.snl i It f — *• lemlnle — P ii Nn 1 1 enj i 

Ventura — Banta Barbara — Loi Angeles 

MOCO 

\ beautiful automobile finish. Its beauty and gloss in- 
crease with use. 
The price is the lowest you will find for a dependable job. 
The saving in first cost is greater because of the short 
time yen are deprived of the use of your ear. 

GENE MORRISS 
Say AUTO PAINTING SYSTEM 

235 VALENCIA ST. PHONE MARKET 9040 



You're entitled to the best 



La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

""The Reroinineniled Laundry"' 

'Phone Market 916 J 



250 Twelfth St.. San Francisco 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Prctted Bv Hand Onlr — Suit* Called For and OrL.rr^d 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parutiim ftyeimf and Clraning 



583 P©*T Street 
In \ iki.imi Horn. 



^»x F*j«*ci««» 
Phot vSukkUH 2510 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 6, 1926 



WIELAND'S BREW 

WITH YOUR MEALS— IT HELPS 

Order by the case from your grocer 

Established 1868 

Main Office, 240 Second Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 671 




.PIONEER 



The 

Nan e J 
on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San FranclNco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES: 



San FranclHeo- 
West 708 



BurlffiKanie 

47.K 



Phono SirrEn 32TB 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

i Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCK-MAKERS nnd WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

::<>» Post Street nt Grant Avenue 
Snn Frnnc.Mcn, Calif. 

Alameda 



Call and Deliver 
and So, 



n San Francisco, 
Mateo Countie 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



Palo alto Office: 
616 EMERSON ST. 



SAN MATEO— Phone 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



Auto Service Plus 

Spring should always mean "house 
cleaning" of some sort ; even your au- 
tomobile should cmne in for an amount 
of brightening up, so that when you 
hear the "call of the wild" you will be 
in readiness with your machine all ren- 
ovated and repaired to take the road 
and answer the call of Spring, which 
one hears now, so persistently. 

Take your car to the corner of Van 
Ness Avenue and Ellis Street and put 
it into the hands of the Auto Service 
Plus. You will hardly recognize it 
when it comes out of this efficient and 
speedy shop. 



A New Salary Plan 

Paying employe--- a small drawing ac- 
count and a share in profits instead of 
high wages has come. The plan has 
been discovered and put into effect by 
a Kansas dry goods merchant who 
says that it is giving excellent results 
in numerous ways. 

To any one who understands mod- 
ern business conditions and tendencies 
this seems to be a natural and inevit- 
able development. The struggle for 
better wages has absorbed so much of 
the time and effort of workers for so 
many generations that it is no wonder 
that they so often cling tenaciously to 
the high wage and reject the various 
plans for profit-sharing, etc., that arc 
presented to them from time to time. 

The fact remains, however, that em- 
ployers and employes are essentially 
partners in their business enterprises. 
They may ignore that fact and regard 
themselves as enemies, reaping the re- 
ward that enmity always reaps, or they 
may acknowledge it and receive the in- 
crease that harmonious activity always 
gives. 

There is no doubt that both em- 
ployers and emyloyes are now rapidly 
ci 'ining to understand and acknowledge 
the fact of their essential unity of in- 
terest and we may expect them to adopt 
many and various plans whereby they 
may work out their problems of pros- 
perity in ways most appropriate to 
their particular needs and conditions. 

If a drawing account instead of 
wages appeals to them they will adopt 
that method, if some other way seems 
best, they will try that device. The 
important thing is not the particular 
means of co-operation that they adopt, 
but the fact that they have abandoned 
the idea of class and class conflict and 
are working Out their problems in com- 
mon-sense and good will. 



The House Agent 
The House Agent — "You say you 
have no children, gramaphone or wire- 
less, and you don't keep a dog. You 
seem just the tenant the owner in- 
sists on." 



The House Hunter — "I don't want 
to hide anything about my behavior, 
so you might tell the owner that my 
fountain pen squeaks a bit." — The By- 
stander. 




N. W CORNER 

POLK uo POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office and Work* 1026 !U!aalon St. 

Phone Market 7018 

llrnneh Office i 7410 Suiter St. 

< Hotel Canterbury ithl f. t 

I'll one Prospect UH-15 

Work Called For and Delivered 



<.i mil: i C. Homer 



S. A. Lovejov 



Carfirld 2024 



The Homer System 

BOOKKEEPING -COLLECTIONS 



Installment, Current Delinquent Accounts, Legal Aid, 

linlif<-S\stems, Financial Statements, Income Tax 

Hcporls, Bookkeeping {Part Tima Service) 



I l: Yoi'NC li ■■! 



San Francisco 



>( ^y° u P a y no more ^ 

BESTFLOWE^ 




Thelfaloe cfa Thousand Oardena' 

224-226 Giant Ave lei Keanr/ 4975 




WHERE TO DINE 



Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c. 75c. 51 .1)11 35c, 50c, 75c {1.00.S1.50 a la carte 

Dancing 7:00 P. M. to 1:00 A. M. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 




ICE CREAr% 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



Graytftone 

unit 3Hil 31(.r 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vlcoroum brushing once or twice a day ia 
tnkJne very pood cure of them. HruNuing 1m only a part of the 
procemi. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
1-omuetent dent bit can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They mny not be a* sound an you Imnslne. A toothache mean* 
trouble; do uot wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are scum troubles that will destroy teeth fa»ter than 
decay. Are your teeth ttoref Do your minis bleed t Coll in today 
and tnlk it over. It will cont nothing. My nene blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerved and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Kxtrn.'llmiN; Crowns; Self denning Bridges; 

Porcelain Work and Rooflett* Plates 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 




Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2: JO 
and tea from 3 to 5 



and. 



334 Sutter St. 



Douglas 7118 



tfeanorS 



445 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and RF AMP O ' Q Phone 

Larkin Sli. ** *-■ *"*■ * ^ V* V-* tj Franklin 9 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) $ .75 No Vmlor Should Leare the City Wilb- 

Sunday Luncheon 1.00 out Dining in the Finest Caf« 

Dinner, Week Day* _ f 1.50 in America 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays 1.7S 

DANCING SUNDAY EVENINGS 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

l>:t Third Avenue, SAN M VTKO 





Peat tiring Southern Cooking 
Prom 
11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 
i:S0 p B :30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVBK1 KONDA1 

Half Black from lliuhtv.-iy 



14- Mill Hoi j* 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

open 8:00 a. m. to mm p. m. 

unsurpassed clisink 

Carl Leonhardt 

formerly of 
Golden Cite Park Cmiin. 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic. 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



.Make yourself at home at 
GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 '1 ill.,, Place, at 241 Grant Avenue 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

[mportations from Zachnsdorf, Hunt. Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AM- PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



DR. B. W. HAINES 

DENTIST 

Elkan Gunst Building 
323 Geary at Powell Hours: 9 to 4 

San Francisco Telephone Douglas 2949 J 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. ISth and 19th Sts.. 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Botlled at i/ie Sprirtet" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

22-> Clara SfcrW* Cl«uU M 



3fe PlClURFD 

NEWS 

ofthe 

Worlds 




Worshipers at Pagan 
temples — languorous 
maidens of tropical 
islands — tribal dances 
in murky jungles — 
carnivals in Old-World 
capitals — fire — flood 
— revolution ! 

Among all climes and 
peoples are found the 
entertaining pictures 
for The 

Shr San Jrannsro (Ehxontrli 

KOTAGRAVURB 





The NEW 

HOLLYWOOD PLAZA 

HOLLYWOOD'S most modern hotel; exclusive — 
luxuriously appointed. Conveniently situated in the 
heart of this famous city, it is the center for all activities. 
20 minutes from Los Angeles — 20 minutes from the beach. 
You'll thoroughly enjoy your stay here. Rates: Rooms 
with bath, $2.50 up. 

Hotel Bus Meets Trains 

HOLLYWOOD PLAZA HOTEL 

Vine St., South of Hollywood Boulevard 




Their watchword is smiling courtesy. — This is but one of the 
features of this great hotel where thoughtful and kindly 
service combines with ideal comfort and surroundings to 
make a stay enjoyable. 



The center 

for Thialtrt 
<Banki, Shop* 

^Pleote "u-rile 
for booklet 



$ RATES— 'Per 1>ay, single, €uropcan Wan 

120 rooms with running water • 52.50 to >4-O0 
220 room* wiih bath - • • 5.50 to 5.00 
160 rooms with bath - - 6.00 to 8.00 

Double. $4.00 up 

Alio a number of large and beautiful rooms and 
suites, some in period furnishing* with grand piano, 
fire place and bath. $10 00 up. 



LARGE AND WELL EQUIPPED SAMP! E ROOMS 

r%^ e NCHO QOLF CLUB] 
L available to all guestsJ 



1 guesu 
HAROLD E. LATHROP 

cWaneztr 



nty, 



HOTEL/ 



ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles N „, 




Golden Gate Ferry 
Company 

S 

WINTER SCHEDULE 

Effective October 1, 1925 

s 



Leave Sausalito 




Leavi San Francisco 


5:00 a.m. 

6:00 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:00 p.m. 




5:30 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

7 :00 a. m. 
Every Half 
Hour Until 
10:30 p.m. 


Then 




Then 


11 :00 p.m. 

12:00 p.m. 

1 :00 a. m. 




11:30 p.m. 

12:30 a.m. 

1:30 a. m. 


Saturdays and Su 


ndavs Only 


2:00 a.m. 




2:30 a.m. 


ON SATURDAYS, 


SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 


There will be 


extra trips 


if traffic warrants. 


A. O. Stewart 

President 




Harry E. Speas 
Vice-Prcs. and Gen. Mgr. 



^kauiu NEWS .ND PROGRAM 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, MARCH 13th, 1926 







Demonstrations is 
Your Home 



u 



The 

COUNTERPHASE-SIX 

Suit! exclusively in San I ranciscq h\ 

IMPERIAL RADIO COMPANY 



Phone Douci \s 2699— 220 Stockton Street 



77 



You are invited to 
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REMOVAL NOTICE 

The Executive Offices 

of the 

S. F. News Letter 

Have Moved to 

268 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Opposite Pacific Gas and Electric Company Building 



^ 



nmm 







MOCO 



Because MOCO Finish Retains tts Beauty Indefi- 
nitely — Withstands All Weather Driving Condi- 
tions — Won't Check, Chip, Peel or Scratch — Grows 
Better With Age. 



GENE MORRISS AUTO ^ ONE DAY 

AUTO 
PAINTING 

235 Valencia St. Market 9040 * & SYSTEM 



PAINTING SYSTEM 



1 




The NEW 

HOLLYWOOD PLAZA 

HOLLYWOOD'S must modern hotel ; exclusive — 
lu.\uriuiisl\ appointed. Conveniently situated in the 
heart of this famous city, it is the center for all activities. 
20 minutes from Los Anu'clcs — 20 minutes from the beach. 
You'll thoroughly enjoy your stay here. Rates: Rooms 
with hath, $2.'50 up. 

Ho/el Bus Meets Tniins 

HOLLYWOOD PLAZA HOTEL 

Vine St., South of Hollywood Boulevard 




E«t»b1Uh»d July tO, l&M 



FRANCl^ 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The San Francisco News L,etter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1SS4 to 1925. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 225 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California. Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 CornhiU, E. C 

London, England. Subscription Rates {including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., MARCH 13, 1926 



No. 11 



From One Thing to Another 

By Eleanore F. Ross 



Lemon blossoms would be more appropriate on certain occa- 
sions than orange blossoms. 

Green rubbish cans have been mistaken for letter boxes, 
down San Mateo way. We rise to remark that the rubbish 
can is the best place for lots of letters. 

* * * 

Punctuation, since the invention of machines which have 
eliminated "hand set" printing, is becoming a lost art. In 
other words, it is punc. 

* * * 

Love, fundamentally, is a game of tag. During the first 
part of the maneuvers, the man chases the woman; catches 
her (as a rule), and then is himself chased. If the woman 
succeeds in securing her quarry ( which docs not always hap- 
pen), the strains of Mendelssohn's most popular tune are heard 

on the air. 

* * * 

The Dearborn "Independent" of March 6 publishes an arti- 
cle called "Never Lost a War. But Never Won a Conference," 

which article cites numerous cases pertaining to the failure of 
the U. S. A. in gaining any point for itself through interna- 
tional diplomatic negotiation.. From which foregoing infor- 
mation we would conclude that our Nation is virile, strong, 
rich, speedy,— a young giant for physical strength and natural 

resources, but unverse 1 as yet in intrigue and the art of deceit. 

otherwise called "diplomacy." We hope this record is not pro- 
phetic of our future accomplishments in the World Courtl 



If the local carpenters do not obey the comman 1 that comes 
from union headquarters in Indianapolis, to refuse to work 
on any jot) where there are non-union carpenters, there will 
i, ike on the first of April. And the strike will not be 
for shorter lours or higher wages; it will simplj he a matter ol 
Irving to force the non-union workers to join the union. I nder 
the American Plan, instituted in 1921, there has been no labor 

trouble "i am seriousness; work is plentiful, wages an 
working conditions arc right, and there has been more 
of a buil ling boom for years now. in this city. Are these ex- 
cellent con litions all going to he smashed because a small group 
of industrial autocrats thousands ^i miles away, dictate high- 
han Yd measures to a body of efficient and independent work- 
ing men. who have adopted the policy of the American Plan— 
the right to work ? 



The speedy mental transformation which comes about 
through changes in one's position in life, is often amusing. 
I have seen a ranting Socialist change his tactics com- 
pletely, in the event, possibly, of his purchasing a peanut 
stand. It would argue, therefore, that opinion is sometimes 
a matter of material being, instead of intellect. 



The old custom of a man footing the bills when acting as 
escort to a woman, is becoming rather farcical in view of 
the increasing economical independence of the fair sex. 
"Circumstances alter cases," no doubt, but isn't the situa- 
tion an injustice to the man, when, for instance, his com- 
panion may be making twice his income? If two people 
are congenial, and like to ramble around together, why 
shouldn't each pay his own share? 

* * * 

It is quite the ordinary thing to see a bald-headed, ple- 
thoric old man making a silly ass of himself over some beau- 
tiful but dumb flapper, but if a woman wdio has left her 
first youth behind her, and still has kept herself young 
and "spry," tinds pleasure in the society of a man younger 
than she, almost always she is a mark for ridicule. Per- 
sonally. 1 find men of my own age rather stuffy and in- 
clined to spend the time inside four walls; or incased in 
a closed automobile; very seldom do they prefer the wide, 
open spaces out-of-doors and the use of their own legs. The 
younger men are the ones to ramble with — take it from me, 
( ieraldine. 

* * * 

Straw voters are showing their intelligence by favoring 
Federal regulation and control of liquor, plus the elimina- 
of the saloon. Modification — in favor of wine and beer, 
would seem to me to he an amendment almost as futile as 
the Volstead Act itself, for the great evil which prohibition 
has created is the traffic in "moonshine" whiskey and gin, 
and its attendant ills and deaths, and allowing the sale of 
wine and beer would not kill this evil.. 

The great thirst of the masses is for stronger drink, and 
stronger drink they will have. The medicinal quality of pure 
v is an acknowledged fact, and under Federal regula- 
tion and control. I believe that the liquor question might he 
safe and sane. Witness our next door neighbor. Canada, in 
this connection. Unconditional repeal of the prohibition law 
would bring into existence again the loathsome saloon; no re- 
spectable citizen wishes to see that again, surely? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 13, 1926 




It would appear from a recent 
Handling the Automobile report of the Department of 

Commerce that in San Fran- 
cisco at lea it we are beginning to take hold of the auto prob- 
lem with