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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (July-Dec. 1927)"




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Vol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JULY 2, 1927 



No. 27 



Companionate Marriages 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



)) 



It was Ella Wheeler Wilcox, that woman born at least 
fifty years before her time, who conceived the idea of 
"trial marriage." Her scheme was to start a man and 
the woman of his choice (properly chaperoned), on a 
journey together, for the reason that if the exigencies 
and oftimes discomforts of traveling could not affoct 
them to the point of breaking off all relationship, nothing 
else that could happen in their lives, ever would. 

It takes some courage, old and young boys and girls, to 
come out flat-footedly with such statements as Rev. 
Lewis made at the Episcopal Convention held recently in 
this city. When a writer or speaker voices the views that 
the union of an unmarried man and woman should be 
sanctioned by the church, he or she does so at the risk of 
personal scandal, at least. 

"Ha, ha!" exclaim their friends triumphantly: "we 
knew their was a love nest somewhere!" And the man or 
woman of temerity, with the courage of their convictions, 
is anything but the gainer in the end. 

However we may disagree personally, with Judge Lind- 
sey in his advocation of "companionate marriage," the 
thinkers among us surely realize that the Judge, with 
years of experience in the criminal courts of Denver, with 
years of association afnongst the "delinquent" youth of 
the land, is far better able to draw conclusions in this re- 
gard than the ordinary, person, who goes along in the con- 
ventional rut which his or her position or occupation has 
created. 

Both Lewis and Linldsey were stating bald, bare facts 
deducted from the daily conditions into which they were 
thrown, and under which they were compelled to work. 
The former, especially, might have refined his language 
to advantage, but Truth cannot always be dressed in flow- 
ery diction and a subject which appears to be interesting 
and involving the wh<j>le world, is best handled without 
gloves, for the benefit of those great masses of people 
who live by t lie sweat of their brow and are in the habit 
of calling a spade a spade and not a garden implement. 

Lindsey has proposed a type of preliminary marriage 
which he calls Companionate Marriage. This is to be a 
marriage undertaken by two people for "mutual com- 
fort," as the Prayer Book has it. with a full knowledge of 
birth control and with the deliberate intention of not 



having children. So long as there are no children, and 
with due deliberation, this companionate marriage may 
be dissolved again by mutual consent. On the other hand, 
at any time the couple may turn their marriage into the 
permanent "family marriage" form. 

This provision or suggestion was evolved for the prac- 
tice of the "fretting and impatient young people of the 
community," and for the eventual elimination of "promis- 
cuity, prostitution, disease, crime and general unhappi- 
ness" that is existing today; and seems to be, on the 
face of it, a wise precaution, inasmuch as the blindest 
and most prudish of us cannot help but see the growing 
need of some such solution, if solution it can be called! 

But delving a little deeper into the heart of things, we 
surely discover the very patent fact that the only novel 
or new phase of this plan or scheme of Lindsey's is its 
publication to the world in general! Men and women have 
always "lived together," and always will, for the very 
good and sufficient reason that when God created man 
(and woman) in His image, He certainly had in mind, 
their inevitable union! 

Those of us who are temperately inclined, are temper- 
ate, and those who are blessed or cursed with a "warm. 
Oriental nature" indulge themselves accordingly, and 
plans or provisions or schemes for the betterment of the 
world seem but futile affairs, for the world itself has 
never cried for reformation, except in a few isolated and 
abnormal instances. 

Whether the youth of today are worse or better than 
their precedents is a question only answered by close 
watch on their personal habits or physical examinations, 
and we trust even the blue-nosed Volsteaders will not be 
able to think up an amendment providing that each hu- 
man should be handcuffed to a Federal guard to keep tab 
on his or her actions throughout the day and night. 

One deduction and one only, have I been able to come 
to. after a certain amount of personal observation, a good 
deal of conversation amongst my friends, and a weari- 
some lot of reading in the daily press, and that is : The 
world is a much more honest world than when I was in 
pigtails and short (er) skirts, and I'll bet you can't laff 
that off! 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 2, 1927 






Our Natal Day 

Here is another birthday to our credit and the Fourth 
of July comes along again noisily and dangerously, but 
more gloriously than ever. This year more than any 
year heretofore, the rising sun of the great Fourth shines 
upon a country united and prosperous as no country has 
ever been before in human history. 

The principles of the body of brave and sagacious men 
who stood out on the first Fourth have been vindicated 
as bravery and wisdom always are vindicated. Our land 
is step by step climbing the heights of human achieve- 
ment. The crossing of the Atlantic has made a com- 
mercial air service to Europe only a question of time ; 
and the same is true of Asia. The country, which at the 
signing of the Declaration of Independence, was but a 
strip along the Atlantic Coast, now stretches out its 
arms East and West to touch the rest of the world. 

But what is our material growth even compared with 
the influence which we have had and are having upon 
the rest of the world? Year after year sees the prin- 
ciples of the great Declaration more and more fully ac- 
cepted. There is no great war, but monarchies tumble 
and republics arise, professing the same principles and 
largely resting upon the same theoretical foundations as 
those which our own founders laid down. 

The Republic of the United States was founded solidly 
and well. Its fundamental principles are beyond any 
question, and time has shown over and over again the 
essential soundness of its basic doctrines. No wonder 
that a country so well established has the unfaltering 
and loyal service of its people! 



The Duboce Tunnel 

The proposal to use the Duboce tunnel by the cars of 
the Market Street Railway Company has raised a great 
deal of unnecessary discussion and has revealed an unex- 
pected amount of stupid as well as ill-natured comment. 
The Duboce tunnel is made for the purpose of helping 
and expediting traffic between the Sunset and other dis- 
tricts of San Francisco. 

The convenience of the public is the main thing to be 
considered. The Market Street System has car lines 
which go into the Sunset district. Dwellers in that dis- 
trict, who want an expeditious route to other parts of 
San Francisco and who live along the lines of the Market 
Street Railways in that district, will naturally want to 
enjoy the most expeditious route. That means that the 
Market Street cars should operate through the tunnel. 
If they are not allowed to do so, it follows that the people 
who live along the right of way of the Market Street 
roads are unjustly discriminated against. 

The failure of the bond issue places the Sunset line 
through the Duboce tunnel in a bad position. Cars for 
partial service is the best that the municipality can sup- 
ply at the present time. The Market Street road, if it 
were given a chance, would supply the deficiency in op- 
ei-ation, which has arisen from the failure of the bond 
issue. There is no way that the number of cars required 
can be given by the municipality except by taking them 
from other services. 

Under these conditions it is a very dog in the manger 
policy which forbids the use by the Market Street Rail- 
ways of the Duboce tunnel, when complete. 



Telephone Rates 

The tumult which has arisen over the proposed raise 
in telephone rates does not reflect any too great credit 
upon the instigators of revolt. Without the slightest 
consideration the most virulent abuse has been heaped 
upon the proposal. The ordinary citizen who knows 
nothing of the workings of a telephone system and has 
not any idea of the expenses involved therein cannot form 
a judgment with respect to the proposed rates. In the 
last analysis, it is a question for the experts. 

We are all aware of the importance of the telephone. 
We know that modern business cannot be conducted and 
a modern city cannot be run without the use of the tele- 
phone on a large scale. The telephone companies have 
been the most potent and beneficent instruments in the 
creation of cities and the development of commerce. It 
is only right, therefore, that their case should receive 
careful attention and that they should have every oppor- 
tunity of placing it before the public. 

The gist of the telephone companies' case lies in the 
discovery that the more a telephone system is developed, 
the more expensive it relatively becomes. This is so new 
an idea that it has been received with incredulous hoots, 
for other business does not act in that way. If it is 
true for telephone companies, then, of course, the charges 
will have to be estimated accordingly. There is no doubt 
that the telephone company should have every oppor- 
tunity to lay its case before the public, without any initial 
prejudice. It is entitled to a fair deal. 



Presidential Angling 

There has been some slip somewhere in the presiden- 
tial angling publicity. There is no doubt that the fact 
that the President has fished for trout with a worm has 
had a very disillusionizing effect upon thousands of peo- 
ple to whom the presidential office has hitherto carried 
a nimbus of idealistic mystery. 

This mysterious adoration of the abstract always suf- 
fers from shock when face to face with reality. Now, to 
an angler the mere fact of catching trout with a worm is 
abhorrent. A very hungry angler who fishes for trout, 
for the purposes of satisfying his hunger, might con- 
ceivably use a worm. But, even then, it would be at the 
expense of his conscientious scruples, for in nothing, 
more than in sport, is conscience very troublesome. But 
this devotion to a particular kind of fishing arises from 
the demands of the sport itself as in abstraction, again 
It has nothing to do with the catching of fish. If one 
wants to catch fish, perhaps trout can be more readily 
caught with a worm than with a fly. We note that the 
first lady of the land, while by no means a practiced an- 
gler, did, at least satisfactorily, well with worms. 

It is very evident that the President, when he goes 
fishing, likes to catch fish. Perhaps, in this fact, lies the 
secret of the marvelous success which has attended him 
and the explanation of the popularity which has accom- 
panied him for more years than usual. This is a realis- 
tic age and the people like a realistic President, who 
catches fish, even with worms, but catches them. 



July 2, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



The Railroad Murders 

There has been much dissatisfaction over the fact that 
the de Autremont brothers should have escaped the death 
penalty for their crime in the robbery and murders at- 
tendant upon their criminal attack on a Southern Pacific 
train. It was one of the most dastardly and contemptible 
crimes in recent history and involved the killing of three 
workingmen, whose deaths were not even necessary to 
the carrying out of the robbery. 

We are of the opinion that the so-called confession of 
Hugh de Autremont bears on its face a certain unreal 
swagger and insincerity which should cause it to be re- 
garded with great suspicion. Thus, the statement that 
one of the twins was a radical and had become socially 
disaffected through the reading of Schopenhauer, Dar- 
win and Huxley, seems to be quite false. There is a 
certain cleverness in it, too, for the writers have been 
used by the fundamentalists to point a moral and there 
is but little question that the mere use of these names 
had quite an effect in inducing a portion of the ruralists 
in Oregon to view their escape from the gallows with 
favor. 

The question presented by this case is not very easy 
of solution. For many reasons it would seem better that 
the crime should have been proved against them by the 
State, if only for the purpose of showing the criminally 
inclined that in the long run a crime career is not a pay- 
ing career. It is very important that this lesson should 
be impressed upon wavering youth and it does not seem 
to us that the method taken of ending the de Autremont 
case was the best method. Somehow the punishment 
does not seem to fit the crime. 



Here Is Summer 

We need no calendar to tell us that the summer is at 
its height and that the California midseason is again 
with us. They are calling "peaches" in the street and 
the mounds of ripe black figs in the peddler's wagons 
are mute evidence that the sweetness and youth of April 
have already developed into the rich maturity of July. 

The country is full of thronging thousands and the 
highways, along which the middle aged of us were wont 
to tramp or ride on horseback, are filled with struggling 
automobiles, racing for position or stalled in long lines, 
as the break down in front holds them back. The scent 
of the ripening tarweed has given place to the smell of 
gasoline. Here and there burnt crops testify to the 
carelessness of motorists who have recklessly flung a 
lighted cigarette into the tinderlike barley. Times have 
changed, as the country within reasonable distance of 
the bay cities can unfortunately show. For. with the 
development of man's mechanical powers, there has not 
been a commensurate development of manners and con- 
sideration. 

But away from the beaten tracks nature is lovely as 
ever. The deep woods of Mendocino, the hills of the 
Sierra country, the lakes and the rivers are full of an 
indescribable and unforgettable charm and glory. To lie 
down in the open under the deep skies of California and 
to wake in the morning to the sweetness of the dawn are 
experiences which each must have, if he is to enjoy 
memories which no work of man can ever duplicate. 

Now. is the time to forget the city and the toil thereof. 
Now is the time to go forth into the country and drink 
the health and vigor which our wonderful land can give 
in the enchantment of its summer time. 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 



Martyr to Duty 

Chuck — I thought you promised to save me some of 
that liquor you had. 
Wally — I tried to, but it ate holes through everything 

I put it in and I finally had to drink it. — Judge. 

* * * 

Ancient Accelerator 

"Times sure have changed, haven't they?" 
"I'll say. Why, I can remember when a rusty nail was 
considered the most dangerous thing to step on." — Cin- 
cinnati Enquirer. 

» * * 

"What is your car, a five-passenger?" 
"Yes, but I can get eight in it if they are well acquaint- 
ed." — Selected. 



Family Keepsake 

Teacher — Joseph, what are you going to give your little 
sister for a birthday present? 

Joseph — I dunno ; last year I gave her the chicken-pox. 

— Rexall Magazine. 

* * * 

Just Carried On 

"To what do you attribute your longevity?" inquired 
the young man. 

"To the fact," replied the old man, conclusively, "that 

I never died." — Boys Life. 

* * * 

Please, Teacher! 

She was still rather new at driving a car and a little bit 
confused in traffic. Down Broadway she forgot to stop 
soon enough at the signal and shot out into the middle of 
the street. 

Pompously the traffic officer bore down upon her. 

"Didn't you see me hold up my hand?" he shouted 
fiercely. 

The culprit gasped a breathless "Yes." 

"Didn't you know that when I held up my hand it 
meant Stop?" 

"No, sir: I'm just a school-teacher," she said, in a 
timid, mouselike voice, "and when you raised your hand 
like that I thought you wanted to ask a question." — New 
York Sun. 



The motor-bus was proceeding in a rather jerky man- 
ner when a young woman passenger inquired: 

"What's wrong with the car?" 

"The engine misses," replied the driver. 

The young woman smiled. 

"How did you know I was married?" she asked. — Se- 
lected. 



A New Minimum 

A certain convivial young chap dealt and bid a No 
Trump; all passed. Dummy put his hand down and re- 
marked : 

"Well. I can't imagine what you bid No Trump on when 
I have three Aces and four Kings." 

"Well, if you want to know," the Declarer said, "I bid 
it on one Jack with two Queens and three cocktails." 

— Auction Bridge Bulletin. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 2, 1927 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Society Seeks 
Seaside Resorts 

Seaside resorts, with their fasci- 
nating attractions ; and Tahoe, with 
its magnetic allurements ; Del Monte, 
Pebble Beach — in fact, all of the out- 
of-town places are drawing Society 
folks over this week-end. 

The general exodus means that, 
here in town — there will be very lit- 
tle of importance in the way of So- 
ciety events. 

Independence Day has a different 
patriotic trend these days from what 
it used to have — a very different 
trend. The observance of Fourth of 
July seems to have its expression, 
principally, within the hearts of 
Americans with just a few outbursts 
of oratory to keep alive the fervor. 

There are no longer any firecrack- 
ers. 

There has been none, lo, these 
many a day! Nor are there any 
booming parades. But, we seem to 
be really just as patriotic ! Perhaps 



Society's Play-Day 

Golf matches, tennis tournaments, 
riding jaunts, motor tours, and a lot 
of marvelous picnics, underneath the 
shade trees that is the way society 
is celebrating, this year. 

Oh, to be sure there are to be some 
real patriotic exercises in town at the 
Civic Auditorium, where the na- 
tionalities participate in cooperative 
celebration ceremonies. These cere- 
monies, too, are very impressive and 
memorable and the music is always 

of excellent choice and presentation. 
* * * 

Charming Wedding 

June of this year has been liberal 
in its bestowal of happy wedding 
days, and with each event, Cupid 
seems to record something lovelier 
than before. 

One of the prettiest of the recent 
marriages took place last Wednesday 
evening, June 22, in the grey room of 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway, Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



the Fairmont Hotel, when beautiful 
Miss Millicent Elston became the 
bride of Mr. Verne Hopkins Thrall, 
Dean J. Wilmer Gresham of Grace 
Cathedral read the marriage cere- 
mony before a group of relatives and 
a few intimate friends. 

The bride was given in marriage 
by her brother, Mr. John Jay Elston, 
well known hotel man of San Fran- 
cisco. He also acted as best man at 
the ceremony. The bride is the 
daughter of Mrs. George B. Elston of 
San Francisco. She is a talented 
Southern girl, a graduate of the Bos- 
ton Conservatory of Dramatics and 
has appeared at notable recitals in 
this city and elsewhere throughout 
the State. 

The wedding gown worn by Miss 
Millicent Elston was especially charm- 
ing. It was made of snow-white 
chiffon outlined with pearl beads. 
Her elegant wedding veil fell yards 
upon yards from the dainty wreath 
fastened about her pretty face. The 
flowing tulle was completely covered 
with rose-point lace, exquisitely 
made, with clusters of orange blos- 
soms placed here and there. She 
carried a shower bouquet of lilies of 
the valley and orchids and was a pic- 
ture of loveliness. 

Miss Virginia Elston, sister of the 
bride, was maid of honor. Her gown 
was pink taffeta with two-tone shad- 
ings of pink. She carried a bouquet 
of pink roses and was so charmingly 
naive and dainty, looking as if she 
had just stepped out of some ador- 
able book of debutantes, the simplic- 
ity of her attire being most becom- 
ing. 

* * * 

Out-of-Town 
Visitors Present 

Relatives of both bride and groom 
came to San Francisco from far 
northern points and also from Geor- 
gia to attend the wedding of Miss 
Millicent Elston and Mr. Verne Hop- 
kins Thrall. 

Mrs. J. A. Martin, mother of the 
groom, and Mrs. Laura Gisher, sister 
of the groom, came from their Se- 
attle home. They were attired in 
excellent taste, the mother wearing a 
pretty soft georgette gown and Mrs. 
Gisher was attired in a dainty blue 
gown trimmed with lace. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Harris Doyle Ho- 
ward and their two young sons from 



Atlanta, Georgia; Mr. and Mrs. Z. 
Hopkins and Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Latta of Stockton, were other rela- 
tives present at the wedding. 

After a honeymoon in the North, 
Mr. and Mrs. Thrall will return to 
San Francisco, where the groom has 
prepared a home for his bride on 
Washington Street near Jones. They 
have a host of friends along the Pa- 
cific Coast and, upon their return, 
will be the center of many delightful 
occasions planned in their honor. 

The grey room of the Fairmont 
Hotel, where the marriage ceremony 
took place, was especially beautiful, 
in plan and design. An altar had 
been erected at the east end of the 
mirrored room the approach to the 
altar forming an aisle of palms and 
pink sweet peas while at the altar, it- 
self were tall candelabras shedding a 
pleasing glow over the beautiful cere- 
mony. Mr. John Smith, pianist of 
the Fairmont Hotel, played the wed- 
ding march, and among his selec- 
tions just preceding the marriage 
service he played a composition writ- 
ten by the bride, which brought forth 
considerable commendation in praise 
of the bride's talent as composer as 
well as a dramatic reader of classics. 

Engaged 

At a large tea in Peacock Court 
Mark Hopkins Hotel, the Misses Enid 
and Betty Evans announced their be- 
trothals. The brides - elect are 
daughters of Mr. and Mrs. M. D. 
Evans of Alameda. 

Miss Betty Evans will marry Mr. 
Clark R. Spence, Jr., this Fall. Miss 
Enid Evans will marry Mr. Volney F. 
Grace at the same time, the double 
wedding to be of special interest. Mr. 
Spence and Mr. Grace are University 
of California men and both are mem- 
bers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fratern- 
ity. Mr. Grace is the son of Mrs. R. 
A. Grace, Alameda ; and Mr. Spence is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Clark Spence 
of San Francisco. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3660 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



July 2, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Announcement of the 
double engagement was 
made by small betrothal 
cards tucked away into 
corsage bouquets made 
of pansies and gardenias 
and designated the places 
of each of the guests at 
the charming Mark Hop- 
kins tea. 



Among visitors of 
prominence now in San 
Francisco are Dr. and 
Mrs. Suzzallo of Seattle, 
who are at the Clift 
Hotel. 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 
Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

500 Rooms 

Tariff: From $4 per day 



Talented Girls 

Many San Francisco friends of the 
popular Mr. MacDonald at the Fair- 
mont Hotel have been congratulating 
him upon the honors conferred not 
long ago upon his talented daughters 
in the South, Miss Leslyn MacDonald 
having aroused the attention of dra- 
matic critics in her splendid dramatic 
work. 

During the presentation of "The 
Wisdom Tooth," by the Community 
Players of Los Angeles and Pasa- 
dena, Miss MacDonald won special 
praise, playing her part with unusual 
skill and dramatic ability. "Leslyn 
MacDonald was excellent" stated the 
critics, "Never has she contributed 
anything so delightful. Her delivery 
was a pleasure to hear, because it 
lacked that common type of dramatic 
expression which proclaims to the 
audience: 'I am an actor and I am 
now acting'." She is always lovely 
and full of promise. 

Mr. MacDonald has many sincere 
friends in hotel circles and among 
the large constituency of society and 
blub leaders who make their head- 
buarters at the Fairmont. They are 
now extending congratulations to the 
proud father of two talented daugh- 
ters one of whom is a well known 
Writer and the other prominent in 
dramatic fields. 

* * * 

Beautiful Wedding 

One ct' the most attractive wed- 
dings in June took place Sunday, 
•lunc ."), at the Fairmont Hotel, when 
Miss Dorothy Louise .Moss became 
the bride of Mi'. Martin Herman 
Liebes. The ceremony took place at 
high noon, with Rabbi Louis New- 
man reading the ceremony. 

The bride, a beautiful girl, was 
given in marriage by Iter father. Mr. 
Monroe Moss. She made a lovely 
picture in her bridal robes ^( white 
satin and tulle fashioned with a 
close-tit ting bodice. The skirt was 
bouffant, ruffles of tulle ending in a 
panel of real lace. 



The handsome tulle 
veil was held by a "rose- 
point lace cap ornament- 
ed with orange blossoms 
and most becomingly 
framing her pretty face. 
She carried a shower 
bouquet of lilies of the 
valley and orchids. 

Mrs. Georbe Liebes, 
matron of honor, wore 
a Callot gown of biege 
lace and a picture hat 
to match. She carried a 
bracelet shower of yellow 
pansies and corn-colored 
gold tulle. 

Three, little flower girls 
were the only other at- 
tendants. They were 
darlings! Ruth Mary Goldstein, and 
Jane and Betty Marks were dressed 
in white and carried old-fashioned 
nosegays. 

The bride entered the gold ball- 
room of the Fairmont on the arm of 
her father, passing down an aisle of 
gladioli in Grecian urns, linked to- 
gether with garlands of orchid stock. 
The altar itself, before which the 
ceremony took place, was made to re- 
semble a hedge banked with Dorothy 
Perkins roses. This divided the gold 
ballroom. 

On either side of the steps leading 
to the altar two gold urns were filled 
with pink gladiolas and a tall' golden 
candelabra in the center glowed with 
exquisite candles. The wedding 
breakfast was served in one end of 
the mirrored ballroom which reflected 
the fascinating scenes. 



The Harders at Home 

After a honeymoon spent in tour- 
ing the southern part of the state in 
their luxurious car. Dr. and Mrs, 
Walter G. Haider have returned to 
this city, and will he at home to their 
numerous friends at 900 Chestnut St. 

They have been the honored 
guests at a regular series of social 
affairs: dinners, luncheons, theater 
parties, and although it is always 
gratifying to be the center of the so- 
cial stage for a period of time, still, 
it becomes eventually exhausting. 
and the Harders welcome the return 
to the quiet elegance of their domi- 
cile on Russian Hill after the con- 
tinual round of gaities of the earlier 
weeks of their married life. 

Mrs. Harder was the widow of 
George W. Hopkins, well known fi- 
nancier of Boston, and has become 
very popular on both the Atlantic 
and the P&cifi - by reason of 

her charming personality, and intrin- 
sic sincerity. 




Lake Tahoe 

Sleeper 

— note through to Tahoe Station 
without change of cars. 
You can leave here any 
evening aboard a comfort- 
able Pullman, for arrival at 
Lake Tahoe for breakfast 
next morning. 

\ swift, enjoyable trip to 
this delightful inland sea 
high in the Sierra. You'll 
have the maximum amount 
of time there if you go by 
train. Pullman returning 
leaves the lake in the eve- 
ning arriving here in time for 
business next day. 

Leave San Francisco (Ferry) at 
7 p. m. arriving Tahoe Station at 
7:00a m Rcturninc. leave Tahoe 
Station at 9:30p.m. arriving San 
Francisco al 7:50 a.m. By day, 
leave San Francisco at 7:40 a.m., 
a fascinating ride up the Sierra, 
arriving Tahoe Station at 5:30 
p. m. Similar service returning. 

til J6 round trlpl good 

»*»••» for 16 days. Outer 

lares and limits Ask for new illu> 
(rated booklet about Tahoe Lake 
rion; also the booklet "Low 
Fares lor Summer Tr 

Southern 
PaciMc 



Sao Francisco Offices 
—65 Geary St.; Ferry 
Station. *rd $* 
Pb*mt Det • ntr^rtfooo 
Oakland Offices - 
ljlth&B'wiy:! 
Sta .: 1st &: Bn 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 2, 1927 




'LEISURE'S WW 



OBEY WO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore. 




Let's Go (o 
the Theater 

Want a rest from business cares? 
Want to find some stamina for more 
and better business? 

Go to the theater! 

You'll be surprised how much bet- 
ter you will feel .iust as soon as you've 
been to a good show. It is marvelous 
what theaters can do in the way of 
tracing one up ! 

Theaters are really a tonic — that 
is, if you want them to serve their 
purpose. 

Naturally, we mean the best of 
them, of course ! 

* * * 

Curran 

The Curran Theater is to have 
"The Barker" for a short engage- 
ment, beginning Monday, July 4th, 
with popular matinees on Wednes- 
day and Saturday at the $1.50 price 
for best seats. 

In securing this attraction, the 
Curran Theater has struck a high 
note of theatrical importance for the 
play has been the outstanding suc- 
cess of both New York and Chicago 
for the past season and has been seen 
in only three cities in America. 

San Francisco has been given the 
preference over other large cities of 
the East and Middle West. 

The reason for this is that this city 
is fast becoming recognized as one of 
the principal theatrical centers of 
America. 

Kenyon Nicholson, the author of 
"The Barker" has written a colorful 
melodrama of carnival circus life. 
Every trick and device known to the 
carnival showman is used in the play. 
It is these atmospheric surroundings 
that make this play highly interest- 
ing and one of the main reasons for 
its huge success in the East. 

The producer, Mr. Fred Butler, 
who has probably staged more plays 
than any one man in America, has 
given "The Barker" an excellent cast, 
headed by John St. Polis, Isabel 
Withers, and Virginia Cleary, with a 
host of clever artists supporting 
them. 

Seats were placed on sale Thurs- 
day, June 30, at the Curran box of- 
fice. Evening prices range from 50 
cents to $2.50. 



By Josephine Young 

Al Jolson in his musical comedy 
success, "Big Boy," will end his en- 
gagement on Saturday, July 2. 

Lurie 

" 'Chicago' is a corking good show," 
says the advertising man. 

Go, and see it and judge for your- 
self! 

Nancy Carroll is the star and there 
are several stage people of import- 
ance in support of the dainty leading 
lady. She plays the role of Roxie 
Hart, the murderess, and performs 
some startling bits of acting with 
surprising sparkle and winsomeness 
in spite of her publicity intentions. 

"Chicago" is funny. It is packed 
with irony and as it was written by 
a well known Illinois newspaper court 
reporter — it is written with the 
"know." 

Thank Heavens, there is, at last, a 
real newspaper reporter in the play. 

$ $ :f: 

President 

Laughter and thrills are served in 
generous proportions at the Presi- 
dent, the Henry Duffy theater on Mc- 
Allister near Jones and Market 
streets, where "The Ghost Train" is 
the play in which the Duffy players 
present an amusing story in splendid 
fashion and high interpretation. 

The story concerns a bridal couple, 
a quarreling husband and wife, a 
maiden lady and a foppish English- 
man. 

They all manage to supply consid- 
erable merriment even though ter- 
rorized, at times, over the spooky 
events. It is one thrill after another 
on that train — but funny as can be, 
in spite of the scares. 

Leneta Lane is the star. 

Frank Darien, Joseph De Stefani, 
John Mackenzie, Westcott Clarke, 
Helen Keers, Earl Lee, Dorothy La- 
Mar, Kenneth Daigneau, Ronald Tel- 
fer, Olive Cooper are well known 
Duffy players essaying the principal 
roles. 

* * * 
Alcazar 

"The Patsy" still draws crowds to 
the Alcazar Theater on O'Farrell 
street, where this popular comedy is 
now entering its thirteenth week. 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"The Patsy." Henry Duffy and Dale Winter 
in the cast. 

Capitol, Ellis nr. Market 

"One Man's Woman." Torrid modern drama. 
A Macloon production. 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

"The Barker." Comedy drama of circus life. 
John St. Polis, Isabel Withers and Virginia 
Cleary in the cast. 

Lurie, Geary at Mason 

"Chicago." A pun cent satire on modern day 
justice. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"The Ghost Train." A Henry Duffy mystery 
comedy. 



VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

On the screen. "Quarantined Rivals." Comedy 
by Geo. Custar starring Robert Agncw and 
Kathleen Collins. On the stage, Wallace 
Weems heading a bill of vaudeville. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"Our Gang Kiddies" in person, presented by 
Hal Roach, heading a bill of vaudeville. 

Pantages, Market at Hyde 

On the screen. "Is Zat So?", starring Edmund 
Lowe and George O'Brien. The "Two Black 
Crows" heading the vaudeville program. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 



ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 

California, Market at 4th 

"The Rough Riders." A story of Roosevelt's 
Spanish-American war career. Charles Farrell, 
Noah Beery and Mary Astor are in the cast. 
Gino Severi conducts the California Orchestra. 

Casino, Ellis at Mason 

Sat.. "Broken Hearts of Hollywood" and "For 
Another Woman." Sun.. Mon., "Breed of the 
Sea" and "Bachelor Brides." Tues., Wed.. 
"Tramp. Tramp, Tramp" and "Rose of the 
Tenement." Thurs.. Fri.. "Her Big Night" 
and "The Call of the Klondike." 

Granada, Market at Jones 

Richard Dix in "Manpower." A Fanchon and 
Marco production with Gene Morgan as mas- 
ter of ceremonies. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th. 

"The Better 'Ole." Syd Chaplin starred as Old 
Bill in the picture made from Bruce Bairns- 
feather's cartoons. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"The Poor Nat." A college farce starring 
Jack Mulhall, Charlie Murray and Jane Win- 
ton. On the stage, a Fanchon and Marco act. 
"Tassela." Walt Roesner is again leading the 
Warfield band. 



July 2, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Dale Winter and Henry Duffy are 
leading principals in this excellent 
play. 

Duffy announces an additional 
Fourth-of-July matinee Monday. 

This performance with the Sunday 
matinee will give people who come 
here from interior California as they 
do over the national holiday, year 
after year — a chance to see "The 
Patsy." 

A taste of San Francisco's wonder- 
ful air — its cooling breezes, and — 
maybe some of its fog, you never can 
tell — always acts as a real nerve 
bracer for the weary out-of-towners 
who make this city a mecca over the 
three-day holiday. Henry Duffy 
knows this, full well, and to accom- 
modate his patrons has provided this 
extra matinee for Monday afternoon. 

With Dale Winter as the star and 
Duffy, himself, playing opposite, the 
cast includes: John Stokes, Florence 
Roberts, J. Anthony Smythe, Alice 
Buchanan, Eunice Quedens and Henry 

Caubisens. 

* * * 

Capitol 

"One Man's Woman" is still on at 
the Capitol Theater, Ellis street near 
Market. 

This Louis O. Macloon production 
is the work of Michael Kaessler and 
tells the story of a man who becomes 
discouraged and out -of -sorts- with - 
the-world, and a woman of the under- 
world. Both of them find their way 
back to life, as the play goes. 

Musical features include some real 
Hawaiian numbers. 

* * * 

Columbia 

Have you seen "Old Ironsides," the 
motion picture now on at the Colum- 
bia Theater, Eddy street near Powell? 

Don't miss seeing this photoplay. 
It is most unusual and it is historical- 
ly interesting as well as packed with 
romance and adventure. 

The magnaacope is used in this pic- 
ture. It will give you a thrill, too. or 
we lose our guess. The great sailing 
vessel moving over the waters ap- 
pears to come right out of the pic- 
ture, so realistic is the illusion — and 
so masterful the craftsmanship of 
this new motion picture invention. 

Wallace Beery. Esther Ralston. 
George Bancroft. Charles Farrell are 
in the cast. The story of the screen 
follows closely the story of American 
history with stirring romance splen- 
didly portrayed. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

An event of nationwide importance 
takes place at the Orpheum Theater 
beginning this Saturday matinee 
when the entire group of "Our Gang" 
kiddies, known as Hal Roach's Ras- 
cals, make their debut on the speak- 



ing stage in a comedy entitled "Act- 
ing Out." 

Harry Weber, well known producer 
is responsible for this event and is 
bringing these kiddies, including Joe 
Cobb, Farina, Jean Darling, Jackie 
Condon, Ray R. Smith, Mango and 
Harry Spear, to San Francisco to 
make their first appearance on the 
speaking stage. Youngsters will revel 
in this announcement and indications 
are that the Orpheum will have a big 
week. This will mark the beginning 
of the 41st year of the Orpheum in 
San Francisco. 

In addition to "Our Gang Kiddies" 
there will be a splendid bill of foot- 
light favorites, including Gladys 
Clark and Henry Bergman, two clever 
entertainers in "Dutch," a hilarious 
comedy skit; Neville Fleeson, writer 
of "Bye Bye Bonnie," "The Gingham 
Girl," and a host of other song suc- 
cesses, and Bobby Folsom, musical 
comedy favorite and late feature of 
Earl Carroll's "Vanities," in the sec- 
ond edition of their smart song cycle ; 
Ken Howell and his Collegians pre- 
senting snappy music; Chong and 
Rosie Moey, two talented Orientals in 
their version of American songs and 
dances; Joe Wilbur and Fay Adams 
presenting "Accidents Will Happen"; 

and several other features. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

One of the season's finest picture 
comedies, "Quarantined Rivals," pro- 
duced by Archie Mayo from George 
Randolph Chester's story of the same 
name, heads the Golden Gate bill this 
week. This picture is a mirthful 
comedy telling hilarious happenings 
when two jealous rivals are quaran- 
tined, in the same house, witii their 
sweetheart. Featured stars are Rob- 
ot Agnew, Kathleen Collins. Vera 
Daniels and John Mil.jan. 

The big feature of the vaudeville 
lull is the A & P Gypsies, an orches- 
tra famed for radio programs and 
phonograph records. The orchestra is 
made up of seven stringed instru- 
ments, including violin, viola, violin- 
cello, bass and piano. Harry Horlick 
is directing. Five other acts and short 

films complete the bill. 

* * « 

Warfield 

"The Poor Nut." a famous college 
farce and a very successful stage play 
is the feature attraction of the War- 
field Theater, starting Saturday. July 
'2. This is a comedy starring Jack 
Mulhall. Charl. .Murray and Jane 
Winton. 

The story is extremely funny. It is 
built around a certain young college 
student who is suffering from an in- 
ferior complex and peculiar shyness. 
He is known to other students as "the 
poor nut." 

(Continued on page 9) 



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THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 2, 1927 



Symphony Concert 

Those who were privileged to hear 
the third concert of the Summer 
Symphony Series, last Tuesday eve- 
ning, when Mishel Piastro conducted, 
will long remember the supreme mu- 
sical joy afforded. 

The crowd, which practically filled 
the Exposition Auditorium, was in 
fine mood to receive each magnificent 
number on the program, comprising 
selections by Russian composers. Th e 
people cheered lustily and long voic- 
ing their valuation of the selections, 
as well as appreciation of the master- 
ful Piastro. 

Sometimes, I think that we do not 
pay enough attention to the audi- 
cences however, in our commendation 
of concert work. It is true that 
world-famous conductors spread be- 
fore us musical feasts, but the highly 
trained, thorough musicians in the 
orchestra, and the people who fill the 
huge auditorium, also deserve recog- 
nition. 

Our San Francisco Symphony Or- 
chestra is the pride of the commun- 
ity. They are real musicians. They 
are on a par with any other group — 
to be found in any other Symphony 
Orchestra ! 

Every conductor, practically, who 
has ever appeared here, tells us so! 
They all recognized the musicianly 
worth of our orchestra. Why not 
come forward, after this third con- 
cert, and just tell them how much 
we do value the kind of music our 
San Francisco Symphony players are 
giving us? They are making musi- 
cal history for the entire coast, as 
well as satisfying our civic pride and 
our true appreciation of wonderful 
music, magnificently played! 

The third number of last Tuesday's 
concert program, Variations on a 
Russian Theme, in which six of Rus- 
sia's most distinguished composers 
collaborated in the production of the 
ingenious selection thoroughly stirred 
the audiences. The Sokolow "An- 
dante" and the Glazounow "Moderato 
Maetoso" were certainly gorgeous. 

Piastro, the conductor, was superb, 
in his masterly reading of all the 
numbers, but we especially noted his 
leadership in these scintillating 
movements. 

After the first two groups Mishel 
Piastro, was called and recalled to 
the footlights in response to enthus- 
iastic applause. Then, we did the 
old-fashioned but expressive and gra- 
cious thing of passing over the foot- 
lights baskets and baskets of choice 
flowers just as another way of telling 
this great musician, Piastro, that 
here in San Francisco he has a host 



Harmonic Happenings 

By Josephine Young 

of friends eager to pay him homage. 

Tschaikowsky's "March Slav" 
closed the program, its thematic ma- 
terial based on Russian or Servian 
folk-music, giving opportunity for 
many solo measures. One closing 
section set forth a new idea in the 
clarinets, accompaniments being giv- 
en to violoncellos and basses, pizzi- 
cato and kettledrums, afterwards 
combined with the Russian hymn vo- 
ciferated by the trombones. 

Artistic solos were interspersed in 
other program numbers by Kajetan 
Attl, harpist ; by Randall, clarinetist ; 
Brucker, who played the trumpet ; by 
flutist, Linden; and also by Addi- 
mando, whose oboe measures skill- 
fully entered into the musical inter- 
pretations. 

The next concert of the Summer 
Symphony Series will be given at the 
Auditorium next Tuesday night, July 
5, when Bruno Walter, famous con- 
ductor of Berlin and Vienna, will be 
the leader. Walter created a sensa- 
tion in the New York Symphony 
when he was a guest conductor for 
Walter Damrosch. Mr. Walter is re- 
garded by many as the greatest of 
the younger conductors. 

There will be three Wagner num- 
bers on the program next Tuesday 
evening, and "The Birthday of the 
Infanta," by Schrecker, which will 
be played for the first time in San 
Francisco. * * * 
San Francisco Open Forum 
Paid Tribute to Max Dolin 

Max Dolin, violinist, and director 
of programs for the National Radio 
Association, was honor guest at a 
dinner given by the San Francisco 
Open Forum, of which Prof. Chaun- 
cey McGovern is the president. The 
Music Cabinet, directed by Mr. W. 
A. Rider, had charge of the musical 
offerings which introduced prominent 
musicians in a series of rare selec- 
tions. 

Alfred Metzger, musical critic of 
the Chronicle, publisher of Musical 
Review, and an authority on all mat- 
ters concerning music, was the prin- 
cipal speaker at the noteworthy din- 
ner given in honor of Max Dolin, in 
the ballroom of the Bellevue Hotel, 
last Friday evening. 

In his brilliant address Mr. Metzg- 
er paid high tribute to Max Dolin. 
significantly referred to his devotion 
to classical programs, and pointed 
out many deserving honors which 
have been conferred upon the noted 
violinist. Metzger emphasized the 
tendency of musical appreciation, 
these days, and, in response to re- 
quest, dwelt upon the passing of jazz 
as a present-day mood, and exalted 



the standards of better music and 
the hearty approval of classical mu- 
sic by audiences constantly increas- 
ing in number. He added his en- 
thusiastic tribute to Dolin's stalwart 
stand for "the best" in musical pro- 
grams, and placed superlative value 
upon Max Dolin's place in musical 
circles where musicians and the laity, 
alike, recognize the supreme ability 
of the noted violinist and leader. 

Alfreda Wynne, soprano singer, 
and great friend and admirer of the 
honor guest, paid him additional tri- 
bute for his courage in refusing to 
place jazz numbers on his programs 
and included in her splendid talk the 
appreciation of those who had ap- 
peared on the stage with Max Dolin 
during concert work. Alfreda Wynne 
spoke of her brother Herman Heller, 
violinist, and one of the foremost 
musicians standing out for the best 
music in concert programs. The al- 
lied interests of the two violinists 
were touchingly included in the talk 
by Mrs. Wynne. 

A group of songs was sung by Al- 
freda Wynne as part of the note- 
worthy program at the Max Dolin 
dinner, the charming personality of 
the singer and the exquisite voice 
qualities receiving enthusiastic ap- 
preciation from those in attendance 
at this noteworthy gathering. 

Margaret Mary O'Dea, contralto 
singer, whose gorgeous voice, is the 
delight of musicians and musical ad- 
mirers, contributed solo selections 
with that rare musicianly skill for 
which Miss O'Dea is famed. 

Then, as a pleasing surprise, Max 
Dolin, himself played some of his 
choicest selections adding further 
distinction to this Music Cabinet 
meeting as part of the notable gath- 
erings over which Prof. Chauncey 
M'Govern presides when famous peo- 
ple are honored as special guests. 

Judge George Cabiniss made an il- 
luminating address at the Max Dolin 
dinner paying respects to those who 
planned the event and pointing out 
its high ideals. Other speakers in- 
cluded, Mr. W. A. Rider, chairman of 
the Board of Governors; Irene L. 
Hoffman, recording secretary, San 
Francisco Forum; Margaret E. Bald- 
win, secretary ; Hon. Prosper Reiter, 
and Mr. Murray Sheppard, the treas- 
urer. 

Letters of tribute were read by 
President M'Govern written and sent 
by David Starr Jordan, Gertrude 
Atherton, Congressman and Mrs. 
William H. Kent, Charles Caldwell 
Dobie, Sarah Bard Field, John D. 
Barry, and other honorary members 
of the Forum. 



^ 



My 2, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from page 7) 

Nevertheless, he is ambitious to be 
a college hero. A pretty girl shows 
interest in him and he eventually 
snaps out of his coma to be admired 
and fairly idolized by fellow-students. 

"Tassels Ideas," a sensational 
stage spectacle, will be Fanchon and 
Marco's stage offering with elabor- 
ate settings and also featuring sev- 
eral local stars including Roy Smoot 
and Helene Hughes. 

Walt Roesner and his super-soloists 
are back again at the Warfield sup- 
plying musical entertainment of a 
high order. 

* * * 

Pantages 

"Is Zat So" on the screen is even 
funnier than on the stage. With Ed- 
mund Lowe and George O'Brien in 
the title roles the most is gotten out 
of a very funny story. 

A "Ham and Egg" boxer and his 
manager are picked up by a society 
family to become butler and second 
man. There is a right and a wrong 
way to do everything, including "but- 
ling." Lowe and O'Brien sure picked 
all of the wrong ways. Yet they man- 
aged to get a bout with the light- 
weight champion and prove that 
"they have the goods" in their own 
particular line. 

"Two Black Crows" in person are 
heading the vaudeville program. 

St. Francis 

"The Better 'Ole," with Syd Chap- 
lin starred as Old Bill, an English 
Tommv, is playing in its third week. 

The story of "The Better 'Ole" was 
taken from Bruce Bairnsfeat tier's 
cartoons and depicts the adventures 
of an English Tommy at the front 
during the Great War. Old Bill is an- 
tagonistic toward everybody bul the 
enemy and his exploits bring him 
everything in the form of trouble. 
Finally he redeems himself by exe- 
cuting a coup on the enemy. His re- 
demption, however, is not as interest- 
ing as his foibles. This is a sure fire 
comedy. 

* * * 

California 

"The Rough Riders." a story of 
Roosevelt's Spanish-American war 
career, is in its second week. 

The story was written l>y Herr- 
mann Hagerdorn and directed by Vic- 
tor Fleming. In the east are Frank 
Hopper as Roosevelt, Cliarles Farrell. 
Charles Kmmott Mack, Mary Astor, 
Noah Beery, George Bancroft, Fred 
Bolder. Colonel Fred Lindsay, and 
1200 rough riders. This picture de- 
picts many historical scenes, includ- 
liK the famous ehar.ee up San Juan 
Hill. 



Gino Severi has arranged a special 
score for the picture and also con- 
ducts the California Orchestra in a 
concert on the stage. 

* # * 

Richard Dix in "Manpower" is the 
film attraction at the Granada The- 
ater this week. The story must have 
been written for Dix rather than hav- 
ing Dix picked for the story. It is the 
thriller variety which we are wont to 
connect with this star. It starts out 
as a comedy but the situations and 
the hero become too serious for this 
to last. He certainly has to work hard 
to win that girl ! 

On the stage Gene Morgan is the 
master of ceremonies in a Fanchon 
and Marco production. Gene has some 
new antics and a green hat. 

* * * 

Salinas Rodeo 

Ten carloads of wild horses from 
the ranges of Nevada, Montana and 
Idaho will be brought to Salinas for 
the California Rodeo to be staged 
here July 20 to 24 inclusive according 
to an announcement today by Arthur 
Hebbron, president of the rodeo. The 
horses will be used in the World's 
Championship Bucking Horse contest 
which will be the main feature of the 
colorful celebration. 

Some of the most famous riders 
in the world have signified their in- 
tention of competing for honors in 
the contest. Hebbron stated. . 

All the color and glamour of the 
early days of the West when the one 
big celebration of the year followed 
the annua! round-up will he depicted 
in the celebration. For days before 
the rodeo opens cowboys and cow- 
girls from surrounding ranches will 
ride into Salinas garbed in vivid- 
hued shirts, gay colored bandanos, 
"tell gallon" sombreros, high-heeled 
hoots and chaparajos. 

The program includes bucking 
horses, hull riding, bulldogging, steer 
roping, wild cow milking contests, 
free for all horse races, an exhibition 
of fancy horses and cattle, polo pony 
contest and a wild horse race. Purses 
and trophies will he awarded winners 
in the various events. 

* * * 
News from Santa Cruz 

The Fourth of .July Golf Tourna- 
ment. -July 2-4, will have a full list of 
entries. 

Qualifying rounds of 18 holes will 
he played on Saturday, July 2. with 
match play on both Sunday and Mon- 
day. July :< and 4. 

Handsome trophies have been se- 
cured for this annual tournament, in- 
cluding cups for low net and low 
gross in the qualifying rounds, and 
for winners and runners-up in each 
flight. 



This is always a popular tourna- 
ment with California golfers and 
many prominent players are expected 
to be seen in action on the Santa Cruz 



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10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 2, 1927 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 5) 
Junior League 

The formal opening of the Junior 
League Shop, in Tillman place, has 
been set for September 12 and if 
plans work out as they are scheduled 
this store will be one of the most 
useful and unique of its kind. Mrs. 
Howard Fleming is in charge of the 
shop . 

There will be one head saleswo- 
man, who will be in the shop per- 
manently. It has not been decided 
yet whether she will be a Junior 
League girl or not. Two girls go on 
duty every morning and two others 
will relieve them in the afternoon. 
They will be Junior League girls and 
will change every week. 
Co-workers 

Working with Mrs. Howard Flem- 
ing for the new shop will be many so- 
ciety matrons and debutantes includ- 
ing: Mesdames Lawrence Fox, Jr., 
William L. Shaw, J. C. Burgard, Law- 
rence Bowes, Misses Ruth Langdon, 
Emily Clift Searles, Mollie McBryde. 

At a quiet ceremony performed 
Sunday, (June 12) at the Clift Hotel, 
Miss Helen Alexander became the 



MISCELLANEOUS 

SYNOPSIS OF THE ANNUAL STATEMENT 

OF 

Realty Mortgage Insurance 
Corporation 

of San Francisco in the State of California on the 
31st day of December. 1926, made to the Insurance 
Commissioner of the State of California, pursuant 
to law. 

ASSETS 

Real estate * „IS'J!i 

Mortgages and collateral loans 105.J5U.UU 

Bonds and stocks and certificates 303.000.00 

Cash in company's office and in banks 6.937.24 

Premiums in course of collection None 

Bills receivable ?5J"2? 

Other ledger assets 9ii.77d.zi 

Ledger Assets S510.022.68 

NON-LEDGER ASSETS: 

Interest and rents due or accured $ None 

Market value of securities over book value None 
Other non-ledger assets — Equity in Mort- ' 

.gage Loans - 29,581.75 

Total gross assets $ 53 ?' 604 "™ 

Deduct assets not admitted 82,777.32 

Total Admitted Assets $456,827.11 

LIABILITIES 

Net unpaid claims, except liability and 

workmen's compensation _ $ None 

Special reserve for unpaid liability and 

workmen's compensation claims None 

Estimated expenses of investigation and 

adjustment of claims v — ... None 

Total unearned premiums on unexpired 

rjgkg None 

Commissions and brokerage due or to be- 

come due None 

All other liabilities - 185,314.45 

Total Liabilities (except capital and 

surplus* $185,314.45 

Canital $316,850.80 

Surplus "'.'.'.".'.". 45,338.14 271,512.66 

Total Liabilities, Capital and Surplus $456,827.11 

J. M. HENDERSON, Jr., 

President. 
CHARLES C. BOWEN. 

Secretary. 



bride of Dr. Joseph Levitin. The af- 
fair was marked by a charming sim- 
plicity and was attended only by rela- 
tives of the couple. Following a 
motor trip North, Dr. and Mrs. Levi- 
tin will make their home in this city. 



Santa Maria Inn 

There are always a number of pro- 
minent people over the week-end, and 
many spending the entire season at 
Santa Maria Inn of which Frank Mc- 
Coy is manager. During the recent 
week-end those who enjoyed the at- 
tractions of the place included: Mr. 
and Mrs. E. D. Wetmore of Santa 
Barbara; Col. and Mrs. Frank W. 
Marstons, San Francisco; Miss H. B. 
Bakewell of Oakland and Mrs. E. N. 
Hazard of Santa Barbara. Mr. and 
Mrs. H. H. Zellerbach, Mrs. J. W. 
Adams, Mrs. W. H. Brown and Miss 
Virginia Belknap, Mr. and Mrs. E. 
W. Newhall Jr., and Miss Newhall, 
San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. G. F. 
Coleman, Mr. and Mrs. James R. 
Chapman, Santa Barbara ; Mr. and 
Mrs. J. D. Redding, Mr. and Mrs. Mar- 
shall Nuckolls, San Francisco ; Judge 
and Mrs. A. F. St. Sure and Mr. and 
Mrs. E. R. Eliassen, Piedmont. 

* * * 

Feted Graduates 

Mrs. Joseph J. Young entertained 
at tea at the Mark Hopkins Hotel 
Saturday, June 4th, in honor of her 
daughter, Miss Aloha Young, who 
graduated from St. James High 
School last Thursday. The table was 
beautifully decorated with attractive 
corsages in pastel shades. 

* * * 

Tea in June 

One of the largest affairs of June 
was a Tea at which Miss Ruth Russ, 
Miss Joan Oliver and Miss Jean Oliver 
were joint hostesses, entertaining 
friends at the Fairmont Hotel. The 
Laurel Court formed an artistic set- 
ting for the smartly gowned guests, 
who were received by the hostesses 
assisted by Miss Morris, Elizabeth 
Goldsberry, Miss Chaffita Thomas 
and Miss Jean Wheeler. Decorations 
of the buffet tea table were an artis- 
tic arrangement of rare flowers in 
tall brass ornamental holders placed 
about the table. 

* * * 

Soroptomists Meet 

Hundreds of brilliant women mem- 
bers of the Soroptomist Club held 
their convention this past week at 
the Fairmont Hotel where for three 
days, June 28, 29 and 30 the state- 
wide and national organizations 
gathered for congress events. 

Mary D. Boldeman, past president 
of the San Francisco Club ably pre- 
sided over the events, Miss Mabel 



Johnson popular leader and head of 
the hospitality department of women, 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, had charge of the convention 
details at the Fairmont. Florence , 
Gardner was general chairman of the 
conference. 

Mrs. Louise Brehany one of San 
Francisco's foremost musicians, had 
complete charge of the musical pro- 
grams which were outstanding at- J 
tractions of the convention. Mr. 
Earl Schwartz, musical director and i 
composer, wrote a song which was 
sung during the convention as a tri-| 
bute to its leaders. Evelyn Ware, ] 
pianist, was the official accompanist, 
Mme. Pearl H. Whitcomb, Mme. An- 
nie K. Blotcky, Nellia Wren, Stella 
R. Wright, Mme. Stella Vought, Jean- 
nette Conday were prominent musi- 
cians contributing musical selections 
at the convention. 

Prominent among the delegates 
was Jane Higbie of San Jose, rej 
cently returned from London and 
Paris, where she was a guest at So- 
roptomist Clubs there and to which 
she carried greetings from Califor- 
nia. The clever business and profes- 
sional women identified with this 
club made special impressions upon 
the community for the thoroughness, 
and dispatch of their sessions, andf 
the fine purposes back of each event 
* * * 

At the Clift 

One of the most interesting vis- 
itors to San Francisco this month' 
was Mrs. Frank C. Atherton of Hono-> 
lulu, who was a guest last week at 
the Clift Hotel, en route to New Yorld 
for a brief stay. Her family are de-> 
scendants of pioneer missionaries,- 
who emigrated to the islands from 
New England approximately a cen-i 
tury ago. 

(Continued on page 13) 




Photo graphs 

I @</>r Forevt 






July 2, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 






THROUGH EUROPE ON §2.00 A 
Day, by Charles Schoonmaker; §2. 

A most entertaining book, giving 
accounts of the routes actually tra- 
veled by the author in nearly every 
country of Europe at a minimum of 
expense, and told in a manner at 
once interesting and enlightening. 
It is written in a running narrative 
style, and the reader falls under the 
impression that he has received in- 
teresting letters from a far-away 
friend who is trying to show the best 
methods of traveling to one who is 
soon to become a member of the vast 
group of pleasure seekers who want 
to "go to Europe some day." 

From his extensive store of notes, 
the author gives elaborate details 
gathered during his various experi- 
ences, as to each and every route, 
side trip, method of travel and how 
to secure the best accommodations at 
the least expense at hotels and pen- 
sions, even specifying the rates that 
should be charged. Not to be satis- 
fied with one of the two or three 
methods given would indicate a 
somewhat peevish and querulous tra- 
veling companion. 

The author not only shows himself 
to be familiar with the best means of 
passing through the various coun- 
tries, but gives an interesting ac- 
count of the art and history as well. 
Although he usually manages to 
reach the important cities at some 
time during his itinerary, he spends 
most of his time wandering through 
districts practically unknown to the 
casual traveler. 

Some of his stories of his means of 
getting from one place to another are 
amusing and his Hashes of humor 
are delightful. Anyone contemplat- 
ing a trip to Europe on a minimum 
budget would do well to tuck this 
book into a convenient handbag to be 
ready for use on every occasion. His 
last chapter on General Information 
contains excellent advice and should 
be pasted in the hat band of every 
person who is about to seek adven- 
ture and pleasure in a trip to West- 
ern Europe. 

* « * 

SPREAD EAGLE, by George S. 

Brooks and Walter B. Lister ; $1.75. 

Good reading. A story told in his- 
toric style, with dialogue good and 
characters natural — not forced. 

The situation is handled like the 



Edited by Florence DeLong 

playing of an accurate game of chess. 
The attack is bold, but the King is so 
strongly entrenched in the back- 
ground that his offense is cunningly 
concealed. The game is ruthless. 
The poor White Knight is forced into 
the openings to make a good position 
for his King (Henderson) : to make 
Mexico safe for plutocracy. 

Joe Cobb, the Black Knight, is al- 
ways "on the job" protecting his 
King even to the sacrificing of the 
White Knight in the crises. One 
wonders how the game would have 
ended were it not for the effective 
and effectual moves of faithful Joe. 

Whether the story is told by disil- 
lusioned doughboys who realize that 
their sacrifice had been in vain after 
their burst of enthusiasm had been 
dampened by the mud and water of 
the trenches ; whether it is told by 
disgruntled analysts who have at- 
tempted to show how wars can be 
provoked by the "big guns" at home 
to be fought by the men behind the 
guns on the field: whether the au- 
thors are pacifists who are trying to 
show that there should be no such 
thing as war (not that war itself is 
futile, but the cause itself is apt to 
lie personal and selfish): the story 
holds the interest of all to the end. 

The atmosphere is pessimistic and 
somewhat depressing. But when 
Joe. whose diabolical plots have 
caused most of the mischief; who, in 
spite of his better nature, has served 
his master to the limit and saved 
that master when he could not save 
himself, when Joe announces that he 
is going out to help clean up the mess 
that he has been instrumental in 
starting, you realize that there is 
something in life to live and fight 
for and that things are worth while 
after all. Good old Joe! We hope 
he wins the war. 

If the words of the book are quot- 
ed in their entirety in any stage pro- 
duction, it might be well to take ear- 
muffs with you. as some of the con- 
versation is startling in the extreme. 
* • « 

Hannibal 
THE ROAD TO ROME, by Robert E. 

Sherwood. Scribners. $1.75. 

Ever since he was a school boy Mr. 
Sherwood, editor of LIFE, has pon- 
dered over the problem of Hannibal — 
why on earth he turned back from the 
very gates of Rome, after sixteen 
years of successful strategic planning 



and battling to reach it and destroy 
it in the name of Carthage. In this 
play he attempts an answer. 

And of course the answer comes in 
the person of a charming woman, the 
Greek wife of the Roman dictator. 
She who appears so flippant turns 
out to be the saviour of all Rome. 
However, to the humor of the out- 
come, Rome's dictator declares that 
Rome is saved through its high moral 
purpose — as he explains it to his wife, 
"Virtue, my dear, is the one perfect 
defense against all the evil forces on 
this earth" — while his wife smiles, 
waving her hand at the departing 
Hannibal, who has given in to the 
wish of a woman not exactly under a 
virtuous flag. The play's triumph 
may be explained especially because 
of these sly innuendos. Hannibal's 
repartee with the Greek woman is 
filled with witty lines, as is the entire 
play. 



Books that are reviewed in the Newi Letter 
can he obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PACL ELDER'S LIBRABT 
23» Put Street San Francisco. Calif. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 

BROKER 

208 CROCKER HOLDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Sprinrs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

Hi CLARA STREET— GARFIELD M4 



S. A. LOVEJOY 

WILL BRING 

ORDER 

Out of Chaos! 

In your Books. 
Financial Statements 
Income Tax Reports 

Expert Auditor 

PART-TIME SERVICE 

268 Market SU Room 101 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 2, 1927 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




C. J. Pennington 

The fourth annual Pacific Radio 
Show will mark the greatest stride 
forward in the development of radio 
in the history of this youngest of 
America's great industries. 

The first official information avail- 
able regarding the 1927 showing of 
the radio manufacturers more than 
justifies the predictions already made 
that the Pacific Radio Show to be 
held here August 20th to 27th will be 
epochal. 

Every radio show in the country 
has its eyes focused on San Francis- 
co's show in view of the fact that 
this is the first exposition that will 
be held anywhere in the United 
States this season. California, and 
in fact the entire Pacific Coast, is 
regarded as one of the greatest radio 
centers, inasmuch as we have such 
remarkable all-year-around recep- 
tion. This naturally heightens the 
interest of the radio trade in any- 
thing being done here. 

In conversing with other associa- 
tions putting on shows and with some 
of the leading manufacturers, it was 
learned that we are considerably 
ahead of the other shows as to plans 
and the sale of space. 

Much interest will center in the 
new socket power devices which will 
be shown here for the first time at 
the exposition. Many of these prom- 
ise to be revolutionary in their influ- 
ence, it is declared. New lines in 
cabinet design promise to add greater 
charm and beauty to the sets. 



Beginning yesterday, July 1, a 
series of weekly Friday night popu- 
lar programs will be offered from 
KPO, the Hale-Chronicle station, un- 



der the auspices of the California Pe- 
troleum Corporation. The newly 
formed "Calpet" orchestra will be 
the main feature of the new series. 
At the head of the new orchestra will 
be Johnny Wolohan, well-known or- 
chestra leader of the Pacific Coast. 

The Calpet programs will present 
each week various novelties of both 
the popular and semi-classical type. 
Each week prominent California so- 
loists will be introduced to the listen- 
ers. The programs will be given 
every Friday night beginning July 
1, from 8 to 9 o'clock. 



A recent addition to the staff of 
entertainers on KPO's late Monday 
night Variety Hour is Anna Kristina. 
Swedish dialect reader. This young 
woman, who strolled into KPO's stu- 
dios recently for a try-out, is a dis- 
tinct "find" and will participate in all 
the Variety Hour programs in the 
near future. Listeners who have 
heard her Swedish version of the fa- 
miliar fairy tales during the last two 
weeks, are writing KPO with enthus- 
iastic praise. All her stories are 
original. 



KPO's Big Brother has given the 
thousands of boys and girls who lis- 
ten to him nightly during his 5:30 to 
6 P. M. Big Brother period, a new 
feature on Friday nights, in the pro- 
grams of children's songs presented 
by May Dearborn Schwab, one of 
KPO's most popular soprano singers. 
Mrs. Schwab, who is already becom- 
ing known to the youngsters as the 
"Princess," is one of the pioneer ra- 
dio artists of this Coast. For many 
years, before she entered the radio 
world, she made a study of songs of 
children. With her delightfully 
smooth voice and her large reper- 
toire of children's melodies, she has 
become a welcome visitor to the 
youngsters of radioland. 

Spanish rhythms, dreamy romantic 
waltzes, and Mexican melodies are 
the musical menu Chief Gonzales and 
his Barcelonians offer radio listeners 
over KOA every Tuesday and Satur- 
day night. Gonzales, who boasts an 
Irish-Spanish ancestry, directs his 
colorful orchestra with a hand-carved 
ivory baton that is said to have be- 
longed to a Moorish orchestra direc- 



tor in the days when the Alhambra 
was young. 

* * * 

Music that sounds well out-of-doors 
is KOA's latest contribution to ethe- 
real entertainment. Now listeners 
may drag forth the loud speaker to 
the porch of the mountain cabin 
within the circle of the campfire, or 
among the beets and radishes of the 
lowly back yard, and hear an open- 
air concert, played by the Denver Mu- 
nicipal band, especially planned and 
directed for out-of-door reception. 
The numbers, running to love lyrics 
and moonlight waltzes, are said to be 
especially suitable for summer 
nights. 

* * * 

Tourists who tune in KOA will re- 
ceive valuable hints on road condi- 
tions, where to go and how to get 
there, what to take on a camping 
trip, and what to wear at various re- 
sorts. Road reports go out every 
evening at 6:25 m. s. t., while other 
tourist information will be broadcast 
during the housewives' matinee. 



Summer Radio Programs 
Better Than Ever 

Earle C. Anthony, nationally 
known radio figure, believes that ra- 
dio broadcasting is perhaps the only 
form of entertainment which is not 
seasonal. Mr. Anthony is the owner 
of broadcast station KFI in this city, 
and at the present is in New York 
attending a session of the National 
Association of Broadcasters, of which 
he is president. 

"There seems to be a growing tend- 
ency upon the part of the public to 
believe that broadcasting like the 
theater, suffers in quality of programs 
during the summer months" says An- 
thony, but this is certainly an erron- 
eous impression. "This is one me- 
dium of amusement which is in de- 
mand throughout the year, and is 
one of the most popular forms during 
the summer months, if for no other 
reason that it requires practically no 
exertion on the part of the listener. 
It is of special value when the opera, 
concert halls and many theatres have 
closed their doors." 

Anthony points out that the radio 
audience is not decreased, but rather 
increased during the vacation period, 
and for this reason the public can ex- 
pect programs as good or better than 



July 2, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



the rest of the year. Most of the 
larger broadcast stations including 
KFI, plan no diminuation whatsoev- 
er, but to the contrary, plan to make 
the coming summer schedules the 
best that broadcast listeners have 
had. 

As an indication attached to sum- 
mer presentations by Anthony, he in- 
timates that KFI will shortly make 
an announcement of forthcoming 
programs which is sure to be of great 
interest to every owner of a receiving 

set. 

* * * 

KFI, Los Angeles, recently cele- 
brated the return to the air of Paul 
Roberts, popular tenor of that sta- 
tion. Roberts had been away for 
several weeks on a vacation to Mon- 
terey, San Francisco, and Lake Ta- 
hoe. An entire Saturday Midnight 
Frolic was dedicated to him, and 
thousands of receptionists joined in 
welcoming him back to the micro- 
phone. 

* * * 

Auditions or try-outs at KFI, Los 
Angeles, have been discontinued for 
the summer months. According to 
word received from Robert Hurd, 
manager of the station, this decision 
was reached because of the fact that 
recent auditions have brought to 
light so many worth-while artists 
that none of them would have a 
chance to appear on programs if the 
list were to be made any longer. 

* • * 
KFI Director in Movies 

Arthur F. Kales, general manager 
of KFI, Los Angeles, recently pur- 
chased a small motion picture cam- 
era, and straightway decided to try 
it out by shooting a few thousand 
feet of film on the KFI staff in action. 
His first subject was Robert Hurd. 
the program director. 

"Now just be natural and do some- 
thing characteristic," Kales directed 
Hurd. "Let me see. I think it 
would be well to photograph your re- 
action to an artist — a soprano for in- 
stance." 

The manager got one of the young 
ladies in the office to take some music 
and feign singing a difficult aria with 
all the tremolos, cadenias and so 
forth. Hurd immediately got into 
character, grabbed a hatchet and 
proceeded to chase the poor jrirl 
around the root' garden until she was 
rescued by Carl Haverlin with the ad- 
monition to not take the situation too 
seriously. 

The film was good and it should be 
added in all fairness and for the bene- 
fit of prospective radio sopranos, that 
it was merely a stunt, and in all of 
Mr. Hurd's career he has never been 
known to commit mayhem or murder 



on the persons of his aversions — so- 
pranos. 

* * * 

SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 10) 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Hanchett, who 
have occupied a suite at the Clift Ho- 
tel during the Winter and Spring 
months, are preparing to leave Wed- 
nesday (June 22) for Montecito, 
where they will remain during the 
summer. They are anticipating the 
return of their daughters, Miss Alice 
and Miss Margaret Hanchett, from 
New York, where Miss Margaret has 
been attending school. 

* * * 

At a nuptial Mass in Mission Do- 
lores Church Wednesday morning 
(June 22) Miss Lolita Marie Kelley, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Kel- 
ley, became the bride of Mr. James 
Samuel Cantlen, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
J. Cantlen of this city. The maid of 
honor was Miss Isabel Lynch, cousin 
of the bride, and the two brides- 
maids were Miss Gertrude Collins 
and Mary Keenan. Mr. Henry Cant- 
len, brother of the groom, acted as 
best man. The bride's white attire 
and the pastel shades of the attend- 
ants gowns, made an attractive pic- 
ture against a background of gladio- 
las and larkspur. 

* * * 

Following the ceremony, attended 
by a large number of close friends of 
the couple, a wedding breakfast was 
held at the Clift Hotel. 

Upon returning from their honey- 
moon. Mr. and Mrs. Cantlen will 
make their home in Burlingame. 

* * * 

Lovely Wedding 

The marriage of Miss Ida Rosen- 
blum, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. 

Kosenblum to Mr. Morris Irving Ger- 
shenson took place Sunday evening, 
in the Roof Garden of the Whitcomb 
Hotel. 

Two hundred guests witnessed the 
ceremony. The bride's dress was of 
white satin and Chantifly lace, with 
a tulle veil and a bouquet of bride's 
roses, gardenias and lilies of the val- 
ley. The attendants were: Misses 
Lina Rosenblum. Frits Zeman. Han- 
nah Bolin. Pauline Rosenblum and 
Fay Gershenson and Mrs. Edgar M. 
Haas, sister of th bride, as matron 
of honor: Miss Beatrice Zeman. cous- 
in of the bride, maid of honor. As 
ushers were: Messrs. Jack Grimes. A. 
Levin. Murray I.evine. Joseph Levitt 
and Mark Gershenson. Herbert 
Haas was best man. Flower girls 
were: Marjorie Jean Haas and Leila 
Faye Curilow. 

The ceremony was followed by a 



buffet supper and reception. During 
the evening, announcement was 
made of the engagement of the 
bride's sister, Miss Lina Rosenblum 
to Mr. Jack Grimes of Oakland. 

* * * 
Farewell 

Close friends of Miss Mildred Win- 
dell gathered Saturday (June 18) at 
a delightfully informal luncheon in 
the Florentine Room of the Clift Ho- 
tel, for a leave taking prior to Miss 
Windell's departure on an extended 
vacation. Dainty place cards to- 
gether with corsages of pink baby 
roses made the table most attractive, 
and following luncheon the guests 
attended a matinee. Those present 
were the Misses Melba McDaniel, Eva 
Homier, Georgia Evans, Seana Mc- 
Coy, and the Honor guest. 



CLUB 
AUTO SERVICE CO. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 

For All Occasions 

Day and Night 

City Sightseeing ----- $3.00 per hoar 

Shopping .---..-- 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips. Taxicah Rates 



PROSPECT 

1000 



585 Po.t. St.. 
S.n Francisco 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

626 California Street (and Branches). San Francisco 

For the quarter year ending June 30th. 1927, a 
dividend ha* r*>en declared at the rate of four and 
one-quarter (I', 1 ptr cent per annum on all deposit*. 
payable on and after July 1st. 1927. Dividends nut 
called for are added to the deposit account and earn 
interest from July 1st. 1927. Deposits made on or 
Inly 11th. 1927. will earn interest from July 
lat, 1927. 

Wll. D. NEWHOUSE. Secretary. 



Phone Sutter 3279 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shrev* £ Company I 

i I o. KM4KEKS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime. Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

2*9 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mateo Coanties 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office »i>« W.rk.: lt]5 M St. 

Phone Market ?»11 
Branch Office : :«• Salter Street 
-burr Bldr- > 
PWai Prwpect IM 

Work Called for and Delivered 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 2, 1927 




T N h a e me PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whether 
it be typewriter pa- 
per or manuscript 
cover, means com- 
plete satisfaction. 
There is a grade for 
every need. Ask 
your printer or sta- 
tioner to show you 
samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Doocrlas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 



Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Max Rosenthal 

WHERE GOOD TAILORING 
COSTS LESS 

A choice selection of seasonable 

Woolens suitable for Formal, 

Sport and Business wear is 

now ready for your early 

consideration. 

527 POST ST. SAN FRANCISCO 
OPP. OLYMPIC CLUB 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
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Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. WELLER 
National Automobile Club 

State Highways 

The section of the new all-year 
road into Yosemite Valley between 
Mariposa and El Portal has been sur- 
faced and oiled. On the portion be- 
tween Mariposa and Merced, light 
fuel oil will be applied, reducing the 
dust nuisance through the summer 
season. This work will be intermit- 
tent as local conditions require, but 
the traffic will be handled on one-way 
control, which will eliminate any in- 
convenience. 

The section of the road between 
Mariposa and El Portal which has 
been completed, is exceptionally good 
and offers excellent traveling condi- 
tions. At present time, redwood logs 
are being placed, forming a barrier 
between the road and the river. 

* * # 

From Lima, Peru, to California, 
paved highways all the way. That is 
the hope expressed by a South Ameri- 
can delegate to the recent Pan-Ameri- 
can trade convention. In his speech 
urging the ultimate binding together 
of the various sections of the conti- 
nents, the Peruvian said that a great 
amount of good will would be created 
by the contact brought about by such 
connections. The intercourse thus 
gained teaches the traveler that the 
fellow in the other countries is the 
same sort of human being as himself, 
he said. 

* * * 

"The highway's the thing." Com- 
parative times from San Francisco to 
New York in 1903 and 1927 striking- 
ly demonstrate this. It was a fifty- 
three day drive in 1903 but this year 



thousands will make it leisurely in 
two weeks. 

The first man to make the journey 
set out for San Francisco in a one- 
cylinder car, equipped with the oil 
lamps of that day, and loaded with 
material for making his own roads 
when the occasion required it. On the 
way he cut through wire fences and 
made his hazardous way with a rail- 
road map and information gathered 
from the country dwellers along the 
road. Soon the motorist will be able 
to speed over a continuous chain of 
paved highways. 

* * * 

Five hundred automobiles on the 
way to Mexico from American dealers 
passed through Laredo, Texas, dur- 
ing the month of May. Seventy-three 
carloads of autos for the Mexicans is 
evidence that American cars find a 
good market in Mexico and that the 
Mexican is stepping forward indus- 
trially. 

* * * 

The Tioga Pass Road, between Yo- 
semite Valley and Mono Lake, has 
not yet a definite opening date. The 
opening has been postponed due to 
the fact that there is still considera- 
ble snow in the high country. 

* * * 

The highway through Pocket Can- 
yon between Forestville and Guerne- 
ville on the Russian river is now com- 
pleted and open to traffic. This gives 
a direct paved road to Guerneville 
and eliminates the necessity of going 
through Monte Rio. 

* * * 

That the motor vehicle is a danger- 
ous weapon and that the state has 
power to enforce regulations looking 
toward its proper control in the inter- 
ests of public safety, was the recent 
ruling of the Massachusetts Supreme 
Court. 

The effect of this ruling may be 
far-reaching. It means that states 
may take steps to prevent the opera- 
tion of motor vehicles that are so far 
gone mechanically that they consti- 
tute a menace to other motorists and 
to the general public. It means that 
states may take more stringent meas- 
ures to regulate cars in the field of 
proper braking facilities, tire equip- 
ment and the like. 



"You have only to mumble a few 
words in church to get married." says 
a writer. And a few in your sleep to 
get divorced. — Passing Show. 

* * • 

"Do you suppose he's in a position 
to ask me to marry him?" 

"I should say so. Haven't I just 
returned him his ring ?" — Every- 
body's Weekly. 



July 2, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 




A Guest Chamber 

"Memory knows 
How still it lies, 

Between the sunset and sunrise. 
The pilgrim is past hope or prayer 
Who could not lay his load down there. 

"Scent of a rose 
Breathes in the gloom 
Which dusk brings to that friendly room. 
And through the lattice open wide 
Sweet ghosts of saintly lilies glide. 

"Here one may prove, 
Here one may see 
How comradely a bed can be 
Pillows will speak a soothing word, 
And sheets, when these are lavendered. . 

"Cool windlets move 
The curtained space 
Until the first star shows her face. 
Then through the dark that old delight — 
A river running in the night." 

— Fay Inchfawn in the Windsor Magazine. 



Wayfarer's Thorn 

Of all the trees, in every land, 

From Forest Flame to snowy pine, 
O I will keep, by heart and hand, 

The hawthorn and the blackthorn mine: 
Of all the trees that I have known. 

On every road, however long — 
For hawthorn flower is memory's own 

And blackthorn boughs as faith art' strong. 

never a tree but fairly grows! — 
Slight birch, the Lady of the Woods, 

And oak, and ash. and sweet wild ruse. 

And cypress in starlit solitudes: 
Laburnum and lilac, cherry, larch, 

Red rowans in the hills of home. 
Slim sallow stems that flower in March. 
And ilex by the salt sea foam. 

Yes. elm and apple, and beeehen dales. 

Dim silvery firs by silent seas — 
But still shall rove Time's nightingales 

Thro' hawthorn trees and blackthorn tr< 
And holier yet in music's wake. 

As holly's lamps when autumn ends. 
Sweet hawthorn blooms for sorrow's sake. 

And blackthorn boughs are pilgrims' friends. 

In hawthorn red by upland ways. 
Or white as cloud in evening dells. 

1 will keep lovely all my days 

The magic hours that need no bells: 
And when the blackthorn spills its load 

Of stars too bright to let me rest. 
I'll cut a stick, and take the road. 

And walk into the crimson West. 

— Bv Hamish Maelaren. 




LOU W. SARTOR. Proprietor PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 

LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling: and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 

Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco, Calif. 



GRAYSTONE 130 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage. 1361 Buah St. 

Management of WILLIAM SAUNDERS 



TRUNKS — RACKS — BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVENUE 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 



Kst.ihlished 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON. General Agent 

:>ll Market Street. San Francisco, Cai. 

TELEPHONE SUTTER SJ42 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 2, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY IOTH, 1863 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1926 

Assets $111,776,567.46 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,550,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $565,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21rt Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haighl and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4\<) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY DE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought; FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued; CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON, ENGLAND: NEW YORK; PORTLAND. ORE.: SEATTLE. 
WASH. ; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst, Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pipe and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS. CtlLVERTS, PENSTOCKS. 

FLUMES. GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS. ETC. 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles. Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



(UaliforniaXiitifr.isrr. 

TRANSCONTINENTAL HIGHWAY 
EXPOSITION EDITION 

A beautiful number devoted to the 
opening of the Victory Highway 
and the Reno Exposition. 
Brimming with articles of current 
and historical significance. 
Splendidly illustrated. 

Second Edition 
NOW OUT — 50c PER COPY 



Finance 



The "Fireman's Fund Record" for June is a good num- 
ber. It has an article upon the subject of how insurance 
helped Lindbergh. The Ryan Airplane Company, which 
was organized for the purpose of carrying passengers 
from between Los Angeles and San Diego, and whose 
president and sole owner, B. F. Mahoney, is twenty-six 
years old, built the now famous "Spirit of St. Louis." 
Everyone connected with the building of the plane is 
under thirty. 

* * * 

There is a very determined fight being made in Europe 
against the dominance of the American automobile. This 
country is still ahead, however, in methods of mass pro- 
duction and keeps the price per pound on motor cars be- 
low the best that Europe can so far meet. Still, the cars 
which Europeans are manufacturing are beginning to 
aggregate a higher percentage in the total number of 
cars produced in the world. That percentage has increased 
from 8% to 11% since 1922. 

* * * 

It is a curious fact that California grows the finest 
dates anywhere produced. This is a new development, 
for it was not till 1901 that the government began the 
cultivation of dates in the Coachella Valley. The Depart- 
ment of Agriculture chose the best date, the Doglet-Noor, 
and, by dint of careful cultivation, has much improved it 
over its Arabic progenitor. Successful as the growth is 
the industry of raising and selling dates for the home 
market is still in its infancy. 

* * * 

J. T. Saunders, freight traffic manager for the South- 
ern Pacific, says: "Due to the expenditure of hundreds of 
millions of dollars 'for increased facilities and equipment, 
the railroads have been able to keep pace with the grow- 
ing demands of national commerce and industry in a 
period of unusual and sustained national prosperity." 

* * * 

Plans for the fourth annual Pacific Radio Exposition 
to be held in the exposition auditorium, August 20th to 
27th, under the auspices of the Pacific Radio Trade Asso- 
ciation, are rapidly being formulated. More than 80% of 
the exhibit space has already been taken. 

* * * 

It seems incredible that we should have such savages 
in our midst that the destruction of the yellow diamond 
road signs in Northern and Central California costs the 
California State Automobile Association thousands of 
dollars a month to repair. The actual expenditure of the 
Automobile Association for work on these signs has ex- 
ceeded 875,000 per year for the past three years. Repairs 
and replacements cost over $35,000 annually. 

* * * 

It is astonishing that the enormous building develop- 
ment still persists, in spite of the oft repeated warnings 
of the experts that it had reached its peak. New buildings 
are filled readily, but the question is beginning to arise as 
to how far they are so filled at the expense of the older 
ones. There is no doubt that the effect of continual build- 
ing activities has a distinctly bullish effect on industry 
as a whole. 

* * * 

One marked feature of the automobile industry this 
year has been the increase in the number of exports. 
These exports are becoming an increasingly important 
factor in the business. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Moat Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c. $1. 35c. 50c. 75c SI. DO. $1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People i 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSERfii 



fjyuzu IIuxujLlm Oruap^ 



430 POST ST.. S. 

Garfield 234 

CLIFT HOTEL 

Prospect 4700 



RAMONA STUDIO. PALO ALTO 

Palo Alto 433 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Matson Nav. Co. Steamers 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants* Lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private Dining Roomi 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystone 8100 



Weekdnys. Luncheon $ .75 

<11:30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week Days & Sundays 1.50 



No visitor Should Lea\e the City 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



NOAH'S 
ARK> 

93 Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 
11:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 
6:S0 p. m. to S :30 p. m. 
Sumiays and Holidays 
4 :S0 to 8 :30 p. m. only 
CLOSED EVERY MO\l>\> 
Half Block from Highway 







Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN 1 " ' V M TO 11:** P. M. 
l'nsurpa*scd lui.ine 




El Rjt^ 




14-Mile House 


CARL LEONHARDT 

Formerly of Golden Gate Park Casino 



^— ^ 






CAROLINE JONES 


^Kf >. 






Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 


m% 




<• 


2:30 and Tea from 3 to 5 




i 


Inclusive use of room for club dinner.* 


'**ni 


& 




TO 1 Sutter St. Douglas 711$ 




ICE CREAi% 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 

DINNER 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

STERLING ANDERSON, Manager 
Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling. Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 



1140 GEARY ST. 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 4266 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy- Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blacksmithing. 

AU' FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



Sport Clothes, too. Let's show you how well 
we can launder them. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



"The Recommended Laundry' 
250 Twelfth St. PHONE MARKET 911 

Penlnaula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 



DR. 

9tt0-*2 Kino 


B. FRANKLIN PEARCE 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

BOirn 

d Ituildine. Powell and Market Streets. San Francisco 
PHONE GARFIE1 D 





Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 








MME. M. S. E. LEE 








Pariafan Dyeing and Cleaning 




58] 


Post Street 


San Franciftf-n 


In 


Virginia Hotel 


Phone Franklin 


2510 




Carquinez Bridge 



NOW OPEN 



ON THE PACIFIC HIGHWAY BETWEEN 

CROCKETT AND VALLEJO "THE SHORT 

WAY" between San Francisco Bay Area and 

Points North 

Affording rapid transportation to all vacation points in 
Napa and Lake Counties, Russian River and Lake Resorts. 

AVOID HOLIDAY WAITS! 

No Ferries OPEN ALL NIGHT No Delays 



♦«C 



:»•♦ 



AMERICAN TOLL - BRIDGE CO. 

525 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

OSCAR H. KLATT, President Phone Douglas 8745 







<5 



c^^mbassador- 



bos Airg'eles 

Plan to enjoy Southern California's 

glorious summer climate this year at 

this world-famous hotel. 

CAM. VAN VECHTEN 

Famous Author, writing in VANITY FAIR, saya: 

TA* Ambassador is, / tbouta think, one of the very beii hoiets 
m tht world- The service is superlative, tht food ait me, 
the courtesy of management ana employee* unfailing. " 

In trie wide range of its attractions, the 
Ambuiadoi likewise excels Superb. 
27-acre park, with miniature goll course 
and open-air plunge. Riding, hunting 
and all sports, including privileges of ^ 

Rancho Goli Club Motion picture 
thtjiL-i and 25 smart shops within the 
hotel Dancing nightly to the music oJ 
the famous Cocoanut Crovi- orchestra. 

Moderate Summer Rates 
Attractive rooms with bath as low 
as $5. $6 and $7 a day single, 
from $7.00 double. 



-~V&6k 



WRITE for Chtft BookJer of 
C*Hf Rcopa ind Inlormiuoo, 

BEN U FRANK &Un*tc 




SAIL TO NEW YORK 




SISTER SHIPS 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL 
and GAY HAVANA, en route 

Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropica 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail 
Liner with seven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and 
historic ports — Manzanillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La Lib- 
ertad. Salvador; Corinto, Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone. See 
the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa. Cristobal and historic old Panama. 
Every cabin on a Panama Mail Liner is an outside one; each has an 
electric fan, and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. 
There is an orchestra for dancing; deck games and sports and salt water 
swimming tank. The Panama Mail is world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, includ- 
ing bed and meals on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return by 
rail (or vice versa) for as little as $380. (This price does not include berth 
and meals on trains.) Panama Mail Liners leave San Francisco and New 
York approximately every 21 days. Next sailings from San Francisco- 
SS COLOMBIA. July 9th; SS VENEZUELA, July 30th. From New York ■ 
SS VENEZUELA. June 25th; SS ECUADOR, July 16th. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
01 ticket agent, or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 

548 S. SPRING STREET 2 PINE STREET 10 HANOVER SQUARE 
LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 




Hollywood Plaza Hotel - 

HOLLYWOOD CALIF. 




$5.00 PER YEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO 







Saturday, July 9, 1927 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



LOS ANGELES 




r=*] Malm 




■carries your clothes on hangers 
while you are travelling 

Motorists proclaim this Wardro-Case 
to be a revelation for travelling. Its 
superior features have made it pop- 
ular with hundreds. 



[ 



Malm Wardro - Case opens 
while locked to the car or is 
removable at the turn of a key. 
Complete trunk with cover 
and rack reasonably priced at 



3 




50 




C. A, Malm & Co* 

586 Market Street 



One Hundred and Nineteenth Half Yearly Report 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 



SAVINGS 



COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th. 1863 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolida tions with other Banks 



MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



JUNE 30th, 1927 
Assets — 

United States Bonds, State, Municipal and Other Bonds and Securities 

(total value $34,565,768.52), standing on books at $31,034,977.14 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first mortgages 70,366,635.05 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities 2,003,066.35 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices (value over $l,S&5,0Uu.„u), 

standing or. books at 1-00 

Other Real Estate (value over $65,000.00). Ft.inding on books at 1.00 

Employees' Pension Fund (value over $575,000.00), standing on books at 1.00 

Cash on hand and checks on Federal Reserve and other Banks 10,521,150.00 



Total $113,925,831.54 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $109,225,831.54 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,700,000.00 

Total $113,925,831.54 

GEO. TOURNY, President A. H. MULLER, Vice-President and Manager. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 30th day of June, 1927. 

(SEAL) O. A. EGGERS, Notary Public. 



A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE- QUARTER (434) Per cent per 
annum was declared, Interest COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED 

QUARTERLY, 

AND WHICH MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Deposits made on or before July 11th, 1927, will earn interest from July 1st, 1927. 



--V ;■:■: i 



Hill 



QlSISJaijjijjaijj!^^ 

The Second Edition — Now Out 

RENO EXPOSITION and 

TRANSCONTINENTAL HIGHWAY 

EDITION 
of the 

S. F. NEWS LETTER 

AT ALL NEWS STANDS 50c 

or 

F. A. MARRIOTT, Publisher 

S. F. News Letter 

268 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Oi/afiiHSiaiSIe!Ji^^ 




Established July 20, 1856 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 



The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser w«s founded July 20 1856 bv Fr*»H«»riMr u„«»; n H j>„ki;„v. a u t^ j • . .* 

WOoT-lSSS,*.^^ ,. w!!!:'" > cSU&. on e nd ;e n ar. E $6 E io nd - Subs " ipti °" Rat « <«■*«■« "»t™«>. one year. 



California. Postoffice as second-class matter. 



Vol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JULY 9, 1927 



No. 28 



From One Thing to Another 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



A Conspicuous Failure 

In the year 1620, a band of courageous pilgrims came 
to America from the then far distant shores of England ; 
braving the perils of the deep, suffering hardship, hunger 
and disease on the tedious journey over the Atlantic. 
when travel was made only by frail sailing vessels; risk- 
ing disease, disaster and death, upon their arrival on this 
shore, and through all their days of travail, at the mercy 
of the Indians. Dissenting from the Established Church 
in their home country, they came here to worship God 
in their own way; they came to enjoy in the words of one 
of the men who founded our great Constitution, — their 
"inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of hap- 
piness." 

From this little band of stalwart Pilgrims, our wonder- 
ful America evolved; fighting always for freedom, not 
only for its own people, but for the oppressed peoples of 
other countries; "taking up the torch" of liberty to illumi- 
nate the darkest and most obscure corners of the universe 
with its beams. 

Up to the time of the world war. we prided ourselves 
on our position among the nations of the world as a coun- 
try that stood, first of all. for "personal liberty." We felt 
that in all our dealings, not only nationally but interna- 
tionally, we had carried out consistently and persistently. 
the ideals and principles inculcated in our constitution. 

Then came certain "war measures" created to contend 
with contingencies the like of which the world had never 
before staggered under; among them the 18th amend- 
ment was foisted upon the citizens of America, while the 
backbone of the country, so to speak, was busy maneuver- 
ing in the hideous game of War. 

Created at a time when America was distraught with 
great questions involving not only its own national life, 
but the lives of its brothers across the seas, it was met 
with little or no resistance by a people confronted with 
affairs bo much larger and seemingly, so much more im- 
portant. 

The following statement of Admiral Hugh Rodman. U. 
S. N. who commanded the United States Battleship fleet 
during the World War. is only one of many such state- 
ments from men of prominence, quite a few of whom 
were originally for Prohibition, but who have seen and 
admitted its utter futility: 

"In theory 1 believe in prohibition, and if it could be 
enforced 1 would back it to the utmost. 

"Practically it is a conspicuous failure, is not enforced. 



and after a number of years trial, the authorities do not 
seem to have found any solution or means of enforcing it. 

"We naturally look upon our laws as being beneficial; 
those relating to prohibition have had just the opposite 
result and have been directly instrumental in causing 
endless violations of both the moral and statutory law. 

"Formerly the Government derived a large revenue 
from its tax on alcoholic beverages. Today it spends mil- 
lions in an idle attempt to enforce prohibition. Several of 
the Canadian States tried prohibition and abandoned it 
as being impractical, and now dispense alcoholic bever- 
ages under government supervision, and profit by it mor- 
ally and financially. 

"I firmly believe that the same policy should be adopt- 
ed by our government." 



A Sane Fourth 

A natal day with less fires, explosions, accidents and 
.-.mbulance calls than has been the record for many years, 
testifies to the wisdom of the "sane" Fourth of July which 
we celebrated last Monday, in San Francisco. 

The ordinary American has always been prone to show 
his emotions by demonstrations of ear-splitting noise, 
and even in his expression of the arts, this raucous in- 
clination is still predominant. The birth of our great na- 
tion has been commemorated for 151 years by the ex- 
plosion of cannon, bombs and fire crackers, and the youth 
of the land has taken advantage of this particular license 
to make day and night hideous with various sounds. San 
Francisco, among other cities, is fostering the idea that 
on this day. we may remember the great founders of 
our Republic without the usual accompaniment of Bed- 
lam let loose in the way of racket, and that our admira- 
tion and love for our country's ideals can be indulged by 
>aner and. eventually, more educational methods, than by 
the aforesaid clamor. 

Very beautiful fireworks were part of Monday's pro- 
gram, in the evening, which took place at the Civic Cen- 
ter, and these lovely "set pieces" and other pictures in 

olorful flame, attracted a vast crowd to the classical 
Center, and also, to the neighboring hills, from which 

hey viewed the spectacle. Love of beauty is thus being 
- ngendered in the masses of people instead of love of 
•loise! 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 9, 1927 






Our Sea Eagles 

It will be thirty years, next year, since the final defeat 
of Spain marked our new arrival upon the scene as an im- 
perial power with foreign possessions and a new stake 
in the destiny of the world. The guns of our fleet an- 
nounced the coming of our majority. We had passed 
through the infantile and adolescent stages of nationhood 
and were now adults. 

Since then our progress has been rapid. We now 
stand at the head of the column of nations in material 
wealth. It is now necessary for us to show that distinc- 
tion which entitles us to the chieftainship. 

It is just at this point that the gallant record of our 
aviators comes to the rescue. We can point to these 
young men who, beginning with Lindbergh, have suc- 
cessfully braved the perils of trans-oceanic flying. They 
are our very own and show the qualities which our par- 
ticular form of civilization tends to produce. The spirit- 
ual characteristics of these flyers are such as a free re- 
public, with unlimited opportunity for self-expression, 
alone can show. They imply an individuality, which 
brooks no denial, and a fine daring which transcends the 
limitations of the merely material. That is the glory of 
our country, and these young heroes are the best exam- 
ples of its existence which we have as yet had to offer. 

What must be noted, too, is the decorous modesty 
which all of them have shown. There has been no ar- 
rogance of boasting, on the part of the heroes, whatever 
may have been the vulgarity of some of the stay at 
homes, who have tried to profit by their exploits. 

Our sea eagles are worthy of the land which produced 

them and the land is a proud mother to them. To show 

great deeds well done for no material reward, is to prove 

our national worthiness. 

* * * 

The Sick Lion 

There is a very general impression that the British 
Lion is quite sick. This conviction, on the part of the 
less well informed, has led to a flood of propaganda, 
based on that assumption and supported by rather viru- 
lent cartooning. 

As a matter of fact the real conditions do not support 
the theory. It is perfectly true that there is unemploy- 
ment on a large, but, recently diminishing, scale ; that the 
heavy industries, by which is meant the iron and steel in- 
dustries, are not in very good condition ; that the coal ex- 
port trade is shot to pieces, and that the general export 
business is not relatively as strong as formerly. These 
are, broadly speaking, the marks of weakness. 

On the other hand, the possession of natural essential 
products in parts of the Empire is beginning to operate 
to the advantage of the investors. Enormous returns from 
what are practical monopolies are offsetting the losses 
due to the present stage of industrial competition. The 
profits of colonial and imperial investments are conspicu- 
ously increasing, so that the moneys available for further 
foreign investments show no falling off, and the tremend- 
ous indebtedness due to the war is met with unfailing 
regularity. 

The dividends of the great banks are, at least, as good 
as most of our own. When we read that the Midland 
Bank was prepared to loan fifty millions of dollars to the 
Russians just prior to the Arcos raid, we become con- 
vinced that the reports of the sickness of the Lion are 



greatly exaggerated and that there is still plenty of vi- 
tality left. It would be rash to predicate anything on the 
downfall of Great Britain. Her endurance is almost 

proverbial. 

* * * 

Towards The Coast 

The survey of the principal highways leading to Cali- 
fornia from the Middle West by representatives of Cali- 
fornians, Inc., for the past six weeks, has revealed a 
movement of great importance to the future develop- 
ment of this part of the country. Thousands of family 
cars are moving westward it is reported, with California 
as an objective. The opening of the new Victory High- 
way is, of course, the main factor in this new and sig- 
nificant movement. 

There is a great interest, too, in the Redwood High- 
way and the auto movement is described as a genuine 
tourist movement, as distinguished from the flivver- 
tramp activity which was formerly too apparent. There 
is a marked decline of the latter element. Why thati 
should be so does not appear unless we are to assume that 
general prosperity has automatically removed it. 

It is notable, however, that the motorists who are now 
on the way are substantial Americans willing and ready 
to pay for their holiday. They are mostly family parties, 
who are taking six weeks or two months vacation and I 
becoming acquainted with their own land. There is no 
need to stress the point that these are the very cream of 
the summer tourist business and that the movement in 
our direction is fraught with great significance to the 
State. 

It must not be supposed that such a profitable business 
will be without competition. Great efforts will be made 
in all communities through which the stream passes to j 
hold these tourists, for the economic importance of it is 
obvious. But San Francisco and California have their 
own lure and we shall profit. It is to be hoped that the) 

new field will be sagaciously exploited. 

* * * 

The Farmer Problem 

Some of the wisest words yet spoken of the farmer 
problem were recently uttered by Dr. W. J. Cooper, state 
superintendent of education, in an address at the tenth 
annual convention of the Vocational Agricultural Teach- 
ers' Association. Said Dr. Cooper — "Until farmers are 
taught to solve their own problems they will remain un- 
solved. The big problem today is to teach the farmer 
the principles underlying the production of farm produce 
and the marketing of the product after they have pro- 
duced a crop. The relief measures that have recently 
been attempted to help the farmer would in the long run 
have proved of slight benefit." 

That is the truth. None of the bills which were pro- 
posed and which the President, bravely and wisely ve- 
toed, would have helped very much. To tell the truth, 
the whole question of successful farming is a question of 
ability and there is too little ability in the business. The 
problem is, speaking broadly, to be able to tie up the 
farming industry to the great social industry in such a 
way that farming becomes a responsible and properly ad- 
justed occupation. This means a greater supervision of! 
the efforts of farmers by responsible and informed aul 
thority. And this, in turn, means the weeding out of thel 
incompetent farmer. 






July 9, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



State interference is very little needed. Already the 
banks have begun to impose regulations upon the farmers 
in order to save their own investments. No banks want 
the land; they want the interest on their loans. The 
payment of this interest is dependent upon the prosper- 
ity, that is to say, the ability of the farmer. Hence the 
banks are beginning to encourage the able farmer and to 
destroy the incompetent. The end will be a great social 
gain. 

* * * 

The Referendum 

We feel ourselves obliged to join in the complaint which 
some of our leading journals are making against the abuse 
of the referendum. We agree that the referendum was 
never contemplated as a method of artificially intruding 
upon legislation by means of a list of signatures which 
have been collected by paid agents. To allow of the per- 
petuation of a system like this means that anybody with 
money enough can tie up the operation of legislation, 
which has passed the legislature and received approval 
by the executive of the State, for two years. 

That is the present state of affairs and it cannot but 
have a very bad effect upon the progress and well-being 
of the community if it is persisted in. No matter how 
good a law may be, no matter how necessary, if there are 
people who are opposed to it and have money to get the 
signatures to a referendum, that law is incontinently tied 
up, until the referendum is disposed of. Of course, it 
does not require a person of more than ordinary capacity 
to see that such a state of affairs is almost intolerable. 

We have never been enthusiastic about the referen- 
dum, for we are not convinced that the masses of citizens 
are competent to legislate. In fact, the declining per- 
centage of voters at elections seem to establish the slight 
capacity of the average citizen for politics. Be that as it 
may however, and conceding that the referendum might 
be valuable at times as a check on legislative extravag- 
ance, some steps should be taken to preserve it from the 
hands of those who abuse it. 

A class of professional signature-getters has arisen. 
The mere fact of signature implies nothing but clever 
canvassing. This is not healthy and we air glad to see 
that Senator Boggs is trying to find a sensible solution of 

this difficult question. 

* * » 

Safe Streets 

Oakland seems to be on the way to give us what we 
have been for years clamoring for. Her streets are grad- 
ually becoming famous tor safety from automobile acci- 
dents, which lias recently marked her attempts to regu- 
late the traffic. Since the beginning of this year Oak- 
land has had three periods of thirty days each without a 
single deatli from traffic in the streets. It is also pointed 
out that, two of the periods being consecutive, there were 
sixty days with no deaths. 

How does tliis come about, when nearly everywhere 
else the toll of death is mounting and accidents are he- 
coming the commonest events in the streets of our cities? 
In what particular does the regulation by Oakland differ- 
entiate itself from other attempts? 

The answer is fortunately very plain. Oakland has set 

to work to regulate not only automobile traffic but also 
the movements of the pedestrians in the streets. In the 
down town section where the cars are thick, there is the 
most complete and careful regulation of the movements 
of the foot traffic. .Most places have rules. Oakland en- 
forces hers vigorously. The system of signals becomes 
operative in tile hands of a vigilant police force, By 
dint of discipline, the pedestrian becomes accustomed to 
the proper crossing of streets: this, in time, again, be- 
comes mechanical, so that the labor of the police is con- 
stantly diminished as the populace learns its lesson. 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 



First Gold-Digger — I have a new sugar papa now. 
Second Gold-Digger — What became of the other one? 
First Gold-Digger — Oh, I melted him down. 
* * * 

Disarmament is a help, but what the world needs is a 
history schoolbook that reads the same in all countries. — 
Detroit News. 



This, declares a trade journal, is a wireless age. 
cept, of course, in politics. — Wall Street Journal. 



Ex- 



A minister preaches on the "ten deadly virtues." There 
used to be more of 'em. — New York Evening World. 

* » » 

Lindbergh's old flivver is being trotted out into public 
gaze. An old flivver has something of the same relation 
to a man's past as a log-cabin birthplace formerly did. — 

Wichita Eagle. 

* * * 

It appears that there are almost as many persons who 
know how to control floods as there are who think they 
can run a newspaper. — New York Evening Post. 

* * • 

The General Federation of Women's Clubs is convinced 
that girls still prefer home life, but the divorce records 
go farther and show that many girls even prefer two or 
three home lives. — Indianapolis News. 

* • * 

The last of the hairpin manufacturers of France, who 
failed, might have been saved if he could only have 
thought of some way of using them with beards. — New 
York Evening Post. 

* * * 

Our paper money is to be made smaller. Already we 
are stretching ours to make ends meet. — Greenville Pied- 
mont. 

* • • 

With the Red menance, the Yellow peril, the blue laws 
and the negro problem, this is certainly a colorful world. — 

Florence (Ala.) Herald. 

» * « 

Mussolini aspires to have the greatest and finest armed 
forces in the world. It seems to indicate that he can't 
remember as far back as 1914. — Nashville Banner. 

* * * 

China has put its first refrigerator car in service be- 
tween Shanghai and Nanking. This is an excellent indi- 
cation that they are going to keep something cool there at 
least. — Christian Science Monitor. 

* • • 

The French Government is going to put a bunch of ob- 
streperous royalists and another lot of equally unruly 
radicals in jail. It might be a pretty good scheme to 
lock them up together. — Manchester Union. 

* * • 

Almost. — "Say. that fellow over there looks just like 
.our brother." 
"Sure, he is my sister." — Northwestern Purple Parrot. 

» * * 

Another crying need is the perfection of a serum for 
lersons bitten by bootleg liquor. 

* • • 

Father — Isn't that young man rather fast? 
Daughter — Yes: but I don't think he'll get away. — Ski- 
I -Hah. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 9, 1927 





By Antoinette Arnold 




Week-End Parties 
Attract Fashionables 

Many delightful week-end parties 
have been the attractions, luring So- 
ciety folks to the various California 
resorts'. 

In every instance special events 
have either been previously staged 
for the fashionables, or they, them- 
selves, have presented and directed 
charming affairs. 

' ; Oh, to be out-in-the-open," seems 
to be the universal cry ; and every day 
groups of prominent society leaders 
make a bee-line to the country. 

More and more are we, here in 
glorious California, beginning to dis- 
cover the wealth of pleasure and gen- 
uine joy that lie at our very doors. 
There is no end to the allurement and 
the vacation attractions within the 

boundaries of our magnificent State. 
* » » 

Lake Tahoe The 
Mecca for Society 

No other place, we verily believe, 
has attractions beyond those at Lake 
Tahoe. 

Each year, this matchless Lake af- 
fords better accommodations, too — 
and there is the urge for Society un- 
surpassed by any other place of 
pleasure. 

Tahoe Tavern, with its beautiful 
hotel comforts, its varied entertain- 
ments and its perfect accommoda- 
tions, pleasures, and its excellent "ta- 
ble" is one place especially beckoning 
Society, this season. 

Many of the city's leading citizens ; 
many of the best known society folks 
have selected the Tavern for their 
Summer vacation. 

Horseback riding, motoring, tramp- 
ing, swimming, boating, canoeing, 
fast motor boat rides, golfing, bow- 
ling, tennis, and perhaps the best of 
all out-of-door sports: fishing, are 
features offered visitors at Tahoe 
Tavern. 

Dancing, in the evening, to the 
strains of lovely music played by An- 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway, Half-War Between 
San Francisco and Loa Angeles 

An Inn of Unusnal Excellence 

Wire or write for reservation* on your 
next trip south 



son Weeks' orchestra, is one of the 
pet pleasures of Society. This or- 
chestra came directly from the Hotel 
Senator, Sacramento, and offers some 
of the best music for dancing in the 

entire country. 

* * * 

San Francisco Society 
Sojourn at the Lake 

Prominent among the Society folks 
from San Francisco now stopping at 
Tahoe Tavern are: Mr. and Mrs. John 
F. Wheldon, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin 
J. Henley, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Kiddle, 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank McCrevy, George 
W. Hope, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph S. Bas- 
sett, M. L. Ryan, Mr. and Mrs. Eu- 
gene Jones, Mr. and Mrs. George F. 
Volkmann, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Hut- 
ton, Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Steenrod, Miss 
Peggy Steenrod, Mr. and Mrs. George 
E. Stiles, R. W. Gould and son, Mr. 
Dudley Sweeney, R. J. Quinn, Miss R. 
Qumn, Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Samuels, 
Miss Ford Nahr, John Shea, George 
E. Madding, Miss Clare Louise Van 
Cleave, Mrs. C. W. Spitz, Billy Spitz, 
Miss Barbara Smythe, Mr. and Mrs. 

Ivan L. Smith. 

* * * 

Oakland People 
Seek the Tavern 

The lure of fishing, the tempta- 
tions of the tennis grounds and lovely 
moonlight dancing at Tahoe Tavern 
were magnetic enough to attract 
many prominent Oakland people this 
last week-end. Among those at the 
Tavern were: Mr. and Mrs. H. P. 
Drueke, Dr. Elliott Royer, Mrs. C. C. 
Roe, Mrs. L. L. Scott and son, J. J. 

Rosborough. 

* * * 

Frontier Ball 

A Frontier Ball was given last Sat- 
urday night at the Tavern, following 
the performance of three plays in the 
Tamarack Theater. 

Pretty costumes and charming eve- 
ning gowns worn by Society matrons, 
and debutantes added brilliancy to the 
occasion. While the dresses were all 
of the latest modes, none of them 
were too elaborate. Handsome, fluf- 
fy gowns, flowered chiffons, flowing 
sashes and lots of dainty dresses 
were outstanding styles noted at the 
ball. 

Miss Esther Ehrman, who danced 
constantly, as a favorite of Tahoe 
Tavern, in many of the brilliant balls 
.of the present season wore, on one oc- 
casion, a stunning chiffon frock of 



flowered material. She had an im 
mense bow of the same material on 
her left shoulder and another chou 
exactly to match on her hip. Her at- 
tire so sweetly simple and yet of such 
quiet elegance attracted the atten- 
tion of admirers among both men 
and women. Miss Ehrman is well 
liked and has charming manners in 

addition to her beauty. 

* * * 

Berkeley Visitors 

Many from the City of Berkeley 
have been recent visitors to Tahoe 
Tavern, overlooking magnificent Lake 
Tahoe. Among the Berkeley people 
were Mrs. J. Elliott Rogers who has 
enjoyed a visit at the Tavern and Mr. 
and Mrs. John F. Rutherford. 

Oakland vacationists at the Tavern 
included Mr. and Mrs. S. E. Taylor, 
and many of their personal friends 

were entertained by the Oaklanders. 

* * * 

Burlingame Contingency 

Every year there is a certain group 
from Burliname who migrate to Lake 
Tahoe where they make their head- 
quarters for Society events at Tahoe 
Tavern. 

This season the list reads like the 
Blue-Book from Society's realm. 
Some of those who are now at the 
Tavern are: Mr. and Mrs. R. D.| 
Smith, C. J. Gannon, John B. Gordon, 
E. F. Bryan, John D. Prince, Mr. and 
Mrs. Morgan LaRue, Miss Mary 
Elizabeth LaRue, Mrs. Alexander 
Bell, Miss Nancy Bell, Mrs. C. S. 
Maltby, two children, Mrs. K. Percy, 
Mrs. W. H. Hanson, W. P. Frisbee, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ira Smith and Mrs. M. 
Mero. 

* * * 

Prima Donna Sojourning 
In the Auburn Hills 

Mrs. L. Foster Young (Anna 
Young, Prima Donna, Grand Opera) 
and her young son, Bradford Wood- 
bridge Young, are spending a vaca- 
tion period in the hillside town Ap- 
plegate of Placer County, where they 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Franciieo 

Telephone Sutter 3660 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



July 9, 1927 

are having a glorious 
out-of-door vacation. 

Anna Young will con- 
certize this Fall and 
Winter, introducing pro- 
gram numbers of unusu- 
al attractions and dis- 
tinctions. Her reper- 
toire includes some Pied- 
montese folk songs that 
have never before been 
sung in this country. She 
gives these songs in cos- 
tume and recites the 
story or legend of the 
songs before she sings 
them. One of the cos- 
t u m e s which Anna 
Young wears comes 
from Italy from Siniga- 
lia, the composer, himself, who has 
been so pleased with this California 
Prima Donna's operatic work, that 
he sends the beautiful costume for 
her to wear in her song presenta- 
tions. 

Anna Young also sings many spe- 
cial selections, written by Miss Dor- 
othy Crawford, a San Francisco com- 
poser, and dons some exquisitely 
dainty French costumes, with white 
wig and bouffant skirt, in singing 
groups of Old French songs. 

Anna Young is the daughter' of Dr. 
and Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge of 
Roseville, Placer County. Mrs. 
Woodbridge, the Hon. Cora Wood- 
bridge, is prominent in legislative 
circles of this State, having been 
elected three times to the California 
State Assembly. She is a distin- 
guished speaker and a general favo- 
rite wherever she goes in prominent 
men and women's gatherings. 

* * * 

Soroptimists 

Members of the Soroptimists Club 
this past week held their Interna- 
tional Conference at the Fairmont 
Hotel, June 28 to June 30 inclusive, 
Mary Dry Boldeman. president, pre- 
siding over the splendid events. Ma- 
bel Johnson of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce took an active 
and prominent part in all of the pro- 
ceedings and was greatly responsible 
for the smoothness and precision of 
the club deliberations. 

Delegates from other countries as 
well as those from the United States 
were contributing assets to the ex- 
cellent programs and executive work 
of the Soroptimist Club. Mrs. Louise 
Brehany. one of San Francisco's 
most prominent musicians. had 
charge of the musical programs in- 
troducing an original song written 
by Karl Schwartz, musical dfr 
and composer, 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick C. Clift 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 
Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

500 Rooms 

Tariff: From $4 per day 



have just returned from 
a delightful vacation 
trip. They were away 
more than three weeks, 
and motored as far 
north as Vancouver, B. 
C. Mr. Clift is the- own- 
er of the hotel in this 
city bearing his name. 

Santa Barbara 
People Here 

Mrs. Kent Wilson, of 
Santa Barbara, accom- 
panied by the Misses 
Myrtle Lee and Mary 
Margaret Ambrose, is a 
visitor in San Francisco 
and is stopping at the 
Clift. The Misses Am- 
brose, who graduated in June from 
the University of California, are leav- 
ing in a few days for Estes Park, 
Colorado, where they plan to spend 
the summer. 

* * * 

Detroit Folks 
Visit Here 

Among Eastern visitors at present 
in San Francisco are Mr. and Mrs. J. 
S. Heaton, of Detroit, who are at the 
Clift Hotel. The Heatons are enroute 
to Honolulu, and upon their return 
will visit relatives at Pebble Beach. 

* * * 

Miss Janet Coleman, who has been 
abroad for more than a year, having 
accompanied Miss Louise Boyd to 
Europe when the latter made her 
now famous trip to Franz Josef Land, 
will return to San Francisco about 
July 12. Miss Coleman will stop at 
Lake Tahoe, where she will be the 
guesl of Iter brother and sister in law 
Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Coleman. 

She will be here but a short time 
after her arrival, as she and her sis- 
ter. Miss Persia Coleman, will go to 
tin' Hotel Benbow. on the Redwood 
highway, for part of the summer. 

Miss Boyd, who has been East sev- 
eral times since returning from Franz 
Josef Land, is now at her San Rafael 
home for the summer. 

* » » 

Garden Wedding 

At a lovely garden ceremony 
Thursday. June 30, at the home of 
Mrs. Charles B. Cleveland at Los 
Gatos. Mrs. Cleveland's daughter. 
Louise Lord Coleman, became the 
bride of Theodore Carter Achilles. 

An altar was erected on the terrace 
in the beautiful garden. On each 
side were tall jar- of Italian pottery 
rilled with huge ->ikes of deep blue 
delphinium and large pink hydrange- 
as. Faster lilies and tall hollyhocks 
added to the state ly decorative effect. 
The bridal aisle was marked by a row 
■d in Italian jars. 



Wears Boue Frock 

The bride wore a dainty Boue 
frock, made over a slip of flesh color 
and with it a rose colored picture hat 
unornamented save for a large bow 
of rose velvet. Her bouquet was of 
orchids and delphinium. 

Miss Helen Caronavro, a niece of 
the bridgegroom, and Miss Nancy 
Ella Burt were the two flower girls 
and only attendants. Miss Caronav- 
ro wore an organdie frock in three 
shades of delphinium blue and little 
Miss Burt's frock was in three shades 
of lilac. Both carried baskets filled 
with dainty roses. 

* * * 

Many Attend 
The Wedding 

Many relatives and friends of the 
bridal couple attended the beautiful 
garden wedding. The sister of the 
bridegroom, Mrs. George Caronavro, 
her husband and small daughter ar- 
rived from Honolulu a week ago for 
the ceremony. Lawrence Achilles, a 
brother, and a cousin, Pritchard 
Strong, and his bride, whose mar- 
riage was a fashionable event in Ro- 
chester earlier in the month, arrived 
recently. Also Mr. and Mrs. Darwin 
Martin of Rochester, friends of the 
bridegroom's family, came from the 
East especially for the wedding. 

Tomorrow the newly married cou- 
ple, also Mr. and Mrs. Pritchard 
Strong, and Mr. and Mrs. Martin will 
sail for Honolulu. Mr. and Mrs. 
Theodore Achilles will pass their 
honeymoon at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. George Carter, on Diamond 
Head. 

The two families have long been 
prominent in the East. Mrs. Achilles 
comes of an old Maryland family and 
her husband's people formerly lived 
in Rochester, N. Y., Mrs. Gertrude 
Strung Achilles, the bridegroom's 
mother, now maintains a beautiful 

estate at Mountain View. 

* * » 

Noted Visitor 

Albert Herter, Santa Barbara ar- 
tist, whose mural decorations have 
won him wide renown, is a guest at 
the Clift Hotel. His achievements 
include a memorial for his son, who 
was killed in the flying service during 
the World war. This depicts troops 
departing for the front lines, and was 
presented to the French government, 
being now on display in Paris. Hert- 
er's most recent work is a mural 
painting for El Mirasol in Santa Bar- 
bara. Before returning to his home 

Herter will make a trip to New York. 

* * • 

Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Ziroli. who ar- 
rived from Honolulu on the Matsonia, 
are passing a few days in San Fran- 
cisco, and are stopping at the Clift 
Hotel. From here they will go to 
'itinued on page 10) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 9, 1927 




PlmsureSW^nd 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Hoore- 




Theaters, This Week 
Offer many New Bills 

San Francisco theaters, this week, 
offer many new programs with peppy 
features. 

The Curran theater, opened with 
a new stage play last Monday night 
with the presentation of "The Bark- 
er" and the Alcazar, the Henry Duffy 
theater of triumphs, will now have a 
new play, "Meet the Wife." Several 
fascinating motion picture houses are 
presenting excellent entertainment 
this week for amusements seekers. 
The offerings are good too. 
Both stage and screen will please 
you if you are eager for cheery 
amusement. 

So, go to the theaters, this week, 
and you'll find just what you're seek- 
ing, according to mood and inclina- 
tion. 

* * * 

Curran 

"The Barker," which opened at the 
Curran theater this week is one of 
the rare circus plays with sincere 
purpose — that of interesting one 
with detailed perfection and also stir- 
ring one's emotion with romantic sit- 
uations. This drama of American 
Tent Show life features the hardened 
circus ballyhoo man — the barker and 
the romances of the various circus 
folks. 

Realism is certainly an outstanding 
characteristic of this Kenyon Nichol- 
son play and the atmospheric attrac- 
tions seem so vivid at times that one 
has the urge to enter the tents and 
buy a glass of pink lemonade. But 
that isn't all by any means, for it has 
the pathos of drama, the high ten- 
sion of emotion and the underlying 
romance of those whose lives weave 
in and out of a dramatic story. 

Masterly construction is evident 
all through the play. 

Touches of well known circus life 
increase the thrilling episodes with a 
laugh tucked into each plot and sub- 
plot as the theme moves along 
through the fibre of the dramatic tale. 

Isabel Withers takes the part of 
Lou handling her part with the ar- 
tistry for which she is famed. It is 
a different character role from some 
of the recent ones in which she has 
delighted local audiences. 



By Josephine Young 

John St. Polis the central figure of 
the play as the barker portrays his 
character role with skill and handles 
each difficulty in which he becomes 
entangled with skill. He is the en- 
thusiastic showman, the very, very 
indifferent lover — and the devoted 
father all in one. 

Fanny Rice, a former stage favo- 
rite of this city, is receiving a rous- 
ing welcome from her friends here 
who remember this actress with ten- 
der emotions, and appreciation. 
Fanny Rice takes the part of the for- 
tune teller and we are glad of every 
minute that she is on the stage. Her 
work is art — art personified. 

Virginia Geary, whose role is that 
of the Hawaiian dancer, infatuated 
with the barker, has some highly 
dramatic episodes in her career — all 
of which she masters with most con- 
vincing stage work and pleasing per- 
sonality. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"Meet the Wife," with Marion Lord 
heading a new company, will be the 
Alcazar attraction beginning with 
the matinee Sunday, July 10. Lynn 
Starling is the author of this play a 
sparkling comedy with a new slant 
on the modern woman idea. There is 
gorgeous fun in this play. 

Henry Duffy has brought to San 
Francisco one of his most popular 
stars, Marion Lord, who takes the 
part of the wife in this merry new 
Alcazar play. Miss Lord has a high 
record as a comedienne and her San 
Francisco appearance in "Meet the 
Wife" follows a six months booking 
in Australia in this production where 
she made a decided hit. 

William Macauley, Robert Adams, 
Marion Strely, Richard Ehlers, John 
Stokes, Marie Sorrille and John Mac- 
kenzie are in the cast as supporting 
players. 

As might be expected the wife in 
this play is a very important person- 
age. She has maneuvered herself 
into the position of a social queen in 
her home town and she it is who is 
called upon to entertain a celebrated 
English novelist whose latest "best 
seller" has all of the women literally 
at his feet. His coming is the one 
big event in her life, but she takes 
time on the day he is to arrive to ar- 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"Meet the Wife." Henry Duffy comedy, feat- 
uring Marion Lord. 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

"The Barker." Circus comedy. 

Lurie, Geary at Mason 

"Chicaco." An outspoken comedy depictinir 
the foibles of our courts. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"The Ghost Train." A Henry Duffy mystery 
comedy. 



VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

On the screen: "The Nicht Bride." with Marie 
Prevost. Vaudeville. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Henry Santrey, bond conductor and comedian, 
heading a bill of vaudeville. 

Pantages, Market at Hyde 

Tom Mix in "The Can von of Light." Six 
"hokum" acts head by Alexandria. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 



ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 

Alhambra, Polk and Green 

"Remember," Dorothy Phillips, Saturday; "Al- 
most a Lady," Marie Prevost, Harrison Ford. 
Sunday: "The Yankee Clipper," Mon,, Tues.. 
Wed.. William Boyd. Eleanor Faire. 

California, Market at 4th 

"Resurrection." Film version of Tolstoy's 
classic, featuring.' Dolores Del Rio and Rod La 
Rocque. Scveri and the California Orchestra. 

Cameo, Market opp. Fifth street 

"God's Great Wilderness." Lillian Rich. Sat- 
urday to Wednesday. 

Casino, Ellis at Mason 

"The Dice Woman," John Bowers; "The Fron- 
tier Trail." Sat.; "Sunny Side Up." Vera Rey- 
nolds, Sun. and Mon.; "Poisoned Paradise," 
Clara Bow. 

Columbia, 70 Eddy St. 

Wallace Beery in historical him drama. "Old 
Ironsides." 

Granada, Market at Jones 

"12 Miles Out." John Gilbert and Ernest Tor- 
rence. Gene Morgan and stage presentation. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th. 

"The Way of All FleBh." Emil Janninus. Belle 
Bennett. Phyllis Haver. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"Service for Ladies." Adolphe Menjou, Clar- 
ence Kaull. Fanchon and Marco Idea. 



July 9, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



range for her daughter's marriage to 
a foppish young fool without the 
girl*s knowledge or consent. 

When the great man comes he 
brings with him the big surprise of 
the play, a surprise too good to be 

revealed in advance. 

* * * 

President 

"The Ghost Train," bringing car- 
loads of laughter, thrills and sus- 
pense, will continue to arrive on its 
regular schedule of ten trips next 
week at the President. The time ta- 
ble calls for two arrivals Sunday, 
Thursday and Saturday at 2:20 and 
8:20 P. M. and one arrival at 8:20 
during the remaining days of the 
week. 

It is a weird and creepy thing this 
"ghost train." The spectator is start- 
led and excited by it to an unusual 
degree. The mystery of its coming 
and the fun that accompanies it serve 
to fascinate and entertain the wait- 
ing travellers and the audience as 
well. 

Henry Duffy found himself con- 
fronted with many intricate problems 
in connection with the production of 
the piece, but all have been satis- 
factorily solved and the players 
themselves fairly revel in it. The 
cast includes: Earl Lee, Kenneth 
Daigneau, Frank Darien, Dorothy La 
Mar, Ronald Telfer, Helen Keers, 
Charlotte Treadway, Olive Cooper, 
Joseph De Stefani, Henry Caubisens 
and Westcott Clarke. 

* * * 

Lurie 

"Chicago," the Louis 0. Macloon 
drama is still popular at the Lurie 
theater on Geary street near Mason 
where this thrilling comedy will con- 
tinue throughout the coming week. 

Nancy Carroll is the pet of the 
play. She really deserves to — lie- 
cause she is fascinatingly attractive. 

The court room scene in this com- 
edy is well worth the price of admis- 
sion, itself. It certainly is a thriller! 

* * * 

Capitol 

"One Man's Woman." has proved 
one of the Louis O. Macloon successes 
where it is still on at the Capitol the- 
ater. Kllis street near Market. 

* * * 

Henry Santrev. band conductor. 
brings his symphonic orchestra to 
the Orpheum this coming week fol- 
lowing their successful 42 weeks in 
Australia and eight weeks in Hawaii. 

With Santrev will lie his wife 
known as Anna Seymour and her 
brother. Harry. Anna and Harry do 
a comedy act and Santrev and Anna 
have an act. Then Cantrey and his 
band make a composite act for the 
entire family. 

On this same Orpheum bill will be 



Lillian Fitzgerald, the musical com- 
edy star, so well known especially for 
her part in "The Perfect Fool." 

When Santrey and his company 
went to Australia the engagement 
was booked for ten weeks, only, but 
their popularity brought the appear- 
ances of the entire group to a full 

rounded 42 weeks' registration. 
* * * 

California 

"Resurrection," Leo Tolstoi's novel 
has been done into films at the Cali- 
fornia theater, beginning with Fri- 
day morning's showing. Edwin Ca- 
rew had the collaboration of Count 
Ilya Tolstoi, son of the famed nove- 
list in producing the story. Dolores 
del Rio the young Mexican actress 
whom many remember in "What 
Price Glory," is the star. 

Gino Severi, the director of the 
California orchestra has arranged a 
musical score to accompany the 
screening of this picture. The or- 
chestrations presented by Severi in- 
clude "Kamenoi Ostrow." 
* * * 

St. Francis 

"The Way of All Flesh," the story 
of a man who wanders into harsh en- 
vironment will follow the showing of 
"The Better Ole" on Saturday at the 
St. Francis theater. This picture 
features Emil Jannings in his first 
appearance in an American-made 
film. 

Victor Fleming directed the adap- 
tation of Samuel Butler's classic, 
whose locale we transferred from 
England to Chicago and Milwaukee, 
[telle Rennett. Phyllis Haver and 
Philip De I.acey have important roles 

in this picture. 

* * * 

Granada 

"12 miles Out" an adventure on 
the high seas, with a lot of laughter 
running through the entire plot is 
the screen feature of this coming 
week at the Granada Theater. 

John Gilbert is the star and the 
lover of the story. He takes the part 
of a young rover and adventurer and is 
as convincingly fascinating as he has 
ever been in all of his preceding tri- 
umphs. Ernest Torrence is said to 
have one of his best roles in this pic- 
ture. 

Joan Crawford has the feminine 
lead and a splendid cast of screen fa- 
vorites are in the east. 

The screen version is said to be 
quite different from the stage play. 
The Granada staKe presentation this 
week will be especially attractive. 

* * » 

Warfield 

"Service for Ladies" will be the 
screen feature of the Warfield the- 
ater this week commencing with Sat- 
urday's showing and introducing as 



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For then the food cooks perfectly, it 
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That is why the Electric Range is 
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And these new Electric Ranges are 
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8 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 9, 1927 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from page 7) 

stars, Adolphe Menjou and Kathryn 
Carver. 

This will mark the first time of the 
showing of a Paramount picture at 
the Warfield which is known as the 
home of First National productions, 
and those of the Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer studio productions. 

"Service For Ladies" the debonair 
leading man introduces Miss Carver 
in her first leading lady character 
role. 

The Fanchon and Marco specialty, 
this week, will be a novelty number 
with Walt Roesner and his Super- 
Soloists providing the musical at- 
tractions. 

Golden Gate 

Mr. Joe Frisco, late star of the 
Ziegfeld Follies, and originator of 
the Frisco dance, which has been imi- 
tated more than any other step ever 
presented on the stage, heads next 
week's bill at the Golden Gate. Frisco 
has not been on the Coast for several 
seasons and is offering a novelty this 
year from the fact that he is work- 
ing alone. A lot of bright new stories, 
some original fun and his famous 
dance with the cigar and derby, and 
several other nifty dance steps make 
up his offering. 

A strong screen play for the week 
is Marie Prevost's newest comedy re- 
lease, "The Night Bride." In this 
story Miss Prevost plays the part of 
a modern young woman who rushes 
into the home of a confirmed woman 
hater when she discovers her fiance 
in the arms of her sister. How she 
eventually wins the hard-hearted wo- 
man hater for a husband is told in a 
series of very funny and exciting 
situations. Harrison Ford is the wo- 
man hater and Robert Edeson has a 
third featured role. 

Burt Shephard, "the Australian 
Whip King," is a second important 
act on the new bill. Shephard will 
stage a series of the most daring 
stunts and fancy manipulations ever 
offered with a whip. He is assisted 
by a pretty girl. 

The usual list of short films, includ- 
ing Aesops Fables, a news reel, a 
comedy, and Claude Sweeten's music, 
with four other acts yet to be an- 
nounced, fill out the bill. 
* * * 

Tamarack Theater 
At Tahoe Tavern 

Every season California adds some- 
thing interesting in the way of out- 
door dramatic performances. The lat- 
est venture, which proved successful, 
was the presentation last Saturday of 
three Indian masks by Hartley Alex- 



ander in Tahoe Tavern Tamarack 
Theater, a pine-pillared amphitheater 
on the edge of Lake Tahoe. 

Mrs. Marion Craig Wentworth, 
author of "War Brides," directed the 
plays, which were acted by a strong 
cast of professionals with Francis 
Josef Hickson in the leading roles. 
Hickson was supported by Miss 
Esther Gilbert — who proved to be an 
ideal Indian girl, — Walter Phillip 
Farrell and George Fisher, all of them 
fine types. 

The masks chosen were "Carved 
Woman," "The Weeper" and "His 
Voice Is a Whisper," each founded on 
a tribal legend. The principal parts, 
differing greatly in their character- 
ization, made a severe demand on Mr. 
Hickson, who proved himself to be 
endowed with rare powers of inter- 
pretation. He has the gift of convey- 
ing strong emotions subtly and he 
moved his audience to quick response. 
In addition to a voice that he uses ef- 
fectively, he has a symmetrically de- 
veloped body through which he is 
able to express much. The Indian 
roles afforded him opportunity to re- 
veal his versatility and he played 
with undeviating restraint, which is 
the result of good training as well as 
natural intelligence. 

The performance was given as a 
feature of the Tavern's annual Indian 
Ceremonial Day, which brought to- 
gether a large group of Washoes and 
Piutes from California and Nevada. 



Columbia 

"Old Ironsides" will remain as a 
screen attraction at the Columbia 
theater, Eddy near Powell, where the 
James Cruze production shows Amer- 
ican history and romance from a 
thrilling viewpoint and features 
many remarkable inventions as addi- 
tional attractions. 

Cruze has given us many notable 
productions and this picture "Old 
Ironsides" is completely consistent 
with the high ideas of picture per- 
fect. The sailing of the old ship and 
its stately appearance all through 
the thrilling episodes make "Old 
Ironsides" a photoplay long to be re- 
membered as a cinema achievement. 

Wallace Beery and George Ban- 
croft are central figures. 
# * 

Summer Symphony 
Fourth Concert 

Bruno Walter, famous conductor, 
was accorded a real San Francisco 
ovation last Tuesday night at the Ex- 
position Auditorium, when the fourth 
of the Summer Symphony concerts 
was given before a record audience. 

This marvelous musician merited 
the enthusiasm that positively ran 



riot on the evening of July 5, especi- 
ally after his gorgeous reading of the 
Tschaikowsky Overture - Fantasia, 
"Romeo and Juliet" and the Schreker 
Overture to "The Birthday of the In- 
fanta." 

It seems to me that never have I 
heard such an interpretation of Wo- 
tan's "Farewell and Magic Fire Spell" 
from the Wagner "Die Walkure" as 
that which Bruno Walter spread be- 
fore us as a memorable insight into 
the Brunhilde emotions. The dis- 
tinguished conductor's interpreta- 
tions, also, of the other two Wag- 
nerian numbers ; Prelude and Love 
Death from "Tristan and Isolde" and 
the Overture to "Rienzi," the latter 
of which closed the memorable pro- 
gram, will long be the topic for mu- 
sical discussions wherever classical 
appreciation is expressed. 

Especially gorgeous was the pow- 
erful music-drama of the Love Death 
so often too tremendous in its effects. 
But, under the baton of Bruno Wal- 
ter, we felt not only the melodic- 
forms and the remarkable skill of the 
composer, but there was a sense of 
supreme satisfaction, musically. The 
restless, irresistible passions of the 
characters in the story were modu- 
lated into a transport of exquisite 
love ; while grief, itself, took on a 
newer significance under the inter- 
pretative skill of the famous Bruno 
Walter. 

Shouts of "Bravo!" "Bravo!" were 
heard at the conclusion of the last 
concert and many lingered in the au- 
ditorium filling the vast spaces with 
prolonged applause as the final notes 
faded away or tucked themselves 
away somewhere in the beams or 
draperies of the Civic Auditorium as 
a memento of another great event in 
the musical history of San Francisco. 



Pantages 

Starting Saturday Pantages will 
present six "hokum" acts, headed by 
Alexandria and his gang of funsters 
in a routine of comedy songs and 
dances. Alexandria is Pantages lat- 
est importation and has for years 
been a favorite in Europe. 

Other featured acts on the program 
will include Bobby "Uke" Henshaw, 
ukelele player, in a skit entitled "Take 
It Easy," and Joe Phillips in his play- 
let, "The Osteopath." 

On the screen Tom Mix and Tony 
will be seen in "The Canyon of Light." 
Mix has the role of Tom Mills, army 
captain in the French battle front se- 
quences that figure important in the 
production. Many of the scenes were 
filmed in Yellowstone National Park. 



July 9. i:27 THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Anniversary Celebrated at Aladdin's 




Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Mooser 



Today, July 9, Mr. and Mrs. Sam- 
uel Mooser celebrate their fifty-sixth 
wedding anniversary and at the same 
time, Mr. Mooser's eighty-sixth 
birthday. 

The couple were married in Sac- 
ramento on July 9, 1851, and both 
still enjoy the best of health, a thor- 
ough enjoyment of life and a wide 
circle of friends. 

Their two daughters, the Misses 
Hattie and Minnie Mooser, who con- 
duct the Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room, 
are celebrating their parents anniver- 
sary by giving a tea in the afternoon 
at the Aladdin. To this, any couple 
who has been married for as long a 
period as Mr. and Mrs. Mooser. or 
longer, will be cordially welcomed and 
share honors for the afternoon. 

A son, George Mooser, lives in New- 
York. The family has always been 
identified with the theatrical and Bo- 
hemian element of San Francisco. 
The Aladdin is the rendezvous of the 
player folk and has been for the six 
years that it has been operated. 



sons, all of San Jose ; Mrs. J. A. Hou- 
lihan and Miss Helen Houlihan, both 
of Piedmont and Miss Geneva Hack 
of Sacramento; Mrs. John Harold 
Philip and John H. Philip, Jr., Mrs. 
F. B. King, Miss F. King, and Miss 
Berndell, Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Griffin. 
Mr. and Mrs. C. V. Jensen, Mr. and 
Mis. G. H. Hart and Miss Jane Hart, 
all of San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank R. Devlin, Miss Ruth Devlin, 
Miss Denis Devlin and Miss Marion 
Devlin, all of Berkeley. 



At Santa Maria Inn 

The following people have been 
fuests at the Inn during the past 
iveek: .Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rutledge 
uul Miss Genevieve Rutledge. all of 
San Francisco: Mr. and Mrs. E. YV. 
tadtmuller of San Francisco: Mr. 
IBd Mrs. Shirley C. Ward of Los An- 
jeles : and Mrs. Chandler Ward of 
Pasadena; Mrs. E. G. Singletary and 



Dahlia Show. 1927 

With the added impetus of its be- 
ing the official flower of San Fran- 
cisco, the dahlia show, to be held as 
usual this year at the Palace Hotel. 
September 1 and 2, promises to be a 
most imposing affair. The San Fran- 
cisco Dahlia Society. T. A. Burns, 
president, will hold the show for the 
benefit of the dahlia fans of the bay 
region. This will be the 12th annual 
show to lie held in Sin Francisco, and 
all the veteran growers are grooming 
their dahlia bushes -.> that they will 
produce the largest and best blooms 
possible. Among the famous gar- 
dens owners that will show this year 
are: Bessie Boston. Jessie Seal, Jim 
Davies. Frank Pel: mo. Mrs. H. T. 
Hennig. Carl Salba h. and a large 
number of others. An added attrac- 
tion will be a spet .1 display of del- 
phinium and gladioli from some of 
the best collections in the state. 




N W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA. CALIF. 

The Finest Meals in the 
VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms — Clean Linen — Clean Everything 
Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

TELEPHONE 110 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
active. Hot Sulphur Water. Tub Baths and 
Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN. Agua Caliente. 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or se* Peck-Judaa 



WHEN IN PANAMA 
MAKE 

HOTEL CENTRAL 

Cathedral Plaza 

YOl'R HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 

Andrew Johnston. Manager 



CALIENTE VILLA 

Family Resort 

CARL STEFFEN. Prop. 



frMcJi and Italian Dinners Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms - Priiale Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

Four Minntes Walk to Fetters Station. 

Sonoma County. California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F1 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 9, 1927 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 5) 

San Pedro, where Mr. Ziroli will join 
the U. S. S. Maryland of the Pacific 

Fleet. 

* * * 

James D. Dole, who is sponsoring 
the official Hawaiian flight in Au- 
gust, was the guest of honor at two 
affairs during the week, at the Clift 
Hotel. 

The first was a luncheon of the U. 
S. Naval Academy Alumni Associa- 
tion, at which Dr. W. F. Durand, 
aeronautical authority, spoke on 
problems in flying. 

On Friday, Mr. Dole was honored 
by the San Francisco Citizens' Flight 
Committee at a luncheon affair at 
The Clift. 

Mr. Dole has been spending several 
weeks on the mainland and expects 
to leave Wednesday (July 6) on his 
return home to Honolulu. 

* * * 

Movie Ball 

One of the best known directors 
on the Metro-Goldwyn Mayer lot at 
Hollywood will direct the one reel 
picture, featuring seven winners in 
the Screen Star Opportunity contest 
which closes on the night of the 



MISCELLANEOUS 

SYNOPSIS OF THE ANNUAL STATEMENT 

OP 

Realty Mortgage Insurance 
Corporation 

of San Francisco in the State of California on the 
31st day of December, 1926, made to the Insurance 
Commissioner of the State of California, pursuant 
to law. 

ASSETS 

Real estate : $ 1,638.16 

Mortgages and collateral loans 105,350.00 

Bonds and stocks and certificates 303.000.00 

Cash in company's office and in banks 6,937.24 

Premiums in course of collection None 

Bills receivable 324.07 

Other ledger assets 92,773.21 



Ledger Assets $510,022.68 

NON-LEDGER ASSETS: 

Interest and rents due or accured $ None 

Market value of securities over book value None 
Other non-ledger assets — Equity in Mort- 
gage Loans „ 29,581.75 



Total gross assets $539,604.43 

Deduct assets not admitted 82,777.32 



Total Admitted Assets $456,827.11 

LIABILITIES 

Net unpaid claims, except liability and 

workmen's compensation $ None 

Special reserve for unpaid liability and 

workmen's compensation claims None 

Estimated expenses of investigation and 

- adjustment of claims None 

Total unearned premiums on unexpired 

risks None 

Commissions and brokerage due or to be- 
come due None 

All other liabilities 185,314.45 



Total Liabilities (except capital and 

surplus) $185,314.45 

Capital $316,850.80 

Surplus 45,338.14 271,512.66 



Total Liabilities. Capital and Surplus $456,827.11 

J. M. HENDERSON, Jr., 

President. 
CHARLES C. BOWEN, 

Secretary. 



Movies' Ball, July 23, at the San 
Francisco Civic Auditorium. 

Search for a girl who can truly 
represent San Francisco on the 
screens is being continued and will 
be underway, in dead-earnest by 
June 29, all applications having been 
registered previous to that date. The 
only requirement for registration is 
that the applicant be over 18 years 
of age, and that she is a resident of 
San Francisco or the Bay region. 
Headquarters for this event are at 
the Loew-Warfield Building, rooms 
507 and 508, the center of the cam- 
paign. 

Thirty or more girls have already 
qualified for the contest, the major 
prize being a screen test in the Met- 
ro-Goldwyn Mayer studio and in the 
Harold Lloyd Studio at Hollywood, 
covering a period of two weeks, with 
all expenses paid, and the Christie 
Hotel as headquarters. 



Students of Music 
Give Fine Program 

A successful and interesting pro- 
gram was given by pupils of Miss 
Helen Schneider at her piano studio 
on Hayes street last Saturday eve- 
ning. Among the participants were : 
Francis Huntley, Jr., Doris Balkan. 
Chelsea Smith, Alice Dudack, Lucille 
Ghiggia, Gertrude Heskins, Anita 
Hilkens and Raymond Hilkens. Miss 
Schneider with Mildred Magnus, gave 
a musicianly interpretation of Mo- 
zart's Second Symphony arranged for 
two pianos. Helen Schneider is mak- 
ing a great name for herself in the 
musical world — she is so thoroughly 
a musician. 

* * * 

Charles Edison, son of Thomas 
Edison, and chairman of the Board 
of Directors of the Edison Company, 
with Arthur Walsh, president of the 
phonographic division of the Edison 
Company, two important figures in 
the present day reproducing instru- 
ment world, will come west to attend 
the 4th Annual Convention of the 
Western Music Trades, July 11, 12, 
13, 14 and 15 in San Francisco. 

H. Atwater Kent, president of the 
radio company, will give a dinner to 
delegates at the St. Francis Hotel. 
Among the artists who will entertain 
are Allan McQuhae, tenor star of the 
concert and opera stage and Carolyn 
Cone-Baldwin, pianist. 

The Victor Talking Machine Com- 
pany will also give a dinner, and 
dance during the convention with 
Victor artists as entertainers. 

According to Shirley Walker, sec- 
retary of the convention, a record at- 
tendance is expected. The program 
is designed to include social and en- 
tertainment features for delegates as 



well as interesting and instructive 
sessions. 



Ahwahnee Hotel 

A brilliant gathering will mark 
the opening of the Ahwahnee Hotel, 
the spectacular new hostelry in the 
Yosemite Valley, on July 14. While 
the occasion will be official, the ho- 
tel being under government direc- 
tion, a number of society people will 
join the federal and state officials in 
making the opening dinner and re- 
ception a social function as well. 

Among those who have received of- 
ficial invitations to participate in the 
festivities are : Governor and Mrs. C. 
C. Young, Mr. and Mrs. Gaillard 
Stonev, Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Zeller- 
bach, Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Hale, Mr. 
and Mrs. Duncan McDuffie of Ber- 
keley ; Dr. and Mrs. Emmett Rixford, 
Mr. and Mrs. James Tyson, Mr. and 
Mrs. William Sproule, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. F. Moses, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Mer- 
ritt. Miss Annie Florence Brown of 
Oakland ; Mr. and Mrs. James B. 
Duffy of Los Angeles. 



Prettv Wedding 
At Whitcomb 

Miss Emma Rice, daughter of Mrs. 
Frank Rice, of 31 Farragut Avenue, 
was married on last Monday evening 
to Mr. Martin Castell. The ceremony 
took place at St. Michaels Church, 
Rev. Father O'Reardon performing 
the ceremony. The wedding was im- 
mediately followed by a dinner at the 
Hotel Whitcomb at which the wed- 
ding party and intimate friends were 
present. 

The bride wore a bouffant frock of 
white taffeta, with embroidered tulle 
veil and carried a shower of white 
sweet peas and lillies of the valley. 




It 



>HCT[10 GRAPHS 

Q(/z>e Forevt 



orever 



July 9, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 





]M®KyTfiE>LU 




30NGAREE SKETCHES, by Dr. Ed- 
ward C. L. Adams. Published by 
University of North Carolina Press. 
Price $2.00. 

Interesting sketches of the Conga- 
ree Swamps, which have been told 
;o the author by the inhabitants, who 
ire natural-born story tellers of the 
;rue Negro type. In the author's 
lotes we learn that the word "Conga- 
•ee" is "perhaps the last surviving 
vord of a lost language — the speech 
>f the vanished Congaree Indians 
ivho once inhabited that region." 
That "there are no more Congaree 
ndians living, but many of the Neg- 
oes of the district plainly have In- 
lian blood." 

The stories plainly are of Negro 
>rigin — they are full of the supersti- 
;ion of that race, teeming with its 
ear of goblins and ghosts. The older 
nembers have great faith in the su- 
)er-natural and strongly advocate 
eaving alone those things which can- 
lot be explained to their simple 
ninds. 

The pretty little legend of the 
'Purtty Little Folks" is a little gem, 
10 totally different from the rest that 
ve are not surprised when the au- 
hor tells us that it is probably from 
foreign source. The suggestions 
n "The Falling Star" and "Don't 
iturb a Houn" deal more with the 
piritual than the superstitions. "Old 
iister" is clever and can be appreciate 
d by everyone, everywhere, as the 
leroine is not confined strictly to any 
larticular locality. All sections of 
he world suffer from the species, but 
t takes the inimitable old Tad to fol- 
ow her into Heaven and Hell and re- 
ate her experience there. 

All in all, they are amusing little 
ketches and prove more interesting 
vhen read than they might seem on 
he surface. 

* * * 

HE STARLING, by Doris Leslie. 
The Century Company, publishers. 

Price $2.00. 

A story of the modern type told by 
n author who prefers to remain true 
o her title at the sacrifice of its 
amesake. 

Mania really seems to be the 
itarling itself, in reverse incarnation. 
Jo one can blame her for her cry to 
et out from behind the bars that im- 
rison her. Her cage of a home is 
awdry. her surroundings unsympa- 
thetic. She has to rely on her 
>eauty and her wit as her talents are 



Edited by Florence DeLong 

not strong enough to carry her far, 
and there is no money for plumage'. 
She cannot get what she wants and 
does not want what she can get. The 
bitter-sweet of the forbidden fruit is 
not to her taste. 

At last, realizing that she is grad- 
ually losing everything that in her 
heart she longs for, with drooping 
head she accepts the inevitable and 
resigns herself to the existence which 
has claimed her from the begining. 
Poor little Starling! There are many 
such in a humdrum world. We hope 
that "by this time next year," she 
will be happy. 

* * * 

FLOWER PHANTOMS, by Ronald 
Fraser. Boni & Liveright, pub- 
lishers. Price $2.00. 
Rather a novelty in the line of 
story telling. Judy is a lover of flow- 
ers, being one of the assistants in 
charge of Kew Gardens. Her lover 
is unable to follow her into her realms 
of ecstacy where she absorbs each de- 
tail of the plant life so completely 
that the flowers become a part of her. 
He delights, however, in confusing 
her with her conceptions, naming her 
after each flower whose characteris- 
tics she seems to assume for the mo- 
ment. Her brother, however, is not 
so complimentary. 

Her imagination running riot, she 
eventually conceives an orchid so 
beautiful that to her it is a living, 
breathing soul with which she be- 
comes enamoured. In her intoxica- 
tion, the phantom becomes real. 
Pygmalion and Galatea again, in dif- 
ferent surroundings. 

After her delirium has passed, she 
realizes that her agony has not been 
in vain — that she has succeeded in 
producing a dream child, of some- 
what freakish character, it must lie 
confessed, but which will prove a sue- 
in the material world which is 
always looking for something new. 
The process of creation is not easy : 
but her brother is shrewd, her lover 
wise. We welcome the return to nor- 
malcy, hut extend our sympathy to 

the lover in the •'ever after." 
» • « 

At Paul Elders 

Miss Edith Cobuni Noyes. direc- 
tor of the Edith Coburn Noyes' 
School of Boston, w give a series of 
Thursday afternoon drama talks and 
readings in the P.. ;1 Elder Gallery 
during July and A rust. The series 
will start July 14th at 2:30 o'clock 



with C. K. Munro's popular satirical 
comedy, "At Mrs. Beam's." Other 
plays to be read by Miss Noyes are: 
Noel Coward's "Fallen Angels"; W. 
Somerset Maugham's "The Constant 
Wife" ; Noel Coward's "The Vortex", 
and Alfred Sutro's "The Two Vir- 
tues." 

She will also give a program of 
short stories and verse by A. A. 
Milne. Miss Noyes is most distin- 
guished in her art, not only because 
of her marvelous power of self-efface- 
ment, but because of her sympa- 
thetic, broad and careful research 
and study of the literature pertain- 
ing to her programs. 



Proper Training 

Football Coach (to applicant for 
place on team) — "What experience 
have you had?" 

Applicant — "Well, last summer I 
was hit by two autos and a truck." — 



Books that are reviewed in the New, Letter 
can he ohtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Poit Street San Franriiro. Calif. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY ITBL-.C — INSURANCE 
BROKER 

1«8 CROCKER BUILDING 

{Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Franetaco Phone Kearny 391 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Sprinia" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

119 CLARA STREET— GARFIELD -II 



\. LOVE JOY 

WILL BRING 

ORDER 
Out of Chaos! 

In your Books. 
Financial Statements 
Income Tax Reports 

Expert Auditor 

PART-TIME SERVICE 

268 Market St- Room 101 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 9, 1927 






RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




C. J. Pennington 

Radio Show 

Through the co-operation of all of 
the large broadcasting stations of the 
San Francisco bay region, plans are 
under way for the presentation of de 
luxe broadcast programs each day of 
the fourth annual Pacific Radio 
Show. This announcement was made 
here yesterday by Leo J. Meyberg, 
chairman of the show committee of 
the Pacific Radio Trade Association, 
under whose auspices the exposition 
is given. 

The broadcasting will be done in a 
sound-proof glass enclosure, in full 
view of the big show audiences. The 
entertainment will be heard by the 
show visitors by means of special 
loud speakers that will mark another 
step forward in tone reproduction on 
a large volume scale. 

All of the favorite artists of radio 
land will be seen and heard at these 
programs. Insofar as possible, it is 
planned to provide the public an op- 
portunity of meeting the individual 
artists, many of whom have ex- 
pressed their willingness to auto- 
graph photographs and mementos of 
the occasion. 

The special events program is un- 
der the direction of A. B. C. Scull, 
chairman, who declares that the en- 
tertainment this year will surpass 
anything ever attempted. There will 
be a daily change of program and spe- 
cial features that will assure a record 
attendance throughout the show, he 
says. 

The Radio Show will be held in the 
exposition auditorium August 20th 
to 27th. It has become recognized as 
the most extensive showing of the 
radio industry on the Pacific Coast. 
Incidentally, it has the distinction of 
being the first show of thu season 



anywhere in the United States and 
therefore commands an unusual 
amount of attention from the manu- 
facturers of receiving sets and acces- 
sories. 

According to Anthony A. Tremp, 
who is again directing the show, 
practically all of the space has been 
taken, and the character of exhibits 
already signed up pre-determines the 
scope and scale of the show as the 
biggest yet in the history of the west- 
ern expositions. 

* # # 

KPO Komment 

After a "barnstorming" trip around 
the country, in which he sang from 
nearly fifty of the most prominent 
broadcasting stations of the land, 
Maurice Gunsky, KPO'c popular tenor 
and composer of song "hits," returned 
home last week and will be heard 
again from KPO by his thousands of 
admirers of the Pacific Coast. 

Gunsky's trip, which included a 
portion of Canada, was a most suc- 
cessful one in every way and his sing- 
ing of his own compositions and those 
which are now popular Victor rec- 
ords, was praised everywhere. He ap- 
peared before the microphone of the 
largest stations in the East and was 
accorded a wide response from all the 
radio audiences. The KPO favorite 
will be heard frequently on the Mon- 
day night Variety programs of KPO. 

* * * 

"Musical Motoring" is becoming a 
popular outdoor sport through the 
agency of radio and the increasing 
portability of receiving sets. In order 
to make good music easy for motor- 
ists to get by radio on their vaca- 
tion trips, the California Petroleum 
Corporation has inaugurated a "Cal- 
pet Radio Hour" on Friday evenings 
from 8 to 9 o'clock from KPO, the 
Hale-Chronicle station of San Fran- 
cisco. Programs covering a wide 
range in musical entertainment and 
satisfying the tastes of every type of 
listener, will be presented by the Cal- 
pet orchestra and soloists. The range 
will cover the entire musical field 
from jazz and popular melodies to 
the better known symphonies and 
operas. 

Johnny Wolohan, popular San Fran- 
cisco orchestra leader, will head the 
group of Calpet artists who have been 
chosen because of their known musi- 
cal versatility. 

* * * 

The California Petroleum Company 



has achieved a wide reputation for 
pioneering in the broadcasting of 
opera through a combination hook- 
up with KPO and KFI. 



Network Complexities 

It may surprise listeners to learn 
that in a growing number of the 
larger broadcasting stations practic- 
ally every word that is spoken by the 
announcers from the time the station 
begins in the morning until it con- 
cludes at midnight is written out. 
Not only that, but it is even more 
surprising to learn that what appar- 
ently seem impromptu speeches have 
been drafted two or three weeks 
ahead of time. Just as actors are fed 
their lines and get their cues, so is 
it becoming with radio announcers. 

As network broadcasting increases, 
announcing by numerous announcers 
becomes more complicated. What one 
man says must dovetail into what an- 
other immediately following him has 
to say. There must be no repetition, 
and the whole thing must move ahead 
on a split-second watch time sched- 
ule. 

The reason is that studio program 
directors are as a rule vastly more 
concerned as to how long it may take 
a man to say a thing than they are 
with what he is going to say, al- 
though there must be necessary pre- 
cautions with regard to the latter. 

The result is that practically every- 
thing that is said in a radio station, 
not only by those delivering set 
speeches, but, as has been said, by an- 
nouncers, is written out in advance. 



President's Wife KFI Fan 

Word has been received in Los An- 
geles that Mrs. Calvin Coolidge 
spends many of her evenings at the 
summer White House in the Black 
Hills of South Dakota listening to 
broadcast station KFI in that city. 
She is greatly enjoying this feature 
of her vacation inasmuch as for the 
past two months she has been un- 
able to hear this station in Washing- 
ton, D. C, on account of atmospheric 
conditions. 

The wife of the president is quite 
an ardent radio fan, getting a par- 
ticular enjoyment out of listening to 
distant stations. She has logged over 
one hundred stations in various parts 
of the country, and it is said that she 



July 9, 1927 

has heard KFI one hundred and thir- 
ty-two times. 

* * * 

No Diminution in 
Summer Broadcasting 

An optimistic view is taken of the 
forthcoming Summer's broadcasting 
by the National Broadcasters' Asso- 
ciation, which declares :"From what 
information we have been able to ob- 
tain regarding the Summer schedule 
of the larger broadcasting stations 
they plan no diminution whatsoever, 
but, on the contrary, plan to make 
the coming Summer schedules the 
best that broadcast listeners have 
ever had. Not only are these stations 
planning to maintain the present 
high standard of their programs, but 
many are to add special features." 



Behind the Microphone 

Estelle Heartt Dreyfus' name is 
well known and well beloved by all 
music lovers of the Southland. There 
is a warmth in her voice and a glow in 
her tone, which combined with the 
almost tangible joy which she puts 
in her singing, characterize her as a 
sincere and fine artist. 

She it was who sang the first song 
from super station KFI in Los An- 
geles years ago. It was Stevenson's 
"Salutation of the Dawn" and each 
time she presents a program at KFI 
she receives many requests for the 
number from receptionists who re- 
member the auspicious first night on 
the air. 

A pleasing feature of Mrs. Dreyfus' 
KFI recitals is her own announce- 
ments and notes on the songs. She 
has a rich, speaking voice, velvety in 
its smoothness, beautiful diction, and 
an excellent choice of words, which 
fire the imagination. 

It is to be hoped that she will be 
heard again on the air within the 
very near future, as those who have 
heard her consider her singing one of 
the most distinctive features which 
has been broadcast, 



Summer DX 

G. Edward Elwell. Jr.. famous log- 
ger of distant radio stations is still 
pulling them in. despite the summer 
humidity at his home in Bloomsburg, 
Pa. A log of KFI's program for the 
night of June 21 has been received by 
officials of that station. He reports 
that there was considerable atmos- 
pheric disturbance, but that he was 
able to hear the program on his loud 
speaker. This is considered remark- 
able reception for the summer sol- 
stice, when most receptionists are 
contenting themselves with programs 
from stations near at hand. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



DAILY PROGRAM BRIEFS 
Week of July 24, 1927 

Saturday, July 30, 7:30 p. m. 

Felipe Delgado's Media Hora Es- 
panola presented each Saturday eve- 
ning at 7 :30 at KFI always pleases a 
large audience of lovers of Spanish 
music. Senor Delgado is known as 
California's greatest interpreter of 
Spanish songs, and is assisted by 
Edna Clark Muir, pianist. This Sat- 
urday's program will be made up en- 
tirely of request numbers. 

Friday, July 29, 7 p. m. 

Alex Reilly's Aeolian Organ Re- 
citals broadcast every Friday night 
at 7 o'clock by KFI is one of the most 
consistently popular programs on the 
air. Mr. Reilly is rated as one of the 
finest artists of his kind in California 
and has the happy faculty of incor- 
porating in his recitals the selections 
which please the greatest number of 
people. 

Thursday, July 28, 9 p. m. 

KFI announces that the Sullivan 
light opera "The Mountebanks" will 
be broadcast from that station for the 
National Broadcasting Company on 
Thursday at 9 p. m. The Gilbert and 
Sullivan pieces are enjoying a popu- 
lar revival at present and the NBC is 
easily in the vanguard in their pres- 
entations. 

* * * 

Wednesday. July 27. S p. m. 

Those who like the better type of 
popular and ballad music will enjoy 
KFI's program on Wednesday at 8 
p. m.. when the Calpet String Quar- 
tet, under the direction of Chieo De 
Verde and Calpet Male Quartet, and 
Paul Roberts, tenor, are scheduled to 
appear. All of these artists have 
proved their worth and artistry be- 
fore the microphone in the past, and 
an entertaining hour may be ex- 
pected. 

* * * 

Tuesday. July 26, 8 p. m. 

Three of KFI's finest artists are 
programmed for 8 o'clock on Wed- 
nesday night from that station. Nellie 
Callender Mills, violinist. I.ilyan 
Ariel, pianist, and James Burroughs, 
tenor, are all well known to recep- 
tionists and their performances give 
evidence of real artistry and appre- 
ciation. 



Monday. July 2r>. 7 
Gene Johnston's 

Monday night at 7 
will present a nun 
tunes by a Collegi 
Craig Leitch. 
the intermissions 
the orchestra. Tl 
distinctive about tl 
and the number 



p. m. 

Music Boy Hour 

o'clock from KFI 
iber of new dance 
te Orchestra, with 
jlar tenor singing 
and choruses with 
lere is something 
is weekly program 

requests received 



each Monday night is conclusive proof 
that the audience is large and en- 
thusiastic. 



Sunday, July 24, 6 p. m. 

An exceptional hour of concert 
music will be presented at KFI at 6 
o'clock on the evening of July 24, by 
the Santa Anita Trio. These versatile 
musicians are well known throughout 
Southern California, and their recent 
debut on radio has greatly popular- 
ized their artistry. 



Superior First Aid 

Nell: "If a man tried to flirt with 
you, would you call a policeman?" 

Bell: "No, a minister." — Florida 
Times-Union. 



"Grandpa's a hundred and three 
years old today, doctor." 

"Isn't that splendid! And does he 
read or do anything?" 

"No, 'e don't seem to 'ave no am- 
bition for nothin'." — Pearson's Week- 
ly. 



CLUB 
AUTO SERVICE CO. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 

For All Occasions 

Day and Niprht 

City Sichtaeeine ..... $3.00 per hour 

Shopping 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips. Taxicah Rates 



PROSPKCT 

1000 



585 Post. St.. 
San Francisco 



Phone Sutter SS78 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve 4 Company) 

CI.OCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime. Antique and Complicated Clacks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENLE 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mate* Counties 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Oliee «nd W.rk.: K3S Mi.ti.n St. 

Phone Merket 7911 

Branch Of ire: 7M Softer Street 

i Hotel Canterbury Bids.) 

Pfce.De Preepect »<.4S 

Work Called for and Delivered 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 9, 1927 




PIONEER 



The 
Name 

on a box of office 
stationery, whether 
it be typewriter pa- 
per or manuscript 
cover, means com- 
plete satisfaction. 
There is a grade for 
every need. Ask 
your printer or sta- 
tioner to show you 



' preHTTTVn :WJM4:U( samples 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 



Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Max Rosenthal 

WHERE GOOD TAILORING 
COSTS LESS 

A choice selection of seasonable 

Woolens suitable for Formal, 

Sport and Business wear is 

now ready for your early 

consideration. 

527 POST ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

OPP. OLYMPIC CLUB 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 



Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. WELLER 
National Automobile Club 

A CAR FOR EVERYONE! 

One automobile to a whole country 
of inhabitants in some of the South 
Sea Islands and one to every four and 
a fraction residents in the United 
States. That is about the difference 
in the ratio of distribution of the 
27i/> million or more motor vehicles 
in the world. 

There is one car to every sixty-four 
and a fraction people on the globe. 
This ratio is becoming smaller year 
by year due to the increasing popu- 
larity in all countries of the American 
idea of motor transportation. Im- 
proved living conditions, diminishing 
of post-war effects and a gradual en- 
richment of the working classes are 
making it possible for Mr. Average 
Citizen to have his car. 
* * * 

Highway Tuition 

A school for highway employes is 
a recent innovation in New Mexico. 
Increased road-building and a de- 
mand for experienced highway main- 
tenance men have made this step nec- 
essary. 

In many states, highway instruction 
is given by correspondence or is an 
incidental in some larger department, 
but the school in New Mexico is a 
regular departmental activity. It is 
located at Encino, has several build- 
ings and shops and a regular course 
of instruction including lectures, shop 
work and field work. There is avail- 
able for practice at least one unit of 
every kind of equipment used by the 
department. The students, carefully 
selected from many applicants, are 
paid enough to live on while taking 



the course and are given assignments 
when their study is completed. 

* * * 

Pavement from 
Cal. to Peru 

From Lima, Peru, to California, 
paved highways all the way. That 
is the hope expressed by a South 
American delegate to the recent Pan- 
American trade convention. In his 
speech urging the ultimate binding 
together of the various sections of 
the continents, the Peruvian said 
that a great amount of good will 
would be created by the contact 
brought about by such connections. 
The intercourse thus gained teaches 
the traveler that the fellow in the 
other countries is the same sort of 
human being as himself, he said. 

National animosities are fostered 
by lack of understanding and to do 
away with this misunderstanding no 
better solution than international 
travel could be found. The gentle- 
man from Peru even ventures to hope 
for an Arctic to Antarctic Highway 
which will complete the bond between 
the two hemispheres. 

* * * 

Local Roads 

The River Road from Oakland to 
Sacramento is now open and in good 
condition with the exception of one 
mile. 

This road was open ahead of sche- 
dule in order to accommodate the 
holiday traffic. No trucks or heav- 
ily laden vehicles will be allowed to 
use the road until July 15th, at which 
time the road will be open to unre- 
stricted travel. 

* * * 

Mono Lake 

Cooking soda, 92,000,000 tons of it 
within an area of 90 square miles. 
This fact never fails to interest the 
motorist who travels to Mono Lake. 

Another peculiar feature of the 
lake is that seagulls, traveling one 
hundred miles from their homes on 
the ocean, visit the the district by 
the thousands yearly, to lay their 
eggs and rear their young. Mark 
Twain was much impressed by this 
strange freak of nature. 









Lemon Squeezer 
Seldom Used 

There is a little trick which KFI 
announcers call "squeezing the 
lemon." On the announcing desk 
there is a secret button, which when 
pressed throws the station off the air. 
It is used when an artist is far off 
key, or borders on the suggestive. The 
fact that the lemon has not been used 
for over three months, speaks much 
for the quality of the artists pre- 
sented. 



July 9, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 




Distance 

We have clasped hand again, ah true, 
We have no quarrel — that is done — 
But nevermore beneath the sun 

Comes back to me that friend I knew. 



We shall break bread together; men 
May mark no difference in our ways, 
But only through my yesterdays 

The friend I loved shall walk again. 



We have forgiven — act and speech 

Have proved it. Who shall then surmise 
That space between our hearts that lies 

Unbridged — beyond all sound or reach ! 



The March 

I who was very weary, turn again 

To face the journey of the winding day. 

To take my place amid the march of men 
And be as brave as they. 



To toil — to dare— to battle — to rejoice 
Until night yields us resting place : 

And yet I have not heard my captain's voice 
Nor ever seen his face. 



Nor do I know wherefore we strive or when 
The strife shall end. 1 knew each day 

I take my place amid the march of men 
And listen — and obey. 
— Theodosia Garrison, in "The Joy o' Life. 



Elegy Written in Desperation 

The dollars toll the knell of parting pay. 

The waiter looks askance upon his tip. 
The milkman slowly plods his weary way. 

And I just curse and marvel at the gyp. 



Oft in the early morning when she parts 

From me who's thrown my money at her feet. 
Chill poverty doth grip my trembling heart: 

I see myself go foodless for a week. 



Vet I'm just one of thousands who have said. 

•'I'm tired of falling for an empty brain," 
Bui then, another wench will turn my head 

And soon I know that I'll be broke again. 

— Exchange. 




LOU W. SARTOR, Proprietor 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing: 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

OilinL' and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 

Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco, Calif. 



GRAYSTONE 130 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California . 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 BuhIi St. Monarch Garage. 1361 Bush St. 

Management of WILLIAM SAUNDERS 



TRUNKS — RACKS — BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVENUE 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 

i stabHaM 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON. General Agent 
544 Market Street. San Francisco. Cai. 
telephone surra 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 9, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1858 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1927 

Assets $113,925,831.54 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $575,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH . Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4}4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought: FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued; CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND: NEW YORK; PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, 
WASH. ; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, 



Calif. 



Western Pine and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS, CULVERTS. PENSTOCKS. 

FLUMES. GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS. ETC. 

San Francisco. Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



,os> »5*5«w. 



t£ali(ornia~Aiibrrlisrr. 

TRANSCONTINENTAL HIGHWAY 
EXPOSITION EDITION 

A beautiful number devoted to the 
opening of the Victory Highway 
and the Reno Exposition. 
Brimming with articles of current 
and historical significance. 
Splendidly illustrated. 

Second Edition 
NOW OUT — 50c PER COPY 



Finance 



Evidence as to the abounding prosperity of this dis- 
trict is furnished by the reports of the various San Fran- 
cisco Banks. We note especially the following: 

The two Crocker first banks show a remarkably even 
progress, the percentage, computing the ratio of capital, 
surplus and undivided profits, being 12.6 per cent as of 
June 30, 1927, whereas in April, 1927, it was 12.7. The 
Crocker bond holdings, two-thirds being United States 
Securities, total 828,276,146. The Crocker banks report 
§120,927,707 total resources and deposits of S97, 898,514, 
compared with S114,561,656 and 893,015,670, for these 
items on March 23, 1927, the last previous call date. 

The Bank of Italy has the largest total of United States 
Government securities in the country, with the exception 
of the First National Bank of New York. According to 
the last report of this bank, capital surplus and undivided 
profits as appeared from the statement, amounted to 
860,990,212 and deposits were 8600,846,056. The bank's 
liquid assets are 43 per cent of its deposit obligations, 
higher than almost any large bank in the country. 

The San Francisco Bank publishes a very interesting 
and prosperous report. The total assets are stated to 
be 8113,925,831.54. The amount owing to depositors is 
8109,225,831.54 and to stockholders for the amount of 
stock actually paid up, 8100,000,000. Each of the fore- 
going banks shows a steady development. 

* * * 

One of the most egregious forms of waste from which 
we are at present suffering in this community is the use of 
expensive community service, where individual commer- 
cial service would pay better. It has been pretty well 
shown, that one of our counties could save 831,000 a year 
by the substitution of commercial busses for county- 
owned busses for the transportation of school children. 

* * * 

The foregoing is no single instance. There is plenty 
of work for the California Taxpayers Association as soon 
as it can settle down to the job. 

During the last twenty years the Southern Pacific fer- 
ries have carried 474 million passengers without the loss 
of a life or serious accident through all weathers. More- 
over, the worst storms have never caused a total suspen- 
sion of the service. 

* * * 

It has been proved beyond doubt, according to the 
Fish and Game Commission, that the new method of fish 
planting adopted last year is a success. The planting of 
20,600 year-old trout, ranging from three to five inches 
in length, from the Mount Whitney hatchery to Inyo, 
Mono and Alpine counties, was carried through with com- 
plete satisfaction to the experts. This is a fine achieve- 
ment. 

* * * 

Jesse L. Lasky has come out with a pronouncement 
which may have a very important effect upon the mov- 
ing picture industry. He insists that wages must be cut 
and that overhead must be greatly reduced. There seems 
to be no doubt that the film people are awaking to the 
fact that they are carrying excessive "overhead" and we 
may expect disturbance in the industry until that matter 
is settled. 



Encouraging 

"Could you learn to love me?" 

"Well, I learned to speak Polish." — Yale Record. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 
Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c. 75c, $1. 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00. $1.50 a la Carte 
Dancin? 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 

Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 



Ucwzi/ iJ^ajjJLu, Oivopp 



490 POST ST.. S. 

Garfield 231 

CLIFT HOTEL 

Prospect 4700 



RAMONA STUDIO, PALO ALTO 

Palo Alto 433 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Matson Nav. Co. Steamers 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' Lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. <a la carte). Private Dining Rooms 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrcll and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystone 8100 



Weekdays. Luncheon % .75 

(II :80 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week Days & .Sundays 1.50 



No visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

n Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 
11:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 
5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays* and Holidays 
4 :S0 to 8 :30 p. m. only 
CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Highway 







Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN 8:M \ M TO 11:00 P, M 

I'nsurpassed Cuisine 




1 ""SOL. 






U-Mile House 


C Mil 1 BONHASDT 
Formerly of Qoldva Gate Park Casino 



^Qk 


CAROLINE JONES 


iflKf y^^k 


Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 


^ml(W 


2:30 and Tea from 3 to 5 

I'.xclusive use of room for club dinners 


* .ni.^ 


134 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 




LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

STERLING ANDERSON, Manager 
Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 4266 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy- Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blacksmi thing. 

RADIATOR WORKS 



Send us your vacation laundry. We pay 
transportation one way. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 

250 Twelfth St. PHONE MARKET 916 

Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 



DR. B. FRANKLIN PEARCE 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

aouR 

' Flood Buildine. Powell and Market Streets, San Francisco 
PHONE t; ARKIELD 5394 





Parisian Dyeing 


and Cleaning 








MME. M. S. 


E. LEE 








Parisian Dyeing i 


nd Cleaning 




583 
In 


Post Street 
Virginia Hotel 




San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 2510 




Carquinez Bridge 



NOW OPEN 



ON THE PACIFIC HIGHWAY BETWEEN 

CROCKETT AND VALLEJO "THE SHORT 

WAY" between San Francisco Bay Area and 

Points North 

Affording rapid transportation to all vacation points in 
Napa and Lake Counties, Russian River and Lake Resorts. 

AVOID HOLIDAY WAITS! 

No Ferries OPEN ALL NIGHT No Delays 



♦«C 



ruf* 



AMERICAN TOLL - BRIDGE CO. 

525 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

OSCAR H. KLATT, President Phone Douglas 8745 




Famous cuisine 

...thoughtful ser- 
vice . . . centrally lo- 
cated accommoda- 
tions win your heart- 
iest approval of the 
Alexandria. 

RATES, pcp Day, Single, 
European Plan 

120 rooms with running water #2.50 to 04.00 

220 rooms with bath . . . 3.50 to 5.00 

170 rooms with bath . . . 6.00 to 8.00 

Double, 04.00 up 

ALSO a number of large and beautiful rooms and 

suites, some in period furnishings with grand piano, 

fireplace and bath, J10 up 



Hotel 

^lexanoria. 



Los -Angfeles 



Large and well equipped Sample Rooms. 

Rancho Golf Club available to all guests 

Wease 'write for booklet. HAROLD E. LATHROP. Manager 



ft*. 



*4 



SAIL TO NEW YORK 




SISTER SHIPS 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL 
and GAY HAVANA, en route 

Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropics 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail 
Liner with seven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and 
historic ports— Manzanillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La Lib- 
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the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, Cristobal and historic old Panama. 
Every cabin on a Panama Mail Liner is an outside one; each has an 
electric fan. and there is a comfortable tower bed for every passenger. 
There is an orchestra for dancing; deck games and sports and salt water 
swimming tank. The Panama Mail is world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, includ- 
ing bed and meals on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return by 
rail (or vice versa) for as little as $3«0. (This price doeB not include berth 
and meals on trains.) Panama Mail Liners leave San Francisco and New 
York approximately every 21 days. Next sailings from San Francisco - 
SS COLOMBIA, July 9th; SS VENEZUELA. July 30th. From New York • 
SS VENEZUELA. June 25th; SS ECUADOR, July 16th. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
oi ticket agent, or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 

548 S. SPRING STREET 2 PINE STREET 10 HANOVER SQUARE 
LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 




^Hollywood Plaza Hotel- 

HOLLYWOOD CALIF. 






SAN FRANCISCO 




Ml WHITNEY 14,500 lot High 
[Highest Point in the United States) 



"But on and up, u 
Saturi's II 
amid the Hiih." — Lord He 



;' 


1 


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" 



Telephone Building 
140 New Montgomery Street 



Night View 
Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Building 




Established July 20, 1856 

SAN "||Neittta 




TKR 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20 1856 hv FrprW.w iw a .»;„t(. d„v,t i. a v. -m j ■ i «■ 

I. now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 268 Marked Street. San Francis" CaKfornta ™„&J^Z? nS 1 ^* 11 "/*?™* ™i to 1925 - 
Cal.fornia. Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornh 11 E C Lo^ndon Encland |j,£^t!?n B » r , E . n . tered a ' San fanc.sco, 

$5.00. Foreign, one year. $6.00 Canada', one yea'r $6 00 Subscr.pt.on Rates (mcludmg postage), one year. 



Vol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JULY 16, 1927 



No. 29 



From One Thing to Another 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



No Thrill Left? 

This is an age of startling mechanical inventions; an 
age of monstrous international schemes and warfare ; an 
age of colossal engineering achievement, and at the same 
time, of individual attainment unsurpassed by any other 
period or time. 

San Franciscans may hold conversations over the phone 
with people in London; we will be able soon, not only to 
hear voices overseas, but also to behold the speakers ; we 
separate continents, and tunnel through lofty mountains ; 
we turn rivers from their original course ; we descend 
"20,000 leagues under the sea" ; we interlace the poor be- 
wildered globe with a network of wires ; we harness tum- 
bling tons of water power and make it do our bidding ; we 
become brothers to the stormy petrel and fly thousands 
of miles across the ocean ; we have apparently mastered 
sea and land, and now we are mastering the very skies 
above and about us ; we wait no longer on time and tide. 

The ones who "blaze the trail" receive the acclaim ; 
whatever is accomplished by their followers, no matter 
if the journey has been longer and more arduous, is bereft 
of the first flaming enthusiasm from the fickle populace. 

People in general are commenting on the poor reception 
afforded our Hawaiian fliers, last Tuesday. Not only was 
the "parade" (if one can so designate it) a pitiful at- 
tempt, hardly more than a "corporal's guard," but there 
was a lack of appreciation in the thin crowd which lined 
Market Street, a lack of that ardor which greeted the lone 
eagle, Lindbergh, on his arrival in New York. Did we 
bestow so much enthusiasm on Lindbergh that we had 
none left for these intrepid airmen, whose journey across 
the Pacific was even a longer one than Lindbergh accom- 
plished? 

We. whose boast has always been that "San Francisco 
knows how," repudiated our famous slogan, surely, last 
Tuesday morning! 



The "First Lady" 

A pessimistic scientist lias stated that human beings, 
in the next titty years, will be bald, blind, deaf and unable 
to use their legs ! 

Statistics show, if I remember rightly, that there is an 
automobile to every 3'-j persons in America: (incident- 
ally. I belong to the other half!) and an inclination on the 



r art of people in general to save shoe leather by motoring. 
"Why pay $15.00 a pair for shoes," they ask; "when for 
ten or fifteen dollars a month you can meet installments 
on the reliable old 'Lizzie' and bundle in the whole family 
into the bargain?" Why, indeed? 

Walking used to be considered the cheapest sport in the 
category of athletic occupations; but Shank's mare is no 
longer popular as a money-saver even with the "op- 
pressed (?)" working classes. Janitors, bootblacks, win- 
dow washers, — all, all drive their own cars; only a few 
seedy artists, poets, editors, college professors are still 
compelled. to shake their legs instead of shaking their 
chassis. 

And now comes the "First Lady of the Land," our ad- 
mired Mrs. Grace Goodhue Coolidge, who may bring back 
to millions of pairs of deteriorating legs, the gentle art 
of walking. Mrs. Coolidge is a walker who thinks nothing 
cf covering eight or ten miles a day, and enjoys it im- 
mensely. In spite of her many, and at times, no doubt, 
displeasing duties, she finds time to indulge in healthful, 
normal exercise, that incurs no expense, like golf or 
tennis, and has been in style since the Garden of Eden 
first lured man into its fascinating confines. 

Walking should be revived as a fad by the fashionables ; 
the bourgeoisie will soon follow suit. 



Birthday of 
Fargo Bank 

During this past week, the days of the pony express 
and stage coach, the time when depositors paid banks to 
keep their gold, came to mind, when the Wells Fargo 
Bank and Union Trust Company, the oldest financial in- 
stitution in the West, celebrated its seventy-fifth birth- 
day. 

Way back in 1852, the bank got its start buying gold 
d ist. From that inception, when San Francisco was a 
small town of shacks and tents, nestled in hills of blowing 
sand, up to the present great city of palatial homes and 
monstrous sky-scrapers, the Wells Fargo Bank has stood 
for all that is substantial, efficient, modern and trust- 
worthy in the financial world in this community. Freder- 
i k L. Lipman is president. Charles J. Deering. executive 
vice-president. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 16, 1927 






THE PACIFIC ACES 

The return of Lieutenants Maitland and Hegenberger 
is an event of first class importance in the history of this 
community. It is well that it should be so regarded and 
that the heroism and daring which made their feat pos- 
sible should have been appreciated by our fellow citizens. 

The flight was a matter of particular concern to the 
whole of the Pacific Coast, but more than all to San Fran- 
cisco itself. The future of aviation was greatly strength- 
ened by the exploit and the future of aviation is bound up 
inextricably with the future of our dealings with the 
Orient and our own island possessions in Hawaii and the 
Philippines. 

The venture showed two or three things of first class 
importance. It proved the value of the type of plane, 
but that is not so important, for of course planes will 
change their type. It did show, however, that radio sig- 
nals can be used as guides and that small islands can be 
readily located from enormous heights with certainty 
and precision. It also proved that one can map out a 
plan for air travel and actually carry it out with some 
degree of certainty, though this latter fact may be said 
to have been fairly well demonstrated by European ex- 
perience. 

But all of these things are very essential in the forma- 
tion of the actual and practical organization of air travel 
and in order that they may be shown, some such experi- 
ence as that of the two men we have honored, was neces- 
sary. 

The work must be followed up. The best way to ac- 
claim our heroes is to carry on their job. We must have 
a great flying base here, from which we can send forth 
our fleets of air vessels which will in time be launched to 
the glory of our country and the advantage of San Fran- 
cisco. 

* * * 

PHELAN AND ROLPH 

There is no man whose opinion on political affairs is 
more deserving of respect than in that of ex-Senator 
James D. Phelan, whose career in local politics was one 
of distinction, and whose national record as U. S. Senator 
reflected the greatest credit upon himself and the com- 
munity which sent him to Washington. 

In the history of San Francisco we have had no Mayor, 
at least since Mr. Phelan's own term of office, which is 
at all comparable with that of Mayor Rolph, who ever 
since 1911 has maintained a very high standard of gov- 
ernment and who had with entire credit piloted the city 
through dangerous and troublous times. 

It is pleasant to see that Senator Phelan has expressed 
his opinion of the career of Mr. Rolph as Mayor in no 
uncertain terms. We note that in a recent interview, 
Mr. Phelan is reported as saying that Rolph is his own 
logical successor and "none can reasonably deny that fact 
if he closely studies the Mayor's actions while he has 
been in office." Mr. Phelan also points to a fact upon 
which we have dwelt at times in former editorials, that 
is, that "Mayor Rolph is the most widely and favorably 
known San Franciscan in the world and thus is the city's 
best advertisement everywhere." 

That is a great deal to say, but it is no more than the 
simple truth. The Mayor, in addition to his gifts as a 
municipal expert, is endowed with that inexplicable and 



invaluable quality, which belongs to very few, of favor- 
ably impressing himself upon the world in general and of 
provoking responses of regard and esteem and even of 
affection, from comparative strangers. 

This means a great deal to the city. It is one of those 
intangible which Bismarck said create destiny. We have 
a marvelous asset in our Mayor. 

THE BRIDGE QUESTION 

So we are not to have a bridge over the Bay, because 
such a bridge might be an impediment to the moving of 
battleships, in the case of a quite imaginary war, to occur 
at some time, which is not even predicated. This ap- 
pears to be a little far fetched. We have every confi- 
dence in the judgment of our naval authorities in con- 
crete naval matters, but we have an idea that, as pro- 
phets, they are no better equipped than any one else to 
give an opinion. 

The welfare of San Francisco is no hypothetical ques- 
tion. It is a matter of immediate and definite concern. 
There is no doubt at all that the erection of a bridge over 
the bay is very important to the future and even to the 
present of this city, for values are influenced by the pos- 
sibility or non possibility of rapidity of movement and 
the opening of new avenues of transportation and com- 
merce. We are confronted with a reality against which 
a mere hypothesis has no standing. 

Even the hypothesis is subject to criticism. Rear Ad- 
miral William S. Sims, for whose judgment, it may be 
said at once, we have the greatest respect, says that the 
battleship is no longer the mainstay of the navy ; that 
the submarine and the airplane have "clipped its wings." 
He recommends that battleships be sent up the Missis- 
sippi well out of the way in the next war and that sub- 
marines and airplanes take the front offensive. And we 
know very well that Great Britain in the last war care- 
fully cuddled her battleships in Scapa Flow. 

Of course, if our bridge were a risk to the country, we 

should be willing to make a sacrifice, but hardly to such 

a bugaboo hypothesis as has been stated. 
* * * 

DUCK PROTECTION 

It is not long ago since carts used to make the rounds 
of the San Francisco streets, selling ducks in season. 
Most of us can remember that very well. It is now some 
years since we could buy wild ducks in the markets and 
the restaurants have been forbidden to serve them for 
these many moons. To the older ones among us the 
recollection of duck and its festive accompaniments on 
rainy days, in the old fashioned eating houses, brings the 
sigh of regret. 

Now, it is probable that the United States government 
will be called upon to furnish protection for the breeding 
of wild ducks and a place of refuge for them round 
Klamath Lake. It is proposed to survey Klamath Lake, 
Malheur Lake, in Oregon, California lands along the San 
Joaquin River and the marsh country of Utah. It is even 
designed to eliminate the alkaline deposits in these sec- 
tions so that ducks may breed in comfort. To meet this 
expense a fund has been raised by the United Duck Club. 

The biological department of the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture looks with favor on the plan and there is 
little doubt that the federal government and possibly, 
also, the state governments, will be called upon to provide 



July 16, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



appropriations so that the ducks may have good places in 
which to rear their families and make future sport pos- 
sible. It is hard to see, however, how public funds can 
be used to sustain a sport which has now become so lim- 
ited and for the development of which private preserves 
from which the public is carefully excluded, have been 
found necessary. 

The foregoing, however, plainly reveals the revolution 
which has occurred in the life on the Pacific Coast. It is 
little more remote than yesterday since duck shooting 

was the easiest and least expensive of sports. 

* * * 

CUSTOMER OWNERSHIP 

In a recent speech to the Pacific Coast Electric Asso- 
ciation at Santa Cruz a short time ago, Commissioner 
Leon A. Whitsell of the Railroad Commission stated that 
there was in this State a large increase in customer own- 
ership of public utility securities. There are, he said, 
in this State, approximately 250,000 citizens who have a 
direct financial interest in the electric service companies. 
It is through this customer ownership that the utilities 
companies have been largely able to finance themselves 
at home. 

This customer ownership shows very plainly a com- 
plete confidence on the part of the public in the operation 
and success of the public utilities companies and is a proof 
of the esteem in which they are held by the masses of the 
citizens. It is the simplest and most conclusive reply to 
the criticisms which are levelled at the companies by the 
irresponsible press. People do not invest their money in 
enterprises which they do not esteem and in whose con- 
duct they have no confidence. The public utility com- 
pany serves the public. It is appreciated in proportion to 
the degree and kind of service which it renders. Appre- 
ciation of that service is shown by further public invest- 
ment. This is a perfectly natural and logical sequence. 

The reason for this result is a matter of argument. 
The strong upholder of the state commissions says that 
it is due to public regulation and points to the fact that 
the regulation of public utilities has reached a more 
highly developed plane here than elsewhere. The advo- 
cate of non-interference on his part insists upon the ability 
and high mindedness of the corporate management. 

* * * 

BABSON AND OURSELVES 

There is no more reliable and esteemed financial expert 
in the United States than Roger Ward Babson. His eco- 
nomic forecasts and estimates are received with the 
greatest respect. All over the world his opinion is re- 
garded as sound and reliable. When he says, therefore, 
as he did, here, the other day, that "If statistics mean 
anything, the Pacific Coast will be the most active and 
densely populated section of the United States in the fu- 
ture," it is no empty declaration. 

There is nothing new in this to most of us here who 
have foreseen this development, signs of which have lie- 
come more and more apparent as the tide of international 
trade has set to an ever increasing extent in our direc- 
tion. The awakening of Asia and the ever growing de- 
mands for the products of civilization on the part of those 
great masses of people resident in the Orient creates an 
illimitable market. This Coast must be the distributing 
point for the greater part of the products of the western 
world and this in turn means increasing population and 
vastly increasing wealth. 

Here, around the Hay of San Francisco, will be the cen- 
tral point of that distribution and the cities within that 
area, will develop with enormous celerity and accumu- 
lated energy. For, as the activity connected with this 
extension of commerce shows itself, there will be a move- 
ment of wealth and population to the point of contact 
between the Occident and the Orient. 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 



Auntie (arriving on beach) — Well, my dears, looking 
for pretty pebbles? 

Nephew — No, we've forgotten where we've buried 
Uncle. — Humorist. 

* * * 

Politician — How'd you like to be elected president by a 
unanimous vote of the people, Senator? 

"Impossible!" 

"Not at all. I'm going to get up a third party, and call 
it the Morons' League." 

* * * 

Artist (to friend) — See that picture over there? Well, 
I painted it, and a million wouldn't buy it! 

Friend — Well, I'm one of the million ! — Ohio State Sun 

Dial. 

* * * 

"I'm happy and all that, of course, old chap; still, I 
wish my wife wouldn't talk so much about her last hus- 
band." 

"Forget it — mine's always talking about her next." — 

Tit. Bits. 

* * * 

The trouble with the School of Experience is that the 
diploma begins with the words: "Here lies." 

* * * 

One reason for the divorce evil is that people don't 

divorce evil. 

* * * 

Vicar (to his sidesmen) — As I shall be preaching on 
"Thrift" this morning, I think it would be advisable to 

take the collection before the sermon. — Passing Show. 

* * * 

Pappara — How can you bear to fiddle while Rome is 
burning? 

Nero — It's the best I can do — the saxophone hasn't 

been invented yet. 

» * * 

"Oh, waiter — what is this you've brought me?" 
"Why, that's bean soup, sir." 

"Of course, it's been soup, but what is it now?" — 
Louisville Satyr. 

» • * 

Visitor — Say. chappie, can you tell me. . . . 
Collegiate — Yes; but it will take me a half hour to 

to get it. — Brown Jug. 

* » « 

Old Friend — How did your children turn out? 
"First rate. Moira's bootlegging and Aloysius is hi- 
jacking — I only hope they don't come into conflict." 

* * * 

First College President — What is the difference be- 
tween a beautiful and a dumb stenographer? 

Second College President — You can fire the dumb one. 

— Wesleyan Wasp. 
« » * 

Bobbed hair is easy to comb and doesn't catch on a 

man's coat buttons. 

« • » 

Traced to the Source 

Small Boy in the Country — No, mama, I won't drink 
this milk. I will drink milk that comes from a wagon; 
but do you know where they got this milk? They pulled 
it out of a cow. — Pointer. 

The real millennium will come when the pedestrian 
and the motorist shall lie down together. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 16, 1927 





OGieT 





By Antoinette Arnold 



July Finds Favor 
With Happy Brides 

July, so it seems, is competing, fav- 
orably, with the month of June for 
happy wedding days. 

This year, apparently, there are 
not enough days in June for wedding- 
ones and so the sister month of July 
is liberally sharing honors in record- 
ing nuptials. 

Why not? July is wonderful. Flow- 
ers are marvelous, the sunshine is 
radiant and there is everything to en- 
courage July — month of rubies and 
joy — for merrily tuned marriage 
bells. 

So ring out — wedding bells, from 
June through December and make 
this world lovelier! 

Besides — young folks will get mar- 
ried anyway. So, let's be co-partners 
and cheer them along their way ! 
* * * 

Birmingham Wedding One 
Of Elegance and Charm 

St. Luke's Church, this past week 
(on Thursday, July 7, to be exact), 
was the scene of one of the most 
charming and really elegant weddings 
which has ever taken place in San 
Francisco. 

The bride, Miss Eleanor Birming- 
ham, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. 
Birmingham, was truthfully a picture 
of loveliness. She is such a pretty 
girl, so naive and attractive — and in 
her bridal gown she looked as if she 
had just stepped out of some charm- 
ing story-book, as she walked up the 
aisle of the church to become the 
bride of Lieutenant Ralph Harold 
Henkle, United States Navy. 
It was a tulle wedding. 
The bride's snow-white wedding 
gown was made entirely of white 
tulle — yards and yards of tulle form- 
ing tiers of filmy ruffles. Her wed- 
ding veil fell from an elegant orange- 
blossom cluster fastened at the back 
of her head while a most becoming 
arrangement of orange blossoms en- 
circled her pretty face. 



As she stood before the altar tak- 
ing her marriage vows, her bridal 
veil fell the entire length from the 
altar down onto the steps leading into 
the sanctuary. Never have I seen such 
an exquisite wedding veil. In fact, 
the whole wedding was a vision ! 

Miss Alma Birmingham, the cele- 
brated pianist, sister of the bride, 
came out from Chicago to act as 
maid-of-honor. Her dress was also of 
tulle, rose pink, made with many ruf- 
fles, with a large picture hat match- 
ing it in color tones. She carried a 
shower bouquet of roses the same 
shade. ,-,., 

Four bridesmaids wore tulle gowns, 
beruffled alike, and with shower bou- 
quets and tulle riats to match. The 
blending colors ;) vere of shades of 
green worn by two bridesmaids ; and 
orchid color worn by the other two 
bridesmaids, who were Misses Vir- 
ginia Hart, Audrey Kirkbride, Fran- 
ces Boyd and Mrs. Walter Leach. 

They were all — so attractive, so 
youthful and charming! 

Each one of the bridesmaids car- 
ried a huge shower bouquet of sum- 
mer flowers. 

Yes, the bride's bouquet was a 
shower, but it was one of the most 
beautifully arranged bridal bouquets 
we've seen this season, and was en- 
tirely of lilies of the valley with 
strands of filmv ribbons. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway, Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



Flower Girl 

Little Jane Dunne, whose blonde 
hair was so pretty, and who wore a 
frock of pink tulle, was the flower 
girl at Miss Eleanor Birmingham's 
wedding. Her basket was filled with 
flowers of rare pink combinations. 

Jimmie Dunne, attired in a natty 
sailor suit, was an escort of dainty 

little Jane, his sister. 

* * * 

Famous Singer Mother 
Of Pretty Bride 

Mrs. Lillian Birmingham, one of 
California's most famous contralto 
singers, is also known for her excel- 
lent taste in dressing. At her daugh- 
ter's wedding she wore a dress which 
attracted admiration. It was made of 
June rose gorgette, with which she 

wore a hat to match. 

* * * 

Navy Officers 

Lieutenant John Richmond was 
best man. The ushers were Lieuten- 



ant-Commander Callahan and Lieu- 
tenants U. S. N. Elles Hugh Geisel- 
mann, W. P. Clark, and H. W. 
Toomey, all of the Mississippi, the 
ship of the bridegroom. 

As the bridal party passed out of 
the church the navy officers formed 
the customary aisle with raised 
swords which is always so fascinat- 
ing to those of us who love this sight 
and value it significance. 

Rev. W. W. Jennings of St. Luke's 
Church officiated at the ceremony, 
with Rev. Frederick Clampett, who 
had baptized the bride, assisting in 
the marriage ceremonies. 

Dr. J. Humphrey Stewart, another 
old-time friend of the Birmingham 
family, came up from his San Diego 
home to play the wedding march for 
the beautiful bride and added just an- 
other touch of real sentiment and 
loveliness to this perfect wedding. 
* * * 

Home Reception 

A reception to intimate friends and 
relatives was held at the home of the 
bride's parents on Pierce street im- 
mediately following the wedding. 

Distinguished relatives who came 
West to attend Eleanor Birmingham's 
wedding included Mrs. Ferdinand 
Dorries of Buffalo. Others present 
were: Mr. and Mrs. Carl Kraft, Dr. 
and Mrs. Howard Fletcher and Mr. 
and Mrs. George Gunn. 

Lieutenant Henkle is the son of 
Charles B. Henkle of Indianapolis. 
After a honeymoon trip the young 
couple will locate at San Pedro where 
Lieutenant Henkle is stationed. 

The Birmingham home was gorge- 
ously decorated in pastel shades for 
the reception, where a sumptuous 
wedding feast was served, while ex- 
quisite music was part of the wed- 
ding day and, upon request, song se- 
lections were sung by Lillian Birm- 
ingham, mother of the adorable bride. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3660 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



July 16, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Honor Bride 

Mrs. LeRoy Linnard, bride of the 
well-known hotel manager of the 
Fairmont Hotel, was the honor guest 
at an elaborate society eventlgiven by 
the California Hotel Women's Club of 
which Mrs. John Zeeman is president. 

The affair took place at the newly 
opened Benjamin Franklin Hotel, San 
Mateo, last Tuesday, and during the 
day many special events were intro- 
duced in compliment to Mrs. Linnard. 

Hotel men of the district were wel- 
comed in the evening, when an elab- 
orate dinner dance was given by the 
hotel club women. 

Prominent members who have been 
away on vacation were welcomed 
home — Mrs. Florence Lombard and 
Mrs. A. C. Grimm. Mrs. Lombard has 
just returned from a three months' 
trip to New York via the Panama 
Canal. Mrs. Grimm has spent several 
months in Honolulu. 

* * * 

Burlingame Fetes 

One hundred young people of Bur- 
lingame have formed a dancing club 
to meet at the Burlingame Country 
Club during their vacations from 
school. The first meeting took place 
last week. 

The patronesses of the dances as- 
sisted in making the evening a suc- 
cess. They are Mrs. Robert Hender- 
son, Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent, Mrs. 
Robert Hays Smith, Mrs. Lewis Car- 
penter and Mrs. Walker Salisbury. 

Members of the club include Miss 
Isobel McCreery, Miss Patricia Tobin, 
Miss Janet Whitman, Miss Sybil 
Coryell, Miss Barbara Carpenter, Miss 
Heath Hamilton, Miss Florence Mc- 
Cormick, Miss Evelyn Taylor, Miss 
Inez Mejia, Miss Marianna Casserly, 
Miss Marianne Avenali, Miss Gloria 
Ames, Miss Genevieve Hart, Miss 
Dale King, Miss Katherine Stent, 
Miss Elena Musto, Miss Daisy Bell 
Overton. Miss Elizabeth Vincent, 
Miss Virginia Webb, Miss Laura Doe, 
Miss Peggy and Miss Evelyn Salis- 
bury, Miss Sallie Ordwav, Miss Mary 
McCarthy. 

Also Messrs. Harry Poett Jr.. Wil- 
liam Sullivan. Fentress Kuhn, William 
Kuhn, Charles Bancroft, Val Scales, 
Robert Girvin, Mark McCann Jr., 
John Shortridge, James V. Coleman, 
William H. Taylor. Corral) Plant. 
Lent Hooker. Geiger Lee. Russell 
Pratt. Albert Ames. Charles McCor- 
Blick Jr.. Walter Newhall. John Hayes 
and Xieol Smith. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Carpenter and 
their daughter, Miss Barbara Carpen- 
ter, gave a large dinner at their home 
in Burlingame in advance of the dance 
and entertained the patronesses and 
about twenty young people. 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 
Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

500 Rooms 

Tariff: From $4 per day 



Dances and Many 
Diversions at 
Lovely Tahoe Tavern 

Week-end parties at Tahoe Tavern, 
especially this past week, included 
many novelties. 

Dances, motion picture filming and 
special programs drew large numbers 
of summer residents from various 
other Lake Tahoe resorts to the Tav- 
ern. 

Venetian night, July 16, will be un- 
usually elaborate for which prepara- 
tions have been made under skillful 
management and with much thought. 
Miss Marjorie Day has charge of the 
program for tonight's celebrations. 
Saturday, July 16, and under the full 
moon which now travels the skies 
there will be an Italian street bazar 
established on the Tavern pier. Pretty 
girls will offer wares to visitors and 
every one taking part is pledged to 
appear in Italian costumes. 

An illuminated boat parade will be 
held on the Lake at 9 o'clock with 
sailing crafts of all kinds in the spec- 
tacular event. After the parade there 
will be an Italian buffet supper in the 
Casino with Italian troubadours pro- 
viding the music and the program 
features. Then will follow — dancing 
to the lilting and tantalizing music of 
the Tavern Orch stra directed and 
conducted by Anson Weeks. 

Special races are -cheduled for Sun- 
day. July 17. and as a large number 
of entries are already registered the 
event promises to be of exceptional 
interest. 



Prominent Personages 

Many prominent California fami- 
lies and many d 'inguished people 
from various part- of the country are 
registered at Tahoe Tavern, where 
there are too many good times to miss 
and too many wor lerful events to let 
escape. 



Prominent among the present visi- 
tors from San Francisco at Tahoe 
Tavern are: Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. 
Daniels, Miss Beatrice Horst, Miss 
Helen Horst, Mr. and Mrs. B. S. Berry, 
Miss Muriel J. Aldrich, Downey Saun- 
ders, Oliver Fountain, Miss Inez M. 
Oldham, Miss Lilian McClintic, Mr. 
and Mrs. F. R. Short, Nancy Short, 
Mrs. Belle Congdon, Mr. and Mrs. Roy 
Arnold, Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Stanley, 
Mr. and Mrs. Kirkham Wright, Mr. 
and Mrs. George D. Keller and child, 
Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Rivinius, Mr. and 
Mrs. M .E. Pinckard, Miss Dorothy 
Pinkard, Mr. and Mrs. C. 0. Carlston, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. George, Miss Isa- 
bel George, Miss Frances George, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. A. Schearer. 

Many from Berkeley, the Univer- 
sity City, are sojourning this year at 
Tahoe Tavern which increases in 
popularity all the time. They include: 
Mrs. E. Bushwalter, Mrs. Edward de 
Laveaga, Miss Lucia de Laveaga, Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Menning. From Oak- 
land, those at the Tavern include Mr. 
and Mrs. P. Von An, Mrs. Edward 
Watson, Miss Betty Watson, Miss M. 
E. Kerr, Herbert E. Dow, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. P. Crossley, Miss F. Archer, 
Miss J. N. Hodge. Piedmont: Mr. V. 
E. Pay, Mr. H. A. Mosher, Dr. and 
Mrs. Homer T. Craig. 

* * * 

Mrs. Levin Has Vacation 
Near Los Gatos Foothills 

Mrs. Al Levin and son, young Ed- 
ward Levin, are spending a delightful 
vacation at Los Gatos where they 
have been for several weeks. Mr. 
Levin, the prominent theater man of 
Northern California, motors down 
evenings from San Francisco to Los 
Gatos to be with his family. 

* * * 

Yosemite Guests 

Dean Wilmer Gresham of Grace 
Cathedral, and Mrs. Gresham are 
spending vacation days in Yosemite 
Valley and stopping at the Yosemite 
Lodge. 

Will C. Wood, State Superintendent 
of Banks, and Mrs. Woods are at 
Camp Curry, enjoying the wonders 
of the great National Park. 

* * * 

Prominent Visitors 

Among recent arrivals of interest 
in the army set are Lieutenant and 
Mrs. Warren J. Clear, who are at the 
Clift Hotel. Lieutenan Clear has been 
stationed at Fort Benning, Ga., and 
has come to San Francisco to report 
for duty with the 30th Infantry. 

* * * 

Horace Darton. son of Mrs. Frank 
Ainsworth by a former marriage, will 
visit his mother here. He is vice- 
president of a bank in Houston, Tex. 
He will remain several weeks. 
(Continued on page 9) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 16, 1927 




Pleasure's Ww 



obey no wand bui pleasures 

_ 75/77 Aloone. 




By Josephine Young 



"San Francisco Knows 
Its Drama and Wants 
Nothing But— 'Drama' " 

Now, comes along young Edward 
Belasco, younger brother of David 
Belasco, and this brilliant and far- 
seeing young man points out the likes 
and dislikes of San Francisco's audi- 
ences. 

It's refreshing to hear this young 
Californian speak of his profession — 
the profession which has made the 
name of Belasco an honored one, 
throughout the civilized world. 

Edward Belasco knows audiences 
from one coast to the other. Of the 
West, he says: 

"San Francisco will have none of 
the patently risque plays." Then, in 
emphatic words does this young the- 
atrical man declare: 

"For twenty-five years I was with 
the Alcazar company here and I have 
had ample opportunity to observe the 
public's likes and dislikes. Never in 
all that time have San Francisco au- 
diences patronized a patently risque 
play. 

"People, here, do not pay their 
money to support salaciousness." 
Then adds Edward Belasco: 
"I am proud of the attitude of San 
Francisco people. They recognize 
what is really artistic. They differ- 
entiate between 'dirt' and drama." 

Greetings, from our hearts ,Mr. 
Belasco ! 

Young ideas — like yours — are mak- 
ing dramatic history and, an appre- 
ciative people shall turn the tide in 
your favor, and generation now in 
the budding, shall arise and pronounce 
you: 

"True to the Belasco ideals!" 
* * * 

Curran 

Madge Kennedy, with Sidney Black- 
mer, Mary Marble and Percy Haswell 
will begin an engagement in "Love 
in a Mist" at the Curran Theater, the 
opening performance to be Sunday 
night, July 17, following the closing 
performance today, Saturday, of "The 
Barker," a colorful comedy featuring 
John St. Polis, Isabel Withers and 
Virginia Cleary. 

Belasco, Butler and Davis in asso- 
ciation with Charles L Wagner are 
presenting the versatile Miss Ken- 
nedy and an excellent supporting cast. 



"Love in Mist" comes here after 
its successful run' of ninety-one weeks 
engagement in the East and will, no 
doubt, pack the Curran Theater dur- 
ing its performances here. 
* # * 

Lurie 

"Chicago" will complete its engage- 
ment with this coming week's per- 
formances at the Lurie Theater on 
Geary street near Mason. 

This Louis 0. MacLoon comedy hit 
features Nancy Carroll in one of her 
best character roles, in which she 
portrays the pai-t^of Roxie Hart. Good 
acting and suspense with the lure of 
"the unexpected" are uppermost feat- 
ures of this play with lines which 
classify it as comedy-drama, although 
there is much to stir one's desper 
emotions. 

Clark Gable commends himself not 
only for his good acting but because 
he does appear as a real reporter — 
and heaven knows the stage seldom 
gives us the "real" from newspaper 
fields or editorial offices. Reporters 
have unusual intelligence (most folks 
admit) — but oh, the way the play- 
wright draws them — is a crime. Wel- 
come Mr. Gable, and equally welcome 
Mr. Barry Townly, the defense law- 
yer — though we might not like ex- 
actly what they have to do, we like 
the way they do it. 

"Chicago" pokes its fingers at 
newspapers and newspaper reporters 
— but so much does the local craft 
take the lambasting in merriment 
that this past week the whole Press 
Club went in a body to one of the per- 
formances and afterwards enter- 
tained the whole cast of "Chicago" in 
their interesting and attractive club 
rooms. 

* * * 

Warfield 

W. C. Fields, formerly of the Fol- 
lies, and at present one of the most 
popular comedians of filmland, comes 
to the Warfield Theater Saturday, 
July 16, in "Running Wild." 

Pretty Mary Brian is the star, 
playing opposite in the role of the 
adorable daughter and Claud Buch- 
anan is her "boy friend." Marie Shot- 
well, Barney Raskle, Frederick Bur- 
ton are in the cast. 

In "Running Wild" the woes of the 
henpecked husband are told in com- 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"Meet The Wife." Henry Duffy Comedy star- 
ing; Mar-inn Lord. 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

"Love In A Mist." Madge Kennedy and Sid- 
ney Blackmer in a comedy supported by Mary 
Marble and Percy Haswell. 

Lurie, Geary at Mason 

"Chicago." A satire on American jurispru- 
dence aptly termed. "Getting Away with Mur- 
der." 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"The Ghost Train." A Henry Duffy mystery 
drama. 

* » * 

VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

On the stage. "Our Gang." The Hal Roach 
Kiddies of movie fame in person. Additional 
vaudeville acts. 

On The screen, "The Little Adventuress." fea- 
turing Vera Reynolds, Victor Varconi and 
Phyllis Haver. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Henry Santrey and his hand, Harry and Anna 
Seymour are held over for the second week as 
headliners of a bill of vaudeville. 

Pantages, Market at Hyde 

"The Country Beyond" with OKve Borden. 
Ralph Graves and Gertrude Astor on the 
screen and a program of vaudeville. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 

* * * 

ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 

California, Market at 4th 

"Resurrection.*" Screen version of Tolstoy's 
story starring Dolores Del Rio and Rod La 
Rocque. 

Gino Sever! conducting the California Orches- 
tra. 

Cameo, Market opp. Fifth street 

"Where the North Holds Sway," a thrilling 
story of mounted police and the northland. 



Casino, Ellis at Mason 



Sat. "My Old Dutch" and "The Street of 
Tears." Sun., Mon. "Gigolo" and "Atta 

Boy." Tues., Wed. "For Wives Only" and 
"The Denver Dude." Thurs., Fri. "The 
WilderncsB Woman" and "Who's Your 
Friend?" 

Granada, Market at Jones 

On the screen, "The Callahan* and the Mur- 
phys." 

On the stage. "Bathing Beauty Pageant." 
Gene Morgan conducting the Granada Orches- 
tra and master of ceremonies. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th. 

"The Way of All Flesh." Emil Jennings sup- 
ported by Phyllis Haver and Belle Bennett. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"Running Wild." W. C. Fields comedy with 

Mary Brian on the screen. 

A Fanchon and Marco Presentation with 

Walt Roesner conducting the Orchestra on the 

stage. 



July 16, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISGO NEWS LETTER 



edy manner. Fields is "The Patsy" 
in his family circle. He and the dog 
rate about equal in prestige around 
home, until Arvo, hypnotist, tells the 
downtrodden Elmer Finch, played by 
Fields, that he is a lion, and Elmer 
believes him. 

So he proceeds to act like a lion, to 
the amazement of all. He breaks up 
a tea party his wife is giving. He 
also puts over a big business stroke, 
still under the impression he is a lion. 

The Glorias, Albert and Adelaide, 
are featured on the stage at the War- 
field Saturday. A "Screen Idea" is the 
Fanchon and Marco offering. The 
Glorias, formerly in Ziegfeld's "Mid- 
night Frolic," are stars, and Ernest 
Charles, composer and tenor, is an- 
other attraction. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

Next week's bill at the Orpheum 
again features Henry Santrey and his 
symphonic orchestra in an entirely 
new program. Santrey's boys, con- 
ceded by critics to be the most ver- 
satile group of musicians on the 
stage, have a new group of specialties 
and Harry and Anna Seymour, who 
appear with Santrey, have new songs 
and dances. Anna Seymour, who is 
Mrs. Santrey, will offer a new num- 
ber with friend hubby and the band. 

A second feature of the week's 
show will be Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
Phillips with Norman Phillips Jr. in 
a one-act playlet, "A Family Revue." 
The act features Norman Jr., said to 
be the most clever juvenile performer 
in the show business and his work 
has been a sensation in the East. 

There will be a strong supporting 
show of Orpheum Circuit features in 
addition to Pathe News. Aesop* Fa- 
bles and musical numbers by Tommy 
Boyd and his Orpheum Orchestra. 
* * * 

Golden Gate 

Hail, Hail, "Our Gang" will be here, 
for they're coming back to San Fran- 
cisco next week to play an engage- 
ment at the Golden Gate. Joe Cobb, 
the heavy man of the Gang. Farina. 
the little darkey with the roly poly 
eyes, Mango. Farina's sister. Jay R. 
Smith with more freckles than ever, 
Harry Spear with his old derby hat. 
Jean Darling the cute little blonde 
leading lady, and tousle-haired Jackie 
Condon, — they'll all lie on the Golden 
Gate stage just as big as life. 

All attendance records have been 
bfokell at every theater where the 
kiddies have played and the Gang 
had the time of their lives entertain- 
ing audiences that have been watch- 
ing them on the screen for five years. 

A popular part of the engagement 
of the Gang will be the receptions 



that will be held on the stage follow- 
ing every matinee except Sunday at 
the Golden Gate. Every child in the 
audience will have an opportunity to 
go upon the stage and personally 
meet each member of the Gang. This 
feature is only for matinees and will 
follow their act which includes bits 
by each child and some scenes from 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin." 

A strong supporting bill will be of- 
fered in conjunction with the engage- 
ment of the "Gang," including Wright 
and Dietrich, singers. The screen 
feature will be "The Little Adven- 
turess," a comedy drama starring 
Vera Reynolds. Victor Varconi plays 
the leading male role. The usual short 
films and Claude Sweeten's music will 
round out the show. 

* * * 

Pantages 

"The Country Beyond" will be the 
screen feature at Pantages theater 
commencing with [ Saturday's pro- 
gram. Olive Borden, "Ralph Graves, J. 
Farrell McDonald and Gertrude Astor 
are in the cast. The picture is a 
filmed version of James Oliver Cur- 
wood's story. 

A Revue Fantasy heads the vau- 
deville program with singing and 
dancing features. Young Krevoff, 
a pupil of Tarasoff, New York danc- 
ing maestro, has the lead in the 
revue. 

Other acts on the program include 
Barrett and Clayton in "The Re- 
bound" with a cast which comprises 
Mercedes Mordant and Abbott 
Adams. Brit Wood, exploited as the 
"world's champion harmonica play- 
er" and Princeton and Yale — in chat- 
ter and song; Don Valerio and com- 
pany with wire walking stunts as- 
sisted by Helen Gartz complete the 
bill. 

Exterior views of "The Country 
Beyond" screen feature, were filmed 
in Jasper National Park. Alberta. 
Many of the scenes were taken on 
the shores of Lake Maligne and 
Mount Edith Cavell. 

Don George is at the organ of Pan- 
tages theater ami Shad Rosebrook 
conducts the orchestra. 
* * * 

California 

"Resurrection." screen version of 
Tolstoy's novel is on the screen at 
the California theater for another 
week where Gino Severi is conductor 
of the California orchestra. 

Dolores Rel Rio and Rod La Rocque 
are the stars in this photoplay which 
follows closely the Tolstoy story, one 
reason, no doubt, of this plan being 
due to the co-operation of Count Ilya 
Tolstoy, who assisted in filming 
"Resurrection" from the pen of his 
famous uncle. 

page 8) 



Home Preserving now 
cool and easy 

Home preserving is so easy when 
you have a new Gas Range. For its 
Oven Heat Control is the secret of fine 
easy preserving. Freshly cleaned fruit, 
for example, is packed right in jars 
and put into the oven. You merely 
set the Oven Heat Control and steady 
even heat preserves the fruits' firm- 
ness, its delicious fruit - flavor and 
color. No lifting of boiling kettles. 
No watching. The kitchen stays cool. 

These new Gas Ranges equipped 
with the Oven Heat Control can be 
seeh at the dealer's store or at our 
office. 



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"PACIFIC SERVICE" 

Pacific Gas and electric Company 

Owned ■ Operated ■ Managed 
' by Californians 

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CEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

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1. S00. 000 cap* were served at the 
Panama-Pacific International E*p*aitt©» 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 16, 1927 




reduced 

round trip 
JTfares ^ 

I 1 



from California 
points and return 




GAKE advantage 
of these low ex- 
cursion fares to visit 
the old home this 
summer. 

Start any day before 
September 30. Re- 
turn limit October 
31. Our travel books 
will help you plan 
your trip and may 
he had upon request 

SANTA FE Ticket Offices 
and Travel Bureaux 



601 Market Street 

Telephone Sutter 7600 

Santa Fe Depot 

SAN FRANCISCO 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from page 7) 

St. Francis 

"The Way of All Flesh" will con- 
tinue at the St. Francis another week 
with Emil Jannings in the principal 
role. The picture is said to exhibit 
the finest acting since Janning's por- 
trayal in "Variety." 

Belle Bennett, whose mother roles 
have made her one of the screen lu- 
minaries, and Phyllis Haver, a ver- 
satile and charming screen actress, 
support Jannings in this picture. 

This picture was shown in New 
York where it registered box receipts 
to please the theater owners, reach- 
ing the figure, so we are authorita- 
tively informed, of $40,000. The 
drama is strong and the acting is up 
the Jannings' standard. That speaks 
a lot. 

* * * 

Granada 

"The Callah«ns and the Mur- 
pheys," a chapter out of the Irish 
American family, life as told in the 
popular stories by Kathleen Norris, 
California's famous novelist, will oc- 
cupy the screen at the Granada this 
week beginning with Saturday's 
showings. 

Frances Marion, famous scenarist, 
wrote the screen version of the Nor- 
ris magazine stories and brought out 
the vein of humor and homely char- 
acteristics of the author to a nicety. 
The cast includes Marie Dressier, 
Polly Moran, Sally O'Neil, Lawrence 
Gray and Eddie , r Gribbon. 

The Granada theater this week will 
offer as its stage attraction Southern 
bathing beauties, with a Beauty Page- 
ant part of stage feature. Miss 
Southern California, fairest of the 
southern bathing girls, will be star- 
red during these presentations, spon- 
sored by Fanchon and Marco. Gene 
Morgan conducts the Granada orches- 
tra and is master of ceremonies. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"Meet the Wife," the keen comedy 
of satire and lively wit begins its sec- 
ond week at the Alcazar tomorrow, 
July 17, with Marion Lord in the 
leading role in her portrayal of "the 
wife." She is a positive "scream" in 
this play and keeps up the merriment 
at a rapid pace all through the drama 
of sparkling humor. 

More than a year ago Henry Duffy 
obtained the Australian rights to this 
play and Miss Lord and her company 
visited the principal cities there and 
in New Zealand presenting "Meet the 
Wife" to large audiences. 

William Macauley, John Stokes and 
Robert Adams have comedy roles. 
Marion Sterly, Richard Ellers, Marie 
Sorrille and John Mackenzie are in 
the cast. 



President 

Realism is an essential feature of 
"The Ghost Train," an exciting mys- 
tery melodrama, which Sunday be- 
gins its sixth week at the President. 
Henry Duffy has gone to great 
lengths for scenic effects, which have 
been elaborately perfected. 

The first thrill in this play comes 
with the rise of the curtain, before a 
single word has been spoken. When 
action begins there is a succession of 
laughs and surprises that keep the 
spectator in a state of mirth. The 
comedy work of Earl Lee, who has 
the principal role, has been particu- 
larly pleasing to his many friends. 

The cast contains many new play- 
ers and includes: Charlotte Tread- 
way, Ronald Telfer, Dorothy LaMar, 
Ben Taggart, Lillian Dean, Thomas 
Brower, John O'Hara, Joan Warner, 
Henry Caubisens and Westcott 

Clarke. 

* * * 

Cameo 

"Where the North Holds Sway" a 
picture of the mounted police and dar- 
ing adventure will be shown at the 
popular Cameo theater this week, 
with many daring scenes and people 
of the northland, picturesque scenery 
and bravery the outstanding features 
of the screen story. 

• • • 

GREAT GUEST CONDUCTOR 

Ossip Gabrilowitsch, conducting 
the San Francisco Symphony Orches- 
tra, in the fifth concert of the Sum- 
mer Symphony series last Tuesday 
night, appeared before the largest au- 
dience of the summer season — so the 
box office tells us. 

Gabrilowitsch's marvelous music, 
however, can by no means be reck- 
oned by statistics, for this great con- 
ductor gave us something immeas- 
ureably superior. He gave us music 
that we, here in San Francisco, shall 
remember for a long, long time! 

Did you wish to hear Beethoven as 
a solace to your very soul? Then, 
verily, were you satisfied with the 
Overture, "Lenore" No. 3, which, 
we are informed, is one of the four 
different overtures Beethoven wrote. 
His only opera, "Fidelo," originally 
entitled, "Lenore" after the principal 
character in the opera, contains this 
Overture, No. 3 declared by critics a 
masterpiece of dramatic unity, 
strength and passion as well as of 
imposing construction. 

This Overture was the first num- 
ber of last Tuesday night's Sym- 
phony, giving us an idea of the rare 
musical treat in store for us through- 
out the entire concert. 

The Brahms "Symphony No. 1, in 
C minor," stirred the emotions of all 
(Continued on page 10) 



July 16, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 5) 
Mrs. Bracknell 111 

The many friends of Mrs. George 
J. Bracknell will be distressed to hear 
of her accident. She fell and frac- 
tured her leg and is now at the Stan- 
ford Hospital, where she will be a 
week or two longer. 

* * * 

Surprise News 

News came as surprise Saturday 
when it was learned that Miss Lucy 
Gladys Ainsworth, who is engaged to 
Lieut.-Commander Cornelius Flynn, 
U. S. N., left that same day for the 
Orient. She will go directly to Shang- 
hai, where she will be the guest of 
Dr. and Mrs. William Rector Smith 
and will be married very soon after 
arriving. Flynn is the son of Dr. and 
Mrs. Thomas H. Flynn of Summer- 
ville, N. J. He has received orders 
which will keep him in the Orient in- 
definitely. For this reason the young 
couple decided to be married soon 
after Miss Ainsworth's arrival in 
Shanghai. 

* * * 

Wedding Day 
Is Named 

The wedding day has been an- 
nounced for the nuptials of Miss Mary 
Anne Sutro and Mr. Balfour Bowen 
which is to take place on Thursday, 
September 8, at the home of the 
bride's parents, ,Mr. and Mrs. Oscar 
Sutro, in Piedmont. The wedding will 
be held in the evening at nine o'clock. 

The bridegroom-to-be is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Bowen of Rox- 
well, Essex County, England. 

Maid of Honor 

Miss Barbara Sutro will be the 
maid of honor and the bridesmaids 
will be the Misses Adelaide Sutro, 
Mary Chickering, Irene Griffin, 
Frances Stent, Dorothy Griffin and 
Harriet McCormick. 

George Fortune, who is also an 
Englishman, will attend the bride- 
groom, and the ushers will include : 
Messrs. Harrison Dibblee Jr.. Elliot 
McAllister, H. S. M. Burns, Everett 
Griffin. John Baldwin and Arthur 
Sutro Jr. 

After the ceremony there will be a 
reception at the bride's home. 

* * * 

Well Known Family 

The bride-elect comes from a prom- 
inent San Francisco family, the Sutros 
and the O'Sullivans. Her mother was 
Miss Mary O'Sullivan, daughter of 
the late Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius O'Sul- 
livan : the late Dennie O'Sullivan, the 
Binger, was an uncle. Miss Sutro at- 
tended Miss Ransome's School, in 
Piedmont, and later graduated from 
the Sacred Heart Convent at Menlo 



Park. She has toured Europe twice 
since then. Bowen was educated at 
Brasenose College Oxford, and is now 
in business in San Francisco. 

The engagement was announced at 
a luncheon given by Mrs. Oscar Sutro 
at the beginning of the year at her 
home in Piedmont. 



Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Colm, with 
their children, have closed their home 
in Bakersfield for the summer and 
are again in San Fr-amcisco to spend 
July and August. The family are 
registered at the Hotel Whitcomb, 
where they annually make their head- 
quarters during the summer months. 

Professor Charles Beach Atwell 
and Mrs. Atwell of Evanston, Illinois, 
who are summering in California, are 
registered at the Hotel Whitcomb. 
Professor Atwell is a member of the 
staff of the Northwestern University 
at Evanston. The couple will spend 
several months in touring California. 
* * * 

Oscar Klatt in the East 

Oscar H. Klatt, president of the 
American Toll Bridge Company, is in 
New York, attending the convention 
of the Toll Bridge Association of 
America, of which he is also presi- 
dent. 

The Association convened -on the 
15th of July, and will last two or 
three days, taking up important mat- 
ters pertaining to the American Toll 
Bridge Company. 

After the convention adjourns, Mr. 
Klatt will leave for Germany, where 
he will visit his mother, whom he has 
not seen for seventeen years. He will 
be gone for six weeks. 



Society of California 
Pioneers Elects Officers 

The Society of California Pioneers, 
one of the State's foremost organiza- 
tions, this past week, held an election 
of officers at their headquarters on 
July 7. at number 5, Pioneer Place. 

president Charles S. Cushing, 
under whose excellent executive work 
the Society of California Pioneers has 
advanced to still more splendid at- 
tainments was given an ovation of 
leal appreciation from his co-workers 
and fellow member-. With his ef- 
forts as president, much activity in 
collecting historical records of Cali- 
fornia, valuable pic' ires, maps and 
rare books has been carried on with 
the compensating suit of a collec- 
tion unequalled in many respects. 
President Charles S. Cushing was 
most ably assisted >y Secretary H. 
;>age 10) 




l,U ■•*• 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



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Swimminjr Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN. Agua Caliente. 
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WHEN IN PANAMA 
MAKE 

HOTEL CENTRAL 

Cathedral Plaza 

YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 

Andrew Johnston. Manager 



CALIENTE VILLA 

Family Resort 

CARL STEFFEN. Prop. 



French and Italian Dinners Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms Priiare Cottages 

AGUA -C.VLIENTE 

Four Minutes Walk" to Fetters Station, 

Sonoma County. California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



T'C 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 16, 1927 




Lake Tahoe 

Sleeper 

— now through to Tahoe Station 
without change of cars. 

You can leave here any 
evening aboard a comfort- 
able Pullman, for arrival at 
Lake Tahoe for breakfast 
next morning. 

A swift, enjoyable trip to 
this delightful inland sea 
high in the Sierra. You'll 
have the maximum amount 
of time there if you go by 
train. Pullman returning 
leaves the lake in the eve- 
ning arriving here in time for 
business next day. 

Leave San Francisco (Ferry) at 
7 p.m., arriving Tahoe Station at 
7:00a.m. Returning, leave Tahoe 
Station at °:30 p.m. arriving San 
Francisco at 7:50 a.m. By day, 
leave San Francisco at 7:40 a.m., 
a fascinating Tide up the Sierra, 
arriving Tahoe Station at 5:30 
p. m. Similar service returning. 

£t Tt 9C round trip) good 

* X ■*••* for 16 days. Other 
fares and limits. Ask for new illus- 
trated booklet about Tahoe Lake 
Region; also the booklet "Low 
Fares for Summer Trips." 

Southern 
Pacific 



San Francisco Offices 
—65 Geary St.; Ferry 
Station; 3rd St. Sta.; 
Phone Davf.nport4ooo 
Oakland Offices - 
13th&BVay;J6thSt. 
Sta; lst&BrOiid<v-v< 



Great Guest Conductor 

(Continued from page 8) 

music-lovers. It was gorgeously 
played with the tonal shadings for 
which Gabrilowitsch seems especially 
famed. The other two numbers of 
the fifth concert were "Viviene," a 
Symphonic poem by Chausson and the 
beloved Hungarian Rhapsody of 
Liszt, No. 2. 

No more popular works exist for 
the piano than the compositions for 
which Liszt is famed, and the most 
popular of them all, beyond the shad- 
ow of a doubt is the second Rhap- 
sody. 

So this is the kind of music we are 
getting during these Summer Sym- 
phonies and the increasing attend- 
ance each Tuesday evening at the Ex- 
position Auditorium is eloquent ap- 
preciation and permanent applause 
for the thorough musicians who com- 
prise our San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra, as well as for the masters 
who favor us with their presence as 
notable guest conductors. 

Before closing our article we want 
to call attention to the Chausson 
number, "Vivieije," the delicacy and 
artistry of the music having been 
most skillfully and fascinatingly 
played. Solo passages throughout 
the number enhanced its appeal to 
our musical appreciation. Comment 
was made by those "in the know" of 
Drucker's trumpet calls. The musi- 
cal composition really makes provi- 
sion for two trumpets, but so skill- 
fully does Drucker play the passage 
that the effect of the two trumpets is 
achieved with pleasing tone qualities 
and accentuation. 

* " * * 

The next concert, sixth of the Sum- 
mer Symphony series, will be given 
next Tuesday evening, July 19, in the 
Exposition Auditorium, eight-twenty 
o'clock, with Ossip Gabrilowitsch 
again conducting. There are two 
Schubert numbers on the excellent 
program and the Scriabin Symphony 
No. 3 "The Divine Poem," will be 
heard for the first time in San Fran- 
cisco. * * * 
Lecture 

Victor Liechtenstein, will give an 
informal discussion and musical il- 
lustration of the Symphony Concert 
music on Monday night, July 18 in 
the Woman's City Club, 465 Post 
Street, beginning at 8:15 o'clock. A 
small admission fee is required. 



in the legal profession and well known 
citizens of the great commonwealth. 
As an additional tribute to the retir- 
ing president, Mr. Stidger will have 
Mr. Cushing as a member of the 
executive staff in the office of a di- 
rector. Others elected to their re- 
spective places on the Board include: 
Dr. Joseph A. Oliver, Mr. James K. 
Moffitt, Mr. Robert R. Russ, Mr. Wil- 
liam T. Hale, Mr. J. R. Skinner, vice- 
presidents. Charles J. Deering was 
elected treasurer ; J. H. P. Gedge, 
elected marshal and the directors are: 
Messrs. James P. Taylor, John J. Ler- 
men, Charles S. Cushing, L. J. Scoo- 
fy, E. A. Douthitt, H. L. Van Winkle, 
Dr. G. N. Van Orden, Fred G. Russ, 
F. De P. Teller. 

Banquet to Officers 

Mr. H. L. Van Winkle presided at 
an elaborate banquet held in the room 
of the Dons at the Mark Hopkins Ho- 
tel on July 7, where speeches, music 
and splendid entertaining features 
were programmed for the honor of 
the out-going and in-coming officers 
of The Society of California Pioneers. 



: Phine I aketide 1420 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 9) 

L. Byrne in this special work of his- 
torical value. 

Mr. Oliver P. Stidger was elected 
to the offic of President following 
the expiration of Mr. Cushing's term. 
Both gentlemen are very prominent 



Lucky 

(After Leigh Hunt) 
Jenny missed me by a hair 

As she darted down the highway 
Boy, I got a nasty scare 

When her roadster darted my way. 
Say her driving's pretty bad, 

Say her bumper nearly kissed me, 
Say the following: "X!$0!z," but add 

Jenny missed me! 

— Arthur L. Lippmann. 






W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 




PHOTO GRAPHS 
QUivc Jvrez/e/ 



July 16. 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 





HERE IS ENGLAND, by Marion 

Balderston. Robert M. McBride & 

Company. Illustrated, S3.00. 

By the time you have finished this 
book you will know a great deal more 
than when you started. You will ab- 
sorb the contents as much through 
the pleasure it gives you as through 
the eyes. The author knows her sub- 
ject thoroughly, not only how to take 
you for a most enjoyable trip, but she 
has an amazing fund of knowledge of 
everything pertaining to it. It would 
be interesting to learn whether she 
studied architecture before she stud- 
ied the cathedrals, or whether she be- 
came so interested in the cathedrals 
that she studied architecture because 
of them. Whichever way it was, she 
has blended the two subjects so com- 
pletely that she has a perfect combi- 
nation. 

She loves the cathedrals and can 
tell you all about them from crypt 
to spire. Who built them and when, 
and how well they were built. As 
she says, the best our ancestors had 
"either as a period of time or as a 
single man, went into the building," 
and "never once did a workman do 
his job badly because he thought no 
one would see it." 

Take the Cathedral of Glastonbury, 
just for one instance: She first traces 
the history of England from the first 
invaders, (and you will be surprised 
to learn that the first invader of all 
was the sea itself) ; then to Britain 
came Joseph of Arimathea with the 
Holy Grail; then St. Patrick, King 
Arthur, and with the retirement of 
the Romans, the Saxons, who were in 
turn driven out by the Danes. 
Finally the Normans, and on and on 
and on. But it is an interesting 
story she tells, not the dull routine 
of "history." Her style is true and 
concise, and above all entertaining. 

She has not forgotten her history 
as flagrantly as some of us have. 
How interestingly she places it all be- 
fore you ! All the famous old kings 
and queens whose names sound fa- 
miliar but whose deeds we cannot re- 
call. We can remember them now. 
of course. 

We are given a lesson in derivation 
of words — and we always thought en- 
tomology so dry and uninteresting. 
But what fun it is to follow through 
her explanations. That is part of 
the attraction of the book. She ex- 



Edited by Florence DeLong 

plains so easily just by telling you — 
she does not stand on the platform 
and teach. She can tell us about 
glass making and how the wonderful 
old method of stained glass has be- 
come a lost art. She understands 
music — harmony — orchestration. 
She dips into the different religions 
without giving offense. What a born 
pedagogue she is, with an inborn 
gift of imparting interestingly. The 
dullest student could learn from her 
book without realizing how many 
lessons he is absorbing. 

Her favorite method of getting 
about the country is in a motor car. 
She even tells you where to honk your 
horn, where to lock the wheels and 
slide to your fate if you are inclined 
to be rash ; where to get out and 
walk ; what time is best to enjoy to 
the full the beauties of each place, — 
in fact how to get the most out of the 
trip. Incidentally you learn how to 
work up an enthusiasm to go and do 
likewise, if you have never felt the 
urge before. There is a whole chap- 
ter on how to get your own car to 
England, if you so desire, and the 
reasons why she advocates renting or 
buying a car in England as the bet- 
ter plan. 

There are several excellent maps 
scattered throughout the book and 
numerous interesting illustration. 



THE TRIUMPH OF YOUTH, by Ja- 
cob Wassermann. Boni and Live- 
right. S2.00. 

A story for "grown-up children." 
A child is the hero and the children 
are the ultimate conquerors. 

A lad — the son of a dissolute 
father and a weak and shivering 
mother, grows up without any of the 
care which is lavished now-a-days by 
fond parents on their delicate off- 
spring. He is nominally under the 
care of a tutor, but the poor man 
lives in daily dread of losing his vo- 
cation because he cannot manage his 
charge — in fact, he can hardly ever 
find him. The boy is a vagrant. 

Fortunately, his dastardly father 
dies when the boy is only six years of 
age. and his mother deserts him 

about the same ti For comfort. 

he turns to the "fairies" whom he 
learns to love through books pur- 
loined from his tutor; and they in 
turn seem to endow him with a wist- 
ful imagination. He becomes a child 




of nature ; and as nature unfolds her- 
self through her endless variety, he 
unfolds a pure and innocent spirit 
through his sweet, childish stories. 
He is a sort of Peter Pan, a Pied 
Piper, a will-o'-the-wisp. Everyone 
loves him, and young and old follow 
him about begging for a "story." 
Even his villainous old TJncle falls 
under his spell — although the old 
man is probably more sinned against 
than sinning, when you consider the 
times and the sinister "shadow" 
under which he lives. Pater Gropp 
is an unlovely block of granite chisel- 
ed with an unkindly hand, and there 
is no heart in him. But just as he is 
about to topple upon the poor Young 
Baron and crush the life out of him, 
the children take a hand and he is 
saved. 

But — the poor youth, through his 
suffering, has now become a man, and 
he pleads with his people for time 
before he can tell them any more 
stories. His deeds may speak well 
for him later, but we wonder if the 
beautiful gift of story-telling is gone. 
Youth and innocence cannot be cul- 
tivated, but, when later they are tem- 
pered with suffering, out of them 
may come a man worth while. 



Books that are reriewed in the Newa Letter 
can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Poat Street San Franciico, Calif. 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs"" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

J29 CLARA STREET— GARFIELD M4 



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ORDER 
Out of Chaos! 

In your Books, 
Financial Statements 
Income Tax Reports 

Expert Auditor 

PART-TIME SERVICE 

268 Market St.. Room 101 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 16, 1927 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 







C. J. Pennington 
Wonderful Lighting 
At Radio Show 

A novel lighting plan, developed by 
Elliott Conroy, illumination engineer 
of the famous "Miracle" production, 
has been provided for the fourth an- 
nual Pacific Radio Show to be held in 
the Exposition auditorium, August 
20th to 27th under the auspices of 
the Pacific Radio Trade Association. 

The lighting plan, according to Leo 
J. Meyberg, chairman of the radio 
show committee of the association, 
will surpass anything ever seen in the 
big indoor spectacle held in the audi- 
torium. One of the features of the 
lighting will be the utilization of 80 
powerful spotlights throwing a rain- 
bow effect of varying colors up the 
walls and converging in the center of 
the great overhanging canopy. A col- 
orful scheme of decoration will further 
enhance the lighting effects. 

In addition to the indoor lighting, 
large batteries of concealed flood 
lights in the Civic Center will bathe 
the auditorium in a brilliant glow 
that will turn the night time hours 
into daylight. In recognition of the 
fact that this is America's first radio 
show of the season, the Board of Su- 
pervisors of San Francisco have an- 
nounced their intention of lighting 
the §4,000,000 City Hall and other- 
wise putting the Civic Center in gala 

attire. 

* * * 

National 
Broadcasting Co. 

The entire twenty-second floor of the 
Hunter-Dulin building is under lease 
to the National Broadcasting Com- 
pany, who have been building for 
over two months a type of broadcast- 
ing studio that is unique in the annals 
of radio. The Spanish motif was se- 
lected to bear out the traditions of 



early Western history. The largest 
studio is fashioned after a Spanish 
patio, or garden, and so built and dec- 
orated. The smaller studio is designed 
after the interior of a Spanish room 
with all the appropriate decorations 
and hangings. 

The general offices and rehearsal 
rooms are practically completed and 
the members of the staff have moved 
into their new quarters. 

Every convenience possible has 
been incorporated into the new stu- 
dios in hopes that no changes will 
have to be made in the near future. 

KNX 

The Loftus Land Company, devel- 
opers of "Sunshine Acre Farms," has 
started a series of radio programs 
over KNX. The orchestra featured 
on the program is known as the "Egg- 
beaters' Band" ; the dialogue numbers 
are given by Tom and William, a new 
organization over the air, and the 
"Dixie Girls," two girls from the 
South, lend their voices, singing all 
the old Southern melodies. 
* * * 

"Take the Air" 
Has New Meaning 

This one actually happened on a 
recent KFI Midnight Frolic : The an- 
nouncer after having presented a new 
artist and turning to him said, "All 
right. Take the air." The artist's 
face rapidly ran the gamut of all the 
emotions from surprise to disappoint- 
ment and disgust, then he dejectedly 
walked away. The announcer sensed 
that he had been misunderstood, and 
ran after him to explain that around 
a studio the expression "Take the 
air" has a decidedly different mean- 
ing than that accorded it in the 
vernacular. 



The Grandfather of Jazz 

Much interest is shown in "The 
Hour in Memory Lane" programs of 
the National Broadcasting Company, 
broadcast over the Pacific Coast net- 
work of stations every Friday night 
from 9 to 10 p. m. The revival of 
popular songs seem to be enjoyed by 
all classes and ages. 

Recently in releasing information 
on the program the statement was 
made that the old song, "To ra ra 
boom de ay" song was the grand- 
father of the modern jazz melody, 
dating back 30 years. A few days ago 
a letter was received from a resident 
of Spokane, Fleetwood Ward, a music 



lover past 80 years of age, who made 
the following statement: 

"I am over 80 years old. About 50 
years ago, as a member of the Union 
League Club of Philadelphia, I had 
occasion to enter the library of the 
Club one day. I came across several 
volumes containing the words and 
music of old songs and the pictures of 
the music halls in London where they 
were first sung. About this time Lot- 
tie Collins, a London music hall fav- 
orite, was making a decided success 
in New York at Koster and Bials 
Theater singing this number. To my 
surprise I came across the identical 
song in one of the old volumes and 
looking at its date of publication I 
found that it had been printed over a 
hundred years before." 



KPO KOMMENT 

Dedication of KPO's new Philhar- 
monic organ, the installation of which 
was recently announced by the station 
management, will take place during 
the first week of August when Uda 
Waldrop, the station's official organ- 
ist, will return from his summer va- 
cation. 

The new instrument is now entire- 
ly completed. It was built in the lab- 
oratories of the Welte Organ Com- 
pany of New York, according to 
specifications worked out by Waldrop 
himself. The organ has been especial- 
ly designed to give the best tone ef- 
fects for radio reproduction. It has 
been installed at KPO at a cost of 
§25,000 and will be used in the re- 
citals given by Waldrop, which have 
been a weekly feature of the station 
for several years. 

Waldrop is not only KPO's official 
organist, but is also the municipal or- 
ganist for the city of San Francisco. 



Diner — I say, waiter, the portions 
were much bigger last year. 

Waiter — That's an optical illusion 
on your part, sir. Now that the res- 
taurant has been enlarged they just 
appear smaller. — Pele Mele, Paris. 



"What sort of a chap is Jack, 
dear?" 

"Well, when we were together last 
night, the lights went out, and he 
spent the rest of the evening repair- 
ing the fuse !" — Pink Un. 



July 16, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



RADIO PROGRAMS 



wavelength 

Station (meters) 

KMTR — Log Angeles 526 

KLX— Oakland 50s'2 

KGW— Portland .... 491.5 

KFI — Los Anfieles 4C7.5 

KFRC — San Francisco ..... 454 3 

KFOA— Seattle .. . ... 447 5 

KFSD— San Diego 440.9 

KPO — San Francisco 422!3 

KHJ — Los Angeles 405 2 

KGO— Oakland . 3944 

KJR— Seattle '384.6 

KHQ — Spokane .. 370.2 

KFWB — Los Angeles 361.2 

KNX — Los Angeles 336.9 

KOA — Denver .. . 325 9 

KOIN— Portland .. Z"819. 

KPSN — Pasadena .... 3is!6 

KYA — San Francisco 309 1 

KOMO— Seattle . ."305!8 

KSL — Salt Lake . 302 8 

KOWW— Walla Walla .!!'. 299.8 

KQW — San Jose ... 296.9 

KTBI — Los Angeles 288 3 

KTAB— Oakland 28o'2 

KTCL— Seattle 277.'6 

KFWI — San Francisco 267.7 

KGA — Spokane 260 7 

KFUS— Oakland 256^3 

KRE — Berkeley 256.3 

KZM — Oakland 245.8 

KLS — Oakland ... 245.8 

KEX — Portland ... 239 9 

KFWM— Oakland ' 236.1 

KJBS — San Francisco 220.4 

KGTT — San Francisco . 206.5 



Power 

(watts! 

500 

500 

1000 

5000 

50 

1000 

500 

1000 

500 

5000 

2500 

1000 

500 

500 

5000 

1000 

1000 

500 

1000 

1000 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

2000 

50 

100 

100 

200 

2500 

500 

50 

50 



KYA. KOA. KGW. 



SUNDAY 
(July 17) 
:00 am— KFUS. 
10:00am— KFI, KNX, KTAI1. 

10 :30 am— KGW. KFI. KTAB 
11:00 am— KTAB. KGO. KFUS 

KFI. KGA. 
12:00 m— KGW. KGA. 
1:00 pm— KFWI. 
2:00 pm— KNX. 
3:00 pm— KPO. KGTT. KNX. 
4 :00 pm— KGO, KGTT. KNX. 
5:00 pm— KNX, KFI. 
6:00 pm— KPO, KOA, KNX. KFI. 
■' :30 pm— KPO. KGO. KNX. KFI. 
:00 pm— KPO, KGO. KNX. KFI. 

:30 pm— KPO. KGO, KGTT. KYA. KGW. KNX, KFI 
:00 pm— KPO, KGO, KGTT, KFWI. KOA. KGW 

KNX, KFI, KTAB. 
:00 pm— KPO. KGO. KGTT. KOA. KGW, KNX 
KFI. KFWB. 
10:liil P m— KGW, KFI, KFWB. 

11 :00 pm.— 



MONDAY 

7:00 am— KPO. KNX. 
8:00 am KPO, KFWI. KNX. 
9:110 am KNX, KTAB. KJBS. 
111:1111 am KFUS, KFWI. KOA. KGW. KFOA. KNX. 

KJBS. KTAB. KFWB. 
10:30 am- KPO. KLX. KFWI. KOA. KGW. KNX. 

KJBS. 
11:00am KFWI. KYA. KOA. KGW. KGA. K.II1S. 
11:30 am KPO, KGO. KYA. KGA. 

12:00 m KPO, KFWI. KYA. KFOA. KGA. KFWB, 
12:30pm KPO, KGO, KGTT, KYA, KNX. KGA, 
KFWB. 
1:00pm KPO. KGO. KYA. KFWB, 
2:00pm KFWB. KFOA, KNX. KJBS. 

8:00 pm KNX. KJBS. 

1 ■ n KPO, KGO. KFWI, km \ KNX, 

l:00pra KTAB, KFWB, KPO, KFWI. KOA KNX. 
6:80pm KTAB, KFWB, KPO, KGO KLX. KFWI, 

IO V KFI. KNX. KG \ 
6:0 ii KTAB, KFWB, KPO, KGO. MX KFWI, 

KYA. KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KGA 
7:00pm KTAB. KFWB, KPO, KGO, KLX, KFWI. 

KYA, KOA. KFI. KFO V KNX. KGA 
: SOpm KFWH. KOA. KGW, KFI. KFOA. KNX, 

KGA, 

B pm KGA. KTAB. KFWH. KPO. KGO KLX, 

Kiwi. KYA, KOA, KGW, KH. KFOA 

k\\ 
pm KTAB, KFWI! KFO KLX, KFWI. KYA, 

KGW. KFI, KNX 
KFWH, KPO, KFWI. KYA, KGW, KFI. 

KNX 
pm KFWI, KYA, KGW, KNX, 
pm 



;i :00 

1 1 







1 KNX. KFWI, KFO. 
m KNX. KFWI. KPO. 
im KNX. KTAB, KJBS. 

»N\, KGW. KFWH. KPO, KTAB, KJBS. 

W, KYA. KFWI. KPO, 1 
■ \. KGW. KOA, KFWB, KW KFWI. 

KGA. KOA, KGO, KPO 
m KGA. KNX. KFilV KOA, KFWB, KYA. 
KPO. 
KFOA. KFWB. KYA. KG r I' KGO. 
im KFOA, KFWB. KY\. KFWI. KGO. KPO, 
1.1 KGA. KNX KFOA KGW. KOA. KFWB, 
KIX. KGO, K.1BS. 
Mil KGA. KNX. KOA. KPO. K 



4:00 pm— KNX. KFOA. KFWI. KGO. KPO. 

5:00 pm— KNX. KOA. KFWB, KFWI. KPO. KTAB 

5:30 pm— KNX. KFI. KFWB. KYA, KFWI. KLX. 

KPO. 
6:00 pm— KGA. KNX. KFOA, KFI. KGW. KFWB 

KYA. KFWI. KGO. KPO. KTAB. 
7:00 pm— KNX, KFOA, KFI. KGW, KOA. KFWB, 

KYA. KFWI. KLX. KGO. KPO. KTAB. 
7:30 pm— KFWB. KNX. KFOA. KFI. KOA. 
8:00 pm— KGA. KNX. KFOA, KFI. KGW, KOA, 

KFWB, KYA, KFWI, KGTT. KGO, KPO. 

KTAB. 
9:00 pm— KNX. KFOA. KFI. KGW, KFWB. KYA. 

KFWI. KGTT. KGO, KPO. KTAR. 
10:00 pm— KNX. KFI. KGW. KFWB. KFWI, KGO. 

KPO. 
11:00 pm— KGW. KFWI. 
12 :00 pm— 

WEDNESDAY 

7:00 am— KNX. KPO, KFWI. 
8:00 am— KNX, KPO, KFWI-i 
9:00am— KNX, KTAB, KJBS... . 
10:00 am— KGW. KFOA. KNX KFWB. KFUS. KFWI. 

KTAB. KJBS. 
10:30 am— KGW, KNX, KPO, KLX, KFWI, KJBS. 
II :00 am— KGW, KGA. KPO. KFWI. KYA. KOA. 
11:30 am— KGA, KPO. KGO. KYA, KOA. 
12:00 m— KFOA. KGA, KFWB, KPO, KGO, KFWI, 

KYA, KOA. 
12:30 pm— KFOA. KNX. KGA, KFWB. KGO, KGTT, 
KFWI, KYA. 
1:00 pm— KFOA, KFWB, KPO, KFWI. KYA. 
2:00 pm— KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KGO, KLX. KJBS. 
3:00 pm— KNX, KPO, KLX. KGTT, KJBS. 
4:00 pm— KFOA, KNX. KPO. KGO. KLX. 
5:00 pm— KOA. KNX, KFWB,' KPO. KFWI. KTAB. 
5:30 pm— KOA. KFI. KNX, KGA, KFWB. KPO, 

KLX. KFWI. KYA. 
6:00 pm— KOA. KGW, KFI. KFOA. KNX, KGA, 

KFWB. KPO, KGO. KLX, KFWI. KYA. 
7:00 pm— KOA, KGW, KFI, KFOA, KNX, KFWB, 

KPO. KGO. KLX. KFWI, KYA, KTAB. 
7:30 pm— KNX. KFWB. KOA. KGW. KFI, KFOA. 
8:00 pm— KOA. KGW. KFI. KFOA, KNX. KGA, 

KFWB. KPO. KGO. jiLX, KGTT. KFUS. 
KFWI. KYA, KTAB. 
9:00 pm— KGW. KFI, KFOA„l<NX, KFWB, KPO. 
KGO. KLX. KGTT. KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
10:00pm— KFI. KNX. KFWH. KPO, KGO. KFWI. 
11:00 pm— KNX. KGO. KFWI. 
12:00 pm — 

THURSDAY 

7:00 am— KNX. KPO, KFWI. 
8:00 am— KNX, KPO. KFWI. 
9:00 am— KNX, KTAB. KJBS. 
10:00 am— KCW, KNX. KFWB. KPO. KFWI, KJBS. 
10:30 am— KGW. KNX. KPO. KFWI. KJBS. 
11 :00 am- KOA. KGW. KNX. KGA. KFWI, KYA. 
11:30 am— KOA. KNX, KGA, KPO. KGO. KFWI. 

KYA. 
12:00 m— KOA. KFOA. KGA. KFWB. KI'O. KGO. 

KFWI. KYA. 
12:30 pm— KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO, KGO, KGTT, 
KFWI. KYA. 
1:00pm — KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO, KGO. KFWI, 

KYA. 
2 :00 pm -KFOA. KNX. KFWH. KGO, KLX. KJBS. 
3:00pm KOA. KNX. KFWH. KPO. KJBS. 
I:00pm-KOA. KFOA, KNX. KPO. KGO. KFWI. 
6:00pm KNX. KFWH. Khl, KGO. KFWI. KTAB. 
5:30pm— KFI. KNX. KGA. KfWH. KPO. KGO. 

KI.X, KFWI. KYA. 
0:00pm KGW, KFI. KFOA. KNX. KGA. KFWB. 
kl'd, KGO, KLX, KFWI, kYA. KTAB. 

pm KGW. KFI, KFOA, KNX, KFWB. 

KPO, KGO. KI.X. KFWI. KYA. 
7:30pm— KFI. KNX. KFWH. KGW. KFOA. 

B im KGW, KFI. KFOA. KNX. KGA. KFWB. 

KPO. KGO. KFWI, KYA. KTAR. 
9:011 pm KGW. KFI. KFOA KNX. KFWH. KPO. 
KFWI. KYA. KTAB'. 
10:00pm KGW. KFI. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KFWI. 

11 :00 pm KGW, KNX. KFWI. 

18 :00 pm 

FRIDAY 
1 :00am KNX. KPO. KFWI. 

i '.11 am KNX. KPO. KFWI 
111 KNX, KTAB, K.IPS 

m KGW, KFOA. KNX KFWB. KFUS, KFWI, 
KTAB, k.ips 

I0:30am KGW. KNX, KOA KPO, KI.X. KFWI. 
KYA. KTAB. K.1HS. 

11 am KGW, KGA. KOA KFWI. KYA. 

11:3ii am KG\. KOA. KPO M.O. KFWI. KYA. 

•r, KFOA. KNX. KGV KOA. KFWH. KPO. 
KGO. KFW I. KYA 
12:80pm KFOA. KNX. KG \ KFWH. KGO. KGTT. 
KYA 
1:00pm KFOA. KNX. KFWH, KGO. KFWI. KYA. 
2:00pm KGW. KFOA. KNV KFWB. KPO. KGO. 
KI.X. K.1HS. 
pm KNX KOA. KPo KJBS. 
,m KFOA KNX. KIM KGO. KFWI. 
im KNX KOA kFV ' KPO. KFWI. KTAB. 
pm KFI. KNX, KGA V kl-Wll. KPO. 

KG '). KI.X KFW I KYA, K ! 
pm KGW. KFI. KFO KNX. KGA. KOA. 

KFWH. KPO, KGO KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 

OA, KFWH. KPO. 
KGO. KI.X. KF\ KYA. KTAB. 

■•. KFI. KNX, KOA 1,1 W B. ki.W I 
■ 1 KGW. kl I. k\ 

KPO. KGO. Kl > KGTT. KFWI, KYA. 
KTAB. 
m KGW. KFI. KFOA KNX. KOA. KFWB. 
KPO. KGO Kl ,GTT. KFWI. KYA. 

KTAB. 



1" m KGW. KFI, KFOA. KNX. KFWB KPO 

KGO. KI.X. KFWI. KJBS. 
11:00 pm— KGW. KNX, KFWI. KFOA 
12 pm— 

SATURDAY 

7:00 am— KNX. KPO. KFWI. 

8:00 am— KNX. KPO. KFWI. 

9:00 am— KNX, KTAB. KJBS. 
10:00am— KGW. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KFWI, KJBS 
10:30 am— KNX, KOA. KPO. KFWI. KJBS. 
11:00 am— KGA. KOA. KFWI. KYA. 
11:30 am— KGA, KOA. KPO. KGO. KYA. 
12:00 m— KNX. KGA. KOA. KFWB. KPO, KGO 

KFWI. KYA. 
12:30 pm— KNX. KFWB. KGO. KGTT. KYA 

1:00 pm— KFWB, KPO, KGO, KFWI. KYA. 

2:00 pm— KNX, KFWB. KPO. KGO, -KLX. KJBS. 

3:00 pm— KNX. KPO, KJBS. 

4:00 pm— KNX. KPO, KGO.KFWI. 

5:00 pm— KNX, KFWB. KPO, KFWI. 

5:30 pm— KFI, KNX. KGA. KFWB. KPO. KFWI, 

6:00 pm— KGW. KFI. KNX. KGA, KFWB. KPO. 

KFWI, KYA. 
7:00 pm— KFI. KNX. KOA. KFWB. KPO. KLX, 

KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
7:30 pm— KFI. KNX. KOA, KFWB. 
8:00 pm— KGW. KFI, KNX. KGA. KOA, KFWB. 

KPO, KGO, KFUS, KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
9:00 pm— KFI. KNX. KFWB, KPO. KGO. KFWI. 
KYA. KTAB. 
10:00 pm— KGW. KFI. KNX. KFWB. KPO, KGO. 

KFWI. 
11:00 pm— KGW. KFI. KNX, KPO. KGO. KFWI. 
12:00 pm— KNX, KPO. KGO. KFWI. 

1 :00 am— KFWI. 

2 :00 am— KFWI. 



Daredevil's Terrors 

Interviewer — "Aren't you some- 
times frightened when you look down 
at the street below you ?" 

Steeplejack — "Yes. Only yester- 
day I thought sure I was going to see 
a pedestrian get run over." — Life. 



CLUB 
AUTO SERVICE CO. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 

For All Occasions 

Day and Night 

City Sijrhtseeinc $3.00 per hour 

Shopping -------- 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips. Taxicah Rates 



PROSPECT 

4000 



585 Post. St.. 
San Francisco 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime. Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given tJ 

Each Order 

Office and Works: 1625 Mission St. 
Phone Market 7913 
Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 
rbury Blilc. » 
Phone Prospect ! 

Work Called for and Delivered 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 16, 1927 




The 

Name 



PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whether 
it be typewriter pa- 
per or manuscript 
cover, means com- 
plete satisfaction. 
There is a grade for 
every need. Ask 
your printer or sta- 
tioner to show you 
samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
First Street. San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 



Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Max Rosenthal 

WHERE GOOD TAILORING 
-_5C0STS LESS 

A choice selection of seasonable 

Woolens suitable for Formal, 

Sport and Business wear is 

now ready for your early 

consideration. 

527 POST ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

OPP. OLYMPIC CLUB 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 



Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 




By E. V. WELLER 
National Automobile Club 

Among the Glaciers 

With highways in good condition 
and innumerable scenic attractions 
along the way, the trip to Mt. Rainier 
National Park is growing in popular- 
ity with the vacationist. Leading 
through the central and northern 
parts of California, through the state 
of Oregon and into Washington to 
Tacoma, a pleasant trip is outlined by 
the National Automobile Club. From 
San Francisco, the route leads up the 
Pacific Highway through Sacramen- 
to, Red Bluff, Redding and Yreka to 
the Oregon line. 

After leavng the southern bound- 
ary of Oregon, the highway leads 
through Grant's Pass, Roseburg, Eu- 
gene, Salem, and into Portland. From 
Portland into Washington through 
Kalama, Centralia and Olympia the 
route leads into Tacoma from where 
the trip to Mt. Rainier National Park 
is begun. It is but a short distance 
from Tacoma, on Puget Sound, to 
Washington's great snow-capped vol- 
canic mountain — 56 miles. 

Leaving Tacoma, the National 
Park Highway is a fitting approach to 
the beautiful park. Winding through 
forest and across park-like prairies, 
it reaches the great log gateway 
which marks the entrance to the Na- 
tional Park. Here guests are regis- 
tered and automobile permits secured 

Longmire Springs, at an elevation 
of 2,732 feet comes next along the 
way. At Longmire there are 48 hot 
and cold springs, a phenomenon of 



much interest to the tourist. National 
Park Inn is also located here. 

From Longmire a gradual climb 
brings the motorist to the terminus of 
Nisqually Glacier. Ten miles more of 
glorious mountain scenery terminate 
the highway at Paradise Valley, high 
up in the mountains. Here the atmos- 
phere is clear and crisp and the ' 
panoramic beauty is unsurpassed. 

Mt. Lassen, visible from the start 
of the trip at Tacoma, is the highest 
volcano in the United States, being at 
an altitude of 14,408 feet. The top, 
covered with snow and ice except in 
spots melted away by the volcanic 
heat, is not the source of its glaciers. 
The glaciers originate about four 
thousand feet below the top and are 
fed with the winter snows and aval- 
anches coming down from the sum- 
mit. 

A climb to the summit presents no 
difficulties to the 32-degree mountain 
climber and although the inexperi- 
enced will find it somewhat out of the 
ordinary as a hike he will count the 
reward well worth the climb. Hun- 
dreds of tourists make the climb 
every summer. 



Don't throw paper sacks, bottles, 
picnic plates or tin cans onto the 
highways from the car while touring 
the country. The villager and farmer 
may retaliate as one Middle- Western- 
er is planning to do. This particular 
farmer is saving up all the tin cans 
and other rubbish thrown near or at 
him by the city motorists during the 
summer. In the fall, he plans to make 
a visit to the city and return the col- 
lection to its original owners by 
strewing it on the boulevards. 



Automobile manufacturers have 
been asked to make all bumpers at an 
equal distance from the ground, 18 
inches. Thus, bumper would bump 
bumper instead of becoming entan- 
gled or injuring other parts. 



"Sweeten the highways!" Never! 
It can't be done. It was tried in Egypt 
without success, due to the fact that 
concrete won't harden if there is 
sugar present in the mixture. 

Two cases of concrete failed to 
harden and an investigation led to the 
fact that there was some sugar in it. 
The alarm was sounded that sugar 
combines with lime to form sacchar- 
ates. These destroyed the resistance 
of the concrete, and the sugar part of 
the road, although it may have had 
its good points from a sentimental 
angle, was found wanting from a 
practical standpoint. 



July 16, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



i5 




AFTER FORTY 
By Lue F. Vernon 

After forty, locks grow thinner, 

We grow stouter — "there's the rub?" — 

Linger longer o'er our dinner, 
Shirk the matutinal tub. 

After forty we get lazy, 

To the lads the girls resign — 
They may flirt with Dot and Daisy 
While we loiter o'er our wine. 

After forty we discover 

Aches and pains distinctly new. 
Once a lobster salad lover, 

Now we court the homely stew. 
After forty fidgets find us, 

Sad to tell, an easy prey; 
Leaving lightsomeness behind us, 

We grow graver day by day. 

After forty, saucy misses 

Treat us like their own papas — 
No feat now of stolen kisses, 

Billets — doux, irate mammas; 
But, their white arms calmly resting 

On our shoulders, if you please, 
They will ask (I am not jesting) 

After our rheumatic knees. 

After forty, graybeards claim us 

Quite as "one of them" — ah, me? 
Men of sixty thus defame us — 

We are only forty-three ? 
Old "Jim Crow," too, crawls with pleasure, 

After forty on our phiz, 
Time, who picks our locks at leisure. 

Winks at wigs — the horrid quiz? 

What's the moral of the matter? 

This, and lay it well to heart: 
After forty, cease light chatter. 

Act no more the stripling's part. 
Let us take with resignation, 

In old fogies' ranks a place — 
'Tis an art worth cultivation. 

That of "growing old" with grace. 

— From the "Spectator." 



KNOWLEDGE 

I have known sorrow — therefore I 

May laugh with you, friend, more merrily 

Than those who never sorrowed upon earth 

And know not laughter's worth. 

I have known laughter — therefore I 
May sorrow with you far more tenderly 

Than those who never knew how sad a thing 
Seems merriment to one heart's suffering. 
— Theodosia Garrison in "The Joy o' Life. 




LOU W. SARTOR. Propriclor 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 

Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco. Calif. 



GRAYSTONE 130 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garatre, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage. 1361 Bush St. 

Management of WILLIAM SAUNDERS 



TRUNKS — RACKS — BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVENUE 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 
DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 

Established 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON. General Agent 
544 Market Street, San Francisco. Cai. 



TELEPHONE SUTTER 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 16, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY IOTH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

JUNE 30th, 1927 

Assets $113,925,831.54 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $575,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (A]4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought : FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued; CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA anu 
at LONDON. ENGLAND ; NEW YORK ; PORTLAND, ORE. ; SEATTLE, 
WASH. ; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager ABSt. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pipe and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES. GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS. ETC. 

San Francisco, Calif. Loa Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



e& m tf Jj£5*>5«l» 



tSaliforaia^X&tjrrtisrr. 

TRANSCONTINENTAL HIGHWAY 
EXPOSITION EDITION 

A beautiful number devoted to the 
opening of the Victory Highway 
and the Reno Exposition. 
Brimming with articles of current 
and historical significance. 
Splendidly illustrated. 

Second Edition 

NOW OUT — 50c PER COPY 



Finance 



H. J. Brunnier, chairman of the Highways Committee 
of the California State Highways Association, says : "The 
frequency of highway accidents resulting from traffic 
congestion has demonstrated not only that we must con- 
struct our new highways of ample width but also that we 
need to widen many of the roads and bridges now in use. 
This has led to the construction in the vicinity of large 
industrial centers and on main thoroughfares of what is 
known as the 'super-highway' to insure the maximum 

road capacity speed and safety." 

* * * 

Guy C. Earl, president of the Great Western Power 
Company of California, states that subscriptions to pre- 
ferred capital stock during the year ran over $2,250,000 
and the close of the year showed 8,825 holders of 7 per 
cent preferred stock, a total of 11,606 holders, being an 
increase of 2,341 for the year. Preferred sales through 
the company's own organization during the year, 
amounted to 82,264,200, an average of six shares per pur- 
chaser. 

The extent of the life insurance business appears from 
the fact that approximately 60,000 agents leave every 
year, according to Manager John Marshall Holcombe, 
Jr., of the Life Insurance Sales Research Bureau. This 
is an enormous 'mortality' and would seem to imply that 
the material chosen for that particular work is not picked 
with sufficient care. At the same meeting it was pointed 
out that lapsed business is not worth going after for re- 
storation. 

It took 200,000 insurance people as a field force last 
year to produce $16,000,000,000 of life insurance busi- 
ness. 

* * * 

Whitney Palache, well known Californian, will retire as 
United States Manager of the Commercial Union fleet, at 
the end of August, to enjoy a well earned leisure. He 
has been engaged in underwriting for 42 years. Upon 
his retirement, he will return to California, his native 
state, to reside. It was here that he first won distinction 
as manager on the Pacific Coast for the Hartford Fire. 

* * * 

According to the Santa Fe reports, California crop con- 
ditions continue favorable and production will probably be 
the best for the last ten years. Grain yields have been 
satisfactory, and the grape production of the 312,424 
acres now under cultivation, is immense. The area given 
to grape production was 299,765 acres last year. On the 
other hand, California cotton production is below that of 
last year. 

* * * 

It is interesting to learn that of the total steel produc- 
tion of the last year, railroads have used twenty-five per 
cent, a total value of $507,302,000. This has been largely 
due to major construction jobs, among which may be 
especially noted the new 210 mile Southern Pacific Cas- 
cade mainline between San Francisco and Portland. 
« » * 

All previous records for activity of the San Francisco 
Stock and Bond Exchange were broken during tire" first 
six months of 1927. There was an increase of 11.6 per 
cent over the same period of last year. Shares thus far, 
for 1927, totalled 7,468,578 as compared with 4.930,298 
for the first six months of 1926. 



Nubbville Spark 

"Lindbergh is gettin' Nubbville folks interested in 
geography in spite of themselves." 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, $1. 35c, 50c. 75c S1.00.S1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p.m. to 1 :00 a. m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 



&/ IMMjUlLm blUmdy 



490 POST ST., S. F. 
Garfield 234 
CLIPT HOTEL 
Prospect 4700 



RAMONA STUDIO, PALO ALTO 

Palo Alto 433 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Matson Nav. Co. Steamers 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' Lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private Dining Rooms 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystone 8100 



Weekdays, Luncheon % .75 

(11:30 to 2 p. tn.) 
Dinner. Week Days & Sundays 1.50 



No visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

93 Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 
11 :30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 
6 :30 p. m. to S :30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4 :30 to B:80 p. m. only 
CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from H-ghway 







Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN S:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. 
1 nsurpassed Cuisine 




IKm*H 




14-Mile House 


CARL LEONHARDT 
Formerly of Golden Gate Park Casino 







CAROLINE JONES 






Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 


i^»H^5v-.l i 


\ w«« 


2:30 and Tea from 3 to 5 


^'WiU l V 




Lxclusive use of room for club dinners 




4*° 


S34 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 




ICE CREAM^ 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 

POLK t CALIFORNIA STS I LUNCHEON 

5100 Ym" iioi l~ INNER; 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

STERLING ANDERSON, Manager 
Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 



1140 GEARY ST. - T EL. GRAYSTONE 4266 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy- Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blacksmithing. 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 




We do Handwork, too, and have a large 
Staff of Experts. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 

250 Tncllth St. PHONE MARKET 916 

Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 



DR. B. FRANKLIN PEARCE 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

HOURS: 9-12. 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building. Powell and Market Streets, San Francisco 

PHONE GARFIELD 5394 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 




MME. M. S. E. LEE 




Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 




583 Post Street San Francisco 
In Virginia Hotel Phone Franklin 2510 




Antioch Bridge Route 



Sacramento 

Is Now PAVED All the Way 



No Traffic Congestion No Delays 

The Cool, Quick Way 

Along the Sacramento River, Through 
the Netherlands of America 




From Oakland 
The Tunnel Road 



From Sacramento 
South on 21st Street 



H 



AMERICAN TOLL-BRIDGE 
COMPANY 

Owners and Operators of 

CARQUINEZ BRIDGE and ANTIOCH BRIDGE 

Tolls the Same on Both Bridges 
Autos, 60c Passengers, 10c 




o4mbassador~ 

Los An-g-eles 

Plan to enjov Southern California'* 

glorious summer climate this year at 

this world-famous hotel. 

CAM, VAN VECHTEN 

ious Author, writing in VANITY FAIR. «yj: 

Tbt Ambassador a, I ibouia tbink. ont oj tbt very befl bottu 
m tbt world- The service is tuberlatnt, tbt foodaiunt, 
tbt courtesy of management ana employees unfailing." 

In the wide range ol its attractions, the 
Ambassador likewise exceh Superb. 
27-acre park, with miniature golt count 



and open-air p. 



ige. Riding, hunting 

eluding privileges oi 

Motion picture 

.thin the 



d all sports 
Rancho Golf Club 
theatei and 25 smart shops w 
hotel Dancing nightly to the 
the famous Cocoanut Grove orchestra. 



Moderate Summer Rates 
Attractive rooms with bath as low 
as $5. $6 and $7 a day single, 
from $7.00 double. 



WRITE (or Chef. Booklrt of 
Ctlif. Rcapcs m J Intonuooa. 
BEN U FRANK &U*ncr 




SAIL TO NEW YORK 







-<r 


t 




w 










;) 


a 

















SISTER SHIPS 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL 
and GAY HAVANA, en route 

Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropics 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail 
Liner with seven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and 
historic ports — Manzanillo, Mexico ; San Jose de Guatemala ; La Lib- 
ertad, Salvador; Corinto, Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone. See 
the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, Cristobal and historic old Panama. 
Every cabin on a Panama Mail Liner is an outside one; each has an 
electric fan, and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. 
There is an orchestra for dancing; deck games and sports and salt water 
swimming tank. The Panama Mail is world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, includ- 
ing bed and meals on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return hy 
rail (or vice versa) for as little as $380. (This price does not include berth 
and meals on trains.) Panama Mail Liners leave San Francisco and New 
York approximately every 21 days. Next sailings from San Francisco: 
SS VENEZUELA, July 30th; SS ECUADOR, August 20th. From New 
York: SS ECUADOR, July 16th; SS COLOMBIA, August 13th. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
oi ticket agent, or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 

548 S. SPRING STREET 2 PINE STREET 10 HANOVER SQUARE 
LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 




^Hollywood Plaza Hotel - 

HOLLYWOOD CALIF. 







$5.00 PER YEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Saturday, July 23, 1927 



'■- 



LOS ANGELES 



Horse Show Function at Palo Alto 




Flashlight. a fine type of saddle pony that will compete at the Palo Alto 

Horse Show August 8-13. The rider is Carol Lansburgh, petite 

daughter of the G. Albert Lansburghs oj San Francisco. 




"Such sights as youthful poets dream, 
On Summer eves by haunted stream . . . ." 

— Milton 



Established July 20, 1856 






Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1S56, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, Jr.. from 18S4 to 1925 
Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 26S Market Street. San Francisco. California. Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco 
California. Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. London. England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year. 

$5.00. Foreign, one year. $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00 



Vol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JULY 23, 1927 



No. 30 



From One Thing to Another 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



Poison ! 

It would be a stupid person, indeed, who, being at- 
tracted to the beauty or lusciousness of wild berries, 
would proceed to pick and eat them, with no knowledge 
of natural food in wood or fields ; very few people have 
the temerity to gather mushrooms unless they are fami- 
liar with the edible ones ; when they do, it inevitably 
means illness or death ; then why, will the misguided 
wander along beaches and pluck and devour the seem- 
ingly innocent bivalve without a knowledge of ichthyol- 
ogy to assist them ? 

Anyone of a logical turn of mind would realize that 
shell fish which cling to piles or rocks along the shores 
of bays or rivers receiving city sewage, might, at times, 
be questionable food. It is a fact that wooden piles are 
treated with poisonous chemicals to resist corrosion, and 
this poison in turn, corrupts the fish. Mussels would ap- 
pear to be unusually unreliable, for I have heard of per- 
sons being poisoned by mussels gathered from rocks, along 
a coast unpoluted by sewage. These bivalves had better 
be left alone, unless one can order them at an absolutely 
dependable market or restaurant. 



Nation-Wide Motorists 

California highways and by-ways are being traveled 
by people from all over the United States. Practically 
every state in the Union is represented by auto plates 
that 'one encounters on even the shortest drive, and na- 
tives and residents of the Golden State should realize 
that every motorist they meet, from Oshkosh or Kala- 
mazoo, can be made into an advertiser or booster for our 
California. 

It is our desire, or should be, to offer them the finest 
roads in the world, and even it" our building program is a 
little backward, and our road finances slightly tangled, 
we should always bear the idea in mind, that the condi- 
tions of roads is a most important criterion in judging 
prosperity of a community or state. 

The California Highway Commission has put forth un- 
tiring efforts into creating beauty for our highways. Sys- 
tematic tree planting was inaugurated in 1020, and since 
then, hundreds of miles have been planted. At the pres- 
ent time, the Highway Commission is maintaining 56.400 
trees on the state highways, covering a lineal distance of 
approximately 685 miles. 



This is more of a task than the layman realizes. It de- 
mands consistent inspection and care throughout the en- 
tire life of the tree, including special planting, watering 
and protection of young trees against insect pest, dam- 
age by squirrels, gophers and moles and loose stock driven 
along the highways. The hazard is also great. 

Shaded highways are a necessity in the hot valleys of 
California, besides being a mode of beautification that is 
practical as well as aesthetic. There is nothing the jaded 
motorist welcomes more fervently than shade on a scorch- 
ing day. 



"Snoopers" 

Busybodies will always exist; just so long as the qual- 
ity of prying or "snooping" into other people's business 
remains in the general make-up of certain persons, the 
great urge of reforming the world will actuate a large 
percentage of our citizenry. 

A new busybodies' or snoopers' association has been 
recently formed in the United States of America. 

It is called: "The Citizens' Service Association," and 
is nothing more nor less than a body of private citizens 
who have constituted themselves as policemen without 
badges or official authority ; they are, in fact, merely offi- 
cious, and obnoxiously officious, at that. 

Their ambition is to start a snooping campaign against 
the "demon rum," and to aid federal officers — without 
being asked — in their fight for prohibition enforcement. 

Here is what R. P. Andrews, Pres. of the Merchants & 
Manufacturers Association, says anent the above: 

"I think that the church and state should be kept sep- 
arate. The church and its members should confine them- 
selves to saving men's souls. It should look to its attend- 
ance and try to make things more attractive for members 
instead of creating suspicions regarding neighbors and 
entering into outside political activities. The Citizens' 
ice Association will fail." 

Statement of John F. Maury. President of the Wash- 
ington Real Estate Board: 

"The scheme of the Citizens' Service Association is a 
ridiculous one. One of the most objectionable features is 
the opportunity given to obtain revenge in private feuds 
between neighbors and acquaintances. I am opposed to 
such measures, which threaten to disrupt law and order 
in the district." 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 23, 1927 






Practical Aviation 

We have had more flights with practical success, for in 
spite of the loss of the plane, the Smith flight to the Ha- 
waiian Islands may be considered as an accomplishment 
of its purpose. Military and civilian planes have done 
about equally well in the pursuit of records for trans- 
oceanic flying and we may safely flatter ourselves that 
we have the material for air-conquest at least to the same 
extent as other peoples, who, while they may have been 
less sensational in their methods, have nevertheless pro- 
ceeded along the line of progress in the science of aviation. 

Chamberlin, however, recently struck the true note 
when he said that the next experiment must be made to 
see whether long distance flying can be made to pay. 
After all, there is the gist of the matter. Unless aviation 
is a paying proposition commercially, it will be nothing 
but a sport, a splendid sport, and one calling for all sorts 
of fine qualities; still, a sport as equitation is today, as 
compared with what the horse meant fifty years ago. 

That is the heart of the matter. Of course these pre- 
liminary trips are very necessary to prove that as a prac- 
tical problem the air can be traversed by a plane with 
practical certainty, although that had been substantially 
decided some time ago, even in the war. The French are 
about to try out planes to give special speed, where re- 
quired, between New York and Europe, by sending up 
planes from the decks of passenger steamers and thus sav- 
ing time. It is obvious that, although this is good in an 
emergency, where special speed is required, it does not 
apply to the general problem. There is still much to be 
done. 

* * * 

Shaky Ground 

The newspapers on Monday morning showed a black 
prospect. There was an incipient revolution in Vienna; 
heavy rioting had occured, numbers had been killed and 
it was anticipated that the revolution proper had not yet 
been staged but that this incipient rioting was merely 
preliminary. Apart from the ever imminent Red peril, 
which pervades the whole of European political life, there 
are troubles connected with the strongly expressed de- 
sire of the Austrian people, as a whole, to be absorbed in 
the German republic. This might be a very good thing 
for Austria and Central Europe, but would not be enthu- 
siastically endorsed by the French. 

Then, the ever active Mussolini is to the fore again, 
demanding that the railroads, blocked by a general strike, 
be cleared for Italian trains or he will clear them with an 
army. This would be invasion. If Mussolini can justify 
an invasion of Austria for the purpose of clearing the 
tracks for Italian trains to Germany, we get a curious ap- 
plication of the principles of our interstate-commerce 
regulations applied to international concerns. Once this 
was conceded, the United States of Europe would not be 
far off; for if one nation could invade another for the 
purpose of preventing interference with commerce, the 
necessity of a general governing body with police powers, 
would become at once apparent. It will be interesting to 
see what Mussolini can do in this matter. 

The stupidity of the League of Nations becomes appar- 
ent in a situation like this. The organization is not calcu- 
lated to act with force and energy and surely when crisis 
like the above occur, and they may occure at any time, 
force and energy are prime necessities. 



Again, Our Bridge 

There is a feeling throughout the entire country, as we 
read our exchanges, that San Francisco is not having fair' 
treatment in the matter of the bridge, which the Secre- 
tary of the Navy has again placed under his disapproval. 
Of course, we know that Secretary Wilbur is in the hands 
of the admirals, when he makes this decision and that the 
naval board is really back of the blockade against our de- 
velopment and growth. 

It would not matter so much if the contentions made 
by those against the bridge were such as could not be, 
logically and easily met. If it did happen that we were- 
in such a position that we were obliged to meet a situa- 
tion, in which the interests of the country and our own I 
local interests were in necessary and natural antagonism, 
we should have to make the best of it. San Francisco is) 
patriotic enough to sacrifice, willingly, anything to the) 
well-being of the country, as a whole. But there havej 
been no reasons advanced, other than the familiar andl 
stale arguments, which have been put forward, time and! 
time again. 

There were no reasons offered against the construction 
of a bridge across the Golden Gate which, after all, is a J 
practical necessity to the real growth and development of | 
Marin County and the Northern part of the State, along 
the ocean. Yet, it is clear that reasons could have been 
presented, much stronger and more cogent than those i 
which have been applied to the Rincon Hill bridge project. 
Imaginings get us nowhere; most of us can imagine 
enough danger connected with any move to effectively 
paralyze our activities. Rational caution is one thing; 
panic, unreasonable fear, is another. 



Anti-Saloon League Tyranny 

The recent exposures of the machinations of the Anti- 
Saloon League are astounding, even to those of us who 
considered ourselves fairly well informed as to its opera- 
tions and fairly well cognizant of the tyrannical and cor- 
rupt schemes which inflamed the minds of its manipula- 
tors. But the audacity and the assumption of this clique 
surpasses the most partial imaginings of its critics. 

Imagine a group of people, who never at the most were 
more than 300,000 strong, presuming to dictate the af- 
fairs of the United States government, to have a hand in 
the appointment of federal officials and United States 
marshals, to have a controlling voice in the appointment 
and the management of the federal judiciary, to seek and 
obtain enormous sums of money aggregating some S65,- 
taking into their own hands functions which belong to 
the regularly appointed servants of the people! Indeed, 
so far were they lost in their own form of drunkenness, 
that, at one time, they had about decided to launch im- 
peachment proceedings against the President himself for 
slackness in obeying their demands. 

It is very doubtful whether any civilized country ever 
was in a dilemma like this. To have an irresponsible group 
of second raters and petty ministers arrogating to them- 
selves such power, places us in the most ridiculous light 
in the presence of the whole world. It is an intolerable 
and disgusting situation and must be at once cleared up. 



July 23, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Wells Fargo Anniversary 

The recent Wells Fargo anniversary cannot go without 
notice since the State and the whole Pacific Coast owe so 
much to the energy and enterprise of the organization 
which seventy-five years ago took upon itself the arduous 
task of maintaining connections and business relations 
between the then distant and uncivilized West and the 
parent East. Seventy-five years is a relatively short time, 
but it spells the whole era between Indian primitive sav- 
agery and modern commerce and industrialism, the his- 
tory of two thousand years of human growth, in fact. 

Wells Fargo Bank and Union Trust Company is now 
the oldest financial institution in the West and the larg- 
est west of the Mississippi, confining its activities to one 
city. It dates from March 18, 1852, when Henry Wells, a 
New Hampshire banker, and William G. Fargo, who had 
been in the express business in New York, obtained a 
charter from the State of New York to engage in the 
banking and express business. In July of that year they 
established their first banking and express business at 
114 Montgomery street in this city. Their first advertise- 
ments ran "Gold dust is bought and bills of exchange 
given in any amount. General and special deposits re- 
ceived. Collections and remittances made in all parts of 
the world." It was the only bank in San Francisco that 
survived the financial hurricane of Black Friday. 

From that time on the story of the bank and the ex- 
press business is one of constant and rapid progress, until 
it starts on the last quarter of the century of its life with 
resources of more than $152,000,000, taking Wells Fargo 
Bank and the Union Trust Company, which has developed 
from it, together. 



California and the South 

The later statistics on foreign trade show that the 
products of California are finding increasing markets in 
Central and South America. Commercial travellers re- 
turning from those parts find a great increase in the 
amount of California food products in the hands of mer- 
chants. California is becoming well known and canned 
fruits and dried fruits of our making are in great demand. 

This is a natural market and should be of enormous 
value to the state, if properly developed. Its development 
depends, however, more than anything else, upon the at- 
titude taken by our people to this trade. It must be im- 
pressed upon our dealers who seek for foreign trade that 
the taste of foreigners must be considered and met. It 
does not follow that, because a certain product meets with 
our enthusiastic approval when placed before us in a 
certain way, that the same fashion of presentation will 
be acceptable to other people in other places with a dif- 
ferent history. As one authority, who has made a close 
examination of this matter says: "Intelligent direction is 
necessary to bring success to the manufacturer or ex- 
porter who wishes to deal with these people, for their 
methods, thoughts and ideas of business are totally dif- 
ferent from ours. This does not mean, though, that they 
are not good business men or keen buyers ; they are all of 
that." 

That is very true. It offers somewhat of a problem un- 
der our new system of standardization. This latter has 
been so perfected that any departure from the system is 
attended with financial loss. It is when we come into con- 
tact with foreign trade with backward communities that 
we learn the advantage of standarized publicity. 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 



Some Mistake 

Hubby — Your check to the grocer came back with "no 
funds" on it. 

Wifie — That's funny, I saw an ad in the paper yester- 
day which said the bank has a surplus of over $3,000,000. 

— Green Gander. 

* * * 

Silver Digger 

Eeny — He uses the touch system. 

Meeny— On the typewriter? 

Eeny — No, on his friends. — U. of Wash. Columns. 

* * * 

Our idea of a life job is membership in the committee 
Chicago has just appointed to investigate crime. — New 
York Evening Post. 

* * * 

Weekly Procession 

If all the autos in the world were laid end to end, it 
would be Sunday afternoon. — Judge. 

* * * 

Patent Silencer 

"Pa," said Clarence, "what is an optimist?" 
"He's a man, son," replied his dad, "who thinks if he 
tells the back-seat driver to shut up, she'll keep mum the 
rest of the trip." — Cincinnati Enquirer. , 

* • • 
Bright Messenger 

"Willie," said his mother, "I wish you would run across 
the street and see how old Mrs. Brown is this morning." 
A few minutes later Willie returned and reported : 
"Mrs. Brown says it's none of your business how old 
she is." — Boys' Life. 

* » » 

Cop (to man driving past a Stop sign) — Hey, there, 
can't you read ? 

Motorist — Sure I can read, but I can't stop! — Black & 

Blue Jay. 

* • • 

Irate Pater — What do you mean by coming home at 
five a. m.? 

Indignant Daughter — For cryin' out loud, Pop ! I have 
to patronize the old roost some time, don't I? — Washing- 
ton & Lee Mink. 

* • • 

Well Hooked 
Tiresome Work 

Mother (to small daughter) -yWhy, Hilda, what do you 
mean by saying you've had enough of sex appeal? 

Hilda (wearily) — Oh, nothing — only we were playing 
tag and I was "IT" practically all afternoon. 

* * * 

No Time to Waste 
Sick Chorus Girl — I have a confession to make. 
Doctor — Do you want a priest ? 
S. C. G. — Hell, no! Send for a publisher. 

» • • 

Nothing Under the Plate 

Sandy — My son writes that he is in a tight place. 
Jock — What's the trouble? 
"He's a waiter in Edinburgh." 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 23, 1927 





ociery 




By Antoinette Arnold 



Athletic Society 

Has all Society turned athletic ? 

It seems so; for, no longer is the 
drawing-room lily, fragile and pale, 
the popular one in Society. Her more 
robust sister, given to athletics, is 
the social favorite. 

Golf, tennis, rowing, riding, motor- 
ing, hiking — are society pastimes 
and the debuntante who proves the 
best "pal" in out-of-door events is 
the chosen one these modern days. 

True, attire has much to do with it. 
And, the modish garments women 
wear in participating with their suit- 
ors, their brothers and with husband 
— are an encouragement for the ath- 
letically inclined. 

Some one has said that the pleas- 
ing game of croquet would have re- 
tained its popularity years ago had 
some wise modiste just had foresight 
enough to have designed "croquet 
sweaters, blouse and smartly fash- 
ioned 'croquet sets' for women." 
* * * 

Croquet Popular 

As it is, there are many prominent 
folks who really enjoy the intricacies 
of croquet and play many a delight- 
ful game on the pretty croquet 
ground of their country estates. 

The famous Norris family, at Sara- 
toga, have a most charming croquet 
ground, and it is not an unusual sight, 
by any means, to see the beloved au- 
thor, Kathleen Norris, and her dis- 
tinguished novelist husband, Charles 
Norris, competing for honors in a 
spirited croquet game. 

How often do I recall how my own 
mother and father used to play 
croquet. What fun they had! What 
arguments, too, for croquet can be 
made a game of real competitive 
sport, and they who are skilled in the 
rulings of wooden balls and grounded 
arches, say: "Oh, there's competition 
in croquet — plenty of it, if you know 
the game." 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway, Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



More Strenuous 

However, we started out to talk 
about the more strenuous pleasures 
of Society — and that of course, means 
the ever popular game of the golf 
links — where Society folks mingle 
constantly. 

No California resort seems com- 
plete, these days, without its golf 
course and even up at Lake Tahoe, 
where Society was formerly given 
over to the less strenuous athletics of 
rowing and fishing, hiking, according 
to inclinations and endurances, the 
fashionables there find interesting 
golf links. 

Dancing, after nightfall, naturally, 
has first claim in Society's realm, al- 
though bowling, and the various in- 
door games also have their appeal for 

many. 

* * * 

Treasure Hunts 

Just about so often, the fascinating 
lure of treasure hunts bobs its head 
above the popular sports and de- 
butantes and swains rush madly to 
and fro, engaging in an elusive treas- 
ure-search. 

This last week an exciting treasure 
hunt was held at Del Monte, where 
the merry chase began at the famous 
old custom house, in Monterey, and 
ended at the picturesque and modern 
maze in the Del Monte grounds with 
some things hid near the beautiful 
Roman plunge. 

Miss Vail Jones, San Rafael society 
girl; Miss Dorothy Burns, so popular 
at Pebble Beach ; Miss Carol Kofer, 
pretty debutante of this city and the 
Misses Lavender Stewart and Nanette 
Stewart, visitors from Melbourne, 
Australia, and Mrs. J. C. Sturtevant 
of Chicago participated in this merry 
game of hunting for hidden treasures. 
The men of the party included Messrs. 
Oren Taft III, Thomas Williams, Al- 
fred Hemmersmith, Earl Riley, John 

Bun and John Kofer. 

* * * 

Polo Parties 

Every year polo gains more adher- 
ents. This wonderfully popular and 
typical "men's sport" is now attract- 
ing society women, more and more, 
some of them even venturing upon 
the ponies to participate in the game. 

But, let's hope that polo will con- 
tinue to belong to the men. 

Women have competed in practical- 
ly every known sport with men, and 
in many instances outdistanced their 



valiant companions in the very games 
which the cavaliers taught them. 

Polo has long been a he-man game. 
It is theirs by right of heritage and 
long, long victories. Let us really 
hope that they may continue to claim 
polo — for we, women - folks, alas, 
should have some just on-looking 
sports to engage our enthusiasm. 

I, for one, would rather watch a 
well-matched polo tournament than 
any other game it has ever been my 
great privilege to see. 



Society Entertains 

Peninsula society gave many pretty 
parties, interesting luncheons, out-of- 
door barbecues and a series of elabor- 
ate dinner parties recently to distin- 
guished visitors from afar who came 
to California for the summer season. 

Mr .and Mrs. William Roth gave a 
delightful luncheon at their Woodside 
home in compliment to well-known 
society folks. 

Their guests included: 

Dr. and Mrs. Alanson Weeks, Mr. 
and Mrs. Edwin Eddy, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles McCormick, Dr. and Mrs. 
George Lyman, Mr. and Mrs. Augus- 
tus Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart 
Lowery, Mr. and Mrs. Russell Slade, 
Miss Marion Zeile, Mr. Vernon Ten- 
ney, Mr. Herbert Gallagher and Mr. 
Charles N. Black. 

* * * 

Hamilton Luncheon 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hamilton 
entertained a group of friends in the 
Menlo Circus Club, their guests for 
this occasion including: 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hays Smith, Mr. 
and Mrs. Cliff Weatherwax, Mr. and 
Mrs. Cyril Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. Jos- 
eph Oliver Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. Wal- 
ter Filer, Mr. and Mrs. Archibald 
Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Walker Salis- 
bury, Mrs. Ferdinand Thieriot, Mr. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Franciico 

Telephone Sutter 3660 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



July 23, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Raymond Armsby and Mr. George 
Newhall Jr. 



Polo Players 

Prominent polo players last week 
in Menlo included Mr. Cliff Weather- 
wax, Mr. Archibald Johnson. Mr. 
George Pope Jr. and Mr. Robert Mil- 
ler. 

Mr. Walter Hobart was the judge 
of the polo races. He was assisted by 
Mr. Alexander Hamilton, Mr. Ross 
Ambler Curran, Mr. William Roth, 
Dr. Max Rothschild, Mr. Robert Mc- 
Gibbon and Mr. Joseph Oliver Tobin, 
one of the most enthusiastic polo 
players of the country. 



Polo at Stanford 

Did you know that polo is being 
taught at Stanford? 

It has recently been added to the 
list of athletics and many young col- 
legians have already asserted their 
enthusiasm and their ability to sit 
well on the saddle and carry other 
honors with technical strikes and 
drives for scoring. 

The manliness of the sport makes 
its appeal to every true out-of-door 
athlete. Besides, the technicalities 
appeal to their intelligence. 

And don't forget the horses! 

Every regular man loves a horse 
and the well trained polo ponies be- 
come real pets as well as necessary 
animals for the success of any big 
tournament in polo fields. 

So who knows but that Polo games, 
may in the future, make rising claim 
to college sports and popularity. 

Polo is really a magnificent sport — 
and every one who plays the game at 
all, loves it beyond measure. 



Midshipmen Entertained 

Miss Delia Neagle entertained a 
group of visiting midshipmen and 
several local friends for dinner and 
dancing at the Hotel Whitcomb on 
Saturday evening. The party was 
chaperoned by Mrs. Henry Shannon, 
and the young guests were: 

Misses Arthelia Shannon, Hattie 
MacWharton, Dorothy Palamountain, 
and Midshipmen Kenneth McPher- 
son, Everett Schaefer and James 0. 
Vosseler. 

* » » 

Prominent Visitors 

Dame Alice Godman and her two 
daughters of Sussex, England, who 

are visiting this city, have been regis- 
tered at the Hotel Whitcomb. Dame 
Godman is well known for her exten- 
sive war work and received the honor 
title in recognition of her splendid 
and noble activities. From San Fran- 
cisco Dame Godman will go to Canada. 





BJ-'' l-'S'l 



HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 
Nob Hill 

A Srr.art Town House for a 

Day or a Year, 

600 Rooms 

Tariff : From $4 per day 



Garden Tea Given 

By Hotel Women's Club 

Mrs. LeRoy Linnard, the lovely 
bride of the famous hotel manager of 
the Fairmont Hotel, was honor guest 
at a most delightful affair given last 
Tuesday by the California Hotel Wo- 
men's Club of which Mrs. John Zee- 
man is the president. 

A large card party and garden tea 
was staged in the handsome new Ben- 
jamin Franklin Hotel at San Mateo, 
where the flowering beds of choice 
blossoms, the handsome lawns and 
the grand old oak trees of the hotel 
grounds supplied an ideal setting for 
this event. 

Mrs. Linnard, who has already cap- 
tured the hearts of San Francisco 
people, was presented a corsage bou- 
quet of lilies of the valley and orchids. 
The president, Mrs. Zeeman, made an 
appropriate and gracious speech in 
making the presentation on behalf of 
the Hotel Women's Club. 

Mrs. Perley Young, former presi- 
dent of the club, who now makes her 
home in Los Angeles, was accorded an 
enthusiastic welcome by her many 
friends here, at this lovely gathering. 
Mrs. Young came up from the south 
purposely to attend this society event, 
looking, as usual, like a model of cor- 
rect and charming attire. Mrs. Young 
has many friends in this part of the 
State where she and her husband 
were prominent in all hotel events. 



Back From Tour 

Mrs. Florence Lombard, who has 
recently returned from a trip to New 
York by way of the Panama Canal, 
was accorded a real "welcome home" 
by constituents in the California Ho- 
tel Women's Club of which Mrs. Lom- 
bard is an officer. She was dressed in 
white, and with her typical gracious- 
ness, assisted Mrs. Zeeman in the re- 
ception of members and guests. 



Mis. Belle D'Aquin, prominent 
member of this organization, who re- 
cently returned from a tour of the 
world, with her husband, was the re- 
cipient of felicitations at this pleas- 
ant gathering. Mrs. D'Aquin wore a 
lace gown over green silk with a bow 
of ribbon, matching in green tones, 
placed at the side of her lovely frock. 

Mrs. Perley Young's gown was of 
white, adorned with red ribbon em- 
broidery with which she wore an over- 
jacket of white, of youthful mode. 
Her bag, hat and shoes formed a fash- 
ionable ensemble. 

Mrs. Adelyn Brickley Jones, a guest 
of the day, Miss Lillian Connolly of 
the San Francisco Chronicle and Miss 
Connolly's mother, were also enter- 
tained as special guests at this nota- 
ble event. 

After hours devoted to card games, 
tea was served on small tables out 
under the oak trees, facing the lawns 
of the new Benjamin Franklin Hotel. 
The day was ideal and the flowers in 
their beauty, the cordiality and the 
service of the new hotel made the af- 
fair, indeed, memorable. 

Under the management of Mrs. 
John Zeeman, to whose efficiency and 
charm the present high standard of 
the club is due, maintaining, too, the 
high status of the other club presi- 
dents, the Club is achieving many 
things. Their greatest pride, how- 
ever, is the work of the Base Hos- 
pital at Palo Alto, where they have a 
room completely furnished and main- 
tained by members. 

The San Francisco club is the first 
club of the kind in hotel women's cir- 
cles, but they now have in mind a 
plan whereby to extend their work 
and are thinking of forming similar 
groups in other parts of the State. 

The local club is really the Califor- 
nia Hotel Women's Club, with mem- 
bership enrollment from other cities; 
although it is the only club of the 
kind, the members seek to widen its 
activities, under Mrs. Zeeman's splen- 
did leadership. 



Wedding Days 

Oh, these happy wedding days! 

Every week some lovely bride 
changes her name to that of the man 
she loves, these July days, and every 
time it seems to me it is actually the 
prettiest wedding of them all. 

Frankly, I adore weddings. I'd 
rather go to a wedding than any 
other dear and fascinating society 
event. Nor does it have to be in so- 
ciety — I just love a wedding, every 
time. 

Perhaps it is because in my inner- 
most thoughts there is cherished the 

ntinued on pagt 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 23, 1927 




>LE4SURE'SW^ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURES 

Tom Moore- 




By Josephine Young 



Theaters Offer Good 
Summer Attractions Here 

All during the Summer season the 
San Francisco theaters have an ap- 
peal for out-of-town visitors as well 
as for those who have not yet gone 
on their vacations. 

Especially do the people from the 
interior towns — where the heat is op- 
pressive — thoroughly enjoy being in 
San Francisco where cool breezes fan 
jaded nerves. These same out-of-town 
folks have one big goal in mind dur- 
ing their sojourn and that is — our 
theaters. 

That is why San Francisco thea- 
ters, with their fine programs to of- 
fer, are always well filled, the long 
year 'round. 

This week there is plenty to please, 
in our legitimate theaters and, also, 
in our motion picture palaces. 

Leave the heat of the valleys, come 
to the Golden Gate, and visit the San 
Francisco playhouses. 
You'll work better when you go 

home. 

* * * 

Curran 

"Love in a Mist," starring Madge 
Kennedy in this week's stage attrac- 
tion at the Curran Theater on Geary 
street, between Mason and Taylor. 
Dainty, exotic as a flower, and lovely 
to behold is this fascinating star in 
the comedy-play by Amelia Rives and 
Gilbert Emery. 

Sidney Blackmer and Jack Willard 
are principals with Miss Kennedy. 
The original New York production is 
being offered by the Curran Theater 
so that local audiences will find one of 
the best plays, enacted by as fine a 
cast as has been our privilege to greet 
for a long time. 

High class comedy is an outstand- 
ing distinctive of this "Love in a 
Mist," with scintillating humor and 
touches of sparkling wit, giving 
verve and vigor to the lines. 

With the exceptional outburst of 
expressive if not elegant words inter- 
jected when absolutely needed, the 
play is refreshingly clean, yet not 
stupid in any sense of the word. It 
glitters with genuine fun and spurs 
the tendency of those who love a good 
laugh, such as is provided in several 
places throughout this radiating play. 

Jack Willard, the Italian Count, 



can say his swear word — when neces- 
sary — and that means a lot. Natalie 
Schaffer and Percy Haswell are in the 

cast. 

« » * 

Lurie 

"The Harem," the David Belasco, 
Butler and Davis production, will be 
on the stage at the Lurie Theater fol- 
lowing the close of "Chicago." The 
new play opens on Monday night, 
July 25, with Isabel Elsom, the dis- 
tinguished actress in the leading role. 
Others in the cast are Alan Brooks, 
Jed Prouty and Robert Fischer. 

The plot in "The Harem" is really 

farcical. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"Meet the Wife," starring Marion 
Lord, is still drawing crowds to the 
Alcazar Theater, where the clever 
comedy pleases packed houses of 
laughing audiences. You can't have 
the blues and listen to the dialogues 
in this Henry Duffy play. 

There is a lot of action throughout 
the play, too, to hold the interest of 
every one and not a dull moment 
from beginning to end. 

William Maccauley, Robert Adams, 
Marion Strely, Richard Ehlers, John 
Stokes, Marie Sorrille and John Mac- 
kenzie are in the cast and each one 
does well in his part — adding that 
touch of real dramatic art typical of 
these Alcazar Henry Duffy comedies. 

Be sure to see "Meet the Wife," and 
take the wife along. 

* » » 

President 

"The Ghost Train" is beginning its 
seventh week at the President The- 
ater on McAllister, near Market, 
where thrills and dangers vie for fa- 
vor with roars of laughter. Henry 
Duffy presents a cast of players head- 
ed by Earl Lee, Kenneth Daigneau, 
Frank Darien, Dorothy La Mar, Ron- 
ard Telfer, Helen Keers, Charlotte 
Treadway, Olive Cooper, Joseph De 
Stefani, Henry Caubisen and West- 
cott Clarke. 

The story is unusual. It is weird 
and tragic but balanced with comedy 
enough to keep the theme moving on 
as it should. 

» • • 

"Retrousse" because he is always 
turning up. — Passing Show. 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"Meet the Wife." Henry Duffy Comedy, star- 
ring Marion Lord. 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 



"Love in a Mist.' 
ney Blackmer. 



Madge Kennedy and Sid- 



Lurie, Geary at Mason 

"The Harem." Jsohel Elsora and Allan Brooks 
in a David Belaaco Comedy. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 



"The Ghost Train.' 
Comedy. 



Henry Duffy Mystery- 



VAUDEVILLE 

Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

Rod La Rocqoe In "His Doc" on the screen. 
Pearl Hickman Kiddies and The Neapolitan 
Four heading the vaudeville bill. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Frank McCIynn as Abraham Lincoln heading 
a bill of vaudeville. 

Pantages, Market at Hyde 

On the screen. "The Honeymoon Express." 
"Al's Here." a fantasy on pre-prohibition days 
heading the vaudeville bill. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Pictures — Vaudeville. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Pictures — Vaudeville. 

* * * 

ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 

California, Market at 4th 

"Chang." A picture of the jungles of Siam 
with the human clement woven into the Bcenic. 
Glno Severi and the California Orchestra. 

Cameo, Market opp. Fifth street 

Educational films and news reels in addition 
to first run pictures. Change of pictures every 
Wednesday and Saturday unless otherwise 
stated for longer til 



Casino, Ellis at Mason 



Sat.. The Midnight Girl" and "The Seventh 
Bandit." Sun., Mon.. "Taxi. Taxi" and "The 
Flame of the Yukan." Tues.. Wed.. "The 
Duchess of Buffalo" and "While London 
™ ps ; ". , Tnur "" Fri " " T "e Sea Wolf and 
the Midnight Message." 



Granada, Market at Jones 



The Duncan Sisters in "Topsy and Eva" on 
the screen. The last week of Gene Morgan 
leading the Granada Orchestra. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th. 

"Beau Gestc." starring Ronald Colman. First 
time this picture has heen shown in this city 
at popular prices. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"After Midnight," starring Norma Shearer, on 
the screen. The stage act is titled "Tommy 

4? ',J%*\ Wn " R ° esn " i» conducting the 
YvarGeld Orchestra. 



July 23, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Golden Gate 

Heading a bill opening with Satur- 
day's matinee at the Golden Gate will 
be Pearl Hickman's twenty talented 
juvenile song and dance stars. This 
season, which is the fourth that Miss 
Hickman has staged revues at the 
Golden Gate stage, brings an act that 
for beauty, entertainment, value and 
costuming surpasses all her others. 
Every number is new and the chil- 
dren change costumes six and eight 
times. A feature of the production is 
a fashion show number. 

The second feature of the bill is the 
photoplay "His Dog," starring Joseph 
Schildkraut. The story is one of ap- 
peal, casting Schildkraut as a "down 
and outer" who is eventually regener- 
ated and returned to society through 
the faithfulness of his dog. Albert 
Payson Terhune wrote the story. 
Julia Faye is the girl. 

A second featured vaudeville act is 
that of Bert Gordon, the celebrated 
Jewish comedian, in the skit "Desper- 
ate Sam," with Gordon in the title 
role. 

The Neapolitan Four, Italian street 
singers, with their harmony songs, 
are also included in the list of attrac- 
tions. 

Rives and Arnold, comedians, in a 
comedy skit written especially for 
them by Herman Timberg, two other 
acts yet to be announced, Pathe 
News, Aesops Fables and music by 
Claude Sweeten's Golden Gate orches- 
tra complete the show. 
* * * 

Warfield 

Headed by Norma Shearer in 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's production of 
"After Midnight," the program to be 
offered by Loew's Warfield Theater, 
Saturdav, is to bear the title "The 
Warfield's Show of Shows." 

Nell Kelly, a madcap miss, who 
laughed and danced her way into the 
heart of San Francisco last year, re- 
turns home on the Saturday program. 
Nell Kelly has become a most import- 
ant name in the theater world as the 
result of her original pranks, songs 
and dance foolery. She is a graduate 
of the Fanchon and Marco ranks, 
having gained her initial laurels here 
at the Warfield Theater but two years 
ago. Since departing from San Fran- 
cisco this "streak o' preen" has occu- 
pied the advertising lights o( many 
of America's leading theaters. She 
brings an entire new program of 
songs and dances for Saturday. 

Balancing the incoming Warfield 
show will be the newest of Fanchon 
and Marco stage creation, this time 
titled the "Tommy Atkins Idea." Joe 
Niemeyer, an eccentric dancer, who 
comes direct from New York engage- 
ments, heads the artists. Doris Walk- 
also a Broadway favorite, will 



share honors with Niemeyer. Delara 
and Melford, dance team, and Hector, 
a performing dog, will be other prin- 
cipals. A sextette of boys will also be 
found in the act. 

* * * 

Granada 

Shakespeare has been done in slang 
and modern dress and half a dozen 
actresses have appeared bob-haired 
as "Camille," but it took the irre- 
pressible Duncan Sisters to think of 
putting the fun in the seriously melo- 
dramatic "Uncle Tom's Cabin." 

Their internationally famous trav- 
esty, "Topsy and Eva," brings the 
little local stars to the Granada screen 
and stage Saturday. Preparations are 
being made by the management for 
record breaking attendance crowds, 
as the last time the Duncan Sisters 
appeared here in person all box office 
records were shattered. 

There is no tragic note in the lively 
screen play of Harriet Beecher 
Stowe's famous story. The picture is 
much the same as the musical com- 
edy, conceived some years ago by the 
Duncans. 

No effort has been spared by United 
Artists Corporation to make this first 
screen effort of the sisters one of the 
funniest and expertly finished comedy 
presentations of all time. The inimit- 
able stars were given free rein to in- 
ject their originality and peculiar 
gift for fun-making wherever they 
saw fit. Everything is done in fun. 
For instance, Little Eva, played by 
Vivian Duncan, doesn't go to heaven, 
and Uncle Tom is a jovial darky who 
can dance the Charleston with the 
best of them. "Simon Legree," the 
hardest bucko-mate in literature, al- 
though he still cracks his whip, is 
made the constant target for the imp- 
ish buffoonery of Topsy, played by 
Rosetta. 

The Granada Theater orchestra has 
matched the scenes with fitting melo- 
dies. 

* * * 

St. Francis 

"Beau Geste." romantic adventure 
of England and the African Desert. 
comes to the St. Francis Saturday at 
popular prices. 

Ronald Colman has the principal 
role in this picture made from the 
Christopher Wren story, which has 
made both novel and screen history. 
In the cast are Alice Joyce. Neil Ham- 
ilton. Ralph Forbes, Mary Brian. Wil- 
liam Powell, Norman Trevor and Vic- 
tor McLaglen. 

* * * 

California 

The jungle picture, "Chang." is 
playing at the California Theater this 
week. 

"Chang" is a picture of the interior 
of Siam with prowling beasts as the 

(Continued on page 10* 



The Electric Range 
does perfect frying 

Because of evenly 
distributed heat 

The frying of omelets, bacon and 
many other foods requires evenly dis- 
tributed heat under the frying pan. 
For then the food cooks perfectly, it 
looks more appetizing, and it tastes 
better. 

That is why the Electric Range is 
ideal for frying. It has three differ- 
ent degrees of steady even heat that 
comes from closely wound coils. 

And these new Electric Ranges are 
speedy. 

So what is more enjoyable in the 
early morning than perfect frying 




"PACIFIC SERVICE" 



Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

Owned - Operated ■ Managed 
by Calijornians 

117-627 




i Companion, of 
tlje morning' • - • 
itffrefresMiuT- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1.800.000 cups were served at the 

Panama-Pacific International Exposition 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 23, 1927 




reduced 
sound trip 

I 1 



"from California 
points and return 




OAKE advantage 
of these low ex- 
cursion fares to visit 
the old home this 
summer. 

Start any day before 
September 30. Re- 
turn limit October 
31. Our travel books 
will help you plan 
your trip and may 
be had upon request 

SANTA FE Ticket Offices 
and Travel Bureaux 



601 Market Street 

Telephone Sutter 7600 

Santa Fe Depot 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SOCIETY 
(Continued from page 5) 
vision of another home, another 
American family-life, another happy 
pair going down life's journey to- 
gether. 

And I am in perfect sympathy and 
accord with the bride who always 
dates everything from her wedding 
day. 

"It was just a year from my wed- 
ding day"; or, "It was just one week 
before the day that I was married" — 
and similar conjugations — it is all the 
same to me, too, a wedding day is a 
day from which to reckon many 

things. 

* * * 

Green-Carlston 

Miss Gertrude M. Green, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Green, of 
Central avenue, was married to Mr. 
Charles 0. Carlston, at St. Mary's 
Church, His Grace Archbishop Hanna 
officiating. The ceremony was imme- 
diately followed by a breakfast at the 
Hotel Whitcomb at which the bridal 
party and members of the immediate 
family were the guests. 

The bride wore a pink georgette 
dress with lace trimmings and a pink 
hat to match. She carried a shower 
of pink roses and lilies of the valley. 
Miss Viola Green was her sister's 
maid of honor and Mr. John Carlston, 

brother of the groom, was best man. 

* * * 

To Be Wedded 
In September 

Miss Mary Ann Sutro and Mr. Bal- 
four Bowen will be married in Sep- 
tember in the Piedmont. Plans are 
being made for a delightful wedding 
with elaborate settings and all the 
fashionable and magnificent things 

which go to make a perfect wedding. 

* * * 

Society Wedding 

Another society wedding this 
month will take place July 30 when 
Miss Helen M. Faull becomes the 
bride of Mr. Frederick Denicke 
Leuschner. The ceremony will take 
place in the home of the bride's uncle, 
and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Willard O. 
Wayman in Ross, Marin County. 

Miss Faull is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Fiske Faull. The 
Faull family is one of the oldest in 
the city. 

Mr. Leuschner is the son of Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. A. 0. Leuschner of 
Berkeley. 

Miss Helen Cathrall of Alameda 
will be the maid of honor, and the 
bride's cousin, Miss Martha Faull, and 
Mrs. Frederick Reichert will be the 
Bridesmaids. 

Mr. Richard Leuschner will be his 
brother's best man, and the ushers 
will be Mr. Ashley Hill, Mr. Manning 
Davidson and Dr. Frederick Reichert. 

The bride and groom will spend the 



remainder of the summer in Califor- | 
nia and will then go to New York to ] 

make their home. 

* * * 

Re-Elected 

"Let us re-elect the same staff of 
officers who, by their unfailing work 
and devotion, their foresight and 
their business sagacity have made 
possible the completion of the new 
San Francisco Women's Building" — 
was universally heard, just previous 
to the first members' meeting held in 
the handsome structure at the corner 
of Sutter and Mason streets last Fri- 
day morning. 

So, with but two exceptions, the 
entire board was re-elected without 
any fuss or confusion — but with sin- 
cere desire to expressively register 
continued trust in the work of the 
noble-minded and valiant women. 

Executive Staff 

Prominent women elected to again 
serve as officials in the San Francisco 
Women's Building Association in- 
clude the following notables: 

Mrs. Edward Dexter Knight was 
again made president ; Dr. Mariana 
Bertola, first vice-president; Mrs. C. 
A. Hawkins, second vice-president, 
and Mrs. Minna McGauley, third vice- 
president. Mrs. Harry A. Kluegel, 
president of the San Francisco branch 
of the American Association of Uni- 
versity Women and Mrs. J. E. Butter- 
field, new president of the City and 
County Federation of Women's Clubs, 
were the two new directors chosen. 
Splendid Board 

Members of the board who so cour- 
ageously have "carried on" the work 
of the San Francisco Women's Build- 
ing Association, were again placed in 
office and include: Mrs. D. C. Heger, 
chairman of the Building Committee 
who called sessions every week pre- 
paratory to the building and furnish- 
ing of the handsome structure ; Mrs. 
Prentiss Cobb Hale and Mrs. Jessie 
Axel, Mrs. Henry Boyen, Mrs. George 
Bernhard, Miss Zulu Clements, Miss 
Margaret Dailey, Mrs. D. E. F. Eas- 
ton, Mrs. Oscar Fernbach, Mrs. W. T. 
Fletter, Mrs. Helen W. Greer, Mrs. D. 
F. Hannah, Mrs. D. C. Heger, Mrs. 
Annie M. Johnson, Mrs. Felix Kahn, 
Miss Miriam Michelson, Miss Jennie 
K. Partridge, Mrs. Paul Scovel, Mrs. 
Albert W. Stokes, Mrs. B. F. Stoll, 
Mrs. Gaillard Stoney, Miss May Sins- 
heimer, Miss Russela Ward, Dr. 
Edith Hammond Williams and Miss 

Emma Van Bergen. 

* * * 

Life's Darkest Moment 

Slim — When do you do your hard- 
est work? 

Fat — Before breakfast always. 

Slim — What do you do? 

Fat — Try to get outa bed. — Boy's 
Life. 



July 23, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Palo Alto Horse Show 




A. P. Fleming, Manager of the forthcoming horse 

show at Palo Alto for the henefit of the Stanford 

Convalescent Home. Mr. Fleming is well known as 

the manager of the successful horse shows at 

Oakland, Stockton and Portland. Oregon. 



The Northern California Horse 
Show Association, composed of lead- 
ing business men of San Francisco 
and the Peninsula is sponsoring a 
great horse show to be held on Stan- 
ford campus the week of August 8th 
to 13th for the benefit of the Stan- 
ford Convalescent Home for Children. 

Ninety-five classes for all divisions 
of horses will be shown during the 
eight performances, of which two are 
matinees. Atholl McBean is serving 
his third year as president of the or- 
ganization, whose two previous shows 
were held in the municipal auditor- 
ium at Oakland. James O. Tobin, R. 
Stanley Dollar, James S. Drum. Her- 
bert Fleishhacker, William S. Tevis 
Jr., Charles D. Dunphy and Alexan- 
der Hamilton are vice-presidents: 
Timothy Hopkins, treasurer; G. Al- 
bert Lansburgh, secretary, and A. P. 
Fleming, manager. 

Many entries have been received 
fiom exhibitors residing east of the 
Mississippi river, and the show, which 
offers $24,000 in prize money besides 
more than $1000 worth of plate and 
trophies, will be of national signifi- 
cance in the horse show world. 

Pacific Coast exhibitors whose 
horses excel in quality, will be pres- 
ent without exception and it is prob- 
able that there will be not less than 
800 entries in Manager Fleming's of- 
fice at the Whitcomb Hotel, when the 
looks are finally closed on August 1st. 

That it will be one of the grea 

cial events of the summer is proven 



by the box sales for the season, which 
have already reached large propor- 
tions and include the names of the 
elite of the socially inclined of San 
Francisco and Bay District. 

Donators of §1000 stakes, for im- 
portant classes are Mrs. W. P. Roth, 
Miss Ruth Lansburgh, R. Stanley 
Dollar, Herbert Fleishhacker, Palo 
Alto Chamber of Commerce, Los An- 
geles National Horse Show, Timothy 
Hopkins, Hartford Livestock Insur- 
ance Co., Nipa Hut Co. and Irving 
Hellman. The Bloomfield Hills Stock 
Farm, through W. E. Tevis, Jr., is 
sponsoring a S2000 stake for polo 
ponies, the largest that has ever been 
offered anywhere in this division, 
which has resulted in the manifesta- 
tion of great interest amongst the 
large polo contingent on the Penin- 
sula. Over twenty entries for the 
polo stake are already in hand, mak- 
ing it the largest class of its kind 
ever held in the west. 

Work on the arena is well under 
way; 268 boxes, 250 box and 100 tie 
stalls constitute part of the equip- 
ment being erected. Vehicles and 
space for harnessing and unharness- 
ing will be under cover of a tent, 
300x60 feet, which will be erected be- 
tween the stables and the arena. 

Guarantors of the finances of the 
horse shoe, whose subscriptions will 
go to swell the coffers of the Conval- 
escent Home, are Atholl McBean, 
Geo. A. Newhall, Herbert Fleish- 
hacker, John S. Drum, R.Stanley Dol- 
lar. Alexander Hamilton, Mrs. W. P. 
Roth, Mrs. William Matson, Mrs. A. 
W. Pike, Wm. T. Sesnon, Chas. D. 
Dunphy. J. O. Tobin, W. S. Tevis Jr., 
Timothv Hopkins, Ross Ambler Cur- 
ran. T. T. C. Gregory, R. S. Moore. G. 
Albert Lansburgh, Mrs. A. B. Sprec- 
kels. C. R. Walter. A. Swinerton, C. 
R. Tobin. Dr. T. A. Shumate, A. E. 




Ruth Lanshurch of San Francisco and 
The Cardinal. 



Schwabacher, Sanford L. Goldstein, 
George A. Pope Jr., Mrs. C. H. Mer- 
rill, Mrs. S. R. Dannenbaum, Mrs. E. 
T. Perry, Mrs. Catherine Sudden 
Blair, Mrs. Ninon Tucker, Miss Alice 
E. Forderer, J. A. Donohue, Ruby 
Hale, Dr. Ira B. Dalziel, John G. Rapp 
and Morgan A. Gunst. 



Hollywood Notes 

Proving popular among the guests 
and the public as well, the salons in- 
stituted by Gabriel Ravenelle at the 
Hollywood Plaza Hotel in Hollywood, 
Calif., have just entered their second 
anniversary. Attendance is by invi- 
tation. Some of the leading artists of 
California and other parts of the na- 
tion appear on the programs, which 
also encourage and give recognition 
to the younger artists. 

Another activity at the hotel which 
is gaining widespread favor are the 
occasional programs of the Children's 
Educational Theater of Hollywood, of 
which Mr. Ravenelle is director. Sev- 
eral hundred parents were present at 
the last entertainment, which was in 
the Palm Tree Patio of the hostelry. 

The next salon will be on Wednes- 
day evening, July 27, with Mme. 
Grace Whistler, mezzo soprano and 
kin of the famous artist, James Mc- 
Neil Whistler; and Marion Haw- 
thorne, dramatic soprano and winner 
of the George Eastman three-year 
prize scholarship at the Rochester 
School of Music in New York, will be 
among the artists on the program. 



At the Elder Gallery 

Miss Edith Coburn Noyes, director 
of the Edith Coburn Noyes' School, 
Boston, will give a program of short 
stories and verse by A. A. Milne in 
the Paul Elder Gallery, Thursday 
afternoon, July 28th, at 2:30 o'clock. 
Miss Xoyes will draw from Milne's 
books, "The Day's Play," "Once a 
Week." and "The Sunny Side"— vol- 
umes of intimate short stories — and 
"Winnie the Pooh" and "When We 
Were Very Young." his child verse 
that has endeared him to the entire 
English reading public with its de- 
licious humor and wistful pathos. 



Mingelgrun — I have lost my big- 
gest creditor, today. 

Kohn — Has he died? 

Mingelgrun — No. I was forced to 
pay him. — Faun. Vienna. 



?0 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 23, 1927 




PHONE 

GRAYSTONE 240 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The Finest Meals in the 
VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms — Clean Linen — Clean Everything 
Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

TELEPHONE 110 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
active. Hot Sulphur Water. Tub Baths and 
Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN. Affua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judafc 



WHEN IN PANAMA 
MAKE 

HOTEL CENTRAL 

Cathedral Plaza 

YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 

Andrew Johnston, Manager 



CALIENTE VILLA 

Family Resort 

CARL STEFFEN, Prop. 



French and Italian Dinners -Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

Four Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, 

Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from page 7) 

principal actors. There are tigers and 
elephants aplenty. The primitive life 
of a family, father, mother, son and 
daughter is woven into this scenic. 
There loves, hates, joys and disap- 
pointments form the basis for the ac- 
tion. 

The scenes portrayed have never 
been photographed before and they 
graphically prove to us that there is 
still room for plenty of adventure on 
this earth of ours. 

Gino Severi leads the California 
Orchestra in a specially prepared mu- 
sical score. 

* « * 

Pantages 

"The Honeymoon Express," star- 
ring Irene Rich, is the screen attrac- 
tion at the Pantages Theater this 
week. This picture leaves the impres- 
sion that the most dangerous time in 
married life is after twenty years. 
Why any particular time? Helene 
Costello, Harold Goodwin and Vir- 
ginia Lee Corbin are also in the cast. 

Headlining the vaudeville acts is a 
fantasy of pre-prohibition days titled 
"Al's Here." Other acts include the 
Dance Studio with Jean Spence and 
the six dancing models, the Denno 
Sisters and Thibault, Kay and Rose 
in a blackface comedy act, and Hach 
and Mack, an acrobatic team. 

* * * 
Cameo 

The popular Cameo theater on Mar- 
ket street opposite Fifth street will 
show some fine scenic pictures, as 
usual, and a number of News Reels in 
addition to their feature pictures. 
This cosy theater has an appeal for 
those who like to see many fine edu- 
cational films as well as some first- 
run photoplays starring well known 
cinema stars. 

Be sure to go to the Cameo this 
week. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

The distinguished character actor, 
Frank McGlynn, heads the bill this 
week at the Orpheum in his imperso- 
nation: "Abraham Lincoln" written 
especially for McGlynn. The famous 
stage and screen star looks and ap- 
pears so much like the great Amer- 
ican that it seems almost at times as 
if the Great Emancipator were here 
again in the flesh. 

"California's Own" Sunkist, with 
Eddie Nelson and Dolly and Officer 
Jack Jennings, are on the bill. Due 
to the popularity of the "Our Gang" 
Kiddies, the Orpheum announces that 
they will again be in person at the 
theater this week beginning on Sat- 
urday with "Mickey," Daniels and 
Eames 0. "Peggy" and the rest of 
them who have made fame for them- 



selves and the Hal Roach Company of 
tiny comedians. 

Frank De Voe, the popular song 
star, in 1927 humor, and Eddie Willis 
at the piano are other attractions 
this coming week. 



Well and Home Again 

The many friends and admirers of 
Laurel Conwell Bias are warmly wel- 
coming her back to her home in the 
Fairmont Hotel after her serious ill- 
ness of the past few weeks. 

Mrs. Bias is a talented dramatic- 
reader, president of the Speech Arts 
Association of California, and head of 
the Bias Evans School of Expression. 
She writes and produces original 
children's plays and pantomimes, ar- 
ranges programs for the Easter 
breakfasts and Mayday festivals at 
the Fairmont and recently gave one 
of the most attractive events of the 
kind dressed in a stunning old-fash- 
ioned costume. Talented children are 
always participants in her programs. 

She read opera dramas before the 
last opera season, at both the Fair- 
mont Hotel, and at the recently des- 
troyed Seven Arts Club on Van Ness 
avenue. Mrs. Bias is to give a series 
of opera dramas before the coming 
opera season, her present health again 
permitting her to go on with her ex- 
cellent dramatic work. Her beauty, 
as well as her pleasing personality 
and her voice are characteristics of 
this well-known and brilliant young 
dramatic reader. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 




Photo graphs 

Q^/yc JFbrever 



July 23, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




ftJlP^Ry TffiLE 





PREHISTORIC MAN by Keith Hen- 
derson. E. P. Dutton & Company. 
Price S2.50. 

A book based on authentic investi- 
gations and the actual discoveries 
and scientific deductions thereof of 
fossils entombed tens of thousands of 
years ago in the prehistoric caves of 
No Man's Land. The author and the 
professors, whose assistance he ac- 
knowledges in his preface, have given 
years of their lives to this study and 
you are listening to the voice of au- 
thority. 

The story begins "some thousand 
million years ago" (the author has a 
wonderful memory) with the erup- 
tion of the earth from the sun. The 
earth in turn disagreed with the 
moon and turned her out; and then 
all our troubles began. 

Some 500,000,000 years after this 
(a little longer ago than can be re- 
membered by even our oldest inhabi- 
tant) queer creatures began to ap- 
pear — jelly-fish and such; later horr- 
ble fish with horrid manners; then 
reptiles. Reaching the Eocene period, 
we find the tree-climbing animals. 
Lemurs came first — then the great 
apes, and finally the super apes. 

Proceeding into Java, a specimen 
is at last found that is too apish to 
be a man — too human to be pure ape. 
The processes of deduction are inter- 
esting. The brain is studied, the brow 
and eyebrows, the teeth (the teeth 
tell a lot). It is interesting to note 
that it has been resolved (through 
careful investigation after all these 
50,000 years and more) that some 
of the animals have suffered from 
toothache, from mastoid abscesses 
and even arthritis, which we had 
fondly believed was fairly modern. 
We learn that one "man" received a 
blow on the head which did not kill 
him immediately. Instead the hole 
festered and the fester traveled 
around to form a second abscess low- 
er down. (We wonder whether this 
started litigation between his rela- 
tives and his insurance company.) 

The Mousterians now come along 
with their torches. Yes, sir. Al- 
though no one knows who started the 
first tiro, these almost human beings 
left remnants of hearths and ashes. 
showing that they had fire to burn. 

But down in South Africa trouble 
is brewing. The Tall Aurignacians 
are approaching!: Run. you Maus- 



Edited by Florence DeLong 

terians, or you will be annihilated. 
Too bad!! Brave though they were, 
the Mausterians are supposedly wiped 
from the face of the earth, although 
it is hinted that some are captured 
for slaves. Maybe it is just as well. 
Our story might have been different. 

These Aurignicians are men, — sav- 
ages, one must admit, but men. There 
appear to be artists among them. Bits 
of their work have been discovered 
and removed to the various museums. 
The author has embodied some of 
their efforts in his book and consider- 
ing the "age of the artist" the work 
is remarkable. The world at this time 
appears to be black. There are no 
red, white or yellow races as yet, (al- 
though the Aurignicians men have 
traces in their make-up of what we 
know later as the Red Indians). But 
the women — ye gods ! ! Look on this 
picture (page 70) and then on this 
(page 71). No, they certainly would 
not qualify in this day and age. 

From this time on the human race 
begins to begin. Human character- 
ises become more apparent until step 
by step we come at last to the things 
we learn about in histories and read 
about in better known books. 

Interesting? Of course it is. Some- 
thing happened back there on the 
trail — we do not know what; but the 
author and his noted colleagues have 
gone back to investigate. Their 
search has been exhaustive and the 
reports are seemingly convincing, not 
to say interesting in the extreme. It 
is hard to prove of course. He, him- 
self, says: "The professors have not 
yet quite succeeded in disentangling 
and straightening out the intricate 
arabesque of man's origin. There are 
still one or two difficult knots round 
the great apes." 

One of his tests sounds logical: 

"When the blood of a man is trans- 
fused into that of a dog, say, or a 
horse, or any other animal, the hu- 
man blood serum behaves in a hostile 
manner, and there is great disturb- 
ance, ending usually in the total de- 
struction of the red corpuscles; 
whereas when the blood of a man is 
transfused into the blood of an ape, 
or vice versa, there is a harmonious 
mingling of the two — so close is the 
relationship." 

However, when visiting the mon- 
key cage at the zoo. we leave with 
small desire to claim kinship with our 



supposed ancestors. On the whole it 
is rather hard on the "superiority 
complex." 

There are numerous illustrations 
throughout the book and the author 
furnishes us with a map of Paleo- 
lithic Europe. In those days there 
was no such furore of getting across 
the Channel without a boat. The "ani- 
mals" of those days simply walked 
across. England was connected with 
the mainland and the Channel did not 
exist. 



In a will case the plaintiff, when his 
name was called, stood up in the jury 
box. 

"Why," said the judge, "what are 
you doing there?" 

"I was chosen, my lord, to serve on 
the jury." 

"But," said the judge," that was a 
mistake, of course. Surely you must 
know that you cannot sit on a jury 
and try your own case?" 

"Well," admitted the plaintiff, rue- 
fully, "I thought it was a bit of luck." 
—Tit Bits. 



Books that are reviewed in the Newa Letter 
can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Pott Street San Franeiaco, Calif. 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 CLARA STREET— GARFIELD 844 



S. A. LOVEJOY 

WILL BRING 

ORDER 
Out of Chaos! 

In your Books. 
Financial Statements 
Income Tax Reports 

Expert Auditor 

PART-TIME SERVICE 

268 Market St.. Room 101 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 23, 1927 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 



.3* 

j£t J 
OPT * 




C. J. Pennington 

Manager of Reno Fair, to Direct 
Radio Show 

Anthony A. Tremp, managing di- 
rector of the Nevada Transcontinen- 
tal Highway Exposition, has been re- 
lieved of his duties at the Reno fair 
in order that he might take up his 
active work here as director of the 
fourth annual Radio Show to be held 
in the Exposition auditorium, Aug- 
ust 20th to 27th. 

This is Tremp's second year with 
the Radio Show. A large measure of 
the success of last year's exposition 
is attributed to his professional hand. 
Tremp did all of the preliminary or- 
ganization work for the Nevada Ex- 
position and carried it to a point 
where he felt that the local officers 
could see the Fair through to its con- 
clusion before asking to be released 
for the Radio Show here. Prior to 
this, Tremp for several years was the 
managing director of the Industrial 
Exposition held annually in the local 
auditorium. 

Tremp has had several conferences 
this week with Leo J. Meyberg, chair- 
man of the radio show committee of 
the Pacific Radio Trade Association, 
under whose direction the show is 
held, and also with Ernest Ingold, 
president of the association. Tremp 
declares that at no time has there 
been such a heavy advance sale of 
space, practically every foot of ex- 
hibit area having been sold. 

Numbered among the exhibitors 
are all of the leading manufacturers 
of receiving sets and radio accessor- 
ies. The show this year will evidence 
the growth in experience over the ex- 
hibits of preceding years in many 
other ways than an increased num- 
ber of exhibitors. There will be a 
more impressive arrangement of dis- 



plays, and an unusual lighting plan 
and decorative scheme. 

A full program of events that will 
mean something of special import- 
ance for every day has been provided. 



KPO Comment 

How much are your fingers worth 
to you? Dave Kane, leader of the 
Kane's Hawaiians, now an exclusive 
radio feature from KPO, recently had 
all the fingers of both his hands in- 
sured for S2000 apiece. The playing 
of a Hawaiian guitar, in which few 
equal Mr. Kane, requires the use of 
all the fingers of each hand of a play- 
er, and the loss of a single finger on 
either hand would be a decided handi- 
cap. Kane is not taking any chances 
and has insured every finger against 
a possible loss. 

Kane and his group of versatile 
Hawaiian musicians and singers have 
a number of Victor records to their 
credit, several of which are original 
compositions of their leader. They 
are well-known throughout the Pa- 
cific Coast for their excellent noon- 
day programs from KPO. They are 
also prime favorites on KPO's late 
Monday night feature, the Variety 
Hour. 



Elmer Herling, KPO's stellar bari- 
tone and a Variety Hour star, has 
sung in a great many opera produc- 
tions in Kansas City, where he lived 
for many years before coming to San 
Francisco. He appeared in "Aida" 
several years ago with Louise Homer, 
Marie Lapphold, Henry Scott and 
Clarence Whitehall, all nationally 
prominent opera stars. 

For more than a year Herling was 
choir leader in a prominent church of 
Falls City, Nebraska, his birthplace. 
He appeared first from KPO about a 
year ago, his remarkably clear, smooth 
baritone voice immediately attracting 
the attention of the radio listeners. 
Herling's singing diction is another 
factor in explaining his popularity as 
a radio artist. 

* * * 

KPO's new Tuesday night dramatic 
and musical feature, "Dan Casey's 
Fireside Hour," has already become 
the "best bet" of Scout Troop No. 
112, according to a recent letter re- 
ceived from Frank Mariach, the 
scoutmaster. 



Scout Troop No. 112 is the only one 
of its kind in America, being com- 
posed of the inmates of the San Fran- 
cisco Shriners' Hospital for Crippled 
Children. 

In his letter to KPO the scoutmas- 
ter of the troop said that Dan Casey's 
novel hour from the station does 
more for his "shut-ins" than can be 
imagined. All the scouts of the troop 
are cripples, most of them never get- 
ting out of bed, and they get a great 
pleasure out of the radio programs, 
the scoutmaster declares. 



Better Balance 

KFI notes that with the use of two 
microphones in the main studio much 
better balance between the instru- 
ments and voices results. By pointing 
the mikes at different angles, the 
artists can be grouped so as to broad- 
cast to the best advantage. 



International Time Signals 

The remote village of Coronilla in 
Mexico lately suffered an earthquake 
which broke all telephone lines and 
communication with the outside world 
except radio. All clocks were stopped 
by the severe tremor. An American 
mining man, possessor of the only 
radio set in town tuned in KFI and 
received the correct time, thus allow- 
ing Coronilla to take its daily siesta 
at exactly 2 p. m. as is fitting and 
proper. 



Starr Versatile Star 

KFI receptionists know Henry 
Starr as an appealing vocalist and 
"hot" pianist, but officials of that sta- 
tion disclose the fact that he, is even 
more. Starr is a thorough musician, 
having studied for over twelve years, 
and while his radio performances fea- 
ture blues and jazz, he is primarily 
a classical artist. And the piano is 
not his only instrument, for he is 
equally adept at all the instruments 
in an orchestra. 

He has written several composi- 
tions for piano, has been in musical 
comedy, and spends most of his time 
at present writing arrangements and 
playing piano for Mosby's Dixieland 
Blue Blowers. It is rumored that he 
may shortly accept a tempting offer 
to desert KFI and his orchestra for a 
vaudeville contract. 



July 23, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



RADIO PROGRAMS 



wavelength 
Station (meters) 

KMTR— Los Angeles S'26. 

KLX- Oakland 508 2 

KGW— Portland 491.5 

KFI — Las Angeles 467.5 

KFRC — San Francisco 454 3 

KFOA — Seattle .. . 447 5 

KFSD— San Diego A40.9 

KPO — San Francisco 422.3 

KHJ — Los Angeles 405.2 

KGO — Oakland 394.4 

KJR — Seattle !. .384.6 

KHQ— Spokane .. 370.2 

KFWB — Los Angeles .... 361.2 

KNX — Los Angeles 336.9 

KOA — Denver 325 9 

KOIN— Portland .. 319 

KPSN — Pasadena 315.6 

KYA — San Francisco 309 1 

KOMO— Seattle . 305 8 

KSL — Salt Lake ... 302 8 

KOWW— Walla Walla 2991s 

KQW — San Jose 296.9 

KTBI — Los Angeles 288 3 

KTAB— Oakland 280 2 

KTCL— Seattle 277.6 

KFWI — San Francisco 267.7 

KGA — Spokane 260 7 

KFUS— Oakland 256^3 

KRE — Berkeley 256 3 

KZM— Oakland .. 245 8 

KLS— Oakland 245.8 

KEX — Portland 239 9 

KFWM— Oakland 236.1 

KJBS — San Francisco . ... 220 4 

KGTT- San Francisco 206.5 



Power 

(watts I 

500 

500 

1000 

5000 

50 

1000 

500 

1000 

500 

5000 

2500 

1000 

500 

500 

6000 

1000 

1000 

500 

1000 

1000 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

2000 

50 

100 

100 

200 

2500 

500 

50 

50 



SUNDAY 
(July 17) 
9:00 am— KFUS. 
10 :00 am— KFI. KNX. KTAB. 

10 :30 am— KGW. KFI. KTAB. 

11:00 am— KTAB, KGO. KFUS. KYA. KOA. KGW 

KFI. KGA. 
12:00 m— KGW. KGA. 

I :00 pm— KFWI. 

2:00 pm— KNX. 

3 :00 pm— KPO. KGTT. KNX. 

4 :00 pm— KGO. KGTT, KNX. 
5:00 pm -KNX. KFI. 

6:00 pm— KPO. KOA. KNX. KFI. 

6 :30 pm— KPO. KGO. KNX. KFI. 

7 :00 pm— KPO, KGO, KNX. KFI. 

7:30 pm— KPO. KGO, KGTT. KYA. KGW. KNX, KFI 
8:00 pm— KPO. KGO. KGTT. KFWI, KOA. KGW. 

KNX, KFI, KTAB. 
9:00 pm— KPO. KGO. KGTT. KOA. KGW. KNX. 

KFI. KFWB. 
10:00 pm -KGW. KFI. KFWB. 

11 :00 pm. 

MONDAY 

7:00 am— KPO. KNX. 

8:00am KPO, KFWI. KNX. 

9:00am — KNX. KTAB. K.IHS. 
10 :00 am -KFUS. KFWI. KOA. KGW. KFOA. KNX. 

KJBS. KTAB. KFWB. 
10:30 am — KPO. KLX. KFWI. KOA. KGW. KNX. 

KJBS. 
11:00 am KFWI. KYA. KOA. KGW. KGA, KJBS. 
11:30 am KPO. KGO. KYA. KGA. 

12:00 m- KPO. KFWI. KYA. KFOA. KGA. KFWB. 
12:30 pm KPO. KGO. KCITT, KYA. KNX. KGA. 
KFWI! 

1:00 pm KPO. KGO. KYA. KFWB. 

2:00pm KFWB. KFOA. KNX. KJBS. 

8:00 pm KNX. K.IHS. 

4:00pm KPO. KGO, KFWI, KFOA. KNX. 

5:00pm KTAB, KFWB, KPO, KFWI. KOA, KNX. 
5:30pm KTAB. KFWB, KPO. KGO. KLX. KFWI. 

KYA. KFI. KNX. KGA. 
6:00pm KTAB. KFWB. KPO. KGO. KLX, KFWI. 

KYA. KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KGA 
7:00pm -KTAB. KFWB. KPO. KGO. KLX. KFWI. 

KYA. KOA. KFI, KFOA. KNX. KGA. 
7:30,.,,, KFWB. KOA. KGW. KFI, KFOA. KNX. 

KGA. 
8:00pm KGA. KTAB. KMVB. KPO. KGO, KI.X. 

KFWI. KYA. KOA. KGW. KFI. KFOA. 

KNX. 
9:00pm KTAB, KFWB. KPO. KLX. KIWI, KYA. 

KGW. KFI. KNX 
10:00 KFWB. KPO. KFWI. KYA. KGW. KFI. 

KNX. 
11:00pm KFWI. KYA, KGW, KNX 

12 :O0 pm 

Tl'RSDAY 
? :00«m K\\ 

im KNX. 

9:00am KNX. 

11,1 KNX. 

111:30 :,m KNX. 

11:00 am KGA. 

K.1BS. 

11:30 am KGA 

12:00 m KGA. 

KFWI 

12:30 pm KFOA 

1 :00 pm KFOA 

2:00 pm KGA. 

KI V 

in KGA 



KFWI. KPO. 
KFWI. KPO 

KTAB. KJBS 

KGW, KFWB, KPO. KTAB. KJBS. 
KGW. KYA. KFWI. KPO. KJBS. 
KGW. KOA. KFWB. KYA. KFWI. 

KOA. KGO. KPO. 

KNX. kllM KOA. KFWB. KYA. 

. KGO, KPO. 

, KFWB. KYA KGTT, KGO 

. KFWB KYA. KFWI. KGO KPO 

KNX. KFOA. KGW, KOA. KFWB. 

KGO K.IHS 

KNX, KO \ KPO. KJBS. 



4:00 pm KNX. KFOA, KFWI. KGO. KPO. 

5:00 pm— KNX, KOA. KFWB. KFWI. KPO, KTAB. 

5:30pm KNX. KFI, KFWB. KYA. KFWI. KLX. 

KPO. 
6:00 pm— KGA. KNX. KFOA, KFI. KGW. KFWB, 

KYA. KFWI. KGO. KPO. KTAB. 
7:00 pm — KNX. KFOA. KFI. KGW. KOA. KFWB. 

KYA, KFWI. KLX, KGO. KPO. KTAB. 
7:30 pm— KFWB, KNX. KFOA. KFI. KOA. 
8:00pm— KGA. KNX. KFOA. KFI. KGW. KOA, 

KFWB. KYA. KFWI. KGTT. KGO. KPO. 

KTAB. 
9:00 pm— KNX. KFOA, KFI. KGW. KFWB. KYA. 

KFWI. KGTT. KGO. KPO. KTAR. 
10:00 pm— KNX, KFI, KGW. KFWB. KFWI, KGO. 

KPO. 
11:00 pm— KGW. KFWI. 
12 :00 pm — 

WEDNESDAY 

7:00 am— KNX, KPO. KFWI. 
8:00 am— KNX. KPO. KFWI. 
9:00 am— KNX, KTAB, KJBS. 
10:00 am— KGW. KFOA, KNX, KFWB, KFUS. KFWI. 

KTAB, KJBS. 
10:30 am— KGW. KNX. KPO, KLX. KFWI. KJBS. 
11:00 am— KGW. KGA. KPO, KFWI, KYA. KOA. 
11:30 am— KGA. KPO, KGO, KYA, KOA. 
12:00 m— KFOA. KGA, KFWB, KPO, KGO, KFWI. 

KYA. KOA. 
12:30 pm— KFOA. KNX. KGA, KFWB, KGO, KGTT. 
KFWI. KYA. 
1:00 pm— KFOA, KFWB, KPO, KFWI. KYA. 
2:00 pm— KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KGO. KLX. KJBS. 
3:00 pm— KNX. KPO, KLX, KGTT. KJBS. 
4:00 pm— KFOA. KNX, KPO, KGO. KLX. 
5:00 pm— KOA. KNX, KFWB, KPO, KFWI, KTAB. 
5:30 pm— KOA. KFI. KNX. KGA. KFWB. KPO, 

KLX. KFWI, KYA. 
6:00 pm— KOA. KGW, KFI. KFOA. KNX. KGA. 

KFWB. KPO. KGO. KLX, KFWI, KYA. 
7:00 pm— KOA. KGW. KFI, KFOA. KNX. KFWB. 
KPO. KGO. KLX. KFWI. KYA, KTAB. 
7:30 pm— KNX. KFWB. KOA, KGW. KFI. KFOA. 
8:00 pm— KOA. KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KGA. 

KFWB. KPO. KGO. KLX. KGTT, KFUS, 
KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
9:00 pm — KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO. 
KGO. KLX. KGTT. KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
pm— KFI. KNX. KFWB. KPO, KGO, KFWI. 
KNX. KGO. KFWI. 



URSDAY 

KNX. KPO, KFWI. 

KNX. KPO. KFWI. 
-KNX. KTAB. KJBS. 

-KGW. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KFWI, KJBS. 
—KGW. KNX. KPO. KFWI, KJBS. 

KOA. KGW. KNX. KGA. KFWI, KYA. 

KOA. KNX. KGA. KPO, KGO. KFWI. 

KYA. 

KOA. KFOA, KGA. KFWB. KPO. KGO. 

KFWI. KYA. 

KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO, KGO. KGTT. 

KFWI. KYA. 

KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KGO, KFWI. 

KYA. 

KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KGO. KLX. KJBS. 

KOA. KNX. KFWil. KPO. KJBS. 

KOA. KFOA. KNX. KPO. KGO. KFWI. 

KNX. KFWB. KPO. KGO. KFWI. KTAB. 

KFI. KNX. KGA. KFWB. KPO. KGO. 
KI.X, KFWI. KYA. 

KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KGA. KFWB. 

KPO, KGO, KLX. KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 

KGW, KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB, 

KPO. KGO. KLX. KFWI. KYA. 

KFI. KNX. KFWB. KGW. KFOA. 

KGW, KFI. KFOA. KNX. KGA. KFWB. 

KPO. KGO. KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 

KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO. 

KPWI, KYA, KTAH 

KGW. KFI. KXX. KFWB, KPO. KFWI. 

KGW. KNX. KFWI. 



FKIDA1 

7 :00 am KNX. KPO, KFWI. 
,.1 KNX. KPO. KFWI. 
9:00 am KNX. KTAH. KJBS. 
10:00am KGW. KFOA. KNX. K FW H. KFUS. KFWI. 

KTAB. K.IHS. 
10:30am KGW. KNX KOA. KPO. KLX. KFWI. 

KYA. KTAB. KJI 
11:00am KGW. KGA. KOA, KFWI. KYA. 
11:30 am KGA. KOA. KPO, KGO. KFWI. KYA. 
12:00 m KFOA, KNX. KGA, KOA. KFWB. KPO. 

KGO. KFWI. KYA. 
12:30 pm KFOA. KNX. KGA. KFWB. KGO, KGTT. 
KYA 
1:00 pm KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KGO. KFWI. KYA. 
■i. KGW. KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KGO. 
KI.X. KJBS 
3:00pm KNX. KOA. KPO. KJBS. 
4:00pm KFOA. KNX. KPO. KGO. KFWI 
5:00pm KNX. KOA. KFWB. KPO. KFWI. KTAB. 
5:S0pm KFI. KNX. KGA. KOA. KFWB. KPO. 
KGO. KI.X, KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
m KGW. KFI, KFOA. KNX. KGA. KOA. 

KFWB. KPO. KGO. KFWI, KYA, KTAB. 
:m KFI. KFOA. KNX. KOA. KFWB. KPO. 
KGO. KLX. KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
7:30pm KFI. KNX. KOA. KFWB. KGW. KFOA. 
8:00pm KGW KFI KNX. KGA. KOA. KFWB. 
KPO. KGO. KLX. KGTT. KFWI. KYA. 
KTAB. 
9:00 pm KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KOA. KFWB. 
KPO. KGO KLX. KGTT. KFWI. KYA. 
KTAB. 



10 


(ill 


pm- 


11 


00 


pm— 


12 


00 


pm 
Til 


7 


00 


am- 


8 


III! 


am- 


9 


00 


am- 


Pi 


00 


am- 


10 


30 


am- 


11 


00 


am- 


11 


30 


am- 


12 


00 


m 


12 


30 


pm- 


1 


.00 


pm 


2 


•00 


pin 


3 


111. 


I'll! 


4 


:00 


pm- 


b 


:00 


pm- 


5 


:30 


pm 


6 


:00 


pin 


7 


Hill 


phi 


7 


-.30 


pm 


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pm 


9 


:00 


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10 


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pm 


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10:00pm -KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB KPO 

KGO. KI.X. KFWI. K.IHS 
II :("i pm KGW, KNX, KFWI. KFOA 
12:00 pm 



URDAY 

KNX. KPO. KFWI. 

KNX. KPO. KFWI. 

KNX, KTAB, KJBS. 

KGW. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KFWI, KJBS. 

KNX. KOA, KPO. KFWI, KJBS. 

KGA. KOA. KFWI, KYA. 

KGA, KOA. KPO, KGO, KYA. 

KNX. KGA. KOA. KFWB. KPO. KGO 

KFWI. KYA. 

KNX. KFWB, KGO, KGTT. KYA. 

KFWB. KPO. KGO. KFWI. KYA. 

KNX. KFWB. KPO, KGO. KLX, KJBS 

KNX, KPO, KJBS. 

KNX. KPO, KGO, KFWI. 

KNX, KFWB. KPO, KFWI. 

KFI, KNX, KGA. KFWB, KPO. KFWI. 

KYA. 

KGW, KFI, KNX, KGA, KFWB. KPO, 

KFWI, KYA. 

KFI. KNX. KOA. KFWB. KPO. KLX. 

KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 

KFI. KNX. KOA, KFWB. 

KGW. KFI, KNX, KGA, KOA, KFWB, 

KPO, KGO. KFUS. KFWI, KYA, KTAB. 

KFI, KNX, KFWB, KPO, KGO. KFWI. 

KYA. KTAB. 

KGW. KFI. KNX, KFWB. KPO. KGO. 

KFWI. 

KGW. KFI. KNX. KPO, KGO, KFWI. 

KNX, KPO, KGO, KFWI. 

KFWI. 

KFWI. 







SATl 


7 


00 


am — 


8 


on 


am — 


9 


III! 


am — 


111 


00 


am — 


10 


30 


dill 


11 


(III 


am — 


11 


30 


am — 


12 


00 


m— I 


12 


30 


pm — 


1 


00 


pm — 


2 


00 


pm — 


3 


mi 


pm — 


4 


(III 


pm— 


5 


00 


pm — 


5 


30 


pm — 


6 


00 


pm — 


7 


00 


pm — 


7 


:30 


pm - 


8 


:00 


pm — 


9 


:00 


pm — 


10 


:00 


pm — 


11 


:00 


pm — 


12 


:llll 


pm — 


1 


:0(1 


am — 


2 


:00 


am — 



Daredevil's Terrors 

Interviewer — "Aren't you some- 
times frightened when you look down 
at the street below you ?" 

Steeplejack — "Yes. Only yester- 
day I thought sure I was going to see 
a pedestrian get run over." — Life. 



CLUB 
AUTO SERVICE CO. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 

For All Occasions 

Day and Night 

City Sightseeing - - - - - $3.00 per hour 

Shopping 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips. Taxi cab Rates 



PROSPECT 

4000 



585 Post. St.. 
San Francisco 



Phone Sutter S378 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKHAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime. Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

Z0» POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and DelWer in San Francisco. Alameda 

and Ban Mateo Counties 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given ta 

Each Order 

Office and Works: M25 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Salter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bids;.) 

Phone Prospect 984; 

Work Called for and Delivered 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 23, 1927 




T N h , e m e PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whether 
it be typewriter pa- 
per or manuscript 
cover, means com- 
plete satisfaction- 
There is a grade for 
every n_e*d. Ask 
your printer or sta- 
tioner to show you 






BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 



Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Max Rosentha 



WHERE GOOD TAILORING- 
COSTS LESS 

A choice selection of seasonable 

Woolens suitable for Formal, 

Sport and Business wear is 

now ready for your early 

consideration. 

527 POST ST. SAN FRANCISCO 
OPP. OLYMPIC CLUB 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 

EXCHANGE 

Phont Garfleld S8S2 664 Market St. 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. WELLER 
National Automobile Club 

"The Booker T. Washington School 
on Wheels," maintained by the Tuske- 
gee Institute, was founded by Booker 
T. Washington and is probably the 
most famous school of its kind in the 
country. 

Dr. Washington, anxious to assist 
his fellows, many of whom were liv- 
ing in miserable conditions on their 
farms in the South, secured financial 
assistance from a wealthy man in the 
North and sent out a wagon equipped 
with garden tools, dairy apparatus 
and farm implements. With the wa- 
gon, instructors went through the 
poorer regions of the South and 
brought education to dwellers in out- 
of-the-way places. Specimens of well- 
bred livestock and of good crops were 
also shown. 

This venture was a success and out 
of it has grown the present school 
which is mounted on a truck and 
reaches hundreds of negro farmers 
yearly. It travels in districts which 
are inaccessible by railroad and brings 
improved means of living to many 
who would otherwise never come in 
contact with modern methods. Ar- 
rangements for the school's coming 
are made in advance and it "keeps" 
the year around, giving an education 
of a practical nature. 

"School on Wheels" are also oper- 
ated in some states by the Forest 
Service in an effort to educate people 
in the methods of fire prevention. 
Last year these schools drew audi- 
ences of 27,000 persons and traveled 
7,000 miles. One truck traveled 



through the State of Arkansas and 
another covered the Appalachian re- 
gions and Florida. Each school car- 
ries several instructors. 



Auto Invades London 

London is becoming "American- 
ized" and all on account of the auto- 
mobile. Old-timers of that city are 
bewailing the fact that the popular 
American sport of automobiling is 
encroaching on some of their most 
honored traditions. This lament is 
because all things are being regulated 
in such a way as to make way for 
the great increase of motor car traf- 
fic. 

Many tears have been shed over the 
changes made necessary to bring 
about this new order of things. Al- 
though the alterations are being made 
with an attempt to save all historic 
and artistic associations, it has been 
found needful to do away with old 
landmarks, in many instances. 

London's traffic problem is as both- 
ersome as the traffic problems with 
which most of the large American 
cities have to contend. In London, 
the old streets are narrow and crook- 
ed and the number of cars is large. 
Part of Piccadilly and the Strand are 
being transformed to make way for 
the automobile. 



Road Conditions 

Construction work is still in prog- 
ress on the Coast Highway between 
Ventura and Carpinteria. The first 
four miles are open but work is still 
in progress on this stretch. The next 
two miles are one-way road and de- 
lays of from ten to fifteen minutes 
may be experienced. The next six 
miles consist of newly completed pave- 
ment and the last four miles, leading 
into Carpinteria is open. 



The highway is again open between 
Carpinteria and Summerland. The 
five-mile paving contract is nearing 
completion with two-thirds of its 
width open to travel and the remain- 
ing portion being rapidly completed. 
Traffic was formerly detoured via the 
Foothill Road. 



Just welcomed into the now famous 
National Canada Dry Hole-In-One 
Club, are the following new members : 
Mr. D. H. McGeough, 630 Geary 
street, City ; Mr. R. V. Hill, 473 Ellis 
street, City; Mr. L. A. Hewitt, 2230 
MacDonald Ave., Richmond, Calif. 



July 23, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 




Lindbergh 

So beautiful his deed, and brave, 

It is heroic, great, and yet — 
Today I saw a man war-blinded 

Sell papers; I can not forget — 

Another youth, another time, 

Oh, not so very long ago, 
That risked Its sight, Its skin, Its all, 

To keep a reeking world from woe. 

His deed is beautiful and brave; 

It shall stand shining through the years 
While those sleep in their unknown graves, 

Lost even to their love's dear tears. 

His, a reward beyond all dreams; 

Theirs, but a passing line, strange grave ; 
His, splendor of a daring feat ; 

Theirs, honor and a world to save. 

Is it not timely that his daring 

Illumines one memorial day? 
To turn men's memories, slackening, 

To all youth proudly gave away? 

— By George Elliston. 



Don't Be Shy- 
Lives of men like Shaw remind us: 
That we will, if we are wise, 
Leave our modesty behind us. 
And get out and advertise. 

— London Opinion. 



Defiance 

You have hounded me well, my Lady Life, 
You have beaten and bruised and bent. 

But ever I stayed me amid the strife 
To turn you a compliment. 

You have cozened me there and tricked me here. 

Your way with a soul, long since — 
But I'll mock before I'll plead, my dear. 

And I'll boast before I wince. 

Why. think you to make me a captive cowed? 

That day that you slay. I swear 
I will kiss my finger tips to the crowd 

And jest with the headsman there ! 
— Theodosia Garrison in "The Joy o' Life." 




PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU W. SARTOR. Proprietor 

LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry AH Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 

Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco, Calif. 



GRAYSTONE 130 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 
Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of WILLIAM SAUNDERS 



TRUNKS — RACKS — BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVENUE 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 
DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 

Established 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, General Agent 
544 Market Street, San Francisco, CaL 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 23, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, IB58 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

JUNE 30th, 1927 

Assets $113,925,831.54 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $575,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haisht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital S20.000.000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought ; FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued; CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 5S0 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND; NEW YORK; PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. 
WASH. ; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability. Plate Glass. Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety. Burglary. Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pice and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS. PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS. ETC. 

San Francisco. Calif. Lob Angeles. Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



For Lease 

FIRE PROOF BUILDING 

TWO STORY AND BASEMENT 

Suitable for Printing — Manufacturing or Storage 
Rent Reasonable 

& X 

CORNWALL, COLDWELL & BANKER 

57 Sutter Street San Francisco 



inance 



The Finance Committee of the Board of Supervisors 
proposed an appropriation of 3275,000 for the reconstruc- 
tion of streets. This item was increased to S309.000 by 
the inclusion of street work which had been previously 
scheduled to be done out of the "Good Roads Fund." 

* * * 

The new ordinance with respect to the budget of San 
Francisco contains the very essential provision that no 
department shall incur any liability in excess of the 
amount provided therefore; and that no appropriations 
shall be made for any other purpose than specifically de- 
clared. This prevents the now established practice of 
transfers between items, which encourages the incurring 

of deficits. 

* * * 

Col. T. H. Jackson made a very informing address to 
the Commonwealth Club recently in which he detailed 
the efforts made by the United States government to pre- 
vent floods. It is a fine story of grappling with difficulties 
and contrasts favorably with the management of the 
Mississippi problems. In this connection, Col. Jackson is 
emphatic in his stand against the resumption of placer 
mining in the headwaters of the Sacramento River. 

* * * 

The Pacific Coast has more great waterfalls than any 
other part of the world. These waterfalls have a poten- 
tial power sufficient for more than thirty million people, 
according to J. T. Saunders, the traffic manager of the 

Southern Pacific. 

* * * 

California industrial stocks show well on the exchange 
in spite of the summer slump. 

* * * 

The California Tax Payers' Association is conducting a 
campaign against one-room district schools, upon the 
ground that such schools are obsolete and uneconomic. 
This State ranks sixth in percentage of teachers in one- 
room schools. 

* * * 

The development of the Salinas rodeo appears in the 
fact that S40,000 will be given in prizes this year. 

* * * 

The report of H. I. Mulcrevy, county clerk in the twen- 
ty-first year of his office, is a very inspiring document 
and reflects the greatest credit upon the incumbent. He 
has succeeded in handling the business of the office, in 
spite of its enormous increase, without additional forces, 
and has earned §1,064,574.45 in excess of running ex- 
penses during his administration. 

* * * 

While there are probably more than 100 insurance com- 
panies writing industrial insurance in the United States, 
over 85 per cent of such insurance is in the hands of three 
companies, the John Hancock Mutual, Metropolitan Life 
and the Prudential. That does not mean that the business 
conducted by the others is light, for three of them pass 
the million mark in policies in force. 

* * * 

Figures on electric power consumption and bank clear- 
ings still indicate that trade is running on record break- 
ing levels to quote the National City Bank of New York. 
But there is on the other hand a notable decline in steel 
production and there is no doubt that railway shipments 
have declined somewhat. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Plact 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Suppei 

50c. 75c, SI. 35c. 50c. 75c S1.00.S1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1 :00 a. m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 397, 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSEfc 



Ucvzu IIumjjlLu, Oivop& 



490 POST ST.. S. 

Garfield 234 

CLIFT HOTEL 

Prospect 4700 



RAMONA STUDIO. PALO ALTO 

Palo Alto 433 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Matson Nav. Co. Steamers 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' Lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private Dining Roon 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystonc 8100 



Weekdays, Luncheon $ .75 

(11:30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner. Week Days & Sundays 1.50 



No visitor Should Leave the Cilj 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 




ICE CREAr% 



CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 

t CALIFORNIA STS | LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



■m ~r ^-^ j* -w- ~% y f-*f Featurinc Southern Cookinn 

i\ \ J f\ H L J 0pen From 
-*- » V^ -J- -A- -*- -M. »_^ U: 3 „ m l0 2:00 p.m. 

5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 

/\ M B TS~ Sundnys and Holidays 
/-I fr l\ 4:30 to 8:80 p.m. only 
-*■ "*- -*■»■-*•»- CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
93 Third Avenue. SAN MATEO Half Block from Highway 






Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN »:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. 
Unsurpassed Cuisine 




■P" Z ^^^Q^M 




14-Mile House 


CARL LEONHARDT 
Formerly of Golden Gate Park Cnsino 











CAROLINE JONES 




fi* 






Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 


M 


j£/R 




k 


2:30 and Tea from 3 to 5 


teM 




i> 


Lxclusive use of room for club dinners 


% 


and. 


4* 




334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

STERLING ANDERSON, Manager 

Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 



1140 GEARY S ¥~ TEL. GRAYSTONE 4266 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy- Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blacksmithing. 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 




Golf Hose, Knickers, Sweaters, etc., laundered in 
accordance with our reputation. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 

2.,0 Twelfth St. PHONE MARKET 916 

Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 



DR. B. FRANKLIN PEARCE 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

HOURS: 9-12. 1-5 

'.)Mt-.s2 Flood Htiildinff, Powell and Market Streets, San Francisco 

PHONE GARFIELD 5394 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



583 Post Street 
I n \ irffinia Hotel 



San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 2510 




Antioch Bridge Route 



to 



Sacramento 

Is Now PAVED All the Way 



No Traffic Congestion No Delays 

The Cool, Quick Way 

Along the Sacramento River, Through 
the Netherlands of America 



From Oakland 
The Tunnel Road 



From Sacramento 
South on 21st Street 



^ 



AMERICAN TOLL-BRIDGE 
COMPANY 

Owners and Operators of 

CARQUINEZ BRIDGE and ANTIOCH BRIDGE 

Tolls the Same on Both Bridges 
Autos, 60c Passengers, 10c 




Famous cuisine 
...thoughtful ser- 
vice . . . centrally lo- 
cated accommoda- 
tions win your heart- 
iest approval of the 
Alexandria. 
RATES per Day, Single, European Plan 
275 rooms with running water $2.00 to $3.00 

(Many with private toilet) 
380 rooms with bath $3.00 to $4.00 

245 rooms with bath $5.00 to $8.00 

For two persons, $3.00 up 
Spt rial rates for parties 
number of large and beautiful rooms and suites, 
some in period furnishings with grand piano, fireplace 
and bath. $10 up. Large and well equipped sample rooms. 
Other special features include the famous Franco-Italian /lining 
room. Peacock Coffee Shop — Alexandria <!■ luxt 
Self-Service Restaurant. 

Hotel 

Alexandria. 

Los -Angeles 

ALEXANDRIA HOTEL CO. 
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Vol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JULY 30, 1927 



No. 31 



From One Thing to Another 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



Incredulity Is Sometimes Ignorance 

When you tell the person of limited intelligence that 
each new subscription to a magazine means a loss, in- 
stead of a profit, he or she stares at you blankly and in- 
credulously. 

They do not realize that the profit of a journal comes 
only from its advertising; that each extra copy printed 
adds to, instead of lessening the expenses ; and when you 
go on to explain, for instance, that the Ladies Home Jour- 
nal or the Saturday Evening Post, or any other of the 
thousands of voluminous publications lose on their sub- 
scriptions, they show every indication of summing you 
up as a poor nut. 

The Telephone Company has been trying to explain 
this situation to the general public ; for each new exchange 
is similar to each new subscription, and entails an added 
expense to the Telephone Company, instead of swelling 
the profits of the Company. 

The more the Telephone Company develops, the more 
costly relatively, the system becomes. 

This is too novel an idea for the limited intelligence to 
grasp, however, and so far the public, which the phone 
company has so faithfully served for nearly half a cen- 
tury, greets all its explanations and elucidations with de- 
risive scorn. 

It is only right that the Company be given a fair deal. 



Need of Signals 

It is hardly an exaggeration to say that almost everj 
lay an accident occurs at the intersection of Davis, Pine 
and Market streets. Why this particular street junction 
should be minus a stop and go signal, or a traffic cop. is 
one of the mysteries involved in the administration of 
the city's politics. The interference of the Board of Su- 
pervisors with the Traffic Department, is uncalled for 
and unnecessary. In fact, it is more than that; it borders 
on impertinence. 

The traffic department of San Francisco is headed by a 
capable and practical man. Captain Henry Glee- in, under 
whose management the traffic system of this city has de- 
veloped and improved to an admirable degree; that his 



supervision should be hindered by the manipulations of 
politicians, is to be deplored. 

The traffic chief of a city should surely be the one to 
choose the locations of these signals that so often mean a 
matter of life and death. Otherwise, why maintain this 
position? This particular corner should be attended to, 
at once. 



Living Costs 

There is -quite a decrease in the cost of living in San 
Francisco, since the year 1920, we are told. Just 18.1 per 
cent less, to be exact. But personally, the figures do not 
mean anything, and I have no doubt, the average citizen 
feels the same way. I have not seen any decrease in 
rents, nor in foods. Clothing appears to be slightly less 
expensive this year, but this is only a temporary decrease, 
due to the usual Summer dullness in business. 



Prices of Crops Should Be Regulated 

The situation existing between the fruit growers and 
the canners is one which should be arbitrated by a com- 
mittee of disinterested citizens, if such a body of men 
could be found. 

The writer has passed through the apple orchards of 
the Pajara Valley, when lusciously ripe fruit was rotting 
on the ground in heaps, and has turned from the car 
windows to find a boy with baskets of apples, offering 
them at five cents apiece ! 

What sort of injustice is this? We have a railroad com- 
mission, regulating freight rates on the very fruit which 
the growers threaten to leave unpicked, this year, because 
of a deadlock with the canners ; why should the handling 
of the fruit be important enough to demand commission- 
ers to supervise the rates, and the prices for the fruit 
itself, be made the cause of a disastrous fight between 
the farmer and the canner? Waste is a criminal condi- 
tion, and there threatens to be a waste of tons of good 
fruit unless the canners' association and the grower come 
to terms. This question is one that cries aloud for arbi- 
tration. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 30, 1927 






Foreign Trade 

There is no question that the main matter before busi- 
ness men of this country, at the present time, is the rapid 
extension of foreign trade in order to find a ready market 
for the mass of manufactured goods which we are turn- 
ing out in hitherto unheard of quantities. 

The United States leads the world in the production of 
goods. Our industrial system is such that we have de- 
veloped methods of manufacture in mass, which are at 
once the envy and despair of the industrialists of other 
countries. We have, at the same time, developed the de- 
mands of our working people by the payment of good 
wages, to a point where they consume proportionately 
much more of the goods manufactured than do the work- 
ing people of any other country, twice as much, as the 
nearest, in all probability. 

Even so, the mass of goods accumulates. The question 
of the disposal of those goods becomes more and more 
urgent, and very soon, unless the demand is steady and 
uninterrupted, the mass tends to congeal, to clog the ma- 
chinery of production and to cause gluts and trade de- 
pressions. 

Thus the necessity for the discovery of ever new for- 
eign markets and the importance of foreign trade. The 
United States is now the world market, not as formerly, 
selling raw materials, but to an ever greater extent, as 
selling manufactured goods. They are high class goods, 
in some respects the best goods in the world. It is neces- 
sary that they be sold, and the home machinery kept 
busy. These goods add to the well being of man wherever 
they go. The machinery which sells them is an instru- 
ment of human happiness. 

* * * 

Our Trade With Mexico 

The Faculty Club of the University of California is 
doing much good with its dinners-conferences in connec- 
tion with the Assembly on International Relations. A re- 
cent dinner at which the Mexican Consul was the chief 
speaker, was particularly illuminating. During the course 
of the evening, B. A. Alameda, Mexican commercial at- 
tache at San Francisco, pointed out that the trade with 
Mexico amounted to an average of SI, 000,000 a day of 
which California's share was about b c /c , or, annually, 
about S18,000,000. This is no small amount and is worthy 
of consideration by the people of the State. 

The same gentleman called attention, also, to a matter 
which is generally overlooked and that is a tendency on 
the part of Mexican farming to develop into vegetable 
gardening. Thus he declared that the local markets in 
San Francisco received, from Mexico, during the first six 
months of this year 454 carloads of bananas, green pep- 
pers, tomatoes and the like, all sent by railroad. 

Generally speaking, Mexico is the best buyer from Cali- 
fornia of any American Latin country and its purchases 
amount to abcut the same as those of Canada. 

Of course trade is reciprocal and, as fast as the Mexi- 
cans develop prosperity, so fast will their demands for 
the produce of our part of the country develop. It is much 
better for us to have a prosperous and growing commun- 
ity next door, than to have one sunk in poverty and sub- 
ject to the confusion of revolutionary methods. Destiny 
lies largely in the hands of our commercial men. As fast 
as trade is developed, wants grow and relations between 



countries grow closer. The very statement of the extent 
of trade with Mexico makes us feel more friendly. 

* * * 

The Pugilistic Decline 

The last fight, which was marked by all the stupiditie 
and brutalities of the fighting game, reveals the fact that 
in all probability prize fighting has passed the zenith of 
its popularity and is being gradually relegated to a more 
remote place among amusements. The newspapermen 
who proclaimed so confidently that the victor in the re 
cent Sharkey-Dempsey fight would be as popular as Lind 
bergh have proved to be wrong. There is not even a ripple 
of public excitement over the affair. In fact, it is freely 
whispered that there might have been more enthusiasm 
if Dempsey had been well trounced. 

Be that as it may, there is no doubt that the revelation 
of crookedness, in this particular pastime, has had much 
part in cooling off public interest. It is hard to take an 
interest in a sport that is honeycombed with corruption. 

Bernard Shaw recently expressed his opinion as a stu- 
dent of the prize ring, on which he wrote the novel 
"Cashel Bryon's Profession." He says that as a matter 
of fact, prize fighters hurt themselves very little and the 
amount of physical damage done mutually by these well- 
trained men, is comparatively slight. If once this notion 
is taken hold of by the public there will be a very distinct 
falling off in popular interest, for there is little doubt that 
the charm of the thing, to most people, lies in the im- 
pression that they are watching a contest in which men 
really get hurt. 

Meanwhile, it seems undeniable that the amount of! 
money expended, and the enormous publicity connected I 
with it, are detrimental to the best interests of society, 
as a whole. * * * 

Another Boycott 

There is quite an interesting commentary on the use of 
the boycott in the fact that the Standard Oil Company 
of New Jersey has followed the example of the Royal 
Dutch Shell, in placing a boycott on Russian oil. 

The very powerful Royal Dutch Shell Company, which 
has far reaching European influence, has declared that it 
will not buy Soviet oil products as long as the Soviet gov- 
ernment refuses to acknowledge the rights of private 
property. Of course, if such a plan were carried out by 
the oil companies of this country as a whole, it would 
strike a very deadly blow at the Russian governmental 
policy and would damage the economic power of Russia 
very considerably. But it appears that the Standard Oil 
Company of New York and the Vacuum Oil Company, 
both of which are in the Standard Oil group, are still buy- 
ing large quantities of oil from Baku for European trade. 

The boycott may be considered as the reply of Great 
Britain, so far, to the Russian movement towards the 
boycott of British trade since the expulsion of Arcos, the 
Russian trading group, from Britain and it is the appli- 
cation of a new method of fighting on the p<.rt of the cor- 
porations. Formerly, the boycott had been the weapon of 
the labor groups exclusively. It is clear, however, that it 
has potentialities as the weapon of the possessing groups. 

If Russia refuses to buy industrial products from what 
it calls "bourgeois capitalists," in other countries, with 
the idea of embarrassing them financially, it is clearly 
within the power of such industrialists to refuse to buy 
Russian industrial products for the same reason. 



July 30, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Two can play at that game and the fact that the Rus- 
sians have not seen it that is proof of the soundness of 
the statement of Winston Churchill that they are "sec- 
ond raters." 



The Nicaragua Matter 

There is, in some quarters, a great outcry about affairs 
in Nicaragua, and the repulse of a bandit army by the 
United States Marines. It is much ado about nothing ; 
merely one of those scavengering instances which are in- 
separable from the extension of our influence and the 
impact of the civilized on the backward peoples. 

The question is, whether, after all, it is to the interest 
of humanity, as a whole, that the black spots in Central 
America should be cleaned up and that decency should 
prevail where, up to the present conditions, have been 
little short of disgusting. We are well acquainted with 
the doctrine that an independent state can govern its 
own country in its own way. But such a country cannot, 
and must not, be allowed to interfere with legitimate con- 
duct of business on the part of people who have gone 
down into it for trade and business purposes with the 
agreement of its own government. 

Still less can it be argued that the United States, or 
any other country should sit supinely by and see the prop- 
erty of its citizens destroyed and their lives threatened 
by banditti which the government of the country is un- 
able or unwilling to subdue. Such banditry must be 
stopped at any price. If it persists in trying to upset the 
lives and liberties of people and engaging in the childish 
pastime of parading under arms and committing robbery 
and arson, it must be stopped even if it takes bullets and 
bombs to do it. 

We do not pretend to think scavengering heroic, but it 
is necessary. The Marines are a sanitary precaution in 

Nicaragua. 

* * * 

Anti-Salcon League Infamy 

The news that the Anti-Saloon League actively took 
part in the appointment of Judge A. F. St. Sure as Fed- 
eral judge in this district is a shameful and disgraceful 
episode in the history of the State. Nothing worse has 
happened for a long time, if ever. 

The Federal judiciary is the crowning glory of our na- 
tional system of jurisprudence. Its bench has been occu- 
pied, from the beginning of our history, by men against 
whose integrity and scholarship there can be no cavil. 
It has, for a hundred and fifty years, been regarded, at 
home and abroad, as a bulwark of our liberties and a se- 
curity for the integrity of our national existence. It there- 
fore comes as a great shock that an irresponsible body 
such as the Anti-Saloon League, should have called upon 
a candidate for such distinction to appear before it and 
show cause why he should not lie opposed and his candi- 
dacy threatened. Nothing more insolent has ever been at- 
tempted. We think that the attempt should have been 
exposed when made, and that it should not have been left 
to newspaper enterprise to discover the brutal assault up- 
on judicial independence and expose it to the public. 

It is useless to say that there was no attempt to inter- 
fere with the administration of justice, when we have the 
admission of the judge himself that he was asked to be 
strict in his enforcement of the prohibition laws and se- 
vere in punishment. His reply, as reported, was that it a 
man was convicted under the prohibition law. he saw no 
reason why be should not get the full penalty. W hen a 
judge promises practically to give the full penalty for a 
man convicted of a special sort of crime he. to that extent, 
has already given pledges with respect to the administra- 
tion o\' the law. It is a bad busin. 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 



Add summer vacation advice : Don't rock the plane. — 

New York Evening Post. 

* * * 

Those who censor the modern bathing-suit have scant 

reason for doing so. — St. Louis Post-Dispatch. 

* * * 

The old-fashioned fellow who never thought anything 
of walking eighteen or twenty miles in an afternoon has 
a grandson who never thought of it either. — Detroit 

News. 

* * * 

The Department of Commerce informs us that cotton 
stockings are being manufactured, and then adds the 
wholly unnecessary information that most of them are 

exported. — St. Louis Post-Dispatch. 

* # * 

Cook-book for brides advertises itself as giving "Con- 
crete rules for making biscuits." It should be pointed out 

that concrete is used in the abstract. — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

"Live dangerously from Saturday to Monday," advised 
the romantic Robert Louis Stevenson. How "R. L. S." 
would have rejoiced in the automobile era! — Chicago 
Daily News. 

The British are very cordial toward any scheme of 
naval equality which will leave them with the biggest 

Navy. — Dallas News. 

* * * 

If it keeps on, the parking of American airplanes will 
become another of Europe's troubles. — Columbus Dis- 
patch. 

* * * 

Europe seems to be willing to let America take the lead 
in transatlantic flying. That's one way we get more tour- 
ists over. — Florida Times-Union. 

* * * 

In 1950 it is likely that the careful mother will insist 
on parachutes when her daughter goes riding with a 

young man. — Nashville Banner. 

* * * 

Come to Think of It 

Judge — Well, John, I can give you this divorce, but it 
will cost you three dollars. 

John — Three dollars, boss? 

Judge — That's the fee. 

John — Well, boss, I jes' tell ya, I don't b'lieve I wants 
no divorce. There ain't three dollars difference 'tween 
dem two wimmen. — Alabama Rammer-Jammer. 

* * * 

How to Torture Your Wife 

"John, dear, I am to be in an amateur theatrical. What 
would folks say if I were to wear tights?" 

"They would probably say that I married you for your 
money." — Hardware Age. 

* * * 

"And there." said the Athenian guide, "is the Parthe- 
non." 

"Gee," exclaimed the American tourist, "wouldn't it 
make a swell filling station." — Judge. 

* * * 

Movie Star — Why did Roy lose his job with the com- 
pany ? 

Comedian — Well, some one told him to throw the dum- 
my over the cliff and he thought they meant the director. 
— Judge. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 30, 192: 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Dubutantes Will 
Make Society Debut 

What is ever more interesting and 
speculative in Society than a debut? 

The charming young debutantes of 
Golden California are so superlatively 
attractive, so magnetically beautiful, 
that no one can forego the formal 
presentation, in Society, of these 
promising young "irresistibles." 

Every season, some one of Califor- 
nia's millionaires stages a "coming- 
out" party which is the last word in 
elegance and distinction. 

This year, we have had many per- 
fectly marvelous events when the 
lovely young creatures have held the 
limelight most gracefully. 

Now, w T e are to have another splen- 
did and elaborate coming-out party 
when Miss Agnes Clark, youngest of 
three daughters of Mrs. Tobin Clark. 
will make her formal debut. 
* * * 

Miss Clark Will 
Bow to Society 

Miss Agnes Clark, who is now visit- 
ing her friend, Miss Phyllis Bryne, at 
Bar Harbor, since finishing school 
days at the New York Spence School, 
will be presented by her mother, Mrs. 
Tobin Clark in one of the most beau- 
tiful debuts, so we are told, ever 
known here in the West. 

Miss Patricia Clark, the second 
daughter, was last season*s star in 
the social realm when she made her 
bow to society. The ball given in 
honor of Miss Patricia surpassed any 
other event in quite some time, and, 
I thought, was really one of the most 
truly exquisite affairs within the 
realm of society. 

The handsome home of Mrs. Tobin 
Clark in San Mateo, it is now planned, 
will be the setting for Miss Agnes 
Clark's debut. 

"El Palomar" is one of the most at- 
tractive places on the entire penin- 
sula and famed for its architectural 
beauty, its magnificent gardens and 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway. Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



the entire exterior, as well as the in- 
terior, of the Tobin Clark home. 

Miss Mary Clark made her debut 
on her mother's estate last summer 
when the millionaire set were in rep- 
resentative attendance. Then, last 
season, Miss Patricia Clark was so- 
ciety's favorite and her debut was 
declared one of the most elaborate 
and charming events of all. 

So, no wonder, we are all eagerly 
anticipating this Society Season with 
lovely Miss Agnes Clark, the debutante 
upon whom all eyes will be centered. 
She is an adorable young girl, un- 
spoiled and so always charmingly 

gracious. 

* * * 

Burlingame Dance 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Grant will 
give a dinner dance tonight, July 30, 
at the Grant summer home in Bur- 
lingame, in honor of their daughter, 
Mrs. William A. Magee Jr., and her 
husband. Many of the Peninsula set 
and society folks from Piedmont will 
be present at this lovely affair, typi- 
cal of all the Joseph Grant home par- 
ties. 

* * * 

Crocker's Home 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Crocker have 
returned from abroad where they 
have been spending their honeymoon 
and are now at New Place in Bur- 
lingame. the home of Mr. Crocker's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. William H. 
Crocker. 

The young bride, Mrs. Crocker, is 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Horace 
Bennett of Denver, Colorado. 

Mr. William Crocker went to Eng- 
land to attend the wedding of his 
daughter, Helen, and Mr. Henry Pot- 
ter Russell, but is returning home 
this week. Mrs. William H. Crocker 
will spend the remainder of the sum- 
mer months in Paris. 
* * * 

Miss Mollie Merrick 
Returns From Abroad 

Miss Mollie Merrick, the brilliant 
young music critic of the San Fran- 
cisco Bulletin, has returned from a 
tour of European cities, especially the 
musical centers of the Old World. 
While abroad Miss Merrick wrote 
articles on conditions as she found 
them, in her own clever way, while in 
various cities of Europe. Her articles 
on music were exceptionally vibrant, 
with the verve and originality for 
which this young critic is famous. 



Names Her 
Wedding Day 

Miss Katherine Kuhn has namec 
the day of her wedding Saturday.' 
August 20. when she will become the 
bride of Mr. Thomas Jefferson Cool-' 
idge of Boston. The wedding will take! 
place at 4 o'clock in St. Matthew's 
Church, in Burlingame. 

Mrs. Robert G. Hooker Jr., the for-! 
mer Miss Marianne Kuhn, a sister of 
the bride, will be the matron of honor 
and Miss Mary Jennings Hill, a cousin 
of the bride and a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Jerome Hill of Pittsburgh, 
will be the maid of honor. Little Miss 
Angelica Hill, the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Fentress Hill, another cou- 
sin, will be the flower girl. The best 
man will be Mr. Armory Coolidge, al 

brother of the bridegroom. 

* * * 

Relatives Coming 

Mrs. Thomas Jefferson Coolidge 
will accompany her sons to California 
for the wedding. 

Mr. Coolidge belongs to a well- 
known .Massachusetts family and is 
related to Miss Eleanora Sears and a 

number of other prominent persons. 

* * * 

Prominent Families 

Mrs. William Scaife of Pittsburgh 
and Xew York, arrived from the East 
last week, coming West for the lovely 
wedding of Miss Kuhn and Mr: 

Thomas Jefferson Coolidge. 

* * * 

The wedding in the church will be 
followed by a reception at the home 
of the parents of the bride-to-be, Mr. 
and Mrs. William Speer Kuhn of Bur- 
lingame. 

Miss Kuhn is one of the most popu- 
lar girls in peninsula society and 
many affairs are planned for her be- 
tween now and the time of her mar- 
riage. 

* * * 

Mrs. Louis Parrott and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Mayo Newhall have been spend- 
ing a few weeks at Feather River Inn, 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



July 30, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Children's Parties 
At Feather River Inn 

Did you ever go to a Children's 
Party and then wish that you were 
once again a child? Of course you 
have — everybody has, especially if 
they have a heart of gold and a pen- 
chant for fun. 

That's what happened to most of 
us as we watched the happy young- 
sters at Feather River Inn last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nion Tucker and their 
children, Miss Nan and Buddy Tuck- 
er, have been staying at Feather 
River Inn and that's where the elders 
as well as the children had the "time 
of their lives." Miss Nan Tucker was 
the honor guest at the party, for it 
was the birthday of this charming 
little lady, while Buddy helped his_ 
sister "receive." 

The feature of Miss Nan Tucker's 
party was a large Jack Horner pie 
into which many thumbs were thrust. 
It adorned the center of a table pret- 
tily arrayed in pink and blue, flowers, 
ribbons and birthday favors. 

After the party of ice cream and 
bon bons, there were out-of-door 
games on the big green lawns, where 
the children were entertained. Those 
who were present at Miss Nan Tuck- 
er's birthday party were little Misses 
Barbara Tobin, Tania Whitman, 
Yvonne Thieriot, Nancy Leighton, 
Lila Renshaw, and Genevieve Lyman. 
The young cavaliers who were pres- 
ent, also, included Masters Peter 
Thieriot, Howard Renshaw Jr., John 
Renshaw, Harry Jackson, Buddy 
Tucker, Freddie Whitman and Alec 
Henderson. 

They all had a "perfect time." 
* * * 

Fancy Dress Ball 

For Happy Youngsters 

A pretty fancy dress ball for the 
children was staged for those who 
stayed at Feather River Inn this past 
week. It was the prettiest affair you 
could ever imagine. All of the little 
folks were arrayed in fancy dress cos- 
tumes and many of the boys chose 
their favorite, a pirate's outfit. 

Clever costumes were worn by the 
youngsters, the prize going to pretty 
Miss Tania Whitman, who represent- 
ed a jonquil in her dainty yellow frock 
of petaled tissue paper. 

Prizes for the most original cos- 
tumes were awarded the Tucker chil- 
dren, who appeared as saucy chanti- 
cleers, looking for all the world as 
proud as the proverbial roosters. 

Young Peter Thieriot won a prize. 
too, for his Indian costume and his 
sister. Miss Yvonne Thieriot. was also 
given a prize for her Indian costume. 
Then there were a lot of other inter- 
esting prize awards. Little Miss 
Nancy Leighton. daughter of the 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 

Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

500 Rooms 

Tariff: From S4 per day 



Coffman. All events will be held un- 
der the rules of P. A. A., of which an 
official has been delegated. This 
promises to be the largest swimming 
meets ever held in the Lake Tahoe re- 
gion and is looked forward to with 
considerable expectancy by guests of 
Tahoe Tavern. 

On the same date the San Francisco 
Motor Car Dealers' Association will 
arrive on its Sociability Run to Tahoe 
Tavern, headed by President E. W. 
Milburn of the association, and Chair- 
man Fred W. Pabst. There will be 
about fifty machines in the motor 
caravan which will leave San Fran- 
cisco on the evening of August 12th, 
and will comprise about one hundred 
and fifty people. 



popular Mrs. H. C. Leigton, who with 
her husband, of New York City, is 
visiting the Inn, was dressed in a 
fancy costume to represent "Satur- 
day Night." 

* # * 

Little Pirates 

Two ferocious but attractive pirates 
were represented by Miss Lila Ren- 
shaw and Master John Renshaw, 
while Master Howard Renshaw, Jr., 
was a brave-looking fireman. Master 
Alec Henderson, in his Oriental cos- 
tume was an intelligent appearing 
Chinaman. Little Miss Barbara Liv- 
ingston went to the costume party 
dressed as a Japanese girl ; Miss Gene- 
vieve Lyman was a pretty pansy and 
Jimmie Zellerbach was a sailor. Mary 
Louise Bine was dressed to represent 
"Stanford," in her flaming red dress 
with white adornments. Barbara 
Blue was the prettiest kind of an 
Irish girl; Harry Jackson was a pi- 
rate, Marjorie Davis wore a peasant 
girl costume and lovely Marjorie 
Calm took the role of "Summer." 

Altogether this children's party 
was a thing of beauty — and a perfect 
joy to beholders as well as to the 

juveniles. 

* * * 

At Lake Tahoe 

Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Taylor of 
Menlo Park, and their daughter. Miss 
Evelvn Taylor, have been visiting 
Mr. and Mrs. George Pope at their 
Lake Tahoe summer home. 

* * * 

Swimming Meet for 
Society Folks. Soon 

Under supervision of H. D. Lawler. 
director of publicity for the D. M. 
Linnard Hotels. Inc.. Tahoe Tavern 
will hold the first annual swimming 
meet on August 13th and 14th. Teams 
of swimmers, divers and water polo 
plavers will be sent from the Olympic 
Club in charge of Coach Tom Whit- 
aker and Swimming Commissioner 



The week of July 11th was the 
busiest of the mid-summer season for 
Hotel Mark Hopkins. A great many 
people from the East and Southern 
Calilfornia having registered, some to 
stay a day or so on their way to Ta- 
hoe, the Yosemite and other Califor- 
nia resorts, Honolulu and the Orient 
— others to spend several weeks in 
the city and its vicinity — making the 
Mark Hopkins their headquarters. 
There were also many guests from 
Los Angeles and the Valley cities. 
The approach of the Bohemian Club 
encampment brings several important 
reservations. Already inquiries for 
hotel apartment accommodations for 
the Winter have been received and 
several suites above the tenth floor are 
being prepared for occupancy. 

Among those from the East who 
registered at the Mark Hopkins were : 
W. H. Graham of New York, Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles R. Page of Montclair, 
New Jersey ; Mr. and Mrs. B. F Beal 
of Brookline, Massachusetts ; Dr. A. 
J. Bedell and family of Albany, A. E. 
Dietze of New York, S. L. Harris and 
family of New York, Mrs. J. F. Tatem 
of Haddonfield, New Jersey; C. Wa- 
ters of Brooklyn, New York ; Mr. and 
Mrs. J. C. Crawford of Washington, 
D. C, and Mrs. E. M. Simpson of 
Philadelphia. 

A European visitor, Mr. Arturo 
Gramaj and his wife of Paris, are 
stopping at the Mark Hopkins dur- 
ing their stay in San Francisco. 

Mr. Randall of the Richfield Oil 
Company had dinner for thirty-one 
persons in one of the small dining 
rooms of the hotel. A large luncheon 
by Garnett King of the Southern Pa- 
cific Company in Peacock Court was 
another important event of the week. 
Another luncheon was held by offi- 
cials of the Hartford Fire Insurance 
Company. 

(Continued on page 8) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 30, 1927 




ftE/ISURESWW 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURES 

Tom Noore- 




By Josephine Young 



Let's Go To 
A Show Tonight 

How often do we hear some one 
say: "Let's go to a show, tonight. 
What's good?" 

In this city, there is always some- 
thing good to see, and that's no mis- 
take. Our theaters have a fine reputa- 
tion to uphold in the way of "good 
shows" and they seldom, if ever, fall 
short of the high mark. 

So take your very best girl, and 
let's hope she's the dear wife of many 
a year, and go somewhere to one of 
our San Francisco theaters — where 
you and she will be sure to have a 
"peach-of-a-time." 

Theaters were made for real folks 
— like you and your friends — so put 
aside every care, and go to see every 
show in town. 

You'll be a better business man! 



Lurie 

"The Harem," a Belasco comedy, 
is on at the Lurie Theater (Geary 
street, right near Mason), with Iso- 
bel Elsom in the starring part in the 
role that Lenore Ulric sent whirring 
to success. 

Belasco, Butler and Davis bring 
this play to our town with many fine 
people in the cast, Alan Brooks being 
a co-star with Isobel Elsom. A splen- 
did group of players sustains the sup- 
port. 

This comedy-drama was written by 
Avery Hopwood and deals with pleas- 
ure-loving people of Vienna, the lo- 
cale being Budapest, with several 
lines of sophisticated intent bent on 
adding more frolic to the plot. 

In the story of "The Harem," a 
wife puts on Turkish trousers and 
wears a veil in her scheme to flirt 
with her own husband whose fidelity 
she seems determined to doubt. Rob- 
ert Fischer of the original cast ap- 
pears in this company presenting 
"The Harem" at the Lurie Theater. 

The advertising man tells us that 
this is the first time the play has been 
produced in the West and that the 
engagement in San Francisco must, 
necessarily, be a limited one. 



Curran 

"Love in a Mist," at the Curran, 
has proven so much of a hit that the 
attraction will be held over a third 
week beginning Sunday night. This 
delightful comedy of love, laughter 
and lies with Madge Kennedy and 
Sidney Blackmer in the title roles, 
was produced in New York by Charles 
Wagner and ran in that city for over 
a year. The entire production and 
cast was brought direct from New 
York to San Francisco by Belasco, 
Butler and Davis. 

Miss Kennedy has not been seen on 
a local stage for ten years and Sid- 
ney Blackmer, who is sometimes 
called the young John Drew has spent 
most of his young life in the East. 
These two as a team are rated as the 
foremost romantic couple on the 
American stage. The rest of the sup- 
porting cast is excellent. 

Bargain matinees are given on 
Wednesday and Saturday where the 
best seats may be obtained for $1.50. 
Night prices range from 50c to $2.50. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

An enthusiastic welcome has been 
accorded Marion Lord in the Alcazar 
play, "Meet the Wife," which, on 
Sunday will start its fourth success- 
ful week. 

"Meet the Wife," written by Lynn 
Starling, is really a "festival of fun" 
with its clever lines, witty repartee, 
and its full measure of satire. In her 
portrayal of Mrs. Gertrude Lennox, 
the wife, Marion Lord charms her au- 
dience, indeed, and keeps up the turn 
of laughter. Robert Adams is funny 
in his role of the effeminate Victor 
Staunton. 

Henry Duffy, producer of this play, 
has chosen his cast well, including 
John Stokes, William Macauley, as 
principals; and Marion Sterly, Rich- 
ard Ellers. Marie Sorrille and John 
Mackenzie. 

* * * 
President 

Themerry thrills which punctuate 
the Ghost Train," now entering up- 
on its eighth successful week at the 
President, stills packs 'em in. 

Earl Lee takes the part of a blun- 
dering Englishman who is responsi- 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"Meet the Wife." Henry Duffy Comedy star- 
ring Marion Lord. 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

"Love in a Mist." Comedy, starring Madpr 
Kennedy and Sidney Rlackmer. 

Lurie, Geary at Mason 

"The Harem." Farce written by Ernest Vajda 
starring Isobel Elsom and Alan Brooks. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"The Ghost Train." Henry Duffy Mystery- 
Comedy. 



VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

Henry Santrey nnd his liand heading the vaude- 
ville program. Jack Mulhall in "See You in 
Jail" on the screen. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

A bill of vaudeville including Edmund Breese, 
Mercedes and Hari Oniki. 

Pantages, Market at Hyde 

"Slaves of Beauty" on the screen. Seven acts 
of vaudeville. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Pictures — Vaudeville. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Pictures — Vaudeville. 

* * * 

ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 

California, Market at 4th 

"Chanc." Life and scenes of the funnies of 
Siam combined into a remarkable scenic. 

Cameo, Market opp. Fifth street 

"Midnight Watch." Saturday. Jack Dempsey 
and His Wife — "Manhattan Madness," Sun- 
day, Monday. 



Casino, Ellis at Mason 



Sat.. "The Foolish Virgin" and "A Fight to 
the Finish." Sun.. Mon.. "The Clinging Vine" 
and "Obey the Law." Tues., Wed.. "The 
Prince of Tempters." Thurs., Fri.. Lon Chaney 
in "Flesh and Blood" and "Her Man O'War." 

Granada, Market at Jones 

On the screen, "Metropolis." An impression of 
how our centers of population will appear a 
thousand years from now. On the stage, a 
Fanchon and Marco Idea. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th. 

"Beau Geste." Ralph Forbes, Ronald Caiman, 
Neil Hamilton. Following- run of Fmil Jen- 
nings in "The Way of AM Flesh." 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"College." Anne Cornwall, Snitz Edwards. 
"Pep Idea" on the stage. 

RESIDENCE DISTRICT 

Alhambra, Polk St., nr. Green 

"Jim the Conquerer" and "Oh Baby," Madge 
Kennedy. Sat.; "The Notorious Lady." Sun.; 
"The Auctioneer," three days. Mon., Tues., 
Wed., George Sidney, Marian Nixon. 



July 30, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



jle for many a laugh. Charlotte 
rreadway, afraid of her own shadow, 
ireates hysterical situations. 

This play ranks high with the other 
rlenry Duffy comedies which have a 
listinct place in our theaters. Care- 
'ul and discriminating stage craft, as 
veil as acting, is always considered 
>y the masterful Duffy who looks to 
ivery detail of his pleasing plays. 
Dorothy LaMar, Ben Taggart, Lil- 
ian Dean, Ronald Telfer, Joan War- 
ier, Thomas Brower, Westcott Clarke 
uid Henry Caubisens are players in 

'The Ghost Train." 

* * * 

Jrpehum 

The Orpheum Theater announces 
in all-new program for the week be- 
ginning Saturday matinee with three 
lotable headline attractions. Shar- 
ng topline honors will be the Ameri- 
can star, Edmund Breese, who will 
ippear in a one-act play entitled 
Happy New Year," written by the 
International humorist and writer, 
trvin S. Cobb ; Will and Gladys Ahern, 
playing a return engagement in an 
oddity entitled "A Spinning Ro- 
mance"; and the Italian comedian, 
Harry Burns, assisted by Carlena 
Diamond and Tony De Luca in a rip- 
roaring skit called "I Think You 
Touch." 

Haru Onuki, Japanese prima donna, 
is to make her reappearance in vaude- 
ville after an absence of several years 
offering a repertoire of songs; Sim 
Moore and Pal in a surprise act ; The 
Three Lordens in "Lights Out," and 

several other Orpheum feature acts. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Henry Santrey and his orchestra, 
returning from tours of Australia 
and Hawaii, will headline the bill this 
week at the Golden Gate Theater, be- 
ginning with Saturday matinee. 
Harry and Anna Seymour, brother 
and sister, two versatile comedy art- 
ists, will present breezy bits of melo- 
dy, comedy and mirth, as members of 
the Santrey company. 

The Ruth Howell Duo and La Pan 
and Bastedo are also prominent on 
the new bill. 

"See You in Jail," with Jack Mul- 
hall. in a picture of laughs and thrills 
will be the motion picture feature. 
Pathe News Weekly. Aesop's Fables. 
a scenic, a short comedy and Claude 
Sweeten and the Golden Gate Orches- 
tra in a special concert number will 
complete this week's splendid pro- 
gram. 

Santrey in his musical numbers 

will present the aori Harkar. 

* * * 

Warfield 

A world premier. "College." newest 
of Joseph M. Sehenck productions, 
comes to the Warfield Theater this 
week with Buster Keaton in the prin- 



cipal role. This picture was especial- 
ly secured for its initial showing at 
Loew's Warfield through arrange- 
ments by the West Coast Theaters, 
Inc. 

In addition to an elaborate cast of 
screen players headed by Anne Corn- 
wall, Snitz Edwards, Grant Withers 
and Buddy Mason, the cast includes 
five world champions of sport and 
two famous international sport fig- 
ures. Bud Houser, Charlie Borah, 
Lee Barns, Kenneth Grumbles, Mor- 
ton Kaer and Ben Wallis of Yale are 
some of these stars. Sam Crawford, 
former Detroit ball wonder, is seen 
as coach of the baseball club on which 
Buster plays. 

Nell Kelly, San Francisco stage 
star who is making her return ap- 
pearance at the Warfield this week, 
remains over a second week to cut 
more capers with Walt Roesner. 
Roesner, by the way, has prepared 
another carefully planned music pro- 
gram for Saturday. The stage at- 
traction will find George Givot as the 
star of Fanchon and Marco's "Pep 
Idea." 



Cameo 

"Midnight Watch," which closes 
its screening Saturday at the popu- 
lar Cameo Theater, stars Roy Stewart 
and David Torrence in a thrilling 
story of adventuresome daring and 
excitement. The stars and the picture 
provide plenty of picturesque events. 

Jack Dempsey and his wife will be 
shown at the Cameo on Sunday and 
Monday in a dashing story entitled 
"Manhattan Madness." Then there 
will be the educational films in addi- 
tion to the feature picture. 

* * * 
Granada 

"Metropolis," an impression of 
cities in the future, screen feature at 
the Granada Theater this week, will 
give imaginary ideas of how many 
large population centers might ap- 
pear one thousand years from now. 
This picture is one of the most un- 
usual cinema features yet shown. A 
Fanchon and Marco stage "idea" will 
be in keeping with the plan and in- 
troduce many striking novelties. 



St. Francis 

Emil Jannings proved such a big 
drawing card at the St. Francis in 
"The Way of All Flesh" that after 
we had gone to press last week it was 
decided to retain this picture. There 
is just a possibility *hat it may still 
remain .ner another week. But other- 
wise the St. Francis Theater will then 
offer the great American Legion film. 




Lake Tahoe 

Sleeper 

-now through to Tahoe Station 
without change of cars. 

You can leave here any 
evening aboard a comfort- 
able Pullman, for arrival at 
Lake Tahoe for breakfast 
next morning. 

A svrift, enjoyable trip to 
this delightful inland sea 
high in the Sierra. You'll 
have the maximum amount 
of time there if you go by 
train. Pullman returning 
leaves the lake in the eve- 
ning arriving here in time for 
business next day. 

Leave San Francisco (Ferry) at 
7 p.m., arriving Tahoe Station at 
7:00a.m. Returning leave Tahoe 
Station at 9:30p.m. arriving San 
Francisco at 7:50 a.m. By day, 
leave San Francisco at 7:40 a.m., 
a fascinating ride up the Sierra, 
arriving Tahoe Station at 5:30 
p. m. Similar service returning. 

£11 *C round trip) good 

»*»••» for 10 days. Other 
fares and limits. Ask for new illus- 
trated booklet about Tahoe Lake 
Region ; also the booklet "Low- 
Fares for Summer Trips." 

Southern 
PaciMc 

San Francisco Offices 
—65 Geary St.: Ferry 
Station: 3rd St- Sta.; 
Phone Davtnport 4000 
Oakland Offices — 
13th&B'wa>-.!6thSt. 
Sta ; 1st & Brojdwiv Sta.. Phone Lakeside 1420 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 30, 1921 




reduced 
round trip 
states 




OAKE advantage 
of these low ex- 
cursion fares to visit 
the old home this 
summer. 

Start any day before 
September 30. Re- 
turn limit October 
31. Our travel books 
will help you plan 
your trip and may 
be had upon request. 

SANTA FE Ticket Offices 
and Travel Bureaux 



601 Market Street 

Telephone Sutter 7600 

Santa Fe Depot 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 5) 
GoJf Tournament 

The A. B. Spreckels Golf Tourna- 
ment, among the most notable golf 
classics of the Pacific Coast, will be 
held at the Coronado Country Club, 
Coronado Beach, from August 23rd 
to 27th, inclusive. Awards will be 
made for special events, the trophies 
going to winners and runners-up with 
entries open to members of all golf 
clubs affiliated with the golf associa- 
tions. 

Many prominent society people will 
attend with registrations from vari- 
ous parts of the State already made 
and many more already on the way. 

The principal trophy is a beauti- 
fully etched silver punch bowl. A 
gold medal will be given to holder of 
low gross score in qualifying round. 
Trophies similar to those for 1927 
tournaments were won by such ama- 
teur golfers as Wilier Hunter (not 
professional), runner-up Jack Tar- 
rant. Allen Moser possesses two win- 
ner's trophies, 1925 and 1926. Run- 
ner-up in 1925, Captain S. Bullock 
Webster. Runner-up Dave Martin. 

Mel S. Wright is manager of the 

Coronado Beach events. 
* * * 

Many prominent people have been 
spending the week at Santa Maria 
Inn which is constantly growing 
more and more popular. 

Those who have been at the Inn 
this past week include : Mrs. Joy 
Lichtenstein and Stanley Lichten- 
stein, San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. 
Walton N. Moore and Miss Eliza- 
beth Moore, Piedmont; Mr. and Mrs. 
John J. Barrett, Miss Barrett and 
Garret H. Barrett, all of San Fran- 
cisco; Mr. Paul O. Tietzen, Berkeley; 
Captain and Mrs. B. Aillet and Miss 
Aillet, San Mateo; Mr. and Mrs. H. 
S. Gump, Miss Rose and Miss Vivian 
Gump, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. E. Green, 
Mrs. G. H. Hart and Miss Jane Hart, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Brooks, San Fran- 
cisco; Mr. and Mrs. E. Palmer Gavit 
and Mrs. Jackson, Santa Barbara ;Mrs. 
Wm. Pratt Lyman, Newport, Rhode 
Island ; Mr. A. Z. High Jr. and Mr. G. 
Leisander, Mr. and Mrs. Jas. E. Zieg- 
ler, James Ziegler Jr., and Karl Zieg- 
ler, Mrs. F .H. Cowdin and J. C. Cow- 
din Jr., San Francisco, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Ensley B. Smith, Miss Leslie 
and Miss Coralie Smith of Oakland, 
and Mr. S. A. Lovejoy of San Fran- 
cisco. * * * 

At the Elder Gallery 

W. Somerset Maugham's play, "The 
Constant Wife," is one of the few 
brilliant dramatic successes of the 
present season. It will be read by 
Miss Edith Coburn Noyes of Boston, 
in the Paul Elder Gallery, Thursday 
afternoon, August 4th, at 2:30 
o'clock. "The Constant Wife," a mod- 



ern version of marital constancy, has 
proved a vehicle of rare distinction 
for Ethel Barrymore's superb per- 
sonality and acting. 

Symphony Concert 

Will we ever forget the fourth 
Summer Symphony concert? 

How can we? Ossip Gabrilowitsch, 
the conductor and celebrated pianist, 
captivated musical and music-loving I 
San Francisco two weeks ago, when| 
he first appeared. Now, last Tuesday 
night, July 26, he registered another 
triumph and cemented a friendship 
and appreciation which we, in the 
West, will nurture for many a year to 
come. 

The largest audience in the history 
of the Summer Symphonies, wel- 
comed and applauded the conductor' 
when nine thousand people sent soar- 
ing to the roof their valuation of the 
marvelous program. 

Tschaikowsky's Symphony No. 6, 
"Pathetique," with its lights and 
shadings, its emotional appeal and its 
stirring tragedy, moved the people as 
nothing has for quite some time. It 
was the artistic interpretation andl 
the masterful domination of Gabril- 
owitsch which made us rejoice wheni 
the selection was played. 

Two Nocturnes by Debussy, 
"Clouds" and "Festivals," with poetic- 

The next Symphony concert, Aug- 
ust 2nd, will be led by Alfred Hertz,. 
with the Goldmark overture, "In! 
Springtime," a program number ; also, 
Dvorak's Symphony No. 3 "From the- 
New World" and Respighi's "The- 
Pines of Rome." Mishel Piastro, solo- 
ist, will be heard in the violin con- 
certo as an additional attraction. 
* * * 

Nelly Gaffney, Inc., Shop 

Another smart shop has been add- 
to the Fifth avenue of San Francisco. 
Nelly Gaffney, Inc., at 354 Post street 
had a brilliant opening on Monday, 
July 25th, and amid hundreds of | 
beautiful floral baskets, the manne- 
quins stepped among the smart visi- 
tors, displaying the advanced models 
for the coming season. Gowns for 
sports, afternoon and evening and 
sumptuously fur trimmed coats all 
displayed exquisite taste. 

The Nellie Gaffney Shop is modern 
French in its furnishings and designs 
and is the smartest shop of its type 
on the Pacific Coast. 

Juanita Oldham, San Francisco's 
foremost milliner, has associated her- 
self with the Nelly Gaffney Shop and, 
carrying out the French idea, Miss 
Oldham makes the hat on the head 
and individualizes the chapeaux for 
each client. 

Modes for Smart Women is the 
slogan of this shop and the writer 
predicts it will be the rendezvous for 
San Francisco's smartest women. 



July 30, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Horse Show at Palo Alto 




"Miracle Man," pride of Carnation Farm 
Stable, owned by E. A. Stuart of Seattle. 
The rider is Don Reavis who has shown 
the great five-fraited EeldinB to the win- 
ninjr of more money and stake events dur- 
inc the past year than any other horse 
and rider have won. 



The Palo Alto horse show, next 
month, will probably be made memor- 
able by the most sensational jumping 
ever seen at a western horse show. 

There are sixteen hunting and 
jumping events to be shown during 
the week, each course carrying from 
four to seven jumps. Heading the list 
are the §1000 stake for hunters, do- 
nated by Mrs. W. P. Roth, and the 
$1000 stake for jumpers, donated by 
E. A. Stuart of Seattle, proprietor of 
Carnation Farm Stable ; each of these 
events and the sweepstake already 
has almost twenty entries and some 
of the other classes have upwards of 
thirty. 

The sensational and dangerous 
handy hunters class has 33 entries. 
This event calls for seven jumps, in- 
cluding the treacherous "pig pen" 
and a table and benches with a dum- 
my red-coated soldier on the table. 
which seems to be so much of a men- 
tal hazard to horses that they cannot 
be depended on to take it. Many a 
good rider has found himself stretched 
out beside the dummy soldier when 
his horse has had a last minute 
change of mind about taking the ta- 
ble j umii. The "pig pen," one of the 
obstacles in the Corithian as well as 
the handy hunters class, is another 
jump that causes trouble to anything 
but a well trained hunter and some- 




times even to them. It is not unusual 
to see one get in all safe and sound, 
make a poor landing and stop and 
then with a distance of only sixteen 
feet for the start, find himself penned 
in and unable to get out, thus bring- 
ing ridicule on both horse and rider. 

An idea of the extent of the amount 
of jumping that will be done during 
the week may be gained by the fact 
that it is estimated that no less than 
fifteen hundred individual jumps will 
be made by horses during the eight 
performances, each of which carries 
two hunting or jumping events. 

The first shipment from the East, 
that of Bridgford Bros., bankers of 
Joy, Illinois, will be entrained Tues- 
day. The Bridgfords will bring with 
them a fine hunter, Jack Frost, just 
purchased by Alex. Young Jr., of San 
Francisco, from Hugh McNair of Chi- 
cago. 

Other Eastern jumpers that will 
exhibit are those of Walter Sporle Jr., 
who is sending nine from Edmonton, 
Alberta, Canada, a district that is 
noted as the breeding place of many 
of the greatest high jumping horses 
of the world. 




Aaron M. Frank, of Portland. 11 
inn hi* topping harneM pony. 



rpcon. dri\- 
"Aloma." 



"Rosewall." greatest fine harness of his 
time and cominir into his own as a splendid 
Rve-mited saddle horse. Owned by Irvine 
H. Hellman. hanker and sportsman of Los 
Anm-k-s. The rider is Mrs. Wm. Threlkeld. 
of Menlo Park. 



Two other great stables of hunters 
will come from Portland, Oregon. 
Aaron M. Frank, beside his harness 
ponies, will send four hunters of fine 
reputation — Frank Kierce, Mayheart, 
Dreadnaught and What's What. Dr. 
and Mrs. J. H. Held will send six or 
seven, including the famous Flying 
Fox and Kentucky Bob. Lovely Man- 
ners and Topey Sinclair. 

From Portland also will come Hula 
Kula. a hunter of tine conformation 
and good jumping ability, and Spider. 
champion grafton. broad jumper of 
the West, which will be shown by 
their owner, Mrs. Claud D. Starr. 



The Electric Range 
does perfect frying 

Because of evenly 
distributed heat 

The frying of omelets, bacon and 
many other foods requires evenly dis- 
tributed heat under the frying pan. 
For then the food cooks perfectly, it 
looks more appetizing, and it tastes 
better. 

That is why the Electric Range is 
ideal for frying. It has three differ- 
ent degrees of steady even heat that 
comes from closely wound coils. 

And these new Electric Ranges are 
speedy. 

So what is more enjoyable in the 
early morning than perfect frying 



p.Qand 




■►acific SBBVICI" 

Pacific Gas and electric Company 

Owned • Operated • Managed 

by Californians 

117-627 



©wells 

^-^ NATIONAL CRES1 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.80*,0M cops were terred at the 
Panama -Pacific International Ezpoeitian 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 30, 1927 



Fallen^ Leaf Lodge 

The Ideal Tahoe Resort 

Located on Fallen Leaf Lake. 
Five miles from the State High- 
way. In the center of a Wonder- 
land of Mountains, Lakes 
and Streams. 

Qood Jishing i Hiking t 'Boating 

Comfortable rooms, tents and cottages 

— with and without private bath; and 

famous dining room service, combine 

to make the Lodge a popular 

vacation spot. 

MRS. W. W. PRICE 

Fallen Leaf P. O., Lake Tahoe, Calif. 



WHEN IN PANAMA 
MAKE 

HOTEL CENTRAL 

Cathedral Plaza 

YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 

Andrew Johnston, Manager 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 CLARA STREET— GARFIELD 844 




PHONE 

GKAVSTONE240 



N. W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



BEAUTIFUL BROCKWAY 
By Eleanore F. Ross 

Just as one has a mental picture of 
one's ideal home, career, automobile, 
wife or husband, I have always had 
in mind what would appeal to me 
most as a sum Tier resort. 

It must be near water — always — 
preferably a lake; it must be among 
snow-capped mountains; pines must 
abound, for I love pine trees best, the 
soft murmur of their branches, the 
sweet, heady, balsamic breath of their 
brown needles, trodden under foot in 
the heat of the day; there must be 
small brown cottages among the 
pines; and at night the only sound to 
break the stillness, the splash of 
mimic waves along a sandy shore; 
the soft wind in the tree tops ; and 
music, perhaps, wafted from some 
distant casino. 

Floating along water so change- 
able, so glassily smooth, so altogether 
beautiful that it seems as ephemereal 
as the sky, whose color it has filched, 
the little white lake steamer ap- 
proaches Brockway's, after the en- 
chanting trip half way around the 
lake. 

Near the long pier at Brockway's, 
gleaming launches skimmed to and 
fro, interspersed with the slower and 
more ponderous row boats ; gayly ap- 
pareled women moved about, under 
the trees; a group of white shirted, 
white trousered young men merrily 
twanged guitars; prettily dressed 
children laughed and chattered on 
the beaches near the hotel, an atmos- 
phere almost Utopian, in its happi- 
ness and beauty, clothed the scene. 

The speediest way to reach Brock- 
way's from San Francisco is by the 
Southern Pacific to Tahoe City, where 
a splendid bus meets all the trains 
and guests are driven the twelve-mile 
journey along the shores of the lake 
to Brockway. 

One may follow one's favorite sport 
at Brockway's, or one may just rest. 
Noted instructors in equestrianship, 
golf, swimming, and general physical 
development are at your service. If 
you want the gentle stimulus of bath- 
ing in mineral waters, the famous 
Brockway Hot Sulphur Spring is 
piped to all rooms; or you may dis- 
port yourself in the commodious con- 
crete swimming tank built on the 
sandy beach; if dancing lures you, 
there is the tantalizing orchestra to 
put new life into your feet, at the 
rustic casino. 

Brockway, — it is the ideal resort 
for sport enthusiasts, or for those 
who just want to lie at ease, and let 
the loveliness of the scenery, the 
balmy air, sink deeply into one's soul, 
and so return to the city's maelstrom, 
refreshed and ready for the business 
of life again. 



Brockway, 

Lake 

Tahoe 

gOLF. . . 

All Grass Greens 
and Grass 
Jairways 

Swimming, natural hot 
water; dancing; horse- 
back riding; boating; 
fishing; tennis. For in- 
formation and rates, 
write or wire 



H. 0. COM STOCK, 

Manager 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
active. Hot Sulphur Water. Tub Baths and 
Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 



T. H. CORCORAN, Agua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judah 



CALIENTE VILLA 

Family Resort 

CARL STEFFEN. Prop. 



French and Italian Dinners Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

Four Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, 

Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The Finest Meals in the 
VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms — Clean Linen — Clean Everything 
Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

TELEPHONE 110 



July 30, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




ttJ]BI$R^ TtfBLE 



K :.IBMl»»gs-^S^ 




TAWNY SPAIN by H. C. Chatfield 
Taylor. The Park Street Library 
of Travel. Illustrated. The River- 
side Press, Cambridge, Mass. $3.00. 
This seems to be the time when the 
thoughts of all good writers turn to- 
wards travel. And this book on Spain 
is both timely and interesting. There 
are many who travel in the better- 
known countries of middle Europe; 
but Spain seems not to be so widely 
known. Mr. H. C. Chatfield Taylor 
knows this country from north to 
south, from east to west. He visited 
nearly every city and town on its 
map or off, in the intense heat of 
summer and the bitter cold of win- 
ter, and knows the characteristics of 
every class of its people. 

"Tawny Spain." The name is a 
happy thought. It suggests a people 
at once light, lithe, graceful, quick, 
brave and patient. However, the pa- 
tience is not that of the animal stalk- 
ing its prey, but rather the patience 
acquired through years of oppression 
and tyranny. A brave man will meet 
a worthy foe with courage and valor, 
but even the most courageous will 
falter when met with treachery and 
unearned persecution. 

A short story of the history of 
Spain tells the tribulations of a gal- 
lant people struggling for existence 
against fearful odds. Spain was al- 
ways the invaded, seldom the invader. 
Her soldiers were kept too busy fight- 
ing for the protection of their homes 
from fierce raiders from without, and 
against the oppression of fanatical 
tyrants from within, to become a na- 
tion of power or prosperity for any 
length of time; and her outward at- 
tempts were too futile to be effective 
or of long duration. 

The chapter on the sports of Spain 
is especially interesting as the types 
of sports indicate the real nature of a 
people. Bull fighting, of course, is 
given precedence. And the author's 
explanation of the love for this seem- 
ingly brutal method of amusement is 
extenuating in spite of our prejudice 
against such a practice. He prefaces 
his description: "It would be difficult 
for me to justify the national sport 
of Spain, it being undeniably cruel; 
but it is. at the same time, fascinat- 
ing, exciting and alluring: in short, 
the finest spectacle of modern days. 
comparable only to the gladiatorial 
shows of ancient Rome." 

Cock-fighting is a close second, with 



Edited by Florence de Long 

Pelota (a game resembling racquets) 
and football — yea, our own football 
rapidly coming into popularity. 

Whatever the author writes about, 
you see. Take his description of the 
scene preceding the banquet, on the 
staircase of the royal palace of Ma- 
drid — the arrival of the guests, the 
formation of the cortege which pro- 
ceeds to the Throne Room; and the 
picture of the banquet hall. As a 
brilliant artist with a few sweeps of 
the brush produces a picture at once 
vivid and beautiful, so the author 
with a few quick strokes of the pen 
brings into focus a mental picture 
that is long remembered. He has the 
gift of saying a great deal in a few 
words, and his style is both concise 
and vivid. He makes you feel the 
courteousness, the courtliness and the 
warm-heartedness of the Spaniard. 
He depicts them as a patient people, 
their history of oppression bequeath- 
ing them that characteristic. He gives 
a fine example of the courage of the 
present King of Spain who showed 
not a tremor of fear at a moment 
when there was a possibility- of his 
being in extreme danger. He tells 
many interesting little anecdotes of 
experience of his wife and himself 
traveling through the country. A 
chapter is devoted to a description of 
each of the larger cities and many of 
the smaller ones are treated with no 
small detail. 

The book is really interesting and 
makes you feel that "Tawny Spain" 
is a country well worth visiting. And 
it is certainly well worth reading 
about when described with an easy 
pen in the picturesque style of this 
author. 



News From Santa Cruz 

Following the announcement of 
plans to organize the Santa Cruz 
Bridle Path and also a Breakfast 
Club, and to outline bridle paths 
along the shore of Monterey and into 
the scenic Santa Cruz mountains, the 
younger generation has announced 
their intention of organizing the San- 
ta Cruz Girl's and Boy's Bridle Path 
Club. 

Champ Hicks and Elmer Hunt 
have arrived from Marysville with 
Shetland ponies and bridle paths 
along the beach, and yet away from 
the bathing section, have been out- 
lined for the children. 




S. A. LOVEJOY 

WILL BRING 

ORDER 

Out of Chaos! 

In your Books, 
Financial Statementa 
Income Tax Reports 

Expert Auditor 

PART-TIME SERVICE 

268 Market St., Room 101 



Books that are reviewed in the Newt Letter 
can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco. Calif. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 



Park Lane Maisonnettes 

5 to 8 Rooms with 2 to 5 Baths 

Magnificent view. Every service, from 
doorman to valet. Furnished or un- 
furnished. Garage. Class A steel 
frame building. 

"Maisonnette" lias the elegance of a mansion villi 
all conveniences <>l an apartment house. 

PARK LANE APARTMENTS 

1100 Sacramento Street 
Diagonally Across from Hotel Fairmont 




PHOTOGRAPHS 
(Miye roreve 






12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 30, 1927 






RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 



C jjfcC J 




C. J. Pennington 

The idols of radioland will be vis- 
ualized for the throngs attending the 
fourth annual Pacific Radio Show 
when artists of the various broad- 
casting stations in the San Francisco 
bay region attend in person and meet 
face to face the audience they have 
been singing to over the mysterious 
radio air lanes. 

Complete co-operation of all the 
major broadcasting stations here has 
been assured the show, according to 
Charles B. Clendenen, chairman of 
the special events committee. A daily 
change of program every afternoon 
and evening is being arranged, from 
the opening of the Radio Show, Sat- 
urday, August 20th, until the closing 
date, Saturday, August 27th. 

One of the big events of the show 
will be a gala night, Monday, August 
22nd when all of the stations will 
jointly participate in the program 
with their artists appearing on the 
same program. At the same time the 
stations taking part will broadcast 
the program to the multitude of radio 
enthusiasts denied the pleasure of 
both seeing and hearing the program 
at the show. 

All of the broadcasting will be 
done in a glass enclosed room, making 
it possible for the audiences at the 
Radio Show to see as well as hear the 
program. 

Radio progress in the show prepar- 
ations is being made, according to Leo 
J. Meyberg, chairman of the show 
committee for the Pacific Radio 
Trade Association under whose aus- 
pices the show is held. With A. A. 
Tremp, show manager now here, it is 
the plan to get everything in readi- 
ness to move into the civic auditor- 
ium at the earliest possible date. 



"This will be the most outstanding 
exhibit of its kind in the history of 
the radio industry," declared Tremp. 
"We will not only have the record 
this year of presenting the first Radio 
Show of the year in America but also 
the most comprehensive and the most 
beautiful." 

Tremp, together with officials of 
the Radio Trade Association, believe 
that all attendance records of past 
years will be surpassed. 

* * * 

KPO's Saturday night Goodrich 
Silvertown Cord Orchestra programs 
of unusual dance music arrangements 
have become an important radio feat- 
ure in hundreds of Western commun- 
ities, according to letters received by 
the sponsors, the B. F. Goodrich Rub- 
ber Company. 

Under the capable direction of Cy- 
rus Trobbe, violinist and leader of 
the Palace Hotel Concert Orchestra 
for many years, the Goodrich Silver- 
town Cord Orchestra has been pre- 
senting from KPO on Saturday nights 
a type of dance music radically dif- 
ferent from what is usually sent out 
in radioland. The orchestra itself is 
a departure from the usual type of 
dance orchestra in that woodwinds 
and strings are the dominant instru- 
ments. 

Unique dance travesties, synco- 
pated classics with preliminary ren- 
ditions by Trobbe of the compositions 
in their original form, waltzes and 
old-time dance compositions, feature 
the Goodrich program. 

* * * 

KPO is being heard in the Hawaiian 
Islands practically every night. This 
was recently reported by a resident 
of the Island of Maui in the Hawaiian 
group. According to a letter received 
from Mrs. H. G. Van Grundy of 
Haiku, Maui, KPO comes in with good 
loud speaker volume almost every 
evening. "We enjoy your programs 
out here in Mid-Pacific," said the 
writer. As the Island of Maui is more 
than 2000 miles in direct airline from 
San Francisco, this is declared by ra- 
dio experts to be unusual transmis- 
sion for the summer months, when 
conditions are usually at their worst. 

* * * 

This one is from KFI, Los Angeles : 
Not long ago an orchestra failed to 
appear at the studio for its program, 
so, as often happens, Dean Metcalf, 
one of the announcers, after stalling 
as long as he could, announced him- 



self and played a whole string of piano 
medleys, ranging from Negro spirit- 
uals to popular fox trots. In a mo- 
ment of apparent desperation, he 
sang what is evidently the only song 
he knows, the St. Louis Blues. 

When the artists for the following 
hour finally arrived and consented to 
start their program early, Metcalf 
was immediately called to the tele- 
phone. "What is your idea, and why 
do you do it?" queried an anxious 
voice over the wire. "I check you on 
my piano and find that you play 
everything in G. Flat. That's six of 
them, Mister, and I would like to 
know whether you are trying to show 
off, or have a special love for the black 
keys, or can't play in any other?" 

The announcer-pinch-hitting-pian- 
ist explained that he plays everything 
by ear, and while the key in question 
is certainly difficult to read, he finds 
it the most harmonious and actually 
the easiest for him. It is a peculiar 
fact, but nevertheless, a true one, for 
many so-called "ear-players" cannot 
play unless them have a handful of 
black keys. 

* * * 

The KFI announcers claim that 
there are only two kinds of radio 
artists who want to get too near the 
microphone when performing; male 
and female. In other words it seems 
that there is almost a universal 
tendency on the part of musicians to 
doubt the microphone's ability to pick 
up their music if they are more than 
two feet from the instrument. 

The Biblical drama, "Lot's Wife," 
with a symphonic orchestral setting 
will be the National Broadcasting 
Company presentation over the Paci- 
fic Coast Network, Sunday evening, 
August 14th, from 8 to 10 p. m. 

This drama of Bible times, telling 
of Lot's wife, who disobeyed the com- 
mands of God, is perhaps one of the 
most intense of Bible stories. 

* * * 

Under the direction of Max Dolin 
the National Opera Company will 
present the opera "Der Freischutz" 
(The Freeshooters) Monday, August 
15th from 8 to 9 p. m., over the Pa- 
cific Coast Network of stations. 

The opera, "Der Freischutz" (The 
Freeshooters) by Carl Maria Von 
Weber, is one of the most remarkable 
of all operas because it definitely es- 
tablished a new development in the 
field of music drama. 



July 30, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



RADIO PROGRAMS 



wavelength 
Station (meters) 

KMTR— Los Angeles 526. 

KLX — Oakland 508 2 

KGW— Portland ~" 491.5 

KFI — Los Angeles 467.5 

KFRC — San Francisco 454 3 

KFOA— Seattle 447 5 

KFSD— San Diego 440.9 

KPO — San Francisco .422.3 

KHJ — Los Angeles 405.2 

KGO — Oakland 394 4 

KJR— Seattle ZI384X 

KHQ — Spokane 37O 2 

KFWB— Los Angeles 361.2 

KNX — Los Angeles 336.9 

KOA — Denver 325 9 

KOIN— Portland 319' 

KPSN— Pasadena . ' Sls'.S 

KYA — San Francisco 309 1 

KOMO— Seattle . 305,'s 

KSL — Salt Lake 302 8 

KOWW— Walla Walla ... 299!s 

KQW — San Jose 296.9 

KTBI — Los Angeles 288 3 

KTAB— Oakland 280 2 

KTCL— Seattle 277^6 

KFWI — San Francisco 267.7 

KGA — Spokane O60 7 

KFUS— Oakland Z'Z". 25 !3 

KRE — Berkeley 256 3 

KZM— Oakland 2458 

KLS— Oakland .. 245'8 

KEX— Portland 239.9 

KFWM — Oakland 236.1 

KJBS — San Francisco 220 4 

KGTT— San Francisco ... 206!5 



Power 

(watts) 

500 

500 

1000 

5000 

50 

1000 

500 

1000 

500 

5000 

2500 

1000 

500 

500 

5000 

1000 

1000 

600 

1000 

1000 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

2000 

50 

100 

100 

200 

2500 

500 

50 

50 



SUNDAY 
(July 17) 
9:00 am— KFUS. 

10 :00 am— KFI. KNX. KTAB. 
10 :30 am— KGW. KFI. KTAB. 

11:00 am— KTAB. KGO. KFUS. KYA. KOA. KGW 

KFI. KGA. 
12:00 m— KGW. KGA. 

1 :00 pm— KFWI. 

2 :00 pm— KNX. 

3 :00 pm— KPO. KGTT. KNX. 

4 :00 pm— KGO. KGTT, KNX. 
5:0 11 -KNX. KFI. 

G :00 pm— KPO, KOA. KNX. KFI. 

6 :80 nm— KPO, KGO. KNX. KFI. 

7 iOO pm — KPO, KGO. KNX, KFI. 

7 :80 pm — KPO. KGO. KGTT. KYA. KGW. KNX KFI 
8:00 pm— KPO. KGO. KGTT. KFWI. KOA. KGW, 

KNX. KFI. KTAB. 
9:00 nm— KI'O, KGO. KGTT. KOA. KGW. KNX 

KFI. KFWB. 
I" :00 pm KGW. KFI. KFWB. 

11 illll pm.— 

MONDAY 

7 :00 am KI'O. KNX. 

8:00 am KPO, KFWI. KNX. 

9:00am KNX. ktah. Kins. 

1' lam KIUS, KFWI. KOA. KGW. KFOA. KNX. 

KJBS, KTAB, KFWB. 
10am KPO, KLX, KFWI, KOA, KGW, KNX. 

KJBS. 
11 00am KFWI, KYA. KOA. KGW. KGA. KJBS. 
11:3(1 am KPO, KGO. KYA. KGA. 
12:00 "i KPO. kkwi. KYA, KFOA, KGA, KFWB. 

CPO. KGO, KGTT. KYA. KNX. KG V 

KFWB. 
1 1 pm KPO, KGO, KYA. KFWB. 

n KFWB. KFOA. KNX. K.1IIS. 

8:00 pm KNX. KJBS. 

1 n KPO KGO, KFWI. KFOA, KNX. 

pm KTAB. KFWB. KPO, KFWI. KOA. KNX. 

5:311 pm KTAB. KFWB, KPO, KGO, Kl \. KFWI. 

KYA. KFI, KNX. KGA. 
6:00pm KTAIt. KFWB. KI'O. KGO. KLX. KFWI, 

KYA. KGW, KFI, KFOA. KNX, KGA 
7:00pm KTAB, KFWB, KPO, KGO, KLX, KFWI. 

KYA. KOA, KFI, kko v KNX, KGA. 

80 I sI'WII. KOA, KGW . KFI. KFOA. KNX. 

KGA 
- 00pm KGA. KTAB, KFWB. KPO, KGO, KI.X. 

KFWI, KYA, KOA, KGW. KFI, KFOA, 
KNX 

):00 KTAB Kl « B KPO, Kl \ KFDI I, KYA 

KGW. Kl I. KNX 
KFWB, KPO, KFWI, K1 V KGW. KFI. 
KNX 
I m KFWI. KYA. KGW, KNX 

1 111 



00 

.- Illll 

1.1. mi 



TIFSIlVl 

am KNX. 



KNX 

KNX. 
KNX 
KGA 
K.lliS 
KGA. 
in KGA. 
KFWI 
KFOA 
KFOA 
KGA. 
Kl X. 
:0Q pm Ki. \ 



11 :30 



:.in 
:im 

am 

.■mi 



> pm 



KFWI, KPO 
KFWI, KPO, 
K T Ui, K.I US. 

kGU , KFWB, KPO. KTAB. KJBS. 
KGW. KYA. KFWI, KI'O. K.IBS. 
KGW, KOA. KFWB. KYA. KFWI. 

KOA. KGO. KI'O 

KNX KFOA, KOA. KFWB. KYA. 

KGO, KI'O. 

KFWB KYA. KGTT 

KFWIi KYA KIWI. KGO. KPO. 
KNX, KFOA. KGW. KOA. KFWB. 
KGO, K.MiS 
KNX, KOA. KI'O. K.1HS. 



4 :00 
5:00 
5:30 

6:00 

7:00 

7:30 
8:00 

9:00 

10:00 

11:00 
12:00 



pm- KNX, KFOA. KFWI. KGO. KPO. 

pm— KNX, KOA. KFWB. KFWI. KPO. KTAB. 

Pm— KNX. KFI. KFWB. KYA, KFWI. KLX, 

pm— KGA. KNX. KFOA, KFI. KGW. KFWB, 

KYA. KFWI, KGO. KPO. KTAB. 
pm— KNX, KFOA. KFI. KGW. KOA. KFWB. 

KYA, KFWI. KLX. KGO. KPO. KTAB. 
pm— KFWB, KNX. KFOA. KFI KOA 
pm— KGA. KNX. KFOA. KFI. KGW. KOA. 

KFWB, KYA, KFWI. KGTT, KGO. KPO. 

KTAB. 
pm— KNX. KFOA. KFI. KGW. KFWB, KYA 

KFWI. KGTT. KGO. KPO, KTAR. 
pm— KNX, KFI, KGW, KFWB. KFWI. KGO, 

KPO. 
pm— KGW, KFWI. 
pm — 



WEDNESDAY 

7:00 am— KNX, KPO. KFWI. 
8:00 am— KNX. KPO, KFWI. 
9:00 am— KNX, KTAB. KJBS. 
10:00 am— KGW, KFOA. KNX. KFWB, KFUS. KFWI. 

KTAB. KJBS. 
10:30 am— KGW. KNX, KPO. KLX, KFWI. KJBS. 
11:00 am— KGW. KGA, KPO, KFWI, KYA, KOA. 
11:30 am— KGA. KPO, KGO. KYA, KOA. 
12:00 m— KFOA. KGA. KFWB, KPO. KGO, KFWI, 

KYA. KOA. 
12:30 pm— KFOA, KNX, KGA. KFWB, KGO. KGTT. 
KFWI. KYA. 
1:00 pm— KFOA. KFWB. KPO, KFWI, KYA. 
2:00 pm— KFOA. KNX, KFWB. KGO, KLX, KJBS. 
3:00 pm— KNX, KPO, KLX, KGTT, KJBS. 
4:00 pm— KFOA. KNX, KPO. KGO, KLX. 
5:00 pm— KOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KFWI, KTAB. 
5:30 pm— KOA, KFI, KNX, KGA, KFWB. KPO, 

KLX. KFWI. KYA. 
6:00 pm— KOA. KGW, KFI, KFOA. KNX, KGA, 

KFWB. KPO. KGO. KLX, KFWI. KYA. 
7:00 pm— KOA. KGW. KFI. KFOA, KNX. KFWB. 

KPO. KGO. KLX. KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
7:30 pm— KNX. KFWB. KOA, KGW. KFI, KFOA. 
8:00 pm— KOA. KGW, KFI. KFOA, KNX. KGA. 

KFWB. KPO. KGO. KLX. KGTT. KFUS. 
KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
9:00 pm— KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO. 
KGO. KLX. KGTT. KFWI, KYA. KTAB. 
10:00 pm— KFI. KNX, KFWB. KPO. KGO. KFWI. 
11:00 pm— KNX. KGO, KFWI. 
12:00 pm— 

THURSDAY 

7:00am— KNX. KI'O, KFWI. 
8:00am— KNX, KPO. KFWI. 
9:00am— KNX. KTAB. KJBS. 
10:00 am— KGW. KNX. KFWB, KPO, KFWI. KJBS. 
10:30am— KGW. KNX. KI'O, KFWI. KJBS. 
11:00 am— KOA. KGW, KNX, KGA. KFWI. KYA. 
11:30 am— KOA. KNX. KGA. KPO. KGO. KFWI, 

KYA. 
12:00 m— KOA. KFOA. KGA. KFWB. KPO. KGO. 

KFWI. KYA. 
12:80pm KFOA, KNX. KFWB. KPO. KGO. KGTT. 
KFWI. KYA. 
1 mi miii KFOA, KNX. KFWB. KPO. KGO. KFWI. 

KYA. 
2:00pm KFOA. KNX. KFWB, KGO. KLX. KJBS. 
3:00pm KOA. KNX. KFWI:. KI'O, KJBS. 
1:00 pm KOA. KFOA, KNX. KPO. KGO. KFWI. 
5:011 pin KNX. KFWB. KPO. KGO, KFWI. KTAB. 
6:30pm KFI. KNX. KGA. KFWB. KPO. KGO. 

KI.X. KFWI. KYA. 
6:00 pm KGW, KFI. KFOA. KNX. KGA. KFWB. 
KI'O, KGO. KI.X, KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 

I 1.1 KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB. 

KI'O. KGO. KI.X. KFWI. KYA, 
7 :30 pm KFI. KNX. KIWI'.. KGW. KFOA. 

CGW, KFI, KFOA, KNX. KGA. KFWB. 

KPO. KGO. KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
B "Min KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO. 
KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
1.1 KGW. KFI. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KFWI. 
II :00 pni KGW. KNX. KFWI. 
ill 



FRI 

7 :ini ani 

8 :00 nm 

1 ' am 

lilnnl inn 

10 :80 am 

11 
n 
12 

It 



hay 

KNX 
KNX 
KNX 
KGW 
KTAB 



KPO. KFWI. 
AVI. 

K r,\i:. KJBS. 

KNX. KFWB. KFUS. KFWI. 
KJBS. 



:00 am 

Kill ill 



KGW. KNX, KOA, KPO. KLX. KFWI. 
KYA. KTAB, K.IBS. 
KGW, KGA. KOA, KFWI. KYA. 
KGA, KOA Kin, KGO. KFWI. KYA. 
KFOA, KNX. KGA. KOA. KFWB. KPO. 

KGA, KFWB. KGO. KGTT. 



KFWB. KGO. KFWI. KYA. 
KNX. KFWB. KPO. KGO. 



KGO. KIWI. 
KFOA. KNX, 
KYA 
1 :II11 pm KFOA. KNX. 
., KGW , KFOA 
KLX. K.IBS 
:l:Uil pm KNX. KOA. Kin KJBS. 

,1 KFOA. KNX, KPO. KGO. KFWI. 
,1 KNX. KOA. KFWB, KPO. KFWI. KTAB. 
5:80pm KFI. KNX KCA KOA. KFWB. KPO. 
KGO. KI.X. KIWI. KYA. KTAB. 
, KGW KFI. KFOA, KNX. KGA. KOA. 
KFWB. KPO. KGO. KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
7:00pm KFI. KFOA. KNX. KOA. KFWB. KPO. 

KGO. KLX. KIWI. KYA. KTAB. 
7:S0pm KFI. KNX. K" \, KFWB. KGW. KFOA. 
1 KGW. KFI KNX. KGA. KOA. KFWB. 
KPO. KGO Kl X. KGTT. KFWI, KYA. 
KTAB. 
9-00 pm -KGW. KFI KFOA. KNX. KOA. KFWB. 
KPO. KGO KLX KGTT. KFWI. KYA. 
KTAB. 



13 



:00 pm KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB KPO 

KGO. KI.X. KFWI, KOIS. 
:00 pm— KGW. KNX. KFWI. KFOA 
:00 jim — 

SATURDAY 
:00 am— KNX. KPO. KFWI. 
:00 am— KNX, KPO. KFWI. 
:00 am— KNX, KTAB. KJBS. 

:00 am— KGW. KNX, KFWB. KPO. KFWI, KJBS. 
:30 am— KNX. KOA. KPO, KFWI, KJBS 
:00 am— KGA, KOA. KFWI, KYA 
:30 am— KGA. KOA, KPO, KGO. KYA. 
:00 m— KNX, KGA. KOA. KFWB, KPO, KGO 

KFWI. KYA. 
:30 pm— KNX. KFWB. KGO. KGTT. KYA 
:00 pm— KFWB, KPO, KGO, KFWI. KYA 
:00 pm— KNX, KFWB, KPO. KGO, KLX. KJBS 
:00 pm— KNX. KPO. KJBS. 
:00 pm— KNX. KPO. KGO.KFWI. 
:00 pm— KNX. KFWB. KPO, KFWI. 
:30 pm— KFI. KNX, KGA, KFWB. KPO. KFWI, 

KYA. 
:00 pm— KGW, KFI. KNX. KGA. KFWB, KPO. 

KFWI. KYA. 
:00 pm— KFI. KNX. KOA. KFWB. KPO, KLX, 

KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
:30 pm— KFI, KNX, KOA. KFWB. 
:00 pm— KGW. KFI. KNX. KGA. KOA. KFWB. 

KPO, KGO. KFUS. KFWI, KYA. KTAB. 
:00 pm— KFI, KNX. KFWB, KPO, KGO. KFWI. 

KYA. KTAB. 
:00 pm— KGW. KFI, KNX. KFWB, KPO. KGO, 

KFWI. 
:00 pm— KGW, KFI, KNX, KPO. KGO, KFWI. 
:00 pm— KNX. KPO, KGO. KFWI. 
:00 am— KFWI. 
:00 am— KFWI. 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1864 

The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



CLUB 
AUTO SERVICE CO. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 

For AM Occasions 

Day and Nijrht 

City Sizhlseeinc S3. 00 per hour 

Shopping -------- 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips. Taxicah Rales 



PROSPECT 

4000 



585 Post. St. 
San Francisco ' 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

I Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCH MAKERS 

Chime, Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and DalWtr in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

Nc» Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention (iiven t.j 

Each Order 

Office and Work*: 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

i Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 

Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called for and Delivered 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 30, 1927 




HTH'.iM.HilLmiiLJl 



T N h a e me PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whether 
it be typewriter pa- 
per or manuscript 
cover, means com- 
plete satisfaction. 
There is a grade for 
every need. Ask 
your printer or sta- 
j tioner to show you 
samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 



Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Max Rosenthal 



WHERE GOOD TAILORING 
COSTS LESS 

A choice selection of seasonable 

Woolens suitable for Formal, 

Sport and Business wear is 

now ready for your early 

consideration. 

527 POST ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

OPP. OLYMPIC CLUB 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 



Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. WELLER 
National Automobile Club 

Oddities in Auto News 

A skyscraper garage 28 stories 
high and with a capacity for 1,050 
automobiles is being planned for New 
York City. The new garage will prob- 
ably be the largest structure of its 
kind in the world. 

Laundries for cars, chauffeurs' 
rooms, various kinds of waiting 
rooms, and compartments where own- 
ers and chauffeurs may make repairs 
will be included in the building. New 
devices for parking and cleaning cars 
will be regulated so that all chances 
for damaged fenders and greasy up- 
holstery will be guarded against. 
High-speed, self-leveling elevators 
are to be used for parking the cars. 

* * * 

Tokio. Japan, probably has the 
highest automobile taxes of any city 
in the world. The taxes amount to 
110 to 637 yen per car, being levied 
in accordance to horsepower. Yoka- 
hama has recently increased taxes on 
an average of 100 per cent over the 
previous range of from 75 to 125 yen 
per car, according to seating capacity. 
* * * 

The Province of Alberta, Canada, 
is rapidly going ahead with the road 
building program that is making it a 
popular motoring country. It is es- 
timated that this Province wil spend 
$1,200,000 on main highways during 
1927. Of this amount 81,000,000 will 
be spent for construction of new 
highways and §200,000 for mainten- 



That lovable old lunatic, Don 
Quixote de la Mancha, would no doubt 
experience a great surprise if he were 
to return today to the scenes of his 
former triumphs and mishaps. He 
would encounter objects which would 
impress him as monsters obviously 
put into action by his enemies. For 
the automobile would greet him with 
a honk which might frighten Rozi- 
nante into antics such as never would 
that celebrated steed have conde- 
scended in those days when Knight- 
hood was not quite flowery enough to 
suit the Don. 

Although the high-hooded, two- 
wheeled carts still rattle along the 
bumpy streets in some parts of Spain, 
automobiles are becoming the popu- 
lar means of locomotion. 

If, in a year or two from now, how- 
ever, Don Quixote, the terror of 
giants, the avenger of injuries, the 
establisher of justice, should make 
his hazardous way into the neighbor- 
hood, he might find something more 
to his liking. This would be a monu- 
ment of Dulcinea, his beloved, who is 
again to be enthroned upon a pedes- 
tal. The statue is to be erected to her 
near Toboso, her former home. Then 
all the world will know the beauties 
of the peerless Dulcinea. Should Don 
Quixote return to see this monument, 
he would be compensated for the 
other changes which have taken place 
since he roamed with faithful Sancho 
Panza in search of damsels who need- 
ed protection. 



British East Africa is proving a 
lucrative market for American auto- 
mobile manufacturers. It is estimat- 
ed that approximately 90 per cent of 
the automobile vehicles (exclusive of 
motorcycles) imported into that coun- 
try come from the United States. 
About one-half of the tires sold are 
also of American make and the mar- 
ket for tractors and light trucks from 
the United States is rapidly growing. 



Since an Eastern professor has de- 
cided that "You Can Teach an Old 
Dog New Tricks," there is no longer 
an excuse for old people not learning 
to drive an automobile. 



Transcontinental motor tourist 
traffic is over 30 per cent heavier 
than it was at this time a year ago. 
It is estimated that the total will 
reach a figure at least 35 per cent 
greater than last year as the trend 
is toward a constant increase. 



July 30, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Foreign Trade Exposition Commissioners 

Special commissioners to various countries of the world 
have been appointed to extend invitations to manufac- 
turers, tourists and world traders to attend the Pacific 
Foreign Trade and Travel Exposition to be held in San 
Francisco, November 11th to 20th of this year. William 
D'Egilbert, director general of the exposition, announced 
the appointment of this group of commissioners, who are 
to spread the message of the exposition abroad. 

William G. Marvin has been named commissioner to 
Europe. He is now in Geneva, Switzerland, attending the 
Economic Conference. Marvin is head of the firm of Mar- 
vin & Bergh, international lawyers, with offices in all 
principal cities of the world. He is general manager of 
the American Manufacturers Foreign Credit Insurance 
Exchange. 

Abel Santos and Pedro Cezon have been appointed spe- 
cial commissioners to Latin America. Nicholas Berger 
has been made commissioner to Siberia; Ralph E. Board- 
man, publisher of Melbourne, commissioner to Australia; 
E. Nixonwestwood, commissioner to New Zealand and 
South Sea Islands. 

Hugh J. Fleming, former United States commissioner 
to the Paris Exposition, has been named special commis- 
sioner to the Atlantic States; William Ralston, manufac- 
turer and lumber merchant of Dallas has been appointed 
commissioner to Texas, and Dr. Albert C. Carlton, com- 
missioner to Oregon, Washington and British Columbia. 
Dr. Carlton is now traveling in the northwest and has in- 
terested 16 Chambers of Commerce in that territory in 
the forthcoming Trade and Travel Fair, and has also in- 
vited participation by the ports of Seattle, Portland and 
Bellingham. * * * 

Woman's Board for the 
Pacific Foreign Trades 

Under the sponsorship of the Foreign Trade Club of 
California, an association of leading transportation, busi- 
ness, educational and financial interests, there is to be 
held in the Exposition Auditorium of San Francisco, the 
Pacific Foreign Trade and Travel Exposition, on an elab- 
orate and most interesting plan. The doors of this Expo- 
sition will open on November 11 (Peace Day) and con- 
tinue until November 20th, inclusive. 

Woman's participation in this Pacific Foreign Trade 
and Travel Exposition in which "California Invites the 
World," is one of the most significant gestures of the 
present time, according to those "in the know." In ex- 
plaining the coming Exposition to a group of writers, 
Mr. William D'Egilbert, director-general of the Exposi- 
tion, whose great work in the Exposition of 1915 is a 
matter of State history, stated that as many of the orig- 
inal Woman's Board that it was possible to get, were 
again to act in co-operation. 

"The Woman's Board of the 1915 Exposition" stated 
Mr. D'Egilbert, "was the most famous Woman's Board 
which has ever convened for a given purpose, such as our 
incomparable P. P. I. Exposition." Sad, to add, many of 
the original Woman's Board have passed to the Great 
Beyond; in fact just exactly one-half of the number are 
now "missing." Those who now are to act in their origi- 
nal capacity of the Woman's Board are full of remem- 
brances: and. with high ideals are ready to back the new 
project — The Exposition of the Pacific Foreign Trades 
and Travel. 

Mrs. Edward C. Wright has been chosen president of 
the Honorary Woman's Board. P. P. I. E.. 1915. In her 
message to the members. Mrs. Wright said: "When the 
Woman's Board of the Panama Pacific International Ex- 
position disincorporated it was the tacit understanding, 
among us. that if ever a similar opportunity occurred, we 
would be ready to lend our co-operation as during the 
World's Fair. That time, as many of us who met in a 
recent conference believe, has arrived." 




LOU W. SARTOR, Proprietor PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 

LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing; and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 

Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco, Calif. 



GRAYSTONE 130 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage. 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage. 1361 Bush St. 

Management of WILLIAM SAUNDERS 



TRUNKS — RACKS — BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVENUE 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 

Established 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, General Agent 
544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cai. 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 30, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1858 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

JUNE 30th, 1927 

Assets $113,925,831.54 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $575,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Hafeht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4H) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought: FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued: CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 650 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND : NEW YORK ; PORTLAND, ORE. ; SEATTLE. 
WASH. ; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manaper 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and Health. 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pipe and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS. PENSTOCKS. 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Antreles. Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



For Lease 

FIRE PROOF BUILDING 

TWO STORY AND BASEMENT 

257-259 MINNA STREET 
Bet. 3rd and 4th 

Suitable for Printing — Manufacturing or Storage 
Rent Reasonable 

S S 

CORNWALL, COLDWELL & BANKER 

57 Sutter Street San Francisco 



Finance 



The development of the fruit carrying trade of this 
State is shown in the fact that it takes 20,000 refriger- 
ator cars of the Sante Fe alone to handle the share of the 
Santa Fe in transporting fruits, melons and vegetables. 
* * * 

A wise warning has been sent out through the Califor- 
nia Tax Payers' Association in the following words — 
"We should certainly take stock before we go too far in 
committing ourselves to the general policy of municipally 
owned aviation fields and see, if possible, what return the 
ones who will pay those bills may expect to get from such 
vast expenditure of public money through the United 
States on flying fields." 

Forest fires will make kindling wood a luxury says the 
engineer of maintenance of way and structures for the 
Southern Pacific. The continuance of the orgie of forest 
fires will render wood so scarce "as to render almost pro- 
hibitive many common-place articles now regarded as 
necessities." 



In order to hunt deer this year you must first procure 
both a hunting license and two deer tags in duplicate. 
The hunting license costs S1.00. You cannot obtain the 
tags unless you have first purchased the hunting license 
and you must exhibit your hunting license when applying 
for deer tags. When you go hunting you must have both 
license and tags in your possession. 
* * * 

In total our revenue collections was 7th among the 
States of the Union for the last two years, being exceeded 
in collections for 1927, by New York, Pennsylvania, Illi- 
nois, North Carolina, Michigan and Ohio. The total 
amount of revenue collected in the State of California in- 
creased from $134,841,398 in 1926, to §139,517,056 in 
1927. This is a gain of 3.4%. We were 6th in the United 
States on income tax collection. 



The Yosemite Portland Cement Corporation has com- 
pleted a new plant at Merced which is one of the most 
modern in existence. All the structural steel buildings 
were fabricated and erected by the Western Pipe and 
Steel Company as well as all the tank work. The whole 
plant is so constructed that its capacity may be doubled 
or trebled without interference with the daily operation 
of existing units. 

* * * 

Philip B. Webster of Napa in addressing the Common- 
wealth Club the other day describes the methods by which 
high schools in the rural districts are developing farm 
culture among the students and paving the way to make 
high class farmers out of them. It is a matter of great 
moment in the state development. 

* * * 

Dr. Alonzo E. Taylor, the other day, made one of the 
wisest statements with respect to European affairs. He 
said : "Until European capital realizes that it cannot have 
a big market until labor has big buying power, and labor 
sees that high wages cannot be paid without high effi- 
ciency, there will be no mass production in Europe. Mass 
production is the distinguishing element of American 
industrial life and has put this country on top of the 
world." 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriemtal Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, $1. 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 



ZJcnKu IIu^jjlLu, Oluxp^ 



490 POST ST.. S. F. 
Garfield 234 
CLIFT HOTEL 
Prospect 4700 



RAMONA STUDIO. PALO ALTO 

Palo Alto 433 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Matson Nav. Co. Steamers 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50— Also a la Carte 

Merchants' Lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private Dining Rooms 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystone 8100 



Weekdays. Luncheon $ .75 

(11:30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week Days & Sundays 1.50 



> visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

93 Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 
5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4 :30 to 8 :30 p. m. only 
CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Highway 







Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN 8:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. 
Unsurpassed Cuisine 




HE231 




It-Mile House 


CARL LEONHARDT 
Formerly of Golden Gate Park Casino 


^PC^k CAROLINE JONES 
^^LjAtK^A Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 

AwSsiT \ ^ - : '° and Tea from 3 t0 5 
< %x9ty)il \J^ Exclusive use of room for club dinners 

^JEE^ 0, 334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 




LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing: from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

STERLING ANDERSON, Manager 

Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 




1140 GEARY ST. T TEL. GRAYSTONE 4266 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy- Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blncksmi thing. 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



We keep step with progress. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 
250 Twelfth St. PHONE MARKET 916 

Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 



DR. B. FRANKLIN PEARCE 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

HOURS: 9-12. 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building. Powell and Market Streets, San Francisco 

PHONE GARFIELD 5394 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 




MME. M. S. E. LEE 




Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 




583 Post Street San Francisco 


In Virginia Hotel Phone Franklin 


2510 




Antioch Bridge Route 



to 



Sacramento 

Is Now PAVED All the Way 









^ongegttfXh^ ~***' No- Delays 

The Cool, Quity'Way 



Along the Sacramento River, Through 
the Netherlands of America 



From Oakland 
The Tunnel Road 



From Sacramento 
South on 21st Street 



« 



AMERICAN TOLL-BRIDGE 
COMPANY 

Owners and Operators of 

CARQUINEZ BRIDGE and ANTIOCH BRIDGE 

Tolls the Same on Both Bridges 
Autos, 60c Passengers, 10c 




c/lmbassador- 

Los Axigfeles 

Plan to enjoy Southern California's 

glorious summer climate this year at 

this world-famous hotel. 

CAM, VAN VECMTEH 

Famous Author, writing in VANITY PAIR, sayj: 

"Tbt Ambassador is, I thouta think, ont of tht very bell hoieu 
hi tht worta- The service is supertatitt, the food divine, 
the courtesy of management ana employee! unfailing." 

In the wide range of its attractions, the 
AiTili.TMr.iku likewise excels Superb. 
27-acre park, with miniature golt course 
and open-air plunge. Riding, hunting 
and all sports, including privileges ot 
Ram iu. Colt Club Motion picture 
thearet and 25 smart shops within the 
hotel Dancing nightly to the music o) 
the famous Cocoonut Grove orchestra. 



-TSSBk 



Moderate Summer Rates 
Attractive rooms with bath as low 
as $5. $6 and $7 a day single, 
from $7.00 double 



WRITE (or d«r« Boold« of 

("j 1 1 1" Rraprt tnA Inlormuum, 
BEN L. FRANK &Unqer 




SAIL TO NEW YORK 




SISTER SHIPS 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL 
and GAY HAVANA, en route 

Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropics 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail 
Liner with seven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and 
historic ports — Manzanillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La Lib- 
ertad, Salvador; Corinto, Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone See 
the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa. Cristobal and historic old Panama 
Every cabin on a Panama Mail Liner is an outside one; each has an 
electric fan, and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger 
There is an orchestra for dancing; deck games and sports and salt water 
swimming tank. The Panama Mail is world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage includ- 
ing bed and meals on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return bv 
rail (or vice versa) for as little as S380. (This price does not include berth 
and meals on trains.) Panama Mail Liners leave San Francisco and New 
York approximately every 21 days. Next sailings from San Francisco- 
SS VENEZUELA. July 30th; SS ECUADOR. August 20. From New York-' 
SS COLOMBIA, August 13th; SS VENEZUELA. September 3rd 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
01 ticket agent, or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 

548 S. SPRING STREET 2 PINE STREET 10 HANOVER SOUARF 
LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 



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oAugust 23 to 26 

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SUMMER RATES 

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in Effect. 

SWIMMING • AQUAPLANING . BOATING 

Dancing 

L. E. CARLILE, SAN FRANCISCO AGENT 
2 TINE STREET Phmi DOUGLAS 5600 



MEL. S. WRIGHT, Manager 
CORONADA BEACH CALIFORNIA 



'■■■■ ■ ■ m umi i hiiI i f 




Ready for Talo Alto Horse Show, August 8 - 13 



Bdgeware Marvel, one oj the truly 

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owned by Mrs. K '. P. Roth of 

Woodsidc and San Franeisco, 

driven by Peter McDonald. 




at this 
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HOLLYWOOD CALIF. 




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Plan to enjov Southern California's 

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CAM, VA"N VECHTEH 

Famous Autkor. writing in VANITY FAIR says: 

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the courtesy ot management ana employee! unfailing." 

In the wide range ol its attractions, the 
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theatci and 25 smart shops within the 
hotel Dancing nightly to the music oJ 
the famous Cocoanut Grove orchestra. 



Tt^sm^ 



Moderace Summer Rates 
Attractive rooms wiih bath as low 
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from $7.00 double 

WRITE tor O.f . Bookl.t of 
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BEN U FRANK SMsn^tr 




Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 
DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 

Established 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, General Agent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cai. 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 2342 



On Russian Hill 

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369 BUSH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
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Established July 20, 1856 

0$ EFK^fgo©^ 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1856. by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott. Jr.. from 1884 to 1926. 
If now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 268 Market Street. San Francisco. California. Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, 
California, Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill. E. C, London. England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year. 

$5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00 



Vol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., AUGUST 6, 1927 



No. 32 



Our Radio Editor Goes Up in the Air 



By C. J. PENNINGTON 

Drawings by V. Risto 



The Pacific Air Transport, carriers of 
the Air Mail between all coast cities, and 
also quite recently establishing a passen- 
ger service in connection, has a set of in- 
structions on: "How to get the utmost 
enjoyment from an airplane flight." They 
are: "Don't worry; relax; settle back and 
enjoy life. If there's any worrying to be 
done, let the pilot do it. Enjoy life." In- 
cidentally, anyone who fails to enjoy a 
trip with the Pacific Air Transport from 
San Francisco to Portland are long past 
the stage of enjoyment ! 

The writer having quite recently com- 
pleted the round trip, an explanation of 
the actual flight and its pleasures will 
herewith follow. 

Taking off from Crissey Field in San 
Francisco at 5:30 a. m., circling out over 
San Francisco Bay and heading north 
towards Portland was the start of the flight. 

The plane was of the monoplane type, driven by a 200 
horse power motor of the same make which is creating 
aviation history. Mr. Ralph B. Virden, the pilot, a man 
with many years of flying experience, piloted the trip as 
far north as Medford, Oregon. He proved to be a very 
capable pilot, but at all times, for that matter, during the 
entire round trip, we were in the hands of an efficient 
pilot, as the Pacific Air Transport has a very high class 
personnel, each man being unusually qualified for his po- 
sition. 

Every point of interest was readily observed. In pass- 
ing over San Francisco Bay so early in the morning, a 
light fog was just entering the Golden Gate. The sun 
was coming up over the horizon and in gaining elevation 
above the fog, a wonderful view was possible. San Fran- 
cisco and the entire Bay district was visible, and we most 
certainly enjoyed the panorama spread out beneath us. 
A sight to behold, and one not to be forgotten by any one 
who makes this trip. 

We followed up the neck of the Bay as far as Vallejo. 
passing almost directly over the new Carquinez Bridge. 
and then heading inland to pass over the Sacramento 
Valley. The Valley, noted for its torrid temperature dur- 
ing the summer month, was passed over in comfort. The 
Vallev country was a beautiful sight, with its rice fields 
of green and black which gave the appearance of a large 




checker board. The farm houses were 
plainly visible, the plane's course taking 
it along the highway and railroad. 

The Sacramento river could be seen at 
all times. An occasional train passed be- 
low, giving the appearance from our ele- 
vation of 3100 feet of a long black ser- 
pent crawling along at a snail's pace, as 
compared to our own speed of 110 miles 
per hour. 

Upon leaving the Valley country, Red- 
ding, California, was the last town to be 
sighted before crossing over the Moun- 
tains. In starting to cross the mountains, 
the elevation was increased until the high 
point of 9200 feet was gained and main- 
tained practically all the way over the 
mountainous country. The day was very 
clear, making it possible to see as far as 
the eye could reach. At that elevation 
there was only a slight change in temperature, which was 
cooler, but not enough to be uncomfortable. 

The foothills of the mountains, which from the ground 
would seem high, floated beneath as small mole hills. 
Several snow capped peaks were passed very close, but 
the outstanding sight was that of Mount Shasta. While 
passing Mount Shasta it appeared close enough to reach 
out and gather snowballs. 

Although the mountain did tower above the plane, it 
was still high enough for us to be able to enjoy looking 
down upon the greater part of it. Black Butte, a large 
cone-shaped pile of volcanic ash, 6500 feet above sea level, 
was passed over, but we were above it by almost 3,000 
feet. An excellent view of Mount Lassen was to be had 
in the distance; Mount Lassen being the only active vol- 
cano in the United States. The largest fish hatcheries in 
the world and numerous towns were passed, but in going 
north the country in general was observed the more 
closely, the towns passed to be described later. The trains 
and automobiles making their way up the mountain sides 
was a sight almost too marvelous to explain. Railroad 
tunnels were seen, which seemed no larger than small 
holes in the ground. 

A few minutes after passing the mountains, we grad- 
ually lost elevation and glided to a landing in Medford, 
Oregon, 400 miles from San Francisco by air line, slightly 
(Continued on page 12) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 6, 1927 






Grown Up 

In a recent speech before the Institute of Pacific Rela- 
tions, Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur, President of Stanford Uni- 
versity, made the very important statement : "The United 
States is reaching its maturity and it must view its for- 
eign relations from a new standpoint of responsibility." 

There is a world of truth in this that affects us all in a 
variety of ways and that places upon us a new responsi- 
bility with respect to the world in general and our rela- 
tions to that world. "Foreign relations" means our atti- 
tude to the other peoples of the world and is expressed by 
our commercial and consequently political attitude to- 
wards them. We are no longer able to regard ourselves 
as a boxed off, very prosperous but entirely self-contained 
community. Far from it. All that we can do concerns not 
only ourselves but the world in general. "Circumstances," 
as the learned speaker declared, "force us to a larger par- 
ticipation in world affairs." 

In this great transformation of our attitude, the fact 
that the Pacific Ocean has now become a vehicle of trans- 
portation and communication with a part of the world 
which has hitherto been regarded as distant and differ- 
ent, is a very important factor. And our position in that 
Ocean is so dominating that San Francisco, by virtue of 
the pre-eminence of its place with respect to that ocean, 
becomes forthwith one of the most important cities in the 
world, with prospects of power and greatness almost in- 
conceivable. It is our duty to recognize this fact and to 
prepare ourselves for the imperial destiny which awaits 
us. 

President Wilbur practically gives notice that petti- 
fogging politics and demagogery will not do. We agree. 



Commerce With Central America 

The new plan set out by Professor David B. Barrows 
should have careful consideration at the hands of the for- 
eign policy experts of this country. It contains the germ 
of an idea not only for peace in the communities con- 
cerned, but for a great extension of American trade. It ! 
will be noted, too, that trade with Central America is par- 
ticularly appealing to San Francisco. 

Professor Barrows, whose knowledge of Spanish peo- 
ples is unusually accurate, contends that before any real 
progress can be made in Central America, the nations 
which constitute the several republics of that district 
must be rendered solvent. This can only be done by re- 
funding the foreign debts which are held for the most 
part by European bondholders. The money for such finan- 
cial operations should be advanced by the United States 
on the best terms, the credit of the United States being 
behind the respective governments. The result would be 
a federation of Central American states with America in 
the background as supporter and protector. 

There is no doubt that steps will have to be taken to 
ensure the maintenance of peace and well being without 
which no progress is possible and that the United States 
of necessity will take the lead in such action. Whether 
Professor Barrows has the right plan we are not experts 
enough to say. At any rate the effect of stronger and 
closer connection between the United States and Central 
America must greatly stimulate our commerce and gen- 
eral trade relations. Just in proportion as the Latin peo- 
ple to the South of us develop their demands for commo- 
dities, so will our trade develop. We have an enormous 
and growing field to the South and the politician should 
work hand in hand with the merchant. 



Our Bay Bridge 

We have again a wave of optimism with respect to the 
bay bridge, the necessity of which is perfectly obvious to 
the unprejudiced observer. Congressman Nicholas Long- 
worth, who is visiting this city, declares that we have a 
very good chance of obtaining permission to construct 
the bridge. He points out that the naval department, 
which is opposing the construction, acts merely in an ad- 
visory capacity and that the ultimate decision rests with 
Congress. And Speaker Longworth adds the very con- 
solatory statement, "whether your problems are of wa- 
tering arid lands or bridging navigable streams, they will 
be listened to by Congress with sympathetic ear." 

The necessity of the bridge is so great that there is 
little doubt that we shall ultimately get what we desire 
in the matter. But in order to do so we must have a 
united community. The whole of the influence of the city 
and the transbay must be directed to the single purpose 
of getting congressional support for the project. Any 
wavering in that regard, any internecine war as to the 
future construction of the bridge by private or public ef- 
fort, will have a most destructive effect upon the pros- 
pect of the carrying out of the project. 

If the Board of Supervisors gets to playing politics on 
the question of public ownership of the bridge at the 
present time, there is little doubt that the apple cart will 
be upset. As has been well said, public ownership is not 
regarded in Congress as an indisputably good policy. 



Women to the Front 

The recent appointments of the Governor in connection 
with the State Administration show the rapidity with 
which women are developing administrative ability. That 
they have made good politicians, in the ordinary accepta- 
tion of the term, is undeniable. It is now apparent that 
they are producing at least their quota of leading ad- 
ministrators. 

There are three appointments in particular to which 
we call attention. First, that of Mrs. John H. Eschelman, 
the widow of a former Lieutenant Governor. While we 
cannot pretend to admiration for the fundamental poli- 
cies of the late John H. Eschelman, we join in the general 
recognition of his integrity and admirable ability. Mrs. 
Eschelman, who is herself a business woman, has had the 
undeniable advantage of association with her esteemed 
husband and consequent familiarity with public affairs. 
It is an appointment of the best sort and there is little 
doubt that Mrs. Eschelman will render signal service to 
the State in her capacity as a member of the State Civil 
Service Commission. 

Mrs. Anna M. Saylor, whom the Governor has appoint- 
ed to the important position of Director of Civil Welfare, 
is mostly interested in the management of public institu- 
tions for the care of the sick and the unfortunate. She 
has been a member of the Legislature and has shown 
very expert knowledge of the workings of social legisla- 
tion for human betterment. She is a woman of whom the 
State can be very proud. 



August 6, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO 'NEWS LETTER 



Mrs. Daisy L. Short, who has been a member of the 
Oakland City Board of Education, has been promoted to 
he State Board. This appointment is recognized by ex- 
Derts in education as very fitting and in all respects ap- 
propriate. 

It is a sign of progress that we now accept such ap- 
wintments of women with approbation. 

* * * 

The New Bar Organization 

The new State law with regard to the organization of 
the lawyers of the State, is about to take effect and the 
Chief Justice and his assistants are getting ready for the 
operation of the act which is quite a new departure in 
American legal life. 

It is almost a shock to discover that there are eleven 
thousand practising attorneys in this State. It is a large 
number relative to the population. It would seem as if 
there were some reason behind the agitation which has 
produced this organization, for such a body is hard to 
keep up to the mark, without some form of discipline. 
We must say, however, that we have had little sympathy 
with this particular law, for the same reasons as Governor 
Richardson expressed in vetoing the act in the former 
legislature. We regard it as a form of special legislation. 

Under the law, every member of the bar will have to 
belong to the State organization, willy-nilly. This may 
appear to partake of some of the objectionable qualities 
of trade unionism, but it is nevertheless the law. There 
is a commission created by the law, known as the State 
bar commission, the duty of which is to organize the bar 
and be its representatives at large. These, with eleven 
others, who represent the congressional districts, consti- 
tute the governing body of the bar association. 

The main purpose of this governing body is to improve 
the administration of justice by raising the standard of 
legal practice through the co-operation of lawyers and 
the courts. 

* * * 

Progress in British Economy 

A few weeks ago we called attention to the facts that 
there had been almost universal misapprehension of the 
actual economic conditions in Britain. It had been too 
readily assumed that the country was on the down-grade 
and that the imperial power of the great colonizer was 
over. No mistake could have been more serious. It was 
due to the Russian propaganda of a weak England that 
the Chinese movement took the anti-British slant, for 
which there will no doubt be a stiff price to pay. 

Later reports show a very distinct upward trend in 
Britain. And we are hearing less and less of the economic 
debacle which was so freely predicted. The numbers of 
unemployed are declining quite fast this year. Business, 
recovering from the terrific impact of the general strike, 
shows a very distinct progress. The returns from the 
imperial oversea possessions mount in quantity and prove 
the existence of a practically unlimited field for expansion 
and development of natural resources and an increasing 
control over the prime essentials of life and industry. In- 
deed. Britain will have to be careful lest her almost 
monopoly of some of these necessities win her the envy 
and tear of other countries. It is nearly as dangerous to 
have too much as to have too little. 

What is still more interesting and almost incredible is 
that Britain, which was supposed to be sunk in conser- 
vatism, is showing enormous powers of industrial re-or- 
ganization. For example, the steel output is greater by 
one-third than before the war. and is produced by forty- 
four thousand less workers. The coal trade is bad, but 
the Welsh anthracite collieries have increased capital in 
order to add to their holdings and the Co-operative whole- 
salers have purchased a large block of shares in one of 
the most important colliery groups in Lancashire. 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 



Admiring the View 

Country Cousin (after prolonged inspection of building 
operations) — I don't see the sense of putting statues on 
the top of your buildings. 

City Cousin — Statues? Those aren't statues. They're 
bricklayers. — Hardware Age. 

* * * 

Europe calls us dollar chasers, but those who can't bor- 
row them must chase them. — Publishers Syndicate. 

* * * 

"There is always rubbish in the air," says a scientist. 
Yes, but you're not obliged to listen in to it. — Punch. 

* *i: * 

The Government will lighten our burdens by making 
paper money smaller. — Florence (Ala.) Herald. 

* * * 

The Chicago man who gave his bride a rented automo- 
bile for a wedding present seems to have had no illusions 
about the duration of marital happiness. — Chicago Daily 

News. 

* * * 

If it is true that 207 American paid taxes on incomes 
of more than §1,000,000 last year, it doesn't show just 
how rich we are, but how many of our rich are that hon- 
est. — Louisville Times. 

May — So you told Charlie you loved him, after all? 
Mary — Yes, I didn't want to, but he just squeezed it 
out of me. — Everybody's Weekly. 

* * * 

Modern Story 
"Make me the happiest man in the world!" he begged. 
So she agreed on two hundred a month alimony, and gave 

him a divorce. 

* * * 

A husband may not be superstitious, but he always 
pays attention to signs when his wife makes them. 

Awkward — Do you practice psychology on your girl? 
Squad — Say, we ain't even engaged yet! — Annanpolis 

Log. 

* * * 

Reading the motor accidents we are led to believe that 
this industry has the greatest turnover of any. — Atlanta 

Constitution. 

* * * 

Why, It Would Soon Break Him 

"Five thousand dollars!" ejaculated the movie idol as 
he read his lawyer's statement. "Well, that's the last di- 
vorce I'll ever get from him." 

* * * 

The first cheese made in a New England factory has 
been sent to the White House. There is reasonable doubt 

as to its being the first. 

* * * 

Another thing we can look forward to when transat- 
lantic flying becomes popular is a four thousand mile trip 

without seeing a billboard. 

* * * 

Double Misfit 

Mabel — Mr. Diggs, the contractor, offered me his hand 
and fortune, but I refused both. 

Madge— Oh, why ? 

Mabel — One was too large and the other too small. — - 
Boston Transcript. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 6, 19271 





dciery 



efs 



Famous Woman's Board 
Re-Organize for Work 

The famous Woman's Board of the 
1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition, is 
now being re-organized for participa- 
tion in the activities of the coming 
Pacific Foreign Trade and Travel Ex- 
position which is to take place in this 
city at the Exposition Auditorium, 
November 11 to 20, inclusive. 

During the memorable Exposition 
days, when San Francisco held its 
great World's Fair, a group of incom- 
parable women leaders assumed di- 
rect charge of the women's activi- 
ties, co-operating with, and for, the 
Board of Governors and Managers of 
that historical Exposition. 

"There has never, in the history of 
events, been a Woman's Board to 
equal that of the Panama-Pacific Ex- 
position Woman's Board," stated Mr. 
William D'Egilbert, director general 
of the Pacific Foreign Trade and 
Travel Exposition, in addressing a 
group of San Francisco writers. 

"The women, at that time, were 
noted throughout the world for their 
efficiency, their clear judgment, for 
their manner of business procedure 
and for the high standard of every 
event coming under their special jur- 
isdiction," added Mr. D'Egilbert, as 
vividly he traced the momentous ac- 
tivities of the distinguished women 
who formed the personnel of the Wo- 
man's Board. 

Just about one-half of the original 
Woman's Board is now living, and, of 
that number, those who once held the 
reins of leadership have met in splen- 
did concourse, and have re-organized 
for the special purpose of actively 
participating in the Foreign Trades 
Convention. 

* * * 

Significant Message 

Mrs. Edward C. Wright, now presi- 
dent of the Honorary Woman's Board, 
Panama-Pacific International Exposi- 
tion of 1915, in sending a written 
message to members, said : 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway, Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



By Antoinette Arnold 

"When the Woman's Board of the 
Panama-Pacific International Exposi- 
tion disincorporated it was the tacit 
understanding among us that if ever 
a similar opportunity occurred we 
would be ready to lend our co-opera- 
tion as during the World's Fair. 

"That time, as many of us, who 
met in a recent conference believe, 
has arrived." 

Mrs. Wright was a member of the 
original Woman's Board and is now 
president of the Honorary Woman's 
Board. Mrs. Philip E. Bowles, Mrs. 
William Hinckley Taylor, Mrs. 
Charles W. Slack and Miss Laura Mc- 
Kinstry are the vice-presidents. 

Mrs. Gaillard Stoney, who was the 
secretary of the famous Woman's 
Board, of which Mrs. Phoebe A. 
Hearst was honorary president, and 
Mrs. Frederick G. Sanborn was act- 
ing president, will again serve in her 
capacity as secretary. It is with con- 
siderable pride that the present board 
makes announcement of Mrs. Stoney's 
position, Honorary Secretary. She is 
one of the best beloved of San Fran- 
cisco women, known for her gracious- 
ness and kindliness, as well as for her 
excellent ability and stability of pur- 
poses. 

* * * 

Board to Operate 
During Convention 

The Pacific Foreign Trade and 
Travel Exposition is being sponsored 
by the Foreign Trade Club of Cali- 
fornia of which E. W. Wilson is the 
president. 

It being the first occasion of un- 
qualified Exposition merit that has 
come to our attention since 1915, as- 
sociates of the original Woman's 
Board have been sincerely asked for 
their approval to the plan of co-oper- 
ating. The Board will not function 
until just previous to the opening of 
the Exposition in November and dur- 
ing the short period of its duration. 
* * * 

Woman's Participation 

Mrs. W. A. D'Egilbert is honorary 
director of "Woman's Participation" 
in the Pacific Foreign Trade and 
Travel Exposition, and Miss Ada 
Teitel is secretary. 

Mrs. D'Egilbert is well qualified to 
take charge of women's events. She 
holds a high place in the community 
of her activities in outstanding lines 
of valiant work. She is gracious, tal- 
ented, diplomatic and, with it all, is a 



thorough Californian with the inter 
ests of the State sincerely at heart. 

"California Invites the World" is 
a slogan adopted by the committees 
in charge of the coming Exposition, 
and it is the intention of Mrs. D'Egil- 
bert that the magnetic phrase may 
bring magnificent results. Mrs, 
D'Egilbert was one of the six Honor- 
ary Hostesses for California during, 
the World's Fair activities at the' 
California Building in 1915. 

"There is every prospect of really 
worth while participation by the wo- 
men of California in our coming Ex- 
position," said Mrs. D'Egilbert, "prill 
cipally because it has an idealistic 
viewpoint and because of the educa- 
tional and scientific advantages, wo- 
men will be more than interested 
through the appeal made to children 
and students. * * * 

Board of Governors 

The Board of Governors of the first! 
annual Pacific Foreign Trade and I 
Travel Exposition is headed by Rob- 
ert Dollar, K. R. Kingsbury," R. I. 
Bentley, A. R. DeForest, Charles C. 
Moore, Frederick J. Koster, E. W.' 
Wilson. 

The Exposition Organization Com- 
mittee comprises: Harry B. Scott, 
chairman ; John C. Rohlfs, Leonard 
B. Gary, C. E. Hydes, W. E. Hettman, 
Aubrey Drury and William D'Egil- 
bert, director-general. 

The Exposition will feature dis- 
plays of commodities and manufac- 
tures entering into the world trade 
of California and the Pacific Coast 
States and contiguous domestic and 
international markets. 

It will also emphasize the import- i 
ance of Pacific travel to, and from, 
Hawaii, Canada, the Antipodes, Asia, 
the United States and all the South! 

American countries. 

* * * 

Original Decoration 

An original scheme of decoration 
will prevail throughout the Exposi- 
tion, making it notable as an artistic 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3660 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



August 6, 1927 



THE SAM FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



achievement. Blue and white, the 
colors of the Foreign Trade Club, will 
predominate. 

The opening day, November 11, 
Armistice Day, will be devoted to a 
program dedicated to, and under the 
auspices of the American Legion; 
Saturday, November 12, will be 
known at American Legion Day. Dr. 
Albert C. Carlton, general chairman 
of the Armistice Celebration Com- 
mittee, and first vice-commander of 
the San Francisco Council American 
Legion, and Commander Frank Bel- 
grano Jr., will direct program events. 

At the Exposition, manufacturers 
and exporters and importers of the 
United States will make representa- 
tive exhibits. 

* * * 

Prominent Society 
Women on First Board 

Many of California's most promi- 
nent and distinguished society wo- 
men were on the original Woman's 
Board of the Panama-Pacific Exposi- 
tion of 1915, one of the most promi- 
nent of them being Mrs. Mary E. S. 
Bucknall, an honored vice-president 
of the Woman's Board. 

Mrs. Bucknall has the distinction 
of being the first child born of Anglo- 
American parents in San Francisco. 
As little Mary E. Davis, she repre- 
sented her State when it was admit- 
ted to the Union September 9, 1850. 

She was identified with all the lead- 
ing activities of the Woman's Board 
during the World's Fair held in this 
city and, because of her refinement, 
her womanly graciousness, her in- 
telligence and her heritage, was an 
acknowledged leader in many of Cali- 
fornia's most brilliant society events. 

Mrs. Bucknall was elected as the 
only Honorary Woman member of 
the Society of California Pioneers, 
She was a founder of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the Society, serving 
twin' as its president. She was a 
charter member of the Sorosis Club 
and was, at one time, the president. 

The present Woman's Board is 
proud indeed to claim Mrs. Bucknall 
as one of its members again, follow- 
ing her memorable and marvelous 
work of many magnificent years' 
achievements. 

* * * 

Daughters and Relatives 
Step Into Shoes of Work 

Many relatives, particularly the 
daughters ami the nieces of the origi- 
nal Woman's Board, will carry on the 
work recording California's place m 
the world of definite aims and real 
purposes. These young women who 
may emulate their forebears will take 
hold of the Travel and Trades Con- 
vention events under supervision and 
advice of the elder women of noble 
attainment. 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 

Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

500 Rooms 

Tariff : From $4 per day 



sion were: Mesdames Charles McVey, 
A. W. Sisson, Theodore Hardee, Vic- 
tor Peters and Bert Richter; Misses 
Ruth Sisson, Lucille McLaughlin, 
Rose Mary McVey, Vera Michels, 
Marian Donovan, Ruth Simpson and 
Bernadette McVey. 



Mr. and Mrs. Wendel 0. Widaman, 
who were married in New York on 
June 21st, are traveling abroad — at 
present in Budapest. Mrs. Widaman 
is the former Miss Geraldine War- 
ford, daughter of Mrs. Roy D. John- 
son, who is making her home at the 
Mark Hopkins Hotel. On their return 
about the middle of September, Mr. 
and Mrs. Widaman will spend several 
days with Mrs. Widaman's mother at 
the Mark Hopkins. 



Mrs. George Hearst will lead in 
many of the younger matron's activi- 
ties. Prominent among the present 
list of the Woman's Board are Mes- 
dames Edward R. Dimond, Edson E. 
Adams, Frank B. Anderson, Joseph 
D. Grant, Francis Carolan, Reuben B. 
Hale, Prentiss Cobb Hale, I. W. Hell- 
man, C. Edwards Holmes, Robert 
Oxnard, Horace D. Pillsbury, Jesse 
Lilienthal, George A. Pope, William 
T. Sesnon, Max C. Sloss, Dr. Mariana 
Bertola and those who have already 
been named. 



Consulate Endorsement 

As described to us, the Pacific For- 
eign Trade and Travel Exposition is 
to be an expression by California 
that we desire the nations of the 
world to bring their products in ex- 
change for ours, and by the same 
process travel and tourist conditions 
will be more reciprocal. Added to this 
is the evident desire of the sponsors of 
this non-profit organization to lax- 
stress upon the educational advan- 
tages to lie derived from a demon- 
stration such as will be given at the 
Exposition. 

The Consulate Corps of San Fran- 
cisco representing 46 countries, has 
given its unqualified endorsement to 
the project and each Consul is Hon- 
orary Chairman of the committee of 
his countrymen. 

* * * 

Engagement Party 

Miss Bernadette McVey of Kent- 
field. Marin County, was hostess at a 
tea in Peacock Court of Hotel Mark 
Hopkins on Saturday. July 9th. com- 
plimenting Miss Ruth Sisson. whose 
engagement to Mr. John L. Toole was 
announced. The tabic was beautifully 
decorated with pansies and lilies of 
the valley, forming a center piece, 
and individual corsages of the same 
flowers. Those present on this occa- 



Bethrothed 

Miss Helen Bernice Baker of Oak- 
land, who has announced her engage- 
ment to Mr. Harry Emerson Pratt of 
Fairbanks, Alaska, was honor guest 
at a bridge tea at the Fairmont Hotel 
on Saturday, July 23, given by Miss 
Elizabeth Meacham. Miss Baker, who 
is leaving for Fairbanks, will marry 
Mr. Pratt immediately on her arrival. 
Miss Baker is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of California, and Mr. Pratt 
is a graduate of the University of 
Colorado. He is attorney for the Fair- 
banks Exploration Company in Fair- 
banks and a Senator for the Fourth 
Division. A number of events have 
been given for the bride-to-be. Miss 
Meacham's guests included Miss Jan- 
ice Curry, Miss Aurelia Frazee, Miss 
Muriel Alexander, Miss Helene Sy- 
mons. Miss Helen Phillips. Miss Mar- 
ion Phillips, Miss Helen E. Morris and 
Mrs. Claude Fancher. 

Miss Margaret E. Ward of Seattle 
stopped at Hotel Mark Hopkins on 
her way to Hollywood where she will 
take part in a picture that Mary Pick- 
ford is directing. 



Hurley Miserve and E. D. Williams 
prominent attorneys of Los Angeles, 
here on court duty, stopped at the 
Mark Hopkins on Thursday and Fri- 
day. 

* * * 

Mrs. Chas. Houghton of Beverly 
Place, Berkeley, was hostess at a tea 
in Peacock Court of Hotel Mark Hop- 
kins on Monday, July 25th. Her 
guests on this occasion were: Miss 
Christine Waller. Mesdames J. K. 
Smythe. F. P. Rogers, John Bertol- 
one. George Suvoey. Wm. Xeeson, 
Louis Mendel, Ruth Clegg. P. Thorsch, 
J. J. Petty and Joseph Angeli. 
itinued on page 14) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 6, 1927 




>LE/1SURE'SW4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURES 

lorn Moone- 




By Josephine Young 



Theater Lures 

Comedy dramas seem to hold sway 
in large proportionate measure in San 
Francisco theaters. 

So there's really no excuse for the 
glooms, these days. 

All one needs to do to have a happy 
evening, is to buy a ticket for one of 
the pleasant plays, or motion picture 
houses, and let them do the rest ! 

There is many a-laugh in keeping 
for theater patrons, if laughter is 
what you want. High entertainment, 
also, is yours for the seeking. 

* * * 

Lurie 

There's a surprise in "The Harem," 
the play now on at the Lurie Theater 
on Geary street right near Mason. 

Isobel Elsom, portraying the re- 
sourceful wife in the David Belasco 
new comedy, keeps up a constant ap- 
peal to one's imagination and inter- 
est. She really is a natural-born 
charmer ! Alan Brooks plays opposite 
Miss Elsom in his role of the hus- 
band who falls in love with his mas- 
querading wife under intriguing cir- 
cumstances. 

The story is not entirely new but 
with the Belasco-Butler-Davis mas- 
terful touches it becomes intensely 
alluring. It deals with an ever-inter- 
esting theme: a woman's determina- 
tion to hold her husband's love under 
fascinating spell. Novel side-lights 
and plot slants increase the interest. 

Limping lies glibly told by the hus- 
band and his best friend provide 
much amusement. Lee C. Millar 
proves able support as do Mia Mar- 
vin, Robert Fischer, Fred Hargrave 
and Elizabeth Page. 

The entire production is under the 
personal direction of Fred J. Butler. 
"The Harem," by Ernest Vadja, was 
adapted by Avery Hopwood. 

* * * 

Curran 

Love, laughter, lies provide truth- 
ful alliteration describing "Love in 
a Mist," now playing at the Curran 
Theater on Geary street, with Madge 
Kennedy and Sidney Blackmer in the 
starring roles. 

The play is far too good to miss, if 
you haven't seen it already. 

Diana, the heroine of the story, is 
the most cheerful little liar and the 



more white lies she tells the blacker 
and bigger they grow. It is a bounc- 
ing comedy-drama with twists of plot 
registering laughter at many angles. 
"Sidney Blackmer is the sort of a 
real chap any girl could love," repeat 
the feminine contingency at matinee 
performances. He is a regular fellow 
all through the plot. Jack Willard, 
Natalie Schafer are the other loving 
pair in the story, Willard giving his 
interpretation of a Count. Percy Has- 
well and Mary Marble do good work. 

* :•: * 

Alcazar 

"The Alarm Clock," farce-comedy 
by Avery Hopwood, with Marion 
Lord heading a carefully chosen cast, 
will have its first production in San 
Francisco Sunday afternoon at the 
Alcazar. This play is said to be a 
laughfest and Henry Duffy expects 
that it will shatter attendance rec- 
ords at his O'Farrel street theater. 

The story concerns a rich young 
bachelor who has been required to 
leave off his gay life for a time and 
lead a quiet existence. The country 
people in the story finally decide to 
go to the city, where their experi- 
ences provide the mirth of the play. 
Marion Lord's portrayal of the pleas- 
ure-seeking country woman is Clevel- 
and uproariously funny. Thomas 
Chatteron appears as the rich bache- 
lor. John Stokes, Alice Buchanan, 
William Macauley, Zeda Ree, Robert 
Adams are in the cast, Haviland 
Chapelle, Richard Ellers and John 
Mackenzie being the other favorites 
of the players. Walter B. Gilbert, the 
new director for Henry Duffy's plays 
will have charge of "The Alarm 
Clock," his fine reputation East pre- 
ceding to our midst. 

* * * 

President 

"The Ghost Train" still thrills and 
startles big audiences at the Presi- 
dent Theater on McAllister street 
near Market, where the Henry Duffy 
players have been playing in this 
comedy for eight consecutive weeks. 
The play will be continued for there 
seems to be no chance of a change 
there for the present. 

Earl Lee, Charlotte Treadway, 
John D. O'Mara, Dorothy La Mar, 
Ronald Telfer, Ben Taggart, Thomas 
Brower, Lillian Deane, Westcott 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 

Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"The Alarm Clock." New Henry Duffy pro- 
duction starring Marion Lord. Thomas (hat- 
terton also in the cast. 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

"Love in a Mist." Comedy featurinc Madire 
Kennedy and Sidney lllarkmer. 

Lurie, Geary at Mason 

"The Harem." David Belasco Comedy fcatur- 
inE Isohel Elsom and Alan Brooks. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 



"The Ghost Train." 
Comedy. 



Henry Duffy Mystery- 



VAUDEVILLE 

Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

Mickey Daniels and Peggy Eames of "Our 
Gang" comedies in person. "The Sunset I 
Derby." with Mary Astor and William Collier' 
Jr. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Florrie Le Vere, comedienne, heading a hill of' 
vaudeville. 

Pantaeres, Market at Hyde 

Irene Franklin, American comedienne, heading*: 
a hill of vaudeville and pictures. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Pictures — Vaudeville. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Pictures — Vaudeville. 



ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 

California. Market at 4th 

"The Big Parade," Famous war-time picture ■ 
at popular prices. Gino Severi conducting the 
California Orchestra. 

Cameo, Market opp. Fifth street 

"The Code of the Range," Sun.. Mon. : "Char- 
ley's Aunt." Tues.. Wed.. Thurs. Today rfo ■ 
final showings. "The Night Owl," starring 
Reed Howes. 



Casino, Ellis at Mason 



Sat., "Her Father Said No" and "The Princess 
on Broadway." Sun.. Mon.. "Risky Business'* 
and "Sweet Rosie O'Grady." Tues.. Wed., 
"The Winning of Barbara Worth." Thurs., 
Fri., "Moulders of Men" and "The False ■ 
Alarm." 

Granada, Market at Jones 

"Smile. Brother, Smile," Dorothy Mackaill, 
Jack Mulhalt, T. Roy Barnes. Jane Green in 
stage presentation of Fanchon and Marco, 
"The Petter." 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th. 

"Beau Geste." Adventure and romance of the 
French Foreign Legion in Africa. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"Adam and Evil." Lew Cody and Aileen Prin- 
gle, "Adam and Evil." "Specialty Ideas,'* 
featuring Nell Kelly in songs and dances. 
RESIDENCE DISTRICT 

Alhambra, Polk St., nr. Green 

H. G. Wells. "Mar cgair"Q t ;ciiianY,rg sh 
H. G. Wells. "Marriage." Virginia Valli, and 
also Tom Mix in "No Man's Gold," Sat.; "Be- 
ware of Widows." Bryant Washburn, Sun.; 
"Lost at the Front," three days. Mon., Tues., 
Wed.; "Venus of Venice," Constance Tat mage, 
Thurs.. Fri. 



August 6, 1927 



THE SANi FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Clarke, Joan Warner and Henry Cau- 
bisens are the players. 



screen attractions. Claude Sweeten 
and his, orchestra in a special number 
round out this week's bill. 



Warfield 

Lew Cody and Aiken Pringle are 
the principals this week at the War- 
field in the polite comedy, "Adam and 
Evil." Cody and Miss Pringle have 
proved so splendid a pair in these 
novel comedy features that they 
seemed destined to play opposites for 
quite some time. 

Gwen Lee, Hedda Hopper and Ger- 
trude Short are in the cast as sup- 
porters who keep the lively comedy 
at running figures. In the story the 
hero of the play finds himself unable 
to keep all his feminine engagements 
and so enlists the aid of his twin 
brother. Lew Cody plays the part of 
the twin. 

Stage attractions this week include 
"Specialty Ideas," with Nell Kelly 
held over the third week to sing and 
dance with the orchestra leader, Walt 
Roesner. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

An all-star feature bill this week at 
the Orpheum is headlined by Long 
Tack Sam, China's master wonder 
worker, supported by the Misses 
Mina and Nee Sa Long, in a medley 
of Oriental feats. Florrie La Vere, 
with Lou Handman, in "Celebrities," 
is assisted by Edythe Handman, as 
another headline attraction. 

Eddie Miller and Frank J. Corbett 
in "Brothers in Harmony," with late 
song selections, and Ken Murray, 
clever comedian, with his group, in- 
cluding Helen and Milton Charleston 
and Baby Kathleen Bassette, are also 
Orpheum attractions. Michael has a 
"surprise" to spring. 

An announcement of considerable 
interest is that of Nick Lucas who is 
coming very soon in one of his big 
features. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Mickey Daniels and Peggy Eames, 
of the Hal Roach "Our Gang" come- 
dies, will appear in person again this 
week at the Golden Gate. These tal- 
ented juveniles are as popular in per- 
sonal appearances as they are on the 
screen. 

Clark and Bergman, stars of musi- 
cal comedy, will be seen in •'Dutch." 
written especially for them. Frank 
DeVoe of Broadway fame will appear 
in "1927 Humor in 1927 Way." He is 
assisted by Eddie Williss at the piano. 
Adolph, the Italian minstrel, and 
other popular acts will be on this 
week's program. 

"The Sunset Derby" is the feature 
film featuring Mary Astor and Wil- 
liam Collier Jr.. in a racing story. 
Short comedies and a scenic add to 



* * * 

i 

Pantages 

Irene Franklin, thelAmeircan come- 
dienne who has returned from a Lon- 
don engagement will appear at the 
Pantages for the week starting Sat- 
urday, presenting a cycle of old fav- 
orites and a number of new songs, too. 

Jerry Jarnagin, her husband, ac- 
companies her on the piano. 

"America turns out the best popu- 
lar melodies and the worst lyrics," 
stated Miss Franklin who writes her 
own songs, giving them character in- 
terpretations as well as singing them. 

* * * 

California 

"The Big Parade," King Vidor's 
great production featuring one of the 
most striking events of the screen is 
now on at the California Theater 
where it is being shown at regular 
prices. John Gilbert and Renee Adoree 
are the stars in the cinema production 
which some critics declare is a "hu- 
man document" of unusual strength 
and screen triumph. 

Those who missed "The Big Pa- 
rade" will now have an opportunity 
to see this picture under the splendid 
California Theater management with 
Gino Seven's excellent musical set- 
tings. 

* * * 

St. Francis 

"Beau Geste" is on the screen this 
this week at the St. Francis Theater 
following the fourth week of Emil 
Janning's success in "The Way of All 
Flesh." 

Ronald Colman heads the cast in 
"Beau Geste," with Alice Joyce, Mary 
Brian, Neil Hamilton. Ralph Forbes, 
Noah Beery, William Powell. Norman 
Trevor and several hundred extras in 
support. This production is now being 
shown at the St. Francis at their reg- 
ular prices. 

* * * 

Granada 

"Smile, Brother, Smile." will be the 
Granada Theater attraction this week 
at the Granada Theater following 
the "Metropolis." Jack Mulhall stars 
in the new picture in his role of a 
glibe traveling salesman. 

Dorothy Mackaill plays the part of 
a telephone operator and proves the 
heroine of the story which is prin- 
cipally a matter of many laughs. T. 
Rov Barnes is a salesman of the 
"wise-crack" variety. The peppy pic- 
ture runs a merry pace from start to 
finish. 

Fanchon and Marco feature Jane 

Green of Victor Record fame, using 

one of their productions, "The Pet- 

ter." for the stage presentation. 

(Continued on page 13) 



CALIFORNIA BY DAYLIGHT 




Along the Sea 

to 

Los Angeles 

— famous non-stop journey over 
the scenic Coast Line 

The Daylight skirts the sea- 
shore for 113 miles of the trip 
to Los Angeles. Mountains 
slope to the blue Pacific; here 
and there lush valleys; inter- 
esting cities are along the 
way. 

A fascinating journey of 12 
daylight hours — 7:45 a.m. to 
7:45 p. m. Observation and 
club car comfort at no extra 
charge. Special family -style 
lunch and dinner, $1, and a la 
carte menu at breakfast. All- 
day lunch car for light re- 
freshments, moderately priced. 

Aa<9.50 San Francisco 
^r~l^ to Los Angeles 

and back, limit IS days. Ten 
I rains daily, including the 
Sunset and the Owl, unexcel- 
led for overniuht travel. 

Visit Los Angeles. Play at 
the beaches. See Hollywood, 
great movie center, Pasadena, 
Long Beach, the missions. 

To see California take the 

Daylight 

Southern Pacific 

San Francisco Offices— 

65 Geary St- Fen y Station 3rd Sc. Station 

Pbone Dai en port 4000 

Oakland Offices— 

13th. & B Way 16th St.Sta. Ist&B waySta. 

Phone Lak tiide 1420 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 6, 1927 



Hawaii— By Arthur E. Bixby 

Director ^Publicity Mai on Line 




The Royal Hawaiian and its neighbor, the Moana, as seen from Kapiolani Park, Waikiki. 



Hawaii, playground and wonder- 
land of the Pacific, only 2,091 sea 
miles from San Francisco, the short- 
est route from the Pacific Coast, has 
been on the front pages of the world's 
newspapers this summer because of 
the various airplane flights, and is 
still in the minds of hundreds of 
thousands of people all over the world 
as their objective for their next ocean 
voyage or world tour. 

The successful flight in June of 
Maitland and Hegenberger, the 
Army's daring airmen, from Oakland 
aii-port to Honolulu, focused the 
world's attention on the Hawaiian 
Islands to fully as great a degree as 
the historic attempt on September 1, 
1925, by the late Commander John 
Rodgers, of the Navy. The flight by 
Ernie Smith and Emory Bronte from 
Oakland to the Island of Molokai 
brought Hawaii again into the head- 
lines, and the Dole prize flight this 
month, for a first prize of $25,000 
and' a second of S10,000, offered by 
James D. Dole, president of the Ha- 
waiian Company, Ltd., is continuing 
to cause people to think about Ha- 
waii for their vacation tour next 
year. 

As if these factors were not 
enough, Madame Pe-le, Hawaii's fire 
goddess, returned in robes of fiery 
splendor on July 7th to her home in 
Halemaumau, firepit of Kilauea Vol- 
cano in Hawaii National Park, after 
an absence of seven years. From past 
performances of the volcano, scien- 
tists who have studied Kilauea closely 
believe that the present activity will 
continue for six months or a year. 
Kilauea is thirty miles from Hilo, on 
the Island of Hawaii, a delightful 



overnight sea voyage from Honolulu 
by the Matson liners Maui or Mat- 
sonia or the Inter-Island's fast steam- 
er, Haleakala. A paved highway leads 
from Hilo to the Volcano House, over- 
looking the firepit three miles awav. 
In the year 1926, more than 15,000 
tourists visited the Hawaiian Islands, 
these travelers coming from all parts 
of the world, and from all ports on 
the Pacific Coast. This was an in- 
crease of ten per cent over the 1925 
figures. Indications are that 1927 will 
exceed all other years. An aggressive 
advertising campaign by the Hawaii 
Tourist Bureau, the Matson Naviga- 
tion Company, the Dollar Line, the 
Los Angeles Steamship Company, 
and the new Royal Hawaiian Hotel of 
Honolulu, is being continued this fall. 



There are eight islands in the Ha- 
waiian group. For tourists, however, 
the principal attractions are on the 
four larger islands — Oahu, on which 
is Honolulu ; Hawaii, noted for Kil- 
auea Volcano and Hawaii National 
Park; Maui, famed for Haleakala, 
world's largest inactive crater ; and 
Kauai, whose chief attractions are its 
colorful canyons, Waimea and Olo- 
kele. 

Starting in October, the Matson 
Line's new de luxe express liner Ma- 
lolo (Flying Fish) will be placed in 
service between San Francisco and 
Honolulu. She will make the run in 
four days and will carry 650 passen- 
gers, all first class. This palatial ship 
will establish a new standard of speed 
and luxury in traveling to Hawaii. 
There will then be available more fine 
passenger ships than at any time 
since or before the war. 

The new 400-room Royal Hawaiian 
Hotel at Waikiki Beach, Honolulu, a 
coral-pink castle in a cocoanut grove 
was opened last February and is one 
of the world's finest resort hotels. It 1 
has every luxury and in July opened 
its own 18-hole golf course for guests, j 

Hawaii is just as delightful in! 
August as in January. The islands 
are cooler in mid-summer than Lost 
Angeles, Chicago or New York. You ' 
can swim for hours at Waikiki with- 
out becoming chilled, as the water is 
nearly as warm as the air. Miles of 
pineapple fields and sugar plantations, . 
breath-taking mountain panoramas, 
streets lined with flowering trees, . 
miles of fine concrete highways, life 
amid totally new and fairy-like sur- 
roundings, make the Hawaiian Isl- • 
(Continued on page 13) 




Only a few blocks from the Royal Hawaiian 
tropical Kapiolani Park 



and Moana, are rujtKed Diamond Head 
ith its coco palms. 



August 6, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



The Palo Alto Horse Show 



The recognition accorded the Palo 
Alto horse show by exhibitors from 
all parts of the United States is 
unique and a real compliment to A. P. 
Fleming, whose standing as a horse 
show manager is such that all who 
know the game are aware that condi- 
tions at his shows will be as nearly- 
right as they can reasonably be made 
and that entries may be made with- 
out uncertainty as to results or ques- 
tioning of details. 

Over 700 entries have been booked 
for the show and more than 250 
horses will grace the ring 
during the eight perform- 
ances. All divisions except 
those for harness horses 
are well filled and harness 
pony classes will be strong 
enough to counter balance 
the shortage of the big 
hackneys of which there 
will be but eleven in the 
ring. However, it will be 
remembered that a few 
years ago, many a great 
Pacific International show 
consisted of only six or 
eight. 

Hunting and jumping 
classes will be of moderate 
size, with from a dozen to 
twenty entries. Quality, 
however, is better than 
has ever been known on 
the coast and it is of ac- 
tual benefit to the program 
that those jumping events 
should not drag through 
the showing of thirty or 
forty jumpers in class 
after class throughout the 
week. All other divisions 
are full to overflowing, 
with more evenly distributed high 
quality than is usual. 

Looking over the entries in three 
and flve-gaited classes, it is impossi- 
ble in many of them to even approxi- 
mately pick those that should win. 

One of the big features is the great- 
est polo stake ever shown — $2,000, of- 
fered by the Bloomfield Hills Stock 
Farm of Gilroy. Calif., of which Will 
S. lev is. Jr.. is president and man- 
ager. 

Tevis and others of the Burlingame 
and San Mateo Polo Club have taken 
a great deal of interest in seeing that 
the polo classes are properly tilled and 
there are twenty entries in the stake 
event alone. 

A splendid arena has been erected 
on Stanford University Campus; three 
tiers of boxes surrounding a well 
hanked ring 220x120 feet, with twen- 



ty-five hundred grandstand seats be- 
hind the boxes. 

Box stalls to the number of 125 are 
adjacent; 75 tie stalls nearby and a 
tent 350x60 feet, will hold 50 more 
and provide fine accommodation for 
rigs and hitching. 

Interest in the show seems to be 
extensive and if attendance is as good 
as the show deserves, there will be 
another fixture in the horse show 
world on the Pacific Coast. 

Box holders at the Palo Alto horse 
show include the following: — 




Nancy Highland, winnei and undefeated last year at New York, Chicago, Kansas 

City. Los Angeles. Oakland and other (Treat shows, owned by Miss Maud Fawn 

Banks. Covina. Cal. The rider is Roy L. Davis, proprietor of 

Bel Air Stables. Los Angeles. 



Mrs. P. E. Bowles, Mrs. George 
Barr Baker, Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Buck, Mr. and Mrs. Tobin Clark, Mr. 
and Mrs. Selah Chamberlain, Mrs. 
William Cluff, Mrs. Henry J. Crocker, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran, 
Dr. and Mrs. Sydney Dannenbaum, 
Mr. and Mrs. Cecil de Mille. Mr. Wil- 
liam Dinwiddie. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Dollar, Mr. and Mrs. John S. Drum. 
Mrs. Eugene Dumesnil ; 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dunphy, Mr. 
Edward L. Eyre. .Mr. and Mrs. Her- 
bert Fleishhacker. Mr. and Mrs. A. P. 
Giannini. Mr. and Mrs. Sanford L. 
Goldstein, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. 
Grant. Mr. and Mrs. T. T. C. Gregory. 
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hamilton, 
Mrs. E. S. Heller. Mr. and Mrs. Irving 
Hellman. Mrs. Margaret Heitman. Mr. 
P. B. Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. Timo- 
thy Hopkins; 



Mr. and Mrs. Lindsay C. Howard, 
Mr. Julius Kahn Jr., La Hunda Riders, 
Mr. and Mrs. G. Albert Lansburgh, 
Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Lonsdale, Mrs. 
Stewart Lowery, Mrs. William Mat- 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. McCann, 
Mr. and Mrs. Atholl McBean, Mrs. G. 
H. Mendell Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Ben R. 
Meyer ; 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Miller, Mr. 
and Mrs. Leslie Moore, Mr. and Mrs. 
R. S. Moore, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Mer- 
rill, Mrs. Kate Nielson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis O'Neal; Mr. and Mrs. W. H. 
Pool, Mr. George A. Pope 
Jr., Mr. and Mrs. W. P. 
Roth, Mr. and Mrs. Har- 
vey Snodgrass, Mrs. Louis 
Tevis Sharon, Mr. Frank 
P. Simmens, Mr. and Mrs. 
Alfred Swinerton, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. E. Schwabacher, 
Mrs. Gus Taylor, Mr. and 
Mrs. George C. Thomas 
Jr., Mr. and Mrs. William 
Threlkeld, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph O. Tobin, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. R. Tobin, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. B. Weir, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. R. Walter, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. D. Zellerbach. 

It was King Edward 
who made the statement 
that horses should be bred 
for pleasure, and auto 
trucks built for the hard 
work of the business 
world. 

In a way, his words are 
coming true, for a renais- 
sance of horse shows is 
taking place over the State 
of California. It is planned 
by the Northern Califor- 
nia Horse Show Associa- 
tion to give eight shows a year, in the 
following cities : San Francisco, Stock- 
ton, San Jose, Oakland, Fresno, Port- 
land, Seattle and Reno. 



At the Elder Gallery 

"The Vortex," a high strung, tense 
drama, by Noel Coward, will be read 
by Edith Coburn Noyes in the Paul 
Elder Gallery. Thursday afternoon, 
August 11th. at 2:30 o'clock. As a 
playwright and actor, Noel Coward 
made a profound impression with 
this play. 



There is said to be a craze in Lon- 
don restaurants for tripe. Diners, we 
understand, prop the novel against 
the cruet and read it during the meal. 
— London Opinion. 



HORSE SHOW SUMMER SEASON G 




Marcheta, fine three-gaited type owned 
and ridden by Mrs. W . P. Roth of Wood- 
side and San Francisco, who has many 
fine horses entered for the 
Palo Alto Show. 



Top — M rs. George W. Baker, of Piedmont, and her dainty 
Cecilia Dawn. Below — "Let's Go" doing a single bar at 
over five feci, ridden by one of America's best horse 
women, Mrs. Hilda McC. Cook of Seattle, who will show 
at Palo Alto, Stockton and Sacramento Horse Shows. 



JS AT PALO ALTO AUGUST 8 to n 




>p Maud Kennedy, a sweet jumper, owned by John 
Short o< Sacramento, toko brings nine hunters and 
jumpers to the Shows this Summer. 

The Great Bounder, retired hero oj the Show 
Ring and his little "pal" at Sierra \ista. 



v 
t 



Center — A. P. Fleming, manager of Palo Alto and Stock- 
ton Horse Shows. 

Below — Mrs. Claud D. Starr, of Portland, Oregon and 

Kula Kula. a very promising jumper of good hunter type 

that will make his first appearance at Palo Alto. 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 6, 1927 



OUR RADIO EDITOR GOES UP IN THE AIR 

(Continued from page 1) 

less than four hours. 

The stop in Medford was only long enough to transfer 
to another plane and hop off for the last lap of the flight 
to Portland. The second plane was a Biplane driven by 
the same type of motor as the first plane. The pilot on 
this particular occasion was Mr. N. B. Evans, Traffic Man- 
ager of :he Pacific Air Transport, who, true to the policy 
of the Company, is a man with many years of flying ex- 
perience. Again the course led over the mountains and 
as soon as elevation was gained, mountain peaks were 
visible in almost every direction. The elevation main- 
tained being about 8,000 feet, with an air speed of ap- 
proximately 150 miles per hour, high speed was made 
possible through the help of a wind blowing in the same 
direction as the flight of the plane. 

Mount Hood, Mount Rainier, Mount Adams, the Three 
Sister Mountains and in all, seven snow- 
capped mountain peaks reflected their 
white gleaming tops from different 
points. 

The entire trip over Oregon was an 
ever-changing, beautiful picture. In pass- 
ing over, the city of Portland was soon 
observed, at an elevation of 3,000 feet, 
the whole of it plainly visible. The river 
running through the center of the city, 
crossed by many bridges, with its resi- 
dential district, made a very interesting 
study from above. The landing was made 
at Pearson's Flying Field, across the Co- 
lumbia River in Vancouver, Washington, 
at noon, which made the entire trip, from 
San Francisco to Portland, just six and 
one-half hours. 
Flying Back 

On the return journey, the take-off 
from Vancouver, Washington, was at 
7:00 a. m. Clouds were hanging over the city of Portland 
and the air was chilly, but Mr. J. R. Cunningham, our 
pilot, who celebrates his tenth year of flying in October, 
1927, with his pleasant and reassuring personality, pre- 
dicted fair weather at a short distance, which proved cor- 
rect. Not many towns are passed in the flight from Port- 
land to Medford ; in fact, the railroad cannot be seen fif- 
teen minutes after leaving Portland. The beginning of 
the route is directly over the foothills of the Cascade 
range of mountains. The first view from 3,000 feet at a 
speed of 110 miles per hour, was that of the Willamette 
River, with its winding course from the mountains as far 
as the eye could follow it. Off to the west, Salem, the 
capital of Oregon, could be glimpsed, the plane gaining 
elevation until at this point it was 6,000 feet high. Ten 
minutes later, Silverton, Oregon, could be recognized. 

The sun was shining brightly by now and the weather 
was ideal, except for a haze which prevented points at 
extreme distances being picked out. The plane kept gain- 
ing elevation and almost half way between Portland and 
Medford, an elevation of 15,000 feet was attained. 

A great deal has been said about elevation having an 
unpleasant effect upon some people, but we were not 
aware of any change. It was learned from Mr. Cunning- 
ham that height had no effect on passengers, unless told 
how high they were. At 15,000 feet, almost 3 miles in the 
air, it was cool, but not enough to be disagreeable. A 
rain storm was passed and a few flashes of lightning could 
be looked down upon without the slightest fear. 

After passing many interesting mountain peaks, Rose- 
burg, Oregon, could be seen, and soon thereafter a small 
white speck on top of a high peak could be made out, 
which proved to be a fire look-out post, with the plane 




heading directly toward it, circling it as a large bird 
would circle its prey, dropping the daily paper to the look- 
out, then heading again southward. 

Fifteen minutes later, the landing field in Medford was 
sighted, and a little after 9:00 a. m., slightly over two 
hours after leaving Portland, the plane was brought to 
rest on the first lap of the return journey, where another 
plane and pilot takes up the flight on to San Francisco. 

The course leading out of Medford for San Francisco 
heads directly into the Siskiyou Mountains and starts to 
gain elevation immediately upon leaving the ground. A 
strong headwind was against the course of the plane 
which necessitated flying as low as possible to make the 
trip on schedule. Our pilot from Medford was Mr. Arthur 
Starbuck, a fine fellow, well met, who has been piloting 
continuously for the past ten years. 

After taking off from Medford, Ashland could be seen 
in a few minutes and no sooner had the plane passed Ash- 
land than it was flying low over the 
mountains, lower than on the northward 
journey, but still a considerable distance 
above the high peaks. Every town and 
hamlet on the Southern Pacific routes 
through the Sacramento Valley could be 
seen ; the Valley country being followed 
until nearing Napa, when the course was 
changed to take the ship out to the coast. 
Flying directly over Napa ; then over the 
northern end of Mare Island, out over the 
Bay and down the Bay to San Francisco. 
Visibility was perfect, and all points of 
interest could be seen and recognized. 
After enjoying such a beautiful sight, it 
was with reluctance that we felt the 
plane glide to a perfect landing on Crissy 
Field in San Francisco at 1:15 p. m. 

No words can adequately express the 
feeling one receives from such a trip, but 
the only solution to the mysteries of the 
air is to take the flight with the Pacific Air Transport, in 
safety and be convinced that traveling by air has come 
to stay ; and no better group of competent pilots and 
planes could be assembled for your comfort than this 
Transport Company has secured. 



Tractor Versus the Horse 

An interesting argument is growing out of the many 
problems of farm relief: The tractor versus the horse. 
This chestnut is one of old standing. When the machine 
first came to the farm, hundreds of rural sages declared 
it could not last. Thousands today are of the opinion 
that modernization is responsible for the present farm in- 
dustry difficulties. Not so much because of labor revolu- 
tion as because of the creation of a new overhead. Be- 
fore the tractor came to the farm, and all of its attendant 
pulleys and wheels, the farmer knew almost no overhead. 
Now he is burdened with it equal to any typical industry. 
Price fluctuation in crops and over-production and bad 
years — all taken together make this new overhead un- 
bearable. 

It appears, however, that the farmers have discovered 
again only one of those half-truths. Appearances give 
the facts some foothold, but the proof of figures lies on 
the other side. The horse never could, nor never will 
save the farm by himself. 

* * * 
Well-known Breed 

"What are these 'yesmen' that I sometimes hear 
about?" writes a feminine inquirer. 

"Yesmen, madam, are fellows who hang around the 
man that nobody noes." — Boston Transcript. 



August 6, 1927 




reduced 
sound trip 
glares 



'from California 
points and return 



^m Boston. M.is.. 


. . J157.76 


V Chicago, lit . 


. . 90.30 


W Denver, Colo. 


. 67.20 


J DeB Moines, la. 


. . 81.55 


Houston, Tex. . 


. 75.60 


Kansas City, Mo. 


. 75.60 


Memphis, Tenn. 


. 89.40 


Minneapolis, Minn 


91.90 


Montreal, Que. . . 


148.72 


New Orleans, La. 


89.40 


New York, N. Y. . 


151.70 


Portland, Me, • . 


165.60 


St. Louis, Mo, , . 


85.60 


Washington. D. C. . 


145.86 A 


and many others. fl 



7^~c\ AKE advantage 
\_J of these low ex- 
cursion fares to visit 
the old home this 
summer. 

Start any day before 
September 30. Re- 
turn limit October 
31. Our travel books 
will help you plan 
your trip and may 
be had upon request 

SANTA FE Ticket Offices 
and Travel Bureaux 



601 Market strrrt 

Telephone Sutter 7600 

Santa Fe Depot 

SAN FRANCISCO 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Cameo 

The popular Cameo Theater on 
Market street, right opposite Fifth, 
will screen "The Night Owl" today, 
Saturday, for the last showing, with 
Reed Howe in the starring role. "The 
Code of the Range" is to be screened 
Sunday and Monday with Jack Per- 
rin the principal. Then for three days 
the Cameo will show "Charley's 
Aunt," starring Syd Chaplin, Tues- 
day, Wednesday and Thursday. Many 
educational films are featured at this 
cozy theater. 

HAWAII 
(Continued from page 8) 
ands a true wonderland and play- 
ground. 

Life in Hawaii is restful and peo- 
ple are kind. You are welcomed with 
Aloha Oe and say goodbye wreathed 
in fragrant flowers. It is a land of 
music and song, of green islands 
washed by the cool trade winds, of 
balmy days and unforgetable moon- 
lit nights. Musicians stroll around 
the streets singing for the love of it, 
and even the truck drivers wear 
flower leis (wreaths) around their 
hatbands. Those who visit Hawaii 
are never entirely happy until they 
can return again. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE: 
The MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, loca- 
tion of principal place of business, San Francisco. 
Calif. 

Notice is hereby piven that at a meeting; of the 
Directors held on the 2nd day of AUKUst, 1927, an 
assessment of one-half cent per share was levied upon 
the issued capital stock of the corporation payable 
immediately in legal money of the United 'States, to 
the Secretary, at the office of the company. Room 
245. Monadnock Building, San Francisco. Calif. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the 5th day of September. 1927 will be 
delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, 
and unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
Tuesday the 27th day of September, 1927 to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY. Secretary. 

24S Monadnock Building. 

San Francisco, Calif. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT 

of the State of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco 
Marjrarot Vanderhoovrt. I 'In in tiff. vs. John W. B. 
\ anderhoogt. Defendant 
N«. isi.;j-.. 

Action brought in the Superior Courl of the State 
■ •i California in and for the City and County of San 

Francisco, and the complaint filed in the office of 

the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The ; fornia semi greeting 

to; John w. B. Vanderhoogt, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above-named Plaintiff in 
the Superior Court of the £ lifornia, in and 

for the City and County of San Francisco, and t.> 
answer the Complaint filed therein within ten days 
live of the day of service) after the service on 
this summons, if served within this City and 
or if served elsew here within thirty days. 
The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
cree of this Court dissolving the bonds of ma- 
trimony now existing bet* ■ n plaintiff and defend- 
ant, on the grounds sal's wilful dee 
and wilful neglect, also for general relief, as will 

more fully appear in the Com plain I on rile, to which 
special reference is herein made. 

And von are hereby notified that unless you appear- 
and answer as above required, the said PlaintitT will 
tdgment for any money or damans demanded 
in the complaint as arising upon contract or will 
apply to the Court for other relief demanded in the 
complaint. 

Given under mv hand and Lhe Seal of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco. 

Dated this twenty-seventh 'lav of July. 192.. 

H T MULCREVY, Clerk. 
By J. J. BAFFERTY, Deputy Clerk. 
i SeaO 

,tfn Lewis. 178 Mills Bldg., &an Francis 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 



Preserving is cool 

and easy with the 
Oven Heat Control 

YOU can preserve summer fruits 
that taste as delicious and remain 
as firm as on the day they were 
picked from the laden bough. Briefly, 
here's a cool, easy way — 

Cool because you don't have to lift 
boiling kettles about the stove. 

Easy because the Oven Heat Con- 
trol on the new Gas Range is the se- 
cret of delicious home preserving that 
is done in the oven without watching 
or anxiety. Fruit is packed right in 
jars and put into the oven. You mere- 
ly set the Oven Heat Control and 
steady, even heat preserves the fruit's 
firmness, its delicious fruit-flavor and 
color. Jams and jellies also are well 
preserved by this cool, simple way. 

Visit the range displays and see the 
Oven Heat Control on the new Gas 
Ranges. 




"PACIFIC SEHVTCI- 



Pacific Gas and electric Company 

Owned • Operated • Managed 
by Calijomians 

219-827 



©well's 

^"""-^ NATIONAL CREST 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1.800.000 cops were served at the 
Panama-Pacific International Exposition 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 6, 1927 



Fallen Leaf Lodge 

The Ideal Tahoe Resort 

Located on Fallen Leaf Lake. 
Five miles from the State High- 
way. In the center of a Wonder- 
land of Mountains, Lakes 
and Streams. 

(jood Jishing* Hiking f 'Boating 

Comfortable rooms, tents and cottages 

— with and without private bath; and 

famous dining room service, combine 

to make the Lodge a popular 

vacation spot. 

MRS. W. W. PRICE 

Fallen Leaf P. 0., Lake Tahoe, Calif. 



WHEN IN PANAMA 
MAKE 

HOTEL CENTRAL 

Cathedral Plaza 

YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 

Andrew Johnston, Manager 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 CLARA STREET— GARFIELD 844 




PHONE 

(JKAYSTONE240 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 5) 

Luncheon-Bridge 

Mrs. Winston R. Wheatly of San 
Francisco was hostess to a number 
of friends at a luncheon at the Hotel 
Whitcomb Tuesday, July 26, in honor 
of Mrs. Fred Uhl, Jr., of Visalia, Cali- 
fornia. The luncheon table was at- 
tractive with vari-colored summer 
blooms and dainty place cards. 
Bridge was enjoyed during the after- 
noon. Those in attendance were Mrs. 
Arthur L. Watson, Mrs. F. E. Hajek, 
Mrs. C. M. Greenwood, Mrs. Frank L. 
Ryon, Mrs. S. L. Jacobs, Mrs. Wilbur 
Krogh, Mrs. Lon M. Walker and Mrs. 
Norman Van Iderstine of Stockton ; 
Mrs. Charles Merz of Marysville, and 
Miss Rose Barrett of Sacramento. 



The Women's Traffic Club of San 
Francisco, consisting of representa- 
tives from railroad companies, steam- 
ship companies and traffic depart- 
ments of various industrial concerns 
held a luncheon and card party in the 
Spanish Room of Hotel Mark Hop- 
kins on Saturday, July 23rd. This club 
was organized for educational pur- 
poses only, and at each meeting there 
is a speaker who is an authority on 
matters pertaining to traffic — the 
movement of freight, either by 
steamer or rail. 



Prominent People 

Nathan Strauss and Judge Grover 
Moscowitz, two prominent members 
of New York social and political life 
are at Hotel Mark Hopkins. They are 
here for pleasure and rest, renewing 
acquaintances and enjoying the beau- 
ties of this part of California. 



Mae Sewall, who has been with the 
San Francisco Opera Company for 
three years, will be the soloist this 
week at the Hotel Mark Hopkins Sun- 
day evening concert. Miss Sewall is 
a pupil of Madame Kristoffy and has 
a fine record on the concert as well as 
the operatic stage. 



Dr. N. W. Matson of Portland, Ore- 
gon, left Portland early Thursday 
morning and had lunch at the Mark 
Hopkins on Thursday— making the 
trip by aeroplane. He was very en- 
thusiastic about the trip. 



Dr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Monaghan and 
Mrs. Frank A. Brown from Hotel Mc- 
Alpine, New York, have made reser- 
vations at Hotel Mark Hopkins for 
August. 



Brockway, 

Lake 

Tahoe 

gOLF. . . 

All Grass Greens 
and Grass 
Jairways 

Swimming, natural hot 
water; dancing; horse- 
back riding; boating; 
fishing; tennis. For in- 
formation and rates, 
write or wire 



H. O. COMSTOCK, 

M A N ACER 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
active, Hot Sulphur Water. Tub Baths and 
Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN, Agua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judah 



CALIENTE VILLA 

Family Resort 

CARL STEFFEN, Prop. 



French and Italian Dinners Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

Four Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, 

Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4P4 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The Finest Meals in the 
VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms — Clean Linen — Clean Everything 
Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

TELEPHONE 110 



August 6, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 




]M®KyTfi£>L£ 




"CARMEL, ITS HISTORY, LIFE 
AND SAINTS. J. P. Kennedy & 
Sons, New York. $3.00. 

An inspired Carmelite Nun of 
Santa Clara, endowed with marked 
literary skill, has dipped her pen deep 
in the wells of spirituality to reveal 
to the outside world an enchanting 
word picture of the life inside the 
walled cloisters of the most ancient 
contemplative religious Order. The 
gifted author must remain unknown, 
consistent with the self-effacement of 
all Carmelites. Her work is sponsored 
by "The Discalced Carmelites of Bos- 
ton and Santa Clara. 

The new book, "Carmel, Its His- 
tory, Spirit and Saints," just pub- 
lished, authoritatively answers all 
questions so frequently asked about 
the history, purpose and meaning of 
Carmel, and the personal lives of its 
Saints. The writer succeeds remark- 
ably in treating a supposedly heavy 
subject with bright touches that ren- 
der the book intensely interesting 
even for lay readers who hold them- 
selves outside the realm of religion. 

The graphic history of Carmel, 
from its dawn in Palestine, in what 
is known as the prophetic era, down 
to its latest monasteries in America, 
spreads a picturesque background for 
the work, while the spirit of the Or- 
der, mingled with the lives of its 
Saints and Martyrs, sheds lustre 
through every page. 

Carmel's dramatic story moves 
swiftlv across the history of all na- 
tions. 'the darkness of its difficulties 
brightened with anecdotes reflecting 
the aureole of sanctity that has at- 
tached to the Order and endured with 
it through all the vicissitudes of the 
ages and unto its greatest triumphs. 
The book contains narration of much 
that is not generally known of the 
so-called mysterious Carmel. 

Orders for the book will lie received 
at the Carmelite Monastery. Santa 
Clara. California. The price is $3.00 
and postage. It may also lie had at 
hook stores, or from V. ■^■ Kennedy & 
Sons, publishers, New York City. 

* * * 
STORIES OF PORTO RICO, by Eliza- 
beth Kneipple Van Deusen, Ph. B. 
Silver. Kurdett and Company, New 
York, publishers. 

A woman of versatile talents, this 
Elizabeth Van Deusen. who. incident- 
ally, is Supervisor of English, in the 



Edited by Eleanore F. Ross 

Department of Education, San Juan, 
Porto Rico. 

Primarily, a writer of descriptive 
verse, exquisite in its sensuous color, 
the author has compiled a series of 
short and instructive stories into one 
volume, which has been accepted by 
the Porto Rican Board of Education 
as a text book for the seventh and 
eighth grades of the public schools. 

Many Spanish names of persons 
and things occur in the .pages of 
"Stories of Porto Rico," for, as Juan 
B. Huyke, Commissioner of Educa- 
tion in San Juan says: "The author 
recognizes that our Spanish language, 
as well as every other, has its own pe- 
culiar terminology. For, even though 
we speak English correctly, our con- 
versation will always require certain 
of our words and idioms to convey 
the exact meaning of that which is 
peculiarly ours, and which in our na- 
tive tongue alone has true vitality." 

Scattered through this little vol- 
ume which has proved to be not only 
authentic as regards Spanish customs 
and characteristics, but also very in- 
teresting reading to the dweller out- 
side as well as inside of Porto Rico, 
are some of Miss Van Deusen's best 
poems, — telling of exotic and alluring 
Porto Rican places, flowers, sunsets, 
moon-drenched scenes so vividly that 
one can almost imagine one's self 
among them. 

* * * 

New Appointments for Santa Fe 

L. R. Everett has been appointed 
assistant general passenger agent of 
the Santa Fe railway at San Fran- 
cisco, succeeding J. F. Moses, who re- 
signed to enter another field of en- 
deavor. The announcemnt of the ap- 
pointment today was made by Jas. B. 
Duffy, general passenger agent of 
the Coast Lines, Los Angeles. 

Everett received his education in 
Los Angeles schools and first entered 
the service of the Santa Fe as rate 
clerk in the freight offices at Los An- 
geles in 1901. He was made traveling 
agent at Santa Barbara in 1906. and 
early in 1909 he came to San Fran- 
cisco. Again returning to Santa Bar- 
bara as general agent, he served in 
that capacity until his appointment 
to the San Bernardino district. 

The selection of G. E. Harrison, as- 
sistant industrial agent at Los An- 
geles as Everett's successor, also was 
announced by Mr. Duffy. Both ap- 
pointments are effective August 1st. 




S. A. LOVEJOY 

WILL BRING 

ORDER 
Out of Chaos! 

In your Books, 
Financial Statementa 
Income Tax Reports 

Expert Auditor 

PART-TIME SERVICE 

268 Market St., Room 101 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter 
can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 



Park Lane Maisonettes 

5 to 8 Rooms with 2 to 5 Baths 

Magnificent view. Every service, from 
doorman to valet. Furnished or un- 
furnished. Garage. Class A steel 
frame building. 

"Maaonnetti " has il<<- elegance of a mansion with 
all conveniences oj an apartment house. 

PARK LANE APARTMENTS 

1 Hill Sacramento Street 
Diagonally Across from Hotel Fairmont 




PHCTDO GRAPHS 
QsLij/e JForeve 



Forever 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 6, 1927 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 



35^. «_ 




C. J. Pennington 

"Hits and Bits of The Argentine" 
will be the National Broadcasting 
Company presentation over the Pa- 
cific Coast Network for Tuesday eve- 
ning, August 16, from 9 to 10 p. m. 

A program has been arranged of 
songs and orchestral numbers typi- 
cally of the Argentine. The tango, of 
which the Argentine is justly proud, 
it being the most popular type of 
music, will be featured on the pro- 
gram. Among the numbers to be 
played will be "El Chocolo," "Argen- 
tine Nights," and "Mio Vida." 



"Courting on the Old Mill Pond" 
will be a new feature on the Memory 
Lane program over the Pacific Coast 
Network of stations Friday, August 
19, between 9 and 10 p. m. 

The scene on the mill pond will be 
represented in songs and descriptive 
music reminiscent of the old days. 

Some of the songs this evening are 
"Down in Jungle Town," "Every- 
body's Doing It," "He Walked Right 
In and Walked Right Out Again," 
and "Dearie." Descriptive pieces by 
the orchestra will include "At the 
County Fair," "The Local Train" and 
"The Horse Race." 



The National Players, under the 
direction of William Rainey will pre- 
sent two short plays Wednesday, 
August 17, from 9 to 10 p. m. over 
the Pacific Coast Network. The first 
is the dramalog "The Happy Prince," 
by Oscar Wilde with incidental music 
by Liza Lehmann. "The Sentimental 
Journey," by Harold Simpson will be 
the second presentation. 

"The Happy Prince" is a fantasy 
with music that is particularly well 



adapted to radio presentation. "The 
Sentimental Journey" is a jolly little 
comedy depicting married life in 
three stages. First the honeymoon, 
next after 14 years and then after 
40 years. The three stages are done 
by three characters, The Wife, The 
Husband and a Waiter. 

"The Red Hussar" will be the light 
opera presentation of the National 
Broadcasting Company under the di- 
rection of Max Dolin Friday, August 
18, from. 9 to 10 p. m. 

This is a comedy opera in three 
acts by Edward Solomon. It was first 
produced at the Lyric Theater in 
London in 1889. 

The action takes place during the 
reign of Queen Ann, at a time when 
England was at war with France and 
calling recruits for her army. The 
scenes are laid in England and Flan- 
ders. 

Ralph Rodney, once a wealthy gen- 
tleman, joins the regiment of Cor- 
poral Bundy, and goes to the English 
camp in Flanders. Rodney is in love 
with a young girl, Kitty Carrol, who 
follows the army to the continent. 
Rodney, disguised as a German girl, 
secretly leaves the camp to meet his 
sweetheart, but his commanding offi- 
cer finds that he has left and sen- 
tences him to imprisonment. Bar- 
bara, a girl with whom his command- 
ing officer is in love, purchases Rod- 
ney's freedom and so all ends happily. 



Radiotorial 

One of the most intertsing series of 
talks on the air is on KFI each Mon- 
day evening on the 6:15 Radiotorial 
Period, when Senator George Wilder 
Cartwright takes the microphone. 
Mr. Cartwright is the author of a 
book, "The Voice of America," which 
is dedicated to the upholding of the 
National Constitutions, and while his 
KFI addresses are not taken directly 
from the book, they are concerned 
with the various aspects of this gen- 
eral subject. The Senator is a clear 
thinker, non-political, and is doing a 
great deal in the moulding of public- 
opinion along the lines of practical 
patriotism. 



Pennsylvania Mail Swamps KFI 

For the fourth consecutive year, 
Pennsylvania leads the field in num- 
ber of letters written to KFI, Los An- 



geles, with California second, New 
York third, and Illinois fourth. It is 
a singular fact that the total number 
of letters received from citizens of 
Pennsylvania, some 2600 miles dis- 
tant, is almost twice the number 
written from the home State, Califor- 
nia. 

Only 2 per cent of the mail received 
by KFI is uncomplimentary to that I 
station, its programs or artists. This I 
indicates one of two things: either I 
KFI programs are usually excellent, I 
or the audience is most complacent. I 
KFI makes a point of welcoming I 
criticism and suggestions in order to 
increase the quality of its presenta- I 
tions. 



Before forty minutes had elapsed 
after Nellie Callender Mills, radio 
violinist, received a wire from her 
parents in Minneapolis requesting 
two of their favorite musical selec- 
tions, she had arranged with KFI to 
get on a program, rushed to the KFI 
studio, played the numbers, returned 
to her home and received another 
wire from them in appreciation of 
the solos. 



Governor Young Praises Exposition 

Commendation of the Pacific For- 
eign Trade and Travel Exposition has 
been given by Hon. C. C. Young, gov- 
ernor of California, in a message to 
the Foreign Trade Club, which is 
sponsoring the event. The State's 
chief executive declares that the con- 
tinued development of world trade is 
of permanent importance to Califor- 
nia's prosperity. 

In his statement. Governor Young 
says: "I heartily commend the efforts 
to assemble together the material in- 
terests of the Pan-Pacific countries in 
the Pacific Foreign Trade and Travel 
Exposition to be held in San Fran- 
cisco during November. 1927, and I 
am confident the result will amply 
justify this splendid enterprise." 

The Civic Auditorium will be the 
scene of the exposition, which is to be 
held from November 11th to 20th. 
"There will be exhibits representing 
many different countries." says Wil- 
liam D'Egilbert, director general of 
the exposition, "and colorful enter- 
tainment features are being ar- 
ranged. It is expected that the at- 
tendance will exceed 200,000." 



August 6, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



RADIO PROGRAMS 



Station 
KMTR— Los Angeles 

KLX— Oakland 

KGW— Portland 

KFI — Los Angeles 



wavelength 

(meters) 

526. 

50S.2 

491.5 

.467 



KFRC — San Francisco .. 454 3 

KFOA— Seattle 447*5 

KFSD— San Diego 440. 9 

KPO — San Francisco ..422.3 

KHJ — Los Angeles 405.2 

KGO — Oakland 394*4 

KJR— Seattle '''''''384*6 

KHQ — Spokane 370.2 

KFWB — Los Angeles .361.2 

KNX — Los Angeles 336.9 

KOA — Denver .. 325*9 

KOIN— Portland .. 319* 

KPSN— Pasadena "!315*6 

KYA — San Francisco 309 1 

KOMO— Seattle ""305*8 

KSL— Salt Lake 302*8 

KOWW— Walla Walla Z'.Z"''*M»'8 

KQW — San Jose 296.9 

KTBI — Los Angeles 288 3 

KTAB— Oakland 280 2 

KTCL— Seattle .. ...''*277*6 

KFWI — San Francisco 267*7 

KGA — Spokane 260*7 

KFUS— Oakland ......'.'.'.' 256*3 

KRE — Berkeley 256 3 

KZM— Oakland I245.*8 

KLS — Oakland 245*8 

KEX— Portland 239*9 

KFWM— Oakland 236.1 

KJBS — San Francisco 220 4 

KGTT— San Francisco ... .'*' "206*5 



Power 

(watts) 

500 

500 

1000 

5000 

50 

1000 

500 

1000 

500 

5000 

2500 

1000 

500 

500 

5000 

1000 

1000 

500 

1000 

1000 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

2000 

50 

100 

100 

200 

2500 

500 

50 

50 



9:00 am— KFUS. 

10 :00 am— KFI, KNX. KTAB. 
10:30 am— KGW. KFI. KTAB. 

11 :00 am— KTAB, KGO. KFUS. KYA, KOA. KGW 

KFI, KGA. 
12:00 m— KGW. KGA. 

1:00 pm— KFWI. 

2:00 pm— KNX. 

3 :00 pm— KPO. KGTT, KNX. 

4:00 pm— KGO. KGTT, KNX. 

5:00 pm— KNX. KFI. 

6:00 pm— KPO. KOA. KNX. KFI. 

0:30 pm— KPO. KGO. KNX, KFI. 

7:(in pm KPO, KGO, KNX. KFI. 

7 :30 pm— KPO. KGO. KGTT. KYA, KGW, KNX, KFI, 

8:00pm- KPO, KGO, KGTT. KFWI, KOA. KGW, 
KNX. KFI, KTAB. 

9:00 pm— KPO. KGO. KGTT. KOA. KGW, KNX. 

KFI. KFWB. 
10:0(1 pm — KGW. KFI. KFWB. 
11 :00 nm. 



:00 am- 

:00 am 
:0(l am 
Bin 



10:30 am 

11 :0(I am 
11 :30 am 
[8:00 m 

l: ;8 n 



:im pm 
: :O0 pm 
: l00 pm 

:O0 pm 
. :O0 pm 

i :.u< pm 

; :II0 pm 
:00 pm 

:8Q pm 

i :00 pm 

1 :00 pm— 

i 00 m 

: pi 



KPO, KNX. 

KPO. KFWI. KNX, 

KNX. KTAB, KJBS. 

KFUS. KFWI. KOA, KGW. KFOA. KNX. 

KJBS, KTAB. KFWB. 

KPO. KI.X. KFWI. KOA. KGW. KNX, 

KJBS. 

KFWI. KYA, KOA, KGW, KGA, KJBS. 

Kill, KGO. KYA. KGA, 

KPO. KFWI. KYA. KFOA, KGA, KFWB. 

KPO, Kilo, KGTT. KYA, KNX. KGA. 

KFWB. 

K in. KGO. KYA. KFWB. 

KI'U B, KFOA. KNX. KJBS. 

KNX. KJBS. 

KPO. KGO. KFWI. KFOA, KNX. 

KTAB, KFWB, KPO. KFWI. KOA. KNX. 

KTAB, KFWB, KPO. KGO. KI.X. KFWI. 

KYA, KFI. KNX. KGA. 

KTAB. KFWI!. KPO. KGO, KIN. KFWI. 

KX \. KGW KFI, KFOA. KNX. KGA 

KTAB, KFWB. KPO, KGO, KLX, KFWI, 

KX V KOA. KFI. KFOA. KNX, I 

KFWB. KOA, KGW KFI, KFOA. KNX. 

KGA. 

KGA. KTAB, KFWB. KPO. KGO. KLX, 

KFWI. KX \, KOA. KGW. KFI, KFOA. 

KNX. 

.. I IB KFWB. KPO. KI.X. KFWI. KYA. 

KGW, KFI, knx 

W II, KPO. KFWI, KX V KGW. KFI. 
KNX 

KFWI, KYA, KGW , KNX. 



8:00 am 
9 :00 am - 

10 :30 am 

11 :00 am- 

11:30 am 
12:00 m- 

111(0 pm 

1 :00 pm- 
2:00 pm 

3 :00 pm 



KNX. KFWI. KPO 

KNX, KFWI. KPO 

KNX, KTAB, K.IPS 

KNX. KGW. KFWB. KPO. KTAB. KJBS. 

KNX. KGW, KYA. KFWI, KPO. KJBS. 

KGA. KGW, KOA. KFWB. KYA. KFWI. 

KJBS. 

KGA. KO V KGO, KPO 

KGA. KNX. KFOA, KOA. KFWB. KYA. 

KFWI. KGO. KPO 

KFOA. KFWI1. KX\ KGTT. KGO. 

KFWB KX A. KFWI. KGO. KPO. 
KGA KNX. KFOA KGW, KOA. KFWB. 
KI.X. KGO. K.IPS 
KGA, KNX. KOA, KPO KJBS. 



I :00 pm— KNX, KFOA. KFWI. KGO. KPO. 

5:00 pm -KNX. KOA. KFWI!. KFWI. KPO. KTAB. 

5:30 pm— KNX. KFI, KFWB. KYA, KFWI. KLX. 

KPO. 
6:00 pm— KGA. KNX, KFOA, KFI. KGW. KFWB, 

KYA. KFWI. KGO. KPO, KTAB. 
7:00 pm— KNX, KFOA, KFI. KGW. KOA. KFWB, 

KYA. KFWI. KLX, KGO. KPO, KTAB. 
7:30 pm— KFWB. KNX, KFOA, KFI. KOA. 
S :00 pm— KGA. KNX, KFOA. KFI. KGW. KOA, 

KFWB. KYA, KFWI. KGTT. KGO. KPO. 

KTAB. 
9:00 pm— KNX. KFOA, KFI, KGW, KFWB, KYA. 

KFWI, KGTT. KGO. KPO. KTAR. 
0:00 pm— KNX. KFI, KGW, KFWB, KFWI, KGO, 

KPO. 
1 :00 pm— KGW. KFWI. 
2:00 pm— 



WEDNESDAY 

7:00 am— KNX, KPO, KFWI. 
8:00 am— KNX. KPO, KFWI. 
9:00 am— KNX. KTAB. KJBS. 
10:00 am— KGW. KFOA, KNX. KFWB, KFUS, KFWI, 

KTAB, KJBS. 
10:30 am— KGW, KNX, KPO. KLX. KFWI. KJBS. 
11:00 am— KGW, KGA. KPO, KFWI. KYA, KOA. 
11:30 am— KGA, KPO. KGO. KYA. KOA. 
12:00 m— KFOA. KGA, KFWB, KPO, KGO. KFWI, 

KYA, KOA. 
12:30 pm— KFOA. KNX, KGA. KFWB, KGO, KGTT. 
KFWI, KYA, 
1:00 pm— KFOA, KFWB. KPO. KFWI, KYA. 
2:00 pm— KFOA. KNX, KFWB, KGO, KLX, KJBS. 
3 :00 pm— KNX, KPO, KLX, KGTT, KJBS. 
4:00 pm— KFOA, KNX, KPO. KGO, KLX. 
5:00 pm— KOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO, KFWI, KTAB. 
5:30 pm— KOA. KFI, KNX, KGA, KFWB, KPO, 

KLX. KFWI, KYA. 
6:00 pm— KOA. KGW. KFI. KFOA, KNX, KGA, 

KFWB, KPO, KGO. KLX. KFWI. KYA. 
7:00 pm— KOA. KGW, KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB, 

KPO. KGO, KLX. KFWI, KYA, KTAB. 
7:30 pm— KNX. KFWB, KOA, KGW, KFI. KFOA. 
8:00 pm— KOA, KGW, KFI. KFOA. KNX. KGA. 

KFWB. KPO. KGO. KLX, KGTT, KFUS, 
KFWI. KYA, KTAB. 
9:00pm— KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB, KPO, 
KGO. KLX, KGTT, KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
10:00 pm— KFI. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KGO, KFWI. 
11:00 pm— KNX. KGO. KFWI. 
12:00 pm — 

THURSDAY 

7:00 am— KNX. KPO. KFWI. 
8:00 am— KNX, KPO, KFWI. 
9:00 am— KNX. KTAB. KJBS. 
10:00 am— KGW. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KFWI. KJBS. 
10:30 am— KGW, KNX, KPO. KFWI. KJBS. 
11:00 am— KOA. KGW, KNX. KGA. KFWI. KYA. 
11:30 am— KOA. KNX. KGA. KPO. KGO. KFWI. 

KYA. 
12:00 m— KOA. KFOA, KGA. KFWB. KPO, KGO, 

KFWI, KYA, 
12:80 pm KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KGO. KGTT. 
KFWI. KYA. 
1:00 pm KFOA, KNX, KFWB, KPO, KGO. KFWI. 

KYA. 
2:00 pm— KFOA, KNX. KFWB. KGO, KLX, KJBS. 
3:00pm— KOA. KNX. KFWI!, KPO. KJBS. 
I :00 pm— KOA. KFOA. KNX. KPO. KGO, KFWI. 
5:00pm -KNX. KFWB. KPO. KGO. KFWI, KTAB. 
5:311 pm— KFI. KNX. KGA. KFWB. KPO. KGO. 

KI.X. KFWI. KYA. 
6:00pm KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KGA. KFWB. 
KPO. KGO. KLX. KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
7:00pm KGW, KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB, 

KPO. KCO. KLX. KFWI. KYA. 
7:30 pm -KFI. KNX. KFWB, KGW. KFOA. 

B pm KGW. KFI. KFOA, KNX, KGA, KFWB, 

KPO. KGO. KFWI. KYA, KTAB. 
9:00 pm- -KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KPO. 

KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
111:011 pm KGW. KFI. KNX. KFWB. KPO. KFWI. 

11:00 pm— KGW, KNX. KFWI. 
12:00 pm 

FRIDAY 

i am KNX. KPO. KFWI. 

8:00am KNX. KPO. KFW l 

9:011 am — KNX. KTAB. KJBS. 
10:00am- KGW. KFOA. KNX. KFWB, KFUS. KFWI. 

KTAB. KJBS. 
10:80am— KGW, KNX. KOA, KPO. KLX. KFWI, 

KYA. KTAB. K.IBS. 
11:00am— KGW, KGA. KOA. KFWI. KYA. 
11:30am— KGA, KOA. KPO, KGO. KFWI. KYA. 
12:00 m — KFOA. KNX. KGA. KOA. KFWB. KPO. 

KGO. KFWI. KYA. 
12:30pm- KFOA. KNX. KGA. KFWB, KGO. KGTT, 
KYA. 
1:00pm— KFOA. KNX. KFWB. KGO. KFWI, KYA. 
p, KGW, KFOA. KNX, KFWB. KPO, KGO, 
KLX. KJBS. 
3:00 pm— KNX. KOA. KPO. KJBS. 
4:00pm KFOA. KNX. KPO. KGO. KFWI. 
5:00 pm— KNX. KOA. KFWB. KPO. KFWI. KTAB. 
pm- KFI. KNX. KGA. KOA. KFWB. KPO. 
KGO. KI.X. KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
8:00 pm— KGW, KFI. KFOA, KNX, KGA. KOA, 

KFWB, KPO. KGO. KFWI, KYA, KTAB. 
pm— KFI. KFOA. KNX. KOA. KFWB. KPO. 
KGO. KLX. KFWI. KYA. KTAB. 
7:30 pm— KFI. KNX. KOA. KFWB. KGXV. KFOA. 
i m- KGW. KFI. KNX, KGA. KOA. KFWB. 
KPO. KGO. KLX. KGTT. KFWI, KYA. 
KTAB. 
9:00pm— KGW. KFI. KFOA KNX. KOA. KFWB, 
KPO. KGO. KLX. KGTT. KFWI. KYA, 
KTAB. 



17 



:00pm KGW. KFI. KFOA. KNX, KFWB, KPO. 

KGO. KI.X. KFWI. K.IBS. 
:00pm KGW, KNX. KFWI. KFOA. 
:00 pm— 

SATURDAY 
:00 am— KNX. KPO. KFWI. 
:00 am— KNX, KPO, KFWI. 
:00am— KNX, KTAB, KJBS. 

:00 am— KGW. KNX. KFWB. KPO, KFWI, KJBS. 
:30 am— KNX, KOA. KPO, KFWI. KJBS 
:00 am— KGA, KOA. KFWI. KYA 
:30 am— KGA. KOA. KPO. KGO. KYA. 
:00 m— KNX, KGA. KOA. KFWB, KPO. KGO. 

KFWI. KYA. 
:30 pm— KNX. KFWB. KGO, KGTT. KYA. 
:00 pm— KFWB. KPO, KGO. KFWI, KYA. 
:00 pm— KNX, KFWB. KPO. KGO. KLX. KJBS. 
:00pm— KNX, KPO. KJBS. 
:00 pm— KNX, KPO, KGO. KFWI. 
:00 pm— KNX, KFWB, KPO, KFWI. 
:30 pm— KFI, KNX, KGA. KFWB. KPO. KFWI. 

KYA. 
:00 pm— KGW. KFI, KNX, KGA, KFWB, KPO, 

KFWI, KYA. 
:00 pm— KFI, KNX. KOA. KFWB, KPO, KLX. 

KFWI. KYA, KTAB. 
:30 pm— KFI. KNX, KOA, KFWB. 
:00 pm— KGW. KFI. KNX. KGA, KOA. KFWB. 

KPO. KGO. KFUS. KFWI, KYA. KTAB. 
:00 pm— KFI, KNX. KFWB, KPO, KGO. KFWI. 

KYA, KTAB. 
:00 pm— KGW, KFI, KNX, KFWB, KPO, KGO, 

KFWI. 
:00 pm— KGW, KFI, KNX, KPO, KGO. KFWI. 
:00 pm— KNX. KPO. KGO. KFWI. 
:00 am— KFWI. 
:00 am— KFWI. 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1864 

The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



CLUB 
AUTO SERVICE CO. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 

For All Occasions 

Day and Night 

City Sijrhtseeinjr ----- $3.00 per hour 

Shopping -------- 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxicab Rates 



PROSPECT 

4000 



585 Post. St.. 
San Francisco 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime. Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francigco. Calif. 

Call and D«lWtr in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 
Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office and Works: 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bide.) 

Phone Prospect M4S 

Work Callsd for and Delivered 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 6, 1927 



40*** 



Name 




PIONEER 



on a box of office 
stationery, whether 
it be typewriter pa- 
per or manuscript 
cover, means com- 
plete satisfaction. 
There is a grade for 
every need. Ask 
your printer or sta- 

_ _. .: =-,-_-..__ tioner to show you 

>'iJ^i:ILH:lJ.1JJ:Hf samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Doucjas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 



Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Max Rosenthal 

WHERE GOOD TAILORING 
COSTS LESS 

A choice selection of seasonable 

Woolens suitable for Formal, 

Sport and Business wear is 

now ready for your early 

consideration. 

527 POST ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

OPP. OLYMPIC CLUB 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 



Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. WELLER 
National Automobile Club 

American Types 

Automobile travel is taking its toll 
from the ranks of the American hobo, 
and is rapidly causing another type, 
that of the provincial youth, to di- 
minish. 

There was a time, before the ad- 
vent of economical touring by auto- 
mobile, when many a youth was pre- 
vented from extensive travel by finan- 
cial considerations. One of the ways 
of getting around this difficulty was 
that of joining a band of migratory 
wayfarers as it passed by the edge of 
town. While this method of travel 
was said to have been advantageous 
from a standpoint of leading a care- 
free life, there were many disadvan- 
tages such as lack of social position, 
failure to arrive on time at an in- 
tended destination and other such in- 
conveniences. 

With the coming of inexpensive 
transportation by automobiles, trans- 
continental highways, and a road sys- 
tem which has been metaphored as a 
mosquito netting covering the entire 
United States, traveling is a vastly 
different proposition. Nowadays, it 
is a rare youth who has not crossed 
the boundaries of his home State 
many times. 

Thousands of young men set out 
annually during vacation time, and 
tour the country from one end to the 
other. Many travel in small "cut- 
down" cars, carrying enough blan- 
kets and provisions to enable them to 
camp out. Some find odd jobs from 
time to time on their journey, and 



thus earn money to buy fuel and sup- 
plies for the next hop. In this way, 
education and experience are gained 
at a minimum of expense. Trips are 
planned in advance and points of his- 
toric and educational interest are in- 
cluded in the itenerary. This healthy 
method of combining recreation with 
education is said to have fostered 
more interest in history of States 
and sections than any other method 
of treatment. 

Another method whereby the youth 
of today gains travel experience is 
that of promoting a trip with the en- 
tire family in the family car. Such 
trips are often made on a somewhat 
more lavish scale, but any number of 
them are made economically each 
year. In this way, even the smaller 
children soon become experienced 
travelers. These trips are pre-ar- 
ranged, the routing usually being 
supplied by the touring department 
of an automobile club; stopovers and 
interesting locations are marked in 
advance and a large amount of ground 
is thus covered during a minimum 
period of time. 

Week-end trips out of State are 
easily made, especially in California 
where motoring is in season through- 
out the year. It is no longer a nov- 
elty for the country youth to drive 
to the large cities two or three times 
a month. 

Thus the provincial or "hick" is di- 
minishing as a type; thus fewer new 
members join the hobo fraternity. 
Both decreases are directly attributa- 
ble to the motor age. 



Trophy for Coronado Tournament 

Many San Francisco people have 
admired the beautiful silver trophy 
which has been exhibited for the past 
three weeks in the A. G. Spaulding 
Brothers sport goods store, the Cali- 
fornia Sport Shop and the St. Francis 
Hotel. This huge silver punch bowl 
is to be given outright, together with 
an equally attractive runner-up tro- 
phy and prizes for the various flights 
in the A. B. Spreckels amateur golf 
tournament to be played at Coronado 
Beach, California, August 23 to 26. 

The 1924 event was won by Willie 
Hunter, then an amateur, since which 
time Allen Moser of the Wilshire 
Country Club, Los Angeles, has 
walked off with two of the big punch 
bowls, winning in 1925 and 1926. It 
is doubtful if Moser will participate 
this summer, but it is expected that 
a field of nearly 200 players from all 
over the United States will tee off 
in the qualifying round August 23. 
Entries may be made by addressing 
Major Colin G. Ross, secretary, Cor- 
onado Country Club, Coronado Beach, 
California. The entrance fee is §5. 






August 6, 1927 

The Honolulu Flight 

Negotiating the Pacific Ocean to the little island of 
Oahu, and landing safely on the aviation field of Honolulu 

this is the lure for those who go over the sea in planes. 

Army and civilian pilots have already accomplished 
this feat, minus the incentive of the Dole prize, which is 
to be bestowed upon the lucky winner, during this month, 
for a continuous flight to Honolulu. 

There will be between 15 and 20 entrants for the Dole 
prize and much speculation is already evident as to how 
many will complete the trip. 

To have a number of planes start as scheduled, all fin- 
ishing safely in Honolulu, will be a stellar achievement in 
aviation for long distance flying. It certainly would place 
a very large feather in aviation's bonnet if the entire field 
entered for the Dole race, finished without mishap! 

From all indications the conquest of the vast stretches 
of the Pacific by airplane is up to the American aviators, 
and from proposed flights contemplated for future dates, 
it appears as if they would eventually reach all corners of 
the globe. 

A suggested flight to Australia has an undeniable sport- 
ing appeal, but would mean far less than a successful ef- 
fort to link the various American possessions in the Pa- 
cific together by so many different types of makes of ma- 
chines which are entered in the coming race. 

Even a flight from Honolulu to Guam, 3,842 miles, 
would be a record, and in addition would have real mili- 
tary significance with regard to the defense of America's 
possessions in the Pacific. 

The Australian flight would have an intense appeal by 
reasons of its length and the complications of tropical 
travel, but the line of American influence in the Pacific is 
San Francisco, Honolulu, Guam and Manila. Whatever is 
done along that line has deep political and military sig- 
nificance for the future. 

Commander Byrd would, it seems, have an opportunity 
to turn his talent and equipment to a task in the Pacific 
greater and fuller of meaning than anything yet accom- 
plished by any American aviator. 

Such a flight by Byrd might not compare with the sen- 
sational flight of Lindbergh's, nor create the excitement 
of the present race, but no air journey within the range 
of present endurance could hold more fascination for 
those who see in aircraft a means of communication be- 
tween widely separated points on the globe, with the ulti- 
mate welding together of the peoples and interests in- 
volved. 



Aerial "rubberneck wagons" are the next thing on the 
program. These will be placed at the disposal of San 
Francisco within the next three weeks by a corporation 
which will also operate cabin airplanes regularly between 
this city and Del Monte. 

Mr. Robert Fowler, who is president and general man- 
ager of the California Air Service. Inc.. which is about to 
launch this venture, states that a feature of this service 
will lie that every passenger will be insured for 810.000. 

The sight-seeing San Francisco trip will cost 825.00. 
Round trip to Del Monte. S45.00. 



Down to Brass Tacks 

Girls when they went out to swim. 

Once dressed like Mother Hubbard: 
Now they have a bolder whim: 

They dress more like her cupboard. 
— Wesleyan Wasp. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



"Ping" Bodie Day 

Appreciation of "Ping" Bodie's twenty years of effort 
towards keeping the great American game of baseball 
clean and above reproach, will be shown by his friends at 
Recreation Park, Saturday, August 27th. 

His excellent record and service to the game calls for 
recognition, and his many admirers will demonstrate the 
regard in which they hold Bodie in a most fitting way on 
this occasion at the beginning of the game on this date. 
Mr. Gus Olivia, the well-known wholesaler of green 
produce at 565 Clay street, is chairman of the committee 
which has been formed to carry out the program of the 
day, and all checks and contributions should be made 

payable to him. 

* * * 

Santa Maria Inn 

The following people have been guests at the Inn dur- 
ing the past week: 

Mrs. Peter B. Kyne and Mrs. R. C. Newell, both of San 
Francisco; Mrs. D. W. Clark of Ross; Mrs. H. L. Slosson 
Jr., of San Francisco; Mrs. M. E. Beggs of St. Louis, Mo. ; 
Mrs. J. W. Leavitt, Miss Helen Leavitt, J. W. Leavitt Jr., 
all of San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Brooks of San 
Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Bovey of San Francisco; 
Mr. and Mrs. M. A. McCann of Menlo Park ; Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. G. Mugan of San Francisco ; Mrs. R. J. Mallette and 
Bobby Mallette, both of Sacramento ; Mr. Chas. A. Storke 
of Santa Barbara ; Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Daley of San Fran- 
cisco ; Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Newhall and Miss Newhall, all 

of San Francisco. 

* * * 

A warning with regard to the extension of the system 
of instalment selling comes from the Credit Men's Asso- 
ciation, which believes that it should be carefully watched 
and at all times controlled by the best credit principles. 



Cut %mu- liasgUr &0&S 

ALEMITE 

EXPERT LUBRICATION MERE 
D RIVE . INJ 



925 OTarrell Street 
San Francisco 



LOU W. SARTOR. Proprielor 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing; and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasine — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 

Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco, Calif. 



GRAYSTONE 130 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage. 1361 Bash St. 

Management of WILLIAM SAUNDERS 



TRUNKS — RACKS — BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVENUE 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 6, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1858 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

JUNE 30th, 1927 

Assets $113,925,831.54 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $575,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haigrit and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought; FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued; CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND : NEW YORK ; PORTLAND, ORE. ; SEATTLE, 
WASH. : MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pipe and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS. PENSTOCKS. 

FLUMES. GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS. ETC. 

San Francisco. Calif. Los Angeles. Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



For Lease 

FIRE PROOF BUILDING 

TWO STORY AND BASEMENT 

257 - 259 MINNA STREET 
Bet. 3rd and 4th 

Suitable for Printing — Manufacturing or Storage 
Rent Reasonable 

c7 5 

CORNWALL, COLDWELL & BANKER 

57 Sutter Street San Francisco 



Finance 



San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange Publicity De- 
partment features Pacific Lighting as the most notable 
stock feature during recent days. On one day it soared to 
552, a new high. Realizing sales caused a reaction, so that 
the stock closed at 500, 26 points higher than the previ- 
ous close. 



The growth in wealth in the community may be gath- 
ered from the number of millionaires who have recently 
visited the Monterey Peninsula. One pressman writes: 
"The railroad siding at Del Monte looks like the scene of 
a national convention of private cars, there being over 
a half millions dollars worth of personal Pullmans now in 
evidence with more expected tomorrow." 



Figures recently published show that the loss of life by 
aviation during the past ten months, at the rate of 100 
miles per hour, averages one death for each 324,000 miles 
flown. That is a distance equivalent to thirteen and a 
half times around the world. Contrasting steam with 
this, the Southern Pacific steam trains travel a distance 
of 193,091 times around the world, without killing aj 
person. 



The Forest Service of the California District reports 
that extreme forest fire hazards are the result of low j 
humidity. The importance of this factor is indicated by] 
the fact that some insurance companies are now granting 
reduced rates on timberland in the Pacific Northwest, 
when the operator agrees to suspend logging operations 
for any period during which the relative humidity is be- 
low 30 per cent. 



The State Corporation Department issues a warning to 
housewives not to buy soap from people offering it for ' 
sale with a stock certificate as a bonus, such a scheme 
being now in operation. 



Chester H. Rowell, in a recent speech to the Common- 
wealth Club City Planning Organization, said : "Market 
Street, instead of being an avenue for traffic, has turned 
by actual count to be an obstruction to traffic. The great 
breadth of Market Street that was to make it easy to 
handle business upon it, is making your wife afraid to ! 
walk across Market Street to do business on the other 
side of it. And that makes it a very great handicap to 
the development of business values on Market Street." 
There seems to be a certain amount of special pleading in 
the foregoing statement. 



On the other hand, Maurice T. Dooling Jr., hit the mark 
very well at the same conference when he said : "The 
members of the Board of Supervisors have not the techni- 
cal ability, nor is there provided in the Charter a means 
for obtaining the trained assistance necessary to formu- 
late a plan for the proper construction of the city." 



The Department of Commerce at Washington estimates 
the population of California at 4,316,000 on July 1, 1926, 
and at 4,180,000 on July 1, 1925. The number of divorces 
in 1926 was 2.80 as against 2.54 in 1925. The number of 
marriages per 1000 of the population was 13.1 in 1926 as 
against 13.2 in 1925. 

Attempts to escape the operation of the fish and game 
laws are becoming increasingly unsuccessful. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Lurie and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 





Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c. 75c, SI. 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 



LA CASA BIGIN 

411 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



Lxajuj ImjujlLu, bruo^ 



490 POST ST., S. 

Garfield 234 

CLIFT HOTEL 

Prospect 4700 



RAMONA STUDIO. PALO ALTO 

Palo Alto 433 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Matson Nav. Co. Steamers 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

STERLING ANDERSON, Manager 




Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 




NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling. Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 





CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' Lunch II a.m. to 2 p.m. (a la carte). Private Dining Rooms 
for Banquets and Parties. Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 




1140 GEARY ST. "X~ TEL. GRAYSTONE 4266 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy- Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blacksmithing. 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



O'Parrell and 
Larkin Sin. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
firaystone 8100 



Weekdays, Luncheon $ .75 

(11:30 to 2 p. hi. I 
Dinner, Week Days & Sunday* 1.50 



No visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dininjr in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



Vacation Clothes! Send them to us and we'll 
■ send them back transportation prepaid. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 

250 Twelfth St. PHONE MARKET 916 

Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 



DR. B. FRANKLIN PEARCE 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

HOURS: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Streets, San Francisco 

PHONE GARFIELD 6394 



NOAH'S 
ARK 



93 Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 
S:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p.m. only 
CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Highway 





Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 






MME. M. S. E. LEE 






Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 




583 
In 


Post Street San Francisco 
Virginia Hotel Phone Franklin 2510 




14-Mile House 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN 8:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. 

Unsurpassed Cuisine 

CARL LEONHARDT 

Formerly of Golden Gate Park Casino 




CAROLINE JONES 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 

2:30 and Tea from 3 to 5 

Lxclusive use of room for club dinners 

334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 



Siin Francisco Storage Company prospects 

STORAGE i 

MOMMi. packing, shipping 

( ■ SUTTER At— imX. I UWawORTn 5TS. 




Antioch Bridge Route 



to 



Sacramento 

Is Now PAVED All the Way 



No Traffic Congestion No Delays 

The Cool, Quick Way 

Along the Sacramento River, Through 
the Netherlands of America 



From Oakland 
The Tunnel Road 



From Sacramento 
South on 21st Street 



H 



AMERICAN TOLL-BRIDGE 
COMPANY 

Owners and Operators of 
CARQUINEZ BRIDGE and ANTIOCH BRIDGE 

Tolls the Same on Both Bridges 
Autos, 60c Passengers, 10c 




Famous cuisine 
.. .thoughtful ser- 
vice . . . centrally lo- 
cated accommoda- 
tions win your heart* 
iest approval of the 
Alexandria. 
RATES per Day. Single. European Plan 
75 rooms with running water $2.00 to $3.00 
(Many with private toilet) 
380 rooms with bath $3.00 to S4.00 

2-15 rooms with bath $5.00 to $8.00 

For two persons, $3.00 tip 
Special rati i for parties 
number of large ami beautiful rooms and suites, 
some in period furnishings with grand piano, fireplace 
and bath. $10 up. Largo and well equipped sample rooms. 
Olftet special feature* include th>: famous Franco-Italian dining 
room, Peacock Coffee Shop — Alexandria de tuxi 
St HSi rvii e Restaurant. 

Hotel 

Alexandria. 

Los -Angeles 



ft* 



ALEXANDRIA HOTEL CO. 
E. C. Eppley Charles II. Hamilton 

President Vice-President ami Managing Director 

Tkt Alexandria is an affiliated unit o) the Eppley system o} hotels in thr 
MiddU West, and thr' Hamilton chain of hotels on tht Pacific Coast. 



*A 



SAIL TO NEW YORK 




SISTER SHIPS 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL 
and GAY HAVANA, en route 

Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropics 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail 
Liner with seven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and 
historic ports — Manzanillo. Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala: La Lib- 
ertad. Salvador; Corinto, Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone. See 
the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa. Cristobal and historic old Panama. 
Every cabin on a Panama Mail Liner is an outside one; each has an 
electric fan, and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. 
There is an orchestra for dancing; deck games and sports and salt water 
swimming tank. The Panama Mail is world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, includ- 
ing bed and meals on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return by 
rail (or vice versa) for as little as $380. (This price does not include berth 
and meals on trains.) Panama Mail Liners leave San Francisco and New 
York approximately every 21 days. Next sailings from San Francisco - 
SS ECUADOR. August 20th; SS COLOMBIA, September 17th From New 
York: SS COLOMBIA, August 13th; SS VENEZUELA. September 3rd. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
oi ticket agent, or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 

548 S. SPRING STREET 2 PINE STREET 10 HANOVER SQUARE 
LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 



THEA.B.SPRECKELS 

AMATEUR GOLF TOURNAMENT 
oAugust 23 to 26 

Winner receives outright 
one ot the finest trophies 
ever presented in an ama- 
teur golf event. An equally 
attractive trophy to run- 
ner-up and prizes in all 
flights. 

Summer Rates 

HOTEL DEL CORONADO 

As Low as $6.00 Per Day • American Plan 
in Effect. 

SWIMMING • AQUAPLANING . BOATING 
Dancing 

L E. CARLILE, SAN FRANCISCO AGENT 
2 PINE STREET Phone DOUGLAS 5600 



MEL. S. WRIGHT, Manager 
CORONADA BEACH CALIFORNIA 










$5.00 PER YEAR 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 




Saturday, August 13, 1927 



HM^^H^^^H 



LOS ANGELES 





Marin Hills 



FROM A PAINTING BY LOUIS E. REA 



'No tears 

Dim the sweet look that Nature wears." 
— Longfellow. 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 

Established 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, General Agent 
544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cai. 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 2342 



In Marvelous 
Marin 



Modern seven room home — 
situated in exclusive Winship 
Park District of Ross. Paved 
roads — beautiful wooded sur- 
roundings— 5 minutes walk 
from depot. One hour by train 
or auto from San Francisco. 
Excellent public and private 
schools within walking dis- 
tance. Price $15,000. 

Terms if desired 

Owner: Room 101-268 Market Street 
San Francisco 




Money cannot buy a £inei% 
more comfortable mattress 

THE AIRFLEX LUXURY b the down- 
iest, most yielding and most restful mattress 
you can buy at any price. Made of finest Mid- 
dling cotton obtainable and specially pro- 
cessed, it will retain its even surface for year) 
and years and years. A S46 re- 
tail value, sold direct to you bv^ 
the factory for 



35 



flirflexMattressCA 



•E DWAR.D 



L-ME ROSKEY ~ PRESIDENT 



1687 Market St. 



Above 12 th St., where Val- 
encia St. turns otC Market. 



On Russian Hill 



FOR RENT 



[Furnished or Unfurnished] 



Modern Apartment - Flat. Four Rooms (with extra 
sun-room suitable for Studio or Bed Room). 

Artistically Furnished — Marvelous Marine View 

— Sheltered from Winds and Fogs. 

1101 Filbert St., Cor. Leavenworth 

R. A. WILSON COMPANY 

369 BUSH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
or Phone Franklin 8271 




Established July 20, 1856 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

fhe San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott. Jr.. from 1884 to 1925. 
b now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 268 Market Street. San Francisco, California. Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, 
lalifornia, Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill. E. C, London. England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year. 

$5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year. $6.00 



M. cix 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., AUGUST 13, 1927 



No. 33 



South Africa 

By ERNEST F. RIXON 



The Karoo 

Within the first hundred miles after leaving Capetown 
bn the run to Kimberley and Johannesburg, the country 
commences to rise to the considerable altitudes which 
characterize the topography Great Karoo district, the 
country rising in a series of steplike terraces to the great 
plateaux of the interior, the vast pastoral plains of the 
Great and Little Karoo. At Worcester, 109 miles from 
Capetown, the altitude is 795 feet. At De Dooms, 129 
miles, 1,570 feet, at Touws River, 160 miles, 2,532 feet, 
thence varying to 5,735 feet at Johannesburg. 

The Karoo is almost 100,000 square miles in extent and 
forms a vast arid space where rain seldom falls. The 
scant vegetation, supported by sufficient underground 
moisture to sustain life, affords pasturage for millions of 
sheep. While affording little of a strictly scenic nature, 
the vast illimitable spaces afford a charm all their own. 
The traveler in South Africa will see vast stretches of 
open country and the senses must be schooled to a real- 
ization and appreciation of their charm. These vast 
spreading plains and low hills or "kopjes" are by no 
means without beauty, monotonous as they may at first 
appear. Dawn and sunsel touch them with rare colors 
and the nights are cool and radiant. Over all is the bril- 
liant African sunshine— a land of big distances and wide 
plains, not unlike the Canadian Prairies, though lacking, 
alas, their wonderful fertility. 

Kimberley 

A town built on diamonds, the very streets of which 
are diamond bearing, the site of the world's greatest 
diamond mines. From great shafts penetrating down- 
wards for thousands o( feel is produced the "blue ground 
from which is won by the medium of vast machinery the 
precious gems for a never-satisfied market. From the 
first operation to the pulsator tables on the grease of 
which with fascinating regularity drop gems, great and 
small, to the final sorting in the diamond house, the visi- 
tor is held in thrall. 

The "Big Hole." now abandoned, is one ot the largest 
man-made' craters known, from which diamonds to the 
value of millions of pounds sterling were taken for a long 
period of years. Its only rival is the Premier Diamond 
Mine outside Pretoria, where diamond recovery from an 
open mine will be witnessed, as distinct from the shaft 
mining now carried out at Kimberley. 

The entire output of diamonds is controlled by the 
Delieers Consolidated Diamond Mines. Ltd.. by whose 
Courtesy the visitor is enabled to witness every process in 
diamond recovery. It is well to remember that no one 



may possess a rough diamond without a police permit, 
and that it must be obtained from a licensed diamond 
dealer. Any infringements of this law mean imprison- 
ment and the law is rigorously applied. Arrangements 
have, however, been made with the detective department 
and the diamond syndicate for cruise members to be per- 
mitted to purchase rough diamonds. 

Kimberley, though hot in summer, has a healthy Karoo 
climate and is said to get more sunshine than any other 
town in the world. Some cotton is grown in the neighbor- 
hood and horse-breeding occupies a principal place in the 
general farming activities of the district. 

Bulawayo 

Freely translated, the name Bulawayo means "the place 
of killing," and Mosilikatze "the pathway of blood." Bar- 
barism and sheer savagery reigned unchecked until Cecil 
Rhodes, after superhuman effort and sheer cold courage, 
brought civilization into the wilds and today Bulawayo, 
the largest town in Rhodesia, stands as a living testi- 
mony to his courage and faith. 

Victoria Falls 

Victoria Falls, the great falls of the Zambesi River, the 
unrealized ambition of thousands, is without question one 
of the scenic masterpieces of the world, terrific in its 
force, awesome in the tremendous rush of its falling wa- 
ters and the majestic solitude of its gigantic gorges. The 
views from Danger Point, from the Knife Edge and the 
Rain Forest, are entrancing in their sheer beauty, while 
over all lies the spell of a majestic grandeur that holds 
the observer speechless, hearing stilled in the awful roar 
of its descending waters, the eyes blinded, the throat 
made breathless by the whirling spray descending from 
the very heavens. 

Inevitably comparison is sought with the great Falls of 
Niagara but each enjoys a distinction of its own, each re- 
mains a monarch unchallenged amongst Nature's mighty 
creations. While Victoria Falls is higher and wider and 
the volume of its roaring waters greater, it is not these 
matters of comparison, the mere data of statistics, that 
appeals to the observer. Beauty and majesty combine to 
render the Great Falls of the Zambesi a position quite 
unique amongst the great cataracts of the world. 

Victoria Falls was discovered by Dr. Livingstone, the 
great African explorer, in November. 1855. Known of old 
by its ancient name "Shongwe" or "boiling water in a 
j ot," its more modern native appelation "Mosi-oa-tunya," 
or "the smoke that thunders," conveys more nearly the 
poetry, the beauty and majesty of this terrific cataract. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 13, 1927 






A New Danger 

We are apparently on the edge of a boom in flying and 
very soon there will be an extraordinary demand for air- 
planes so that the new fashionable sport may be satisfac- 
torily enjoyed. But this new sport will have to be watched 
carefully if there is not to be a massacre of the innocents. 

At the Oakland airport a week ago a young man called 
Henry K. Axton was killed, under circumstances which 
deserve and we hope will have a thorough and searching 
enquiry. The plane was set on fire immediately after the 
accident. This was done purposely by one of the owners, 
who says, according to the daily press, that the purpose 
of this burning was: "to avoid adverse publicity. It would 
not have looked well to have pictures taken of the wreck. 
It would injure our business and it would have a bad 
psychological effect upon other student flyers." 

It is at least questionable whether the plane was safe. 
in the first place. It was admittedly an experimental 
plane and had none too good a reputation among those 
who are acquainted with plane requirements. Experi- 
mental or not, it killed a very fine young man, who was 
an engineering student at Stanford and whose social value 
at least required that he should not have been ruthlessly 
sacrificed. 

The young men who take to the air and develop this 
new human faculty of flying are the very pick of our 
race. They have qualities of endurance and courage, of 
bravery and daring which are of the greatest potential 
value to the nation. They are ready to risk their lives, 
but that is no reason why they should be needlessly sacri- 
ficed. The licensing and inspection of planes should be 
carefully carried out, proper protection given and traf- 
ficking in human life stopped. 



should be more closely observed and that laws which en- 
trench upon that individualism should be very closely 
and critically regarded. 

* * * 

Muddled Matrimony 

We are so eager to interfere that it is impossible for 
our legislators to keep their hands off anything where 
they can find an opportunity to muddle up the concerns 
of other people. Take the new attempt to prevent mar- 
riages by the introduction of the three day notice before 
a license will be issued. The result at this early date has 
been to cause a falling off in the number of licenses is- 
sued. More than that, it has already brought about at- 
tempted evasion by perjury, false statements as to age 
and residence and the like, and in addition has produced 
a marked tendency to elopement. 

Wherever else we go in the world we find a tendency to 
make marriage more accessible. The world in general ap- 
pears to have arrived at the conclusion that a hurried 
marriage is better than elopement and that to put im- 
pediments in the way of wedlock is greatly to increase 
the risks of living. The old system of a long notice of 
intended marriage was suitable for a static community, 
where a week or two made no difference. Nowadays in 
California three days may make a world of difference. 
With such general ownership of automobiles, it is no 
trick to run up to Reno and make the law ridiculous. 

The idea back of the legislation is a foolish concept 
that it is possible to apply reason to matrimony and that 
the marriage of young people may be made amenable to 
logic and foresight. But real marriage is, like birth and 
death, something which does not come by taking thought 
and which will not stay for all your care. There are re- 
gions which legislators cannot successfully invade. 



Individualism and Law 

If one listened to the radio last Sunday transmitting 
the speeches at the dedication of the bridge at Buffalo, he 
would have heard the strong and positive voice of Vice- 
President Dawes, which, indeed stood out conspicuously 
among the other voices. And if one followed the speech 
he would have heard the Vice-President say that Great 
Britain and the United States could not quarrel fatally 
because each of them stood for the principle of individual- 
ism under the law. 

That is all very well, and we presume it is quite true. 
But after all, the question is, how much individualism 
and how much law? South of that Canadian line we seem 
to be parting with much of our individualism and getting 
in exchange a very great amount of indifferent law. We 
find ourselves becoming more and more restrained and 
tired by the burdens which the law places on our indi- 
vidualism. If this sort of process continues, the argu- 
ment of Vice-President Dawes will have no weight, as 
the principle will not apply to the two civilizations. We 
shall have parted with our individualism in exchange for 
a whole collection of limiting laws. 

It is just at this point that we want again to register 
our disapproval of the change which is going on in the at- 
titude of the United States government, and to a greater 
extent in that of the governments of the separate states. 
We think that the dictum of the Vice-President that our 
principle is one based fundamentally on individualism 



Anglo-American Friendship 

The bridge dedicated on Sunday last at which the Vice- 
President of this great Republic and the Prince of Wales, 
heir to the crown of the greatest of Empires met, is very 
typical of the relations between the two peoples. The 
friendship of Britain and the United States rests upon a 
secure basis. Though there may be occasional rifts, the 
bridge is there and upon that bridge the representatives 
of the two peoples can always stand and pledge their 
mutual esteem even when they differ. 

This is very much to the point at this time, when the 
breakdown of the Geneva Conference with respect to 
naval armament reduction has created a great deal of 
wild talk, particularly in the European continental press. 
Some prominent German organs have seen in the result 
of the Geneva attempt a proof that relations are becom- 
ing strained between Britain and the United States and 
that there may some day be a break which will culminate 
in war. The wish is father to the thought. There is not 
the remotest chance of a war between the two peoples. 
The very existence of Canada, close to us, almost a part 
of us, is evidence to the contrary. 

We do not pretend to know the inside of the affairs at 
Geneva. It appears that both nations sent naval experts 
to the conference. Naval experts are rather kittle cattle. 
We have seen that exemplified in their attitude to our 
own Transbay Bridge. The naval experts evidently got 
into a theoretical discussion and broke up the game. 



August 13, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



There is nothing very dreadful about that. Next time we 
want an agreement; we should let both sides send busi- 
ness men and then we shall get an understanding. It is 
notable that one great British naval authority warned his 
government against sending admirals. He knew the breed. 

* # % 
Prohibition Fails 

Is it good to make a law and then wink at the infrac- 
tion of that law ? There is one question that every advo- 
cate of the demoncratic republican principles that lie at 
the root of our political system will enthusiastically an- 
swer in the negative. It is not good to make laws which 
are not enforced. Such a state of things tends to the 
breakdown of law altogether and creates lax behavior 
with respect to law and crime. This is precisely what has 
happened to the country at large; this is just the condi- 
tion in which our laws are' placed today with respect to 
the country in general. 

But, again, we ask: Is it good to make laws which can- 
not be enforced, even if all the forces of the community 
are placed behind them? This is a little harder question 
than the former, for, to this question one may reply that 
the law ought to be enforced will-nilly. This is the posi- 
tion of the Anti-Saloon League. The destructiveness of 
that position is seen in its effect upon the League itself. 
The League has been shown to be a dishonest, tyrannical, 
interfering, bluffing institution which has used the most 
corrupt methods and the basest motives in its endeavors 
to attain a place where it could enforce the unenforce- 
able. Beginning as a group of honest fanatics, the Anti- 
Saloon League has become a parasitical, hypocritical in- 
cubus. 

Meanwhile, the masses of the people are beginning to 
crudely make their own drinking material. The art of re- 
fined manufacture of beverages has declined, until the 
masses of our people are where they were about two hun- 
dred years ago, in that respect. The fine grapes are gone 
and the coarse grapes remain. These go East by the 

thousands of carloads. 

* * * 

Death of W. E. Creed 

The death of Wigginton E. Creed, after a brief illness, 
is a very distinct loss to the community and a marked 
setback "to present industrial development here. At the 
time of his death he was president of the Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company, one of the strongest and perhaps the 
best managed public utility corporation in the world. 

Mr. Creed died at fifty, far too early for one of his 
powers and usefulness. It may be stated with entire ac- 
curacy that he fell victim to his own energy and consci- 
entiousness and that the zeal and industry with which 
he pursued his work destroyed the physical basis and 
with it a most unusual and gifted mind. Such losses are 
Uneconomic in the most complete sense, they are wasteful 
and unnecessary. They must be stopped; for nothing can 
compensate a business or a community for the loss of a 
man such as this. In the death of W. I. Brobeck, a week 
or two ago, we had another example of the utter destruc- 
tiveness of that over-zealous pursuit of business. There 
is something radically wrong in the way in which our 
big r men approach their work. No other country pays 
such a toll as we do for this overdriven business industry. 

Wigginton E. Creed played a uniquely important role 
in the development of the East Bay District: first, as 
president of the East Hay Water Company. Beginning 
as a poor boy, from Fresno County, he made his way to 
the verv foremost position in public utilities organization. 
It is said that it was due to his work, perhaps in a greater 
e than to all other efforts taken together that Cali- 
fornia has won its position of supremacy in hydro-electric 
power. His motto was co-operation between business and 
the public. 



From Brighter Pens Than Oars 



Wise ones in Mexico who run for Presidency and lose 
will keep right on running. — Wall Street Journal. 

* * * 

The new King of Roumania is only five years of age, 
but that is plenty old enough for a modern King. — Dallas 

News. 

Another thing we admire about Colonel Lindbergh is 
that he doesn't seem to have been cured of anything yet 
in the patent-medicine advertisements. — Ohio State 

Journal. 

* * * 

Cal donned chaparajos and a cowboy hat, but getting 
the right steer will be more to the purpose. — Weston 
(Ore.) Leader. 

If politics makes strange bedfellows it is due to their 
fondness of the same bunk. — Florence (Ala.) Herald. 

* * * 

Wherever all these non-stop flyers are headed, they are 
all really trying to land on the first page. — Wichita Eagle. 

* * * 

Half of the world's supply of coffee is consumed in the 
United States in spite of what some of us have to drink 
at breakfast. — El Paso Times. 



President Coolidge has yet to appear in a girl-scout 
outfit, and a Ku Klux Klan nightshirt to ketch 'em acom- 
ing and agwine. — Louisville Courier-Journal. 



A popular song composer is a young man whose host of 
imitators died before he was born.— Detroit News. 



Disarmament is like a social function. Nobody wants 
to arrive until every one is there. — St. Paul Pioneer Press. 

* * * 

The Vienna mob burned the Palace of Justice and then 
went back to work to earn enough money to pay taxes 
for a new building. — St. Louis Star. 

* * * 

Probably Mr. Coolidge's idea in attending those rodeo 
performances was to catch onto the latest wrinkles in 
bull-dogging a donkey. — Macon Telegraph. 

* * * 

Tall Feather, an Indian Chief, is reported to have run 
from Chicago to Milwaukee, a distance of eighty-five 
miles, in nineteen hours. We don't blame him. — Punch. 
■ * * * 

Science can predict an eclipse of the sun years in ad- 
vance, but can not forecast a blowout over the week-end. 
—Brunswick (Ga.) Pilot. 

* * * 

If those who object to the publication of crime news on 
the front page will keep up supplied with Lindberghs, all 
will be satisfactory. Arkansas Gazette. 



A critic says of a musical comedy actress that she is 
without a peer. Owing to the brisk demand, there are 
probably not enough to go 'round. — London Opinion. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 13, 1927 






Society Adds Glamour 
To Palo Alto Horse Show 

Groups of society folks, from all 
parts of the State, have been enthu- 
siastic participants in the Palo Alto 
Horse Show on the Stanford Univer- 
sity Campus. 

Fashionables from the north and, 
also, from the southern cities, attired 
in their smartest sport frocks, gave 
a dash from their side lines. 

Box holders entertained visiting 
celebrities. Dinner parties, teas and 
any number of luncheons were addi- 
tional attractions for the social set 
during activities of the Horse Show. 

Many millionaire families were rep- 
resented in the entries. Horses owned 
by prominent Californians were en- 
tered in the various matches. Tradi- 
tional rivalry added zest to contests. 

Best of all, the Palo Alto Horse 
Show is being given for the benefit of 
the Stanford Home for Convalescent 
Children. 

* * * 

Jolly Hospitality 

Hospitality has prevailed all during 
the performances and the jolly par- 
ties, with many of society leaders 
acting as hosts and hostesses, revived 
the fame of California's social pres- 
tige. Handsome gowns worn by the 
women, and the latest from the 
tailors, by the men folks, certainly 
has created anew our standing for 
smartness and good grooming, on 
both sides of the turf line. 

The stadium of Stanford Univer- 
sity provided an adequate setting. 
* * * 

Campus Arena 

The arena which has been erected 
on the Stanford University Campus 
is ideal for this Horse Show. 

Tiers of boxes surround a substan- 
tially banked ring. 

There are twenty-five hundred 
grandstand seats behind the boxes 
and every seat supplies an unob- 
structed view of the arena. In fact 
every possible provision has been 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway. Balf-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



By Antoinette Arnold 

made for the comfort of those who 
attend. 

There is a matinee today, Satur- 
day, and another performance tonight 
— so don't miss seeing this marvelous 

Horse Show. 

* * * 

Smartly Attired 

"Aristocrat," coming from Wash- 
ington, was one of the most admired 
horses. He was ridden by Madelyn 
Mae McCleave, and he looked every 
bit the name he has had bestowed up- 
on him. 

Mrs. Sydney Dannebaum, one of 
the best known horeswomen of the 
West, competed in some of the most 
difficult feats of the Horse Show. 
Mrs. Dannebaum looked the perfec- 
tion of attire, too, in her stunning 
and "positively correct" attire. 

Mrs. William Cavalier of Piedmont 
wears her riding habit with ease and 
oh, how stunningly it fits her, too. 
Her steed is an equine king. 

One of the unusual entries which 
aroused considerable comment was 
"The Giggling Pony." He is owned 
by Dwan Monroe and proved a pet of 
the horse show, especially to his ad- 
mirer, Marian McDougall. 

* * * 

Beautiful Women Ride 
Handsome Steeds for Honors 

Two cleverly attired young women 
from the South were the center of ad- 
miration. Miss Cecilia Hoyt de Mille of 
Hollywood wore white riding trousers 
with a long dark coat, hat to match 
and a four-in-hand of the latest mode 
tied snugly around her neck over the 
white shirt. Her boots with tips of 
white, her gloves and boutonniere 
with the dash of color in kerchief 
was the magnet for admiring eyes. 

Miss Josephine Thomas of Beverly 
Hills wore a complete outfit of dark 
broadcloth, the skirt somewhat longer 
than many and her boots, though 
well fitting, were subdued in tone and 
texture. Miss De Mille and Miss 
Thomas were inseparable in their 
companionship throughout the entire 
event. 

* * * 

Pretty Girls and 
Petted Ponies 

Margery Cory of Berkeley looked 
perfectly charming in her outfit. She 
wore light riding breeches most of 
the time with a coat with considera- 
ble flare. Her hat was broad brimmed, 



and her tie varied in hue, according 
to the young lady's color scheme for 
the day. 

"Patsy," is her beloved pony's 
name — and no wonder he's such a 
pet. Miss Seville Shuey of Oakland 
wears gray a great deal, her entire 
habit, from tip to toe, almost match- 
ing exactly whatever color she 
chooses to wear. Her "Molly 0" is a 
real aristocrat of the turf. 

I am describing the women, of 
course, in these society columns, but 
"Carnation Silver," one of the three- 
gaited geldings of the show was dis- 
played mostly by his owner, John 
Stewart of Seattle. 

Didn't Diana Dollar look wonder- 
fully attractive on "Bright Eyes," 
the blue-ribbon pony? This clever 
little miss is simply "the last word" 
in riding togs and how that young 
lady can sit the saddle! 

Her pony is always correctly at- 
tired, too, every bit of his trappings 
being exactly up-to-date and smash- 

ingly smart. 

* * * 

Matrons in Boxes 

Many matrons from the million- 
aire set of Burlingame, San Mateo, 
Palo Alto, Hillsborough, San F'aii- 
cisco and Piedmont have occupied 
boxes during the Palo Alto Horse 
Show. Prominent among them are 
Mesdames Tobin Clark, Kate Nielson, 
George Barr Baker, William Cluff, 
Augustus Taylor, William Matson, P. 
E. Bowles, Henry J. Crocker, Stewart 
Lowery, Eugene Dumesnil, Margaret 
Heitman, E. S. Heller, Louis T. 
Sharon and G. H. Mendell Jr. 
* * * 

The Fashionable 

Prominent among California's most 
distinguished society folks in attend- 
ance this week at the Palo Alto Horse 
Show we note the following who sat 
in the boxes: Messrs and Mesdames 
Herbert Fleishhacker, J. D. Zeller- 
bach, P. M. Lonsdale, William H. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 8560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



August 13, 1927 

Pool, Cecil de Mille, Stanley Dollar, 
W. B. Weir, A. P. Giannini, J. 0. 
Tobin, Joseph D. Grant, A. E. Schwa- 
bacher, Alexander Hamilton, Harvey 
Snodgrass, Irving Hellman, Atholl 
McBean, G. Albert Lansburgh, C. H. 
Merrill, Mark A. McCann, Selah 
Chamberlain, Ross Ambler Curran, 
Charles Dunphy, John Drum, C. R. 
Walter, T. T. C. Gregory, C. R. Tobin, 
Sanford Goldstein, George C. Thomas 
Jr., Timothy Hopkins, Alfred Swiner- 
ton, L. C. Howard, Louis Oneal, Les- 
lie Moore, R. S. Moore and Ben R. 
Meyer. Doctors and Mesdames Syd- 
ney Dannebaum and John J. Miller. 

If you haven't found the time to go 
down to Palo Alto this week remem- 
ber there are two more performances, 
Saturday matinee and Saturday 
night. You will see more than seven 
hundred horses in this show. 

Polo matches will be among the at- 
tractions with Will S. Tevis Jr., presi- 
dent of the Bloomfield Hills Stock 
Farm sponsoring the two thousand 
dollar stake. 

Proceeds from the Palo Alto Horse 
Show, we remind you, is for the 
Stanford Home for Convalescent 
Children. 

* * * 

Engaged 

The engagement announcement 
this past week which aroused pleas- 
ant interest and surprise was that of 
Miss Alberto Morbio, daughter of 
Mrs. Pio Morbio and granddaughter 
of the late Adolph Sutro, to Dr. Harry 
J. Pruett. The betrothal news was 
made known at a luncheon given in 
the Woman's Athletic Club on Sutter 
street. 

The wedding is to take place in Oc- 
tober. 

Miss Morbio has had a most inter- 
esting life since her debut a few years 
ago. She went into training at Stan- 
ford Hospital a few years ago and 
there she first met her fiance. A year 
or two later Miss Morbio accompan- 
ied the Grenfell expedition to Labra- 
dor and there passed a year in so- 
ciological work. 

The relatives of the bride-to-be in- 
clude a sister. Mine. Marguerite de 
Maillv, now in Europe, and two 
brothers, Adolph and Carlo Sutro 
Morbio. 

Dr. Pruett is a son of Mrs. John 
Pruett of Fresno, where his father 
was a pioneer physician. He has two 
brothers, also doctors. Dr. John and 
Dr. Alvin Pruett. both practicing in 
San Francisco. He is a brother of 
Mrs. Thomas Giffen of Fresno and 

Mrs. Elton Hoffman of Reno. 

» * * 

Miss Lucy A. Penney of Paterson. 
Now Jersey, was hostess at a birth- 
da) dinner given at the Hotel Whit- 
comb in Drury Lane on Monday eve- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 
Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

500 Rooms 

Tariff: From $4 per day 



The marriage of Miss Mary C. Kil- 
day, daughter of Mrs. M. M. Kilday, 
to James T. Cotter, took place on 
Wednesday morning at 8:30 o'clock 
at the Mission Dolores Church, Father 
H. Campton officiating. 

Following the ceremony the imme- 
diate friends and relatives were 
guests at a wedding breakfast in the 
Italian Room of the Hotel Whitcomb. 

The attendants were Mrs. G. C. 
Ahern, the bride's sister, who was 
matron of honor and Mr. E. T. Cot- 
ter, brother of the groom, who acted 
as best man. The bride wore a dress 
of white satin with a lace veil and 
carried a bouquet of gardenias and 
lilies of the valley. After a short trip 
the couple will make their home in 
San Francisco. 



ning. Those invited to the affair were 
Miss L. Duryee of New York City, 
Mrs. Edith S. Todd of Philadelphia, 
Miss Bernice Hachmeister of Brook- 
lyn, and Mr. M.S. Lucas of New York 
City. 

$ £ $ 

The Garden of Hotel St. Francis 
was the center for a tea Saturday, 
July 30th, at which announcement 
was made of the engagement of Miss 
Livia B. Bianucci to Mr. Nicholas A. 
Buja. A large basket made up of in- 
dividual corsages of assorted flowers 
centered the table and the guests in- 
cluded: 

Misses Rene D. Bianucci, Ursula 
Frellson, Clelia Rispoli, Florence 
White, Kathleen Crothman, Evelyn 
Culverson, Evelyn Swanberg, Alfihld 
Swanson, Eileen Combs, Lillian Nel- 
son and Mrs. Edward Fliegle. 

* * * 
Married 

Miss Ella Christine Sorenson, 
daughter of Captain and Mrs. L. M. 
W. Sorensen, was married to Kenneth 
Clinton Williams on Wednesday eve- 
ning at 8 o'clock at the Grace Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, Reverend J. H. 
Williams officiating. 

The attendants were Miss Kather- 
ine Larson, maid of honor ; Roscoe 
Sorensen, best man ; Miss Helen Lan- 
glois and Mrs. B .C. Picetti, brides- 
maids, and Donald Thompson and 
Jarvis Williams, ushers. 

After the ceremony the immediate 
relatives and friends were entertained 
by the bride's parents at a supper in 
the Italian Room of the Whitcomb 
Hotel. 

The bride wore a bouffant dress of 
white satin, trimmed with orange 
blossoms, a tulle veil, and carried a 
shower of white roses and lilies of 
the valley. 

After a honeymoon in Canada, the 
young couple will return and make 
their home in Mendocino County. 



Pretty Bride 

At an impressive ceremony per- 
formed Thursday evening (August 
4) at Christ Church Lutheran, Miss 
Ada Koepke became the bride of Mr. 
Paul Warren Johnson. Only mem- 
bers and close relatives of the two 
families were present. 

The bride was given in marriage 
by her father, Mr. H. J. H. Koepke. 
Her gown was of white crepe, and the 
tulle bridal veil was held in place by 
a wreath of orange blossoms. She 
carried a shower bouquet of garde- 
nias and lilies of the valley. 

Mrs. Lee Sorensen, matron of 
honor, wore peach colored satin and 
carried a bouquet of bridesmaid's 
roses. 

Mr. Edward J. Koepke, brother of 
the bride, acted as best man. Mrs. 
Elsa Spencer, the bride's sister, ren- 
dered a vocal solo preceding the serv- 
ice. 

Immediately following the cere- 
mony the guests gathered at the Clift 
Hotel, where an attractively appoint- 
ed wedding supper was served. 

The young couple left on a honey- 
moon without disclosing their destin- 
ation, and upon their return will make 
their home in Berkeley. 



Mr. and Mrs. Le Roy Blessing of 
Honolulu are here following an ex- 
tended visit in Eastern cities, and are 
guests at the Clift Hotel. 

Their time in the East was divided 
between Washington, Chicago, where 
Mrs. Blessing pursued a special course 
of vocal study at the Normal conser- 
vatory, and Philadelphia, where they 
attended the national convention of 
the American Automobile Associa- 
tion, of which Mr. Blessing is secre- 
tary. 

The Blessings will sail for home 
shortly on the S. S. Matsonia. 
(Continued on page 12) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 13, 1927 




#LEj4SURE'SW4ND 



obey no wand bui pleasure's 

_ lorn Moone. 



Public Pronounce 
Movie Verdict 

Now, after all that has been said, 
of motion picture censorship — and 
what the public wants, and what 
they won't patronize, comes the ver- 
dict from the movie patrons, them- 
selves. 

The great "public opinion" of which 
we hear so much, has one great way 
of talking, and that is — through the 
box office. 

So, we find here in San Francisco, 
that the big motion picture houses 
along Market street, which have been 
giving us good pictures — superior 
pictures are "holding 'em out" every 
night. 

The St. Francis Theater, after re- 
peatedly telling us that "The Way of 
All Flesh" was to be followed by 
"Beau Geste," just kept on showing 
the first named picture. 
Why? Public demand! 
Packed houses at the St. Francis, 
where the Emil Jannings powerful 
story has thrilled thousands, and no 
doubt convinced hundreds — has had 
its counterpart in other motion pic- 

The Granada Theater, with "Met- 
ropolis," the drawing card, has broken 
even the "Topsy and Eva" record 
when the Duncan Sisters appeared in 
person, so we're told. Then, the War- 
field with Buster Keaton in "College" 
established a new record. While 
"Chang" at the California brought in 
such big returns at the box office 
that the managers meditated quite 
some time before making a change — 
even for so fine a picture as "The Big 
Parade." 

So, never say again, that the pub- 
lic doesn't want good pictures. It 
does, and when motion picture peo- 
ple give it something out-of-the-ordi- 
nary, the public in general fairly 
storm the movies. 

There is no talk quite so convinc- 
ing to producers, after all, as the cash 
register in determining the public 
pulse. 

It's a healthy pulse, too, as any one 

must admit! 

* * * 

Lurie 

"I Love You" will follow the run of 
"The Harem," now on its final week 
at the Lurie Theater, where Isobel 



By Josephine Young 

Elsom and Alan Brooks play the lead- 
ing roles. 

Avery Hopwood's comedy intro- 
duces many interesting twists with 
flashes of humor which keeps one 
laughing and intensely amused from 
start to finish. The clever farce will 
complete its engagement at the Lurie 
Theater Sunday night, August 21st, 
and those who have not yet had the 
pleasure of seeing it have this week's 
opportunity. 

Johnny Arthur, stage and screen 
star, will be the principal in "I Love 
You," his last appearance here being 
in "The Butter and Egg Man." 



Alcazar 

"The Alarm Clock," by Avery Hop- 
wood, an amusing farce-comedy of 
lively action and dashing fun, is now 
on the stage at the Henry Duffy Al- 
cazar Theater. 

Marion Lord is as captivatingly 
clever and funny in this play as she 
was in "Meet the Wife," which had a 
long run at the Alcazar. She essays 
the role of a country woman who 
falls victim to the jazz of Broadway 
and keeps up her merry mannerisms 
throughout the entire comedy. There 
is a lovable quality, too, about Mar- 
ion Lord — it is her sincerity and her 
humanness, I think. 

Thomas Chatterton is back again 
and does some fine work in his role 
of Bobby Brandon, who fails to recog- 
nize all warning against joy-life. 
Henry Duffy has brought another 
star to his popular playhouse, Char- 
lotte Treadway. Her part is import- 
ant. 

Walter B. Gilbert directs the play 
and the settings ; stage appointments 
and entire production are a credit to 
him. John Stokes, Alice Buchanan, C. 
Haviland Chappell, Robert Adams, 
William Macauley, Zeda Reed, Rich- 
ard Ellers and John Mackenzie are in 
the cast. 

* * * 

President 

"The Ghost Train" is still popular 
at the President where the Henry 
Duffy players pour out their full 
measure of merriment. Leneta Lane 
and Earl Lee head the cast, including 
John O'Hara, Lillian Dean, Ben Tag- 
gert, Dorothy LaMar, Joan Warner, 




Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"The Alarm Clock." new Henry Duffy produc- 
tion starring Marion Lord: Thomas Chatter- 
ton also in the cast. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 



"The Ghost Train." 
comedy. 



Henry Duffy mystery 



VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

Rosita, popular dancer and her Spanish Revue. 
Norman Phillips in "A Family Revue." featur- 
ing Norman, aged 10. Johnny Hines in "White 
Pants Willie." screen. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Nick Lucas. "Crooning Trouhadour"; Niohe, 
aquatic star; Albert Lewis presents Jean 
Adair and Co.; Other stars, Frank Davis. 
Adelc Darnell. "Birdseed Couple"; Connor 
Twins. Duci De Kerekjarto. royal violinist. 

Pantages, Market at Hyde 

Emil Jannings, Pola Negri in "Passion." 
Vaudeville octs on the program. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Pictures — Vaudeville. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Pictures — Vaudeville. 



ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 

California, Market at 4th 

"The Big Parade," famous war-time picture 
at popular prices. GIno Scveri conducting the 
California orchestra. 

Cameo. Market opp. Fifth street 

"Old Shoes," Sat.: "The Kinc of the Saddle." 
Sun.. Mon. : "Dream Street." Tues.. Wed., 
Thurs. : "Salome." Fri.. Sat. 



Casino. Ellis at Mason 



"The Speeding Venus" and "The Handsome 
Brute." doulile hill. Sat.; "The Manic Gar- 
den." Sun. 

Granada, Market at Jones 

"Rolled Stockings," Louise Brooks, James Hall. 
Maurice Gunsky in person. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th. 

"The Way of All Flesh" may continue another 
week, with Emil Jannings in the starring role. 
This remarkable picture will he followed by 
"Beau Geste" with change of program. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"The Stolen Bride," Billie Dove. Fanchon and 
Marco. "Masks," stage feature. Zilla Simpson. 
soprano singer. 

RESIDENCE DISTRICT 

Alhambra, Polk St., nr. Green 

"Marriage," Virginia Valli ; and "No Man's 
Gold," Tom Mix, double hill. Sat.: Laura La 
Plante, "Beware of Widows," Sun.; Charlev 
Murray and George Sidney, "Lost at the 
Front." Mon.. Tues., Wed. 



August 13, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Thomas Brower, Ronald Telfer, Hen- 
ry Caubisens and Westcott Clarke. 
This play is now entering its tenth 

week. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

Nick Lucas, "The Crooning Trouba- 
dour" and famous Brunswick record 
artist, is to be the headliner at the 
Orpheum Theater for the week begin- 
ning this Saturday matinee. Nick 
Lucas, with his guitar, will have a 
program of his record song hits. 

Other features on this all-new bill 
will include Duci De Kerekjarto, 
royal violinist virtuoso, with Maurice 
Eisner at the piano; Jean Adair, the 
famous character actress, and her 
company in "The Old Aristocrat" ; 
Frank Davis and Delia Darnell, "The 
Birdseed Couple," in a new farce com- 
edy entitled "Auto Row" ; Sidney 
Marion with Ottalie Corday, musical 
comedy highlights, in "Divertise- 
ments"; The Connor Twins, Thelma 
and Velma, with a song and dance of- 
fering ; Niobe, the international 
aquatic marvel; The Wonder Girl in 
a surprise novelty act, complete the 

program. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Rosita, one of the most popular 
dancers, appears at the Golden Gate 
Theater this week, assisted by her 
Spanish orchestra in a striking Span- 
ish revue with Paco Moreno and Pil- 
arcia in the act. 

Sharing headline honors will be 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Phillips of the 
George White "Scandals," with Nor- 
man Phillips Jr., in "A Family Re- 
vue," featuring young Phillips, ten 
years of age. Tempest and Dickin- 
son, comedians, are other headline 
stars. William and Weston and other 
Orpheum circuit stars are on the pro- 
gram. 

Johnny Hines in "White Pants 
Willie" is the feature of the screen 
with the comical screen actor in a 
"cyclone of mirth." Claude Sweeten 
and his Golden Gate orchestra give 
special musical numbers. 



Cameo 

The popular Cameo Theater on 
Market street, right opposite Fifth 
street, is to have some very specially 
attractive pictures this coming week. 
especially notable being the D. W. 
Griffith production. -Dream Street." 
in which Carol Dempster is the star. 
This is one of the splendid Griffith 
pictures with great dramatic work 
dominating the story. 

"Old Shoes" is on the screen Sat- 
urdav for the final showing and on 
Sunday will be screened "The King 
of the Saddle." which is a thrilling 
picture. "Salome" will be screened 



Friday of the coming week. News 
reels and many outstanding films are 
also screened. 

* * * 

Warfield 

"The Stolen Bride," starring Billie 
Dove, is the screen feature at the 
Warfield Theater, starting Saturday, 
in which the lovely star plays the 
part of a beautiful countess, with 
Lloyd Hughes playing opposite. 

The picture is a mixture of drama, 
action and court intrigue. A princess, 
a scheming prince, a loyal and hand- 
some peasant, a dancer with designs 
on a baron, and the baron jealous of 
the countess' admiration for the 
peasant, make up the fabric of the 
story through which the plot finds its 
way. 

Walt Roesner leads the orchestra 
and Nell Kelly will appear in her 
lively dance measures with other 
Fanchon and Marco attractions. 

* * * 

St. Francis 

Judging by the way the St. Francis 
Theater is still holding 'em out this 
week, as we go to press, there is every 
possibility that "The Way of All 
Flesh" may stay on for its sixth week. 
If it does, it will attain the high rec- 
ord of "The Merry Widow" and "Be- 
hind the Front," the two other films 
which share these honors for long 
runs. From all appearances it looks 
as if the present picture may stay on. 
Following this Emil Jannings' tri- 
umph of the screen will be shown 
that other famous story, "Beau 
Geste," with Ronald Colman, Neil 
Hamilton, Noah Beery and Alice 
Joyce as principals. 

* * * 

California 

"The Big Parade." a King Vidor 
production, is on the screen at the 
California with John Gilbert. Renee 
Adoree, Karl Dane. Tom O'Brien the 
principals, and Hobart Bosworth. 
Claire McDowell, Rosita Marstini, 
other stars in a picture which is rec- 
koned as an outstanding cinema pro- 
duction. 

This photoplay formerly was pre- 
sented at top notch prices, and now 
that we have another chance to see 
it at regular prices, the California 
Theater will no doubt have crowded 
performances. Humor, pathos and vi- 
brating war events punctuate the 
film and there is not one dull moment 
throughout all the thrilling story. 

John Gilbert is entirely different in 
this picture from that of any other 
in which he has appeared as star. 

Gino Severi provides high musical 
entertainment in concert selections 
with the "California orchestra." 
Grace Rickards and Frances Huntley 
are at the organ. 



Pant ages 

Emil Jannings, whose phenominal 
rise to fame is a matter of cinema 
history, will be on the screen this 
week at Pantages Theater with the 
exotic and emotional actress, Pola 
Negri, playing opposite in a picture 
entitled "Passion." 

The picture is an adaptation of the 
story of Countess Du Barry, with 
Emil Jannings appearing in the role 
of King Louis XIV. Ernst Lubitsch 
directed the picture. Vaudeville acts 

are additional attractions. 

* * * 

Summer Symphony 

Vladimir Shavitch, conductor of 
Symphony orchestras in South Ameri- 
ca, London, Paris and Berlin, and his 
wife, Tina Lerner, universally known 
as the world's great woman pianist, 
gave music-lovers an evening last 
Tuesday, at the ninth Summer Sym- 
phony concert, which will long be 
cherished as a "feast of elegance." 

Shavitch captivated 10,000 enthu- 
siastic people in the San Francisco 
Exposition Auditorium, many of 
whom 'rose and shouted "Bravo" as 
the program unfolded. 

Much has been said of Tina Lerner 
as a pianist, but to watch her play as 
well as to hear this glorious exponent 
of the piano was a privilege. She 
played the Grieg concerto for piano 
and orchestra, A. minor, as I never 
expect to hear it played again. It was 
a revelation, and she used no notes, 
nor did her husband, Vladimir Sha- 
vitch. Oh, the art of their work! 

"Don Juan," a Tone Poem by 
Strauss; "The Preludes," Liszt; and 
the Berlioz Overture, "Benvenuto 
Cellini" were played in Part 1 of the 
last Summer Symphony concert. 
Then came that remarkable Orches- 
tral Movement "Pacific 2-3-1" with 
its locomotive theme unlike anything 
we have ever heard before, realistic 
train interpretation — a sensation, 
most assuredly. "The Prelude to Lo- 
hengrin," and another Wagner num- 
ber. "Ride of the Valkyries" — and 
then all too soon the magnificent 
Symphony concert became a vibrat- 
ing memorv. 

* * * 

Granada 

"Rolled Stockings." featuring Para- 
mount Baby Stars of 1927, comes to 
the Granada Theater Saturday with 
Louise Brooks taking the role of a 
pretty co-ed. James Hall. Nancy Phil- 
lips. El Brindel. Richard Arlen and 
the screen favorite David Torrence 
are in the cast. 

It is the story of a family's white 
sheep and black sheep on the college 
campus. The California-Washington 
crew race held on the Oakland estu- 
ary forms one of the thrilling cli- 
maxes in the story. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 13, 192 






RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 







facturers of radio receiving sets and 
accessories will be represented. 

A feature of the show is to be a 
several day gathering here of radio 
dealers from all sections of the State. 
Plans have been completed for the 
decoration of Market street from the 
Ferry to the Civic Center in honor of 
these visitors. There will be special 
illumination of the city hall and au- 
ditorium for the event. Plans also call 
for the elaborate decoration and in- 
terior illumination of the auditorium. 



C. J. Pennington 

Radio Show 

The fourth annual Pacific Radio 
Show will put California on the map 
in terms of radio in a way that no 
other show of its kind has ever at- 
tempted, according to plans disclosed 
here yesterday by the Pacific Radio 
Trade Association, under whose aus- 
pices the big exhibit will be held in 
the auditorium here, August 20th to 
27 th. 

Arrangements have been effected 
for the simultaneous broadcasting of 
the show programs nightly over sta- 
tions scattered from Los Angeles to 
Seattle. This will be done from a 
glass enclosed broadcasting studio 
situated on the stage in the auditor- 
ium with all of the operations of the 
broadcasting and control rooms in 
full view of the audience. 

"California has always taken a 
leading part in radio development in 
the United States and we have had a 
desire to advertise this fact so that the 
entire Pacific Coast would be aware 
of this leadership," said Leo J. Mey- 
berg, chairman of the show commit- 
tee for the Radio Trade Association. 

Through the co-operation of the 
broadcasting stations around the bay 
the radio public will have an oppor- 
tunity to meet personally many radio 
stars of note. These will broadcast 
from the show studio and show visi- 
tors are to be permitted to meet the 
unseen artists of the air who enter- 
tain vast audiences nightly through 
the medium of the genie "radio." 

The show will be an example of the 
latest refinements and improvements 
in the products of America's young- 
est industry — radio. Scores of manu- 



Broadcasting Organ 

KPO's new 825,000 philharmonic 
organ, which was recently installed 
in the station's main studio, will be 
dedicated on Tuesday evening, Aug- 
ust 16 in an hour's recital of classical 
masterpieces by Uda Waldrop, the 
station's official organist, the pro- 
gram beginning at 8 o'clock. 

This great instrument, which is 
probably the first of its kind installed 
in a radio studio, was designed ac- 
cording to the specifications of Wal- 
drop and embodies his ideas as to the 
best tonal effects for radio reproduc- 
tion. While its tone is not particular- 
ly intended to be pleasing in straight 
organ work, it is voiced to make defin- 
ite impressions of definite character 
on a sensitive radio microphone. 

The layout of the tonal family in 
KPO's new organ runs more toward 
the orchestral than to the straight 
organ. The string family and flutes 
will be well represented. In the orches- 
tral families there will be the trum- 
pet, French horn, clarinet, English 
horn and oboe. 

According to the officials of the 
Welte Organ Company of New York, 
builders of the instrument, KPO's or- 
gan is the first to have been designed 
primarily for broadcasting. The man- 
agement of KPO has given organ 
music a prominent place in the sta- 
tion's programs, and has worked six 
years towards the objective of pos- 
sessing an instrument that could 
broadcast pipe organ music with true 
fidelity. 

Following the dedication of the new 
KPO organ on Tuesday evening, 
August 16, Waldrop will present a 
weekly recital from the station. The 
evening of the week and hour will be 
announced later by the KPO manage- 
ment. 



Opera on the Air 

The National Opera Company, un- 
der the direction of Max Dolin, wil 
present the opera "Carmen" Monday 
August 22nd, from 8 to 9 p. m. over 
the Pacific Coast Network. 

Bizet did not write "Carmen" until 
toward the end of his career. The 
work came in for so much criticism 
that he believed it a failure and died 
almost of a broken heart. The oppo- 
sition was largely racial — Bizet was 
a Jew — for as events proved "Car- 
men" was to share with "Faust" the 
distinction of being the most popular 
of all French operas. 

"Carmen" is founded on a novel by 
Prosper Merimee. It tells of the Span- 
ish gypsy "Carmen," a woman of au- 
dacious coquetry and charm, who, 
however, wild and dissolute she may 
have been, was yet faithful to the 
gypsy law. Don Jose first came to 
know her when she worked in a cigar- 
ette factory in Seville and was arrest- 
ed for stabbing another girl. As cor- 
poral of the guard he became so vic- 
timized by her daringly used charms 
that he aided in her escape and fled 
with her to the mountains. For her 
sake he became a deserter from the 
army and gave up his former sweet- 
heart to join the gypsy smugglers, 
among whom he became a Chieftain. 
But Carmen soon wearied of him in 
favor of Escamillo, a bull fighter. 
Running away from the gypsy camp 
and terrified by the warning of the ' 
cards that she is to meet her doom, 
Carmen goes to Seville. Don Jose 
goes in pursuit and after one last ap- 
peal stabs her just as Escamillo 
emerges in triumph from the bull 
ring, hoping to find his reward in 
Carmen's arms. Don Jose flings him- 
self upon the dead body of his lost 
love and in a last despairing cry as 
the gypsy's life blood pours from the 
wound. 



Rumanian automobile dealers have 
no such used car problems as those 
which harass their brothers in the 
United States and other countries. 
Used cars in Bucharest, the capital 
of Rumania, bring about 40 per cent 
more than they would in the United 
States. 



August 13, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Programs 



KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC. 



Sunday, August 14 

10 :00 a. m. — Morning Services direction of Los An- 
geles Church Federation. 

6:00 p. m.— Boris Myronoff. concert pianist. 

6:58 p.m. — Father Ricard's sunspot weather fore- 
cast. 

7 :00 p. m. — Aeolian organ recital. Alex Reilly at the 
console. 

8:00 p.m. — Packard classic hour. 

9.00 p. m. —National Broadcasting Company, Bible 
drama "Lot's Wife" broadcast over the Pacific 
Coast Network. 
10-00 p. m.— Billy Cox and his Packard Eight Orches- 
tra with the Dare Sisters, soloist. 



Monday, August 15 

5 -.30 p. m.— Carl Hansen, musical saw. 

6 :15 p. m. — -Radiotorial. 

6 :30 p. m. — Gamut Male Quartet. 

7:00 p.m. — Gene Johnston's Music Box Hour, Craig 

Leitch. tenor. Gene Johnston Trio. 
8:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company, Grand 

Opera. "Der Freischutz." 
9:00 p.m. — Classical program arranged by Alma 

Frances Gordon. 
10:00 p. m. — Purcell Mayer, violinist, and Lilyan 

Ariel, pianist. 



Tuesday, August 16 

5:30 p.m.— The Dragon Hawaiians. 

6:00 p. m.— Talk on the Hollywood Bowl Concerts by 
Sarah Ellen Barnes. 

6:30 p.m. — Vest Pocket program. 

6:15 p. m— Prof. Carl S. Knopf. 

7 :00 p. m— Los Angeles Fire Department Orchestra, 
and Helen Guest, soloist. 

8:00 p. m.— Song recital by Virginia Flohn and Rob- 
ert Hurd. 

9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company Hits 
and Bits of The Argentine." 
10:00 p.m. — Collegiate Aeolians Danch Orchestra. 

Wednesday, August 17 

5 :30 p. m.— Sebastians Cotton Club Orchestra. 

6:15 p.m.— Dr. George A. Cole, on the Radiotunnl 
Period. -.***_* 

6:80 p. m.— Bill Funk and his Packard Six Orchestra 
with Irene Langley. soloist. 

7 :30 p. m — Nick Harris, detective stories and talks. 

8*00 p. m.— California Petroleum Corporation pre- 
senting Paul Roberta. 

9:00 p.m. National Broadcasting Company drama, 

"The Happy Prince." 
10:00 p. in- Virginia McCoy, contra-contralto. 

Thursday. August 1H 

5:30 p.m.— Elkin's and Hire's Dixieland Orchestra. 
6:15p.m. Griffith Jones on the Radiotorial Period. 

6:30p.m. — Don Parker, popular pianist. 
7:00 p. m. — Pastel Trio, 
s :00 p.m. -KFI drama hour. 

B :80 p. m.— Program by Mrs. Edward C. trossman. 
contralto. _ . ,, 

9:00 p.m. National Broadcasting Company Light 
Opera. "The Red Hussar." 
10:00 p. m. -Program of modern classical music. 

Friday, August 19 

5:80 p.* m,— Henry Starr, pianist and vocalist. 

6:00 p. m.— Talk on the Hollywood Bowl Concerts by 

Strata Ellen Barnes. 

6:16 p.m.— Madams Kelson, psychologist 
B:80p.m. Claries Russell and Leslie Adama. 
, 00 p m. -Program by Paul Roberta with Haroin 

Uulholten and forks Copaland, violinists. 
g mi p, m. Program of popular music 
:i tin p.m. National Broadcasting Company program 

"An Hour in Memory Lane." 

ic : >. m, -Dresden Girls Trio. 

Saturday, August 20 

."> :80 p. IB.— Matinee program, 
p m. Radiotorial Period. 

6:80p.m. Vest Pocket program 

p m. Felipe Delgado and Edna Clark Muir. 

pianist in Media Horn Bspanola. 

8:00 p m National Broadcasting Company program. 
p, m. Program by Maunne Dyer, James Bur- 
rougha, tenor, and Lilyan. pianist 
LO :00 p. m.— Packard Radio Club. 
tl:00p.m. KFI Midnight Frolic. 



5 :30 to 6 :30 p. m— Brother Bob's club ; Boy Scout 
program. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— Amusement information : news 

broadcast. 

8 :00 to 9:00 p. m. — Special program by Builders* Pal- 

ace Exhibit. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Weekly meeting of Lake Merritt 
Ducks. 

Tuesday. August 16 

2:45 p.m.— Baseball. 
5 :30 to 6 :30 p. m.— Brother Bob. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — -Amusement information ; news 
broadcast. 



Wednesday, August 17 

10 :30 a. m.— Martha Lee. 

2 :45 p. m. — Baseball. 

5 :30 to 6 :30 p. m. — Brother Bob. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Athen Athletic club orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— Amusement information ; news 
broadcast. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Educational program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Special program. 



Thursday, August 18 

2 :45 p. m. — Baseball. 

5 :30 to 6 :30 p. m.— Brother Bob. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Ern Russell in "song and story," 

courtesy Osgood Drug Company. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Amusement information ; news 

broadcast. 



Friday, August 19 

10:30 a. m.— Martha Lee. 

2 :45 p. m. — Baseball. 

5 :30 to 6 :30 p. m.— Brother Bob. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— Amusement information ; news 

broadcast. 

8 :00 to 9 :30 p. m. — -Community night program by 

Suisun-Fairrield, Cal. 

9 :30 to 10 :30 p. m. — Athens Athletic club orchestra. 



Saturday, August 20 

2 :45 p. m. — Baseball. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Amusement information ; news 
broadcast. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC 
OAKLAND— 394 

Sunday. August 14 

11 :00 a. m. - First Baptist Church service, Oakland. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Concert by Bern's Little Symphony 

Orchestra. 
7:30 p.m. — Weather and baseball. 

7 :35 to 9 :00 p. m.- First Baptist Church service. Oak- 

land. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company 
program. 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNB 
OAKLAND— 508 
Monday. August 15 
10:30a. m. Martha Lee; George Ksaetpp, 



Monday. August 15 

11 :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington luncheon 

concert. 
12:30. weather: 1:00. weather: 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 ;08, N. Y. stocks. 

4 :00 to 5 :00 p. m. — Frank Ellis and his Hotel St. 

Francis dance orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— KC.0 Kiddies' Kluh. 
•; :00 to 6 :46 p. m, Stanislas Bern's Little Symphony. 
fi :«G p. m.— "What's Happening in the World." John 

D. Barry. 

', baseball; 7:08, S. F. produce, 

grain, cotton; 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); " =23. 

N. Y. stocks tclosing). 

5 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company 

program. 
9:00 to 9:20 p. m. — "Chats About New Books." 

Tuesday. Ausrust 16 

11 :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m.— Hotel Leamington luncheon 
concert. 

18:80, weather: 1:00. weather: 1:03. S. F. stocks; 
1 ;0S, N. Y. stocks. 

o8 :00 p. m.— Pacific Radio Trade Association 
concert. 

4 :00 to 5:00 p. m.— Hotel St. Francis Concert Orches- 
tra. 

6 00 to 6:55 p. m. — Stanislas Bern's Little Symphony. 

news; T :03. weather; T:«6, baseball: 7 :0^. S, F. 
produce, grain, cotton: 7:16, S. K. stocks (cJaeing) : 
N. Y. stocks tclosing i. 



8:00 to9:00 p. m.— (Oakland studio)— The Pilgrims. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company 

program. 
10:00 to 10:30 p. m.— "HM" and "JP" entertain. 

10 :30 to 11 :00 p. m.— Surprise broadcast. 

Wednesday, August 17 

11 :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington luncheon 
concert. 

12:30, weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks: 
1 :08. N. Y. stocks. 

2 :00 to 3 :00 p. m.— Pacific Radio Trade Association 
concert. 

4 :00 to 5 :00 p. m. — Hotel St. Francis Concert Orches- 
tra. 

6 :00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:55. news; 7:03, weather; 7:06, baseball: 7:08, S. F. 
produce, grain, cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 
7:23, N. Y. stocks (closing). 

8 :00 to 9:00 p. m.— Vacation program. Road informa- 

tion. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company 

program. 

10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m.— John Wolohan's Californians. 



Thursday. August 18 

11 :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington luncheon 
concert. 

12:30, weather; 1:00. weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 
1 :08, N. Y. stocks. 

2 :00 to 3 :00 p. m. — Pacific Radio Trade Association 
concert, 

4 :00 to 5 :00 p. m. — Hotel St. Francis Concert Orches- 
tra. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — "Friends to Boys." 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:55. news; 7:03. weather: 7:06. baseball: 7:08, S. F. 
produce, grain, cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing) ; 
7:23. N. Y. stocks (closing). 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Program by the Wharry Lewis 
Quintet. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company 
program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Hotel St. Francis dance orches- 
tra. 



Friday. August 19 

11 :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington luncheon 
concert. 

12:30. weather: 1:00. weather: 1:03. S. F. stocks; 
1 :08. N. Y. stocks. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m.— Pacific Radio Trade Association 
concert. 

4:00 to 5 :00 p. m.— Hotel St. Francis Concert Orches- 
tra. 

5:30 p. m. — Wise man from the Land-O-Health. 

6:00 to 6:45 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6 :45 to 6 :55 p. m. — "Weekly Financial Review." 

6 :5.t. news; 7:03. weather: 7:06, baseball: 7:08. S. F. 
produce, grain, cotton: 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 
7:23. N. Y. stocks (closing). 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Western Artist Series. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company 
program, 

10:00 to 11 :00 p. m.- Hotel St. Francis dance orches- 
tra. 



Saturday. August 20 

11 :S0 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington luncheon 
concert. 

12:30. weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 
1 :0s. N. Y. stocks. 

2 :00 to 3 :00 p. m. — Pacific Radio Trade Association 
concert. 

4 :00 to 5:00 p. m. — Hotel St. Francis Concert Orches- 
tra. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company 
program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Program by the International 
Four. 

10 :00 p. m. to 1 :00 a. m. — Wilt Gunzendorfer's Band. 



KPO— HALE BROTHERS AND THE CHRONICLE 

SAN FRANCISCO — 422 

Sunday. August 14 

8 :4£ to 4 :30 p. m. — Broadcast of baseball game. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 
6:30 p.m. — Baseball scores. 

6 :35 to 8 :35 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 
B :8G to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 



Monday. August 15 

6 :45. 7 llS and 7 :46 a. m. —Health exer.- 

B :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10:30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
11 :30 to 12 :50 p. m. — Program by Kane'* Hawaiians. 
12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
12 :50 p. m.— Stock market quotations. 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Radio Program 



August 13, 192 



1 :00 to 2 :00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
3 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

7 :30 to S:00 p. m. — DX. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Program by National Broadcasting 

Company over Pacific Coast network. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program for Shell Company of 

California. KPO-KFI. 
10 :00 p. m. to 12 midnight— KPO's variety hour. 



Tuesday, August 16 

6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m.— Health exercises. 

H :00 to 9 :00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10:30 to 10:45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11 :30 to 12 :50 p. m. — Program by Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12:50 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

1 :00 to 2 :00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra, 

2 :45 to 4 :30 p. m. — Broadcast of baseball game. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

C :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — -Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

7 :30 to 8 :00 p. m. — DX. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.- — Dan Casey's fireside hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company's 

program. 
10:00 to 11 :00 p. m.— Palace Hotel dance orchestra. 

Wednesday. August 17 

6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11 :30 to 12 :50 p. m. — Program by Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
12 :50 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

1 :00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

2:45 to 4 :30 p. m.— Broadcast of baseball game. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

C :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

7 :30 to 8 :00 p. m.— DX. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Program by the At\vr,ter Kent 
Artists. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company's 

program. 
10:00 to 11 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 



Thursday, August 18 

6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :0U to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 
10:30 to 10:45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11 :30 to 12:50 p. m. — Program by Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon— Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12:50 p.m. — Stock market quotations. 

1 :00 to 2 :00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

2 :45 to 4 :30 p. m. — Broadcast of baseball game. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6:30 p. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m.— States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company's 
10:00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Palace Hotel dance orchestra. 



Friday, August 19 

6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10:30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:45 a. m.— Ninon, fashion critic of The Chronicle. 

11:30 to 12:50 p. m. — Program by Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12:45 p.m. — Commonwealth luncheon at Palace Hotel. 

1 :30 to 2:00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

2 :45 to 4 :30 p. m.— Broadcast of baseball game. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :20 p. m.— Book review. 

7 :20 to 7 :30 p. m. — Sports-on-the-air. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.-DX. 

S :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Program, featuring the 

orchestra. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company 

program. 
10:00 to 11 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 



Saturday, August 20 

6:45. 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 
S:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 
10:30 to 10:45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11 :30 to 12 :50 p. m. — Program by Kane's Haw 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 



12:50 p. m.— Stock 
1 :00 to 2:00 p. m.— 
2:45 to 4 :30 p. m — 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m.— 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m — 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m.- 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— 
7:30 to8:00 p. m.— 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— 

Company. 
9:00 to 12:00 midn 

Chester. 
12:00 m. to 1 :00 a. 



market quotations. 

Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
-Broadcast of baseball games. 
-Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 
-Twilight hour. 
-Ye Towne Cryer service. 
-States Restaurant orchestra. 
-DX. 
-Program by National Broadcasting 

ight — Goodrich Silvertown Cord or- 

m. — Palace Hotel dance orchestra. 



KGW— MORNING OREGON! AX 
PORTLAND — 191.5 

Sunday, August 14 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening Church services. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— P. M. X. B. C. program. 
10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Link- Symphony orchestra. 

Monday, August 15 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. -Dinner concert. 
7 :30 to 7 : 15 p. m. -Utility service. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. -N. B. C. program from San Fran- 
cisco, Grand Opera "Der Freischulz." 
9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Concert. 



Tuesday. August 16 

(i :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — "Travelogue." 

7 :30 to 7 :45 p- m. — Utility service. 

7 :45 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.-N. B. C. program. 

10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m.— Dance music. 



Wednesday, August 17 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

7 :30 to 7 :45 p. m.- -Utility service. 

8 :00 to 9 -.00 p. m. --Concert. 

9 :00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company 

program. 



Thursday, August IS 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 7 :45 p. m. — Utility service. 

7 :45 to 8 :00 p. m. — Lecture. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program from San Fran- 
cisco. 



Friday, August 19 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to B :00 p. m.— -Program. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m,— National Broadcasting Company 
program. 

Saturday, August 20 

6:00 to 7 :00 p. m.- Dinner concert 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company 

program. 
10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Dance music. 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS. INC. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 267 



Sunday. August 11 

12 :30 to 1:30 p. m. -Organ recital. 
7 :50 to 9 :00 p. m.— Services from 
Christ Scientist. 

9 :00 to 10:00 p. m.— Laura Ellen Windsor and pupil 

10 :00 to 12:00 p. m.— Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 



Sixth Church of 



Calpet Monday, August 15 



8:20 to 10:27 a. m, 
10:27 to 10:30 a. n 
10:30 to 11:00 a. m 
11 :00 to 12:00 m.- 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m. 
5:00 to 5:30 p. m, 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. 
7:00 to 7 :15 p.m. 
7:15 to 7:30 p. m. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. 
tra. 



Musical breakfast program. 

-U. S. weather reports. 

-Babette's fashion hints. 
Organ recital. 
— Luncheon program. 
-KFWI tea party. 
-Construction reports. 
-Theatrical announcements. 
-Dinner hour concert. 
-Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
Advertising talk. 
Clyde Cooper's Roof Garden orches- 



9:00 to 9:80 p. m.— Geo. Taylor and Clem Kennedy 

9 :30 to 10 :00 p. m.— Darneille Sisters. 

10 :00 p. m. —Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 12:00 p. m.— Clyde Cooper's Roof Garden oi 
chestra. 



Tuesday, August 16 

7:00. 7:30 and 8 :00 a. m.— Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m.— Musical breakfast program 

10:27 to 10 :80 a. m.— U. S. weather reports 

10:30 to 11:00 a. m. -Beauty hinls. 

12 :00 to 12 :30 p. m.— Musical luncheon program 

12:30 to 1 :()0 p. m. Organ recital. 

1 :00 to 1 :80 p. m.— Country store, 

1:80 to 2 :00 p.m. Cowell Deln, piano and banjo 

5 :00 to G :30 (>. m. -Construct i.,n reports. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m. -Theatrical announcements. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:16 p, m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis 

7:15 to 7 :30 p.m. KFWI Builders of Progress Club 

i9:00p.m. Clyde Cooper's orchestra 
•' i" 1 ' n. in; m. Barn.-s Vaudeville Agency, 

10:00 p. in, Weather an,] police r.-ports 

" l:<i:i to [ i :00 ii- in. Clyde C n ' orchi I ... 

11:00 to 12:00 p.m. Zc/.y. macks mysterious hour 



Wednesday. August 1 7 

■ d • :O0 ;.. m. Health -\.-reises. 
3:20 to 10:27 a. m, Musical breakfast program 

0:27 to 10:80a. m, U. s. weather re] 

hi :.ih to li :00 a. m. — Cynthia Grey's column 

11 :00 to 12:no m. Organ recital. 

1 ■' - ; " I m, Luncl n program. 

12 :80 to i :00 p. m, Organ recital, 
I :00 p> 1 :80 p. m. Country store. 

■"' :00 to 5 :80 p. m. Construction reports 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m. Theatrical announcement 

6:00 to 7 :00 p.m. Louis Donnto and Jack Kelsey 

i :00 to i :i,, p, m . Sports by Geo. T. Davis 

■ :1*. i" 7 :3n p. m. Studio program. 

8:00 to 9 :00 p.m. Program by Jerry Warner. Binginl 

banjo i i. 
'■'-"" u, li.rOO p. m. Clifford Schneider, baritone 

m, \\ eather and police re] 

10:08 to 12 :00 p.m. Clyde Cooper's orchestra 



Thursday. August IS 



i :00, 7:80 and - :00 

- :20 to in :27 a. m.- 
M:l'7 to in :30 a. m. 
10:80 to 11 :00 a. m. 
12:00 to I2:3ii p. m 

12 :8 i : m 

] :80 p. m.— 

i :00 to 6:00 p. m. 
5:00 to 5:30 p. m. 
.7:30 to 6:oo p. m. 

6 i"i w 7 :00 p. m. 
i :00 l" 7 ;1.. ,,. m. 

7 :15 lo 7 ; :(ii p, m. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. 
9:00 to 9:80 p. m 

■•■-'■ D p. li :00 I-, m. 
1 1 :00 to 12:00 p. m 



Musical breakfn-t program. 
. — D. S. weather reports. 

I a* hion hints by Babetti 

. -Musical luncheon program 
Organ recital. 

Country store, 

KFWI tea party. 
-Construction reports. 

' n "-'" M rica i d i uncementa. 

Dinner hour program. 

Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

Kenneth A. Millican. 

Studio program by Wm. Johnson. 

Gloria Del ftae. 

Bill Bennett 
-Clyde Cooper'l orchestra. 



Friday. August 19 

i :00, 7 :80and 8:00a. m. Exercise hour. 

fn o?t ,a •«** "■ HV fl ' Cal breakfast program. 
10:2. to 10:30 a. m. U. s. weather reports. 
10:80 to ii ;00a. m. Beauty hints 

11 :00 to 1L':00 m. Organ r« i 

12:00 to 12 :80 p.m. Musical lunch,.,,, program. 

1- :30 to t ;00 p. m. Organ recital. 

' N " '" ; ::; " !'■ m. Country store. 

1 l:3'i to 2:00 p. m . c„ w ,|| Dein. banjo and piano. 

4 :00 to 5:00 p. m.— KFWI tea party. 

■■ :00 to 5 :30 p. m. Construction re] 

■", :30 P. t; : oo ,,. m. Theatrical announcements. 

5:00 to . :00 p. m. Program arranged by frcne Smith. 

> :0fl to , :)") p. m . Sports by Geo. T. Davis 

i :16 to , :30 p. m. Talk by E. S. Daniels 
3 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 

0:on to 10:00 p. m. California Sunshme Boys. 
lo :00 p.m. Weather and polio.- reports. 
10:03 to 12:00 p. m. Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 



Saturday. August 20 



7:00, 7:30 and S:00 
8:20 to 10:27 a. m.- 
10:27 to 10:30 a. m. 
10:30 to 11 :00 a. m. 
12:00 to 12:30 p. m. 
12:80 to 1:00 p. m 
1 :00 to I :30 p. m. 
5:00 to 5:30 p. m.- 
B:80 to *:00 p. m. 
0:00 to 7:00 p. m.- 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m.- 
7 :15 to 7 :30 p. m.- 
*:00 to 9:00 p. m.- 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m, 
12:00 to 2:30 a.m. 



:. m. — Exercise hour. 

Musical breakfast program. 

-U. S. weather reports. 

-Cynthia Grey's column. 
—Musical luncheon program. 
-Organ recital. 
Country store. 

Construction reports. 
Theatrical announcements. 
Dinner hour concert. 
Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
Geo. Taylor and Clem Kennedy. 
Athena Alexandroff, soprano. 
-Clyde Cooper's orchestra 
-KFWI hour of mirth . 






19! August 13, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




Shirley Mason 

;; ho starred in 

'Sweet Rosib O'Grady" 



Jacqueline Logan 

always exotic and 

fascinating 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 13, 1927 I 



Society 

(Continued from page 5) 

Colonel and Mrs. J. E. Brady of 
New York, who came to California on 
the S. S. President Polk, have ar- 
rived in San Francisco after some 
time spent in the Southland, and are 
guests at the Clift Hotel. 

The Bradys plan to visit Lake 
Louise in the Canadian Rockies. From 
there they will journey to Lexington. 
Kentucky, for a visit with their son, 
Dr. George K. Brady, professor of 
English at the University of Ken- 
tucky. 



Hole in One 

Just welcomed into the now famous 
National Canada Dry Hole-in-one 
Club, are the following new members : 
Mr. Gerhart Myers, Arbuckle, Calif. ; 
Mr. Walter M. Decker, Turlock, Cali- 
fornia; Mr. H. H. Raby, 1314 Post 
St., San Francisco, Calif.; Mr. H. T. 
Frost, 1 Drumm St., San Francisco, 
Calif. ; Mr. D. C. Martin, 2030 Frank- 
lin St.; San Francisco, Calif.; Mr. 
Luis Wright, 1632 San Pablo, Fres- 
no, Calif.; Mr. W. E. Durfey, 605 
Forthcamp Ave.; Fresno, Calif.; Mr. 
Grant Stephenson, Del Monte, Calif. 



saotafe 

sum mer 

XOTESHBiS 

to Glorious 

vacation 
spots 



ask. 
about 

tmwwtd 

trit 




Illustrated Folders 

will be mailed upon re- 
quest. They will helj> 
you to plan your trip. 



YosemiteValley 
Sequoia and 

General Grant 
National Parks 

Grand Canyon 
Mesa Verde 

Carlsbad Caverns 

Navajo -Hopi 
Indian Country 
Colorado Rockies 



SSUtt9^^ckd^m^MBumua 




601 Market Streer 

'Telephone Sutter 7600 

Ferry Depof 

SAN FRANCISCO 

SANTA ROSA SAN JOSE 

Sie Fwnh Suca 1^ EmA ±xau LUn Si 

STOCKTON 

111 fust Nibum 1 K.nt KLtf - 



Report on Santa Cruz Crowds 

Commenting on the class of people 
vacationing in this city, George A. 
Thompson of Atlantic City states: "II 
have visited many resorts, both ocean 
and mountain, during the past month 
and I have not seen a finer class of 1 
people than those who daily enjoy the 
beautiful beach and surf in Santa 
Cruz. They truly exemplify the real 
type of this State, possessing the 
California spirit of cordiality and de- 
siring good, wholesome amusement. 
It is truly remarkable in that one 
finds, as a rule, disturbing elements 
in such large crowds of vacationists, 
but not so in Santa Cruz. My work in 
Atlantic City is "sizing up" crowds 
and that is why I am in California, to 
ascertain the various factions in re- 
sort crowds. My report of Santa 
Cruz will certainly be a most favor- 
able one." 

Mr. Thompson visits resorts as a 
vacationist and mingles with crowds 
while he makes mental notes to be 
recorded in written reports later. 



Santa Maria Inn 

Many prominent people have made 
Santa Maria Inn their headquarters 
this past week, with festivities of 
various interests to attract them in 
addition to the delightful pleasures of 
the Inn, itself. This last week-end 
those who were guests at the delight- 
ful place of which Frank J. McCoy is 
manager, include: Mr. and Mrs. Z. W. 
White, Oakland ; Bishop and Mrs. 
Charles Wesley Burns and the Misses 
Burns, Mr. Wm. F. Humphrey of San 
Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Shea, 
New York; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ben- 
ner, Oakland; Mr. and Mrs. H. E. 
Manwaring, Mr. and Mrs. Irving 
Rosenblatt, Mr. Irving Rosenblatt Jr., 
Miss Elizabeth Rosenblatt and Mrs. 
Fanny Newman, San Francisco; Mrs. 
Chas. S. Howard Sr. and Mrs. Chas. 
S. Howard Jr., Burlingame; Dr. and 
Mrs. Jerome Jansen, Mr. and Mrs. A. 
F. Bulotti, San Francisco; Mr. and 
Mrs. F. M. Umphred, Oakland; Dr. 
and Mrs. W. A. Gregory, Piedmont; 
Mrs. Reardon T. Lyons, Miss Patricia 
Lyons and Mr. Franklin H. Lyons, 
and Mrs. R. Sharboro and Miss Shar- 
boro, San Francisco. 

* * * 

If my girl said what she thought 
she'd be speechless. — Judge. 

* * * 

Wifie (3 a. m. — I thought you put the 
cat out. 

Hubby — I did, but I suppose grand- 
ma let it in again when she came 

home. 

* * * 

"Did your dog ever have rabies?" 
"No, but she had puppies." — Co- 
lumbus Jester. 



so 



August 13, 1927 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT 

of the State of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco 

Margaret Vanderhoogt, Plaintiff, vs. John W. B. 
l/anderhoogt. Defendant. 

No. 184626. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the State 
>f California in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the office of 
the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The people of the State of California send greeting 

: John W. B. Vanderhoogt, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above-named Plaintiff in 
the Superior Court of the State of California, in and 
for the City and County of San Francisco, and to 
wer the Complaint filed therein within ten days 
(exclusive of the day of service) after the service on 
■ou of this summons, if served within this City and 
County; or if served elsewhere within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of ma- 
trimuny now existing between plaintiff and defend- 
nt, on the grounds of defendant's wilful desertion 
nd wilful neglect, also for general relief, as will 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
jpecial reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you appear 
md answer as above required, the said Plaintiff will 
take judgment for any money or damages demanded 
in the complaint as arising upon contract or will 
apply to the Court for other relief demanded in the 
complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco. 

Dated this twenty-seventh day of July, 1927. 

H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk, 
By J. J. RAFFERTY, Deputy Clerk. 
(Seal) 

Austin Lewis, 473 Mills Bldg.. San Francisco, 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE: 
The MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, loca- 
ion of principal place of business, San Francisco, 
Calif. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 2nd day of August, 1927. an 
assessment of one-half cent per share was levied upon 
the issued capital stock of the corporation payable 
immediately in legal money of the United States, to 
the Secretary, at the office of the company, Room 
246. Monadnock Building, San Francisco. Calif. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall remain 
unpaid un the 5th day of September, 1927 will be 
delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, 
and unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
SNleaday the 27th day of September. 1927 to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY. Secretary. 
246 Uonadnoek Building, 
San Francisco. Calif. 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime, Antique end Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 




w corner 



POLK and POST STS. 



Trade and Travel Exposition 

That the coming Pacific Foreign 
Trade and Travel Exposition, to be 
held in San Francisco next Novem- 
ber, will be an outstanding success is 
the declaration of Hon. James Rolph, 
Jr., mayor of San Francisco. Mayor 
Rolph served as vice-president of the 
Panama-Pacific International Exposi- 
tion in 1915. 

In a communication to the Foreign 
Trade Club of California, which is 
conducting this year's exposition, San 
Francisco's chief executive states: "I 
predict for the Foreign Trade and 
Travel Exposition the greatest suc- 
cess, sponsored as it is by our official 
shipping, financial, export and import 
interests; and because of its definite 
expression of California's interest 
specially and the attraction of world 
commerce generally." 

Many extensive displays have al- 
ready been arranged, according to 
William D'Egilbert, director general 
of the exposition. Not only will 
American concerns be represented by 
exhibits, but there will also be a num- 
ber of displays from other countries. 
Colorful entertainment features 
have been aranged for the exposition, 
which will be held in the Civic Audi- 
torium from November 11th to 20th. 
The exposition will feature displays 
of commodities and manufactures en- 
tering into the world trade of Califor- 
nia and cotiguous domestic and in- 
ternational markets. It will also em- 
phasis the importance of Pacific 
travel to and from Hawaii, Canada, 
the Antipodes. Asia, the United 
States and all the South American 
countries. 

"At the exposition," declares Wil- 
liam D'Egilbert, "manufacturers and 
exporters and importers of the United 
States will make representative ex- 
hibits. All other countries are being 
invited to participate, and inquiries 
are already coming in from Canada, 
Mexico, South America and Europe. 

"Steamship companies and travel 
agencies are to feature models of 
modern liners making San Francisco 
a port of call; transcontinental rail- 
roads are arranging attractive exhib- 
its of their de luxe modes of travel; 
and there will be photographic dis- 
plays representing the color and life 
of travel abroad. 

"Among the unique exhibits will be 
special sections devoted to radio 
transmission, phototelegraphy, sub- 
marine telephone transmission, ocean 
navigation contrivances, commercial 
aviation, cinema production, together 
with highly interesting mechanical 
and engineering devices, bringing 
the results of successful inventions 
before the visitors. 

"An original scheme of decoration 
will prevail throughout the exposi- 
tion. 



The safe temperature 
Sor keeping Sood 

Automatically maintained with 
the Electric Refrigerator 

Like a clear cold Autumn morning, 
the frosty temperature inside the 
Electric Refrigerator adds crispness 
to vegetables. It improves the flavor 
of meats. It keeps milk sweet on the 
warmest days. In this cool tempera- 
ture salads become tastier, more ap- 
petizing and delicious. 

The Electric Refrigerator automa- 
tically maintains the temperature in- 
side the box between 42 degrees and 
47 degrees Fahrenheit. This is the 
safest temperature for keeping food. 

You'll need this safe, carefree elec- 
tric refrigeration, especially if you go 
away from home a great deal on auto- 
mobile trips and week-end vacations. 




"rAcme service" 

Pacific Gas and electric Company 

Owned • Operated • Managed 
by Calijomians 

120-827 




Companion of 
tJ$e morning • • • 
it> relreshiW* •• 




CEO. W. CASWELL 
r 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1.8M.M* cape were set-red at the 
Panama-Petite International Expasitiea 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 13, 1927 



Fallen Leaf Lodge 

The Ideal Taboe Resort 

Located on Fallen Leaf Lake. 
Five miles from the State High- 
way. In the center of a Wonder- 
land of Mountains, Lakes 
and Streams. 

(jood Jishingr Hiking* boating 

Comfortable rooms, tents and cottages 

— with and without private bath; and 

famous dining room service, combine 

to make the Lodge a popular 

vacation spot. 

MRS. W. W. PRICE 

Fallen Leaf P. O., Lake Tahoe, Calif. 



CLUB 
AUTO SERVICE CO. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 

For All Occasions 

Day and Night 

City Sightseeing - - - - - S3. 00 per hoor 

Shopping -------- 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxicab Rates 



PROSPECT 

4000 



585 Post. St.. 
San Francisco 



WHEN IN PANAMA 
MAKE 

HOTEL CENTRAL 

Cathedral Plaza 

YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 

Andrew Johnston, Manacer 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 CLARA STREET— GARFIELD 844 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1864 

The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



Players Guild 

Promising new fame for San Fran- 
cisco as a center of dramatic art and 
production, the Players Guild has an- 
nounced its adoption of a program of 
professional activity which will give 
the city some plays which, otherwise, 
it would not see and which will open 
doors of opportunity to local play- 
wrights. 

In leaving strictly amateur produc- 
tions and taking up professional ac- 
tivities, the Players' Guild is follow- 
ing the example of the Theater Guild 
of New York which has given the 
Eastern metropolis world fame as an 
art and producing center. 

As its first step, the Guild enlisted 
an advisory board of nationally fa- 
mous writers and devotees of the 
drama and a committee of several 
hundred outstanding citizens as guar- 
antors. It then took a lease on the 
Community Playhouse, Mason and 
Sutter streets, where it intends to 
produce some twenty plays with pro- 
fessional casts, direction and man- 
agement during the season of ten 
months. 

Members of the advisory board are : 
Charles Norris, C. Templeton Crock- 
er, Charles Dobie and Mrs. Kathleen 
Norris, authors, and Mrs. Mark Gers- 
tle and Noel Sullivan, patrons of the 
drama, and Edgar Walter, sculptor. 

Reginald Travers, director, and 
Stanley MacLewee, manager, are 
reaching out to all the theatrical cen- 
ters for the best professional talent 
for the first plays, rehearsals of 
which will start within a fortnight. 
Travers is accredited with having 
produced more successful plays in 
San Francisco during the last fifteen 
years than any other person. He has 
been chosen almost invariably to pro- 
duce the famous Bohemian Grove 
plays. MacLewee, a producer, play- 
wright and manager of New York 
and San Francisco experience has a 
record of many successes. 
* * * 

Trout Hospital 

Fred K. MacDonald, popular man- 
ager of the Casa del Rey here, has 
established what friends term a 
"Trout Hospital." 

A few years ago MacDonald se- 
cured tiny trout, placing them in the 
fountain in the beautiful court lead- 
ing from the hotel lobby, and today 
there are about twenty trout averag- 
ing two feet in length. A few days 
ago MacDonald noticed a wound "in 
one of the trout's mouth, which was 
lanced and coated with iodine, but 
this failed to save the fish. Later 
another ill fish was given treatment 
and saved. 

Noticing that the trout did not have 
as much pep as formerly, he now ad- 
ministers a treatment of castor oil. 



Brockway, 

Lake 

Tahoe 

gOLF. . . 

All Grass Greens 
and Grass 
yairways 

Swimming, natural hot 
water; dancing; horse- 
back riding; boating; 
fishing; tennis. For in- 
formation and rates, 
write or wire 



H. O. 



COMSTOCK, 

Manager 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
active. Hot Sulphur Water. Tub Baths and 
Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 



T. H. CORCORAN, Agua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judah 



CALIENTE VILLA 

Family Resort 

CARL STEFFEN. Prop. 



French and Italian Dinners Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms - Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

Four Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, 

Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA. CALIF. 

The Finest Meals in the 
VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms— Clean Linen— Clean Everything 
Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

TELEPHONE 110 



August 13, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 





LP$E^ T/IBL£ 



THE HOMELAND OF ENGLISH 
AUTHORS, by Ernest H. Rann. E. 

P. Dutton & Company. §2.50. 

The best description of this book is 
given by the author himself at the 
beginning of the Sixth chapter: "It 
is not my purpose, as I have said, to 
make this volume into a guide-book, 
giving distances, hotels and charges 
and other details dear to the heart of 
the tourist, whether by train, motor- 
car, or bicycle, or on foot. Neither 
have I in mind primarily a course of 
literary geography, taking a certain 
district of England, and marking out 
where this author lived or rested, or 
where a certain poem or classic of 
prose was written. My purpose rather 
has been to take my reader with me, 
preferably on foot, and in the high- 
ways and byways to see what Eng- 
land has to offer to the literary pil- 
grim. 

"The process does not and should 
not involve complete knowledge of 
any author and his work. We call on 
one man here, note the house where 
he lived or the church where he 
preached, linger over the view made 
famous in a song or a story ; and then 
in the face of the westering sun say 
'Good-bye and thank you for a pleas- 
ant memory,' and push on and stake 
out another little claim of explora- 
tion." 

The purpose of the book, therefore, 
is two-fold. You not only have a 
travelogue of the portions of England 
made famous by such well-known 
men and women as Dickens, Hardy. 
Shakespeare, Shelly, George Eliot, 
the Brontes, Kipling, Wordsworth, 
Kingsley, Arnold Bennett. Fitzgerald 
and numerous others, but you get in- 
timate details of their lives inter- 
spersed with fragrant s of their work, 
the biographies and the quotations 
both giving an insight into the char- 
acter of (lie people and the geography 
of the country that is rather a novel- 
ty in the art of writing. To steal from 
a quotation from Carlyle, cited in the 
tirst chapter of the book, the author 
would seem to be an "ingenious and 
ingenuous" man. 

Unfortunately, he does not give us 
enough of Carlyle. What a master 

Carlyle was! The witchery of his con- 
trol over the intricacies of the Eng- 
lish language is as the ripplings of a 
glorious cadenza beneath the magic 



Edited by Florence de Long 

fingers of the maestro playing on the 
heartstrings of his audience. How- 
ever, Carlyle did not devote himself 
to fiction, so this is rather beside the 
mark. But, having had one or two 
delicious morsels in the quotations 
mentioned by the author, we are 
rather inclined, like Oliver Twist, to 
ask for more. 

However, Oliver Twist reminds us 
of Dickens and brings us back to the 
"Homeland." Dickens seems to be a 
prime favorite of Mr. Rann, and well 
he might be, as his name is almost 
synoymous with that of England. He 
plays a conspicuous part in several 
chapters, and is mentioned in others. 
Possibly this is due to the fact that 
in his descriptions Dickens gave such 
minute details of the locations and 
even the numbers of the houses and 
rooms used by his characters, that 
the sites could be easily picked out. 
All the places made famous by him 
now wear labels and inscriptions ; but 
relic hunters should be warned that 
these are all sacred to British hearts 
and nothing is removable. 

Hardy is another favorite of the 
author, possibly for the reason that 
his life being more recent, it is the 
more easily traced. An interesting 
chapter of twenty-four pages is de- 
voted to his life and literature. 

The author skirts cleverly about 
the Shakespearean controversies, and 
though he apparently believes in the 
Shakespearean theory, he is careful 
not to quarrel with any of those who 
dispute his fame. 

One result of this book, whether 
intentional or not, is to put the desire 
into the heart of the reader to devote 
a little more time out of a busy life 
to reading more of the masters of the 
English language. 



At the Elder Gallery 

Miss Edith Coburn Noyes of Bos- 
ton will close her series of Thursday 
afternoon readings in the Paul Elder 
Gallery August 18th, at 2:30 o'clock, 
with "The Two Virtues." by Alfred 
Sutro. In literary and dramatic por- 
trayal and "clever lines." this comedy 
is almost incomparable. Miss Noyes 
is director of the Edith Coburn 
Noyes' school in Boston. She has de- 
lighted the audiences that have heard 
her in this series. 




S. A. LOVEJOY 

WILL BRING 

ORDER 
Out of Chaos! 

In your Books, 
Financial Statements 
Income Tax Reports 

Expert Auditor 

PART-TIME SERVICE 

268 Market St., Room 101 



Park Lane Maisonnettes 

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Magnificent view. Every service, from 
doorman to valet. Furnished or un- 
furnished. Garage. Class A steel 
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all conveniences oj an apartment house. 

PARK LANE APARTMENTS 

1100 Sacramento Street 
Diagonally Across from Hotel Fairmont 



Books that are renewed in the Newt Letter 
can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 




PHS 

/ z C Forever 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

From One Thing to Another 

Bv ELEANORE F. ROSS 



August 13, 192 



There is something incomprehensible about the work- 
ings of the human body. A big man like Creed dies all at 
once almost without warning, at the same time a Stan- 
dard Oil chemist in Richmond who was wounded at 
Chateau Thierry coughs up with complete nonchalence a 
piece of shrapnel as big as your little finger which he has 
been carrying in his system for nine years, in spite of the 
doctors. It is a hit or miss life. 



: Now that there is a bridge from Toronto to Buffalo the 
path of the thirsty will probably be as well marked as 
that to Juarez. North America ebbs and flows South and 
North with the evening hours. Now it will ebb and flow 
North and South. Whatever else it may be it will be no 

bridge of sighs. 

* * * 

The publicity over the Sacco-Vanzetti case is something 
very appalling, not to say exasperating. Take the vast 
amount of space which has been given to these two Ital- 
ians who were convicted of murder and robbery and the 
enormous money value of the notice which has been given 
them. It is almost incredible that it should have occurred. 
It would seem as if to give a person a class value was 
sufficient to secure a world hearing. Very important re- 
sults frequently come from agitations as far-fetched even 

as this. 

* * * 

Queen Marie has a good one on American journalism 
when she points out that the one heart story, to- wit, — the 
removal of the shoes and stockings from Princess Ileana 
by a student of the Culver Military Academy when the 
princess was taken ill on an automobile ride. It is said 
that the princess was taken into a drug store by the stu- 
dent, and her circulation restored by energetic rubbing. 
Not having any personal acquaintance with the part 
rubbed, we are unable to say for our part whether there 
was actually a heart story. Mothers are prone to jump at 
such conclusions regarding their daughter's heart stories. 



The last horse-shoer in Oakland, 73 years of age, hav- 
ing been kicked by a horse, wants an automobile. He had 
been more than forty years in close proximity to horses 
and had never gotten in wrong with one of them until the 
other day, when he was unaccountably assaulted. He will 
be mistaken, however, if he thinks that by the purchase 
of an automobile he will avoid the attacks of tempera- 
ment. Autos have a disposition, also. 



The State Board of Health has laid down the doctrine : 
"If a child is compelled by law to go to school, it is the 
duty of the State to see that his health is not endangered 
when he goes there." Fine, but there is no way in which 
hygiene, even at its best, can secure safety in crowds. 
School will always be more or less dangerous. 



Now we are going to have a traffic survey. It sounds 
very imposing and we presume that it is very necessary, 
but what is the use of a survey if the results are not lived 
up to ? We have had so much preaching and so little prac- 
tice, so much expensive investigation and so little real 
profit from it, that we may be excused for being a little 
dubious about it all. Big names, like soft words, butter 
no parsnips. 



Mayor Issues Statement 

Our Mayor has announced his candidacy this week fo 
re-election, and says he will soon publish the platforn 
upon which he will ask the voters to continue him at th 
helm of the city of San Francisco. The Mayor's state 
ment follows in part: 

"To the voters of San Francisco: I am a candidate foL 
Mayor of San Francisco. My platform can be read in th< 
recent history of our city. After years of bossism an< 
corruption, which dishonored San Francisco at home an< 
abroad, the people instituted an era of honesty, progress, 
efficiency and economy in public affairs. During this 
period San Francisco has been politically clean, withou' 
scandal, a wholesome city of homes and industries, ei 
joying its self-respect and the respect of all the worL 
Public service is a public trust. Our city has prosperei 
through honest government. Honesty and efficiency i: 
every department of the municipality must be maintainec 
Bossism in San Francisco was abolished years ago ant 
has been absent ever since. In this respect our city hai 
been superior to most other great cities of the land.' 



"Three Days" 

At first glance it would seem as if the gin marriage la 
was a good thing. It appears as if it might be an antidoteftn 
to the old saying: "Marry in haste and repent as leisure.'||j| 
Under the salacious influence of liquor, and especiall; 
liquor of today, two persons of opposite sex could ver;, 
easily be inclined towards matrimony or any other equally 
reckless proceeding. 

In the three days interval between the "publishing of p 
the banns" and the actual ceremony, one has time, judg- 
ing from very recent statistics, to sober down and visual- 
ize this most important and sometimes disastrous step in 
life. 



But, on the other hand, there are often exigencies ex- 
isting which would make speedy matrimony the wisest 
possible action, and the law which compels a couple to 
publish to the world the fact that they are about to be- 
come wed, three days before so doing, smacks too much 
of "blue laws" and the New England spirit of supervising 
one's soul. It is a fact that marriage records have de- 
creased since this three-day "sobering up" process. It 
may prove to be just another evil created by Prohibition. 



The Reds 

"Bombs to the right of us, bombs to the left of us!" 
Never did the country seem to be so full of explosives 
and vengeful spirits, as it does now. The man with the 
dynamite stick is without question, more criminal than 
the ordinary murderer, who goes after one person, and 
gets him or her. The dynamiter, in his insane rebellion 
against conditions which he, surely, could never improve, 
slaughters innocents with whom he has no enmity. 

Bombs are seldom in the hands of the true blue Ameri- 
can. They are almost always placed by brown hands, for- 
eign hands, hands that belong to alien races, people who 
foster and cherish the spirit of "vendetta"; who look 
upon Hate as some look upon their gods. 

We need more and more rigid immigration laws. 



ugust 13, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Fascinating Fallen Leaf 

By Eleanore F. Ross 



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In early Summer the lakes of the high Sierras clothe 
;hemselves coquettishly in ever-changing, opalescent 
rcists, like chiffon veils, donned in a time of introspective 
nodesty; Autumn's searching hand brushes them aside, 
md they stand forth in all the beauty of their true colors, 
like gleaming gems, rimmed round with the cameo-clear, 
snowy peaks of the ancient, enduring mountains. 

There is a charm in early Autumn that appeals more 
poignantly than all the budding green of Spring or full- 
blown blossoming of mid-Summer; a revealing and yet 
concealing season, for shrubbery and trees are slowly and 
reluctantly letting fall their last gorgeous draperies, and 
Mother Earth is drawing back into her kindly bosom, the 
life-sap that has burgeoned forth in bloom all the long, 
dreamy Summer days. 

Around fascinating Fallen Leaf some late wild flowers 
are still vaunting brilliant hues, and the flaming scarlet 
of the mountain ash berries, the gold and red of the aspen 
thickets, the crimson and yellow of dog wood along rip- 
pling brooks, vie with the lovely deep blue of the fringed 
gentian, which William Cullen Bryant wrote of: 
"Then doth thy sweet and quiet eye 
Look through its fringes to the sky. 
Blue — blue — as if that sky let fall 
A flower from its cerulean wall." 
The upper lakes are teeming with fish, for the heavy 
rains of last Winter and Spring brought an abundance of 
water to the high places, and many a full creel of rainbow 
trout from Susy or Heather Lake, draws a flock of admir- 
ing guests to the wide verandas of Fallen Leaf Lodge, 
when the fishermen come in. at evening time. We are 
told that fishing lias been exceptionally good this season. 
and almost everyone brings in a sizeable catch. 

At the present time the woods are full of chipmunks 
and ground squirrels t hat are just old enough to leave 
their nests and fend for themselves. On nearly every 
trail the hiker may find these little animals, so tame that 
they will come and eat out of one's hand, and one enjoys 



watching them as they fill their pouches full of nuts or 
other food, stowing it away until their little cheeks stick 
out alarmingly ; then they run away and hide their plun- 
der in their nests for Winter use. 

Small birds are just learning to fly, for seasons come 
late to the high regions, and one can still see the mother 
bird feeding her young on a branch near her nest. Gorge- 
ous blujays, tanagers and warblers flash among the trees, 
adding their blues, and reds and golds to the general 
colorful atmosphere ; sometimes a saucy woodpecker 
comes and taps on your house or makes a hole in some 
tree to hide the acorns which he gets from the "huckle- 
berry oaks." 

Wild geese wing their way over the lake, in v-shaped 
flight, bound for warmer lands, and the plaintive cry of 
the flicker pierces the noon-time silence, with its eternal 
question: "Why? Why?" 

Winter is still afar off, but just the hint of his breath 
is in the air, a briskness that makes all the more enjoya- 
ble the long hikes one can take up various mountain 
trails. — especially do I remember the trip to Angora 
Lakes; rather a hard trip for city-bred muscles, but one 
which fully repays the climber to these beautiful lakes, 
over 9.000 feet above sea level. They lie rather near to- 
gether, as if seeking company in that remote region, — 
"close to the sun in lonely lands"; the higher lake with 
its mighty back wall rising as starkly and steeply as any 
mountain-side in far-famed Switzerland, the snow lying 
in straight ledges along its hoary sides. 

To those who look upon mountain climbing as too much 
of an exertion, there is the placid lake to gaze upon, the 
rushing brook, with its rushing water fall, the more ac- 
cessible trails to negotiate, always leading you on. on 
from one fair vista to another. 

And in the evening, there is the hospitable lodge to 
come back to, the roaring fire in the big living room, the 
friendly faces to greet you, — the delicious supper, the 
comfortable bed. How could one ask for r 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 13, 1927 




PIONEER 



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By E. V. WELLER 
National Automobile Club 



Historic Juarez 

Motorists who travel over the Old 
Spanish Trail route will find the side 
trip from El Paso, Texas, to Juarez, 
Mexico, a very interesting one. A ten 
minute ride effects a magical transi- 
tion — from a metropolitan American 
city to the heart of a colorful foreign 
community. 

Juarez is a city of vivid contrasts 
— brilliant cosmopolitan cafes lie 
within the shadow of the spire of a 
17th century mission ; automobiles 
and street cars pass within sight of 
the historic bull-ring; quaint and an- 
cient adobe houses face modern paved 
streets. On every hand will be found 
things of interest, because of their 
being so totally different from any- 
thing American. 

The historic old Mission, built in 
1659, with its beamed ceilings carved 
by the Indians and with its ancient 
bells from old Spain, is particularly 
interesting. The tower is practically 
the same as it was when constructed 
by the Indians. 

Juarez Monument, a beautiful piece 
of Mexican art, is also well worth see- 
ing. And the famous bull-ring, a 
large circular enclosure of adobe, is 
still the scene of occasional bull 
fights. The teeming municipal mar- 
ket place gives one an idea of how the 
Mexican buys his supplies. The old 
custom house, where Presidents Taft 
and Diaz once met and dined in regal 
splendor, is still in use. 

Several famous cafes line both 
sides of Calle 16 de Septiembre, the 



main street, while the shops have on 
display many shawls, drawn work 
and fine laces. Pottery and other 
handiwork of the natives may be pur- 
chased in the stores and markets. 
American money is the medium of 
exchange in all of these places. 

* * * 

Road conditions from Banning to 
Thousand Palms Canyon are in fair 
condition, according to the latest re- 
ports. From Banning, pavement is 
followed through Cabazon and to 
within a short distance of Edom. 
From that point on into Edom, the 
road is not paved, but is in good con- 
dition. Leaving Edom, a rough dirt 
road is encountered for about five 
miles, thence a somewhat sandy 
wash. This wash is followed to the 
first grove of palm trees. 

* * * 

The water is lowering in June and 
Gull Lakes, Deadman and Glass 
streams, and fishing is much better 
in this region. Spinners and eggs are 
the best bait and gray flies are the 
best fly. Sagehen are also plentiful in 
this district which is reached from 
the Bishop to Mono Lake road. 

Lakes in the Big Pine district are 
dropping and clearing rapidly and 
some of the best fly fishing in the 
State is to be found in these waters. 
Queen of Waters, Royal Coachman, 
Mosquito, Blue Bottle, and Black Gnat 
are the best flies. Worms, grasshop- 
pers and grubs are good bait. 

* * * 

Motor Advice 

The distributor head on your car 
should be wiped clean of dust and 
grit. Dirt attracts moisture when the 
car is standing in rain or fog and 

mis-fire or failure to start may result. 

* * * 

The carburetor is the last thing on 
your car that should be changed to 
eliminate a miss in the motor. It does 
not adjust itself as do ignition points 
or spark plugs. 

* * * 

Motorists on long tours should be 
careful of excessive fatigue. Better 
cut the day's journey short than risk 
the dangers encountered while driv- 
ing in an exhausted condition. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office and Worka: 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury BIdK.) 

Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called for and Delivered 



August 13, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



SAFE FLYING 



By C. J. Pennington 

In searching back through the records of aviation it is 
revealed that our present net work of air lines was born 
some seven years ago. In those seven years many pilots 
lost their lives. It is not pleasant to dwell upon accidents, 
but truths must be met; therefore, for the purpose of 
reaching somewhere near the truth for causes, this may 
be in parts unpleasant reading, — again it may be food for 
thought. 

Since the invention of the airplane, practically every 
known test has been applied to determine their stability, 
and most accidents which have happened in tests, have 
been due to the equipment being inadequate or faulty. 
In the past seven years new navigating instruments have 
been tested by flying through fog and storms at night. 
Many have crashed over scheduled routes, forced land- 
ings have been made under all conditions, until today we 
are in airplane construction to the point where planes 
handled as they should be, are a safe method of transpor- 
tation, but not yet, nor in the present generation will 
they become fool-proof. 

Gravity has not yet become controlled, and the law of 
"what goes up must come down" is still in force, and un- 
doubtedly will be for some years to come, but taking into 
consideration the foolish stunts which would-be pilots 
and others knowing little or nothing about flying have 
attempted, it is strange that more have not met a speedy 
finish against solid old mother earth. 

A person may learn to pilot a plane with ten hours of 
instructions and actual flying experience, nevertheless, 
ten hours in the air is most assuredly not a sufficient 
length of time to learn and know everything about flying. 
It is safe to state that pilots, today, who have been flying 
for years continuously, meet new situations daily in their 
flights. 

Airplanes constructed as they are, reveal the fact from 
their appearance that they are not built for the purpose 
of flying upside down and otherwise being conducted 
through various contortions in the air, merely for the 
pleasure of some fool-hardy individual. But, if a plane 
falls while being put through a series of tricks, a wail is 
sent up condemning aviation as being unsafe, when in 
reality it is not the faulty plane or its unsafe construc- 
tion; it is the fault of the unbalanced pilot driving the 
ship. 

A plane may be stable enough from appearance, but a 
sharp turn OB an untested weak joint may bring a good 
pilot to a quick termination of his chosen career. If a 
storm is encountered, severe strains are put upon the 
wing's, and to fly safely through unforeseen difficulties, 
an airplane should be carefully tested before each flight, 
no matter how short the flight. 

It goes without question that accidents will continue 
to happen as aviation develops, but do we not continue to 
have railroad accidents which in most cases are caused, it 
must be admitted, by human errors? How about the au- 
tomobile accidents, due mostly to the incompetent hand- 
ling of the machines? People are driving automobiles 
today who should not even be trusted out alone with a 
wheelbarrow, not to mention the driving of a car. How- 
many auto accidents are there, caused by faulty equip- 
ment ? Very few. 

It is possible, however, to have automobile accidents 
without serious consequences, but in flying an airplane a 
human error or the lack o( proper testing before a flight, 
resulting in an accident, in most cases calls for slow 
music and flowers for the occupants. 

With present facilities in flying, it is folly for anyone 
to ever anticipate a flight without first attaching a para- 
chute to their person. Parachutes were invented and per- 



fected for the purpose of assuring the continuance of 
human life through accidents in the air, and they should 
be worn on every flight. Cases where parachutes are 
used for landing are few, but to be up in the air and en- 
counter serious difficulties without one, is a precarious 
and vital situation. To be attached to a parachute is not 
the most pleasant mode of traveling one could conceive 
of, but if one flies one should at least be equipped so as 
to return to terra firma intact. A parachute upon open- 
ing treats its passenger rather roughly, and again, upon 
landing, one has the sensation of making a fifteen-foot 
leap. But the art of flying in general necessitates an ad- 
venturous spirit and a strong constitution. 



Sales Department Has Outing 

Kendall's Dell, down the Peninsula, was the scene of a 
very enjoyable and unique picnic, with the addition of a 
Dog Show and other hilarities, staged by the sales depart- 
ment of La Grande & White's Laundry Company. 

The participants drove to their destination on Sunday 
morning, August 7th, in a huge "skyscraper" bus which 
looked like a cross between a motor bus and a war tank, 
and gave onlookers the impression that a truckload of 
Movie Sheiks had invaded the peaceful Peninsula. 

For the refreshment of this merry assembly, almost all 
the watermelons and berries in the commission district 
of San Francisco were bought up, and the pound keeper 
of this city reported that during the preceding night his 
entire crop of dogs had been stolen. 

Of all the baseball events pulled off in the county of 
San Mateo, none was more interesting than the game at 
Kendall's Dell, between the married and single men. The 
married men won by a good margin. Why shouldn't they ? 
They are used to home runs. 



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20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 13, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 18S3 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidat ions with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1927 

Awsets $113,925,831.54 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $575,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESI DIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4}4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought; FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued; CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND : NEW YORK : PORTLAND, ORE. : SEATTLE. 
WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pipe and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

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FIRE PROOF BUILDING 

TWO STORY AND BASEMENT 

257 - 259 MINNA STREET 
Bet. 3rd and 4th 

Suitable for Printing — Manufacturing or Storage 
Rent Reasonable 

B- cj 

CORNWALL, COLDWELL & BANKER 

57 Sutter Street San Francisco 



Finance 



Corporation earnings have been unexpectedly favor- 
able. General Motors ranks first in aggregate profits and 
in rate of increase with net earnings, including profits of 
subsidiaries, not consolidated for the half year, ending 
June 30th of S129,250,207, an increase over correspond- 
ing figures for the first half of 1926 of S27, 550,253. 



General survey of the labor market shows that fewer 
workers are employed in the manufacturing industry 
than in 1923. There has been a reduction in pay rolls, 
also, but not a corresponding reduction, thus showing 
that wages are higher than heretofore. 



Building industry is progressing in the country in un- 
usually large volume, and the agricultural industry is de- 
manding a great amount of machinery which adds to the 
energy of the steel industry. It is to be noted, however, 
according to the report of the National City Bank, that 
automobile production has been 12 per cent under that of 
last year. The new models are expected, however, to give 
this production a new impetus. 



The assistant secretary of commerce in charge of aero- 
nautics makes the prohpecy that the premium income on 
aircrafts and cargoes will exceed the premiums from au- 
tomobile insurance in the not very distant future. 



It is a curious fact that the moral hazard in insurance 
is regarded as less in Alaska than in any other part of 
the country; according to the statement of R. R. Stowell 
of the Pacific Coast Agency Company. 



Dryden Phelps, after living five years in the heart of 
China, tells the Commonwealth Club that there is no es- 
sential difference, intellectually speaking, between the 
Chinese and other folks. The great turmoil arises from 
the fact that they are trying to do at one stroke what our 
people took several revolutions to accomplish. 



The San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange says that 
the volume of trading over 1926 is steadily increasing. 
There is a gain of over 28 per cent since last year. The 
market values of the shares sold are 8243,152,410 as 
against §240,005,427 last year. 



A new demand for local lands comes from a class in the 
East which desires small farms near established com- 
munities. These people are mostly from industrial cen- 
ters and have had some farm experience. They plan to 
live near good towns so as to get the advantage of the 
convenient town life. 



The best levels on the local stock market for the week 
were reached by Caterpillar Tractor and Paraffine com- 
mon taking the lead. Caterpillar finally closed at 31Va. 
a net gain of 2% points. 



The rapid increase of oil production in South America 
shows that that country may be relied on for an oil sup- 
ply for many years to come. The great need is the con- 
struction of railroads for the transportation of the oil. 
The primitive state of transportation facilities is the 
great impediment to progress. 



There is still a record waiting for the first grandmother 
to fly across. — Springfield Republican. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Lurie and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




ICE CREAr%, 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 
Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c. $1. 35c, 50c. 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing: 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATT1E MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



U&uzl/ ImxuaLu, bruffib 



490 POST ST.. S. 

Garfield 234 

CLIFT HOTEL 

Prospect 4700 



RAMONA STUDIO. PALO ALTO 

Palo Alto 433 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Matson Nav. Co. Steamers 



THIRD STRE ET 

STERLING ANDERSON. 



GARAGE 

Manager 



Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50— Also a la Carte 

Merchants' Lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private DininR Rooms 
for Banquets and Parties. Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 4286 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy- Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blacksmithing. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystone 8100 



Weekdays, Luncheon S -75 

<11 :30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week Days & Sundays 1.50 



No visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



Our best advertisements are what our 
customers tell their friends. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 
250 Twelfth St. PHONE MARKET 916 

Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 



NOAH'S 
ARK 



93 Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 
11:30 n. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

i :30 to 8:30 p. m. only 
CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 

Half Block from Highway 





Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 








MME. M. S. E. LEE 








Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 




583 
In 


Post Street 
Virginia Hotel 


San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 2510 




14-Mile House 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OTEN S:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. 

I'nsurpassed Cuisine 

CARL LEONHARDT 

Formerly of Golden Gate Park Casino 




anA 



CAROLINE JOXES 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 

2:80 and Tea from 3 to 5 

Inclusive use of room for club dinners 

334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 




Antioch Bridge Route 



to 



Sacramento 

Is Now PAVED AH the Way 



No Traffic Congestion No Delays 

The Cool, Quick Way 

Along the Sacramento River, Through 
the Netherlands of America 



From Oakland 
The Tunnel Road 



Prom Sacramento 
South on 21st Street 



^ 



AMERICAN TOLL-BRIDGE 
COMPANY 

Owners and Operators of 

CARQUINEZ BRIDGE and ANTIOCH BRIDGE 

Tolls the Same on Both Bridges 
Autos, 60c Passengers, 10c 




o4mbassador- 

Los Angfeles 

Plan to enjoy Southern California's 

glorious summer climate this year at 

this world-famous hotel. 

CAML VAH VTECHTEH 

Famous Author, writing in VANITY FAIR says: 

Tbt Ambasiador «, / tbouia think, ont of tbt very beft boteti 
m tbt world. Tbe service it superlamt, tbt food an me, 
the courtesy ot management ana emplo\ee> unfailing. " 

In the -wide range ot its attraction;, the 
Ambassador likewise excel* Superb. 
27-acre park, with miniature goll course 
and open-air plunge. Riding, hunting 
and all sports, including privileges of 
Rancho Goll Club Motion picture 
thearei and 25 smart shops within the 
hotel Dancing nightly to the mutic ol 
the famous Cocoanut Grov* orch< 



Moderate Summer Rates 
Artracove rooms with bath as low 
as $5. $6 and $ 7 a day single, 
from $7.00 double 

WRITE for Owf. Bocki« of 
Calif. Rfarti and Information. 
BEN L- FRANK ZHmat* 




SAIL TO NEW YORK 



Jut 

4 I 
• 1 


. 




m J 


•i 


SISTER SHIPS 


* ink: 


■ *. 


SS VENEZUELA 


2/ JllVt 


^Jiffi 


SS COLOMBIA 


i^^jUlm 




SS ECUADOR 







See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL 
and GAY HAVANA, en route 

Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropics 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail 
Liner with seven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and 
historic ports — Manzanillo, Mexico; San Jose dc Guatemala; La Lib- 
ertad, Salvador; Corinto, Nicaragua. Two daj-B in the Canal Zone. See 
the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, Cristobal and historic old Panama. 
Every cabin on a Panama Mail Liner is an outside one; each has an 
electric fan. and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. 
There is an orchestra for dancing; deck games and sports and salt water 
swimming tank. The Panama Mail is world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, includ- 
ing bed and meals on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return by 
rail (or vice versa) for as little as §380. (This price does not include berth 
and meals on trains.) Panama Mail Liners leave San Francisco and New 
York approximately every 21 days. Next sailings from San Francisco - 
SS ECUADOR. August 20th; SS COLOMBIA. September 17th. From New 
York: SS COLOMBIA, August 13th; SS VENEZUELA, September 3rd. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
oi ticket agent, or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 

548 S. SPRING STREET 2 PINE STREET 10 HANOVER SQUARE 
LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 



THEA.B.SPRECKELS 

AMATEUR GOLF TOURNAMENT 
cAugust 23 to 26 

Winner receives outright 
one of the finest trophies 
ever presented in an ama- 
teur golf event. An equally 
attractive trophy to run- 
ner-up and prizes in all 
flights. 



Summer Rales 

HOTEL DEL CORONADO 

As Low as $6.00 Per Day • American Plan 

in Effect. 

i" 

SWIMMING • AQUAPLANING . BOATING 

Dancing 

l. E. CARLILE, SAN FRANCISCO AGENT 
2 PINE STREET Pkone DOUGLAS 5600 



MEL. S. WRIGHT, Manager 
CORONADA BEACH CALIFORNIA 



r 







$5.00 PER YEAR 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOS ANGELES 




An Old Adobe oj Monterey 



FROM A PAINTING BV F. II. CUTTING 



cs£r 






8-80 and 8-70 

two remarkable 8 'in-line 
motor cars that are earning 

More Glory 

for Locomobile 

— the New 8-80 "^ finest automobile 

in the $3000 class!" 

1i *J ^kC\ m ^ an F ranc i sco "for the fully 
vjJ £/ ZJ V/ equipped 5-passenger sedan 

the New 8-70 " one °f l ^ e industry's 

most successful light 
S-in-line cars" 



^2 



1 J S3 



$^j ^| i| g in San Francisco — for the fully 
Id jL JL !D equipped sedan, brougham, or 
sport roadster 

at 230 FULTON STREET 

Salon of the Locomobile Company of California 

Telephone Hemlock 3800 

Also Broad Motor Company, 1906 Van Ness Ave. 

San Francisco. Telephone Qraystone 6304 



K^ 






Established July 20, 1856 






Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1856. by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, Jr., from 1884 to 1925. 
b now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 26S Market Street. San Francisco, California. Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, 
California. Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year. 

$5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00 



Vol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., AUGUST 20, 1927 



No. 34 



From One Thing to Another 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



The mildest words ever set to a ruler's swan song: "I 

do not choose to run for President in 1928." 

* * * 

Many anticipated candidates are still up in the air on 
announcements — but this is aeroplane week and every- 
body is conforming in spirit. 

* * * 

Adolph Uhl's offer to donate his salary as mayor, if 
elected, to the orphans of San Francisco is something 
new under the city's sun and the gesture ought to have 
for him a beneficial effect. 

* * * 

The entrance of Mr. Uhl into the big-prize fight has put 
the politicians to deep thinking as to where his support 
shall lie. Mr. Rolph and Mr. Power are known to be seek- 
ing or to have been promised the big local sachems' sup- 
port — so this third entry is apt to breed sundry compli- 
cations in their reckonings. 

* * * 

Public institutions of learning had their opening day 
last Monday, when an army of 80.000 boys and girls took 
possession of the citadels of education. We hope there 
were none like Shakespeare's "whining school boy. with 
his satchel, and shining morning face, creeping like a 
snail, unwillingly to school." 

* * * 

The number of mayoralty candidates is gradually 
growing. It is possible Eugene E. Schmitz. former super- 
visor, may make it a "foursome." Schmitz endeavored to 
come back before as mayor of San Francisco, and. inci- 
dentally, pulled a big vote. He shows a persistence, at 
least, that is commendable. 

* * * 

It is delightful news to hear that the Palo Alto Horse 
Show is to become an annual event. This assurance was 
given us by Alfred P. Fleming, manager of the exhibi- 
tion, who states that more than (8000 in stakes has been 
promised for the 1928 show. Approximately (1500 will 
go to the Stanford Home for Convalescent Children as a 
result of the recent horse show given in Falo Alto. There 
is an elegance, a verve, a charm about a horse show 
which no other kind of exhibition can ever bring forth. 

* * * 

The notorious female Billy Sunday headed a cavalcade 
er 500 of her followers into the tall timber adjacent 
to Lake Tahoe this week, with the intention of establish- 
ing a summer colony, li seems utterly too bad that this 



crowd of morons should invade one of the most beautiful 
spots in California, to profane and pollute this heavenly 
and remote region with their salacious actions and teach 7 
ings. * * * 

The gay gathering of over a hundred motor car dealers, 
who met last week-end at Tahoe Tavern, had serious in- 
tentions in view, as well as sociable ones. The bay bridge 
plan really actuated their getting together, for, according 
to Governor Balzar, of Nevada, who met the dealers at 
Donner, the building of the bay bridge would mean not 
only a great deal to the San Francisco bay territory, but 
also to the entire State of California and to Nevada. With 
state officials of Nevada back of this plan, as well as those 
interested at home, the bay bridge should become a 
reality. 

There are people who deplore air races such as just took 
place this week ; who look upon the risk taken by the 
participants, with its attendant sorrow to bereaved rela- 
tives and friends, as unnecessary, and in a way, a detri- 
ment to the progress of flying. Of course, they say, it 
takes daredeviltry and courage and a great amount of 
recklessness to enter into such a race as Mr. Dole put up 
for, this past week, but why not develop this art of flying 
as other arts and inventions are developed — in a sane and 

safer manner? 

* * * 

We are all inclined to feel that way, when we read of 
crack-ups and disasters, and loss of life — events which 
must of necessity accompany the intrepid entrants for 
speed records in a game as dangerous and utterly un- 
certain as flying still is. We forget that all inventions in 
transportation have meant, down the ages, disaster and 
death to the "trail blazers"; a great risk of life to the 
human beings who are making the pathway smooth for 
the rest to follow; and especially that, in this commercial 
age, money must always play the most important part as 

an incentive in such enterprises. 

* * * 

So, in the big event of the past week, it is only natural 
that the masses of people thrilled to every bit of news 
that was radioed or wired regarding the "fearless four" 
who negotiated the air lanes across the Pacific from this 
point to Honolulu : it is only fitting that when the winner, 
Goebel. returns to these shores, he should be given a 
rousing reception: and it will be only running true to 
form, if the fickle populace forgets him whi n the next 
"pilot of the stellar seas" accomplishes son* J at that 
puts his in the shade! 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 20, 192 r , 






The Naval Parley 

After the coarse talk of some of the rampant jour- 
nalism, the failure of the naval parley at Geneva is 
beginning to appear in its true light to the average news- 
paper writer. 

We may discount all talk of hostility and disagreement 
in any actual or objective sense. One of our local writers, 
whose articles on international affairs are generally very 
enlightened, appears to have been misled on that point 
by French comment. The whole matter is one of dis- 
agreement between the experts as to what the number of 
light cruisers should be, in view of the needs of Great 
Britain. The American experts looking, perfectly prop- 
erly, at the possibility of war, which is always a contin- 
gency, however remote, regarded the British demand for 
light cruisers as unreasonable and tending to place this 
country at a disadvantage. 

On the other hand, the British maintain that, in view 
of the submarine peril, they are only asking enough light 
cruisers to enable them to keep their necessary food 
supply secure in the narrow seas, the favorite operating 
places of submarines. The submarine was a new weapon 
in the last war and came pretty nearly finishing the war, 
as far as Great Britain was concerned. 

This makes a very awkward situation, for it is very 
clear that if the British naval experts declare that num- 
ber of light cruisers to be necessary, no British admiralty 
board will consent to serve with fewer. If the result is 
competitive building, it is regrettable but unavoidable. 

At the same time, this does not in any way increase 

the risks of war between Great Britain and the United 

States. It only increases the profits of the shipbuilding 

industry. 

* * * 

The Career of a Laborite 

There are all sorts of success, and the latest news of 
P. H. McCarthy is an instance in point. 

We all remember P. H. McCarthy, leader of the build- 
ing trades here during the rosy days of labor supremacy , 
mayor of San Francisco and the champion of the "down 
trodden working man." It is now announced that he is 
going to Boston to spend his later days. His son is about 
to enter Harvard, and two daughters are going to finish- 
ing school at the metropolis of American culture. 

We do not know what Boston is going to do about it, 
for the McCarthy brand of culture will hardly fit with 
that in vogue at the shrine of the Lodges and the Cabots. 
We remember one occasion when it was the duty of the 
ex-president of the building trades, as mayor of San 
Francisco, to address an audience in the amphitheater at 
Berkeley. He had prepared with care and the oration 
was received with glee by the assembled intellectuals. 
No, we cannot imagine P. H. McCarthy as a leader in 
Boston. But even Boston changes, and it may be that 
grammar is not as essential as we have been led to 
believe. 

However, San Francisco has grown too coarse for the 
ex-mayor and his family. He is going East. His children 
are going to high class schools and his son to Harvard. 
This costs money. Which would seem to show that the 
leadership of the union hosts is not so unremunerative 
as might be supposed. There seems to be a career some- 
how or other in labor leadership, a career which among 



other things, produces money. We wonder how this isj 
done. 

We know it has been done several times and that morel 
than one labor leader has died rich. But we have neveil 
been shown convincingly just how they managed it.) 
Some few appear to have learned the trick, among them] 
P. H. McCarthy. 

Trade With Australia 

A leading newspaper woman is here from Australia 
and is about to write accounts of the people of this coun- 
try for the benefit of the Australians. She points out 
that the Australians are greatly interested in the Ameri- 
cans and that the compliment should be returned, for 
Americans make a great deal of money out of Australians. 
The balance in favor of American trade she computes at 
150,000,000 dollars and is continually growing. 

There is no reason why trade with Australia should 
not develop very greatly and why San Francisco should 
not enjoy the full benefit of that trade. There is noi 
people who can better appreciate the needs of a growing 
new country than we, for we are only just emerging from 
that condition ourselves. Better than any long estab- 
lished community we can grasp and anticipate what is 
required in a country which is just breaking through the 
primitive and gradually evolving into an independent! 
modern state. 

Of course, one of the greatest and most satisfying ad- 
vantages which we can get out of Australian intercourse: 
is that it is with people who are essentially like ourselves, 
whose manner and tastes have not to be learned from 
the beginning, like those of the South Americans, for 
example. We know their needs, for their needs are the; 
same as our own. 

It is this fact, coupled with the additional reason that I 
our inventive ability and standardized manufacturing' 
processes give us a great advantage that has placed us- 
far in the lead in competition for trade with Australia. 
We are winning our way to trade superiority in that! 
growing and interesting Commonwealth. The advantages 

are great and permanent. 

* * * 

Our Starved Schools 

The children are going back to school and there is noti 
enough room for them. Not only is the accommodation 
insufficient, but the equipment is not at all what it should 
be in a city of the size of ours, occupying as distinctive 
a position in the world. We are robbing our school chil- 
dren of much of the products of our wealth, to which they 
are entitled by right of birth in the community. 

Every year the school roll grows. It must, or the city 
population would decline and San Francisco would fail. 
If there is one thing certain, it is that the growth and 
progress of the city is dependent upon constant increase 
in the number of children of school age. Whatever else 
comes and goes, the increase in child population must be 
constant if the city is to live. As a matter of fact, it is 
constant. 

But with a strange and quite incomprehensible fatuity, 
the Supervisors appear to be unable to grasp that ele- 
mentary fact. It would seem to be evident that if the 
numbers of school children increase every year, the 
amount of school buildings should be also annually in- 
creased in due proportion. This, the Supervisors will not 



Lijgust 20, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



o. They will not estimate the amount necessary for 
chools and then pay it out of the current income. They 
;t the school accommodation run behind the demand and 
hen make it up with a bond issue. In the meantime, the 
hildren are not properly provided for in the schools and 
he health and education of our growing citizens suffer 
ccordingly. 
We feel that of all civic expenditures, that on education 
I at once the most satisfactory and the most remunera- 
ive in the long run. The schools of this city should be 
f the best sort, well built, commodious and thoroughly 
quipped with the safest and sanest school apparatus, 
'hat they are not so reflects no credit on our city govern- 

lent. 

* * * 

Jew President for 
larket Street Railway 

A man thoroughly versed in business management has 
ust been elected president of the Market Street Railway 
lompany, in the person of Samuel Kahn, who for fifteen 
ears has been an active public utility executive in Cali- 
ornia with the Byllesby Engineering and Management 
orporation, this Corporation having taken charge of 
he Railway Company's operations in San Francisco 
uring the end of 1925. 

In 1912 Mr. Kahn moved to Stockton to participate in 
he management and operating direction of the H. M. 
iyllesby & Company properties on the Pacific Coast, 
vhich are located over a territory from San Diego in the 
outh, to Everett, Washington, in the north. 

While in Stockton, he was active in civic affairs, having 
erved as president of the Chamber of Commerce, gave 
lis time to the Boy Scouts, Community Chest and many 
if Stockton's industrial activities. 

In 1925, Mr. Kahn came to San Francisco to assume 
ctive operating direction of the Market Street Railway 
!ompany. Besides his present position as president of 
his Company, he is a director in the Standard Gas & 

lectric Company, which is the parent organization of all 

Syllesby utilities. 

* * * 

New Highway 

The proposed San Francisco-San Mateo joint highway 
listrict, formed for the purpose of relieving the Colma 
lottleneck by creating a new highway west of the ceme- 
eries, as an extension of Junipero Serra boulevard and 
Nineteenth avenue, was officially endorsed by the Board 
if Supervisors of San Mateo County last Monday. Super- 
ior Harrelson was named by the San Francisco board as 
hairman of the special committee to confer with San 
Mateo County. Harrelson considers that this is one of the 
jlggest things the two counties could put over. The time 
vill come, when the peninsula will be threaded with high- 
rays, and still traffic will be a problem! 

* * * 

leeting-Place 

'or Friends 

"Oh. what pleasure it is to meet SO many old friends:" 

This expression is heard almost every day within the 
vails of the beautiful new Woman's Building. 

Many who, for some reason or another, have been 
separated over a span of years, meet again in the French 
Bunge, in the auditorium halls, in the luncheon rooms, 
he pretty little breakfast nooks, or in the incomparable 
Ittle Theater. 

I verily believe that this unplanned resource is not 

mly going to express its psychological influence, but the 

•ons; ant 'desire to "find a friend" may help to fill the 

offers of the different departments in the Woman S 

luilding, adding materially to its exchequer. 




When Jim Rolph recently announced his candidacy for 
the big city job the surprising thing was that no one was 
surprised. 

* * * 

Seems it's gotten to be as natural to associate "Rolph" 
with "Mayor of San Francisco" as it is "Twin" with 
"Peaks." 

* * # 

Yet, politics is politics, and Jim Rolph assuredly wishes 
he had more power and less Power in the coming mu- 
nicipal unpleasantness. 

* * * 

Not the eternal triangle, but Adolph Uhl, civic worker, 
has made it "three all" in the spurt for mayorship. Mr. 
Uhl is known to all newspaper readers in San Francisco 
on account of his penchant for delving into municipal 
questions. 

* * * 

In a report issued by the State Federation of Labor, 
San Francisco assemblymen and senators are given high 
rating for voting for labor measures in the last legisla- 
ture. Los Angeles legislators stand at the bottom of the 
list. 

* * * 

C. C. Baker of Salinas and C. W. Lyons, Harry Cham- 
berlin and Frank C. Weller from Los Angeles and Pasa- 
dena voted consistently against union propositions. 

* * * 

H. C. Kelsy of Berkeley voted twenty-two times against 
labor and Byron Walters of San Diego twenty-one times. 
Neither voted for labor once. 

* * * 

Jack Spaulding, Olympic Club member, identified with 
the American Legion, Sons of the American Revolution 
and promoter of the East-West football games for the 
benefit of the Shrine Hospital, has shied his beaver into 
the supervisoral ring for the coming municipal bouts. 

* * * 

The Young Men's Rolph Club, Leo A. Cunningham, 
president, has launched a city-wide campaign in the inter- 
est of James Rolph's re-election at the November contest. 

* * * 

The 363rd Infantry of the 91st Division, composed of a 
large number of veterans of the World War, is organizing 
a big drive to once again put Jim Rolph in charge of the 
controls. Col. Thomas A. Driscoll, Major Edward J. 
Mitchell, David McCullough, D. J. French, Frank Baldini, 
James J. Herz and Walter A. Krauter are tuning up their 
machine to put "Sunny Jim" first over the line. 

* * « 

The virgin-like modesty actuating the multitude who 
shall be on that November ballot is edifying. A scant 
dozen have so far announced their candidacy whereas we 
know of at least thirty who are all primed for the political 

hop-off. 

* * * 

Xot much of his own inclinings in the matter of presi- 
dential aspirations could be coaxed out of Nicholas Long- 
worth during his three days' stay at the St. Francis. 
But it's useless to dissemble: who wouldn't want to be 
out there batting at the head of the great American 
League '.' 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 20, 192V 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Days of Elegance 

"Harking back to the days of ele- 
gance" — that's what the Palo Alto 
Show indicated! 

As we sat there in the boxes watch- 
ing the thoroughbreds go through 
their paces, we wondered why on 
earth horses, intelligent thorough- 
bred horses, were ever relegated to 
the side lines and replaced by man- 
made limousines. 

The gorgeous horses — looking as if 
they had just stepped out of some 
story book to revive our jaded senses ! 

"I didn't know that there were so 
many elegant horses left in the 
world," commented the debutante 
sitting beside me. 

"It is like the good, old elegant 
days of old," returned her compan- 
ion, owner of a string of thorough- 
breds, whose eyes glistened with 
pride while he never took his gaze off 
of the field. 

"Any one can own an automobile, 
but, believe me, it takes a thorough- 
bred to recognize a thoroughbred!" 
added his wife as she looked know- 
ingly up into her husband's beaming 
countenance. 

So it was, that the revival of those 
old days of elegance, when horses 
were held in homage, as indicative 
of social standing and prestige, 
aroused our admiration during the 
Palo Alto Horse Show. 

It was all over too soon. We wish 
that the time could have been ex- 
tended and that thousands of others 
who love and appreciate a thorough- 
bred, could have another chance to 
attend. 

* * * 

Why Pants? 

Trousers are trousers, and pants 
are just pants. 

I don't care whether they are worn 
by a man or a woman. That is why, 
perhaps, that we (companion and I) 
did not like the long pants worn over 
the riding boots at the Horse Show. 



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Only a few of the riders wore them 
that way. Thank goodness! 

Most of the women not only sat 
the saddle to perfection — but like the 
thoroughbreds they rode, they were 
groomed to perfection. 

However, some of the smart look- 
ing women-riders did wear the long 
pants over their riding boots, and say 
what you may, they are not "good- 
looking." 

The full trousers, tucked smoothly 
into the boot, not only looked neater, 
more attractive in every way — but 

they were smarter! 

* * * 

Exquisite! 

If ever a lady-of-quality looked 
positively exquisite on her mount it 
was Mrs. William Threlkeld! 

I think I have never seen any one 
who looked as lovely as she. Her 
habit of white, from the top of her 
pretty head to the tip of her snug- 
fitting boot, was the last word in ex- 
quisite attire. 

She was the most perfectly 
groomed young woman it has ever 
been my privilege to see. Her grace 
of manner, her modesty, her charm — 
were all so fascinating she was the 
cynosure of all eyes. 

Mrs. Threlkeld won many first 
prizes and trophies for her riding — 
and as we watched her at the Satur- 
day matinee we felt inclined to add 
other recognition and homage for the 
exquisite picture she certainly was. 

* * * 

Last Whisper in 
Riding Attire 

Beauty and smartness and excellent 
horsemanship were attributes which 
made the Horse Show distinctive. The 
last word in riding attire was pro- 
nounced by the lovely women who 
took part. 

Miss Cecelia de Mille attracted con- 
siderable attention in her handsome 
riding habit. She and Miss Cathryn 
Worth were adorable. Mrs. A. W. 
Pike was one of the favorites, many 
of her entries gathering a liberal num- 
ber of trophies. 

Mrs. S. R. Dannebaum, who makes 
her home at the Fairmont Hotel, was 
one of the most popular exhibitors at 
the Horse Show, her thoroughbreds 
capturing many big prizes. 

Miss Josephine Thomas of Beverly 
Hills, Miss Barbara Thompson of Palo 
Alto, Mrs. William P. Roth of San 



Francisco, Mrs. Charles Sooy, anci 
Miss Jane Spieker were the center 01 
admiration as their horses came out] 
victors in several contests. 

Miss Eleanor Weir of Menlo Park 
was one of the most enthusiastic par-, 
ticipants. Miss Mary C. Young lookec, 
perfectly charming and she was 
jubilant, too! Miss Grace A. Hamil- ( 
ton and Miss Ruth Lansburgh had 
entries in the best amateur riders 
class along with Miss Eleanor Weir. 
They looked charming. One was all 
in brown, one in tan, and still another 
in gray — each one lovelier. 

Many Women Exhibitors 

Many prominent women in addition 
to those I have already named were 
exhibitors at the Palo Alto Horse 
Show. 

Mrs. M. H. Adamson of Los An-i 
geles, Catherine Blair, Miss Dorothy 
Burns, Miss Kathrine Breuner of San 
Francisco, Miss Barbara Carpenter of> 
San Mateo, and Mrs. H. McCormick of 
Washington had entries. 

Miss Patricia Clark of San Mateo, 
one of society's most lauded debu- 
tantes of the entire Pacific Coast,' 
hardly ever misses a horse show no 
matter where she is. Miss Clark ex- 
hibited "Beau Brummel" in the novice 
three-gaited saddle-horse events. 

Miss Diana Dollar of Piedmont and 
her blue-ribbon pony excited the envy 
of many. Miss Alice Forderer of this 
city and Miss Elinor Getz of Beverly 
Hills, and Miss Grace A. Hamilton of 
Menlo Park all had their horses in 
entries. 

* * * 

Aristocrats 

"Aristocrats on both sides the turf 
line" was the comment held by those 
who went with wide-open eyes. 

Most assuredly was the event not- 
ably aristocratic, for certainly no oc- 
casion more than a horse show is 
really capable of bringing out aristo- 
crats. It has always been so — the 
world over. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

Sun Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



tugust 20, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



5 



May we have repetitions of the 
irst Annual Palo Alto Horse Show 
nder the same supervision. Atholl 
IcBean is president of the Northern 
alifornia Horse Show Association, 
he vice-presidents include Joseph 0. 
'obin, R. Stanley Dollar, John S. 
brum, Herbert Fleishhacker, William 

Tevis Jr., Charles D. Dunphy, Alex- 
nder Hamilton. 

Timothy Hopkins is the treasurer. 
}. Albert Lansburgh the secretary. 
Mrectors include: Mark A. McCann, 
Janford Goldstein, George A. Pope 
Ross Ambler Curran, T. T. C. 
Jregory, R. S. Moore, A. E. Schwa- 
acher, C. R. Walter, Alfred Swiner- 
on, Mrs. W. P. Roth. A. P. Fleming 
3 the manager. 



The Ladies 

Prominent among the ladies who 
sxhibited horses were Mrs. Franci J. 
ieney of Los Altos; Mrs. Archibald 
Tohnson, San Mateo, Mrs. G. Albert 

,ansburgh, Miss Ruth and Miss Carol 
^ansburgh, Mrs. Charles Merrill, Mrs. 
^eslie Moore, Mrs. Paul G. Nathan, 
Sacramento; Marybeth Pike, Mrs. A. 
iV. Pike, Redwood City; Mrs. W. P. 
Joth of San Francisco was one of the 
nost enthusiastic ; Mrs. S e 1 m a 
Schwartz of Sacramento; Miss Jane 

pieker of Menlo ; Miss Francis Wood, 
Vliss Virginia Wood and Miss Mary 
tfoung of San Francisco. 



Chamber of Commerce 

The Palo Alto Chamber of Com- 
nerce provided a S1000 stake for fine 
torses. Ben R. Meyer, a stake of the 
same amount for harness horses. 

Miss Ruth Lansburgh, in memory 
if Leland Stanford, had a stake of 
ilOOO for harness ponies. 

Oh. what beauties the harness 
lonies were, too! 

The Dollar Steamship Line gave a 
take of the same amount for three- 
pited saddle horses. They were mar- 
els, those three-gaited horses. 

Timothy Hopkins contributed a 
stake of $1000 for tive-gaited horses. 
Anil that's when my joy went wild! 
How those horses stepped ! So proud 
and so graceful! 

Hunters and jumpers, were award- 

(1 $1000 stakes from the Carnation 

Farm Stable and from Mrs. \V. O. 

Roth. The Nipa Hut gave the same 

stakes for Shetland ponies. 

Never as long as I live do I ever 
expect to see such elegant Shetland 
ponies. They came in singles, in pairs 
and in tandems'. 





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Nob Hill 

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500 Rooms 

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Polo Ponies 

Polo ponies! 

There's the entry ! If you didn't get 
a thrill watching those polo ponies — 
then you're a collapse. 

Light weight, heavyweight, and 
team ponies were entered in the polo 
pony class. The Bloomfield Hills Stock 
Farm awarded $2000 stakes for polo 
ponies. 

William S. Tevis Jr., Hugh Drury, 
Kenneth Walsh, Jean de St. Cyr, Miss 
Eleanor Weir, Lindsay Howard, Miss 
Grace A. Hamilton, J. K. Armsby had 
entries in the polo pony class. 
* * * 

The Gray Thorning Lumber Com- 
pany provided stakes for stock horses. 
The Hartford Livestock Insurance 
Company had two stakes of S500 each 
for draft horses. 



Happy Kiddies 

The happiest people in all the Palo 
Alto Horse Show were the kiddies 
who rode the children's saddle horses 
and the beautiful Shetland ponies. 
Miss Jane Spieker and Marybeth Pike 
were queens in this domain of minia- 
ture thoroughbreds. Mrs. Leslie 
Moore had an entry on Saturday and 
so did D. C. Welty. 

Like the rest of those devotees of 
those days when elegant equipage 
meant the "handsomest span" in 
town. I am eagerly awaiting the next 
Palo Alto Horse Show. 



Substantial Returns 

Substantial return- for the Palo 
Alto Hospital for Convalescent Chil- 
dren are the result of the horse show 
we are informed upon good author- 
ity. The noble purpose had its pre- 
miere in the convincing argument of 
noble steeds looking and performing 
like real intelligentsia ! 



Wedding Ceremony 

A wedding of interest to a large 
circle of friends was that of Miss 
Everne Emelie Schaefer, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Josef Schaefer and Dr. 
Caston Pope. The marriage service 
was read by the Reverend H. S. Feix 
at St. Mark's Lutheran Church at 
8:15 o'clock in the presence of the 
family and a few intimate friends. 
After the ceremony a handsomely ap- 
pointed reception was held at The 
Fairmont Hotel, over two hundred 
being present. The Norman Hall was 
the setting for the affair and was 
beautifully decorated with dahlias 
and roses. 

The bride and groom were assisted 
in receiving by Miss Helen Francke, 
the bridesmaid and Mr. Willis H. 
Kemp of Los Angeles, the best man, 
also Mr. and Mrs. Josef Schaefer. 
Mr. Frank Macbeth, the toastmaster 
of the evening, Mr. Fred Boeken and 
Mr. Tom Miller, general chairmen, 
assisted by Dr. and Mrs. George Mil- 
ler, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kennedy, 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hamon, Dr. and 
Mrs. Coford Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack Mullally, and Mr. James W. 
Harris. 

The bride is well known in society 
and highly accomplished. Dr. Pope is 
one of the rising young professional 
men of the city, prominent in frater- 
nal organizations, being Past Noble 
Grand of the Alta Lodge I. O. O. F. 
and also holding office in Presidio 
Lodge F. & A. M. After a honeymoon 
at Lake Tahoe and vicinity Dr. and 
Mrs. Pope will make their home in 

the city. 

* * * 

Home 

Mrs. May S. Bachman has returned 
to her home at The Fairmont Hotel 
after a visit of several months in New 
York and the fashionable seaside re- 
sorta of the East. During her absence 
she was the recipient of much social 
attention, and many affairs were 
given in her honor. 



Pretty Wedding 

A pretty wedding of midsummer 
was that of Miss Adele Goodwin, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. 
Goodwin, and Mr. Ernest Lafrenz, son 
of Mrs. Katherine Lafrenz, all of San 
Francisco on Tuesday. August 9 at 10 
o'clock in the morning. Rev. Father 
Martin Ryan reading the service in 
the presence of a few intimate friends 
and the immediate family at the 
Chapel of St. Vincent de Paul Con- 
vent. After the ceremony a wedding 
breakfast was served at the Fair- 
mont Hotel to the bridal party. The 
bride was charming in a gown of 
pink chiffon with hat to match, and 

(Continued on page 13) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 20, 19£ 




'LEISURE'S WW 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore- 




Greater Movie Season 

Bringing to the screens of 250 
theatres, motion pictures valued at 
more than $175,000,000, the thirty- 
first birthday of the motion picture 
industry will have as its anniversary 
party in cities west of the Rockies, a 
Greater Movie Season celebration, 
commencing Saturday, August 20. 

Sponsored by the West Coast Thea- 
tres, Inc., and endorsed by the Mo- 
tion Picture Producers and Distrib- 
utors of America, of which Will Hays 
is president, the 1927 Greater Movie 
Season will start simultaneously in 
all cities and towns on the coast from 
Seattle to San Diego where West 
Coast Theatres have holdings. Harold 
B. Franklin, president of this large 
theatre circuit, is general chairman 
of the 1927 season campaign. A. M. 
Bowles is head of the local festival. 
In San Francisco alone, it is esti- 
mated by Chairman Bowles, that 
films worth $75,000,000 will have 
been flashed across the screens of the 
first run theatres before Greater 
Movie Season has passed. 



California 

"Ben Hur," the General Lew Wal- 
lace classic follows "The Big Parade" 
at the California as part of the 
Greater Movie Season attractions. 

Ramon Novarro and Francis X. 
Bushman play the part of the mortal 
enemies, contenders for honors and 
the heart of a girl, according to the 
famous old story. Novarro plays the 
role of Ben Hur. He was selected for 
the character after many other cin- 
ema stars were previously named and 
many others had yearned for the 
role. The choice of Novarro is im- 
mediately commended when seeing 
him as the daring hero and lover. 

This picture cost more than any 
other sent out from the studios, we 
are told upon authority. It is partly 
in color, exquisitely toned colors, and 
has an enormous cast of extras in the 
big scenes. 

Gino Severi and the California or- 
chestra provide musical attractions 
of excellence in attune with the high 
standard of the photoplay. 



By Josephine Young 

Granada 

The "It" girl, Clara Bow, is now on 
the Granada screen, taking the lead- 
ing role in "Hula," the story by Ar- 
mine von Tempski, young author of 
the Hawaiian seas, who knows every 
nook and stream of the islands where 
she lived since childhood days. 

"Hula" seems aptly the role for 
Clara Bow, the stellar sensation of 
the silver screen, whose rise to prin- 
cipal has been nothing short of me- 
teoric. 

The story is full of verve and 
youthful vigor like that of the bril- 
liant young woman who wrote 
"Hula." It was my good fortune to 
know Armine Von Tempski and to 
hear her lecture at the Paul Elder 
Book Shop, where she told her ex- 
periences on her beloved island. Much 
of her life is reflected in the story 
now attracting universal attention. 

Clive Brook, Arlett Marchal are in 
the cast. 

Fanchon and Marco have built 
their idea, this week around play boy, 
Frank Jenks. This picture is part of 
the Greater Movie Season, West 
Coast, Inc. 

* * * 

St. Francis 

"Beau Geste," we are at last as- 
sured, will now be on the screen at 
the St. Francis, following the six 
weeks' run of "The Way of All 
Flesh," which has made motion pic- 
ture theatre record. 

Ronald Colman, Neil Hamilton, 
Ralph Forbes, Noah Beery, Alice 
Joyce, Victor McLaglen, Mary Brian, 
William Powell, Norman Trevor are 
the cast — all names to conjure with, 
in movie parlance. 

This picture was shown at the St. 
Francis before at top prices. Now we 
can all see it again at this theater, at 
their popular prices, starting Satur- 
day morning. 

# * * 

Warfield 

Lon Chaney will be at the Warfield 
Theatre, Greater Movie Season at- 
traction. The man of "a thousand 
faces" comes to the Warfield Satur- 
day, August 20, in "Mockery," in 
which the noted star takes the part 
of a peasant. 

This picture is a story of Russia 
where the drama of its people, with 
(Continued on page 8) 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"The Alarm Clock." Henry Duffy corned 
starring Marion Lord. 

Capitol, Ellis nr. Market 

"Abie's Irish Rose." 

Lurie, Geary at Mason 

"I Love You." comedy, featuring Johnnv Ar 
thur and Alma Tell. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"Two Girls Wanted." comedy by John Golden 
Leneta Lane is the star. 



VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

Triple headline bill of Mercedes, mental teleJ 
pathist; Duci De Kerekjarlo. violinist; ano 
Grette Ardine and John Tyrell. On the screen 
Lois Wilson and Sam Hardy in "Broadway 

Nights," 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Nick Lucas is held over as the headliner for 
the second week. 

Pantages, Market at Hyde 

John Gilbert in "Cameo Kirhy" and a bill of 
vaudeville. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville, pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Musical comedy, pictures. 



ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 

California, Market at 4th 

"The Bic Parade." John Gilbert and Renee 
Adoree. (;ino Severi music. 

Cameo, Market opp. Fifth street 

Dcmpsey-Sharkey Buhl pictures complete run. 
This theater returns to former policy recardin? 
prices and pictures. 

Casino, Ellis at Mason 

Sat.. "Meet the Prince" and "Where the North 
Holds Sway." Sun.. Mon.. "For Alimony 
Only ' and "Old Shoes." Tues., Wed.. Monte 
Blue in "Across the Pacific." Thurs., Fri., 
"Mother" and "The Trouble Chaser." 

Granada, Market at Jones 

"Hula." taken from the recent novel bv Von 
Tempski. Santaella conducting the Granada 
Orchestra in a Fanchon and Marco presenta- 
tion. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6(h. 

"Beau Geste." starring Ronald Colman. Neil 
Hamilton, Ralph Forbes. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"Mockery." featuring Lon Chaney. Walt 

Roesner is conductine the Warfield Orchestra. 

RESIDENCE DISTRICT 

Alhambra, Polk St., nr. Green 

Raymond Hitchcock and Nancy Nash — "I'p- 
strcam." and Marion Nixon and Otis Harlan 
— "Down the Stretch." Sat. Betty Compson— I 
"Lady Bird." Sunday. John Barrymore thrHM 
days — Don Juan, starting Monday. 



\ugust 20, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




Mai Mvrrai 

famed for her bizurrr costumes 



Ciirinnf Griffith 

vquisitcl? appareled 



THE SAN, FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 20, 1927 




reduced 

round trip 
JTfares 




/'"XAKE advantage 
\_J of these low ex- 
cursion fares to visit 
the old home this 
summer. 

Start any day before 
September 30. Re- 
turn limit October 
31. Our travel books 
will help you plan 
your trip and may 
be had upon request. 

SANTA FE Ticket Offices 
and Travel Bureaux 

601 Market Street 

Telephone Sutter 7600 

Santa Fe Depot 

SAN FRANCISCO 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 6) 

tears and smiles intermingled, is de- 
picted via the way of the screen. 

It is said that this picture lay on 
the shelf until dust covered it, wait- 
ing for a suitable actor to portray the 
principal role. Then came Chaney and 
the picture revived is said to be com- 
pelling in its thrilling episodes. 

Fanchon and Marco ideas will be 
startling in plan and presentation, so 

we're told. 

* * * 

Lurie 

"I Love You" is the attraction at 
the Lurie Theater, which opens Mon- 
day night, August 22, with Johnny 
Arthur in the leading role. 

Alma Tell, a Broadway favorite, 
plays opposite and there is a good 
supporting cast to divide honors. 
Local theatergoers are interested in 
Ida Maye, formerly of the Alcazar, 
whose ingenue roles were genuine at- 
tractions. 

This Le Baron comedy brings 
Johnny Arthur back to the stage, and 
although many know him as screen 
comedian, they will recall Arthur's 
last appearance here in "The Butter 
and Egg Man." 

The Lurie play is full of sparkling 
situations and vibrantly clever lines 
while the dominating humor of the 
production makes its appeal to the 
tired business man. It's a rattling 
good comedy. 



Curran 

"The Third Day" will reopen the 
Curran Theater soon, but as we go to 
press we haven't the exact date. Ruth 
Chatterton is the star and "everyone 
loves Ruth." 

This play is adapted from the 
Czecho-Slovakian story by Milin Be- 
govic, John Van Druten. It is pro- 
duced by A. H. Wood. 

Some discussions arose as to who 
would play the leading feminine role, 
which is strong in character. Finally, 
after consideration of many other 
actresses, Ruth Chatterton was the 
choice. 



Alcazar 

"The Alarm Clock," Avery Hop- 
wood's farce-comedy, is attracting 
crowds to the Alcazar with Marion 
Lord, Thomas Chatterton, John 
Stokes and Robert Adams, all Alca- 
zar favorites, playing the leads. Char- 
lotte Treadway takes the heroine 
role. 

Zeda Reed and C. Haviland Chap- 
pell, two new players here, are in this 
mirthful play, and Alice Buchanan, 



William Macauley, John Mackenzie 
and Richard Ellers are in the cast of | 
prominent players. 

Riotous fun and clever dialogue are 
combined in the farce. 

"The Alarm Clock" is the first pro- 
duction to be made by Walter Gilbert, 
the new stage director of the Henry 
Duffy staff, and is rated as one of' 
the best of the year. 
* * * 

President 

"Two Girls W a n t e d," a John 
Golden play, will be given its western 
premiere next Sunday afternoon, Au- 
gust 21 at the President Theater on 
McAllister street, near Market. 

Ever since Golden staged "Light- 
nin," he has held the reputation for 
clean American plays with the maxi- 
mum of fun. 

Leneta Lane plays the principal 
role. Joan Warner is one of the stars 
Earl Lee, Lillian Dean, John O'Hara, 
and other well known Duffy players, 
complete the cast. 



Capitol 

"Abie's Irish Rose" is back at the 
Capitol Theater, opening its present 
engagement on Sunday, August 21, 
for a farewell engagement. The same 
company that presented the play here 
a short time ago will again be seen 
with Dorothy Coghlan taking the 
title role. 

This Anne Nichols' play has just 
broken world records for continuous 
performances, we're authentically 
told, with New- York's theaters bring- 
ing the performances up to 2238. 

William McFadden, Ada Jaffee, Leo 
Hoyt, James R. Walters, Frank Her- 
some, Frank L. Royce and Jack 
Holmes are the players. 



Woodland Theater 

"The Sunset Trail," had its Cali- 
fornia premiere last night, Friday, 
August 19, in the new Woodland 
Theater, Hillsborough, and will be 
presented again today, Saturday, Au- 
gust 20, for the benefit of the people 
who live in the San Mateo County 
Alms House. 

Charles Wakefield Cadman, famous 
American composer, wrote this In- 
dian operetta with its magic interest, 
telling the story of the final flare of 
revolt on the part of the Indians 
against the white man. The lyrics 
were written by Gilbert Moyle of Ber- 
keley. Fred Carlyle has staged the 
production. 

Colorful dances, rich costumes, bat- 
tle scenes, weird lightning and an 
artistic performance are distinctive 
features of "The Sunset Trail." 



August 20, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



9 



Tickets may be obtained at Sherman- 
Clay, at the office, 57 Third avenue, 
San Mateo, and at the Woodland 
Theater the nights of the perform- 
ance. 

Those who do not go down the 
peninsula to the new theater are ad- 
vised that they can take the Market 
Street railway to San Mateo. Get off 
at the corner of Griffith and Tilton 
avenues and then have but a short 
walk to the theater. Taxicabs will be 
at the end of the line in San Mateo 
for the convenience of those who go 
to see this remarkable operetta by 
Charles Wakefield Cadman. 



Orpheum 

The Orpheum will headline Nick 
Lucas, the crooning troubadour, on 
their program beginning with the Sa- 
turday matinee, August 20. Lucas 
has a new program of his record song 
hits which he will give to the Or- 
pheum patrons, during this engage- 
ment. 

Other Orpheum features will be 
placed on the program with a few 
favorites of last week for the hold- 
over attractions. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Three headline acts at the Golden 
Gate Theater include Mercedes, the 
scientific sensation, assisted by the 
"Marvelous Mystic" Mile. Stantone; 
Duci De Kerekjarto, royal violinist 
virtuoso, accompanied by his sister, 
Marika De Kerekjarto, and Grette 
Ardine and John Tyrell, dancers. 

"Broadway Night" will be the 
screen feature, with Lois Wilson the 
star. Comedy films, Pathe News, 
Aesop's Fables, a scenic and Claude 
Sweeten and the Golden Gate Orches- 
tra in special musical numbers are 
also included on the program. 



Cameo 

The popular Cameo Theater on 
Market street, opposite Fifth, really 
had what is known in newspaper par- 
lance, a "scoop" thi:- past week in the 
presentation of the Dempsey-Shar- 
key fight pictures. 

First to announce its screening of 
the big fight, round by round, the 
Cameo was the only theater to fea- 
ture the training camps of both 
Dempsey and Sharkey. Manager F. 
A. Lacey gave out the first announce- 
ment of local screening of these fight 
films. 

Manager Lacey announces that 
with the conclusion of the fight pic- 
tures the Cameo Theater will return 
to its former policy of prices and pic- 
tures which are changed twice and 
sometimes three times a week. 



Alhambra 

The Alhambra Theater on Polk 
street, near Green, where Walter 
Rudolph and his melody masters pro- 
vide some of the very best music in 
any motion picture theater, will this 
week present a good program. 

Raymond Hitchcock and Nancy 
Nash appear Saturday in "Up- 
stream," and Marion Nixon and Otis 
Harlan in "Down the Stretch." 
Betty Compson in "Lady Bird," Sun- 
day. Monday, Tuesday and Wednes- 
day John Barrymore will be screened 
in "Don Juan." 

Pantages 

"Cameo Kirby," a fitting vehicle 
for John Gilbert, is on the Pantages 
screen this week. Gertrude Olm- 
stead plays the feminine lead and the 
cast includes Alan Hale, Richard 
Tucker, Jean Arthur and Eric Mayne. 

No period of American history has 
been more fruitful of adventure and 
romance than the heydey of the 
steamboat traffic on the Mississippi. 
Booth Tarkington and Harry Leon 
Wilson, in creating the character of 
Cameo Kirby, in the play of that 
name, realized the lure of the old 
river days and made a play with a 
real American background. 



"Sweethearts' quarrel! Why, your 
girl didn't give you that, did she?" 

"No ; it was her other sweetheart." 
— Answers. 

e, you pay no more jQ 

fiESTFlOWHg 

1 * TheAfoice o/a Thousand Gardens" 

224-226 GrantAve. TelKeamy 4975 



Feather River Inn 
People Have Good Times 

One thing noticeable about Feather 
River Inn, especially: The people all 
seem to have a radiantly good time. 

The season at Feather River Inn 
is still very active, for although a 
number of prominent people have left 
on account of the opening of schools, 
there are many young people here. 

The ladies' golf championship was 
won by Mrs. G. E. Sykes of Hollister. 
She was presented with a beautiful 
silver fruit dish. 

The mixed doubles tennis tourna- 
ment was won by Jane Leighton of 
New York and Henry E. Keyes of 
Stanford University. It was a hard 
fought match between Janette Whit- 
man and Freddie Whitman of Bur- 
lingame. 

Mr. E. J. Tobin and family left for 
home after a stay of six weeks at the 
inn. 

The dinner dance last Friday eve- 
ning was well attended and several 
large dinners were given. Among 
those entertaining were: Mrs. A. C. 
McLaughlin, who gave a dinner to 
celebrate her husband's birthday. 
Among her guests were: Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank King. Miss Evelyn Mc- 
Laughlin, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Eames, 
Mr. Hugh Leighton. 



"Hello, Perkins, where did you get 
the black eye?" 



\mprov/ngr 
c^nFranc/sco 

r BVLLESBY~*-i 



bl Market fe 





Barrier sign used by track department 
of Market Street Railway Company 

Samuel Kahn, 
President 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 20, 1927 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




C. J. Pennington 

Radio Show 

With the opening of the fourth an- 
nual Pacific Radio Show tonight, the 
next few days will be marked with 
feverish preparations on the part of 
both the show committee of the Pa- 
cific Radio Trade Association and the 
hundred or more exhibitors. 

The association and the exhibitors 
have transformed interior into a col- 
orful setting that promises to furnish 
the most beautiful background of any 
radio exposition ever held in the 
West. Both the decorations and the 
lighting scheme will be commensur- 
ate in their artistic effect with the 
beauty of the radio equipment on dis- 
play. 

In view of the fact that this show 
marks the opening of the new radio 
season throughout the United States, 
city officials have joined with the 
Radio Association in making this an 
event of more than merely local im- 
portance. Special lighting plans have 
been developed for the Civic Center, 
the City Hall and the exterior of the 
Auditorium. Market street is dec- 
orated from the Ferry Building to 
the Auditorium in honor of a thou- 
sand or more radio dealers, manufac- 
turers and distributors from up and 
down the coast, who will be here for 
this occasion. 

The doors will be opened at 7 o'clock 
tonight. The dedicatory program 
starts at 7 :45 o'clock. Thereafter, the 
show will be open every afternoon 
and evening with a variety of enter- 
tainment and special events crowd- 
ing the program. 

Many interesting and novel ex- 
hibits will be featured in the show, 
according to officers of the associa- 



tion. More than 300 nationally ad- 
vertised lines will be shown covering 
radio receiving sets and accessories. 
Every available bit of exhibit space 
has been taken and the success of the 
show is already pre-determined. 

In addition to the commercial radio 
exhibits there will be a number of 
displays illustrating uses of radio 
other than the reception of broadcast 
station programs. There will be a 
high powered monoplane of the same 
type as used in the trans-Pacific 
flights fully equipped with the radio 
devices that have enabled the fliers to 
successfully negotiate the great dis- 
tance between here and Honolulu. 
The Signal Corps of the United 
States Army will have an exhibit of 
its field equipment and will project 
motion pictures showing the Signal 
Corps in action in the field. 

Perhaps one of the most elaborate 
features will be the operation of a 
modern broadcast station with its 
studio and control rooms. This will 
be erected on the stage and glass en- 
closed in order that show visitors 
may see all of the operations required 
in broadcasting radio entertainment. 
Programs both afternoon and eve- 
ning will be given in this studio by 
the leading artists of six of the local 
stations, KPO, KGO, KFRC, KYA, 
KFWI and the National Broadcasting 
Company. 

Through the courtesy of the Na- 
tional Broadcasting Company a part 
of the show program every night will 
be broadcast over its Pacific Coast 
network of seven stations, KPO and 
KGO, San Francisco; KFI, Los An- 
geles; KOMO and KFOA, Seattle; 
KGW, Portland and KHG, Spokane. 



Radio Singers Need 
Ability Plus 

Even a radio singer must know 
how to sing. 

It seems almost impossible to con- 
vey this thought to the thousands of 
woefully deficient vocalists who 
weekly descend upon the broadcasting 
stations of the country, say officials 
of KFI. 

Students of a month's standing be- 
siege radio stations, sure that over- 
night fame and fortune await them. 
Many cannot read music. Few can 
produce a correct scale. None would 
dare to approach concert or theatrical 
managers, but all consider the micro- 
phone legitimate prey. Of one thou- 



sand applicants, less than ten are 
really acceptable, and perhaps only 
one is a valuable find. 

"A good radio singer must have a 
flawless production. This perfection 
is not necessary in concert work for 
their facial expression, costume, per- 
sonality and the distance of the 
singer from the listener mask even 
major defects. A radio singer stands 
within three feet of the microphone 
and the loud speaker is only a few 
feet from the auditor. Few artists 
can sing in your ear and make you 
like it. 

"The concert artist may work with 
the vigor and broad strokes of a 
mural painter, while the radio singer 
must sing with the meticulous exact- 
ness of a painter of miniatures. The 
radio voice must not be 'breathy' as 
the impact of the breath column on 
the microphone may overload the 
tubes. Correct breathing from a well 
supported diaphragm is necessary for 
a firm free tone. Clean unexaggerat- 
ed diction is imperative to prevent 
hisses and gurgling noises. Playing 
to what is really a blind audience, 
color and feeling are the soul of the 
radio voice. Great volume is not 
necessary, but the muscular ability to 
maintain a certain tone level and 
color is. Also the artist must have an 
innate sense of dramatic effect ; must 
be able to pull down volume on forte 
passages and still achieve power. 
Tempo, so often disregarded, is one 
of the rarest and most valuable aids 
of the broadcast vocalist." 

In the ruck of the three gold 
rushes — '49, movie and radio — have 
trailed thousands of incompetents. 
Time weeds them out, however, and 
in the next five years the supply of 
bad radio artists will have exhausted 
itself running from studio to studio. 
Then radio stations will be able to 
concern themselves with using the 
suitable material at hand rather than 
struggling to evade the inadequate. 



Modernist — In this painting, be- 
loved, I have laid bare my innermost 
soul. 

Fiance (thoughtfully) — Tell me, 
Klodmir, don't you think we'd better 
break off our engagement? — Flieg- 
ende Blaetter. 

* # * 

It's never too late for a woman to 
keep an appointment. 



August 20, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



Radio Programs 



KFRC— DON LEE 
SAN FRANCISCO— 454 



1. — Services from Old St. 



Sunday. August 21 
12:00 noon to 1:00 p. 

Mary's Church. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Twilight recital. 
6:00 to 6:25 p. m. — Talk by Dr. West. 
6 :25 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen reports. 
8:30 to 10:30 p. m.— Walter Krausgrill's Orchestra. 

Monday, August 22 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Early Bird program. 
8:00 to 8:30 a. m.— Jenny Wren overture. 
8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m.— Sherman, Clay program. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
6:00 to 6:20 p. m. — Joe Mendel and his pep band. 
6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen, police reports. 
fi:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Western Motors Co. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Eddie Harkness' dance orchestra. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Blue Monday jamboree. 
10:00 to 1:00 p. m. — KFRC's period on gala Radio 
Show program. 

Tuesday, August 23 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Early Bird program. 

8:00 to 8:30 a. m. — Jenny Wren overture. 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m.— Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m.— Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 

11:30 a. m. to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryout program. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m.— Organ recital. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6:30 to 6:50 p. m.— Russell-Colvin Co. 

6:50 to 7:00 p. m.— "Investment Securities. 

7-00 to 7:30 p. m.— Eddie Harkness' dance orchestra. 

•00 to 8:30 p. m.— KFRC Radio Movie Club. 

•30 to 9:30 p. m.— Walter Krausgrill's orchestra. 
9:30 to 12:00 p. m| — Eddie Harkness' dance orchestra. 

Wednesday, August 24 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Early Bird program. 

8:00 to 8:30 a. m.— Jenny Wren overture. 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m.— Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Household hints. 

11-30 to 12:00 noon— Musical tryout period. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m.— Sherman. Clay concert. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m.— Organ recital. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m.— Mac and his gang. 

6:20 to 6:80 p. m. Stage and screen. 

6:80 to 7:00 p. m— Western Motors Co. 

7-00 to 7:30 p. m. -Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 

8 : 00 to 9:00 p. m.— Maxwell HouflC CottW program. 

:00 to 10:00 p. m.— KFRC trio. u™»™ 

10:00 to 12:00 p, m. Walter KraUsgrilU orchestra. 

Thursday. August 25 

7-00 to 8:00 a. m. — Early Bird program. 
slim in 8:30 p. m. Jenny Wren overture, 
g.jjg h , g.QO a. m. Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m, Musical program. 
n -00 to u :80 a. m Doings of Dorothy. 
11*30 i" 12:00 noon Amateur tryouts. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. Sherman. Clay COHOart. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m— Organ recital. 

r ,. ;lll ,,, 8 ;20 p, m.- Madame Marie's Beaut* Talk. 

6'30 to 7:00 p. m. Western Motors to. 

7 mki to t :10 p. m. Shu-.' and screen. 

?il0 to 7:80 p. m.— Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 

B-00 i" 9:00 p. m. -Mona Motor Oil ' o. 

„. no t0 10:00 p. m. Instrumental concert solos. 

[0 :5o ,o 12:00 p. m. -Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 

Friday, August 26 

7-00 to 8:00 a. n.. Earls I 1 ""'' program. 

8:00 to B:80 a. m. Jenns \n ren overture. 

i ,,. g ;00 a. m Musical program. 
10:00 bo 11:00 a. m. Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:80 a. m. Hints o home-makers. 

18:00 noon -Amateur tryouta. 

10 ... . to p. m. Organ 

. ,. ;2Q p. m. Mac and his gang. 

,. ■■ ;8Q p "i e and screen, 

I ,i,i p . m. AH Uornl program. 
-no to i 80 p. m Mark Hoi-kins dance orchestra. 

.,, b B nfl p , m . Musical educational series. 
a.qq „ io:00 p. m. Walter Krausenjls ™"™- 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. Mark Hopkins danes orcheatra. 

Saturday. August 27 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. Early Bird program. 
a. m. -Jenny Wren orchestra. 
bo 9:00 a. m. -Musical program, 
to 11:00 a. m.— Musical program. 

11:00 to 11(46 a. m, -Amateur tryouta. 

U:46 to 12:00 noon Announcements of Sunday 
church sermons. 

1:00 p. m. Sherman. Clay concert. 
4:S0 to 5:30 p. m. -Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 
p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
8:80 p. ni. Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. Western Motors Co. 
7 :0Q to T :80 p. m.— Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 
Ml a. m.— Mark Hopkins dance or- 
chestra. 



KYA— PACIFIC BROADCAST CORP. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 309.1 
Sunday, August 21 

11 :00 a. m.— Church services. 

7:45 p. m. — Church services. 

Monday, August 22 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Golden Gate Crier. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Concert Trio. 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Golden Gate Crier. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Prize package period. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m.— The Venetian Quartet. 

8:30 to 9:00 p. m.— The Venetian Quartet. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 1:00 a. m. — Broadcast from Radio Show. 

Tuesday, August 23 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Golden Gate Crier. 

8 :00 a. m. — Correct time. 

10:30 to 10:45 a. m.— Diet and health talk. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

4 :00 to 5 :00 p, m. — Broadcast from special studio of 

Radio Show. 
5:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Golden Gate Crier. 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — "Magazine on the Air." 
7:15 to 7:30 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Truett-George Instrumental Duo 

and KYA Artists. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Benny Lipston, lyric tenor. 
10:00 p. m. — Correct time. 
Wednesday, August 24 
7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Golden Gate Crier. 
8 :00 a. m.- — Correct time. 
12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

5 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Golden Gate Crier. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Malvina Cohn, soprano. 

10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m.— Broadcast from the special 
studio of the Radio Show. 

Thursday, August 25 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Golden Gate Crier. 

8:00 a. m. — Correct time. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

5 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Golden Gate Crier. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Regular weekly meeting "26th 
Squad." 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — The Clarion Trio. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. -The KYA Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. 

Friday. August 26 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Golden Gate Crier, 

8:00 a. m. — Correct time. 

10:30 to 10:45 a. m. — Diet and health talk. 

12:30 to 2:00 j 

5 :30 to 7 :00 p 

7 :00 to 7:30 p 

S :00 to 9:00 p 

9:00 to 10:00 

10:00 p. m. — 

Saturday. August 

7 ;00 to 8:00 a. r 

S:00 a. m.— Correct time. 

18:80 to 2:00 p. m. -Clifl Hotel Concert Trio. 

5:30 to 7:00 p. m. Golden Gate Crier. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program by Annae K. Blotcky. 

10:00 p. m. Correct time. 



Thursday, August 25 

5 :30 p. m. — Elkin's and Hite's Dixieland Orchestra. 

6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 

6 :30 p. m. — Don Parker, popular pianist. 

7:00 p. m. — Pastel trio. 

8:00 p. m. — Mrs. Edward C. Crossman, contralto. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — Program of modern classical music. 

Friday, August 26 

5:30 p. m. — Eugene Biscailuz program. 

6:15 p. m. — Talk on the Hollywood Bowl. 

6:30 p. m. — Lois Whiteman and Ralph Van Hoore- 

i beke. 

7:00 p. m.— Program by Paul Roberts. 

8:00 p. m. — Program of popular music. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m.— Packard Ballad Four. 

Saturday, August 27 

5:30 p. m. — Strangers Social Club Orchestra. 

6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket program. 

7 :30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado and Edna Clark Muir. 

8 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9 :00 p. m.— Program by Maurine Dyer. 
10:00 p. m.— Packard Radio Club. 

11 :00 p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. 



("lift Hotel Concert Trio. 
3. m. — Golden Gate Crier. 
p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio, 
p. m. — Studio program, 
p. m. — KYA artists. 
Correct time. 
27 
. -Golden (late Crier. 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE 
OAKLAND— 508 
Monday, August 22 

10:30 a. m. — Martha Lee; George Keneipp. 
5 :30 to 6 :30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club . 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Amusement information. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Special program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Weekly meeting of Lake Merritt 

Ducks. 
Tuesday, August 23 
2:45 p. m.— Baseball. 
5 :30 to 6 :30 p. m. — Brother Bob. 
7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Amusement information. 
Wednesday, August 24 
10 :30 a. m.— Martha Lee. 
2 :45 p. m. — Baseball. 
5 :30 to 6 :30 p. m.— Brother Bob. 
6:30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Athen Athletic club orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Amusement information. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Educational program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Special program. 
Thursday. August 25 

2 :45 p. m. —Baseball. 

G :80 to 6 :80 p. m.— Brother Bob. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Ern Russell in "song and story." 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Amusement information. 

Friday. August 26 

10:80 a.m. — Martha Lee. 

2 :45 p. m. — Baseball. 

5 :30 to 6 :30 p. m. — Brother Bob. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Amusement information. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Community night program. 

9:30 to 10:30 p. m. —Athens Athletic club orchestra. 

Saturday. August 27 

2:45 p. m.— Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Amusement information. 



KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY. INC 
LOS ANGELES — 16$ METERS 

Sunday. August 21 

10:00 a. m. Morning service. 

11:00 ;i. m. - Baptist Church serai 

6:00 p. m.— Boris Myronoff. concert pianist. 

6:1)8 p. m. — Father Ricards foreaast 

m.— Aeolian organ n 
v ( ,n p, ,„. Packard classic hour 
■too p m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

,. m.- Hilly Cox and his Packard Eight Orches- 
tra. 
Monday. August 22 
S*80 p. m- -Carl Hansen, musical saw. 

i m. - Radiotorial. 
6:30 P. m.— Gamut male quartet. 
7:00 p. m.— C.ene Johnstons Music Box hour. 
m .— National Broadcasting Company. 
s!00 P. m.— Shell Company of California. 
10:00 p. m. — Purcell Mayer. twin 
Tuesday. August 23 
5-30 p m.— The Dragon Hawanans. 

p m.-Talk on the Hollywood Bowl. 
6:15 p. m.—Prof. Carl S. Knopf. 
6:30 p. m.— Louise Caselotn contralto. 
7:00 p. m. -Bill Punk and his Packard Six Orchestra. 
m. -Song recital by Virginia Flohn and Rob- 
ert Hurd. _ 
9 . 00 p m —National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m.— Collegiate Aeolian Dance Orchestra. 
Wednesday. August 24 v M ,„ 
5:30 p. m.- -Sebastians Cotton Club Orchestra. 
6:15 p. m.— Radiotorial period. 
|:8Q p. m.— Pal O'Mine trio. 

m ._ Mick Harris detective stones. 
v m . -William MacDougatl. Scotch singer, 
p. m.— Calpet String Quartet. 
9-00 p m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
10 00 p m.— Virginia McCoy, contra-con tralto. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC 

OAKLAND— 394 
Sunday. August 21 
11:00 a. m. — Church service. 

o 7:3<) p. tn.— Bern's Little Symphony. 
7 :80 p. m. --Weather and baseball. 
7:86 to 9:00 p. m. — Church service. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
Monday. August 22 

11:110 a. m. to 1:00 p. m.— Hotel Leamington concert. 
12:30. weather; 1:00 weather: 1:03. S. F. stocks. 
1:00 to 5:00 p. m. -Hotel St. Francis dance orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— KGO Kiddies' Kluh. 
6 :00 to 6 :46 p. m.— Stanislas Bern's Little Symphony. 
6:45 p. m.— "What's Happening > n the World." 
7:03. weather: 7:06, baseball; 7:08. S. F. produce. 

cram, cotton : 7:16. S. F. stocks (closingt; 7:23. 

N. Y. stocks (closing i. 
S;00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 to 9:20 p. m. — "Chats About New Books." 
Tuesday. August 23 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Hotel Leamington concert. 
12:30. weather: 1:00 weather: 1:03. S. F. stocks. 
2:00 to 3:00 p. m.— Pacific Radio Trade Association 

concert. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— Hotel St. Francis orchestra. 
6 :00 to 6 :55 p. m. — Stanislas Bern's Little Symphony. 
7:08, weather; 7:06, baseball; 7 :0*. S. F. 

produce, grain, cotton: 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 

7 :'23. N. Y. stocks (closing!. 

| :'i0 p. m. -t Oakland studio I — The Pilgrims. 
9-00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 10:30 p. m.—"HM" and "JP" entertain. 

10 :30 to 11 :00 p. m.— Surprise broadcast. 
Wednesday. August 24 

11 -SO to 1 :00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington concert. 
12*80 weather: 1:00. weather: 1:03. S. F. stocks. 

2 :00 to 3 :00 p. m.— Pacific Radio Trade Association 
concert. . „ 

4:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Hotel St Francis orchestra. 

6-00 to 6 :"-> P ™ Bern's Little Symphony. 

,ws: 7:03. weather: 7:06. baseball: 7 :0S. S. t . 
produce, grain. ' cotton : 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing) . 
7:23. N. Y. stocks (cloafngt- 

«-00 to 9:00 p. m. — Vacation program. 

9 00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

10 :00 to 12 :00 p. nu^John Wolohan s California!*. 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 20, 1927 



CALIFORNIA BY DAYLIGHT 




Along the Sea 

to 

Los Angeles 

— famous non-stop journey over 
the scenic Coast Line 

The Daylight skirts the sea- 
shore for 113 miles of the trip 
to Los Angeles. Mountains 
slope to the blue Pacific; here 
and there lush valleys; inter- 
esting cities are along the 
way. 

A fascinating journey of 12 
daylight hours — 7:45 a.m. to 
7:45 p. m. Observation and 
club car comfort at no extra 
charge. Special family - style 
lunch and dinner, $1, and a la 
carte menu at breakfast. All- 
day lunch car for light re- 
freshments, moderately priced. 

£<M^B.50 San Francisco 
^r*l^ to Los Angeles 

and back, limit 18 days. Ten 
trains daily, including the 
Sunset and the Owl, unexcel- 
led for overnight travel. 

Visit Los Angeles. Play at 
the beaches. See Hollywood, 
great movie center, Pasadena, 
Long Beach, the missions. 

To see California take the 

Daylight 

Southern Pacific 

San Francisco Offices — 

65 Geary St. Ferry Station 3rd St. Station 

Phone Davenport 4000 

Oakland Offices— 

13th.&B'Way 16th St.Sta. Ist&B'waySta. 

Phone Lakeside 1420 



—Hotel Leamington concert, 
weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 



Thursday, August 25 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington concert. 

12:30. weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks. 

2 :00 to 3 :00 p. m. — Pacific Radio Trade Association 
concert. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Hotel St. Francis Orchestra. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— "Friends to Boys." 

6:00 to 6 :55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:55, news; 7:03, weather; 7:06, baseball; 7:08, S. F. 
produce, pram, cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing) ; 
7:23, N. Y. stocks (closing). 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.-KGO players. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m— Hotel St. Francis dance orches- 
tra. 

Friday, August 26 

11 :30 a. m. to 1:00 

12:30. weather; 1:00, 
1:08. N. Y. stocks. 

2:00 to 3 :00 p. m. — Pacific Radio Trade Association 
concert. 

4 :00 to 5:00 p. m. — Hotel St. Francis Concert Orches- 

tra. 

5 :30 p. m.- — Wise man from the Land-O-Health. 
6:00 to 6 :45 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6 :45 to 6 :55 p. m.— -"Weekly Financial Review." 
6:55. news; 7:03. weather; 7:06. baseball: 7:08, S. F. 

produce, grain, cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing) ; 
7:23, N. Y. stocks (closing). 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Western Artist Series. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Hotel St. Francis dance orches- 
tra. 

Saturday. August 27 

11:30 a. m. to 1 :00 ; 
concert. 

12:30, weather: 1:00, weather; 
1 :08, N. Y. stocks. 

2 :00 to 3 :00 p. m.— Pacific Radio Trade Association 
concert. 

4 :00 to 5:00 p. m.— Hotel St. Francis Concert Orches- 
tra. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10 :00 p. m. to 1 :00 a. m. — Wilt Gunzendorfer's Band. 



-Hotel Leamington concert. 
1:03, S. F. stocks; 



KPO— HALE BROTHERS AND THE CHRONICLE 

SAN FRANCISCO — 122 
Sunday, August 21 

2:45 to 4 :30 p. m.— Broadcast of baseball game. 
6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 
6 :30 r. m. — Baseball scores. 

6:35 to 8 :35 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 
8 :35 to 10 :00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
Monday, August 22 

6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
11:30 to 12:50 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 
12 :50 p. m.- — Stock market quotations. 
1 :00 to 2:00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

3 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m.— States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
7:30 to 8 :00 p.m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program by National Broadcasting. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Program for Shell Company of 

California, KPO-KFL 
10 :00 p. m. to 12 midnight— KPO's variety hour. 
Tuesday. August 23 
6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:30 to 12:50 p. m.— Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon— Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12:50 p.m. — Stock market quotations. 

1 :00 to 2 :00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

2:45 to 4 :30 p. m.- — Broadcast of baseball game. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

7 :30 to 8 :00 p. m— DX. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Dan Casey's fireside hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 11:00 p.m. — Palace Hotel dance orchestra. 

Wednesday, August 24 

6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:30 to 12:50 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

12:50 p. m.— Stock market quotations. 

1 :00 to 2 :00 p. m.- — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

2 :45 to 4 :30 p. m. — Broadcast of baseball game. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m.— Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
7 :30 to 8 :00 p. m.— DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Atwater Kent Artists. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

Thursday, August 25 

6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10:30 to 10:45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:30 to 12:50 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12:50 p.m. — Stock market quotations. 



1 :00 to 2 :00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
2 :45 to 4 :30 p. m. — Broadcast of baseball game. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6:30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m.— States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m.-DX. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company's 

10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Palace Hotel dance orchestra. 

Friday. August 26 

6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m.— Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 ^0 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:45 a. m. — Ninon, fashion critic. 

11:30 to 12:50 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12:45 p.m. — Commonwealth luncheon at Palace Hotel. 

1 :30 to 2 :00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

2 :45 to 4 :30 p. m. — Broadcast of baseball game. 

4 :30 to 5 ;30 p. m.— Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :20 p. m.— Book review. 

7 :20 to 7 :30 p. m— Sports-on-the-air. 
7:30 to 8 :00 p.m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Program, the Calpet orchestra. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Stales Restaurant orchestra. 
Saturday. August 27 
6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. --Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m.— Domestic economist. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:30 to 12:50 p. m.— Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12 :50 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

1 :00 to 2 :00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

2 :45 to 4 :30 p. m.— Broadcast of baseball games. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m.— Twilight hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.-DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. —National Broadcasting Company. 

9 :00 to 12 :00 midnight— Goodrich Silvertown Cord or- 

chester. 
12 :00 m. to 1 :00 a. m. — Palace Hotel dance orchestra. 



KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN 
PORTLAND — 191.5 
Sunday, AugUBt 21 

7 :30 to 9 :00 p. m.— Evening Church services. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
10:00 to 11 :00 p. m.— Little Symphony orchestra 
Monday, August 22 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 7 :45 p. m. — Utility service. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Concert. 
Tuesday, August 23 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— "Travelogue." 

7 :30 to 7 :45 p. m.— Utility service. 

7 :45 to 9 :00 p. m.— Educational program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance music. 
Wednesday, August 24 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

7 :30 to 7 :45 o. m.— Utility service. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
Thursday, August 25 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m.— Utility service. 

7 :45 to 8 :00 p. m.— Lecture. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
Friday. August 26 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 8 :00 p. m.— Program. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

Saturday, August 27 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m.- — Dinner concert. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m.— Dance music. 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS. INC. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 267 
Sunday, August 21 
12 :30 to 1 :30 p. m.— Organ recital. 
7:50 to 9:00 p. m.— Services from Sixth Church of 

Christ Scientist 
9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Laura Ellen Windsor and pupils. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 
Monday, August 22 

8:20 to 10 :27 a. m.— Musical breakfast program. 
10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 
10:30 to 11:00 a. m.—Babette's fashion hints. 
11:00 to 12:00 m.— Organ recital. 
12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m, — Luncheon program. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KFWI tea party. 
5 :00 to 5 :30 p. m. — Construction reports. 
5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m. — Theatrical announcements. 
6:00 to 7 :00 p. m.- — Dinner hour concert. 
7 :00 to 7 :I5 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7 :15 to 7 :30 p. m. — Advertising talk. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Clyde Cooper's Roof Garden orches- 

tra. 
9:00 to 9:30 p. m.— Geo. Taylor and Clem Kennedy. 

9 :30 to 10 :00 p. m.— Darneille Sisters. 
10:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 12:00 p. m.— Clyde Cooper's Roof Garden or- 
chestra. 



August 20, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT 

of the State of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco 

Margaret Vanderhoogt, Plaintiff, vs. John W. B. 
Vanderhoojrt. Defendant. 

Nil 18462$. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the State 
of California in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the office of 
the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The people of the State of California send greeting 
to: John W. B. Vanderhoogt, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above-named Plaintiff in 
the Superior Court of the State of California, in and 
for the City and County of San Francisco, and to 
answer the Complaint filed therein within ten days 
(exclusive of the day of service) after the service on 
you of this summons, if served within this City and 
County : or if served elsewhere within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of ma- 
trimony now existing between plaintiff and defend- 
ant, on the grounds of defendant's wilful desertion 
and wilful neglect, also for general relief, as will 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
special reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you appear 
and answer as above required, the said Plaintiff will 
take judgment for any money or damages demanded 
in the complaint as arising upon contract or will 
apply to the Court for other relief demanded in the 
complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco. 

Dated this twenty-seventh day of July, 1927. 

H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
By J. J. RAFFERTY, Deputy Clerk. 
(Seal) 

Austin Lewis, 473 Mills Bldg., San Francisco, 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE: 
The MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, loca- 
tion of principal place of business, San Francisco, 
Calif. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 2nd day of August, 1927, an 
assessment of one-half cent per share was levied upon 
the issued capital stock of the corporation payable 
immediately in legal money of the United States, ti> 
the Secretary, at the office of the company. Room 
245, Monadnock Building. San Francisco, Calif. 

Any stock on which this assess nifnt shall remain 
unpaid on the 5th day of September, 192*1 will be 
delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, 
nd unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
Tuesday the 27th day of September, 1927 to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with ens Is of adver- 
tising and expense of sale. 

M. .1, SBELY, Secretary, 
245 Monadnock Building, 
San Francisco. Calif. 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime. Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 




Tuesday, August 23 

7 :00. 7 :S0 and 8 :00 a. m. -Health exercises. 
8:20 to 10:27 a. m.— Musical breakfast program. 
10:2, to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 
10:30 to 11:00 a. m.— Beauty hints. 
12:00 to 12:30 p. m. — Musical luncheon program 
12 :30 to 1 :00 p. m.— Organ recital. 

I :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Cowell Dein. piano and banjo. 
5 :00 to 5 :30 p. m.— Construction reports. 

5 :30 to 6 ;00 p. m.— Theatrical announcements. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner houV concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m.— KFWI Builders of Progress Club. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Barnes Vaudeville Agency. 
10:00 p. m.— Weather and police reports. 
10:03 to 11 :00 p. m. — Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 
11:00 to 12:00 p.m.— Zezz Black's mysterious hour. 
Wednesday, August 24 

7 :00, 7 :30 and 8 :00 a. m.— Health exercises. 
8:20 to 10:27 a. m.— Musical breakfast program 
10:27 to 10:30 a. m.— U. S. weather reports. 
10:30 to 11:00 a. m.— Cynthia Grey's column. 

II :00 to 12:00 m.— Organ recital. 

12 :00 to 12 :30 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

12 :30 to 1 :00 p. m.— Organ recital. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5 :00 to 5 :30 p. m. — Construction reports. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m. — Theatrical announcements. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Louis Donato and Jack Kelsey. 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7 :15 to 7 :30 p. m. —Studio program. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program by Jerry Warner, singing 

banjoist. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Clifford Schneider, baritone. 
10:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 
10:03 to 12 :00 p. m. — Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 
Thursday, August 25 

7 :00, 7 :30 and 8 :00 a. m.— Health exercises. 
S :20 to 10 :27 a. m. — Musical breakfast program. 
10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

10 :30 to 11 :00 a. m. — Fashion hints by Babette. 
12 :00 to 12 :30 p. m.— Musical luncheon program 
12:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Organ recital. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

4 :00 to 5 :00 p. m.— KFWI tea party. 

5 :00 to 5 :30 p. m.- — Construction reports. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m.— Theatrical announcements. 
fi :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour program. 
7 :00 to 7 :15 p. m— Sports by Ceo. T. Davis. 

7 :15 to 7 :30 p. m.— Kenneth A. Millican. 

8 :00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program by Wm. Johnson 
9:00 to 9:30 p. m.— Gloria Del Rae. 

9:30 to 11:00 p. m.— Bill Bennett. 

11 [00 in 12 :00 p. m.— Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 
Friday, August 26 

7:00. 7:30 and s :(10 a. m. Exercise hour. 

8 :20 to 10 :27 a. m.— Musical breakfast program. 
10:27 to 10:80a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

10 :30 to 11 :00 a. m.— Beauty hints. 

1 I :un to 12 :00 m. -Organ re 

]J :00 i" I- :80 p. m. — Musical luncheon program. 

12 :80 to 1 :00 p. m. Organ recital. 

I sOO to i :80 p. in -Country store. 

1:80 to 2:00 P. m. Cowell Dein. banjo and piano. 

4 :00 to 5:00 p. m.— KFWI tea party. 

5 :Di) to 6 :30 p. m. — Const ruction reports. 

5:8 :00 p. m, Theat viral i ouncementa. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Program arranged by Irene Smith. 
? ;00 to 7 :16 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7:16 to 7:80 p. m.- Talk by F.. S. Daniels. 
B .00 to :00 p. m. I - orchestra. 

9 -00 bo 10 :00 p. m. California Sunshine Boys. 
10:00 p. m.- Weather and Police reports. 
10:08 to [2:00 p. m. Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 
Saturday. Aucust 2: 

7 .00, 7 :80 and B .00 a. m. Exercise hour. 

g rju to 10:27 a. m. Musical breakfast program. 
10 :27 to 10 :30 a. m.- U. S. weather reports. 
10:80 to 11:00 a. m, Cynthia Grey's column. 

I to 12:80 D. m. Musical luncheon program. 

12 :30 to 1 : '. m. < trgan recital. 

in. Country store. 
G :00 to :. :80 p. m. Construction reports, 

-30 to 6 00 p m. Theatrical announcements. 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. -Dinner hour concert. 

P m. Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7:15 to 7:80 p. m.- -Geo. Taylor and Clem Kennedy. 
p, m. Athena AJexandroff, soprano. 
1 12:00p.m.- Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 
12:00 to 2 :80 a.m.— KFWI hour of mirth . 



Societv 



N W CORNER 

l.RAYSTONE 240 POLK ano POST STS. 



tinued from page 5) 
her only attendant. Mrs. Edwin Mad- 
den . the matron of honor, wore a 
powder blue chiffon, with beige hat 
with blue trimmings. Mr. Edwin Mad- 
den acted as best man. The Empire 
Room at The Fairmont, where the in- 
formal reception and wedding break- 
fast was served, was converted into 
a bovver of flowers. After a honey- 
moon spent touring the Canadian 
Rockies, the bride and groom will be 
at home in San Francisco. 



Preserving is cool 

and easy -with the 
Oven Heat Control 

YOU can preserve summer fruits 
that taste as delicious and remain 
as firm as on the day they were 
picked from the laden bough. Briefly, 
here's a cool, easy way — 

Cool because you don't have to lift 
boiling kettles about the stove. 

Easy because the Oven Heat Con- 
trol on the new Gas Range is the se- 
cret of delicious home preserving that 
is done in the oven without watching 
or anxiety. Fruit is packed right in 
jars and put into the oven. You mere- 
ly set the Oven Heat Control and 
steady, even heat preserves the fruit's 
firmness, its delicious fruit-flavor and 
color. Jams and jellies also are well 
preserved by this cool, simple way. 

Visit the range displays and see the 
Oven Heat Control on the new Gas 
Ranges. 




"FAC1FIC SERVICI* 



Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

Owned - Operated • Managed 

by Califomians 

219-827 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 665-4 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Dirt*: 

1.800.00* cops were .erred at the 
P. nam. -Pacific International E.pa.iti.n 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 20, 1927 



Fallen Leaf Lodge 

The Ideal Tahoe Resort 

Located on Fallen Leaf Lake. 
Five miles from the State High- 
way. In the center of a Wonder- 
land of Mountains, Lakes 
and Streams. 

(jood Jisbing r Hiking r 'Boating 

Comfortable rooms,. tents and cottages 

— with and without private bath; and 

famous dining room service, combine 

to make the Lodge a popular 

vacation spot. 

MRS. W. W. PRICE 

Fallen Leaf P. O., Lake Tahoe, Calif. 



CLUB 
AUTO SERVICE CO. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 

For All Occasions 

Day and Night 

City Sightseeing ----- $3.00 per hour 

Shopping: - 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxicab Rates 



PROSPECT 

4000 



585 Post. St.. 
San Francisco 



WHEN IN PANAMA 
MAKE 

HOTEL CENTRAL 

Cathedral Plaza 

YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 
Andrew Johnston, Manager 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 CLARA STREET— GARFIELD 844 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1864 

The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



A Great Man Passes 

"Greatness" is an elastic word; it 
may have many interpretations. 

To the money-mad, it means ac- 
cumulation of great wealth; to the 
thinker, great vision ; to the practical 
person, direct and efficient action in 
important business affairs; to the 
humanitarian, love and sympathy for 
the underdog. 

To Elbert H. Gary, head of the 
American steel industry, who passed 
away early in the morning of August 
15, these attributes may be applied 
in varying proportion. 

He was rich, he was a man of vis- 
ion, he was "efficient" to an extraor- 
dinary degree, and he treated labor 
"white," as labor expresses itself. 

He was known to be antagonistic 
to unionism, but it was at his behest 
that the U. S. Steel Corporation 
adopted the plan of voluntary com- 
pensation to injured workmen long 
before such action was made compul- 
sory by the laws of many states ; and 
the elimination of the 12-hour work- 
ing day was due to his efforts. To 
illustrate the feeling between the 
head of the steel corporation and its 
employees the following story is told : 

During the strike of the elevator 
operators in New York, several 
years ago, every man was found at 
his post in the building which had 
been recently purchased by the steel 
corporation. When asked the reason 
for this, one of the operators replied : 

"As soon as the corporation bought 
this building, our wages were raised. 
We are getting as much or more than 
the unions are demanding. Judge 
Gary has treated us 'white,' and you 
can bet your life we are going to stick 
by him, strike or no strike." 

Gary was admitted to the bar of 
the United States Supreme Court in 
1882. Aside from this, he will go 
down to posterity as one of America's 
greatest men. 



If a Bill, now before the Italian 
Parliament, becomes law, officers un- 
der thirty years of age in the Italian 
Air Force will be forbidden to marry. 
Aviation is getting safer and safer. 

* * * 

This is Apple Week. Hurrah! An 
apple a day keeps the doctor away — 
unless you get the seeds in your ap- 
pendix. — Iowa State Green Gander. 

* * * 

Sunday-School , Teacher — My dear 
children, I want you to look upon me 
as a shepherd, and I shall look upon 
you as my sheep. Now you all know 
what the shepherd does to his sheep. 

Little Boy — Shears them. — An- 
swers. 



Brockway, 

Lake 

Tahoe 

gOLF. . . 

All Grass Greens 
and Grass 
Jairways 

Swimming, natural hot 
water ; dancing ; horse- 
back riding; boating; 
fishing; tennis. For in- 
formation and rates, 
write or wire 



H. O. COMSTOCK, 

M A N A C E R 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 

active. Hot Sulphur Water. Tub Baths and 

Swimmine Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 

Write for Booklet. 



T. H. CORCORAN, Agua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judah 



CALIENTE VILLA 

Family Resort 

CARL STEPFEN. Prop. 



French and Italian Dinners - Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

Four Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, 

Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The Finest Meals in the 
VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms — Clean Linen — Clean Everything 
Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

TELEPHONE 110 



August 20, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 





]M^W Tffil£ 




THE THUNDERER, by E. Barring- 
ton. Dodd, Mead and Co., Inc.; 
$2.50. 

E. Barrington, author of "The Ex- 
quisite Perdita," "The Divine Lady," 
"The Glorious Apollo," and "The 
Chaste Diana," has given the world 
of letters another historical novel, 
which, in my opinion, transcends all 
of the other preceding books. 

"The Thunderer," just off the 
press, is Barrington's latest novel, 
graphically and glowingly mirroring 
historical deeds. In this fascinating 
book, the author portrays the dra- 
matic and world-renowned love story 
of Napoleon and Josephine. 

Like many other biographical nov- 
els by this author, "The Thunderer" 
contains the names of people whose 
lives were intertwined with the great 
Napoleon's rise to historical heights. 
That is really one of the fascinations 
of Barrington's books. There is al- 
ways the certainty of romance with 
historical foundation and authentic 
background. 

In "The Thunderer," we first see 
the great Corsican as a lieutenant dis- 
persing a Parisian mob ; or, as the 
first chapter puts it, "sowing the 
seed." Then we follow this man of 
destiny through amazing stretches of 
fame which have made the very name 
of Napoleon a candle-light to be 
snuffed out at will; or. a burning 
beacon to lead one's ambition — ac- 
cording to personal analysis. 

This book reveals the passion of 
Napoleon for his Josephine. The 
startling love letters which Napoleon 
wrote to his wife before, and after, 
he became Emperor are quoted prac- 
tically in their entirety. Oh. those 
letters! Never in all history has any 
other lover, in blazing and magnifi- 
cent passion, been able to equal those 
amatory epistles. 

"The Thunderer" takes us to the 
imperial coronation with its trans- 
lucent and clean-cut phrases vision- 
ing each detail of the court. Later 
we follow each episode which leads up 
to the renunciation and divorce of 
Josephine. 

Without any desire to moralize or 
to influence, the author draws aside 
the curtain and depicts each event in 
a romantic way. typical of novel-au- 
thorship, but with a deep and pro- 
found understanding of the facts as 
recorded by history. Flashes of 



Edited by Josephine Wilson 

humor illumine the pages in consis- 
tent measure. 

The Napoleonic generals, Junot, the 
personnel of the Convention, the Di- 
rectory, Talleyrand, the great Eng- 
lish commander, Nelson, and many 
other notable names in history are 
brought into the story in their his- 
torical sequence. 

Maria Louise, Countess Walewska, 
and the son born to Napoleon and 
Maria Louise have a place in "The 
Thunderer" which stirs one's emo- 
tion no matter how familiar to the 
reader may be the facts. Cognizant, 
or not, with this part of Napoleon's 
implacable life, there is an appeal in 
the Barrington outline unlike any 
other it has been my privilege to read. 

E. Barrington and L. Adams Beck, 
as most book-lovers know, is one and 
the same author. An Englishwoman 
whose forebears were distinguished 
British navy men. Her grandfather, 
Sir Fairfax Morseby, was at one time 
Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific 
Station. 

"As part of a British navy family, 
she was from childhood steeped in 
tales of Lord Nelson." 

Mrs. Beck lives in Victoria, Brit- 
ish Columbia. Surrounded by a beau- 
tiful English garden she writes the 
books which are now adding fame to 
an illustrious name. Her two per- 
sonalities, so different in expression, 
are distinctly revealed under the two 
names of Barrington and Beck. 

With whole-hearted sincerity and 
stalwart appreciation of "The Thun- 
derer." do I recommend possession of 
this outstanding book. 



Animal Lovers Meet 

A meeting of the San Francisco 
Anti- Vivisection Society and a get- 
acquainted reception will be held on 
Tuesday evening. August 23, in Mt. 
Diablo Hall, Native Sons Building. 
Addresses by prominent speakers and 
a splendid musical program will be 
presented. Speakers for the evening 
include Mr. Bernside Cromwell. S. R. 
Parchment, Johr Munsell Chase. Dr. 
C. Lucht. Vocal selections will be 
given by Miss Catherine T. Morgan, 
accompanied by Richard Manners: 
Mr. Fred Coy. Alice Bradley. Denny 
Huttedall. accompanied by Madame 
Lillian Slinkey Durini. 



S. A. LOVEJOY 

WILL BRING 

ORDER 

Out of Chaos! 

In your Books, 
Financial Statements 
Income Tax Reports 

Expert Auditor 

PART-TIME SERVICE 

268 Market St., Room 101 



Park Lane Maisonnettes 

5 to 8 Rooms with 2 to 5 Baths 

Magnificent view. Every service, from 
doorman to valet. Furnished or un- 
furnished. Garage. Class A steel 
frame building. 

"Maisonnette" lias the elegance, of a mansion with 
all conveniences oj an apartment house. 

PARK LANE APARTMENTS 

1100 Sacramento Street 
Diagonally Across from Hotel Fairmont 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter 
can he obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC — INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 




PHOTOGRAPHS 
Q>C/ye Forever 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Pilots of the Stellar Seas 



August 20, 1927 



"Flying is the easiest thing in the 
world," said "Pop" Croft, veteran 
flyer at Brooks Field during the "war 
in Texas." "All you have to do is 
control the ship." Pop was right, but 
there are still a good many folks who 
don't know how to "control the ship." 
And they are the ones we hear most 
about — the ones who take tumbles 
and crack up. Little is said about the 
thousands who fly, year after year, 
without even washing out an under- 
carriage. Beginners, of course, must 
learn, but we shall soon have airplane 
inspection and rules for student flyers 
that will practically eliminate acci- 
dent among them. 

There are those adventurous souls, 
the pioneer flyers, and then there are 
the air mail pilots who drive across 
the map according to printed sched- 
ules. The time has come, it seems to 
me, when commercial aviation and 
stunt flying must part company and 
go their own respective and progres- 
sive ways. Our daring and audacious 
Magellans of the aerial void have no 
longer much in common with the cool 
and cautious navigators of the air 
mail and passenger lines. The one is 
the creator of a new realm ; the other 
is the public servant quietly and 
carefully performing his duties. And, 
although we have only begun to 
realize the possibilities of the air, 
we are settling down to a quiet enjoy- 
ment of those uses we already have, 
meanwhile urging and encouraging 
the pioneers to give us more. For 
pioneers there will always be. 

While the world has stood amazed 
at the daring of those who have 
crossed the seas during the past few 
weeks, and at the same time mar- 
veled at the possibilities in it for us 
all, steady and reliable forces have 
been working toward a realization of 
our dreams. Air mail and passenger 
lines, spanning the country east and 
west, north and south, have been put 
to work on a business basis. The man 
on the street is now beginning to see 
in himself what but a few months 
ago he saw in his heroes — a man of 
the air — able to experience the 
strange and unfamiliar, to gratify a 
longing as old as man — to fly through 
the blue void. 

Not only himself but his communi- 
cations with men in far-off places 
may be carried at incredible speed. 
A letter marked "air mail," with ten 
cents postage, is carried thousands 
of miles away in the short space of a 
day and a night, and delivered safely 
at a certain door. Two hundred, three 



By Lieut. Blaine Stubblefield 

hundred, five hundred words, a de- 
liberate message, a message of rec- 
ord, carried across the continent for 
ten cents per half ounce ! It is a serv- 
ice that could not have been expected 
a short time ago. 

San Francisco, the hub of the Pa- 
cific Coast, has just been linked to 
Chicago, industrial center of the 
Middle West, by a 21-hour air mail 
and passenger service. The mail line 
schedule was taken over by the Boe- 
ing Air Transport, Inc., on July 1 and 
passenger service was officially be- 
gun the first of August. San Fran- 
cisco also has the Pacific Air Trans- 
port, carrying mail and passengers 
between Los Angeles and Seattle, 
operating on a daily schedule. 

The Boeing route is the longest air 
mail line in the world at the present 
time, totaling about 1972 miles from 
San Francisco to Chicago — almost 'as 
the crow flies. Stops are made at Sac- 
ramento, Reno, Elko, Salt Lake City. 
Cheyenne, North Platte, Omaha, Des 
Moines and Iowa City. The run is 
divided into four divisions, with 
changes at Salt Lake City, Cheyenne 
and Omaha. The ships leave Con- 
cord Field, San Francisco, at 8 :45 
a. m. and reach Chicago early in the 
morning of the following day — 21 
hours later. 

Twenty-five Boeing biplanes, cost- 
ing §25,000 each, were brought new 
from the factory and put on the 
route. Each has a two-passenger 
cabin, fitted with reclining chairs. A 
Boeing plane carries a load of 1600 
pounds — 1200 pounds of mail besides 
the two passengers and their bag- 
gage. The running speed is about 130 
miles per hour. Fuel for six hours 
flying, about 100 gallons, is carried in 
the tank, giving a flying radius of 
600 miles. The motor has 410 horse- 
power. 

An average size business letter 
weighs about a half ounce; thirty- 
two such letters weigh a pound. At 
that rate, one of these mail planes 
will carry about 38,400 letters. If 
these already established air mail and 
passenger lines are to live and give 
the public service, the public must 
soon know and use them to the full- 
est extent. Those who begin using 
air mail, we learn at the post office, 
continue to use it, increasing their 
volume. This service has been tried 
and proven. 

Those interested in this public 
utility as a means of promoting the 
commercial and industrial life of 
their communities, should bear in 



mind, for their own and others in- 
formation, that air mail letters are 
ten cents per half ounce to any point 
in the United States, Canada, Eng- 
land, or any other country having a 
two-cent ordinary postage convention 
with this government ; that any post- 
age will do — air mail stamps are not 
necessary; that letters need only be 
marked "via air mail" ; that any en- 
velope will do — air mail envelopes are 
not necessary, though desirable ; that 
air mail letters may be dropped in 
any mail box or letter chute. 

So we have the tenderwing flyers, 
trying to learn, who crack up and 
furnish most of the accident news. 
We have the knights errant of the 
air looking for new realms to con- 
quer, who supply the romance and 
thrills. And we have the air mail 
pilots, hundreds of them, who do the 
expected thing every day and are 
therefore not often heard of. 



Symphony Concert 

Several outstanding records were 
made last Tuesday night when the 
Summer Symphony Concert was 
given with Hans Leschke conducting. 
The vast Auditorium was packed to 
the rafters. The San Francisco Mu- 
nicipal Chorus gave us a musical sur- 
prise, and Alice Gentle, famous 
operatic star, sang as we always knew 
she could sing — and captivated the 
audience with her exquisite voice and 
artistry. 

The "largest audience of the sea- 
son" fairly went wild and clamored 
for encore, when Alice Gentle, noted 
American' soprano, sang the Tann- 
hauser, Aria "Dich Theure Halle." 
She first sang the Gounod aria from 
"The Queen of Sheba," in which she 
has appeared as operatic star. Her 
wondrous voice, rich in tone quality 
and clarity, was gorgeous in the con- 
cert numbers of the symphony pro- 
gram. Alice Gentle looked the aristo- 
crat in her handsome black chiffon 
beaded gown with which she carried 
a stunning orange-colored ostrich 
fan. Her head dress was a coronet of 
handsome stones. 

The Municipal Chorus is a credit 
to the community. The members 
sang superbly. Their musical de- 
corum, their enunciation, their man- 
ner of attack in opening each num- 
ber and their musical understanding 
gave convincing demonstration of 
perfect training. 



August 20, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



P. A. T. NEWS 

The Pacific Air Transport Company is commended by 
Postmaster General New in his bulletin of August 10, 
as one of six contract air mail routes which "performed 
100 per cent service during the month of July." 

P. A. T. now has another distinction. They are the 
largest commercial customers of Wright Aeronautical 
Corporation of Paterson, N. J., having eleven of the 
famous "whirlwind" motors. Every 200 hours each 
motor is completely overhauled and rebuilt. Two are 
in the shop at all times. 

A San Francisco newspaper recently reported a forced 
landing as a "crash." This, of course, is very damaging to 
the reputation of an air transport company for safe flying 
and it may cost many hundreds of dollars to such a com- 
pany. It doesn't seem quite fair when it is considered 
that forced landings are not dangers but are in reality a 
sign of good judgment on the part of the pilot when motor 
trouble is suspected or darkness or bad weather are 
imminent. Under the rule that no passengers will be flown 
at night, except in grave emergency, PAT travel is highly 
safe. 

Forced landings without accident are not reported, since 
they are unimportant and, when printed, merely add to 
the confusion in the public mind as to what equipment is 
safe and what is unsafe. 

PAT is the first American air-travel line ever to have 
international representation, so far as is known. A folder 
designed for both domestic and foreign circulation has 
just been issued in large quantities, with cover design 
drawn from an actual photograph of a PAT plane at the 
peak of Mt. Hood (18,500 ft.). A schedule and tariff card, 
which also tells "How to Get the Utmost Enjoyment from 
a Flight," accompanies each folder. 

Another new printed piece is a "Certificate of Travel" 
which is presented to each passenger when ticket is pur- 
chased. At each change of plane, the card is given to the 
pilot who fills in all pertinent data, such as total flying 
time, maximum speed, maximum altitude, weight of air 
mail cargo, etc. The pilot signs the card and returns it to 
the passenger. 

The 80-odd Pacific Coast residents who were passengers 
in PAT plane No. 15 (Travelair cabin monoplane in which 
Smith flew to Hawaii) have been invited to membership in 
the newly-formed "No. 15 Club," and appropriate cards, 
personally autographed by Pilot Ernie Smith, have been 
issued to such of them as can be located. The remaining 
cards are being held for those whose addresses are un- 
known, and every effort is being made to locate them. The 
"No. 15 Club" is one of the most exclusive clubs in exist- 
ence, since membership was forever closed when Ernie 
"laid her down" in the kiawe trees of Molokai. 

By the way. Ernie was the guest of honor this week of 
the Oakland Traffic Association at their Athens Club 
dinner. This body is taking the lead in striving to bring 
to the Oakland Municipal Airport both the PAT hangar 
headquarters and the Western transcontinental terminus. 
according to newspaper reports. Ernie told them of his 
famous Hawaii hop. General Superintendent Grover Tyler 
outlined his work in "Keeping the Mail in the Air" and 
Traffic Agent Young pointed out the advantages gained in 
various commercial lines through use of the coastwise air 
mail, express and passenger service of PAT. 



P. G. & E. Elects New Officials 

Filling the place of the late Wiggington E. Creed, A. F. 
Hockenbeamer was elected to the presidency of the 
Pacific Gas & Electric Company at a special meeting held 
last Tuesday morning. 

Mr. Hockenbeamer has been vice-president, treasurer 
and director of the company for almost twenty years. He 
was born in Logansport, Indiana on March 6, 1871. Start- 
ing at the early age of sixteen years, he became asso- 
ciated with various Eastern railroad lines until the fall of 
1907 when he came to San Francisco in the interests of 
the New York investment banking firm of N. W. Halsey 
& Company, which at that time was one of the controlling 
stockholders of the Pacific Gas & Electric Company. 

The following year, Mr. Hockenbeamer became comp- 
troller of the P. G. & E. Co., and later on was given the 
additional duties of treasurer. During the next two years 
he was made vice-p*esident. 

Outstanding among his other achievements, was his 
initiation in June, 1914, of the policy of customer owner- 
ship of utilities which has since been adopted by the ma- 
jority of utility companies in America. 

The following elections took place: 

Charles H. Dickey, of San Francisco, was elected a 
director to succeed Wiggington Creed; 

John P. Coghlan was elected second vice-president; 

E. W. Hodges was elected controller in charge of the 
company's accounting, tax and insurance departments. 

The company's board of directors is constituted as fol- 
lows: F. B. Anderson, Allen L. Chickering, Charles H. 
Dickey, W. H. Crocker, A. B. C. Dohrmann, John S. 
Drum, F. T. Elsey, D. H. Foote, A. F. Hockenbeamer, 
Frank A. Leach Jr., Norman B. Livermore, John D. 
McKee, John A. McCandless and C. O. G. Miller, all of 
this city> and John J. O'Brien of Chicago. 




Mrs. Crayon — Sarah, why ever did you leave that big 
cobweb uii there? 

Sarah— Oh. if you please, ma'am, I thought it was part 
of the wireless. —Pearson's. 



LEAVE FROM THE FERRY BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO 

by the 

NORTHWESTERN PACIFIC 
AUTO FERRY 

IF YOU MOTOR TO THE 

Redwood Empire 

With new STEEL BOATS, the Northwestern Pacific Aoto 
Ferry offer* swift and comfortahle service hetween San 
Francisco and Sausalito. 

ALL - DAY — ALL - NIGHT 
SCHEDULE 

.10-minutc service from early in mornine till late in evening-. 
namely — leave San Francisco i Ferry Bids. > on even hour 
and half hour: and Sausalito at 1.". and 15 minute* after the 
hour. Departures at convenient intervals from both ter- 
minals ALL MIGHT. 

Returning to San Francisco, when you reach Sausalito Tl RN 
TO THE LEFT. 

NORTHWESTERN PACIFIC 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 20, 1927 




PIONEER 



The 

Name 

on a box of office 
stationery, whether 
it be typewriter pa- 
per or manuscript 
cover, means com- 
plete satisfaction. 
There is a grade for 
every need. Ask 
your printer or sta- 
tioner to show you 



* )fc A* 4 JV,' J : ltH:B iM J^:Hf samples. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street. San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 



Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco. 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Max Rosenthal 

WHERE GOOD TAILORING 
COSTS LESS 

A choice selection of seasonable 

Woolens suitable for Formal, 

Sport and Business wear is 

now ready for your early 

consideration. 

527 POST ST. SAN FRANCISCO 
OPP. OLYMPIC CLUB 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 



Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. WELLER 
National Automobile Club 

Road Building 

Gone are the days when a road was 
built in Arkansas only once in a 
coon's age, for that state is now- 
building highways and roads right 
and left, the latest addition to the 
highway system being a continuous 
concrete road from Little Rock, in the 
center of the state, to Texarkana on 
the Texas border. This road will be 
ready for traffic all the way as soon 
as the new concrete bridge over the 
historic Red river is completed. 

County roads are also getting their 
share of attention and it is a rare 
county that is not spending large 
amounts on road building and road 
improvement. 

Zion National Park in Southern 
Utah is to have five miles of new 
highway in the near future. The 
route of the new road will be a spec- 
tacular one, climbing 3000 feet along 
the almost perpendicular walls of 
Mukuntuweap canyon. A series of 
long tunnels, through which numer- 
ous arches will offer unexcelled views 
of the canyon, is also part of the 
plan. 

This five miles is the first step in 

a program of twenty-four miles which 

is to be built at an estimated cost of 

81,650,000, part of which is to be 

paid by the state of Utah and the 

remainder by Federal appropriation. 
* * * 

Construction work on the road 
through Dublin canyon between Hay- 
ward and Dublin is expected to begin 



within a short time. The entire road 
will be repaved and much of the route 
realigned, thereby eliminating many 
sharp turns and long grades. 

Traffic will very likely be detoured 
by way of Niles Canyon as the oiling 
program which is expected to be car- 
ried out in the canyon will be com- 
pleted by the time construction is 
started between Hayward and Dub- 



Six miles of gravel road between 
Boulder Creek and Big Basin in Santa 
Cruz county has just been given an 
oil coating and now offers excellent 
traveling conditions. This work com- 
pletes the oiling program for that 
section. 

Pavement construction between 
Dublin and Santa Rita on the Valley 
route has been completed and the 
road is now open to traffic. The open- 
ing of this stretch of pavement 
eliminates the bad seven-mile detour 
which has been in effect, and makes 
available a paved detour from Santa 
Rita to Pleasanton, thence to Liver- 
more. 

That part of the road between 
Santa Rita and Livermore, however, 
is still closed and is not expected to 
be opened until about October. 

* * * 

The contract for oiling the road in 
Niles canyon has been awarded, and 
it is expected that this work will be 
completed within the next two weeks. 

* * * 

Canada's Pacific Exhibition, now 
being held in Vancouver, B. C, is at- 
tracting many motorists. 

There are many interesting events, 
one of the most attractive being the 
huge pageant depicting the growth 
and progress of Canada during the 
sixty years of Confederation, starting 
with the primitive life of the Indian 
and working up through the develop- 
ment of the Dominion and the build- 
ing of the transcontinental railroads, 
to the prosperity and power enjoyed 
today. 

Other attractions are the cowboy 
events, such as bronco riding, calf 
roping, trick riding and Roman stand- 
ing races, and Highland dancing. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office and Works: 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury BldK. t 

Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called for and Delivered 



August 20, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 




Trinity from "Poetry" 

Wisdom, I think, is made of these 
Three discoveries. 

First, the raw incredible ache 
Of a new heartbreak. 

Bitter this — but bitterer far 
Learning how brief all heartbreaks are, 
When the hurt heals over and leaves no scar. 

And last, that love full-feasted, even 
Is somewhat short of utter heaven. 

Wisdom is wrought of these 
Three certainties. 

—Ted Olson. 

* * * 

Message 

Seeing in flight along the lifting wind, 
Like sudden birds peopling an empty sky, 
Those last crisped leaves so long you had passed by— 
Where dark they hung that had been fire behind 
The pasture whose scant blossoms kept in mind 
Our summer now grown gold for memory — 
Did you remember as you saw them pass, 
Flutter and sink, sully the silvered grass, 
That each forsaken stem bears, fast asleep, 
An eager bud to tell the tale of spring? 
Will you forget, hearing the darkness weep, 
How each hour moves toward their awakening? 

— Dorothy M. Richardson in "Poetry." 



By Way of Fire 

I've come to think that way of fire 
Joy may be reached, and just as soon 

As the invisible, swift heat of desire 
May reach and embrace the moon. 

And I've thought, too. that ruin lays 
A glittering road for Beauty to travel: 

And at every cross-road the sign-post says 
It's the miles behind you've got to unravel. 

But the one thing I could never make out. 

The legible and assumptive thrust 
Of the wind that blows my passions about 

And leaves but their shadows on the dust. 
— William Stanley Braithwaite. 



Stylish Poem 

The way t hese women 

Dress, by Heck! 
Is certainly quite shocking. 

They shove their compacts 
Down their neck — 

And find them in their stocking. 

— North western Purple Parrot. 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 
DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 

Established 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, General Agent 
544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cai. 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 2342 




LOU W. SARTOR. Propri«lor 



PHONE GRAVSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry AM Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 

Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco. Calif. 



GRAVSTONE 130 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building. Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage. 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage. 1361 Bush St. 

Management of WILLIAM SAl "NDERS 






TRUNKS — RACKS — BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVENUE 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 20, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SWINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

JUNE 30th, 1927 

Assets $113,925,831.54 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $575,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4%) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought; FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued; CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND ; NEW YORK ; PORTLAND, ORE. ; SEATTLE, 
WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability. Plate Glass. Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pice and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS. CULVERTS. PENSTOCKS. 

FLUMES. GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS. ETC. 

San Francisco. Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



For Lease 

FIRE PROOF BUILDING 

TWO STORY AND BASEMENT 

257-259 MINNA STREET 
Bet. 3rd and 4th 

Suitable for Printing — Manufacturing or Storage 
Rent Reasonable 

rj S 

CORNWALL, COLDWELL & BANKER 

57 Sutter Street San Francisco 



Finance 



The State Fair will be held at Sacramento from Sep- 
tember 3 to 10. It will be the largest ever held. Prices 
total Sill, 000. Curiously enough, there will be lots of 
horse competition with blooded imported horses to the 

front. 

* * * 

The Southern Pacific is transporting to France a sec- 
tion of a California redwood tree as a gift to the war 
veterans of France from the American Legion of Cali- 
fornia. It is 9 feet 8 inches in diameter and is said to be 
1995 years old. That will make French countrymen open 

their eyes. 

* * * 

Stock exchange reports show reaction. The start with 
new high prices did not keep up last week and during the 
present week that has been no marked recovery. Summer 
lethargy has quite a lot to do with the apparent fall. 

* * * 

The handling of fruit perishables places an ever in- 
creasing load upon the railroads. All through Santa 
Clara County and down as far as Watsonville the amount 
of additional track required is very great. At Watsonville 
Junction alone, the necessary additions will cost 8140,000. 

* # * 

The Fireman's Fund Record is as interesting as ever, 
among other items which strike us, is one to the effect 
that the economic loss caused by lightning oil fires within 
five years past is between S10,000,000 and $20,000,000. 
So they are experimenting in Amador County (where 
there is plenty of lightning), in ways and means to meet 

the menace. 

* * * 

In explaining the reason for the highway level cross- 
ing problem in this country, which is of course much 
greater than the same problem in Europe, the editor of 
the "Railroad Age" points to the obvious fact that high- 
ways came before railways in Europe and largely after 
them in this country. That is why there are 230,000 
highway grade crossings in the United States. 

* * * 

Electric business is running ahead of that of a year 
ago. The amount of power used constantly increases in 
volume. It is a curious economic phenomenon that this 
increase in the use of electric power is coincident with 
the decrease this summer of railway movement of manu- 
factured products. 

* * * 

The prophets are all out, both on the building and the 
automobile industries. As a matter of fact, the building 
trades were the first to report full time employment this 
year. Yet it has been gravely prophesied that the satura- 
tion point had been reached in the building industry. 

All sorts of speculations are being indulged in as to 
the ability of Germany to meet reparation payments 
under the Dawes Plan since the economic future in inter- 
national affairs is largely bound up in that matter. The 
general opinion seems to support that of the Agent Gen- 
eral that the plan, while by no means perfect, is working 
satisfactorily on the whole and that with a measure of 
good faith it may be made to serve its purpose. 

* * * 

According to a recent report, smoking matches are 
responsible for losses amounting to 50 to 60 millions of 
dollars per year. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Lurie and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City'B Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 
Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c. 75c, $1. 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7 :00 p. m. to 1 :00 a. m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER. 



tJyuzu IdyuujLLu, oiwp& 



490 POST ST.. S. F. 
Garfield 234 
CLIFT HOTEL 
Prospect 4700 



RAMONA STUDIO. PALO ALTO 

Palo Alto 433 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Matson Nav. Co. Steamers 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' Lunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. (a la carte). Private Dining Rooms 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystone 8100 



Weekdays. Luncheon S -75 

(11:30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner. Week Days & Sundays 1.50 



No visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room la Open Again on Sundays 



NOAH'S 
ARK 



93 Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 2 :00 p. m. 
5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4 :30 to 8 :30 p. m. only 
CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Highway 




14-Mile House 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN 8:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. 
I'nsurpasscd Cuisine 
CARL LEONHARDT 

Formerly of Golden Gate Tark Casino 




'*TSa 



CAROLINE JONES 

Luncheon ia served from 11:30 to 

2:30 and Tea from 3 to 5 

Exclusive use of room for club dinners 

334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 




LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to I a. m. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

STERLING ANDERSON, Manager 
Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 



1140 GEARY ST. 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 4266 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy - Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blacksmithing. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



We ha 



ive perfected scientific cleanliness 
in laundering to a fine art. 



La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 
250 Twelfth St. PHONE MARKET 916 

Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 





Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 








MME. M. S. E. LEE 








Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 




583 


Post Street 


San Francisco 


In 


Virginia Hotel 


Phone Franklin 


2510 




Antioch Bridge Route 



to 






Sacramento 

Is Now PAVED All the Way 



No Traffic Congestion No Delays 

The Cool, Quick Way 

Along the Sacramento River, Through 
the Netherlands of America 



From Oakland 
The Tunnel Road 



From Sacramento 
South on 21st Street 



U 



AMERICAN TOLL-BRIDGE 
COMPANY 

Owners and Operators of 

CARQUINEZ BRIDGE and ANTIOCH BRIDGE 

Tolls the Same on Both Bridges 
Autos, 60c Passengers, 10c 




at this 
Famous 
Hotel in 

! HOLLYWOOD 




Hollywood WazaHotel - 

HOLLYWOOD CALIF. 




SAIL TO NEW YORK 



SISTER SHIPS 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL 
and GAY HAVANA, en route 

Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropics 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail 
Liner with seven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and 
historic ports — Manzanillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La Lib- 
ertad, Salvador; Corinlo, Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone. See 
the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, Cristobal and historic old Panama. 
Every cabin on a Panama Mail Liner is an outside one; each has an 
electric fan, and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. 
There is an orchestra for dancing; deck games and sports and salt water 
swimming tank. The Panama Mail is world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, includ- 
ing bed and meals on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return by 
rail (or vice versa) for as little as $380. (This price does not include berth 
and meals on trains.) Panama Mail Liners leave San Francisco and New 
York approximately every 21 days. Next sailings from San Francisco: 
SS ECUADOR, August 20th; SS COLOMBIA. September 17th. From New 
York: SS COLOMBIA, August 13th; SS VENEZUELA, September 3rd. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
oi ticket agent, or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 

548 S. SPRING STREET 2 PINE STREET 10 HANOVER SQUARE 
LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 



THEA.B.SPRECKELS 

AMATEUR GOLF TOURNAMENT 
cAugust 2} to 26 

Winner receives outright 
one of the finest trophies 
ever presented in an ama- 
teur golf event. An equally 
attractive trophy to run- 
ner-up and prizes in all 
flights. 



Summer Rates 

HOTEL DEL CORONADO 

As Low as $6.00 Per Day • American Plan 
in Effect. 

y 

SWIMMING • AQUAPLANING . BOATING 
Dancing 

L. E. CARLILE, SAN FRANCISCO AGENT 
2 PINE STREET Phone DOUGLAS 5600 



MEL. S. WRIGHT, Manager 
CORONADA BEACH CALIFORNIA 




$5.00 PER YEAR 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Saturday, August 27, 1927 



y^fO/O^HP 10 CENTS 

- 
LOS ANGELES 







1. JJ 

r T3 



'13 



8-80 and 8-70 

two remarkable 8 'in-line 
motor cars that are earning 

More Glory 

for Locomobile 

— the New 8-80 "^ fi nest automobile 

in the $3000 class!" 

3 'J ^C\ * n ^ an F ranc i sco ~for the fully 
JL/ 3 %J equipped 5-passenger sedan 

— the New 8-70 " one °f ^ e industry's 

most successful light 
8-in-line cars 1 ' 

$1) H) if £ * n ^ an F ranc i sco — for the fully 
ZZr 13 equipped sedan, brougham, or 
sport roadster 

at 230 FULTON STREET 

Salon of the Locomobile Company of California 

Telephone Hemlock 3800 

Also Broad Motor Company, 1906 Van Ness Ave. 

San Francisco. Telephone Qraystone 6304 



ft 




Established July 20, 1856 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

Tie San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, Jr., from 1884 to 1925. 
3 now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street. San Francisco, California. Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, 
ialifornia, Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, 

$5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6,00 



Vol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., AUGUST 27, 1927 



No. 35 



The Aspirants 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



There are some wise old saws that have to be revised 
;o fit the exigencies of the present age. 

"No news is good news," is one of them. 

This may apply to any circumstance in life, except in 
he matter of aeronautics. 

Then the word "good" must be changed to "bad." 

The attitude which some people take towards the 
science of flying is much like that assumed by the ordi- 
nary person in regard to farming. 

The latter cherish the erroneous idea that farming is 
1 simple process of digging up the ground and planting 
seeds. Nature, they believe, will do the rest. 

The former imagine (apparently) that all one must 
nave on hand is something to fly in, a limited amount of 
experience, and — propitious weather. 

The recent Dole race proves that this opinion is preva- 
ent, for in the preliminary test of machines before the 
nop-off, only nine qualified out of the original fifteen, and 
inly five out of the nine made a getaway, the fifth being 
;he ship of the belated Erwin. And eventually but two 
eached their destination. 

There is a rumor abroad that Uncle Sam may step in 
ind put a stop to air races and stunts for prizes given by 
ffivate persons, and people in general are beginning to 
eel that these contests are detrimental to the art of 
lying, instead of advancing it. 

Outstanding events such as the Dole race, with its at- 
endant disasters and deaths, are apt to be taken by the 
lasses as a criterion in the game of aeronautics, and to 
eventually prejudice people against flying, when eommer- 
ial air companies, and the U. S. air mail service continue 
m their way. with few if any mishaps in their statistics. 

There is another angle to these races which the press 
has not stressed as far as I can see. and that is. the con- 
iition of heart ami mind of the distressed relatives and 
friends, who must for days and nights agonize in dread- 
ful uncertainty regarding the fate of their loved ones. 



I know something of this last condition, for I had occa- 
sion several years ago to spend some time in "Aviation 
Row" out at the Presidio, and experienced some of the 
mental anguish endured by the little wives of aviation 
lieutenants. 

I may cite the case of "Billie" Goldsborough, who par- 
ticipated in the first transcontinental flight, made in Feb- 
ruary, 1919-, I believe it was. His plane crashed into a 
mountain in a blinding snow storm, crushed his pilot and 
he himself was badly injured. He walked and crawled a 
distance of four miles over the snow, with wolves fol- 
lowing in his bloody wake, to a farmhouse to get help for 
his dying comrade. A harrowing experience, and one 
which might have been avoided, if the flight in question 
had been scheduled during summer weather. 

But when flying was in its inception, even Uncle Sam 
made deplorable mistakes. 

It would seem as if one of the most hazardous modes 
of transportation ever conceived, is being made more 
perilous than necessary, by bad judgment, carelessness, 
greed for money and speed. 

And it appears to me that there should be a law passed 
prohibiting a private citizen from taking a flight who has 
not the permission of those nearest and dearest to him 
or her. 

In the Dole race, a little schoolma'am from the Middle 
West has recklessly thrown away a life which likely 
would have proved a most valuable one to her com- 
munity; a mother who has made continual sacrifices for 
her son. has made those sacrifices, has endured those 
hardships in vain. These are merely two of the instances 
that marked the tragedy of the Hawaiian flight. 

If one possesses that "flaming youth," that wild desire 
tor adventure, that dare-deviltry which can snap its 
fingers in the face of death, he or she should be compelled 
to give thought to those who are to be left behind, to 
those who, in the end, know the keenest agony. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 27, 1927 






EXPENSIVE PROGRESS 

It may be that the only way in which mechanical 
progress is gained is by loss of life; that the penalty of 
death, in some degree, has to be paid by pioneers in any 
line of physical development. History would seem to 
prove this. It is beyond any question of doubt that sea 
navigation has cost enormously in human life, and that 
the development of steam power has been freighted with 
terrific sacrifice. 

To come to later times, it can hardly be doubted that 
the development of the automobile was greatly acceler- 
ated by the knowledge learned through the early racing 
which took a very heavy toll in young life. It may be 
that only in this way can actual progress be made in the 
science of air navigation and that not otherwise can the 
air routes be made safe for the people at large. 

But there does seem to be a recklessness about the 
affair of the Hawaiian competition which is regrettable. 
The later explanation that the contest took upon itself an 
aspect that was never contemplated by the originators 
is easy to believe. They had contemplated a well prepared 
test by experts who had taken every known precaution. 
Instead, we had an almost frantic haste together with 
excitement and public interest which threw the whole 
affair out of focus. 

We are very loth to recommend public interference, in 
a governmental capacity, in anything. But we must ad- 
mit that, but for the inspectors, there would be a greater 
chance of tragedy at Oakland. Aviators appear to need 
to be protected from themselves. 
* * * 

LIGHT ON THE ORIENT 

The Conference of the Institute of Pacific Relations ap- 
pears to have been particularly successful this year, at 
least m the opinion of its participants. It has no par- 
ticular standing at present, in official circles, but men 
hke President Wilbur of Stanford University, and Ches- 
ter Rowell evidently consider that it has a future, for the 
former says, "We will force recognition by presenting 
ideas that will stand criticism and convince public opin- 
ion that we are right." 

That is all very well and most people who have watched 
the progress of events in the East and are aware of the 
dangers which they are producing in the world at large 
will wish well to the movement. 

But it does appear as if the whole idea of the promoters 
of the conference was too great and embracing to get the 
consideration that it should, theoretically speaking de- 
serve. For example, the notion that the entire system of 
diplomacy as heretofore prevailing can be scrapped, does 
strike one as appalling in its simplicity and not' very 
likely to achieve any immediate results. Says Dr Wil- 
bur: "The necessity is not so much to break it up as to 
alter the point of view of the diplomats, politicians and 
statesmen of the old school and of changing the per 
sonnel by bringing experts into the field." 

Surely, that is true. It is exactly the position that we 
have always taken on political questions. We maintain 
that, after all, the main things are a knowledge of the 
facts and a grasp of them which only the expert will be 
able to get. But where do we find the politician who will 
yield to the expert? He has not been discovered as yet 
It is the same with the diplomat. And yet says the 



learned president, without this knowledge, we may have 

1o "shoot ourselves out of trouble." 
* * * 

JAMES ROLPH AND THE MAYORALTY 

We now know certainly that Mayor James Rolph is to 
be a candidate to succeed himself. It is the greatest tes- 
timonial to the present mayor that after fifteen years of 
control of the city his candidature is regarded as essen- 
tial by a large element of citizens. 

To be mayor of a city like San Francisco, which is con- 
tinually evolving in power and wealth and which occupies 
so important a strategic position in the future trade de- 
velopment of this nation implies an amount of energy and' 
sagacity possessed by very few men. To have stood the 
strain of that position for a period so long and at the endi 
of that period to be still a candidate for the highest po-° 
sition in municipal life, is a most unusual achievement. 

The last fifteen years have been years of unsurpassed, 
growth and progress in San Francisco. Economically and 
spiritually we have made great headway. Our local af- 
fairs are well managed. As compared with most cities inr 
this country our municipal politics are clean and freei 
from the more vulgar defects of city management. Oun 
people are well looked after. The city activities, though 
inclined at times to encroach upon private fields, are at 
least as laudable as those of other cities. Our municipal 
charities are fine and noble; our art standards, although 
they are by no means very high, are constantly improv- 
ing. Our concepts of public freedom are unusually good 
and we have not been drawn into those denials of funda- 
mental liberties which have disgraced many other places. 

Taking it all in all, the last fifteen years of San Fran- 
cisco history have been such as can well be looked at with' 
satisfaction and James Rolph, as mayor, has been per- 
haps the greatest factor for good in San Francisco dur- 
ing the whole of that period. 

* * * 

PACIFIC TRADE EXPOSITION 

The British Consul General, who is the chairman of the 
consular committee of the Pacific Foreign Trade and: 
Travel Exposition, has written a very useful and inform- 
ing article on the coming exposition. Mr. Gerald Camp- 
bell, the Consul General, has already become one of us, as; 
it were, and no one in San Francisco is more readily ancti 
gladly heard on a matter like this. 

Mr. Campbell says that while the foreign governments 
themselves will not participate in the exposition, sincei 
they have not been invited, they are being put in a posi- 
tion to advise the firms in their countries who may wish 
to participate. It is very important that the suggestion 
of the Consul General concerning the prompt furnishing 
of the necessary information be complied with as upon 
the success of the coming exposition depends to a great 
extent the future of such expositions which, it is antici- 
pated by the far-sighted, may become annual or even per- 
manent affairs. 

It is true, as Mr. Campbell points out, that the path of 
the foreign seller is by no means rosy in a country like 
our own, which has developed industrially to the highest 
known point and which is well protected by tariff pro- 
visions. 

It is hoped that the Pacific Foreign Exposition will be 
a means of breaking the vicious post war circle under 



August 27, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



which the adverse trade balances are piling up and 
threatening trouble for the future. It is a matter of 
jreat concern that this exposition should justify itself 
and it undoubtedly will do so, if other countries and their 
nanufacturers show the enterprise and co-operation of 
Mr. Campbell. 



HARBINGERS OF PEACE 

J. Frederick Richardson, speaker at the special lunch- 
on of the Foreign Trade and Travel Exposition, held last 
Wednesday at the San Francisco Women's Building, 
pointed out the illuminating idea of the "philosophy of 
ommeree and the philosophy of service'" in aviation. 

Under the premise "Aviation and the Exposition -as 
Harbingers of Peace," the speaker dwelt with emphasis 
lpon commercial aviation as the wheel of destiny com- 
pleting its turn. He drew deductions of American 
progress through the air lanes of the world. 

The courage and genius of Colonel Charles Lindbergh 
was held as a permanent beacon for other fliers whose 
onstructive and definite progress in aviation would pro- 
vide avenues for increased American trade. Richardson 
leclared that the friendship of nations would be cemented 
Dy means of aviation and that airplanes should be re- 
garded as the future messengers of peace and good will. 

Dwelling on the mighty progress of American indus- 
tries, the vast trade with foreign countries which looms 
across the horizon of the future, the well known lec- 
turer, publicist, author and aviation expert, pointed out 
the avenues of the air not as "new roads to war, but as 
future avenues of understanding, promulgating peace 

mong the nations of the world." 

The tenor of all talks at the noteworthy luncheon was 
toward diplomatic dealings in commerce and the advance- 
ment of industries, summed up under the big topic of 
tviation, upon which hearts and minds are focused today. 

Specific statements were made regarding the dissemin- 

tion of American ideals and the exporting and importing 
levelopment of American industries through the provi- 
nces of newly discovered air routes. The speaker pointed 
with pride to the friendliness of nations which were to be 
;he culmination of development of aviation in which 
Richardson declared America was to take the lead. 



MARKET STREET RAILWAYS 

It is a very poor policy to do anything to impede the 
aeration of the Market Street Railways for that organi- 
sation is by all odds the most useful social force in the 
_-it v. Thus supervisors who try to interfere with the 
latural development of transit merely because it is ob- 
viously to the benefit of the railways, overlook the patent 
fad that it is also to the benefit of the public. W hat is 
;o the public benefit should be considered fairly and nn- 
jartiallv and not from any censorious or hostile partiality. 



THE CANADIAN MARATHON 
Umberto Rovere, noted Italian long distance swimmer. 
opera singer, and restaurant proprietor, and one of the 
leading contenders in Bill Wrigley's now famous t <\ta'ma 
marathon, is in Toronto. Canada, training for the N^O.OuO 
swim over a 21-mile course, to be held in connection with 
Ithe Canadian National Exhibition, on August 31st. 

Rovere is the only Los Angeles entrant m the mara- 
thon but three swimmers are expected to leave from 
Venice. The pick of the swimmers from eight nations 
will compete in this ra< 




They're all wondering what was the great idea in that 
dinner given Detective-Sergeant Leo Bunner by about a 
hundred of his friends the other night! Is Leo all set for 
a race with Finn for sheriff? 



Rumor along the place of political hop-offs is increasing 

loud that our genial chief of police, O'Brien, thinks a 

sheriff's regalia would drape his manly form even more 

fittingly than his present uniform and Dan seems not a 

bit peeved because of the whisperings anent his asserted 

ambition. 

* * * 

But Bunner and O'Brien are friends even to the extent, 
'tis said, that the former will not enter the flight if his 
chief elects to take off. 

"James B. McSheehy, Assessor," seems the logical 
sequence to Mac's great work as chairman of the Board 
of Supervisors. His record as a public servant is spotless 
and such an officer should be encouraged by promotion, 
where possible, to a position carrying decent compen- 
sation. 

* * * 

McSheehy's unique record: two reductions in the tax 
rate in two consecutive budgets — alone should sweep him 
into the important position of assessor. In that office he 
could best give an account of his honesty and capability. 
And apparently this paper made no mistake in supporting 
Mac in his last campaign for supervisor. 

* * * 

It is amusing how the bought-and-paid-for section of 
the press strives to talk away McSheehy's hitherto un- 
heard of feat of reducing the city's tax rate! This of 
course is the opposition's appeal to the unthinking among 
voters and carries conviction to them only. 

* * * 

And 'tis said Eugene E. Schmitz, former supervisor, is 
hearkening to the buzz of the racing bee. It is revealed 
that the one-time mayor declares a committee has waited 
on him recently to ask him to try the big hop for mayor. 
What effect the urge had is not revealed. 



Then, as the race for the big prize has become a three- 
cornered affair, conjecture has it Mr. Schmitz is looking 
over the field with a view to qualify at the take-off in 
November so as to make it a four-cornered fight. 
* * * 

It is difficult to say which of the two, Rolph or Power, 
is the more affected by the Uhl entry into the political 
flight. The latter has been for a long time at variance 
with the doings of the Board of Supervisors and recently 
opposed the Spring Valley and Municipal Railroad exten- 
sion bonds. 



Mayor Rolph's admirers down in the Latin quarter are 
organizing a big club to work for his re-election. Among 
the North Beachers in the line-up are property owners, 
professional men and women and merchants of the dis- 
trict. Nat Cereghino is president of affair and Vic 
Sbraggia is chairman of the campaign committee. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 27, 1927 





ocier 




-^vg^ 



By Antoinette Arnold 




Brilliant Society Season 
Predicted by Smart Set 

Society will have a brilliant season 
this winter, according to those in the 
know. Already the social calendar 
notates several elegant affairs and the 
present outlook presages a California 
social season of distinctive events. 

The first society affair of outstand- 
ing importance will be a dinner dance 
on September ninth, when Mrs. Tob- 
in Clark of San Mateo entertains at 
her home, "El Palomar" in compli- 
ment to Miss Huguette Clark. 

* * * 
Senator's Daughter 

Miss Clark is the daughter of the 
late Senator William A. Clark of Mon- 
tana. She and her mother are com- 
ing north from Santa Barbara to 
make a visit at the Tobin Clark man- 
sion. 

All of the younger society set are 
on the qui vive in anticipation of Miss 
Huguette's arrival. She is exceed- 
ingly popular and noted for her smart 
attire and graciousness. Any num- 
ber of affairs have already been ar- 
ranged in her honor. 



Home From Trips 

Prominent among the returning 
fashionables are Mr. and Mrs. Bliss 
Tucker, who have reached their home 
in San Francisco after visiting some 
time in Santa Barbara. The Tuckers 
were house guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Coy Filmer for several days. 



Back from Banff 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Herrman have 
returned from Lake Louise and Banff 
and are established again at their 
home here. The Herrmans were one 
of the most sought after couples in 
Society last Winter. Mrs. Herrman 
is prominent in the Junior League and 
is known among her friends as one 
who "dresses to perfection."' 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway, Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unnsual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservatiors on your 
next trip south 



Author Recovering 

Mrs. William Beckman, author of 
many published books and newspaper 
articles, is receiving hundreds of 
messages and congratulations from 
hosts of friends upon her rapidly-re- 
turning health after many weeks of 
serious illness. 

Mrs. Beckman is prominent in so- 
ciety and literary circles of Sacra- 
mento and San Francisco. She is 
well known for her books of travels 
and philosophy, her Red Cross activi- 
ties and as donor of a chair at the 
University of California for the study 
of American literature. 

Her husband, the late William 
Beckman, was universally known in 
banking circles and for years was 
president of some of the first banking 
institutions in the Capitol City. The 
Beckmans made a number of world- 
tours together and were leaders in 
Society at Sacramento. 
* * * 
Many Events Planned 

Mrs. Beckman founded the Salon 
des Artistes of which she is the presi- 
dent with professional musicians, 
writers and artists in creative fields, 
both men and women, enrolled as 
members. 

When Mrs. William Beckman is en- 
tirely recovered a number of interest- 
ing events will be given in her honor. 

* * * 
Visitors At Lake 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmond Herrscher 
have been spending a vacation period 
at Lake Louise where the young cou- 
ple were general favorites. Mr. Herr- 
scher is well known in legal circles 
and his beautiful wife is always the 
center of attraction. Sh e dresses 
with exquisite taste and has a charm 
of manner which makes her a social 
favorite. 

The Herrschers have a handsome 
apartment on Nob Hill at the fash- 
ionable Park Lane. They often spend 
much time, also at Lake Tahoe mak- 
ing their headquarters at Tahoe 
Tavern, the D. M. Linnard hostelry 
on the Lake. 

* * * 

Phelan Country Estate 
Scene of House Party 

Hon. James D. Phelan, former 
United States Senator, gave a note- 
worthy week-end party on his coun- 
try estate, Villa Montalvo, near Sara- 



toga, in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph 
C. Miller and Mrs. Sydney A. Cloman' 
of Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Phelan has recently returned 
from Santa Barbara, where he de- 
livered an address on the occasion of 
the re-dedication of old Mission Santa 
Barbara. This famous old Mission, 
destroyed by earthquake two years 
ago, has been rebuilt on the same old 
architectural lines and is once again 
in the great chain of California's sac- 
red Missions established by the Fran- 
ciscans, Spanish fiesta ceremonies 
were part of the re-dedication events, 
when Ex-Senator Phelan gave his 'J 
brilliant discourse. 



Society Guests 

Prominent society folks who were* 
guests at the Phelan home at this: 
past week-end house party, included: 
Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marye, Mr.f 
and Mrs. J. Downey Harvey, Mr. and. 
Mrs. Robert Patterson, Mrs. MacRae,' 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Leimert of Losr 
Angeles; Colonel Harry S. Howland.l 
Mr. Noel Sullivan, Mr. Frederick Mur-- 
phy, Jr. 



Luncheon of Travel and 
Foreign Trades Big Success 

Mrs. William D'Egilbert, chair-'! 
man of the Women's Participation,) 
Foreign Trade and Travel Exposition,:! 
presided at the luncheon given last 
Wednesday in the San Francisco Wo- 
men's Club Building, complimenting 
Miss Geneve Shaffer, Commissioner 
to Alaska. 

The subject of "Aviation and the 
Exposition as Harbingers of Peace" 
was discussed, J. Frederick Richard- 
son, principal speaker. Mrs. Chris- 
tine H. Hall had charge of the reser- 
vations for this interesting event, 
marking an auspicious beginning for 
the division over which Mrs. D'Egil- 
bert presides with consummate skill. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3660 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



August 27, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Society Wanderings 

Mrs. William P. Roth has been 
spending considerable time at Lake 
Tahoe. She expected to return to her 
Redwood City home this week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard W. Ford are 
on a camping trip leaving their San 
Mateo home just a few days ago. 
# # * 

Mrs. Raymond Wilson has been en- 
tertaining her niece, Miss Katherine 
Wright at her Santa Cruz country- 
home. They plan to spend some time 
in Santa Cruz, later going to the Wil- 
son's home in Carmel. Miss Wright 
is from Santa Barbara. Her mother, 
Mrs. Irving Wright is Mrs. Wilson's 
sister. 



Garden Party 

Mrs. Joseph D. Grant will entertain 
the San Francisco Garden Club at her 
home in Burlingame this week, as- 
sisted by Mrs. William Hinckley Tay- 
lor, president of the Garden Club. In- 
spection of the gorgeous flowers in 
the Grant home will be part of the 
pleasant affair. Both men and wo- 
men are members of the club. 



Burlingame Dance 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hamilton 
gave a dinner dance last Friday night 
at the Burlingame Country Club in 
honor of Mrs. Ferdinand Thieriot of 
Paris. It was a most attractive af- 
fair, attended by more than seventy 
prominent society folks of the Bur- 
lingame set. 

* * * 

Jacklings Give 
Benefit Concert 

An afternoon of music and tea ser- 
vice will be the attractions on Sunday 
afternoon, September 4. at the coun- 
try home of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. 
[Tackling, "Family Farm," in Wood- 
side for the benefit of the Church of 
Our Lady of the Wayside. 

The delightful concert will be pro- 
vided by well known musical artists 
and will start at half past three o'- 
clock with a tea hour following. Tic- 
kets are to be obtained from Mrs. 
Jackling, Woodside. 



Sacramento Visitor 

Mrs. Edna Wilson Becsey of Sacra- 
mento has been the motif of a number 
of delightful affairs during her visit 
in San Francisco, a luncheon at the 
Fairmont Hotel and a tea at the Fal- 
ace Hotel being among the many 
pleasant social events when the young 
Sacramento writer was honor guest. 
She returned Monday to her home 
in the Capitol city. 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 
Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

500 Rooms 

Tariff : From §4 per day 



At Hotel 
Mark Hopkins 

La Parfaite Union Lodge, No. 17, 
F. & A. M. held a banquet in honor of 
the Grand Master of Masons and 
Reno Lodge, No. 13, in the Room of 
Dons, Hotel Mark Hopkins. Over 200 
persons were present on this occasion. 
Mr. Ed. L. Charpentier of Burlin- 
game and Mr. Brewster Ames, of San 
Francisco, were in charge of the af- 
fair. 

August 10th was selected for the 
dinner of the Lambda Omega Soror- 
ity in the Room of the Dons'. The 
table of horseshoe shape was beauti- 
fully decorated with pastel shades of 
asters and maidenhair fern. Over 
seventy-five were present. 

Among those who entertained at 
tea in Peacock Court during the week 
were: Miss Helen Irwin, Miss O. K. 
Kerley and Mrs. Lewis Hemrich. 

The following are some of those 
who presided at tables for the dinner 
dance in Peacock Court last Satur- 
day: T. M. Casad, Mrs. H. Rosener, 
M. M. Tait, Dr. H. W. Herbert, Mme. 
Hedges, J. A. O'Connell, Stanley Hall. 
J. A. Stewart, L. Lofurd, Mrs. W. 
Weinhaitt, Mrs. M. Selig. E. T. Fitz- 
patrick, H. H. Price. Dr. W. R. Love- 
grove. Mrs. B. F. Williamson, Mrs. L. 
Blethen. Mrs. Jules Levy, Geo. G. 
Heye (of New York City), Judge Wm. 
J. Blesse. Harold C. Faulkner and G. 

C. Paterson. 

* * * 

The marriage of Miss Emily Laura 
Thomas, daughter of Walter W. 
Thomas, to John Dale Stine. took 
place on Thursday evening ot last 
week, at 8:15. at the home of the 
bride's father. Rev. H. S. Feix officiat- 
ing. 

Following the ceremony a wedding 
dinner was held in the Italian Room 
of the Hotel Whitcomb. The attend- 
ants were Miss Lillian Viedermann. 
Robert Thomas and Walter Thomas. 



The bride wore a colored georgette 
dress and carried a bouquet of gar- 
denias and lily of the valley. 

The guests at the dinner included 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Thomas, Mr. 
and Mrs. Harrison S. Stine, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Whisenant, Miss Kate 
Stine, and Mrs. Evelyn Brinkhans. 

At Hotel 
Mark Hopkins 

On August 17th, Mrs. W. C. Ander- 
son was hostess at an attractively ap- 
pointed luncheon in Peacock Court of 
Hotel Mark Hopkins. After luncheon 
the guests adjourned to one of the 
hotel's drawing rooms for a few hours 
of bridge. 

Mr. Emil Weil, Consul General of 
Germany, was the honored guest at a 
banquet on August 18th given by the 
San Francisco Open Forum, Inc., in 
the Spanish Dining room. About 300 
were present on this occasion. 

Mrs. E. H. Emmick entertained at 

a beautifully appointed luncheon in 

one of the hotel's suites on August 

18th. Later on the guests enjoyed 

several hours of bridge. 
* * * 

Among the interesting arrivals at 
the Mark Hopkins last week were: 
Mr. Lalchand Mehra of Amritsar, In- 
dia ; Mr. Francis X. Bushman, Motion 
Picture Actor, Miss Virginia Pearson, 
actress, F. C. Thornley, writer of fic- 
tion, Mr. J. French, Manager of the 
Richfield Oil Company, Los Angeles; 
Dr. and Mrs. G. W. Boskowitz who 
just recently returned from Europe. 
Others who arrived during the week 
were: Mr. and Mrs. O. O. Olson of 
Chicago. Illinois; Mr. E. F. Bessette 
of Detroit, Michigan; Mr. and Mrs. 
H. G. Zander of Chicago; Mrs. J. M. 
Welsh of New York City; Mr. L. K. 
Allman of Worcester, Mass. ; Mrs. F. 
R. Hunkins of St. Louis, Mo.; Dr. and 
Mrs. G. W. Boskowitz, A. Corlies and 
family of New York City; Dr. and 
Mrs. G. H. Davison of Pittsburgh, 
Pa.; Dr. C. A. Gundelach and family 
of St. Louis, Mo.; Mrs. H. F. Hadfield 
of Hilo, Hawaii; Mrs. E. C. Travers 
of Rochester. N. Y. The following 
registered from Southern California: 
(Continued on page 13) 



^ you pay no more ^ 




THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 27, 1927 




Pleasure's W^nd 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

Tom Moore- 




By Josephine Young 



Tneater Lures 

There is plenty in San Francisco 
theaters to lure patrons this week, 
with a smile or a hearty laugh pro- 
vided in full measure. 

Visitors, from afar, as well as those 
within the radius of our Bay and pen- 
insula district, in addition to regular 
theater goers of the local contingency 
find excellent attractions here on both 
stage and screen. 

* * * 
President 

"Two Girls Wanted" the comedy 
by Gladys Unger, brilliant San Fran- 
cisco playwright, begins its second 
week at the President on McAllister 
street near Market and Jones streets. 
Leneta Lane has the leading role in 
this Henry Duffy play and Peggy 
Tomson, San Francisco girl returning 
to her home town, has an important 
part. 

Symona Boniface, Harvey Ste- 
phens, Joan Warner are new comers 
in this play, including Peggy Tomson. 
Earl Lee, is the popular player who 
adds more to his fame, in a part par- 
ticularly suited to him. John O' 
Hara, Lillian Dean, Thomas Brower, 
Dorothy LaMar, Lloyd Monroe and 
Henry Caubisens are Duffy players 
who find favor in their character roles 
as usual. 

Lurie 

"I Love You," at the Lurie theater 
this week, features the well known 
stage and screen star, Johnny Arthur, 
and handsome Alma Tell in a clever 
William Le Baron comedy. This 
clever play has drollery, flecked with 
fun of the radiant order and moves 
along at a rapid pace from beginning 
to end. 

Belasco, Butler and Davis are the 
producers and Fred J. Butler the di- 
rector and their names speak success 
and supremacy in direction and pre- 
sentation. The play is clean, highly 
entertaining of the refreshing order 
and, furthermore there is not one lag- 
ging minute in the whole comedy. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

The Orpheum announces the open- 
ing of the fall season with a list of 
celebrities headed by Beatrice Lillie 



who was first brought to this country 
by Andre Chariot. She will appear 
in "After Dinner Music," written 
especially for her by Noel Coward. 
George Wiest and Ray Stanton offer, 
"A Little Rhyme and Less Reason" 
with Lew Miller, Eileen Shannon and 
Al Bones in what is termed "Eye and 
Ear Entertainment." 

Dainty Marie, "Venus of the Air" 
brings her own company in "A Feast 
of Laughs and Daring." Montague 
Love of screen fame appears in a 

monologue. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

One of the best bills in the circuit 
is announced for the opening of the 
1927-28 season of Orpheum vaude- 
ville at the Golden Gate Theater, Sat- 
urday, with Albert Lewis and Jean 
Adair and Company presenting "The 
Old Aristocrat," by Tom Barry. 

Henri Margo and Helene Beth and 
their retinue will present "A Carnival 
Night," with dancing features. Sim 
Moore and Pal in "A Little of Every- 
thing" sing, dance and perform gym- 
nastics. Laurel Lee "Chummy Chat- 
terer" and other acts, complete the 
vaudeville. 

May Robson and Phyllis Haver in 
"The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary" a 
clean, delightful comedy is the film 
feature. 

* * * 

Warfield 

"The Life of Riley" starring 
Charles Murray and George Sidney 
is on the screen this week starting 
Saturday. The action of the story 
takes place in a small town with a po- 
lice department and a fire chief prin- 
cipal interests including the mixup of 
funny situations. Myrtle Steadman 
has the heroine role. 

Fanchon and Marco stage "Ideas" 
supply the features of an elaborate 
entertainment and gorgeous settings. 



Alcazar 

"The Alarm Clock" the Henry Duf- 
fy play at the Alcazar theater fea- 
tures Marion Lord. She shares hon- 
ors in the play with Thomas Chatter- 
ton and Charlotte Treadway. John 
Stokes is clever and likeable in his 
comedy part and Alice Buchanan 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"The Alarm Clock." Henry Duffy comedy* 
starring Marion Lord. 

Capitol, Ellis nr. Market 

"Abie's Irish Rose." Anne Nichol's play in 8 
final local performance. 

Lurie, Geary at Mason 

"I Love Vou." Comedy starrinj* Johnny Arthur 
and Alma Tell. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"Two Girls Wanted." A Henry Duffy prescn- 
tation of John Golden's latest comedy. 



VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave, and Taylor 

Jean Adair, comedienne, heads the vaudeville 
I. ill. 

"The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary." featuring 
May Rohson and Phyllis Haver on the screen. 



Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Dainty Marie, who tells the women folk how 
to reduce, is the headliner of a hill of vaude- 
ville. 

Pantages, Market at Hyde 

Tom Mix on the screen. "The Circus Ace." J 
Norman Tclma. juirirler; Mabel Hale and Joyce 
Sisters, comedy act: Roy Byron and Company; 
Reno Arlcn comedy act : Harry Slatko'a sun- 
beams, sinirinj,' and dancing revue. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Musical Comedy — Pictures. 



ON THE SCREEN 



California, 



DOWN TOWN 

Market at 4th 



"The Bijr Parade." War time picture featur- 
ing John Gilbert and Rence Adoree. Gino 
Severi conducts the California orchestra. 

Cameo, Market opp. Fifth street 

"One Exciting Nieht," D. W. Griffith picture, 
Friday and Saturday. Change of pictures for 
balance of week. 

Casino. Ellis at Mason 

Sat. — "The Midnight Watch" and "Easy Go- 
inu Gordon." Sun.. Mon. — "The Red Kimono" 
and "Young April." Tues.. Wed. — "My Official 
Wife." Thurs., Fri. — John Gilbert in "The 
Show," and Charlie Chaplin in "Shoulder 
Arms." 

Granada, Market at Jones 

On the screen. "Underworld." On the stage, 
Frank Jenks leads the Granada orchestra in a 
musical carnival. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th. 

"Beau Geste." Ronald Colman is starred in a 
story of the French Foreign Lesion. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

On the screen, "Life of Riley." 

On the stage. Walt Rocsner and a Fanchon 

and Marco presentation. 

RESIDENCE DISTRICT 

Alhambra, Polk St., nr. Green 

"Money to Burn." Malcolm MacGregor and 
Dorothy Dcvore, and "Jewels of Desire," John 
Bowers and Priscilla Dean. Saturday. "The 
Claw," Sunday, with Claire Windsor and Nor- 
man Kerry. "The Tender Hour." Mon.. Tues., 
Wed.; Ben Lyon and Alec B. Francis. 



August 27, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



again takes the role of a scheming 
woman, who with a perfectly good 
husband of her own tries to dominate 
a young bachelor. 

Robert Adams, Zeda Reed, Richard 
Ellers, William Macauley, C. Haviland 
Chappell and John Mackenzie are in 
the cast. The fourth week of the en- 
gagement begins with the matinee 
Sunday afternoon. 

* * * 

Capitol 

"Abie's Irish Rose" the Anne Nic- 
hols comedy is still on at the Capitol 
theater, where it continues to fill the 
theater with each performance. The 
company of players which delighted 
San Francisco audiences some time 
ago is again presenting this clever 
play. The Capitol has matinee per- 
formances Wednesday, Saturday and 

Sunday. 

* * 

Granada 

"Underworld," with George Ban- 
croft the star in a drama directed 
by Joseph Von Sternberg, is the fea- 
ture of the screen at the Granada this 
week, with Clive Brook , Evelyn 
Brent, George Kohler and Larry Se- 
mon in the cast. 

On the stage Fanchon and Marco 
will present "Blue Ideas" in which 25 
Serpentine Girls return to San Fran- 
cisco. Nora Schiller, singer of popu- 
lar melodies and dancers will appear 
in the stage act of Frank Jenks, "The 
Play Boy" and his orchestra. 
* * * 

California 

"The Big Parade." the famous pic- 
ture is to remain at the California for 
another week. This picture has been 
playing to large crowds and, as we go 
to press, the management has decided 
that it would be wise to extend the 
performance one more week. John 
Gilbert and Renee Adoree made their 
initial starring performance in this 
picture and since it was first shown 
they have been in constant demand 
by movie fans and casting directors 
alike. The story is of the great war. 
Some of the scenes are on the gran- 
diose order with production predom- 
inating. There is comedy, but on the 
whole the picture is filled with pathos. 

Gino Severi conducts the California 
orchestra in a concert as well as in an 
interpretative score. 



Fivers Guests 
Of the Clift 

Guests of interest at the Clift 
Hotel this week included four of the 
fliers of the Dole Hawaiian flight. 
Messrs. Arthur C. Goebel, Kenneth 
C. Hawkins. Martin Jensen and Navi- 
gator Paul Schluter, former captain 
of the Nome City, a coastwise 
steamer. 



Dahlia Show 

With the added impetus of being 
the official flower of San Francisco, 
the dahlia show, to be held as usual 
this year at the Palace Hotel, Septem- 
ber 1 and 2, promises to be a most 
imposing affair. The San Francisco 
Dahlia Society, T. A. Burns, presi- 
dent, will hold the show for the bene- 
fit of the dahlia fans of the bay re- 
gion. This will be the 12th annual 
show to be held in San Francisco, and 
all the veteran growers are grooming 
their dahlia bushes so that they will 
produce the largest and best blooms 
possible. Among the famous garden 
owners that will show this year are 
Bessie Boston, Jessie Seal, Jim Davies, 
Frank Pelicano, Mrs. H. T. Hennig, 
Carl Salbach and a large number of 
others. An added attraction will be a 
special display of delphinium and 
gladioli from some of the best collec- 
tions in the state. The dahlia of 
course will have the limelight, but a 
special side room will be devoted to 
the blues of the delphinium and the 
vari-colored gladioli. The eager quest 
for a blue dahlia is still going on, but 
none of the growers will admit hav- 
ing found it as yet. 

All dahlia growers, professional as 
well as amateurs are invited to join 
the society and exhibit at the show, 
which on account of San Francisco's 
place as the dahlia center of the 
v orld, is watched with interest by 
floriculturists all over the world. 



Motorists Warned to Observe 
Yosemite Speed Regulations 

Motorists visiting Yosemite Na- 
tional Park should bear in mind that 
the new speed limit of 40 miles an 
hour, made effective by State law, is 
not applicable to roads in Yosemite. 

According to George S. Grant, 
manager of the Association Touring 
Bureau, many motorists have been 
running afoul of the Federal govern- 
ment regulations in the valley under 
the erroneous impression that the 40 
mile limit prevailed there. Regula- 
tions fixed by the National Park Serv- 
ice are the rules of the road in 
Yosemite. 

The maximum limit allowed on 
straight stretches of open road on 
the floor of the valley. Grant pointed 
out. is 30 miles an hour. Through 
villages or camps, crossing bridges, 
passing vehicles, at intersections or 
where visibility is obscured, the limit 
is 20 miles an hour. On all other roads 
within the park boundaries, the limit 
is 15 miles on grades and around 
sharp curves and 20 miles on straight 
open stretches. 



The safe temperature 
for keeping food 

Automatically maintained with 
the Electric Refrigerator 

Like a clear cold Autumn morning, 
the frosty temperature inside the 
Electric Refrigerator adds crispness 
to vegetables. It improves the flavor 
of meats. It keeps milk sweet on the 
warmest days. In this cool tempera- 
ture salads become tastier, more ap- 
petizing and delicious. 

The Electric Refrigerator automa- 
tically maintains the temperature in- 
side the box between 42 degrees and 
47 degrees Fahrenheit. This is the 
safest temperature for keeping food. 

You'll need this safe, carefree elec- 
tric refrigeration, especially if you go 
away from home a great deal on auto- 
mobile trips and week-end vacations. 




"PACIFIC SERVICE" 



Pacific Gas and electric Company 

Owned ■ Operated • Managed 

by Californians 




■ Companion of 
T»e morning - • 
ity refreshing- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6634 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1.8*0. 000 cops were Mr-red at the 
Panama-Pacific International Expoaitiaa 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 27, 192'! 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




C. J. Pennington 

Elaborate plans are being made 
for broadcasting during the fourth 
annual Los Angeles radio show, which 
opens September 5. The Evening 
Express radio station, KNX, operates 
the panel at the Ambassador Hotel, 
where the show is to be held, and has 
offered it for use by all other stations. 

The show committee selected five 
other stations, namely, KHJ, KNRC, 
KFWB, KFI and KMTR, along with 
KNX for the programs. 

KNX will furnish the program for 
the opening day, which is Labor day. 
Each station has an afternoon in the 
Ambassador Theater, adjoining the 
show auditorium, for talent to appear 
in person. This same station on that 
day furnishes the talent during the 
evening in the show proper. 



The program for Saturday, Septem- 
ber 3, will be broadcast from the 
studios of KGW-Portland, over the 
Pacific Coast Network of the National 
Broadcasting Company. 

This is in accordance with a recent 
plan to let each of the various sta- 
tions comprising the network put on 
one program, so that the vast Pacific 
Coast radio audience might become 
acquainted with the artist personnel 
of the stations and enable them to 
hear a program built from the most 
popular features of each station. 

It is hoped that this plan will give 
more variety to the National Broad- 
casting Company programs and in- 
augurate a friendly rivalry among 
the several stations in an effort to 
out-do each other in the quality of of- 
ferings. 



A Word For The Sopranos 

"Why are radio sopranos in such 
general disfavor? Because, like the 
little girl, when they aren't good they 
are terrible," says Robert Hurd, pro- 
gram manager of KFI. 

"The microphone seems to magnify 
defects in the higher registers more 
than in the lower ranges. For this 
reason a slight defect in the voice of 
a great soprano is more displeasing 
than the lugubrious bellow of a bad 
baritone. 

"To hear the criticisms of the un- 
thinking, one would imagine that no 
soprano ever lived who could really 
sing. When one considers the great 
sopranos of the past thirty years — 
Patti, Melba, Tetrazzini, Galli Curci, 
Alma Gluck, Farrar, Bori, Barrientos, 
Destinn, Ponselle, Talley and a host of 
others, all of them headline box office 
attractions, such a contention be- 
comes ridiculous. These women tri- 
umphed in concert and I believe most 
would have made a great success at 
the microphone. 

"There are a few sopranos who reg- 
ister solidly with the radio audience. 
Analyze these voices and you find ab- 
solute accuracy of tone, pitch and pro- 
duction and control. Radio fortunate- 
ly possesses several sopranos with 
these qualities among whom Virginia 
Flohri of KFI may be mentioned as 
perhaps the most outstanding exam- 
ple of microphone technique." 



Drama 
Broadcast 

The Pacific Division of the National 
Broadcasting Company will present 
the biblical drama, "Samson and De- 
lilah" over the net work on Sunday 
evening, September 4, from 9 to 10 
P. M. 

The Bible story of the mighty Sam- 
son, who was betrayed by Delilah, will 
be presented in dialogue form with 
an appropriate symphonic orchestral 
accompaniment. 

The following persons will depict 
the characters of the drama: Emelie 
Melville, Benjamin Purrington, Wil- 
liam Rainey and Margaret O'Dea. 



KFRC— DON LEE 
SAN FRANCISCO — 154 



-Services from Old St 



Junior — Did you hear that they are 
going to fight the battle of Bunker 
Hill over again? 

Rook — No. How's that? 

Junior — Because it wasn't fought 
on the level. — Oregon Orange Owl. 



Sunday, August 28 
12:00 noon to 1:00 ] 

Mary's Church. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Twilight recital. 
6:00 to 6:25 p. m.-— Talk by Dr. West. 

6 :25 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen reports. 
8:30 to 10:30 p. m. — Walter Krausgrill's Orchestra. 

Monday, August 29 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Early Bird program. 
8:00 to 8:30 a. m.— Jenny Wren overture. 
8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Household hints. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon— Amateur tryouts. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
6:00 to 6:20 p. m.— Joe Mendel and his pep band. 
6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen, police reportsJ 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Western Motors Co. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Eddie Harkness' dance orchestra. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Blue Monday jamboree. 
10:00 to 1:00 p. m.— KFRCs period on gala Radio 
Show program. 

Tuesday. August 30 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Early Bird program. 

8:00 to 8:30 a. m.— Jenny Wren overture. 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Doings of Dorothy. 

11:30 a. m. to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryout program. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m.— Sherman, Clay concert. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m.— Stage and screen. 

6:30 to 6:50 p. m.— Russell-Colvin Co. 

6:50 to 7:00 p. m. — "Investment Securities." 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Eddie Harkness' dance orchestra. 

S:00 to 8:30 p. m.~KFRC Radio Movie Club. 

8:30 to 9:30 p. m. — Walter Krausgrill's orchestra. 

9:30 to 12:00 p. m] — Eddie Harkness' dance orchestra.: 

Wednesday, August 31 

7:00 to *:00 a. m.— Early Bird program. 
8:00 to 8:30 a. m. — Jenny Wren overture. 
8:30 to 9:00 a. m.— Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Household hint-. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon— Musical tryout period. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m — Sherman. Clay concert. 
■1:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
6:20 to 6.30 p. m.— Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Western Motors Co. 

7 :00 to 7:80 p. m. — Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Maxwell House Coffee program^ 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— KFRC trio. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Walter Krausgrill's orchestra." 

Thursday. September 1 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Early Bird program. 

S -.00 to 8 :30 p. m. — Jenny Wren overture. 

3:80 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 

11 :80 to 12:00 noon— Amateur tryouts. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay concert. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m.— Organ recital. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Madame Marie's Beauty Talk. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Western Motors Co. 

7:00 to 7:10 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

7:10 to 7:30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Mona Motor Oil Co. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Instrumental concert solos. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 

Friday. September 2 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Early Bird program. 

B:00 to 8:30 a. m.— Jenny Wren overture. 

8:30 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Hints to home-makers. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6:20 to 6:80 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Art floral program. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Musical educational series. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Walter Krausgrill's orchestra. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 

Saturday. September 3 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Early Bird program. 
8:00 to 8:30 a. m. — Jenny Wren orchestra. 
S :30 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:45 a. m. — Amateur tryouts. 
11:45 to 12:00 noon — Announcements of Sunday 
church sermons. 



August 27, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



12:00 to 1:00 p. m.— Sherman, Clay concert. 
4:80 to 5:30 p. m.— Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:20 p. m— Mac and his gang. 
6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Western Motors Co. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins dance orchestra. 
8:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Mark Hopkins dance or- 
chestra. 

KYA— PACIFIC BROADCAST CORP. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 309.1 

Sunday. August 28 

11:00 a. m. — Church services. 

7 :45 p. m.— Church services. 

Monday. August 29 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Golden Gate Crier. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Concert Trio. 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Golden Gate Crier. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Prize package period. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Clift Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m.— The Venetian Quartet. 

8:30 to 9:00 p. m.— The Venetian Quartet. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 1:00 a. m. — Broadcast from Radio Show. 

Tuesday, August 30 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Golden Gate Crier. 

8:00 a. m. — Correct time. 

10:30 to 10:45 a. m.— Diet and health talk. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

4 :00 to 5 :00 p. m. — Broadcast from special studio of 
Radio Show. 

5:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Golden Gate Crier. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — "Magazine on the Air." 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Truett-George Instrumental Duo 
and KYA Artists. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Benny Lipston, lyric tenor. 

10 :00 p. m. — Correct time. 

Wednesday, August 31 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Golden Gate Crier. 

8:00 a. m. — Correct time. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

5:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Golden Gate Crier. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Malvina Cohn, soprano. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. -Broadcast from the special 
studio of the Radio Show. 

Thursday, September 1 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Golden Gate Crier. 

8:00 a. m.— Correct time. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

5:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Golden Gate Crier. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Regular weekly meeting "26th 
Squad." 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— The Clarion Trio. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — The KYA Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. 

Friday. September 2 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Golden Gate Crier. 

8:00 a. m. — Correct time. 
10:30 to 10:45 a. m. Diel and health talk. 
12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio, 
5:80 to 7:00 p. m. -Golden Gate Crier. 

7:00 to 7:80 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

6:00 to 9:0(1 p. m. Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.- KYA artists. 

10:00 p. m.— Correct time. 

Saturday. September 3 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Golden Gate Crier. 

s:oo a. m. Correct time. 

12:80 t<> 2:00 p. m. Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

3:80 lo 7:011 ,i. m. Golden Gate Crier. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. -Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 io I0:uo p. m. Program by Anna.' K. Blotcky. 

10:00 p. m. Correct time. 



KI'O— HALE BROTHERS AND THE CHRONICLE 

SAN FRANCISCO — »22 
Sunday. August 28 

_' : is i" i :80 p. m. Broadcast of baseball came. 

6 :00 to :8Q p. m. StatM Kestaurant orchestra. 

t; :8Q p. in. Baseball scores. 

ii t8G to s ::ir> p. mi. Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 
s ; :*:» io 10:00 p. m, Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
Monday. August 29 

. i i . ■ IB «. m. Real) h exercise* 
8 100 to 9 :00 a. m. Sparry Flour happy hour, 
to :80 to 10 :46 a. m. -Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:80 to 12:50 p. m. Kane's Hawaii 
12 noon Time signals. Scripture reading. 
12:50 p. m. stock market Quotations. 
i 00 to 2:00 p. m. Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
D 5 :80 p.m. Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

S :80 to 6:00 p. m. Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :80 p. m, Ye Towne Cryer service. 

:00 p. ni States Kestaurant orchestra. 

7 :0Q to ? :S0 p. Rl Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
; :80 to s :oo p. m, DX, 

s >00 to 9:00 p. m. Program by National Broadcasting. 

10:00p.m. Program for shell Company of 
California. KPO-KF1. 

10:00 P. m. to 12 midnight KPO's variety hour. 
Tuesday. August SO 

1 :1G an.l 7 :-!.=. a. m. Health exercises. 

8 :00 to • :00 a. tn, Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10:00 to 10:30 a. m.— Domestic economist. 

owns Cryer service. 

12:60 p. m. Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 nwn- Time signals. Scripture reading. 
12:60p.m. Stock market quotations. 
1 :00 to 2 :00 p. m. Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
2 :46 tO 4 :S0 P. m. Umailfa^t of baseball game. 



4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7:00 to 7 :30'p. m.— Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Dan Casey's fireside hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 11:00 p.m. — Palace Hotel dance orchestra. 

Wednesday, August 31 

6 :46. 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:30 to 12:50 p. m, — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

12:50 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

1 :00 to 2 :00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

2:45 to 4 :30 p. m.— Broadcast of baseball game. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Atwater Kent Artists. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 11 :00 p. m.— States Restaurant orchestra. 

Thursday. September I 

6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m.— Health exercises. 

S :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:30 to 12:50 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12 :C0 p. m.— Stock market quotations. 

1 :00 to 2 :00 p. m. —Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

2 :45 to 4 :30 p. m. — Broadcast of baseball game. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:00 p.m.-DX. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company's 
10:00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Palace Hotel dance orchestra. 
Friday, September 2 

6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :30 to 10:45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 
10:45 a. m. -Ninon, fashion critic. 

11 :30 to 12 :50 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon— Time signals. Scripture reading. 
12:45 p.m. — Commonwealth luncheon at Palace Hotel. 

1 :30 to 2 :00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 

2 :45 to 4 :80 p. m. — Broadcast of baseball game. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :80 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :20 p. m. — Book review. 

7 :20 to 7 :80 p. m. Sports-on-the-air. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m— DX. 

x !0Q to 9:00 p. m. — Program, the Calpet orchestra. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 11:00 P. 'm.- States Restaurant orchestra. 

Saturday. September 3 

ii : IB. 7 :16 ami 7 :46 a. m. — Health exercises. 

;00 tO 9:00 a. m. Sperry Flour happy hour. 
L0 :00 to 10 :80 a. m.— Domestic economist. 
10 :80 to 10 :45 a. m, — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
11:30 to 12:50 p. m.- Kane's Hawaiians. 

l_' in Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12:60 p.m. Stock market quotations, 
i no i,i ■: -00 p. m. Fairmont Hotel concert orchestra. 
'_' ; !"• to 4 :30 p. m. Broadcast of baseball games. 
1:80 to 6:80 p.m. — Palace Hotel concert orchestra. 
.. :80 In G :00 p. m. ■ Twilight hour. 

, m. Ye Towne Cryer service. 
<\ :So to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant orchestra. 
7:30 to B:0Q p- ni. -DX. 

s:im to BlOO p- m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
8:00 to 12 i00 midnight Goodrich Silvertown Cord or- 

chester. 
12 :00 m. to 1 :00 a. m. Palace Hotel dance orchestra. 



9:30 to 10:30 p. m.— Athens Athletic club orchestra. 

Saturday, September 3 

2 :45 p. m. — Baseball. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Amusement information. 



KLX 



-OAKLAND TRIBCNE 

OAKLAND— 508 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC 
OAKLAND— 394 
Sunday. August 28 
11 :00 a. m. — Church service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Bern's Little Symphony. 
7:30 p.m. — Weather and baseball. 
7:35 to 9:00 p. m.— Church service. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
Monday. August 29 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m.— Hotel Leamington concert. 
12:30, weather: 1:00 weather: 1:03, S. F. stocks. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Hotel St. Francis dance orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— KGO Kiddies' Klub. 
6 :00 to 6 :45 p. m.— Stanislas Bern's Little Symphony. 
6:45 p. m. — "What's Happening in the World." 
7:03. weather: 7:06, baseball: 7:08, S. F. produce. 

grain, cotton: 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, 

N. Y. stocks (closing). 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 to 9:20 p. m.— "Chats About New Books." 
Tuesday, August 30 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington concert. 
12:30. weather; 1:00 weather: 1:03, S. F. stocks. 
2 :00 to 3 :00 p. m. — Pacific Radio Trade Association 

concert. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— Hotel St. Francis orchestra. 
6 :00 to 6 :55 p. m. — Stanislas Bern's Little Symphony. 
6:55, news: 7:03, weather; 7:06, baseball; 7:08, S. F. 

produce, grain, cotton: 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 

7:23. N. Y. stocks (closing). 
8 :00 to 9:00 p. m. — (Oakland studio) — The Pilgrims. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10 :00 to 10 :30 p. m. — "HM" and "JP" entertain. 

10 :30 to 11 :00 p. m.— Surprise broadcast. 
Wednesday, August 31 

11 :30 to 1 :00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington concert. 
12:30, weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03. S. F. stocks. 

2 :00 to 3 :00 p. m. — Pacific Radio Trade Association 

concert. 
1:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Hotel St. Francis orchestra. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 
6:66, news; 7:03. weather; 7:06. baseball; 7:08, S. F. 

produce, grain, cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing) ; 

7:23, N. Y. stocks (closing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Vacation program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — John Wolohan's Californians. 
Thursday. September 1 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington concert. 
12:80, weather; 1:00, weather: 1:03. S. F. stocks. 
2 :00 to 3 -.00 p. m.— Pacific Radio Trade Association 

concert. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Hotel St. Francis Orchestra. 

5 :00 to 6:00 p. m. — "Friends to Boys." 

6 :00 to 6:55 p. m.— Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:65, news; 7:03, weather; 7:06. baseball; 7:08, S. F. 
produce, i:rain. cotlon ; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 
7:23. N. Y. stocks (closing). 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— KGO players. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Hotel St. Francis dance orches- 
tra. 

(Continued on Page 12) 



Monday. August 29 

10:30 a. m. -Martha Lee: George Kenoipp. 
i ;80 p. m.— Brother Bob's club . 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.- -Amusement information. 
D 0:00 P m Special program. 

p. m. — Weekly meeting of Lake Merritt 
Ducks. 
Tuesday. August 30 
2 :45 p. m. — Baseball. 

o 6 :80 p. m. — Brother Bob. 

7:00 to 7:80 p. m. Amusement information. 
Wednesday. August 31 
10:30 a. m.— Martha Lee. 
2 :45 p. m.- Baseball. 

5 :30 to 6 :30 p. m. — Brother Bob. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Athen Athletic club orchestra. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Amusement information. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. -Educational program. 
9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Special program. 
Thursday. September 1 
2 :46 P- m.— Baseball. 

6 :SQ to 6 :30 p. m.— Brother Bob. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Ern Russell in "song and story." 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Amusement information. 

Friday. September 2 

10:30 a. m. Martha Lee. 

2 :45 p. m.— Baseball. 

5 :30 to 6 :30 p. m.— Brother Bob. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Amusement information. 

18 p. m. —Community night program. 




GOLF EQUIPMENT FOR 
EVERY NEED 



Private Instruction B> Appointment 



$Ss 



rnia 

hop 



474 POST STREET 

near Mason 
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 27, 1927 



SCREEN AND STAG 




Billy Dove, First National star, is in trouble. How would 
you play the shot? 



P. & A. photo 
Lithesome Betty Branson, Hollywood film favorite, 
trains "over the sticks." 



An invitation from 








Kline photo 

Julia Faye of the Cecil B. De Mille Players keeps "in 
shape" on the Volley Ball courts. 




Esther Ralston, Paramount beauty, taking her exercise 
in the "youngest" of all sports. 



August 27, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



STAIRS II IS) SPORTS 




Otto Dyar photo 
ow, Paramount star. 



Otto Dyar photo 

Hebe Daniels plays at play in the "Campus Flirt" 

for the Paramount, but she looks very 

serious about it. 




P. & A. photo 

Another use for roller skates was discovered by 
Virginia Lee Corbin, First National player, 




W 






photo 

Leatrict toy, Ctcil P De Mille scrttn sf.ir. looks 
like .j nal angler. 



SI 



Don CUIum pkolo 

Chirr Windsor. ttttro-Goldvm star. archery. She has scared 

friend husband on the picture. 

Courtly of Women's Sports 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 27, 1927 



Friday, September 2 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m.— Hotel Leamington concert. 

12:30. weather: 1:00. weather: 1:03, S. F. stocks; 
1 :0S, N. Y. stocks. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Pacific Radio Trade Association 
concert. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Hotel St. Francis Concert Orches- 
tra. 

5:30 p.m. — "Wise man from the Land-O-Health. 

6:00 to 6:45 p. m.— Bern's Little Symphony. 

6 :45 to 6 :55 p. m. — "Weekly Financial Review." 

6:55, news; 7:03. weather; 7:06, baseball; 7:08, S. F. 
produce, train, cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing) ; 
7:23, N. Y. stocks (closing). 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Western Artist Series. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Nat.onal Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 11 .00 p. m.— Hotel St. Francis dance orches- 
tra. 

Saturday. September 3 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 ; 
concert. 



-Hotel Leamington concert. 



12:30, weather; 1:00, weather: 1:03, S. F. stocks; 
1:08. N. Y. stocks. 

2 :00 to 3 :00 p. m.— Pacific Radio Trade Association 
concert. 

4 :00 to 5:00 p. m.— Hotel St. Francis Concert Orches- 
tra. 

R :00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10 :00 p. m. to 1 :00 a. m. — Wilt Gunzendorfer's Band. 

KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY. INC 
LOS ANGELES— 46* METERS 
Sunday, August 28 
10:00 a. m. — Morning service. 
11:00 a. m. — Baptist Church services. 
0:00 p. m. — Boris Myronoff, concert pianist. 
6:58 p. m. — Father Ricard's forecast. 
7:00 p. m.— Aeolian organ recital. 
8:00 p. m. — Packard classic hour. 
9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m. — Billy Cox and his Packard Eight Orches- 
tra. 



satt&tfe 

sum mer 
JEOBSWISS 

"to Gl&£l4Ml£ 

vacation 

spots 



ask 

about 

towwwut 

tripftms 




Illustrated Folders 

will be mailed upon re- 
quest. They will help 
you to plan your trip. 



YosemiteValley 
Sequoia and 

General Grant 
National Parks 

Grand Canyon 
Mesa Verde 

Carlsbad Caverns 

Navajo -Hopi 
Indian Country 
Colorado Rockies 



SdSA^t/fckdO^ces^TraidBwtaux 






601 Market Streer 

'Telelhone Sutter 7600 

Fferry Depot* 

SAN FRANCISCO 

SANTA ROSA SAN JOSE 

MO haunti Sued IS fjnh ^.m. i_Lr»Sr 

STOCKTON 

111 Fua MummuI BanUadg" 



Monday, August 29 

5 :30 p. m. — Carl Hansen, musical saw. 

6:15 p. m.— Radiotorial. 

6:30 p. m. — Gamut male quartet. 

7:00 p. m. — Gene Johnston's Music Box hour. 

5 :00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 p. m.— Shell Company of California. 
10:00 p. m.— Purcell Mayer, violinist. 
Tuesday, August 30 

5:30 p. m.— The Dragon Hawaiians. 
6:00 p. m.— Talk on the Hollywood Bow], 
6:15 p. m.— Prof. Carl S. Knopf. 
6:30 p. m. — Louise Caselotti, contralto. 
7:00 p. m.— Bill Funk and his Packard Six Orchestra. 
S:00 p. m.— Song recital by Virginia Flohri and Rob- 
ert Hurd. 
9:00 p. m| — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m.— Collegiate Aeolians Dance Orchestra. 
Wednesday, August 31 

5:30 p. m.— Sebastians Cotton Club Orchestra. 
6:15 p. m.— Radiotorial period. 
6:80 p. m.— Pal O'Mine trio. 
7:30 p. m. -Nick Harris detective stories. 
7:46 p. m.— William MacDougall. Scotch singer. 
8:00 p. m.— Calpet String Quartet. 
9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p, m. — Virginia McCoy, contra-contralto. 
Thursday, September 1 

5:30 p. m.— Elkin"s and Hite's Dixieland Orchestra. 

6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 

6 :30 p. m. — Don Parker, popular pianist. 

7 :00 p. m. — Pastel trio. 

3:00 p. m.— Mrs. Edward C. Crossman. contralto. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m.— Program of modern classical music. 

Friday. September 2 

5:30 p. m. — Eugene Biscailus: program 

6:15 p. m.— Talk on the Hollywood Bowl. 

6:80 p. m.— Lois Whiteman and Ralph Van Hoore- 

beke. 
7 :00 p. m.—Pronram by Paul Roberts. 
8:00 p. m.— Program of popular music. 
9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company 
10:00 p. m.— Packard Ballad Four 
Saturday. September 3 

5:30 p. m.— Strangers Social Club Orchestra. 
BUS p. m. Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket program. 
7:30 p. m.— Felipe Delgado and Edna Clark Muir. 
8:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company 
9:00 p. m. — Program by Maurine Dyer 
10:00 p. m.— Packard Radio Club 
11:00 p. m.— KFI Midnight Frolic. 



program. 



KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN 
PORTLAND — 191.5 
Sunday. August 28 

JUX? 9 iS°n P « IT, -~ Evenin ' r Church services. 
°.° J? : ?J P- ™.- N. B. C. program. 

JlnnS. 1 I :00p ; , ?i~ Littlc Symphony orchestra. 
Monday. August 29 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 7 :45 p. m. — Utility service 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— N. B. C 
9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Concert. 
Tuesday. August 30 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
i :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— "Travelogue.*" 

7 :30 to 7 :4G p. m.— Utility Bervice. 

7 :J5 to 9 :00 p. m.— Educational program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.-N. B. C. program 
10:00 to 12 :00 p.m.— Dance music 
Wednesday, August 31 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

7 :30 to 7 : -15 p. m.— Utility service. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 tO 10:00 p. m— National Broadcasting Company. 
1 hursday. September 1 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m— Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 7 :-15 p. m.— Utility service. 
7 :4S to 8 :00 p. m. — Lecture. 

5 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
Friday. September 2 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to S :00 p. m.— Program. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

Saturday. September 3 

ti :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS. INC. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 267 
Sunday, August 28 
12 :30 to 1 :30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

7:50 to 9:00 p. m.— Services from Sixth Church of 
Christ Scientist 

9 :00 to 10:00 p. m.— Laura Ellen Windsor and pupils. 

10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m.— Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 
Monday, August 29 

8:2(> to 10 :27 a. m.— Musical breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

10:30 to 11:00 a. m.—Babette's fashion hints. 

11:00 to 12:00 m.— Organ recital. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KFWI tea party. 

5 :00 to 5 :30 p. m. — Construction reports, 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m. — Theatrical announcements. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner hour concert. 
7:00 to 7 :15 p.m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7:15 to 7:80 p. m.— Advertising talk. 



August 27, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Clyde Cooper's Roof Garden orches- 
tra. 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m.— Geo. Taylor and Clem Kennedy 

9:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Darneille Sisters. 

10:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 12:00 p. m— Clyde Cooper's Roof Garden or- 
chestra. 

Tuesday, August 30 

7 :00, 7 :30 and S :00 a. m.— Health exercises. 
8:20 to 10 :27 a. m. — Musical breakfast program. 
10:27 to 10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

10 :30 to 11 :00 a. m.— Beauty hints. 

12 :00 to 12 :30 p. m. — Musical luncheon program. 

12 :30 to 1 :00 p. m.— Organ recital. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

1 :30 to 2 :00 p. m. — Cowell Dein, piano and banjo. 

6 :00 to 5 :30 p. m. — Construction reports. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m. — Theatrical announcements. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7:15 to 7 :30 p. m.— KFWI Builders of Progress Club. 

8 :00 to 9:00 p. m.— Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Barnes Vaudeville Agency. 
10:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 

10 :03 to 11 :00 p. m. — Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 

11 :00 to 12 :O0 p. m. — Zezz Black's mysterious hour. 
Wednesday, August 31 

7 :00. 7 :30 and 8 :00 a. m.— Health exercises. 
8:20 to 10:27 a. m. — Musical breakfast program. 
10:27 to 10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

10 :30 to 11:00 a. m.— Cynthia Grey's column. 
11:00 to 12:00 m.— Organ recital. 
12 :00 to 12 :30 p. m. — Luncheon program. 
12:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 
1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 
5 :00 to 5 :30 p. m. — Construction reports. 
5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m. — Theatrical announcements. 
6:00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Louis Donato and Jack Kelsey. 
7 :00 to 7 :15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7 :15 to 7 :30 p. m.— Studio program. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program by Jerry Warner, singing 
banjoist. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Clifford Schneider, baritone. 
10:00 p. m. — Weather and police reports. 
10:03 to 12:00 p. m.— Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 
Thursday. September 1 

7 :00, 7 :30 and 8 :00 a. m.— Health exercises. 

8 :20 to 10 :27 a. m.— Musical breakfast program. 
10:27 to 10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

10 :30 to II :00 a. m.— Fashion hints by Babette. 
12 :00 to 12 :30 p. m. — Musical luncheon program. 
12:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Organ recital. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m.— Country store. 

4 :00 to 5:00 p. m.— KFWI tea party. 

5 :00 to 5 :30 p. m. — Construction reports. 

5 :30 to 'i :00 p. m.— Theatrical announcements. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour program. 

7 :00 to 7 :15 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7:15 to 7:80 p.m.— Kenneth A. Millican, 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Studio program by Wm. Johnson. 
9:00 to 9:30 p. m.— Gloria Del Rae. 

0:8 11 :00 p. m.~ Bill Bennett. 

11 :00 to 12 :00 p. m.- Clyde C r's orchestra. 

Friday. September 2 

7 :00, 7 :30 and 8 :00 a. m. Exercise hour. 

8 :20 to lfi :27 a. m.— Musical breakfast program. 
10:27 to 10:30a. m. U. s. weather reports. 

10 :30 to 11 :00 a. m.— Beauty hints. 

11 :00 to 12:00 m. Organ recital. 

12 :00 to 12 :80 p. m. M listen I luncheon program. 
12:30 to I :00 p. m.- Organ recital. 

1 :00 to l :80 p. m. Country store, 

1:80 to 8:00 p. m. Cowell item, banjo and piano. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.- KFWI ten party. 

6 :iii) in 5 i.'iii p. m. Construction reports. 

G :80 tn G :00 p. m.- Theatrical announcements. 

fi :00 to 7 : 00 p. m. Prog n m arranged liy Irene Smith. 

7 :00 to 7 :15 p. m. Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7 :U to 7 :80 p. m.— Talk by B. S. Daniels. 

s :tni tn !i :ini p. m. Clyde Cooper's orchestra. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. California Sunshine Boys. 
in :00 p. m, - Weather and police i ■ 
10 :08 to 12 :00 p. m. Clyds Cooper's orchi 

Saturdny. August 2S 

7 :00, T :80 and 8 :00 a. m. — Exercise hour 
s :20 to lu -.21 a, m. Musical breakfast program. 
10 :27 to 10 :80 a. m. V. s. weather reports. 
10:80 to 11:00a. m. — Cynthia Grey's column. 

12:0 t2:80p m Musical luncheon program. 

12 :80 to l :00 p. tn. Organ recital. 
i 00 I- i 10 iv m. Country store. 
5 i" 1 bo 6 :80 p. m.- Conatrud toi 

5 i80 to ,; :00 !•- m. Theatrical annoum-eim-nts. 

I 00 to ■ :00 p. m, Dtan tr hour concert. 

i:16p. m. Sports by Geo, T. Davis, 

r :80p.m. Geo. Taylor and Clem Kennedy. 

8:00 to i> :<iii p. ni. xandrofT. soprano. 

8:00 to 12:00 p. m.- Clyde Coopers orchestra. 

12:00 to 2 :80 a.m. KFWI hour, of mirth . 



WANTED 

Young Attorney or Law Student who 
desires practical instruction and ex- 

f>erience to associate with established 
aw lirm. Good opportunitv for right 
party. Investment required. 
cAddras for mtertiat : P. O. Box No. 647 
BURLINGAME, CALIF. 



KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO CO. 
„ , SEATTLE— 348 

Sunday. August 28 

6 :00 to 7 :45 p. m.— Dinner Hour Concert. 

7:45 to 8:00 p. m.— Twilight Organ Hour. 

8:00 to 9:15 p. m. — Evening services. 

9:15 to 10:45 p. m. — Camlin Hotel concert orchestra. 

Monday, August 29 

5 :40 to 6 :00 p. m. — Stock quotations. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Time signals, sport news. 

6:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Henri Damski's concert orchestra 

8 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

Tuesday. August 30 

5 :40 to 6 :00 p. m. — Stock quotations. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Time signals, sports news. 

15 :30 to 8 :00 p. m. — Camlin Hotel concert orchestra. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers* dance orchestra. 

Wednesday, August 31 

5 :40 to 6 :00 p. m. — Stock quotations. 

0:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Time signals, sport news. 

6 :30 to 8 :00 p. m. — Camlin Hotel concert orchestra. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

Thursday. September 1 

5 :40 to 6 :00 p. m. — Stock quotations. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Time signals, sport news. 

(i :30 to 8 :00 p. m. — Camlin Hotel concert orchestra. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Concert by Henri Damski's or- 

chestra. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 
Friday, September 2 
5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — Stock quotations. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Time signals, sport news. 
6:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Camlin Hotel concert orchestra. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 
Saturday, September 3 
5 :40 to 6 :00 p. m. — Stock quotations. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Time signals. 
6:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Camlin Hotel concert orchestra. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

Society 

(Continued from page 5) 
Mr. and Mrs. W. V. P. Campbell, Mrs. 
E. F. Condon and daughter, of Los 
Angeles ; Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Riley of 
Los Angeles; Miss Ethel Rosen and 
Miss Effie Rosen of Hollywood; Mr. 
Francis X. Bushman of Hollywood; 
Mr. J. French and family of Los An- 
geles ; Mr. and Mrs. R. J. McHugh of 
Los Angeles ; Mr. and Mrs. Lou Rog- 
ers of Los Angeles; Miss Virginia 
Pearson of Hollywood; Mr. F. C. 
Thornley of Coronado ; and Mr. G. C. 
Noble of Hollywood. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hirshfeld en- 
tertained at an elaborately appointed 
dinner given at the Fairmont Hotel 
on Tuesday, in honor of Mrs. Bud 
Meyer of New York who is visiting 
her sister. Mrs. Zachery Taylor 

Coney, at Belvedere. 

* * * 

Dr. and Mrs. Sumner Everyingham 
and Mr. and Mrs. H. N. Atkinson are 
entertaining at a studio supper at the 
Fairmont Hotel Saturday evening for 
-Miss Alice Seckels and Mr. and Mrs. 
James Shakelford Hines. all of whom 

have recently returned from Europe. 

* * * 

Courtesy Era 

Police Judge Leonard states that 
he has adopted a policy of leniency to- 
ward the visitor in Santa Cruz. He 
explains to each stranger appearing 
before the bench on a parking charge, 
the details of the Santa Cruz law and 
grants them freedom from fine but 
advises against repetition of the in- 
fractions. His policy has been warmly 
commended by Mayor Swanton. one 
of whose election planks demanded 
"courtesy to the stranger." 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime. Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT 

of the State of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco 

Margaret Vanderhoogt. Plaintiff, vs. John W. B. 
Vanderhoogt. Defendant. 

No. 1S4626. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the State 
of California in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco, and the complaint filed in the office of 
Hit (aunty Clerk of said City and County. 

The people of the State of California send greeting 
to: John W. B. Vanderhoogt. Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought :mainst you by the above-named Plaintiff in 
the Superior Court of the State of California, in and 
for the City and County of San Francisco, and to 
answer the Complaint filed therein within ten days 
(exclusive of the day of service) after the service on 
you .it' this summons, if served within this City and 
County; or if served elsewhere within thirty days. 

Th>? said act inn is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of ma- 
trimony now existing between plaint iff and defend- 
ant, -in the grounds of defendant's wilful desertion 
and wilful neglect, also for general relief, as will 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you appear 
and answer as above required, the said Plaintiff will 
take judgment for any money or damages demanded 
in the complaint as arising upon contract or will 
apply to the Court fur other relief demanded in the 
complaint. 

Given under my hand .md the Seal of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco. 

Dated this twenty-seventh day of July, 1927. 

H. I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 
By J. J. RAFFERTY. Deputy Clerk. 
.Scab 

• In Lewis. 4 73 Mills Bldg.. San Francisco, 
rney for Plaintiff. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE: 
The MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, loca- 
tion of principal place of business. San Francisco, 
Calif. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 2nd day of August. 1927, an 
r.ent of one-half cent per share was levied upon 
»ued capital stock of the corporation payable 
immediately in lecal money of the United States, to 
the Secretary, at the office of the company. Room 
-indnock Building. San Francisco, Calif. 
Any stock on which this assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the 5th day of September. 1927 will be 
delinquent and advertised for sale at puhlic auction. 
and unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
the 27th <i.: -r. 1927 to pay the 

delinqi:^ -*. together ' adver- 

tising and expense of sale. 

M. J - --?t*ry. 

' nadnoek Building, 
..I if. 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 27, 1927 



Fallen Leaf Lodge 

The Ideal Tahoe Resort 

Located on Fallen Leaf Lake. 
Five miles from the State High- 
way. In the center of a Wonder- 
land of Mountains, Lakes 
and Streams. 

Qood yishingr Hiking * 'Boating 

Comfortable rooms, tents and cottages 

— with and without private bath; and 

famous dining room service, combine 

to make the Lodge a popular 

vacation spot. 

MRS. W. W. PRICE 

Fallen Leaf P. O., Lake Tahoe, Calif. 



CLUB 
AUTO SERVICE CO. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 

For All Occasions 

Day and Night 

City Sightseeing- ----- $3.00 per hour 

Shopping -------- 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxicab Rates 

PROSPECT 

58o Post. St.. 
4UUU San Francisco 



WHEN IN PANAMA 
MAKE 

HOTEL CENTRAL 

Cathedral Plaza 

YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 

Andrew Johnston, Manager 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 CLARA STREET— GARFIELD 844 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1864 

The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



WHO'S WHO AND WHERE 

Society folks both in the city and 
at the pleasure resorts are already 
turning their attention to Autumn 
festivities. 

Many prominent people are still in 
the country, reluctant to return to 
their urban duties and social affairs. 
Although school opened this week, 
there are many of the elite still lin- 
gering in hotels where country air 
and out-of-door events are lures to 
hold their interest. 

San Francisco's hotels are buzzing 
with life. Dinners, tea parties, sup- 
pers and any number of bridge par- 
ties are already crowding the social 
calendar. 

Everywhere there is life — abund- 
ant, radiant life and all of the 
famous hotels of California see a 
busy season ahead. 

In fact, from our own point of view, 
there is not to be a dull moment — 
within the social realm, this glorious 
season. 



Moonlight Picnic 

Think of having a moonlight picnic 
on horseback. 

Well, that is what the young folks 
planned at Feather River Inn while 
the older folks joined them in auto- 
mobiles at the rendezvous where a 
delicious supper was cooked out-of- 
doors. 

Those who rode horseback to the 
scene of the picnic included: Mrs. B. 
M. Carlisle and her son "Bud," Miss 
Jane and Betty Leighton, Miss Mar- 
ion and Doris Glaenzer, Arthur 
Simons, Hugh Leighton Jr., Marjorie 
Semple, Alfred Cook, Trescott Buell. 



Old Fashioned Evening 

An affair that was particularly en- 
joyable was an old-fashioned eve- 
ning with games around the fire in 
the "Play House," the party winding 
up with a Virginia Reel. Among those 
participating were Mr. and Mrs. A. 
C. McLaughlin, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. 
Eames, Miss Evelyn McLaughlin, 
Miss Marion and Doris Glaenzer, Mr 
and Mrs. B. M. Carlisle, Bud Carlisle 
William Roe, Jane Leighton and 
Hugh Leighton, and many others, 
about sixty guests in all. It was im- 
mensely enjoyed. 

Recent arrivals at Feather River 
Inn include Mr. and Mrs. Austen Bid- 
die, Mrs. Marshall Hale and Mrs. F. I. 
Raymond and her mother, Mrs. W. 
W. Young. 



"Sweetheart, do you believe mar- 
riages are made in heaven?" 

"Probably. Heaven only knows 
why some are made."— Western Re- 
serve Red Cat. 



Brockway, 

Lake 

Tahoe 

gOLF. . . 

All Grass Greens 
and Grass 
Jairways 

Swimming, natural hot 
water; dancing; horse- 
back riding; boating; 
fishing; tennis. For in- 
formation and rates, 
write or wire 



H. 0. COMSTOCK, 

M A N A C E R 






Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
active, Hot Sulphur Water. Tub Baths and 
Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN. Agua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judah 



CALIENTE VILLA 

Family Resort 

CARL STEFFEN. Prop. 



French and Italian Dinners— Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

Four Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, 

Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The Finest Meals in the 
VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms — Clean Linen — Clean Everything 
Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

TELEPHONE 110 



August 27, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 






EVELYN GRAINGER, by George F. 

Hummel. Boni & Liveright; S2.50. 

We are told that this is a story of 
modern life and manners and customs 
— which seem to form the basis of 
endless discussion now-a-days be- 
tween the modern sophists and those 
of the more Victorian vintage. 

Evelyn Grainger evidently means 
all right when she starts out. She 
has the puritanical ancestry that 
should have stood her in good stead, 
but she seems to have been innoculat- 
ed with that modern serum "It," 
which means she just can't help her- 
self so there's no use trying! 

She is young, beautiful and mag- 
netic, naturally! She marries well, 
but she and friend husband drift 
apart to a certain extent. She finally 
acquires a soul-mate in a young lad 
whom she meets at a summer resort 
and — well, Evelyn ought to be 
ashamed of herself, but she isn't — she 
is really more terrified at being dis- 
covered by her husband, John Ferris, 
who arrives sooner than he is expect- 
ed. After a narrow escape from an 
almost impossible dilemma and its 
Subsequent denouement, she thank- 
fully proceeds to behave according to 
convention until after John's death. 

At the age of forty-five, when her 
two children are of college age, she 
meets a college professor. After his 
first dissertation on the subject of 
marriage we all know just what is 
going to happen. By this time Evelyn 
is surely old enough to know better; 
but we have to close our eyes to the 
inevitable and proceed to gloss over 
the next six months or so of happi- 
ness and woes, pleasures and trials. 
of diverse sorts, until they finally de- 
cide to become actually married. 

Evelyn is a clever woman in her 
own way. although an empty-headed 
doll in others. After their marriage, 
with her money (which, through 
gifts to her children she has reduced 
to a minimum for her. but which 
seems like a fortune to him), she 
starts him off right in a business way. 
albeit over his protests. Being a man 
of real natural ability in this chosen 
line of work (he has only adopted the 
professorship as a means of earning 
his daily bread), and with her weal- 
thy relatives behind him. he even- 
tually becames a man of affairs. His 
position is somewhat shaken during 
the World war (he is a Tolak by 
birth), but the toppling structure is 



Edited by Florence de Long 

preserved after the Armistice is 
signed and all should go on happily 
ever after. 

But, unfortunately, the past is sub- 
consciously too much in the back of 
her mind. She is ten years older than 
her husband, and now becomes fear- 
ful of his beginning to look with wist- 
ful eyes upon the younger generation. 
She fears the flapper who is begin- 
ning to come into her own; she is 
jealous of the energetic war workers 
who are returning home with so much 
to talk about and so much to do. She 
imagines that her husband cannot be 
satisfied with her, and makes at- 
tempts in a feeble way to keep in step 
with him. She cannot be content with 
the peaceful humdrum life. In a spirit 
of unrest she finds flaws, picks quar- 
rels, and when he reminds her deli- 
cately of the past, she is inconsistent 
enough to become offended. 

Finally it is over. Better to dive 
through into clear water than to be 
forever stirring up the muck in the 
shallows. However, this does not 
mean that she spends the rest' of her 
life in repentance or in sorrow. Her 
triumphant cry on her sixtieth birth- 
day indicates that she has lived her 
"modern" life to the full, and as far 
as site is concerned, she is perfectly 

satisfied. 

* * * 

AT PAUL ELDERS 

The fall series of events in the Paul 
Elder Gallery will start in September. 
The calendar is of unusual interest 
and variety and includes authors' aft- 
ernoons, lectures, exhibitions, dra- 
matic readings, and other cultural ac- 
tivities. 

Dr. David Starr Jordan, Prof. Ar- 
thur W. Ryder and Stephen Child, 
landscape architect, will appear in the 
series of authors' afternoons which 
will be opened on Saturday, Septem- 
ber 10th, by Louis L. De Jean, "poet 
laureate of aviation," with an ad- 
dress on "Men Who Fly — and Why." 

Late plays and poetry are to be 
interpreted by Mrs. Hugh Brown, 
who will give a series of seven Thurs- 
day afternoon readings, and Mrs. 
Laurel Conwell Bias will read the 
gripping play of the hour, "Capon- 
sacchi." 

Among the lectures are two series 
to be given by Mrs. Juliet James. 
One series will begin Wednesday 
morning. August 31st. The other, 
Friday morning, September 2nd. 



S. A. LOVEJOY 

WILL BRING 

ORDER 

Out of Chaos! 

In your Books, 
Financial Statements 
Income Tax Reports 

Expert Auditor 

PART-TIME SERVICE 

268 Market St., Room 101 



Park Lane Maisonnettes 

5 to 8 Rooms with 2 to 5 Baths 

Magnificent view. Every service, from 
doorman to valet. Furnished or un- 
furnished. Garage. Class A steel 
frame building. 

"Maisonnette" //</.< the elegance of a mansion with 
all conveniences o\ an apartment house. 

PARK LANE APARTMENTS 

1100 Sacramento Street 
Diagonally Across from Hotel Fairmont 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter 
can he obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

20S CROCKER Bl ILDIN'G 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 




16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

American Aviatianica 

By Lieut. Blaine Stubblefield 

(Editor's Note: Next week Lieut. Stubblefield will 
favor us with some outstanding facts regarding aeronau- 
tics, to offset this article on the fictitious ideas which the 
general public holds in connection with the great game 
of flying.) 



August 27, 1927 



"My what a big fan that airplane has!" 

A heavy slipstream from the out-going air mail's prop 
threw a half hitch in the sweet girl's skirt, discovering 
two sun-burned knees. 

"That engine must get dreadfully hot to need such a 
breeze on it! Why the fan on father's car isn't half that 
big. It honestly isn't!" 

That is what SHE said. 

And it would seem that our friends of popular fiction, 
and fiction's friends, the public, in writing and speaking 
about the exotic art of flying, are inspired by the above 
quoted Gretchen. 

All of God's chil'en haven't got wings, but they like to 
imagine they have, and pretend they know how to use 
them. We all like to feel familiar with things. While 
those few who have wings are out buzzing up gasoline, 
the rest of mankind gathers around the coal stove or the 
ice box and plays at that well-known and dizzy sport — 
indoor aviation. And out of this ground school of high- 
er flying comes most of the data used by short story 
writers and sidewalk "tale" spinners. 

This literature and lore, if squeezed into a 25-foot 
shelf, would form a compendium of useful misinformation 
from which any assiduous text-booker might glean a 
volume to be entitled "American Aviatianica" — or a word 
to that effect — ten easy lessons in parlor split-tails and 
street corner side-slips. All of which, if crisply para- 
graphed, would give us an aero-credo, teaching all those 
ethereal precepts already well understood by the kiwi 
world — a ready reference to aeronautical errata. First 
giving due credit for our method to the "Bad boy of Bal- 
timore" and his witty friend George Jean, let us quote 
briefly from the Aviatianica. 

That when its motor stops an airplane will fall. 

That if one flies into a cloud he will not be able to tell 
whether he is right-side-up or not. 

That if the engine stops and the pilot makes a landing 
he has shown himself an expert. 

That aviators are the cream of young manhood. 

That all pilots are brave and venturesome. 

That young women fall in love with flyers at sight. 

That airplanes can fly slowly or lazily. 

That aircraft in windstorms are subject to great 
strains. 

That if one looks down from a plane he sees the ground 
flying along beneath as it does from a train window. 

That if one goes up high enough he cannot see the 
ground at all. 

That the engine is controlled by a foot throttle on which 
the pilot treads as he takes the curves and steep grades. 

That an aviator in flight eats only chicken sandwiches. 

That airplane wings are made of silk. 

That low flying is dangerous because one may run into 
something. 

That only skilful flyers can do loops and spins. 

That air pockets exist. 

That air pockets cause airplanes to fall. 

That when a plane lands it jars everybody in it. 

That airplane engines run extremely fast. 

That looking down from a high altitude makes one 
sick or dizzy. 



That a ship is brought down for a landing with the 
power on. 

That all airplanes fly at least 100 miles per hour. 

That air mail letters may be dropped only in red, white, 
and blue mail boxes. 

That Lindbergh was handicapped because he couldn't 
see in front of his ship. 

That one must use an air mail stamp to post an air 
mail letter. 

That as one rises in the air the horizon seems to go 
down. 

That airplanes cannot fly in the rain without getting 
water in their carburetors. 

That ladies with pink-eyed dogs will some day prome- 
nade the hurricane decks of air liners, exposed to the full 
blast of the wind. 

That one must have an air mail envelope to send an air 
mail letter. 

That an airplane will fly only with special gasoline. 

That Eddie Stinson could fly up-side-down as long and 
as far as he wanted to. 

That one cannot breathe while dropping swiftly 
through the air. 

That air mail letters will go only where the air mail 
routes are traced on the map. 

That a ship in a tail spin descends tail first. 

That hinterland natives always run and hide when they 
see a flying machine. 

That a forced landing is a wreck. 

That old people should not fly, and that it is hot news 
if they do. 

That it is difficult to take a plane off against the wind. 

That a pilot can fly in the night to a given point simply 
by following a compass. 

That an airplane being stunted is likely to fall. 

That pilots are all keyed up before a hop. 

That women worry while their husbands are flying. 

That world war aviators pursued every German ship 
they saw. hoping to pick a fight. 

That it is difficult to breathe while flying over high 
mountains. 

That unless one is strapped into the cock-pit he will 
fall out. 

That all the stories told by fivers are true. 

* * * 

Coroner (at inquest)— What happened when your hus- 
band put the tube from the heater into his mouth' 
Wife— He stood aghast. Heh, heh ! 

— Cornell Widow. 

* * * 

You can fool some of the people all the time and all of 
the people some of the time, but the rest of the time the 
joints are padlocked. Judge 

"What rent do you pay?" 

"I don't pay it." 

"What would it be if you did pay it?" 

"A miracle." — Rutger's Chanticleer. 

* * * 

"Beware of the dogs," said the experienced guest to 
his friend, as they started on Lucretia Borgia's picnic. 

— Yale Record. 



August 27, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 



She — Aren't you ever afraid of losing control of your 



car: 



He — Constantly; I'm two installments behind already. 

— Everybody's Weekly. 



"I keep on reading about capital and labor, but I can 
never understand about it." 

"But it's very simple. You give me ten duros ; that's 
the capital." 

"And the labor?" 

"That's what you have getting it back from me. 

— De Excelsior, Madrid. 



If all the college boys who slept in class were placed 
end to end they would be much more comfortable. 

— Cornell Widow. 



"How are the fish in this lake?" 
"Perfectly contented." 



"Look here," shouted the agitated customer, rushing 
into the chemist's shop, "you gave me strychnine instead 
of quinine." 

"Then that will be another fourpence, sir," said the as- 
sistant. — Tit Bits. 



"I could die dancing," he declaimed as he walked all 
over her feet. 

"Maybe so," she agreed ; "but we don't need to make a 
death pact out of it." — Pitt Panther. 



Mrs. Biggs — My old man goes out for a constitutional 
every evening. Does yours? 

Mrs. Wiggs — No, my dear; we always keep a drop in 
the lodgings. — Humorist. 



Wife— The wolf is at the door. 

Hubby — Tell him I can't pay the rent today. 



The average married man wouldn't object to his wife 
wearing her skirts a little shorter if she'd only wear them 
a little longer. 



When a woman goes up in the air she usually lands on 
her husband. 



Beryl — Should a man propose to a girl on his knees? 
Barbara — Either that or she should get off. — Answers. 



If a man kills a quart — that isn't news; but if a quart 
kills a man — that isn't news either. — California Pelican. 



California Tax Payers Association finds that several 
millions of dollars are spent every year in California in 
transporting school children from their homes to school. 
The Educational Committee has therefore published a 
booklet with the hope that these millions may be prop- 
erly accounted for and possible improvements and eco- 
nomies made. 

• • • 

Well, women at least do not have to worry about their 
skirts getting baggy at the knees. 

— Washington Dirge. 

» » • 

"Jim proposed to me again." 

"What did he propose this time?" — X. Y. I". Medley. 



On Russian Hill 

FOR RENT 

[Furnished or Unfurnished] 

Modern Apartment - Flat. Four Rooms (with extra 
sun-room suitable for Studio or Bed Room). 

Artistically Furnished — Marvelous Marine View 

— Sheltered from Winds and Fogs. 

1101 Filbert St., Cor. Leavenworth 

Apply to 

Owner — noi Filbert Street 

Corner Leavenworth 
Phone Graystone 2793 



In Marvelous 
Marin 



ALE — 

Modern seven room home — 
situated in exclusive Winship 
Park District of Ross. Paved 
roads — beautiful wooded sur- 
roundings— 5 minutes walk 
from depot. One hour by train 
or auto from San Francisco. 
Excellent public and private 
schools within walking dis- 
tance. Price $15,000. 

Terms if tL: 

Oitner: Room 101-268 Market Street 
San Francisco 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 27, 1927 



A?***!*. 



PIONEER 



on a box of office 
stationery, whether 
it be typewriter pa- 
per or manuscript 
cover, means com- 
plete satisfaction. 
There is a grade for 
every need. Ask 
your printer or sta- 

- . , tioner to show you 

■ iV.UVl:IL]J:l J.UJ:l--ll samples. 




BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 

Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Max Rosenthal 

WHERE GOOD TAILORING 
COSTS LESS 

A choice selection of seasonable 

Woolens suitable for Formal, 

Sport and Business wear is 

now ready for your early 

consideration. 

527 POST ST. SAN FRANCISCO 
OPP. OLYMPIC CLUB 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 



Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. WELLER 
National Automobile Club 

Auto Oddities 

One of the most interesting points 
visited by the motorist over the Na- 
tional Old Trails route in New Mexico, 
is the city of Santa Fe, the oldest seat 
of government in the United States. 

Nestling beneath the rugged peaks 
of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, 
lies this ancient city of Holy Faith. 
Not only is Santa Fe the capital of 
the state in which it is situated, but 
it is the capital of a dim historic past 
in which the cliff dwellers and Pueblo 
Indians were the central figures. 
Right at the doors of this interesting 
city is the land of the cliff dwellers 
with its mysterious remains and le- 
gends inscribed on rocks, ever puzz- 
ling to archeologists. 

At short distances from Santa Fe 
are numerous Indian villages where 
motorists may view the ancient rites 
and ceremonies that resemble those 
performed before the advent of Co- 
lumbus. 

In 1605 Juan de Onato founded the 
Villa of Santa Fe, and many of the 
buildings of that day still remain, the 
principal one being the old chapel of 
San Miguel. The Palace of Gover- 
nors is now a seat of culture, housing 
the American School of Archeology. 
Here it was that General Kearny 
raised the American flag in 1846 and 
where Kit Carson and other brave 
frontiersmen made their headquar- 
ters when the town was the western 
outpost of American civilization. 
This building, located on the Plaza at 
Santa Fe, has seen the rulers of Spain, 



the Pueblo Indians, Spain again, then 
Mexico and finally, America, hold 
sway and rule an enormous empire. 

This city is also the location of the 
State Museum, a splendid building 
founded on the Pueblo and Mission 
type of architecture and containing a 
very interesting collection of Indian 
and early Spanish trophies, and also 
containing a fine Art Gallery where 
the work of visiting artists is exhib- 
ited. Within an area of 50 miles 
around Santa Fe are the remains of 
civilization contemporary with the 
Mammoth and the Great Lava Flow. 



Cooler nights and lower water are 
responsible for the best fishing of the 
season at Rush and Leevining Creeks, 
and June, Gull, Gem and Agnew 
Lakes in the Bishop district. 



The fish house at June Lake has 
been the center of attraction for some 
time for it has been hung full of fish 
during the last few weeks. The cool 
nights prevent night feeding and 
therefore the day fishing is en- 
hanced. The best bait at this time 
is spinners, worms and salmon eggs, 
while the best flies are Coachman or 
any brown or gray flies. 



Approximately 8300,000,000 worth 
of automotive vehicles were stolen 
in the United States during 1926. 



Gasoline consumption in California 
during the first six months of 1927 
amounted to 489,149,000 gallons. This 
is an approximate increase of 15 per 
cent over the corresponding period 
of last year. 



Santa Cruz To Be 
Scene for New Movie 

Mayor F. W. Swanton has received 
a message from Jack Hoxie, famed 
star of western motion picture 
dramas, stating that the latter will 
arrive in Santa Cruz within a few- 
days with a supporting company of 
one hundred persons for the filming 
of a super-special western drama. 
Hoxie plans to erect an exact replica 
of the famous Wyoming "Dude 
Ranch" in the Santa Cruz mountains. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

OITice and Works: 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch OITice: 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bide) 

Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called for and Delivered 



August 27, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 




WHERE SHALL I WALK 

Where shall I walk with my new love? 

Not by the sea ; 
There my old and faithless love 

Used to walk with me. 

Shall I meet her in the wood? 

Better elsewhere : 
By yon tree my old love stood; 

She will still be there. 

Shall I climb with her this hill 

Warm with autumn's gold? 
Nay I cannot: she I loved 

Walked once there of old. 

Where then shall I go with her? 

Up a city street; 
The tread of hosts who travel there 

Will drown my old love's feet. 

— Wilson MacDonald in Scribner's. 

* * * 



AN EPITAPH ON BAD ROADS 

They took a little gravel, 

And took a little tar, 
With various ingredients 

Imported from afar; 
They hammered it and rolled it. 

And when they went away 
They said they had a good street 

To last for many a day. 

They came with picks and smote it. 

To lay a water main. 
And then they called the workmen 

To put it back again. 
To lay a railway cable 

They took it up once more. 
And then thej put it kick again 

Just where it was before. 

They took it up for conduits, 

To run the telephone, 
And then they put it back again 

As hard as any stone. 
They tore it up for wires 

To feed the 'lectric lights: 
And 'then they put it back again. 

And were within their rights. 

Oh the Btreet's full of furrows. 

There are patches everywhere: 
You'd like to ride upon it. 

But it's seldom that you dare. 
It's a very handsome street. 

A credit to the town: 
They're always digging of it up 

Or putting of it down. 

— Washington Post. 



Grayce — Percy says he fell in love with me because of 
my exquisite taste in perfume. 

Diana — Won by a nose, eh? — Judge. 

* * * 

"Say, lend me a dollar and I'll be eternally indebted to 
you." 

"Yep, that's just what I'm afraid of." 

— Williams Purple Cow. 

* * * 

"Triplets," announced the nurse to the proud father. 
"Really?" he said. "I can hardly believe my own 
census." — Dartmouth Jack-o'-Lantern. 

* * * 

Wifey — John, there is someone in the pantry and I've 
just made a pie. 

Hubby — Well, it's all right with me as long as he don't 
die in the house. — Oregon Orange Owl. 

* * * 

Landlady — I don't allow any games of chance here. 
Student — This isn't that sort of a game. My friend 
here hasn't got a chance. — Brown Jug. 

* * * 

Lady — Are you positive these are new potatoes? 
Vender — New? Why, lady, they haven't even got their 
eyes open yet ! — Ohio Hobo. 

* * * 

Abie — Vot is de idea of raising de price of gasoline all 
de time? 

Garage Man — What do you care? You haven't got a 
car. 

Abie — No, but I got a cigar lighter. — Southern Calif. 
Wampus. 




LOU W. SARTOR. Proprietor 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polish. nc 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oilinc and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET CAS STATiON 

Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco. Calif. 



GRAYSTONE 130 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building. Class A C on s truc tion 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco. California 

in conjunction with 

St. Georre Garacc. 410 Bush St. Monarch bun U«I Bu>h St. 

Miniccmtnl of WII.I.IAM SMNDFRS 



TRUNKS — RACKS — BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVENUE 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 27, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY I0TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1927 

Assets $113,925,8J1.54 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $575,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (IV\) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 S20.000.000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought; FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued: CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND ; NEW YORK : PORTLAND, ORE. ; SEATTLE, 
WASH.: MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety. Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pine and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS. PENSTOCKS. 

FLUMES. GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 

San Francisco. Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



For Lease 

FIRE PROOF BUILDING 

TWO STORY AND BASEMENT 

257-259 MINNA STREET 
Bet. 3rd and 4th 

Suitable for Printing — Manufacturing or Storage 

Rent Reasonable 

?r s 

CORNWALL, COLDWELL & BANKER 

57 Sutter Street San Francisco 



Finance 



It is quite noticeable that the estate of a pioneer San 
Franciscan worth §4,000,000 twenty years ago has shrunk 
to 818,000. This was the estate of George Frink. Na- 
turally, the banks and trust companies are well aware of 
the advertising in such a fact, and a brisk debate is go- 
ing on as to the relative values of private parties and 
trust companies as executors. The "Wall Street Jour- 
nal" appears to have got into the fray and there is much 
wrangling. 



The Southern Pacific Bureau of News is of the opinion 
that the coming of Lindbergh to San Francisco will bring 
more people into the city than any single one-day event 
has ever done. It is making special preparations to 
handle crowds within a radius of 200 miles from San 
Francisco. 



The new requirements for listing securities on the 
San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange are the same 
rigid requirements that have been put in force in New 
York for the protection of the investor in the purchase 
and sale of securities. All corporations whose securities 
are listed must appoint a registrar to register and sign 
all stock certificates. 



Rudolph Schaeffer, artist and educator, in addressing 
the section of the Commonwealth Club on Art, Letters 
and Music, says that America is developing an esthetic 
consciousness, as is the rest of the world. He says that 
the deadening effect of mechanical monotony has to be 
partially offset by variation in color and that the old 
puritan dislike of color is not applicable to the present. 



The Assistant Secretary of Labor, Walter W. Husband, 
sees danger in the increasing immigration from neigh- 
boring American nations in place of that from Europe. 
He says : "The most disturbing phase of the development 
just now is found in the greatly increased immigration 
from Mexico, although the people of Cuba and South and 
Central America may become important factors at any 
time. The way is open to them and the experience of a 
hundred years has shown that very little inducement is 
required to start an immigration movement towards the 
generous pay rolls of American industry." 



As an instance of the way in which great masses of 
wealth come to be administered by individuals the prop- 
erty interests over which the late Wigginton E. Creed 
had control are estimated at $600,000,000. There is no 
doubt that the management of such intricate and rich 
concerns with the consequent burdens takes a great toll 
of human energy and places an almost unbearable burden 
on the shoulders of the responsible. 



It is said that affairs of the Key System Transit Com- 
pany are looking up, but not yet paying. 



The following was the verdict by an Iowa jury in a 
suit against a railroad company: 

"If the train had run as it should have run; if the bell 
had rung as it should rang; if the whistle had blowed as 
it should have blew, both of which it did neither — the 
cow would not have been injured when she was killed." 

— Erith Observer. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Lurie and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c. SI. 35c, 50c. 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carte 

Dancing 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 



Ucwu ij^cuulLu, uiumdy 



490 POST ST.. S. P. 
Garfield 234 
CLIFT HOTEL 
Prospect 4700 



RAMONA STUDIO, PALO ALTO 

Palo Alto 433 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Matson Nav. Co. Steamers 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, §1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' Lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private Dining Rooms 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating 76 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Grnystone filOO 



Weekdays. Luncheon $ .75 

ill :30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week Days & Sundays 1.50 



No visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

!>3 Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking: 

Open From 
11:30 n. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4 :30 to S :30 p. m. only 
CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 

Half Block from Highway 







Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OTFN 9:M V H. TO 11 :00 P M. 
1'nsurpassed Cuisine 




■fe£jP 




11-Mile House 


CAM LEOXHARDT 
Formerly of Golden Gate Park Casino 



vf^ 


CAROLINE JONES 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 

2:30 and Tea from 3 to 5 

Inclusive use of room for club dinners 


^B^ 


184 Sutter St. Douglas 711S 




LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

STERLING ANDERSON, Manager 

Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 
Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 4266 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy- Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blacksmith inc. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



In laundry progressiveness, we set 
the pace. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



"The Recommended Laundry' 

250 Twelfth St. PHOXE MARKET 916 

Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 






MME. M. S. E. LEE 






Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 




583 Post Street 
In Virginia Hotel 


San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 2510 




Antioch Bridge Route 



to 



Sacramento 

Is Now PAVED All the Way 



No Traffic Congestion No Delays 

The Cool, Quick Way 

Along the Sacramento River, Through 
the Netherlands of America 



From Oakland 
The Tunnel Road 



From Sacramento 
South on 21st Street 



^ 



AMERICAN TOLL-BRIDGE 
COMPANY 

Owners and Operators of 

CARQUINEZ BRIDGE and ANTIOCH BRIDGE 

Tolls the Same on Both Bridges 
Autos, 60c Passengers, 10c 




cy4mbassador^ 



Los An.g'eles 

Plan to enjov Southern California's 

glorious summer climate this year at 

this world-famous hotel. 

CAM, VAH VECeTEN 

Famous Author, writing in VANITY FAIR, says: 

"Tbt Ambassador is, I sbouia think, one of the very best boita 
m the world. The service is superlautc, tht fooddtvtne, 
tbt courtesy of management ana emphxecs unlading. " 



In th 

Ami.:: 

27-acrepi 

and opcn-B 

• nd .11 .p 



idc range ol its attractions, the 

do t likewise excels Superb. 

k . with miniature golf course 

in plunge. Riding, hunti'ng 

luding privileges of 



Q 



Rancho Golf Club Motion picture 
theater and 25 smart shops within trie 
hotel Dancing nightiy to the music ol 
the famous Cocoanut Grove orchestra. 



Moderate Summer Rates 

Attracove rooms with bath as low 
as $5. $6 and $7 a day single, 
from $7.00 double. 



•W= 



WRITE for Oief . Bookl« of 
Calif. Rrap»i and Inlormanon. 
BEN L. FRANK OiUnattr 




SAIL TO NEW YORK 




SISTER SHIPS 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL 
and GAY HAVANA, en route 

Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropics 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail 
Liner with seven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and 
historic ports— Manzanillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La Lib- 
ertad. Salvador; Cormto. Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone See 
the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa. Cristobal and historic old Panama 
fcvery cabin on a Panama Mail Liner is an outside one: each has on 
electric fan. and there is a comfortolilc lower bed for every passenger 
There is music for dancing: deck games and sports and salt water swim- 
ming tank. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class possoge. includ- 
ing bed and meals on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return by 
rail (or vice verso) for as little as S350. (This price does not include berth 
trains.) Panama Mail Liners leave San Francisco and New 
21 days. Next sailings from San Francisco: 



and meals 

York approximately every 



SS COLOMBIA, September 17th : SS VENEZUELA/Octobcr 8th From N. 
York: SS VENEZUELA. September 3rd: SS ECUADOR September 24t 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
oi ticket agent, or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 

518 S. SPRING STREET 2 PINE STREET 10 HANOVER SQUARE 

LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 

Established 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, General Agent 
544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cai. 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 2342 















11 


SAN FRANCISCO 1 1 


UDHH* 


If 


&W9H 


y** 


$5.00 PER YEAR 




PRICE 10 CENTS 





SAN FRANCISCO 









Saturday, September 3, 1927 



LOS ANGELES 




S T * T E ■ 







Southern Pacific on 

the "Daylight" Route 

between San Francisco 

and Los Angeles 




^ms^^^^mammsmsms^^a^t 1 ^^^ 



\3D 






v. Jj 



8-80 and 8-70 

two remarkable 8 -in- line 
motor cars that are earning 

More Glory 

for Locomobile 

— the New 8-80 "^ e finest automobile 

in the $3000 class!" 

^^7 ^ C\ * n ^ an F ranc i sco ~~ f° r tn e fully 
vJ' £* Zs \J equipped 5-passenger sedan 

— the New 8-70 " one °f l ^ e industry's 

most successful light 
8-in-line cars" 

$1) / "D if ^ m ^ an F ranc i sco — f° r tne fully 
^ JLj \_ 3 equipped sedan, brougham, or 
sport roadster 

at 230 FULTON STREET 

Salon of the Locomobile Company of California 

Telephone 1 Hemlock 3800 

Also Broad Motor Company, 1906 Van Ness Ave. 

San Francisco. Telephone Qraystone 6304 




Established July 20, 1856 



^3 FS^MBD 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1856. by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, Jr., from 1884 to 1926. 
Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 268 Market Street. San Francisco. California. Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, 
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Vol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SEPTEMBER 3, 1927 



No. 36 



From One Thing to Another 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



The Cross Roads 

In days of old the intersection of the cross roads were 
pregnant with a dread and fearsome meaning ; a ghastly 
presience of shadows to come — shadows that shaped 
themselves into struggling Things that resembled men, 
hanging by their necks! 

There were other phases associated with the cross 
roads, apprehensions felt by every timid coachman on the 
King's highway, filled with visions of masked men on 
plunging steeds! 

And yet again, the cross roads held the superstitious in 
its weird spell, for all sorts of incantations have been 
breathed over strange and significant objects buried by 
the light of the gibbous moon at the "four cross roads," 
from rabbit's feet to the last molar of a distempered dog. 

At the junction of Pine, Davis and Market streets, 
there are four cross roads, almost as significant of death 
and disaster as the four cross roads of olden days. No 
traffic cop stands here, nor is there an automatic stop and 
go signal, yet it is one of the busiest and most dangerous 
cross roads in the city. Other points along the King's 
Highway are ably protected against accident, but this 
spot becomes so complicated with traffic congestion at 
times, that even the youngest and most active becomes 
panic striken, and automobiles and trucks swirl about, 
missing each other by a hair's breadth. 

This is the spot which Captain Henry Gleeson has en- 
peavored to have protected by either an officer or a signal, 
but the Board of Supervisors has taken it upon them- 
selves to interfere in the traffic department of San Fran- 
cisco, and this intersection, one of the worst in the city. 

is still undefended. 

* * * 

Our Mayor 

A Mayor must be more or less like a King of some small 
province; he must posses, aside from the intelligence 
Which his office entails, a maximum of the social graces, 
an instinctive as well as an acquired knowledge of the 
social amenities which mean so much not only to the 
city, but to the state, when it is visited by notables from 
other parts of the world. 

These talents, these social graces, our Mayor Rolph 
possesses in abundance, and he also has the health and 
strength to cany them out. for it takes a man in the 
very prime and vigor of his manhood, to attend the dozens 
of social functions which our Mayor attends, always with 
a beaming cordiality, always with a sunny countenance. 
He meets the tourist Prince and Princess, the statesman, 
the world-famous aviator or artist, with the same gen- 



iality that has surely endeared him to all classes. He' is, 
one might say, the most perfect democrat that this coun- 
try has ever produced. And, perhaps you remember what 
Gertrude Atherton says, anent he definition of a demo- 
crat: "A true democrat must be a born aristocrat." 

. Give that a little thought! 

* * * 

Fashion Show 

(Today) Saturday, is the opening of the Fall Fashion 
Show, held under the auspices of the Retail Dry Goods 
Association, and designers, drapers and window experts 
are working overtime to make it a memorable one in the 
history of Fashion. 

This is an occasion which should be fostered by every 
merchant in the town, for already our fashion shows are 
becoming quite famous, even in the big metropolis of New 
York. An enthusiastic New Yorker once remarked to me 
that, although, of course, our stores were smaller than 
the New York stores, our window displays were just as 
beautiful, and our various dry goods and silks, just as 
wonderful as any displayed in that city. A significant 
fact is the increase and beauty of the different weaves 

which local mills are turning out. 

* * * 

A Typical American 

The life of Carl W. Hamilton, Wall street operator, is 
worth noting. 

Hamilton was engaged this week in arranging his art 
collection, valued at four million dollars, in the Legion of 
Honor Palace. He possesses, aside from this collection, 
the most valuable assembly of Italian masters of the 
Renaissance in the world. 

When this famous American was not on the top of a 
ladder, or arranging period furniture, some of the high 
lights of his varied existence were given the intervi 

He used to shine shoes and sell newspapers. Before he 
was eleven, he was the main support of a family of seven. 
Today he is one of the foremost of America's business 
men. capitalists and philanthropists. He has won world- 
wide recognition as a collector and connoisseur of art, 
but is essentially modest and sensitive. 

A strange combination, for as a rule, the business man, 
by very necessity, must grow a thick hide over whatever 
sensitiveness he is plagued with, and does not have the 
time to seek and appreciate the beauties of art or Xature. 

He is fundamentally, a product of American demcv 
for nowhere in the world, we believe, can a man or woman 
rise from such depths to such heights, a- can be accomp- 
lished by a native of the United States of America. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 3, 19271 






Our Transportation Facilities 

There is talk about a survey of the transportation 
facilities of the city. It is greatly needed, but it must be 
an honest survey, not loaded in the interests of the 
municipal investments and framed so as to give a just 
estimate of the actual conditions and requirements. 

There is a citizen's traffic committee which it is sug- 
gested should make an offer to the Board of Supervisors 
to undertake the task of the survey. It would seem as if 
a body of citizens who have already done quite an amount 
of work in connection with a survey of street transporta- 
tion, might be of inestimable value to the Board of 
Supervisors by working in co-operation with the Board. 
The committee represents all the leading organizations 
and the stable interests of the city and has unquestion- 
ably, the full confidence of the community as a whole. 

The question of the expert depends very largely upon 
the organization which is behind the expert. If the or- 
ganization is political and desires to produce political 
effects regardless of the economic truths involved, then 
we shall get an expert who will give such a report as is 
pleasing to the politicians who employ him. It is very 
obvious that such a report would not be at all advan- 
tageous to the community for it would not be a true 
report of actual conditions. 

What we want is somebody who will make an impartial 
survey of the whole field of city transportation and report 
on the same for the benefit of the community as a whole, 
solely on the facts without reference to, the political 
questions involved. Then, we shall know how to meet the 
matter and what may be regarded as fair terms for all 
parties. 

* * * 

The Navy Men 

It is a matter of great interest to any patriotic citizen 
to watch the behavior of the boys of the Navy on the 
occasions of their visits to the chief port of call of the 
Pacific squadron. There is always romance connected 
with the sea and more than all with that branch of sea- 
service which comes under the flag of the United States 
Government. 

Formerly, the fact of rowdiness was taken for granted 
and it was quite expected that the advent of some hun- 
dreds of active young men would be coincident with a 
great deal of noise and street trouble. As a matter of 
fact such was the case. The arrival of several ships meant 
additional worry to civil authorities. Generally, there 
were rows with consequent contusions. 

Today there is nothing of the sort. The boys of the 
Navy behave themselves much better than the average 
collegians when turned loose in a strange town. Indeed, 
it may be very safely said that the behavior of the boys 
of the Navy is better than that of the students at our 
two great universities on occasions of celebration and 
festivity. 

This is the proof of the strength of our institutions 
and their indisputable merit. When our system of educa- 
tion and training is such that we are able to produce from 
the ranks of ordinary citizenship a body of young men 
whose manners and conduct are as creditable as those 
of our Navy, we are on the high road to a really civilized 
community such as has not hitherto existed anywhere. 



The Bridge Prospects 

The matter of the bridge across the bay has to be 
faced, for it is idle to deny that there are many impedi 
ments in the way of the completion of the project which 
the majority of people in the Bay district, at least, regard 
as a matter of the gravest concern to local interests. 

A bill has been prepared at Washington of which Leo 
McClatchy has provided an interesting summary. The 
form is that which has been hitherto approved by the 
interstate and foreign committees and all of these bills 
state that the franchise is granted by Congress in ac 
cordance with the provisions of the general bridge law of 
March 23, 1906. One of the chief and indeed, the deter- 
mining feature, of that law is the provision that the plans 
and specifications, including the location, must be ap- 
proved by the chief of army engineers and the Secretary 
of War. The Navy refused to accede to the wishes of San 
Francisco and vicinity and thus the appeal is made to 
Congress. 

As for Congress — Representative Denison of Illinois, 
who is chairman of the bridge sub-committee, said that 
all bridge franchise hitherto granted contain the pro- 
vision of the act of March 23, 1926, and that no bridges, 
such as we require, are possible without the distinct ap- 
proval of the Secretary of War. 

Under these conditions it does not look as if congres- 
sional action is going to be very effective, unless the 
opposition of the Navy can be overcome or modified to 
such a degree as to make the construction of the bridge 
fit in with Navy requirements. The problem begins to 

look really serious. 

* * * 

Britain Prosperous 

Britain is our best customer; the more Britain pros- 
pers, the more money she has to spend with us, and the 
better off we all are. We do not belong to that group of 
patrioteers, which is the very opposite of patriots, who 
have a notion that one nation benefits at the expense of 
another and that there cannot be more than one very 
prosperous people at one time in the world. The contrary 
is true ; the more prosperous everybody is, the better off 
is everybody. That seems obvious enough to be ridicu- 
lous; but Mr. Hearst's papers do not know it. 

At any rate, Britain is growing prosperous again. The 
capital investments, new, for the last six months, amount 
to more than a billion dollars, that is to say about 80 
million dollars more than in 1913. So that the corner is 
safely turned and the nation is securely on the up grade, 
within ten years of the close of the war. This represents 
an amount of ability and sagacity in the conduct of busi- 
ness which it may safely be said has never before been 
seen in the world's history. And yet there were people 
who said that the British were decadent. 

The investment of this billion dollars is interesting. 
No less than 60 per cent of it goes into domestic industry 
concerning which it appears that the British investor has 
no real doubt, and 16 per cent goes into colonial develop- 
ment. This latter appears to be rather a slight propor- 
tion, since the colonial possessions are obviously in need 
of capital. But only 8 per cent goes into foreign invest- 
ment. We are seeing a development of the home plant 
with an extension of imperial development of primary 
essentials, such as rubber, which will some day surprise 
the world. 






eptember 3, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Finis Coronal Opus 

We do not often break into Latin but the above well 
nown quotation from commencement exercises is very 
ppropriate to the campaign of Mayor Rolph for re-elec- 
on. He has done so 'much for the city and has in hand 
nterprises and plans of such enormous value to the 
eople of our beloved San Francisco that it would be the 
ery height of folly on the part of the electorate not to 
llow him to finish the job. It is inconceivable that our 
sually quite commonsense population should be guilty 
f any such stupidity. 

A new club for the advancement of the candidature of 
ur Mayor puts the matter very well indeed from this 
ngle. Says the West Clay Rolph Club, "to place the un- 
Dmpleted civic projects which Mayor Rolph has started 
lto inexperienced hands or to permit them to come under 
he control of self-seeking political bosses whose own 
iterests would be placed above those of the public at 
irge would be unwise." It certainly would be most un- 
'ise and there is very slight chance of the people of this 
ity being caught in any such act of unwisdom. 

The response to the Mayor's declaration of intention to 
gain contest the mayoralty has been eager, as was to 
e expected. We have within us, in spite of the sudden 
woops and changes to which democratic electorates are 
ow and again subject as an essential loyalty to those 
fho have been loyal to us. To have carried the burden 
f the upbuilding of this city for fifteen years is a task 
f no light significance. The man who has done it has 
jarnt wisdom in the doing and we need the aid of that 
wisdom in the solution of pressing problems of great 
mportance. 



Indoor Golf 

An indoor golf game, which calls into play every stroke 
sed in outdoor golf, is the latest pastime invented by 
ames W. Runchy and Harold Sampson, and will be dem- 
nstrated on the Palace course, in the Sharon building. 
'his was announced by Frank G. O'Kane, president of 
he National Enclosed Golf Company. 

Last Thursday afternoon, September 1st. the company 
leld an opening of the Palace course, attended by prom- 
nent golf players who were enthusiastic in regard to the 
wssihilities of the new indoor game. The layout on the 
Dwer floor of the Sharon building, occupies a space lOOx 
10 feet, and six holes have been installed in conformity 
nth the plans of the inventors. _ 

"The beauty of this game is that you get variety, said 
(resident O'Kane. "The player moves around the circuit 
md Rets a change of conditions that challenges his skill, 
n this game one shot, anil one only can be made at a 
ime. The clubs are there tor it and do not have to be 
arried from hole to hole." 

At the opening ceremonies last Thursday, Mayor James 
tolph officiated with his usual bonhomie. 



Political Hop-OfFs 



The first luncheon meeting of the Young Men's Rolph 
club was held recently at the Palace Hotel. Leo A. Cun- 
ningham presided and Bill Bennett's radio club provided 
the entertainment. 



We and our language always did seem funny to the 
foreigner. With us "in" isn't "inn," "bear" isn't "bare," 
"might" is farthest from "mite," "beer" isn't "bier" 
(though it may lead to it), and now the famous "choose" 
isn't "choose," for, Senator Shortridge a few days ago 
interpreted "choose" to mean "do not wish"! And ap- 
parently, in a republic, the president is not his own keeper. 



Norman D. Cook has announced his intention of hav- 
ing it out with District Attorney Brady in the November 
8th hop-off. He took off for the same office four years 
ago, but was forced down late on the evening of the same 
day. He is a resident of the Park-Presidio district and 
a member of numerous organizations. 



Jack Spaulding is tuning up his machine for the super- 
visoral flight. He has perfected his organization and 
among his campaigners are Dr. Charles E. Schwartz, Au- 
gust R. Oliva, Julian H. Alco, K. A. Lundstrom and A. 
de Voto. 



A startling move by Mayor Rolph is still being dis- 
cussed wherever politicians foregather. He deposed 
Charles A. Stephens from the temporary management of 
his campaign and in his stead appointed W. F. Benedict, 
his official secretary to take charge. Mr. Benedict has 
been granted a leave of absence without pay from his 
former position and is mapping his work for a whirlwind 
campaign. 

Adolph Uhl doesn't seem to believe in using a muffled 
cut-out on his tongue. Asked if he was out to weaken 
Rolph's strength, he is asserted to have emitted this 
blast : "I'm out to get rid of Rolph and his bosses and of 
Power and his. I am certain I can lick both of them"! 
That's with the cut-out wide open! 



James E. Power has started a personal sweep around 
the field in preparation for his hop-off. He did a dip into 
the Ocean View district some days ago and was guest to 
an assemblage of his friends, among whom were Fred 
Jones, president of the Ocean View Improvement Club, 
John McKenna, Mrs. Lorraine Quigley and Jos. McCarty. 



Real Service 

Real service is that which can be set down in black and 
vhite. in terms of figures, which is, therefore, ai I al and 
iot merely potential. Measured in these terms I he service 
tendered by the Market Street Railway Company is very 
•eal An organisation which can come out and state that 
» has track paved more than 150 street crossings, and 

•paved do-ens of blocks of rough paving in the paving 
ra for the year, is an organization which is doing 

al work for the City and County. Such an organisation 

deserving of the best consideration at the hands ol tne 
itizens. 



repa\ 
pi . 
real 



William C. McDonnell has been added to the Power's 
headquarters staff. Mr. McDonnell took an active part 
last year in Governor Young's campaign. 

Four in the hop-off for mayor seems not enough for the 
ambitious. Leading Socialists now intimate they intend 
to have one of their boys lor girls) take off. Attorney 
Slikerman. the Debs Socialist candidate for mayor in the 
last race, tried it. but took a nose dive when only 1571 
votes up. 



November 8th next will thoroughly exemplify the 
biblical truism: "Many are called, but few are chosen." 



4 




■THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 3, 1921 




By Antoinette Arnold 




Opera Season Attracts 
The Society Contingency 

Every year the Opera Season en- 
courages, invites and stimulates bril- 
liant society events. 

Notable affairs either precede, or 
immediately follow the opera, around 
which the smart set make their circle 
of events. 

We have been told that this year 
the Auditorium will make better pro- 
vision for the comfort and the seat- 
ing of patrons. Catering to the so- 
ciety contingency is no idle fancy, 
for it takes both sides of the foot- 
lights to make the opera season a suc- 
cess. 

Many of California's millionaires, 
who are registered as enthusiastic 
sponsors for this year's Opera Sea- 
son, have engaged season boxes where 
they will entertain friends and vis- 
itors. 

Beautifully attired audiences are 
attractions none the less potent than 
the personnel of operatic stars. At- 
tractive audiences give the spur to 
artistic work and make the whole 
ensemble something exquisite and 
elegant. 

Box holders should be given the op- 
portunities for brilliancy of attire, so 
let us sincerely hope that the Audi- 
torium seats will permit of sparkling 
array. 

When we get our new Opera House 
— then Society can indeed be correctly 
gowned for the opera. But, in the 
meantime — why can't we give San 
Francisco's lovely women and their 
suitors and escorts a chance to look 
the part? 

It greatly depends upon seats — and 
we are told that they will be better 
this year. 

So, here's hoping! 



Prominent Folks Will 
Occupy the Boxes 

Many prominent Californians have 
already engaged boxes for the Opera 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA 

On the Coaat Highway. Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



Season which will have its auspicious 
opening on the evening of Thursday, 
September 15, with "Manon Lescaut," 
Gaetano Merola conducting. 

The list of boxholders includes 
many among whom are: Judge and 
Mrs. M. C. Sloss, Dr. and Mrs. Kaspar 
Pischel, Judge George Edward Cro- 
thers. Messrs. and Mesdames: Frank 
Berrien Anderson, Robert Irving 
Bentley, Frederick W. Bradley, 
Charles A. Christin, George T. Cam- 
eron, Thomas Graham Crothers, Mil- 
ton H. Esberg, Georges de Latour, 
William McPherson Fitzhugh, George 
N. Armsby, William Bowers Bourn, 
John F. Brooks, Horace Bradford 
Clifton, I. W. Hellman Jr., Ira Pierce, 
Frank D. Madison, D. M. Linnard, S. 
Waldo Coleman, Sidney M. Ehrman, 
Esward L. Eyre, Ross F. Faxon, Ama- 
deo P. Giannini, Stanley Harris, Rob- 
ert Burns Henderson, William T. 
Sesnon, Richard H. Sprague, Joseph 
0. Tobin, John A. McGregor, Prentis 
Cobb Hale, William Joseph Leet, M. C. 
Threlkeld, Nion R. Tucker, William 
Wallace Mein, Gaetano Merola, Wil- 
liam H. Mills, E. Raymond Armsby, 
Sherman Clay and Company. 



Mrs. Hearst Comes to 
See the Little Twins 

Mrs. William Randolph Hearst, 
looking as attractive and charming as 
ever, with her engaging manners and 
perfect attire in the latest modes, ar- 
rived in this city this past week to 
see the twin babies of her son, Mr. 
George Hearst and his beautiful wife. 
Mrs. Hearst saw for the first time the 
twin daughter and son of Mr. and 
Mrs. George Hearst upon her arrival 
here. She has just returned from an 
extended tour of Europe where she 
was extensively entertained. 



Honolulu Folks 

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Baldwin of 
Honolulu, who arrived recently in 
Southern California on the S. S. City 
of Honolulu, are here for a few days' 
visit and are guests at the Clift Ho- 
tel. Numerous informal entertain- 
ments have been given for them by 
friends and relatives in this city. 

The Baldwins are planning a two 
months' vacation tour, which will in- 
clude a journey to New York for the 
purpose of attending the Interna- 
tional Polo Games there. 



Gregorys Entertain 

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Lestock Gre 
gory, who are famous for their hos 
pitality, entertained a group o 
friends at their home last week, hav 
ing a number of social favorites & 
guests for the evening. Prominen" 
in the list of friends were: Doctori, 
and Mesdames, John Sperry, Howarc 
Dignan, Messrs. and Mesdames. Har 
vey Allen, Armstrong Taylor, Stuar 
Henshaw, James Blood, James Si 
Hines, Philip Lyon, Wm. T. White ; 
Henry Heller, Edward Jones, W. H 1 
Wood, Horatio Bonestell, 0. S. John- 
son, Frederick Russ, Bernard Rochet 
Hal Atkinson, Horace Guittard; Mes- 
dames, Eleanor Mighell, Dolly RolpM 
Dorothy Sims, Frederick Henshawa 
Misses Elena Redoy, Mabel Gilles- 
pie; Messrs. John Bonestell, E. MJ 
Miller, E. G. Gillespie, Rudolph Hab- 
enicht, Antony Caffaro, Rene Peronj 
Doctors E. D. Shortlidge, Frank Ro- 
dolph. * * * 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Balch and their 
familv, of Honolulu, are registered' 
at the Hotel Whitcomb. The family, 
arrived on the mainland, the early: 
part of the summer and have spent 
the past few months, motoring iro 
the northwest, spending considerable 
time on Vancouver Island and at 
Rainier National Park. 

Mr. Balch, who is president of the 
Mutual Telephone Company, of Ha- 
waii, is sailing the early part of the 
week for the islands. Mrs. Balch 
will remain in California, to place the 
children in school. Miss Adrian 
Balch is to be a student at the Dom- 
inican Convent in San Rafael. 
* * * 

Santa Barbara Guests 

Dr. and Mrs. J. C. Bainbridge of 
Santa Barbara, who for the past two 
months have been making an ex- 
tended tour of Eastern and Canadian 
points, including New York, Quebec, 
Montreal and Vancouver, are here for 
a visit enroute home. They are 
guests at the Clift Hotel. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell find Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



September 3, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



[ome-Coming Luncheon 
ttracts People of Note 

The special luncheon of the For- 
ign Trade and Travel Exposition held 
tst Wednesday, August 24, in the 
ew San Francisco Women's Club 
uilding was really one of the decid- 
dly worthwhile events of the social 
ealm. Mrs. W. D'Egilbert, chairman 
f Women's Participation had charge 
f the program. 

The home-coming of Miss Geneve 

Shaffer, Commissioner to Alaska, 

fas the motif of the luncheon at- 

nded by prominent men and women 
f the community. Miss Shaffer gave 
n outline of her recent visit in Alas- 
a where she extended a cordial invi- 
ition to all the northern people to 
ttend the forth-coming convention. 

With typical charm and decision 
liss Shaffer told her confreres just 
ow she had met the Alaskan people 
,nd then repeated the invitation 
idiich she voiced in behalf of her be- 
sved city. She concluded her clever 
ddress with the poem, "San Fran- 
feco, City of Enchantment," written 
ly Adelyn Brickley Jones, San Fran- 
isco writer and educator. 

W. D'Egilbert, director general 
ind manager of the Pacific Foreign 
Trade and Travel Exposition, intro- 
luced the guests, diplomats, Consuls 
ind Consul-Generals in enthusiastic 
support of the Exposition. E. W. 
iVilson, president of the Foreign 
Trade Club, gave an excellent address, 
)riefly telling the purpose of the 
ivent, pointing to constituents in the 
vork. C. E. Hyde outlined the vari- 
ous displays. A musical program 
vas presented under the supervision 
)f Mrs. Edward Ransome Place, in- 
troducing Andrew Robinson, who 
rave a number of beautiful selections. 



L,uneheon Party 

Mrs. S. E. Holmes was hostess at a 
iridge luncheon given in Drury Lane, 
Hotel Whitcomb on Tuesday after- 
noon, honoring her sister, Mrs. Alfred 
Goldstein, of New York, who has 
been her guest for the past two 
ffeeks. The table was very attrac- 
tively decorated with flowers and 
after luncheon, .Mrs. Holmes took her 
guests to the Roof Garden to play 
bridge. Those invited to the affair 
were Mesdames: Willard Greenfield. 
Charles Joseph, H. H. Harpham. N. 
[, Caesar. Thomas M. Robinson, Ann 
Lagerquist, Howard J. Griffith, Wil- 
liam T. rlolling, Alex Miltenberger, 
Charles M. Royan. E. B. Taylor. Fred- 
erick Tarter. Edward Seligman, H. W. 
Welch. E. E. Thompson. Victor Stein. 
Albeit Stein. Herbert Eggarts, Geo. 
Poole. (Catherine Spolter, P. T. Gron- 
oskv. Louis Raisin. F. E. Pierson. 



ll<* 




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SSlSli'41 


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iii;M-J 

P^i;' r ;,JPJ 







HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 
Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

600 Rooms 

Tariff : From $4 per day 



Society California Pioneers 

The 77th Anniversary of the Ad- 
mission of California into the Union 
will be celebrated by the Society of 
California Pioneers at a picnic to be 
held at Fairfax Park. Marin County. 
H. L. Van Winkle, president, James 
P. Taylor and John J. Lermen of the 
entertainment committee have pro- 
vided an enjoyable day for the mem- 
bers and friends in attendance at the 
noteworthy event. There will be 
many different kinds of games with 
prizes in many novel races. Dancing 
will be a feature of the event with 
music provided by Sapiro's Municipal 
Band. No one will be privileged to 
appear on the dancing floor without 

a pioneer badge. 

* * * 

E. A. Knudsen, of Honolulu, with 
his daughters, Misses Ann and Eliza- 
beth and his son, Valdemar, are reg- 
istered at the Hotel Whitcomb. The 
family are sailing for the islands on 
the President Monroe, the early part 
of the week. They have been on the 
mainland since the middle of June 
and have spent the time in motoring 
through Oregon. Washington, British 
Columbia, and California. Later in 
the fall. Valdemar Knudsen will re- 
turn to California, where he will 
spend the winter as a student at the 
Thatcher School at Ojai. California. 

* * * 
Younger Set Entertained 

Or. and Mrs. Irving C. Gobar en- 
tertained the younger set of the Em- 
erald Lake Country Club at their 
home in Buena Vista avenue last Sat- 
urday evening in honor of their son. 
Irving Gobar Jr. 

* * * 

Women Artists 

Miss Evelyn A. Withrow. honorary 
president and Miss Helen Forbes, 
president, of the San Francisco So- 
ciety of Women Artists, head an in- 
teresting bulletin of club announce- 



ments for the present month, begin- 
ning with a meeting, September 15, 
in the Woman's City Club, 465 Post 
street. 

A program beginning at 3 o'clock 
will feature Dr. Phyllis Ackerman in 
a lecture: "The Maintenance of 
Standards in the Arts." After the 
lecture, tea will be served under the 
supervision of Miss Sallie Benfield, 
Mrs. W. F. Booth, Miss Elizabeth 
Chandler, Mrs. Harry Mann and Mrs. 
Milan Soule. 

Members will assemble at 2:30 
o'clock for one of discussion events of 
an interesting and worthwhile day in- 
augurating the society. 
* * * 

Interesting Visitors 

Last week there were many inter- 
esting visitors at the Mark Hopkins 
Hotel, including Mr. and Mrs. Monte 
Blue, Carrie Jacobs Bond, Mrs. Eliza- 
beth T. Miller, Count and Countess 
A. Wedel, Mrs. A. S. Farber of Chi- 
cago, Illinois, Mr. and Mrs. R. J. 
Hackney of Memphis, Tennessee, 
Mr. I. L. Horn and family of Norwalk, 
Ohio, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Irish of Jer- 
sey City, New Jersey, Miss Naomi 
Newman of Los Angeles, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. J. Zimmerman of Gary, In- 
diana, Mrs. J. B. McDonough and son 
of Fort Smith, Arkansas, Mr. W. G. 
Howard and family of Santa Monica, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Kerkam of Wash- 
ington, D. C, Mrs. M. C. McCutchen 
of New York City. 



* * * 



Tea Hostess 

Mrs. J. R. Sharpsteen was hostess 
at tea in Peacock Court of the Hotel 
Mark Hopkins Saturday, August 27. 
The table was beautifully decorated 
with summer flowers. Previous to tea, 
bridge was enjoyed by the guests in 
one of the hotel's attractive suites. 

.Miss Alice Kelly was hostess at tea 
in Peacock Court to twenty of her 
friends last Saturday. Bridge was 
enjoyed previous to tea in one of the 
hotel's drawing rooms. 
* * * 

A Game of Bridge 
Follows Lovely Luncheon 

Miss Anna Gaffney entertained at 

(Continued on Page 14) 






^ you pay no more ^ 



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BESTFlOWHg 




*The'\fc«ce cfa. Thousand Gartens' 
224-226 Grant Ave TeLKearny 4975 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 3, 19271 





Theater Events 

Some new shows at the local play- 
houses and a number of continued 
plays make up the schedule for the 
coming week. 

There is enough to attract attention 
and lure theater patrons in the way 
of high entertainment, especially in- 
teresting being the stars now provid- 
ing San Francisco's contingency 
with the rare chance of seeing favo- 
rites. 

* * -■■• 

Curran 

The Curran Theater will re-open 
on Monday night, September 12, 
with the initial production in English 
of the Hungarian play, entitled, "God 
Incarnate," written by John Colton, 
author of "The Shanghai Gesture" 
and "Rain." 

We are to have the privilege of see- 
ing Ruth Chatterton in this drama 
with Edward Leiter and Kenneth 
Thomson in support. Miss Chatter- 
ton is a San Francisco favorite and 
we are told that she likes the char- 
acter role of this Colton play. 

Kenneth Thomson is remembered 
as the handsome man and fascinating 
actor who appeared not long ago with 
Mrs. Minnie Maddern Fiske in "The 
Rivals" in the role of Captain Abso- 
lute. Ivis Goulding and Montague 
Shaw are in the cast. 

"God Incarnate" proved nothing 
less than a sensation in Europe where 
it is still being played in Budapest 
and Vienna in addition to smaller 
continental cities. 

San Francisco is to be a producing 
center, according to Homer Curran 
and L. C. Wiswell, who predict as 
great opportunities here as in New 

York along this line. 

* * * 

Lurie 

The lively comedy, "I Love You," 
remains as the attraction of the Lurie 
Theater with Johnny Arthur and Al- 
ma Tell the stars. 

The care-free bachelor played by 
Johnny Arthur of both stage and 
screen comecby roles is highly enter- 
taining and interesting. There is 
enough comedy or real farce in the 
romantic story to keep up a continu- 
ous round of laughter. 

Amusing situations and cleverly 
arranged plot race through the com- 
edy amid settings that are particu- 



LE/ISURE'SWW 



OBEY NO \aJAND BU7 PLEASURE'S 

Torn Moore. 



By Josephine Young 

larly lovely, especially the moonlight 
and garden scene basis for most of 

the romance. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"The Alarm Clock" continues to 
awaken the average mortal to a full 
sense of appreciation of things as 
they find them in the Henry Duffy 
play now on at the popular O'Farrell 
street theater, the Alcazar. 

There is a cosiness about this the- 
ater which is difficult to equal any- 
where. The people who go there ex- 
pect to find the homey atmosphere 
for which this notable playhouse is 
famous and they are never disap- 
pointed. Furthermore any one, any 
time, can always find a fine, clean 
springly play with a robust laugh 
tucked in for good measure at the 
Alcazar, where the Henry Duffy 
standard is always maintained. 

The players who make you laugh ? 
Well, Marion Lord heads the splendid 
cast, sharing honors with Thomas 
Chatterton and Charlotte Treadway 
and the other desirables, John Mac- 
kenzie, William Macauley, C. Havi- 
land Chappell, Robert Adams and 
Alice Buchanan doing some of her 
good work interpreting the schemer. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

Holding over for a second week 
Beatrice Lillie, international star, 
will have a new program for the 
Orpheum bill starting Saturday ma- 
tinee. She has a novelty repertoire to 
present with the week's attractions 
assisted by Hugh Sinclair at the 
piano. 

On this new bill will be a number 
of features including Edith Clasper, 
danseuse, and her company of boys 
offering a singing and dancing en- 
semble entitled: "Smuggled Goods"; 
O'Neill Vermont, blackface comedian ; 
Claudia Coleman, mimic artist, ap- 
pearing in "Feminine Types" ; and 
Diero, world-famed accordionist, are 
other of the big features at the Or- 
pheum. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Three impressive headliners will 
appear on the stage at the Golden 
Gate Theater Saturday as part of the 
program for the second week of the 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"The Alarm Clock." comedy, presented byt 
Henry [>ufTv. itarring Marion Lord. 

Capitol, Ellis nr. Market 

"Abie's Irish Rose." Anne Nichols comedy. 

President. McAllister nr. Market 

"Two Girls Wanted," comedy by John i.nlden. 

* * * 

VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

On the screen. Milton Sills ami Natalie hine- 
ston in feature picture. 
On the stage, Harry Burns, Italian comedian, 
in "I Think You Touch." 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Beatrice Lillie held over for the second week I 
as the headliner of a bill of vaudeville. 

Pantages, Market at Hyde 

Mrs. Florence Rcid in "The Satin Woman," ' 
and a hill of vaudeville. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Musical show — Pictures. 

* * * 

ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 

California, Market at 4th 

"Camille." modern version of Dumas' story, 
starring Norma Talmadge. Gino Severi music. 

Cameo, Market opp. Fifth street 

James Oliver Curwood story, "My Neighbor's 
Wife." Sat. "The Outlaw Express," Sun. and 
Mon. "The White Rose," D. W. Griffith pro- 
duction, starring Mae Murray, Tues.. Wed.. 
Thurs. 

Casino, Ellis at Mason 

Sat., "The Midnight Message" and "Tarzan 
and the Golden Lion." 

Sun., Mon., "The Passionate Adventure" and 
"Pals in Paradise." 
Tues.. Wed.. "The Third Degree." 
Thurs., Fri., "The Scarlet West" and "A Gen- 
tleman Roughneck." 

Granada, Market at Jones 

Wallace Beery and Raymond Hatton. comedy 
team, in "Fireman. Save My Child." 
Frank Jenks leading the Granada Orchestra 
and a Fanchon and Marco stage act. 

Imperial, Market, opp. Jones 

"We're All Gam hi era," starring Thomas 
Meighan in the reopening of the Imperial. 
Hermie King and his syncopating hand. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th. 

"Beau Geste,'" starring Ronald Colman. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

Behe Daniels and Gertrude Ederle in "Swim. 
Girl, Swim." 

Wall Roesner conducting the Warfield Orches- 
tra and a Fanchon and Marco stage presen- 
tation. 

RESIDENCE DISTRICT 

Alhambra, Polk St., nr. Green 

"Three Weeks in Paris." Dorothy Devore. Sat.; 
"The Honeymoon Express," Irene Rich, Sun.; 
"The Cheater. Helen Ferguson. Pat O'Malley. 
Mon.; "Ankles Preferred," Madge Bellamy. 
Tues.. Wed.. Thurs. 

Civic Auditorium, Market at Larkin 

Marion Talley. youthful grand opera star in 
a concert on Tuesday night. Sept. 6. 

Circus, 16th Street at Bryant 

Kingling Bros, and Barnum and Bailey com- 
hined, Sept. 2, 3. I. 



September 3, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



fall season of Orpheum circuit vaude- 
ville: Harry Burns, Italian come- 
dian, assisted by Carlena Daimond 
and Tony De Luca, will act in a com- 
edy burlesque. The act includes a 
number of musical features. 

Frank Davis and Delia Darnell will 
present a farce comedy by Frank 
Davis. Margo and Beth, dancers, 
have a dance extravaganza with ex- 
otic settings. With them will be the 
Collene Sisters, Margaret Fallenius, 
violinist, and Jay Seiler. 

Michel, the boy xylophonist, the 
Three Lordens in a trapeze novelty, 
and other performers will be on the 
new bill. 

"Framed," starring Milton Sills 
and Natalie Kingston, will be the 
photoplay feature, showing for the 
first time in San Francisco. It por- 
trays love and adventure in the dia- 
mond mines of South Africa. Claude 
Sweeten and the Golden Gate Orches- 
tra in a special concert number, a 
travelogue, Pathe news and a short 
comedy will be added features. 

President 

"Two Girls Wanted," by Gladys 
Unger, has taken the popular fancy 
and the President has enjoyed large 
patronage ever since the first per- 
formance. Henry Duffy announces a 
third week of the attraction begin- 
ning with the matinee Sunday after- 
noon. 

John Golden was the original pro- 
ducer of "Two Girls Wanted" and it 
ran for 328 performances over a per- 
iod of ten consecutive months on 
Broadway. It has only just concluded 

its New York engagement. 

» * * 

Warfield 

Campus life will be shown on the 
Warfield screen Saturday when 
"Swim, Girl, Swim," starring Bebe 
Daniels, opens a week's engagement. 
Gertrude Ederle, the first woman to 
swim the English Channel, is featured 
in the picture. 

College athletics take an important 
part in the picture, together witli the 
dramatic yearn of a staid and spec- 
tacled co-ed to break into the span- 
gled phase of campus life. This 
character, played by Bebe Daniels, 
and that of her instructor a beetle- 
legged bug chaser are responsible for 
much of the laughter in the picture. 

In the Channel swimming scenes. 
Miss Kderle is shown in her first 
movie. There are many shots of her 
in action in the water and also "in 
character'* when she takes Miss 
Daniels in hand and trains her. 

On the stage. Fanchon ..V Marco will 
present "Seasons Ideas'' featuring 
.lean Winslow. Frieda Webber, the 
Berkoffs and the Sunkist Beauties. 
Walt Roesner and the Super-Soloists 
will contribute comedy and music. 



Granada 

Wallace Beery and Raymond Hat- 
ton occupy the screen at the Granada 
theater this coming week in the pic- 
ture, "Fireman, Save My Child." 

The story has to do with three 
school chums. Tom Kennedy being 
one of the trio. All of the boys join 
the fire department which provides 
comedy, thrills and excitement in the 
development of the lively plot. Ed- 
ward Sutherland who directed the 
other two films in which Beery and 
Hatton made such hits, "Behind the 
Front" and "We're in the Navy Now" 
was director of this picture. 

"Diversities" will be th,e Fanchon 
and Marco idea for the stage, this 

week. 

* * * 

Players' Guild 

The Players Guild of San Francis- 
co, will open its winter season with 
"Hay Fever," sparkling comedy by 
Noel Coward, which ran all last year 
at the Maxine Elliott Theater in New 
York. 

San Francisco's own Emelie Mel- 
ville will do the part of Judith Bliss 
in "Hay Fever" which opens Thurs- 
day night, September 8 and will play 
Thursday, Friday and Saturday 
nights and Saturday matinee, of Sep- 
tember 8, 9, and 10 and on Septem- 
ber 15, 16, 17. 

The Guild this year will have a de- 
lightful setting for its productions, 
in the new Community Theater in 
the recently completed Women's 
Building, 609 Sutter Street. The lit- 
tle theater is an architectural gem 
and seats between six and seven hun- 
dred persons. An exceptional cast 
supports Miss Melville in "Hay Fev- 
er," which is to be followed the later 
pari of September by the Hungarian 

play "Fata Morgana." 

* * * 

California 

The management of the California 
now announces the screening of "Ca- 
mille" featuring Norma Talmadge 
for the week beginning Friday and 
following the showing of "The Big 
Parade." 

Fred Niblo directed this picture 
which deals with the character made 
famous in fiction, although the scene* 
and events are modernized by the 
motion picture production. Beautiful 
settings make a fine background for 
the romantic film, providing for Miss 
Talmadge one of her best roles, ac- 
cording to those in the know. 

* » « 

Imperial 

A. M. Bowles announces that the 
Imperial Theater will return to its 
policy of first-run pictures commenc- 
ing with this Saturday's showing of 
Thomas Meighan in "We're All 
Gamblers." 

tinued on Page 13) 



A blue gas flame keeps 
your cooking utensils clean 

A perfectly working Gas Range is a 
delight to use. 

But at times, food boiling over or dust 
drawn in through the air mixers will 
carbonize and unless the burners are 
cleaned these particles will close the 
holes or ports of the burners. The result 
is a yellow flame or a "popping" noise 
when you turn off the gas. This is im- 
proper combustion. 

The burners of your Gas Range are 
easily removed and should be cleaned 
each month to insure perfect combustion 
and cleanliness. Merely boil the burners 
in a solution of lye water or caustic soda 
until they are thoroughly clean. 

You'll find it easy to keep your Gas 
Range as clean as any other piece of fur- 
niture in the house. The range will oper- 
ate perfectly. It will last longer. You'll 
enjoy its speed, cleanliness and the ease 
of cooking with Gas — just as thousands 
of other women are doing today. 




"»ACinC SEHV1CI" 



Pacific Gas and electric Company 

Owned • Operated • Managed 
by Calijomianf 




GEO 

Sutter 61 



rELL 
land 1017 



l.-0«.«»« cap* were **rrw! at the 
Panama-Pacifi*- International Expaaitiaa 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 3, 1927 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




C. J. Pennington 

"CAIN AND ABEL" ON THE 
NETWORK 

"Cain and Abel," the dynamic story 
taken from the Bible will be the 
Bible story with symphonic orches- 
tral accompaniment presented by 
the National Broadcasting Company 
over the Pacific Coast Network Sun- 
day, September 11, from 9.00 to 10.00 
P.M. 

This is the story of the beginning 
of hatred in the world and the trag- 
edy of the first murder. 

The first scene is laid on a moun- 
tainside where Cain has gone to offer 
a sacrifice to the Lord. In the valley 
below him Cain sees his brother Abel 
watching his sheep. He envies his 
brother's prosperity and longs for the 
luxuries that wealth procure. He 
leaves the mountainside with bitter- 
ness in his heart and approaches his 
brother with the demand that he turn 
over his flocks to him. Cain tells his 
brother, that he hates him but Abel 
does not understand the meaning of 
hate. Cain slays Abel and steals his 
sheep, taking them into the hills, but 
is followed by the voice of conscience. 
The voice of conscience tells him that 
he is the author of war. of hate and 
of murder and that men will curse his 
name for all time. 



A NEW LINE OF LOUD SPEAKERS 
By H. A. Eyeleth 

The slogan, "A Utah For Every 
Purpose" has been fulfilled by the 
new line of Utah speakers brought 
out by the Utah Radio Products Co. 
There is a price range from ten dol- 
lars to one hundred dollars and de- 
signs to meet every taste and require- 
ment. 



The most elaborate speaker is 
known as the "Screen." It is of an- 
tique brown, wood finish, standing 
40 inches high by 28 inches wide and 
12 inches deep and is equipped with 
a 10-foot concealed air column horn 
with Utah DeLuxe unit. Its beau- 
tiful tone quality and elegant appear- 
ance make it an outstanding speak- 
er of the season and it meets the de- 
mand for a reproducer of quality to 
be used with the higher priced sets 
and in the most finely appointed 
home. This is the S100.00 speaker. 

A cabinet type speaker is available 
in the Utah "No. 100." This is fin- 
ished in walnut and stands 36 inches 
high by 27'o inches wide and 17 
inches deep, and is equipped with con- 
cealed 9 foot air column and Utah De 
Luxe Unit. There is room in the 
cabinet for batteries or eliminator 
equipment. An idea of its sturdy 
construction is gained by the knowl- 
edge that it weighs 100 pounds. Price 
S80.00. 

The "No. 30" is a cone speaker fin- 
ished in antique brown metal casing 
and grill which conceals the cone and 
mechanism. Its height is 18 inches. 
The design is very effective and it 
blends well with both mahogany and 
walnut finished cabinets. This speak- 
er sells for S30.00. 

The "No.16" Drum speaker is of 
metal construction, antique brown 
finish, and stands I6V2 inches high. 
It is similar to the No." 30 in general 
appearance but sells at $16.00. It 
has excellent tone quality and will 
handle all the volume desired for gen- 
eral use. At the price it is an ex- 
ceptionally fine value. 

There is a straight cone type speak- 
er in the "Junior" cone at S10.00. 
This is 15 1 ■_> inches high and is the 
open type, free edge cone. Many 
users of sets like to have one or more 
speakers in other parts of the house 
and this makes an ideal unit to use 
for that purpose. It is also a good 
portable speaker, weighing only seven 
pounds. 

There are two horn type speakers, 
the "Standard" with 14 inches bell 
and the "Junior" with 11 inch bell. 
The finish is antique brown and thev 
are priced at S22.50 and $12.50 re- 
spectively. 

The Utah "Piano" unit is designed 
to be attached to the sounding board 
of any piano. It is equipped with a 
25-foot cord and sells for S10.00. 



This is a very novel way of reproduc- 
ing radio reception and is most effec- 
tive. 

There are two phonograph units, 
with and without stand, nickel finish, 
listing at S9.50 and $10.00 respec- 
tively. There are two speaker units 
only, to be adapted to horns as de- 
sired ; the King at $6.50 and the De 
Luxe at $10.00. There is also a Con- 
sole unit, for adaption to cone dia- 
phragms, which sells at $10.00. 

There are a variety of Utah air- 
column horns available. These are 
for use in cabinets and come equipped 
with Utah De Luxe units. Several 
shapes are manufactured and the 
lengths of air columns vary from 
seven to twelve feet, which permits a 
selection to meet the requirement of 
any particular cabinet. The price 
range is from $12.50 and $25.00, with 
unit. 

Programs for Next Week 

KFRC— DON I.EE 
SAN FRANCISCO— 451 

Sunday. September 4 

- to 1:00 p. m. — Church service. 

5 :00 to 6 :00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Talk. 

6:25 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen reports. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. ni. — Twilight recital. 

8:30 to 10:30 p. m.— Walter Krausgrill's Orchestra. 

Monday, September 5 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Early Bird program. 

8 :00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Household hints. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 

•1 :30 to 5 :30 p 

5:30 to 6:00 p 

6:00 to 6:20 p 

6:20 to 6:30 p 

6:30 to 6:50 p 

6:50 to 7:00 p. m 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m.— KFRC Movie Club with Joe 

Benson, pianist 
8:30 to 9:30 p. m. — Walter Krausgrill's Orchestra. 
9:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 
Tuesday, September 6 

7 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Early Bird program. 
■- :m> in :i inn ;i. tu. Mii-n-,1 pruvrram. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 in 11:80 a. m.— Doings of Dorothy. 
11:80 :t- m. to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryout program. 
12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert. 
4:30 to 5:80 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6 :20 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 6:50 p. m. — The Cecilians. 
6:50 to 7:00 p. m.— Talk. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m.— KFRC Radio Movie Club. 

8:80 to 9:30 p. m. — Walter Krausgrill's orchestra. 

9:80 to 12:011 p. m.— Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra, 

We