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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (Dec.-Aug. 1927-1928)"






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Saturday, December 31, 1927 




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Established July 20. 1856 




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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1856. by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott. Jr.. from 18S4 ;o 1925. 
Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 26S Market Street. San Francisco. California. Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco. 
California. Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill. E. C. London. England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, 

$5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CX. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., DECEMBER 31, 1927 



No. 1 



Air Lines 



By Lieutenant Blaine Stubblefield 



Nationwide interest in aviation is calling forth a new 
aviation magazine nearly every change of the moon. 
These magazines vary in their point of view and treat- 
ment of subject matter, so that 
one may choose to his liking and 
needs. The writer is familiar 
with twelve or fifteen of these 
publications, and for the benefit 
of News Letter readers who do 
not already know about them, a 
brief review is herewith sub- 
mitted. 




Lieut. Blaine SI ul, 1.1,1 i. 1.1 



Oldest of all the aeronautical 
publications, now in its twenty- 
third year, one year younger 
than aviation itself, is AVIA- 
TION, published in New York 
City. AVIATION is probably 
the most authoritative of them 
all, is conservative and thorough, 
and is best suited to men of the profession. Anyone, how- 
ever, can read it with genuine enjoyment and benefit. 
Every phase of the aeronautical world is treated by rec- 
ognized leaders in the field. The magazine is illustrated 
with pictures and drawings, and carries a wide variety 
of advertising. 

It is not the intention to even attempt to list the avia- 
tion magazines in the order of their importance, but U. 
S. AIR SERVICES comes next to our attention. It is. as 
its name implies, the organ of the Navy. Army and other 
Government air services, but it is not by any means lim- 
ited to that scope. Each month it contains a story or 
two, essays on the activities and development of various 
manufacturers and operators, technical material on aero- 
dynamics, engines, etc., pictures, and instructive adver- 
tisements. 

Of special interest to California people is WESTERN 
FLYING, published in Los Angeles, now only in its third 
year, but growing rapidly in volume of material and cir- 
culation. This magazine is edited for both technical and 
lay readers, and the combination is very well handled. 
We like to read about familiar airports and events, and 
they are always there for us in WESTERN FLYING. 
Like most of the other organs of the air. it contains salty 
little paragraphs and epigrams on the trade, much inter- 



esting news matter. Among its departments are "A 
Bird's Eye View," under which Editor Bob Pritchard 
airs his views ; "Hanging 'Round the Hangars" ; "In the 
Great Northwest" ; " 'Round San Francisco Bay" ; "In 
the Air at San Diego"; "Western Airports"; "The Avi- 
ator's Bookshelf" ; and even "Book Reviews." "Doings 
in the Industry" is another one. Altogether, it is a maga- 
zine that ought to be in all western homes and offices. 



The SLIPSTREAM, as most people now know, is the 
stream of air driven after from a plane by its propeller, 
but this periodical is not at all windy as its name might 
imply. It was founded eight years ago during the World 
War, and has grown steadily with the game since then. 
SLIPSTREAM is attractively made up, with many large 
pictures and narrow columns for readibility. This maga- 
zine is published at Dayton, Ohio. It has a wide circula- 
tion throughout the entire country among the profes- 
si >n and all classes of people. 



POPULAR AVIATION, as one might readily guess, is 
modeled on the popular mechanics' type of magazine, but 
is far more authentic than most of them. Some of the 
titles in a current issue are "When Ford Went Up," 
"Women Flyers Meet at Sea." "Winter Flying," "The 
Safe-Aircraft Competition," "The Memphis Model Tour- 
nament." "L'tah Flying Club." "Baby Airports for Small 
Communities," and so forth. For the average citizen, and 
for the voting men and women interested in the progress 
of flight. POPULAR AVIATION can be recommended 
without reserve. 



Brand new in the field, is a weekly review of aero- 
nautics called AIR TRANSPORTATION. This publica- 
tion is in fact a weekly newspaper, presenting all the 
events and developments of the week in short, concise 
items. Men in the air transport business who have little 
time to read extended articles, are finding this paper a 
great time saver. Schedules, time tables, rates, announce- 
ments, new records made, mechanical developments — all 
are condensed in readable and summary form. The writer 
finds this review indispensable. 

itinued on P;i>r. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



December 31, 1927 






Feeding the Hungry 

We are a very prosperous community, perhaps, almost 
certainly, the most prosperous in the world today. Yet, 
prosperous as we are, the cold fingers of poverty clutch 
some of our people at times. The chances of life are such 
that not even the most prudent can always escape. And 
there are always the imprudent and the backward, the 
stupid and the unfit, who must be fed, at any rate, while 
Christmas bells ring and the lights sparkle on the trees. 

The Community Chest enabled the charitable societies 
to investigate the cases of poverty in our midst at pres- 
ent. They are of the opinion that all the cases were 
hunted down. The result was the bringing of joy to 
5000 families. No family went unfed on Christmas Day 
if it could be found. Until very late on Saturday night 
the messengers of pity were on their rounds. 

It is astonishing how the heart responds to the old 
call. In one market the merchants made up 500 packed 
boxes for distribution through the Community Chest. 
Just think of the labor involved in that, in addition to 
the demands made by the hurry and bustle of the Christ- 
mas trade. 

Everybody seems to have been remembered. The sick 
soldiers and sailors in the Marine and other hospitals 
were helped and their isolation and loneliness relieved 
by performers who gave up their day going the rounds, 
cheering people in the name of love. 

The Community Chest went even beyond the city in 
its work of mercy. It made presents from St. Mary's 
Orphanage in San Jose to the Albertinium orphanage as 
far away as Ukiah. 

The Christmas spirit develops. The social feeling grows 
from year to year and we are becoming more civilized. 



necessary danger. We do not think that the facts justify 
the conclusion. But that is neither here nor there. There 
is no doubt that Oakland has a good air port. It is the 
duty of the people of Alameda County to develop that to 
the full, as it is our duty to develop ours. 



The Air Port Craze 

There seems to be some ill feeling and considerable dis- 
agreement in Berkeley over the report of City Manager 
Edy, in which he declares to the city councifthat there 
is no need of an airport for Berkeley and that conditions 
are unfavorable for the creation of a good air port. 

We are quite inclined to agree with the City Manager. 
There is no feasibility in the proposed thirty-nine acre 
tract to be used as an air port. Indeed there is no need 
for an air port for Berkeley at all. 

The tendency to the creation of a number of unneces- 
sary air ports throughout the country is going to result 
in a great loss of money and will simply encourage specu- 
lation and the worst sort of real estate grafting on mu- 
nicipal organizations. In the very nature of things air 
ports do not need to be attached to every town. In these 
days of automobile travel, it is no hardship to make a 
trip to an air port. In Europe, where air travel has 
reached a much more important relative position than 
here, there is no attempt to make the air port the ad- 
junct of every community. 

Alameda County at present seems to be quite well 
supplied with air ports. The recent decision to make 
Oakland the air port for the postal service was a very 
distinct victory for that region. We are not satisfied 
with the decision that the crossing of the bay imports 
an element into the air situation which makes for un- 



Our Growing Power 

The United States has taken great strides forward this 
year as an international factor of first importance. Our 
political position is beginning to be commensurate with 
our economic. We are the strongest economic unit in the 
world today. According to all the teachers of economics, 
the conclusion that we shall become the greatest of po- 
litical powers is also unavoidable. The last message of 
the President carried with it that implication in unmis- 
takable terms. 

There is no doubt that our statesmen are getting a 
better hold and are acting with greater confidence and a 
more assured grasp of the purposes of international 
action. The Nicaraguan situation is the best recent proof 
of that. Its whole conduct differs for the better from any 
preceding action on the part of this country. We have 
been accustomed to see our government make futile and 
meaningless dabs at foreign action and as suddenly sub- 
side. We have had many expeditions which have been 
merely expeditions and which have subsided into igno- 
miny and futility. 

Those evil days have gone, we hope for ever. The 
Nicaraguan matter has been carried through with skill 
and ability and with as little destructiveness as is possible 
for a military expedition operating on foreign soil. The 
destiny of this country is wrapped up with the control 
of the canal and nothing must be allowed to interfere in 
any way with our possession and mastery of it. 

Our statesmen are beginning to grasp the idea of our 
future in terms of our great trade development. As fast 
as they do that we shall grow in actual power. 



Peace Ahead 



After all, the prospects of peace for the coming year 
are perhaps better than they have been at any time since 
the last great conflict was closed. The worst of the dis- 
turbing factors seem at present to have somewhat sub- 
sided and to have lost most of their poisonous quality. 

It would seem that Italy begins to understand that the 
disturbance of the Balkans will not be tolerated by the 
powers and that her absurd ambition to compete foi 
position with France had better be laid on the shelf foi 
the present. Neither Britain nor France is in the mooc 
to have its rehabilitation and recovery disturbed by th« 
senseless plunging into confusion and ruin which tht 
chip-on-the-shoulder policy would produce. 

The great step forward has been made by the genera 
understanding that Russia is not intending to break the 
peace even to get at Poland. The suggested general dis 
armament was of course all talk, intended as part of tha 
everlasting propaganda from which the Soviets canno 
free themselves. The promise, however, to meet agaii 
in March and the undertaking on the part of the Rus 
sians to make partial disarmament on the same scale a 
the other powers, brings with it a fine promise for th 
future. 



December 31, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Yokelism 

We read that the captor of Hickman made an exhibi- 
tion of his prisoner all the way through Oregon and that 
gaping crowds, thronged the depot and were allowed to 
feed their fill of gazing and comment. This is the sort 
of thing that brings the administration of justice into ill 
repute. Hickman was supposed to belong to the mob. 
In reality he belonged to that department of the state 
government which is concerned with the administration 
of justice and did not belong at all to the mob. 

It is just this vulgar familiarity which breaks down 
the proper administration of justice and which in the 
long run produces disrespect for law in the minds of the 
multitude. The captor of the notorious criminal was a 
traffic policeman on the roads leading to Pendleton, Ore- 
gon. He is evidently a personally popular officer and 
helped along his popularity by making his prisoner an 
object of interest to people whom he knew. But that 
captor was, at the same time an officer of the state, 
engaged in the necessary and really quite dignified duty 
of bringing a prisoner into the hands of the authorities. 
A proper insistence upon his position in that regard would 
have prevented him from making such a display as the 
papers report. 

After all, perhaps one of the chief reasons for the 
popular disrespect of law is that officers of the law do 
not sufficiently respect themselves. The value of ritual 
is not yet understood by our people. The mere fact of 
playing up to one's position produces not only a finer 
understanding of that position on the part of the officer 
but an instinctive respect on the part of the people. This 
is a psychological fact which should receive greater at- 
tention at the hands of our legal officers of all grades. 
The church long ago saw the value of dignity combined 
with authority. 



Happy New Year 

When the sun climbs Diablo on Sunday and looks 
Tamalpais in the face it will light up the most promising 
piece of country in the world today. There is no place 
anywhere, in which prospects are better. There is cer- 
tainly no place where beauty and charm are so widely 
spread and so rapidly developing. Year after year the 
improvement goes on. What was waste and wilderness 
is becoming cultivated and established, but so cunningly, 
that the charm of the former state is not broken. 

We wish all of our readers a Happy New Year and 
trust that they will begin by enjoying and contemplating 
the beauty with which they are so conspicuously sur- 
rounded. To ride almost anywhere out of town nowadays 
is to take a run into paradise. To drive down the Pen- 
insula to Los Gatos will give you a short and beautiful 
Experience, every bit of it in perfect condition and full 
of the most lavish perfection of climate and develop- 
ment. To go to Marin is about as wonderful an experi- 
ence as falls to the lot of the ordinary man or woman. 

Here is our home and this territory to which we point 
is a priceless part of the State, whose development is just 
beginning and whose future will rank with that of the 
most famous and opulent of regions. This is the part of 
the country which Californians. Inc. is most interested 
in developing. Never did a finer province wait to be cul- 
tivated and enriched. 

We are lucky to be living here and if we do our work 
our children will be even luckier, for the belt of cities 
round the hay will have become a mighty and beautiful 
metropolis full of prosperity and delight. Happy New 
Year ! 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 

Bishop Hughes says that jazz is dead. We thought we 
detected something. — American Lumberman. 



A St. Paul prisoner attempted to escape in a woman's 
clothing. Not much of a disguise. — Fargo Blade. 



One person who always makes money by going to the 
dogs is a chiropodist. — Louisville Times. 



The growing pains of the Mexican Republic are, mora 
accurately, shooting pains. — Arkansas Gazette. 



Eliza was lucky at that — she may have crossed the 
ice, but she didn't have to cross the street. 



A Mexican wife has one advantage. When she tires of 
her man, she can persuade him to be a candidate. — 

Sumter (S. C.) 



New York now has a vehicular tunnel to Jersey, but it 
would probably prefer a pipe line to Canada. — Norfolk 
Virginian-Pilot. 



Senator Borah says he will not be a candidate. It is 
unusual for Mr. Borah to side with the majority this way. 
— San Diego Union. 



The more lawbreakers, the more laws; the more laws, 
the more lawbreakers. That explains everything. — De- 
troit News. 



It is estimated that there are 3,424 spoken languages or 
dialects in the world, but money speaks in them all. — 
Seattle Times. ^ 



One of the oddities is that every centenarian has either 
used whisky most of his life or let it alone. — Richmond 
Item. 



Seven hundred carloads of grapes come into New York 
daily. New Yorkers, apparently, are fond of jelly. — Wall 
Street Journal. 



If the Chinese understand what they are fighting about, 
it certainly gives them a most decided advantage over the 
rest of the world. — Nashville Banner. 



The "average man" spent a day in Chicago and wasn't 
shot at, held up or thugged — which shows that he is 
either above or below the average. — Tampa Tribune. 



Mustafa Kemal Pasha has just finished delivering a 
seven-day address, which relieves Mustafa of all suspicion 
of being the unspeakable Turk. — Detroit News. 



In a contest in dressing for speed, a Chicago girl won 
in forty-five seconds. What could she have been putting 
on the last thirty seconds? — Los Angeles Times. 



We may sometimes criticize the style of a Mexican 
presidential campaign, but at least it lacks nothing in 
execution. — Detroit News. 



After many years of study, a Vienna doctor announces 
that he has discovered a cure for asthma. At last Vienna 
has done something to atone for psychoanalysis. — Cleve- 
land Plain Dealer. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



December 31, 1927 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Happy New Year 

Happy New Year to all ! 

Yes, the old, old salutation. But, 
this year, it has just a different ring 
— and means more. 

Certainly it does to most of us, and 
I hope, with all my heart, that it 
means more, much more, to you! 

It looks like a good year for every 
one. 

Prophets tell us so. Stock market 
indications and financial centers also 
tell an eloquent and substantial story. 

Spiritual advisers, executives of 
national and state affairs, add in- 
creased confidence in the dawning 
year — predicting development of big 
affairs. 

Happy New Year — May your joys 
surpass highest expectations! 

Farewell, 1927! Greetings, 1928! 

We're ready and eagerly await a 
bright New Year! 

Most Brilliant 
Social Event 

The most brilliant event of the sea- 
son, without any hesitation, was the 
"coming-out" party given on the 
country estate of Mrs. Tobin Clark 
when her youngest daughter, Miss 
Agnes Tobin, was formally presented 
to society. 

The memorable affair took place 
Saturday evening, December 17, in 
the magnificent San Mateo home of 
the Tobins, and transcended anything 
that has yet been registered on the 
scrolls of exclusive society. 

In the first place, the feted debu- 
tante is exceedingly popular. Her two 
sisters, Miss Mary and Miss Patricia 
Clark, both made their formal debuts 
in the winters of 1925 and 1926, when 
the same friends, practically, gath- 
ered to welcome them. On both of 
those occasions, society was charmed 
and fascinated. 

But the handsome party given in 
honor of Miss Agnes Tobin was so 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway, Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



decidedly different in every way that 
society is yet under its spell. 

* # * 

Crystals — Everywhere 

The brilliancy of crystals, added to 
a decorative scheme of unusual splen- 
dor, was responsible for the scintillat- 
ing beauty of the ball when the gra- 
cious Miss Agnes Tobin bowed to 
society. 

"Dawn" and "Sunset" were motifs 
which pronounced the major plan of 
decorations carried to fruition. The 
supper room, arranged with a back- 
ground of blue, and another of radi- 
ant rose, was approached by arched 
doorways from which were suspended 
garlands of silvered leaves and flow- 
ers. The ceilings were festooned with 
tinseled leaves and flowers giving the 
appearance of fairyland. 

A crystal fountain in the supper 
room created considerable admira- 
tion. It was a magnificent idea to be- 
gin with, and its illusions of beauty 
offered a challenge to one's vocabu- 
lary of adjectives. 

A deep pool was encircled by sil- 
vered leaves. At certain intervals of 
the circle were various fruits of rare 
colorings. 

A tall pyramid of glass, with its 
mirrors, spurted sprays of water into 
the pool below, with rainbow color- 
ings shining through the prisms, and 
fell like some magic potion into con- 
tainers. 

Branches of white coral floated 
about in the water of the pool or re- 
flected their radiance in the mirrors 
which towered in symmetrical forma- 
tion. 

It was simply gorgeous! 

What a picture to be cherished by 
those attending this memorable ball! 
The fascinating scenes displayed 
easily the gowns worn by the friends 
of the debutante, increasing their 
own natural charms and, also, trans- 
forming the surroundings into some 
kind of a beautiful dream. 

That is what most of the debu- 
tantes present seemed to think, while 
their elders exclaimed in ardent ad- 
miration : 

"Marvelous. Exquisite. Loveliness 

personified!" 

* * * 

Mrs. Beekman's Salon 

One of the notable affairs of the 
holiday season was a luncheon given 



by Mrs. William Beckman, promt 
nent in literary and society circles, 
at the Stewart Hotel, where sh< 
makes her home. 

Relatives of the well known author 
were contributing artists on the pro- 
gram. A trio of holiday songs opene( 
the event with Mrs. Esther Miller, 
Mrs. Ethel Forrest, Mrs. George C 
Davis singing the selection, Mrs 
Floyd Judson Collar at the piano 
They sang delightfully. 

"Thought Stitches From Lifej 
Tapestry," the most recent book bj 
Mrs. William Beckman, was reviewec 
by Mrs. Vernille DeWitt Warr. 

Miss Beatrice Sherwood, soprano 
sang some songs with charm and mu 
sicianly skill. Mr. Charles Cunning 
ham, a soldier godson of the hostess 
gave an address on his recent visit t( 
the battlefields of Europe and the re 
ception accorded the American Le 
gion of Honor while in France. 

Dr. Frederick Warford, barytone 
sang a group of songs as one of the 
outstanding artists of the program. 



Dr. Grant Speaks 

Dr. John T. Grant, well known in 
literary affairs, provided much mirth. 
He also presented a number of his 
more serious poems in response to 
popular request. 

Mrs. George C. Davis, a niece of 
Mrs. Beckman, and Mr. Harold Mac- 
dougall sang the concluding number 
at this enjoyable event. 

The table around which the guests 
sat was artistically adorned with 
flowers of the holiday season and 
many pleasantries of the hour were 
offered as surprise features in honoi 
of the noble-hearted woman who pre- 
sided at this luncheon of the Salorj 
Des Artistes of which Mrs. Beckmar 
is the president. 

(Continued on Page 16) 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



ecember 31, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Club Land 

One of the pleasant affairs of the 
eek was the luncheon and bridge 
arty on Saturday, when the State 
eachers' College assembled for a re- 
nion at the Fairmont Hotel. The 
aurel Court was the setting for the 
n joy able affair. Those present in- 
luded : 
Misses Charlotte Sudkin, Irene 
arey, Alma Toso, Aileen Fulton, 
Lgnes Smith, Ardelle Gough, Teressa 
IcKenney, Eunice Cone, Hazel Peter- 
on, Eleanor Sugrue, Isabel Cook, 
lorence Levy, Marion Shelly, Lillian 
Christiansen, Helen Kiesel, Annette 
'eterson, Kathleene Kelly, Iowen 
itcKenna; Mrs. B. Whitlock, Mrs. 
om Kirkland, Mrs. Emily Swanson. 



inen Shower 

Mrs. Hilary J. Bevis was hostess 
t a luncheon and linen shower given 
>n Saturday in honor of Miss Delpha 
kitchener of Oakland, whose engage- 
ment to Mr. Louis Oliver of Los An- 
geles has recently been announced, 
the Empire Room at the Fairmont 
Hotel being the setting for the hand- 
somely appointed affair. The oval 
table was banked with flowers and 
fern, the color scheme being carried 

()ut in pink and lavender. Appropri- 
ate place cards added to the decora- 
tive scheme. Those present included: 
Mesdames Leslie Peters, Theodore 
Michaels, Raymond Kitchener Jr., 
Mrs. C. E. Muller, Raymond Kitch- 
ener Sr., Mary Catherine McGurrin, 
Maria McDonald, A. Wilson, Arthur 
Angel. Frederick Palmer, Mrs. Rob- 
ert Walker, Edward Arnold, Robert 
Hatch, Harold Noack, Edward Nor- 
ton; Misses Eleanor Rossi. Alice 
Stevens, Dorothy Mills. 

Unusual Club 

One club in San Francisco intends 
to extend the Christmas cheer 
throughout the entire year. 

The Hotel Women's Club, of which 
Mrs. John Zeeman is president, lias 
outlined a real, definite purpose of 
endeavor with thoughts of others the 
primal object of its unceasing activi- 
ties. Quantities of jellies, jams, table 
delicacies and other sick-room foods, 
especially suitable for the eonvales- 



Park Lane Maisonnettes 

5 to 8 Rooms with 2 to 5 Baths 

Magnificent view. Every service, from 
doorman to valet. Furnished or un- 
furnished. Garage. Class A steel 
frame building. 

"Maisonnette" has the elegance o! a mansion icilh 
all conveniences oj an apaetment house. 

PARK LANE APARTMENTS 

1100 Sacramento Street 
Diagonally Across from Hotel Fairmont 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 

Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

500 Rooms 

Tariff: From S4 per day 



cent, have already been collected by 
members of the club for distribution. 

For a long time the club has main- 
tained a room at the Palo Alto Con- 
valescent Home for disabled veterans 
and each month the women have trav- 
eled down the peninsula with baskets 
full of dainties from home pantries. 
Now, according to Mrs. Zeeman and 
Mrs. D'Aquin, the efficient secretary, 
the members will extend their ben- 
evolence and take care of many con- 
valescents in the way of providing 
home-made jellies, jams and proper 
diet for the shut-ins. 

It would seem as if this club were 
establishing a criterion for other local 
clubs in the way of unselfishness, 
thoughtful care of those in need of it 
and without any attempt at self- 
aggrandizement. 

All honor to the Hotel Women's 
Club and the noble purposes of this 
most remarkable and worth-while or- 
ganization ! 

# * * 

Allied Arts 

A charming program was presented 

by the Allied Arts Club in the ball- 
room of the Fairmont Hotel last 
Wednesday with Rudolphine Radii. 
prima-donna soprano and Josephine 
Swan White, pianist and dramatic 
reader, the Contributing artists. 

An Hour in Musical Bohemia was 
the announcement for this Christmas 
program, opening with a group of five 
songs sung by Rudolphine Radii, a 
charming young singer who has re- 
cently returned from study in Vienna. 
Italy and other European musical 
centers. Miss Radii has a fine mu- 
sicianly manner of presentation, sing- 
ing her songs with artistic apprecia- 
tion. 

Josephine Swan White, than whom 
there is none other in cantillation 
and piano dramatics, presented the 
second number. "The Bartered 
Bride." Smetana. ballet music from 



the opera. Mrs. White's personality, 
her high ideals and her thorough 
mastery of the piano and voice com- 
bination always stands for something 
exceptionally good. Of her most re- 
cent program, such a statement car- 
ries additional prestige. 

Alternating with songs by Miss Ra- 
dii, and dramatic readings by Jose- 
phine Swan White, including "King 
Sava," a legend of ancient Bohemia 
cantillations arranged to Bohemian 
folks-music by Josephine Swan 
White, this program most assuredly 
pronounces something in advance of 
club schemes and the standard of 
programs. 

$ $ ♦ 

Pioneer Women 

The Association of Pioneer Women 
of California entertained at a Christ- 
mas tea and jinks at the Hotel Mark 
Hopkins last week perpetuating their 
get-together in a most desirable way. 
A large birthday cake was a feature 
of the occasion, as it is their custom 
to celebrate the birthdays of members 
occurring in the month of December. 

Charter Members 

Three charter members were pres- 
ent — Mrs. Sophie Neal, Mrs. Laura 
Phelps and Mrs. Somers of Gilroy. 
Mrs. Emma G. O'Donnell is president 
of the organization. Mrs. M. Lawr- 
ence Nelson acted in the capacity of 
toastmistress. Mrs. Josephine Sim- 
mons was in charge of arrangements, 
and the invocation was given by Mrs. 
Charles R. McNulty. 

An interesting musical program 
was arranged. Frederick McKim sang, 
accompanied by Miss Orrie E. Young, 
and James Driscoll also gave a few 
selections, accompanied by Mrs. 
Claire Harrington. They also sang 
together. Mrs. Clara M. Mundt and 
Miss Wallace Rhea gave selections. 
Two readings were given by Mrs. 
Catherine Cooper of Oakland and 
Miss R. O. Chamberlain. 
» * * 

California Golf Club 

The California Golf Club will be 
the setting for a very large party on 
New Year's Eve. A number of parties 
(Continued on Page IT I 



> C 



f y° u p a y no more j&# 

BESTFLOWHg 




"IWVbce of a. Thousaad Gardens' 
224-226 Grant Ave., Sutter 6200 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



December 31, 1927 




Pleasure's Ww 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moone. 




Theater Offerings for 
New Year's Are Supreme 

"Obey no wand but pleasure's," 
sa-'d Tom Moore, a long, long time 
ago. And, tonight, thousands, yea, 
millions, will welcome the mandate! 
Local theaters have much to offer 
in the way of New Year's entertain- 
ment. 

Every playhouse, cinema and legi- 
timate, practically, has made some 
provision for supreme pleasure and a 
riotous close of the old year. 
1927 is bidding us farewell. 
We will be writing 1928 tomorrow 
and with the dawn another calendar 
record makes its entrance into indi- 
vidual lives and careers. 

Theatrical managers in most of the 
playhouses will prolong programs un- 
til the witching hour of twelve. 

There will be much to amuse and 
attract us at the theaters and that is 
where many of us will greet the New 
Year. 

May "Pleasure's Wand" provide 
you many joys. 

A Happy New Year to you, each 
and every one! 

* * * 

Curran 

"Chauve-Souris," for which we 
have expectantly waited, lo, these 
many moons, came to the Curran 
theater last Monday night and more 
than captivated California folks. It 
sang and danced right into our very 
hearts and consciences in a way that 
held and enthralled us. 

This gorgeous "Czar of Russ com- 
edy" is unlike anything else. 

It is comedy, tragedy, drama of 
high degree and exquisitely artistic 
— all arranged in myriads of fascinat- 
ing scenes and nuances. 

Baileff, the Russian impresario, is 
not only an actor of supreme artistry, 
but he gives us mighty full measure 
of satire, joy, irony, thrusts at our 
foibles and tops it all with stagecraft 
and acting of such high order, that 
we surrender all our emotions to his 
bidding — and rejoice at the privilege. 

"The March of the Wooden Sol- 
diers," one of the masterful numbers 
on the marvelous program, had to be 
repealed and repeated before our ap- 
petites for its charm and beauty 
could in any way be appeased. It is 



By Josephine Young 

an imposing, picturesque and fascin- 
ating bit of art. 

"Katinka," "The Chorus of the 
Brothers Zaitzeff," "The Nightin- 
gale" and "A Night at Yard's," were 
also numbers that charmed us in this 
program category. 

One can scarcely outline such a 
production as "Chauve-Souris," with 
its magnificent scenes, its dances, its 
appealing pictures with performers 
of supreme attainment as the prin- 
cipals. 

Mme. Efimovskaya and Mme. Er- 
shova were great favorites in their 
presentation of "The Nightingale," 
singing the number exquisitely. 

Tamara Geva, premiere dancer, is 
an outstanding artist. She is really 
superb. She is beautiful. She is a 
marvelous dancer and gives us some- 
thing to remember all of our days. 

Society, en masse, greeted the 
players on the opening night. They 
have packed the Curran every night. 
Matinee performances, too, are no- 
tably fashionable and every seat in 
the house from orchestra front to the 
last seat near the theater roof is filled 
at all performances. We are informed 
that "Chauve-Souris" will remain 
here for three weeks only and will not 
play Oakland. 

* * * 

Columbia 

Eva LeGallienne deserves our eter- 
nal gratitude for sending the beauti- 
ful production, "The Cradle Song," to 
San Francisco. 

Here is a play! No one can see it 
without thinking of it for many a 
day. It is exquisite in its simplicity, 
charming in its law of repression as 
expressed in highest detail, and mag- 
nificent in its superlative artistry. 

Mary Shaw, whom we know as an 
actress of supreme attainment, was 
given the principal role in "The 
Cradle Song." Every intonation of 
her voice, every turn of her head, 
every suppressed emotion spoke vol- 
umes and held aloft the standard 
which distinguished this beautiful 
play. 

The scenes are laid in an old Span- 
ish Dominican monastery, faithfully 
portraying the scenes of convents 
which we know and providing genu- 
ine visions of the gentle women — the 



Amusements 

Next Week 
ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"New Brooms." Henry Duffy Players. 

Columbia, Eddy nr. Powell 

!'T h . e Cradle Sons." Eva LeGallienne's beau- 
tiful play. 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

Baileff's "Chauve-Souris." magnificent show. 

Lurie, Geary nr. Mason 

"Hit the Deck." musical comedy. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"The Gossipy Sex." Henry Duffy players. 

Community Playhouse, Sutter and 
Mason 

"Bulldog Drummond." Player's Guild. 



VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

f/.TV 4 '^""; Xif? ar,i8< ' E,hel Clayton and 
Ian Keith, double headliner. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"Florentine Choir." headliner. second week. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — Pictures 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Vaudeville — Pictures 

ON THE SCREEN 
Downtown 
California, Market St. at 4th 

"Love," John Gilbert and Greta Garho. 

Casino, Ellis at Mason 

Pictures changed 

Cameo, Market opp. Fifth St. 

Popular films — chance of pictures 

Embassy, Market nr. Seventh 

Vitaphone features. "Old San Francisco " 
screen feature. 

Granada, Market at Jones 

Will RoKers in "The Texas Steer." Midnight 
revels Sat. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th 

"Old Ironsides," James Cruze picture. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"Serenade." Adotph Menjou. Kalhryn Carver. 

Residence District 
Alhambra, Polk St., nr. Green 

Rudolph's Music Masters in special numbers. 
Pictures. 



December 31, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



nuns who are the principles through- 
out the play. To this sacred cloister 
a sinful woman brings her infant 
which she deposits at the wicket. The 
nuns take the child, confused at first 
and not knowing just what to do, and 
rear her in the convent. The babe 
grows up to be a light hearted young 
woman and then goes away with her 
lover to be married. 

One scene, showing the faithful 
nuns making the wedding trousseau 
for the young bride, is so appealing 
that it brings both smiles and tears. 
Oh yes, there is plenty to bring a 
smile, too, in "The Cradle Song." 
Harry Davenport, playing the role of 
the doctor" provides abundant laugh- 
ter and the rebellious nun — the fret- 
ful novice — add mirth to the play. 
Phyllis Rankin plays the part of the 
cynical Vicaress magnificently. She is 
wonderful, really. Mary Hone, in her 
role of Sister Joanna of the Cross, 
stands out in my memory as no other 
actress has in a long, long time. Per- 
sonally, I think she is a dramatic star 
of particular brilliancy. 

* * # 
Lurie 

"Hit the Deck" is now on the last 
week of its run at the Lurie theater 
where it has proved a great success. 

This operetta of sea-going romance 
has provided many Lurie theater pa- 
trons with considerable pleasure and 
entertainment. The splendid cast of 
players and the rousing songs are 
of especial interest in a musical pro- 
duction that sparkles with wit and 
refreshing repartee. 

May Boley, Regis Toomey and 
Kathleen Kidd have roles that give 
their talent special play. Durant and 
Mitchell, as brisk young sailor lads, 
are real favorites. 

"Hit the Deck" will be followed by 
"Laugh, Clown, Laugh," which comes 
to the Lurie on Monday night, Janu- 
ary 9. 

* * * 

President 

"The Gossipy Sex," John Golden's 
recent comedy success, is the big at- 
traction at the President, where it is 
now on another popular run. un- 
doubtedly. 

This play is well constructed. 
Clever situations and a now slant on 
Dame Grundy provides much of the 
merriment. "Danny" Grundy, the 
talkative fellow, who always gives in- 
formation to the wrong person, is the 
center of fun. Earl Lee takes the role 
of Danny. 

Leneta Lane has the feminine lead 
and Kenneth Daigneau plays opposite 
her. The cast in "The Gossipy Sex" 
is large, including Genevieve Blinn. 
Thomas Chatterton, Eunice Quedens, 



J. Raymond Northcut, Zeta Harrison, 
Robert Adams, Dorothy LaMar, Har- 
ry Leland, Tommy Richards, Elsie 

Dawn and Alan Ryan. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"New Brooms," now playing at the 
Alcazar, features Robert McWade in 
his original role and Helen Ferguson, 
well-known stage and cinema star. 

San Francisco has given this com- 
edy, by Frank Craven, a rousing re- 
ception. It is a play that justifies 
reports of its entertaining qualities. 
Robert McWade, the star, portrays 
the role of Thomas Bates with under- 
standing. 

Henry Duffy has made good his 
promise of a splendid cast. 

* # # 

Theater Arts 

Carrying out the Christmas and 
holiday spirit, the Theater Arts Club, 
Inc., which, for the past three and a 
half years has been giving monthly 
performances of one-act plays, pre- 
sented its December program, staged 
in the playhouse of the Women's City 
Club, 465 Post street. 

Four plays were staged, namely: 
"Happy Returns," by Essex Dane, a 
comedy with a cast of ten women ; 
" 'Twas Ever Thus," by Ida Lublen- 
ski Ehrlich ; "The Dust of the Road," 
by Kenneth Sawyer Goodman; and 
"A Helping Hand," a farce of Christ- 
mas time by Blanche Cumming, local 
playwright. 

Talma Zetta Wilbur is director of 
the group of "little theater" players. 

* * * 

California 

"The Private Life of Helen of 
Troy," concluded its engagement at 
the California and will now be fol- 
lowed by "Love," with John Gilbert 
and Greta Garbo in the principal 
roles. 

The combination of these two cin- 
ema stars in romantic scenes pro- 
vides plenty of speculation. The pro- 
duction is splendid in its presentation 
with some alluring settings in the 
story. 

Gino Seven, leader of the orches- 
tra, provides the musical accompani- 
ment for the photoplay in addition to 
a concert program of exceptional 

worth. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Two vaudeville headline attrac- 
tions. Gene Austin, the popular Vic- 
tor artist, and Ethel Clayton and Ian 
Keith, stage and screen stars, come 
to the Golden Gate theater on the 
new bill for next week. 

Gene Austin's lilting, crooning 
voice has won him recognition as re- 
cording artist of the popular tunes. 
Page 19) 



Here's new life, new color 
for your living room 

This lamp really lights a room 

The money you spend for one of these 
lamps does more to improve a room 
than the same money spent for other 
furnishings. 

For the abundance of soft colorful 
light makes an "interior" seem love- 
lier. It's just like redecorating the 
whole room. 

These floor and table lamps are dif- 
ferent from any other lamp. There is 
a reflector under the silk shade that 
diffuses and scatters the light. This is 
the new principle of design that com- 
bines beauty with good lighting and 
eliminates harmful gloom and glare. 
Such lighting is kind to your family's 
eyes. 

The lamps have a base finished in 
silver or gold and there is a selection 
of four silk shades. You can see them 
at our office. 



p.Q.and 




"FACIF1C SEBV1CZ- 

Pacific Gas and electric Company 



Owned • Operated ■ Managed 

by Catifornians 



138-1226 



©well's 

^■"^ NATIONAL CRIST 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

t.SOO.OOO cops were served at the 

Panama- Parific International Expos tti. 



8 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



December 31, 1927 



"Yes, madam, I am an official of the Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals — what can I do for 
you ?" 

"I wish to draw your attention to the inhumane practice 
of scratching racehorses; my husband, who is by no 
means a kind-hearted man, is much disturbed about it, 
too!" — Sydney Bulletin. 



"My plate is damp," complained a traveler who was 
dining in a London hotel. 

"Hush," whispered his wife, "that's your soup." — Bir- 
mingham Post. 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass. Accident and Health. 
Fidelity and Surety. Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Paci6c Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



CARL N. CORWIN CO. 

general oAgent 

Homestead Fire of Baltimore 

Mercantile Underwriters Agency 

Union Fire of Buffalo 

Queensland 2nd Pacific Dept. 
Northwestern Casualty & Surety 



AUTOMOBILE 



FIRE 



FIDELITY & SURETY BONDS 



CASUALTY 



Royal Insurance Building 
201 Sansome Street 
San Francisco 



Insurance Exchange Building 
Los Angeles 
California 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought: FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued; CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND; NEW YORK; PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. 
WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Phones Davenport 4480 
Sutter 4400 



Insurance Exchange Building 
433 California Street 




SCOTT & 
MULVIHILL 

General Insurance and 
Surety Bonds 




MADE TO ORDER ONLY 

r JEosEKeai p ^fjf s 'JhosEKeai 

Milfil^ NIGHT R0BES ^Iflfill^ 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



Finance 



A complete highway survey is being made of the state 
highway situation in California. Charles Carlton, for- 
merly counsel for the highway commission, has it in hand. 
The study has been ordered by the board of public works. 



We note that Edison is offering to help the navy raise 
the submarine. Judging by results, we should think that 
there is no need on the part of the navy to resist help. 
Edison never falls down on a job. 



Democrats are striving to put tax reduction legisla- 
tion on the statute books before March, in Washington. 
There is no more necessary legislation than this. The 
wastefulness of the government, both national and state, 
is becoming a matter of instant concern to the people 
as a whole. 



Fines at the rate of S1.00 per mile for speeding, will ] 
hereafter be imposed by the San Francisco police judges 
on motorists who drive between 35 and 40 miles an hour 
in residential sections. This was the recommendation of 
the traffic law enforcement board and was agreed upon 
by all the police judges. 



The development of the air service, both as regards 
mail and air transportation, is insisted up by Col. 
Lindbergh. He points out that the proper assistance 
given now will develop a business which, in the course 
of time, will become highly profitable and of the greatest 
value to the community. 



The general manager of Amtorg, the Russian-American 
Trade Organization in San Francisco, reports that the 
business done with Russia last year was S100,000,000. 
This sum could be greatly increased by the extension of 
long term credits, such as are granted by the Western 
Europeans. These latter grant five years' credit, whereas 
a year is the longest credit which is advanced by mer- 
chants in this country. 



Changes in the personnel of the Industrial Accident 
Commission are pending, according to report. Will J. 
French, it is said, is about to take his place again in the 
commission. John A. McGilvray is to go, so they say, but 
according to the calendar he has two more years to serve. 
This Industrial Accident Commission has become a very 
important factor in the industrial life of San Francisco. 



Farmers who think the state should help them are 
frankly disappointed with the outlook in the new Con- 
gress. They are going to pin their faith on Lowden, and 
think that they will help matters by trying to get him 
nominated. Nothing will help the farmers except a re- 
organization of the farming industry, placing it on a 
business basis. Anything else is a mere dream and of no 
value. 



It is estimated that poisoned liquor has in the past 
seven years killed some 65,000 people. The result is due 
to the fact that the operation of the Volstead law has 
put out of business all reputable and responsible distil- 
leries and breweries, conducted in accordance with the 
pure food laws, and has brought into being thousands of 
irresponsible and wicked concerns which employ poison- 
ous adulteration. 



December 31, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Local News of the Week at a Glance 



For Those Away From Home 



Vallejo's new airport is to be developed during 1928. 
The airport, which is located near the old Three Mile 
House on the Napa highway, was dedicated last fall. 
Aviators who have used the field, say that it is ideal for 

aeir purpose. 

* * * * 

Faithfulness of John Gonsalves, for many years gard- 
ener on the estate of Mrs. Henrietta Farrelly, wealthy 
pioneer of the Eastbay, was rewarded with a bequest 
of $25,000. Mrs. Farrelly passed away on December 17th 
last. She was ninety years old. 

Five new prison road construction camps are soon to 
be built along the stretch of highway from Carmel, in 
San Luis Obispo county to Cambria, and these camps will 
accommodate 800 convicts, thus relieving congestion at 
San Quentin, which now has the largest number of in- 
mates of any time in its history. 

Fifty-five persons sat down to a family Christmas 
dinner served in Modesto last Sunday by Mr. and Mrs. 
H. T. Crow. It was the largest dinner of its kind served 
in the city or county. They had as their guests relatives 
from San Joaquin valley and bay city points. In order 
to see that his guests were in the dining room, Mr. Crow 

made an informal roll call. 

* * * * 

Telegraphic reports of all motor bus accidents in which 
anyone is killed or seriously injured must be rendered 
hereafter by all bus companies operating in the state, the 
California Railroad Commission ordered last Tuesday. 
State companies must supplement such reports with 
monthly reports giving details of all accidents of every 

nature. 

* * * * 

More than 8200,000 was appropriated by San Francisco 
supei-visors last Tuesday for work on streets, schools 
and miscellaneous public projects. The largest sum, $147,- 
333, will go for reconstruction of twenty-one streets. 
$58,000 will be used as architects' fees for construction 
of five new schools ; 85,000 to help defray expenses of the 
Olympic Games swimming tryouts, to be held here next 
June; and another portion will go for the installation of 
new street lights on Golden Gate avenue, Van Ness and 
other city arteries. 

£t $ $ $ 

A fireproof roofing ordinance characterized by Fire 
Chief Thomas R. Murphy as the most constructive piece 
of fire prevention legislation in years, was adopted this 
week by the Board of Supervisors. It enlarges the area 
in which fire-resistant roofing must be used, to cover vir- 
tually the entire city, excepting only a small district south 
of Mission street, and provides that when existing roofs 
of non-resistant material are damaged to the extent of 
20 per cent of their area, they must lie entirely replaced 
with legal roofing. The previous limit was 40 per cent. 

* * * * 

According to Jack Matthews, manager of the Lake 
Tahoe Tavern, conditions this year are better than for 
many years past for snow sports at the lake, and holiday 
revelers who journey to the mountain resort this year 
will find plenty of variety of outdoor pleasures. A big ice 
rink has been cleared on the lake, which has ice two feet 
in thickness. A toboggan slide two miles in length also 
has been completed. Altogether, the heavy fall of snow 
which came down last Wednesday assures a joyous Xew 
Year's celebration at Lake Tahoe. 



About 1400 bales of cotton have been ginned at the 
Porterville cotton gin, with prospects of about 600 bales 
more this season. Recent frosty weather is causing the 
bolls to open rapidly and picking is continued steadily, 
except when halted by the rains. 

* * * * 

Prospects are that the storage for the Oakdale and 
South San Joaquin Irrigation districts will be doubled 
within a few years. The Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
pany has completed surveys for another reservoir to be 
built at Parrott's Ferry. The power company is also 
planning a reservoir at Donnell's Flat and Beardsley's 
Flat. 

# # # # 

Jack Spaulding, candidate for supervisor in the No- 
vember election, will be named for undersheriff, it was 
announced last Tuesday. During the World War, Spauld- 
ing was a naval engineer in charge of the naval division 
shipyard plants with headquarters in San Francisco. He 
is a member of the Olympic Club and was president of 
the Twelve-Ten Club. 

* * * * 

Pondosa, a logging town thirty miles east of McCloud, 
Shasta County, is thoroughly dry because the water 
mains to Bear Creek are frozen. There is no water in 
the town except that made by melting snow. The drought 
is being lifted by hauling water in railroad tanks from 
Bartle, eighteen miles away, to Pondosa, a town of 
twenty or more families. 

Portsmouth Square, one of the most historical spots 
in California and the site of San Francisco's first import- 
ance as a settlement, may soon become known as Ports- 
mouth Plaza. Introduction of a resolution calling for this 
change was one of the last official acts of Supervisor 
Lewis F. Byington, who attended his final meeting before 
retirement from office. 

$ $ $ ♦ 

Judge William W. Morrow, dean of the Federal judi- 
ciary in this district, is to be married. The learned mem- 
ber of the United States Circuit Court of Appeals cheer- 
fully admitted his 84 years of life last Tuesday, when 
he walked into the marriage license bureau with his 
bride-to-be, Miss Julia Neill, 51, a nurse who has taken 
care of Judge Morrow through severe illness since she 
first met him as a patient in April, 1926. Judge Morrow 
was appointed to the Federal bench on September 1, 1891. 

* # # * 

Miss Emilia Da Prato, winner of second honors in the 
recent national radio audition, wv.s given an official wel- 
come home celebration and reception last Wednesday 
evening by her home city of South San Francisco. Miss 
Da Prato, after the usual speeches, etc., was introduced 
from the platform and was given an ovation by the en- 
thusiastic audience. She sang several songs, by special 
permission of the Atwater Kent Foundation, with which 
she has signed a three year contract. 

* * * * 

An airship laden with candy for the thousands of 
youngsters expected to attend the New Year's Day air 
derby at Mills Field. Sunday, will be flown over San Fran- 
cisco tomorrow (Sunday) morning by Lieutenant George 
O. Xoville. U. S. N., navigator of the famed Byrd trans- 
atlantic flight. He will land in the field with the candy 
which should have been distributed at the field last Mon- 
day, but this scheduled arrival was postponed on account 
of inclement weather. 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



December 31, 1927 



The John C. Wooster Calendar 

As full of entrancing color as any of Maxfield Par- 
rish's famous paintings, is the beautiful picture of a 
Spanish galleon, on the calendar for 1928 which the firm 
of John C. Wooster, opticians, 234 Stockton street, has 
just had printed. The artist is R. Atkinson Toy, whose 
handling of shades and graduations of color resemble in 
a remarkable degree, the masterly touch of the Eastern 
painter. 

The galleon is sailing between lofty peaks of moun- 
tains, over dark blue, gleaming waters, and over all is 
that golden hue which so often characterizes Parrish's 
work. It is a picture well worth framing. 

Camille's 

One does not have to visit Paris, with its famous cafes, 
to imbibe the Parisian atmosphere along with gustatorial 
pleasures. There are restaurants in San Francisco so 
Frenchy in custom, cuisine and method of service that 
one has only to shut one's eyes to revel in that spirit of 
camaraderie always associated with our Latin cousins. 

If you have not been in Europe, if you have not eaten 
in one of those fascinating rotisseries for which Ibe 
French capital is famed, ramble up Pine street, to Ca- 
mille's, at No. 441, and order a French dinner, or a la 
carte. Merchants' lunch is from 11 a. m. until 2 p. m. and 
there are private dining rooms for banquets and parties, 
seating 75 to 100 people. During the New Year's holi- 
days it is wise to make reservations in advance. Call 
Kearny 468. 



Air Lines 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Other publications, all serving the air game in one way 
or another, and which we have not space enough to men- 
tion at length, are Aviation Stories and Mechanics, Pa- 
cific Aviation, Air Travel News, National Aeronautic Re- 
view published by the National Aeronautic Association, 
and Aero-Digest, which has just started a national news- 
paper news service, and which deserves more detailed 
comment than we can give it here. The Slipstream, U. S. 
Air Services, Popular Aviation and Western Flying are 
monthly publications. 



Lindbergh has flown 35,000 miles in seven months. His 
second long distance flight to Mexico City has convinced 
the world, both lay and professional, that skill and proper 
equipment are all that is needed for safe and practical 
flying. Contributing further to this conclusion is the fact 
that air mail planes out of San Francisco for the north, 
south, east, cover more than Lindbergh's mileage every 
week. Boeing Air Transport, flying between San Fran- 
cisco and Chicago, covers more than a lap around the 
world each week, and up to this time, after six months of 
operation, no accident has occurred. 



Both Boeing Air Transport and Pacific Air Transport 
carried record loads of Christmas mail. Eastbound mail 
to Chicago last Tuesday morning was 458 pounds, the 
largest load ever taken east from the Bay since the air 
mail service was inaugurated in 1918. 




A Lawyer 
Says: 



I read reports of impor- 
tant cases with one quest 
in mind — facts, uncolored, 
unbiased, clean-cut. I al- 
ways find such facts in the 



(Jljttcrtride 



Pacific Air Transport 

Legislation in Congress covering foreign air mail will 
be introducecl by Representative Kelly of Pennsylvania, 
according to information just received by the Pacific Air 
Transport Company. Representative Kelly also urges 
that the rate on air mail be 10 cents an ounce. At the 
present time the rate is 10 cents for a half ounce. If his 
recommendation is adopted, this would be the second air 
mail reduction within a year, and according to the local 
air mail operators, would greatly increase the poundage 
of mail over their lines. Commercial aviation as repre- 
sented by the air mail and passenger lines of the entire 
country would be given additional stimulus. Under exist- 
ing laws it is said that the postmaster general has no 
authority to adjust the air mail rates. 

Christmas air mail has been so heavy on the coast lines 
of the Pacific Air Transport that a number of passenger 
reservations have had to be cancelled, due to lack of space 
on the planes. 



Binks (to shopkeeper) — Have you any eggs in which 
you can guarantee there are no chickens? 

Grocer — Yes, sir — duck's eggs. — West Bromwich Free 
Press. 

Old Gentleman — When I was a lad I used to think noth- 
ing of a fast twenty-mile walk. 

His Nephew — -Well, I don't think much of it, either. — 
Answers. 



Cannibal Princess — Mother, I am bringing a young man 
home for dinner. 

Cannibal Mother — Well, don't bring a tough one — Cali- 
fornia Pelican. 



December 31, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Bolivia and its Resources 



11 




Mr. H. Velarde 
Consul General to Bolivia 



With the occasion of the Foreign 
Trade and Travel Exposition, I de- 
sire to contribute to a better knowl- 
edge of my 
country b y 
p u b 1 i s hing 
the following 
data showing 
the opportun- 
i t i e s which 
Bolivia offers 
to American 
capital. 

It is situat- 
ed in the Tor- 
rid Zone, in 
the heart of 
South Amer- 
ica, extending 
over an area 
of 1,332,808 
square kilo- 
meters, with a population of three 
million, an average of eleven acres per 
inhabitant. By reason of its moun- 
tainous character, all varieties of cli- 
mates exist within its boundaries, 
from the cold of the Cordillera of the 
Andes, with a mean altitude of 3,500 
meters above sea level, to the mild 
temperature of the valleys and plains 
of the interior, and again, to the heat 
of the Amazonic region with its great 
tropical forests, still in part unex- 
plored. 

In Bolivia, then, practically all 
agricultural products can be raised, 
from potatoes, wheat, corn, and cot- 
ton, to coffee, rice, cacao, sugar cane 
and tropical fruits, which grow spon- 
taneously without need of fertilizers. 
Rubber. Between the years 1895 
and 1925, Bolivia exported 100,04:; 
metric tons of rubber, which was of 
a superior quality and was quoted at 
the highest market prices. 

The principal industry of Bolivia, 
however, is mining; because of its 
geographical position it is a nucleus 
where great mineral wealth has been 
concentrated: it is rich in almost 
every metal known. 

Silver. The Cerro of Potosi alone 
produced during the Spanish colonial 
period 3.667,968,000 troy ounces of 
silver, worth 82.433.750.000. The ex- 
portation of this metal has relatively 
decreased with this fall in value, but 
in 1925. 2.653.025 troy ounces were 
exported, with a value of 82.908,- 
935.18. 

Tin. Bolivia leads the entire world 
in the production of tin. in the fol- 
lowing proportions: (Averages of 
the last live years). Annual produc- 
tion of world (including Bolivia). 



Huascar Velarde R. 

121,046 metric tons; annual produc- 
tion of Bolivia alone, 29,216 metric 
tons. Bolivia produced in 1925, 54,- 
330 metric tons with a value of $29,- 
488,432.59. 

Gold. "It has been calculated by 
competent authorities," says the Lon- 
don Times, "that during the last 
three centuries Bolivia has contrib- 
uted £650,000,000 or $3,163,875,000 
to the world's production of gold." 
(Exchange $4.86%). 

Bismuth. According to the same 
journal, "There is no other country 
in the world that can compete with 
Bolivia in the production of bismuth." 
In 1925 the exportation of bismuth 
reached $1,242,174.81 (542 metric 
tons). 

Copper. Bolivia's copper mines 
date back to the time of the Incas. 
Natural plates of pure copper have 
been discovered which have even 
reached a weight of 600 pounds. In 
1925, 14,659 metric tons of copper 
were exported with a value of Sl,- 
517,373.70. 

Antimony. Bolivia is the only 
country in the world that produces 
antimony. In 1925, 23,000 metric tons 
of antimony were exported, with a 
value of .$2,518,518.52. 

Lead. The production for 1925 was 
36,838 metric tons with a value of 
$3,887,914.81. 

Zinc. Bolivia is the only country in 
South America that produces zinc. In 
1925 it exported 6,210 metric tons 
with a value of $575,555.60. 

Tungsten. Bolivia has great na- 
tural deposits of tungsten, and in 
1918 the value of the metal exported 
reached $3,922,751.48 (3.418 metric 
tons). Mr. Worton, editor of The En- 
gineering and Mining, states. "Amer- 
ican tungsten is not good for the 
manufacture of certain objects and 
tools which can only be manufactured 
with Bolivian tungsten." 

Nickel. Molibdenite, Vanadium and 
other rare metals are also found in 
quantity- 
Petroleum. American corporations 
have discovered petroleum, and "The 
Standard Oil of Bolivia" and "The 
Bolivian Development Co." have ac- 
quired concessions of 3.000.000 acres. 
The first of these lias already eleven 
complete wells in operation and 
twelve in preparation. 

In the year 1879. Chile carried on 
an offensive campaign, in which Bo- 
livia's seaports were seized. Deprived 
of its seaports Bolivia has had great 
difficulty in the development of the 
industries. However, in spite of this 
handicap, foreign trade has increased 



considerably ; and Bolivia is now in a 
period of reconstruction. The present 
government, under the direction of 
Hernando Siles, is the most progres- 
sive it has had. In 1905 its total ex- 
ports amounted to $16,839,970.00; 
by 1926 they had increased to $71,- 
671,392.59 with a balance of $19,203,- 
637.78 over imports. The exterior 
commercial balance has always been 
able to maintain stable the value of 
Bolivian currency. The United States 
holds first place in Bolivian trade 
(28.81 per cent). 

The public debt of Bolivia stands 
today at S62,066,209.42, the greater 
part of which is in the hands of 
American capitalists in the form of 
loans for the construction of rail- 
roads. 

Bolivia has a total of 2,090 kilo- 
meters of railroads, which cost $79,- 
142,094.20. Of this 592 kilometers of 
railroads are government owned with 
a value of S23,409,010.00. The govern- 
ment has recently called for bids for 
the construction of a line from 
Cochabamba to Santa Cruz, and the 
capital is already deposited in New 
York. 

Bolivian stocks and bonds are 
quoted above par in the New York 
and London markets because of the 
punctuality with which the interest 
and amortization are paid. 

The immigrant who wishes to es- 
tablish himself in Bolivia may receive 
fifty hectares of land for cultivation 
at a rate of S.04 per hectare and his 
passage and freight gratis on the 
railroads of Bolivia. In Bolivia there 
is a field for any industry. To the 
tourist Bolivia offers marvelous pano- 
ramas such as can be found in no 
other country on earth. 

Bolivia's International Policy 

In her international relations, and 
especially in those with border coun- 
tries, Bolivia has always maintained, 
even at the cost of great extentions 
of territory, its traditional policy of 
peace and the respect of foreign 
property rights; settling differences 
through treaties and friendly agree- 
ments, and on occasion having re- 
course to arbitration. 

In the present dispute with Para- 
guay concerning the "Chaco Boreal," 
a conference is being held under the 
auspices of the Argentina govern- 
ment in which Bolivia is defending 
her legitimate rights as defined in the 
"uti-possidetis juris of 1810," the 
principle which determines the lines 
of demarcation of the South Ameri- 
can countries. 

: 70 i? equal t 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



December 31, 1927 




MOTOR BODY CORPORATION 

MANLY S. HARRIS 

1116 Post Street Graystone 8020 

Body Construction and Repair 

Duco, Bake Enamelling, Fender Repairs, Upholstering, 

and all body specialties 



LOU W. SARTOR. Proprielor 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



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We Carry AH Popular Bruno's Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 

Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco, Calif. 



GRAYSTONE 130 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage. 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage. 1361 Bush St. 

Management of WILLIAM SAUNDERS 




457 NINTH STREET 



Complete Brake Relining Service 

WAGNER ELECTRIC CORPORATION 

Manufacturers and National Service 

Organization for Lockheed Four 

Wheel Hydraulic Brakes 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Franklin 4191, Das'; 3985, Night 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



Superior Auto Washing & Polishing 

228 HYDE STREET (Bet. Turk and Eddy) 

C. E. Ruellan — Proprietors — L. M. Nickerson 

It is not always that the old and larger establishments do the best work. 

We have just started in a small place and pride ourselves as being 

experts in our line. Our customers always "stick." 
TRANSMISSION AND MOTOR — CLEANING — TOP DRESSING 



1140 GEARY ST, 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 4266 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy - Acetylene Weld- 
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AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



AUTO BODY CO. 

LACQUER ENAMELING AND PAINTING 
BODY DESIGNING AND BUILDING 
UPHOLSTERING AND SEAT COVERS 
COLLISION WORK OUR SPECIALTY 



Wni. C. Grayson 



1355 BUSH ST., Near Polk 

San Francisco, California Phone Prospect 3182 



Petrol Paragraphs 

By K. R. Schwartz 

National Automobile Club 

The new year book and touring guide of the National 
Automobile Club will be mailed shortly after the first of 
the year to all members, and it is estimated that more 
than 50,000 will be distributed throughout California. 

The new edition of the book is permanently bound into 
a very handsome volume, and is greatly enlarged in order 
to include more maps and touring information. All maps 
are revised and up to date. 

A directory of cities and towns wherein are located golf 
clubs is also included in the book, as well as a summary 
of fish and game laws, a complete list of emergency road- 
side garages and many other useful sections. 

Another notable feature of the book is the particular 
attention paid to points of historical and romantic inter- 
est. How to find the many towns and villages, many of 
them "ghost towns" that now live only in the writings 
of Bret Harte, Mark Twain and other equally famed 
authors, is told in brief but interesting fashion. 



How the Indians of Wisconsin have become victims 
of an "automotive" complex, and how this has accom- 
plished more to bring them to the ways of white men than 
has 100 years of reservation life and education, is told by 
Wisconsin Indian Reservation reports. 

Indians like to drive, and for the most part have given 
up horsedrawn vehicles of the pre-motoric age to sit at 
the wheel of a modern motor car. But to have cars, In- 
dians must work, and so are choosing the white man's 
habits of industry and thrift. 



The Pedestrian's Right 

An article recently published referred to a decision 
of the United States Supreme Court in the case where a 
pedestrian was struck while walking across the street 
(between two streets, not at a crosswalk). The pedestrian 
sued the company and got a verdict of S15,000. The ex- 
press company appealed to the United States Supreme 
Court on the ground the crosswalk was for the use of 
pedestrians and if a pedestrian used any other part of 
the street he did so at his own risk. The verdict rendered 
by the highest court was most interesting, and if it could 
be brought to the attention of automobile drivers gener- 
ally, would go far toward requiring the exercise of greater 
aution. 

The verdict as quoted reads: 

"The streets belong to the public ; pedestrians have the 
right to walk on any part of the street or roadway, and 
the right cannot be taken away. Driving a car is a privi- 
lege that may be revoked at any time ; therefore, it be- 
comes incumbent upon the driver of an automobile to 
see to it that he does not strike the pedestrian. 

"The appeal is dismissed and the verdict of §15,000 
against the express company is sustained with interest 
and costs." 

As a result of this verdict the express company on all 
its trucks has a tablet near the driver's seat which reads: 

"Safety First! Pedestrians have the right of way. In 
case of doubt — stop! Take no chances of injuring any- 
one." 



A man is something that can see a pretty ankle three 
blocks away while driving a motor car in a crowded city 
street, but will fail to notice, in the wide, open country- 
side the approach of a locomotive the size of a schoolhouse 
and accompanied by a flock of forty-two box cars. 



December 31, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Famous S. F. Lawyer Passes 

From all walks of life San Francisco has poured forth 
tribute to the late Gavin McNab, who passed away last 
Wednesday afternoon, in the midst of his usual work. 
Against the advice of his physicians, McNab had refused 
to relinquish the labor which was as the breath of life 
to him. 

"America has lost one of her distinguished sons in the 
death of Gavin McNab," states Mayor James Rolph Jr. 
"There has passed to the Great Beyond a marvelous in- 
tellect ; a broad vision ; a kindly heart whose influence 
has been felt many, many times in the solution of prob- 
lems affecting the entire world. 

"The son of Scotch parents, plain and thrifty tillers of 
the soil, Gavin McNab moved onward and upward to lofty 
spheres wherein he mingled with the most eminent 
statesmen of the world and gave them freely of his valu- 
able advice. But never once did he lose touch with the 
plain people, never once was there dimmed that warm 
glow of sympathy which forever characterized him." 

James D. Phelan said in part: "Gavin McNab was a 

worthy product of democracy He sprang from small 

beginnings ... he fought the bosses with his inherited 
Scotch vigor and tenacity although he was accused of 
being a boss himself, and the sturdy strokes of his battle- 
ax fell disastrously upon the heads of Buckley, Rainey, 
Kelly, Crimmins and others, who had assumed lordship 

over San Francisco He rushed to the aid of Mayor 

Rolph in the last election, with a zeal that was at once 
a loyal tribute and an effective achievement .... With his 
death, the city has lost one of its most consistent and 
useful friends." 

"With the passing of Gavin McNab," said Herbert 
Fleishhacker, "California suffers the loss of one of its 
most distinguished, respected and admired citizens .... 
He was, in every sense of the term, a self-made man. He 
leaves the world better for his living. His memory will 
be cherished, his passing sincerely mourned, by a people 
in whose service he never tired." 

McNab was born in Glasgow, Scotland, on February 
11, 1869, a son of Alexander McNab. But he spent most 
of his life in California. 

It is said he never went to school, despite the wealth 
of literary background and general information which 
made him so formidable a forensic adversary. The secret 
was that his father had a library and there young McNab 
spent most of his time. Coming to San Francisco at the 
age of 20, he first worked as a clerk in the old Occidental 
Hotel and studied nights. His early career as an attor- 
ney was as obscure as the little debating societies he 
organized. McNab became Democratic "boss" of San 
Francisco in 1893, and he had been the leader of Demo- 
cracy in this section ever since. 

Only once in his life did McNab run for public office 
(as supervisor), and then was decisively beaten, the 
reason for his defeat being that he had worked at the 
Occidental Hotel, which employed "China boys." Anti- 
Chinese public sentiment was strong at that time. Never 
again would he consent to run for any office. 

Several times President Wilson drafted him for im- 
portant national services, and then he gave his energies 
gladly. He was. as Fleishhacker expresses it: "A self- 
made man." and his life can be taken as an example of 
What the opportunities and educational advantages of a 
Democracy can secure for a man of lowly birth, providing 
the man himself possesses the ability and perseverance 

' i ssary. 



fe 




—THE MOST 
COMFORTABLE 

— MILE-A-MINUTE 
CAR EVER BUILT 



the 
FRANKLIN 

Airman 



FRANKLIN-TENNANT MOTOR CO. 



1900 VAN NESS AVE. 

San Francisco 

2800 BROADWAY 

Oakland 



C4 




14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



December 31, 1927 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




Pacific Coast Network Sunday after- 
noon from 3 to 5 o'clock, January 1, 
1928. 

The Standard Symphony Hour will 
be presented to the Pacific Coast Net- 
work radio audience tonight from 
6:30 to 7:30 o'clock. 



On the Air 
By C. J. Pennington 

A long felt need for radio enter- 
tainment on Sunday afternoon was 
filled recently with the announce- 
ment of a series of Sunday recitals 
between 2 and 4 o'clock, a heretofore 
silent period, by KFRC, the Don Lee 
station, at San Francisco. Fan re- 
sponse has exceeded all expectations 
according to the KFRC management. 

The New Year's Day program will 
feature the Aeolians, a cello, harp and 
flute trio, Lucille Atherton Harger, 
staff contralto, Mildred Sahlstrom 
Wright, the Fireside Singers with 
guitar accompaniment, William Wise- 
man tenor, and Nellie Wren, soprano. 



KFRC will usher in the new year 
with musical entertainment until 3 
o'clock in the morning of New Year's 
Day, according to announcement is- 
sued by the station management. 

Permitting all terpsichorean par- 
ties to continue without interruption, 
KFRC has arranged for dance music 
from 9 o'clock New Year's Eve until 
3 the next morning, bringing three 
orchestras before the microphone. 
The KFRC dance orchestra will play 
from 9 to 11. From 11 to 12 a. m. 
Walter Krausgrill's Balconades Or- 
chestra will alternate with Clem 
Raymond's band, furnishing continu- 
ous music. Krausgrill will remain on 
the air until 3 o'clock, with inter- 
mission soloists performing in the 
Balconades studio. 



Magically transporting the radio 
audience to the homes of the great 
composers of music, to the scenes 
and times of the "Great Moments" 
in history, and to the colorful setting 
of famous song cycles, the first of 
the new series of "Aladdin's Lamp" 
programs will be broadcast over the 



Monday, January 2, 8 to 9 p. m. 

Rudy Seiger's Shell Symphonists. 

The favorites of the light opera and 
musical comedy stage of years ago 
are never wholly forgotten and will 
be featured by the "Spotlight Hour," 
which will be broadcast over the as- 
sociated stations of the Pacific Coast 
Network from 10 to 11 o'clock. 
Tuesday, January 3, 8 to 8:30 p. m. 

The new Eveready Salon orchestra 
will present to the Pacific Coast Net- 
work radio audience the first of the 
new half-hour programs. 

The half hour from 8:30 to 9 to- 
night will bring to Pacific Coast Net- 
work listeners the tenth of the week- 
ly series of Auction Bridge Games. 

"A Poor Rule" is the title of the 
Retold Tale — O. Henry story to be 
enacted before the microphone in the 
"Retold Tales" period to be broad- 
cast through the associated stations 
of the Pacific Coast Network tonight 
from 9 to 9:30 o'clock. 

The new half hour program from 
9:30 to 10 o'clock tonight will be a 
regularly weekly presentation and 
will bring Pacific Coast Network list- 
eners melodies and harmonies, old 
and new, as only the Rounders can 
sing them. 

Wednesday, January 4 

Tonight from 7:30 to 8:30 o'clock 
the seven associated stations of the 
Pacific Coast Network will be linked 
with 26 stations of the Red and Blue 
Networks in what promises to be one 
of the biggest radio events of 1928. 

The program to be given by the 
Dodge Brothers Motor Company, cen- 
ters around Will Rogers, who from 
his home in Beverly Hills, will act 
as master of ceremonies. Paul White- 
man and his orchestra will play in 
New York, Fred Stone will face the 
microphone in Chicago, Al Jolson will 
sing in New Orleans and President 
Wilmer of the Dodge Company will 
give a short address from Detroit. 

Friday, January 6 

Tonight's Memory Lane program 
to be broadcast over the Pacific Coast 
Network from 9 to 10 o'clock will 
take listeners back to the old days 
before the motor car, the telephone, 
or the radio. While no particular set- 

( Continued on Page 16) 



Programs for Next Week 

KFRC— DON LEE 
SAN FRANCISCO — 154 
Sunday. January 1 
10:00 to 12:00 noon — Concert. 
12 noon to 1 :00 p. m. — Church service. 
2 :00 to 4 :00 p. m. — Matinee program. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Talk. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins concert orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KFRC dance orchestra. 
Monday, January 2 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
9:00 to 9:10 p. m.— Shopping service. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 
2 :00 to 4 :00 p. m. — S & W special program. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5 :15 to 6 :20 p. m. — Joe Mendel and Pep Band. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen, police reports. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m.— Sports talk 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — The Hawaiians. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Blue Monday Jamboree. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KFRC Dance Orchestra. 
Tuesday. January 3 

7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 
11:30 a. m. to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert. 
4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:10 p. m. — M«c and his gang. 
6:10 to 6:25 p. m. — With stamp collectors. 

6 :25 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 6:50 p. m. — The Cecilians. 
6:50 to 7:00 p. m. — Investment talk. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — The Cecelians 

8 :00 to 8 :30 p. m. — H. Romberg, Cellist. 
8 :30 to 9 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Wednesday. January 4 

7:00 to 8:00 p. m.— Seal Rock program. 
8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryout period. 
12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay concert. 
4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6 :20 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Maxwell House Coffee program. 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 
Thursday, January 5 

7 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:10 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 
6:10 to 6:20 p. m.— Beauty talk. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage, Screen, Police reports. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Hawaiian Orchestra. 

5 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Mona Motor Oil Co. 
9:00 to 9:45 p. m.— KFRC Movie Club. 
9:45 to 10:00 p. m. — Airplane flying lesson. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Balconades Dance Orchestra. 

Friday. January 6 

7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Musical program, 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Hints to home-makers. 

11 :30 to 12 :00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 
4 :00 to 4 :30 p. m. — Student hour. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5 :30 to 6 :20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
6:20 lo 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Skyway Journeys. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m — Dance orchestra. 
Saturday. January 7 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program, 

11:00 to 11:45 a. m. — Amateur tryouts. 

11:45 to 12:00 noon — Announcements of Sunday 

church sermons. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5 :30 to 6 :20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
6-20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— The Cecilians. 
s : on lo 0:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 



December 31, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



KPO— HALE BROTHERS AND THE CHRONICLE 
SAN FRANCISCO— 422 

Sunday. January 1 

9:46 to 10:30 a. m.— Church services. 
4:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Mixed Quartet. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Chickering Hour. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Symphony orchestra. 
7:30 to S:30 p. m.— Organ recital. 

8:80 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orches- 
tra. 
Monday, January 2 

6 :45. 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10:30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
11:30 to 12:50 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
6:00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:80 to 7:30 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 p. m. to 12 midnight — KPO's variety hour. 

Tuesday, January 3 

, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m.- — Domestic economist. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

1:1 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m— KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m— KPO orchestra. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :l)il to ti :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Gypsy and Marta. 

8:30 to 11:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

Wednesday, January 4 

6 :46, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m.— Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10:30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:45 a. m. — Home service talk. 

11:30 to 12:50 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — KPO Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Atwater Kent Artists. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Ahas String Quartette. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KPO Dance Orchestra. 

Thursday, January 5 

6 :46, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m.— Domestic economist. 

10:30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:30 to 12:50 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— KPO Concert Orchestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Book review and sports. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Caswell Hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO Dance Orchestra. 

Friday, January 6 

6 :46, 7 :16 and 7 :45 a. m.— Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10:30 to 10 :46 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:45 a. m. — Home service talk. 

11:30 a. m. to 12:45 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12:45 p. m. — Commonwealth luncheon at Palace Hotel. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 
00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Ye Town.- Cryer service, 

»:30 to 7:30 p. m.— KPO Concert Orchestra. 

! :00 to 9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

) :00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. - KPO Dance Orchestra. 
Saturday, January 7 

S :45. 7 :15 and 7 :46 a. m. — Health exercises. 
' :00 to 9:00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m.— Domes! ie economist. 
[0:30 to 10:45 a. m— Ye Towne Cryer. 
11:30 to 12:60 p. m— Kane's Hawaiinns. 
12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. - KPO orchestra. 
!:00 p. m.— Football. 
00 to fi :00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
00 to 6:30 p.m. Ye Towne Cryer service. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — KPO Dance Orchestra. 
! :00 to 12:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS. INC. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 267 

>unda>, January 1 

' :50 to 9:00 p. m. — Church servii 

>:00 to 10:00 p. m. Studio program. 

.!ii:00 to 11:00 v. m. Dance program. 

Monday, January 2 

>:20 to 10:27 a. tn. Breakfast program. 

0:27 to 10:30a- m.- U. S. weather rejH>rts. 
m. — Interior Decorating. 

2:00 to l unchcon program. 

:00 to 1:30 p. m. Country store. 
6 :30 p. m. Coi 

:00 to 7:00 p. .m. Dinner concert. 

:00 to 7:15 p. m. Sport? talk. 

:16 to 7 :30 p. m. -Advertising tnlk. 



S:00 to S:30 p. m.— Darneille Sister. 

8:80 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 11:00 p. m.— Dance music. 

Tuesday. January 3 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m.— Concert. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 10:30 p. m.— Novelty program. 

10:30 to 11:00 p. m.— Program of popular music. 

Wednesday. January 4 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m.— Concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

Thursday, January 5 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m.— Breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.— U. S. weather reports. 

10:30 to 11:00 a. m.— Fashion hints. 

12:00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5-:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour program. 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— KFWI Gypsy band. 

Friday, January 6 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Exercise hour. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m.— Breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Musical luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m.™ Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Program. 

7 :00 to 7 :15 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7:16 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

10:00 p.m.- — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 10:30 p. m.— Gloria Del Rae 

10:30 to 11:00 p. m. — Popular program. 

Saturday. January 7 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Exercise hour. 

B :20 to 10 :27 a. m. — Musical breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

E :00 t<> 9:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Harriet Lewis. 

10:00 to 12:30 p. m.— KFWI surprise party. 

KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 
Sunday, January 1 

1:30 to 3:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
3:30 to 5:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Monday. January 2 

9:00 to 12:00 m. —Instrument and vocal Belecti 
1:30 to 7:30 p. in. Instrument and vocal selections. 
B:O0 to 9:00 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Tuesdav. January 3 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
1 p. m.- Instrument and vocal selections. 

D 9:00 p. m- Orthophomc selections. 
9:00 to 11:01) p. m.— Coco-Nut Club meeting. 
Wednesday. January 4 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m.— Instrument an. I vocal selections. 
1 :30 to 7 :8Q p. Bl, Instrument and vocal selections. 
S :00 to 10:00 p. m.— Orthophonic recital. 
Thursday. January 5 

9:00 to 12:00 a. nv— Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7 :3il p. in. Instrument and vocal Beta 

D 10:00 p. m. — Music lovers' program. 
Friday. January fi 

9:oo to 12:00 a. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:30 to 7:30 p. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 

StOO to 0:80 p- m. Dance music. 

9:30 to 11:00 p. m. Studio program. 

Saturdav. January 7 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and HM 

p. m.- Instrument and vocal selections. 
KL\— OAKLAND TRIBUNE 
OAKLAND — 508 
Mnndav. Jinuan 2 

:\. m, Economics hour. 
11:80 to 1 P. m. Luncheon concert. 

; m. Brother Bob's club. 
p. m. Dinner concert. 
I p. m.- News broadcast. 
p, m. — Dance orchestra. 

■i p. m. — Weekly meeting of Lake M«r- 
ri:t I' 



Tuesday. January 3 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:80 u> 1:00 p, m, Luncheon concert. 
5:80 to i;:30 p. m.— Brother Bob'a club. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Special program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Dance music. 

Wednesday, January 4 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. —Economics hour. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Variety hour. 

Thursday, January 5 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Hawaiian Orchestra. 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Brother Bob's club. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— News broadcast. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Special program. 

Friday, January 6 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Variety hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Athens Athletic Club Orchestra. 

Saturday, January 7 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

0:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC 
OAKLAND— 394 
Sunday, January 1 

11 :00 a. m. — Church service. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— Spenser Steel program. 

4 :00 p. m. — Vesper services. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Standard. 
7 :30 p. m. — Weather report. 

7:35 to 9:00 p. m. — Church services. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

Monday. January 2 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — luncheon concert 

12:00 p. m. — Weather. 

3:30 to 4:00 p. m. — Women's Clubs. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — St Francis Orchestra. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— KGO Kiddies' Klub. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m.— Concert Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Shell Co. program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — The Pilgrims. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 

Tuesday, January 3 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon Concert. 

12:30. weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks* 

1 :08, N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dance Orchestra. 
6:55. news; 7:03, weather; 7:08, S. F. produce, grain 

cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks {closing); 7:23, N. Y. 

stocks (closing). 

5 :00 to 8:30 p. m. — Eveready program. 

*:30 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

Wednesday, January 4 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:30, weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03. S. F. stocks; 

1 :08 N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert, 
fi :30, weather. 

6 :35 to 7 :30 p. m. — -Farm program. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Vaudeville. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 



FOR BETTER RADIO 
RECEPTION 

WILLARD 

POWER UNITS 



Hear the Difference 
at 

YOUR RADIO DEALER'S 



BAY SALES CO. 

Distributors 

13S4 Bush St. San Francisco 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



December 31, 1927 



Thursday, January 5 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:30, weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :08. N. Y. stocks. 
5:00 to 5:15 p. m. — Mental Measurements. 
5:15 to 6:00 p. m. — "Friend to Boys." 
6 :00 to 6 :55 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:55 p. m. — News; 7:05, weather; 7:08, S. F. produce, 

grain, cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, 

N. Y. stocks (closing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Composers Birthday Night. 
9:00 to 9:30 p. m. — Dodge Brothers program. 
9:30 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Friday, January 6 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :0S. N. Y. stocks. 

5 :30 p. m. — Wise man from the Land-O-Health. 
6:00 to 6:45 p. m. — Dinner concert program. 

6 :45 to 6 :55 p. m. — "Weekly Financial Review." 
6:55, news; 7:05, weather; 7:08. S. F. produce, grain, 

cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, N. Y. 

stocks (closing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Wrigley hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Saturday, January 7 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30, weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :0S. N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Weather, news. 

7 :15 to 7 :30 p. m.- — Weekly sport review. 

8:00 to 11:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC 
LOS ANGELES — *68 
Sunday, January 1 
10 :00 a. m.— -Morning services. 
11:00 to 12:30 p. m. — Church services. 
1:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
5:30 p. m. — Johnnie Dell and Orchestra. 
6:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
7:35 p. m. — Bob Buckner and Orchestra. 
8:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital. 
9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Orchestra. 
Monday, January 2 

2:00 p. m.— Football from Rose Bowl. 
5:30 p. m. — Leon Rene and Orchestra. 
6:00 p. m. — Clarice Russell. 
6:30 p. m. — Gamut male <iuartet. 
7:00 p. m. — Gene Johnston's Music Box hour. 
8:16 p. m. — L. A. Philharmonic Orchestra. 
10:00 p. m. — Metropolitan Dance Orchestra. 
Tuesday. January 3 
5:30 p. m. — The Dragon Hawaiians. 
6:00 p. m. — Florence Sanger. 
6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 
6:30 p. m. — Glenn Edwards and Orchestra. 
7 :00 p. m. — L. A. Fire Dept. 
7:30 p. m. — Helen Guest. 

5 :00 p. m. — Piano recital. 

8:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 

Wednesday. January 4 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m.— Gold Medal Talks. 

5 :30 p. m. — Sebastians Cotton Club Orchestra. 

6:15 p. m.— Radiotorial period. 

6:30 p. m.— Hal Chasnoft's orchestra. 

7 :00 p. m. — Song recital. 

7:30 p. m. — Nick Harris Detective Stories. 

7:46 p. m. — William MacDougall. 

8:00 p. m. — Maryon Bliss. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — Winifred Hooke. 

Thursday, January 5 

5:30 p. m. — Vernon Elkins and Orchestra. 

6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m. — Henry Starr. 

7:00 p. m. — Program by the University of Southern 

California. 
8:00 p. m. — Drama program. 
9:00 p. m. —National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m.— Program of modern classical music. 
Fridav, January 6 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m.— Gold Medal Talks. 
5:30 p. m.— Paul McNally. 
6:00 p. m. — Florence Sanger. 
6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m.— Clarice Russell. 
7:00 p. m. — Artist Students Club. 
8:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m. — John Slingerland. 
Saturday. January 7 

5:30 p. m. — Strangers Social Club Orchestra. 
6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m. — Tarvin Sisters. 
7:00 p. m.— Piano recital. 

7:30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado, Spanish Baritone. 
8:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
10 :00 p. m. — -Packard program. 
11:00 p. m.— KFI MidnicM Frolic. 

KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO CO. 
SEATTLE— 348 
Sunday, January 1 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 

9:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

Monday, January 2 

6:00 to 6:30 n. m. — Time signals, sport news. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — -Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Dance music. 

10:00 to 12:30 p. m.— Goofy Bird Frolic. 



Tuesday. January 3 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m.— Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 

Wednesday. January 4 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m.- — Studio program. 

10 :00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance music. 

Thursday, January a 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m.-— Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.-— Concert orchestra. 

10:00 p. m.— Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Friday, January 6 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Instrumental trio. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 

Saturday. January 7 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Sport news, News Items. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.- — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 P- m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers Dance Orchestra. 

KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN 
PORTLAND — 191.5 
Sunday. January 1 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 

10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Little Symphony orchestra. 

Monday, January 2 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— Talk. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Concert hour. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Spot Light Hour. 

Tuesday. January 3 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Musical program. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Book review and talk. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m.— Sealy Dance program. 

8:30 to 11:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 

Wednesday, January 4 

6:00 to 7:80 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Silver King Revellers. 

Thursday, January 5 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 7 :40 p. m. — Utility service. 

7:40 to 8:00 p. m.— Flower girls. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. program. 

Friday. January 6 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Concert. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— Utility service and talk. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Concert. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m— Keep Growing Wiser Order of 

Hoot Owls. 
Saturday, January 7 
G :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Concert. 
8:00 to 12:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 



On the Air 

(Continued from Page 14) 

ting has been chosen for the presenta- 
tion, the musical selections are relied 
upon to carry the audience to the "old 
days." 

Saturday, January 7 

The fourth of the newly inaugurat- 
ed two hour dance programs will be 
broadcast over the Pacific Coast Net- 
work tonight from 10 to 12 o'clock. 

The popular eleven piece dance 
band is known as the "Trocaderans," 
the name being taken from "The Tro- 
cadero," a famous London night club. 



"Nobody knows how dry I am" used 
to be a song instead of a politician's 
declaration of principles. — Stockton 
Independent. 



The great problem of showmen 
seems to be to get the uplift and the 
upkeep in the same theater. — Greely 
(Col.) Tribune-Republican. 



Society 

(Continued from Page 4) 

Marriage Ceremony 
Social Event 

The marriage of Miss Florence I. 
Ratzell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Perry Ratzell of Calistoga, and Mr. 
John J. Miller Jr., son of Dr. J. J. 
Miller of San Jose, was solemnized at 
a simple ceremony performed by the 
Rev. Dr. W. K. Guthrie in the First 
Presbyterian Church of San Fran- 
cisco, at high noon on Friday, De- 
cember 23, in the presence of a few 
relatives and intimate friends. Im- 
mediately after the ceremony a wed- 
ding breakfast was served at the 
Fairmont Hotel in the Empire room, 
artistically decorated for the event. 
Both the bride and groom are well 
known in Calistoga and San Jose, and 
after a honeymoon, the destination 
being a secret, the young couple will 

make their home in San Jose. 

* * # 

Brilliant Tea 

Society assembled in the Laurel 
court of the Fairmont Hotel last 
Thursday afternoon, when a tea was 
given in compliment to members of 
the cast in "The Cradle Song," now 
playing at the Columbia theater. 

Miss Mary Shaw, who has the lead- 
ing role in "The Cradle Song," told 
the fashionable audience some of her 
interesting experiences on the stage. 
A special program of music for the 
tea was arranged by Rudy Sieger for 

this notable event. 

* * * 

Society Hostess 

Mrs. Charles Hellwig presided as 
hostess at a table decorated in accord 
with the dramatic work of "The 
Cradle Song," for the tea given in 
Laurel court at the Fairmont Hotel 
last Thursday. Mrs. Hellwig, a beau- 
tiful young woman of unusual talent 
in the dramatic world, is the wife of 
one of San Francisco's prominent 
business men. She had a number of 
distinguished women as her guests, 
all of whom were afterwards intro- 
duced to members of the "Cradle 

Song" cast. 

* * * 

Mrs. John Sylvester Pinney was a 
hostess at one of the largest tables 
at this delightful tea, honoring Mary 
Shaw, Phyllis Rankin, Fanny Daven- 
port and other principals in the play. 
Mrs. Pinney's table seated twenty 
guests, most of whom were members 
of the exclusive Cap and Bells Club 
of which she is the presiding execu- 
tive. 

Mrs. Henry Hastings, formerly of 
the State Board of Education, had a 
coterie of five friends as guests at 
the "Cradle Song" tea in the Fair- ■ 
mont. 



December 31, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



Bridge Luncheon 

Mrs. Edward Murray O'Neill was 
hostess at a handsomely appointed 
bridge luncheon given in Laurel court 
at the Fairmont Hotel, assembling a 
group of friends in honor of Miss 
Ruth Antonovich, the fiancee of Mr. 
Douglas Lux. The table decorations 
were carried out in mounds of roses 
and chrysanthemums, charmingly 
combined with fern. Hand painted 
place cards designed the guest ar- 
rangement. Those present included: 
Mesdames Paul O'Neill, Charles 
Wissing, Foster Clute, Edward 
Brown, Holt Alden, Jere Mahoney, 
Arthur Canaris, Ruth Antonovich, 
Agnes Oliver, Norma Cone, Ivan 
Maroevich, Stanley Burns, Warren 
Casey, William Blake, George Nich- 
ols, Walter Kelly, Martin O'Brien, 
David Christian, Burnett Sheehan, 
Frederick Ocherman, Larry Cook, 
Wallace Sheehan, Joseph Kelty, 
George Farnsworth, Alexander Spo- 
torno, James Weightman, Warren 
Crafts, Vincent Donnelly. Misses Ce- 
celia Oliver, Marion Burns, Edna 
Little, Marion Gill, Peggy McMullen, 
Bernice Thompson, Agnes Roberts, 
Helen Roberts, Rose Kirk, Madeline 
Farrell, Ruth Fleming. 

* * * 
Holiday Luncheon 

Mrs. William Windeler entertained 
at a bridge luncheon on Saturday. 
December 17, the Laurel court at the 
Fairmont Hotel being the artistic set- 
ting for the affair. A round table 
had a center piece of flaming poin- 
settias, and the place cards carried 
out the holiday spirit of the decora- 
tions. Those present included : 

Mesdames Carl Jorgensen, Her- 
mann Martens, Howard Van Orden, 
William Herlitz, Adolph Becker, F. A. 
Harris, James Nixon Boyd, William 
Kutter, Herman Trantner. Lile Jacks. 
Frank Unger, Charles Lee, Walter 
Johnson, Dwight McCormack, Frank 
Klimm, Bert Lagarus, William Leahy, 
Mark Noon. 

* * * 

The following people have been 
guests at Santa Maria Inn during the 
past week from San Francisco: Mr. 
Walter F. Foster and Miss Helen D. 
Foster. Mr. and Mrs. Scott Hendricks. 
Mr. rainier Wheaton, Mr. Jos. L. 
Greenebaum, Mr. Sanford F. Walker, 
Dr. and Mrs. John J. Kingwell, Mr. 
and Mrs. Victor Clarke. Mr. and Mrs. 
H. H. Gutterson, Mrs. George Whit- 
tel, Mrs. J. A. Folger, Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel J. O'Brien, Miss E. Donahue. 
Mrs. Leon Stone. Mr. and Mrs. George 
de LaTour, Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy 
Ryone, Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Haley. 
Mi-, and Mrs. Ernest Drury and Mas- 
ter Ernest Drury Jr.. Mr. and Mrs. H. 
E. Manwaring, Miss Lupita Rorel and 



Miss Grace Bovet of San Mateo, Mr. 
William K. Gutzchow, Miss E. Gutz- 
chow, Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Barkley, 
Mrs. J. K. Armsby, Mrs. L. K. Put- 
nam, Miss M. P. Huntington, Mrs. S. 
0. Davenport, Mrs. J. B. Metcalf, 
Mrs. J. H. P. Howard, Mrs. W. Hen- 
drickson, Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Miller, 
Mrs. E. P. Breyfogle, Mrs. M. Russ, 
Bishop and Mrs. Burns and the Misses 
Burns, Mr. and Mrs. Guy J. K. Bige- 
low and the Misses Kenyon, Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Brisbane of New York, 
and Mrs. Charles Hodge and Master 
Gilbert Hodge of Hodge, California, 
Mrs. G. H. S. Williamson of San Ma- 
teo and Mrs. P. K. G. Williamson of 
London, England. 



Club Land 

(Continued from Page 5) 
have already been made, numbering 
over 300 in all. 

Mrs. M. M. Madson entertained at 
a bridge luncheon Thursday, Decem- 
ber 15th. Mrs. Madson is a very 
popular golfing member of the club, 
and was a joint guest of honor at a 
luncheon given for Mrs. J. C. Costello 

and Mrs. Madson. 

* * * 

On Thursday afternoon, December 
22, the California Golf Club enter- 
tained at a children's Christmas tree 
party, and a tea for mothers of the 
children. 

Poet Entertains 

The Misses Mary Elizabeth and 
Nancy Buckley gave a small tea at 
their home on Fell street on Monday. 
Those who were asked were Mes- 
dames James Blaine Clark, Oliver 
Kehrlein, Laurence Cox, Wilberforce 
Williams, Arthur Rogers, Anthony 
Frier, G. W. Johnson, Edmond de 
Spiganoviz, Louis Henes and the 
Misses Loretta McCarthy, Libby 
Smith. Evelyn and Anita McCarthy. 
All these young women are members 
of the Sacred Heart Alumnae and 

often meet at these informal affairs. 

* * * 

Santa Clans was host to ninety- 
seven "shut-in" children from penin- 
sula cities at the Woodside Country 
Club last Tuesday afternoon. Santa 
came through the redwood forest at 
2 o'clock in tin- afternoon and 
brought with him a bag of toys, fruit 
and sweetmeats t'< t lie children await- 
ing him in the woodland dining room 
of the chili. 

The children came from Palo Alto. 
San Mateo, Rurlingame. Woodside 
and Menlo Park. The affair was di- 
rected by Mrs. Louise Haycroft Ec- 
cleston and she was assisted by Mrs. 
Stanley W. Morshead, Mrs. Clarence 
S. Crary, Mrs. William B. Duff. Mrs. 
E. C. Jon,- and Mrs. Fred O. Cooke. 



— NOW IN OUR 30TH YEAR — 

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Tailors 

Fall Woolens 

Now on Display 



Special Line of 
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Scotch Sport Material 



Suite 201 — 12 Geary Street 

Phone Kearny 2866 
San Francisco 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 

Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
active, Hot Sulphur Water. Tub Baths and 
Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN, Ajrua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judah 



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SONOMA. CALIF. 

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YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 

Andrew Johnston, Manager 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1864 

The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



December 31, 1927 



MINIATURES of YOURSELF 

or members of your family 

make appreciated and valued 

presents. 

Last a Life Time 

HARTSOOK 

149 POWELL STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 




R\ML ELDERS 

239 Posh S tree r, San Francisco 




N. W CORNER 
;RA YSTONE 240 POLK and POST STS. 




PHOTOGRAPHS 
Q>Lrue Forever 



Society 
Interesting Tea 

Mrs. Roy G. Mitchell and Mrs. 
Johnson who has just recently re- 
turned from a tour of Europe, were 
hostesses at the fashionable tea given 
in the Fairmont Hotel during the fete 
of the "Cradle Song" cast. 

Mrs. J. W. Dutton presided as host- 
ess to six friends at this charming 
affair entertaining some of her tal- 
ented friends. 

Miss Margaret Roney, a well known 
San Francisco writer, was the presid- 
ing hostess at a table of five when the 
tea was given in Laurel court for the 
principals of "The Cradle Song." 
Miss Roney is finishing a novel, which 
will soon be published, dealing with 
San Francisco life from an entirely 
new viewpoint. Her own brilliant con- 
versation is reflected in all that this 
young writer brings forth. 



Mrs. Walsh Hostess 

Mrs. Marie Pernau Walsh was hos- 
tess to a group of friends at the tea, 
some of her guests being members 
of the dramatic sections in prominent 
clubs of the city. Mrs. Walsh is known 
for her own dramatic work and has 
appeared in amateur plays and semi- 
professional productions. 

* * * 
Hostess Table 

Laurel Conwell Bias, prominent in 
San Francisco's highest dramatic 
circles, presided at the head table 
during the "Cradle Song" tea at the 
Fairmont, with members of the Eva 
LaGallienne company as her guests. 
Mrs. Bias supervised the splendid 
event assisted by her confrere, Jo- 
sephine Young Wilson, a California 
writer, of theatrical heritage and ac- 
complishments. 



Haines Eats Standing Up: 
Polo Is the Cause 

William Haines dines standing up 
these days. The star is not trying to 
set a new fashion ; far from it. But he 
has to ride horseback all day in an 
English saddle playing polo in his new 
vehicle, "The Smart Set," which Jack 
Conway is directing, with Hobart 
Bosworth, Jack Holt, Alice Day and 
others of note. 

"Smart set is right," says Haines, 
"It smarts when I set down!" Hence 
— dinner off the mantel. 



Lady Methuselah. — Mrs. Holler, 
101 years old, died at city hospital of 
senility. She is survived only by a 
grandson and a great-grandmother. — 
St. Louis Post-Dispatch. 



Just welcomed into our now fa- 
mous National Canada Dry Hole-In- 
One Club, are the following new mem- 
bers: 

W. Foster Stewart, 3300 Clay 
street, San Francisco; Chris Jones, 
vice-president, Hickman-Coleman Co., 
Sacramento; M. Fry, Municipal Golf 
Course, Oakland; F. J. O'Connor, 
1855 California street, San Francisco; 
R. M. Sims, 36 Hillcrest road, Berke- 
ley ; D. R. Powell, 3620 Grand avenue, 
Oakland; Dr. C. F. Jarvis, Sequoyah 
Hills, Oakland; I. Ezra, 2745 Lake 
street, San Francisco and Myron 
Walsh, 533 F street, Eureka. 

DIVIDEND NOTICES 
THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

526 California St. (and Branches). San Francisco 



For the quarter year ending December 31st, 1927, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four and 
one-quarter <4 I /i) per cent per annum on all deposits, 
payable on and after January 3rd, 1928. Dividends 
not called for are added to the deposit account and 
earn interest from January 1st. 1928. Deposits made 
on or before January 10th. 1928, will earn interest 
from January 1st, 1928. 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Secretary. 



ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST COMPANY 

(Savings Departments) 

Main Bank, Market and Sansome Sts, 

Branch Banks : 101 Market street 

Market and Ellis streets 

Market and Jones streets 

Fillmore and Geary streets 

Third and Twentieth streets 

Mission and Sixteenth streets 

Geary street and Twentieth avenue 

For the half year ending December 31. 1927, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of FOUR 
AND ONE-QUARTER l 1 • , • 1'ER CENT per an- 
num on all savings deposits, payable on or after 
Tuesday, January 3, 1928. Dividends not called for 
are added to and bear the same rate of interest 
as the principal from January 1, 1928. DEPOSITS 
MADE ON OR BEFORE JANUARY 10, 1928. 
WILL EARN INTEREST FROM JANUARY 1. 
1928. 

LOUIS SUTTER. 
Vice-President and Cashier. 

BANK OF ITALY - . National Trust and Savings As- 
sociation, Head office and San Francisco branches 
— For the half year ending December 31. 1927. a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four per 
cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 
on and after Tuesday, January 3. 1928. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same rate 
of interest as the principal from January 1. 192s. 
Savings deposits made on the first business day of 
any month (or on or before the tenth day of 
January, April, July and Octoberl will earn inter- 
est from the first of that month : deposits made 
after that date will earn interest frum the first of 
the following month. SAVINGS DEPOSITS MADE 
TO AND INCLUDING JANUARY 10, WILL EARN 
INTEREST FROM JANUARY 1. 

JAMES A. BACIGALUPI. President. 

CROCKER FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY, 
corner Post and Montgomery sts. — For the half 
year ending December 31. 1927, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of four per cent per 
annum on all savings deposits, payable on and 
after Tuesday, January 3. 1928. IT IS NOT 
NECESSARY TO PRESENT PASS BOOKS ON 
JANUARY 3, FOR THE ENTRY OF DIVIDENDS 
as dividends not called for are added to deposit 
account and earn dividend from January 1, 1928. 
Deposits made on or before the fifth day of any 
month (or the tenth day of January. April. July 
and October) will earn interest from the first of 
that month; deposits made after said dates will 
earn interest from the first of the following month. 

M. R. CLARK. Cashier. 



December 31, 1927 



Pleasure's Wand 

(Continued from Page 7) 

The southern drawl and stage per- 
sonality of Austin add to the songs. 
His coming is a musical treat. 

Ethel Clayton and Ian Keith are 
to appear in person in a very amusing 
sketch entitled "Clipped." Both Miss 
Clayton and Mr. Keith are well known 
for their stage and screen successes. 

Claude and Marion, in a funny 
comedy offering "Still Arguing"; 
George and Jack Dormonde, the pan- 
tomime artists, in "Scientific Non- 
sense"; "Pagana," a violinist, known 
as the girl with the piquant person- 
ality, and other acts round out the 
program. 

The dainty little dancing miss, 
Vera Reynolds, is the star in "The 
Main Event," feature picture of the 

week. 

* * %■ 

St. Francis 

"Old Ironsides," that grand old 
frigate, sailed into the St. Francis 
theater with sea-scrapes and a thrill- 
ing sea battle back in the first glori- 
ous days of the American Navy. 

More than a year in the making, 
and running into the Famous Players 
coffers to the extent of two million 
dollars, "Old Ironsides" is said to be 
a worthy tribute to the staunchest 
fighting ship ever launched by this 
nation. More than forty victories 
stand to its credit. 

In the cast of the picture are Wal- 
lace Beery, again as a frowsy char- 
acter, George Bancroft, Charles Far- 
rel, who made a name for himself in 
"The Seventh Heaven," and Esther 
Ralston. 

* * * 

Musically talented children of San 
Francisco's best known families took 
part in the Christmas festival play, 
"Trees," at the Community Play- 
house. The young people included 
Charles Hurtgen, Barbara Burrell. 
Beverly Blake, Meta Rinder, Virginia 
Wise, Basil Grillo, Gloria Jones, Eliza- 
beth Patterson, Stuart Brady. Kath- 
erine Durbrow, Wanda Bern. Berenice 
Giffen. Mary Wise, Charles Coburn, 
Eleanor Hart, Helen McEwen, Dona 
Park. 

The play, which symbolizes the 
preservation oi' trees, was adapted by 
Mrs. Thomas Guy Haywood (Gerda 
Wismer) from Joyce Kilmer's poem. 
The play is dedicated to his memory. 
Christmas is held in the forest and 
the trees are visited by children and 
fairies who merry-make till midnight, 
and trees are left unhurt. 

* * * 

Granada 

Will Rogers will appear in "The 
Texas Steer." screen attraction at 
the Granada Theater, beginning with 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Saturday. Louise Fazenda, Ann 
Rourk, and Douglas Fairbanks Jr., 
are supporting principals. 

The picture is taken from the old 
story of Texas cattle life and real 
cowboy adventures which was known 
as the Charles Hoyt comedy of many 
years back. Dry humor and lively 
action permeate each part of the 
story. 

Fanchon and Marco have a spec- 
tacular stage presentation and Frank 
Jenks will conduct the orchestra in 
special musical features. 



19 



St. Francis 

"Old Ironsides" has proved so 
great an attraction at the St. Fran- 
cis Theater that it looks as if the 
beautiful photoplay would be held 
over for another week. Wallace 
Beery, George Bancroft and Charles 
Farrell have the leading roles. It is 
a Paramount picture, and magnifi- 
cently staged. 



Embassy 

San Franciscans, especially, have 
been thoroughly relishing the picture 
now on at the Embassy Theater, 
where scenes of the metropolis before 
the fire are shown. 

The Vitaphone, with its marvelous 
voice and action synchronization, still 
draws hundreds of people who will 
always marvel at the wonders re- 
vealed by this great Warner Brothers 
production. 

* * * 

Warfield 

Adolphe Men.jou as a musical gen- 
ius of Vienna, Kathryn Carver as 
the beautiful girl who becomes his 
inspiration and finally his wife; Lina 
Basquette as the gorgeous dancer 
who lures him away from his home, 
and Lawrence Grant as the bewhis- 
kered Cupid who manages to repair 
the ruined romance, comprise the cast 
that enacts what Paramount believes 
to be one of the new season's fine 
pictures — "Serenade." 

This production, which reaches the 
Warfield Saturday, was directed by 
Harry P'Arrast, the young man who 
so ably guided Mr. Menjou through 
both "Service for Ladies" and "A 
Gentleman of Paris." It is the story 
of a man whose music makes him 
famous only after he has met the girl 
whose love inspires him toward 
greater things. Running through it 
i^ something that makes itapartfrom 
anything that has been shown here 
in many a month — a song, a serenade, 
that you feel even though you don't 
hear it. 

(Continued on Page 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime, Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



T YPE WRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IP DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office and Works: 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 

Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called for and Delivered 




NEW ORLEANS 

New^tdljarlar 

To better serve our many fnends and 
patrons over *4oo.ooo has been ex- 
pended in reconstruction to maintain 
this famous hostelry as 

One of Americas Leadin? Hotels 

ACCOMMODATING IOOO GUESTS 

Laree rooms with unusually hifh 
CeiurrK and ?ood ventilation ab- 
solutely essential to the Southern 
climate make for perfect corrdbrt- 

Alfred S. Amer & Co. Ltd 

NEW ORLEANS. LA. 
Send for dcscnpuwe folder Ticket offices of 
Illustrated Mardi Gras all Transportation 
Program for uV asking Lines in Lobby 

3be Roosevelt 

PHOENIX. ARIZONA 

'iVherc Winter Mver Comes' 
OPENING OCTOBER I9"l& 
^Air wo S Amer 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



December 31, 1927 




ffle 

Sunset 
Trail 

through romance 

You may see the picturesque 

South west and old South at 

no additional fare on your 

trip EasLj 

The colorful route of "Sunset 
Limited," through the picturesque 
Southwest and the romantic Old 
South will delight you. Arizona, 
New Mexico. Texas, luxuriant Lou- 
isiana; everywhere reminders of 
stirring history of the nation's 
southern boundary. 

Apache Trail Highway trip if you 
wish; strange mesa lands; El Paso 
■with quaint old Mexico just across 
the river at Juarez. 

"Sunset Limited," famed round 
the world, carries you swiftly and 
comfortably over this fascinating 
route. Its appointments are superb; 
as fine as a first-class hotel or club. 

Ask for Sunset Route pictorial 
booklet. From New Orleans, you can 
continue to Chicago or points ease 
by train or go to New York aboard 
Southern Pacific steamship. 

Return, if you wish, via another 
of Southern Pacific's routes — Over- 
land, Golden State or Shasta. 



Great 
' Routes 



-| ^ Famous 
X.Z* Trains 



For transcontinental travel 
A choice offered only by 

Southern 
PaciMc 

F. S. McGINNIS 

Pass. Traffic A\gr. 

San Francisco 



Pleasure's Wand 

(Continued from Page 19) 
Orpheum 

Owing to the sensational success 
of the Florentine Choir at the Or- 
pheum Theater this week, the man- 
agement has made special arrange- 
ments whereby the entire personnel 
of this company will remain over for 
a second and positively final week in 
San Francisco. 

The Orpheum Theater manage- 
ment also announces an entirely new 
supporting bill which will include Al 
Trahan and Vesta E. Wallace, in a 
comedy classic by Frank Fay entitled 
"The Curtain Speech"; Peter Hig- 
gins, the sweet-voiced tenor assisted 
by Frank Dixon in "Songs You Love 
to Hear" ; the famous Ziegfeld Follies 
"Shadowgraph," which is said to be 
the greatest of all laugh creators with 
the most sensational stage effect ever 
devised ; Day and Aileen in a beauti- 
ful dance offering entitled "Ballet 
Caprice," with W. Wania, supported 
by John Joyce, Maybrey Hokanson, 
Doring Keegan and Florence Simon- 
son; Jack Redmond, the golf wizard 
in "A Lesson in Golf"; and other 
Orpheum attractions. 



At the Elder Gallery 

The season of events in the Paul 
Elder Gallery will open Saturday aft- 
ernoon, January 7th, at 2:30 o'clock, 
with a review of the new Paris plays 
by Mme. Marie de Mare Stein, who 
is just returning from a visit to 
France with personal impressions of 
the present cultural tendencies. 
"Maya," that thrilling play given on 
the tiny stage of the "Studio des 
Champs Elysees" and drawing the 
most ardent theatergoers of Paris, 
and other prominent productions will 

be discussed. 

■f * * 

An exhibition of fine prints, ar- 
ranged to demonstrate the different 
processes of reproduction, will be 
shown in the Paul Elder Gallery, 
starting Monday, January 9th. Se- 
lection has been made of the works 
of prominent English, French and 
American artists in etching, aquatint, 
lithograph and wood cut, and, to com- 
pare with the last mentioned, a group 
of Japanese prints will be shown. The 
gallery attendants will be pleased to 
explain the different processes. 



Women, says an English paper, 
have invaded all but thirty-seven of 
the occupations of the world. There 
are as yet no women engine-drivers. 
There isn't any back seat in a loco- 
motive cab. — Judge. 



"Are you an Elk?" 
"No, but I don't mind drinking. 1 
— M. I. T. Voo Doo. 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 



Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 



Buy a 

Sunday Pass 

and Ride 

all Day for 

20c 

Ask the Conductor 




SAMUEL KAHN, 
President 



Bookkeeper, Typist, Machine - Billing, 
Filing. Handles correspondence. Pub- 
licity experience. Meet public. Desires 
temporary or permanent position re- 
quiring any or all of above qualifica- 
tions.— Box 10, S. F. NEWS LETTER 
268 Market Street 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Lurie and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Orieintal Show Place 
Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c. $1. 35c, 50c. 75c $1.00. $1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants* Lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private Dining Rooms 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystone 8100 



Weekdays, Luncheon $ .75 

(11 :30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week Days & Sundays l.r.O 



No visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dining: in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

!t.H Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 

11 :30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

5 :30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holfd&yfl 

I :80 to S ;S0 n. m. only 

Closed for our Annual Vacation. 

Dec. 19th. 1!>27 to Jan. 1st, 1928 

Half Block from Highway 




ICE CREAM^ 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 

C CALIFORNIA STS LUNCHEON 



Cr.j.Un. IDINNER 

3100 3101 3102 1 



w 



We now deliver to any part of the city — including Sundays and Holidays. 
No extra charge. 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

STERLING ANDERSON, Manager 

Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 



Western Pipe and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS. PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES. GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS. ETC. 

Snn I" ancisco. Calif. Los Anseles. Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



For 64 years we have earned the title 
"The Recommended Laundry" 

La Grande & White's Laundry 



250 Twelfth St. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 

PBONE MARKET 916 
Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 







Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN 8:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. 
Unsurpassed Cuisine 




ilfFij? 




14-Mile Bouse 


CARL LEONHARDT 

Formerly of Golden Gate Park Casino 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



5S.1 Post Street 
In Virginia Hotel 



San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 2510 







CAROLINE JONES 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 

2:30 and Tea from 3 to 5 

Kxelusive use of room for club dinners 






334 Sutter St. Douglas 71 IS 





1 
THE ADVANCE BEAUTY OF 


SPRINGTIME IS 




NOW HERE 




DON'T MISS 






the January beauty 
of the Russian River 
country, ."the Valley 
of the Moon", and 










ENJOY 

the superbly beau- 
tiful Sacramento 






the Redwood Em- 




River countrv — 






pire beyond. Most 
economically, com- 
fortably and easily 
reached over the 




"the Netherlands of 
America." A drive 
you'll never forget 
• — a variety of scen- 
ery found nowhere 






CARQUINEZ 




else in America. Fine 
pavemert all the 
way. Reached over 






BRIDGE 




the 






Take 

SAN PABLO AVE. 

OAKLAND 




ANTIOCH 

BRIDGE 

Take 










TUNNEL ROAD 






OAKLAND 




Bridges Open All Da 
No Time Tables - 


v and All Night 
- No Delays 




Write American Toll-Bridge Company, Underwood Building, 

San Francisco, for Hew free travelogues and maps. 



SAIL TO NEW YORK 



SISTER SHIPS 
SS VENEZUELA 
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ERNEST F. RIXON, General Agent 
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D. M. LlNNARD, 

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Ernest Drury, 
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Established July 20. 1856 




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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

Tht- San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, Jr., from 1*84 ;o 1925. 

now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 26$ Market Street. San Francisco, California. Telephone Kearny S357. Entered at San Franc JCO 

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Vol. CX. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 7, 1928 



No. 2 



Save the Beaches! 

By C. C. Young, Governor of California 

(From California Highways and Public Works) 



Does the public realize that California, with her many 
hundreds of miles of picturesque and beautiful coast line 

a coast line which ought to be a heritage for all future 
generations — is rapidly throwing away this heritage? 

Does it realize that of her beaches, the greater part 
has passed into private development and is denied to the 
pleasure of all our people? Does it know that of the little 
that is left some of the fairest parts are in danger of 
defacement through private commercializing and exploi- 
tation ? 

This is a plea to the public, to the members of our 
automobile associations, to the leaders of the oil industry, 
that they unite in creating a sentiment which will stay 
the hand of the oil promoter until some plan can lie 
worked out which may protect his legitimate interests, 
and at the same time preserve for California one of her 
greatest charms. 

Not so very many years ago California's redwood for- 
ests were in similar danger of destruction. Trees that 
had taken untold centuries to grow, whose beauty had 
charmed and delighted the nations of the earth, were 
being converted into grape stakes and railroad tics. 
leaving only unsightly patches of scarred and denuded 
ground. 

An organization was formed to "Save the Redwoods," 
particularly along our main trunk highway system. 

Members of the California Highway Commission and 
other state and county officials co-operated to the utmost. 
Private organizations and patriotic citizens joined in the 
effort to save these mighty forests. A Park Commission 
has just been organized which will help complete this 
work. 

But with all due credit to these private individuals and 
public organizations who joined hands in this task, the 
fact remains that the redwoods were saved largely be- 
cause the owners of these forests stopped cutting along 
the highways until time was accorded public and private 
organizations and patriotic citizens to formulate a prac- 
tical plan for saving the trees, therein- earning the ever- 
lasting commendation of the people both of California 
and the whole world 

Now the necessity has arisen to "Save the Beaches." 
The wondrous anil spectacular charm of California's 
■laches is menaced by the activity of oil inter 



It is the same old question that arose in the redwoods. 

It is a question of temporary profit taken against a 
permanent scenic and spiritual enrichment. 

It is a question of pennies now against dollars in the 
future. 

It is a question of this generation against the genera- 
tions that are to come. 

There was no question when the redwoods were im- 
perilled what the people of California thought. Neither 
is there any question as to what the people of this state 
think as far as its beaches are concerned. 

Oil is one of California's greatest and most beneficent 
resources. The recovery of oil constitutes a glorious 
chapter in California's industrial history. 

But granting all this, the fact remains that first values' 
must come first. The permanent scenic value of the 
beaches of California are immeasurably greater than the 
value of all the oil that their sands can ever contain. 

We commend to the oil interests of California the ex- 
ample of the owners of the redwood forests. 

Let drilling be stopped until a method of saving these 
beaches can be worked out. 

This method may come in several ways. 

It may be that the state can aid in the situation by 
the extension of the rights of way of its highways. 

It may be that the law under which drilling on tide- 
lands is being carried on will be declared unconstitutional. 
If such is the case, the effect will be to stop drilling when 
such determination is reached. 

It may be that the oil wells can be drilled on the high 
beaches away from the highway, thus securing prac- 
tically all the oil and at the same time saving the beaches. 

It may be that public spirited men and women will join 
together to purchase and dedicate to the state the rights 
of oil operators, if the tideland lease law is held to be 
national. Memorial groves in the redwoods, dedi- 
cated in perpetuity to the enjoyment of the people of the 
world, is proof that such public spirit exists. 

Certain it is that whatever the method of relief may- 
be, if time only is given, some way will be found of pre- 
serving these leaches, their beauty unmarred and their 
charm unimpaired, as a heritage to humanity for all time 
to come. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 7, 1928 






Watch the Supervisors 

This year is going to be a critical one in the history of 
our municipal government. We are on the point of decid- 
ing the course of the governing body of this city and 
shall be able, in a few weeks, to make out the general 
direction of the policy. 

It would appear as if the Mayor would have his hands 
full in preserving a steady movement in the direction 
of popular government, with those liberties which have 
come down to us intact. There is a constant effort to 
tamper with those liberties and to impose upon us a new 
form of government, with a whole body of collectivistic 
principles, not in accord with the constitutional and pro- 
gressive character of our institutions. 

We note a tendency on the part of the Supervisors to 
proceed to extremes and to resort to conflict with the 
Mayor, when they are thwarted. This is a turbulent sort 
of spirit which will become more ominous as time goes 
on and differences begin to accumulate. We have a Mayor 
upon whom we can rely in all emergencies and he should 
have the undeviating support of the better element of 
our population. He will need it. 

The problems which underly existing differences of 
opinion as to method are important and cannot be avoid- 
ed. They are such as will strain relations to the utmost, 
because they deal with fundamental things. 

The street railroad question is one calling for the great- 
est caution and disinterested citizenship, but it is being 
discussed in an atmosphere of contention and unfairness. 
There is no ethical sense in much of what is said on that 
question. 

The Board of Supervisors will bear watching. 



Nicaragua Again 

The news of the recent engagement with the Nicara- 
guan rebel troops has caused a great deal of excited com- 
ment in Washington. The incident appears to have been 
an entire surprise to the war office. The obstinacy and 
the discipline of the rebel forces were entirely unexpected 
and the fact that such a battle was possible has contra- 
dicted the optimistic announcements which have been 
recently broadcast. 

There is nothing new about it, however, and as we 
progress in our new policy such happenings will become 
more common. These little wars are very persistent and 
in the long run very expensive, both in men and money. 
But it is not easy to see how they can be avoided, if the 
country is to continue in its course of expansion. It is 
part of the penalty that has to be paid for growth and 
development. 

It may be taken for granted that the second canal is a 
necessity for the growing trade and transportation which 
our economic development has brought into being. We 
cannot have the canal unless we are able to control the 
country through which the canal passes and, such being 
the case, we must, either by pacific or warlike means, 
take that control. There may be some legitimate criticism 
as to the manner in which the affair has been conducted 
on the political side, but, when once the military forces 
were called upon, there can be no question that they de- 
serve and should have the unfaltering support of the 
country. Marines are the "first to fight" and to give up 



their lives for their country and their sacrifice calls for 
appreciation and continued effort. 

It is a good thing that the President himself is going 
to the Pan-American Congress at Havana. He will be 
able to convince the people of Latin America that this 
country is by no means seeking any imperialistic dom- 
ination and that it is merely underwriting a development 
and growth necessary for civilization itself, and still more 
necessary for Latin America. 



Toll Roads 



An agitation is being set on foot against the develop- 
ment of roads in this state made by private concerns. It 
is part of the general movement, so zealously projected 
by a portion of the community, against the natural ten- 
dency, on the part of energetic private concerns, to supply 
a necessity in the present condition of transportation fa- 
cilities. There is no doubt that new roads are required 
and if the state cannot keep up with the needs, the defects 
of the state must be supplied from private sources. 

The proposal to make a new road into Contra Costa 
County has given a new impetus to the movement. The 
Alameda County board of supervisors has now before it 
a request from a private concern to permit the construc- 
tion of such a road, with the institution of toll gates, to 
pay for the construction and to return a reasonable profit 
on the investment. This proposal is being met with con- 
siderable opposition. 

If the road is necessary it should be constructed. As 
a matter of fact, it really is not important whether it b£ 
built by the public or by private funds. There seems to 
be some sort of an impression that the construction of a 
road out of the public funds costs nothing. As a matter 
of fact it costs just as much, and probably more, than if 
a private concern were to build it. There must be a return 
on the public expenditure or public money is wasted. This 
return must be met out of taxation. Whether it is met 
by the imposition of tolls or by taxes does not matter, 
It comes to practically the same thing in the long run ; for 
the present methods of control assure the public against 
any tyrannical exploitation on the part of the utility cor- 
poration which will provide the road. 



Traffic and Returns 






It is a notable fact that though traffic increases on the 
railroads there is no corresponding increase in revenue 
such as could be reasonably expected, under the circum- 
stances. Paul Shoup, executive vice-president of the 
Southern Pacific, is very clear on that point. 

He shows that the fruit and crops yield was so gooc 
this year that the railways carried more than in 1926 anc 
yet the returns on the work were lower than they wen 
then. The reasons for this lowering of returns lie in the 
following facts: wages were increased as the result o:i 
arbitration; there was an actual decrease in the Fates fo: 
carrying merchandise and there was a distinct loss ii 
passenger traffic, owing to the competition of highway 
carrying, both private and public. 

The prospects of the coming year are dependent upol 
the crops, which, as far as can be judged at present 
should be normal, and on building materials, steel prod 
ucts, automobiles and their accessories, and manufacture] 



January 7, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



articles. What these will produce is of course dependent 
upon the general condition of trade. On this matter Mr. 
Shoup refuses to hazard a guess. 

Railway earnings were below the mark of 1926, and 
increased costs have added to the uncertainty of the 
situation. 

There does not appear to be any satisfactory solution 
of this state of affairs at present. There is no doubt that 
•aihvays are a vital part of the national economy and 
there is no sense in so important a branch of industry 
being impeded and interfered with to the extent of par- 
tial crippling. 



Public Utility Activity 

It would be hard to find a better discussion of the pres- 
ent condition of public utility activity than that made by 
John J. O'Brien, president of H. M. Byllesby & Co. 

To begin with, this authority declares that there is 
nothing approaching hard times for 1928, although it is 
frankly admitted that on the whole, business conditions 
are not in as good shape as they were a year ago. He 
says: 

'The country as a whole is in a period both of eco- 
nomic readjustment and a lull in the recent pace of de- 
velopment." Though there is no contention that the 
present public utilities are overbuilt, next year will prob- 
ably see a reduction in the building program and, as a 
matter of fact, the writer says that the program is about 
two-thirds as large for this year as it was last year. 

It is pointed out that the electric light and power in- 
dustry is very largely in the hands of the people today. 
There are no less than 3,000,000 individual shareholders 
in electric companies and probably half as many bond- 
holders. Besides this direct investment, savings banks, 
insurance companies and other popular institutions of 
that sort have invested enormously in public utilities of 
this character so that the whole savings of multitudes are 
directly or indirectly involved in public utilities and de- 
pend upon the way in which those institutions are pre- 
served from predatory attack or unnecessary interfer- 
ence. 



Tendency Upwards 

There was much searching of the cause of trade condi- 
:ions in 1927, but a fair examination of them appears to 
ead to the conclusion that on the whole they are decidedly 
lpwards in character. Taking all together, the conditions 
ivere firm throughout the year and it is the general opin- 
on of financial experts that the same condition will pre- 
vail in 1928. 

There has been a decline in wholesale commodity 
irk-cs. but coincident with that, there has also been an 
ncrease in bank debits which, outside of New York, were 
ligher than in 1926. This is in spite of a slump of more 
han ordinary proportions in the volume of summer busi- 
iess. There has been recently a very distinct rise in 
■ertain commodity in ices and the whole pace of trade 
md industry has been quickened. 

Car loadings tell the story of the year better, perhaps. 
han anything else. The first part saw total car loadings 
ro a long way above the pace set by 1926. but in May 
here was a change and the figures fell below the 
.92(1. By Julj they were actually 10 per cent below those 
: !6, and this slump kept up until November. This is 
lot easy to explain until the matter of the bituminous 
■oal strike has been taken up. 

By far the best study of this matter that we ha\ l 

: rs in a recent article by W. L. Crum, professor of 
ics at Stanford University, who lias shown great 
ability and facility in handling this very complicated 
aroblem. 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 

What this country needs is fewer people telling us 
what this country needs. 



The trouble with drinking today is that the flesh is 
willing but the spirits are too strong. 



The only things getting longer about women's evening 
gowns are the shoulder straps. 



New Problem for Henry 

Wanted — Man with car that can speak Spanish for 
collector. — San Antonio Express. 



We'll Print No More of These— 

He was only on old rake, but he still had all his teeth. 
-Dennison Flamingo. 



Agent (selling radio sets) — I have something here 
that will bring the world to your door. 

Jones — How much a quart? — Penn State Froth. 



Reflected Prominence 

Nitt — Her husband owes a lot to her, doesn't he? 
Witt — Sure ; nobody ever heard of him before she shot 
him. 



Doctor (to taxidermist) — The stork has arrived. 
Tax. (absent-mindedly) — All right; put him on the 
shelf next to the owls. — Navy Log. 



Robinson — I met my wife in a very funny way — I ran 
over her in my car and later married her. 

Brown — If everybody had to do that there wouldn't 
be so much reckless driving. — Tit Bits. 



Clean Sweep 

She — You never hear of women cashiers embezzling 
or running off with their employer's money. 

He — Not often, but when it does happen, they take the 
employer, too. — Laughter. 



The present chess champion of the world took 2 hours 
10 minutes to make one move in a recent match. Natur- 
ally there is a certain amount of jealousy in bricklaying 
circles. — Humorist. 



He — This dining-room table goes back to Louis 14th. 

She — That's nothing. My whole sitting-room set goes 
back to Sears-Roebuck on the fifteenth. — Wisconsin Oc- 
topus. 



"Visiting your wife, old man?" 

'Yes: she asked me down for the week-end to look over 
a couple of airdales and a future husband." — Everybody's 
Weekly. 



A New Angle 

We're thinking of writing a scenario with a novel twist. 
A war story. The hero goes to France and his regiment 
stops at a farmhouse. The farmer has no daughter. This 
makes the hero so mad he goes out and wins the war. 



Anybody Feel Flattered? 

Bobby — Daddy ! A boy at school told me that I looked 
just like you ! 

The Dad — That so? — and what did you say? 

Bobby— Nothin". He was bigger'n me. — Passing Show 
(London). 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 7, 1928 





ociery 



New Year Brings 
Many Festive Plans 

Ever on the qui vive for something 
new, society has planned any number 
of festive affairs which may tran- 
scend most preceding events. 

Western society is distinctive for 
its originality and during the coming 
months, there is a decided desire to 
keep up many traditions for which 
California is famous. 

San Francisco and the Bay region, 
synchronizing each social ambition, 
with the time and purpose of the oc- 
casion, have already outlined many 
out-of-door events, as well as a series 
of beautiful- balls, debutante parties, 
receptions, or dinner dances. 

What gorgeous festivities now 
await society is not a matter of con- 
jecture at all, but clever and interest- 
ing ideas — just about ready to burst 
into brilliancy. 

Dorothy Hart Becomes the 
Bride of John Randolph Hearst 

Miss Dorothy Hart, charming 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Seth Hart 
of Los Angeles, on Saturday, Decem- 
ber 17, became the bride of Mr. John 
Randolph Hearst, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Randolph Hearst, at a beau- 
tiful wedding held in West End Col- 
legiate Reformed Church, New York. 
The Rev. Dr. Henry Everton Cobb of- 
ficiated. 

* * * 

Hostesses 

Mrs. Charles Hellwig, wife of the 
well-known San Francisco business 
man, was hostess to a group of 
friends at the celebrity tea, honoring 
Mary Shaw. 

Mrs. Hellwig was the picture of 
loveliness at the tea, wearing a mod- 
ish hat of black with her stunning 
gown of the new spring design. Her 
guests included prominent literary 
and musical people. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway, Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Anceles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



By Antoinette Arnold 

Tea Hostess 

Mrs. John Sylvester Pinney, head 
of one of the most exclusive women's 
clubs in San Francisco, presided at 
a table of guests during the celebrity 
tea given in Laurel Court of the Fair- 
mont Hotel. Members of the cast, in- 
cluding Virginia Gregori, one of the 
nuns in the beautiful play, sat with 
Mrs. Pinney who entertained some of 
her own personal friends. 

* * * 

Dinner Dance 

Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Nonenmann en- 
tertained at a dinner dance on Satur- 
day evening in Drury Lane at the 
Hotel Whitcomb, in honor of the 
birthday of their daughter. Miss Gen- 
evieve Nonenmann. Pastel shades 

were used in the table decorations. 

* * * 

Bridge Tea 

Miss Bessie Miller entertained a 
group of her friends at a bridge tea 
on Saturday afternoon in the Roof 
Garden of the Hotel Whitcomb, in 
honor of her graduation from Lowell 
High School. The place cards and 
favors were red and white, the school 

colors. 

* # * 

The Bankitaly Club held their 
Christmas dinner dance on Saturday 
in the Colonial Ballroom of the St. 
Francis. This dinner dance is an an- 
nual gathering of senior officers and 
branch managers from San Francisco 
and neighboring towns. The Ballroom 
was decorated with greens and holly 
amid which the big seal of the Bank 
of Italy stood out as an interesting 
feature of the decorations. Another 
unusual feature and one that was 
greatly appreciated, especially as it 
came as a great surprise, was a minia- 
ture replica of the head office building 
of the Bank of Italy clone entirely in 
sugar by the pastry chef of the St. 
Francis. This chef d'oeuvre of work- 
manship was greatly admired and 
formed the center piece at Mr. A. P. 
Giannini's table. 

Other tables were reserved by Mr. 
James A. Bacigalupi, president of the 
Bank of Italy ; Mr. Joseph Grace, vice- 
president, Santa Rosa ; Mr. A. B. Post, 
vice-president, San Jose; Mr. George 
Warfield, vice-president, Healdsburg. 

Officers of the club : Mr. William P. 
Spratt, president; Miss K. Dorothy 
Ferguson, secretary. 




Vallejo Bride and Groom 

Miss Lucy Castagnoli, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. James Castagnoli. 1234 
Georgia street, and Roland Draughon, 
son of former Mayor and Mrs. Arthur 
H. Draughon, were married here yes- 
terday at St. Vincent's Catholic 
Church. The newlyweds will make 
their home in Vallejo, after a honey- 
moon trip in the southern part of the 
state. 

Tall St. Joseph lilies and handsome 
green were used in the church decora- 
tions where the simple but impressive 
ceremony was held. The bride was 
given away by her father. Mr. George 
Weiler of Los Angeles acted as best 



Pretty Wedding Gown 

The bride was attired in a modish 
gown of pigeon-gray satin, the bodice 
being tight, with long sleeves and ele- 
gant lace falling over the hands. On 
the left shoulder was a wide bow, the 
ends of which fell gracefully in long 
streamers. A pleated skirt flared ac- 
cording to dictates of fashion. 

She wore a small felt hat of the 
same soft tones of gray and carried 
a bouquet of beautiful orchids. 

Miss Nancy Wood of Lansing, 
Mich., was maid of honor and wore a 
green crepe gown made in bolero ef- 
fect and trimmed with exquisite lace. 
A small green hat trimmed with tiny 
green feathers pronounced the latest 
mode in smart attire and was particu- 
larly becoming to the lovely young 
debutante. Her bouquet was of cycla- 
men. 

* # * 

Atlanta Home 

Mr. and Mrs. John Randolph Hearst 
are spending a honeymoon in Havana 
and upon their return will live in At- 
lanta, where Mr. Hearst is to continue 
his studies at the University of Ogle- 
thorpe. 

(Continued on Page 1G) 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

G50 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



January 7, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




Club Dinner 

Many club women gave generously 
of their time and talents, their sub- 
stance and their club activities, these 
past few weeks for the comfort and 
the happiness of those less fortunate. 

Mrs. J. E. Butterfield, president of 
the San Francisco City and County 
Federation of Women's Clubs, is fore- 
most in this philanthropic plan of pro- 
viding cheer. 

Known as one of the most unselfish, 
as well as the head of a big organiza- 
tion numbering something like 12,000 
women, this able executive has, in 
the back of her clever head, any num- 
ber of events with "a thought for 
others" the basic principle prompting 

activities. 

* * * 

Prominent Club Woman 
Passes to Great Beyond 

Funeral services were held last 
Tuesday for the beloved Mrs. Au- 
gusta Borle, prominent in literary and 
musical circles and well known as a 
member of the Pacific Coast Women's 
Press Association. She was a well 
known writer, artist and musician and 
dearly loved for her sunshiny dispo- 
sition. 

Mrs. Borle was the daughter of 
General Robert A. Friedrich, former 
Attorney-General of Alaska under 
President William McKinley, and 
Elizabeth A. Newcomb Friedrich, of 
Virginia. She was the wife of C. A. 
Borle, deputy Assessor of Alameda 

County. 

* * * 

D. A. R. Meet 

D. A. R., Tamalpais chapter, will 
hold the regular monthly meeting and 
tea Saturday afternoon, January 7, 
at the Clift Hotel. Mrs. C. L. Lorey, 
regent, will preside. Hostesses will be 
Mesdames R. E. L. Jewett, Cecil Hast- 
ings, G. W. Hippeley, Ed Miller and 
Florence Perkins and Miss Herburta 
Saithorn. 

Mr. Marvin G. Marvin will address 
the group on the subject of "Foreign 
Relations." Mr. Marvin has just re- 



Park Lane Maisonnettes 

5 to 8 Rooms with 2 to 5 Baths 

Magnificent view. Every service, from 
doorman to valet. Furnished or un- 
furnished. Garage. Class A steel 
frame building. 

rnette" has Ike elceance of a mansion milk 
all conveniences of an apartment house. 

PARK LANE APARTMENTS 

1100 Sacramento Street 
Diagonally Across from Hotel Fairmont 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 
Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

500 Rooms 

Tariff : From S4 per day 



turned from a lecture tour of South- 
ern California in the interest of for- 
eign relations. 

* * * 

Laurel Hall 

Mrs. Frank Panter of Laurel Hall 
Club, recognized as one of the most 
active club leaders of the state, whose 
programs are most unusual and 
charming has arranged a plan for her 
club which takes precedence in point 
of interest and refinement. 

On Wednesday, January 4, a book 
review day was held under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. John Farnham Leader. 
Leonardo Da Vinci was the author 
considered at this meeting, preceded 
by short talks on literature, by Mrs. 
Ernest Johansen ; fine arts by Mrs. 
Edward Turkington: music, by Mrs. 
R. \V. Gilloglev. Mrs. H. E. Harris; 
and. Mrs. F. G. Rupert. 

A biographical sketch of the life 
of Leonardo Da Vinci was given by 
the president. Mrs. Panter. 

Hostesses for the day included: 
Mrs. W. D. Stendebach, chairman; 
Mrs. William Schwyter, vice chair- 
man, assisted by Mesdames Agnes 
Aldrich. Jonathan Green, Henry W. 
Allen, P. Burchard. W. G. Thompson. 
Mrs. J. A. Valiquette was chairman 
of the general arrangements. 

* * * 

Allied Arts 

A program which registered the 
high mark was presented by the 
Allied Arts Club last Wednesday. De- 
cember 28. in the red room of the 
Fairmont Hotel. Rudolphine Radii. 
prima-donna soprano and Josephine 
Swan White, pianist and dramatic- 
reader, being the guest artists. 

Dressed in the native attire of the 
Bohemians. Rudolphine Radii gave as 
her opening numbers a group of five 



songs of Bohemian folk songs with 
Josephine Swan White at the piano. 
Mrs. White also wore the fascinating 
Bohemian attire — the two artists pre- 
senting a picture of loveliness and 
artistry- 
More and more am I personally con- 
vinced that costume recitals, both in 
dramatic and musical presentations, 
are the most delightful and memo- 
rable. One seems to forget the person 
in the personalities represented. One 
certainly finds keener joy in entering 
into the real spirit of a program when 
authentic costuming is the word. 
* * * 

Josephine Swan White, one of the 
best beloved of all the artists 
throughout northern California, is 
master of her work — beautiful can- 
tillations. When she plays the musi- 
cal score and reads the words of her 
poems, there is indeed something that 
lingers long in one's memory and pro- 
nounces the ideal art which is typical 
of all that this beautiful woman pre- 
sents. 

Ballet Music from the Opera, "The 
Bartered Bride," (Smetna) was the 
second number on the program pre- 
sented exquisitely by Josephine Swan 
White. 

Rudolphine Radii, a most attractive 
prima donna, lately returned from 
Vienna, sang her solos with the mu- 
sicianly art for which her work is 
famed. She told the story of each 
song before singing the solo, her na- 
turalness of manner and her fascinat- 
ing personality enhancing the pro- 
gram presentations. 

A Legend of Ancient Bohemia with 
cantillations arranged by Josephine 
Swan White and four songs of the 
modern Bohemian School were on this 
eventful program over which the 
president Mrs. Edward R. Place, her- 
self a well known musician, presided 
pleasingly. 

(Continued on Page 17) 

^ you pay no more j£ 




"LWVbce c/aTKouscujtd Gardens' 
224-226 Grant Ave., Sutter 6200 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 7, 192 r 




>LE/ISURE'SWlND 



OBEY NO vJAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore. 



Famous Actress Extols 
The Stage and Theater 

Mary Shaw, the distinguished ac- 
tress now playing in "The Cradle 
Song," at the Columbia theater, was 
honor guest at a celebrity tea given 
last Thursday in the Laurel Court 
of the Fairmont hotel. Members of 
the entire cast and many prominent 
literary folks, writers and dramatists 
were present. 

"The women of the country are the 
real critics of the theater," stated 
Mary Shaw in her address. "It is the 
word of women that places the final 
word of praise or disparagement on a 
play; and to women do we owe our 
successes or failures. 

"They have a responsibility, too, 
for it is their verdict which pronoun- 
ces what the theater may produce. 
Husband or suitor always takes his 
wife or his sweetheart to the play, or 
to the theater, chosen by the woman. 

"I want you to love the theater," 
stated Mary Shaw, "I want you to 
realize the meaning of the word: 
theater, which has the same deriva- 
tion as 'theology'." 

Extolling the theater and its place 
in the world, the noted and beloved 
actress told the large assemblage of 
men and women in the Fairmont hotel 
that every actor and actress worthy 
of the profession loved the stage with 
a reverence soaring to the highest 
heights, and that every member ot 
"The Cradle Song" company held 
ideals akin to their most reverential 
thoughts, paying honor to their pro- 
fession in a way that meant supreme 
devotion to the stage. 



Curran 

"Chauve-Souris," as staged by Mor- 
ris Gest, still packs the Curran thea- 
ter, where this exotic Russian drama- 
comedy-and-musical story is being 
held over as the big attraction. But 
this week will be the final week, ac- 
cording to present announcements. 

The "Wooden Soldier" is one of the 
most fascinating of all the numbers 
and there is plenty of artistry to de- 
light those who prefer dancing above 
all else in the way of supreme enter- 
tainment. 



By Josephine Young 

Lurie 

Lionel Barrymore will be the next 
attraction at the Lurie theater in 
"Laugh, Clown, Laugh," following 
the run of "Hit the Deck" which gives 
its final performance at the Lurie 
Saturday night. 

"Laugh, Clown, Laugh" presents 
the well known actor in a part which 
he played for a year on Broadway 
and in which he has just completed 
a six weeks' run in Los Angeles. 

In the cast will be Edward Leiter. 
seen here in "The Devil's Plum Tree," 
and Lolita Lee, who was the first Miss 
San Francisco in the national beauty 
contests. Others are Hardee Kirk- 
land, brother of Odette Tyler, now 
Mrs. R. D. McLean; Kitty Barlow. 
Julia Blanc, Harry T. Shannon, Bruce 

Payne, Ann Lockhart and many more. 
* * * 

President 

"The Gossipy Sex," the popular 
Henry Duffy play at the President 
theater, has fourteen characters in 
the play, each of Whom shares in the 
merriment of the production. 

Leneta Lane, leading woman, plays 
Alice Bowen; Kenneth Daigneau is 
opposite as John, her husband, and 
Earl Lee plays Danny Grundy, the 
guest who innocently spoils their 
house party. 

Robert Adams has a distinctive 
comedy role, second only to Earl 
Lee's for unexpected developments. 
Some of the other players in an un- 
usually large cast are Genevieve 
Blinn, Thomas Chatterton, Zeta Har- 
rison, J. Raymond Northcut, Dorothy 
La Mar, Harry Leland, Eunice Que- 
dens, Thommy Richards, Alan Ryan 
and Elsie Dawn. 



Alcazar 

Henry Duffy's players are bringing 
crowds to the popular Alcazar theater 
on O'Farrell street, near Powell, 
where "New Brooms" is being played 
with Robert McWade and Helen Fer- 
guson in the leading roles. 

This amusing play by Frank Craven 
is packed with witticisms and lively 
action which give all of the players 
plenty to do from the first rise of the 
curtain to the conclusion. Like all of 
the Henry Duffy plays, the merriment 



Amusements 

Next Week 
ON THE STAGE 

Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"New Brooms"; Henry Daffy players. 

Curran. Geary nr. Mason 

Balieff's "Chauve-Souris"; wonderful show. 

Capitol, Ellis nr. Market 

"Who's Your Neighbor?" 

Lurie. Geary nr. Mason 

Lionel Barrymore in "Laugh, Clown. Laugh." 
Belasco success. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"The Gossipy Sex"; Henry Duffy players. 

VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

-Doc" Baker. George McKay. Ortie Ardine. 
stranded" on the screen. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

New policy will include motion pictures. "No 
Place to Go"; Mary Astor, Llovd Huches. 
ranny Brice, comedienne. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Vaudeville — pictures. 

ON THE SCREEN 
Downtown 
California, Markei St. at 4th 

"Love," John Gilbert. Greta Garbo. Gino 
beveri, musical director. 

Casino, Ellis at Mason 

^'Millionaires"; George Sidney. Vera Gordon. 
A Hero on Horseback"; Hoot Gibson. Elhlvne 
Clair. Saturday. 

"White Gold." and "Saturday Afternoon": 
Harry Langdon. Sunday and Mondav. 
"Camille"; Norma Tolmadge. Tues.' and Wed. 

Cameo, Market opp. Fifth St. 

Chanjre of pictures. 

Embassy, Market nr. Seventh 

"Reno Divorce": May McAvoy. 
Remold Werrenrath on the Vitaphone. 
The \acht Club Boys"; June Pursell; bur- 
lesque. 

Granada. Market at Jones 

"The Cohens and the Kcllvs in Paris"- 
George Sidney and Charlie Murray. Special 
stage presentation. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-f»th 

"Old Ironsides": Wallace Beery, Geo. Ban- 
croft. Esther Ralston. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"West Point": William Raines and Joan 
Crawford. Return of Rub Wolf. Stage revue. 

Residence District 
Alhambra, Polk St., nr. Green 

Rudolph Music Masters, stage presentations 
Chance of pictures regularrr. 



January 7, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



is so spontaneous that frequently 
audiences burst into a concerted roar 
of laughter. This is perhaps one rea- 
son why the never-failing Alcazar is 
certain to amuse, please and consist- 
ently fascinate. So don't miss "New 
Brooms" for other Henry Duffy plays 
are already in preparation to follow 
the present production. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

A departure in amusement presen- 
tation will take place at the Orpheum, 
beginning this Saturday matinee 
when the theater will add a first run 
feature photoplay to its vaudeville 
program which will in no way affect 
the standard of the vaudeville that 
has been presented at that theater 
for the past forty years. In fact it is 
stated that it will enable the booking 
department to even improve on the 
shows. 

Elaborate preparations are now be- 
ing made for this innovation. The 
theater is being renovated and an en- 
tire new stage equipment is being in- 
stalled. For the presentation of the 
photoplays nothing in modern equip- 
ment has been overlooked. It is claim- 
ed by officials of the Orpheum that 
the motion picture apparatus and 
booth will be the most modern and 
up-to-date of any projecting room on 
the Pacific Coast. 

Fannie Brice, the greatest of all 
comediennes, will head the big all- 
new vaudeville end of the program. 

Golden Gate 

"Doc" Baker, George McKav and 
Ottie Ardine, A Night at the Club, 
and Boyle and Delia, are on the bill 
at the Golden Gate this week. 
Peaches and Poppy, two pretty sing- 
ing and dancing girls, balance the act 
which Baker calls "The Wishing 
Well." 

"A Night at the Club" is the title 
of a musical offering given by a male 
chorus of twelve. Hollis Devany, who 
played the part of Franz Schubert in 
"Blossom Time." and Francis Tyler 
are the principals. Boyle and Delia. 
in "How's That," a rollicking fun am! 
song turn; and the "Three Vagrants," 
merry singers and musicians of the 
old time minstrel or troubadour 
school, round out the program. 

The screen adaption of Anita Loos' 
story, "Stranded." is the photoplay 
offering for the week. 

* * * 

Embassy 

Reno is shown in "A Reno Di- 
vorce." at the Embassy theater. May 
McAvoy is starred in this production 
while her leading man, Ralph Graves. 
is author and director of the opus. 

The picture opens in a divorce court 
where the wits of a thrice-divorced 



society woman are pitted against a 
twice-divorced roue. May McAvoy en- 
ters and finds romance, which ends in 

just another Reno divorce. 

* * * 

Warfield 

"West Point" is the Warfield Thea- 
ter picture with William Haines and 
Joan Crawford the stars. This is the 
second screen romance to come out 
of West Point "Dress Parade" star- 
red William Boyd and Bessie Love. 
As in "Dress Parade" the hero of this 
drama goes into the academy a raw 
youngster and emerges a courageous 
man. 

The great military academy, with 
its parade ground, its mess halls and 
class rooms forms a background for 
the story. "West Point" was made at 
the academy, with the help of the 
cadets and staff. 

Fanchon and Marco have an elab- 
orate revue to celebrate Rube Wolf's 
return to the Warfield, after several 
months at the Metropolitan in Los 
Angeles. 

Granada 

"The Cohens and the Kellys in 
Paris," a new version of the inimit- 
able "Cohens and Kellys," as por- 
trayed by Charlie Murray and George 
Sidney, will come to the Granada this 
Saturday. 

Those who witnessed this comical 
team in "McFadden's Flats," their 
last venture, will surely enjoy this 
new demonstration of the talents 
which Murray and Sidney possess. 

There will be a new stage presen- 
tation by Fanchon and Marco, and 
Frank Jenks will lead the orchestra 
with his usual verve. 

* :[; * 

California 

Greta Garbo and John Gilbert are 
the ideal lovers of the screen, just 
now. If Greta portrays a quality 
verging more on an emotion which is 
the antithesis of love, the gaping 
public does not differentiate, so why 
should we? 

En passant, however, we cannot 
refrain from commenting on the fa- 
tuity of the title. "Love." as given to 
Tolstoy's novel. "Anna Karenina." 
Still, we fully realize that the true 
title would not mean very much to 
the ordinary fan. 

So. when the dramatization of a 
book which created a furore many 
moons ago. was rechristened "Love." 
no doubt the dramatist had weighed 
the taste of the modern reading pub- 
lic in the balance and found it want- 
ing. 

Let that be as it may, "Love" is 
worth the price at the California, if 
just to see how Greta Garbo inter- 
prets it. 



This lighting 

improves a room's 

appearance 

If you wish to improve a room's ap- 
pearance in an easy, inexepensive way, 
do it with good lighting. 

The money you spend for one of 
these lamps does more to improve a 
room than the same money spent for 
other furnishings. 

For the abundant, soft, colorful 
light makes an "interior" seem love- 
lier. It's just like redecorating the 
whole room. 

This lamp is different from any 
other lamp. There is a reflector under 
the silk shade that diffuses or scat- 
ters the light. 

The lamps (both floor and table) 
have a base finished in silver or gold 
and there is a selection of four silk 
shades. You can see them at our office. 




"FACinC sebvice- 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

Owned ■ Operated • Managed 



by Califomians 



103-128 




Companion of 
"tje morning • • • 
it^refreshiiuT-- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter £654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.800.000 caps were serred at the 

Panama-Pacific International Exposition 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 7, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidat ions with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street; San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1927 

Assets $117,394,234.04 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $600,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-I'RESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Haigbt and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (A^i) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Fin 



ance 



Our tourist expenditures abroad in 1927 have been 
phenomena], very largely in excess of the S761,000,000 
which we spent in 1926 on travel. 



The San Francisco Stock Exchange has given notice of 
the change of name from San Francisco Stock and Bond 
Exchange. 



Industrials on the San Francisco Stock Exchange 
showed a reaction as the year closed, but later stiffened 
somewhat and at the close showed small losses. 



A notable feature of the San Francisco Stock Exchange 
transactions was the strengthening of department store 
issues. The Emporium, Magnin's, and Schlesinger "A" 
common, all showed improvement. 



Compensation. General Liability, Plate Glass. Accident and Health. 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital S20.000.000 S20.000.000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought: FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued: CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND: NEW YORK: PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. 
WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Phones Davenport 4480 
Sutter 4400 



Insurance Exchange Building 
433 California Street 




SCOTT & 
MULVIHILL 

General Insurance and 
Surety Bonds 




The governing board of the San Francisco Stock Ex- 
change has ruled that from January 3 and until further 
notice, no buyer option contracts shall be made on the 
floor of the Exchange. 



The United States Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce points out that the imports of the United 
States declined five per cent last year, but the volume 
was greater than before. This was due to falling prices. 



Twenty-five industrials listed on the New York Stock 
Exchange show an advance of 44 per cent for the year. 
These 25 stocks have a total value at present of 10 bil- 
lions, having enhanced in value more than 3 billion dollars 
since January 1st, 1927. 



Compared with the last few years, 1927 was profitable 
to cotton growers. There was an income of $200,000,000 
more, with a crop production of 5,000,000 bales less than 
in 1926. There was a spectacular recovery in prices and 
an enormous increase in exportation to Asia and Europe. 



Foreign loans for the year reach the amount of SI, 600,- 
000,000. This is a record volume for such loans. It may 
be questioned if it is not too high. At any rate there is 
little question that such loans have had an effect in swell- 
ing the amount of our exports. 



Recovery after summer slackening in industry, is now 
very plainly shown not to have been as complete or as 
ready as in immediately preceding years. This does not 
mean, however, that there is any tendency towards gen- 
eral depression, but only that a period of stabilization is 
setting in. 



MADE TO ORDER ONLY 



'JhosEKent 



SHIRTS 

PAJAMAS 

NIGHT ROBES 



k /h6s£Ken& 



Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



It is interesting to note how economic demand arises. 
We can get this very well in the cotton industry. The 
change in style in women's clothes and the discovery and 
development of other fabrics were supposed to have fa- 
tally wounded the cotton market. But new demands have 
arisen. Thus the automobile industry alone uses 500,000 
bales a year, for tires, in this country, the grocery trade 
uses 250,000 bales and the cement industry 100,000 bales 
for the making of bagging. 



January 7, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Air Lines 

By Lieut. Blaine Stubblefield 



For an idea of how active the world of aviation and 
aircraft manufacture has become of late, one need but 
turn to the news items of a 
single week. For example, take 
the week ending December 24, 
and note the items picked up by 
the various aeronautical publi- 
cations. 




Lieut. Blaine Stuhhlefield 



will be produced. 



The Fokker Aircraft Corpora- 
tion of America announces that 
it will begin quantity produc- 
tion, under exclusive Fokker 
rights in America and the entire 
Western Hemisphere. A factory 
with more than 100,000 square 
feet of floor space will be erected 
at Wheeling, West Virginia, 
early in the spring. Both the 
Universal and three motor type 



More than 28 of the leading airplane manufacturers of 
Southern California have subscribed §25,000 toward the 
National Air Races scheduled to be held in Los Angeles 
in 1928. The fact that there are more than 28 aircraft 
manufacturers in Southern California, or even in the 
entire state, is news to most of us. 



The governor of Maine announces his sponsorship of 
a passenger airline between New York City and Maine 
cities. 



"Air Transportation," Vol. I, No. 10, a weekly review 
of aeronautics, already firmly entrenched in its field, an- 
nounces an increase of 25 cents an inch for advertising 
space. 



The Daniel Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of 
Aeronautics announces it has completed plans for financ- 
ing a model airway between San Diego and Los Angeles. 
Fokker planes equipped with Pratt and Whitney "Wasp" 
engines will be used. The route will be operated by the 
Western Air Express, Los Angeles-Salt Lake City air 
mail contractors. 



The republics of Latin America welcomed Col. Charles 
A. Lindbergh who left Mexico City right after Christ- 
mas. He will make a non-stop flight from Havana to St. 
Louis. 



In Milwaukee, the Advertising Club suggests that their 
city hold an aeronautical show, to be conducted like the 
shows sponsored each year by automobile dealers. The 
proposition will be recommended to the Association of 
Commerce. 



Hamilton, famous manufacturer of airplane propellers, 
organizes Hamilton Metalplane Company and gets ready 
to deliver 25 new ships on March 1. 



On January 1, 1928, the South Texas air mail and pas- 
senger line, serving Houston, Galveston, and San Antonio, 
and connecting with the Chicago route at Dallas, will 
begin operations. 



The University of Cincinnati will have the Schmidlapp 
Chair of Aeronautics financed by a gift of $5000 a year 
for five years from a trust fund created by Jacob G. 
Schmidlapp, who recently died. 



The Douglas Company announces that it will erect a 
new airplane factory at Santa Monica. California, that it 
will add 200 men to its present force of 600, and that in 
1928 it will turn out 225 planes. 



The General Electric Company has received an order 
for boundary lights to be installed around the airport of 
Salt Lake City. 



Exhaustive tests are being run on a three-cylinder 40 
horsepower motor for two passenger planes. An order for 
30 of these engines has been placed. 



Boeing Air Transport, San Francisco-Chicago air mail, 
express and passenger line, carried the biggest load of 
air mail that ever went east out of the Bay region on 
Wednesday, December 21 — 559 pounds. But more is ex- 
pected. The ship that carried it could have taken 1400 
pounds. 



Clarence Chamberlin will build a plane to sell for 81500. 
The motor will be built by Charles B. Kirkham, formerly 
chief engineer for the Curtiss Company. Henry Ford 
made it possible for all of us to flivver, and somebody will 
rig us out to fly. Maybe it will be Chamberlin. 



The city trustees of Exeter, California, propose to turn 
their golf course into an airdrome. It must be too level to 
be interesting as a golf course, but good for a landing 
field. They can chase the gutta percha over somebody's 
mule pasture, and have just as much fun. 



On December 21, the Pacific Air Transport, flying be- 
tween Seattle and Los Angeles and all coast cities, carried 
the biggest day's combined load in their history of more 
than a year — 560 pounds — about 22,000 air mail letters. 



Major Emilio Carranza has applied to the President of 
Mexico for permission to attempt a non-stop flight from 
Mexico City to Washington. 



The New York Aviation Service Corporation delivers 
new planes by flying them from the factory to the home 
of the purchaser. The purchaser is then given free in- 
struction in the care and use of the plane. 



Preliminary tests of a neon airport beacon manufac- 
tured by the General Electric Company indicate that the 
reddish-orange beam can be seen through a half mile of 
dense fog. If that is true, it is a long step toward final 
conquest of aviation's worst enemy. 



Boeing Air Transport, flying between San Francisco 
and Chicago, nears the three-quarter million milestone, 
SO times around the world, with no mishap. About 150 
tons of air mail have been carried, and 550 passengers. 



These are the leading news items of the week ending 
December 24. With events such as these piling up 52 
weeks a year for the next five years, at an ever increas- 
ing rate, it seems that some history will be made. 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 7, 1928 



Air Mail Increasing- 
Air mail up and down the Pacific Coast for the first 25 
days of December exceeded that of the first 25 days of 
November, a month ago, by 1072 pounds, or 18 per cent, 
according to Mr. Vera Gorst, president of the Pacific Air 
Transport, Inc., who is making a short stay in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Up to the twenty-fifth of December, 7074 pounds were 
carried on this air mail line between Los Angeles, San 
Francisco, Portland and Seattle, this being a 57 per cent 
increase over the same portion of December a year ago. 
In a year the people of the Pacific Coast have seen the 
air transport companies emerge from comparative ob- 
scurity to an important factor in the transportation sys- 
tems of the West. Expectations for 1928 business are 
very bright and with the public becoming rapidly air- 
minded, plans for new and more equipment are under 
way. The Pacific Air Transport within the past month 
has brought two new Travelairs with Wright motors to 
add to its already speedy fleet of nine planes. 



FOR RENT 

New, Modern Apartment — All outside rooms — 
Four rooms and breakfast room. Large closets. 
Completely furnished — Oriental rugs and phono- 
graph. $125.00 per month. Apartment 6, 1100 
Fulton Street, Cor. Pierce. May be seen by ap- 
pointment. Phone Graystone 428. 



A Father 
Says: 



The paper that comes to 
my home by my choice 
reflects my ideals to my 
children. I have never felt 
apologetic for the 






Municipal Air Port News 

Showing 2895 flights and landings of planes carrying 
4560 passengers and hundreds of tons of mail and mer- 
chandise to and from all parts of the United States, the 
first annual business report of San Francisco's municipal 
airport at Mills Field has been released. 

The report covers seven and a half months' operation 
since Mills Field was opened last May. It shows a continu- 
ous growth of business each month, the December in- 
crease nearly doubling that of November. 

Some idea of the phenomenal development of business 
at Mills Field may be gained from the following tabula- 
tion: 

Flights and 





Landings 


Passengers 


May 


13 




15 


June 


19 




17 


July 


57 




85 


August 


374 




601 


September 


371 




673 


October 


638 




1091 


November 


503 CDecreasei 


ii' In rain) 


756 


December 


920 




1322 



2895 4560 

Supervisor Milo F. Kent, chairman of the city's air- 
port committee, declared upon filing the report with the 
Board of Supervisors that provision has been made for 
expanding the equipment and acreage of Mills Field to 
meet the 1928 demands of commercial aviation. 



Derelicts of the Air 

Meeting a derelict airplane was one of the most weird 
and awe-inspiring experiences of the airmen in the World 
War, according to Baron Richthofen, the great German 
ace, whose dramatic story is told by Floyd Gibbons in 
"The Red Knight of Germany" (Doubleday, Page & Com- 
pany.) One afternoon when Richthofen and his squadron 
were approaching a small bank of clouds, an English two- 
seater with motor full on emerged from the clouds and 
flew straight for the center of the German V but without 
firing a single shot. Boelcke, the German squadron leader, 
dived to a position over the tail and pressed the machine 
gun trigger. From above and below he saw his bullets 
go into the bodies of both the pilot and the observer who 
were sitting bolt upright in their cockpits. Still there 
was no return fire from the English plane but no devia- 
tion in its course, no attempt to shake off its pursuers. 
The German ace was puzzled. 

Gradually he flew directly over it. Banking his wings 
slightly to depress one side of the fuselage, he peered 
down into the two cockpits of the English plane and into 
the blood-stained faces of the two dead men sitting 
rigidly strapped to their seats. 

The plane was a derelict of the air. Death had placed 
its controls in neutral holding it to an even keel as it sped 
onward across the sky, its motor roaring from a wide- 
open throttle. Boelcke flew some minutes above the dere- 
lict, escorting it like a funeral plane as it flew westward 
with the bodies of its air Vikings on their last flight. Be- 
fore changing course to return he dipped his wings in a 
final salute to the dead. 



"I have been married for thirty years and I spend 
every evening at home with my wife." 
"Ah, that is love." 
"No, it is gout!" — Die Muskete, Vienna. 



She — They tell me you were arrested for disorderly 
conduct the other day. 

He — Yes, I tried being a pal to my boy. 

— Toronto Goblin. 



Jrnuary 7, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



It 




By Lloyd Farrington Wilson 



THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT IN AMERICA, by George N. 

Schuster; Lincoln McVeagh; Dial Press; S3.00. 

The book is a profound and masterly exposition of 
Catholic idealism; a defence of the Catholic Church in 
America by a man chiseled from its philosophy. 

The author differentiates between the Catholic and the 
American intellect. American tradition, literature and 
commercialism have created a caste in which the Catholic 
is isolated, yet capable of more fruitfully participating 
in the nation's political, moral and social functions. 

I shall not cast myself as the learned interlocutor. My 
own view on this sort of subject is a man-for-man affair 
of little consequence. However, in my role of chronicler, 
I form the following opinion: a book that will be ac- 
cepted by the Catholic enthusiast, tolerated by the nomi- 
nal Catholic of American idealism, not held in great es- 
teem by the Protestant, and perhaps ignored by the 

agnostic. 

* * * 

OVER THE BOAT-SIDE, by Margaret Eiker; Doubleday, 

Page; S2.50. 

It is a sane, disillusioning and beautifully written 
story of a bargain marriage. 

Eltin Henderson, the girl, develops with the story and 
is a sturdy and wholly satisfactory character. The hero, 
Reverdy Smith is a book type. The hero-lover, along with 
a politician, a critic, an actor, and too much family, form 
the character assemblage. 

This is one of those three-book affairs. The first part 
contains family background and ends up in a secret mar- 
riage — young school ma'am vs. society hound and archi- 
tect-to-be. 

Book two (you may join me in a yawn here) gets bet- 
ter from a male standpoint by putting this same young 
woman back into circulation via the Nevada divorce mart 
(no ad). But book three is all to the good. The defeated 
wife becomes a successful playwright, and the ex-hus- 
band, once again a husband plus parental duties, pros- 
pers despite the fact he lives in Boston. But they meet 
again with a merger of fame and fortune. Rare ending — 
joy and happiness, no end. 

Some day this author may write a story of the theater, 
or an intimate tale of people like those who supposedly 
dwell in Greenwich Village, and it will be a knock-out. 
She seems to know the world of make-believe. 

* * * 

THE DEMON CARAVAN, by Georges Surdez; Lincoln 

McVeagh: Dial Press; $2.00. 

Here is a well done piece dealing with the love and war 
of North Africa. 

Again we have an interesting portrayal of the fearless 
Legionaires. The author does not moon over desert 
nights and shifting sands: instead he pictures the Arab 
in a knowing way. Then, too, he has arranged a series 
of adventures around his principal, one Captain Lartal. 
A native soldier, Tlemsani, who replaces the customary 
hard-boiled sergeant (correspondence school rules here 
rejected) is an excellent character. 

There is a great play of imagination on the part of 
the author, but his story-tolling ability smooths it out. 
A mountain fortress and empire of Islam furnishes the 



setting of the love affair between Lartal and a girl of 
French-Berber origin. Then, too, though the climax calls 
for a small war, Mr. Surdez does not shoot up every page. 
I managed to keep off the high furniture, and reading 
it caused no public disturbance — but it was good. 

:;: # # 

The worst thing I've met in many moons is that called 
"The President's Daughter," involving Warren G. Hard- 
ing, by a woman named Britton. Harding, with due re- 
spect to his good qualities, most assuredly was a poor lot 
as a Don Juan. The book is a lot of balderdash, not inter- 
esting enough to annoy. "The Vanguard" (Doran) by 
Arnold Bennett is an excellent piece and will be reviewed 
at length in our next. "Red Star at Morning" (Double- 
day, Page) by Margaret Kennedy is slow and dull. Eng- 
lish setting ; unreal characters revolving around a like- 
father-like-son plot. 



THE WHITE ROOSTER, by George O'Neil; Boni and 
Liveright. 

Vivid insight into many illusions of life, keen apprecia- 
tion of what happiness hath to bestow, and felicitous 
acknowledgment of variant tendencies are outstanding 
principles pictured in this book of poems by a straight- 
line thinker. 

"The Parable of Gold" especially impressed one re- 
viewer. 



Gilbert and Sullivan in Tombstone 

Tombstone, roaring, turbulent, the most picturesque 
tough town of the old Southwest with famous sheriffs 
and equally famous outlaws, and its man for breakfast 
every morning, is amusingly recorded in the local news- 
papers of its red heyday, according to Walter Noble 
Burns, who has written its history under the imprint of 
Doubleday, Page & Company. Mr. Burns' account of a 
witticism which brought down the house at a perform- 
ance of "Pinafore," gives the flavor of the times. 

"A sheriff's posse has a fight at the Stockton ranch 
with two outlaws," says Mr. Burns. "A member of the 
posse is killed. Also one outlaw. The other outlaw is 
wounded and brought to Tombstone, where he is placed 
in the hospital, the authorities declaring him too badly 
hurt to be locked in jail. In a week or two, the outlaw 
strolls out of the hospital and is seen no more. The towns- 
people view the official laxity with indignation. A little 
afterward a crowded audience greets the amateur per- 
formance of 'Pinafore' in Schieffelin Hall. When Ralph 
Rackstraw in his tuneful farewell to the captain's daugh- 
ter, sings 'I go to a dungeon cell,' Dick Dead-Eye inter- 
rupts. "Say. Cap,' says Dick Dead-Eye, 'have you got a 
dungeon cell on board this ship?' 'No,' replies the cap- 
tain, 'but we have a hospital.' This suggestive quip brings 
down the house." 



"Where'd you get that eye?" 

"You know that pretty little woman we said was a 
widow?" 
"Yes." 
"Well, she isn't." 

—Pink 'Un. 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 7, 1928 




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Complete Brake Relining Service 

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Organization for Lockheed Four 

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Superior Auto Washing & Polishing 

228 HYDE STREET (Bet. Turk and Eddy) 

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1355 BUSH ST., Near Polk 

San Francisco, California Phone Prospect 3182 



Petrol Paragraphs 

By K. R. Schwartz 

National Automobile Club 

The Old Spanish Trail highway, the great transcon- 
tinental highway in the extreme south, touching the 
Gulf of Mexico and following in the footsteps of the 
Conquistadores, is now carrying a tremendous amount of 
winter traffic. 

The progress of this trail has been amazing and during 
1927 no less than 821,000,000 in new highway comple- 
tions were opened to travel. The openings celebrated in- 
clude: the Iberville bridge in Mississippi; Sugarland- 
Richmond, Texas, paving and bridge ; Dayton, Texas, con- 
crete paving; Mobile Bay bridge, ten and one-half miles; 
Liberty county and East Texas, bridges and paving ; Gila 
River bridge, nine spans, Arizona ; Sabine River bridge, 
Texas-Louisiana line, and the complete paving of the 
stretch between Jacksonville and Tallahassee. 

This highway has the distinction of starting at the 
oldest city on the Atlantic Coast, St. Augustine, and end- 
ing at the oldest city on the Pacific Coast, San Diego. It 
skirts the southern parts of Alabama, Mississippi, Louisi- 
ana, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California and is 
2759 miles in length. 

The Old Spanish Trail highway will always keep alive 
the interesting history of old Spanish days, a history 
reaching from Florida to California. It offers historical 
associations more romantic than any other transconti- 
nental highway, including the days of Spanish splendor of 
cavalier and conqueror, of Columbus, Cortez and Pizarroj 
of Ponce de Leon, De Soto, Coronado and the great orders 
of priests whose missions are scattered along the length 
of the trail. The Spaniards dreamed of gold and glory, 
and with expeditions worth a king's ransom, they fought 
their way through swamps and deserts and over moun- 
tains which often led to despair and death, but the phan- 
tom of riches caused others to follow, and today the Old 
Spanish Trail is a project which has woven old trails and 
new ways together and opened anew the southern border- 
lands to modern motor travel. 



A new kind of eyeglasses, designed to protect drivers 
of automobiles against glaring headlights, is the recent 
invention of a Stockholm eye specialist. 

Using the German-made Hallauer glass, No. 66. which 
eliminates irritations caused by certain light rays, the 
Stockholm specialist employs a method of gradually shad- 
ing the Hallauer glass into ordinary clear glass at the 
lower portion of the lenses so that, by slightly bending 
the head when encountering a glaring headlight, the mo- 
torist is protected and can at the same time have unin- 
terrupted vision for ordinary driving. 



Fast moving automobile traffic into and out of the 
larger cities of the United States will be one of the major 
results if the Holaday bill, now under consideration by 
the seventieth Congress, is passed. 

One of the provisions of the Holladay bill is for the 
construction of four-lane, hard-surfaced highways twenty 
miles out from each city with a population of 200,000 or 
more. 

Another provision calls for 64 main routes extending 
from Canada to Mexico and the Gulf, and from coast to 
coast, which would form a network of highways, system- 
atically designed and built to dissect the nation, with 
Washington, D. C, state capitals and important cities as 
points of conversion ; connecting lines to be as straight as 
possible. 



January 7, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Local News of the Week at a Glance 



For Those Away From Home 



Recent graduates from California nursing schools who 
desire to register with the State will have an opportunity 
on March 7th to submit to examinations necessary, so 
the Bureau of Registration of Nurses, Department of 
Public Health, announces. The examinations will be held 
simultaneously in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Sacra- 
mento. 



Plans for one of the largest and highest aerial beacons 
in the world, with an output rated at 20,000,000 candle 
power for the summit of Mount Diablo have been an- 
nounced by J. P. Worthington, airway extension superin- 
tendent of the Department of Commerce. The light, the 
only one of its kind in the world, will serve to guide air- 
planes flying in the San Francisco district by night. 



Ransom Rideout of Berkeley has won the all-American 
prize for a full-length play, the contest being held under 
the auspices of Longmans, Green & Company and the 
Drama League of America. Several hundred plays were 
sent in, thirty-seven states being represented in the con- 
test. The Berkeley man entered his play, "Deep River," 
which was produced by the Berkeley Play-house Associa- 
tion last season and won much acclaim at the time. 



New Year's Eve at Tahoe Tavern, Lake Tahoe, staged 
a moving picture, not down on its holiday program. When 
the cook walked out and quit, Manager Jack Matthews 
donned the chef's cap and apron, appointed two cook's 
helpers as head cooks, and with the help of dishwashers, 
bus boys and waitresses, labored manfully at his job 
until relief came. After dinner, the following day, when 
the guests caught on, they brought Matthews into the 
dining room and gave him three rousing cheers. Early 
this week Matthews came to San Francisco to enjoy the 
cooking of some one else, for a change. 



Free mention of the efficacy of mob lynch law in the 
past, and vehement attacks on a judicial system which 
permits delays and paroles, marked a sensational meeting 
of the Los Angeles police commission, last Tuesday in 
the southern city. The debate, in which indignation over 
the Hickman case reached white heat, arose during dis- 
cussion of a resolution to amend the law so that the pen- 
alty for kidnaping for ransom shall lie capital punish- 
ment, even in cases where kidnaped persons are not killed. 
Commissioner Insley stated that "he was not sure but 
that the old lynch law was a good thing in some in- 
stances." 



In good spirits and apparently none the worse for their 
experience, nineteen Boy Scouts and their three leaders, 
snowbound in the mountains since last Tuesday, returned 
to their homes here and to neighboring towns, early Sun- 
day morning, last. The party included Vernon Baird, 
Modesto, scout executive of the Yosemite Council, in 
charge of the party, and two other scout leaders. A. R. 
Martin of Sonora and Sheldon Smith of Modesto, and the 
following Scouts: Jim Reynolds. Roland Hunt. Wardell 
Julius and John Simms, all of Modesto; Harold Bowen. 
Raymond Greenhill and Robert Hill, all of Empire: Paul 
Leedon. Arthur Adams. NorvaJ Roper. Conald Cook and 
Buddie Walters of Turlock: Joseph Cabral of Crows Land- 
ing: Lyle Macomber, Howard and Arthur Kingston and 
Jim McFerren of Riverbank, and Francis Herron and 
Frank Davis Jr. of Sonora. 



Two hundred Olympians dived into the Pacific Ocean 
last Sunday, New Year's Day, in the thirty-fifth annual 
New Year's run and dip of the Olympic Club. The very 
thought of those chilling waves in the cold drizzle of New 
Year's morn was enough to make a stay-at-home swoon, 
but the brave Club swimmers performed their usual 
stunt, not one of them turning back at the water's edge. 



All moneys expended by public utility corporations for 
political purposes must hereafter be reported in itemized 
detail in the annual statements submitted to the State 
of California Railroad Commission. The reports must also 
be submitted under oath. The drastic order is said to be 
the direct result of charges made that Los Angeles power 
companies spent large sums of money to defeat a bond 
election in that city. 



Mrs. Helen Evelyn Partridge, mother of the late Fed- 
eral Judge John S. Partridge, passed away Thursday last 
at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Beatrice Wilmans, in 
Berkeley, after an illness of three years. Mrs. Partridge 
was a California pioneer, leaving her home, Batesville, 
Arkansas, with her parents, at the age of seven years 
and crossing the plains to California in an ox-team. Her 
husband, the late John C. Partridge, was one of the orig- 
inal founders of the Masonic lodge in this State. 



At this writing, Ina Coolbrith, "poet laureate" of Cali- 
fornia, lies very ill at the home of her niece, Mrs. Finlay 
Cook, 2906 Webster street, Oakland. Miss Coolbrith, who 
came overland to California in a "covered wagon," at the 
age of five years, has spent all her life, since that time, 
in California, with the exception of a few years' visit to 
the East. She is the last of the "old guard," which in- 
cluded such men as Bret Harte, Mark Twain, Ambrose 
Bierce, Joaquin Miller, Herbert Bashford, Talisien Evans 
and others whose names have gone down to posterity as 
brilliant writers. 



A musical event that will evidence closer relationship 
of San Francisco and Los Angeles, took place this week, 
when the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, Alfred 
Hertz, conductor, went to Los Angeles, and the Philhar- 
monic Orchestra of the southern city, George Schnee- 
voigt, came north. This fs the first time in the seventeen 
years since formation of the Symphony, that it has visited 
Los Angeles, and it is likewise the first time that the 
rhilharmonic has played in San Francisco. The latter 
will give a concert at the Curran Friday and Saturday 
and a pop concert at the Exposition Auditorium Saturday 
night. 



The national character of a people can be formed by 
exalting and elevating the virtue of its notable men; the 
efficiency of its system of justice and government; its 
heroic greatness ; its puissant industrial mechanism ; its 
commercial progress and of all those other factors in 
which they might take pride. But in order to do this it 
is not necessary to infect the children with hatreds and 
rancours toward other peoples of different race, habits 
and ideals. We should, on the contrary, speak to them of 
the virtues and the racial qualifications that are charac- 
teristic to every people and country, be they weak or 
powerful, big or small. We should make them see what 
each race and nation has contributed or can contribute to 
the welfare of the world. We should make them under- 
stand that civilization is the result of the efforts of all 
nations and the contribution of all races. 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 7, 1928 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




On the Air 
By C. J. Pennington 

Sunday, January 8 

The NBC Pacific Coast Network 
radio audience will be offered the sec- 
ond of the new two hour Sunday aft- 
ernoon programs from 3 to 5 o'clock 
today. 

Beginning at 5:30, the Crosley Mos- 
cow Art Orchestra, under the direc- 
tion of Max Dolin, will open the pro- 
gram with the Crosley Bandbox 
March, written by Arno Arriga. 

During the hour from 6:30 to 7:30 
NBC Pacific Coast Network listeners 
will be presented with another of 
those delightful hours of symphony 
by the Standard Symphony Orches- 
tra. 

Rudy Seiger's Shell Symphonists' 
second program of the New Year will 
be broadcast over the NBC Pacific 
Coast Network tonight in the hour 
from 8 to 9 o'clock. 



Monday, January 9 

NBC Pacific Coast Network listen- 
ers will be brought another Spotlight 
Hour from 10 to 11 o'clock. The Spot- 
light Hour is built around the idea of 
a magic spotlight, shining on an im- 
aginary revolving stage and bringing 
back hits from the shows of the clays 
when syncopation was in its swad- 
dling clothes. 

Following its usual custom of de- 
voting each program to one type of 
music, the concert to be given over 
the NBC Pacific Coast Network by 
the Eveready Salon Orchestra, spon- 
sored by the National Carbon Com- 
pany, will be of Spanish music, Tues- 
day evening January 10 between 8 
and 8:30. 

The eleventh auction bridge game 
of the weekly series will be broadcast 
over the NBC Pacific Coa"t Network 
tonight from 8:30 to 9 o'clock. 



"Phoebe" is the O. Henry story to 
be presented in dramatic form as the 
Retold Tale feature broadcast over 
the NBC Pacific Coast Network to- 
night from 9 to 9:30. 

The NBC Rounders will offer a 
roundup of captivating harmony to 
the Pacific Coast Network radio audi- 
ence in the half hour from 9 :30 to 10 
o'clock tonight. 

* * * 

Wednesday, January 11 

The NBC Vagabonds will be on the 
air from 9 to 10 o'clock to give Pacific 
Coast Network listeners the atmos- 
phere of the arrival and departure of 
army transports at famous ports. 

* * * 

Thursday, January 12 

NBC Pacific Coast Network listen- 
ers, from 8 to 9 o'clock tonight, will 
be offered another musical treat in 
the Calpet Hour presented every 
other Thursday at this time by the 
California Petroleum Company. 

The Dodge Brothers, Inc. weekly 
presentation will be broadcast over 
the NBC Pacific Coast Network to- 
night from 9 to 9:30 o'clock. 

The fifth of the dainty, melodious 
half-hour programs broadcast over 
the NBC Pacific Coast Network under 
the title of "Moon Magic" will be on 
the air over the Network Thursday 
night January 12, from 9:30 to 10 

o'clock. 

* * * 

Friday, January 13 

NBC Pacific Coast Network listen- 
ers will be taken to the Magic Isle for 
another Wrigley Hour from 8 to 9 
o'clock. 

The Hour in Memory Lane to be 
broadcast over the NBC Pacific Coast 
Network tonight from 9 to 10 o'clock 
features exclusively the music of 
Harry Von Tilzer, prolific composer 
of popular songs and ballads. 



Saturday, January 14 

Radio listeners tuning in on the 
stations of the Pacific Coast Network 
of the NBC this evening will hear the 
first of tonight's programs between 
8 and 9 o'clock. 

Another period of varied music en- 
tertainment will be offered NBC Pa- 
cific Coast Network radio listeners in 
the Philco Hour broadcast from 9 to 
10 o'clock. 

The radio audience of the NBC Pa- 
cific Coast Network will be entertain- 
ed with another two hour dance pro- 
gram tonight from 10 to 12 o'clock. 



Programs for Next Week 

KFRC— DON LEE 
SAN FRANCISCO — (54 
Sunday, January 8 

10 :00 to 12 :00 noon — Home, Sweet Home Concert. 
12 noon to 1 :00 p. m. — Church service. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m.— S & W Recital. 

5 :00 to 6 :00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Talk. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins concert orchestra. 

7 :30 to 8 :30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KFRC dance orchestra. 

Monday, January 9 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

9:00 to 9:10 p. m. — Shopping service. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 

2 :00 to 4 :00 p. m. — S & W special program. 

4:80 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 6:00 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6:00 to 6:20 p. m. — Joe Mendel and Pep Band. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen, police reports. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Sports talk 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — The Hawaiians. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Blue Monday Jamhoree. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KFRC Dance Orchestra. 

Tuesday, January 10 

7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 
11:30 a. m. to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 
12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:10 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 



:10 to 6:20 p. 
6:20 to 6:30 p. 
6:30 to 6:50 p. 
6:50 to 7:00 p. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. 
8 :00 to 10:00 r 
10:00 to 12:00 ] 



-With stamp collectors. 

-Stage and screen. 

— The Cecilians. 

—Investment talk. 

— The Cecelians 

t. — Studio program. 

1, — Dance orchestra. 



Wednesday, January 11 

7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m.— Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryout period. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay concert. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6 :20 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

S :00 to 9:00 p. m. — Maxwell House Coffee program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Fancies of former days. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

Thursday. January 12 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

S :00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 

4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 



5:30 to 6:10 p. 
6:10 to 6:20 p. 
6:20 to 6:30 p 
6:30 to 7:00 p. 
7:00 to 7:30 p 
8:00 to 9 :00 p. m.- 
9:00 to 9:45 p. m.— 
9:45 to 10:00 p. m. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. i 
11:00 to 12:00 p. r 



-Mac and his Gang. 
. — Beauty talk. 

.—Stage. Screen. Police reports. 
— Sports talk. 
. — The Hawaiians. 
— Mona Motor Oil Co. 
—KFRC Movie Club. 

-Airplane flying lesson. 

i. — Dance orchestra. 

. — Balconades Dance Orchestra. 



Friday. January 13 

7:00 to 8:00 p. m.— Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Hints to home-makers. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 
12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 
4 :00 to 4 :30 p. m. — Student hour. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5 :30 to 6 :20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
6-20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— The Cecilians. 
8 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m — Dance orchestra. 

Saturday. January 14 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:45 a. m.— Amateur tryouts. 

11:15 to 12:00 noon — Announcements of Sunday 

church sermons. 
12-00 to 1:00 p. m.— Sherman. Clny concert 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m.— Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
6-20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

5 :00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m, T 



-Dance program. 



January 7, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



Kl'n— HALE BROTHERS AND THE CHRONICLE 
SAN FRANCISCO — 122 

Sunday. Janunry 8 

9:46 to 10:30 a. m. — Church services. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Schubert program. 

1:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
4:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Mixed Quartet. 
■ :'M\ i<> 7 :80 p. m.— Symphony orchestra. 
7:80 to 8:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

3:80 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orches- 
tra. 
Monday, January 9 

, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m. — Health exercises. 
8 :00 tu 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10:30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
R80 to 7:30 p. m. — KPO Orchestra. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Musical program. 
10:00 p. m. to 12 midnight — KPO's variety hour. 
Tuesday, January 10 

tl : 15, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m.— Health exercises. 
8:00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 
10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Organ recital. 

8:00 to 11:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
Wednesday. January 11 

6 :45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m.— Health exercises. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
10:45 a. m. — Home service talk. 
ll:3f) tu 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
6:00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer Bervice. 
fi:30 to 7:30 p. m. — KPO Orchestra. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Atwater Kent ArtiBts. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Abas String Quartette. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO Dance Orchestra. 
Thursday. January 12 

6 :46, 7 :15 and 7 : 15 a. m. — Health exercisea. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 
10:30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
3:80 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 
1:H<> to 5:00 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 
6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:80 to 7:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Book review and sports. 
1.00 to 9:00 p. m. — Caswell Hour. 
0:i»(i to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m— Piano Novelties. 
Friday. January 13 

6:45, 7 :15 and 7 :45 a. m.— Health exercises. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
£0:80 to 10:46 a. m. — Ye Towne Oyer service. 
10:46 a. m. — Home aervice talk. 
B:8Q a. m. to 12:45 p. m.— Kane's Hawaiians. 
I'l noon -Time signals. Scripture reading. 
12:45 p. m. — Commonwealth luncheon at Palace Hotel. 
1:80 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 
6:00 i" 0:nn p, m.— Children's hour. 
|l00 to 0:H0 p. m.- Ye Towne Cryet service. 
fftBO i" i :80 i>. m. — Organ recital. 
s mi to 9:00 p, m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 i" 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m, KPO Dance Orchestra. 
Saturday, January 14 

LS and 7 :46 a. m. — Health exercisea. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m, Sperry Flour happy hour. 
li» : on to 10:30 a. m, Domestic economist, 
in ;80 to 10 : 16 a. m.- Y. Towi ■ Cryer. 
i :00 p. m, Kane's Hawaiians. 

1 '_' in Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 
2 :00 p. m. Pootbail. 

■ p, m. — Children's hour. 
i. no to 6 80 p m Ye I ■■■■■ ne Cryer service. 
KPO Dane- Orchestra. 
to 12:00 p. m. -National Bro mpany. 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS. 
SAM FRANCISCO— 267 

Sunday, January s 

o 9 :00 p m. -Church ser^ 

in :00 p, m, Si udio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Dane* proitrara. 
Monday, January 9 

Breakfast program. 

■n. -V S, weather reports. 
11:00 a. m.- Interior Decorating. 
1 :00 p. m.— Luncheon pn 
1:00 to 1:80 p. m.- Country store. 

i - rt. 
5:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 



7:00 lo 7:15 p. m.— Sports, talk. 

7 :16 to 7 :30 p. m. — Advertising tnlk. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m.— Darneille Sister. 

8:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 

10:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:08 to 11:00 p. m.— Dance music. 

Tuesday. January 10 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m. — Breakfast program, 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m,— Concert. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

10 :00 p. m.— Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 10:30 p. m.— Novelty program. 

10:30 to 11:00 p. m. — Program of popular music. 

Wednesday, January 11 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

Thursday. January 12 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m.— Breakfast program. 

10 :27 to 10 :30 a. m.— U. S. weather reports. 

10:30 to 11:00 a. m. — Fashion hints. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m.— Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour program. 

7 :00 to 7 :15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7 :15 to 7 :30 p. m. — Art course. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— KFWI Gypsy band. 

Friday. January 13 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. —Exercise hour. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Musical luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. —Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m.— Program. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m.— Sports hy Geo. T. Davis, 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

s:0ii to 0:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Dance program. 

10 :00 P. m. — Weather and police reports. 

L0:08 to Hi:30 p. m.— Gloria Del Rae 

10:30 to 11:00 p. m. — Popular program. 

Saturday. January 14 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Exercise hour. 

8 :20 to 10 :27 a. m. — Musical breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10 :30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

5:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. -Construction reports. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 P. m.~ Dinner hour concert. 

B ;00 to 9 :00 p. m. Studio program. 
> mi to 10:00 p. m.— Harriet Lewis. 

10:00 to 12:80 p. m. — KFWI surprise party. 

KJBS— JI'LITS BRIXTON & SONS 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 

Sundav. January 8 

1:30 to 3:30 p. ni. -Instrument and vocal selections. 

3:30 to 5:00 p. m. -Dance music. 

Monday. Janunry !' 

9:00 to 12:00 m. Instrument and vocal select! 

1:80 to 7:80 p. m. -Instrument and rocal selections. 

.. 0:00 p. m. -Instrument and vocal selections. 

o 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday. January 10 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m.— Instrument and vocal sel< 

I p. m. -Instrument and vocal selections. 

o 9:00 p. m. -Ortho 
■i : oii to U:00 p. <■■■■ Club meeting. 

Wednesday. January 11 ... 

9-00 to 12:00 B. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m. -Instrument and vocal selections. 

no p. m. Orthophonk recital. 

Thursday. January IS . . • _*s 

9-00 to 12:00 a. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m. -Instrument and vocal selections. 

ram. 
Friday. January 13 

Q-00 to 12:00 a. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:80 to 7:30 p. m. -Instrument and vocal selections. 

bo 0:80 p m. — Dance music. 

• 11 :00 p. m.— -Studio program. 

Saturday. January 14 ,,..-„ 

9-00 to 1° *0fl a m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 

o 7:30 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 

KI.X— OAKLAND TRIBUNE 
OAKLAND— 508 

Monday. January 9 

to 11:30 a. m. — Economies hour. 

bo 1 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

•N P. m. —Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 



to 7 :30 p. m.— News broaden 
8:00 (o 9:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 
9:00 to lo:ou p. m. -Weekly meeting of Lake M<w- 

ritt Ducks. 
Tuesday, January 10 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11 :30 to 1 :00 p. m. Luncheon concert. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.- — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Special program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Wednesday. January 11 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — luncheon concert. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Educational program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Variety hour. 
Thursday. January 12 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Hawaiian Orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Special program. 
Friday, January 13 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
0:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Variety hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Athens Athletic Club Orchestra. 
Saturday, January 14 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
fi:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC 
OAKLAND— 394 
Sunday, January 8 
11 :00 a. m.— Church service. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
3:00 to 7:30 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
7 :30 p. m. — Weather report. 
7:35 to 9:00 p. m. — Church services. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
Monday. January 9 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:00 p. m.— Weather. 
3:30 to 4:00 p. m.— Women's Clubs. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — St. Francis Orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— KCO Kiddies' Klub. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Shell Company program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m— The Pilgrims. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Co. 
Tuesday. January 10 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon Concert. 
12:30, weather: 1:00, weather: 1:03. S. F. stocks: 

1 :0S. N. Y. stocks, 
fi :00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dance Orchestra. 
6:55. news; 7:03, weather; 7:08, S. F. produce, grain, 

cotton; 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23. N. Y. 

stocks (closing). 
8:00 to B:80 p. m.— Eveready hour. 
8:80 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
Wednesday. January 1 1 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather; 1:00. weather; 1:03. S. F. stocks; 

1:08 N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

" :00 p. m. — Sunklst dinner hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Farm program. 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m — Vaud. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. -St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Thursday. January 12 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03. S. F. stocks: 

1 :08, N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 5:15 p. m. — Mental Measurements. 
5:15 to 6:00 p. m. — "Friend to Boys." 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:55 p. m. — News: 7:05. weather; 7:08, S. F. produce. 

crain. cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, 

N. Y. stocks (closing). 
B:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Friday. January 13 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03. S. F. stocks; 

M. Y stocks. 
5:30 p.m. — Wise man from the Land-O-Health. 
6:00 to 6:15 p. m. — Dinner concert program. 
ti :4G to fi :65 p. m. — "Weekly Financial Review." 
6:55. news: 7 :0.i. weather; 7 :0S. S. F. produce, erain. 

cotton: 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, N. Y. 

stocks (closing i - 

10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.-- Dance music. 
Saturday. January 14 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:80, weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m.— Weather, news. 
- 

11:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 7, 1928 



KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY. INC 
LOS ANGELES— 468 

Sunday, January 8 

10 :00 a. m. — Morning services. 

1:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

3 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

5:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

6 :30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7 :35 p. m. — Bob Buckner and Orchestra. 
8:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:30 p. m. — Albin Trio. 

10 :00 p. m. — Packard Orchestra. 

Monday. January 9 

5 :30 p. m. — Leon Rene and Orchestra. 
6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 

6:30 p. m. — Glenn Edwards and Orchestra. 

7 :00 p. m. — Gene Johnston's Music Box hour. 

S:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 p. m. — Composers hour. 

10:00 p. m. — Metropolitan Dance Orchestra. 

Tuesday, January 10 

5:30 p. m. — The Dragon Hawaiians. 

6:00 p. m. — Florence Sanger. 

6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 

6:30 p. m.— Dick Campbell's Trio. 

7 :00 p. m. — L. A. Fire Dept. 

7:30 p. m.— Helen Guest. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Co. 

Wednesday. January 11 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m.— Gold Medal Talks. 

5 :30 p. m. — Sebastians Cotton Club Orchestra. 

f> :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 

6 :30 p. m. — Hal ChasnolT's orchestra. 
7:30 p. m. — Nick Harris Detective Stories. 
7:45 p. m. — William MacDougall. 

5 :00 p. m. — Maryon Bliss. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

iri;00 p. m.— Packard program. 

10:30 p. m. — N. C. Mills, violinist. 

Thursday. January 12 

5:30 p. m.- — Vernon Elkins and Orchestra. 

6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m. — Henry Starr. 

7 :00 p. m. — Program by the University of Southern 

California. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m. — Program of modern classical music. 
Fridav, January 13 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m.— Gold Medal Talks. 
5:30 p. m. — Paul McNally. 
6:00 p. m. — Florence Sanger. 
6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m. — Clarice Russell. 
7:00 p. m. — Artist Students Club. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m. — John Slingerland. 
Saturday, January 14 

5:30 p. m. — Strangers Social Club Orchestra. 
6 :15 p. m.— Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m.— Tarvin Sisters. 

7:30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado, Spanish Baritone. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard program. 
11:00 p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. 

KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO CO. 

SEATTLE— 348 
Sunday, January 8 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 
9:00 to 10:30 p. m.— Concert orchestra. 
Monday, January 9 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m.— Time signals, sport news. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 
10:00 to 10:30 p. m.— Dance music. 
10:30 to 12:30 p. m.— Goofy Bird Frolic. 
Tuesday, January 10 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
10 :00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 
Wednesday, January 11 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m.— Time signals. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Thursday. January 12 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Concert orchestra. 
10:00 p. m.— Time signals. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance music. 
Friday. January 13 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Instrumental trio. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 
Saturday, January 14 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Sport news. News items. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers Dance Orchestra. 

KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN 
PORTLAND— 491.5 
Sunday, January 8 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. program. 
10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Little Symphony orchestra. 
Monday, January 9 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 



7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Talk. 

S :00 to 9:00 p. m. — N. B. C. program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert hour. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Spot Light Hour. 

Tuesday, January 10 

G :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — -Musical program. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— Book review and talk. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Sealy Dance program. 

S:30 to 11:00 p. m. — N. B. C. program. 

Wednesday, January 11 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 

5 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. Program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Silver King Revellers. 
Thursday, January 12 
6:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 7 : 10 p. m. — Utility service. 
7:40 to 8:00 p. m. — Flower girls. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
Friday, January 13 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Concert. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Utility service and talk. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.~ -N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Concert. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m.— Keep Growing Wiser Order of 

Hoot Owls. 
Saturday, January 14 
G :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to S:00 p. m. — Concert. 
8:00 to 12:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 



Society 

(Continued from Page 4) 
Spring Blossoms 

California Spring Blossom and 
Wildflower Association members will 
meet at the Palace Hotel at 2 o'clock 
on Monday, January 9. Miss Kather- 
ine Chandler will preside and there 
will be an illustrated talk on wildflow- 
ers, animal life and forests by Pro- 
fessor 0. J. Kern under the title, "Sig- 
nificant Contacts With Out-Door 
Life." Professor Kern is a member 
of the faculty of the college of agri- 
culture at the University of Califor- 
nia. 



Engaged 

Mrs. Clancy Ross Dempster has an- 
nounced the engagement of her 
daughter, Miss Dorothy Leontine 
to Mr. Percy Monroe Spedden. 

The bride-elect is the daughter of 
the late Mr. Clancy Ross Dempster 
and Mrs. Dempster, and a sister of 
Mrs. F. L. de Jongh of Los Angeles. 

* * * 

Luncheon Party 

Mrs. M. G. Barnes of Oakland en- 
tertained at a luncheon on Tuesday 
afternoon in Drury Lane at the Hotel 
Whitcomb, honoring Mrs. G. H. Reier. 
After luncheon, Mrs. Barnes' guests 
played bridge in the roof garden. 

* * * 

Busy Month 
In Society 

The month of December was a busy 
one at Hotel Mark Hopkins. The 
Junior League Fashion Shows held 
each month at the Mark Hopkins are 
growing increasingly popular. They 
are filling the need, exemplifying as 
they do the correct way to wear the 
modes and novelties of the moment. 



Last Monday's show had as an inno- 
vation a display of fancy dresses. 
Among the manikins were : Miss 
Florence Veach, Miss Jacqueline 
Keesling, Miss Alma Walker, Miss 
Virginia Phillips, Mrs. August Vir- 
den, Mrs. James Moffitt and Miss Vail 
Jones whose debut took place on the 
previous Saturday night in the Room 
of the Dons and the Spanish room at 
the Mark Hopkins. 

* * * 

Mrs. Kilborn Moore, nee Aileen 
Doe, who spends a great deal of her 
time at Diamond Springs where Mr. 
Moore is engaged in the lumber in- 
dustry — is stopping at the Mark Hop- 
kins. She arranged a party in honor 
of her daughter, Miss Aileen Johnson, 
held at the Women's City Club. 

* * * 

Colonel and Mrs. Frank C. Bolles, 
Major and Mrs. Alfred Rockwood, 
Lieutenant and Mrs. George A. Mc- 
Kay, Captain Victor Parks and Miss 
Alice Bell were the guests of honor at 
a dinner dance given by the 302nd 
Gas Regiment at the Hotel Mark 
Hopkins. 

Celebrity Tea 

Laurel Conwell Bias presided at a 
charming celebrity tea given last 
Thursday in the Laurel Court of the 
Fairmont Hotel, when Mary Shaw, 
principal of the company now appear- 
ing in this city in "The Cradle Song," 
was honor guest. 

Tables were spread in the refresh- 
ing Laurel Court, with members of 
the company seated with Mary Shaw 
and other hostesses of the delightful 
occasion. Mrs. Bias sat at the head 
table, her guests included Mary Shaw, 
famous for her Iben roles. 

Blanche Bates (Mrs. George Creel) 
introduced Mary Shaw to the 250 
guests at this notable tea in the man- 
ner for which Blanche Bates is known, 
sparkling with wit and thrilling the 
guests with her marvelous voice. 

Mary Hones, who takes the role of 
the novice in "The Cradle Song," was 
especially entertained. Phyllis Ran- 
kin, Harry Davenport, the principal 
in the role of doctor in the great Eva 
LeGallienne production, were promi- 
nent guests and were formally intro- 
duced by Laurel Conwell Bias in her 
delightful and gracious way. Zita 
Johann, who takes the part of the 
young girl adopted by the nuns, sat 
with Mrs. Bias. 



Whitcomb Notes 

The marriage of Miss Helen Lucille 
Johnson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
George E. Johnson, to Allen T. Cook- 

(Continued on Page 17) 






January 7, 1928 

Lindbergh's Success Was Not 
"Luck," But Work 

Lindbergh has told the story of his 
"barnstorming" days through the 
West and South, when he played 
tramp in the air, selling joy-rides in 
patched-up Jennies for §5 a ride; he 
has given account of his rigid Army 
training at Brooks and Kelly fields; 
and he has described how, while the 
"Spirit of St. Louis" was building out 
in San Diego, he studied (and that 
with expert advice) the charts of the 
North Atlantic, the winds, the weath- 
er reports, the temperature varia- 
tions, and worked out the plan which 
made it possible for him to be his own 
most efficient navigator in the first 
and only perfect point-to-point air- 
plane crossing the Atlantic. 

For the flight to Mexico he did the 
same thing. It was his own chart, 
worked out with the hydrographers 
in Washington, which guided his 
course as far as the border and was 
so up-to-the-minute to his hour of de- 
parture — suddenly decided though it 
was — that it hit weather conditions 
along the route nearly enough to en- 
able him to make the 2,000-mile hop 
within his estimated time allowance, 
plus one hour — in spite of two hours 
lost by getting off his course in the 
fog after passing Tampico. 

Even Lindbergh cannot always hold 
his course exactly. If he strays from 
his course or is forced off it, he has 
studied out means of finding it again. 

On the Atlantic flight, for instance, 
he had to fly around cloud obstacles — 
even once to turn back on his course 
to find more open weather conditions 
— he even came down within a few 
feet of the waves and made estimates 
of the direction and velocity of the 
wind from the way the foam flecks 
from the whitecaps were borne. He 
knew, likewise, the value of what he 
calls the "air cushion" close to the 
surface of the land or the water for 
making flying easier — and made good 
use of his knowledge. 

There is thus a method in Lind- 
bergh, and whatever other things 
that are in him that count — his clean, 
clear-cut personality, his simplicity, 
his high courage, his invincible cool- 
ness of youth (a rare kind of cool- 
ness) — it is Lindbergh's thorough 
method which goes far to explain his 
extraordinary control of the two fac- 
tors of his success — the two instru- 
ments of flying, his machine and him- 
self. 



Mr. Richard Aurandt was the host 
at a dinner dance on New Year's Eve 
in Drury Lane, at the Hotel Whit- 
comb. About the dinner table, which 
was decorated with fall flowers, were 
seated the host and Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Hodges, Mr. Earl Williams, 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Melville. Mr. 
Edward Bernard. Miss Ann Ann. Miss 
Leona Westcott and Miss Billie Hig- 

gins. 

* * * 

The announcements of two en- 
gagements, whieh are of interest to a 
wide circle of friends, were made at 
a dinner party which took place on 
Monday evening in Drury Lane. The 
engaged couples are Miss Helen M. 
Gordon and Mr. James W. Maloney 
and Miss Marie A. Fiane. who is to 
marry Mr. Charles Hause. The guest 
list included Mrs. Florence Widholm. 
Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Gordon. Mr. and 
Mrs. F. \Y. Gordon. Mr. and Mrs. H. 
B. Theetge, Miss Ann H. Elliott and 
Mr. Maurice Smith. 



Great Britain thinks we ought to The Russian experiment proves 
^..t our tariff. The chickens next door nothing, except that when the train 
think we ought to leave our gate turns over the upper berths are low- 
open. — American Lumberman. ers. — Martins Ferry Times. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Society 

(Continued from Page 16) 

sey, of Monterey, took place in San 
Francisco on Saturday evening, De- 
cember 31. The couple was married 
at the First Presbyterian Church by 
the Rev. Wm. E. Guthrie, in the pres- 
ence of a small group of relatives and 
intimate friends. 

The ceremony was immediately fol- 
lowed by a wedding supper and recep- 
tion at the Hotel Whitcomb, where 
the bride and her parents have been 
residing. The bride's only attendant 
was Miss Janet Edwards, of Berkeley, 
a former school friend. 

Mrs. Cooksey is a graduate of the 
New England Conservatory of Music 
in Boston and is well known in musi- 
cal circles in the Northwest and in 
the Bay district. She is also a former 
student at the University of Califor- 
nia. Immediately after the reception, 
the young couple left for their future 
home in Monterey, where Cooksey is 
identified with the Industrial Asso- 
ciation. Before going so.uth, the 
bride-to-be was considerably enter- 
tained by her friends in Portland, fol- 
lowing the announcement of her en- 
gagement, early in the fall. 

After the holidays, Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson, parents of the bride, will go 
south to spend the remainder of the 
winter at Long Beach. 



17 



— NOW IN OUR 30TH YEAR — 

WADE AND RUEGG 

Tailors 

Fall Woolens 

Now on Display 



Special Line of 
"SPORTEX" 

Scotch Sport Material 



Suite 201 — 12 Geary Street 

Phone Kearny 2866 
San Francisco 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 



Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
active, Hot Sulphur Water. Tub Baths and 
Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 



T. H. CORCORAN. Agua Caliente. 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judah 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The Finest Meals in the 
VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms — Clean Linen — Clean Everything 
Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

TELEPHONE 110 



WHEN IN PANAMA 
MAKE 

HOTEL CENTRAL 

Cathedral Plaza 
YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 

Andrew Johnston, Manager 



cut 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 18K4 

The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 7, 1928 



MINIATURES of YOURSELF 

or members of your family 

make appreciated and valued 

presents. 

Last a Life Time 

QLTS 



149 POWELL STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Bfbks 



R\ML ELDERS 

239 Post Street, San Francisco 




N. Wj CORNER 

POLK ANt) POST STS. 




'HCttD GRAPHS 



ive Forever 



Art Notes 

The American Academy in Rome 
has announced its annual competi- 
tions for fellowships in architecture, 
painting, sculpture, musical compo- 
sition, and classical studies. In the 
fine arts the competitions are open to 
unmarried men not over 30 years of 
age who are citizens of the United 
States; in classical studies to unmar- 
ried citizens, men or women. 

Fortunately the academy has been 
able to increase the stipend to S1500 
a year, and also to grant an allowance 
of 8500 for travel. Residence and 
studio are provided free of charge at 
the academy, and the total estimated 
value of each fellowship is about 
S2500. 

The Grand Central Art Galleries of 
New York City will present free 
membership in the galleries to the 
painter and sculptor who wins the 
Rome prize and fulfills the obligations 
of the fellowship. 

Entries for all competitions will be 
received until March 1. Circulars of 
information and application blanks 
may be secured by addressing Roscoe 
Guernsey, executive secretary, Amer- 
ican Academy in Rome, 101 Park ave- 
nue, New York City. 

* * * 

Santa Cruz will be the mecca for 
many of California's outstanding ar- 
tists from February 1st to 15th, 
1928, when the first annual art ex- 
hibit will be held in the sun parlors 
and bay view room in the auditorium 
at the beach. Three cash prizes of 
S100 each will be awarded for the best 
pictures in oils, pastels and water 
colors. All entries must be filed with 
Mrs. Bert M. Rose, chairman art ex- 
hibit committee, Rose Arbor, Santa 
Cruz, California, on or before Janu- 
ary 25th. 

Mrs. Rose states that the response 
received from artists throughout the 
state exceeds all expectations. The 
exhibit is sponsored by the Santa 
Cruz Art League. The judges are N. 
H. Clapp, manager of the Oakland 
Art Gallery; H. L. Dungan, art editor 
of the Oakland Tribune; Miss Eliza- 
beth Carlton Fortune of Monterey, 

and Harry N. Pratt of Berkeley. 

* * * 

The portrait of Thomas Jefferson, 
painted from life by Gilbert Stuart, 
portrait artist and painter of George 
Washington, has just arrived from 
Scotland, having been purchased by 
the Babcock Galleries, New York 
City. The sudden appearance of this 
famous picture has startled the art 
world and has been accepted as the 
most important piece of Americana 
by leading connoisseurs. Its return 
to America is hailed with delight by 
art lovers and the public in genera!. 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 



Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 



Dividend Notices 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 
526 California St land Branches), San Francisco 



For the quarter year ending December 31st, 1927, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four and 
one-quarter (4>'i) per cent per annum on all deposits, 
payable on and after January 3rd, 192K. Dividends 
not called for are added to the deposit account and 
earn interest from January 1st, 1928. Deposits made 
on or before January 10th, 1928, will earn ink- rest 
from January 1st, 1928. 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Secretary. 



ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST COMPANY 

(Savings Departments) 

Main Bank, Market and Sansome Sts. 

Branch Banks: 101 Market street 

Market and Ellis streets 

Market and Jones si roots 

Fillmore and Geary streets 

Third and Twentieth streets 

Mission and Sixteenth streets 

Geary street and Twentieth avenue 

For the half year ending December 31, 1927, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of FOUR 
AND ONE-QUARTER (4»il PER CENT per an- 
num on all savings deposits, payable on or after 
Tuesday, January 3. 192S. Dividends nut called Eor 
are added to and bear the same rate of interest 
as the principal from January 1, 102s. DEPOSITS 
MADE ON OR BEFORE JANUARY 10. 1928, 
WILL EARN INTEREST FROM JANUARY 1, 
1928. 

LOUIS SUTTER, 
Vice-President and Cashier. 



BANK OF ITALY, National Trust and Savings As- 
sociation. Head office and San Francisco branches 
— For the half year ending December 31, 1927, a 
dividend has been declared at the rale of four per 
cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 
on and after Tuesday. January 3. 1928, Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same rate 
of interest as the principal from January 1, 1928. 
Savings deposits made on (he first business day "f 
any month (or on or before the tenth day of 
January, April, July and October) will earn inter- 
est from the first of that month; deposits made 
after that dale will earn interest from the first of 
the following month. SAVINGS DEPOSITS MADE 
TO AND INCLUDING JANUARY 10. WILL EARN 
INTEREST FROM JANUARY 1. 

JAMES A. BACIGALUPI. President. 



CROCKER FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY, 
corner Post and Montgomery sts.- For the half 
year ending December 31. 1927. a dividend lias 
been decls red al the rate of four per ceni per 
annum on all savings deposits, payable on and 
after Tuesday. January 3. 1928. IT IS NOT 
NECESSARY TO PRESENT PASS BOOKS ON 
JANUARY 3, FOR THE ENTRY OF DIVIDENDS 
as dividends not called for are added to depn-it 
account and earn dividend from January 1, 1928. 
Deposits made on or before the fifth day of any 
month tor the tenth day of January. April. July 
and October i will earn interest from the first of 

that month ; deposits made after Baid dates w i I] 

earn interest from the first of the following month. 
M. R. CLARK. Casl 



January 7, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Placement Bureau in New Quarters 

The Community Placement Bureau, 
an office employment bureau, organiz- 
ed and conducted by San Francisco 
employers, has moved to new quar- 
ters, from 67 Sutter street to the 
Hunter-Dulin building, easily acces- 
sible to employers and applicants. 

The new offices, located on the 
fourth floor, will provide better fa- 
cilities and comforts for the carrying 
on of this growing 1 organization, 
which bases its success on the idea of 
a fixed fee of 10 per cent of the first 
month's salary, and no charge to the 
employer. 

This low fee has been made possible 
only through the co-operation of the 
business firms in need of the best 
available office help, who desire to 
protect their employes from the pay- 
ment of large fees in order to secure 
employment. 



At Elder's 

Charles Caldwell Dobie, author of 
"The Arrested Moment," will appear 
in an author's afternoon in the Paul 
Elder Gallery Saturday, January 14, 
at 2:30 o'clock. He will speak on 
"What is a Happy Ending." Uffing- 
ton Valentine, literary critic of the 
San Francisco Argonaut, will contrib- 
ute to the program with a review of 
Mr. Dobie's literary work, particular- 
ly referring to his volume of brilliant 
short stories entitled "The Arrested 
Moment." The interested public is 
cordially invited. 

Dr. Will Durant, whose "Story of 
Philosophy" has been a best seller for 
the past two years, is being tendered 
an author's evening in the Paul Elder 
Gallery Monday, January 16, at 8:15 
o'clock. This will afford the interest- 
ed public the opportunity to hear Dr. 
Durant speak in an informal manner 
on the general subject of his work. 
He may enlarge somewhat upon his 
recently published book, "Transition: 
A Mental Autobiography." in which 
he is said to voice the deepest philo- 
sophical urge of his age. There is no 
admission charge. 



Just welcomed into the now famous 
National Canada Dry Hole-in-One 
Club are the following new members: 
Mr. Arthur Whiting. Mt. Diablo Coun- 
try Club. California — Scored a hole- 
in-one while playing on course of 
Castlewood Country Club. Pleasanton, 
California: Mr. A. H. Hooker. 327 
Merritt. St.. Turlock, California: Mr. 
M. Spazer, Monterey Peninsula Coun- 
try Club, Del Monte, California: Mr. 
Frank W. Cournun. 6814 Geary St.. 
San Francisco, California. 



Film Flicks 

Joan Crawford, heroine of Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer's production of "Rose 
Marie," is to have another of the most 
important roles of the year, succeed- 
ing the French Canadian heroine. She 
is to play the heroine of "The Tide 
of Empire," Peter B. Kyne's romance 
of the West. In view of the present 
year's screen epic being "The Trail of 
'98," a romance of the Klondyke gold 
rush, choice of a story surrounding 
the days of '49 for the next big pro- 
duction. 



Christmas turkey almost caused a 
strike in the camp of the Cossacks 
playing in Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's 
new John Gilbert vehicle, "The Cos- 
sacks," when Gilbert planned a tur- 
key dinner for the Russian riders. 
Emissaries "tipped" him that the 
Cossacks could not eat of birds that 
fly during the holy season. They com- 
promised with barbecued suckling pig 
instead. During the Yuletide, it 
seems, Cossacks hold birds of the air 
sacred for three days — a recognition 
of the dove as a symbol of the Holy 
Ghost. 



Monte Blue, Robert Anderson, and 
other players are now on the Pacific, 
enroute to the South Sea Islands, 
where they will join Robert Flaherty 
and W. S. Van Dyke, engaged in the 
filming of "Southern Skies," Flaher- 
ty's new romance of the tropics. They 
will join the company at Papeete. 
The remainder of the cast is a native 
one. The story tells of the arrival of 
the first white men in the South Seas. 



The old "Norwall," famous clipper 
ship of early Pacific shipping history, 
and which has perhaps seen more 
thrilling adventures in and among 
Oriental ports than any vessel on the 
Pacific Coast, is now a floating studio 
for Ramon Novarro. In the old ves- 
sel, cruising in Pacific waters, No- 
varro is at work on his vehicle. 
"China Bound." with Joan Crawford 
as heroine, and Ernest Torrence. 
Louis Wolheim, Duke Martin and a 
notable cast, under the direction of 
William Nigh. 



Model Jane 



Both beautiful and dumb 

My own true love must be : 
Beautiful, so I'll love her — 
And dumb, so she'll love me. 

—Life. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime. Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



T Y PEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 
Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office and Works: 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury BldB.) 

Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called for and Delivered 




NEW ORLEANS 

To better serve our many fhends and 
patrons over J 4oo.ooo has been ex- 
pended in reconstruction to maintain 

this famous hostelry as 
One of Americas Leadur? Hotels 

ACCOMMODATING IOOO GUESTS 

Lar?e rooms with unusually hiyh 
Ceilinjs and food ventilation ab- 
solutely essential to the Southern 
climate make for perfect comfort- 

Alfred S. Amer & Co. Ltd. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA. 
Send for oesenptrw? folder Ticket offices of 
Illustrated MaidiCras all Transportation 
Program lor the asking Lines in Lobby 

fflbf Roosevelt 

PHOENIX. ARIZONA 

*HJheK WuiurTikvcrQmes' 

OPINING OCTOBER 1918 

,Al/ft£D S AmER m 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 7. 1928 



One Hundred and Twentieth Half Yearly Report 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 



SAVINGS 



INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th. 1868 



COMMERCIAL 



One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Assets __ DECEMBER 31st, 1927 

United States Bonds and Treasury Bonds and Certificates, State, Municipal 
and Other Bonds and Securities (total value $34,791,804.95), standing on 

books at $31,071,853.79 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first mortgages 71,990,345.34 

Loans on Bonds and StocKs and other Securities 2,139,611.72 

Bank Buildings end Lots, main and branch offices (value over $1,925,000.00), 

standing on books at 1.00 

Other Real Estate (value over S75.000.00). standing on books at 1.00 

Employees' Pension Fund (value over $600,000.00), standing: on books at 1.00 

Cash on hand and checks on Federal Reserve and other Banks 12,192,420.19 



Total $117,394,234.04 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $112,544,234.04 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,850,000.00 



Total $117,394,234.04 

GEO. TOURNY, President WILLIAM HERRMANN, Vice-President and Cashier. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st dav of December, 1927. 

(SEAL) 0. A. EGGERS, Notary Public. 



A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE- QUARTER (4 J 4) per cent per 
annum was declared, Interest COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED 

QUARTERLY, 
AND WHICH MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Deposits made on or before January 10th, 1928, will earn interest from January 1st, 1928. 

-. .- -, - - -.- -, - - --. =--. -.^ -.. ----- r^ — tj- ■r.T.^'T""."" _ " ' '" -------- - -------- -- r 



fc»B 






(Note : After hearing a lecture by George Wharton James on the Mojave 
desert many years ago, illustrated with stereopticon views, the author of the 
following sonnet, Eleanore F. Ross, went home and wrote "Death Valley.") 

Death Valley 

It is a place of silence, strange and deep ; 
The barren mountains near its sandy side, 
Look down impassive at its death-like sleep. 
Under its "skeleton plant" the rattlers glide, 
Among its painted rocks, the lizards creep. 
Above in the hot glimmer of the sky. 
A flock of wild geese wing their falt'ring way, 
With weary pinions, and with echoing cry. 
Below, in desert sands, that shine and shift, 
Lie the unburied dead, the heat waves drift 
O'er loneliness of graves ; by torrid day 
Or torrid night, breathless and gleaming, lie 
Stretches of gray sand, where no shadows hide. 
And over all, its silence, strange and deep. 

Eleanore F. Ross. 



(Editor's note: The following sonnet was inspired by the frontispiei n 

titled "The Desert," which appeared in the Christmas number of the News Lette 
for 1927. It was written hy Mr. Adnlphe de Castro, who edited this publicatiol 
during the early eighties, and is now living in New York. I 

Zuleika in the Desert 

By love enchanted I, half dreaming, lay 

Within my tent and saw the light caress 

Zuleika's lips. It touched to wakefulness 

The palm and gilt the long-leaved, fragrant bay 

The mists of night in pallor drew away 

To let the crags, enveiled in bister dress 

Of vapors woven in the wilderness, 

Raise lambent heads to greet triumphant day. 

The desert demon rose with all his might 
Against the solar hosts. Zuleika slept 
And dreamed ; but soon the furies of the night 
Awaked her from her dream. In fear she crept 
Quite close to me and said, "Oh, press me tight 
And let us pray for Allah's blessed light." 

— Adolphe de Castro. 









CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Lurie and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




ICE CREAM^ 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



w 



We now deliver to any part of the city — including: Sundays and Holidays. 
No extra charge. 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City*s Most Distinctive Oriental Show PJace 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c. $1. 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7 :00 p. m. to 1 :00 a. m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, SI. 50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants* Lunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. (a la carte). Private Dining: Rooms 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating- 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystone 8100 



Weekdays, Luncheon f .75 

(11:30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week Days & Sundays. 1.50 



No visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining: Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

93 Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



Fcnturing Southern Cooking 

i i;>in From 

II ::t0 a. m, to 2 :00 p. m. 

; m, in S:.t0 p. m. 

SlJ inlays ami Holidays 

i ;S0 i" 8 l80 p. m. only 

Closed fur our Annual Vacation. 

Dec. lyth. 1927 to .Ian. 1st. 1928 

Half Block from Highway 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



THIRD STREET 

STERLING ANDERSON, 



GARAGE 

Manager 



Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing*. Oiling, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 



Western Pipe and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS. SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 

San Fianeisco. Calif. L»» Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



Life is (rive and take. Give us your things to launder 
and we will take care of them. 

La Grande & White's Laundry 



250 Twelfth St. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 

PHONE MARKET 916 
Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 







Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN B:»0 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. 

1 nsiir|tasscd Cuisine 








14-Mile House 


CARL I.EONHARDT 
Formerly of Golden Gate Park Casino 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



5S3 Post Street 
In Virginia Hotel 



San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 2510 









CAROLINE JONES 








Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 


Ht 




«. 


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Vol. CX. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 14, 1928 



No. 3 



Air Lines 



By Lieut. Blaine Stubblefield 



Thus begins an application for a pilot's job 1 received at 
operating headquarters of Boeing Air Transport in Salt 
Lake City: "When I was about 
17 I built a Swiss type bobsled 
large enough to carry three and 
was the only one that could steer 
it down a half mile hill without 
taking a spill." And here follows 
the essence of this young Lind- 
bergh's imagery: "I feel sure 
that I can get into a plane and 
soar off, although I have never 
tried one. I believe it would not 
take me more than a week to be- 
come familiar with the stick, 
rudder and throttle, as I already 
know them. I am hard of hear- 
ing since childhood but this does 
not interfere with my ability and 
mechanical skill as I can hear the roard of any airplane 
engine." 




Lieut. Blaine Stuhhleficld 



We have lately read proposals to establish airplane 
landing fields in the High Sierras where there are no roads 
and not even pack trails, thus making accessible to any- 
one with a good airplane the wild and scenic places not 
hitherto reached except by great toil and expense of time. 
There seems to be nothing impractical about the idea, and 
it appeals strongly to those of us who haven't three- 
month vacations to visit these haunts a-foot. To take off 
in our own plane from one of our good airports and pitch 
camp within three hours in the midst of a vast mountain 
range, far beyond reach of tourists with their can openers 
and folding bedsteads, is little short of the magic carpet 
and other enchantment stunts. It is not unreasonable 
to believe that summer resorts and even whole industrial 
communities might some day exist where there never 
was, and never will be. a railroad or a highway. 

When the week-ends invade every flat spot in the moun- 
tains and the piney silences, where can one go to lie 
alone ? 



Lieutenant Arthur Gavin. U. S. X.. has been awarded 
the Schiff cup for 1927, having made a record of 865 
flying hours without a mishap during the year. The pre- 



vious record, held by Captain Harold C. Campbell, U. S. 
M. C. during 1926, was 839 hours. Transcontinental air 
mail planes, flying between San Francisco and Chicago, 
travel more than 25,000 miles a week. Their total mileage 
is now approaching 1,000,000 with no mishap. Such argu- 
ments as these for the safety of aircraft cannot be ig- 
nored by any process of reasoning. They will convince the 
human race eventually, even after ten or twenty thousand 
years of ground lubbering. 



According to Department of Commerce figures, there 
are now in the United States 2846 airplanes in commercial 
and private use valued at $5,000,000. About half of these 
planes are of modern construction, with a valuation of 
.54,713,000, while the older ones total a value of $346,000. 



It seems there is a close race on between aircraft manu- 
facturers and book publishers to see whether there will 
be more airplanes than there are books about aviation. 
Western Flying, our own Pacific Coast and Western 
states aviation organ, publishes in its last edition reviews 
of 28 books on aero dynamics, the science of flight, air- 
plane construction, and so forth. All of these books serve 
a purpose, and will be sold and placed on library shelves, 
public and private. With all these books, and some fifteen 
or twenty periodicals on aviation, all the public has to do 
is to assimilate the information. There is plenty of it. 



So sure of their planes are pilots on the Boeing San 
Francisco-Chicago route that they do not wear parachutes 
on any flights, according to an announcement from operat- 
ing headquarters at Salt Lake City. Parachutes were 
used during the first two or three months of operations, 
beginning July 1, last summer, but that was because the 
pilots' cock-pits were not equipped with cushions. The 
Boeing factory recently sent out cushions for all the 
planes, and the "chutes" have been relegated to shelves 
in the hangars. 



San Francisco radio station KFRC is being compliment- 
ed from all quarters on the attention and assistance it is 
giving aviation and airports in the Western states. 
KFRC's Thursday evening aviation "lessons" are attract- 
(Continued on page 9 1 



THE SAN FHANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 14, 1928 






Insanity? Fiddlesticks! 

We are going to be treated to an exhibition such as that 
which disgusted the world when Clarence Darrow put 
over the insanity plea in the infamous case of Loeb and 
his partner in Chicago. We saw how those two young 
devils who had put through an atrocious and filthy mur- 
der, were coddled into a position where they can still 
exist, at the expense of the state, and still find enjoyment 
in life, although confined in jail. For, it is a fact that 
their intellectuality is such that they can use books to 
gain pleasure and satisfaction out of life, denied to most 
ordinary people, and this, in spite of the fact that they 
are authors of a most contemptible and horrible crime. 

The same game may be played at Los Angeles. It is 
not very likely, for the counsel for the dreadful Hickman 
is not a man of the dangerous ingenuity and trained sa- 
gacity of Clarence Darrow, and, what is more to the point, 
the Hickman person has not the money to put up such a 
defense. Still, the game may be played by an astute coun- 
sel so as to darken the minds of many people and to hide 
the enormity of the crime behind a mantle of sickly sen- 
timentality. There are so many people in the community 
who are liable to attacks of morbid and irrational sym- 
pathy that the wise must be constantly on the alert to 
offset their influence upon the course of justice. 

The sentimentalists must not be allowed to triumph. 
We look to the courts at Los Angeles to give a fair trial 
and no more. Courts are not institutions for the study of 
psychological problems; still less are they intended as 
eleemosynary institutions for the aid of weak offenders. 
They are to administer the law and incidentally as much 
justice as the law will allow, which, we concede is often 
enough, very little. But we know what justice requires 
in this case and the law should help out. 



ing out the sources of conflict. As a man who has been 
through one war he is not keen on any other. Neverthe- 
less, here he is, pointing out the perils of the situation. 



War Threatens 



There is no doubt about Lloyd George being a good 
politician. He is so good that he has earned the distrust 
of a great number of his fellow countrymen, who have 
a curious distaste for talent, and consider that the best 
guide in all public affairs, even in the management of an 
army, is the possession of a thick but honest mentality. 
It may be a pretty good rule, even so, on the whole. But 
we have noticed that in a pinch, keen mentality has usual- 
ly found its way to the front in British affairs. 

At any rate, Lloyd George, being a Welshman, has a 
nimble intellect, with which he has done much in the past. 
A man who could take hold of a nation and lead it to ac- 
tivity as he did in spite of the hatred of a silly and flat 
general staff, cannot be called quite a fool. 

The point of all this is that Lloyd George thinks that 
the present condition in Europe is heading for war and 
that there is more than an indication that the forces 
which make for conflict are going to demonstrate their 
superior power. And we all know what that means ; it 
means nothing short of the destruction of Western 
Europe, as we know it. It means the end of what we have 
so far called civilization. 

Now, there is a chance that Lloyd George may soon be 
again prime minister of Britain. The present conservative 
government totters on the edge of complete unpopularity. 
Lloyd George sees the danger of the future and is point- 



Stupid Supervisors 

There is something for the supervisors to do which is 
more important than the payment of political debts and 
the wasting of money which should go into the repair and 
maintenance of the public streets. The whole future of 
this city is clamoring for attention and unless it is soon 
heard, the position of San Francisco as one of the world- 
capitals will be greatly impaired. 

There are some things which must be done if we are 
to increase in importance and in population, without 
which, importance in an economic sense, is hardly pos- 
sible. We are in a restricted area as regards topography 
and in order that that area can be increased, transporta- 
tion facilities for the passing to and from the city itself 
into new suburbs is required. 

The whole street car question should be taken up with 
a view to immediate solution and the city should at once 
proceed to acquire the property of competing private cor- 
porations, at a fair and reasonable rate. This the super- 
visors firmly refuse to do. On the other hand, they are 
determined, if possible, to force the corporations to accept 
terms which are less than just and are more concerned in 
winning a wicked victory than in pursuing a path of 
justice and rectitude which will redound to the benefit of 
the city. 

In this course they are aided by certain newspaper in- 
fluences which clamor for the guillotine as far as the 
public service corporations are concerned and are ready 
to throw decency to the winds in all such matters. 



What Is Wrong? 

There is something wrong about the way in which the 
traffic is managed in this city. The fact that the rate of 
murder grows and that the hit-and-run man still operates 
with increasing virulence, is proof that the whole sub- 
ject is somehow wrongly organized. The call upon school- 
boys to help police the streets in the vicinity of schools is 
a confession of weakness which should not have been 
made by a self respecting police authority. Understand, 
we have no objection to the employment of the boys. On 
the contrary, we think that it is good to bring the adoles- 
cent into closer contact with society and to make him 
work in the interests of the group, with which his adult 
life will be associated. 

But to call in the boy to remedy the defects of police 
administration is a poor policy. If things had been going 
well and the list of killed and injured at the hands of 
criminal motorists had declined rather than grown, such 
a shift of responsibility for local accidents might have 
been at least explained. Now, it is a call to the youth to 
help out the police force, which does not tend to increase 
youthful respect for the force. 

Perhaps we are to blame for the whole thing. We do 
not show perseverance in any given direction. It is only 
a month since the new regulations of traffic went into 
effect and already there is a slackness in their execution 
which is becoming more and more apparent. To such an 



January 14, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



extent is this growing that, before very long the signs 
will have no meaning and the expense of the new system 
will have been wasted. 



God's Garden 



It is said that Fra Junipero Serra, the great missionary 
priest to California, called the district 'round Monterey 
Bay by the name of "God's Garden." We have not seen 
any historical proof of the fact, and such statements have 
a fashion of coming from the mouths of the great, after 
their death, when the interests of real estate or other 
mundane interests are likely to be served thereby. 

Still, Serra was a very able man and much inclined to 
see the material side of the spiritual conquests which he 
won. He not only baptized the Indians in large numbers, 
but he set them to work, and cattle and corn soon made 
their first appearance in the aboriginal wilds of our be- 
loved state. So, it is perhaps, not improbable that he did 
coin the phrase. 

He was very susceptible to the influences of beautiful 
scenery- It is said that when he looked upon the valley 
in which he afterwards erected the church of St. Anthony 
of Padua, his joy expressed itself in leapings and bursts 
of delight in spite of the pain of his troublesome leg, from 
which he suffered incessantly. His brother monks 
thought his suffering had affected his brain. But not so, 
the delight was natural. He loved beautiful scenery with 
a passion which was foreign to most ecclesiasts who have 
on the whole shown themselves strangely indifferent to 
the delights of mountain and sea. 



Brazen Impudence 

Seldom in the history of modern nations has there been 
such a contemptible spectacle as that now presented by 
William Randolph Hearst in connection with his Mexican 
letter expedition into the realms of corruption. The epi- 
sode reeks with the most flagrant and hypocritical dis- 
regard for elementary propriety. 

There is no doubt now that the so-called letters were 
without a shred of genuine reality. They were false from 
the first to the last, composed in the most flagrantly care- 
less fashion at the hands of a person who has been shown 
to have been well known as a seller and fabricator of 
fraudulent political material. No steps, even the most 
obvious, were taken to discover the fraud or to prove the 
genuineness of the documents. There is no doubt that the 
falseness of the letters was suspected from the beginning 
by Hearst and that he went ahead in spite of that fact. 
This, of course, is the most damning thing that could be 
said of any newspaperman and shows an utter lack of 
conscience with respect to the duties of his calling. 

Has the exposure at all shaken the confidence of the 
malefactor? Hardly. There is some evidence that the 
letter of Senator Norris, one of the most terrible indict- 
ments which has fallen upon any public man in our times, 
did shake his equanimity. But, on the whole, he is just 
as brazen, just as blandly thick-skinned as heretofore. 
He is depending upon the people to forget. And it would 
seem as if his anticipations in that respect would not be 
disappointed. 

His present position, that, granting that the letters are 
forgeries, t he fact of Mexican antagonism to the United 
States is none the less true, does not take us anywhere. 
He said that four senators were corrupted by Mexican 
money and that certain newspapers in this country had 
been bribed. The charges are false: the evidence upon 
which they rested is fabricated. 



From Brighter Pens Than Ours 

Home is the place where you don't have to engage 
reservations in advance.— Arkansas Gazette. 



An excellent time to win freedom by means of good 
behavior is before you go to jail.— Publishers Syndicate. 

Singularly enough, the only thing that will put the 
blind pig out of business is the squeal. — Detroit News. 

You can't choose your ancestors, but that's fair enough. 
They probably wouldn't have chosen you. — El Dorado 
Tribune. 



One Mexican general escaped by changing the color of 
his hair and whiskers. It was dye or die for him. — Dallas 
News. 

Another thing: You can learn by mail to speak good 
English, and that will astonish your friends. — Manila 
Bulletin. 



Honesty isn't the best policy. It isn't any kind of policy. 
It is a state of mind, or else it isn't honesty. — Roanoke 
World News. 



A certain Arkansas road is said to be "in good condi- 
tion as a whole." Many a road is all right as a hole. — 
Arkansas Gazette. 



A man has been convicted of stealing pearls on seven- 
teen different occasions. Apparently he regarded the 
world as his oyster. — Passing Show. 



If you think women better qualified than men to pick 
the best candidates, look what they marry. — Memphis 
News-Scimitar. 



A New York professor says that married men are much 
more inventive than single men. They have to be. — 
Punch. 



"One. man is knocked down by an automobile every 
twenty minutes in Los Angeles." — News Item. 

You would think it would wear him out. — Motor Chat. 



First Youth — What you s'pose Jim got married for? 
Second Same — I dunno. He keeps on workin'. 

— Answers. 



This from the menu of a fish cafe along the road : 
Most any old fish can float, and drift along and dream, 
But it takes a regular live one, to swim against the 

stream. 



Just as you enter the sand hills between El Centro and 
Yuma a flaring sign announces: "This is Peg Leg's Los 
Angeles Dry Dock: Latest and Biggest Subdivision." 

And. of course, without referring to Peg Leg, let us 
a, Id that there is "some windjammer" parked in that dry 
dock. 



Said the flapper, after she had introduced her boy 
friend to her parents: "What side of the family do you 
think I take after?" 

"Well, you have your father's eyes, nose and mouth," 
said the boy friend, "but you get your legs from your 
mother." — Country Gentleman. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 14, 1928 





ocier 





Bv Antoinette Arnold 



Orchids and Lace 

Have you noticed how much lace 
and how many orchids are being worn 
by our San Francisco debutantes? 

Lace frocks, lace about the neck, 
lace on some of the new spring hats 
— and orchids on the smart coats and 
wraps or worn upon the right-shoul- 
der. 

Many of the lovely evening grown s 
are of lace. Many of the wraps, too — 
are made of graceful flounces of lace, 
or are adorned with gold and silver 
metallics, or colored lace. 

Lace and orchids — for the modern 
miss revives, in a way, the becoming 
modes of our forebears when laven- 
der and lace added their loveliness to 
each feminine face. 

I adore lace myself. Don't you ? 

As for orchids, well, give me lilies- 
of-the-valley ! 



Wedding Day 

Miss Elna Marion Swesey, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Swesey, and 
Mr. Victor Emerald Hauser, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hauser, were 
married the first day of the year at 
the St. Paul Episcopal Church, Rev. 
Leslie Kelley, cousin of the bride, of- 
ficiating. 

A lovely reception at the Fairmont 
Hotel followed the marriage cere- 
mony, with a wedding supper served 
in the mirrored grey room, beauti- 
tifully decorated for the occasion. 

Garlands of evergreens were used 
in the church and the chancel was 
banked in white chrysanthemums. 
Huge candlesticks held tall candles 
placed about the altar. The pews in 
the church were linked with garlands 
forming an aisle through which the 
bridal party passed. 

The bride was given in marriage by 
her father. 

She wore a wedding gown of white 
taffeta made in the bouffant mode, 
the hem being outlined with Garde- 



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nias. The bodice was plain and a long 

tulle veil fell in graceful folds about 

her lovely face. She carried a shower 

bouquet of pink roses and lilies-of- 

the-valley. 

* * * 

Maid of Honor 

Miss Verna-Henri Swesey, sister of 
the bride, was maid of honor and she 
wore a robe de style of coral taffeta 
with an Italian lace overskirt. Her 
bouquet was of exquisite roses and 
lilies-of-the-valley. 

Twelve bridesmaids were all gown- 
ed alike. 

Pastel shades of taffeta, made in 
the bouffant style, and muffs in har- 
monizing shades of flowers and os- 
trich feathers, made a picture of 
youthful loveliness. 



Bridesmaids 

The bridesmaids were : the Misses 
Mildred Anderson, Mary Biggam, 
Esme Briggs, Loraine George, Mar- 
jorie Jacobson, May Lane, Marjorie 
Lindeburg, Ada Lewis, Martha Mayo, 
Eleanor Mercier, Carla Rankin, Lydia 
Wainwright. 

Little Barbara Jones, in a green 
taffeta dress, was flower girl, dressed 
so charmingly and carrying a basket 
of rose petals. Tiny Howard Jones, 
wearing a white satin suit, was the 

ring bearer. 

* * * 

Mr. Herbert Thielmeyer was best 
man at the Swesey-Hauser wedding. 



Ushers 

Ushers at this pretty wedding 
were Messrs. William Mayo and Ber- 
nard Schoeningh and George Hauser. 

The bride has been identified for a 
number of years with the Camp Fire 
Girls as guardian and the group act- 
ing as her bridesmaids were some of 
her intimate friends in this splendid 
organization. 

The bridegroom is a graduate of 
the University of California, '26, and 
a rising young business man of this 
city. Both families are well known in 
business circles and are prominent 
San Franciscans. 

After their honeymoon in Carmel- 
by-the-Sea, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Hauser will be at home to their 
friends in this city, where they are 
taking up their residence. 



Dinner Party Host 

Mr. Edward De Vere Saunders, 
who makes his home at the Fairmont 
Hotel, gave a number of delightful 
dinner parties recently, entertaining 
his son, Drury De Vere Saunders, now 
attending school at San Rafael. Out- 
of-town friends of Mr. Saunders were 

guests of the genial host and his son. 

* * * 

Pretty Dinner Party 

Dr. and Mrs. J. M. Scanland gave 
a delightful dinner party recently at 
the Hotel Californian in honor of 
their daughters, Miss Adele Scanland 
and Mrs. K. E. Kesler, and Lieut. V. 
F. Simmons, U. S. N. and Mr. Kesler. 

Dr. and Mrs. Scanland are making 
their home this winter at the Hotel 
Californian and have entertained 
their friends several times recently 
at informal dinner parties 

* * * 

Home From Abroad 

Mrs. J. C. Jensen, prominent in lit- 
erary and social circles, presided at a 
luncheon given recently in the Hotel 
Californian in compliment to her sis- 
ter, Mrs. A. M. Johnson. 

Both Mrs. Jensen and Mrs. Johnson 
returned from Europe a short time 
ago. Mrs. Johnson visited the Euro- 
pean cities in company with Miss 
Little, the well known builder and 
hotel owner of this city. 

The table, set in the main dining 
room of the Hotel Californian, was 
artistically decorated for the luncheon 
and many of the guests assembled at 
bridge tables in the cosy bridge room 
on the mezzanine floor of the hotel 
at the conclusion of the luncheon. 

Mrs. Jensen is past president of the 
Presidents' Assembly, an organiza- 
tion composed entirely of women ex- 
ecutives, all of whom have at some 
time, were, or who are now, presiding 
officers of the club they represent. 
This assembly is regarded as one of 
(Continued on page 16) 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powdl and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter S560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



January 14, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




Poet Honor Guest 

Xancy Buckley, the talented young 
writer, was the guest of the St. Fran- 
cis Study Club at their regular meet- 
ing Tuesday evening, January 10th, 
at the San Francisco Women's build- 
ing. Miss Buckley, who has recently 
returned from the scenes of the life 
of St. Francis of Assissi spoke on St. 
Francis as a social reformer and read 
her poem on the patron saint of San 
Francisco. Miss Buckley is the author 
of three books of poems that have 
met with splendid reviews. She has 
in preparation a fourth book to be 
published some time this year. Her 
lyric "Alien" won the Blanden poetry 
prize for the best lyric of 1926. Many 
of her lyrics have been set to music 
by distinguished composers. Though 
she has been writing but a few years, 
she has already secured for herself a 
prominent place among California 
women of letters. 

* * * 

Laurel Hall 

Mrs. Frank Panter, president of 
Laurel Hall Club, has outlined a splen- 
did social day program for her mem- 
bers to take place on Wednesday, 
January 18, in the Fairmont Hotel, 
when the subject of discussion will 
be: "The American Scene in Recent 
American Literature," with Prof. B. 
H. Lehman the speaker of the day. 

Prof. Lehman draws upon a wealth 
of knowledge acquired in several uni- 
versities and through teaching, writ- 
ing and traveling is authentically in- 
formed. He is a finished lecturer with 
a pleasing voice and personality. 

* * * 

Hostesses 

Hostesses for the Laurel Hall meet- 
ing will include: Mrs. Edward J. Dol- 
lard. chairman; Mrs. W, C. Kempton, 
vice-chairman; Mrs. Jacob Brandt. 
Mrs. F. J. Schnackenberg, Mrs. Vir- 
ginia Jasper. Mrs. A. Hant'rey. Mrs. 
Emma Krebs and the entire executive 
board. 



Park Lane Maisonnettes 

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dent of Cap and Bells Club, announces 
the annual card party of the club to 
take place on Thursday, January 19, 
in the gold ballroom of the Fairmont 
Hotel, with Mrs. William McKay the 
chairman. 

A committee of prominent mem- 
bers are assisting Mrs. McKay, in- 
cluding: Mesdjames A. E. Kroenke, 
J. Emmet Hayden, Angelo J. Rossi, 
A. G. Stoll, C. M. Gardner, William 
Edwards, Dr. Blance Culver, Walter 
Gray, E. J. Florentine, J. R. O'Don- 
nell, Alexander Woodside, Norman 
McKellar, Frank Robb, Arthur M. De- 
Vail, John Hepburn, W. J. Owens. 



The card section of Laurel Hall 
held its luncheon on Friday, with 
Mrs. Emma Krebs in charge. 

* * * 

Open Forum 

The San Francisco Open Forum, of 
which Chauncey M'Govern is presi- 
dent, has prepared a month's program 
of unusual interest. Last Monday the 
members met at luncheon at the Bel- 
levue Hotel to hear a message from 
City Attorney J. J. O'Toole, with 
George B. Koch the impressario. 

Ella Miehels Sterling, now Aurora 
Esmeralda, will be honor guest on 
Thursday evening at 8:30 o'clock, 
when a discussion will be held on 
"Literature of California." Music will 
he provided by Prosper Reiter and 
Mademoiselle Eleanor Joseph. The 
impressario of the evening will be J. 
Munsell Chase. 

Prof. Chauncey M'Govern states 
in his printed members' post-card 
that at both of these meetings an- 
nouncement will lie made of the new 
million dollar "Temple of Cultural 
Arts." to he erected under the aus- 
pices of the San Francisco Open 

Forum. 

* * * 

History of Art 

The history of the art class of the 
Cap and Bells Club will meet on Tues- 
dav morning. January 17. in the Cali- 
fornia room of the Fairmont, when 
members will discuss: "Greek Art 
Before Phidas." Miss Helen Gordon 
Barker is leader and Mrs. Alexander 
Woodside is chairman of this interest- 
ing section of the club. 

* * * 

Card Parts 

Mrs. John Sylvester Pinney. presi- 



Talk On Flowers 

One of the outstanding meetings of 
the past week took place at the Fair- 
mont Hotel when Mrs. G. Earle Kelly 
gave an address before Cap and Bells 
Club on "Flowers and Shrubbery." 

Mrs. Kelly once before spoke to the 
club on "Birds" and her memorable 
address at that time brought out 
many interested members to hear her 
again on her other favorite subject 
of California's flowers and particular- 
ly on the topic of fig trees and the 
varieties of the eucalyptus and the 
acacia. 

This address will certainly linger 
in the minds of her fortunate listen- 
ers. We learned so much! 

Cap and Bells orchestra provided 
beautiful musical selections and there 
were many reports from chairmen of 
the sections. 

Mrs. Pinney presided over the 
meeting and, as usual, began her new 
year with promising ideals for a re- 
markable administration. The popu- 
lar president has an ardent constit- 
uency of active workers — in fact 
there are no drones in Cap and Bells. 



s & you pay no more ^ 

4? 



felFlOWHg 




"The\bice o/aThousa»d Gardens' 
224-226 Grant Ave.. Sutter 6200 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 14, 1928 




#LMSURE$WW 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore. 




This Week's Attractions 

No one need have the blues while 
the theaters are running. For there 
is enough sparkle and merriment, on 
both stage and screen, to keep the 
blood tingling and to "put ginger in 
one's gait." 

So go to the theater. 

Select what you like— by reading 
the papers and the reviews, of course 
— and then take your best girl and 
trot down to the theater. 

You'll be happier for so doing ! 

We do not patronize the theaters 

enough, really, for they are veritable 

tonics and a "very pleasant help in 

time of trouble," or words to that 

effect ! 

* * * 

Lurie 

America's foremost actor makes de- 
but. 

Lionel Barrymore, elder brother of 
the famous royal family of the Ameri- 
can stage, Lionel, Ethel and John, and 
long acclaimed America's foremost 
actor, it is asserted, made his first 
San Francisco appearance at the 
Lurie theater last Monday evening, 
January 9, in the famous David Bel- 
asco-Tom Cushing dramatic success, 
"Laugh, Clown, Laugh." 

This unique drama was written es- 
pecially for Barrymore by Belasco and 
presented by the great producer with 
Barrymore in the stellar role for more 
than one year in New York City. 

The character of Tito, as created by 
the star, is said to be one of the most 
brilliant characterizations of the 
star's long and successful career. 

The story has to do with the fa- 
mous clown, who through a nervous 
affliction has frequent and unexpected 
fits of weeping, and a rich young man 
who, through dissipation, breaks into 
uncontrollable fits of laughter. A 
noted nerve specialist recommends 
that they both fall in love. 

They do — with beautiful Simon- 
etta, the clown's ward. 

The Belasco theater management is 
said to have surrounded the star with 
a cast of unusual excellence and su- 
perior production. 

Matinees are given Saturday and 
Wednesday. 



By Josephine Young 

Lionel Barrymore is gifted with 
practically every requisite for being 
a great actor. He has a voice of mag- 
nificence which seems to express 
every emotion of mood and feeling. 
He has stature, a magnetic person- 
ality, a countenance which registers 
the full gamut of dramatic power and 
persuasion. 

Like his brother, John Barrymore, 
whom he resembles so much, and yet 
possessed of his own distinct individu- 
ality, Lionel Barrymore convinced us 
all anew on the opening night of 
"Laugh, Clown, Laugh," that he is a 
masterful genius. 

* * * 
Curran 

"Broadway" will open at the Cur- 
ran theater Monday night, January 
16, with the Jed Harris presentation 
of the cabaret drama. A special New 
York cast will appear in the San Fran- 
cisco performances. 

Some of the people in the show 
comprise: Hobart Cavanaugh, Rich- 
ard Cramer, Morris Ankrum, Claire 
Nolte, Hooper L. Atchley, Juanita 
Zerbe, Dee Loretta, Maurice H. 
Black, Nellie Leach, Louis Haines, 
Doris Kemper. 

President 

"The Gossipy Sex," which has de- 
lighted us for many weeks at the 
President theater, where the Henry 
Duffy plays provide wholesome laugh- 
ter, concludes its run Saturday night, 
to be followed on Sunday, January 15, 
matinee performance, by a modern 
melodrama entitled, "Nightstick." 

The new play is a New York reign- 
ing success, and when played by the 
Henry Duffy company will attain the 
same heights, no doubt, as that al- 
ready firmly established by the Henry 
Duffy players in preceding triumphs. 

The foresight of Henry Duffy and 
his New York connections is respon- 
sible for this city's having the op- 
portunity of enjoying this thrilling 
play so soon. Duffy, moreover, main- 
taining his policy of bringing some 
new players for each new show, has 
searched afar and is said to have 
made interesting discoveries. For the 
role of Charles "Chick" Williams, the 
crook thief, played in Gotham by John 



Amusements 

Next Week 
ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"New Brooms." Henry Duffy players. 

Capitol, Ellis nr. Market 

"Who's Your Neighbor?" 

Columbia, Eddy nr. Powell 

Marx Brothers in "The Coeoanuts." 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

"Broadway." Jed Harris production. 

Lurie, Geary nr. Mason 

Lionel Barrymore in "Laugh. Clown, Laugh 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"Nij-htstick," modern melodrama. 



VAUDEVILLE 



. 



Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylo 

"The Code of the Sea." Francis X. Bushman 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Panny Brice — held over headliner. Jerome and 
Gloria Gray. "The Gigham Girl." screen 
feature starring Lois Wilson and George K 
Arthur. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Vaudeville — pictures. 






ON THE SCREEN 
Downtown 

California, Market St. at 4th 

Mary Pickford in "My Best Girl" by Kath- 
tvrn Norris. 

Casino, Ellis at Mason 

"Camille," Norma Talmadge. 

Cameo, Market opp. Fifth St. 

Change of picture twice a week. 

Embassy, Market nr. Seventh 

o T,1e S' irl from Cni<, aEo." Conrad Naeel, 
Kosa Raisa assisted liy t.iacomo Rimini and 
other Vitaphone acts. 

Granada, Market at Jones 

"The Shepherd of the Hills." Alec B. Francis. 
Frank Jcnks and his play hoy. "Folliettes." 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th 

"Sadie Thompson." Gloria Swanson, Lionel 
Barrymore. 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"Baby Mine." Karl Dane and George K. 
Arthur. Rube Wolf has returned. 



Residence District 
Alhambra, Polk St., nr. Green 

Rudolph Music Masters stage presentations. 
Change of pictures regularly. 



January 14, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Wray (one of the authors of the 
piece), he has brought here George 
Leffingwell, characterized as an actor 
of unusual talent and personality. 
With Kenneth Daigneau he will share 
the principal male honors of the play. 
Another important part will fall to 
Mildred Von Hollen, also new at the 
President. Popular Earl Lee is again 
in the cast, as is also Thomas Chat- 
terton. Others are: William Abram, 
Dorothy LaMar, J. Raymond North- 
cut, Stewart Wilson, Frank Darien, 
Zeta Harrison and Alan Ryan. 

"Nightstick" is in three acts and 
four scenes and requires four separ- 
ate sets. An elaborate production is 

the forecast. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"New Brooms" is a clever play. 

I really think that every father and 
son should go to the Alcazar theater, 
if he hasn't already done so, and see 
this sparkling drama with its quaint 
business-story packed to the limit 
with one hundred per cent logic and 
merriment in equal ratio. 

Personally, I think that "New 
Brooms" is one of the very best man- 
and-son dramas that I have ever seen. 

There is so much that is human 
about it — so much that makes one 
review his own family scenes — so 
much that is tender and yet well sea- 
soned with terseness and severity. 

* * * 

Embassy 

Commencing January 13th, the 
Embassy theater will show "The Girl 
From Chicago," a thrilling melodrama 
featuring Conrad Nagel and Myrna 
Loy. Taken from an Arthur Somers 
Roche short story, this picture is re- 
plete with action of the type which 
appeals to both adults and children. 
As the climax, the film boasts a 
chase in which a complete squadron 
of motorcycle policemen pursue a 
gang of crooks across the entire width 
of Chicago. A machine gun battle en- 
sues in which hundreds of denizens of 
the famous Windy City underworld 
battle fiercely with the minions of the 
law. 

On the Vitaphone, Rosa Raisa. the 
beloved soprano of San Francisco. 
will make her initial appearance. As- 
sisting her will be Giacomo Rimini, 
also celebrated as a baritone with the 
Chicago Opera Company. 

Other acts include Roger Wolfe 
Kalm and his recording orchestra. 
"Realization," a one-act playlet, and 

Murray and LaVere. 

* * * 

Columbia 

"The Four Marxes," known as 
Harpo, Groucho, Zeppo and Chico, 
will appear at the Columbia theater 
next week, beginning with Monday 
night. January 16, in a musical com- 



edy entitled, "The Cocoanuts." 

The music and the lyrics are by 
Irving Berlin. The book is by George 
S. Kaufman, the dance numbers by 
Sammy Lee, and Oscar Eagle directed 
the book. 

The mother of the Marx brothers 
was known on the stage as Minnie 
Palmer. Al Shean of the Gallagher 
and Shean comedy pair is an uncle. 
They appeared in vaudeville until 
their first musical comedy, "I'll Say 
She Is," and for a number of seasons 
were headline vaudeville actors. 

"The Cocoanuts" is the second 
starring vehicle of the Marx Broth- 
ers and perhaps their most successful 
musical comedy. Sam Harris has sur- 
rounded the quartet of comedians 
with a lavish production, claimed to 

be on a par with his Music Box Revue. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

Record crowds are attending the 
Orpheum theater at both matinees 
and nights under the new entertain- 
ment policy inaugurated last Satur- 
day. First run feature photoplays 
are now shown in addition to the 
vaudeville program. The photoplay 
precedes and follows the vaudeville 
bill at both afternoon and evening 
p;rformances so that persons who 
wish to enter the theater anytime be- 
tween 1 o'clock and 2:30 in the after- 
noon and between 7 o'clock and 8:30 
in the evening may see the entire pro- 
gram. 

Fannie Brice, "the great come- 
dienne," who is headlining the first 
show under the new policy, has tri- 
umphed again in her new act. In fact 
Miss Brice is making a hit with the 
patrons and the management is going 
to hold her over for a second and 
final big week starting on this Satur- 
day matinee. 

There will be an entire new vaude- 
ville bill in support of Miss Brice, in- 
cluding Hal Jerome and Gloria Gray 
in "Hoos Hoo?"; Billy Farrell and 
Company presenting "Home Sweet 
Home" : Herman Hyde and Sally Ber- 
rill in "A Bit Different," and The 
Four Readings, sensational jugglers. 

The photoplay offering will be a 
screen adaptation of that famous 
Broadway musical comedy success, 
"The Gingham Girl." starring Lois 

Wilson and George K. Arthur. 

* * * 

St. Francis 

"Sadie Thompson." the screen story 
of "Rain." comes to the St. Francis 
theater with Gloria Swanson in the 
title role and Lionel Barrymore play- 
ing the parr of the minister. Rev. 
Davidson. 

The story of the girl of the street 
and the clergyman from the novel 
by W. Somerset Maugham, and made 
itinued on 



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To grandmother, warmth meant fuss 
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healthful heat is instantly available 
by touching a match to a gas fired 
radiant heater. 

A gas fired radiant heater in your 
fireplace costs about one cent and a 
half an hour to operate. 

You can heat a room without warm- 
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You bring the warmth and cleanli- 
ness of Spring sunshine into your 
living-room. This banishes chills and 
keeps the family well. 

You instantly get invigorating 
warmth when you come home from 
shopping or from the theatre. 

Come in and ask us about modern 
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Panama-Pacific International Exposition 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1927 

Assets $117,394,234.04 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $600,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Hoight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (AM) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation. General Liability. Plate Glass, Accident and Health. 
Fidelity and Surety. Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Fi 



nance 



January 14, 1928 



Lumbering is still experiencing over-production diffi- 
culties. The question is one of considerable importance. 



Trading on the Curb Exchange opened with an initial 
?roup of about 85 stocks which had been admitted to 
trading by the Curb Stock Admission Committee. 



The San Francisco Curb Exchange opened on January 
3rd, at the curb exchange building on Bush street. The 
luilding has been remodeled and re-equipped to meet the 
requirements of the new market. 



The San Francisco Stock Exchange has '.listed among 
local securities, Atlas Imperial Diesel, Class A stock, 
65,000 shares, no par value; California Ink Co., Class A 
stock, 40,000 shares listed, no par value. 



Fireman's Fund Insurance, ex-dividend, touched 127 
and closed up 3% at 126% on the San Francisco Stock 
Exchange. Federal Brandes, among the public utilities, 
registered a new high at 28, closing at 27. 



The Bank of Canada reports business not as good in 
that country as in 1926. British Columbia, Manitoba and 
the maritime provinces fell behind the procession, but not 
to an extent sufficient to warrant pessimism with respect 
to the coming year. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 S20.000.000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought; FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued; CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND ; NEW YORK ; PORTLAND, ORE. ; SEATTLE. 
WASH. ; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Phones Davenport 4480 
Sutter 4400 



Insurance Exchange Building 
433 California Street 




SCOTT & 
MULVIHILL 

General Insurance and 
Surety Bonds 




MADE TO ORDER ONLY 



y Jhos£jReat 



SHIRTS 

PAJAMAS 

NIGHT ROBES 






Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



It is interesting to know that the life of Bernarr Mc- 
Fadden, publisher of ten magazines besides the New 
York Graphic, has been insured for a million dollars. He 
is sixty years of age and had no difficulty in passing the 
tests required. 



Market value of stocks traded in on the San Francisco 
Stock Exchange for the month of December, 1927, reach- 
ed a total of S131, 092,269, which exceeds by S43,000,000 
the previous record for trading in a single month; which 
record was made in October 1927, amounting to 887,269,- 
682 for that month. 



Business conditions are said to favor further gains in 
life insurance for the coming year. When we consider 
that 817,000,000,000 of new life insurance was purchased 
in the United States during the past year, it would not 
seem easy to find an opening for further extension. But 
life insurance grows by its own existence and the fact 
that there is now insurance to the amount of 888,000,000,- 
000 in this country, shows how strong a hold it has on 
the American mind. 



The Tax Digest, the organ of the California Taxpayers' 
Association, says, "As government may requisition the 
lives of its citizens, so, too, it can requisition their for- 
tunes for the public service. Taxes can only be justified 
when they are levelled for useful and necessary objects 
of government, and applied economically and wisely to 
such purposes. Unless these conditions are fulfilled, taxa- 
tion degrades into a state of virtual robbery, under the 
guise of law." The matter could hardly be better put. 



January 14, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Air Lines 

(Continued from page 1) 

ing wide attention, and numerous cities and towns are 
taking advantage of the interest awakened in the building 
of airports. 



Football 



Figures compiled by the Department of Commerce 
reveal that since the air mail service was organized in 
1918, air mail planes have flown 20,000,000 miles and 
carried 9,000,000 pounds of air mail, or about 360,000,- 
000 letters. Loss of air mail by the air services during 
this nine-year period was so slight that efficiency of opera- 
tion figures .9997, which means that only .000265 per cent 
of the mail carried was lost. During 1922, 1923 and 1925 
there was not a single loss. These records, say the depart- 
ment, can well be envied by any form of surface trans- 
portation. 



Insurance rates on air express from London to Paris, 
Amsterdam, Cologne and Zurich are now lower than rates 
on surface transports. 



A perfect model of the Boeing air mail, express and 
passenger special plane, 24 of which are now in operation 
on the Chicago-San Francisco route, arrived here this 
week from the Boeing factory in Seattle. The little plane, 
which has a wing spread of about 5 feet, is built through- 
out exactly to the scale of its big brothers, and is made 
of the same selected materials. Even the propeller, con- 
trols, landing gear, and bracing are exact replicas of the 
parts in the larger plane, and they function perfectly. 
The only difference is that the engine does not burn 
gasoline. A small electric motor, concealed in the fusi- 
lage, spins the propeller. If equipped with automotive 
power, the plane would fly perfectly. The plane required 
fully as much engineering skill and labor to build as 
many of the smaller machines now in actual use. The 
model is on exhibition in the window of Schwabacher- 
Frey. 



Probably the most significant news item in the field of 
aviation this week, is a dispatch from Washington, D. C. 
saying that Key West, Florida, has been made the first 
American airport of entry. Meachen Field, of the Pan 
American Airways, Inc., has been so designated by the 
Treasury Department under the Air Commerce Act of 
1926. This action was taken so that goods coming by air 
from Havana, Cuba, the company's southern terminus, 
can be cleared through the customs on the field, rather 
than be transferred to the port of entry at Tampa for 
inspection. 



In order to get an idea of the proportions of the grow- 
ing tourist travel it is enough to look at the Circular Let- 
ter No. 2671 of the Passenger Traffic Department of the 
Southern Pacific Company which shows tremendous and 
growing development. It is said that just after the 
Russian revolution the whole of Russia seemed to be 
traveling by railway. Certainly, the same might be said 
of the people of this country, judging by the document 
referred to. 



Exports in 1927 exceed $4,925,000,000. a substantial in- 
crease of 18 per cent in volume over 1926. Though the 
volume has thus increased, the value has increased only 
2 1 - j per cent. This difference is due to falling prices. The 
favorable balance of trade is $700,000,000. This is the 
largest balance since 1924 and shows that we are more 
than holding our own, in spite of the fact that Europe 
is coming back into active competition. 



Oh, For a Nice Foggy Day! 
By Lyman Martin 

Most of us are now familiar with the name Major 
Graham McNamee, radio broadcaster of events and en- 
thusiasm. His most recent enthusiaser was the Stanford- 
Pittsburgh game down at Pasadena. During this phe- 
nomenal display of vocal pyrotechnics we learned a great 
deal about the weather in Southern California. It is good 
and no fooling. Yet to our most material minds we were 
more interested in the outcome and the play by play 
reports of the football game than in the sunshine. It may 
be a case of sour grapes, but anyhow we much prefer a 
stimulating fog. 

While our southern part of the state, through persist- 
ent efforts of its Chamber of Commerce, has developed 
wonderful mid-winter climate, we of the north have 
gathered into our fold a football player who really is a 
football player and that is what this story is supposed to 
be about. 

The inter-collegiate football season ceased along about 
New Year's, yet the dyed-in-the-wool football fan is now 
being entertained with professional games. Composing 
the teams in this professional organization are such play- 
ers of national repute as Nevers, Grange, Wilson and 
Friedman. As a side issue on George Wilson's team is 
"Rabbit" Bradshaw. The four first mentioned were 
almost unanimously picked as all-Americans and "Rab- 
bit" was never heard of for the simple reason that he 
made the very grievous error of playing for the Univer- 
sity of Nevada. The University of Nevada never has had 
a very strong team except when it was represented by 
the "Rabbit." 

There have been two games to date on the professional 
schedule and "Rabbit" has stolen the glory in both of 
those games. It is not because the opposition has been 
mediocre, for those boys who are playing "pro" football 
know what it is all about or they would not be where they 
are. The main reason for Bradshaw's brilliance is that 
the "Rabbit" has the goods and is an ail-American if 
there ever was one. 

This Sunday, out at Ewing Field, the bill is scheduled 
as Wilson's Wildcats vs. Benny Friedman's Bulldogs. It 
is an odds on bet that "Rabbit." who is playing for Wilson, 
will again steal the show and win for Wilson as he has 
the last two games in which he has participated. 

"Pro" football hasn't quite the thrill of college football 
nor has it one hundredth of its color, yet who is the foot- 
ball fan so blase that he cannot get a wallop out of a 145 
pound midget going through a team of 200 pound 
bruisers. 

Too bad, "Rabbit," that you didn't play before Major 
Graham McNamee when you were playing for little old 
Nevada. He might then have even forgotten all about the 
weather. 



A stadium of 40,000 persons watching two dozen men 
at play presents a wonderful picture of the way our race 
takes its exercise. — Boston Herald. 

Chicago Is Churchgoing Town — Headline. A consid- 
erable number of the churchgoers, we imagine, attend in 
the capacity of pallbearers. — Arkansas Gazette. 

A scientist says human intelligence is 450,000 years 
old. but doesn't state how soon it will begin to act its age. 
— Detroit News. 

California is preparing to spend a larger sum on its 
state highways in 1928 than the entire bond issue of $18,- 
000,000, voted in November, 1909, for these roads. 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 14, 1928 



Ode to the Horse 

Your inner tubes are all 0. K. 

And, thank the Lord, they stay that way. 

Your spark plugs never miss and fuss, 

Your motor never makes us cuss. 

Your frame is good for many a mile, 

Your body never changes style. 

Your wants are few and easy met, 

You've something on the flivver yet. 

horse, you are a wonderful thing; 

No buttons to push, no clutch to slip, 

No sparks to miss, no gears to strip, 

No license-buying every year. 

No plates to screw on front and rear, 

No gas bill climbing up each day, 

Stealing the joy of life away. 

No speed cop chugging in your rear, 

Yelling summons in your ear. 

— Gouvernelt (N. Y.) Free Press. 



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Completely furnished — Oriental rugs and phono- 
graph. §125.00 per month. Apartment 6, 1100 
Fulton Street, Cor. Pierce. May be seen by ap- 
pointment. Phone Graystone 428. 



A Broker 

Says: 

It is only natural that I 
read the best financial 
daily and the paper that 
carries the bulk of finan- 
cial advertising. That is 
the 



€ljwmrle 



Oldest Olympic Club Member Passes 

After an illness of some weeks, William Wallace Arm- 
strong, oldest member of the Olympic Club, passed away 
Wednesday night of last week, in the Franklin Hospital, 
where he had been removed from the Post street club. 

Armstrong was born in Canada, December 4th, 1831, 
but came to the United States in his early youth. At the 
start of the Civil War he enlisted and became a captain 
in the 17th New York Infantry. Often he has delighted 
his friends with vivid descriptions of events of the famous 
"Seven Days' Fight," when a member of Fitz John Por- 
ter's division of the Army of the Potomac. 

Armstrong joined the Olympic Club in 1871, almost 
coincident with his coming to San Francisco to live. He 
took an active interest in the club's affairs, and in recent 
years the anniversaries of his birth have been observed 
with appropriate ceremonies. Armstrong has no relatives 
in San Francisco, and the closest of kin are some nieces 
and nephews, one of whom, H. W. Armstrong, is well i 
known in Los Angeles. 



Write Your Dream Story Into a Fiction Story 

Everyone who has lived has lived short stories, dozens 
of them, that might have been published in a short story 
magazine. 

But few have written compared with the millions who 
have dreamed. It has been because they lacked the 
knowledge of "how to write the acceptable story." 

It has been the same with stories of travel, of news, 
good news for the papers. Those stories never "got over" 
because the one who knew them or lived them did not 
know how to write them. 

Now the University of California Extension is arrang- 
ing classes in short story writing, travel story and other 
types of feature story writing, and newspaper writing, 
to be conducted by Gilbert G. Weigle, San Francisco 
writer who has successfully conducted similar classes for 
a number of years. 

The news and feature story writing classes will meet 
next Tuesday evening at 7 and 8 o'clock at room 102 in 
the new extension building at 540 Powell street, and the 
short story writing classes, for beginners and advanced 
students, at 7 and 8 o'clock Wednesday evening. They 
will meet thereafter once a week. 

The classes are open to the public. Interested persons 
are invited to visit the classes or may register now. Full 
particulars may be had by telephoning Kearny 100, ex 
tension headquarters. 



. 



Si — "Sara, is there anything you want from town thi 
mornin'?" 

Sara — "You might stop in at one of them there stores 
and buy a jar of that there Traffic Jam I been ahearin' 
so much about." 



Golden Gate Theater 

Francis X. Bushman will be featured at the Golden Gate 
theater in "The Code of the Sea" ; Nitza Vernille, danc- 
ing star is the second feature ; Gus King and several other 
vaudeville acts will also be part of the vaudeville program. 

On the screen, "My Friend From India," made from 
the esoteric farce in which Walter Perkins starred for 
many years, will be shown. Elinor Fair lends her beauty 
to illuminate the story. 



January 14, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



ftJiBi^gy TTlBLE 



^ ■mmm s-Tszs* 




By Lloyd Farrington Wilson 



As It Seems to Me 



The book reviewer is the interlocutor and the publish- 
ers are the end men; therefore I suggest that you buy 
books : but just between you and me, here's a word to the 
wise. Were I to meet my host of admirers in a closed 
meeting held in one of the phone booths in any drug 
store, with rental libraries as my subject for literature, 
here's what I would say. 

Rental libraries are my idea of a public utility. For the 
small fee charged, the rental libraries make extensive 
reading possible for everyone. As I see it, this is an age 
when smartness is quite the thing, and conversational 
ability is and always will be a definite note of smartness. 
In order to carry one's end in conversation at the dinner, 
luncheon or bridge table, when books and authors are the 
popular topic, one must be "in the know" on the subject. 

Today it is humanly impossible to read even a small 
percentage of the mass of book matter published, nor is 
it advisable. Those who have a taste for fiction, light 
verse, and biographies that satisfy a celebrity complex, 
are in the majority. So it is this group that most re- 
viewers help and the rental libraries cater to. Also it is 
this group that is the last satisfied by the facilities of the 
public libraries. 

The telephone directory lists some dozen or fifteen pri- 
vate rental libraries. Despite the fact that on appear- 
ance I would never pass as a learned bookman, I get a 
?reat deal of pleasure out of exploring book stalls. I 
have been in San Francisco such a relatively short time 
that I cannot do justice to the city's possibilities. How- 
ever, I have visited Paul Elder's, and found it all that 1 
had hoped for. The literary atmosphere which attends 
functions there is equal to that found in any New York 
ir Chicago gallery. The rental library department is in 
excellent shape and every courtesy is extended to the 
Members. If you really want to follow my lead drop up to 
1105 in the Russ building — and discover Anderson's; 
Moreover, meet Wanda Anderson who is all things to this 
smart little library. Mrs. Anderson's knowledge of books 
and her sincere desire to help one make a selection, to- 
gether with her charming personality, make her library 

joy. Then too, there is an easy chair to lounge in and 
'ilways cigarettes for "friends, readers and customers." 



Money Writes, by Upton Sinclair; A. and C. Boni; $2.50. 

Here is a book that will call out the big guns of every 
ritic and writer in the country — if they can stop laughing 
ong enough. Upton Sinclair, the radical socialist, has 
ittacked the cream of the literary world. H. L. .Mencken. 
Sinclair Lewis. Carl Sandburg, Theodore Dreiser. Joseph 
lergeshimer, Booth Tarkington, Sherwood Anderson. 
'arl Van Yechten. Amy Lowell. Gertrude Atherton, 
lames Branch Cabell. Jack London, and a host of others 
ill come under his axe. 

Vincent Starret has heralded what he calls the decline 
>f "The Great God .Mencken" : now Sinclair has listed 
Mencken under the title of "Boobus Americanus." That's 
:oo much. This country needs to be debunked: a mighty 
man must do it. and Mencken is the man. My admiration 
tor Mr. Mencken is of long standing and. though I have 
it times deplored his slightly changing group attitude, it 



will endure many books like Mr. Sinclair's. 

If you would hear your favorite author ridiculed by a 
man whose ability and taste you will question — as I do — 
read this. Mr. Sinclair will make more money than any 
he condemns in this book, in a far less valuable and ad- 
mirable way. 

The Vanguard, by Arnold Bennett ; The Literary Guild of 

America; Geo. H. Doran. 

This book I heartily recommend, with all the force, 
eclat, and gusto I am capable of. Arnold Bennett's most 
recent addition to the list that has long since stamped 
him as one of the foremost Englishmen of letters, is a 
worthy one. 

On board a sumptuous yacht with the Mediterranean, 
Rome and Monte Carlo for a field of adventure, Bennett 
enacts a modern romance that has a vivid touch of the 
fantastic, yet is not wild or unreal. 

Lord Furber, Septimus Sutherland and Harriet Per- 
kins are a great trio of principals. The royal one we liken 
to a magician — with money for magic. He is the cat, 
while Sutherland is the rather clever mouse. But, ah! 
the woman — ever she plays with the men, so we have 
Harriet. Big business, domestic trouble, and above all a 
very satisfactory love affair comprise the plot. I started 

with a yea — here I add the team! 

* * * 

Trader Horn, by Ethelreda Lewis; Simon & Schuster; 

$4.00. 

"Trader Horn" is no other than one Alfred Aloysius 
Horn — a man who has "lived." The old ex-trader of the 
African Ivory Coast, past seventy years old, was doing 
house-to-house canvassing when he met Miss Lewis. She 
has edited and brilliantly arranged the life and works of 
the old man as set down by himself. 

With Trader Horn you enter the land of mystery. The 
voodoo dance, the rescue of a fair octoroon, missionaries, 
cannibals, apes, the fight for ivory, all are part of our 
adventures as we travel with the old trader. 

You'll like the book, because it is as true and real as 
the author is. It is the best book of adventure I ever read. 
Its color, wit, and reality make it the best thing in the 

bookshops today. 

* * * 

On the Table 

One of the dailies has announced that Col. Chas. A. 
Lindbergh's "We" will be run in serial form. Lindy's 
book has had a great run of popularity, and justly so. It 
is well written and if you go in for that sort, it will be 
worth your while. Mother India, by Katherine Mayo 
(Harcourt-Brace) is still "batting near the top." I have 
a rumor that H. L. Mencken has added another to his 
Prejudices Series. I haven't seen it ; when I do, I'll lead 
the cheering in my section. Genius and Character, by 
Emil Ludwig (Harcourt. Brace) is among the best of the 
biographies. It is stimulating and interesting by right of 
the many brilliant character portrayals. Gay Matter, by 
Arthur L. Lippmann (A. & C. Boni) is an exceedingly 
clever collection of humorous verse. Mr. Lippmann is well 
known to readers of Judge, and his verse, according to 
my notion, is not "hard to take." if you know what I 
mean. 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 14, 1928 




MOTOR BODY CORPORATION 

MANLY S. HARRIS 

1116 Post Street Graystone 8020 

Body Construction and Repair 

Duco, Bake Enamelling, Fender Repairs, Upholstering, 

and all body specialties 



LOU W. SARTOR, Proprielor 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 

Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco, Calif. 



GRAYSTONE 130 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garasre. 410 Bush St. Monarch Garaee. 1361 Bush St. 

Management of WILLIAM SAUNDERS 




457 NINTH STREET 



Complete Brake Relining Service 

WAGNER ELECTRIC CORPORATION 

Manufacturers and National Service 

Organization for Lockheed Four 

Wheel Hydraulic Brakes 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Franklin 4191, Day; 3985, Night Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Washing and Polishing Specialists 

228 HYDE STREET (Bet. Turk and Eddy) 

Latest Type Pressure Equipment Used 
Open $1.50 CARS WASHED Closed $2.50 

Special Wash and Polish $5.50 
TRANSMISSION AND MOTOR — CLEANING — TOP DRESSING 



1140 GEARY ST. 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 4266 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy- Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blackamithing. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



AUTO BODY CO. 

LACQUER ENAMELING AND PAINTING 
BODY DESIGNING AND BUILDING 
UPHOLSTERING AND SEAT COVERS 
COLLISION WORK OUR SPECIALTY 



Wm. C. Grayson 



1355 BUSH ST., Near Polk 

San Francisco, California Phone Prospect 3182 



Petrol Paragraphs 

By K. R. Schwartz 

National Automobile Club 

Proper lubrication of an automobile is figured in min- 
utes and cents, while replacement of bearings is figured 
in hours and dollars, according to L. C. Shaw of the 
Service Department of the National Automobile Club. 
Also, remember that a gallon of oil costs less than an hour 
of mechanic's time, urges Shaw whose list of rules for 
the lubrication of an automobile engine follows: 

1. Do not wait until there is a squeak before beginning 
to lubricate. A squeak means a dry or dirty bearing, and 
if the right care is taken at the right time, such condi- 
tions will not exist. 

2. Never race a cold engine. Use an oil that will flow 
freely in cold weather, because perfect lubrication cannot 
occur with extremely heavy-bodied oil in cold weather. 

3. See that the engine is kept clean — always, and that 
the air, fuel and oil cleaners are inspected regularly. 

4. While driving, keep an eye on the oil gauge for pos- 
sible failure in the lubricating system. 

5. Change the oil at regular intervals. During the 
winter, oil in the average engine should be changed every 
500 miles. If there is an oil filter on the engine, it is best 
to change every 1000 miles. 

6. Keep the erankcase filled to proper level with a grade 
recommended by the company from which you buy your 
oil. Never fill beyond the proper level, as this will make 
the engine slow moving. 

7. Rather than expect a heavier oil to correct such de- 
fects as loose bearings and piston fits in an old engine, 
have the motor repaired. 

8. Never drive a new car at a fast rate of speed or allow 
it to overheat. 

By keeping these rules, which are the result of experi- 
ence, in mind, the motorist will find that most of his 
lubricating troubles have vanished, and that less bother, 
less expenditure for repair, and more enjoyable motoring 
will follow, Shaw declares. 



In relining brake bands, the motorist who does his own 
repair work is prone to commit the error of getting the 
lining too tight in various spots. If it is drawn taut be- 
tween certain rivets, brake drag is an almost inevitable 
result. In such case, the lining either must wear or 
stretch until it fits snugly against the band. Its efficiency, 
naturally, is diminished. 

The simplest way to reline bands is to seek no more 
than a snug fit in the first place. That is the good me- 
chanic's way of doing it. 



Pennsylvania's new motor vehicle laws, recently effec- 
tive, contain regulations which are new to motorists of 
Pennsylvania and many other states. The new code is 
said to approximate closely the Hoover Uniform Code. 

Among the provisions of the code is that which allows 
highway department officials to condemn vehicles which 
are so old as to be unfit for use on the highways. The 
officials will determine whether or not vehicles in ques- 
tion are safe for operation. 

The speed limit on open highways in Pennsylvania is 
35 miles an hour under the new laws. Motorists are re- 
stricted to 15 miles an hour while passing schools where 
children are arriving or leaving. 



inuary 14, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Among the offenses made unlawful by the new regula- 
;ions are the use of sirens and whistles except by police, 
fire and hospital machines; the display of stickers on 
windshields and windows; the operation of a car while 
more than three persons are on the driver's seat; coast- 
ing down grade with gears in neutral; loaning of license 
plates to another motorist; parking an automobile 25 feet 
from an intersection; following another car closer than 
is reasonably proper, and the failure to report to police 
authorities any accident where injury or damage exceed- 
ing S50 is caused. Stopping or parking in front of a pri- 
vate driveway is prohibited. 



The wireless traffic director will not stop reckless mo- 
torists and place them under arrest, but will be valuable 
at right-angle "invisible" crossings which are not guarded 
by regular traffic police, it is thought. 



All passes over the Sierras are now closed, and the only 
way points east of the Sierra Nevada mountains can be 
reached is either via Redding, Alturas, thence to Susan- 
rille and Reno, or via the southern route through Bakers- 
leld and Mojave, thence north through western Nevada. 

The Placerville road is closed by three feet of snow at 
the summit. The first snow is encountered at seventeen 
niles above Placerville, and it is not advisable to attempt 
;o drive beyond that point. 

On the Colfax road, a little snow will be found at Colfax 
jut in no great quantity until Baxter's Station is reached. 
Baxter's is sixteen miles beyond Colfax. 

The Yuba Pass road is closed to through travel. It is 
Dossible, however, to get to Sierra City and four miles be- 
fond. Chains are advisable between Dowmeville and 
Sierra City as this is a narrow dirt mountain road. 

The Red Bluff-Susanville road is also closed to through 
raffle. It is possible to get to Mineral; the road is closed 
jeyond that point. 



The Kings River Canyon highway moved another step 
toward realization a few days ago, when the state location 
•ngineer and assistants went into that area for the pur- 
pose of establishing the most feasible route, which will 
>pen to the world this spectacular part of the Sierras. 

According to the engineering department of the Na- 
tional Automobile Club, it will take about six weeks to 
complete the preliminary work. 



\ bill, making it obligatory for every applicant for a 
Iriving license to obtain a physician's certificate of men- 
al and physical soundness before a driving license is 
.ranted, is being prepared in the Chamber of Deputies 
)f France. Automobile accidents in that country resulted 
n approximately 2500 deaths during the last year. 



The motor ear used by Chief Justice Tat't while he was 
'resident of the United States has just been received by 
he Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The ear will 
>e exhibited in the department of mechanical engineering 
>f the museum as an illustration of the older type ot 
.Utomobile. 



From the motorist's standpoint, one of the most im- 
portant pieces of national legislation that will be con- 
sidered by the present session of Congress will be the 
appropriation of $75,000,000 in Federal Aid money for 
the construction of highways in the next two years. 

It is expected, according to information from Washing- 
ton, that considerable opposition to the continuance of 
Federal Road Aid will make its appearance at the session 
of Congress. 

This opposition is not new, but it is believed to have 
gained considerable strength within the last couple of 
years, especially in the Eastern seaboard states. Because 
of this opposition the progress of this legislation must 
be closely watched by all those Western states whose 
highway building programs depend upon Federal Aid 
money. 

California is particularly interested in the outcome of 
this legislation, for the reason that in this state the tour- 
ist travel is increasing by leaps and bounds. Thus more 
and better highways are a vital necessity. 

True, California has a large highway fund of its own, 
thanks to the passage last year of the one-cent increase 
in the gallonage tax on gasoline. This, it is expected, will 
give the state a highway fund of some $120,000,000 in 
the next decade. 

In spite of this, however, California cannot sit idly by 
and watch the defeat of the Federal Aid measure in Con- 
gress. The loss of this aid from the Federal government 
would be a serious loss to many of the Western states 
who depend- largely upon this assistance to bring their 
highway building to a successful conclusion. 

While California is not in this position itself, it must 
present a solid front with the other Western states to 
retain the 875,000,000 appropriation on the statute books. 

This state also is vitally interested in the passage of 
the 87,500,000 appropriation for the construction of For- 
est Reserve roads by the national government, since this 
state has a large national park area. In order that the 
motorists of this and other states may enjoy the benefits 
of these forest reserves it is essential that good highway 
communications be maintained. 

The money received from the national government in 
Federal Aid is less than one-sixth of the total amount 
spent by the states in order to obtain this help. In addi- 
tion, the states have spent 8452,798.000, or more than 
four times the sum spent to match Federal Aid. 



"The radio traffic policeman" is soon to put in an 
ippearance on the streets of Copenhagen. Denmark. 

The new device, developed by two Danish radio en- 
gineers, consists of a system of warning lights which are 
let in operation by a radio apparatus which picks up vi- 
(rations caused by approaching vehicles. The energy Ol 
he vibrations is raised and then caught up by antenna 
Ipross streets at a certain distance from crossings. The 
ights warn motorists that the crossing is not clear and 
low driving is advisable. 



Old Age Pensions 

Professor Chamberlain of Columbia University says 
that "old age pension laws are the next big step in social 
legislation in America." 

This measure will come before the next session of the 
legislature in this state and the San Francisco branch 
of the American Association for Old Age Security will 
hold a public meeting in the Native Sons' building, Shasta 
hall, addressed by prominent speakers, January 25. 

Bishop Francis McConnell is the president of the Na- 
tional organization and Father John A. Ryan of the 
Catholic University is vice-president. 

The public is invited to the meeting Wednesday at 8 
pr-m.. January 25. 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 14, 1928 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




On the Air 
By C. J. Pennington 

A daily matinee lecture service, fea- 
turing the best speakers available in 
the Bay district, will be inaugurated 
by KFRC beginning Monday, January 
16th. Each afternoon, between four 
and four-thirty, set owners may avail 
themselves of an interesting and 
stimulating talk on such subjects as 
religion, science, art, literature and 
self-expression. The object of the 
speakers will be to provide facts and 
ideas which will prove valuable in the 
lives of their listeners. 



Sunday, January 15 

The second program of the newly 
inaugurated "Golden Strand Group" 
will be broadcast over the NBC Pa- 
cific Coast Network from 1 to 2 p. m. 
This hour features a large orchestra, 
augmented by a tenor and a soprano 
soloist. From 3 to 3 :30 p. m. the NBC 
will offer "In a Persian Garden." Be- 
tween 3:30 and 4 p. m. the Arion Trio 
will be heard. From 4 to 4:30, "From 
a Concert Platform," featuring Ma- 
dame Marie Verda. 4:30 to 5 p. m., 
"Great Moments in History" (Alex- 
ander Hamilton). In the hour from 
6:30 to 7:30 o'clock the NBC will pre- 
sent a symphony concert sponsored by 
the Standard Oil Company. From 8 to 
9 p. m. an exceptional program is of- 
fered listeners through the NBC in 
the Atwater Kent Hour broadcast. 
* * * 

Monday, January 16 

The hour from 8 to 9 p. m. will 
bring listeners of the NBC another 
musical program from Rudy Seiger's 
Shell Symphonists. From 10 to 11 p. 
m. the Spotlight Hour. The Spotlight 
Hour has won a place in the hearts 
of the radio fans, and its sole mission 
is the bringing back of the best opera 



music and musical comedy hits of 

other years. 

* * * 

Tuesday, January 17 

The Eveready Salon Orchestra will 
be heard from 8 to 8:30 p. m. in a 
program of Italian music. From 8:30 
to 9 p. m. the weekly bridge lesson 
will be broadcast over the NBC net- 
work. At 9 p. m. "Retold Tales," 
O'Henry's story "Vanity and Soma 
Sables," will be presented over the 
NBC network and continue until 9:30 
p. m. At 9 :30 The Rounders will take 
you on another round-up of rollicking 
rhythm. 

:;: * * 

Wednesday, January 18 

The Sunkist Melodists will present 
another musical fruit cocktail over 
the NBC network from 6:30 to 7:00 
o'clock. Beginning at 9 o'clock and 
for the next hour the NBC Vaga- 
bonds will take Pacific Coast Network 
listeners on a musical journey "With 

Street Singers of the Past." 

* * * 

Thursday, January 19 

Tonight's Dodge Brothers presen- 
tation over the NBC Network from 9 
to 9:30 p. m. is, as usual, light and 
popular in character. The program 
features the Sterling male quartet, 
the lively orchestra and the air come- 
dian. The sixth of the "Moon Magic" 
programs will be heard from 9:30 to 
10 o'clock ; this half hour will feature 
Kajetan Attl, famed harpist. 

* * * 

Friday, January 20 

The weekly program of the Wrigley 
Spearmen will be broadcast over the 
NBC network from 8 to 9 p. m. The 
familiar Magic Isle is again the set- 
ting. The half hour from 9 to 9:30 
will mark the inauguration of another 
sponsored program broadcast over 
the NBC network. This new addition 
is presented by the White Rock Min- 
eral Spring Company. This new 
broadcast will usher in an entirely 
different type of program. Tonight at 
9:30 o'clock we will be carried back 
to the old days when the events of the 
winter season always included a spell- 
ing match, a quilting bee and a "re- 
quest program" in the school house. 
Such will be the broadcast featuring 

"Memory Lane." 

* * * 

Saturday, January 21 

The tinkling tones of the old fash- 
ioned music box will introduce an- 
other RCA hour tonight at 8 o'clock. 
The music to be presented during this 
(Continued on page 17) 



Programs for Next Week 

KFRC— DON LEE 
SAN FRANCISCO— 454 

Sunday, January 15 

10 :00 to 12 :00 noon — Home, Sweet Home Concert. 

12 noon to 1 :00 p. m. — Church service. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m.— S & W Recital. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Talk. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins concert orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KFRC dance orchestra. 

Monday. January 16 

7:00 lo 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

9:00 to 9:10 a. m. — Shopping service. 

10 :00 to 11 :00 a. m. — Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 

2 :00 to 4 :00 p. m. — S & W special program. 

4 :30 to 5 :00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5 :00 to 5 :15 p. m. — News items. 
5:15 to 5:45 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

5:15 to 5:20 p. m. — Joe Mendel and Pep Band. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen, police reports. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Sports talk 

7:00 lo 7:30 p. m. — The Hawaiians. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Blue Monday Jamboree. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m — KFRC Dance Orchestra. 

Tuesday. January 17 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8 :00 10 9 :00 a. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 

11 :30 a. m. to 12 :00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert. 

1:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 5:80 p. m. — News items. 

5:30 to 6:10 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

—With stamp collectors. 

-Stage and screen, 
m. — The Cecilians. 
m. — Haas program. 

-Concert orchestra. 



6:10 to 6:20 p. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. 

s :iii) |„ u:00 ii. 

'. 11 



10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 
Wednesday, January 18 
7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m.— Georgia O. George. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Household hints. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryout period. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert, 
4:00 to 4:30 p. m.— Calif. Slate Library Talk. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5 :15 to 5 :30 p. m. — News items. 
5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

8 :00 to 9:00 p. m. — Maxwell House Coffee program. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

Thursday. January 19 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 

11:30 lo 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Cay program. 

4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m. -News items. 

5:30 to 6:10 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6:10 to 6:20 p. m. —Beauty talk. 

6 :20 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage. Screen. Police reports. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Sports talk. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — The Hawaiians. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Mona Motor Oil Co. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
10:00 lo 12:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 
Friday. January 20 

7 :00 I,, s :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 lo 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Hints to home-makers. 
11:30 lo 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 
4 :00 to 4 :30 p. m. — Student hour. 
4:80 lo 5:15 p. m.- Organ recital. 
5:15 to 5:30 p. m.- News items. 
5:30 in 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
R -20 to 6 *30 p. m. — S'age and screen. 
6:80 '<• 7:00 p. m. — The Cecilians. 
B:00 to 9:00 p. m. Skyway journeys. 
B:00 l" 10:00 p. m. -Concert orchestra. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m — Dance orchestra. 
Saturday. January 21 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. Seal Ttock nroeram. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 to 11:45 a. m. — Amateur tryouts. 
11:46 lo 12:00 noon — Announcements of Sunday 

cburch sermons. 
12:00 lo 1-00 p. m. Sherman. Clay concert. 
4:80 lo 5:15 p. m. Organ recital. 
5:15 lo 5:30 p. m. News items. 
5-10 lo 6:2fi p. m. — Mae and his gang. 
C :20 lo 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 



inuary 14, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 
00 to 9:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

PO— HALE BROTHERS AND THE CHRONICLE 

SAN FRANCISCO— 422 
imday. January 15 
45 to 10:30 a. m. — Church services. 

1:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
to 5:30 p. m.— Mixed Quartet. 
H to G:80 p. m. -Chickering hour. 
30 to 7:30 p. m. — Symphony orchestra. 
SO to 8:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

SO to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orches- 
tra, 
ionday. January 16 
:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
0:30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
1:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
moon— Time signals, Scripture reading. 
:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
:00 to 5:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
:00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
:80 to 7 :30 p. m. — KPO Orchestra. 
:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Musical program. 
0:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KPO's variety program. 
'uesday, January 17 
:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
:00 to 9 :00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 
:00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 
0:30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
1:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Kane's Hawaiians. 
2 noon— Time signals, Scripture reading. 
:00 to 2 :00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
:00 to 5:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
:00 to 6 :00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
:00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
0:00 to 12:00 p. m— KPO dance orchestra. 
Vednesday. January 18 
:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
:00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
0:30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
0:45 a. m. — Home service talk. 
1:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
2 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
_00 to 5 :00 p. m.— Studio program. 
:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
:00 to 6 :30 p. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 
30 to 7:30 p. m. — KPO Orchestra. 
00 to 9:00 p. m. — Atwater Kent Artists. 
:00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Abas String Quartette. 
0:00 to 12:00 p. m— KPO Dance Orchestra. 
'hursday, January 19 
:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
:00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 
0:30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
1 :30 to 1 :00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
2 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 
:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 
H to 7:00 p. m. KI'O concert orchestra. 
:00 to 7 :30 p. m.— Book review and sports. 
:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Caswell Hour. 

:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
0:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
rifl;.y, January 20 

:45 to 8 :(10 a. m. Health exercises. 
:00 to 9:00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 
0:80 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
0:45 a. m, — Home service talk. 
1:3d a. m. to 12:45 p. m. Kane's Hawaiian! 
2 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
2:45 p.m. — Commonwealth luncheon at Palace Hotel. 

:80 to 2:00 p. m. Kl'O orchestra. 
:00 to 5:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
;00 to 6:00 p. m.- Children's hour. 

e00 to G:30 p. m. Ye Towne Cryer service 
SO to 7:80 p. m. Organ recital. 

:iui to 10:00 p. m. National Broadcasting C 

0:00 to 12:00 p. m. KPO Dance Orchestra, 
alurday. January 21 

K to B : (1 " a. in Health exerciaea. 
:00 to 9:00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 
:00 to 10 :30 a. m. Domestic economist. 
0:30 to 10:46 n. m. Ye Towne Cryer. 
1:30 to 1:00 p. m. Kane's Hawaii 
■ ,.. rime signals, Scripture reading. 
:no to 2:00 d. m, KPO orchestra, 
no p, m Football. 
DO to 6:00 p. m. Children's hour. 

•00 to 6:80 p. m. — Ye Tonne Cryer service. 

;80 p. m KPO Dance Orel 
:0o to 12:00 p. m. National Broadcasting Company. 

KPWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS. INC. 
s\\ FRANCISCO— 1«7 
iunday. January 15 

■ 
jOO to 10:00 scram. 

0:00 to 1 1 :00 p. •■ gram. 

Ionday. January IS 

in. Breakfast program. 
Thrift program. 
o 10 :30 a.m. U S. weather reports. 
: i :00 a. m. Interior Decorating. 
i :00 p. m. -Luncheon program. 
:00 to 1 :30 p. m.- Country store. 
i:00 to 5:30 p. m. Concert. 
00 to 7:00 p. .m. Dinner concert. 



7:00 to 7:15 p. m.— Sports talk. 

i :16 to 7 :jo p. m. — Advert ising talk. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m.— DarneMle Sister. 

B:80 io 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

10:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, January 17 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

S :20 to 10:00 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 

10:2? to 10:80 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m.— Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m.— Sports hy Geo. T. Davis. 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.- — Musical program. 

10:00 p. m.— Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 10:30 p. m.— Novelty program. 

10:30 to 11:00 p. m. — Program of popular music. 

Wednesday, January 18 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. —Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:00 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m.— Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5 :30 to fi :00 p. m. — Construction reports. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 
Thursday, January 19 
7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Health exercises. 
8:20 to 10:00 a. m.— Breakfast program. 
10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 
10:27 to 10:30 a. m.— U. S. weather reports. 
10:30 to 11 :00 a. m.— Fashion hints. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 
1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m.— Country store. 
5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour program. 

7 :00 to 7 :15 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

S :00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.-KFWI Gypsy band. 

Friday, January 20 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Exercise hour. 

8:20 to 10:00 a. m.— Breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Musical luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m.— Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

fi :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Program. 

7:00 to 7:16 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

s :00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

[0:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 10:30 p. m.— Gloria Del Rae 

10:80 to 11:00 p. m. -Popular program. 

Saturday. January 21 

7:oo in B:00 a. m. Exercise hour. 

■- ■ :L'(i ir. 10:00 ;i. m. Musical breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m.- Thrift program. 

10:27 to 10:80 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

r,:oo to 5:30 p. m. — Concert 

I ;o 6:00 p. m.— Construction reports, 
fi nil i,. t on n. m.— D : nner hour concert. 
B:0Q to 9:00 p. m. Studio program. 
9:00 i" 10-00 p. ni. — Harriet Lewis. 
10:00 to 12:30 p. m.-KFWI surprise party. 

K J B8— JULIUS BRCNTON & SONS 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 

Sunday, January IS 

1:80 to 8:80 p. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 

; in to 5:00 p. m. Dance music. 

Monday, January 16 

o L2:00 m. Instrument anil vocal Belectl 

1;80 tO 7 '.HO p. m. Instrument and TOCI 

vDii tO Instrument and vocal selections. 

,. 1 1 ;00 p m. 51 idio program. 
Tuesday. Januar> 17 

o;i)o to 12:00 a. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 

7:80 p. ni. Instrument anil vocal selections. 

> p. m. tin) 
. H:00 p, hi. Coco-Nut Club meeting. 
Wednesday. Januar> 1 * 
9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — 

rumen! and vocal selections, 
to 10:00 p. m. Orthnphonic recital. 
Thursday. January 19 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 
P. ni. Instrument and vocal selections. 
ie lovers' program. 
Friday. January 20 

■> : no to Instrument and vocal selections. 

imont and vocal selections. 
10 p. pi, l».\nce music. 
i 11:00 p. n- Studio program. 
Saturday. Januar> .1 

hi a. m. Instrument and • ■ 

r iment and voca! selections. 

KLX— OAKLAND TR1BINE 
OAKLAND— 30* 

Mondav. January 16 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. F.conom. * hour. 

'.1:30 to 1 p. m Luncheon concert. 



■ : " to 6 :80 p. m. Brother Hoi.' 
8 :80 to 7 :00 p. m. Dinner concert 
7 :00 io 7 :80 p. m. New-* broadcast 

8:00 to 9:00 p. n>. Dance orchestra 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Weekly meeting of Lake Mcr- 

ritt Ducks. 
Tuesday, January 17 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. —Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Special program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Dance music. 
Wednesday, January 18 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Economies hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. nv — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Educational program 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Variety hour. 
Thursday, January 19 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Economics hour. 
11:80 to 1:00 p. ni. —Luncheon concert. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Hawaiian Orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Special program. 
Friday, January 20 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7 :00 to 7 :S0 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Variety hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Athens Athletic Club Orchestra. 
Saturday, January 21 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.~News broadcast. 

KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC 
OAKLAND— 394 
Sunday. January 15 

11:00 a. m.— Church service. 

1 :00 to 4 :00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

4 :l)0 p. m. — Vesper services. 

6:30 to 7:80 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

< :J0 p. m. — Weather report. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Atwater Kent hour. 

Monday. January 16 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 

12 :00 p. m.— Weather. 

3:30 to 4:00 p. m.— Women's Clubs. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— St Francis Orchestra 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— KGO Kiddies' Klub. 

6:00 to 6:45 p. m.— Concert Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Shell Company program 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— The Pilgrims. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Co. 

Tuesday. January 17 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. -Luncheon Concert. 

12 i 3 2i x, ea v er: V 00 ' wea,h er; 1:03. S. F. stocks: 

I :08, N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m.— Dance Orchestra. 
6:55. news: 7:03. weather: 7:08. S. F. produce, grain 

cotton: 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, N. Y 

stocks (closing). 
B:00 tO 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
Wednesday, January In 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. -Luncheon concert 
12:30. weather: 1:00. weather: 1:03. S. F stocks- 

1 :0S N. Y stocks. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Dinner concert 
6 :8Q p m. Weather. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m . Sunkist dinner hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Farm program. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Vaudeville. 

9:00 io 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. -St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Thursday. January 19 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
12:30, weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03. S. F 

1 :0S. N. Y. stocks. 

p. m. 'Friend to Bo 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:66 p. m. —News : 7:05. weather; 7:08. S. F. produce 

grain, cotton; 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23. 

N. Y. stocks (closing). 

! m. The EGO Pi., 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.- National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.-- St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Friday. January 20 
11:00 to 11:80 a. m. —Louise Landis. 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. -Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather: 1:00. weather: 1:03. S. F. stocks: 

N Y. <tr.cks. 
5:30p.m. — Wise man from the Land-O-Health. 

p. m. -Dinner concert program. 
fi • •' tn fi --,-, p. m— "Weekly Financial Review." 

7:06, weather: 7 :0S, S, F. produce, cram, 
cotton; 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing! ; 7:23, N. Y. 
-ing>. 
o 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Dance music. 
Saturday. January 21 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. -Luncheon concert. 

feather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 
■ 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. —Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m. —Weather, news. 
-Jy si>ort r-'v 
to 11:00 p. m. —National Broadcasting Company. 
■ to 12:00 p. m.— Dance music 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 14, 1928 



KPI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC 
LOS ANGELES— 468 
Sunday, January 15 
10:00 a. m. — Morning services. 
11 :00 a, m. — Church services. 

1 :00 to 4 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
5 :30 p. m. — Johnnie Dell and orchestra. 

6 :30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7 :35 p. m. — Bob .Buckner and Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9 :30 p. m. — Albin Trio. 

10 :00 p. m. — Packard Orchestra. 
Monday. January 16 

5 :30 p. m. — Lone Rene and Orchestra. 

6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 

6:30 p. m. — Glenn Edmunds and Orchestra. 

7:00 p. m. — Gene Johnston's Music Box hour. 

8:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 p. m. — Shirley Mirkin. 

10 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

Tuesday. January 17 

5:30 p. m. — The Dragon Hawaiians. 

6 :00 p. m. — Florence Sanger. 

6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 

6 :30 p. m. — Whispering Jack Don. 
7:00 p. m. — L. A. Fire Dept. 

7 :30 p. m. — Helen Guest. 

8 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 
10 :00 p. m. — Metropolitan Dance Orchestra. 
Wednesday, January 18 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m.— Gold Medal Talka. 

5 :30 p. m. — Sebastians Cotton Club Orchestra. 

6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 

6 :30 p. m. — Hal ChasnorT's orchestra. 

7 :30 p. m. — Nick Harris Detective Stories. 

7 :45 p. m. — William MacDougall. 
8:00 p. m. — Song recital. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10 :00 p. m. — Winifred Hooke. 
Thursday, January 19 

5 :30 p. m. — Vernon Elkins and Orchestra. 

6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 

6 :30 p. m. — Henry Starr. 

7 :00 p. m. — Program by the University of Southern 

California. 
8:00 p. m. — Audrey Anderson. 
8:15 p. m. — L. A. Philharmonic Orchestra. 
10:00 p. m. — Program of modern classical music. 
Friday, January 20 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m.— Gold Medal Talks. 
5:30 p. m.— Paul McNally. 

6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m. — Clarice Russell. 

7 :00 p. m. — Program by Paul Roberts. 

8 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10 :00 p. m. — Virginia McCoy. 

Saturday. January 21 

5 :30 p. m. — Strangers Social Club Orchestra. 

6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 

6 :30 p. m. — Jack Farrell and Orchestra. 

7 :30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado. Spanish Baritone. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10 :00 p. m. — Packard program. 
11:00 p. m.— KF1 Midnight Frolic. 

KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO CO. 

SEATTLE— 348 

Sunday. January 15 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 

9 :00 to 10 :30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
Monday, January 16 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Time signals, sport news. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Dance music. 
10:30 to 12:30 p. m.— Goofy Bird Frolic. 
Tuesday, January 17 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m, — Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 10 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 
Wednesday, January 18 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 10 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. i 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Thursday, January 19 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals*. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Friday. January 20 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Instrumental trio. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 

Saturday, January 21 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Sport news. News items. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers Dance Orchestra. 

KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN 
PORTLAND— 491.5 

Sunday. January 15 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. program. 

10 -00 tn 11 :00 V . ro Little Symphony orchestra. 

Monday. January 16 

:00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p- m. — Concert orchestra. 
7 :30 to S :00 p m. — Talk. 



8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — N. B. C. program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert hour. 
10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Spot Light Hour. 
.Tuesday, January 17 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Musical program. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Book review and talk. 

8 :00 to 8 :30 p. m. — Sealy Dance program. 
8:30 to 11:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
Wednesday, January 18 

6 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Silver King Revellers. 

Thursday. January 19 

6 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:40 p. m. — Utility service. 

7:40 to 8:00 p. m.— Flower girls. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Conrert. 

9 00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
Friday, January 20 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Concert. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Utility service and talk. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Concert. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Keep Growing Wiser Order of 

Hoot Owls. 
Saturday, January 21 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 8 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

8:00 to 12:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 



Society 

(Continued from page 4) 

the most exclusive groups of women 
in the city and was founded several 
years ago by Miss Christine Hart. 

* * * 

Theater Party Host 

Mr. John A. Hirschman, who spent 
the holidays with Mr. and Mrs. M. A. 
Hirschman at the Fairmont Hotel, 
was host to a group of friends at din- 
ner and later at the theater. Mr. 
Hirschman is attending school at 
Santa Barbara. 

Guests on this occasion included : 
Misses Margery Walter, Jane Bran- 
stein, Claire Bush, Caffie Arnstein, 
Ann Ackerman, Frances Hayman, 
Elizabeth Lippert and Messrs. Rich- 
ard Elkus, Edward Coleman, Joe 
Haber, Leo Rosener, Lloyd Ackerman. 
(Continued on page 17) 



California Club 

Mrs. A. Forrester Hilton presided 
with her usual graciousness over the 
California Club Assembly, which took 
place last night, Friday, January 13, 
in the especially decorated auditorium 
of the club house on Clay street. 

Those who attend these delightful 
dances have such good times that no 
one wants to miss one of them. Good 
music, splendid features, and dancing 
from nine until midnight are part of 
the assembly under the splendid su- 
pervision of Mrs. Hilton and her ex- 
cellent committee. The next dance is 
scheduled for February 10 and as it 
approaches Valentine's Day, the deco- 
rative plan will introduce sentimental 
favors and motifs of the occasion. 



Club Activities 

(Continued from page 5) 
Women's Building 

Miss Lillian Connolly of the 
"Chronicle" writes this splendid 
story : 

"A club city within four walls" is 
the way San Francisco's new Wo- 
men's building at 609 Sutter street is 
described in an interesting article 
written by Mrs. Helen M. Knight, 
president of the San Francisco Wo- 
men's Club, in the new issue of the 
Woman's Journal. 

Club women over the country will 
find a model example of how a modern 
building to house women's organiza- 
tions grew from a small building fund 
to a twelve-story structure in Mrs. 
Knight's article, and San Francisco 
women will be proud of an ac- 
complishment greater than any other 
city can boast of in this line. 

Mrs. Knight gives in detail the his- 
tory of the building, with a complete 
description of the interior and the 
method of financing the project. 

Incidentally the directors of the 
Women's building and the People's 
Assembly have announced a new 
"club assembly privilege plan," which 
permits those who are not members 
of the Women's building to have com- 
plete use of the building. The plan 
provides for the payment of an initial 
fee and a monthly assessment there- 
after. 



A better feeling between Mexico 
and the United States is in the air. 
Lindbergh put it there. — Virginian- 
Pilot. 



Series of Lectures 

The Astronomical Society of the 
Pacific announces a series of five illus- 
trated popular lectures to be given in 
the auditorium of the Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company, 245 Market street, 
on the third Monday evening of each 
month from January to May, inclu- 
sive. The first lecture of the series 
will be given next Monday evening, 
by Dr. Donald H. Menzel, of the Lick 
Observatory, on "T h e Variable 
Stars," which include the spectacular 
Novae, the eclipsing Binaries, the pul- 
sating Cepheids, and the mysterious 
long-period Red Variables. The lec- 
turer will describe and illustrate each 
of these classes of stars, and will ex- 
plain, as far as is known, the causes 
of their variation. 

The remaining lectures will be as 
follows: February 20, "The Explora- 
tion of Space," by Dr. Hubble of the 
Mount Wilson Observatory ; March 
19, "Multiple Stars," by Dr. Aitken 
of the Lick Observatory; April 16, 
"The Past Twenty Years of Physical 
Astronomy," by Dr. Adams of the 
Mount Wilson Observatory ; and May 
21, the "Gaseous Nebulae," by Dr. 
Moore of the Lick Observatory. Ad- 
mission to all of the lectures is free. : 



anuary 14, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



Society 

(Continued from page 16) 
Irs. Levin Feted 

Mrs. Al Levin, wife of the promi- 
ent motion picture and theater ex- 
cutive, was the honor guest at a 
umber of beautiful affairs preceding 
ler trip to New York. 

During the fashionable tea hour at 
he Mark Hopkins last Tuesday after- 
loon, Mrs. Levin was feted by a 
rroup of friends who gathered to say 
arewell to the charming and attrac- 
ive young San Franciscan. 

Mrs. Levin, in company with her 
usband and their young son, Edward 
,evin, left Tuesday night for New 
fork, although they have planned to 
top in Chicago and in other large 
ities throughout the country. 

Al Levin of the Alexandria, Coli- 
eum, Balboa and other motion pic- 
ure theaters, is one of the most 
irominent theater men of the West, 
lis superior management and theat- 
rical understanding has placed him 
is one of the foremost theater men 
>f the Pacific Coast. 

Mr. and Mrs. Levin expect to visit 
nany of the eastern cities before re- 
urning to their home in San Fran- 
isco. 

Urs. Emerson Entertains 

Mrs. Valahdin Emerson, well 
mown in literary circles, was hostess 
tt several dinners and luncheons this 
past week in compliment to Miss Ida 
I^era Simonton, New York author 
vhose story of South Africa, "Hell's 
'layground," was later dramatized as 
'White Cargo." Mrs. Emerson enter- 
;ained a number of literary people at 
ler studio on California street in 
lonor of Miss Simonton, one of her 
listinguished eastern friends. 

* * * 
Santa Maria Inn 

The following people have been 
quests at the Santa Maria Inn during 
he past week from San Francisco: 
Dr. and Mrs. H. S. Kiersted and Miss 
khussler, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Hilp. 
Bishop and Mrs. Burns and the Misses 
3urns, Mr. and Mrs. P. C. Petersen, 
tfr. and Mrs. Raymond Benjamin and 
Miss Benjamin, Mrs. V. H. Owen. 
Vliss Gladys Owen Lewis and Mr. Vic- 
:or Owen Jr.. Mr. and Mrs. A. H. 
Dastle and Mrs. F. B. Worthington, 
VIr. and Mrs. Robert C. Newell. Mr. 
md Mrs. Irvin J. Wiel, Mr. and Mrs. 
3. J. O'Brien and Mr. George O'Brien. 
VIr. D. L. Bliss Jr. and Miss Ruth 
Langdon, Mrs. A. Frolich. Miss E. 
Prolich and Mr. Irving Frolich. 

* * * 
\t Elder Gallery 

Miss Edith Coburn Noyes, director 
)f Boston's Little Theater, will give 



two Thursday afternoon drama read- 
ings in the Paul Elder gallery at 2:30 
o'clock. January 19th she will read 
"The Tragedy of Nan," a play in 
three acts by John Masefield, which 
has recently been produced in the 
Little Theater, Symphony Chambers, 
Boston, with Miss Noyes in the role 
of Nan Hardwick. January 26th, Miss 
Noyes will read "The Rat Trap," by 
Noel Coward. 



The 20-30 Club 

Mr. Clay Miller, past president of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, spoke to the members of the 
20-30 Club on the future development 
and welfare of San Francisco, Thurs- 
day noon at the Palace Hotel. 

Mr. Miller stated that, inasmuch as 
the members of the 20-30 Club were 
young executives, between the ages 
of 20 and 30 years, they would play a 
major part in the future destiny of 
San Francisco. 



Just welcomed into the now famous 
National Canada Dry Hole-In-One 
Club, the following new members: 
Mr. L. P. Garat, 35 Commonwealth 
avenue, San Francisco; Mr. T. T. 
Greaves, Los Altos Golf and Country 
Club, Los Altos ; Mr. R. C. Rosenberg, 
2321 Sacramento street, San Fran- 
cisco ; and Mr. Warren Tucker Jr., 819 
Mandana boulevard, Oakland. 



Radio 

(Continued from page 14) 

hour includes both the classical and 
the popular. From 9 to 10 o'clock the 
NBC listeners will be offered the 
Philco Hour, weekly feature by the 
Philadelphia Storage Battery Com- 
pany. The two hour period from 10 
to 12 midnight will featjre the NBC 
eleven piece orchestra. The Trocader- 
ans, playing late song and dance hits 
with new special arrangements. There 
will be in addition, between groups 
of three numbers, vocal and instru- 
mental solos and several surprise fea- 
tures. 



Air mail is distinctive. 

Air mail for a dime saves valuable 
time. 

Get action with air mail. 

A thousand words by air mail, 10c. 

A 1000-word air message, 21 hours 
to Chicago, 10c. 

A 1000-word air message, 31 hours 
to New York, 10c. 

Air mail reaches any address in the 
U.S. 

Air mail letters are read first. 

Seattle by air mail, 8V 2 hours. 

Los Angeles by air mail, 5 hours. 

Ask for an air mail reply. 



— NOW IN OUR 30TH YEAR — 

WADE AND RUEGG 

Tailors 

Fall Woolens 

Now on Display 



Special Line of 

"SPORTEX" 

Scotch Sport Materia] 



Suite 201 — 12 Geary Street 

Phone Kearny 2866 
San Francisco 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 



Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
active, Hot Sulphur Water. Tub Baths and 
Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN, Acua Caliente. 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judah 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The Finest Meals in the 
VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms — Clean Linen — Clean Everything 
Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

TELEPHONE 110 



WHEN IN PANAMA 
MAKE 

HOTEL CENTRAL 

Cathedral Plaza 

YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 

Andrew Johnston, Manager 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1864 

The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 14, 1928 



Local News of the Week at a Glance 



For Those Away From Home 



A minimum width of 18 feet and a thickness capable of 
holding up under the heaviest of general traffic are among 
the government specifications. It is pointed out that state, 
roads meeting the necessary requirements would be, with 
consent of the state, taken over at cost. 



Carl Ben Eielson, veteran Arctic airplane pilot and 
aviation inspector for the Department of Commerce, is 
coming to San Francisco soon to make preparations to 
accompany Captain G. H. Wilkins on the third explora- 
tory flight over the Arctic between Alaska and the Pole. 



John H. Clarke, who has been for fifty years associate 
justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, has 
resigned his position and will "rest and read" for awhile 
in Hawaii, that enchanted land that calls to those who are 
world-weary. Mr. Clarke is at present staying at the 
Clift Hotel. 



W. F. Neiman of Berkeley has been elected by the Odd 
Fellows of California as major general and department 
commander of the Patriarch's Militant, I. 0. 0. F., to 
serve during the coming three years. An Odd Fellow 
since 1905, Neiman has passed through all branches of 
the fraternal order and has held nearly every chair in the 
lodge. 



A congratulatory meeting of the Police Commission 
took place last Monday, both Chief of Police Daniel 
O'Brien and Commissioner Jesse B. Cook being objects 
for felicitations, the chief for his return to duty after 
a prolonged illness, and Cook for his re-appointment. The 
commission reorganized and Theodore J. Roche was re- 
named president. 



Inauguration last Monday of Charles D. Osborne as 
Mayor of Auburn, Placer County, marked the advent of 
the third successive generation of the same paternal name 
as chief executive of the city. The father of the new 
Mayor, the late Thomas Mott Osborne, was Mayor of 
Auburn in 1903-4-5 and his grandfather, the late David 
Munsen Osborne, was Mayor of Auburn in 1878. 



Kezar Stadium in Golden Gate Park is to be enlarged 
to provide a seating capacity for 60,000 and otherwise 
improved until it will be one of the most up-to-date and 
architecturally attractive stadiums in the United States, 
it was announced last Tuesday by Herbert Fleishhacker, 
president of the park commission. The cost is estimated 
at between 8225,000 and 8250,000 and this sum has been 
promised by members of the finance committee of the 
Board of Supervisors. 



Directors of the Down Town Association reorganized 
for the ensuing year at a meeting held last Monday. 
Constant J. Auger was re-elected president, and Marshal 
Hale was elected first vice-president; Max Sommer, sec- 
ond vice-president ; Dr. George W. Merritt. secretary, and 
A. J. Mount, treasurer. The association is one which 
enjoys a reputation as an organization whose ambitions 
and purposes are entirely for the good of San Francisco 
and it is equally ready to discourage and combat any 
movement that might be detrimental to the growth of 
the city. 



Four commissioners on various municipal commissions 
were renamed by Mayor Rolph last Monday. They were: 
Police Commissioner Jesse B. Cook, Park Commissioner 
William F. Humphrey, Park Commissioner George Tourny 
and Fire Commissioner William A. Sherman. 



Sidney J. Hester, assistant secretary of the Board of 
Public Works, was last Monday appointed secretary of 
the board and deputy commissioner to succeed William 
J. Fitzgerald, who resigned to become sheriff of the city 
and county of San Francisco. 



Emilia Da Prato sang for members of the Electrical 
Development League last Monday in a way that brought 
her audience to its feet cheering. It was the official wel- 
come home celebration for this little girl of 20, who was 
picked from 30,000 contestants as one of the two best 
amateur singers in the United States. 



The Department of Agriculture has approved the prin- 
cipal features of the San Francisco Bay bridge bill now 
before the United States Senate. Assurance to this effect 
was received from Senator Hiram W. Johnson last Thurs- 
day by Mayor Rolph, Supervisor James B. McSheehy, 
City Attorney John J. O'Toole and other city officials 
actively concerned in the bridge matter. 



Timothy A. Reardon, president of the Board of Public 
Works, was the recipient of honors last Monday night at 
a banquet at Tait's at the Beach where more than 200 
citizens gathered at the invitation of Morris Rosenberg, 
to congratulate Reardon on his appointment for the fif- 
teenth consecutive year as a commissioner of the works 
board. 



Four hundred and ninety-two United States Marines, 
officers and men, sailed from San Diego last Monday on 
the naval ammunition carrier "Nitro" bound for Nicar- 
agua. Three infantry companies, a machine gun and 
howitzer company and hospital corps men made up the 
force, which is under the command of Major Harold 
Pierce. 



The annual convention of the Secretaries' Association, 
comprised of officials of chambers of commerce through- 
out the state, opened in Riverside Thursday and continued 
until today (Saturday). Among the speakers were Lieu- 
tenant-Governor Fitts, State Fire Marshal Jay W. 
Stevens, Major T. C. Macauley, aviator, and several others 
of note. 



A new national campaign of advertising will be started 
this month by the Southern Pacific Company, according 
to an announcement by F. S. McGinnis, passenger traffic 
manager. This is in the form of a picture map of Cali- 
fornia in antique style, appearing in current national 
periodicals and eastern newspapers. The scenic and ro- 
mantic appeal of the West and the finer train service of- 
fered travelers on leading overland trains on faster 
schedules will be advertised throughout Europe, Hawaii, 
the Orient and Australia as well. 



w 



anuary 14, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



MINIATURES of YOURSELF 

or members of your family 

make appreciated and valued 

presents. 

Last a Life Time 



149 POWELL STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Film Flicks 



B°bK> 



RWILELDER5 

239 Posh Street, San Francisco 




N. W. CORNER 

;ka vstone 240 POLK and POST STS. 




Photographs 



Heir to Role of 
John Drew Enlists 
In Ranks of Film 

O. P. Heggie, one of the best known 
actors of the American stage, who 
took the place of John Drew in "Tre- 
lawney of the Wells" on the latter's 
recent death, is one of the last of the 
"old guard" of the stage to succumb 
to the lure of the films. He is to play 
on the screen the same role he played 
on the stage when he fell heir to the 
mantle of Drew. He is to play "Sir 
William" in "The Actress," Norma 
Shearer's new starring vehicle, based 
on the Arthur Wing Pinero stage 
play. 

Heggie was signed in New York 
and hurried to California to join the 
cast, which includes Owen Moore, 
Ralph Forbes, Gwen Lee, Roy D'Arcy, 
Lee Moran, Virginia Pearson, Mar- 
garet Seddon, William Humphrey, 
Effie Ellsler, Cyril Chadwick, Andre 
Tourneur and others. Sidney Frank- 
lin is directing the picture. 

* * * 
Following his triumph in "Under 

the Black Eagle," "Flash," the new 
Metro - Goldwyn - Mayer police dog 
star, has been placed under a new 
contract, according to an announce- 
ment by Harry Rapf. The producer 
who introduced "Rin-Tin-Tin" and 
"Peter the Great" to the screen, holds 
that the new dog is the greatest find 
in history among canine actors. The 
dog's next appearance will be in a 
newspaper story now being written 
by Richard Schayer. "Under the 
Black Eagle" was a war story, with 
Ralph Forbes, Marceline Day and a 

notable cast. 

* * * 

Garbo Bob Is 
Now the Rage 

Paris may make fashions in gowns, 
but Hollywood does it in hairdresses. 
For instance. Greta Garbo's "semi 
hob" has taken the country by storm, 
since she introduced it in "Love." 
Miss Garbo modified the former bob 
by having it fairly long, but still with 
a decided bobbed effect. 

Incidentally, the Swedish actress 
lias never appeared in a picture with- 
out a different style of hairdressing. 
In her latest vehicle. "The Divine 
Woman," she wears her hair in an 
elaborate curled coiffure. 

;: t # 

Blister Keaton is shortly to start 
work at the Melro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
studios on the first picture under his 
new contract. He is now on a brief 
vacation preparatory to starting 
work. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC — INSURANCE 

BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 
San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

{Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime. Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



T iPE WRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office and Works: 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 

Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called for and Delivered 




NEW ORLEANS 

New$t(ffl(?arlar 

lb better serve our many friends and 
patrons over *4oo.ooo has been ex- 
pended in reconstruction to maintain 
this famous hostelry as 

One of Americas Lead in? Hotels 

ACCOMMODAnNG IOOO GUESTS 

Uree rooms with unusually hifh 
ceilinjs and Jbod ventilation ab- 
solutely essential to the Southern 
climate make for perfect comfort- 

Alfred S. Amer & Co. ua. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA. 
Send for descnpuw folder Ticket offices of 
Illustrated Maidi Cms all Transportation 
Program lor the asking Lines in Lobby 

<3be Roosevelt 

PHOENIX. ARIZONA 

''Where WwterMverCom.es' 
OPINING OCTOBER 1918 
..Alfred S Amer 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 14, 1928 



East 

through the 

Sunny South 




i 



— Sunset Limited, famed 
'round the world, offers a 
journey of rare attraction. 

Southern Pacific's colorful 
Sunset Route lies along the na- 
tion's southern border.Through 
California's orange lands, 
across fertile mesas and broad 
plains and along placid Louis- 
iana bayous to New Orleans. 
All the way the romance and 
historical interest of the South- 
west and the Old South. See 
Apache Trail highway — one 
day side trip in Arizona. 

It costs no more to go ease 
this way to New York. From 
New Orleans, continue by train 
or enjoy the delightful ocean 
voyage to New York aboard 
Southern Pacific's steamship 
(meals and berth on the ship 
included in your fare) . 

Over this route, "Sunset Limited" 
carries you swiftly and comfortably. 
Its appointments are complete in 
every detail. Also the "Argonaut" 
from Los Angeles over this route. 

Go this way and return some other 
Southern Pacific route if you wish 
— Overland Route, Chicago to San 
Francisco; Golden Slate, the direct 
line from Chicago to Los Angeles 
and San Diego; or Shasta Route, 
west over northern lines and south 
from Seattle and Portland. 

' Read the interesting Sunset Route 
booklet describing the trip in de- 
tail. Ask for a copy and for further 
details. 

Sunset 
Limited 

Southern Pacific 

F. S. McGINNIS 

Passenger Traffic Manager 

San Francisco 



(Continued from page 7) 

from the stage play in which Jeanne 

Eagles made fame, is followed closely 

in the photoplay presentation. 
* * * 

California 

Mary Pickford, starring in the 
Kathleen Norris story, "My Best 
Girl" comes to the California theater 
on Saturday with Charles Rogers 
playing opposite. 

This picture, dealing with the trials 
and triumphs of a department sales 
girl in a ten-fifteen cent store, is said 
to be one of the best vehicles that 
Mary Pickford has had for a long, 
long time. America's sweetheart still 
holds her undisputed place on the 
screen, her frankness, her naive man- 
nerisms, her cheerfulness and her 
high dramatic work registering anew 
the high place this wonderful cinema 
celebrity occupies and will, no doubt, 
always be acclaimed. 

Kathleen Norris has written this 
story especially for Mary Pickford — 
our own cherished "Mary." 

* * * 
Warfield 

"Baby Mine," featuring Karl Dane 
and George K. Arthur, is this week's 
attraction at the Warfield, where 
Rube Wolf is again wielding the 
baton. 

Broad humor and lots of real fun 
is found in this picture, with campus 
life and some American universities 
shown in the film. Lots of wise- 
cracks are captioned and there is 
sparkle and romance to add to the joy 
of the photoplay. 

Charlotte Greenwood, the famous 
long-legged comedienne, appears in 
this picture, her antics making new 
records in the motion picture line. 

Rube Wolf and his orchestrations 
are again delighting Warfield audi- 
ences. 

* * * 

Granada 

"Shepherd of the Hills," made from 
the story by Harold Bell Wright, 
comes to the Granada Saturday, Janu- 
ary 14, when Alec B. Francis appears 
in the title role. Matthew Betz, Matt 
Howitt and Molly O'Day are the other 
principals. 

Frank Jenks and his Play Boy Band 
will be on the stage as usual in a Fan- 
chon and Marco offering, "Folliettes," 
with about fifty people in the act. 

As picturesque as the hills that 
have attracted them for two cen- 
turies, the people of the Ozarks are 
shown as they were characterized by 
Wright in his novel. The primitive 
beauty of the country, together with 
the equally primitive simplicity and 
customs of the inhabitants, are shown 
in this picture for which many mo- 
tion-picture fans have been waiting a 
long time. 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 



Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 



Buy a 

Sunday Pass 

and Ride 

all Day for 

20c 

Ask the Conductor 




SAMUEL KAHN, 
President 



Bookkeeper, Typist, Machine - Billing, 
Filing. Handles correspondence. Pub- 
licity experience. Meet public. Desires 
temporary or permanent position re- 
quiring any or all of above qualifica- 
tions.— Box 10, S. F. NEWS LETTER 
268 Market Street 



ba« 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Lurie and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 
Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c. 75c, $1. 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' Lunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. (a la carte). Private Dining Roon 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystone 8100 



Weekdays, Luncheon $ .75 

(11 :30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week Days & Sundays..!. 50 



No visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

91) Third Avenue. SAN MATED 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 
1 1 :80 a.m. t<> 2 :00 p.m. 

I p.m. 

i.i v.- i n d '•■ i : 
i ;S0 
CLOSED EVERY HONDA1 
Half Block from Highway 




We now deliver to any part of the city — including Sundays and Holidays. 
No extra charge. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

STERLING ANDERSON, Manager 

Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 



Western Pipe and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS. CULVERTS. PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 

San F/ancisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



To start 1928 "laundrywise," try us. 

La Grande & White's Laundry 



250 Twelfth St. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 

PHONE MARKET 916 
Peninsula Phone San Mateo 148S 



San Francisco 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



583 Post Street 
In Virginia Hotel 



San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 2510 



A. & E. DAINI. Props. 



A. J. JACOPI, Mgr. 



Boston Bedding & Upholstering Co. 




Mattresses Made Over 

Reupholstering and 
Remodeling 



S-JUIH. 



195761 POLK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Graystone 759 







Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN S:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. 
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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856. by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, Jr., from 1884 to 1925. 
now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 268 Market Street. San Francisco. California. Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, 
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Pol. CX. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 21, 1928 



No. 4 



THE FIRING LINE 

By Lloyd Farrington Wilson 



San Franciscans need not bewail the loss of the big 
onventions; after all Kansas City and Houston are just 
wo places that require a U. S. A. postmark. I do hope 
hough that the candidates' names reach the outside 
vorld in time to vote. 

i|C 3|C qC 3|C SfC ^G 

If our whistling policemen continue to interest people, 
ve suggest that Captain Goff install sidewalk bleachers 
o we can sit down and watch the police join the motor- 
sts in chasing the illusive pedestrian. 



In line with Gene Tunney's denunciation of football as 
angerous, Jack Dempsey deplores using cheer leaders to 
tir prize fight crowds. That sort of thing may bring the 
oble sport into disrepute and drag a scientific sparring 
emonstration between say, Wildcat Kelly and Carnivor- 
us Cohen down to the level of a grid brawl between 
California and Stanford. 

# # * # jH * 

Eleven American cities have been dropped from the 
ocial register. But a city thus discarded must clinch its 
eeth against the future even though it has lost its 
pper set. 

Paris "tourist views" are to be used on French postage 
tamps. However, as those views will be confined to ex- 

riors such as Eiffel Tower, the Louvre. Johnny's bar. 
nd the Opera, we look for no renaissance in stamp eol- 

cting, such as was foreseen by the bare announcement. 
****** 

People who haven't heard the latest Ford joke may 

ave seen it. 

****** 

A secret society is something one has to join to find 

t why one joined. I wonder it' the same doesn't explain 

hy so many are jumping from one to another of these 

'W-fangled religions. 

****** 

This week's best laugh is on the management of the 
le Wigwam theater who announces the exclusive stage 
>pearance of the two Oregon policemen that captured 
illiam E. Hickman. This sort of hero worship may still 
i in the provinces — but to me a trip to the Wigwam 
eater this week would be like a ride in a Chinatown 
rap-wagon." 



Gangsters are finding the famous California climate to 
be unhealthy. Out here, they say, police grip is catching. 

jp $ ♦ + + + 

According to William Randolph Hearst's preliminary 
statement to the special senate committee, Mexico had 
bought or intended to buy about everything in Washing- 
ton, the Army and Navy building, the dome of the Capi- 
tol, Pennsylvania avenue, Dupont circle and Rebecca, the 
White House racoon. But the committee has proved that 
Mr. Hearst was only foolin' and that Wall street is still 
sole owner. 

Statistics show that there were 202 telephone conver- 
sations per capita in the U. S. last year, compared with 
34 chatters per person in 1900. It is evident that more 
and more we are becoming a jaw-abiding people. 
****** 

A man wearing a dinner jacket merely thinks he's 
dressed, says one style authority. But when some women 
wear dinner gowns they have to think a lot harder. 
****** 

Now's a good time to trade Jawn McGraw an auto- 
graphed mustache cup for an infield. 
****** 

Leap year promises to be a tough period for the boy 
who lacks appeal. As a wall-paper polisher he'll keep his 
shoulder blades well honed. 

****** 

The many revolutions in Nicaragua have caused me 
much worry. How do the belles find out what revolution 
they are daughters of? Can it be that they call them- 
selves the D. A. R. — Daughters of All Revolutions'.' 
****** 

Will Rogers does not seem to want us to investigate the 
sinking of the submarine. As a nation we must investi- 
gate everything. If an American should fall from an 
aeroplane he would appoint an investigating committee 

on the way down. 

****** 

This space was reserved for Coolidge — but he didn't 

say anything. 

****** 

I fire at the line and let the shots fall where they may. 
This line will be no wake. Bang! Bang! 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1928 






Better Supervisors 

We keep after the supervisors because a better and 
more capable group of supervisors is very necessary to 
the well-being of this city and the development of the 
community. The year goes along and so far we fail to 
note that the board is doing anything of real service or 
undertaking to dispose of any one of the serious matters 
upon which the future of all of us and of our children is 
so dependent. 

That our criticisms are by no means due to our prej- 
udices may be seen from the expressions of Lewis F. By- 
ington, who, having been appointed to the board, and 
having given careful and persevering attention to the 
doings of the members, retired with pleasure, and in so 
doing expressed himself upon the general character of 
the board in severe and unmistakable terms. Mr. Bying- 
ton is of the opinion that the board as a whole is incapable 
of dealing with the problems that come before it. He 
says that there are many members who are not able to 
grapple with public questions in any statesmanlike fash- 
ion. If that is so, and the actions of the board show that 
he states a fact, the situation calls for a very drastic 
remedy. 

It would be very much to the advantage of the city if 
a more reliable and better educated body of men could be 
brought into the field of city administration. Unfortu- 
nately the conditions of politics are such that they are 
intensely disagreeable to sensitive and refined people and 
yet such are the people who should be doing the work. 

The present board, aided by journalistic scavengering, 
is likely to produce a situation which cannot be described 
by any other word than calamitous. 



himself to poetry. In this endeavor he achieved great 
distinction. He died, a very old man, held in the highest 
esteem by all whose opinion is worth noting. 



Thomas Hardy 

Now and again a man dies whose life belongs to the 
race and not to any particular portion of it. Such men 
transcend the limits of nationality and belong to human- 
ity as a whole. Such a man is Thomas Hardy, who died 
last week. 

Among all the great writers who marked the wonderful 
Victorian epoch, he was, perhaps, the greatest; greatest 
in his grasp of fundamental human passions and certainly 
greatest in his philosophical scope. He had a theory of 
life and that can hardly be said of men like Dickens and 
Thackeray, who, in spite of their manifold abilities, dealt 
with phenomena of life rather than with the underlying 
realities of which life is but a manifestation. 

The mere fact of his philosophy was enough to render 
him suspect to the great mass of his countrymen. The 
British have an inherent suspicion and dislike of philo- 
sophical concepts. They are essentially a pragmatic peo- 
ple who deal with the facts as they arise, and who trouble 
very little about the inner significance of such facts. They 
are all the more disinclined to recognize any teaching 
which is pessimistic. Probably they rightly regard such 
teachings as likely to paralyze effort and the accomplish- 
ment of the concrete things which they regard as the 
essence of living. 

The result was that Thomas Hardy failed to secure the 
recognition which he deserved. His "Jude the Obscure," 
which tended to show the powerlessness of man in the 
grip of destiny, was received with such disapproval that 
he abandoned the field of fiction and henceforth devoted 



Prohibition Incompetence 

The fact that civil service examinations have disquali- 
fied all except 500 out of 2000 prohibition agents tells its 
own story. The men who have been administering the 
prohibition law would not be allowed to operate in any 
other branch of civil service. E. R. Bohner, who was 
the head of prohibition enforcement in Northern Califor- 
nia, failed to pass the test. The same condition, we under- 
stand, applies to Administrator McReynolds of Southern 
California and Arizona. 

We understand that there is great indignation among 
the political chiefs at the failure of some of their nomi- 
nees to pass the examinations. Indeed, Senator Short- 
ridge, for whose opinion we have the greatest regard, 
declares that the loss of these agents will paralyze the 
administration of the Volstead Act. 

The civil service examinations have been attacked as 
lacking in practicality, but there is no showing that they 
are more to be criticized than other examinations of a 
similar character. It is a very good thing that the ex- 
amination was held. It shows the type of men charged 
with the carrying out of the greatest outrages upon the 
liberty of the citizen and domestic security in the history 
of any civilized community. 

We have learned by bitter experience that the mass of 
prohibition agents are tainted with dishonesty; graft 
has become another name for their trade. Now, we know 
that they are below the average in intelligence. It is time 
that the whole mess was disposed of once and for all. 



The Community Chest Again 

We are approaching the time when the Community 
Chest will make its usual appeal to the citizens of this 
community for their aid to carry over the coming year. 
Last year the city fell below its quota and time will show 
what happens this year. 

We do not like to see the city fall behind in any chari- 
table endeavor. For, care of the unfortunate and aid of 
the needy are necessary qualifications for successful mu- 
nicipal life. There can be no great city where the pangs 
of undeserved poverty go unrelieved and where children 
suffer for the faults or incapacity of their elders. And yet, 
San Francisco, which is notoriously a city of great gen- 
erosity and which never fails to heed the voice of misery, 
did not achieve its quota in the estimate made for the 
work of the Community Chest. 

There must be reasons for this; reasons why a great 
many people of charitable intent prefer to go on sub- 
scribing to their favorite individual charities rather than 
to aid the Community Chest. It would pay the people in 
charge of the Community Chest to examine into those 
reasons and endeavor to discover why they exi^t. 

They might find that there is a great popular protest 
against the methods of collection employed. There is a 
general feeling that the same sort of tactics are being 
used to compel subscriptions as was used to sell Liberty 
Bonds and, while people can overlook necessary war-com- 
pulsion, they are not so easily reconciled to the same 
thing in times of peace. 






January 21, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



There is also a certain criticism, perhaps unavoidable. 
with regard to the modes of expenditure of the funds. At 
any rate, one should be able to tell a hungry down-and- 
outer where he can get a free breakfast. One does not 
like subscribing to a Community Chest and then handing 
out quarters for humanity's sake. 



A Stupid Clergyman 

It is such a pity that the church so frequently, in the 
person of its ministerial representatives, makes mistakes 
so foolish as to place all the decent feeling in a com- 
munity on the antagonistic side. Such an occurrence in 
Berkeley last week has done more harm to appreciation of 
religion in the community than can be undone for many 
years. 

An accomplished and esteemed actress, Ruth Renick, 
was invited to give a talk and recital to the Presbyterian 
Church men's club in Berkeley. Everything was arranged. 
Suddenly the minister wrote a curt and what, under other 
conditions than ministerial, would be considered a rude 
note, cancelling the invitation. The result, of course, has 
been division in the church and a veritable storm of 
criticism on the outside. The whole question of church 
and stage is now to the front and the church is not going 
to gain anything by the occurrence. 

People were getting over their indignation at the crude 
performances of some of the reverend gentlemen. Even 
"Elmer Gantry" had failed to stimulate any great indig- 
nation against the clergy, who, by taking part in the 
common life, and visiting secular clubs, had become better 
understood. It was beginning to filter into the mind of 
ordinary men that the church might be a help in solving 
human problems, by understanding and mutual respect. 

Then a thing like this happens. The clergy again appear 
to the mass of people as cold-blooded, inhuman theorists ; 
the work of years is undone and Miss Renick has the 
sympathy of the public. 



The Apotheosis of Science 

It is not so long ago that scientists came forth and de- 
clared that they had the key to human knowledge and 
that before long we should be in possession of the gate- 
way to the condition which Genesis describes as "God's 
knowing good and evil." As time goes along the claims 
of the scientists are not so impressive. Results achieved 
do not seem to add particularly to human grasp of funda- 
mental knowledge. We are still groping and still fain to 
raise our feeble gaze to matters far beyond our ken. 

Thus, recently, Professor Osborne, who is among the 
greatest, has come out with a statement that the evi- 
dences of human life discovered in Suffolk, England, prove 
the existence of an intelligent human being, with all the 
faculties of man as we know them, about 1,500,000 years 
ago. The geological formations in which the remains are 
found are proof of that length of time. Instruments for 
the skinning of animals, made of flint, have been found, 
in close proximity to them the bones of elephants, upon 
whose bodies the flint knives had evidently been used. 

When we talk about a million years, as far as our com- 
prehension is concerned we might as well give up the 
process of trying to reason. We have grown accustomed 
to the use of such figures in speaking of astronomical 
phenomena. Rut astronomy has always had for man the 
attributes of an abstraction, and very few have ever been 
able to conceive of the stars as concrete and actual ma- 
terial objects. 

When, however, we reach the point of talking about 
millions of years, in connection with man himself, we are 
at the mercy of something which we cannot at all com- 
prehend. 



FROM BRIGHTER PENS 
THAN OURS 



It doesn't matter what planet a man is born under so 
long as he is able to keep on the earth. 



A pedestrian is an uncertain body entirely surrounded 

by automobiles. 

* * ♦ 

The old-fashioned girl certainly knew how to get a 
dinner. The modern girl does too, but she uses a different 

method. 

* * * 

Simile — As happy as a radio announcer who has learned 

a new adjective. 

* * * 

The Girl — "And where did you learn so much about 
femininity?" 

The Boy — "Well, I didn't stroke the Vassar crew for 

nothing!" 

* $ * 

I knew a man who spent twenty years writing one 
novel! 

That's nothing. I know a man who is spending his 
whole life finishing one sentence. 



An old lady, visiting an insane asylum, observed the 
lunatics at work. One man was standing in a corner, idle. 

"My good man," inquired the O. L., "Why don't you 
work? Aren't you crazy?" 

"Yes mum, but not that crazy," the man replied. 



Student — How's my chances of getting through this 
course ? 

Prof. — The best in years, my boy. 



Wearin' of the Green. — Landlord of village inn (to 
local shopkeeper)— I'll take another porous plaster, Tom. 
That clumsy lout, 'Orace 'Awkins. 'as ripped the cloth off 
the billiard table again." (London.) 



.Magic Touch. Hostess (to gloomy youth)— "I hope you 
enjoyed your game with Major Swift. He's awfully clever 
at cards." 

Youth— "I should think he is! He started by telling my 
fortune, and now he's counting it. — (Tit-Bits.) 

* * * 

Coolidges will eat simple meal of Near East orphans. 
(Indianapolis News.) 

Or Try Our Razor Blades. The Shopkeeper— "No sir, 
we don't' sell revolvers. What about a couple of yards of 

clothesline?" 

* * * 

Behind the Times. Daughter— "Dad, I want some 
monev for my trousseau." 

Father— "But my dear child. I didn't even know you 
were engaged." 

Daughter— "Good Heavens. Father ! Don t you ever 
read the papers?" (London.) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1928 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Lively Events 

Society is staging any number of 
lively events. 

Not a day passes but that there is 
something of exceptional interest 
within the social realm to add new 
zest to the continual rounds of gaiety. 

These splendid January days lure 
golf players, crowding the various 
country clubs, while out - of - door 
sports find favor in all their variants, 
typical of California. 

What fun to set the blood tingling 
with a game on the golf links ! What 
a fascination to "eat beneath the 
trees," as many are doing, e'en 
though the calendar calls the season 
"winter time" and just a few days 
since December. 

San Francisco and its environs 
know no real winter, although "Isn't 
it cold?" has been a form of greeting 
between friends. 

Golf is not all, however. For there 
have been many dinner-dances, sup- 
per-parties, and even barbecues with 
the rolling lands of country estates 
the locales for sports. 

The social season is on — and will 
wend its merry way on and on — until 
Lent proclaims its limitations. 

In the meantime, there is plenty to 
claim the undivided interest of ma- 
tron and maid, debutante and society 
folks, and that plenty is bounteous in 
variety and kindred joys! 

On with festivities! When the 

heart is gay — and it usually is — in 

California. 

* * * 

Daughter of Mayor, 
Mrs. Rolph, Wedded 

Miss Georgina Rolph, the younger 
daughter of Mayor and Mrs. James 
Rolph Jr., became the bride of Mr. 
Richard Crossley Willits, January 14, 
at the home of the bride's parents on 
San Jose avenue. Immediate rela- 
tives of both families were guests at 
the impressive and lovely ceremony. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway, Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



Rev. George Whistler of Palo Alto 
was the officiating clergyman. 

Georgina Rolph is a sweet, unaf- 
fected young lady whose natural 
charms and graciousness have made 
her a great favorite among hosts of 
friends. She seems to drop little rays 
of sunshine wherever she goes, and 
her radiant smile is just typical of her 
sunny nature. 

On her wedding day, the bride wore 
a gown of white satin made with a 
tight-fitting waist and bouffant skirt 
which was particularly becoming to 
her wistfulness. A cascade of rose- 
point lace was draped on the skirt 
and caught with clusters of orange 
blossoms. A court train fell from the 
shoulders, its soft fluffy folds enhanc- 
ing the grace of the bride. A charm- 
ing wreath of orange blossoms en- 
circled her head. She carried a gor 
geous shower-bouquet. 

Mrs. John Percival Symes, sister of 
the bride, nee Annette Rolph, whose 
marriage took place not so very long 
since, acted as matron of honor and 
was the bride's only attendant. Her 
frock was of ecru lace and chiffon, 
trimmed with fine tucks, and made 
with a simple waist and slightly 
draped skirt. Mrs. Symes looked 
simply beautiful, too. 

Mr. George Avery acted as best 
man at the wedding. 
* * * 

First Lady 

Mrs. James Rolph, "The First Lady 
of San Francisco," whose exquisite 
taste is as well known as her own 
charming personality, wore a hand- 
some gown at her daughter's wed- 
ding. The gown was of periwinkle 
blue georgette crepe trimmed with 
cream-colored lace and made over 
peach-colored satin. 

Mrs. Rolph looked so lovely. She 
always does! 

The altar, erected in the Rolph 
home for the marriage ceremony, was 
covered with cloth of gold and banked 
with Easter lilies. The remainder of 
the room was decorated to resemble 
a real garden with palms and flower- 
ing shrubs and potted plants. 

A wedding luncheon followed thr 
ceremony and the table where the 
bride and groom sat with Mayor and 
Mrs. Rolph and Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
D. Willits, parents of the groom, and 
their respective families, was beauti- 
fully adorned with a center piece of 



lilies-of-the-valley while garlands of 
white carnations trailed over a golden 
cloth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Willits will make 
their home in Berkeley upon their re- 
turn from their honeymoon. 
* * * 

Mardi Gras 

Mrs. Irwin Crocker is chairman of 
the committee preparing for this 
year's Mardi Gras ball which will 
take place on Tuesday evening, Feb- 
ruary 21 at the Civic Auditorium. 

Mrs. Augustus Taylor, Mrs. Alan 
Lowrey, Mrs. Robert Miller, Mrs. 
George Bowles, Mrs. Fentress Hill 
and Miss Marion Zeile are assistants. 
Miss Louise Boyd has charge of the 
supper arrangements and Mrs. Hop- 
kins Cowdin heads the floor commit- 
tee. Mrs. Stewart Lowery is taking 
charge of the publicity for the Mardi 
Gras, which will reflect many radiant 
ideas as well as, in a measure, trans- 
cend all preceding affairs, so we are 
told. 

The Children's Hospital, with its 
additional buildings erected during 
the past year or so, will be the bene- 
ficiary, and all of the women so long 
identified with the Children's Hos- 
pital work are working zealously for 
the great success of this year's fa- 
mous Mardi Gras. 

There will be something like 108 
boxes built for this occasion, the sales 
of boxes being in the hands of Mrs. 
Latham McMullin and Mrs. Henry 
Kiersted. 

The marriage of Miss Beth Wal- 
ther, daughter of Mr. Matthys Wal- 
ther, to Mr. Edward Owen took place 
on Saturday evening at 8 o'clock in 
the Italian Room of the Hotel Whit- 
comb. Rev. William McKnight read 
the marriage service. 

The bride was attended by Mrs. 
Caswell Smith, who was her matron 
(Continued on page 16) 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



January 21, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




Anniversary 

One of the newest clubs in the city, 
the Nonpareil, formed for study pur- 
poses, held its founders' breakfast at 
the Fairmont Hotel last Wednesday, 
Mrs. Byron Hoffman, the president, 
in charge of a memorable event. 

Tables seating more than one hun- 
dred and fifty members and guests 
were prettily decorated in compliment 
of the anniversary, each table being 
under the personal supervision of a 
club member. 

You could pick out the members — 
for they all removed their hats and 
dressed in handsome afternoon re- 
ception gowns in deference to the 
noteworthy occasion. 

Mrs. Hoffman made a delightful 
address in opening the day's affairs, 
stressing in her talk the real purposes 
of the club, defining "Nonpareil," and 
its literal significance. She is a charm- 
ing little lady, this president, whose 
serious business in life appears to be 
able to make everyone happy. She 
does it so easily and gracefully, too. 

# * * 

Notables Present 

Many dignitaries of the club realm 
were seated with Mrs. Hoffman as 
honor guests, their places at the head 
table being a mark of deference after 
the manner of splendid club affairs. 

Mrs. Johns Sylvester Pinney, presi- 
dent of Cap and Bells Club, sat at 
Mrs. Hoffman's right and was intro- 
duced as a member, also, as well as 
the chief executive of one of the most 
exclusive clubs in the local sphere — 
Cap and Bells. 

Mrs. Margaret Schwoerer, founder 
of the club, was placed in a seat of 
highest honor in deference to her 

work and as the first president. 

* * * 

City Federation 

Mrs. J. E. Butterfield, president of 
the San Francisco City and County 
Federation, with its 14.000 enroll- 
ments, was honored as the head of the 
largest local organization. 



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Dr. Theresa Meikle, assistant dis- 
trict attorney, elected an honorary 
member of Nonpareil, sat next to Mrs. 
Butterfield at the honor table, espe- 
cially decorated for this anniversary 
breakfast. 

Mrs. Charles Weile, representing 
Mrs. Aurelius Buckingham, president 
of the Presidents' Assembly ; Mrs. 
Frank Panter, president of Laurel 
Hall ; Mrs. Maurice Griffin, president 
of the Novo Club ; Mrs. Marie Pernau 
Walsh, president of the California 
Club ; Mrs. Joseph Mells, president of 
To Kalon; Mrs. L. C. Pistolesi, presi- 
dent of Papyrus ; Mrs. L. R. Morcom, 
Berkeley ; Mrs. John Zeeman, presi- 
dent of the Hotel Women's Club; 
Mrs. C. M. Gardner, vice-president of 
Nonpareil; Mrs. E. R. Briggs, secre- 
tary; Mrs. H. C. Smith, secretary- 
treasurer; Mrs. C. L. Culan, Woman's 
Auxiliary, American Legion; Mrs. F. 
G. Athern. president of the Berkeley 
Women's City Club; Mrs. J. R. O'Don- 
nell, radio section. City Federation; 
Josephine Young Wilson, past presi- 
dent of the Press Association and 
past National State vice-president. 
League of American Pen Women ; 
Miss Lillian Connolly, club editor of 
the Chronicle and Miss Ethel Whit- 
mire, club editor of the Examiner, 
were honor guests at the first anni- 
versary breakfast of Nonpareil. 
* * * 

Program Good 

Mrs. Henry Hastings, member of 
the club, presented the excellent pro- 
gram which included vocal solos by 
Claire Upshur, with Edna Watts 
Oliver at the piano: vocal selections. 
Mr. McKnight; cornet solos. Mrs. 
Thomas Alexander East ; violin, Doro- 
thy Minty. 



Clever Play 

A short skit was a feature of the 
anniversary program presented under 
the direction of Eva Hackett. The 
chairman of the literary department, 
Mrs. Jesse M. Whited had charge of 
this portion of the day's program. 

Mrs. C. M. Gardner was general 
chairman of the day, with the able 
assistance of Mrs. John Schwoerer, 
the founder; Mrs. Roscoe Warren 
Lucy, Mrs. H. C. Smith, Mrs. J. W. 
Stirling and Mrs. R. B. Swayne. 



Singer Feted 

Amelia De Prato, prize winner of 
the Atwater Kent audition, was the 
honored guest of the Junior Auxiliary 
of the Vittoria Colonna Club last Mon- 
day night at an elaborate meeting 
held in the Fairmont Hotel. 

Miss De Prato is a member of the 
Junior Auxiliary of Vittoria Colonna. 
Miss Lena Pagliughi, protege of Ma- 
dame Luisa Tetrazzini, now singing 
in grand opera in Italy, is also a mem- 
ber of this auxiliary. Miss Clelia Ci- 
pelli is the president. 

Miss Edith Faustino arranged a 
short program of music, including 
numbers by Miss De Prato, the lis- 
teners being thrilled by her beautiful 
voice with its true Italian quality and 
musicianly tones. Miss Verna Torre, 
another prominent young singer ap- 
peared on this program. Piano selec- 
tions were played by Miss Elena 
Blanchini ; violin numbers by Miss 
Rosanna King; vocal duets by Miss 
Rosanna King and Miss Jeanette Tits- 
chey; instrumental trios by Alfred 
Bock, 'cello; Lawrence Sassa, violin; 
Val Ritschey, piano. 

Miss Cipelli presided at this most 
delightful musical evening under the 
Vittoria Colonna Junior Auxiliary. 
(Continued on page 16) 



^e, you pay no more ^ 



C 




"The%ice of a. Thousand Gardens' 
224-226 Grant Ave.. Sutter 6200 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1928 




Pleasure's Wind 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

Tom Moore. 




What's On! 

San Francisco theaters have much 
to offer in the way of amusements 
this week. 

Stage and screen alike present for 
your selection any number of splen- 
did plays and cinema productions. 
Famous names, in addition to high en- 
tertainment, add value to the pro- 
grams. 

So step out, these nice cold nights, 
and have a royal good time. You can 
— if you choose. 

Theaters are veritable tonics to 
one's disposition. 

And that's not a new idea, by any 

means! 

* * * 

Lurie 

Lionel Barrymore. 

One of the famous family of Bar- 
rymores is here at the Lurie, playing 
in a drama written especially for him. 
The play is called "Laugh, Clown, 
Laugh," but, don't judge the worth 
of this glorious play by the name. 

Why is it that some of our best 
plays are positively condemned by the 
name that is fastened on them? 

If you have not yet seen Lionel 
Barrymore in this masterpiece and 
heard this wonderful actor in this 
gripping play, then you have a treat 
ahead of you. It is far too good to 
miss! 

Barrymore convinces us over and 
over again that the histrionic ability 
of the illustrious family from which 
he comes deepens with each perform- 
ance, adding new luster to a distin- 
guished name. 

"Laugh, Clown, Laugh" stands out 
as a perfect production. 

One can't find a flaw in it. 

In his role of "Tito," the clown, 
Lionel Barrymore finds a full fling for 
his big characterizations. He is ap- 
pealing, masterful, tender, terrible, 
emotional, gentle and yet high- 
strung. His noble-bearing and the 
pathos of the clown-role are some- 
thing so delicately fine that one's 
own emotions rise to keep pace with 
the story, as it unfolds. 

I have never seen a finer play, and 
in that, I speak thoughfully. 

Edward Leiter plays the part of 
"Luigi" admirably. He is the man, 
in the story, afflicted with laughter. 
He is the rival in a romance so sweet 



By Josephine Young 

and tender, yet so tragically power- 
ful that it grips intensely. Lolita 
Lee plays the part of the ward, "Si- 
monetta," the sweet girl with whom 
both the clown and his friend fall in 
love. 

Harry Shannon plays a clown role, 
as "Flok," while Barrymore is "Flik." 
Bruce Payne gives us a fine bit of 
dramatic worth in his part as a cele- 
brated nerve specialist. Psychologists, 
especially, thoroughly relish the first 
act and the scene in the office of Prof. 
Gambella. 

One cannot soon forget the Barry- 
more play — in fact, he will most likely 
never forget it — it is the kind that 
lingers in one's mind ; and the kind 
by which we measure other plays and 
standards. 

if ♦ ♦ 

Cm-ran 

"Broadway," the Jed Harris pro- 
duction, is now on at the Curran 
theater where it opened a brief en- 
gagement last Monday night, with 
back-stage life and its fascinations 
laid bare to the ever-increasing inter- 
est of theater patrons. 

The entire action of the play takes 
place in the private party room of the 
Paradise Night Club. 

While the original company re- 
mains in New York, the cast sent 
west is certainly one of which we 
cannot complain. 

Hobart Cavanaugh, comedian and 
dancer does good work. 

Claire Nolte is well cast. Maurice 
H. Black, proprietor of a Greek res- 
taurant, and Samuel Levine put their 
share of pep into the play. Dee Lor- 
etta, prima donna in the play, wife of 
Wilbur Hall, well known in these 
parts, wins considerable favor. 

"Broadway" is truly Broadway- 
esque in dialect, its slang and idioms 
being not a minute behind the times. 
London has accepted "Broadway" 
where it has been running success- 
fully ever since Christmas, so Mr. 
Frank Mathews tells us, and he 
knows ! 

* * * 

President 

"Nightstick," which followed the 
long run of "The Gossipy Sex" at the 
President theater, is a thrilling play 
with a lot of comedy tucked in for 
good measure. 



Amusements 

Next Week 
ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"New Brooms"; Henry Duffy Players. 

Capitol, Ellis nr. Market 

"Who's Your Neighbor?" 

Columbia, Eddy nr. Powell 

Marx Brothers, in "The Cocoonuls." 

Lurie, Geary nr. Mason 

Lionel Barrymore. "Laugh. Clown. Laugh." 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"Nightstick," modern melodrama. 

Theater Arts Club— Women's City 
Club— 465 Post St. 

Tuesday night, Jan. 24— Four plays. Talma- 
Zetta Wilbur, director. 

VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

Joe Morris and Flo Campbell. Jack Brooks 
and Don Rose. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Nance O'Neill, emotional actress; John Steel. 
American tenor; Shirley Richards. Denver 
Junior League; Ned Wayburn and Company. 
Screen showing: "Women's Wares." Evelyn 
Brent. Bert Lytcll. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Vaudeville — pictures. 

ON THE SCREEN 
Downtown 
California, Market St. at 4th 

'My Best Girl." by Kathleen 

Casino, Ellis at Mason 

Double hill Saturday— "Simple Sis." Louise 
lazenda: "Sky High." featuring Al Wilson. 
Llsie Tarron. Sunday, double bill — "The Re- 
turn of Peter Grimm," starring Alex B. 
r rancis. 

Embassy, Market nr. Seventh 

"The First Auto." featuring Barney Oldfield 
and Patsy Ruth Miller. 

Granada, Market at Jones 

"Wife Savers." Wallace Beery and Raymond 
Hatton. Owen Sweeten replaces Frank Jenks 
as master of ceremonies. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th 

Gloria Swanson. "Sadie Thompson." 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

n T t e h""}. Wollz ." with European plovers. 
Rube Wolf, stage presentations. 

Residence District 
Alhambra, Polk St., nr. Green 

Rudolph Music Masters, stage presentations. 
Change of pictures regularly. 






Mary Prckford, 
Norris. 



January 21, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



The Henry Duffy players multiply 
in numbers, according to the require- 
ments of each new play, and Duffy 
has brought to the McAllister street 
playhouse several players whom we 
have not seen before, notably George 
Leffingwell, who essays the central 
crook-character, and Stewart Wilson 
is another. 

Kenneth Daigneau, a great favorite 
among the Duffy players, takes the 
part of a detective in the play, while 
the indispensable Earl Lee plays the 
role of crook. 

Thomas Chatterton, William R. 
Abrams, Dorothy La Mar, and Frank 
Darien, prominent "principals," put 
the play over as they have a faculty 
for doing. Miss Madaliene Sheehan 
made her profession debut last Sun- 
day after many local amateur parts. 

Alcazar 

"New Brooms," the Frank Craven 
comedy, continues to pack the Alca- 
zar theater. 

Robert McWade is the star. He is 
well worthy of his part and really is 
one of the most natural and pleasing 
actors on the stage. He plays the part 
of the father in the story, and while 
he is a consistent grouch and a crab 
in the first part of the drama, he is 
absolutely lovable in the end. 

Irving Mitchell, playing the son 
role, has achieved something in "New 
Brooms," with which we will long as- 
sociate this able young actor. Helen 
Ferguson is captivating. 

The whole story is vital and human 
and deliciously funny from start to 
finish. In fact it is in my estimation 
one of the best father-and-son dramas 
it has ever been my privilege to see, 
and I repeat this view of the Alcazar 
play. 

See "New Brooms" by all means. 



Columbia 

The Marx Brothers have come to 
town. 

You'd know that they were here if 
you just walked up Eddy street from 
Market and didn't even stop to read 
the Columbia electrics. The crowds 
have a way of their own of spreading 
good news. 

"The Cocoanuts" is the vehicle fur- 
nished the four Marxes. It is a musi- 
cal comedy. George S. Kaufman 
wrote the story and the music and 
lyrics are by Irving Berlin, master of 
"jazz." The revue is in two acts and 
like the Music Box Revue, requires a 
large company including many prin- 
cipals and a large chorus. As I haven't 
yet seen this special attraction, as we 
go to print. I can only quote in part 
something from those who already 
pronounce it a great show, and well 
worth seeing. 



California 

Mary Pickford, "My Best Girl" and 
Kathleen Norris. 

California theater is offering such 
a bill for another week, where Mary 
Pickford in her clever impersonation 
of the sales girl in a five-ten store, is 
making new screen history. 

Kathleen Norris, the celebrated 
California author, wrote the story es- 
pecially for Mary, and it suits the 
cinema celebrity to a dot. Whimsical, 
humorous and pathetic, stirring and 
yet full of frolic, "My Best Girl" is 
a screen romance of refreshing con- 
sistency. 

Buddy Rogers has a splendid part 
and plays it well. 

Hobart Bosworth, always a favor- 
ite, is a principal. Other players in- 
clude Mack Swain, Lucien Littlefield, 
Carmelita Geraghty. 



St. Francis 

"Sadie Thompson," a name selected 
for the screen version of the stage 
drama, "Rain," opened a limited en- 
gagement at the St. Francis theater 
last week, with Gloria Swanson play- 
ing the title role. 

Lionel Barrymore has a leading 
part in this picture, taking the role 
of the missionary. Raoul Walsh plays 
the character part of Sergeant 

O'Hara. 

# * * 

Warfield 

"The Last Waltz" is now on at the 
Warfield theater following the run of 
"Baby Mine," which featured Karl 
Dane and George K. Arthur with the 
inimitable Charlotte Greenwood in 
the cast. 

This picture is a German-made pro- 
duction with European players in the 
cast. The picture is adapted from the 
operetta of the same name. 

Rube Wolf has prepared special 
stage presentations for this picture. 

* * # 

Granada 

"Wife Savers" is the Granada at- 
traction. 

Wallace Beery and Raymond Hat- 
ton are the pair who provide comedy 
for the whole production and they cer- 
tainlv are a team. 

The Swiss Alps is used for locale 
in the story where American dough- 
liovs are presumably billeted. Ray- 
mond Hatton takes the part of a sec- 
ond lieutenant. 

Beery is the biscuit-maker for a 
small section of the army. 

Villagers, particularly the young 
dames/ are keen for the soldiers in 
this screen story, which contains 
many a laugh. 

(Continued on page 20) 



Healthful electric heat 
for cold days 

A large portable electric heater 
gives healthful, clean warmth 
quickly. It warms a room for 
dressing. Heats the bathroom 
for father's morning shave. 
Quickly drys mother's hair. Pro- 
vides invigorating heat in case 
of sickness. Helps keep the 
whole family well in winter 
months when the temperature 
suddenly changes. 

When the children come home cold, 
a portable electric heater is ideal. It 
gives healthful heat for their play- 
room. Provides safe warmth when 
you leave the children by themselves. 

Have our electric heating repre- 
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heating rates. 




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1.800,000 cups were aerTed at the 

Panama-Pacific International Exposition 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidat ions with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1927 

Assets $117,394,234.04 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $600,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa bt. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4H) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary. Automobile Insurance 




Blanch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Phones Davenport 4480 
Sutter 4400 



Insurance Exchange Building 
433 California Street 




SCOTT & 
MULVIHILL 

General Insurance and 
Surety Bonds 




MADE TO ORDER ONLY 

ffisMEeat p SHmTS s TJhhsEKed 

Mlllill? 7 NIGHT R0BES ^BM^ 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital S20.000.000 S20.000.000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought; FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued; CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 650 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND; NEW YORK; PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, 
WASH. ; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



FINANCE 



The number of immigrants from Mexico per year now 
amounts to at least 50,000, which is practically equal to 
the combined quota of Great Britain, Northern Ireland, 
Sweden, Denmark and Italy. 



The State Supreme Court of California has ruled that 
school districts cannot insure in mutual insurance com- 
panies of other states because such action would make a 
school district a member of a mutual company. This was 
in 1924. Only California county mutuals can insure 
schools in this state. 



German and Italian insurance companies are to re-enter 
the American field. Four German and two Italian com- 
panies are already making plans to write insurance busi- 
ness. 



Barrett N. Coates, consulting actuary, has been ap- 
pointed actuary for the legislative commission appointed 
to study and report on a system of pensions for California 
state officials and employes. The commission has been 
appointed by Governor Young. 



The monetary loss to the nation annually through 
deaths is estimated at 86,000,000,000. The fight against 
death is making headway. A child born today has 10 
years more expectancy than his father had when he was 
born, and 20 years more than his grandfather. Thus the 
whole community is served by the keeping alive of men 
who are trained and whose efforts count for the most. 



There is evidence of considerable slack in the industrial 
situation. The holiday sales show an improved agricul- 
tural buying position owing, no doubt, to improved prices 
for farm produce. 



The Southern Pacific Development Department calls 
attention to the Mission Play at San Gabriel on January 
16. This is the seventeenth season of this play which has 
become a state institution. It has a growing capital value ; 
the profits being used for the perpetuation of famous 
California landmarks. 



The California Vineyardists Association announces that 
its campaign to develop new markets for California grapes 
in Eastern cities has had notable success and that this 
year the unprecedented number of 23,570 
handled in the New York terminal district. 



cars were 



President Sidney L. Schwartz of the San Francisco 
Stock Exchange has announced: "It has long been an 
established custom with the San Francisco Stock Ex- 
change that all securities listed on the exchange must 
submit an annual financial statement to the exchange and 
to its stockholders, together with an earning statement 
covering the same period. In fact, every corporation list- 
ing its securities on the exchange must first agree to 
publish annually a full and complete statement of its 
financial condition." For not following this rule the com- 
mon stock of the Marine Corporation has been stricken 
from the listed securities of the exchange. 



Price paid for seats on the San Francisco Curb Ex- 
change was $18,000 last week when John J. Parker and 
Charles T. Hughes bought seats. 



Market value of stocks traded in on the San Francisco 
Stock Exchange for the first 7'/2 days of this year was 
835,033,573. 



January 21, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



AIR LINES 



By Lieut. Blaine Stubblefield 



Authentic news items from the realm of aviation tell a 
more useful story than a wordy author, fired by a flighty 
imagination, can hope to tell. For 
the second time in our News Let- 
ter history, therefore, we take 
out our long scissors and carve 
the most significant of aeronauti- 
cal events for the week ending 
January 7. 




Baton Rouge, Louisiana, also comes forward with *75.- 
000 to build an airport for their visitors, flying citizens 
and the air mail service. 



Close to home, or rather, at 
home, as it should be, we find 
Oakland making lively prepar- 
ations for an air mail week, to 
include January 22 and 28. An 
air mail information bureau with 
personnel from the air transport 
organizations is working with 
the Chamber of Commerce, the 
Post Office and a large number 
of social and civic organizations, to disseminate informa- 
tion about the air mail service during the week. It is 
planned that everyone in Oakland shall know the rules of 
the service, or rather, the new lack of rules. Every busi- 
ness house and citizen will be reached, as they were in 
San Francisco when Colonel Lindbergh was here. 



Lieut. Blaine Stuhblefield 



Speaking on aviation in 1928, William P. MacCracken 
Jr., Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Air, said that 
there is every indication that greater advances will be 
made in the field during the coming year than were made 
during 1927. That covers quite an extensive program. 



New air commerce regulations, drafted by the govern- 
ment as a result of the December conference of the in- 
dustry in Washington, D. C, will go into effect soon, retro- 
active to January 1. It seems there is to be a tightening 
of requirements concerning both pilots and equipment. 



The B. F. Mahoney Aircraft Company prepares to build 
a $50,000 plant at St. Louis. A new corporation is being 
formed with $500,000 capital. Ryan monoplanes will be 
built. The famous "Spirit of St. Louis" was, and is, a 
Ryan. 



Six thousand pounds of Christmas air mail came west 
from Chicago during the last few days of December, 
twice as much as was sent the year before. 



How long will an airplane last? A well-known machine. 
the second turned out by its factory, has just flown 224 
hours without an adjustment, and carried 3762 passen- 
gers. Of course, if it had been adjusted, it might have 
done some real hauling. 



Guiseppe Bellanca plans a huge aircraft factory on a 
350-acre site at Washington, D. C. Several members of 
the Du Pont family are interested in the new company. 



Everybody in the city of Akron. Ohio, has turned out 
for the' purpose of getting an airport. Judging from the 
long list of officials and business men active in the cru- 
sade, they want to get the job done soon. 



In addition to these, we find airport developments in 
Rome, N. Y. ; Albany, N. Y. ; Springfield, Mass.; Indian- 
apolis, Ind. ; Hazelton, Pa., and at many lesser places. 



It is reported that Ireland expects soon to have an air 
transport service, an extension of the Imperial Airways 
from London. 



It is proposed that a national airport be erected at 
Kitty Hawk, N. C, where the first flying machine left 
the ground under its own power, under the control of 
the Wright brothers, Wilber and Orvil. Congress some 
time ago authorized the erection of a memorial at Kill 
Devil Hill, from which they made the flight, but the 
project has met with opposition because the country is a 
wild waste and practically inaccessible. The people of 
Dayton, Ohio, where the Wrights were brought up, and 
where they actually built their first plane, are trying to 
have the memorial built there. At present, one must go 
to France to see a memorial to the world's first flyers. 
When the famous brothers made their flight from Kill 
Devil Hill, only four or five people saw them do it. The 
news electrified the country. Then the next flight was 
planned at Dayton. Newspaper men gathered, but the 
plane failed to fly. Another attempt was made, with suc- 
cess, but no reporters were present, because they thought 
the flying machine was a fake after they saw it fail to 
rise. After that, the Wright brothers went to Europe to 
continue their experiments. It was there that they began 
to make turns and circles with their planes, and to learn 
that an airplane could actually be made to go where they 
wanted it to. Europe, especially France, took great inter- 
est in the miracle of flight. When they came back to 
America, we were ready to be shown. It was not, how- 
ever, until 1927 that we seriously tried our wings. 



Wichita, Kansas, has just got its sixth airplane factory 
under way. The new plant is to be built and operated by 
the Swift Aircraft Company. 



A new air maile route from Salt Lake City to Helena, 
Montana, has just been contracted into the family of air- 
ways. It is now proposed that a line be established be- 
tween Boise and Butte. Airlines will probably touch 
every town in the country of 10,000 inhabitants within 
the next few years. 



Since the air mail service was established in 1918. air 
mail planes have flown 20,000,000 miles and carried 9,- 
000.000 pounds of air mail. 



As we go to press the result of the endurance flight 
of Lieutenant George R. Pond, U. S. N., and Captain 
Charles E. Kingsford-Smith. Australia, in the "Spirit of 
California." is not yet known. The giant three-motored 
Fokker monoplane has been hovering over the city and 
East Bay in a most spectacular flight. 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1928 



The Girl of Today 

(Apologies to Berton Braley) 

There's no necessity for wanton controversy or lengthy 
disputation, so, without circumlocution, I proceed to the 
vindication of the speaker sex. 

The clergy and laity express contempt at her gayety, 
in fact scoff and ridicule the girl of the current interim ; 
boycott her levity, and are distressed by her brevity and 
insufficient habiliment. Maiden aunts blush and assume 
a most exasperated demeanor, shocked to denouncement 
of whatever she does or she did. But, really, I say. is the 
person discussed so terrible, so brazen and quite beyond 
the point of toleration? Let us contemplate the object. 

It is rather obvious that she is pliable, and along an- 
gular tension and most extraordinarily possessed of 
energy. We are somewhat abashed to note she is 'er silken 
of limb ; manifesting a disposition of brave serenity, and 
her carriage is irreproachable — God save the queen. If 
she is facing destruction and is spiritually at low ebb, 



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Four rooms and breakfast room. Large closets. 
Completely furnished — Oriental rugs and phono- 
graph. S125.00 per month. Apartment 6, 1100 
Fulton Street, Cor. Pierce. May be seen by ap- 
pointment. Phone Graystone 428. 



An Author 
Says: 



News with a style — the 
writings of good thinkers 
here and abroad — a def- 
inite poise, a live recep- 
tiveness. These are qual- 
ities I find in the 



uanttsro 

€ljttcrmde 



we are unable to prophesy it. Again, my retort is, let us 
contemplate the object. 

You say she is pursuing a course of violent inebriety — 
associating with questionable and hectic society. I readily 
grant she may be moving with tremendous velocity, yet 
I am most disturbed to find (after the utmost scrutiny, 
mind you) no evidence imbedded in her appearance. She 
has more than surpassed the achievement of her maternal 
background with rigorous work and vigorous sport. The 
object of this profound discussion, blithely denoting 
grace and gross activity, meanders thither and yon ask- 
ing no aid regardless of occupation. 

Rumor has it that she partakes of the forbidden nectar, 
notwithstanding such insinuations, I fail to see the result, 
nor am I willing or obliged to announce this as the source 
of her excessive energy. Her entire anatomy from cere- 
brum to ganglia seems to be saturated with an abundance 
of stimuli. It is beyond my diminutive comprehension to 
ascertain the foundation for her strength and endurance : 
and I admonish you she has health in reserve. I find it 
difficult to believe that she is overly dissipated or that a 
decline is inevitable. For, I say, let us contemplate the 
object. 

(Author will now trade dictionary for parachute, copy 
of "Here's How," or what have you.) — By L. F. W. 



Westward Ho! 

The scenic and romantic appeal of the West is being- 
carried to the people of the United States through a new- 
national campaign of advertising started this month by 
the Southern Pacific Company. 

The 1928 campaign will not only depict the scenic won- 
ders and recreational opportunities of California and the 
whole Pacific Coast, according to announcement of F. S. 
McGinnis, passenger traffic manager, San Francisco, but 
will direct attention to the finer train service offered to 
western travelers on the leading overland trains, whose 
faster schedules now bring the East nearer to the West. 

The first advertisements, appearing this month in na- 
tional periodicals and eastern newspapers, present in the 
form of an unusual picture map, done in antique style, an 
outline of the outstanding scenic attractions of California 
and the Pacific coast and the chief transcontinental travel 
routes to the West. 

This will be followed up with a series of advertisements 
catching the spirit of the heroic pioneers who blazed the 
first trails to the coast. Attention will be called to the 
fact that over those pioneer trails, today the lines of the 
first transcontinental railroad, the finest of modern trains 
offer easy and comfortable access to the land of charm 
west of the Rockies, scenic playground of the continent. 

The advertising is to be followed up with the solicita- 
tion of Southern Pacific representatives that are located 
in centers of population throughout the country and wide- 
spread distribution of a new publication, "How Best to 
See the Pacific Coast." 

The present campaign of Southern Pacific is a new 
phase of the railroad's advertising work in bringing tour- 
ists and settlers to California and the West in which many 
millions of dollars have been spent since the western span 
of the first transcontinental railroad was completed by 
the parent organization of Southern Pacific 59 years ago. 

Southern Pacific's advertising campaign in behalf of 
the territory its lines serve, is now world-wide in scope, 
involving publication advertising in Europe and distribu- 
tion of advertising material printed in four languages in 
Europe, Hawaii, the Orient and Australia, including a 
notable new illustrated booklet, "How to See the United 
States of America," emphasizing the attractions of the 
Pacific Coast. 



January 21, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




By Lloyd Farrington Wilson 



Nothing— But Talk 



Although statistics may prove that our colleges and 
secondary schools turn out a greater number of bond 
salesmen and school teachers, it is hard to make the 
average book reviewer or magazine editor believe that 
potential authors do not lead the list of learned exports. 

Nearly every critic respects only the very good and 
the very bad writer. The latter type is so constantly be- 
fore him, sending in novels and short stories, always 
asking for long letters of criticism, that he cuts ruth- 
lessly through much estimable material. 

Most young writers are wholly unprepared. Top grades 
in school type of English composition or gilt-edged di- 
plomas from correspondence schools do not assure suc- 
cess. However, as long as the idea prevails, we will con- 
tinue to find much of the contributed matter all in the 
same vein of thought. A vivid imagination, the ability 
to look upon "the animals of the human show" from a 
new viewpoint, also a thorough understanding of the sub- 
ject, is essential. 

The commonplace is all too obvious. But a new idea — 
if that is possible — handled with originality or reality, is 
always wanted. 

The mythical Fraternity of American Literati does no 
rushing. The candidate will be greeted with no polite 
speeches, welcoming him in the name of the eminent 
living and the illustrious dead. The struggle to gain the 
will-o'-the-wisp of literary lure is like the wanderlust — 
most of us are always on the way. 



In the provinces, where the simian gabble of the cross- 
roads consists of an ancient set of platitudes, book re- 
views are unknown. In the cities, where people in their 
effort to keep abreast of the times, either have time or 
take time to consider new thought, to smirk at the fun- 
damentalists, to develop an appreciation of the finenesses 
of the arts and literature; the critic is a guideon. 

Well — to speak directly pro domo — we think we are in 
a position to switch "The Table," this week, from straight 
reviews to a rather broad selective list. There are a 
goodly number of books of criticism, several very tine 
pieces in the biography line, some excellent verse, and a 
little fiction of the first order. 

* * * 

Here are three books from the "Barzoi Broadside" that 
arc demanding quite a bit of attention. For everyone, 
without exception, who has the slightest taste for sound 
writing in the English language, including those who 
"don't read novels": Death Conies for the Archbishop, 
by Willa Cat her. 

For admirers of (lie curious and the exquisite as well 
as for readers of any of the same author's books: Peter 
Whiffle: His Life and Works, by Carl Van Vechten. 

If you are among those of us who are disturbed by 
recent encroachments on freedom of speech, teaching and 
research: The War on Modern Science: A Brief History 
of the Fundamentalist Attacks on Evolution and Modern- 
ism, by Maynard Shipley. This evidence should be inter- 
esting to those optimists who regard the anti-evolution- 
ists as mere clowns, and hold that their campaign against 
sense has been stopped. 



The Cannoneers Have Hairy Ears, Anonymous (Sears) 
is one of the best of the ever lengthening list of war sto- 
ries. This book is the diary of an American captain of 
artillery. In civil life I am told he is a newspaperman. 
Though the book suggests the same author as "Wine, 
Women and War," the publisher claims it is not the same 
man. This book is written in high spirits, and gives evi- 
dence that the author saw plenty of action. It is extra- 
ordinarily frank and vivid throughout. I think you will 
like it. 

Through the Wheat, by Thomas Boyd (Scribners) 
struck me as another tolerable war story with an added 
cheer for Captain John W. Thomason Jr.'s illustrations. 
Also Captain Thomason has done a story of his own that 
is equally good in Fix Bayonets (Sears). 
* * * 

Up From the Streets: Alfred E. Smith, by Norman 
Hapgood and Henry Moskowitz (Harcourt, Brace) is the 
latest book about the New York governor, who threatens 
to be a popular candidate for president. On the surface 
this is just another story of how a poor boy made good. 
But, because Mr. Smith is more of a national figure than 
the inventor of listerine or the robust comedian who holds 
forth in Chicago, it is good to know about him. The book 
is rich in material and well written and illustrated. To 
the authors, the governor is one of the heroes of latter- 
day America. 

Menckeniana: A Schimpflevikon (i.e., Dictionary of 
Abuse). This is a book without an author (Borzoi), about 
the editor-author, H. L. Mencken. It is the utterance of 
the thousand-headed hydra of cisatlantic Babbittry, Ku- 
Kluxery, Rotarianism, Methodism, and so on and such ; 
the book of a gargantuan, inchoat, sprawling, un- 
organized, self-chosen committee — a basketful of leaves 
from the green bay-tree of American self-esteem! What 
more could I say? 

The Devil of Pei-Ling, by Herbert Asbury (Macy-Mas- 
cuis) . This is undoubtedly one of the best mystery stories 
of recent years. I say, "It is the most blood curdling story 
since Poe wrote 'The Murders of the Rue Morgue'." The 
author displays a vast knowledge of the lore of demon- 
ology. It is remarkably imaginative, gripping and all 
such. Buy, steal or borrow it, but read it. 

The Arrested Moment, by Charles Caldwell Dobie, is 
said to be fine. It shows a great versatility on the part 
of the author that is highly commendable. The book is a 
collection of short stories. Frankly, I haven't read it; let's 
do it together. 

Despite much criticism I still stand for Bruce Barton 
and hail his latest book as a good one. What Can a Man 
Believe (Bobbs, Merrill) is a very sensible discussion of 
religion in modern life. Take it for face value, if you can 
stand a little argument, it at least won't do any harm. 
Some People, by Harold Nicolson, is being cheered all over. 
I suppose I'll have to read it. 



A noted radio authority says that we should make our 
loudspeakers more decorative. This remark will cause a 
lot of Congressmen to wonder if there's anything personal 
in it. — San Diego Union. 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1928 




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and all body specialties 



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PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



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New Method Washinpr and Polish. tie 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 

Post and Franklin Streets San Francisco, Calif. 



GRAYSTONE 130 


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Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

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Complete Brake Relining Service 

WAGNER ELECTRIC CORPORATION 

Manufacturers and National Service 

Organization for Lockheed Four 

Wheel Hydraulic Brakes 

SAN FRANCISCO 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

By K. R. Schwartz 

National Automobile Club 

Gallup, New Mexico, located on the National Old Trails 
route, may be said to be the strategic center of the Indian 
country of the southwest, and motorists over this high- 
way can spend several days sightseeing in this district. 

Eighty-five miles northwest of Gallup, near Chin Lee, 
Arizona, is Canyon de Chelly, with its two tributary can- 
yons, Del Muerto and Monument. It is about forty miles 
long and is the true home of the prehistoric cliff-dwellers 
in all their colorful glory. Among the cliff ruins most 
widely known are the White House, Antelope Ruins and 
Mummy Cave. 

Canyon de Chelly possesses additional interest inas 
much as in the valleys are thousands of peach trees dat- 
ing from early Spanish times and which belong to the 
Navajos who may be seen living in these canyons in the 
same primitive fashion that they lived centuries ago when 
the Spaniards first came. 

About 65 miles south of Gallup is the Perpetual Ice 
Cave, a natural wonder in an old lava flow in which is an 
immense body of ice. The face of the ice is from twelve 
to fifteen feet thick and extends back into the cave for 
several hundred feet. Scientists are at a loss to account 
for the presence of this body of ice, for the mouth of the 
cave is practically the same width as the cave. 

In the same vicinity is the cave known as the "Breath 
of the Devil," the opening to which is small and into 
which the air is sucked by some unknown force and then 
violently expelled. 

Forty-nine miles southeast of Gallup near the irrigated 
valley of Ramah is the Inscription Rock on the face of 
which is cut the records of explorers and pioneers. El 
Morro is its other name, and the first explorer who carved 
an account of his expedition thereon was Onate, in 1606. 

Ninety-six miles north of Gallup lies Pueblo Bonito, one 
of the largest and most impressive of all the major pre- 
historic villages in the United States. The 400 ground- 
floor rooms of this remarkable ruin cover a D-shaped area 
of over three acres, and fourth story walls are still stand- 
ing. In its heyday this ruin sheltered 1200 individuals — 
peaceful farms who labored unstintingly in the interests 
of their primitive home. 



Phone Franklin 4191. Day; 3985. Night Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Washing and Polishing Specialists 

22S HYDE STREET (Bet. Turk and Eddy) 

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Open $1.50 CARS WASHED Closed $2.50 

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taining to Automobiles 
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BODY DESIGNING AND BUILDING 
UPHOLSTERING AND SEAT COVERS 
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San Francisco, California Phone Prospect 3182 



A passenger car depreciates each year about 26.2 per 
cent of the value it had at the beginning of the year, ac- 
cording to the statistical bureau of the National Automo- 
bile Club. It has been found that its value at the end of 
the first year is about 73.8 per cent of the original de- 
livery cost; at the end of the second year, about 54.5; the 
third year about 40 per cent ; the fourth year about 30 
per cent, and at the end of the fifth year the value had 
shrunk to about 22 per cent of the original. These figures 
vary with different makes and types of cars, but the latest 
statistics show that the above is a fair average basis on 
which to figure the market value of used cars. 



The home of the jaywalkers is in Addis Ababa, the 
capital of Abyssinia, for in that city there are 200 auto- 
mobiles and one traffic policeman at present. Although 
there are sidewalks, the greater part of the population 
continues to use the streets for walking as well as talking. 
Due to the fact that motorists realize they cannot drive 
far at a high speed, there is very little reckless driving 
and few serious accidents. 



January 21, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Plans for the construction of a Sl.250,000 highway to 
traverse Sonora from north to south are under way as a 
part of the most ambitious state highway program ever 
attempted in the Republic of Mexico. This road is to be 
approximately 300 miles long, paved all the way. and will 
extend from Nogales, on the American border, south 
through Hermosillo, capital of the state, to Guaymas, on 
the Gulf of California. Funds for the project will be 
shared half by the Mexican government and half by a 
state appropriation. 

A Real Party 

When the curtains rang down on half a dozen of the big 
shows playing in San Francisco this week their principals 
and companies trouped over to the Aladdin Studio at 363 
Sutter street where Hattie and Minnie Mooser staged a 
midnight kitchen party for them. 

' Fannie Brice was there and the Duncan Sisters — 
Rosetta and Vivian ; the Marx Brothers ; Doris Cameron 
and her Broadway company — in fact everyone who was 
worth while in showdom. 

Along with them came George Warren of the Chronicle, 
Edgar Waite of the Examiner, Curran Swint of the News 
and a few others of pendom. ,..,-„ 

The Aladdin, long the rendezvous of the theatrical tolk, 
did itself proud. The dainty maidens from Chinatown, 
who trip about with Minnie's and Hattie's tea and wafers 
and things, were proud as peacocks at the honor of serv- 
ing stars. 

There was a mad scramble between these dainty misses 
as to who should carry the things that the Duncan girls 
ate and drank and they finally flipped a dime to decide 



mobile Association suggests that it is a good plan to 
wind the pipe from manifold to muffler with one fourth 
inch asbestos cord. 



In Women's World 

The types of visitors to the Kiang collection are a cross 
section of the social variety which flavors the gateway to 
the Orient which we cherish. World travelers, local con- 
noisseurs, diplomats, army, navy and local Oriental celeb- 
rities mingle with the usual artists, writers and syste- 
matic exhibition seekers. 

Eastern publications have already published accounts 
of this Kiang family collection, which is unique, as it is 
the first time that a private Chinese family has presented 
its treasures to the public, either in China or America. 
The custom in China is such that a collection of paintings 
is never shown except to close friends of the family. Dr. 
Kiang has brought these paintings to America to save 
them from the perils of unsettled conditions in China, 
as well as to allow the art loving American people to 
enjoy them. 

Lectures on the Kiang Family Collection of Ancient and 

Modern Chinese Paintings. (Free.) (1st two.) In the 

East West Gallery of Fine Arts until January 31. S. F. 

Women's Club building, Sutter and Mason streets. 

Tuesday, January 24, 8:30 p. m. Dr. Kiang Kang-hu on 

"Philosophical Ideals Dominating Chinese Painting." 
Thursday, January 26, 8:30 p. m. Katharine M. Ball, on 
"An Analysis of the Art Forms in Chinese Painting." 
Tuesday, January 31, 8:30 p. m. Dr. Arthur Upham Pope, 
internationally known authority on Near East art, on 
"Some Aesthetic Considerations of Chinese Painting." 
Under the joint auspices of the East West Gallery of 
Fine Arts and The People's Assembly. Admission 50c. For 



the winner. 

It was a real party by real folks and they put on a t!le benefit of the New Orient Society, 
show for their own benefit that was worth S20 of any- 
body's money, only nobody had to pay anything. Except, 
of course, the Mooser girls who staged the affair and who 
didn't care. 



Counties Urge New Ferry Grant 



The Duncan Sisters entertained the members of the 
20-30 Club of San Francisco, Thursday noon at the Palace 
Hotel and were given a great ovation by all the members 
who declared the songs to be one hundred per cent pure 
enjoyment. 

Motor Car Dealers to Hold Sociability Run 
to Yosemite 

The San Francisco Motor Car Dealers' annual mid-win- 
ter Sociability Run to Yosemite Valley will be held Janu- 
ary 20 to 22, and indications are that a record attendance 
wi'll be drawn to the dealers' frolic in Yosemite over the 
week-end. ,. 

This event was inaugurated last year as the motor car 
dealers' tribute to the completion of the AU-Year high- 
way Sociability is the keynote of the run and in no way 
is it a speed or endurance test. Participants have all 
added interest in that driving at a normal pace is made 
a contest. The three motorists coming nearest to the 
official pace-maker's time will be given prizes. Once in 
the valley, the members of the party will be entertained 
with a wide variety of snow sports. 

The committee of the Motor Car Dealers Association 
in charge of the sociability run consists of E. \\ . Milburn. 
L. G. Lehousse. F. W. Pabst. George Webber and Carl J. 
Simpson. 

Cover Exhaust Pipe 

Often heat from the exhaust pipe makes it unc orn - 
fortablv hot in a closed car. The California State Auto- 



The Boards of Supervisors of Napa and Lake counties 
have indorsed the proposed new ferry line of the Golden 
Gate Ferry Company, from San Francisco to Point San 
Quentin, near San Rafael. At this writing copies of the 
indorsements have been given the Board of Supervisors 
of San Francisco, requesting the necessary franchise for 
the new ferry line and to the State Railroad Commission, 
requesting the necessary certificate of public convenience 
to be issued. 

The Lake county indorsement recited that the proposed 
ferry line will materially lessen the congestion on the 
state highway between Sausalito and San Rafael, and 
eliminate the long haul over the Corte Madera grade; will 
afford the farmers and merchants of Lake county a 
shorter and more economical outlet for freight trucks and 
a shorter haul for the stage lines; will save time and will 
encourage travel into Lake county, resulting in a greater 
use of the summer resorts in that county. 

The Napa county petition declares that the new line 
will hasten the development of Marin, Sonoma and Napa 
counties, give a more direct scenic route for auto travel 
between San Francisco and Napa valley, and relieve con- 
gestion at Sausalito and eliminate the delays now experi- 
enced on week-ends and holidays. 



-Friendly nations" sounds funny. Are men friendly 
when they "discuss the kind of knives they will use on one 
another next time?— Anaheim (Cal.) Plain Dealer. 
* * * 

Once more. Colonel Lindbergh, although flying alone, 
has carried a whole nation with him.— Christian Science 
Monitor. 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1928 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




On the Air 
By C. J. Pennington 

Dance music Sunday afternoons has 
made a decided "hit" if fan mail re- 
ceived by KFRC, the Don Lee station 
at San Francisco, is evidence of its 
popularity. 

KFRC recently conceived the idea 
of offering terpsichorean enthusiasts 
music by which they might trip the 
light fantastic Sunday afternoons. A 
deluge of telegrams and letters has 
resulted in the assignment of the 
KFRC dance orchestra to the task of 
providing this program weekly, here- 
after, between 3 and 4 o'clock. Nov- 
elty intermission numbers are also 
being arranged, according to the an- 
nouncement. 



Sunday, January 22 

Beginning at 1 o'clock the Pacific 
Coast Network listeners will hear the 
third program of the new "Golden 
Strand Group." At 3 p. m. another 
two hour concert will go over the 
NBC network. The first hour and a 
half features a varied musical pro- 
gram. Selections by the NBC orches- 
tra, under the direction of Max Dolin, 
the Arion Trio, Easton Kent and Elsa 
Naess make up this portion of the 
program. The half hour from 4:30 
to 5 will feature another "Great Mo- 
ment in History" radio drama. The 
title of this presentation is "Robert 
E. Lee." The story will tell many in- 
teresting incidents in the life of this 
great Southern general. 

Beginning at 6:30 and continuing 
for one hour the Standard Symphony 
Orchestra will present its regular 
Sunday evening concert over the NBC 
network. 

Rudy Seiger's Shell Symphonists 
will be heard in another exceptional 
program in the hour starting at 8 
o'clock. 



Monday, January 23 

The Los Caballeros Orchestra, 
which was heard in the NBC inaug- 
ural program over the NBC network 
last April, will present a program 
originating in the Los Angeles stu- 
dios tonight in the hour from 10 to 

11 o'clock. 

* * * 

Tuesday, January 24 

The Eveready Salon Orchestra, un- 
der the direction of Max Dolin, to- 
night from 8 to 8:30 p. m. From 8:30 
to 9 the usual weekly half hour bridge 
lesson will be broadcast to the NBC 
listeners. 

"A Night in New Arabia" is the 
title of the O'Henry story to be broad- 
cast over the NBC network from 9 to 
9:30, as the Retold Tale feature. 

The NBC Rounders will be heard in 
another round-up of harmony from 
9:30 to 10 o'clock. The ever-increas- 
ing popularity of this group of enter- 
tainers is best shown perhaps by the 
many requests that follow each pro- 
gram. 

* * * 

Wednesday, January 25 

NBC network listeners will be pre- 
sented another musical fruit cocktail 
from 6:30 to 7 this evening. At 9 
o'clock and continuing until 10, "The 
Vagabonds" will take their listeners 
to Paris. They will do the usual sight- 
seeing trips and see the night life of 

Montemarte. 

* * * 

Thursday, January 26 

Tonight's program from 8 to 9 
brings before the microphone the Cal- 
pet Orchestra and ensemble, featuring 
excerpts from Gilbert and Sullivan's 
tabloid light opera 'The Yeoman of 
the Guard." 

Dodge Brothers, Inc., offer a pro- 
gram from 9 to 9:30. 

From 9:30 to 10 o'clock will bring 
forth over the air another dainty and 
graceful light classic program known 
as "Moon Magic." 

* * * 

Friday, January 27 

8 to 9 — Wrigley Review. 

9 to 9:30— The second of the newly 
inaugurated "White Rock Programs" 
will be broadcast over the NBC net- 
work. 

9:30 to 10 — Down "Memory Lane" 
to the ice cream festival, given by the 
Ladies' Aid Society, will be the at- 
traction. Tonight's offering will bring 
back memories to those who were 
reared in small communities where 
the ice cream festival was one of the 
big events of the summer season. 



Saturday, January 28 

An entirely new type of program 
featuring classic music of a high or- 
der will be introduced in the RCA 
hour broadcast over the NBC net- 
work in the hour from 8 to 9 tonight. 

A musical gamut is run in the 
Philco hour for this evening from 9 to 
10 o'clock over the NBC network. 

Another two hour dance program 
by the popular "Trocaderans" is in 
store for NBC listeners tonight from 
10 to 12 o'clock. 

An extensive variety of new and 
popular dance tunes, late song hits, 
and recent musical comedy successes 
are featured in this brilliant presenta- 
tion. 



Programs for Next Week 

KFRC— DON LEE 
SAN FRANCISCO— 454 
Sunday. January 22 

10:00 to 12:00 noon — Home, Sweet Home Concert. 
12 noon to 1 :00 p. m. — Church service. 
1:00 to 3:00 p. m.— S & W Recital. 
3:00 to 4:00 p. m.— KFRC dance orchestra. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Talk. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins concert orchestra. 
7 :30 to 8 :30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
8:30 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance music. 
Monday, January 23 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
9:00 to 9:30 p. m. — Georgia O. George. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon— Amateur tryouts. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 
4:30 to 5:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:00 to 5:15 p. m. — News items. 
5:15 to 5:45 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
5:45 to 6:20 p. m. — Joe Mendel and Pep Band. 
6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen, police reports. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Sports talk 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — The Hawaiians. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Blue Monday Jamboree. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KFRC Dance Orchestra. 
Tuesday, January 24 

7:00 to S:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
S :00 to 9:00 a. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Studio program. 
11:30 a. m. to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay concert. 



4:30 to 5:15 

5:15 to 5:30 

5:30 to 6:10 p. 

6:10 to 6:25 p. 

6:25 to 6:30 p. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. 

9:00 to 10:00 r 
10:00 to 12:00 



Organ recital, 
m. — News items, 
m. — Mac and his gang, 
m. — With stamp collectors, 
m. — Stage and screen, 
m. — The Cecilians. 
m. — Haas program. 
. m. — Concert orchestra. 
m. — Dance orchestra. 



Wednesday. January 25 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryout period. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay concert. 

4:00 to 4:30 p. m.— Calif. State Library Talk. 

4 :30 to 5 :15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Maxwell House Coffee program. 

9:00 1«» 12:00 p. m.— Dance program. 

Thursday. January 26 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m.— Georgia O. George. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Studio program. 

11:30 lo 12:00 noon — Amateur trymiis. 

12:00 tn 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 

4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5:30 to 6:10 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6:10 to 6:20 p. m— Beauty talk. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage, Screen. Police reports. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Sports talk. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m.- — The Hawaiians. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Mona Motor Oil Co. 



January 21, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



to 9:45 p. m.— KFRC Movie Club. 
9:15 to 10:00 p. m. --Airplane Plying Lesson. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 
Friday, January 27 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m.— Georgia O. George. 

to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Hints to home-makers. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur tryouts. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 

4 :00 to 4 :30 p. m.— Student hour. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:16 I" 5:30 p. m.— News items. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— The Cecilians. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Skyway journeys. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m — Dance orchestra. 

Saturday. January 28 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m.— Shopping service. 

11:00 to 11:45 a. m. — Amateur tryouts. 

11 :45 to 12 :00 noon — Announcements of Sunday 

church sermons. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5 :30 to 6 :20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
P :20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and Bcreen. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

KPO— HALE BROTHERS AND THE CHRONICLE 

SAN FRANCISCO— 422 
Sunday, January 22 

9:45 to 10:30 a. m.— Church services. 



m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

m.- — National Broadcasting Co. 
m.— Mixed Quartet. 

m. — National Broadcasting Company, 
m. — Organ recital, 
a. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orches- 



:00 to 4:00 

:00 to 4:00 
4:00 to 5:30 p. 
5:30 to 7:30 p. 
7:30 to 8:30 p. 
8:30 to 10:00 p. m.- 

tra. 

Monday, January 23 
6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m.— -Ye Towne Cryer service. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 
4:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Musical program. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO's variety program. 
Tuesday, January 24 
6:45 to 8:00 a. m.— Health exercises. 
8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m— KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m.- — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KPO dance orchestra. 

Wednesday, January 25 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m.- -Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9:00 a. m.— Sperry Flour hnppy hour. 

10:30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:46 a. m.- — Home service talk. 

11 :30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon Time signals, -Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Ye Town* Cryer service. 

BiSO to 7:00 p. m. — KPO Orchestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. ni. -Gypsy jiiuI Marta. 

B:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Atwater Kent Artists. 

B:0Q to 10:00 p. m. — Abas String Quartette. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO Dance Orchestra. 

Thursday. January 26 

6 : i 15 to 8 :00 a. m. Heall h 

B :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10:00 to 10 :30 a. m.- Donv mist. 

in :80 to 10 :45 a. m.- Ye Towne Cryer service. 

h :■' to 1:00 p. m.- Kane's Eawaiians. 

12 i n Time signals. Scripture reading. 

l -00 to 2 :00 p. m, KPO orch 

I mi :,. ■ oo p. m . KPO Orchestra. 

to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

o :S0 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

i. ■ . :00 p ram. 

and poultry talk. 

a 10:00 p. in. National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. Studio program. 

Friday. January 27 

o 8 :O0 a. m.- Health exerci 

■ (ii Sperry Flour happy hour. 
■ ne Cryer service. 
i m, Home service tnlk. 

*:45 p. m. Kan.'- Hawaiians. 
n.ils. Scripture reading. 
12:45 p. m.— Commonwealth luncheon at Palace Hotel. 
1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

to 5 :00 p. m. KPO orchee 
6:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6:90 P. m. Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Organ recital. 



8:00 to 10:00 p, m. National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. KPO Mane., Orel* 
Saturday, January JS 

6:46 to 8:00 a. m. Health exercises. 

B :00 to 9 :00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10:00 to 10 :30 a. in.- Domestic economist. 

10:30 to 10:45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m.- Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. KPO orchestra. 

2:00 p. m.— Football. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— KPO Dance Orchestra. 

8:00 to 12:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS. INC. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 267 
Sunday, January 22 

7 :50 to 9 :00 p. m. — Church services. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m.- — Dance program. 
Monday. January 23 

8:20 to 10:00 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 

10 :27 to 10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

10:30 to 11:00 a. m. — Interior Decorating. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m.— Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. .m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m.— Sports talk. 

7 :15 to 7 :30 p. m. — Advertising tnlk. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Darneille Sister. 

8:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

10:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 11:00 p. m.— Dance music. 

Tuesday, January 24 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:00 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m— Thrift program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 10:30 p. m.— Novelty program. 

10:30 to 11:00 p. m. — Program of popular music. 

Wednesday. January 25 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:00 a. m.- — Breakfnst program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m— Thrift program. 

10 :27 to 10 :30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports.' 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 

Thursday, January 26 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
8:20 to 10:00 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 

10 :27 to 10 :30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

10:30 to 11:00 a. m. — Fashion hints. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. —Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:80 to 6:00 p. m.— Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m.— Dinner hour program. 

7 :00 to 7 :15 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

iu nil to 11:00 p. m.— KFWI Gypsy band. 

Friday. January 27 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Exercise hour. 

B:20 to 10:00 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:21 a. m.— Thrift program. 

10 dW to 10 :80 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Musical luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:0Q to 6:80 p. m. — Concert. 

5:80 to 6:00 p. m. Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7 :00 p. m. -Program. 

7:00to7:16p m, Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
n. m. — Art eo>:rse. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program, 
i -Dance program. 

|0 :00 p.m. Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 10:30 p. m. — Gloria Del Rae 

. ni. -Popular program. 

Saturday. January 2S 

7 -no i,i 8:00 a. m. -Exercise hour. 

-t program. 
n -Thrift program. 
10:27 to 10 :30 a. m. ither reports. 

■ p. m. — Concert. 
mi p. m. — Construction reports. 
; :00 p. m. Pinner hour concert. 
' i>. 111. — Studio program. 
9-on to 10:00 p. m. — Harriet Lewis. 
10-00 to 12:30 p. m.— KFWI surprise party. 
KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 
Sundav, January 22 

1:30 to 3:30 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
3:30 to 5:00 p. m.— Dance music. 
Monday. January 23 

9:00 to 12:00 m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
1-30 to 7:30 p, in.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
bo 9:00 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 



B :00 to i ! :00 p, n . udfo -'-ram. 
Tuesday. Januarj 21 

i ! OQ . ■, . i rumen 
i :80 to - :80 p, m. Inst rumenl and vocal h ■ 

8 :00 to :00 p. m. I h I h< . ions. 
0:00 to ll:0ii p, m Coco-Nut Club mcetlns. 
Wednesday. January 25 

9 :00 to 12 :00 a. m. Instrument 

1:30 to 7:80 p. iii. in trument and vocal selections. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. in. Orthophouic recital. 
Thursday, January 26 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal Belec 

1:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 

S:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Music lovers' program. 

Friday, January 27 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:30 to 7:30 p. m.- Instrument and \<" 

8:00 to 9:30 p. m.— Dance music. 

9:30 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Saturday, January 28 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE 
OAKLAND— 508 
Monday, January 23 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 

11:30 to 1 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Brother Bob's club. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m— News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Weekly meeting of Lake Mer- 

ritt Ducks. 
Tuesday, January 24 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Special program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Dance music. 
Wednesday. January 25 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Variety hour. 
Thursday. January 26 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.- — Luncheon concert. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. —Hawaiian Orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Special program. 
Friday. January 27 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Variety hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Athens Athletic Club Orchestra. 
Saturday. January 28 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC 
OAKLAND— 394 
Sunday, January 22 

11:00 a. m. — Church service. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

3:00 to 7:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7 :30 p. m. — Weather report. 

7:35 to 9:00 p. m. — Church service. 

Monday. January 23 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

3:30 to 4:00 p. m. — Women's Clubs. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— St. Francis Orchestra. 

5 :30 to 6:00 p. m.— KGO Kiddies' Klub. 

6:00 to 6:45 p. m. —Concert Orchestra. 

6:46 p. m.— What's Happening in the World. 

S :00 to 9:00 p. m. — Shell Company program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— The Pilgrims. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Co. 

Tuesday. January 24 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon Concert. 

12:30. weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03. S. F. stocks: 

1 :08, N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dance Orchestra. 
6:55. new3 ; 7:03, weather: 7:08, S. F. produce, grain. 

cotton: 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, N. Y. 

stocks (closing). 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
Wednesday. January 25 
11:15 to 11:30 a. m. — The Home. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
12:30, weather: 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :0S N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:80 to 7:00 p. m.— Sunkist dinner hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Farm program, 
s :00 to 9:00 p. m. — Vaudeville. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 !>. m. - St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Thursday, January 26 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12 :S0, weather: 1 :00. weather ; 1:08. S. F. stocks : 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — "Friend to Boys." 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

£:.■">.") p. m. — News: 7:05. weather; 7:08. S. F. produce, 

grain, cotton; 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23. 

N. Y. stocks (closing). 

9:00 p. m.— Calpet hour. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1928 



Friday. January 27 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Louise Landis. 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. ra. — Luncheon concert. 

12:30, weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :0S. N. Y. stocks. 
5:30 p.m. — Wise man from the Land-O-Health. 
6:00 to 6:<15 p. m.- — Dinner concert program. 

6 :-i5 to 6 :55 p. m. — "Weekly Financial Keview." 
6:55, news; 7:05, weather; 7:08, S. F. produce, grain, 

cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, N. Y. 

stocks (closing). 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Saturday. January 28 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
1j!:30, weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1:08. N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:50 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:50 to 7:15 p. m. — Weather, news, new books. 
7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Weekly sport review. 
8:00 to 11:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY. INC 
LOS ANGELES— 46S 

Sunday, January 22 

10;UU a. m. — Morning services. 

1:00 to 7:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7:35 p. m. — Bob Buckner and Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Aeolian organ recital. 

9:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Orchestra. 

Monday. January 23 

5:30 p. m.— Lone Rene and Orchestra. 

0:15 p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 

0:30 p. ra. — Glenn Edmunds and Orchestra. 

7 :U0 P- m. — Gene Johnston's Music Box hour. 
S:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 p. m. — Lenere Killian. 

10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

Tuesday, January 24 

5:30 P- m. — The Dragon Hawaiians. 

6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 

0:30 p. m. — Whispering Jack Don. 

6:45 p. m.— Talk. 

7 :00 p. m. — L. A. Fire Dept. 

7:30 p. m. — Helen Guest. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 

10:00 p. m. — Metropolitan Dance Orchestra. 

Wednesday, January 25 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m. — Gold Medal Talks. 

5:30 p. m. — Sebastians Cotton Club Orchestra. 

6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 

6 :30 p. m. — Hal Chasnoff's orchestra. 

7:30 p. m. — Nick Harris Detective Stories. 

7:45 p. m. — William MacDougall. 

8:00 p. m. — Musical Club program. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard program. 

10:30 p. m.— N. C. Mills. 

Thursday, January 26 

5:30 p. m. — Vernon Elkins and Orchestra. 

6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 

6:30 p. m. — Henry Starr. 

7:00 p. m. — Program by the University of Southern 

California. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m. — Program of modern classical music. 
Friday. January 27 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m.— Gold Medal Talks. 
5:30 p. m. — Talk by Eugene Biscailuz. 
5:45 p. m.— Paul McNally. 
6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m. — Clarice Russell. 
7:00 p. m. — Program by Paul Roberts. 
8:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 p. m. — Packard Symphonette. 
10:00 p. m. — Virginia McCoy. 
Saturday, January 28 

5 :30 p. m. — Strangers Social Club Orchestra. 
6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 

6 :30 p. m. — Jack Farrell and Orchestra. 

7:30 p. m.— Felipe Delgado, Spanish Baritone. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m.— Packard program. 
11:00 p. m.— KFI Midnight Frolic. 

KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO CO. 
SEATTLE— 348 
Sunday, January 22 
7:30 to 9:00 p. m. —Evening services. 
Monday, January 23 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Time signals, sport news. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:30 p. m.— Studio program. 
10:30 to 12:30 p. m.— Goofy Bird Frolic. 
Tuesday, January 24 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10 :00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— -Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 
Wednesday. January 25 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10 :00 p. m. — Time signals. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Thursday, January 26 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Concert orchestra. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance music. 

Friday, January 27 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 8 :00 p. m.— Studio program. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Instrumental trio. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 
Saturday, January 28 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Sport news. News Items. 



6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers Dance Orchestra. 
KG W— MORNING OREGONIAN 
PORTLAND— 491.5 
Sunday. January 22 
7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. program. 
10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Little Symphony orchestra. 
Monday. January 23 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m, — Concert orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:00 p m. — Talk. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.-— N. B. C. program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert hour. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m — Spot Light Hour. 
Tuesday, January 24 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Musical program. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Book review and talk. 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Sealy Dance program. 
t:30 to 11:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
Wednesday, January 25 
6:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Concert orchestra. 
7:30 to S:00 p. m.— Lecture. 
8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. —Concert. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. Program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Silver King Revellers. 
Thursday, January 26 
6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7 :30 to 7 :40 p. m.- — Utility service. 
7:40 to 8:00 p. m. — Flower girls. 
8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Concert.- 
0-on to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. program. 
Friday, January 27 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner ' concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— Utility service and talk. 
8 :00 to 9 :00 n. m.— Concert. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. Program. 
10:00 to 10:30 p. m.— Concert. 
10:30 to 12:00 p. m.— Keep Growing Wiser Order of 

Hoot Owls. 
Saturday, January 28 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Concert. 
8:00 to 12:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 



Loafing — Socially 
At Santa Maria Inn 

following people have been 
at the Inn during the past 



Frolich 
of San 



The 
guests 
week: 

Mrs. A. Frolich, Miss E. 
and Mr. Irving Frolich, all 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Beary of San 
Jose. 

Mr. and Mrs. Syer of San Jose. 

Dr. and Mrs. B. F. Alden of San 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Ayer, Mr. Den- 
ison Ayer, and Mrs. H. G. Ayer, all of 
Piedmont. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Judson Sale of San 
Francisco and Mr. and Mrs. S. Ewell 
of Marysville. California. 

Mr. and Mrs. Felix Kahn, Miss Bil- 
lie Kahn and Miss Janet Harris, all 
of San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Newhall and 
Miss J. Newhall, all of San Francisco. 

Mrs. J. A. Buck and Mr. and Mrs. 
W. E. Buck, San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. Anson S. Blake of 
Berkeley. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Dollar II, and 
Miss Alice B. Dollar, all of San Rafael. 

Capt. and Mrs. B. Aillet and Miss 
Aillet, all of San Mateo. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Alden of San 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen L. Gibson and 
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Gayton, all of San 
Francisco. 



CLUB ACTIVITIES 

(Continued from page 5) 

Ten Women Elected 

The Women's City Club, which 



located in a handsome and homelike 
building on Post street, almost on the 
corner of Powell, elected ten women 
on the board of directors, last week. 

Four of the ten were new members 
of the board and recognized for their 
valiant work covering many, many 
years preceding the club's formation 
as well as now, during its wonderful 
prosperity. These four new members 
are: Mrs. William F. Booth, Mrs. W. 
B. Hamilton, Mrs. Edward H. Clark 
Jr., and Miss Henrietta Moffat. Six 
members of the board re-elected to 
office are: Miss Irene Ferguson, Mrs. 
Narcus Koshland, Miss Marion W. 
Leale, Mrs. Harry Staats Moore, Mrs. 
Howard G. Park, Mrs. Paul Shoup, 

There are thirty-one women on the 
board of directors. Ten are elected 
for one year, ten the next and eleven 
the third year. Mrs. Cleaveland 
Forbes has been the presiding execu- 
tive for the past year and to her 
splendid judgment and ability is due 
much of the great progress of the 
Women's City Club, according to her 

many constituents. 

# * * 

Literary Lectures 

Lectures on literature, which have 
been given by Prof. B. H. Lehman, 
will continue at the club, the first one 
of the new series to take place on 
Tuesday, January 24, when old and 
new plays will be included in the 
course. O'Neil, Galsworthy, Maugh- 
an, Werfel and Lawson are included 
as subjects for the brilliant dis- 
courses. 

SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 4) 

of honor, and Miss Thys Walther, 

bridesmaid. 

* * * 

Engagement News 

Engaged couples have many ways 
of letting their friends "in" on the 
secret. 

Sometimes, it is a clever announce- 
ment card devised to "spring the 
news," as it were, and, many times it 
only reveals what everybody surmised 
right along, but were not quite sure it 
was so. 

During the past week, any number 
of society girls have told their pretty 
romances to their immediate groups 
of friends, before letting the general 
society contingency hear the happy 



They're Betrothed 

The engagement of Miss Ruth Es- 
ther Jordan to Dr. Dwight Locke Wil- 
bur has been announced by Mr. and 
Mrs. Benjamin Ely Jordan, parents of 
the bride-to-be. 

The bride graduated from Stanford 
University last June and took an 
active part in college activities, being 



January 21, 1928 

woman's editor of the 1927 Stanford 
"Quad." 

Dr. Wilbur, her fiance, is the son 
of President and Mrs. Ray Lyman 
Wilbur, of Stanford University. He is 
resident physician at the University 
of Pennsylvania, having graduated 
from Stanford in 1923 and later get- 
ting his degree in medicine at Penn- 
sylvania, '26. He is a member of the 
Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor 
society. 

Miss Jordan is a descendant of a 
prominent California family. She is a 
member of Cap and Gown honor so- 
cieties and privileged to wear the 

block "S". 

* * * 

Miss Alma Eastin, who makes her 
home at the Whitcomb Hotel, return- 
ed this week from eight months in 
Europe. Miss Helen McKeever, who 
traveled with Miss Eastin, is still 
abroad but will return to San Fran- 
cisco the latter part of the month. 
The two travelers spent considerable 
time in England and two months in 
Paris, from where they made trips to 

Holland, Switzerland and Italy. 

* * * 

On last Thursday afternoon, Mrs. 
M. J. McBrearty entertained the card 
club, of which she is a member, for 
luncheon and bridge at the Hotel 
Whitcomb. Luncheon was served in 

Drury Lane. 

* * * 

Roof Garden Party 

Thirty members and guests of the 
Rediviva Club, of the University of 
California, were entertained in the 
Roof Garden of the Hotel Whitcomb 
last Thursday afternoon. Miss Har- 
riet Pugh was in charge of the ar- 
rangements. After playing bridge, 
the guests were served tea at a hand- 
somely appointed table. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. John I. Fisher, of Los 
Angeles, are guests at the Hotel Whit- 
comb for a short stay. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fisher formerly made their perman- 
ent home at the Whitcomb, before 
moving to Los Angeles. Mrs. Fisher's 
daughter, Mrs. Mail in Walter, and 
Mr. Walter, who are now living in 
New York, are expected to visit the 
coast during the coming season. 

* * * 

Golf Club Member 
Fetes Recent Bride 

Miss Avis Nelson entertained Miss 
Vivienne Collins, bride-elect of Mr. 
William Elliot Locke, at a bridge-tea 
held at the California Golf Club. 
Among those present were: Misses 
Vivienne Collins. Lorraine Collins. 
Leontine DeLuca, Doris Meaeham, 
Gladyse Arata, Beatrice Boyen, Helen 
Fitzhugh, Dorothy Kriess, Avis Nel- 
son; Mesdames George DeVineenzi. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Theodore Hollis Roche, John Thomas 
Hayden, Clyde Benton Hudson, J. 
Allyn Thatcher, Thomas-Fraser Mor- 
rison, William Stewart Wobber, Ed- 
ward Wachsmuth Slack, Alvin Thu- 
lander, Ernest Haugh and Walter 
Smith. 

* * * 

Dr. and Mrs. D. H. Craig, formerly 
of San Francisco, now making their 
home in the south, entertained at a 
formal dinner party for fourteen 
guests at the California Golf Club. 
Later, bridge was enjoyed in the main 
lounge. 



17 



FILM FLICKS 

Andre Tourneur, who started her 
career as a film extra, has been given 
an important role in Norma Shearer's 
new vehicle, "The Actress." Miss 
Tourneur was injured in a western 
picture, which removed her from the 
screen for a time, and the new role is 
her "comeback." 

Frank Currier and Edward Con- 
nelly, veterans of the screen, have 
played in the same studio for thirteen 
years. But they are playing in the 
same picture for the first time, in 
"China Bound," Ramon Novarro's 
new vehicle. 

* * * 

Novarro Mans 
Bilge Pumps 

Manning the bilge pumps as a side 
line to acting was the strenuous, but 
rather enjoyable, experience of Ra- 
mon Novarro during the filming of 
"China Bound," his new story, adapt- 
ed from Ben Ames Williams' tale. The 
film is being made on the Pacific 
aboard an old "wind jammer" and 
during a blow the vessel sprung a 
seam. The crew was sent to the 
pumps, old hand-operated affairs, and 
Novarro. who is an athlete, insisted 
on taking a turn. The pumps were 
worked until caulkers could repair the 
seam. 

Joan Crawford, Ernest Torrence 
and a notable cast appeared in the 
new sea romance, which William Nigh 
is directing. 

* * * 

Huge Battle Climax 
To Cossack Picture 

A battle in which more than eight 
hundred horsemen took part was a 
thrilling climax to "shooting" of "The 
Cossacks." starring John Gilbert. 
Russian Cossacks and extras mingled 
in a desperate encounter between 
Turks and Cossacks in a replica of a 
Turkish fort. 

Renee Adoree plays the heroine : 
Ernest Torrence and others of note 
are in the cast of the new Russian 
spectacle, 



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The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Local News of the Week at a Glance 

For Those Away From Home 



January 21, 1928 



The weather continues to be anti-California and aside 
from the "Current Murder and Offense Trials" not much 
appears in the daily press. However, here are a few 
choice tid-bits, that, if added to the adequent news sup- 
plied in the society and club columns, may satisfy your 
craving. 



Through the efforts of Don V. Nicholson, secretary of 
the Traffic Law Enforcement Board, and Supervisor Todd, 
chairman of the traffic committee, §5,000 has been voted 
as an appropriation for new police equipment. Chief of 
Police O'Brien gave his promise that ten new motorcycle 
policemen would be on duty in the residential sections 
within the next ten days. The committee is taking all 
steps necessary to combat with reckless driving. 



The removal of E. B. Smith, as auditor of the First 
National Bank of Oakland, on charges of embezzling 825,- 
000, has brought a woman into the clutches of the law. 
Mrs. Bessie Ralph of Oakland, who has admitted accept- 
ing gifts from Smith, is being held. Also she threatens 
counter suit, against the Fidelity and Casualty Company 
of New York, to regain bonds and securities alleged to 
have been taken by detectives without her permission. 



The "ferry war" between the Golden Gate Ferry Com- 
pany and the Northwestern Pacific Railroad is still at 
words ends. The ferry companies' application for a fran- 
chise to operate a direct line between San Francisco and 
San Rafael will come up on Monday, January 30, before 
the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. In answer to the 
railroad threat to reduce their service, the ferry company 
stated they would put on parlor bus service for every 
train taken off. 



Governor C. C. Young calls illicit liquor a menace to 
society. Although the Governor was a ratifier of the 
amendment and has long been a champion of prohibition, 
in an open statement, he has voiced what seems to be 
the national sentiment. He believes that as the law be- 
comes more capably enforced its effectiveness will also 
improve. He hits severely at bootleggers, as law break- 
ers, and calls their "wares" dangerous. But, he says, 
drinking among the masses is notably decreased. Also the 
removal of traffic dangers and saloon influences in politics, 
are placed to the amendment's favor. 



C. A. Fleming, manager of the industrial department of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, announced that 
121 new industries and eight large distributing concerns 
had been brought to San Francisco during 1927. Chair- 
man L. O. Head, of the industrial committee, announced 
that in addition to this activity the committee would de- 
vote much time to fostering the industries already here. 



The annual Community Chest drive will be under way 
soon, with a larger quota than ever before. The day 
nurseries that care for children of the poor and allow 
the parent to be a wage earner is one of their greatest 
appeals. It will take far more money and more thorough 
work than we have ever seen to do all that is needed in 
this or any city. But the work of the Community Chest 
is unapproachable and deserves all the support and finan- 
cial aid we can give. 



San Francisco has been created hub in big air merger. 
The merger of the Boeing Air Transport, Inc., and Pacific 
Air Transport, Inc., one of the longest commercial air 
routes in the world, has centered here. (See Air Lines.) 



William J. Hayes, former Alameda and Contra Costa 
counties referee in bankruptcy for twelve years, will head 
the legal department of the Board of Trade of San Fran- 
cisco, it was announced by President George Makins. 



Miss Marian Hollis, at one time world's champion golf 
player, has informed Mayor F. W. Swanton of this city 
that her plans have been formed for the beautification of 
the Building's tract, next to the San Lorenzo river, which 
will include an 18-hole golf course. The completion of this 
course will give Santa Cruz two of the finest 18-hole golf 
links in California. 



In the world of arts and literature come three interest- 
ing items. The celebrated Community Players of Pasa- 
dena will be in the city for two weeks, installed at the 
Lurie. Also the Players' Guild has sponsored the appear- 
ance of Dr. Louis I. Newman who lectured at the Com- 
munity theater. Again, the patrons of arts and the thea- 
ter gathered at the Fairmont to observe the Japanese 
theater. The many peculiarities of the oriental stage will 
be under study. 



The vanguard of 400 Kiwanians who are coming to 
Monterey peninsula for the annual trustees and officers 
conference of the California-Nevada district, is beginning 
to arrive. 

William O. Harris, the new district governor, will be 
installed at a banquet in the Hotel Del Monte grill on 
Saturday evening. Among the entertainment features of 
the convention will be a tour of the Seventeen-Mile drive 
and two golf tournaments, one for the ladies Saturday 
and the annual Kiwanis State Golf tournament on Sunday. 

H. W. Follette of the Monterey club is general chairman 
of the Kiwanis committee. 



Following is the tentative program announced for the 
Pacific Coast polo championship period at Del Monte, 
February 17-March 11: 

February 17-24 — Novice event (for 6 goal teams with 
no man over 2 goals). 

February 17-24 — Junior event (no team to exceed 12 
goals). 

February 25-28 — Eight goal team event (no man over 
4 goals) . 

March 1-11 — High goal handicap (no team less than 15 
goals) . 

March 1-11 — Pacific coast open championship (high 
goal fiat event). 

In the meantime there will be games every Wednesday, 
Friday and Sunday afternoon featuring the Del Monte 
team, consisting of the Marquis de Portago, Harry East, 
and Captains Selby McCreery and Henry W. Forrester; 
the San Mateo Blues whose lineup includes Lin Howard, 
Hugh Drury, George Pope Jr., and Kenneth Walsh ; the 
Eleventh Cavalry four of Monterey Presidio and other 
teams as they arrive. 



January 21, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



MINIATURES of YOURSELF 

or members of your family 

make appreciated and valued 

presents. 

Last a Life Time 

<L^3 



149 POWELL STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 




PAUL ELDERS 

239 Posh Sh-eel", San Francisco 




N W CORNER 




PHOTOGRAPHS 
Q>t/jv Forez't 



oret'er 



Down Monterey Way 

Captain Jack Neville today* tenta- 
tively named the California team to 
meet Oregon here January 28-29. The 
team, as announced by Neville, will 
include George Von Elm, Dr. Paul 
Hunter, George Ritchie and Neville 
himself. 

The Oregon team will be captained 
by Dr. 0. W. Willing and will consist 
of H. Chandler Egan, Rudie Wilhelm, 
Frank Dolp and Willing. 

This will be the first time Oregon 
has ever competed with California 
officially in a dual golf meet. It will 
be the most important golf event in 
California this year, with the excep- 
tion of the California Amateur Golf 
Championship at Del Monte in Sep- 
tember. 

Oregon is sending a large delega- 
tion to accompany its four-man team. 
Some two score golfers will charter a 
special car for the trip to Monterey. 
They will meet an equal number of 
California golfers in an inter-state 
handicap tournament, which will pre- 
cede the team matches. This handicap 
event will take place January 26-27 
and will conclude in time for the par- 
ticipants to gallery the team matches. 
Jack Neville, the California captain, 
has written every golf club in Cali- 
fornia, and as a result many of the 
leading golfers of the state are ex- 
pected to be here for the handicap 
event. There will also be a special 
ladies tournament in connection with 
the big week-end. 

There will be trophies for the han- 
dicap and ladies' events. The Oregon 
Golf Association is sending down a 
fine trophy for the California-Oregon 
team match victor. 

On paper the Oregon team is fa- 
vored to take this trophy back home 
with them. All four members of the 
northern aggregation are rated high 
in Pacific Coast golfing circles. Rudie 
Wilhelm is champion both of the Pa- 
cific Northwest and also of Oregon 
State. Egan was twice national ama- 
teur champion and four times west- 
ern amateur champion, as well as 
California amateur champion in 1926. 
The veteran is now superintending 
the improvements at Pebble Beach in 
preparation for the National Amateur 
Championship in 1929. 

California's hopes rest largely on 
Von Elm in spite of the fact that 
George did not display his best wares 
in the recent Los Angeles open, nor, 
for that matter, in any of last year's 
major golf events. If Von Elm does 
his stride, it will make a lot of dif- 
ference in the Oregon-California re- 
sults. Von Elm. Dr. Paul Hunter and 
Jack Neville are all former California 
amateur champions. George Ritchie 
holds the Northern California ama- 
teur title. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

Ban Francisco Phone Kearny 391 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime. Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



typewriters 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas €19 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

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Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

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ANNUAL MEETING 
THE JOSHl A HENDY IRON WORKS 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of 
The Joshua Hendy Iron Works will be held at the 
office of the corporation. No. 200 Pine Street. San 
Francisco. California, on Tuesday, the 14th day of 
February. 192$. at the hour of 10 o'clock a. m. for 
the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve 
for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meeting. 

CHAS. C. GARDNER. 
Office : Secretary. 

200 Pine St.. San Francisco. Cal. 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 21, 1928 



PLEASURE'S WAND Theater Arts Club 



(Continued from page 7) 

Orpheum 

The Orpheum theater management 
announces an entirely new show for 
the week starting Saturday matinee, 
which boasts of many big stage stars, 
including John Steel, American tenor, 
who will be assisted at the piano by 
Eddie Fitzgerald; Nance O'Neil, 
America's emotional actress, appear- 
ing with her own company in a con- 
densed version of her Belasco success. 
"The Lily" ; Jay Brennan, formerly of 
the team of Savoy and Brennan, with 
Stanley Rogers in a humorous skit; 
Ned Wayburn's Promenaders, a lav- 
ish and colorful miniature follies (the 
first time in San Francisco) with a 
large company including John Byam, 
singing and dancing juvenile, Peggy 
Hanlon, prima donna soubrette, Shir- 
ley Richards, a Denver Junior League 
protege and high-kicking specialist, 
Blanche and Elliott, adagio dancers, 
and one dozen or more Ned Wayburn 
pupils and proteges ; Dick Henderson, 
the comedian, known as the funny 
man from England ; Charles Harrison 
and Sylvia Dakin presenting "An 
Operetta for Two" ; and Peggy Mack- 
echnie, the mentally marvelous school 
girl. 

The first run feature photoplay will 
be "Women's Wares," a powerful 
story of a girl's battle against the 
opposite sex, with a cast of players 
including Evelyn Brent, Bert Lytell. 
Larry Kent, Gertrude Short, Richard 
Tucker. Myrtle Stedman and Cissy 
Fitzgerald. * * * 

Golden Gate 

Joe Morris and Flo Campbell are to 
be one of the several featured acts on 
next week's bill at the Golden Gate 
theater. They are to appear in a 
musical farce called "Any Apart- 
ment," supported by May Talbot and 
Phil Silvers. Morris and Campbell are 
enjoyable v a u d e ville entertainers. 
This season they head their own little 
company, presenting a musical farce 
that has a lot of laughs. 

On the same bill will be Jack Brooks 
and Don Ross, "Two Boys and a 
Piano." Brooks is a tenor and Ross a 
baritone. They use their voices prin- 
cipally for harmony singing. 

The feature picture next week is 
"The Lone Eagle," an epic that meets 
the clamorous demand for super air 
thrills created by the nerve and dar- 
ing of Lindbergh, Chamberlin and 
Byrd. Great in theme, gripping in 
drama, the roar of giant planes and 
the soft glow of romance behind the 
battle-torn front — it's the great air 
picture. Barbara Kent and Raymond 
Keane are co-starred, and Lt. Ralph 
Blanchard of the U. S. Air Forces 
wrote the story. 



Eugene O'Neill's tense one-act 
drama, "Where the Cross Was Made" ; 
"Joe," a Hudson valley tragedy by 
Jane Dransfield; Charles Caldwell 
Dobie's "The Cracked Teapot," and 
"Appearances," a comedy by Rex 
Taylor, will comprise the January 
offering of one act plays to be pre- 
sented by the Theater Arts Club on 
Tuesday evening, January 24. 

The production will be staged in the 
playhouse of the Women's City Club, 
465 Post street, under the direction 
of Talma-Zetta Wilbur. 

The dramatic fragment by O'Neill 
was taken by him from his four-act 
play, "Gold." Dobie's vehicle is an 
unusual bit which requires some real 
acting. The performance starts at 
8:15 o'clock. 

The Theater Arts Club, which spe- 
cializes on the interpretation of one- 
act plays, is nearing the beginning of 
its fifth year of dramatic activity 
here. It was founded in May, 1923. 
It is the present plans of the director, 
Talma-Zetta Wilbur, and the club to 
take part in the national little theater 
tournament this summer in New York 
City. 

Community Playhouse 

The celebrated Community Play- 
house of Pasadena is sending its com- 
pany of players on a tour of two 
weeks here and will appear at the 
Lurie theater on special matinee per- 
formances, January 30 and on Feb- 
ruary 2 and 3. These players are well 
known for their excellent work and 
the plays chosen for their work are 
taken from an extensive repertoire. 

Bernard Shaw's "Getting Married," 
and Witter Bynner's "Cake," will each 
be given two performances. 

Gilmore Brown, Ralph Freid, Helen 
Jerome Eddy and other well known 
players are in the cast. 



On Friday, January 20, the screen 
at the Embassy theater will travel 
back twenty-eight or so years in 
showing "The First Auto," a special 
Warner Brothers picture. In the film 
are such incidents as the invention of 
the then termed "devil machine," and 
the first walk taken toward town by 
one of the belles of the day. 

Barney Oldfield, beloved old race 
driver, is the star of the production 
which also includes Patsy Ruth Miller 
and Douglas Gerrard in its cast. The 
film is to be shown the week before 
the San Francisco Auto Show and 
will be given a flying start by a mam- 
moth parade which will show all the 
local "first autos" on march between 
the Ferry building and the City Hall. 



On the Vitaphone, Willie and Eu- 
gene Howard, popular vaudeville and 
revue stars, are the headliners. They 
are remembered for their splendid ap- 
pearance in several musical shows 
here during the past decade. Others 
who are seen and heard on this mar- 
velous new entertainment device are 
Joseph Diskay, Hungarian tenor; 
Venita Gould, star impersonator; and 
Henry Halstead and his orchestra. 



Mrs. Eda Bruna Fallows will read 
"Escape," by John Galsworthy, in the 
Paul Elder Gallery, Tuesday after- 
noon, January 24, at 2:30 o'clock. This 
play of episodic scenes, full of keen, 
truthful observation and witty hu- 
man dialogue, is the most satisfactory 
play on Broadway and may prove to 
be the most popular that Mr. Gals- 
worthy has ever written. Mrs. Fal- 
lows is a well known artist, with sev- 
eral years' stage experience. 



Edith Coburn Noyes of the Boston 
Little Theatre, will read "The Rat 
Trap," by Noel Coward, in the Paul 
Elder Gallery, Thursday afternoon, 
January 26, at 2:30 o'clock. Always 
sophisticated, always brilliant, Noel 
Coward's plays have taken both Lon- 
don and New York by storm. "The 
Rat Trap" again proves Mr. Coward's 
skill as a playwright. 



Sara Bard Field, author of "The 
Pale Woman," and other poems, will 
be tendered an author's afternoon in 
the Paul Elder Gallery, Saturday. 
January 28, at 2:30 o'clock. Mrs. 
Field will speak on "The Nature of 
Poetry," and read a selection of her 
poems. Professor Benjamin H. Leh- 
man, author of "The Lordly Ones," 
will contribute to the program with 
a review of Mrs. Field's poems. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE: The MINERAL DE- 
VELOPMENT COMPANY, location ..f principal place 
of business. San Francisco. Calif. 

Notice is hereby given 'hat at a meeting °^ lne 
Directors, held on the 17th tiay of January. 192s. an 
assessment of one-half cent per share was 
upon the issued capital stuck r.f the corporation pay- 
able immediately, in legal money of the United States, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company. Room 
245. Monadnock Duildinir, San Francisco. Calif. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the 21th day of February. 192* will be 
delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, 
and unless payment is made before, will be sol.) mi 
Tuesday, the 20th day of March. 192s to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with r mm - of adver- 
tising and expense of sale. 

M. J. Seely. Secretary. 

245 Monadnock Building, 

San Francisco. Calif. 



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Vol. CX. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 28, 1928 



No. 5 



THE AUTOMOBILE SHOW 



By E. V. Weller 

Bridge the Bay ! That is the slogan of the Pacific Automobile Show of 1928. Third of the great 
automotive exhibitions of the country, the San Francisco show attracts motor car buyers and dealers 
from all over the West and marks the advent of the automobile New Year. 

The San Francisco show has always been a delight to the eye, not only on account of the brilliance 
of color and attractive decorative displays but because of the gorgeous array of new models — shining 
things of steel that are the magic carpets of modern day transportation — the realization of man's 
dream through the ages. 

The Automobile Show means more than a mere exhibition of things mechanical. It is a visual 
representation of one of the most powerful industries in the world. Four years ago enthusiastic 
prophets of the automotive industry predicted a production of one million five hundred thousand cars 
as the record-breaking production of that year. Last year, one manufacturer alone, Chevrolet, turned 
out more than one million units to meet the ever-increasing demand. This year promises even bigger 
things for the automotive industry. Production will be many times that of 1924 to meet the demand 
of the world today — a world that cannot exist without rapid transportation. 

Out at the Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, under canopies, oriental in design and gorgeous in 
coloring, with the bay bridge as the motif on every side, you will step out of the humdrum of every- 
day life into a play-world of beauty. Through every arch that spans the entrances to the main hall, 
you may glimpse these symbols of the age of transportation. 

Haughty limousines, in colors dull and bright, sporty racing models that tug at the leash and 
long to step away over the California hills, family cars for Pa and Ma and Jack and Jill, and little 
roadsters and big roadsters and plate glass affairs for all weathers, sedans and sedanettes, coupes 
and couplets, broughams and landaulets — all are waiting for their future owners to pick them 
out and drive them away. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 



The New York and Chicago shows have contributed 
their bit to the coast display. The new models which were 
features of the great eastern exhibits you will find at the 
auditorium. And the new cars are better products of 
better manufacturing methods than those of a year ago 
and more. Yet in lines you will find that the ultimate in 
automobile design has almost been reached. The day of 
"something radically different" has passed and the desire 
for the bizarre and unusual in motor cars seems to have 
passed. 



far toward proving to the eastern factory chief that Cali- 
fornia knows no season or weather that does not adapt 
itself to motoring. 

The automobile show is one of the great educational 
factors of the present day. You can learn a great deal 
about mechanics and design and color the while you find 
out a great deal about human nature as well. There will 
be libraries of literature telling the how and the why, the 
bore and the stroke, the wheelbase and the number of 
teeth in the pinion gear, the slowness and the speed in 




The New LaSalle Two- 
Passenger Business Coupe 



The principal motif of the new order of automobiles 
will be found in the many little refinements that add to 
the comfort of the passenger. One concern has tailored 
the seats to conform to the curvature of the body. Riding 
in this car is like riding in your own overstuffed easy 
chair at home. For many years automobile manufacturers 
spent all their time on the mechanical end and failed to 
take note that the comfort of the passenger was an 
element to be considered as well. But things are shaping 
differently now. The straight lines of the cushions have 
given way to more comfortable backs and seats. The 
spring suspensions have been improved so that even a 
corduroy road has no worries for the motorist. And in 
the closed cars this has been carried to the degree that 
you will find a vanity case here and a match safe there 
or a lighter, and a mirror or two and perhaps a fan, and 
these refinements haven't added to the price of the cars 
because they are lower as a whole today than they have 
ever been before. Therefore, the motor car buyer of today 
can be assured of a better bargain than he has ever had 
tempting his pocketbook in the history of motoring. 

The Pacific Automobile Show is now ranked as the 
third in importance in the country. It takes precedence 
over Detroit, the home of the motor car, over Philadelphia 
and Boston and over Baltimore and New Orleans. It is 
largely because San Francisco's automobile row "knows 
how" to put on such an event so that it is productive of 
interest and sales and because it has come to mean so 
much to the motor car owner and prospective buyer. 

Many of the leading automobile officials will be on hand 
for the opening of the San Francisco show. They have 
come to look on California as the district that admits of 
motoring the year round, and that means a great deal to 
a manufacturer who expects to keep the wheels of his 
factory turning every working day in the year. When 
the east is snowed in and motoring is an impossibility, 
Golden State motorists are still enjoying their Sunday 
spins, and the healthy registration that has been piled up 
by the California salesmen for the winter months goas 



high gear and all sorts of things of general interest to 
the man who owns one. Then there will be other libraries 
of literature on accessories, everything that you carry 
along on a trip into the country from the extra can of 
gasoline to the kitchen stove and down in the basement 
there will be the array of power and strength that goes 
with an exhibition of motor trucks and motor buses. For 
down there will be the St. Bernards of motordom, the big 
brothers of the greyhounds and the airedales and the fox 
terriers on the floor above. 

You'll find a different strata of human life out there at 
the show from that which you find on Market street. Mr. 
and Mrs. America and the little Americas are all up to 
date, with a considerable knowledge of things mechanical 
and a thorough belief that the motor car is a more im- 
portant thing in the life of today than parlor, bedroom 
and bath or the home fireplace with the andirons and the 
Maxfield Parrish print that gleams down from the mantel- 
piece. For the motor car is the spirit of movement, of 
progress and the Mr. and Mrs. America of this day and 
age are not going to be classed with the Victorians not 
as long as Irving Berlin writes songs and Mr. Mencken 
evolves new theories of philosophy. 




Kleiber Brougham, Five Passenger, Fully Equipped, ^1950, S. F. 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



The San Francisco^JSl^ws Letter depicts to its readers a number of the 

popular models of motor cars which will he on exhibition at the 

Civic Auditorium, from January 28th to February 4th 




BOWARD AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 
•,ue ami California Street. San Francisco 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

By K. R. Schwartz 

National Automobile Club 




Stutz Speedster 



Those automobile enthusiasts whose chief pleasure lies 
in viewing beautiful models and artistic color-combina- 
tions, are year by year becoming more satisfied. This 
year is no exception. When the Twelfth Annual Pacific 
Automobile Show opens in the San Francisco Exposition 
Auditorium today for an eight-day run, the accumulated 
results of several years of "pointing" toward the beautiful 
in motor cars will be on display. 

The idea of beautifying the automobile is not exactly 
new, but it is young. A few years ago, a number of auto- 
mobile manufacturers whose products were among the 
best, from a mechanical standpoint, began slowly to ab- 
sorb knowledge to the effect that in order to improve 
sales, they must make their cars outstanding in appear- 
ance. Before that, all thoughts were of mechanical per- 
fection, safety, power and similar considerations. Acting 
upon this knowledge, those manufacturers gave consid- 
erable thought to the outward show and to nicety of de- 
tail. One result was a better looking production. Another 
was increase in sales. The public liked the idea. 

And, once in undeniable public favor, the notion grew 



steadily. More and more producers fell into line, until 
the making of beautiful models became a part of the auto- 
mobile industry. 

For many years the Pacific Automobile Show at San 
Francisco has had the reputation of being the most elab- 
orate from an artistic standpoint, and this year neither 
effort nor expense has been spared to retain this enviable 
distinction. 

The most beautiful in motor cars on display at the 
most artistic of auto shows. There you have it. 



Plans for the construction of a coast line highway to 
connect up existing stretches of coast road and form a 
part of the all-shore-line road from British Columbia to 
Mexico, about 1700 miles, are now under way, initiated 
by the National Automobile Club. 

When the connecting links of this all const road are sup- 
plied, it will constitute one of the most spectacular scenic 
highways in the world. 

(Continued on page 8) 



Stutz 5 Passenger Sedan 




Courtesy Benson Motor Co. Van Ness and California, Sun Francisco 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




Courtesy D.vhl Ouismobile Co., 1540 Market Street, San Francisco 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 




The Star Sport Roadster 



The Star Two-Door 
Sedan 





The Durant 75 Brougham 




The Star Four-Door 
Sedan 




The Durant 65 Four-Door 
Sedan 



Courtesy Walter C. Sword 

Van Ness and Sutter, San Francisco 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




Edw.u 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 




Latest Model Duesenberg 
Straight Eight 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

(Continued from page 4) 

This plan is to be accomplished by the formation of 
joint county highway districts and already the first of 
these has been organized with San Francisco, San Mateo 
and Santa Cruz counties participating. The board of di- 
rectors of this district is made up of Supervisors John 
B. Badaracco of San Francisco, F. W. Poole of San Mateo 
and George Rostron of Santa Cruz, and a committee of 
three highway engineers is now studying the matter for 
the purpose of laying out the first link, an all-shore-line 
highway between San Francisco and Santa Cruz. 

At the proper time the matter of developing a joint 
highway district north of San Francisco Bay will be 
taken up. 



Highway engineering with a hose is the latest wrinkle 
in California's road building program, according to Ben 
Blow, field secretary of the National Automobile Club 
who, during a recent trip over the Redwood highway, 
found Division Engineer T. A. Bedford of the California 
Highway Commission busily at work washing away the 
sides which each winter come down on that famous scenic 
highway. 

In this work Bedford has revived California's old time 
hydraulic mining practice, and with a huge Giant nozzle 
and a tremendous water pressure piped down from ad- 
jacent hills, is washing away the thousands of cubic 
yards of earth which have slid down toward the road as 
a result of heavy rains. 



A sluice, built under the highway, carries the earth 
away without interference with traffic, enables one man 
with a Giant to do the work of ten with ordinary equip- 
ment, and reduces the cost of moving the earth from forty 
to sixty cents, the usual price, to approximately eight 
cents per cubic yard. 

So far as is known this method of taking care of slides 
is unique, and the plan is being employed near Garber- 
ville, to the south of Eureka and between Areata and 
Trinidad to the north. 

Latest statistics indicate that in the last fifteen years 
the average life of an automobile has lengthened three 
years. This increase has been mostly due to improve- 
ments in design and materials and better roads. 

Cars scrapped in 1912 and 1913 had been registered 
about five times, while those being scrapped now have 
been listed from seven to eight times. 



While thousands of miles of game fields and fishing 
streams are patrolled day in and day out by officers of 
the Division of Fish and Game in automobiles and on 
foot, one must not overlook the hundreds of miles of 
waterways of California that must be covered by fish 
and game deputies operating in motor-driven water craft. 

The coast line from San Diego to the Oregon boundary 
is patrolled regularly and the bays, rivers and sloughs are 
also carefully watched for violations of the fish and game 
laws by tireless workers who keep many all night vigils 
in their endeavor to conserve the fish and game. 

The power boat "Quinnat," operated by the fish and 



Kissel Model 90 Brougham 
Sedan Special 




Courtesy Lloyd S. Johnson Company 1946 Van Ness Avenue, Sun Francisco 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 







game division, has headquarters on San Francisco Bay. 
This boat patrols the bay and also San Pablo Bay, as well 
as other waters where violators may be found. Illegal 
nets, night and out-of-season duck shooting, and the 
catching of fish out of season and of a size smaller than 
permitted by law, keep the boatmen busy. 

Many a night is spent with the boat running through 
the dark waters, dragging a long heavy rope to which is 
attached a four-pronged drag hook to snag the illegal 
set nets. When nets are found, they are pulled in, and 
search then starts for the offenders. These violators of 
the laws are generally consistent ones, familiar with all 
of the tricks of the trade, and the officers must be able 
to cope with them at all times. 

Down in southern California the diesel-motored "Alba- 
core," largest of the fleet, is operated. One of the im- 
portant duties of the operators is the search for lobster 
traps, which are set before the season opens. As these 
traps are set in places where much kelp is found, it is a 
difficult matter to plow through the heavy beds of this 
seaweed in search of the illegal traps. In addition to this 



work, the "Albacore" also is constantly on patrol, seeking 
illegal fishermen, undersized fish and commercial fisher- 
men operating without licenses. The checking of all fish- 
ing craft to ascertain whether or not the operator has 
the proper permits is a big .job in itself. 

At Monterey Bay, the motorboat "Steelhead" is oper- 
ated in similar work. The "Steelhead," in its cruises about 
the bay, also keeps close tab on cannery operations and 
the fishermen that bring their catches to the many plants 
there. 

The speedboat "Hunter" has headquarters at Vallejo, 
and due to its speed is used almost anywhere in the bay 
section where violators may be found, be they users of 
illegal nets or duck hunters shooting at night from power 
boats, or out of season. 

On the Sacramento and San Joaquin River, the motor- 
boat "Rainbow" is operated. Watching those who would 
take fish out of season, or undersized fish, and the same 
general work of the other boats except that which is 
somewhat restricted as to locality, falls to the lot of the 
"Rainbow." 




»H Bahmsos Co, l.'OO tnue,Sm Fr 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 




Hudson Super Six Coach 
$1485 Delivered, S. F. 



Hudson Super Six 

Standard Sedan 

$1565 Delivered, S. F. 






' rnrr""' 


Ht— 


'It- ■* \.wi¥ 



Esse* 5'w/w Sf'.v Sedan 
$970 Delivered, S. F. 



Courtesy Stanley W. Smith, Inc. 
1625 Fa» A'c5x Avenue, San Francisco 



Essex Super Six Coach 
$898 Delivered, S. F. 



' ^sh 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




Courtesy Edward Lowe Motors Co . Van Xess and Jackson Streets 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 



' * -'■ 






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Oakland Ail-American 

Six Brougham 



Oakland All-American 
Six Sport Cabriolet 



W\ 


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Oakland All-American 
Six Four-Door Sedan 



Oakland All- A nierican 
Six Landau Sedan 



Courtesy Western Motors Co. 

Van Ness and California, San Francisco 















*^^B 




|j 







January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 




Courtesy Locomobile Commits of California, 230 Fulton Street, San Franciseo 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 




New Series Pontiac 
Four-Door Sedan- 



New Scries Pontiac Six 
Sport Roadster 



«ga 








\ 


1 PI 
















New Scries Pontiac 
Sport Cabriolt I 



Courtesy Western Motors Co. 

Van Ness and California, San Francisco 



Chevrolet Coupe 





Chevrolet Imperial Landau 



Courtesy Robert A. Smith, Inc. 
399 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 




Chandler Special Six 

Sportster, $1585 Completely 

Equipped, Delivered, S. F. 



Chandler Big Six 

Metropolitan Sedan, $1845 

Completely Equipped, 

Delivered, S. F. 





Chandler Special Invincible 
Sedan, $1355 Completely 
Equipped, Delivered S. F. 



Chandler Royal Eight 
Sedan, $2385 Completely 

Equipped, Delivered. S. F. 




Courtesy Chandler Sales Corporation 
1700 Van Sets Avenue, San Francisco 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 



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SAN DIEGO 
FRESNO 



OF CALIFORNIA 

SAN FRANCISCO 
LOS ANGELES 
SACRAMENTO 



STOCKTON 
OAKLAND 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 






PEACE AND PLATITUDE 

There is no question that calls for more stupid and 
vacuous writing and speaking than the talk about peace. 
Every fool thinks that he is entitled to an opinion on this 
most difficult and perplexing of questions and every un- 
licked cub is ready to match his opinion against philoso- 
phers and men of affairs. There are able pacifists, but 
they are not as well informed as they should be. The 
wish is father to the thought, as it must be with every- 
one of us for there is nobody, with the least sense of 
responsibility who does not detest the very idea of war. 

But when we come to the practical question of main- 
taining perpetual peace we are met by all sorts of diffi- 
culties. For example, the first suggestion in order to put 
a stop to war is to come to an agreement. But the mere 
fact of agreement does not carry us any further, or very 
little. There was plenty of agreement about Belgium but 
how much did it amount to when the desire to make war 
invaded the minds of men? 

There are, therefore, needs for what is known as "pre- 
paredness." But, as Secretary Davis well points out, 
"there are two kinds of preparedness. The first and best 
known is for aggressive war and is characterized by a 
large regular army, constantly under arms, and second 
by the ability to mobilize the entire nation in arms within 
the period of a few days. The second kind is "prepared- 
ness for defense." 

This last is the American conception of preparedness. 
We have never aimed at other than peaceful development, 
but to be without peace preparedness is the extreme of 
folly. 



THE POLICY OF LATIN ENVOYS 

So far the Pan-American Congress is a sort of love 
feast at which nothing definite is said and where it is not 
the intention of the participants that anything important 
or definite shall be said. 

The United States will be satisfied if on this hemis- 
phere there can be built up an organization which can 
work something like the League of Nations and which 
will include all the nations of this continent. To do that 
time must elapse, for Canada is taking no part in this 
affair and the British, French and Danish West Indies 
arc. equally, not represented. In such a state of affairs 
it is plain that there is as yet no organization which can 
speak for this continent in any full and sufficient way. 

Again, the United States would be better satisfied if 
those American nations which have taken part in the 
councils of the League of Nations would withdraw there- 
from. It is very plain that there cannot be any satisfac- 
tory Pan-American Union as long as American powers 
are involved in European affairs, as must be the case as 
long as they remain members of the League. But there 
is no great desire to withdraw from the League, for. in 
spite of some drawbacks, there is a certain prestige at- 
tached to a League membership. 

There is no doubt that, to the small republics of Spanish 
origin, there is grave doubt as to the attitude of the 
United States and fear of our imperialistic control. As 
long as this lasts there is no possibility of a successful 
Pan-American Union. 



ARMY HOUSING 

The report on the housing of men and officers in the 
United States army must create a feeling of profound 
disgust throughout the land. It is nothing short of a 
scandal that men whose lives are placed at the service 
of the country should receive such treatment at the hands 
of the government. The report is unquestionably sound 
and reliable, for it is supported by photographs of the 
actual buildings occupied by the officers and men of the 
service. 

Structures which were built hurriedly and in "jerry" 
fashion, for the period of the war, when there was great 
need of haste and the operations of contractors were not 
watched with that degree of care which was ordinary 
business precaution, are still used by troops, although 
these structures are practically in ruins. Governmental 
funds have not been forthcoming to keep them in decent 
repair. The result is that men of our army live under 
conditions, in many instances, which would ordinarily 
bring about local governmental interference. Laborers 
in our cities would not be allowed to live under some of 
the conditions imposed by the war department upon 
soldiers. 

All this is contrary to the wishes and feelings of the 
people of the United States. The contract made with men 
enlisting and with officers taking commissions does not 
contemplate any such condition. 

Reform in the present state of affairs is essential. The 
quicker that is carried out the better, otherwise there is 
little doubt but that the service will suffer. 



A SIGNIFICANT MERGER 

The United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., have 
brought about a consolidation of contractors, which 
makes the largest engineering and construction firm in 
this country and, almost certainly, in the world, for there 
is no such alignment and organization of construction 
forces anywhere as in this country. 

Four companies which are outstanding in the general 
engineering field, both in the matter of construction and 
of public utilities, have thus pooled their efforts- to create 
the new organization known as the United Engineers and 
Constructors, Inc. 

The effect upon construction engineering activity will 
be tremendous. Already the new corporation is taking in 
hand jobs to the amount of $100,000,000. The possibili- 
ties of economy and efficiency in such a marshalling of 
assets and talent are almost beyond calculation. 

The field is practically unlimited. Already the estab- 
lishment of offices at New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, 
Los Angeles. Newark, Pittsburgh and Buenos Aires, as 
well as Rio de Janeiro, shows the scope of the organiza- 
tion. It is not only national but aims at the control of the 
great engineering enterprises of the entire hemisphere. 

It must be noted that with a very marked acuteness 
that the new company has placed itself in a strategic posi- 
tion to deal with the vast amount of construction which 
will, in the very near future be required in South America. 
There can be no question of the importance of this or- 
ganization and the vast influence which it may exert upon 
international affairs. 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Mardi Gras 

Now comes the Mardi Gras! 

Society, pluming itself in magnifi- 
cent array, has been planning, talk- 
ing, working and preparing for this 
brilliant event during the past few 
weeks. 

The Children's Hospital will, as 
usual, be the beneficiary. 

This year the appeal will be more 
universal, for the price of tickets will 
be much less, just one-half really, and 
the Civic Auditorium has been select- 
ed because of the enormous crowds 
anticipated. 

"Wings" is the name of the pageant 
with legendary and timely interpreta- 
tions. 

There will be an elaborate prologue 
and a picturesque pageant, different 
entirely from any that has preceded 
this year's effort. Beautiful misses, 
debutantes, stalwart young men, ma- 
trons and cavalier attendants will be 
participants. 

The sky itself will be a motif in 
decoration and pageantry. 

As usual, the Mardi Gras grand ball 
will take place on Shrove Tuesday, 
which will be on February 21, so the 
calendar tells us, for Lent, this year, 
begins on February 22, Washington's 
birthday. * * * 

High Flyers 

Many high flyers in "Wings" who 
will take part in the gorgeous pag- 
eant have already been assigned 
their roles. Theodore Kosloff is di- 
recting the cast. 

In addition to the society dancing 
there will be any number of spectacu- 
lar ballets in which the professional 
stars will be features of the spectacu- 
lar entertainment. Rehearsals have 
been in full swing for quite some time 
and perfection of detail is pledged by 
experts directing the affair. 
* * * 

Committee Leaders 

Mrs. Laurance I. Scott heads the 
auxiliary under whose supervision the 
Mardi Gras will be presented. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway. Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



Mrs. Lathan McMullin and Mrs. 
Henry Kiersted have charge of the 
boxes. The society contingency from 
San Francisco, the Bay cities and 
from the peninsula smart set, are co- 
operating, as they always do, in a 
concerted effort to bring success to 
the charity ball. 

* * * 
Box-Holders 

Many have already engaged boxes 
for the ball, including Doctors and 
Mesdames Henry Kiersted, Chester 
Woolsey, T. E. Bailey; Mesdames Ir- 
win Crocker, Ira Pierce, William Mat- 
son, Miss Louise Boyd. 

Former United States Senator- 
James D. Phelan has taken a box and 
will entertain many of his friends, as 
he always does. 

Prominent among those who have 
boxes are Messrs. and Mesdames: 
Richard McCreery, Robert B. Hender- 
son, Walter Martin, Waldo Coleman, 
F. W. Bradley, George Bowles, An- 
drew Welch, Alfred Tubbs, George 
Volkmann, Robert Oxnard, George B. 
Robbins, George Newhall, Peter Mc- 
Bean, Julian Thorne, Frank Noyes, 
Sidney Ehrmann, Milton Esberg, 
Herbert Fleishhacker, Robert Bolton, 
Henry Foster Dutton, William 
Thomas, Harry Poett, Stewart Low- 
ery, Joseph D. Grant, George Pope, 
Samuel Knight, John Drum, Selah 
Chamberlain, William Roth, Richard 
Hanna, Walter Sullivan, Alexander 
Hamilton. 

Mrs. John Drum of the Fairmont 
Hotel, accompanied by Countess 
Wurmbrand, left on Thursday for a 
visit to the southland, stopping en 
route at Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 
and Hollywood before reaching Coro- 
nado. They will be joined by a party 
of friends. 

* * * 

Sir Thomas and Lady Hesketh, 
Mrs. Chauncy Goodrich, Mrs. Silas 
Palmer and a few friends lunched in- 
formally at the Fairmont Hotel on 
Thursday. 

* * * 

Luncheon Parties 

Mrs. Robert Oxnard was hostess to 
some friends at luncheon at the St. 
Francis Hotel this past week. 

Mrs. George Hearst, young wife of 
the San Francisco publisher, wore a 
smart frock of beige tweed ensemble 



at a luncheon in the St. Francis Hotel 
Monday. Her coat was of three quar- 
ters length. She wore a hat to 
match. 

Mrs. Jerd Sullivan, one of the most 
popular young matrons of the fash- 
ionable set, wore a tweed ensemble, 
with a three-quarter length coat and 
a felt hat matching the tones of her 
dress. 



Society Lunches on 
Mondays in Town 

It has long been the custom for 
society to lunch in town on Monday, 
coteries of the peninsula, Piedmont 
and San Francisco families, gathering 
very frequetly in the fable room of 
the St. Francis Hotel. 

Mrs. Harry Scott, Mrs. Richard 
Heiman, Mrs. Robert Miller, Mrs. 
Ross Ambler Curran, Mrs. Howard 
Spreckles and Mrs. Kenneth Mont- 
eagle lunched in town at the St. Fran- 
cis last week. 

* * * 

Bridge Luncheon 

Mrs. Frank A. Austin, who makes 
her home at the Hotel Whitcomb, en- 
tertained with a luncheon and bridge 
last week complimenting Mrs. George 
Brent and Mrs. George E. Sipe, both 
of Fort Winfield Scott. 

Seated at the luncheon table were: 
Mesdames George Brune, Virginia 
Burnett, Louis Perkins, C. L. Emer- 
son, Mary C. Ackley, Glenn C. Hitt 
and A. P. Entenza. 



Miss Deering Feted 

Miss Francesca Deering, one of the 
greatest favorites in society, has been 
feted on many occasions recently. 
Miss Deering was in a luncheon party 
this past week at the St. Francis 
Hotel. Mrs. Bruce Dohrmann and 
Miss Nancy Davis being with Miss 
Deering. 

(Continued on page 31) 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powril and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 




Cap and Bells 
Give Card Party 

Cap and Bells members digressing 
for a time from their study in art, 
literature and dramatics, gave a bril- 
liant play-day in the gold ballroom of 
the Fairmont Hotel last Thursday. 

Mrs. John Sylvester Pinney, presi- 
dent of Cap and Bells, and Mrs. Wil- 
liam McKay, chairman of the bridge 
section of the club, arranged the de- 
lightful affair. There were more than 
400 present and each table was espe- 
cially favored by hostesses. 

The pretty card tables were ar- 
ranged the entire length of the beau- 
tiful ballroom of the Fairmont, long 
mirrors reflecting the handsome 
gowns of the ladies. 

Mrs. McKay was assisted in wel- 
coming guests and members by a 
large committee comprising Mes- 
dames A. E. Kroenke, J. Emmet Hay- 
den, Henry Hastings, Angelo Rossi, 
A. G. Stoll, Carl M. Gardner, William 
Edwards, Dr. Blanche Culver, Walter 
Scott Gray, E. J. Florentine, Joseph 
R. O'Donnell, Alexander Woodside, 
Norman McKellar, Frank Robb, Ar- 
thur M. DeVall, John Hepburn. 

Tea was served following the bridge 
hour and announcements of intense 
interest were made by the president, 
Mrs. J. S. Pinney. 

* * * 
Hotel Women's Club 

The San Francisco Hotel Women's 
Club, of which Mrs. John Zeeman is 
president, gave a most charming 
bridge tea at the Clift Hotel on Tues- 
day where the members entertained 
many prominent women as their 
guests. 

* * * 

Sorosis Club 

The Sorosis Club of which Mrs. Lil- 
lian Birmingham is the president held 
its regular meeting last Monday in 
the attractive clubrooms on Sutter 
street where, for many years, Sorosis 
has owned its own reception rooms, 
auditorium and stage equipments. 



Park Lane Maisonnettes 

5 to 8 Rooms with 2 to 5 Baths 

Magnificent view. Every service, from 
doorman to valet. Furnished or un- 
furnished. Garage. Class A steel 
frame building. 

"Mouonnalte" has the elegance ol a mansion wilk 
all conveniences cf an apartment house. 

PARK LANE APARTMENTS 

1100 Saeramrnto Street 
Diagonally Aero** from Hotel Fairmont 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 

Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

500 Rooms 

Tariff: From S4 per day 



Mrs. Birmingham made a delightful 
speech introducing the guest of honor, 
Nancy Buckley, California poet, who 
read a number of her poems. Some 
were from "Cameos" and other poems 
were from her other published books, 
"Wings of Youth," "Laughter and 
Longing." She was asked to read, 
also, her prize poem, "Alien," which 
was chosen in the Blanden contest 
when many poets from various parts 
of the state competed for honors. 

A delightful feature of the Sorosis 
Club meeting was a group of songs 
sung by Madeline O'Brien with Miss 
Elvira Gomez Zink at the piano. The 
words of the songs were from the pen 
of Nancy Buckley. 

Piano solos were played by Frederic 
Dixon. A large audience greeted the 
young artists during the tea hour 
which followed this splendid program. 

* * * 

Miss Nancy Buckley and Miss 
Mary, her sister, entertained at two 
small teas during the week. One was 
given at their home on Fell street, 
and the second was in the Laurel 
Court of the Fairmont Hotel. 
* * * 

Santa Cruz Art 

The first state-wide art exhibit is 
announced by the Santa Cruz Arts 
League which will be held at the 
Santa Cruz hotel, Casa del Rey. in the 
Bayview ballroom and sun parlors 
from February 1 to 15 inclusive. 

* * * 

Junior Presidents 
Form a Council 

Mrs. Walter R. Jones, chairman of 
the Junior Auxiliary of the City and 
County Federation has discovered the 
real way in which to interest young 
girls. 



She works with them, consults 
them, rather than constantly advising 
them. She finds that their knowledge 
of things is worthy of consideration^ 
and so successfully does her splendid 
plan evolve into something superla- 
tively good that chairmen the state 
over are wondering why they did not 
think of it long ago. 

Charming and intellectual herself, 
Mrs. Jones takes it for granted that 
those with whom she deals have the 
same qualifications. She never talks 
down to her proteges, she talks with 
them, listening with keen interest to 
what the girls may suggest. It sort 
of balances things all around and 
makes for harmony and genuine 
work, besides. 



Club Heads 
Organizing 

A Junior Presidents' Council was 
organized at a tea given by Mrs. Wal- 
ter R. Jones at the Women's Athletic 
Club. Mrs. J. E. Butterfield, presi- 
dent of the City and County Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs and past state 
chairman of junior auxiliaries, was 
honor guest. Mrs. Jones is chairman 
of junior auxiliaries for the local fed- 
eration. Junior club officers present 
were : 

Miss Edith Trickier, president 
Allied Arts Juniors; Miss Betty 
Chambers, president California Club 
Juniors; Miss Dorothy Ton, vice- 
president Council of Jewish Juniors; 
Miss Miriam Linnell, president Cor- 
ona Club Juniors; Miss Gertrude 
Fleming, president Siena Club; Miss 
Edna Ruth Cunningham, president To 
Kalon Juniors ; Miss Beda Berg, presi- 
dent Utile Dulci Juniors; Miss Clelia 
Cipelli. president Vittoria Colonna 
Juniors ; Miss Evelyn de Marta, presi- 
dent Young Writers' Round Table. 
(Continued on page 32) 



6 you pay no more j£^ 



C 




"IW\foice o/a Thousa»d Gardens' 
224-22fi Grant Ave.. Sutter 6200 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 




LEISURE'S WW 




OBEY NO WAND BU7 PLEASURE'S 

Tom Moone- 




Let's Go to 
A Good Show! 

Why not? 

There are good shows in town. So, 
step out and go to the theaters. 
You'll be mighty glad that you did. 

Many times, in these columns, I 
have advocated the theater as a, 
panacea for whatever may be 
troubling you. But I go still further 
in this philosophy and maintain that 
theaters are the real cheer foods. 
They also stimulate! 

If you select the right play— you'll 
agree with me that the treatment is 
a success. Besides, you'll feel more 
like working afterwards. 

San Francisco, keeping apace with 
the times, offers whatever kind of 
amusement that best pleases you. 

Make your choice. 

In the meantime we recommend 

the: 

* * * 

Lurie 

Lionel Barrymore, in his famous 
characterization of "Tito" in "Laugh, 
Clown, Laugh," will be at the Lurie 
theater for this week in his final ap- 
pearances in this present engagement. 

If you haven't already seen this 
great actor in this David Belasco-Tom 
Cushing production, you have a treat 
in store. 

Don't miss this play by any means. 

In his characterization of the 
clown who sacrifices everything he 
cherishes in order to bring happiness 
to his dearly loved ward, Lionel Bar- 
rymore is superb. 

His acting soars to histrionic 
heights and grips one by its head-and- 
heart appeal in a powerful and com- 
pelling way. 

Lolita Lee plays the part of the 
girl with whom both the clown and 
a wealthy suitor are in love. She is 
admirable in the characterization and 
true to her lines in a manner so naive 
and fascinating that one cherishes 
the memory of her. 

Edward Leiter plays the gentleman 
role of one who laughs and laughs 
without cause or direction. He is an 
actor whose mettle whets the ability 
of others in the cast. Harry Shannon, 
Julia Blanc, Bruce Payne, Ann Lock- 
hart and Hardee Kirkland are in the 
supporting cast with the Great Bar- 
rymore. 



By Josephine Young 

There is always a popular matinee 
on Wednesday, in addition to the reg- 
ular Saturday matinee. 



Curran 

"Broadway," or, as it is called, the 
Jed Harris Night Club classic, still 
draws crowds to the Curran theater 
where the story of cafe life unfolds, 
with intimate views behind the 
scenes. 

The play is different from what we 
usually see on the stage in the way 
of entertainment. The novelty, itself, 
aside from its dramatic worth, is 
worth attention. 

I found "Broadway" decidedly 
adrift from anything ever shown on 
Geary street, and it was so interesting 
I did not want any intermissions. You 
know that feeling when you get so 
excited that you can't wait for the 
next act. Well, that's the way we felt 
about "Broadway." 

The story deals with night club life 
in all its ramifications. Players, boot- 
leggers, hijackers, detectives and a 
Greek restaurant owner supply the 
threads woven through a rough-ap- 
pearing fabric, with quaint and droll 
dialogue running along with the 
theme. 

Hobart Cavanaugh, Maurice Black, 
Hooper Atchley, Dee Loretta, Louis 
Tanno, Morris Haines, Richard Cra- 
mer, Doris Kemper are some of the 
principals. Madge Nutter, Claire 
Nolte and Nellie Leach (with the at- 
tractive figure), are other players in 
this production. 

"Broadway" has a limited engage- 
ment at the Curran theater. Matinees 
are on Wednesdays and Saturdays. 



Community Players 

The Pasadena Community Players 
will appear at the Lurie theater in 
four special matinee performances, 
the first on Monday, January 30, when 
the George Bernard Shaw play : "Get- 
ting Married," will be given. 

Gilmor Brown, celebrated actor, 
known for his fine characterizations, 
will take the role of the bishop, in the 
drama. Brown will be supported by 
an excellent cast of the Pasadena 
Community Players Company, with 
(Continued on page 26) 



Amusements 

Next Week 
ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"New Brooms," Henry Duffy players. 

Columbia, Eddy nr. Powell 

Marx Brothers, in "The Coeoanuts." 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

Jed Harris presents "Broadway," a Night Club 
Classic. 

Lurie, Geary nr. Mason 

Lionel Barrymore, final week in "Laugh, 
Clown, Laugh." Dramatic triumph. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"Nightstick," modern melodrama. Henry Duffy 
players. 

Community Play House, 
Sutter nr. Mason Sts. 

"Bocksgesang" or "The Goat Song." January 
30. Reginald Travers, director. Performances 
now, "Aren't We All?" 

VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

AI Trahan and Vesta Wallace — American 
actors. Jack Redmond, golf professional, pre- 
sents: "A Golf Lesson." Nance O'Neil, head- 
liner. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Eddie Leonard, Minstrel. Lester Crawford. 
Helen Broderick. "The Girl from Rio" on the 
screen. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 

ON THE SCREEN 

Downtown 

California, Market St. at 4th 

Emil Jannings in "The Last Command." 

Embassy, Market nr. Seventh 

Home of the Vitaphone. Rin Tin Tin in per- 
son. "Dog of the Regiment." 

Granada, Market at Jones 

"Lamp Shade Idea" Fanchon and Marco stage 
acts: "Beau Sahreur," screen: Owen Sweeten, 
orchestra leader and master of ceremonies. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th 

Gloria Swanson in "Sadie Thompson" — Lionel 
Barrymore. Followed by Douglas Fairbanks in 
"The Gaucho." 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

Gae Foster, stage numbers: "Sweet Sixteen." 
Norma Shearer, "The Latest from Paris." 
Rube Wolf, musical director, stage presenta- 
tions. 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

THE FIRING LINE 

By Lloyd Farrington Wilson 



21 



CUBA to CAL— Hello— Good-bye! 



Cal went to Havana and back. God reigns and the 
Government still lives. Oh say, can you see? 

$ $ $ $ + 4 s 

Once there was a Scotchman who was never weighed 
because he refused to tip the scales. 

If all the boarders in the world were seated side by side 
they would reach across the table. 

The fellow who thought finger nails were a substitute 
for thumb tacks has been put away. 

One of the strictest of modern conventions decrees that 
when a youth and a maid are sitting out a quiet smoke 
the youth at least should furnish the cigarette lighter. 



M. Lelong, French fashion czar, says the well-dressed 
woman should consult the barometer and weather report 
before selecting her gown and her rouge. Of course the 
chivalrous Frenchman did not infer that she might seek 
the mirror for a weathered map. 

To keep my phone from everlastingly ringing I'll accept 
the next leap-year proposition received. And the lucky 
young lady will receive as a wedding present wash tub, 
scrub board and a mirror. Then she can support us or 
watch herself starve. 

During one phase of the wedding ceremony between 

the Hindu maharajah versus the American girl, they are 

to hand each other cocoanuts. What oriental foresight 

and justice — that each shall be fully prepared for the 

first onslaught. 

****** 

The former kaiser has asked to be allowed to travel, 
Berlin reports. Probably he'd use a horse and buggy, as 
he likes to take his time jogging along and enjoying the 
scenery. Why, once he took four years going part way 
from Berlin to Paris. 

Mr. William Hohenzollern, formerly the war lord of 
Germany, has decided that Dutch theatricals are so bad 
that he will build a theater in Doom and go into the busi- 
ness himself. Wait until William puts on his first show 
and reads what the dramatic critics say about him. Then 
he will wish the Allied troops had caught him before he 

got to neutral soil. 

* * * 

A prominent officer of the United States Army. who. 
for obvious reasons, does not wisli his name used, said 
yesterday, when interviewed by a reporter in Washing- 
ton, that, while he did not wish to make a statement with- 
out the permission of the General Staff, the Army War 
College, the Secretary. Assistant Secretary, and the As- 
sistant's Assistant Secretary of War. and full approval 
of the President, still he would not mind savin? that he 
rather thought it was a nice day. Some of the afternoon 
papers in Washington are hinting that a court-martial 
may be ordered. 



They tell me Cal came home singing that popular little 
ballad, "Me and Machado." 

Also: When lifting a cocktail always address the host 
with: "Here's looking at you. It may be the last time 
for me." 

H« sjc s(c }|e s}: 4= 

Even the lexicographer has conceded woman's superior 
conversational powers, for he refers to one's native lan- 
guage as the mother tongue. 



Through action of the American commander, Nicarag- 
uan belles have been requested not to marry United 
States Marines. Yet some say that Uncle Sam is not 
working for peace in Nicaragua. 

And sometime in the near future there shall arise a 
vice-president who will become famous, not for his topsy 
turvy pipe, but for his remark that "What this country 
needs is a good 5c cup of coffee." 

"U. S. War Experts to Perfect Army on Wheels." — 
Headline. When that is achieved we will read every line 
of Captain Bob Casey's motorized martial diary, "The 
Cannoneers Have Oily Gears." 



Pat Frayne over at the Call says there will be another 
edition of the Dempsey-Tunney affair. If this thing is 
going to be like the Annual Follies, I think Charlie Pyle 
should get busy and send the boys on a national vaude- 
ville tour. New York or Chicago is a long way to go to 

see a third-run act. 

****** 

Those people who. being aware of the boisterous Sen- 
ator Heflin's senatorial activities, have decided that Ala- 
bama is noted for the birth and export of nit-wits, can 
now be at peace with that fair state. Ruth Elder is 
"Alabama bo'n." One look at Ruth and I am ready to 
forgive Alabama anything. 



The hypothetical questions asked candidates for posi- 
tions as dry snoopers seem to have been a trifle too hard. 
I hereby submit some to take the place of those asked. 
Assuming you are a dry snooper in disguise and are asked 
to dinner. Just before the dinner a flock of cocktails rush 
in. (1) Should you accept a cocktail, drink it, and say. 
•'Well. Bill, that's certainly good stuff," and sit quietly 
down to dinner? (2) Or ought you to overturn the table, 
shoot out the lights, and escape with the evidence? (3) 
If only Bill, his wife, the twins, and Aunt Susan are pres- 
ent, should you bring out the machine gun or send for 
the nearest U. S. Marshal with a posse of two hundred 
deputies? (4) Should the shaker in which the cocktails 
were mixed be beaten into submission, or should you 
hand it to Bill and ask him to mix up another dose? 



This line is dedicated to "Life, Liberty and the Right 
to Combat Pyhorrea." My ambition is to make enough 
money to patronize our advertisers: and, although I have 
heard of prohibition. I do not believe Listerine should be 
the national beverage. Selah!!! 



22 




On the Air 
By C. J. Penningion 



The successful demonstration of 
television by the Radio Corporation 
of America and the General Electric 
Company at Schenectady brings the 
realization of this much-talked of 
feature nearer reality, and only a 
matter of time intervenes in its adap- 
tation as a necessity to every home 
radio. 

When it does become part of radio 
reception, broadcasting will have 
changed considerably. 

The method of putting on a radio 
program today will never satisfy the 
audience of tomorrow, which will be 
enabled through television, to sit be- 
fore the fireplace and enjoy an entire 
vaudeville bill, perhaps a drama, cer- 
tainly the great operas. 

Some fear television may develop 
so greatly as to worry theatrical mag- 
nates, who will have nothing more to 
offer on their stages than can be had 
in one's own home. Perhaps not as 
much, because of the great sums 
which can be expended in talent for a 
single broadcast because of the vast 
audience which it reaches. This, how- 
ever, is improbable, because of the 
love of the American public for mass 
gathering — because of its general 
restlessness and its penchant for ac- 
tivity. There will always be people 
who will not stay at home but must 
seek amusement hither and yon. 

Television will cause many changes 
in talent available for broadcasting. 
Where only the art is broadcast now, 
television will bring the personage 
into being and appearance will be as 
great a factor in radio as it is on the 
stage. Many artists who are unable 
to appear on the stage because of 
physical drawbacks or because they 
lack physical personality are success- 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 

ful on radio where only their talents 
register. 

Television will make possible the 
broadcasting of humor in the form of 
monologues and the like which re- 
quire physical personality to be ef- 
fective and are not acceptable radio 
entertainment today. 

* * * 
Sunday, January 29 

The Golden Strand group, the new- 
ly inaugurated program of the Ameri- 
can Wire Fabrics, will be offered on 
the Pacific Coast Network beginning 
at 1 o'clock. Starting at 3 o'clock and 
continuing for two hours the Pacific 
Coast Network will send forth an- 
other concert program. 

The Standard Oil symphony orches- 
tra, under the direction of Nathan 
Abas, will be presented over the coast 
network from 6:30 to 7:30 o'clock. 



January 28, 1928 



Monday, January 30 

NBC radio fans who tune in tonight 
in the hour of 8 to 9 will hear another 
program by the Rudy Seiger Shell 
Symphonists. 

This popular group of talented mu- 
sicians is under the direction of Rudy 
Seiger, who announces each number. 

Including selections from some of 
the best American and European 
musical comedies and light operas, 
the Los Angeles Studio Hour goes on 
the air from 10 to 11 o'clock over the 
Pacific Coast Network. 



Tuesday, January 31 

The Eveready Salon Orchestra, un- 
der the direction of Max Dolin will 
offer another half hour program this 
evening from 8 to 8:30. 

The 14th auction bridge game of 
the weekly series will be broadcast to- 
night from 8 :30 to 9 o'clock. 

Another O'Henry story will feature 
the Retold Tale radio drama period on 
the air from 9 to 9:30 tonight over 
the NBC network. The drama is en- 
titled "Pimiento." The NBC Round- 
ers will fill the radio lanes of the Pa- 
cific Coast Network with a half hour 
of pleasing harmony tonight from 
9:30 to 10. 

* * * 

Wednesday, February 1 

The Musical Fruit Cocktail dinner 
program over the NBC from 6:30 to 
7 o'clock this evening brings the Sun- 
kist Melodists with a selection of 
semi-classics and the better type of 
popular numbers. 

The change in the American ways 



of entertainment is the central idea 
of "American Contrasts," which will 
be presented over the NBC network 
tonight from 9 to 10 o'clock by the 

Vagabonds. 

* * * 

Thursday, February 2 

The weekly program sponsored by 
Dodge Brothers, Inc., goes on the air 
over the NBC network from 9 to 9:30. 

From 9 :30 to 10 o'clock, another of 
the quaint and imaginative "Moon 
Magic" programs will be offered. 

* * * 

Friday, February 3 

Once again that weekly parade of 
the Wrigley Spearmen will be heard 
as they pass in review before the 
microphone of the NBC Coast Net- 
work tonight from 8 to 9 o'clock. 

Another sparkling "White Rock" 
program, the third of the weekly ser- 
ies, will be offered NBC listeners to- 
night in the half hour beginning at 
9:30 o'clock. Memory Lane, featuring 
another social institution of the small 
town of twenty years ago will be re- 
viewed tonight over the NBC net- 
work from 9:30 to 10, when the Mem- 
ory Lane program presents "A Box 

Social." 

* * * 

Saturday, February 4 

The second of the new RCA hours 
will be broadcast over the NBC to- 
night from 8 to 9 o'clock. 

From 9 to 10, the Philco Hour. 

At 10 p. m. will start a two hour 
musical rjrogram featuring the Tro- 
caderans. This program has offered 
many surprises and now a most wel- 
come one comes in the form of an an- 
nouncement. Vinton La Ferrera, vio- 
linist, has been engaged as director of 
the Trocaderans. This program will 
continue until 12 midnight. 



Programs for Next Week 

KFRC— DON LEE 
SAN FRANCISCO — 154 
Sunday. January 29 

10 :00 to 12 :00 noon — Home. Sweet Home Concert. 
12 noon to 1:15 p. m. — Church service. 
1:15 to 3:15 p. m— S & W Recital. 
3:15 to 4:15 p. m. — KFRC dance orchestra. 
1:15 to 5:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

5 :00 to 6 :00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Talk. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins concert orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

8:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Monday, January 30 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m. — Georgia O. George. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 

11 :00 to 11 :30 a. m. — Household hints. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 

4 :00 to 4 :30 p. m. — Educational talk. 

4 :30 to 5 :00 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:00 to 5:15 p. m. — News items. 
5:15 to 5:45 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

5 :45 to 6 :20 p. m. — Joe Mendel and Pep Band. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen, police reports. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Sports talk 



K^ 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



23 



7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — The Hawaiians. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Blue Monday Jamboree. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KFRC Dance Orchestra. 

Tuesday, January 31 

1 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m.— Georgia O. George. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Studio program. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert. 



:00 to 4:30 
4:30 to 5:15 p. 
5:15 to 5:30 p. 
5:30 to 6:10 p. 
6:10 to 6:25 p. 
6:25 to 6:30 p. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. 
8:00 to 9:00 p 
9:00 to 10:00 j 
10:00 to 12:00 



p. m 



Educational talk. 
-Organ recital. 
-News items. 
-Mac and his gang. 
-With stamp collectors. 
Stage and screen. 
Sports talk. 
-Haas program. 
— Concert orchestra. 
-Dance orchestra. 



"Wednesday. February 1 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m.— Georgia O. George. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Household hints. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — -Amateur Auditions. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. —Sherman, Clay concert. 

4:00 to 4:30 p. m. — Educational talk. 

4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Maxwell House Coffee program. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m.- — Dance program. 

Thursday, February 2 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

9 :00 to 9 :30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 

9:30 to 10:00 a. m.— Charles Hamp, 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 

11 :00 to 11 :30 a. m.— Studio program. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Sherman. Clav program. 

4:00 to 4:30 p. m. — California State Library talk. 

4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m.— News items. 

5:30 to 6:10 p. m. — Mac and his Gang, 

6:10 to 6:20 p. m— Beauty talk. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage, Screen, Police reports. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Cecilians concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

M:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Mona Motor Oil Co. 

9:00 to 9:45 p. m.— KFRC Movie Club. 

9:45 to 10:00 p. m.- — Airplane Flying Lesson. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

Friday, February 3 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m.— Musical program. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m.— Georgia O. George. 

9:30 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Hints to home-makers. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 

4:00 to 4:30 p. m. — Student hour. 

4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:16 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5 :30 to 6 :20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6 :20 to 6 :80 p. m. — Stage nnd screen. 
ii :30 to 7 :00 p. m.— The Cecilians. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Charles Hamp. 

8:00 to 9:00 p, m. — Skyway journeys 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Concert orchestra. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m — Dance orchestra. 
Saturday, February 4 
7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Seal Rock program. 

5 :00 to 9:00 a. m.— Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m.— Shopping bi 

11 100 to 11 :45 a. m. — Amateur tryOUtS. 

11:1" to 12:00 noon — Announcements of Sunday 

church sermons. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert. 
4:00 to i :80 p. m. Educational talk. 
4:80 to 6:16 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:16 to 6:80 p. m.— New? [(ems. 
5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
P:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and BCl 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 
8:00 to 9:110 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 t<> 12:00 p, m. — Dance program. 

KPO— HALE RROTHFRS AND THK CHRONICLE 

SAN FRANCISCO— 122 
Sundayi .January 29 

0:46 to 10:46 a. m. -Church services. 

p, m, - National Broadcast inc Company. 
3:00 to 4:00 p, m.— National Broadcasting Co. 
4:00 to 6:80 p. m. Mixed Quartet. 
5:80 to 7:80 p. m. -National Broadcasting Company. 
7:30 to S:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

10:00 p. Da. — Fairmont Hotel concert orches- 
tra. 
Monday, January 30 

- iOQ a. m. — Health ftXCT) 
;» :00 a.m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :80 to 10 :4S a. m. — Ye Towne Cryor service. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
18 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 8:00 i>. m. — KPO orchestra. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m. Studio program. 
6:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to t> :30 i> m.— Ye Towne Cry** service. 
6:S0 to 7:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — Musical program. 
10:0d m. — Kl'O's variety program. 



Tuesday, January 31 

6 :45 to 8 :00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10 :30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service, 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

6:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO dance orchestra. 

Wednesday. February 1 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10:30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:45 a. m. — Home service talk. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Gypsy and Marta. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Atwater Kent Artists. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Abas String Quartette. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO Dance Orchestra. 

Thursday. February 2 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

0:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Sports and poultry talk. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Caswell hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.- — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Friday, February 3 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:45 a. m. — Home service talk. 

11:30 a. m. to 12:45 p. m. —Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon— Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12 :45 p. m.— Commonwealth luncheon at Palace Hotel. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

0:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5 :00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m— KPO Dance Orchestra. 
Saturday. February 4 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10:80 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

1^ noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m— KPO orchestra. 

2 :00 p. m. — Football. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :80 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:30 to 7:80 p. m.— KPO Dance Orchestra. 

:00 to 12:00 p. m. National Broadcasting Company. 

KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS. INC. 
SAM FRANCISCO— 267 
Sunday. January 29 
; :50 to 9:00 p. m.— Church service* 
g>00 to 10:00 p. m. Studio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.- Dance program. 
Monday. January .30 

B:20 to 10:00 a. m.— Breakfast, program. 
10:00 to 10:27 a. m. -Thrift program. 
10:87 to 10 :80 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 
10:30 to 11:00 a. m. — Interior Decorating. 
12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 
1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 
. mi! to 6 :S0 p. m. Concert. 
G :00 to 7 :00 p- -m. — Dinner concert, 
7:00 to 7:16 p. m. — Sports talk. 

7 :15 to 7 :80 p. m. — Advertising tnlk. 

,,. B:80 p. m.— Dnrneille Sister. 
8:30 to 9:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 
10:00 p.m. Weather and police reports, 
10:03 to 11:00 P. m. 1'ance music. 
Tuesday, January 31 
7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Health exercises. 
8:20 to 10:00 a. m.— Breakfast program. 
10:00 to 10:27 a. m. -Thrift program. 

i ;,.. m.- r. S weather reports. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m.— Concert 
1 :00 to 1 :80 p. as.— Country store. 
5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— Construction reports. 
6-00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 
7:00 to 7:16 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7:15 to 7:80 p. m.— Art course. 
s :00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. —Musical program. 
10:00 p. m. — Weather and police reports. 
10:03 to 10:30 p. m.— Novelty program. 
10:30 to 11 :00 p. m.— Program of popular music. 
Wednesday. February 1 
7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exer. 
B:M In 10:00 a. m.— Breakfast program. 
10:00 to 10:27 *- m.— Thrift program. 



10:27 lo 10 :30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m.— Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 

Thursday, February 2 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:00 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.— U. S. weather reports. 

10:30 to 11:00 a. m.— Fashion hints. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour program. 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— KFWI Gypsy band. 

Friday, February 3 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Exercise hour. 

8:20 to 10:00 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Musical luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m. — Construction reports. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Program. 

7 :00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Dance program. 

10:00 p. m.— Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 10:30 p. m.— Gloria Del Rae 

10:30 to 11:00 p. m.— Popular program. 

Saturday, February 4 

7 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Exercise hour. 

8:20 to 10:00 a. m. — Musical breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Harriet Lewis. 
10:00 to 12:30 p. m— KFWI surprise party. 

KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS 
S4N FRANCISCO— 220 
Sunday, January 29 

1:30 to 3:30 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
3 :30 to 5 :00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Monday. January 30 

9:00 to 12:00 m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
9:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
Tuesday, January 31 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. —Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Orthophonic selections. 
9:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Coco-Nut Club meeting. 
Wednesday, February 1 

9:00 io 12:00 a. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Orthophonic recital. 
Thursday, February 2 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Music lovers' program. 
Friday. Fehruary 3 , , ^ 

o 12:00 a. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
7:80 p. m— Instrument and vocal selections. 
8:00 to 9:30 p. m. — Dance music. 
9:30 to 11:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
Saturday. February 4 

9 -no to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 

KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE 

OAKLAND— 508 

Monday. January 30 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Economics hour. 
11-30 to 1 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
6:30 to 6:80 p. m. -Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Weekly meeting of Lake Mer- 

ritt Ducks. 
Tuesday. January 31 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
5:30 to fi:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:S0 to 7:00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

- broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Special program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Wednesday. Fehruary 1 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Educational program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Variety hour. 
Thursday. February 2 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

:S0 p. m. — Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Special program. 



24 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 



Friday, February 3 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Brother Bob's club. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Variety hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic Club Orchestra. 

Saturday. February 4 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 

11 :30 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC 
OAKLAND— 394 
Sunday, January 29 
11:00 a. m. — Church service. 

1 :00 to 2 00 p. m. — National Broadcasting: Company. 
3:00 to 7:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
7 :30 p. m. — Weather report, 
7:35 to ?:00 p. m. — Church service. 
Monday, January 30 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:00 p. m. — Women's Clubs. 
4 :00 to 5 :00 p. m. — St Francis Orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— KGO Kiddies' Klub. 
6:00 to 6:45 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 
6:45 p. m. — What's Happening in the World. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Shell Company program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— The Pilgrims. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 
Tuesday, January 31 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon Concert. 
12:30. weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1:08, N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dance Orchestra. 
6:55, news; 7:03. weather; 7:08. S. F. produce, grain, 

cotton; 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, N. Y. 

stocks (closing). 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
Wednesday, February 1 
11:15 to 11:30 a. m. — The Home. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks: 

1:08 N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Sunkist dinner hour. 
7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Farm program. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Vaudeville. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— St. Francis Dance Orchestra." 
Thursday, February 2 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :0S. N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:55 p. m. — News; 7:05, weather: 7:08, S. F. produce, 

grain, cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, 

N. Y. stocks (closing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Composers' Birthday Night. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Friday, February 3 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Louise Landis. 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30, weather; 1:00, weather: 1:03, S. F. stocks: 

1 :08, N. Y. stocks. 
5:30 p.m. — Wise man from the Land-O-Health. 
6:00 to 6:45 p. m. — Dinner concert program. 
6 :45 to 6:55 p. m. — "Weekly Financial Review." 
6:55, news; 7:05, weather; 7:08. S. F. produce, grain, 

cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, N. Y. 

stocks (closing) . 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Saturday, February 4 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather: 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :08. N. Y. stocks. 

6 :00 to 6 :50 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

6:50 to 7:15 p. m. — Weather, news, new books. 

7 :15 to 7 :30 p. m. — Weekly sport review. 

8:00 to 11:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance music. 

KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC 
LOS ANGELES — 168 
Sunday, January 29 
10 :00 a. m. — Morninc services. 

1:00 to 5:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
5:30 p. m. — Johnnie Dell and orchestra. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
7:35 p. m. — Bob Buckner and Orchestra. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Aeolian organ recital. 
9:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Orchestra. 
Monday, January 30 

5 :30 p. m. — Lone Rene and Orchestra. 
6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 

6:30 p. m. — Glenn Edmunds and Orchestra. 

7:00 p. m. — Gene Johnston's Music Box hour. 

8:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 p. m. — Lenore Killian. 

10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

Tuesday. January 31 

5:30 p. m. — -The Dracon Hawaiians. 

6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 

6:30 p. m.— Gene Johnston's program. 

7:00 p. m. — Gypsy String Quartette; 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — Metropolitan Dance Orchestra. 

Wednesday, February 1 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m.— Gold Medal Talks. 

5:30 p. m. — Sebastians CotLon Club Orchestra. 

6 :15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 

6:30 p. m.— Hal Chasnoff's orchestra. 
7:30 p. m.— Nick Harris Detective Stories. 
7:45 p. m. — William MacDougall. 



8:00 p. m. — Musical Club program. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10 :00 p. m. — Packard program. 

10:30 p. m.— N. C. Mills. 

Thursday, February 2 

5:30 p. m. — Vernon Elkins and Orchestra. 

6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 

6:30 p. m. — Henry Starr. 

7:00 p. m. — Program by the University of Southern 

California. 
8:00 p. m. — Drama program. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m. — Program of modern classical music 
Friday, February 3 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m. — Gold Medal Talks. 
5:30 p. m. — Talk by Eugene Biscailuz. 
5:45 p. m. — Paul McNally. 
6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m. — Clarice Russell. 
7 :00 p. m, — Program by Paul Roberts. 
8:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 p. m. — Packard Symphonette. 
10:00 p. m. — Virginia McCoy. 
Saturday. February 4 

5:30 p. m. — Strangers Social Club Orchestra. 
6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial period. 
6:30 p. m. — Jack Farrell and Orchestra. 
7:30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado, Spanish Baritone. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard program. 
11:00 p. m.— KFI Midnight Frolic. 

KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO CO. 
SEATTLE— 348 
Sunday, January 29 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 

Monday, January 30 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Time signals, sport news. 

6:80 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:30 to 12:30 p. m.— Goofy Bird Frolic. 

Tuesday, January 31 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m.— Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 

Wednesday, February 1 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m.- — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Thursday, February 2 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

10:00 p. m.— Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Friday, February 3 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Instrumental trio. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m.— Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 

Saturday, February 4 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Sport news. News Items. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers Dance Orchestra. 

KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN 
PORTLAND— 491.5 

Sunday. January 29 

7 :30 to 9 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 

10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Little Symphony orchestra. 

Monday, January 30 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p m.— Talk. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert hour. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Spot Light Hour. 

Tuesday. January 31 

6 :00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Musical program. 

7 :30 to 8 :00 p. m. — Book review and talk. 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Sealy Dance program. 
B:30 to 11:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
Wednesday, February 1 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— Lecture. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Silver King Revellers. 

Thursday, February 2 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:40 p. m.— Utility service. 

7:40 to 8:00 p. m. — Flower girls. 

5 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C, program. 
Friday, February 3 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Concert. 

7:30 to S:00 p. m.— Utility service and talk. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m.— Concert. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m.— Keep Growing Wiser Order of 

Hoot Owls. 
Saturday, February 1 
6:00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert 
7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Concert 
8:00 to 12:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 



PROMOTION 

CAMPAIGN 

Announcement is made by the Pa- 
cific Gas and Electric Company of an 
aggressive sales campaign for the de- 
velopment of business to become ef- 
fective immediately throughout the 
entire territory served by the com- 
pany. The program, according to R. 
E. Fisher, Vice-President in Charge 
of Public Relations and Sales, will in- 
volve an. expenditure on the part of 
the company, in excess of one million 
dollars. Over 300 salesmen will be 
employed in this campaign, which will 
be the most extensive sales promo- 
tion program in the company's his- 
tory. 

"Electricity is Cheap — You Can 
Use it Freely" will be the company's 
slogan for the year and will be based 
on the proposed slash in rates, which 
will result in a saving of approxi- 
mately 81,750,000 to the company's 
consumers. 

Execution of the sales program will 
be under the direction of H. M. Craw- 
ford, General Sales Manager, who 
states that particular stress will be 
laid on the development of additional 
business to off-set the reduction in 
revenue due to the voluntary cut in 
rates to become effective about March 
1, 1928. 

He further states: "We hope to in- 
crease the consumption of electric 
energy by making it attractive for 
the consumers to use a greater quan- 
tity and thus balance the loss in reve- 
nue due to the reduction in rates by 
increased volume of consumption." 

An extensive advertising program 
under the direction of J. Charles Jor- 
dan, Publicity Manager of the com- 
pany, will support the sales program. 
Jordan states that the daily and 
weekly newspapers have been found 
to be the most satisfactory mediums 
for this type of work and that they 
will be used exclusively. 

It is estimated that in addition to 
the actual expenditures for the spe- 
cific sales activities of the company, 
another million dollars will be spent 
for labor, material and supplies, for 
lines and added facilities to take on 
this new business. 

It is also estimated that 766 car- 
loads of gas and electric consuming 
devices will be sold which will stimu- 
late the sales for local dealers, re- 
sulting in a vast increase in business 
for all connected with the gas and 
electric industry. 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



25 



LOOK AND LEARN 

By A. C. Gordon 

1. What are the five largest cities in the world? 

2. Who was the only president whose likeness appeared 
on an American coin during his lifetime? 

3. Which is the nearest to the earth of all celestial 
bodies? 

4. Which state leads all others in literacy? 

5. Which are the only four stones entitled to be called 
"precious"? 

6. What is called the oldest of all the arts? 

7. What city is the most important center in anthra- 
cite mining? 

8. What is the only animal in the world that has its 
wings made of skin? 

9. What are the names of the four Gospels? 

10. What causes waves? 

11. In what country are bachelors taxed? 

12. What American writer was first to be recognized in 
England as the producer of real literature? 

13. What was the famous "Missouri Compromise"? 

14. Which bird is supposed to be the best singer in 
America ? 

15. Which Canadian province produces annually more 
than half the wheat crop of Canada? 

16. How many steps must one climb to reach the top 
of the Washington Monument, if he does not use the 
elevator ? 

17. What four nations are not in the League of Na- 
tions. 

18. Who was Ireland's greatest poet? 

19. What was the first book printed in the American 
colonies? 

20. What is a bunsen burner? 

21. What is asbestos? 

22. Who was Clara Barton? 

23. Which country has the largest forest resources in 
the world? 

24. Who was catted the first western President? 

25. What are the male and the female of the seal family 
called ? 

26. Which is the sacred river of India? 

27. Who was called "the English Bluebeard"? 

28. What do undertakers-now call themselves'.' 

29. What is a mustang? 

30. Who was known in Bible times as "the sweet singer 
of Israel"? 

We take pleasure in adding the above column tg our 
paper. The answers to each week's questions will appear 
the following week. Mr. Gordon, the author, is well- 
known and in line with current times and thought we feel 
that his column will gain a following. 

—The Editor. 



NEW BOAT FOR FERRY FLEET LAUNCHED 
BY GOLDEN GATE 
The tide "that waits for no man," hurried the launching 
of the Golden Gate Ferry Company's new ship, the "Gold- 
en Era." Miss Katherine McNeeley christened the ship 
as it slid down the ways — number fourteen of the fleet. 
The "Golden Era" is 240 feet long and eighty feet beam. 
with automobile-carrying capacity of eighty-five cars. 
She is diesel-electric driven and was constructed at a cost 
of $400,000. 



On RUSSIAN 
HILL- ■ 

FOR RENT 

[Unfurnished] 

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Modern Apartment - Flat. 
Three Rooms. 



AUTO LICENSE DEAD LINE. JAN. 31 

You'll have to hurry, hurry, hurry. Plateless machines 
will be seized by the state. 



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from Winds and Fogs 

S S S 

1101 Filbert St., Cor. Leavenworth 
Phone Graystone 2793 







An Author 




Says: 




News with a style — the 
writings of good thinkers 
here and abroad — a def- 
inite poise, a live recep- 
tiveness. These are qual- 
ities I find in the 




Q)v.on\dc 



26 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Lurie and Curran Theaters 

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Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 

2:30 and Tea from 3 to 5 

Exclusive use of room for club dinners 

334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from page 20) 

Ralph Freud, Robert Griffin, Margaret Clarke, star; 
Louise Hooper, youngest member of the company on tour, 
and Helen Jerome Eddy, of stage and screen success. 

Maurice Wells, associate director of the Pasadena Com- 
munity Players, has a leading role in "Getting Married." 
Richard Menefee, William Earle, Lloyd Nolan and Martha 
Allan are in the cast. 

* * * 

James Hyde's expressionistic setting is a daring bit of 
new stagecraft. Supports of the rooms branch like Gothic- 
arches, each support representing a couple. The dominant 
note is blood-red against a black cyclorama. "Getting 
Married" will also be given on February 2. 

"Cake," by Witter Bynner, is to be given on Tuesday 
afternoon, January 31, and on Friday, February 3, with 
all the cast of the Pasadena Community Players. 

* * * 

President 

"Nightstick," New York's latest sensation in the realm 
of the drama, begins its third week at the President Sun- 
day afternoon. Two companies, simultaneously, are pre- 
senting this exciting crook play, one on each side of the 
American continent. The Broadway premiere preceded 
the San Francisco production by only a few weeks. 

Henry Duffy has duplicated the New York production 
in essentials. The four elaborate settings are represented 
as being on a par with those created for Gotham, while a 
comparison of the cast would seem to indicate that the 
players appearing here are equally as talented as those 
in the eastern company. Not since the theater world 
watched with interest the friendly rivalry between New 
York and San Francisco during the parallel runs of "The 
Best People," has the President housed an attraction that 
was being staged at the same time on Broadway. 

Many thrills are to be found in "Nightstick." Its story 
is one to grip the audience and an element of suspense 
prevails. The players include: George Leffingwell, Ken- 
neth Daigneau, Zeta Harrison, William Abram, Earl Lee, 
Mildred Von Hollen, Thomas Chatterton, Dorothy LaMar, 
Frank Darien, Stewart Wilson, J. Raymond Northcut, 
Alan Ryan and Madaliene Sheehan, the San Francisco 

girl. 

* * * 

Columbia 

Well, if you're pining for a laugh, just trot around to 
the Columbia where the Marx Brothers will supply you 
with enough to last you for quite some time. 

You needn't think that you can escape laughing, either, 
whether you have a permanent grouch or whether you're 
the "hardest boiled" person in town. You'll laugh at "The 
Cocoanuts" or else you have lost the joyous art. 

Music for the score was written by the jazz-master 
Irving Berlin and it fairly sparkles with zip and melody. 
In fact there's not a dull moment in "The Cocoanuts," 
which is really difficult to describe, in a way. 

You'll just have to go — and judge for yourself. 

By the way the Columbia engagement of the Marx 
Brothers is limited. The "extravaganza of fun" will come 
to an end at the close of this week, to be followed by 
"Sunny," musical comedy, which is booked for an opening 

on Monday, February 6. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"New Brooms," finely written comedy by Frank Cra- 
ven, is being presented at the Alcazar by one of the best 
balanced companies of the season. Henry Duffy knew his 
stuff when he made his plans for the production. Not 
being content with bringing to San Francisco the original 
star, Robert McWade, for the dominating role, he picked 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



27 



supporting players for character types. The play has 
been enthusiastically acclaimed by the local theatergoing 
public. 

Three members of the cast stand out. They are Mc- 
Wade, who scored a triumph on Broadway in the star 
role of Thomas Bates; Helen Ferguson, movie celebrity, 
whose portrayal of the appealing part of Jerry is a de- 
light ; and Irving Mitchell, who plays the son, with feeling 
and understanding. 

The production sets a high standard. The scenes are 
artistic. They are fresh, new! The complete cast in- 
cludes: Bernice Elliott, Joseph De Stefani, Glenda Far- 
rell, Ken Browne, John Breeden, William Macauley, Helen 
Keers, Bert Farjeon, Henry Caubisens and Charles Edler. 
* * * 

Orpheum 

Eddie Leonard, American minstrel, will head his com- 
pany of twenty singers and dancers, as the headline 
feature of the all-new vaudeville bill at the Orpheum 
theatre for the week starting Saturday matinee. 

In addition to Leonard there will be other big feature 
acts, including Lester Crawford and Helen Broderick, in 
"A Smile or Two"; Harry Roye and Billee Maye, who 
have just returned from Europe, in a dance revue as- 
sisted by Boyd Davis ; Peg Wynne, a vivacious miss, and 
"Her Smile" ; the Arnaut Brothers, Keo, Taki and Yoki. 

The first run photoplay will be "The Girl from Rio," 
an exciting romance of a Yankee youth and a Brazilian 
belle, with a cast headed by Carmel Myers. 




ICE CREAr% 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



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THIRD STREET GARAGE 

STERLING ANDERSON, Manager 
Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 

Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

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Gasoline Oils Sundries 



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Golden Gate 

Nance O'Neil, eminent actress, will headline the pro- 
gram this week. Al Trahan and Vesta Wallace will be 
featured at the Golden Gate theater this week in an offer- 
ing entitled: "The Curtain Speech." After a London 
engagement, they have returned to vaudeville where the 
American actors of international fame have a following 
of enthusiastic admirers. 

Jack Redmond, the golf professional, presents an act 
of intense interest to golf players, showing his crack 

shots and actually giving "A Golf Lesson." 

* * * 

Embassy 

Rin Tin Tin, whom Will Rogers praised so highly in 
the recent nation-wide broadcast will appear on the stage 
as well as on the screen of the Embassy theater com- 
mencing January 27. 

On the stage he will be seen in an interesting ten- 
minute act showing his unique type of screen acting. His 
owner and trainer Lee Duncan will accompany him and 
act as master of ceremonies. Special tricks will be shown 
for kiddies at afternoon performances. 

"Dog of the Regiment" is the film in which Rin Tin Tin 
is starred on the Embassy screen. The story of the pic- 
ture is based on experiences of the dog during the war 
when he was adopted by Duncan overseas. Rinty figured 
in a series of sensational escapes and proved of invalu- 
able service to the army. 

On the Vitaphone Sally Ward is the headliner. This 
lovable German comedian will be seen in a sketch "At 
the Party." Others on the program include Pat West and 
His Middies. Oilman and Arden, and the one-act playlet 
"Amateur Night" which is veritable mirthfeat. 

* * * 

Symphony Concert 

The sixth popular concert of the season will he given 
at the Curran Sunday afternoon. Schelling's "Victory 
Ball" will be a feature of the program. The week fol- 
lowing that Maurice Ravel, one of France's greatest living 
composers, will be guest leader of the San Francisco 
Symphony in a program of his music. Lisa Roma, soprano, 
will be assisting artist. 



We're not satisfied until you are. 

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San Francisco 



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Phone Franklin 2510 



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POLK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone Grajstone 759 




28 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 



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PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



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Wheel Hydraulic Brakes 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Franklin 4191, Day; 3985. Night Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Washing and Polishing Specialists 

22S HYDE STREET (Bet. Turk and Eddy) 

Latest Type Pressure Equipment Used 

Open $1.50 CARS WASHED Closed $2.50 

Special Wash and Polish $5.50 
TRANSMISSION AND MOTOR — CLEANING — TOP DRESSING 



1140 GEARY ST. 




TEL. GRAY'STONE 4266 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automohiles 
—Oxy- Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blackstnithing. 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



AUTO BODY CO. 

LACQUER ENAMELING AND PAINTING 
BODY DESIGNING AND BUILDING 
UPHOLSTERING AND SEAT COVERS 
COLLISION WORK OUR SPECIALTY 



Wm. C. Grayson 



1355 BUSH ST., Near Polk 

San Francisco, California Phone Prospect 3182 



AIR LINES 

By Lieut. Blaine Stubblefield 

Undoubtedly the leading news item of the week is the 
appearance of W. E. Boeing 1 on the scene of the Pacific 
Air Transport. After a year and a half of operations be- 
tween Seattle and Los Angeles, that organization passed 
to the control of the same men who organized and have 
been guiding Boeing Air Transport, San Francisco- 
Chicago air mail, express and passenger line, since July 
first. Pacific Air Transport will continue under the same 
name, but will be governed by the policies of P. G. John- 
son, who is its new president. Johnson, who looks to be 
no more than 35 years old, is now president of the Boeing 
Airplane Company of Seattle, said to be the largest 
producer of aircraft in America, of Boeing Air Trans- 
port, largest air mail route in the world, and of Pacific 
Air Transport. 

At the helm, or rather the "stick" of Pacific Air Trans- 
port, is A. K. Humphries, as vice-president and general 
manager. Mr. Humphries continues his duties from the 
same post he held under the old organization. 

Business men will be interested to know that this new 
organization is financed entirely with home capital dis- 
tributed along the Pacific Coast. Prominent and con- 
servative men in Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, the Bay 
Cities and Los Angeles have put their money into what 
they consider a vital public service, with a certain pros- 
pect of growth. 

The combined airways of the Boeing and Coast lines 
total 3017 miles, by far the longest air route in the 
world. The air mileage from the Bay to Chicago is 1918 
miles, and it is 1099 miles, air line, between Seattle and 
Los Angeles. The two routes combined approximate the 
air distance from San Francisco to New York. The hook- 
up puts the Bay within 21 hours of Chicago and 8V2 
hours from Seattle. Passengers can travel from Seattle 
to Chicago, by way of the Bay, in 38 V2 hours elapsed 
time, or 29 Vs hours flying time, with 19 hours layover in 
Oakland and San. Francisco. 

The principal change in Pacific Air Transport under 
the new regime will be increased working capital, most 
of which will be spent for new equipment. Fokker, Ryan 
and Travelair planes have been used up to this time, and 
none but two or three of the ships were equipped with 
closed cabins for passengers. It is true that those who 
fly for sport will choose open planes in preference to 
closed ones, after the manner of the sport motorist, who 
likes to feel the wind whizzing past his ears. But all in 
all, travelers on established air lines prefer to ride in 
closed cabins. In fact, the season is closed on sport flying 
on the North Coast section during most of the year, due 
to the low temperatures encountered over the Siskiyou 
mountains at the Oregon line. 

To take care of Coastwise passenger traffic. Pacific Air 
Transport has ordered four new Boeing biplane air mail 
and passenger special ships, and work has already begun 
on them in the factory at Seattle. The new planes will 
carry six passengers comfortably seated in a ventilated, 
heated, and electric-lighted cabin. The chairs will be well 
upholstered and of the reclining type. Sliding windows 
will be adjustable at the will of the passengers, and so 
arranged that they give an unobstructed view of the 
ground. 



January 28, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



29 



FINANCE 



Money rates are lower than ever, and there is no ap- 
parent reason for any change in the outlook over a con- 
siderable period of time. There will be, it is expected, 
however, by the best authorities, a period of seasonal 
hardening. 



There is a marked decline in the holdings of govern- 
ment securities by the Federal Reserve System, and 
experts, who are watching closely, wonder if this implies 
a change in governmental policy which may be the fore- 
runner of an advance in rediscount rates. 



The evidence of improving conditions becomes appar- 
ent in the steel industry where there is an utterly un- 
suspected and unexpected gain of over half a million 
tons in unfilled steel orders. 



The activity in the automobile and related industries 
is becoming marked. It is said that the great tire com- 
panies are in splendid condition to meet the situation 
implied in the rising price of rubber, and that the profits 
of these companies will be great during the coming year. 



Fireman's Fund stock showed a gain of a point and a 
half on the San Francisco Stock Exchange. Bancitaly 
showed a gain of 5^ points in a week. Practically all the 
well known stocks showed marked headway, thus reflect- 
ing the popular notion that the short period of depression 
is over and that the coming year will show a gain. 



"The Story of Petroleum," a seven-reel educational 
motion picture, has been released by the United States 
Bureau of Mines for distribution. This film was made in 
conjunction with the American Petroleum Institute and 
is the ninth in a series of petroleum films. The educa- 
tional value of these films is very great as they give a 
view of the interlocking activities of an industry repre- 
senting eleven billion dollars of invested capital. 



The transportation of crude oil in this country is a 
very complicated and enormously valuable business. 
Trunk pipe lines with their ramifications and subsidiary 
lines which bring the crude oil to the refineries are gi- 
gantic concerns. As a feat of engineering, the construc- 
tion of a welded pipe line and the activities connected 
with the shipment of oil over the Mississippi by a trunk- 
line, make one of the most fascinating and instructive 
stories in modern engineering. 



Members of the Federal Radio Commission are im- 
pressed by improvement in reception conditions but are 
convinced that more changes will have to be made before 
good service can be generally secured. They advocate use 
of a comparatively short wave band of 200 meters by 
high powered stations. 



Refinancing of war bonds aggregating more than $5,- 
000,000.000 will have been accomplished by the United 
States Treasury within eighteen months, when the Third 
Liberty bonds mature on September 15. Second Liberty 
bonds were financed so successfully as to cause hardly a 
movement in the financial life of the country. But the 
operation resulted in the saving of a great amount of 
interest to the government. Our treasury affairs are 
managed with great sagacity. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1668 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidat ions with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1927 

Assets $117,394,234.04 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $600,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER {AM) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation. General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought; FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued: CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON, ENGLAND ; NEW YORK ; PORTLAND. ORE. ; SEATTLE. 
WASH. : MEXICO CITY. MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Phones Davenport 4480 
Sutter 4400 



Insurance Exchange Building 
433 California Street 




SCOTT & 
MULVIHILL 

General Insurance and 
Surety Bonds 




FOR RENT 



New Modern Apartment — All outside rooms — Four rooms and breakfast 
room. Large closets. Completely furnished — Oriental rues and phono- 
graph. $12.-i.OO per month. Apartment 6. 1100 Fulton Street. Cor. Pierce. 
May he seen by appointment. Phone Graystone 428. 



MADE TO ORDER ONLY 

^HIF --H-s ( <§w? 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 
15 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



30 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 



A radiant gas heater gives 
clean, quick warmth 



To grandmother, warmth meant fuss 
and trouble. But to mother, clean, 
healthful heat is instantly available 
by touching a match to a gas fired 
radiant heater. 

A gas fired radiant heater in your 
fireplace costs about one cent and a 
half an hour to operate. 

You can heat a room without warm- 
ing the whole house. 

You bring the warmth and cleanli- 
ness of Spring sunshine into your 
living-room. This banishes chills and 
keeps the family well. 

You instantly get invigorating 
warmth when you come home from 
shopping or from the theatre. 

Come in and ask us about modern 
radiant gas heaters. They're not ex- 
pensive and the saving in fuel bills 
soon pays for the heater. 



P*G*55 d 



•rAcrnc sebvicz* 




Pacific Gas and electric Company 

Owned ■ Operated . Managed 
by Calijornians 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.800.000 cups were served at the 

Panama-Pacific International Exposition 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 18) 

Mrs. Linnard Gives 
Informal Affair 

On Saturday afternoon Mr. and 
Mrs. LeRoy Linnard entertained in- 
formally at a tea given in their won- 
derful new bungalow, "Ojai," on top 
of the Fairmont Hotel, in honor of 
Mr. and Mrs. Willy Dombre of the 
Villa d' Este, at Como, Italy, who are 
spending their honeymoon in Califor- 
nia. Mr. Dombre is one of the big 
hotel men of Europe and the Dom- 
bre's hotel is a famous old Italian 
mansion, the former domicile of many 
notables. Napoleon 1st being once a 
guest there, also many kings and 
queens of later days. The estate has 
been in the hands of the Dombre 
family for forty years and is noted 
for its antique furnishings and the 
beauty of its setting. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dombre will visit all the points of in- 
terest on the coast before returning 
east en route to their home in Italy. 

* * * 
Entertaining at the second of a 

series of bridge afternoons which she 
is giving at the Hotel Whitcomb dur- 
ing the season, Mrs. Wm. Solari had 
twelve ladies for lunch on Tuesday, in 

honor of Mrs. Walter Grant Campbell. 

* * * 

Hon. James Phelan 
Entertains Guest 

Hon. James D. Phelan gave a din- 
ner at his Saratoga home last Sunday 
in honor of Whitney Warren Jr., who 
has come to this state to attend the 
University of California where he will 
take a special course of study. 

The handsome estate of the former 
United States Senator James D. 
Phelan is frequently the center of 
entertainment for distinguished visit- 
ors. Phelan is a host than whom 
there is none more genial in all 
America. 

* * * 

Polo Lures Fashionable 

Polo matches this year at Monterey 
are attracting society from many 
parts of the world. The most alluring 
polo calendar ever scheduled in Cali- 
fornia is underway with festivities in 
the fashionable world keeping pace 
with the sport. 

* * * 

Brilliant Players 

The polo team of Marquis de Por- 
tago and the teams of Captain Selby 
McCreery and Henry W. Forrester are 
attracting almost undivided attention. 

Polo games are being played every 
Wednesday, Friday and Sunday after- 
noons and, as they progress, interest 
rises to corresponding heights. 

Society makes much of the occasion 
and presents a fashion-show of its 
own. Western women wear their 
clothes so exquisitely! 



— NOW IN OUR 30TH YEAR — 

WADE AND RUEGG 

Tailors 

Fall Woolens 

Now on Display 

Special Line of 

"SPORTEX" 

Scotch Sport Material 



Suite 201 — 12 Geary Street 

Phone Kearny 2866 
San Francisco 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 

Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
active, Hot Sulphur Water. Tub Baths and 
Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN, Ajrua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judah 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The Finest Meals in the 
VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms — Clean Linen — Clean Everything; 
Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

TELEPHONE 110 



WHEN IN PANAMA 
MAKE 

HOTEL CENTRAL 

Cathedral Plaza 

YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 

Andrew Johnston. Manager 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1864 

The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



January 28, 1928 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

{Opposite Palace Hotel) 

Ban Francisco Phone Kearny 391 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKHAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime, Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 
Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office and Works: 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 

Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called for and Delivered 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 



Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Fashionables 

Mrs. Walter Hobart, Mrs. Robert 
Hayes Smith, Miss Louise Boyd, all 
of whom are active in Mardi Gras 
events, were luncheon guests at the 
St. Francis Hotel this past week 
where tryouts for the pageant were 
held. 

Miss Virginia Jones, Miss Grace 
Hamilton, Miss Eleanor Weir and 
Miss Burns were a quartet at one 
table for Monday's society luncheon. 



31 



WNUAL MEETING 
THE JOSHUA BENDY IK11N WORKS 

i annual meeiinjr of the stockholders of 

Iron Works will !>■■ held at the 

■ linn. No. 200 Pine Street. San 

lifornta, on Tuesday, the 14th liny of 

128, al the hour of 10 o'clock a. m. for 

in.anl of Directors i 

ir, ami the transaction of such 

.is may come Iwfore the meeting. 



I'll \S. C 






GARDNF.R. 

Secretary. 



Mrs. Sanborn Young of Los Gatos 
who is entertaining as her house 
guests Mrs. Edward K. Hardy of 
Evanston, Illinois, and Mrs. A. N. 
Young, spent the week-end at the 
Fairmont Hotel, attending the sym- 
phony concert on Friday. The home 
of Senator and Mrs. Young, "Yung 
see San Fong," at Los Gatos, is one 
of the most attractive and unique of 
the many beautiful country places of 
that section. Mrs. Young, Ruth Com- 
fort Mitchell of the literary world, is 
one of the most versatile writers of 
short stories, novels and verse, many 
of her books having been published 
from time to time and are among the 
most popular sellers. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

The following people have been 
guests at the inn during the past 
week : 

Mr. and Mrs. Horace L. Hill Jr., of 
Los Altos. 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Kleiser, 
Mrs. Edith Botsford and Mr. George 
W. Kleiser Jr., all of San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Lewis of 
San Francisco. 

Miss Mary Shallue of Oakland. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Zellerbach of Sin 
Francisco. 

Mrs. John G. Johnston and Miss 
Jane Johnston, both of San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Thompson of 
San Jose. 

Mrs. Roy ('. Ward and Miss Jean 
Ward, both of Mill Valley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hufschmidt 
of San Francisco. 

Capt. and Mrs. W. J. Gray and Mr. 
and Mrs. W. J. Gray Jr.. all of San 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Webster of San 
Francisco, Mrs. J. E. Webster and 
Miss Helen Webster of Burlingame. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sydney L. Plant of 
San Francisco. 

Mr. W. R. Chamberlin and Mr. E. 
A. Chamberlin. both of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Dr. and Mrs. X. Austin Cary of 
Oakland. 

Mrs. J. A. Buck of San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred E. Raas of San 
Francisco. 



MINIATURES of YOURSELF 

or members of your family 

make appreciated and valued 

presents. 

Last a Life Time 



149 POWELL STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



RWIL ELDERS 

239 PosrSrreer, San Francisco 




N W CORNER 

GRAYSTONE 240 POLK * NO POST STS - 




tve JFbrever 



32 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 28, 1928 



East 

through the 

Sunny South 




— Sunset Limited, famed "II 
Wound the world, offers a \l 
journey of rare attraction. JJ 

Southern Pacific's colorful 
Sunset Route lies along the na- 
tion's southern border.Through 
California's orange lands, 
across fertile mesas and broad 
plains and along placid Louis- 
iana bayous to New Orleans. 
All the way the romance and 
historical interest of the South- 
west and the Old South. See 
Apache Trail highway — one 
day side trip in Arizona. 

It costs no more to go east 
this way to New York. From 
New Orleans, conrinue by train 
or enjoy the delightful ocean 
voyage to New York aboard 
Southern Pacific's steamship 
(meals and berth on the ship 
included in your fare). 

Over this route, "Sunset Limited" 
carries you swiftly and comfortably. 
Its appointments are complete in 
every detail. Also the "Argonaut" 
from Los Angeles over this route. 

Go this way and return some other 
Southern Pacific route if you wish 
—Overland Route, Chicago to San 
Francisco ; Golden Stale, the direct 
line from Chicago to Los Angeles 
and San Diego; or Shasta Route, 
• west over northern lines and south 
from Seattle and Portland. 

Read the interesting Sunset Route 
booklet describing the trip in de- 
tail. Ask for a copy and for further 
details. 

Sunset 
Limited 

Southern Pacific 

F. S. McGINNIS 

Passenger Traffic Manager 

San Francisco 



CLUB ACTIVITIES 

(Continued from page 19) 
School Luncheon by 
P. T. Association 

The Second District, Parent-Teach- 
ers Association, has gained the ap- 
proval of the Board of Education to 
install hot lunch service in the San 
Francisco public schools. 

After a long and well contested 
battle for their intention, the club 
women finally won their point, argu- 
ing with all the determination of their 
kind that such service was necessary 
for the welfare of children. 

New schools now being built in San 
Francisco are equipped with nutrition 
kitchens and cafeteria lunch rooms 
and the foremost club leaders are now 
pleased over the fulfillment of one of 
their most urgent of civic and educa- 
tional requests, to say nothing of the 
necessity of this healthful require- 
ment. 

* * * 

Star Bridge Club 

Mrs. Melissa Beanston presided as 
hostess at a bridge luncheon given at 
the Fairmont Hotel last Friday enter- 
taining as her guests members of the 
Star Bridge Club. Mrs. Minnie Rich- 
ardson was the honor guest at the en- 
joyable affair. Those present included 
Mesdames George W. Kneass, George 
Bell, Jesse Mote, George E. Kneass 
Jr., John Kemp, Alice Hardenbrook, 
Stephen Dean, William Chamberlain, 

Eugene Del Monte, William Muhlner. 

* * * 

Thinkers' Club 

Miss Evelyn Groves, president of 
the "Thinkers' Club," entertained the 
members of the club at a bridge tea 
on Saturday afternoon in the Roof 
Garden of the Hotel Whitcomb. In 
her party were: Misses Ree Posini, 
Louise Knoch, Anetta Brocato, Re- 
nata Morris, Alma F. Shimek, Alma 
Postler, Margaret Breckwoldt, Elsa 
Ritter, Florence Natson, Carolyn 
Watson, Eina Richter, T h e 1 m a 
Wright, Margaret Whitman, Edna 
Bellmer, Lucile Breckwoldt, Marguer- 
ite Arana, Ruth Kessing, Shirley 
Schiff, Vivian D. Stevens, and Mes- 
dames C. N. Kaiser, G. M. Nofte and 

Richard Schneider. 

* * * 

Eastern Star 

The conductresses of the different 
Eastern Star Chapters of San Fran- 
cisco entertained their associate con- 
ductresses at a large luncheon given 
at the Fairmont Hotel on Saturday 
(January 21). Bridge was enjoyed 
during the afternoon. Miss Viola 
Reed, chairman, was assisted in re- 
ceiving by Mrs. Hazel Reid, Mrs. 
Katherine Thomas, Mrs. Louise Ait- 
chison, Miss Elvira Armbrust and 
Miss Eva Rensford. 



Buy a 

Sunday Pass 

and Ride 

all Day for 

20c 

Ask the Conductor 




SAMUEL KAHN, 
Pieadcnt 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE: The MINERAL DE- 
VELOPMENT COMPANY, location of principal place 
.,f business, San Francisco. Calif. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting "f the 
Directors, held on the 17th day of January. 1928, ;" 
assessment of one-half cent per share was levied 
upon the issued capital stock of the corporation Pay- 
able immediately, in legal money of the United States, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company. Room 
'2-15. Monadnock Building. San Francisco. Calif. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the 21th day of February. 192n will be 
delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, 
and unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
Tuesday, the 20th day of March. H'L's to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expense of sale. 



M. J. Seely. Secretary, 

245 Monadnock Building, 

San Francisco. Calif. 



THE ADVANCE BEAUTY OF 


SPRINGTIME IS 




NOW HERE 




DON'T MISS 






the January beauty 
of the Russian River 










ENJOY 
the superbly beau- 






country, ''the Valley 








of the Moon", and 




tiful Sacramento 






the Redwood Em- , 




River country — 






pire beyond. Most 




"the Netherlands of 






economically, com- 




America." A drive 






fortably and easily 




you'll never forget 
— a variety of scen- 






reached over the 




ery found nowhere 






CARQUINEZ 




else in America. Fine 
pavement all the 
way. Reached over 






BRIDGE 




the 






Take 
SAN PABLO AVE. 




ANTIOCH 






OAKLAND 




BRIDGE 






Take 






TUNNEL ROAD 






OAKLAND 




Bridges Open All Da 


y and All Night 




No Time Tables — No Delays 


Write American Toll-Bridge Company, Underwood Building, 


San Francisco, jor new free travelogues and maps. 



SAIL TO NEW YORK 




SISTER SHIPS 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA. PANAMA CANAL 
and GAY HAVANA, en route 

Pnnnma Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropics 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure dallffht aboard a palatial Panama Mail 
Liner with seven never-to-he-foruoHen visits ashore at picturesque and 
historic ports — Mantanillo. Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La Lih- 
ertad. Salvador; Corinto, Nicarai;un. Two days in the Canal /one. See 
the creat Panama Canal; visit Ilallioa. Cristobal and historic old Panama. 
Every cabin on a Panama Mail Liner is an outside one; each has an 
electric fan. and there is a comfortable loner bed for every passenger. 
There is music for dancing; deck games and sports and salt water swim- 
ming tank. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost tl lees lhan S9 a day for minimum first-class pastacc, includ- 
ing bed and meals on steamer. Go Kast. by Panama Mail and return hy 
rail (ur vice versa I for as litlb- as $3S0. (This price doe* not include berth 
and meals on trains.' Panama Mail Liners lca\e San Franc isen and Ne» 
York approximate!} cverv 31 da>i. Next sailings from San Francisco : 
SS COLOMBIA, Februan )ih: SS VENEZUELA, Fehruarv ISth. From 
New York: SS VENEZUELA. Jinuin list; SS ECUADOR. February 
llth. 192S. 

lor illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
01 ticket agent, or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 

548 S. SPRING STREET 2 TINE STREET 10 HANOVER SQUARE 
LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 




c/tobassador^ 

Los Angle les 

Plan to enjov Southern California's 

glorious summer climate this year at 

this world-famous hotel. 

CAM, VAN VECMTEN 

Famous Author, writing in VANITY FAIR, says: 

Tht Ambassador is, I tbouta think, ont of tht very besl hotels 
in tht world. The service is supertatift, tht food a i tine, 
the courtesy of management and employees unfailing." 

In the wide range ot its attractions, the 
Ambassador likewise excels Superb, 
A 27-acrepark, with miniature golf course 

f.;-"/ and open-air plunge. Riding, hunting 

and all sports, including privileges ot 
Rancho Golt Club Motion picture 
thcntci and 25 smart shops within the 
hotel Dancing nightly to the music of 
the famous Cocoanut Grove Orchestra. 



XJ&&. 



Moderate Summer Rates 
Attractive rooms with bath as low 
as $5, $6 and $7 a day single, 
from $7.00 double. 

WRITE for Chef* Booklet of 
Calif. Red pel and Information. 

BEN L. FRANK &Ui*t<r 




Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 

Established 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, General Agent 
544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cai. 



TELEPHONE SU^fER 23it 






Give the Bus a Happy Mw Tear 

<U mmV/. CTV-PfV 



with SIXPLY 



pentmjhmma Balloons 



PENNSYLVANIA RUBBER CO. OF AMERICA, INC., Jeannette, Pennsylvania 
TANSEY-CROWE COMPANY, Distributors 

San Francisco, California 



SAN FRANCIS 




POPULAR MODELS AT THE AUTOMOBILE SHOW 




Courtesy Fraxklix-Tenxaxt Motor Co., 1900 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 



Established July 20. 18S6 




^StS? 1 *^ 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 268 Market Street. San Francisco. California. Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco. 
California, Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co.. 80 Cornhill, E. C. London. England. Subscription Rates (including postage) one year, 

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Vol. CX. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., FEBRUARY 4, 1928 



No. 6 



THE FIRING LINE 

By Lloyd Farrington Wilson 



If I may keep you awake for a few minutes, please 
adjust the earphones and I'll broadcast a few choice 
morsels of petty annoyance. 

****** 

The last Democratic National Convention dragged into 
weeks. If the way the Democrats are fighting in the 
senate is any criterion, the convention in Houston will 
last a year, and finally result in the landing of the 
Marines. 

>(t $ * * * $ 

After all there is some hope for chaps who flunk out of 
college — they can still qualify as prohibition officers. 

That is, if necessity downs pride. 

****** 

Those of us who don't get picked by the Gotta Koppa 
Papa Leap Year Sorority can still become Missionaries to 

Moronia. 

****** 

In an examination at the State University of Arkansas 
one student, in answer to the question "Who is Charles 
A. Lindbergh ?" said he was prime minister of Sweden in 
the fifteenth century; another said he was a German 
general in the World War; another thought he was a 
leader of the Bolsheviks in Russia ; still another said the 
Lindbergh line was the battle line the Allies had so much 
trouble breaking during the World War. No, No, No, I 
haven't the heart, you write your own answer. 
****** 

People who go over to the Embassy to see Rin Tin Tin 
in person, must remember that, after all. it may not be 
Lon Chaney — besides the dog has feelings. 

****** 

Now that I am getting a salary, eating lunch isn't the 
feature of the week, but where I eat it is everybody's 
business. May my ancestors be spared that I should sound 
like a radio announcer, but I do like Hattie and Minnie 
Mooser's Aladdin Studio. The atmosphere and personality 
of the place justifies the appearance of the sort of people 
who like different things and places. 
****** 

President Cosgrave of Ireland, on way to Washington, 
said Chicago was "an unbelievable city." If he had come 
out here he would probably have dubbed Los Angeles "the 
{Unspeakable city." 



People have decided that the reason Coolidge went to 
Cuba was to find out what the Marines were doing in 
Nicaragua. It must be embarrassing when even the 
President don't know the answer. Plans for international 
peace and more battleships continue to evolve. 
***** * 

The men are going to wear high heels this summer 
say the fashion kings. Oh, mercy, mercy, lipstick, rouge, 
and now high heels. Oh, Algernon, your smelling salts, 
dearie, we think we are going to faint. 

* * * 

Oh, Admiral Plunkett, who would have thunk it, you'd 
be so indiscreet. What did you do it for. You ought to 
know, our fighting men must never think of war. 

* * * 

When I was looking for some job to keep me from being 
elected to the Rotary Club — as a representative of the 
unemployed, I selected a few choice ones. My idea of a 
soft snap would be to be the master of the wardrobe dur- 
ing the filming of "Helen of Troy." I didn't get it. Alas; 

alas, I must slave. 

* * * 

Jack Dempsey has decided to quit the ring. Damit, 
that leaves a doggoned good serial unfinished. 

****** 

Down in Mississippi they are passing a law to make 

motorists get out and count five before trying to beat a 

passenger train to the crossing. Add Famous Last Words, 

"Five." 

****** 

An inventor has perfected a loud speaker that can be 
heard a mile. If the National Radio Commissioners will 
do what we think they are hired to do they will put this 

bird in jail for life. 

**-**** 

The world's favorite hero went down in a submarine 
the other day. Lindy! Lindy! Lindy ! stick to something 

safe! 

****** 

Now. dear public. I am running short of white space and 
besides Mac and I are going over to our favorite "soft 
drink parlor" and break the Volstead Act. So I leave you 
where we met. down on the firing line. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1928 






THE AUTO PROSPECT 

The New York "Nation," writing of the auto activity 
in New York, says, "Crowds and crowds ; new models, new 
beauty, new colors, new styles, new prices and new induce- 
ments; greater public interest than ever — this was the 
New York automobile show of 1928." 

And what is true of New York is more than true of 
San Francisco where the show has become the third of 
the automotive displays of the country. It is a marvelous 
showing, with incredible delight, mechanically and artis- 
tically. 

The prosperity of the motor industry is clear. There is 
no talk at present of that "saturation point" which has 
formed the basis of so much pessimistic foreboding. The 
demand appears to have banished the "saturation" 
theory. More and more cars are called for by the masses 
of prospective and actual buyers. The one car standard 
has been passed. Our people are becoming to an ever- 
greater extent the purchasers of two cars and a two-car 
garage is fast becoming a domestic necessity. 

It is very fortunate that such is the case for the in- 
dustry has become a key industry in the sense that its 
condition is an index and a reflex of the prosperity of the 
country. The land is prosperous now in terms of the auto 
industry. An increased demand, which is now certain, is 
a proof of the general prosperity, a weakening would, on 
the other hand, be an index of retrogression. 

Not only the mechanical, but to an ever increasing de- 
gree, the whole structure of credit buying is dependent 
upon the maintenance of the present high position of the 
auto industry. 



PERVERTED POLITICS 

The movement of the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, looking to a change in the schedule of rates, has 
let out an unpleasant stream of political demagoguery. 
There is no doubt a right on the part of the community 
to dispute the necessity for new rates but there is no need 
for the atmosphere in which the dispute is being carried 
on. Indeed, this atmosphere is quite a preventive of any 
real progress to a solution of the matter. 

It was announced in stentorian tones by the demagogic 
press that the company had refused the municipalities 
the right to inspect the books of the company. The re- 
fusal was made in Oakland, and it would seem that the 
whole affair arises from the inability of counsel for the 
city to understand the position of the company in the 
matter. The question arises whether the municipality as 
such has any right to examine the books of the company. 
Says James T. Shaw, the vice-president and general coun- 
sel for the corporation, "The public utilities act gives the 
right to examine our books only to the railroad commis- 
sion and to no others." 

This seems to be sound reason and common sense as 
well as good law. The railroad commission is charged 
with the matter of rates in public utilities questions and 
the railroad commission is therefore entitled to all the 
information possible on that matter. But it is certain that 
the law does not give miscellaneous people the right to 
examine the books of the company whenever they desire. 
The fact is that most dmagogues think or profess to think 
that there is some special virtue about the very word 
"municipal." 



BANCITALY AGGRESSIVE 

There is no repose about A. P. Giannini. In one year 
he has made the spectacular and remarkable record of 
the Bancitaly Corporation a marvel among the nations, 
he has shown such tremendous financial ability that it is 
doubtful if the whole history of banking can provide an 
equal to it, considering all the circumstances of the case. 
Then he has electrified the community by the present of 
SI, 500, 000 to the state university, not a gift causa mortis, 
but while he is in the prime of life and in full possession 
of all his wonderful energy. 

Now he has taken the aggressive outside the borders of 
the state and is marching to new conquests in Europe. 
London first, then Paris, then Berlin are to feel the effects 
of his financial prowess. He would have gone on to Lon- 
don now to open the branch there, but for the unfortunate 
sickness of his son which brings him back to California. 

It will be interesting to watch the effect of his efforts 
in Europe. The whole European system is so different 
from our own that the prospects are fraught with a con- 
siderable degree of uncertainty. There is no doubt that 
Mr. Giannini is well aware not only of the obstacles but 
of the promise in his new venture, for he has lately visited 
Europe much and is, no doubt, very thoroughly informed 
on the whole situation. 

Nevertheless, we shall watch the comments of the Lon- 
don financial press upon the invasion of the treasured 
seclusion of British finance with a great deal of interest. 



STREET MURDER 

We have had our first taste of the thing which is dis- 
gracing Chicago. A man was shot in the public streets 
of San Francisco by an assassin from a closed car which, 
so far, has managed to make its escape. The professional 
gunman has made his appearance in connection with the 
liquor trade. In this respect, also, the similarity to the 
Chicago affairs is very marked. 

It is well now to insist that such things cannot be done 
in the city and that we are no candidates for competition 
with Chicago in the highjacking murder game. The prob- 
lem is frankly up to the police and the people of this city 
will expect the police to measure up to the requirements 
of the situation. Our police force is going to be estimated 
in this city and in the world at large, not only by the 
activity which it shows in this matter, but also by the 
success with which its efforts are marked. This is no con- 
dition to be met by an alibi. The people of San Francisco 
demand the arrest and trial and, in the event of verdict, 
a condign punishment of the offender. Nothing less than 
this will be satisfactory. 

It is unfortunately true that it is just in this sort of 
thing that the police of Chicago have fallen down. It is 
well known that the condition of affairs in Chicago would 
not exist in its dreadful enormity if it had not been that 
the police were either careless or actually interested in 
some of the murders. We can say frankly that any such 
implication involving our local police force would be re- 
ceived with great indignation by the people of this city. 
We believe in our police force. But we do insist that it 
earn that faith by the faithful discharge of duty. 



February 4, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



ECONOMICS AND EDUCATION 

There is a theory that education follows the necessities 
)f the industrial and commercial system at a given time, 
hat social necessity determines the sort of education that 
Deople will be having at a certain period. 

This idea has received quite strong corroboration in 
he curious state of affairs recently discovered in Contra 
Hosta county. There the arrest of a boy with a bottle of 
fin in his possession led to the discovery of a school for 
he development of successful bootlegging. It seems that 
he pupils paid for instruction; they were given bottles 
;o deliver, they were paid so much for every bottle de- 
ivered and a bonus for new customers. The whole system 
vas intended to turn out really adept bootleggers and 
ellers of liquor, who would develop in time a veritably 
•emarkable ability in dodging prohis and delivering the 
roods desired. 

This is exactly what might be expected to happen. In 
ases, such as bootlegging, where the profits of successful 
landling are really astonishing, there is an overwhelming 
iesire to get into the game. In a society in which the 
noney incentive is the strong incentive, youth desires 
noney, for money means success. Money does not smell ; 
noney made by bootlegging is just as good as any other 
noney. So teachers arise and pupils come and the whole 
ame is ready to hand. It is a perfectly natural process 
ind only a fool would expect anything else. 

Unfortunately, we not only have a fool prohibition law 
)ut it is for the most part also administered by fools. 



A MODERN PERPLEXITY 

Time was when jail was a very distinguishable place, 
it least as far as the inmates are to be considered. Bar- 
•ing political prisoners, of which we have none, or very 
:ew, in this country, the inmates of jails might be clas- 
sified as socially undesirable, from the point of view of 
;raining or morals or education. But a change is coming 
)ver that state of affairs ; the social atmosphere of a jail 
s not of necessity universally repulsive. In fact, the 
socially satisfactory, from the point of view of manners 
ind education, appear to be gaining in numbers. This 
nust have its effect upon jail discipline for willy nilly we 
ire obliged to treat the educated and the well mannered 
>therwise than we treat the crude and the rough. 

There is not only an increasing number of young pris- 
oners of social distinction, as far as training and social 
education are concerned, but there is also, in the jail 
tself, a tendency towards education and personal culti- 
vation. The growth of the college extension systems into 
;he jails has had a powerful effect in that direction. 

But, apart altogether from that aspect of the case, 
here are, on the whole, large numbers of professional 
nen who in the stress of modern life, as in the recent 
■ase of Jesse Robinson, have fallen into such eomplica- 
;ions as can only be solved by the imposition of a prison 
lentence. 

It will be curious to watch the effect of this state of 
iffairs upon the conduct of prison management. 



WE BEG YOCR PARDON 

Due to a typographical error in our copy in issue of 
lanuary 28. the page of Franklin cars was listed under 
Be Edward Lowe Motors Company. However, these cuts 
fere supplied through the courtesy of the Franklin-Ten- 
lant Motor Company. On the inside cover of this issue 
,ve repeat the display in error, in full justice to the Frank- 
in-Tennant Motor Company. 



DUDLEY FIELD MALONE 

Dudley Field Malone, ranked as one of the leading 
orators of America, who held an audience of fourteen 
thousand persons spellbound during a previous anti-pro- 
hibition mass meeting in San Francisco, was the feature 
speaker at another mass meeting, held on the evening of 
February 2, in the Scottish Rite auditorium. 

Word that Mr. Malone, who is a close friend of Captain 
William H. Stayton, chairman of the Association Against 
the Prohibition Amendment, was coming to the coast, 
arrived only recently and was the signal for feverish ac- 
tivity upon the part of the California division to arrange 
to have him address one or more meetings in San Fran- 
cisco and the state. 

The meeting on February 2 was held under the auspices 
of the association and attracted a capacity crowd. 

Dudley Field Malone, of New York, has spent the 
greater part of a distinguished life fighting for principles 
of liberty. He resigned as Collector of the Port of New 
York during 1917 as a public protest because Woodrow 
Wilson, then president, had not urged the passage of 
the woman suffrage laws. With Clarence Darrow, Mr. 
Malone volunteered to defend Prof. Scopes who was ac- 
cused of violating the anti-evolution laws of the state of 
Tennessee. Scopes was convicted and then freed on appeal 
to a higher court. 

Mr. Malone's first public speech against prohibition, as 
far as a California appearance is concerned, was made 
under the auspices of the Association Against the Prohi- 
bition Amendment at a mass meeting held in our Exposi- 
tion Auditorium during February, 1924. 

Mr. Malone, then as now, had been called to the coast 
on business and kindly consented to address the meeting, 
which had been arranged principally to welcome Captain 
Stayton. 

It is not often that the people of San Francisco have 
the opportunity of hearing an orator of the type of Mr. 
Malone. He comes here with the whole story of the politi- 
cal situation in the East and at this time, when presiden- 
tial possibilities are being considered, there is no question 
but that his message will help to mold public sentiment 
for or against certain candidates. 

Mr. Malone's record is one of achievement. He was born 
in New York on June 3, 1880, and after graduating from 
the law school, began practicing law in 1905. He was city 
attorney of New York during 1909 and from April to No- 
vember of 1913, was Third Assistant Secretary of State. 
He left that high post to become Collector of the Port of 
New York, a capacity in which he served from November, 
1913, to September. 1917. 



Anti-Saloon League Fears Debate Outcome 

The California Anti-Saloon League found that there 
was "such a pressure of important work already laid out 
for this year." that it was "unable" to furnish a repre- 
sentative to debate with Dudley Field Malone. At least 
that is the reply of A. H. Briggs, paid superintendent of 
the league, to the challenge to debate issued by W. H. 
Metson. Mr. Metson's challenge to Briggs was as fol- 
lows : 

January 24, 1928. 
"To Dr. A. H. Briggs. superintendent, California Anti- 
Saloon League, San Francisco, Calif. 
"The Association Against the Prohibition Amendment 
(the nationally recognized "wet" organization) CHAL- 
LENGES the Anti-Saloon League (the nationally recog- 
nized "dry" organization) to a public debate or at your 
pleasure a series of debates. Subject: Should Congress 
modify the Volstead Act? 

(Continued on page 13) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 192S 





ocier 




s^s^H|^i 




Bv Antoinette Arnold 



Home Again 

Many society folks, who have been 
traveling abroad for months, are, one 
by one, returning home. 

Prominent among the fashionables 
are world-wide travelers, all of whom 
express over and over again, with en- 
thusiasm: "Yes, I'm glad to be back. 
There is no place like home." 

So often are the homecoming 
phrases used by interesting people 
that there can be no doubt as to their 
sincerity. While, on the other hand, 
friends await with keen anticipation 
a "home again" reception, dinner 
dance or formal party. 
. * -- * * 

Mrs. Roos Entertains 

Mr. and Mrs. Achile Roos who, 
since their recent return from Europe 
have entertained groups of friends at 
a number of handsomely appointed 
affairs, were hosts at a dinner party 
on Saturday evening in their apart- 
ment at the Fairmont Hotel. The 
Italian dining room of their suite, 
which is hung in rare tapestries, was 
the beautiful setting for the dinner. 
The oval table at which the guests 
were seated was covered with rare 
lace. In the center a large mirror out- 
lined in bronze filigree held a tall 
flower candelabra, the base being 
filled with pink and crimson carna- 
tions. From the flowers pink tapers 
cast a soft light on the diners. Fanci- 
ful bronze holders on either end of 
the table held blooms of the same deli- 
cate shading. The place cards were 
unique conceits brought from Europe. 
During the evening cards were en- 
joyed. 

* * * 

Debutante Luncheon 

Mrs. Spencer Buckbee entertained 
at a luncheon at her home on Clay 
street in honor of Miss Eleanor Weir 
and Elizabeth Bolton. 

Others of the debutante set present 
included: Misses Elizabeth Raymond, 



Betty Downey, Eda Sherman, Elsie 
Faxon, Katherine Deahl, Vail Jones, 
Harriet Brownell, Grace Hamilton, 
California Bruner, Alison Cunning- 
ham. 

Visiting Bankers 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Tuohy of 
Chicago and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 0. 
Smith of New York are at the Fair- 
mont Hotel. Both Mr. Smith and Mr. 
Tuohy are prominent bankers of the 
eastern and middle-west metropoli. 
Mr. and Mrs. Tuohy are returning 
east via Colorado Springs and Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith will visit New Orleans 
and other southern cities on their re- 
turn to New York. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA 

On the Cout Highway, Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



Among prominent visitors from 
the east are Mr. and Mrs. Gavit Fort 
of Boston who have been at the Fair- 
mont Hotel for the past ten days. Mr. 
Fort was formerly president of the 
Boston and Maine Railroad, and dur- 
ing the war was railway adminis- 
trator for the war. He has resigned 
his position with the railroad and ac- 
cepted the presidency of the Raymond 
& Whitcomb Company of Boston. The 
Forts are very active in the social life 
of Boston and since their arrival in 
San Francisco have been honored 
guests at many luncheons, teas and 

dinners. 

* * * 

Miss Musto Hostess 

Miss Romilda Musto was hostess to 
a group of friends at the Musto home 
on Washington street this past week, 
entertaining her friends at bridge. 



New Yorker Entertained 
By Western Society 

Prominent society folks of Burlin- 
game and San Francisco have been 
entertaining at a number of smart 
affairs in honor of Mr. Whitney War- 
ren Jr., of New York. 

Warren is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Whitney Warren of New York City, 
his father being one of America's 
leading architects, having received 
honor decorations in Europe as well 
as in this country. 

William Templeton Veatch gave a 
beautiful affair at his home in honor 
of Mr. Warren whom he knew in Cey- 
lon where Veatch was vice-consul. 



Dinner for Debutante 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Grant gave a 
charming dinner at their home in 
town last Thursday evening in com- 
pliment to Miss Grace Hamilton. Mr. 
and Mrs. Alfred Hendrickson shared 
honors with Miss Hamilton. 

* * * 

Hales Entertain 

Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Hale were hosts 
at an informal dinner on Friday eve- 
ning at the Fairmont Hotel, where 
they make their home. The Hales 
entertain their friends in smaller 
groups from time to time, preferring 
the more intimate smaller parties to 
the large formal ones. 

* * * 

Bridge Luncheon 

Mrs. Oris Bonetti was hostess at a 
bridge luncheon at the Fairmont 
Hotel on Thursday. Around the flow- 
er laden table were seated her guests 
which included: Mrs. Albin Andren, 
Mrs. Harold Isaacs, Mrs. Herman 
Martens, Mrs. Percy Colman, Mrs. 
Harry Clawson, Mrs. Raymond Mur- 
phy, Mrs. Roy Isaacs. 

* * * 

Mrs. Dargie's Home 
Near Its Completion 

Mme. Herminia Peralta Dargie, 
who has made her home at the Fair- 
mont Hotel for some time past, is 
busily engaged in completing her 
beautiful Spanish home in Piedmont. 
Her niece, Miss Inez Orena and her 
nephew, Capt. Antonio Martin, have 
been down the peninsula and among 
those entertaining them was Miss 
Marie Antonia Field of Monterey, 
who gave a large tea. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Corkins of Lara- 
mie, Wyoming, are guests at the 
Hotel Whitcomb attending the Ameri- 
can Honey Producers' meeting. Cork- 
ins is the treasurer of the University 
of Wyoming, which is located at Lara- 
mi (V 

(Continued on page 16) 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



February 4, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



MEN AND THEIR AFFAIRS 



Men figuring in the big affairs of 
municipal life have been exceedingly 
active in their various spheres this 
past week. Many have been enter- 
taining notables and prominent busi- 
ness men visiting San Francisco. 

Leaders of the various enterprises, 
executives of men's organization and 
many who have headed convention 
programs have added more fame to 
San Francisco's place as a meeting- 
place for big affairs. 



Commonwealth Club 

The Silver Anniversary of the Com- 
monwealth Club of California was 
held yesterday, Friday, February 3, 
t the Palace Hotel. 

Men figuring in the financial, pro- 
fessional and business world, who be- 
ong to this leading club of San Fran- 
cisco, took part in the day's delibera- 
tions, the anniversary program being 
nder the chairmanship of Edward 
F. Adams. 

Past and present governors of the 
Commonwealth Club from 1903 to 
1928 comprise: Edward F. Adams, 
David P. Barrows, Charles H. Bent- 
ey, T. Danforth Boardman, Albert E. 
Boynton, Frederick W. Bradley, Fred- 
;ric Burk, J. P. Chamberlain, Wil- 
iam Fitch Chenet, George E. Cro- 
hers, 0. K. dishing, Horace Davis, 
i'rank P. Deering, William Denman, 
George W. Dickie, William Jay Dut- 
on, Charles deY Elkus, Francis P. 
j'arquhar, John D. Galloway, Morton 
1. Gibbons, C. E. Grunsky, Prentiss 
Cobb Hale, Thomas E. Haven, I. N. 
libberd, Beverly L. Hodghead, Rufus 
D . Jennings, James A. Johnston. J. M. 
Kepner, Manfred S. Kohlberg, Fred- 
rick J. Koster, Charles D. Marx. J. 
I. McCallum, Alonzo G. McFarland. 

harles W. Merrill, George W. Mer- 
itt, James W. Mullen, James D. 
»helan, Charles Raas. Emmet Rix- 
ord, Paul Scharreaberg, Max C. 
Boss, Clarence M. Smith. Grant H. 
Smith, Reginald Knight Smith. Wal- 



Park Lane Maisonnettes 

5 to 8 Rooms with 2 to 5 Baths 

Magnificent view. Every service, from 
doorman to valet. Furnished or un- 
furnished. Garage. Class A steel 
frame building. 

"Maisonmtte" has the elrrance of a mansion with 
all conveniences ol an apartment Mouse. 

PARK LANE APARTMENTS 

1100 Sacramento Street 
Diagonally Acroaa from Hotel Fairmont 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 

Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

600 Rooms 

Tariff : From $4 per day 



ter V. Stafford, Max Thelen, Eugene 
T. Thurston, Earle A. Walcott, Wil- 
liam H. Waste, Rolla Vernon Watt, 
Harris Weinstock, John Phillip 
Young, Frederick Whitton, E. W. 
Wilson, C. M. Wollenberg. 

* * * 

Presentation of Gavel 
And Anniversary Crown 

John L. McNab presented the 
twenty-fifth anniversary gavel and 
crown to Father Edward F. Adams, 
founder of the Commonwealth Club 
and its second president (1908 to 
1912). 

"Presidents I Have Known" was 
the topic of an address by Executive 
Secretary Earle Ashley Walcott. 
"Past Accomplishments of the Com- 
monwealth Club of California" was 
reviewed by President Eugene T. 
Thurston. 

Max Thelen, ex-president, spoke on 
"Membership and Policies of the Com- 
monwealth C 1 u b. Ex - President 
Beverly L. Hodghead paid high trib- 
ute to "The Commonwealth Club of 

California." 

* * * 

Musical Program 

A musical program was given at 
this silver anniversary of the Com- 
monwealth Club, under the direction 
of Cyrus Trobbe, the orchestra play- 
ing favorite selections. 

* * * 

Advertising Talks 

K. L. Hamman. who presided at the 
annual convention of branch man- 
agers of the Johnston-Ayres Com- 
pany, held in San Francisco this past 
week, declared in one of his impres- 
sive talks, that advertising of the 
type that will stabilize profits of 
clients is wanted. Hamman stated 



that competitive advertising condi- 
tions become keener and keener. 

Methods for meeting these condi- 
tions were discussed during the inter- 
esting sessions at the Johnston-Ayres 
Company's offices on Market street. 

Banquets and luncheons were held 
during the convention meetings with 
always some prominent speaker ap- 
pearing before the gatherings, attend- 
ed by prominent men from all parts 
of the state. 

Leading men at the convention in- 
cluded: K. L. Hamman, president of 
the Johnston-Ayres Company and 
George Eberhard, director, San Fran- 
cisco, and H. C. Fiester and D. W. 
Cummings of the L. S. Gillham Com- 
pany, Los Angeles; M. C. Nelson, L. 
S. Gillham Company, Salt Lake City ; 
Raymond Kelly of Syverson & Kelly 
Company, Spokane; George Follett 
and F. L. Tomasche of K. L. Hamman 
Advertising Co., Oakland ; Norman B. 
Stern, vice-president and service man- 
ager. 

Hamman is also president of each 
agency in the group as well as of H. 
E. Lesan Company of New York, Chi- 
cago and St. Petersburg, Florida. 

* * * 

Dinner for Masonic 
Lodge Leaders Held 

An elaborate dinner with program 
numbers of interest was given recent- 
ly by Educator Lodge 554, F. and A. 
M. with Junior Warden Johannes Jor- 
genson chairman of the dinner. 
Eighty-four members attended. 

Plans were outlined at this dinner 
for the year's activities and, judging 
from the suggestions that were made, 
the lodge will have a brilliant season. 
The program outlined includes dinner 
dances, theater parties, athletic com- 
petitions, outings and an annual play. 

* * * 

San Francisco Contractor 
Chosen to Head Organization 

W. A. Bechtel of San Francisco has 
(Continued on page 17) 



^e, you pay no more y^ 



*L 




"The\bice of a. Thousand Gardens' 
224-226 Grant Ave., Sutter 6200 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1928 




'LEISURE'S WW 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ 7dm Moore- 




Theater Lures 

Many theaters and motion picture 
houses offer lures for those who want 
something especially good, this week. 

Somehow it seems as if San Fran- 
cisco was getting to be more and more 
a good theater town and so the big 
productions are coming west — just to 
hear what is meant by San Fran- 
cisco's enthusiasm. 

* • * * 

Curran 

"Broadway" at the Curran theater 
is drawing crowds'. 

• There are any- number of reasons 
why the play draws. The actors are 
all good, exceptionally good; brilliant. 
The play is positively clever and up- 
to-the-minute. It shows back-stage 
scenes^that are most fascinating and 
real. 

" But' why so much profanity ? To 
even -the most seasoned of theater- 
goers it squnds out of place. It is 
rather to one's liking, in places, to 
hear a genuine' "damn it" where it 
belongs. \yhy the repetition and all 
the rest of the profanity — prefixing 

the name of the deity, I mean ? 

* * * 

Change of Name 

. The Lurie theater will henceforth 
be called Geary theater, and be under 
the operatjpn of Homer F. Curran 
and the Wobber brothers who with 
the Shuberts have bought out the 
entire interest of Louis R. Lurie. 

* * * 

Geary 

Miss Pauline Frederick, one of 
America's most beautiful and accomp- 
lished actresses, will be the attraction 
at the Geaj*y theater, beginning next 
Monday, February 6. The coming of 
Miss Frederick to this city will be 
notable for several reasons. As an 
actress sh^ ranks among the first, not 
only on the American stage, but 
wherever the English language is 
spoken. It, will be the first appearance 
in spoken drama of Miss Frederick in 
the United States since her triumph- 
ant tour of Great Britain, where she 
was acclaimed the greatest tragic 
actress that had played there since 
the immortal Bernhardt. It will also 
be the first performance of the new 
play, "The Scarlet Woman," by Zelda 
Sears and Reita Lambert ; the play in 
which Miss Frederick intends to ap- 
pear in London in the early summer. 



By Josephine Young 

"The Scarlet Woman," despite the 
underworld character of its title. Is 
one of the merriest of comedies. The 
name is fastened upon the heroine of 
the story by a group of gossiping 
women, when, after an absence of 
some time from home she returns 
with an infant from a foundling asy- 
lum that she has charitably adopted. 
The committee on morals of the local 
woman's club sees to it that she is 
duly branded, but after amusing her- 
self with the blunders of the commit- 
tee, the young woman clears her char- 
acter and has a good laugh on her 
would-be traducers. 

Miss Frederick, in her delightful 
performance of Somerset Maugham's 
play, "Lady Frederick," last season 
proved to the theatergoers of this 
city that she was equally artistic in 
comedy or tragedy. Her earliest suc- 
cesses were made in comedy and, in 
returning to this field, she is follow- 
ing the desire of years. She brings 
with her a supporting company of 
unusual excellence, in which are such 
clever players as Thomas Holding, 
who played the title role in "Ben 
Hur" a few years ago; Marie Shot- 
well, at one time the leading lady of 
James O'Neill when that great actor 
played "Virginians," "Monte Cristo," 
and "The Three Musketeers"; Frank 
Raymond, a former musical comedy 
star; Lillian Elliot; Norman Peck, 
who played the young Swede in "The 
Cradle Snatchers"; Henry Hall, once 
a star well known in the middle west, 
and several others of note. The 
gowns and other accessories to the 
production are said to be very hand- 
some. Mail orders for seats may be 
sent in now. 

* * * 

Columbia 

"Sunny" opens at the Columbia 
theater Monday night with a cast of 
twenty-one principals, circus perform- 
ers and a jazz orchestra of their own. 

Sunny will be Helen Patterson. 
Nicky Pitell is comedienne and dan- 
cer. William Valentine, Harry Miller, 
Ernest Wood, Elmira Lane, Fred G. 
Holmes, Peggy Fear, Wendell Mar- 
shall, Morgan Williams and the Cros- 
by brothers are principals. 

Oscar Hammerstein Jr. and Otto 
Harbach, together, turned out the 
book. Jerome Kern wrote the music. 



Amusements 

Next Week 
ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"New Brooms." Henry Duffy players. 

Columbia, Eddy nr. Powell 

"Sunny," musical comedy. Starts Monday. 
Marx Bros. — Company of 115. 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

Jed Harris presents "Broadway." a Nieht Club 
Classic. 

The Geary, Geary nr. Mason sts., 
Formerly the Lurie 

Pauline Frederick in the "Scarlet Woman." 
Starts Monday. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"Nightstick," modern melodrama. Henry Duffy 
players. 

VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

"The Promenaders" — Ned Wavburn Follies. 
"The Cheer Leader," Gertrude Olmstcad. Ralph 
Graves. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Paul and Lloyd Waner — baseball players in 
song, dance and features. On the screen "The 
Coward." Warner Baxter. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Vaudeville — Pictures. 

ON THE SCREEN 

Downtown 
California, Market St. at 4th 

Emil Jannings in "The Last Command." 

Casino, Ellis at Mason 

Double Bill — "Womanpower." Ralph Graves, 
Lou Tellegcn. Saturday: "The Call of the 
Heart." featuring "Dynamite," (The Wonder 
Dog). Sunday and Monday: "The Auctioneer," 
featuring George Sidney. 

Embassy, Market nr. Seventh 

Louise Fazendn in "A Sailor's Sweetheart." 
Clyde Cook. Vitaphone feature Mischa Elman. 
noted violinist and a two act play "Solomon's 
Children." 

Granada, Market at Jones 

Kolb and Dill in skit "In Algeria." 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th 

Douglas Fairbanks in "The Gaucho." 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"Rose Marie,, — Joan Crawford, George Cooper, 
House Peters, Creighton Hale. 



February 4, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



The Four Marx Brothers end their 
engagement Saturday night at the 

Columbia. 

* * * 

Community Players 

The Pasadena Community Players 
came here last week and completely 
captivated us with their supreme 
mastery of each drama. 

"Getting Married," the George 
Bernard Shaw play, with its timely 
discussion on marriage, was presented 
Monday afternoon, and I never saw a 
more perfect production or a better 
balanced company of players. 

Gilmor Brown was superb ! 

Margaret Clarke, whom many San 
Franciscans have followed in their 
interest of her stage career, essayed 
the role of the bishop's daughter. She 
is talented and beautiful and may at- 
tain to whatever heights she cher- 
ishes. 

How every actor must appreciate 
the chance to appear in a play, espe- 
cially a Shaw play, with Gilmor 
Brown, whose gorgeous voice, histri- 
onic ability and subtle humor are just 
a few of his qualifications as an actor. 
I haven't said anything about how 
handsome he is, but every other 
woman in the theater raved about 

him. 

* * * 

President 

"Nightstick" is still packing 'em in 
at the President. 

Don't miss seeing this Henry Duffy 
play, which is now in its fourth big 
week with popular Duffy players in 
the cast, including Kenneth Daig- 
neau, Thomas Chatterton, Earl Lee 
and Frank Darien. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

"The Promenaders," third of a 
series of the "Follies" type sent over 
the Orpheum circuit this season by 
Ned Wayburn, is to share headline 
honors with Bill Robinson at the 
Golden Gate theater. The cast in- 
cludes : John Byam, singing and 
dancing juvenile, Peggy Hanlon, 
prima donna soubrette, Shirley Rich- 
arils, high-kicking specialist, Blanche 
and Elliott, adagio dancers, and a 
dozen of the Wayburn pupils and pro- 
teges. 

Bill Robinson is well known to 
vaudeville audiences. He is a colored 
comedian in "The Dark Cloud of 
Joy." 

Billy Farrell and Company have a 
new farce comedy called "Home. 
Sweet Home." Harry Holmes is a 
pessimist who carries good cheer. 

The feature photoplay is a snappy 
college picture. "The Cheer Leader." 
Ralph Graves and Gertrude Olmsted 
are the featured players. 



Orpheum 

Paul and Lloyd Waner, baseball 
brothers, are to head the bill at the 
Orpheum theater starting Saturday 
matinee, for one week, which will be 
called "Celebrity Week." These two 
boys, known as "The Record Break- 
ers of the Pittsburgh Pirates," are 
musicians as well as ball players. 
They play the saxophone and violin. 
In their act they also have comedy 
bits as well as a baseball talk. 

Other features will include a dance 
called "One Arabian Night," with 
Lois Syrell the featured artist ; Betty 
and Jerry Browne in a skit called 
"The Elopers"; Con Colleano, Span- 
ish "Wireist," assisted by a dashing 
Spanish girl; Gaston Palmer, the 
French humorist. 

The feature photoplay will be "The 
Coward," a powerful melodrama, 
headed by Warner Baxter. 

* X # 

Embassy 

Louise Fazenda, popular come- 
dienne of the screen, will be the star 
of the next attraction at the Em- 
bassy. This film is entitled "A 
Sailor's Sweetheart" and gives the 
star, together with Clyde Cook, an 
opportunity to cavort. 

Miss Fazenda is seen as a dignified 
teacher in an exclusive school for 
girls. She inherits a fortune and the 
world commences paying her homage. 
Husbands, sweethearts and suitors 
arrive. The resulting events form the 
plot for one of the funniest comedies 
ever shown on the screen. Myrna 
Loy and John Miljan are others in 
the cast. 

On the Vitaphone, Mischa Elman 
is the featured player. The noted 
violinist of the concert stage offers a 
pair of his most fascinating numbers, 
"Humoresque" and the Grossec "Ga- 
votte." Others on the entertaining 
bill are The Rollickers, Cliff Nazarro, 
and a two-act playlet. "Solomon's 

Children." 

* * * 

California 

Emil Jannings starring in "The 
Last Command" is still on at the Cali- 
fornia theater with high military life 
and court scenes depicted in spectacu- 
lar drama. A tragic climax is a big 

feature. 

* * * 

Granada 

Kolb and Dill, in person, are at the 
Granada theater this week in one of 
the skits which feature the tall and 
the fat man in their old-time stuff 
which made them so famous. 

The skit is called "In Algeria." 

with a big company of pretty girls 

taking part. The Granada theater is 

starting their "greater stage season." 

(Continued on page 20) 



All the Hot water 
you want 

—no -waiting, no bother 

Isn't it a wonderful convenience to al- 
ways have plentiful hot water im- 
mediately? 

Men like their clubs and the hotels 
for just this reason. 

And you can have this excellent hot 
water service in your own home. 

An Automatic Storage Gas Water 
Heater gives plentiful hot water day 
and night — deep hot water for bath- 
ing, a basinful for shaving. There's no 
waiting, no bother. 

Details on replacing your old water 
heater with a modern Automatic Stor- 
age Gas Water Heater can be obtained 
by phoning or calling at our local 
office. 




■ PACIFIC SEBV1CI" 



Pacific Gas and electric Company 

Owned • Operated • Managed 

by CdlijoTnicms 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.900.000 caps were serred at the 

Panama-Pacific International Exposition 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidat ions with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1927 

Assets $117,394,234.04 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $600,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-I'RESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa bt. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4]4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation. General Liability. Plate Glass, Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety, Burclary. Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital S20.000.000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought: FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued: CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 650 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON, ENGLAND : NEW YORK ; PORTLAND, ORE. ; SEATTLE, 
WASH.: MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Phones Davenport 4480 
Sutter 4400 



Insurance Exchange Building 
433 California Street 




SCOTT & 
MULVIHILL 

General Insurance and 
Surety Bonds 




MADE TO ORDER ONLY 

Muffin night robes ^fllBK' 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 

25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



FINANCE 



There was a notable falling off of insurance shares on 
the San Francisco Stock Exchange. Fireman's Fund lost 
11/2 to 121 and Home Fire and Marine declined 1% to 45. 



Chas. D. Slattery, general manager in the brokerage 
firm of Feeney and Slattery, has been elected to member- 
ship in the San Francisco Curb Exchange. Slattery was 
formerly associated with Anderson and Fox and some 
time ago was connected with Newell-Murdoch-Railley & 
Company. 

Volume of business for a single month passed the 
§100,000,000 mark on the San Francisco Stock Exchange. 
A year ago in January trading totaled only $28,190,428 
for the month. The number of shares traded in greatly 
exceeds that of last year for January- 



Southern Pacific issues a pamphlet called "How best to 
see the Pacific Coast," of which it distributed 200,000 last 
year throughout this country, Canada and Europe. It is a 
very formidable and artistic piece of propaganda for the 
Pacific Coast. 



The Fish and Game Commission had a clean up of the 
ice chests in the markets containing game — geese and 
ducks — marked by the sportsmen. The 15th of January 
was the limit for geese and ducks and the birds taken 
were confiscated and turned over to the Relief Home. The 
joke was on the sportsmen who took it philosophically. 



Tourist traffic with California rises so fast that the 
Santa Fe has put ten of the largest and fastest passenger 
locomotives ever designed to pull the continental trains 
in service. These engines are capable of taking a Pullman 
train of seventeen cars through the Rocky mountain 
division of the system with ease at a speed that had not 
before been considered possible. 



Samuel Kahn, president of the Market Street Railway 
Company, refuses to be discouraged by the results of 
1927 which showed a downward tendency in revenue. He 
says, "The public requires three outstanding essentials 
in city transportation — comfort, dependability and speed 
with safety." 



"The economic principle of seeking greater earnings 
through maximum sales volume at the lowest possible 
price has been consistently followed by H. M. Byllesby 
and Company with a degree of success which is now fairly 
well known nationally among investors and the public in 
general," says "Inside Track," the organ of the Market 
Street Railway Company. 



Leading bank issues have again hit high levels on the 
San Francisco Stock Exchange. Bancitaly, with a heavy 
turnover of 64,049 shares, had a very mixed week, start- 
ing at 148 :I D and ending at 146. Bank of Italy made new 
ground, touching 266% and closing at 264. Pacific Gas 
made a gain of 1. 



British air transport companies operating between im- 
portant centers within the United Kingdom are unable 
to compete with rapid and regular water and rail trans- 
port, because of the short distances, but they are making 
a good showing to and from the Continent. Their ma- 
chines carried 69,870 passengers across the channel up to 
December 31, 1926. From five to 50 per cent of the total 
were carried by other European companies. There were 
32,712 flights by British, French, Dutch, Belgian and 
other aircraft, which carried 109,634 passengers. 



February 4, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



AIR LINES 

By Lieut. Blaine Stubblefleld 




Means for increasing the safety of air travel is just 
now receiving close attention by aeronautical engineers in 
all parts of the world. Of par- 
ticular interest in this connec- 
tion, is a paper read by H. 
Brunat, of the Service de la 
Navigation Arienne before the 
Societe Francaise de Navigation 
Arienne. We are indebted to 
Popular Aviation, published in 
Chicago, for a detailed account 
of M. Brunat's proposals. Inci- 
dentally, Mr. C. R. Borkland, 
business manager for Popular 
Aviation, is in San Francisco 
and Oakland this week, taking 
notes on the status of aviation 
on the Pacific Coast. He flew 
here from Chicago on Boeing Air 
Transport mail planes, and will 
visit Seattle and Los Angeles on Pacific Air Transport 
planes. 

Briefly, M. Brunat suggests that the speed range of air- 
planes be increased, that is, that they be so constructed 
that control can be maintained at a slower flying speed. 
Control at slower flying speed means that planes could be 
materially slowed down in landing without approaching 
the stalling point. M- Brunat thinks that aircraft should 
be able to take off and land at speeds as low as 25 or 30 
miles an hour, although he admits that this advantage 
would be offset by a great reduction of the normal cruising 
speed. And with too much reduction in cruising speed, 
the speed-value of the airplane would be materially de- 
creased. As a solution to this problem, the writer sug- 
gests a slotted wing structure, already tried by Handley- 
Page, which enables the pilot to change the angle of 
attack, thereby increasing or decreasing the speed-lift 
ratio of the machine. 



Lieut. Blaine Stubblefleld 



M. Brunat further asserts that, next to fog, engine 
trouble is the greatest problem now confronting flyers. 
The trouble is, of course, that partial or total engine 
failure may necessitate a landing where no suitable land- 
ing field is within reach. The most common causes of 
engine failure, he continues, are valves, control springs, 
valve rocker arms, and rocker pins. Next in order come 
piston troubles, which are, he asserts, mostly eliminated 
in the new types of engines now being turned out. But 
most engine failures are due to lack of inspection and 
proper care, and a remedy is to be found in close co-opera- 
tion between engine manufacturers and flyers. 

This co-operation may be practiced through a "rem- 
and-sale" system, under which the user would rent the 
airplane for a period, after which lie agrees to buy it if 
(he terms of the contract are carried out. 

Engine troubles might be further alleviated by the 
elimination of valves and water cooling systems. Longer 
endurance tests on the ground, and not so many in the 
air are recommended, for the reason that engines may 
be more accurately checked up while running on the 
block. 

The use of multi-motored planes, which can continue to 
fly indefinitely with one motor stopped, is the leading 
step. M. Brunat thinks, toward the complete elimination 
of forced landings. 



Pat Froom, Pacific Air Transport station superintend- 
ent at Fresno, reports what we think is the first instance 
of a bum being booted off a passenger plane. No, they 
kicked him off before the ship got aloft. The man came 
down to the field and asked if he could buy a ticket for 
Los Angeles. He was told that passengers were not car- 
ried over the route in darkness. With a sigh of disap- 
pointment, the customer turned away. Just as the plane 
was leaving the warming block, Froom opened the cabin 
door and looked in to see if everything was in trim. There 
sat the itinerant gent, huddled in the corner, hoping that 
the pilot would take the air before the sup gave it to him. 



This week, we have two new arrivals in the great 
family of air mail transport lines. One is from Albany 
through Buffalo to Cleveland, and the other is Route No. 
24, Cincinnati to Chicago. The latter is operated by the 
Embry Riddle Company of Cincinnati, using five Waco 
planes. Waco planes, now very popular in the light-plane 
market, carry two passengers and several mail sacks in 
the front cockpit. As is usually the case, poundage on 
these new lines is rather light, but the outlook is en- 
couraging. San Francisco's interest in them is, of course, 
that they add two more arms to the vast airway system 
by which we contact the nation with air mail. Other 
lines lateral to the transcontinental are expected to ccme 
into Chicago in the spring. 



A Chicago bank this week announced that the minimum 
amount of exchange items to be cleared by air mail has 
been reduced from S500 to S300. 



Entertaining his passengers is a hobby with Clair K. 
Vance, western division pilot between Reno and San 
Francisco on the Boeing Air Transport line. Vance has 
installed telephones between his cockpit and the passen- 
ger cabin so that he can converse with his passengers. 
When the ship sails over a town, or a river, or a moun- 
tain, he calls up the folks and tells them names and his- 
tory. Maps are supplied the passengers, showing the 
country under the route, but inexperienced observers too 
often lose track of themselves on the map, and become 
very curious as to their whereabouts. Vance keeps them 
posted by phone, so that they may become duly amazed 
about the speed they are making, and take mental notes 
so as to tell the boys what they saw on the way. There 
is no bell on the aerial phone system ; the flashing of a 
small light signals the passengers that they are to listen 
in. Passengers cannot call the pilot, because there are 
times when he must be occupied with other things than 
chatting about the scenery. 



An interesting statement by Postmaster General New: 
"For the first ten months of 1927 there were 654 steam 
and 126 electric locomotives made in America for the 
railroads of the United States. Three hundred new Pull- 
man cars were ordered for 1927. 275 of which were de- 
livered. The whole number owned by the Pullman com- 
pany is 4864. There were 1040 passenger cars made and 
delivered to the railroads in the first ten months of 1927. 
Think of these figures and again think of the 3000 com- 
mercial airplanes for the year." 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1928 



On RUSSIAN 
HILL. ■ 

FOR RENT 

[Unfurnished] 

5 S S 

Modern Apartment - Flat. 
Three Rooms. 



Marine View — Sheltered 
from Winds and Fogs 

5 S s 
1101 Filbert St., Cor. Leavenworth 

Phone Graystone 2793 



An Author 
Says: 

News with a style — the 
writings of good thinkers 
here and abroad — a def- 
inite poise, a live recep- 
tiveness. These are qual- 
ities I find in the 

(Sfymddc 



HALLIBURTON FETED 

Richard Halliburton, author of two of the best sellers, 
"The Royal Road to Romance" and "The Glorious Adven- 
ture," visited San Francisco last week and convinced 
every devotee and reader present that YOUTH is the 
motive power of the day. 

No wonder Richard Halliburton's books are in big de- 
mand. If you ever met the brilliant lad — for he's only 
twenty-seven or twenty-eight, I forget exactly his age — 
if you ever spoke two words with this effervescent ex- 
ample of youth, you would readily understand just why 
everyone is reading and re-reading his masterful books. 

At a luncheon given in the St. Francis Hotel last Friday, 
when his publishers, Bobbs-Merrill Company, were hosts] 
Halliburton told in his refreshing way some of the inti- 
mate incidents of his life. Paul Elder, San Francisco 
book-seller, author and publisher, was the presiding of- 
ficer at the luncheon. George Douglas, editorial writer, 
book reviewer of the Bulletin, introduced Halliburton, as 
no other living man can introduce an honor guest. In fact, 
my idea of being famous, is to have George Douglas of 
San Francisco, give an introduction in that flawless dic- 
tion of his, with his keen insight into literary work and 
his rapt appreciation of those who are true celebrities. 

Richard Halliburton gives no long involved explanations 
of how, or where, he made each new conquest. At the 
luncheon, where western booksellers and critics and the 
local literati were guests, the brilliant young author paid 
high tribute to his mother. He told how she had made the 
sacrifice when he was spurred with ambition for adven- 
ture. In a manly, appealing way, Halliburton exemplified 
the spirit, the enthusiasm, the self-reliance which is his 
heritage and captivated every listener as his boyish young 
voice rang out in highest adulation to "the real heroes of 
this story," as he explains in the dedication of "The 
Glorious Adventure," naming Nell and Wesley Hallibur- 
ton, "my long enduring, and ever courageous infinitely 
patient parents." 

Richard Halliburton is the Lindbergh of literature. 
They both possess that inevitable essence of success — 
stability of purpose coupled with enthusiasm and the 
rarest kind of intelligence. These young Americans 
prompt thinking men and women throughout the universe 
to rise up and say to all the world: "This is a man." 

Only, we paraphrase William Shakespeare by applying 
the supreme specimen to YOUTH, a recognized propelling 
power of our day. 

JOSEPHINE WILSON. 



BUSY KNIGHTS 

The most elaborate program of civic and educational 
activities in the history of a Catholic fraternal society in 
the west will feature a brilliant "California Pageant of 
Progress," to be sponsored by California Council No. 880, 
Knights of Columbus, in San Francisco's Civic Audi- 
um, daily and evenings, from April 24 to 28, inclusive. 
Grand Knight Chris D. McKeon of California council has 
announced the completion of arrangements for the rental 
of the entire auditorium structure for the spectacular 
program, which is expected to draw thousands of visitors 
to San Francisco from all parts of California. 



"How long you in jail fo', Mose?" 

"Two weeks." 

"What am de cha'ge?" 

"No cha'ge; everything am free." 

"Ah mean, what has you did?" 

"Done shot my wife." 

"You all killed yo' wife and only in jail fo' two weeks'.'" 

"Dat's all — then I gits hung." 



February 4, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




IP$gy T?IBL£ 




By Lloyd Farrington Wilson 



THE LUXURY HUSBAND, by Maysie Greig; Lincoln 

Mac Veagh ; The Dial Press ; $2.00. 

This author is one step ahead of Hans Christian An- 
dersen and the Grimm Brothers when it comes to telling 
fairy tales and kindred boloney. The title doesn't help 
the book any, though I guess it's about the best possible. 
There is an intimate glance at the theatrical world that, 
to me, justifies the book. The marriage of a la-de-da heir- 
ess to a penniless young musician was a new idea when I 
wore a bib — but the reaction of the L. H. is well done. 
The spoilt leetle rich girl finally sees the light of happi- 
ness over the remains of the usual titled-but-broke Eng- 
lishman and with the help of a soul sister of her hus- 
band's, contrives a reconciliation. 

Here, too, jazz is called art and a young musician gains 
wealth and fame. In this day and age it's best that we 
all prepare for what might happen — so try this. It's light 
and easy and in spots all to the good. 

* * * 

THE WISE WIFE, by Arthur Somers Roche; The Cen- 
tury Company. 

In a few words, here's how. A highly entertaining story 
of a modern wife who arranges her husband's trial mar- 
riage to another woman and then wins him back at the 
same old game. It's not bad reading and if you know 
Arthur Somers Roche you'll know it's well done. I can 
go horn-blowing on this book as well as any other. The 
tale, if not new, is young and modern. The marriage 
philosophy, "if you can, I can," is the plot around which 
Mr. Roche splashes some very smart conversation and a 
little ultra-ultra suburban colony life. 

* * * 

PLEASANT JIM, by Max Brand ; Dodd, Mead and Com- 
pany; |2.00. 

Came a western thriller. If you still crave 'a little blood 
and thunder or like a little open space literature now and 
then to keep from crying because the buffalos are disap- 
pearing, here 'tis. 

At least there is much in Max Brand's book that puts 
it above the average. The people do their stunts in a way 
that, at worst, doesn't warrant writing your congressman 

to stop. 

* * * 

PICTORIAL GOLF, H. B. Martin ; Dodd, Mead and Com- 
pany; $2.00. 

This is just what the title says. Though most of us 
who do these "punchboard by Underwood" sketches don't 
brave books of instruction, this. I shall allow to live (it 
will anyway). Tommy Armour. Alex Smith, Mike Brady, 
Beorge Duncan, Joe Kirkwood and the late Walter J. 
Travis have all come out in favor of this piece, what more 
do you need? Personally I will keep it to read in dark 

pecrecy. 

* * * 

On the Table 
"The Dawson Pedigree," by Dorothy Savers, and 
'Tracks in the Snow" are two mysteries that have come 
down from the (Lincoln Mac Veagh) Dial Press. Lord 
Charnwood, who did the "Tracks in the Snow." is the 
author of "Abraham Lincoln." Both will come in for a 
fiver next week. 



I await with glee and anticipation the appearance of 
"The Legion of the Damned," Bennett J. Doty's own story 
of his adventures in the Foreign Legion. The Century 
Company are the publishers and I believe they have a hot 
one in this. * * * 

It is particularly interesting in view of the floods 
which have recently devastated London to know that a 
similar flood on an infinitely larger scale is the theme of 
a book entitled "Deluge," which made its author, S. Fow- 
ler Wright, a celebrity over night in England. "Deluge" 
will make its appearance under the Cosmopolitan flag late 
this month. * * * 

The combined efforts of Rafael de Nogales and R. M. 
McBride Co. will give us the long sought answer to the 
question, "Why are we in Nicaragua." This is a matter 
without jest and the "Looting of Nicaragua" is frank, 
whole hearted and an honest answer. This boy knows his 
Nicaragua and, moreover, he has a deucedly elusive 
answer well in hand. 

* * * 

Thomas Hardy's death, which the newspapers recently 
announced, has set us to rereading the books of the man 
who was, perhaps, England's greatest literary master of 
the twentieth century. "Jude the Obscure," "Tess of the 
D'Ubervilles," "The Mayor of Casterbridge," what mighty 
works are these! To those who, having read Hardy's 
great novels, wish to know more of their characters, the 
background which they portray, and their creator, I 
could recommend no finer book than R. T. Hopkins' 
"Thomas Hardy's Dorset" (Appleton). 



IN THE LITERARY LIGHT 

George Palmer Putnam's Arctic exploration lectures 
will be delivered in the Scottish Rite auditorium under the 
direction of Paul Elder. "Greenland — The Little Known" 
is the subject for Tuesday evening, February 7th, and the 
1927 expedition to Baffin Land and beyond will be describ- 
ed Wednesday evening, February 8th. The lectures are 
illustrated with motion pictures taken by Maurice Keller- 
mann that are reported to be most exciting and unusual. 
Arthur H. Young, bow and arrow expert, who accom- 
panied the expeditions, will attend the lectures and give 

a demonstration of bow and arrow shooting. 

* * * 

Dr. Ali-Kuli Khan, founder and director of the Persian 
Art Centre of New York and San Francisco, will deliver 
a lecture in the Paul Elder gallery Saturday afternoon, 
February 4th. at 2:30 o'clock, on "Persia's Contribution 
to the World's Culture." Almost priceless treasures from 
his collection of old Persian manuscripts, paintings, tex- 
tiles, potteries, etc., will be shown to illustrate his re- 
marks. Dr. Khan is widely known among experts and col- 
lectors as an authority on Persian art and his lectures are 

extremely brilliant and interesting. 

* * * 

Mrs. Eda Bruna Fallows will read the New York 
Theater Guild play. "Porgy," in the Paul Elder gallery 
Tuesday afternoon, February 7th. at 2:30 o'clock. This is 
a drama of negro life along the waterfront of Charleston. 
S. C. and rises to terrifying dramatic heights in places, 
carrying sophisticated audiences along with it. 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1928 




MOTOR BODY CORPORATION 

MANLY S. HARRIS 

1116 Post Street Graystone 8020 

Body Construction and Repair 

Duco, Bake Enamelling, Fender Repairs, Upholstering, 

and all body specialties 



LOU W. SARTOR. Proprietor 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry AH Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 

Post and Franktin Streets San Francisco. Calif. 



GRAYSTONE 130 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 
St. George Garage, 410 Bash St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Br 

Management of WILLIAM SAUNDERS 




457 NINTH STREET 



Complete Brake Relining Service 

WAGNER ELECTRIC CORPORATION 

Manufacturers and National Service 

Organization for Lockheed Four 

Wheel Hydraulic Brakes 

SAN FRANCISCO 



THIRD STREET 

STERLING ANDERSON, 



GARAGE 

Manager 



Three Blocks from Southern Pacific Depot 
Corner Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 
Repairing. Oiling, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 



1140 GEARY ST, 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 426S 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automobiles 
— Oxy- Acetylene Weld- 
ing — Blacksmithing. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



AUTO BODY CO. 

LACQUER ENAMELING AND PAINTING 
BODY DESIGNING AND BUILDING 
UPHOLSTERING AND SEAT COVERS 
COLLISION WORK OUR SPECIALTY 



Wm. C. Grayson 



1355 BUSH ST., Near Polk 

San Francisco, California Phone Prospect 318 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

By John E. Tiedeman 

National Automobile Club 

One is almost dazzled by the brilliance of the spectacle 
at the Pacific Automobile Show that opened its doors last 
Saturda}' night with one of the handsomest displays ever 
made on the Pacific Coast. It is a matter of speculation 
as to how automobile manufacturers can find the ideas to 
improve their product as frequently as they have in recent 
years. 

It is not so long ago that an automobile show had to 
depend for its effect on the decorations with which the 
displays were surrounded. Not so in this present year 
of the Automobile Age. Out at the Auditorium the deco- 
rative effect is left entirely to the automobiles themselves 
and that would seem to be more than enough. 

From display to display one wanders in a maze of bril- 
liant colorings that rival the spectrum. Gone are the drab 
colorings that were such a feature of the automobile dis- 
plays of only a few years ago. The black automobile has 
almost disappeared and in its place has come that dazzling 
gasoline chariot that sports all the colors of the rainbow 
in most bewildering and artistic combinations. 

True it is that the decorative scheme of "Bridge the 
Bay" has been given great prominence, but this is merely 
by the way. The many, many beautiful machines capture 
the eye with the least difficulty, so much so in fact that 
the decorative scheme of the auditorium itself is merely 
secondary in the opinion of the beholder. In fact some 
express the opinion that the automobiles themselves form 
the best of decorations for the show. 

This year the number of new models on display is larger 
than ever. All the manufacturers have vied with each 
other in their attempts to turn out the very handsomest 
as well as the most mechanically perfect machine on the 
market. How well they have succeeded may be judged by 
the fact that all of those on display are far superior to 
the models of any previous year. 

Of course, the buying public has much to do with the 
output of finer and handsomer cars. The demand for 
beauty came about in the last few years with the appear- 
ance of the feminine element in the automobile market. ] 
Her influence was bound to be felt. And since the woman 
buyer had become a definite factor in the purchase of an 
automobile, just as she had become in the purchase of a 
home, it is not to be wondered at that the automobile 
manufacturers came to take this influence into considera- 
tion. 

Mechanically, the new cars are by far the most perfect 
that the American manufacturer has ever turned out. 
This was to have been expected, however, because prog- 
ress, even in the manufacture of an automobile must not 
be allowed to stand still. So many improvements have 
been made in the modern motor car that it is difficult to 
give even an approximation of them. 

Year by year the great factories have come more and 
more to the realization that here in the United States it 
is one of the first requirements that any automotive 
product must necessarily be a good product. The Ameri- 
can buyer has, especially in the last year or two, become 
very motor wise. It is no longer necessary to sell him on 
looks only. 

The American motorist is much more motor wise than 
his contemporary in any other country. He must be con- 
vinced that what is under the hood and in the rear end of 
a car is up to standard and he will no longer purchase a 
car because a salesman has told him that it is practically 
perfect mechanically. He looks under the hood himself to 
be convinced of its mechanical excellence. 



February 4, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



One is continually astonished at the number of acces- 
sories that are now considered standard equipment. Time 
was not so long ago when all one got for his money was a 
chassis with a body, painted in indifferent colors on it and 
a more or less efficient engine under the hood. All the 
rest of the "gadgets" needed to make it a real car, the 
purchaser had to go to the accessory and supply houses 
and get for himself. 

Not so today. Now bumpers, a novelty not so very long 
ago by the way, and shock absorbers are considered stand- 
ard on all cars. None comes without either. And there 
was a time when even headlights had to be purchased 
as an extra. Now they come in several styles on all the 
cars. 

One of the things in which the modern car has made 
great progress in is upholstery. As a result the interior 
of the cars have been made things of beauty, indeed. 
Herein, too, the manufacturer has had to take the femi- 
nine requirement into consideration. And now comfort 
and beauty go hand in hand to the great advantage of 
the automobile buyer and owner. 

It is declared that never in the history of the automo- 
tive industry has the motor car manufacturer given so 
much for the dollar the buyer spends with him. That this 
is no idle boast is well illustrated by the present display 
at the auditorium. And this is another reason why the 
industry has, in comparatively few years, climbed into 
the position of the major industry of the country. 

The fact that the automobile dollar goes as far as it 
does is an added reason that there are more than 23,- 
000,000 passenger cars on the roads of the country today. 
It is a very poor family, indeed, that does not own a motor 
car of some kind. Motor cars are now manufactured at 
prices that bring them within the reach of every size 
pocketbook, especially when the present day system of 
installment payment is taken into consideration. 

While the motor car is the principle feature of the 
automobile show and the raison d'etre for its being, one 
must not overlook the fact that many of those who visit 
the show go with the intention of hearing the excellent 
musical program that is given by Creatore's band. 



MOTOR NOTES 

Motorists over the Old Spanish Trail route will find a 
short side trip to the Picture Rocks, fifteen miles west of 
Tucson, Arizona, a very interesting one. 

This historic spot can be reached by traveling west on 
Congress street in Tucson and taking the turn toward 
Silverball. Stay on this road for twelve miles, then turn 
to the left at a sign and take the trail for three miles 
more. Hundreds, or even thousands of years ago, some 
persons whom today we call savages, tried to leave for 
posterity on a group of rocks, a message, or history, per- 
haps, but none the less something of record. 

Today we can only conjecture as to the meanings that 
lie in the crude representations of suns, dancers, priests, 
men, goats, etc. Others there are, too numerous to men- 
tion, that seem to bear something of a legend, some 
■leaning that the wise men of today cannot fully under- 
stand. Some of the pictures on the rock have become so 
worn with age as to lie barely decipherable, but the ma- 
jority are clearly cut into the rocks, apparently as plain 
today as when first carved. 

Among these rocks also are found "pot-holes" which 
are holes worn in the rock where the tribes ground their 
corn. Fragments of pottery alias and stone implements 
have also been found, showing the initiative and advance- 
ment that these aborigines had made. At several other 
points in the Tucson range of mountains, and also in the 
ptoskruge range, are to be found parts of mountains cov- 
ered with similar picture writings. 



DUDLEY FIELD MALONE 

(Continued from page 3) 

"Dudley Field Malone would represent this association 
in the proposed debates. 

"In the matter of selecting a chairman we would sug- 
gest the Rt. Rev. Edward L. Parsons, Bishop of California 
Diocese, Episcopal Church, or some other man of high 
standing to be mutually agreed upon. 
"We would appreciate an immediate answer. 

"(Signed) W. H. METSON, 
"Chairman, California Division, Association 
Against the Prohibition Amendment." 
The following reply was received from Dr. Briggs : 
"W. H. Metson, chairman, California Division, Associa- 
tion Against the Prohibition Amendment. 
"San Francisco, California. 

"Dear Mr. Metson: I have just received your letter of 
January 24th, inviting a debate with Mr. Dudley Field 
Malone on the subject, 'Should Congress Modify the Vol- 
stead Act?' There is such a pressure of important work 
already laid out for this year, that I do not feel that we 
can consistently allow ourselves the diversions of a debate 
with Mr. Malone. 

"Very truly yours, 

"(Signed) A. H. BRIGGS." 



The Win Love Marionettes will produce "The Princess 
and the Pea," in a dramatization in two acts and a pro- 
logue, of Hans Andersen's celebrated story, in the Paul 
Elder gallery Saturday, February 11th. There will be 
two performances, at 10:45 a. m. and 2:30 p. m. Nothing 
has been spared to make the Win Love Marionettes the 
finest of their kind. The stringed "dolls" were designed 
by Emil Kosa. The stage lighting, by Taylor and Scott, is 
said to be a triumph. The play is produced under the di- 
rection of Mrs. Clara V. Winlow, with the assistance of 
Anna C. Winlow and a cast of six manipulators. 



A FLYING FACT 

Business got off to a flying start for 1928 at Mills Field, 
San Francisco's municipal airport, according to the Janu- 
ary report just filed by Supervisor Milo F. Kent, chairman 
of this city's airport committee. 

The Kent report shows 918 flights and landings, carry- 
ing 1162 passengers, without a single mishap, to and from 
all parts of the United States. This makes a total of 3813 
flights and landings and 5722 passengers since Mills Field 
opened for business last May. Hundreds of tons of mail 
and merchandise also have been handled in the Mills Field 
service. 

In the eight and one-half months of Mills Field opera- 
tion business has grown continuously, necessitating con- 
stant expansion of the equipment. New hangars are now 
being built at Mills Field to accommodate the increasing 
demands of commercial aviation and the Board of Super- 
visors is considering acquiring additional land adjacent 
the 250 acres now in use at Mills Field, where several 
Hying schools and agencies of airplane manufacturers 
have leased space. 

Mills Field is now general recognized as "the model 
municipal airport of America" and many cities have se- 
cured its plans to follow in the construction of airports. 

After an extensive survey of airports in the San Fran- 
cisco Bay region. Mills Field has been selected as the 
terminus for a new passenger air line to be opened March 
5 between this city and Seattle by the West Coast Air 
Transport Company. 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1928 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




On the Air 
By C. J. Pennington 

ATTENTION, BROADCASTERS 

Every broadcasting license in the 
United States is due to expire on 
March 1. Before' new permits are 
granted, however, broadcasters will 
have to answer more questions about 
themselves than they have been re- 
quired to do in the past. 

One important question is: The 
location of the transmitter. An an- 
swer to that one could be furnished 
very satisfactorily by the majority of 
the local listeners here in San Fran- 
cisco. It undoubtedly would be that 
all local broadcast stations have their 
transmitters entirely too close to the 
largest number of listeners. The Ra- 
dio Commission should do something 
about this situation when they pass 
out the new broadcasting permits. 

Another important question of in- 
terest to local fans is : approximately 
how many families are there within 
a radius of one, two and three miles 
of the transmitter? Taken on a 
square mile basis, in San Francisco, 
the majority of the people owning re- 
ceiving sets live within the three-mile 
limit of every transmitter. At pres- 
ent there are three high powered sta- 
tions and one low powered station. 
The greatest distance between the 
two furtherest stations is less than 
one mile. Under such conditions is 
there any wonder that local listeners 
complain of poor reception, especially, 
after taking into consideration that 
under each roof there are from one to 
fifty, and even more sets, depending 
upon the number of apartments in 
each building. 

The radio dealers of San Francisco 
should take this situation up with the 
radio commission themselves. It cer- 
tainly would stimulate sales on the 
medium priced receiver to have all 
local transmitters far enough away to 



eliminate a part of the present inter- 
ference. Ask any dealer what diffi- 
culties he meets in selling a medium 
priced receiver in San Francisco. Per- 
haps that is one of the important 
reasons why sales of receiving sets 
dropped off during the month of De- 
cember. People as a whole are in 
favor of good reproduction, but to 
hear a classical program with a back- 
ground of jazz music is too much ; 
naturally, the answer is no sales, and 
who is to blame? 



Friday, February 10 

9 to 9:30 p. m White Rock pro- 
gram. Another sparkling "White 
Rock" program, the third of the 
weekly series, will be offered the NBC 
Pacific Coast Network radio audience 
tonight in the half hour beginning at 
9:30 o'clock. This presentation is 
sponsored by the White Rock Mineral 
Springs Company, producers of White 
Rock water, and makers of White 
Rock ginger ale. 



National Broadcasting program for 
the week of February 5, 1928: 

Sunday, February 5 

1 to 2 p. m.— The Golden Strand 
group. 

3 to 5 p. m. — Great Moments in His- 
tory. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Standard Sym- 
phony orchestra. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 9:30 p. m. — Don Amaizo the 
Wizard. 



Monday, February 6 

8 to 9 p. m. — Shell Symphonists. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

10 to 11 p. m. — Los Angeles studio 
program. 



Tuesday, February 7 

8 to 9 p. m. — Eveready Salon or- 
chestra. 

8:30 to 9 p. m.— U. S. bridge les- 
sons. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 
9 to 9:30 p. m.— Retold tales. 
9:30 to 10 p. m.— The Rounders. 



Wednesday, February 8 

6:30 to 7 p. m Musical Fruit 

Cocktail 

9 to 10 p. m. — The Vagabonds. 



Thursday, February 9 

8 to 9 p. m. — Calpet hour. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 9:30 p. m.— Dodge Brothers, 
Inc. 

9 :30 to 10 p. m. — Moon Magic. 



Friday, February 10 

8 to 9 p. m. — Wrigley review. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 9:30 p. m. — White Rock pro- 
gram. 

9:30 to 10 p. m. — Memory Lane. 



Saturday, February 11 

8 to 9 p. m. — R. C. A. hour. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 10 p. m. — Philco hour. 

10 to 12 midnight — The Trocader- 
ans. 



Programs for Next Week 

KFRC— DON LEE 
SAN FRANCISCO — 154 
Sunday, February 5 

10:00 to 12:00 noon — Home. Sweet Home Concert. 
12 noon to 1 :15 p. m. — Church service. 
1:15 to 3:15 p. m.— S & W Recital. 
3:15 to 4:15 p. m. — KFRC dance orchestra. 
-1:15 to 5:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Talk. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins concert orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

» :30 to 12 :00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Monday. February 6 

7 :00" to .K :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
'- :mi in ',i:mi :i. m.— Studio program. 

9 :00 to 9 :30 p. m. — Georgia O. George. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 

■1 :00 to 1 :80 p. m. — Educational talk. 

4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5 :30 to 6 :20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen, police reports. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— The Cecilians. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Blue Monday Jamboree. 

1 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

Tuesday. February 7 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. —Georgia O. George. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Studio program. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay concert. 
-1:00 to 4:30 p. m. — Educational talk. 

4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5 :15 to 6 :30 p. m. — News items, 

5:30 to 6:10 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6:10 to 6:25 p. m. — With stamp collectors, 

i: :25 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Sports talk. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Haas program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 
Wednesday, Fehruary 8 

7 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay concert. 
-1:00 to 4:30 p. m. — Educational talk. 

4:30 to 5:15 p, m. — Organ recital. 
5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 
5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
6 :20 to 6 :80 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m.— The Cecilians. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Maxwell House Coffee program. 

9 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Dance program. 
Thursday. February 9 

7 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Musical program. 

9 :00 to 9 :30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Charles Hamp. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 

4 :00 to 4 :30 p. m. — California State Library talk. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5 :15 to 5 :30 p. m. — News items. 
n. — Mac and his Gang. 
a. — Beauty talk, 
m. — The Cecilians. 
n. — Mona Motor Oil Co. 
m.— KFRC Movie Club. 

-Airplane Flying Lesson. 
-Dance orchestra. 



5 :30 to 6 :20 i 

6:20 to 6:30 | 

6 :30 to 7 :30 

8:00 to 9 :00 I 

9:00 to 9:45 p. m.- 

9:45 to 10:00 p. m.- 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.- 

Friday. Fehruary 10 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

9 :00 to 9 :30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 

9:30 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Hints to home-makers. 



February 4, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay program. 

4 :00 to 4 :30 p. m. — Student hour. 

4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6 :20 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

1:80 to 7:00 p. m. — Sports talk. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Charles Hanip. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Skyway journeys. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m — Dance orchestra. 

Saturday. Fehruary 11 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m.— Shopping service. 

11:00 to 11:45 a. m. — Amaieur tryuuts. 

11 :45 to 12 :00 noon — Announcements of Sunday 

church sermons. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert. 
4:00 to 4:30 p. m.— Educational talk. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m.- — Organ recital. 
5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 
5:30 lo 0:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
$ :20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

KPO— HALE BROTHERS AND THE CHRONICLE 

SAN FRANCISCO— 422 
Sunday, February 5 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Church services. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

8:00 to 4:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Co. 

4:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

5:30 to 7:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orches- 
tra. 

Monday, February 6 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
:00 to 9 :00 a. m.— Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11 :30 to 1 :00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 

4 :00 to 5 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Musical program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO's variety program. 

Tuesday. Fehruary 7 

" :45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
:00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m.— Domestic economist. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:0(1 to 11:30 a. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO dance orchestra. 

Wednesday, Fehruary 8 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10:30 to 10 :45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:45 a. m. — Home service talk. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiian?. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

6:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to (i :30 p. m. — Ye Tnwne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7 [00 to 7 :80 p. m.- Gypsy ami Maria. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Atwater Kent Artists. 
9:00 in 10:00 p. m.— Abas String Quartette. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KPO Dance Orchestra. 
Thursday, February 9 

6:46 io 8:00 a. m- Health exercises. 

B :00 to :00 a. m.- Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10:30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

n :80 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. KPO orchestra. 

■i ;0fl to G :00 p. m. mm. 

6:00 io 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

i; :00 to 6 :80 p. rn. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:80 to 7:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

t :00 to t ;80 p. m. Snorts ami poultry talk. 

1 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. Na( Ions I ins Co. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. Studio program. 

Friday. February 10 

8:00 a, m.- Health exerc 
to :00 a. ID.— Sparry Flour happy hour. 
10:30 to 10 :45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 
10:46 a. m. — Home service talk. 
11:80 a. m. to 12:46 p, m. -Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
12 :15 p. m.— Commonwealth luncheon at Palace Hotel. 
1:80 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
6:00 to 6:00 P. m. — Children's hour. 
6:00 to 6:80 p. ni.- Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:90 to 7:30 p. m. -Organ recital. 

B*00 to 0:80 p. m. National Broadcasting Company. 
0:80 to 10:30 p. m. Kt'O Concert Orchestra. 

to 12:30 a. m. KPO Dance Orchestra. 
Saturday. Fehruary II 
6:4,% to 8:00 a. m. —Health exert 



8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :00 to 10:30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 
10:30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer. , 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon— Time signals. Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 
2:00 p. m.— Football. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6:30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— KPO Dance Orchestra. 

S:00 to 12:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS, INC. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 267 
Sunday, February 5 

7 :oii tu y :UU p. m. — Church services. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance program. 
Monday, February 6 

8:20 to 10:00 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 

1U:2i I to 10 :3U a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

10:30 to 11:00 a. m. — Interior Decorating. 

12 :uu to 1 :00 p. m.— Luncheon program. 

1:00 to 1:30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Concert. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. .m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports talk. 

7 : 15 to 7 :bU p. m. — Advertising tnlk. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m.— Darneille Sister. 

8:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

1U :0U p. m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, February 7 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:00 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m.— Concert. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — ftrt course. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Musical program. 

10 :00 p. m.— Weather and police reports. 
10:03 to 10:30 p. m.— Novelty program. 

10:30 to 11:00 p. m.— Program of popular music. 
Wednesday, February 8 
7:00 to 8:00 a. m, — Health exercises. 
s:20 to 10:00 a. m. — Breakfast program. 
10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 
10:27 to 10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 
12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 
1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 
5:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Concert. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Construction reports. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Concert. 
7 :00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
B:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 
Thursday. Fehruary 9 
7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Health exercises. 
8:20 to 10:f10 a. m. — Breakfast program. 
10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 
10 :27 to 10 :30 a. m.— U. S. weather reports. 
10:30 to 11:00 a. m.— Fashion hints. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon program. 
1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 
.-> ;00 to 6 ;80 p. m. Concert. 
5:30 bo 6:00 p. m. Construction reports. 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour program. 
, :00 to 7 :15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 
7:15 to 7:80 p. m.— Art course. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. Studio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — KFWI Gypsy band. 
Friday. February 10 
::iin i.i B:00 ■• m, Exercise hour. 
8:20 to in:on a, m Breakfast progranu 

in no tO 1(1:27 ft. m. Thrift program. 

bo 10:80 a.m. — U. s. weather reports. 
12:00 tu 1:00 p. m. Musical luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

6:80 to 6:00 p. m. Construction reports. 

10 p. m. Program. 
: :«in to 7 :16 p- m.- S "• T. Davis. 

p. m. — Art course. 
tn 9:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
to 10:00 p. m. — Dance program. 
in :00 p. m. — Weather and police reports. 
10:08 to 10:80 p. m.- Gloria Del Rae 

11:00 p. m Popular program. 
Saturday. February II 
7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Exercise hour. 
8:20 to io:no n. m.— Musical breakfast program. 
10:00 to 10:27 a. m.— Thrift program. 
1027 to 10:30a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 
to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 
to 6:00 p. m.— Construction reports. 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. —Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Harriet Lewis. 
10:00 to 12:30 p. m.— KFWI surprise party. 
KJBS— J1I.IIS BRIXTON & SONS 
BAN FRANCISCO-MI 

Sunday. Fehruary 5 

1:30 to 3:30 p. m. - Instrument and vocal selections. 

8:80 to 5:00 p, m. — Dance music. 

Mondav. February 6 

9:00 to 12:00 m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:30 to 7:30 p. ni. -Instrument and vocal selections. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. —Instrument and vocal selections. 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesdav, Fehruary 7 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 



8:00 to 9:00 p. m.--Orthophonic selections. 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Coco-Nut Club meeting. 

Wednesday. Februnry 8 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocnl selections. 

1:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Instrument an. I vueal - r ■ j . „ ■ , ;,,,,-, 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Orthophunic recital. 

Thursday. Fehruary 9 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. --Music lovers' program. 

Friday. February 111 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

8:00 to 9:30 p. m. — Dance music. 

9:30 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Saturday, February 11 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE 
OAKLAND— 508 
Sunday, February 5 

4:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Chas. T. Besserer, on Scottish 

Rite organ. 
Monday, February 6 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:30 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m„— Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Weekly meeting of Lake Mer- 

ritt Ducks. 
Tuesday, February 7 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11 :30 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:30 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Special program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Wednesday. February 8 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:30 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m.— Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.- — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Variety hour. 
Thursday. February 9 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Lunrheon concert. 
3 :30 to 4 :30 p. m.— Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:80 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. —Dinner concert, 
i !00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
B;fiD to 10:00 p. m. —Special program. 
Friday. February 10 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. —Economics hour. 

to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
8:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m.— Organ recital. 
5:80 to 0:80 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.- -Dinner concert. 
to 7:80 P- m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 tn 10:00 p. m.- (tpera program. 
Saturday, Fehruary 11 
i" i" in 11:80 a. m. — Economics hour. 

1 :00 p. ni.- Luncheon concert. 
5:00 to 8:00 p. m.— Organ recital. 
8:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Hawaiian orchi 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.-News broa. least. ' 

KCO— GENERAL ELECTRIC 
OAKLAND— 391 
Sunday. February 5 
11:00 a. m. — Church service. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
l:0C p. m. Vespt-r service. 

to 7:30 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

m. —Weather report, 
to 9:00 p. m. — Church service. 
Monday, February 6 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 n. m. — Luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:00 p. m. — Women's Clubs. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— St. Francis Orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— KCO Kiddies' Klub. 
6:00 to 6:45 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 
fi:4C p. m. What's Happening in the World. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— The Pilcrims. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 
Tuesday, February 7 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon Concert. 
12:30. weather; 1:00. weather: 1:03. S. F. stocks; 

V Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dance Orchestra. 
6:55. news: 7:03. weather: 7:08, S. F. produce, grain, 

cotton; 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23. N. Y. 

stocks (closing). 

o 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
Wednesday. February 8 
11:15 to 11:30 a. m.— The Home. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather: 1:00, weather; 1:03. S. F. stocks; 

1 :08 N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
6-.30 to 7:00 p. m. — Sunkist dinner hour. 
M 7:30 p. m. — Farm program. 
P. m. — Vaudeville. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Thursday. February 9 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1928 



12:30, weather.; 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :08, N. Y. stocks. 
€ :00 to 6 :55 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
■6:55 p. m. — News; 7:05. weather; 7:08, S. F. produce, 

grain, cotton; 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, 

N. Y. stocks (closing). 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Calpet program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Friday, February 10 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Louise Landis. 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30, weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1:08, N. Y. stocks. 
6 :30 p. m. — Wise man from the Land-O-Health. 
6 :00 to 6 :45 p. m. — Dinner concert program. 
6 :45 to 6 :55 p. m.— "Weekly Financial Review." 
6:55, news; 7:05, weather; 7:08. S. F. produce, gram, 

cotton; 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23. N. Y. 

stock-; (closing). 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to lliOO p. m.— Dance music. 
Satu-day. February 11 

11*30 a m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :08, N. Y. stocks. 
6 :00 to 6 :50 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:50 to 7:15 p. m. — Weather, news, new books. 
7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Weekly sport review. 
8:00 to 11:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance music. 

KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY. INC 
LOS ANGELES — 4€8 
Sunday, February 5 

10 :U0 a. m.— Morning services. 

1:00 to 5:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
5:30 p. m. — Glenn Edmunds and orchestra. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. *n. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7 :35 p. m. — Bob Buckner and Orchestra. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Aeolian organ recital. 
9:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Orchestra. 

Monday, February 6 

5 :30 p. m. — Lone Rene and Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — White King program. 

7:00 p. m. — KFI Symphonette. 

8:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 p. m. — L. A. Philharmonic Orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Metropolitan Dance Orchestra. 

Tuesday, February 7 

5:30 p. m. — The Dragon Hawaiians. 

6:00 p. m. — White King program. 

7 :00 p. m. — Gypsy String Quartette. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — Program, U. of Southern California. 

Wednesday, February 8 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m. — Gold Medal Talks. 

5 :30 p. m. — White King program. 

6:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7:00 p. m. — KFI Symphonette. 

7:45 p. m. — William MacDougall. 

8:00 p. m. — Musical Club program. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard program. 

10:30 p. m.—N. C. Mills. 

Thursday, February 9 

5:30 p. m. — Vernon Elkins and Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m.— White King program. 

7:00 p. m. — KFI Symphonette. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m.- — Program of modern classical music. 

Friday, February 10 

10:45 to 11:05 a. m.— Gold Medal Talks. 

5:30 p. m. — Talk by Eugene Biscailuz. 

5:45 p. m. — Paul McNally. 

6:00 p. m. — White King program. 

7:00 p. m.— KFI Symphonette. 

8:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 p. m. — Packard Concert Orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Virginia McCoy. 

Saturday, February 11 

5:30 p. m. — Packard Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — White King program. 

7:08 p. m. — Nick Harris Detective Story. 

7:30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado. Spanish Baritone. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — -Packard program. 

11 :00 p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. 

KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO CO. 
SEATTLE— 348 
Sunday, February 5 
7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Monday. February 6 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Time signals, sport news. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 9:30 p. m.— Studio program. 
9:30 to 10:30 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 
10:30 to 12:30 p. m.— Goofy Bird Frolic. 
Tuesday, February 7 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
10:00 p. m.— Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 
Wednesday, February 8 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Thursday. February 9 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Friday, February 10 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dancR orchestra. 



Saturday, February 11 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Sport news. News Items. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Vic Meyers Dance Orchestra. 

KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN 
PORTLAND — 191.5 
Sunday, February 5 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.—N. B. C. program. 

10:00 to 11 :00 p. m.— Little Symphony orchestra. 

Monday. February 6 

6 :<J0 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Concert orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p m.— Talk. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.—N. B. C. program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Concert hour. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Spot Light Hour. 

Tuesday, February 7 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Musical program. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Book review and talk. 
8:00 to 11:00 p. m.—N. B. C. program. 
Wednesday, February 8 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Concert orchestra. 

7 :30 to 8 :00 p. m. — Lecture. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 

Thursday, February 9 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:40 p. m. — Utility service. 

7:40 to 8:00 p. m. — Flower girls. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m.—N. B. C. program. 

9:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

Friday, February 10 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Concert. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Utility service and talk. 

3 :00 to 9 :00 p. na. — Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.—N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Concert. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. Uk.— Keep Growing Wiser Order of 

Hoot Owls. 
Saturday, February 11 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. na. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Concert. 
8:00 to 12:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 4) 

Architect and Wife 
Are Dinner Hosts 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Reid were 
hosts at a dinner given in the Vene- 
tian room at the Fairmont Hotel on 
Tuesday evening. Later the party at- 
tended the Japanese play in the Ter- 
race Gold room. In honor of the occa- 
sion the table decorations had as the 
motif a Japanese garden and the place 
cards held diminutive Japanese para- 
sols and lanterns. The favors were 
lacquered bon bon boxes of unique de- 
sign. 

* * * 

Mrs. Mark Altman was hostess at 
a bridge luncheon given at the Fair- 
mont Hotel on Wednesday. Lovely 
spring flowers were used in the table 
decorations and hand painted place 
cards designated the guest arrange- 
ment. The afternoon was devoted to 
bridge. Those present included: Mes- 
dames H. F. Westerfelt, Joseph Wil- 
liams, M. Wright, Robert Young, Har- 
old Gardner, W. E. Asher, M. E. 
Reichert, S. N. Uommi, I. M. Sommer, 
Jack Grandfield, F. W. Callison, B. 
Wright, R. Gill and Dr. Augusta Daw- 



The Vittoria Colonna Club enter- 
tained leaders in executive circles at 
their Junior League meeting recently 
when a musical program was given. 



Guests of Junior 
Auxiliary Council 

Other guests were Mrs. W. W. Bed- 
ford, chairman junior auxiliaries; 
Mrs. Howard C. Brown, past president 
Corona Club Juniors; Miss May Bell 
Walkup, past president of To Kalon 
Juniors ; Miss Emilia Da Prato, mem- 
ber of Vittoria Colonna Juniors, who 
is the latest member to bring dis- 
tinction to the junior groups, having 
won second place in the national radio 

audition recently held in New York. 

* * * 

Miss Norma Stoner, of Los An- 
geles, who is spending the winter at 
the Hotel Whitcomb, has returned 
from a trip south. Miss Stoner is a 
recent graduate of the University of 
California, a member of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma and has a number of friends 
in the bay district who always wel- 
come her return to San Francisco. 

* * * 

They Played Bridge 

Mrs. Henry M. Plate assembled a 
group of friends at a bridge luncheon 
given at the Fairmont Hotel on 
Thursday. Spring blossoms artis- 
tically arranged brightened the table 
around which were seated: Mesdames 
Frank M. Ballard, Elwood C. Boobar, 
Roy J. Cantrell, Russell H. Carpenter, 
William L. Cochran, Leon H. Ene- 
mark, Richard A. Fanto, Fabius T. 
Finch, Thomas H. Fox, Hugh T. 
Gower, William Hoelacher, Winslow 
G. Harnden, William W. Kerr, Ralph 
H. Lachmund, August J. Lartigau, 
Frank J. Lee, Clinton A. Lothrop, 
Floyd S. McAllister, Alfred M. Mc- 
Carty, Henry G. McPike, Edmund A. 
Peiser, Alfred Regan, Alfred C. 
Rulofson Jr., John D. Twohy, Ben- 
ning Wentworth, Henry M. Plate. 

* * * 

Nevada Club Leaders 

Mrs. James F. O'Brien was hostess 
at a beautifully appointed bridge 
luncheon given at the Fairmont Hotel 
Saturday, inviting a group of friends 
to meet Dr. Christine Clegg, who with 
her husband, Dr. J. W. Clegg of Gold- 
field and Reno, is spending the winter 
in Alameda and will at a later date 
take up their permanent residence in 
Los Angeles. All of the members of 
the party were residents of Nevada at 
one time, and in honor to the state 
Mrs. C. A. Week read several charm- 
ing poems from a book of verse pub- 
lished and arranged by the Nevada 
Federation of Women's Clubs. Those 
present at the happy reunion includ- 
ed: Dr. Christine Clegg, Mrs. A. E. 
Christensen, Mrs. George Bertschy, 
Mrs. Walter H. Pearson, Mrs. C. A. 
Week, Mrs. Charles J. Adams, Mrs. E. 
E. Hull, Mrs. J. K. Daly, Mrs. W. E. 
Brown, Mrs. J. K. Thomas and Miss 
Katharine O'Brien. 



February 4, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



INN SOCIALLY 

The following people have been 
guests at Santa Maria Inn during the 
past week: 

Mrs. John G. Johnston of San 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. R. Thorsen of 
Berkeley. 

Mr. Frank Sheridan of Carmel. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Frank of San 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Hunt of Ber- 
keley. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Zellerbach of 
San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Mackenzie of 
Pebble Beach. 

Mr. Louis F. Haber and Master 
Edgar Haber, both of San Francisco. 

Mr. G. P. Fay and Mr. S. P. Fay, 
both of Los Angeles. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Kuhn of San 
Mateo. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. J. Kuhn of San 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Bliss of Pied- 
mont. 

Mrs. Lee S. Roberts Sr. and Mrs. 
Lee S. Roberts Jr., both of San Fran- 
cisco. 



MEN AND THEIR AFFAIRS 

(Continued from page 5) 

been chosen president of the Asso- 
ciated General Contractors of Amer- 
ica which held their convention last 
week at West Baden, Indiana. Bechtel 
will succeed Sumner Solitt of Chicago. 
The San Francisco contractor is 
well known nationally as well as in 
this part of the country and the elec- 
tion of Bechtel is welcomed by asso- 
ciates throughout the West. 
* * * 

Historical Group 
Elect Directors 

At a luncheon given at the Clift 
Hotel this past week, the California 
Historical Society elected directors 
for the ensuing year. 

C. Templeton Crocker, James D. 
Phelan, C. 0. G. Miller, Boutwell Dun- 
lap, Sidney M. Ehrman, E. J. Molera, 
Dr. George D. Lyman, Francis F. Far- 
quhar and Carl I. Wheat of San Fran- 
cisco were chosen directors. Four 
directors will represent Berkeley, in- 
cluding Prof. Charles L. Camp, Prof. 
H. D. B. Soule. Mrs. Helen Troop 
Purdy and Anson S. Blake. D. Q. 
Troy of Alameda and Robert E. 
Cowan of I. os Angeles were other di- 
rectors elected to office. 

C. O. G. Miller presided at this 
notable luncheon, having as guest at 
the speakers* table, Mrs. S. E. Dutton. 
daughter of James King of William. 

Dr. George D. Lyman gave a lecture 
on the Vigilante Committee of 1856, 
using lantern slides to illustrate his 
talk. 



Distinguished Visitors 

A party of distinguished New 
Yorkers spent the week-end at the 
Fairmont Hotel. The party included 
Mr. Charles Stone of New York and 
his daughter, Mrs. R. C. V. Mann, 
Messrs. R. E. Hunter and Carretson 
Dulin of Los Angeles were in the 
Charles Stone party and have now 
continued their journey on to New 

York in the private car of Mr. Stone. 

* * * 

We'll All Fly 

"Within three years people will be 
flying about California in much the 
same manner as they now drive about 
in automobiles," said Mr. Ernest Van 
Pelt at the St. Francis Hotel, where 
he arrived last Friday as representa- 
tive of the corporation that distrib- 
utes Ryan airplanes, built from the 
same model as Lindbergh's "Spirit of 
St. Louis." 

A number of brilliant affairs were 
given in honor of Van Pelt who ex- 
pects to close negotiations for the dis- 
tribution of Ryan airplanes, from 
headquarters established in San 
Francisco. * * * 

Dudley Field Lectures 

Dudley Field Malone, publicist and 
orator, was honor guest at an open 
meeting of the Women's Civic Center 
last Friday night at the Hotel Whit- 
comb roof garden when he spoke on 
the prohibition amendment. He is 
appearing in lectures for the Associa- 
tion against the Prohibition Amend- 
ment. * * * 

From the Southland 

Mr. E. W. Murphy and his daugh- 
ter, Miss Kathleen Murphy, of Los 
Angeles have been spending the past 
fortnight at the Fairmont Hotel. Miss 
Murphy is a popular leader in the 
younger society set of the southern 
metropolis and the Murphy home is 
noted for its hospitality. A number of 
affairs have been given compliment- 
ing the visitors during the time they 
have been in the city. 



Dane's Dollar Dog Nets Him Profits- 

"Dane's Dollar Dog." as Karl 
Dane's new pet is known, holds the 
record for profit on an investment, for 
the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer actor re- 
cently turned down five hundred dol- 
lars for him. The initial investment 
was one dollar — which means a profit 
of five hundred per cent. 

The dog was the puppy of one of 
the five hundred dogs used in "The 
Trail of "98." in which Dane appeared. 
At the close of the picture all extra 
dogs were sold at a dollar apiece, and 
Dane picked out a pup, paid his dol- 
lar, then discovered he had chosen a 
thoroughbred Airedale which, grow- 
ing up, developed points that made it 
an ideal show dog. 



— NOW IN OUR 30TH YEAR — 

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Phone Kearny 2866 
San Francisco 



San Francisco 
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A Soft Water Laundry 



Good Work, Courteous 
Routemen 

Telephone connection in San Francisco. 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
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Swimming; Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 



T. H. CORCORAN, Acua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judah 



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Andrew Johnston. Manager 



| J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1864 

The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 4, 1928 



LOOK AND LEARN 
By A. C. Gordon 

1 — What is the ratio of automobiles to the population 
in the U. S.? 

2 — What U. S. city is known as "the workshop of the 
world" ? 

3 — What are words called, when spelled alike but dif- 
ferent meanings? 

4 — What is the world's chief fiber-producing animal? 

5 — Who was food administrator for the U. S. during 
the World War? 

6 — Are there more Christians than non-Christians in 
the world? 

7 — When it is noon at Atlantic City, what time is it 
at San Francisco? 

8 — Into what three sections is the world's history 
usually divided? 

9 — Who has been called the "March King"? 

10 — What large Canadian city is noted for its winter 
sports ? 

11 — What city is the home of the cash register? 

12 — By whom was "Don Juan" written? 

13 — Who were Noah's three sons? 

14 — What city is said to be the coldest place on earth 
in winter? 

15 — What mythological person fell in love with his re- 
flection in the water? 

16 — Who invented the first practical telephone? 

17 — What bird is so small that it can easily be put into 
a thimble? 

18 — In what language were the Old and New Testa- 
ments written? 

19 — In what year did the Pilgrims land in New Eng- 
land ? 

20 — To what western city does the world's greatest 
aqueduct supply water? 

21 — The kilt is a garment characteristic of what 
people ? 

22 — What are trolley cars called in England? 

23 — What is the finish of the proverb "Marry in haste 



24 — Who was known as the "Wasp of Twickenham"? 

25 — With what European country has the U. S. no 
official diplomatic relations? 

26 — Who invented the "Daily Dozen"? 

27 — Of what country is the fox terrier a native ? 

28 — What are male bees called? 

29 — What South American city claims the most beau- 
tiful harbor in the world? 

30 — How did God change Abram's name? 

Answers to Last Week's Questions 

1— London, New York, Berlin, Paris, Chicago. 2— 
President Coolidge; the special Sesquicentennial half- 
dollar. 3— Moon, 339,000 miles. 4— Iowa. 5— Diamond, 
ruby, sapphire, emerald. 6— Dancing, on the authority of 
Drmkwater. 7— Scranton, Pa. 8— Bat. 9 — Matthew, 
Mark, Luke and John. 10 — Wind. 11 — Italy, by Musso- 
lini's decree. 12 — Washington Irving. 13— An act of 
Congress, 1821, declaring all land north of latitude 36 
degrees, 30 seconds, forever free from slavery. 14 Mock- 
ing bird. 15— Saskatchewan. 16—898. 17— U. S. Rus- 
sia, Mexico, Turkey. 18— Thomas Moore. 19— "Bay 
Psalm Book," printed in 1640. 20— A burner in which gas 
and air are mixed in proper proportions to make a very 
hot flame. 21— A rock. 22 — Founder of the American 
Red Cross. 23— Russia. 24 — Andrew Jackson of Ten- 
nessee, at that time a western state. 25 — The male is the 
bull, female the cow. 26 — Ganges. 27 — King Henry VIII 
28 — Morticians. 29— A horse found on the prairies of 
North America. 30 — David. 



FROM BRIGHTER PENS 
THAN OURS 

Standing Pat. — "Remember," said the serious man, 
"that money is not the only thing to be striven for." 

"Maybe not," answered the other, "but a whole lot of 
people think it is, and I'm not egotistic enough to try to 
set any new fashions." — Boston Transcript. 



HEY! HEY! 

"Do vou think autos are ruining the younger genera- 
tion?" 

"Positively no! I think the younger generation is ruin- 
ing the autos." — Motor Land. 



THEY USUALLY ARE 

Lawyer— You say you passed this big truck near 
Scott's Corners? Did you notice anything peculiar about 
it? 

Witness — Yes ; it wasn't in the middle of the road. — 
Life. 



She — If you tell a man anything, it goes in one ear and 
out of the other. 

He — And if you tell a woman anything, it goes in at 
both ears and out of her mouth. — Tatler. 



First Knight — What's the dope on the knaves who 
broke into the king's wine cellar at two in the morning? 

First Page — Good, my lord; they were shot at sunrise! 
— Virginia Reel. 



Spilling the Beans — At a reception in Washington the 
lion of the evening was a distinguished Arctic explorer. 
A stout old lady said to him, "It must have been terrible 
up there, and you must have suffered untold hardships 
and privations." 

"Well, I can't say that exactly," rejoined the explorer 
with a smile. "The fact is, I've been telling them all this 
season to large audiences." — Boston Transcript. 



Visitor (distractedly) — Doctor, my husband complains 

of seeing dots before his eyes. 

"I hardly think that is cause for serious alarm." 
"But, doctor, he tries to sign his name on them." — 

Answers. 



"In their hearts women are not law-abiding," says a 
writer. Especially, comments a correspondent, regarding 
the laws of bridge. — Pashing Show. 



"At cards I win one day and lose the next." 
"Well, why don't you play every other day?" — Man- 
chester Evening News. 



"What is the gentlest way of breaking the news to the 
chief that the cashier has absconded?" 

"Let the bookkeeper tell him — he stutters." — Passing 
Show. 



Visitor — And how is your son getting on since you set 
him up as a money-lender? 

Moses — Veil, he borrowed a thousand pounds from him- 
self, and now he isn't able to pay it back ! — London Opin- 
ion. 



February 4, 1928 



MINIATURES of YOURSELF 

or members of your family 

make appreciated and valued 

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Fbrvz/ef 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

INA BRADSTREET WESTON 
A Tribute 

Her life was gentle and the graces 
of womankind so sweetly blended in 
her character that Nature might 
stand up and proclaim to all the 
world : Here was a noble-hearted lady- 
of-quality ! 

Ina B. Weston. 

Long will her name be cherished 
by women within the ranks of 
achievement. She was leader by uni- 
versal selection. She was president 
of the Pacific Coast Women's Press 
Association by re-election, and prom- 
inent in the President's Assembly, an 
organization the personnel of which 
includes exclusively chief executives, 
presidents. 

As a board member of the Ina Cool- 
brith Circle, Mrs. Weston was a rec- 
ognized leader. In fact, wherever this 
sweet-faced, lovely lady found her- 
self, she was immediately exalted to 
places of executiveship. But, Ina 
Bradstreet Weston, beautiful soul 
that she was, will longest be remem- 
bered for her sweetness of disposi- 
tion, her character, her graciousness 
and her kindly spirit toward every- 
one. 

As a writer, she will be quoted 
whenever ideals are cherished. I re- 
member, principally, one of her de- 
lightful sketches, entitled: "Smilin' 
Through," based on the famous play 
of that name, in which Mrs. Weston's 
poem stressed the value of smiles 
versus frowns — a quality which was 
a part of her own beautiful charac- 
ter. 

Friends, associates, devotees and 
constituents, by the hundreds, will 
long ascribe lasting honor to the 
name of Ina Bradstreet Weston. 

Her example of noble womanhood, 
her radiant smile, her consistent 
sweetness, and her kindly words will 
ring throughout woman's realm as 
long as women congregate, and they, 
of one accord, will rise and call her 
"blessed." 

Universally loved, brilliant in 
thought, in poetic and literary 
achievements, gracious, kindly, gen- 
uinely friendly and sincere — are 
words which hasten to proclaim a 
tribute to Ina B. Weston. She died 
Saturday, January 21, at her home 
on Funston avenue, after an illness of 
only two days. 

Her funeral, last Tuesday. January 
24. was attended by a representative 
group of writers from various parts 
of California. Members of her dearly 
loved Press Association attended the 
last rites of their great leader in a 
body, every member in the city being 
present to add their profound and 
loving respect to their real friend — 
their president. 



19 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime. Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



typewriters 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office and Works: 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bide.) 

Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called for and Delivered 



USED 

ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

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RENTED 

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Phone Garfield 3852 



564 Market St. 



A son. E. Roy Weston of San Fran- 
cisco and Bakersfield ; two daughters. 
Mrs. George R. Bent and Mrs. Mar- 
shall F. Cropley, both of San Fran- 
cisco, and two granddaughters, Betty 
and Janice Cropley, survive. 

We shall think of precious Mrs. Ina 
B. Weston in phrases of her own coin- 
age, as ever "smilin' through." 

JOSEPHINE WILSON, 

Past President, Pacific Coast 

Women's Press Association. 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



PLEASURE'S WAND 



(Continued from page 7) 
Warfield 

Few famous stage successes have 
possessed a plot better suited for mo- 
tion pictures than "Rose-Marie." That 
may account for the keen competition 
among producers to secure the picture 
rights. M-G-M paid the price, and 
now, the film completed, will be shown 
at the Warfield Saturday. 

A cast of well known actors inter- 
pret the story. Joan Crawford has 
the title role. Others were George 
Cooper, James Murray, Gibson Gow- 
land, House Peters, Creighton Hale, 
Lionel Belmore and William Orla- 

mond. 

# # * 

St. Francis 

Douglas Fairbanks is on the screen 
at the St. Francis this week in "The 
Gaucho." It is a South American pic- 
ture with the principal character or 
cowboy — or gaucho, in the patrols. 
Douglas Fairbanks has one of his 
typical roles of daredeviltry and reck- 
lessness and plays the part of an ad- 
venturesome lover. Lupe Velez and 
Eve Southern are the feminine prin- 
cipals. 



Goldwyn-Mayer contract, it is an- 
nounced by Irving G. Thalberg, and 
the story will tell the trials and tribu- 
lations of bachelors. Pierre Collins is 
now working on the story. St. Clair 
was specially borrowed from Para- 
mount to handle the megaphone on 
the new Cody vehicle. 



AN ILLUMINATING FACT 

One hundred and eighty-one munic- 
ipal electric light and power plants 
sold to privately operated companies 
during 1927. 

One hundred and eighty-one mu- 
nicipally-owned electric light and 
power generating plants, or distribut- 
ing systems, were sold during 1927 
to privately operated companies to be 
absorbed in more economically oper- 
ated interconnected systems, accord- 
ing to data presented in a recent issue 
of the Electrical World. 

States in which the greatest num- 
ber of municipal plants were sold 
were: Nebraska with 22 plants sold, 
North Carolina 18 plants, Oklahoma 
15 plants, Georgia 12 plants and Iowa 
and Kansas each with 10 plants sold. 

Municipal plants in a total of 34 
states were involved in the sales to 
privately operated companies. 



FILM FLICKS 

Mai and Lew to 
Defend Bachelor 

At last the much maligned bachelor 
is to have defenders. Malcolm St. 
Clair, the director who won fame en- 
graving the adventures of blonde 
gold-diggers on celluloid, and Lew 
Cody, who usually plays flirtatious 
papa roles, are to join in telling the 
bachelor's side of the story. 

St. Clair will direct Cody in his first 
comedy vehicle under his new Metro- 



Lon Chaney Proves 
Versatile Acrobat 

Lon Chaney, usually noted for 
cripple roles, did just the opposite in 
his theater scenes in "Laugh, Clown, 
Laugh," when he proved an acrobat 
equal to the best. He climbed poles, 
did the "spin around" on a rigging 
fifty feet high, walked a tight wire 
and had a crowd of extras playing a 
theater audience absolutely breath- 
less. Also he staged a collection of 
falls and tumbles. Chaney in his 
youth was an acrobatic dancer and 
has lost none of his old skill. 

The character star plays a tragic 
clown in the new Herbert Brenon 
production at the Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer studios. It is a vivid tale of 
the theater, adapted from the stage 
play. Loretta Young is the heroine, 
and Nils Asther, Gwen Lee, Bernard 
Siegel, Cissy Fitzgerald and others of 
note are in the cast. 



The comedy team of Karl Dane and 
George K. Arthur will continue on 
the screen. Arthur has just been 
placed under a new contract by Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer and Chester Conklin 
will direct the heroes of "Rookies" in 
"Detectives," a police comedy, within 
a few weeks, according to announce- 
ment by Irving G. Thalberg. 



South Sea Flappers 
Like Paris Fashions 

Fashion magazines are much in de- 
mand by South Sea flappers these 
days. So reports Robert Flaherty, di- 
recting "Southern Skies," Metro- 
Goldwyn - Mayer's romance of the 
tropics, and now at work at Tahiti. 
Magazines from Papeete have pene- 
trated the jungles and the girls try 
to make Parisian gowns out of nipa 
cloth, he asserts. 

Flaherty and W. S. Van Dyke are 
filming a romance of the islands, with 
a native cast, except for Monte Blue 
and Robert Anderson. It is a romance 
of the coming of the white man to 
the islands. The director, who created 
"Moana of the South Seas" and 
"Nanook of the North," declares that 
modernism is fast being adopted by 
the natives, and he had to penetrate 
interior jungles to find perfect native 
life. 



February 4, 1928 

of the nations. This was proved by 
the crowd assembled for the Singa- 
pore scenes in Ramon Novarro's new 
vehicle "China Bound," which Wil- 
liam Nigh is directing. No less than 
twenty-seven nationalities were rep- 
resented in the extras on the set — 
Chinese, Japanese, Malays, Siamese, 
Javanese, French, Dutch, and many 
others being in the cast. 

So wide is the variety of types de- 
manded in pictures, that all nation- 
alities have come from afar for jobs, 
and a call for any type of extra can 
be filled in an hour. 



Antenna Wire Finds 
Startling New Use 

Radio antenna wire, devised for a 
modern day and age, has proved an 
ideal accessory for dress of the past. 
Norma Shearer's wide hoopskirts in 
"The Actress," her new Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer vehicle, are stiffened by 
this wire, which replaces the crinoline 
of former years. 

The new picture is an adaptation of 
Arthur Wing Pinero's "Trelawney of 
the Wells," directed by Sidney Frank- 
lin. Ralph Forbes, 0. P. Heggie, Gwen 
Lee, Cyril Chadwick, Margaret Sed- 
don, and others of note are in the 
cast. 



Wampas Frolic to 
Create New Modes 

Creators of fashions are busy in the 
studios these days, all because of the , 
coming Wampas frolic and ball. De- 
signers are vieing with each other to 
evolve startling styles for the big 
event of filmdom. At the Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer studios Gilbert Clarke, 
famous designer, is creating a gown | 
of gold cloth for Gwen Lee, 1928 
Wampas Baby Star, which will be 
woven to her body. He has also de- 
signed startling innovations for Mar- 
celine Day and Joan Crawford, who 
are candidates for the $1000 achieve- 
ment trophy of Don Lee. This trophy 
is to be awarded the former Wampas 
Baby Star achieving the greatest 
triumphs since her election, to be de- 
termined by a radio listeners' vote. 
Eleanor Boardman won the trophy 
some time ago. 

The gold cloth gown, Clarke be- 
lieves, will set a distinctive new style 
in elaborate costuming for social 
functions. 



Hollvwood Melting Pot 
Of Nations of World 

Hollywood is the real melting pot 



Pertinent to Players 

Monte Blue, now in the South Seas ' 
playing the male lead in "Southern 
Skies," Metro-Goldwyn - Mayer's ro- | 
mance of the tropics, writes the stu- 
dio that he shot a panther on a recent 
hunting trip in the jungles. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Lurie and Curran Theaters 

GEAEY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriejntal Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c. $1. 35c, 50c. 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carte 

Dancing 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 

Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 




ICE CREAr% 



CANDY 
PASTRY 



CrayateM 

1100 3101 3102 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



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We now deliver to any part of the city — including Sundays and Holidays. 
No extra charge. 



Western Pipe and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS. PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS. ETC. 

San Francisco. Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



What's worth laundering, is worth 
laundering our way. 

La Grande & White's Laundry 

"The Recommended Laundry" 



250 Twelfth St. 



PHONE MARKET 916 
Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, §1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' Lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private Dining Rooms 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystone 8100 



Weekdays, Luncheon $ .75 

(11:30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week Days & Sundays.. 1.50 



No visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

93 Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 
Open From 

1 1 :80 ■ i ' :00 ,,.m. 

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Sundays s n ■! Holidays 

I ;80 bo S:H0 p.m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 

Half Block from Highway 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



583 Post Street 
In Virginia Hotel 



San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 2510 



A. & E. DAINI. 


props. A. J. JACOPI. Mgr. 


Boston Bedding & Upholstering Co. 




%^^%J%5&^~5!£\ Mattresses Made Over 


^181 


EZItfsSsisS^^ Reupholstering and 
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%mt 


•^"^ 1957-61 POLK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone Graystone 759 







Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN 8:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. 
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Saturday, February 11, 1928 



LOS ANGELES 





Pauline Frederick, one oj the most 
charming oj American actresses, 
now playing in San Francisco in a 
new comedy "The Scarlet Woman" 
at the Geary Theatre, which was 
formerly the Luric. 




Sir Pfevile Wilkinson and interior view of 
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Established July 20. 1856 




m$\ w\n&m% 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

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Vol. CX. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, FEBRUARY 11, 1928 



No. 7 



THE FIRING LINE 

By Lloyd Farrington Wilson 



AT LAST: After years of study and research, Dr. 
William Marston, of Columbia University, has decided one 
of the great problems of the world: "brunettes display 
greater emotional reaction to a kiss than blondes." Now 
the nation has very little to worry about, that is, aside 
from the International peace issue, crime control, labor 
difficulties, trust activities, and such minor problems. 

Speaking of women, have you ever met the real estate 
flapper? She's the sweet young thing that deals in lots 
of clothes, lots of fellows, lots of good times and lots of 
money. 

The U. S. liner George Washington arrived in Hoboken 
last week two days late because of rough weather. We 
rolled the broad Atlantic once and the only passengers 
who were not seasick were 2,000 Roller canaries, a parrot 
and a couple of Polish cavalry horses. The canaries were 
naturally chirpy, the parrot was too busy telling lies and 
horses thought they were jumping hurdles. 
***** 

They tell me the shrewd Benito Mussolini, whose auto- 
biography will be published in this country soon, has 
taken his cue from Lindy's triumph and calls his opus 

"ME." 

***** 

Scientists of the Smithsonian Institute plan to seek an 
American of the Glacial Age in Florida. I don't know 
much about Florida, but I recall distinctly having seen 
him pitching horseshoes down at Long Beach. 

***** 

Mayor Jimmy Walker of New York says he does not 
drink champagne or alcohol in any form. Hurray! I alius 
thought there must be someone in New York who never 

touched the stuff. 

***** 

Milking cows in boyhood has made President Coolidge 

champion hand-shaker. Ho seems confident, no doubt. 

that the taxpayers are not going to kick. 
***** 

Wouldn't it be a treat if the basketball season was 
topped off with a game between the inmates of San Quen- 
tin and the bank tellers for the Cage Championship? Or 
is the Court game tiring? 



After the other night I have decided that it isn't the 
cover charge in some night clubs but the waiters' hover 
charge that deflates the bankroll. 
$ $ $ $ * 

Returning European travelers report that some hotels 

are giving away gasoline to boost patronage. I But it has 

long been necessary to give American tourists gas after 

they get the bill. 

***** 

When Artemus Ward pulled the wise-crack about the 
American people being willing to pay 10 cents to see an 
eclipse of the moon through an open-top tent, he never 
dreamed that they would flock hundreds of miles to an 
automobile show. 

A lecture on "The American Language," scheduled in 

Chicago has been canceled. However, it is understood 

that a bootleg English translation will be circulated in 

defiance of the authorities. 

***** 

Papers say February 29th will be Labor Day over at 

Cal. Shucks, one day's work in four years isn't bad. No 

wonder they are making such elaborate plans, everybody 

likes a novelty. 

***** 

Dempsey. the married man. will never, never, never 

tight again. I can just see Tunney bursting into tears in 

a refined way. 

***** 

Sunday night, sandwiched in between "sure cures for 
falling of the sox" and "deal at Glutzes' " ads, I heard 
Dr. Louis I. Newman lecture over KFRC. Dr. Newman's 
subject was "Woodrow Wilson" and it was splendid, in 
fact one of the most colorful tributes to "The War Presi- 
dent" I have ever heard. I should like to meet Dr. New- 
man, he must be a BIG man. 

***** 

Joy and thanks, no end. Just when I was beginning to 
think I was doing this line for sheer pleasure, came some 
dandy letters. I would like very much to hear from any 
of my mythical readers; whether I amuse, annoy, or 
whatever I provoke. Our circulation is rapidly increasing 
so at this time I dare not run my picture on this page — 
but I promise to do justice to every letter. Now fire back. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1928 






THE PASSING OF FATHER CROWLEY 

On Monday, last, the mortal remains of Father Crowley 
were laid to rest amid the mourning of a whole city 
which, without distinction of race or creed, united in grief 
at his going and thankfulness that we had had the ex- 
perience of such a life among us. 

The world is very fond of saying that we are a narrow 
and materialistic people, but such an event as last Mon- 
day's throws at least grave doubt upon the assumption; 
for, the life which we glorified on that occasion was the 
very contradiction of that which is held to be the aim of 
the struggling American. We are supposed to be racially 
intolerant and spiritually careless. But the facts in his 
case are the very reverse. 

We have a man, who began life as an Irish miner, with 
none of the advantages which come from social prestige ; 
a man who worked with his hands and then went into the 
service of the priesthood, which brings little personal 
comfort and no material rewards. This man devoted his 
life to poor young boys, a most arduous and, in many 
respects, thankless job, for the young male adolescent is, 
under the best circumstances, a difficult proposition. 
Moreover the young male, sunk in poverty, tempted by 
vice, driven by envy and tortured by impossible longings 
is still more difficult. Yet it was out of such material that 
the sturdy miner and devoted priest extracted riches of 
human life and added immeasurably to the spiritual 
wealth of the community. It would be staggering to ex- 
press even in terms of dollars the actual achievements 
of Father Crowley. 

But he was always poor, generally tired, frequently 
misunderstood, always dubious about his own work and 
its results. Yet this city rightly and in obedience to a 
correct instinct gave him its love and reverence. 



SUBMARINES AND POLITICS 

Secretary Kellogg says that he is willing to sign an 
agreement not to use submarines for any purpose, if 
other nations will do the same. That will not get us very 
far, for other nations will not do the same. The poten- 
tialities of the submarine are practically irresistible after 
the experiences of the last war. The smaller nations, 
meaning the nations whose naval power is less strongly 
developed than that of the big three, see in the submarine 
their sole chance of making headway against the naval 
superiority of their rivals. 

Yet, there is much to say for the abolition of the sub- 
marine. It can serve, really, only as an efficient machine 
for attacking merchant ships engaged in carrying sup- 
plies to the enemy. This, of course, makes the submarine 
a potential weapon against nations which have a great 
sea-going trade and a particularly strong weapon against 
nations which depend upon the outside world for their 
food supply. 

It is for this reason that Great Britain has for a long 
time taken a view antagonistic to the submarine. The 
outlawry of the sub would be an enormous advantage to 
Great Britain. At the same time, it would be of value to 
this country, for as our commerce increases our risks at 
the hands of submarines also increase. 

The fact is that it would pay all the great navy nations 
to have submarines abolished, but it does not appear as if 
it would be an agreeable proposition to a country like 



France, which has a large army and a fair sized navy, 
both of which could be rendered impotent by the enor- 
mous navies of other rivals, against which the submarine 
is alone effective. 

We can put the abolition of the submarine among the 
pious but unattainable wishes which infest international 
affairs. 



JOSEPHUS DANIELS 

Somehow or other that extra syllable seems to have 
played the very deuce with Mr. Daniels. Joseph is a very 
good name, it means nothing exotic, except, perhaps, a 
suggestion of vari-colored garments. But Josephus ! that 
is quite a different matter! And, as a fact, Mr. Daniels is 
always a different matter. He is always getting in wrong 
so to speak and his career as a naval head, while perhaps 
not quite as stupid as that of the present incumbent, was 
queer enough. He never seems to get the idea of America 
in international affairs. 

An instance in point is the Nicaraguan matter on which 
he has ventured to express himself and has emitted an i 
incoherent howl destructive of sanity and grotesque in the 
extreme. He has his solution; "The United States cani 
well afford to submit the Nicaraguan question to the con- 
sideration and arbitrament of the Pan-American organi- ■ 
zation." 

In other words, Mr. Daniels thinks that the United 
States can afford to place its actions on this continent at 
the disposal of the other nations which constitute the rest : 
of the continent. This country is worth economically ai 
great deal more than all of them put together. To give ; 
ourselves up to the arbitration committee of the Pan- • 
American Union would be very like putting the manage- 
ment of a corporation in the hands of a body of minority 
stockholders who did not control more than a fraction of: 
the shares. It is absurd in the extreme. 

We are just beginning our work on this continent. The 
development of our country will demand a further and I 
further movement of ourselves into lands that lie to the* 
south, not necessarily by actual occupation, but, unques- 
tionably with closer control. Are we to surrender our'j 
freedom of action into the hands of the other nations? 



ROTTEN ADMINISTRATION 

We have a board of supervisors which could talk a 
stone image into disintegration, but which is unable to 
do the simplest work in connection with running a city. 
Most of the members can spout by the hour about cor- 
poration greed and the like but they cannot keep the 
streets in decently good order. The recent rains have 
revealed a very disgusting and disgraceful condition of 
the streets. 

It took the rain to bring public attention to what has 
been for some time a growing evil, one which will, in the 
course of time, have a very bad economic effect upon the 
community. The streets, even the main streets, on which 
the traffic of the city largely depends, are in very bad con- 
dition. The state of the road is incredibly poor, and grows 
worse. 

There would be no room in a short article to even list 
the dreadful and almost intolerable vileness of the streets 
which have to carry a very valuable burden of transpor- 
tation and which should afford cleanly and comfortable 



February 11, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



passage for pedestrians. In both respects the streets fall 
down so badly that if the condition continues we shall be 
a byword among the nations for sheer bad housekeeping. 

Let anybody take a walk down Kearny on a moderately 
wet day, such a day, with such a rainfall as the city 
gutters should readily be able to handle. He will find 
below Bush, pools of filthy stagnant water, through 
which machines flounder and slip and throw up geysers of 
dirty fluid over the clothes of pedestrians, who, held by 
the "stop" signs, are obliged to take it all. The effects 
upon temper and purse are alike incalculable. There is no 
sense in having ourselves and our visitors exposed to such 
attacks, which are as unnecessary as they are vile. 

Is it too much to ask our representatives to look after 
our streets? 



THE STATE CABINET 

The governor's council is a new departure in our gov- 
ernmental arrangements. It is the equivalent of the cabi- 
net in national affairs and has been hailed by the so-called 
"liberals" with quite a salvo of applause. It is very funny, 
what "liberals" can applaud. We have seen them at it 
many times. They seem to be able to swallow their prin- 
ciples very quickly when faced by a new fact, for every 
new fact in the political world is, in their estimation, 
"Progressive." 

Now, Mr. Chester Rowell, who is a very able progres- 
sive, favors this new governmental departure. He says, 
"The cabinet meets and makes decisions which hitherto 
had either to wait for the legislature or else to be made 
arbitrarily by the governor, personally, or by a single 
state official. Now, they are made on the joint responsi- 
bility of the entire executive department and constitute 
a really governmental act." 

In other words, the new system is to create a divided 
responsibility. We were always of the impression that a 
divided responsibility was a very bad thing. Also that 
government by the irresponsible was very dangerous. To 
our conservative mind, these seem to have been valuable 
and undeniable principles of political management. Now 
the "liberals" tell us something else. 

We believe that even the cabinet of the United States 
is not a good thing, as it is now, as it is divorced too 
much from personal responsibility. They are so particular 
about that in Britain that a cabinet minister, on his ap- 
pointment, has to go through another election. 

We are doubtful about the "cabinet" and we do not un- 
derstand the "liberals." 



HAND AND BRAIN 

We readily admit an admiration for the old California 
tradition of the value of hand work, which is maintained 
in a more or less satisfactory fashion by the custom at 
the stale university of having a labor day every four 
years on which some definite piece of manual labor is 
done by the student body for the benefit of the university. 

This year, five thousand university students will de- 
velop the west entrance to the university campus, a piece 
of work which has been called for for years and which 
should be completed. This is how leap-year is observed. 
Recording to the annals of the university and perpetual 
memorials in the shape of useful tasks well done mark 
the contribution of each graduate student to the physical 
development of the place of his travail. 

The improvement this year has been urgent for some 
time and has been recognized to the extent of the last 
legislature voting funds to the amount of S100.000 for 
the purpose. The work of the students on February 29 
will be simply preparatory labor. It is obvious that a 
great deal of manual labor can be done by 5000 husky 
young men in four hours. 



But it is not the material gain to the state which is 
interesting, it is the recognition of the value of hard 
manual work, the actual acceptance of the fact that the 
marvelous growth of this western country in the last 
analysis rests upon the hard, rough, manual labor put 
into the development, without which we should not have 
arrived. 

As long as the bond between hand and brain persists, 
the agitator will call in vain. 



ART FOR CHARITY 

"Titania's Palace," soon to visit San Francisco, occu- 
pies very little space, yet it houses one of the world's 
most exquisite collections of miniature art, statuary, an- 
tiques, etc. For instance: 

The tiny throne has for its back a marvelously wrought 
peacock with outspread tail studded with Brazilian dia- 
monds, sapphires, rubies and emeralds, the world of the 
court jeweler of Napoleon III in 1856. On its arms are 
two gold figures, made by Benvenuto Cellini, the only 
other known pair being in the Pierpont Morgan collection. 

The library has printed books the size of postage 
stamps. The tiny piano can be played. Decorating one 
mantel are two delicately carved tourmaline bird groups, 
made for a Chinese empress, but secured for the "fairy 
palace" through a San Francisco collector. 

Sir Nevile Wilkinson, K.C.V.O., spent nearly 20 years 
in the creation of the palace, during which he traveled in 
many lands and gained assistance of connoisseurs in all 
parts of the world. The palace is 7 by 9 feet and 27 
inches high. It contains 16 rooms, all completely and ar- 
tistically furnished, with the tiny frescoes, mosaics, til- 
ings, etc., minutely perfect. 

"Titania's Palace" comes to San Francisco February 
13, opening at the auditorium of The Emporium. All 
proceeds go to child welfare work of the American Legion 
Auxiliary, for Sir Nevile insists that his masterpiece be 
shown only to aid charity. 

And to further the local success in every way possible, 
Sir Nevile and his wife, Lady Beatrix, daughter of the 
14th Earl of Pembroke, are coming here from Dublin. 
They are due in New York within a few days. Owing to 
the prominence of Sir Nevile as a soldier as well as an 
artist, and his offices as Ulster King of Arms, registrar 
of the Order of St. Patrick, etc., plans for his entertain- 
ment are being made in many social, art and military 

circles. 

IN THE ART WORLD 

"Lazarus Laughed," by Eugene O'Neill, a symbolic 
play, will be read by Mrs. Hugh Brown in the Paul Elder 
Gallery Tuesday afternoon, February 14, at 2:30 o'clock. 
Mrs. Brown's interpretative skill makes her readings 
stand out with the clarity of a stage production. 

* * * 

Ernest Bloch. eminent composer and conductor, will 
speak in the Paul Elder Gallery under the auspices of the 
San Francisco Conservatory of Music. Thursday evening, 
February 16, at 8:15 o'clock. His subject will be "Edu- 
cation Through Music." Of Mr. Bloch's lectures, a critic 
has said: "No account could give an idea of the extra- 
ordinary vivacity, wit. insight and power of the distin- 
guished composer's talk." 

* * * 

A recital by Haske-Xas-Wood. Navajo Indian baritone, 
will be given in the Paul Elder Gallery Saturday after- 
noon, February 18. at 2:30 o'clock. The program will com- 
prise a group of Navajo tribal songs, with drum accom- 
paniment and a group of adaptations of Indian themes by 
white composers. Professor Derrick X. Lehmer. of the 
University of California, will talk on -Primitive Music" 
as an introduction to this unusual and interesting recital. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1928 






Everything Is 
"The Mardi Gras" 

Debutantes and matrons alike are 
thinking, talking and planning, almost 
to the exclusion of all other topics, for 
the coming Mardi Gras. 

The Exposition Auditorium has 
been chosen as locale of the pageant 
with talented amateurs led by pro- 
fessionals taking part. 

"Wings" is the title chosen for the 
pageant and those "in the know" de- 
clare that, in some respects, it will 

transcend all preceding Mardi Gras. 

* * * 

Polo Season On 

Society down the peninsula, play- 
ing up to sportive instincts, find polo 
an engrossing game and smartly 
gowned women from various parts of 
the state are enthusiastic observers 
while their men folks, either partici- 
pate in the polo matches or stand at 
the lines in cheering constituency. 

The presence of the Marquis and 
Marquesa de Portago added zest to 
the polo games attendance, exciting 
unreserved interest. They are a strik- 
ing couple and have hosts of friends 
among the fashionables of western 
society, especially among the smart 

set of Pebble Beach and Monterey. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Elliott of 
Woodside, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon 
Hitchcock of Burlingame, Mrs. Alfred 
Monatti also of Burlingame, and Dr. 
and Mrs. A. B. Baer, all residents of 
San Francisco's fashionable suburbs, 
were registered at the Fairmont hotel 
over the week-end. 

* * * 

Society and Dramatic 
Tea Attracts Many Folks 

Laurel Conwell Bias, dramatic 
reader of national prominence, will be 
the feted guest at a brilliant society 
tea to be given in Laurel court at the 
Fairmont hotel on Monday, February 
11, following her scholarly reading 
of "Caponsacchi," by Arthur Good- 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA 

On the Coast Highway. Half-Way Between 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 

An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



By Antoinette Arnold 

rich and Rose Palmer. This reading 
opens a series of six Monday after- 
noon dramatic events. 

Mrs. Bias is a great favorite in 
western society circles as well as 
among the dramatic exponents. With 
a thorough background of training 
necessary to the high standards of 
every true artist she has a complete 
command of emotion and impresses 
her listeners in her dramatic readings 
in such a way that they retain a last- 
ing memory of the interpreted drama. 

Tea Plus Bridge 

Miss Luella Armitage, of Berkeley, 
and Miss Mariza Clow, of this city, 
entertained at a bridge tea in the roof 
garden of the Hotel Whitcomb on Sat- 
urday afternoon, to which a group of 
their friends were invited. 

Mrs. A. H. Turner, who with Mr. 
Turner and their daughter, Miss Ruth 
Turner, make their home at the Fair- 
mont hotel, entertained a group of 
friends at luncheon on Friday and the 
party later attended the symphony 
concert. The Laurel court was the 
pretty setting for the affair and the 
table had as a centerpiece a large 
basket filled with shaded carnations 
and lovely blooms of spring combined 
with fern. 

* * * 

They're Married 

Miss Elsie Otto, daughter of Mrs. 
A. A. Otto, became the bride of Wil- 
liam Henry Taylor on Wednesday 
evening at 8 o'clock at the Trinity 
Episcopal church. Rev. H. H. Powell 
read the marriage service. The bride 
was given away by her brother, 
Harold Otto. 

Attendants to the bridal party were 
Miss Gertrude Munder, maid of honor 
and Charles Stilson, best man. The 
ushers were Coleman Fannin and Ar- 
mand Rouche. Little Virginia Bow- 
man was flower girl and her brother, 
Harold, ring bearer. 

Following the ceremony, a supper 
was given in one of the private par- 
lors of the Hotel Whitcomb to the 
bridal party, relatives and intimate 
friends of the two families. 

After a motor trip south, the young 
couple will make their home in this 
city. 

* * * 

Tea Hostess 

Mrs. George A. Webster was host- 
ess at a large tea given at her apart- 



ment in Stanford court, receiving 
from four to seven o'clock. Her honor 
guests were Mrs. Paul Horst of Paris 
and Mrs. E. Hutton Webster of Santi- 
ago, Chile. The rooms were artisti- 
cally decorated with a profusion of 
spring flowers. During the visit of 
Mrs. Horst and Mrs. Webster in the 
city many affairs have been planned 

for their entertainment. 

* * * 

Mr. Josef Sigall, painter of Euro- 
pean fame, who recently arrived in 
the city from Washington where he 
painted both President and Mrs. 
Coolidge and many other notables, 
and who has opened a studio at the 
Fairmont hotel, was host at a lunch- 
eon given at the hotel on Saturday. 
Among his guests were: Mr. and Mrs. 

B. Charles Ehrman, Mrs. Anita D. 
Hubbard, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Biss- 
inger, Mrs. John Kahn, Mrs. Abe 
Haas, Mrs. Benjamin Boas, Mrs. S. 
W. Ehrman, Mrs. E. Wagenheim, 
Miss Mary Staufer, Consul General 
Emil Wiehl, Charles Caldwell Dobie. 

Consul von Ernst, M. Michailowsky. 

* * * 

An informal dinner dance was 
given at the California Golf Club. 
Hosts and Hostesses of the evening 
were: Messrs. and Mesdames J. P.] 
Shaffer, R. F. Bennett, C. H. Bessett, 
R. W. Wright, R. T. Smith, A. J. 
Maclure, J. W. Casev, Jas. A. Arnott, 

C. L. Moore, Catlin Wolfard, and Dr. 

and Mrs. J. A. Eason. 

* * * 

Dr. and Mrs. Herman F. Wilson en- i 
tertained informally at a dinner party 
at the California Golf Club on Friday, 
February 3. * * * 

The ball given by the Sigma Phi 
Upsilon in the Terrace Gold room at 
the Fairmont hotel was an enjoyable 
ending of the Grand Chapter Con- 
clave which had been in session and 
which is celebrated every four years. 

About seven hundred were present 
(Continued on page 20) 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between PowHI and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



February 11, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




Governor Will Be 
Honor Guest 

Governor Young was the honor 
guest and speaker at an elaborate 
dinner given on Tuesday night of this 
week under the splendid direction of 
the San Francisco Center of the Cali- 
fornia League of Women Voters. 

The Colonial ballroom of the St. 
Francis was packed to capacity with 
interested men and women, while the 
Governor, in his impressive way, gave 
an address of timely importance. 

Miss Ruth A. Turner, president, 
presented the honor guest to the in- 
terested assemblage of people. 

# * * 

Dr. George M. Stratton will speak 
before the Center on Tuesday eve- 
ning, February 14, on the subject of 
Emotion in Health and Disease. Dr. 
Stratton is one of California's most 
distinguished psychologists. He is 
now at the University of California. 

* * * 

Underwriters Congregate 

Experts in the service of fire insur- 
nce were in the limelight this past 
week during the convention of the 
fifty-second annual meeting of the 
Fire Underwriters Association of the 
Pacific Coast. Prominent men from 
many parts of the west took part in 
;he deliberations of annual sessions. 
with George E. Townsend, president, 
!n charge. 

Delegates from the Pacific coast 
states and British Columbia were in 
tttendance. Officials of the Ancient 
md Honorable Order of the Blue 
Toosem, the fire insurance fraternal 
Organization, were representative 
lelegates. An annual dinner and 
nitiation of new members took place 
n the Commercial Club rooms, last 
jtonday night, Arthur M. Brown of 

award Brown and Sons acting as 

oastmaster. 

-. ■-. ^ 

•resident Townsend's Address 

The business of the past year was 
eviewed by President Townsend at 
he opening session of the under- 



Park Lane Maisonnettes 

5 to 8 Rooms with 2 to 5 Baths 

Magnificent view. Every service, from 
doorman to valet. Furnished or un- 
furnished. Garage. Class A steel 
frame building. 

"Mancnnttte" has the elegance pf a manticn icith 
it apartment house. 

PARK LANE APARTMENTS 

1100 Sacramento Street 
Diagonally Across from Hotel Fairmont 




HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 
Nob Hill 

A Smart Town House for a 

Day or a Year 

500 Rooms 

Tariff: From $4, per day 



writers convention with technical 
phases of fire insurance outlined. 
"The Conflagration Hazards of the 
Smaller Cities" was discussed, with 
Arthur M. Brown Jr. leading as 
speaker. Thomas H. Anderson, Pa- 
cific coast manager of the Liverpool 
and London and Globe Insurance 
Company, was speaker on "Special 
Mortgage Agreements." 

H. B. Mariner discussed the topic 
of "Tenants, Improvements and Bet- 
terments." Arthur A. Semsen spoke 
on "Appraisal Methods and Their 
Relation to Fire Insurance." Ken- 
neth Withers of Sacramento was 
speaker on the subject: "Stock Losses 

on Country Stores." 

* * * 

Modern Fire Department 

An outstanding subject of discourse 
during the convention was presented 
by Chief R. J. Scott of the Los An- 
geles Fire Department, who gave an 
illustrated lecture on the "Modern 
Fire Department." 

J. H. Martin talked on "Unprofit- 
able Classes." Leland Gregory spoke 
on the recently adopted use and oc- 
cupancy rules. Thomas J. Craig on 
"Meeting Requirements of the Insur- 
ing Public" and Charles J. Peckham 
of Los Angeles, on "Insurance Adjust- 
ments." 



Oil Fires 

How to handle oi 
be one of the livelie 
Louis Stockmeir. tire 
of San Francisco, pre 
information on the 
Hodgkinson, manager 
Automobile Club, tok 
the organization and 
shal Jay W. Steven: 



new law which governs the construc- 
tion and regulation of dry cleaning 
plants in California. 

* * * 

Annual Banquet 

An elaborate annual banquet, held 
last Wednesday night at the Fairmont 
hotel, marked the peak of the conven- 
tion sessions, A. R. Heron, chairman 
of the State Department of Finance 
and Russell W. Osborne, arbitrator of 
the Board of Fire Underwriters, being 
the principal speakers. A beautiful 
table arrangement with novel deco- 
rations and artistic adornments of 
flowers and favors made the banquet 
at the Fairmont hotel something to 

be remembered. 

* * * 

Prominent Personages 

Ira P. E. Reynolds of Portland, 
Oregon, the leading delegate and of- 
ficial, Thomas H. Anderson, J. H. Mar- 
tin, of the National Liberty Insurance 
Company, secretary-treasurer, were 
officers who stand prominently iden- 
tified with executive leadership and 
government for the coming year. 

Frank M. Avery and H. P. Blan- 
chard had charge of the memorable 
banquet pronounced exceptional by 
those in attendance, and a successful 
conclusion to the big conclave of un- 
derwriters. Sessions were held in the 
Merchants Exchange building on Cali- 
fornia street. 

* * * 

Buck Harris Will 
Direct Publicity 

Eric T. ("Buck") Harris, has been 
appointed director of publicity of the 
Mark Hopkins hotel and will co-op- 
erate with Melville W. Erskine, ad- 
vertising manager. 

Harris handled the publicity for 
the opening of the Mark Hopkins 
hotel and is one of the best liked men 
in his line, winning friends wherever 
he goes as well as putting the right 
punch into features of the hotel, of 

(Continued on page 19) 



fires proved to 
;t of all topics, 
prevention chief 
senting valuable 
topic. Arnold 
of the National 
I of the work of 
State Fire Mar- 
explained the 



e, you pav no more j£ 



C 




"TheVace o/a Thousand Gaidens' 
224-226 Grant Ave., Sutter 6200 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1928 




MEASURE'S W^ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI Ol£ASURE"S 

_ Tom Moore, 




What's On? 

Plenty ! 

Good plays, comedy and drama — 
and a lot of good motion picture pres- 
entations. 

There's the new Geary theater. 
We're just about getting used to the 
new name of this theater — The 
Geary. 

It's easy to the mind. Besides it 
carries geographical information, 
and under the new management is 
bound to leap to still higher achieve- 
ment. 

Experienced men are behind its 
aims and ambitions. It is bound to 
succeed, for Homer F. Curran knows, 
and the strong combination of the 
Shuberts and the Wobber Brothers 
make an operating interest of su- 
preme distinction. 

There are other theaters in town, 

offering good attractions. Some not 

so good. Some, positively — 

But, that's another story! 
* * * 

Geary 

Pauline Frederick is at the Geary. 

This beautiful actress, with her 
fascinating voice and mannerisms, 
wearing gorgeous gowns, and exemp- 
lifying perpetual youth, is starring 
in "The Scarlet Woman." 

Comedy, romance and a story of 
condensed joy are outstanding clas- 
sifications of the play, written by 
Zelda Sears and Reita Lambert. 

The story is a touching one and 
deals with the impulse of a girl who 
adopted a baby and who then dis- 
covers that small-town gossipers have 
their own version of her act. 

Humor of rare quality permeates 
the situations with Pauline Frederick 
playing the role of the girl branded 
as a woman to be shunned, according 
to the busy-bodies of the town. 

Then a man enters the story. He 
is president of a college. What trans- 
pires from then on supplies the ro- 
mantic part of the drama, with a 
triumphant trend of fun and spark- 
ling satire supplying a pleasant cli- 
max. The entire production is su- 
preme. 

Thomas Holding plays opposite 
Miss Frederick and is fine mettle for 
her wit. He's hero enough to satisfy 
the sentimental and strong enough to 
please, besides looking his characteri- 
zation to perfection. 



By Josephine Young 

But it is always exquisite Pauline 
Frederick who fascinates and holds 
the audience. 

Lillian Elliott, Burdell Jackson, 
Marie Shotwell, Frankie Raymond 
are in support. You'll not forget the 
baby, for she's adorable Mary Mar- 
garet Reid. 

* * * 

Curran 

"Broadway," the Jed Harris 
"Night Club Classic," is still running 
at the Curran theater where audi- 
ences are proving their liking for the 
play by filling the theater. 

Clever dialogue, back -stage scenes, 
cafe life, pathos and tragedies are in 
rapid sequences as the plot unfolds. 
There are any number of excellent 
players in the performance — and 

there is also a lot of profanity. 

* * * 

Columbia 

"Sunny" came to the Columbia last 
Monday night. 

It's a musical show with a lot of 
snappy songs, well sung by pleasing 
voices. 

Circus events supply the atmos- 
phere and there is sparkling enthusi- 
asm running through the bright per- 
formance from the first song rushing 
over the footlights to the final note 
of the closing selection. "Who" is es- 
pecially liked ; one comes away whist- 
ling the air. "Strolling," also, is an 
echo of the show, and "When We Get 
Our Divorce" and "Two Little Blue 
Birds" are other song favorites. 

Helen Patterson, William Valen- 
tine, Elmira Lane, Jack Crosby, Jer- 
ry Jarrett, Fred C. Holmes, Peggy 
Fears, Ernest Woods and the popular 
Harry S. Miller are the players, but 
not named here in the order of their 
importance. 

You'll have to hear them for your- 
self! 

* * * 

President 

Four famous actors and authors 
were concerned in writing the com- 
edy-drama "Nightstick," at the Presi- 
dent theater where the Henry Duffy 
players are big drawing cards in the 
John Wray, J. C. Nugent, Elliott Nu- 
gent, Elaine Sterne Carrington play. 

Wray is now being featured in 
New York, where the "Nightstick" 
runs simultaneously with the San 
Francisco production. George Lef- 



Amusements 

Next Week 
ON THE STAGE 

Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"New Brooms"; Henry Duffy players. 

Columbia, Eddy nr. Powell 

"Sunny," musical comedy. 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

Jed Harris presents "Broadway." a niirhl cluh 
classic. 

The Geary, Geary nr. Mason sts., 
Formerly the Lurie 

Pauline Frederick in the "Scarlet Woman,** 
comedy 'drama. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"Nightstick," modern melodrama: Henry 
Duffy players. 

VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

Jay Brennan and Stanley Rogers; Hal Jerome 
and Gloria Gray, comedy; Peg Wynne. On the 
screen, Marie Prevost in "The Rush Hour." 
"One Arabian Night," song and dance, Lois 
Syrell. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Charlotte Greenwood, famous comedienne: 
Johnny Burke, stage and screen comedian. 
Six Gatenos. acrobats. Pauline Frederick on 
the screen in "The Nest." 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Vaudeville — pictures. 

ON THE SCREEN 
Downtown 

California, Market St. at 4th 

"The Student Prince"; Norma Shearer. Ra- 
mon Novarro. 

Casino, Ellis at Mason 

Change of pictures. 

Embassy, Market nr. Seventh 

Al Jolson in "The Jazz Singer." heard and 
seen on the screen. Vitaphone feature. 

Granada, Market at Jones 

"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," Ruth Taylor 
appearing in person Saturday and Sunday. 
Eight Victor Artists on the stage. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th 

Douglas Fairbanks, "The Gaocho." 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

"Sporting Goods." Richard Dix. 



February 11, 1928 

fingwell was brought .here by Duffy 
for the leading role. He gives an ex- 
cellent characterization. 

Kenneth Daigneau plays an impor- 
tant part. 

Walter Gilbert's excellent staging 
of the play contributes immensely to 

the success of this production. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

Have you seen "New Brooms" at 
the Alcazar? 

Well, don't miss it. 

* * * 

Embassy 

Al Jolson is now on at the Embassy 
theater, the home of the Warner 
Brothers Vitaphone, where the fa- 
mous singer, actor and motion picture 
star is both seen and heard in the 
great picture, entitled: "The Jazz 
Singer." 

The picture is the first feature film 
to be scored completely on the Vita- 
phone. During the course of the story 
one sees and hears Al Jolson sing six 
numbers and more in his own in- 
imitable manner; sees and hears him 
talk to his mother in the story; sees 
and hears him joke in his best indi- 
vidual manner. 

The film is based on the play of the 
same name by Samuel Raphaelson 
which ran for over a year in New 
York. It nearly parallels in many 
cases the life of Jolson and is a sub- 
ject which is near to his heart. Others 
in the cast include May McAvoy and 
Warner Oland. 

"The Jazz Singer" has been booked 
for a limited engagement at the Em- 
bassy which will be its only San Fran- 
cisco showing on the Vitaphone. 
Don't miss this chance to see and 
hear Jolson, "The World's Greatest 
Entertainer," in two hours of song 

and laughter. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

"Long, lean and lanky Letty," as 
Charlotte Greenwood, the famous ec- 
centric comedienne is known, will 
head the new bill at the Orpheum 
theater for the week starting this 
Saturday matinee. She brings an en- 
tirely new batch of songs in which 
she will be assisted by Martin 
Broones. Miss Greenwood has re- 
turned to vaudeville for a brief stay 
after completing a picture in Holly- 
wood. 

Johnny Burke, stage and screen 
comedian, will remain over for a sec- 
ond week, with his second edition of 
"Dirty Work." 

There will be new acts on the pro- 
gram including the Six Galenos. Eur- 
opean acrobats; Art Henry and com- 
pany in a comedy skit. "A Rehear- 
sal" : Billy Reed and Lew Duthers in 
"Feats of Feet." in which they intro- 
duce the "Tunney - Dempsey fight 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

dance"; Miss Raftin and her clever " 
monkeys in a new novelty act. 

On the screen will be the first San 
Francisco showing pi Pauline Fred- 
erick in an adaption of her stage suc- 
cess, "The Nest." 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Last week at the Golden Gate thea- 
ter, there was a photoplay which I 
verily believe was one of the best 
motion pictures that I have ever seen. 

"Almost Human" was the title, 
with dogs taking the principal roles. 
The plot unfolds as if the dogs were 
telling the story. There are four in- 
telligent dogs in the lead with a cast 
of smart dogs supporting the prin- 
cipals. 

The photography is certainly clever 
and the direction excellent. The titles 
are amusing. But the picture itself is 
so good that you'll have to see it to 
appreciate it all. 

So when this picture' appears at the 
other theaters don't miss seeing "Al- 
most Human." 
This Week's Program 

The Golden Gate this week is fea- 
turing Jay Brennan, formerly of the 
team of Savoy and Brennan, starting 
with the Saturday matinee. Brennan 
has a new partner, Stanley Rogers, to 
carry on the "Margie" character in 
their skit, "You Slay Me." 

Hal Jerome and Gloria Gray are to 
present their humorous oddity, "Hoo 
Hoc" Peg Wynne will also be a fea- 
tured performer. Marie Prevost will 
be seen on the screen in a comedy- 
drama of romance, humor and thrills, 
"The Rush Hour," with Harrison 
Ford, Seena Owen, David Butler and 
Ward Crane supporting the princi- 
pals. 

"One Arabian Night," a unique 
combination of song, dancing and 
comedy, will feature Lois Syrell and 
eight other artists. Gaston Palmer, 
the French humorist, is on this bill. 

* * * 

Granada 

"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," film- 
ed from the Anita Loos' book and 
stage play is now on the screen at 
the Granada, with Ruth Taylor play- 
ing the role of Lorelei Lee, the girl 
who gives the story its title. 

The never-failing and very capable 
publicity man of the Granada sends 
us the interesting information that 
Miss Taylor will appear at the Gra- 
nada in person on Saturday and Sun- 
day. She is making a tour of the 
cities simultaneously with the screen- 
ing of this picture. 

Eight Victor artists will be on the 
Granada stage as extra attractions 
this week, as part of the "Greater 
Stage Season" bookings. 

(Continued on page 20) 



Chilly or cold? 

— snap on safe 

electric heat 

When you come home cold, you get 
healthful warmth quickly with a large 
portable electric heater. You have 
pleasant warmth tor a minute or two 
or for hours. 

A portable electric heater is light 
in weight. That makes it easy to have 
warmth in any cold room. It warms 
the bedroom for dressing. Heats the 
bathroom. Quickly dries mother's 
hair. Provides safe warmth when you 
leave the children by themselves. 

Have our electric heating represen- 
tative tell you about our special heat- 
ing rates. 




"FACI7IC 6EBV1CI 



Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

Owned • Operated • Managed 
by Califomians 



(Swell's 

^^-" HATIONA1CRIS1 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.80*. 001 cape were MrrW at *• 

Fan* ma- Pacific International Exposition 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidat ions with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1927 

Assets $117,394,234.04 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $600,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haicht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulioa bt. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (i 1 ^) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought; FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued i CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON. ENGLAND: NEW YORK: PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. 
WASH.: MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Phones Davenport 4480 
Sutter 4400 



Insurance Exchange Building 
433 California Street 




SCOTT & 
MULVIHILL 

General Insurance and 
Surety Bonds 




MADE TO ORDER ONLY 

Mtflfli? 7 NIGHT R0BES vBDJIiy 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 

25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



FINANCE 



Western States Life and Western Life insurance com- 
panies developed quite unexpected life in the stock mar- 
ket last week. West Coast advanced from $4 to §6 per 
i share, closing at S5 ; Western States Life sold steadily at 
3514). 



There is an agitation against the permitting of bank 
stocks to be sold on the open market, the reason offered 
being that such shares should be withdrawn from specu- 
lation. An eminent German authority has recently criti- 
cized this point of view and insists that owners of bank 
stocks must, like every other owner of securities, be given 
full opportunity to dispose of his property, should he so 
desire. It seems to be a legitimate argument. 



The record for export of automotive products from this 
country grows steadily. There was an increase of twenty 
per cent last year and the market, so far, appears to be 
definitely in the control of our manufacturers. It is worth 
noting that the increase in sale of motorcycles abroad is 
very marked. The same is true of aircraft parts and 
motorboat machinery. 



Reports from the New York Stock Exchange show that 
liquidation is still in progress. The action of the main 
body of stocks is said to indicate that the speculative 
element is giving more consideration to the New York 
Federal Reserve Bank's action in raising the rediscount 
rate to four per cent. 



There are great shipments of gold to the Argentine 
these days. Foreign exchanges are steadier and there is 
much interest in the statement of President Poincare 
that the franc may be stabilized above its present rate of 
25.50 to the dollar. 



George McCormick, superintendent of motive power for 
the Southern Pacific, says, "Lacking adequate new motive 
power, cars and other facilities, railroads could not long 
continue to serve the public efficiently and well. It must 
be remembered that railroads, to make these large and 
necessary expenditures for equipment, must be able to 
earn sufficient to render railroad securities safe and at- 
tractive to the average man and woman with a dollar to 
invest." 



The San Francisco Stock Exchange is about to intro- 
duce the New York system of trading in "odd lots." The 
experiment is necessary to relieve the pressure on the 
floor caused by the great number of orders for small 

amounts of shares. 



The unit of trading "odd lots" will be 100 shares. An 
order for a small amount of shares will be called an "odd 
lot" and will be bought from and sold to an "odd lot" 
dealer, and will not be subject to purchase and sale on the 
trading floor of the exchange. The price of an odd lot will 
be filed by the price of the last 100 shares of stock, next 
following the time from when the dealer received the 
order of sale. 



For the first time in the history of California, according 
to the statement of Governor C. C. Young, "a budget is 
being published in which a complete biennium s program 
of new highway construction is mapped out in advance of 
any call for bids or awards of contracts." 



February 11, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



AIR LINES 



By Lieut. Blaine Stubblefield 



When a hen sees a hawk or an eagle it is just one of 
her daily thrills, but when she sees a bird with a wing 
spread of forty or fifty feet and 
a voice of thunder, she forgets 
to lay an egg. The poultrymen 
of Hayward, scientific men of 
the trade, who count their eggs 
before they are laid, claim that 
production is running under 
schedule because of the many 
airplanes that fly low over the 
egg and cackle belt. No remedy 
has as yet been suggested, but 
airmen may soon expect to see 
a big sign on the ground — 
"Quiet! Throttle Your Engines! 
Ten dollars fine for scaring the 
chickens." It may be that there 
will be no solution for this pon- 
derous problem ; the flow of eggs 




Lieut. Blaine Stubblefield 

may someday cease, and America's oldest and most glori- 



ous tradition, ham and eggs, may disappear, leaving ham 
without a counterpart. 



This letter from a boy of vision to the traffic office of 
Boeing Air Transport : 

Dear Sirs: I see in "Popular Aviation" where your 
company is building three tri-motored 12-passenger 
planes for operation next summer between Chicago and 
San Francisco. I would like very much to get a job on one 
of these planes as messenger boy or page. I am a soph- 
omore at Vanderbilt University (mechanical engineering 
school), and I am very much interested in commercial 
aviation. If there is an opportunity for me to get a job 
for this summer, will you please write me. I am enclosing 
a stamp. Sincerely, 

P. E. MULDOWNEY. Nashville, Tenn. 

Doubless this youngster pictured himself in braided 
jacket and pants, roaming the corridors of a vast Levia- 
than of the air, calling at the doors of staterooms with 
cracked ice and soda for the passengers. We smile, and 
then wonder a little. It has always been youth who had 
the visions. 



Establishment of an air mail fee of eight cents instead 
of ten cents for each half ounce, in addition to the regular 
postage on articles mailed in the regular mails to foreign 
countries has just been announced by the Post Office De- 
partment. The change does not affect the domestic air 
mail rate. 

The new ruling was made to conform to provisions 
made last September by the International Air Mail Con- 
ference at The Hague. 

Letters or packages mailed in this country to an ad- 
dress in England, for example, designated as for air mail 
transit, will be carried by the United States Air Mail 
Service to, or as near as possible to. the port of sailing 
by steamer. Our ordinary letter rate to England is two 
cents per ounce. Then, if your air mail letter to England 
weighs something less than a half ounce, three-quarters 
of an ounce, or any weight less than or exactly one ounce, 
it requires just two cents ordinary postage. And the air 
mail postage, in addition to this, will be eight cents for 
each half ounce or fraction. If the letter weighs a half 
ounce or less, the total postage (ordinary plus air mail) 
would be ten cents ; if it weighs more than a half ounce 
and up to a full ounce, the total postage, (ordinary plus 



air mail) would be 18 cents. The same rates apply to air 
mail letters posted in England for delivery in the United 
States. Air mail to foreign countries should always be 
rated by your postmaster, because ordinary mail rates 
differ to various countries. 



The Kiwanis Club of Oakland has an effective method 
of promoting interest in aviation. They call it making 
their members "air minded." Everybody who hasn't gone 
up for a hop in two weeks gets fined two dollars. If the 
plan is another one of those odious schemes to get money, 
it is a flat failure, for all the boys had rather have the 
ride — especially since it costs only a little more than the 
fine. 



Someone has started an argument about the where- 
abouts of an airway — and just what is an airway? Some 
editors write that airways are on the ground, others that 
they are up in the air, and still others that airways are 
both in the air and on the ground. None of them are 
right. Airways, according to law, are not on the ground 
except over established airports. Over an airport, the 
airway is from the ground up ad infinitum. Elsewhere 
along an established air route, the airway is 500 feet 
above the ground and up ad infinitum. Aircraft flying on 
established airways are not permitted to fly lower than 
500 feet except for reasonable causes, such as a low fog 
ceiling, or to gain advantage against a strong wind. It 
is obvious that the private lands in the line of an estab- 
lished airway cannot be considered as a part of the route. 



An interesting announcement from the air transporta- 
tion field this week is that an organization known as the 
American Airports Corporation plans to sponsor a vast 
system of airports in all parts of America. 

Developing of airports, from the choosing of a site to 
their final management as units in a "chain store" system 
of air harbors, is the announced intention of the com- 
pany. During its early stages, it is announced, operations 
will be confined to the region east of the Mississippi, 
though developments will be made in the West ultimately. 
If they wait many years there won't be any airports left 
in the West to develop. Hundreds of towns and cities are 
already planning their own. 



WE LEAD IN FLYING 

Under the auspices of the California Development Com- 
pany, an exhibit, indicating the leadership of California 
in the field of commercial aviation is now on display in 
the Ferry building. Miniature planes, modeled identical 
to those used by the Boeing Air Lines, are on display. 
The exhibit is a decisive step of progress that all may 
witness, all may share in and help make possible. 



CHAMBERS OF WEST MEET 
IN HONOLULU 

The meeting of the Western Division of the Chamber 
of Commerce of the United States is now in session in 
the Island city. Arrival of delegates, committee lunch- 
eons, and routine business are in progress, as we go to 
press. 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1928 



On RUSSIAN 

HILL- • 

FOR RENT 

[Unfurnished] 

?r B- 5 

Modern Apartment - Flat. 
Three Rooms. 



Marine View ■ — Sheltered 
from Winds and Fogs 

S 2T B- 

1101 Filbert St., Cor. Leavenworth 
Phone Graystone 2793 



An Advertising Man 
Says: 

Clean, clear, understand- 
ing typography is rare 
indeed. But there is one 
paper that does this im- 
portant job well — the 

^ — - — -^ 



POLO 

Bobby Strawbridge, 9 handicap poloist of international 
repute, is counted upon to take the place of Louis Stod- 
dard, president of the U. S. Polo Association, on the 
famous Sands Point team, whose appearance will feature 
this year's Pacific Coast polo championship at Del Monte, 
February 17-March 11. 

This news became public here today, after it was 
definitely learned that Stoddard would be unable to join 
his team mates, Tommy Hitchcock, Averill Harriman and 
J. Cheever Cowdin for the Del Monte polo season. 

Strawbridge is generally rated an even better player 
than Stoddard and the American open championship team 
will be more formidable than ever. 

The preliminary games every Wednesday, Friday and 
Sunday afternoon are drawing large crowds to the polo 
field and Monterey will soon be in the midst of the great- 
est polo season in California history. 
* * * 

Plans for a series of polo matches at Santa Cruz were 
laid at a meeting held here yesterday (February 8) in 
the St. George Hotel. The polo field at Rio Del Mar will 
soon be in condition and new bleachers are to be created. 
The old polo clubhouse, which was formerly the property 
of Claus Spreckels, will be moved to a more suitable loca- 
tion and redecorated. 

New officers for the ensuing year were elected at the 
meeting here yesterday. Deming Wheeler was unani- 
mously re-elected president. An executive committee was 
elected, pending the taking office of a permanent board 
of directors. Those on the newly formed executive com- 
mittee are: Willard Paine, Dr. G. B. Falconer, Sam Wier- 
man, Samuel Leask Jr., Francis G. Wilson, W. A. Saun- 
ders, S. T. Dorsey, James Jones and Sidney Long. 



YACHTING 

The Santa Cruz Yacht Club has been organized in this 
city with Bruce L. Sharpe as commodore; J. A. Harris 
Jr., vice-commodore ; Leo Cardwell, secretary-treasurer, 
and R. L. Cardiff and R. H. Hamilton, directors. The 
Yacht Club was formerly affiliated with the San Fran- 
cisco Yacht Club as a branch organization. Two big yacht- 
ing and boating events are to be sponsored by the club 
during the year 1928. Junior membership will be granted 
to youths from ages of 12 to 21. A committee has been 

appointed to purchase a yacht for use on Monterey Bay. 

* * * 

The annual convention of the Associated Sportsmen's 
Clubs of California, to be held in Santa Cruz with head- 
quarters at the Casa del Rey and sessions in the audi- 
torium at the beach in the fall of this year, promises to 
be the largest attended of any in the history of the or- 
ganization. Committees of the Santa Cruz Rod and Gun 
Club have been appointed and the 128 sportsmen's clubs 
in the association, with thousands of members, will be 
solicited through attractive literature to attend the con- 
clave. * * * 

Santa Cruz is drawing many motorists from not only 
the San Francisco Bay region but from the valley cities. 
The ideal winter climate, in which no fog is experienced, 
as well as the scenery over the mountains and along the 
coast, proves an incentive for motorists coming to Santa 
Cruz to enjoy week-end trips. There is a movement on 
foot to build an ocean shore road to Santa Cruz, and the 
roads at present are in good condition, passing through 
heavily forested mountains, skirting the ocean and Mon- 
terey Bay and through green farming country. Santa 
Cruz is considered one of the most delightful resort cities 
of northern California. It is not unusual on Saturday and 
Sunday to see scores of people enjoying surf swimming, 
the temperature of the water and sunny weather appeal- 
ing to the swimmers. 



February 11, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




By Lloyd Farrington Wilson 



I have met a young chap who boasts that he has read 
about two thousand novels (or as he says, books) within 
the last three years. I cannot help but contrast him with 
another acquaintance, who, though I have never heard 
her make any similar statement, I have every reason to 
believe is the more well-read. My contrast is absurd. The 
basic education, environment, tastes and even ages of 
these two people are worlds apart, but it is with the 
initial statement of this young man in mind that has 
caused me to change the entire make-up of The Library 
Table this week. Instead of being a publishers' ballyho, 
I offer a few thoughts to readers in general. 

READ— BUT WHY, AND WHAT 

Reading is primarily a method of self-culture. The art 
of self-culture is the art of acquiring, and then widening 
and deepening a certain attitude toward life. This atti- 
tude, just because of its flexibility and malleability is 
hard to define, and its external expression varies in dif- 
ferent epochs and localities. 

An adept in the pursuit of culture would doubtless in 
India be more metaphysical, in Japan more "artistic," in 
Germany more learned, in England more aristocratic, in 
France more critical, in Russia more impassioned, in 
America more unprejudiced and eclectic; but, behind such 
a person, whatever his local bias may be, there is that 
which remains intrinsically human and universal. 

I do not for one moment propose that one live in the 
historical ages of romance and mystery. In that circum- 
stance a man leaves his books, plunges into the turbulent 
stream of the world, and life is a different thing. It prods 
him and scrapes him and harrows him with a raw harsh- 
ness, a rank flippancy, a crude purposelessness, as it has 
no accepted part in his world of books. What I am getting 
at is I believe that if we acquire, with the aid of the tra- 
ditional apparatus of culture, poetry, music, sculpture, 
drama, painting, history and philosophy a bit of the fine- 
nesses, we can enjoy the "side show of life." 

It is pathetic to see a person who is living in a world of 
fiction. Living in hopes, before the unattainable with 
grotesque ideas of what we are in "the great scheme of 
things." If then we crave or enjoy experience, adventure, 
romance, highly lacquered life, is it not best to have a 
foundation that will enable us to differentiate between 
that that is real and that that is not. 

ON THE TABLE 

"I've Got Your Number!" the hilarious psychoanalysis- 
for-the-parlor book by Webster and Hopkins (Century). 
is now on every best-seller list in the country. The pub- 
lishers report that the demand for it seems to grow every 
day and at the present time it is selling at the rate of five 
thousand copies per week. There is now every indication 
that it will reach its fiftieth thousand by February 17th. 
by way of celebrating on that day the birth of a sister 
volume, "Marriage Made Easy." This new book by the 
same authors guarantees to simplify the problem of 
matrimony for everyone in the course of an entertaining 
parlor pastime. 



Parson Weems, the versatile and amusing clergyman of 
Colonial America, who was the first biographer of George 
Washington, is the subject of a biography written by 
Harold Kellock entitled "Parson Weems of the Cherry 
Tree," to be published by the Century Company. 

Parson Weems was the author of the first American 
best-sellers. His biographies of Benjamin Franklin, Wil- 
liam Penn and General Francis Marion enjoyed tremen- 
dous sales. His numerous pamphlets arid their sensational 
illustrations were the "tabloids" of the period, and the 
Parson packed them with spicy reports of murders, sui- 
cides, drinking and gambling orgies, etc. The parson was 
also the first American book-agent and for many years 
he traveled over the roads between Philadelphia and 
Savannah hawking his literary wares. He is said to have 
been a very unconventional clergyman. His sermons were 
always characterized by his boisterous humor and he in- 
variably concluded his services by playing popular selec- 
tions on his fiddle. * * * 

Lyle Saxon, the young author of "Father Mississippi," 
(Century) has settled down to work again in his little 
cabin on Cane river near New Orleans. He is working on 
a new book about New Orleans in which he promises to 
continue his fascinating historicizing of the old South 
begun in "Father Mississippi." He is also putting the 
finishing touches to his first novel, which the Century 

Company will probably publish later this year. 

* * * 

Among the interesting features of the present Shakes- 
peare celebration is the discussion centering around the 
new biography of the bard, "Shakespeare: Actor-Poet," 
by Clara Longworth de Chambrun. This is the volume that 
was awarded the Bordin prize by the French Academy. 
A recent review of the book in the "Theatre Arts Month- 
ly" remarked "To have so studied and re-arranged 
Shakespeare's plays, and most particularly his sonnets, 
as to give us a new chronology, and thereby to clarify to 
a startling extent the motivation of the poet's life, the de- 
velopment of his genius and his relations with Southamp- 
ton and with Florio, is in itself an evidence of insight. 
To have done all this and at the same time to have made 
of the biography an enthralling tale which is hardly less 
interesting to the casual reader than to the professional 
student of Shakespeare, proves Madame de Chambrun to 

be one of the 'modern biographers'." 

* * * 

Ernest Gruening, former managing editor of "The Na- 
tion" and editor of that impressive symposium, "These 
United States." published a few years ago. has just com- 
pleted the manuscript of a new book entitled "Mexico and 
Its Heritage," which the Century Company will publish in 
May. Mr. Gruening has spent more than two years in 
Mexico gathering material for the book. Mary Austin, 
well known author and critic, has just read the book in 
manuscript and reports that it is "the last word on 

Mexico." 

* » * 

Among the stories selected by the 0. Henry prize com- 
mittee is James Warner Bellah's story entitled "Fear." 
This is one of a group of stories of aviators and of life 
at the front included in Mr. Bellah's recently published 
volume "Gods of Yesterday" (Appleton). 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1928 




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PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

By John E. Tiedeman 

National Automobile Club 



ORGANIZED MOTORDOM MAPS INTENSIVE 
PUBLIC SAFETY DRIVE FOR 1928 

Organized motordom throughout the nation has con- 
secrated the full strength of its resources in a deter- 
mined effort in 1928 to push the specter of death from 
the streets and highways of America, reports the Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association. Reports received 
from headquarters of the American Automobile Asso- 
ciation show that every one of the 958 affiliated clubs of 
the nationwide motorists' body is engaged in programs 
to increase public safety. 

Protection of children in traffic is a major feature of 
the safety program and the association's Public School 
Traffic Reserve system, now operating in 29 cities of 
northern and central California, is being installed by A. 
A. A. clubs everywhere. 

The association's plan of visual education in traffic 
safety for children by means of poster lessons is now 
being given in close to 11,000 classrooms in our territory. 

Some of the more important additional public safety 
activities of the state association, which find their coun- 
terpart in the 1928 safety programs of organized motor- 
dom throughout the nation, consist of sponsoring the 
uniform traffic ordinance to replace divergent regulations 
which cause confusion and accidents ; supporting law en- 
forcement and strict penalties for the reckless and intoxi- 
cated driver; conducting educational campaigns in safety 
for both motorist and pedestrian ; erecting new and im- 
proved types of street and highway warning signs; urg- 
ing a greater measure of safety being built in highways 
by elimination of dangerous curves, grades and narrow 
roadways and by protection or elimination of grade 
crossings; assisting in the collection of accident statistics 
for reseai-ch purposes and co-operating in brake, head- 
light and other campaigns to encourage the motorist to 
keep the car in safe condition. 



He — Why are you so sure Joan wasn't kissed when they 
turned out the lights? 

She — Because she was the only one who was blushing 
when they were turned on again. — Everybody's Weekly. 



There was a fire in a Glasgow tobacconist's shop recent- 
ly. The police had considerable difficulty in dispersing the 
crowd which gathered to inhale the free smoke.- 
Humorist. 



The auctioneer, who had been whispering excitedly to 
a man in his audience, held up a hand for silence. 

"I wish to announce," he said, "that a gentleman here 
has had the misfortune to lose a wallet containing five 
hundred pounds. He tells me that a reward of twenty- 
five pounds will be given to anyone returning it." 

After a silence a man in the crowd shouted: "I'll give 
thirty pounds!" — Tit Bits. 



Lady (at theater, to man in seat behind) — I hope my 
hat is not worrying you. 

The Man — It is worrying me a lot — my wife wants one 
like it. — Journal Amusant, Paris. 



February 11, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



A TRAVEL STORY 

MILLIONAIRES IN SINGAPORE— SEEING THE 

ORIENT IN COMFORT 

SPECIAL STEAMER AND SPECIAL TRAINS 



Clipping— "The Straits Times" 

Singapore, Dec. 30, 1927. 

The arrival of two American millionaires in Singapore 
yesterday on a world tour, was a reminder of the fact 
that the possession of great riches, whatever its alleged 
handicaps in regard to entering the next world, has cer- 
tain undeniable advantages in this one. 

Some days ago these gentlemen, Mr. Charles Hayden 
and Mr. Daniel C. Jackling — both of whom are prominent 
in the business and financial world of the United States 
— found themselves at Manila. They wanted to go to 
Saigon. There was no direct steamer service, and they 
did not want to make the side-trip to Hong Kong or 
Singapore for the very good reason that they had already 
visited the former port and were about to visit the latter. 
What was to be done? The ordinary mortal would have 
shrugged his shoulders and traveled as the steamship 
routes dictated. But not Mr. Hayden and Mr. Jackling. 
They chartered a special steamer and went direct. Travel 
de luxe with a vengeance ! 

Let no envious reader, jogging prosaically along on the 
"Makan gagi" basis, turn up his nose at such extrava- 
gance. It was not a matter of ostentation, but of con- 
venience. Mr. Hayden and Mr. Jackling are going 'round 
the world, and they have six months in which to do it. 
They want to see as much as possible in that time, and, 
judging by their itinerary through the Far East, they 
are succeeding. Whatever can be done to expedite travel 
and to add to its interest and enjoyment, they are pre- 
pared to do, and they are fortunate enough to have the 
wherewithal with which to do it. Thus in Manila they 
took a special train and ran up to Baguio. and in China 
and Siam they traveled in private railway coaches. Again, 
as a matter of convenience. As Mr. Hayden remarked. 
"In covering so many thousands of miles, and in visiting 
so many countries and cities, all within a short time limit, 
it necessitates our going from one place to another with 
the least pssible loss of time — which is our reason for 
going by special this and special that." 

Frustrate Chinese Business Men 

Mr. Hayden and Mr. Jackling, whose many and varied 
^business connections give an idea of what really big busi- 
ness means in America, left New York on October 13 and 
Key expect to be back there on March 28. They traveled 
through Japan, where they were hospitably entertained 
by Baron Mitsui, the great Japanese industrialist, and 
went on to China, where they met Chang Tsao Lin and 
1 a number of leading Chinese in Peking and Shanghai. 
. They had four busy days in the Philippines, and then went 
through Indo-China. Siam. and the Malay Peninsula. They 
leave Singapore today by the Opten Noort for a trip 
through Java and Sumatra, and the remainder of their 
journey will include India, the Persian Gulf to Bagdad. 
and thence to Europe. 

In conversation with a "Straits Times"' representative 
at the Europe hotel yesterday. Mr. Hayden said that they 
had been greatly impressed by the quality of the Chinese 
business men and bankers whom they had met in Peking 
and Shanghai. "They are first rate." and said, "and if the 



government of the country was in their hands, instead of 
the politicians, one could feel more hopeful about the 
future of China. As it is, it is very disheartening to see 
such a wonderful country so entirely given up to war- 
fare, and to see railroads that ought to be carrying freight 
and passengers, used for nothing but troop trains. The 
merchants and bankers are very able and sensible men, 
but they frankly admit that they are not the political 
bosses, and by themselves they can do little to remedy 
the present state of affairs in China." 

Tourist Possibilities 

Both Mr. Hayden and Mr. Jackling spoke enthusiasti- 
cally of the tourist possibilities of Indo-China, Siam and 
the Malay Peninsula, and it was evident that they had 
thoroughly enjoyed their travels between Saigon and 
Singapore. From Saigon they motored to Phompenh and 
Angkor, and from Angkor to Aranya Prades, which is 
the railhead on the Siam line. They traveled to Bangkok 
by rail and from there to Penang and down through the 
peninsula, stopping at Kuala Lumpur to look over the 
mining industry. 

"It was all very interesting and beautiful country," 
said Mr. Hayden, "and it would attract many more tour- 
ists if the existing travel facilities were better known. 
The roads in Indo-China were excellent. In the isolated 
districts of the United States there are not roads of that 
standard. The railways we have traveled over are very 
well run ; the trains are punctual, and everything is done 

ir the comfort of passengers. But your tourist adver- 
tising is not up-to-date. For example, the tourist agen- 
cies will tell you that a fortnight is required to cover the 
route we have taken from Saigon southwards, and the 
average tourist is not prepared to devote that amount of 
time to it. Actually, it can lie done comfortably in eight 
days. It is quite possible to breakfast in Angkor and dine 
in Bangkok, and that fact ought to be broadcast to tour- 
ists. 

The Road to Aranya 

"Before I went to Indo-China someone told me that in 
order to get to Aranya. on the Siam railway. I would have 
to travel some miles in a bullock-cart, but we found that 
a splendid new road has recently been opened over that 
stretch of country. That is one of several things which 
ought to be emphasized in advertising the possibilities 
of travel southward of Saigon and northward of Singa- 
pore." 

Mr. Jackling also pointed out what an advance in tour- 
travel for travelers from the western hemisphere the 
round-the-world service of the. Dollar Line represented. 
He agreed that American tourists did not go up country 
from Singapore at present, but he was convinced that if 
the scenic possibilities and travel facilities of the Malay 
Peninsula. Siam and Indo-China were properly adver- 
tised these countries would enjoy a remarkable increase 
in tourist traffic. "The Dollar Line has paved the wbj 
making travel westwards easy and convenient." he said, 
"and it is up to these countries to do their part if they 
wish to attract the tourists who are coming in increasing 
numbers from the western hemisphere." 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1925 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




On the Air 
By C. J. Pennington 

After a radio receiving set has 
been in use for some time without 
proper inspection it has a tendency to 
not function as well as it did when it 
was new. Right now seems to be the 
proper time to give a few hints on 
taking care and checking over the en- 
tire set for the fault, as many set 
owners are experiencing the same dif- 
ficulties. 

In checking up a radio for weak 
signals it is advisable to start by 
looking over the aerial and ground 
equipment. Should this be found to 
be in the proper condition, examine 
the radio frequency transformers for 
broken wires, and poor connections. 

The various stages of radio fre- 
quency should be checked over, and 
where the by-pass condensers are 
used they can be checked and if found 
leaky or open-circuited, replaced with 
new ones. 

The tubes also should be inspected. 
If not familiar with carrying out 
these tests any radio dealer will glad- 
ly test the entire set for you, at a 
very nominal charge. Passing now to 
the detector, its grid leak and con- 
denser should be examined. It is be- 
coming more important to look for 
faults in bypass condensers now that 
higher "B" battery voltages are be- 
ing employed through the use of elim- 
inators and power tubes. Without 
knowledge of so doing it becomes pos- 
sible at times to throw a high volt- 
age across these bypass condensers 
either by tubes with shorted plate and 
grid connections or socket trouble. 

An open circuited audio trans- 
former may, under certain conditions, 
give very loud signal strength on cer- 
tain stations with accompanying bad 
distortion, and again a set will appear 
to be entirely dead insofar as any 
sound coming through the loud 
speaker or headphones. 



To preserve the good operation of a 
radio set, it should be periodically in- 
spected, either by the owner or a com- 
petent radio man. If the fault is in 
the set it is not iikely the owner will 
be properly equipped to make the 
necessary repairs, but after making 
the above tests without locating the 
trouble it is advisable to call in the 
dealer to locate the trouble for you. 



The White Rock orchestra, with 
saxophone ensemble and Harold 
Dana, baritone soloist, will entertain 
Pacific Coast listeners from 9 to 9:30 
Friday evening, February 17. 

This sparkling program is offered 
as a weekly toast to fans who appre- 
ciate the unusual in radio presenta- 
tions. 

As an opening selection the orches- 
tra will play "Where the Cot Cot Cot- 
ton Grows," which is followed by an- 
other orchestral number, "I Never 
Dreamed." 



Program of the National Broad- 
casting Company for the week start- 
ing February 12. 
Sunday, February 12 

1 to 2 p. m. — Golden Strand group. 

3 to 5 p. m. — Sunday afternoon 
concert. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Standard Sym- 
phony hour. 

8 to 9 p. m. — Atwater Kent con- 
cert. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 
9 to 9 :30 p. m. — Don Amaizo. 

Monday, February 13 

8 to 9 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Shell 
symphonists. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

10 to 11 p. m. — Broadways and 
Boulevards. 

Tuesday, February 14 
' 8 to 8:30 p. m. — Eveready Salon or- 
chestra. 

8:30 to 9 p. m.— U. S. bridge les- 
sons. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 9:30 p. m.— Retold Tales. 

9:30 to 10 p. m.— The Rounders. 

10:30 to 11 p. m. — Johnson's Wash- 
er Company. 
Wednesday, February 15 

6:30 to 7 p. m. — Musical fruit cock- 
tail. 

9 p. m. — Longine's correct time. 

9 to 10 p. m. — Los Angeles studio 
program. 
Thursday, February 16 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 9:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:30 to 10 p. m. — Moon magic. 
Friday, February 17 

8 to 9 p. m. — Wrigley review. 



9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 9:30 p. m. — White Rock pro- 
gram. 

9:30 to 10 p. m.— Memory Lane. 
Saturday, February 18 

8 to 9 p. m. — R. C. A. hour. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 10 p. m. — Philco hour. 

10 to 12 p. in.— The Trocaderans. 



Programs for Next Week 

KFRC— DON LEE 
SAN FRANCISCO — 154 
Sunday. February 12 

10 :00 to 12 :00 noon — Home, Sweet Home Concert. 
12 noon to 1 :15 p. m. — Church service. 
1:15 to 3:15 p. m.— S & W Recital. 

3 :15 to 4 :15 p. m. — KFRC dance orchestra. 

4 :15 to 5 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Talk. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins concert orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

8 :30 to 12 :00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Monday, February 13 

7 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Studio program. 

9 :00 to 9 :30 p. m. — Georgia O. George. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping Bervice. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 

3 :00 to 4 :00 p. m. — KFRC Concert Orchestra. 

4 :00 to 4 :30 p. m. — Educational talk. 

4 :30 to 5 :15 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5 :30 to 6 :20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen, police reports. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Blue Monday Jamboree. 
1 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 
Tuesday, February 14 

7 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Studio program. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 



12:00 to 1:00 p. 
3:00 to 4 :00 p. 
4 :00 to 4 :30 p. 
5:15 to 5:30 p. 
5:30 to 6:10 p. 
6:10 to 6:25 p. 
6:25 to 6:30 p. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. 
9:00 to 10:00 



Sherman. Clay concert, 
m.— KFRC Concert Orchestra, 
m. — Educational talk. 
m. — News items, 
m. — Mac and his gang, 
m. — With stamp collectors, 
m. — Stage and screen, 
m. — Sports talk, 
m. — Haas program. 

Concert orchestra. 



10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 
Wednesday. February 15 
7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 
10 :00 to 11 :00 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Household hints. 
11 :30 to 12 :00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert. 

3 :00 to 4 :00 p. m. — KFRC Concert Orchestra. 

4 :00 to 4 :30 p. m. — Educational talk. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5 :30 to 6 :20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Maxwell House Coffee program. 

9 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Dance program. 
Thursday. February 16 

7 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Musical program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Charles Hamp. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 

4 :00 to 4 :30 p. m. — California State Library talk. 

4 :30 to 5 :15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m.— Beauty talk. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Mona Motor Oil Co. 
9:00 to 9:45 p. m— KFRC Movie Club. 
9:45 to 10:00 p. m. — Airplane Flying Lesson. 

10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 
Friday, February 17 

7 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program, 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 

9 :30 to 11 :00 a. m. — Shopping service. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Hints to home-makers. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KFRC Concert Orchestra. 
4 :00 to 4 :30 p. m. — Student hour. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 



February 11, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



|:16 to 5:30 p. m.— News items. 

5:30 to 0:20 p. m. — Jo Mendel and Pep Band. 

6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

G-.liit to 7:00 p. m. — Sports talk. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Charles Hamp. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Skyway journeys. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m — Dance orchestra. 

Saturday, February 18 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 tn 9:00 a. m.— Musical program. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 

11:00 to 11:45 a. m. — Amateur tryouts. 

11 :4B to 12 :00 noon — Announcements of Sunday 

church sermons. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman. Clay concert. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m.— KFRC Concert Orchestra. 
4:00 to 4:30 p. m— Educational talk. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 
6:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 
5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
f:20 to 6:30 p. m. — -Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

KPO— HALE BROTHERS AND THE CHRONICLE 

SAN FRANCISCO— 422 
Sunday, February 12 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Church services. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
8 :00 to 4 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 
4:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Studio program. 
6:30 to 6:30 p. m — Checkering hour. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
~:30 to 8:00 p. m— Organ recital. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orches- 
tra. 
Monday, February 13 
6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10:30 to 10 :45 a. m. —Ye Towne Cryer service. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.- -Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
4 :00 to 5 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m— Organ recital. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Kolster hour. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KPO's variety program. 
Tuesday, February 14 
6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
8:00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 
10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m.— Domestic economist. 

10 :30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— National Broadcasting Co. 
11:80 to 1:00 p. m.— Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 

6:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer Bervice. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m— KPO Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO dance orchestra. 

Wednesday. February 15 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10:30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:45 a. m. — Home service talk. 

11 :30 to 1 :00 p. m.- — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 

1:01) to 5:00 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 

6:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Gypsy and Marta. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Atwater Kent Artists. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Abas String Quartette. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO Dance Orchestra. 

Thursday, February 16 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 
10:30 to 10:46 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11 :30 to 1 :00 p. m.- — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

4 :0H to 5 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Sports and poultry talk. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KTO dance orchestra. 

Friday. Fehruary 17 

6:46 to 8:00 a. ni. — Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10:80 to 10 :45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:45 a. m. — Home service talk. 

11:30 a. m. to 12:45 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

12:i5p.m. — Commonwealth luncheon at Palace Hotel. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 

6:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Y« Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — KPO Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:80 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:30 to 10:30 p. m.— KPO Concert Orchestra. 

10:30 to 12:30 a. m.— KPO Dance Orchestra. 

Saturday, February 18 

6:46 to 8:00 a. m.— Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Sperry Flour happy hour. 

10:00 to 10:80 a. m. — Domestic economist. 



10:30 to 10:45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noun — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m, KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— KPO Dance Orchestra. 

8:00 to 12:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS, INC. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 267 
Sunday, February 12 

7:50 to 9:00 p. m. — Church services. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

Monday, February 13 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m.— Breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

i2 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

5:30 to 5:45 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. .m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m.— Sports talk. 

7 :15 to 7 :30 p, m. — Advertising tnlk. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

10:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, February 14 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:3U a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m.— Concert. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5:30 to 5:45 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — The Cocoanut Club. 

Wednesday, February 15 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m.— Breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert. 

5:30 to 5:45 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Sports and sales talk. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 

Thursday. February 16 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m.— Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m.— Breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.— U. S. weather reports. 

12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Concert, 

5:30 to 5:45 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour program. 

7 :00 to 7 :15 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. DaviB. 
7:15 to 7:30 p. m. — Art course. 

S :00 to 11:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

Friday. February 17 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Exercise hour. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Musical luncheon program. 

1:00 to 1 :30 p. m.— Country store, 

5 :00 to 5 :30 p. m. — Concert. 

5:80 to 5:46 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Program. 

7:00 to 7:15 p. m.— Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

7:16 to 7:30 ]>. m. — Studio program. 

S :00 to 9:00 p. m,— Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

10:00 p. m.— Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 11:00 p. m. — Popular program. 

Saturday. February 18 

7:00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Exercise ln.ur. 

* :20 to 10:27 a. m. — Musical breakfast program. 

10:27 to 10:80 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m,— Concert 

5:30 to 5:46 p. m. — Construction report. 

S :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner hour concert. 

7 iOO to 2 :Q0 a. m. — Policemen's Ball. 

KJBS— JI/LH S BHl'NTON & SONS 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 
Sunday, February 12 

1 :30 to 3 :30 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 
3:30 to 5:00 p. m.— Dance music. 
Monday. February 13 

9:00 to 12:00 m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
B:0Q to 9:00 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Tuesday. Fehruary 14 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument And vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
S :00 to 9:00 p. m. — Orthophonic selections. 
9:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Coco-Nut Club meeting. 
Wednesday. February 15 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Orthophonic recital. 
Thursday. Fehruary 16 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Music lovers' program. 
Friday. February 17 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
8:00 to 9:80 p. m. — Dance music. 
9:80 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Saturday. February 18 

9:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:80 to 7:80 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 



15 

KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE 
OAKLAND— 508 
Sunday, February 12 

4:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Chas. T. Besserer, on Scottish 

Rite organ. 
Monday. February 13 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m,— Economics hour. 
11 :30 to 1 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:30 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m.— Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Special program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Weekly meeting of Lake Mor- 

ritt Ducks. 
Tuesday, February 14 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:30 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 

4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Brother Bob's club. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Wednesday, February 15 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:30 g. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Educational program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Special program. 
Thursday, February 16 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:30 p. m.~- Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Special program. 
Friday, February 17 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:30 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m.— Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Opera program. 
Saturday. February 18 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Organ recital. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC 
OAKLAND— 394 

Sunday. February 12 

11:00 a. m.— Church service. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company 

3:00 to 7:30 p. m. National Broadcasting Company. 

7:30 p. m. — Weather report. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Atwater Kent hour. 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m. Musical program. 

Monday. February 13 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

3:30 to 4:00 p. m. — Women's Clubs. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — St. Francis Orchestra. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— KGO Kiddies' Klub. 

6:00 to 6:45 p. m.— Concert Orchestra. 

6:45 p. m. — What's Happening in the World. 

9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— The Pilgrims. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Co. 
Tuesday. Fehruary 14 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon Concert. 
12:30. weather: 1:00. weather; 1 :0S. S. F. stocks: 

1 :08. N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dance Orchestra. 
6:55. news: 7:03. weather: 7:08. S. F. produce, grain. 

cotton: 7:16. S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, N. Y. 

stocks (closing). 

8 :00 to 10:00 p. m. -National Broadcasting Company. 
Wednesday. February 15 

11:15 to 11:30 a. m.— The Home. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:30, weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03. S. F. stocks: 

1 :08 N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:80 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Sunkist melodists. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Farm program. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Vaudeville. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Thursday. February 16 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks ; 

1 :08, N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:55 p. m. — News; 7:05. weather: 7:08. S. F. produce, 

grain, cotton: 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23. 

N. Y. stocks (closing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Drama hour. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Friday. Fehruary 17 
11:00 to 11:80 a. m. — Louise Landis. 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather: 1:00. weather: 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :08. N. Y. stocks. 

5 :S0 p. m. — Wise man from the La nd-0 -Health. 
6:00 to 6:45 p. m. — Dinner concert program. 
6:45 to 6:55 p. m.— "Weekly Financial Review." 
6:55, news; 7:05, weather; 7:08. S. F. produce, grain. 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1928 



cotton; 7:16, S. F. stocks (closing); 7:23, N. Y. 

stocks (closing). . 

S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Saturday. February 18 

11*30 am. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30, weather; 1:00. weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1:08. N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:50 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:50 to 7:15 p. m. — Weather, news, new books. 
7:15 to 7:30 p. m.— Weekly sport review. 
8:00 to 11:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC 
LOS ANGELES— 468 
Sundav. February 12 

1:00 to 5:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
5:30 p. m. — Glenn Edmunds and orchestra. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

7 :35 i m.— Bob Buckner and Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

9 :00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Orchestra. 
Mondav, February 13 

5:30 p. m.— Lone Rene and Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m.— White King program. 

7 :00 p. m. — KFI Symphonette. 

8:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 p. m. — Packard Concert Orchestra. 

10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

Tuesday. February 14 

5 :30 p. m. — The Dragon Hawaiians. 
6:00 p. m. — White King program. 

7 :00 p. m. — Gypsy String Quartette. 

7:30 p. m.— Nick Harris, Detective Stories. 

S:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m.— -C- Patton Wallace. 

Wednesday, February 15 

5:30 p. m. — White King program. 

6 :30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7 :00 p. m. — KFI Symphonette. 
7:45 p. m. — William MacDougall. 
8:00 p. m. — Musical Club program. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard program. 

10:30 p. m. — N. C. Mills. 

Thursday. February 16 

5:30 p. m. — Vernon Elkins and Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — White King program. 

7 :00 p. m. — KFI Symphonette. 

8:00 p. m.— Packard Orchestra. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — Program of modern classical music. 

Friday, February 17 

6:00 p. m. — White King program. 

7:00 p. m. — Program by Paul Roberts. 

8:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 p. m. — Packard Concert Orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Virginia McCoy. 

Saturday, February 18 

5:30 p. m. — Packard Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m.— White King program. 

7 :00 p. m. — Packard Orchestra. 

7:30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado, Spanish Baritone. 

B:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10 :00 p. m. — Packard program. 
11:00 p. m.— KFI Midnight Frolic. 

KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO CO. 
SEATTLE— 348 
Sunday. February 12 
7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Monday, February 13 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Time signals, sport news. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 9:30 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:30 to 10:30 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 
10:30 to 12:30 p. m. — Goofy Bird Frolic. 
Tuesday, February 14 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m.— Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 
Wednesday. February 15 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Thursday, February 16 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m.— Time signals. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Friday. Fehruary 17 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m.— Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 
Saturday, February 18 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Sport news. News items. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. in. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers Dance Orchestra. 
KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN 
PORTLAND — 191.5 
Sunday. February 12 
7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
10 :00 to 11 :O0 p. m. — Little Symphony orchestra. 
Monday, February 13 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:00 p m.— Talk. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert hour. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Spot Light Hour. 
Tuesday,' February 14 
6 :00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 



7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Musical program. 

7:30 to S:00 p. m.— Book review and talk. 

S:00 to 11:00 p. m. — N. B. C, program. 

Wednesday. February 15 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 

8:00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Copcert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

Thursday, February 16 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:40 p. m.— Utility service. 

7:40 to 8:00 p. m. — Flower girls. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m.— N. B. C. program. 

9:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

Friday, February 17 

t; :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Concert. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Utility service and talk. 

3 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Concert. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m.— Keep Growing Wiser Order of 

Hoot Owls. 
Saturday. February 18 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Concert. 
S :00 to 12:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 



FOREIGN TRADE CLUB 
LAUNCHES PROGRAM OF 

EXPANSION 

William G. Marvin Elected 

President for 1928 

The executive committee of the 
Foreign Trade Club of California, at 
a meeting in the Merchants Exchange 
building yesterday afternoon, out- 
lined plans for expanded activity for 
the coming year and elected officers 
to direct the program. William G. 
Marvin was elected president ; Charles 
L. Wheeler, of the McCormick Steam- 
ship Company, first vice-president ; H. 
M. Huff, of the United Fruit Com- 
pany, second vice-president, and 
Wesley O. Ash, of the U. S. Bureau of 
Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
third vice-president. William D'Egil- 
bert is managing director. A unani- 
mous vote of thanks was extended to 
E. W. Wilson and Harry S. Scott, re- 
tiring president and first vice-presi- 
dent, for their services in upbuild- 
ing the port of San Francisco through 
their leadership in the Foreign Trade 
Club. 

Marvin is head of the international 
law firm of Marvin & Bergh, and 
managing director of the American 
Manufacturers' Foreign Credit Insur- 
ance Exchange. He is an official dele- 
gate to the Pan-American conference 
at Havana, Cuba. 

The newly-elected executive com- 
mittee of the Foreign Trade Club, be- 
sides the officers, consists of Wallace 
I. Atherton, Aubrey Drury, H. K. 
Faye, Hugh Gallagher, C. Parker 
Holt, Walter E. Hettman, Percy R. 
Mott, Fred D. Parr, John C. Rohlfs, 
Harry S. Scott, George S. Williams. 
The advisory committee of past presi- 
dents consists of C. E. Hydes, E. W. 
Wilson, W. H. Hammer, J. G. De- 
catur, Harry Glensor and C. A. Mavd- 
well. 



FILM FLICKS 



Rumor Killed by 
Novarro Contract 

Dame Rumor died an untimely 
death with the signing by Ramon 
Novarro of a new contract by which 
his services remain exclusively with 
the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios, 
where his greatest hits, including 
"The Student Prince," "Ben Hur," 
"Forbidden Hours," and others have 
been made. During the past few 
months there have been many rumors 
to the effect that Novarro planned to 
desert the screen for a monastery, or 
capitalize on his voice and start on a 
concert tour. Both guesses proved 
incorrect when Irving G. Thalberg 
announced the star's name on the 
dotted line. 

Novarro is now working on his lat- 
est vehicle, "China Bound," a vivid 
sea romance adapted from Ben Ames 
Williams' story, and directed by Wil- 
liam Nigh. Joan Crawford is the hero- 
ine, and Ernest Torrence, James Ma- 
son, Edward Connelly, Frank Currier, 
Anna May Wong and others are in 
the cast. Much of it was filmed 

aboard ship on the Pacific. 

* * * 

Chaney Is Author 
Of Encyclopedia 

Lon Chaney, character star of the 
screen, has been accorded a unique 
honor. He is the first screen player 
to be chosen as one of the authors of 
the Encylopedia Brittanica. He has 
been elected to write the chapter on 
makeup in the book. This places him 
in a list of authors that includes Sir 
Oliver Lodge, Steinmetz and many of 
the world's foremost scientists and 
authorities. Chaney is now at work 
on "Laugh, Clown, Laugh," his new 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer starring ve- 
hicle, directed by Herbert Brenon. 

Dane- Arthur Comedy 
Team Will Continue 

Signing of George K. Arthur, the 
comedian, under a new contract at the 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios indi- 
cates that the team, composed of the 
little Scotch comedian and Karl Dane, 
responsible for "Rookies," "Baby 
Mine" and "Monkey Business," is to 
continue. Irving G. Thalberg an- 
nounced the new contract, and in the 
meantime Chester M. Franklin and 
Robert Lord are at work on "Detec- 
tives," a new comedy thriller in which 
the two will co-star. Franklin will 
direct the play. 

Arthur first won note in America 
in "The Salvation Hunters," and 
later in "Lights of Old Broadway." 
"Tillie the Toiler," and with Dane in 
"Rookies" and the other comedies of 



February 11, 1928 

the team. He was born in Scotland, 
went on the stage in England and 
played the lead in "Kipps," filmed in 
England. 

# * * 

Anna May Wong, Chinese actress, 
appearing with Ramon Novarro in 
'China Bound" at the Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer studios, electrified Holly- 
wood when she appeared in a blonde 
wig. "Chinese gentlemen prefer 'em 
too," she asserts. She hopes it'll start 
a new fashion in Chinatown, just as 
Greta Garbo's hairdresses start them 

in New York. 

* * * 

Scenarist's Typewriter 
Working Overtime Now 

The typewriter o f Waldemar 
Young, famous scenarist of "The Un- 
holy Three," "The Big City" and 
other noted plays is working overtime 
these days, as he is putting the finish- 
ing touches on "Tide of Empire," be- 
ing adapted from Peter B. Kyne's 
romance of the Argonauts of '49. 
This is to be given a lavish production 
at the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios, 
with Joan Crawford as the heroine 
and Jack Conway directing. 

Young, a newspaperman for years, 
does not dictate to a flock of secre- 
taries as some do, but sticks to his old 
newspaper training and pounds his 

own typewriter. 

* * * 

Indian Girl Heap 
Big Flapper Now! 

Fashion magazines, Hollywood 
films, and Paris modes have revolu- 
tionized the modern Minnehaha — and 
Indian girls today, rather than dress- 
ing in the quaint apparel of their 
forefathers, roll their stockings, use 
lipsticks and try to look like screen 
flappers. 

So asserts Tim McCoy, Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer western star, just 
back from his vacation trip to New 
York and his beloved Indian reserva- 
tions. 

"Indian flappers today wear high 
heels," he bewails, "and I saw one 
with bobbed hair and a sport coat 
made from a Navajo blanket a hun- 
dred years old. They all want to look 
like Norma Shearer!" McCoy will 
start in a few days on his next Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer adventure story — but 
won't have any modern Indian flap- 
pers in it ! 

* * * 

"Miss New Zealand" 
Se.s Travel Record 

Setting the world's record for dis- 
tance traveled to gain a film role. Miss 
Dale Austen. "Miss New Zealand." 
has arrived at the Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer studios after a 6500-mile trip 
from Auckland. She is to appear in 
M-G-M productions. 

Miss Austen won the New Zealand 



Nils Asther who plays the juvenile 
lead in Lon Chaney's now Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer vehicle. "Laugh. Clown, 
Laugh." says that his ultimate am- 
bition is to start an automobile fac- 
tory in Sweden. 

* * * 

Ramon Novarro, playing the sailor 
hero of Metro - Goldwyn - Mayer's 
"China Bound." boasts that during 
the Pacific voyage made for the pic- 
ture he learned to "box the compass." 

* * * 

Virginia Pearson, wearing hoop 
skirts in Norma Shearer's new Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer vehicle. "The Ac- 
tress." has forty yards of cloth in her 
costume. She can't get through an 
ordinary door in it. nor can she sit in 
a modern armchair attired in the 
tent-like expanse of satin. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

film star contest, sponsored by thea- 
ters and newspapers there, and is to 
be given a screen opportunity as a 
prize. She is seventeen, very pretty, 
with brown hair and blue eyes — and a 
very charming accent. 

* * * 

Mickey McBan, noted child charac- 
ter actor, and Betsey Ann Hizar, also 
a noted screen juvenile, have been 
added to Lon Chaney's supporting 
cast in the Herbert Brenon produc- 
tion of "Laugh, Clown, Laugh," at 
the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios. 
Mickey has been in every one of 
Brenon's productions for several 
years and Betsey played under his 

direction in "Sorrel and Son.' 

* * * 

Pertinent to Players 

Joan Crawford will play the hero- 
ine in "Tide of Empire," Peter B. 
Kyne's famous story, at the Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer studios as soon as she 
finishes her role opposite Ramon No- 
varro in "China Bound." 

* * $ 

Cissy Fitzgerald, appearing with 
Lon Chaney in "Laugh, Clown, 
Laugh," at the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
studios, is chaperoning her sixteen- 
year-old daughter, Cissy Junior, at 
the same time. Cissy Junior, just out 
of school, is playing her first screen 

role in the picture. 

* * * 

Ramon Novarro smokes a pipe for 
the first time in his career before the 
camera as the sailor hero of "China 
Bound" at the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
studios. * * * 

O. P. Heggie, famous stage actor, 
playing in the cast of "The Actress," 
Norma Shearer's new Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer vehicle, is playing the 
same role in which he replaced John 
Drew on the latter's death. The play 
is an adaptation of "Trelawney of the 
Wells," which proved Drew's farewell 
to the stage. 



17 



— NOW IN OUR 30TH YEAR — 

WADE AND RUEGG 

Tailors 

Fall Woolens 

Now on Display 



Special Line of 

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Scotch Sport Material 



Suite 201 — 12 Geary Street 

Phone Kearny 2866 
San Francisco 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

A Soft Water Laundry 



Good Work, Courteous 

Roufenien 

Telephone connection in San Francisco, 
San Bruno and San Mateo 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table 

New Dance Hall. Special Attractions. Radio- 
active. Hot Sulphur Water. Tuh Baths and 
Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN. A*ua Caliente. 
Sonoma Co., Calif., or see Peck-Judah 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA. CALIF. 

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VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms — Clean Linen — Clean Everything 
Rates Exceptionally Reasonable 

TELEPHONE 110 



WHEN IN PANAMA 
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HOTEL CENTRAL 

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YOUR HEADQUARTERS 

A Hotel With An Atmosphere 
Andrew Johnston, Manager 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1864 

The Original Pioneer Carpet 
and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1928 



LOOK AND LEARN 

By A. C. Gordon 

1 — In what state of the Union are no divorces granted ? 

2 — What two bones in the body are not connected with 
any other bone ? 

3 — How many times a minute does the adult in repose 
breathe ? 

4 — What is 300 times sweeter than cane sugar? 

5 — What three countries have the largest navies? 

6 — What tree's bark is used in making canoes ? 

7 — What is the name of the mythical continent, sup- 
posed to have existed in the Atlantic ocean? 

8 — How is Easter determined ? 

9 — What eight languages are classified under the head 
"Teutonic"? 

10 — What is a glacier? 

11 — What is called the greatest epic in the English 
language? 

12 — Which is the oldest standing monarchy in Europe? 

13 — What sermon has been called "the finest ever given 
and the hardest to put into effect"? 

14 — What animal supplies us with pearl buttons? 

15 — Where does most of our raw silk come from ? 

16 — What causes a rainbow? 

17 — Which is larger, North America or Africa? 

18 — What U. S. president was the great champion of 
the strenuous life? 

19 — What places on the globe have no longitude? 

20 — What Italian city is celebrated for the manufac- 
ture of violins? 

21 — How many battles of Bull Run were there in the 
Civil War? 

22 — Which two South American countries have deserts 
along the sea coast? 

23 — Is tin an alloy or an element itself? 

24 — What ancient king was reprimanded for allowing 
cakes to burn? 

25 — What country is famous for its watches, cheese 
and chocolates ? 

26 — What exiled monarch lives in Holland? 

27 — What stone is reputed to have the power of im- 
parting the art of flattery ? 

28 — What is the "third degree"? 

29 — For whom did the sun stand still for 24 hours? 

30 — What city is the metropolis of the Canadian part 
of the northern wheat belt ? 

Answers to Last Week's Questions 

1 — One to six. 2 — Philadelphia. 3 — Homographs. 4 — 
Sheep. 5— Herbert Hoover. 6— No; about 560 million 
Christians, and about one billion non-Christians. 7 — 9 
a. m. 8 — Ancient, medieval, modern. 9 — John Philip 
Sousa. 10— Montreal. 11— Dayton, Ohio. 12— Lord By- 
ron. 13— Shem, Ham, Japeth. 14 — Verkhoyansk, Siberia. 
15— Narcissus. 16— Alexander Graham Bell. 17— Hum- 
ming bird. 18— The Old Testament was written in He- 
brew, the New in Greek. 19—1620. 20— Los Angeles. 21 

—Scotch Highlander. 22 — Tram-cars or trams. 23 

" repent at leisure." 24 — Alexander Pope. 25 — 

Russia. 26— Walter Camp. 27— England. 28— Drones. 
29— Rio de Janeiro. 30— To Abraham. 



FROM BRIGHTER PENS 
THAN OURS 



Rules for Drivers 

An arm protruding from the car ahead means that the 
driver is: 

1. Knocking ashes off a cigarette. 

2. Going to turn to the left. 

3. Telling a small boy to shut up, he won't buy any 
red pop. 

4. Going to turn to the right. 

5. Pointing out a scenic spot. 

6. Going to back up. 

7. Feeling for rain. 

8. Telling his wife, yes, he's sure the kitchen door is 
locked. 

9. Saluting a passing motorist or going to stop. — Life. 

"There's mother's ashes in the jar on the mantlepiece." 
"So your mother is with the angels!" 
"No, sir; she's just too lazy to look for an ash tray." 
— Northwestern Purple Parrot. 

Another advantage Noah had was that he didn't have 
to bring out a new model ark every year or two. — Dallas 

News. 

* * * 

When some people tell the truth it is only for the pur- 
pose of creating trouble. — Legion News. 

* * * 

"See that little man over there? He's an etiquette 
teacher in a deaf-and-dumb school." 

"What are his duties?" 

"He teaches the pupils not to talk with their hands 
full." — Passing Show. 



The Acid Test 



, 



There is a contention that the issuing of licenses to 
Bank of Italy branch managers to act as agents to handle 
insurance, which the bank controls through credit opera- 
tions, is illegal. i 



He had just asked her father for her hand. 
"How do you know she really loves you ?" asked father, 
"Well," returned the prospective son-in-law, "she hasn't 
kicked about the car I drive." — Motor Land. 



One of the strangest things in this world is why the 
self-made man employs college professors to make his 

sons. — Dallas News. 

* * * 

The most annoying thing in a theater is a baby crying. 
How can anybody sleep with a baby crying? — Judge. 

* * * 

He — May I have the next dance? 

She — But I don't know you. 

He — Then perhaps we'd better sit one out first. — 

Everybody's Weekly. 

* * * 

You can't visualize a barrage unless you've seen one, 
but eating grapefruit gives you an idea. — Washington 
Post. 

* * * 

Sunday School Teacher — And why did Noah take two 
of each kind of animal into the ark? 
, Bright Child — Because he didn't believe the story about 
the stork. — Penn Punch Bowl. 

* * * 

In order not to show anything brutal on the screen, 
most movies end just as the couples are about to be mar- 
ried. — Judge. 



February 11, 1928 



MINIATURES of YOURSELF 

or members of your family 

make appreciated and valued 

presents. 

Last a Life Time 



149 POWELL STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 






BObb 



PAVILELDEKS 

239 Posh Street, San Francisco 




N W CORNER 

(JRAYBTONE240 POLK and POST STS. 




Photographs 

^ (3</jv Forever 



DOWN SANTA MARIA WAY 

The following people have been 
guests at the Santa Maria Inn during 
the past week: 

Miss J. F. Daniels of San Francisco. 
Miss Edith Perry and Miss Ada 
Dodd. both of San Anselmo. 

Mr. A. H. Breed and Mr. M. J. 
Diggs. both of Oakland. 

Mrs. H. J. Crocker, Miss Marian 
Crocker and Mr. Clark Crocker, all of 
San Francisco. 

Mr. \V. H. B. Fowler. Mr. Earl C. 
Behrens and Mr. Horsey Campbell, all 
of San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Mohr of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Bostwkk and 
Miss Florence Bostwick. all of San 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Barrett of San 
Mateo. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Frank of San 
Francisco and Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Frank of Milwaukee Wis. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
MEN AND THEIR AFFAIRS 

(Continued from page 5) 

which George D. Smith is president 
and managing director. 

* * * 

Iroquois Club 

George E. Reilly tells us that the 
Iroquois Club will hold their conven- 
tion in this city in March with promi- 
nent Democrats in attendance. 



The "20-30" Club 

Jack Keogh, sports announcer for 
KPO, spoke to the members of the 
20-30 Club on football and other 
sports Thursday noon at the Palace 
hotel. 

Jack Keogh's announcing is fa- 
miliar to all the members of the 20-30 
Club and, inasmuch as all the mem- 
bers are rabid football fans, they kept 
him busy answering such questions 
as "Why was the Notre Dame-U. S. 
C. decision?", "What causes foot- 
ball?" and so forth. 

Don C. Elliott, chairman of the en- 
tertainment committee of the Shrine 
Luncheon Club was elected an honor- 
ary member of the 20-30 Club. 
* * * 

We Offer Our Sixth 
Congratulation to Mr. Drury 

This week Mr. Ernest Drury, man- 
ager of the Hotel Whitcomb, is cele- 
brating his sixth anniversary as head 
of that San Francisco hostelry. 

Mr. Drury is one of the men who 
prove that "hotel men are born, not 
made." His many successful years in 
the profession have gained him a 
legion of friends, and the utmost re- 
spect of his employes. 

A telegram from Mr. D. M. Lin- 
nard, owner of the Hotel Whitcomb, 
was one of many, but one of the most 
hearty. 



19 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE 
BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

(Opposite Palace Hotel) 

San Francisco Phone Kearny 391 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS AND WATCHMAKERS 

Chime, Antique and Complicated Clocks 

and Watches a Specialty 

209 POST STREET at GRANT AVENUE 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda 

and San Mateo Counties 



T ^PE WRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 

506 MARKET STREET 
Phone Douglas 649 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office and Works: 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Office: 760 Sutter Street 

I Hotel Canterbury Bide.) 

Phone Prospect 9945 

Work Called for and Delivered 



USED 

ADDING. BOOKKEEPING, 
CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Tear 

BOUGHT — SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
KXCHANGE 



Phone Garfield JSS2 



561 Market St. 



Mr. and Mrs. James Madison Jr. of 
San Francisco. 

Mrs. E. P. Young and Mrs. Robert 
Stanton, both of Carmel. 

Mrs. Lee S, Roberts Sr. and Mrs. 
Lee S. Roberts Jr., both of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Mrs. George H. Tyson of Alameda 
and Mrs. William B. Weir of San 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Raas of San An- 
selmo. 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 11, 1928 



East 

through the 

Sunny South 




i 



C— Sunset Limited, famed 
'round the world, offers a 
journey of rare attraction. 

Southern Pacific's colorful 
Sunset Route lies along the na- 
tion's southern border.Through 
California's orange lands, 
across fertile mesas and broad 
plains and along placid Louis- 
iana bayous to New Orleans. 
All the way the romance and 
historical interest of the South- 
west and the Old South. See 
Apache Trail highway— one 
day side trip in Arizona. 

It costs no more to go east 
this way to New York. From 
New Orleans, continue by train 
or enjoy the delightful ocean 
voyage to New York aboard 
Southern Pacific's steamship 
(meals and berth on the ship 
included in your fare) . 

Over this route, "Sunset Limited" 
carries you swiftly and comfortably. 
Its appointments are complete in 
every detail. Also the "Argonaut" 
from Los Angeles over this route. 

Go this way and return someother 
Southern Pacific route if you wish 
—Overland Route, Chicago to San 
Francisco; Golden Stale, the direct 
line from Chicago to Los Angeles 
and San Diego; or Shasta Route, 
west over northern lines and south 
from Seattle and Portland. 

Read the interesting Sunset Route 
booklet describing the trip in de- 
tail. Ask for a copy and for further 
details. 

Sunset 
Limited 

Southern Pacific 

F.S.McGINNIS 

Passenger Traffic Manager 

San Francisco 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 4) 

and the following guests and mem- 
bers were received by the new presi- 
dent: Mr. J. D. Walters, the past 
president and Mrs. Walters; Mr. and 
Mrs. C. R. Gibb and Mr. and Mrs. 
Edwin Witter. 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from page 7) 

As the name of the organization 
indicates, these artists have become 
universally known through their Vic- 
tor records and have given something 
like seven hundred concerts during 
the past season. 

* * * 

Warfield 

"Sporting Goods" brings Richard 
Dix to the Warfield screen where the 
affable star is now screened in com- 
edy. 

In this picture, Dix is a traveling 
golf suit salesman, mistaken for a 
millionaire and he makes good in or- 
der to win the heart of a girl, who 
happens to be very rich. 

Gertrude Olmstead is the girl. 
Myrtle Steadman and Phillip Strange 
are in the cast. 

We are told that this is a rattling 

good picture. 

* * * 

St. Francis 

Douglas Fairbanks is at the St. 
Francis. 

His picture is "The Gaucho" with 
the cinema celebrity appearing in 
hair-raising adventure. The story is 
one of rivalry between a bandit chief 
and a dictator. 

There's a delicious love story, too, 
in the picture with Lupe Velez play- 
ing the role of sweetheart. 

One just can't afford to ever miss 
a Douglas Fairbanks picture and this, 
the latest release, presenting the fa- 
mous screen star, is rated as one of 
his best photoplays. 

* * * 

California 

"The Student Prince" is at the 
California theater, showing a screen 
version of the popular musical com- 
edy. 

Norma Shearer and Ramon No- 
varro are stars in the photoplay, di- 
rected by Ernest Lubitsch. It is a 
triumph in motion picture produc- 
tion. Some of the scenes show gi- 
gantic settings of an entire town with 
huge mystic castles in the back- 
ground. 

The story is gripping and the 
screen brings spectacles of entrancing 
beauty and gripping interest. 



Buy a 



Sunday Pass 

and Ride 

all Day for 

20c 

Ask the Conductor 




SAMUEL£KAHN, 

Presidtnt 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE: The MINERAL DE- 
VELOPMENT COMPANY. location of principal place 
df business, San Francisco, Calif. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors, held on the 17th day of January, 1928, ;iri 
assessment of one-half cent per share was levied 
upon the issued capital stock of the corporation pay- 
able immediately, in legal money of the United States, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company. Room 
2-15, Monadnock Building. San Francisco. Calif. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the 24th day of February. 19&8 will be 
delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, 
and unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
Tuesday, the 20th day of March. 1928 to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expense of sale, 

M. J. Seely. Secretary, 

2-15 Monadnock Building, 

San Francisco, Calif. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Lurie and Curran Theaters 

GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

REVUE 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 

DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




We now deliver to any part of the city — including Sundays and Holidays. 
No extra charge. 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c. $1. 35c. 50c. 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carte 

Dancing 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

363 Sutter St. Phone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
Headquarters for Theatrical People 

HATTIE MOOSER MINNIE C. MOOSER 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. 



Western Pipe and Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles. Calif. 

444 Market Street 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



Yes, we do a lot of handwork, too. 

La Grande & White's Laundry 

"The Recommended Laundry" 



250 Twelfth St. 



PHONE MARKET 916 
Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



San Francisco 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' Lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private Dining Rooms 
for Banquets and Parties, Seating 75 to 100 People 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larkin Sts. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 
Graystone 8100 



Weekdays. Luncheon S .75 

(11:30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week Days & Sundays. 1.50 



No visitor Should Leave the City 

Without Dining in the Finest 

Cafe in America 



Our Main Dining Room Is Open Again on Sundays 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

93 Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Op n Frnm 

11 :30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 

fi:30 p.m. to 8:80 p.m. 

Sundays ;i nH Hoi I 

I to 8 :80 p.m. only 
CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Highway 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 




MME. M. S. E. LEE 




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Vol. CX. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., FEBRUARY 18, 1928 



No. 8 



THE FIRST ANNUAL STATE ART EXHIBIT 

By Bertha A. Miller 



No art center in California has been chosen with more 
discriminating taste than that of Santa Cruz. A back- 
ground of mountains with ever-changing hues, a fore- 
ground of surf and interesting coast line, a calm restful 
spirit pervading its very atmosphere, make just a proper 
setting for an annual exhibit. 

Thousands of visitors attended the first annual state- 
wide art exhibit held in the Casa del Rey Bayview Room 
and sun parlors from February 1 to February 15. One 
hundred and sixty-three pictures were chosen from the 
six hundred submitted. As a whole the exhibit represents 
a sane, forward and progressive movement in art. 

The first prize in oils of a hundred dollars was awarded 

to Margaret Bruton of Monterey for her picture entitled 

Monterey Landscape." Rinaldo Cuneo of San Francisco 

received the second prize, fifty dollars, for his "Winter 

on the Desert." 

In the pastel group, "The Palpino Fishing Fleet." by 
Valere de Mari of San Francisco, carried away first 
honors. Matteo Sandona, also of San Francisco, received 
second mention in this group for his "Hisa." 

"The Back Water." by Stanley Wood of Carmel. was 
judged the best water color in the exhibition and "Indian 
and Leaves," by Edouard A. Vysekal of Los Angeles, the 
second best. 

In "Farm Buildings," a canvas by Jeanette Maxfield 
Lewis, there is an unusual treatment interlocking of in- 
teresting planes that gives the clouds a feeling of depth 
and form that few artists paint. The whole is rich in 
quality of design. 

In viewing Piazonnis' "California" and "The Soil" one 
feels that there is real life under t he hills producing the 
Buoyancy, and that the hills belong to previous exhibits. 
In Lee Randolph's "Hills in Autumn" life is ebbing and 
the richer colors and mood of Autumn appear. 

The rhythm of the lines and bold treatment of '•Indian 

nd Leaves" by Edouard Vysekal. give this water color a 

swing and attraction that lift it far above the mediocre. 

Margaret Bruton's "Luzisia." a portrait in oil. has a 
pleasing balance of warm color against cool. The char- 
acter o( her subject, rather than the photographic per- 
fection of features, is paramount. This portrait has wear- 
ing qualities thai many artists strive to get. but few 
attain. 



One cannot view "Wild Grasses" and "Squatter's Ro- 
mance," by a colorist, without a greater appreciation for 
this sort of technique. 

"The Avenue," a canvas by Cor De Gavere, brings us 
to an avenue of eucalyptus, such as one sees around this 
art center. 

The enthusiastic reception of the first state-wide art 
exhibit, the progressive type of work chosen, the natural 
beauty of the setting of Santa Cruz, justifies us in pre- 
dicting that the next annual exhibit held here will be 
even larger- than the present one. 

Among those exhibitors who received special mention 
besides the prize winners, were Lee F. Randolph, Giot- 
tardo Piazzoni and J. Burnside Tufts of San Francisco, 
Heath Anderson of Alameda, Florence Alston Swift and 
William H. Wilke of Berkeley. 

Other San Franciscans included F. Elizabeth Atkins, 
Leland Hyde. Lucien Labaudt, Smith O'Brien, Otis Old- 
field. Mildred Rosenthal, Florence Inglesby Tufts and E. 
Seivert Weinberg. 



IN THE ART WORLD 

The annual art exhibit of the Bohemian Club will open 
Monday. February 20, and will continue up to and in- 
cluding March 3. The hours will be from 2 to 5 every 
afternoon and Wednesday evenings, from 8 to 11 o'clock. 
Only works from the artist members of the Bohemian 
Club will be exhibited. 

Mr. James Swinnerton. chairman of the advisory art 
committee of the Bohemian Club, also announces that 
the Phelan competitive exhibition of figure paintings is 
to be held in the early autumn. The exact date will be 
announced later. This exhibition will be open to all Cali- 
fornia artists. 



An exhibition of oil paintings by Clara Lyon Hayes 
will be shown in the Paul Elder Gallery, opening Mon- 
dav. February 20. These charming oil paintings of flow- 
ers and the old fashioned gardens of California very 
appropriately herald the approach of our beautiful Cali- 
fornia springtime. Clara Lyon Hayes was a pupil of 
Soyer Studio. Paris. Royal Art School. Berlin, and Wil- 
liam Keith. San Francisco. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1928 






GEORGE WASHINGTON 

The Father of his Country has had a hard time this last 
year, for the biographical sharks have been raking the 
ashes of his life and the hundred per centers, in the fool- 
ishness of their defense, have actually done the Father 
of his Country more harm than all the attacks, if they 
are attacks, of the biographers. 

Of the latter, Rupert Hughes has come in for the worst 
denunciation and yet it is hard to see why. Rupert 
Hughes set to work to tell the story of Washington, as a 
man. He did not go into the matter of his deification or 
sanctification, or whatever terms may be applied to the 
place where sentimentality has tried to place him. Hughes 
seems to think that Washington was born like the rest of 
us, that he had baby complaints such as we have had, all 
of us; that he had amiable little vices, liked a bit of 
gambling now and again, was not averse to a little harm- 
less flirtation, had a funny trick of counting everything, 
was a fine businessman but sometimes had hard luck and 
had to borrow money; was occasionally a little set on 
himself and had essentially the awkward modesty of the 
English squire, which modesty he tried to conceal by an 
affected dignity. 

There he is, a man like all of us, with weaknesses and 
sweetnesses and the same unaccountable depression of 
spirit which sometimes takes us all. But do these facts 
militate against him? Not in the slightest degree. On 
the contrary they increase the respect which we feel for 
his courage and his faith through adversity and trial and 
the magnificent quiet common sense with which he 
greeted victory. 

Let the biographers get all the facts; Washington 
stands like a protecting mountain over the destinies of 
the people of this glorious land of ours. 



receive a new, magnificent impulse and there is little 
doubt that the science of aeronautics will profit enor- 
mously. 



THE OLD COMPETITION 

It is interesting to see that the competition which for- 
merly raged between Britain and the Germans for lead- 
ership in sea transportation has now been accentuated 
by the advent of air transportation, sufficiently well de- 
veloped to make it a profitable field of effort. 

The British are about to institute a fleet of lighter- 
than-air ships which will cross the Atlantic in safety and 
transport passengers with rapidity and security. The first 
of these ships will be larger than the Mauretania and, 
of course, they will increase in size as the traffic war- 
rants it. At present there is an effort being made to in- 
terest American capital in the enterprise and the pro- 
posal is that three should carry the British and three the 
American flag. 

Now comes the news that the great German Zeppelin 
LZ-127 will be ready by May, which is four months in 
advance of the time that the British expect to be in the 
field. This ship is expected to make a trip across the 
Atlantic and then go down the coast to South America 
without making a landing. 

There will be much soreness of heart over the contest, 
for German and Briton are equally anxious to get the 
credit of the first trans-Atlantic passenger trip. The 
Germans claim a new method of fueling which will reduce 
weight, a new gas being substituted for petrol. 

This is the sort of rivalry that does the world good. 
We shall all reap the advantage of this struggle. The 
mechanism and the chemistry of air transportation will 



SENATOR SHORTRIDGE 

Our Senator Shortridge is credited with making the 
best speech in Congress on the Jones Bill, which aims at 
continuing the Federal government indefinitely in the 
shipping business. 

The Senator makes the unanswerable contention that 
the government has failed miserably in the shipping 
business. He founds this upon the undeniable record that, 
since the government took upon itself this invasion of a 
field which is properly within the scope of private enter- 
prise, the American trade in American bottoms has 
gradually dwindled while that of foreign competing ship- 
pers has increased in the actual transport of American 
goods. 

There is no doubt, argues the Senator, that American 
shipping business must increase. The conditions of our 
export trade demand it. There is no sense in a great 
nation, which is now emerging as the greatest exporter 
of manufactured goods, being dependent upon other and 
competing people for the transportation of those goods. 
The thing is a foolish contradiction. The contradiction 
must be overcome. America must become the master of 
its own transportation. The government has failed. It is 
now the time to allow private. enterprise to take up the 
matter and, if necessary, to sustain such private enter- 
prise until it is fully on its feet. 

There does not appear to be any answer to this argu- 
ment and we are very glad that the State has had the 
distinction of the ability and force of Senator Short- 
ridge, in its presentation. It is a matter of tremendous 
concern to the people of this city, with which the Senator 
is so closely connected. Needless to say we desire eagerly 
the triumph of the cause which he represents so well. 



THE BAND AT SAN QUENTIN 

In one of the papers this week was the account of a 
very unusual band which the prisoners at San Quentin 
have organized and which renders good music so credit- 
ably that it has won the approval of numbers of eminent 
musicians. 

This band is led by a murderer who displays quite dis- 
tinguished ability, not only in the actual conduct of the 
music, but in his methods of instruction, which produce 
such results that men who have graduated through the 
band find little trouble in securing good positions after 
their term has expired. It is also interesting to learn j 
that from ten to fifteen prisoners a year have musical ' 
training of a high order, which, considering the relative | 
numbers of such men to the entire population, does not 
by any means recommend music as a vocation ensuring 
moral integrity. 

The social implications of these facts are peculiar and 
rather shocking to the ordinary mind. In the first place 
we gather that among the masses of criminal prisoners 
in our largest state institution there is a group which, 
by reason of its musical power, is capable of social service 
of a high order. Indeed, the music produced is of so 
satisfying a character that Sunday concerts were pro- 
hibited because of the crowds of visitors which they at- 
tracted. 



February 18, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



We have had no satisfactory explanation from crimi- 
lologists or others of the fact that large numbers of 
people seem to be inherently incapable of maintaining 
ocial standards. Yet the same people while under the 
fccipline and confinement of prison rule can produce 
irtistic results of a high order. The conclusion is that 
here is no necessary connection between art and decency. 



OUR NEW STATUE 

A new statue is quite a municipal event. Centuries ago 
t would have been hailed with great enthusiasm and 
'easts in its honor would have caused joy for days. But, 
n those days, they made statues which would last for all 
;ime and defy the attacks of the bilious. 

We enjoy no such advantages in connection with our 
statues. On the contrary, they are just as likely to be 
nailed down and destroyed tomorrow or the next day, 
ind as for attacks, critics and even the public fall upon 
hem almost with vindictive fury. 

Do you not remember how Jacob Epstein made a new 
tatue to perpetuate the memory of W. H. Hudson and 
low the populace, the priests and the press fell upon him 
vith almost sanguinary hostility and London seethed 
vith marching crowds going to vent their anger against 
i stone panel four feet by six. It was all very thrilling 
tnd all very silly ; still it was encouraging that people of 
ur Babbitt breed could still find steam enough to object 
o a statue on some other grounds than that it showed 
oo much of the human body. 

Our new statue is of Lincoln by Haig Patigian. Well, 
vhat of it? There will be no marching denunciations, 
leither on the other hand, will there be applauding co- 
lorts. The statue is typical of the state of mind of our 
minently respectable people. It says "Safety First" in 
mperishable stone. It is a very safe Lincoln and will 
ppeal with pathetic force to our Middlewest visitors. 

It is like Lincoln, oh yes, no doubt Lincoln was like 
hat. But in this safe image one looks in vain for the 
leroic patience and sweet humor which carried us tri- 
mphantly through the bloodiest and darkest period of 
ur national existence. But the statue is safe and very 
ane, too sane for distinction. 



MAYOR ROLPH RIGHT AGAIN 

The Mayor is gifted with a sense of the fitness of 

lings which comes to the front in the most unexpected 

ashion at times and for which we, as a community, 

hould be particularly grateful. The last instance of his 

erspicacity and humanity is connected with the killing 

f a small child, three years old, by a Municipal street 

ar. There seems to be good reason for inquiry in this 

latter, as it appears that the street car went ahead, like 

Speeding automobile. The charge is that more than one 

W went over the body of the child as it lay on the tracks. 

We do not pretend to have any opinion on this ease, as 

case, for the facts will all have to come out and to state 

conclusion at present would be merely to act on a senti- 

lental impulse. What we wish to point out is that the 

layer has seen the importance of the situation and has 

snsibly called for exhaustive inquiry into the matter. 

The fact that the car was a Municipal car made the 

latter all the more pressing. We are quite well aware 

lat. if it had happened in the case of the private cor- 

oration cars, the press, or at least a portion of it. would. 

sfore now, have been ringing with denunciation and call- 

ig down wrath upon the heads of those who were even 

anotely connected with the street car operation. 

It is the excellent conduct of the Mayor in calling at- 

ntion to the fact that it is the duty of the municipality 

> carefully watch the operation of its own instruments 

nd not allow the fact of municipal ownership to obscure 

le equally important fact of municipal responsibility. 



FROM BRIGHTER PENS 
THAN OURS 

The new Assistant Secretary of War is a lawyer. So 
if we lose the next war, we may escape the consequences 
by pleading insanity. — San Diego Union. 



Trotzky having been banished from Moscow, we are in 
doubt whether to congratulate Trotzky or Moscow. — 
Weston (Ore.) Leader. 



Another day we never expected to live to see, but did, 
was the one when we began to think that what Pennsyl- 
vania and Illinois needed was some such organization as 
Tammany Hall to clean up their politics. — Ohio State 
Journal. 



"Did you ever hear about the Scotchman who was so 
tight that he stood on a corner and gave away five dollar 
bills?" — Virginia Reel. 



Always borrow from a pessimist — he never expects it 
back, anyhow. — Boston Beanpot. 



Joe C. — What price is this sport roadster? 
Rolls-Royce Salesman — §13,695. 

Joe C. — Well, what would you allow me on a 1914 Ford 
touring? — Pennsylvania Punch Bowl. 



"So your father knows the exact moment he will die, 
does he, the exact year, month and day?" 

"Yassuh, he had ought to. The jedge tole him." — Cor- 
nell Widow. 



The office cynic's wife has found a book on child psy- 
chology very helpful. She uses it as a paddle. — Portland 
Express. 



Perhaps the President wants the government to get out 
of the shipping business because of what it doesn't get 
out of the shipping business. — Weston (Ore.) Leader. 

In offering a reward for the head of every bank bandit 
killed, the Texas Bankers' Association has, of course, 
taken precautions against attempts by unscrupulous 
persons to cash heads that are not genuine. — Punch. 



England is still greatly upset over the refusal of the 
House of Commons to approve the revision of the Prayer 
Book. This brings us the comforting reflection that our 
own Congress, though it is not without its faults, does 
not tell US how to pray. — The New Yorker. 



A specialist says everybody is crazy on some subject. 
His subject, apparently, is craziness. — Fresno Republi- 
can. 



The New York air. we read, is almost like champagne. 
So. we understand, is some of the New York champagne. 
— Punch. 



That Columbia professor who says long legs indicate 
brains hasn't noticed what awful boners the stork pulls. 
—San Francisco Chronicle. 



Growler: "I didn't sleep a wink all night. I had an 
awful toothache." 

James: "Ah. you should try repeating to yourself fifty 
times every day. 'Get behind me, pain'." 

"Not much! Do you think I want lumbago " 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1928 






Happy Hunting Grounds 

All the happy hunting grounds are 
not in that place designated in Indian 
legendry. 

No, indeed, there are many reserves 
for happiness close at hand. If you 
ask Peninsula society, they will beck- 
on you to the San Mateo-Burlingame 
Polo Club, to Pebble Beach, or Mon- 
terey, or to other familiar places not 
far from town. 

Polo, golf and other out-of-door 
events are lures for the smart set and 
society makes it a point to miss nary 
a one of the scheduled affairs. 

Go to any of them just once and 
you'll understand. The weather, too, 
permits of much pleasure, and Spring- 
time is here. 

* * # 

Society Does the Rest! 
"A 1' Apache" 

Thomas Hitchcock Jr., interna- 
tional polo star, was the motif and 
special honor guest of a picturesque 
Apache ball given at the San Mateo- 
Burlingame Polo Club in San Mateo 
recently when Jean de St. Cyr was the 
host. 

Costumes of the Montemarte order 
were donned by the guests while fun 
ran at high speed throughout the 
novel and thoroughly clever affair. 

* * * 

Junior League 

What lively times for the Junior 
League these past few days. It has 
been convention time with notable 
visitors as honor guests. Mrs. Fred- 
erick Legg of Baltimore was the feted 
official and, in addition to formal af- 
fairs in her honor, there was any 
number of brilliant gatherings of 
Junior League camaraderie. 

* # * 

Mrs. Milo Robbins was hostess to 
the honored visitor, Mrs. Legg, at a 
dinner of elaborate design. Mrs. 
Harry Dodge also gave a dinner in her 
honor. 



"" 



SANTA MARIA INN 

SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA 

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An Inn of Unusual Excellence 

Wire or write for reservations on your 
next trip south 



By Antoinette Arnold 

Mrs. Evan S. McCord of Seattle, a 
prominent convention official, was 
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Page Maillard at their home on Val- 

lejo street. 

* * * 

House Guests 

Mrs. Edgar Park of Santa Barbara 
who has a host of friends in this part 
of the state was the house guest of 
Miss Frances Stent, who also enter- 
tained Mrs. E. L. Doheny Jr., of Los 
Angeles and Miss Emily Anderson of 

New York. 

* * * 

Mardi Gras 

Something new every minute for 
the Mardi Gras 

Election of the queen, selection of 
participants in pageant roles, and a 
hundred or more pleasing details, 
preparatory to the ball, which takes 
place Monday evening, February 21, 
in the Civic Auditorium have held our 

interest. 

* * * 

Engaged 

Dr. and Mrs. John K. Plincz an- 
nounced the betrothal of their daugh- 
ter, Wanda, to Fred Sturtevant Herr- 
ington, son of the late F. W. Herring- 
ton. The news was the feature of a 
pleasant surprise conveyed to the 
friends of both families at a large tea 
at the Mark Hopkins Hotel on Satur- 
day afternoon, February 4. 

* * * 

Mrs. Florence Nutter arrived on the 
President McKinley from Honolulu 
and registered at the Hotel Whit- 
comb. Mrs. Nutter has been spending 
the past year in the Islands, visiting 
friends, but has now come back to 

make her home in San Francisco. 

* * * 

An informal luncheon was held at 
the Hotel Whitcomb by the members 
of the P. E. 0. Mrs. Frances Wallace 
presided at the luncheon which was 
followed by bridge in the roof garden. 

* * * 

Dinner Party 

Mme. M. Jueptner-Stuarts of Paris 
and San Francisco entertained a 
group of friends at a handsomely ap- 
pointed dinner at the Fairmont Hotel 
where she makes her home. Mounds 
of pink roses, sweet peas and stock 
on runners of maidenhair fern, and 
tall candles placed in silver holders 
were the decorations for the table. 
Cards were enjoyed after dinner. 



Mrs. Arthur Zirkman entertained 
several members of the auxiliary of 
the Pacific Coast Horticultural Socie- 
ty at a luncheon in Drury Lane at the 
Hotel Whitcomb in honor of Mrs. J. 
A. Morgan. The guest list included 
Mesdames V. P. Podesta, Angelo 
Rossi, A. A. Myers, A. D. Rose, J. J. 

Gill. 

* * * 

Exquisite Luncheon 

Mrs. James Francis Dunne was 
hostess at an exquisitely appointed 
luncheon given in the Rose Room at 
the Fairmont Hotel. She was assisted 
in receiving her guests by Mrs. Ed- 
ward B. Montgomery who accompan- 
ied her on a recent tour of the world, 
and Mrs. Joseph Rucker. After lunch- 
eon moving pictures of countries 
visited by the ladies while abroad 
were shown and interesting incidents 
connected with the scenes were re- 
lated by Mrs. Montgomery. Eighty 
guests were entertained. 



Mrs. Phin Burchard entertained a 
number of her friends on Saturday 
afternoon at a bridge tea in the Roof 
Garden of the Hotel Whitcomb. The 
tea table was attractively decorated 
with early spring flowers. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. David Blankenhorn of 
Los Angeles spent a few days in the 
city during the week and were domi- 
ciled at the Fairmont Hotel. 

* * * 

Bridge-Tea 

Mrs. J. Alan Robey entertained at 
a delightful bridge tea in the Garden 
of the St. Francis, honoring Miss 
Ruth Rosalie Chapman who is to be 
married in June to Mr. Merlin Porter. 
The centerpiece for the dainty tea 
table was formed of corsage bouquets 
placed for the guests. 

(Continued on page 20) 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 BUSH STREET 

Between Powell and Stockton 

San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. Bl.ETHEN. Proprietor 



February 18, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




California Leads 

J. W. Crabtree, secretary of the 
National Education Association re- 
ports in his annual membership out- 
ine that California leads the United 
States in the actual number of mem- 
bers with an enrollment of 18,497. 
The association has gained more than 
11,000 new members among teachers 
or school officials this past year. 
* * * 

Publishing Company 

The biggest piece of news this past 
week among prominent men has been 
the business transaction of the "Bul- 
letin." 

A. B. C. Dohrmann and Wallace M. 
Alexander severed their interest in 
the San Francisco "Bulletin" and the 
property passed into control of the 
San Francisco Publishing Company, 
incorporated two weeks ago. 

John F. Schurch of Hillsborough 
and formerly of New York is the new 
president of the San Francisco Pub- 
lishing Company. William H. Hines, 
one of the best known and most ef- 
ficient newspaper man in the entire 
West, who has been editor and pub- 
lisher of the "Bulletin," and Charles 
E. Fisher, business manager, are of- 
ficials with the new publishing com- 
pany. 

Hines, in addition to his present 
and former duties, is also vice-presi- 
dent of the San Francisco Publishing 
Company. Fisher is treasurer of the 
company, announced as a §1,000,000 
institution. Schurch holds the con- 
trolling interest. 

Schurch's previous business activi- 
ties include executive positions with 
the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Saulte 
3te. Marie Railroad Company. He be- 
came prominent in insurance fields in 
Minneapolis. Other positions he held 
include: vice-president of the Railway 
Materials Company, Chicago, and 
president of the Damascus Brake 
Beam Company, Cleveland. 

Later, in 1917, Schurch became 
vice-president of the Symington Com- 
pany. Rochester, N. Y. In March. 



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1927, he was elected chairman of the 
board of directors of the Manning, 
Maxwell and Moore Corporation, a 
New York manufacturing concern, of 
which he had been the president. He 
held this chairmanship up until the 
time that he came to California. 

The "Bulletin" was purchased three 
years ago by A. B. C. Dohrman and 
Wallace Alexander from the late Lor- 

ing Pickering. 

* * * 

Real Eslate Board 
Gives Lecture Course 

Leslie R. Cupples, chairman of the 
educational course of the San Fran- 
cisco Real Estate Board announces 
that Dr. Ira B. Cross of the Univer- 
sity of California will give a lecture. 
February 20, at the Galileo High 
school on the subject of "Title Insur- 
ance." 

Last week. Dr. Cross spoke on 
"Land Economics." On Monday 
night. February 28. the subject will 
be "Taxation and Assessments; Ap- 
praisals for Loans." 

* * * 

Lincoln Statue 
Present to City 

The Haig Patigian statue of Lin- 
coln was presented to the city of San 
Francisco last Monday morning with 
appropriate ceremony. Mayor James 
Rolph Jr. officiated. 

A granddaughter of William Wel- 
ler Stone, who originated the statue 
idea, unveiled the statue on behalf of 
the Lincoln Monument League. 

Hon. James D. Phelan, former 
United States Senator, was the prin- 
cipal speaker at the exercises, held in 
the Civic Auditorium, prior to the un- 
veiling ceremony. More than 10.000 
school children sang patriotic songs. 



Miss Estelle Carpenter, supervisor of 
music in the San Francisco public 
schools, leading the children. 

Delevan B. Bowley was chairman 
of the program committee and pre- 
sided over the events, after the intro- 
duction of Frank R. Havener, chair- 
man of the citizen's committee. John 
C. Chapman, commander of the 
George H. Thomas Post No. 2, G. A. 
R., read the immortal Gettysburg ad- 
dress of Lincoln. 

Mrs. Byron McDonald, contralto, 
sang several selections, with Madame 
Cecile von Seiberlich at the piano. The 
Municipal band, under the leadership 
of Sapiro, played a number of selec- 
tions as their part of the memorial 
ceremonies. 

* * * 

Down Town Men 
Visit South S. F. 

T. P. Andrews, heading a Down 
Town Association delegation, paid a 
visit to the industrial plants of South 
San Francisco, which now ranks as 
one of the leading industrial centers 
of the Pacific Coast. The members 
were met by a representative group 
of South San Francisco leaders who 
escorted the visitors through the 
plants. 

Mayor A. J. Eschekbeck of South 
San Francisco extended to Down 
Town Association members a cordial 
welcome, the special tour having 
been made in behalf of the Bay Shore 
highway construction and by invita- 
tion of Mayor Eschekbeck. 

Luncheon for the delegation was 
given at the California Golf and 
Country Club as guests of Em Kar- 
dos, officer of the Metal and Thermit 
Company. 



Son — "Pa. if a lion ate me. would 
I go straight to Heaven '.'" 

Dad — "Yes. my son." 

Son — "Oh, goody ! I was afraid I'd 
have to wait until the lion died." — 
Hollywood Filmograph. 



e, you pay no more jR 




"TheVace of a. Thousand Gardens* 

224-226 Grant Av\ Ruder ^200 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, lj 




Theaters Beckon 

;. Every theater in town and practi- 
cally every motion picture house this 
past week had programs of value. 
-, Crowds standing in long lines reg- 
istered the public pulse while the box 
office told the whole story. 
■ . Naturally, we expect much this 
week. 
. . We have a right to ! 

Some of the good shows are hold- 
ing over and others of merit are 
billed to supply the same standards. 
Trot out with "someone" and see 
the San Francisco shows. We predict 

that you'll be that much happier. 
* * * 

Geary 

": Pauline Frederick is at the Geary 
for another week in "The Scarlet 
Woman." 

This play is one of the best comedy- 
dramas I know of. One would think 
that every line was written for the 
famous actress of stage and screen, so 
admirably . does it suit her and so 
splendidly does it display her charm- 
ing grace and subtle humor. 

In the first place "The Scarlet 
Woman" is human, very human, dis- 
playing to a nicety, frailities and 
foibles of human-kind, especially the 
female contingency. 

The story concerns a young woman 
of decided opinions and self-reliance 
who, in a moment of impulse, adopts 
a baby. She returns from New York 
to her home town with her infant — 
and not taking the trouble to explain 
"everything" to the satisfaction of 
the village gossipers — starts a whirl- 
ing wheel of trouble. 

Oh, it's a delicious bit of gossip. 
One man sitting behind us at the 
-theater so thoroughly relished the 
small town type, displayed in the 
play, that he fairly roared with laugh- 
ter. 

It's all so down-right natural. 

Pauline Frederick is marvelous — 
and I hesitate not to say that in "The 
Scarlet Woman" she is better than 
ever and that's saying a-plenty ! 

Thomas Holding, playing the role 
of the professor, is an actor of con- 
vincing attainment. He is used to 
playing opposite Miss Frederick, and 
no one could be better. 

Just a word in praise of Norman 
Peck who plays the part of the boy, 
a druggist in the story. He's about 



>LEj4SURE$W4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Hoone- 




By Josephine Young 

the most refreshing man in his flaw- 
less characterization we've ever been 
privileged to see. Just like many a 
wholesome, straight-thinking lad and 
— a thoroughbred! 

The entire cast is good, exception- 
ally so! 

* % * 

Curran 

"Iolanthe," "The Mikado" and "The 
Pirates of Penzance" have early book- 
ings at the Curran theater, next door 
to the Geary, where the Winthrop 
Ames' Gilbert and Sullivan Opera 
Company will soon be heard. 

"Broadway," in the meantime, is 
attracting big audiences to the Cur- 
ran where the drama of night club 
life now starts its sixth week. 

It is a clever backstage play and 
fairly sizzles with life, pathos, humor 
and realities. 

Columbia 

"Sunny" the current attraction at 
the Columbia theater is a musical 
comedy sparkling with merry melody 
and songs one can sing or whistle. 

Helen Patterson has the title role. 
Her singing is delightful. She dances. 
She acts and she is good to look upon. 
In fact Helen Patterson fills every re- 
quirement of "Sunny." 

William Valentine i s another 
favorite. He has the assistance of a 
good male chorus. 

The dancing in "Sunny" is excel- 
lent. You'll like all of it, the dance of 
the clowns in particular. 

One song, "Henry's Made a Lady 
Out of Lizzie." is nothing short of a 

riot with the audience. 

* * # 

President 

The Henry Duffy players start on 
their sixth week of "Nightstick" at 
the President with tomorrow's mat- 
inee, and like most of the Duffy per- 
formances, the play gains in popular 
momentum. 

Kenneth Daigneau, George Leffing- 
well, Zeta Harrison, Earl Lee, 
Thomas Chatterton, Leah Winslow, 
Frank Darien, J. Raymond Northcut, 
Robert Adams, Dorothy La Mar, Wil- 
liam Abram, Alan Ryan and Madalene 
Sheehan are the splendid cast. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"New Brooms" starts on its tenth 
week now. 



Amusements 

Next Week 
ON THE STAGE 
Alcazar, O'Farrel! nr. Powell 

"New Brooms"; Henry Duffy players. 

Columbia, Eddy nr. Powell 

"Sunny." musical comedy. 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

Jed Harris presents "Broadway," a nitfht clinY 
classic. 

The Geary, Geary nr. Mason sts., 
Formerly the Lurie 

Pauline Frederick in the "Scarlet Woman," 
comedy-drama. 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"Niphtstick," modern melodrama; Henry 
Duffy players. 

VAUDEVILLE 
Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

Baseball brothers, Paul and Lloyd Waner; 
Con Colleano with Zeneta "The Bull Ficht,*' 
on the screen. Anna Q. Nillson-Francis X. 
Bushman in "The Thirteenth Juror." 

Orpheum, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Charlotte Greenwood — Second week in "Her 
Mornintr Bath." Carl McCullounh, musical 
comedy star. Mary Sowerd and Larry Brad- 
dam, "Just Crooninjj A Tune." Screen feature, 
"Niffht Life," featuring Alice Day, Johnny 
Harron, Walter Huts. 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Vaudeville — pictures. 

Wigwam, Mission nr. 22nd 

Vaudeville — pictures. 

ON THE SCREEN 

Downtown 
California, Market St. at 4th 



"The Student Prince' 
Novarro. final week. 



-Norma Shearer, Ran 



Casino, Ellis at Mason 

"Sinews of Steel" — "The Bandit's Son" — V 
double bill Sat. Billie Dove in "American 
Beauty." Sun. Monday "The Law and the 
Man," double bill — Gladys Brockwell, Thomas! 

Santschi. 

Granada, Market at Jones 

Four Marks Brothers with company of thirty j 
in person. Screen feature: "French Dressing'^ 
— Lois Wilson, Clive Brooks. H. B. Warner. ] 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th 

Douglas Fairbanks. "The Gaucho." 

Warfield, Market at Taylor 

Behe Daniels in "Feci My Pulse." "Circus I 
Days," Lillian St. Leon and her African Lions. 
Maeftioni Brothers, acrobats — Bernard's leap- 
inn hounds. 



February 18, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



This comedy, written by Frank 
Craven, is about the best father-and- 
son drama ever staged and, with the 
Duffy players presenting the char- 
acterizations, it's simply great. Rob- 
ert McWade of New York fame has 
the principal role. Helen Ferguson 
plays the feminine lead. Irving 
Mitchell is the young son in the story. 
Joseph De Stefani, Bernice Elliott, 
Helen Keers, Henry Caubisens, 
Charles Elders, William Macauley are 
the other principals. 

* * * 

Green Street 

Although utterly different from 
"The Married Virgin" in theme and 
treatment, "The Bridal Bed" at the 
Green Street Theater, with Elinore 
Jackson and Barry O'Daniels in the 
leading roles is proving as big a 
favorite as its predecessor chiefly be- 
cause of its sensational daring. 

Praise of the highest sort is ac- 
corded Miss Jackson, O'Daniels and 
the members of the supporting cast 
which includes Anette Andre, Harry 
Schumm, Ed Redmond, Gene McCar- 
thy and Gloria King. 

Charles Mere, the author, has 
handled his subject without gloves 
and the climax of this audacious story 
of a girl who marries without divulg- 
ing the fact that she has been the 
mistress of a married man brings 
startled gasps even from sophisticat- 
ed audiences. 

The run of "The Bridal Bed" is to 
be short because of a new European 
farce that Managers Biebel and Gold- 
tree have just secured. It is reported 
hilariously risque and enjoyed a phe- 
nomenal success in Paris. It will be 
announced shortly. 

* * * 

Granada 

The Four Marks Brothers are com- 
ing to the Granada for the Greater 
Stage Season presentations. They 
are bringing with them a company 
of thirty people with singing, dancing 
and novelty features of rare enter- 
tainment. Coming directly back to 
this city where they formerly ap- 
peared at top-notch prices, the Four 
Marks Brothers will give a variety of 
rapidly moving features. On the 
screen at the Granada this week will 
be the Allan Dwan directed picture. 
"French Dressing." starring Lois 
Wilson, Clive Brooks, H. B. Warner. 

* * * 

Warfield 

"Circus Days" comes to the War- 
field with Lillian St. Leon and her 
thoroughbred, Gobel's African lions, 
Maggioni Brothers, acrobats, Umber- 
to and Etters, clowns, and Bernard's 
leaping hounds. The circus riding 
school act is a novelty. Rube Wolf 
Will be master of ceremonies as usual. 



The featured picture will be Bebe 
Daniels in "Feel My Pulse." Drama, 
action and many instances of laugh- 
ter are features of this picture. 

* * * 

California 

"The Student Prince" will be at 
the California until Thursday, Feb- 
ruary 23, with Ramon Novarro and 
Norma Shearer, the stars. The pic- 
ture is drawing crowded houses and 
many like the screen version of the 
story, apparently, better than the 
drama. Be that as it may, according 
to choice, "The Student Prince" is a 
beautiful production under Ernst 
Lubitsch's masterful direction. 

Gino Severi provides musical set- 
tings and presents excellent orches- 
trations. 

* * * 

St. Francis 

Douglas Fairbanks, cinema celeb- 
rity, is at the St. Francis for another 
week in his latest success, "The 
Gaucho." The screen favorite and fa- 
mous star is packing the theater. The 
story deals with rivalry between a 
bandit chief, played by Fairbanks, 
and a South American dignitary, 
played by Gustave von Seyffertitz. 

Lupe Velez plays the role of the 

heroine. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

Charlotte Greenwood, "The So 
Long Letty Girl," who is winning 
new laurels at the Orpheum Theater 
this week with her batch of new 
songs, remains over for a second and 
final week in San Francisco, this sea- 
son. She has been requested to pre- 
sent her comedy skit, "Her Morning 
Bath," one of the big laugh sensa- 
tions. Miss Greenwood will be as- 
sisted by Martin Broones. 

Helen MacKellar, young dramatic- 
star, will head the list of newcomers 
on the program bringing her own 
companv in a condensed version of 
"The Mud Turtle." 

Other big features on the program 
will include Carl McCullough, the pop- 
ular musical comedy star in "Bright 
Bits of Travesty": Lew Hearn. co- 
median, with Ethel Gray, in an amus- 
ing skit ; Mary Cowerd and Larry 
Braddam, "Just Crooning a Tune": 
La Salle and Mack. "Static Nuts," and 
other Orpheum acts. 

The feature photoplay will be 
"Night Life." a picture of merry 
Vienna with a cast of players headed 
by Alice Day. Johnny Harron and 

Walter Hiers. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Baseball's famous brothers. Paul 
and Lloyd Waner. are at the Golden 
Gate heading a Hill of stellar attrac- 

ntinued on page 16) 



All the Hot water 
you want 

—no waiting, no bother 

Isn't it a wonderful convenience to al- 
ways have plentiful hot water im- 
mediately? 

Men like their clubs and the hotels 
for just this reason. 

And you can have this excellent hot 
water service in your own home. 

An Automatic Storage Gas Water 
Heater gives plentiful hot water day 
and night — deep hot water for bath- 
ing, a basinful for shaving. There's no 
waiting, no bother. 

Details on replacing your old water 
heater with a modern Automatic Stor- 
age Gas Water Heater can be obtained 
by phoning or calling at our local 
office. 



p.Q.and 



*>Acrnc SBBV1CZ" 




Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

Owned • Operated ■ Managed 

by Calijornians 




(Companion, of 
morning- 
it ^ refreshing • 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.800.00ft caps w«re served at tlie 

Panama-Pacific International Exposition 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1927 

Assets $117,394,234.04 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $600,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESI DIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Hoight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4 l i) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and Health, 
Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



FINANCE 



In the prevention of accidents to passengers and em- 
ployes, 1927 was the best year in the history of the South- 
ern Pacific For each fatality and reportable accident the 
railroad made an equivalent distance of 3.7 times around 
the world. 



Industrial casualties per million man-hours, including 
employes on the track and in the shop and freight houses 
were 9.72 per cent, a reduction of more than 17 per cent 
over the year 1926, which was previously the best. It is 
obvious that the new methods are accomplishing dis- 
tinguished results. 



The agitation for a proper budget system for cities has 
received distinct impetus from the survey of New York 
City finances made by Professor Lindsay Rogers of Co- 
lumbia University. 

It is very wisely pointed out that a public budget must 
not deal solely with the receipts and expenditures of a 
single fiscal year. "A budget should indicate those items 
which will require capital expenditures in the future and, 
if possible, the budget making authorities should con- 
sider their capital program for the future when they 
prepare and adopt the annual appropriation budget." 



The Tax Digest of the California Taxpayers Associa- 
tion, which makes a specialty of investigating taxation, 
recognizing that, in the long run, the equitable arrange- 
ment of taxation rests ultimately upon the will of the 
people, says, "It is only by an articulate and responsive 
electorate that the fundamental principles of our govern-, 
ment can be made to operate for the welfare of all. It is 
when the people become indifferent that inefficiency 
creeps into our governmental function." 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20. 000.000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought; FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS 
Issued; CANADIAN COLLECTIONS Effected Promptly and at REASON- 
ABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and 
at LONDON, ENGLAND ; NEW YORK : PORTLAND. ORE. ; SEATTLE, 
WASH. ; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager AsBt. Manager 



Phones Davenport 4480 
Sutter 4400 



Insurance Exchange Building 
433 California Street 




SCOTT & 
MULVIHILL 

General Insurance and 
Surety Bonds 




MADE TO ORDER ONLY 



T 7SosJJXeaf 



SHIRTS 

PAJAMAS 

NIGHT ROBES 



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Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 

25 Kearny Street Phone Kearny 3714 



In 1926 the corporation income tax paid in California 
was $61,602,849 and the total individual income tax was 
846,487,204. The total income tax collected in the state 
amounted to §108,090,054. California ranked sixth; but 
in 1927 California ranked fifth, with an increase in in- 
come tax paid of over 86,500,000. This fact alone shows 
the prosperity of this part of the country. 



Osmun R. Hull, associate professor of education in the 
University of Southern California says, "It is unreason- 
able to expect the educational affairs of a county to be 
efficiently and economically administered by as many as 
153 independent committees as was found in one county. 
It is impossible for the taxpayer to locate the many items 
of waste and extravagance that are bound to occur in a 
loosely organized system of the California type." 



The National City Bank of New York is still optimistic 
in its views on the industrial and commercial situation. 
It says, "The trend of industry and trade has been to- j 
wards betterment since the first of the year, the chief 
evidence being in the steel and automobile industries." ( 
An improvement in those branches of production neces- 
sarily means an improvement all around. 



In the East the seasonal movement of winter apparel 
has been much interrupted by the warm weather. There 
was a prevalence of mildness throughout January which 
greatly interfered with the clothing trade in which busi- 
ness has been the worst in years. 



February 18, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

THE TOWN CRIER 

By Jacques E. Ozanne 



One apparently has to reach the age of eighty-one, as 
Thomas Edison just has, to realize the tremendous value 
of life. Interviewed on his birthday, the great inventor 
stated that he wasn't going to risk his life in an airplane 
and that he considered capital punishment the relic of a 
barbarous past. 

Cautious Cal was never so cautious as when, one day 
last week, he allowed it to get into the papers that he 
endorsed both a trans-Atlantic dirigible service and the 
construction of a fleet of fast American-built liners. 

Kansas City came near losing her big show when the 
Republican National Committee failed to see in the city 
a big enough auditorium in which to hold the pow-wow 
and a sufficiency of sleeping accommodations for the 
weary delegates. We wonder which lack would trouble 
the Republicans most. 

They will have it that Mr. Jack Dempsey and Mr. Gene 
Tunney will meet again under the auspices of Mr. Tex 
Rickard to provide another exhibition of the manly art 
before a public which apparently never grows tired of 
such encounters. If those two birds fight each other 
again, though, we'll begin to think that they're related. 
* $ $ * * 

"San Francisco is one glorious defiance of the laws of 

gravity," writes Philip Guedalla, British historian. Which 

may or may not give Brother Andrew Volstead cause for 

feeling that, at least, Sir Isaac Newton has nothing on 

him. 

***** 

"I ESTIMATE," estimates Mr. Guedalla, "that a cent 
dropped on the crest of California street would gather 
speed enough to kill a horse on Market street." The safety 
of pedestrians and horses alike must, therefore, depend 
solely on the fact that the residents of upper California 
street were taught early in life to hold on to every penny. 

* :'.= * * * 

Some men are never content. Senator LaFollette has 
made the Senate go on record as opposed to President 
Coolidge's having a third term. The President's own de- 
cision not to be a candidate is a better guarantee that he 
won't, though, than any number of resolutions the Senate 

may pass. 

***** 

Another Lindbergh anecdote has come our way. It 

appears that one of the Lone Eagle's recent hostesses — 

a particularly nosy one, she must have been — discovered 

that her guest possessed only one shirt to his well-known 

name. She asked the reason why. Lindy shyly replied: 

"I send my shirts to the laundry and I never get them 

back. They cut them up for souvenirs." At least, he has 

the satisfaction of knowing why he doesn't get them 

back, which is more than most of us do. 
***** 

"Information, please." has been the popular request of 
the public to the telephone company these past few weeks. 
***** 

Several San Francisco newspapers have been asking 
the municipal government to make jobs for the unem- 
ployed. They have apparently been noticing the way gov- 
ernments have of creating jobs where none existed before. 
***** 

" 'Tis the stuff of which dreams are made" explained 
the young poet as he carved himself a slice of mince pie 
before retiring. 



Bootlegging Bibles into a Turkish school is a more seri- 
ous crime than bootlegging whisky in this legally dry 
country. Miss Edith Sanderson of Berkeley is on trial for 
having broken the Turkish law in this respect and will 
probably be banished from the country. The Turks feel 
just the same about a Bible in their schools as a Tennes- 
seean feels about a copy of Darwin's "Origin of Species" 
in his. 



Intelligence quizzes, such as have been started by A. 
C. Gordon in these pages are indeed instructive. For in- 
stance, we have just learned from one of them that a 
shrew is a small mouse-like animal with an enormous 
appetite. The problem is now to find a new word for those 
ladies who are neither small nor mouse-like and whose 
appetites are nothing worthy of mention. 

$ 4 s ♦ ♦ * 

It is suggested to us that when the bay is bridged the 
completed structure might well be referred to as the 
Bridge of Size. But we don't know about that. 



Liquor seized by Federal agents from one Thomas 
Fabri, away back in May, 1926, has been ordered returned 
to him by the United States Circuit Court. The court had 
previously ruled that the mere possession of liquor does 
not afford grounds for the issuance of a search warrant 
to "prohis." We fancy that Mr. Fabri will receive visits 
in the next few weeks from most of his old friends, all 
eager to congratulate him on the success of his case. 

We wonder where this liquor has been kept during all 
these months. If it has been kept. We remember, too, 
many heart-breaking pictures showing officers of the law- 
doing their duty by cracking the necks of seized bottles 
and allowing the precious stuff to trickle into the sewer. 
What if this or something else has happened to Mr. 
Fabri's liquor, will the prohibition agents know where to 
go t" replace it and will they be required to replace 
exactly the same vintages and brands they illegally seized. 
Five Star where they took Five Star, Johnny Walker 
where they took Johnny Walker. And the right colored 
labels, too. 

***** 

In order to pay the rewards to fathers of large families, 
■Mussolini is going to levy a special tax on bachelors. It 
is all in the interests of the state and of equality of 
Sacrifice. However, he ought to go a step further and 
have bachelors called out of their beds at odd moments 
during the night and made to walk up and down their 
rooms for a quarter of an hour or so. 
***** 

Other Senators are not as eager as Senator Walsh of 
Montana to investigate an alleged power trust. Those 
who succeeded in having his resolution referred to the 
Federal Trade Commission know the public mind a little 
better than he does. They do not care whether a trust 
exists or not so long as they do not feel that they are 
being overcharged. Not only have the electricity rates 
throughout the country not risen with the other commod- 
ities, but power companies are everywhere tending to 
reduce them. Considering the benefits the average house- 
hold reaps from its electric service company, the monthly 
bill is the smallest item on the family budget. 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1928 



On RUSSIAN 
HILL-- 

FOR RENT 

Furnished or Unfurnished 

MODERN APARTMENT FLATS 
5 rooms, studio room and sun porch. 
4 rooms and bath. 
3 rooms and bath. 

Marvelous Marine View — Sheltered from 

winds and fogs. Must be seen 

to be appreciated. 

1101 Filbert St., Cor. Leavenworth 

or 

Owner, Rm. 101, 268 Market St., San Francisco 



An Engineer 

Says: 

My training makes me an- 
alytical of facts and their 
statement. That is why I 
always turn to an accur- 
ate paper. I read the 

€littcrmrle 

Cl *J /3 



HOLLYWOOD 
By Ralph Parker 

Hollywood, the undisputed international capital of the 
motion picture industry, is becoming more and more fully 
appreciated as a vacation center. 

The movies themselves have been a powerful lure, of- 
fering fans of many nations an opportunity to see how 
the magical pictures are made. Your dyed-in-the-wool 
follower of the celluloid reel considers a glimpse of Mary 
Piekford or Pola Negri ample recompense for crossing a 
continent or two. The serious student-traveler considers 
himself a bit more nearly educated when he has learned 
something about the inner workings of an art-business 
which is, next to the printed word, this earth's most influ- 
ential molder of public opinion. And the professional 
educator who keeps his vision a few years ahead, realizes 
that the once-despised "pictures" will some day be almost 
the backbone of the newer methods of teaching. 

The motion picture industry, as Charles Danziger, man- 
ager of the Hollywood Plaza, points out in a recent letter, 
is entirely or partly responsible for many of the attrac- 
tions of Hollywood. For instance, there are the lion and 
alligator farms, originally launched to provide lions and 
alligators for the studios and now developed into impor- 
tant businesses. The adventurous Captain Carrosella is on 
the way to India to acquire tigers for a tiger farm for the 
benefit of studios and tourists. For years the vicinity of 
Hollywood has boasted two ostrich farms. And there is i 
an enormous zoo where you see monkeys and other ani- 
mals you have seen on the screen. 

There is a certain Parisian atmosphere about Holly- 
wood's night life. Cabarets, theaters of every description, 
including several motion picture palaces almost dazzling 
in their reckless magnificence, bizarre eating places, 
dressmakers whose styles are copied by European houses 
for later importation to New York — all these and many 
other factors contribute toward making Hollywood the 
world's most metropolitan town. 

The film industry is responsible, too, for bringing to 
Hollywood the players, writers, artists, directors of the 
world. From the farms and cities of the Americas, Asia, 
Europe, Africa and the islands of the seas come the tal-j 
ented and ambitious. Some of them acquire fortunes, 
others drift into waiting on tables or shining shoes. From 
the tourist's viewpoint, they all help to make Hollywood' 
a world within a single community. 



Readings and Concerts 

Mrs. Selena Lewis will read that tense melodrama by 
Somerset Maugham, "The Letter," in the Paul Elder Gal- 
lery, Tuesday afternoon, February 21, at 2:30 o'clock. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Katherine Hale of Toronto, Canada, will give a recital 
of legends and chansons of French Canada in the Paul 
Elder Gallery Thursday afternoon, February 23, at 2:30 
o'clock. Katherine Hale is the pen name of Mrs. John 
Garvin, author of several delightful books published by 
Macmillan Company and others, and of a volume of verse. 
This recital will take her audience into a fascinating, 
almost mediaeval life that exists alone on this continent 
in the Province of Quebec. 

* * * 

A recital of Ernest Bloch compositions, rendered by 
well-known musicians of the faculty of The San Francisco 
Conservatory of Music, will be given in the Paul Elder 
Gallery Saturday afternoon, February 25, at 2:30 o'clock. 
The program will present piano, vocal and chamber music 
works. There will be no admission charge. 



February 18, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




By Jacques E. Ozanne 



Critics are busily speculating as to the place which 
Thomas Hardy will hold in literary history. The English 
novelist and poet who died last month was, during the 
latter part of his life, looked upon as the dean of English 
letters. Respected by the younger writers and critics, he 
nevertheless represented the nineteenth century tradition 
and today they are chiefly wondering whether his par- 
ticular attitude, a product of the era during which he was 
forming his philosophy, is not going to limit his appeal to 
the readers of the future as it has already begone to 
render his works less popular than they were twenty 
years ago. 

Hardy was greatly impressed, or rather depressed, by 
much of the scientific writing of the middle of the last 
century. He saw a world in which men and women were 
merely the creatures of irresistible and heartless forces 
and it was about this world that he wrote his great novels, 
'Tess of the D'Urbevilles," "Jude the Obscure" and "The 
Mayor of Casterbridge." He wrote beautifully though, 
and created characters who are loved and understood by 
his readers. Perhaps his works will survive in an age 
which sees in science and its revelations, something less 
dreadful and depressing. 

* * * 

A well-dressed young man was trying to sell an ency- 
clopaedia to a middle-aged lady who was quite obviously 
a poor prospect. "Why, I never have any cause to look 
anything up in one of those things!" she exclaimed and 
the poor young man was stumped and politely said good- 
bye and proceeded to the next house. 

Although it. is doubtful whether any line of argument 
would have sold an encyclopaedia or anything else to thai 
lady, we can't help thinking that encyclopaedia salesmen 
miss one of their best sales points when they stick solely 
to the value of an encyclopaedia as something useful in 
which "to look up things." 

For we once knew a man who had read through the 
"Encyclopaedia Britannica" literally from A to Z twice 
and he was on his third lap when last we heard of him. 
While far from being willing to emulate him, even on a 
let, we have derived considerable pleasure in picking up 
the volumes and reading whatever item strikes our fancy. 
It is thus that we learned of pinnipeds. Who knows what 
a pinniped is? There are some very near San Francisco, 
if not actually within the city limits. It is thus that we 
first learned of Enteric Fever, of Foraminifera and of the 
charming Didunculus. 

* * * 

Sooner or later, this was to happen. When Alexandre 
Dumas followed up his "The Three Musketeers" with 
"Twenty Years After." readers were so pleased to receive 
this hook from his pen that they didn't stop to ask what 
were d'Artagnan. Athos. Porthos and Aramis doing dur- 
ing those twenty years. Surely, four such lively blades 
did not remain sheathed in their scabbards for a whole 
More of years. An interim during which the history of 
France was particularly agitated. 

The credit for the discovery of this unpardonable omis- 
sion goes to two compatriots of Alexandre Dumas. Paul 
Feval and M. Lassez. and they have filled the gap with a 
novel entitled "The Years Between." which has been 



translated into English and published by Longmans, 
Green and Company. The authors claim to have discov- 
ered a manuscript dealing with those twenty years in the 
chateau of one M. Grimaud, who certainly must be a 
descendant of the silent servant of Athos, who probably 
made up for his lack of speech by an industrious note- 
taking for which we may well be thankful. 

* * * 

What must have been the last work of that eminent 
historian, John Spencer Bassett, who was so unfortu- 
nately killed by a street car in Washington, D. C. last 
month, is entitled "The League of Nations: A Chapter 
in World Politics." It is being published by Longmans, 
Green and Company. 

That Percy Mackaye is still finding beauty and poetry 
in the Kentucky mountains is evidenced by the Long- 
mans, Green announcement that they will publish this 
spring his "The Gobbler of Gob," the first of a series of 

five books presenting five aspects of Appalachian lore. 

* * * 

Those who remember Charles Merz's "Centerville, U. 
S. A." will be glad to learn that he has found time be- 
tween writing editorials for the New York "World" to 
write another book. It is entitled "The Great American 
Bandwagon" and has been chosen by the discriminating 
Literary Guild as their February "plat du jour" for their 
constantly growing membership. (The John Day Com- 
pany, S3.) 

* * * 

The 1927 George Sterling Memorial Prize, awarded by 
the Order of Bookfellows for the best poem appearing 
during the year in its monthly journal, "The Step Lad- 
der," in memory of the late San Francisco poet, has been 
awarded to Daniel Henderson for his poem, "Nantucket 
Whalers." Some of Mr. Henderson's poems have ap- 
peared in book form, under the titles of "A Harp in the 
Winds" and "Children of the Tide," both bearing the 

Appleton coat of arms. 

* * * 

Among the new books which are promised for the near 
future and which we hope to read is "Once More. Ye 
Laurels." by David Cort. Dave used to edit the humorous 
monthly at our Alma Mater and we believe that we shall 
have a treat in store for us. in this, his first book. It is 
being published by the John Day Company who will sell 
it for S2 and who describe it as "revealing in an ironic 
and sympathetic fashion the comedy of man's immutable 

faith in his bright potential." 

* * * 

A new book from the always witty pen of Aldous Hux- 
ley has been published by Doubleday. Doran. (We almost 
wrote Page.) According to the advance notice. Mr. Hux- 
ley "philosophizes with a fresh and oblique humor about 
these modern problems which vex our minds .... Dogma, 
ideals, eugenics, personality and the discontinuity of the 
mind, the essence of religion and its substitutes, educa- 
tion, intelligence, equality, these are a few of the abstrac- 
tions which Mr. Huxley clothes in his richly fashioned 
prose." Is Mr. Huxlty becoming a serious thinker'.' We 
shall see. This volume, by the way. will be entitled 
"Proper Studies." 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1928 




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SAN FRANCISCO 



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San Francisco, California Phone Prospect 3182 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

By K. R. Schwartz 

National Automobile Club 

While the Lincoln and Victory Highways from San 
Francisco to Salt Lake City via Reno are closed, it is still 
possible to reach Salt Lake City; either via the Pacific 
Highway to Portland, Oregon, thence via the Old Oregon 
Trail through Idaho, thence to Salt Lake City, or via Los 
Angeles and the Arrowhead Trail. If the motorist does 
not wish to go as far south as Los Angeles on the latter 
route, he can take a short cut from Bakersfield to Bar- 
stow and Mojave, thence via the Arrowhead Trail. 

The Pacific Highway from San Francisco to Portland 
is in good condition throughout with the exception of a j 
seven mile stretch just north of La Moine, in the Sacra- 
mento River Canyon, where the road is under construc- 
tion. This road is passable without difficulty. The road 
over the Siskiyous is excellent, being paved the greater 
part of the way, but chains are also necessary on this 
stretch in the early morning and late in the evening as 
freezing temperature makes the road dangerously slip- 
pery. 

Leaving Portland via the Columbia River Highway the 
road is clear to Multnomah Falls. From this point to" Cas- 
cade Locks there are several short stretches of one-way 
traffic under control and this road is kept open from 8 
a. m. to 11 p. m. Good road is then encountered to Pen- 
dleton. Snow will be encountered in the Blue Mountains 
between Pendleton and La Grande, but this road is being 
kept open by snow plows. Good road will be encountered 
between La Grande and Boise with the exception of a 
three mile detour east of Nampa, which is very poor. 

From Boise to Mountain Home the road is rough, thence 
good gravel to American Falls. Snow will be encountered 
between American Falls and Pocatello and snow drifts 
constitute a hazard. Good from Pocatello to Salt Lake 
City. 



In Hawaii, prospective motorists must pass a strict 
examination before being granted a driver's license, and I 
this is said to account for the comparatively small num- 
ber of automobile accidents among the Island motorists. 

A police examiner accompanies the applicant for license 
while he makes an adventurous and strenuous drive, and 
only if the driver gives complete satisfaction is he 
granted a permit. Anyone found driving without a permit 
is given a S50 fine. 



On the road from Banning to Palm Springs, a concrete 
highway is followed to the junction of the Palm Springs 
road, and at this point the motorist turns to the right 
over a macadam road which is quite washboarded in I 
spots. 

From Palm Springs to Palm Canyon, a distance of 
seven miles, the road is narrow in places, and is un- 
improved desert road in type. This canyon lies at the 
eastern base of San Jacinto, which has the distinction of 
being the steepest mountain for its height on the con- 
tinent, and is noted as the home of the finest surviving- 
grove of the American fan palm, "the Washington fili- 
fera," so named by the European palmographer Wend- j 
land in honor of George Washington. These are great, 
splendid trees, with straight trunks from 80 to 100 feet 
high and ornamented with great tufts of fan shaped 
leaves. 

The territory, including the principal groves in Palm. 
Murray and Andreas Canyons, was recently set aside by 
act of Congress as a National Monument. The Agua Cali- 
ente Indians own the land and use the water on their 
scanty ranches in the desert below. 



February 18. 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



CITY GREETS NEW LINER 



By James Edward O'Keefe 




"I H II'l i II V I | I ' j I lllM l ■.-.", 



San Francisco greeted last Monday 
the largest American-built vessel as 
the Panama Pacific Line's new S. S. 
'California" slipped into pier 22 
shortly before one o'clock after a six- 
teen-day run from New York through 
the Panama Canal. 

The new ship was welcomed official- 
ly by the city which realizes that her 
presence in the harbor and the fact 
that she is entering into a regular 
service between this port and New 
York is another important step in the 
progress which San Francisco is 
making towards becoming one of the 
greatest shipping centers in the 
world. The "California" is, as a mat- 
ter of fact, only the first of three 
such large and palatial liners which 
the Panama-Pacific Line is building 
exclusively for this service. 

The ship which was constructed at 
a cost of $7,000,000 represents the 
last word in ship design and construc- 
tion. It is, furthermore, the most 
completely electrically-driven com- 
mercial vessel, embodying many of 
the devices which had hitherto been 
employed exclusively on the larger 
warships of the United States Navy. 

In its appointments and in the pro- 
visions made for the comfort, safety 
and entertainment of its passengers. 
the California is the peer of any of 
the floating palaces which maintain 
the express mail service between New 
York and the European ports. Special 
consideration has been given to the 
nature of her cruise, the greater part 
of it lying, as it does, through tropi- 
cal waters. A great abundance of deck 
space, two outside swimming pools 
and the fact that every stateroom is 
an outside stateroom, add materially 
to the passenger's enjoyment of its 
exceptional route. 

By maintaining an average speed 
of eighteen knots an hour, the "Cali- 
fornia" has reduced the sea journey 



from New York to sixteen days. The 
fastest time before her advent into 
this service was eighteen days. Her 
length is 601 feet, breadth 80 feet, 
depth of hull 52 feet and total depth 
from upper deck to keel 100 feet. She 
has a capacity for 8000 tons of freight 
and 750 passengers. Her maximum 
speed is 21% statute miles. 

In her mechanical departments the 
"California" offers a complete novel- 
ty. Electricity is employed in all de- 
partments of the big ship and justifies 
the title of "The Electrical Liner," 
given her by her owners. The electric 
energy generated in the "California" 
is 20,000 horsepower, or 15,000 kilo- 
watts. 

The American spirit has been in- 
corporated into her interior finishings 
The style adopted was inspired by the 
best colonial models, from the Geor- 
gian panels and pillars in her dining 
salons and drawing rooms to the old 
pine paneling in the smoking rooms. 
These classic American forms of dec- 
oration are brightened and set off by 
colorful draperies, floor coverings and 
upholsterings that are also strictly 
true to period. 

As the principal eastbound cargo of 
the "California" will be the fruits of 
the state whose name she bears, there 
has been installed aboard her 60,000 
cubic feet of space for cool air car- 
goes and 40.000 cubic feet of refrig- 
erated space. The liner also has a 
garage with a capacity for 140 cars. 

To facilitate the handling of pack- 
age freight, stores and passengers' 
automobiles without hoisting, and for 
passengers* gangways, the "Califor- 
nia" has in the sides of her hull 
twenty-six ports. 

The ship has eight decks, the area 
of which with the lower hold is 7.2 
acres. The interior measurements of 
the ship's hull and inclosed super- 
structure is 2.717.000 cubic feet, equal 



to the living space of 270 average 
dwellings of eight rooms each. The 
distance from the top of the "Califor- 
nia's" smokestacks to the keel is 133 
feet, 4 inches. The stacks above the 
decks are oval, being 19 feet in one 
dimension and 24 feet in the other. 

The ship's master is Capt. Henry 
A. T. Candy, who was formerly in 
command of the Panama-Pacific 
Line's S. S. "Mongolia." The chief 
engineer is John Carstairs while 
Lewis Daughtrey is chief purser and 
Leo J. Gallagher, purser. The liner 
carries a crew of 370 persons ; 225 are 
employed in the service department, 
70 in the deck department and 75 in 
the engine room staff. The entire per- 
sonnel was recruited from the other 
ships of the company's fleet. 

During her stay in port, the "Cali- 
fornia" was presented with a plaque, 
the replica of the seal of the State of 
California, by the California Develop- 
ment Association, the State's Cham- 
ber of Commerce. The presentation 
was made on the ship by R. B. Hale, 
president of the association. Gover- 
nor Young was represented at this 

(Continued on page 16) 




14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1928 



RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




ON THE AIR 
By C. J. Pennington 

Listeners all over America will be 
given the opportunity to hear the 
popular features of one of the West's 
leading broadcasting stations on Feb- 
ruary 29 when radio KPO, Hale Bros, 
and The Chronicle, will feature an all 
night program from its main studios. 

In doing this, KPO feels that east- 
ern listeners should have the oppor- 
tunity to hear the type of popular 
programs presented in the West. So 
often, by the time the air lanes are 
cleared in order to get distance, noth- 
ing but dance music remains. 

A few of the stars who will be fea- 
tured on this all night broadcast will 
be Maurice Gunsky, nationally known 
radio star and Victor recording artist ; 
Merton Bories in pianologues, assist- 
ed at the second piano by Bob Allen ; 
the KPO popular ensemble ; David 
Kane and his Victor Recording Ha- 
waiians ; Gypsy and Marta, Columbia 
artists and known nationally for their 
broadcasting from KPO and WEAF 
and associated network stations in 
the East ; Elaine Tickner, singer of 
ballads, and a host of others. 



White Rock Program 

Friday, 9 to 9:30 p. m. 

Harold Dana, baritone, will be 
heard in two solos from his concert 
repertoire on the White Rock pro- 
gram over the NBC Pacific Coast Net- 
work tonight from 9 to 9:30 o'clock. 

The weekly White Rock concert 
presents the White Rock Orchestra 
with its featured reed section of elev- 
en saxophones. The vibraphone modu- 
lations, as usual, will constitute the 
musical background for the brief an- 
nouncement of each number. Open- 
ing the program will be the orchestra 
offering "Thou Swell," from "Con- 
necticut Yankee," which will be fol- 
lowed by Moskowski's lively "Spanish 



Dance No. 1." Other numbers to be 
played by the orchestra will be the 
"Doll Dance,' "For My Baby" and 
"The White Rock March," which 
brings the program to a conclusion 

each week. 

* * * 

Program of the National Broadcast 
Company for the week beginning Feb- 
ruary 19: 4 

Sunday, February 19 

1 to 2 p. m. — Gold Strand Group. 

3 to 5 p. m. — Sunday afternoon con- 
cert. I) 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Standard Sym- 
phony Hour. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 9:30 p. m. — Don Amaizo. 

9 :30 to 10 p. m. — Moon Magic. 

* * * 

Monday, February 20 

8 to 9 p. m. — Rudy Seiger's Shell 
Symphonists. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 
9:30 to 10 p. m.— Fisk Tire pro- 
gram. 

10 to 11 p. m. — Broadways and 

Boulevards. 

* * * 

Tuesday, February 21 

10:30 to 11 a. m.— Johnson Trav- 
elogue. 

8 to 8:30 p. m. — Eveready Salon 
Orchestra. 

8:30 to' 9 p. m.— U. S. Bridge les- 
sons. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 
9 to 9:30 p. m.— Retold Tales. 
9:30 to 10 p. m.— The Rounders. 

* * * 
Wednesday, February 22 

6:30 to 7 p. m.— Musical Fruit 
Cocktail. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 10 p. m. — Los Angeles studio 
program. 

* * * 

Thursday, February 23 

8 to 9 p. m. — Calpet program. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 
9 to 9:30 p. m. — Program, 

* * * 

Friday, February 24 

8 to 9 p. m. — Wrigley review. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 9:30 p. m.— White Rock pro- 
gram. 

9:30 to 10 p. m. — Memory Lane. 

* * * 

Saturday, February 25 

8 to 9 p. m.— R. C. A. Hour. 

9 p. m. — Longines correct time. 

9 to 10 p. m. — Philco Hour. 

10 to 12 p. m.— The Trocaderans. 



6:10 to 6:26 
6:25 to 6:30 p. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. 
8:00 to 9:00 



Programs for Next Week 

KFBC— DON LEE 
SAN FRANCISCO— 454 

Sunday, February 19 

10:00 to 12:00 noon — Home, Sweet Home Concert. 

12 noon to 1:15 p. m.— Church service. 

1:15 to 3:15 p. m.— S & W Recital. 

3:15 to 4:15 p. m. — KFRC dance orchestra. 

4:15 to 5:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m— Talk. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Mark Hopkins concert orchestra. 

7 :30 to 8 :30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

8:30 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance music. 

Monday. February 20 

7:00 10 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m.— Studio program. 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m. — Georgia O. George. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Household hints. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon— Amateur Auditions. 

12:00 to 1 :U0 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — KFRC Concert Orchestra. 

4:00 to 4:30 p. m. — Educational talk. 

•1:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

0:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen, police reports. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Sherman Clay program. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— blue Monday Jamboree. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 

Tuesday, February 21 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

S:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 9:30 a. m.— Georgia O. George. 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m.— Doings of Dorothy. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Studio program. 

11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay concert. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m— KFRC Concert Orchestra. 

4:00 to 4:30 p. m. — Educational talk. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5:30 to 6:10 p. m. — Mao and his gang. 

—With stamp collectors. 
—Stage and screen. 
-Sports talk. 
— HaaB program. 
9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 
Wednesday. February 22 
7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m.— Georgia O. George. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Household hints. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay concert. 
3 :00 to 4 :00 p. m— KFRC Concert Orchestra. 
4:00 to 4:30 p. m.— Educational talk. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 
5 :30 to 6 ;20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 
6:20 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Maxwell House Coffe* progran 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 
Thursday. February 23 

7 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 a. m. — Musical program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m. — Georgia O. George. 
11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Charles Hamp. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 
4:00 to 4:30 p. m. — California State Library talk. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News itemB. 
5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 
6:20 to «:30 p. m. — Beauty talk. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— The Cecilians. 
H:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Mona Motor Oit Co. 
9:00 to 9:45 p. m.— KFRC Movie Club. 
9:45 to 10:00 p. m. — Airplane Flying Lesson. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 
Friday, February 24 

7 :00 to 8 :00 a. m. — Seal Rock program. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
9:00 to 9:30 a. m.— Georgia O. George. 
9:30 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping service. 
11 :00 to 11 :30 a. m. — Hints to home-makers. 
11:30 to 12:00 noon — Amateur Auditions. 
12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay program. 
1 :00 to 2:00 p. m. — KFRC Concert Orchestra. 
4:00 to 4:30 p. m. — Student hour. 
4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 
5:30 to 6:20 p. m.— Jo Mendel and Pep Band. 
fi :20 to 6-30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Sports talk. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Charles Hamp. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Skyway journeys. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m — Dance orchestra. 
Saturday, February 25 

7:00 to 8:00 n. m. — Seal Rock procram. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Musical program. 
10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Shopping Bervice. 
11:00 to 11:45 a. m. — Amateur tryouts. 
11:45 to 12:00 noon— Announcements of Sunday 
church sermons. 



February 18, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Sherman, Clay concert 

2:00 tO 1:00 p. m.- KFRC Concert Orchestra. 

■I :00 to -1 :30 p. m. — Educational talk. 

4:30 to 5:15 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

5:15 to 5:30 p. m. — News items. 

5:30 to 6:20 p. m. — Mac and his gang. 

* :20 to 6 :30 p. m.— Stage and screen. 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — The Cecilians. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

KPO— HALE BROTHERS AND THE CHRONICLE 

SAN FRANCISCO— 422 
Sunday, Fehruary 19 
9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Church services. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

13:00 to 4:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 
4:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Studio program. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Studio program. 
6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m.— Organ recital. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel concert orches- 
tra. 
Monday, February 20 
6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Happy hour. 
10 :3U to 10:45 a. m. —Ye Towne Cryer service. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.- -Kane's Hawaiians. 
12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 
4 :00 to 5 :00 p. m. — Studio progiam. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 
6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Studio program. 
8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Kolster hour. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KPO's variety program. 
Tuesday, February 21 
6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 
B:00 td 9:00 a. m. — Happy hour. 
I 10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10:30 to 11:00 a. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 

11:00 to 11:15 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer Service. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra, 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO dance orchestra. 

Wednesday, February 22 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Happy hour. 

10 :30 to 10:45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:45 a. m. — Home service talk. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— KPO Orchestra. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to C. :30 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Gypsy and Marta. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Atwater Kent Artists. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Abas String Quartette. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KPO Dance Orchestra. 

Thursday, Fehruary 23 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m.— Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m. — Happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10:30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10:30 to 10 :45 a. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Kane's Hawaiians. 

12 noon- — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6:30 p. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Sports and poultry talk. 

S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Co. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO dance orchestra, 
Fridayt February 24 

6:45 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:00 to 9:00 a. m.— Happy hour. 

10 :30 to 10 :45 a. m.— Ye Towne Cryer service. 

10:46 a, m. Home sen lee talk. 

11:30 a. m, to 12:46 p. m. Kant's Hawaiians. 

12 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12:45 p.m.- — Commonwealth luncheon at Palace Hotel. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m.— KPO orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m. KPO orchestra. 

5:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:00 to 6:80 p. m. Ya Towne Cryer service, 

6:80 to 7:80 p. m, KPO Orchestra. 

8:00 to 9:30 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

10:80 to 12:80 a. m. KPO Dance Orchestra. 

Saturday i February 2."> 

6:46 to B:00 a. m. Health exercises. 

B ;00 to '. ( :00 a. m. Happy hour. 

10 :00 to 10 :30 a. m. — Domestic economist. 

10:80 bo 10:45 a. m.- Ye Towns Cryer. 
11:80 i" 1:00 p. m. Kane's Hawaiians. 

I" ii i Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. KPO orchestra. 
1:00 bo 5:00 p. m. ■ KPO Orchestra. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m.- Children's hour. 

tO 6 :80 p. m. — Ye Towne Cryer service. 
to 7:30 p. m. — KPO Dance Orchestra. 

nal Broadcasting Company. 



10:27 to ,10:30 a. m.—U. S. weather reports. 

iz :uu to 1 nJU p.m. — Luncheon program. 

1 :00 to 1 :30 p. m. — Country store. 

o:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5 :30 to 5 :4o p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. .m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:16 p. m. — Spurts talk. 

; :16 to 7 :30 p. m. — Advertising talk. 

8 :U0 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

»:U0 to lu:uu p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

iu ,\m p. m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, February 21 

'. :U0 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

* j :£i iu 1U :<3U a. m. — U. S. weauier reports. 

1.4:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Concert. 

x .\)\t lo 1 :3u p. in. — Country store. 

■o :W to 6 :30 p. m. — Concert. 

u :30 to 5 :45 p. m. — Construction reports. 

0:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

i :00 to 7:15 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

i :io to 7 :d0 p. m. — btudio program. 

o:00 to 9:0J p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — The Cocoanut Club. 

Wednesday, February 22 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m. — Breakfast program. 

1U :Zi to 10 :oU a. ni. — U. b. weauier reports. 

12:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

l :uO to 1 :3U p. in. — Country store. 

o:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5:30 to 5:46 p. m. — Construction reports. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Sports and sales talk. 
S:uj iu 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Dance orchestra. 
Thursday, February 23 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. — Health exercises. 

8 :20 to 10 :27 a. m. — Breakfast program. 
iu:2i iu 1U;ju a. m.— O. S. weauier reports. 
12 :00 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon program. 

i ;wu to 1 :3U p. m. — Country store. 
6:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5 :30 to 5 :45 p. m.— Construction reports. 

6 :U0 to 7 :U0 p. m. — Dinner hour program. 

i :uo to 7 :16 p. m. — Sports by Geo. T. Davis, 
j :15 to 7 :80 p. m. — Art course. 
8:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Friday, February 24 



3:80 to 4:30 p 
1 :30 to 5:30 p 
5 :80 to 6 :30 j 
6:30 to 7:00 p 
7:00 to 7:30 
8:00 to 9:00 



Hawaiian orchestra, 
■Organ recital* 
p. m. — Brother Hob's club, 
p. m. — Dinner cuncert. 
p. m. — News broadcast. 
Remar hour. 



-Exercise hour, 
n. — Breakfast program. 
. — 0. to. weather reports. 
a. — Musical luncheon program. 
-Country store. 
n. — Concert. 

i. — Construction reports. 
. — Program. 
-Sports by Geo. T. Davis. 

-Studio program. 

-Studio program. 

— Dance program. 



7 :00 to 

8:20 to 10:27 a 

ill:a i to 1U:40 a 

12:00 to 1:00 p 

1 :UU to 1 :3u p. n 

5 :00 to 5:30 p. n 

5:30 to 5 :46 p. m 

to :U0 to 7 :0U p. m 

7 :00 to 7 :16 p. m.— 

7 :15 to 7 :30 p. m 

» :00 to 9 :U0 p. rr 

9:00 to 10:00 p. 

10:00 p.m. — Weather and police reports. 

10:03 to 11:00 p. m. — Popular program. 

Saturday. February 25 

7:00 to 8:00 a. m. -Exercise hour. 

8:20 to 10:27 a. m. -Musical breakfast program. 

iu:^< io it) :.J0 a. m. — U. S. weather reports. 

5:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Concert. 

5 :80 to 5 :45 p. m. Construction report. 

u :U0 tO 1 tUU p, m. — Dinner hour concert. 

7:00 tu 2:00 a. m. —Policemen's Ball. 

KJBS— JULlt'S BRUNTON & SONS 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 
Sunday, February 19 

1:00 to 3:30 p. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 

3:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Monday. February 20 

8:00 to 12:00 a. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:30 to 7:8U p. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. Dance music. 

Tuesdav, February 21 

8:00 to 12:00 a. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 

1:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Instrument and vocal selections. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

Wednesday. February 11 

12:00 a. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 

to 10:00 p. m. — Orthophonic recital. 
Thursday. February 23 

8:00 bO 12:00 a. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 
,. 7:80 p. m. Instrument and vocal selections. 

10:00 p. m. Music lovers' program. 
Friday. Fchruar> 21 

B:00 to 12:00 a. m. - Instrument and vocal selections. 
p, m. Instrument and vocal selections. 
a lit :00 p. m. — Studio program. 
Saturday. February 25 

12:00 a. m.- Instrument and vocal selections. 
1:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Instrument and vocal selections. 

KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE 
OAKLAND — 508 
Sunday. February 19 
4:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Chas. T. Bessorer. on Scot tub 

Rite organ. 
Monday. February 26 

• 11(80 a. m. Economics hour. 
11:30 to I p. m. Luncheon concert 
3:30 to 4:30 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

6:80 p. m. Brother Bob's club. 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 267 
Sunday, February 19 

1 p, in Church services. 

lio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. Dance program. 
Monday, Fehruary 20 

:i. m. Breakfast program. 



INC. 



6 :30 to 7 :00 

7 :S0 p. m 

10 :M P 

nit Ducks. 
Tuesday. February 
10:00 to 11:30 a. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. r 



Dinner concert. 
- broadcast. 
> program. 
■n. Weekly meeting of Lake M«-r- 



:i 



Economics hour. 
Luncheon concert. 



Wednesday, February 22 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11 :30 to 1 :00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:30 p. m.- — Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Educational program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Special program. 
Thursday, February 23 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Luncheon concert. 
3 :30 to 4 :30 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m,— News broadcast. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Special program. 
Friday, Fehruary 24 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:30 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
5:30 to 6:30 p. m.— Brother Bob's club. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
Saturday, February 25 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — -Economics hour. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Organ recital. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Hawaiian orchestra. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC 
OAKLAND— 394 
Sunday, Fehruary 19 
11 :00 a. m. — Church service. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m, — National Broadcasting Company. 
3 :00 to 4 :00 p. m.— Vesper Service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
7:30 p. m.- — Weather report. 
7:35 to 9:00 p. m. — Church service. 
9:00 to 9:30 p. m.— Musical program. 
Monday, February 20 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
3:30 to 4:00 p. m. — Women's Clubs. 
4:00 to 6:00 p. m. — St. Francis Orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— KGO Kiddies' Klub. 

8 :8S in 8 :46 p. m. Concert orchestra. 

6:45 p. m.- — What's Happening in the World. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. —Dinner concert. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— The Pilgrims. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Co. 
Tuesday. February 21 
10:80 to 11:80 a. m. Studio program. 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon Concert. 
12:30. weather; 1:00. weather; 1:03. S. F. stocks: 
1 :08, N. Y. stocks. 

ii) 7:30 p. m. -Dinner concert. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
Wednesday. February 22 
11:15 to 11:80 a. m.— The Home 
11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon cuncert. 
12:30, weather; 1:00. weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks: 

1 :08 N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Svinkist mebnli -t . 

■ii 7:30 p. m. — Farm program. 
8:00 to 0:00 p. m. — Vaudeville. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Thursday. Fehruary 23 
11 :30 to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30. weather; 1:00, weather; 1:03. S. F. stocks; 

N. Y. stocks. 
6:35 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
B:0fl to 9:00 p. m. — Calpet program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. St. Francis Dance Orchestra. 
Friday. Fehruary 21 

11:10 to 11:30 a. m.— Home Economics. 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. n. — Luncheon concert. 
12:30, weather: 1:00, weather: 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :0s. N. Y. stocks. 
5:30 p. m.— Wise man from the Land-O-Health. 
p. m. -Dinner concert. 

7:00 p. m. — Financial R- 
■■■ 7:30 p. m. —Dinner concert. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Dance music. 
Saturday. February 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
12:80. weather: 1:00. weather; 1:03, S. F. stocks; 

1 :0*. N. Y. stocks. 
6:00 to 6:50 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7:15 p. m.— Weather, news, new books. 

7:80 p. m. •Weekly sport rev> 
. 11:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Dance music. 

KFI— EARLE C ANTHONY. INC 
LOS ANGELES — 168 
Sundav. February 19 

5:30 p. m.— Glenn Edmunds and orchestra. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

m. -Father Rickard's Forecast, 
p, m.— Aeolin Organ Recital. 

m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

11:00 p. m -Packard Ore- 
Monday. February 20 
5:30 p. m.— Leon Rene and Orchestra. 
6:00 p. m. — White Kin* program. 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 18, 1928 



7:00 p. m.— KFI Symphonette. 

8 :00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

S :30 p. m. — L. A. Philharmonic Orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

Tuesday, February 21 

5 :30 p. m. — The Dragon Hawaiians. 

6:06 p. m. — White King program. 

7:00 p. m.— Nick Harris, Detective Stories. 

7 :30 p. m.— Henry Starr. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m.— C. Patton Wallace. 

Wednesday, February 22 

5:30 p. m. — White King program. 

6:30 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

7:00 p. m. — KFI Symphonette. 

7:45 p. m. — William MacDougall. 

9:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard program. 

Thursday. February 23 

5:30 *. m. — Vernon Elkins and Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — White King program. 

7:00 p. m. — KFI Symphonette. 

8:00 p. m.— Packard Orchestra. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m.— Program of modern classical music. 

Friday, Fehruary 24 

6:00 p. m— White King program. 

7:00 p. m. — Program by Paul Roberts. 

8 :00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

10:00 p. m. — Virginia McCoy. 

Saturday, February 25 

5:30 p. m.— Packard Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — White King program. 

7:00 p. m. — Packard Orchestra. 

7:30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado, Spanish Baritone. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— National Broadcasting Company. 

11:00 p. m.— KFI Midnight Frolic. 

KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO CO. 
SEATTLE— 348 

Sunday, February 19 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

Monday. February 20 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m.— Time signals, sport news. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 9:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:30 to 10:30 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

10:30 to 12:30 p. m.— Goofy Bird Frolic. 

Tuesday, February 21 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10 :00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers' dance orchestra. 

Wednesday, February 22 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Thursday, February 23 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Friday, February 24 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers* dance orchestra. 

Saturday, February 25 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Sport news. News Items. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time signals. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Vic Meyers Dance Orchestra. 

KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN 
PORTLAND— 491.5 
Sunday, February 19 
7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — N. B. C. program. 
10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Little Symphony orchestra. 
Monday, February 20 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:00 p m.— Talk. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — N. B. C. program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert hour. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m — Spot Light Hour. 
Tuesday. February 21 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Musical program. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Book review and talk. 
8:00 to 11:00 p. m. — N. B. C. program. 
Wednesday, February 22 
6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert orchestra.. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.~ N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

11;00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra. 

Thursday. February 23 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:40 p. m. — Utility service. 

7:40 to 8^00 p. m.— Flower girls. 

s :0fl to 9 :00 n. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 9:30 p. m.~N. B. C. program. 

9 :30 to 10 :00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 
Friday, February 24 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Concert. 

7:30 to S:00 p. m. — Utility service and talk. 

3 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— N. B. C. Program. 

10:00 to 10:30 p. m.— Concert. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Keep Growing Wiser Order of 

Hoot Owls. 
Saturday, February 25 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 8:00 p. ra.— Concert. 
8:00 to 12:00 p. m. — National Broadcasting Company. 



POLO AT DEL MONTE 

With the Pacific Coast Polo Cham- 
pionship series at Del Monte, interest 
in this famous sport is becoming ex- 
ceedingly keen and already scores of 
polo enthusiasts are arriving to re- 
main throughout the entire cham- 
pionship series, February 17-March 
11. 

News of the injury to Harry East, 
star member of the Marquis de Por- 
tago's Los Piratas team, was the 
cause of temporary consternation 
among the Marquis' many followers 
here. However, the "Spanish Pirates" 
have been rescued by the substitution 
of Arthur Perkins, San Mateo star, in 
East's place. 

Whether "Tiny" Harry recovers in 
time for the high goal flat event re- 
mains to be seen. In any event, the 
Spanish team is due to give a good 
account of itself with either East or 
Perkins in the line-up. 

They have been playing great polo 
in the South, where they have beaten 
Eric Pedley's Midwick Four, both on 
the flat and handicap. The Marquis, 
himself, has been performing far bet- 
ter than anyone expected even such a 
distinguished novice as he to play, 
and made a great impression in the 
southern contests. 

During the absence of Los Piratas 
the Burlingame Blues have been hold- 
ing forth at Del Monte with the 11th 
Cavalry Army team as their prin- 
cipal competitor. The Burlingame 
aggregation, composed of Lin How- 
ard, Hugh Drury, George Pope and 
Kenneth Walsh, have been playing 
well over their handicap and, thanks 
to their conscientious work in pre- 
liminary games, are expected to ac- 
complish something worthy of note in 
the championship series. 



this luncheon, likened the two ship- 
ping men to Poseidon, the Greek god 
of the sea, and to Neptune, the Roman 
god of the sea. Mayor Rolph, who 
was also present at the luncheon, 
lauded the two men for their courage 
in building up a merchant marine un- 
der private ownership and expressed 
the hope that he would soon see the 
government out of the shipping busi- 
ness. 



THE "CALIFORNIA" 

(Continued from page IS) 

ceremony by B. B. Meek, Director of 
Public Works for the State. Other 
speakers included Winfield Thompson 
of the International Mercantile Ma- 
rine and Leo Archer, Pacific Coast 
manager of the Panama-Pacific Line. 
The plaque, which was carved by 
Samuel Berger, will be the ship's prin- 
cipal ornament. 

At a luncheon given at the Hotel 
St. Francis last Tuesday Mr. P. A. S. 
Franklin, president of the Interna- 
tional Mercantile Marine, which con- 
trols the Panama-Pacific Line, was 
entertained by Captain Robert Dol- 
lar, president of the Dollar Line and 
the "grand old man" of Pacific ship- 
ping. The occasion was the arrival in 
this port of the new liner. 

William F. Humphrey, president of 
the Olympic Club, who presided at 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from page 7) 

tions. Their routine consists of in- 
strumental numbers in addition to a 
baseball talk. 

Con Colleano, with Zeneta, in "The 
Bull Fight," will also be featured. 
From a standing position on a wire 
he spins into the air, turns two com- 
plete revolutions backwards, landing 
again on the wire. The Arnaut Broth- 
ers return again this season with 
their buffoonery. 

Peggy MacKechnie, the mentally- 
marvelous school girl, in a demonstra- 
tion of her photographic mind, and 
Alexander and Peggy, in "Piling It 
On," a biack-face comedy skit by 
Eugene Conrad, are on the program. 

Anna 0. Nilsson and Francis X. 
Bushman are co-starred in the fea- 
ture photoplay, a thrilling melodrama, 
"The Thirteenth Juror." 



HOLE-IN-ONE CLUB 

The following have become mem- 
bers of the National Canada Dry 
Hole-in-One Club: Burt 0. Warren, 
Monterey ; Leslie E. Burks, Oakland ; 
A. H. Kopperud, Piedmont. 



LA GRANDE & WHITE 
QUARTERLY BANQUET 

The quarterly banquet of the sales 
staff of the La Grande & White's 
Laundry was held on Wednesday eve- 
ning, February 8, at the Hotel Whit- 
comb. 

President Charles P. Cain, acting 
as toastmaster, commented on the 
splendid showing of the business get- 
ters of this organization in carrying 
out their part of the large advertising 
campaign now in progress on behalf 
of the laundry industry. 

Their slogan is to relieve the home 
of the drudgery of wash day, to sup- 
ply a service based on scientific prin- 
ciples that make the linens last longer 
and to deserve, in every respect, the 
name this firm has earned — "The Rec- 
ommended Laundry." 

Many musical numbers were offer- 
ed in the evening's program, to which 
a surprisingly large percentage of 
home talent contributed its efforts. 



February 18, 1928 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



AIR LINES 

By Lieut. Blaine Stubblefield 




Lieut. Blaine Stubblefield 



Ever since Lincoln Beaehy and his enterprising con- 
temporaries showed the world that airplanes could turn 
over on their backs without seri- 
ous results, there has been a 
notion among laymen that when 
one is flying in a cloud or in 
darkness he cannot distinguish 
between "up" and "down." It is 
often said that flyers may be up- 
side-down without knowing it. 
This is not true, of course, and 
yet the supposition is based on 
sound physical laws. 

For a practical illustration of 
this theory, we are indebted to 
Mr. Martin Jenson, who explain- 
ed it in part over the air from 
radio station KFRC last Thurs- 
day night. His time was limited 
so his explanation may not have 
been sufficiently detailed for all to understand. 

Mr. Jenson, speaking strictly of transoceanic flight, said 
that after darkness overtook him when he was far out 
over the Pacific on his way to Honolulu in the Dole race, 
he was unable to see any trace of horizon, stars or water. 
All was total darkness, a void in which there was abso- 
lutely nothing by which to judge position relative to the 
perpendicular. In this predicament, he said that he was 
unable to keep his plane on an even keel, and that three 
times it got into a tail spin before he could prevent it. 

It is easy for one to stand or sit erect, even in complete 
darkness, without any contact or sensibility to adjacent 
objects. Why is it then, that a pilot under such conditions 
cannot keep a plane on an even keel through the func- 
tioning of his own inherent sense of vertigo? It would 
seem that the motion of the plane in some way destroys 
the validity of this sense at a time when it is mosl 
needed. That in brief is the answer. 

To make a convincing test of this theory, one may per- 
form a very simple experiment. The materials required 
are a box in which one can stand up when the lid is on. 
and a rope to suspend the box from a beam overhead. 
A box the shape and size of a telephone booth will answer 
the purpose nicely. When the box is suspended on twelve 
or fifteen feet of rope, so that the bottom is level, let the 
subject get into it, and shut him up so that he can see 
nothing. Absolute darkness is nut necessary; it is re- 
quired only that the subject cannot see anything outside 
his compartment. It is assumed that his position is equiv- 
alent to that of a pilot flying a plane in a \oid where ii" 
object but his plane is visible. 

Now. while the subject is standing erect in the box, lei 
the experimenter push it to one side, very slowly, so that 
it hangs at an angle. The subject in the box will know 
at once that he is out of plumb. This may be tried several 
times to make sure of results, always moving the box 
slowly so as to set up no centrifugal reaction. 

But now let the box lie set to swinging in a circle, fast 
enough SO that it is thrown some distance away from the 
center. The swinging can then be changed gradually into 
a pendulum motion, and then back to circular again. The 
subject will become confused and will not be able t 
when his position is vertical and when it is not. True, he 
stands erect in the box with ease, but he balances himself 
against a centrifugal force which is always vertical to 
the bottom of the box. The centrifugal force I 
him a substitute for the gravity to which he is accus- 



tomed, and he unconsciously substitutes the new direction 
of this force for "up" and "down." 

Therefore, the pilot, flying in a blank void, once his ship 
has been thrown into even a slight bank and turn, may 
lose his conception of the horizontal and be unable to 
regain it. It is wrong to say that he loses his sense of 
balance, for he does not. His senses function normally, 
but they follow a wrong stimulus. In daylight, or in night, 
with even a dim trace of the skyline or a single star in 
sight, the flyer easily overcomes the misleading effects 
of centrifugal motion through visional correction. 

The bank and turn indicator of course shows the po- 
sition of the ship relative to the water, but so strong is 
the flyer's conviction that he is in a level position, under 
the circumstances pointed out, that he may ignore its 
indication momentarily. 

Once in a spin or a sideslip, and the pilot sees that he 
is losing altitude, his easiest way out is to put the plane 
in a normal spin. This shows him which way is "down," 
and he can then pull out to normal position again. 

Flyers over the land are not concerned with these prob- 
lems. So varied in color and shape is the ground and its 
contours that a void with no visibility is seldom encoun- 
tered. If such conditions do arise, there is always the 
friendly earth to wait on while the weather clears. 



Air mail poundage on the Pacific Air Transport Seattle- 
Los Angeles route has increased 58 per cent since this 
date 1927, according to a traffic report by A. K. Hum- 
phries, general manager. During the first seven flying 
days of February 1927, 1310 pounds of mail were carried 
north and -south. During the first seven flying days of 
February this year, 2234 pounds were carried both direc- 
tions. The last figure also represents an increase of 114 
pounds over a like period for January of this year. Air 
mail poundage in all parts of the country is not only 
increasing, but the rate of increase is mounting. 



Chicago has eighteen air mail planes arriving and de- 
parting every day. The San Francisco Bay cities now 
have six planes daily, with a prospect for more in the 
near future if poundage continues to increase at the pres- 
ent rate. 



The United States now has 11.700 miles of airlines over 
which air mail planes fly 24,756 miles daily. The planes 
of Boeing Air Transport. Bay-Cities-to Chicago line, fly 
about 28,000 miles a week, and carry 36 per cent of all 
the country's air mail. 



Europeans patronize their air lines to such an extent 
that the air travel rate between Paris and Lyon is now 
less than fare on the famous "Blue Train" express. 



Business got off to a flying start for 1928 at Mills 
Field. San Francisco's municipal airport, according to the 
January report just filed by Supervisor Milo F. Kent, 
chairman of this city's airport committee. 

The Kent report shows 918 flights and landings, carry- 
ing 1162 passengers, without a single mishap, to and 
from all parts of the United States. This makes a total 
of 3813 flights and landings and 5722 passengers since 
Mills Field opened for business last May. Hundreds of 
tons of mail and merchandise also have been handled in 
the Mills Field service. 



18 



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Why? It's the Water and the Table 

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Swimming Pool. Fireproof Hotel. 
Write for Booklet. 



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353 TEHAMA STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 3084 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Three standard type Boeing air- 
planes are being placed on shipboard 
at Seattle, Washington, destined for 
Buenos Aires, Argentina, for demon- 
stration by Ralph A. O'Neill, World 
War ace, for the joint interests of the 
Boeing Airplane Company of Seattle 
and the Pratt & Whitney Company 
of Hartford, Conn., in the South 
American Republics. 

This information was made public 
today by Philip G. Johnson, president 
of the Boeing Airplane Company, who 
arrived here yesterday in a Boeing 
mail plane from Chicago. 

A standard Boeing pursuit type 
plane, a flying boat, and a mail-ex- 
press-passenger plane, all equipped 
with Pratt and Whitney "Wasp" en- 
gines, have been turned over to Mr. 
O'Neill for demonstration in South 
America, Mr. Johnson said. The pro- 
ject will be financed jointly by the 
Boeing Airplane Company, and the 
Pratt