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Full text of "S.F. Newsletter"

D BQD7 1ET1E3 

California State Library 



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Call No. /Q XI OS) 

I S/fc*, 



*L 



Price per Copy. 10 C. 



ESTABLISHED JULY. 20. 1856. 



[Annual Subscription, (5. 







<&idifoxmnx> 



*$X#M. 



DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol.32. 



SAN FRANOISOO, SATURDAY, JULY 16, 1881. 



NO.l. 



GOLD BARS— S90@910— Refined Silver— 13t@14# cent, discount. 
Mexican Dolla rs, 9&@10 per cent, disc. 

tST Exchange on New York, par ; On London, Bankers, 49^ ; Commer- 
cial, 49$. Paris, Bight, 5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams, 1-10 per 
cent. 

W Price of Money here, 6@10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
open market, l@l£ per month. Demand light. On Bond Security, 
3@4£ per cent, per year on Call. 

jW Latest price of Sterling in New York, 484i@486j. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

San Francisco July 15, 1881. 



Stocks and Bonds. 

BONDS. 

Cal. State Bonds, 6's,*57 

S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 03,*58 

S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 7s . . . 

Montg'y Av. Bonds 

Dupont Street Bonds 

Sacramento City Bonds.... 

Stockton City Bonds 

Yuba County Bonds 

Marysville City Bonds , 

Santa Clara Co. Bonds ..... 
Los Angeles County Bonds 
Los Angeles City Bonds. . . . 
Virg'a & Truckee R. R. Bds. 
Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bds 

Oakland City Bonds 

Oregon R. & N. Bonds, Os. 

S. P. R. R. Bonds 

U. S. 4a (ex-coup'n) 

BANKS. 

Bank ol California (ex-div). 

Pacific Bank (ex-div) 

First National (ex-div) ... 

INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

Union (ex-div) 

Fireman's Fund (ex-div).... 
California (ex-div) 



Bid. 


Asked 


105 




Nom. 


Nom, 


Nom. 


Nom. 


CO 


65 


50 


— 


50 


— 


105 


— 


103 


106 


100 


102 


105 


107 


110 


112 


110 


— 


101 


103 


lilt 


113 


125 


130 


112 


115 


100 


— 


116} 


116} 


147} 


_ 


126 


123 


112} 


115 


123 


127 


123 


127 


123 


127 



Stacks and Bonds. 

INSURANTS COMPANIES. 

State Investment (ex-div). 
Home Mutual (ex-div). ... 

Commercial (ex-div) 

Western (ex-div) 

RAILROADS. 

C. P. R. R. Stock 

C. P. R. K. Bonds 

City Railroad 

Omnibus R. R 

N. B. and Mission R. R. . . . 

Sutter Street R. R 

Geary Street R. R 

Central R. R. Co 

Market Street R. R 

Clay Street Hill R. R 

F. Gaslight Co (ex-div)*. 
Oakland GaslightCo (ex-div) 
Sac'to Gaslight Co (ex-div) 
Califor'a Powder Co (ex-div) 
Giaut Powder Co (ex-din).. 
Atlantic Giant Powder, do 
Gold and Stock Teleg'h Co 
9. V. W. W. Co. 's Stock... 

S. V. W. W. Co' Bonds 

Pacific Coast S.S. Co's Stock 
Saucelito L. & F. Co.'s St'ck 



112 


116 


112 


117 


112 


116 


100 


105 


93 


93} 


115 


118 


70 


— 


30 


— 


35 


— 


65 


— 


63 


69} 


43 


— 


Nom. 


Nom. 


Nom. 


Nom. 


67J 


68} 


32} 


32J 


65 


67 


110 


— 


78 


80 


42} 


43 


78 


— ■ 


100} 


101 


112} 


— 


77} 


80 


Nom. 


Nom. 



This is dividend week for the quarter, as well as for the first six months 
of this year, but as most of them are payable to-day we cannot judge 
their effect, as the demand for all first-class investments is so great as 
render them difficult of purchase even at our outside figures. By the en- 
Buing week we will give a list of these dividends in detail. Money con- 
tinues to be. offered at very low rates, while collaterals are not as freely 
criticised as they were two months since. 

Andeew Baird, 312 California st. 

STOCK MARKET. 
The mining-aba re market shows returning strength, but not great 
activity. Consolidated Virginia is in demand, and taken up freely at ad- 
vanced rates. The contest for the control of Savage keeps it apparently 
busy, but the price has not risen, as if either party cared to pay much for" 
the honors of management. Alta quickens some under promise of a new 
deal and slight manipulations, but the public have several times paid 
dearly for that whistle, and wait to Bee " Wattle " be developed. Albion 
gyrates between $3 50 and $4, with watchful sentinels to take advantage of 
any circumstance, either in court or in market. Holmes has been a nim- 
ble feline for the past fortnight, with transactions of thousands of shares, 
rising from 20c. to SI 05, falling back to 40c, and the public don't know 
what on, except a 10c. assessment. Silver King pays its regular dividend, 
and Northern Belle another regular of 50 and regular extra of 25. Tip 
Top comes to the front with a 20c. dividend. As we go to press, the mar- 
ket remains steady, with moderately large sales. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Julv 15, 
1881. United States Bonds— is, 116g; 4£s, 1143; 3Js, 102*. Sterling* Ex- 
change, 4 84i@4 SCJ. Pacific Mail, 50. Wheat, 124@127 ; Western 
Union, 91$. Hides, 23@23.|. Oil— Sperm, — . Winter Bleached, — . 
Whale Oil, — . Winter Bleached, — . Wool — Spring, fine, 17@32 ; 
Burry, H@24 ; Pulled, 33@38 ; Fall Clips, 15@17; Burry. 12@15. Lon- 
don, July 15. — Liverpool Wheat Market, 9s. 6d.(5,9s. 9d.; Bonds, 4s, 
120; 4£s, 1172 ; 3*3, 104*. Consols. 100 3-16@100 5 10. 

London, July 16th.— Latest Price of Consols, 100 3-16@100 5-16. 



MARRIOTT'S 



EMPLANE? 



FOR NAVIGATING THE AIR. 

The Committee of Incorporation having now made their election of 
Directors, with power to add to their number, will now meet once a week 
for the furtherance of the business of the company. They have concluded 
that under the patent laws, providing for the completion and specification 
of their plans, which grant the necessary time to perfect the invention, 
that they will not attempt a practical illustration of the Aeroplane until 
October next. In the mean time, their arrangements for the first exhibi- 
tion at Woodward's Gardens or the Mechanics' Pavilion will remain in- 
tact. All letters for the company may be addressed to 609 Merchant 
street. 

DEATHS SICKLE. 
The mortuary report for the week ending July 15, 1881, gives a total 
of 80 deaths, against 70 for the corresponding week last year. The prin- 
cipal causes of death are, from inanition, 4 ; phthisis, 3 ; pneumonia, 5 ; 
heart disease, 4 ; cholera infantum, 3 ; cancer, 3 ; enteritis, 3 ; asphyxia, 
3 ; epilepsy, 2 ; typhoid fever, 2, and whooping-cough, 4. The city seems 
to be very liable to typhoid fever just at this time of the year, and whoop- 
ing-cough has again made its appearance with its accustomed regularity. 
There were three suicides and two homicides — not a bad showing for the 
week — one death from diarrhoea and two from premature birth. Twenty 
children were under one year of age, and only ten deaths are recorded 
from one year to twenty. There were 9 between 20 and 30, 13 deaths be- 
tween 30 and 40, 10 between 40 and 50, and 1 between 80 and 90, the rest 
being evenly distributed between 50 and 70 years. Of these 72 were 
whites and 12 Mongolians ; 3 were still-born. Classified according to sex, 
39 were males and 41 females. There were 14 deaths in public institu- 
tions, and 15 in the Eleventh Ward, 8 in the Twelfth and 10 in the Fourth 
Ward. 

LICENSE COLLECTIONS. 
Subjoined is an excerpt from the annual report of the License Collec- 
tor, Col. Richard Sinton: During the last fiscal year 23,962 licenses were 
issued as follows: Merchandise 12,818, amounting to 583,444; bankers, 
137, realizing $26,200; brokers, §8,515; billiards, 53,370; auctioneers, 
$1,885; livery stables, $325; bowling-alleys, $75; pawnbrokers, $4,500; 
theaters and exhibitions, $3,770; intelligence offices, $720; retail liquors, 
$125,140; grocery and retail liquors, 3,191, realizing $63, *20— total, $322,- 
464. There were 6,601 licenses issued on vehicles and street railroads, 
etc., for the Street Department Fund, yielding $21,228 50. The total 
number of licenses issued during the year was 41,658, making a total 
revenue of $433,550 40; amount paid City and County Treasurer, $420,- 
717 20; amount paid State Treasurer, $12,833 20. 

The Pacific Bank paid a dividend of 4 per cent on July 1st. This 
was for the six months ending June 30, 188L The dividends will hereaf- 
ter be paid semi-annually, at the rate of 8 per cent, per annum, which is 
the rate paid by the First National Gold Bank. 



During the week ending July 2d, $85,500 in specie was imported at 
New York, and $582,800 was exported. This is the largest amount ex- 
ported from that port in some time, and was nearly all in fine silver for 
Europe. 

Bank of California stock has recently advanced from 130 to 150, and 
appears to be hard to get at even that figure. It is the highest- priced 
bank stock on the market. 



The San Francisco Gaslight Company has declared a monthly 
dividend at the rate of 7 per cent, per annum, payable on the 15th. 



Wool— There 13 at present a lull in the market at 25@30c for all good 
to choice Fleece; Earthy and Burry, 1 7 ; ■_ 



Entered at the Post-Office at San Francisco, Cat., as Second-Class 

Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1881. 



THE WATER QUESTION. 

The public are deeply interested in a just and reasonable settlement of 
the water question, but this is hopeless so long as it remains the possible 
source of journalistic bribery, the certain subject of journalistic jealousy, 
and the popular grievance for political debate. No one can suppose that 
the Bayley ordinance will be accepted on the indorsement of the Chronicle, 
or that the tirades of the Bulletin are intended to reduce the water rates, 
and so strongly is the public prejudiced by the injustice which affects the 
question that it seems impossible to consider it calmly from a business 
point of view. This is before all things necessary, and it would be well 
to remember that disputed bargains are generally decided by a comprom- 
ise, which, if it fail to satisfy all parties, is nevertheless accepted as pre- 
ferable to continued strife. 

It cannot be doubted that the long-suffering consumers of Spring Valley 
water are ruinously taxed. It seems a monstrouB imposition that hun- 
dreds of industrious families should be called upon to pay more for water 
than they do for bread, whilst at the same time millions worth of property 
enjoys the public system of water protection againBt fire without the pay- 
ment of a cent. For this evil the Bayley ordinance is but a clumsy, un- 
satisfactory and insufficient remedy, as between the public and the Spring 
Valley Company it fails altogether to touch the basis of dispute, which is, 
in truth, the supply of pure water at a reasonable rate, and in seeking to 
redress one grievance it is open to the possibility of erecting a greater in 
its place, since it affords no sufficient guarantee against excessive price. 
There is, in fact, no reliable satisfaction for either of the parties interested. 

And now comes the Bulletin with its proposal to bore artesian wells, as 
if it were possible to subdue a strong and established institution by such 
feeble opposition. All the possible water obtainable from artesian wells 
within the city area would fail to afford sufficient water for domestic use. 
And what sort of water would it be ? To put it mildly, artesian water is 
chiefly filtered sewage — in fact, Spring Valley water after it has passed 
through closets, sinks and drains. Not a fourth part of the sewage of the 
city ever reaches the outlets. The sewers are rotten and the leakage uni- 
versal. The bricks are soft and the cement sand, and so the sewage es- 
capes into the underground water-courses, from whence the Bulletin pro- 
poses it shall be pumped for use a second time. 

What, then, remains but to return to the original and fundamental 
auestion, What are fair and reasonable rates ? and this once settled on a 
square basis it does not seem difficult to put the burden equitably on the 
proper shoulders. Now, the question of what is fair and reasonable de- 
pends on the valuation of Spring Valley property as it now stands. 
People are continually objecting that the works cost little, and that the 
stock is watered ; but is any one mad enough to suppose that the value of 
any property in this city can be determined by its'original cost and the 
subsequent outlay for improvements 1 We would like that the whole city 
should be purchased on these terms. It would be a nice way of appropri- 
ating the profit on the Lick estate and of despoiling millionaires. The 
question of cost can never be entertained in such a case, and the real 
question at issue is, What is an equitable valuation, and by what means 
is it possible to prevent the imposition of excessive and dishonest rates? 
Now, we venture to doubt if this has ever been effected by commissions 
or other arbitrating bodies, however constituted. In a proprietary corpo- 
ration actual interest is the only real power, and in some of>the most suc- 
cessful instances the municipal authorities of large English cities have 
taken a large pecuniary interest in the water works, and have thus ac- 
quired a real power in the administration of affairs. 

We believe that such an arrangement would be particulaly suitable to 
this city, where it would be dangerous to place the entire management 
and patronage of so important an institution in the hands of the munici- 
pal authorities. In one English city the municipal authorities represent 
40 per cent, of the capital of the company, and possess a corresponding 
representation on the Board of Management. The action is harmonious, 
and the interests of the city are sustained and shared by those of the 
proprietary, who are also, for the most part, citizens. In this conjoint ar- 
rangement the public would have their interests carefully supervised, 
while the slight predominance of the private proprietary element insures 
economical and honest administration of affairs. Under such conditions 
the purchase would be more easily and equitably effected, since the pro- 
prietors remain interested, while excesses of profit are shared by the pub- 
lic at large. If such a scheme were once sanctioned, it would not be dif- 
ficult to settle water rates on a just basis, nor to distribute the burden 
fairly among those who ought to bear it. 

In the Front Hank. —Among the stable dividend banks of the city 
the Pacific Bank, corner of Pine and Sansome streets, has long held a 
leading position. The last year's operations place it still more to the 
front, having been the most successful of its very successful career. It 
now starts on its nineteenth year with more brilliant prospects than ever 
before. Its success is the result of judicious and intelligent management, 
combining enterprise with a rigid adherence to sound business principles. 
Continuing under the same management, with ample resources and. unsur- 
passed facilities for doing a general banking business, its future is assured. 

The public has but a very short time to close with the bargains of S. 
Mosgrove & Bro., at 114 and 116 Kearny street. They remove to their 
new Crystal Palace, on Post street, in time to open there on the 1st of 
August. In a future article we propose to allude to the many advantages 
of thiB new and beautifully designed building. At present it is more ur- 
gent to remind ladies— and gentlemen, too, for the matter of that — of the 
fact that the large and carefully selected dry-goods stock of S. Mosgrove 
& Bro. is now being closed out far below cost, and that new and fresh 
goods are actually being sold there below cost. 

The assorted meats put up by King, Morse & Uo. are from nicely se- 
lected fresh meat, and are known for their excellence. 



OPERA. 

<c Ruy Bias " is a lyric drama in three acts and a prologue, written 
some fifteen years ago. The composer, Signor Filippe Marchetti, was 
then a young man of 27 years. His work was an instantaneous success 
on all Italian stages, created great enthusiasm when produced in St. 
Petersburg and London, and was received with great favor when sung at 
the Salle Ventadour in Paris, with Adelina Patti as the heroine. The 
composer seems to have been satisfied with the pecuniary success of his 
first operatic work, and willing to rest his fame on the one effort, for he 
has never composed a second one. The subject is one admirably suited 
for dramatic music. The most powerful emotions of human nature, love, 
hate, jealousy and revenge, are brought into play in the development of 
the plot, and strong, powerful situations are numerous. Two other com- 
posers have musically treated Victor Hugo's dramatic tale. There is 
an overture and symphony by Mendelssohn, and an English opera by a 
musician whose abilities were not sufficiently marked to keep his name 
fresh in public memory. Marchetti's work is of the advanced Italian 
school, in which simple melodies with primary accompaniments are merely 
incidents, not essentials. It is a work of force and sweetness. The music 
is mostly descriptive and declamatory. It is replete with bits and passages 
of rare melody, framed in elaborate harmonic orchestration. The numbers 
of the Bcore, with the exception of a couple of solos, are concerted pieces. 
Duos, trios and quartets abound, with here and there a few ensembleB, 
which are all admirably worked up. The opera is to be repeated, which 
will give opportunity for a more detailed review. As regards the rendi- 
tion of this work, it is an undoubted fact that the troupe show in it to 
better advantage than in their previous efforts. A point in their favor is, 
that in this case there is lacking the elements of comparison, and they 
stand on their own merits. The soprano's part is one long song of roman- 
tic passion, one deep sigh of love. In the earlier scenes the music is sim- 
ple and pathetic, toward the finale it becomes elaborate and difficult. 
Signora Montaldo succeeds in filling these requirements with remarkable 
satisfaction to her auditors. The contralto is given the role "Casilda," 
the youthful, mischievous lady-in-waiting. Signora Gemma Trizzo does 
the best she can with the music, but she lacks the flexibility 
of voice and sprightliness of manner necessary to successfully ren- 
der the allotted music. Both baritone and basso are favored 
as regards effective numbers, and it is but justice to say 
that Signors Parolini and Paoletti are eminently satisfactory. Parolini 
on Wednesday evening was in splendid voice and sang with great vim. 
Paoletti's voice sounded at times somewhat hard and flat, but be sang so 
well that this can pass unnoticed. Mons. Charles, or rather Signor Carlo, 
and Lafontaine were entrusted with minor parts and filled them to ad- 
vantage by contrast with Signora Magri's " Duchess," which was a miser- 
able affair. The chorus — well, the chorus was, as usual, bad, very bad, 
very, very, very bad. It came near spoiling one of the gems of the opera, 
a number in the second act, which, commencing as a quartet, runs an 
elaborated, ascending scale, the chorus joining in at the fifth and all finish- 
ing in a grand fortissimo chord, and all this without instrumental ac- 
companiment. The chorus wavered a great deal in this number, but the 
wave of sound took it along and carried it safely through. The orches- 
tra did fairly, but what can such a beggarly array of musicians do with a 
work so elaborately and beautifully written up. The orchestration is 
rich and effective, and requires a full orchestra, not a few violins, etc., 
and an occasional oboe. There was an attempt at mise-en-scene which was 
laughable in the extreme. 

At the Tiyoli Flotow's famous comic opera of Martha, which has 
drawn such full houses, gives place next week to Balfe's Satanella. This 
opera has never, as far as we know, been performed in San Francisco, but 
the celebrated aria, "The Power of Love," is familiar to nearly every- 
body. The choruses are very pretty, and some of the concerted music 
shows the composer at his best. 

TO CAPITALISTS. 

A n individual who lias just relumed , from Arizona bas 

-£*- several excellent mines for sale. Energetic capitalists can be shown how to 
make a good round sum cf money. 

&JF" Full particulars can be obtained by applying to 

Ji"<= 25. B. &.. Xews Letter Office. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

Day and Boarding School for Young Ladies and Children, 
KINDERGARTEN. Next Term will commence July 20th. 
Jan. 29. MADAME B. ZEITSKA, Principal. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. Room 4, No. 531 California Bt. 

SAMUEL 0. HOVEY, 

Dealer in Local Securities, 
No. 436 California Street San .Francisco, Cal. 

IggT Gas, Water, Insurance, Railroad, Rank, Telephone, Powder Stocks, etc. 
Rought and Sold. July 9. 

WILLIAM M. PIERSON, 

LAW OFFICE, 

SO. 631 SACRAMENTO STREET. [Jan. 22. 



FLOWERING 

BULBS. 



Large Variety Just Received. 

r. J. xuvmbvtjX, & co., 

319 & 321 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



SALTPETRE, 

Refined, for Sale in Lots to Suit by 

THE CALIFORNIA POWDERVWORKS, 
230 California Street. 



Crude 



R. H. LLOYD, 

Attorney-at-Law, Room 13, Nevada Block. 



July 16, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SOCIETY NOTES. 

San Francisco, July 14, 1881. 

Dear New* Letter : The " Glorious Fourth " is by many regarded as 

the turning point of the season, some being content after that to settle 

down again at home for the rest of the year, while some wait for that 

■ make an exit from this windy city of ours. Therefore it in that 

" things " are a little mixed, and not much to record of society doings in 

yet. 

Mrs. Savage and her daughter sailed on the Qaetic, and were fairly over* 
with rWal offerings the morning of their departure from the many 
friends who assembled on the steamer to say a last adieu. They were 
accompanied by Mias G rattan, who wont to officiate as her friend Miss 
Chica's bridesmaid, and, perhaps, should the gods so will it, to follow her 
Mend's example, no matter if it lead to a future residence iu Siberia, or 
even Core*. Murriage is a lottery after all, and the prize is as likely to 
be drawn in China as elsewhere. Who can tell where the " coming man " 
may be found? 

Mr. Hyde Bowie has sailed away on his victorious yacht with a party 
of friends to Monterey. He has reason to he proud of his vessel, but I 
have heard his letter to Mr. Gallagher very harsnly criticised, as being in 
bad taste, to say the least. The chances of a trial of speed between the 
jfcllie and the Catco are more than likely, and yachtsmen are looking for- 
ward to a hard struggle for the right to maintain the whip at the mast- 
head. 

Mr. Lloyd Tevis has returned from quite a lengthened visit at the 
East, and been warmly welcomed back by his friends here. Mrs. 
Bixler has also arrived, and, as I prophesied, is laden down with Art 
treasures, which she proposes giving her friends an opportunity to exam- 
ine ere long. The stalwart form of " Brother John " Hemphill also de- 
lights the eyes of his parishioners once more. He remains faithful to the 
home of his adoption, refusing to be tempted away from these shores, no 
matter how glittering the bait. His pretty step-daughter, Miss Mamie 
Coghill, is creating quite a sensation at Eastern watering-places this sum- 
mer, but she expects to return to 'Frisco some time during the autumn, 
report says leaving several behind her ueither heart whole nor fancy free. 

Miss Rebecca McMullin remains yet awhile at Monterey, and we shall 
probably not see her much before the date of her friend MisB Soloman's 
wedding, at which she is to officiate as bridesmaid. All are sorry to say 
adieu to Mrs. Jack Hays, who accompanies her husband to Arizona for 
an inde6nite period. Mrs. Eddy, the charming widow, and her fair 
daughter, are also soon to b ; lost to us, as, contemplating a tour of the 
world, they depart by the August steamer for China. I fear 'twill be 
long ere we see them again. 

To-day our French residents are making merry over their celebration 
of the Fall of the Bastile, and the fireworks to-night are, I hear, to be 
something magnificent. How thoroughly they always enter into the spirit 
of anything they undertake. The success of the celebration will be due 
to the untiring efforts of Mr. Raphael Weil, who in this, as in many 
other instances, is the right man in the right place. 

Yours. Felix. 



LETTER FROM SAN RAFAEL. 

■ Tamalpais Hotel, July 12, 1881. 

Dear News Letter: We are now having the first really hot weather 
that has visited San Rafael this Summer, which has caused the lovely 
moonlight nights of the past week to be enjoyed to the uttermost; but 
yesterday was a scorcher and no mistake, making me think with delight 
of the cooling breezes of 'Frisco, to which I shall soon be returning. A 
varied programme was in order for the Fourth, but the President's illness 
caused it to be abandoned, except the unlimited supply of gunpowder the 
" Young America " of this burgh felt it incumbent on them to burn, to 
compensate for other disappointments, and a beautiful display of fire- 
works in the evening. 

By the way, why is it that we generally have moonlight nights when 
fireworks are on the bills ? Rome indulged in a climb up the sides of 
Mount Tamalpais to try if they could reproduce the sensation 
which convulsed this village the other day in the shape of an imaginary 
eruption. Others fished at Lagunitas, and others passed the day riding 
and driving. 

The guests at this hotel are now constantly varying. Many of those 
who came over in the Spring are leaving for home or other resorts, but are 
replaced by new comers, so the house is always full. The Schmiedells 
have just gone, and Mrs. Hager, with her family, is about to change her 
base to Monterey. She will be missed here, as she always instils life into 
the most hopeless of dull places, and her unfailing good nature makes 
people see everything couleur de rose, two considerations for which, if I 
were a hotel keeper, I should be tempted to board her for nothing. 

The McCrelHshes are among the most recent arrivals, he coming for the 

Eurpose of recuperating both bodily and mentally, and already feels the 
enefit of the change. The Shreves remain here all Summer, as they are 
greatly attached to the place, and kind, good-hearted, big Jim Burling 
spends nearly all his Sundays under the shadows of old Tamalpais. 

I confess I leave here with regret, but why I couldn't say if I were 
given a week wherein to explain. Others there are who have laid the 
foundation for lifelong happiness on the broad verandahs of Tamalpais 
Hotel, some items of which will be given to the public ere long, or no 
prophet is Kate. 



COME ALONG WITH YOUR COWHIDE. 

We have received pretty accurate information to the effect that a 
certain man has been employed by the person whom we recently ex- 
posed in this paper, and by his nephew Tom, and that they have guaran- 
teed the payment of all expenses to cowhide one of the gentlemen con- 
nected with the News Letter. We mention no names now, as the man 
whom we are informed is to do the cowhiding is too common and low a 
blackguard to make an expose" of at present. But if he desires a few 
facts concerning himself, it may amuse him in the near future to read, 
among other of his disgraceful acts, a description of his amours with a cer- 
tain printer's wife, an account of his expulsion from the Olympic Club for 
cheating at cards, and various other trifles, which would probably afford 
him interesting reading. 



STRAW HATSI 



Come and See the Elegant Styles, the Very 
Latest, the Nobbiest, and all Just Opened. 



MACKINAW, 
CANTONS, 

MILANS, 
PALM, 



LEGHORNS, ETC 



MARACIBO, 
PANAMA, 

PEDLE BRAIDS, 
TUSCAN, 



AT THE GREAT I XL, 

Corner Kearny and Commercial Streets, S. F. 



SEASIDE SUCKERS. 

At last the average Californiau should be satisfied. At last calm 
content should possess his soul. For many years the boast of the inhab- 
itant of this slope has been of the superiority of the trees, the mountains, 
the waterfalls, the big vegetables and the gigantic fruits; and yet one thing 
was lacking; one sore spot has always rankled in the heart. Until now 
no community amongst us has been bold enough to set themselves up as 
a direct competitor to Niagara Falls, that haven of wealthy hack-drivers; 
that abode of bloated inn-keepers; that bourne from whence returns the 
wearied traveler with enlarged experience and depleted purse. This re- 
proach can no longer be cast at us. Santa Cruz, with a vigor worthy of 
a better cause, assumes to be not the meek and humble follower but the 
successful rival of Niagara. Yosemite has tried but failed, and the scoff- 
ing Easterner turns away from the valley with money enough to get to 
the nearest telegraph station, where he lies in pawn until remittances ar- 
rive. But Santa Cruz must remember that Bimple willingness is not every- 
thing. Fruition comes not with mere desire. She must bear in mind the 
superior geographical position of Niagara, with its dozen railroads and its 
nearness to the great centers of population, and if the inhabitants of our 
seaside towns would excel in the laudable career they seem to have marked 
out for themselves they must organize, must throw aside all petty local 
jealousies, and remember that in union there is strength. They must 
bear in mind that only to those who labor faithfully comes the reward, 
and a few words of advice from one who has Buffered may not be amiss. 
Let them think of the time it has taken Niagara to reach its proud emi- 
nence and be patient. No one will deny but that with their limited ex- 
perience Santa Cruzans have done well. They have done more, they have 
done nobly, but perfection has not been reached and they must persevere. 
When they have thoroughly organized, which they can do by next Sum- 
mer; when they are so banded together that it will be impossible for the 
traveler to get away with anything more than his bathing suit; when they 
have arranged with the railroads for free passes to carry the depleted 
visitor forty miles away from town; when they have fully mastered the 
art of pleasantly emptying pockets, no matter how full, in forty-eight 
hours, and when they have entirely attained the science of getting all the 
sojourner has and of giving absolutely nothing in exchange, then, and 
not till then, may they offer themselves with confidence to the traveling 
public as a worthy and successful rival to Niagara. A most laudable ex- 
ception may be made in the case of the principal hotel in Santa Cruz, but 
the greed of the average inhabitant who has a bed to let, or supplies or 
horses to furnish, will out-Herod the appetite of a little bittern or the 
greed of a Kearny-street pawn-broker. 



OUR OUTINGS. 

The doings of some of our prominent men during the Summer vaca- 
tion are worthy of note. Ex-Supreme Judge Wallace, from holding the 
rod in terror over the heads of " proponent and defendant," has been 
holding the rod over fish with a flattering result. Lloyd Tevis betook 
himself to New York for the "express" business of Wells, far (as it) 
go's. Sharon has been enjoying the beauties of Nature. Tom Bell is 
cultivating a Lily. D. O. Mills, in an outburst of unparalleled gen- 
erosity, is studying the moTal development of man. Hoffman has been 
drowning his eloquence in "the wild sea's foam," and Charlie Crocker 
bathed not only in the briny deep, but in waves of bliss from ladies' 
smiles. Jim Fair has been floating, not stocks, but himself in the surf at 
Santa Cruz, while Flood has confined his pleasures to the palatial home 
he has newly built at Menlo Park. General Barnes has been in a 
of aristocracy, from dukes to quasi baronets. Reub. Lloyd, deserting 
hills, has taken to plains. Charlie Howard has employed his vacatimi in 
visiting different hydropathic establishments, as following the homeo- 
pathic doctrine that "like cures like," he is anxious to administer water 
cure to the Supervisors afflicted with water on the brain. _ Tiburcio Par- 
rott is paying attention to calves, having a magnificent pair to start with. 
Eugene Dewey, as usual, devoted his time to smashes, not brandyized, 
but feminine. Luning is searching for mental development, i. c, calcu- 
lating how to keep what he's got Raphael Weil is trying how to spend 
his coin, while Joe Hoge is translating the French proverb: "Dan* la nuit 
tout la chat* xont oris." Hall McAllister is studying rural felicity. 
Charlie Felton is writing his life. Goddeffroy is playing doppelganger at 
the seaside. Booker is immersed in " biz," and we— well, we are in San 
Francisco. 



There has been a big jam of logs on the Kennebec 
rent jam, probably. 



.pit of cur- 



Modest talent and moderate appreciation of one's own worth are 
traits in the characters of professional men which must endear them to 
the public. Pre-eminent among such unassuming ones Dr. F. E. I. Can- 
iuv stands boldly forth. This modest individual is now suing the South 
Pacific Coast Railroad for $12,500, as his valuation of the protest 
services rendered bv him to persons injured at the Big Tree railroad acci- 
dent of May 23. 1SS0. It remains to be proved how far the jury will 
agree with him in his self -appreciation. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 16, 1881. 



LATEST FROM LONDON. 

Belations Between Italian and French--The Tunisian Question- 
able Irish Agitation-Boycottingr-Dosing a Farmer with Castor 
Oil-Bejection of the Capital Punishment Abolition Bill-Sunday 
Collections for Hospitals-The Lord Mayor's Banquets -The 
Comet and Popular Superstition--A Domestic Economy Con- 
gress—Compressed Garters-Vaccination and Mortality— The 
Marine Society; 50,000 Boys Trained-The Telegraph Clerks- 
The Royal Mint-Lunacy LawBeform-Chit-Chat. Etc. 

London, June 25, 1881. 
The English, as little probably as tbe French army itself, expected 
the turn which relations between tbe Italians and French are taking. 
The indiscretion on the part of tbe occupiers of the balcony at the 
Italian Club, in Marseilles, has precipitated matters somewhat, and per- 
haps that is all that can be said. Sooner or later, despite the suave cour- 
tesy of tbe diplomatists towards each other, tbe indignation felt among 
the people would have found a vent. Opinion here is bo unanimous on 
the Tunisian question and the results of the annexation, that if I 
give one extract from the Timet, it may be taken as the general 
expression of the country's feelings. "Although we deplore," it says, 
" the manner in which France has advanced in this Tunisian affair, we 
should deeply regret to see the adventure result in a rupture, or even in 
a Berious coolness, between France and Italy. Republican France and 
United Italy are, if the word means anything, natural allies, and it would 
be lamentable— disastrous even — if this wretched annexation of a Mus- 
sulman Bey should lead to a breach between the two nations. All Eng- 
lishmen are anxious that peace and good relations should continue to exist 
between France and Italy, as between France and ourselves. This coun- 
try has no intention of taking any direct action with regard to Tunis; our 
interests do not require it. So long as our real interests in the Mediter- 
ranean, especially in Egypt, are not threatened — and there is no reason 
to consider them likely to be threatened— we may look on the French 
proceedings in Tunis with regret indeed, but without aDxiety on our own 
account." Earl Granville, in the House of Lords, on the evening of the 
21st inst., announced that " we have received the strictest engagements 
that our treaty rights, so far as the commerce of this country is concerned, 
will not be invaded." Our attitude, therefore, is, as the Daily News has 
well put it, one of " friendly regret." 

On the action of the Prince of Bulgaria, however, Earl Granville, in 
the same speech, pronounced what the Morning Post calls " the most un- 
equivocal condemnation." Bulgarian public men have appealed to the 
British Government for aid, and our position is one of some difficulty. 
The part we took in raising Bulgaria to an independent place among na- 
tions must make us, to a certain extent, responsible for the preservation 
of justice, as well as of law and order, in tbe new principality; and we 
ought scarcely to stand by and tacitly consent to the erection of a des- 
potism where we took such pains to secure a constitution of freedom. In- 
terference of some sort seems to be called for. We can, however, but 
wait to see what new surprises this Alexander of Battenburg has in store 
for us. 

There is an old proverb, "The pride of France, the treason of Eng- 
land and the war of Ireland shall never have end." Verily, the Tunisian 
expedition and the Irish disturbances seem to justify this proverb's ex- 
istence even now. But we must agree to cut out the middle clause. 
England has grown famous for loyalty. Treason is rare indeed, and we 
are almost slavish in our adulation of monarchical authority, in the ab- 
stract or in detail. We watch the movements of tbe Royal Family with 
great interest, and our affection to them as individuals and officials is far 
from declining, rather is it on the increase. The only unmarried son of 
her Majesty, Prince Leopold, has lately been created Duke of Albany, 
Earl of Clarence and Baron Arklow, and the 20th inst. saw his admission 
to the House of Lords in due form. The popularity of Prince Leopold 
and his royal brothers is ever being evidenced ; their special traits and 
predilections are carefully fostered by the country. No great meeting or 
pageant is complete without one or other of them, and they work wonder- 
fully hard to satisfy the demands made upon their time. 

The Irish agitation is pursuing its steady course. Nothing of great 
moment has occurred since I last wrote to you, probably tbe startling ex- 
hibitions that have been devised for our edification and annoyance are 
exhausted for the present. I may mention an incident relative to '* Boy- 
cotting," which has reached here lately: A farmer had some of his cattle 
fall sick, and the remedy, castor oil, was only to be procured from a 
chemist who had been excommunicated by the Land League, Under 
cover of night the anxious farmer purchased a supply of the necessary 
fluid, but, on his road home, three or four men attacked him, and poured 
the half-pint of oil slowly down his throat, causing him great agony, un- 
doubtedly. There is a little of the ludicrous about this episode, which, 
however, renders the inhumanity none the less. Most barbarous cases, 
discreditable to the veriest uncivilized savage, are frequently reported. 
The quandary in which the Government are placed can only be relieved 
by the passing of the Land Bill. Some progress is to be reported in this 
measure, but its efficacy when applied to the excited Irish is yet to be 
tested. It is still uncertain, too, whether the Lords will throw it out. 
The consequences, if they do, I have already told you ; be it on their own 
heads. 

By 175 to 79 votes the Commons have rejected the second reading of 
the Capital Punishment Abolition Bill. The Government do not see their 
way clear to do away with the extreme penalty at present, though there 
can be but little doubt that their sympathies are with tbe principle of 
the Bill, and they admit the advisability of reforming the law "to suit 
the practice," as the Daily News has it. The Home Secretary, if ap- | 



pealed to now, has practically to try the case a second time, and an anx- 
ious time he must have of it. But it is a large question, admitting of 
many and strong arguments on either side. The division of the country 
is as nearly as possible equal, I should say, and, despite the call for settle- 
ment, it is obliged to lie over, like so many other matters of equal mag- 
nitude and importance. 

The Sunday collections for hospitals and similar institutions have re- 
sulted ia a response of something like £20,000 so far. In our haste to get 
rich we must not forget those who are precluded from taking part in the 
race by their afflictions. It is a case of " doing as we would be done by," 
and all creeds cheerfully recognize the duty of helping in such a cause. 
Yet £20,000 is no marvelous sum to come out of the pockets of a city 
like London. Every year tbe total increases, but does it do so in pro- 
portion to the increase of population ? Perhaps it is not to be expected it 
would. Infants cannot subscribe. They drain the resources in another 
direction themselves. However, the duty of giving to Buch funds is 
acknowledged by all, and England must not say one thing and do an- 
other over such a matter as the hospital charity. 

The Lord Mayor is giving a series of banquets to the Judges, the Pre- 
lates, the representatives of literature, art, and so forth. The Archbishop 
of Canterbury was at the dinner given to the Bishops on the 22d inst., 
and alluded to the time when his order could scarcely appear in public 
with safety, but had to doff their clerical habiliaments in going to and 
from the House of Lords, and were otherwise inconvenienced and tor- 
mented. He instanced a case where a " wild bull" was driven upon a 
Bishop during the ceremony attaching to the consecration of a church in 
the east end of London, a statement for which the Bethnal Green au- 
thorities have taken him to task as being untrue. His Grace's reply is 
not yet made known, but this is not the first occasion when anecdotes 
and illustrations have been adduced, and discovered to be either highly 
garbled or absolutely without foundation. St. Peter's successors will 
have to be careful. 

The juvenile slumbers are being disturbed that tbe infants may look at 
" the comet," whose appearance was announced in large type on the con- 
tents bill of an evening journal two days ago. It appears that some of 
the provincial inhabitants feel by no means certain, even in this nine- 
teenth century, that such phenomena do not portend awful disasters, war, 
famine, and the like. A daily paper rather hesitatingly observes that we 
need not make ourselves uneasy on the matter. We are hardly justified 
in so doing, seeing our ignorance as to the constitution or movements of 
comets. 

A " Domestic Economy Congress," got up in imitation of those for tbe 
discussion of Social Science, to enable the ladies of independent position 
to show their learning on such questions as food, servant's dress, health, 
and the like, is being held from day to day. An amusing incident is de- 
scribed by the Daily News as occurring at the Society of Arts yesterday. 
" There was much amused sympathy with Lord Alfred Churchill, upon 
whom fell the duty of reading a paper on " The Prevention of Disease," 
sent by Miss Louisa Twining. His Lordship kept a tolerably grave coun- 
tenance while discoursing upon feeding bottles, but began to falter over 
* tight stays,' and utterly broke down with confusion and merriment 
when tbe necessity was forced upon him of denouncing the feminine use 
of 'compressing garters.'" A few days ago similar amusement was 
caused by the attempts of Sir Henry Cole to read an absent lady's paper, 
written so badly as almost to defy his efforts to decipher it. 

Recent statistics from a small-pox hospital showed that three per cent, 
of vaccinated persons die of the disease, while of those unvaccinated 38^ 
per cent, succumb. 

At the presentation of prizes by Lady Emma Baring to the boys of the 
" Warspite " Training-ship, it was remarked that the Marine Society have 
trained 50,000 boys for the nautical profession, 30,000 of whom have en- 
tered the Royal Navy. 

Much dissatisfaction has recently been evinced by the Telegraph Clerks 
of the Post-office system, at their rate of wages, over-time and holidays. 
The concessions of tbe Treasury involve an increase of £67,000 imme- 
diately, and £128,000 a year prospectively. Announcing tbe recognition of 
their demands, Lord Frederick Cavendish said that the Treasury " re- 
serves to itself the right to suspend execution of the scheme in any Post- 
office of which the members are henceforth known to be taking part in 
extra-official agitation." He deprecated the pressure which, as electoral 
voters, they might bring to bear on their representative members of Par- 
liament, and this " threat," as it is termed, is criticised with disfavor by 
the PresB generally as ill-advised, and as evincing a yielding to injustice 
only under coercion. 

Alterations and improvements are necessary in the Royal Mint, and it 
is undecided whether or not to erect a new building on the Thames Em- 
bankment. The cost is estimated at £480,000, but the Government have 
ordered that the works in the present building shall not be stopped, with- 
out which alterations cannot be made. We have enough money lying by 
to go on with, and there seems no reason why the outlay on a new erec- 
tion should not be saved, but of course the Treasury knows best. 

Lunacy Law Reform is again projected, a matter as urgent as Capital 
Punishment Abolition. It is proposed to buy up tbe proprietary asylums, 
and to alter the requisite proceedings to get a patient into an asylum. 
However, the question is again shelved, which is to be regretted, although 
perhaps unavoidable. Many other reforms are on the tapis, notably that 
of the Bankruptcy and Patent Laws, which are to be made Government 
measures at the earliest opportunity. 

Yet another pressing question has been revived. The Contagious Dis- 
eases (Women) Act is said to be immoral and productive of bad conse- 
quences. It is called a " State Protection of Vice," and several great in- 
ternational meetings have recently been held to abolish it. Not long ago, 
a girl was brought up for attempted suicide. She pleaded that the police, 
armed with the authority conferred them by this act, were chasing her 
from pillar to post, under the impression that she was a prostitute. She 
had no alternative, she said; she was " driven into the sea." Such cases 
are sad, but the Act protects, not vice, but our soldiers and sailors from 
a horrible and loathesome disease, and its repeal would be a piece of fool- 
ish squeamishness. 

The great match between Captain Webb and Willie Beckwith, of speed 
and endurance in a six-days' swim, finishes at 11 o'clock to-night. Tbe 
younger man last night had scored 80 miles, 32 laps; Webb, 77 miles, 29 
laps. If Beckwith can hold out till to-night, be wins, I should say, and 
may claim to have beaten the champion of the Channel. But I doubt if 
he could stand a 23 hours' sea-swim. He is obliged to take frequent rest. 

The weather is showery, and the crops are looking up. 



July 16, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



AW IRISH EVICTION. 

The pigs and potatoes, the donkey and sheep 
Were ntberod together, almost in a heap, 
Off ended by men with a blackthorn apiece, 


BANKS. 


THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 


Ami yeUicg like demons : " Come <m! Who's afraid ! 


WM. ALYOBD President. 


We'll show of what stuff are the Irishmen made. 
11 There's the door of the house, and go in if ye dare. 
But before ye set foot in ye'd best say a prayer, 
Fur when ye come out it won't be on yer feet. 
But stretched on a shutter, and under a sheet ; 
Uo and turn out the woman or fire the thatch, 
And maybe ye'H find that ye're meeting yer match. 
" There isn't the time for to cut off yer ears, 
And, begorra, I b'lieve that we haven't the shears j 
They're lent to the boys in the parish beyand 
For the tails of the cows on some gintleman's land, 
Some dirty spalpeen that was wanting his rint 


THOMAS BBOWJI, Cashier | B. MURRAY, Jr., Ass't Cashier 
Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, the Oriental Bank Cor- 
poration. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 


(As if he could get it when wance it was spint)." 
The orator stooped (as he spoke) for a stone — 
'Twas the signal for action, and dozens were thrown ; 
The constables met them with bayonet stabs, 
But the Irish in danger can sidle like crabs, 
And few were the scratches, and harmless the pricks 
Which parried the blows of their murderous sticks. 
Now 'tis said (and we know the good book it is in 
That all a man has he will give for his skin ; 
So the agent, whose face was as white as a card, 
And whose chattering teeth could scarce utter a word, 
Said, "Really, I think we had better withdraw ; 
If we fire on these ruffians we'll outrage the law." 
You see, business was business as far as it went, 
And collecting the money meant so much per cent ; 
But it wasn't worth while to endanger his life, 
To orphan his children and widow his wife ; 
So, heading the party, he hastily went, 
And cheers of derision were after him sent. 
** Now, boys," said the spokesman, " 111 give ye a toast, 
And whoever drinks hardest will honor it most — 
May the landlords grow fat for manuring our ground. 
They'll be under it surely and soon I'll be bound. 
May the tenants be shortly the lords of the soil, 
And be fair to each other in sharing the spoil. 
*' May the curses of Cromwell alight on the man 
Who'll peach on his comrades for gold if he can ; 
May our glass not be empty or pipes not unfilled, 
And who'll care a rap for the blood that he spilled, 
When the stills for our whisky may freely be seen, 
And we pay no more duty to country or Queen." 

BOOK REVIEWS. 

The SPlan of Creation. By R. M. Widney, Los Angeles, Cal. San Francisco: 
Methodist Book Depository, No. 1041 Market street. Rev. J. B. Hill, Agent. 
Price, $1 60. 

This is one of the many evolutions of tangled modern thought. The 
author asks his readers, in his preface, to accept, reject or modify his 
"general sketch" to whatever extent knowledge, reason and judgment 
may dictate. Mr. Widney has evidently made the plan of creation the 


BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Tneorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, $1,800,- 

X 000, with power to increase to §10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office— 28 Cornhill, London. Branches— Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advancos made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSEND, Manager. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

T>aid up Capital 91*900,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool* 

_C worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; CaBhier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, George A. Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Wormser, James Phelan, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents— London : Baring Bros. & Co. Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin 
Lane, Lombard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hease, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chiua and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 


LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

(Incorporated 18S0-] 
d Capital, $3,100,000. --San Francisco Office, 424 California 

Kj street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; 
Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, Bankof Englandand London 
Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co.; Boston, Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Busi- 
ness in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and all parts of the 
world. (October 1st, 1880.1 Oct. 0. 


THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 


favorite study of his latter years, but the fault of his book is the constant 




succession of presumptions unaided by the algebraical proof, which is gen- 
eral form of thought. When a writer reduces archangels to equations, 
and writes a whole chapter to show " that man was created an order of 
beings lower than the angels, wherein mind and matter are united, and 
that he has been specially cared for by the Creator," patience ceases to be 


Agency at New Tork, 62 Wall street. 

Agency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. Nov. 8. 


a virtue, and the book may safely be consigned to the waste basket in the 
interest of humanity in general. 

Boswell and Johnson. Their Companions and Contemporaries. By J. F. Waller, 
L.L.D. Cassell's Popular Library. 

This is a most interesting account of the lives of two men who have 
been the subject of more stories than any two man who ever lived. As 
the author hints in the preface, there is no apology needed for this little 
work. Notwithstanding all that has been written on the subject, there 
is room for a book such as this aims to be— an abridgment of what is in 
Boswell — and, in addition, somewhat that is not to be found there, in re- 
lation to the literature of Johnson's day. Boswell and Johnson are two 
names that may well be placed together: a great artist and his great sub- 
ject. Indeed, the name of the one ever recalls that of the other, as Guido 


THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

422 California St.. San Francisco. 
T onclon Office, 3 Ang:el Conrt ; \oh Tork Agents, J. W. Sol - 

J_J igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized hi, 000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion , 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEINHART, Managers. 
P. N. Lilisnthal, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL 8300,000. 

ftfficers: Vice-President, Jerome Lincoln ; Secretary, W. 

\_J S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 


Boswell owes all the permanency of bis fame to Johnson, Johnson owes 
not a little of his to Boswell. The finest and the wisest table-talk that 
English literature possesses has been preserved by the faithfullest and 
ablest of chroniclers. 

A Reasonable. Christ.anitv. By Laurentine Hamilton, Oakland, California. 
Dewey & Co. , Publishers, San Francisco. 
This work is only sold by subscription. It is the result of a great deal 
of searching after truth, a mixture of a puzzled, unsettled theology, and 
uncertain as to the limits of sacred and secular science. The volume is 
not published with a view to profit. That is evident. And it would have 
been better if it had not been published. The author has yet to adopt a 
sure, defined and comfortable creed; to give up searching and settle down. 
The book throughout bears unmistakeable traces of deep thought and in- 
tense longing after what is true, holy and right, and an equal abhorrence 
of what is false, unholy and wrong. Any one can read it with advantage, 
for it is a new string in perfect harmony with the chord that sines to us 
of faith, hope and charity. It is a practical book, preferring all the way 
through action to feeling, and the author bids fair to end up either in a 
monastery or a hospital. 


THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

■TAentsche Spar and Leihlmiik, No 526 tall forn last reel. Sun 
1_J Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors — Fred. 
Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw, Kruse, George H. EggerF, N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon, 
Peter Spreckels, Igu, Steinhart. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorney, JOHN" R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 


M. A. GUNST & CO., 

203 KEARNY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, 

IMPORTERS AJfD OKALERS JUT 
HAVANA AND KEY WEST CIGARS, 

ALSO 

Agents for Kimball, Qaulliener & Co 'a Guatemala Cigars. 

t^~ Inform the Public that they receive large invoices of Choice 
Havana Brands ttcice a month. 


The management of the Eintracht, 539 California street, has been 


(February 19.] 


taken in hand again by its former owners, Schnabel & Co. It is the main 
depot for the celebrated Fredericksburg lager from San Joed Leave or 
send your orders there for keg or bottle beer, delivered free to any part of 
the city. 


GEORGE C. HICKOX tt CO., 

/Commission Stock Brokers, nave Removed to >"o. 410 

\^l CALIFORNIA STREET. Feb. 12. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 16, 1881. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND." 

s We Obey no "Wand bat Pleasure's."-- Tom Moore. 



California Theater.— It is seldom, if ever, our stage has witnessed a 
finer impersonation than Sheridan's " Louis XI." It is certain that time 
will briDg this sterling tragedian both fortune and fame in this part. 
The audience that assembled on Monday evening was the best test of the 
esteem in which this actor is held. Coming so soon on the footsteps of a 
former engagement, some doubt had been expressed at the advisability of 
this early re- appearance. The audience and applause that greeted the 
Btar's efforts were the best testimony that could have been given in con- 
tradiction of these fears. Appreciation, to a rare degree, rewarded every 
point made, and re-calls at the end of each act were prolonged to a degree 
of embarrassment. Our late criticisms of Sheridan's efforts in thiB role 
are too recent and fresh in the minds of our readers to admit of repetition 
here. It sums itself up in this, that one of the most difficult characters 
in the range of tragedy— a part that taxed all the marvelous strength of 
Kean's powers— is rendered in a manner', that amounts to a positive 
revelation. It is easy to imagine what a colorless performance it might 
be made by an actor less gifted, but by Sheridan the arrant hypocrite iB 
made to stand out with Rembrandt-like distinctness, and every shading 
of the character iB given by a master hand. There is more individuality 
in this character than any we have seen since Barrett's "lean and hungry 
CassiuB." The support is from fair to excellent, Eva West being particu- 
larly clever as the Dauphin. The two rustics, rendered by Annie Adams 
and F. G-. Ross, are especially deserving of mention. Their by-play in 
the forest scene, in the presence of the King, shows an attention to little 
things not often seen in subordinate characters. A young man in the 
cast, N. G-. Matthews, is one day going to make his mark on the stage. 
We have seen him do many minor characters, and he always does them 
well. Mr. Craig as "Nemours," and Miss Keene as "Marie," made a 
pleasing impression. 

Baldwin's Theater will open on Monday, July 18th, with the Wal- 
lack Company in La Belle Jtusse. The caste comprises Mr. Osmund Tearle, 
as " Captain Jules Clopin," Gerald Eyre, as "Sir Philip Calthrope," J. 
W. Jennings, aa " Monroe Quilton," Jeffreys-Lewis as "Geraldine Glan- 
bore." Neither Mr. Elton, the low comedian, nor Miss Arden, soubrette, 
appear until a subsequent play. La Belle Ilusse is said to be a drama of 
much interest, and affords Jeffreys-Lewis another chance of scoring one 
of her successes. 

The Minstrels at the Bush Street have been having everything their 
own way and packed houses have been the rule. Billy Emerson has at 
last got into the right channel, and has made a hit as "Moriarity, M. P." 
McAndrews improves on a subsequent visit and his act invariably brings 
a round of applause. There is an entire change of programme this 
week. 

Woodward's Gardens are, as usual, to the front with a series of 
novelties which cannot fail to attract. Among the chief of these are the 
Arnold Brothers, Miss Ida Siddons, Fred J. Mackley, and a host of 
others. The monstrous fifty-pound sea spider from Japan is also on exhi- 
bition free of charge. 

Chit-Cbat. — Harry Courtaine is steadily rising in the estimation of 
Eastern theater-goers. He has just received an offer from a London 
manager.— —Marian Elmore and Lena Merville, of the Edouin troupe, 
sailed last Thursday for their home in England. After a short rest they 
return to this country.— —Booth's share of the profits of tlie Irving-Booth 
engagement in London was S15,000.-^Clara Morris's telegram to Mrs. 
Garfield looks exceedingly like a cheap advertisement.— The Trouba- 
dours are spending S5,000 on new costumes for this coming season. It is 
likely this combination will again visit us, as it is said they contemplate 
a visit to Australia.— 'Wallack's old theater saw its last night under the 
Wallack management last week. At the close of the performance the 
audience sang " Auld Lang Syne." The new theater will be opened this 
winter. -^— Haverly's Colored Minstrels visit London shortly. They com- 
prise sixty men and fifteen women. -^Kate Claxton is expressing her 
dissatisfaction East over her San Prancisco engagement.— —Ben Wolff is 
at work on a musical comedy for Willie Edouin.— — From appearances 
there will be five or six traveling Hazel Kirke companies East this sum- 
mer.— Raymond has booked forty weeks of his time this coming sea- 
son. There's life in "CoL Sellers" yet.^— Wallack's Theater will be 
opened by a new comedy from the pen of the author of Hazel Kirke.'^— 
Chas. Wyndam will play in New York with his London company nexD 
season.— Maud Harrison will not leave the Union Square, but will con- 
tinue with it tor another season.— E, C. Macfarlane and W. T. Barton, 
two enterprising geniuses, intend astonishing the rural inhabitants of 
Marin County with an amateur minstrel show shortly. ^— Booth has just 
returned from England, and has brought over an English physician with 
his sick wife. ^— Mary Anderson's earnings nave been going to her father- 
in-law, Dr. Griffin, for several seasons, which he has invested in property 
in his own name. After a family broil, he has deeded the property to her. 

The returning visitors from Santa Cruz and Monterey are nearly all 
keeping up the healthful and enjoyable practice of sea bathing. The fa- 
cilities afforded by the Neptune and Mermaid Baths being such as to 
tempt any one who loves a dip in the sea. The baths are at the foot of 
Larkin and Hyde streets, and are easily accessible by the Clay-street 
c irs. The new bathing suits just received are very handsome. Professor 
Berg, the superintendent and teacher of the art of Bwimming, is a most 
capable instructor, many of his pupils, after a month's lesson, making 
graceful swimmers. 

George Francis Train has volunteered his legal service in the defence 
of Guitteau. This is just as it should be, and with the able assistance of 
such a similar mind the public can rest assured that in ease of Guitteau's 
acceptance of the offer conviction is certain. It is, however, to be feared 
that the preponderance of method in the would-be assassin's madness may 
cause him to decline the brilliant offer. 



THE NEW AND MAGNIFICENT 

"Hotel del Monte," 

MONTEREY, CAL., 

Commenced its SUMMER SEASON on Wednesday, June 1, 1881. 



The fourth Hop of the Beasontahes place this ( Saturday ) EVENING 
MUSIC BY BALLENBEES'S BAND. 



Among the great improvements made during the past winter is the con- 
struction of a mammoth warm Salt Water Swimming Tank, 150x50 feet 
in size, and being THE LARGEST IN THE WORLD. 

GEORGE SCHONEWALD, Manager. 



BALDWIN THEATER. 

Thos. Magruire, Manager." Announcement, Extraordinary. 
THE WALLACK COMPANY, from Wallack's Theater, New York, including 
Mr. Osmond Tearle, Mr. Gerald Eyre, Mr. Wm. Elton, Miss Jeffreys-Lewis and Miss 
Ethel Arden, who will make their first appearance in a new and very powerful Play, 
entitled 

La Belle Russe ! 
Commencing Monday Evening, July 18th. Further particulars in future announce- 
ments. Sunday Evening, July 17th, Complimentary Benefit of THOMAS MAGUIRE 
(Manager), tendered by Jarrett & Rice's FUN ON THE BRISTOL COMPANY, who 
will appear in their Musical Comedy, FUN ON THE BRISTOL, introducing their 
successful burlesque, THE TWO ORPHANS. Mr. Sheridan's Irish Coterie, Mr. Wm. 
Courtright's Flewy Flewy, and 50 volunteers. July 16. 

BUSH-STREET THEATER. 

Clbas. E. Lockp, Proprietor. --Holding the Fort! Continued 
/ Throngs Nightly! 

Haverly's Mastodons ! 

Last Times of this Week's Great New Bill ! Last -Times of Emerson's ' ( Moriarity !" 
Another New Programme Mondaj! Recollect To-morrow'B Immerse Matinee! Recol- 
lect Sunday Night's Grand Novelties! Secure Seats. Every House Crowded Before 
Rise of Curtain. July 16. 

THE TIVOLI GARDENS, 

Eddy street, between Market and Mason.*- fireling* Bros., 
Proprietors aud Managers. Positively Last Nights of the Ever Popular Comic 
Opera, MARTHA! Monday, Ju!y IStb, Balfe's Grand Spectacular Opera, in 5 acts, 

Satan ell a ! 
which will be produced at an enormous expense. July 16. 

CALIFORNliTTHEATER. 

Tbis (Saturday) Evening-, Mr. W. E. Sheridan in bis Great 
Representation of 

Louis XI. 

This (Saturday) Afternoon, LAST LOUIS XI. MATINEE. Sunday Evening, July 
17th. Last Time of this Great Play, LOUIS XI. Monday, July ISth, MERCHANT 
OF VENICE. Carriages at -10.45. July 16. 

Richard Savage.] SAVAGE & SON, [Richard H. Savage. 

Empire Foundry aud Machine Works, 137 to 141 Fremont 
street, San Francisco. Stamp Batteries and Prospecting Mills, Saw Mills, 
Gang Edgers, Set Works, Gearing and Shafting. Harvey's Heaters, Creen-house Fix- 
tures, Plumbers' Stock, Dodge's Rock Breakers and Concentrators, Architectural 
Work and Machine Jobbing. Send for Circular. June 25. 

ROEBLING'S WIRE ROPE AGENCY. 

250.000 Feet on Hand, All Sizes - 

For Sale, Lowest Rates. Wire Rope for Elevators. Wire 
Rope for Mines (round or flat). Wire Rope Especially for Cable Roads. Wire 
Suspension Bridges, built to order, all sizes. Sole Agents for Pacific Coast, 

L. REYNOLDS & CO., 
Office, Room 1, Nevada Block. Warehouse, No. 16 First street. July 9. 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

"VT os. 57, 59 anil 61 Minna street, between First and Second, 

J3I 8&n Francisco, One Block from Palace Hotel. Also, Carriages and Cabs at 
Pacific Club, N.E. corner Montgomery and Bush streets. Vehicles of Every Descrip- 
tion at Reduced Rates. Telephones in Stable. Feb. 10. 

JOHN JENNINGS 

Hooper's South End Warehouses, corner Japan and Town- 
send streets, San Francisco. First-class Fire-Proof Brick Building, capacity 
10,000 tons. Goods taken from the Dock and the Cars of the C. P. R. R. and S. P. 
R. R. free of charge. Storage at Current Rates. Advances and Insurance Effected 

COAL OIL STOVES. 

The Summer Queen, Fairy Queen and Triumph. 

All sizes for heating and cooking. The trade supplied. 




May 14. 



WIESTER & CO., 17 New Montgomery street, 

San Francisco. California. 



JOHN KEOGH, 

73 and 75 New Montgomery Street, 

Importer of Curled Hair, Feathers, Bnrlaps, Furniture 
Springs, Pulu Tufts, Bed Lace Moss, Tow, Ticking, Webbing, Twines, Excelsior. 
[January 29.] 



July 16, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTINC ITEMS. 



Snooting. —The coming quail season promises to he a Bplendid one, an 

already in Sonoma, Matin and U unities the voaug quail are 

plentiful, and in some cases already more than half grown. The 
bevys, too, are larger than usual, the writer having last week seen in one 
evening Dear ClorenUe six families of over fifteen. All along the So- 
noma Valley doves are plentiful an I in excellent condition. By obtain- 
ing permission from the ranchers to shoot over their grain fields bags of 
* hundred aud over can be made by even a moderate shot. Young jack- 
rabbits are also plentiful and easy of approach. Persons, however, who 
would get i>ermits to shoot must be most careful of tire, and be sure to 
ne but the best felt wads. Fire is the nanftcrfB dread, and he ia 
right to guard against it in every way. In Mendocino County, a few 
miles from Cloverdale, persons who are good deer hunters can make sure 
of killing a good fat buck or two and of seeing a good many more. A 
most flagrant case of breach of all the laws of sport occurred on Dry 
Creek last week. A young man, living two miles from the Old Brown 
Ranch, without saying a word, took his rifle and hound into a field of 
Mr. (.'tilbert Cooke's, and in course of an hour or so killed three fat bucks. 

Mr. Cooke met him packing them out, but young M d had not the 

decency to "tier him a portion of his game or even make any nice remark. 

Mr. Cooke learnt next day that M d had shipped them all off to 

Cloverdale for sale and was then out looking for more. Such conduct is 
apt to make ranch owners strictly refuse permission to all. During the 
first week of the season thirty-four bucks were killed in the immediate 
vicinity of Cloverdale. At Highland Springs deer are very plentiful, and 
the visitors to that delightful pleasure resort find that they are sufficiently 
easy of access to satisfy even the most delicately framed kid-glove hunter. 
In the immediate neighborhood of Felton doves abound in immense 

?uantities and have been so little shot at that big hags can be easily made. 
f one is in search of large game other than deer they can find enough 
California lions amund Boulder Creek to keep themselves and dogs from 
making too much fat for lack of exercise.— There is hardly a pigeon 
shooter in the State who has not at one time or another come into pleas- 
ant contact with Richard Heyes, and who will not hear of his 
death from appoplexy last week with feelings of sorrow and regret. 
Dick, as he was generally called, attended every large shoot for a long 
time past, and reported the doings of the competitors for the Examiner, 
Chronicle and Call, and it is no small tribute to his ability and integrity 
of character that he was employed by three rival newspapers. Like all 
men of fixed principles, "Dick" had enemies, whose ill-will he had won 
by his manly and open denunciation of mean and unfair practices at the 
trap, but we doubt not that even they will join with us in saying that 
"Dick" never wrote a line of criticism, favorable or otherwise, that he 
did not honestly believe was deserved. He was an Englishman by birth, 
and a man of considerable education. — Philo Jacoby and a large num- 
ber of the members of the German Hunting Club are having a grand deer 
hunt on Sulphur Creek, a tributary of the Russian River. They have 
five deer hounds with them, and in two days killed bo many bucks that, 
being fearful of exterminating the entire breed, they turned their atten- 
tion to bears. At the last account received from them, the entire party, 
dogs and all, had surrounded a cave in which bruin was at bay. In a 
future issue we will be able to Bay whether or not bruin had raised the 
siege.-^— At the eleventh hour the California Pigeon Shooting Club has 
fallen in line, and has adopted a system of handicapping for club shoots. 
The' schedule they have adopted is fair, and is copied from that used by 
several other clubs. 

Rowing.— To-morrow morning, at Long Bridge, the SI, 000 race be- 
tween Griffin and White, of the Pioneer Club, will be rowed. A good 
deal of interest haa been taken in the match, and, without a doubt, there 
will be a big turn-out of spectators. Both the men fancy they have the 
race as a cheap gift, and will be surprised to find how much they have 
underrated each other. Griffin should lead to the turn, and if White is 
able to do his best in a waiting race he need have no fear for the results, 
but as he is a comparatively young sculler, and has never pulled for a big 
stake before, it would be no disgrace should he weaken. The Columbia 
Rowing Club, of Oakland, will give a Club Regatta on Oakland Creek 
some time next month. George has announced his intention to train so 
hard that he will be able to give Casey a hard race.^— In training for 
his race, one day last week, White was so exhausted at the end of a two- 
mile spin that he fell out of his boat, and had to be carried into his 
dressing-room.— Gentlemen who have entered for the Admission Day 
wherry race are anxiously inquiring why Mr. Price has bought a new 
wherry, and have interrogated other members of the Committee as to 
whether or not Mr. Price is not barred from competition. We are happy 
to be able to allay their fears by informing them that Mr. Price only 
bought the boat for the younger members of his Club to practice in. We 
know that, as we Baw five different members rowing in her one day last 
week. 

Fishing. — The trout streams in Mendocino have all been pretty well 
cleared out, but good sport can be had with coarse fish in the Russian 
River. TheBe fish rise well to a fly, and are fairly game. They are sweet, 
but terribly bony, each bone being a regular patent choker. ' If Santa 
Cruz had no other attractions for visitors, it would still receive many calls 
at this season of the year from lovers of the gentle sport who go to filch 
the game trout from its well-stocked streams, now that all the waters 
near the city have been fished out completely. Nearly every good trout- 
fly will be found effective in that part of the State.— Why does not one 
of the many Sportsmens' Clubs in this State get up a fishing match ? Our 
English exchanges are filled with reports of such pleasant tournaments 
of that kind, that we imagine they could be introduced here with profit 
to all concerned except the fish. 

Athletic— Meyers and Merrill are accused by the English press of 
having put themselves in the bauds of a pack of gate-money speculators. 
Ab one paper expresses it, the situation is " the catchers' club with Mey- 
ers and Merrill versus the gentlemen of England." Meyers won the quar- 
ter-mile race at the Mosely Harriers' games in 49s., and no question about 
the time. Authorities to the contrary, Lockton ia open to run a 100-yard 
race with Meyers, -^— Cummings is coming to America, and W. G. George 
is too sick to run with Meyers or any one else. 

Baseball. —There is some talk of a series of games alternately at Oak- 
land and the Recreation Grounds between the clubs of the California and 
Oakland Leagues. 



Yachting. Th<' owners nf the AW/.V and the O'Connor have been dis- 
OOJUillfl the olfcima of their yaohta to speed, and their own claims to be 
i red gentlemen. One talks about the other running away to avoid 
a challenge, and after having been beaten in a race for $1,000 wants to 
Bail fort a dinner. Btia opponent talks back about Silver services and 
$10,000 checks, and finally proposes a three-cornered race with the Chispa 
as the odd boat. Then "there is a gauzy story about the O'Connor being 
kettled, and all of which iroea to show that " outside matches for money, 
as -vas aptly said by the President of the Pacific Yacht Club, " are a de- 
triment to San Francisco's yachting interests."— • A stag party, including 
such ardeut yachtsmen as Mr. Edgar, Mr. Roouey, Mr. Flavin, Hyde, 
Bowie and ** Humphey Smith," filled the Nellie up with provisions last 
Friday, and, after having taken Ray Falk on board as cook, lugged their 
anchor up and aet sail for Santa Cruz. After a terrific engagement with 
Mai de Mar they were safely landed. Pressing business of the utmost 
importance compelled some of the party to return by rail, much as they 
felt hurt at having to lose the delightful pleasure of a second sea voyage. 
Gentlemen who take such risks as this party appear to have done may be 
surprised to hear, but such is the case, that they violate their life insur- 
ance policies. 

SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE & MARINE INS. CO., 

OF NEW ZEALAND. 
Capital 810,000,000- 

CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED. 

Capital 85,000,000. 

STANDARD MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $5,000,000- 

W. OALMIiOHtIC & CO., 
General Agents, 

213 Sansorne Street San Francisco. 

THE AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC BANK, , LIMITED, 

(Incorporated Under the Companies' Statute, 1864), 
42 Collins Street W est Meinour ne . 

Capital. £500.000, in 100,000 £5 Snares. Subscribed Cap- 
ital, £107,500. Duikctors:— David Death, Esq. (Messrs. Beath, Schiess 
& Co.), Chairman; John Whittinghain, Esq. (Messrs. Whittingham Bros.),Vice- 
Chairraan; M. H. Davies, Esq. (Messrs. Dimes & Strongman); Win. Anderson, Esq. 
(Messrs. Win. Anderson & Son); Wm M'Lean, Esq (Messrs. M'Lean Bros. & Ri?g). 
A Third Issue of Ten Thousand Shares is now in progress, a large portion of which 
were forthwith applied for by the existing shareholders. The novel feature of op- 
tional payments makes this form of investment equally available for the capitalist 
and tor the man of moderate means, for the clerk or the artisan, and hence the 
Share List is representative of all classes. HENKY CORNELL, 

July 16. Manager. 

ST. IGNATIUS COLLEGE, 

Corner Hayes Street and Van Ness Avenne. 

Literary and Scientific Department, 
RE-OPENS MOKDAT, AUGUST 1, 1SS1. 

(July 2.) 

ST. MARY'S HALL, 

BENICI A, CALIF ORNIA. 

BP" This Collegiate (Protestant) SCHOOL FOR YOUXO LADIES will re-open 
August 4th. For Catalo<rue3, address 
July 10. REV. L. DELOS MANSFIELD, A.M., Roctor. 

PROF. D. SPERANZA, 

Italian Musical Institute, or Sun Francisco, 30 Post street. 
Sing Lessons, in Classes, every day from 4 to n p.m. fur Ladies, and from 8 to 9 
every evening for Gentlemen. July 16. 

' ANNUAL MEETING. 

The Regular Annual Meeting of the Boston Con. Mining 
Co. will bo held at the office of the Company, Room Vfo. - r >. No. 330 Pine street, 
San Frandaoo, California, on TUESDAY, the 19th dav of July, 1881, at the hour of 
1 o'clock P.M., for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve during the 
ensuing year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. F. E. LL'TY, Secretary. 

Office— No. 830 Pine street, Room No. 6, S. F. Cal. [July 16. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Spring Valley Water Work**. Nan Francisco, Jnly 7. lSsi... 
Tiie Annual Meeting of the stockholders ol the Spring- Taller Water Works, 
for the election of Trustees for the ensuing /ear, wflJ be held at the ofluoof the 
Company, 516 California street, nn WEDNESDAY, July 20th, 1881, at 12 M. 

July a WM. NORMS. Secretary. 

HIGHLAND SPRINGS, 

LAKE COUNTY. CALIFORNIA. 

This popular Summer Resort for families and Invalids 
is now open to receive guests for the season. 
The Springs arc situated at an altitude of 1,700 feet above sea level; and for 
natural beauty "f BOenery, healthful climate, banting and fishing, arc unsurpassed 
in the State. The surrounding forests and valley arc' particularly inviting to camp- 
eis, who will be specially entertained at 

The waters have produced many wonderful cures in the following diseases: I>ys- 
pepsia. Paralysis, Erysipelas, Rheumatism. Sciatica Liver and 
Kidney. Bronchitis, Pulmonary Complaints in their early stages, Gen- 
eral Debility, and a never-failing remedy f->r Chills and Fever. 

RATES, including Mineral Baths, $10 per week. CHILDREN under six years 
of age. and SERVANTS, half price. 

og board for two munths or more will be allowed a liberal discount. 
Direct route by San Rafael, 7 A.*., connecting with S. F. and N. P. R. R. to Clo- 
verdale, thence by stage te the Spring. 

For further particulars, address MRS. J. C. GOODS. 
Junet. Hi ghland S prings^ 

"notice. 

For the- T«ry hest photographs go to Bradley A Bulofson's, 
In an Elevator, 439 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 16, 1881. 



TRUSTWORTHY TESTIMONY. 

Some Vital Facts Concerning the Welfare of the Commu- 
nity made Public— What Calif ornians Say, and How their 
Statements are Confirmed. 

[San Francisco Chronicle.] 

No fact has been made more plainly manifest daring the past few 
years than the important effect which climatic changes have upon the 
constitutions of American people. The steady-going habits of Europe 
tend to longer lives, but the influence of European climate is towards ap- 
oplectic and other similar diseases. On the other hand, the bustling hab- 
its of the American people necessarily tax the nerve centers and other im- 
portant portions of the body, while severe and sudden changes of the at- 
mosphere add still more to the difficulties to be overcome. 

San Francisco, as well as all cities in this and more southern latitudes, 
is especially subject to these diificulties, and the necessity for the utmost 
care, particularly at this season of the year, is clearly manifest to every- 
one who stops to reflect. These facts are espeuially true with reference to 
the human kidneys and liver, and the alarming increase of Bright's dis- 
ease and all minor Kidney difficulties has caused this subject to be a 
theme of almost universal conversation. Knowing these facts, and in or- 
der that our readers might be more thoroughly informed upon the subject, 
a representative of this paper has taken pains to collect some new and 
important data, which is herewith presented: Having learned of a re- 
markable illustration of the subject under consideration, a call was made 
upon Mrs. N. H. D. Mason, at 37 Liberty street, who, upon being ques- 
tioned, said : 

" For a long time my daughter had suffered with Alhumaria, and she was treated 
by the best physicians in this city and in Oakland, but tbey failed to afford her any 
relief. When odema oi the lower extremities set in we were in despair, and consid- 
ered her disease incurable; in fact we felt that her case was utterly hopeless Think- 
ing that a change of climate might in some degree alleviate her sufferings, and being 
the only remaining effort that 1 could make in her behalf, I started with her for 
Southern California. While on the steamer we met with a Dr. Showerman, of New 
York, who earnestly recommended the use of \\ arner's Safe Kidney and Liver Cure 
for my daughter's disease, and told of several remarkable cures that had come under 
his observation in the East from its use. Although strongly opposed to the use of 
proprietary medicines, and having but little faith in their efficacy, I was persuaded 
by the doctor's faith in this remedy to at least give it a trial. She commenced to im- 
prove after taking the first three bottles, and from that time on her improvement 
was rapid, until we now consider her cured. Her general health is now excellent, 
and 1 feel that too much cannot be said in favor of this remarkable remedy, which 
has done so much for her. At this point of the interview a young lady of bright and 
animated appearance entered the room, and addressed a few words to Mrs. Mason. 
After her departure Mrs. M. said: "That was mj daughter, who was once an inva- 
lid; does she look very sick now?" The reporter expressed his surprise that a per- 
son once so hopelessly ill could ever present such a fresh and healthy appearance, 
hut was assured that such was the case. " Do you feel, Mrs. Mason, that you owe 
her recovery entirely to the use of this remedy ?' "1 do, most assuredly. I do not 
think she could have lived six months bad 1 not used it; and so great Is my faith in 
it that 1 unhesitatingly recommend it to all who are in any degree sufferiug f rom 
kidney or liver complaint. 

A call was then made on Mr. C. A. Page, No. 1305 Leavenworth street. 

** I understand, Mr. Page, that yon have had some experience regarding the ef- 
fects of our climate upon the kidneys and liver. Can you give any information on 
the subject?" "Yes, sir; 1 have suffered severely from an affection of the kidneys 
and bladder, and 1 have no hesitation in stating the facts. As the world grows 
wiser, people learn that they have kidneys and that they must take care of them. 
This climate renders us liable to constant colds, and a cold will certainty affect the 
kidneys if they are at all weak. Three years ago 1 was taken sick with pains in my 
back, loins and kidneys. The doctors pronounced it Sciatica and treated mefor that 
disease; but when I commenced to pass gravel they decided that it was kidney and 
bladder difficulty. Two years ago I was in the French Hospital in this city, and had 
the operation of Lithotripsy performed, gravel and fungus being taken from me at 
that time. I have consulted with the best physicians and visited all the mineral 
springs, but nothing gave me any permanent relief. I suffered continual pain; I 
have spent over $4,<KK) in doctors fees and traveling expenses, but all the time 
the disease seemed to be making progress and gettiDg a stronger hold on me. My 
weight was reduced from 3S5 to 120 pounds. A friend knowing my condition advised 
me to try Warner's Safe Kidney and Liver Cure. Anxious to get relief, if nothing 
more, I concluded to try it. Two days after commencing it 1 experienced decided 
relief and continued to grow better from that time." " Then you think you owe 
your present health to this cure?" "Yes, sir. It has done more for me than all the 
doctors or springs combined. I consider it the greatest medicine of the age for Kid- 
ney and Bladder difficulty. ** 

The next person visited was Mr. Charles E. Eurgan, No, 1211 Broadway, who said: 
" For six years my wife has been troubled with derangement of the kidneys. She 
was all the time steadily growing u orse, and at times was completely prostrated. 
Her limbs bad become stiff, and the desire for natural relief was as often as every 
ten minutes. For the last ten months her sufferings have been beyond description, 
and she has often prayed to die. I have employed six different physicians during 
this time, some of them the most prominent in this city, but they could give her no 
help. One day I found a pamphlet of Warner's Safe Remedies in my front yard, and 
took it in to my wife. She had formerly lived in Albany, N. Y., and recognized some 
of the names attached to the testimonials in it. She thought she would like to try 
the medicine, and so I got her a bottle of Safe Kidney and Liver Cure, and also a 
bottle of Safe Nervine. It took three doses of Nervine the first night to put her to 
sleep, the next night only one. The Safe Kidney and Liver Cure has relieved her so 
much that she can now sleep all night without taking anything. She has taken 
three bottles of Kidney and Liver Cure, and now feels perfectly well, although she will 
continue to use it for some time to completely eradicate the disease from her system. 
I feel that the results of such a wonderful cure should be known to the thousands 
throughout the land that are suffering from Kidney and Liver Complaint, and any 
one suffering from such complaint, or wishing to kuow more of the results of this 
remedy, is at liberty to call upon me, or address me on the subject, and I will cheer- 
fully teU them all it has done for my wife." 

Mr. J. L. Knapp, of Santa Clare, said: "I was taken sick with catarrhal or acute 
inflammation of the bladder. My sufferings were intense, and I was often obliged 
to get up from ten to fifteen times during the night, when my agony would be so 
great that 1 was almost bent double. I employed the best medical aid, both homeo- 
pathic and allopathic, but was pronounced by all incurable. They said I could not 
live lontr, and I thought myself that my time on earth was drawing to a close, and 
gave up all hopes of recovery. My son in St. Louis, knowing how sick I was, sent 
me some papers containing reports from several of the St. Louis leading physicians 
and testimonials from a number of citizens concerning the cures resulting from the 
use of Warner's Safe Kidney and Liver Cure, and urged me to try it. I got some of 
the medicine and immediately commenced its use. After taking a few bottles I 
found myself rapidly improving, until I can now say I am cured." " What do your 
physicians say about your recovery?" "Only a short time ago I met Dr. Carpenter 
and said to him, ' What do you think of the effect of Warner's Safe Kidney and 
Liver Cure ? He answered, * I think that medicine one of a thousand the way it has 
acted in your case.' " 

But one conclusion can be drawn from the above facts by any fair-minded individ- 
ual. That conclusion must Irs that while Kidney and Liver difficulties are so alarm- 
ingta increasing, still there is i safe and certain means by which they can be avoided; 
or, having been contracted, a way by which they can positively be cured. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

INSURANCE AGENCY. 
& 324 California Street, San Francisco, 



Fire Insurance. 



TEUTON1A of New Orleans. 

BERLIN-COLOGNE of Berlin. 

LACONFIANCE of Paris. 

DWELLING HOUSE UNDERWRITERS 

of New York, 

LION INSURANCE CO of London. 

THE FIRE INS. ASSOCIATION (Limited) 
of London, England. 



GIRARD of Philadelphia. 

NEW YORK CITY INS. CO of N. Y. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

REVERE of Boston. 

LA CAISSE GENERALS of Paris. 

WATERTOWN of New York. 

ST. PAUL of St. Paul 

Marine Insurance. 

PARIS UNDERWRITING ASSOCIATION of Paris. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

LA FONC1ERE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY of Paris. 

Capital Bepresented $27,000,000. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

W. L. CHALMERS, Z. P. CLARK, J. C. STAPLES, 
Special Agents and Adjusters. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

O rganized 1864 . 

Principal Office 406 California Street, S.F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital (Paid Up in U. S. Gold Coin) $300,000.00 

Re-Insurance Reserve $174,989 69 



Assets January 1, 1881 S 639,147.88 

Surplus for policy holders 624,677.17 

Premiums, since organization 8,621,232.23 

Losses, since organization 1,635,202.84 

OFFICERS: 

J. P. HOUGHTON President I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary. 

L. L. BAKER Vice-President. J R. H. MAG1LL General Agent. 

Directors of the Home Mittfal Insurance Co.:— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, J. L. 
N. Shepard, John Currey, J. F. Houghton, W. T. Garratt, C. C. Burr, J. S. Carter, 
Charles Belding, D. W. Ea rl. July 10. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, 

84 0,647,942 . 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co., of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

XtOBEJtT DICKSOX, Manager. 
W. XjALXE SOOKJBB, Agent and Attorney. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building:. 
[October 11. | 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY, 

Of San Francisco, California. 



Fire and Marine Established 1871. 

We are also Agents of the Following Companies: 
New Ham pshire Fire Insurance Co., of Manchester. N. H. 

Assets January 1st, 1881 $585,334 20. 

Pacific Fire Insurance Company, of New York. 

Assets January 1st, 1S81 §722,319 53. 

United Assets of Company and Agencies 81,673,930 27 

__ Board of Directors: 

"peter Donahue, Richard Ivers. D. Callaghan, Dr. C. F. Buckley, R. Harrison, Jas 
Irvine, L. Cunningham, M. Maybluni, George O. MeMullin, H. H. Watson, C D 
O'SuIlivan, H. W. Seale. F. Ames, A. J. Bryant, H. Dimond. 

A. J. BRYANT President | RICHARD IVERS Vice-President 

CHARLES H. CUSHINQ Secretary. 

Office: 218 and 220 SANSOHE STREET, S. F. 

FIRST-CLASS RISKS ARE SOLICITED. April 23. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $7,600,000 

Cash Assets 1,709,976 

Cash Assets in United States 775,003 

BALFOIR. G1THRIE «S CO., General Agents, 
March 20. 316 California Street, San Eranciseo. 

PHENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London. Eng., Estab'dl782 Cash Assets, 85,266,372.35. 

BRITISH AMERICA "ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab d 1833 Cash Assets, £1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd 1 851 Cash Assets, 81,357,326,39. 

BUTLER A- HiLDAX, 
General Agents for Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

[July 10.1 



July 16, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SEEKING REST. 

Oh ye that fare amid these hreathlesa places, 

Spending foot muIi 'twuct ftotoryand mart, 
Ye whcekt qnlok eyes ami pale and ea^er faces 

Reveal the restless heart. 
What are ye seeking in your fever'd labor, 

That knows no pause thro' all the crowded week, 
Each for himself, no man for hia neighbor, 
What is it that >v Mflkl 
"Oh, Bime seek bread — no more— life's mere subsistence, 
And somo seek wealth and ease— the common quest, 
And some seek fame that hovers in the distance ; 
But all are seeking rest, 
"Our temples throb, our brains are turnincr, turning. 
Would God that what we strain at were possess'd ; 
God knows our souls are parch'd and black with yearning ; 
God knows we faint for rest." 



THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND THE FENIAN 
PRESS. 

We have from the first wondered why, if the Government thought 
it rik'ht to institute the Freiheit prosecution at the instigation of Berlin, 
they did not themselves instigate the Government of the United States to 
deal with the Irish World and similar utterances. Articles are written 
inciting to the commission of destructive outrages in Eugland, and money 
is subscribed to pay the expenses. The policy of the step which the 
British Government has taken depends upon two considerations. Is the 
American Government likely to be moved to suppress or prosecute the 
offensive journals? If so. is the offense of which we complain likely to 
be abated in consequence ? We should be inclined to doubt very strongly 
whether either of these questions can be answered satisfactorily. It 
seems extremely improbable that the American Government will be al- 
lowed, either by tradition or policy, to meddle with the Irish -American 
press. An overt preparation of an expedition it would no doubt put down, 
as they have done before. But there is no talk of an expedition, and 
Mr. Gladstone has expressly defined the object of the application to the 
United States to be "the incitements of the public press." With the 
press, we repeat, it is more than doubtful whether the United States 
Government will venture to interfere. The brutalities of Mr. O'Donovan 
R-ossa and the incendiary talk of the Irish World do not strike Ameri- 
cans as being of importance. Their connection with any actual outrage 
in England or Ireland is too remote and beyond strict evidence for them 
to be inclined, or perhaps even competent, to take legal cognizance of 
them. It is not necessary to Bay anything of the electoral influence of 
the Irish. That consideration may or may not be present to the Ameri- 
can Secretary, but we need not assume that it must be at the bottom of 
the politely cold and formal reply which we may by-and-by expect from 
Washington. Let us go a step further. If the Irish World were com- 
pelled by a prosecution, or an apprehension of one, to be a trifle leas vio- 
lent and less direct in its incitements, that would not put a stop to what- 
ever mischief there may be in the machinations of the worse kind of Irish 
across the water. If there are miscreauts in America who contemplate 
outrages in England against particular individuals, to some of whom, as 
Mr. Gladstone said, "considerable prominence is given," they will not be 
deterred because their favorite newspapers are obliged to pitch their key 
a little lower. It would be far wiser to take as little notice of all this 
ugly froth as we do of Mr. O'Donovan Bossa's or Mr. Healy's tremen- 
dous promises of what they would do to the Chief Secretary if only he 
would " go out " with them. In short, we wish that the Government had 
followed the sound principle in all such things of "letting it alone." — 
Pall Mall Budget 

THE ELECTRIC RAILWAY AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE. 

Ever since the early days of electrical science the aim of all elec- 
tricians has been to discover some means of utilizing the enormous force 
which can be developed by electricity, and an impetus was given in this 
direction by the construction of powerful dynamo-magoetic machines for 
the purpose of the electric light. Naturally the first thought was to 
transmit the power thus generated to machinery, which could thus be 
worked at a considerable distance; and following this came the idea of 
locomotion by electricity. Dr. Siemens, whose electrical researches are 
well known, has long thought of employing these machines for working 
elevated railroads, and in the Summer of 1879 the model of an electric 
railway was Bhown at the Berlin Exhibition similar to that exhibited dur- 
ing the past few weeks at the Crystal Palace. The electrical force is gen- 
erated by a stationary engine at one end, and the rails themselves are 
used as conductors of the electricity. The car itself is the connecting 
link, and contact can be made or broken at pleasure by a lever in charge 
of the guard. This communicates through a wire brush with a central 
rail, insulated by being supported on wood blocks. Through this rail the 
current is Bent from the primary machine. When contact is made the 
electrical circuit, being complete, sets in motion a small dyuamo- machine 
beneath the car, and this in turn moves the wheels. The current passes 
away through the tires of the wheels to the exterior rails, whence it is con- 
veyed by a wire back to the primary machine. The railway at the Crys- 
tal Palace is exhibited by the Society Anonyme d'Electricite" of Brussels, 
is situated on the upper terrace, and is circular, being about 300 yards 
long. The engine draws three carriages, containing eighteen passengers, 
at the rate of ten miles an hour. Dr. Siemens has also constructed 
another railway between Lichterfeldt, a suburban station of Berlin, and 
the Military Academy. It is about a mile and a half in length and is 
working successfully, the time occupied in the transit being about ten 
minutes. In a country abounding in waterfalls the expense of working 
such a railway would be reduced to a minimum, as water-power could be 
used for setting the primary or stationary engine in motion. 



THE RETALIATORY TOAST. 

A subscriber, who read the Orange and Ribbon toasts last week, says 
that the commonest toast of the Ribbonmen is as follows: "Here's to 
King William in the pillory, and the devil pelting him with leprehauns." 
The leprehaun is a little fairy who is supposed to appear in dykes, mend- 
ing shoes, and clad in crimson. It is said to have casks of money buried 
in the country, and the name is used as an epithet of contempt by the 
peasantry. 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE -UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds.— BBtebllstaed in 1S61.— -Non. 416 ami 
418 California stroot, Oub Capital, 0760,000 In Gold Coin. Fair Kates! 
Prompt Settlement of Loses!) BoUd Security I ! DIRECTORS.— J. Mora Moss, 
Moses Holler, J. O. KMriil^e, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Daniel Meyer, Adam 
Grant, A. E. Sabatio, Charles Kohler, E. L. Goldstein, liartlett Doe, I, Lawrence 
Pool, A. Weill, I. Stoinhart. N. B. Stone, Wallace fcverson, A. B. Phipps, Samuel 
Hort, H. C. Parker, N. Q. Kittle, Joseph Brandenstein, W. M. Hoajj, Nicholas 
Luning-, James Moltltt, John Parrott, J. IJaum, M. D. Sweeney, Gustavo Touchard, 
George C. Hickox, J. H. Freeman, John Conly, J. H. Baird, Win. Sctaolle. Charles 
Bauni, J. G. Kittlo, Benjamin Brewster, Isaac L. Requa. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 
Chari.bs P. Havbn , Secret ary. Gso. T. Bqhbn, Surveyor. Nov. 6. 

THE MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, ENGLAND. 

[ESTABLISHED 1836,] 

"Whole Amount of Joint Stock and Guaranteed Capital. .$5,000,000. 

Whole Amount of Capital paid up 000,000. 

Cash Assets December 31 , 1876 3,710,000. 

The undersigned have been duly authorized to issue Policies at current rates on 
Freight and Shipments to or from England, Europe, New York, Japan, China, Aus- 
tralian Colonies, Sandwich Islands, and Northern Coast Ports. If desired, policies 
made payable at port of termination. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., Agents, 

Aug. 10. 218 California street. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSUR. CO. OF BOSTON. 

Has transacted tbe business of Life Insurance for nearly 
thirty-flve years. Its assets amount to over Fotjrtbbn Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Ohlt Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 2-1. j 328 Montgomery street. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia* 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction . 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ, A 'jnt, 225 Sansome st., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital 85,000,000.— Agents: Balfonr, Guthrie A Co., No. 
^ 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



THOMAS PRICE'S 

ASSAY OFFICE AND CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 

524 Sacramento Street, San Francisco. 

Deposits of Bullion received, melted into bars, and returns 
made in from twenty-four to forty-eight hours. 
Bullion can be forwarded to this office from any part of the interior by express, 
and returns made in the same manner. 

Careful Analysis made of Ores, Metal, Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, etc 
Mines examined and reported upon. Consultations on Chemical and Metallurgica 
questions. March 20. 

A. F. KNORP 

Manufactures to Order 
OFFICE AND LIBRARY FURNITURE. 

Stores and Offices Fitted TJp and Finished in Any Style from 

Original Designs. 

Brackets, Monldlutrs and Mouse Finish. 

411 MISSION STREET, 

April S3, (mechanics' Kills) up stairs. 

[Established Nov., 1878.] 
SEASON OF 1881-82. 

FRAZER'S DANCING ACADEMY, 

105 Post Street. 

Opening for the Reception of Pupils Monday . July 1 1 , 1881 . 

Thorough revolution in the system of takingCLASS Pupils. PERFECTION in 
the art of Round and Square Dances GUARANTEED, 
Geutlemen 815. I Ladies 88. 

PERFECTION in the art of Modem Round Dances only, 

Geutlemeu 810. I Ladies 88 SO 

Regardless of the number of lessons required, whether it be one month or one yiar. 

Circulars giving full particulars mailed on application, or can be had at W. A. 
FREY'S store, 107 Post street, under the Academy, on and after June 14th. 

Q£g~ Private Tuition a SPECIALTY, as heretofore. For terms see Circular. 

f£g- For Children see Circular. [June 25.] J. WILLIAM FRAZER. 

DANCING ACADEMY, 

IN RED MEN'S BUILDING, 
No. 320 Post Street Opposite. Union Square. 

PROF. O. A. LUNT respectfully announces that his new Academy, No. 390 Poa 
street, is now open (or Juvenile and Evening Classes. Office Hours, for Terms, etc., 
10 A.M. to 12 M., and 1 to 6 P.M. March 12. 

CALIFORNIAN AND EUROPEAN AGENCY 

REMOVED TO 
16 MONTGOMERY AVE5TE. 

E. J. JACKSON .....San Francisco 

MESSRS. BAILEY, WILSON * CO London and J.ew \ork 

(July 2.) 

C^X a— CrOfi per day at home. Samples worth f-*> free. -^ 

!?0 TO O.J U Address Simsox A Co., Portland. Maine 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 16, 1881. 



THE PRESIDENTS CONDITION. 
6. We were a little petulant last week about the condition of the 
President— and it was natural, for the petulancy was born of the contra- 
dictory medical reports which were flashed over the wires. Writing at 
the present time, we have every hope that Mr. Garfield will speedily re- 
cover. We have a fouler detestation than ever of the crime that pros- 
trated him, and pray fervently that the President may soon be on his legs 
again. We believe, in saying this, that we express the feelings of the 
nation, which abhors cant, and only looks forward to the assured conva- 
lescence of Mr. Garfield as a just excuse for a national holiday. If it 
were not a development of national love, it would be almost absurd to 
chronicle the affection with which we hang on to the slightest bulletin re- 
garding the President's condition. And we does not mean the San Pran- 
cisco Hews Letter, or America in toio. "We" means the world. Men get 
up at daylight in search of their morning newspaper, and the first thing 
they turn to is the telegraphic bulletin regarding the President. Few of 
us in California ever saw him, but when he gets well he will probably 
give us the same chance that President Grant did, at Belmont, to get 
hold of his fist; and if his wrist does not ache before the last Californian 
has passed out of the reception-room, he muBt have an arm like the hind 
leg of a mastodon. There is an excuse thiB week for levity, in writing 
about the President, because everybody feels that he is going to get well, 
and that his wound is not mortal. That God may grant that it may be 
so, is the silent wish of every good man's heart in this world. In the dis- 
patches this week, it was stated that the President asked if it was true 
that the Catholic priests had been saying MaBs for him, and whether the 
Masses were ordered or spontaneous ? Why, bless your old Baptist soul, 
President James A. Garfield, don't you know that there is not a Jew, 
Catholic, Protestant, Unitarian, Universalist, or any other "ist," that 
hasn't asked God to grant your recovery? All that California wants is 
to see you get well, and to aee you after you get well. Our average opin- 
ion as to what ought to be done with your assassin is that it would be a 
merciful act — a genuine act of clemency, in fact — to board him with a hu- 
mane family of hyenas, and wait till the hyenas got hungry. 

THE NORTH POKE. 
Restless and ever-advancing science has decreed that the discov- 
ery of the Noith Pole, and the solving of the mysteries which Burround 
it, ai e imperative necessities of the nineteenth century. Ever since Sir 
John Franklin and his gallant companions sacrificed their hives to this 
end, expedition after expedition has started on the same errand, and the 
adventurous spirits of all nations have vainly risked, and in many — far 
too many cases — lost their lives in endeavors to bring back definite and 
well-authenticated information of the exact locality and geographical at- 
tributes of this much searched-for Pole. The whaling bark Thomas Pope 
has just brought the laiest news from the Arctic regions, and her (?) log 
records the meeting with and speaking of the bark Progress. Prom the 
captain of this vessel, Capt. Maillard, it was learnt that the natives had 
seen the Mount Wollaston and Vigilant, the two long missing whalers. 
From information gained from this source, it seems that both vessels have 
been stove-in, and that their crews have perished. The last that was 
seen of those vessels was in October, lb79, when the ill-fated crafts parted 
company with the Helen Mar. Two days after they were last sighted, the 
Eden Mar took on board the crew of the abandoned bark Mercury, 
There seems just a faint hope that some of the crews of\the missing 
whalerB may have managed to reach the Jeannette. The Thomas Pope 
brings no news of Gordon Bennett's vessel. And now comes the question 
as to whether, instead of individual efforts like Mr. Bennett's, the efforts 
of single nationB or societies, which have too often consisted in half-pro- 
visioned and patched-up old hulks like the Eodgers, it is not time that the 
civilized nations of the world should unite in the common cause of science, 
and tit out such a perfectly equipped and amply provisioned fleet as 
Bhould either discover the North Pole or show (if such a showing is neces- 
sary) what a sad waste of valuable lives and material the further search 
with inadequate means will prove. Until such an international expedi- 
tion is decided upon, we are of opinion that the " North Pole " will only 
prove a loadstone to draw brave spirits to destruction, and furnish stay- 
at-home philosophers with ground upon which to build up theories which 
probably have no foundation in facts. 

THE IRISH-AMERICAN AGITATION. 
Th© Irish agitation is simmering down. There is nothing in it after 
all, except bubbles. If it had not been for American dollars, the Land 
League would have collapsed long ago, and the agitation has been kept 
up in this country simply as a means tor influencing local politics. Does 
any one imagine that Judge Toohey, for example, or Colonel Tobin, or 
the young and aspiring Sullivan, careB anything about Ireland ? "We can- 
not think such an idiot is to be found in San Prancisco, but they do care 
for the Irish vote. This is where their policy comes in. Every aspiring 
politician thinks it prudent to "say a good word for Ireland," and en- 
deavors to impose upon the phenomenal verdancy of Pat, on matters per- 
taining to " the ould sod." This thing has gone quite far enough, and it 
is about time the ignorant dupes of political sharpers and charlatans were 
warned to button up their breeches' pockets and refuse any more money. 
Once let the supplies be stopped this side, and it will be astonishing with 
what rapidity the Irish leaders will adjust their differences with the 
British Government. The sudden advent of the comet did not produce 
hah* the sensation which this course would. Ireland would become paci- 
fied, from Cape Clear to the Giant's Causeway, rents would be paid, the 
doctrine of wholesale confiscation would be denounced from the altars, 
and, just to keep old memories green, the Ribbon and Orange factions 
would declare war and sustain the national character for folly and 
fanaticism. 

When a lobster takes hold of a swimmer's toe h£ does it with eclat. — 
Boston Transcript. i 



HE WEPT ! ! ! 

During the dark, anxious hours which succeeded the attempted assassin- 
ation of the President, there was one little glimmer of humor that waB 
far more amusing than the antics of the best circus clown that ever trod 
the sawdust. The telegraphic dispatches told us that the Vice-President 
wept, and that he showed other symptoms of great tribulation. To the 
calm, close observer this proceeding partook too much of the nature of 
theatrical display. It was one of those little tragic bits which, when 
overdone, becomes a burlesque. Let us look at the facts: President Gar- 
field and "Vice-President Arthur never did maintain close or very friendly 
Bocial relations, and, in addition, in the discharge of his official duties, 
Garfield had incurred the bitter antagonism of the political faction with 
which Arthur trained. Now, this being so, why did Vice-President Ar- 
thur cry? The attempted assassination of the President was a horrifying 
deed, but it was not a sufficient cause to provoke the flood-gates of the 
Vice-President's soul to open — except to let but a pressure of crocodile 
tears. Strong men do not boil over in this sloppy way. Sometimes there 
are occasions in men's checquered lives when the brain reels, when the 
heart-strings are torn with bitter anguish, when the very sun of life seems 
to have gone down forever, and the atmosphere is that of hopeless despair. 
At times of this kind men do cry. Away in the recesses of their private 
chamber their tears and souls come forth like a mountain torrent, the 
mental strain ib relieved, and the maniac's cell or the suicide's grave 
avoided. - It is not, therefore, reasonable to suppose that it was sympathy 
for the stricken man which made Arthur weep, and it would be equally 
absurd to suppose that he wept because he and hiB party associates, 
Conkling, Piatt & Co., were harshly criticised in connection with the at- 
tempted murder. The only inference is, that the Vice-President's tears, 
swollen eyes, dejected looks, etc., were intended for effect, and were ex- 
pected to serve as an interesting spectacular drama. 



PRESS REFORM NEEDED. 

Press telegrams are vile rubbish as a rule. Fancy telegraphing every 
day the weight, appearance, etc., of a lunatic who' tried how long he 
could fast, and then telegraphing with equal minuteness how he gorged 
himself after hiB appetite got the better of his will. Yet thiB is all the 
purveyors for the daily press found worth noting for a week in Chicago. 
If any vile crime is committed anywhere, or any brutal remark made by 
a foul-mouthed ruffian, the press telegraphic agent recites the details of 
the crime or repeats the brutal language for the information of the coun- 
try. In this way the public taste is lowered and public morals are cor- 
rupted. To scan*the daily papers one would be apt to think that current 
history was made up of such doings and sayings. This is far from being 
the case. The world is less wicked and corrupt to-day than ever it was, 
but the telegraphic reporters for the press cannot or do not discriminate, 
and evidently think that by recording the achievements of the viler por- 
tions of the community they are presenting a true record of the daily life 
of the people. This is not so, and it is for the daily press to rectify this 
gross abuse. The public buys the daily papers for news, for a record of 
the progress of society and the achievements in every branch of intellect- 
ual, moral and physical activity. They dou't wan't a daily record of the 
stews. This is all they get for their money at present. The remedy 
rests with the conductors of the daily papers. Let them refuse to receive 
the rubbish and garbage of the brothels which the telegraph reporters 
rake up and the thing is done. Intelligent and cultured agents will be 
employed to collect the news and the public taste will be improved. If 
the daily newspaper is to retain its influence as a public instructor it must 
do this. If it does not the weekly presB will supersede it as a popular 
guide and instructor. 

THE CHINESE IN AUSTRALIA. 

The Australian colonies have lately kicked against Irish immigra- 
tion, and have decided, in the language of an old comic song, that "No 
Irish need apply." Now they are threatened with an immense influx of 
Chinese. As labor in these colonies is already low, the depressing effect 
of the arrival of 20,000 coolies cannot but cause much distress and a good 
deal of very just growling among the laboring class. In 1864 John Bay- 
ley Darvall, then Attorney- General of New South Wales, was instru- 
mental in passing a bill charging each Chinaman §50 before landing. 
This had the effect of stopping almost entirely what was even then grow- 
ing into a serious curse to the country. Only a few Chinamen, and those 
of the better class, could afford to land, and whole ship-loads had to re- 
turn without touching dry land. This good law must have lately been 
repealed, and China, with her teeming hordes of half starved slaves, is 
never slow to take advantage of such chances to get rid of herBurplus 
poor. 

HE WOULD AND HE WOULDN'T. 
■When Mayor Ealloch said he had retired from politics, we thought 
he meant it, but now we Bee he did not mean anything of the kind. He 
has been addressing a Sand-lot club, and advised them to preserve their 
organization as the representative of a cause that is pure and holy. This 
is clap-trap, and Mayor Kalloch knows it is. He knows quite well that 
the Sand-lot is the embodiment of ignorance, brutality and crime; and if 
he had not some ulterior object in view he would not have given the ad- 
vice he did. What iB that object? Why is he skirmishing around the 
Sand-lot clubs just at this time, after he had formally taken leave of pol- 
itics? Has he been hired by any of the Bosses to ring in the Sand-lot 
element ? It looks like it. If Mayor Kalloch is out of politics let him 
keep out of them ; if he is in them, let him cast aside his cloak of piety 
and receive the chastisement his acts provoke. 

An education teat should be incorporated in the naturalization laws. 
It cannot have been the intention of Congress to confer all the rights of 
citizenship upon men who are incapable of exercising the franchise intel- 
ligently. If the ignorance of monarchical Europe is to be armed with the 
franchise, it is about time to abolish the public schools, so that native 
Americans could meet the foreign voters upon a common level. To en- 
franchise ignorance and maintain public schools is an illogical and con- 
tradictory policy. In their own countries, nine tenths of the foreign citi- 
zens of the United States never would have been entrusted with the fran- 
chise, nor should they be here until they had qualified themselves for it 
by education and a knowledge of the principles of the Government. Mere 
residence is no proof of fitness to vote. 



July 16, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

'Hear the Ort»r!" *■ Wh»l iha d»»il art thon ?" 
' On* 1 1; a', will plaj the dvrll, »w with you." 

' Ha'd a Hinc in his tail ai long as a flail. 
Which mad* him crow boldar and bolder." 



John W. Mackay (so the telegrams Bay) has declined to contribute to 
what in known as tho " Mrs. Garfield Fund," and John W. Mackay is 
most pre eminently, assuredly, positively and directly riyht. If we could 
think of any more emphatic words the* would go right into this para- 
graph. The man who (wasted that he would raise a quarter of a million 
dollars in the twinkling of an eye for Mrs. Garfield is not only an ass, 
but by no possibility can he be a gentleman. The bare idea of atoning 
fur Guitteau 's crime by a bald present of money to the President's wife is 
in inch atrociously bad taste that it calls for the severest criticism. We 
e.ive money to servants as a douceur or a pour boire, but the offer of coin 
to the President, through his wife, v.\u only emanate from the united 
heart of a corrupt ring of politicians, who have persuaded rich but weak 
men to contribute to the fund. The News Letter is second to no paper in 
the land in its loyalty to the President, and there is not one of its many 
writers who does not sympathize with all his strength with Mrs. Garfield 
and with the Peesident. But we say plainly that this contribution busi- 
ness is all wrong, and are willing to bet that every gentleman in the land 
is of the same opinion. 

There were only seven divorce cases on Thursday to be adjudi- 
cated on, so Thursday was comparatively a light day. The causes are 
generally very insufficient, being mainly intemperance, habitual drunk- 
enness, desertion, failure to provide, wife beating, adultery, bigamy, ex- 
treme cruelty, and other trivial provocations which no sensible judge 
ought to regard as a necessity for separating a loving couple temporarily 
out of temper. If a man deliberately poisons his wife and she is only 
saved by the application of a stomach-pump, then there are grounds on 
which a mutual separation might be deemed advisable. If he gets mad 
with her, and under the influence of passing excitement in a moment of 
forgetfulness, and from absence of self-restraint puts more than three 
bullets into her, then it is the duty of a judge to think seriously as to 
whether he ought to permit the wife to continue to live with such an ill- 
tempered husband. But as it is the fashion in this community to kick 
wives round, desert them for somebody else's wife and to have other 
wives in other communities, Judges of the Superior Court will do well 
in future to consider that these little peccadilloes are no substantial 
grounds for divorce. 

In his recent interesting lecture on the Brahmans of India, Dr. 
Scudder described the Brahmanical language as copious, elaborate, flow- 
ing, musical and beautiful, and added : " When Mrs. S. and I wish to 
converse and not be overheard we always go back to this language." No 
doubt the plan answers very well as a general thing, but the Doctor 
should remember that in a cosmopolitan city like San Francisco, where 
all the races of the earth are represented, it would be wise to be careful 
even when "going back" to the elegant tongue of the Brahmans. A 
Hindoo waiter, who had got employment in the Doctor's hotel under pre- 
tense of being a real nigger, sends us the following fragment of table talk 
which he overheard between the learned lecturer and his better half : 
Mrs. S. — " Iff kachu luking-at thatnas tything attbeo thertablea gain, 
Ilepulyor hairyu oldrech." Mr. S. — " Butmideeri wosnoi!." MrB. S. — 
" Ono, ovcorsnot ! Dontorkto meubroot I" The conversation did not 
cease here, but the above will give an idea of what the mellifluous dialect 
of the Brahmans looks like in print. It would hardly be fair to give a 
translation, so we refrain. 

Those of our readers who remember the double-headed, Bingle- 
breasted, four-legged woman, Millie and Christine, which was exhibited 
at Piatt's Hall last year, will be interested to know that the curiosity re- 
ceived apropoBal from a good-looking Mormon the other day in Salt Lake 
City who only had three wives. He was frank enough to say that he 
could afford a couple more, that he liked his spouses to live together, and 
didn't think there was much chance of Millie and Christine ever being 
apart. Millie said he was just too sweet for anything, and Christine said 
he was a nasty, two-headed, polygamous thing. Well, Millie had the 
strongest temperament, so she just lugged Christine off to the nearest 
justice of the peace with her Mormon. But when it came to the mo- 
mentous question Millie shrieked " Yes 1" and Christine bawled " No 1" 
and Millie put her arm round her fiancee, while Christine tried to twist 
round and scratch him. The difficulty was solved by the justice of the 
peace informing the bridegroom that he could not get married because it 
was a divine command that those whom God had joined together no man 
should put asunder. 

Not depending upon the wordy and gaseous telegrams given the 
public through the dailies, the News Letter detailed one of its moat trust- 
worthy Eastern representatives to personally interview the assassin Guit- 
teau. He sends the following telegram, which the unbiased reader must 
acknowledge contains facts hitherto never made public: " Your reporter 
visited Guitteau yesterday, and, finding him in a communicative mood, 
gleaned from him the following important statements: * My idea in shoot- 
ing at Garfield was to hit him. The pistol I shot him with was manufac- 
tured for the express purpose by a gunmaker. In shooting, I closed my 
left eye. I pulled the trigger with my first finger. The explosion made 
quite a noise. I awoke the next morning and found myself under 
restraint. In jail I eat three times a day, masticating my hash, and re- 
fraining from chewing my coffee. I sleep with both eyes closed, and snore 
through my nose.' " 

The smallpox is disappearing at Honolulu, and the Sandwich 
Islands undertakers are as mad as they can be. They propose, however, 
to import two or three thousand badly infected Chinamen, and to stop all 
vaccination on the islands. Twenty-five per cent, are to be reliable, guar- 
anteed lepers, and the rest are to he first-class variola cases. It is hard 
on a really good undertaker that his efforts to make a living should be 
squelched in the bud, as it were. King Kalakaua is fooling round Lon- 
don and neglecting the interests of his constituents shamefully. The 
chief merchants of Honolulu are all undertakers, and if King Kalakaua 
does not import certified cases of cholera, smallpox, leprosy and con- 
tagious diphtheria then it is no good sending royalty on a trip for the 
benefit of the Sandwich Islands. 



We alluded last week to the interesting telegrams about the Presi- 
dents condition. While the subjoined are fictitious, they are about as 
valuable as those we do get; " President Garfield slept this afternoon 
while he was not awake. Dr. Bliss played a game of pedro with the at- 
tendant physicians, and won §7.85. He was heartily congratulated by 
his many friends. The President opened one eye at 3:40 p.m. Toward 
3:41 p.m. he shut it again. No anxiety is experienced by the attendant 
physicians, who are still playing pedro. Dr. Baxter has just lost $2.75, 

and said . The President is sleeping quietly, and breathing 

gently through his left ear. Conkling is in the ante-room with Arthur, 
weeping four quarts an hour. The President has moved the big toe of 
his right foot, which is not considered a bad sign by Dr. Bliss, who has 
just won $4 more. If there is no change in the President's condition, Dr. 
Reyburn will play three more games for $2.50 a side. Everything is quiet 
at the White House, and Dr. Woodward has just sent for a new deck." 

The action of the " moral" instructor of the State's Prison, "a 
party by the name of " Cummings, seems to call for special mention at 
the present time. Relying on the reportB of the daily papers, which are, 
doubtless, closely accurate, it appears that this old apology for insincerity 
had some letters from Governor Perkins — private letters— and actually 
wanted to read them to the Commissioners who are now investigating the 
prison management. Just think of a gentleman offering to read the pri- 
vate correspondence of his patron ; imagine a man with any sense of 
honor, directly or indirectly, even using the name of the man to whom 
he owes his position. Cummings, you are not a gentleman from any 
possible moral aspect, and no jury of twelve men would ever convict you 
of being one ! It is to be regretted that there are so many men holding 
public positions in California who do not seem to have the slightest idea 
of the obligations due to those who have been their benefactors. 

In the recent examination of Judge J. McM. Sbafter before the 
Prison Commissioners, he is reported to have said last Thursday: He had 
sold cattle to meat contractors for the prison. The class of cattle com- 
prised old stags and rejected cows. The stags were good enough for dog- 
meat. He sold them to a contractor named Worden, and had no positive 
knowledge that they were destined for the prison, but supposed so. The 
stags he sold were 66 per cent, cheaper than first-class beef — that is, if the 
contract with the prison called for first-class beef, and the contractor fur- 
nished such cattle as he sold to Worden. The contractor would be 66 per 
cent, gainer on the contract, or would be 66 per cent, below the require- 
ment of the contract. 1 ' This is remarkably candid testimony. 

An item in the papers informs us that "Mrs. Williams, the only 
daughter of the late G. P. K. James, the famous novelist, is spending the 
Summer in Oregon." Such a way of putting it is enough to make the 
lady's distinguished father turn in his grave. The item should have be- 
gun: "The rain was sploshing in the moist land of the Webfeet when a 
solitary horsewoman might have been seen," etc. No matter how incon- 
sequential such a commencement might be, it ought to have been rung in 
somehow as a delicate tribute to the memory of the illustrious author who 
invented, patented and monopolized the "Solitary Horseman," which 
Bince his decease has done such incalculable service for the writers of dime 
novels. 

"Dass last time as I have mit myself to a party gewent," said Mrs. 
Ferkelstecber, " war das ice-cream so verdammt bad bey Misses Nudel- 
fresser, dass ich unable war es zu eaten. Und die cakes waren so sehr 
common und shtale! Mein Gott, ich habe niemals undergestood vy peo- 
ple, ven vey vos a party geben, das Ding nicht square up and up dooen. 
Es ist aber meine oun fault dass wir mit common-people mixen. In fu- 
ture wir proposen only mit high-toned families supper zu taken, und 
meine little daughter soil mit keinen anderen dirty little raggamuffms 
spielen. Folks sind so verdammt vulgar nowadays." 

Does it not strike the average reader who is wading through this 
paragraph, that " commissions " in this State mean patronage, and that 
patronage means steals, and that steals mean rings, and rings mean rot- 
ten, festering, lying, corrupt bands of men who, having sunk to the low- 
est grade of mental indecency imaginable, bind themselves together with 
the insane idea that they are virtue personified ? 

" What is the lowest thing you can think of?" asked one American- 
born gentleman of another this week. And the reply came like a rocket, 
swift and bright: " The lowest thing I can think of is a President of a 
Land League Club, who is a scrub pot-house politician, and who is trying 
to get office on his pretended affection for Ireland." Geewhilikins, how 
true that answer was! 

There is an editor in this city who breaks his leg, as a rule, every 
month. The practice is commended to all tired journalists, as the habit, 
once well formed, insures a rest of at least six weeks every time. We 
don't exactly understand how a man can break bis leg every month and 
be in bed for six weeks, but the application of a little gentle lunacy will 
probably solve the problem. 

John Wilson Guitteau, the brother of the assassin, respectfully re- 
quests the prayers of all Christian people that the darkened understand- 
ing of his brother may be opened. The T. C. respectfully requests the 
prayers of all Christian people that a trap door may be speedily opened 
for Mr. Guitteau, the assassin, which will leave him no under-standing. 

In the contest for the Democratic nomination this week a warm parti- 
san of Mike McGrath was heard to remark that the difference between 
McGrath and Mr. Sam Carusi was that the one was all brains and the 
other one immense bunch of intestines. This habit of making personal 
remarks is very impolite. 

"What made you cross yourself just now?" said a San Francisco 
Police Court attorney to an Irish friend who was passing. " Merely be- 
cause I saw you take off your hat without apparent cause," answered his 
friend, " and I thought the devil must be within a yard of me, and that 
you were paying your respects to your master." 

The next doctored bulletin about the President that may be ex- 
pected is that the wound has been probed, and that the surgeons in at- 
tendance have found two fish-balls and a false tooth, that he swallowed 
after the battle of Gettysburg, when struck by a rebel quill pen. 

The Los Angeles Herald is unusually bright of late. It recently 
contained quite an article about a magnolia that was presented to it by 
the French Consul, and said it was ever so fragrant, and that it was in 
the "sanctum." 



12 



SAN ' FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 16, 1881. 



C. P. R . R. 

Time Schedule, Saturday, June 4, 1881. 

Trains leave, and are due to arrive at, 
San Fran cisco as f ollows: 



LBAVB 
FOR 



DESTINATION. 



ARRIVE 
FROM 



9:30 a.m. 

•3:00 p.m. 

*4.00p.M. 

8:00 A.M. 

3:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
*4:00 p.m. 

9:30 A.M. 

4:30 P.M. 

9:30 A.M. 

8:00 a.m. 
*4:00 p.m. 

8:00 A.M. 
*3:30p.m. 
J8:00a.m. 

9:30 a.m. 

8:00 A.M. 

5:00 p.m. 

9:30 A.M. 
*4:00 p.m. 

8:00 A.M. 
10:00 A.M. 

3:30 P.m. 

5:30 p.m. 

8:00 A.M. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

3:30 P.m. 
*4:00 P.M. 

8:00 A.M. 

3:00 P.M. 

8:00 a.m. 

9:30 A.M. 

3:30 P.M. 
*4:00 P.M. 

3:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
*.* :30 p.m. 
*8:00 a.m. 



Antioch and Martinez.... 



. . . Calistoga and Napa. . . . 



. . j Deming and \ Express 

.. ( East /Emigrant... 

El Paao, Texas 

. . J Gait and ) via Livermore. . 
. . ( Stockton j via Martinez . . . 

.... lone , 

. . . .Knight's Landing 

.... " " (^Sundays only) 

...'.Lo3 Angeles and South 

.Livermore and Niles 



..Madera and Tosemite 

. . Marysville and Chico 

. . Niles (see also Liverm'e & Niles 

( Ogden and 1 Express. 

j East (Emigrant 

. . Redding and Bed BluS 

{Sacramento, \ via Livermore. 
Colfax and V via Benicia.. . . 
Alta j via Benicia 

. Sacramento River Steamers. . 
.San Jose and Niles 



...Vallejo., 



.Virginia City.. 
.Woodland 



.Willows and Williams. . 



3:35 p.m. 
*10:05 a.m. 
*12:35 p.m. 

7:35 p.m. 
11:35 a.m. 

7:35 p.m. 
*10:05 a.m. 

3:35 p.m. 

8:05 A.M. 

3:35 P.m. 

6:05 p.m. 
+12:35 P.m. 

6:05 p.m. 
11:35 a.m. 

3:35 p.m. 

6:05 p.m. 

8:35 a.m. 

3:35 p.m. 
♦12:35 p.m.' 

7:35 p.m. 

4:05 P.M. 
11:35 a.M. 

6:05 A.M. 

7:35 p.m. 

6:05 P.M. 

7:35 P.M. 
11:35 a.m. 
•6:00 A.M. 

4:05 P.M. 

9:35 a.m. 

7:35 p.m. 

3:35 P.m. 
♦10:05 A.M. 
♦12.35 p.m. 
11:35 A.M. 
11:35 a.m. 
♦7:35 p.m. 
♦7:35 p.m. 



Train leaving San Francisco at &:30 a.m. should meet 
Pacific Express from" Ogden " at San Pablo; also Pacific 
Express from "Demin g" at Byron. 



From "SAN FRANCISCO," Daily. 



To EAST OAKLAND— *t6:10, t7:30, t8:30, t9:30, 10:30, 

11:30, 12.30, 1.30, t3:30, |4:30, f5:30, t6:30, 7:00, 8:10, 

9:20, 10.40, *11:45. 

(tRunning through to Alameda, Sundays excepted.) 
To ALAMEDA Direct— 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 

12:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, *7:00, 8:10, 9:20, 

10:40, *11:45. 
To BERKELEY — 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 10:30, 11:30, 1:00. 

3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, ♦6:30. 
To WEST BERKELEY— *6:10, 8:00, 10:00, 12:00, 1:30, 

3:30, 4:30, 5:30, ♦6:30. 

To "SAN FRANCISCO," Daily. 



From Broadway, Oakland -♦5:20, ♦6:00, 6:50,and every 
24th and 54th minute of each hour (excepting 2.24) 
from 7r24 A.M. to 6:f>4 p.m. (inclusive), 8:00, 9:10, i0:30. 

From EAST OAKLAND -*5:10, *5:50, 6:40, t7:44, t8:44, 
t9:44, tl0:44, 11:44, 12:44, 1:44, 2:44, t3:44, +4:44, 
to:44, to:44, +7:50, 9:00, 10:20. 

(tStarting 20 minutes earlier from Alameda, Sundays ex- 
cepted.) 

From ALAMEDA Direct -♦5:00, '5:40,6:25, 7:00, 8:00, 
9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1.00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 
*7:20, S:40, 9:55. 

From BERKELEY— *5:40, ♦6:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 10:30, 
11:30, 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00. 
From WEST BERKELEY— *5:40, *6:30, 8:00, 10:00, 

12:00, 1:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, *6:30. 



Creels Route. 

From SAN FRANCISCO— *7: 15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15, 3:15, 

5:15. 
From OAKLAND— *6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:15 



All trains run daily, except when star (*) denotes Sun- 
daya excepted. 



"Official Schedule Time" furnished by Randolph & 
Co., Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Townb General Superintendent. 



AN ANCIENT TOAST. 

"I drink to one," he said, 
" Whose image never may depart, 
Deep graven on a grateful heart, 

Till memory is dead. 
"To one whose love for me shall last 
When lighter passions long have passed, 

So holy 'tis and true ; 
To one whose love has longer dwelt, 
More deeply fixed, more keenly felt 

Than any pledged by you ! " 
Each guest upstarted at the word, 
And laid a hand upon a sword 

With fiery flashing eye; 
And Stanley said, " We crave the name, 
Proud knight, of this most peerless dame 

Whose love you count so high." 
St. Leon paused, as if he would 
Not breathe her name in careless mood 

Thus lightly to another, 
Then bent his noble head as though 
To give that name the reverence due, 

And gently Baid, "My Mother." 



^^^^"HQRTHEnN^=^^^=^TTVT^TOH^ 


S^s/ 


^BU 


l 


j?fe»- <>RAI L.HOfl.D.'PJ 





BROAD GAUGE. 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing Saturday, J nue 4 fcli, 1881, 
and until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
San Francisco, from Passenger Depot on Townaend 
street, between Third and Fourth streets, as follows: 



Q QQ a.m. daily for San Jose and Way Stations. 
u '" u (Returning, arrives San Francisco 3:36 p.m. 
g3^ Stages for Pescadero (via San Mateo) connect 
with this train only. 



Q O f\ a.m. Sundays only, for San Jose and Way Sta- 
^•"^-' tions. (Returning, arrives S. F. 8:15 P.M.) 



1 (~\ AC\ a.m. daily (Monterey and Soledad Through 
- 1 - yj»^yj Train) for San Jose, Gilroy, (Hollister and 
Tres Pinos), Pajaro, Castroville, Monterey, Salinas, Sol 
edad and Way Stations. (Returning, arrives San Fran- 
cisco 6:00 p.m.) 

6^~ Parlor Cars attached to this train. 

83?" At Pajaro the Santa Cruz Railroad connects 
with this Train for Aptos, Soquel and Santa Cruz. 

%2&~ Stage connections made with this train. (Pesca- 
dero Stages via San Mateo excepted.) 



Q Of \ p. m. daily, Sundays excepted, "Monterey 
"•*-'" and Santa Cruz ExpRE8S"for San Mateo, 
Redwood, Menlo Park, Santa Clara, San Jose, Gilroy 
(Hollister and Tres Pinos), Pajaro, Castroville (Salinas), 
and Monterey. (Returning, arrives S. F 10:02 a.m.) 

g^*At PAJARO the SANTA CRUZ RAILROAD 
connects with this train for Aptos, Soquel and Santa 
Cruz. 

PASSENGERS BY THIS TRAIN 
HOTEL DELMONTE. 



•C i MONTEREY, 

3 (SANTA CRUZ.. 



..7.05p.m.— 3h. 35m. 
.7.26 p.m.— 3h. 56m. 



40 PC p.m. Daily Express for San Jose and Principal 
• AO WayStations. (Returning, arrives S.F. 9:03a.m. 
BSirSundays only this train slops at all Way Stations. 



51 fC p.m. Daily, Sundays excepted, for Menlo Park 
•-L" and Way Stations. (Returning, ar. S.F. 8:10 a.m. 

6Q (~\ p.m. daily, for Menlo Park and Way Stations. 
• 0\J (Returning, arrives San Franciseo 6:40 a.m.) 



SPECIAL BATES 
To Monterey, Aptos, Soquel , Santa Crnz. 

Single Trip Tickets toany of above points. $3. 50 
Excursion Ticbets (Round Trip) to any of 
above points, sold on Saturdays and Sunday 
mornings, good for return until following 

Monday inclusive $5 00. 

SPECIAL ROUND TRIP SEASON TICKETS, 
(Good for return until October 31, 18^1), 

San Francisco to Monterey and return $6 00 

San Francisco to Monterey and Santa Cruz, 
inclusive, and return $7 00. 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 

The well-known " Pacific Grove Retreat" at Monterey 
is now open for the reception of visitors, tourists and 
"campers." This popular resort has been entirely re- 
fitted by its present owners (the Pacific Improvement 
Company) with new furniture, tents, etc. Circulars 
giving full information as to rates, terms, etc., can be 
bad upon application to any " Station Agent," on the 
line of the Central or Southern Paciflc Railroad. 



Also, Excursion Tickets to SAN JOSE and inter- 
mediate points sold on Saturdays and Sunday mornings, 
good for return until following Monday inclusive. 



Ticket Offices— Passenger Depot, Towrsend street, 
and No. 2 New Montgomery street, Palace Hotel. 

A. C. BASSETT, Supt. H. R. JUDAH, A. P. & T. A. 



SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. 

g=gr" Passengers for Los Angeles and intermediate 
points, as also Yuma and all points east of the Colorado 
River, will take the cars of the Central Pacific Railroad 
via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 9:30 A.M. daily (S. P. Atlan- 
tic Express Train). 



Scented Camellias have been produced by 
an Italian gardener, who has been engaged on 
the experiment for years past. Only those flow- 
ers of a pale rose hue possess the perfume, the 
white flowers remaining perfectly scentless. The 
odor is very delicate, and resembles a mixture of 
jonquil and pytbosphorm. A correspondent of 
The Times, London, however, states that be haB 
possessed fragrant camellias for several years, 
given him by a Ghent flower amateur. 



$72 



A week. $12 a day at home easily made. Costly 
Outfit Free. 

Address Tbue & Co., Augusta, Maine. 




Commencing Snnday, April 10th, 1881, 
and until further notice, Boats and Trains will 
leave San Francisco as follows: 



7 1A A.M. daily (Sundays excepted) San Quentin 
I . J. V/ Ferry, foot of Market street, for Cloverdale, 
Guerneville and Way Stations. Stages connect at Santa 
Rosa for Mark West Springs and Sevastopol, at G^yser- 
ville for Skaggs' Springs, and at Cloverdale for Ukiah, 
Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, 
Bartlett Springs and the Geysers. 



3(~\/~\ P. M. daily (Sundays excepted), Steamer 
• V-'V-f "James M. Donahue," Washington street 
Wharf, connecting at Sonoma Landing with cars for 
Sonoma, and at Donahue with train for Cloverdale 
and way stations. Stages connect at Cloverdale for 
Mendocino City and Navarro Ridge. 



SUNDAY EXCURSIONS. 

8 A A.M. Sundays only, Steamer "James M. Don- 
•^" ahue," Washington-street Wharf, for Sonoma, 
Cloverdale, Guernsville and Way Stations. Round Trip 
Tickets, on Sundays, to Sonoma, Si; to Petaluma,$1.50; 
to Santa Rosa, §2; to Healdsburg, $3; to Cloverdale, 
$1 50; to Guerneville, §3. 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Ag 



SOUTH PACIFIC COAST R. R. 

(NEW ROUTE-NARROW GAUGE.) 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing April 4, 1881, Boats and 
Trains will leave San Francisco from Ferry Land- 
, foot of Market street, as follows: 



8<_) f\ A M., Daily, for Alameda, West San Leandro, 
,0\J \y e at San Lorenzo, Russell's, Mount Eden, 
Alvarado, Hall's, Newark, Mowry's, Alviso, Agnew's, 
Santa Clara, San Jose, Lovelady's, Los Gatos, Alma, 
Wright's, Glenwood, Dougherty's Mill, Felton, Big Tree 
Grove, Summit and Santa Cruz. 



3 0A p.m., Daily, for Santa Cruz and all intermcdi- 
• O KJ a te stations. 



4QA p.m., Daily, Sundays excepted, for San Jose 
• Ow an d all intermediate points. 



g^ In Alameda all through trains will stop at Park 
Street and Pacific Avenue only. 

Stages connect at Los Gatoa with S:30 a.m. and 
3:30 p.m. trains for Congress Springs and Saratoga. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 

Sold on Saturdays and Sundays, good until Monday fol- 
lowing, inclusive: To San Jose and return, Si2 50; Santa 
Cruz and return, $5. 

OAKLAND AND ALAMEDA FERRT. 

Ferries and Local Trains leave San 

Francisco for Oakland and Alameda: 

♦6:35—7:35— 8:30— 9:30— 10:30— 11:30a.m. +12.30—1:30- 
30-3:30 4:30-5:30-0:30-7:30—8:30 and 11:30 P.M. 

From Corner Fourteenth and Webster 

Streets, Oakland: *6:00 -*7:00— 8:00— 8:50— 

9:50— 10:50— tll:50A.M. 12:50- -1:50—2:50—3:50—4:50— 

5:50—6:50 and 9:50 p.m. 

From IIi£h street, Alameda— "5:45— *6:45 

-7:45— S:38-9:35-10:35-tll:35 a.m. 12:35—1:35—2:35 

-3:35—4:35—5:35—6:35 and 9:35 p.m. 

t Saturdays and Sundays only. 

* Daily, Sundays excepted. 

Up-Towu Ticket Office, 208 Montgomery street. Bag- 
gage checked at hotels and residences. 

Through trains arrive at San Francisco at 9:35 and 
10:35 a.m. and 6:35 p.m. 



F. W. BOWEN, 
Superintendent. 



GEO. H. WAGGONER, 

Gen. Pass'gr Agent. 



Miss Moseley, a domesuc in a family in 
"West Middlesex, Penn., was supposed to have 
died suddenly a few weeks ago. Her family had 
moved to Missouri previous to her death, and 
Miss Moseley was given a respectable burial by 
her employer. A few days after some friends 
arrived there from Missouri to remove her re- 
mains West, and on opening the coffin it was dis- 
covered the young lady had been buried alive 
while in a trance, and awakened in her grave, 
and turned over on her side. She was lying face 
downward, her hands clenched in her hair and 
her distorted features plainly showing the inten- 
sity of suffering she bad undergone. It was ap- 
parent that in the short interval which muBt have 
enBued between return to consciousness and death 
by suffocation, she had comprehended her condi- 
tion and turning upon her face, had endeavored 
to throw open the lid of the coffin by pushing 
against it with her back. — Elmira Gazette. 



July 16, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 




"The World." the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[By a Trathfnl Penman.] 

The appeal to the United States about Fenian conspiracies to commit 
Binder in RogUod is a false move, which only a Government professedly 
Liberal could have ventured on. The Americans say that they are ready 
to put down any attempts actually made, but that they cannot conde- 
scend to t>otter about men who are so childish as to conspire in public. 
Meantime Russia is on the watch to introduce Russian systems of protec- 
tion into Knyland. Whenever she succeeds in doing this, we can have 
little doubt that Russian outrages will be perpetrated here, so that the 
very cause of the evil will be continued under pretense of stamping it 
out. ^— The workingman — our horny-handed brother— has much to teach 
us. In simplicity, and in the elementary and unsophisticated principles 
of honor especially, his example may refresh the conscience of a conven- 
tional civilization. A manufacturing town, and particularly its mechan- 
ics, in England, owed much to a benevolent local magnate, and resolved 
to offer him a presentation portrait of himself. A hundred guineas were 
subscribed, and a deputation came to London to look for an artist. They 
did not come to terms with one quite bo quickly as might have been 
wished, for it at once appeared that they required a commission of fifty 
per cent, upon their order. In other words, the guileless deputation. 
wanted to get their hundred -guinea portrait for fifty guineas, and to ab- 
Borb the rest. One artist declared himself willing to give the Rons of toil 
twenty-five per cent, of the money due to him, but they austerely refused 
to take less than the half.— We spoke the other day of the terrible fas- 
cination that the freedom and comforts of America are exciting over the 
population of Europe. Switzerland is in consternation at the steady in- 
crease of emigrants, Germany is legislating against it, and now Sweden 
is gloomily anticipating depopulation. Out of a population of 4,000,000 
inhabitants, 35,000 have left for New York within a year. Nor are Nor- 
way and Denmark much better off. In the former, out of 2,000,000, 
10,000 have gone, and Denmark, with the same total, has lost 6,000. So- 
cialism in Sweden has taken the disagreeable form of incendiarism, and 
malicious fires have become terribly frequent.^— It must be a sincere 
satisfaction to the languishing and unhappy nobleman, Orton, to know 
that the somewhat unfortunate result of his efforts to translate himself 
into a Baronet has not prevented two new aspirants from putting in a 
claim to the family honors. One of these candidates was, we are told, 
lately interviewed by the Duke of Sutherland in America, and he is pro- 
nounced by an eminent legal authority to be either the real man or an 
impostor. This oracular opinion, especially the latter portion of it, is 
probably not far wide of the mark ; but it will be pleasant if we are to 
be favored with two new Tichborne trials. It is a pity that the worthy 
Kenealy is no more. Considering the immense success he commanded 
with a single swindler, what an unbounded triumph might he not have 
achieved could he have presented to his admirers a trinity of Tichbornes 
— three persons and oue Baronet — defrauded of their rights by an infa- 
mous conspiracy of Jesuits, jurymen and judges!— Major-General 
Strelbitsky has just published a pamphlet which might be studied with 
advantage by the simpletons who believe that Russia is cruelly wronged 
by those who accuse her of seeking to aggrandize her territory. The au- 
thor of this pamphlet, who is an officer of the staff, and who is a great 
favorite of the present Czar, Btates that at the accession of Alexander II. 
the Russian Empire covered an area of 18,842,961 square versts (the verst 
is not quite three-quarters of a mile), of which 12,878,174 versts were in 
Asia, 4,801,087 in Europe, and 1,163,700 in America ; while on the 1st of 
January last the total had been increased by 655,228 square versts, to 14,- 
652,200 in Asia and to 4,845,979 in Europe. _ This is exclusive of the 601,- 
000 square versts in Kuldja, concerning which negotiations were in pro- 
gress when that calculation was made, and of the Turcoman territory 
since annexed by Skobeleff ; but even without them the conquests made 
during the late reign exceed those of any previous period since Peter the 
Great. The conquests are in reality more important than they seem, for 
the total of 65,228 square versts represents the difference between 1,883,- 
992 gained and 1,178,768 lost. Now, the territories lost, or rather ceded, 
were Alaska, which was sold to the United States for a good round sum ; 
an island or two off the coast of Japan, which were exchanged for part 
of the island of Saghalien ; and part of Bessarabia, which was taken from 
Russia by the Treaty of Paris in 1856, and given back to her by the 
Treaty of Berlin in 1878. So that, in reality, she has acquired nearly two 
million square versts in Central Asia and the Caucasus. — Vanity Fair.— 
An important experiment with torpedoes against torpedo nets is reported 
from Trieste. A torpedo boat launched a torpedo against a vessel with a 
torpedo net stationed at a distance of a thousand feet. In 27 seconds the 
torpedo touched the net and exploded, tearing a hole in the net and send- 
ing up a column of water 250 feet in bight. The vessel itself was consid- 
erably shaken, but not damaged in the least. The charge in the torpedo 
was half a hundredweight of gun-cotton.— —No one can have forgotten 
the sensation which Mdlle. Sara Bernhardt created last year at Copenha- 
gen by the unseasonable emphasis which she gave to her anti-German 
sentiments — an emphasis which, according to common report, placed an 
official admirer of hers in a very disagreeable position vis-a-vis with 
Prince Bismarck. The distinguished actress, at that time more French 
than the French themselves, was understood to cherish such an undying 
resentment towards the conquerors of Alsace and Lorraine that no in- 
ducement could be sufficiently great to tempt her to the German stage. 
Since then, however, Mdlle. Bernhardt has crossed the Atlantic, and the 
worship of the almighty dollar appears to have somewhat modified the 
ardor of her patriotism. According to the Boo'sen Courier, she has ac- 
cepted an engagement for a six months' professional tour in Germany. If 
this be correct, she may satisfy her conscience by reflecting that such an 
engagement is the only method by which she can bring back to France 
some portion, at least, of the lost milliards. 



GEO. STJtEET, Agent Xeu>» Letter, 30 Comhitl, JE. C, London. 



T 



UK SPECIAL NUTRIMENT IN 



f tONSl'MPTION. SPECIAL NUTRIMENT IN 



w 



ASTINd AND DEBILITATING DISEASES. 



T>ANCREAT1C EMULSION, or MEDICINAL FOOD. 



T 



HE SPECIAL NUTRIMENT QUICKLY RESTORES 



D 



IQESTIVE POWER, STRENGTH, WEIGHT, &o. 



s 



PANCREATIC EMULSION SUPERSEDES COD LIVER OIL, &c, Palatable and 

easily borne by d elicate stomachs of Children and Invalids. % 

AVORY & MOORE, NEW BOND SREET, LONDON, and Chemists Everywhere. 
[November 27.] 

IN CONSEQUENCE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS OF 

LEA A PEKRINS 1 SAUCE, wblcb are calculated to deceive 
the public, Lea and Perrina have adopted A NEW LABEL, bearing their sig- 
nature, " LEA & PERRINS," which is placed on every bottle of WORCESTER- 
SHIRE SAUCE, and without which none is genuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERRINS' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per. Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & Blackwell, 
London, etc., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughout the world. 
Nov. 16. MESSRS. CROSS & CO., Agents, San Francisco. 

"THE CATERER," 

Published Monthly ',is a Business "Wuide, Philosopher and 
Friend" for Cooks, Confectioners, Hotel Keepers and Restaurateurs, to 
whom it furnishes Information, Instruction, Practical Wrinkles and Advice on all 
Matters connected with 

The Cuisine, The Pastrycook's Art, 

Refreshment Catering, New and Labor-saving Inventions, 

Domestic Economy, Culinary Literature, 

Hotel Management, Decoration and Furnishing, 

Food Supplies, Our Food Industries, 

The Bar, Cellar, and Kitchen. Innkeeper's Law, etc., etc., etc. 

Yearly Subscription, 4s., Post Free Anywhere. 

NEWTON A ESKELL 329, High lloloom, Loudon. 

[May 21.] 

owlands' Macassar Oil has been known for the last eighty years as the 
best and safest preserver and beautifierof the hair; it contains no lead 
or mineral ingredients, and is especially adapted for the hair of children; 
sold in usual four sizes. 

Ron lauds" Odonto is the purest and most fragrant dentifrice ever made; it 
whitens the teeth, prevents decay, and gives a pleasing fragrance to the 
breath, aud the fact of its containing no acid or mineral ingredients 
specially adapts it for the teeth of children. 

Rowlands* Kalydor produces a beautifully pure and healthy complexion, 
eradicates freckles, tan, prickly heat, sunburn, etc., and is most cooling 
and refreshing to the face, hands and arms, during hot weather. Ask 
any Perfumery Dealer for 

Rowlands* articles, of 20, Hatton Garden, London; and avoid spurious worth- 
leas imitations. [Oct. 2. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

Inestaud Cheapest Bfeat-flavoring Stock for Soaps, Hade 

Dishes and Saucea. 



R 



P 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT, 

An Invaluable a««i Palatable Tonic In all Cases of Weak 
Digestion and Debility. Is a success and boon for which Nations should feel 
grateful. Sep "Medical Press," "Lancet," "British Medical Journal," etc. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

Caution-- Gennine only with fac-sinille of Baron JLiebig's 
Signature, in blue ink, across Label. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

To be had of all Store-keepers. Grocers and Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale only). C. David & Co., 43, Mark Lane, 
London . England. Sold wholesale by RICHARDS & HARRISON, San Francisco. 
[March 2.] 

CHAMPAGNE. 

HEIDSIECK & CO.'S 
DRY MONOPOLE. 

THEODOK SATOW & CO., LONDON, 
Sole Agents for Great Brttatn, India and the Colonies. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphureta. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms, 

June 13. PBENTISSiSELBY, Superintendent. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction In Price : Wholesale Price, SO cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price, GO cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRAN'CISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Xedal, Ports, 1878. 

Sold by all Stationers. Sole Agent for the United States: 
MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 6. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 16, 1881. 



CRADLE. ALTAR, AND TOMB. 

CRADLE. 

Baumak— In this city, July 12, to the wife of Charles Bauraan, a son. 
Barrett— In this city, July 9, to the wife of Patrick Barrett, a son. 
Comstock— In this city, July 5, to the wife of John F. O. Comstock, a son. 
Coooan— In this city, July 11, to the wife of Win. H. Coogan, a son. 
Dowdall— In this city, July 11, to the wife of W. P. Dowdall, a daughter. 
Goeprl— In this city, July 9, to the wife of Otto Goepel, a son. 
Hancock— In this city, July 10, to the wife of Samuel Hancock, a son. 
Rademaker— In this city, July 13, to the wife of J. M. Rademaker, a son. 
SHBEHy— In this city, July 11, to the wife of James W. Sheeny, a son. 
Whipple— In this city, July 4, to the wife of E. A. Whipple, a son. 

ALTAR. 

Broemhel-Houwiksner— In this city, July 12, B. Broemmel to H. Hohwiesner, 
Lewin-Asch— In this city, July 10, Moses Lewin to Rachel Asch. 
Levy-Solomon— In this city, July 10, Henry Levy to Sarah Solomon. 
Lonergan-St. Ledger— In this city, June 29, J. H. Lonergan to Emily St. Ledger. 
Miller-Trask— Id this city, July *6, Wm. H. Miller to Lizzie C. Trask. 
Makowski-Murpht— In this city, July 5, Herman Makowski to Virginia Murphy. 
STEiNKAiiP-WiLcaBNS— In this city, July 10, Chas. F. Steinkamp to C. Wilckens. 
Steffens-Helmke— In this city, July 10, John Steffens to Auguste Helmke. 
Vernon-Amgier— In this city, July 13, Joseph H. Vernon to Feroline L. Angier. 

TOMB. 

Attridge— In this city, July 12, Thomas Attridge, aged 67 years. 

Bowman— In this city, July 11, Frank Bowman, aged 31 years. 

Cooney— In this city, July 12, Mary E. Cooney, aged 35 years. 

Duffy- In this city, July 10, John Patrick Duffy, aged 17 years and 8 months. 

Ellich— In this city, July 11, George Ellich, aged 55 years and 2 months. 

Gray— In this city, July 10, Bridget Gray, aged 44 years. 

O'Hara—Id. this city, July 10, Mrs. A. J. W. O'Hara. aged 31 years and 2 months. 

Pond— In this city, July 12, John Taylor Pond, aged. 7 months and 11 days. 

Reagan — In this city, July 10, Mrs. Mary Reagan, aged 75 years 

Skidmorb— In this city, July 12, James Edward Skidmore, aged 42 years. 

FREE WATER 

It is well known that the question how to get water without having 
to buy it is a perplexing problem to some of the quid nuncs in San Fran- 
cisco. In fact we know of two ancient inhabitants who, having reveled 
in riotous journalism morning and evening until the vigor of life has 
passed away, now devote the wisdom that is supposed to be incidental to 
old age to the consideration of the problem. Water ! water ! is their 
constant cry, and one of them wants it scalded. It is by reason of such 
persistence, however, that some of the greatest discoveries of modern times 
have been made. An important idea resulting from these mental incuba- 
tions has been given to the community by the journalists referred to. It 
was nothing less than to bore down into the bowels of the earth, which, 
Professors Proctor and Denton and Lnring Pickering and other remark- 
able men tell us, is full of water that has leaked through the crust, and 
bring it back to the surface, where it can be dispensed free to all. These 
bores, not the Professors, are called artesian wells, the name conveying 
two important suggestions, to wit, that to bore successfully is an art, and 
that when the bore is a success it is easy to discover at what depth the 
subterranean fluid exists. The last named of the three great men above 
mentioned has suggested the boring of more artesian wells than any man 
who has lived in the past seventy-three years and six months. An ex- 
pert has computed that in the city and county of San Francisco alone he 
has, up to last Saturday, suggested the boring of not less then 603 wells. 
On one of these bores work has already been commenced ; it is out at 
what is known as the Sand-lot. The remainder of the 603 are to be com- 
menced so soon as — but we won't digress now from the main subject about 
which we commenced to write. 

It was at the bore on the Sand-lot that an interesting discovery has 
been made. The main Sand-lot work has been carried on secretly and at 
night, according to plans and designs furnished by L. P., the savan. For 
good reasons its location was immediately under the rostrum occupied on 
Sundays by the learned and eloquent Webster of the Pacific coast, D. K. 

A few nights ago it had reached a depth of 101 feet 8| inches, when sud- 
denly the bore penetrated the water stratum, and at the same instant 
there issued from the mouth of the bore a peculiar gas having most valua- 
ble chemical, illuminating and combustible qualities, and of an odor suf- 
ficiently powerful to keep at a distance all meddlesome and curious peo- 
ple. It was formed of a combination of carburetted and sulphuretted 
hydrogen, and has been pronounced by the California Academy of Sci- 
ences as proceeding from something undergoing the process of eremacausis. 

The liquid of the stratum was of a beautiful green color, which, where 
it came in contact with the white edge of a copy of the Evening Bulletin, 
a fragment of which lay upon the ground near by, produced so distinct an 
impression that the savan, L. P., who was present, suggested that 
it might be used as an appropriate substitute for printers' ink in future 
editions of that paper. 

But the most interesting development was that of a few fossil speci- 
mens brought to the surface, and which were believed to belong to the 
pliocene age. They were interesting as establishing the existence of ani- 
mal, and even insect, life at that ancient period. The first specimen was 
a few small fragments of a bright, enameled, bony substance not larger 
than a good-sized bean, but containing pure gold visible. 

The second was an irregular shaped fragment, about six inches square, 
of what was evidently a portion of the epidermis of some pachyderm, 
and which had become indurated until it had lost all flexibility and was 
quite brittle. The third was about a thimbleful of insects of an iridescent 
hue, blue and green colors predominating, resembling very greatly the 
bottle-flies of the present age. These were in a perfect state of preserva- 
tion, so much so that one of the savans fancied he detected motion. A 
special meeting of the Academy has been called to examine and report 
upon these antediluvian curiosities, and to suggest how the discovery may 
be utilized. The institution will probably pass a vote of thanks to L. P., 
through whose instrumentality such great results have been accomplished. 

P. S. — Since the foregoing was written, further tests and examinations 
of the ground and of the neighborhood have developed some connection 
of the stratum in which the fossils were found with an old drain which 
led from a building where resided the keeper of the Yerba Buena ceme- 
tery, which formerly occupied that site. The same gaseous exhalation 
was found to proceed from that drain, and in it was found an old boot- 
leg, from which a portion was missing, the pachydermatous specimen ex- 
actly fitting the defective leg-covering. A microscopical examination of 



the enameled gold-bearing specimens revealed the fact that they were a 
few molars which had settled down from the localities of their former 
possessors in the cemetery, and had reached the bed-rock, whence they 
had been carried along together with the flies which are indigenous to bucq 
localities. Until the other bores in progress shall be completed and new 
developments made, the Bulletin will continue to be printed with ink as 
heretofore. But free water is almost certain to be reached by the time 
the 603 wells shall be in flowing condition. 



H. S. Williams. 



A. Ohesebrough. 



W. H. Dimond, 



WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 
UNION BTJILDINa, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STS. 

AGENTS FOR 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam. Navigation 

Company, The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, 

"The California Line of Clippers" from New York 

and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line." 

San Francisco, January 31, 1880. [Jan. 31. 

C. AD0LPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 
SAN FRANCISCO and NEW YORK. 

g3P Agents of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery streets, 
San Francisco, California. Jan. 17. 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS., 



Shipping and Commission Merchants- 

Hawaiian I/ine of Packets. 

109 California Street San Francisco. 

May 28. 



TABER, HARKER & CO., 

IMPORTERS AJfD WBOI.HSA.I.X! GJtOCJESS, 
108 and 110 California St., S. F. 

[April 19.] 

H. L. Dodge. L. H. Sweeney, J. E. Buggies, 

DODGE, SWEENEY & CO., 

Importers, Wholesale Provision Dealers and Commission 
Merchants, 

Nos. 114 and 116 Market, and 11 and 13 California Sts. 

[August 7.1 

Francisco Daneri. Henry Oasanova. 

F. DANERI & CO., 

Dealers in "Wines, Liquors and Groceries, 

27 and 29 California Street Between Davis and Dramm. 

[March 19.] 

L. H. Newton. NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., M. Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers in Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, 204 and 206 California street, San Francisco, Cal May 25. 



CASTLE BROS. & LOUPE, 

ESTABLISHED IN THE YEAR 1850. 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, Nos. 218 and 215 
Front-street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 

C. W. M. SMITH, 

The Leading and Oldest Patent Solicitor, 

Established in. 1S0Z, 

Removeil to 224 Sausomo Street, 

[March 12.1 

MOUNT TAMALPAIS CEMETERY. 

A Rural Burial Place for San Francisco. 

Office: Masonic Temple. J. O. ELDRIDGE, President. 

A W. Do Eois, Secretary. Aug-. 18. 




CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of the Standard Syrup, a superior article 
put up in barrels expressly for home consumption. Also, Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Refined Sugars at loweBt market rates. Office, 215 Front 
street, up stairs. Dec. 21. 

C. KOOPMANSCHAP, 

Chinese Immigration Agent, is prepared to contract or 
receive orders for Chinese laborers to any part of the world Apply at 
Merchants' Exchange, Room 28, second floor, or Hongkong, China. June 18. 



PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS. 

This well-known and popular summer resort open for the 
reception of guest3. Stages conuect at Los Gatos with morning and evening 
trains. For terms, address LEWIS A. SAGE, Proprietor, 
April 30. Saratoga, Cal. 

COWEN & PORTER, 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS, 

112 Geary Street San Francisco. 

[May 21.] 



July 16, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



MARINE INTELLIGENCE. 



ARRIVALS AND CLEARANCES AT THE PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO. FOR 
THE VVEKK ENDING Jl LY 14, 1S8J. 



ARRIVALS. 



MTI.I VKUIL. 


MASTIR. 


wilKRK FROM. 


COKSIQKRRS. 


J'K 1> R»rk C»nlln»l 


z«ajre 


rlmmpcrieo... 


Master. 




Metcalfe 

Amesburv . . 


HOQgkODg 




.11 lurk p J Oartton.... 


W. T. OolODQU A Co. 


i> . . Kulvertson.. 


M.I1 i.iirm- . . 


Geo. J. Theobald A Co. 


\p Kn'tof Uu (; arte r H.uh.-.hI ... 


North Shield* 


Balfour, Guthrie A Co. 


tonnlal. 




New York.... 


John Rosenfeld. 


Dttish Minstrel. 


I'.n.i,- .... 


Wilmington... 


Rotifers, Mover & Co. 


-•hip East Croft 

BtK Minnie Caroell . . 


KiimiHT 


S\dl)eV 


Rodgers, Meyer & Co. 


Clark 


BonakooA 


Macondray & Co. 


i' rk Thomas Pom 


Millard 


J. N. Knowlcs. 


. . )■-' Sch'rClau? Spreekk-s. . Cousins 


Kahalui 


J. D. Spreckles& Bros. 


.. nstrn'rCliv of N. York.'Beabury... . 




Williams, Dimond & Co. 



CLEARANCES. 



DATS 


VRSSRL. 


MASTER. 


WIIKRE BOUND 


BY WHOM OLKARBD. 


J*lv 9 


stavY Naples 


White 


Hongkong... . 


W. T. Coleman & Co. 


.. o 




Wbitmore . . 




w. Dresbach. 




Ship Glory of the Seas. 
-eli'r DMhlng Wave... 


Mc Laughlin 


Havre 


G. W. McNear. 


.. G 




La Libertnd . . 


D. De Castro. 


.. 11 




Monroe 


(Jueenstown .. 


R. Sheehy. 


.. 11 






Qaeenatown.. 


Parrott &Co. 


.. 12 


.ship Bcottlflh Chieftain 


Mclntyre... 


Cork 


G. W. McNear. 


.. IS 


Ship Gilroy 


Leslie 




Parrutt & Co. 


.. 12 




Menzies .... 




Starr & Co. 


.. 12 


Sch'r Consuelo ........ 






W. Loaiza. 


.. 13 




Bidwell 


Quee-QBtOWn . . 


Parrott & Co. 






Oltmann. . . . 
Melander . . . 


Queenstown .. 
Tahiti 


G. W. McNear. 


.. 13 


bark J. W. Seaver.... 


A. Crawford A Co. 



CREMATION. 

In every part of Europe intelligent people are beginning to realize 
the objections to the Christian practice of burying the dead, and not a 
few who have been brave enough to conquer the prejudices of association 
have resigned their bodies to cremation. It is remarkable that Italy is 
the birth-place of the revival of a process which was practiced throughout 
that country in Pagan times. The Bishop of Manchester, one of the 
wisest of the English prelates, has been bold enough to declare that we 
must face the problem, " How to bury our dead out of sight more practi- 
cally and more seriously than we have hitherto done." In the same sense 
that the Sabbath was made for man, and not man for the Sabbath, so was 
the earth made, not for the dead, but the living. No intelligent faith can 
suppose that any Christian doctrine is affected by the manner or the time 
in which the body crumbles into the elements out of which it was origi- 
nally made. The idea of cremation revolts only because it violates estab- 
lished custom. Science now declares this custom is more honored in the 
breach than the observance. Science has denounced a score of habits not 
less deeply rooted, and we may be sure that she will gain the mastery in 
this. The Bishop observes that the instincts in favor of inhumation are 
sentimental and illogical, and must give way before the difficulties, in- 
conveniences, expense and positive dangers of the existing system. 

In Italy there have been already many cremations. Crematories have 
been erected in Lodi and Milan. The Royal Lombard Institution of Sci- 
ences awarded a medal to Mr. Frederick Siemens, of Dresden, for the 
best method of disposing of the dead. Many Italian town authorities 
have declared their preference for cremation over interment, as being 
cheaper and better from a hygienic point of view. In Gotha the Muni- 
cipal Council of the city have erected a crematorium, open to all Germany, 
and bodies have been forwarded from Dresden, Vienna, Hanover, Breslau, 
Bamberg, Liepsic and other places. The whole cost of the process, in- 
cluding religious ceremonies, anthems, choristers, etc., is 165 marks, or 
about $41. The actual cost of the cremation for attendance, fuel and the 
use ot the furnace is only S14, which, in this city, would be saved three 
times over in the price of the casket. We are of opinion that the con- 
tinued addition annually of four or five thousand bodies to the mass of 
decomposition now collected at Lone Mountain threatens the public 
health of this city, and must be stopped before long. We have no hope 
that the present cemeteries will be removed elsewhere, and we therefore 
look to the introduction of cremation as the only safe, rational and scien- 
tific solution of the difficulty. 

GLADSTONE'S HEALTH. 

The following excerpt from a letter from Mr. Charles Overton will 
be read with interest, as it is supplemented by a note from Mr. Glad- 
stone's private Secretary, Horace Seymour: 

New York, July 5, 1881. 

My Dear Sir; When in San Francisco, about three months ago, I was 
in the habit of sending the News Letter to my father in London. In one 
of the numbers you had a paragraph that referred to Mr. Gladstone. 
My father being one of his friends, cut it out and sent it to him. I send 
you Mr. Gladstone's answer and the portion of my father's letter in 
which he refers to it. I thought it would he interesting to you. I send 
it from a friendly feeling, so pray don't consign it to your waste-paper 
basket, as Mr. Gladstone's letters, although written by his private Secre- 
tary, are getting valuable. Yours truly, Charles Overton. 

My father writes: ** I inclose Gladstone's letter (rather amusing for 
him) in reply to my sending cutting from one of your papers— 8. F. News 
Letter — regarding the accusation that he was in the habit of drinking his 
neighbors' wine at dinner-parties, when excited by his conversation. I 
asked him if it was a true bill. His reply will be a curiosity to your 
American friends, so I send it: 

10 Downing Street, Whitehall, May 21, 18SL 
Sir: Mr. Gladstone desires me to thank you for your letter of the 6th 
inst., and the cutting you sent him from the San Francisco News Letter. 
His physician is very strict against mixture of wines, and Mr. Gladstone 
is, he hopes, his obedient patient. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, Horace Seymour. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

H ale and Norcnm.i silver >i Inlng Company. --Location of 
Principe] Phuw of Business, Ban Francisco, California. — Location of Works, 

Virginia Mining Dli ■■■. OounW, Nevada.- Notice to hereby (riven that ata 

meetinjro! the Board of Directors, held on the twelfth day of July, issi, an assess- 
ment (No. 70) of 60 Cents per share wax levied upon the capital Btock of the Co r- 
poratlon, payable lmm< dlately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
Office of the Company, Room 68, Nevada Block, 809 Montgomery street, San Frau- 
ofaoo, California. 

An\ stmk upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the SIXTEENTH 
day of AUGUST, 1881, will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; 
and unless payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the SEVENTH 
day of SEPTEMBER, 1881, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the board of Directors. 

JOEL F. LIGHTNER, Secretary. 

Office— Room 58, Nevada Block, 300 Montgomery st., S. F., Cal. [July 16. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

CON. PACIFIC MINING; COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 3 

Ann unit per Share 40 Cents 

Levied July 9th 

Delinquent in Office August 12th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 1st 

P. E. LUTY, Secretary. 
Office— Room 6. No. 330 Pi ne street, S. F. July 16. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

BEST & BELCHER MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 21 

Amount per Share 60 Cents 

Levied July 12fch 

Delinquent in Office August 16th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 7th 

WILLIAM WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 80, Nevada Block, 3C9 Montgomery street, S. F. July 16. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

MAYBELLB CON. MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 8 

Amount per Share 20 Cents 

Levied June 22d 

Delinquent in Office July 29th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 23d 

WM. J. TAYLOR, Secretary. 
Office— Room 25, 310 Pi ne street, San Francisco. July 9. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

RED CLOUD CON. MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 1 

Amount per Share 20 Cents 

Levied June 22d 

Delinquent in Office July 27th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 17th 

WM. J. TAYLOR, Secretary. 
Office--Room 25, 310 Pine street, San Francisco. July 9. 

REGULAR DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of Northern Belle Mill and Mining; Compauy, San 
Francisco, Cal., July 9th, 1881— At a meeting of the Board of Directors of 
the above-named Company, held this day, a Dividend (No. 48) of Fifty Cents (50c.) 
pjr share was declared, payable on FRIDAY, July 15th, 1881. Transfer Books closed 
on Monday, July 11th, 1881, at 3 o'clock r.M. 

WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, Sa.i Francisco, 
California. July 16. 

EXTRA DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of Northern Belle Mill and Mining- Company, San 
Francisco, Cal., July 9th, 1881.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
above-named Company, held this day, an Extra Dividend (No. 49) of Twenty-five 
Cents (26c.) per share was declared, payable on FRIDAY, July 16, 1881. Transfer 
Books closed on Monday, July 11th, 1881, at 3 o'clock >\m. 

WM. WILLIS, Secretory. 
Office— Room No. 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery Btreet, San Francisco, 
California. July 16. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Silver Kin;; Mining Company, San Francisco, 
July 8th, 1881.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above 
named Company, held this day, a Dividend (No. 19) of Twenty-five Cents (25c.) per 
share was declared, payable on FRIDAY, July 15th, 1881, at the office of the Com- 
pany, Room 19, 328 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. Transfer Books 
will be closed on July llth, 188L 
July 16. JOSEPH NASH, Secretory. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Saving* and Loan Society, 619 Clay street. —For the six 
months ending J une 30, ISM , the Board of Directors have declared a dividend 
on all deposits at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax, and 
payable on and after Friday, July 16, 1681. 
July 16. CYRUS W. CARMANY. Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NUMBER SEVENTY. 

The Home Mutual I intoranre < 'ompany w ill p»y Its regnlar 
monthly dividend (No. 70) of One Dollar ($1) per share upon it* Capital Stock, 
on the llth day of July, 1881. CHARLES R. STORY. Secretary, 

July 16. 400 California street. 

HjivioeniTnotice.^ 

The German Savings and Loan Society .--For the hair year 
ending this date, the B<>ard of Directors of the German Savings and Loan So- 
ciety has declared a dividend on Term Deposits at the rate of five and one-tenth 
(6 1-10) per cent, per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of four and one- 
fourth (4J) percent, per annum, free from Federal Taxes, and payable on and after 
the llth day of July, 18SL By order, GEORGE LETTE, Secretary. 

San Francisco. June 30, 1881. July 2. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, N.W. cor. Powell 
and Eddy streets. —The Board <>f Directors ban declared a Dividend to Depos- 
itors at the rate of five and one-teutb (5 lu) per cent, per annum on Term Di 
and four and one-quarter (4j) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free from 
Federal Tax, for the half year ending June 30, 1881, and payable on and after July 
15, 1881. \July 1) VERNON CAMPBELL, becretary^ 

£*f* (i a week in your own town. Term? and $5 outfit free. 

tJpDO Address H. HA1XETT * Co.. Portland, MaiDe. 



16 



SAST FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 16, 1881. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Beoorded in the City and County of San Francisco, California, for 
the Week ending Jtily H. 1881. 

CompUedfrom the Records of the Commercia l Agency ,401 California St. ,S.K 
Tuesday, July 5th- 



SBANTOB AND GRANTEE. 



Jas Collison and wf to J P Poole. 

Mars M Hendry to Mageie Hendry 
Mary E Jones to SamlM Wilson. 

H Le vison to Emma Levi eo u 



John Mngge to Frank Silva 

Henry Wreden to Martin Mangels 
W P Lapidge and wf to M O'Hare 



C A Low to Daniel E Martin., 
D E Martin to W F Lapidge ... 



Cath Norris to Patk Reynolds 

Hib S and L Socy to Babette Eisen 



Peter Craig to RobtMcClollan.... 



DESCRIPTION. 



W Chenery, 213 e Roanoke, ne 25x100 ;! 
portion lot 10, b'.k 16, Pairmoant 

E Baena Vista, 52:6 s Sacramento, 30x60 

N Washington, 100 e Fillmore, e 28x127: 
8— Western Addition 317 

Sw Tyler and Buchanan, w 57:6— West- 
ern Adition 28 2 

Portion lot 20, blk 3, College Homestead 

N Lombard, 80 w Taylor, w 7:6x80 

W Lapidge, 125 n 19th, n 25x80— Mis- 
sion Block 71 

W Montgomery, 68:10 e Washington, s 
30:4x63:9— 50-vara 3 

W Valencia, 100 n 10th, n 100, w 100, n 
*25, w 80, s 125, e 55, 8 100, e 25, n 100, 
e 10 to com— M B 71 ; w Valencia, 120 
s 18th, s 25, w 100, s 25, w 80, n 100, e 
80, 8 50, e 100 to com ; e Lapidge, 300 
n 19th, n 25x80 ; w Lapidge, 100 n 19Ih 
n 50, w 80, a 50, e 25, s 100, e 25, n 100, 
9:30 to com; w Lapidge, 200 n 19th, n 
225x80— Mission Block 71 

S Minna, 222 e 5th, e 25x80— 100-va 134. 

W Franklin, 103:1 e Fulton, s 103:1, w 
57:6, n 17, w 10:6, n 20:3, w 4:6, n 34:4, 
e 55— to com— W A 138 

Se half of lot 21, section 32. Masonic 
Cemetery 



500 
10 



Gift 
300 
450 

510 

1 



5 

2,000 



8,800 
115 



Wednesday, July 6th- 



j I) Walker to Sidney L Johnson. 

J B Lewis to Jas Hendy 

APCatlin to Wm W Wade 

A J Rhodea to A P Catlin 



Thoa P Stoney to City and Co S F 

J M Wood to Bame 

Robt WilBon to Henry JFinigan. 

G C Letcher to Angnste Perry.... 
Andrew Faller to Robt G Kelly. . . 

Laarel Hill Cem to Eliza F StearnB 
WFDrathmann to Carl Leichter. 

Jno Grant to Security Savs Bank. 

J S Bowman to E M Gal v in et al. . 

Wm Thomson et al to G Ferrea 

J Ambrose by ehff to W Thomson 
ThoBPendergaat to Frank H Bnrke 
Wm Wolff to Jas D Walker et al. . 



Ne Stenart, 137:6 se market, se 91:8x137: 

6— Band Water 598 and 599 

Sw Chestnut and Stockton, s 35x103:6— 

50-vara 680 

E Iowa, 266:8 n Yolo, n 166:4x200— Po- 

trero Block 33 

Same, and also property in Sacramento 

County 

Streets and Highways 

Same 

W Church, 65 n 23d, n 25x117:6 -Harp- 

ere Arid tion 85 ; subject to mortgage. 

Lo 4, blk 82, University Mound 

W Mission, 220 n 25th, n 25x90— Mission 

Block 67 

Lot 2323 

W Pierce, 110 s Tyler,8 27:6xll0-West- 

ern Addition 434 

Se Townsend, 275 ne 3d, ne 125 ; nw of 

Townsend, 275 ew2d, De 50x125 

Undivided half, sw Beach and Hyde, w 

137:6x137: 6-50- vara 1343 

Loisl, 2, 3, blk 1, Belle Roche City .... 

Same 

N M street, 50 e Gnerrero, e 25x114. . . . 
E Webster, 25 s of O'Farrell, b 52x90— 

Western Addition 278 



200 
1 
1 



3,700 
75 

1,500 

34,000 

1 

1,500 

1,525 

425 



Thursday, July 7th. 



George R Adams to H F Cooper. 
M Greenwood toMargt L Bell..., 



L WMcLanflin & wf toF B Carter 



FB Carter to L W McGlanflin.... 
Ed Durkin et al to S F Savs Union 



Robt McElroy to Jas Fogarty,, 



D E Martin to Wm F Lapidge.... 



W F Lapidge and wf to H Kuhn. 
H Hadeler to Johann A Schmidt.. 



Wm Hadeler et al to same , 

Miles McCarthy to John Hayden. 



H Mahan to Soloman GuBlavns . . . 
C Hanson to Amelia C Truesdell.. 



Wm Leviston et al to BS Brooks. 



Patk McGee to G W Beckh 

A HaaB et a) to Hib S and L Socy. 



N Vallejo, 30 w Octavia, n 24:3x125 

S Washington, 50 w Maple, w57:8, s 
131:3, se to a point, n 139:4 to corn- 
Western Addition 844 

N Sacramento. 29:9 e Pierce, e 26x103— 
Western Addition 391 

Same 

Se Howard, 125 ne 2d, ne 50x80— 100-va 
4S ; ne 7ib, 150 Be Brannan, Be 25x85 
—100- vara 319 

N Fell, 59:5 e Fillmore, e 40:7, n 75, w 
27:1, sw 76 to commenoement— West- 
ern Addition 299 

W Valencia, 95 s 18tb, s 25x100— Mis- 
sion Block 71 

Same 

Undivided half w Kearny, 22:6 n Geary, 
n 40, w 50:5, s 62:6, e 20, n 22:6, e 30 
to commencement— 50-vara S97 

Undivided half same 

Ne 7th, 230 nw of Brannan, nw 25x80- 
100-vara 304 

Lot 14, blk 644, Pt Lob Ave Homestead. 

is Jackeon, 148:6 w WebBter, w 44x127: 

8— Western Addition 317 

Ne Broadway and Gough, 137:6— West- 
ern Addition 119 

Se Market, 175 sw 5th, 25x100 -50-v 199 

Nw 17th and Folsom, n 140x247— Mis- 
sion Block 42 



$1,500 

837 

6 
5.200 

12,500 

1,425 

5 
1,700 



52,000 
1 

1,900 
300 



295 
30,350 



Friday, July 8th. 



Katy Marble and has to G Mearns 
Mary A Grouard to S and Ln Socy 
Meyer Lewis to Sallie A Roundey. 
Amanda U Slade to Margt E Hagan 

LoneMoun Cem to AC Austin 

A C Austin to Cornelia J Austin . . 
Mary Piratsky to Mary C Pirataky 



C D Cole to C C Rohrle 

T G Lambert to George Torrens . . 
O Byrnes et al to Hib S and L Soc 



E Powell, 91;8 n FranciBco, n 22:11x91: 

8— 50-vara 1512 

SSackaon, 68:9 e Gough, e 68:9x127:8— 

Western Addition la2 

S Sacramento. 220 w Octavia, w 40x132: 

7— Western Addition 196 

W Powell, 137:6 s Washington, 20x60— 

50-vara 150 ; w Powell, 137:6 n Clay, 8 

7:6x60— 50-vara 156 

Lot 793 

Same 

S Oak, 206:3 w Franklin, w 22:11x120— 

Western Addition 142 

Potrero blks 202 und 203 

N Clay, 137:6 w Hyde, w 18:9x45 

W Frauklin. 80 a of Hayes, 8:40x112:6— 

Western Addition 140 



J 5 
5,000 
4,000 



1,500 
150 
Gift 

Gift 
10 
100 



Saturday, July 9th. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



W Hutchinson to H M Hutchinson 



M A McCarthy et al to M J Lovell 



W F Lapidge to E Williamson.... 
Colin M Smith to Eugene Dalton. 

Eugene Dalton et al to Jno Dalton 
John Dalton et al to J H Bolton. . 
R R Swain et al to Cala Ins Co . . . 



G E Wellington to A R Wellington 
Wm F Lapidge to Mary J Rogers 
Mary Cronin to Margaret W Hinea 

Patk Eagan to Wm J Gunn 

J C Duncan to Norah Spooner. . . . 



DESCRIPTION. 



Norah Spooner to M H Sawyer.. . 
Jno F Pynch to Mary R Mercado. 
Philip S Fay to Peter Difley 



S Peter to FH Kellogg.. 



E cor 5th and Minna, ne 74x80— 100- vara 
134, and subject to a mortgage, being 
lot 14, block 'I,' lot 3, blk 'K,* Eureka 
Homestead 

E Caetro, 118:41 n Market, n 55:6, e 65. 
125-1000, sw 83 to commencement — 
Mission Block 116 

E Lapidge, 250 n 19th, n 25x80— M B 71 

Nw Washington and Devisadero, n 62 
x 137:6— Western Addition 497 

Same 

Same 

Nw Utah and Sonoma, n 275, w 100, s 
100, w 100, s 100, e 100, n 25, e 50, s 
100, c 50 to commencement — Potrero 
Nuevo 81 ; Be Natoma, 120 sw 2d, sw 
35x80— 100- vara 

N Sacramento, 81:6 w Leavenworth, w 
56xl00-50:vara 1187 

E Lapidge 275 n 19th, n 25 x 80— Mis- 
sion Block 71 

S Filbert, 165 w Montgomery, w 27:6— 
50-vara 1482 

N Valley, 126 e Sanchez, e 51:4x114— 
Harpers Addition 96 

Lots 12 and 13, blk 'G,' Railroad Home- 
stead No 2 

Same *. 

Lot 7 blk 97, University Homestead.... 

N Grove, 237:6 e Fillmore, e 37 6x137:6 
—Western Addition 301 

W 41st avenue, 200 s of 'M' etreet, s 100 
x 120— Outside Lands 916 



Gift 



900 
i 550 

10 
5 

4,000 



5 
Gift 

650 

875 

5 

5 

750 
150 

5 

5 



Monday, July 11th. 



J C Merrill to Hib S and Ln Socy. 



M J Crowley to Mary A Crowley. . 



Hannah Lafkin to SamlBrnk — 
Jos Steadman to Geo A Moure 



Lillie Wellock to same 

J W Davis to Anne M Worrall.... 



S S Wright et al to L Gottig 

Geo A Bordwell et al to same 

Michael Smith and wf to P Heran 

Marie L Lagrange to E L Lagrange 

WmFLapidge to T McAuliffe.... 

Geo H Collins to Saml Bowman.. 
Jno J S Kehan to Johu Brickell. . 



N California, 45:10 w Front, w 32:6x137: 
6-B and W 229, 230, 231 ; and undi- 
vided half nw Brannan and 8th, nw 
550x275— 100- vara 336, 337 

S Turk, 183 w Jones, w 23x137:6-100- 
vara 1109 

S Merchant, 15S e Drumro, e 22:6x55 

S Union, 155 w of Battery, w 40x97:6— 
50-vara 570 

Same , 

N California, 56:3 w Baker, w 25x90:2- 
Western Addition 280 

S 21st, 136:6 w Mission, w 22x90-Mis 
Bion Block 65 

S 24th, 80 e of York, e 40x100— Mission 
Block 176 

N Bernard, 33:6 w Taylor, w 23:6x60- 
50-vara 812 

E Hampshire, 425 n Helena, n 25x100 
lot 123, Silver Terrace Homestead.... 

W Lapidge, 150 n 19th, n 50x80— Mission 
Block 71 

Lois 16 and 17, blk 11, College Hd 

N 16th. 172 w Valencia, w20xl00-Mis- 
sion Block 36 



Gift 
2,000 

8,500 
8,500 

1,100 

2,500 

2,500 

1,500 

5 

1,040 
200 



poison oak 

CUBED BY THE USE OF 

STEELE'S GRI N DELI A LOTION, 

OR 

FLUID EXTRACT OF GRINDELIA ROBUSTA. 



STamifactured and Sold by 

JAMES G. STEELE & CO Druggists, 

63S Market Street, Under tbe Palace Hotel. 

[May 7.] 

DR. A. J. BOWIE, 

Having entirely recovered his health, has resumed the 
practice of Medicine and Surgery in conjunction with his two sons, DR. 
HAMILTON C. BOWIE and DR. ROBERT J. BOWIE, Graduates of the Royal Uni- 
versity, Munich. 

Besidences 729 Sutter St. and 714 O'Farrell St. 

EST* Telephonic communication with Office and Residences at all Hours. 
Hours: 10— i p.m. [March 26.1 Office: 330 SUTTER STREET. 

DR. WILLIAM E. TAYLOR. 

OFFICE: 215 CiliARY ST. RUSIDEXt'JC : THE BALDWIN. 

Feb. 5.] OFFICE HOTJKS: 1 to 4 P.M. 

DR. JAMES W. KEENEY, 

OFFICE AND RESIDENCE: 22 MONTGOMERY STREET. 

HOTJKS: 9 to 10 a.m., 2 to 4, 7 to 7:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS: 10 to 11 a.m., 6 to 7 p.m. April 9. 

M ARBLE WOR KSJ 

MANTELS AND GRATES, 
jaOJfTTMENTS JLXJO HE jtD- STO JV\E S , 

In Marble and Scotch Granite, 
827 Market Street Between Fourth ami Fifth. 

£5T Designs Sent on Application. !£$ 
June 11. W. H. McCOBMICK. 

ANDREW BAIRD, 

Negotiator of Loans and Commercial Paper, 
Broker in Local and State Secnrities, 

No. 312 California Street San Francisco. 

[P. O. Box 1,208.] July 19. 



July 16, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



NOTABILIA. 



THE PEDDLER 3 SONG. 
Uwn m white %a driven snow ; in«>ir« mul stomachers, 

Cyprees black m e'er m crow ; For nu tani l " jrw *helr dears; 

Oloves aa sweet as daniksk rosea ; aid poMnwticto of Btwal. 

Masks for faces .>■■>! for noses ; W 1 , v t mudfl link from heiul to heel : 

: »c, amber; OonMlxrf ol ma,oomtt;eaniebaj .roinobuy, 

Perfume fur a lady's chamber ; Bw, lads, or else your losses cry. 

William SHAKsrRARB. 



There is do present that a young husband can make to a young 
wife more valuable than a sewing-machine, and sometimes there is no 
present so worthless. By this we menu that it altogether dependB where 
you buy your sewing-machine, and what kind you get If you purchase 
a poor one you bring a nuisance into the house ; if you buy a good one 
yon import a domestic blessing. The writer purchased, six years ago, a 
.Davis Vertical Feed Sewing-Machine from Mark Sheldon, of 130 Post 
street, and it is to-day as perfect as when it was bought There are other 
machines which are, perhaps, equally good, as, for instance, the Howe 
and the Chicago Singer machines, for which Mr. Sheldon is also agent 

" I wonder what has become of the scissors?" said Mrs. Johnson the 
other day; " I have been looking for them all the evening, and can't find 
them high or low." After awhile the hired Dutchman commenced pulling 
off his boots, preparatory to going to bed, " All dis day," said he, " I 
tink I got some little grabble stones in my poot. I kess I kit him out 
now." When he turned up his boot, all that he could find in it was a 
thimble, a pair of scissors, half a loaf of bread and a few dozen tacks. 

The cbaimjng drives around this city are often spoiled by a bad 
turn-out— an illy-painted buggy, perhaps, or an ugly horse. And yet it 
costs no more to get a perfect turn-out, a gentle yet speedy team, a per- 
fectly appointed carriage ; and all that is requisite to obtain these is a 
visit to Tomkinsou's Livery Stables, at Nos. 57, 59 and 61 Minna street 
Here the resident of San Francisco or the visiter to our city can hire the 
most superb horses, carriages, buggies, landaus, rockaways, coupe's, double 
and single teams to be found in the United States. It is the specialty of 
this stable that it keeps nothing but the beat of anything, from a thou- 
sand dollar trotter to a whip. 

If you want to rejoice the internal soul of a San Francisco reporter, 
just tell him that six women and seven children have been torn asunder, 
limb from limb, in a hcuse around the next corner — that blood is gushing 
from all the windows and doors — that a steamboat has "burst," killing 
all on board — that the Mayor has just cut his own throat — and that he 
can get it all in time for the second edition. 

A friend was complaining to another that he should be obliged to 
change his tailor, as he found a suit of clothes would not last him above 
one-half the time it ought to, and inquired if he could recommend him 
any place where he could find apparel more durable ? "Yes," he replied, 
"I could recommend you to the English Court of Chancery, and there 
you may have a suit that will last you for life." This was a joke, but a 
solemn fact is that Beamish's shirts will last longer than any ever made. 
They are also in the latest style, and can be obtained from $1, un- 
laundried, up to $4 and $5, specially imported. Beamish's store is on 
Third and Market street, under the Nucleus House. 

"I think," said Mrs. Partington, getting up from the breakfast-table, 
"I will take a tower, or go on a discursion. The bill says, if I collect 
rightly, that a party is to go to a very plural spot, and to mistake a very 
cold collection. I hope it won't be as cold as ours was for the poor last 
Sunday. Why, there wasn't efficient to buy a foot for a restitute wid- 
der." And the old lady put oti her sash, and left 

A gentleman, dining at a country hotel, sent a boy for a piece of beef. 
He was gone so long that the individual supplied himself from another 
hand. When he returned, the gentleman said to him, with well-affected 
surprise, " Are you the boy I sent for some beef ?" " Yes, sir." " Is it 
possible? Why, how you've grown!" That is not the way they serve 
things at Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, above Kearny, where the 
nimble fingers of ready waiters are at all moments on the guts vive to 
bring to customers the choicest delicacies of the season. Ice cream, la- 
dies' lunches and confectionery of all kinds are a specialty. 

Yankee: " Hello, stranger, you appear to be travelin' ?" " Stranger: 
" Yes, I always travel when on a journey." " I think I have seen you 
somewhere abouts?" "Very likely, I've often been there." "Wal, 
look'ee 'ere, stranger, what might be your name 1" " It might be Sam 
Patch, but it isn't." "Have you been long in these parts?" "Never 
longer than five feet nine." " Do you ever git anything new ?" " Yes, I 
bought a new whetstone this morning." " Wal, I thought so." 

A " hard case " was interrogated the other Sunday by a friend, who 
had just seen him at church, but who was now found swallowing a glass 
of brandy and water at a public bar-room, thus: "I saw you at church 
this morning listening very attentively to the discourse, how comes it 
that I now see you here drinking?'' "I always thirst after righteous- 
ness," was the answer. We thirsted after one of De La Montanya's 
ranges until we got one. The Arlington Range is the most perfect ever 
constructed. Go and see one on Jackson street, below Battery. 

A Dutchman says: "I vos vonce went out into the orchard and 
climbed an apple-tree to get some peaches to make a plum-pudding mid, 
and ze limb broke me fall down mid von leg both side of ze garden fence, 
and like to stave mine outsides in." 

Class in middle-aged geography stand up. "What is a pyramid?" 
" A pile of men in a circus, on the top of t'other." " Where is Egypt ?" 
"Where it allers was." " Where is that, you young vagabond?" "Dunno, 
sir." " Where is the house of P. J. Cassin & Co., the best liquor mer- 
chants and purveyors for families in San Francisco situated ?" " At the 
corner of Washington and Battery streets, sir V* Good boy! you can sit 
down while 1 go and take a drink. 

The Way to Make a Coat "Last— Make the vest and trowsers first 



A serious difficulty almost occurred this week over a trifling bet of 
a hat between two politicians. The one that lost wanted to pay his 
wager at a store that he had dealt with for several years, while the win- 
ner refused to accept any hat at all unless it was purchased of White, 
the hatter, at G14 Commercial street. The positiveness of both parties 
almost resulted in blows, until tho loser, like 'a gentleman, gave way to 
his friend and went with him to Mr. White's store and paid for a Bilk hat. 
When he saw the almost endless styles there he was so delighted that he 
bought one for himself. 

At St. Bartholemy, in France, an old peasant lay on his death-bed ; 
his son was sent to fetch the curate, ana stood knocking on the gate 
for three hours. " Why didn't you knock louder?" asked the curate. 
" I was afraid of disturbing you," answered the clown. " Well, what is 
the matter?" "I left my father dying." "You didl Then he must 
certainly be dead by this time." " Oh, no," said the simpleton, " neigh- 
bor Peter said that he would amuse him until I came back again! " 

During the examination of a witness as to the locality of the stairs in 
a house, a counsel once asked: "Which way did the stairs run?" The 
witness answered: "One way they ran up, but the other way they ran 
down," Nobody, however, ever "ran down" the perfect photographs of 
Bradley & Rulofson, which are famous all the world over. Call and see 
them at the gallery, on the corner of Montgomery and Sacramento streetB. 

A colored man was brought before a magistrate and convicted of pil- 
fering. The magistrate asked him, " Do you know how to read ?" " Yes, 
masBa, little." " Well, don't you ever make use of the Bible ?" "Yes, 
massa, strap him razor on him sometimes." 

Flowing like a rivulet in May, 
Bubbling and rejoicing on its way, 
The purest water yet that ever ran 
From any spring that God e'er sent to man, 
Is Napa Soda. 

[To be Continued.] 

" Old age is coming upon me rapidly," as the urchin said when he was 
stealing apples from an old man's garden, and saw the owner coming furi- 
ously with a cowhide in hand. 

The most perfect fitting glove ever made is, beyond all question, the 
" Foster." It can be obtained in all conceivable shades and colors at the 
"Arcade" of J. J. O'Brien & Co., 924, 926 and 928 Market street, and 
with from one up to twelve buttons. It is cheaper than many more pre- 
tentious, but worse, French gloves, and it certainly is unequaled, being 
the best article offered to ladies both for perfection of manufacture, style 
and durability. 

A Western editor puts above the door of his sanctum: "Lady visit- 
ors are requested to go to the devil when they wish to obtain an interview 
with the editor." 

The American Exchange Hotel, Sansome street, opposite Wells, 
Fargo & Co.'s Express, San Francisco. This popular hotel is now under 
the experienced management of Charles Montgomery, which means good 
living and moderate charges. Board with room, $1, $1.25 and $1.50 per 
day, or $6 to $10 per week. Table first-class. Nice single rooms, 50 
centB per night. Free coach to and from the hotel. 

"Ma, is the portrait of father torn!" asked a little cherub of three 
summers. "No, child, why do you ask?" "Why, this morning he 
said, ' Darn my picture!" 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

The following play upon words cannot well be beaten: I cannot 
bear to see a bear, bear down upon a hare ; when bare of hair he strips 
the hare, for hare I cry, forbear! 

There is an old maid out West, 'tis said, so tough and rough that 
they use her forehead for a nutmeg-grater. 

Try the Something New 4 TJ Cigarette. It is delicious. 



a, 






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18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 16, 1881. 



BIZ. 



The only article of merchandise that is attractive to speculators at 
present seems to be that of Grain Bags. They first depressed prices in 
June to 7f@8c, a rate actually less than the cost of importation. They 
then very quietly entered the market and, simultaneously approaching all 
large holders, succeeded in securing the control of the market. This they 
steadily followed up, offering weekly small lines at public auction at 9@ 
9|c, and then advanced prices to 10@llc, and they now are confident of 
their Bafe position, and we would not be surprised if they eventually suc- 
ceeded in advancing the price to 12£c. This result is the more surprising 
when we consider the immensity of our Spot and prospective stock, and 
which under the most favorable output of our Grain crop will leave us a 
surplus of many million Bags to be carried over into the next harvest 
year. One singular feature of this Bag business is, that when they are 
low in price— far less than the cost of importation— farmers and dealers 
appear to be afraid to touch them ; but when they begin to advance and 
prices upon the " rampage," then all hands begin to complain of monopo- 
lies, etc., yet very quietly come to the front, buy freely, and thus play di- 
rectly into the hands of sharpers. Thus far in the season it is not gener- 
ally known who the parties are actually engaged in this Bag monopoly. 
The buying of them has been managed very quietly by a firm of brokers 
who have had large experience and make Bags a specialty of their 
business. 

Freights and Charters. — During the current week we have had sev- 
eral arrivals of deep-water vessels, being a small portion of the large fleet 
of ships now due at this port. Most of these vessels come to hand under 
previous charter, and one or two of them at extremely low rates for 
Wheat, as compared with the present Spot rate of 80@82s. for the United 
Kingdom. The fleet now headed this way, to arrive within the next six 
months, aggregates of registered tonnage, 375,000 tons, against 150,000 
tons at even date for the past two years. It should be borne in mind 
that at least one-third of this tonnage has already been secured to arrive, 
at rates ruling from 72s. 6d to 77s. 6d. These rates for July canceling j 
some, however, run into August. With thiB view of the situation, and 
knowing that our surplus crop of old Wheat is not less than 500,000 tons, 
and this on the top of another good crop now being harvested, which will 
give us not less than 1,200,000 tons of Wheat to be exported in the next 
twelve months. Assurance is given to ship-owners of good paying freights 
for months to come. At this writing there are but two disengaged vessels 
in port, but there are upon the berth twenty-six vessels, of 33,960 tons 
register, and these ships are filling up quite rapidly. 

Wheat and Flour. — As yet but little new Wheat has been marketed, 
farmers not anxious to sell at current-going rates of SI 35(fly,l 42£ per ctl. 
It is, however, pretty generally understood that shippers having vessels 
on the berth have already secured cargoes therefor, which is now in store 
awaiting their pleasure. Flour at the moment is in limited request at 
S4 50@4 75 for Extra Family, and Bakers' Shipping Extras can be bought 
for §4 25@4 50. Superfine rules all the way from $2 75@3 50 per 196 
lbs., all in half or quarter sacks. 

Barley.— The market is firm for Chevalier at SI 15@1 25 ; Brewing, 
81 10@1 20; Feed, 85@95c. per ctl. 

Oats.— Good to choice Milling is worth SI 65@1 75 per ctl.; Feed, 
SI 40@1 50. 

Quicksilver. — The market is poorly supplied. Holders demand 38c, 
but prices are shaded a little for export lots. Exports by sea since Janu- 
ary 1, 1881, 23,448 flks., value S678.929; 1880, 21,310 flks., value S645,813. 
Increase 1881, 2,138 flks., value §33,116. Receipts since January 1st, 29,- 
413 flks. Overland shipments from January 1 to June 1, 1881, 3,354 flks. 

Borax.— Market firm at 9J@10c. Receipts 1880, 2,125,052 lbs.; 1881, 
1,942,500. Exports by sea, I860, 11.500 ctls.; 1881, 10,000 ctls. The Bhip 
James Nesmith, for Liverpool, carried 1,127 ctls. 

Sugar. — On the 13th inst., prices of all Refined were reduced ic, now 
13c, for Cube and Crushed, lO^HJc for Yellow and Golden. Imports 
for six months of 1879, 32,967,786 lbs; 1880, 45,359,769 tts.; 1881, 72,931,- 
154 K>8. This is exclusive of overland receipts. The Claus Spreckels has 
arrived from the Sandwich Islands with 7,741 sks. 

Rice. — The market is steady for Hawaiian at 5c; Mixed China, 4|@ 
5ic;No. lCbina, 6J@6Jc. Imports for six months of 1879, 24,149,235 lbs.; 
1880, 16,158,675 lbs.; 1881, 28,285,954 lbs. 

Salmon. — The run of Fish in the Columbia River is better than earlier 
in the season. Large sales of 1-lb. tins are reported on the river at SI 22£ 
@S1 25 $ dozen. 

Coffee. — The market is firm at 12@14c. for Central American Greens. 
Imports for six months, 1877, 101,473 bags ; 1878, 91,308 bags ; 1879, 67,- 
435 bags ; 1880, 129,843 bags ; 1881, 85,168 bags. 

Teas. — Auction sales are of little moment, as leading importers have 
pooled their stocks, and they keep prices steady. Imports for six months, 
1880, 4,707,932 lbs.; 1881, 6,194,202 lbs. 

Coal. — Imports are liberal, and prices low for all cargo parcels — say 
S6@-S6 75 for Steam. British Columbia and Carbon Hill sell ex-ship to 
the trade at S9 ; Seattle, S7 ; California, S5@S6. 

Butter, (Cheese and Eggs.— Supplies are liberal. Eastern Butter, 18 
to 20c; California Roll do, 25 to 27ic; Pickled do, 20 to 22ic. Cheese, 
10@12ic for California; Eastern. 17@19c. Eggs sell at 23@24c for fresh 
California; Eastern, 17(§19c; Oregon, 20c 

Fruits and Vegetables. — The market is copiously supplied with all 
kinds of seasonable Fruits, such as Berries, Apples, Peaches, Pears, 
Plums, Tomatoes, etc. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's steamers will sail for Yokohama and 
Hong-hong: CITY OF TOKIO, August 2d, at 2 p.m. Excursion Tick- 
ets to Yokohama and return at special rates. 

For NEW YORK via PANAMA: GRANADA, July 19th, at 12 o'clock M., taking 

Freight and Passengers to MAZATLAN, SAN BLA.S, MANZANILLO and ACA- 

PULCO, and via Acapulco to Lower Mexican and Central ports, calling at SAN 

JOSE DE GUATEMALA and LA LIBERTAD to land Passengers and Mails. 

Fare to New York—Cabin, $139 ; Steerage, $65. 

Tickets to and from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rates ; also to Ha- 
vana and all West India ports. 

For HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY: CITY OF NEW YORK, July 30th, 
at 2 p.m., or on arrival of the English mails. No freight taken for Honolulu. 

S10 additional is charged for passage in Upper Saloon. Round the World Trip 
Tickets, via New Zealand and Australia, §650. 

Tickets must be purchased at least one hour before time of sailing. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan streets. 
July 16. WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., General Agents. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran* 
nan streets, at 2 p.m„ for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

Gaelic. Oceanic. Belgic. 

Wednesday, July 6th; Tuesday, July 19th; Friday, Aug. 19th: 

Saturday, Sept. 17th; Thursday, October 6th; Friday, Nov. 4th. 

Saturday, Dec. 3d. Wednesday, Dec 21st. 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at Reduced Rates. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets on sale at C. P. R. R. Co.'s General 
Offices, Room 74, corner Fourth and Townsend streets. 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street, Union Block. 



LELAND STANFORD, President. 



T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Acent. 



June 11. 



FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

The Oregon Railway and Navigation Company and Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company will dispatch every five days, for the above ports, 
one of their new Al Iron Steamships, viz.: COLUMBIA, OREGON and STATE 
OF CALIFORNIA. 

Sailing- Days 
July 6, 10, 15, 20, 25. and 30 I August 4, 9, 14, 19, 24, and 29. 

At 10 o'clock A. M. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

K. YAN OTERENDORP, Agent O R. & N. Co., 

No. 210 Batterv street, San FranciBco. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents P. C. S. S. Co., 
July 9. No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
for VICTORIA, B. C, and PUGET SOUND PORTS on the 10th, 20th and 30th 
of each month (except when such days fall on a holiday, then on the day previous), 
for PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with the O. R. & N. Co. every5 days, and for 
EUREKA, LOS ANGELES, SANTA BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ, SAN DIEGO, SAN 
LUIS OBISPO, and all other NORTHERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS in 
California about every three days. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
cisco Daily Papers. 

Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 



Oct. . 



GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
No. 10 Market street. 



G . 8. IiAJ>J>, President. 



M. GREENWOOD, Vice-President. 




CALIFORNIA ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Telegraph and Electrical Engineers and Manufacturers, 

Electro-Platers in Nickel, Gold and Silver, 

Blasting Machines and Supplies and Amalgamating Plates for Mines a Specialty. 

Office and Works: 134 Sutter street, S. F. 

May 14. PAUL SELLER, Superintendent. 

QUEEN TRANSPARENT OIL CAN. 

The body is made of thick glass, surrounded by a 
corrugated tin casing. Being glass it cannot leak, and the tin cas- 
ing prevents it from being broken. Jt measures the oil and prevents the 
seller from cheating in quanti y, or qualitv, of oil sizes— 1, 2, 4, 8 quarts. 
WIESTER & CO., 17 New Montgomery street, 
May 14. General Agents for the Pacific Coast. 

QUICKSILVER. 

The Celebrated "A" Brand, shipped direct from the New 
Almadeu Mine, for sale in any quantity, by the producers. CARLOAD 
LOTS will be shipped from San Jose for NEVADA, ARIZONA and the EAST, or de- 
livered at Pacific Mail Steamship Compauy's Wharf, San Francisco, without charge. 
THE QUICKSILVER MINING COMPANY, 

J. B. BANDOL, Manager, 
July 9.] No. 320 Sansome St., over Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Express Office. 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No. 310 Sansome Street, 

SAN Francisco, 
WHOLESALE 1> E A I E J& 8 IN FTTR8* 

[September 21.1 



ROBERT WALKINSHAW, 

Notary Public. 407 Montgomery street, is prepared to take 
charge of Estates or Trusts; to act as General Agent for persons absenting 
themselves from the State ; to buy and sell farming lands, take charge of securities, 
make collections, correspond, and make remittances. Reliable references. [July 9. 



July 16, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



HO FOR THE BIO TREE OROVE ! 
Attention taodQed to the exonraionof the South Pwdfia Railroad, 
, next Sunday, July 17th. A special train will leave the 

la K-rry, foot of Market street, at 7:^-'> a.m. 

iharp, departing from Twelfth and Webster streets, Oakland, ^t 7 :■"><> a.m., 
ami nt 8:15 a.m. from Park street, Alameda. The price of the excursion 
has been net at $3 for the round trip ; children between live ami twelve 
years old being carried at half rates. This is an excellent chance for per- 
sons who have never seen the Bis: Tree Grove ami Santa Cruz. The 
Company ia moat careful of the comfort and safety of the exoursioniats, 
and this little trip will give onr citizens a chance to see some of the most 
beautiful scenery in the world, over and around the mountains, through 
canyons and tunnels. The route runs by pretty sylvan creeks, and 
through groves of majestic redwood trees. Ihepure air and the enjoy- 
ment of the ride are of themselves great incentives to the trip, and five 
hours at the seaside are a delightful contrast to the smoky atmosphere of 
the city and the strong winds which come in from the ocean at this time 
of year. The Oak Grove, between Felton and Santa Cruz, is a most de- 
lightful place to stop at. There are plenty of deer in the hills, and quan- 
tities «>f doves in the grain-fields. Trout-fishing is exceUent also, and the 
rambles in the woods must be undertaken to be appreciated. A trip to- 
morrow on the South Pacific Coast Railroad to Santa Cruz will well re- 
pay the excursionist, and give him, also, a chance for a good sea-bath, 
which, in the present warm weather, is a great luxury. 

THE ROSY REDWOODS. 

On Sunday next a special excursion will leave for Sonoma, Peta- 
luma, Healdsburg, Cloverdale and Guerneville, which every one who 
loves a July jaunt should patronize. The quiet of the trip, the gorgeous 
scenery, and the absence of all hoodlums is the main charm of the trip, 
which is health-giving and a most restful antithesis to the labors entailed 
by our necessary duties during the week. One American dollar will buy 
a return ticket to Sonoma. Three American dollars will purchase one to 
the Redwoods. The fares have been specially reduced to give all classes 
who love relaxation and need it a chance to get it. Any one who neglects 
the unusual opportunities which the railroad companies have given to the 
public this year of taking an outing is very foolish. A good brush in the 
country, a healthy sniff of pure air, is often a lease of life to a man, and 
an excursion like this brings him back to the city a little tired perhaps 
physically, but a new man in a hundred ways. 



There ia no pleaaanter trip in the month of July than a jaunt to 
Alameda, in quest of a salt-water bath, and there is no pleas- 
anter salt-water bath than the one to be obtained at the Ter- 
race Baths, opposite Third Avenue station. Messrs. Robert Ha- 
ley & 0. A. Edson, the proprietors, have probably the finest inclosed 
bath in the world. Its main advantages are the warmth of the water, the 
many nice showers, salt and fresh, to be obtained, and the perfect com- 
fort obtainable. During the warm weather a good sea-bath will often 
avert sickness, and at the Terrace Baths the salt water is pumped in 
daily over nearly three and a half acres of ground, so that it is perfectly 
pure and constantly changed. There is no wind there, and hundreds of 
people who do not bathe sit on the Terrace watching the bathers in their 
bright and variegated costumes. The Terrace Baths are the leading es- 
tablishment in Alameda, and unsurpassed by any baths in the world. 

One of the latest successful ebullitions of nineteenth century ingenuity 
is the New Tule Carpet Lining now being manufactured in this city. The 
factory is on Fourteenth avenue and P street, in South San Francisco, 
and its utility is so apparent that it has been applied to most of the pub- 
lic buildings in the city, besides being universally used in private dwell- 
ings all over San Francisco, and even in Eastern cities. Its superiority 
over all other carpet linings consists in the fact that it not only makes 
the carpet more pleasant to walk upon, but also protects it from wear, 
allowing dust and dirt to percolate and find its way to the floor, instead 
of grinding the surface of the carpet and spoiling its face. The Tule 
Carpet Lining will be found an invaluable blessing in every household, 
and it is a saving of money to take up carpets at any time and lay this 
excellent material under them. 

It is a well-known fact that the climate of California, owing to its 
extreme dryness, severe winds and violent rainstorms, is a most trying 
one to buildings of all descriptions. In order to protect himself against 
these drawbacks, the householder falls back upon the use of paint. The 
question then suggests itself : What paint? Without hesitation, we say: 
The Imperishable, sold by James R. Kelly & Co., on Market street, be- 
low Beale. It is all that its name implies, and can be purchased in shades 
to suit the most esthetic. The saving in using the " Imperishable " lies 
mainly in the fact that one coating of it goes as far, and lasts longer than 
two of any other. It will cover, also, more space than any other paint 
yet invented, and is weather-proof, water-proof, sun-proof, and in fact 
the very best pigment ever invented. 

The talk Of the town is the Busby hand-made, welted glove. The 
feature about this article is the patent welt, which gives it strength, elas- 
ticity and durability. At Mr. Busby's establishment, at 412 Market 
street, gloves are made in buckskin, dogskin, calf, kid and cloth. We 
have all more or less suffered from the misery occasioned by an illy fit- 
ting, unreliable glove; therefore it is a pleasure to note that we have a 
factory here which turns out gloves of so fine a quality, and so strong, 
that they can compete with any rival manufactory in the world. 

" Where did I buy my hat ?" you ask. To auswer you is such a fool- 
ish task. I bought it, of course, from Madame Skidmore, a lady who, in 
ten minutes, did more to make me look beautiful, modest and dutiful, 
than any other millinery establishment in the world could. Madame 
Skidmore's parlors are at 1114 Market street, and the first ladies in the 
city can be constantly seen there, purchasing the latest style of bonnet or 
hat. All you have to do is to remember the address, and to go there to 
get a lovely bonnet. 

Piper Heidaieck Champagne.— Henry Lund, 214 California street, 
Bole agent for the Pacifie Coast, is in constant receipt of both Quarts and 
Pints of this old fav orite Wine. 

Best pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724J Market street. 



HIGHEST STOCK OJTJOTATIONS 
For the Week Ending July 15, 1881. 

COMFILRD BY GSORGR C. UlCKOX & CO., 410 CALIFORNIA StRKBT. 



Nam* of Mink. 



'Albion 

•Argenta 

"Amies 

Alpha 

A1U ... . 

Addenda , 

'Bullion 

Belcher , 

Best & Belcher 

♦Benton 

Bodie Con 

Boston Con 

Bechtet Con , 

'Belle Isle 

Buhver Con , 

Cuncordia 

Concordia (Va.)..., 

Crown Point 

Chollar 

'California 

Con. Virginia 

•Caledonia 

Confidence 

Eureka Con 

Exchequer 

Fairfax 

Gould & Curry.... 
"Grand Prize,.. . 

Goodshaw 

Hale&Norcross. . 

Julia 

Justice 

Kentuck 

Lady Washington. 

Mexican 

Mount Diablo 

Mono 

Modoc 

Navajo 

Northern Belle. 

Noonday , 

North Noonday. . . 

Oro 

Ophir 

Overman 

Occidental 

Potosi 



Silver Hill 

Seg Belcher 

Silver King, Arizona . 

♦Scorpion 

Sierra Nevada 

Tioga 

♦Union Con 

Utah 

Ward 

Wales Con 

Yellow Jacket 



TURSDAY. WrDNKBDY 
A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. 



19$ 



2ll 



Pai. 

A.M. 



21* 



211 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 



SIGNAL SERVICE METEOROLOGICAL REPORT, WEEK 
ENDING JULY 14. 1881, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Highest and- Z,otvest Barometer. 



Prl. 8. 



20.997 
29.957 



53 

74.7 
W. 
361 
Fair. 



Sat. 9. 



30.011 
29.5WG 



Sun. 10 



30.0U 
29.954 



Mon 11 



29.969 

29.S49 



Tue. 12 



29.853 
29.S06 



29.S0C 



Maximum and Minimum Thermometer. 



I 



61 | 63 ' 72 I 65 

63 ! 52 ! 52 55 

Mean Daily Humidity. 

79.7 I 82.0 | 73.0 1 71.7 

Prevailing Wind. 

W. | sw. I w. i w. i 

Wind— Miles Traveled. 

474 | 340 | 256 I 273 | 

State of Weather. 
Fair. | Fair. | Clear. | Clear. | 
Rainfall in Twenty-four Hours 
I I I I 



62 
63 



I 74.7 | 



29.998 

29.916 

62 

51 

79.0 
W. 

293 
Fair. 



I 



Total 'Rain During Season beginning July 1, 1881 inches 



BOYS' AND GIRLS' MO SOCIETY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Subscriptions will be than k fully re-col vo»l in behnlf of the 
s octety by any d! the offieers named below, or by Mr. H. L. Chamberlain, its 
collector, who wilt call Upon those who may I r 

Trustees:— Andrew MeF. Davis (President). 41 First street: James S. Bunnell 
(Secretary), Room S, 320 Sansome street; Dudley C. Bates ^Treasurer), K 
Nevada Block; Charles K. Alien. 180 Beale street; George & Butler 
street; Sol. Heydenfeldt, Room 33, Nevada Block; George O. Blcfeax, 410 California 
street; Alex. H. Loughborough, 507 Montgomery street; Charles A. Murdock, 532 
Clay street. April 2. 

EDWARD BOSQUI & CO., 

Printers, Engravers, Lithographers and Bookbinder*, 

leidesdorff street, from Clay to Commercial. 



A. WALDSTEIN, 

lthograpber anil Zlncograpber, No. 320 Sansome street, 

J Room 4S, Second Floor. J» n - 29- 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1881. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 
They are having lively times in Tunis, if we can believe the daily dis- 
patches. Recently a conflict occurred in the streets of Tunis between 
the French and Arabs and Tunisian soldiers, who recently returned from 
Sfax, where they were not landed for fear they would not fight the in- 
surgents. The Tunisians taunted the Arabs with being bad Mussulmans, 
and shouted for a holy war. One Arab was seriously wounded, and his 
comrades to the number of five hundred took him to the French Legation 
and demanded justice. 

They are no better off in the matter of incorruptibility in England than 
we are here at a primary election. Prosecution was begun this week 
against election agents in Sandwich for illegally influencing votes. One 
pleaded guilty, and sentence was deferred. At the next Chester Assizes, 
Liberal and Conservative election agents in Macclesfield will be prose- 
cuted on like charges. 

Mr. Bradlaugh is, as we say in America, slightly on his ear. On Thurs- 
day last he served formal notice upon the Speaker and other officers of 
the House of Commons, protesting against his previous expulsion from 
the House as illegal, and giving notice that, before the 3d of August, he 
will present himself, and that any one endeavoring to prevent him will 
be committing an illegal act, and he will resist physical force and en- 
deavor to overcome it, if offered. 

M. Gambetta, who presided at a banquet of the guild of toy-makers at 
St. Maude" recently, mentioned that the elections would probably take 
place about September 25th. In the course of his speech he said : "We 
have outlived many tempests, and it is not at a time like this that miser- 
able personal disputes should be placed in the scale with the welfare of 
the Republic. When one's labors have not been crowned with success 
one resumes them on the morrow with more ardor than before. People 
talk of the multiplicity of constituencies to whom I am declared to intend 
offering myself for election. I am at home withjone arrondisBement only, 
and that, I think, cannot be seriously contested against me." 

The recent reports about the nervousness of the Czar, and the prostra- 
tion of the Czarina, seem to lack confirmation. We have been hugging 
the idea for the last three weeks that he has been hiding, in a state of ex- 
treme terror induced by the threats of the Nihilists. Now the news 
comes that the Czar and Czarina and Czarowifceh. on Tuesday, without 
ceremony or important escort, came from Peterhof on a steam yacht, 
landed at the English quay, and drove in an open carriage to attend Mass 
at Partress Cathedral. The news is necessarily taken from, the wires, and 
therefore to be accepted cum grano sails, but the idea of a man wrapping 
himself up in the cotton wool of cowardice, who is Emperor of Russia, is 
impossible to accept. 

RESERVED SEATS. 
Editor News Letter : The disgraceful affair at the Bush-Street The- 
ater on Monday night is of importance enough to be noticed by the press, 
which, by the way, is the only curb the theatrical profession seems to re- 
gard in the slightest degree. A Mr. Harris {whom I do not even know 
by sight) went to the theater some time before eight, paid his dollar for 
admission, and took a vacant seat at the back of the house. At that 
time the last four rows of seats were not sold. He occupied this position 
until the performance had commenced, and, in fact, until a quarter past 
eight. At that hour a person purchased this seat, and, upon Mr. Harris 
declining to surrender it, on the plea that it was not sold when he 
took it, and that he could not then obtain another, the policeman in at- 
tendance arrested Mr. Harris, and, with great and unnecessary violence, 
dragged him from the theater to the city prison on the charge of having 
resisted an officer. I sincerely hope that Mr. Harris will test this case to 
the utmost, and I trust he will sue the theatrical management for heavy 
damages. It is time the question was settled as to whether the public 
have any rights in the theaters which the management is bound to respect. 
I have always been of the opinion that when a ticket of admission was 
sold it conferred the right to any unoccupied seat, or any seat unsold at 
that time, and, if the case could be carried to a final decision, I believe 
it would be ruled that, after the doors are opene' ad tickets of admis- 
sion are being sold, no reserved seats can be disposed of. While speaking 
of this policeman, I should like to call the attention of the proper au- 
thorities to a gross violation of the law, which it certainly ought to be his 
duty to prohibit, and which is nightly committed under his very nose. An 
ordinance forbids any chairs or stools being used in the aisles of any the- 
ater. Every night since the opening of the Minstrels a double row of 
stools has extended the whole length of the center aisle. Monday night 
last it took twenty minutes to clear the house. It is safe to say that, 
with the inadequate means of exit from this house, and the evil custom 
of extra chairs, an alarm of fire and a panic would result in the loss of 
hundreds of lives, for not one-half the occupants would ever reach the 
street. It is the duty of the management to obey the law, and it is the 
duty of the sworn officers of the law to see that the law is enforced, and 
it is the duty of the theater-going public to weigh these facts before trust- 
ing themselves in this place under its present system of management. 
Lex. 

A Warning to Drinkers.— Nowthat the South Pacific Coast Railroad 
has, by increased facilities, added immensely to its Alameda and Oakland 
travel, the public will be pleased to learn that Frank J. Connelly still 
runs the bars on the steamers Bay City, Newark and Garden City. When 
it is understood that Mr. Connelly sells Hotaling's "J. H. Cutter Whisky" 
and J. W. Shaffer's " Bon Ton " and other fine brands of cigars, there is 
no longer an excuse for any gentleman corroding his stomach by drinking 
in a City Front saloon before the boat starts. 



THE AUSTRALIAN MAIL. 

The Australian mail arrived this month duly on contract time, bring- 
ing us full files of our exchanges and a few sheets hitherto new to the Pa- 
cific Coast. Thanks all round. The feeling of pleasure which we expe- 
rience every month on the arrival of the Sydney steamer can hardly be 
understood by Australasian scholars and gentlemen who have never re- 
sided in San Francisco, or any other of our large cities where newspapers, 
whether dailies or weeklies, might be expected to be, if not a credit to 
journalism at least not a disgrace to it. 

Theleading journals of all the metropolitan cities of Australasia are models 
of high-class journals, whether as daily or weekly issues. But the week- 
lies form the wonders of journalism in whatever way we view them. 
Their price is usually six pence (twelve cents). The fine quality of the 
matter generally, the original essayB, the high moral and social, if not al- 
ways religious, tone ; the very paper, ink and type with which they are 
printed, Btamp them with the character of high-class journals. 

Yet, with the exception of New South Wales and the Island of Tasma- 
nia, none of those colonies is older than California; and, save Victoria 
alone, not one nearly so populous as this State, while in most of them the 
population is scattered over an area more than ten times that of Califor- 
nia. Why is this? We do not attempt to account for it, except by the 
suggestion that the local press of every country is a reflex of the social, 
moral and religious condition of the people. 

About the press of this State there is an air of hurry and slovenliness. 
The news paragraphs, whether local or foreign, are a disgraceful jumble, 
hashed up with quack advertisements. One half of the news itself is 
unreliable. The tone is bad, the manner worse, and the morals execrable. 
With two, or at most three weeklies, the Sunday reading is poor in the 
extreme, foreign correspondence, cooked up in a back room in this city, 
and selected matter not always decent. 



THE REAL ESTATE MARKET. 

Business property, if offered at reasonable rates, finds ready buyers, 
and real estate men are not required to keep valuable lots on their 
books longer than two weeks if they are offered at low rates. Property 
in the Western Addition, and especially on the north side of the 
Western Addition, finds ready purchasers if offered at low rates. There 
has been a reasonable amount of transactions during the past week, in- 
cluding the following : J. D. Walker to Sidney L. Johnson, property on 
the east side of Steuart street, a few feet south of Market street, for $30,- 
000; John Grant to the Security Savings Bank, property on the south- 
east side of Townsend street, near Third, for §34,000; E. Durkin et al to 
the San Francisco Savings Union, property on the Bouth side of Howard, 
near Second street, for 812,500; H. Hadeler and William Hadeler to 
Johann A. Schmidt, property on the west side of Kearny street, 22i feet 
north of Geary street, for 852,000; Patrick McGee to G. W. Beckh, 
property on the southeast corner of Market and Fifth streets, for S30,- 
350; A. Haas et al to the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, property 
on the northwest corner of Seventeenth and Folsom streets (Mission 
Block No. 42), for §16,206; J. C. Merrill to the Hibernia Savings and 
Loan Society, property on the north side of California street a few feet 
west of Front street, also the undivided one-half of property on the 
northwest corner of Brannan and Eighth streets, for $82,786; and the 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society to C. S. Fechemier, property on the 
northwest corner of Folsom and Seventeenth streets, for $16,000. 



HELP THE HELPLESS. 

The San Francisco Fruit and Flower Mission held its quarterly 
meeting on Wednesday last. The Visiting Committee reported that 185 
visits bad been made to private houses. Miss Sadie Maynard, Chairman 
of the Visiting Committee, stated to the Mission that no less than thirty- 
five private cases were carefully attended to twice a week, the Committee 
supplying them with flowers and all the delicacies that the doctors had 
recommended. In the two days of each week for the past quarter, and 
which are set apart for this charitable work, more than 7,085 bouquets 
had been distributed. In the way of reading matter over 14,000 news- 
papers and magazines have found their way into the hospitals and char- 
itable institutions, the State prisons and the Pensacola in the last week. 
Very few people have any conception of the value of the work done by 
this charity. Through the assistance of the press the inmates of all our 
hospitals are provided with newspapers and from private sources with 
fruit and flowers. It might seem immodest to mention that our innumer- 
able exchanges go to the Mission except that we know that many other 
papers in the city do the same thing. 

DEATHS IN THE CITY PRISON. . 
The average San Francisco policeman is quite as much of an adept 
as his Eastern and European brothers at jumping at a conclusion. He 
finds a man lying insensible on the sidewalk, and immediately concludes 
he is drunk. In nine cases out of ten, he is right, but the question sug- 
gests itself as to whether the life of the tenth man is not of sufficient 
value to render a more minute examination of the other nine a matter of 
pubiic importance. The nasal organs of our efficient police may be most 
reliable in cases where whisky judgment is concerned, but as most 
of the force wear mustaches, and occasionally imbibe themselves, their de- 
tection of its use by others is not safe to bet on. Nearly every week 
deaths occur in the City Prison, and lives are lost, which even a casual 
surgical examination might have saved. Would it not be as well to give 
the insensible man the benefit of the doubt, and let the police surgeon or 
his deputy have a look at him before he is pitched into a cage with a 
dozen squalid drunks to take his chances of life, death or disgrace. 

The Assassin. — One would suppose that an assassin would be an unin- 
teresting subject for pictorial art. The Government, however, ordered 
pictures to be made of the fellow Guitteau, not less than ten different 
views having been taken by the well-known photographer, Bell, of Wash- 
ington, and are, of course, the only correct likenesses to he had. They 
may be found at Snow's, 12 Post street. 

St John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor. The Rev. Dr. Scott, Pastor, will preach Sunday at 11 A.M. and 
7& p.m. " Prayer and Praise Service, 6£ P.M. Public cordially invited. 

If you get a case of King, Morse & Co.'s Champagne Cider you will 
find it both excellent and economical. This is a case where our advice is 
not worthless. 



Price par Copy. 10 Cents.] 



ESTABLISHED JULY. 20. 1S56. 



[Annual Subscription. S5. 



€ ^1 WJVy^Blqs^ 




(&tdif#mi& 



nikx&tx. 



DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 32. 



SAN FBANOISOO, SATUBDAY, JULY 23, 1881. 



NO. 2. 



G 



OLD BARS— 890@910— Refined Silver- 
Mexican Dollars, 9&@10 per cent, disc. 



13@13i $ cent, discount. 



JW" Exchange on New York, 1-10 premium; On London, Bankers, 49£ ; 
Commercial, 49|. Paris, sight, 5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams, 
15-100 per cent. 

*3" Price of Money here, 6@10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
open market, 1@1$ per month. Demand fight. On Bond Security, 
3@4£ per cent, per year on Call. 

*3" Latest price of Sterling in New York, 484@486. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

San Francisco July 29, 1881. 



Stocks and Bonds. 

BONDS. 

Cal. State Bonds, 6's,'57 

S. F. Citv & Co. B'ds, lis,'6S 

S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 7s 

Montg'y Av. Bonds 

Dupont Street Bonds 

Sacramento City Bonds. . . . 

Stockton City Bonds 

Yuba County Bonds ....... 

Marysville City Bonds 

Santa Clara Co. Bonds 

Los Angeles County Bonds. 

Los Angeles Citv Bonds 

Virg'a & Truckee R. R. Bds. 
Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bds 

Oakland City Bonds 

Oregon R. & N. Bonds, 6s.. 

S. P. R. R. Bonds 

U. S. 43 (ex-coup'!)) 

BANKS. 

Bank of California (ex-div). . 

Pacific Bank (ex-div) 

First National (ex-div) .... 
1N8U RANCH COMPANIES. 

Union (ex-div) 

Fireman's Fund (ex-div).... 



Sid. 

105 

Nora. 

Nom. 

60 

50 

50 
105 
103 
100 
105 
110 
110 
101 
110 
125 
112 
100 
116J 

147J 
126 
112J 

123 
123 
123 



Asked 



Nom. 
Nom. 



106 
102 
107 
112 

103 
113 
130 
115 

116} 



12$ 
115 

127 
127 
127 



Stocks and Bonds. 

INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

State Investment (ex-div). 
Home Mutual (ex-div). ... 

Commercial (ex-div) 

Western (ex-div) 

RAILROADS. 

C. P. R. R. Stodc 

C. P. R. K. Bonds 

City Railroad 

Omnibus R. R 

N. B. and Mission R. R. . . . 

Sutter Street R. R 

Gearv Street R. R 

Central R. R. Co 

Market Street R. R 

Clay Street Hill R. R 

S. F. Gaslight Co 'ex-div).. 
Oakland Gaslight Co (ex-div) 
Sac'to Gaslight Co (ex-div) . 
Califor'a Powder Co (ex-div) 
Giant Powder Co (ex-div).. 
Atlantic Giant Powder, do . 
Gold and Stock Teleg'h Co. 
S. V. W. W. Co. 'b Stock.... 

S. V. W. W. Co' Bonds 

Pacific Coast S. S. Co's Stock 
Saucelito L. & F. Co.'s St'ck 



Bid. 

112 
115 
112 
100 

94 
H4i 

70 

30 

85 

55 

68 

43 
Nom. 
Nom. 

07:1 

32* 

55 
110 

80 

434 

78 

1004 
1144 

so 

Nom. 



Asked 

115 
118 
115 
105 



110 



694 

Nom. 

Nom. 
68i 
32iJ 
57 

81 
43j 
80 
101 



Nom. 



California (ex-div) 

The difficulty of getting facts regarding dividends paid by miscella- 
neous corporations is greater than we anticipated last week, but we hope 
that, when completed by the next one, it will, in a measure, repay the 
delay. The business of the week has been very limited, owing to the 
firmness with which all kinds of standard securities are held. 

Andrew Baird, 312 California st, 

Boone 8c Oaborn, Patent Solicitors, 320 California street, report the 
following number of patents issued from the U. S. Patent Office to in- 
ventors on the Pacific Coast for the two weeks ending July 12, 1881: Wm, 
Beeson Dillon, Montana Territory, swimming apparatus; Samuel B. H. 
O'Connor and W. D. Ferguson, Virginia City, Nevada, automatic coun- 
ter-balance to pumps; Wm. T. Cottier, Napa, assignor one-half to J. F. 
Montgomery, Sacramento, Cal., ventilator; A. H. Lightall, assignor one- 
half to P. Taylor, San Francisco, combined header and thresher; A. 
Schneider, assignor one-third to C. E. Broad, San Francisco, magazine 
firearm ; John Thomson and C. H. Evans, San Francisco, pumping 
engine; J. R. Adams, Oakland, pillow sham, re-issue; E. T. Barlow, San 
Francisco, barrel tap, re-issue; E. L. a:. J M. A. Dietz, Oakland, dust 
pan; A. Ehrit, West Berkeley, rotary valve; C. J. Hall, San Francisco, 
Bteam boiler and furnace; W. H. Howland, San Francisco, ore amal- 

famator; W. H. Howland, San Francisco, machine for grinding ores; J. 
-epley, Amador City, timber framing machine; W. J. MeOue, San 
Francisco, gearing for carriages; John Hansford, Stockton, feeder for 
thresher; H. Ruth, San Francisco, tension apparatus for cable railways; 
E. W. Wagner, Enterprise, Cal., assignor to J. Heno, ore feeder for 
stamp mills. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange. — New York, July 22, 
1881. United States Bonds— Is. 116g; 4*8, 114!; 3X L02f. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 84@<4 Si). Pacific Mail, 48$ \\ beat, 12663130 ; Western 
Union, 89. Hides, 23@23i. Oil-Sperm, — . Winter Bleached, — . 
Whale Oil, — . Winter Bleached. — . Won] -Spring, tine, 17@32 ; 
Burry, 14@24 ; Pulled, 33@38 ; Fall Clips, 15@17; Burry, 12(515. Lon- 
don, July 22. — Liverpool Wheat Market, 9s. 5d.{S9s. 6d.; Bonds, 4s, 
11U,' ; 4&S, 117V : 3.1s, 1042. Consols, 101 1-1(5. 



THE MOWER. 
Death has been taking a vacation this week, as in all this large city 
only 65 deaths were recorded, as comparing with 87 for the corresponding 
week last year. We are not aware of any special advantage outside of 
red tape in recording the corresponding week last year, as the weather is 
hot one year, cold another, and death and the weather have a good deal 
to do with each other, particularly in the cases of infants and aged people. 
This week the chief causes of death were as follows : Phthisis (as usual), 
10 ; pneumonia, 4 ; brain disease, 4 ; cholera infantum, 3 ; dropsy, 3 ; ina- 
nition, 3; Bright' s disease, 2; infantile convulsions, 2; typhoid fever, 2. 
There are 44 deaths of males recorded and 21 of females. Of these 55 
were white and 10 Mongolian. Six children were still-born. There were 
15 deaths in public institutions. Classed according to nativities, 33 were 
of foreign birth, 8 from the Atlantic Coast, and 24 from the Pacific Coast. 
There are no deaths chronicled from either whooping-cough, diphtheria or 
smallpox. 

The Fireman's Fund Insurance Company has recently made two im- 
portant changes by electing Mr. Wm. J. Dutton to the position of Sec- 
retary. He was formerly Assistant Secretary during Mr. George D. 
Dornin's time. Mr. E. W. Carpenter has been elected Assistant Secre- 
tary. For many years past he was " agency correspondent," a position 
which he held with great credit. Both promotions will add preatly to the 
strength of the Fireman's Fund Insurance Company, already deservedly 
one of the most popular and reliable institutions in California, and the 
united energy of Mr. Dutton and Mr. Carpenter in their new spheres of 
industry will doubtless make its mark on this well-tried corporation. 



The needed list of Directors for the furthering of the business of the 
Aeroplane Co. being now completed, a working quorum of Directors will 
meet every week until the first practical working carriage, the Leland 
Stanford, makes its initial flight at Woodward's (Jaidens or the Mechan- 
ics' Pavilion. At a meeting held this week considerable satisfaction was 
manifested by the Directors at the progress of the Aeroplane, the success 
of which now seems assured. All communications should be addressed to 
E. J. Jackson, Secretary Aeroplane Co., office 609 Merchant street. 



Edison is still pushing on his preparations for lighting up the district 
bounded by Spruce and Wall streets, and Nassau street and East River. 
The wires have been put in nearly 500 houses, and the district will prob- 
ably be lighted by October 1st. The work is all completed, with the ex- 
ception of the erection of heavy engines in a central station. The con- 
tract made with the subscribers is that the light shall cost the same 
amount as gas. The lighting of the district, Edison thinks, will reduce 
the cost of gas to $1 per 1,000 cubic feet. 



The Providence Quartz Mine. — By yesterday's mail we received a 
prospectus of this mine from London. We are glad to observe that a 
valuable property like the Providence has been favorably entertained in 
financial circles there. The wonder is that more of a similar character 
are not taken up. The prospectus itself is beyond cavil, but we should 
like to have seen a stronger Board of Directors than that named, and we 
trust the new company will be successful in obtaining their capital. 

Doctor Ackerman, of the firm of Ackerman Bros., has just returned 
from a business t*t, Iito the East and Europe. He returned to ua two 
weeks ago, leaving again almost immediately for Oregon, where he went 
on business for the firm. He has since come back from Portland, and 
states that the trip was most beneficial to his health and enjoyable 
throughout. It is activity such as this which builds up large enterprises. 



Fall of a Great Bell. — While being rung in a wedding peal the big 
bell in the Minster Tower, Wimbourne, fell ; but, luckily for the ringers, 
got wedged in between two beams in the first floor it came to. The ring- 
ers, in a srreat fright, ran down the tower steps into the churchyard. The 
fallen bell is more than a ton and a half in weight. 

Freights and Charters.— Within the past three days several Wheat 
Spot Charters have been written a large American ship, to Liverpool 
direct, at 75s.; a small British ship to Cork fur orders U. K., 80s.; a large 
British ship to a direct port, 77s. 6d. No disengaged tonnage in port. 
Freights firm. 

London, July 22d.— Latest Price of Consols, 101 1-16. 

Entered at the Fost-O&ce at San Francisco, Cat., as Second-Class 
Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, 8in Frandico, OaUfaraU. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



July 23, 1881. 



REGARDING THE POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The exploits of police officers Dunn and Sherman recently, which re- 
sulted in the shooting and dangerously wounding of an inoffensive citizen 
named Michael McKenna, are significant illustrations of the fact that 
the personnel of our police force is not what it ought to be. For this fact 
the Police Commissioners are responsible. It is a notorious fact that, at 
the outset of the- administration of the present Commissioners, an un- 
worthy and unjustifiable combination was formed between two of them 
with a view to controlling the whole organization, and that the third Com- 
missioner has practically had no voice at all in the management of the 
force. Between these two Commissioners it has been a game of "you 
tickle me and I'll tickle you." We regret being obliged to state this un- 
pleasant fact, because the present Commissioners are gentlemen who, in 
other capacities in life, have acquired a reputation for probity and honor, 
and are respected by those to whom they are best known. The stern 
fact, however, remains, and the public interests, which the News Letter 
always labors to serve, demand that it be stated. When two of three 
Commissioners, to whom a great trust has been confided, form a cabal 
for the purpose, practically, of administering that trust in accordance 
with their own individual will and pleasure, and not in accordance with 
what is right and just, they simply betray the confidence which has been 
reposed in them. In administering the affairs of our Police Department 
there should be no " Star Chamber " meetings of the Commissioners, and 
there shoxild be no secret compact between two of the Commissioners for 
the purpose of excluding the third from all practical participation in the 
conduct of affairs. If everything was fair, square and above board, there 
would be no need for secret sessions. Another thing, the law which 
brought the present Commission into existence contemplated and pre- 
scribed that there should be three Commissioners, and a combination 
which practically reduces the Commissioners to two in number, is a viola- 
tion of the law, and should be made a criminal offense. There are men 
at the present moment incarcerated in San Quentin for violations of the 
law that were not half so hurtful in their nature to the public interests as 
this one is. We know whereof we speak when we say that, by means of 
this combination, men better fitted for a felon's cell than for the perform, 
ance of the duties of a peace officer have been placed on the police force, 
and are kept there now. 

IN THE COUNTRY. 

Highland Springs, July 20, 1881. 

Dear News Letter: This is such a charming place that I write to you 
this week in the hope that you can let me tell your readers all about it — 
how to get here and what you can do when you are here. In the first 
place, I'll tell you how I got here myself. I left the San Quentin Ferry 
at 7:10 a. M., and changed to the San Francisco and North Pacific Rail- 
road cars, passing through the lovely Sonoma valley and arriving at Clo- 
verdale at about 11:20 A.H., after a most pleasant ride. The railroad runs 
smoothly and pleasantly, and we enjoyed the journey so far immensely. 
Perhaps some tiny ham sandwiches, a cold chicken and a wee sip of Ar- 
pad Haraszthy's Eclipse Champagne had something to do with the en- 
hancing of our pleasure about eleven o'clock. But if you are unprovided 
with lunch, you can get an excellent dejeuner a la fourchette at Cloverdale, 
at either the United States Hotel or the Cloverdale House. The proprie- 
tors of the latter are more attentive, although both houses set a good ta- 
ble. Van Arnam & Co.'s stage line for Highland Springs leaves here at 
about 12:20, passing up Sulphur Creek, which is full of trout that can be 
actually seen in the creek and pools below from the stage, and strongly 
tempt the angler. After leaving Sulphur Creek, the stage passes over the 
mountains, arriving at Tyler's, which is half-way, about a quarter to 
three, where the four gallant steeds are led smoking into the stables, to be 
replaced by four others equally good. When you arrive at the top of the 
grade, after leaving Tyler's, a view is had of Clear Lake with its lovely 
valley. Really, it is a grand sight. Down the grade the road winds like 
a serpent, crossing and re-crossing the mountain at least a dozen times be- 
fore you reach the bottom. Two hours more of a ride behind the 
excellent four-in-hand spoken of brings you to Highland Springs, and you 
land in the pleasant sunshine about five o'clock, with just time enough to 
take a bath before dinner. The hotel is two stories high, and there are 
several very cosy cottages. The view surrounding is picturesque in the 
extreme. The mountains are full of game, and deer, quail, rabbits and 
hares are to be had in abundance. 

There are ten springs here, each one having its peculiar mineral value 
and special medicinal qualities. Some contain iron, some soda. Others, 
again, are charged with iron, sulphur and magnesia, etc. Some combine 
all these chemicals. The temperature of the springs vary, the coolest being 
^0° and warmest 82° in Summer. The baths combine the various medicinal 
qualities of four of these springs, having a wonderfully invigorating and 
strengthening effect, acting as a strong tonic. 

The Douche Bath is extremely popular, affording perhaps the greatest 
satisfaction to the bather of anything of the kind in the State. It is 
given by applying a heavy stream of mineral water, of about 80° in tem- 
perature, about six inches wide, which falls a distance of ten feet, having 
the most wonderfully invigorating, appetizing and strengthening effect on 
the system. The waters are, beyond all doubt, the finest in the State. 
One spring, called " The Dutch Spring," is pronounced by tourists who 
have been to the various springs of Germany, to be exactly the same as 
the famous Ems Spring. 

Mrs. J. C. Goods, the proprietress, is deservedly very popular and most 
obliging and attentive to her guests. When once a person is comfortably 
located there he never wants to leave, for the kindness received, the ad- 
vantage of the waters, the croquet ground, than which nothing could be 
finer, make the day one round of pleasure. The croquet ground, by the 
by, is in the center of a grove of trees and wild grape vines, whose shad- 
ows keep it delightfully cool all day long, making it extremely popular 
with the guests. 



At the large reception-room all the visitors congregate in the evening 
to listen to delightful music and enjoy dancing and singing. We play 
chess, draughts, cribbage and all kinds of games, and sometimes we girls 
take a moonlight stroll with some of the young gentlemen, who think 
they are " too utterly utter." Van Arnam & Co.'s stage line runs to Kel- 
seyville, and through to Lakeport, the county-seat of Lake County, 
about twelve miles from Highland Springs. They have thirty horses and 
four stables, own most splendid stock and easy-riding coaches. They have 
also good, careful drivers, and make excellent time bowling over the roads. 
These are kept in A No. 1 order, and there is therefore very little dust. 
In fact, the only dust is the first six miles from Cloverdale up to where 
the Geyser stage turns off the road. 

I have written you an awfully long letter, and, as there is a too aw- 
fully awfully nice guest from the Palace waiting for me, and who plays 
accompaniments divinely, I must go in and sing Esser's " Mein Engel " 
for him in the reception-room. We get the News Letter here regularly, 
and enjoy it ever so much. Madeleine. 

A QUARTER OF A MILLION. 

We reported recently the fact that the "Arcade," or more properly 
speaking, J. J. O'Brien & Co., had bought out the entire stock of Sachs, 
Strassburger & Co., for §235,000, or nearly a quarter of a million of dol- 
lars, which was just about one-third of their value, and which are being 
disposed of at about the rate of 40 cents on the dollar. It is a wonderful 
sight to go in there on any afternoon and see the dozens of clerks — all 
light, quick, gentlemanly fellows, rushing from counter to counter, and 
seemingly knowing where to lay their hands on anything that is called 
for. In this extraordinary purchase of J. J. O'Brien & Co., which in 
point of magnitude has never been equaled in San Francisco, we find in- 
cluded 300 dozens of Misses' hose, ecru, cardinal and sky-blue silk; 2,500 
gross or 300,000 dozen assorted buttons; hundreds of pairs of curtains, lace 
and guipure; rich brocade satins, endless quantities of muslins, sheetings, 
Canton flannels, etc., at less than manufacturers' quoted prices, and in- 
deed everything at rates that make all the outside trade shudder. A hu- 
morous line that we note in an advertisement of the firm, in one of the 
dailies this week, reads: "Two thousand dozen corsets will be slaughtered 
this week." However, as long as this house only slaughters the corsets, 
and not those who wear them, we have no objection. Extraordinary bar- 
gains this week are offered in silks, dress goods, hosiery, cloaks and all 
things necessary to make a home comfortable. Young housekeepers 
should not by any means neglect this opportunity to secure all sorts of 
comforts for home, at the rates of the present sale, and they will do well 
to remember that all goods are marked in plain figures, so that they have 
no need to ask the price. Goods are sent to any part of the country, and 
samples mailed free on application. Now is the time to go and see for 
yourself, before the sale closes, whether the Arcade, of 924, 926 and 928 
Market street, is not offering unparalleled bargains. 

There is no greater luxury than a visit to the Neptune and Mermaid 
Baths, and a good healthy splash in their now splendidly fixed establish- 
ment. Professor Berg is always in attendance to give lessons to ladies 
and gentlemen in swimming. The Baths are at the foot of Larkin street, 
and accessible by the Clay-street and other cars. 



REMOVAL NOTICES. 



THE OP PICE OF THE 
CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY 

HAS BEEN REMOVED TO 

No. 325 Market Street Corner of Fremout. 



THE OFFICE OF THE 
HAWAIIAN COMMERCIAL COMPANY 

HAS BEEN REMOVED TO 

So. 325 Market Street Corner of Fremont. 



THE OFFICE OF 

JOHN D. SPRECKEES & BROTHERS, 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

HAS BEEN REMOVED TO 

No. 325 Market Street Corner of Fremont. 

[July 23.] 

[Organized 1863.] 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Eire and Marine Insurance. 
Assets $1,220,000. 

J8S" The Largest Assets and Largest Income of all the Companies hailing from 
West of New York State. 

D. J. STAPLES President. 

ALPHEUS BULL Vice-President. 



WM. J. DUTTON Secretary. 

E. W. CARPENTER. . . . ABs't Secretary. 



HOME OFFICE: 

Southwest Corner California and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 

[July 23.] 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

Of Hamburg. 

Capital, 91,500,000. V. N. Gold Coin.-- Losses Paid in Gold 
Coin immediately after Adjustment. This Corporation holds contracts of fif- 
teen other European Insurance Companies, re-insuring- by far the greater part of 
every risk, as soon as accepted in our office. The combined subscribed Capital which 
our policies therefore offer to the public amounts to §26,900,000, U. S. Gold Coin, of 
which $7,650,000 is paid up, besides the always available Reserve Funds. 



July 23. 



GEORGE MARCUS & CO., General Agents for Pacific Coast, 
No. 304 California street. 



July 23, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SOCIETY NOTES. 

S.vS FlUVOIBOO, July 90, L88L 
Dear News Letter: The old cry of *• everything quiet on th« Poto 

mac"o>uM very truthfully be applied, with a littlo alteration, to the 
state of society in 'Frisco just now, bat m July is always regarded here 
as an especially " »fi " month socially, 1 do not think we save any greater 
reason t*\ eomplaia of this year than of any that have preceded it during 
the hut decade. Still, people are gradually but .surely returning to town, 
ainl in another month it promises to be more lively. 

Company <I had an informal reception and dance, following an eihibi- 

Hon drill, which they pave at the club-roomi last Tuesday eveninft which 

1! attended and apparently enjoyed by those present, ijut can 

■otbbag be done to improve the floor for dancing? At present it is ex- 

oaedingly heavy, rendering that pastime, more of a toil than a pleasure. 

But let me tell you of the glorious time we had last Monday at the 
golden wedding eelebration of Mr. ami Mrs. Murphy, at Mountain View. 
The "lil couple are among the very earliest settlers in this State, and they 
and their sons are so well known that it is little wonder that between 
three and four thousand guests assembled on that occasion to do them 
hoimr. 

On arrival at the ranch, whither we were conveyed by special train, we 
found that in a throve of oaks a platform several hundred feet square had 
been erected, one eud of which was reserved for the venerable pair. This 
was canopied with flags and hung with garlands of flowers, exquisite floral 
designs appearing also in the greatest profusion. One of the prettiest de- 
BJgnB probably was the huge floral bell, composed of white ro3es, white 
pinks and ferns, the clapper being made of red carnations. On one side 
of thiB, in red pinks, were the numbers 1831, on the other 1881. 

Under this the old couple received their many guests, greeting each cor- 
dially and most warmly. Among them I noticed Judges Ryland and 
Archer, of San Jose, S. O. Houghton, Charlie Hensley and wife, C. B. 
Polhemus and family, Mrs. Judge Wallace, William Matthews, Fred. 
Castle, Mrs. Barte Shorbe, Miss Mary Casey and Wm. Ward; also all 
the Thorntons, including Judge J. D. Thornton and his pretty daughters, 
Mrs. Sam Brookes and her daughter, and the daughters of her sister, 
Mrs. Bessie Nisbet Thornton; Peter Donahoe, with his pleasant, chatty 
wife, who can tell you something kind about everybody; his son and Miss 
Mamie Donahoe; that war-horse of the Democracy, Hon. Philip Roach, 
and the other war-horse, venerable Dr. Gwin; Joe Nougues, Mr. and 
Mrs. Alex. Loughborough, Tiburcio Parrott, Mr. T. J. Bergin, the Ral- 
ston boys, Sam and Willie, were all there, and hundreds of others whom 
space will not permit me to mention. 

At the north side of the platform the band was stationed, and, the cere- 
mony of presentation having been got through with, the orchestra dis- 
coursed its liveliest strains for those who felt inclined to " trip the light 
fantastic," which was done with unflagging energy during the greater part 
of the day. 

Soon after noon we were led to tables laid under the trees, which were 
spread with literally everything in the shape of eatables and 
drinkables that one could possibly think of, while the decorations were 
not only beautiful but of the most varied description, from elaborate de- 
signs in sugar, fruit and nougat to a stuffed bear, which was placed at one 
side. 

Here the guests were served in detachments, many of them partaking, 
for the first time, of a regular Spanish barbacue — beeves, Bheep and pork- 
ers roasted whole — by the dozen, I was going to say, but in sufficient quan- 
tity to feed the army of visitors assembled. Then followed recitations of 
poems and appropriate speeches, and then appeared upon the scene a verit- 
able Irish piper, who upon his bagpipes played jigs innumerable, which 
were danced with spirit on the platform, while the baud rested. 

As night came on, countless Chinese lanterns, suspended from the trees, 
were lighted, making the scene still more gay, and the festivities were, I 
hear, kept up till a late hour, but I was obliged to return to town quite 
early, to ray great regret. Take it all in all, we shall never look "upon its 
like again. 

General John F. Miller, accompanied by Mrs. Miller and pretty Miss 
Dora, returned to his admiring constituents last Monday, and I have 
heard bis good sense highly commended in refusing the reception which 
his friends were anxious to force upon him. 

Fred Sharon also arrived by the same train, and by to-morrow's comes 
Col. C. L. Weller, who, doubtless, will profit by the knowledge gained 
during his encounter with New York sharpers. The many friends in 
'Frisco of Mrs. Bierstadt will no doubt be pleased to hear that her health 
has much improved, and that she is spending the summer at Estes Park, 
in the Rocky Mountains, where Mr. Bierstadt is making studies for some 
orders he has received from abroad. I hear from Monterey that Col. 
Eyre has been making it very lively there since his arrival. I intend 
going down on Saturday, and what I see and hear you shall be duly in- 
formed next week. Yours, Felix. 



HOWARD STREET METHODIST CHURCH. 

The usual social which takes place in the parlors of Howard-street 
Methodist Episcopal Church on the first week of each month will be 
deferred next month. Professor 0. B. Smith, an eminent traveler, re- 
cently returned from an extended tour to Europe and Asia, is making 
extensive preparations and will deliver tn)o highly interesting pictorial 
lectures on the principal places of interest, in the parlors of above church, 
on Monday evenings, the 1st and 8th proximo. The learned gentleman 
will give a graphic description of sights and scenes experienced personally 
in Greece, Italy, Syria, Palestine, Egypt and England. Over 150 views 
will be exhibited in the two evenings, consisting of mammoth dissolving 
views of cities, ruins,buildings, rivers, tombs aud works of art, of both 
ancient and modern nations. These views will be thrown vividly upon a 
twenty-f jot canvas, by the aid of a powerful hydro-oxygen calcium light, 
adjusted to the most perfectly constructed lantern ever in use. This de- 
partment of the entertainment is under the supervision of a gentleman 
who has devoted much time and skill in the special preparation of the 
mechanical apparatus for the perfect representation of these magnificent 
views. The proceeds realized will be appropriated to the Sunday School 
Library for the purpose of repairing and replenishing its stock, as it is 
now in a dilapidated conditiou and almost total wreck for lack of funds 
to keep it in circulating order. The philanthropic gentleman, Professor 
O. B. Smith, furnishes the mechanical apparatus for the entertainments, 
and also gives his services gratuitously. It is anticipated that his noble 
efforts will be rewarded with a good attendance. 



STRAW HATS! 



Come and See the Elegant Styles, the Very 
Latest, the Nobbiest, and all Just Opened. 

MACKINAW, MARACIBO, 

CANTONS, PANAMA, 

MILANS, PEDLE BRAIDS, 

PALM, TUSCAN, 

LEGHORNS, ETC- 



AT THE GREAT I XL, 

Corner Kearny and Commercial Streets, S. 



F. 



•WHAT THE HARVEST -WILL BE. 

No careful observer of passing events can deny that the recent 
attempt on the life of President Garfield is likely to be productive of very 
beneficial results to the country. It has already made the terms ** stal- 
wart" ?nd "stalwartism," and the things designated thereby, odious in 
the eyes of the great majority of the American people. This is some- 
thing which should cause every well-wisher of the country and its insti- 
tutions to rejoice. '* Stalwartism" in politics signifies all that is corrupt 
and unprincipled. The political "stalwart " runs witb the party machine, 
and has no higher hope or wish than to secure party success. The best 
interests, the happiness and the prosperity of the whole country are things 
for which the " stalwart " cares nothing ; for good government he cares 
nothing. In short, he has no regard for anything save bis own selfish 
personal advantage. The civil service he regards, not as something 
which must necessarily be maintained in order that the public business 
may be transacted, but as an institution the principal object of which is 
to allow him to pay out of the public treasure chest pensions and salaries 
to his adherents and henchmen. "Stalwartism" in politics signifies 
11 Boss" rule. There is not an overbearing, tyrannical, dictatorial politi- 
cal " Bobs" throughout the length and breadth of the United States who 
is not a "stalwart." Cameron is a "stalwart," Logan is a "stalwart," 
Conkling is a "stalwart." On the other side, Tweed was a "stalwart," 
and his successor, John Kelly, is a "stalwart," Not one of those 
men who have betrayed public trusts and stolen public moneys 
has been anything else but a "stalwart." Belknap was a "stal- 
wart," the Chicago Whisky Ring was made up of " stalwarts," 
Robeson was a "stalwart," Sheppard was a "stalwart," Dorsey, Brady 
& Co. are " stalwarts," and George C. Gorham is a " stalwart." " Stal- 
wartism," in other words, is a phrase which signifies everything that is 
dishonorable, dishonest, dangerous and unpatriotic in American politics. 
The death of this dangerous foul thing will inure to the material benefit 
of the country. The crack of the assassin's pistol has also served to con- 
centrate public attention upon the pressing necessity which exists for 
Civil Service Reform. This concentration of thought will, in time, lead 
to resultant actions. The pain which has been inflicted upon President 
Garfield, and the anguish which has been inflicted upon his family, will 
not have been suffered in vain if it hastens the day when the American 
Civil Service will be put upon the same basis that the Military Service 
is, for the day which sees the Civil Service patronage wrested from the 
hands of politicians, will also see the unprincipled demagogue give place 
to the conscientious patriot, the dishonest buffoon make way for the in- 
tellectual man who has an honorable ambition to take a hand in the man- 
agement of his country's affairs. Presidential and other elections will 
become struggles for the success of great principles, and will no longer be, 
as they are now, indecent scrambles for "spoils." Truth, and honor, and 
patriotism, and a desire for the well-being of the country, will once more 
predominate in the council halls of the nation. 



THE SALT SEA WAVES. 

We notice that the excursions of the Southern Pacific Railroad this 
year have become so popular that there is the greatest difficulty in ac- 
commodating the tired metropolitans who are eager to avail themselves 
of a sea-bath at Monterey or Santa Cruz, and a stay of five hours at 
either of those delightful seaside resorts. The intending tourist can choose 
between the immense swimming tank in the bathing pavilion at the Hotel 
del Monte, in Monterey, or the pleasant waves at the sunny beach of 
Santa Cruz. A special excursion- train will leave this city to morrow, 
starting from Fourth street and Townsend at 7 A. m., and stopping at 
Valencia street at 7:10 A. M. It returns from Monterey at 4:30 p.m., and 
from Santa Cruz at 4:10 P.sr. During the summer months there can be 
no greater pleasure than a Sunday trip to the southern seaside watering- 
places, and thousands in this city daily attest the comfort of the ride, the 
beauty of the scenery, and the pleasure experienced during the stay at 
the sea-shore. The round trip to-morrow costs but $3. 



Kearney's tongue moveth not, except to the side of his cheek in de- 
rision. His appeal for dollars and dimes last Sunday to save the Secre- 
tary of the Sand-lot gang from death by starvation, resulted in a response 
of a little over §3. It was too much, perhaps, for the appeal ; it was too 
little for the object Kearney is fat and rich, and should make poor old 
Moore's latter end easy if he had any gratitude or honor. But he is 
Denis Kearney, W. P. C, and there is no more to be said. Pass the 
creature along. 

Mr. J. R. Keene has presented the sum of 5,000 francs to the poor of 
Paris out of his winnings by the race for the Grand Prize of Paris, [Just 
like him! There is no impulse suggested by sodlike humanity to which 
[( he does not respond. May the wheel of fortune never desert him.] 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 23, 1881. 



GET READY FOR NOVEMBER. 

A contemporary has unearthed an idiot named Leonardo Aretino, an 
Italian "prophet" of the fourteenth century, whoBe knowledge of things 
was so great that he predicted the destruction of our globe for November, 
1881. He was wide awake enough to fix a date for the catastrophe subse- 
quent to the limit of time within which he would have to take his own 
departure, and thus he could challenge contradiction pretty safely. In 
this respect he was wiser than Dr. Cumming and the other prophets who 
lived to proclaim and to prove their own idiocy. This is the Italian 
prophet's programme : First day, the sea will overflow. Second day, the 
w ater will penetrate into the soil. Third day, death of all freBh-water 
fish. Fourth day, death of sea animals. Fifth day, death of the birds. 
S ixth day, fall of all houses and buildings. Seventh day, fall of the rocks. 
Eighth day, earthquake. Ninth day, fall of the mountains. Tenth day, 
men will become dumb. Eleventh day, the graves will open. Twelfth 
day, rain of stars. Thirteenth day, death of all mankind. Fourteenth 
day, destruction of heaven and earth by fire. Fifteenth day, general 
resurrection and last judgment. 

All persons owing any money to the News Letter should discharge their 
obligations without delay in case this prophecy is fulfilled ; though it is 
only right to state that we have arranged to continue the publication of 
the News Letter all the same, as we are neither heavenly or earthy. We 
intend to catch some of the biggest stars and exhibit them in our office, 
together with some of the explosive material used in the destruction of 
h eaven and earth. If anybody wants any little trinkets taken care of 
from the 13th to the 15th day (or before for that matter), they can leave 
them at our office, but as men will be dumb they should bring their wives, 
sisters, cousins or aunts with them to give the necessary instructions and 
explanations. It will be a good and sensible idea to go out fish- 
ing on the third day, as there will be a corner in Salmon on the fourth 
day. The earthquake can be seen splendidly from our roof, ladies only 
admitted. A special performance will be given by the Biancbi-Montaldo 
Troupe on the day men become dumb, which will be greatly enjoyed by 
those who have heard the tenor. An excellent view of the fall of Mount 
Diablo and Tamalpais can be obtained from the Oakland ferry-boat, fare 
fifteen cents. There will be a pigeon match at San Bruno, on the fifth 
day after the death of the birds. The best place to witness the fall of all 
the houses and buildings will be the sixth floor of the Palace Hotel. An- 
ticipating the death of all mankind, we have arranged to purchase the 
business of most of the undertakers. Anybody wishing to buy coffins in 
advance Bhould send their orders to the News Letter. Anybody caught 
stealing sea-lions after the fourth day will be prosecuted with the utmost 
rigor of the law. When the whole business is over there will be a special 
extra double edition of the NewsLetter, printed in red ink, with gilt edges. 
Orders should be sent in advance. 



PICTURESQUE. 

Brown, who is a diligent^ peruser of the daily press, read in a paper, 
the other morning, that for the coming season it would be fashionable to 
be picturesque. For a moment he was at a loss to understand what that 
could mean as relating to the body corporate, when suddenly he remem- 
bered his experience on that never-to-be-forgotten occasion when he had 
his photograph taken for her. Acting upon this idea (for Brown is noth- 
ing if not fashionable), he that afternoon arrayed himself in a pair of 
light doeskin pants, a green cutaway coat and a broad expanse of white 
vest, across which was artistically displayed his massive watch-chain. 
Then, brushing his hair and whiskers so as to stand out stiff, as though 
"each particular hair did stand on end," he carefully placed his light 
gray stovepipe on the side of his head, at an angle of 45 degrees. This, 
with a pair of lavender kids and a cane, completed his costume. Assum- 
ing a smile, which it pleased him to imagine was one of the most 
captivating, but which in reality made him look like a harmless idiot, he 
sallied forth to be admired and envied. He flattered himself he attracted 
attention. Perhaps he did, though not of the kind he desired. Near the 
White HouBe he met his friend Smith, who asked him what in Hades — 
the new name for a country it is uncomfortable to patronize during hot 
weather — was the matter with him ? "Ah," said the delighted Brown, "I 
thought you would notice it. Why, man alive, it's the last thing out — 
I'm picturesque I " 

"SASSAGES" IS RIZ. 

Oar sapient Supervisors have ordered that no more doers shall be 
impounded, as the pound-keeper's establishment costs four hundred dol- 
lars a month, and retrenchment must commence somewhere. This is 
" penny wise," for it virtually dispenses with the necessity of paying the 
tax on dogs, which is more than the amount sought to be saved. It is 
"pound foolish," first, because it is foolish to abolish the pound, and, 
secondly, because stray dogs are very dangerous to the numerous children 
who play in our streets in the suburbs. Which is the better policy, to 
have the children worried and bitten by stray dogs, or pay the pound- 
keeper ? _ This riddle can best be answered by the parents of children at 
the Mission and in the Western Addition, and the answer is not doubt- 
ful. This, in all seriousness. Now, how about the " sassengera ?" from 
whence the supply to the increasing demand? Are we to pay famine 
pricesfor this favorite refection because of this " dog-goned "resolution ? 
Here is a show for the financial talents of the " famous philanthropist " 
who, two years ago, made a corner on the poor man's coals. Make a cor- 
ner on the bow-wows, and a " sassage boom " will result, and the poor 
man's sausage money will be in the rich man's pocket. And what is to 
become of Sam Weller's " little old gen'elman who was so remarkably 
fond of 'sassages' all his life?" "To the demnition bow-wows" with 
such municipal orders! 



BANKS. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISGO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

AVM. ALTORD President. 

THOMAS BBOWN, Casbier | B MIRKAI, Jr., Ass t Cashier 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calf ornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, the Oriental Bank Cor- 
poration. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 1 , Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— -Capital paid up, $1,800,- 
000, with power to increase to S10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
Bome streets. Head Office— 28 Cornhill, London. Branches — Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Cheek 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada — Bank of Montreal; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSEND, Manager. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISGO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital 91*500,000, Gold. President, B. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, George A. Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Wormser, James Pbelan, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents— London : Baring BroB. & Co. Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin 
Lane, Lombard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : HeBse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer & Co. NewYork: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Black stone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available iu Europe, Chiua and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

THE AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC BANK, LIMITED, 

(Incorporated Under the Companies' Statute, 1864), 
42 Collins Street "West Melbourne. 

Capita], Cioo.OOO. in 100,000 £5 Snares. Subscribed Cap- 
ital, £107,500. Directors:— David Eeath, Esq. (Messrs. Beath, Schiess 
& Co.), Chairman; John Whittingham, Esq. (Messrs. Whittingham Bros.),Vice- 
Chairman; M. H. Davies, Esq. (Messrs. Davies & Strongman); Wm. Anderson, Esq. 
(Messrs. Wm. Anderson & Son); Wm M'Lean, Esq (Messrs. M'Leau Bros. & Rigg). 
A Third Issue of Ten Thousand Shares is now in progress, a large portion of which 
were forthwith applied for by the existing shareholders. The novel feature of op- 
tional payments makes this form of investment equally available for the capitalist 
and for the man of moderate means, for the clerk or the artisan, and hence the 
Share List is representative of all classes. HENRY CORNELL, 
July 16. Manager. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

[Incorporated 1880.3 

(Capital, $3,100,000. -San Francisco Office, 43* California 
J street; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; 
Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, Bankof England and London 
Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co.; Boston, Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Busi- 
ness in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and all parts of the 
world. rOctober 1st, 1880. 1 Oct. 9. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid "Dp $3,000,000. 

Reserve, XT. S. Bonds 4,000,000. 

Agency at Wev York, 62 Wall street. 

Agency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. Nov. 8. 

THE ANGLO-CAUFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

422 California St., San Francisco. 

London Office, 3 Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Scl- 
igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, $6,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEINHART, Managers. 
P. N. Luientual, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 8300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President, Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sanaome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar unci Leinbnnk, Mo 526 California street, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors.— Fied. 
Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kxuse, George H. Eggerp, N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon, 
Peter Spreckels, Ign. Steinhart. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 



GEORGE C. HICKOX & CO., 



C Commission Stock Brokers, nave Removed to No. 410 
J CALIFORNIA STREET. Feb. 12. 



July 23, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SUMMER. 

[BY ELAINE GOOPALB.] 

She walk.-* between tho teaseled corn, 

Whose serried ranks her fair face screen ; 
She greets me with a careless scorn, 

And scornful laughter rings between. 
Black-haired, red-lipped, her dark, bright face, 

The toy of every woman's whim. 
Her form the mold of sensuous grace, # 

Supple and smooth and round of limb. 
And is it Summer I behold? 

A breathing splendor, stretched and warm, 
Within her bosom's plenteous fold 

She thrusts a brown and shapely arm. 
This harvest nymph, whose loosened braid 

Drops down a cheek of glowing tan, 
Incarnate Summer is, and made 

To satisfy the heart of man. 
Nay. but a simple country lass 

That dark abundant beauty wears, 
Her poppied slumbers softly pass 

The ripened harvest warmth she shares. 
Beside her couch the heat is sore — 

Her silken couch, with green o'erlaid ; 
Whose glistening spears I pass before, 

And leave unharmed my barefoot maid. 

"WHAT TO DO WITH GUITEAU. 

We think it creditable to the moral sanity of the country that little 
personal animosity is expressed toward the madman who so nearly de- 
prived the country of its chief magistrate, and who hears of the failure of 
his deed with lamentations that he did it so badly. That Charlea G-uiteau 
will be punished by ordinary process of law, we do not believe. In the 
interests of our Presidents, present and to come, we hope he will not. 
The laws of the District punish such assaults as this merely with eight 
years of imprisonment. At the end of that period, or possibly a still 
shorter one, the fanatic would be free to resume the bloody work, whose 
failure he so much regrets. It would be much better to treat him as the 
English did a similar character, who fired at the Queen in the opening 
year of her reign. They acquitted him of crime on the ground that he 
was insane, and then, to his disgust, committed him to Bedlam, taking 
precautions that be should never be released. We owe some such precau- 
tion to the men whom we make by our votes the targets of such criminals. 
The notion that Guiteau had accomplices of the same sort is now en- 
tertained by no one. Detectives have traced his conduct for weeks 
before the crime, without finding a trace of evidence to implicate any 
person. The one circumstance on which it was possible to erect a 
suspicion was his possession of money. Although destitute of any 
visible means of support, and too poor to pay his board-bill, he 
managed to arm himself, and to pay the hire of the carriage which took 
him to and from the depot. But it has been found that he had just re- 
ceived by Post-office order $25, which was due him as commission from 
an insurance company; and this small sum he had devoted to the execu- 
tion of his fanatical enterprise. But if he had no accomplices, he seems 
likely to have some imitators. Another madman has appeared on the 
scene, with an equally divine commission to kill either Mr. Blaine or 
Mr. Arthur, he is not quite resolved which! Such acts as this of Guiteau 
are not unlikely to prove infectious to weak brains. Hence the wisdom 
of the English law which inflicts a flogging upon any one who assaults the 
Queen. — Philadelphia American. 

DOUSE THE GLIM! 

The tramp and the burglar are jubilant. The Supervisorial recom- 
mendation to reduce the number of the street lamps by forty-five per 
cent, is enough to make the stoutest-hearted suburban householder quake 
with apprehension, for himself not alone, but for his family. He will be 
unable to leave his house after sundown. The " Lodge " excuse for late 
hours will be no longer valid, for the simple reason that he won't risk his 
life trying to get home after dark; and then the " average " husband will 
not care to leave his wife and children unprotected. The request to the 
Gas Inspector is for a report on " those street-lights that can be discon- 
tinued with the least detriment to the public welfare. 1 ' The street-lights 
have hitherto been a detriment, and a Berious one, to the *' burglarial " 
and " tramporial " professions, and as the gentlemen aforesaid are to re- 
tire from their present lucrative positions very shortly, it may be that 
they do not wish any detrimental impediments to remain in the way of 
the adoption of what will evidently be their new professions. The forty- 
five per cent, reduction, if such must be, should be made in the center of 
the town, where there is mutual protection and double the force of police, 
but not in the suburbs and outskirts of the town. 



The Duke of Cambridge, while at the dinner of the London cabmen, 
the other night, received a somewhat equivocal compliment. One of the 
cabmen, in responding to the toast of the evening, described the joy 
which he felt at the first sight of the duke. His Royal Highness, said 
Cabby, had a presence and an appearance which, had he not known who 
he was, would nave induced him to think that he was a cabman of thirty 
years' standing. The round and rubicund duke looked glum for a 
moment, and then joined heartily in the laughter which followed. — The 
Republic. 

Bullet in the Brain. — The death of a soldier who had carried a bullet 
in his brain for sixty-five years was reported recently. The wound was 
received at the battle of Waterloo. The bullet entered at the right eye, 
destroying it, of course, and traversing the brain, lodged in the back and 
lower part of the head. After the outer wound was closed, he suffered 
no special inconvenience from the presence of the bullet, although always, 
when turning himself in bed, he could feel that the ball dropped into a 
different position. He was unusually healthy, and he died of old age. — 
Army and Navy Journal. 

It does not follow that the man who has no front teeth is a back 
biter. 



POISON OAK 

CURED BY THE USE OF 

STEELE'S GRIN DELIA LOTION, 

oa 

FLUID EXTRACT OF GRINDELIA ROBUSTA. 



Manufactured, and Sold by 

JAMES Q. STEELE & CO Druggists, 

635 Murk ii street, Under the Palace Hotel. 

[May 7.] 

DR. A. J. BOWIE, 

Having: entirely recovered his health, has resnmed the 
practice of Medicine and Surgery in conjunction with his two sons, DR. 
HAMILTON C. BOWIE and DR. ROBERT J. BOWIE, Graduates of the Royal Uni- 
versity, Munich. 

Kesidenoes 729 Sutter St. and 714 O'Parrell St. 

EsT* Telephonic communication with Office and Residences at all Hours. 
Hours: 10—4 P.M. [March 28.1 Office: 330 SUTTER STREET. 

DR. WILLIAM E. TAYLOR. 

OFFICE: 215 HEART ST. RESIDENCE: THE BALDWIN. 

Feb. M OFFICE HOURS: 1 to 4 P .M. 

DR. JAMES W. KEENEY, 

OFFICE AND RESIDENCE: 22 MONTGOMERY STREET. 

HOURS: 9 to 10 a.m., 2 to 4, 7 to 7:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS: 10 to 11 a.m.. 6 to 7 p.m. April 9. 

M. A. GUNST & CO., 

203 KEARNT STREET SAN FRANCISCO, 

ixportexs Aim dealers in 
HAVANA AND KEY WEST CIGARS, 

ALSO 

Agents for Kimball, Oaulliener & Co. 'a Guatemala Cigars. 
t^T" Inform the Public that they receive large invoices of Choice 
Havana Brands twice a month. 

(February 19.] 

G. S. Z.LDD, President. M. GXEENWOOB, rice-President. 



CALIFORNIA ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Telegraph and Electrical Engineers and Manufacturers, 

Electro-Platers in Nickel, Gold and Silver. 

Blasting Machines and Supplies and Amalgamating- Plates for Mines a Specialty. 

Office and Works: 134 Sutter street, N. F. 

May 14. PAUL. SELLER, Superintendent. 

ST. IGNATIUS COLLEGE, 

Corner Hayes Street and Van Ness Avenne. 

Literary and Scientific Department, 
RE-OPENS MONDAY, AUGUST 1, 1SS1. 

(July 2.) 

ST. MARY'S HALL, 

BENICI A, CALIF ORNIA. 

f^- This Collegiate (Protestant) SCHOOL FOR VOUNQ LADIES will re-open 
August 4th. For Catalogues, address 
July 10. REV. L. DELOS MANSFIELD, A.M. , Rector. 

M ARBLE WO lKST" 

MANTELS AND ORATES, 
MONUMENTS AND BE A D- S TO NE 8 , 

In Marble and Scotch Granite , 
827 Market Street Between Fourth and Fifth. 

<3T Designs Sent on Application. Itt 
Juno 11. W H. McCORMICK. 

ANDREW BAIRD, 

Negotiator of Loans and Commercial Paper, 
Broker In Local and State Securities, 

No. 312 California Street San Francisco. 

[P. O. Box 1,808.] July 19. 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No- 310 San some Street, 

San Francisco, 

WHOLE Sillf DEALERS Ilf FURS. 

[September 21.1 



SALTPETRE, 

Crude or Refined, for Sale in Lots to Snit by 

THE CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS, 
Jane IS. 830 California Street. 



WILLIAM M. PIERSON, 

LAW OFFICE. 
631 SACRAMENTO STREET. 



IJan. 2i 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 23, 1881. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND." 

* We Obey no Wand bat PleasnreW—Tom Moore. 



Bald-win's Theater.— A very large and brilliant audience witnessed 
the debut of the Wallack Company at this theater in the dramatization 
from the French, La Belle Rvsse. The audience had been led to expect 
something out of the ordinary run, and they were not disappointed. 
Aside from a tendency to " talkiness " in the first act, which wore away 
as the dramatist warmed up to his work, there was little to find fault 
with as a dramatic composition. The piece has the merit of originality. 
The motif is old and familiar, 'tis true, but its treatment was novel and its 
interpretation by the actors good. "La Belle Busse," the heroine, a 
clergyman's daughter, goes to ruin early in life. She becomes the mis- 
tress of "Captain Jules Clopin," who then travels under an assumed 
name. " La Belle," otherwise " Beatrice Glandore," has a sister, " Ger- 
aldine," who bears a remarkable resemblance to her. This sister marries 
" Sir Philip Calthorpe " in a clandestine manner and is not recognized by 
"Sir Philip's" family. They endure poverty together until their 
position becomes so desperate " Sir Philip " knockB a man down in 
the London streets, robs him, incloses a part of the money by post to his 
wife, and flies to foreign parts. The scene opens ten years later, when 
" Sir Philip's" mother relents and advertises for her lost son's wife. 
"Beatrice" impersonates ;her sister " Geraldine," and answers the ad- 
vertisement. The same day that she sees the family lawyer, "Sir Philip" 
and " Clopin," who have met in India and become great friends, appear 
on the scene after many years of absence. "Sir Philip" flies immediately 
to the family lawyer, for news of his wife, and learns she has that day 
been found, and has just gone to the family seat, where he and " Clopin " 
follow. "Sir Philip" is deceived by the resemblance, but "Clopin" recog- 
nizes his former mistress. The scene that here ensues, when "Clopin" 
demands "Beatrice's" instant departure, and threatens her with exposure 
and disgrace, is very emotional, and the climax is worked up in a very 
artistic manner. Miss Jeffreys-Lewis was, as might be expected, exceed- 
ingly successful as the heroine. There were no flaws in this rendering, 
and the audience showed their appreciation in a most marked manner. 
The two new actors were manly and quiet; with not, perhaps, the mag- 
netism of O'Neill, but clean and neat in their methods. "Tearle," as 
" Clopin," showed considerable talent in the light comedy lines. Jen- 
nings, as " Quilton," the family lawyer, was entirely out of place, and 
spoiled an otherwise almost perfect dramatic performance by his buffoon- 
ery. Little Maud Adams made a very pretty and interesting " Little 
Kay." La Belle Russe will be played until further notice. 

We note the announcement of a grand Swimming Tournament and 
Boat Pace to-morrow, at the Neptune and Mermaid Swimming Baths, at 
the foot of Larkin street. The exercises are under the supervision of an 
excellent Committee of Arrangements composed of M. Price, M. J. Fla- 
vin, F. Searight, Val Kehrlein, Dr. F. Eiehl, Dr. F. Knowlton, Charles 
Scott, L. Osborn and K. Melrose. The sports commence at ten A.M., and 
the first event iB a swimming-race for boys under fifteen years of age, for 
a silver medal. Then there are two half-mile races for gold medals — the 
first open to those who never won a prize, and the second to all except 
professionals. This will be followed by a second-class barge-race, for a 
silver cup, an aquatic horse-race, a fisherman's tilting match in boatB and 
an exhibition of fancy swimming. The finale will be a grand pig hunt 
by the crowd of swimmers. There is no entrance fee for any of the races. 
This novel natant regatta will be doubtless attended by crowds. 

The Tivoli — A word of sincere congratulation is due to Messrs. Kre- 
ling Brothers for the really superb way in which they have produced 
Satanella, which was sung for the first time in San Francisco, we believe, 
at this house on Monday night. Balfe's Satanella is not an even opera by 
any means, for Balfe was in a constant change of mood all his life, and 
unfixed musically. His last opera, The Crusaders, was an insincere con- 
version from "Verdi to Wagner, although probably the best thing this 
occasionally great and occasionally small composer ever scored. Miss 
Ethel Lynton sings the title role nicely, and Mr. Eckert, the tenor, is 
heard to great advantage as "Prince Rupert." Mr. Cornell, who really 
ought to appear under his own name, which it has pleased him to drop, 
makes a most effective " Pirate Chief," and the transformation scenes are 
superb in design and work beautifully. The Tivoli chorus was never 
heard to better advantage than in the third act. 

California Theater. — Sheridan is not getting the recognition he is en- 
titled to. His performance of " Sir Giles Overreach " was a most mas- 
terly one. It is not often that this character is delineated in the manner 
in which it was on Thursday night, and, instead of crowded houses, only 
a moderate attendance has rewarded the actor's efforts. Richelieu was 
given on Friday, and will be played this evening. On Sunday night and 
next week Macbeth will be put on. J. K. Grismer is now supporting Mr. 
Sheridan, and gave an excellent rendering of " Wellborn." We may not 
soon again have a season of the legitimate, and certainly will not have 
often an actor of Mr. Sheridan's power with us. It is only a question of 
a few years before we may expect to see his name in the front rank of the 
tragedians of the world. 

The many friends of Mr. Charles Dungan, who is to leave soon with 
the Melville Opera Company for the East, propose tendering him a fare- 
well testimonial. It is understood that this will be made quite an affair, 
and that the project is in influential hands. Mr. Dungan is certainly en- 
titled to some kind of remembrance, and this testimonial promises to be 
a brilliant one. The writer of these lines studied with Mr. Dungan 
in the San Francisco Musical Conservatory (which was inaugurated 
by Louis Schmidt and Oscar Weil} in 1870. Mr. Dungan is a finished 
baritone singer, a gentleman whom it is an honor to know, and we trust 
that his benefit may be all his hundreds of warm personal friends can 
desire. 



The operatic season at the Grand Opera House has come to a sudden 
end. It was, from every point of view, a most peculiar and remarkable 
episode in our operatic experience — a troupe consisting of one first-class 
artist (a soprano), one second-class singer {a basso), and four very inferior 
people, supported by a miserably driHed chorus and a very small and but 
tolerably efficient orchestra, commenced giving grand opera ! The per- 
formances were bad, very bad, but the public's patronage was very large. 
Old and familiar standard operas were given in a miserable, unsatisfactory 
way. Comparisons with the work done by other companies made this all 
the more apparent. And yet the public filled the large theater to reple- 
tion, shouted and applauded, bravoed and clapped. An enthusiasm that 
Kellogg, Cary, de Murska, Marie Koze, Adams, Panteleoni, etc., had 
failed to excite was aroused by Koig, Balma, Tuzza and such ! A galaxy 
of Pattis and Gersters, of Campaniuis and Nicolinis, of Fames and 
Galassis honoring our burg with its presence, could not have been better 
received or more lauded. The applause came in torrents, was showered 
on all alike, principals and chorus ! All this was, and still is, inexplica- 
ble. This community is not a musically educated one ; that all know ; 
but still we are not asses — and we wrote ourselves down as such when we 
applauded such musical butcheries as this troupe's Casta Diva, or its thii d 
act of Faust. But our musical standing has been saved ! The "craze" 
did not last. The public's sober second thought came to the rescue of 
outraged musical taste. The audiences dwindled away to mere handfuls 
of curious people, attracted by performances of new, unfamiliar operas, 
and the season closed. Our musical reputation (if we have any) is saved. 
One swallow does not, etc. Ergo, one artistic prima donna does not make 
an opera troupe. 

Sarah Bernhardt at the Gaiety. — No sooner was it announced that 
Sarah Bernhardt was to make her first appearance on June 11th in La, 
Dame aux Camelias, than every available seat was taken. Dumas' drama, 
which has hitherto been banished by a rigorous Lord Chamberlain from 
our theater boards, is, however, well known, owing to its adoption by 
Verdi in Traviata. Never did the great French actress appear to better 
advantage, and in the great scene in the third act, after swearing to M. 
Duval senior (M. Landrol) to renounce the love of his son Armand {M. 
Angelo), the mingled accents of hope and despair with which she ex- 
claimed, "Je mourrai, ct Dim me pardonnera," brought tears to the eyes 
of many a hardened playgoer, and enthusiastic bravos from every part of 
the densely-crowded house. Among the audience present on the occasion 
were the Prince and Princess of Wales. 

Woodward's Gardens. —The first appearance here to-morrow is an- 
nounced of Miss Lilian F. Smith, who, although only ten years old, is 
said to be the champion rifle shot of America. The Arnold Brothers, Ida 
Siddons, Adler and Duray, Fred Mackley and the large variety company 
also appear. Among the latest attractions are the cassowary in the men- 
agerie and a fifty pound Japanese sea spider. 

The Minstrels at the Bush Street Theater are Btill cramming the 
house with people, whose sides emerge aching. This week's bill is the 
best yet presented. Billy Emerson's " Josephua Orange Blossom " is re- 
viving his former triumphs. Next week there is yet another change of 
programme, and *' fun until you can't reBt." 

That popular young actress, Miss Constance Langtry, who is no re- 
lation to the English Langtry (the Jersey Lily), but who is just as pretty, 
and is also very talented, has just returned from Stockton, where her 
dramatic talent was highly appreciated. Her services should be secured 
at once by one of our local managers. 

Chit-Chat. —The outlook East for the Melville Troupe is exceedingly 
encouraging.-^— Fred Ward's first appearance as a star will be at Pope's 
Theater, St. Louis, where McCullough made his first Eastern appearance 
and Mary Anderson secured her first start.-— -Agnes Booth goes to the 
Madison Square as leading lady.^— Marie Prescott, late walking-lady of 
the California Theater, stars next season. This is bad.— Gussie De 
Forrest will also astonish the bucolics in the same manner — and this is far 
worse. Nym Crinkle calls them the "Starring Brigade." As far as 
heard from they number thirty-two. —Marie Prescott was sued lately in 
New York by her former agent, who got judgment for a considerable 
sum, which she promptly paid, and he paralyzed the theatrical fraternity 
by depositing the sum to the credit of Marie's eldest son in a savings' 
bank. The agent was formerly a newspaperman.^— The proposed bene- 
fit in aid of the Garfield Fund, in N. Y., meets with much opposition from 
influential managers. ^— The Madison Square double-moving stage has 
not turned out the success that was anticipated.— Mestayer, wife and 
Nick Long are rusticating in New Hampshire.-^— Adele Waters will be 
the guest of Mrs. Pobson during the Summer. ^^ McCullough during his 
transatlantic trip Bpent some time in hunting up the tombs of his ances- 
tors. It is not reported if there were any kings amongst them.— Ed- 
ouin's profits this season were S15,000. Marion Elmore remains with him 
next season.— J. H. Haverly has engaged Leon, late partner of Kelly 
& Leon, for the Mastodon Minstrels, for two years, at the salary of $250 
per week. Minstrelsy is not played outyet.^— J. T. Maloneis now sup- 
porting J. E. Owens.— Fred DeBelleville is appreciated East. He has 
refused four offers as leading man : from Colville for Michael Strogoff, 
Fanny Davenport, Boston Theater, and also Frank Gardner for 
the Legion of Honor. He remains in the city of New York at the 
Union Square.-^Daly's Theater opens the season with a new play 
by himself.— Lawrence Barrett is at present a guest of Lord Mande- 
ville, in Ireland. ^^Fred Lyster has been giving the true inwardness of 
theatrical management in 'Frisco in the columns of the New York Mirror 
lately.— —The Madison Square management are receiving a great deal of 
cheap advertising East over their late engagement at the California. 
Louise Searle is temporarily filling Emma Howson's place in The Mas- 
cotte,^— The electric lights are being banished from the theaters East.— 
Miss Hannie Ingham, a talented amateur of the Ingham Club, has joined 
the professional stage, and is now en tour as leading lady of E. T. Stet- 
son's troupe. The company opened lately at Eureka, Humboldt County, 
when the lady scored a decided success, and gave promise of good work 
in the future. 

English Decay!!!— A curious example of English poverty was af- 
forded the other day by the sale of a plot of land at the corner of Bread 
street, London. A poor purchaser was found who gave 865 a square foot 
for it, or at the rate of two and a half millions of dollars per acre. It 
would not seem difficult to provide for the adverse balance of trade for 
many years to come by the annual sale of a few acres at this rate. 



July 23, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTINC ITEMS. 



Snooting. -In our l«t issue it was announced that Phllo Jacoby, Dr. 
Dg, Mr. Kadelbnrg, ■' a. M. Qottschalk ami a nun: 

don ha<l sun 1 tie, in which it was alleged that 

a bear had taken rafuga. After walthn f*>r nearly two boon, daring 
which tine bruin fthowM do dispositiiiii to come out from hi* ambush ana 
do battle with a party of inch expert hear slayers, it was decided to 
take some means to coax the bear out. Jacoby, who is considered finite a 
wit by his intimate friends, started in to build up a joke about a Russian 
bear that could m>t bear to be rushed, but upon finding himself covered 
by the deadly rifles of Stanton and GrOfrinB he wisely brought bis Nihil- 
istic remarks to an abrupt termination. The medico thought that the 
animal could be induced to leave his harbor of refuge if some noxious 
dross baring a fool smell were thrown into the cavern. Mr. Kadelburg 
said that if the bear knew that a doctor was watching at his bedside, as it 
were, and was issuing hourly bulletins with a strong probability of send- 
ing in a big bill for medical attendance at an early date, it would come 
forth instantly and be killed in preference to lingering on under such a 
terrible state of siege. Mr. Stanton had got midway in the relation of 
how himself and a party of hunters many years ago had sunk a shaft 
through the solid rock to smoke out a bear, and had struck a nne lead of 
gold bearing ore, when without an instant's warning out rushed the bear. 
Though six days have elapsed since the bear made that mighty charge the 
little party of hunters who made room for it to pass have 
not arrived at any definite conclusion as to the reason for 
his sudden appearance, and are divided in opinion as to whether 
it was in the nature of a protest against the sin of story-telling 
or for fear that, if he remained pent-up much longer, he would be talked 
to death. Our readers have, doubtless, made up their minds by this time 
that bruin was instantly slain, and that his head and skin adorn the 
hunting lodge of some one of the party. If they are of that opinion they 
labor under a great hallucination, for, at last accounts, that bear was in 
good health aud was traveling at a good pace toward the Coast Range. 
Jacoby says that the reason he did not shoot the brute when he had a 
splendid chance, was that he had already slain many bears, and desired 
that some of the younger members of the party should have an opportu- 
nity to distinguish themselves. Dr. Ooering states that, when the bear 
came forth, he was so lost in admiration of his immense proportions that 
be did not think to tire until it had gained the cover of the chaparral. 
The other members of the party say that they were too well-bred to think 
of taking precedence of Jacoby and the Doctor, and more than intimate 
that the two first-named gentlemen were too busy looking for some good 
place to hide in to have room for any other idea. On the return trip to 
camp the party fell in with a California lion, and, as Jacoby is having a 
tine animal of that species stuffed, there is evidence that he 
killed it. Four fat bucks and lots of small game were killed by 
the party before they returned to the city.— — Dr. J. A. Bauer, 
F. Urban, H. J. Brand, C. Drexel, and M. W. Stackpool have 
just returned from a hunting trip in Sonoma County. They report 
that deer were rather plentiful (they shipped six to friends in the city), 
and that the bevys of quail they saw were unusually large. Doves were 
too plentiful to be considered worth shooting.— -Mr. J. K. Orr reports 
that the coming quail season may be expected to be the best seen in this 
State for many years. He says that the bevys in Marin County are 
larger and more forward than he has seen since 1872.— ^Last week we 
reported that California lions could be easily found in the neighborhood 
of Bowlder Creek, about twelve miles from Santa Cruz. Since that time 
Dr. Vaux and Mr. Liebrandt, of Santa Cruz, killed a magnificent speci- 
men at the place indicated, and though they failed to find any more, they 
saw evidences that others were in the vicinity.— The monthly shoot of 
the Cosmopolitan Club at San Bruno, last Sunday, resulted in a victory 
for Young, who made a clean score at 21 yards. Maskey, Card, Rover 
and Day tied on 11 birds each, and in the shoot-off at double birds gained 
prizes in the order named. — The final match of the season for members 
of the Cosmopolitan Club will be shot at San Bruno on Sunday, August 
14th. -^— A number of Gilroy sportsmen met at the Williams House, on 
Monday evening last, and organized a Rod and Gun Club. E. Leavesley 
was called upon as temporary President. The expediency of holding 
annual field trials, open to the State, was discussed. The following offi- 
cers were elected : President, E. H. Farmer ; Vice-President, George 
Halloway ; Treasurer, H. M. Briggs ; Secretary, E. Leavesley. The fol- 
lowing Committees were appointed : Constitution and By-laws, E. Leaves- 
ley, E. S. Harrison, R. J. Payne; on Field Trials, E. Leavesley, H. 
M. Briggs, George Halloway. 

Rowing. — Last Sunday, in the presence of a large number of specta- 
tors, Louis White and Dennis Griffin, of the Pioneer Club, rowed 
a three-mile single-scull race at Long Bridge, for a medal and a wager of 
$500 a side. The course was from Third-street wharf to the new sugar 
wharf, and return. White led to the stake, where a bad turn placed 
Griffin in front, which position he held until he came in an easy winner, 
in 23m. 7s., witb his opponent actually all out and nowhere. Griffin is a 
Bmaller and younger man than White, and deserves considerable credit 
for pluckily rowing a stern race. The fact that the loser was a 2 to 1 fa- 
vorite, and had unlimited coin behind him, shows that the rowing sharps 
of this city are mighty poor judges of what a man can do in a blood race. 
White's principal backer was rather badly hit, and will probably change 
his opinion of that gentleman's ability as an athlete. As usual, "Bob Go- 
ble and some of the Ariel boys picked out the winner. ^^Thirty new 
members were placed on the roll of the Golden Gate Club last week, aud 
the prospect of still further increasing the membership of the club is most 
promising. The officers elected are as follows: Jobn Wilson, President; 
Charles Schwilke, Vice-President; J. W. Finn, Secretary; J. D. Griffin, 
Treasurer; James Brown, Captain ; James Clark, Lieutenant and 
Sergeant-at-Arms. A meeting will be held to-morrow to complete the 
organization and select crews. — The Ariel Club are about to add an ad- 
ditional story to their boat-bouse at Long Bridge. This club is in a most 
prosperous condition. 

Bicycle.— The San Francisco Bicycle Club, at a recent meeting, took 
up the matter of the proposal from the State Fair managers to participate 
in a bicycle tournament. It was said that should satisfactory arrange- 
ments be made from twelve to sixteen gentlemen will participate in the 
events, which will probably take place next September in Sacramento, 
during the State Fair. On motion of Charles A. Butler, the Secretary 
was instructed to respond to the communication. 



Swimming. —The managers of the Neptune Baths at North Beach 
announce an aquatic exhibition, to be given at that place to morrow. 
The programme they have prepared includes swimming races, diving 
matches, chasm,- the pig (whatever that delightful recreation may have 
to do with aquatics we cannot conceive), horse swimming races, and, as a 
grand finale*, a tilting match between fishing boats. No doubt the affair 
will afford Iota of fun, and we would bo pleased to see similar sports ar- 
ranged mote frequently. iQaptofai Webb and Willie Beckwith have 
had another six-day swimming match, and again Beckwith has defeated 
the Channel hero. His score was 89 miles aud Webb's 86, The fastest 
mile was made by Beckwith in 30:04, Webb's best being 32:06. The exhibi- 
tion was given at the Westminster Aquarium, and was well patronized. 

yachting. — Hyde Bowie's schooner Nellie returned from Santa Cruz 
last Tuesday. During her stay Mr. Bowie made himself very popular 
with the natives and visitors by throwing his yacht open to all comers 
and giving a ball at the Pacific Ocean House last Saturday night, at 
which all the fashionable people in Santa Cruz were present. He also 
made two visits to Monterey with large parties of ladies. ^^ Yachting 
m;u are asking how it is that the sloops Annie and Ndlie carry whips 
when that honor properly belongs to the schooner Nellie alone.-^"The 
vawl Ariel has been fitted out and has been brought from Oakland to San 
Francisco.^— The Virgin is now in commission, after an eight months' 
rest in Oakland Creek.-^— That race between the O'Connor, Chispa and 
Nellie still hang3 tire. 

Turf. — Following is a summary of the great stallion race at Chicago, 
July 20th, for which Sauta Claus, the California horse, started first favor- 
ite: Free for all Btallions for a purse of $5,000, with $500 added to win- 
ner of fastest heat, if better than 2m. 15|s. is made: Piedmont, 3 2 3 11 
1; Robert McGregor, 14 16 6 2; Santa Claus, 215233; Hannis, 4 
3 2 3 5; Wedgewood, 5 5 4 4 2 r. o.; Monroe Chief, 6 6 6 5, 4, r. o. 
Time, 2m. 18s.— 2m. 17is.— 2m. 184s.— 2m. 17£s. —2m. 19^3.— 2m. 21s. 

It is a very pretty quarrel as it stands, between the Bulletin and 
Chronicle, on the water question. Both are right. One wants a water 
subsidy, the other has got it. What the householders want is cheap 
water, but this they cannot get. By the way, what did the Post mean 
by styling the water question a firebrand 1 Perhaps Chief Seannell could 
tell! 

GRAND SWIMMING TOURNAMENT AND BOAT RACE, 

At Neptune and Mermaid Swimming Baths, 

FOOT OP LARKIN STREET. 
Committee of Arrangements.— M. Price, Dr. F. Riehl, Dr. F. Knowlton, Charles 
Scott, K. Melrose, L. Osbc.ru, M. J. Flavin. F. Searight, V. Kehrlein. 
Sunday, July 24th Commencing at 10 o'clock a- m. 

1. Boya' Swimming Race, under 15 yeare ; Silver Medal. 

2. Half-mile Race, open to all who never won a prize Gold Medal. 

3. Half-mile Race, open to all except professors Elegant Large Gold Medal. 

4. Second-class Barge Race Silver Cup. 

5. Exhibition of Fancy Swimming, by a number of the Finest Swimmers on the coast. 

6. An Amusing Aquatic Horse Race, between the noted horaes, Bourbon and Jersey 

Lightning. 
1. Interesting Fishermen's Tilting Match, in boats. 
8. Grand Pig Hunt by the crowd of swimmers. 
gB^" No entrance fee for an y of the races. July 23. 

BUSH-STREET THEATER. 

(Charles E. Locke. Proprietor.-- Amazed Audience*! "No 
j Standing Room" Nightly! Only one week of present great programme! 
EMERSON as "Orangeblossom!" " TheBroker's Daughter!" "The Picnic!' "The 
Broadway Squad!" 

Haverly's Mastodons! 
This (Saturday) Afternoon, Last " Orangebloasotn " Matinee! Ladies, secure seats at 
once, by telephone if not in person! Box Office always open! Remember last Sat- 
urday's great rush, when hundreds wre unable to gain admission long before rise of 
curtain! Sunday— Grand Special Performance! Monday— Another Immense New 
BiH! . July 23. 

BALDWIN THEATER. 

Thomas Magnlre, Manager.-- The Greatest Hit In Tears! 
Unanimously Indorsed by the Entire Press of Sau Francisco. The WALLACK 
COMPANY aud the New Play, 

La Belle Rxisse! 

Witnessed by the Elite of the City Every Evening, and pronounced the Strongest 
Play of the Century. LA BELLE RUSSE MATINEE this (Saturday) Afternoon at 
2 o'clock. S cats may be secured si x d ays in advance. July 23. 

THE TIV0LI GARDENS, 

Eddy street, between Market And MnMOii."Krellug Bros., 
Proprietors and Managers. Instantaneous Success ' 
Satanella ! 

Every Evening until Further Notice! Audiences held in amazement with the most 
wonderful mechanical effects of the day. Most comfort, and best entertainment of- 
fered i n th i s city. __ July 23. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Indorsed by the Press nnd Public! Sir. xr. E. Sberidnu, tbe 
Eminent Tragedian. Saturday and Sunday Eveninga, 

Richelieu ! 

This (Saturday) Afternoon, ONLY MERCHANT OF VENICE MATINEE. Monday 
Evening. July aoth, MACBETH I July 23. 

TO CAPITALISTS. 

An Individual who has just returned from Arizona has 
several excellent mines for sale. Energetic capitalists can be shown how to 
make a good round sum cf money. 
62T* Full particulars can be obtained by applying to 
June 25. R- G. . News Letter Office. 

A. WALDSTEIN, 

Lithographer and Zincographer, Xo. 320 Nansome street. 
Room 4$, Second Floor. Jan. 29. 

A. BUSWELL & CO., 

BOOK BINDK.KS. 

625 Clay Street San Francisco. 



8 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 23, 1881. 



SECRET SOCIETIES IN POLITICS. 
The presence in this city at the present time of two secret political 
associations, the members of which are bound and held together by oaths, 
signs and pass-words, is such a menace to good government and the honest 
administration of public affairs, that the tax-paying citizens should give 
the matter their most careful consideration. The two organizations to 
which we refer are connected with the Democratic party. This latter 
fact makes them none the better and none the worse. Under our system 
of government, or, in fact, under any system of government which is 
based on representative institutions, secret political societies can have no 
object that is good, and cannot, in attempting to attain their objects, be 
using other than illegitimate methods. The grand idea underlying our 
system of government is, that all political power of right belongs to the 
people. In carrying out and giving effect to this idea we hold, at period- 
ical and Btated times, elections at which the people are asked to designate 
by their ballots the persons whom they desire to occupy the public offices 
and administer the public affairs. Secret political associations areformed for 
the deliberate and express purpose of over-ruling and over-reaching the power 
of public opinion in these matters; consequently they are antagonistic to the 
spirit of our Government, and are, by reason of their very existence, a 
standing menace to the perpetuation of republican institutions. The 
object of the secret political association is to take political power from the 
hands of the people and to transfer it to the members of the association, 
or, rather, to the one or two leading spirits who control the organization. 
It is in this way, and by the aid of this institution, that the reign of the 
political "Boss " has grown up; it is in this way that flagrant corruption 
has crept in, and honorable, honest men been driven out of public life. 
Tweed, Tammany Hall and the New York Municipal Government are 
fair specimens of this seed and the description of fruit which it produces. 
The good government of San Francisco will not be subserved by placing 
political power in the hands of "Boss" Buckley or "Boss" Mooney. 
The News Letter does not propose to enter into any discussion of the moot 
question of whether the "Manhattan" Club or the "YoBemite" Club 
contains "the best elements of the party." In a country which possesses 
a free ballot and representative institutions, there is no place for secret 
societies in politics, and no intelligent man who entertains a conscientious 
regard for the obligations of his citizenship should allow himself to be 
connected with them. The sooner this fact is known and recognized by 
ge ntlemen of political aspirations, who are now imparting to these clubs 
a flavor of gentility, the better it will be for all concerned. And if these 
ambitious blue-blooded politicians will not take the hint, public opinion 
should give them a gentle reminder of its power when the occasion arises. 
They should he taught that when they connect themselves with an insti- 
tution whose aims are illegitimate, and which constitutes, of itself, a 
menace against the life of the republic, they commit a crime for which, 
they will be held responsible. In this connection it is proper to state that 
this city has been disgraced, within the past four weekB, by one of its ju- 
dicial officers descending from the Bench to soil his ermine in the filth of 
a primary election as the open and avowed advocate of one of these rival 
secret societies. The time has come when this state of affairs must cease. 



CHINAS RETROGRESSION. 
The powers that be in China seem terribly afraid of any step taken 
toward the education (in our_ acceptation of the term) of their subjects. 
There is a conservative faction in that most conservative of countries 
which is constantly on the qui vive to check progress. This faction has 
lately obtained the upper hand, and, in consequence, the Chinese students 
now being educated in the United States have been ordered back to 
China. The predominance of the retrogression party will, of course, put 
a stop to all the railroad and telegraphic schemes which were considered 
to be in a fair way of being carried out. It is impossible, however, that 
a country with such vast mineral and other resources as China can much 
longer refuse to attempt to catch up with the progress made by more 
highly civilized natious, for the many well-born Chinese who have re- 
ceived the benefit of European and American educations, and have thus 
had their ideas broadened and refined, will, in course of time, act as a 
lever which will rouse that country from its ages of torpor. What the 
effect of a thorough opening out of such a vast and almost unknown 
country as China would beupon the world at large, it is difficult to say, 
but it is not unsafe to predict that its influence for good or evil upon the 
white races will be immense. Should some enlightened and ambitious 
Mongolian monarch take the thing thoroughly in hand, and engage good 
military men to train his millions of subjects, Russia might be made to 
feel that long-despised China was a foe worthy of her steel, and one to be 
dreaded far more than the Turk. 

DEATH OF DEAN STANLEY. 

Arthur Fenrhyn Stanley expired of erysipelas on July 18th in Lon- 
don. His death leaves a wide breach in the ranks of the Broad Church 
party in England. The telegraph tells us that his last audible words, 
which were spoken to the Archbishop of Canterbury, were as follows, : 
" I have labored amidst many frailties and much weakness to make West- 
minster Abbey a great center of religious and national life in a truly lib- 
eral spirit." His death will also be a blow to the Queen, who was one of 
his sincerest friends. He was born in 1815, and was the son of the late 
Dr. Stanley, Bishop of Norwich. Some years ago he made a visit to the 
United States, during which he delivered a series of lectures on West- 
minster Abbey, English Cathedral life and other subjects. Liberality of 
thought, constant devotion to work and great personal piety were his 
chief characteristics. 

The early apple catches the small boy. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

IXSTTRANCE AGENCY. 
A 334 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Fire Insurance. 

TEUTONI A of New Orleans. 

BERLIN-COLOGNE of Berlin. 

LACONFIANCE of Paris. 

DWELLING HOUSE UNDERWRITERS 

of New York. 

LION INSURANCE CO of London. 

THE FIRE INS. ASSOCIATION(Limited) 
of London, England. 



GIRARD of Philadelphia. 

NEW YORK CITY INS. CO of N. Y. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

REVERE of Boston. 

LA CAISSE G ENERALE of Paris. 

W ATERTOWN of New York. 

ST. PAUL of St. Paul 

Marine Insurance. 

PARIS UNDERWRITING ASSOCIATION of Paris. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

LA FONCIERE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY of Paris. 

Capital Hepresented $27,000,000. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

W. L. CHALMERS, Z. P. CLARK, J. C. STAPLES, 
Special Agents and Adjusters. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

O rganized 1864 . 

Principal Office 406 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital (Paid TJp in TJ. S. Gold Coin) $300,000.00 

Re-Insurance Reserve $174,989 69 



Assets January 1, 1881 S 639,147.88 

Surplus for policy holders 624,677. 17 

Premiums, since organization 3,521,232.23 

Losses, since organization 1,635,202.84 

OFFICERS: 

J. F. HOUGHTON Presideut. I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary. 

L. L. BAKER Vice-President. | R. H. MAGILL General Agent. 

Directors of the Home Motual Insurance Co.:— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, J. L. 
N. Shepard, John Currey, J. F. Houghton, W. T. Gariatt, C. C. Burr, J. S. Carter, 
Ch arles Belding, P. W. Ea rl. July 10. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS^ 

84 0,64X942 . 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co., of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

BOBBBT DZCKSOlf, Manager. 
W. 1AJSM BOOKJEB, Agent and Attorney. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building. 
[October 11. J 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $7,500,000 

Cash Assets 1,709,976 

Cash Assets in United States 775,003 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., General Agents, 

March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 

PHENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, Eng., Estab'd 1782.— Cash Assets, 85,266,372.35. 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd IS 33 Cash Assets, $1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd 1 851— Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39. 

BUTLER * H4LD1N, 
General Agents for Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

[July 10.1 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSUR. CO. OF BOSTON. 

Has transacted tbe business of .Lite Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing' every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California, 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sep t. 22. J 328 Montg omery street. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sua- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world, In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 225 Sansome St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital §5, OOO.OOO. —Agents: Balfour, Guthrie A Co., Hfo. 
' 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



July 23, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



IN THE SPRING. 
wind whispers, 

Calmly the Banahina falls. 
And from green waving bnnohM 

The tlinnh repeats his calls. 
Gailv the starling answers 

To his iit:iU' in the steeple nijrh ; 
On earth there are venlure ami blossom, 

With mask and ghidnesa on high. 
Here are the darting swallows, 

New from their distant home, 
And the cuckoo shouts his clearest 

From the poplar's silver dome: 
Greenly the yountf corn mtingeth 

In lines of emerald light, 
And the songful skylark wingetfa 

To heaven his fearless flight 
Spring with her countless treasures 

Gladdens the earth once more, 
And the tall trees bend, rejoicing 

That winter's reign is o'er ; 
For the violet-buds unfolding, 

And the hawthorn-bloom on high, 
All tell the same sweet tidings 

To the wind that wanders by. 

FOXTAIL GRASS, OR WILD BARLEY, 

There is no greater curse to the wool-growing interest of California 
than this grass. The seeds work into the wool, pieroiug the flesh and 
causing exquisite ngony to the poor sheep, besides rendering the wool com- 
paratively unsalable. The worst part of the business is that this pest in- 
creases each year, and no method has as yet been discovered to stop its 
growth. Wherever the sheep camp, huge beds of the weed grow up, and 
as stock of no kind will eat it, the seeds are, in course of time, ripened 
and scattered by the winds over the entire country. It is true that, by 
setting fire to these beds, some good can be done, but the danger of the 
rapid spread of 6re renders the cure worse, if possible, than the disease. 
In some of what have hitherto been considered the finest sheep ranges of 
Mendocino county, Bheep raisers have actually been unable to sell their 
wool on account of these seeds, wool buyers positively refusing to take it 
at any price. So serious has the question become, that sheep owners are 
apprehensive, and eagerly on the look-out for some means by which the 
evil can be allayed, if not cured. Within the last few years, whether 
from over-stocking or other causes, acre on acre of good grazing land has 
been rendered next to useless by the rank growth of this pest, and unless 
Borne stringent measures are taken towards its suppression, the wool- 
growing interest of Northern California will suffer to an enormous extent. 
For the benefit of the community, suggestions are requested from men 
who have studied the subject as to the cause of its growth and the best 
means for its extinction. 

HOW HE TOOK THE BASTILE. 
Alphonse de Bulle is a distinguished and robust son of France, whose 
muscles have been hardened and whose physique generally improved by 
the arduous but healthy exercise of airing a species of dog known as the 
poodle. Alphonse is patriotic. He wears the iron ring, I'anneau de fer, 
and would no doubt have fought for La Belle France during the late war 
had he not had a softer billet in San Francisco. On Thursday week, the 
14th of July, Alphonse drank "not wisely but too well" — so well, in fact, 
that his " sacre bleu'a and " got tarn's " got him temporarily disliked even 
by the fair ones who were wont to smile upon him with especial favor. 
The strong arm of the law was brought into play, and the struggling form 
of the adipose Alphonse was soon safely deposited behind the bars of the 
City Prison. Exhausted with his struggles and overcome with the heat, 
he fell into a gentle slumber. About 3 a.m. the prisoners were aroused 
from their criminal naps and drunken stupors by a sound which resembled 
the noise which a mule creates when kicking an empty coal oil can. An 
irate trusty sought the cause, and found Alphonse taking short runs the 
length of his cell, thus gaining impetus to butt his head against the iron 
bars. Between each butt he shouted, " I take ze got-tara Bastile." One 
charge more violent than the rest laid him out, and peace once more 
reigned in the municipal dungeons. The Police Judge showed his leniency 
by $5, or 24 hours. 

Some rude races have strange substitutes for kissing. Of a Mongo 
father a traveler writes: " He smelled from time to time the head of his 
youngest son, a mark of paternal tenderness usual among the Mongols 
instead of embracing." In the Philippine Islands, we are told, "the 
sense of smell is developed to so great a degree that they are able, by 
smelling at the pocket-handkerchiefs, to tell to which persons they be- 
long, and lovers, at parting, exchange pieces of linen they may be wear- 
ing, and, during their separation, inhale the odor of the beloved being." 
Among the ChittagongWU people, again, it is said, "the manner of kiss- 
ing is peculiar. Instead of placing lip to lip, they place the nose and 
mouth upon the cheek, and inhale the breath strongly." Their form of 
speech is not " Give me a kiss," but " Smell me." Iu the same way, ac- 
cording to another traveler, " the Burmese do not kiss each other in the 
Western fashion, but apply the lips and nose to the cheek, and make a 
strong inhalation." Moreover, " the Samoans salute by juxtaposition of 
noses, accompanied not by a rub, but a hearty smell." There is Scrip- 
tural precedent for such customs. When blind Isaac was in doubt 
whether the son who came to him was Jacob or not, " he smelled the 
smell of his raiment and blessed him." 



Emigration from Liverpool. —According to the Board of Trade re- 
turns, during last month 90 ships left the Mersey for foreign parts, carry- 
ing 38,273 passengers, an increase on the April returns of 2,623, and com- 
pared with the emigration in May last year, an increase of 8,971. The 
nationality of 11,441 was stated to be English, of 265 Scotch, of 4,299 
Irish, and 22,097 foreign. Their destinations were— United States 32,203, 
British North America 5,700, Australia 50, South America 109, East In- 
dies 43. West Indies 22, West Coast of Africa 47. The returns of the rive 
months show that about 15.000 more persons emigrated through Liverpool 
than in the corresponding period of last year. 



INSURANCE. 



SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE & MARINE INS. CO., 

OF NEW ZEALAND. 
Capital SIO.OOO.OOO. 

CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED. 

Capital 85,000,000- 

STANDARD MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF VERPOOL. 

Capital 85,000,000. 

W. J. < JlLLM'GHAH dc CO., 
General Agents, 

213 Sansome Street San Francisco. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE-UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyd*.— Established lii 1861.— Nos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash Capital, 3750,000 in Gold Coin. Fair Rates ! 
Prompt Settlement of Loses!! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS.— J. Mora Moss, 
Moses Heller, J. O. Eldridge, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Daniel Meyer, Adam 
Grant, A. E. Sabatie, Charles Koliler, E. L. Goldstein, Bartlett Doe, I. Lawrence 
Pool, A. Weill, I. Steinhart, N. B. Stone, Wallace Everson, A. B. Phipps, Samuel 
Hort, H. 0. Parker, N. G. Kittle, Joaeph Brandonatein, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas 
Liming, James Moftitt, John Parrott, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Guatave Touchard, 
George C. Hickox, J. H. Freeman, John Conly, J. H. Baird, Wm, Scholle, Charles 
Bauiii, J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, Isaac L. Requa. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 
Chaiu.bs P. Havbw, Secretary. Quo. T. Bohbn, Surveyor. Nov. 6. 

THE MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, ENGLAND. 

[ESTABLISHED 1836.} 

Whole Amount of Joint Stock and Guaranteed Capital. .$5,000,000. 

Whole Amount of Capital paid up 900,000. 

Cash Assets December 31, 1878 3,710,000. 

The undersigned have been duly authorized to issue Policies at current rates on 
Freight and Shipments to or from England, Europe, New York, Japan, China, Aus- 
tralian Colonies, Sandwich Islands, and Northern Coast Porta. If desired, policies 
made payable at port of termination. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND * CO., Agents, 

Aug. 10. 218 California street. 



THOMAS PRICE'S 

ASSAY OFFICE AND CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 

624 Sacramento Street, San. Francisco. 

Deposits of Bui lion received, melted into bars, and returns 
made iu from twenty-four to forty-eight hours. 
Bullion can be forwarded to this office from any part of the interior by express 
and returns made in the same manner. 

Careful Analysis made of Ores, Metal, Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, etc 
Mines examined and reported upon. Consultations on Chemical and Metallurgica 
questions. March 20. 

A. F. KNORP 

Manufactures to Order 
OFFICE AND LIBRARY FURNITURE. 

Stores and Offices Fitted Up and Finished in Any Style from 

Original Designs. 

Brackets, Mouldiug-s and House Finish. 

411 MISSION STREET, 

April 33. (Mechanics' Mills) up stairs. 

[Established Nov., 1878.} 

SEASON OF 1881-82. 

FRAZER'S DANCING ACADEMY, 

105 Post Street. 

Opening for the Reception of Pupils Monday, July 11, 1881. 

Thorough revolution in the system of taking- CLASS Pupils. PERFECTION in 
the art of Round and Square Dances GUARANTEED, 
Gentlemen 815. | Ladles 88. 

PERFECTION in the art of Modern Round Dances only, 

Gentlemen 810. | Ladles 86 50 

Regurdless of the number of lessons required, whether it be one month or one ytar. 

Circulars giving full particulars mailed on application, or can bo bad at W. A. 
FREY'S store, 107 Post street, under the Academy, on and after June 14th. 

6^" Private Tuition a SPECIALTY, as heretofore. For terms see Circular. 

g^~ For Children see Circular. [June 25.] J. WILLIAM FRAZER. 

QUEEN TRANSPARENT OIL CAN. 

Tin- body Is made of thick glass, surrounded by a 
corrugated tin casing. Being glass it cannot leak, and the tin cas- 
ing prevents it from being broken. It measures the oil and prevents the 
seller from cheating in quanti'y, or qualitr, of oil sizes— 1, 2, 4, 8 quarts. 
W LESTER & CO., 17 New Montgomery street, 
May 14. General Agents for the Pacific Coast. 

QUICKSILVER. 

The Celebrated "A" Brand, shipped direct from the New 
Aim Aden Mine, lor sileinanv quantity, bv the producers. CAR LOAD 
LuTS will bo shipped from San Jose for NEVADA, ARIZONA and the EAST, or de- 
livered ;it Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San Francisco, without charge. 
THE QTJICKSILVEB MINING COMPANY, 

J. B. RANDOL, Manager, 
July 9.] No. 320 Sansome St., over Wells, Fargo & Co-'s Express Office, 

ROBERT WALKINSHAW, 

"VT"utary Public. 407 Montgomery street, is prepared to take 

J3I charge of Estates or Trusts; to act as General Agent for persons absenting 
themselves from the Stale; to buy and sell farming lands, take charge of securities, 
make collections, correspond, and make remittances. Reliable references. [July 9. 

C* B + ~ i^On Per day at home. Samp ea worth *ft free. . 

»^V> TO OZ\J Address StixsOS 4 CO., Portland, aine 




10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 23, 1881. 



A FOOUSH FORGER. 

Some three months ago a young man, apparently about twenty- 
seven years of age, presented himself at this office and handed Mr. 
Frederick Marriott, Senior, a card neatly engraved, which purported to 
be the visiting card of " Professor Francis Reed Porter," a journalist just 
arrived from New York, and the special correspondent of the New York 
Star. He described himself practically as a young Ingersoll, a lecturer 
well known, and anxious to be better known, and, with great suavity of 
manner and some adroit management, succeeded in getting into the good 
graces of the senior proprietor of this paper. After a few weeks, under 
representations that he was in straightened circumstances, he requested 
Mr. Marriott to aid him temporarily, and got from him an order on Mr. 
Swain, of Swain's Bakery, at 213 Sutter street, for meals to the extent 
of 85. He never wrote, and was probably incapable of writing, a line 
for this paper that its editor's would have accepted, but, by skillful en- 
gineering, he succeeded in obtaining various sums ranging from fifty cents 
to 82, many of which sums are charged to him on our books. How much 
more Mr. Marriott may have given him privately the editor of this paper 
cannot say. But that he duped this establishment is a small mat- 
ter, occasioning us only a little chagrin, and entailing the loss of 
only a few dollars. His next act was, however, to ingratiate himself with 
Mr. Swain, who, knowing Mr. Marriott's order for 85 worth of food to be 
genuine, and in his transactions with us having been credited with that 
amount, cashed two notes for Mr. Porter, if that is his real name, on 
which were the forged indorsements of Mr. Marriott, and which together 
amounted to between 8200 and 8250. The forgeries are very clumsy when 
gone into carefully, but, under the circumstances, they were clever enough 
to deceive Mr. Swain. We understand that, from first to last, that gen- 
tleman is a loser to the tune of about 8185, reckoning money due for 
board and cash advanced. While we regret Mr. Swain's loss, we also re- 
gret that he should have been led into the belief that either of the pro- 
prietors of this paper indorses notes or fathers paper for any one. It was 
a mistaken act of charity to give this suave thief an order on Mr. Swain 
for even a two-bit meal, for the charity has resulted most disastrously. 
He is now, however, behind the bars and held under S6,000 bail, and, at 
the proper time, he will doubtless don the striped suit, which i3 his proper 
attire. Among other speculations he had organized a baby show to take 
place. Under existing circumstances the baby show promises to be a 
miscarriage. 

A WORD TO THE NATION. 
The Albany fight is a very bad business. It illustrates the meanness 
and malignity of American politics. There is no possible apology or ex- 
cuse for slander, bribery and the coirupt exercise of patronage. Yet 
these things have all been proven in this case. It has been shown con- 
clusively that Johnny Davenport went, armed with executive authority, 
to trade an important place for a vote against Conkling. It has been 
proven, on oath, that money was freely used as bribes on behalf of the 
Executive. It is as clear as noonday that a conspiracy was set on foot 
to ruin Piatt's moral reputation, and that the leaders of the Administra- 
tion party, in carrying it out, were guilty of conduct that would disgrace 
the Barbary coast. It is as clear as noonday that the attempt to murder 
the President was feloniously used by the Administration party to ruin 
their opponents. And it is past peradventure that the bulk of the Ameri- 
can people indorse these ruffianly acts. Why is this? What is the cause 
of this moral perversity? It is habit. The public sense has been blunted 
by reckless journalism, and public honor has been eclipsed by the shadow 
of consolidated corruption. There is nothing inherently wrong in Ameri- 
can institutions; there is the very perfection of evil in American political 
methods. There is so little hope for a country which has lost the sense of 
moral responsibility, and the Albany scandal proves that the United 
States is utterly wanting in that sense. Else why did not the Democratic 
members of the New York Legislature protest against the iniquity which 
was being practiced under their eyes? They did not protest, and conse- 
quently the session is " long drawn out," and the State pays 83,000 a day 
expenses; wherefore the precious rascals who constitute the Legislature of 
New York will remain in session until December next, for the Bake of 
the plunder. Surely there is a limit to such conduct? If not, it is hope- 
less to expect to govern fifty millions of people by a system-of fraud and 
rascality. The whole edifice must tumble to the ground before a tempest 
of unbloody but indignant revolution. All good men everywhere sympa- 
thize with the United States in her efforts after universal liberty, but her 
tolerance of universal fraud will be her ruin unless it is checked. 



MR. MILLS' GIFT. 

The munificent donation of D. O. Mills, of 875,000, to found a chair 
of Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity in our State University, is worthy 
of more than passing comment. It is true that Mr. -Mills is a very rich 
man, and that he does not feel the Iobs of his gift, probably, but he has 
set an example that must knock at the doors of the hearts of a great 
many wealthy people in this State and city. It is bordering on imperti- 
nence, perhaps, to even reflect on the judgment of Mr. Mills in so gener- 
ously founding this chair, for he doubtless saw grave and wise reasons in 
the future for enlarging the scope of our university in this special way. 
But the lesson that his gift teaches is that it would be a very easy task for 
a few rich men to follow suit in another act of useful beneficence, and the 
object before our mind's eye is the San Francisco Free Public Library, 
which might, by a few wealthy men, easily be enriched by a donation of 
8100,000, every dollar of which, when invested, would reach more than a 
hundred thousand people. There was a fund of quiet, and a complete 
lack of ostentation, in the princely gift of D. O. Mills to the Berkeley 
University, and so graceful a bestowal of part of his wealth, during his 
lifetime, speaks volumes for the Beriousness of an active brain united to 
the generosity of a great heart. 



AT.T. BROKEN UP. 

The unwashed, unterrified Democracy of the city of San Francisco, 
seems to be in a bad way. One of its peculiarities is the facility, the cer- 
tainty and the regularity with which it gets into "a bad way," when it 
stands a good chance of winning a municipal election. When the offices 
— the spoils — come in sight, the patriots lose their presence of mind, and 
then ensueB an indecent scramble. "The party," God bless it! splits 
into two factions, each of which struggles at the primary, usually by the 
use of criminal methods, to control the Convention. As both factions 
can't win, one must be defeated; and the defeated faction, with all the 
regularity of clockwork, yells fraud ! What it means by this is, that in 
the game of voting dead men, aud personating living ones, the successful 
faction has displayed more ability than the unsuccessful one has. To speak 
plainly, when there is a good prospect for party success, a Democratic 
primary election in this city is one of the most shameful spectacles that 
can be seen. When the party stands no chance of success, its primary is 
the cleanliest thing imaginable. In the municipal election of 1879, the 
Democratic primary was the purest thing of the kind ever held in the 
United States. In that election the most sanguine Democrat did not 
hope to elect the one side of a poundmaster's clerk, and so purity and 
honesty prevailed. This time there is, or rather there was, a good pros- 
pect for success, and so the usual cut-throat struggle began within the 
ranks of the party. As things stand now, the Democracy is broken up 
into four factions. It is broken clear in two, and the W. P. C, which is 
simply a branch of the Democracy, is also ripped up the middle. The 
probabilities are that these contending clans will settle up their little dif- 
ferences and arrange a satisfactory division of the spoils before election 
day. The Democracy has always had a wonderful knack of healing up 
its little domestic strifes before the poll opened. But whether this be 
done or not, the fact remains that the spectacle which the Democracy 
presents at the present moment is disgraceful, and is a reproach to our 
system of government. 

ATTORNEY CORKHILL. 
We noticed in the early part of the present week some very pompous 
dispatches about Mr. Corkhill's peremptory disposition of the assassin 
Guiteau, and we are glad to note that Mr. Corkh ill has been thoroughly 
well snubbed by the warden of the prison in which Guiteau is confined. 
It would be a new thing for a District Attorney to dictate to a warden of 
a prison how he should treat prisoners under his charge, inasmuch as 
while the attorney is presumably competent to draw the complaint against 
Guiteau he is beyond all question utterly and necessarily incompetent in 
all matters of prison management. But there is, perhaps, something at 
the root of Mr. Corkhill's snobbish, dictatorial and unconstitutional 
orders to the warden, for we read in Thursday's dispatches that "Cork- 
hill's order to put him (Guiteau) in solitary confinement and shut him off 
from the sight of others has not been complied with, as the jail has too 
many prisoners to admit this. Besides, the warden considers Guiteau's 
present mode of confinement about as satisfactory as can well be in a jail 
so full of prisoners." And the warden might have added because he does 
not want the interference of any district attorney in the management of 
his prison. It seems to us, and if we are in error we regret it, that there 
are a number of people just now aspiring to notoriety on the strength of 
the President's wound. We except the doctors, of course, for the heart 
of the nation hangs on their bulletins regarding his condition ; but there 
are undoubtedly men around Mr. Garfield who would like to rise into na- 
tional prominence by the constant use of their names in the telegraphic 
dispatches announcing their devotion or their opinions as to his ultimate 
recovery or their messages to Mrs. Garfield. Who they are we leave to 
our readers to opine, but, like the " butterflies born in a bower, christened 
in a teapot and gone in an hour," their very names will be forgotten be- 
fore another moon has waned,- as is eminently right and proper. 

THE TRUE INWARDNESS OF OUR PRISON SYSTEM. 

Whatever may have been the causes which instigated the present 
official investigation at San Quentin, and they are variously attributed to 
personal spite, political motives, and, by a very few outsiders, to a genu- 
ine spirit of reform, much of the inside working of our convict system 
has been laid bare to the public gaze, and some good cannot but come of 
it. A Mr. Sutherland, with seven years' prison experience, gave this as 
his opinion: " I do not think that convicts go out of here any better 
than they come in. Convicts are inclined to talk about their exploits 
and glory in their acts of crime ; the atmosphere is criminal ; they deride 
the Moral Instructor and his work ; they deride religion, and say they do 
not need it. It would be different if the criminals were not allowed to 
congregate and discuss all topics freely; there is nothing in the system 
here to isolate a young convict from an old and hardened criminal." Mr. 
Sutherland further stated that he considered the prison at San Quentin 
to be a "nursery of crime." Young men coming to this prison to serve a 
first term are, by their associations with hardened criminals, and their 
meeting them outside, confirmed and strengthened in their criminal in- 
stincts, and seldom fail to return to prison, the next time, probably, for 
some praver offense. We have not the pleasure of knowing Mr. Suther- 
land, but his ideas seem to express in a nutshell the crying evil of our 
prison system. The statistics show only too plainly that crime is on the 
increase, and its suppression by every means in our power, is of more im- 
portance to the public than the vexed question as to whether Warden 
Ames prefers alcoholic stimulants to tea or coffee. Unless our prison sys- 
tem undergoes some change, the graduates from that college of crime will 
flood our State and propagate villainy of all kinds. 

SAN FRANCISCO REAL ESTATE MARKET. 

Among the improvements going on in the city is the Eighteenth street 
sewer, which has dragged its slow length along to Valencia street. The 
Phelan Block nas acquired two respectable stories and the third one is be- 
ing added. The Crocker building, on Post street between Kearny and 
Dupont is almost completed, and has cost about 8100,000. It is five sto- 
ries high, and extends clear through from Post to Morton street. Colonel 
Fair is tearing down the buildiDgs on the southwest corner of Pine and 
Sansome streets to make room for a business block, which will cost 81,- 
000,000. The Spreckels Sugar Refinery is progressing as rapidly as could 
be expected of such a colossal structure. The sales during the past week 
have not been very numerous or remarkable. The personal property as- 
sessment Bhows a large amount of money laying idle in our banks, and 
money will no doubt remain cheap for several months to come. 



July 23, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"Hear the Crier What th* d«vil *r» Iboo ? 

"One tb»t will pUj lbs devil, ur with you.'" 

" He'd & •line in hit tail as Ion* »■ a Hail, 
Which nude him crow bolder and bolder.' 



We wonder when the English will understand tho entire glory of 
Republican institutions. They are very hard to educate, but the follow- 
ion little story may do something toward tonching their hearts and vann- 
ing them toward this free country. If we suppress the name of the 
President alluded to it is only because he was one of the early ones, and 
his heirs and descendants and things are living in Maryland or Texas or 
Maine, or somewhere. But this should show the Duke of Sutherland, 
the Prince of Wales, young Lome and others how easy it is to be a Presi- 
dent, if you only begin low enough. Young — well, let us call him 
Blithers, was born at an early age somewhere on the dividing line between 
New Hampshire and New York. His parents having both expired long 
before his advent into the world, he was somewhat of an orphan— a half 
orphan, at any rate. But these natural disadvantages in no way discour- 
aged him. Finding himself without teeth on the day of his birth, and 
having no mother, he resolutely got up and stole a pint of milk from a 
neighbor's doorstep, which act he repeated from day to day until he was 
detected (when seven days old), arrested and imprisoned for life, though 
afterward pardoned by executive clemency on the day he was weaned. 
At the age of nine years, after a severe course of study in the Alms 
House, he was appointed bottlewasher to a night restaurant, his experi- 
ence there being, as he often said with emotion in after life, very valuable 
to him. Rising proudly step by step, he became a pawnbroker's clerk, a 
barkeeper, a Supervisor, Mayor, Congressman, United States Senator, 
President, head of a church organization and proprietor of a faro bank, 
and when life's duties were all accomplished he passed away in peace, sur- 
rounded by two divorced wives and gently repeating, with clasped hands, 
the sweet lines of the poem, "Beautiful Snow.'' 

The habit of talking in one's sleep is a very dangerous one, and is often 
fatally destructive to domestic happiness. Only the other day the wife of 
a Methodist minister got a divorce by simply Bwearing to the fact that he 
constantly muttered thingB in his sleep about a pretty girl named Eliza- 
beth Jones, and begged her to come into his study with him. Henry 
Ward Beecher always ties his head up with a red silk handkerchief before 
retiring. It does not stop him from snoring, but it fools Mrs. B. every 
time he is inclined to be somniferously loquacious, as it were. The Rev. 
Mr. Kalloch has a simpler device, merely fastening a piece of sticking- 
plaster transversely across, as it might be, up and down his lips. We 
have now, however, in process of invention, and will shortly be issued, 
" The Patent Ministerial Gag and Jaw-Binder," which will enable all 
husbands addicted to talking in their sleep to slumber in perfect comfort 
and safety. We have applied it to the foreman of this office on publica- 
tion days to stop his swearing, and find it answers perfectly. Care should 
be taken, however, not to lose the key of the little padlock attached to 
the right side of the mouth, as serious inconvenience might result when 
the wearer becomes hungry. We unlock the foreman every week as soon 
as he has locked up the forms. 

In another column we reprint, from the Army and Navy Journal, a 
doubtless perfectly authentic item about a soldier who was shot at the 
battle of Waterloo through the eye, and who lived for sixty-five years 
with the bullet lodged in the base of the brain. We knew him. When 
he shook his head it was worse than a baby's rattle, and he was the most 
comical old genius of his day. Sometimes the bullet would slip down 
into his neck, and he would have to stand on his head to get it back again 
into the base of the brain. When he got bald, he stooped down too low 
one day, and it slipped up to the top of his head and looked just like a 
four-ounce wart. He had to get a man to shake him for an hour before 
they could get the bullet down to its proper place in the cerebrum, and he 
cried all the time because he was afraid he had lost his rattle. Any one 
who doubts our veracity can call at this office on Sunday, and we'll show 
them whether we are liars or not. 

The conversations of Mrs. Metzgermeister Ferkelstecher appear to 
afford some amusement to the Poelnischc Juden, so we venture to submit 
another this week, which is perfectly authentic. The compositors of the 
News Letter threaten to all resign in a body if, after this, any more of 
Mrs. F.'s linguistic salads appear. But she said this week: " Ich habe 
gebeard das President Garfield geshootet war, und dass der bis jetzt noch 
nicht gefundener ball durch sein Liver gegangen ist. Er muss ein sehr 
unpleasant pain in seinem Stomach haben und der Guiteau muss ein, 
crazy fool seyn um Mr. Garfield killen zu attempten. It vos youst las 
night as I vos tell mei mann and shpeake mit him und I say, I hope as 
they hang dot verfluchten Schkowndrel (how you say in Englisch ?) bis 
Beine Fuesse — wohl— until his feet vos four miles high von der ground und 
you betyourlife as I don't telly ounoly." 

It is a dirty bird, etc., says the old proverb, and it was never more 
applicable to any community than to San Francisco, Dirty birds that 
foul their own nests are souls without a spwk of square, broad generosity 
in their composition — foul, lean, moulting, featherless, washed-out birds 
of prey, who look on all that surrounds them with a wrong-font eye. Of 
such are the San Quentin witnesses in the present prison investigation, 
with few honorable exceptions, and the dailies, who smell corruption 
more quickly than the vulture scents carrion, pounce on the details — the 
petty smallnesaes of the matter under investigation— and put their beaks 
into its very intestines. (Vide Call y Friday, July 22d, seventh column, 
first page). Healthy investigation is a thing to be encouraged. Investi- 
gation, born of political hatred, is the curse of these United States. 

The Oregonian papa, when he does object to the man who is after 
his daughter, is a man of prompt action. One Kinney, a Umatilla County 
pedagogue, fell in love with the fair daughter of Switzer, the storekeeper 
of the village. Thinking it the proper thing to do, Kinney called in to 
see the old man and fix up things for the weddiug. He found Switzer in 
a bad humor, as, after some little polite conversation, he opened his bat- 
tery upon his would-be son-in-law. Kinney, thinking he might as well 
take a hand, too, drew his pop-gun, and a lively time was had generally. 
Results: Kinney shot in left eye and cheek; Switzer shot in the neck. 
Moral: In courting an Oregon girl.be sure to pop over her papa before 
popping the question, or, better still, woo none but wealthy orphans. 



Another young banker a clerk has gone to the Springs, in order to 
again demonstrate to the world that nooody can drive fast horses and lead 

a fast life on si.iii per month. The difference between meum and tuum is 
very slight in the eyes of many young people in responsible positions. 
With educated young men like Air. Lewis, whose name we would gladly 
keep out of this column, the fine line between criminality and self-indulg- 
ence is a very difficult one to draw. Only it seems unjust that in Cali- 
fornia, while well-connected criminals, whose relatives are able and willing 
to cover up their offenses, go free, the poor and ignorant reap the full 
punishment of their crimes. 

The unhung beasts who met in Irish-American Hall last Wednesday 
night, and who call themselves the Socialistic Labor Party, are reported to 
have said that if God did not want President Garfield Bhot he would have 
stayed the arm of the assassin. How free this country is! It is so free 
that every one who means well wonders whether there are not some means 
by which these United States can be freed of the presence of such devil- 
possessed wretches. The reaction in America is very close at band, and 
the day not far distant when Monnonism, Socialism, Communism, Land- 
Leagueism, and every other irreverent species of ignorance, will be 
stamped out. 

Whenever there is a little religious compliment to be paid to a min- 
ister, the quotidian scribe of the metropolitan diurnal journal (this sounds 
fifty per cent, better than a reporter on a daily paper) invariably talks 
about the Reverend gentleman filling his pulpit to the very great satisfac- 
tion of the congregation. We submit that it is time this hackneyed 
phrase was dropped. Let some writer start in with "shedding the hair 
of grace from his mediaeval rostrum," or remark that Mr. So-and-So is a 
perfect telephone of righteousness, and a telegraph-wire of religiouB con- 
solation. It may be remarked, however, en passant, that the average 
side-whiskered parson usually fills his pulpit with molasses. 

It is an unpleasant duty to have to devote two or three lines this 
week to a man named Francis Reed Porter, who was held this week in 
the sum of S6.000 on two charges of forgery of the name of the senior 
proprietor of this paper. His forgeries were very clumsy, and he will 
doubtless have plenty of time to ponder over their stupidity before he de- 
livers another lecture on *' Why Death Ends All." There is no necessity 
for saying anything more, except to perhaps call the attention of all 
young men who want to use more money than they earn to the evident 
advantage of working more and spending less. 

The attitude of one of our Superior Judges, in taking so active a part 
in one of the Democratic Club Conventions, has provoked considerable 
comment from the editorial writers of the daily preBs. It should not. It 
is merely an evidence that many of the men in the United States, who 
are elected to high public offices, are simply politicians, and when one of 
the bench, and above all a criminal Judge, who has from time to time to 
perform the gravest functions, mingles in the loathsome puddle of munici- 
pal politics, it is not to be wondered at if the rank and file of the party 
are less dignified than ever. 

In the trial of a policeman this week for alleged drunkenness while on 
duty, the defendant is said to have testified that "just previous to his 
arrest he had seen a man shot in his immediate presence, and that this 
act had affected his nervous system to such a degree that he trembled 
like a leaf. He did not positively aver that he would not have trembled 
like a leaf if he had not seen the man shot, but it is in order to advise the 
officer in question to retire from a position where pectoral agitation is not 
a recommendation, and, after that, to hire himself out as a tremolo stop 
to a large organ. 

Two men were poisoned this week from eating fried meat-gravy in a 
laundry. We have always thought fried meat-gravy was poisonous, es- 
pecially when it emanates from a diseased and deceased cow, and is cooked 
in a verdigris frying-pan, properly primed with disacetate of copper. The 
cook was arrested, but, apparently, without any tangible cause. Whether 
officer Hayes was judicious in making the arrest remains to be seen. Of- 
ficers, like other people, have sometimes excellent reasons for what they 
do, and sometimes none. 

There is a Congress of Nihilists now being held in St. Petersburg, 
which promises to accomplish most usefnl and practical results. We are 
not at liberty to state what this Congress proposes to ultimately effect, 
but may add casually that we have bought an interest in a dynamite fac- 
tory this week, and are prepared to till European orders at the shortest 
notice. Our new Prince-exterminator bomb is guaranteed free from all 
impurities, and warranted to blow any monarch four miles. Price lists 
on application. 

The number of candidates for positions in the next County Clerk's 
office must be something enormous, as there are, it is said, about two hun- 
dred aspirants, each one of whom has promised at least four hundred 
positions. We know of one clerk whose head is level. He is in the office 
now, and has promised privately about fifty-five of the most prominent 
office-seekers his undivided support and the usual pro rata of salary, if 
retained. He is willing to take them against the field. 

The Dog Pound has been done away with and is no more, and the 
shyster lawyers who have been wont to warm up their comatose fleas on 
the Merchant street sidewalks now fairly howl with delight. Formerly 
the arrival of the pound wagon sent them scooting into the nearest five- 
cent beer kennel, with their tails between their legs, to avoid the well- 
directed lariat of the Mexican noblemen who were retained at great 
expense by our citv fathers. 

If we may believe the telegraphic dispatches, President Garfield is 
getting so very strong and so very cheerful that, the first thing we know, 
he will be issuing a challenge to Jem Mace to fight him for §1,000 a side, 
S200 forfeit, and be in a perpetual state of hilarity while punching him. 
While the whole world eagerly reads all particulars about the President's 
condition, the bulletins continue to be very trivial and silly. 

There is no prettier sight on a Summer morning than that of the lit- 
tle twelve-year-old San Francisco maidens tripping to school with neatly 
braided hair and bright smiling faces. Yea verily, forsooth, by thunder, 
even as the fawn is fairer than the hippopotamus, so are they more grace- 
ful than a 240 pound colored lady waddling up Broadway. 

A small boy, who was challenged by another and refused to fight, was 
told by his antagonist that he was lucky that he did not lick him then and 
there. He replied : " I was lucky, but I am glad, and fought -yon -not." 
This item is idiocy, but will, perhaps, serve to amuse Harry M-s-h-11 at 
the Bohemian Club. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 23, 1881. 



G. P. R. R. 



Time Schedule, Saturday, June 4, 1881. 


Trains leave, and are due to arrive at, 


San Francisco as follows: 


«%? } DESTINATION. { A ™'™ 


9:30 a.m. 


.... Antloch and Martinez 


3:35 p.m. 


*3:00p.m. 




*10:05 a.m. 


•4.00 p.m. 


" " " 


*12:35 p.m. 






7:35 p.m. 






11:35 a.m. 






7:35 p.m. 


*4:00 P.M. 




*10:05 a.m. 


9:30 A.M. 


. . j Deming and ) Express 


3:35 p.m. 


4:30 P.M. 








3:35 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


.". ( Gait and ) via Livermore 

. . ( Stockton j" via Martinez 


6:05 p.m. 


♦4:00 P.M. 


♦12:35 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


.lone .......... 


6:05 P.M. 


*3:30 p.m. 
18:00 A.M. 






" " (JSundays only) 




9:30 A.M. 


.... Los Angeles and South 


3:35 p.m. 


8:00 A.M. 


.. .Livermore and Niles 


6:05 p.m. 


6:00 p. m. 


'* " " 


8:35 a.m. 


9:30 a.m. 


.... Madera and Yosemite 


3:35 P.M. 


♦4:00 p.m. 


» " " 


♦12:35 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 




7:35 p.m. 


10:00 a.m. 


.... Niles (see also Liverm'e & Niles 


4:0a p.m. 


3:30 p.m. 


. . J Ogden and 1 Express 

..(East f Emigrant 


11:35 a,M. 


6:30 p.m. 


6:05 A.M. 


8:00 a.m. 




7:35 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


.. (Sacramento,} via Livermore. 


6:05 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


. . ■{ Colfax and > via Benicia 


7:35 P.M. 


3:30 p.m. 




11:35 a.m. 


*4:00 P.M. 


....Sacramento .River Steamers.. 


•0:00 a.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


. . . . San Jose and Niles 


4:05 p.m. 




>i it ti 


9:35 a.m. 






7:35 p.m. 

3:35 P.M. 

*10:05 A.M. 

*12.35 P.M. 

11:35 A.M. 








k 




it 


3:30 p.m. 


....Virginia City 






11:35 A.M. 
*7:35 P.M. 
♦7:35 P.M. 






*S:00 A.M. 


Willows and Williams 


Train leaving San Francisco at if:3(l a.m. should meet 


Pacific Express from " Ofiden " at San Pablo ; also Pacifies 


Express from "Deming" at Byron. 


From "SAN FRANCISCO," Daily. 



ToEASTOAKLAND-*+6:10, +7:30, +8:30, +9:30, 10:30, 

11:30, 12.30, 1.30, 13:30, t4;30, +5:30, t6:30, 7:00, 8:10, 

9:20, 10.40, *11:45. 

(tRunning through to Alameda, Sundays excepted.) 
To ALAMEDA DiRECT-7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 

12:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, *7:00, 8:10, 9:20, 

10:40, +11:45. 
To BERKELEY — 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 10:30, 11:30, 1:00, 

3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, +6:30. 
To WEST BERKELEY-*6:10, 8:00, 10:00, 12:00, 1:30, 

3:30, 4:30, 5:30, +0:30. 

To "SAN FRANCISCO," Pally. 

From Broadway, Oakland -+5:20, +6:00, 6:50, and every 
21th and 64th minute of each hour (excepting 9.24) 
from 7:24 A.M. to 6:54 p.m. (inclusive), 8:00, 9:10, 1.0:30. 

From EAST OAKLAND -»5:10, *5:50, 6:40, t7:44, tS:44, 
t9:44, tl0:44, 11:44, 12:44, 1:44, 2:44, t3:44, t4:44, 
+5:44, +6:44, +7:50, 9:00, 10:20. 

(tStarting 20 minutes earlier from Alameda, Sundays ex- 
cepted . ) 

From ALAMEDA Direct— *5:00, *5:40, 6:25, 7:00, 8:00, 
9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1.00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 
+7:20, 8:40, 9:55. 

From BERKELEY— +5:40, *6:30, 7:30,8:30, 9:30, 10:30, 
11:30, 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00. 
From WEST B£RKELEY-*5:40, *6:30, 8:00, 10:00, 

12:00, 1:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, +6:30. 



Creek Route. 

From SAN FRANCISCO— +7:15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15, 3:15, 

5:15. 
From OAKLAND— +6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:15 

All trains run daily, except when star (*) denotes Sun- 
days excepted. 



"Official Schedule- Time" furnished by Randolph & 
Co., Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Townk General Superintendent. 



ONLY. 

Only a baby, 

Kissed and caressed, 

Gently held to mother's breast. 
Only a child, 

Toddling along, 

Brightening now its happy home. 
Only a boy, 

Trudging to school, 

Governed now by sterner rule. 
Only a youth, 

Living in dreams, 

Full of promise life now seems. 
Only a man, 

Battling with life, 

Shared in now by loving wife. 
Only a father, 

Burdened with care, 

Silver threads in dark brown hair. 
Only a gray-beard, 

Toddling again, 

Growing old and full of pain. 
Only a mound, 

O'ergrown with grass, 

Dreams unrealized — rest at last. 




BROAD GAUGE. 
SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing Saturday, Jniie4tli. IS 81, 
and until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
San Francisco, from Passenger Depot on Townsend 
street, between Third and Fourth streets, as follows: 



Q QH a.m. daily for San Jose and Way Stations. 
<U**J\J (Returning, arrives San Francisco 3:36 p.m. 
ES? 3 Stages for Pescadero (via San Mateo) connect 
with this train only. 



9 0A a.m. Sundays only, for San Jose and Way Sta- 
•«-'" tions. (Returning, arrives S. F. 8:15 P.M.) 



"1 f\ Af\ a.m. daily (Monterey and Soledad Through 
J- V/.rtV/ Train) for San Jose, Gilroy, (Hollisterand 
Tres Pinos), Pajaro, Castroville, Monterey, Salinas, Sol- 
edad and Way Stations. (Returning, arrives San Fran- 
cisco 6:00 p.m.) 

63^" Parlor Cars attached to this train. 

8^** At Pajaro the Santa Cruz Railroad connects 
with this Train for Aptos, Soquel and Santa Cruz. 

85?™* Stage connections made with this train. (Pesca- 
dero Stages via San Mateo excepted.) 



3 0Ap.ji. daily, Sundays excepted, "Monterey 
• *JV/ AND Santa Cruz Express " for San Mateo, 
Redwood, Menlo Park, Santa Clara, San Jose, Gilroy 
(Hollister and Tres Pinos), Pajaro, Castroville (Salinas), 
and Monterey. (Returning, arrives S. F 10:02 a.m.) 

6^" At PAJARO the SANTA CRUZ RAILROAD 
connects with this train for Aptos, Soquel and Santa 
Cruz. 

PASSENGERS BY THIS TRAIN 
("'HOTEL DEL MONTE,' 



•E 1 MONTEREY, 

£ ( SANTA CRUZ . 



7.05 p.m.— 3h. 35m. 

...7.26 p.m.— 3h. 56m. 



4S} FZ p.m. Daily Express for San Jose and Principal 
,~jO Way Stations. (Returning, arrives S. F. 9:03a, m. 
SSTSundays only this train stops at all Way Stations. 



5 1 fC p.m. Daily, Sundays excepted, for Menlo Park 
•-*-*." and Way Stations. (Rtturning,ar.S.F.8:10A.M. 



60 r\ p.m. daily, for Menlo Park and Way Stations 
'0\J (Returning, arrives San Francisco 6:40 a.m.) 



SPECIAL RATES 

TO Monterey, Aptos, Soquel, Sauta Cruz. 

Single Trip Tickets to any of above points. £3.50 
Excursion Tickets (Round Trip) to any of 
above points, sold on Saturdays and Sunday 
mornings, good for return until following 

Monday inclusive $5 00. 

SPECIAL ROUND TRIP SEASON TICKETS, 
(Good for return until October 31, 1831), 

San Fx'anciaco to Monterey and return $6 00 

San Francisco to Monterey and Santa Cruz, 
inclusive, and return '. $7 00 . 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 

The well-known "Pacific Grove Retreat " at Monterey 
is now open for the reception of visitors, tourists and 
" campers." This popular resort has been entirely re- 
fitted by its present owners (the Pacific Improvement 
Company) with new furniture, tents, etc. Circulars 
giving full information as to rates, terms, etc., can be 
had upon application to any " Station Agent," on the 
line of the Central or Southern Pacific Railroad. 



Also, Excursion Tickets to SAN JOSE and inter- 
mediate points sold on Saturdays and Sunday mornings, 
good for return until following Monday inclusive. 



Ticket Offices— Passenger Depot, Townsend street 
and No. 2 New Montgomery street, Palace Hotel. 

A. C. EASSETT, Supt. H. R. JUDAH, A. P. & T. A. 



SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. 

B3P~ Passengers for Los Angeles and intermediate 
points, as also Yuma and all points east of the Colorado 
River, will take the cars of the Central Pacific Railroad 
via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 9:30 A.M. daily (S. P. Atlan- 
tic Express Train). 



It is a well-known fact that the members 
of the Italian House of Representatives receive 
no pay. A representative from Piedmont, speak- 
ing of one of his colleagues the other day, said 
he was so poor as to spend his nights in the coupe* 
of a railway car in order not to be obliged to 
sleep in the open air. Members of the House 
are entitled to free passes on the railroads ; the 
one in question went nightly from Rome to Flo- 
rence, comfortably ensconsing himself in a re- 
served coupe*, and taking his nightly rest until 
dawn of day, when he returned to Rome by 
another train. The car had become both his 
domicile and bed. 




Commencing: Sunday, April loth. 1881, 
and until further notice, Boats and Trains will 
leave San Francisco as follows: 



7 If) A.m. daily (Sundays excepted) San Quentin 
I . J. \_/ Ferry, foot of Market street, for Cloverdale, 
Guerneville and Way Stations. Stages connect at Santa 
Rosa for Mark West Springs and Sevastopol, at G^yser- 
ville for Skaggs' Springs, and at Cloverdale for Ukiah, 
Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, 
Bartlett Springs and the Geysers. 



3.00 



p. m. daily (Sundays excepted), Steamer 
James M. Donahue," Washington street 
Wharf, connecting at Sonoma Landing with ears for 
Sonoma, and at Donahue with train for Cloverdale 
and way stations, Stages connect at Cloverdale for 
Mendocino City and Navarro Ridge. 



SUNDAY EXCURSIONS. 

8 A A.». Sundays only, Steamer "James M. Don- 
•^" ahue," Washington-street Wharf, for Sonoma, 
Cloverdale, Guerniville and Way Stations. Round Trip 
Tickets, on Sundays, to Sonoma, $1; to Petaluma, §1.50; 
to Santa Rosa, §2; to Healdsburg, $3; to Cloverdale, 
34 60; to Guerneville, S3. 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



PETER J. McGLTNN, 
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Ag 



SOUTH PACIFIC COAST R. R. 

(NEW ROUTE— NARROW GAUGE.) 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 
omniencing April 4, 1881, Boats and 
Trains will leave San Francisco from Ferry Land- 
foot of Market street, as follows: 



c 



Q 'JAam., Daily, for Alameda, West San Leandro, 
^■t/V-f West San Lorenzo, Russell's, Mount Eden, 
Alvarado, Hall's, Newark, Mowry's, Alviso, Agnew's, 
Santa Clara, San Jose, Lovelady's, Los Gatos, Alma, 
Wright's, Glenwood, Dougherty's Mill, Felton, Big Tree 
Grove, Summit and Santa Cruz. - 



3 9A p.m., Daily, for Santa Cruz and all interrnedi- 
• t> \J ate stations. 



4*\(~\ p.m.. Daily, Sundays excepted, for San Jose 
cQV-^ and all intermediate points. 



gST" In Alameda all through trains will stop at Park 
Street and Pacific Avenue only. 

Stages connect at Los Gatos with 8:30 a.m. and 
3:30 p.m. trains for Congress Springs and Saratoga. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 

Sold on Saturdaj'S and Sundays, good until Monday fol- 
lowing, inclusive: To San Jose and return, $2 50 ; Santa 
Cruz and return, 35. 

OAKLAND AND ALAMEDA FERRY. 

Ferries and Local Trains leave San 

Francisco Tor Oabland and Alumetla: 

*G:35-7:36-8:30-9:30— 10:30— 11:30a.m. -+12.30-1:30- 
2:30—3:30 4:30—5:30—6:30—7:30—8:30 and 11:30 p.m. 

From Corner Fourteenth and Webster 
streets, Oakland: *«:00 — +7:00 — 8:00 — 8:50— 
9:50— 10:50— +11:50 A.M. 12:50- -1:50—2:50—3:50—4:50— 
5:50—6:50 and 9:50 P.M. 

From High street, Alameda— "5:45— *6:45 
—7:45— 8:38-9:35— 10:35— +11:35 A.M. 12:35—1:35—2:35 
—3:35—4:35—5:35—6:35 and 9:35 P.M. 

+ Saturdays and Sundays only. 

* Dairy, Sundays excepted. 

Up-Towu Ticket Office, 208 Montgomery street. Bag- 
gage checked at hotels and residences. 

Through trains arrive at San Francisco at 9:35 and 
10:35 a.m. and 6:35 P.M. 



F. W. BOWEN, 
Superintendent. 



GEO. H. WAGGONER, 

Gen. Pass'gr Agent. 



$72 



MARRIAGE A LA MODE. 

A hat, a cane, 

A nobby beau ! 
A narrow lane, 

A whisper low. 
A smile, a bow, 

A little flirt 1 
An ardent vow 

That's cheap as dirt ! 
A hand to Bqueeze, 

A girl to kiss 
Quite at one's ease 

Must needs be bliss. 
A ring, a date, 

A honeymoon, 
To find too late 

It was too soon ! — Puck. 

a week. $12 a day at home easily made. CoBtly 
Outfit Free. 

Address True & Co., Augnsta, Maine. 



July 23, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 




'The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[By a Truthful Penman. 1 



Gen. Beauregaid claims to have originated the cable system for street 
railroads. He brought a suit against the .San Francisco Company, and it 
oXDpromised by the agreement of defendants not to extend their use 
of it away from the Pacific Coast It is stated that the Chicago compa- 
nies will pay bim a royalty for the use of the system in that city. — Army 
\<trij Join ;,<</.— »A gentleman named White, residiugat Prineegate, 
has proceeded against a jeweller in Oxford street to compel bim to take 
back a diamond tiara and bracelet which were bought for four thousand 
teven hundred pounds, on the understanding that they would, if the 
plaintiff desired, be repurchased for two hundred pounds less than that 
amount at any time within two years. Mrs. White gave evidence as to 
the persuasion she brought to bear upon her husband to buy the jewels. 
Finding, however, they were too heavy for her, the lady requested the 
jeweller to take them back. It was stated that the value of the jewels 
had depreciated. The jury found for the plaintiff, and the defendant was 
ordered to pay four thousand five hundred pounds on restoration of the 
jewels, or eighteen hundred pounds damages if the plaintiff should have 
to keep the jewels. — London Weekly Times. -^English yachtsmen have 
ere now made voyages round the world, notably Mr. Thomas Brassey, Sir 
Thomas Hesketh, Mr. Lee, Mr. Lambert, etc.; yet their exploits are 
about to be rivaled by a foreigner, as M. Henry Say has had a large bark- 
rigged vessel fitted out for bim ; and, starting from Baltimore, intends 
visiting Bermuda, Gibraltar, Suez, China, San Francisco, etc. She is to 
carry half a dozen guns, and will probably be away for three years. She 
is said to be 1,000 tons.i " ^London World.— — M. Gordan Bennett in- 
tends having the largest steam-yacht in the world, and is building one of 
800 tons. The largest English steam-yacht is the Wanderer, 750 tons. 
now on a voyage round the world. Mr. Stewart's army is the next larg- 
est, she being 600 tons. Talking of large steam-vessels, the Inman Com- 
pany launched a fortnight ago, their new steamer, the " City of Rome," 
8,800 tons. She is the largest ship afloat, next to the "Great Eastern." 
She will make her first voyage in the autumn, when it is said she will 
have Madame Patti for a passenger. The "City of Rome" will steam 
eighteen knots, so that the voyage across the Atlantic should not be a long 
one. — lb.— A New York correspondent of the World, writing on the 
14th inst., says: "The great American eagle is on the scream just now 
over the great American victory achieved by English horses, trained in 
English stables, and ridden by English jockeys. Except in trotting, the 
Americans are not in it in racing, and quite out of it as equestrians. Pic- 
ture an American horseman in the Park here ! Long, lanky, bony horse, 
with well-scooped-out back, tail flowing to the ground, half -groomed, with 
dirty reins and dirty irons ; saddle-cloth with a big monogram ; man in a 
velvet or plush skull-cap, tight breeches buttoned all the way down the 
leg, long leather boots, Mexican stirrups, toe just in and no more, heel 
well in, toe well out, dragoon spurs, and the rider's legs almost meeting 
under the horse ; yellow gauntlet-gloves, gold-tipped riding- whip ; rein- 
hand well up under the chin, other hand straight as an arrow down the 
leg ; never rising in the trot— voila I Yet you just take that man off that 
horse and put him on a bale of cotton, and he'll make you pay double for 
it before you can wink."— —Mrs. Mackay, wife of the " Bonanza King," 
has purchased a dinner service of a hundred and nine pieces, for £3,600. 
The design is Buffon's, and is exquisitely wrought out in its details. The 
naturalist is said to have called it the second edition of his book on birds. 
Such a service is, of course, intended to be looked at and admired. If 
used the servants would smash it in an agony of responsibility. -^Sir 
Evelyn Wood's new girl-baby cannot be said to be badly off in the 
matter of godmothers. The Queen is one, and the Empress Eugenie is 
the other. The infant bears the name of "Victoria Euge'nie."^— 
According to the Cyprus Times, locusts's eggs, which would have produced 
2,830,472,600 live insects, have been destroyed in the island during the 
present year.^^" I am leading a dog'B life," lately remarked the Prime 
Minister. " Yes," replied Lord Houghton, who was standing near, " the 
life of a St. Bernard, which is spent in saving the lives of others." — 
2V«(/i.— The worshipers in the church at Windsor recently, where the 
Royal Horse Guards hold their church -parade, were somewhat astounded, 
not to say scandalized, to see the rest of the congregation stand up when 
the Prince and Princess of Wales, and other members of the Royal Fam- 
ily, entered the sacred building — an acknowledgment of State supremacy 
which the extreme High Church do not brook. But outsiders were 
greatly pleased when the Prince appeared in full uniform at the church- 
door at the head of his fine regiment, and marched with tbem. — World. 
■^—Another invasion of the Moody and Sankey party is mentioned as 
probable, but the Haverly Minstrels are likely to prove terrible rivals. 
The Salvation Army must take care. — Cuckoo. 



There has been some discussion as to the limits of the Principality of 
Wales. We had thought the subject long forgotten and buried, but that 
it is not so is proved by letters in papers discussing, with some acerbity, 
the question whether Monmouthshire is or is not a part of Wales. No 
advantage will be gaiued in settlement either way. It is a moot point, 
and would form matter enough for a young men's discussion class, or a 
Royal Society lecture, but it does not call upon Englishmen and Welsh- 
men to take up the cudgels on opposing sides and decide it once for all. 
Perhaps the learned disquisitors who contend that Wales has been robbed 
of a county would be astonished to bear that the Principality itself is a 

f>art of England. Yet this would not be a mere play upon words. So 
ong as such a question only affords practice for the researches of antiqua- 
rians, no harm will be done; but when it develops into acrid recrimina- 
tion of " your correspondent, so-and-so," it becomes absurd. A spectacle 
for the gods would be Essex and Middlesex in arms about an extra half 
yard of paving-stone in or near Bishopsg ate- street without. 



GEO. STREET, Agent Keu>» Letter, 30 Cornhlll, E. C, London. 

rpIIE BEST FOOD FOR INFANT LIFE. 
npHE BEST FOOD FOR INFANT HEALTH. 



HB BEST POOD FOR INFANT GROWTH. 



T 

S 



UE ONLY FOOD-(SAVORY & MOORE'S). 



PECJALLY PREPARED FOR INFANTS. 



rpHE BEST FOOD FOR INFANTS. 

rT^HE BEST SUBSTITUTE FOR MOTHER'S MILK. 

SAVORY & MOORE, NEW BOND STREET, LONDON. 
Obtainable everywhere. 



[Nov. 13. 



JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 
rpiic attention of Sportsmen Is Invited to the following 

JL Ammunition, of the best quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India aud the ColouieB : Joyce's Treble Waterproof and F 3 Quality Percussion 
Caps ; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding ; Joyce's Gas-Tight Car- 
tridges, for Pin-fire and Central-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold by 
all gun-makers and dealers in gunpmvder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Oct. 2. 67 Upper Thames street, London. 

IN CONSEQUENCE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS OF 

LEA A PERKINS' SAUCE, which are calculated to deceive 
the public, Lea and Perrins have adopted A NEW LABEL, bearing their sig- 
nature, " LEA & PERRINS," which is placed on every bottle of WORCESTER- 
SHIRE SAUCE, and without which none is genuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERRINS' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per. Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & Blackwell, 
London, etc., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughout the world. 
Nov. 16. MESSRS. CROSS & CO., Agents, San Francisco. 

"THE CATERER," 

Published Monthly, is a Business "fctuide, Philosopher and 
Friend" for Cooks, Confectioners, Hotel Keepers and Restaurateurs, to 
whom it furnishes Information, Instruction, Practical Wrinkles and Advice on all 
Matters connected with 

The Cuiaine, The Pastrycook's Art, 

Refreshment Catering-, New and Labor-saving Inventions, 

Domestic Economy, Culinary Literature, 

Hotel Management, Decoration and Furnishing, 

Pood Supplies, Our Food Industries, 

The Bar, Cellar, and Kitchen. Innkeeper's Law, etc., etc., etc 

Yearly Subscription, 4s., Post Free Anywhere. 

NEWTON A ESHEliE 329, High llolborn, London. 

[May 21.] 

HARTLEY FLEMING, 

Who sailed from London, England, lor Melbourne, In 
October, 1870, as Midshipman on board the "Lady Cairns," and, it is be- 
lieved, left his ship at San Francisco in 1871, will hear of something to his advantage 
by addressing WILLIAM FIELDING, 41 West Twentv-sixth street, New York. Any 
one furnishing information regarding him will be rewarded. June 26. 

owlands' Macassar Oil has been known for the lost eighty years as the 
best and safest preserver and beautifler of the hair; it contains no lead 
or mineral ingredients, and is especially adapted for the hair of children; 
sold iu usual four sizes. 

owlands 1 Odonto is the purest and most fragrant dentifrice ever made; it 
whitens the teeth, prevents decay, and gives a pleasing fragrance to the 
breath, and the fact of its containing no acid or mineral ingredients 
specially adapts it for the teeth of children. 

Owlands 1 Ualydor produces a beautifully pure and healthy complexion, 
eradicates freckles, tan, prickly heat, sunburn, etc., and is most cooling 
and refreshing to the face, hands and arms, during hot weather. Ask 
any Perfumery Dealer for 

owlands* articles, of 20, Hatton Garden, London; and avoid spurious worth- 
less imitations. ^ [Oct. 2. 



R 
R 
R 
R 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

Finest and Cheapest Meat 'flavoring Stock for Soups, Made 
Dishes and Sauces. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT, 

An Invaluable n.,«l Palatable Tonic In all Cases or Weak 
Digestion and Debility. Is a success and boon for which Nations should feel 
grateful. See "Medical Press," "Lancet," " British Medical Journal," etc. 



c 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

antlon—Oenuine only with fac-simile of Baron IJebig'a 

Signature, in blue ink, across Label. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

To be had of all Store-keepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale only). C. David* Co., 43, Mark Lane, 
London England. Sold wholesale by RICHARDS & HARRISON, San Francisco. 
[ March 2.] 

^CHAMPAGNE. 

HEIDSIECK & CO.'S 

X>KY MONOPOLE. 

THEODOK SATOW & CO.. JLONDON. 
Sole Agents for Great Britain, India and the Colonies. 



&Pd a week in foot own town. Terms and & ontnt free. . 

«tpOO Address H. HiUjnr * CO.. Portland, Maine. 



14 



SATS FRATSTCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 23, 1881. 



OUR PARIS LETTER. 

FoxhalTs Victory— Americans in Paris- -Their Patronage of Art- 
American Products— The Fishing; Season— A Circus in a Private 
Garden-Emma Thurshy Singing— The Palace de 1' Industrie— 
Chiseling off Napoleon's Initials— An Astronomical Toy— San 
Franciscans in Paris— Chit-Chat, Etc., Etc. 

Paris, June 30, 1881. 

The victory of Foxkall at Longchamps has not ceased to be a topic of 
interest, and Parisians seem to be suddenly filled with sad reflections on 
what they call the American invasion of Europe. Of all people, how- 
ever, the people of Paris should be the last to complain of an American 
invasion, for no foreign city on earth has profited by the Americans and 
their prodigious scattering of coin so much as has Paris. 

Marie Van Zandt reigns supreme at the Opera Comique. Miss G-riB- 
wold, whose petit nom, Gertrude, is prettier than her family name, is mak- 
ing herself a reputation at the Grand Opera. The studio of Bounat is 
full of American pictures. Go to the Louvre or the Luxembourg and 
you will find dozens of American girls copying and studying the masters. 

American beef, American hams and American fruit may be seen in all 
the shops, and asked for with an avidity that shows beyond the effort of 
any puff their inherent superiority. What the native producers may lose 
by the competition is amply made up by the hotel bills paid by the in- 
vaders, and the orders executed for them by Worth and Pingat. 

The fishing season on the Seine reopened on Thursday, to the great de- 
light of the gamins. The quays are now once more peopled with hundreds 
of men and boys, whose privilege it is to be able to angle the livelong 
day for gudgeon and white-bait. The army of fishermen that may be 
seen any day between Bercy and Auteuil is one of the many instances 
that might be cited of the facility of life in Paris. 

Mr. Molier, a wealthy and "horsey" gentleman who lives at Passy, 
has built a circus in his garden, and he and a number of his friends de- 
vote their leisure time — even all their time— to training horses, teaching 
poodles to perform, and in practicing acrobatic exercises. Two or three 
performances were given at this amateur circus last year with great suc- 
cess. On Saturday another performance was given, at which " all Paris" 
was present ; "letout Paris mondain, viveur et sportsman," is the some- 
what polyglotish description given by one paper. 

Miss Emma Thursby lent her valuable aid to the Society for the Adop- 
tion of Abandoned Young Girls at their concert on Thursday evening. 
She sang Proch's " Variations," Ricci's valse " d'Una Folia a Roma," and 
one of the parts in the quartette from Rigoletto. 

The Palace de l'lndustrie is once more in the hands of the workmen, 
who are preparing the grand electrical exhibition which is to open in 
August. Among the marvels of this exhibition will be a large basin con- 
structed in the middle of the garden. In the midst of the basin a light- 
house will be built, and around it an electrical boat will navigate. 

A curious collection is about to be sold at the Salle Drouot. It in- 
cludes the posters stuck up on the walls of Paris during the Revolution 
of 1848, the Empire, the Prussian Siege and the Commune, under the 
Presidency of Marshal McMahon, to which have been added the " ca- 
nards " published during the same period, the illustrated political journals 
published during the Empire and subsequent to that reign, the political 
organs of the Commune, etc. The whole includes some 7,000 pieces, and 
is interesting as affording historical data of considerable value. 

The initials of Napoleon III. on the bridges of the Seine are now being 
chiseled off. Nothing symbolic of his ex-Majesty remains, except the 
coin, which is also being rapidly melted down. In contradistinction to 
this last may be stated that the name of Victor Hugo has been given to 
one of the great boulevards of the town of Lille. 

Parisians are to have their toy cannon in the gardens of the Palais 
Royal restored. This little cannon is mounted on a pedestal of granite, 
and goes off by the sun directly at noon. It thus competes with the 
Bourse clock. When the Regent first introduced this astronomical toy, 
all Paris came to see it going off. In course of time, a restaurateur named 
Cuisinier — a suitable name — obtained the right to fix the cannon on the 
balcony of his dining-room. This attracted a crowd of customers, and on 
a day that the sun did not shine, the wags at hand undertook the duty of 
setting the cannon off with the end of a cigar. 

J. \V. Glazier and family are at the Grand Hotel. Mr. Greenbaum 
and wife have gone to Vienna. Commodore Baldwin, U. S. N., formerly 
of San Francisco, and C. Adolpbe Low & Co., is also in Paris. 

The Salon closed on Monday. In connection with Patti's forthcoming 
tour in the United States, it may be interesting to hear that it has been 
determined that the price of a stall at the Steinway Hall performances 
has been fixed at S20, other places being rated in proportion. Her repre- 
sentative demanded the enormous sum of §400,000 for a series of fifty 
performances. The very popular play, Les PUutes du Diable, is to be re- 
vived at the Porte-Saint- Martin, with a mise en scene, which is to throw 
Michel Strogoff into the shade. Apiece in one act by Octave Feuillet, 
IS Acrobat, is being rehearsed at the Gymnase. Bancroche. 

The Granite Monthly, a New Hampshire magazine, for the current 
month, has just come to hand. It contains some well written articles, 
which, though no doubt of immense interest to home readers, can hardly 
be expected to have much attraction for outsiders. The articles of most 
interest to the reading public are " An Old-Time Love Story " and " The 
First Ocean Steamboat." The former is a nicely written story of old 
Colonial times, and ends somewhat curiously in its hero leaving the Con- 
tinental side and joining the English. The latter is a most interesting 
article, containing much valuable matter. The less Baid about the verse 
the better, as it is not at all up to the mark. 



Resigned. — The Rev. John Hemphill, for many years pastor of Cal- 
vary Church, has handed in his resignation to the church, with a view of 
accepting a very lucrative call to a church in Philadelphia, 



THE NEW AND MAGNIFICENT 

"Hotel del Monte," 

MONTEREY, CAL, 

Commenced its SITMMEB SEASON on Wednesday, June 1, 1881. 

The fourth Hop of the seasontakes place this ( Saturday ) EVENING 
MUSIC BY BAILENBESS'S BANS. 



Among the great improvements made during the past winter is the con- 
struction of a mammoth warm Salt Water Swimming Tank, 150x50 feet 
in size, and being THE LARGEST IN THE WORLD. 

GEORGE SCHONEWALD, Manager. 



SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid fur Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUEST/ONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working: GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June 18. PBENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 

DANCING ACADEMY, 

IN RED MEN'S BUILDING, 
No. 330 Post Street Opposite Union Square. 

PROF. O. A. LTTNT respectfully announces that his new Academy, No. 320 Pos 
street, is now open for Juvenile aud Evening- Classes. Office Hours, for Terms, etc., 
10 A.M. to 12 m., and 1 to 5 p.m. March 12. 

Eichard Savage.] SAVAGE & SON, [Richard H. Savage. 

Empire Foundry and Machine Works, 137 to 141 Fremont 
street, San Francisco. Stamp Batteries and Prospecting" Mills, Saw Mills, 
Gang- Edgers, Set Works, Gearing and Shafting, Harvey's Heaters, Green-house Fix- 
tures, Plumbers' Stock, Dodge's Rock Breakers and Concentrators, Architectural 
Work and Machine Jobbing-. Send for Circular. June 25. 

ROEBLING'S WIRE ROPE AGENCY. 

250,000 Feet on Hand, All Sizes 

For Sale, Lowest Rates. Wire Rope for Elevators. Wire 
Rope for Mines (round or flat). Wire Rope Especially for Cable Roads. Wire 
Suspension Bridges, built to order, all sizes. Sole Agents for Pacific Coast, 

L. REYNOLDS & CO., 
Office, Room 1, Nevada Block. Warehouse, No. 16 First street. July 9. 

CALIFORNIAN AND EUROPEAN AGENCY 

REMOVED TO 
16 MONTGOMERY AYENIIG. 

E.J.JACKSON San Francisco 

MESSRS. BAILEY, WILSON & CO London and New York 

(July 2.) 



PROF. 0. SPERANZA, 



D 



Italian Musical lusutute, of San Francisco, 30 Post street. 
Sing Lessons, in Classes, every day from 4 to 5 P.M. for Ladies, and from 8 to 9 
every evening for Gentlemen. July 16. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET, 
ay and Boarding: School for Young Jjadies aud Children, 

KINDERGARTEN. Next Term will coniineuce July 20th. 

2'J. MADAME U. ZKITSKA, Principal. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. Room 4, No. 531 California 8t. 

SAMUEL D. HOVEY, 

Sealer in Local Securities, 
No. 436 California Street San .Francisco, Cal. 

BS^ Gas, Water, Insurance, Railroad, Bank, Telephone, Powder Stocks, etc., 
Bought and Sold. July 9. 

Large Variety Just Received. 

JR. J. TRTTMBTTZZ, & CO., 
319 & 321 Sansome St., San Francisco, 



FLOWERING 

BULBS. 



NOTICE. 

or the very best photogrrapbs go to Bradley A Kulofson's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



P 



R. H. LLOYD, 

Attorney-at-Law, Room 13. Nevada Block. 



July 23, 1881 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



CRADLE, ALTAR, AND TOMB. 



CRADLE, 
m— In thii city, July 15, totba wife of Edwud Aatonatti, a son. 
'u1 v 17, to th. It, a daughter. 

•..'.Ink i-. to the wife of M .Cohen, a daughter 

wife of V. P. Desmond,* daughter. 
b, this city, .lutv 11, to the wife of J. M.-Grah, adau 
ilj 11, to the wifoof P, Lrdon, a son. 
Ltm* In tliis i-itv. .iu!v 10, to the wife of J son. 

, July 12. t.. tin- wife -if I>. Maedonald, a son. 
In thii city, Julv 11. to the wife of J. H. Btvronson, I son. 
Stewart— In thl ■ Frank Stewart, a daughter. 

Wourr— In thia city, July is, to the wife of Marcus Wolff, a son. 

ALTAR. 

FArRHOLT-ForosTKDT— In this city, July 18, 0, s. FaarhoU to Amalla Fougstcdt. 
Hmioo-Cirklk-Ih thii city, July — . Louis Horzogto Sarah Clrkle 
Hatm-Lym-ii - Iii tlii? city, July 11. Wm, J, Hayos to Untfl Lynch. 
Kamntnaa-Woaoi) lo thu eta , Jul.\ 16, Thomas Kerrntsh to Marion Wilson, 
PBAHLMAS-LAMinTAt'TKK— In tins city, July •>, 1.. M Poortman to 0. Langstadter. 
Parkkr-Maddkn-Iii this city. July 12, William Parker to Mary Madden. 
Tbrry-Lisdt— In llii» city, July IS, George W. Terry to Emily 0. Lundt. 

TOMB. 

Bi-rkr— In this city. July 19, Thomas Burke, aged 54 years. 

■ i.i.v — In this city, .Inly 15, Jntin C«inn<illv. a-ed 00 years. 
Covbrt— In this city, Jul> i7, Susan Belle Covert, aged 22 years and 11 months. 
McDonald- In thi* citv, July 15, Wm. McDonald, aged 68 years. 
Frazkk— In this city, July 10, Vitruvius Frazce, aged 46 years. 
Ooopmann — In this City, July 17, Belle C. Goodmann, aged 30 years. 
LaBOCBV— In this city, July 10, Pierre A. Laroche, aged 42 years. 
Riley- In this city, July 19, Michael Riley, aged 45 years. 
Rogers— In this city, July 16, Edmund K. Rogers, aged 57 years and 6 months. 
Swkrst— In this city, July 18, Bridget Sweeny, aged 02 years. 

THE WATER QUESTION. 

We venture respectfully to Bubmit, in somewhat greater detail, the 
proposal made by us last week for a just and satisfactory settlement of 
the Water Question. It is proposed 

" That the public shall purchase two-fifths of the Spring Valley stock 
at a price and on conditions to be settled by arbitration. The payment 
to be made by bonds raised on the credit of the city on the best possible 
terms. 

The charter of the Spring Valley Company shall be revised as follows: 

The future board or management to consist of, say, five Directors, 
three of whom shall be elected by the stockholders, and two by public 
election. 

The Directors elected by the public shall not be stockholders while 
holding office. They shall each be elected for a term of four years, one 
retiring every second year. 

There shall be two auditors of the Company, one of whom shall be 
elected by the stockholders, and the other nominated by the Mayor of 
the city. The conditions of office and the duties of both auditors shall 
be alike. 

Whenever the dividends of the Company shall pay for six successive 
months at the rate of 8 per cent, per annum, the water-rates shall be re- 
duced proportionately, and no augmentation of the rates shall be made 
unless the dividends shall, for the same consecutive period, be reduced to 
5 per cent. 

The entire management of the works, the conditions of public and pri- 
vate supply, and the rates charged, shall be under the exclusive control of 
the Board of Directors. 

Adequate provision shall be made for the extinction of fires, the 
Bprinkling of streets, the watering of the public parks, the flushing of 
sewers, etc., and every citizen shall be entitled to a sufficient supply of 
pure water, on the conditions named in a schedule to be published every 
six months. 

One half of the total water rate shall be charged on improved property 
liable to fire, one-fourth upon unimproved real estate, and the remainder 
shall be charged upon consumers according to the value of the property 
occupied. 

Three-fourths of the water-rate shall be collected by the Tax Collector, 
and paid from the public Treasury, by order of the Mayor and Auditor. 
The advantages of this proposal are: 

That it resumes a large part of the franchises granted to the Spring 
Valley Company, and does so on equitable terms. It secures for the pub- 
lic a large and powerful representation on the management of a question 
of the greatest public interest. 

It reduces the magnitude of the question in dispute. Instead of dis- 
puting on the total value of the Spring Valley property, and the interest 
which should be paid to the proprietors, the real difference would only be 
that of the stock held by the proprietors in excess of that held by the 
public ; in other words, 20 per cent, of the present total. It would put an 
end to the present anomalous and unsatisfactory relation between the pub- 
lic and the company. It would remove the sulyect from the arena of politics. 
It is calculated to prevent disputes and law expenses, to promote economy 
of administration, and prevent waste of water ; and, on this last account, 
it would have a tendency to prevent the necessity of any unnecessary ex- 
tension of the works. 

The Percolation from Cemeteries.— In the immediate neighborhood of 
one of the London cemeteries there is a row of fine houses. No one can 
now live in them. The stench in the basements is insufferable, because 
the drainage from the neighboring grave-ground percolates through the soil. 
Typhoid fever broke out in one of them, and the tenants had to leave for 
their lives. The soil near London is less pervious than that of Lone 
Mountain, and the bed-rock is not so near. It would be interesting to 
know how far the percolation reaches down Hayes Valley, and how many 
of seventy wells near are polluted with disease germs. 

The patriotic Frenchman who went into a strange restaurant on 
Thursday morning and recklessly ordered Bifstck a la Marseillaise, would 
not have eaten the dish with such evident relish had he known (as we 
did) that the German cook was chuckling as he carefully prepared the 
steak o fa Watch -on -the- Bh.hte,with Alsace-Lorraine sauce. 



The United States is the only country in the world where foreigners 
run the Government. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Hale mill No re roN* Silver Minim; Company. —Location of 
9ao Fnanataoo, » !aUfornia. Location of Works, 
Virginia Mining District, Storoj County, Nevada, Notice is hereby given that ata 
aoo h of the £ ol Directors, held on the twelfth day of July, 1881, an usscaa- 

uit'iit (No. 70) of 60 Cents \k r Bhare WM levied upon the capital stock of the Cor- 
poratlon, i ■ ediately, iti United State* gold coin, to the Secretary, at tho 

olliee of the Company, Room 58, Nevada Block, 809 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this ns.-^Hsment shall remain unpaid on tho SIXTEENTH 
dav of AUGUST, 1881, will he delinquent and advertised for salo at public auction; 
sad unless payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the SEVENTH 
day erf SEPTEMBER, 1881, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
ad\ ertislng and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JOEL F. LIGHTNER, Secretary. 
Office — Room 58, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., S. F., Cal. [July 16. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

CON. PACIFIC MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 3 

Amount per Share 40 Cents 

Levied July 9th 

Delinquent in Office August 12th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 1st 

F. E. LUTY, Secretary. 
Office— Room 5, No. 330 Pine street, S. F. July 16. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

BEST & BELCHER MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 2 1 

Amount per Share 60 Cents 

Levied July 12th 

Delinquent in Office August 16th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 7th 

WILLIAM WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, S. F. July 16. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

MAYBELLE CON. MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 8 

Amount per Share 20 Cents 

Levied June 22d 

Delinquent in Office July 29th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock . August 23d 

WM. J. TAYLOR, Secretary. 
Office— Room 25, 310 Pine street, San Francisco. July 9. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

RED CLOUD CON. MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 10 

Amount per Share 20 Cents 

Levied Juue 22d 

Delinquent in Office July 27th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock , August 17th 

WM. J. TAYLOR, Secretary. 
Office- -Room 25, 310 Pine street, San Francisco. July 9. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

GOULD & CURRY SILVER MINING COMPANY 

Assessment No. 40 

Amount per Share 50 Cents 

Levied.... July 15th 

Delinquent in Office August 19th 

Day of tale of Delinquent Stock September 8th 

ALFRED K. DURBKOW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, S. F. ("July 23. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Saving's and Lonn Society, 619 Clay street. —For the six 
months ending June 30, 1881, the Board of Directors have declared a dividend 
on all deposits at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax, and 
payable on and after Friday, July 16, 1881. 
July 16. CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NUMBER SEVENTY. 

The Home Mutual Insurance Company will pny Its regular 
monthly dividend (No. 70) of One Dollar ($l) per share upon its Capital Stock, 
on the 11th day of July, 1881. CHARLES R. STORY. Secretary, 
July 16. 406 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Saving's and Loan Society. —For the half year 
ending this date, the Board of Directors of the Gorman Savings and Loan So- 
ciety has declared a dividend on Term Deposits at the rate ol live and one-tenth 
(5 1-10) per ceut. per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of four and one- 
fourth (41) per cent, per annum, free from Federal Taxes, and pavahle on and after 
the 11th day of July, 1881. By order, GEORGE LETTS, Secretary. 
San Francisco. June 30. li-81. ■ July 2- 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society. N.W. cor. Powell 
and Eddy streets.— The Board of Directors have declared a Dividend t" Deb- 
itors at the rate of five and one-tenth (5 10) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, 
and four and one-quarter (4\) per cent, per annum on Ordioary Deposits, free from 
Fed' ml Tax, for the half vear ending June 30. • able on and after July 

16, 1881. tJuly 2.) VERNON CAMPB ELL, Secretary. 

JOHN JENRINOS 

Hooper's South End Warehouses, corner Japan and Town- 
send streets, San Francisco. First-class Fire-Proof Brick Building, capacity 
10,000 tons. Goods taken from the Dock and the Cars of the C. P. R. R. and S. P. 
R. R. free of charge. Storage at Current Rates. Ad vances and Insurance Effected 

COAL OIL STOVES. 

The Snnimer Queen. Fairy Queen and Triumph* 

All sizes for heating and cooking. The trade supplied. 
WI ESTER & CO., 17 New Montgomery street, 
May 14. San Francisco. California. 

JOHN KEOGH, 

73 and 75 New Montgomery Street, 

[mportcr of Curled ITnir, Feathers. Burlap*. Fnrnltnre 
Splines, Pulu Tufts, Bed L.\ ricking, Webbing-, Twk 

[January 39.] 




16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 23, 1881. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco. California, for 
the Week ending July 16, 1881. 

Compiledfrom the Records of the Commercial Agency, 401 California St. , S. F. 
Tuesday. July 12th. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Chas H Killey to J S Potter 

A De La G Ord to Edward Rogen. 



Edward Kogen to Caroline J Kahn 
Hit) S and L Soc to C S Fechemier 



RobtE Snook to Wm J Tnrner... 
Wm Hale to Robt McDonough 



Homer S King to G Chiappari.... 
Wm F Lapidge and wf to C Kormil 



Henry Hinkel to Manuel Eyre 

F W Voll and wf to Chas Ruppel. 
3 V Voorhamme to Morris O'Brien 



|S Filbert, 87:6 e Fillmore, e 50x137:6- 
Westera Addition 323 _ 

Commencing 137:6 se of Harrison, and 
275 ne Spear, ne 82 xnw 45:10 

Same 

Nw 17th and Folsom, n 140x245— Mis- 
sion Block 42 

Nw Post and Powell, n 25x60— 50-va 586 

N Pine 156:3 e of Webster, e 25x137:6— 
Western Addition 372 i 

Lots 29 and 30, blk 483, Bay City Hd. . . 

W Valencia, 70 s 18th, s 25x100— Mis- 
sion Block 71 

Se of Bush and Buchanan, e 90x24:6— 
Western Addition 275 

Und lot 27:6x137:6 fronting on Post at in 
50-vara 1— Western Addition 275 

Se Hunt, 120:6 ne 3rd, ne 19x55 



5 
Gift 



16,000 
5 



250 

1,700 

6,500 

2,000 
1,600 



Wednesday, July 13th. 



J M Browne by atty to Jno Mugge 
A Whipple et al to Jas Herrmann. 



G Claussenins et al to H Sharp. . . 
J J Felt to Jos L Binet and wife. . 



Colin M Boyd to Jos Soanes . 



Jos Soanes to JoBiah Moulton.. . . 

E V Normandi to F R Whitcomb. 
F R Whitcomb to N R MacDonald 
M ABhbnry to J H Stnckmeyer 



Lot 20, blk 3, College Homestead 

Se Shasta and Illinois, s 200, e 100, 
n 50, w 10, n 75, e 15, n 75, w 145 to 
commencement — P N 428 

S California, 68:9 e Stockton, e 34:4x100 

E Fair Oaks, 228 s 24th, s 32x125— Harp- 
er's Addition 29 

N Washington, 235 e Drumm, c 20x60 ; 
bw Bartlett and 24th, s 65x117:6— Mis- 
sion Block 170 

Undivided half, n of Washington, 235 e 
of Drnmm.e 20x60 

W Dnpont, 77:6 n Pacific, 20x72 

Same 

Se Dnpont and Lombard, e 60x77:6. . 



$ 450 



1,000 

6,837 



2,000 
6,500 
5,500 

3,000 



Thursday, July 14th. 



P R Walsh to J A MclnniB.. 



Henry Hinkel to M Rosenbaum... . 

Geo L Bradley to Henry Hinkel. . . 

H S Dorland to J P Courier 

Wm Edwards et al to A J Bryant. 



A J Bryant to Geo Irvine 

Susan McGolgan to JnoMcGolgan 
J C Wilmerding to Jos W Taylor. 

Chas H Stontenborough to same. . 

Jos A Donahue et al to L Gottig. . 

L S Welton to L A Sanderson 

Lanrel Hill Assn to Mary e Jones. 
S Marks and wf to A Fisher et al. 

A W Von Schmidt to S and L Socy 

C H Parker to Ella C Parker, 



S O'Farrell, 39:6 w Webster, w 22:6x120 
—Western Addition 307 ; lots 2 to 8, 
17, blk 364 ; 10, 15 blk 365 Great Park 
Homestead 

S Bush, 136 e of Gotigh, e 120— Western 
Addition 128 



Timothy L Barker to J Scheerer. 

Same to same 

E Thompson to L R Townsend . . . 
L R Townsend to Jos W Scheerer 



Sr.ndry lots in Mission Block 85 

Nw Sacramento and Devisadero, w 110 
x 76:8— Western Addition 499 

Same , 

W Webster, 55 n Filbert, n 5x87:6 

S Bay, 68:9 e Gough, 68:9x137:6— West- 
ern Addition 111 

S Bay, 206.3 w Franklin, w 6S:9xl37:6— 
Western Addition 111 

Sw Washington and Franklin, s 55x137: 
6 —Western Addition 123; e Valencia, 
90n2(iib, n 40x117— Mission Blk 183. 

W Fillmore, 30 n Lombard, n 60x110— 
Western Addition 341 

Lot 2400 

N McAllister, 178:9 w Lagnna, w 41:3 x 
120— Western Addition 225 

Portion Outside Land blocks 91, 92, 93, 
and lot in Baker Tract 

S Washington, 12:6 e Waverly Place, e 
18: 9x62: 4 -50-vara 57 

Blocks 858 and 867, Outside Lands 

Lot 28, Bernal Homestead 

Lot 19, blk 23, Fairmount 

Same 



$1,500 

6,000 

5 

1,675 

4,605 

'300 

3,000 

3,000 



3,000 
200 

11,000 

1,000 

Gift 
20 
40 
125 



Friday, July 15th. 



James J Doyle to Mary Delaney. . . 

Mary Delaney to J J Doyle 

M Bonis and wf to C L Mermond. 
Chs CBntlerto Alpheos Ball etal 

A J Pope by Tr to Ellen A Jackson 
J W Duncan to J de la Montanya. 
Nellie T Maloney to J L Goodman 



Ne Jackson and Octavia, e 60x117:10—1 
Western Addition 163 

N Jackson, 60 e Octavia, e 77:6x117:10— 
Western AdditionlR3 

E Stockton, 87:6 s of Pacific, e 25x100— 
50-vnra 88 

Ne of Post and Webster, n 275x137:6— 
Western Addition 275 ; as security on 
account of a certain Bond 

W Shotwell, 170 n 23d, s 60x122:6— Mis- 
sion Block 138 

N Bush, 55 e of Mission, e 27:6x137:6- 
50-vara 352 

W Leavenworth, 110 s Eddy, s 27:6x137: 
6-50-varall68 



3 1 
1 

8,875 

10 

5 

9,000 

8,000 



Saturday, July 16th. 



Daniel E Martin to Alex Erickson 
Mary Delany to Honora O'Connor 

Jennie A Forbes to Jno O'Connor 

John Riordan et al to A M Peters. 
Egbert Judeon to Geo T Watterson 

Geo T Watterson lo Wm Abbott. . 

Carl Leichter to Jas S Sbaw 



1:4 x 



Jno Moore to Hib Savs and Ln Soc 
C F de Ramrez to Wells, Far & Co 



H H Oates to Ellen Sinclair 

Wm Satterlee to Warren F Myers. 



N Greenwich, 171:10 e Powell. 

137:6- 50-vara 497 

N Clay, 137:6 w Webster, w 275x137:6 

Western Addition 316 ; to correct 152 

of D278 

E Fillmore, 90 n uf Clay, n 37:8x137:6- 

to correct 939 D 28 

Same 

S Haight, 174:9 w Buchanan, 7:9x120- 

Western Addition 290 

S Haight, 149:9 w Buchanan, w 32:9 x 

120— Western Addition 290 

W Pierce, 110 s of Tyler, s 27:6x110- 

Western Addition 434 

N28th, 175eChurch. e 25x114 

Commencing 137:6 w Montgomery and 

96 s Sacramento, 9 41:6x45:1 

Lot 35, Gift Map 2 

Se Franklin and Jackson, s 87:8x124:3— 

Western Addition 91 



$2,500 



1 
2,600 



4,300 
437 



1,750 
5 



UNSEEN AID. 

If He would only help me just once more ! 

Bending beneath the burden low I cried. 
My eyeB were blind and I did not see 

The shining angel waiting at my side. 

I did not hear the low, sweet words that fell 
Answering, e'en then, my spirit's inner needs, 

I did not heed the touch of holy hands 

That thrilled my own with strength for nobler deeds. 

O, Friend ! in heaven's sweet peace enfolded now, 
How could I guess your love would find a means 

To ease the burden and to point the way, 

And lead me to the fair life of my dreams. 

— Lilian Whiting in Boston Tr 



H. 3. Williams. 



A, Ohesebrough.. 



W. H. Dimond. 



WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 
UNION BUILDING, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STS. 

AGENTS FOR 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation 

Company, The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, 

* ' The California Line of Clippers ' ' from New York 

and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line." 

San Francisco, January 31, 1880. [Jan. 31. 



C. AD0LPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 
SAJf FRA2TCISCO mid NEW TOItK. 

gg= Agents of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery streets, 
San Francisco, California. Jan. 17. 

J. 0. SPRECKELS & BROS., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants* 

Hawaiian Jjine of Packets. 

109 California Street San Francisco. 

May 28, 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

IMPORTERS AJfD WHOLESALE GROCERS, 
108 and 110 California St., S. F. 

[April 19.] 



H. L. Dodge. 



J. E, Buggies. 




L, H. Sweeney. 
DODGE, SWEENEY & CO., 

Importers, Wholesale Provision Dealers and Commission 
Merchants, 

Nos. 114 and 116 Market, and 11 and 13 California Sts. 

[August 7-1 

L.H.Newton. NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., M.Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers in Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, 204 and 206 California street, San Francisco, Cal May 25. 

CASTLE BROS. & LOUPE, 

ESTABLISHED IN THE YEAR 1850. 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, Hies. 213 and SIS 
Front street, San FranciBco. Jan. 13. 

C. W. M. SMITH, 

The Leading and Oldest Patent Solicitor, 

Established in 18G2, 

Removed to 33* Sansome Street. 

[March 12.1 

MOUNT TAMALPAIS CEMETERY. 

A Rural Burial Place for San Francisco. 

Office: Masonic Temple. J. O. ELDRIDGE, President. 

A W. Du Bois, Secretary. Auc. 18. 

CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of tbe Standard Syrup, a superior article 
put up in barrels expressly for home consumption. Also, Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Refined Sugars at lowest market rates. Office, 216 Front 
street, up stairs. Dec. 21. 

PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS. 

I^his well-known and popular summer resort open for the 
reception of guests. Stages conuect at Los Qatos with morning and evening 
trains. For terms, address LEWIS A. SAGE, Proprietor, 
Ap ril 30. Saratoga, Cal. 

C0WEN & PORTER, 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS, 

112 Geary Street San Francisco. 

[May 21.] 

EDWARD B0SQUI & CO., 

Printers, Engravers, Lithographers and Bookbinders, 

Zteidesdorff street, from, Clcvy to Commercial. 



July 23, 1881 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



NOTABILIA. 



THE PEDDLERS SONG. 



L*wn u while u rfriren snow ; 
Cypress black *» e'er w*s crow ; 
Gloves u sweet is damask rose* ; 
Mwk« (or faces and (or noses ; 
tlujrle-bnuclct, necklace, amber ; 
IV rf nine (or a lady's chamber ; 



Gold .[iinips am) stomachers, 
Kit in v lads to ifive their dears; 
a pokhUMtlcka ol stool, 
What maids lack from head to heel : 
Corns boroi nwbqj .come buy, 

Buy, ladt, or else TOUT losses cry. 

WILLIAM SllAKSI'BARB. 



A divorce was very justly granted this week by one of our Superior 
Court Judges to a wife on the grounds of cruelty. The specific act on 
which the separation was given was the husband's refusal to buy his wife 
an Arlington Range from De La Montanya's store, on Jackson street, 
below Battery. The Judge, in his decision, remarked that he could con- 
ceive no more extreme act of cruelty, as it was one of the best stoves in 
the world, and a man who would subject his wife to the indignity of 
nuking on any other range was not entitled to live with her. He added, 
in parenthesis, that if he had power to sentence defendant to death he 
would have done it. Go and see the Arlington Range. 

Oh, ever thus since childhood's hour, 

We've seen our fondest hopes decay ; 

We never raised a calf, a cow, or 
Hen that laid an eg? a day, 
But it was "marked" and took away. 

We never raised a sucking pig, 
To glad ns with its sunny eye, 

But when 'twas grown up fat and big, 
And fit to roast, or broil, or fry — 
We could not find it in the sty. 

One of the happiest unions on record culminated recently through a 
glove. A young stockbroker saw a lady at the theater, and, being be- 
hind her, naturally was unable to see her face, but he caught a glimpse 
of an exquisite figure and a perfectly-fitting glove. He followed her from 
the theater, found out where she lived, and ascertained the name of her 
family at a neighboring grocery store. He obtained an introduction, mu- 
tual respect followed, then love and marriage, and it was all because she 
wore the celebrated " Foster " glove, which can be obtained at the Ar- 
cade House of J. J. O'Brien & (_'o., at 924, 926 and 928 Market street 

The diary of a Texas editor has been found, containing the following 
important memoranda: "Been asked to drink, 11,362 times; drank, 
11,362 times. Requested to retract, 416 times; did retract, 416. Been 
asked the news, 300,000; told, 23 times; didn't know, 200,000; lied about 
it, 99,977 times. Been to church, 2 times. Gave to charity, 95. Gave 
for a terrier dog, 525. Cash on hand, $1. That one dollar will buy him 
a splendid unlaundried shirt at the store of P. Beamish, on Market and 
Third streets, where the finest gentlemen's furnishing goods in the city 
are to be found. 

It is a very common practice in this country for bashful young 
people who want to get married to exchange photographs. A curious 
case occurred recently where a young fellow got photographed at some 
obscure gallery, and sent his portrait to a lady. She returned it with 
the remark that she would sooner marry a hippopotamus. He had the 
good sense, however, to see his error and get his picture taken at Bradley 
& Rulofson's, on the corner of Montgomery and Sacramento streets, and 
to forward it to his inamorata. She replied: "Come quick and marry 
me," and he did. 

Hover Wicked. — " Go to Hell ! " was the reply of an excited female, 
who, being in the witness box, and her capacity to take an oath being 
doubted, was asked by the Court crier, " Do you know what will become 
of you if you tell a lie ?" That woman was almost being committed. — 
Sydney Fun. 

The Bostonians are undecided whether to construct their exhibition 
buildings in the form of a loaf of brown bread, or in sections, like pieces 
of pork, or a heaping plate of baked beans, the votes of the most aesthetic 
rather favoring the latter design. The most carefully prepared and deli- 
cious brown bread, pork and beans to be found in this city are at Swain's 
Bakery, 213 Sutter street, just above Kearny. Here, too, are most ex- 
quisite lunches for ladies who have no escorts, and ice-cream and confec- 
tionery that cannot be surpassed. 

Mr. Benjamin Bobstay has gone on a yachting trip up the Sound. 
The yacht will return with two or three scowloads of bricks, and Mr. 
Bobstay, with the aid of the captain and mate, will show his ability as 
chief and only mariner of the upper floor. — Puck. 

I would it were my gift in common ways, to sing the human song 
that voiceless sways ; I would I could so speak the common speech— so 
breathe in words the common hope that plays 'mid the twittering birds 
and summer rays, so as to be able to tell people what a perfect and beau- 
tiful sewing-machine the Davis Vertical Feed is. But Mr. Mark Shel- 
don, at 130 Post street, can tell all about it, and also all about the merits 
of the Howe and Chicago Singer sewing-riiachines, for which he is sole 
agent. 

A tramp in Alabama recently fell dead while Bawing wood. The 
strange part of the affair is found in the fact that the tramp actually en- 
gaged in wood sawing. His death will be a warning to gentlemen of bis 
class.— New Orleans Picayune. 

The American Exchange Hotel, Sansome street, opposite Wells, 
Fargo & Co.'s Express, San Francisco. This popular hotel is now under 
the experienced management of Charles Montgomery, which means good 
living and moderate charges. Board with room, 91, 91.25 and 91.50 per 
day, or 96 to 910 per week. Table first-class. Nice single rooms, 50 
cents per night. Free coach to and from the hotel. 

A printer setting up the line which is so often placed under a wedding 
notice, *' It is not right that a man should live alone," carelessly left the 
v out cf the word live, which made the bride blush. 

Try the Something New 4 U Cigarette. It is delicious. 

A ham can be easily cured by smoking; a man cannot 



A Warning to Drinkers. —Now that the South Pacific Coast Railroad 
has, by increased facilities, added immensely to its Alameda and Oakland 
travel, the public will be pleased to learn that Frank J. Connelly still 
runs the bars on the steamers Say City, Newark and Garden City. When 
it is understood that Mr. Connelly sells Hotaling's "J. H. Cutter Whisky" 
and J. W. Shaffer's " Bon Ton " and other fine brands of cigars, there is 
no longer an excuse for any gentleman corroding his stomach by drinking 
in a City Front saloon before the boat starts. 

Mr. McBllzzard can still be seen every day except Sunday driving 
hifl two-in-hand. Mr. McBlizzard has & host of warm friends, and iB 

willing to give any of them a lift for five cents a head.— Puck. 

Fuck says: " We have wronged a wholesome and harmless industry. 
We always said that picnic or circus lemonade was nothing but water 
with an occasional bit of lemon peel dropped into it. As three hundred 
people at Harrisonville, Mo., have been sick from drinking some, we take 
back all our cruel remarks, and now admit that there iB really something 
in it besideB lemon peel. Nobody would ever get sick if they bought 
their wines and liquors, wholesale and retail, from P. J. Cassin & Co., 
on the corner of Washington and Battery street. 

A man called upon an unfortunate tradesman to pay a demand. " I 
can never pay it," said he ; "I am not worth a farthing ; but I will give 
you a note—1 am not so poor yet but that I can sign a note." 

There is no greater pleasure than a drive behind a good team, and 
at the same time to be sure that you are in a perfectly appointed buggy 
and have a good blooded yet quiet team in front of you. There is no 
question as to the leading livery stable of San Francisco for either coupe's, 
landaus, rockaways, buggies or close carriages. That stable is Tomkin- 
son's, at 57, 59 and 61 Minna street, and it is impossible to tell one of 
their teams from the turn-out of a millionaire in the Golden Gate Park. 
Superbly groomed horses and exquisite carriages are their specialty. 

We once heard a good old Methodist parson say in his sermon: "As 
I was once riding along on one of those beautiful western prairies, with 
my dear wife who has since gone to heaven in a buggy — " 

A Child between three and four years old, recently fell from a six- 
story window in Paris, rolled from the roof to the gutter, and thence to 
the middle of the street, striking first on the head of a diligence-driver, 
then on the horses, and thence to the ground. The child walked off un- 
injured, but the stage-driver's life was only saved from the fact that he 
wore a splendid silk hat, purchased at the emporium of Mr. White, the 
well-known hatter of 614 Commercial Btreet, in this city. The straw-hats 
this season are in every style and in perfect taste. 

The Yuma Free Fress says yumarously : " A hen laid an egg in the 
sand outside the Free Press office, and the heat of the sun poached it 
Since then we plant three every day for lunch." 

" I was always a pauper," said Mr. Bifkins, the other day, to Mrs. 
Nudelfresser, until I started in to drink Napa Soda and leave whisky 
alone. Now I am opulent and -in the zenith of my prosperity. Wiltest 
thou havest me ?" And Mrs. N., knowing that he drank nothing stronger 
than this delicious mineral water, responded: "I wiltest" That was a 
year ago, and now the twins drink it 

The graduating-class at West Point this year was fifty-three. Re- 
cruiting offices will be opened to enlist the army up to the same point. — 
Republic. 

The management of the Eintracht, 539 California street, has been 
taken in hand again by its former owners, Schnabel & Co. It is the main 
depot for the celebrated Fredericksburg lager from San Jose*. Leave or 
send your orders there for keg or bottle beer, delivered free to any part of 
the city. 

A genius out in Iowa has just invented a wooden horse that will 
jump thirty miles an hour. The motive power is a bag of fleas. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon. — This celebrated whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark— star within a shield. 

Hell's Gate will be changed on the maps to correspond with the re- 
vised edition. 
Best pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 7'24\ Market street 



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18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 23, 1881. 



BIZ. 



During the week under review the Produce Exchange has heen the 
attraction of many. First, the issuing of their Stock Bulletin, giving the 
amount of Flour and Grain in the State, old crop surplus July 1st. This 
was followed hy an election of officers for the ensuing year, and resulted 
in securing an entire new Board, the independent or opposition ticket be- 
ing successful. The stock exhibit shows that on July 1st we had in the 
State at large a big surplus of Breadstuffs, say of Flour 135,592 bbls, 
Wheat 12,444,278 ctls, Barley 595,028 ctls, Oats 15,744 ctls, Beans 70,780 
ctls, Corn 94,270 ctls, Eye 3,820 ctls. The excess as compared at same 
date as last year stands thus: Flour 57,739 bbls, Wheat 7,361,188 ctls, a 
deficiency of Barley of 1,056,759 ctls, Oats 79,476 ctls, Beans 42,928 ctls, 
Corn 134,827 ctls. On the first of January last we stated that our crop 
was a very large one, and that we then had on hand 1,100,000 tons of 
Wheat, an amount easily obtained if one would take the trouble to look 
it up. Great injury was done our coast by continually understating our 
surplus, thereby discouraging tonnage from coming here, and causing those 
that did come to ask such rates as to take all the profit from the pro- 
ducer. At the time of taking stock the Sacramento Union, Stock- 
ton Independent and others belittled the report of the Produce Exchange 
and stated the stock so low in the State as to discourage ship-owners from 
afar to doubt the amount available for shipment, and therefore would 
only come here on a positive charter, and but for the enterprise of a few 
leading shippers, who found from their own investigations that the report 
of the Produce Exchange had underestimated the stock, sent orders to all 
foreign and American ports and Becured all the disengaged tonnage. Oth- 
erwise had the small amount of surplus been accepted the railroads would 
to-day be carrying Wheat to New York at $1 25 per cental. From a com- 
parison made six months after a report had been taken by the Produce 
Exchange it was found that their estimates had been too low. A natural 
result, from the fact of so many places and many lots of which no in- 
formation can be obtained. The cost of this doubt thrown out by the 
newspapers and grangers has, like the new Constitution, cost the farmers 
many a dollar. With the present large crop and the large surplus of the 
old let the facts go out to the world so that tonnage may come in time and 
at reasonable rates before the profits are all eaten up in storage and in- 
terest. 

Wheat— The spot market is quiet at SI 30@S1 40 # ctl. New crop 
comes in sparingly as yet, but as the old is becoming more or less weevily 
the new has the preference. 

Barley. — The Spot market is firm for Feed at 90^95c._; Brewing, SI 05 
@1 15; Chevalier, 95c.@$l 15 for Coast and Bay respectively. 

Oats.— Stocks are light and the market steady at SI 35@1 65 for Feed 
and Milling. 

Com.— The demand is light at SI 05@1 15 per ctl. 

Beans.— The market is firm, with sales of Butter at S2 17J; Pink, 
S2 25 ; Bayos, 90c. per ctl. 

Hops. — The stock is well-nigh exhausted — price, 15 to 25c. 

"Wool. — There is very little business doing at present ; stocks free and 
liberal. Oregon, 23@30c. ; California, 16@18c. for Burry and Earthy; 
good to choice Fleece, 28@30c; Extra, 31@32&c. 

Bags. — The Spot market is fed liberally through the auction-rooms at 
9Jc. The Combination is resting, not offering their stocks until the out- 
siders have disposed of their limited supplies. We must confess that we 
think the Bag ring will have a big load to carry for the next twelve 
months to come. 

Coffee. — The market is steady, with a fair demand for Green at 12@ 
13Jc. 

Coal — Supplies of foreign are free and liberal; cargo sales at 86 50. 

Sugar. — Heavy arrivals from the Sandwich Islands during the week, 
say 3,000,000 K>s. Our refiners make no change in prices, say 13c. for 
White, 10|@llic. for Yellow and Golden. 

"Wines. — The steamer Granada, for New York, carried 56,072 galls., 
valued at $30,311. 

Metals. — There is no life to the market for Pig Iron, Tin Plate, etc. 
Stocks heavy, and prices low and nominal. 

Case Goods. — Large sales of Salmon are reported on the Columbia 
river, at SI 25, here at SI 30@S1 32J, $ dozen. Our local canners have 
been making large contract sales of Peaches and other fruits of this sea- 
son's canning, both for English and Eastern account. Prices are said to 
be low, but the details are withheld. ' 

Dairy Products. — We are in receipt of several car-loads of Eastern 
Butter in Welsh tubs, and, though very soft and oily, it sells at 16 to 18c. 
to the bakers. Good to choice fresh Roll Dairy sells freelv at 25 to 28c. ; 
store packed, 21@22Jc.; pickled roll, 27£c; do. kegs, 22J@25c. Cheese 
sells freely at 10@13c. ; Eastern, 17@18c. Eggs, 27ic for choice ranch ; 
Eastern, 17 to 19c; Oregon, 20c; Salt Lake, 18c 

Fruita and Vegetables.— The market is well supplied with all season- 
able varieties of stone fruit, etc., also Melons, Tomatoes, etc. 



St. John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor. The Bev. Dr. Scott, Pastor, will preach Sunday at 11 a.m. and 
7J P.M. Prayer and Praise Service, 6& P.M. Public cordially invited. 

Piper Heidsieck Champagne. — Henry Lund, 214 California street, 
sole agent for the Pacifie Coast, is in constant receipt of both Quarts and 
Pints of this old favorite Wine. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Tbe Company's steamers will sail for Yokohama and 
Hongkong: CITY OF TOKIO, August 6th, at 2 p.m. Excursion Tick- 
ets to Yokohama and return at special rates, 

For NEW YORK via PANAMA: COLIMA, August 4th, at 12 o'clock M., taking 
Freight and PasaengerB to MAZATLAN, ACAPULCO, SAN JOSE DE GUATE- 
MALA, LA LIBERTAD and PUNTA ARENAS. 

Fare to New York— Cabin, $139; Steerage, $65. 

Tickets to and from Europe hy any lino for sale at the lowest rates ; also to Ha- 
vana and all West India ports. 

For HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY: CITY OF NEW YORK, July 30th, 
at 2 p.m., or on arrival of the English mails. Freight taken for Honolulu. 

§10 additional is charged for passage in Upper Saloon. Round the World Trip 
Tickets, via New Zealand and Australia, S650. 

Tickets must he purchased at least one hour before time of sailing. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan streets. 
July 23. WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., General Agents. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

The Oregon Railway ami Navigation Company and Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company will dispatch evevv five days, for the above ports, 
one of their newAl Iron Steamships, viz.: COLUMBIA, OREGON and STATE 
OF CALIFORNIA. 

Sailing Days 
July 6, 10, 15. 20, 25, and 30- | August 4, 9, 14, 19, 24, and 29. 

At 10 o'clock A. M. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent O . R. & N. Co., 

No. 210 Battery street, San Francisco. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents P. C. S. S. Co., 
July 9. No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers ol" this Company will sail from BroadwayWbarf 
for VICTORIA, B. C, and PUGET SOUND PORTS on the 10th, 20th and 30th 
of each month (except when such days fall on a holiday, then on the day previous"), 
for PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with the O. R. & N. Co. every5 days, and for 
EUREKA, LOS ANGELES, SANTA BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ, SAN DIEGO, SAN 
LUIS OBISPO, and all other NORTHERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS in 
California about every three days. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
cisco Daily Papers. 

Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 



Oct. 30. 



GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
No. 10 Market street. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at 2 p.m., for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

Gaelic. Oceanic. Belgic. 

Saturday, Sept. 17th; Saturday, July 23d; Fridav, Aug. 19th: 

Saturday, Dec. 3d. Thursday, October 6th; Friday, Nov. 4th. 

Wednesday, Dec 21st. 
Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at Reduced Rates. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets on sale at C. P. R. R. Co.'s General 
Offices, Room 74, corner Fourth and Towusend streets. 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific MailSteam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street, Union Block. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
LELAND STANFORD, President. July 23. 

HIGHLAND SPRINGS, 

LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 

This popular Snmmer Resort for families and invalids 
is now open to receive guests for the season. 

The Springs are situated at an altitude of 1,700 feet above sea level; and for 
natural beauty of scenery, healthful climate, hunting and fishing, are unsurpassed 
in the State. The surrounding forests and valley are particularly inviting to camp- 
ers, who will be specially entertained at the Springs. 

The waters have produced many wonderful cures in the following diseases: Dys- 
pepsia, Paralysis, Erysipelas, Rheumatism, Sciatica Liver and 
Kidney, Bronchitis, Pulmonary Complaints in their early stages, Gen- 
eral Debility, and a never-failing remedy for Chills and Fever. 

RATES, including Mineral Baths, $10 per week. CHILDREN under six years 
of age, and SERVANTS, half price. 

Parties desiring board for two months or more will be allowed a liberal discount. 

Direct route by San Rafael, 7 a.m., connecting with S. F. and N. P. R. R. to Clo- 
verdale, thence by stage te the Springs. 

For further particulars, address MRS. J. C. GOODS, 

June 4. Highland Springs. 



PROF. JOS. JOSSET, 



Graduate of the University of Paris; Ex. Professor of Se 
la Mennais' Normal, France; late of Point Loma Seminary, San Diego. Pri- 
vate Lessons in the French Language. Residence: 516 Union street, between Du- 
pont and Stockton. At home from 12 to 2 p.m. Private Lessons given at the res- 
idence of the pupil. Dec. 6. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction in Price : Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, XS7S. 

Sold by all Stationers. Sole Agent for the ITnited States: 
MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 5. 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

N os. 57, 59 and 61 Minna street, between First and Second, 
San Francisco, One Elock from Palace Hotel. Also, Carriages and Cabs at 
Pacific Ciub, N.E. corner Montgomery and Bush streets. Vehicles of Every Descrip- 
tion at Reduced Rates. Telephones in Stable. Feb. 10. 



July 23, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



LATEST FROM LONDON. 
The Land BUI— The Times on Parnell— The Lefroy Murder Mys- 
tery—An Interesting Resume of all the Latest English Themes 
on the Subject 

London. July 2, 1881. 

The ('.overnmeiit hiia more than once promised the Irish that the Land 
Bill shall be settle*! this session. There are forty-eight clause?, ami the 
committee have now reached the seventh, so it i» no matter of surprise 
that Mr. Gladstone should announce that the measure will take prece- 
dence over all -.rders of the day and notices of motion. The Irish party 
apparently abandoned their shortsighted policy of obstruction, but in an 
inuirect way they still hinder the pr igr< as of the bill. It is clear that if 
the whole energy of the House is not devoted to the Land Bill that the 
session will have to be prolonged indefinitely, and the Times remarks that 
avao Id the event of the most "exclusive application of Parliamentary 
time" it is not by any means clear that all the obstacles will be removed. 
Speaking of the tactics of the Irish party, the Timet bitterly suggests : 
*' It may be that Mr. Parnell and his friends are simply actuated by a de- 
sire to place themselves an evidence* and to justify their Parliamentary ex- 
istence in the eyes of their Irish clients. The agitation in Ireland is fiag- 
ring and requires to be stimulated. It may be, also, that the Land 
. fearing its occupation will be gone if the till becomes law, is 
pressing it-; agents in the House of Commons to give proof of their hos- 
tility to the measure. Practically nothing but Irish affairs have been 
noticed by the House this session, and to the end of it Irish affairs will 
block the way. 

S[>eakingof the barrenness of the session, the Dublin Express remarks: 
■• Household suffrage in the counties, which was the great battle-cry of 
the Liberals when out of power, must stand over for their third session of 
otHee. Nothing has been done to improve the relations of employer and 
employed, which formed another main article of the programme. The 
Grand Jury Laws of Ireland, and the representation of Irish boroughs, 
remain untouched. Even the seats rendered vacant by the disfranchised 
boroughs in both countries stand over for redistribution. Mr. Bradlaugh 
is still suspended, like the coffin of Mahomet, and the Scotch members 
are beginning to murmur loudly at the neglect of Scottish legislation." 
The Dublin Express might have enumerated, also, the Bankruptcy Bill, 
the Patents for Inventions Bill, and many others which are shelved by 
this precedence of the Land Bill. It is the Government measure ; its au- 
thors are bound up in it, they stand or fall by it. If it passes, we may 
confidently look for a satisfactory settlement of some of the pressing 
questions which, through the doctrine of taking the lesser of two evils, 
have been for a time relinquished. 

Accustomed as we are to the greatest publicity and the greatest care in 
all cases of murder, it is no wonder that some doubt prevails as to the 
guilt of Midhat Pasha, seeing the privacy and the haste which have been 
observed in Turkey. At the time of the death of Abdul Aziz, he was ex- 
amined by sixteen doctors of different nationalities, who reported his 
death as having been caused by self-inflicted wounds with a pair of scis- 
sors lent him by the Sultana to trim his beard. Some little doubt was 
expressed at the time, but the matter appeared to have been forgotten, 
when, apparently frightened by the regicide in Russia, the Sultan and his 
advisors instituted a Court of inquiry, which speedily charged Midhat 
Pasha with complicity in the murder of the late monarch. Midhat, from 
his statesmanlike sagacity and his partiality to reforms, is obnoxious to 
the narrow-minded Turkish officials, and they would cheerfully see him 
executed. Some dissatisfaction is, however, reported to exist, even in 
Turkey. The Da Hi/ News says: "No Western European, and no Turk 
either, will believe that the judgment has any relation to the evidence, or 
expresses the conviction of the Court. Midhat Pasha may be guilty, but 
he has been condemned not because he is guilty, but because he is incon- 
venient and dangerous." 

This week has witnessed a tragedy which calls to mind the murder of 
Mr. Briggs by Midler in 1864. On the arrival of an express-train from 
Croyden at Preston Park, near Brighton, on Monday afternoon, the 
ticket-collector found in a first-class carriage a man of respectable appear- 
ance, covered with blood, and having, apparently, been shot. The 
wounded man gave his name as Arthur Lefroy, a journalist and author, 
and said that two companions had been in the carriage with him, one an 
old gentleman, the other a farmer, apparently. After leaving Croyden he 
heard a shot, and was immediately stunned by a blow on the head. He 
remained insensible until the train reached Preston Park, when he found 
himself alone. He assumed, therefore, that his fellow -passengers had 
left the compartment while the train was in motion. Accompanied by a 
ticket-collector he went on to Brighton to see a doctor, to whom he told 
the same tale, which he had also repeated at the Brighton station to the 
superintendent, in the presence of two metropolitan detectives, employed 
by the railway company. Leaving Brighton, he was accompanied home 
to Wallington by the two detectives, one of whom went with him to his 
house, the other waiting at the station. The officer did not go into the 
house, but remained outside, and the other presently came up to keep 
strict watch, in consequence of a telegram announcing the discovery of a 
body on the line, subsequently identified as that of Mr. F. I. Gold, of 
Preston. Lefroy not appearing, the officers inquired at the house, and 
heard that he had changed his clothes and gone out, saying he was going 
to a medical man. All the Burgeons in the neighborhood were visited 
without success, and it dawned upon the officers that he might have 
known more of the body found in the tunnel than he had stated. Strict 
search was accordingly instituted, detectives have been placed at all the 
stations, and in every likely hiding-place, the Telegraph has given a sketch 
of his face, a most unintellectual and unprepossessing countenance, but 
all precautions have been hitherto in vain, and Lefroy has not been re- 
captured. 

The occurrence has caused the utmost excitement all over the country. 
Several false arrests have been made, but Lefroy has eluded all the at- 
tempts of the detective force. Two hundred pounds reward, half from 
the Government and half from the Brighton Railway Company, is offered 
for his capture, and the Scotland Yard authorities declare that he must 
be taken soon. Accounts given by his relations show him to be an unmar- 
ried man of twenty-one years of age, real name Percy Lefroy Mapleton, 
whose health has never been good, and whose mind has always shown 
Bigns of wandering. Many instances of this, which prove something more 
than eccentricity, are given in the columns of the daily papers, audi there 
is every reason to believe that this murder has been wantonly committed 
by him as the crowning act of a brain long diseased, which has now en. 



finlv given way. The inquest on the body of Mr. Gold was opened on 
\\ edneeday. The body hai ing been identified, Mrs. < lold gave some in- 
formation of her husband's business habits unci visits to London. She 
also identified the watch and piece of chain which were seen projecting 
from one of Lefroy'a boots as having belonged to her husband. The wife 
oi ■ laborer, who was sitting at her cottage window, said as the train 
passed she saw two gentlemen standing up in a carriage fighting, and a 
traveler in another compartment of the same carriage spoke of hearing 
four shots fired. 

When Mr. Gold was thrown on to the line he was evidently conscious, 
for close to him was the collar of his aggressor. It has been identified 
as resembling very exactly the sort that Lefroy used to wear. This fact, 
together with the man's voluntary hiding, seem to establish his guilt. 
Mr. Gold had collected some money from his business manager and 
banked it, and, so far as has at present been ascertained, he has been 
robbed of £2 only. The inquiry is still proceeding. 



SIGNAL SERVICE METEOROLOGICAL REPORT, WEEK 

ENDING JTJLY Si, 1881, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Highest and Lowest Barometer. 



30.143 
29.946 

62 
53 

77.7 

W. 

321 

Fair. 



Sat. 16. 



30.141 
30.041 



Sun. 17 



30.062 
29.943 



Mon 18 



29.943 
29.855 



Tue. 19 



29.966 
29.855 



Wed 20 



29.908 
29.841 



Thr21 



I 



Maximum, and Minimum Thermometer. 

6S I 67 I 62 | 69 I 73 

52 ! 53 j 53 | 52 I 55 

Mean Daily Humidity. 
75.3 | 78.7 | 80.7 | 70.3 | 67.3 
Prevailing Wind. 
w. I W. | w. i \V. ] w. 

Wind — Miles Traveled. 
242 | 279 | 379 | 372 | 203 

State of Weather. 

Fair. | Fair. | Fair. | Clear. | Clear. 

Rainfall in Twenty-four Hours. 

I I I I 



29.963 
29.856 

63 
54 

84.7 

W. 

340 
Fair. 



I 



TotalBain During Season beginning July 1, 1881 inches 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS 

For the "Week Ending July 22, 1881. 

Compiled by George C. Hickox & Co., 410 California Street. 



Name op Mike. 



Albion 

♦Argenta 

Andes 

'Alpha 

Alta 

"Addenda 

Bullion 

Belcher 

k Best & Belcher 

Benton 

Bodie Con 

Boston Con 

BechtelCon 

•Belle Isle 

Bulwer Con 

Concordia 

Concordia (Va ) 

Crown Point 

Ctaollar 

•California 

Con. Virginia 

♦Caledonia 

Confidence 

Eureka Con 

Exchequer 

Fairfax 

♦Gould & Curry 

'Grand Prize 

Goodshaw 

* Hale & Norcxoss 

Julia 

Justice 

Kentuck 

Lady Washington 

'Mexican 

Mount Diabld 

Uono 

Modoc 

Navajo 

Northern Belle. 

'Noon.lay 

♦North Noonday 

I Oro 

| Ophir 

Overman 

Occidental 

Potosi 

i Savage 

[ Silver Hill 

■ Seg Belcher 

Surer King, Arizona .. 
I 'Scorpion 

♦Sierra Nevada 

Keg* 

•1 "' ion Con 

Dtah 

Ward 

Wales Con 

i Yellow Jacket 



I 

i 

li 

-I 
H 

1 

sol 

l) 
Si 

li 

6i 

ll 
a 



MOSDAT. 

, ' V 

A.M. P.M. 



n! 



I 

~»| = 
n t 

3i 



1T r 



il 



1 



-a i a 



Flu. 
A.M. 



SO] 



n 

3 

Ml 

J 

■1 



41 4) 41 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus ' 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1881. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 
We might 'well, in San Francisco, take a lesson from France, which 
has j ust devoted 2,200,000 francs for the improvement of her water works. 
The water question in this city has been most stubbornly disputed by the 
enemies of the Spring Valley Water Company, and it is almost time that 
the public opened itB eyes to the indisputable fact that enterprise should 
never be browbeaten, and that the class of men who aspire to ruin corpo- 
rations is a class that aspires to build up its own future on the ruins of 
that which it seeks to pull down. We cannot expect an appropriation for 
water in San Francisco, neither is it asked ; but the city is nearly old 
enough for its inhabitants to cease howling at every successful, but always 
doubtful, investment of money made by its citizens. France evidently 
knows the value of good water, and, with her many beautiful rivers, is 
yet willing to make this large appropriation for the comfort and cleanli- 
ness of her citizens. 

Prince Alexander of Bulgaria has not been a student of history for 
naught. We suspect that Macchiavelli's Prince is his favorite study. 
He has done everything that a student of that great master of chicane 
and tyranny would be apt to practice ; but it is by no means certain 
that his ultimate success is assured. It certainly was a mistake of Rus- 
sia to conquer constitutional government for the Bulgars, while denying 
it to Russian subjects. It was a great mistake for Russia, having once 
permitted the Bulgarians to taste the sweets of freedom, to deprive them 
of it by a coup d'etat. Prince Alexander of Bulgaria is a puppet of Rus- 
sia, and his reactionary measures will inevitably end in revolution. With 
the Balkan peninsula in a blaze, with Austria intrenched in Bosnia and 
Herzegovina, which would extend its territory to Dalmatia and the Adri- 
atic, with King Charles of Roumania across the Danube in the Do- 
brudscha, with Servia strong, enlarged, and eager — when the torch of war 
is lighted north and west of the Balkans, what is to become of Prince 
Alexander and his Bulgarian State ? It will be eaten up, annexed to 
Roumania and Servia, while Austria will annex the western belt of the 
Balkan peninsula, thus giving her an outlet to the Adriatic without pass- 
ing through Italian soil. It would pay Austria to conciliate Italy by 
ceding Trieste and adjacent territory for the peaceful acquisition of such 
a valuable region. But Russia will be left out in the cold, and will find 
herself thrust away from Turkey in Europe. Her duplicity and tyranny 
will bring it about, and the princeling Alexander will be the agent. 

We are great admirers of the French nation. We think and believe 
that France leads in art, literature, science and culture; but we do not 
think Frenchmen are worth anything in foreign affairs. The French na- 
tion has been used, time out of mind, by the representatives of countries 
which were little removed from barbarism. But latterly France has been 
untrue to itself. It has entered upon a war of aggression. Under pre- 
tence of protecting the commercial interests of the country it has em- 
barked in a war of conquest. For a brief period all went smoothly. The 
Bey of Tunis ratified a treaty dictated at sword's point, taking care that 
France should engage tn protect his sovereign rights, And now, when the 
slow moving Mohammedan population begins to realize that it is subject 
to France the reaction has begun. France must fight and conquer, not 
for itself but for its victim, the Bey. There is no glory in this Tunisian 
business for France, neither is there honor. The trained soldiers of the 
French Republic may shoot down the unarmed Arabs, but the God of 
Battles is just, and there will come retribution. France will not be al- 
lowed to annex Tunis, and without annexation all the loss of life is vain. 
Europe cannot tolerate such an act of national brigandage. Better far 
that France should attend to her own affairs and repeal "the infamous 
laws banishing the religious orders which educated her youth. 

America has again come to the front as the mother of marvelous marks- 
men. This week, at Wimbledon, in the Albert jewel competition at 
1,000 yards, the Americans again won. Scott, of the American team, 
won it in 1880, and Milton Farrow, also of the American team, won it in 
1879. This year Frank Hyde, American, and Captain Godsall, of the 
Second Bucks Regiment, each made a score of 70 out of a possible 75, 
and on shooting off the tie Hyde made three bull's-eyes against Captain 
Godsall's two inners and one bull's-eye. We are very far-sighted on this 
side of the Atlantic. 

The Afghan leaders are warring upon each other. They should be en- 
couraged by all means. 

The most useful invention for a new country is, beyond all doubt, 
one that is of most importance to the settler. Now, the first thing a man 
does in a new country is to build a house, and then he sets about and 
thinks how to paint it. In ninety-nine cases out of a hundred he does 
not know anything about mixing oils and paints, and he daubs his home- 
stead all over with some substance that blisters and cracks, and it looks 
like a smallpox patient within three months. This can all be avoided by 
using the Imperishable Paint, prepared by James R. Kelly & Co., on 
Market street, below Beale. 

The daily rush to the store of Mosgrove & Bo., at 114 and 116 Kearny 
street, is rapidly clearing out their really mammoth and colossal stock, 
which had to be entirely disposed of before the firm moves into their New 
Crystal Palace, on Post street, on August 1st, when a thoroughly new 
and gorgeously beautiful line of dry-goods, now imported from Europe and 
the East, will be offered to the public. Ladies will remember that they 
have just one more week in which to secure bargains. 

There are three deaths recorded from dropsy this week. People 
dropsy quickly when they get it, don't they? (Christian Union please 
copy). 



MARINE INTELLIGENCE. 



ARRIVALS AND CLEARANCES AT THE PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO, FOR 
THE WEEK ENDING JULY 21, 1881. 







ARRIVALS. 




DATE. 


VESSEL. 


MASTER. 


WHERE FROM. 


CONSIGNEES. 


J'ly 15 
.. 16 
.. 17 

.. 17 


Ship City of Athens. . . 


McDonald.. 
Connolly ... 
Strickland.. 
Soule 


Sunderland... 

Hull.. 

New York.... 
Newcastle.... 

Pisaqua 

Kahalui 


Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 
Williams, Dimond & Co. 
Geo. J. Theobald & Co. 




Freeman . . . 
Dubreuith.. 
Surft 










.. 18 
.. 18 
.. 20 


Bark Helen W. Almy. 


Jones & Co. 

J. \V. Grace & Co. 

J. D. Spreckles & Bros. 



CLEARANCES. 



DATE. 


VESSEL. 


MASTER. 


WHERE BOUND 


BY WHOM CLEARED. 


J'ly 15 






Queenstown .. 


W. Dresbach. 


.. 15 






Liverpool 


Degener & Co. 






Tate 

Slattsun .... 
Marston 








Guaymas .... 
Honolulu ... 




.. 16 


Bark Lady Lampson . . 


Welch & Co. 


.. ie 


Sch'r Claus Spreckles . . 


Cousins .... 


Kahalui 


J. D. Spreckles & Bros. 


.. IS 


Ship R. R. Thomas . .. 


Nichols . . . 


Queenstown . . 


Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 


.. 1£ 




Milley 


Liverpool 


W. Dresbach. 


.. 1£ 






Queenstown.. 


R. Sheeny. 


.. 2< 




Connolly . . . 




Williams, Dimond & Co. 


.. 2C 




Eversun.... 


Honolulu 


Williams, Dimond & Co. 



D. J. TOOHY'S "BON MOT." 

At a meeting of Branch No. 1 of the " Irish National Land League," 
held in this city on Monday evening last, Mr. D. J. Toohy, the Call states, 
commented very severely upon the remark recently made by the Hawaiian 
King, TCalakaua, at a public banquet in London, to the effect that there 
were no Land Leagues in his country. It seems a great pity that the 
Call, which aims to be the special organ of the Land League, did not pub- 
lish Mr. D. J. Toohy's actual observations, so that intelligent, respecta- 
ble American citizens might form some slight idea of the indecent, black- 
guardly language which that journal designates severe comment. The 
News Letter would like to publish this specimen Land Leaguer's actual 
words, but decency forbids. We cannot go further than to state that the 
severe comment was an unjustifiable reflection on the legitimacy of the 
sable King's parentage, and was couched in language so gross, so disgust- 
ingly filthy, that a fallen woman would have blushed to listen to it. 

This man Toohy, who expresses his low thoughts in the low language 
of the gutter, is President of Branch No. 1 of the " Irish National Land 
League." It is a generally accepted axiom amongst intelligent men that 
a pretty accurate idea of the worthiness of a movement may be formed 
by studying the character of men who are engaged in it, and there is no 
surer way of arriving at a correct index of a man's character than by sim- 
ply reading or listening to his utterances. Here we have the principal 
officer of this organization expressing himself in the language of a black- 
guard and receiving applause therefor. It is, therefore, logical to assume 
that the principal officer and his audience were blackguards, and it is 
equally logical to assume that the object these blackguards are seeking to 
attain is a blackguardly one. 

SOME NUTS FOR SCHOOL DIRECTORS TO CRACK. 

"We are informed, and on very good evidence, that an adopted daugh- 
ter of a former President of the Board of Education, who barely passed 
her examination for teacher, was shortly afterward rewarded with an ap- 
pointment and given a class in one of the out of the way schoolhouses. 
The rule is that should there be no pupils present at the hour when the 
school opens the teacher must report immediately to the Board at the 
New City Hall. In this case, however, it is said that the young lady did 
not report but continued going to and returning daily from an empty school- 
room, and for some months drew her regular salary as a reward for her 
healthful exercise. At the opening of the present term she was appointed 
and promoted to a vacancy in the Denman School. A few days after 
several worthy teachers who had been years in the Department {and were 
well liked by the parents and pupils), were dismissed without a day's no- 
tice. The injury to the primary classes which were discontinued is se- 
verely felt by many families who live all around, some even within half 
a block of the Denman School. This institution is considered the lead- 
ing school for girls, as there are no boys there, so that young ladies come 
there from all parts of the city, which is the cause of its being over- 
crowded. In our opinion girls who go to public schools should be com- 
pelled to attend the school established in the district in which they live, 
and children living in the neighborhood should receive the preference of 
admission to the exclusion of those who live in a different part of the city. 
We have plenty of public schools, but if separate schools for girls are to 
come into fashion then there should be more establishments specially for 
the sex, 

LaBt Sunday being delightfully warm, every bathing establishment in 
Alameda -was well patronized, but the Terrace Baths, as usual, carried 
off all the honors, having the largest crowd. This could hardly be other- 
wise, for their proverbial cleanliness is now so well known that no one 
will go elsewhere if they can possibly be accommodated here. The water 
is changed regularly, and the bottom of the baths thoroughly cleaned. 
We had occasion to notice a trick of another establishment in Alameda, 
this week, to deceive the public into believing their water had been 
changed, when, in fact, but six inches of water was run out and as much 
more pumped in. The proprietor stated that he had emptied the entire 
tank at the same time the Terrace Baths emptied theirs, but he had better 
facilities for filling it again, which accounted for his being full at that 
hour, while the Terrace was still pumping water in. There are tricks 
in all trades but ours. 

The municipal election is a battle of the bags, and the Sand-lot has 
the call of all the empty ones. When the sacks of these demagogues are 
filled there will be little left to go around among the boys. 



Price per Copy. 10 Cents.' 



ESTABLISHED JULY, 20. 1856. 



[Annual Subscription. S5. 



S/\JH F^K@1I©^ 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol.32. 



SAN FRANOISOO, SATUBDAT, JULY 30, 1881. 



NO. 3. 



GOLD BARS— 890@910— Refined Silver— 12£@13 # cent. diBcount 
Mexican Dollars, 9A(S 10 per cent. disc. 

*3" Exchange on New York, 1-10 premium; On London, Bankers, 49J ; 
Commercial, 49£. Paris, sight, 5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams, 
15-100 per cent. 

«6?" Price of Money here, 6@10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
open market, 1@1£ per month. Demand light. On Bond Security, 
3@4£ per cent, per year on Call. 

tS- Latest price of Sterling in New York, 483@485. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

San Francisco July 29,1881. 



Stocks and Bonds. 

BONDS. 

Cal. State Bonds, 6's,'57 . 
S. F. City & Co. E'ds, 6s, '58 
S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 7b . . . 

Montg'y Av. Bonds 

Dupont Street Bonds 

Sacramento City Bonds .... 

Stockton City Bonds 

Yuba County Bonds 

Marysville City Bonds 

Santa Clara Co. Bonds 

Los Angeles County Bonds. 
Los Angeles City Bonds. . . . 
Virg'a & Truckee R. R. Bds. 
Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bds 

Oakland City Bonds 

Oregon R. & N. Bonds, 6s 

S. P. R. R. Bonds 

U. S. 4s (ex-coup'n) 



BANK: 



Bank of California (ex-div). . 

Pacific Bank (ex-div) 

First National (ex-div) .... 

1XSDRANC8 COMPANIES. 

Union (ex-div) 

Fireman's Fund (ex-div). . . . 
California (ex-div) 



Bid. 


Asked 


105 


_ 


Nom. 


Nom. 


Nom. 


Nom. I 


60 


65 


50 


— 


50 


— 


105 


— 


103 


106 


100 


102 


105 


107 


110 


112 


110 


— 


101 


103 


110 


113 


125 


130 


112 


115 


100 


— 


116i 


U6J 


147* 


_ 


127 


— 


110 


— 


120 


123 


120 


125 


120 


125 



Stocks and Bonds. 

I NSD R A SCK COMPANIES. 

State Investment (ex-div).. 

Home Mutual (ex-div) 

Commercial (ex-div) 

Westeru (ex-div) 

RAILROADS. 

C. P. R. R. Stock 

C. P. R. K. Bonds 

City Railroad 

Omnibus R. R 

N. B. and Mission R. R 

Sutter Street R. R 

Geary Street R. R 

Central R. R. Co 

Market Street R. R 

Clay Street Hill R. R 

S. F. Gaslight Co (ex-div). . . 
Oakland Gaslight Co (ex-div) 
Sac*to Gaslight Co (ex-div).. 
Califor'a Powder Co (ex-divj 
Giant Powder Co (ex-div). 
Atlantic Giant Powder, do 
Gold and Stock Teleg'h Co 
S. V. W. W. Co. 's Stock... 

S. V. W. W. Co* Bonds 

Pacific Coast S.S. Co's Stock 
Saucelito L. & F. Co.'b St'ck 



115 

70 

35 

85 

55 

68 

43 
Nom. 
Nom. 

67 

3-2J 

55 
115 

85 

43 

100* 

115 

80 

Nom. 



116 
117 
120 
105 

64 
116 



09* 

Nom. 

Nom. 
67J 
32J 
57 

90 
44 
78 
101 

85 
Nom. 



Quite a large business has been transacted this week in the stock of the 
Spring Valley Water Works, with almost unchanged quotations. Other 
first-class securities are also in great demand, but the extreme views of 
holders restrict the volume of business. 

Andrew Baird, 312 California at. 

GENERAL PURDY. 
Just as we go to press we take occasion to express our sincere sym- 
pathy, our great sorrow for the blow that has fallen on ex-Lieut. -Gov. Purdy 
of this city. Death has robbed him of his son, Gen. Erastus Sparrow Purdy, 
at the age of forty years, at Cairo, in Egypt, where he died on June 21st 
last. These are the last words to be written for the News Letter this 
week, and they are in6nitely the most painful, for Governor Purdy is a 
warm friend, and universally beloved by all who ever shook his hand. 
Indeed, we doubt whether words intended to be kind may not add to in- 
stead of diminishing his suffering. General Purdy, or " Sparrow Purdy," 
as his friends called him, was born in the city of New York, May 25th, 
1839. He was educated at the French Academy,on Thirteenth street, in 
his native town. He came to California via Nicaragua, and arrived at 
San Francisco June 6th, 1855. He officiated as Acting Secretary and 
Cashier of Argeuti's Bank, and subsequently became connected with the 
commission house of Alexander B. Grogan. Shortly thereafter, on No- 
vember 17th, 1857, he left San Francisco as an assistant in the Sonora 
Surveying Expedition, commanded by Captain Charles P. Stone, who had 
a contract from the Mexican Government to survey Sonora, Sinaloa and 
Southern California. At the expiration of three years he was driven 
from Mexico by General Pesquira. He served with distinction during 
the war of the Rebellion, organizing the First California Regiment, leav- 
ingthe service with a record as bright as gold. In March, 1870, he went 
to Egypt, where his indefatigable labors secured him all the honors that 
could be bestowed upon him. The flag of the Pioneer Society was at 
half-mast in his honor. He died, after a short illness of one week, from 
inflammation of the bowels. 

Entered at the Post-Office at San Francisco, Cat., as Second-Class 
Matter. 



MARRIOTT'S 



EMPLANE! 



FOR NAVIGATING THE AIR. 
The Inventor and Patentee of the Aeroplane wishes to present to 
the original stockholders in the " Avitor," or Aerial Steam Navigation 
Company, a corresponding number of Bhares in the Aeroplane Company. 
Said stock will be ready for isHue by the Secretary, at the of- 
fices of the Company, 609 Merchant street, on and after August 10th, 1881, 
and original stockholders are requested to call on him and receive the same. 

F. Marriott, Patentee. 

STOCK MARKET. 

The short, crisp reviews of the Stock Market which our limited 
space obliges, cannot cover in detail the number and variety of interests 
involved. For the Comstocks, it is sufficient to say no new development 
nor special surprise has transpired. A general belief pervades that we 
" are to have a market," which, in street parlance, iB interpreted a rise, a 
boom when the new crosscuts are made, and so the hopes of traders are 
supported, while the old game of see-saw and assessments goes on. In 
Bodie District, Bodie Tunnel has recently become quite active, with sales 
as high as $4, receding to $2.50. Northern Belle still keeps up her good 
shipments and showing, but, for some undiscernable cause, the stock 
droops. The Mt. Diablo game is nearly played out. After much over- 
bragging and large sales at the East, it is now announced that the pro- 
duction of bullion will be stopped because of expense in milling the ore. 
The second duel between Richmond and Albion has been finished by 
sending the latter to grass, with prospect of another assessment upon its 
too confident stockholders for cost of this unprofitable contest. At the 
close the market is a little " off " in prices. 

Mechanics' Fair, 1881— The grand opening of the Mechanics' Fair 
takes place on Tuesday next, August 2d. The forthcoming Fair promises 
to be one of the most interesting exhibitions ever held in this city. 
Changes have been made in the interior of the Pavilion, and the Market- 
street end will be made much more attractive than heretofore. Sea- 
son ticket checks will be sold at the Market-street entrance, which can be 
exchanged at the office during the evening, thus avoiding the usual crowd 
at the door. The Market Street Railway Company will provide extra 
cars for the accommodation of its patrons, and land passengers directly at 
the entrance to the Pavilion. 



We live in an age of investigation. First we had the State Prison 
investigated, and now comes the Mint business. Considering that the 
elections are so near at hand, some idea will suggest itself to even the 
most unsophisticated mind that there is possibly some political motive. 
Somehow these investigations always begin with a terrible outcry for 
" the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth,*' and usually end 
with a general whitewashing, and a few points made by some political 
party. The lawyers and politicians gain, but the poor old State has to 
stand the expenses. After all, it seems difficult to say whether the in- 
vestigators and the investigated do not stand in and divide. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, July 29, 
1881. United States Bonds— 4s, 11GJ; 4£s, 114|; 3*s, 102*. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 83@4 85. Pacific Mail, 50J. Wheat, 122 a 125 ; Western 
Union, 883. Hides, 23@23£. Oil— Sperm, — . Winter Bleached, — . 
Whale Oil, — . Winter Bleached. — . Wool— Spring, fine, 17@32 : 
Burry, 14@24 ; Pulled, 32@3S; Fall Clips, 15@17; Barry. 12(2 15. Lon- 
don, July 29. — Liverpool Wheat Market, 9s. 7d.(s9s. 10d.; Bonds, 4s, 
120; 4£s, 117J ; 34s, 104*. Consols, 101 1-16. 

A Mistake. —A daily contemporary states: In Depart me it 8, before 
Judge Lawler, A. Foreman recovered a small balance of wages from L. 
P. Palmer. It should have read, from L. P. Painter. As both gentle- 
men are, we believe, in the type business, it is as well to correct the error. 

The sailing of the City of New York, for Australia and Honolulu, is 
postponed to Sunday at 2 p.m. 

London, July 29th.— Latest Price of Consols. 101 1-16- 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 616 Merchaat Street, San PraacuKo, Oalifarai*. 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1881. 



THE MINT INVESTIGATION. 

The investigation into the management of the San Francisco Mint, 
■which commenced in this city on Monday last, is of itself a matter of 
very grave importance, and, taken in connection with its bearing upon 
the use, or rather the abuse, of the public service by that numerous, ener- 
getic and thoroughly unscrupulous class of citbens designated politicians, 
it has, at this particular juncture, an additional importance. Mr. Dodge, 
the present Superintendent of the Mint, is a gentlemen who haB resided 
in this community for a long period. He has been engaged in business 
in quite an extensive way, and has at all times maintained in his business 
and social relations the reputation of being an honorable, honest, truthful 
and thoroughly reliable man. "While in active sympathy with the aims 
and purposes of the Republican party he has never pursued politics as a 
vocation nor sought to make merchandise out of assumed patriotism. 
His accuser, on this occasion, is the Hon. Horace Frank Page, who repre- 
sents a Californian district in the National Congress. Mr. Page has been 
in public life for many years. He is not regarded, by those who are com- 
petent to judge, as being the possessor of more knowledge concerning the 
science of government than falls to the lot of any ordinary stage-driver; 
but he is regarded as being thoroughly versed in all the chicanery of ma- 
chine politics of the lowest American type. He is a professional poli- 
tician. He lives, and for years past has lived, in and on politics. This 
contrast of the accuser and the accused will be found instructive when 
the circumstances surrounding the preferment of the charges now being 
investigated are examined. 

Something like twelve months ago a slight misunderstanding arose be- 
tween the very Honorable H. F. Page and Mr. Dodge. To put it plainly, 
the very Honorable H. F. Page demanded the privilege of paying his 
political retainers and strikers with positions in the Mint. Mr. Dodge 
put up with this until he found that the very Honorable Frank's insolent 
demands were growing greater every day, and that unless something were 
done to check them the Mint would have to be enlarged in order to find 
standing-room for the political pimps of this Congressional candidate for 
California's gubernatorial chair. When Mr. Dodge made this discovery, 
he, in the language of the street-corner, "kicked." In other words, he 
intimated to the very Honorable Horace Frank Page that he was going 
to run the Mint as a business institution connected with the United States 
Government, and that he could not permit it to be used as a political 
orphan asylum for an ambitious and unscrupulous Congressman's wards. 
This made the very Honorable Frank mad, and the result of his madness 
is the present investigation. "With what eloquent force these simple facts 
argue in favor of Civil Service Reform ! Fancy the idea of this Congres- 
sional demagogue arising in his place to assail the reputation of a public 
servant who had simply refused to prostitute the public trust confided to 
him! Fancy the idea of the people, as represented in Congress, calmly 
listening to this blatant demagogue, instead of driving him forth from 
their midst! Fancy the idea of this would-be corruptiouist presenting 
charges against the man who refused to be made a tool of, and the Cabi- 
net officer to whom the charges were presented placing them on file, in- 
stead of kicking the Congressman down stairs! Yet this is the sort of 
thing that is going on every day. The very Honorable Horace Frank 
Page is not, unfortunately, the only Congressman of his sort in the coun- 
try; on the contrary, the woods are full of his fac-similes. There is not a 
Custom House, a Post-office, a Mint or other Government office, great or 
small, that is not used by our Very Honorable Representatives and Sena- 
tors as so much spoil and loot wherewith to reward their supporters and 
stx'ikers ; and if, as in this case, a conscientious public servant refuses to 
betray his trust and allow these Congressional highwaymen to have their 
way, his office is immediately investigated, and his personal probity and 
honesty impugned. We are in hopes that the time has come when the 
intelligent public sentiment of the American people will demand that the 
public service of the country be taken out of politics ; and when it is, the 
very Honorable Horace Frank Pages of the country will follow it. 

The most remarkable thing in connection with this investigation is the 
brazen-faced assurance with which the very Honorable Horace Frank 
Page calmly avows that he started in to hunt up charges against Mr. 
Dodge simply as a matter of personal spite or vengeance, and without the 
slightest idea of serving the public interests. In other words, had Mr. 
Dodge accommodated the very Honorable Horace Frank Page, he, Mr. 
Dodge, might have stolen the value of the Mint without let or hinderance 
from the very Honorable Horace F. Comment would be superfluous ! 

THE CONTRACT SYSTEM. 

California appears to be only on the threshold of her wealth and pros- 
perity. With our thousands of invaluable gold quartz mines, which can- 
not possibly be exhausted for many generations, with perfect titles, laws 
thoroughly understood and enforced, freedom from taxation, facility of 
making personal examinations at but little expense of time or money, 
and the ease and cheapness with which mines may be worked, we can 
reasonably look for results hitherto unknown, and well calculated to sur- 
prise our Eastern and European friends. We learn that the " Contract 
System " is being largely adopted in many of our mining districts. In 
Grass Valley, for instance, there are hundreds of gold mines of ascer- 
tained value, plenty of custom mills, and thousands of skilled workmen 
who have lived in the locality for years with their families, and dislike to 
leave it, who are willing and anxious to make contracts to develop mines, 
sink shafts, run your drifts at so much per foot, mine and mill your ores 
at so much per ton, thus enabling mine owners who can ascertain per as- 
say the value of their ores and what percentage the mill should turn out, 
to know in advance the exact yield of ores they may choose to have mined 
or milled. This may be accomplished with greater satisfaction and profit 
to both mine owners and laborers, and the mine much more quickly de- 
veloped and rendered productive than under the old system. — S. F. Stock 
Report. 

The reputation of King, Morse & Co., on the delicious article of 
canned asparagus they pack, is becoming as extensive as the celebrity of 
our climate. 




SPECIAL EXCURSION TRAIN 



Monterey 

AND 

on at PAJARO with the Saut 

Santa Cruz, 



AND 

(Making Connection at PAJARO with the Santa Cruz R- B- for) 



Sunday, August 7th, 1 88 1 



ROUND TRIP TICKETS i 
to either of above points f '** 



.©>i.Y 



$3. 



A SPECIAL TRAIN 

Will leave San Francisco from Passenger Depot, Townseud street, at 7:00 A.M., 
and Valencia street at 7: 1 A. M. 

Returning 1 , will leave Monterey at 4:30 P.M. and Santa Cruz at 4: 10 P.M. 

Tickets can now be procured at No. 2 New Montgomery street, Passenger Depot, 
Townsend street, or at Valencia-street Station. 

5IE3C<oulx*ss £ft tlxe Sea-Sliore, 
affording ample opportunity to indulge in Sea-Bathiner, etc., and viewing 
the Elaborate Improvements recently completed at Monterey, notably the 
Magnificent HOTEL DEL MONTE, with its Beautiful Grounds, etc. 
Also, the New and Elegant BATHING PAVILION, which contains an 
immense SWIMMING TANK (160 feet x 60), varying in depth from three to six 
feet, heated by steam pipes, and supplied with a constant flow of water from the sea. 
For Warm Salt Water Plunge and Swimming Batha, no establishment in the United 
States compares with it. 

II. R. JUOAH, A. P. <fc T. Agent. 
A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 

RUSH TO THE ARCADE. 

The moat extraordinary inducements have been offered during the 
past week at the Arcade by J. J. O'Brien & Co., in order to close out the 
balance of the gTeat wholesale stock of Sachs, Strassburger & Co., which 
they bought at one sweep for the sum of $235,000. The bargains in la- 
dies' and children's hosiery are something never before seen in this city, 
and they are offered all round at about forty cents on the dollar, as com- 
pared with their original cost. Another line of goods, including Printed 
Satteens, Percoles, Cambrics and Ginghams, are now offered at 30 per 
cent, below cost, and 2,000 dozen corsets (which will, by arithmetical pro- 
cess, accommodate 24,000 ladies), are being almost given away at from 
twenty-five to seventy-five cents a pair. There are still 100 pairs of gui- 
pure curtains left, of the latest and most elegant patterns, and 315 pieces 
of extra heavy black cashmere. The proprietors of the Arcade, at 924, 
926 and 928 Market street, invite a careful inspection of their goods, all 
of which are marked in plain figures. A person need not of necessity 
buy anything after inspecting them, although there has never been an in- 
stance of a person doing otherwise after once going in. The Arcade has 
been a little world for three weeks past. Numberless clerks waiting on 
crowds of purchasers, tying up packages, making out bills, showing goods, 
rolling them up and giving orders to boys, present the most busy scene 
conceivable. There has never been a purchase of such magnitude as the 
one made by the Arcade, and never in our history as a city have goods 
been disposed of with such remarkable rapidity. The sale will continue 
until the last button, of which there are 2,500 gross, has been disposed of. 
There is one thing about the sales at the Arcade, they are all genuine. 
What J. J. O'Brien & Co. say is true, and to their unflagging, ceaseless 
energy San Francisco owes a great debt. When they announce bargains 
they arc bargains, and not shams, hence a great deal of their success, be- 
cause people feel in purchasing goods there that they can rely on their 
quality being as advertised. 

ASSASSINATION. 

The World has a paragraph in its issue of July 6th which is worth 
quoting. It says: "Two direct results the events of Saturday last will 
have. In the first place, they will be held to justify the action of the Gov- 
ernment in prosecuting the Freiheit, even though they do not completely 
warrant the severity of the sentence passed upon the wretched Most ; iu 
the second place, they will cause the English people to attach a greater 
importance than, they were disposed to do a week ago to the murderous 
mouthings of such men as O'Donovan Rossa. Whether the action of 
Guiteau is or is not likely to provoke imitation in England or elsewhere, 
it is certain theoretically to give a new stimulus to the abominable move- 
ment which has for its object not so much the death of kings and em- 
perors as the annihilation of the principle of civil authority." 



For years people have wondered to what practical use tules could be 
put. For a long time they were looked upon as useful only as a blind 
for the duck hun'-er, and their young shoots, after the old tules had been 
burned, as food for cattle. At last they have been put to a use which 
they are eminently fitted for. It has remained for the New Tule Carpet 
Lining Company, now doing a very large business at their factory on 
Fourteenth Avenue, San Francisco, to prove what an immense success 
they are as lining for carpets, and the public has shown its appreciation 
of the tule lining by the ready sale it has met with all over the State and 
in the East. Its use is a wonderful saving of wear and tear on carpets, 
and householders now swear by it. Upholsterers' men have their hands 
full taking up carpets to put the tule lining underneath. 



July 30, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTISKK. 



SOCIETY NOTES. 

San IfeAHCISCO, July 28, 1881. 

Dear News Letter: " Man p ., which was exactly my 

fat* last wcfk, and instead of speeding away towards Monterey, as I 
anti.-iiMtt d Ual Saturday, unexpected work in the office kept me ■ moat 
unwilling prisoner at my desk. However, I always oonwle myself with 
the Ihnogbt of the good time coming when compelled to wait for it a little 
longer. H the weather baa been in town I hear it has been 

equally oold end rioamy at Monterey. Hyde Bowie made the return trip 
on the Netiit by himself, as the friends who aooompanied him on her to 
Santa Crux did not care to repeat their experience of the trip down, feel- 
ine almost as if it would be tempting Providence. They were, perhaps, 
wise, aa I hear the yacht encountered very heavy weather couiiug up, 
iiting some repairs. 

Commodore nfcDonoogh has returned from his Eastern sojourn, so his 
yacht, which has beeu laid up at Antioch during his absence, will doubt- 
leas soon be heard of on the Bay. 

It seems that we have been premature in congratulating ourselves on the 
unalterable attachment of Brother John Hemphill, and that after all we 
are to lose him, the promises of more pay and less to do having tempted 
him away from us. 

I hear that Dr. Stone's congregation are rejoicing in the fact of Dr. 
Barrows having accepted their call at last, and that he will return here 
almost immediately. The youthful Beddings are also on their way back 
from their honeymoon trip East, and on Saturday next there returns to 
'Frisco pretty Miss Mamie Riley, who has been absent in New York a 
couple of rears or more. 

Mrs. Willie Howard has been entertaining a succession of visitors at 
the San Mateo homestead. Ditto the Selbys, Athertons and other deni- 
zens of Santa Clara county. So, also, has Mrs. Lilly Coit, at her unique 
cottage in Napa valley. She is a charming hostess, and her guests are 
always anxious for a second invitation, none of which have I ever heard 
of being refused. In fact, nearly all those having country homes have 
been showing hospitality to their other less fortunate friends. Happy 
they who are the lucky guests, for— bar Monterey and, perhaps, Santa 
Cruz — hotel accommodation at country resorts in California is not what 
every one's fancy pictures, and private houses are far more pleasant to 
visit. 

The Pensacola has received orders for sea, and sails for Panama about 
Saturday next, leaving several aching hearts behind her. Ah ! girls, why 
will yon fall in love with sailors? 

Mr. J. H. Ackerman, known among his friends as " Doc," and a mem- 
ber of the well-known firm of Ackerman & Co., is engaged to Miss B. 
Goldstein, daughter of E. C. Goldstein, of the firm of Dreyfus & Co., 
wine merchants of this city. " Doc'' is to be heartily congratulated on 
making so fair a conquest. Yours, Felix. 

RUSTICATING. 

^Etna Springs, July 26, 1881. 

Dear News Letter: You have been favored with so many epistles 
from the various resorts that I don't see why a few lines from ^Etna 
Springs should not swell the list, though there is not very much to say. 
To those who rejoice in being up in the mountains, with plenty of good 
walking in their neighborhood, this is just the place for them to come. 
Of course invalids find no end of benefit derived from drinking the min- 
eral waters and inhaling the soft, pure air, and some who are not to be 
classed as such come for that purpose as well. Among them are your 
wealthy magnates, D. O. Mills and wife, who, for the nonce deserting 
their palatial home at Milbrae, have been here some time. 'Squire Dewey 
and wife also put in an appearance, and lots of others just as nice, but 
not bo rich, some very pleasant Oaklanders being of the number. 

The place itself consists of a number of cottages, even the hotel proper 
being in one of them. The chief fault is their being so far apart. How- 
ever, that has its advantages in the quietude it insures, for the constant 
babble of noisy youngsters is anthing but pleasurable, and I often think 
what a boon to a long-suffering public it would be if the mothers who 
travel without nurses had a special table assigned them and their offspring 
in the dining-rooms of the different hostelrieB, for the training indulged in 
at meal times is, to say the least, injurious to one's nerves and digestion. 

This place has been quite full — the usual amount of Israelites and more 
than the usual number of oldish people ; so flirtations and fun are not so 
largely indulged in as gossip and green tea. Since the big-bugs came we 
have had a better table, though, truth to tell, in this high region, with 
plenty of pure air and exercise, appetite for anything is not wanting. 

The News Letter is a great favorite, and always eagerly welcomed, its 
pink cover being quite a feature round the Sunday's breakfast-table. One 
is sure to find spice to season their food therein. 

Quite a funny incident occurred here the other evening, which I must 
tell you about: Just at dusk, an unexpected buggy appeared upon the 
scene, and fancying, from general outlines, that the descending inmate 
was no other than her looked-for brother from town, little Miss Jennie 

rushed up to him, and, throwing her arms round him, exclaimed, 

" So, sir, you've come at last." Picture her confusion when she discovered 
she was embracing an utter stranger returning from a hunting expedi- 
tion. But those who know say that the acquaintance thus made is likely 
to ripen into something warmer than friendship, and the persistency with 
which the hombre admires the scenery in her society certainly warrants 
that conclusion. 

Well, having Bpun my yarn I will, in nautical parlance, bring to ! and 
sign myself, Yours to command. Jack. 

It is a difficult matter to hold the mirror to Nature, and reflect her in 
all her many changing forms. To do so is the hight of art, and this hight 
has been reached by the proprietors of the Elite Photographic Studio — 
Jones, Robinson & Co. — 838 Market street. These artists have treated 
the photographing business from an sesthetic stand-point, and their photo- 
graphs are life-like masterpieces. No photograph is allowed to leave the 
studio unless the likenesses, retouching, etc., are perfect. At the Mechan- 
ics' Fairs of 1879 and 1880, medals were awarded the Elite for the best 
photograph. This is no slight compliment where photography is so highly 
cultivated. 

The table peaches packed by King, Morse & Co., lead all other 
brands on this coast. The choicest fruit and beat sugar, with the greatest 
cleanliness aud care, make them to excel anything else. 



STRAW HATS! 



Come and See the Elegant Styles, the Very 
Latest, the Nobbiest, and all Just Opened. 

MACKINAW, MARACIBO, 

CANTONS, PANAMA, 

MIXANS, PEDLE BRAIDS, 

PALM, TUSCAN, 

LEGHORNS, ETC 



AT THE GREAT I XL, 

Corner Kearny and Commercial Streets, S. F. 



CLASSIFICATION OF CONVICTS. 

_ The prison investigation drags its weary length along with such in- 
significant results that people are at a loss whether to laugh at the solemn 
labors of the Commissioners or give up all consideration of them in utter 
disgust. Acres of type, descriptive of the investigation, have been given 
to the public, and out of it all the general reader can, at best, arrive at 
the conclusion that our past and present system of prison management is 
sadly faulty. It is conceded on all sides that a penitentiary has two prin- 
cipal objects: firstly, to so punish criminals that they may have a whole- 
some dread of again incurring the punishment ; and, secondly, to reform 
criminals, so that they may have no inclination to walk the paths of evil 
after their liberation. Unfortunately, in most penal institutions in this 
country, one or other of these objects is exclusively sought to be attained. 
Either the scheme of instilling fear is so severe that it amounts to 
tyranny and brutality, or the system by which reform is attempted is so 
mild that it utterly fails of its purpose. In the former case the criminal 
grows callous and desperate ; in the latter case he comes to regard the 
penitentiary as a sort of rustic retreat, which it is not unpleasant to visit 
should his criminal plans miscarry. 

It must be evident to everybody that there ought to be a happy mean 
between these two extremes. We do not believe in making our prisons 
abodes of torture, abuse and despotic outrage. Nor do we think it ad- 
visable that life within their walls should be made too pleasant for the 
convict. But of the two alternatives, we incline rather toward severity 
than leniency. Of course, there are many grades of criminals, and it 
would be manifestly unjust to treat all these alike. But here, again, a 
very fine Bense of discrimination is needed. It is a well-known fact that 
prison officials are too prone to measure the gravity of a crime by the sen- 
tence imposed, yet a moment's reflection will tell us that the homicide, 
who in a moment of passion has earned twenty years of penal servitude, 
but whose life-record is otherwise clean, deserves more sympathy and 
better treatment than the habitual thief, whose many prior convictions of 
petty larceny have at last given him lodgings in the State Prison for a 
year or two. A system of treatment which would be wanton and unneces- 
sary cruelty if applied to the former, would be no more than proper and 
needful correction if applied to the latter. It is, therefore, fruitless to 
argue, as most of our contemporaries have done, for either a more severe 
or a milder plan of discipline than that which has hitherto prevailed at 
the State Prison. It is plain that the matter must be left very largely to 
the discretion of the Warden, who, of course, is responsible for the action 
of the officials under him. The Warden is informed, or ought to be, as to 
the character and antecedents of every prisoner confided to his care, and 
it is for him to determine what course of treatment will be best for the 
morals of the patient. Of course, we do not suggest that every prisoner 
should be doctored individually, but we do contend that a nicer classifica- 
tion of criminals than has hitherto obtained would go far to remove the 
evils the present State Prison investigation has shown up. 

HIGHLAND SPRINGa 
The pleasantest Summer jaunt that a man can take these Summer 
days is, beyond a doubt, to Highland Springs. A delightful jaunt to 
Cloverdale is succeeded by a charming ride behind a fuur-in-hand to the 
Springs, and when once there the visitor can fairly revel in mineral baths 
of all kinds, can hunt deer, rabbit, hares, doves, and all kinds of game 
and be as happy as the day is long. There is a direct route by the San 
Quentin Ferry to San Rafael, connecting with the S. F. and N*. P. R. R. 
to Cloverdale, and both routes are equally pleasant The rates of board 
are most moderate, and Mrs. Goods, the proprietress of the hotel, is all 
that her name expresses in the singular. Highland Springs are just far 
enough away to make one feel that he is in the country, and at the same 
time they are near enough to the city to admit of every comfort and lux- 
ury that a metropolis can graut. Situated in the heart of Lake County, 
there is no more beautiful or desirable place for a Summer vacation. 

It Is with great pleasure we announce the engagement of the Hon. 
William Lane Booker, her Britannic Majesty's Consular Representative 
at this port, to Mrs. Bispham, a lady well known in San Francisco 
society. During his long official residence in this city Mr. Booker has 
made hosts of friends, and has endeared himself to all with whom he has 
come in contact. When, therefore, the wedding bells ring out their wild, 
sweet music, the New* Letter will stand in the center of this host of 
friends, and with them reverently bid the happy couple "God-speed" on 
their journey through life. The wedding is expected to come off at an 
early day. 

The Amende to Charity.— We are glad to hear that the respectable 
old laundress, who made such a fair show to be treated as a lady, has 
been received into the Ladies' Home. This amende speaks well for the 
kind hearts and good sense of the lady managers, and for the value of a 
paragraph in the San Francisco News LetUr. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July SO, 1881. 



WOOE D IN THE DOCK. 

There were twenty-seven persons charged with various offenses 
before his Honor that morning. It was only about eighteen months ago. 

One of the accused was a young girl about seventeen, who was weeping 
very bitterly. The usual crowd of hangers-on to the Police Court was 
leering eagerly at the unfortunate tramp, the irreclaimable drunkard, the 
fore headless petty larcenist and the burly burglar. 

But there was something in this young girl's sobs, in this sorrow of the 
fair-haired maiden who had passed the night in the same cell with 
drunken prostitutes, female dive thieves and women of the worst class, 
that was heart-breaking. 

Even the bailiff of the Court — accustomed to criminal misery and in- 
ured to scenes of suffering, from the suicide of a wanton to the execution 
of a murderer, and his last parting with his mother and sisters—even the 
bailiff felt touched, and, walking up to the railing, whispered some kind 
word in her ear. 

And next to her sat a young man pale aa death. The humiliation of 
his position stood out in bold has relief, in his attitude and in every feature 
of his face; in the nervous clutch of his handsj in the shifting of his feet, 
the disarranged hair and the silently expressed suffering. __ 

The Judge was late that morning, and kept the prisoners waiting. 

" Don't cry," the young man was saying to the girl who sat next to 
him, " I am sure you have done nothing wrong. I would pledge my life 
that you have not. Tell me your trouble and I will tell you mine. I have 
been with a wholesale jeweler for two years, and I got into bad company, 
took some gold that I was to work up into a bracelet and sold it. I first 
accused some one of having stolen it, but last night I confessed. They 
had me arrested, and I shall plead guilty and take my punishment. 

The girl turned her head quickly, and between her sobs said: " But I — 
I have done nothing wrong; only one of the girls at the store where I 
work, put some lace in my pocket because — because she is jealous of me, 
and then they found it there, and a policeman came, and oh! — my heart 

is breaking." 

* * * * * * * 

*' Hugh Murray, accused of robbing his employer, what have you to 
siy?" 

" Guilty." 

His face was whiter than ever, but his mouth was firm and resolute, 
and, after he had said the word that made him a convict, he faced the 
magistrate and said: 

"Tour Honor, I have said guilty because I should be a liar if I said 
anything else; but, your Honor, I have this to add to my.plea: I never 
drank wine in all my life until last Friday uight, and I was utterly under 
its influence when I took that gold. 

And at this juncture an elderly man stepped forward and said, in a 
voice choked with emotion, "Your Honor, I am this young man's em- 
ployer, and I am sorry that 1 have taken these steps now. With your 
permission I will withdraw the charge." 

But his Honor only looked a little dimly through his spectacles and 
said: "Too late; complaint sworn to, arrest made, prisoner pleads guilty." 

And so it came to pass that Hugh Murray expiated the one criminal 
act of his life by six months in the House of Correction. 

But, before he left the dock, he managed to whisper to his neighbor, 
" Tell me your name, won't you? I have been so bad, and I am sure you 
are so good; and, perhaps, when my punishment is over, you, who are so 
gentle, will let me come and see you and call you friend." 

And she, with her great eyes all bleared with tears, said faintly: " My 
name is Isabel — Isabel Daly. I hope you won't ever be bad again, and 
that they won't be unkind to you." 

And he passed out of the dock with those words ringing in his ears. 
" I hope you won't ever be bad again, and that they won't be unkind to 
you." And when he reached the cell from which they were to take him 
away to the House of Correction, the firmness that had kept him up so 
far all left him, and, crouched on the cold stones, he burst into a fit of 
passionate weeping. 

He was not long alone, for his employer had followed him, and the once 
severe master was now as badly broken down as the clerk whom he had 
caused to be punished so severely. The old jeweler put his arms around 
Hugh's neck and for several minutes could not speak. At last he said: 

" My poor boy, I wish I could undo this. When I saw you standing 
in the dock, you made me think of a boy of my own who was ruined by 
the wine cup, and left me for I don't know where. What can I do ? How 
can I undo this ?" 

There was no reply, for both hearts were too full to Bpeak for a mo- 
ment, but the young man at last raised his head and said: "I was not 
crying like a baby for my punishment, and I have nothing but good will 
to you. If you have been harsh to me, I do not know it. Let me be can- 
did with you. I was a thief and I was a drunkard ; a thief for the first 
time and a drunkard for the first time, but still I was both. If you think 
you have been harsh, then, when my punishment is over, help me to go 
somewhere where I can get work — a long way off, and where my story is 
not known — and, as I live, I will repay your kindness tenfold. And 
there ha young girl," he continued, "charged with stealing some lace 
upstairs. Will you see to her? lam sure she is innocent, and in the 
dock she forgot all her trouble for a moment to ask me never to be bad 
again. It was that, Mr. Belden, which made me give way so weakly." 

The parting was a very sad one, but the inevitable had to jome, and 
Hugh Murray was for six months to come only "No. 143," in the West- 
ern Corridor. 

A few days after he had been in prison he received a trunk full of new 
clothing from his late employer, some luxuries in the way of food, etc., 



that were specially permitted by the Warden, and the following letter: 
Mt Dear Hcqh: Please accept the accompanying little gifts from me, and keep up 
a good heart. I send you some uselul books with which to employ your time. 
Your friend, who was in such trouble, was perfectly innocent, and was discharged, 
her arrest having been a conspiracy, and she is now head saleswoman of the house 
where she was accused of theft. 1 called and told her yesterday how bitterly you 
suffered from her sympathy, and the noble girl burst into tears, and bade me tell 
you to be of good courage and never to be bad again. 

********* 

And a year after this there was a little quiet wedding in Toronto, Can- 
ada, and the bridegroom was a successful young jeweler just started in 
business, and president of one of the local total abstinence societies, 
while the bride's name was Isabel Daly. And, as he held her to his heart 
after the ceremony, he whispered: " Darling, do you remember that you 
were wooed in a prison dock ?" 

The one strange thing about the wedding was, however, that when they 
got to their new little home there was a letter addressed to Mr. and Mrs. 
Murray, all the way from California, and it had a smudge on it just like 
as if an old-fashioned salt tear had fallen on it, and all that was inside of 
it was a cheque for .91,000, signed by Everett Belden. D. W. C. If. 

INSURANCE. 

HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

INSURANCE AGENCY, 
No. 322 & 324 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Fixe Insurance. 



TEUTOKIA of New Orleans. 

BERLIN-COLOGNE of Berlin. 

LACONFIANCE of Paris. 

DWELLING HOUSE UNDERWRITERS 

of New York. 

LION INSURANCE CO of London. 

THE FIREINS. ASSOCIATION (Limited) 
of London, England. 



GIEARD of Philadelphia. 

NEW YORK CITY INS. CO of N. Y. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

REVERE of Boston. 

LA CAISSE GENERALE of Paris. 

W ATERTOWN of New York 

ST. PAUL of St. Paul 

marine Insurance. 

PARIS UNDERWRITING ASSOCIATION of Paris. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

LA FONC1ERE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY of Paris. 

Capital Represented $27,000,COO. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

W. L. CHALMERS, Z. P. CLARK, J. C. STAPLES, 
Special Agents and Adjusters. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1864. 
Principal Office 406 California Street, S.F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital (Paid Up in TJ. S. Gold Coin) $300,000.00 

Re-Insurance Reserve $174,989 69 



Assets January 1,1881 S 639,147.88 

Surplus for policy holders 624,677.17 

Premiums, since organization 3,521,232.23 

Losses, since organization 1,635,202.84 

OFFICERS: 

J. F. HOUGHTON President. I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary. 

L.L.BAKER Vice-President. | R. H. MAGILL General Agent. 

Directors op the Home Mutpal Insurance Co.:— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, J. L. 
N. Shepard, John Currey, J. F. Houghton, W. T. Garratt, C. C. Burr, J. S. Carter, 
Ch arles Bel ding, D. W. Ea rl. July 10. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, 

84 0,647,942 . 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co., of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

XOBEBT DICKSON, Manager. 
W. ZANJS BOOKER, Agent and Attorney. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building. 
[October 11. J 

PHGNIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, Eng„ Estab'd 1782.--Cash Assets, $5,266,372.35. 

BRITISH AMERICA "ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd 1533.-- Cash Assets, $1,343,808.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd 1 851.— Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39. 

BITI.EK A HALDAX. 
General Agents for Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

[July 10.1 

THE MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, ENGLAND. 

[ESTABLISHED 1836.] 
Whole Amount of Joint Stock and Guaranteed Capital.. $5,000, 000. 

Whole Amount of Capital paid up 900,000. 

Cash Assets December 31, 1876 3,710,000. 

The undersigned have been duly authorized to issue Policies at current rates on 
Freight and Shipments to or from England, Europe, New York, Japan, China, Aus- 
tralian Colonies, Sandwich Islands, and Northern Coast Ports. If desired, policies 
made payable at port of termination. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., Agents, 

Aug. 10. 218 California street. 



July 30, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



MART 



MAGDALENE. 
Of *1I Um 

Who Uvod in i.Mi 
Ther. whom there doth belong 

A bolter debt of i 
Than bar whose penitence ud tears 

The wortl* of Jea is soothed. 
Who** Btaruvtnm , rough with fears, 

The hand of Jeeus smoothed. 

With prodooi ointment, rich and sweet, 

Bowed Low before her Lord, 
We MM ber bntbi^ and Ida the feet 

Of Him her soul adored ; 
And while we read her towel was 

The glory of her hair, 
We conjure op her image as 

A dear saint young and fair. 

We hear the Master's gentle voice 

The Pharisee repi 
Commending the poor sinner's choice 

And welcoming her love : 

•'Her sins, though many, are forgiven, 
For she hath loved me much." 
What soul by Buch a pardon shriven 
Tan mortal slander touch? 

Next, at her Saviour's feet again, 

She sits to hear his word, 
While busy Martha doth complain : 

"Thou, too, shouldst serve thy Lord." 
But, looking down through her Boft eyes, 

And seeing there her heart, 
The gentle Son of God replies : 

"She takes the better part." 

Aye, Mary, and that part of thine 

Opened thy brother's tomb ; 
Thy faith in him who was divioe 

Called Lazarus from the gloom. 
"One thing is needful " — that you chose 

A woman highly blest ! 
And he whose faith is strong well knows 

How far thy choice was best. 

Once more, O Mary, at the feet 

Of Jesus thou dost kneel. 
Alas ! not now, in accents sweet 

Thy sorrows He doth heal ; 
Stretched bleeding on the cruel cross 

He hangs in agony, 
But weep not, Mary, for thy loss, 

Thou soon thy Lord shalt see. 

What ! weeping at the Saviour's grave 

Because He is not there, 
Because His feet thou canst not lave 

And dry them with thy hair ! 
Nay, Mary, hear the Angel's voice, 

That speaketh from within ; 
Know he is risen, and rejoice 

For man redeemed from sin. 

Thy love, half human, half divine, 

Shall live in history ; 
Such strong, pure woman-faith as thine 

Shall an example be, 
Of how the soul by faith and love 

Forgiveness may obtain, 
And in the realms of light above 

A crown of glory gain. 
San Francisco, Jul)/ 1881. T. A. H. 

A TORN OVERCOAT. 
Tiras, the " dog of the German Empire," is a creature of dubious amia- 
bility of manners. Numerous are the occasions on which he has repaid 
kindness with ingratitude, and, in the matter of misunderstandings, the 
Iron Chancellor's canine companion has many sins marked down against 
his " dogged " conscience. One of his latest achievements in this respect 
is the following one: On the promenades in the garden the Imperial Chan- 
cellor is constantly accompanied by Tiras, who also drives with him to 
the gate of the park surrounding the Imperial Assembly building. This 
he did the other day when his master, still suffering from neuralgia, was 
obliged to use a cane, which latter, on entering the grounds, he stuck into 
the grass-border of a flower-bed, ordering the sagacious and well trained 
Tiras to keep watch of it while awaiting his return from a pretty long 
session. Vainly did one of the policemen, dressed in " cits," repeatedly 
endeavor to drive Tiras back to bis own garden close by — the dog showed 
fight with a strong determination to be let alone. Prince Bismarck made 
his appearance at last, and Tiras' joy at seeing him was great. Just at 
that moment the officious policeman made another attempt to dislodge 
the animal, which, this time feeling sure of his master's protection, 
pounced upon the unsuspecting guardian of the peace and tore his over- 
coat fairly in two. But for the intervention of the Chancellor, who be- 
labored Tiras with the faithfully watched cane, worse would have hap- 
pened. As it was, Tiras' fidelity cost his master fifty marks for a new 
overcoat to the damaged servant of the public weal. 



Many persons who die early in life might prolong their lives if they 
would only take salt water baths, and as thousands of Californians have 
adopted the practice at the seaside this year, we earnestly advise them to 
continue it in San Francisco. There is no finer place to take a plunge in 
the briny than the Neptune and Mermaid Baths, at the foot of Larkin 
street, where Professor Berg is constantly in attendance to give swimming 



A man is 



known by the company he keeps out of. 



INSURANCE. 



SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE & MARINE INS. CO., 

OF NEW ZEALAND. 
Capital $10. 000,000 

CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED. 

Capital $5,000,000- 

STANOARD MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF VERPOOL. 

Capital 85,000,000. 

w. jr. < \i i iMiii am «t co., 

General Agents, 

313 Sansome Street San Francisco. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.-UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California MoydH.— Established iu 1861. — No». 416 and 
413 California street. Cash Capital, 3750,000 in Gold Coin. Fair Kates ! 
Prompt Settlement of Loses!! Solid Security ! ! DI HECTORS. —J. Mora Moss, 
DIosea Heller, J. 0. Eldridge, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Daniel Meyer, Adam 
Grant, A. E. Sabatie. Charles Kohler, E. L. Goldstein, Bartlett Doe, I. Lawrence 
Pool, A. Weill, I. Steinhart. N. B. Stone, Wallace Everson, A. B. Phipps, Samuel 
Hort, H. C. Parker, N. G. Kittle, Joseph Brandenstcin, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas 
Luning-, James MoHltt, John Parrott, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Gustave Touchard, 
George C, Hiclcox, J. H. Freeman, John Conly, J. H. Baud, Wm. Schollc, Charles 
Baum, J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, Isaac L. Requa. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Charles D. Havbn, Secretary. Gbo. T. Bohbn, Surveyor. Nov. 6. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $7,500,000 

Cash Assets 1 ,709,976 

Cash. Assets in "United States 775 ,003 

BALFOUR, U I Til RIE A CO., General Agents, 
March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco, 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSUR. CO. OF BOSTON. 

Has transacted the business of Life Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollaus. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Onlt Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has comp'icd with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 22, j . 328 Montgomery street. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloisc, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may bo sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 225Sansome St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL 

(Capital «5,000 v 000.— Ag-ents: Balfour, Guthrie .V Co., No. 
' 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold. Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphureta. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe Bheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June 18. PRENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 

Richard Savage.] SAVAGE & SON, [Richard H. Savage. 

Empire Foundry and Machine Work*), 137 to 111 Fremont 
street, San Francisco, Stomp Batteries and Prospecting Mills, Saw Mills, 
Gang EEdgers, Set Works, Gearing and Shafting, Harvey*! Beaton, Oreen-houae Fix- 
tures, Plumbers' Stock, Dodge's Rock Breakers and Concentrators, Architectural 
Work and Machine Jobbing. Send for Circular. June 25. 

ROEBLING'S WIRE ROPE AGENCY. 

250.000 Feet on Hand, All Sizes 

For Salf. Lowest Kates. Wire Rope for Elevators. Wire 
Rope for Minos (round or Hit) Wite Rope Especially [or Cable Roads. Wire 

Suspension Bridges, built to order, all sizes. Sole Agents for Pacific I 

L REYNOLDS & CO., 
Otlice, Room 1, Nevada Block. Warehouse. No. 16 First street. July 9. 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 57, 59 and ttl Minna street, between First and Second, 
Ban Francisco. One Block from Palace Hotel. Also, Carriages and Caba at 
Pacific Club, N.E. corner Montgomery and Bush street*. Vehicles of Every Descrip- 
tion at Reduced Rates. Telephones in Stable. Feb. 10. 

SAMUEL D. HOVEY, 

Sealer in Local Seonrities, 
No. 436 Cnliforniu Street San Franelsco, Cal. 

eg^ Gas, Water, insurance, Railroad, Bank, Telephone, Powder Stocks, etc. 
Bought and Sold. July 9. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

Day and Boarding School for 1'onnsr Ladle* and Children, 
K1NDEKGAKTEN. Next Term will commence Jul 
Jan •>!> MADAME B. ZUTSKA. Principal- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 30, 1881. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND." 

*' We Obey no "Wa nd bnt Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

Editor News Letter:" As you know everything and something else, 
I trust you will be able to solve a conundrum that puzzles an opera-goer. 
A benefit has been tendered to Mignor Eugenio Bianchi by the Montaldo 
Opera Company, because, they say, he is a heavy loser by his late enter- 
prise. Now, it is a well-known fact that the average expense for each 
performance has been less than S600, making a total of about 87,800 for 
the thirteen performances. Deducting the price of the passage of the 
troupe from Guatemala to San Francisco, which has been reimbursed to 
the management by the artists, the expense is reduced to less than S7,000. 
As for the receipts, they stand, in round numbers, nearly as follows: Tro- 
vatore (the season tickets included), §2,300 ; Ballo in Maschera, 31,300 ; 
Trovatore (matinee), $440; Ballo in Maschera, $950; Crispino, S400; Cris- 
pino (matinee), £250 ; Norma, S2.600; Norma, S900 ; Faust, $1,000; Kuy 
Bias, $650; Ruy Bias, $450; Kuy Bias (matinee), $400; Forza del Destino, 
$300. Total receipts, $11,950. The conundrum that the public in gen- 
eral wish you to solve is this: Giving $11,950 receipts and $7,000 expenses, 
how it happens that the management of the Bianchi-Montaldo Opera 
Company is a loser ? One Who Knows. 

[ Give it up.— Ed. N. L.] 

Bush-Street Theater.— The Minstrels continue to draw large houses. 
Although the change of programme does not mean that you are to expect 
everything new or original, still, aside from the old jokes and olderfinale, 
there have been several good features this week. Billy Emerson's special- 
ties are always enjoyed, even if his " funny business" in " Grandfather's 
Pants " is stolen from Billy Sweatnam. " The Big Sunflower " carries us 
back to his first "hit" with the San Francisco audience at the old 
Maguire's Opera House on Washington street. In the burlesque of It 
Trovatore, Mr. Paul Vernon was introduced this week. He has a capital 
voice, and Bang his part, although with burlesque acting, better than the 
same parts have been rendered by many prima donnas in opera companies 
that have been here. Mr. Vernon's dresses would do credit to Worth. 
They are really superb. The great Zanfretta, in his " Burlesque Musicale,' 
was very funny, his amusing mimicry fairly doubling the audience over 
the backs of the seats in front of them. 

SigBor Bianchf s benefit was wellfattended. The pecuniary result, 
though not large, will materially reduce the loss which has been sustained 
by the impressano in the regular season. II Trovatore was received, as 
on the opening night of this company, with indiscriminate, unintelligent, 
idiotic applause and enthusiasm. The prima donna was in very good 
voice and sang charmingly. The tenor, as usual, was weak and ineffi- 
cient. The rest of the cast was unchanged, and the chorus and orchestra 
were as bad as ever. Taken all in all, the operatic season, of which this 
was the closing scene, was a most remarkable one. The whole thing was 
most decidedly Californian. Big houses one day, empty seats the next; 
torrents of applause for miserable performances, cold disdain for very fair 
work; the people frantic to see and hear Norma, a hackneyed opera, utj 
terly dull and uninteresting at the best, and they were indifferent to new 
and interesting productions. In short, everything was topsy-turvy and 
inexplicable— in a word, it was California. 

( * The Stranglera of Paris " will follow Adolphe Chalet at Baldwin's, 
and after this the great New York success, The World, will be produced, 
in which the low comedian Billy Elton will probably appear. ^— • Nothing 
definite can be learnt of the intentions of the California management, 
and at the conclusion of Sheridan's engagement next week the theater 
will probably be closed for awhile.-^— The Eastern papers are full of the 
Melville troupe, pnd every indication points to a most successful season. 
Californians cannot complain of any lack of appreciation East, as every one 
that goes there finds fame and a goodly share of this world's good things. 

Tivoli. — Miss Ethel Lynton gains a nightly encore for her beautiful 
rendition of "The Power of Love," in Satanella. She sings it charm- 
ingly, and this popular air is to-day whistled by all the children on the 
street. The stage effects are superb, and the transformation scenes more 
brilliant than anything we remember to have seen for years. The large 
and excellent chorus has been perfectly drilled, and the orchestra deserves 
the greatest credit — that is, next to Kreling Brothers, who have had the 
pluck to inaugurate such a splendid place of entertainment as the Tivoli. 

A host of friends has Mr. Charles Dungatr, for he is a gentleman, an 
artist, and, if it may be said of a man with respect, he is a very lovable 
one. After over twelve years of constant musical study, he is about to 
give up his position in a mercantile house and devote himself to the lyric 
stage ; but before he goes his friends propose to give him a testimonial 
concert, and when it is all arranged full particulars will appear in this 
paper. We propose to roll up our editorial sleeves and go to work and 
try and make it a bumper. 

The concert of the Orchestral Union, which took place ttfo late for* 
notice last week, was the best performance yet given by the Society. The 
gem of the evening was the unfinished symphony of Schubert, which was 
rendered with remarkable precision and breadth of expression. The vo- 
calist of the evening was Miss Ivy Wandesforde y whose voice, although 
not strong, is pleasant and correct. Mr. Toepke is to be congratulated in 
the prosperity of the Society and the great improvement in the perform- 
ance of the executive members. 

"Winter Garden. — We are glad to_ see Mr. Harry Gates on his legs 
again after his severe sickness. _ He is singing the tenor rule, in Boccaccio 
beautifully, making a decided hit. A new comic opera is in preparation 
at this house, translated from the German, and entitled Jonah in the 
Whale. The management is advertising for fifty young ladies for the 
ballet. Messrs. Stahl & Maack are making quite a success of the Winter 
Garden, aided by the judicious stage management of M. A. Kennedy. 



A very pleasant entertainment was given this week by the Only 
Ten Minstrel Club. Miss Victoria Raynaud has a charming voice, very 
clear and distinct, and makes a good appearance on the stage. In future 
we truBt to hear thiB young lady more frequently. The three musical in- 
struments played for an encore by the burlesque trio, Messrs. Grothman, 
Paullin and Orr, was the funnieBt hit of the whole evening, which was, 
throughout, a most agreeable one. 

Bafael Joseffy, the pianist, is coming here shortly, and he comes 
loaded with golden opinions of his merits. The Boston Herald says of 
him: " JosefTy's faultless technique, the marvelous staccato playing, the 
absolute conquering of the most startling difficulties, the perfect pianis- 
simo, the clearness of his phrasing and the exquisite delicacy of his touch, 
all combined to justify the wonderful enthusiasm of the audience." 

Woodward's GardenB.— Miss Lilian Smith, the ten-year-old phe- 
nomenal rifle-shot, appears here to-day and to-morrow. Her rifle-shooting 
is something marvelous, and she equals, if she does not excel, Dr. Carver 
in breaking glass- balls. The three Arnold Brothers also appear here, and 
in their ludicrous sketch entitled "P. T. Barnum'B Baby Elephant." 

Baldwin Theater. — A full house every evening has greeted the second 
week of La Belle Russe. The last performance will be given this evening 
and to-morrow night. Monday Adolphe Chalet will be produced, and 
Miss Ethel Arden, the soubrette, will make her appearance. 

Sunday evening, at the California Theater, Arrah Na Pogue will be 
presented, for the benefit of E. J. Salsbury, Ben Stern and J. R. Shat- 
tuck. Sheridan is the principal attraction as " Shaun the Post." 



WINTER GARDEN, 

Stockton street, between Sutter and Post streets.—Stahl & 
Maack, Proprietors; M. A. Kennedy, Acting MaDager. This (Saturday) 
Evening, July 30th, and every evening until further notice, the Great Success and 
Immense Hit, 

Boccaccio ! 
Appearance of MR. HARRY GATES, after a severe illness. Continued Success of 
MISS HATTIE MOORE. The Great Cast, Grand Chorus, etc. In preparation, an 
entirely new and original Comic Operetta, from the German, entitled JONAH IN 
THE WHALE. Waited— Fifty young and handsome ladies for the Ballet. Apply 
SATURDAY, between 12 aud 1 o'clock. Admission, 25 cents. July 30. 

THE TIVOLI GARDENS, 

Eddy street, between Market and Mason. -•Kreling Bros., 
Managers. Tremendous Success ! Balfe's Grand Spectacular Opera, 
Satan ella ! 

With its Elaborate Mechanical Effects! The Demon's Tower, the Living Picture, the 
Supper for Two, the Popular Pirate Chorus, the Slave Market, Mysterious Disap- 
pearance of Satanella, the Caves of Despair, the Demon Foiled, Grand Apotheosis. 

_ BUSH-STREET THEATER. 

Canaries E. Locke, Proprietor, --Tbis (Saturday) Afternoon, 
J GRAND MATINEE. 

Haverly's Famous Mastodons! 

To-night. Last but one of Emerson's Big Sunflower! The Ball! IH-True-Bad-Doer! 
Standing Room Only Every Performance! MonBter Good-bye Adieu Bill Next Week. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Tbird Week of the Eminent Tragedian, Mr. W. E. Sheridan. 
The Management having received numerous requetts for a reproduction of 
RICHELIEU, will present it for the last time at the Matinee this (Saturday) After- 
noon, at 2 o'clock. This (Saturday) Evening, RICHARD III. Sunday, July 31st, 
Grand Farewell Benefit tendered Messrs. Shattuck aud Stern. 



MR. SHERIDAN as 



Ari-;ih-na-Pogiie! 

' Shaun the Post." 



July 30. 



BALDWIN THEATER. 

Thomas Mag u ire. Manager. --This (Saturday) Evening, last 
night but one of the most powerful play of the day, 
La Belle Russe I 

By D. Belasco, author of "Hearts of Oak,'' with its Great Wallack Cast! LAST 
*' LA BELLE RUSSE" MATINEE this (Saturday) Afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Monday, 
August 1st, First Production of a new and original play, entitled ADOLPH CHALET. 

UNION TRUST COMPANY, 

NO. 421 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Banking Agency, Trust and Safe Deposit Business trans- 
acted at the following rates: 

Discount on business paper and interest on collateral loans, 6 per cent, per annum. 

Interest allowod on deposits, trust funds and unemployed capital, three per cent, 
per annum. 

Buying or selling National, State, City and County Bonds, local stocks, bullion 
and exchange, one-cigh'.b of one per cent. 

Collecting and remitting for Eastern notes, drafts and merchandise sent to our 
care, including New York exchange, one-eighth of one per cent. 

Negotiating bonds and loans for public or private corporations, firms and individ- 
uals, one-fourth of one per cent. 

Taking charge of property, and attending to the interests of absentees and non- 
residents, under powers of attorney or otherwise, one-half of oue per cent. 

Acting as agent, assignee, administrator, receiver and trustee, or as custodian of 
legacies, annuities and estates, one-half of one per cent. 

Transferring, registering and countersigning bonds and stocks, and holding pro- 
perty in trust for bondholders, stockholders, or in any fiduciary capacity, one-tenth 
of one per cent. 

Keeping on special deposit unindorsed securities, one-tenth of one per cent, per 
annum; negotiable securities, one-fifth of one per cent, pef annum,'' and Other val- 
uable property at reasonable rates. 

D, W. C, THOMPSON President. I W. C, WATSON .,. Vice-President. 

N. W. LEONARD Cashier. | A. W. PRESTON Secretary. 

ROBERT SIMSON Attorney, (July 30 . 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

Of Hamburg. 

Capital, $1,500,000. V. S. Gold Coin.-*Losses Paid in Gold 
Coin immediately after Adjustment. This Corporation holds contracts of six- 
teen other European Insurance Companies, re-insuring by far the greater part of 
every risk, as soon as accepted in our office. The combined subscribed Capital which 
our policies therefore offer to the public amounts to §2ri, 900,000, U. S. Gold Coin, of 
which $7,650,000 is paid up, besides the always available Reserve Funds. 



July 30. 



GEORGE MARCUS &CO., General Agents for Pacific Coast 

No. 304 California street. 



July 30, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTING ITEMS. 



Swimming ]*»t Sunday m :> -lull, cold day, hut the interest taken 
in the aquatic tournament at North Beach was so great that fully two 
ml persons assembled at the Neptune and Mermaid Hatha, where 
the affair came off. The wind was Mowing pretty stiffly from the west, 
and the bay was covered with white capped waves yet inside the booms 
recently placed in position by Mr. Bovea. the enterprising proprietor of 
the Kaths, the water was calm and smooth. The first event on the pro- 
gramme was a swimming race for boys under fifteen ; distance, 200 yards. 
The prize, a handsome silver medal, was won by J. Shengheider, who 
came in fully thirty feet ahead of Ben Lord, the second boy. The win- 
ner swam a telling breast stroke, and made good time for a youngster. 
The second race was a half-mile swim, free to all amateurs who had never 
won a prize, and was for a splendid gold medal. Officer Fields and F. 
Marriott cut out the pare at the start, and made it so hot that Fields 
dropped out with a stitch in his side soon after turning the stake boat. 
Marriott turned first, but was so pumped out that, on the return, he went 
back to J. Thompson and H. Fisher, who took places at the finish in the 
order named, with Marriott a good third. The water was rough and 
choppy, and, as they swam straight out to sea, both wind and tide were 
against the men going and returning. The third race was a half-mile, 
free to all amateurs, for a large gold medal, and, as was anticipated, 
proved to be well contested for only a short portion of the course. K. 
Melrose and J, Harris were the only starters. Harris took the water first, 
and at ten yards from the platform was fully half that distance ahead. 
He swam strongly on his eide, but soon went back to Melrose, who swam 
on his breast with the strength and regularity of a steamboat. At the 
turn Melrose was fully fifty yards ahead, and though he was never pushed 
in the race after the first two hundred yards, nevertheless won in the 
excellent time of 13:26. As the course was not accurately measured, the 
record, though good, does not stand. The second-class barge race for a 
handsome silver cup, presented by Professor Berg, was expected to be a 
well contested match, but the rough water made it an utter failure, the 
Dolphin crew turning back with a boat half full of water before they 
had pulled 400 yards, and the winning crew, which merely rowed over the 
course, being nearly swamped. The competing crews were composed as 
follows : Dolphin— T. Fraser (bow), M. Vail (2), E. Calvin (3), E. Peter- 
son (stroke), C. Twigg (cox.) Golden Gate mixed crew — E. Kehrlein 
(bow), E. Borremans (2), Joseph Vice (3), J. Ologa (stroke), C. Griffin 
(cox.) The spectators anticipated a good deal of fun from the aquatic 
tilting match between F. Wadmuller and Steve Grandoner, but the 
roughness of the water made it impossible for them to stand up in the 
boats, and but little amusement was to be derived from the spectacle of 
two men sitting down in boats and poking at each other with long poles. 
Grandoner fell out of his boat before the match commenced, and his boat 
being swamped the crew were forced to swim ashore. The moBt interest- 
ing feature of the fancy part of the programme was an imitation of Paul 
Boynton, given without an inflated suit by Dr. F. Riehl. The Doctor 
floated on his back and paddled along, with his feet strapped together, 
without any artificial support, so quickly that a good swimmer could 
hardly keep up with him. With the straps on his feet he also 
turned a back somersault from the platform. Professor Berg, the 
swimming teacher at the baths, managed the tournament with con- 
siderable ability, and his efforts to make it a success were ably seconded 
by the following gentlemen, who comprised the Committee of Arrange- 
ments: M. Price, Dr. F. Riehl, Dr. F. Knowlton, Charles Scott, K. Mel- 
rose, L. Osborn, M. J. Flavin, F. Searight, V. Kehrlein. 

Shooting.— The Gilroy Rod and Gun Club completed its organization 
last week. The first annual trial will come off Monday, November 7th, 
open to all pointers and setters the bona fide property of residents of Cali- 
fornia. The following stakes will be run and adjudged on the " point " 
systems All Aged Stakes — Entrance, $5. First prize, silver cup; second, 
gold medal; third, silver medal. Puppy Stakes — For dogs whelped since 
January 1, 1880: Entrance fee, $5. First prize, silver cup; second, gold 
medal; third, silver medal. All entrances must be accompanied with the 
entrance fee and a full description of the dog entered, with name of sire 
and dam, if known, with age, color and markings. Application for entry 
to be made to H. E. Leavesley, Gilroy, who will furnish on application a 
copy of the rules governing the trials. We cannot recommend these trials 
too warmly to the notice of the sportsmen of this State. In addition to 
the pleasant gatherings they cause and the amount of sport furnished by 
them, the quantity of knowledge about dog breaking and hunting that 
tyros can learn from them is incalculable. Though the honor and credit 
of organizing them in California is due to the Gilroy Club, and we hope 
that their initial trial will be well supported, it is also to be hoped that 
every sportsman's club in the State will follow suit, and, if possible, out- 
shine the Gilroy Club. These treats will cause an unprecedented 
amount of interest to be taken in legitimate field Bports, and many 
persons who now believe that dogs are only used iu hunting to 
retrieve dead game will be both surprised and delighted to find that the 
dogs display fully as much intelligence and do as much work as the hunt- 
ers.— The Grass Valley Sportsman's Club last week joined the State 
Sportsman's Association. —Deer are so plentiful around some country 
resorts that a favorite amusement for the guests at the hotel is to shoot 
them from the balcony. That is, of course, the inralid guests. The 
healthy guests scorn to kill any game smaller than bears, or less fierce 
than a California lion.— Doves are still plentiful in all the coast coun- 
ties, and as far north as Sacramento. Bags of 200 are almost too common 
to be a subject for comment.— —The California Wing Shooting Club will 
hold their regular monthly match at San Bruno to-morrow.— ^Company 
C, First Regiment, won the Siebe trophy for the third time, at Shell 
Mound last Sunday, which entitles them to keep possession of it 
permanently. 

Athletic. —Haley and Beloher go East early in August. Both feel 
well and confident of a fair share of success. Peter Mclntyre goes with 
them to see if there is any unprospected professional mine in the Eastern 
States.— —A foot-racer named Baker ran 150 yards at Santa Cruz, last 
Sunday, against a quarter-horse, which had to go twice that distance, for 
$50 a side. It was two to one on Baker, and he won by 15 yards in 17J, 
making the first 100 yards in 10A. 

Baseball.— The Oakland and California Clubs played at Oakland last 
Sunday, the former winning by 10 to 5.^— 'There will be a game at Oak- 
land to-morrow afternoon. 



Rowing. — A new comet recently flashed across the rowing firmament 
of San Francisco. It is named Decourcy Duff, and is a journalist. It 
Is now in Virginia, training for a match with Flynn. If Flynn remains 
obdurate, and still refuses to row for money on the comet's return, it will 
go a few degrees Must, and try a match with Hanluti or Courtney. «■« 
The South End Boat Club has been revived, with twenty-four good active 
members. The Club has purchased the house and boats of the defunct 
California Theater Club, and will proceed without loss of time to give an 
exhibition of its ability. It has already entered a barge crew for the re- 
gatta to be held September 9th— Admission Day.— —In the forthcoming 
race between the Vienna crew and the Cornell representatives, the boat 
is to h« used in which the London Rowing Club won at the recent Henley 
Regatta. There is a chance for a protest here. If that boat wins at 
Vienna, England will claim it as an English victory. — Clipper.— Louis 
White and Dennis Griffin ignore their $1,000 match, and Rtill claim to be 
amateurs. Adam and Eve were the originators of this idea of claiming 
to be perfect after a fall from grace, and the two gentlemen named are 
not the first who have successfully copied our common parents.— -Wal- 
lace Ross has posted §200 on his challenge to row Hanlan for SI, 000 a 
side ; time and place at Hanlan's choice. 

Fishing. — Fresh-water fishing is about played out. Perch, tomcod, 
porgies anil sea trout bite freely outside Fort Point, and large catches 
have been made for some time past. 

A Warning to Drinlsers. —Now that the South Pacific Coast Railroad 
has, by increased facilities, added immensely to its Alameda and Oakland 
travel, the public will be pleased to learn that Frank J. Connelly still 
runs the bars on the steamers Bay City, Newark and Garden City. When 
it is understood that Mr. Connelly sells Hotaling's " J. H. Cutter Whisky" 
and J. W. Shaffer's " Bon Ton " and other fine brands of cigars, there is 
no longer an excuse for any gentleman corroding his stomach by drinking 
in a City Front saloon before the boat starts. 



REMOVAL NOTICES. 



THE OFFICE OF THE 
CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY 

HAS BEEN REMOVED TO 

No. 325 market Street Corner of Fremont. 



THE OFFICE OF THE 
HAWAIIAN COMMERCIAL COMPANY 

HAS BEEN REMOVED TO 

No. 325 Market Street Corner of Fremont. 



THE OFFICE OF 

JOHN D. SPRECKELS & BROTHERS, 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

HAS BEEN REMOVED TO 

No. 325 Market Street Corner or Fremont. 

[July 23.) 

M ARBLE WOR KS. 

MANTELS AND ORATES, 
MONUMENTS AND HE A D- STO NE 8 , 

In Marble and Scotch Granite, 
827 Market Street Between Fourth nmlFirtli. 

itST Designs Sent on Application. lgj 

Juno u. w. h. Mccormick. 



DANCING ACADEMY, 

IN RED MEN'S BUILDING, 
No. 320 Post Street Opposite. Union Square. 

PROF. 0. A. LUNT respectfully announces that his new Academy. No. 320 Po3 
street, is now open for Juvenile aud Evening Classes. Office Hours, (or Terms, etc., 
10 a.m. to 12 it., and 1 to 5 P.M. March 12. 

PROF. D. SPERANZA, 

Italian Musical Institute, of San Francisco. 30 Post street. 
Sing Lessons, in Classes, every day from 4 to 6 p.m. (or Ladies, and from 8 to 9 
every evening for Gentlemen. July 16. 

QUEEN TRANSPARENT OIL CAN. 

The body Is made or thick glass, surrounded by a 
corruguted tin casing. Being glass it cannot leak, and the tin cas- 
ing prevents it from being broken. It measures the oil and prevents the 
seller from cheating in quanti y, or qualitv, of oil sizes— 1, 2, 4, 8 quarts. 
WIESTEK & CO.. 17 New Montgomery street. 
May 14. General Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants- 
Hairaiian Line of Packets. 

325 Market Street San Francisco. 

May 23. ___ 

CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of the Standard S3 nip. a superior article 
put up in barrels expressly for home consumption. Also, Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Refined Sugars at lowest market rates. Office, 
street, up stairs. 

LANGLEY & MICHAELS, 

Wholesale Drngrsrlsts, Importers of Pore French, English 
and German Drugs. Fine Essential Oils, Chemicals. Perfumer}-, etc.. etc., 
No 's 101, 103 and 105 FRONT STREET, corner oi Pine, S. F. July 30. 



325 Market 
Dec. 21. 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 30, 3881. 



OUR LONDON LETTER. 

London, July 9, 1881. 

Dear News Letter:— No wonder that people who are "in the swim," 
as Ouida is so fond of remarking in her recent novels (an expression, I 
believe, coined by Lord Charles Beresford), should sigh for the days of 
mid- August, when the JSton and Harrow Cricket Match shall set them 
free to yacht in Southampton water, shoot among the Scotch heather, or 
recuperate at Homburg and Trouville. Truly, who wants to see life as 
refined life is, should pass the season in London. 

But it should be added that he ought to have a coronet either in pra- 
serdi or futuro, with which to decorate his carriage panels and his ser- 
vants 1 livery buttons, and an unlimited supply of coin. * Without these, 
the aloe will blossom for him much too frequently to permit the lingering 
for long of a saccharine flavor on his palate. But with them! "Well, he 
will like it all for about five seasons running; then he will tour it to the 
plains of the far West for buffalo and the Pacific Coast to see Yosemite, 
and then go back home, marry, settle down, and enjoy hunting and his 
Port after dinner for the rest of his days, and be content therewith. 

The mania for joint stock companies still continues. Not a single 
day passes but what at least four or five new concerns are launched, 
while flaming prospectuses, promising all the way from 8 to 25 per 
cent, per annum debentures (as they call dividends over here) on 
the amount invested, are sent broadcast throughout the country, with 
blank forms for applications for shares. Those confiding ones who may 
chance to swallow the alluring bait will, doubtless, wait some time to hear 
more of these money traps once they apply for an allotment. Wildcat is 
no name for them. The Stock Exchange men like them for the " com- 
mish" they bring from both sides. The bubble will be pricked before 
long, no doubt. The only wonder is that it has kept inflated as lotfg as 
it has. A few years ago the idea of offering the average Englishman 
more than 3 or 4 (at most) per cent, for his money would have been re- 
garded as the suggestion of a man afflicted with the delirium tremens. 
Gladstone's threatened reduction of the 3 per cent, consols to 2£ may have 
something to do with it all. 

The satirists of the day are loud in their deprecation of the shortened 
petticoats and lengthened stockings of the little maidens who, sometimes 
even up to the age of fourteen, are seen fluttering about the Park like so 
many sylphides, displaying almost indelicate bareness of limb. The 
ridiculously short skirts of last season, with their insinuatingly long un- 
dergarments, have gone quite out of fashion, but what have we now ? 

The last chic is for ladies to have the clocks on their stockings extend 
to the knee. What the direct object of this can be is a matter of specu- 
lation, for the only period at which these hoseal decorations are supposed 
to be exhibited to the rude eyes of man is when they are exposed for sale 
in the shop-windows. However, during the exertions of lawn tennis and 
the last waltzes at balls, where the exhilarating influence of the cham- 
pagne-cup has given its verve to the swing, there is a momentary chance 
for the inspection of these novelties of a more interesting character, and 
they are, to judge by the anxious rings of waiting and expectant observ- 
ers, opportunities not Blowly taken advantage of by the ''male persua- 
sion." The expansion of the hoops, which are fast coming in, assists 
materially in this direction. Garters, 'tis said, are going out of fashion, 
stockings being arranged to button onto the edges of the garment in 
closest proximity thereto, which are worn quite short in consequence. 
These constant changes in the fashions of things presumably always un- 
der cover, demonstrates pretty clearly how violent the presumption of 
obscurity is. 

The phenomenal success of Henry Irving's management of the Lyceum 
Theater is strikingly illustrated by a fact which has just been made pub- 
lic. The period for which Irving took the theater, or lease, is drawing to 
a close, and the question of renewing the lease was raised. Irving pro- 
poses to settle the matter by buying the freehold. The sum named is 
£123,000 (over §600,000), and this he will pay out of the net earnings of 
his management during the few years that have elapsed since he became 
lessee and manager. Edwin Booth has just sailed for home, taking with 
him £l,G00 as his share of the profits of Othello. Up to the time he ac- 
cepted Irving's invitation to join forces, he was a heavy loser by his visit 
to Loudon. 

Professional beauties are no longer voted good form. Ladies who have 
no greater pretensions than their good looks and the number' of their 
photographs put up for sale in shop windows, are to be henceforth denied 
admission to the society to which they would not otherwise ever have had 
access. It is time, think many. The peerage has beauty enough to show 
when there is a muster roll of the young Countesses and Viscountesses. 
Lady Garragb, Lady Castlereagh, Lady Kintore, Lady Cadogan and oth- 
ers, which space forbids mentioning, are all beauties, and never looked to 
greater advantage than at the Albert Hall " Fayre," in their picturesque 
costumes. 

The most important musical and dramatic event of the week has been 
the production of Rubenstein's opera, II Demonic, at Covent Garden. 
The subject of the work is a ghostly legend, much after the fashion of 
Faust and Mefiatofde. The critics, who are usually very forward in pro- 
nouncing an opinion on any new work, have almost unanimously resolved 
to suspend their judgment and leave the public to decide on its merits. 
The opera cei'tainly had a reception of a most enthusiastic character, com- 
poser and singers being frequently called before the curtain. 

Genevieve Ward is about to depart to the baths of Wilsbad in the 
Black Forest, and there to rest until the Autumn, when she begins an- 
other tour in America, opening at the Union Square Theater in Septem- 
ber, after which she will visit all the principal cities of the Union. That 
includes San Francisco, of course. 



The mosquito is a much-abused insect — mo3t everybody has a slap at 
him. 



BANKS. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM. ALTORD President. 

THOMAS BBOWN, Cashier | B. MiBfiAY, Jr., Ass'tCashier 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bauk ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, the Oriental Bank Cor- 
poration. 

The Bank hag Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Duhlin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Am sterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated toy Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, 81,800,- 
000, with power to increase to §10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office— 2S Comhill, London. Branches — Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada — Bank of Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland —British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand — Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSEND, Manager. 

[Organized 1S63.} 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Fire and Marine Insurance. 
Assets $1,220,000. 

4®* The Largest Assets and Largest Income of all the Companies bailing from 
West of New York State. 

D. J. STAPLES President. I WM. J. DXJTTON Secretary. 

ALPHEUS BULL Vice-President. | E. W. CARPENTER.. ..Ass't Secretary. 

SOME OFFICE: 

Southwest Corner California and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 
[July 23.] 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Paid up Capital $1,500,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— It. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, George A. Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Wormser, James Phelan, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents — London : Baring Bros. & Co. Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin 
Lane, Lombard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. NewYork: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii-a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

(Incorporated 13SO.J 

C lanital, $2, 100, OOO. --San Francisco Oflice, 424 California 
j street ; London Oflice, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; 
Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, Bank of Englandand London 
Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co.; Boston, Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Busi- 
ness in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and all parts of the 
world. [October 1st, 1880.1 Oct. 9. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid TJp $3,000,000. 

Reserve, TT. S. Bonds 4,000,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 
Agency at Virginia, Ifev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Bauk has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. Nov. 8. 

THE ANQLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

422 California St., San Francisco. 

London Oflice, 3 Ang-el Court ; New YorJk Agents, J. W. Sel- 
igtnan & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, §0,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEINHART, Managers. 
P. N. Lilibnthal, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 9300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President, Jerome Uncoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real EBtate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar and Leihbank, No 526 Calif oruiastreet, San 
Francisco. Officers: President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors.— Fred. 
Rocding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon, 
Peter Spreckels, Ign. Steinhart. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 

dfcft (i a week in your own town. Terms and $5 outfit free. 

«JPUU Address H. Hallett Jfc Co., Portland, Maine. 



July 30, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



LONE MOUNTAIN. 
Iwell in marhle houses The morning cornea sod the evening, 

IweUera on the bill, The stars l">.>k from shove, 

i sound of joy or gladness Hut no maiilen nt her casement 
their cold bosoms thrill. Uivauieth her dreams of lovo. 

Bright Bowen bloom at the entrance The children whose feet crew weary, 
And fragrance fill* the air, And the ajjed, tired ana ; 

Bat in* face I>»<k-» from the window Father, mother and children 
On the gardens planted there. Arc dwelling in calm content. 

The sun may shine in glory, Rich and proud with the humble — 

Or earth in Btulnvss weep, All -all must here abide, 

But no hand draweth a curtain And in this marble city 

■ike from their silent sleep. Lie silent side by Bide. 
Houses of marble and granite. No praise or sound of discord 
Beautiful works of art, Disturbs one quiet breast, 

But no thrill of proud possession But the birds Bins: in the branches, 
Stireth the pulseless heart. And all is rest, sweet rest. 

Friends and visitors many We uiourn for the sound of voices. 

At the open gate pass through, And listen for footsteps fled, 
But no one bids them welcome, But none return who enter 
None says to them Adieu. The city of the dead. 

But their marble doors shall open, 
For our father holds the key, 
The sun of their morning riseth 
On the shores of the crystal sea. 
San Francisco, July 29th, 1881. H. P. B. 

OUR KALEIDOSCOPE. 
The Spectrophone. -When Mr. Graham Bell announced the discov- 
ery of the photophone, last August, he ventured to predict that probably 
all matter would be fonnd to possess sonorous properties of the same 
nature as those manifested by the discs used in that instrument. More 
recent investigations in Europe with gases and liquids have fully verified 
this prediction. Any liquid or gas placed in a test tube and exposed to 
the action of a beam of light condensed upon it by a lens can be made, 
by means of an interrupter, to emit musical tones. This has been shown 
by Professor Tyndall in his paper, read to the Royal Society, on radiant 
heat. Some substances thus emit feeble sounds, others stronger ones. 
Iodine vapor, nitrogen oxide, and bromine give very loud sounds. It is 
found that those substances which emit loud sounds are those which ab- 
sorb heat in a high degree, and among these lamp-black is especially re- 
markable. It has been questioned whether such sounds are provoked by 
the luminous rays or by the dark ones. The principal value of the spec- 
trophone, Mr. Bell believes, will be found in the investigation of absorp- 
tion bands in the ultra-red end of the spectrum. 

Surgery and Electricity. —Trouve's utilization of electricity in com- 
bination with surgical instruments is bearing fruit. A case is recorded 
from Vienna in which a doctor has succeeded in curing a cancer in the 
stomach, mainly by the assistance rendered by the polyscope. The elec- 
tric probe, which rings a bell when a ball or any metalic substance im- 
bedded in the muscles is reached, is highly prized by army surgeons, and 
an application of the same principle to surgical forceps has enabled a Ber- 
lin occulist to save the eye of a workman which was damaged by the in- 
trusion of a spark of steel. This case had become so urgent that it was 
necessary to extract the piece of metal without delay or to excise the eye; 
but Doctor Hirschberg, by inserting a soft iron probe and subsequently 
converting it into an electro-magnet, withdrew the particle of metal and 
saved the eye. 

Capt. and Brevet Major A. S. Burt, 9th United States infantry, re- 
cruiting officer at Chicago, on hearing of the shooting of President Gar- 
field, telegraphed to General Swaim at Washington as follows : " Recall 
Capt. Drury's wound through liver, received at Gordon's Mills, before 
Chickamauga. He took the chances and is here in good health." Major 
Burt explains that Capt. Drury originated the phrase " I will take that 
chance," and as Gen. Garheld was familiar with the circumstances in that 
case it is supposed that his remark to Dr. Bliss was in recollection of Cap- 
tain Drury s wound, it being a singular fact that the latter's wound was 
almost a counterpart of the President's, the ball penetrating and destroy- 
ing part of the liver, in spite of which the Captain is now living, hale 
and hearty. — Army and Navy Journal. 

The Faure Cell. — At a discussion which followed a lecture of Mr. 
Siemens' at the Loudon Society of Arts, Mr. Preece said that he had re- 
cently examined the Faure Cell, and that there was nothing in it. He 
found that it possessed considerable motive power and very feeble resist- 
ance, consequently it furnished an intense current for a very short time. 
This method of storing electricity would, therefore, be useless for lighting 
or ordinary industrial operations, for which permanence is necessary. He 
said it was a very pretty apparatus, giving a powerful current for a few 
minutes, but was not likely to be practicable at present. 

A Devout Parrot— Mr. M. D. Conway is the authority for the fol- 
lowing anecdote connected with the late Lady Stanley! Once Lady Au- 
gusta Stanley's parrot escaped, and the dean and a number of the clergy 
including the archbishop, who were with him at the time, went out into 
the garden to find the bird. The search was in vain for a time, but pres- 
ently a voice came from the trees above, saying, "Let us pray! " It was 
a familiar voice, and Lady Stanley laughed, then the dean laughed, and 
finally the whole ecclesiastical group roared, as the parrot cry came again, 
with unction, " Let us pray I 

" Why is It," asks Dr. le Comte, who is physician to a regiment of 
dragoons, " that such quantities of soldiers die upon the battle-field ?" 
And then he replies, confidently, *' Simply because of the difficulty which 
arises in regard to arresting hemorrhages/' The compression of an artery 
being the best mode of stopping profuse bleeding, Dr. le Comte proposes 
to teach each soldier first where these vessels are situated, so that he may 
assist himself while waiting for a surgeon. Therefore he tattoos an image 
of some kind upon every portion of the soldier's body where there is an 
artery. 

Killed by a Cricket Ball.— As the scholars at Huttoti Grammar 
School, near Preston. Lancashire, were playing at cricket, a lad, twelve 
years of age, was struck over the heart by the ball and died almost in- 
stantaneously. 



M. A. QUNST & CO., 

203 KEAKNT STREET SAN FRANCISCO, 

IMPORTERS AKIt in I T. l.lts IN 
HAVANA AND KEY WEST CIGARS, 

ALSO 

Agrents for Kimball, Gaulliener & Co. 'a Guatemala Cigars. 

%^H Inform the Public Unit tln'if receive large invoices of Choice 
Havana Brands twice a month, 

[February 19.] 

ST. IGNATIUS COLLEGE, 

Corner Hayes Street and Van Ness Avenue. 

Literary and Scientific Department, 
RE-OPENS MONDAY, AUGUST 1, 1881. 

(July 2.) 

ST. MARY'S HALL, 

BENICI A, CALIF ORNIA. 

13W This Collegiate (Protestant) SCHOOL FOR YOUNQ LADIES will re-open 
August 4th. For Catalogues, address 
July 18. REV. L. DELOS MANSFIELD, A.M., Rector. 

H. 3. Williams. A. Ohesebrough. W.H.Dimond. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 
UNION BUILDING, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STS. 

AGENTS FOR 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation 

Company, The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, 

"The California Line of Clippers" from New York 

and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line." 

San Francisco, January 31, 1880. [Jan. 31. 

C. ADOLPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 
8 AN FRANCISCO and NEW YORK. 

EST* Agents of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery streets, 
San Francisco, California. Jan. 17. 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE GROCERS, 
108 and 110 California St., S. F. 

[April 19.] 

H. L, Dodge. L. H. Sweeney. J. E, Buggies. 

DODQE, SWEENEY & CO., 

Importers, Wholesale Provision Dealers and Commission 
Merchants, 

Nos. 114 and 116 Market, and 11 and 13 California Sts. 

[August 7.1 

L.H.Newton. NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., M. Newton. 

Importers nud wholesale dealers In Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, 204 and 206 California street. San Francisco, Cal May 26. 

CASTLE BROS. & LOUPE, 

ESTABLISHED IN THE YEAR 1860. 

Importers or Teas and East India Ooods, Nos. 213 and 215 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 

~A. F. KNORP^ 

Manufactures to Ordvr 

OFFICE AND LIBRARY FURNITURE. 

Stores and Offices Fitted TJp and Finished in Any Style from 

Original Designs ■ 

Brackets, Mouldings and Mouse Finish. 

411 MISSION STREET, 

April 23. (Mechanics' Mills) up stairs. 

MOUNT TAMALPAIS CEMETERY. 

A Rnral Burial Place for San Francisco. 

Office: Masonic Temple. J. O. ELDRIDGE, President. 

A \\\ Du Bois, Secretary. Awr. 18. 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No. 310 Sansome Street, 

Sah Fraxcisco, 

WHOLE SALS I>E ALJE RS IN FURS. 

[September 21.1 

PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS. 

This well-known and popular summer resort open for the 
reception of quests. Stages couuect at Los Gatos with morning- and evening 
trains. For terms, address LEWIS A. SAGE, Proprietor, 

April 30. Saratoga, CaJ. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 30, 1881. 



■WARS OP ASSASSINATION. 
It is not an easy matter to write temperately of the villainous 
attempt to destroy life and property in England by the means of infernal 
machines shipped from the United States to Liverpool. That this has 
been done is beyond any question or doubt; and that it was done by a 
criminal baud of men, who seek to terrorize the British Government, is 
likewise past a peradventure. Who are these men ? What are their pur- 
poses ? The detective agencies of the American and British Governments 
should solve the first question, the second we believe incapable of solu- 
tion. If the infernal machines had exploded on board the steamers by 
which they were Bbipped, this would have been the last of the vessels and 
of all on board; but how was this wanton slaughter to influence the Brit- 
ish Government ? If the explosion had taken place in the Liverpool dock 
a great destruction of life and property might have been recorded, but 
Queen Victoria would not have had a hair of her royal head injured, 
much less the stability of her throne shaken. Infernal machines are use- 
less as weapons of revolution. What good purpose has been effected by 
the bombs which killed the Emperor Alexander ? Has the condition of 
Russia improved, either politically, socially or morally, by reason of that 
great crime ? By no means. The converse is the case. Yet Russia is 
under a personal Government; and in Russia, if anywhere, dynamite re- 
form should be successful. It can have no possible effect in England, 
where the Government is practically distinct from the personality of the 
sovereign. It may make widows and orphans of innocent people, and 
send to untimely graves scores of men whose lives are useful to society. 
To ship such engines of destruction is criminal in an eminent degree; to 
plan their use is diabolic, but to cast them adrift, trusting to chance to 
develop their destructive force, is an act of supreme cowardice. To this 
low pass have the champions of Irish nationality descended. Criminal, 
diabolic, cowardly — this vile and villainous trinity embodies the plan of 
warfare which the lawless element of Ireland, in the United States, has 
adopted in a puny effort to intimidate England. It is time for all Irish- 
men of honor and manhood to wash their hands of this murderers* busi- 
ness. It is plain that Ireland will not strike for freedom, and the cause 
that can only be advanced by the exportation of infernal machines, to 
blow up Irish dock-laborers in Liverpool, is not worth sustaining. 

"EVERYTHING IS TIP -TOP." 

That was the last dispatch on Thursday about President Garfield, 
and it carries a great mountain of consolation to the nation. We do not 
pretend for a moment that we have any more special interest in Mr. 
Garfield than we should have had in Hancock, Blaine, English, Arthur, 
or any other American gentleman who might have been called to be 
President of these United States. It is the appalling nature of the crime 
that horrifies us. This infernal fiend, Guiteau, would just as readily 
have shot down any other President. His animosity was not personal, 
but general. He wanted a position, and he did not get it ; so he bought 
his little gun and used it. No sane man can make anything out of Gui- 
teau's crime except a diabolical impulse — a devilish desire to shoot the 
President because his ambition was not satisfied. It is a grave question 
for Congress to look into (and we approach it with seriousness and rever- 
ence), as to whether attempted assassination of any citizen Bhould not be 
punishable with death. How this can be made a law is left to those who 
make laws, but there is really no just enactment that could be framed 
which would set a higher price on the life of the President than on that 
of the humblest American on the water-front of San Francisco. It is 
difficult nowadays to hang any man that has killed his fellow ; therefore, 
it is infinitely harder to punish a man who has unsuccessfully tried to 
shoot his fellow-man. A contemporary observed recently (the Washing- 
ton Republic) that when the Queen of England was shot at, the would-be 
regicide was found insane by the jury and committed to Bedlam for life. 
But this, as we view it, is not adequate punishment for Guiteau. This 
is a free country; there is no oppression, no outrage on law and order and 
decency except that which is effected by politicians all the world over. 
The attempted assassination, then, of the President of the United States 
is a crime which stands out with exceptional prominence. If the heart 
of the nation did not hang so tenderly on the life of the President, it 
might almost permit of his death in order to revenge itself on the assassin. 
But God, in his goodness, has so far given the people of America every 
promise of the President's recovery, and the prayer, Parce ei Domine, has 
gone up from millions of lips. It is, however, now in order for some of 
the best legal minds to put their heads together and see ^shat can be done 
to Guiteau. 

TOO MUCH OP A POLITICIAN FOR THE ERMINE. 

The spectacle of one of the Judges of the Superior Court of this city 
and county taking an active part in a County Convention is simply a 
shame and a disgrace. A pot-house politician has no business on the judi- 
cial bench ; but, being there, he should try to raise himself to its dignity. 
That he cannot rise so high we are well persuaded, but we think he ought 
to be able to rise above the level of Chris Buckley and Con Mooney. 
While Judge Ferral's appearance in the convention alluded to, or in any 
other political convention, is altogether out of place, the position which 
he has assumed is still more objectionable. At the present moment he is 
the champion of the Desmond faction of the W. P. C., and in his cham- 
pionship went so far as to inferentially intimate that the great Democratic 
party was only a side show to the W. P. C, and that while the strength 
of the latter was 18,000 that of the former was 4,000. If the brilliant 
jurist understands his own words, and believes in their truth, he should 
surely be able to see that they form the strongest possible reason for him 
to get up and move that the convention adjourn sine die. A party which 
can only control 4,000 votes is simply a piece club, which can effect 
nothing ; and the bare idea of a Superior Judge getting off the bench to 
scratch and fight in what be admits to be a piece club convention, is dis- 
gusting. 



THE REV. MR. HEMPHILL'S RESIGNATION. 
The Rev. John Hemphill, pastor of the Calvary Presbyterian Church 
of this city, has, as most of the News Letter's readers are doubtless aware, 
tendered his resignation. While the great majority of Mr. Hemphill's 
flock are opposed to his leaving them, there is, unfortunately, a small 
clique who entertain personal enmity toward him. At a meeting of the 
congregation, held a few night's since, and for the purpose of discussing 
the resignation, one of these pious humbugs stated his objection to Mr. 
Hemphill to be the fact that he (Mr. Hemphill) indulged in the use of 
tobacco. The p. h. alluded to did not explain how the use of an inno- 
cent pipe was calculated to impair a minister's usefulness, nor did he 
claim that there was anything in the "Westminster Confession of Faith " 
forbidding the use of the " weed." This p. h.'s objection to the uae of to- 
bacco is one of the most beautiful instances of moral and mental idiocy it 
has been our good fortune to meet with, and it is with great pleasure that 
we announce that, at the meeting mentioned, the congregation refused to 
accept the resignation by an almost unanimous vote. The trouble which 
Mr. Hemphill has had with this insignificant, noisy faction of his congre- 
gation, reminds the writer of an incident which occurred in Australia 
some years ago. It runs as follows: The Reverend Joseph Clarke was 
invited from England to take charge of a Baptist coLgregation in Mel- 
bourne. The Reverend Joseph was an accomplished pulpit orator, but 
he did not carry such a large cargo of religious cant as some of his flock 
wished him to. In a year or two there grew up in his church a noisy, 
troublesome little clique who were opposed to him, and then he resigned 
in disgust. In laying his resignation before the leading lights of the 
church, he said that some of his flock objected to him because he did not 
wear a long enough face, others because he did not " visit " regularly 
enough, and others for equally trivial reasons ; then he added, with an 
exquisite touch of sarcasm, "Gentlemen, the salary of this pastorate iB 
only £750 a year ; now, you cannot expect all the virtues for £750 a year. 
It can't be done for the money." 

THE AGONY BUREAU AT WASHINGTON. 

" The heart of the nation " should not be wrung unnecessarily by 
prolonging the Presidential agony. Every one sympathizes with Presi- 
dent Garfield and his noble wife, but there is a possibility .of over-doing 
even a good thing. The point has been reached when it is just as likely 
as not that a reaction may set in, and, if it does, it will make short work 
of the agony bureau of Mr. Secretary Blaine. The fact is as clear as 
noon-day that the politicians have been manipulating the official bulletins 
for their own selfish purposes. It is further self-evident that they did not 
believe the President was dangerously hurt, and that they worried him 
into a fever by their selfish intrusion, incessant scheming and endless gab- 
ble. And then, when they began to realize the consequence of their un- 
worthy acts, they set to work to fabricate explanations for the President's 
set-back, not one of which is genuine. The result has been seen in a 
series of alarming telegrams, which gave a much greater shock to the 
country than that produced by the report of Guiteaifs pistol. It was 
wicked in an eminent degree to do so. There was no excuse whatever for 
it. But the effect has been to dry up, to a very great extent, the fountain 
of popular sympathy, and to lead men to the conclusion that the Presi- 
dent's wound is being used to lay a foundation for the Presidential cam- 
paign of 1884. When Americans come to think in this way, blighted 
hopes are a certainty. The stalwarts have been killed by the President's 
wound. It would be a misfortune if it also killed his own popularity. 

HUMAN LIFE IS HELD TOO CHEAP. 

The verdict of the Coroner's jury which charged ex -police-officer 
Dunn with the crime of manslaughter, in connection with the recent 
shooting of the unfortunate man McKenna, is, while perfectly correct 
from a strictly legal stand-point, a glaring absurdity. Under the law, 
in order to constitute murder in the first degree, the slayer must have 
premeditated the deed. A man who draws a deadly weapon on another 
is either a cowardly bully, or else be intends in his heart to do murder. 
He has no right, except in self-defense, to draw a deadly weapon, and 
when be does so society is entitled to put the worst construction on his 
act, and to assume that he meant to do murder. When, therefore, ex-po- 
lice-officer Dunn drew his pistol he meant to do murder. It is true that 
he did not intend to do murder on the person of the inoffensive McKen- 
na, who had not yet appeared on the scene, but upon his comrade, Sher- 
man. While, under the law as it now stands, this circumstance clears 
Dunn of the graver charge, it should not do so. Without cause and with 
deliberation, he drew a deadly weapon with the intention of committing a 
murder. He did commit a murder, though his victim was not the one he 
had selected. He is therefore a murderer, and should be punished as one. 
These facts serve to show that the law requires alteration, and the reck- 
less manner in which human life is sacrificed throughout the State of 
California emphasizes the showing. 

THE ESCAPE OF ANOTHER MURDERER 

Another murderer is about to step forth a free man. Carleton, who, 
without a word of warning and in the most cowardly, brutal and cold- 
blooded manner, shot down a rival editor, Brummel by name, in Hollister 
a year and a half ago, has bad his third trial, and the jury refused to 
agree. A more gross, shameless, outrageous miscarriage of justice never 
occurred. In the first place the_ man was guilty of a clear, deliberate 
murder, perpetrated in the broad glare of the daylight in the public 
streets, and in the presence of a number of witnesses. Yet the Grand 
Jury, in violation of their oaths, reduced the charge to manslaughter. 
Upon this charge he was tried at San Jose in August last. At this trial 
the defendant's counsel labored to convince the jury that, if any crime 
had been committed, it was that of deliberate murder (which was true), 
and that, consequently, they could not find his client guilty of the crime 
charged and must acquit bim. The jury, however, convicted him, but the 
conviction was promptly set aside by the Supreme Court under a legal 
legerdemain called res gestae. He has had two trials since that and on 
both occasions the jury has agreed to disagree. It is customary after 
three failures to convict to let the prosecution drop. This murderer, 
therefore, goes free, and another evidence has been given of the fact that 
the law of California is impotent to protect human life, and that we are 
all existing at the sufferance of cutthroats and murderers. 



Duryeas' Starch gives a beautiful white, glossy, lasting finish, be- 
sides renders fabrics very durable. 






July 30, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"Hut th» Ortoi" "What th« d»vi> »« tboo ?" 
'On* that will i l»y the dovil.ti? with yoa." 

" U*'d * fttitift in his tJLil k<« loot as ft flail. 
Which mad* htm grow botd«r and bolder." 



Two of our prominent restaurants on (May street were closed up yee- 
t«rday, ami there is wailim; and gnashing of hollow teeth among the pru- 
dent haberdasher'* clerks, wlio have been wont to cut soup, neb, roast, 
entree, podding and cheOTC for fifteen cents. With a bottle of imported 
French claret thrown in. No longer run the weary bootblack or the 
Kearnystrvet manner treat their lady-love* to a forty-cent banquet ; nor 
can the butchers apprentice pet away with five succulent ears of corn for 
the modest dime. And Clay street looks as though some great calamity 
had befallen the city, as the hungry but economic citizen gazes on the 
lock affixed to the door, and peers vacantly through the window at a 
wooden toothpick. But, in this hour of bitter grief, we bid all young 
men who are boarding themselves on twenty cents a day to be of good 
cheer. A philanthropist from Italy, named Spahgetti, is about to open a 
restaurant on the City Front, where excellent meals can be obtained for 
seven cents, and where the sausages will be heavenly. It is a little fur- 
ther to walk, but what is that among so many? 

An item in yesterday's Call relates how a young lady was accident- 
ally poisoned by grapes, the supposition being that some acid or poison 
had been sprinkled over the vines by the proprietor of the vineyard. 
This reminds us of several similar cases. In 1874 an old lady of 89 died 
from eating a piece of beef cut from an old cow that lived four blocks off 
a rattlesnake. In the same year an infant six weeks old died from eating 
three broiled flounders that, as it was supposed, had been in swimming near 
the carcass of a poisoned dog. A young dressmaker in Iowa was recently 
seized with convulsions from the effects of a green wall-paper in the next 
house, in which, it was thought, there was arsenic. Our readers will also 
distinctly remember the case of Miss Squirteldowser, in New York, 
whose nose was brushed by a fly that had flew near a flea that had hopped 
off a strychnined dog. Miss S. died in great agonj' eleven years after- 
ward. All this shows that we cannot be too careful how frequently we 
drink as long as we can get credit, and that there is poison in the air we 
breathe, and sometimes in the words we speak. 

In its issue of Friday, the Call says: "Superintendent of Public 
Schools Taylor, in response to many inquiries, states that pupils are not 
compelled to write an essay on the subject of intemperance and tobacco, 
or enter into any competition for the McDonald prizes. The scholars 
may do as they please in the matter. Those who do compete, however, 
must furnish original productions." We should imagine that they were 
not compelled to write an essay on either subject, and it is disgracing and 
debasing childhood to ask it to do anything of the sort. To encourage 
children, who have never given the subject a thought perhaps, to try and 
gain prizes of from $100 to $400 (we believe) to write about drunkenness 
or nicotine, is a foul sin. The donor probably never looked at the matter 
in this light, but it is not too late for him to withdraw his misguided offer 
to our children. To study up these subjects is, beyond all question, an 
incentive to children to drink and smoke, and no man need fear to assert 
that, on the subject of intemperance and tobacco, as regards children in 
the public schools, ignorance is bliss. 

At the solicitation of a friend this week we were induced to try some 
of Dr. Eulenspiegel's Parley-vous Francais Bitters. After one dose we 
gained fifteen pounds in weight, and after the eecond every button flew 
right out of our vest. We did not take any more, having only one suit 
of clothes and being unable to obtain credit for a new suit, but for a but- 
ton-bursting tonic we can cheerfully recommend it to all our readers. For 
Bale at all druggists. Price, $1 25 a bottle and a liberal discount to the 
trade. It is very seldomly and most infrequentially that this column is 
ever used for advertising purposes, only Mr. Blithers, the druggist, pays 
a dollar a line for this notice, bo we cannot help remarking that we have 
recently tried Dr. Pudeldinger's patent "Preventive Adiposity Drops." 
After taking two drops we dropped thirty pounds, and our evening ulster 
hangs on us like an empty clothes bag. It is rather a prostitution of the 
News Letter to advertise patent rubbish, but the dailies all do it and 
we've got to make a living as well as any one else. Price of this item, 
fifteen dollars. 

With all possible reverence, and approaching the subject with the 
awe that befits us, we tenderly suggest that it would do no harm— in 
fact, that good might even come out of it — that is to Bay, it would be in 
no way injurious — it couldn't hurt anybody— well, it would be an unmiti- 
gated act of charity to the public if the four end men at the Minstrels got 
their beautiful dirty flannel suits washed. People don't pay a dollar to 

faze on a lot of used-up clothes, and washing is not expensive in San 
Vancisco. There seems to be a feeling among the best troupes which 
visit us that they can be as careless as they please, and can do things here 
which they dare not do in Boston or New York. And that is where they 
make a budding, blooming, flowery error. There is, also, a practice at 
this bouse of handing each lady a lilliputian vial of vile scent, and the 
question arises: Is it donated to the audience to take the smell off the 
Minstrels or to relieve the Minstrels of the smell of the audience ? It is 
an open question. 

These infernal comets are raising Cain in California, and have the 
most extraordinary effect on the population. Personally we have not suf- 
fered half as much as other people, but only this week we were dunned 
by a Chinese washman, had a bilious attack, lost three dollars at poker, 
had a fight with a Supervisors, got our best coat all spotted, upset a can 
of coal-oil on the parlor carpet, quarreled with our wife, lost the dog, and 
the eldest child broke her nose and lost a dollar, which in a moment of 
weakness was given her to buy a doll with. There have been 39 divorces 
recorded this week and any quantity of attempted suicides, and almost 
the only firms that haven't Buspeuded are whisky firms. You can't make 
them suspend worth a cent, that is as long as California is right side up. 

If we may believe the system of reckoning used by the State's Prison 
Directors when they go on their tour of inspection, this State, according 
to their mileage bills, must be about 4,000 miles long. We have always 
supposed that it was only a short distance from the city to Folsom and 
San Quentin, but we are wrong. It is about 300 miles to each place, and 
we can prove it by some of the Directors' bills. 



There seems but little chance of the aesthetic mania which now dis- 
tracts Ln-Jand ever taking much effect in Sau Francisco— that is to say 
if we may judge from the following conversation. One of our society 
belles has just returned from Europe, and though not quite "aesthet- 
ized, yet she still has that sort of regard for it which people who praise 
Tennyson, but cannot understand him, have for the incomprehensible. 
Young lady from Europe—*' You may laugh, dear, as much as you like 
at the aesthetic school, but after all there is something spirituelle in sit- 
ting up all night with a lily." San Francisco girl, who has not made the 
" U-ropian " tour— " It may be very fine and what-do-you-call it, but I'd 
considerably sooner sit up with a too awfully utterly nice young man." 
The traveled one left the room in silence, and pity for the unsophisticated 
one sank deeply into her heart. 

" Mein husband hat ein new house gebuilt," said Mrs. Ferkelstecher 
the other day, " und wir proposen einzumoven in bix weeks. Das Haus 
ist auf dem corner of Broadway and— Herr Gott Sacrament Potztausend 
{excusen sie mich— eine flea hat mich eben auf dem leg gebitet)— auf dem 
corner of Broadway and— (Gott sey Dank und Lob, Ich habe die Flea 
gecatcht)— vel, auf dem corner of Broadway und Stockton strasse. Wir 
haben neue Carpets gebought, and alles ist sehr schoen aufgefixt sieben 
rooms init hot und cold water ein feiner shtove und wunderschoene gas- 
fixtures. Der bath-tub allein hat fifty dollars gekost, und die children's 
cribs sind von dem besten black walnut. So soon als wir gesettlet sind 
wollen wir eine grosse Party geben mit ichecream und champagna, I 
voudschmile." 

Ever since Guiteau took a shot at Garfield the papers have been full 
of accounts of other alleged lunatics who have expressed a wish to gain 
popularity in somewhat the same manner. Governors Cornell and Pills- 
bury have both, if we can believe the reports, had extremely narrow es- 
capes. The former was threatened by a semi-insane but harmless man; 
the latter was about to be shot at by a man with an unloaded musket. 
Such fearfully narrow squeaks suggest to the writer an escape which he 
once had. A man dropped a rotten watermelon from a two-story house as 
he was passing. Providentially it did not hit him. Had itdone so some- 
thing must have given way. 

The tramp is, as a rule, wise in his generation as to the way in which 

he secretes himself for a free ride. Last week a Los Angeles free traveler 
took up his quarters in a then empty water tank on the railroad. In the 
still hours of the night, however, it was filled and, not waking in time, 
the tramp was drowned. The fact of the existence of any extraneous 
substance in the water was only discovered by the accident of a thirsty 
brakesman taking a drink of it. He remarked a faint taste of whisky, 
and, telling his experience to others, a search was instituted for the 
cause. This resulted in the finding of the dead tramp and a natural 
emetic all round. 

Mr. Stephen Massett, (says the Cuckoo) an American composer, who 
set to music Austin Dobson's pathetic poem of "The Dying Boy's 
Prayer," has received a note from Mr. Longfellow, in which he says: 
" Nothing can be more pathetic than the exclamation of the dying boy — 
'Dear God, make room for a tired little fellow.' And these words were 
really uttered by a child who was dying. That makes them doubly pa- 
thetic." Stephen, did Henry Wadsworth really say that, because Charles 
Dickens has said something so extremely like it? 

We saw recently, on one fence in this city, the following advertise- 
ments all stenciled according to the modern fashion: "TrySweezel- 
buster's Infallible Liver Pills," "Prepare to Meet Thy God," " Liebig's 
Extracts are the Best," " Vote for Buggins for County Clerk," " Read 
Florence Marryat's Last Work, ' She Jumpeth Up Like a First-class Acro- 
bat,'" "Smoke Jackson's Plug," "Everybody Uses Cottleton's Capillary 
Tonic." We read these notices carefully, and acted on the advice con- 
veyed. The beer cost us five cents. 

Mr. John Curtin has commenced suit to recover $5,000 for services 
rendered as custodian of the diamonds of Theresa Percy Bell, valued at 
$300,000. Now, when he gets through with his suit, we want to inform 
Mr. John Curtin that he is just the man we need at this office. We have 
an old tom-cat that from time to time gets fearfully neglected, and it 
wants a custodian. If terms are not too high, the gentleman can have 
the billet, and we pay so promptly that he will never have to bring a law- 
suit. 

An editor once made the remark that giving his best articles to printers 
to be set up was like throwing pearls before swine. His funeral, which 
took place the following day under the auspices of the Typographical 
Union, was very affecting, only the corpse was unrecognizable. Aa they 
took the lid off for the last time, an aged compositor said in a husky 
voice, " May God have mercy on his soul ; you couldn't put a hair space 
into a bit of his body that isn't black and blue." 

We notice that Miss Cora E. Hezlep, the yonnglady who so narrowly 
escaped being murdered with Ida Dunn at Wheatland a year or two ago, 
has just been married in San Leandro. We congratulate her heartily, 
but — her husband— William B. Swears— we are sorry for that; we always 
hated profanity. It would have been better if he had been a dumb man, 
as it is evident that the fair Cora Hezlip enough for both. [Editor dis- 
charged. — Prop. N. //.] 

A Texas man has been locked up because he thought he was delegated 
by God to kill all doctors, lawyers and members of the Legislature. To 
lock a man up with such a beautiful inspiration is one of the greatest out- 
rages of the nineteenth century. If the Texas authorities will only lib- 
erate him, and forward him to this office, we guarantee him a steady sal- 
ary of $30 a week and all the implements he requires. 

It is said that 2,000 gallons of buttermilk are sold daily in Milwaukee 
saloons during the hot weather. This would be a large amount of butter- 
milk for a town of this size, and would argue well for the temperance of 
Milwaukee if statistics did not unfortunately show that they sell about 
14,000 gallons of whisky there per diem whether it is hot or cold. 

The Thomas Pope, the whaling bark, has sailed again to the Arctic- 
gone to the North Pole, as it were — to try and find the article. To see 
any joke in this item, the words have to be articulated very cautiously. 
Ah tickle me ! 

We are taught that it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a 
needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven. If business 
continues as it is now, we have all a fair chance of getting there. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 30, 1881. 



C. P. R. R. 



Time Schedule, Saturday, June 4, 1881. 

Trains leave, and are due to arrive at, 
San Jfrancisco as follows; 



DESTINATION. 



ARMVB 
FROM 



9:30 A.M. 

*3:O0f.m. 

*4 00 P.M. 

8:00 A m. 

3:30 P.M. 

8:00 a.m. 
*4:00 p.m. 

9:30 a.m. 

4:30 p.m. 

9:30 a.m. 

8:00 a.m 
*4:00p,m. 

8:00 a.m. 
*3:30 P.M. 
}8:00a.M. 

9:30 a.m. 

8:00 A M. 

5:00 p.m. 

9:30 A.M 
*4:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 

3:30 p.m. 

5:30 P.M. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

3:30 p.m. 
*4:00 P.m. 

8:00 A.M. 

3:00 P.M. 

8:00 a.m. 

9:30 a.m. 

3:30 p.m. 
*4:00 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
*3 :30 p.m. 
*S:00 a.m. 



....Anti«ch and Martinez... 

Benicia 

Calistoga and N9pa..<.. . 



..J Deining and ^ Express..,. 

..\ East j Emigrant.., 

El Paso, Texas 

. . I Gait and ) via Livermore 

, . i Stockton i via Martinez . . . 

....lone •....- 

...* Knight's Landing; 

.... " " (JSundiys only) 
....Los Angeles and South.... 
.. .Livermore and Niles 

....Madera and Yosemite 



. . .Marysville and Chico 

. . . Wiles (see also Liverm'e & Niles 

. j Ogden and / Express. 

. \ East f Emigrant ........ 

. . Redding and lied Bluff 

. ( Sacramento, ") via Livermore. 
. < Colfax and > via Benicia. . . . 

. ( Alta } via Benicia.... 

. . . Sacramento Kiver Steamers. . 
, ..San Jose and Niles 



,ValIejo.. 



.Virginia City., 
.Woodland.... 



.Willows and Williams.. 



3:33 p.m. 
*10)05 A.m. 
*I2:35 9*.m, 

7:35 p. M . 
11:35 a.m. 

7:35 p.m. 
* 10:05 a.m. 

3:35 p.m. 

8:05 a.m. 

3:35 p.m. 

6:05 p.m. 
+12:35 *\m. 

6:05 P.m. 
11:35 a.m. 

3:35 p.m. 

6:05 p.m. 

8:35 a.m. 

3:35 p.m. 
*12:35 p.m. 

7:35 p.m. 

4:0j p.m. 
11:35 a.m. 

6:05a.M. 

7:35 p.m. 

6:05 p.m. 

7:35 p.m. 
11:35 a.m. 
*6:00 a.m. 

4:05 p.m. 

9:35 A.M. 

7:35 P.M 

3:35 P.M. 
*10:05 A.M. 
'12.35 P.M. 
11:35 a.m. 
11:35 a.m. 
*7:35 p.m. 
*7:35 p.m. 



Train leaving San Francisco at 3:30 a.m. should meet 
Pacific Express from ■' Ogden " at San Pablo ; also Pacific 
Express from "Deming" at Byron. 



From "SABf FRANXISCO," Daily. 



To EAST OAKLAND -*t 6:10, t7:30, rS:30, +9:30, 10:30, 

11:30, 12.30, 1.30, +3:30, t4:30, +5:30, t6:30, 7:00, 8:10, 

9:20, 10.40, *11:45. 

(tRunning through to Alameda, Sundays excepted. ) 
To ALAMEDA Direct— 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:1)0, 11:00, 

12:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3;00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, *7:00, 8:10, 9:20, 

10:40, *11:45. 
To BERKELEY — 7:30, 8:30, 9;30, 10:30, 11:30, 1:00, 

3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, *6:30. 
To WEST BERKELEY— *6:10, 8:00, 10:00, 12:00, 1:30, 

3:30, 4:30, 5:30, *0;30. 

To "SAN FRAN CISCO," Daily. 



From Broapway, Oakland -*5:20, *6:00, 6:50,and every 
21th and 54th minute of each hour (excepting 2.24) 
from 7:24 a.m. to 6:54 p.n. (inclusive), 8:00, 9:10, i0:30. 

From EAST OAKLAND -*5:10, *5:50, 6:40,t7:44, t8:44, 
t9:44, U0:44, 11:44, 12:44, 1:44, 2:44, t3:44, t4:44, 
+5:44, +6:44, +7:50, 9:00, 10:20. 

(tStarting 20 minutes earlier from Alameda, Sundays ex- 
cepted.; 

From ALAMEDA Direct— *5:00, *5;40, 6:25, 7:00, 8:00, 
9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12;00, 1.08, 3:00, 4:00, 5.00, 6:00, 
♦7:20, 8:40, 9:55. 

From BERKELEY— *5:40, *6:30, 7:30,8:30, 9:30, 10:30, 
11:30, 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00. 
From WEST BERKELEY— *5:40, *6:30, 8:00, 10:00, 

12:00, 1:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, *6:30. 



Creek Route. 
From SAN FRANCISCO-*7:15, 3:15, 11:15. 1;15, 3:15, 

5:15. 
From OAKLAND— *fl:15, 8:15, 18:15, 12:15, 2:1 5, 4:15. 

All trains run daily, except when star <*) denotes Sun- 
days excepted. 



"Official Schedule Time" furnished by Randolph & 
Co., Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Townk Genarai Superintendent. 



GENTLE WORDS. 
Each gentle word is a thought of love, 
Which finds its way through the blue above, 
To light beyond on the pearly strand, 
And give thee joy in the better land. 
Each gentle word is a wreath of flowers, 
Gathered fresh from the heart's green bowers, 
Whose fragrance will reach the pearly strand, 
To give thee joy in the better land. 
Each gentle word is a harp of gold, 
Which angels bear to the upper fold ; 
To play thee a song on the pearly strand 
To give thee joy in the better land. 
Kind deeds and words are tinkling bells, 
Sounding up from the heart's deep wells { 
Whose chimes will reach the pearly strand, 
To give thee joy in the better land. 
Each gentle word is a swift-winged dove, 
Bridging the way trom thy heart of love 5 
Over the waves to the pearly strand, 
To bear thee acro&s to the better land. 




BROAD GAUGE. 
SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing- Saturday, June 4th. 1881, 
and until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
San Francisco, from Passenger Depot on Townaend 
street, between Third and Fourth streets, as follows; 



Q OAa.m. daily for San Jose and Way Stations. 
uuu (Returning, arrives San Francisco 3:30 p.m. 
fggf Stages for Pescadero (via San Mateo) connect 
with this train only. 



Q QH am. Sundays only, for San Jose and Way Sta- 
t, »^H-' tions. (Returning, arrives S. F. 8:15 p.m.) 



If) J-O AM - dtoity (Monterey and Soledad Through 
J-V^-^tVy Train) for San Jose, Gilroy, (Hollisterand 
Tres Pinos), Pajaro, Castroville, Monterey, Salinas, Sol- 
edad and Way Stations. (Returning, arrives San Fran- 
cisco 6:00 p.m.) 

EcST 3 Parlor Cars attached to this train. 

B3F° At Pajaro the Santa Crtz Railroad connects 
with this Train for Aptos, Soquel and Santa Cruz, 

83F~ Stage connections made with this train. (Pesca- 
dero Stages via San Mateo excepted.) 

Q Qfjp.M. daily, Sundays excepted, "Monterey 
*-*'*-* ^-r asd Sakta Cruz Hxpress "for San Mateo, 
Redwood, Menlo Park, Santa Clara, San Jose, Gilroy 
(Hollister and Tres Pinos), Pajaro, Castroville (Salinas), 
and Monterey. (Returning, arrives S. F 10:02 a.m.) 

feg^At PAJARO the SANTA CRUZ KAILROAD 
connects with this train for Aptos, Soquel and Santa 
Cruz. 

PASSENGERS BY THIS TRAIN 
£ ("'HOTEL DEL MONTE," , „. D „ ~ QKwi , 
| J MONTEREY, .-..7.05 P.M.-3h. 35m. ^ 3 

< ( SANTA CRUZ 7.26 P.M.— 3h. 56m. 



4 9 K p.m. Daily Express for San Jose and Principal 
• AO Way Stations. (Returning, arrives S.F. 9:03a.m. 
SSTSundays only this train stops at all Way Stations. 



5 1 K p.m. Daily, Sundays excepted, for Menlo Park 
,±*J and Way Stations. (Returning, ar.S.F. 8:10a.m. 



(* 0(~\ p.m. daily, for Menlo Park and Way Stations 
9mO\J (Returning, arrives San Francisco 6:40 a.m.) 



SPECIAL RATES 
To Monterey, Aptos, Soquel, Santa Cruz. 

Single Trip Tickets to any of above points. S3. 50 
Excursion Tickets (Round Trip) to any of 
above points, sold on Saturdays and Sunday 
mornings, good for return until following 

Monday inclusive $5 00. 

SPECIAL ROUND TRIP SEASON TICKETS, 
(Good for return until October 31, 1831), 

San Francisco to Monterey and return $6 00 

Son Francisco to Monterey and Santa Cruz, 
inclusive, and return $7 00- 

SPECIAL NOTICE. 

The well-known " Pacific Grove Ret: eat " at Monterey 
is now open for the reception of visitors, tourists and 
" campers." This popular resort has been entirely re- 
fitted by its present owners (the Pacific Improvement 
Company) with new furniture, tents, etc. Circulars 
giving full information as to rates, terms, etc., can be 
had upon application to aiiy " Station Agent," on the 
line of the Central or Southern Pacific Railroad. 



Also, Excursion Tickets to SAN JOSE and inter- 
mediate points sold on Saturdays and Sunday mornings, 
good for return until following Monday inclusive. 



Ticket Offices— Passenger Depot, Townsend street, 
and No. 2 New Montgomery street, Palace Hotel. 

A. C. BASSETT, Supt. H. R. JUDAH, A. P. & T. A. 



SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. 

$W Passengers for Los Angeles and intermediate 
points, as also Yuma and all points east of the Colorado 
River, will take the cars of the Central Pacific Railroad 
via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 9:30 a.m. daily (S. P. Atlan- 
tic Express Train). 



Our Painless Departure. — In the Popular 
Science Monthly for July, Dr. T. D Spencer re- 
views what is known of the end of life, and en- 
deavors to prove tbe painlessness of death. The 
visions of the dying so often attributed to glimp- 
Bes into the mysteries of a future world, he main 
tains are shown in the light of scientific fact to 
be mere wandering of a fast disorganising brain. 
The asphyxia produced by burning charcoal is 
often accompanied by disturbed fancies> similar 
to those preceding death, and the natural infer- 
ence is that they both result from the same cause. 
In a semi-conscious stupor, the thoughts of the 
dying, taking no note of the present, revert to 
the past, and seem to live their lives over again. 




Commencing Sunday, April 10th, 1881, 
and until further notice. Boats aud Trains will 
leave San Francisco as follows: 



7 If) A-M - dau )' (Sundays excepted) San Quentiu 
• . J. \_f Ferry, foot of Market street, for Cloverdale, 
Guerneville and Way Stations. Stages connectat Santa 
Rosa for Mark West Springs and Sebastopol, at Gcvser- 
ville for Skaggs* Springs, and at Cloverdale for Ukiah, 
Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, 
Bartlett Springs and the Geysers. 



3nf) p. m. daily (Sundays excepted), Steamer 
• v -^ v -' "James M. Donahue," Washington street 
Wharf, connecting at Sonoma Landing with cars for 
Sonoma, and at Donahue with train for Cloverdale 
and way stations. Stages connect at Guerneville for 
Ingrams, Fort Ross, Gualala, Point Arena and Cuffey's 
Cove, and at Cloverdale for Mendocino Citv and Navarro 
Ridge. 



SUNDAY EXCURSIONS. 

Q OAA.M. Sundays only, Steamer "James M. Don- 
LJ.AV/ ahue," Washington-street Wharf, for Sonoma, 
Cloverdale, Guerneville and Way Stations. Round Trip 
Tickets, on Sundays, to Sonoma, SI; to Petaluma, SI. 50; 
to Santa Rosa, §2; to Healdsburg, §3; to Cloverdale, 
Si 50; to Guerneville, 33. 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Ag 



SOUTH PACIFIC_ COAST R. R. 

(NEW ROUTE-NARROW GAUGE.) 



SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 
oraniencing- April 4, 1881, Boats and 

_ Trains will leave San Francisco from Ferry Land- 
ing, foot of Market street, as follows: 



c 



Q OAaji., Daily, for Alameda, West San Leandro, 
l -'»"" West Sau Lorenzo, Russell's, Mount Eden, 
Alvarado, Hall's, Newark, Mowry's, Alviso, Agnew's, 
Santa Clara, San Jose, Lovelady's, Los Gatos, Alma, 
Wright's, Glenwood, Dougherty's Mill, Felton, Big Tree 
Grove, Summit and Santa Cruz. 



3 9A p.m., Daily, for Santa Cruz and all intermedi- 
• <J V-/ a te stations. 



4 0(~\ p.m., Daily, Sundays excepted, for San Jose 
• i)v and all intermediate points. 



g^" In Alameda all through trains will stop at Park 
Street and Pacific Avenue only. 

Stages connect at Los Gato3 with 8:30 A.M. and 
3:30 p.m. trains for Congress Springs and Saratoga. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 

Sold on Saturdays and Sundays, good until Monday fol- 
lowing, iuclusive: To San Jose and return, S2 50 ; Santa 
Cruz and return, $5. 

OAKLAXB <1ND AU3IFDA FERRY. 

Ferries anil Local Trains leave San 

Francisco for Onhlaod an it Alameda: 

*G:35 -7:35 -8:20-9:30— 10:30— 11:30a.m. tl2.30-l:30- 
2:30-3:30 4:30—5:30-6:30—7:30—8:30 and 11:30 p.m. 

From Corner Fourteenth aud Webster 
Streets, Oakland: *6:00 -+7:00 — 8:00 — 8:50— 
9:50— 10:50— fll:50 A.M. 12:50- -1:50—2:50—3:50—4:50— 
5:50—6:50 and 9:50 p.m. 

From Hign street, Alameda— "5:45— *6:45 

7:45— 3:38-9:35— 10:35-111:35 a.m. 12:35—1:35—2:35 

3:35—4:35—5:35—6:35 and 9:35 p.m. 

t Saturdays and Sundays only. 

♦Daily, Sundays excepted. 

Up-Towu Ticket Office, 208 Montgomery street. Bag- 
gage checked at hotels and residences. 

Through trains arrive at San Francisco at 9:35 and 
10:35 a.m. and 6:35 P.M. 

F. W. BOWEN, GEO. H. WAGGONER, 

Superintendent. Gen. Pass'gr Agent. 



ADVICE. 

The beat and surest method of advice 
Should spare the person, though it brand the vice, 
Be wise in time ; a moment's thought may spare 
Whole years of vain regret and anxious care. 

The ways of God are ways of mercy still ; 
Full many a blessing springs from seeming ill. 
Who lives to nature rarely can be poor ; 
Who lives to fancy never can be rich. 
When all the blandishments of life are gone, 
The coward sneaks to death, the brave live on. 
One reckless act) one small neglect, may be 
The hidden spring of years of misery. 
Crush in its germ the evil flower ; 
Full soon its growth defies thy power. 



$72 



a week. $12 a day at home easily made. Costly 
Outfit Free. 

Address Teue & Co . , Augusta, Maine . 



July 30, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 




'The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[By a Truthful Penman.] 



A lev? days since, in the parish church of Eu, the young Duke of Or- 
leans received his premiere communion. The Figaro takes advantage of 
this occasion to remark that " believing and monarchial France will ev- 
erywhere join with all her heart in the manly and religious act the con- 
puuiinatiun of which has given it a prince." The young Prince Louis 
Philippe Robert d'Orieans was born on February 0, 1809, He had two 
brothers, whom, says the Figaro % "Providence has spared the trials of 
life," and he remains alone with his two sisters, the Princess Amelie, born 
in 1806, and the Princess Helene, borne in 1871.— Some interest! og fig- 
ures have been published in the Milanese papers relating to the public 
:i\\ earances of the great tenor Mario, who is now living in retirement at 
Borne. Fn m 1839, when he uihde his debut, till 1871, when he retired, 
be sang 931 times in all. 225 of these appearances" were iu operas by Don- 
izetti, 170 by Meyerbeer, 143 Rossini, 112 Verdi, 82 Bellini, 70 Gonnorl, 
68 Moaart, 30 Flotow, 12 Cimarosa, 12 Auber, 5 Costa, 1 Halevy, and one 
by Mercadante. In particular operas Les Huguenots heads the list, Sig- 
nor Mario having song Raonl 119 times. Then comes II Barbiere (Alma- 
viva) 102 times, Lucrezia Borgia 91, Faust 59, Favorita 49, Don Giovanni, 
47, Prophete 45, I Puritani 44, Rigoletto 32, Don Pasquale 32, Martha 
26, Ballo in Maschera 29, and Trovatore 28 times. -^The young Count 
Bismarck has been formally wedded to the Princess Carolatte, with whom 
he had fled to Switzerland. The bride possesses one advantage over her 
young husband— that of the experience which years alone can give, as she 
is bis senior by some three lustres. Bismarck, whose paternal amour pro- 
pre is said to have been much wounded by theraatch, was induced by the 
advice of bis physician to receive the newly-wedded couple and pronounce 
his forgiveness for the rash engagement into which his son had entered. 
^Among the many anecdotes connected with the late M. Menier, of 
chocolatesque fame, which have obtained publicity in the Parisian press 
since his decease, is one curiously exemplifying the ease with which a 
ready wit may convert a seemingly irreparable mishap into a source of 
profit and renown. It appears that some years ago a large quantity of 
cake chocolate, which had been for a considerable time " in stock," stored 
away in M. Menier's warehouses, was found, when required for sale, to 
have turned white. The manager was in great perplexity as to how he 
might remedy so untoward an accident, when one of his clerks proposed, 
upon paymeut of 100,000f., to extricate him from his difficulty. After 
long negotiation, Menier signed a promise to pay the amount demanded, 
conditionally upon his adoption of the expedient, which proved to be the 
following: That he should advertise his chocolate as being the only 
chocolate in the world susceptible of turning gray through old age. Me- 
nier recognized the brilliancy of this quaint notion, paid the money and 
issued the advertisement. An enormous demand for the " white choco- 
late " was the result ; the old damaged stock was sold off at a top price, 
and if we may believe the Gaulois, there are still thousands of chocolate 
consumers in France who exhibit a decided preference for that particular 
description of " chocolat Menier," the cakes of which, when broken, ex- 
hibit a grayish hue throughout their entire substance. ^^Madame Sarah 
Bernhardt is quite as much of a favorite in London as ever, and receives 
more invitations for dinner-parties aud breakfast parties than she can pos- 
sibly accept. She appeared lately at a large dinner party given in her 
honor, in a toilette composed of a cuirass -corsage in peacock blue beads, 
worn over a train of satin of the same hue, and shaded with a profusion 
of old Mechlin lace.^— Her Majesty the Queen has commanded that 
there be a stone erected in Durban, Natal, South Africa, with the follow- 
ing inscription: " This stone is erected by Queen Victoria to the memory 
of James Grant, third son of John Grant, of Crofts, Balmoral, for many 
years head forester to Queen Victoria and the Prince Consort, and of 
Elizabeth Robbie, his wife. Born 7th May, 1816, died 0th May, 1881. 
Beloved and regretted by all who knew him. 'Blessed are the pure in 
heart, for they shall see God.'"-— A German rag-picker, named Pranch, 
sixty years old, was recently ejected from the attic of a tenement house 
in Buffalo, N. Y., where he had been living in the most abject squalor, 
and two bags, containing over $4,000 iu gold and silver coins, were found 
in his possession.— —Count Cassabianca, who, -in consultation with the 
late Duke of Brunswick, played the famous game at chess with Morphy 
at the Paris Opera House, died recently, aged eighty five years. He was 
a warm and enthusiastic patron of the game, and was President of the 
Paris Congress of 1807. — The principal supply of wild pigeons for the 
forthcoming tournament at Coney Island, were shipped from Topeka, 
Kansas. About 20,000 birds were required for the various match shoots. 
Most of the pigeons are trapped or snared in the Indian Territory, where 
a roost of immense extent has been found. The birds for the New York 
tournament are kept in large coops at Jersey City, where they are ** the 
observed of all observers."— —A steamer has arrived in the River Thames 
from the Clyde which is steered by an electric apparatus. The steering 
gear worked well, but the compasses were so affected by the electricity as 
to be useless.— A novel feature of the season at Saratoga and Long 
Brunch, says a correspondent, will be an advertising belle at each of those 
places. Two handsome girls, of good form and style, have been hired for 
the purpose. They will be fashionably dressed, but their mission is not 
to display dry goods. A dealer in hair, hair-dyes, washes for the com- 
plexion, and toilet articles of a beautifying sort employs them, and will 
pay their expenses. They will serve as models on which to exhibit the 
latest achievements in false hair and hair-dressing. Their faces will be 
carefully "made up" with such such preparations as he manufactures. 
The plan is a bold one, but entirely feasible. The hotel balls at Long 
Branch and Saratoga are open to all who come ; and these two profes- 
sional beauties are personally respectable, know how to dance gracefully, 
can talk well enough, and will certainly eclipse most of the amateur 
beauties. 



A PATENTED POEM. 

The hill road like a river bright 

Beneath its windows wimleth down: 

A sombre isle in seas of light 

The moonbeams make, upon its hight 
It overlooks the little town. 

Above the roof the lindens arched 

All night a anltrj rustle keep j 
Across a league of meadows parched 

The taper lake lies smoothed for sleep* 

Heart of my heart, here doth she dwell ! 

This is the hour to roam I love. 
Folk wonder why: ah, ye could tell, 

You little panes, of all above 

That gleam. And now upon the grass 

My shadow's noiseless glide is checked ; 

Then dies the light — my lady's glass — 
Whereof you lost you little recked. 

A dream. Upon the stones outside 

A hurrying cab's belated din 
Jars hard— the dawn of Whitsuntide 

White at the shutters halts— steals in. 

Ah, miles and months there lie between, 
And more than time and space I fear. 

And yet this much of gain hath been, 

Five minutes borrowed from last year.* 

•There was a house upon a hill, 

A girl within there may have stayed — 
May stay. The rest is lies. And still 

This is the way such verse is made. —p-ucH. 

GEO. STREET, Agent News Letter, 30 Cornhill, E. C, London. 

4 STHMA AND DIFFICULT BREATHING. 

A STHMA AND DIFFICULT BREATHING, 
"OROMPTLY RELIEVED BY DATURA TATULA. 
A STHMATIC PAROXYSMS AVERTED AND SUBDUED BY 



D 

A s ' 

D 

S 



ATURA TATULA, THE EFFECTUAL REMEDY FOR 



STHMA AND OTHER AFFECTIONS OF THE RESPIRATORY ORGANS. 



ATURA TATULA, GROWN AND PREPARED BY 



AVORY 4 MOORE, NEW BOND STREET, LONDON, in all forms (or Inhalation 
— Cigars, Cigarettes or Tobacco -Pastilles and Powder for burning. Sold 
everywhere. Nov. 20. 

HARTLEY FLEMING, ~ 

Wbo sailed from London, England, lor Melbourne, Iu 
October, 1S70, as Midshipman on hoard the "Lady Cairns," and, it is be- 
lieved, left his ship at Sun Francisco in 1871, will hear of something to his advantage 
by addressing WILLIAM FIELDING, 41 West Twenty-sixth street, New York. Any 
one furnishing information regarding him will be rewarded. June 25. 

ow lauds' Nncnssar Oil has been known for the last eighty years as the 
best and safest preserver and beunlflerol the hair; it contains no lead 
or mineral ingredients, and is especially adapted for the hair of children; 
sold in usual four sizes. 

on lands' Odon to is the purest and most fragrant dentifrice ever made; it- 
whitens the teeth, prevents decay, and gives a pleasing fragrance to the 
breath, and the fact of its containing no acid or mireral ingredients 
specially adapts it for the teeth of children. 

ow lauds" Kalydor produces a beautifully pure and healthy complexion, 
eradicates freckles, tan, prickly heat, sunburn, etc., and is most cooling 
and refreshing to the face, hands aud arms, during hot weather. Ask 
any Perfumery Dealer for 

Rowlands* articles, of 20, HstUm Garden, London; and avoid spurious worth- 
le ss imitations. [Oct. 2. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

Inestand Cheapest Meal 'flavoring Stock for Soups, Made 

Dishes and Sauces. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT, 

An Invaluable u..il Palatable Tonic iu all Cases of Weak 
Digestion and Debility. Is a success and boon for which Nations should feel 
grateful. See " Medical Press," " Lancet," " British Medical Journal," etc 



R 
R 
R 



F 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

Caution—Genuine only with raoslmile of Baron Ueblfr's 
Signature, En blue ink, across L&beL 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

To be bad of all Store-keepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale onlv). C. David & Co\, 43. Mark Lane, 
London," England. Sold wholesale by RICHARDS A HARRISON, San Francisco. 
[March 2.] 

""BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETYOTCAL 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and t« furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCL'RRIK, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. Room 4, No. 531 California at. 

john Jennings 

Hooper's South End Warehouse**, corner Japan and T6wi« 
send Streets, Ban Francisco. Fir»lH~}as8 Fire-Proof Hrick Buildinu, capacity 
10,000 tons. Goods taken from the Dock and the Cars of the C. P. R- R. aod S. P. 
R. R. free of charge. Storage at Current Rates. Advances and Insurance Effect*d 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 30, 1881. 



CRADLE, ALTA R, AND TOMB. 

CRADLE. 

'Botcher— In this city, Julv 26, to the wife of Albert Botcher, a daughter. 
Charlton-Ih this city, July 12, to the wife of J. C. Charlton, a son. 
Davidson— In this city, July 25, to the wife of J. C. Davidson, a daughter. 
McDonald— In this city, July 27, to the wife of James McDonald, a son. 
Fernald— In this city, July 17, to the wife of Joseph S. Pernald, a son. 
JoEL-In this city, July 25, to the wife of Albert M. JoeJ, a son. 
Malmbero— In this citv, July 17, to the wife of J. P. Malmberg, a daughter. 
'Oxley— In this city, July 2+, to the wife of Arthur W. Oxley, a daughter. 
Silva— In this City, July 24, to the wife of Manuel M. Sflva, a daughter. 
Welch— In this city, July 14, to the wife of Edward Welch, a sob. 

ALTAR. 

Bacon-Mandeville— In this city, July 27, F. L. Bacon to Mary A. MandeviUe. 
0'Hara-McClellan — In this city, July 24, Samuel O'Hara to Lizzie McCIeHan. 
ifiooRE-GiBBS— In this city, July 14, George H. Hooke to Addie V. Gibbs. 
.TMovse-Levy— In this city, July 24, Marc Moyse to Estelle Levy. 
Samson-Hdnte«— Irj this city, July 26, Albert L. Samson to Favalia Hunter. 

TOMB. 

Batlet— In this eity, July 27, Hon. John J. Bayley, -aged 49 years. 

Colby— In this city, July 27, Charles A. Colby (compositor), aged 50 years. 

Dullaouan— In this city, July 24, Thomas Dullaghan, aged 47 years. 

Emery— In this city, July 25, Ellen M. Emery. 

Grant— In this city, July 26, Mrs. Mary K. Grant, aged 37 years and 5 months. 

'Hudnall— In this city, July 27, John A. Hudnall. aged 62 years. 

Jones- In this city, July 26, Elizabeth Jones, aged 28 years. 

Powers— In Gold -Will, Nevada, July 26, Mrs. Ellen Powers, aged 76 years. 

ScHULTZ-In this city. July 26, John Schultz, aged 50 years. 

Vietor— In this city, July 26, Friederich Vietor, aged 47 years. 

WRiGur— Off the Coast of Mexico, July 10, Fred W. Wright, aged 25 years. 

Wester— In this city, July 27, Martin Wester, aged 57 years. 

THE REMOVAL OF THE CEMETERIES. 

The proposal to remove the cemeteries formed an important fea- 
ture of the City Charter submitted to the public vote last year, and con- 
tributed much to its rejection. One has only to pay a visit to Lone 
Mountain to find evidence of the rapidity with which hallowed associ- 
ations take root and grow around the resting places of the dead. Such 
associations are not easily torn up by public votes. However unreal in 
fact, the sentiment of inviolable repose still hovers over the sleep of death, 
and the Christian mind revolts at the bare suggestion of disturbance by 
mortal hands. The evils of intramural sepulture had reached a frightful 
pitch before the dead were driven from the churches in Europe, and the 
evils of Lone Mountain must be far more pronounced than they are at 
present before the sentiment of repose will yield to the proposition of re- 
moval. 

But the question is not one exclusively of sentiment. Expense and 
convenience are considerations not to be despised. All the best families 
in the city have their special freeholds. Upon many graves costly mauso- 
lea have been erected, which are more difficult of removal than the 
caskets they contain. Others have oaly modest head-stones and flower- 
covered graves, from which the caskets have already disappeared. Re- 
moval of their contents has been accomplished by a higher power. With 
change of location the hope is destroyed of mingling the dust of the liv- 
ing with the departed dead. 

The removal of our cemeteries to a greater distance from the city would 
fall heaviest of all upon the poor. The expense of funerals and the Iosb 
of time in going to Lone Mountain is already sufficiently onerous on the 
working population. But the expense of a cortege to a cemetery ten or 
fifteen miles away would absolutely ruin many poor families and would 
be a bar to thousands who desire to pay occasional visits to the graves of 
their departed friends. To secure, therefore, an early removal of the 
cemeteries, the dangers of Lone Mountain must be fully realized and the 
public must be made to understand the superior advantages of a more dis- 
tant site. 

The fact is, however, that few people are able to realize the dangers of 
intra-nrban. sepulture. To an ordinary visitor to Lone Mountain there is 
nothing to revolt the eye or frighten the susceptibility of the most fastidi- 
ous. Even when a vault iB opened for the reception of a fresh occupant 
nothing is visible but a row of handsome caskets. The accumulated gases 
of decomposition have been carefully dispersed by temporary ventilation. 
The vault is, in fact, less offensive than a common dunghill. It requires 
scientific knowledge to appreciate the true condition of affairs and to fol- 
low the foul emanations into the atmosphere; to trace the germs of dis- 
ease to their homes in new victims, through the worm, the soil, the air, 
the water and the food. 

If the germs of cattle plague can be carried in the poisoned fleece, from 
the mountains of South America to the wool-sorters of England; if the 
very washings, spread upon the meadow there, give rise to cattle plague; 
nay, if the germs rise vigorous from the earth, after a burial of a dozen 
years, why should not the germs of fever and smallpox rise from the 
graves of Lone Mountain to find new victims in the citizens living near? 
No one who considers the question from a scientific point can doubt that 
the cemeteries are dangerous!}' near the living, and if, as we believe, there 
are insuperable objections to their removal to a further distance, the diffi- 
culty requires a new solution. That solution is found in the system of 
cremation, by which alone the germs of disease are effectually destroyed, 
and the association of the existing cemeteries preserved without danger 
and expense. 

If there is one thing more healthy than another as an article of food 
in California, it is oatmeal. But there is good oatmeal, indifferent oat- 
meal, and decidedly bad oatmeal. For children, when it is pure, there is 
no better diet, but, if it is impure, it is heating, not easily digested, and 
makes neither bone nor fat. In the opinion of the first physicians of the 
city, the very best oatmeal to be obtained anywhere is that manufactured 
at the Caledonian Mills, Nos. 713, 715, 717 and 719 Sansome street. It 
is very appetizing, perfectly pure, and has a delicious flavor. The pro- 
prietors of these mills have given almost a lifetime to the endeavor to 
produce an article that could compete with the best brands of Scotch oat- 
meal, and they have succeeded so thoroughly that "crowdy," "por- 
ridge" and " oatmeal mush" made of the Caledonia Mills oatmeal haB 
no superior. ^__ 

Duryeas' Starch Works, Glen Cove, L. I., are the largest in the 
world. 



HOP AT 



"Hotel del Monte," 

This Saturday Evening July 30th. 

MUSIC BY BALLENBERG. 



Take the "Daist Train," which leaves at 3:30 this afternoon, and ar- 
rives at the Hotel at 7. 

The attractions at Monterey are: An elegant hotel, splendid people, 
lovely scenery, delightful drives, magnificent groves and gardens, river 
and ocean fishing, surf and warm salt water bathing, and incomparable 
weather. 

The thousands of Eastefti and European tourists who have visited 
DEL MONTE join in pronouncing it 

The Queen of American Watering- Pisces. 
(July 30.) 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Hale and JVorcross Silver Minlug- Compaoy.--IjOCatJou of 
Principal Place of Business, San Francisco, California.— Location of Works, 
Virginia Mining: District, Storey County; Nevada.— Notice is hereby given that at a 
meetingof the Board of Directors, held on the twelfth day of July, 1881, an assess- 
ment (No. 70) of 50 Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the Cor- 
poration, payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, Room 58, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the SIXTEENTH 
day of AUGUST, 1881, will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; 
and unless payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the SEVENTH 
day of SEPTEMBER, 1S31, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors 

JOEL F. LIGHTNER, Secretary. 

Office— Room 5S, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery st., S. F., Cal. [July 10. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

CON. PACIFIC MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 3 

Amount per Share 40 Cents 

Levied July 9th 

Delinquent in Office August 12th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 1st 

F. E. LUTY, Secretary. 
Offi cii— Room 5, No. 330 Pine street, S. F. July i(j. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

BEST & B£LCHER MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment ""i No. 2 1 

Amount per Share 50 Cents 

Levied July 12th 

Delinquent in Office , August ICth 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 7th 

WILLIAM WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, S. F. July 16. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

MAYBELLE CON. MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 8 

Amount per Share 20 Cents 

Levied June 22d 

Delinquent in Office July 29th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock u August 23d 

WM. J. TAYLOR, Secretary. 
Office— Room 25, 310 Pine street, San Francisco. July 9. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

RED CLOUD CON. MINING COMPANY. 
Assessment No. 10 

Amount per Share 20 Cents 

Levied June 22d 

Delinquent in Office July 27th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 17th 

WM. J. TAYLOR, Secretary. 
Office- -Room 25, 310 Pine street, San Francisco. July 9. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

GOULD & CURRY SILVER MINING COMPANY 

Assessment No. 40 

Amount per Share 50 Cents 

Levied July 15th 

Delinquent in Office August 19th 

Day of Sale of Delinqueut Stock September 8th 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, S. F. fJuly 23. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings ami Loan Society.— For the half year 
ending this date, the Board of Directors of the German Savings and Loan So- 
ciety has declared a dividend on Term Deposits at the rate of five and one-tenth 
(6 1-10) per cent, per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of four and one- 
fourth (4±) per cent, per annum, free from Federal Taxes, and payable on and after 
the 11th day of July, 1881. By order, GEORGE LETTE, Secretary. 

San Francisco, June 30, 1831. July 2. 

COAL OIL STOVES. 

The Summer Queen, Fairy Queen and Triumph. 

All sizes for heating and cooking. The trade supplied. 




May 14. 



WIESTER & CO., 17 New Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, California. 



NOTICE. 

or the very best photographs g-o to Bradley & Rulofson's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



F 



July 30, 1881 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



AT MONTEREY. 

Hotel del Montk, July 25, 1881, 

Dear News Letter: Here I am, back at Monterey, and 6nd pretty 
much the same lift- going on u when I left it. There have been a ROOO 
many departures, but so many arrival* that, truly, the Ion of one is the 
gain of another. I am not astonished at the popularity of this princely 
del Monte, for surely no where in the world is there a marine hotel of 
such perfect luxury ami comfort, Fur those inclined to do sentiment, 
how alluring the word verandah*! While to the dowagers and pater fa* 
miiias the blazing logs in the big deep fireplaces offer a most inviting as- 
pect, and render a sojourn indoors the cosiest spot for them. 

The daily routine generally begins with the bath, and the scene on the 
beach is lively in the extreme, more so from about eleven till noon, when 
those who do not attempt " going in " remain as spectators, and criticise 
those who do. Some of the ladies make a very pretty appearance, al- 
though the conventional bathiug-suit is by no means becoming to any one. 
One pretty blonde, however, who shall be nameless, as she is so well 
known, does a good deal of execution in her light blue jersey and long 
stockings, showing to advantage her rounded limbs. After frolicking in 
the waves and Birting on the snore, the crowd returns to the hotel for the 
noonday meal, and then comes the drive. Here one sees a regular medley 
of vehicles, from the aristocratic private teams to those obtainable from 
the stables. The Crockers, Phelans and others have their own carriages, 
and Mrs. McLoughlan, also, has brought hers down. Col. Eyre has been 
delighting bis friends with four-in-hand drives, and his daughter has made 
quite a name for herself as an equestrienne. 

1 also found Miss McMullen looked well in the saddle ; her sister, Miss 
Lilo, I had already seen on horseback in the Yosemite Valley. Cypress 
Point is the point of attraction for the drivers and riders, and of a moon- 
light night it makes a lovely passcar. The afternoon siesta comes before 
dinner, after which meeting round the " convivial board," Ballenberg 
turns up, and dancing becomes the order of the evening. On Saturday, 
among the new faces I -noticed Geo. Gibbs and wife, Adam Grant and 
wife, the Lents, and a large Oakland party, with merry Mrs. Wetherbee 
as a central figure, the BrowDs, with Miss Grade, Ben Crocker and wife, 
with a flock of pretty girls, Jennie Lindley and Sheda Torbert among 
them ; and from San Jose, Tom Fallon and daughter, Judge Archer and 
his daughter, Carey Friedlander, Dick Pease, young Froelich, Reuling, 
Henry Weil, Miss Eddey, and many others "too numerous to mention." 

Report has it that young Tallant is getting ahead of young Beale. 
Well, au cceur valliant rien d 'impossible. George Crocker, too, has his 
little game going on nicely, although the parents on both sides protest 
" there's nothing in it." jtfous verrons. 

I heard to-day that Fred Sharon was expected down with a party. An- 
other collegian, Eugene Lent, has already arrived. 

The girls are loud in their praise of Mrs. Hooker, who, it seems, has 
been a fairy godmother to most of them, being always ready to play ma- 
tron to the merriest party of young people. Mrs. Harry May, too, is 
very amiable in that way, and one can always count upon a lively coterie 
when she is the " head center." 

Among those who have gone since my last visit are the Heads, Hearsts, 
Deweys (who have gone to join the D. O. Mills at iEtna Springs), the 
Sutros, Millers and Phelans; the latter have gone over to Santa Cruz, 
where the Casserlys are staying. 

The most pronounced flirtation of the season so far, they tell me, is that 

of a pretty married woman and shall I hint? Perhaps 'tis safer to 

wait till things take a more definite shape. 

The weather is lovely, and, to my mind, people make a great mistake in 
returning now to town, when fogs and winds are carrying all before 
them. " Occasional." 

BIRDS OP PREY. 

Those unfortunate shipowners who have business relations with 
San Francisco are aware, by painful experience, that a number of harpies 
in that port are making a considerable amount of "blood money " by se- 
ducing sailors from their legitimate employment, and detaining them in 
a demoralizing kind of custody until the unhappy captain who has lost 
his crew is prepared to pay heavily for another. This nefarious system 
has been going on for a long time, but we do not remember to have seen 
a single word relating to it in the shipping press of this country. Of 
course, if shipowners do not object to be fleeced there is an end of the 
matter — it is their affair more than ours; but we Btispect that, like the 
usual run of true Britons, they have grumbled periodically at the extor- 
tion, paid the " blood money," and then allowed the whole affair to drop 
out of mind until it occurs again. And as the rogues thrive and wax fat, 
sailors' wages are about a hundred per cent, or so more at San Francisco 
than anywhere else, and freights are correspondingly increased. We un- 
derstand that complaints have constantly been made to the British Con- 
sul, who says that he can do nothing. It is a matter, no doubt, for the 
police authorities of the place to deal with, but as they either cannot or 
will not attack these harpies, and look on at the evil trade with indiffer- 
ence, perhaps Lord Granville might be induced to do something to stir 
them up a little. If shipowners like to send us some extracts from their 
masters' letters'of account, we shall be happy to publish them, with the 
names of the firms who have thus been robbed. Publicity will do no 
harm, and it is just possible that it may do the San Francisco birds of 
prey some good. — British Trade Journal, July 1st. 

A New Swimming Club.— Company F of the First Regiment of 
Militia have formed from their ranks a swimming club, which promises 
to be one of the best in this State. The number is limited to fifty mem- 
bers, and a fine club house is being built for them at the Terrace Baths in 
Alameda. These baths are today the finest in California, constantly 

flumping in water from the sea, which is warm, bright and clear. The 
adies have their own separate bath, with every imaginable accommoda- 
tion, and the gentlemen have about three and a half acres in which to 
disport themselves. The bathing suits, which are the finest ever im- 
ported, are perfect both in the point of comfort and fit, and it takes just 
thirty-nine minutes to run over to the Terrace Baths by the Alameda 
ferry. Such a bath as you get there is worth a day's journey, for it is a 
luxury unattainable elsewhere. 

Duryeas' Starch has received the highest prize medals at the Inter- 
national Exhibitions, and in every instance of competition maintaining 
an unbroken record of success. 



MA R INE I INTELLIGENCE. 

ARRIVALS AND CLEARANCES AT THE PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO, FOR 
THE WEEK ENDING JULY 28. 1881. 







ARRIVALS. 




DATS. 


VKSSBL. 


MASTER. 


WHERE FROM. 


CONSIGNERS. 


J'ly 23 Ship David Crockett . . 

.. 23 Ship Sea King 

.. 38 Bark Helcnslio 

. . 26lStni'r Newbera 


Anderson .. 
GetcheU..., 

Metzger 


New York..,. 
New York.... 

Guaymas .... 


John Rosenfefd, 
Williams, Dimond & Co. 
Macondray & Co. 
J. Bermingham. 



CLEARANCES. 



DATS. 


VESSEL. 


MASTER. 


WHERE BOUND 


BT WHOH CLSARE*D. 


J'ly 23 








0. & 0. S. S. Co. 


.. 23 






Queenstown .. 


W. Dresbach. 


.. 23 








Balfour. Guthrie & Co. 
W. Dresbach. 


.. 23 






Queenstown .. 


.. 23 




Howard.... 


Kahalui 


J. D. Spreckles & Bros. 


.. 23 


Sch'r W. H. Stevens.. 




Mn.zat.lan .... 


I. Gutte. 


.. 23 


Sloop Tehuantcpec. . . . 




Salinas Cruz.. 


Wm. Wood & Co. 


.. 25 




Boyd 




W. Dresbach. 


.. 25 


Bark Enoch Talbot.... 






Williams, Dimond & Co. 


.. 25 


Bark Chanarel 




Rouen 


0. W. McNear. 


.. 26 


Bark Thomas Pope. . . . 




Whaling 


J. N. Knowles. 






Robertson . . 


Honolulu .... 
Queenstown . . 


Welch & Co-. 
R. Sheeny.- 


.. 27 


Ship Thomas Stevens . 



/ETNA HOT MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Situated sixteen miles east of St. Selena, In Pope Valley,- 
Napa County. These waters closely resemble the Ems of Germany in analysis 
and sanitary effects. They have cured many cases of Heart. Kidney, Spinal 
and Liver Diseases; also Dyspepsia, Jaundice, Paralysis, Erysip- 
elas, Rheumatism. Sciatica, Neuralgia, General Debility, Bron- 
chitis and Pulmonary Complaints in their early stages . See pamphlet 
descriptive of analysis nnd cures at the office of J. A. Bauer, Esq.., Chemist 
and Apothecary, No. 101 Post street, San Francisco. 

Board and Baths $10 Per Week. 

The vEtna Springs Stages will leave the depot at St. Helena upon the arrival of 
the cars atr 11:30 a.m., Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. People leaving San Fran- 
cisco at 8:00 a.m. will reach the Springs at 4:00 P.M. 

Fare $2.00. 

W. H. UDELL, Proprietor. 

Lidell Post-Office, Napa County. _ July 30. 

HIGHLAND SPRINGS, 

LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 

This popular Summer Resort for families ami Invalids 
is now open to receive guests for the season. 
The Springs are situated at an altitude of 1,700 feet above sea level; and for 
natural beauty of scenery, healthful climate, hunting and fishing, are unsurpassed 
in the State. The surrounding forests and valley are particularly inviting to camp- 
ers, who will be specially entertained at the Springs. 
The waters have produced many wonderful cures in the following diseases: Dys- 

§epsia. Paralysis, Erysipelas, Rheumatism, Sciatica Liver and 
Iidney, Bronchitis, Pulmonary Complaints in their early stages, Gen- 
eral Debility, and a never-failing remedy for Chills and Fever. 

RATES, including Mineral Baths, $10 per week. CHILDREN under six years' 
of age, and SERVANTS, half price. 
Parties desiring board for two months or more will be allowed a liberal discount. 
Direct route by San Rafael, 7 a.m., connecting with S. F. and N. P. R, R. to Clo- 
verdale, thence by stage te the Springs. 

For further particulars, address MRS. J. C. GOODS, 
Ju ne 4. Highland Springs. 



QUICKSILVER. 



The Celebrated "A" Braud. shipped direct from the New 
Almaden Mi lie, for sale many quantity, 1-y the producers. CARLOAD 
LOTS will be shipped from San Jose for NEVADA, ARIZONA and the EAST, or de- 
livered at Pacific Mai] Steamship Company's Wharf, San Francisco, without charge. 
THE QTJICKSILVEB MINING COMPANY. 

J. B. II A >"■><» I.. Maunger, 
July 9.] No. 320 Sansorae St., over Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Express Office. 



THOMAS PRICE'S 

ASSAY OFFICE AND CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 

524 Sacramento Street, San Francisco. 

Deposits of Bullion received, incited into barn, and returns 
made in from twenty-four to forty-eight hours. 
Bullion can be forwarded to tins office from any part of the interior by exprees,- 
and returns made in the same manner. 

Careful Analysis made of Ores, Metal, Soils, Waters. Industrial Products, etc 
Mines examined and reported upon. Consultations on Chemical and Metallurgies 
questions. March 20. 



PROF. /OS. JOSSET, 



Gratfnate of the Uuiverslty of Paris; Ex. Professor of Do 
la Mennais" Normal, France; late <>f Point Loirs, Seminary, San Diego. Pri- 
vate Lessons in the French Language. Residence: M6 Union street, between Du- 
pont and Stockton. At home from 12to2r.M. Private Lessons given at the res- 
idence of the pupil. Dec. 6. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Redaction In Price: Wholesale Price. 50 cents per barrel : 
Retail Price. 60eents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANC 1800 GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard aud First streets, aud foot of Seconds!. Jan. 12. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1S7B. 

Sold r>T nil Stationers. Sole Agent for the lulled Stoles: 
SIR. HENRY HOE. 01 John street, N. Y. Jan. 6. 

A. WALOSTEIN, 

Lithographer and Zlncograplier, >'o. 320 San some street, 
Room 4S, Second Floor. Jan. 29. 

R. H. LLOYD, 

Attorney-at-Law. Room 13. Nevada Block. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 30, 1881. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco, California, for 
the Week ending- July 26, 1881. 

Compiled from the Hecords of the Commercial Agency, 401 California St. , S. F. 
Monday, July 18th. 



GBANTOB AND GKAHTEE. 



Isadore Lavenson to S Lavenson. 
B Cunningham toM A Starkey... 



Jas Pollock and wf to C Krenser. . 
Wm Nicolai to Isaac Reiss 



Hugh Curran to Sarah C Whicham 
Wm J Gunn to Nettie Rothschild. . 



Same to Geo F Roberts 

Root Brass Jr to Ales Hall and wf 
Wallace Wing to Emma J Wing 



DESCRIPTION. 



Lots 16, 35 26, blk 12-3, Central Park Hd 

Sw 8th ave, 325 se P et, se to R R ave, 
sw 55, nw to a point, ne to commence- 
ment—portion block 167, Haley & O'- 
Neil Tract 

S Union. 69:2 e Jones, e 22:6sl20— 50- 
vara 846 

Assigns all property for the benefit of 
creditors 

W corner 4th and Welch, nw 30xS0 ... 

S Clement, 32:6 e of 9th ave, e 25x100 
Outside Lands 189 

W Fillmore, 87:6 n Pine, n 12:6x87:6. 

Nw Church and 27th, n 51x80 

E Shotwell, 125 s Alta, s 60x122:6 



$7,500 

5 

1,900 

1 
10,000 

300 
1/flO 
1.350 
Gift 



Tuesday, July 19th. 



Nw of Vallejo and Baker, w 55x137:6—1 

Western Addition 573 $ 800 

S Washington, 110 e Webster, e 27:6 x 
127:8— Western Addition 269: subject 

to a mortgage for £1,000 

W Kearny, 77:6 n Union, u 20x60 . 
N Tyler, 44:6 e Hyde, e 4Sx68:9. .. 
i W Liipidse, 125 n 19th, n 23x80— Mis- 
sion Block 71 ; to correct an error in 

former deed 

Geo B Knowles to Bridget Lassen] Lot 63, Spring Valley Homestead. 

S Peter to F H Kellogg W 41st avenue, 200 s of '41' street, s 100 

| x 120—Ontelde-Lands 916 



Warren P Morrill to F M Varden . . 
John Tuttle to Emma B Tuttle.... 



Henry Holland to Gennaro Faraco 
Pauline Weiss to Jacob Weiss.... 
W F Lapidge and wf to M O'Haro 



600 
1,450 
Gift 



510 
250 



"Wednesday, July 20th- 



Hiram C Clark ct al to A Gibson. 



Mary Herzo to Elizth Paul 

W F Myers to Sallie M Myers. . . 

Geo Brown to Bridget McHugh.. 

J Hirschfeld and wf to Chs Brown 

Chas Brown to Rebecca Hirschfeld 

Wm Kilday to Sarah Kilday 

Wm Cordes et al to Edward Kruse 

Henry L Dodge to N L Jehu 

J Martin to Christopher Windrow. 

Wm B Martin to Craven R Nott. . . 
Stanley W Hoyt to Alex Warner.. 

A Borel to David Clarke 

O Embody to Noyes S Embody 



E Battery, 30 6 Pine, s 61:8, e 87:6, n 91: 

8, w 25. s 30. w 62:6 to commencement 

— B and W 269, 270 '.. 

W Davis, 90 b Sacramento, s 47:6x68:9— 

Band W 488, 489 

Se Franklin and Jackson, s 87:8x124:3— 

Western Addition 91 

N McAllister. 100 w Lyon, 37:6x137:6— 

Western Addition 61 1 

W Buchanan, 150 n of Ellis, n 25x90— 

Western Addition 278 

Same 

Nw Howard, 375 ne 8th, ne 25x90 

Nw Bush and Pierce, w 137:6x137:6— 

Western Addition 427 

W Leavenworth, 47:6 n Sutter, n 27:4 x 

90:7— 50-vara 1179 

Sw 13th avenue, 100 se N st, se 50x100 ; 

portion blk 266, O'Neil & Haley Tract 

N Vale. 266:8 e Noe. e 53:4x114 

Lots 21 and 22, blk 12. Flint Tract Hd . . 
Nw Folsom, 378:1 sw 4tb, sw 34:4x160.. 
S corner Mission and 9tb, sw 56:8x81:3— 

Mission Block 3 



1 1 

5 

Gift 

1,475 

5 

5 

Gift 

9,728 

1 

1,200 

100 

10 

6,700 



Thursday, July 21st. 



John Pbillippi to E S Tnrner et al 
E D Kennedy to F J Thibanlt et al 
Sallie Tbibanlt to Rosioe Heim. . 

EB Eddy to Kate J Kennedy 

Kate J Kennedy ct al to G H Perry 
A M Hamilton etal to W L E'.iott. 
L Oehlert to Delia Murphy 



J S McCain to Margt M Brooke. . . 



Danl F Dagget to S L Daggett.... 
Wm B Carr to F A Hornblower.. 



Jos P Beck to Victor Land 

Wm J Gunn to Chas D Burbank. 

GH Perry to Michl Shannon 

JnoNFarnham to Elizth Paul... 



S O'Forrell, 171:10 e Fillmore. 34:4x120. 

N Houtton, 58 e Jones, e 20x60 

Same 

Sw Noe and Beaver, s 115x135 

Same 

Sw Larkin and Lombard, w 105:9x25 . . . 
Sw Sherman ave and Old San Jose Road 

sw 348, ne to Sherman ave, n w 110 to 

commencement, por blk 6, West End 

Map 2 

S Sacramento, 81:3 e Scott, e 25x132:7— 

Western Addition 425....' 

Lot 98, Hill Side Homestead 

W San Jose avenue, 305:9 s 24th, e 62 x 

298— Harper's Addition 8 

Nw Key's alley and Pacific, w 10x30 

50-varal62 

W 8th avenue, 250 n of Pt Lobos, n 50 

x 120— Outside Land* 1S9 

W Noe, 115 n 16th, n 27:6x100— Mission 

Block 117 

E 1st, 69 s Harrison, s 34:4x137:6 .. 



5 1 

100 

1 

5 

1,550 



1,500 
1 

6,550 

800 

490 

750 

3,600 



Friday, July 22d. 



Nat*] G Bk & T Co to R Spanlding 
Lan'l Hill Cem Assn to E J Seth. . 

GHPerryto Arthnr Attridgo 

Caleb N Cousens to Agnes Bridge 



F Livingston etal to L Gerstle.. 



L Gerstle to Gustav Niebaum 

G Niebaum to Nes Bis Gk Church 
Mary Ellis to H D Cogswell 



John Schaer to R A Bourne. . 



Patk Healy to Presidio R R Co . . . 
John H Wise to Tully R Wise. . . . 



Henry Schnur to G Gianinin: 

Jas P Healy to Margaret Healv 

Wm L Smith et al to O F Savs Bk 



E W Perry Jr to Wash'ton Bartlett 
Solomon Jacobs to Jos Roscnblum 



W Howard, 65 s 25th, s 65x115 

Lot 2404 

W Noe. 142:6 n 16th, n 27:6x100 

W Larkin. 62:6 s Jackson, s 25x87:6- 
Western Addition 19 

Sw Montgomery ave and Powell, b 58, 
w 137:6, n 171:6, e 12. s 70, e 38, s 12:6, 
efil:g se 4:3 to commencement— 50- 
varas 407 and 430 

Same 

Same 

Block bounded by 6th, 7th, Townsend 
and Berrv 

N Biisb 209:3 w Webster, w 25x127:6— 
Western Addition 312; subject to a 
mortgage of $1.600 

E Sharp Place, 136:1 s Union, s 1:5, e 56 
n 1:10, w 56 to commencement 

Nw Leavenworth and Washington, n 
137:6x137:6 

Lots 24 and 25, blk 17, R R Ave Hd . . . . 

Sw Baiter and SntLer, * 25x100 

W Folsom, 40 n 24th, n 105x122:6— Mis- 
sion Block 153 

Ne 24th and Sati Jose avenue, e 90x05— 
MiBsion B'ocklS4 

Se nf O'Farrel] and Hyde, e 47:6x77:6— 
50-vara 1264 



$2,001 
85 
750 



5 
5 

38,000 



2,000 

5 

5 
200 
Gift 

9,711 

2,500 

5 



Saturday, July 23d. 



GHANTOE AND GBANTEE. 



_L 



DESCRIPTION. 



Geo M Wood and wf to L Gottig. 



L Gottia to George M Wood 

David JBneh and wf to Henry Rose 



HDntardand wf to Same 

Henry Rose to Claus Mangels. , 



Merch City Ld Asn to Felix Boyle 
Jos Brooth et al to Henry P Coon 



Henry P Coon to Henrietta I Selby 

Jas F Houghton to Same 

Winfield S Redding to JM'Mackin 



Morris Jenks to E D Keyes 

R Damm to Katharine Damm 

Patrick H Murphy to J McAliBter. 

Nat G Bk & T Co to H H Bancroft 



S California, 75 w Larkin, w 39:6, s 80: 
6, e 25, n 44:G, e 14:6, n 36 to com- 
mencement—Western Addition 15 

Same 

W Howard. 125 6 21st, s 30xl22:6-Mis- 
sion Block 64 

W Howard, 155 s 21st, b 2:6x245— Mis- 
sion Block 64 

W Howard, 127:6 8 21st, s 30x122:6- 
Mission Block 64 

Lot 37, blk 277 

Sw Page and Franklin, w !H, s 89:8, ne 
-115, n 22:1 to beginning — Western Ad- 
dition 143 

Same . 

Same 

N Jackson, 192:6 w Jones, w 27:6x141:6 
-50-vara 879, 878 

B Montgomery, 37:6 s Sutter, s 25x62:6- 
59-vara 553 

W Alabama, 51 n 26th, n 26tb, n 25x100 
—Mission Block 179 

W Dolores, 226:6 n Vale, n 25x100 ; e 
cor 12th ave and G street, se 25x100— 
Portion of lot 9, block 233, S S F Hd 
and R R Association 

W Valencia, 244 s Old San Jose Road, 
s 126x120 



I 



5 
5 

1,000 

425 

10 



14,000 

31,000 

650 

4,000 

31,500 

Gift 

5 
3,150 



Monday, July 35th. 



Wm F Lapidge & wf to T Lenthall 

Same to Same 

Thos Magee to Wm H Mead 



Merch City Ld Assn to R Brown. . 
Solomon Marks to A Fisher et al. 

Wm F Cashman to Robt A Vance 

Same to Ellie Vance 

Patk Furlong to Mary Furlong 

Mary Hays et al to Albert Miller.. 

A Sbarboro to Guiseppe Varni 



Jno Cooney to Hannah Cooney. 
Geo Toole to Ann Coony 



E Lapidge, 325 n 191h, n 25x80— Mission 
Block71 

E Lapidge, 225 n 19lh, n 25x30— Mission 
Block 71 , 

N Page, 110 e Laguna, e 27:6x120— West- 
ern Addition 211 

Lot 42, bl 1:277, Outside Lands 

N McAllister, 178:9 w Lagnna, w 41:3 x 
120— Western Addition 255 .. 

Lot 31, Cashman Tract, Outside Lands. 

Lot 30, same 

E Col •, 113:5 s Carl, e 287:6, se 175, nw 
196, sw 147:6 to commencement 

W Noe, 131:9 s Market, s 25x55-Mis- 
sion Block 115 

Sw Niagara avenue, 336:8 nw Huron, 
nw 43:4, sw to a point, se 83:8, ne 60. 
nw40. ne 100 to commencement 

E Eureka, 217:6 s 19th, s 27:6x125 

Nw Fillmore and Laussct, w 81:3x24— 
Western Addition 372 



8 530 

550 

4,000 

11,000 
185 

185 

Gift 
375 



1,000 
500 



1,000 



Tuesday, July 2eth. 



Ann Shannon to Savs and Ln Socy 



H B Edwards to Mary E Beale. . . . 
Bridget Byrne to Chris D Postel.. 



Jno Byrne to Mary Lonegan 

Marion B Langhorne to N Luning 
Frank V Bell et al to L Gottig. . . . 
N S Arnold etal to same 



Nw Minna, 313:131 sw 3d, sw 21:10i;x 
70— 100- vara 16 

S Vallejo. 97:6 e Battery, e 20x40:10 

S Pacific, 46 e Taylor, c 20:4Jix80— 50- 
vara 658 

F Stevenson, 210 s 19th, s 25x80— Miss'n 
Block 67 

Und H nw Pine and Kearny, n 71:6x45:5 
— 55-vara275 

N Sac'lo, 109:9 e Pierce, e 25 x 12-W A 
391 

W Broderick, 137:6 n Post, n 55x110- 
W A 537 

W Laguna, 137:6 s Geary, s 43x137:6 

Se Market, 425 sw 6th, sw 50x165—100- 
vara243 

Same . . 

S Asztalos and wf to H Rotenstein,S Greenwich, 6S e Stockton, e 20x68:9- 

I 50-vara 468 

Jos B Benway to C Thompson E Missu)n,_870 sw Precita ave, sw 30x 



C C Bntler to Hnjrn Daly.... 
X F Scherr to Morris Jenks 



"Warren Olney et al to same.. 



150-PorP Vlot 364.. 



$3,000 
600 

2,640 

600 

27,500 

2,500 

6.095 
1,000 

37,000 
1 

1,000 

1.700 



POISON OA3K- 

CUKED BY THE XT S E OF 

STEELE'S GRINDELIA LOTION, 

OR 

FLUID EXTRACT OF GRINDELIA ROBUST A. 



Manufactured and Sold hi/ 

JAMES G. STEELE & CO Druggists, 

635 Market Street, Under the Palace Hotel. 

[May 7.] 

DR. A. J. BOWIE, 

Haviriir entirely recovered bis health, has resumed the 
practice of Medicine and Surgery in conjunction with his two sons, DR. 
HAMILTON C. BOWIE and DR. ROBERT J. BOWIE, Graduates ol the Royal Uni- 
versity, Munich. '. - 

Residences 72 i £,Sutt6* dt. and 714 O'Farrell St. 

£^* Telephonic communication with Office and Residences at all Hours. 
Hours: 10^1 p.m. [March 26.1 Office: 330 SUTTER STREET. 

OR, WILLIAM E. TAYLOR. 

OFFICE: 315 GEARY ST. RESIDENCE: THE BALDWIN. 

Feb. 5.] OFFICE HOURS: 1 to 4 P.M. 

DR. JAMES W. KEENEY, 

OFFICE AND RESIDENCE: 23 MOSTfiOMERT STREET. 

HOURS: 9 to 10 a.m., 2 to 4, 7 to 7:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS: 10 to 11 a.m.. 6 to 7 p.m. April 9. 

EDWARD B0SQUI & CO., 

Printers, Engravers, Lithographers and Bookbinders, 

Xtetdesdorff street, from Clay to Commercial. 



Jnly 30, 1*81 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



NOTABILIA. 



THE PEDDLERS BONG. 
Lawn m white u driven snow ; uid stomachers, 



.« crow ; 

tr Emm sod f<T noses ; 

i ockUrc, amber ; 
Perfume (or a lady's chamber ; 



For my l»<) li ilonrs; 

Pins Mid poking ■--'■ 

o heol : 

tme;comobtu .come buy. 
Buy, lads, or else your laasei cry, 

William Suakstkare. 



One of the passengers on board tlie ill fated Metis, at the time of the 

. was an exceedingly nervous man, who, while floating in the water, 

ned how hii friends would acquaint hifl wife i>f bis fate. Saved at 

but, he rushed to the telegTaph office and scut this message: " Dear P , 

I am saved, Break it gently to my wife!" We have saved more by buy- 
ing a I >:ivis Vertical Feed Sewing Machine than by any other purchase 
we ever made in oor life. Mark Sheldon, of 180 Poet street, is the agent 
for this, and also for the Howe and Chicago Singer Machines. They are 
unexcelled. 

An eminent judge used to say that, in his opinion, the very best 
thing ever said by a witness to a counsel was the reply given to Missing, 
the barrister, at the time leader of his circuit. He was defending a pris- 
oner charged with stealing a donkey. The prosecutor had left the animal 
tied up to a gate, and when he returned it was gone. Missing was very 
severe in his examination of the witness. "Do you mean to say, wit- 
ness, the donkey was stolen from that gate?" "I mean to say, sir" — 
giving the Judge, and then the jury, a sly look, at the same time pointing 
to the counsel — the ass was Missing." 

Although ladies, as a general thing, are proverbially fond of horses, 
yet even with them there is a limit to admiration, as was the case with a 
certain belle who turned a deaf ear to a suitor who possessed more bullion 
than brain. " Look at him!" said she to a friend, as he passed ; "could 
you marry him, even if he had a carriage and horses?" " No, indeed," 
replied the sympathizer ; "not if he kept a livery-stable!" If he bad 
only bought his hats of Mr. White, the well-known hatter of 614 Com- 
mercial street, the opinion of those ladies would have been entirely 
changed. 

At the conclusion of a sermon, somewhere in Iowa, the preacher 
requested some one to pass around the hat and " take up a collection." 
A young man, a stranger in the place, jumped up and commenced " cir- 
culating the hat " in such a way as to finish the job at the door and pass 
out with the proceeds. The preacher, eyeing him as he went out, ob- 
served: "If that young man runs away with that money he'll be 
damned." A deacon, sitting by the window, seeing him make off down 
the street, responded: "And if he hasn't run away with the money I'll 
be damned!" 

The marriage of the Princess Victoria of Hesse with the Crown 
Prince of Sweden is fixed for the 20th of September. The Queen of 
Sweden, the Crown Prince of Denmark, and about sixty Royal person- 
ages are expected. With their usual enterprise, Bradley & Rulofson, the 
celebrated photographers, on the corner of Sacramento and Montgomery 
streets, have dispatched one of their best artists to take a picture of the 
imposing ceremony. The artist will be stationed in front of the great 
organ with one of the largest cameras ever constructed. 

The following is hard to beat for pathos and soul-stirring sentiment: 
Here pize and kakes and Bier I sell, 
And Oisters stood and in the shell, 
And fried wuns, too, for them that chews, 
And with dispatch blacks boots and shews. 

I built my soul a lordly pleasure-house, wherein at ease for aye to dwell. 
I said, " O Soul, make merry and carouse, dear Soul, for all is well." A 
huge crag- platform, smooth as burnish'd brass, I chose. The ranged ram- 
parts bright from level meadow-bates of deep grass suddenly scaled the 
light, and I put a stove in the kitchen, the finest for which I'd been itch- 
ing. Isn't it strange, an Arlington range, from De La M on tan y as store, 
on Jackson street, below Battery. Agent for the finest hardware manu- 
factured. 

" Here's a health to me and mine, not forgetting thee and thine ; and 
when thee and thine come to see me and mine, may me and mine make 
thee and thine as welcome as thee and thine have ever made me and 
mine, and me and mine (excuse the grammar) will take thee and thine to 
Swain's Bakery, at 213 Sutter street, just above Kearny, where the finest 
lunches and dinners are to be had ; where thee and thine shall eat ice- 
cream, and take home some of the finest confectionery ever seen in 
America. 

" Friend W^— ," said a clergyman to a sick parishioner, "you are 
now getting to be an old man, and have lived a careless life ; would it not 
be well to take the present opportunity to make your peace with God ?" 
"Lord bless your sou! ' " replied the feeble old man, "he and I hain't 
never had no fallin' out -°V You will never have a falling out if you 
only ride in one of Torakinson's spl did turnouts, hired from his stables 
at 57, 59 and 61 Minna street. They are unexcelled in the United States. 

I'll sing you a song of a shirt — not Hood's — but to read it won't hurt; 
but if you are any way squeamish, just call on our friend Peter Beamish, 
on the corner of Third street and Market, don't lose the address but just 
mark it, and if my advice you would foller, bny unlaundried shirts for a 
dollar, and you will also find there the very best assortment of gentle- 
men's furnishing goods to be obtained in this city. Mr. Beamish's store 
is just under the Nucleus House. 

A bard-shell Baptist preached in this city lately, and took for his 
text, " God made man in his own image." He then commenced, "An 
honest man is the noblest work of God." He made a long pause, looked 
searchingly about the audience, and then exclaimed: "But I opine God 
Almighty hasn't had a job in this city for nigh on to fifteen years." 

Try the Something New 4 U Cigarette. It is delicious. 



How far, how far. Sweet, the Dftfft behind our feet, lies in the even- 
8>Owl MOW, 0D the forward way, lot us fob! our hand* ami pray. Alas, 
Time stays— we go. Only before you fold your hands, see that they are 
enowed tBft perfectly fitting pair of Foster gloves, which can be obtained 
of J. J. Brian A Co., at the Arcade, in ail sizes, shades and number of 
buttons from <>ne to twelve. These are the best gloveB in America to-day, 
and don't forget the address, 024, 926 aud 928 Market street. 

It Is to?d of a young gentleman, whom a maiden liked, but father 
didn't, that at a reasonable hour the old gent mildly intimated that the 
time for retiring had arrived. " I think you are correct, my dear sir," 
answered nineteenth century, modestly; "we have been waiting over an 
hour for you to put yourself in your little bed." The father retired, 
thoughtfully. 

He rose at dawn, and, fired with hope, shot o'er the seething harbor- 
bar, and reach *d the ship and caught the rope, and whistled to the 
morning star. Tennyson tells us so much, but he basely conceals the 
fact that, after the sailor-boy had done whistling to the morning-star, he 
went below and took a drink of P. J. Cassin & Co.'s whisky, purchased 
at their store on the corner of Washington and Battery streets, where the 
finest liquors are to be found, retail or wholesale, in quantities to suit 
both the trade and families. 

Zach Montgomery's scheme for promulgating his own peculiar edu- 
cational ideas and advertising them, took a queer form last week. For SI 
each, 1,500 persons can compete for $1,000 and " neat silver medals." 
This fa, indeed, kind of Zach, and it is to be hoped the entries will fill, 
in order to enable him to get his name up and make a nice little profit. 

Although it is true there is no odor 
To the mineral water named Napa Soda, 
The qualities rare of this water so fair 
Divest all who use it of trouble and care, 
And no one who drinks it will squabble or swear, 
So stick to your Napa Soda. 

The American Exchange Hotel, Sansoroe street, opposite Wells, 
Fargo & Co.'s Express, San Francisco. This popular hotel is now under 
the experienced management of Charles Montgomery, which means good 
living and moderate charges. Board with room, 91, $1.2.7 and $1.50 per 
day, or $G to $10 per week. Table first-class. Nice single rooms, 50 
cents per night. Free coach to and from the hotel. 

An Irishman's Will. — I will and bequeath my beloved wife, Bridget, 
all my property without reserve; and to my eldest son, Patrick, one-half 
of the remainder; and to Dennis, my yonngest son, the rest. If there is 
anything left, it may go to Terence McCarthy. 

The management of the Eintracht, 530 California street, has been 
taken in hand again by its former owners, Schuabel & Co. It is the main 
depot for the celebrated Fredericksburg lager from San Jose. Leave or 
send your orders there for keg or bottle beer, delivered free to any part of 
the city. 

For table raspberries and strawberries, put up with the purest 
sugars, and retaining their color without resorting to any artificial means, 
secure those put up by King, Morse & Co. 

Gttiteau never smoked, drank, or chewed tobacco; bat was a power aa 
class leader in a small prayer meeting. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star withm a shield. 

A new oleomargarine song is entitled: "There are do hairs in last 
year's butter." 

Dnryeas' Starch has always received first prize medala in the United 
States and Europe. 

The way to get fat -Eat oleomargarine. 

Best pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 72AK Market street. 






(0 

o 

u 
Q 




<D 



c 

CO 
X! 
o 

$-. 

CD 



<D 



«_* T +-. wf»> A per dav at home. Samp es worlh $' free. „ . 

1 CO IO K>^yJ StiksoxA Co-.Portui 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 30, 1881. 



"BIZ." 

The Import trade of San Francisco by sea and rail, for the first six 

months of 1880 and 1881, exhibits a very large increase for the current 

year. We allnde now to foreign merchandise. The figures stand as 

follows " 

6 months 1880. 6 months 1881. 

Totals by sea $17,351,413 $17,993,720 

totals byrail 874,491 783,920 

Grand total $18,225,904 $13,777,640 

Increase in 1861 $551,736 

China heads the list in both years. Japan comes second in value; 
Sandwich Islands third in the list; Central America fourth in the tables, 
England fifth, British East Indies sixth. All other countries fall below 
the million. The imports of Treasure for six months of 1880 and 1881 
compare as follows: 1880, $2,876,958; 1881, $3,391,865; increase in 1881, 
$514,907. The total value of the imports from foreign countries, of mer- 
chandise and treasure combined for the first six months of 1880 and 1881, 
as compiled in detail by the Commercial Herald, from Custom House 

books, were as follows: 

' 1830. 1881. 

Value of merchandise $18,225,904 $18,777,640 

Value of treasure 2,876,958 3.391,865 

Grand total $21,102,862 $22,169,505 

Increase first six months 1881 $1,066,643 

The figures of imports from China in each year (six months) exceed $4,- 
800,000; Japan, $3,134,717 in 1880, and in 1881 $2,728,112; Central 
America, 1880, $2,192,508—1881, $1,442,081; England, 18S0, $1,211,961— 
1881, $1,310,564; British East Indies, 1880, $1,163,928-1881, $1,304,410. 
By comparison with the same period in 1880, we find that our receipts of 
Bagging material have increased about one-half. Of Coal we find an ex- 
cess in Australian and English. Coffee has fallen off materially. Malt 
Liquors show a decrease. Iron of various kinds, upon the whole, shows 
a decrease, and in this useful article we will have a very considerable dis- 
placement of imports by a home supply from the works at Clipper Gap. 
Of Tin Plate the imports have doubled. In Provisions, the home mar_ 
ket has reduced the imports to a minimum. Rice came to hand in large 
excess, particularly from China. Sugar comes to hand in largely in- 
creased quantities, particularly Hawaiian. Tea has also increased, and 
foreign Wines come in lessened quantities, as our own excellent native 
product is gaining favor. 

The Freight market continues to exhibit great strength. At this 
time of writing there is not a disengaged deep water vessel in port. Sev- 
eral spot Wheat charters have been written during the week — American 
(wooden), for Liverpool direct, at 77@77s. 6d.; Br. iron ships for Cork 
U. K., at 80@82s., according to the port of discharge. The tonnage fleet 
to arrive within six months, 383,000 tons: same time 1879, 182,000 toDS. 
There is on the berth 40,000 tons. We are advised of two Br. iron steam- 
ers en route to ths port for the O. and O. Company, to take the place of 
the Oceanic and Gaelic. We are farther advised of two or three iron 
steamships being chartered in England to carry Railroad Iron to Oregon, 
and thence to load Wheat in this port for Great Britain. This latter is 
quite a new feature in the grain carrying trade of the Pacific. The above 
Br. steamers referred to are, no doubt, large collier carriers, and have 
been chartered in England for the round voyage. 

Wheat and Flour.— Exports of the former are continued to Europe 
upon a liberal scale. Since July 1st of the current harvest year we have 
cleared one vessel every day in the month, and hope to do even better in 
the month to come. The present price of No. 1 Wheat is $1 42£@1 45 ; 
No. 2 do., $1 35@1 37£. Supplies are liberal, both of old and new, but 
the market is by no means active at current quotations, exporters ap- 
parently well stocked for the loading of ships on the berth. The Oceanic, 
on her last trip to China and Japan, carried 9,836 bbls. The City of 
Tokio will be the next steamer to follow in course ; freight by the former 
$6 per ton, the latter charging $8. 

Barley. — There is a fair local demand at 95c.@$l for Feed ; Brewing, 
$1 10@1 20; Chevalier, 92£c. for Coast. We hear of no sales for export. 

Oats.— The market is sluggish at $1 40@1 65 per ctl. 

Corn.— There is very little traffic at present— price, $1 05@1 10 $ ctl. 

Rye. — A small sale has been made at $1 374. A choice article is held 
at $1 45. 

Hops. — The market is bare of stock — price, 15 to 25c. 

Wool. — There is very little business at present. There is a decided 
lull in the market at 25@30c for good to choice Fleece; fair to good, 20@ 
23c; Burry and Earthy, 15@17c. 

Hides.— Dry are in request at 19^c; Wet Salted, 9£@10£c. 

Tallow is in active request at 7jc for export. 

Honey. — Crop is light this season and but few sales yet made. Choice 
White Extracted, 9@10c; Amber and Red, 6@7c; Comb, 12®13c for 
dark, 14@16c for white. 

Butter.— Choice Fresh Roll, 30@32k: fair to good, 28@30c; Firkin, 
22&@25c. 

Cheese.— For California, 10@13c; Eastern, 16@19c. 

Bggs, 28@30c. 

Borax. — The ship City of Florence, for Liverpool, will carry 112,155 
lbs, valued at $11,200. 

Coal.— The market ia well supplied with foreign, at $6@$6 50. The 
price of Wellington to dealers reduced to $8 50; Seattle, $7; Carbon 
Hill, SS 50. 



Case Goods.— The Salmon market is strong at $1 30@$1 32£ If? dozen- 
Sacramento River, $1 20@$1 25. Our local canners are doing a big busi- 
ness with free sales for export of Apricots, Pears, Peaches and other 
Fruits. Prices reserved but low. 

Coffee. — The market is strong for Central American at 12@14c. 

Dry Goods. — The Oceanic, for Hongkong, carried of Cottons, Sheets 
ings, 2,343 bales, and of Duck 33 bales, valued at $106,122. 

Metals. — There is but little doing in imports. Stocks of Pig Iron, Tin 
Plate, etc., large, and prices both low and nominal. Sydney Pig Tin, 21 
@22c. 

Orchilla. — The Newbern, from Mexican ports, brought, in transit for 
Liverpool, 1,663 bales. 

Quicksilver. — The stock is light and the market firm at 38c. The 
Oceanic, for Hongkong, did not carry a flask. 

Rice.— The City of Tokio, from Hongkong, brought 8,881 mats. We 
quote Hawaiian, 5@5|c; No. 1 China, 5|@,6c; No. 2, 5@5ic; Mixed, 5c. 

Spices. — We note a sale of 122 bags China Pepper at 17c. 

Sugar.— No imports this week ; market steady at 13c. for White, lOf 
@ll£e. for Yellow and Golden. Manila prices are lower, and this has 
caused a decline in the Hawaiian basis price. 

Teas. — The City of Tokio, from China and Japan, brought 8,688 pkgs; 
for this city, and in transit for Eastern cities 10,914 pkgs. 

Wines. — There continues to be a good active demand for Native, both 
Still and Sparkling, at full rates. This year's vintage is very promising. 

Bags. — The market is overstocked, and Calcutta Standard Grain Sacks 
continue to sell at auction at Sj to 9c. cash. 

Duryeas' Starch is the best in the world ; is warranted pure. None 
other so easily used or so economical. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Ttae Company's steamers will sail for ToUobama and 
Hougkougr: CITY OP TOKIO, August Gth, at 2 p.m. Excursion Tick- 
ets to Yokohama and return at special rates. 

For NEW YORK via PANAMA: COLIMA, August 4th, at 12 o*clock M., taking 
Freight and Passengers to MAZATLAN, ACAPULCO, SAN JOSE DE GUATE- 
MALA, LA LIBERTAD and PUNTA ARENAS. 

Fare to New York— Cabin, $139; Steerage, $65. 

Tickets to and from Europe by aDy line for sale at the lowest rateB ; also to Ha- 
vana and all West India ports. 

For HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY: CITY OF NEW YORK, Sunday, 
July 31st, at 2 p.m., or on arrival of the English mails. Freight taken for Honolulu. 

$10 additional is charged for passage in Upper Saloon. Round the World Trip 
Tickets, via New Zealand and Australia, §650. 

Tickets must be purchased at least one hour before time of sailing. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan streets. 
July 30. WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., General Agents. 



FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

The Oretfou Railway and Navigation Company and Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company will dispatch everv five days, for the above ports, 
one of their newAl Iron Steamships, viz.: COLUMBIA, OREGON and STATE 
OF CALIFORNIA. 

Sailing" Days 
July 6, 10, 15, 20, 35, and 30 | August 4, 9, 14, 19. 24, and 29. 

At 10 O'clock A. iU. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent O R. & N. Co. , 

No 210 Battery street, San Francisco. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents P. C. S. S. Co., 
July 9. No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at 2 p.m., for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

Gaelic. Oceanic. Belgic. 

Saturday, Sept. 17th; Saturday. July 23d; Friday, Aug. 19th: 

Saturday, Dec. 3d. Thursday, October 6th; Friday, Nov. 4th. 

Wednesday, Dec 21st. 
Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at Reduced Rates. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets on sale at C. P. R. R. Co.'s General 
Offices, Room 74, corner Fourth and Townsend streets. 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street, Union Block. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
LELAND STANFORD, Pre sident. ; July 23. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
for VICTORIA, B. C, and PUGET SOUND PORTS on the 10th, 20th and 30th 
of each month (except when such days fall on a holiday, then on the day previous), 
for PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with the O. R. & N. Co. every 5 days, and for 
EUREKA, LOS ANGELES, SANTA BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ, SAN DIEGO, SAN 
LUIS OBISPO, and all other NORTHERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS in 
California about every three days. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
cisco Daily Papers. 

Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 



Oct. 30. 



GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
No. 10 Market street. 



CALIFORNIA AND MEXICAN S. S. LINE, 

For RCagdaleua Bay, Cape St. Lucas, Mazatlan, JLa Paz and 
Guaymas.— The Steamship NEWBERNfWm. Metzger, Master) will leave for 
the above ports on SATURDAY, August 6th, 1881, at 12 d' clock m., from Washington- 
street Wharf. Through Bills of Lading Will he furnished and none others signed. 
Freight will be received on Monday, August 1st. No Fieight received after 
Friday, August 5th, at 12 o'clock m., and Bills of Lading must be accompanied by 
Custom House and Consular Clearances. For freight or passage, apply to 

J. BERMINGHAM, Agent, 
Jjily 30. No. 10 Market street. 






July 30, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



UNEARTHING OEMS. 
Anyone who bfond nfl uploringth« quaint by-streeta and the odd 

bund book and print shops 
will enjoy t) tide w Inch Mr. \V. .T. Thorns contributes 

fiipv. Fur the last fifty years his hobby has been 
I during his rambles ha baa unearthed many literary 
(ferns and rarit under of the funeral Roxburgh^ Library res- 

eaedmany of his ohoioeet treaenres From old itaDa, and every one Shows 
that they formed one of the favorite bunting grounds of Lord Maeauley. 
Sir. Thome himself was not only an ardent collector, but an unusually 
lucky one. Differing from Leigh Hunt, who sai»l that " no one bad ever 
found anything worth having in the 'sixpenny-box ' at a bookstall, " Mr. 
Thorns thinks they are fruitful in rarities, ami be mentions in support of 
this that he found in one of them an early OOpy of Thomas Randolph's 
'* Aristippus, or the Jovial Philosopher.* 1 Toe box is the place to go to 
for a forgotten tract or political pamphlet; and he tells us an amusing 
story of now a missing pamphlet of Defoe was found in one after the 
British Museum and the public libraries had been ransacked in vain. 
Again he rescued from a miserable Lot of dirty old hooks in a back slum 
a copy "f "Sprat's " History • »f the Royal Society/* showing strong evi- 
dence of having belonged to Newton. For a shilling he bought a black- 
letter 16mo English translation from Erasmus. A vellum "Junius" in 
his possession Mr. Thorns thinks may be the veritable vellum copy bound 
for Junius himself, but of this he is doubtful.— TV* Malt Budget. 



We note with unfeigned satisfaction the nomination <>f Mr. Julius 

r.i»ndin;iiin. of the Him of H;m lmann. NeiUon & Co. (agents for the 

Giant Powder Company), at the regnlar Republican nominee forSobool 
Director. We know Mr. Bandmann personally, know him to he a gentle* 
ins pew it sun* reprochti and hope that, in the coming election, he 
may attain the office which he has condescended to accept. If there were 
more men of Mr. Bandmann'e calibre, and we in nowise flatter him, who 
could be found willing to enter the arena of politics, our local government 
would he very different from what it is to-day. 



Counting the Coin in the Sub-Treasury. — Since the Hon. William 
Sherman has been relieved by Hon. H. W. Spaulding in the management 
of the Sub-Treasury in this city, it becomes necessary to carefully weigh 
and count the coin in the vaults. This is no idle task, for away down in 
iund are stored away twenty-seven million dollars of silver, besides 
a urge amount of gold, and this enormous amount of treasure has to be 
mined over again, as it were, for those who are employed in bringing the 
coin out of the Croesian depths have found it no boy's play, because their 
hands became raw and sore handling the rusty sacks that have lain quietly 
away in the dark, poisouous cavern for years. The atmosphere is very 
foul and close, so much so that several strong men, who were employed at 
a salary of five dollars per day, had to abandon the task after trying it a 
few hours. The money has to be handled over eight times in order to in- 
sure accuracy. Ten or twelve men are employed in weighing and count- 
ing, and they will not be through with their task for four weeks to come. 

The South Pacific Coast Railroad Company announces another 
pleasant excursion by a special train to the Big Tree Grove and Santa 
Cruz, next Sunday, July 31st. The train will leave the new Oakland and 
Alameda Ferry, at the foot of Market street, at 8:30 a. m. sharp, stopping 
at Twelfth and Webster streets, Oakland, at 8:45, and at Park street, 
Alameda, at 9:15. The train will return from Santa Cruz at 4 p. m., and 
arrive here at 8:30, landing the Oakland passengers at 8:10 p. M. There is 
no more delightful trip imaginable than this in the bight of our beautiful 
Californian Summer. The excursionist not only gets a most enjoyable 
trip, both by water and land, but he also has five hours at the seaside, 
with a chance of a good bath, a blow by the ocean, and a most invigorating 
day. Everybody cannot afford a couple of weeks at the seaside, but al- 
most every one can find three dollars, which is the expense of this de- 
lightful round trip. 

We call attention this week to the invaluable compound now put up 
in this city, and for which James R, Kelly & Co., on Market street, be- 
low Beale, are agents, and which is known as Imperishable Paint. It 
might be termed " every man his own painter," for anybody can apply it 
to a building by following the simple and straightforward directions which 
accompany each can. The Imperishable Paint comes in every possible 
shade of color, embracing in many instances new shades that have never 
been attempted before. It will, when properly applied, cover more space 
and do more to protect a building against rainy weather and the hot sun 
than any preparation ever invented. Full particulars about the merits of 
this really invaluable paint can be obtained by applying at the house of 
James R. Kelly & Co., where it can be seen in all its beautiful and vari- 
gated shades. 

Boone 8c Osborn report the following number of patents issued from 
the United States Patent Office to inventors on the Pacific Coast, for the 
week ending July 19, 1SS1: A. F. Bundock and E. T. Mapel, Sacra- 
mento, Cal., refrigerator; J. J.Burke, Walla Walla, W. T, clamp; 
Geo. Cumtning, San Francisco, Cal., riveting machine; M. B. Dodge, 
San Francifco, concentrating table ; A. P. Gross, San Francisco, bolting 
chest ; J. I. Lancaster and H. A. Sears, Washington Territory, buckle ; 
J. H. Mooney, San Francisco, sewing machine ; J. M. Scott, San Fran- 
cisco, pillow block for Bhafts ; Budd Smith, assignor half to F. Bacon and 
W. G, Hughes, Oakland, Cal., clutch ; A, C. Springer, Nevada, car brake ; 
A. M. Wylie, San Francisco, steam boiler. 

The speedy removal of Mosgrove & tiro, to their new Crystal 
Palace on Post street, near the Lick House, promises to cause a perfect 
revolution in the dry goods business. The sale which is now nearly con- 
cluding at their present elegant store at 114 and 116 Kearny street, has 
been one of the most remarkable ones of the season. Last week we no- 
ticed that they had S55.000 worth of stock, of which over 920,000 was 
closed out at retail, showing the appreciation of the public at the speedy 
bargains of the clearance sale. In a few days this house will be in its 
new and handsome home, and displaying the mass of European and 
Eastern novelties with which they open. 



We note that Mr. Thomas Sullivan, of the well-known cloak and 
mantle repository of 120 Kearny Btreet, leaves for the East in a few days. 
He will be gone about five or six weeks, his visit being a purely business 
one. Among all our business men and merchants, we can recall no more 
energetic or upright man than Mr. Sullivan, and the News Letter wishes 
him a pleasant and successful trip, and hopes that during his visit East 
he may be enabled to enrich his popular establishment with every variety 
of new and tasteful goods. 

Charlotte Thompson and W. B. Sheridan, supported by Alice 
Hastings, the celebrated soubrette, and a full dramatic company of un- 
usual strength will follow the Minstrels at the Bush Street Theater, com- 
mencing Monday, August 8th, opening with Jane Eyre, with Miss 
Thompson in the title role and Mr. Sheridan in his original character of 
"Lord Rochester." To secure Mr. Sheridan Mr. Locke has contracted 
to pay him $500 per week. 

Mr. James Redpath is an orator as polished as he is eloquent. In a 
late speech made at Dublin he pronounced Sir William Harcourt a liar, 
John Bright a renegade, and Hon. William Forster an infamous Quaker. 
If Mr. Redpath airs his Irish in such a free and easy manner, he is rather 
apt to find himself in such a position that his audience will be confined to 
a select few of her Majesty's guardians of the peace. Freedom of speech 
is most certainly allowed in Great Britain, but when it degenerates into 
license the stopper is soon put on. 

Seeing that the Supreme Court, the Judge of another Court, and 
the jury sitting, were lately puzzled as to what constitutes a deadly 
weapon. We give a few which seem to have been left out of the consider- 
ation of these Solons: A woman's tongue, a flatiron properly propelled, 
bad whisky, a mule's hind leg, a bad omelette, a pen. We have several 
thousand more deadly weapons to treat of, but lack of space bids us stop. 

Piper Heidsieck Champagne.— Henry Lund, 214 California street, 
sole agent for the Pacifie Coast, is in constant receipt of both Quarts and 
Pints of this old favorite Wine. 

The Baroness Burdett-Coutta is mentioned by the Birmingham 
Gazette aB looking ten years younger than she did before her marriage. 

The California Paint Company has declared a dividend of $4 per 
share, payable at once. 

HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS 

For the Week Ending July 29, 1881. 

Compiled bv George C. Hickox & Co., 410 California Street. 



Name op Mike. 



Another of those pleasant excursions to Monterey and Santa 
Cruz is announced for to-morrow week, Sunday, August 7th. The round 
trip tickets for this delightful journey are set at S3 to both points. The 
special train leaves the Townsend-street depot at 7 a. m., and the Valen- 
cia-street station at 7:10, returning at 4:30 from Monterey and 4:10 p. m. 
from Santa Cruz, and giving all the excursionists five solid hours of en- 
joyment by the seaside, an opportunity for a dip in the ocean, a blow of 
a healthy sea-breeze and a good time generally. 

It will be good news to those who enjoy eating Muscat grapes to 
learn that King, Morse & Co. retain all the original flavor of this fine 
fruit in the manner in which they can. 



Albion 

Andes 

'Alpha 

Alta 

"Bullion 

Belcher 

h Best St Belcher 

Benton 

Bodie Con 

Boston Con 

Bechlel Con 

Crown Point 

. Chollar 

I 'California 

Con. Virginia 

Confidence 

Eureka Con 

Exchequer 

*Qould & Curry 

Goodshaw 

" Hale & Norcross. . . . 

Julia 

Justice 

Kentuck 

'Mexican 

Mount Diablo 

ttono 

Northern Belle 

Noonday 

♦North NooitiLiv 

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♦Overman 

'Occidental 

Potosi 

Savage 

Silver HU1 

Silver King, Arizona . 

♦Scorpion 

♦Sierra Nevada 

♦Union Con 

♦Utah 

Wales Con 

Yellow Jacket 





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Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 

ROBERT WALKINSHAW, 

Notary Public. 407 Montgomery street, Is prepared to lake 
charm of Estates or Trusts; to act as General Agent for persons absenting- 
themselves from the State; to buy and sell farming lands, take charge of securities, 
make collections, correspond, and make remittances. Reliable references. [July 9. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



July 30, 1881. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 

The (t Dark Continent " is throwing light upon European methods. 
England annexed the Transvaal for good and sufficient reasons, but, from 
a stroDg sense of justice, and against the dictates of national pride, she 
concluded that the Boers had some show of right on their side, and, 
therefore, that they should be accorded the privilege of self-government. 
France invaded Tunis without any pretense of right, and she is bombard- 
ing defenseless towns and massacring mobs of half-armed men, because 
they refuse to submit to her rule. The English in South Africa set an 
example to the French in North Africa which the latter would do well to 
imitate. The Boers, under a British protectorate, will enjoy greater ad- 
vantages than the colonists of Natal and Cape of Good Hope. 

Spain asks for compensation from France for loss of life and property 
in her African colony of Oran. France asks for a bill of particulars, 
which she says will be duly honored, and her Foreign Secretary politely 
expresses the hope that when Spaniards cut French throats in an Arab 
chase the Spaniards will reciprocate. And yet the Don is not satisfied. 

England has forbidden France from invading Tripoli on pain of en- 
countering British puissance, and the French Government has taken back 
water. No more bullying of the Porte about sending troopB to its Afri- 
can pashalic of Tripoli; no more interference with the tribes of the pash- 
alic for going into Tunis to .repel the invader. This is as it should be. 
England has guaranteed the territory of the Sultan, and the tribes of 
Tripoli, in fighting the French, are acting as become patriots. France 
cannot desert the Bey after coercing him and guaranteeing his position 
and dynasty. Altogether it is a pretty nice African muddle. 

The news of the defeat of the Ameer of Afghanistan, which was tele- 
graphed yesterday (Friday), completely changes the complexion of the 
troubles in India. It is said that the army of the Ameer of Afghanistan 
has been completely defeated by the forces under Ayoob Khan, and that 
the Ameer and the Indian Government are greatly concerned at the 
gravity of the situation. The dispatch says a battle was fought between 
the Ameer and Ayoob Khan, during which one of the Ameer's regiments 
deserted and went over to his enemies. Thereupon the Ameer's troops 
fled, leaving their guns and baggage on the field. A Kelat regiment and 
his Candahar horse deserted to Ayoob Khan. The Ameer's Generals fled 
toward Cabul. The London Telegraph says the defeat of the Ameer of 
Afghanistan implies the complete overthrow of the only remaining repre- 
sentative of British influence in Afghanistan. 

SAN FRANCISCO REAL ESTATE. 
The past week has been productive of more than the usual amount 
of sales, and among these were several of considerable magnitude. Among 
the purchasers we notice Nicholas Liming, who would not purchase real 
property unless he considered the market at bed-rock prices. The pro- 
perty purchased by him is the undivided one-'ialf of the large building 
on the northwest corner of Kearny and Pine streets for §27,500, which is 
considered to be very cheap for this property. Among other large sales 
we note that of X. F. Schafer to Morris Jenks, property on the south 
side of Market street, between Sixth and Seventh streets, for 837,000 ; 
Isadore Leavenson to S. Leavenson, lots 16, 25 and 26. Block No. 123, 
Central Park Homestead ; Hugh Curran to Sarah C. Wigham, property 
on the northwest corner of Fourth and Welch streets, for 810,000; Wil- 
liam Cordes, and others, to Edward Kruse, property on the northwest 
corner of Bush and Pierce streets, for §9,728 ; A. Borel to David Clark, 
property on the northwest side of Folsom, between Fourth and Fifth 
streets, for 86,700 ; William B. Carr to F. A. Hornblower, property on 
San Jose Avenue, in Harper's Addition, for S6,550 ; G. Niebaum to the 
Bishop of the Greek Church, the lot on which the Greek Church is erected, 
on the southwest side of Montgomery Avenue, near Powell street, for 
$38,000; William L. Smith, and others, to the Odd Fellows' Savings 
Bank, property on the west side of Folsom, between Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fourth streets, for 89,711 ; Joseph Brooth, and others, to Henry 
P. Coon, property on the southwest corner of Page and Franklin streets, 
for S14.000 ; Henry P. Coon to Henrietta I. Selby, same property, for 
$31,000; Morris Jenks to E. D. Keys, property on the east side of Mont- 
gomery street, between Sutter and Post streets, for $31,500; and Solomon 
Marks to A. Fisher and others, property on the north side of McAllister 
street, near Laguna, for S11,000. 

DE MORTUIS. 
The weeli ending July 29th is a light one in point of mortality, only 
scoring 62 deaths. Of these 43 were males and 19 females. The princi- 
pal causes of death were: From phthisis 5, pneumonia 5, heart disease 4, 
infantile convulsions 4, inanition 3, cholera infantum 3, typhoid fever 2, 
tumors 2, and 1 death from smallpox. There were 15 deaths of children 
under 1 year of age, 3 from 1 to 2, 2 from 2 to 10, and 2 between 15 and 
20. There were 7 between 20 and 30 and 11 between 30 and 40. The 
rest were all between 40 and 70 years. It is impossible to write this 
record year after year without noticing the large number of deaths be- 
tween the ages of 30 and 40 years. This week the number is compara- 
tively light, as is also the record of deaths from phthisis. The number 
of infants' deaths, we imagine, corresponds pretty much with the average 
of other cities, but it would be interesting to the general public to know 
from some skilled physician why there are so many deaths from consump- 
tion in a climate that we are eternally bragging about. Is it the sea fog, 
the high winds, intemperance, or do people come here to Calfornia to get 
cured after phthisis has appeared and then die? Five children this week 
were stillborn, three male and two female. The mortality was greatest in 
the Tenth Ward, where there were 13 deaths. Sixteen persons died in 
public institutions. Classed according to nativities, 32 were of foreign 
birth, 10 from the Atlantic Coast, and 20 from the Pacific Coast. Of 
these 56 were white, 5 Mongolian, and 1 African. For the corresponding 
week last year 73 deaths were recorded. 



THE LEFROY CASE. 

The murder on the Brighton Railway still remains a mystery, in spite 
of the great exertions which are being made by the Scotland-yard author- 
ities. Portraits of Lefroy have been distributed throughout the country, 
and scores of detectives are following up the different clues. The arrest 
and detention of suspected persons continues, aud at Wallington several 
houses have been searched without making any discovery. At the in- 
quest on Saturday Dr. Thomas Bond gave it as his opinion that the im- 
mediate cause of Mr. Gold's death was syncope. The injuries were suffi- 
cient to cause death from this reason in a healthy person. Apart from 
the disease of the heart the wounds would cause death. Men like the 
fugitive have been seen under suspicious circumstances at Southend, at 
Seveuoaks, at New-cross, at Wallington, at Holloway, in the Liverpool- 
road, at Islington, and at other places. There have also been rumors that 
a man has been stopped at the Hague, having traveled thither by the 
Great Eastern Railway's Company's line of boats, via Harwich. The 
remains of Mr. Gold were interred on Monday near Brighton. The in- 
quest was continued at Balcombe on the same day. Mr. JameB Terry, 
chief constable at Brighton, gave his reasons for not detaining Lefroy. 
He at first thought Lefroy waB a lunatic, but when he heard him speak 
he altered his mind. Witness was not told of the pool of blood being in 
the carriage until the following day. 

Gibson, the collector, was very backward in speaking. If witness had 
had any idea that something had happened, he should have had Lefroy 
watched, and he would in all probability have seen the head of the rail- 
way officials. He had heard nothing about Bhots being heard by a pas- 
senger, and Gibson said nothing about the watch being found in Lefroy's 
boot. The carriage was described as being uninjured, with the exception 
of a quantity of blood being on the floor. On Tuesday the chief evidence 
taken was that of Detective-Sergeant Holmes, who accompanied Lefroy 
to his house on the day of the murder. It appeared from bis evidence 
that, although while he was with Lefroy he knew that a dead body had 
been found in the tunnel, he did not think it led to a suspicion of Lefroy 
in the matter. He described the journey back from Brighton to Walling- 
ton, and said that after he had taken a fresh statement from Lefroy, at 
his house, Lefroy conducted him to the door and bade him good-by. By 
the time he had received direct orders from Inspector Turpin to take him 
into custody — about seven minuteB after taking leave of him — the sup- 
posed murderer was not to be found. The inquiry was brought'to a close 
on Thursday. The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the jury, 
after consulting about twenty minutes, returned a verdict of willful mur- 
der against Arthur Lefroy, alias Mapleton, abas Lee, alias Coppin. — Pall 
Mall Budget, July 8th, 

The Ledger's London specials say : The result of the recent agri- 
cultural investigations by the London Times correspondents, throughout 
the midland, western and southern counties of England, show that the 
prospects are not particularly encouraging, but few cropB reaching an av- 
erage. The wheat, like that of last year, is unlikely to come up to the 
expectations generally formed of it. Those forming these observations — 
the results of weeks of travel — do not presage much, if any, diminution 
of the British agricultural depression, and the meteorological conditions 
which have recently prevailed over the British Isles and Western Europe 
do not justify the bright anticipation of the earlier part of the season. 
Intense heat and deficiency of moisure have marked midsummer weather 
from the British and French coasts to Central Europe. It is true that the 
wheat crops in the United States have fallen below the average, but there 
is little ground for calculations of the trans-Atlantic harvests largely ex- 
ceeding the average. 

We are very rough on the poor Hebrews when we happen to remem- 
ber how they shied improper missiles at the prophets. But I am often 
inclined to think that only our veneer of that politeness unknown to 
Hezekiah prevents us from opening fire in the Israelitish manner — that 
is, when the prophet does not address us through the Caucus, and when 
he does not tell us about progress and things of that sort. After all, it is 
a natural and, I venture to think, laudable disposition. I know there are 
several prophets whom I, personally, should like to bombard, and if the 
children of Israel ever had specimens turned loose on them like to some 
eloquent men whom I know, I really don't wonder at the pavements be- 
ing misapplied. On the whole, I will forgive the population of Jerusa- 
lem. — " The Chiel " in Vanity Fair. 

The following occurs in a biography of the great George Stephenson: 
"By an extraordinary coincidence, which I cannot remember to have 
seen remarked upon, it was the very year in which George Stephenson 
was born — namely, 1781— that Dr. Erasmus Darwin first published, in his 
' Botanic Garden,' his memorable prediction : 

1 Soon shall thy arm unconquered steam, afar 
Drag the slow barge or drive the rapid car, 
Or, on slow waving wings expanded, bear 
The flying chariot thro' the fields of air.' " 
We trust to see this prediction verified to the last letter when the Mar- 
riott Aeroplane comes out. 

Politics are rampant, and Dr. O'Donnell has dug himself up once 
more from the mud of temporary oblivion. He is at present busily en- 
gaged hunting up his season's supply of Chinese lepers. The last year's 
crop having given out, he is rather pushed to find them. In case he 
Bhould not succeed in his laudable but somewhat unhealthy efforts, we 
can, at a short notice, supply him with some fine and very much decayed 
specimens of white men within a block of this office. An artistic mind 
like the Doctor's would have no difficulty in getting them up in such a 
manner as to pass for the genuine Mongolian article. 

The gentlemen of the jury in Ireland are, as is known, a pretty 
average-looking lot of ruffians. Now, at a recent trial the judge was 
about to pass sentence on the prisoners at the bar, of whom there were 
several, when a witty Irish barrister said, "Not too long a sentence, my 
lord ; you'll want tfiem before long to try the jury /" — " The Chiel " in Vanity 
Fair. 

Many persons whose digestive powers would not enable them to eat 
ripe cherries, will rejoice to know that they can eat the canned cherries 
so carefully prepared by King, Morse & Co., with relish. 



Price par Copy. 10 Cents.] 



ESTABLISHED JULY, 20. 1856. 



I An mini Subscription, tfi. 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 32. 



SAN FEANOISOO, SATUBDAY, AUG. 6, 1881. 



NO. 4. 



G 



OLD BARS— 890@910— Refined Silver— 13@132 # cent, discount. 
Mexican Dollars, 10 per cent. disc. 



49" Exchange on New York, 1-10 premium; On London, Ba 

Commercial, 49|. Paris, sight, 5-10 francs per dollar. 

15-100 per cent. 
J9* Price of Money here, 6@10 per cent, per year — bank ra 

open market, \@\\ per month. Demand light. On Bor 

3@4.J per cent, per year on Call. 


nkers, 49$ ; 
Telegrams, 

te. In the 

d Security. 


*3* Latest price of Sterling in New York, 483@485. 


PRICES OF LE/ 

San Francisct 


iDINQ STOCKS AND GOV. Bl 


)NDS. 
l. 




Stocks and Bonds. 

BONDS. 

Cal. State Bonds, 6's,'67 

S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 6s, '58 
S. F. City & Co. B'da, 7s . . . 

Sacramento City Bonds .... 

Los Angeles County Bonds. 
Los Angeles City Bonds. . . . 
Virg'a & Truckee R. R. Bds. 
Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bda 

Oregon R. & N. Bonds, 6s . . 


Bid. 

105 

Nom. 

Nom. 

60 

50 

50 
105 
103 
100 
105 
110 
110 
101 
110 
125 
112 
100 
1161 

150 
127 
120 

120 
120 


Asked 

Nodi. 

Nom. 

05 


Stocks and Bonds. 

INSUE&HOB COMPANIES. 
State Investment (ex-div). . 
Home Mutual (ex-div). — 
Commercial (ex-div) 


Bid. 

112 
115 
115 
100 

93 
110 

75 

40 

S7J 

55 

70 

40 
Nora. 
Nom. 

04 

32J 

55 
120 

90 

43 

77 
101 

11(1 

80 


Asked 

115 
117 
120 
102 


RAILROADS. 


94 


C. P. R. h. Bonds 


117 


102 
107 
112 

103 
113 
130 
115 

110} 

123 

125 






N. li. and Mission K. 11 


- 






Central R. it. Co 

Clay Street Hill R. R 

S. F. Gaslight Co 'ex-div). . . 
Oakland Gasligh t Co (ex-div) 
Sao'to Gaslight Co(ex-div).. 
Califor'a Powder Co (ex-div) 
Giant Powder Co (ex-div). . 
Atlantic Giant Powder, do . 
Gold and Stock Teteg'h Co. 
S. V. W. W. Co. 's Stock.... 

Pacific Coast S.S.Co's Stock 


Nom. 

Nom. 
65 
32} 
67 

96 

44 
78 
101} 


BANKS. 

Bank of California (ex-div). . 
First National (ex-div) .... 

INSURANCE COMFAN1K8. 


Fireman's Fund (ex-div). . . . 


85 


The decline in the pri 
ture of the week, for r 
stocks are again in dems 


36 of £ 
jasons 
nd, ai 


San Fr 
not ( 
id ext 


ancisco Gas Stock is the 
efinitely expressed. Str 
erne prices have been pa 
Andrew Baird, 312 Cal 


leadir 
eet ra 
id. 
ifornif 


g fea- 
ilroad 

k St. 



THE REAL ESTATE MARKET. 
The four-story brick building on the corner of Main and Market 
streets is almost completed, and is an important improvement to that por- 
tion of the city. There are some fine residences beinj? erected on and 
near the corner of Octavia and California streets. The Phelan Block has 
received its third story, and begins to assume handsome proportions. A 
millionaire, who has heretofore been loaning his money in the country, 
informs the Neivs Letter that henceforth he will invest his money only in 
the city, and that he has just refused a very large and excellent loan on 
one of the largest and most valuable ranches in the State because he has 
made up his mind to buy city property. There has been some drag in the 
market during the past month or so, but still, when such men as Colonel 
Pair, N. Liming, James Phelan and Adolph Sutro are willing to invest 
millions in city property, it is no time for us to despair of the future of 
our city. The sales for the past two weeks have been fair, and some have 
been of considerable importance. 



Entries and Exits for July. —There were 223 births registered at the 
Health Office during July. Of these 124 were of males and 90 of fe- 
males. This is about twice as many as usual, and is accounted for by the 
fact that physicians and midwives have been notified of the law and 
blanks sent them to report each month. There were also 312 deaths dur- 
ing the month, 209 of males and 103 of females; 272 of whites, 37 of Chi- 
nese, 3 of negroes. The nativities were : Pacific States 100, Atlantic 
States 40, foreign countries 163. Under 1 year of age, 70; 1 to 5, 26; 5 
to 20, 15; 20 to 60, 172; 60 to 80, 24; over 80, 5. Wards- First, 9; Second, 
17; Fourth, 36; Fifth, 1; Sixth, 14; Seventh, 1."); Eighth. 8; Ninth, 9; 
Tenth, 37; Eleventh. 52; Twelfth, 33. Sixty-rive of the deaths occurred 
in public institutions, 6 were the result of casualties, 6 of suicide, and 4 
of homicide. 

London, August 6th.— Latest Price of Consols, 101 1-16. 




MARRIOTT'S 



ER0PLANE° 



F.OR NAVIGATING THE AIR. 

The Inventor and Patentee of the Aeroplane wishes to present to 
the original stockholders in the " Avitor," or Aerial Steam Navigation 
Company, a corresponding number of shares in the Aeroplane Company. 
Said stock will be ready for issue by the Secretary, at the of- 
fices of the Company, 609 Merchant street, on and after August 10th, 1881, 
and original stockholders are requested to call on him and receive the same. 
Next week Mr. Augustus Laver, the constructing engineer of the Aero- 
plane, will publish in this paper his report. 

F. M arriott, Patentee. 

STOCK MARKET. 

The discordant echoes of the Stock Exchange still repeat their con- 
fusing sounds to a thin lobby and vacant gallery. Business lags, and the 
usually hopeful seem discouraged hy continued decline and absence of 
orders. The Comstock line has suffered further shrinkage, which, in the 
face of now progressing work that promised improvement, hurts both 
pride and pockets of waiting speculators. Notwithstanding all this, there 
exists a firm belief in favorable outcome from all these properties when 
it shall suit the ruling powers to disclose their knowledge and long con- 
cealed plana. Until then the average operator is helplesB. Payment of 
the initial assessment on California brought a motley throng to the cor- 
ridors of Nevada Block, whose sad faces showed marked contrast to 
the beaming countenances of former dividend receivers. Con. Virginia 
is reported in debt .$78,000, with light receipts from the mine, and now 
the conundrum is, when and what will she be assessed ? Other districts 
derive some benefit from Comstock dullness, and dealings in outside mines 
are more frequent and larger than in active Washoe trading. "Day 
Silver," without any assured merit, has become quite a fancy, 
and operations considerable. " Bodie Tunnel " is attracting the attention 
of heavy men, and promises to be a sensation when all things are ready. 
Eureka, from some unknown influence, has declined $10 per share, under 
transactions of less than 200 shares. Northern Belle continued on down 
grade until it reached $12, since recovering toward $15. This, for a pro- 
perty which is declared to have a year's dividend in sight, at 5 per cent, a 
month on present rate, is a phenomenal condition. Albion bobs about at 
$1 50, waiting appeal from the late decision. Meanwhile, as indicated in 
our last, a $60,000 blister is applied to its stockholders. Silver King has 
been more active lately at about $20, on a current regular dividend of 
25c. monthly. The steadiness of this mine's value is in decided contrast 
with its feminine neighbor of Columbus district, which Haunts her 7~>e., 
and sells $5 less. In locals, more interest is visible. Water is strong at 
101. Gas suffers further from a prospect of local competition and gradual 
improvement in the application of electric light. Sales of considerable 
lots down to $64 50. (Jiant Powder stocks have been in demand, and ad- 
vanced materially on improved business. At the close, the mining-share 
market is a trifle stronger. 

Albion vs. Richmond. —The legal controversy between these promi- 
nent mining claims as to the ownership of the Uncle Sam ground has, 
within a few days, been decided in the Sixth Judicial District of Nevada, 
Judge Rives holding "the Richmond Company under the Victoria, the 
earlier patentee." Shares have fallen within the past ninety days from $6 
down to §1 40, and an assessment of 40c per share on the Albion has 
been announced. Speculators for a quick turn are thoroughly disgusted. 
Judge Rives decision will repay perusal. 

Signal Service Meteorological Report, Week Ending Aug. 4. — 
Maxim, m and Minimum Thermometer: Friday 29th— 67, ok>; Saturday 
30th— 06, 54 ; Sunday 31st— 70, 54 ; Monday 1st— €6, 54 ; Tuesday 2d— 
67, 53 ; Wednesday 3d— 61, 52; Thursday 4th 6 

A pen portrait of the late Dean Stanley forms the frontispiece of The 
Critic of July 30th, which contains an interesting paper on the Dean's social 
life, by Mr. P. M. Potter. 

Entered at the Post-Office at San Francisco, Cal. t as Second-Class 

Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, Oaliforaie. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



THE COUNTY CLERKS DEPARTURE AND ITS LESSONS 

The circumstances which brought about the mysterious disappear- 
ance of County Clerk Stuart, and his subsequent resignation, form a dark 
chapter in the still darker history of Municipal Government in San Fran- 
cisco. This dark chapter of history the News Letter proposes to write 
briefly, and to comment upon; and the tax-payers and voters would do 
well to peruse it carefully and ponder over it seriously. While ex-County 
Clerk Stuart is not blameless in the matter, he is, after all, but the scape- 
goat of other and greater rascals; and while he is a fugitive from the city, 
if not from justice, the other and greater rascals still hold high and influ- 
ential positions, and actually, on Monday evening last, went through the 
farce, in their luxuriously appointed Supervisorial Chamber, of electing a 
successor to the official they were largely instrumental in ruining. Ex- 
County Clerk Stuart did not run his own office, and, by the way, the 
same statement will apply to several other city and county officials and 
offices. With the exception of a few appointments that were dictated by 
the political machine which secured his nomination, the office was con- 
trolled by the Board of Supervisors. Under their control the office was 
made a foul-smelling sink of iniquity. It was stocked by them with 
complaisant "female copyiBts," a class of persons who should, strictly 
speaking, be designated by another and infinitely more expressive name. 
Male deputies were also appointed at the instance of the City Fathers. 
Any man or woman who applied to the County Clerk for a position was 
not asked to give evidence of good character and fitness. He or she was 
told to " see " the Supervisors, and if he or she " saw " a Supervisor or 
two to good effect, he or she was appointed, even though the law was 
broken. It is quite true that ex-County Clerk Stuart was to blame in 
the matter. We do not attempt to excuse him. He was elected to a po- 
sition of trust, and, had he been an honorable man, he would have re- 
spected that trust and bid defiance to the corrupting influences of Super- 
visors and other political blackguards. But the ex-County Clerk was, 
morally, a weak man; he gave way to temptation, and rushed on to ruin 
and disgrace. The Supervisorial pets, the "female copyists," proved, we 
understand, too much for his heart and his pocket. The "fe- 
male copyists" did not, it is said, reserve all their smiles for 
the City Parents — they bestowed quite a number of them on the gallant 
ex-County Clerk, and as the earnings of " female copyists " are small and 
their expenditures large, Mr. Stuart found himself in a sea of financial 
trouble. He did not seem to understand, as other county officials have, 
how to keep his own and the Supervisorial harem at the expense of the 
taxpayers. In the hands of the Supervisorial pets, the bewitching 
"female copyists," he was too pliable, and his purse was kept in a state 
of chronic emptiness, and so came his downfall. 

And now comes the question : Will this office, in the hands of the newly 
appointed incumbent, General John McComb, be administered differ- 
ently? In General McComb's personal integrity the News Letter, in com- 
mon with all who know him, has the fullest confidence. But General 
McComb will, we fear, be but a figure-head. The Supervisors who elected 
him are the people who have been running the office, and it would be 
asking too much of human nature to expect him to say to those to whom 
he owes his position, " Avaunt ! Quit my sight." He will, we have no 
doubt, steel his heart against the blandishments of the " female copyists," 
keep his private purse strings drawn tight, and avoid going, like his pre- 
decessor, to the " demnition bow-wows." But the office will be run politi- 
cally upon the same principle, by the same men, and with the same 
disregard for the public interests. In all seriousness, the News Letter 
asks : Is it not time for this state of affairs to be stopped ? For years 
past the tax-paying public of San Francisco has been crying out against 
the taxation burdens they have been called upon to bear ; for years past 
the extravagant cost of municipal government has been the theme of dis- 
cussion ; and what is the result ? Here we find the Board of Supervisors, 
a body of men elected for the express purpose of carrying on the muni- 
cipal government and conserving and protecting the public interests, 
actually at the bottom of the chicanery and extravagance, actually incit- 
ing Bureau officers to appoint more officers than are required or allowed 
by law, in order that they may provide for their political strikers and fast 
female ''friends." Reform may and did come out of Nazarath, but hon- 
esty cannot come out of dishonesty, truth out of untruth, or purity out 
of impurity. 

A MARE'S NEST. 
The English papers are discussing, in the most serious manner, the 
possible chances of Col. Barnes' Tichborne Claimant. Somehow or the 
other the British mind seems to be more confiding than the average 
American, for the fraud was at once spotted here, and even the gallant 
General had to admit that he had found a mare's nest, the eggs in which 
were very much addled. There seemB, however, to be quite a reaction in 
England in favor of the man who was defendant in the far-famed Tich- 
borne trial, and there are many who, in spite of all evidence adduced at 
that trial to the contrary, still stick to it that the man now in prison is 
the Simon pure. The prisoner, during his long incarceration, has pre- 
pared a most voluminous statement of his case, and there are far more 
improbable events looming upin the distance than that he may still have an- 
other chance to establish his claim to the Tichborne-Doughty estates. 
Should he succeed, his popularity with the English masses would compass 
that of any man now living, and, for a time at least, he would be of all 
lions the most lionized. His chances, however, are extremely slim, as 
nearly every educated person who took the trouble to follow the trial 
quite concurred in the verdict given. 

Jos. M. Litchfield is a man whose official record will bear the closest 
scrutiny. He has, during his two years Supervisorship, persistently 
fought the corrupt party in that Board, whose object has all along been 
self-aggrandizement and ring- plotting. Mr. Litchfield has been again 
nominated for the Supervisorship of the Third Ward, on the Republican 
ticket. We congratulate that party upon the good judgment it has dis- 
played in choosing bo able and honorable a man as Mr. Litchfield for its 
nominee. 



REPUBLICAN TICKET 

MUNICIPAL ELECTION. 



FOR 

Mator ". MAURICE C. BLAKE 

Sheriff .' JOHN SEDGWICK 

Auditor - HENRY BRICKWEDEL 

Tax Collector CHARLES TILLSON 

Treasurer J. H. WIDBER 

Recorder JOHN W. CHERRY 

County Clerk DAVID WILDER 

District Attorney L. E. PRATT 

City and County Attorney J. F. CO WDERY 

Coroner F. L. WEEKS 

Public Adjiinistrator WALTER M. LEMAN 

City and County Surveyor C. S. TILTON 

Superintendent of Streets '. ROBERT J. GRAHAM 

SUPERVISORS. 

1st Ward W. H. Bodfish 

2d Ward John McKew 

3d Ward J. M. Litchfield 

4th Ward J. H. Carmany 

5th Ward Henry Molineaux 

6th Ward Frank Eastman 

7th Ward George B. Bradford 

8th Ward Charles A. Fisher 

9th Ward Oliver Merrill 

10th Ward Henry B. Russ 

Uth Ward N. C. Parrish 

12th Ward John F. Kennedy 

SCHOOL DIRECTORS. 

Julius Bandmann, J. C. Stubbs, 

Benjamin F. Webster, W. B. Ewer, 

H. M. Fiske, E. J. Bowen, 

Horace D. Dunn, B. F. Sterett, 

David Stern, Joseph S. Bacon, 

T. B. DeWitt, James H. Culver. 

RUBBER HOSE! 

The Celebrated 

MALTESE CROSS HOSE, 

For Garden Purposes and Fire Departments, 

Manufactured and for Sale by the 

GTJTTA FEBCHA AND RUBBER MANTTF AC TURING CO., 

Corner First and Market Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. [Aug. 6. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Standard Con. Mining Company, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., Aug. 2, 1881.— At a meeting- of the Board of Directors of the 
above-named Company, held this day. Dividend No. 31, of Seventy-five Cents per 
Bhare, was declared, payable on FRIDAY, August 12th, 1881, at the office in this 
city, or at The Fanners' Loan and Trust Company, in New York. 

WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. Aug. 6. 

QUEEN TRANSPARENT OIL CAN. 

Tbe body is made of tbick glass, surrounded by a 
corrugated tin casing. Being glass it cannot leak, and the tin cas- 
ing prevents it from being broken. It measures the oil and prevents the 
BeBer from cheating in quantify, or qualitv, of oil sizes — 1, 2, 4, 8 quarts. 
"WIESTEK & CO., 17 New Montgomery street. 
May 14. General Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




SLATER. 

Information wanted as to Robert Slater, Jr., agred 38, son 
of the now deceased Robert Slater, shipsmith, Centre street, Glasgow. Mr. 
Slater, Jr. , was trained as a sailor, and when last heard of, 16 years ago, was engaged 
as mate in a steamer. As he has an interest in the estate of his late father, informa- 
tion regarding him or his heirs will be gladly received by MESSRS. CRAWFORD & 
HERRON, Solicitors, 104 W. Regent street, Glasgow. Aug. 6. « 

NICKEL, GOLD AND SILVER PLATING. 

Ijlvery description of Metal Goods plated with tbe above 
14 metals in a first-class manner, at reduced rate?. 

San Francisco Gold, Silver and Nickel Plating "Works, 
653 and 655 Mission Street, 8. F. 
E. G. DENNISTON, Proprietor. Aug. 0. 

JOHN JENNINGS 

Hooper's Sontb End Warehouses, corner Japan and Town- 
send streets, San Francisco. First-class Fire-Proof Brick Building, capacity 
10,000 tons. Goods taken from the Dock and the Cars of the C. P. R. R. and S. P. 
R. R. free of charge. Storajre at Current Rates. Advances and Insurance Effected 



ROBERT WALKINSHAW, 



"VTotary Public. 407 Montgomery street, is prepared to take 

J3I charge of Estates or Trusts; to act as General Agent for persons absenting 
themselves from the State ; to buy and sell farming lands, take charge of securities, 
make collections, correspond, and make remittances. Reliable references. [July 9. 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SOCIETY NOTES. 

San FbaNCTSCO, Aug. 4, 1881. 

Dear News Letter : That the fashionables o! society are returning to 
town may be judged from the fact that durin; this past week I bail in 
one day the pleasure of Lifting my hat t-> Hi*. W. T. Coleman. Mrs. Jim 
Fair. Mrs. McLaughlin, Mrs li ig*r, Mrs. Schmieden, Mrs, Tevis, Mrs. 
Dr. Whitney, Mrs. Lfa&ak, Mrs. Low, Mrs. Green and Miss Crocker, all 
within the space of a few miuutes; while d uly and hourly I meet other 
leaser lights who were Mnong the earlwft Bitten for the "season," who 
one and all declare they have had enough of it, and are triad to be in 
town again. The opening of the Mechanics' Fair always brings a certain 
number of the absentees back t" the city, besides crowds of country 
cousins to reciprocate visits bestowed " at the niicli," and as tho oue just 
opened promises to be better than usual, our lately deserted streets will 
soon put on a livelier appearance, Mr. and Mrs. Pepe Barron have de- 
parted from our midst, but aside from the pleasure their company always 
gave, general society cannot be said to have sustained a loss iu their leav- 
ing us. as of late years they have done little entertaining except in the 
way of dinners, and even those were confined to an especial set, and were 
principally men at that. But the loss of any of our old-timers is always 
to be noted witli renret, and so I'm sorry the B&rrons have gone. 

But society will sustain a loss in losing the sweet voice of Mrs. Sam 
Mayer, if she spends the coming season in New York, as I hear she now 
talks of doing. We have so few such pleasing singers in 'Frisco that we 
can ill spare nne of them. Let us hope that Sam may not take it into his 
head to go likewise. Apropos of music, I hear that one of the events of 
the week was a very charming little musical party at Mrs. Lyons', on 
Kidv street, last Tuesday evening, given in honor of the distinguished 
violinist, Mad. Pernet (Jenny Claus), who intends leaving for the East 
about the tirst of September, at which the programme, both vocal and 
instrumental, was unusually good. 

The announcement that Mr. Booker has taken the old Barron house on 
Stockton street hill, wherein to set up housekeeping after his marriage, is 
somewhat premature, as he has not yet decided on doing so ; but should 
he, I am safe in prophesying that hereafter, as heretofore, dinners will 
be the sole entertainments that may be looked for within its walls. 

Mrs. McMullen has had a party of friends visiting her at her country 
home iu San Joaquin County, but the family are to be in town in a few 
days, in anticipation of Miss Soloraan's wedding next week. 

It would seem that I was not so very far out in saying, a few weeks 
ago, that we should hear of Mrs. Stuart Taylor as a new professional 
beauty in London. Although not quite arrived at that distinction (!) I 
hear she has been very much admired in that metropolis of the world 
during her stay among the cockneys, and that she and her party have re- 
ceived much attention, and were the recipients of innumerable invita- 
tions from the best society during the season now closing. 

Lieutenant Milton is home attain, and his pretty wife is happy once 
more. Yours, Felix. 

AT THE GEYSERS. 

The Geysers, August 2, 1881. 
Dear News Letter : It seems to be the correct thing nowadays among 
"society" to scan your rose-covered pages to find out where its habitues 
are rusticating, as every Saturday you have a "screed" from some one or two 
of the fashionable resorts. I don't remember that as yet the Geysers has 
been represented, so I'll e'en drop you a line myself from this delightful 
spot. I have been on the go all the Spring and Summer so far, and have 
found this place one of the most attractive I have struck. In the early 
Spring (so they say here) pretty Emelie Melville made things lively. She 
was here en permenance, and that fact drew numbers of visitors, notably 
Saturdays, and the "Larks" were not all confined to the region of Lark- 
mead, by any means. The month of July witnessed a constant throng of 
visitors— Eastern tourists, British ditto, bridal couples, and all the differ- 
ent species which go to swell the " traveling public." Among those who 
are known to 'Frisco, who have been here during July, I noticed Sidney 
M. Smith and family, who were accompanied by Miss Emily Hochkofler, 
Dr. Cutlar and family, Charles Wetherbee and wife, Tobins {father and 
son), Mervie Donahue and sister, the Newtous from the Palace, Mrs. N,, 
particularly noticeable for her magnificent solitaires; W. A. Porter, of 
New York, etc. We had a musical crowd the other night, in the arrival 
of Julius Heinrichs, Clifford Schmidt, the violinist, and Henry Kuhl; 
and "Old Fletch," from the Navy Yard, took a run over from Lark- 
mead with Mrs. Mahon and Miss Tolsen. Later in the week we had a 
flying visit from the bride and groom elect, Consul Booker and Mrs. 
Bispham, accompanied by the Pages, Mr. Forman and Miss Ashe. The 
latter young lady narrowly escaped a serious accident by a fall from the 
stage coach, resulting in a dislocated wrist, which brought their visit to 
an abrupt termination. 

The weather has been too utterly utter in the way of beat, and I would 
Btrongly advise all the rheumatics who are tortured by the chill winds of 
the bay, to come up here and get thawed. 

Perhaps I'll drop you another line from my next stopping-place. Shall 
I? F. D. 

JTJLEG CAFULET. 

The monotonous air which has so long pervaded art circles in this 
city is about to bo broken by the exhibition of a painting by Theodore 
Wores, a young gentleman who has, for the past seven years, been study- 
ing art in Munich under Professor Wagner. The subject of Mr. Wores* 
painting is from Shakespeare's Momeo and Juliet, and represents Juliet's 
visit to Friar Lawrence's cell. The work is an ambitious one, demanding 
the skill of a master to carry to a successful conclusion. How well Wores 
has succeeded will soon be seen by all who take an interest in art matters in 
general, and the progress making by our San Francisco boys abroad in 
particular, a3 the picture will be placed on view at an early day. The 
canvas measures about 5x9 feet, the figures being life size. When it is on 
public exhibition we shall take pleasure in discussing its merits with our 
usual freedom and justice. Mr. Wores is a native of San Francisco, was 
educated in our public schools, and a pupil of the San Francisco School 
of Design at its first session. Judging from the glance had of the picture, 
we think that Mr. Williams has no cause to feel aught but proud of his 
former pupil's achiev ement. 

Duryeas' Starch is the best in the world ; is warranted pure. None 
other so easily used or so economical. 



STRAW HATS! 



Come and See the Elegant Styles, the Very 
Latest, the Nobbiest, and all Just Opened. 

MACKINAW, MARACIBO, 

CANTONS, PANAMA, 

MILANS, PEDLE BRAIDS, 

PALM, TUSCAN, 

LEGHORNS, ETC* 



AT THE GREAT I XL, 

Corner Kearny and Commercial Streets, S. F. 



ARCADIAN JOYS. 

Never have the ladies of San Francisco had such a grand oppor- 
tunity of a bon mavche as is now offered them by that most enterprising 
firm, J. J. O'Brien & Co. Having (by a business stroke unequaled for its 
daring and magnitude by any as yet recorded in the annals of the San 
Francisco dry goods trade) purchased the larce wholesale stock of Sachs, 
Strassburger & Co. at a cost of over $235,000, the firm has determined 
that, as they obtained a bargain themselves, the public upon whom they 
depend for their patronage shall share in the advantages derived. It 
would occupy too much space to enumerate the countless articles for sale, 
the intrinsic values of which far exceed the price at which they are offered, 
a reduction of nearly sixty per cent, being made upon first cost. In 
hosiery, both ladies' and children's, an immense stock is being sold off at 
a great reduction. We may incidentally mention, among the bargains 
to be obtained, printed sateens, percoles, cambrics, ginghams, corsets (2,000 
dozen), which latter, by the by, are being sold off like hot cakes at from 
25c. to 75c. per pair. All the goods for sale are marked in plain figures, 
and such is the eagerness with which the ladies of this city have embraced 
this grand opportunity, that a perfect army of clerks are kept steadily at 
work from morning to night selling goods, making out bills and perform- 
ing those many offices which a large business conducted upon a liberal 
basis involves upon the employes. One of the chief causes of J. J. 
O'Brien's almost unprecedented rush of business is attributable to the 
fact that at the Arcade purchasers are so pleased with their bargains that 
they very naturally show them to others. As a natural consequence, 
their friends are anxious to participate in the good luck, so they go to 
the Arcade, too. This helps to swell the crowd of eager customers, who 
tax all the immense clerical force of the vast establishment to the utmost 
to keep pace with the demand upon its services. There can be no better 
proof of the true value of the bargains obtained than the fact that the 
same people come over and over again, never seeming to tire of the pur- 
chase of goods which they are well aware are being sold off at rates hitherto 
never approached for cheapness either on this coast or in any of the great 
Eastern cities. Now is the time, ladies, to buy. 



THE END OF A NOBLE LIFE. 

On Tuesday last, at the Sacred Heart Presentation Convent, in this 
city, died the Rev. Mother Mary Teresa Comerford, at the age of sixty 
years. The life and works of this most excellent woman are so well 
known that an extended history of them would be superfluous. Born of 
au illustrious and wealthy family in Ireland, she, while yet almost 
a child, devoted her life to the service of her Master, and entered a con- 
vent near Kilkenny, remaining there as a Sister for the period of thirteen 
years. In 1854 she came to San Francisco, and having long set her 
heart upon giving instruction to the poor, founded the Presentation Con- 
vent on Powell street, the Sacred Heart Presentation Convent on Taylor 
street, and a third institution of the same kind at Berkeley, of each of 
which she was, successively, Superioress. Since then she returned to Ire- 
land, where a convent was built for her at Kilcock, County Kildare, by a 
rich relative, and in June last she returned to this city with several of the 
Sisters instructed there. Within a week after the return which gladdened 
so many hearts, however, the reverend Mother was prostrated by illness, 
and, after seven weeks of patient suffering, her pure soul burH its earthly 
bonds and went to join the Master it had served so well. The reverend 
Mother was a woman of whom it may most truly be said " to know her 
was to love her." Though a most zealous and energetic servant of her be- 
loved Church, she was gentle as a child in manner, charitable to all her 
fellow creatures of whatever creed, and withal possessed a sweet dignity, 
which insured respect while it invited affection. A Pontifical Mass was 
celebrated at the convent on Taylor street, on Thursday morning, and the 
mortal remains of the Mother repose in peace at Berkeley. 

New Remedy for Baldness. — In cases of confirmed baldness, the 
new remedy proposed is to remove the scalp, bit by bit, and substitute, 
by skin grafting, pieces of healthy scalp, taken from the heads of young 
persons. The success which has heretofore attended operations of this 
nature in cases of scalp wounds gives a promising outlook for this new 
mode of curimr baldness ; and perhaps the day is not far distant when 
the shining pates of our venerable fathers will bloom with the flowing 
locks of youth. 

Mrs. B. Webster, one of England's celebrated beauties, was recently 
photographed by Taber, of S Montgomery street. The photograph is 
that of a most lovely woman, and the photographer has done justice to 
his subject. A more bewitching picture was never turned out by old 
" Sol," and we almost envy the god of day the privilege of gazing on so 
much loveliness. 

Wnen Canned Fruit is so much cheaper than you can put it up for, 
get the best by securing that which is packed by King, Morse & Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



OUR LONDON LETTER. 

London, July 16, 1881. 

Dear News Letter:— I had scarcely posted my letter to you last week 
when this capital was startled with the news that an attempt had been 
made on the life of your President. It was at first believed to have been 
successful, and the general public waited in anxiety for the Monday pa- 
pers to see whether the rumor had been confirmed. The topic of the 
murder on the Brighton Railway, which was in every man's mouth until 
last Saturday night, was relegated to a secondary place, and the relief 
among those of the people who feel interested in the United States and its 
Magistrates was immense when there appeared on the anniversary of your 
independence telegrams stating that President Garfield was going "to 
take that one chance " of his recovery which had been offered him. Day 
after day the telegrams have appeared more reassuring, and to-day we 
gratefully learn that he may possibly, even probably, be restored to health 
and strength. We were congratulating ourselves on the solidity of the 
good feeling between yourselves and us, as evidenced by Sir Edward 
Thornton's words, and Mr. Gladstone well alluded to you as a nation with 
whom we are growing year by year more friendly. We feel this crime as 
though we were part of you. There is no country with whom we ought 
to be on such fraternal terms as America. You are our ancestors' children, 
our brothers in blood, language and customs, despite a trifling dissimilar- 
ity in our c mstitutions, which can never interfere with our good fellow- 
ship. We held entertainments and concerts of an international charac- 
ter to celebrate the 4th of July ; our leading nonconformist ministers 
have publicly expressed sympathy with you in this hour ; our town coun- 
cils and public bodies have passed resolutions of like nature ; we make 
your trouble ours, and our brotherhood is cemented in this crisis. We 
hesitate to believe that any political jealousy in high places could have 
prompted Guiteau to his mad act. We have scarcely understood the dis- 
pute between the President and Mr. Conkling, and though we learn now 
that the Senator's sympathy was with a system of place hunting 
which Mr. Garfield had determined to uproot, we do not readily believe 
that your public men, even in their zeal for corrupt practices, would coun- 
tenance an assassin as a means of gaining their ends. We rejoice with 
you that the murder has not been accomplished, and we long as fervently 
as yourselves to see the President reinstated in his high position, with his 
old vigor unshattered or unimpared. 

As I write Lefroy is Btill at large. The police have been sinking for 
some time in public estimation. Red tape, false arrests, perjury, and the 
like have rendered them unpopular, and if they fail to find the suspected 
murderer of Mr. Gold, it will be a heavier blow than all to their prestige. 
The £200 reward is still unclaimed, and a verdict of wilful murder has 
been returned against the missing man. 

The Turkish ambassador has told his master that we are dissatisfied 
with the trial of Midhat Pacha, and the Sultan is reported as hesitating 
to enforce sentence. Midhat may be guilty, but he is entitled to fair 
judgment, and we unhesitatingly disbelive in the justice of the late trial. 

The great volunteer review before the Queen to-day is an unprecedented 
affair. Over 52,000 men are assembled to go through their evolutions in 
Windsor Great Park, and the mass of the spectators will joid ir, to make 
up such an array as this generation has never before beheld. Every care 
has been taken to prevent a hitch in the arrangements, and our volunteer 
army has been in anxiety for weeks to do its best. The review is to he 
held at a time when the heat will have partially subsided. On Monday last 
several deaths occurred at Aldershot from sunstroke, and we do not desire 
anv repetition of the sad affair. The heat has been very oppressive late- 
ly," The thermometer has been as high as 92 deg. in the shade and 145 in 
the sun. Pans have been freely used by gentlemen in the city, a rare 
sight, and in spite of the consumption of a ton of ice daily in the cham- 
bers of the House of Commons, the temperature could not be brought 
lower than 75 degs. On the 5th inst, however, we had a thunder storm, 
which was severer than has been known for many years, and the air has 
been much cooler since. Many fatalities are reported from the lightning, 
however, and the floods have done much damage in the north, so we have 
purchased our comfort at the loss of a good deal of life and property. 

Among the spectators at Windsor to-day is King Kalakaua, of the 
Sandwich Islands. This monarch has been to the opera, and seen many 
aspects of British civilization. When in Egypt, he became interested 
in the electric telegraph, and deBired to see how the instruments were 
made. He is, accordingly, to be gratified with a visit to the Telegraph 
Construction and Maintenance Company. 

When King David was going to number his people, he was afflicted with 
a pestilence. We did not take warning by him, and so, when our late cen- 
sus was taken, we were likewise afflicted with the small-pox. Still, the 
Census has been taken, and the preliminary report of the Commissioners 
has been laid before Parliament. Prom it we learn that our population 
in toto on the night of April 4th, was 35,246,562 ; an increase on the cor- 
responding total in 1871 of 4,147,236. Some counties have fallen off, in 
others a very considerable advance is reported, as in Lancashire, where 
we note au increase of 634,730. We have over 200 persons to the square 
mile on the average, but in Lancashire there are 1707 to that area, in 
Radnor only 52. In London there are 3,814,571 enumerated ; 32,326 to 
the square mile. The increase on the last return is satisfactory, and the 
Daily News takes it to mean that great Britain is only " young " yet. The 
above figures include Scotland and Ireland, the Channel Islands, the Isle 
of Man, and the army, navy and merchant seamen abroad. The last 
three contribute together 242.S44 to the general total. 

The Parliamentary Oaths Bill was postponed, with many other meas- 
ures, to give the Land Bill a better chance, and now we learn that it has 
been relinquished altogether. Naturally, Mr. Bradlaugh objects to this, 
and after a fruitless correspondence with the Premier, he has announced 
his intention of presenting himself at the table of the House for admit- 
tance. The officials have according been called upon to be watchful, and 



prevent his entrance to the chamber itself, but he says he will give them 
one notice of his arrival. We may look for more disturbances shortly, 
therefore. The Irish measure which puts his cause into the background 
with so muny others is progressing, clause 19 now being under discussion. 
I open this to say that Lefroy has been arrested in a house at Stepney, 
in the east end of this city. How he got there in spite of his watchers, is 
a mystery, and the police have even now had no hand in his discovery. 
Two detectives captured him through "information received" from his 
landlady, who bad at first no suspicion of her lodger, whom she knew as 
George Clark. He confesses hi» identity but persistently denies his guilt, 
or any participation in the crime. From a telegram he sent to a solicit- 
or's clerk, it appears that he intended flight upon the receipt of some 
money he asked for. The clerk's name is Seele, employed in the office of a 
man well known to me ; where some suspicions have been entertained of 
him by his fellow- clerks. How Lefroy has eluded the vigilance of the 
detectives so long will now soon be known. He has been hiding in the 
same place for ten days, and to-morrow would have been off under dis- 
guise. However, he is taken, and the public mind is at rest. 

INSURANCE. 

HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

INSURANCE AGENCY. 
Ho. 322 & 324 California Street, San Francisco, 



Cal. 



Fixe Insurance. 

BERLIN-COLOGNE of Berlin. 

LACONFIANCE of Paris. 

DWELLING HOUSE UNDERWRITERS 

of New York. 

THE FIRE IKS. ASSOCIATION (Limited) 
of London, England. 



GIRARD of Philadelphia. 

NEW YORK CITY IMS. CO of N. Y. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

W ATERTOWN of New York. 

ST. PAUL of St. Paul. 

TEUTON1A of New OrleanB. 

Marine Insurance. 

PARIS UNDERWRITING ASSOCIATION of Paris. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

LA FONC1ERE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY of Paris. 

Capital Represented $27,000,000. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

W. L. CHALMERS, Z. P. CLARK, J. C. STAPLES, 
Special Agents and Adjusters. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF CALIFORNIA. 
Organized 1864. 

Principal Office 406 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital (Paid TJp in TJ. S. Gold Coin) $300,000.00 

Be- Insurance Reserve $174,989 69 



i January 1, 1881 8 039,117.88 

Surplus for policy holders 624,677.17 

Premiums, since organization 3,521,232.23 

Losses, since organization 1,635,202.84 

OFFICERS: 

J. F. HOUGHTON President. I CH AS. R. STORY Secretary. 

L. L. BAKER Vice-President. | R. H. MAGILL General Agent. 

Directors of the Home Mutual Insurance Co.:— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, J. L. 
N. Shepard, John Currey, J. F. Houghton, W. T. Garratt, C. C Burr, J. S. Carter, 
Charles Belding, D. W. Earl. July 10. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, 

84 0,647,942 . 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co., of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1 780. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. 
W. ZANE BOOKER, Agent and Attorney. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. , Safe Deposit Building. 
[October 11. 1 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, Eng., Est.aVd nS2.--Cash Assets, 85,266,372.35. 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd 1S33.— Cash Assets, 81,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd I851.--Cash Assets, 81,357,326.39. 

BUTLER & HALDAIT, 

General Agents for Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

[July 10.1 

THE MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, ENGLAND. 

[ESTABLISHED 1838.] 
Whole Amount of Joint Stock and Guaranteed Capital. .$5,000,000. 

Whole Amount of Capital paid up 900,000. 

Cash Assets December 31, 1876 3,710,000. 

The undersigned have been duly authorized to issue Policies at current rates on 
Freight and Shipments to or from England, Europe, New York, Japan, China, Aus- 
tralian Colonies, Sandwich Islands, and Northern Coast Ports. If desired, policies 
made payable at port of termination. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., Agents, 

Aug. 10. 218 California street. 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



THE FOG BELL. 
Tolling, tolliiig, tolling, where the laxv billows, rolling, 

<r the ceaseless kntJ] >>f th»t lonely wanton bell ; 

i pell in each solemn sink &i\<\ swell 
the breaker's sullen nwr. 

There i* waning In Its tone, not unlike a sigh or groan, 

A-* tii.- prand hi wafta 1 to aa on the air. 
But its aehoea seem to borrow only BOtM of pitying sorrow, 
i Hi deep roioa murmurs monrofnlly, " Beware," 

It has seen too much of grief, thfa guanlitin of the reef, 
And tba BMBin in it* tone has long since fled; 

And the inm throat BO Inety, now has grown bourse and rusty, 
While its boiling see m s to murmur of the dead. 

Tee, yon rusty iron bell, rock'd upon the ocean's swell, 
Conld tt speak, might tell us tales of cruel woe. 

Tales, that long have changed the gladness of its merry tones to 
ndn 
Tales of misery which the wild waves only know. 

A NOVEL MOUNTAIN RAILWAY. 
A curious project is on foot in connsotlon with the well-known baths 
of l,.i RaUlere, in France. The hot sulphur springs which constitute the 
attraction of the neighborhood are high up on the mountain, and at a 
considerable distance from Cauterets, in the valley below, where invalids 
are wont to take up their residence. An engineer has been putting his 
wits to work to construct a railway for this journey on an entirely novel 
plan. His idea is ingenious, whether or not it be practicable. He has 
planned a railway line like a flight of steps, with an hydraulic lift at each 
of them. A carriage to convey passengers from the village in the valley 
to the hot baths up the mountains is run on to the lower step, and started 
down a slight incline towards the mountain. It is pulled up by a power- 
ful brake as it reaches the platform of the first hydraulic lift, which hoists 
it up to the second step, when it again runs forward on an incline until it 
reaches the second lift. This, in like manner, raises the carriage another 
step, and allows it to run forward, the hydraulic machinery each time 
raising it rather above its intended destination, so as to get sufficient ve- 
locity from gravitation to carry the vehicle forward. Gravitation is the 
power relied on for a forward motion, and a powerful waterfall higher up 
the mountain is brought under the yoke for the vertical lifting. Each 
lift is placed in a kind of tower, and as there are several of these, and the 
machinery must be a rather costly item, it must, we should imagine, be a 
somewhat doubtful experiment financially. The scheme, however, is none 
the less curious and interesting as an engineering device. Of course, it 
would be applicable only to such special circumstances as are to be found 
at La Raillere. A good head of water would be indispensable; and this 
feature in the neighborhood may possibly permit of the idea being 
carried out. 

THE OLD MAN'S MISTAKE. 

A few days ago a Western merchant, who wanted to do some sight- 
seeing and buy his fall stock at the same time, entered a dry goods job- 
bing house on Broadway, and accosted the first person he met with, "Are 
yoxi the proprietor here ?" *' Not exactly the proprietor," was the reply. 
" At present I'm acting as shipping clerk, but I'm cutting my cards for 
partnership next year by organizing noon prayer meetings in the base- 
ment." The stranger passed on to a very important-looking personage 
with a diamond pin, and asked: "Are you the head of the house?'' 
" Well, no ; I can't say I am at present, but I have hopes of a partner- 
ship in January. I'm only one of the travelers just now, but I am lay- 
ing for a $2,000 pew in an uptown church, and that means a quarter in- 
terest here in less than six months." 

The next man had his feet up, his hat back, and a twenty-five cent 
cigar in his mouth, and he looked so solid that the stranger said: 

" You must run this establishment?" 

"Me? Well, I may pretty soon. At present I am the bookkeeper, 
but I am expecting to go into a church choir with the old man's darling, 
and become an equal partner here." 

The stranger was determined not to make another mistake. He walked 
around until he found a man with bis coat off and busy with a case of 
goods, and he said to him: 

" The porters are kept pretty busy here, I see." 

" Yes," was the brief reply. 

" But I suppose you are planning to invest in a gospel hymn-book and 
Bing the old man out of an eighth interest, aren't you ?" 

" Well, no, not exactly," was the quiet reply. " I'm the old man him- 
self." — Unknown Ex change. 

CHEEK. 

It was a remarkable piece of impudence in Mr. Parnell to send a 
message of condolence to President Garfield. Who is Mr. Parnell, I 
should like to know, that he thus thrusts himself forward? Is he high in 
rank? Certainly not— only an Irish gentleman; there is a distinction be- 
tween that and a gentleman from Ireland. T s he of exalted official posi- 
tion ? No; he is not even a permanent official at the War Office, and it 
is to be hoped he never will hold any Government appointment. Is he a 
great political personage ? No; he is only the head of an ill-bred, unprin- 
cipled clique, all the members of which would undoubtedly have been 
hanged had they lived a couple of centuries ago, and serve them right. 
Though, however, not famous, he is temporarily notorious, and I suppose 
that it is on the strength of his notoriety that he, with Hibernian bash- 
fulness, proffered to the victim of Transatlantic assassination that sympa- 
thy which he withholds from those who are murdered in Ireland. I sup- 
pose we shall next have Lefroy telegraphing his congratulations on the 
President's convalescence. — " The Chit-!," in Vanity Fair. 



INSURANCE. 



Of Sir Frederick Leighton's little portrait of Mrs. Ellen Grant Sar- 
toris the London Times says that a more charming sketch of a prettier 
face it would be har d to find. 

California is the land of apricots, and King, Morse & Co. understand 
how to preserve them and improve their delicacy of taste, because they 
can. 



SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE & MARINE INS. CO., 

OP NEW ZEALAND. 
Capital 810,000,000. 

CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED. 

Capital 85,000,000- 

STANDARD MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF VERPOOL. 

Capital $5,000,000. 

W. J. < All IX. II AM .1 CO., 

General Agents, 

213 Sanaome Street San Francisco. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.-UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

Tlie California Lloyds.— Established In 1861.— Nos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash Capital. $750,000 in Gold Coin. Fair Rates ! 
Prompt Settlement of Logos ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. —J. Mora Moss, 
Moses Heller, J. O. Eldridape, M. J. O'Connor,' R. S. Floyd, Daniel Meyer, Adam 
Grant, A. E. Sabatic, Charles Kolilor, E. L. Goldstein, Bartlett Doe, I. Lawrence 
Pool, A. Weill, I. Stcinhart. N. B. Stone, Wallace bverson, A. B. Phipps, Samuel 
Hort, H. C. Parker, N. G. Kittle, Joseph Brandenstein, W. M. Hoajj, Nicholas 
Lulling, James Moffitt. John Parrott, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Gustave Touchard, 
George C. Hickox, J. H. Freeman, John Conly, J. H. Baird, Wm. Scholle, Charles 
Baum, J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, Isaac L. Requa. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Chari.es D. Haven, Secretary. Quo. T. Bohbn, Surveyor. Nov. 6. 

(Organized 1803.] 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Fire and Marine Insurance. 
Assets $1,220,000. 

U®" The Largest Assets and Largest Income of all the Companies hailing from 
West of New York State. 



D. J. STAPLES President. 

ALPHEUS BULL Vice-President. 



WM. J. DUTTON Secretary. 

E. W. CARPENTER.. ..Ass't Secretary. 



BOMB OFFICE: 

Southwest Corner California and Sansome Streets, San Francisco . 
[July 23.] 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $7,600,000 

Cash Assets 1,709,976 

Cash Assets in United States 775,003 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., General Agents, 
March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 



NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSUR. CO. OF BOSTON. 

Has transacted the business of Life Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
_Sept. 22. J 328 Montgomery street. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10.0u0.000 francs ; Baloise, of Uasle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may he sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. ^__ H ARRY \V. SYZ, Agent, 22:< BfcDBOBM st., S. F. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

Of Hamburg. 

Capital, «tl,500,000. V. S. Gold Coin. --Losses Paid In Gold 
Coin immediately after Adjustment. This Corporation holds contracts of six- 
teen other European Insurance Companies, re-insuring by far the greater part of 
every risk, as soon as accepted in our office. The combined subscribed Capital which 
our policies therefore offer to the public amounts to $26,900,000, U. S. Gold Coid, of 
which $7,650,000 is paid up, besides the always available Reserve Funds. 

GEORGE MARCUS &CO., General Agents for Pacific Coast 
Ju ly 30. No. 304 California street. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital 35,000,000.--- Agents: Balfour, Guthrie A Co., No. 
J 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco, 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June IS. PRENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Bold Medal, Taria, 1S7S. 
old by all Stationers. Sole Agent for I he United States: 



s 



MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. 



Jan. 5. 



A. WALDSTEIN, 

Lithographer and Ztncographer, No. 320 Sansome street, 
Room 4S, Second Floor. Jan. 20. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETOER AND 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND," 

" "We Qpey no Wand lint Pleasure's."-- Tom. Moore, 



Baldwin Theater. — Adolpke Clwtllet was produced here on Monday 
eveniDg. The adaptation is a powerful one, at times exceedingly melo- 
dramatic in tone and unreal in conception ; yet it is put together with so 
much dramatic skill that the incongruities are lost sight of in the excite- 
ment of the situations. It is hard to conceive anything more improbable 
in real life than the dueling scene in the last act, where " Challet " tights 
" Bazaine " beside the chair of his dying mother ; yet the audience's atten- 
tion never flagged, and, judging from the stillness of the house and the 
burst of applause at the close of the duel, the scene made a marked 
impression. " Adolphe Challet," an artist, the son of an old servitor of a 
noble French family, educates and supports the daughter of the house, 
"Josephine,"' in the absence of her father, who has been exiled by the 
French revolution. " Josephine " is under the impression that she is an 
heiress, and has no knowledge that she is indebted to the hard earnings 
of the artist for her support. Bad times come, and "Adolphe" finds it 
impossible to keep "Josephine" any longer at school. She leaves the 
seminary ostensibly to visit " Adolphe V mother, and while she is there 
he enlists as a substitute for "Bazaine," a distant relation of "Jose- 
phine's," intending to devote the six thousand francs he secures as bounty 
to her support. " Major Pitt," an American— admirably played by Mr. 
Bradley — here appears on the scene after a long and laborious search, 
with the remnant of "Josephine's" father's fortune— a small matter of 
3,000,000 francs !- -which he had brought from America on the nobleman's 
death. "Josephine" discovers "Adolphe's" sacrifice, rejects "Bazaine," 
who proposes, and tenders her hand to "Adolphe" as a token of her love 
and gratitude. They are married, and in the next act it is disclosed by 
11 Bazaine " that " Adolphe's " mother is a criminal who has escaped from 
prison, where she was incarcerated for stealing money to save her husband 
from the guillotine during the revolution, and liable to arrest, having an 
unexpired sentence to serve. He gives "Adolphe" the alternative of a 
divorce from " Josephine " or seeing his mother sent to prison. On this 
turns the dramatic action of the play, and Tearle's interpretation of the 
principal role was exceedingly fine. His scene at the end of the fourth 
act was magnificent. There is a great charm about this artist's acting, and 
he looked the chivalrous gentleman to perfection. Jeffreys-Lewis played 
a comedy role, "Josephine," without exaggeration, and very naturally. 
It was a pleasure to see her out of the beaten groove she has been play- 
ing in so long. Gerald Eyre's villain, "Bazaine," was extremely good, 
and Bradley and Jennings made great hits, the former especially appeal- 
ing to the patriotic feelings of the gallery by appearing as the American 
just in the nick of time on every excitinp- occasion. Miss Phcebe Davis, 
a debutante, achieved marked success. The decline of interest in the 
drama in San Francisco has been widely commented on. The question 
has many sides, one of which was shown on Monday night, when the 
play under review was produced in a manner to reflect no credit on a dress 
rehearsal. Once in a while we have a play presented here by some East- 
ern company, like Diplomacy or Hazel Kirke, and the town crowds the 
house for weeks. The lesson seems to be lost on local managers. In 
Diplomacy we saw acting that was Mosaic in its perfection, a Meissonier 
in its way — every part told its own story, in which every little detail was 
elaborated and brought to a state of perfection. The actors did not 
cease to act when their lines were spoken. Who does not remember 
Montague wandering around the drawing-room, turning a piece of musie 
here, opening an album there, or lighting a cigarette, with a courteous air 
of apology to the ladies present? These are little things, but they are the 
ones that give an air of realism to the stage. So, but in a less degree, 
with Hazel Kirke, whose caste contained no such artists as Tearle, Eyre, 
Jeffreys-Lewis or Bradley. On Monday night the characters were but 
half-formed in the actors' minds. The business had not been mapped out, 
and, as fine as some of the acting was, subsequent performances showed 
what a few rehearsals would have done for the opening performance. 
Dramatic companies are very much like military ones. Unless a martinet 
is at the head, some are very apt to shirk work. Since Lawrence Bar- 
rett's management of the California Theater stage, we have not had a 
manager here who properly inforced his authority, and such a disci- 
plinarian as Dion Boucicault or Augustin Daly would do much to revive 
the interest in theatrical affairs in this city. Adolphe Challet was hand- 
Bomely mounted, brilliantly costumed, and is well worth seeing. 

Charles Dungan, who is known to his intimate friends, and they are 
a host, as one of the most genial gentlemen in the world, and who has en- 
deared himself to the musical people of San Francisco by his sterling 
worth as a genuine artist, leaves here very shortly as one of Miss Mel- 
ville's principal support. Mr. Dungan's friends are unwilling he should 
depart without carrying away some token of the place he occupies in their 
esteem and affectioD, and it is proposed to make the testimonial a memora- 
ble one. It is entirely a spontaneous affair, and is gotten up without any 
suggestion of the beneficiary. On Thursday, August 11th, at the Cali- 
fornia Theater, a testimonial will be tendered, and it is the intention of 
making it both an artistic and social success. The programme will in- 
clude the Schmidt Quintette, the French Horn Quartette from the Or- 
chestral Union, several popular soloists and choruses, composed of repre- 
sentative members of our best choral societies. 

California Theater.— Sheridan has been playing a round of favorite 
roles this week. Wednesday's performance of Richelieu was the most 
notable, and, after the star's well-known magnificent performance, came 
Miss Keene's "Julie," which was an exceedingly powerful interpretation. 
Her scene with the Cardinal, after the visit from the King, entitles her 
to this acknowledgment. Grismer's " De Mauprat," and Miss West's 
" Francois," were very spirited performances, and, taken all in all, Rich- 
elieu has seldom been better played here. 



The Melville Troupe'3 departure is near at hand. Their manager's 
most sanguine expectations in securing openings at the principal theaters 
in the West and East have more than been realized. The route as laid 
out includes, in the order they are named, Virginia City, Denver, Chi- 
cago, St. Louis, Southern States, New York in December, and Boston 
eight weeks. There is no probability of their playing Patience before 
leaving. The troupe includes Miss Melville, Miss Lillie Post, Ida Mob- 
rig, Hallett, who appeared here lately with the Bristol party, Evans, 
Messrs. McCreery, tenor, Max Freeman, Casselli, Dungan, Henderson 
and others. It is by far the strongest musical combination on the road 
and will probably take the Eastern people by storm. 

It is at last definitely settled that Baldwin's Theater will change 
hands. Baldwin has just signed a lease giving control of the theater to 
Amory Sullivan for two years, commencing August 29th. W. J. Calling- 
ham, the insurance agent, is the moneyed backer. Barry Sullivan will be 
the opening attraction. Nothing is known as to Maguire's future move- 
ments, though it is supposed he will proceed East, as he has a number of 
very valuable plays, and has secured the control of several of Belasco's 
late adaptations. While every one feels sorry for the old veteran they hail 
with pleasure any change that promises an improvement in our leading 
theater. 

Woodward's Gardens.— To-day and Sunday a most elaborate pro- 
gramme is offered to the public at this justly famous place of amusement. 
Miss Lillian Smith, the ten-year-old wonder, will give exhibitions of her 
extraordinary skill with the rifle. It is her last appearance, as next week 
she goes East to fill an engagement there. The Arnold Brothers, Amos, 
William and Frank, will give some of their laughable sketches. Bar- 
num's baby elephant will show its comical little self, and Ida Siddons, Fred 
Mackley, Alfred Dury, George Wallace and a host of mixed talent will 
help to entertain the visitors. 

On Monday, August 8th, Miss Charlotte Thompson will open at the 
Bush Street Theater in Jane Eyre. Miss Thompson will be supported by 
Mr. W. E. Sheridan as "Rochester," and the cast includes Miss Alice 
Hastings (from Chicago), C. G-. Craig, H. N. Wilson, J. L. Wooderson 
and Wm. Yerance. Miss Thompson has always been an immense favor- 
ite here, and supported by Sheridan cannot fail to draw large and appreci- 
ative audiences. Her repertoir includes The Planter's Wife, Ingomar, 
East Lynne, Camille, Miss Mutton, etc., etc. 

Winter Garden. — Boccaccio has run into and through another week, 
and has proved an attraction which has drawn thousands to this pleasant 
place of amusement. Hattie Moore and Harry Gates are the stars, and 
right well they deserve the encores which are nightly Bhowered on 
them. Next week an entirely new operatic absurdity will be produced, 
entitled Jonah in the Whale. 

Bush-Street Theater.— The Minstrels at the Bush-Street have packed 
the houses, and Billy Emerson, Rice and McAndrews are encored time 
after time. This engagement has been the most successful they have 
played here, and aside from the merit of the troupe, which is great, not 
a little of the recognition obtained is due to the energetic management of 
Mr. Haverly's lieutenants. 

Tivoli. — Satanella has proved a grand Buccess, and the management is 
to be congratulated upon the way in which it has taken the public by 
storm. The full houses must do the managerial heart good, and induce 
the house to further exert itself to meet the public taste. A good thing 
will always pay ; a poor one never. 

At the close of the present engagement to-morrow evening, the Mas- 
todons proceed to San Jose and Oakland, returning to the California 
Theater for Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday evenings, and then 
Eastward. 

Billy Emerson takes the Standard Theater in December and will 
run it permanently as a minstrel hall. 

Chit-Chat. — W. E. Sheridan will not go to Oregon, but will proceed 
to Australia at the conclusion of the Thompson engagement. He ought 
to reap a rich harvest, as the Australians have not seen such an actor 
for many a day. ^—Haverly's next novelty will be a mammoth circus at 
the opening of the tenting season. Billy Rice is spoken of as clown. ^— 
Tearle, Eyre, Elton and Miss Arden have been re-engaged by Wallack 
fur next season and will open in his new theater.— Tearle's handsome 
face and form, as seen in Adolphe Challet, ought to do a deal of damage 
with feminine hearts. ^—Randall's new play has been read before the 
critics and elicited high praise.— Elton will not appear here during the 
Wallack season, sickness prevented his coming on.— The Melville 
tenor's name is McCreery. It is the intention of changing it before 
reaching the Summit. 

THE TIVOLI GARDENS, 

Eddy street, between Market and Mason. —Hireling; Bros., 
.Managers. Tremendous Success ! Balfe's Grand Spectacular Opera, 
Satanella ! 

With its Elaborate Mechanical Effects! The Demon's Tower, the Living Picture, the 
Supper for Two, the Popular Pirate Chorus, the Slave Market, Mysterious Disap- 
pearance of Satanella, the Caves of Despair, the Demon Foiled, Grand Apotheosis. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Last Nig-htsof AV. E. Sheridan. This (Saturday) Afternoon, 
August 6th, Last Matinee, 

Merchant of Venice ! 

This Saturday Night, LOUIS XI. Sunday, Last Performance -RICHARD III. 

BALDWIN THEATER. 

Thomas Magnire, Managers-Last Nights or the Orent Emo- 
tional Plaj', ADOLPH CHALLET. Only " Adolph Challet" Matinee this (Sat- 
urday) Afternoon at 2 o'clock. Particularly Requested Next Week— The Wallack 
Company in DIPLOMACY and CAMILLE. In Active Preparation— The Great Pa- 
risian Sensation, 

The Stranglers of Paris ! 

BUSH-STREET THEATER. 

Canaries E.Looko, Proprietor. -•" The Mastodons Mnst Go!" 
J Saturday and Sunday Evenings and Saturday Matinee, Last Performances. 
Seeure seats at once. Don't wait fordoors to open. Delayis certain disappointment. 
Recollect! Only Two Nights More! Only One More Matinee! Monday, August Sth — 
CHARLOTTE THOMPSON and W. E. SHERIDAN. Aug. 6. 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTINC ITEMS. 



Yachting. -Commodore McDonough's scbooner-yaeht Aggie, which 
h*» been ondMgoiiig repai wDshmant »t the Merchants' I > ry 

Dock ilnriiu' tin' past two weeks, wai bumohed last Friday. The 
is one of tlu- i nfbrtebla rucbta ever seen in the 

bay of Bah rYanciaoo, anil wUImI i* remarkably fast, especially in rough 
weather. Her trvmen<l.>u* beam and beautiful fine* jjive her an advantage 
over the rest of the fleet when white Dips are plentiful, and in more than 
one trip down from Vallejo she hafl Man able to offer a tow line to the 
most ambitions of mir yachtsmen. As far qu as the water-line, she is 
painted with tlark brown copper paint, the surface of which is as smooth 
as a mirror. The rest of her hull ts painted a beautiful glossy black. Bet 
off by a Hue of gold, and the name "Aggie," surrounded oy a gold cable, 
on her stern. The decks have been re-calked, the spars scraped, the rin- 
ging overhauled, and the Aggie i* now decked out like a bride. Her 
l.-uve, roomy c:d>in baa been decorated with considerable taste, and noth- 
ing has been left undone that could enhance the beauty of the yacht, and 
the comfort of the many guests that her hospitable owner delights to but- 
roond himself with. A trip across the ocean in a wide, roomy keel-boat 
like the Aggie, would be as safe, and much more pleasant, than crossing 
in the biggest steamer afloat.— The members of the San Francisco 
Yacht Club met in the Palace Hotel lost Tuesday nig-ht. Acting on the 
advice of the Regatta Committee, and with a tender regard for its finan- 
cial affairs, the club decided to drop the August regatta and have a 
Corinthian race on September 17th. The scheme is a good one for many 
reasons. In the first place, yacht owners will brighten up their knowl- 
edge of yacht-sailing. In the second place, in order to get suitable crews, 
they will have to get* some new members in the club. Hyde R. Bowie 
took time by the forelock, and secured the election of W. Edgar, Ray 
Falk, Alley Smith and C. McDonald, the gentlemen who pulled ropes 
and cooked coffee on the Nellie's recent trip to Monterey. It was unkind 
of Mr. Bowie to secure Mr. Edgar when he well knew that Commodore 
Harrison had made up his mind to engage Mr. Edgar's services regardless 
of the cost of champagne, to live ballast the Clara. Mr. Gutte is look- 
ing around for some eligible gentlemen mariners, and before the 19th the 
membership roll of the S. F. Y. C. will doubtless receive accessions of at 
least fifty amateur salts. Commodore Harrison issued an order for an 
excursion on Admission Day, yachts to leave San Francisco at 5 P. M. 
Thursday, moor at Martinet during the night, thence to Antioch, return- 
ing to Sancelito after a day spent at Mare Island. The Commodore was 
empowered to appoint a committee of five to arrange for a small yacht re- 
gatta, fix the date, and secure prizes for the same.— —Acting on a sugges- 
tion made by Mr. Gale, the S. F. Y. C. has decided to give a regatta for 
small yachts i35-foot and under) some time during the month of August. 
Messrs. Gale, Gutte, Bowie, Harrison and Sanderson each offered to give 
prizes, and, no doubt, many other gentlemen will do likewise. Mr. Gutte 
kindly offered to provide a steam tug free of charge, aud then reached the 
very apex of yachting courtesy by placing his handsome yacht at the dis- 
posal of the committee as a stake-boat. Hyde Bowie and Commodore 
Harrison, not to be outdone in generosity, kindly offered the committee 
the use of their yachts. The course will be what is known as the short 
course, omitting the Oakland stake-boat. About forty yachts will com- 
pete, and under the direction of an efficient committee the regatta cannot 
fail of being a huge Buccess. One of the special benefits of small boat re- 
gattas is that they make yachtsmen ambitious to be able to sail their own 
yachts, and not depend on a crew of professionals who, though valuable 
in their way, are not the best material for yachtsmen.^— Farmer will 
launch a 40-foot boat from his Oakland Creek yard in a few days. — ■• The 
Pacific Yacht Club propose to make their regatta on September 9th a 
grand Buccess, in spite of the fact that the San Francisco Club is going to 
Antioch to avoid the pain of seeing how well the Pacifies can run a re- 
gatta. 

Turf.— At the last meeting of the Pacific Coast Blood Horse Associa- 
tion the expulsion of Thomas Jone3 was ratified. We dislike to add to 
Jones' punishment by any harsh words, but must say that, if the associa- 
tion had not done as they did do, they would be offering a high premium 
to robbery on the tnrf.^— Caleb Dorsey, P. A. Finigan and J. C. Simp- 
son were appointed to arrange the programme for the Fall meeting on 
November 10th, 11th and 12th, and Henry Schwartz, P. A. Finigan and 
J. 0. Simpson as a committee to select a track, etc.— ^Entries for all the 
Fairs, and for the leading stakes of '82 and '83 closed last Monday, and 
every facility was at once offered to the different sporting papers to pub- 
lish them. From this rule there was one exception. The Directors of 
the State Fair at Sacramento decline to give the entries for publication 
until a certain favored journal shall have had an opportunity to get a day 
ahead of less fortunate rivals. We do not blame the paper in question, 
but we do blame a set of Jacks-in-office, armed with a little brief 
authority, for withholding public news from the public and for making 
themselves as disagreeable as possible to the press of the State, without 
whose aid their Pair and races would be a howling failure. They did the 
same this year, aud we advise every self respecting journal in the State to 
let them severely alone, unless they mend their ways and learn manners. 
All the turf advertisements that the Chronicle, Call, Alia, Union, Bee, 
Spirit of the Times and News Letter receive in a year would not pay one 
month's salary of one of their turf editors, **nd we think that they owe it 
to themselves to insist on proper treatment, when they do so much to help 
the sport along. 

Aquatic. — Governor Perkins, State Senator Miller and a large number 
of the leading citizens of this State have requested the Secretary of the 
Treasury to recommend the Congressional medal for bravery for W. H. 
Daily, who certainly deserves it for the many lives he has saved at Santa 
Cruz and Monterey. As late as last week Daily rescued Miss May En- 
right, of Santa Clara, from drowning. The young lady had swam to the 
raft and was returning to the shore when her strength failed her. Her 
young brother and Miss Madge Perkins held her up as long as they were 
able, and then called out to a man named Henderson, who wes on the 
beach watching them, for help. Henderson started out in a leisurely way 
and swam so slowly that they would all have drowned ere he reached 
them had not Daily, who was some distance down the beach, gone to their 
rescue. Miss Euright was unconscious for some time, but was finally re- 
suscitated, and was all right the next day. 

Fishing — The salmon season closed last Monday, and was unusually 
good in the Sacramento River. On the Columbia the catch was small 
and of poor quality. 



Rowing. The Padfio Amateur Rowing Association is just now under 
.vernment of as inoompetent a set of noodles as over had an opnur- 
t unity to injur.- the Interwtfl "f ■ progressive and flourishing spurt. The 
element, speaking with regard to Intelligence and a knowledge of 
the spurt, they attempt to govern, have drawn out in disgust and have left 
it* affaire to the tender mercies ol a few callow youths aud moss-covered 
fossils, whose perfunctory acta are even more arbitrary and unaccounta- 
ble than the ranch condemned deahnoiu of the Henley Stewards of un- 
gracious memory. A short time ago White and Griffin pulled a race for 
a si. lino wager, and one of the leading noodles of the P. A. R. A. an- 
nounces that White, who lost, is a professional, while Griffin, who won, 
is on amateur. Griffin is a boat builder by trade, and his work involves 
an inordinate use of the oar, so clearly he could never be an amateur. 
Supposing for the sake of argument, that he was an amateur prior to the 
coin race with White, if that did not affect his standing, for decency's 
sake all distinctions between professional and amateur should at once be 
removed, and if it desires to retain Griffin as a member the P. A. R. A. 
should drop the " A " and come out in its true colors as the Pacific Row- 
ing Association. This is not the first time we have been compelled to 
speak of the inconsistency of this so-called amateur association. When 
they wanted to find an amateur that could beat Johnny Sullivan, who for 
some reason had incurred their displeasure, they did not hesitate to white- 
wash as thorough a professional as ever lived, and whose instant act on 
beating Sullivan was to match himself for coin against A. Stevenson with 
the money he had won on the so-called amateur race. A crew of boat- 
builders is allowed to row as an amateur crew, and the Pioneer 
Club deliberately competes against the man from whom they 
bought their last racing barge. If this well-known rowing asso- 
ciation, as an association, wants to command the smallest amount of 
respect, it can only do so by throwing out all the pros., or else by an- 
nouncing that it was an amateur association no longer.^^Louis White 
waited on Tom Flynn, last week, and proposed to pull him a three-mile 
race for $500 a side, or pull a sweepstake with Dennis Griffin as third 
man. White is about as poor an oarsman as ever Bat in a shell, and one 
feels aghast at his stupendous assurance in offering to back himself for a 
sum of money that would have been a big Btake for a championship race 
two years ago. _ Why, it is about an even $500 that White could not pull 
a shell three miles in any but the smoothest water without falling out. 
Griffin is not much better than White, and Flynn is as yet only a learner. 
It would make a mule laugh to think of those three fledgling scullers, 
none of whom knew an oarlock from a harpoon two years ago, risking 
$1,500 on their ability to row three miles. Of course some one would 
have to win, and. bar accidents, that some one could not fail to be Flynn, 
but $1,500— oh, Lordy! We shall have the babies of our first families 
running races between chairs for 81,000 a side before long. Flynn says 
that he does not care for a coin race, but will row either or both of the 
men for a drink or a S200 watch, just to buow them how little they know 
about rowing. 

Athletic— The Olympic Club held a field day at the Bay District 
Track last Saturday. Hawes won the 100-yard handicap from the 5-yard 
mark, and also the 440-yard handicap from the 25-yard mark, in 47,| ; 
Anderson (65) second, Belcher (scratch) a good third, and Sime (9) fourth. 
The winner beat the pistol in both races. — W. George, of the Mosley 
Harriers, is in New York, open to run 1,000 yards with any amateur. 

Shooting. — The Gun Club will hold their regular monthly shooting 
match at Bird's Point this afternoon. ^— The California Club shoots at 
San Bruno to-morrow.— —The Sportsman's Association has given up the 
projected State shoot at the Sacramento Fair. 



A Warning to Drinkers.— Now that the South Pacific Coast Railroad 
has, by increased facilities, added immensely to its Alameda and Oakland 
travel, the public will be pleased to learn that Frank J. Connelly still 
runs the bars on the steamers Bay City, Newark and Garden City. When 
it is understood that Mr. Connelly sells Hotaling's "J. H. Cutter Whisky" 
and J. W. Shaffer's " Bon Ton " and other fine brands of cigars, there is 
no longer an excuse for any gentleman corroding his stomach by drinking 
in a City Front saloon before the boat starts. 



BUSH-STREET THEATER. 

CHARLES E. LOCKE Proprietor. 

FOR A. BRIEF SEASON, 

Commencing Afouclay August 8tb, 

Special Engagement of America's Favorite Actress, 
MISS CHARLOTTE THOMPSON, 

Together with tho Eminent Actor, 
MR. W. E. SHERIDAN, 

{Especially Engaged) , 

Supported by an Unusually Strong Dramatic Company, embracing, Among Others, 

the Following Well-Knuwn Artists : 

MISS ALICE HASTINGS, 

MR. C Q. CRAIG. MR J. L. WOODERSON, 

MR. HENRY N. WILSON. MR WMiYERANCE, 

Opening with Miss Thompson's World-Famous Sp. 

JANE EYRE, 

As Played by her Over 2.000 Times. 

MISS THOMPSON as Jane Eyre 

MR. SUEKlDANas Lord Rochester 

S5~ Box Sheet Now Open. "» 

In Active Preparation, Miss Thompson's Latest Success, 

The Planter's Wife. 



WINTER GARDEN, 

Stockton street, between Sutter and Pottt streets. --Stnhl A 
Mfuaek, Proprietors; M. A. Kennedy, Acting Manager. Last Week Pos- 
itively of the Triumphant and Unquestionable Success, 

Boccaccio I 
with its Charming Music. Magnificent Scenery, Great Cast and Grand Chorus. MISS 
HAITI E MOORE will continue her Artiste Portraiture ut "Boccaccio." MR. 
HARRY GATES, audall the Favorites. Admission, TWENTY- FIVE CENTS. Mon- 
niug, August 8th, — First production of an entirely new Operatic Absurdity, 
From the G led JONAH IN THE WHALE, for which great preparations 

are being made. FuiLpartacularsduring the week. Aug. <J. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



THE DEACON'S BIBLE CLASS. 

"My dear," said the venerable Deacon, as he spat out the well- 
chewed remnants of several cloves, " did you notice in the papers that a 
prize — in fact, Beveral prizes — have been offered for the best esBay upon 
that most vicious of all vices, intemperance." 

" Well, no, Jabez, can't say as I have," replied the wife of his bosom, 
whose confidence in and veneration of Deacon Gushbooby was in a 
proportionate ratio to her own sublime ignorance of all subjects which 
did not bear upon the three absorbing questions of her life, food, babies 
and clothes. 

" You really should keep yourself more conversant with the current 
topics," said the Deacon, looking unutterable things over the top of his 
spectacles. 

" Now, Jabez, don't let on so," almost indignantly returned Mrs. 
Gushbooby. " You know I ain't got a particle of time to spare a-reading 
sich trash as them newspapers. What with Sarah down with the 
measles, Bobby all broke out in spots, and three meals a day to cook, not 
counting the last baby, which you know I can't breast-suckle, and so 
have to make feed for, my hands is so full that what little time I have to 
spare I devotes to reading the Scripturs." 

" We will waive those domestic questions, my love, and return to the 
subject in hand," grandiloquently replied the Deacon, washing his hands 
with invisible soap, and smiling a smile of inward satisfaction, which 
gave his face the expression of a well-tickled baboon. "Now, I have an idea 
that our boy Jab can get one of these prizes that are to be given for essays 
on intemperance. It is not so much the money that I care for, my love, but 
I always like to see children encouraged to do their best in a good cause." 

" Well, Jabec, if smartness can do anything, our Jab must win sure. 
There ain't a cuter child nowheres than Jab for his age, and the school- 
mistress says that his moral behavior is fust class," answered the now 
smiling Mrs. G. , who, next to her husband, worshiped, adored — nay, al- 
most deified, the snub-nosed, alligator- mouthed, freckle-peppered, red- 
headed caricature of humanity, Jab, the ten-year-old heir of the house of 
Gushbooby. * * * * ***_* 

Finally, it was settled that Jab should compete for the prizes in ques- 
tion, and that intelligent youth was instructed by his reverend father, 
the Deacon, to lose no opportunity of informing himself upon the subject 
in hand. 

Now Jab, despite his snub-nose, alligator-mouth and large deal on 
freckles, was wise in his generation, and, besides winning all the marbles 
from his fellow schoolboys, was acknowledged to be able to smoke more 
cigarettes than any boy in the school. Nay, it was even whispered among 
the little ones that, on a certain Saturday night, Jab had actually drunk 
a whole glass of lager beer. With such points in his favor, of course Jab 
was looked up to as a sort of hero by his classmates. 

Jab jumped at the proposition of his competing, and inwardly deter- 
mined that the subject should have every consideration at his hands. 
Whenever he was missed from home during the evening, and reprimanded 
for his truancy, he always excused himself upon the grounds that he was 
studying up the intemperance question. Tbis always appeased his fond 
mother, and, as the Deacon generally left home after supper to attend 
" bible class," and did not return until pretty late, Jab had a soft time 
of it. 

One night last week the "bible class" got through sooner than usual. 
(It was Friday, a poor day for "bible classes," which run far more 
Bmoothly on pay-dayB and their immediate subsequents) — and the Deacon 
returned to the bosom of his family in that fretful state of mind which 
is apt to be produced by a premature breaking-up of one of these holy 
gatherings. 

" Here you, Jab! " he shouted out, not noticing the brick-top of his 
first-born shining in the room. 

Jab was in the back-yard, and was not slow to answer the marshal 
tones of the perturbed Deacon. 

" Well, father," meekly replied Jab, as he munched a piece of onion to 
kill the aroma of his last cigarette, " what do you want ?" 

" Want, sir !" snarled the irate pillar of the church, "I want to see 
how you have progressed with that essay upon intemperance which my- 
self and your mother requested you to attempt to write." 

"I'm getting along fine, dad," replied the young hopeful, who some- 
how felt he had the dead-wood on the old man ; " would you like to see 
what I've written ?" 

A glow of paternal pride suffused the very open countenance of the 
Deacon as he called in his wife, wiped the dew off hiB spectacles, and, 
taking the manuscript from his son, settled himself down to read it in his 
most impressive style. It read thus: 

"Intemperance. 

Intemperance ain't so much drinkin' as drinkin' too much. Some 
folks ken hold more than others. Them is temperence folks. Them 
what can't hold much wobbleB when they walkB, which is bad. One of 
the worst things about intemperance is, that if you get drunk you is 
mighty apt to git run in. A boy told me his mother once had to pay five 
dollars to git his dad out of prizon. This makes intemperance a mighty 
costly vice. Then agin there is folks what drinks on the sly (here the 
Deacon coughed). Now, for the last eight days I've watched Father go 
to bible class; why, he don't go no further " * * * * 

The Deacon read no more, and, when he turned round to compliment 
his son upon his wonderful powers of observation, he was surprised to 
find him gone. 

Crumpling up the paper he had started in j;o read with such gusto, the 
Deacon suddenly discovered that he had left his spectacle-case down 



town. On his road he called in at the corner grocery, and, after soothing 
his ruffled spirits with a soft toddy, casually inquired of the German pro- 
prietor if he had seen anything of his son Jab loitering about the place of 
evenings lately. 

"Jab! Wetten Sie ihr Leben, bet your life! Every night I vos zee 
dat young verfluchter Teufel, so often as you sit and take a drink, look 
through mein door mit his eyes." 

Jab's essay is nipped in the bud, but a sort of confidential treaty, ce- 
mented by sundry little peace offerings of five-cent nickels, has been es- 
tablished between Jab and his father. The Deacon now always looks 
well around before he settles down to the serious business of the "biole 
class." w. L. E. 



Duryeas' Starch gives a beautiful white, glossy, lasting 
sides renders fabrics very durable. 



finish, be- 



BANKS. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM. ALVORS> President. 

THOMAS BROWN, Cashier I B. M [IRKAY, Jr., Ass't Casbler 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of CaLfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, the Oriental Bank Cor- 
poration. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Duhlin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Fraukfort^on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locamo, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.- — Capital paid up, $1,800, - 
000, with power to increase to 810,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office— 28 Comhill, London. Branches — Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada — Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland — British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan — Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand — Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bauk. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSEND, Manager. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital $1,500,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, George A. Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Wormser, James Phelan, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents — London : Earing Bros. & Co. Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin 
Lane, Lombard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer& Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Black stone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chh-a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000. 

Beserve, TJ. S. Bonds 4,000,000. 

Agency at New York 62 Wall street. 
Agency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. Nov. 8. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

422 California St., San Francisco. 

London Office, 3 Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Sel- 
igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, $6,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEINHART, Managers. 
P. N. Lilienthal, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

C Capital, $3,100,000.— San Francisco Office, 424 California 
j street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; 
Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, Bank of England and London 
Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan Ac Co.; Boston, Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Busi- 
ness in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and all parts of the 
world. [October 1st, 1880.1 Oct. 9. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 9300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President, Jerome La it coin: Secretary, W. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 216 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar and Leibbank, No 526 California street. San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors.— Fred. 
Roeding, Chaa. Kohler, Edw. Krase, George H. Eggerc, N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon, 
Peter Spreckels, Ign. Steinhart. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 



$66 



a week in your own town. 



Terms and $5 outfit free. 

Address H. Hallett & Co., Portland, Maine. 



r. 6, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTISKU. 



9 



THE GIVCR AMD THE TAKER. 

[ by John <;. whittikk.] 

The following U an ntWinnt to versify a litvr.il Emulation of a poem 
dj the Hindoo writer. Tin Lived, it is supp wed, in the thin! 

r «t.l He waa remarkable f«r hii hatred ">f idolatry and 
caste, and fur hi* alu><*t Christian ooooaptSon "f God and human duty: 

WhogtvM wli.it othen may not see, 

N-T oouote "ii favor, hue or praise, 

Shall find his smallest gift outweighs 
The burden of the mighty sea. 

Who kItm to whom hath naught been given, 
HJi ^ri ft in need, though small indeed 
As ia the grass blade's wind blown seed, 

Is large as earth and rich as heaven. 

Forget thou not, O man ! to whom 

A -ift shall fall, while yet on earth, 
Yea, evi-n tn thy >eveii fold birth, 
Revive it in the lives to come ! 

Who, brooding, keeps a wrong in thought, 

Sins much, but greater ain is his 

Who, red and clothed with kindnesses, 
Shall count the holy aims as naught. 

For he who breaks all laws may still 

In Sivam's mercy be forgiven: 

But none can save in earth or heaven 
The wretch who answers good with ill ! 

THE ACTUAL BIRTH OP STEAM NAVIGATION. 

In answer to a querist in last Sunday's Cull, the sage of that elecfcic 
luminosity did his best to perpetuate an error which is nothing short of 
being a national disgrace. How Americans can seriously persist in up- 
holding Fulton as the inventor of steam navigation, is (with the records 
in existence) incomprehensible. Fulton's parents were Scotch people, 
from Kirkpatrick, in Scotland. He was born in 1765, and, as a young 
man, devoted his time to portrait and landscape painting. Finding his 
way to England, he, through West, the celebrated painter, got an intro- 
duction to the Duke of Bridgewater, the noted canal projector, as well as 
to Earl Stanhope, an equally noted and equally advanced mechanic. Here 
it was, during a sojourn of mauy years, Fulton acquired all the funda- 
mental knowledge he ever had in practical mechanics. Leaving England 
he went to France, and for seven years applied himself to theoretical 
studies. When satisOed with the enlightenment he had imbibed, he de- 
termined to return to the United States by way of Scotland, as at Glas- 
gow he could witness a water traffic with a vessel propelled by steam- 
power. In the Glasgow Mechanics' Magazine, for November, 1788, a Mr. 
Miller gave a description of a mode of propelling vessels by steam-power, 
and, with the assistance of a Glasgow mechanic named Symington, con- 
structed a steamer that proved eminently satisfactory. This practical 
illustration was in 1802, and the steamer was named the Cliarlotte Dundas. 
The same magazine, for August, 1802, says: "One day a stranger visited 
the Charlotte Dundas, and betrayed no small amount of inquisitiveness 
and prying curiosity. To please him steam was got up, and he was car- 
ried up and down the canal, even allowed to make sketches of the vessel 
and machinery. The stranger's name was Robert Fulton." That he 
reached the United States, and, some years afterward— that is, in 1806— 
met with the assistance necessary to start just such a traffic on the Hud- 
sou, in America, as he had seen on a canal at Glasgow, in Scotland, is not 
in the least wonderful. Fulton was not the inventor of any one thing in 
connection with steam navigation. The humiliating condition of the 
United States' Atlantic Ocean steam traffic to day, and after a half-cen- 
tury's competitive test, is the most deplorable result that can command 
serious consideration. Of more than a score of Companies — some Eng- 
lish, some Scotch, some French, some German, some Dutch — -all success- 
fully navigating the Atlantic Ocean, not one ship belongs to the United 
States. The aham begun by Fulton has attained its legitimate head, cul- 
minating in disastrous bounce. While Fulton lived no one would give 
him credit as being the inventor of steam navigation, and he died because 
he couldn't get the credit — see the article Fulton, in Maunders' Bio- 
graphies, published forty years ago. 

THE JEANNETTE. 

The search for the Arctic-yatch Jeannette is now being pursued 
with the utmost activity. No fewer than four expeditions will explore 
those parts of the Arctic regions in which the Jeannette is thought most 
likely to be 'found. Of these expeditions, whose courses will widely differ, 
the best chance of success, according to the New York Herald, lies with 
the Government steamer Rodyers, which goes to Wrangell's Land, where 
the Jeannette was last seen. Competent authorities consider that disabled 
Polar ships drift very slowly— witness the Austrian Tegetkoff, which only 
traveled the small distance of 250 miles in a year, and therefore that the 
Jeannette, if disabled, may be found much in the same position as when 
heard of last. The next most promising attempt is reckoned to be that 
of the Corwin, which will cruise along the American coast from Behring 
Strait to Point Barrow, while the Alliance, which has gone to Spitzbergen, 
is considered to be almost out of the running. 

There is more chance for the Proteus, belonging to the Washington Sig- 
nal Service, which will shortly leave under Lieutenant Greely for Lady 
Franklin Bay, to establish the first of the International chain of observation 
stations. This expedition will directly pass the Arctic inlets into Baffin's 
Bay, of that vast current which sets eastwardly from Wrangell's Land, 
and sweeps across the meridians of Arctic America through the Parry 
Islands, and which would probably carry the Jeannette toward Baffin's 
Bay. The observation station at Lady Franklin Bay is to be visited 
yearly by a relief vessel, which will bring supplies and take home the re- 
sults of the observations. Each member of the expedition is bound to 
keep a diary, which will be sent to the Signal Service at Washington. — 
London Graphic. __ 

Duryeas' Starch has received the highest prize medals at the Inter- 
national Exhibitions, and in every instance of competition maintaining 
an unbroken record of success. 



AN EASY CHAIR FOR CONDEMNED CRIMINALS. 
A scientific German gentleman, who in, beside*, a philanthropist, 
being grieved to the bottom of hii sensitive bear! at the sufferii 
eondemned criminals who expiate their crime either by the guillotine or 
the rope, has reached the conclusion that it would be much more hue 
tooarryoul tl i, by humus of an electric battery, the 

■hock of which would kill Instantaneously, without the patient experi 
the slightest Bufferina or oven discomfort, His invention has been 
i in Qermany, tin- result being that it is pronounced decidedly in- 
genious, whatever may be the objections made to the innovation with re- 
gard to ita practicability. A. German contemporary thus describes the 
humanitarian apparatus: " In a hall set apart for executions, an allego- 
rical statue of Jnstioy is erected, holding in one hand a sword, m the 
other a pair of scales. In front of the statue there is afautcuil, destined 
to be occupied by the condemned man. After sentence has been passed, 
the judge (who would fulfill at the same time the duties of the public ex- 
ecutioner} lets a wand, which he holds in Iris right hand, fall into one of 
the scales ; it goes down ; at the same moment a powerful electric bat- 
tery concealed in the statue is brought into action, and this battery being 
connected with the faitteuit, its occupant is struck dead, as if by light- 
ning. Experiments have been made on an ox, a horse and some dogs, 
death in each case being instantaneous. Moreover, an accidental circum- 
stance has proved the rapidity with which human life is destroyed by the 
invention. A magistrate who witnessed the experiments, having impru- 
dently gone too near the fauteuil, was killed on the spot before he had 
time to utter a sound or make a movement."— Overland Mail. 

GEO. STREET, Agent News Letter, 30 Cornhill, E. C, London. 



T 



HE SPECIAL NUTRIMENT IN 



c 



CONSUMPTION. SPECIAL NUTRIMENT IN 



w 



ASTINO AND DEBILITATING DISEASES. 



JANCREATIC EMULSION, or MEDICINAL FOOD. 



T 



HE SPECIAL NUTRIMENT QUICKLY RESTORES 



D 



IQESTIVE POWER, STRENGTH, WEIGHT, &c. 



s 



PANCREATIC EMULSION SUPERSEDES COD LIVER OIL, &c, Palatable and 
easily borne by delicate stomachs of Children and Invalids. 

AVORY & MOORE, NEW BOND SREET, LONDON, and Chemists Everywhere. 
^ [November 27.] 



JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 
rritae attention of Sportsmen Is invited to the following 

A Ammunition, of the best quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India and the Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof and F 3 Quality Percussion 
Caps ; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding ; Joyce's (ias-Tight Car- 
tridges, for Pin-fire and Central-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold by 
all gun-makers and dealers in gunpowder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE & CO. , Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Oct. 2. 67 Upper Thames street, London. 



HARTLEY FLEMING, 

Who sailed from Louden, England, lor Melbourne, In 
October, 1870, as Midshipman on board the "Lady Cairns," and, it is be- 
lieved, left his ship at Siin Francisco in 1871, will hear of something to his advantage 
by addressing WILLIAM FIELDING, 41 West Twenty-sixth street, New York. Any 
one furnishing information regarding him will be rewarded. June 26. 



R 



owlantls* Macassar Oil has been known for the last eighty years as the 
best and safest preserver and beautifier of the hair; it contains no lead 
or mineral ingredients, and is especially adapted for the hair of children; 
sold in usual four sizes. 

Rowlands* Odonto is the purest and most fragrant dentifrice ever made; it 
whitens the teeth, prevents decay, and gives a pleasing fragrance to the 
breath, and the fact of its containing no acid or mineral ingredients 
specially adapts it for the teeth of children. 

Rowlands* Kalydor produces a beautifully pure and healthy complexion, 
eradicates freckles, tau, prickly heat, sunburn, etc., and is most cuoling 
and refreshing to the face, hands aud arms, during hot weather. Ask 
any Perfumery Dealer for 

Rowlands' articles, of 20, Hatton Garden, London; and avoid spurious worta- 
less imitations. [Oct. 2. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

luest aud Cheapest Meat-flavorlug Stock for Soups, Hade 

Dishes and Sauces. 



F 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT, 

Aii Invaluable a.nl Palatable Tonic in all Cases of Weak 
Digestion and Debility. Is a success and boon for which Nations should feel 
grateful. Sco " Medical Press," "Lancet," " British Medical Journal," etc. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

Cantlon— Genuine only with rac-simile of Baron iiebig's 
Signature, in blue ink, across LabeL 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

To be had of all Store-keeper**, Grocers aud Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale onlv). C. David & Co., 43, Mark Lane, 
London, England. Sold wholesale by RICHARDS & HARRISON, San Francisco. 
[March 2.] 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, daily, from iO a.m. 69 1 p.m., by the nnder- 
. to receive subscriptions and donation^ and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCt'RRIE, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. Room 4, N>. 531 California at. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



A DARLING JOB. 

At the present moment there is an interesting and instructive fight 
in progress in the Board of Education. It involves several leading posi- 
tions and also the promotion, over the heads of several deserving teachers, 
of a School Director's sister. The facts of the case stand thus : Joseph 
O'Connor is at present Principal of the Washington Grammar School. 
Charles True is Principal of the Union Primary (formerly grammar). 
The principalship of the Boys' High School is, in consequence of the elec- 
tion of Mr. Reid to the Presidency of the University of California, vacant. 
For this vacant principalship there are many applicants. The person to 
whom the position by right of succession heloDgs is a Mr. Blackburn, at 
present acting principal of the school, and for many years past teaching 
there in the capacity of Professor of Greek and Latin; and even if 
Mr. Blackburn were not available there are many other old, well tried 
and thoroughly competent teachers in the school who could fill the posi- 
tion. Unfortunately, however, for Mr. Blackburn's pretentions, and for 
the good management of the School Department 'of San Francisco, there 
is a Director Darling, and he has a sister. This young lady about one 
year ago, was teaching in the Lincoln Grammar School. How she got 
there the News Letter does not at the present moment know; but we 
presume that it was by the sam e influence and methods which have se- 
cured her subsequent elevation. Prom the Lincoln Grammar School the 
School Director's sister was, by his influence, promoted, over the beads 
of five qualified teachers, to the position of second grade teacher in the 
Den man Grammar School. The design now is to promote Mr. O'Connor, 
of the Washington Grammar School, to the principalship of the Boys' 
High School, then to put Mr. True, of the Union Primary School, in 
O'Connor's place, and, finally, to shoot Miss Darling, Bister of School Di- 
rector Darling, into Mr. True's place as Principal of the Union Primary. 
This is certainly " a darling job," and it has come very close upon fructi- 
fication, by the way. The Board is at present evenly divided between 
Blackburn and O'Connor for the principalship of the Boys' High School, 
and if the latter can be elected the whole job will be consummated. The 
vote at present stands : For O'Connor — Van Schaiek, Darling, Daniel- 
witz, McDonald, Ferguson and Hussey. For Blackburn— Bush, De- 
veney, Patridge, Wadhams, Thompson and Kimball. It is possible that 
some of the six who are standing by Mr. O'Connor are not acquainted 
with the facts we have recited (green School Directors are quite common 
in San Francisco). If there be any such they have now the facts at their 
disposal and have no longer an excuse for supporting this shameless, out- 
rageous, indecent "job." This darling Miss Darling has had more pro- 
motion than she is entitled to and should be left alone for a time. 

TRACKING CRIMINALS WITH BLOODHOUNDS. 
When great ciimes have been committed, and all trace of the fleeing 
murderers or robbers has been lost, it has frequently been suggested that 
bloodhounds should be used to track them. The suggestion, however — in 
the Northern States, at least — has almost invariably been neglected by 
the authorities, though from what sentiment it is difficult to imagine, un- 
less it be that the method savors too much of that employed to catch 
runaway slaves. The only recent exception that we can call to mind is 
when dogs, together with Indian scouts, were used to track the Maxwell 
murderers in Wisconsin. For our own part, we think that the use of 
bloodhounds in such cases is not only justifiable, but greatly to be recom- 
mended, especially in the wilder regions of the West, where, without 
such aid, it is almost impossible to follow the fugitives. Of course, there 
are plenty of so-called humanitarians who would raise a great outcry at 
the idea of running criminals down with hounds, and the spectacle of a 
man being hunted like a wild beast is certainly not a pleasant one to con- 
template. But that is only the sentimental side of the question, and a 
moment's consideration will show that such a view is unsound. In the 
first place, most people imagine that to be chased by bloodhounds means 
to be torn in pieces when caught. This is an entirely erroneous 
idea. The planters of the South did not follow a valuable slave 
with dogs for the purpose of destroying their property, and it is a 
matter of fact that not one man out of a hundred who has been tracked 
by hounds has suffered from them, while in the few cases where such an 
accident has happened, it has either been because he showed fight when 
brought to bay, or because the dogs were badly trained and controlled. 
Again, even if it be granted that there is danger to the criminal if he re- 
fuses to be treed or halt for refuge, we cannot see that any great harm is 
done. His crime would necessarily be a very black one before such means 
of capturing him would be adopted, and we hold that the safety of such 
human beasts of prey is less important than the question of bringing 
them to speedy justice. The robbers, for instance, who will board a train, 
plunder the mails and kill several employees, whose only offense lies in 
protecting the property committed to their charge, certainly do not de- 
serve much sympathy at our hands. Yet when, in just such a case re- 
cently, it was suggested that hounds should be used to track the mur- 
derers, the papers raised a howl of disapproval, and the authorities were 
rendered practically powerless. We will venture to say that a few good 
packs of bloodhounds, kept in different parts of the country, would do 
more to bring criminals to justice and deter them from future depreda- 
tions than all the sheriff's posses put together. 

J. Henley Smith has been nominated by that powerful organization, 
the " Yosemite Club," for Mayor. He was nominated on his merits, not 
being even a member of the Club. The nomination was tendered him, 
and the Club feels grateful at his acceptance of it. Had Mr. Smith 
stooped to button-holing paembers be would, no doubt, have been indorsed 
by both Democratic Conventions. As it is his popularity is so great and 
his worth so well known and appreciated, that when the little differences 
of the Democratic party are settled, he will probably be indorsed by the 
two as a whole. His record for two years as Supervisor is an excellent (One. 



JUDAS 

"Judas Iscariot "— all the guilty shame 
Of centuries is gathered in that name ! 
The murderer is pitied if the vile 
Sin of Iscariot adds not to his guile; 
The thief claims pardon if it can be said 
That he his fellow- thieves has not betrayed. 
E'en to the traitor mercy has belonged 
When he has proved that he was deeply wronged. 
But when the lost one turns to bite the breast 
That nursed and lulled its anguished soul to rest, 
And when all love and confidence is paid 
With help forsaken and with trust betrayed, 
What human heart could any pity feel 
For him who thus his Master's life could steal? 
Thy Master's life ! Nay, Judas, on thy head 
There rests the blood of no mere human dead; 
No mere ingratitude for love misplaced 
Hath Judas' name so utterly disgraced; 
There grows above thy grave no verdant sod, 
Because thou did'st betray the Son of God.* 
Well have the Sophists argued thou wast right ; 
Saying thou would'st but prove thy Master's might 
By calling Ceesar's soldiers to thy aid, 
Only to see them by His strength dismayed.^ 
But, ah ! we doubt it, Judas — wherefore take 
The bribe if zeal thy love for him could slake ? 
Yet, after all, the bribe thou did'st return, 
Feeling the silver in thy fingers burn ; 
Somewhat we pardon thee, then, for the pelf — 
Still more, that thou did'st go and hang thyself. 
Fitting, indeed, the gain thy bribe did yield — 
The purchase of the weed - grown "Potter's Field." 
Yet, Judas, it is not past all belief 
That he who pardoned the repentant thief, 
He who for such as thou died on the cross, 
Pitied thee in thy dark day of remorse. 
Forgiveness was His attribute divine, 
Hath He, then, pardoned that dread sin of thine ? 
San Francisco, Aug. 4, 1881. T. A. H. 

♦There is an old tradition that on or about the spot where Judas is supposed to 
have hanged himself not so much as even a weed will grow. 

JThe reader will remember that W. W. Storey's famous "Defense of Judas" takes 
this view of the betrayal. 



JACK'S JOSTICE. 
The News Letter has, on a number of occasions, drawn attention to 
the brutal manner in which the sailors on board American ships are 
treated, and to the constant scenes of violence and bloodshed that are 
being enacted on the decks over which the stars and stripes wave. An- 
other instance of this brutal violence, and of the queer "justice " that is 
dealt out to poor Jack, occurred on board of the Davy Crockett on her 
last voyage to this port. On the ship's arrival, a charge of assault to 
murder was preferred against one of the men named Cummins. It was 
alleged that CumminB had endeavored to kill the first mate, a brute 
named Fred Jordan. The only evidence in support of the charge was 
that of the brute himself. On the other hand, there was the testimony of 
three or fonr witnesses, among them the carpenter, a petty officer, to the 
effect that the man Cummins had come aboard at New York somewhat 
under the influence of liquor, and had been set upon and brutally beaten 
by the mate, and that the man Cummins had been, from time to time, 
badly beaten after that. It was also put in evidence that the mate had 
a playful habit of pointing a pistol at the men, and, on one occasion, 
discharged a couple of shots with such poor aim that he did not hit any- 
one. These little idiosyncrasies Mr. Commissioner O'Bierne, before whom 
the charge was heard, evidently thought were among the privileges and 
perquisites of the office of first mate of an American ship. At any rate, 
he held the sailor who had been abused and kicked about to answer on 
the charge preferred against him, and let the_ mate go. Any one who 
follows the decisions of Mr. Commissioner O'Bierne will necessarily and 
naturally come to the conclusion that Mr. Commissioner O'Bierne's ideas 
of justice are extraordinary. 

THOSE INFERNAL MACHINES. 
We had always supposed that the Land League, though in our 
opinion a misguided, badly advised and somewhat visionary institution, 
numbered amougits members men who would not openly condone assassin- 
ation and wink at the making and use of dynamite infernal machines. 
It seems, however, that we were mistaken, as the utterings of the man 
Crowe, of Peoria, 111. (if they can be believed, and they seem to be gener- 
ally received as truth), go to prove that a regular system of manufacture 
of these infernal machines has been instituted throughout the United 
States. Crowe's statement must, of course, be taken with a considerable 
amount of salt, but his barefaced acknowledgment of the manufacture of 
the machines which were lately found upon an Atlantic steamer should 
most undoubtedly insure his arrest. If England was wrong in the Ala- 
bama affair, and the fact of her having to pay as she did proves that there 
was an infringement of international law, how much more liable will the 
United States be if, after Crowe's open declaration, we allow the manu- 
facture and shipping of his diabolical machines. If prompt measures are 
not at once taken Crowe and others of the same ilk will imagine that the 
Government of this country is scared at them and their dynamite. Such 
men cannot distinguish between liberty and license, and probably in ad- 
dition to the foreign troubles they may get us into they may finally turn 
their attention to home politics, and the day may not be far distant 
when such men may strive to achieve by this sort of terrorism what they 
have failed to accomplish by the legitimate ballot. 

Gladstone's victory with the Irish Land Bill is one of those supreme 
triumphs of moral earnestness and overmastering intellect of which par- 
liamentary history has few equals. To fight a revolution or to head it is 
a simple task : Gladstone has fought revolution in Ireland and achieved 
reform in the English Parliament in the same session. 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

■H»»r lh* OrtorT "What th» <!»t11 trl ihftB 1 
*Oo» lfc»t will tUj th* divil.tir with too." 

' II»M » sting in his i»ll •■ lon« a* ft flail, 
Which mad* htm crow bolcUr and boldar." 



Let the voting men of America who have been tearing their hair ami 

en**hing their teeth aver since their ouuntiyinan, Harriett, married the 

Baroneai Bnrdatte-Ooutti romui men, we say, Em comforted 

lurk wan t^ ao great, after ;i u. Ha didn't marry a title, as was 

the title married bin. and no man knows ft better 
than himself when be aaaa it recorded in the morning papers that the Bar* 
oneaa Bnrdetta-Oontla "an-1 her husband" were doing this thing or the 
other. " Her hoabawl V Qreat and glorious Jerusalem! If she were 
young, beautiful aud charming, the diminution would be unpleasnnt 
b; but when ahe is old, ugly and emtelietty ugh I Then, again, 
the unhappy Hart Iihs saddled himself with aload of names and surnames, 
connected with hyphens and otherwtaa, until he needs a ream of pa]>cr 
for his signature, a table of logarithms to tell him their order, and a chart 
and compass to read them when written. As to her fortune, it is great, of 
course, and we hear that Hart is allowed some piu money out of it; but 
imagine his feelings as he sees his better half endowing it all away on hos- 
pitals and flannel jackets fm- the heathen] Picture bis remorse as he 
marks the old woman, whom he expected to kill with " love," growing 
younger every day ! Imagine, if you can, his ftelings when he reads in 
the papers that " domestic matters will render it necessary for the Baron- 
ess to retire from active public life for a few months !" 
Twas bad enough to be her hub, 

With hope to he Bole heir ; 
But O, the horror when a cub 

Must all her millions share ! 

There waa a squabble at a meeting of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, last Wednesday, over the important question whether God is 
to be feared or not. The learned theologians who held to the doctrine of 
fear triumphantly cited passages from the Bible showing that " the fear 
of God is the beginning of wisdom," and likewise that " to fear God and 
keep his commandments is the whole duty of man," together with a whole 
battery of other equally pertinent verses. This sacred volley told with 
great effect, and the opposition was at first greatly disconcerted. Pres- 
ently, however, one of them found a shot in the locker in the shape of 
the verse which tells us that "perfect love casteth out fear," and this 
bombshell having exploded with great destruction to the enemy's camp, 
a compromise was arranged on the basis that the revisers of the Old 
Testament ought to " eliminate those objectionable expressions " which 
represent God as a jealous God, who can be cruel enough to object to his 
commandments being broken. The Y. M. C. A. really ought to get out 
a patent for this ingenious suggestion. Its convenience to the public 
generally, and to the public of San Francisco in particular, can be seen 
at a glance. It only remains now to substitute for the "eliminated" 
verses a few lines, stating that the Almighty would a little rather 
have his commandments broken than not, and offering a sure free pass to 
Paradise to those who can break the whole ten in twenty,four consecutive 
hours. 

If there is one thing more than another which has been liable to affect 
President Garfield's recovery, it must surely have been the multitude of 
" church " dispatches that he has received. It is devoutly to be hoped 
that he never saw one-tenth part of them. Even the Earl of Shaftesbury 
cabled the prayers of an English Christian Conference — (God save the 
mark !) — this week, and there is not a Pecksniff, including the Earl of 
Shaftesbury, from Iceland to Africa, who has not done the same thing. 
The editor of this paper, in his own way, but out of his heart, says a 
prayer for the President as he writes this item; so does the compositor 
who sets it up, so does the proof-reader as he goes through this para- 
graph, and so does the employe" that holds copy; so do the proprietors of 
this paper when they read a proof of this, and so doeB every reader of 
the News Letter, and so does everybody everywhere, every day. But these 
sniveling ice cream punishers, who are daily telegraphing their ecclesias- 
tical condolences to Mrs. Garfield, are a lot of whited' sepulchres, whom 
the late Charles Dickens tor years unsuccessfully tried to vx erminate. 
It is a pity that Charles Dickens did not live a hundred years, and retain 
to the last his power to score a humbug and a hypocrite. 

We have just received for review a neatly bound little octavo 
volume, whose title-page declares it to be "The Revised Edition of the 
New Testament." It is a most interesting work, and though the story 
seems in Borne places a trifle unconnected, and the incidents at times a 
little improbable, still, on the whole, it is a most readable little work. 
In glancing through it, one story in particular struck us as (though show- 
ing the wonderful inventive powers of the author) somewhat calculated 
to make the reader imagine he was being made fun of. The story we 
have reference to is the one in which the hero turns water into wine. We 
can imagine wine being watered, but the turning of that tasteless fluid 
into wine gets just a little ahead of us. Some of the other incidents upon 
which the plot hinges require even more swallowing. Such heroes as the 
one described in this delightful little book we seldom meet with in real 
life, and, in our opinion, the author or authors would have done better 
had he or they depicted something nearer to nature. 

E. Lipka is a sucking lawyer, who. when the legal papof his "mother- 
in-law," Judge Baggs, gives out, meanders into the Police Court, and there 
revels in the more or less clean crumbs he can pick up. He picked up, on 
Monday last, a fine fat crumb — nay, a slice of a loaf — in a poor ignorant 
woman named Maggie Crimmins. This woman had been arrested for 
vulgar language, and the law-sucker thought he saw his chance. He in- 
duced ber to hand over first $2.50 and then $2 on a promise to get her 
clear. How much more he would have got out of the poor woman it is 
hard to say, had not a good Samaritan come to her aid. Judge Rix 
should pile it on to such frauds as Lipka, and not allow them to degrade 
a profession they do not belong to by such dirty tricks. Mr. Lipka, if he 
keeps on accumulating legal knowledge in the way he is now doing, will 
be very apt to finish his education in the classic shades of San Quentin. 

The " Call" beads an article " Is God to be Feared ?" It is a most ex- 
traordinary subject for this journal to discuss, the fear of God being so 
utterly unconnected with a San Francisco daily paper. 



A« everybody is anxious to know about ex County Clerk Stuart and 
hu whereabouts, the following information i» given to this Buffering oonv 
inanity; Last Tuesday weak he pawned a #500 gold watoh for 85 cents, 
and bought a ticket on tha Oakland Ferry. Thence he begged his way 
to Alameda by pretending to be a blind man, and from there he went to 
mi nio vu Mexico, on the plea that he was a policoman. He is now 
■eltingpeanute in Arizona, near Tooton, and doing eplendidly, having made 
b money in four days to buy a spick-and-span new buggy and a 
double team. He may start a bank or go into the undertaking business, 
but that is not settled yet, but, in a private note to the T. C, he sayB he 
positively will not accept the nomination for County Clerk of the City 
and ( 'ouuty of San Francisco again, even if all the deputies who are out 
were to beg him to come in. 

The Eastern papers have lately been exposing the frauds perpetrated 
upon credulous maidens by so-called "Matrimonial Insurance Compa- 
nies." It seems that one of these companies has just started in San Fran- 
cisco. We advise all persona who are likely to patronize such an institu- 
tion to beware. It i* bad enough to get married without getting swindled 
at the same time. The company started here may be on the square. If 
so it will bear investigation. Investigate, therefore, ye hapless would- 
be benedicts, and see for yourselves if it is what it represents itself to be. 
The East sends us its played-out walkers, its drafted actors and actresses, 
its burglars, pickpockets and bunko men, but this matrimonial business 
is quite too awfully much. 

Mr. Wheeler is an Oakland orator, and has " blood in his eye." He 
is a " Greenbacker," and is opposed to the individual accumulation of 
coin. His plan to rid the country of capitalists is to throw bombs at 
them, in true Nihilist fashion. It has long been thought that the Green- 
back party represented the Nihilistic element in the United States, but 
no one had any idea that bomb-throwing proved part of their programme. 
It is very probable, however, that the bombastic utterances of the gifted 
Oakland orator were prompted by the swallowing of a fluid sold in the 
modern Athens under the name of whisky, but which possesses all the 
brain aud life destroying attributes of the favorite Nihilist beverage- 
distilled dynamite. 

Said Mrs. Ferkelstecher to Mrs. Schinkenfresser, the other day: 
Wir sind so tired von San Francisco dass mein Husband ein little place in 
dem country gebought hat. Wir koennen chickens raisen und fresh eggs 
haben ; ein oder zwei pigs keepen, und ein flower-garden machen. Wir 
proposen auch eine Cow zu buyen, so daBS die children all the milk they 
want haben koennen. Cows sind nicht expensive. Auf dem country sind 
Sie pretty scheap joostnow. Und es wird bo pretty die children auf dem 
grasB rollen zu see ; Grassrollen ist so healthy fur children. Und wir 
woljen drives taken auf dem roads und die neighbors visitiren, und es 
will so much nicer seyn von der city zu der country zu changen in all re- 
spects betchourlaife. 

That animated flirtation ground, Monterey, has this season boasted 
a bewildering variety of toilets— with feminine forms within— but alas ! 
cry the dear creatures, to what end? The scarcity of young men at that 
watering-place this year, with the exception of the holiday week, is con- 
firmed by the testimony of one of the young men himself. He says: On 
entering the ball-room of the Del Monte, he encountered the hungry gaze 
of two score pairs of female eyes fixed steadily upon him. Though not 
at all inclined to stint the measure of his attentions to the Bofter sex, the 
first thought that arose in his mind was, "Thank you, my dears, but I'm 
afrad there isn't enough of me to go round," and, dreading utter annihila- 
tion if he stayed too long, cut short his visit. 

It is with infinite pleasure that we watch the police patrol as it goes off 
on its target -practicing expeditions. There is a feeling of safety when one 
walks the streets in knowing that a policeman can make a sure shot at a 
large man at five paces. Hitherto when our efficient force has had occa- 
sion to take a street shot at a flying criminal, the criminal has usually 
escaped, but some innocent window or inoffensive passer-by has received 
the municipal bullet. Now things are altered, and we hear, on creditable 
authority, that there is hardly a man on the force who, at five paces, 
could net make a sure hit on Captain Kentzell, even on a dead run. 

Frank Travers, a dumy-cart driver, was arrested this week for bat- 
tery, and held in $1,000 bail, which he promptly produced out of an old 
chest. We have always thought there was something unprofitable about 
journalism, and have long been casting about for a really lucrative busi- 
ness. It is with considerable pain that the editor of this column bids our 
myriad readers adieu, but we have nevertheless to confess that we have 
burned all our copy paper and bought a dump-cart. 

The outside doctors who have been given no chance to gauge the 
President's pulse or describe the color, odor and consistency of the Execu- 
tive pus, are crying aloud at the street corners that the principal doctor 
in attendance at the White House is densely ignorant. The disappointed 
quacks seem to forget, however, that "Where ignorance is Bliss 'twere 
folly to be wise. " 

Yesterday was a black-letter day in the annals of our Hebrew board- 
ing-houses. The day before was the fast of the"Tisha B'av," and the 
pious ones who bad on Thursday mourned the destruction of Jerusalem 
by the malignant Titus, fairly let themselves out on the hash. Strange 
to relate, there was no commensurate rise in the price of pork. 

The following quotations from the revised edition of the New Testa- 
ment are offered : " It is easier for a rich man to go through the eye of 
a needle than for a camel to enter the kingdom of heaven." "And the 
last shall be behind and the first in front, for many start, but it is hard 
to name the winner." 

That ingenuus puer, the Call, says in last Wednesday's issoe that, at 
the opening of the Mechanics* Fair, a divine blessing was invoked by 
Rev. T. K. Noble and a ballad by Miss Ellen Coursen. We have the 
highest opinion of that young lady's singing, but we object to her in- 
voking ballads. 

Poor Billy Emerson is having a hot time of it about those five prom- 
isory notes which the quondam Mrs. Emerson extracted from her sable 
lord for dresses, etc., etc. Burned-cork pays pretty well, Billy, but ex- 
pensive wives and sh&rp-clawed tigers will handicap a millionaire with a 
coal-heaver. 



12 



SAW FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



C. P. R . R. 

Time Schedule, Saturday, June 4, 1881. 
Trains leave, and are due to arrive at, 

San Francisco as fol lows; ^^^^ 



LEAVE 
FOR 


\ DESTINATION. 


ARRIVE 
FROM 


9:30 A.M. 


.... Antioch and Martinaz 


3:35 p.m. 


•3:00 p.m. 


" " " .... 


*10:05 a.m 


•4.00 p.m. 


* « » " 


+12:35 P.m. 


8:00 a.m. 




7:35 P.m. 






11:35 a.m. 






7:35 P.m. 


*4:00 p.m. 




*10:05 A.m. 


9:30 A.M. 


. . ( Deming and ) Express 


3:35 p.m. 


4:30 p.m. 


8:05 A.m. 






3:35 p.m. 


8:00 A.M. 


. . ( Gait and ) via Livermore 

. . ( Stockton j via Martinez 


6:05 p.m. 


*4:00 P.M. 


+12:35 p.m. 


8:00 A.M. 


.-lone ............. 


6:05 p.m. 


*3:30 P.M. 


. . . .Knight's Landing 


11:35 a.m. 


J8:00 A.M. 


.... " " (JSundays only) 




9:30 A.M. 




3:35 p.m. 


8:00 A.M. 


. . . Livermore and Niles 


6:05 p.m. 


6:00 P.M. 


" " " -.... .. 


8:35 A.M. 


9:30 A.M. 


.... Madera and Tosemite 


3:35 p.m.. 


*4:00 p.m. 


" " " .... 


+12:35 p.m. 


8:00 A.M. 


Marysville and Chico 


7:35 p.m. 


10:00 A.M. 


.... Niles (see also Liverm'e & Nile3 


4:0d p.m. 








6:30 p.m. 


..(East f Emigrant........ 


6:05 A.M. 


8:00 a.m. 


. ..Redding and Red Bluff 


7:35 p.m. 


8:00 A.M. 


. . ( Sacramento, \ via Livermore . 


6:05 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


. . ■{ Colfax and > via Benicia. . . . 


7:35 P.M. 


3:30 P.M. 


.. (Alta ) via Benicia.... 


11:35 a.m. 


*4:00 P.M. 


.... Sacramento River Steamers. . 


+6:00 A.M. 














8:00 a.m. 




7:35 P.M. 










(< 






<t 




3:30 p.m. 


....Virginia City 


11:35 A.M. 














*B:Q0 A.M. 




+7:35 p.m. 



Train leaving San Francisco at 9:30 a.m. should meet 
Pacific Express from "' Ogden " at San Pablo ; also Pacific 
Express from "Deming" at Byron. 



Fr om " SAJT FBAJTCISCO." Pally. 

To EAST OAKLAND -*t6:10, t7:30, tS:30, t9:30, 10:30, 

11:30, 12.30, 1.30, t3:30, H:30, +5:30, t6:30, 7:00, 8:10, 

9:20, 10.40, +11:45. 

(-(-Running through to Alameda, Sundays excepted.) 
To ALAJIKDA Direct-7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 

12:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, +7:00, 8:10, 9:20, 

10:40, +11:45. 
To BERKELEY — 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 10:30, 11:30, 1:00, 

3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, +3:30. 
To WEST BERKELEY— +6:10, 8:00, 10:00, 12:00, 1:30, 

3:30, 4:30, 5:30, *6:30. 

To "SAJf FRANCISCO," Daily. 

From Broadway, Oakland -+5:20, +6:00, 6:50, and every 
21th and 54th minute of each hour (excepting 2.24) 
from 7:24 A.M. to 6:54 p.m. (inclusive), 8:00, 9:10, i0;30. 

From EAST OAKLAND -*5:10, +5:50, 6:40,t7:44, +8:44, 
t9:44, +10:44, 11:44, 12:44, 1:44, 2:44, +3:44, +4:44, 
t5:44, t6:44, t7:50, 9:00, 10:20. 

(tS tar tins 20 minutes earlier from Alameda, Sundays ex- 
cepted.) 

From ALAMEDA Direct— +5:00, *5:40, 6:25, 7:00, 8:00, 
9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1.00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 
+7:20, 8:40, 9:55. 

From BERKELEY— +5:40, +6:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 10:30, 
11:30, 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00. 
From WEST BERKELEY— *5:40, +6:30, 8:00, 10:00, 

12:00, 1:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, +6:30. 



Creek Route. 

From SAN FRANCISCO— +7:15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15, 3:15, 

5:15. 
From OAKLAND— +6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4-15 



All trains run daily, except when 
days excepted. 



star (*) denotes Sun- 



" Official Schedule Time" furnished by Randolph & 
Co., Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Townk General Superintendent. 



AT REST. 

A summer night. The pale moonlight 

Sleeps on the throbbing sea ; 
The drooping flowers within their bowers 

Are sleeping silently. 
The birds upon the forest boughs 

With folded wings are sleeping. 
And the bird of night, with noiseless flight, 

In mystic rings is sweeping. 
Beneath the leaf, the ivy-leaf, 

Crouches the dragon-fly ; 
And the beetle bold, in his armor of gold, 

Is booming drowsily. 
The landrail shy, night's sentinel, 

From his sequestered lair 
In medow deep or grassy dell 

Sends forths his watchword clear. 
Morning appears; each flower uprear3 

Its sleep-o'erladen head, 
And opes to heaven an eye all tears 

Like liquid opals shed. 




BROAD GAUGE. 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing Saturday, June 4, 1881, 

And until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
from, and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townsend St., between 3d and 4th streets,) as folluws: 



8:30 a.m. 
X 0:30 A.M. 
10:40 A.M. 
t 3:30 P.M. 

4:25 p.m. 
t 5:15 p.m. 

6:30 p.m. 

8:30 a.m 
t 9:30 A.m. 
10:40 a.m. 
t 3:30 p.m. 

4:25 p.m. 

10:40 a.m. 
t 3:30 p.m. 

10:40 a.m. 
t 3:30 p.m. 

10:40 a.m. 
t 3:30 p M. 

10:10 a.m. 



DESTINATION. 



.San Mateo, Redwood,. 
....and Menlo Park.... 



..Santa Clara, San Joseand.. ! 
...Principal Way Stations... [ 



.Gilroy, Pajaro, Castroville. 
and Salinas.., 



.Hollister and Tres Pinos.. 



. . Monterey, Aptos, Soquel . . 
and Santa Cruz 



.Soledad and Way Stations.. 



3:36 p.M- 
8:15 P.M- 
6:00 p.m- 

tl0:02 a.m- 
9:03 A.M- 

t 8:10 a. M- 
6:40 a.m- 

3:31 P.M. 
t 8:15 P.M. 

6:00 P.M. 
t!0:02 A.M. 

9:03 A.M. 

6:00 P.M. 
HO: 02 A M. 

6:00 p.m. 
tl0:02 a m. 

6:00 P m. 
fl0:02 a.m. 

6:00 p.m. 



tSundays excepted, JSundays only. 

Stage connections are made daily with the 10:40 a.m. 
Train, except Pescadero Stages via San Mateo, which 
e onnect with 8:30 a.m. Train. 



Ticket Offices— Passenger Depot, Townsend street, 
and No. 2 New Montgomery street, Palace Hotel, 

A. C. EASSETT.Supt. H.B. JUDAH, A. P. &T. A. 



jE^*" S. P. Atlantic Exprsss Train via Los Angeles, 
Yuma, etc., leaves San Francisco daily via Oakland 
Perry, foot of Market street, at 9:30 A.M. 



VOICES OF THE SEA. 

[BY G. HUNT JACKSON.] 

Wakeful I lay at night, and heard 
The pulsing of the restless sea. 
The moaning surges 
Sounded like dirges 
From some far-back eternity, 
Whose spirits from the deep are stirr'd. 

Awaking with the morning light, 
Again I listened to the sea ; 
But with its surges 
Were heard no dirges, 
But only life's activity ; 
Morning dispelled the gloom of night. 

At noon I saunter'd forth to view 
The throbbing of that living sea ; 
Still it was surging, 
But only urging 
All men to be both strong and free — 
Strong in the soul, with conscience true. 

At closing day once more I stood, 
Gazing across that mighty sea ; 
For ships were sailing ; 
The light was failing ; 
Time, Inst in immortality, 
Waa the reflection of my mood. 

It is the mind, and not the place, 
Our moods, and not a varying voice, 
That tills with sadness, 
Or thrills with gladness 
A boiiI whose one great ruling choice 
Beflects in all things its own face. 

— Public Opinion. 

Mexico, if it ever had any great faith in free 
trade, seems to be losing it. A new scale of du- 
ties will come into operation in November next, 
by which all goods hitherto duty free will be 
charged 50 cents per 100 kilogrammes — and mer- 
chandise which already pays duty will pay an 
additional duty of 75 cents per 100 kilogrammes. 
— Public Opinion. 

Many persona whose digestive powers would 
not enable them to eat ripe cherries, will rejoice 
to know that they can eat canned cherries so 
carefully prepared by King, Morse & Co., with 
relish. 

Paper Coffins are now made. Rather "run- 
ning the thing into the ground." 




Commencing Sunday, April 10th, 1881, 
and until further notice, Boats and Trains will 
leave San Francisco as follows: 



71 f\ a.m. daily (Sundays excepted) San Quentin 
. J. \J Ferry, foot of Market street, for Cloverdale, 
Guerneville and Way Stations. Stages connect at Santa 
Rosa for Mark West Springs and Sebastopol, at G^yser- 
ville for Skaggs' Springs, and at Cloverdale for Qkiah, 
Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeporfc, 
Bartlett Springs and the Geysers. 



3f~)(~fc p. M. daily (Sundays excepted), Steamer 
• V/v/ "James M. Donahue," Washington street 
Wharf, connecting at Sonoma Landing with cars for 
Sonoma, and at Donahue with train for Cloverdale 
and way stations. Stages connect at Guerneville for 
Ingrams, Fort Ross, Gualala, Point Arena and Cuffey*s 
Cove, and at Cloverdale for Mendocino City and Navarro 
Ridge. 



SUNDAY EXCURSIONS. 

8 OH a.m. Sundays only, Steamer "James M. Don- 
• A\J ahue," Washington-street Wharf, for Sonoma, 
Cloverdale, Guern.ville and Way Stations. Round Trip 
Tickets, on Sundays, to Sonoma, SI; to Petaluma, SI. 50; 
to Santa Rosa, §2; to Healdsburg, §3; to Cloverdale, 
Si 50; to Guerneville, S3. 



ARTHUR HUGHES, 
Gen. Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Ag 



SOUTH PACIFICIST R. R. 

(NEW ROUTE-NARROW GAUGE.) 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing April 4, 1881, Boats and 
Trains will leave San Francisco from Ferry Land- 
ing, foot of Market street, as follows: 



8*J (~\ a m. , Daily, for Alameda, West San Leandro, 
,0\J West San Lorenzo, Russell's, Mount Eden, 
Alvarado, Hall's, Newark, Mowry's, Alviso, Agnew's, 
Santa Clara, San Jose, Lovelady's, Los Gatos, Alma, 
Wright's, Glenwood, Dougherty's Mill, Felton, Big Tree 
Grove, Summit and Santa Cruz. 



3 0A P.M., Daily, for Santa Cruz and all intermedi- 
• Ov/ ate stations. 



4QA p.m., Daily, Suudays excepted, for San Jose 
• Ow and all intermediate points. 



g^ 1 In Alameda all through trains will stop at Park 
Street and Pacific Avenue only. 

Stages connect at Los Gatos with 8:30 A.M. and 
3:30 p.m. trains for Congress Springs and Saratoga. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 
Sold on Saturdays and Sundays, good until Monday fol- 
lowing, inclusive: To San Jose and return, $2 50 ; Santa 
Cruz and return, S5. 

OAKLAND AUfDALAHEDA FERRY. 

Ferries and Local Trains leave Sail 

Francisco for Oakland and Alameda: 

*8:35-7:35-8:30— 9:30— 10:30— 11:30A.M. tl2.80— 1:30- 
2:30—3:30 4:30—5:30—6:30—7:30—8:30 and 11:30 p.m. 

From Corner Fourteenth and Webster 
streets, Oakland: *0:00 -+7:00— 8:00 — 8:50- 
9:50— 10:50— tll:50 a.m. 12:50- -1:50—2:50—3:50—4:50— 
5:50—6:50 and 9:50 p.m. 

From fEigb street, Alameda--' ( 5:45-*6:45 
—7:45— 8:88— 9:35— 10:35 -fll:35 A.M. 12:35—1:35—2:35 
—3:35—4:35—5:35—6:35 and 9:35 P.M. 

t Saturdays and Sundays only. 

♦Daily, Sundays excepted. 

Up-Town Ticket Office, 208 Montgomery street. Bag- 
gage checked at hotels and residences. 

Through trains arrive at San Francisco at 9:35 and 
10:35 A.m. and 6:35 p.m. 

F. W. BOWEN, GEO. H. WAGGONER, 

Superintendent. Gen. Pass'gr Agent. 



A correspondent of the Times says that in 
consequence of our postal authorities refusing a 
" sample post " in a commercial country like En- 
gland, hiB firm lately posted in Belgium many 
thousand samples to be delivered in England. 
The postage from Belgium to England was Id. 
each, against 2d. if posted in England. For 
each of these samples our Post-office gets about 
one-third of a penny, instead of the whole penny. 
Other firms are going to adopt the plan of post- 
ing their samples in Belgium. He adds: "the 
whole thing is treated as a great joke by the Bel- 
gian officials." Supposing only a million of such 
samples were posted annually in Belgium, our 
Post would be losing about £25,000 a year. — 
English, Paper. 



$72 



A week . $12 a day at home easily made . Costly 
Outfit Free. 

Address Tf.ue & Co., Augusta, Maine. 



- 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 




'The World, 

[By 



'the Flesh, and the Devil. 

Truthful Penman.] 



An American heiress bv> had tho courage to reject the hand and 
an impecuni 1'rince. The lady 13 the daughter of 

a celebrated |*tcnt medicice manufsojanr, and was proof against the 
I WIfttm ronet. Her patent of nobility can be seen on 

the wrapper.*^— Why will people who wbh to get out of thia world try 
to end their miserable Uv«s in places of ]»>pulur resort. A faithless wife 
and a false hushami pahbsbed their crime to the world by hurling them- 
selves OfW the American falls at Nia^ra. Tiny wen both in the prime 
of life, and it seerm-d absurd that tiny should kill themselves at aLl, for 
if they had sinned they could have r. tinted and led better lives. Today 
there is scarcely a romantic sjx.t in the Centra] Park which is not asso- 
ciated in the public mind with some deed of self destruction. This is 
one of the cases where society is powerless before the individual, for 
therein n.. human punishment beyond the grave.— The difficulty ex- 
perienced in deciding as to the genuineness of apparitions arises from the 
tact that a stimulation of the brain cells or other parts of the nervous 
system— by blows or blood poisons, for instance— will produce conditions 
of sight or feeling in which the false so closely counterfeits reality as to 
be ondistmgmshable from it. Dr. Gregory, of Edinburgh, was once as- 
sured by a patient of undoubted veracity that, whenever he felt a tit of 
epilepsy approaching, he thought he saw a little old woman in a red 
cloak, who came up and struck him a blow on the head, when he lost all 
consciousness and fell down. Nervous persons might easily fancy that 
they felt some one walking beside them. The " vasty deep" from which 
some spirits are summoned is probably not lower than the brain. -^ 
Compositors had better look out for some other means of making a living. 
The Gutenberg (the German typographical organ), believes that the craft 
is seriously threatened by composing machines. The London Times is 
about to have three new machines, making eleven in all. The Hakersley 
machine in England, the Prasch in Austria and the Lagermann in Swe- 
den are all offered to printing establishments. ^— Paris, after all, has a good 
many more publications— such as they are — than New York, viz., 1,316. 
Four hundred and thirteen new papers saw the light, most of them for a 
few days only, in 1880. The largest circulation is that of Le Petit Jour- 
nal, of which the average circulation in December was 598,309. The 
smallest circulation was that of the Le Vigilant, of Sedan, which reached 
the alluring figure — for advertisers— of 75 copies! Le Petit Lyonnai&has 
a circulation of 73,000.-^— A dilapidated bible, printed by Gutenberg at 
Mayence about 1452, was recently sold in Paris for 10,000 francs.— 
The longest span of wire in the world is said to be a telegraph wire over 
6,000 feet long stretched across the Kistnah river in India, between the 
summit of two hillB, each 1,200 feet high. The only engineering appli- 
ance used in stretching the cable was a common windlass.— —According 
to Consul Jackson, of Antigua, an invention for the artificial drying su- 
gar-cane megass is greatly required in the West India Islands. Writing 
to the United States Department of State, he says that the sugar-cane 
megass, when sufficiently dried, is capable of the manufacture of all the 
steam required at the sugar-works where it is manufactured, and when 
wet weather intervenes to prevent the thorough drying of this megass 
through the action of the sun, a serious loss is sustained through the in- 
efficiency of this fuel, and iB only remedied by substituting wood or coal, 
generally purchased at a high rate, and frequently carted to long dis- 
tances in order that the work on the plantation may progress. At these 
times the megass is taken from the cane-crusher and carried on the heads 
of laborers to a good distance, where it is stacked, in most cases, under 
an expensive shed, there to remain a number of weeks, to undergo the 
natural heating process, but at a considerable loss of fuel power. Now, 
in these inventive times, it would seem that a machine could be invented 
to take this megass as it leaves the rollers of the cane-crusher, pass it 
through, and deliver it in a comparatively dry condition ready for the 
furnace. _ The saving of time, trouble and expense would be incalculable, 
and the inventor of such a machine would reap a great reward. — British 
Trade Journal.^— The latest application of paper is the adoption of pa- 
per plates by some of the great restaurants and cafes in Berlin. The in- 
novation was first introduced during the summer of last year by the ad- 
venturous landlord of a much frequented open-air restaurant. Every 
customer who ordered bread and butter, rolls, cakes, buns or similar 
articles, had them served to him upon a little paper plate, made of a 
light papier macbe, adorned with a pretty border in relief, and having at 
the first glance a great similarity to porcelain. Guests, waiters and hosts 
were all pleased with the novelty; it saved the waiters many a deduction 
from their wages on account of breakage, which the deftest and cleverest 
can scarcely avoid when he handles hundreds of pieces of crockery during 
a single afternoon and evening. The paper plates were so cheap that the 
landlord did not care to assert his ownership over them, and his custom- 
ers were allowed to carry them away, like the pretty serviettes of thin 
paper used in so many restaurants in Holland. There was also a consid- 
erable saving of the time lost, and the chance of accident incurred, in 
the cleansing of earthen-ware pottery. The success of the experiment 
has been so marked that the new species of plates is likely to be intro- 
duced into a great number of restaurants. — Paper TForW.-^The Cus- 
toms for the year ending June 30th, in Montreal, produced $7,077,793, 
being an increase of $1,844,991 over 1879-80, and $1,200,000 over 1874-75, 
which had hitherto been the most prosperous year. Though trade was, 
as is usual at this period, quiet, the amount was greater than in previous 
years, and the trade of the " Eall " was expected to be very satisfactory. 
The prospectB of the crops were encouraging, the reports from almost 
every district being good. Canadian cotton-mill owners are protected, 
and the produce of their mills does not appear to give general satisfaction 
at present. 



REMOVAL NOTICES. 

THE OFFICE OF THE 
CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY 

HAS MUX RUOVRD TO 

No. 325 Mark.-i Mr.,i Corner of Fremont. 

THE OFFICE OF THE 
HAWAIIAN COMMERCIAL COMPANY 

UAH BRKN HRMOVBD TO 

No. 325 Harket Street Corner of Fremont. 

THE OFFICE OF 
JOHN D. SPRECKELS & BROTHERS, 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

MAS BKKN KKMOVKD TO 

No. 325 Market Street Corner of Fremont. 

(July 28.] 



M. A. GUNST & CO., 

203 KEARNY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, 

IMPORTERS AND HEALERS I1T 
HAVANA AND KEY WEST CIGARS, 

ALSO 

Agents for Kimball, Saulliener & Co.'s Guatemala Cigars. 
t^~ Inform the Public that tliey receive large invoices of Choice 
Havana Rrands twice a month. 

[February 19.] 

ST. MARY'S HALL, 

BENICI A, CALIF ORNIA. 

|g£- This Collegiate (Protestant) SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIES will re-open 
August 4th. For Catalogues, address 
J"'y 18 - REV. L. DELOS MANSFIELD, A.M., Rector. 



H. S. Williams. 



A. Ohesebrough. 



W. H. Dimond, 



WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 
UNION BUILDING, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STS. 

AGENTS FOR 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation 

Company, The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, 

"The California Line of Clippers" from New York 

and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line." 

San Francisco, January 31, 1880. [Jan. 31. 

C. A LPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants. 
8AN FRANCISCO and NEW XOBK. 

gEjg* Agents of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery streets, 
San Francisco, California. Jan. 17. 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE OROCESS, 
10S and 110 California St., S. F. 

TApril 19.] 

H. L. Dodge. L. H. Sweeney. J. E. Buggies, 

DODGE, SWEENEY & CO., 

Importers, Wholesale Provision Dealers and Commission 
Merchants. 

Nos. 114 and 116 Market, and 11 and 13 California Sts. 
[August 7.1 



L.H.Newton. NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., M.Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers In Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, 204 and 206 California street, San Francisco, Cal May 25. 



CASTLE BROS. & LOUPE, 

ESTABLISHED IN THE YEAR 1850. 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, Nos. 3 13 and 315 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 



MOUNT TAMALPAIS CEMETERY. 

A Rural Burial Place for San Francisco. 

Office: Masonic Temple. J. O. ELDR1DGE, President. 

A W. Do Bois, Secretary. Aug. 18. 



ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No. 310 Sansome Street, 

San Francisco, 
WHOLESALE DEALERS I If EVRi 

[September 21,1 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



THE PRESIDENT AND HIS DOCTORS. 

There is now very little doubt about the President's convalescence. 
Since the last operation, performed on the 26th of July, his progress has 
been most satisfactory. A piece of broken rib wa3 then removed and a 
free drainage established. Since that time the pain and fever has les- 
sened and the appetite and general health improved. We now hear that 
the President has himself established the location of the missile, and it 
may be anticipated that its removal will be accomplished at the proper 
time by means of a simple and harmless operation. 

Throughout the treatment it has been a great satisfaction to the public 
to feel assured that the President has received the best possible profes- 
sional care. During the civil war the military surgeons of America had 
the opportunity of acquiring vast experience in the history and treatment 
of gunshot wounds, and with the distinguished heads of the military 
staff in Washington have been associated two of the most celebrated sur- 
geons of New York and Philadelphia, Doctors Agnew and Hamilton, 
who have especial claims to the confidence of the public, and the favor- 
able issue of the treatment has more than justified their previous reputa- 
tion. Nevertheless, in reviewing the case, now that the chief dangers 
have been passed, we may be permitted to remark that the official bulle- 
tins have not been remarkable for their fullness or accuracy of detail. 
Discrepancies between the earlier and later diagnoses have been un- 
noticed, if not studiously concealed. The announcement of the last and 
most successful operation transpired and was published by a sort of acci- 
dent, and at no time have the bulletins conveyed such a full and candid 
picture of the President's condition as would enable the medical profes- 
sion throughout the country and the world to assist in the formation of a 
just public appreciation of the case. It may be that there were special 
causes of obscurity to prevent an early and exact determination of the 
course taken by the ball. It may be that the special con6guration of the 
President's muscular development may have presented obstacles to a 
thorough examination of the wound. It may have been thought 
better to exercise a certain degree of reticence towards the pub- 
lic. And, at all events, it must be admitted that it is extremely 
difficult to convey the whole truth by means of Bhort bulletins 
adapted to telegraphic dispatch. But certain it is that a comparison 
of the first bulletins with the later, and of the first opinions with the 
actual result, reveal discrepancies which may possibly be reconciled by a 
further exposition of the case. For example, we hear nothing of the 
broken rib until the operation of the 26th of July, twenty-four days after 
the injury. More than a dozen surgeons were at the first examination of 
the President. In all the early bulletins the ball was reported to have 
entered the body of the President between the tenth and eleventh ribs, four 
inches to the right of the spinal column. The surgeons are reported to 
have put their fingers into the wound, and to have probed it in search of 
the ball on several occasions, and yet it is remarkable that no mention 
was made and apparently no suspicion entertained of a broken rib — an 
injury which is not generally considered to be beyond the scope and 
power of an ordinary investigation. In fact, auscultation of the part 
usually leads to its immediate discovery by the crepitation of the frac- 
tured bone. 

In the next place, it was confidently stated that the ball had passed 
through the right lobe of the liver. The bulletins of the 3d of July stated 
that "the bullet entered the President's body between the tenth and 
eleventh ribs on the right side, and, after passing downward into and 
through the right lobe of the liver, finally lodged in the anterior portion 
of the abdomen." Surgeon-General Barnes expressed his great fear on 
account of this injury. The fears of the public were greatly excited, and 
statistics were looked up in order to give a hope of possible recovery. But 
it is fair to observe that Dr. Agnew spoke more guardedly, and said, per- 
haps the Uver was a littfe lacerated, and, probably suspecting that the ball 
had been deflected by coming in contact with the rib, that the liver might 
have escaped intact. This is probably t'ie case. We are informed that 
the passage of the ball through the liver would probably have occasioned 
far more serious disturbance of the digestive organs, and much more seri- 
ous constitutional disturbance. And it is significant that we hear noth- 
ing lately of the injured liver, and that there has never been any mixture 
of bile with the discharges from the wound. 

But it can scarcely be said that the cure of the President will be com- 
plete and satisfactory without the recovery of the bullet. There is no ac- 
counting for tastes or opinions, but for ourselves we have no desire to 
have such a weighty companion forced upon us for the remainder of our 
lives. We doubt if the permanent lodgement of a bullet in any part of 
the body is at any time free from pain and the possibility of danger. No 
one denies that a fewindividuals have carried bullets and other projectiles 
to an extreme old age. But few know huw much suffering they endured, 
and how many persons have succumbed to a change in location of the 
ball and the resuscitation of disease in consequence. Even now, under 
the movements of the President, the ball might possibly be forced into 
the abdominal cavity, and give rise to new and dangerous complications. 
We shall hope, therefore, that the location of the ball will soon be deter- 
mined with sufficient accuracy to justify its removal, which, if accom- 
plished successfully, will undoubtedly contribute to a perfect cure. 

A deputation, headed by the foreman of this paper, waited upon the 
proprietor last week, and requested that the "funny man" be removed 
from the editorial staff. The reasons assigned for this extraordinary 
course were these: In the firBt place, the unfortunate compositor to whose 
lot it fell to set up the funny one's MSS. was always so convulsed with 
laughter that it took him longer to set a stick of his stuff than a whole 
column of other matter. Secondly, that the jokes were so good that the 
compositor had to read them aloud, and hours which should have been 
devoted to the case were Bpent in uproarious mirth. 

Sixteen dollars will burn up a body in London. 



CRADLE, ALT AR, AND TOMB. 

CRADLE. 

Cathcart— In this city, July 30, to the wife of A. B. Cathcart, a daughter. 
Ddrivaob— In this city, July 25, to the wife of J. L. Durivage, a daughter. 
Harris— In this city, July 31, to the wife of S. Harris, a son. 
Howell— In this city, July 31, to the wife of John S. Howell, a son. 
Hamburger— In this city, July 29, to the wife of Gustave Hamburger, a son. 
Mat— In this city, July 28, to the wife of F. H. May, a son. 
Murphy— In this city, July 23, to the wife of J. F. Murphy, a son. 
McNeil— In this city, July 24, to the wife of D. McNeil, a daughter. 
Pope— In this city, July 29, to the wife of Gus Pope, a son. 
Smith— In this city, July 29, to the wife of W. R. Smith, a daughter. 
Weizlbr— In this city, July 27, to the wife of Johu E. Wetzler, a daughter. 

ALTAR. 

Croon-Stapletos— In this city, July 27, John F. Croon to Hattie B. Stapleton. 
Frazbr-Millner— In this city, July 31, Daniel G. Frazer to Zillie G. Millner. 
O'Hara-McClellan— In .this city, July 24, Samuel O'Hara to Lizzie McClellan. 
Harris-Holder— In this city, July 27, Arthur L. Harris to Mamie Holden. 
Maschio-Duggan — In this city, July 17, Charles A. Maschio to Katie A. Duggan. 
Palmbr-Johnsos— In this city, July 23, William M. Palmer to Serena B. Johnson. 
Wassmas-Gall — In this city, July 23, John H. Wassman to Katie Gall. 
Wilbur-Cunningham— In this city, July 23, B. P. Wilbur to Lulu Cunningham. 

TOMB. 

Brady— In this city, July 30, Francis Brady, aged 71 years. 

Cunningham — In this city, July 15, Ann Cunningham, aged 56 years. 

Cohn- In this city, July 14, Mrs. Henrietta Cohn, aged 29 years. 

McCarty— In this city, July 14, Johanna McCarty, aged 43 years and 8 months. 

Connolly — In this city, July 15, John Connolly, aged 60 years. 

Gorman — In this city, July 14, lohn T. Gorman, aged 21 years and 1 month. 

Glasco —In this city, July 15, Rosa Glasco, aged 32 years. 

Jercovich— In this city, July 13, Nicola Jercovieh, aged 27 years and 2 months. 

Knowlton— In this city, July 31, Benjamin, W. Knowlton, aged 24 years. 

McNameiS— In this city, July 30, Thomas McSTamee, aged 36 years. 

Owens— In this city, July 30, Geraldine Eva Owens, aged 17 years and 7 months. 

Thurston— In this city, July 27, Nicholas Thurnton, aged 30 years. 

/ETNA HOT MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Situated sixteen miles east of St. Selena, In Pope Talley, 
Napa County. These waters closely resemble the Ems of Germauy in analysis 
and sanitary effects. They have cured many cases of Heart, Kidney. Spinal 
and Liver Diseases; also Dyspepsia, Jaundice, Paralysis, Erysip- 
elas, Rheumatism, Sciatica, Neuralgia, General Debility, Bron- 
chitis and Pulmonary Complaints in their early stages. See pamphlet 
descriptive of analysis and cures at the otfice of J. A. Bauer, Esq., Chemist 
and Apothecary, No. 101 Post street, San Francisco. 

Board and Baths S $10 Per Week- 

The jEtna Springs Stages will leave the depot at St. Helena upon the arrival of 
the ears at 11:30 a.m., Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. People leaving San Fran- 
cisco at 8:00 A.M. will reach the Springs at 4:00 p.m. 

Fare ■. $2.00. 

W. H. LIDELL, Proprietor. 
Lidell Post-Office, Napa County. July 30. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

CON. PACIFIC MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No- 3 

Amount per Share ......40 Cents 

Levied '....July 9th 

Delinquent in Otfice .....August 12th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 1st 

F. E. LTJTY, Secretary. 
Office— Room 5, No. 330 Pine street, S. F. July HJ. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

BEST & BELCHER MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 21 

Amount per Share 50 Cents 

Levied July 12th 

Delinquent in Office August 16th 

Day uf Sale of Delinquent Stock September 7th 

WILLIAM WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, S. F. July 16. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

MAYBELLE CON. MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 8 

Amount per Share 20 Cents 

Levied June 22d 

Delinquent in Office July 29th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 23d 

WM. J. TAYLOR, Secretary. 
Office— Room 25, 310 Pine street, Sail Francisco. July 9. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

RED CLOUD CON. MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 10 

Amount per Share 20 Cents 

Levied June 22d 

Delinquent in Office July 27th 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 17th 

WM. J. TAYLOR, Secretary. 
Office—Room 25, 310 Pine street, San Francisco. July 9 . 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

GOULD & CURRY SILVER MINING COMPANY 

Assessment No. 40 

Amouut perbhare 50 Cents 

Levied '. July 15th 

Delinquent in Office August 19th 

Day of sale of Delinquent Stock September 8th 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, S. F. [July 23. 

Richard Savage.] SAVAGE & SON, [Richard H. Savage. 

Empire Foundry and Machine Works, 137 to 141 Fremont 
street, San Francisco. Stamp Batteries and Prospecting Mills, Saw Mills, 
Gang Bdgers, Set Works, Gearing and Shafting, Harvey's Heaters, Creen-houBe Fix- 
tures, Plumbers' Stock, Dodge's Rock Breakers and Concentrators, Architectural 
Work and Machine Jobbing. Send for Circular. June 25. 

NOTICE. 

For the very best photographs go to Bradley *fc Rulofson's, 
in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



•'., 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKRTISEH. 



15 



THE DEBRIS. 

The Other Sid* of the Argument. 
A Statement by the Miners' Association of California. 

L, 1881. 
So many misleading arguments have lately been made to the public 
to the business of hydraulic gravi I Dining, tli.it we Main it 
our duty to make the following statem I be facta aa they act- 

ually exist, which we trust will receive; that dispassionate consideration 
by the iwople of California which tho itD|Htrtance of the issues at stake 
demand. 

CHARACTER AM' Dfl : THE MINES. 

California ha* prodnnad tinea the discovery of gold in 1848, between 
$1,100,000,000 and •1,300,000,000 of that metal, of wbJuh rery much the 
larger portion has come, either directly or indirectly, from tho ancient or 
tie river channel*. Fully nine tenth* of the placer gold thus fur 
produced was the result of the natural washing away of these channels: 
the earthy matter having been carried down into the plains and inland 
lakes, thus ouiMinir tip toe great valley of California ; the gold, by virtue 
of it* k'reat weight, remaining behind in the beds of tho ravines and rivers 
draining the western tlopa »f the Sierras. 

As the platers became exhausted, the miners naturally turned their labors to tho 
aooreea from which the placer gold had been derived. Oommenolna; In 1861, the] 
have »teadily prosecuted the development and working ol the ■ncienl riverbeds, 
until the yield from them amounts ;\ niually to a sum varying rrom $11,000,000 to 
$13,000,000, with the prospect ( r mai ii.ill\ great returns. 

Dompnah this result, the expenditure of large sums of money hug 
been required in build ins dams, canals and tumuls. The Hloomfleld and Milton 
coaipsim-t »fford a good iUustratlon of the larae capital Deoassary. f«»r the successful 
development <>f such propertlea Work was vigorously commenced on the mines of 
these companies in 18M, about $4,000,000 has been expended— all repre- 

senting "capital account"— until 1878, when their works were finally completed. 
All tali $1,000,000. with unimportant exceptions, was furnished by Btoi^oldera res- 
ident in California 

We rou^'hli estimate the present actual value of these mines in California to be 
$80,000,000; adding to this the property whose valu? is dependent upon the existence 
there results a total present value of probably :?i 00,000, 000. 

The owners of thd gravel mines nave been content with much smaller returns from 
their Investments than from ventures either in gold quartz, silver, copper or coal 
mines. They believed that the undoubted extent and permanence of the auriferous 
gravel beds warranted the Opening ol mines promising comparatively moderate 
profits. At the lime when by far the larger part of these expenditures of capital 
had been made the right <■( the miner t<> "deposit his "tailings" in the river beds 
was a cepted by tho whole State as a matter of course. 

These vast Investments have been made in good faith, and now demand equal pro- 
tection of the law with other property, 

It is falsely asserted that the stoppage of these mines would only involve the de- 
struction of the capital placed in them, "most of which is owned by foreigners," 
nd inflict but little injury upon the people nf the mining counties, "China- 
men, powdar and water being tbe forces employed." 

T<> this appeal to the passions and prejudices of the community we can state with 
authority that the percentage of Chinese compared with whites employed in onr 
la tar less than is the case at the valley farms ; not one of the leading mines of 
tho State now using Chinese labor; that out of many hundreds of mines there are 
only three or four held by owners not residents of the United States, and, moreover, 
that the net return from these three or four mines has been quite moderate. 

The repeated assertions that the mountain counties would be but slightly injured 
by the discontinuance of gravel mining are so absurd to one at all familiar with these 
localities as to be hardly worth the trouble of refutation. For the benefit of persons 
who have no knowledge of these counties we will, for illustration, state the present 
condition of Nevada County. This county owes no debt ; jts taxes are low; has a 
population of fully 21,000 souls; has an assessed value for taxation of over S9.000,- 
000; its inhabitants, including the daily laborers, generally own their own comforta- 
ble homes; neither in California nor elsewhere can be found a more truly prosperous 
and contented community; the rate of wages is nearly double that paid in the valley 
counties; and the miners, owning their own orchards and gardens, live in greater 
comfort than does any laboring class in any other part of the world. Fully one-half 
of this population directly depends for its subsistence upon hydraulic gravel mining. 
Were these mines abandoned, the county assessment roll would be reduced one-half, 
the burden of taxation would be consequently doubled on the remaining property, 
and depopulation and ruin would follow. 

The same condition of affairs would obtain in the counties of Placer, Sierra, Plu- 
mas aod Trinity, while the lower counties of Butte and Yuba would be greatly in- 
jured. 

We recognize the fact that injury has been inflicted upon the farmers of Sutter 
and Yuba counties, but we claim that it is neither right nor expedient to destroy 
these prosperous mining communities because of this injury. To this point, which 
seems utterly misunderstood, we ask attention. 

EQUITIES OF THE MINERS. 

It is assumed that so- called hydraulic mining differs from other methods of gold 
mining, whereas it is absolutely identical in principle with the processes involved in 
either placer, drift or quartz mining. The theory of the extraction of the gold is the 
same; a stream of water washes away upon lower grounds the earthy material in 
which the gold is imbedded, the gold, by reason of its gravity, remaining behind. 

In the early days of placer mining, when there were literally hundreds of thou- 
sands of miners washing the soil in every gulch, ravine and river of the Sierra, the 
aggregate quantity of material washed into the rivers must have exceeded the 
amount which, by improved but similar appliances, is now being placed in them. 

The best lands on the Yuba and Bear rivers were covered with mining debris by 
the great flood of 1861-62, most of which was unquestionably the result of placer 
mining. 

The miners have gone on since 1848, following the same plan of work, but gradu- 
ally, by the outlay of great sums ot money, improving their earlier methods. 

For nearly thirty years their right to thus mine remained unquestioned. Lately, 
however, the very men who came to California to work in the mines; who did work 
in them, and contribute to cover up valley lands; who afterward settled, as farmers, 
upon the land below the mines; have discovered that it is only the farmer who has 
rights, and that tbe miner to whom is so largely due the greatness of our State, has 
all along been an interloper and a destroyer. 

When the orchards and rich bottom lands near Marysville and Wheatland were 
covered with debris in 1862, then the farming community should have asserted its 
pre eminent rights, and have thus prevented the expenditure of the vast sums Bince 
need in developing the gravel mines. The truth is, that when these expenditures 
were made, even the valley fanners considered hydraulic mining as legitimate an 
industry as agriculture. 

It is erroneously stated that the Sutter and Yuba county farmers only wish to 
close the hydraulic mines. In the suit of Keyes vs. Little York Company, etc., sev- 
eral drift mines were enjoined by the lower Court from further working. The lan- 
guage of the injunctions granted, restraining the miners from " suffering to flow 
muddy water," if sustained by the highest judicial authority, means absolute de- 
struction to all gold mining, for gold can only be gotten by muddying water. 

In fact, carrying this legal principle to its logical conclusion, the agriculturist 
would not he allowed to cultivate the slopes of the mountains. 

The only way by which the pristine purity of the waters of the State can be 
brought back," is by driving out the present population and restoritig the land to the 
nomadic Indian, for when civilized man touches the soil, the rivers inevitably be- 
come muddy, as has been notably the case in the Ohio and other valleys of our East- 
ern States. 

TUB NECESSITY TO THE UNITED STATES OF THE CONTINUED PRODUCTION OF GOLD. 

The gravel channels of California have yielded in the past near one thousand mil- 



|| Hon* of dollars In gold, which has been a mighty furw in bringing about the rxlBtlrnz 

ater quantity remains In our unworkou 

It l» * i'a Forma does there remain a largo quan- 

known. 

ThoRold product nf Australn urts ol the world has been stcadih da* 

f.ir many years put, while only in Caflfomln ban the yield been mst I 

In tin- state the minimum product of #i!>,<t00,000 was reached in 1877, since whan it 

has been ina;, until f"r this year, 1881, if the mines aro not closed by 

the Court-., it vrill reach about $ 10,000,000. t)f this, as has before been stated, mutt 

. I mines. 
Can California -can the United States— suffor this great treasure to be forever 
Dp in our ni.mntAlns? 

Is it Jndletong t n Insist apon nob action by the Courts, 11 it can bo had, as 

ail] foretarcloee these groat treasuries against tho State and tho world? 

BXAOOaOATSn BTATRMBNT8 Or INJURIES DONS. 

Tno State Engineer In January, 1880, after detailed and careful examination, re- 

poi hi thai 18,646 acres "( land had been depreciated in value by the flow of mining 

dehi is, with ji resulting damage ajnonnting to |&597,08o. This has been not very 

largely Increased during the past year. These authentic figures are raised by our op- 

! I" lUO.lMio acres, and to untold millioUB of loss. 

Hie d. preeiation in values ui. MaryBville is well known to bo chiefly due to tho eon- 
si i net Ion of railroads and tho exhaustion of the great placer mines on the Yuba and 
Feather rivers, whirl, obtained their supplies from that city. 

Should the mines all be eloB id. U many of the valley people now seem to desire, 
tho still further decay <»f Marysville is assured, and, we may add, that the now pros- 
perous city of Sacramento will suffer a loss from which it will be difficult for her to 
recover. That this decay nf Murvsville is not due to increased cost of river trans- 
portation, is clearly shown by the fact that freights to and from that place and San 
Pranclsoo are now, at the present low water stage, aa low or lower than they have 
been before. 

That the Feather and Sacramento rivers have been injured is conceded by all, but 
we have the official statement of Captain Eads -as competent an authority on such 
matters as can be found in the world— that if tho flow of heavy sand is kept from en- 
tering those streams, they can readily, by proper treatment, be brought into excel- 
lent condition. 

For two or three years past the prophecy of the approaching ruin of San Francisco 
harbor has been allowed to slumber. There seems of late, however, Borne disposi- 
tion to revive this charge, and to those desirous of knowing the truth we would refer to 
the testimony of Professor Davidson, Chief of the United States Coast Survey, and 
to that of General Aloxander and other able scientific gentlemen, taken bya Legisla- 
tive committee In 187S, in order to elucidate this question. It was then clearly 
shown that the water on San Francisco bar was as deep, if not deeper, than in 1848, 
and the falsity of this charge was fully exposed. 

It seems to be taken for granted that we have to deal, in our California rivers, 
with engineering problems more difficult of solution than have before been encoun- 
tered. This is not the case, for both in France and Italy many of the rivers carry 
larger quantities of earthy material in proportion to the water than does the Sacra- 
mento. In these countries no great difficulty has been experienced in protecting the 
lower lands and rivers. 

DESIRE OF THE MINERS TO AID THE INJURED FARMERS. 

From the examinations and reports of cur engineers, we became satisfied, several 
years since, that it was practicable, at a comparatively moderate expense, to safely 
store, for many years to come, all the injurious flow of mining debris in the Yuba, 
Bear and American rivers, by forming reservoirs by the construction of brush and 
stone dams in the bottoms and canyons of those streams'. 

The State Legislature in 1878 authorized the investigation of this question by a 
board of engineers. After elaborate surveys had been made, the State Engineer re- 
ported that a sufficient remedy could thus be obtained, not only to guard against fu- 
ture deposits of debris, but also primarily to protect the rivers and valleys from the 
very many millions of cubic yards of saud and gravel which had been accumulating 
in the streamssince the flood of 1861-2. 

Itseemed unjust that the present generation of farmers and miners, living in the 
northern part of the State, should be compelled to pay exclusively for remedying 
damages caused by mining many years before, which had largely benefited the whole 
State, and especially San Francisco. 

With this in view, the now famous "Debris Act " was strongly advocated by both 
farmers and miners, who, in that measure, asked for State aid, so that the necessary 
funds could be procured to inaugurate a thorough system of protection. In this 
legislation the miners showed their willingness to pay their full share of the burden, 
by being taxed in three different ways, and very much more heavily than any other 
class. 

Under the operations of this Act two restraining dams were built in 1880, one 
across the Yuba and the other across Bear river, at a cost of near $-200,000. The 
residue of the money procured by the taxes levied under the authority of the Act, 
amounting to some 32HO.O0O, was spent chiefly in building levees for the purpose of 
confining the rivers, so that they miirht, by a scouring action, deepen their beds. 

These works were hastily built, and, of course, are yet necessarily incomplete. The 
dani3, although bioken, have been of much service, the one on the Yuba river hav- 
ing, it is thought, saved Marysville last Winter from inundation. Able engineers 
now report that the dams can be made permanent, and that they will answer the 
purpose for which they were designed. 

It was never tbe intention of the mining interests to advocate the permanent con- 
tinuation of a general State tax for this relief. It was hoped that the State at large 
would willingly contribute the small tax of 5 cents on the $100, for three years, and 
that after that tune the parties directly interested could take care of the works at 
their own cost, and thcrea.ter maintain and extend them as necessity demanded. 
CONCLUSION. 

The condition of affairs is briefly this: Engineers, as able as can be found in the 
United States, assert that the mines can be worked, that the valley lands at the same 
time can be protected, and that the navigable water courses of the State can be 
brought into good condition. 

In the face of these statements by scientific authorities, it is proposed to at once 
cutoff from the annual revenue nf the people of the State some £13,^00,000. The 
rut n of the mining counties will then follow, and yet the danger from the vast de- 
posits of debris now in the rivers will have to he met. 

With no other result than the payment of huge fees to greedy lawyers, a multi- 
plicity of suits has been commenced when one alone would definitely settle the con- 
troversy. 

It is with regret that we see hundreds of thousands of dollars about to be spent in 
bitter litigation, when the same money, properly expended, would so largely con- 
tribute to the relief and settlement of the injury done to the farmers. 

It has been shown how idle are the statements that the product from our mines 
simply enriches foreiyn owners. The truth is, that much the larger part of it is 
spent for labor and supplies, and that in the end most of it centers in San Francisco. 
Had it not have been for the mining industry, that city would never have become 
the metropolitan and wealthy place it now is, but would, at the best, have been a 
provincial town slightly superior to Portland. Can San Francisco afford to see one 
of the chief sources of its prosperity destroyed 1 

The individual members of this Association are not alore engaged in mining, but 
are many of them also largely interested in agriculture, trade and manufacturing. 
They deprecate tbe attempts made to injure mining, not only because they believe it 
to be a legitimate industry, but because they realize that its destruction would most 
injuriously affect every material interest in the State, 

Miners' Association, by its Board of Council. 

Thomas Bell, Egbert Jpdso.v, 

Alvixza Hatward, Thomas Price, 

William Ashburner. A. A. Sargent, 

R. E. Brewster, L. L. Robinsos, 

James L. Gould, J. P. Brown, 

N. CADWALADEft, J. S. McBRIDE, 

James P. Piercs G. W. Ccmminqs. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 



Recorded In the City and County of San Francisco, California, for 
the Week ending- August 2, 1881. 



Compiled fromthe Records of the Commercial Agency y 4Ql California St. , 8. K 
"Wednesday, July 27th. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



W R Wateon to Daniel Callaghan 
J Q A Ballon to E G Stetson et ' 



Nat G Bk & Tr Co to H P Bancroft 



Same to T A C Dorland 

H Mahan to Pk Ld Investment Co, 



Marie L Benard to AugnsteBenard 



A F Benard to August Stockman. 
Wm Scott by admr to Wm A Clark 



A L Tabbs to Samnel Lachman, . . 



nib S and L Society to same 

Kate Joyce to Bridget Noonan 

Emily S Tamer et al to S Philippi 

Jno Monaban to Delia Monaban . . 
E A Scott et al to Wm A Clark. . . . 

Chas Neleon to Thos H Brunner. . 
A P Wagner et al i» G_T Mayre. . . 



DESCRIPTION. 



Se Capp and 19th. s 125x122:6 

W Texas, 250 n Nevada, n 25x100— Po- 
trero Nnevo 263 

E Valencia, 136:6 n Tiffany Avenue, e 
154, n to a pt, w 174, s 60 to com 

E Valencia, 249:6 n Tiffany ave, e 191, n 
to a pt, w 209, s 55 to commencement 

Se Turk and 1st avenne, e 426:2, s 275. 
w 454:11, n to commencement— Out- 
side Lands 786 

Nw Tehama, 187:6 ne of 4th, ne 25x60- 
100-vara 54 

Same 

W Harrison, 95 s 20th, s 75x122:6— Mis- 
sion Block 53 

N cor Harrison and Fremont, ne 137:6. 
nw 70, sw 37:6, se 9, bw 100, se 61 to 
commencement — 50-vara 732 

Nw Harrison and Beale, sw 137:6x137:6 
-50-733 

Commencing 37:6 e Berenice and 102:9 n 
13th, e 37:6, b 25, w 37:6, s 26:3 to com- 
mencement—Mien Block 17 and right 
of way 

S O'Farrell, 137:6 e Fillmore, e 34:4x120 
Western Addition 307 

S Perry, 375 sw 3d, sw 25x80— 100-va 80 

W Harrison, 95 s 20tb, s 75xl22;6-Mis- 
sion Block 53 

S 21st, 152:9 e Sanchez, e 25x100 

City Hail Lot 28 



$ 592 



1,440 
1.320 



5 
1,400 



9,400 
16,000 



5 

600 

8,000 



Thursday, July 28th. 



M Gradwohl to Thos Donnell., 
David Cahn to M Gradwohl ... 



M Gradwohl to Thos Donnell .... 

Fantin White to Andrew Clark 

L I Mowry to Mary A McDaniel . . 

Jadah Baker Jr to Jos M Johnson 

Albrecht Jabn to G Giannini 

Hib S and L Soc to J M Lakeman 



Perry Taple to Frank N Coburn. . 
Fanny Chavey to J T McKenzie. . 



Wm F Jones by Tax Col to A Jahn 
W Wainright et al to Hib S & L So 



City & Co of S F to F Gallagher. . 

F Gallagher & wf to Car'lne Sharp 
H F Williams to H C Hyde et al. . 

Nat G Bk & Tr to Henry L Oak. . 

A Pastene el al to Hib S Ln Socy. 
Wm Bell to J M Wood 



N Francisco, 137:6 w Scott, w 137:6x275 

Same; also nw Falcon and Diamond Al- 
ley, nw 150:1, ne 71:2, se 133:2, sw 70 
to commencement 

Lors 727 to 734, Gift Map 2 ; and the 
above lot nw corner Falcon and Dia- 
mond Alley 

Se 22d and Alabama, e 50x30— Mission 
Block 140 ; Bubject to a mortgage for 
$1,200 

E Dolores, 200 s 30x125 -Harper's Ad- 
dition 29 

Ne Hansen, 237:6 se Howard, Be 37:6 x 
112 -100-varas 268 

Lot 23, blk 17, Railroad Ave HomeBtead 

Sw 2d, 50 ee Jessie, se 50, sw 75, nw 25, 
ne 5, nw 25, ne 70 to commencement — 
100-vara 7 

Lot 16 blk 23, Market Street Homestead 

Se Fairmount and Palmer, e 115:6, s 118, 
e 25, s 83, nw 120, n 20:3, nw 145:6 to 
commencement; lot 10 and portion 13 
and 14, blk 15, Fairmount. In trust 
for George E Cavey 

Lot 23, blk 17, Railroad Ave Homestead 

Ne 3d, 55 se Tehama se 25x80— 100-vara 
51; sw6tb, 100 se Bryant, se 50x85 — 
100-vara 1S9 ; e Larkin, 70:6 n Califor- 
nia, n 36: 6x11— 50-vara 1411 

Sw Sutter and Broderick, g 82:6x110— 
Western Addition 557 

Same 

Assigns all property for the benefit of 
Creditors 

E Valencia, 196:6 n Tiffany Avenne, 
175, u to a point, vr 191, a 53 to com- 
mencement 

Sw Fillmore and Tyler, w 137:6 -West 
ern Addition 364 

Commencing at w corner of lot 22, La- 
goon Survey, ne 162:5, nw33:5, sw 
162:6 to Van Ness Avenue,- s 17:6, se 
IS, thence 8 to commencement 



$ 100 

5 

1,000 

3,500 

5 

2,500 
50 



25,000 
250 



23,670 
4*500 



1,272 
19,446 



Friday, July 29th. 



G Gaoterau to Wendell Easton.. 



Jno Warnen to Geo J Rasranssen. 
H M Sackctt to Sava & Ln Socy . . 



A Hollnb, Comr, to Lewis GerBtle. 



Jos de Forest to Geo L Bradley. . . 
Felix CJri to Kaufman Wertheimer 

K Wertheimer to E G Rudolph. . . 
Felton Tract Hd to F A Rouleau. . 
Thos J Bailey to Margt Crawford. 



N Waller, 56:3 c Steiner, e 25x72— West- 
ern Addition 372 

Lot 18 blk 344, O'Neil and Haley Tract 
J Jackson, 107:6 e Mason, e 30x137:6— 

50-vary337 

.Ne 9th, 171:10 nwBrannan, nw 103:1, 
1 ne 275, se 137:6, sw 137:6, nw 54:4, sw 
137:6 to commencement— 100-vara 340 
and block 93, O'Neil and Haley Tract 
Snndrv lots in Flint Tract Homestead 
S 25th, 80 w Castro, w 80x114 ; also sun- 
dry lots in Gift Map 2 

Same 

Lots 14 and 15, blk 1205, Outside Lands 
S16th. 167:8 w Market, w 25x80— Mis- 
sion Block 116 



$2,500 
5 



30,000 
10 



2,000 

5 

340 



Saturday, July 30th. 



Geo E Chavey to L Loupe.. 



Phoebe A Kirby to Wm J Lowry. 
Wm H Hart to Jane Stevenson.. . 
Albert Mitlcrt to Abby E Davis. . . 

H N Cook to Catherine Cook 

Wendell Easton to M J Whitehead 



Sc Fairmount and Palmer, e 115:6, s 118 
e 25, s 83, nw 120, n 20, 3 nw 145:6 to 
commencement ; also lot 10 and por- 
tion lots 13 and 14, blk 15, Fairmount 

E DDpont, 95:6 s Clay, e 68:9x29:6-50- 
vara 53 

Sw Sanchez and 24th, w 25:5x80— Harp- 
er's Addition 123 

W Noe, 131:9 s Market, s 25x55— Mis- 
sion Block 115 

W Taylor, :J0 b Broadway, s 30x60— 50- 
vara 812 

E Steiner, 97 s Haight, s 23x81:3— West- 
ern Addition 372 



$ 215 

16,000 

1,472 

375 

1 

2,800 



Monday, August 1st. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



A F O'Connell to F J Sullivan . . . 
ChaB Wilson to Jno McH Hay. . . 



Rachel Abrams to Elias Levy.... 
Jno R Spring to Peter Donahue.. 

E Herons toJasMooney 

Jas Lyngto DeniB Reagan 



Bridget Dowling to Jean B Pon. . . 



ig 
J M Wood to Alfred Malpas 



DESCRIPTION. 



Ne Mason and Vallejo, n 56:6x60 

Se Woolsey and Ion, e 120x50 - portion 
lot 8, blk 177, University Hx Hd 

Nw Folsom, 50 ne 4th, ne 25x80— 100- 
vara 63 

E Stanley Place, 200 n Bryant, n 50 x 
11 2:6 -100-vara 89 

S Temple, 127:2 w Dolores, w 25:6x114 
Harper's Addition 61 

Se Minna, 346:6 ne 6th, ne 36x75— 100- 
vara 202 

S Pacific, 114 e Taylor, e21x80-50-v 658 

Nw Pacific and Steiner, w 68:9x127:8— 
Western Addition 393 



PRICE 

$5,000 

10 

6,000 

3,750 

400 

4,700 
2,700 



Tuesday, August 3d. 



Engene Lies to Henry Barroilbet. . 

S L Coau et al to J G Klnmpke.. . 
M Dinkelspiel to B Diokelspiel... 

C P Duane et al to Jos M Johnson 

Jno McCraith to C Horigan and wf 



E H Miller Jr toBenj Peart. , 



Property as described in 648 of mortgs 
page 15, and 907 of deeds, p 105 

Lot 21, blk 307 Great Park Homestead. 

Nw O'Farrell and Polk, w 137:6x120— 
Western Addition 60 

NeRaiisch, 237:6 se Howard, se37:6x 
112-100- vara 268. 



FB Wilde toGBnzzini 

D E Martin to Wm F Lapidge.. 



Michael Allen to Dennis Lally.... 



E Hyde, 50 n Broadway, n 87:6. e 137:6 
s 137:6, w 10, n 60, s 10, w 67:6 to com 
mencement— 50-vara 1289 

N California, 137:6 e Webster, e 27:6 3 
132:6 -Western Addition 271 

Lot 12, blk 51, Paul Tract Homestead.. 

N 19lh, 125 w of Valencia, w 25x100 ; n 
19th, 55 w Lapidge, w 25x100— Mission 
Block 71 

Se Minna, 60 ne 9th, ne 30x80— 100-vara 
301: subject to mortgage for $600.. 



$ 5 

15 

60,000 
1,000 

5,000 
10,500 



pois^oiv oak: 

CURED BY THE TJ S E OF 

STEELE'S GRINDELIA LOTION, 

OR 

FLUID EXTRACT OF GRINDELIA ROBUSTA. 



Manufactured and Sold hy 

JAMES G. STEELE & CO Druggists, 

635 Market Street, Under the Palace Hotel. 

[May 7.] 

DR. A. J. BOWIE, 

Havlnsr entirely recovered his health, has resumed the 
practice of Medicine aud Surgery iu conjunction with his two sons, DR. 
HAMILTON C. BOWIE and DE. ROBERT J. BOWIE, Graduates of the Royal Uni- 
versity, Munich. 

Besidences 729 Sutter St. and 714 O'Farrell St. 

g^p Telephonic communication with Office and Residences at all Hours. 
Hours: 10-4 p.m. [March 26.1 Office: 330 SUTTER STREET. 

DR. WILLIAM E. TAYLOR. 

OFFICE: 2 15 GEARY ST. RESIDENCE: THE BALDWIN. 

Feb. 5.] OFFICE HOURS: 1 to 4 P.M. 

DR. JAMES W. KEENEY, 

OFFICE AND RESIDENCE: 82 MONTGOMERY STREET. 

HOTJBS: 9 to 10 a.m., S to 4, 7 to 7:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS: 10 to 11 a.m.. 6 to 7 p.m. April 9. 

COAL OIL STOVES. 

The Summer Queen, Fairy Queen and Triumph. 

All eizes for heating and cooking. The trade supplied. 




g^ 6 May 14. 



WIESTER & CO., 17 New Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, California. 



M ARBLE WOR KS. 

MANTELS AWD GRATES, 

jaOlfTTMBNTS AND BEAD- STOlfES, 

In Marble and Scotch Granite, 

827 Market Street Between Fourth and Firth. 

B3T Designs Sent on Application. lES 
June 11. W. H. McCORMICK. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS., 

Shippin and Commission Merchants- 

Hawaiian JAne of Paclcets. 

325 Market Street San Francisco. 

May 28. 

CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of the Standard Syrup, a superior article 
put up in barrels expressly for home consumption. Also, Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Refined Sugars at lowest market rates. Office, 325 Market 
street, up stairs. Dec. 21. 

LANGLEY & MICHAELS, 

Wholesale Drug-gists, Itnporters of Pure French, English 
and German Drugs, Fine Essential Oils, Chemicals, Perfuuiery, etc., etc., 
No.'s 101, 103 and 105 FRONT STREET, corner of Pine, S. F. July 30. 

EDWARD B0SQUI & CO., 

Printers, Engravers, Lithog rap hers aud Bookbinders, 

X/eidesdorff street, from Clay to Commercial. 

$£T +_ 4fiO/~i per day athome. Samples worth $"> free. 
O LU t)];AiVy Address StinsonA Co., Portland, Maine 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



NOTABILIA. 



THE PEDDLERS SONG. 



Lk«D 14 whit« *.• ■irii rn NOW ; 

■ 

Muki for ficra iml f»r non« ; 
B«(rl«-bf«crl«i, nccktar*, tmbar ; 
FwrfunM for a Udj '» chamber ; 



I f»ktnr«Urlu of >tc< I. 
Vth»l MH U< l 'n in hmtl l<> hwl : 
('■ inr bu\ of tuo, come; onnw buy .come buy, 
Ituj, tad*, or etae row Immw 

William mi unruu. 



Two neighbors had quarreled and would no longer apeak to each 
other; 1 nt ooa having bMn recently contorted at a camp meeting, 

f. held oat his band, uying: " How d'ye do, Kemp? I am 
hnmt'i .!<<• band! with a OOB," I 0* the least of 

part ft the ooi . and contrasted most un- 

favorably with the way in which their wives " bridged the chasm." The 
wife of the rude convert pent word by her boy that Mrs. Kemp could 
have the nas of her l>.i\is Vertfo al Fi 1 Sewtng Machine, the agent for 
which machine hi Mark Sheldon, of 130 Post street, 

A Oerman with affectionate tendencies says that even in Vaterland 
there are women who, in the tenderest moment of their existence, do not 
forget the trade dollars, ma per example: 

I showed my love my fond heart, 
And asked would she he mine 
Till cruel death do us part? 

She Answered me, Ach nrin! 
I showed my love my bank-book, 
And then I touched her soul. 
She sighed with such a frank look, 
And sweetly lisped] J<i wohll 

A widow, being cautioned by her minister about flirting, said that 
she knew it was wrong for maidens and wives to flirt, but the Bible was 
ber authority. It said. " Widow's mite." She was flirting awfully at the 
last accounts ; her pastor acknowledged that " widow's might." It is ru- 
mored that, shortly after giving way in such a shameful manner, the min- 
ister himself was caught in the snare. At any rate, they were seen driv- 
ing out together iu one of Tomki neon's handsome conveyances. They 
started from his stables, 57, 59 and 61 Minna, at 4 p.m., and did not get 
back until 10 p.m., which looks suspicious, very. 

Perhaps, after all, it is better that some amateur actors should com- 
mence at the top of the ladder. They can work down much quicker than 
they can work up, and the agony of the public is sooner over by the down 
grade. 

Young people about to enter into the matrimonial state, will, no 
matter how little avarice there may he in their composition, speculate 
upon the probable form which the presents of rich relations will take. 
This was the case with Mr. and Mrs. Booth, who had just concluded all 
the necessary arrangements for the wedding; and were on the qui vive for 
presents. Imagine their joy when a well-to-do Uncle sent them an order 
for one of De La Montanya's Arlington Ranges. How eagerly they 
marched off to Jackson street, below Battery, to select one to suit them. 

It seems sad that people should still be found silly enough to commit 
suicide. Our advice to morbid dyspeptics who contemplate self-destruc- 
tion is, spend about half the money it costs to buy a revolver in pur- 
chasing a bit of land iu Ireland. — Fun. 

No matter how well all your clothes may fit, 

No matter the style of your shoes a bit, 

You never can really be got up right, 

Unless you have purchased your hat from White, 

Six hundred and fourteen Commercial street; 

His hats are just quite too awfully sweet, 

And all agree that to be " bon ton," 

You must have one of friend White's hats on. 

"Can you tell me how old Satan is?" asked an irreverent fellow of 
a clergyman. "My friend, you must keep your own family record,'\was 
the reply. 

"How is it. Tom," asked an admiring friend of one of our leading 
merchants, " that, although you dip pretty deeply into the cup that 
enters, you never look an atom the worse for it in the morning?" " That 
is the easiest thing in the world to explain," said Tom; "just you slip 
into my back office and taste these samples I've got from P. J. Cassin & 
Co., corner of Washington and Battery streets. That's where I get 
whisky that has not a headache in a gallon." His friend tasted and was 
satisfied. He now drinks no other. 

John asked Julia if she would have him. "No," said she, " I will not 
have you," but before John could recover from the shock, she archly put 
in, " but you may have me." 

A good deal of 'wrong has been done the poor bear by comparing him 
with cross, bad-tempered men. A bear, as compared with a dyspeptic, is 
as a kindly sunbeam to an Arctic blast. Tho Senate are seriously con- 
sidering thV advisability of forming public homes for this disagreeable 
class of public nuisances. Avoid the dread mirth-killing, fun damping 
disease by always eating at Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, just above 
Kearny. There the materials and the cooking are so good that he who 
eats there may laugh at dyspepsia. 

■When a man marries a woman, which is the cheaper, the bride or tl e 
bridegroom? The bride, because she is given away, but the bridegroom is 
sold, 

" What! you here, Egerton ?" said the Hon. Arthur Dalrymple, as 
the two met on Montgomery street yesterday afternoon. " Why, I 
thought you were doing Japan." "Fact is," replied Egerton, "I got 
bored with the infernal sameness of the country, and so am returning 
home this way, one of my chief inducements being to get photographed 
by Bradley & Rulofson, whose place is on the corner of Sacramento and 
Montgomery streets." They adjourned there, and it is needless to add 
were charmed with their picture. 

In matters of conscience first thoughts are best. 



j| Dr. Hall says that in Kngtand people are divided into churchmen and 
dtMent^m, but that in Vmcrica they might projwrly be divided into 
ohnrohmen and eh tenters. On one point, however, the good people of 
Ban Pran with en amount of unanimity which U seldom mot 

with in sin h an essentially cosmopolitan town i\* this. That point is in 
declaring thai hirta are the beat and to be got any* 

where. Call at his plai e tinder the Nucleus House, corner of Third and 
Market. 

An Affecting Poem. -The following poem, tho genuine effusion of a 
parson in affliction, baa lately bean found In manuscript: 

Poof Jonathan Snow The winds Moo hi, 

Away did goe, The billers tost, 

All on the ragen main, All hands wore loBt, 

With other malaa And he was one, 

All for to ketch wales, A spritely lad 

& nere cum back agon. Nigh 21. 

" Seb how she leanw her hand upon her cheek! would I were a glove 
upon that hand, that I might touch that cheek!" So cried the impas- 
sioned Romeo as be gazed spell-bound upon the face of his beloved Juliet. 
What was his joy when she suddenly woke from her reverie and ex- 
claimed. " Well, just you hurry up and get me aBix-button pair of Foster 
gloves from J. J. O'Brien's, 024, 026 and 928 Market street, and you can 
just touch my cheek all you want." 

A " drummer" for a New York houBe called on a merchant, and 
handed him a picture of his betrothed instead of his business card, saying 
that he represented that establishment. The merchant examined it care- 
fully, remarked that it was a fine establishment, and returned it to the 
astonished man, with a hope that he would soon be admitted into part- 
nership. 

" No, sir," said a prominent man of San Francisco, " I won't have a 
banquet tendered to me. Folks would think I had been mixed up in 
some rascality. But if you are really anxious to show, in Boroe manner, 
your appreciation of me as a friend and a man, send me a couple of cases 
of Napa Soda, and call it square." Now, that man knew black beans 
from duck shot, you bet! 

As small print most tires the eyes, so little affairs most disturb and 
annoy us. 

The American Exchange Hotel, Sansome street, opposite Wells, 
Fargo & Co.'s Express, San Francisco. This popular hotel is now under 
the experienced management of Charles Montgomery, which means good 
living and moderate charges. Board with room, SI, $1.25 and $1.50 per 
day, or $6 to $10 per week. Table first-class. Nice single roomB, 50 
cents per night. Free coach to and from the hotel. 

Never take the horseshoe from the mule. 

The management of the Eintracht, 539 California street, has been 
taken in hand again by its former owners, Schnabel & Co. It is the main 
depot for the celebrated Fredericksburg lager from San Jose". Leave or 
send your orders there for keg or bottle beer, delivered free to any part of 
the city. 

A Deep Thinker— The submarine explorer. 

Many persons whose digestive powers would not enable them to eat 
ripe cherries, will rejoice to know that they can eat the canned cherries 
so carefully prepared by King, Morse & Co., with relish. 

A Tight Squeeze—" I take lemon in mine." 

J. P. Cutter's Old Bourbon. — This celebrated whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

Yosemite Valley has amused 25,000 tourists. 

Duryeas' Starch has always received first prize medals in the United 
Slates and Europe. 

Women of Letters— Real estate agents' wives. 

Best pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724£ Market street. 

Photographers take the world just as it comes. 

Try the Something New 4 TJ Cigarette. It is delicious. 




18 



SAK FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



BIZ. 



It is with, pleasure that we remark considerable activity in all trade 
departments, notably those of the wholesale jobbers on California, Pine, 
Market, Sansome, Battery and Front streets. Our leading Grocery 
Houses, in particular, Beem to be turning out a great many goods for Ari- 
zona, Oregon and other distant States and Territories, that are steadily 
looking to this city for needed supplies of staple and fancy goods, wares 
and merchandise. There is no question but that the business of this city 
is expanding with a good degree of rapidity. 

Exports other ^han Wheat and Flour are increasing in volume steadily; 
and, in this connection, it is to be remarked that our Mechanical indus- 
tries are growing apace and keeping up with our Agricultural expansion. 
California is now prospering more than ever in all that constitutes sub- 
stantial progress. We remark, also, a marked improvement in the num- 
ber of first-class buildings now in process of erection, not only on the line 
of our business thoroughfares, but in the Western Addition and in the 
Buburbs of our city an unusually large number of first-class stores and 
dwelling-houses are now in process of erection, and many of them very 
costly structures. It is also noteworthy that the number of first-class 
dwelling-houses now vacant and to-let is much less numerous than for 
years past at this season of the year. These remarks will also apply to 
Oakland, Berkeley, San Rafael, and to other towns easy of access. Ileal 
Estate is more sought after than for years past. Money is plentiful and 
to be had at lower rates than ever before in our history. 

Imports during the week have been of considerable importance. These 
include three cargoes from the Sandwich Island. Per Cedar, to Wil- 
liams, Dimond & Co., with Sugar, 13,276 bags; Rice, 2,699 bags. J). C. 
Murray, from same, to J. C. Merrill & Co., with Sugar, 6,225 bags, 120 
kegs; Molasses, 505 bbls.; Rice, 380 bags; Oils, 14 cs. Jane A. Falkin- 
burg, from same, to Jones & Co., with Sugar, 8,138 bags; Rice, 853 bags. 
W. G. Irwin, from same, to J. L. Spreckels & Brothers, with Sugar, 
8,175 bags, 965 kegs; Bananas, 100 bunches. The Louise Marie, from 
Marseilles, has a full cargo of French goods, including Castile Soap, 
3,450 cs., Wines, Vermouth, etc. From New York we have the ships 
Jos. Drummond and Sovereign of the Seas, and from Philadelphia the 
John T. Berry, all with well assorted cargoes of general merchandise. 
From Liverpool we have the Irby, with general merchandise; Manga- 
lore, from Dundee, with Burlaps, Coal, etc.; Bullion, from Antwerp, 
with Steel Rails; Montone, from Atwerp, with Railroad Iron; from Ran- 
goon the James Bolt, with 11,200 bags East India Rice. Besides all these 
we have a fleet of Colliers from England and her colonies, some 30,000 
tons. The Colima, from Central America, with CofEee, Sugar, etc.; also 
from New York, 1,174 bales Cottons for China and Japan. 

Exports for the week include a goodly number of cargoes of Wheat 
for Europe, also to Australia, per City of New York, Salmon, Oils, 
Quicksilver, etc. 

Coffee.— Quotations to-day are 13@13£c. for good to choice Guatemala, 
13@13|c. for good to choice Costa Rica, 12£c. for good green Salvador, 
and ll£@12c. for bleached Salvador. The demand has been mostly for 
the good green qualities. As yet very little has been done with the 
Coffees received per South Carolina, which, as observed in our last review, 
are all more or less bleached. Few sales have been effected for St. Louis 
and Chicago, but latterly there is more inquiry from that quarter in con- 
sequence of an improvement in the Atlantic markets. 

Sugars.— There has been a reduction of £c. lb. during the week in 
the price of refined and a corresponding decline in raw Sugars. Refiners 
continue well provided with refining grades. Quotations are: Refined 
Crushed, 12ic fl? lb.; Refined Yellow, 10£@llc. $ lb.; Hawaiian, grocery 
grades : 7@9|c. ^lb.; Central American Muscovadoes, bright colored, of 
good refining quality, 5i@6£c. ¥? lb.; do. dark, of poor to fair refining 
quality, 4i@5c. $ lb. We continue to draw our chief supply of raw 
Sugar from the Sandwich Islands. Out of a total import of 80,000,000 
lbs. since January 1st the Islands have furnished nearly 60,000,000 lbs. 

Bags. — Our stock of Burlap Grain Sacks is excessive. About two- 
thirds of the large stock is held by capitalists (a combination), who seek 
to control the market, but as yet have been unable to advance prices, ow- 
ing to frequent public offerings of lots belonging to outsiders. Calcutta 
Standards, 22x36, can be readily bought at 9Jc cash. 

Case Goods. — The Salmon season upon the Columbia river has closed. 
We are not advised as to the total catch, but we are of the opinion that 
the total number of cases put up this year will equal that of last year. 
The market for Salmon is firm at SI 30@©1 32$ per dozen. Canned 
Peaches, Apricots, Pears, Berries, etc., have been largely sold for export 
already during the season and at low prices. The pack has been large and 
the Fruit of choice quality. Tomatoes, etc., will soon be in order. 

Iron. — The Clipper Exp. Iron Mine at Hotaling, Plumas county, has 
now been in operation 100 days, 25 tons per day, and already made 2,500 
tons of standard quality; price, S25. Oregon and Washington Territory 
send us more or less Iron, and it is easily to be seen that we will no longer 
have a market here for Scotch or English Pig Iron. 

Rice. — The market is well stocked with China, Siam and Hawaiian, 
the former worth 5|@6c, Mixed 5c, Sandwich Island 5c, cash. 

Quicksilver. — The Spot market is slack at 37|c, 371c. only bid. 
Stock light. 

Freights and Charters. — Large additions to our tonnage supply have 
been made during the week, the bulk of it secured prior to arrival, but a 
number of Spot Wheat charters have been written within the range of 
75s. to a direct port, and 80s. Br. iron to Cork, U. K. There are at this 
writing only four disengaged vessels in port, of 4,167 registered tons. On 



the berth, 53 vessels of 69,325 registered tons. To arrive within six 
months, 360,000 tons, against 186,000 tons same date last year. The mar- 
ket closes firm. 

Coal.— The arrivals during the week from all parts exceed 30,000 tons, 
making thus far in the year 500,000 tons received, which is a large in- 
crease over last year at same date. We quote cargoes of Australian to 
arrive $6, Liverpool Steam $5 75@§6 25, Scotch $6. The local wants of 
the city are largely supplied by the Seattle mines at S7@7 50, Welling- 
ton and Carbon Hill at S8@8 50 tf ton. 



Wheat— The Spot market is strong at SI 35@S1 45 # etl., and in a 
few instances extra choice lots of No. 1 placed at SI 47£@$1 50. Ex- 
ports since July 1—33 vessels, 1,367,430 ctls. Wheat ; value, 81,939,903. 
Same time 1880-4 vessels, 176,313 ctls. Wheat ; value, §264,233. There 
sailed from this port during the past month 26 vessels (including one from 
San Diego), of a registered tonnage of 32,436, carrying of Wheat and 
Flour 47,179 J tons of 2,240 ]T)3. each, which exceeds the general allowance 
given by shippers, usually calculated at 33J $? cent. The average freight 
for these 26 vessels was £3 12s. Hid., making the snug little sum earned 
£172,106 17s. 8d. 

Flour.— The export demand is light. We quote Extra Baker's and 
Family, S4 50@S5 ; Extra Superfine, ®5@$5 25 ; Superfine, S3@-$3 50. 

Barley.— The market is strong at 92£@97ic. for Feed ; Brewing, SI 15 
@S1 20 # ctl. 

Hops. — The growing crops are more promising than they were a fort- 
night since. Spot stocks light at 15@20c. 

Wool. — Stocks are liberal, with a fair demand. Sales 150,000 lb3. 
Eastern Oregon, at 24@26c. for Fleece. We quote California Southern, 
18@20c; do. Northern, 25@28c. 

Hides. — A good demand for Dry at 19@19£c. 

Tallow. — In active request at 7£ to 8c. for export; ordinary packages, 
6J@6fc. 



Kingston's 



iswego 
Starch 



.IS THE.. 



Strongest, Purest and Best, 

And is He cognized as the STANDARD all over the World. 



FOR INVALIDS, 
HISfGSFORD'S CORN STARCH 

IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED FOR ITS 

Purity and Delicacy. 
UNION TRUST COMPANY, 

NO. 421 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Banking Agency, Trust and Safe Deposit Business trans- 
acted at the following: rates: 

Discount on business paper and interest on collateral loans, 6 per cent, per annum. 

Interest allowod on deposits, trust funds and unemployed capital, three per cent, 
per annum. 

Buying or selling; National, State, City and County Bonds, local stocks, bullion 
and exchange, one-eighth of one per cent. 

Collecting and remitting for Eastern ootes, drafts and merchandise sent to our 
care, including New York exchange, one-eighth of one per cent. 

Negotiating bonds and loans for public or private corporations, firms and individ- 
uals, one-fourth of one per cent. 

Taking charge of property, and attending to the interests of absentees and non- 
residents, uuder powers of attorney or otherwise, one-half of one per cent, 

Acting as agent, assignee, administrator, receiver and trustee, or as custodian of 
legacies, annuities and estates, one-half of one per cent. 

Transferring, registering and countersigning bonds and stocks, and holding pro- 
perty in trust for bondholders, stockholders, or in any fiduciary capacity, one-tenth 
of one per cent. 

Keeping on special deposit unindorsed securities, one-tenth of one per cent, per 
annum; negotiable securities, one-fifth of one per cent, per annum; and other val- 
uable property at reasonable rates. 

D. W. C. THOMPSON President. I W. C. WATSON Vice-President. 

N. W. LEONARD Cashier. | A. W. PRESTON Secretary. 

ROBERT SIMSON Attorney. July 30. 

QUICKSILVER. 

The Celebrated "A" Brand, shinned direct from the New 
Almaden Mine, for sale in any quantity, by the producers. CARLOAD 
LOTS will be shipped from San Jose for NEVADA, ARIZONA and the EAST, or de- 
livered at Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San Francisco, without charge. 
THE QUICKSILVEB MINING COMPANY, 

J. B. RANOOL, Manager, 
July 9.] No. 320 Sansome St., over Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Express Office. 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, 



10 



THE GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY OF THE PACIFIC. 

A meeting was held b of the 

-itter Btnft, "(i T- wkim tto rapofti "f 

■tlttition nutl 
H\ I-*w». Profea**- (««ory« IUtiibx.n, I i r**id>nt, in th.- chair. The re- 
a**-.! that a hall had been rrnt*<l .ml fnrnUIieil. that a valuable 
collection of hooka had bevn donated by members, a* well MhygMgnV 
pfcers ami explorer* in the Beat, and that the various department- of tbt 
i meat in Wanhinti^n hatl donated a large number of charts and 
maj« t<- the value of I 

1 he Secretary reported that 100 regular members had joined the So- 
ciety, and six life member*, the total inbacriptions MDOnoting to $1,1*00. 
The Treasurer reported having expended $879 for rent, furniture, station- 
ery, etc 

The President expressed his satisfaction that the Society WM DOW fairly 
launched, and he bad no doubt it would prove of great service, not only 
to the inhabitants of California, to the travelers and explorers of the Pa* 
Ast, who make San Fraacitoo their starting point, but also to the 
navigators of the Pacific Ocean. The Academy of Sciences has hitherto 
necessarily gathered all the geographical knowledge that baa been brought 
to San Francisco; but now that tins Socfaty na8 been established we may 
hope to glean from all parts of this coast more particularly every item of 
new information that can be given. For his part, he should make a point 
of doing all that he could to further ita objects. He wan about to visit 
the interior, and he would contribute all that he could in a geographical 
point of riew. 

Mr. Win. l.ane Hooker stated that he had just received a letter from 
Captain Markham, I\. N.. who gave it as his opinion that no fears need 
be entertained as to the safety of the crew of the Jcanucttc, for although 
the Jeannette miyht be crushed in the ice they had ample means of pro- 
t'-ctinir themselves and of effecting communication with the inhabitants 
along the shore. 

Professor Davidson remarked, that in a conversation with Lieutenant 
Swatka, that gentleman had expressed a similar opinion. 



One of the most notable events of the past week, in business circles, 
has been the removal of Mosgrove &, Bro. from their old store on Kearny 
street to their new, and far more commodious and better-lit, premises on 
Post street, between Montgomery and Kearny. Mosgrove & Bro. are of 
the opinion that a good light is not only an advantage to the purchaser, 
but that it also enables the dry-goods dealer to show to advantage goods 
whose color and quality can stand the most searching light. They are 
enabled, on account of the immense stock they hold, to offer bargains to 
the public such as can be found at no other house in the city, and a vast 
sum can be saved by purchasing for cash silks, dress goods, shawls, gen- 
tlemen's furnishing, lace curtains, ladies' and children's boots and shoes, 
and in fact every article which is embraced in any dry-goods establish- 
ment here or at the East. Hurry up and see for yourself what bargains 
are to be had. 

Now is the time for those who are anxious to escape from all the mis- 
eries which surround the boarding-house, hotel or lodging to purchase a 
cheap homestead and settle down as a domesticated citizen. Never have 
such chances been offered the public as Easton & Eldridge now hold out. 
This firm has on its list houses and lots of all sizes, from the four-roomed 
cottage to large business properties, and are prepared to treat liberally with 
bona fide purchasers. On Tuesday next they will hold a peremptory auc- 
tion sale at their salesroom, 22 Montgomery street, opposite the Lick 
House, when ten or eleven comfortable homesteads will be auctioned off 
to the highest bidder and the most liberal terms agreed upon. No one 
having any idea of investing their capital in that surest of all invest- 
ments, real estate, should miss this grand opportunity of getting hold of 
a cheap home. 

A Prosperous Bank.— The Pacific Bank, corner of Pine and Sansome 
streets, before any other commercial bank in the city, deserves this title. 
Founded in 1863, it has held on the even tenor of its way, under the con- 
servative business head which has guided it by safe, legitimate and en- 
terprising methods to a uniformly increasing success, adherence to strict 
business principles, together with ample accommodation, has gained it a 
vast clientage and an enviable reputation. This past year has been the 
most prosperous of its prosperous existence, and has placed the bank still 
more to the fore among the best of the city. Its management and stock- 
holders are to be congratulated on its success, and the business commu- 
nity on the existence of a bank combining ample resources, the best busi- 
ness advantages and absolute security. 



Families who purchase their coal through small dealers are sure to get 
more or less swindled, both as to price and quality. To remedy this go to 
the fountainhead and obtain your coal direct from the importer. J. Mc- 
Donough, of 41 Market street, will deliver a ton and upwards at any 
residence in town at the lowest wholesale prices. He has just received a 
large shipment of Scotch, Sydney, Egg, Cumberland, etc., etc., and ia 
ready to fill orders a t a moment's notice. 

It is impossible to over-estimate the effect which really good dressing 
has upon the female form. Beauty dressed in a slovenly way, with an 
ill-fitting dress and a hat or bonnet whose colors clash and whose style is 
bad, will hardly meet with recognition, while a merelv passable face and 
figure, dressed as only Madame Skidmore knows how to dress, and 
" topped off " with one of those exquisite hats or bonnets which Madame 
Skidmore has for sale at her parlors, 1114 Market street, will be admired 
everywhere. 

St. John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor. The Rev. Dr. Scott, Pastor, will preach Sunday at 11 A.M. and 
7£ P.M. Prayer and Praise Service, G£ p.m. Public cordially invited. 

Piper Heidsieck Champagne.— Henry Lund, 214 California street, 
sole agent for the Pacifie Coast, is in constant receipt of both Quarts and 
Pints of this old fav orite Wine. 

Royalty is careful to pay proper respect to itself on all occasions. 
Queen Victoria placed her box at the Royal Italian Opera at the disposal 
of King Kalakaua, and sent her carriage to take him to the hotel from 
the opera. So a paragraph in the " Court Circular " of the London Times 
informs us. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's ntenmera will anil Tor Yoknlmma and 
HonirkoiiK: CrTTf OF TOK10, aiurusttth, m S i-.m Excursion iik 
M to Tofrobuna and raturn »t ■peck] rale*. 

For NKW YORK rla PANAMA; OTTY OF PANAMA. August loth. at i-j..\i., v 
w., taking Proichl and Piwengvr- te KA2ATLAN, BAN BLAB, HANZANILLO and 
AOAF1 lx'O, and via Ampnlco (.. Lowa Mexican and Contra] American porta oall 
fug at SAN JUSK 1>K GUATEMALA nml LA LIBEHTAD t<. land Pauenjran 
and Mails. 

Fare to New York-Cabin, $139; Steerage, $65. 

Tickets to and from Europe by IBJ line for Halo at the lowest rates; also to Ha- 
vana and all Went India port*. 

FOT HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY: ZBALANDIA, AugUlt 27th. at 
2 p.m., or on arrival -<f the English mafli Freight taken for Bonoluln. 

810 additional i» charged for passage in Upper Saloon. Round the World Trip 
Ticket!- vj.i n. w Zealand and Australia, $660. 

Ticket* must be purchaMd ut least one hour before time of Bailing. 

For freight or pannage apply at the office, cor. First and Brnnnan streets. 
Aug . 0. WILLIAMS, D1MOND ACQ., Gen eral Age nts. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

The Ore<on Rnlln ay and Navigation Company and Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company will dispatch ovary five days, for the above ports, 
one of their new Al Iron Steamships, viz.: COLUMBIA, OREGON and 8TATE 
OF CALIFORNIA. 

Balling Days 
August 4, 9, 14, 19, 24, and 29. I Sept. 3, 8, 13, 18, 23, and 28. 

At 10 o'clock A. JM. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent R. & N. Co., 

No. 210 Battery (street, San Francisco. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents P. C. S. S. Co., 
Aug. 6. No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at 2 P.M., for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

Gaelic. Oceanic. Belgic. 

Saturday, Sept. 17th; Saturday. July 23d; Friday, Aug. 19th: 

Saturday, Dec. 3d. Thursday, October 6th; Friday, Nov. 4th. 

Wednesday, Dec 21st. 
Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at Reduced Rates. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets on sale at C. P. R. R. Co.'s General 
Offices, Room 74, corner Fourth and Townsend streets. 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street, Union Block. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
LELAND STANFORD, President. July 23. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
for VICTORIA, B. C, and PUGET SOUND PORTS on the 10th, 20th and 30th 
of each month (except when such days fall on a holiday, then on the day previous), 
for PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with the O. R. & N. Co. every 5 days, and for 
EUREKA, LOS ANGELES, SANTA BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ, SAN DIEGO, SAN 
LUIS OBISPO, and all other NORTHERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS in 
California about every three days. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, Bee the Company's Advertisement in the San Frau- 
ciBco Daily Papers. 

Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 



Oct. 30. 



GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
No. 10 Market street. 



CALIFORNIA AND MEXICAN S. S. LINE, 

For Magdalen a Bay, Cane St. Lucas, IhTazatlan, La Paz and 
Guaymas. -The Steamship NEW BERN (Wra. Metzger, Master) will leave for 
the above ports on SATURDAY, August 6th, 1881, at 12 o'clock m. , from Washington- 
street Wharf. Through Bills of Lading will be furnished and none others signed. 
Freight will be received on Monday, August 1st. No Fi eight received after 
Friday, August 6th. at 12 o'clock m., and Bills of Lading must be accompanied by 
Custom House and Consular Clearances. For freight or passage, apply to 

J. BERMINGHAM, Agent, 
July 30. Nn. 10 Market street. 

HIGHLAND SPRINGS, 

LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 

This popular Summer Resort for families and Invalids 
is now open to receive guests for the season. 

The Springs are situated at an altitude of 1,700 feet above sea level; and for 
natural beauty of scenery, healthful climate, hunting and fishing, are unsurpassed 
in the State. The surrounding forests and valley arc particularly inviting to camp- 
ers, who will be specially entertained at the Springs. 

The waters have produced many wonderful cures in the following diseases: Dys- 
pepsia. Paralysis, Erysipelas, Rheumatism, Sciatica Liver and 
Kidney, Bronchitis, Pulmonary Complaints in their early stages, Gen- 
eral Debility, and a never-failing remedy for Chills and Fever. 

RATES, including .Mineral Baths, $10 per week. CHILDREN under six years 
of age, and SERVANTS, half price. 

Parties desiring board for two mouths or more will be allowed a liberal discount. 

Direct route by San Rafael, 7 a.m., connecting with, S. F. and N. P. R. R. to Clo- 
verdale, thence by Btage te the Springs. 

For further particulars, address MRS. J. C. GOODS, 

June 4. Highland Spring s. 

SAMUEL D. H0VEY, 

Dealer in Local Securities, 
No. 436 California Street San .Francisco, Cal. 

Gs£T* Gas, Water, Insurance, Railroad, Bank, Telephone, Powder Stocks, etc., 
Bought and Sold. July '.'. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET, 
ay and Roarfliii£ School for Tonngr I*a«Iie9 and Children . 

KINDERGARTEN. Next Term will commence July 20th. 
Jan. 21). MADAME E. ZEITSKA. Principal. 



D 



PROF. D. SPERANZA, 

Italian Musical Institute, or San Francisco, 30 Post street. 
Sing Lessons, in Classes, every day from 4 to 5 P.M. for Ladies, and from S to 9 
every evening for Gentlemen. July 16. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Aug. 6, 1881. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 

The Conservatives in the English House of Commons have moved 
for several important amendments to the Irish Land Bill, among the most 
conspicuous of which are the exclusion of even parts of estates managed on 
the English plan from the operation of the bill ; the extension of land- 
lords' rights of access to the Land Court ; the exclusion of tenants from 
benefits of Clause 7 who have wasted or exhausted their lands ; the lim- 
itation of compensation for disturbance to the maximum of £500; the 
substitution of Isaac Butt's fair rent valuation for Clause 7 of the Land 
Bill ; the right of appeal from the Land Court under certain limitations, 
and abrogation of Parnell's clause, which provides that a tenant sued for 
debt, or has an action for debt pending within six months after the pass- 
age of the bill, before or after the judicial fixing of rent, shall have power 
to apply to the Court to stay the sale, and said Court have power to do 
s.0. The House of Commons is not likely to accept these amendments. 

Bradlaugh has once more attempted to force an Entrance into the 
House of Commons, and has had to be prevented by force from entering 
the precincts sacred to the English Solons. The fault with Bradlaugh lies 
not in his disbelief but in the way in which he flaunts it. There are 
doubtless in this age of advanced thought many men whose belief in the 
Deity is no greater than that of the cobbler member for Northampton, 
but they have the good sense and taste not to parade their disbelief. 

The Medical Congress in London is now sitting, and represents the pro- 
fession most thoroughly. Europe and the United States have sent some 
of their most able men. It is to be hoped that science will be benefited 
by this large gathering of talent, and that the interchange of ideas may 
tend to smooth down the angles which exist between different schools. 

France is still at work in Tunis, and two battalions of French troops 
are encamped under the walls of Goletta. The inhabitants of- Luca are 
anxious for the French to occupy that town, their fear of native maraud- 
ers exceeding that of their hatred to the French troops. The leader of 
the Sfax revolt entered Tripoli, but was at once ordered out by the au- 
thorities. Valentine Baker, now Baker Pasha, the hero or victim of the 
Dickinson railroad assault, leaves England shortly to take command of 
the Turkish troops in Tripoli. 

The native chiefs of South Africa will not for a moment consider the 
provisions of the proposed Boer treaty, and have expressed their deter- 
mination to fight rather than submit to them. The Boers are likely to 
have more fighting to do before their affairs are settled to suit themselves. 

MUCK JOURNALISM. 

A woeful catalogue of human misdeeds and crimes appears in last 
Sunday's papers, and affords anything but a healthy moral stimulus to 
the community. The pabulum that the newspapers provide for us daily 
seems to be getting worse and worse, and must exercise a very injurious 
effect upon the minds of women and children, as well as of men. It may 
be just the sort of matter that suits the hoodlums, and we fear it is just 
the matter that produces hoodlums. It cannot be necessai-y in the in- 
terest of public education or morals for newspapers to continually hold 
up the dark side of human nature to public gaze, and to scrape together 
all the dirt and filth in the world that people may see how much there is. 
The Muck Journalists of this town, in their eagerness to outstrip each 
other in sensationalism, lose sight of the fact that people are influenced 
as much by example as by precept — very often more — humanity being 
strongly imitative. These ''educators" of the public must themselves 
be taught that sensationalism is not the purest or best form of journalism, 
and that though it may be profitable from a " backsheesh " point of view 
to pander to a depraved taste, it is neither moral nor creditable. The 
misdeeds and crimes to which we have referred are interspersed with a 
number of accidents, to which, perhaps, less exception may be taken, but 
the whole go to form a most dismal and unedif ying catalogue of woes for 
presentation at the breakfast table. Here is an epitome of a few of the 
items which appeared in the Sunday papers : 

"There is another social scandal exciting Washington, involving a 
married gentleman who was, until recently, prominently connected with 
the Signal Service with the rank of Captain. It appears that a residence 
up town has been occupied by a ' former female ' Treasury clerk of great 
beauty, and the Captain supported her in elegant style. The Captain's 
wife found it out." Again: "A notorious highway robber, named Ham 
White, was a year or two ago convicted for robbing the mails in Texas. 
He was a noted and desperate highwayman; he had robbed stage ccaches 
and individuals, and had committed several murders; he had been sen- 
tenced to imprisonment for life, but had got his release, when he immedi- 
ately resumed his career on the highway, and he has now been arrested 
again in Colorado." Then there are more murders by Indians in New 
Mexico. " B.. L. Chovinard has been imprisoned at Chicago for robbing 
the mails." "A distillery tub explodes, with disastrous results." " Dag- 
gart, foreman of Stevenson's ranch, Denver, shot and killed one of 
Brown's ahepherders, and heat another nearly to death, the murderer es- 
caping." " English opinions of Fenian infernal machines." "A lunatic's 
savage attack." "An important witness in a robbery case badly hurt." 
1 ' Skillful burglars at Dixon." "A mysterious case.' 1 "A young woman 
drugged and criminally assaulted." "A Saturday -night stabbing." "Man- 
slaughter on ship-board," etc. 

These items we have picked out from the Chronicle at haphazard, and 
they afford a fair sample of what appears in its columns from day to day 
and week to week. A closer analysis would of course make the catalogue 
still more ghastlj' and distressing. 



BRANNAN AND HIS MEXICAN GRANT. 

The following is an extract translated from a letter from Guaymas, 
published by La Voze del Nuevo Mundo of July 30th. The letter speaks 
for itself, and gives expression to the sad feelings of the Mexican who 
sees his country gradually and inevitably falling into the hands of for- 
eigners. It particularly refers to Samuel Brannan and his Principality 
of Yaqui: 

" At a meeting we learn that he stated that he was going to Mexico to 
demand from our Government the fulfillment of the concession to him- 
self and Castro, and intended to make the said Government realize that 
he has, and that a part of our Republic belongs to him ; that he wishes 
it delivered to him immediately, and that, if the Government refuses, he 
will cause a million men to come from the United States to destroy So- 
nora. Of course, this boast has been uttered only in the presence of his 
friends, for it is certain that, in the presence of a Mexican, he would 
not have expressed himself in such a manner. Of our Government, now 
that it proclaims itself to be a progressive one, we beg and supplicate 
that, when it makes concessions, it may look to the results which later 
may follow, so that in the future we may not be obliged to name our- 
selves emigrants like Brannan ; better if it leaves us without distinction, 
for in place of selling our country, as is being done, it is preferable to re- 
main always retarded in all the branches of industry. 

It is true we have an abundance of unoccupied and uncultivated lands, 
through the want of hands to till them ; but it is equally true that, if the 
Government acts intelligently and to the purpose, it will succeed in re- 
calling a multitude of Mexican families who, exiled, bewail their mis- 
fortunes in strange lands. They but await the Government to assure 
them its protection, and to grant them a piece of land in the country of 
their birth, and to which they certainly have a greater right than strang- 
ers. If our Government will only facilitate means by which our floating 
population by working can obtain certain and assured possession of good 
lands, it will very soon behold those districts colonized which to-day are 
deserts. But, most unfortunately, we perceive the great difficulties which, 
in our country, present themselves in our seeking to acquire a piece of 
land — commencing, first, by the probable want of means for the increased 
revenue costs required by the law in denouncement; next, that the 
authorities of the district seek to be legal owners of denounced territory, 
necessitating opposition by the settler and his employment of lawyers at 
great cost ; resulting from all this that he who is moneyless cannot acquire 
more land than that which corresponds to him from the common plot 
upon the day of his burial. So long as our Government does not rectify 
the law regardirg public lands ; so long as the present restrictions of de- 
nouncement are not withdrawn ; so long as the abuses of local authorities, 
who swindle in the sale of federal lands, remain uncorrected, just so long 
will Government lands remain at the mercy of those who have means and 
pecuniary reasons for acquiring them. In consequence, our country is 
being gradually politically sold to strangers. As to the borders of the 
Yaqui River, we would counsel our Government not to count upon them. 
Those lands scarcely suffice for its natural and present inhabitants, which 
are very numerous, so much so that, by the execution of the Brannan- 
Castro concession, the Yaqui tribe would be compelled to vacate its lands. 
Let the ambition to acquire that territory cease ! If it is necessary to 
civilize the Yaqui Indians, or to bring them to further submission, their 
lands can be peacefully colonized by laborious Mexicans. The services of 
Mr. Brannan are in nowise needed. Now, if our Government owes any- 
thing to this gentleman, let it pay him in money or other security, but 
not with the soil upon which we live, which is our patrimony, and which 
has cost us so dearly." 

THE MINERS SPEAK. 
Hitherto we have only heard the shrill wail of the rancher on the 
Debris Question, and his grievances, real or imagined, have been dinned 
into the public ear until that long-suffering member cried in anguish, 
" Give us a rest." In another column of this paper will be found an ably 
written article taking the other side of the question, and proving most 
conclusively that the interests involved in mining are quite as great, or, 
perhaps, greater, than those in farming. The farmer, like the sailor, is a 
born grumbler ; nothing pleases him, and no weather is just to his fancy ; 
but there is no doubt that he has suffered from mining debriB. This fact 
the miners do not deny, but at the same time, as their business (the min- 
ers'} is a legitimate one, and one which in former years built up the coun- 
try, and now adds largely to the prosperity of the State, ask for protection. 
The damage that mining has done to our chief rivers, the Feather and 
Sacramento, all admit to be serious, but Captain Eads was of the opinion 
that " if the flow of heavy sand was kept from entering these rivers the 
evil could soon be remedied." 

Mechanics' Fair. — The Mechanics' annual Fair opened this week, and 
promises to be a grand exhibition of all our main industries and arts. At 
present things are not perfectly settled, and we defer giving a detailed de- 
scription of the many interesting articles on exhibition until next week, 
by which time all the exhibitors will have had ample time to do them- 
selves justice. The music is excellent, the art gallery well filled with 
good paintings and the horticultural gardens a treat to the eye. 

The Union Mineral and Soda Water "Works of Geo. C. Thompson 
occupy six prominent placesin the Pavilion, three down stairs aod three up. 
This well-known gentleman, who is the importer as well as manufacturer 
of soda fountains, soda machines, etc., has recently removed his place of 
business from 526 Union street to 1905 Mason street. His display at- 
tracts universal comment and attention, each one of the six stands being 
tastefully arranged and conducted by polite and accommodating attend- 
ants. These are the same fountains which took the premiums at the 
State and Mechanics' Fair. He has taken premiums at the Mechanics' 
Institute in New Yo rk City from 1835 till present. 

The Democratic Convention have nominated I. Danielwitz for 
School Director. We are pleased to hear this, for of the present entire 
Board of Education, to whom we have given special attention of late, 
none show a better record than Danielwitz. 

King, Morse & Co.'s Champagne Cider has now an established repu- 
tation second to none on this coast, and excelled byrione anywhere else. 
Be sure to secure it. 

Din-yeas' Starch Works, Glen Cove, L. I., are the largest in the 
world. 



Prir* per Copy. 10 Cent*. 



ESTABLISHED JULY. 20. 1SA6. 



Annual Subscription, MS. 







(fixHfyw&x 



xliz&x. 



DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 32. 



SAN FEANOISOO, SATUBDAY, AUG. 13, 1881. 



NO. 5. 



G 



OLD BARS -SM@910— Refined Silver— 12 j@13i $ cent, discount. 
Mexican Dollars, 10 per cent, disc, 

■ Exchange on New York, 110 premium; On London, Bunkers, 49.^ ; 
Commercial, 49 J. Paris, sight, 5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams, 
15-100 per cent. 

-bank rate. In the 
On Bond Security, 



"Price of Money here, (>@10 per cent, per year- 
open market, 1@1£ per mouth. Demand light. 
3@4£ per cent, per year on Call. 

• Latest price of Sterling in New York, 4S3@4S5. 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

San Francisco August 12, 1881. 



Stocks and Bonds. 
Botros. 

Cal. Stole Bonds. 6'a, '57 

S. P. City *Oo l: ■ 

S. F. City A Co. B'da,7a . 

Montg^ Av. BdDdfl 

DopODt Street Bonds .... 

Saerameuw City Bonds.. 

ii City Bonds 

ounty Bonds 

Harysville (sty Bonds — 

Santa Clara Co. Bonds 



Bid. 

105 
Nom, 

Nom 
60 
50 
50 
105 
103 
100 

105 

lea County Bonds.' 110 

L-is Angeles City Bunds 

Yim'a & Truckee K. R. Bds. 
Nevada Co. N. G. K. R. Bds 

Oakland City Bonds 

Oregon R. & N. Bunds, 0s. 

S. P. R. R. Bonds 

U. S. 4s (ex-coup'n) 

BASKS. 

Bank of California (ex-div). 
Pacific Bank (ex-div) 

First National (^xoli\) ... 

l.NSL'RASCK COMPANIES. 

Union (ex-div) 

Fireman's Fund (ex-div).. . 
California (ex-dh) 



110 
101 

llo 
125 
110 
100 

150 

127 
120 

1-2:'. 
128 
125 



Asked 



Mom. 

Nom. 



106 
102 
107 
112 

103 
113 
130 
112 

UOj 



125 
128 
180 



Stocks and Bonds. 

IXSURANOB COSIPAS1ES. 
State Investment (ex-div).. 

Hume Mutual (ex-div) 

Ci inmiercial (ex-div) 

Western (ex-div) 

KAILItOADS. 

C. P. R. R. Stock 

C. P. R. h. Bonds 

City Railroad 

Omnibus R. R 

N. B. and Mission R. R 

Sutter Street R. R 

Geary Street R. R 

Central R. R. Co 

Market Street R. R 

jclav Street Hill R. R ...... 

S. F. Gaslight Co i ex-div). . . 
Oakland Gaslight Co (ex-di v) 
Sac'to Gaslight Co (ex-div) 
Califor'a Powder Co (ex-div) 
Giant Powder Co (ex-div).. 
Atlantic Giant Powder, do 
Gold and Stock Teleg'h Co 
8. V. w. W. Co. 's Slock... 
S. V. W. W.Co' Bonds.... 

Pacific Coasts. S. Co's Stock 
Saucelito L. & F. Co.'s St'ek 



115 
115 
116 
100 

93 
111! 

75 

35 

871 

55 

75 

10 
Nom. 
Nom. 

02 

82J 

65 
120 

SO 

43 

77 
100* 
117 

80 
Nom 



120 
117 
120 
102 

94 

117 



Nom. 
Nom. 



85 
Nom. 



The volume ot unemployed capital continues to depress the money mar- 
ket, and loans are made at very low rates. The transactions in investment 
securities have been quite small during; the week, but few that are Al of- 
fering. Andrew Bairu, 312 California st. 



We learn that Mr. John Walter, M. P., proprietor of the London 
Times, a man of mark in his own country as well as in this, is en route 
to California. He is, we believe, accompanied by his Grace of Argyle 
and by the Earl of Airlie. We look forward to the advent of Mr. Walter 
among us with pleasure. Unlike other parts of the American continent, 
where the heat has been oppressive and electric disturbances general, we 
in California have too "Pacific" a state of affairs. We long for some 
of the atmospheric displays common to other States of the Union to 
break the monotony of our Italian climate, as it has been termed. Our 
monotonous social state requires a similar break, and this it is likely to 
have when the representative of the great " Thunderer " appears on the 
scene. 

Mr. Fred L. Castle, the well-known Front-street merchant, and one 
of our most popular citizens, will leave us in San Francisco about the 
27th of August for a European tour. He will be accompanied by Mrs. 
Castle and his three children, and the family proposes to spend about one 
year in travel, during which they will visit the main points of interest in 
the Old World. To say that we wish them a pleasant trip and a safe re- 
turn would be one of those commonplace, meaningless remarks that are 
carelessly extended to every worthy citizen who leaves us for a European 
tour, so we say, in all sincerity, " Gott gewaehre Ihnen und Ihrer Familie 
eine glueckliche Reise." 

Latest from tne Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Aug. 12, 
1881. United States Bonds-4s, 1161; 4is, 114*; 3Js, 1028. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 83@4 85. Pacific Mail, 52. Wheat. 123(3130 ; Western 
Union, 89J. Hides, 23J@24. Oil— Sperm, — . Winter Bleached, — ; 
Whale Oil, — . Winter Bleached. — . Wool— Spring, fine, 17@32 ; 
Burry, 14ffi24 ; Pulled, 32@40 ; Fall Clips, 16@17; Barry, 12 S 15. Lon- 
don, Aug. 12. — Liverpool Wheat Market, 10s. 2d.(ol0s. 5J.J Bonds, 4s. 
— ; 4Js, 116J ! 31s, — ■ Consols, 100 9-lfi@100J. 



MARRIOTT'S 



EMPLANES 



FOR NAVIGATING THE AIR. 

When the full report of the superintending engineer is received and 
laid before the Directors, we shall publish it in our columns. In the 
meantime, those who are entitled to shares in the Company can have them 
on application to the Secretary at the office of the Company, between 1 
and 2 o'clock p.m. daily. 

HONGKONG IN 1881. 

Below will be found a list of steamers plying to all partB of the world 
from the colony of Hongkong, and from it an estimate may be made of 
the extent of the business which is done in the colony. Indeed, the har- 
bor is one continued scene of activity and bustle, and the dozens of small 
steam launches flitting hither and thither very naturally add their quota 
to the general effect. There is no port in the East which exhibits so bright 
and so busy a scene. On shore, also, the stream of business is on the 
same scale. The inevitable broker for bills, shares, produce, freight, etc., 
is ever on the move, and during business hours Queen's-road is more like 
Liverpool than a port in 112 East longitude. Sunday even brings only 
partial repose; " dispatch " is the word, and everything yields to urgency. 
If the mail arrives, the Post-office employes are summoned, and delivery 
is made. The Telegraph Companies are open all the day. So that the 
English institution of the observance of the seventh day as a day of rest 
is more honored in the breach thereof. At the coast ports, owing to the 
Customs, no Sunday work is permitted, a curious contrast with the Brit- 
ish colony. 

List of Steam Lines from Hons^oiig-. 

Canton and Macao.— Daily by the Hongkong, Canton and Macao Steamboat Com- 
pany, and Butterfield and Swire. 

Swatow, Asioy, Foocuow, T am si- i f Taiwan foo (Formosa). —Every fourth day, by 
Douglas, Lapraik & Co. 

Hainan Ports and Tonkins.— Russell & Co.; Jardine, Matheson & Co.; and Chi- 
nese, about once a week. 

Manila.— Spanish Line, and Russell & Co., twice weekly. 

Saioon. — Messageries Maritimes, fortnightly, and during the rice seasons in 
April, May, September and October, frequent steamers to and fro. 

Bangkok. — Yuenfat Hong, fortnightly, and occasionally an outside steamer. 

Straits and Calcutta. — David bassoon, Sons & Co.; Jardine, Matheson & Co., 
twice a month. 

Straits and BoiiBAr.— P. and O., three times a month; and Austrian-Lloyds, 
monthly. 

Shanghai. — P. and O., Messageries Maritimes; Siemssen, Holt's, Glencoe, C. M. S. 
N. Co., and sundry vessels make- almost a daily communication. 

Yokohama, Kobe and Nagasaki.— P. and O., Messageries, Mitsu Bishi, Holt's, etc., 
gives about semi-weekly service. 

Australia. — Steamers of the E. and A. Line, Stevens & Co., Rosario &Co., uncer- 
tain dates. 

San Francisco.— Pacific Mail Company, Occidental and Oriental, and China Mer- 
chants Company, fortnightly about. 

A CORRECTION. 
In calling attention to an advertisement of J. Macdonough, the whole- 
sale coal dealer of 41 Market street, last week, we said that " families 
who purchase their coal through small dealers are sure to get more or less 
swindled, both as to price and quality." This was written without due 
calculation as to the possible effect of the words. A number of the deal- 
ers who transact business with Mr. Macdonough have called on him 
during the past week objecting to our paragraph. Xow. as Mr. Mac- 
donough neither knew of nor saw the paragraph until after it had ap- 
peared in print, of course he is in no way responsible for our assertion. 
Mr. Macdonough's trade lies mostl with the retail dealers, among 
whom are some of the most respectable firms in the city. He knowing 
this, our remark last Saturday has annoyed both himself and his better 
class of customers. The notice which appeared was not a paid-for puff, 
but a remark of our own, for which we are entirely responsible. 



London, August 12th.— Latest Price of Consols. 100 9-16^100 3-4. 

Entered at the Post-Ojjice at San Francisco, Cal., as Second-Class 

Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 616 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAtf FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Aug. 13, 1881. 



STILT, COUNTING UNCLE SAMS COIN. 
The IT. S. State Sub-Treasury in this city is at present a very beehive 
of activity. In addition to the regular force employed, there are twenty 
men actively engaged in bringing up the coin from the cavernous depths 
of the vaults, and counting the worn half dollars. The Standard Dollars 
and new coin have been weighed, but the old coin must all be counted. 
One of the counters can average about S14,000 per day of six hours, and 
there is yet about 83,000,000 in silver half dollars to count, so that at 
least another week will be consumed before the count is ended. New be- 
ginners can count S8,000 or $9,000 in a day, but after a few days 1 experi- 
ence it is not considered a great feat fora deft hand to stack up §18,000 in 
six hours. On Wednesday one of the new hands fell down the scuttle- 
hole into the vault below, a distance of eight feet, landing on his shoulders 
on an iron elevator, almost killing him. Among the coin which has been 
rusting away in the vault, where nearly §50,000,000 are deposited, are 
some very rare specimens, and with the silver occasionally a gold piece is 
found. There are few foreign coins among Uncle Sam's treasure, but 
some very old and rare specimens of American coin are unearthed. The 
object of counting this coin is, that President Garfield has appointed Mr. 
Spaulding to succeed Mr. Sherman as Sub -Treasurer, which necessitates 
a counting of all the treasure. 

GIVE US GOOD MEN. 

The Democrats have confessedly been at loggerheads during the past 
four weeks. They have held a Yosemite Convention and a Manhattan 
Convention, and, in both bodies, given ample evidence by their acts of 
their lack of unity. But it is never too late to mend, and even at this 
hour they can bury their hatchets, smother their animosities and do some- 
thing that will reflect credit on the party. And as they seem to have lost 
their heads temporarily, and to be casting around in muddy waters for 
good men, the Nexos Letter, which is utterly indifferent as to the success of 
any party, and always has been, suggests that the lately disunited Demo- 
crats now give us such men as John H. Wise, Frank McCoppin, Judge 
Hagar, Horace E. Piatt, and others whom the people want, and whom 
the people will elect, and that the party lay aside all the corner-grocery 
aspirants, through whose ambition it has been so sorely split in twain. 

DIRECTOR DANIELWITZ. 

The manly way in which ex-School Director Danielwitz spoke at the 
last meeting of the Board, must have gained the approbation of every 
right-thinking person who read the report in the daily papers. His posi- 
tion was decided by the Supreme Court to be untenable, and he there- 
upon retired most gracefully, and his words were applauded by all who 
heard them. During the few months he was in the Board, as School Di- 
rector, his record was unimpeachable, and at the coming election he will, 
doubtless, again take his seat. He has the nomination of the Taxpayers 
and the Democrats, and the sincere approval of all those who desire good 
men in office. We may, therefore, hope next month to see Mr. Daniel- 
witz, by an almost universal vote, appointed to an office to which, during 
his tenure, he did such credit, and as the coming struggle is not so much 
one of parties as of men, we cheerfully commend the name of Mr. 
Danielwitz to our taxpayers. 

There are few more important offices, when its duties are viewed from 
a proper standpoint, than that of School Director, and it is a most diffi- 
cult thing to induce any really worthy citizen, who has no axe to grind 
and nothing but the interests of the city at heart, to accept the position. 
In this connection we are reminded that Mr. Julius Bandmann, Agent 
for the Giant Powder Works in this city, has consented to be a candidate 
for School Director at the coming election on the Republican ticket. We 
know Mr. Bandmann personally, and believe that he is paying a worthy 
tribute to the city he lives in by allowing his name to be used. Let us 
hope that, irrespective of party, we may for the next two years have a 
Board of School Directors who are the peers of Mr. Julius Bandmann, 
and who will give their time to our educational interests out of pure love 
for the welfare of our children. 



When we do find an honest man in politics in San Francisco, that 
vara avis in tevris of the New World, there can be no question as tn the 
duty of every citizen who desires honest and economical government. It 
is his paramount duty, first, to persuade that man to remain in politics, 
and, secondly, to do everything possible to secure his re-election. Such a 
man we believe Jos. M. Litchfield to be, who has received the Repub- 
lican nomination for Supervisor of the Third Ward. His record is blame- 
less, for we find him in the past two years fighting the ring in the Board 
of Supervisors, and showing by his votes that he was not controlled by 
any clique or crowd, but was working heartily for the interests of the city. 

Every good citizen should hail with pleasure the regular Republican 
nomination for Supervisor of the Sixth Ward, Frank Eastman, the 
present incumbent. The fact that he has made so clean a record has re- 
cently held him to the attacks of a certain sheet here, but the public, as a 
body, thoroughly appreciates the honesty of his well tried aud tested acts 
during the past two years, and will doubtless reseat him in his chair at 
the coming election by an overwhelming majority. 

A Nice Man for Coroner.— Of all things that should be sacred, the 
conversation between a woman and her physician should reign supreme, 
and a doctor who would openly boast of the cause of any lady patient 
visiting him should be not only consigned to oblivion, but be punished 
for his infamy. We hold up the name of Dr. Mark Livingston, the 
Manhattan candidate for Coroner, as a specimen of this tribe. If the 
office cannot be bestowed on a better man than he is, it would be better 
to abolish it altogether and let the dead bury their dead. 

Mr. J. D. Sullivan, the well-known Court Commissioner and lawyer, 
has been nominated by the Manhattan Convention for the office of Dis- 
trict Attorney, by acclamation. He is certainly an able and popular gen- 
tleman, and will, if elected, fill the office efficiently and uprightly. 



A FEW CONVENTION PACTS. 

It may not be generally known, but it is nevertheless so, that Mr. 
Patterson, the Superintendent of Streets and the Republican candidate 
for that position for the next term, is what is known as a " Higgins man." 
He employs the Bromley machine for sweeping the streets, and this ma- 
chine is owned by Higgins, Chute and Gannon. Patterson was beaten 
before the Republican Convention and the nomination was given to Bob 
Graham, a deadly enemy of Higgins. On dit that Higgins then told sev- 
eral of his friends that he did not propose to "get left," and that he 
would put in Ned Drum, who is now Health Inspector in Dr. Meares' 
office, as Superintendent of Streets. It is also said that in order to fur- 
ther this scheme to secure the street sweeping he got Peter Hopkins, who 
lives on Van Ness Avenue, to go and stay at the Lick House, and then 
got him the Yosemite nomination for Supervisor of the Fifth Ward. 
Then the Brady and Mannix party, who also own a street-sweeping 
machine, in which the late George Schwartz was interested, but which 
has been stowed away for a long time, thought they would like to get 
some pie. So they organized the Manhattan Convention, which nomi- 
nated McVicker for Superintendent of Streets. 
_ The street machine draws about §100,000 yearly from thiscity. It takes 
eight to ten horses and five or six men at SI 50 per diem to run it. In- 
cluding the cost of repairs to the machine, tools, etc., the whole expense 
is about §10,000 a year, leaving a yearly profit of 890,000 per annum to 
the fortunate speculator in the city's dust. The dust is absolutely more 
valuable proportionately than gold dust. Out of this there is, of course, 
the expense of electing a Street Superintendent and three Supervisors, 
who will swap votes on other steals with three more Supervisors who 
adopt the street-sweeping machine. Even then there is §50,000 plunder 
left for the head bottle-washers. Think of these facts, readers of the 
News Letter, and digest them with your Sunday chicken. And after you 
have got through with the inwardness of this one little factor in the sum 
total of our city government, we think we can offer you further food for 
reflection as to the pockets into which your faithfully paid taxes finally 
drop. 

MECHANICS' FAIR. 

The evidences of our State progress are amply illustrated this year 
at the Mechanics' Pavilion. The hum of the machinery offers the visitor 
a hundred new inventions in mining and mechanics to study. The local 
industries are better represented than ever, and a thousand and one novel- 
ties attract the wanderer around the vast building. 

For the information of strangers, we may say that the Market-street 
entrance is by all odds the most convenient for those who may be staying 
at our principal hotels, and it is also the most fashionable entree' to, and 
exit from, the Fair. 

Harvey's Hot-Water Radiators.— On the east side of the Pavilion, 
and near the center, is located one of the great attractions of the Fair. 
It is the furnace and radiators of Mr. 0. D. Harvey, and shows practi- 
cally how " Harvey's Hot- Water Radiators " operate. They are used for 
the purpose of warming and ventilating public buildings, private resi- 
dences, business houses, and, especially, school buildings. In buildings 
where these " Radiators " are used, the ventilation produced is far super- 
ior to that of any other mode by which rooms are heated, and especially 
is this so in school buildings, where so many children are congregated for 
hours within narrow walls. Another great advantage of these Hot-Water 
Radiators is in the saving of fuel. For instance, in the Oakland High 
School, where, before these Radiators were used, from twenty-five to 
thirty tons of coal were burnt, now only eleven tons are consumed, and 
the temperature is five degrees higher than prior to the introduction of 
these beneficial machines. These Radiators have been adopted by the 
schools of Portland, Oregon, Benicia and Oakland, Cal., BoiBe City, 
Idaho, the State Normal School at San Jose, the Deaf and Dumb Insti- 
tute at Berkeley, and in a number of other public buildings, besides in 
over fifty private residences. Wherever they have been adopted, entire 
satisfaction has followed, and, among the many new exhibits at the Fair 
this year, the visitor will find very few as interesting as the Harvey Ra- 
diators. 

One of the great attractions of the Fair is the buggy made entirely of 
gaspipe. This is the invention of Mr. Garland A. Dabney, of Oakland. 
The fact that a hollow tube is stronger than a solid shaft is admitted by 
all scientific men, aud the only matter of surprise is that no one ever 
thought before of the wonderful advantage of gaspipe for tires, spokes 
and axles. Among the many advantages of this buggy is the fact that it 
is cheaper, more durable and more readily repaired than any other kind 
of wagon, and that the axles are self -lubricating. No one should miss 
seeing this quaint but admirable invention. 

The champagne cider made by King, Morse & Co. is the popular 
brand. It is served in the cabin of the miner, as well as in the gilded 
halls of the Gubernatorial mansion. 

BUSH-STREET THEATER. 

CHARLES E. LOCKE Proprietor. 

IMMENSE SUCCESS! TREMENDOUS HITI 

Euthusiastie Reception of the Favorites, 
MISS CHARLOTTE THOMPSON 

....AXD 

MR. W. R. SHERIDAN, 

Supported by a Powerful Company. 
This (Saturday) Afternoon and Evening- August 1 3th 

JANE EYRE, 

Which will also be Repeated on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, August 14, 15 and 16. 

Wednesday and Thursday Evenings, Aug. 17th and 18th INGOMAR 

Friday and Saturday Evenings, August 19th and 20th CAMILLE 

Wednesday Matinee "" INGOMAR 

Saturday Matinee ... .'-"....'.'.'.'.'.'".".".CAMILLE 

SECURE SEATS JLT ONCE. 



Monday, Angnst 22<l THE PLANTER'S WIFE. 



18, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SOCICTY 



Dear New* Letter : 
- ; h \* pro' 

Uli tb« in.'rrv • 



NOTE3. 

i year f"r wedding* 

iwweinbled at 
i. .iiy In; 
was beautifully 
drr — f'l with th- ehoioMl iToHf . »;i einiiUit? wreath of evergreen* ex- 
tending ecroai i« rafter to the other. 
the niwna.- tube rosea ami fern*, 
an<l ahoT* it vera impended the letter* S ami 0, formed of scarlet 
camatiAOja. 

The hour nimrd was half-ruMt eight, but long before that there was 

•carcely a wat left in the cosy little chnroh, Among the crow. I T noticed 

I»r. an.! Mr-. <;«in. life Inag friends nf the bride'-* father. Major Solo- 

Jndga Thornton and nwuthter, Mr. and Km. Nat Meaaer, Jimmy 

Dnnphy and wife, Deacon Fitch end daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Sam. Wit 

in. Ashe and Mis.* Lennie, Mr. and Mr*. Gfaahwiler. pretty Miss 

Mr-. I. C. Fill. Mr*. .1 l>. Fry and party, Mrs. and Miss Steele, 

.Mr. and Mm Kenton, I»r. ami Min Piatt, and all the MoMullina. 

It vm close on nine o'clock before the bridal party appeared, and very 
charming they looked as thev marched with stately steps up the broad 
aisle. The bride was preceded by four bridesmaids, and tWM whispered 
that the happy conceit and patriotic idea of rohinu them in the national 
colors came from one of the fair attendants, who is noted for her novel 
and artistic taste*. Ifiea Lilly Gerke in white. Mi** Morgan in red, and 
Mi-* M artel! in blue, followed in succession, the fourth. Miss Rebecca 
M'-Mnllin, combining' all three colors in a saUen costume of classic cut, 
profusely ornamented with prismatic beads. 

Here let me remark that, to my masculine taste, the little feet which 
"stole in and out " would nave looked more correct clothed in white slip- 
pers than the black shoe.* she wore, Space will not permit me to detail 
all the costumes ; suffice it to say, the fair bride was attired in a court- 
train of heavy corded silk over a Jupr of white satin, richly trimmed 
with gorgeous white jet friuge. Col. J. 1). Fry escorted her, Mrs. Solo- 
man accompanying the groom. The first and fourth bridesmaids were 
the prettiest girls officiating iu that capacity that I have seen this season, 
Mi-> Lillie Uerke's bright eyes having as bewildering an effect as the 
" Gerke Wine." 

The wedding of Dr. Ham Bowie and Miss Barroilhet is finally fixed for 
early next month, and the lady friends of the bride elect say that never 
will there be seen such a trousseau as her's promises to be, her step mother 
having given the whole strength of her mind to its preparation, in fact 
devoting her time to nothing else. But anyone remembering the toilettes 
of Mrs. Barroilhet in days gone by will not be surprised at the most as- 
tonishing results of what will be to her a labor of love. The young 
couple will reside with the father of the groom for the present, he wishing 
to keep them under his own eye for a time, and a more genial, delightful 
host it would be impossible to find than Dr. Bowie, Senior. 

There are also rumors of one being on the tapis between Mrs. Georgia 
Smith, Mr. Tabor's pretty sister-in-law, and that rising young practitioner 
Dr. Jim Keeney. '"Tis well to be merry and wise," etc. You know the 
rest. Several disputed points of social interest have been set at rest this 
week, one among them that Mr. Booker lias taken the Barron house, so his 
friends can now give their minds to the discussion of some other topic. 
Another, still being " talked of," is whether the Stanfords and Mrs. Hop- 
kins will really .return to us this Autumn. I Bhall believe it when I see 
them. 

The Lents are, I hear, about departing for another European tour. 
What a pity it is that those who have the handsomest houses here seem 
to care so little for inhabiting them. The Crockers have gone to Lake 
Tahoe, the Browns are at Litton Springs, and the Jones's at the Geysers, 
while the Robinsons are en masse "off to the seaside." Au contraire 
among those who have returned to town are the Lows, Friedlanders, 
Kittles, Mr. and Mrs. Harry May, etc., etc. Of those who have been 
at the Geysers ofjlate are Mrs. and Miss Staples, Mr. Beazley, the Willie 
Babcocks and the Eyres. And if all that is said be true, the chime of 
wedding bells will at some future date ring out for two of that party at 
least, uniting Sutter and Taylor streets in silken fetters and Government 
bonds. 

We appear to be losing a number of young ladies from society, and 
some that it will be difficult to replace. Miss Donohoe has gone, so have 
Mrs. and Miss Eddy, who departed last week for China amid showers of 
flowers and blessings from those they left behind. The Misses Cole, too, 
have gone to the wilds of Los Angeles County for a protracted residence; 
but then to make amends for their loss we have charming, piquante, petite 
Dora Miller and pretty Mamie Coghill back with us again, so the odds are 
largely in our favor. 

" 'Tis true 'tis pity, and pity 'tis 'tis true " that we are to be deprived 
of another sweet singer in the departure of Charlie Dungan. His friends, 
who are legion, are busy in getting up a monster farewell for him, and I 
but echo the wish of all when I say I hope it will be a bumper. 

Country society seem to be enjoying themselves with lawn tennis parties, 
and those living along the line of the San Jose Railroad are already pro- 
ficients at it. Mrs. Willie Howard's gathering was a most successful 
one, and the fair winner of the prize was the recipient of many compli- 
ments and congratulations. Others are in contemplation at the Ather- 
tons, Selbys and Mike Castles. At the latter cottage quite a crowd of 
visitors have been domiciled this Summer. 

The Mechanics' Fair is now in all its glory, and many faces of those 
noted in society life can be seen there nightly. It is strange what a hold 
these exhibitions seem to have on the affections of the public, and though 
the ladies vote them "tiresome, the same as last year's, and wearisome to 
the last degree," still they go, not once, but again and again, more to see 
and be seen themselves than to view the contents of the building, if all 
the truth were told. What a host of distinguished visitors (according to 
the telegraph)) are coming to the United States this Fall. 'Tis safe to say 
California will come an fw its share of them, the Pacific coast being un- 
trodden ground to so many, and an object of curiosity and interest to all. 

Among those here recently I may mention the party of Mrs. Morgan, 
of New York, the wife of one of the most prominent bankers of that city. 
They seem to be delighted with all things Californian, but especially with 
the weather, which has been beautiful of late. 

Bishop Kip's many friends will be pleased to hear that the painful 
operation he has just had performed on his eye has been successful, and 
he is progressing satisfactorily toward recovery. Yours, Felix. 



STRAW HATS! 

Come and See the Elegant Styles, the Very 
Latest, the Nobbiest, and all Just Opened. 

MACKINAW. MARACIBO, 

CANTONS, PANAMA, 

MILANS, PEDLE BRAIDS, 

PALM, TUSCAN, 

LEGHORNS, ETC 



AT THE GREAT I X L, 

Corner Kearny and Commercial Streets, S. F. 



THE ADDRESS OP MR. LLOYD TEVIS. 

It is impossible, in the circumscribed limits of an editorial, to do 
justice to the merits of the address delivered by Mr. Lloyd Tevis on the 
financial status of California before the American Bankers' Convention at 
Niagara Falls, on the 10th of this month. It is bo perfect in its line of 
thought, from its inception to its conclusion, such a closely drawn picture 
of the interests of California, that, after a careful perusal of it, all one 
can do is to faintly outline its main points, and earnestly urge all readers 
of the News Letter to peruse it thoughtfully. Mr. LloyH Tevis delivered 
this address in his capacity of President of Wells, Fargo & Co., and it 
will be handed down as the most scientific financial analysis of the State 
ever made. It exhibits throughout evidences of masterly gems of thought, 
close scrutiny, long experience, and, above all, the most acute comprehen- 
sion of the condition of our State as it has been in the past, as it is now, 
and what it will be in the future. The subject of the address is nomi- 
nally the growth, past and prospective, of the industrial and banking sys- 
tem of California. Mr. Tevis treats the Bankers' Convention as a meet- 
ing which "has assumed something of the character of a clearing-house 
of experiences and opinions relating to the financial interests of the coun- 
try." Referring to San Francisco, he shows the delicate web of her com- 
merce in all its branches. Speaking of the institution of which he is 
President, he says: 

Wells, Fargo & Company is peculiarly a California institution. As the 
prospectors and pioneers advanced, it followed them, until its agencies, 
now numbering over 700, form a network which stretches from the Mexi- 
can boundary line to that of British Columbia, and from the Pacific to 
the Rocky Mountains, with outposts upon the Missouri river and the 
G-ulf of Mexico. Wherever the organization of Wells, Fargo & Company 
reaches, the commercial and financial influences of San Francisco extend. 
A volume could be written on this single short quotation from this 
address. 

In the next place, Mr. Tevis accurately dissects the causes of our late 
era of depression, and the fact that our adherence as a State to a gold or 
coin standard through the war, and through the era of inflation which 
followed the war, prevented us from feeling the seeming prosperity which 
took place as currency depreciated. 

Then follows a sharp analysis of the different eras and gradations 
through which we have passed from the first working of placer mines to 
the development of agriculture, the Comstock discoveries and the con- 
struction of the Central Pacific Railroad. Leading naturally from this line 
of thought, Mr. Tevis reviews our imports and exports which will bear 
the high freight of railroads or which can come to us or and from us by 
ships. 

Mr. Tevis scores severely the inflation of values in real estate and that 
curse of California, land speculation. To use his own words : " Inflation 
of values thus produced is worse than inflation of other kinds." And 
here perhaps he hits the germ of all moral disease in California, for be 
adds immediately afterward : " It not only creates fictitious wealth which 
promotes extravagance, but it discourages settlement and improvement." 
Could there be a more concise solution of one great Califomiaa evil, 
speculation in land ? 

The even more important question of stock gambling is most fearlessly 
dissected, and, perhaps, as an instance of its enormity the following fig- 
ures out of a great many of proportionate ratio may be adduced: In Jan- 
uary, 1875, the California Mine was at quoted prices worth $84,240,000, 
and in July, 1881, the fall or shrinkage made the entire stock only worth 
§351,000. In other words, there was a slight falling off of 883,889,000. 
One more fact and we are done. The aggregate value of mining stocks, 
Mr. Tevis tells us, on the San Francisco Board in January, 1875, was 
placed at §282,304,405, and last month it was only $17,902,700, a shrinkage 
of §264,000,000 which never existed, speaks more for the value of Mr. 
Tevis' theories on fictitious values than could be written in a lifetime. It 
reminds us of the poverty-stricken debtor who had not a cent in the 
world but told his creditor that he was not so poor yet that he could not 
give a note. 

He regards the Kearney movement as a natural reaction from wild 
speculation; but, perhaps, the most important part of the address is that 
which refers to the new Constitution. In common with all right think- 
ing men Mr. Tevis acknowledges that much in the new Constitution of 
California was on its face bad; that it drew away capital from Cali- 
fornia and intensified the existing depression temporarily. He shows, 
however, most clearly how the modifications of the new Constitution by 
the Supreme Court and the conservative interpretation of its provisions 
by the lower Judges have made it an instrument better adapted to the 
necessities of our State than was supposed before its adoption. 

Duryeas' Starch. Works, den Cove, L. I., are the largest in the 
world. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 13, 1881; 



OUR LONDON LETTER. 

London, July 22, 1881. 

Dear News Letter:— Tha season is now waning rapidly. The last 
State Ball at Buckingham Palace has been given, the Prince of Wales' 
Garden Party to his august mamma has come off at Marlborough House, 
both the Coaching and Four-in-hand Clubs have had their annual 
meets in Hyde Park, and the Eton and Harrow Cricket Match has been 
played. 

But though" the gaps in the routine of balls maybe getting wider in 
their dimensions, and the clang of Coote and Tinney's band is growing 
less frequent in fashionable squares at night, there is one place that holds 
its own to the last. Rotten Row is as gay as ever, and will maintain its 
reputation for some days to come. Who has not read of Rotten Row in 
fashionable novels, and seen constant allusion to it in society journals ? 
It is an institution of London fashionable life, and for a stranger not to 
have seen it in its glory {if he be in London at the proper time) is as bad 
as though he had neglected the Tower, Madame Tussaud's, the British 
Museum and guard mounting at the Horse Guards. 

Rotten Row first wakens into life about seven o'clock, but it is not till 
a little before ten that there is a buzz of expectation among the few spec- 
tators who have assembled, for there is then a possibility of the Princess 
of Wales appearing, either on foot or in her carriage, giving her daughters 
a constitutional before they enter the schoolroom. Sometimes the Prince 
is with her, and they look as happy a family party as London can pro- 
duce. The little princesses are full of life and talk, and squabble who 
shall have their father's hand as they walk, the little Princess Maud gen- 
erally presuming on her babyhood and being victor, 

I was at a fashionable out-of-town wedding the other day. Among the 
bridesmaids was a well-known and aristocratic London beauty, now in her 
first season. The dejeuner over, she took her departure for town with her 
papa and mamma, having changed her bridesmaid's dress for a traveling, 
costume. The outer toilette I will not describe, except to remark that it 
was black. Nuthing loud in that, you will say. No more there was — in 
it alone. The dress was but a part of the tout ensemble, the sombre hue 
being evidently selected with the intention to highten the effect of the sur- 
prise in store for the gentlemen who stood in the portico to wish her good- 
bye, and a studied setting to display to advantage by contrast of color the 
charms of a pair of low-cut red leather shoes and red silk stockings, the 
latter embellished with golden clocks that reached to the knees, and en- 
circled at the ankles by golden anklets — all of which the young lady (who 
is just nineteen, by-the-bye) managed most adroitly to unconsciously ex- 
hibit to the knot of gentlemen in waiting as she stepped into her carriage; 
the gold garter clasps, undoubtedly there, being left to the imagination, 
hidden beneath the obscurity of the terminal and glirape-caught rims of 
snow-white ruffleB which shaded the stocking tops. That the effect was 
electrical, I can vouch, and the exhibition one that lingers in the memory 
most agreeably. 

The grand Volunteer Review by the Queen in Windsor Park, though a 
success numerically speaking, there having been over 50,000 " Browns, 
Joneses and Robinsons " on the ground, was not so in any other respect. 
The marching and maneuvering of the English " Home Guards " was, as 
a whole, very wide of the mark, and they have been catching it in the 
papers. 

The two operas at Covent Garden and Her Majesty's are both in the 
last week of their seasons, and people who want to hear Patti and Nilsson 
after next Saturday, will have either to wait a whole year for the oppor- 
tunity or follow the former to America, whence she sails October 22d, or 
the latter to Vienna and St. Petersburg. 

The Colonel is still the great attraction at the Prince of Wales, and 
Burnand's salient hits at the aesthetic drivelers as keenly relished as are 
De Maurier's clever wood-cut satires on the same gentry in Punch. The 
leader of the London ^Esthetics is a long-haired, eye-rolling young male 
human being, who passes his time writing love sonnets to lilies and pea- 
cock's feathers. An American paper had it, the other day, that the 
Prince had "requested to be presented " to this creature. The absurdity 
of the statement is patent on its face. To begin with, people are always 
presented to the Prince — he is always passive on such occasions. 

Among San Franciscans just now in London is Colonel G. W. Gran- 
niss, who is, doubtless, combining a trip to view the military systems of 
Europe for the benefit of his old command, with a fatherly eye over the 
movements of young Halleck, who, it appears, is under his tutilage. 

The Duke of Sutherland has returned, greatly pleased with his Ameri- 
can excursion. 

King Kalakaua is swelling it about on a grand scale, invited here, there 
and everywhere. He is not a bad fellow, is this ebony king, but to people 
who know something about the status of royalty in the Sandwich Islands, 
the sight of his name appearing at entertainments before that of the 
Crown Prince of Germany has rather a grotesque look. The object of 
his visit is said to be the staying of the rapid decrease in the population 
of his dominions by the infusion of European blood. 

A new singer is promised for next season, who is said to be the first real 
successorof Malibran. Her name is Caroline Salla, and she is a'niece of 
Alfred de Musset, who refers in one of his poems to the wonderful gift of 
song she possessed when but a child. The chief character in Francisco, 
du Itineria, the new opera to be brought out in November at the Grand 
Opera of Paris, has been written for her. 

A curious book of autographs is just now to be seen near Piccadilly. It 
was the property of Ada Isaacs Menken, and it is curiuus to observe 
what distinguished correspondents she had while doing Mazcppa at 
" Astley's." 

Miss Mildred Lee, the second daughter of the late Confederate Gen- 
eral, is now in London. 

Friday last is.said to have been the hottest day ever known in Englaud. 
We are certainly having a " heated term." and no mistake. 

Yours, Dido. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

INSTJUANCE AGENCY, 
No. 322 A 324 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Eire Insurance. 



BERLIN-COLOGNE of Berlin. 

LACONFIANCE of Paris. 

DWELLING HOUSE UNDERWRITERS 

of New York. 

THE FIRE INS. ASSOCIATION (Limited) 

of London, England. 



GIRARD of Philadelphia. 

NEW YORK CITY INS. CO of N. Y. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

W ATERTOWN of New York. 

ST. PAUL of St. Paul 

TEUTON1A of New Orleans. 

Marine Insurance. 

PARIS UNDERWRITING ASSOCIATION of Paris. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

LA FONCIEEE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY of Paris. 

Capital Represented , $27,000,000. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

W. I*. CHALMERS, Z. P. CLABK, J. C. STAPLES, 
Special Agents and Adjusters. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, ™ 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized X864. 
Principal Office 406 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital (Paid Up in TJ. S. Gold Coin) $300,000.00 

Re-Insurance Reserve $174,089 69 



Assets January 1,1881 g 639,147.88 

Surplus for policy holders 624,677.17 

Premiums, since organization 3,521,232.23 

Losses, since organization 1,635,202.84 

OFFICERS: 

J. F. HOUGHTON. President. I CHAS. R. STOUT Secretary. 

L.L.BAKER Vice-President. | R. H. MAGILL General Agent. 

Directors of the Home Mutual Insurance Co.:— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, J. L. 
N. Shepatd, John Currey, J. F. Houghton, W. T. Garratt, C. C. Burr, J. S. Carter, 
Charles Beldin g, D. W. Earl. July 10. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, 

84 0,647,942 . 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co. , of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

ROBERT DICKSOX, Manager. 
W. I.ANE BOOKER, Agent and Attorney. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. , Safe Deposit Building:' 
[October 11. 1 

PHGNIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, Eag„ EstaVd 1132 Cash Assets, $5,266,372.35. 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., EstaVd 1S33— Cash Assets, 81,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Can., Estab'd 1 851— Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39. 
BUTLER A ff ALDAN, 

General Agents for Pacific Coast, 
413 California Street San Francisco. 

[July 10.1 

THE MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, ENGLAND. 

{ESTABLISHED 1836.1 
Whole Amount of Jo ; nt Stock and Guaranteed Capital. .$5,000,000. 

Whole Amount of Capital paid up 900,000. 

Cash Assets December 31, 1876 3,710,000. 

The undersigned have been duly authorized to issue Policies at current rates on 
Freight and Shipments to or from England, Europe, New York, Japan, China, Aus- 
tralian Colonies, Sandwich Islands, and Northern Coast Ports. If desired, policies 
made payable at port of termination. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., Agents, 

Aug. 10. 218 California street. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.--UNION INsTcoTofT. f7 

The California Lloyds.-- -Established in 1861.— Nos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash Capital, $750,000 in Gold Coin. Fair Rates ! 
Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. —J. Mora Moss, 
Moses Heller, J. O. Eldridge, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Daniel Meyer, Adam 
Grant, A. E. Sabatie, Charles Kohler, E. L. Goldstein, Bartlett Doe, I. Lawrence 
Pool, A. Weill, L.Steinhart, N. B. Stone, Wallace fcverson, A. B. Phipps, Samuel 
Hort, H. C. Parker, N. G. Kittle, Joseph Brandenstein, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas 
Luning, James Moffltt, John Parrott, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Gustave Touchard, 
George C. Hickox, J. H. Freeman, John Conly, J. H. Baird, Wm. Scholle, CharleB 
Baum, J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, Isaac L. Requa. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Chari.bb D. Havbn, Secretary. Gbo. T. Bohbn, Surveyor. Nov. 8. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,060 francs; Helvetia* 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In "the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 225 Sansome St., S. F. 



13, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



LADY PHYSICIANS 
A 8t Louis doctor oat .1 down f.;n ' 

one »<r two in the ' 
.. mi') thf-»c w ■ ■ ii Ul, we heM oaf DM 

• in : l>ut now that r in tagtgad in produ* 

male doctor* an a huaineaa, we mutt prut cut, ftad, in wo doing, will give a , 
few reason* why female doctors will Dot nig branch of Indus- 

tr>;. 

In the first place, if thev doctor anybody it must W women, and three- 
fonrths of the women w. . ul, 1 rather bars a aula doctor SnppoM those 
* turn out tVrnalf doctors until there are as many of them as there 
are male doctors, wh.it have they pot to practice on? A man, if there 
was nothing the matter with him, might call in a female doctor, but if he 
was sick a- a bona if .1 nun i* sicV he El sSek M ■ horse -the last thing 
he would have .imuml would 1»- a female doctor. And why? Because, 
when a man has a female rambling around him he wants to feel well. He 
don't want to be btttoos or ferensh, with his mouth tasting like cheese, 
and his eves bloodshot) when the female is looking him over and taking an 
account of stock. 

Of ooorse these female doctors are all youn^ and good-looking, and if 
one of them came into a tuck room where a man was in bed, and he had 
chills, nod w« as cold as a wedge, and she should sit up close to the side 
of the bed and take hold of his band, his pulse would run up to a hun- 
dred and fifty, and she would prescribe for a fever when he had chilblains. 
Oh. you can't fool us on female doctors ! A man who has been sick, and 
had male doctors, knows just how much he would like to have a female 
doctor 00DM tripping in and throw her fur-lined cloak over a chair, take 
off her hat and gloves and throw them on a lounge, and come up to the 
bed with a pair of marine-blue eyes, with a twinkle in the corner, and 
look him in the wild, changeable eyes, and ask him to ruD out his tongue. 
Suppose he knew his tongue was coated so it looked like a yellow Turkish 
towel, do you summse he would want to run out over five or six inches of 
the lower part of it and let the female doctor put her finger on it to see 
how fur it was? Not much. He would put that tongue into his cheek, 
and wouldn't let her see it for twenty-five cents admission. We have seen 
doctors put their hands under the bed-clothes and foei of a man's feet to 
see if they were cold. If a female doctor should do that it would give a 
man cramps in the legs, A male doctor can put his hand on a man's 
stomach, and liver and lungs, and ask him if he feels any pain there ; but 
if a female doctor should do the same thing it would make a man sick, 
and he would want to get up and kick himself for employing a female 
doctor. Oh, there is no use talking, it would kill a man! 

Now, suppose a man has heart disease, and a female doctor should want 
to listen to the beating of his heart. She would lay her left ear on his 
breast, so her eyes and rosebud mouth would be looking right in his face, 
and her wavy hair would be scattered all around there, getting tangled in 
the buttons of his night-shirt. Don't you suppose his heart would get in 
about twenty extra beats to the minute ? You bet ! And she would smile 
— we will bet ten dollars she would smile— and show her pearly teeth, and 
the ripe lips would be working as though she were counting the beats, and 

he would think she was trying to whisper to him, and Well, what 

would he be doing all this time ? If he was not dead yet, which would be 
awonder, his left hand would brush the flair away from her temple and 
kind of stay there to keep the hair away, and his right hand would get 
sort of nervous and move around to the back of her head, and when she 
had counted the beats a few minutes and was raising her head, he would 
draw the head up to him and kiss her once for luck, if he was as bilious 
as a Jersey swamp angel, and have her charge it in the bill. And then a 
reaction would set in, and he would be as weak as a cat, and she would 
have to fan him and rub his head till he got over being nervons, and then 
make out his prescription after he got asleep. No ; all of a man's symp- 
toms change when a female doctor is practicing on him, and she would 
kill him dead. 



INSURANCE. 



VANITY FAIR ON ASSASSINATION. 

The attempt to assassinate President Garfield seems to show that a 
general disposition to atrocious violence is permeating the globe. None 
of the arguments used in defense of the murder of the Czar apply in the 
present case. If the crime was committed in order to accomplish some 
special purpose, it is not the assassin who will profit, but some person or 
persons hiding in the dark. But whether this attempt had its origin in a 
a political plot or in the dreams of a maniac, the result is the same — a 
furious indignation among multitudes, not only against actual or intend- 
ing assassins, but against all persons who hold unpopular *or unusual 
opinions upon politics. General Grant is said to have declared that the 
assassins must be stamped out. 

For some years past there has been in Germany a persecution of all 
persons who hold opinions loosely designated as Communistic. Attempts 
arestill making to introduce into England these persecutions for opinion 
which have a tendency to drive sane men to madness, and mad men to 
murder. The crime committed at Washington will probably cause some 
stamping- out laws to be proposed in the United States. I hope that the 
sovereign people there will not lose their heads. Whether the execution 
of actual regicides is a protection to Rulers may be reasonably maintained 
and as reasonably doubted; but there can be no reasonable doubt that to 
treat a large number of people as suspected murderers on account of their 
political opinions has a tendency to incite a proportion of these men to 
violent acts. 

The Duke of Nemours once sent his Stewart to call upon an artist 
on whom he wished to confer a snuff-box as a mark of his approbation, to 
ascertain if such a present would be acceptable. The offer was received 
with enthusiasm. " Where shall I send it?" inquired the envoy. " Oh, 
if you would be kind enough," replied the grateful artist, " to pawn it on 
the way, you can let me have the money." 



As a girl was taking leave of a gentleman at her father's house, one 
evening recently, she said to him: " If you ever hear that I am in the 
habit of allowing my male acquaintances to kiss me good-bye you mustn't 
believe it, as I seldom allow such liberties." The close of that interview 
may be imagined. 

Table Apricots which King, Morse & Co. pack are one of the nicest 
delicacies to place before your friends at supper time. Get them. 



SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE & MARINE INS. CO., 

OF NEW ZEALAND. 
Capital .lO.OOO.OOO 

CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED. 

Capital 85,000,000- 

STANOARD MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $5,000,000 

w. j. ( niiM.imi .1 co., 
_._ _ Oeueral Ajcenta, 

313 Sansoma Street San Franoisco. 

t Orf/a II I znl 1888,] 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Fire and Marine Insurance. 
A " sc *» 91,220,000. 

V3~ The I,nru'est Assets nnd Largest Income of all the Companies hailintr from 
West of New York State. 



D. J. STAPLKS President. 

ALPHEUS BULL Vice-President. 



WM. J. DUTTON Secretary. 

E. W. CARPENTER.... Ass't Secretary. 



BOME OFFICE! 

Southwest Corner California and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 

[July 23.] 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $7,600,000 

Cash Assets 1,709,976 

Cash Assets in United States 775,003 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., General Agents, 

March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSUR. CO. OF BOSTON. 

Has transacted the business of Life Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 22. J , 323 Mon tgomery street. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

Of Hamburg. 

Capital, $1,500,000. U. S. Gold Coin. --Losses Paid in Gold 
Coin immediately after Adjustment. This Corporation holds contracts of six- 
teen other European Insurance Companies, re-insuring by far the greater part of 
every risk, as soon as accepted in our office. The combined subscribed Capital which 
our policies therefore offer to the public amounts to $26,900,000, U. S. Gold Coin, of 
which $7,660,000 is paid up, besides the always available Reserve Funds. 

GEORGE MARCUS &C0 , General Agents for Pacific Coast 
July 30. No. 304 California street. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital 95,000,000.— Agents: Balfour, Guthrie A Co., No. 
' 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in then- 
various forms. 

June 18. PRENTISS SEIiBY, Superintendent. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar und Leihbank, No 526 California street, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors.— Fred. 
Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon, 
Peter Spreckels, Ign. Steinhart. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 

QUICKSILVER. 

The Celebrated "A" Brand, shipped direct from the New 
Almaden Mine, for sale in any quantity, by the producers. CAR LOAD 
LOTS will be shipped from San Jose for NEVADA, ARIZONA and the EAST, or de- 
livered at Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San Francisco, without charge. 
THE QUICKSILVER MINING COMPANY, 

J. B. RANOOL, Manager, 
July 9.] No. 320 Sansome St,, over Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Express Office. 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 57, 59 and 61 Minna street, between First and Second, 
San Fraucisco, One Block from Palace Hotel. Also, Carriages and Cabs at 
Pacific Club, N.E. corner Montgomery and Bush streets. Vehicles of Every Descrip- 
tion at Reduced Rates. Telephones in Stable. Feb. 10. 

NOTICE. 

lor the very best photographs go to Bradley A Rulofson's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



F' 



EDWARD BOSQUI & CO., 

Printers, Engravers, Lithographers and Bookbinders, 

Leidesdorff street, from Clay to Commercial. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 13, 1881. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND." 

*' We Obey no Wand but Pleasure'B."--To»i Moore. 

Bush Street Theater. — The announcement of the initial performance 
of Jane Eyre, with Charlotte Thompson in the title role, supported by 
Sheridan aa "Rochester," was sufficient to draw a crowded house at this 
theater. Monday was Miss Thompson's first appearance after an absence 
of many years, and she received a most cordial welcome. The perform- 
ance, barring some defects, was a most enjoyable one. To see two Buch 
artists aa Miss Thompson and Sheridan cast in congenial roles, and ones 
so adapted to their physical appearance, was a treat in itself. Their in- 
terpretations were an intellectual ireat such as is seldom seen here. 
There was no namby-pamby wishy-washiness about it, but a keen, 
sterling handling of character, a reproduction in flesh and blood of two of 
the creations of one of the master painters of human nature. We cannot 
recall a more successful idealization of an author's idea. They seemed 
the characters themselves, and Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre" and 
" Rochester" never seemed so real and possible as on Monday night. 
The dramatization is somewhat of a disappointment, dealing, as it does, 
in the prologue, with "Jant's" early life, and bringing the play to a pre- 
mature close after the heroine's engagement to "Rochester," at his coun- 
try seat, leaving the dramatic story of her flight, and its subsequent pa- 
thetic scene of her meeting "Rochester," later, blind and penitent un- 
told. We have said before that the two characters under review were 
true in their fidelity to the author's idea, and we will modify it to the ex- 
tent of pointing out to Miss Thompson that suffering and abuse had in- 
tensified and matured "Jane's" mind, and that the girlishness of her na- 
ture should not be allowed, in the prologue, to drift into babyishnesB— a 
shading that Miss Thompson gave in one or two scenes. "Jane" was a 
woman in mind at the time the play opens. Where there is so much in a 
performance to praise, it seems harsh to condemn, yet we believe every 
one in the audience made a mental protest every time the gentlemen per- 
sonating "Professor Brockelhurst" and "John Buttercup" intruded them- 
selves on the stage. Their presence is not necessary to the development 
of the plot. What intensified the audience's sufferings waB the fact that 
they could not share the evident enjoyment taken by these actors in their 
treatment of these parts. Miss Hastings was miscast as "Lady 
Georgina," and will undoubtedly do better in a more congenial part. It 
was a pleasure to see Mrs. Saunders on the stage again. The remainder 
of the cast was excellent. Jane Eyre should run for many nights. 

Baldwin Theater. — Diplomacy was given at this theater in a manner 
to reflect great credit on the actors in the cast. It was a hazardous un- 
dertaking to produce a play that had been enshrined in the hearts of our 
theater-goers by poor Montague's untimely end. When last seen here, 
Diplomacy was produced by a company fiat had been selected by New 
York's greatest manager for their especial adaptability to the parts, and it 
had been played for so long by such intelligent performers, that it had 
about attained a state of perfection. If it was again to be presented 
here, there seemed a peculiar fitness in the same manager sending his two 
leading men, countrymen of Montague's, here to produce it. It would be 
unfair to judge laBt Monday's production by the former standard, yet, for 
a first night, it compared very fairly. A comparison of the cast of the 
original and the present production may not be uninteresting: 

"diplomacy." 

Cal. Theater, July, 78. Baldwin's, Avg., '81. 

Capt. Julian Beauclerc H. J. Montague Osmund Tearle 

Henry Beauclerc V. B. Warde Gerald Eyre 

Count Orloff J. W. Carroll . J- R. Grismer 

Algie Fairfax J. N. Long Chas. Norris 

Baron Stein J. W. Shannon Max Freeman 

Markham John Wilson E. N. Thayer 

Dora Maud Granger Ethel Arden 

Marquise de Rio Zares Emily Mestayer Jean C. Walters 

Lady Fairfax Hattie Roche Ada Deaves • 

Mion Jenny Arnot Phoebe Davis 

Zicka Jeffreys-Lewis Jeffreys-Lewis 

Miss Jeffreys Lewis' " Zicka " is famous here. She gave it with all of the 
old strength and intensity, without some of the former exaggeration. 
She is more of an artiste now, and shows in this character more than any 
other the great stride she has made in her profession. The chief interest 
is centered on Osmund Tearle's "Julian Beauclerc." The commingling of 
boyishness and manliness in which this character abounds was given with 
great delicacy and finish. He made it a very lovable impersonation, and 
it was only in the emotional scenes of the second act that he showed to 
any disadvantage. It was here that Montague did his fine acting, and his 
grief and sorrow was that of a cultivated geritleman. Not that Tearle's 
was not a refined impersonation, but he seemed here iucapable of giving 
bis grief the force and keeping it in bounds, and in repressing his grief to 
suit the "locale" of a drawing-room it lost its effect. In his other 
scenes the impersonation can be highly commended. The airyness and 
light comedy air, so successfully given the character of "Henry Beau- 
clerc " by Warde, was somewhat wanting in Gerald Eyre's rendering ; but 
he made up for this by some excellent acting. J. R. Grismer's " Orloff " 
and Max Freeman's "Baron Stein" were excellent, though Freeman 
would do well to drop a few gestures suggestive of "Boccaccio." Miss 
Arden, as "Dora," was a most pleasant surprise. She has been trained 
in a good school and did not suffer in comparison with Maud Granger. 
Miss Phcebe Davis is a most welcome addition to our stage, and it seems 
hard to realize she is a debutante. Diplomacy is one of the most artistic 
plays ever written, and it would be hard to find a con-pany cap.U le 
of interpreting it in the manner the present one at the Baldwin does, and 
it Bhould be good for a two weeks' run. 



The Tivoli Garden. — In no place in the world can one receive as much 
for their money as in the musical gardens of 'Frisco. The cheapness, 
combined with the high grade of attractions offered, have become famous 
all over the XTnion. At present Balfe's spectacular opera of Satanella is 
produced in a manner that would do credit to any theater in this city. 
The Tivoli management have long enjoyed the reputation of presenting 
light opera with every attention todetail and with a lavish expenditure 
of money, and the present production is no exception to the rule. Kreling 
Brothers have made in the last two years the most enviable name as 
caterers to the public taste of any theatrical managers now in San 
Francisco. 

We note "with pleasure the re-appearance of the Bianchi-Montaldo 
Troupe at the Grand Opera House next Monday, on which occasion 
Verdi's great opera of Ernani will be produced. Signor Eugenio Bianchi, 
of this city, has now nothing further to do with the company, which iB 
managing itself entirely. The name Bianchi-Montaldo is that of the 
prima donna. The director is Signor Vicenzo Antinori. The company 
trusts by managing their own affairs during the coming season of grand 
opera to give better satisfaction to their own artistic abilities as well as 
to the public. 

Woodward's Gardens.— To-day and to-morrow are the last two ap- 
pearances of the phenomenal child rifle-shot, Lilian F. Smith, who is go- 
ing to the East and Europe next week, to compete witb any one in the 
world. In the variety company, we note the three Arnold Brothers in 
their sketch of Barnum's Baby Elephant; Ida Siddons, Fred. J. Mackley 
and a host of talent besides. An Australian wallaby has just been added 
to the menagerie. 

Miss Constance Langtry, the popular and charming actress, who has 
deserted the East to sojourn with us a while, will give a dramatic per- 
formance on the 15th September at Dashaway Hall. She will appear in 
scenes from Camille, Romeo and Juliet, Julia, Bianca, Frou Frou and 
Adrienne Lecouvreur, in costume, and will be assisted by some of our best 
local artists. Miss Langtry's talents are so well known that a crowded 
house is assured. 

In our last issue, referring to the backer of Mr. Amory Sullivan, an 
error occurred in the spelling of the gentleman's Dame, which should have 
been written Callagkan, instead of Callingham, It is needless to say that 
Mr. W. J. Callingham, the well-known insurance agent, has no connec- 
tion with any theatrical speculations. 

Winter Garden. — The operatic absurdity of Jonah in the Whale is 
drawing large houses at this popular place of amusement. The cast is 
very strong, embracing the ever popular Hattie Moore, Harry Gates, 
Ella LaFevre and the three comedians, Mackley, Crosbie and Barrett. 

Mr Charles Dungan's friends have decided to postpone the benefit 
tendered him until later on, the Melville troupe having concluded not to 
leave for some little time. This will give an opportunity of making even 
more extended arrangements than were contemplated. 

Chit-Chat. — It iB now announced that Henry Irving will positively ap- 
pear in America next year.^— Nat Goodwin has just saved bis sister-in- 
law from drowning. ^^The Troubadours' new piece is by Bronson How- 
ard, and is called An Amateur's Benefit. The title is nearly self-explana- 
tory.—— Charles B. Welles will play juveniles at the Chestnut-street 
Theater, Philadelphia, next season. ^— J. T. Malone goes with Frank 
Mayo next season. — A. M. Palmer, of the Union Square Theater, New 
York, is 42 years old; Augustin Daly is 43; Lester Wallack, 62; J. H. 
Haverly, 43; H. E. Abbey, 35; and Gillette, of the Union Square, only 
26.^^Miss Stanhope will play at Wallack'a next season.^^M. B. Cur- 
tis is buying diamonds. — A new theater, on the plan of the Madison 
Square, of New York, is to be erected in Boston.-^— The Haverly min- 
strel engagement here is reviving Eastern managers 1 faith in California. 
—Over $3,000 in premiums was paid in New Orleans for the boxes dur- 
ing the Gerster engagement.-^— Louise Searle is about to be married.^— 
The World has been a great suceess wherever played East. We will have 
it here soon at the Baldwin.— Jennie Lee's tour commences soon. She 
will probably come on here.— Katie Mayhew will be soubrette at one 
of the principal theaters in New York this season.— Bella and Robert 
Pateman will support Edwin Booth during his coming American tour. 
—Dickie Lingard will travel with Wm. Horace this season. She will 
probably visit here. 

The reporter who was requested to write up the death of two murder- 
ers said he'd see 'em hanged first. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Silver King Mining Company, San Francisco, 
August 9th, 18SI.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above 
named Company, held thia day, a Dividend (No. 20) of Twenty-five Cents (25c.) per 
■hare was declared, payable on MONDAY, Aug. 15th, 1881, at the office of the Com- 
pany, Room 19, 328 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. Transfer Books 
will be closed on August 10th, 1881, at 3 p.m. 
Aug, 13. JOSEPH NASH, Secretary. 



REGULAR DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of Northern Belle Mill and Mining' Company, San 
Francisco, Cal., August 10th, 1881. — At a meeting of the Board of Directors of 
the above-named Company, held this day, a Dividend (No. 50) of Fifty Cents (50c.) 
p.T share was declared, payable on MONDAY, Aug. 15th, 1881. Transfer Books closed 
on Thursday, August 11th, 1881, at 3 o'clock p.m. 

WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. Aug. 13. 



EXTRA DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of Northern Belle Mill and Mining- Company, San 
Francisco, Cal. , Aug-. 10th, 1881.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
above-named Company, held this day, an Extra Dividend (No. 51) of Twenty-five 
Cents (25c.) per share was declared, payable on MONDAY, Aug. 15,1881. Transfer 
Books closed on Thursday, Aug. 11th, 1881, at 3 o'clock p.m. 

WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 29, Nevada, Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. Aug. 13. 



DIVIDEND NUMBER SEVENTY-ONE. 

The Home Mutual Insurance Company will pay its regular 
monthly dividend (No. 71) of Oue Dollar (SI) per share upon its Capital Stock, 
on the 10th day of August, 1881. CHARLES R. STORY, Secretary, 

Aufr. 13. 406 California street. 



Aug. 13, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTING ITEMS. 



Shooting note grant, about six mile* back 

- «n P*l)|n, in a jv*rvli« for lover* of the gnu. -Iu*t 
Dow tli- only pimp on it that can be legally shot is .loves, rabbits ami 
lark*, but tiie place HUrally awartna irj Is every one knows, 

wh« kaowa anything about tlu* hi-' rv of this State, the crant has been 
in (fiapuU br ft long kin*, and many efforts have been made to obtain 
forcible poaseasion of portiona of it. The dread of Ituul-jumpers has 
caoaed toe hoMon fc» ba chary of permitting sportsmen to shoot on tha 
land, an the (a^-v.''' of the anti-trap law, the quail h.w i 

left tin' :t fur the little damage that a couple of ranchmen 

arim-1 with cheap munle-loader* oonld dtX A guard has been kept on 
watch all the time, and its vigilance has preserve i the i:.iiiu' to anon an 
extent that a good shot could easily bag ten dozen a day when the season 
opens. The birds have got to be quite a nuis.inoe, and several of the 
ranchers have informed us that when the season opens they will be 
pleased to grant shooting permits to a limited number of respectable 
s|M>rtsraen. No pothunters will ba tolerated, and no one will be allowed 
on the land without a permit.^— The Supervisors of Plumas county de- 
clared that it would be legal to shoot quail and ducks in that county on 
and after August _M. They say that the birds are full grown, and they 
ace no necessity in closing the season after the date named. We believe 
that their action is illegal, and recommend the Sportsman's Club to look 
the matter up. ^— The large number of hunting parties in Plumas 
county this season have played havoc among deer in the corn counties. 
As a rule, does and fawns have been respected, but bucks are nearly 
cleaned out, and next season will result in something akin to extermina- 
tion. It may be neoMMry in L883, when the Legislature meets, to get a 
law passed prohibiting the killing of any kind of deer in the ow coun- 
ties tor two years. We commend the suggestion to the leading sportsmen 
of the State. -^The quail season of 1881-82 promises to be the best seen 
in California for many years. The anti-trap law has done good work in 
spite of its imperfect enforcement.^— The trial of ground traps at the 
monthly shoot of the Gun Club, last Saturday, proved a complete suc- 
cess, and all present admitted that birds from a ground trap came nearer 
being a natural field shot than anything ever devised. The score was not 
a good average one, but the newness of the sport. will account for that. 
John K. Orr, one of the best field shots in the world, and who has hardly 
an equal on quail, killed a straight dozen, of which there was not a single 
incomer. Four were right and left quartering birds and the balance 
"kiting tailers." Randall grasped 10, and Traylor, Butler, Mcintosh, 
McShane and Fuller 9 each. After the main match J. V. Coleman and 
Mcintosh shot a twenty- four- bird match, in which the last named gentle- 
man won. The birds were an extra good lot. When Mr. Gerber read 
Mr. Orr "s score he sent him a note saying that he would never shoot 
again, and that his dogs, guns and ammunition were at Mr. Orr's 
service. ^^ The California Club shoot at San Bruno last Monday was, as 
usual, won by- Crittenden Robinson with a clean score. Jellett and 
Walsh tied on three pair on the shoot off for second.^— The Cosmopoli- 
tan Club will hold their regular monthly shoot at San Bruno to-mor- 
row.—— There will be a match between Lieutenant Gittings' and Private 
M. J. Feely s teams, both of Company B, Third Infantry Battalion, for 
$50 a side, on August 21st, at Shell Mound Park. Teams to consist off 
five men ; each man to tire ten shots at 200 yards, and ten shots at 500 
yards ; Creedmoor rules or Springfield rifles. 

Tuit— The trotting and pacing programme of the State Fair is as fol- 
lows: Purse No. 5, 2:40 class, §600, closed with nine entries, including 
Gladiator, Louis D, Starr King, Kitty Thome, Del Monte, Empress, 
Little Belle and M'liss. Purse No. 6, 2:21 class, 81 t 200 f closed with six 
entries, viz., Bateman, Abbotsford, Ashley, Tommy Dodd, Volney and 
Brigadier. Purse No. 7 failed to fill for five-year-olds, and was made a 
Bpecial race for Captain Smith, Belle Echo and Del Sur. Purse No. 13, 
2:30 class, $1,000, closed with ten entries, viz., Blackmore, William Tell, 
Starr King, Peocora Hayward, Empress, Hancock, Susie, Little Belle, 
Tom Stout and b. s. Dexter. Purse 14, $700, for four-year-olds, closed 
with five entries, viz., Roman, Aleck Button, Annie Laurie, Belle Echo 
and Honesty. Purse 15, for three-year-olds, failed to fill, and was made 
a special $400 purse for Flight, Rowdy Boy, Albert W and Joe Atherton. 
Stake 16, for two-year-olds: Leland Stanford names b. f. Wild Flower, 
b. f. Bonnie and b. g. Marlet ; L. J. Rose, San Gabriel, names John 
Mackay's b. f. Eva, blk. g. La Grange— five entries. Purse No. 20, $400, 
free for all pacers, closed with eight entries, viz., Washington, Ouida, 
Maud Bowlev, Cherry, Nimrod (to wagon), Johnnie Weigle, Col. 
Dickey; and Carrie T. Purse 22, 2:25 class, $1,000, closed with eight en- 
tries, viz., Henry McCord, San Francisco, names James McCord's b. g. 
Gold Note ; John A. Goldsmith, M. Saulsbury's dk. b. h. Gibraltar ; G. 
Valensin, s. h. Crown Point; J. Cochran, Sacramento, s. g. Ashley; L. 
J. Rose, San Gabriel, blk. s. Del Sur; L. H. Titus, San Gabriel, br. m. 
Echora ; Wm. Corbett, San Francisco, ch. m* Mollie Drew ; J. M. 
Learned, Stockton, b. h. Reliance.— —In the California Annual Stake, 
for foals of 1878, to be trotted the last day of the State Fair, Mr. Mackay 
will try, with his br. f. Sweetheart, to beat Phil Thompson's three-year- 
old best on record, 2:21.— •" For a good all-round sportsman, commend 
ub to the Italian Count Telfener, who recently made a gigantic fortune, 
partly by American railroads, and partly by marrying a relative of a Cal- 
ifornia Bonanza man. The Count was partial to racing, and he was par- 
ticularly desirous of winning cups. Notwithstanding, however, that he 
had engaged the services of the bold Kemmy Walker, defeat invariably 
awaited 1pm. An idea struck the Count. He carried it out. He got up 
a race meeting of his own, and gave a number of cups to be run for. One 
of the conditions of entry was ' for horses the property of Count Telfener 
only. 1 The races were run. The King was present, and at the end of the 
day the Count was solemnly presented with his own cups. And we can 
tell our readers that ' won by Count Telfener's Flamingo colt,' as the case 
may be, reads deuced well on those cups." — London Sporting Times. 

Cricket. — The Occident and Merion Clubs will meet at the Recreation 
Grounds this afternoon to play the fourth game of the season. Of the 
three games played,, the senior club has won two and the junior one. The 
Merian players are as follows: Burnett, Day, Deane, Klein, J. Mathieu, 
G. Theobald, A. Theobald, J. J. Theobald, Webster, Wigmore, Wool- 
rich. The Occident will be represented by the following players: Aitkin, 
Blakeley, Carr, Campbell, McGavin, McGratty, O'Connor, Purdy, San- 
derson, Stoddart, Waterman; Phipps, umpire. 



Athletic. The following cornea by telegraph: " BlBHlRORAH, August 
8th.— W. K. (leorg.-, the i>edestrian, won the 1,000 yards handicap from 
tin- ■omton in 8:18, This beats the best amateur record in the world, 
Uyen having dono the nam In 2:18 IV George i* going to the 

I States to compete with Hyatt." This effort of QtKMKe'fl JOit OB 
the eve of his departure for America, and in view of his recent sickness, 
which was put forward as an excuse for hi* not competing with Myers), 
looks u If those two young gentlemen had entered into a contract for a 
ti blppodroming scheme, nlyen gnee to England where gate 
nit. to much, and the only man who could extend 
him at 1,000 yards la too sick to run but recovers in time to make a splen- 
did advertising record for the trip to Auii-rir.t, where gate money is im- 
mense if au International :iir can D I given to a contest. — Prizs fighting 
18 not nnii'li of ;i trade nowadays, but it is a much more manly one than 
this gtovfl'fighting business. In BU Francisco there are about six light- 
weight so called champions, yet the minute a m:m comes here that means 
banana they shrink, cur-like, out of sight. The business of sparring in 
1 : beer halls is all they want of the ring of which they claim to be 
champions. These remark-* are prompted by the fact that a 120-pound 
man offers to fight any liuht weight here for $500 a side, and not one of 
the crew of alleged fistic heroes that infest the slums of the city could be 
got to make a match unless a certainty was guaranteed and a light set-to 
promised. It is about time that the foolish people who deify and support 
these fraudulent gladiators could be got to realize the fact that a fighting 
man who will not fight is a blackguard without the blackguard's only re- 
deeming quality, courage. A dead square fight in San Francisco just 
now should be worth fully §2,000 to the winner, a large sum for the 
scrubs who represent a once manly art nowadays. 

yachting. — The State Board of Harber Commissioners is still consid- 
ering the application of the yacht clubs for a yacht harbor inside the 
North Beach sea-wall. We hope that their answer will be favorable. 
^^The Pacific Yacht Club will hold its annual regatta on September 
10th, if the 9th is generally celebrated as proposed. 

Rowing. — The Regatta Committee have been importuned to reopen 
the entries for the lapstreak-race. To avoid doing a wrong, and for the 
sake of the sport, they will endeavor to get an extra prize for lapatreak 
boats. The entries cannot be reopened. 

Duryeaa' Starch gives a beautiful white, glossy, lasting finish, be- 
sides renders fabrics very durable. 

WINTER GARDEN, 

Stockton street, between Sutter and Post streets. --Stan I A- 
Kaack, Proprietors; M. A. Kennedy, Manager. This (Saturday} Evening, 
and every evening until further notice, grand production of an entirely new Sensa- 
tional and Spectacular Operatic Absurdity, entitled 

Jonah in the Whale! 

Catchine in Music, Beautiful in Scenery, Rich in Appointments, and Original in Con" 
ception. Increased Chorus, Pull Orchestra, and a Great Cast, including MISS HAT- 
TIE MOORE, MR. HARRY GATES, MISS ELLA LA FAVRE, and the three come- 
dians, MR. FRED J. MACKLKY{hls first appearance here), MR. W. C. CROdBIE, 
MR. ED. BARRETT. The Talented ALLEN SISTERS In a Grand Ballet. The An- 
imated Skeleton! Grand Amazonian March, and Splendid Spectacular Effects. For 
full particulars Bee bills. Admission, 25 cents. Aug. 13. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Ylceuzo Autluori, Director. — Monday, August 15th, 1881, 
Grand Production of Verdi's Masterpiece, 
Ernani ! 

By the BIANCHI-MONTALDO ITALIAN OPERA COMPANY, with all the principal 
Artists in the Cast. Wednesday, August 17th, RUY BLAS; Friday, August 19th, 
NORMA. Dress Circle— Admission, SI; Reserved Seat, 50 cents extra; Family 
Circle, 60 cents; Gallery, 25 cents; Boxes, from SO to Sl5, according to location. No 
Reserved Seat will be sold after 6 o'clock on the evening of each performan6e. Box 
Office open on and after Thursday, 11th instant, from 9 a.m. to 5 r.M. In Active Re- 
hearsal— LUCREZIA BORGIA, IONE and MOSES IN EGYPT. Aug. 13. 

BALDWIN THEATER. 

Thomas Mag- u I re, Manager. --Particularly Requested! Iu 
response to numerous applications at the Box Office to see the Wallack Com- 
pany in 

Diplomacy! 

This ever popular play will be presented this (Saturday) Evening, August 13th, dur- 
ing the Week and at tho Saturday Matinee. First Appearance of MISS ETHEL AR- 
1>I\N, and Special Engagement of Mr. Joseph Grismer and Mr. Max Freeman in a 
very powerful cast, including Miss Jeffreys- Lew is, Mr. Osmond Tearle, Mr. Gerald 
Eyre, etc. Monday, August 15th, First Production in America of the Great Parisian 
Sensation, THE STRANGLERS OF PARIS. Aug. 13. 

BUSH-STREET THEATER. 

(thns. E. Locke, Proprietor. —Houses Crowded Every Night. 
J Secure your Seats Early. This (Saturday) Evening, MISS CHARLOPTE 
THOMPSON, together with the eminent Actor, MR. W. E. SHERIDAN (especially 
engaged), and an unusually strong cast, presenting 

Jane Eyre ! 

With Miss Thompson as Jane Eyre, and Mr. Sheridan as Lord Rochester. Two Matinees 
each Week, everv Wednesday- and Saturday. Box Sheet always open. In Active 
Preparation, THE PLANTER'S WIFE. Aug- 13. 

THE TIV0LI GARDENS, 

Eddy street, between Market and Jlawoii.-KreUii^ Bros., 
Managers. Tremendous Success ! Balfe's Grand Spectacular Opera, 
Satan e 11a ! 

With its Elaborate Mechanical Effects! The Demon's Tower, the Living Picture, the 
Supper for Two, the Popular Pirate Chorus, the Slave Market, Mysterious Disap- 
pearance of Satauella, the Caves of Despair, the Demon Foiled, Grand Apotheosis. 

JOHN JENNINGS 

Hooper's South End Warehouses, corner Japan and Town- 
send streets. San Francisco. First-class Fire-Proof Brick Building, capacity 
10,000 tons. Goods taken from the Dock and the Cars ol the C. P. K. R. and S. P. 
R. R. free of charge. Storage at Current Rates. Advauce* and Insurance Effected 

ROBERT WALKINSHAW, 

"\Totary Public, 407 Montgomery street, is prepared to take 

J3I charge of Estates or Trusts; to act as General Agent for persons abseating 
themselves from the State ; to buy and sell farming lands, take charge of securities, 
make collections, correspond, and make remittauces. Reliable references. [July 9. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 13, 1881. 



{After the Adoption of the Constitution.) 
The Water Company was organized 
under a law which obligated it to furnish 
water free to the city. This is the law as 
it reads this moment. Notwithstanding 
this fact, it is proposed in the Board of 
Supervisors to surrender this free water, 
and pay the company §240,000 per annum 
therefor."— B ullelm, June, 18S1. 



FACTS FOR THE PEOPLE. 

Letter from the President of Spring Valley— The False- 
hoods of the «* Bulletin " aud "Call" Refuted. 

To the Public; For several years the proprietors of the Evening Bulletin and 
Mornino Call both papers beh.g under one ownership, have seen fit to devote the 
editorial columns of those journals, with disregard of truth, to malicious attacks 
upon the Sprins Valley Water Works. 

Having respect for the right of the Press to discuss fairly the relations of any cor- 
poration with the people, this company has not felt inclined to publicly criticise the 
particular conduct of the newspapers named, but has preferred to rely upon the hope 
that the full consideration and discussion of the subject, though unfairly entered 
uuun would in time lead to correct conclusions and to honorable expression This 
hone has proved fallacious. Falsehood after falsehood has been published and repub- 
lished, with the evident design of deceiving the people as to facts, and of inciting 
them to hostile feeling. «-*_»*. j c j . j 

Lies often repeated may at last have 'the semblance of truths, and find lodgment 

111 Among theniany falsehoods thuB constantly paraded I shall here refer to, and re- 
fute some of the most audacious. 

"Bulletin" and "Call" Legal Opinions. 

While engaged in efforts to prevent the adoption of the new Constitution, those 
papers declared that by it free water would be abolished. When the Constitution 
had been adopted, and those papers renewed their warfare aganibt this company, they 
declartd that free water had not been abolished. Here are their opiuione. 

(Before Adoption of the Constitution ) 

" Now we have free water for flushing 
sewers, supplying public institutions, for 
sprinkling parks and squares, and for the 
use of the Fire Department in suppressing 
conflagrations. Ihe adoption of the new 
Constitution will change all this, and the 
eity will have to pay not less than $200,000 
per annum for what they now receive 
without cost. On this point there can be 
no dispute."— Call, May 3, 1879. 

bFrom the Evening Bulletin, May 3, '79.) 

" The water section adopted by the Con- 
stitution deprives the cily of- free water, 
which she now enjoys under the decision 
of the Supreme Court, for the extinguish- 
ment of fires, flushing the sewers and 
watering the parks, for which at least 
$200,000 per annum would be charged if 
there was no bar in the way, as the law 
now is under the old Constitution." 

In furtherance of their present policy, they declare the Act of 1858, under which 
this company was organized, was a contract between this city and the Water Com- 
pany, and was not annulled by the new Constitution. This company accepted that 
view, and declared its willingness to furnish water free, claiming also that it had 
the right, under the same Act, to have a voice in fixing the rates to be charged. 

The Supreme Court has recently decided that the new Constitution has changed 
the Act of 1S58. If so, it follows that this company is entitled to the same rights 
and subject to the same burdens as those who introduce water under the new Con- 
stitution. 

Opinions of City's Legal Advisers. 

The law officers of the city have given their opinions to the Supervisors upon the 
subject of these changes. City and County Attorney Murphy says: 

' ' In the opinion of this office, the city an d county is liable, under the new Consti- 
tution , to pay for the use of water furnished by any individual, company or corpo- 
ration, for all municipal purposes." 

And District-Attorney Sinoot gives a like opinion to the Board of Supervisors, as 
follows: 

11 Language could not be plainer; it could scarcely be stronger. Nothing is said 
about gratuitous service; nothing about consulting the servant as to the measure of 
compensation. It seemed to be the sovereign will to strike down both at once, and 
get rid of the rate-payers' comvlaint on the one hand and ttie parage of free service 
on the other. If this be true, and it should result in an increase of burdens, and a 
■ corresponding enlargimtnt of the company's revenue, it would not be for the lack of 
power in your honorable body to prevent it." 

The Bulletin and Call support this view in 1879. The Bulletin and Call denounce 
it in 1881. On whieh can the public rely? 

"Bulletin" and "Call" Increase of Water Bates. 

With like mendacity they declare that the Bayly Ordinance increases water rates 
25 to 33 per cent. In proof of the falsehood of this statement, here are, side by side, 
the rates established by the Water Commissioners, and in force prior to the adoption 
of the new Constitution, and those as fixed by the Bayly Ordinance: 

COMMISSIONERS' RATES, 

Subject to deduction of 10 per cent, on 

prompt payment. 



Ground Sur- 




CO 


J - — 




ca 


face Covered 


W 5 


° ? 


3 — ' 




8 "9 


by Tentmait. 


■3 <& 


5' ° 


i' a 


2. c 


»' 5 


Square Feet. 




? 


? 


S" 


s° 


600 to 700. . 


«oo 


$2 00 


82 26 


52 50 


52 75 


700 to 800.. 


•/. (Ill 


2 26 


2 60 


2 76 


3 00 


800 to 000.. 


2 25 


2 60 


2 75 


3 00 


3 25 


900 to 1000. . 


2 50 


2 75 


3 0(1 


3 25 


3 50 


1000 to 1200. 


2 76 


3 00 


8 25 


3 50 


3 75 


1200 to 1400. . 


3 00 


3 26 


3 50 


8 75 


4 00 


1400 to 1600. . 


3 25 


3 50 


3 75 


4 on 


4 2b 


1600 to 1800.. 


3 50 


3 75 


4 on 


4 25 


4 50 


1800 to 2000.. 


3 76 


4 00 


4 25 


4 50 


4 75 


2000 to 2200. . 


4 00 


4 25 


4 50 


4 75 


6 00 


2200 to 2400. . 


4 25 


4 50 


4 76 


5 0( 


5 25 


2400 to 2600.. 


4 50 


4 75 


5 00 


5 25 


5 60 


2600 to 2800. . 


4 75 


5 0C 


5 25 


5 5( 


5 75 


2S00 to 3000. . 


5 0C 


5 25 


5 5( 


5 75 


6 00 


3000 to 3200.. 


5 25 


5 50 


5 75 


6 0( 


6 25 


3200 to 3400. . 


S5C 


6 75 


l!0( 


6 25 


6 50 


3400 to 3600.. 


6 75 


6 01 


6 25 


6 5( 


6 75 


3600 to 3800. ■ 


00 


6 25 


6 5C 


6 75 


7 00 


3500 to 4000. . 


6 25 


6 50 


6 75 


7 00 


725 



BAYLY ORDINANCE RATES 






S ~ 


n If 


S ^ 




CO 

S -1 


Square Feet 




n ° 


2 a 


2. e 


5' a 


600 to 700.. 


SI 60 


8160 


5180 


$2 00 


S2 20 


700 to 800.. 


1 611 


1 XII 


2 00 


2 20 


2 40 


800 to 900. 


1 80 


2 00 


2 20 


2 40 


2 60 


900 to 1000. . 


2 00 


2 20 


2 40 


2110 


2 SO 


1000 to 1200. . 


2 20 


2 40 


2 60 


2 80 


3 00 


1200 to 1400.. 


2 4(1 


2 60 


2 80 


son 


3 20 


1400 to 1600. 


2 60 


2 80 


3 00 


3 20 


3 40 


1600 to 1800.. 


2 80 


3 no 


3 20 


3 4(1 


3 60 


180U to 2000. . 


3 00 


3 20 


3 4(1 


3 60 


3 80 


2000 to 2200.. 


3 20 


3 4f 


3 60 


3KC 


4 00 


2200 to 2400.. 


3 41 


3 60 


3 80 


4 0C 


4 20 


2400 to 2600.. 


3«f 


3 8( 


4 011 


4 20 


4 40 


2600to2S00.. 


3R( 


4 0( 


4 2C 


4 4C 


4 60 


2800 to 3000.. 


4 0( 


4 2( 


4 41 


4 61 


4 80 


3000 to 3200.. 


4 2( 


4 4( 


4 61 


4 81 


5 00 


3200 to 3400. . 


4 41 


4 6( 


4 81 


5(K 


5 20 


3400 to 3600. . 


4 61 


4R( 


6 0( 


5 2( 


5 40 


3600 to 3800. . 


4R( 


5 01 


5 2( 


5 4( 


5 60 


3800 to 4000. . 


5 0C 


5 20 


6 40 


5 60 


5 80 



The other rates fixed by the Bayly Ordinance for bath-tubs, irrigation, meter rates, 
etc., in no case are equal to those established by the Commissioners, It is not pre- 
tended that the Bayly Ordinance diminished the revenue of the company, as the 
company had not, in many cases, charged up to the limit of the Commissioners' 
schedule, and th& increase in the number of consumers since the adoption of the 
Bayly Ordinance 1 has brought the company's revenue up to the general average ; 
but the assertion that the Bayly Ordinance increased rates is absolutely false. 

The Water Bates Beduced One-Fourth. 

The Bulletin and Call declare that the payments made by the city will increase the 
revenue'of'ttie Water Company. Section 11 of the Bayly Ordinance reads: 

"Sec. 11. — The rates of compensation to be collected for water supplies to the city 
and cour.ty of San Francisco, for municipal purposes, shall be as follows: 



" Fifteen dollars per month for each and every hydrant for fire purposes and for 
flushing sewers. 

" Five hundred dollars per month for water furnished to the Golden Gate Park. 

" Seven thousand dollars per month for water furnished to all the public buildings. 

*' In case the rates of compensation hereby fixed for water supplied to the city 
and county of San Francisco for municipal purposes shall be fully paid monthly by 
the said city and county to the Spring Valley V ater Works, the same shall be al- 
lowed by said corporation, upon the rates charged to its consumers, other than the 
city and county, for the month succeeding the month in which the same are collected, 
and in such manner that the rates to such consumers, for such succeeding month, 
shall be dimii.isbed 25 per cent, or such proportion thereof as may be collected from 
said city and county." 

The monthly payments to be made by the city would be: 

For 1,300 hydrants at $15 319,500 

For watering Park 500 

For public buildings 7,000 

Total $27,000 

The monthly revenue of the company, as provided by the schedule of rates, is be- 
tween $105,000 and $108,000 per month. This is now paid entirely by ratepayers. 
Deducting from the larger sum the payments by the city, and ratepayers will have to 
pay but $81,000, or one-fourth less than heretofore, while the company's revenue will 
remain unchanged. 

Politics and Bribery. 
Failing to intimidate this company into submission to their exactions, they call 
upon the political parties to destroy us. As Supervisors are invested with the right 
to fix the water rates, our rightful revenue is to be offered as a bribe for votes, and 
the qualifications of candidates are measured by the magnitude of the depletion 
promised. Hence reductions of 30, even of 50 per cent., are freely bid by aspiring 
office-seekers. 

Our annual revenue is now in round numbers $1,270,000 

Suppose the 30 per cent, bidders shall be elected, and reduce the revenue 

according to promise 423,333 

There will remain $846,666 

Deduct from this interest payable on $4,000,000 of bonds, taxes and 
operating expenses, amounting in all to 623,390 

And there will he available for dividends to stockholders $223,276 

which sum is not quite equal to 3 per cent, per annum upon the capital stock of 
$8,u00,000. If the 50 per cent, bidders are elected, the available revenue will be but 
$630,000, or barely sufficient to pay the interest, taxes and operating expenses, with 
no dividends whatever. 

What is Fair California Interest P 

The Bulletin and Call assert that 4 per cent, per annum would be a fair California 
rate uf interest to stockholders of the Water Company. The falsity of this is ap- 
parent to every business man in San Francisco, where the current rates of moneys at 
loan on wide margin of security are from 7 to 12 per cent. , and where business en- 
terprises are not undertaken except where prospects of even higher rates are en- 
couraging. No one is ignorant of the fact that water works are especially exposed 
to unusual catastrophes, arising from the effects of floods or earthquakes upon costly 
dams and reservoirs, and to deterioration in pipe and works, and that such risks 
justify a revenue above rather than below current rates. 

The Bulletin and Ca«_allege that the company's indebtedness of $4,f00,000 is in 
part owing to the purchase of a valueless piece of property which those papers now 
style a cow pasture— to wit, the Calaveras valley. This valley contains a supply of 
water sufficient for the wants of San Francisco should it grow to a city of several 
millions of population. Eminent engineers have approved its purchase and in- 
dorsed its great value. Colonel Mcndcll, one of the most distinguished engineers in 
the service of the United States, says of it: 

"I think the Calaveras property an indispensable adjunct to Spring Val'ey, and 
they did zvisely to obtain it.'' 

Whose opinion shall be accepted— that of these inconsistent and vacillating news- 
papers, or that of experienced and practical men 1 

'lhe Bulletin and Call dogmatically assert that the company has only nominally 
made its capital $3,100,000, and that it has done so by watering or increasing its 
stock without equivalent investment. 

John F. Pope, an expert accountant, aud having no connection with this company, 
made a thorough examination of its books, and reported to the Board of Supervisors 
that the company had invested in its works a cash outlay more than twice the $8,000,- 
000 of its capital stock. Another expert accountant, Colouel A. J. Moulder, exam- 
ined the system of investigation and the report of Mr. Pope, and declared to the 
Board of Supervisors that it was correct, and that he concurred in that report. 

Chamber of Commerce Slay Fix Income- 

Notwithstanding these unimpeached opinions, this company is willing and ready 
to again submit its books to investigation, and it hereby offers to submit the whole 
question of the cost and value of its works, and the amount of income it ought to re- 
ceive, to a committee of three disinterested, competent men, to be selected by the 
Board of Trade or the Chamber of Commerce. 

The Laws Which Control. 

The Bulletin and Call declare that the company seek to evade legal responsibili- 
ties. On the contrary, here are the laws that govern it. The company always has 
complied with, and has uo desire to avoid them. 
(Act 0/1858.) 

Sec. 3. All privileges, immunities and 
franchises that may be hereafter granted 
to any individual or individuals, or to any 
corporation or corporations, relating to 
the introduction of fresh water into the 
city and county of San Francisco, or into 
any city or town in the State, for the use 
of the inhabitants thereof, are hereby 
granted to all companies incorporated-, or 
that may hereafter become incorporated 
for the purposes aforesaid. 

Sec. 4. All corporations formed under 
the provisions of this Act, or claiming 
any of the privileges of the same, shall 
furnish pure, fresh water to the inhabit- 
ants of such city and county, or city or 
town, for family usee, so long as the sup- 
ply permits, at reasdraibie rates and with- 
out distinction ^persons, upon proper 



demand therefor, and shall furnish water, 
to the extent of their means, to such city 
and county, or city or town, in case of fire 
or other great necessity, free of charge. 
And the rates to be charged for water 
shall be determined by a Board of Com- 
missioners, to be selected as follows: Two 
by such city and county, or city or town, 
authorities, and two by the water com- 
pany; and in case that four cannot agree 
to a valuation, then in that case the four 
shall choose a fifth, 



\(Neio Constitution.) 

Art. XL, Sec. 19. In any city where 
there are no public works owned and con- 
trolled 1 y the municipality, for supplying 
the same with water or artificial light, any 
individual or any company duly incorpo- 
rated for such purpose under and by au- 
thority of the laws of this State, Bhall, 
under the direction of the Superintendent 
of Streets, or other officer in control 
thereof, and under such general regula- 
tions as the municipality may prescribe 
for damages, have the privilege of using 
the public streets, and thoroughfares 
thereof, and of laying down pipes and con- 
duits therein and connections therewith, 
so far as may be necessary for introducing 
into and supplying such city and its in- 
habitants either with gaslight or other 
illuminating light, or with fw;sh Water for 
domestic and all other purposes, upon the 
condition that the municipal goverument 
shall have the right to regulate the charges 
thereof. 

Art. XIV., Sec. 1. The use of all water 
now appropriated for sale, rental or dis- 
tribution is hereby declared to be a public 
use and subject to the regulations and 
control of the State, in the manner to be 
prescribed by law; provided, that the 
rates or compensation to be collected by 
any person, company or corporation in 
this State, for the use of water supplied to 
any city and county, or city or town, or 
the inhabitants thereof, shall be fixed an- 
nually by the Board of Supervisors, or 
city and county, or city or town council. 



13, 1881. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



■6. 

en. 



If thm U »nr 



'-*■ given 



ihh company w, by S«rti<>n S ■ I 
taamunltMac 



-1 u[»>n iDdittdtuU, o--i>-|«nt«a aod < 
XI. of Um ot« ObflMii -.vti-.u 



I l*w, 
. UN 



I do not ■oppo— that mi uor 
ftHt/ttt'- 1 .-Uim that *rt.>!AN «rM,«raii\ .'ihrr w*lt r ^>inp*hi.», are 

by UmI wctioa obUgrd lo farnUh f n . » 

Dfmapotfun of tho Pres*. 

Th»l thaw qrvsparwra are Dot n.lhfnl hi their awrtions of the lofral 

obujrauom of i~ iroad and 

lie. thitt 

I 

■ It, tho Su- 
ho «l. Intimidation, and 

■ 
■ weak ami shuffling m.pliLMrv. but 

si convoutioii*, ana tu «xtort from 

. pledges U> wage war tigntubt thin 
,1.7. 

no more Infunoui attempt at 



other proptHul ; »tlc po« 

'>t Mono 

.lU-tnpt* t<> inftut-iw-v > 

nominee*, through fears of ncw»|>»i*r 

omi]*m under the banner of the IluU*ti 

There can bo no man dojpmding mim* 



umriiatii-it.th.il) »«K*b effort* to warp the Jltdgnwut. to Btultff] t lie sense, and to 
detnoraiiie the eouscicnev of men who hope to receive the suffrages of their fellow 
dtttans. 

The ponr ol Bnpan bmi to determine the ratos of Ihlioompnuy Ii ■ quasi (udtel tl 

power. What would b« thought of a candidate for the bench. 'who, in lulv.-iuec of 

and pre -announce hi* decision "f some question certain to 

fore him 1 And erhal denunciation would be too severe to bestow upon a 
venal ne»«i»jH'r that would .--k na) . command - such pledgee to be 

eve that the people, in their hearts, approve »ucb demands, nor that 
routd justify compliance. It would not be republican; It would not be dem- 
ocratic; it would not be American. It is deniagogism. 

CHARLES WEBB HOWARD, 
Aug. 13. President Spring Valley Water Works. 



DIDN'T WANT TO GET INSURED. 

He waa an old man. and said he'd seen better times. I hoped he had, 
bat as I was unusually busy and didn't want any life insurance, if he 
would excuse me — 

"Oh, yes," said he, "all right, young man, I'll drop in again." 

The next day he did "drop in," and sitting down on my desk, began: 
" Nothing in the world my young friend, will pay so big a per cent on so 
little money invested as a policy in the Mutual Benefit Association, the 
most reliable and the only solid company on earth, capital over seven mill- 
ion, and so prompt — why I insured a man last week for ten thousand dol- 
lars, and the same day he was run over by a street car, so when I sent in 
the policy and premium, I just said by the way of a P. S. : Run over by 
a hoss car not an hour after insured ; better send on check, as he can't 
live ; both legs cut off." The very next day I got a check payable to his 
heirs for 810,560. Dividend, my friend, was more than a premium, and 
don't you call this prompt? That man's widow got this check before he 
had been dead fifteen minutes.*' 

"But," said I, "X. have no wife and don't want any life insurance, I 
tell you." 

" The investment, my young friend— the investment. Look at the div- 
idend. This may get five hundred and sixty dollars in one hour, you 
might say ; and then you may have a wife some day. Now, you don't 
want a policy in this company. I know you do. I'm an old man ; have 
had large and varied experience, and I know you are just aching for one 
of these policies, only you are so extremely modest. Now, I'll just make 
out your application ; it only costs you — let me Bee. How old are you 1 " 

11 Twenty-six, but—" 

11 Twenty-six — hum. Father living?" "No." 

" How old was he when he died?" "Just twenty-seven years old." 

"Twenty-seven, hey? What did he die of? Accident, I presume." 

"No, sir," consumption." "Consumption? You don't look consump- 
tive." 

"But I am consumptive, and — " 

" Mother's living, I doubt not ? " " No sir ; she died at twenty-eight." 

" What was the cause of her death ? " 

" Insanity, sir, hereditary insanity ; family's full of it. All my broth- 
ers, thirteen of us iu all, died between twenty-four and twenty-eight of the 
same disease. Dangerous, too, some of them : my oldest brother was 
taken about this time one day, and he killed his partner, book-keeper, 
three clerks and fourteen customers before they could secure him, and—" 

"You don't tell me. This is wonderful. You look like a strong, 
healthy man, likely to live fifty years. Was you ever sick ? " 

"Oh, yes ; I've had imfjammatory rheumatism, pneumonia, dysentery, 
small-pox, mumps, liver complaint, fits, corns and " 

" Good heavens ! And you want me to insure your life ! Well, my 
company is a good company, willing to take an ordinary business risk, but 
I must say I never kuew them to insure a corpse. I'd like to accommo- 
date you young man ; you seem anxious about it, and I feel interested in 
your family, but our surgeon wouldn't pass such an application. Good 
day." 

A Warning to Drinkers.— Now that the South Pacific Coast Railroad 
has, by increased facilities, added immensely to its Alameda and Oakland 
travel, the public will be pleased to learn that Frank J. Connelly still 
runs the bars on the steamers Bay City, Newark and Garden City. When 
it is understood that Mr. Connelly sells Hotaling's " J. H. Cutter Whisky" 
and J. W. Shaffer's " Bon Ton " and other fine brands of cigars, there is 
no longer an excuse for any gentleman corroding his stomach by drinking 
in a City Front saloon before the boat starts. 



The capacity of the steel works of the world is estimated at about 
3,000,000 tons a year. The Bessemer works in England contribute about 
900,000 tons; the United States, 750 tons more; Germany, about 500,000 
tons; France, about 275,000; Belgium, 150,000; Austria, 250,000; and 
Russia and Sweden, about 150,000. 



The late flbrd Beaconafield, at twelve years of age, was the com- 
piler and editor of a weekly school newspaper. 

There is paid to be a well at Brownsville, Minn., twenty feet deep 
and perpetual ice at the bottom — an ice well to have in the family. 

Duryeas' Starch is the best in the world ; is warranted pure. None 
other so easily used or so economical. 



BANKS. 



UNION TRUST COMPANY, 

NO. 421 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

BmikltiK Airciirj . I rutt nutl •»»!»« Ikepovlt Ilunlnc**! frniin- 
i»rlfil i»t tbe full. .»in 

>.t on collateral loan*, <> i»-r Mitt DOT annum. 
luterott allowed , tnut funds um! uo«mpl 

per Annum 

Huv . Oonot] Bond , I l Stocks, bullion 

and exdwugo, ■ i . . i,i . 

Collecting Mid remitting for Eastern notes, draft i and merchandise sent to our 

Now i wk exi h htfa of i per cent, 

bonds and loans for public or private corporations, Arms and individ- 
uals, one-fourth ol out par a at 

Taking charge ol property , and attending u< tho interests of absentee* and non- 
rosldenl i, under powers of attorney or otherwise, one>half of one per cent. 

ing aa agent, ■;\-;sii,'iire, :uiiniiii*tr:.tnr, receiver and trustee, or M custodian of 
logjaoies. annuities and estates, one hall ol one per cent. 

Transferring, registering and countersigning bonds and stocks, and holding pro- 
pert] in trust for bondholders, stockholders, or in any fiduciary capacity, one-tenth 
of one per cent. 

Keeping on •on.vUl deposit unindorsed securities, one-tenth of one por cent, per 
iiuimin; negi.tiiilih ^securities, onu-flfth of one per cent, per uiimuii; and Other Val- 
uable property at reasonable rates. 



D. W 0. THOMPSON President. I W. C. WATSON 

N. W. LEONARD Cashier. A. W. PRESTON .... 

ROBERT S1MSON Attorney. 



.Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

July SO. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM. ALYORD President. 

THOMAS BROWN, Cashier | B. MURRAY, Jr., Ass't Cashier 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, the Oriental Bank Cor- 
poration. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all tbe princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of tbe Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburg^, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, $1,800,- 
000, with power to increase to $10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office — 28 Cornhill, London. Branches — Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada — Bank of Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSEND, Manager. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital $1,500,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, George A. Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Wormser, James Phelan, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents — London : Baring Bros. & Co. Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin 
Lane, Lombard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : Firet National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Bankihg businesB. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available iu Europe, Chh.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid TJp $3,000,000. 

Keserve, V. S. Bonds 4.000,000. 

Agency n< New Tork, 82 Wall street. 
Agency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sella Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. Nov. 8. 

THE ANOLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

422 California St., San Francisco. 

Loudon Office, 3 Angel Court ; New Tork Agents, J. W. Scl- 
ignian & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, $0,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEJNHART, Managers. 
P. N. Limhnthal, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

C lanital, 82,100,000.-- San Francisco Oflice, 424 California 
j street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; 
Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, Bank of England and London 
Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co.; Boston, Third National Blink. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Busi- 
ness in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and all parts of the 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GPARAMTEE CAPITAl gSOO.OOO. 

Officers: Vtce-President, Jerome Lincoln: Secretary, W. 
S. Jones; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans' made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. ^5 Sancome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 13, 1881. 



THE IMMIGRATION QUESTION AGAIN. 
The San Francisco Board of Trade has appointed a committee to 
inquire into the question of immigration, and to ascertain the best means 
of promoting the same. The Board represents the business interest of 
this great city, if not, indeed, of the whole State. Nevertheless, we are 
driven to the conclusion that it has been asleep for the past twelve 
months. A contemplation of the , following historical facts drives us to 
this conclusion: Last November, just after the close of the Presidential 
contest, the immigration question was discussed in the columns of the 
News Letter. It was then pointed out to the business people of this State, 
and of this city in particular, that if every valley and hillside throughout 
the State could be made to have ten well-to-do inhabitants where they now 
have one, every business interest in the State would be enlarged and im- 
proved in proportion.