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Full text of "S.F. News Letter (Jan.-June 1892)"

2D07 lEISbBT 1 

California State Library 



Call No. V.C OS\ 



Vol. xur 



t >M rBAHoi» 0o 



Humbtr 1. 



News Better 

(California Xbbxxtistx. 

Dtvotco to tmi mJiNd ii»t*^i j'i u* ij»uroM«i» mo ihe Pacific Coast. 

Printed and Published ttrry Saturday 6y the Proprietor. FkbPEUICK 
MaheIoTT, flood But- -ind Market Iran- 

Cisco. Annual Subtcrijttion. including Po$taqe, United State* OSftd 
Canada, $4; fi month*. yz Ml; I months, $1 30; Arete n, $.'« ; 
6 months. $3: 3 month*. $1 BO, 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDA Y, JANUARY 2, 1892. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 






PAOI 

LtADINO ARTICLE* : 

Item- iu Hrlcf 1 

Hew Year Suggestions - 
Judge Wallace 

■r J >ncs' Views - 
i be Ormud Jury b Jeremiads 
The Kir-l of tin- lovestigatlnDfl 

Th.- 1-ate-t Legislative Combine s 

Who l, luBUmeT 3 

8ocn.lv .. ... 4 

Society (continued) 2."> 

New ietf Castonu 6 

Pleasure's Wand — 6 

Sparks. 1 

Over lu Oakland 8 

Suap Shots (Di Vernon J *J ' 

The Looker-Ou . 1C-11 

You Live Me. Don't You? (Poetry) 12 ' 



Paob 

idant of Corneille M 

Vo the New Year [Poeiryl . 18 

That Peculiar Kind of Silence ... v.i 

Financial Keview 11 

Town Crier 16 

Vanities If, 

-*nu beams 17 

Wieabadeu fPoetry) l* 

keal Property 18 

The Bour>e and Underwriter 19 

scientific aud Useful. '20 

J he Rose Jar 21 

Tennis and Baseball 22 

" Biz' —Summary of the Markets. 28 
" Indigo " at the Baldwin 25 

.Sic Trausit Gloria Muudi (Poetry) 26 

The Chief Mau-Killer 28 

Comments on Foreign Affairs 28 



THERE is some consolation in the statement of an European 
scientist, who says that grip recurs at intervals of about 
twenty years, and then prevails for about four years. At that 
rate it has another year to run. We have bad quite enough of it. 

A GOOD New Year's resolution for the Assessor to make would 
be to hereafter see to it that all his assessments, whether ar- 
bitrary or not, sbal! be so fortified by figures and documents that 
he may repulse any charges against him, and not allow allega- 
tions of dishonesty to pass unchallenged. 



LET the farmers and fruit growers thoroughout the State re- 
solve on New Year's Day to do all in their power to make 
tbe Californian Exhibition at Chicago one deserving of our great 
State. It is a magnificent opportunity, of which we should take 
every advantage. 

IF the stories told about the fiendish acts'of Bob Sims of Ala- 
bama be true, the friends of the people alain by him are justi- 
fied in their expressed determination to wipe Sims and his gang 
off tbe face of the earth. To protect itself, a community must 
get rid of such men as Sims, and the more summary the proceed- 
ing, the better the effect. 



NO W arises a deep question in Court etiquette. Tbe Countess 
Clancarty, tbe erstwhile charming dance-hall artist has present- 
te her husband with twins. Will the Queen make an exception in 
this case of twins, and give the mother a golden token of the 
esteem in which her Sovereign holds her for having done her 
duty so well? The world waits. 



THE crank who wants to abduct Jay Gould's daughter is not 
as cranky as the papers try to make hi in. The scheme is a 
good one; there's millions in it, and if the fellow would only in- 
clude old Jay himself in the abduction, what a glad New Year's 
surprise it would be to Wall street. 



IT is said that Emperor William may visit America. If the 
erratic Kaiser does make a tour of this land of the «» free " and 
home of the b. is, he will find it advisable not to utter incendiary 
opinions, for while he may succeed in brow-beating the rulers of 
Europe, he will find it a different game talking back to a Tam- 
many Chief or a Washington boodle ringer. 



GLADSTONE was eighty-two years old on Tuesday last. Re- 
spectora of good government the world over join in wishing 
him a long extension of his lease of life, and a continuation of his 
good works in behalf of his country. He is one of the few mighty 
men left in the world, whose names will be emblazoned upon the 
roll of their country forever. 

MR. MOGAN was somewhat slow in giving up the title of his 
now famous strip of land to complete the Post Office site. It 
is now a question whether, in face of the storm of protests 
against the selection, tbe Washington authorities will confirm the 
choice, even with a complete title. The site is not a popular one, 
unwholesome allegations have been made regarding the manner 
and cause of its selection. All the papers in the city protest 
against its confirmation, and in view of all the facts, the people 
at Washington could not do better than to give the local commis- 
sion one more chance. 



TH K benefit* of the leland Stanford Junior University are t<> be 
Increased t»y a series >'f free, popular leotoreetobegtven there 
daring January, Professor John Henry Oomstock will give 
lectures f->r three months, on Insects, and valuable lectures will 
aleo be given on fruit growing The university Is n very lro« 
portent Vector for the public good, and tbe extension of us in- 
fluence by these lectures i* highly commendable. 

ANOTHER victim of tbe faith-care has died in New York. The 
patient bed ■ simple case of Indigestion, which could have been 
easily cured by medical means, but she rejected all physicians, 
and placed her faith in the prayers of other believers, the In- 
tercession ol Providence. The faith-carer should be controlled by 
penal Statute, and if the cause of the death of a foolish man or 
woman, should be made to answer fur it. 

THE Morgae should have a separate building. Tbe New City 
Hall is not the place for it. It should be apart from any oilier 
department of the city government. For years this city bus been 
trying to get a decent place fur its dead.- The recent agitation of 
the Women's Society fur the Prevention of Public Abuses ban had 
the good effect (if arousing a public sentiment on the Morgue 
question, which will not be subdued until the Supervisors pro- 
vide a proper place in a separate building for the Morgue. 



AT an entertainment given by the people of St. Paul's Church, 
on last Monday evening, according to the programme, "Good 
Tidings" was recited by Christopher Buckley. Was that ironical 
or merely a peculiarly happy coincidence in name and subject? 
The original Christopher has been reciting good tidings ever since 
the Supreme Court was heard from on the Grand Jury matter. 



THE Texan cowboys who captured a train and put off a Chi- 
cago drummer because he wore a red cravat and a high silk 
hat, should receive the thanks of many thousands who have suf- 
fered silently from the red cravat and silk hat combination for 
some time. A man who so attires himself is a suspicious char- 
acter, and should not be allowed in the society of cowboys or 
other respectable freebooters. 



SAGE'S dynamiter seems to have many emulators in New 
York, all of whom, it is noticeable, are animated more by a 
desire to become suddenly rich, than to kill any one. The man 
who wanted to examine Vanderbilt's brains to find out the secret 
of his money-making power, had a method in his madness, for 
many perfectly sane men are ready to take oath that Vanderbilt 
and the other Eastern multi-millionaires have brains of abnormal 
construction, with a particularly large amount of gray matter, 
which is devoted exclusively to acquisitiveness. 



THE newspaper correspondents will have a hard time of it, if 
the Chilean war does not come off, according to dates. After 
75,000 men have been called for, according to fakirs, ships-of-war 
prepared for action, and President Harrison and his cabinet 
attired in their uniforms, it will be bitterly disappointing to the 
space writers if war be not declared. Among the disappointed 
will also be the gentlemen at the Naval Reserve, who recently 
smelled powder on the San Francisco, and also learnedjmuch re- 
garding the manipulation of a derrick in repelling boarders. 

THE local Democrats want harmony in the party, and the 
County Committee has clothed itself in samite and entered 
upon a highly moral campaign, in which the usual "hurrah" 
methods are not to be indulged in. Buckley is of course a dead 
duck (according to the reformers), but it is very remarkable how 
strong bis "recent" followers are in the County Committee. 
That body is yet in the hands of the Boss, and if he return, his 
boast that he would have revenge may prove no idle one. Heroic 
measures are needed to rid San Francisco of this incubus. If the 
local Democracy would succeed at the polls let it purge itself of 
all tbe remnants of Buokleyism. His name is as a curse. It will 
kill any ticket. All known Buckleyites should be got rid of as 
soon as possible. 

CALIFORNIA has received a generous allowance of space at the 
World's Fair, 24,000 feet within the walls of the horticultural 
building having been awarded us, besides several thousand feet of 
table space for an exhibition of fruits. Most of this space will 
doubtless go to Southern California, the leading counties of which 
section are acting together in an endeavor to make the exhibition 
of California citrus fruits at the Fair one unequaled in the dis- 
plays of any similar exposition. It is thought that the northern 
citrus belt will also contribute to the display, and the people of 
Auburn and vicinity are now [exerting themselves to make a 
proper representation of their resources at Chicago. California 
will probably be called on for a large number of palms and other 
tropical trees and plants for general decorative purposes. The 
Commissioners, who will meet in this city on the 12th inst., are 
all active, energetic men, who fully appreciate the magnitude of 
the work they have undertaken, and who intend to make the 
State's exhibit at Chicago one that will arouse the envy of the 
world, and cause thousands of desirable immigrants to come to 
us, so that they may enjoy our bounties. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 



NEW YEAR SUGGESTIONS. 



THE year 1S02 comes to us like a young giant, fall of strength 
and promise. Its record will have to be a good one to beat 
that of its immediate predecessor, but we are strong in the faith 
that it will. The causes, whose effects are good times, appear to 
be present in an exceptional degree Large production, great 
business activity, and more than the average chance for money 
making are to distinguish the new year now close upon us, or we 
have been students of the signs that indicate material prosperity 
to little purpose. The past year, as we have said, will be bard to 
beat. It has done excellently well for California, and our country, 
as a whole, has had reason to be more than satisfied. Even that 
chronic grumbler, the farmer, has been silenced. This time last 
year the " croaker " was abroad in the land, and made us all 
fearfully acquainted with his presence, through his lamentable 
predictions of what was about to befall him and bis. The coun- 
try, it was declared, was going to the " demnition bow-wows," 
unless something was speedily done to save it. The farmers of 
the Great West were denominated the back-bone of the country, 
without which it could not get along. Yet they, strange to say, 
proclaimed that they had lost their own back-bone. They were 
disheartened, and demanded that the Government should come 
to their aid, and do all sorts pf things for them that they were 
better able to do for themselves. The Farmers' Alliance was one 
of the outcomes of that period. It is the most worthy fact of 
that time that, whilst the farmers were willing to be helped by 
their fellow-contributors to the National Treasury, they kept 
their powder dry. In other words, they helped themselves, and, 
as is usually the case when men do that. Providence was not long 
in giving them a lift out of the rut in which they assumed to be 
stuck fast. They put in crops which turned out splendidly, and, 
large as they were, a hungry world supplied more than mouths 
enough to consume them all, and, as a consequence, prices are 
high, and will, almost certainly, be higher. Thus ended the oc- 
cupation of the croaker. It was a valuable lesson, that may well 
be improved at this time. 

The trouble with all too many of our people is that they do not 
sufficiently trust the land to which they have fallen heir?. By 
"trusting the land" we do not alone mean relying upon its 
capacity to grow wheat, or corn, or fruit, or edibles merely : 
although these are matters of tremendous importance. We were, 
however, thinking of the natural wealth of the country in a 
broader sense than in its capacity to produce the fruits of the 
earth. We were thinking of it in comparison with other lands, 
and of the incomparable manner in which it distances them all in 
everything that goes to make a country rich in resources not sup- 
plied by the art of man. Its vast forests, its great watercourses, its 
inexhaustible fields of coal, iron and other minerals, the enormous 
area and capacity of its fertile soil, its natural oil and gas wells, 
and the many other sources of wealth natural to the land in 
which we live, stamp it — we do most verily believe — as a heritage 
reserved by a special providence, until men were prepared to love 
liberty, practice the arts of peace, and further the progress of 
civilization. If, as a people, Amer cans err in one thing more 
than another, we jare persuaded it is not sufficiently realizing 
and trusting the destined greatness of their country. If they had 
less inventive genius than they happily have, or were endowed 
with only half the mechanical skill they possess, or were like 
Samson, shorn of their locks and reduced to the average physical 
stamina of, say, the South American Latin races, the United 
States would still become rich and powerful. A country with its 
teeming natural wealth, could not be kept poor in these days of 
railroads and steam lines, even though it were given up to a 
much less virile people. We say, then, that if we will but trust 
the land, we shall never have much to complain of in the way of 
material prosperity. But we must twist it by showing our con- 
fidence in it, in much the same manner that the farmers of the 
West did. They continued to till it. We, in like manner, must 
not only cultivate it: we must search out all its possibilities, and 
with these revealed, there need be no hard times in this highly 
favored country. 

True as this is in regard to the country as a whole, the people 
of the Pacific Coast have the happy felicity to know that it is, in 
even a more emphatic sense, true of California. In no siaylar 
area in all the world is there such an enjoyable variety of climate, 
such a wide range of products useful and agreeable to man, or 
such an abundance of riches in the form of natural wealth. Our 
people are depending more and more upon the land each recurring 
year. Yet there is room for improvement in this direction. Too 
many able-bodied men, aye, and women, too, crowd our cities and 
live by their wits. They should betake themselves to the country, 
where the soil only waits to be tickled by the plow in order to 
laugh into a beautiful harvest. If they are poor, they can get 
employment. If they have a little money, they can easily secure 
enough land to begin with, and with either employment or money, 
they need not doubt the future. With a prosperous new year, 
there will be, in the main, a happy new year, and that is what 
the News Lettek wishes its readers everywhere. 



JUDGE WALLACE. 

JUDGE WALLACE is conceded on all sides to be a man of 
high legal attainments, and, of course, nobody doubted that 
if he chose to violate the proprieties of his position, and, from 
the Bench, attack his official superiors, he would bring much 
learning and legal acumen to his assistancp. But we venture the 
assertion that no jurist in this State, or any other, will approve 
the course he sa.w -fit to pursne the other day. For the Court 
below to sit in judgment upon the reversal of its own decision by 
the Court above, is to inaugurate a new departure in jurispru- 
dence that violates the best traditions of the Bench and Bar; that 
is calculated to bring the law and its administrators into con- 
tempt, and to cause the average man to rebel against both. It 
may be that, in order to accomplish a political end, Judge Wallace 
intended his revolutionary methods to result in just that kind of 
rebellion. But if that be the role upon which he has intentionally 
entered — and no man I etter comprehends the logic of his own 
acta than be — the ermine should not be used as a cloak 
to cover his designs, nor to shield him from their consequences. 
He not only assumed to sit in judgment on the Appellate Court; 
he pre- u rued to* insinuate that which even the ignorant could 
understand, hue which he did not find the courage to say. He 
harangued for s'lne two hours a Grand Jury functus officio, and 
with whom he had therefore nothing more to do, save to dismiss 
them. To serve a personal end he violated the intent and spirit of 
the order of the Court above for two hours, and, even more, be 
permitted and thanked the Dick, Tom and Jerry, he bad, without 
color of law. packed into the jury-box to cowardly slander the 
Judges elected to give him the law, and he even thanked the retiring 
riff-raff for defiling the records of his Court with a document that 
might well put a Billingsgate fish woman to blush. It greatly 
aggravates Judge Wallace's offenses that he is an ex-Chief Justice 
of the State. He has been on the Supreme Bench, and knows 
the duty due it by the Courts below, and which duty no Supreme 
Judge was ever more imperious in exacting than he. The trouble 
with Judge Wallace is that be is an able man run wild through 
disappointed ambition. Unable to regain a seat on the Supreme 
Bench, he became Buckley's tool to pull his railroad chestnuts 
out of the fire, promulgated the monstrous doctrine that rail- 
roads were public and not private property, burnt bis fingers, 
and has been nursing his sores ever since, with the result that 
they are sorer to-day than ever. 



SENATOR JONES' VIEWS. 



SENATOR JOHN P. JONES, of Nevada, is a friend of the Ad- 
ministration, a clear thinker, a cautious speaker, and a safe 
man generally. He does not often submit to the »' interviewer," 
but when be does, it is because he has something to say. He is 
spending the holidays at hia Santa Monica home, and there has 
had himself interviewed, because be evidently thinks he is in the 
line of duty in referring to a matter that is ot special public inter- 
est at this time. He regrets that this country has not treated 
Chile with " greater forbearance and patience," and thinks it 
should have » made allowance for the fact that at the time of the 
Baltimore incident there was no well-established government, and 
that mob rule had not yet been supplanted by the civil author- 
ities." The Senator fears that wise counsels are not prevailing, 
and that there may be needless strife, that will prove inconvenient 
to Pacific Coast interests. That is the view this journal has ex- 
pressed from the beginning. He agrees with the News Letter 
that Seiior Matta's letter completely turns the tables on Blaine. 
As the matter is assuming serious importance, we print in parallel 
columns Blaine's dispatch to Italy and Chile's dispatch to Blaine: 



Blaine to Italy. 
"Even if i he National tjovern- 
meut had the eutire juri.-dictiou 
over the alleeed murderer-, it could 
not give assurauce to any foreign 
power that they should he punished. 
The Pres dent is unable to s-re hnw 
auy government coul" j 1 1 > 1 1 y give 
an assurance of this character in ad- 
vance of a trial and a verdict of 
guilty. I have informed Barou Fava 
that the unhappy tragi dy at New 
Orleans will be must thoroughly in- 
vestigated * * lint this Govern- 
ment will uot permit itself to be un- 
duly hurried, uor will it make 
answer to auy demand until every 
faci essential to a judgment is ascer- 
tained by legal authority." 



Chile to Blaine. 
"The MiuUter of Foreign Affairs 
can only rec- guize the jurisdiction 
and authority of nis own couutry to 
judire and punish the guilty in 
Chi eau territory. The Adminis- 
trative and judicial minorities are 
investigating the matter under 
Chilean law in teeret, but the time 
has not yet arrived to make known 
the result When that time does ar- 
rive he will communicate the re- 
sult, although he does not recognize 
auy other authority compeieuc to 
judge criminal cases than that estab- 
lished by the Chilean people He can 
see nothing iu this delay that should 
imperil the frieudly relations be 
tweeu the two countries." 



THE South of the Park Improvement Club has shown com- 
mendable enterprise in pushing the building of the ocean 
boulevard. This boulevard scheme has been discussed for de- 
eades, and now that it is at last fairly under way, the work should 
be continued rapidly until it is completed. The boulevard will 
be elevated, one hundred feet wide and two miles long, extending 
along the ocean beach fron the Park to the pueblo line. It will 
be macadamized and rolled, and put in as fine condition as the 
Park driveways. The boulevard should be very popular, as it 
will be a driveway unequaled in the world. 



Jan. 2. 1 



BAN KK ^NCISCO NEWS I ETTER, 



THE GRAND JURY S J^REMIADE. 



TBI iftimimm wrrba of the Grand Jury** report is before US. It 
b a remarkable— a eery remarkable document. In the name 
of all that the ootnmonesi of our oommon schools ought t « » have 
done, but failed to do. w ho \% r.-u- || : Korenmn Henley repudiates 
having bad a band in it? construction. It was hardly nee 
he should have taken the trouble, for by no possibility could it 
have entered any sane man's bead that a member of a " learned " 
profession bad anything to do with it. A crazy-quilt in the ir- 
regularity of its construction, a jumble of pieces out of a school- 
boy's puzzle box in the difficulty of matting its parts tit together, 
a lover'? maze in the almost superhuman effort required to find 
its logical beginning or end, or to tuake head or tail of it, it is a 
mass of pretentious words strung together without regard to 
sense, fact, or the simplest requirements of the English language. 
We had not supposed it within the region of imaginable possibili- 
ty that a "specially selected" Grand Juryman could have fathered 
such a document, and the surprise to all but the veriest ignoram- 
uses is, that so learned and distinguished a jurist as \V. T. Wallace 
did not take precautions to prevent an occasion, which for him 
was a very important one, being belittled and discredited by an 
official document that would have disgraced a ten-year-old boy 
oat of a bedge school fifty years ago. To give such parts of the 
report as justify this description would be to quote nearly the 
whole document, and that would be a fraud upon our space and 
a failure to give our subscribers their money's worth. 

To give a fair idea of the courage of the whole, it is very safe 
to judge it by the parts we are about to give. It is worse in some 
other places, and nowhere better. The essential element of a 
Grand Jury report is that it shall be true, and it is manifestly not 
that on its face when it reports one fact two opposite ways. Of 
that kind of thing the precious document contains several more 
or less pronounced specimens. For reasons, not alone known to 
himself, the Grand Jury's singular scribe desired to placate the 
school teachers, and with that end in view, proceeded to say : 
" The teachers, with few exceptions, are efficient instructors of our 
youth, and tbe citizens of San Francisco have just cause to be 
proud of this department of our city government." Without 
stopping to inquire how he knew the " efficient instructors " were 
" few " or many, we pass on to what he says of the department 
in bis very next paragraph: "This system (appointment by in- 
dividual Directors of their friends, political and otherwise) has 
engendered a greed for patronage which has filled our schools with 
a large number of useless teachers. * * Members of the Board 
are loaded down with pledges to appoint their political friends, 
irrespective of their fitness for tbe position. * * Glaring de- 
fects have grown up in the course of years, which will, in time, 
destroy the usefulness of our schools. * * If less were tp3nt on 
teachers not required, there would be ample funds to furnish suit- 
able accommodation to every child applying for admission. * * 
Sorue of tbe class-rooms are unfit for human habitation." Yet 
we are told we should be proud of the department! In other 
words, what is described as white in one part of the report, is 
pronounced black, and very black at that, only a few lines further 
on. One statement or the other must be false, and coming from 
a Grand Juror, sworn to find nothing but the truth, is a reckless 
proceeding, to which the law gives another name. 

A judicial body, such as a Grand Jury is, bound by law, 
propriety, and the requirements of a good example, is made 
to blow hot and cold in its treatment of its official 
superiors, the popularly elected Supreme Judges of the 
State. We are told that they decided against ■« tbe law, the right, 
and the truth," and that " when there is r.o confidence in the 
law-giver, there can be no virtue in the law." In the very next 
breath we are assured that "this apothegm cannot, perhaps, be 
applied to this body (the Supreme Court) for it has been selected 
by the people and they (sic) must be assumed to be righteous and 
honorable men." This kind of cowardice marks the entire docu- 
ment. Although it is full of the tallest kind of talk about rascals, 
no names are mentioned, save those of Bruner and Buckley, 
whom it was safe to name, because everybody bad named them 
already. Yet it would have been of all things interesting to learn 
who the o vultures " are, who are " eating into our vitals," rend- 
ering " Christian civilization impossible," and who, if not speed- 
ily overtaken and punished, will " cause organi/.edjsociety to per- 
ish." Talk of this kind, born of the stump, is well enough in its 
way, at a political meeting, but is altogether out of place in an 
official presentment by a Grand Jury, unless backed by names, 
facts, dates and proofs. A Grand Jury has every right to indict 
men for proven crime, but no right whatever to kill them by 
innuendo. It's sworn duty is to protect them from that sort 
of thing. Great evils, undoubtedly afflict this community, but it 
has happily been spared tbe greatest evil of all: the Grand In- 
quisition of the county has been saved from falling into the 
hands of disgruntled politicians, disappointed place-seekers, and 
men gangre-ned by private malice, The Supreme Court'i decision 
finds it's sufficient justification for setting this jury aside in the 
stupidly ignorant and cowardly document to which we have not 
space to further allude. 



THE FIRST OF THE INVESTIGATIONS 

THE tir-t of the many investigations likely to be Instituted by 
tin- Congress baa just been ordered. Tbe honesty ol the 
Pension Bureau has long i»rt*n doubted, and now the bottom fact* 
are to be got at by a Special Committee of tbe blouse. Lei oa 
bope that tbe Bureau « II come out unscathed, for || would be " 
humiliating Fact to discover that even the soldier's pensions were 
nol safe from tbe marauders of tbe period. Tbe charges, how- 
ever, are not of a very reinsuring nature. General B 
Iteved i" be fn league with the pension agents; in fact, the pnrt- 
ner of tbe most unscrupulous of tbenii and to he managing the 
Pension Bureau in their interest, lie is known to have been in- 
terested financially in a doubtful refrigerator enterprise, and to 
have practically forced employes in the Bureau to take stock in 
it by giving them to understand that they would thereby improve 
their chances of promotion. Me is said to have violated tbe civil 
service rules repeatedly in regard to changes among his officers. 
His own son was detected in taking money of the Bureau entrusted 
to his care, and in appointments which were obtained oy surrep- 
titious examinations, and was allowed to resign by the Presi- 
, dent. Baum's most recent offense is charged to be his seeking to 
I have discharged from the Government service three officers who 
' exposed his son's rascalities. The most serious charges against 
| him have been made in the New York Tribune, the leading or- 
gan of the administration. The pension appropriations are so 
large that enormous thefts are possible somewhere between tbe 
Bureau and the soldier's pockets. 



WHO IS TO BLAME? 



T 



HE NEWS LETTER pursued Buckley during the whole course 
1 of bis evil public career, and brought more of bis acts of wrong- 
doing to light than all - of its contemporaries put together, 
ruany of whom extended him aid indirectly, which they dare not 
have vouchsafed openly. Even certain of tbe most active of the 
recent illegal Grand Jury were then his pals, and never tired of 
inveighing against this journal for its opposition to the great, tbe 
successful and only possible leader. The question is now being 
discussed as to who was to blame for this man's bold on power. 
The only fair statement in the whole of the illegal Grand Jury's 
report refers to that point. When it is said that tbe corporations 
which " came down " at his bidding, made him what he was, that 
is said which is not true? Somebody else made him to their great 
cost. The money which first enabled him to carry the primaries 
made him. After that he was master of the situation. He then 
controlled " tbe machine " that ground out nominations and made 
judges, supervisors and legislators. He avowed that he ran poli- 
tics for coin, and so it came that there was not an act that an 
official could perform, but could be had by purchase. The cor- 
porations were in turn given trouble until they were compelled 
"to step round and see him." That is his history in brief. Such 
history is now in process of repeating itself. Crimmins and Kelly 
are being given a greater hold on power than he ever possessed, 
and are being given it quietly, whilst " the dear people " are pur- 
suing a false scent after a drowned rat. 



THE LATEST LEGISLATIVE COMBINE. 



FAYLOR'S "combine" of Senators, who cleaned up $7,000 fur 
their two years' term, have been improved upon in an open 
way down in Brazil. It took Congress there fifty days to pass 
its first important bill. It related to members' salaries. Tbe 
precedents hrought out in the debate on that important public 
question showed that the stipend of the members of the first 
Constituent Assembly, after the separation from Portugal, was 
ff 1,200 a year. That amount continued to be paid to members of 
Parliament down to 1873, when the change was made to the rate 
of $37 50 a legislative day for Senators and $25 a day for Deputies. 
A natural indifference to the length of sessions was observable 
under that arrangement, and was used as an argument for not 
continuing it under the Republic. But a proposition to make the 
pay $500 for tbe whole session was voted down and the old plan 
of payment by the day adopted. There arose a dispute between 
the two houses over the amount tbe members of each should re- 
ceive. It was finally agreed that genuine republican principles 
required equality of payment, and, as tbe Senator would not come 
down, the Deputies agreed to go up, and the rate for both was 
fixed at $37.50. So it came that each member received $1,875 for 
the trouble of voting it, and expected to go on at the same rate as 
long as his term of three years lasted. Yet our well-informed 
dailies have been abusing Fonseca fordissolving such a Congress. 
It ia back again, however. 

THE cbildrens' day at the Park should be made an annual insti- 
tution. Three thousand happy orphans, loaded with presents, 
and burdened with go d dinners and countless pop-corn balls and 
candies, is a sight to make ev- n an old Scrouge happy. The Park 
Commie-oners are deserving of high praise lor the active interest 
taken by them in all charitable matters, and for the willing aid 
they always extend whenever it is in their power to assist a pop- 
ular movement. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 




ASIDE from the usual preparations for, and festivities conse- 
quent upon, the Christtuasiide, last week was compara- 
tively quiet in society circles. Christmas trees and Christmas 
dinners were thealmost exclusive thought in every home, and the 
season was very thoroughly enjoyed in the family circle. One 
of the most enjoyable of the Christmas eve parties, was that 
arranged by Mrs. Volney Spalding at the Bella Vista, where a 
gorgeous Christmas tree, laden with gifts for the young, was the 
chief feature of the early hours. Then came dancing and supper 
fur the elders, and afterwards more dancing until far on toward 
njorning. 



Tuesday evening, the first of the regular hops of the season, 
which will be given on alternate Tuesday nights, took place at 
the Presidio, where the hop-room was prettily trimmed with green 
boughs and red berries. 

Irving Hall presented a very attractive appearance during the 
week, the ladies of the Church of the Advent holding therein 
their Cnristuias Bazar in aid of the Building Fund. An excellent 
lunch was spread each day, and in the evening varied perform- 
ances were given. 



Mrs. John Landers' recent tea was a very pleasant gathering. 
The decorations of the house were distinctly Christmas in their 
character, and daylight was carefully excluded. Mrs. Fred Tal- 
lant assisted her mother in receiving, and the rooms were crowd- 
ed during the entire time of the reception. The " Christmas Mar- 
ket," given by Mrs. Tallant at her residence on Bush street, was 
an old idea under a new name. It was in aid of the Girl's Home, 
one of the charities under the direction of Trinity Church, of 
which congregation Mrs. Tallant has long been a prominent mem- 
ber, and resulted in netting over four hundred dollars. The 
Muses May Pope, Edith Taylor, and Nellie Tubbs presided at the 
different tables, and proved themselves to be efficient sales- 
women. 



One of the pleasantest recent events was the party given on 
Wednesday evening, the 16ih, by Mrs. Preston Robinson, at the 
Fleasanton, when her daughter, Miss Edna, made her formal 
debut in society. There was general dancing until after supper, 
when a few figures of the German were danced, under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Greenway. 



The last Friday Night Cotillion was a decided failure, in point 
of attendance, which was far below the average. Tho**e who 
were there had a pleasant evening, with plenty of room for 
dancing. The figures, led by Mr. Geurge Vernon Grey, were 
pretty, though none of them new, and the supper was, as usual, 
excellent. 



The bal poudre, which will take place on Friday night of next 
week, promises to be the cotillion of the season.which will prove 
the most successful, as all the members announce their inten- 
tion of "going to it if to none of the others." For it, the young 
ladies are reserving their chuicest and most becoming costumes. 
Miss Emdy Hager will lead it solus, and there will be a number 
of handsome favors presented by her. 



The exodus of fashion to Monterey for the holidays results in 
a comparative quiet in social circles in town this week also. 
However, for those who remained in the city, a good time has 
not been lacking. There have been numerous holiday musical 
gatherings, and among other entertainments, the hop at the 
Berkshire and the reception of the Crocker Auxiliary, at the Old 
People's Home, on Tuesday evening ; the receptions at the San 
Francisco Verein and Concordia clubs, the hop at the Hotel 
Pleasanton, the private theatricals and dance at the Bella Vista, 
and the usual St. Sylvester supper at the Julius B\indiuann's on 
Thursday evening; the reception at the Maria Kip Orphanage 
taking place on Saturday. 



The wedding of Miss Mary Williams and Mr. Seymour Davison, 
which took place at the Williams residence on Fillmore street, on 
the 16lh, was one of the prettiest home weddings which has oc 
curred for some time. Tne decorations of the parlors, which was 
the work of a number of young friends of the bride, were par- 
ticularly beautiful, combining the flowers of the season with 
foliage most artistically arranged. At 9 o'clock the wedding j 
party entered the room and took their places in the bridal bower, 
beneath the wedding bell, where the Rev, Mr. Bolton performed 
the marriage service; the bride's sister, Miss Weenonah Williams, 
appearing as maid of honor, the groom being supported by Mr. 
Rothwell Hyde as best man. Five little maids, the Misses Elsie 
Tallant, Ann Williams, Moilie Dutton, Maud Luty and Beth 
Thompson, led the cortege as the party came upon the scene, 
wearing gowns of white India silk made in the style of the first 
Empire, and each carried a Calla lily tied with yellow ribbons. 



The bridal robe was a combination of white satin, with a long 
court train of white brocade trimmed with orange blossoms, and 
a vail of white nmleine. The costume of the maid of honor was 
of corn-colored crepe de Chine. After the ceremony there was 
dancing followed by supper, and an inspection of the many 
handsome and valuable gifts to the young couple. The honey- 
moon is being spent at Del Monte. 

The Fisher-Jennings wedding was one of the events of last 
Wednesday, the ceremony taking place at the home of the bride, 
on Sutter street, the Rev. Dr. Williams, of Plymouth Church, 
officiating, in the presence of relatives and intimate friends only. 
The honeymoon is being spent in Southern California, and upon 
their return to San Francisco, Tuesdays will be the reception day 
of Mrs. Fisher. 

Mr. Charles Rollo Peters and Miss Catherine Francis Murphy 
were married on Wednesday last, and departed the same after- 
noon for Europe, expecting to remain a couple of years abroad. 
The wedding of Dr. Briggs and Miss Rideout was solemnized on 
Thursday evening, at the residence of the bride's mother, on 
Washington street. 

The Church Club, which is headed by Bishop Nichols, and 
composed of the other Episcopal clergy of San Francisco, con- 
templates giving a reception, at the Occidental Hotel, some time 
during January. 

During the stay of the San Francisco in port last week, numer- 
ous parties of the officers' friends visited the vessel. On Tuesday 
several of the personal staff of the Commanding General, with 
their respective wives, were entertained at luncheon on board by 
Admiral Brown; and on Wednesday General, Mrs. and Miss 
Ruger were the guests of the Admiral on board the cruiser. The 
San Francisco sailed on Saturday last, presumably for Chilean 
waters. 



Miss Mattie Gibbs has gone to spend Christmas with her sister, 
Mrs. Stafford, at St. Louis; Miss Minnie Houghton will be with 
her sister, Mrs. Bulkeley in New Haven for the New Year holi- 
day; Miss Alice Gritfeth will pass most of the winter at the East, 
visiting Miss Jennie McLane, who was so lately her guest in San 
Francisco, at the home of the McLane's at Baltimore; and Miss 
Alice Ziska has gone to Vancouver, Washington, to visit the 
family of General Kautz, where she will remain until the end of 
January. Miss Jennie Sanderson, who will be another loss to 
our young society, will not, however, depart until the spring, 
when she purposes joining her mother and sisters in Paris, and 
remaining there with them. 

Del Monte is again this year the scene of a large holiday gath- 
ering, many of oar social lights preferring to spend that season 
there rather than in the city. Among the guests are Col. Fred 
Crocker and his family, Mrs. M. A. Easton, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
T.Scott and Miss Cunningham; Mr. and Mrs. Webster Jones, 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Eastland, Captain and Mrs. Taylor, Miss Edith 
Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Tubbs, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Tubbs, 
Miss Nettie Tubbs, Mrs. and Miss Pope, Mr. and Mrs. H. M. A. 
Miller, George Pope, Dan Murphy and many others. 



Mr. and Miss Pullman, who spent a part of last week at the 
Palace Hotel, are now settled in comfortable quarters at Santa 
Barbara, where they will remain all winter. Mrs. Pullman's 
mother, Mrs. Sanger, is with them. 



Captain and Miss Collier have taken a bouse in town for the 
rest of the winter season. Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Wilshire have re- 
turned from their visit East. Mrs. George M. Stoney, with her 
children, returned from China by the City of Peking. Mr. D. 0. 
Mills has returned to New York from a visit hereof several 
weeks. Senator and Mrs. Stanford are now occupying their resi- 
dence on K street, in Washington. Mr. M. M. Estee is at the 
National Capital, as were also Mr. and Mrs. W. Hinckley Taylor 
when last heard from. 



Another of our heiresses is announced to be engaged to a New 
Yorker, the bride-elect being Miss Agnes McDonough, who is 
spending this winter with her aunt, Mrs. Maria Coleman, in 
Washington City, and her fulur is Mr. John G. Agar, a lawyer of 
Gotham. Mr. and Mrs. Fred May, who have just returned from 
Eirrope, are also the guests of Mrs. Coleman, with whom they 
will remain until their handsome new house is ready to receive 
them. 



Miss Jessie Bowie, who, since her return from Mrs. Collier's, at 
Clear Lake, has been passing some weeks with her brother and 
bis wife. Dr. Hamilton and Mrs. Bowie, at San Mateo, is now 
visiting some friends at Berkeley. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bowie 
were in Chicago last week. 



The wedding of Miss Hilda Siessinger and Mr. M. A. Roth- 
child will take place at the New California Hotel, Monday even- 
ing, January 18th. On the following day the young couple will 
leave for the Hawaiian Islands, where they will spend their 
honeymoon. 

[Continued on Page 25.] 



Jan. 2 IR»2 



SAN FR INCISi NEWS I ETTER. 



NEW YiAR CUSTOMS 



TU ni»rk with ceremonial-. .\: .1 SnMing ih* hour when the 
tir-ptrtinpr year pcivr* plan to a custom thai 

mu>t he a« oM »« humanity. f«"r a* far back as can be traced writ fa 
any certainty. evMenors are F>mnd ••( it* having been observed as 
i religious festival. It wu also the custom of the Ancients 10 
ntTer at each ilmes apnn ibe t" iibs <■( their sooestors, g'(u to the 
departe«l. and the practice Mill continues in China. India and 
other barbaric countries. Tli** presentation of gifts is therefore 
nn modern idea. It is older then L'hri»ttanlty. The oostom is 
mentioned by two Roman writers, Suetonius and Tacltns, 
na the early Saxon*., gift making formed a portion Of the 
New Year festival. Henry lit exit rted New Year presents from 
. 'ject«. and the Knghsh carried Ibe habit to excess during 
the rei*n of BIlKSbfitb. The li-t <>( yearly presents to the Virgin 
y leen included valuable ornament" for her palaces, costly articles 
of personal adornment, both dresses and jewels, and well filled 
purses. Gloves were the most ravorite article to bestow upon 
friends at this period, as well a« the newly invented pins, both of 
which were wry high priced. Merry makings approprinle to the 
observance of New Year's Day, .ire also of very ancient date. 
In England, in olden time, every fanny, and every monastery also, 
bad its bowl of spiced ale called H'.>.. nail, from the Saxon phrase 
IrTus-Aaef— to your health, li was the custom of poor people to 
carry a bowl, decked with ribhons. to the doors of the rich, 
begging, with songs suitable to the occasion, for something to fill 
ii : a petition never denied. Krom this wassail bowl sprang the 
Loving Cup. a double handled II igon of sweetened and spiced ale, 
which, at Corporation Feasts in London, was passed to the left 
from the person who presided, till it made the circuit of the board, 
all standing as they drank. 

t'ntil 1S12. among the superstitious Scotch, the first person, 
who, on New Year's eve, entered a house after midnight, was. 
termed the First Foot. That luck might come to the family, his 
hands should he full of cakes, etc., consequently at midnight the 
heads of families provided with kettles of wassail, buns, short- 
cakes, 'bread and cheese, would sally out to visit each others' 
houses, where they called every member of the household to eat 
and drink what they brought. When the parties met in the 
Mreet. each drank from the others' kettle, and the streets in 
Edinburgh were more thronged at midnight that at noonday. But 
in the above-mentioned year, some revelers were set upon, sev- 
eral dying from the injuries received, an event which proved a 
fatal blow to tue custom. The old Roman calenders contained 
more holidays than working days. We of this generation are 
slaves to fortune, and festivals are now few and far between. In 
England, especially, New Year's Day is usually the busiest day 
in the whole year. Some see the old year out with feasting, 
dancing and games, but many consider the occasion too serious 
for levities, and flock to the churches, where midnight services 
are held. With the Germans, New Year's eve is a time of uni- 
versal feasting and merriment. The festival is generally ob- 
served by great crowds congregating together for the purpose of 
carousing. Midnight services are held in the various churches, 
some being crowded to suffocation. The next day the doors of 
wealthy families are besieged by dependents and servitors, who 
are seldom turned away euipiy-bamied. In France, New Year's 
Day is a jour defete. Everybody gives to everybody else For 
days previous to the great occasion, that quarter in Paris de- 
voted to the confectioners is almost impassable, so densely 
blocked is it with vehicles loaded with confections for the pro- 
vinces. Parisian bon-honnieres are marvels of art and ingenuity; 
formed in every conceivable shape; suited to every taste, and 
one may do the correct thing equally, by presenting to a friend 
some trifling, inexpensive, yet dainty little box of candies, or 
make a valuable* o£yc( cte vertu, a receptacle for bon-bons. 

fn Dublin the first of January is observed as a public holiday 
but this is because of its being Lord Mayor's Day. Early in the 
forenoon a procession, formed of the outgoing and incoming Lord 
Mayors, the former riding in the glass coach presented to the city 
by William HI., the latter following in his private carriage, takes 
its way, attended by Councilmen, Aldermen, a troop of cavalry 
and police, to the Guildhall, where the new Lord Mayor is form- 
ally inaugurated. Returning, the newly-made official occupies 
the glass coach, while his predecessor rides behind in his own 
more modest conveyance. # 

In the United States the first day of the New Year has always 
been observed as calling-day by the gentlemen, ladies keeping 
open house to receive them. This custom is still continued in 
many portions of the country, though of late years it has been 
inure honored in the breach than the observance. 

The Japanese celebrate January 1st very much as Americans 
do, but add to it as many days as they think necessary for begin- 
ning another year in proper style. They are great callers. In- 
timate friends are received with great ceremony, and are elabor- 
ately entertained, while mere acquaintances exchange cards 
simply. But instead of stopping when midnight ushers in an- 
other day, they keep on until they have paid each person of their 
uncial circle a New Year visit. 



^PRICE'S 




Powder 



Used in Millions of Homes — 10 years the Standard. 



'MORNING PRAYER," 



BY LEE LASH. 

Tbis Wonderfully ltealistic Picture, Representing 

Morning Prayers at the OIJ Feopfe's Home, 

HAS JD3T BEEN COMPLETED, 
AND WILL BE ON EXHIBITION AT THE 

BIJOU THEATRE, 

From 10 a. m to 10 p. M., 

Commencing Monday, December 28 



EXHIBITION TO BE FOR THE 

Benefit of the Old People's Home, 

AND CONDUCTED UNDER THE DIRECTION 

—OF THE— 

BOARD OF LADY MANAGERS OF THE HOME. 

ADMISSION, 25 CENTS. 
TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Bros .. . . Proprietors and Managers. 

To-Night— Our New Spectacular Burlesque, 

THE ISLAND OF ZENOBAR ; 

Or, Princess Benedict ! 

Catchy Misic! *Wilty Dialogue! Scenic *e*lth! Gorgeous Oo-tuines! 

Numerous specialties! 
THE AGE OF PROGRESS, by OSCaR L. Fe t. 

POPCLAK PRrCES . . . 



25c. and 50c. 



TH: TEKPLE. 



J. B. Francis 



. .Proprietor and Manager. 



Turk Street, near Taylor. 



First Class Cone rt Hall and f-amily Resort. 
A Tremendous Hit ! 

VIENNA LADIES' OROHESTRA I 

Vocal Selection-* by well-known Artists. Performance every Evening, 8 
to 12. Sunday Matiuee from 2 to 5. 
Admission 10 aud 20 cents 

DR. J. H. STALLARD 

— AND — 

Dr. J. CLARK, 

^=X3LlZ:STC:T-£s-2X'3, and. STJBCrEON-S, 
632 Sutter Street 

A. LUSK & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Packers of the following celebrated brands: 

CELEBRATED LUSK BRANDS. 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY, 

SAN LORENZO PACKING CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 




L^JjigMwj) 



" We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore 

LAST Monday night found the San Francisco theatre-goer with- 
out a single first-night performance at the leading theatres. 
The only opening announced, that of the Carleton Opera Com- 
pany in Queen Indigo at the Baldwin, did not come off, and all 
the other places of amusement, except the Orpheum, were run- 
ning second weeks. The Carleton company was, at the time ad- 
vertised for its appearance, several hours' time out on the road, 
The disappointed opera-seeker should have gone to the Orpheum 
— perhaps he did. He would have seen and heard there Balfe's 
musical and always popular Bohemian Girl, not, perhaps, with the 
perfect ensemble of the Carleton company, certainly not with its 
elegance of costuming and scenic display, but well interpreted 
and well sung by a very clever company, and with an extremely 
creditable stage presentation. Miss Tellula Evans, as Arline, was 
graceful and interesting, as well as tuneful, and showed herself at 
her best, Henry Hallani, as Thaddeus, made a distinct success, 
and won a large share of the liberal applause by his fine tenor 
voice, spirited singing and pleasing stage presence. Charles H. 
Drew had a congenial role in Devilsboof, and endued that pictur- 
esque and melodious vagabond with a dash and tire characteristic 
alike of the gypsy and Drew. The cast also included Emily 
Soldene as the gypsy queen, Frank Valerga, George Olmi (a noble 
Count Arnheim), and others, who, with a well-rehearsed chorus 
and orchestra, gave the favorite opera a thoroughly enjoyable 
production. Notwithstanding the seeming ill-luck which attends 
the Orpheum (undoubtedly partly due to bad management) Man- 
ager Frank Burrill is making more than a tolerable success, which 
will be increased as the public gradually discovers the genuine 
merit of the entertainment, and also, no doubt, as he gets the 
management of the theatre more into his own hands. The 
Orpheum is accessible, cheap, and thoroughly respectable, and 
should be sustained in an amusement-loving community not 
over-burdened with cash. The next opera wilt be The Princess of 
Trebizonde. 

* # # 

The California is in a pleasant state of excitement over its un- 
expected windfall in E. S. Willard's two weeks' engagement. It 
will doubtless be a brilliant one, as there is a general desire to test 
Mr. Willard's versatility in the abrupt change from the nervous, 
intense, pre-occupied, and nearly worn-out potter, to the 
athletic and wide-awake young end-of-the-century clergyman. 
The California engagement of Mr. Willard begins Monday night, 
January 4th. 

» » » 

The Bush Street will have Dan'l Sully in The Millionaire next 
week. Both actor and play are too well known here to need 
comment in advance, and both are popular. To-night and to- 
morrow are the last nights of U and I. 
» # # 

The Tivoli finds its Christmas spectacle so popular, that it is in 
no hurry to change, and will keep on The Island of Zenobar until 
after the holiday season, at least. The piece is full of life, move- 
ment, color, and catchy music, original and "adapted," or 
adopted; and was, by the way, arranged for the Tivoli stage by 
Harry Gates, for many years leading tenor at the popular opera 
house, and a most reliable member of its company. 

* # # 

" The Temple," on Turk street, near Taylor, is becoming a reg- 
ularly patronized place of resort for a large class of amusement- 
seekers. Plenty of music, with light, warmth, a variety of crea- 
ture comforts, and the privilege of a pipe or cigar, seem attractively 
restful and free-and-easy to the man tired with work, business, or 
conventionality. Ritzau's band of soloists is a lately-added 
attraction, and new features are introduced every week. 

* # » 

The Polish Jewish company already referred to in this column 
as fully deserving of the much-misapplied adjective " unique," is 
to produce Samson at the Powell-street Theatre Sunday night, 
January 3d. There would certainly be no sin in << bowing down 
and worshiping" this company or its performances, as neither 
is "a likeness of anything in the heavens above, the earth be- 
neath, or the waters under the earth." Whoso cravetb a new 
sensation, should get him to the Powell-street Theatre and Samson 
on Sunday night. 

* # » 

The skating rink at the Pavilion has in addition to the charms 
of the rollers and the wheels something new for its patrons every 
night. This week's programme includes Mr. Dan. Canary, a 
famous trick bicyclist, a ladies' sweepstakes race, M'lle. Girard in 
grotesque skating, etc. 

* # * 

Wm. Sherwood, an eminent pianist, and present director of the 
Chicago Auditorium Conservatory of Music, will soon afford our 
musical people something novel and interesting in two lecture- 
recitals. The lectures will be scientific and analytical, yet popu- 



lar in style, so as to interest the mere mnsic-lover no less 
than the musician. The fame of Mr. Sherwood as a pianist is 
European as well as American, and the musical illustrations will 
be a rare pleasure. Owing to Eastern engagements, Mr. Sher- 
wood can give but two lecture-recitals here. They will take place 
Tuesday evening, January 12th, and Thursday afternoon, Janu- 
ary 14th, at Metropolitan Temple. Mr. Sherwood visits this city 
under the management of Marcus M. Henry. 

# » » 

Some one suggested to Marie Wainwright that in her elaborate 
production of Amy Robsart she should adopt a dramatic version 
which deals out poetic justice by letting Amy escape and Varney 
" fall into the pit which he had digged " after the scripturally de- 
fined fashion of the ungodly. But Miss Wainwright adheres to 
Scott, and, as the loving, hapless Amy, takes the plunge in all its 
realistic horror. Miss Wainwright will be seen in Amy Robsart at 
the California before long. 

» # * 

The New York Musical Courier gives its readers a " golden num- 
ber " for a holiday present. On its cover, framed in a broad band 
of gold, is the head of the great Paderewski in all its artistic wild- 
ness and unkempt hairiness. The inside is adorned by life-like 
portraits of Patti, Scalchi, Lilli Lehmann, Marie Van Zand t, Emma 
Eames, Albani, the Ravogli sisters, Oapoul, the two de Reszkes, 
etc. The reading is equally interesting, 

• » # 

Old Californians, as well as patrons of the drama throughout 
the United States, have never forgotten that bright little star, 
Alice Kingsbury, who scintillated through a wide expanse of the 
theatrical heavens for over twenty years. Her name is a spell 
that invokes a host of delightful recollections: a charm all her 
own invests each one of her impersonations with peculiar inter- 
est, and the woman, as well as the actress, receives the sincerest 
respect and admiration. In 18G0 she played a season of ten 
nights at the old Washington Theatre, under Tom Maguire's 
management. Alice Kingsbury, now the widow of the late Col. 
F. M. Cooley, of the Loyal Legion, has been living in San Fran- 
cisco for a number of years, appearing on the stage only at rare 
intervals. On the evening of Thursday, January 7, 1892, at the 
Powell-street Theatre, she will take a benefit and make a farewell 
appearance in a play in which she always ranked at her best — 
Fanchon, the Cricket. Her son, Frank Cooley, already a promising 
young actor, will be in her support. 
|. * • 

The next Musical Sunday Afternoon at Steinway Hall will take 
place January 10th. An unusually fine programme is an- 
nounced. The first of a new series of the Carr-Beel » Pops " is 

set tor Saturday, January I6th. Nelson Decker, long connected 

with the San Francisco stage, and well and widely known here, 
died recently in the Forrest Home, near Philadelphia. He was a 

reliable actor and a good man. Kyrle Bellew and Mrs. Potter, 

having conquered India and the Orient generally, are now, ac- 
cording to Dunlop's Stage Neivs, on their way to Bechuana land, 
South Africa, to delight the natives. Send along another ship-load 

of missionaries, quick! Mr. Wilkinson's Widows is said to be 

one of the best of Mr. Gillette's comedies. 



The Maison Riche is the favorite restaurant among the bon vivants 
of tne city, for there may be obtained everything that the heart of an 
epicure may long for. 

BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Al. Hayman, Lessee and Proprietor. | Alfred Bouvier Manager. 

W. T. CARLETON OPERA COMPANY. 

This Week. Every Evening (except Sunday). Matinees Friday and Sat- 
urday. Strauss' 

INDIGO! 

With New Scenery and a Great Cast. 
Wednesday Matinee, Beuefitof Commercial Travelers' Association, 



Second Week—" Dorothy,' 



NANON ! 
' Gondoliers," etc. 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Handsomest Theatre in the World. 

Mr. Al Hayman, Lessee and Proprietor | Mr. Harry Mann Manager. 

Monday, January 4th. Every Evening (except Sunday). Matinee Sat- 
urday. Engagement of the Emiueut Actor, MR. E. S. WILLARD and Mr. 
Palmer's Company, presenting for the first time in this city, 

JUDAHI 

Henry Arthur Jones' Great Play. 
Seats Now Selling. 



RUSH STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Leayitt... Lessee and Proprietor | J: J. Goitlob Manager. 

Commencing Monday, January 4th, the clever Irish Actor, DANIEL 
SuLLY, in Leander Richardson's Charming Comedy, 

"THE MILLIONAIRE lj" 

Matinees Wednesday and Saturday. 



J An. 9 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS I ETTER 




Ool the inn itgna ihM CbiistntM has been with us i* Ibe 
number of brand-new purs«a, tatchtlt and card cases lo he 
•een In the ladies' harnl> in ib« ftreets or car* ; while the men 
lb umbrellas, canes, gorgeous neckwear and handkerchiefs. 

If all that is said by lh< iave a shade of veracity even, 

it would teem *> though •■ ibe little rift within the lute" has be- 
gun to show signs of ex late nee in the lately announced Chicago 

engagement. What grounds goaalp has f*»r its whisperings it is 
ffilble to tell, but that there are whisperings to that effect is 
certain. The fair fiancee is a young lady of strong will, and ac- 
customed :o have ber own way. and possibly has shown a desire 
to rule not exactly pleasing to the young *■ congratulated," who. 
although genial and frank, is by no means without character of 

bis own. 

« • • 

Another on (tit. w bich comes from Nob Hill, is to the effect that 
a rich widower, who has long laughed at women's wiles when 
directed by Hyman. has struck his colors at the shrine of a well- 
known widow, who dwell.- in his neighborhood, Shuuld this be 
true, every one will say it is a most suitable match on both sides. 
Mrs. Spaulding's rout to may yet be " manana, manana." 

That pioneer couple, so popular i.i society life for many years, 
Mr. and Mrs. Bamuel Hort, have been painfully afflicted by the 
loss of two favorite grand-daughters, of late. But it is question- 
able in many minds if the loss of Mrs. Winn, nee Dora Boardman, 
was not less bitter than that of Mrs. Maillard, net Tompkins. 
The sympathy of the entire enmmunity has been wilh the aged 
couple and their daughters in their double trial. 

# # » 

The intimate friends of the recently-wedded Miss Sally Tbibault 
are sincerely hoping that lady will not carry out the intention 
ascribed to her by the Paris correspondent* of the daily papers, 
and return to this coast wilh her latest acquisition — a husband. 
This is one of the cases in which, it is said, " distance lends en- 
chantment." 

» # * 

What a peculiar people those in our swim are, in the way of 
taking up a line or idea and running it into the ground. Once it 
was progressive euchre parties; then amateur theatricals or 
musicales. Now it is teas. No wonder the men are scarce at 
such entertainments. It is very well for a woman to evoke the 
breaking of the tenth commandment by all the other women in 
the display of her teacups, but a man fails to find alluring dissi- 
pation in swallowing scalding or lukewarm tea, and talking 
twaddle between each gulp, no matter how dainty the service or 
pretty the girl may be who serves it. 

# # * 

The buzz of expectancy anent the Leap Year cotillion fills the 
air. Report says a New York beau or two will grace the ball- 
room, and our girls are preparing the most ravishing toilettes. The 
fact of its being de rigueur to wear powder is a source of delight 
to several of our frisky matrons, whose efforts to defy Time's 
frosty finger have compelled them, in the language of a local 
wit, " to dye often and dye hard." 

The Roman Catholic fraternity are said to be greatly exercised 
over the rumor of the engagement of Mrs. Johnson and an artist 
in whom the rich widow has taken more than a passing interest. 

# # * 

Pretty Miss Catherwood has chosen her bridesmaids, but their 

names are a secret so far. 

# # # 

Charming Miss May Hoffman, whose sunny smile displays an 
even white row of pearls, inherits the conversational ability of 
her esteemed uncle, the late Judge Ogden Hoffman. 

# • # 

Among the new additions to our army of beaux, the ladies de- 
clare Lieut. Sydenham to be one of the most agreeable and pol- 
ished. 

# # * 

Why is it that when a man or woman possesses intellectual 
gifts or acquirements of more than average ability, they become 
careless as to their personal appearance. Evidently what is inside 
the head is the essential point in their eyes. But a certain very 
clever Lieutenant might " prink up " a little to advantage. The 
question of his being so difficult to interest came up one evening, 
and a bright girl who lives on Pine street, remarked; » Pshaw, 
he's been scorched already. Why, even his very thoughts are 
turned to ashes." 

w # » 

What a singular thing is what is called " the proprieties of 
life. People who are careless of all natural obligations, who have 



no Iota For home or kindred, no ftallng • •. ravannoa f<«r anything 
human or divine, will - a«anm« a virtue," and tci w bai Ibi 

i for the sake of propriety, i be old rail <■ v* bo laAoary- 
I and a grandfather, althoitRh be may i.rmk nil the com- 
mend men la in private, will, on Bonday, appear In tb a family 
paw for the aak> of propriety. The husband ami wife who al 
bean are Impatient ol the rattan thai bind ihem, will In public 
vie with each other In affectionate demonstration. Prfenda who 
are at variance secretly, will openly be polite and courteous to 
each other. All is vanity. 



TheGraai Central Wine Rooms, al 16 and L8 Third street, en |o] 

tlu " CU*tO f the men who drink oulv the best, brand of linuora, be- 
cause l! is a well-known rule of the bonse that only the fines! goods 
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with satisfaction over the bar, because they are certain to be nerved 
wiili the best wines and liquors to be had in the market. 




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MACKINTOSH 

COATS 

FOE 

1 Ladies and Gentlemen 

MANUFACTURED BY 



*-* AGENTS. 'SAN FRANCISCO. ^* 




MR. ASHTON P. STEVENS, 

T E uSu O HZ E B. OB BA^TJO. 
Studio— 26 Montgomery Street, Room 8. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 



OVER IN OAKLAND. 

CITW Justice Allen made a desperate attempt to grow whiskers, 
so tbat he could look patriarchal and distinguished as he sat 
down to assault the family turkey on Christmas Day. Hitherto, 
like Lin Church, Judge Nusbaumer, Will Dargie, Cleve Dam, 
Billy Bond, and others of the talent, be has affected the Crrreco- 
Roman smooth shave, despite the earnest protestations of his lady 
friends. However, he decided at last to let his facial tresses 
blossom forth, so locking up his ra/.or he let nature take her 
course, and a remarkable course she took. His whiskers bloomed 
in three different colors; red near his hair, gray on his chin and 
black on his throat. For days he watched their progress anxious- 
ly, hoping and praying that they would decide on one color, or 
compromise in some manner, but nol the different shades grew 
liarcer and fiercer, and at last he had to bring his trusty blade 
fiom its lair again. The wind can sob a requiem in vain, he says, 
for he will never try the experiment again. 

Hugh Craig, the Lord Mayor of Piedmont, is having a lot of 
trouble at the school house there regarding the ousting of a 
teacher. Craig, who represents the New Zealand Insurance Com- 
pany on the coast, has made wonderful strides here. When he 
first came to Oakland, years ago, he bucked sawdust in a water- 
front planing mill, whereas now he owns one of the prettiest 
places in Piedmont. He is an eminently religious man, and the 
story is told tbat when be went to Denver, not long ago, to es- 
tablish an agency there, he first settled up the business part with 
the local manager, and then dropping on his knees, said: 

"And now let us invoke the Divine blessing on our enterprise." 

The agent nearly had a fit, but he flopped down and listened as 
Hugh prayed aloud. Strange to say, during the next few months 
Denver was visited by a series of the most destructive fires in her 
history, and the New Zealand Company lost about $100,000. The 
agent does not place much faith in prayer nowadays. 

Nearly everybody in and around Oakland has got an idea tbat 
Montgomery Howe, President of the Piedmont Cable Road, and 
his brother, are remarkably rich men, in fact almost millionaires. 
Now, the truth is that for many months past matters have been 
gloomy for them ; they have been unable to pay their assessments 
to the car line, and in order to raise the wind, it is said, they in- 
tend very shortly to have an auction of some of their effects. 
The news will be a staggerer to many. 

Doctor Chamberlain, who obtained unenviable notoriety in the 
daily papers recently, is a very artful individual. He ran a 
mining development bureau here for a little while, with an em- 
ployment agency as a side-show. The sequel to this occurred 
the other day, when an ugly-looking fellow came into the doc- 
tor's office and drawing a pistol, said: " Now I want the $200 
you got from my wife, or I'll put a hole through you.'' The 
doctor delved deep and often, and paid without a murmur. It is 
rumored quietly that as soon as he gets a divorce he is striving 
for, he will marry Miss Aikens, of Sacramento. 'Tis said that 
she has considerable money. 

Bohemian to the backbone is a club that is to be organized 
here in a few days, under the name of » The Odd Number Club." 
Membership will be limited to twenty-one, and the sole purpose 
of organization, is to have a monthly dinner at one of the leading 
restaurants in town. At this feast each member must tell an ori- 
ginal story, sing a good song, or render an acceptable recitation. 
Every effort will be submitted to the diners by the President for 
approval, and if it has not come up to the mark, the offender 
will be fined one dollar, which will go into the treasury of the 
organization. Each dinner will be novel in every respect, even 
as regards the menu and observances, and it is determined to 
have nothing but originality as regards the conducting of every 
meeting. That the club will be a bright affair is certain, for this 
is the list of charter members: Ed. H. Hamilton. Ed. Clough, 
Charles Yale, Judge Harry Melvin, Ed. Cahill, Judge Henshaw, 
Scl. N. Sheridan, Geo. Allen Watson, Walter Laymance, Geo. 
Hatton, Judge Allen, Paul Goldsmith, Johnny Conners, Joseph 
E. Baker, Dr. Hatch, Cleve Dam and George Carleton. The ma- 
jority, it will be noticed, are newspaper men, and the others are 
all well known in circles where bright minds are appreciated. 
The motto of the club is Falstaff's remark to Mrs. Quickly in 
TKa Merry Wives of Windsor: 

"There is divinity in odd numbers, either in nativity, chance, 
or death." 

The amateurs who so successfully presented Held by the Enemy 
are so encouraged that they now intend to perform Julius Caesar 
for some other charitable organization. The parts have already 
been given out, and the piece will probably be produced some 
time in January. 

Probably it is a little out of place to discuss the matter here, 
but the social status of a barber was settled very decisively by a 
young woman the other night. It was at one of the cheap 
dancing academies on Twelfth street, and the weekly hop was in 
full swing. The young person in question was a stranger there, 
and when a gaudily dressed individual of about twenty-two 
asked the favor of a dance with her, she accepted, and was 
highly entertained by his eloquence during the madding whirl. 
Subsequently she sat in the ladies' parlor with a couple of other 



girls, and she asked them if they knew who it was she had been 
dancing with. 

» Why, yes," was the reply, «« he's a barber on Ninth street." 

" Oh, pshaw! " said the inquirer, " have I been dancing with a 
■common barber?" And as the individual in question passed by 
a few seconds later, and bowed to her, she turned up her nose 
scornfully and looked the other way. They found out her 
identity the following day. Her father drives a swill cart in 
North Oakland. 

Ex-County Clerk Charles Boardman has taken the trouble to 
write to the dailies here and deny the story reprinted by them 
from the News Letteu, to the effect that he was a performer in a 
bears' den at the Portland Exposition. One of his friends here, 
though, who was at Portland at the time and saw him, will vouch 
for the truth of the News Lettek's story, and says that Charley is 
only bluffing now because he did not want the story to get out. 

There were high old times at the Athenian Club on New Year's 
eve, for 1892 was ushered in with a glorious " chirps." Ed. Ham- 
ilton was Archon, Harry Melvin bad charge of the music, and 
Cleve Dam was a most efficient Lord of Misrule. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co. , Real Estate Agents , make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-40R Montgomery street. 



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OLIVE TREES FOR SALE. 

Large numbers of splendidly rooted trees of different 
ages. New process of rooting, the result of ten years' 
experimenting. No artificial heat used. Address 
W. ALSTON HAYNB, Jr , 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 

HOTEL PLEASANTON, 

Sutter Street, c orner Jones. Sa n Francisco, Cal. 

The Largest, Best Appointed and Most Liberally Managed Family and 
Tourist Hotel iu Sau Francibco. Lighted by Electricity throughout. 

Elegantly Furnished Dining Rooms and Parlors for Banquets, Private 
Dinners, Parties, Weddings, etc. 

The Cuisine a Special Feature. 

Mrs. M. E. PENDLETON, 
Proprietor and Manager. 



F. B. McCLEERY, 



Billiard Instructor, 



Flood Building, 



Jan. . 



BAN Ki; INCT8C0 \K\vs 1 ETTEB 



P SHOTS. 



[Bt Pi Viiroi.] 

THK woman 1 ! branch -»f tlir Auxiliary for the World*! Con- 
■ive laid out a \ :i-t ti-ld of work for themselves. 
Tin- Woman*a ' ouiiuIUmoI iba World*! Uongreea Auxiliary on 
Labor m In fit! Iba women of all lands to unlt« with 

thriii in the ooiulderaUoti of question! of vital In tercel to women; 
stating as a broad and grnrriil propualtloo (but women labor 
under peculiar difficulties and still have muofa to learn. 
and many a field to conquer before they can be said 
to »iart even with men in the content for which independ- 
ent existence is the invaluable prize at stake. The Aral topic to 
be considered. * The Industrial Condition o( Women, 11 involves 
a discussion of the industrial conditions under which women now 
tabor; the relative wages they receive for labor compared with 
men in the same fields, the relative value of women's work and 
wages as proportioned to the coat <>f living, occupations now- 
open to women, and possible openings in the future; also, the 
benefits already derived from organizations, child-labor, the rights 
of the child and parental obligations. 

The second topic, "The Economic Dependence of Women," 
will provoke discussion on the (liabilities incident to such de- 
pendence, and as to bow such dependence, whether theoretical or 
real, jeopardizes her title to property and the control of her chil- 
dren, and whether the present laws relating to marriage and di- 
vorce, and other domestic relations, may not be modified to insure 
to woman the right to labor, and to enjoy the fruits of her toil. 

Weighty questions these, which should receive the careful con- 
sideration of every profound thinker, every student of sociology, 
and of every woman. It has been said that happy women, like 
happy nations, have no history. To a woman who has been 
delicately nurtured, carefully reared and chivalrously protected 
from contact with a hard world, whose every wish has been an- 
ticipated, who holds property in her own name, whose children 
rise up and call her blessed with the full consent of their mascu- 
line relatives, to such a woman the struggles of the less fortunate 
of her sex should hold a deep interest and a sacred duty. How 
many women know that in the State of New York, to-day, a man 
dying before the birth of his child may will that unborn babe 
away from the woman who is to pas3 through her deadly hour 
of peril, and in the travail of her soul groan over the thought 
that her child, for which she is to suffer the pangs of maternity, 
is to be taken from her by the malice of a man and the strong 
arm of the law ? The discussion that will arise over these and 
kindred topics cannot but work some needed reforms. 

• • » 

The recent case of a man in the East who was bitten by a dog, 
and then was actually scared to death by his friends, who called 
to offer sympathy and to see how he was getting along, only 
emphasizes the fact that there are lots of people in the world who 
are never so happy as when telling bad news or making unpleas- 
ant remarks. They preface their speeches with the hope that" 
you will not feel hurt by what they ar« going to say; that they 
speak as a friend for your own good; that they say it in all kind- 
ness, and that it is the truth, as if thatassurance were not adding 
insult to injury! One thing is certain, from friends of the plain- 
speaking sort, whose candid calmness is but fuel to the flame of 
your indignation, it is always safe to look for the greatest impu- 
dence and outrageous presumption. 

* * * 

Once in a while young girls say something that is rather witty. 
I overheard a party of recent High School graduates talking over 
their former schoolmates. "And so Nellie Brown and Kitty 
Flynn are going back to the Normal class. They are tired of 
society." »■ Weil, since they've been in it for two years, they're 
not rosebuds any more." " Say, girls, notwithstanding the 
pleasant conversation, the morning does seem to drag, neverthe- 
less." " Well, what would you have; we are not Madam De 
Staels." " Oh I she was too conceited for anything. She wouldn't 
look out of the window to see the Bay of Naples 1 " 

Its rather amusing to see people affecting simplicity as a matter 
of taste, when it is palpably a question of economy. But why in 
the name of consistency do they attempt to gain the credit for a 
lavish display after the affair is over? Why are only a few friends 
invited, because of the well known quiet taste of the family, and 
then why is the affair heralded in terms of great extravagance? 
But stop, it may all be due to the wicked reporters, for of course 
it's a mystery how all these things get into the papers. 

# * * 

Every now and then the social world is startled by a marriage 
between people widely apart, as to age, station and interests. It 
asks, " How could she marry him ?" " Or what did he see in 
her?" Very often he sees money. There is a number of men 
in this city, who, for years have been on a bold and openly 
avowed hunt in the hopes of capturing coin. They have paid 
their addresses, which, by the way, was about all they did pay, 
to every rich rosebud society girl, rich widow — as she appeared 
on the horizon with the mystic dollar sign graven between her 



eyes. Some of them have «urreeded, tome of them are yet In the 
ind not a few have fallen by the wayalde, and not sveii 
the fowls care to come ind devour them. Manj a |lrl baa mar- 
ried because ids saw a vis. on of old maidenhood itretoblngdown 
the lengthening years. Buch bara alombered on In a nightman 
sleep In the CasiIe-of-No-Men Hath Chosen-U! ;.. bs awakened 
by the tones of I'M nee I harming. Lei him be lame, ball and 
blind, he will not live single any longer. The old maid has cap- 
tured the prl 

« • f 

Charitleaand churches have always an open palm for donations, 
and an immense reaching ability, and a good grip when they 
reach oui after some desired good, lint In the ra.se of soma ol the 

charitable societies, the open palm to receive, may clench Into 
the Hal to strike at a friend. For instance, newspaper people know- 
how many times during the year personal appeals are made to 
them in behalf of charitable projects. They are asked to make 
mention of a coming entertainment, they are urged to give meel 
ing notices space, they are importuned to make appeals for dona- 
tions, they are invited to attend some festive occasion and write 
it up so as "to keep the cause before the public, you know." 
And the newspaper people do it. They help with an influential 
factor not to be despised. The notices are inserted, the affairs 
written up, and advertisements receive a big discount or a bill 
receipted for the same. With what result? The cause is bene- 
fitted, but not in nine cases out of ten does either the paper or 
the reporter receive a note of thanks. And the very next time 
that the paper which has rendered the charity such signal ser- 
vice wishes to gain a little information concerning the society, 
the request is either met with a flat refusal with scant courtesy, 
or by a note whose suavity of expression but intensifies the ingrati- 
tude; " the ladies connected with the charity shrink from any fur- 
ther publicity, therefore we cannot furnish you with a list of our 
officers, or members. But when we need any further notice we 
shall be glad to receive the benefit of your pen." Ingrates, 
snobs, has it ever occurred to you that any society which appeals 
to the general public for financial support has no right to with- 
hold information of such sort from the public? Next time you 
want newspaper favors, take a new field. 



Pure is one thing ; whole- 
some, another. Pure arsenic 
is not wholesome. Pure 
ammonia, pure white clay, 
or pure alum cannot make 
a wholesome baking pow- 
der, even if it is called 
"absolutely pure." 

Every housekeeper knows 
that pure cream of tartar, 
pure soda, pure flour, are 
wholesome. These three 
ingredients; and these three 
only, are used in Cleve- 
land's Baking Powder. 
Cleveland's is pure and 
wholesome; it leavens most, 
and leavens best, but its 
special excellence is that it 
is perfectly wholesome* 

F. H. AMES «V CO., Agents*. 




H. MEYERFELD, Proprietor and Gutter, 

Will Guarantee a Stylish Cut and Perfect Fitting Pair of 
Pants, and keep them in Repair for one year without extra 
charge. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 




rustler, as he raked in the pot. 
On the wall was a sign reading: 



IT was in the Press Club, just after the Kickers' Club had been 
called to order. The Kickers' Club, be it known, is an organ- 
ization within the Press Club, to which no one can belong who 
has not rendered himself odious to his fellow-members ot the 
latter club on meeting nights, by making a stump-speech in ex- 
planation of his " kick " about the architecture of the cuspidors 
or the fibre of the paper with which the fires are lighted. » Sock- 
less Harry " was the first president of the club, but he was de- 
posed, as he proved untrue to the rules of the organization, and 
allowed one Press Club meeting to pass without making a five 
minutes' kick. He was called Sockteas Harry because, being a 
true Bohemian, he glories in one pair of socks and two cutfs. 
- Crimson Phil is now president of the club. He derives his name 
from a flaming red necktie, which he insists upon wearing, prin- 
cipally for the reason that the police have warned him to retire 
it, as it is a menace to life, for every horse that catches its gleam 
shys and dashes madly down the street, killing and maiming 
people. It is said that Crimson Phil is the friend of a student in 
surgery at the Receiving Hospital, and thinks it bis duty to send 
the young blood-letter numerous cases. Every " Kicker " has to 
sing a song, tell a story, dance a jig, introduce a new card game, 
or — press the button. Crimson Phil told this story. 
» * # 

"Say, you talk about the Thompson-street Pojser Club, but 
those niggers wouldn't be in it in Arizona. I remember that I 
was in Tombstone once, as Special Commissioner for the Inter- 
national Society of Archaeological Rersearch " 

" Oh, break-away, this isn't a space story," interrupted Sock- 
less Harry. 

"Say, I'd like to kuow who is telling this story, anyway? 
Gentlemen, is the president of your club to be thus interrupted at 
the very outset of his career, by a man who has been false to our 
teaching; who has proved untrue to us; who has not made a 
square kick in open meeting for a month ; who, in the lan- 
guage of John P. Irish, has ' done us dirt ' ? Are we, I say, to 
allow such conduct from one wbo — who " 

" Fine him! Fine him!" yelled Administration Jim. 

"So ordered. Sockless Harry is fined the beers. The victim 
being found, I shall now proceed, gentlemen," and Crimson Phil 
patted his necktie and continued. " As I was saying, I was in 
Tombstone, and happened to go into a gambling house. Most of 
the Mugwumps there assembled were playing poker. The wall 
was decorated with signs telling tbe rules of the house. While I 
was watching proceedings, in came a long limbed tenderfoot from 
Jeem's Corners, or somewhere, and after sizing up the combina- 
tion he said be thought be would take a hand. He was received 
with open arms. It was table stakes, and a bard game. Things 
went along all right, until the tenderfoot opened a jack-put, 
and " 

" What's that?" asked Sorrowful Sara. 

" I say some one opened a jack-pot, and " 

" What's a jackpot ?" 

" A jack-pot, my son," answered Crimson Phil, "is a pitfall 
dug by the devil for the discomfiture and despoiiation of tne un- 
wary." 

" Well, the jack-pot was opened by the tenderfoot, and three 
men saw him, and one raised. Tbe tenderfoot raised again. 
Everybody dropped, except the second man, wbo came back; 
and they kept at it until there was a big pile of chips in tbe pot. 
Tbe tenderfoot drew two cards and the other fellow took three. 
Then they had it hot and heavy. The tenderfoot was game, and 
as he had a big wad there was about $500 on tbe board. Finally 
he weakened and called. 

" ' I've got three aces and a pair of jacks, 1 he said, in a some- 
what triumphant tone. 

" * No good,' said the other man; • I've got a lalekooler.' 

" ' A what? 1 said the victim. 

" • A lalekooler.' 

"• What's that?' 

" ' Why, a queen and a jack. Don't you know what a lale- 
kooler is?' 

" ' Never heard of it,' said the tenderfoot. 

" 'Well, just cast your optics on that sign on the wall,' said the 



LALEKOOLER, 
<i V ee N and Jack 
Beats Anything in Sight. 



"The victim read it, sighed, and said: ' Well, of course, I've 
got to abide by tbe rules of the game.' 

"The play continued, and in about half an hour there was 
another big jack-pot, into which the tenderfoot plunged reck- 
lessly. He threw down twenties as if they were beans, and 
forced every one out but bis former antagonist. The tenderfoot 
drew three cards, and the other fellow two. After the draw the 
betting went wild, until there was $800 on the green. 

" i Call yer,' said the two-card man, finally ; * what yer got ? ' 

'• -Oh, I've got you this time, my boy,' said the tenderfoot; 
' I've got a lalekoolar,' and he reached for the pot. 

"'Hold on there; not so fast. I've got three deuces. Lale- 
kooler's no good.' 

" ' No good ! Like to know why ? ' 

" ' Just read that sign on the wall behind you.' 

" The tenderfoot turned around and looked at the sign. It read : 



LALEKOOLER, 
Can be Played Only Once 
la any Game. 



It was a happy thought on the part of tbe Examiner people to 
commission H. J. Stewart to write a special Christmas song for 
the holiday issue of their paper. To those who are unacquainted 
with Mr. Stewart's compositions this song was a surprise, and 
when sung in Trinity Church on Christmas murning by 
Donald de V. Graham, its effect was truly magnificent. The 
music has been placed in our church programmes side by side 
with the immortal " Noel " and "Nazarette," and it is but simple 
truth to say that it has not suffered by comparison. If the forth- 
coming opera is up to this standard, California will have reason to 
be proud of the composer who has made this the land of his 
adoption. 

The Christmas Jinks of the Bohemian) Club which took place 
last Saturday night, was one of the most brilliant and successful 
events in the history of the institution. James D. Phelan, the 
President, read an interesting paper at the opening, Dr. Bebr, the 
veteran scientist; Captain Woodruff, U.S. A., Alfred Bouvier, 
General W. H. L Barnes, George T. Bromley and others con- 
tributed to the High Jinks, tbe subject of which was " False 
Gods." The decorations of the rooms were Oriental. Huge 
lanterns depended from the ceilings, and the passage ways were 
lined with tropical plants and shrubs. The musical portion of the 
jinks, under the direction of Professor H. J. Stewart was superb. 
Mr. Stewart's original ode was sang by Donald De V. Graham and a 
chorus, and was most enthusiastically received. A Chinese play, 
written by Mr. J. D. Redding, was given at the "Low Jinks," 
\\ hich were said in a most hutm tjus ai.d skillful manner by Mr. 
Al. Gerberding. That gentleman's opening address was intensely 
humorous. Mr. Charles Dickman also did some fine wurk. The 
play, at which a genuine Chinese Orchestra assisted, was a per- 
fect copy of the Chinese Theatre. Mr. Louis Sloss Jr., Mr. 
Mitchell, Mr. Porter Asbe, Mr. De Pue, Mr. Joullin, Mr. J. D. 
Redding and others, copied the antics of the Chinese actors to 
perfection. One of the agreeable incidents of the evening was the 
presentation of a fine painting by Mr. JuuIIin, to the club, by 
Mr. Phelan. 

* ■» # 

Lee Lash's large picture is now on exhibition at the Bijou 
Theatre, under the auspices of the lady patronesses of the Old 
People's Home. Tbe painting, which represents morning prayer 
at tbe Home, is an interior witii the inmates gathered for morn- 
ing devotion. The reader stands at the head of the long library 
table, around which the aged worshipers are grouped in reveren- 
tial attitudes. These figures, of which there are thirty-six, are 
all portraits, and the composition is strikingly effective. The 
detail involved in such work and tbe exacting nature of tbe varied 





27-37 Kearny St. 



HOUSE COATS, GOWNS, 

MACKINTOSH'S, SILK UMBRELLAS, 
OVERCOATS, FINE UNDERWEAR, 

NECKWEAR, SATCHELS, ETC. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



ll 



portraiture, form m work of inch magnitude a* mljibl wall caqm 
an irtint lo lay do wo his broil ur; and. a Ten while re- 

■oloa. one Involuntarily pay* tribute to the 
equally essential, if mora prosaic qualities— the indomitable 
energy and industry wrhlcfa have kept Hie young painter Dp t" bit 
work for the past six montbs. The effort of space and diatanoa 
is admirably managed, and the Bgurea themselves are full of life 
and movement, notably the while haired woman in the left fore- 
ground and her neighbor. The bands rnoal dlfflcnll to manage. 
and usually the •• deadest M thing In a portrait i of tin- num. are 
marvel* of life-like expression, while the intensity of feeling in 
the noble old face of t tie woman is so instinei with vitality, lliat 
one would hardly be astonished to see the firm lips part in speech. 
If one were to BpeoHy the aallenl excellences of this tine paint- 
ing, he might find them in atmospheric effect, strength of value, 
and strong characterization. The last quality noticeable in Mr. 
- previous works, is peculiarly marked in this. The specta- 
tor feels that he could walk among those old people in their cozy 
A strikingly artistic effect is the morning light coming 
in through the windows on the left. So delicate and airy is the 
painter's touch, that the first impri Bsion is of a stage effect which 
throws light from behind, through a transparent canvas. Mr. 
Lash's work bears traces of the French school in which he was 
educated, but his strong individuality overpowers all technical 
trammels, and makes the work essentially his own both in treat- 
ment and character. The work, in effect and detail, is worth 
study. It will remain a^the Bijou till January 14th. 

'T« v^ kind of you, Buckley, to plainly speak out 

And leave the dear public no longer in doubt; 

We knew you were innocent, honest and pure, 

But of the real rascals we never felt sure 

Till you pointed them out beyond any mistake. 

The judge that you made and refused to remake, 

The undeveloped and bang-haired young man who in spite 

Turned against you because you would not "down" Steve White, 

And that reformed broker who got raad and gave battle 

Because you.withheld the Congressional rattle — 

Hub-a-dub-dub, those three men in the tub, 

Now we're perfectly sure who they be, 

The justice, the broker, the newspaper-u aker, 

We '11 turn the rogues out — all three. 

# * • 

8o quiet has the story been kept that 'tis doubtful if half a 
dozen people in San Francisco and Oakland combined know of 
the ordeal through which the Rev. A. L. Hatch baa been passing 
during the last few days. Mr. Hatch is well known on both sides 
of the bay. In addition to his prominence as Commissioner of 
Immigration for the port of San Francisco, be has achieved 
notoriety during his residence in Oakland by his literary feats, his 
recent agnostic crusade, and last, but not least, his espousal of the 
cause of Mrst Liliengren in her divorce proceedings against Pastor 
Liliengren of the Swedish Methodist Church. Outside of all this, 
though, Mr. Hatch has won fame through his social qualities, for 
he is a capital story-teller, and has a repertoire of anecdotes that 
would have to appear in French should they ever find their way 
into type. The fact that he is the originator of most of them, too, 
added extra leaves to his lanrels, and with a view toout-Heroding 
even himself, he composed a piece of poetry the other day called 
" The Maiden and the Monk." The title is suggestive enough, 
and as regards the wording — well Secretary C. R. Bennett, of the 
Society for the Suppression of Vice, can tell about that, for Mr. 
Hatch's manuscript fell into his hands before it had got fairly 
well on its travels. Some one, who had a grudge against the 
reverend author, was the cause of the poem's mishap, and Bennett 
was then urged to bring prosecutory proceedings. He, however, 
declined to do so, and the Hatch escutcheon still hangs untar- 
nished on the family tree. 

# # # 

The Union League Club will soon have its annual election, and 
from indications it seems that A. E. Castle will be the next Presi- 
dent. The project of a building is again being discussed by the 
club. It is proposed to form a club house corporation, which will 
purchase the land, build the club house and furnish it, all of 
which can be done for about $100,000. It will soon be proposed 
in the club to admit army and navy officers to the club privileges 
as honorary members. It will be an honor highly esteemed by 
these gentlemen. 




LOUIS R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 

The Highest tirade Champagne in the World. 

(WHITE LABEL) 

A Magnificent Rich Wine. 

'-<3-:r_a-:n":d aai3st sec," 

(BBOWN LABEL) 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 
See that every Bottle bears the privatelabel of 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




A. W. STOTT, 

Jeweller, 

3 Montgomery Street, 

I inlor Hie Hwonlc Temple, 

OFFERS FOR SALE 

A Rare and Choice Stock, 

UNSURPASSED IN SAN FRANCISCO FOR HIGH 

QUALITY AND LOWJPRICE, 

DIAMONDS, 

RUBIES, SAPPHIRES, 

Opals, Emeralds, Etc., 

Set and. TJnset. 

Swiss & American Watches, 
Unique Designs in Fine Jewellery. 

A visit from, intending purchasers is respectfully solicited. 



THE KALMIA, 



Rooms I, 2, 3, 
112 Post Street. 



The most elegantly fitted anr] arranged l)IKVATOi,o«I('Al SAIOON 

in the United States. 



THE "KALMIA" TOILET PREPARATIONS 



For beautifying and improving the Complexion, and for the Treat- 
ment and Kemoval of all facial blemishes hov ' been scientifically 
manufactured under the supervision of askilledplijsiciaii and an expe- 
rienced chemist. 

Manicuring and Chiropody, Hyqienic Facial Treatment, 
Electrolysis, Hair Dressing, Etc. 

MRS. 8PEDDING ahd MRS. COPELAND. 



LOOIS COOKS. 



WILLIAM COOKS. 



MAX COOKS. 



COOKS BROS., 

ITSTTEiE/IOE, DECOBATOBS. 

Dealers in Stained Glass, Wall Paper, Lincrusta Walton, Paper 

Mache, Parquet Floorirg, Moorish Fret Work, 

Frescoing, Wall Mouldings, 

943 and 945 Market St., b et ween 5th and 6th, San Francisco. 



)LNS^ 



Artistic Hair Dressing 
G> VW^K BEAUTIFYING PARLORS, 

\^ ^^ VK ^J ,oe Em * st ' ,,<,ar Powell, 

IMPORTERS OP 

Human Hiir and Parisian Novelties, 
Toilet Accessories, Cosmetics. Etc.. Etc. 

Dr. Rowas' Famous Remedy for Sea-Sickness. 

If you intend taking a trip by sea, try a bottle and be convinced of its 
merits. To be obtained from all druggists, and from 

L. R. ELLERT, 
S. W. corner Kearny and California streets, S. F. 
Price per bottle. 50 cents 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892 



YOU LOVE ME, DON'T YOU ?—W, II. Robinson, in Wick's Maga- 
zine. 



Oh! love yon not the sunset hour 

When passion wakes, as sleeps the flower? 

You do, sweet, don't you? 
And when that sunset hour shall come, 
And hush to rest man's busy hum — 

You'll meet me, won't you? 

For you the fairest wreath I'll twine, 
Of roses form'd and eglantine — 

You'll take it, won't you? 
And mind you not when first we met, 
And cheeks were flush'd and eyes were wet — 

You do, love, don't you? 

You sigh, and can it be you feel 
Love's magic influence o'er you steal; 

You do, sweet, don't you? 
Then oh! at evening's sunset hour, 
When passion wakes, as sleeps the flower; 

You'll meet me, won't you? 

A DESCENDANT OF CORNEILLE. 

LEON ALBERT CORNEILLE, a descendant of the great French 
dramatist of the same name, lives in New City Hall place, a cul 
de sac, off McAllister street, near the new City Hall. He is 23 years 
of age, and has already had a career that is full of interest. An 
elder brother, Pierre Rene Corneille, is in the French army, and it 
was to this branch of the public service that Leon Albert first 
turned for a field in which to win fame and honor. He was 
rejected because of an imperfect thumb, the result of a boyish 
accident. Then he went to Algeria, where he sought admission 
to the Spahis Cuirassiers, the most famous of the French dra- 
goons. Here, too, he was refused. He made a lour of Europe 
then, and finally crossed the Atlantic. While in this country he 
turned his attention to civil engineering. He returned to France 
for a year or two, and then came back to America, 
this time to San Francisco, to prosecute his studies 
in practical civil engineering. He went to work in the Union 
Iron Works, where he could get an insight into bridge building, 
while in the evening he attended a Civil Engineering Academy. 
He is a member of the Technical Society of this city, and is now 
in the employ of the Southern Pacific Company, in the depart- 
ment of bridge and viaduct construction. It is worthy of men- 
tion that Albert Leon Corneille came into a snug little fortune 
upon his twenty-first birthday that placed him beyond the need 
of working. This inheritance is bound to be added to in after 
years, for the young engineer is in the direct line of descent from 
several very wealthy members of his family. The name of 
Corneille is held in the same veneration in France as the name of 
Shakespeare by English speaking nations. In France one finds 
the Theatre des Corneille, the Maison Corneille, the Rue des 
Corneille, and even a famous rock in the Bay of Biscay is named 
after the great dramatist. Some of his plays are yet considered 
masterpieces. 

THE Consolidated Black Cat Company is the name of an organiza- 
tion recently formed in Washington State for the propagation 
of black cats on Puget Sound. An island is to be purchased, ac- 
cording to latest advices from the Pacific Coast, so that cats can 
not mingle with the feline population of the surrounding country, 
and here the black-cat breed is to be perpetuated on the same 
commercial principle that govern the breeding of cattle on West- 
ern ranches. The animals are to live on fish, which are plentiful, 
and the expenses will thus be reduced to a minimum. The cats 
are to be raised and killed for their fur, and the projectors expect 
to make " millions " out of it. Mosl of the original stock, it is 
announced, will be brought from Holland." The company re- 
ferred to is connected with the Buckley Lamb Propagation Cor- 
poration, which has had great success at its Bush street works 
during recent years. 

MARY Queen of Scots had a favorite lapdog which is said to have 
been present at the execution of its poor mistress in Fother- 
ingay Castle. After the royal lady had been beheaded, the faith- 
ful creature refused to leave her dead body, and had to be carried 
out of the hall by force. At that period lapdogs were the pets of 
men as of women. Dr. Boleyn, a relative of the unhappy Queen 
Anne Boleyn, owned one " which," as it is written, " he doted 
on." Anne once asked him to grant her one wish, and in return 
he should have whatever he might desire. Knowing his affection 
for the dog, she begged it of him, and, of course, the doctor had 
nothing to do but to give it to her. " And now, raadame," he 
said, " you promised to grant my request." " I will," quoth the 
Queen. " Then, I pray you, give me my dog again." 



For liver and stomach troubles try Ayer's Pills. They are mild, 
pleasant, thorough, and searching. Your druggist has Ayer's Al- 
manac. 

Grandmas' made happy with ierfecl fitting glasses from C. Muller, opti- 
cian, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush, Sau Francisco. 



3&oEida 



H 

DIRECT FROM EUROPEAN CENTERS. 

An assortment not to be found in any olber establish tuenl suit- 
able for gifts. A number of new paintings and aquarelles just 
added to our collection. VISITORS WELCOME. 

S. & G. GUMP, 581 Market Street. 
ofie^ iiaviEcr sriiETi jS. 

GOLD AND SILVER ELECTK ° «i? PLATES . 



-MADE SOLELY BY- 



DR. B.W. HAINES, Dentist, JX1K5: 



Over 200 of these plates are now in use in this city, and they 
give entire satisfaction. Many who could not use the old style 
plates wear these, and experience the greatest comfort. 

To those who cannot be fitted by the old processes, we guar- 
antee a perfect-fitting plate. Difficult cases solicited. 

VAN VLECK ART STUDIO, 

Rooms 6 and 7, 131 Post Street. 



Artistic Wood Carving from original designs 
a specialty. Instructions in all Art branches. 
Art Novelties of all kinds on exhibition and 
sale. 

RENTING HOUSES 



And the Collection of Rents is a 

Specialty of 

TEVIS & FISHER, 14 Post St. 



R. J. WHEELER. 



J. W. GIRVIN. 



J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 

Rubber and Leather Belting, Hose, Packing, etc. 

Rubber Clothing, Boots, Shoes, etc. 

Pacific Coast Agents for Boston Belting Co. aud Fayerweather & Ludew, 
formerly J- B. Hoyt A Co. 2 «V 4 California St.. S.F.,<al. 

S. L. Jones. E. D. Jones. 

S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 

207 and 209 California Street. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AOENT FOR 
PAOIFIC OOAST, 

123CaliforniaSt..S.F 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOR SALE BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



Jan. 2, 1S92. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



l I 



TO THE NEW YEAR 



How do yon do, 

Young Ninety TwoT 
Well, to jodge by your cheek* row-tinted, 

You've teen Beat Rock? 

The Crocker bli 
Is our climate all it if painted .' 

It's bard, you - 

To make ri^rht free 
t'ntil we (ire better acquainted. 

Of course you know 

About the row 
O'er the Post-office's position; 

The thing is stuck 

Out in the muck 
At the corner of Seventh and Mission. 

And there 'twill stick 

If no one kick 
The Commissioners to perdition. 

You know, no doubt, 

We've just come out 
Of the jaws of a reformation ; 

The Supreme Bench 

Gave it a cinch 
And it died of strangulation; 

The boodle ring 

Now has full swing, 
And we are a-drifting to damnation. 

It seems no use 

To Gght abuse; 
A few people get up and holler, 

Then comes the sack, 

Gets in its whack, 
And resistance succumbs to the dollar; 

Dp goes the sponge, 

And with a lunge 
The crowd settles back to its collar. 

Of course we hope 

That you may ope 
Some way for us out of our bother; 

We hoped the same 

When others came, 
But we're yet in the same old pother, 

And it looks still, 

For good or ill, 
One year will be just like another. 

We do not do 

The " Happy New 
Year to you," as you may discover; 

That is played out 

When there's about 
Us no prospect where hope can hover; 

We've lived your best, 

And bide the rest, 
And shall be glad when for us they are over. 

You may not find 

The world so kind 
That you feel you shall ever regret it; 

Long ere the day 

You pass away 
You may wish to forsake and forget it, 

And prize no view 

It offers you 
Like the final one when you quit it. 



THAT PECULIAR KIND OF SILENCE. 



* ^ A LFRED," said Mrs. Lovidovie, " you do not love me as you 

J\_ did in years gone by ; you no longer call me pet names ; you 
have ceased to coin new terras of endearment for me; years ago 
all the newspapers in the world could not have kept you from my 
side for one evening. In those happy days you were " 

" I was a young ass," grunted Mr. Lovidovie, from behind his 
paper. 

,i True! true', true! " sighed the neglected wife, "that's just 
what I was going to say." And a long time afterward she added, 
" You are older, now." 

And Lovidovie read the same paragraph in the paper over and 
over, and tried hard to think of something to say, and couldn't 
just think of it right then, and so kept on thinking and thinking 
and thinking and thinking, and wanted to peep over the paper 
and look at her, but was afraid she might be looking at him. And 
he couldn't think of anything to say back until some time the fol- 
lowing day, and then something told him it was too late. 

— Burdette in Ladies 1 Home Journal, 



No other medicine has won approval, at home, equal to Ayer's 
Sarsaparilla in Lowell, 




FUR NOVELTIES 

.A.T PEICES 

Which are Positively Less than One-half of what is Charged by 
Other Dealers for Similar Goods, 



6000 FUR CAPES, 

$2 and. upward, 

4000 FUR BOAS, 

$1 2S and. upward.. 

10,000 FUR MUFFS, 

60e. and upward. 

§000 Children's Fur Sets, 

80o. and upward. 

FUR EDGINGS AND TRIMMINGS 

Of- IN ALL VARIETIES. -%Q| 
We also wish to announce that we have just received a shipment of 

LONDON-DYED 

ALASKA SEALSKINS 

of superior quality. 



Parties wishing to order should do so at once, so as to obtain 
the pick of our New Skins. 



GARMENTS IN LEADING STYLES, $125 UPWARD. 

■ Send for Illustrated Catalogue, "TK4 



H. LIEBES & COMPANY, 

(INCORPORATED), 

The Largest Exclusively Fur Establishment in the World, 

133. 135, 137, 139 Post Street. 

O IP T£l JST TU ^T TJJ jsr- I T5T O S . 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 




THE mining market on Pine street, was dull and lifeless during 
the week. When the Board opened after the holiday?, a 
small accumulation of orders built prices up for a short time, but 
the movement did not last many hours, and the market fell back 
into its old rut. The business is now practically in the hands of 
a few inside manipulators, who are content to regulate prices, 
and let the market take care of itself, ao far as trading is con- 
cerned. The public have been gradually weeded out on margin 
sales, and only a few of the leading brokers seem to care whether 
school keeps or not, so far as a clientage is concerned. It is more 
fashionable at present to control mines, and the public an- 
nouncement is made that stockholders in despair between 
the devil and the deep sea, can find their savior in a stock- 
broker. A member of the Board in discussing an article which 
appeared in the last issue of the News Letter, objected 
to the inference that the Board officially countenanced 
any movement to obtain the control of the Comstock mines. 
» It is a private matter altogether," he remarked, " among a few 
brokers, who believe that they are in a position to make a 
better selection in the way of directors, and vote or direct 
the voting of stock more intelligently than their clients.' 1 It all 
amounts to the same thing, however, and if the Board does not 
see fit to put a stop to its members' interfering with outside busi- 
ness, it may be taken for granted that it approves of their action. 
If it had not been for an undue ambition in this direction, the 
present ill-feeling which exists among the heavier operators 
would never have interfered to check business. The brokers have 
not money enough among theru to deal stocks and interest outside 
capitalists, and it will take considerable nursing to bring back 
the business they have lost recently. It is a misfortune that 
mining speculation should have run down as it has lately, and 
the brokers have no one to blame but themselves. It behooves 
them to adopt some new and more sensible methods after the 
New Year, and drop the unseemly squabbling which has been 
going on for some time past. 

IIS 

A FEW weeks ago Mr. Geo. V. Sims passed through this city on 
his way north, and during his short stay a daily contempora- 
ry wrote him up for a column in its usual sensational style. He 
was made to say things in this interview which probably the un- 
fortunate man never dreamed of, and combine after combine was 
outlined, until there was hardly an undertaking left in the State 
which was not bonded by the enterprising promoter. He had 
offered to take up all the stock of a collapsed banking institution 
down South, had control of a complete water system for irrigating 
a tract of some million acres of land, and was just about to close 
a contract covering all the free timber tracts up North. The re- 
sult of it all was that London began talking about the matter, 
until finally the Lombard Trust Company, with which he was 
said to be connected, deemed it expedient to take action and deny 
the impeachment that it was desirous of taking possession of the 
entire Pacific Coast States. The Board of Directors met accord- 
ingly, and the following resolution was passed: "That a com- 
munication be made to the press to the effect that Mr. Sims is in 
America on his own business, and is entirely without authority 
from this company to represent it in any way, or to enter into 
any contract on its behalf, and that the several statements which 
have been put forward are without the board's authority in any 
way whatever." This was signed by Percy Orr, the Secretary, 
and C. E. Davidson, Chairman. This resolution may amount to 
much and it may only be for effect. When Mr. Situs was here 
he made his headquarters at the office of the Lombard Trust 
Company in this city, and dealt with people as the representative 
of the company. Mr. Sims will prubably be heard from next. 
tH 

A COMPANY has just been formed in London to purchase some 
gold and silver mines at Tominil, in the State of Durango, 
Mexico. The company comes out under the auspices of the 
Mexican Association, Limited, and the Mexican Explorations, 
Limited, two corporations, the titles of which would suggest that 
between them they own the biggest share of the sister republic. 
The strange part of the business is that the new company, known 
as the Tominil Mines, Limited, pays no cash for the properties, 
but takes all the ground, with machinery, stores, reserves of ore, 
etc., for a consideration consisting entirely of shares. This is the 
polite way ot putting it before the public, who will not, however, 
get their shares for nothing. In view of the extreme liberality of 
the vendors, credulous investors are expected to swallow the 
bait, and take the vendors' shares off their hands at par. This 
is the latest dodge ot confidence operators. Apparently they are 
thoroughly disinterested as regards financial results, but they get 
there just the same, even if the way around the stump is a 
little long. It would be the more honorable and safer plan to de- 
mand a fair price for the property and have done with it, instead 
of raiding the pockets of outside investors in this underhand 
manner. 



A GENERAL meeting of the San Jacinto Tin Company has just 
been held in L mdon. Sir John Stokes, who presided, in mov- 
ing the adoption of the report and accounts, stated that great pro- 
gress had been made at the mines. A water dam had been con- 
structed, four batteries were on the ground and the necessary 
concentrates were in working order. At the present time, how- 
ever, only one battery had been erected, and this was sufficient to 
crush 48 tons of ore per day, and this would give them two tons 
of metal per day, which could be easily sold at $500 per ton. 
When the mines had been still further developed the other batter- 
ies would be erected, which would mean a turn-out of an addi- 
tional two tons of tin per day for every battery worked. Mr. 
Purcell, an engineer who had recently been appointed superin- 
tendent at the mines, gave a description of thedevelopment of the 
property, and stated that the average amount of tin produced 
from the ore was 5 per cent., which was about double tbat pro- 
duced from the richest mines in Cornwall. He characterised the 
San Jacinto as the richest tin mine in the world. The report and 
accounts were, after a considerable atuount of adverse criticism 
and discussion, adopted. 

$$ ? 

IT is hopeless to expect much from outside stocks when the 
Comstocks are lifeless. One of the peculiar features of stock 
speculation in this city is, that the market is generally controlled 
by one line of stocks. If they advance, up goes the whole line, 
and vice versa. This seems most unreasonable, especially when, 
as in the case of the Tuscarora and Quijotoa shares, the mines are 
located hundreds of miles apart from the controlling camp. A 
bonanza struck in North Belle Isle or Peer counts for nothing in 
its effect on the market, if the weights are on Con. Cal-Virginia, 
and B st <fc Belcher is selling below a dollar. As a matter of 
fact, the outside mining camps are in a more flourishing condition 
than they have been for years, and a little independence on the 
part of the managers of the mines would soon create a market 
for their own stocks. There were no assessments levied during 
the week, but one or two are pending in the Comstock companies. 
The annual meetings of Peer, Peerless and Weldon were held on 
Thursday. 

II $ 

A CONVENTION of the miners of this State will be held in 
the city on January '20th. San Francisco will be represented 
by 10 delegates, and the other counties of the State wilt have 30 
each. From the address issued by the committee issuing the call, 
the general condition of the mining interests will he taken up, 
and the convention will not confine itself to action on behalf of 
the owners of hydraulic mines. This branch of the industry will 
not, however, be overlooked, and it is to be hoped that the meet- 
ing will result in deviling some means for the resumption of work, 
on these valuable properties. The people of this State are inter- 
ested just now on the alleged annual loss of from $7,000,000 to 
$10,000,000 in gold, and it will be the miners' own fault if they 
do not set the case fully and clearly before the public when they 
have a chance, and carry the day in their favor. 
% $ t 

THE New York promoter is again at work in Amador County, 
and a number of claims, including the Astoria, Hollywood 
and Middle Bar have been taken up for stock dealing purposes. 
The opinion of a local expert is not very Mattering in regard to the 
intentions of the new companies. The mines are unpatented, and 
for years only sufficient work has been done on them to sati>fy the 
United States laws. The surface works and underground devel- 
opments are not worth mentioning. People in the vicinity, it is 
said, pay no attention to the frivolous operations which have dis- 
tinguished these claims; they cut no figure whatever in the min- 
eral development of this region. It has seemed all along that the 
object is to work off stock on the over-credulous in New York, 
rather than an honest endeavor to search for mineral treasures. 

*$$ 

THE Daily Financial News, of New York, notes the fact that the 
old Emma Mining Company, Poker Schenck and Trenor W. 
Park's great bonanza scheme, out Utah way, has come to the 
front again. This time the debenture bondholders are asked to 
take stock for their bonds; last time the stockholders were asked 
to pay an assessment and take bonds for their stock. Who says 
the law of evolution does not exist? and the end is not yet; in 
fact, the dividend is far distant. 

it $ 

ENGLISH investors are now asked to subscribe the capital 
necessary to build a railroad from Jaffa to Jerusalem, with 
the option of extensions to Natlous, in the direction of Damascus, 
and to Gaza. The iron horse seems destined to invade sacred 
ground as well as the benighted regions of darkest Africa, and 
henceforth even a pilgrimage to the Holy Sepulchre wilt lose 
much of the romance which has attached to it ever since the days 
of the crusaders. 

s$ : 

THE recent dividend of 10 cents declared by the Standard Con., 
of Bodie, is its seventy-seventh, aggregating to date, $3,615,- 
000, or $36.15 per share. After paying this dividend the company 
will have a cash surplus of $30,000. 



Jin. 1 



SAN n: wo, NEWS LETTER. 



16 




*Hc*rf Whil the devil «i tl 

■ One that will pUr thedertl.tlr, with you." 



N 



OW sit you down before* the lire. 

And while the Logi blsM cheerily. 
We'll have n remiuiscent talk. 
An idle stroll, * careless, walk 
Through lueiuurj'l woods, ami. as it were, 
Pick up the thread of the old year. 
Not Mkdty, friend, but merrily. 
Because the New is (nil of cheer. 

Fanny, the dark-eyed, wears the ring 
Young Nob ton on her linger set, 

You met her once at Napa Springs, 
Or Monterey. I may forget. 

But you were very sweet on her, 

And uiamma, too, seemed to concur. 

Then coldness came, neglect, and then 

A tbrong of fond adoring men 

To worship Fan, to hold her shawl, 

Although she liked you best of all, 

I think 'tis better as it is. 

She never seemed to bold a kiss, 

A sacred thing for one alone, 

She'd kiss Fernand when Dick was gone, 

And let stout Harry clasp her waist 

And Milkpunch Tom her sweet lips taste. 

So much for Fan. She's Nobton's now. 

May no tall antlers crown his brow. 

Some of the jolly lads we knew 
Now lie far down beneath the mould, 
The warm hands we pressed are cold, 
'And one within the vasty blue 
A sailor's grave has found; last year 
He talked, as we are talking here, 
Of those who when we called the roll 
Were missing; 'twas a gentle soul 
Within that giant frame; perchance 
When down and down, our comrade sped, 
Down in the deep, so calm and fleet, 
The cannon shot bound at his feet. 
Some sea-nymph pillowed his fair head 
Upon her breast, and from the dead 
Kissed him, to live beneath the waves 
A life of love in coral caves. 

'Tis almost midnight. Noiselessly 

The old year dies — for you and me 

How many memories with him glide 

To rest in Time's engulfing tide. 

So we full soon shall change our phrase, 

Not of to-days, or yesterdays 

To speak, and mark the record near, 

But of the things that were last year. 

"Now while we drink a toast to him 

It mingles in our requiem, 

The sad, yet not the painful theme, • 

That we, awaking from a dream 

Of wine and women's lips and song; 

And all the glorious things of earth 

Shall find the threshold near — so near, 

And pass out with the dying year. 

NIGHT, gentle, soothing night was softly withdrawing her 
mantle from the bosom of the earth, but Asa Fisk still slum- 
bered. That kindly soul was dreaming upon all the wicked 
things the newspaper men had said about him, and was wishing 
that he bad all their endorsements on ,one mighty note, so he 
could crush them at a single goshoop. Ha! ha! ha! laughed a de- 
moniac voice. Asa awoke and saw before him a curious appari- 
tion. It was bulky, bearded and much resembled a man. " You 
have come for me too soon," murmured Asa, " I ain't half through 
yet." " Foo, forn," thundered the demon, " get your traps ready, 
and follow me." » My things ain't come home from the wash," 
protested the shivering usurer. " Don't care," said the demon, 
« you'll be cooler without a shirt in the place we are going to." 
As Mr. Fisk was actually on the point of fainting from sheer 
fright, the apparition Hung off its mask, and the sunny face of 
David Jacks beamed upon Asa. I'll never forgive you for start- 
ling me so," said Mr. Fisk." " You will," said Davy, " when 
you see what I've brought you," and the good epicure produced 
a beautiful, skinny Bologna sausage and a crust. It is needless 
to say that the feast was delightful, and that both liberal-hearted 
gentlemen enjoyed themselves hugely. 



J II IIBBBABD hugraotsdj phloe V Utiles * divorce from WiL 
lUm 1. DltiCk, bfMlIN <>f hli wilful n. 

ft wouldn't .1... Af e all the trouble Wlllle'l auntie and 
mam nil took in visiting the rdit-.r*. *,, u t,> keep their little 
relative from becoming newspaper-famous, Willie g"t th< 
last. A simple divorce announcement Is not rauob In Itself, nor 
is willful neglect generally considered any great cause f"r the 
^•'i"" But behind Willie's willful neglect of Josle bangs :i tale. 
Josle was an Oroville girl, or from some place up In the northern 
citrus belt. She must have been pretty, else she could not have 
enchained Willie's vagrant fancy. They loved, and Joste's papa 
Insisted upon an immediate marriage. Alas! tin- groom was a 
1ml without any visible means of support. HI a mamma did not 
approve of the compulsory marriage, nor did -In- believe in divid- 
ing her income wiih a daughter-) n-la w. Willie was torn from his 
bride's arms and sent from Sun Francisco. 1'resuiiiably cured, he 
returned, but not to his waiting mother. Joaie's attractions were 
too great. This could not be borne by his fond parent, and the 
naughty boy was forced to go abroad again, just as his cousin 
Jed Irwin was exiled to Australia for a somewhat similar, but 
not so pronounced an escapade with an Oakland girl. Josie has 
been granted a divorce. 

BY all odds, the most inspiring sight in the Park at this festal 
season is Mr. Thomas E. Flynn, astride of his celebrated 
horse, Ballyhooley. I had occasion to refer in a vein of respect- 
ful admiration to this noble steed, shortly after he came into 
the possession of the incumbent. The winter months have not 
dealt harshly with Mr. Flynn's steed. A close observer might say 
that he is more finely drawn in the region of the vertebne than 
when he first owed allegiance to the accomplished journalist, and 
that his rib lines are more distinct. Nor is be as hilarious as 
formerly, only cavorting now when the perfume of roasted chest- 
nuts reaches bis nostrils, which only shows the close sympathy 
between horse and rider. His master, too, is graver than he used 
to be, which may be attributed to an advance in the price of green 
feed. On Saturday afternoons the Park would be a desolate 
wilderness without Ballyhooley and the O'Flynn. Even the 
animals have grown to look for the presence of that symmetrical 
horse, and the reindeer eyes him curiously as he hears the Lim- 
erick noble clattering on toward the Pacific ocean. 

THE large number of matches arranged in Jewish society circles 
has made the schatche /is clap their ba ds with delight and smile 
in great glee. They have been doing, so to speak, a land-olfice 
business recently, as is evidenced by the large number of engage- 
ments announced. The schatchen's business is to find heiresses 
for young men whose finances are in a delapidated state, and to 
assist young or aged maidens, who are desirable only from a 
financial point of view, in finding husbands. For his services the 
schatchen gets a percentage of the marriage dowry or a stated fee. 
There are only two or three in the business here, and those who 
require their services pay rather high rates. An opposition firm 
of schatchens would do a good business at cut rates. 

A DOMESTIC, recently from the wilds of Tulare, but now wrest- 
ling with the kettles and pans in a kitchen on Jones street, at- 
tended a theatrical performance a few nights ago. It was her 
first visit to a city theatre, and from her seat in the gallery she 
enjoyed two hours of rapturous pleasure. The next day she 
described to her mistress the wonders of the play, and then, as if 
suddenly reflecting upon the hole made in her month's wages, 
said: " But I think six-bits was an awful price for a ticket." 

<• Yes," answered her mistress, " but you know, Julia, that 
some performances cost much more than that. Occasionally a 
theatre or opera ticket costs three or four dollars." 

" Oh, yes, I know they do for Sullivan and them," said Julia. 

THE parallel between the war rumors in Chile and the orange 
crop in San Bernardino is really remarkable. For example, 
one morning we read : " War in Chile certain. Nothing can avert 
it." On the next, when we open our paper, thirsting for gore, we 
see, to our intense disgust, that Chile has not smote an American 
sailor recently, and that the War Department, therefore, is laying 
upon its oars. So with San Bernardino. Monday we were as- 
sured that the orange crop would be a total failure. Wednesday 
the report was contradicted, and we are told that the oranges are 
all right, and that San Bernardino will yield a fine crop. Well, of 
course we allow the necessity for the existence of newspapers, 
but good Lord, how refreshing it would be if they aimed even at 
telling the truth. 

NEW YEAR resolutions are going out of fashion and there is 
the pity. For there was a certain satisfaction, it must be 
confessed, in working about the close of the year on this bitumin- 
ous pavement, which they say, constitutes an important portion 
of the lower regions. 

Tis better to swear off, and smash, 
Thau never to swear off at all. 

A morning paper has sent a very clever writer, a brilliant man, 
but devoted to the booze to Los Gatos to exhibit himself on bi- 
chloride of gold. He ib expected to describe all bis symptoms 
in the most acurately literary manner. It is sure to be highly in- 
teresting stuff, and if a cure is wrought, there will be joy in San 
Francisco saloondoom. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 







ANOTHER acceptable gift is a lampshade, and some of them 
are marvelous erections. A pale, green silk shade has a ruche 
round the top, and a deep frill of coarse black net on which the 
key-pattern is embroidered in mauve baby ribbon. The lamp- 
shade has eight corners, and the frill forms festoons by being 
caught up at each corner by bunches of pansies. A triangular 
shaped shade is covered on the top by a billowy mass of pale 
green and blue erepe de chine. Deep frills of the two shades are 
turned back and caught at the corners by a cluster of small shells, 
showing the two colors. A shade made in Pagoda form is com- 
posed of yellow silk, with a wide flounce of black lace, which is 
ornamented at the corners with rosettes of ribbon. A Spanish 
looking shade is in poppy-red silK, powdered with black pom- 
poms. A fringe of black chenille ending in pompoms hangs over 
a red frill, while at the corners are hung tambourines. 



Handkerchief sachets embroidered with ribbons or silk are 
easily made, and are always acceptable presents. One made in 
mauve satin, with the corner turned back and the name em- 
broidered in gold, is bordered with Parma violets, and scented 
with the corresponding perfume; and another, in pale green silk, 
has a deep frill of the same, caught up with forget-me-nots at ir- 
regular intervals. These, it is needless to add, are French, bnt 
would really not be difficult to make. A large cushion of pale 
pink silk had a diamond-shaped piece of silk of the same color, 
embroidered with violets, laid on the center. A deep frill of pink 
silk is attached to the cushion by a violet-colored cord, fastened 
at the corners by tiny bunches of the flowers. 

In these days of dandyism, it is easier than it was a Tew years 
since to give men what is likely to please them. Handkerchiefs, 
with the initial or autograph embroidered in the corner, are al- 
ways acceptable; while, for men who have bachelor quarters, a 
lamp-shade, lamp, or photograph frame are useful presents. A 
lovely cigar-case, prepared for a fiance, was in hammered gold, 
with a miniature of the fiancie, surrounded by diamonds in one 
corner. A tortoiaeshell cigarette case had the owner's initials in 
diamonds at one side and his address in gold letters at the other. 
A silver cigarette-case, filled with cork-tipped cigarettes, had the 
advertisement picture enameled on the outside. A tie-case of 
morocco leather, with apenures for studs, sleeve-links, and pins, 
and a stand with a clock, calendar, and thermometer, are useful 
gifts. 



The prejudice against opals, which, by the way were, until the 
beginning of the present century, always considered the most 
unlucky of precious gems, is rapidly disappearing, and now that 
they are found in our own country, people are commencing to 
appreciate the beauty of this wonderful jewel, and favor jewelry 
in which it is seen. One of the prettiest and most attractive breast- 
pins this season shows the variegated and changeful tints of an 
opal clover, enhanced by a circle of alternate rubies, emeralds and 
diamonds. 



One of the fads of the season in Paris threatens to be the prac- 
tice of tattooing. There are at present there two Americans, a 
man and a woman, who are not only decorated nearly over their 
bodies, but are also professors of the art. They produce all kinds 
of pictures on the human form divine in various colors, and with 
scarcely any pain, and they are already doing a good business in 
this particular form of art. Strange to say, many ladies have 
gone in for the new craze. 

The beautiful enamel flower decoration on watch cases, which 
has recently been revived, and which, until this season, cnuld 
only be applied to solid gold, is now shown on rilled cases, and 
this enables many with slender purses to possess time-pieces that 
have always been beyond the reach of any but those of means. 
A pretty design, that has just been introduced, is a pansy of soft 
velvet colors on a plain polished surface. 

Some young ladies may consider it impertinent to present their 
beau with a scarf-holder simulating an interrogation point, of 
Roman gold set with diamonds and turquois; but, notwithstand- 
ing, such an ornament has been placed on the market, and is 
creating luuch favorable comment on its suggestiveness and 
unique appearance, says the Ladies' Home Journal. 

A dog belonging to a French lady was seen the other day posi- 
tively attired in stockings and some brown material several 
times darker than its natural coat, and to these stockings were 
attached leather soles, in which the pampered spaniel went pat- 
tering and clattering along the pavement. The stockings came 
half-way up his legs, and were fastened with elastic bands. 

Mothers be Sure and Use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 
children while Teethiug. Price, 25 cents a bottle. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

AND 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street. San Francisco, California. 

NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO. OF IRELAND; 
ATLAS ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON; 
BOYLSTON INSURANCE CO. OF BOSTON; 
OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON. 

WILLIAMS. DIMOND & GO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for— 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship I The China Trade and Insurance Co. 

Company, (L'd.), 

" The California Line of Clippers," The Baldwin Loeomotive Works, 

from New York, Steel Rails and Track Material. 

" The Hawaiian Line of Packets," I 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Agents for Spreckels' Liue of Hawaiian Packets, S. 8. Hepworth'B Centri 
fugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 
327 Market Street, corner Fremont. 

8AN FRANC ISCO. 

SCHOOL OF ELOCUTION AND EXPRESSION. 

1170 Market St., Donohoe Building. 

The school furnishes the most thorough and systematic training for 
voice, bndy aud mind. Courses are arranged to meet all classes. Pupils 
prepared for the staee, public readers, teachers of elocution and expression 
or social accomplishment. The Delsarte system of dramatic training aud 
development of grace aud ease a specialty. 

(Mrs. May .lose phi Klnrald, 

PRINCIPALS ?Prof. J. Rub. rls KiucaMl, 

((Graduate Boston School of Expression) 

.BOWEN. 

GROCER S 

426432 Pine St. Telephone Noi 

215-217 Sutter St. Telephone No. Ill 

TWO STORES TW ^ STORES. 

PINE STREET, JUST BELOW KEARKY. 

SUTTER STREET, JUST ABOVE KEARNY. 

THE SEASON'S DELICACIES. 

Dainties and Luxuries from every market of 
the world, New Jordan Almonds, New Ger- 
man Potatoes, New French Candied Fruits, 
New Maillards Candies, New Bon-bons, New 
Smyrna Figs, New Carton Raisins (just the 
thing to send your Eastern friends) New Mince 
Meat, New Weisbaden Fruits, in juice, wine 
and arrae, New Shell Fish in glass. 

HAVANA CIGARS. Weekly shipments. 

Splendid Selections. Cigars sold on the basis 

of grocer's profit. 

St^*Send for new monthly Catalogue, free. 



Jan. 2. 1892. 



BAN PRANCISl NEWS I ll i Ti: 



1 



SUNBEAMS 




ERE Capld'fl dart had ceu«d to smart 
Whale'er she thought of doing 
He sanctioned; thus she ih railed hlfl heart 

With btUing and with i 
Hut since the honeymoon i* "\-r 
Tia plain that he -i be willing 
To have her coo a little n; 

Am! bring about less billing. 

— Waihitigton Star. 
At the baths an important young man walked up to the door of 
one of the compartments and, knocking at the same, testily inquired : 
*• When in thunder are you going t*> get those trowsers on?" There 
was a faint giggle, and a silvery voice replied: "When I gel mar- 
ried, I suppose. He fainted at once. He had mistaken the door. 

— Irish Times. 
" tioing to decorate a grave? I thought your lot was in the 
other cemetery." '• It is ; but when I was first married my wife made 
a sponge cake for me. which a tramp stole and ate. I got Ins body 
From the Coroner and every year 1 lay a wreath of flowers on his 
grave as a mark of gratitude. — Life. 

^^ T ''mnn— Why do you send her so many flowers if it 

is mi horribly expensive and you cannot atfurd it? The Young GenlU- 

That's just the trouble. If I should stop sending the flowers 

the florist would think I was losing the girl, and I should have to pay 

up. — Life. 

She always used to shake my hand 

With touch light as a feather; 
Last night I said I loved her, and 

She shook me altogether. — Harper's Bazar. 
Mrs. Bingo — My dear, while I was in the tobacco store the other day 
buying those cigars for your Christinas, your St. Bernard dog came 
in and tried to pull me out. What do you suppose he meant? Bingo 
— He probably wanted to save my life. — Life. 

Prof. Hardhead — I am surprised. Miss Giddie, to find that you play 
chess. Mi$s Giddie {making a move) — Why so, Mr. Hardhead? "You 
said you never indulged in games of chance." "Why, Mr. Hardhead! 
Do v'ou consider chess a game of chance?" " It is as you plav it." 

—Life. 
Mrs. Greatmann— What are you worrying over? Nobody will be- 
lieve what those papers say. now that you have boldly sued them for 
libel. Hon. Mr. Greatmann {despondently) — I'm afraid I can't keep the 
case from coming to trial. — Puck. 

Little Tot {lugging away at her Papa's leg)— Dinime dime, Papa ! Her 
Papa- -Why f bless you! What for. child? Little Tot— I heard brover 
George tell sister Tillie 'at he pulled you 1 leg for live dollars last night. 
I'll do it for less'n that ! — Puck. 

A five-gallon demijohn of whisky, corked and sealed, was found in 
the stomach of a whale that drifted ashore the other day. Antiquar- 
ians will now ascertain whether Jonab was in the habit of carrying a 
corkscrew. — Detroit Free Press. 

—The coquette laughs and sorrows not 
As she ber conquests doth recall, 
'Tis better to have loved a lot 

Than never to have loved at all. 

— Chicago Times. 
Lady (at the theatre who has been bobbing arouad in her seat)— Shall I 
take off my hat? " Giinsey—No, ma'am; not necessary. I am a pro- 
fessional contortionist. — Frank Leslie's. 

Mrs. X. — Yes ; but have they any children ? Mrs. Y. — Children ? 

Mercy! What are you thinking of? No, indeed! Why, those peo- 
ple are Americans— not Irish. 

—Clerk — The hotel is so crowded sir, that the best we can do is to 
put you in the same room with the proprietor. Guest— That will be 
satisfactory. Will you kindly put my valuables in the safe? 

— Puck. 
— — Jinks— What are your objections to cremation? Filkins — Well, 
I should bate to be put into a jar where the first man who came 
along might mistake me for a new brand of tooth-powder. 

— New York Herald. 

— -" Tommy Figg," said the teacher, " you wrote this excuse your- 
self." '• Yep," admitted Tommy. " You see, paw writes such a poor 
hand 'at I felt 'shamed for you to see it." — Iadiana,polis Journal. 

" Heh, you feller! Come backund pay for dot beer!" The " Tough 
Customer" {making Ms exit)— "Ah, conie off! Didn't you say de 
frot' 'd settle?" " —Judge. 

Customer— I want a clock to run thirty days. Jeweler {politely) I'm 
sorry to disappoint you, sir; but we conduct an exclusively cash 
business. —Jewelers' Weekly. 

Lady — Don't you consider it ridiculous to plume yourself so much 
on your birth? Gent— Not at all; I couldn't exist without it. 

— Scherzshafter . 



Things Never Sold.— Pope. 



Riches, like insects, while concealed they lie, 
Wait for wings, and in their season fly; 
To whom can riches give repute and trust, 
Content or pleasure, but the good and just? 
Judges and senates have been bought for gold; 
Esteem and love are never to be sold. 



THE DELBECK 

THE EXTRA DRY 



THE PERFECTION OF A DRY WINE. 





THE lIluT, 

The highest grade ot Champagne without 
sweetness. 



THE BARTON & GUESTIER 

(established 1725, Bordeaux) 

Clarets, White Wines and Olive Oils. 




JAMES DE FREMERY &. CO., - San Francisco, 

General Agents, Pacific Coast, 

ARE YOU BUILDING? 

DO YOU INTEND TO BUILD? 

IF SO 

Call and see our Elegant Stock of Artistic 
Hardwood MANTELS, at ex- 
tremely low prices. 

California Gas Fixture Company, 

STARR KING BUILDING, 

123 geary street. 

Fall Millinery ! 



I will be pleased to have 
you examine our large stock 
of FALL MILLINERY. 

I will convince you that 
you will save at least 25 per 
cent by purchasing your 
Millinery from the direct 
im porter. 



P. F. BUTLER, 



808 Market Street, Phelan Building. 




18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 



WIESBADEN. 



The London fog was black and thick 
As through the streets, at double-quick, 
A stranger rattled in a hack, 
This label on his carpet-sack, 

" Wiesbaden.' 

* In search of baths why have you come 
So far from your delightful home, 
Where you have full a dozen Spas 
As good?" The only answer was, 

" Wiesbaden.' 

1 Return, you poor, tired Boss, and rest 
Again in your own Golden West. 
The Grand Jury is overthrown;" 
But still he answered with a moan, 

" Wiesbaden. 

'Think you another may be drawn 
As fearless as the one ibat's gone? 
Think you at last the wrathful tide 
Has turned against you?" He replied: 

" Wiesbaden.' 

At the next term they will report, 
The caller cried. " Gome into Gourt, 
Christopher Buckley!" and the cry 
Received this only in reply, 

" Wiesbaden.' 

There in a bath, o'er seas away, 
In perfect health and peace he lay, 
And calmly puffed at his cigar, 
And said, " "fwas well I came to far 

11 Wiesbaden. 



£^k Pfr°PZKTJB 



THERE is a difference in opinion in local real estate circles. 
Some say the New Year's activity will begin the first of the 
month ; others maintain that not until the middle of January will 
the boom be with us. About the fact of the matter is that one- 
balf of the real estate world will not begin to do big business till 
two weeks or so after the holidays, while the other half will begin 
its boom immediately. It is all according to the kind of real es- 
tate business one does. There is great unanimity, however, in 
the firm belief that 1892 will be a guod year for the real property 
man. A great many new tracts are to be opened in January, more 
yet in February and still more in March, and so on throughout 
the year. At least three lines of electric street railways will be 
finished during the year, one or more branch steam railways will 
be completed, additional ferryboats are to be put on, and in a 
score of different ways the suburbs of the metropolis are to be 
brought nearer to the city. 

Renting is dull, yet there is a demand for modern stores and 
dwellings with all improvements and conveniences. The signs of 
the times are that the " to let " signs will be on the increase this 
year on all old-fashioned, badly constructed houses in which the 
plumbing is bad and the sanitary conditions worse. This is a 
healthy sign, the renting agencies declare, and shows that San 
Franciscans mean to liv well, if it does coat a little more. 

Away from South Omaha and the Town of Lake, Chicago, come 
inquiries to O'Farrell & Lang for Baden property. Already there 
area number of Baden land owners frofri Omaha and the World's 
Fair cities. 

The GarnallHopkins Company will open the Knox Park tract 
in Oakland, on the first of the year. This is not a large property, 
but is billed as the Cream of Oakland lots. It is on Knox avenue 
between Telegraph avenue and Grove street. 

There have been several good sales in the past week, despite 
the inevitable dullness of a holiday season. S. P. Middleton sold 
a $15,500 improved house and lot on Clementina street, between 
First and Second Tevis & Fisher sold Senator Stewart's old 
residence on Hyde street, near Clay, to Dr. MacMonagle for 
$16,000, and a building lot on Geary street, near Franklin, for 
$9,500 to Dr. John A. Miller, who will put up a handsome and 
costly residence at once. There were many other less important 
sales during the week, and as much inquiry as could be expected 
at this season. 

The Belvedere roads have been graveled lately, and are now in 
an excellent condition, despite the wet weather. There is a good 
demand for property on the peninsula and prices are firm. 

Building lots were not very generally distributed this year as 
Christmas presents. 



Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of ChemicalB, by the Use of the 
LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER I 

..Over 300 in Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

1 Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount oi 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

33 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. _^___ 

Good Cheer and a Souvenir of California for our Eastern Friends. 

Parties desiring to send to their 
frieudn East the 

INGLENOOK TABLE WINES 

Tan have their or 'ers filled at San 
Francif-co prices aud of freight at 
carload rates added, thus taviug 
a great expense by leaving their 
orders in time with 

F. A HABER, 
Office and Depot Inglsnook Vineyard, 122 Sansom e St., S. F 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

JL CaiTIBT HOME 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 

Systems — " Slaltery " Iuductiou; " Wood " Arc. Factories— Fort Wayne, 
Indiana; Brooklyn. New York. 

Electric Improvement Company. 

General Agents for California, Nevada, Oregon, Arizona and Washington 
of the Fort Wayne Electric I,lgbt Co , Fort. Wayne, Ind. 

Estimates furnished for Electric Railways, Electric Light and Steam 
Plants, House Wiring, etc. Mariue Work a Specialty. 




35 New Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



Dr. Ricord's Restorative pills. 

Buy none but the Genuine — A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
aud the Medical Celebrities. Agents for California aud the Pacific StateB. 

J. U. STEEIJS A tO., 
No. 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), Sau Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED. Boj: of 50 pills, SI 25: of 100 pills, *2; of 200 pills. 
$3 50; of 400 pills, $fi : P reparato ry Pil ls. $2, Send for Circular. 

LAYER,' MULLANY k LAVER, 

ARCHITECTS, 

Furnish plans, specifications, aud Superintendence for the construction 
or renovation of dwelling houses, aud every description of building. 
Office: 93 Flood Building, tor. 4ili and Market StH.. S. F. 

Fine Sanitary Plumbingand Gas-fitting 
Estimates furnished. Jobbing promptly 
attended to. 

CHARLES E. ANDERSON, 
1616 Polk Street, near Clay, and 1214 
Polk Street, near Sutler, 
telephone No. 2107. 



PLUMBING 



Quacks and patent optometers a fruitful source of misfits. Consult 
C. Muller, the optician, 13a Montgomery street, near Bush, San Francisco. 



Fine Table ^,- 
Wines 



From ou^ Celebra- 
ted Orleans 
"Vineyara 




>w^ J Producers of 




Wr 



EGLIP 



CHAMPACNE, 

530¥asMnglonSt 

SAN FEANCISO0. 



The Orleans Vineyards of 
Messrs. Arpad Haraszthy & 
Go- are situated among the 
foothills of Yolo County, three 
miles west of Esparto, near 
the entrance of the Capay Val- 
ley, and comprises 640 acres 
of rolling hill land, of which 
360 are planted with the 
choicest Imported European 
Grape Vines, whose product 
ranks with the highest grade 
Wines produced in California. 






BAN Ki: VNCI8C0 NEWS T ETTER, 



)' 




THKRE b*9 been a holocmi-t of Iowm on the Pacific Cout in 
Ihvpasi week, which brings ih.- mooib'a lire lou« (..r ilmi 
section up to and above half a million dollars. This has been the 
tn< -t .i:sa>irou3 year the tire insurance oompantes ol the United 
Slates have experienced since the big Boston tires, and a careful 
estimate places the outgo fully |20 000,000 more than the income, 
for the fire business generally. The Pacific Coast has been a com- 
paratively favored district. There is scarcely an agency or a com- 
pany out here, but that will find a balance on the credit sheet 
thit year. 

Underwriters are bead over heels in figures just now, preparing 
the annual statements. These will be completed and made public 
about the middle of January, when there will be news enough. 
and much food for cogitation. 

At last the Pacific Insurance I'nion has wakened up to the 
importance of the sprinkled risks question. For weeks they have 
been struggling with tbe problem. The result is now announced 
in a 25 per cent, reduction on all sprinkled fire risks. The Arm- 
strongs seem to have forced this action on tbe Union. Armstrong 
was a reformer and had many good ideas. Now that he is figur- 
atively dead, every underwriter will admit that- And like every 
reformer, though be comes to grief himself, the. impress of his 
work is left to posterity, and the world is better for his having 
lived and struggled — yes, and failed. Armstrong recognized the 
importance of preventing large conflagrations and forsaw that a 
properly protected risk could be taken at a much less rate than one 
not protected. He foresaw, too, what underwriters are just now 
waking up to. that protected risk3. no matter how small the rate, 
were more profitable than even small lines on unprotected risks. 
He started out to take big lines on sprinkled risks, and his plan was 
to take nothing but sprinkled risks. Had be adhered to this plan 
and been satisfied with a moderaie-sized, though profitable busi- 
ness, he would not now be non est. Here are the figures to prove 
it: Out of $4,000,000 worth of premiums on sprinkled risks in a 
given period, Armstrong's loss was less than $75,000. He had 
another good plan. It was to do business directly with the as- 
sured. This really was the keynote of his phonomenal success. 
He gave John Smith tbe benefit of the middleman's 40 per cent. 
John Smith soon realized, loo, that it was money in bis pocket, to 
do business with Armstrong. Armstrong's expenses were 17.79 
per cent, of his income. All these things should be well studied 
by the stock companies. They are not so perfect but that they 
may learn even from the misguided and unfortunate reformer. 

But have tbe Mutuals gone out of business? Armstrong has 
retired, but it is not so certain about the retirement of his Mutu- 
als. Toe New York Daily Commercial Bulletin is authority for the 
statement that the directors have a movement on foot looking to 
tbe continuance of the Mutuals; tlfat W. JE. Lowe, Seth Milliken 
and Nathan D. Bill have given assurances of financial support to 
the extent of .|^5,000 each, and that George W. Montgomery or 
J. (J. Hatie, or both, will manage the reconstructed concern. After 
all, it may only be Armstrong out and some one else in. 

Insurance men say there is a disposition on the part of the 
owners of risks with large, open areas, to avoid the increased 
rates by adopting elevator traps, automatic sprinklers, and other 
protectives. This will suit underwriters to a nicety, as the sole 
object of the increased rates have been to make the risks more 
secure. 

The Equitable Life will be one of the tenants of the new Crocker 
building as soon as the latter is ready for occupancy. 

H. L. Low will take possession of the Transatlantic, of Ham- 
burg, on the first of the year. George Leonard, also of Butler & 
Holden's agencies, will be the assistant manager. The new 
offices will be located on the second floor at 220 tiansotne street 

F. Wigan, inspector and chief auditor of tbe United States 
Branch of the Alliance Company, of London, has arrived in this 
city from Europe, and has reported for duty to Manager James. 
Mr. Wigan has been with the Alliance for seventeen years, and 
his transfer to this coast shows that tbe Alliance means to enter 
tbe field here in earnest, and make this one of their most im- 
portant branches. 

The U'hitesboro, which went ashore at Little River on Tuesday 
last, was not much damaged, and was but lightly insured. 
Marine underwriters do not breath freely these days, and are con- 
stantly on the watch for disasters. 



For Debilitated Men! If vou desire to be restored to, complete 
vigor and manhood, promptly, permanently and cheaply, we will 
send you full particulars (sealed) of a reliable, unfailing Home 
Treatment free. No electric nonsense, no stomach drugging. 
Address Albion Pharmacy Co., Box L. Albion, Mich. 



"White's hat emporium, at 614 Commercial street, continues to be 
the leading store in that line in the city. 



PALATINE INSURANCE CO,, Ld, 



CF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 



Subscribed and Guaranteed Capital 
Paid Up Capita/ 
Assets - 



S3. 000. (00 00 

600.000 00 

1.388.708 00 



$200,000 UNITED STATES BONDS 
Deposited with the Treasurer of the State of Oregon for the 
beni in "f .ill policy-holders in the Cnited States. 

'' also deposited in Oregon as required by the laws of 

said titate. 

THE UNITED FIRE INSURANCE CO., Ld., 

OF MANCHESTER. ENGLAND. 
Subsc ibsd and Guaranteed Capital - - $1,250,000 00 

Paid Up Capital 500,000 00 

Assets 1,174,764 00 

On Deposit in the State of New York $200,0011 and reserve re- 
quired by law, for tbe benefit of all policy holders in the United 
Slates. 

is »ili Companies Joiutly Responsible on All Policies. 

CHARLES A. LATON, Manager, 

Also Attorney and Ageut, 

439 CALIFORNIA STREET - - SAN FRANCISCO. 

{Safe Deposit Building.) 

ST. MATTHEW'S HALL, SAN MATEO, CAL. 



A SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 



Twenty-sixth Year. 



Rev. ALFRED LEE BREWER. !>!>., Rector. 



Madame Waldow Cohen, 

Teacher of ZFiano I^orte and Sin.g-in.g', 

1315 11,4V STREET. 




ZDOZTnTT 

DRINK 

DISEASE! 



Begin the New Year by pur- 
chasing a CELEBRATED 

PASTEUR 

GERM-PROOF FILTER 



Call aud see them in operation 



C. BROWN & SON'S, 

823 Market Street, 
Academy of Science Building. 



Examine our complete Hue of 
Parlor aud Kitchen Stoves and 
Uteusila before purchasing else- 
where. 



20 



SAN FRANCIPCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 



?. - ,/-». 



THE important medical manuscript whicb George Ebera ac- 
quired at Luxor eighteen or nineteen years ago, writes the 
Berlin correspondent of the Lancet, only fragments of which have 
hitherto been translated, is now accessible to all who can read 
German. A complete translation has been made by a Berlin 
medical man, Dr. Henrich Joachim, who learned Egyptian for 
the purpose. By his assiduous labors the oldest medical work in 
the world, written, it is supposed, at latest, 1550 b. c, and many 
parts of which are of a much older date, is now common prop- 
erty. It consists mainly of receipts, interspersed here and there 
with proverbs. The treatise shows that many methods at present 
in use were practiced by the old Egyptian physicians. 

— A remarkable case of successful removal of a piece of metal 
imbedded in the retina is reported by Dr. Tatbam Thompson, 
ophthalmic surgeon to the Cardiff Infirmary. A blacksmith was 
engaged in December last, at a colliery near Pontypridd, in stamp- 
ing some new tools, when a small splinter of steel Hew off and 
struck him in the white of the left eye, causing irritation and 
other symptoms which eventually rendered it necessary either to 
remove the eye or to make an attempt to extract the cause of the 
trouble. The latter daring experiment being decided on, the 
patient was put under the influence of ether. The little wound 
was then reopened with an instrument known as a » cataract 
knife," and the curved pole of the electric magnet was introduced. 
This was then passed across the vitreous body as nearly as could 
be judged in the direction traversed by the splinter. On the first 
withdrawal nothing appeared ; but a second attempt, in which 
the pole was passed still further, ended in the fragment of steel 
passing easily through the opening "in tow ;t of the magnet. 
The sufferer is stated to have since resumed his duties with re- 
scored sight. 

At the meeting of the Royal Botanic Society in London, 

recently, there were upon the table some interesting illustrations 
of the various substitutes used for, or in the place of, tea. The 
secretary said that mankind in all parts of the world had selected 
some vegetable product from which to obtain an agreeable and 
useful beverage, and it was a remarkable fact thatall these drinks 
thus obtained, whether they were from leaves or fruits, con- 
tained more or less of the remarkable property known under the 
name of theine and the like. He submitted to the meeting samples 
of coffee-tea, or prepared coffee leaves, grown in the society's 
conservatory, and said it had been estimated that the percentage 
of theine in the leaves of coffee is 1-26, as against 100 in the 
beans; and as the leaves may be easily grown in many parts of the 
world where it is difficult to insure good crops of coffee beans, he 
thought it might prove a valuable agricultural productin many of 
our warmer colonies. At present only some 2,000,000 of men 
used coffee-tea, in comparison to 110,000,000 who used the bean, 
and 500,000,000 who drank Chinese and Indian tea. 

A valuable invention has been under trial in Germany, and 

has now been definitely adopted as an adjunct to the manufac- 
tories of explosives for military use. The liability to explosion 
with compounds used for charges of torpedoes and similar pur- 
poses is very great. A German inventor has devised a vacuum 
chamber for drying these substances, so that on the incidence of 
any explosion the gases have room to expand, and when the ex- 
pansion is sufficient to exert pressure on the sides of the chamber, 
a number of small doors or escape valves open automatically and 
permit the harmless egress of the gas. The whole force of an ex- 
plosion is thus neutralized, and the only damage likely tu arise 
is the consumption of the charge in the chamber. It is found 
also that the process of the drying is more rapidly accomplished, 
and thus smaller charges can be dried, so that a still further 
diminution in the risk of manufacture is effected. Herr Emil 
Fassburg, of Breslau, has done good service to his country in per- 
fecting this apparatus. 

One of the attractions for loafers just now is the new stearu 

plow tnat has made its appearance in the streets of London. 
This has come into use as an aid to the street-menders, who are 
busy at this time of the year remetalling the roads that are mac- 
adamized. The metal is pressed down so hard by the steam 
rollers that the task of breaking up the surface with pick by hand 
is a painfully laborious and prolonged operation. The pLow 
harnessed to a powerful traction engine travels up and down the 
road, tearing open the surface easily and rapidly as it goes. In 
its path follow the carts laden with metal, which are tipped and 
spread. Finally comes the steam roller, and the work is com- 
pleted in about a quarter of the time it used to occupy. 

— — A process by which iron and steel plates can be coated with 
nearly pure lead is now in operation at works in London. Hith- 
erto it has not been possible to get lead to adhere to iron without 
the aid of tin, since lead has little or no affinity for iron, but in 
the new process this difficult feat is accomplished, the coating 
being effected with a bath of lead of about 98J per cent, purity. 
The plates or other articles to be coated are first pickled in a bath 
to remove scale. 



iB^:r>r:K:s_ 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,00r 00 

Surplus 1,000,000 00 

Undivided Profits (July 1st, 1890) 3,275,919 48 

WM. ALVOBD, President. 

Thomas Bbown Cashier | B. Murray, Jr . Assistant Cashier 

Irving P. Moulton, 2ud Assistant Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; B03TON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India, China, 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frauki ort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama. Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland- 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



N\ W. Corner Sansoine aud Busli Streets. 

Established 1870. U S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) $1,500,000 

SURPLUS. $600.0001 UNDIVIDED PROFITS $166,000 

S. G. MURPHY. President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT.. .Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

DIRECTORS: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins. 8. G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffitt. 

Thomas Jennings, Johu A.. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A Ueneral Banking Business Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LY/NCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from $5 to $lou per auuum (under the exclusive control of 

tho reuter), for me care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 

Btorage. A spe<'ulty made of the care of wills. Office bours, 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 

Authorized Capital $3,50u,000 | Capital paid up 2.450,000 

.Reserve ... 3y5,000 

San rrancisco Office, 424 California St. | London Office 73 Lombard Su.E. C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1005 A Street. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM d EEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YOKK-Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

Thib Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THESATHER BANKING COMPANyT" 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON ....President 

J. L N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: Chas. Maiu, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. Johu&on, 
C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. ahepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York — Drexet, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia — Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis — The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. Loudon— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

WELLS, FAR60 & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

JV £. Corner San some and Sutler Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $5,500,000.00 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker, J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Ban kin 
Business. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS f-ORTCOSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tous. Regular Warehouse lor Sau 
Fraucisco Produce Excliauge Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best aud newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain etored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company. 2C2 Sansome St.. over the AnglO'California Bank. 



THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 11.000,000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, I E. H. MILLER, Jr. 

R. c. WOOLWORTH President. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier 

SECORITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $800,000 

OFFICEHS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary S. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 






BAN Ki: INCI8C0 NEW8 T BTTBR. 



21 




THE CHESSBJAhi 



Irene, rlo you yet remember, 

ire were grown to itdt* «rl 
Those evenings in ibe l>le*k December 
1'urtained warm from the snowy weather 
When you and I j> . together, 

Checkmated by each other*! •: 
Ab, still I see y.<ur -«"ft white hand 
Hovering warm o'er Queen and Knight. 

Brave Pawns In valiant battle stand; 
The double Ci-tles guard the wings! 
The Bishop bent on distant things, 
M.ves, sidling through the fight. 

Our fingers touch: our glances meet, 
And falter; falls your golden hair 
Against my cheek; your bosom sweet 
Is heaving. Down the field, your Queen 
Rides slow her soldiery all between, 
And checks me unaware. 
Ah! me, the little battle's done, 
Disperst is all the chivalry; 
Full many a move, since then, have we 
'Mid life's perplexing chequers made. 
And many a game with Fortune play'd — 

What is it we have won? 
This, this at least — if this alone; — 
That never, never, never more. ■ 
Aa in those old still nights of yore, 

(Ere we were grown so sadly wise) 
Can you and I shut out the skies, 
Shut out the world, and wintry weather, 
And, eyes exchanging warmth with eyes, 

Play chess, as then we play'd together. 

A GARDEN FAIR. 



A garden fair, 

An Autumn air, 
Aye! golden leaves a-falling down; 

And she is there. 

And he is — where? 
Oh, sky so blue! Oh, leaves so brown I 

Tho' far be he, 

No care need be; 
Aye! dainty words, sweet billet-doux! 

Tho' winter call 

Tho' leaves may fall, 
I know — I know my love is true! 



A FRAGMENT.— 7?// Norah FilzIIenry. 



Only an old, old wall, yet doth it form 

A picture, in itself complete, 

Where trailing wreaths of ivy creeping o'er 

And hanging down, their graceful tendrils meet 

And intertwine. 

And here and there are little tufts of moss; 

Seeming more emerald green 

In contrast to the old gray stone. 

With grass and golden dandelion the summit crowned. 

While deep-hued wallflowers fill the air around 

With fragrance. Who shall say, 

" Only an old stone wall; there is no beauty there?" 

The soul that seeks for beauty finds it everywhere. 



FOR NEW YEAR'S 



DAY.— (Union 
Journal. 



ScuUard in Ladies' Home 



Friend, if thou dost bethink thee now 
To lip some earnest pledge or vow, 
Search well thy heart, nor idly let 
The burden on thy soul be set. 
Lead not thy faith until it strain^ 
And break, and all be worse than vain; 
Measure thy power, and for the rest 
Beseech thy God to bless the test. 

Love. — William Wilfred Campbell. 

Love came at dawn when all the world was fair, 

When crimson glories, bloom and song were rife ; 
Love came at dawn when hope's wings fanned the air, 

And murmured, " I am life." 
Love came at even when the day was done, 

When heart and brain were tired, and slumber pressed ; 
Love came at eve, shut out the sinking sun, 

And whispered, " I am rest." 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

CAPITAL PAID UP m,K„ >h1( , , 

BESEHVE mm t<M 000 

Bontheul corner Bait hh.1 9 uii 

HEAD OFFICE OU LOMBARD STREET. LONDON. 

I,,;VN ; .mm. m. Portland:, 

808 BriiUhr« imtmtef, \ «. aw, rfantlmo And Kamloopi, 

i,T,'','\'.',' , " k , "■""-"••'- » General Banking Biulneaa. Aoc i- npe I lab 

leet to Check, Aud spec posit, . . ommurclalCrc.il, 

I«oJ J , e .' ' '"" : Ipprovod Bill. dUoouuted nad «.l 

"'"'" I-""", 1 ." 11 ',•■'■ »"d UmnchM. aud upon lit Ageula, a, follow*: 

v ,\ , ' '. ' *''" ; ' * CAnAUA— B»uk r Montreal; LIVER1 

-North and south H, , lueuCompauy; [RK- 

LANU-Bauk ol ^Ireland: MEXICO aud 80 UTH IMERIC* Loudon bank 
pi Mexloo and South America CUIHA aud JAPAK Chaitercd Bank ol 
ludla, Australia on. I . hlua; AUSTRALIA au.l NEW ZEALAND- Bauk of 
Australula, commercial Bunking Company ol Sydney, EugllBb Scottlch 
aud Aiiatrallau Chartered Bauk and National Bunk „| AnMrala.,1,.; dkm- 
EltAKA ami I BIMlnn (We>l Indira)— Colonial Hank. 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

032 1'alliurula street, turner Webb street. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner r..lk. 

DopoalhhJnue 30.1891 »»8,3U,U61 oo 

Uuurauleetl Capital au<l Surplus I.34U.U35 00 

DIRECTORS. 

M^^ rt ir M i lle J'' P^/lent George W. Beaver. Vice-President: Thomas 
Magee. E B Pond, Charles Pace, Dauiel E. Marliu, VI. C. B. DeFremerv 
George C. Boardmau, J .. Ea»llaud; Love'l While, Cashier. 

Keeeives Deposits, and Loans only on real esiale security. Country rc- 
™r,f„" ce rr m ?, b f s l ut b J Wells ' Far «° & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in ban Francisco, but the responsibility of this savings 
Bank commences ouly with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for pass book or entrance lee. Othce Hours-a a. at. to 3 e. M. Saturday 
evenings, ~* 'ou to o. 



THE 6ERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 Calilornla Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND $ 1,576,000 00. 

Deposits duly 1, 1891 26,749,898 34. 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRUSE 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN : Secretary, GEO TOURNY Board 
of Direetors-L. Gottig. Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoemauu, E. 
Meyer, F. lillmauu, H. Horstmauu, M. Ehrmau, B. A. Becker. Attorney 
John R. Jabbob. j ' 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Uuaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAM BS PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

DlBECTORS—James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper C. G Hooker 
James Phelau, James Motiitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cad walader and James 
D. Phelau. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecuntieB. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Gear/ Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C WF.BER ■ .PRESIDENT. I ERNST BRAND SECRETARY 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter St9. 

vt it lied Capital. $2,600,000 \ Paid Up Capital 92,000,000 

Heserue Fund $650,000. 
Hbad Office .... 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, PariB and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. 10 Wall 3t.,N Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17Boule 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. EUGENE MEYER, Manager. 
LP. Althchpl, Cashier. 

~~ THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund. 650,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel Court, Loudon, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, aud issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys aud sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART | 

P N. LILIENTHAL.t 



Managers. 



COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

806 Market Street (Pbelaa Building). 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for pois- 
tively extracting teeth without pain. '•Coltou Gas" has au established aud 
unrivaled world-wide repu'ation for its purity, efficacy aud perfect safety 
in all ea«es. Thirty -five tuousaud references. Established l»b3. ludorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
all operations in dentistry. 

DR. CHARLES W. DECKER 



22 



SAN FKANCieCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892 



TENNIS AND BASEBALL. 

THE tournament on Christmas Day, was a grand success; the 
number of entries showed the amount of interest taken by the 
members. The next match will take place in about three months, 
and it is expected that the entries will be even larger than before. 
Joe Tobin, Will Taylor and A. B. Wilberforce constituted the 
tournament committee, and were hard at work in keeping the 
players playing and the result wab, that the tournament was 
finished in two days, instead of dragging on for weeks. PJay 
commenced at 10 a. m. sharp, and the game was called at 4 p. m., 
it being too dark to finish. Hubbard and Yates had fought their 
way through, and it was settled to play the finals the next day at 
2:30p.m. Yates defeated Hobart, 6—4, 6—1; A.Taylor, 6—1, 
6—0; Detrick, 6—2, 6—1; and S. Hoffman, 6—1, 6—0. Hubbard 
defeated Field 6—1; 6—0. Wilberforce, 6—0; 6—4. Madison, 
6—0; 6—1. lie Long, 6—2; 6—1. Gray, 6—4; 6—0. It was 
remarkable how easy some of the sets were won. During the 
whole tournament there were very few close sets, but in nearly 
every match, every game was bitterly contested. There was 
only one set when the contestants reached five all, and that was 
the one between A. Taylor and Collier, finally won by Taylor. 
Vernon Gray and Wilberforce both fell before Hubbard with the 
same score, the remarkable thing being that Gray defeated Tobin 
6 — 3, 6 — 3, playing very good tennis, but he seemed quite power- 
less to do anything against Hubbard. Wilberforce on the other 
hand played quite a dashing game in the second set and would 
have probably won it if he had kept his heart up and been in 
practice, but at present he is no match for his formidable oppo- 
nent. We were pleased to notice the improvement some of the 
more bashful members have made, and feel convinced that before 
long they will be very favorably mentioned. 

There was quite a good crowd to witness the finals on Satur- 
day, and for once we bad impartial applause. The crowd came 
to see tennis, and applauded a good stroke, no matter who made 
it. The first set fell to Yates. 6-4; the next to Hubbard, 6 1 ; the 
third to Yates, 6 1; the fourth and deciding ones to Hubbard at 
6-4, 6 1. From this it can be seen that, none of the sets were very 
close, yet, as in other matches, the games were hotly contested. 
Hubbard played with his usual dash, but Yates did not do him- 
self justice. Quite a number present were disappointed at the 
game, and expected to see a much harder match. We cannot re- 
frain from saying that the tennis displayed could and ought to 
have been better, but taking it all through, it was pretty. Both 
players made more double faults than necessary, and several 
points were lost by badly smashing an easy ball. Nevertheless 
Hubbard worked bard for bis victory, and deserved the applause 
he got. We shall not be at all surprised to see the tables turned 
at the next meeting, but it will be unfortunate if these players 
meet early in the draw, as Hubbard will have to enter as every 
one else does, as there is no defending. After the match Presi- 
dent Linderman, with his usual grace and a neat speech, presented 
the cup. In the evening Gus Taylor gave a theatre party at the 
California to several members, and the evening passed very 
pleasantly. 

The finals of the league games between Taylor and Tobin, and 
Bates and Neel, will be played either to-day or next Saturday, at 
the grounds of the California Club; the result will give the much- 
coveted pennant to one of the clubs. 

We expect to see some good tennis at Monterey Ibis New 
Year's, as the Taylors, Wilberforce, Schmieden and others will be 
there with their rackeis. 

Had the weather been favorable since the Portland and San Jose 
teams commenced playing baseball for the coast championship, 
the contest would have ended in favor of either by this time. 
When the unfavorable weather is taken into consideration, it must 
be conceded that both teams have played very good baseball, with 
the exception of the first. All the games have been played when 
the days were cold, rainy, foggy or otherwise disagreeable. Hoff- 
man will be given a chance to again pitch against the Portlands, 
either this afternoon or to-morrow. The Portland and San Jose 
teams will play at the home of the latter to-morrow. If it should 
rain heavily tonight the game will have to be postponed, as the 
San Jose diamond and grounds are composed of adobe soil. The 
manager of the San Franciscos is trying to sign McNabb, now 
with the Portlands, for the next season. In the contemplated 
series of games between the San Francisco and Portland teams 
the home club will play Reitzau on third base and Peeples at short- 
stop. This will retire Nick Smith. The San Franciscos will play 
a picked nine at the Haight-street grounds to-morrow. 



i-Nrarrs-^ifrc^:. 



Chas. Lainer. artistic photographer. 71o Market street. Crayon 

Eortraits a specialty. There is an unmistakably air of truth about all 
is portraits, from the smallest card photo up to the most ambitious 
specimen of the photographic art. 

The Poet. — Robert Lovcman. 

No sooner doth one song depart 

In fancy's realm to soar. 
Another stands outside my heart 

And taps upon the door. 




Insurance Company, 
capital $1 ,000,000, | assets 12,660,000. 

D. J. STAPLES President. 

WILLIAM J. DUTTON Vice-President. 

B. FAYMONVILLE Secretary 

J. B. LEVISON ...Marine Secretary 

Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United States. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871. J 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up _ .1400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 278 AND 220 HANSOME STRtET, 

San Francisco, California. 

GEORGE L. BRANDER, 

President. 



CHAS. H. CD8HING, 
Secretary. 



Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool, Established 1857. 
Royal Exchange Assurance Corporation of London, 

[INCORPORATED 1720]. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

N.W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 



FIRE 



INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Company of London, 
Imperial Fire Insurance Company of London, 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Mauager. eub-Mauager. 

Pacific department. 214 Sansome St., ». F. 

8 WAIN & MUBPOCK. City Agents. 

Department of the Pacific States and Territories. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000. | CASH ASSETS IN U. S -. $746,186.00 

SCOTTISH UNION AND NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

CAPITAL $30,000,000 | CASH ASSETS $19,550,042.00 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Cat. 
W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent 

THE LANCASHIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 



MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 



GEORGE STEWART, 



General Manager. 



Guaranteed Capital $15,000,000 OO 

Ajisela 7,852,366 69 

All iuformation in regdrd to the Company may be obtained from 
MANN & WILSON, 
General Agents for the Pacific I'oast, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $5,000,000 

AOENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 Calltornla Street, San Francisco. 

- THE NEW EN6LAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS. Assets. S19.724.538.4S. 

President, BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBEN8. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 




318 C nLiroB,s " rl . St- 



>> ^Company? 3 *• 



Jan 




FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SUMMARY UF THE MARKETS. 

Flour Is tcttre; foreign demaud >pod:Kztni|Bu3^A|5.?6:Saperfloi 

Wh. v - - l Milling $l - 

evnul. 
B&rler Udull: R- Peed, 1 "V.tjl.10 per ctl. 

Oabt. Milling. II I. 

ffhlte.fl i<vfi ij' s Yellow, J! '*»1.S"> |HT « fl. 
By . >1 demand, fl.70^11 : Cement, f2.O0A2.75. 

eat, Slft^SK. Alfalfa, fll<$fl2. 

lemaii'l. It ran. JiTuji.' per ton. 

" d&SOc per ctl. 
Eastern, lac to 20c. 
. 
ElolM f. Com '■.:■'- -M ' Extract \ ■ V iltry iu good supplv. 

;i> are worth %c@lc. Beeswax la lower at \z:c ■■ 

ed— active, Fruil i* very plentiful and cheap. 
Kafsln;- and Dried Grapes in hich favor al good pa vine rales. 

are bteady; Dry, 7cAl0c Wool is iu demand ai Ue.@22c. 
■ move off steadily. Bags favor the seller al S@S%c 
Coffee higher at 18c022c for C. A. (.'aimed Fruits of all kinds iu favor. 
Coal Is lower, with adecliuiue tendency. LStata find ready j-ale. 
Quicksilver I* scarce at 14^00 per iln-k. Hops arc in demand at H@13c. 
Sugar, eood slocc of both Kaw» and Kefiued. Whites, d^gs-V^e. 

The rains of December have been of incalculable benefit to the 
tillers of the soil throughout the length and breadth of the State 
and enter upon the new year with cheering prospects for the 
future. 

The Steamship Monowai, from the Colonies via Honolulu, 
brought us 275.000 English Sovereigns of the value of $1,375,000— 
previous steamers in the past few months have landed here 
over $7,000,000 in gold from Australia, all of which was sent to 
the Mint for recoinage. For cargo the Monowai brought 3,164 
bales of Wool, 200 ingots Sydney Tin, 225 bales Flax, 72 sks Kari 
Oudj; also from the Islands, 520 sks Copra; 30 crates dessicated 
Cocoanuts; from Honolulu, 2,000 bchs Bananas, etc. 

During this, the holiday week, business is very sluggish with 
few sales of Wheat to record; prices, spot, $1.80 pr. ctl. Barley is 
dull of sale at $1.05@$1.10 per ctl. for feed, brewing $1.15(541.22. 
Oats ond Corn are quite neglected. Hay is in good request; Beans 
in moderate demand, Potatoes are weak and onions steady in 
price. Dairy produce in fair supply, with a promise of increased 
supplies of fresh Grass Butter at an early date. 

Receipts of Domestic Produce from the beginning of the harvest 
year to date, of leading items, are as follows: Flour and Wheat 
combined, reduced to Grain, 11,600,000 ctls. ; same time last year, 
9,000,000 ctls.; increase this season, 2,600,000 ctls. Barley, 1,900,- 
000 ctls. ; same time last season, 9G1.000 ctls., nearly a million ctls. 
increase this year. The Corn receipts this year are less than last 
season, so also of Potatoes. We note the arrival of a carload of Rye 
from Utah, which sold at $1-70 pr. cental. 

Exports during the week include the Agnes' cargo for Sydney, 
consisting of 262 M. feet of Lumber, 343 M. feet Shingles, 4,546 
Doors and 50 pkgs. Machinery, value $20,194. Schr. Howard, 
for Mexico, carried 1,050 cs. Powder, 61 M. feet Lumber, 24,765 
lbs. Blue Stone, 69 flsks. Quicksilver, etc., value $23,476. The 
bark Alex. Black, for Liverpool, carried 41,349 ctls. Wheat, 5,861 
ctls. Barley, 3,000 cs. Canned Fruit, 5,254 cs. Salmon, 9,861 galls. 
Brandy, value $124,578. Schr. Anna, for Kahului, carried 200 
bbls. Flour, 550 sks. Bran, 676 ctls. Barley, etc. 

Of Flour for Ireland, the Br. ship Abercarne, for Sligo, carried 
19,050 bbls. Extra Flour, valued at $88,000. 

Wheat clearances for the European continent this December 
will, no doubt, reach 40 full cargoes, and since July 1st, 191 ves- 
sels have cleared with Flour and Grain. 

Oregon continues to send us liberal supplies of Flour and Wheat 
and other .produce. At the same time there are now thirty ships 
in the Columbia River, all under charter to load Wheat and Flour 
— the largest fleet on record. 

Washington is also exporting more largely tha" ever before. 

There are, at this writing, fifteen ships at Peat ^osta and Val- 
lejo, loading Wheat for Europe, in addition to these now in our 
bay waiting cargo. 



One who has enjoyed a dinner at the Original Swain's Bakery, at 
213 Sutter street, will be certain to go there again, for it is without a 
superior in the city as a restaurant where first-class meals may 
always be had, served in a perfect manner. It is known among the 
elite as one of the few restaurants in the city which is as near per- 
perfection as possible. 

The oysters of Moraghan, of the California Market, are unsur- 
passed. He enjoys the patronage of all the good-livers of the city. 

Go to J. Carmany's, of 25 Kearny street, if you want to purchase 
any gift goods in the gentlemen's furnishing line. 

THOS. W. BREE~ 
«?-s— #S^TEACHER OF BANJO, GUITAR AND MANDOLIN 

**>^ 305 Seventh Street. 

MANUFACTURER OF BANJOS, GUITARS, Etc. 



nSTSTT -R A-lsTC "E . 



REMOVAL! 
HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY 

Now Ocoapisa Pramliea »i Hie N. K. c.r. California and Sansome 

8ts., S. P., Lately Vacated by Wells. Fargo A Oo. Hank. 

Twenty-seventh Annual Exhibit. 

Jniiunry 1. 1H01. 
INCORPORATED A. I). 1864. 
Losses p'd since org«nl'u.$.'!,l7'',7M.21 I Reinsurance Reserve . . . 
Assets January 1. 1891 867.51119 Capital paid up. Gold . 

Surplus for policy holders M4.M4.6g | Nel8urplnaoYerev'yth'g 
Income lu 1S90 .. .. »».M,i84.82 | Fire Losses paid In 1890. 

Fire Losses unpaid. January 1. 1891 

President... J. F. HOTOHTON I Secretary ... CHARLE8 R. STORY 

Vice-President .HENRY I. DODGE I General Agcnt.ROIIERT H. MAOILL 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

Capital .... ..... $1,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S. 534,795.72 



300,000.00 

278,901.10 

M2,S38.90 

11.40-1.00 



GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

£32 California St., S.F.,€al. 

£3^"General Agents for the United States and Territories west of the 
Rocky Mountains. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed (10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve (in addition to Capital} 2,125,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6,124,057.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street, San Francisco. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $10,625,000 

Cash Assets 4.701,201 39 

Cash Assets In United States 2,272,084 13 

REINSURERS OF 

Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation 

AND 

Southern 1'allrornla Insurance Company. 
"W3VE. 3VCA-C3D035TA.IJI3. 

MANAGER. 

D. E MILES, Assistant Manager. 

315 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, S. F. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. BALOISE of Basle— Capital 5,000,000 Francs. 
TheBe three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under au English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street, San Francisco- 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782] 
American Fire Insurance Company of New York [Estab. 1857.1 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Paeifie Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. J 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.) 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento'and Montgomery Streets. 

GEO. F. GRANT, Manager. 

3PA.CI3PIG 3D3i!3?A.33, , 3?3Vn3i]3SrT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN FIRE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1821. 
Paid-up Capital, - - - I 5,000,000. 
Cash Assets, $21,911,915. 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1710. 

Cash Assets, $9,031,040. 

Assets in America, - - - $1,956,331. 



WM. J. LANDERS, flen'l Agent, 20i Sansome St., San Francisto, Cal. 



ILITIMS 



INSORANCE COMPANY- LTD. 

fa OFMANCHESTEH, EN S l_y\rslo7^ 3 

Capital paid cj guaranteed S 3,000,000,01). 

Chas A Latph, Manager 1 , 
439 6a!iforri[a St. Sa>: FraMiSEO,, 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 



/ETNA 



MINERAL 



WATER 



CURES 



DYSPEPSIA 



SOLD EVERYWHERE. 



PARKE & LACY CO., 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET. 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IRON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS. STEAM PUMPS. 
BELTING. OILS AND 8UPPLIE8. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Peer Mining Company. 
The regular annual meetiug of the stockholders of the Peer Miuiug Com- 
pany will be held at the office of the company, Koora 26, Nevada Block, 
San Francisco, California, ou 

Thursday, the 3 1st Day of Decern be'. 1891, at the hour of 1 o'clock, 

for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

meeting. 

Transfer books will close ou Monday, December 25th, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

NAT. T. MESSER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 26, Nevada Block. San Francisco, California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending December 31st, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and four-tenths (i 410) per ceut per annum on Term De- 
posits and four and one ha'f (A\ 2 ) per cent per anunmon Ordinary Deposits, 
payable on and after Saturday, January 2, IS 2. 

JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

Office— 33 Post street 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Eureka Consolidated Mining Company. 

At a meeting of the Rnard of Trustees, held December 15,* 1891, at the 
office of the company, room 21 101 eausome street, fan Francisco, a divi- 
det.d (No 90) of i weuty five (25c) per share wa- declared upou the capital 
stock of the above company, payable Tuesday, Jauuary b. 18'2 

Transfer books will close Monday, December 28, 1S9L, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

H. P. BUSH. Secretary. 

Note.— Dividends on stock issued in New York since May 1, 1884, payable 
at the office of C. E. Laidlaw, 14 Wall street, New York. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Savings and Loan Society. 
101 Montgomery street, ci.ruer Sutter. 
For the half year ending December 31. 1S91, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five aud fonr-teuths (5 4-10) per cent per anuiim on Terrr. 
Deposit aud [our aud one-half (4\£1 per c^nt per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable ou and after Saturday, January 2, 1892. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending December 81, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five aud four tenths (5 4-10) per ceut per annum on Term 
Depo-its aud four aad one half 14J^) per cent per anuuin ou Ordinary De- 
posits, payable on aud after Saturday, January 2 18J2. 

GEORGE TOUBNY, Secretary. 
Office— .">2Ci California street. 

Dividend notice. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 
Divideud No. 70 (Fifty Cents per share) of the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany will be pa> able at the office of the company, 327 Market street, on aud 
after Moudav. lauuary 4ih. 1892. 
Transfer books will cose Monday, December 2Sth, 1891, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Justice Mining Company. 

Location of prinripul place of business, San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of work — Gold 11.11 Minin f District, Storey county, Nevada 

Notice is hereby given thut at a meeting of the Board of Director-;, held 
ou the 28d dav of December, 1*91, an assessment (No 49> of Tweutv-fivc (25) 
Cents per share was levied upon the CHpital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able imnipd'alely, in United states eold coin, to the Secretary, at the office 
of lhe company. No 4l9t"ali ornia str->* t, *oom 3 Sai Frtucisco, California. 

Any stock upon whicli this assessment shall remain unpaid ou 

The Twen'y-e ghth Day of January, 1092. will be delinquent. 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold oo WEDNESDAY, the 17th day of February is 2, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising aud 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. K. KELLY, Secretary. 
Office— No. 419 California stre t, room 3, Sau Fraucisco, Caliioruia. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of Business — San Francisco, California. Lo- 
tion of works — Gold Hill, storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the second day of December, 1891, au assessment. No. 56, of F fry 
Cents per share was levied upou the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 2, 331 flue street, Sau Fraucisco Stock Exchange 
Building, San raucisco, California. 

Ally stock upou which this assessment shall remaiu unpaid ou 

The Sixth Day of Januiry, 1892, will be delinquent. 

aud advertised for sale at public auction; aud uuless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold ou WEDNESDAY, the 27th day of January, 18y2, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising aud 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLANDS. Secretary. 
Office— Room 3.331 Pine stre t, San Fraucisco block Exchange Building, 
Sau Fraucisco, California. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



Crocker Mining Company. 

•an Fraucisco, California. 



Lo- 



Location of principal place of business— 
cati .n of works— Quijotoa, Arizona. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors held 
ou the 15th day of December, 1891, an assessment No 11) of Tea Cents per 
share was levied upou the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at ih- office of the com- 
pany, No. 20 Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, Sau Fraucisco, Cal. 

Any stock upou which this assessment shall remain unpaid ou 

The Nineteenth Day ol January, 1892, will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; aud unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on THURSDAY, the eleventh day of February, 1892. to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising aud 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

NAT. T. MESSER, Secrctarv. 
Offic e— No. 309 Montgomery s'reet, San Frauc sco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Hale & Norcross Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco. California. Lo- 
cation of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees held 
on the 21st day of December, 1891, an assessment (No. 10.)) of Fifty Cents 
per share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately, iu United States gold coin, to the Secretary, «t the office of 
the company, room 58, Nevada BloL-k, No 3J9 Mou gomery street, Sau Frau- 
cisco. California. 

Any .stock upon which this assessment shall remaiu unpaid ou 

Tuesday, the Twenty-sixth Day ot January, 1892, will be delinquent. 

and advertised for sale at public auction; aud, unless paymeut is made 
before, will be sold on WEdNKSDaY, the 17tli day of February, 1SJ2, to pay 
the deliuquent as essmeut, together with the costs of advertisiug aud ex- 
peusea of bale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

A. B. THOMPSON, Secretary. 
Offitf.— Room 58, Nevada Block, No. 303 Montgomery street, Sau Francis- 
co, Caiiforuia. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Weldon Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the W Idou Mining 
Compauy wi 1 be held at the office of the compauy, room 26, Nevada B.uck, 
Sau Francisco, California, on 

Thursday, the 31st Day of December, 1891, at the hour of 1 o'clock, 
for the purpose of electiug a Hoard of Directors 1o serve for the ensuing 
year aud tne transaction of such other business as may coma befjre the 
meeting. 
Transfer books will close ou Monday, December 28th, at 3 p. M 

AUG. WATERMAN. Secretory. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Pee 



jrless Min ng Company, 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Peerless Min- 
ing Compauy will be held at the office of the company, Koum 2ti, Nevada 
Block, Sau Fraucisco, California, on 

Thursday, the 31st Day ot December, 1891, at the hour ot 1 o'clock, 

for the purpose of electiug a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year and the transaction of such other busiuess as may cume before the 

meeting. 

Transfer hooks will close on Mondav, December 28th, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 



Jan- 9 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Thr Mioses I'tnmnd. n ho fere n->w •ruled In Iheir new hoove no 
Wa«hmjrt»n street, will receive on W. tne«d*»y« in January. Mr 
■ml Mrs. Jo»pph Muttn **fr Muriel, are refilling m 2503 Pi II mora 
Mrerl. where Friday will be Mrs. Manlen'it day At home. Mrs. 
H. J. Booth and her daughter* will be n\ hotnr Tuesday* in Jan- 
aary. at 1316 California itreet. Mr. and Mn. A. 1'opeTalbot. 
who are ^prnding the winter at the Palace Hotel, will hold their 
wedding receptions on Mondays in January. 



Mrs. and Mips Rising, of Virginia City, Capt.. Mrs. and Miss 
Kohl, of San Mateo, have been among the recent guests at the 
Palace Hotel. Mr Nick Kittle left f-»r the East last Saturday, 
and will he absent for several w« ks. Mr. Lansing Kellogg is one 
of our prospective losses, as he contemplates an early departure 
the continent, where he will make a protracted stay. Mr. 
J. A. Kolger is expected home from his Eastern trip next week. 

Mr*. Worth, wife of Major \V. 8. Worth, is visiting Captain 
and Mrs. A. E. Wood, at the Presidio. 



Ceneral \V. H. Dimond and family are now domiciled at their 
Washington-street house. The Misses Dimond will receive on 
Wednesdays in January. 

Colonel Crocker, Mrs. Easton and the Crocker children will 
pass the holidays at Del Monte. 

The closing hop of the Boya' High School, Friday afternoon, 
December. 18th, was a most enjoyable affair. The rooms 
were beautifully decorated, and there were nearly eighty couples 
present. The affair was the pleasantest dance given in the his- 
tory of the High School. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paris Kilbourn will be at home on the first and 
third Tuesdays, at 704 Post street. 

The Club of '91 gave a party last Saturday evening, at the resi- 
dence of Mrs. Isaac Hecht, corner of Post street and Van Ness 
avenue. The residence is particularly well fitted for events of 
this kind, and the young folks present spent a delightful evening, 
dancing and in other social pastimes. Supper was served at mid- 
night, after which dancing was renewed. 



Miss Salina Dannenbaum is visiting friends in Portland, 
Oregon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cass Zemansky, nee Walter, have returned from 
their honeymoon. The young couple reside at the home of the 
bride's parents, 2104 Bush street. 



Miss Josie Frank and Mr. D. Sutton receive at the residence of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Frank, 1807 Laguna street, Sunday night. 
Their engagement was announced last week in these columns. 



The engagement is announced of Miss Julia Erlanger, of this 
city, and Mr. Jacob Small, of Redwood City. They will receive 
their friends Saturday, January 3d. Miss Erlanger is an artist of 
considerable ability, and has a host of friends. 

The members of the Calliopean Club had an enjoyable 
time at their high jinks last Saturday evening. Mr. Bachman's 
speech was the event of the evening. Some of the vocal music 
would have done credit to professionals. 



The Thenius Club also had a little family gathering at their club- 
rooms. An evening of song and story-telling, interspersed with 
liquid refreshments, was the event. 



There seems to be an epidemic of engagements in Jewish society 
circles. All past records have been broken. The latest engage- 
ment announced is that of Miss Beatrice, the beautiful and ac- 
complished daughter of Mrs. Aaron Cook, to Mr. Albert Sire, a 
talented young New York lawyer. Miss Cook is well known in 
society circles. There were receptions at Mrs. Cook's residence, 
1308 Post street, last Sunday and on New Year's Day. 



Miss Whartenby gave a dinner Christmas eve, at her mother's 
residence, 1917 Franklin street, in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
A. Carlisle. Twelve guests were invited to meet the newly 
wedded couple. Mrs. Carlisle is the daughter of Hon. Clem 
Siudebaker, of South Bend, Ind., and is en route for home, after a 
four months' wedding tour through the United States and Mexico. 
Mr. and Mrs. Carlisle breakfasted with Judge and Mrs. Estee and 
dined with Mr. and Mrs. Erbe, on Christmas Day. 



Announcement is made of the engagement of Miss Emily L. 
Phillips, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. Phillips, to Mr. Benjamin 
Lauer, of Alturas, Cal. They will receive their friends at 1247 
Franklin street, on Sunday afternoon, January 3d, and Tuesday 
afternoon, January 5th. 



Mr. and Mrs. Edward Austin Rix will receive at 1076 Union 
street, on Fridays, after January 1st. Felix. 



A Sore Th rout or Congli, if suffered to progress, often results in an 
incurable throat or luug trouble. "Brown's Bronchial Troches" give instant 
relief. 



"IN DICK)" AT THE BALDWIN 



Tl! B delayed Carleton Company opened at the Baldwin Tm-.lny 
night to a v. tv good house, in ipIlQ of the depression <>f the 
all-pervading nut door welm \ Mule jam o( carriages at the 

curbstone; adeshnl light or brilliant oolor among the ladles In 
dress, wrap or feather, and a scattering display ol 0CC0 pants in 
the boxes, gave quite an operatic tone to the evening. Tndigo is 
aBtrauM, hence a waits-opera. The sweet, familiar strains ol the 
Thonsand and-One-Nlghu and Blue Danube waltsea run through 
the three arts, as an embroidery of melody. The ground -work 
itself is taking, very little ■ rilling" being evident. Mr. Carleton 
has a clever ami well balanrcd company and a good chorus. The 
details of stage appointment and costuming have received the 
minute attention characteristic of the manager. The costumes, 
especially, are elegant, tasteful and effective. Each act opens 
with a full stage and tableau, bringing in the best work of the erli- 
cient chorus. Miss Clara Lane is as graceful and vivacious 
as we remember her, and sings well. Mr. Carleton is, of course, 
the youthful lover, Janio, (once a young baritone, always a 
young baritone in opera) and sings the part exceptionally well, 
even if not as he once might have sung it, but yet very well. 
How is it, by the way, that Mr. Carleton always contrives to 
dress his head and his lower extremities respectively so as to 
make himself look top-heavy? The new comedian, Mr. Cbas. A. 
Bigelow made a hit in King Indigo, showing himself possessed of 
a humor both genuine and distinctive. His leading of the or 
chestra in ■• a little melodee " was a novelty and very amusing- 
winning the decided recall of the evening. Mr. Fitzgerald did 
well as donkey-driver, sang a good song, » Never in a Thousand 
Years," and made considerable fun in the slave buying scene. 
The local favorite, J. K. Murray, was too ill to appear, but Mr. 
Basil Ptetson took his place acceptably and made a solemn, 
Pooh-Babish prime minister. Miss Clara Wisdom can be funny, 
but she has no chance in Indigo. Miss Alice Vincent was an 
athletic Toff ana, the donkey-driver's wife, and was viragoish 
enough to scare a larger husband, if she had not sung so well. A 
pretty clean-limbed donkey and a handsome horse with a counte- 
nance of winning kindliness, are attractive members of the com- 
pany. The entr'actes should be shortened. Next week Dorothy, 
The Gondoliers, etc., will be given with matinees on Wednesday and 
Saturday. Chas. Frohman's comedy company in Wm. Gillette's 
latest, Mr. Wilkinson's Widows, will follow the Carleton Company, 
Monday, January 11th. 



People intending to send floral gifts to their friends, with the com- 
pliments of the season on New Year's Day, should not overlook the 
important fact that they can satisfy both themselves and their friends 
by purchasing their buds and orange blossoms from Charles M. Leo- 
pold, the florist and decorator, of 35 Post street. His decorative 
work is unsurpassed, being charming in design and artistic in execu- 
tion. 

THE NUIONAL PANORAMA COMPANY 

EXHIBITS AT 

203 Powell Street, near O'Farrell. 

Series of Views of the First Order, taken from Nature, of all 

Countries on (lie Globe. 

OP* They met with uuparalleled success In the great cities of Europe. 
Admission, 25 cents. Children, 10 cents, 

CALIFORNIA LEAGUE BASEBALL GROUNDS, 

End of Gulden Gate Park Cable Cars. 

New Year's Day, at 2 P. M PORTLAND vs. SAN JOSE 

Saturday, at 2:80 p. in PORTLAND vs. SAN JOSE 

Sunday, at 2 P. M SAN FRANCISCO vs. PICKED NINE 

Admission, 25 cents. Reserved Seats, 25 cents extra on Sunday. 




26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 



SIC TRANSIT GLORIA MUNDI. 



In these degenerate later days — 

Fin du si'.cle! — century's closing! 
I've witnessed militant displays 

That other people thought imposing; 
I've seen one of the haughty Czars 

Review a hundred thousand henchmen; 
I've seen upon the Champ de Mara, 

Napoleon scan as many Frenchmen; 
I've seen, devoid of glory's boasts. 

Our own immortal soldier-tanner 
Watch grimly the returning hosts 

That bore the Union's glorious banner; 
But, though the spectacles conferred 

Home pleasure by their size and lustre, 
None stirred my heart as it was stirred 

When first I saw a village muster. 

I stood a-munching gingerbread 

When some one shouted they were coming. 
And here they rattled!— at their bead 

One man a-fifing, one a-drumming. 
Full sixty menl All tall, at that, 

And, what made their appearance bolder, 
A red cockade in every hat, 

A tin spontoon to the right shoulder! 
They'd march one way awhile, right large, 

Then turn around and march the other, 
And then they'd lower their spears and charge 

Upon some enemy or other; 
And so they marched, and wheeled, and scoured 

Around the common's grassy borders, 
Saul Gifford flourishing his sword 

And shouting out his thrilling orders! 

Saul Gilford was a graceless scamp, 

For all his pomp and martial hauteur; 
To-day he would be called a tramp, 

Then he was only the town pauper; 
The poor-house long had been his home, 

The only hope and hold remaining. 
But every year when muster came 

They let him out to boss the training; 
For, though his life was so low down 

You can't imagine lower faring, 
He was the only man in town 

Of military skill and bearing; 
And I have often thought since then, 

Though in some slight respect they differed, 
I've seen a heap of martial men 

About the measure of Saul Gilford. 

But in those days war had for roe 

A charm that has no feeling altern; 
I would have given worlds to be 

Saul Gifford or his least subaltern; 
I would have forfeited the best 

Of life — I fancied then so splendid 
To be a soldier like the rest 

And march as proudly as those men did! 
0, thoughtless youth, that looks at gaud 

With only the desire to wear it! 
0, guiless eyes, that see in fraud 

A thing as genuine as merit! 
I'd give the remnant of life's drool, 

Misguided fate to me has granted. 
To be one hour the happy fool 

I was ere being disenchanted! 

Joseph T. Goodman. 
San Francisco, January, 1892. 



The Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm. 

A merchant carrying a large stock of goods, or any easily inflam- 
mable material, or whose premises are located in what is considered 
a hazardous district, is always under heavy penalties for an insur- 
ance policy, and in the majority of cases has no means of knowing 
, at night time whether an alarm from his store district is rung for a 
fire in his place or not. Both these objections may be obviated by 
the boxes of the Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm, the office nf which 
company is at 323 Pine street. The boxes are placed in residences or 
at any other place, and in the event of a fire in a store or office down- 
town, thealarm is at once rung in the residence of the merchant. The 
presence of the owner at the scene of a fire always results in greater 
saving than could be effected otherwise. Recognizing this fact the 
Pacific Insurance Union gives reduced rates on risks having the«e 
auxiliary hre alarm boxes. 

The Panorama opened at 203 Powell street is a novelty in the wav 
of amusements that will be greatly appreciated. Over 100 colored 
photographic views of scenes and places in foreign countries are on 
exhibition, and are at once instructive and interesting for old and 
young. It tikes fully an hour to see all the pictures, and the time is 
well-spent. The views are changed weekly. This week sights in the 
Holy Land and Switzerland are exhibited. 



S. F. NEWS LETTER 

COMBINATION SUBSCRIPTION LIST FOR 1892. 



Special attention is called to the following 
list of publications, each a leader in its class. 
The concessions are the best ever offered by 
any publisher. Send your subscription direct 
to this office. No order taken for less than one 
year. Terms, cash, with order. The S. F. 
News Letter and any publication in this list 
will be mailed to any address in United States 
or Canada for the Combination Price. Address, 
Publisher S. F. News Letter, 7 Flood Building, 
San Francisco. 

Regular 
Price. 

Ceatury Magazine $4 00 

The Forum 5 00 

Harper's Monthly 4 00 

Scribner's Magazine 3 00 

Harper's Weekly 4 00 

American Cultivator 2 00 

Cultivator aud Country Gent ... 3 00 

Scientific American (A. & B Edit.) 2 50 

Decorator and Furnisher 4 00 

Army aud Navy Journal 6 00 

Blackwood's Magazine 3 00 

Critic , 3 00 

Nation 2 00 

Freuud's Music aud Drama 4 00 

Electrical World 3 00 

Engineering aud Mining Jourual 4 00 

Iron Age 4 50 

Clothier and Furnisher 1 00 

Harper's Bazar . . 4 00 

Frank Le.-lie's Weekly 4 tO 

Good Housekeeping 2 50 

Judge 4 00 

Life 5 CO 

Puck 5 00 

St. Nicholas 3 00 

Wide Awake 2 40 

Albany Law Journal 5 00 

Insurance Law Journal 5 00 

Americau Medical Digest 2 00 

Boston Medical aud Sui gical Jourual . . . 5 00 

Medical Jourual 5 00 

Catholic World 4 00 

Christian Union 3 00 

Cougregatioualist 3 00 

Jewish Messenger. 4 CO 

Lutheran Observer 2 50 

Hall's Jourual of Health 1 00 

Popular Science Monthly 5 00 

Science 350 

Home Journal (N. Y.) 2 00 

Town Topics (N. Y.) 4 00 

Truth 4 IX) 

Americau Field 5 00 

Forest and Stream, 4 00 

Outing 3 00 

Spirit of the Times 5 00 

Castell's Famiy Magazine 1 50 

CasselPs Magazine of Art 3 50 

Current Literature 3 00 

Clipper, N. V 4 00 

Dramatic Mirror 4 CO 

Demorest's Family Magazine 3 00 

Dramat ; c Times 4 CO 

Harper's Young People 2 00 

Frautt Leslie's Popular Monthly 3 00 

Magazine of Americau History 5 00 

Muusey's Weekly 3 00 

North American Review 5 00 

New York Weekly 3 00 

Public Opinion 3 00 

Photographic Times 5 00 

Scientific Americau . ... 3 00 

Scientific American Supplement 5 00 

Shooting, Fishing 3 00 

The Story Teller 150 

Texas Siftiugs 3 50 

Turf, Field aud Farm 5 00 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Bullion Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the -tockhoMers or the Bullion Min- 
ing Company will be held at the office of the company, room 21, 331 
Pine street, San Francisco, California, ou 

Tuesday, the 1 2,h day of January. 1892, at the hour of 2 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Saturday, the 9th day of Jauuarv, 1S92, at 
12 o'clock uoon. 

R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 21, 331 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Publisher's 


Combnt'u 


Price Both. 


Subscrip. 


J8 00 


$7 00 


9 00 


7 50 


8 00 


6 50 


7 00 


6 00 


8 00 


6 70 


6 00 


5 30 


7 00 


6 20 


6 50 


5 50 


800 


6 50 


10 00 


8 50 


7 00 


6 25 


7 00 


6 10 


6 00 


5 25 


8 00 


7 00 


7 00 


6 25 


8 00 


7 00 


8 50 


7 50 


5 00 


4 25 


8 00 


6 70 


8 00 


6 70 


6 50 


5 25 


9 00 


750 


9 00 


7 75 


9 U0 


7 50 


7 00 


6 00 


6 40 


5 50 


9 00 


7 75 


9 00 


7 75 


6 00 


5 25 


9 00 


7 75 


9 00 


7 75 


8 00 


6 75 


7 00 


6 00 


7 00 


6 00 


8 00 


6 75 


6 50 


5 50 


5 00 


4 50 


9 CO 


7 50 


7 60 


6 50 


6 00 


5 00 


8 00 


6 50 


8 00 


6 50 


9 00 


7 50 


8 00 


6 50 


7 00 


6 00 


9 00 


8 00 


5 50 


■1 70 


7 50 


6 30 


7 00 


5 90 


7 00 


6 70 


8 00 


6 70 


6 00 


5 00 


8 00 


6 70 


6 00 


5 00 


7 0) 


5 90 


9 00 


7 50 


7 00 


5 90 


9 00 


7 50 


1 00 


5 75 


7 00 


5 75 


9 00 


7 25 


7 00 


6 00 


9 00 


7 50 


7 00 


6 00 


5 50 


4 70 


7 50 


6 00 


9 00 


7 25 



Jan. 2, ! 



BAN FRAN! IS( NEWS I RTTER. 



27 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE OONAHUE BRO»OG»UGE ROUTE." 

COXMEM I.V', BUXDAY, KOV. 39. I»l, aod 
unul further notice. Boat, ml rrmliu wii 
leare from io<] art-Ire at ihc San Fram-;. t». 
»»n«er D*j>ol. MARKET STREKI WII.U 1 . •• 
follows : 

Frost San Francisco for Point Tiburon Bel.eder. and 

San Rifail. 
WEEK PAYS— 7:«0 A. «.. 9 JO A. »., 11 I) A. » 

snor. at., s«i r. *.. 6 30p m. 

gATl'KP \YS uNl.Y-Au Ollra trip at 1 50 r.M. 
SI'.SPAYS— »«l ».M., 9:30 a.m.. 11 .tu a.m.. 2.-00 r.M 

6:00 r. m.. t-.l&r. M. 

From San Rafael lor San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS— «26 \ ■., 1 >. m., 930 A M. 

1.- I • r.M., I -«P P M .6*6 P M. 
SATTKPAYS ONLY— An ixtra trip at 6:30 p.m. 
oTNPAYS— 8:10 a.m., »:*0 a.m., 12:16 p. m..3.«0p.M. 

5:00 » «.. 6:26 P. M. 

rrom Point Tiburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK PAYS- 6:60 a.m.. 8:20 a.m., 9:66 a.m.: 1:10 

p. M. 4:06 P. M.. 5:!0 P. M. 

Saturdays only au extra trip at 6:65 P m 
SI'S PAYS— 8:33 A.M.. 10:05 A.M.. 12 4 J P.M., 
1:05p.m.. 5:30 P.M., 6:50 P.M. 



LiatiS. F. 



Days. 



Sunday*, 



Destination. 



arbive in S. F. 
Sunday JM* 



7:40a.K 8:00a. 
3:30p.M. 9:30a. 
5:00 p.M 5:0Op. 



Petaluma 

and 

Santa Roea. 



7:40a. M 

3:30P.M. 8:00a. M 



Fulton 
Windsor, 
Healdsburg. 
Litton SprinCT, 
Cloverdale & 
Way Stations 



7:40a.. M. *:Q0 a. m 



Hopland 
and Ukiah, 



10:40 A.M|8:50 A.M. 
6:05p.mIi0:30a..v 

7:2of.H.6:10p.M. 



7:40a.m. 8:00a.m. Querneville. 7:25p.m. L0:30a.m. 
3:30 P.M. 6.10 p.m. 



I0:30a.M 
6:10p.M 



7-40 a. m. 8:00a.m. Sonoma and 10:40a. M. 8:50a.m. 
5X0 p.m. 5:00 p. M Glen Ellen. 6.05P.M ifi:10P.M. 



7:40 a. M I 8:00a M | Sebastopol | 10:40 A. M I 10:30am 
3:30 P.M | 5:00 P.M I j fijOftp.M j 6:10 p.M 

Stages connect at Santa Rosa lor Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieia for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay; at Hopland 
for Lakeport; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Lakeport, 
Willits, Canto, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, West- 
port, Usal, Hydesville aud Eureka. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, Jl 50; to Santa Rosa, ?2 25: to 
Healdsburg, $3 40; to Cloverdale, $4.50; to Hop- 
land, $5.70; to Ukiah, $6.75: to Seba^topol, $2.70; 
to Guerueville, $3.75; to Sonoma, $1.50; to GleD 
Ellen, $1.80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only- 
To Petaluma, $1; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Healds- 
burg, $2.25: to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, $4,50; to 
Hoplaud, $3.80 to Sebastopol, $1.80; to Guerne- 
vilfe, $2.50; to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1.20. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New Montgomery Street. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers CITY OF PUEBLA, WALLA 
WALLA and UMATILLA, direct for VICTORIA, 
B. C.j and PUGET SOUND ports, at 9 a. m. every 
five days. 

The steamers sailing for Puget Sound ports at 
9 a. M. connect at Port Townsend with steamers 
or Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
U. P. R'y Co. every four days. 

For SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San Simeon, 
Cayucos, Santa Baebaea, San Buenaventura, 
Hukneme, San Pedko, Los Angea.es and San 
Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA, ARCATA aud HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, steamer LOS ANGELES, every Wed- 
nesday, at y a. m. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco 

ATLANTIC & PACIFIC R. R. 

(Santa Fe Route) 

Trains Leave an* Arrive at San Francisco. 
(Market St. Ferry.) 



K<Vp COO.- QtOTffi \\ . 

Is a lion in the way? 

Keep 

Tell him you reaped bin pride, 

Tell him thai the world i- wide 

Ami that bo must Bland aside. 

Keep cool. 

Decor&ffv^ 




300 Post Sreet. 

Art Novelties and Holiday, Birthday 
and Wedding Presents. 
Oriental Draper ies. 



L've Daily | f rom Nuv. 1, 1891. | Ar ve Daily 



5:00 p. M. 
9.00 a. M. 



Fast exp, via Mojave 
AtlaiUic hxpress 
via Los Auge les 



12:15 a. M. 
8;45 P. M. 



Ticket Office, 650 Market St., Chronicle Build- 
ing, S. F. W. A. BISSELL, 

General Passenger Agent. 



THE CALIFORNIA 
SAVINGS & LOAN 
SOCIETY, 

Corner of Eddy and Powell Streets. 

(Established 1873.) 
Savings Bank Deposits received and interest 

Eaid on same semi-aunually— in January aud July, 
oaus made on Real Estate Security. Open Sat- 
urday evenings. 

DAVID FARQUHARSON, President. 
VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 



KNABE 



It is a fact universally conceded 
that the KNABE surpasses all other 
instruments. 



L. BANCROFT & CO., 

303 Sutter street. 



PIANOS 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing, 

8teamers leave wharf corner FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer 1891 

Gaelic Saturday, Nov. 28, 12 m. 

Bblgic Saturday, December 19. 

Oceanic Tuesday, Jan. 12, 18^2. 

Gaelic (via Honolulu). ..Thursday, Feb. 4, 1892. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at 8. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, atthe 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San 
Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 

GEO. H. RTOE. Traffic Manager 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

The splendid 3,000-ton steamers of this line, car- 
rying the United States, Hawaiian and Colonial 
Mails, sail from Folsom street Wharf, as under: 

For Honolulu Only, 
S. S. Australia (3,000 tons) Tuesday Dec. 22, 1891, at 

2 P. M. 

Fop Honolulu, Auckland and 

Sydney, Direct, 

S. S. Monowai Jauuary 7, 1892, at 3 P. m 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar 
ket street. 

JOHN D. SPRECKEL8 & BROS., 
aen^rfll 4txpT't« 



CUNNINGHAM, 

CURTISS & 

WELCH, 

holcsale Stationers and Booksellers 

327, 329, 331 Sansome Street. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PAClFir BY8TEM. 

Trnin* t.««v« and nro Due to Arrlva at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

mav«: From December 6. 1991. 

Be at eta, Kunuey, Sac rami 
7:8oa. Uirwudi, Hue* and nan > 

8.00a. Martluui, »au Hamuli and Ual- 

... ■ 

*8.00 a. Kl Verauo and Santa BOM. 

*.ou a. iaonunfoi* nodding, vm varls. 
8:00 a. Second cia** [orOgdenand East, 

hi id first Qla» locally 10:4ft P. 

8:30a. Mllea, Sau Jose, .-Jioekton, lone, 
Sacrmmento. uarjavllle, Oro- 

vi lie and Red Jil u"iT .... 4:46 P. 
9:00a. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Baker.sflul'l, ttailU Barbara A 
Lou Angeles. . ... 12:1ft r. 

1200m. Haywards, Nilcs and Livcrmore 7:15 p. 

*1:0Up. SH<Tainentu River Steamer* '9:00 p, 

3:00 p. Haywards, Niles aud Sau Jose. . 9:45 a. 
4 :00 p. Martinez, Suu Ramon & Stockton 9 :45 a. 
4:00p. Vallejo, Cahstoga, El Vcmuu and 

Sauta Rosa . ..... 9.45 a. 

4:30p. Beuiola, Vaoaville, Sacramento. 10:4ja. 

4:30p. Woodland and uroville 10:45a. 

*4;oup. IS lies aud Livermore. . *S:4o a. 

5:00p. Sunset Route, Atlantic ExpresB, 
Sauta Barbara, Los Angeles, 
Deming.Kl Paso.iNew Orleans 

aud East 8:4&P. 

5:00 p. Sauta Fe Route, Atlautic Express, 

for Mohave aud East 12:15 p. 

6:00p. Haywards, Niles aud Sau Jose. . 7:45a. 

. ... Niles and Sau Jose J6:15p. 

6:00 p. Ogden Route Atlantic Express, 

Ogden aud East 11:45 A. 

17:00 p. Vailejo +8:46 p. 

7:U0p. Shasta Route Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East. . 8:16 a 

Santa Cruz Division. 

8:15a. Newark, Ceuterville, Sau Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 6 :20 p. 

•2:15 p. Centerville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz. *10:50a. 

4:15 p. Ceuterville. San Jose, Los Gatos, y:t»lA 
fll:45p. Huuters" Traiu to Newark, Al- 

yiso , Sau Juse aud Los Gatos., J8:Q5p. 

Coast Division (Third a id Townsend Streets). 

7 :0U a. aan Jose, Almaden aud Way Sta- 
tions 2:30 p. 

8:30a. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos.Pa- 
jaro.SamaCruz, Monterey, Pa- 
cific Grove, Salinas, San Mi- 
guel, Paso Robles and Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) 
aud principal Way Stations 6:10 p. 
10:37A. Sau Jose, and Way Stations.. . 6:10p. 

12:16 P. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 4 :00 p. 

*2 :30p. San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, PacificGrove 
aud principal Way Stations. ...*10.48a. 

*3:30 p. Menlo Park, Sau Johe and Prin- 
ciple Way Stations. ... .. *10:03a. 

*4:15p. Meulo Park aud Way Stations. . . *S.06a. 

6 -.15 p. Sau Jose aud Way Stations 9:03 a, 

6;3Up. Meuio Park and Way Stations. .. 6:35 a. 
rll:45p. Meulo Park aud principal Way 

Stations +7:30 P. 

a. for Morning . p. for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. +Saturdays only. 

tSundays only. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 
For New York via Panama, 

8. S. "Sau Jose" Wedue>day, Dec. 23rd, 1891 

at 12 O'CLOCK M., 
Taking freight aud passengers direct for— 

ACAPULCO, 

CHAMPER1CO, 

SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA, 

ACAJU1LA, 

LA LIBERTAD, 

LA UNION, 

PUNTA ARENAS, 
— AKD - 

PANAMA, 
And via Acapulco for all lower Mexican and Cen- 
tral American ports. v 

For Hongkong via Yokohama, 

S. 8. " City of Peking," ..Thursday, Dec. 31, 1891, 

at,3o'clock p. m. 
S. S. City of Rio de Janeiro, 8atarday, Jan. 23, 

18v2, at 3 o'clock p. m., 
8. S. "China," .. Wednesday, Feb. 17th, 1892. 

at 3 P. m. 
Round-Trip Tickets to Yokohama and return at 
reduced rates. 
For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. 
Branch Office, 202 Frout street, 

ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent. 
N. B.— Note change in hour of sailing of China 
Line Steamers. 



23 



SATC FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2, 1892. 




GRAND DUKE SERGtUS is suspected of conspiring against 
the Czar. Whether the rumor is well founded or not, it is 
certain that the Grand Duke is ambitious, and for an ambitious 
member of the House of Romanoff the temptation must be 
great, since the unpopularity of the Czar has been increasing 
from day to day. 

Nothing indicates better the corruption of the civil authorities 
in Russia than the discovery made last week that the large con- 
sign men t of barley-flour purchased by the Government from 
dealers in Libau for the purpose of supplying food to the inhab- 
itants of the famine-stricken districts, was adulterated with 
chalk and other deleterious matter. If such crimes can be per- 
petrated in the capital and under the very eyes of the Govern- 
ment, one may imagine what is happening in the more remote 
districts, and if the officials connive at cheating the poor starving 
wretches in the famine districts, one may be certain that tbey 
will not be over-scrupulous with regard to other matters. 

By the death of Sir William White, British Ambassador to 
Turkey, England loses a diplomatist whose knowledge of the 
conditions of southeastern Europe made him a very valuable ad- 
visor to the Foreign office, and his counsel will be missed especially 
at the present moment, when the Oriental question promises to 
become again a problem of more than common importance in 
European politics. 

The defeat of Michael Davitt at Waterford, Ireland, and the 
election of Redmond, was due to two causes, one of them the 
great popularity of the Redmond brothers all over Ireland, the 
other the fact that nowhere in the Emerald Isle have the Catholic 
clergy, who supported Davitt, less influence than just in Water- 
ford. There was nothing especially remarkable in the contest, 
except, perhaps, the fact that the election passed off without one 
of the scandalous riots which have been quite frequent of late 
in Ireland, and which were rarely ever absent even in former 
times. 

By the death of the Duke of Devonshire, the Marquis of Hart- 
ington becomes a Duke, and thus a member of the House of 
Lords. It is a great loss to the Liberal Unionist party in the 
House of Commons that Lord Hartington will no longer be able 
to lead it during the debates. Although Lord Hartington's 
speeches lacked emphasis and were somewhat monotonous, as 
far as delivery is concerned, they were ma^terworks as regards 
style and logic, and they were always listened to with the great- 
est attention, even by his political antagonists. His fairness and 
impartiality, even in questions where he felt strongly, was ad- 
mirable, and although perhaps nobody would have been more 
excusable than he for a display of temper when replying to the 
Irish members, since his own brother had been murdered by Irish 
conspirators in Rhtenix Park, Lord Hartington always spoke 
calmly and with moderation even during the most heated debate 
on the Irish question, and was guided merely by his own strong 
conviction. The new Duke of Devonshire will be a great orna- 
ment to the House of Lords, and even there he will no doubt 
continue to aid his party by his great talent and his conspicuous 
moral qualities, but his usefulness will be greatly limited, for 
the House of Commons is the only place in which a talented 
British politician can utilize bis ability. If Lord Salisbury should 
be a member of the Lower House, be would have a much better 
chance of making his influence felt than in the House of Lords, 
and Mr. Gladstone knew perfectLy well that if he would have 
accepted a peerage which was offered to him on several occasions 
he would have been practically rendered helpless, and his politi- 
cal usefulness, or rather influence, would have been considerably 
curtailed. 

Mr. Joseph Chamberlain, it is said, will become the leader of 
the Liberal-Unionists in the House of Commons. Mr. Chamber- 
lain is a brilliant orator, a good debater, a clever diplomatist and 
a gentleman of the highest education. As far as oratorical gifts 
are concerned, be is second only to Mr. Gladstone, but as regards 
the more sterling virtues of a statesman, high principles, steadfast 
purpose, genuine patriotism and strict fairness, he would hardly 
be able to obliterate the memory of his pr* decessor, Lord Harting- 
ton, who in these better qualities excelled all his colleagues. 

The present Chancellor of the German Empire has delivered his 
first great speech in the German Reichstag, on the occasion of 
introducing the new commercial treaties, and although be dis- 
played a great deal of talent and political sagacity, it cannot be 
said that he produced any very pronounced impression. All 
actions of the new head of the German Government must lead to 
invidious comparisons with his great predecessor, and under 
these circun.stii.cjs Chancellor di Caprivi would always labor 



under a great disadvantage, even if he were a much greater states- 
man than he really is. 

Prince Bismarck had a narrow escape last week from being 
killed by a railway train which threatened to collide with his car- 
riage. The death of Prince Bismarck, although he no longer is at 
the helm of the government in Germany, would be a great disaster 
for Germany, because even now the greater part of the German 
population looks upon him as the man who will come to the aid 
of the government if real danger should threaten the Fatherland. 
The feeling is growing that, if European affairs reach a crisis ibe 
Emperor will be forced, although perhaps unwillingly, to listen to 
Bismarck's voice, which will surely be heard on the eve of the 
outbreak of the storm that is now brewing, provided that fate 
spares the old statesman's life until that time. 

A rumor says that Russia is willing to consider a commercial 
treaty with Germany similar to that made between Germany on 
the one hand, and Austria, Italy and Switzerland on the other. 
This rumor is hardly based on fact, for it would mean a practi- 
cal isolation, and at this moment Russia could hanMy atford to 
give offense to her only ally during an eventual conflict with the 
triple-alliance. 

THE CHIEF MAN-KILLER. 



THE conversation turned on " killers " and other bad men, at 
an up-town club the other day, and a resurrected San Diegan 
perpetrated this truthful tale: Among the " killers " at San Diego 
during the boom, was Wyatt Earp, of the notorious Earp brothers, 
known as " gun-fighters " and men slayers from ** way back." 
So well established was his reputation as a quick pistol puller 
and a dead shot, that the minor toughs kotowed to him, and fre- 
quently allowed disputes to be settled by his arbitration. If a 
shooting match were on, both men to it were held off by their 
friends until Earp had investigated the matter, and his decision 
was final. Bob Cahill ran a " bank " at San Diego in those days. 
The limit was $25. A man named Kelly was a regular player. 
One night he was in good luck, and began forcing the game. 
Several times he placed $50 on a card, notwithstanding Cahill's 
protest. Finally Bob told him that he would have to stay with 
the limit or quit the game, as be did not intend to have any one 
come in his own bank and break him. Kelly bet ?50 again, and 
bis card won. 

" I told you not to top the limit," said Cahiil, as he pushed him 
$25; " that's all you get." 

" Don't you intend to pay me the fifty?" Kelly asked, sullenly. 

» No, sir," said Cahill; " I told you several times to stay with 
the limit " • 

• « Well, I guess you better pay me," said Kelly, and he dropped 
his right hand for his gun. 

" Well, I guess not," said Cahill, who also reached for his re- 
volver. Immediately the other players fled, and in a minute 
there would have been a fusilade, if Joe Bell, a friend of Kelly, 
had not caught him by the arms and hustled him inlo another 
room. Cahill was also taken away. Then the friends of both 
men, instead of summoning the police or the sheriff, sent for 
Wyatt Earp to get the benefit of his experience in the matter. 
Earp, it was conceded, knew more about the ethics of man kill- 
ing than any other man in San Diego. 

He came and listened to explanations. Then he saw Kelly, 
and said, "You want to ki 1 Bob, eh ?*' 

" That's right, Wyatt," said the gambler. 

Cahill was next interviewed by the boss man slayer. 
<<You want to kill Kelly, do you ?" said Earp. 

" Well, I want to prevent him killing me, Wyatt," said the 
dealer. 

Earp then returned to the gambling room, and weighed the 
testimony, the gamblers waiting in respectful silence for his de- 
cision. Both disputants were summoned by his orders, and then 
stepping over to Kelly, Earp said; "Kelly, I've heard all the 
testimony in this case, and from all the evidence, I don't think 
you've got no kill a-coming." 

" All rif.h\ Wyatt, that settles it; let's all lake a drink," said 
Kelly. He and Cahill shook hands, and everybody drank; then 
there was a round on the bouse, and Kelly and Cahill resuming 
their seats at the faro table, the game went on. 



DiV DENO NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society. 
Coruer of .FoweJl and Eddy sts. 
For the half year ending Decern berHl, 1891, a divideud has been declared 
t the rale oi five and fonr-teuths (5 4 10) per c-ut. per annum ou term de- 
posits, aud four and oue-half i4V<) per ceut. per autium ou ordiuary de- 
posits, payable ou aud alter Saturday, January 2, 18*J2 
y VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank, 
Corner of Market aud Fourth streets, iu tue Flood building. City. 
For the half-vear ending December 31. 1891. a divideud has been declared 
at the rate of Five aud four tenths 16 4-10) per ceut per annum nu Term 
Deposits and Four aud one-half (4\£) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on aud after January 2, 1892. 

B. C. CARR, Secretary. 



-. t v^« *. Lsitei 




J! 



r»i. xu r. 



News 






Humbrr 




(Tnlifornia AOtartiwr. 

DCVOTCO TO THE LEAOiNQ INTCrttSTB OP QAUMMMlA «nO TNC PACIHO COAST. 

( and Pvbfifhft '■ \\ hy the Proprietor, Kkf.pf.uuk 

Mabkiott, Flood Bui ■ Jfar£«< ${rrrtf, 9an Fran- 

eueo. Annual Smbeeriplio i, > . '.din.; PMtaft, United (States and 

Canada. $4; 6 MonlA I monfa*, $1 30; Foreign, $5; 
6 noma*. $3: 3 moiUAf. $1 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATC.WAY. JANUARY ". 1892. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Pag* 

LllDlNO ARTICLES : 

Item- in Brief 1 

ej i Loodou Interview. "J 
- Hin Mail Subsidy Law 
!;•■ tailing Chile's Frieud^h p. 2 
A ; -.'■••p'liabie Appointment. 3 
Att We MaaiifacltiriugTiu'.* 3 
.\ .Ww- Charier Needed. 8 
Bv Wav of the Straits of Magel- 
lan .3 

Society 4 

Society (continued) 7h 

The Concordia Ball 5 

At the Telepnoue 5 

Pleasure's Wand '• 

Pleasure's W*ud (coutinued) 7 

Overfu Oakland 8 

Snap Shots (Dl Veruou) 9 

The Looker-On 10 

The Looker-Ou (couttuued) 11 



Page 

Sparks. 12 

The Night After New Year 

Poetryl 13 

To the Late Grand Jury (Poetry). 19 



Financial Review 

Town Crier 

World. Flesh and Devil 

Sunbeams 

Real Property 

The Bourse and Underwriter. 

Vanities 

The Rose Jar 



1 i 
16 
16 
17 

18 

iy 

. 20 
21 

Who Is It? (Poetry) 22 

Chronicles of the Builders 22 

" Biz" — Summary of the Markets. 23 
Scientific aud Useful. . ... 24 

The Claucarty Twins (Poetry) ... 2(3 

Tenuis aud Baseball 2G 

New Rel.gious Edifices 28 

Comments ou Foreigu Affairs ... 28 



THE Republican newspapers are pretty well agreed that the 
Speakership contest was a good thing for their party. 



THE United States Senate should abolish secret Executive ses- 
sions. They are too much like the Star Chamber, of despica- 
ble memory. 

IT is understood that Buckley is not altogether out of the Boss 
bnsiness. It is said that Crirumins and Kelly are carrying out 
the divide fairly, namely, 60 per cent, to the winners, and 40 per 
cent, to the losers. 



CANADA imported goods from the United States last year to 
the value of $43,700,000. The total purchases from us by all 
South America amounted to $37,500,000. Yet we scotf at the one 
trade, while we go wild over the other. 



THERE is talk now of locking up the Eastern anthracite coal 
supply in a big trust. If these coal barons do not want their 
property ruthlessly seized by the State, they will take care how they 
proceed to tamper with the grate and destroy the people's fireside. 



HERBERT SPENCER has recanted his views in favor of 
woman suffrage, and in his recently published book, "Justice," 
argues that for fundamental reasons the spheres of activity of the 
sexes must be kept apart, and especially must the participation 
of women in government be limited, 

THE Boston Police Commission takes a hand in carrying the 
elections in favor of license, and ibis has so incensed a num- 
ber of the voters that the result was close the other day, for the 
first time. It is said that if the Commission does not quit there 
will surely be a year of prohibition. 

IF the ordinance for the cleansing of Morton street can be car- 
ried into effect, it will be a good thing for the city. That street 
is a moral lazaretto, which ought to have been suppressed long 
ago, and would have been, were it not for the pull which certain 
landlords of the disreputable houses possessed. 

MR. BLAINE recently complained that he found great difficulty 
in procuring the services of young men sufficiently well ac- 
quainted with modern languages to qualify them to fill desirable 
places in the diplomatic service, as secretaries and attaches. 
Many young men would promptly qualify themselves, if they 
were certain they could get and keep the places. 

SENATOR STEWART thinks he has found a short way across 
lots to the free coinage of silver; but the Chronicle defies him 
and all his works, and will enter into the citadel of bimetallism 
by the broad road or not at all. 8tewart cares more for results 
than he does for. the means by which the results may be attained. 



A CONFIDENTIAL circular has been issued to the Government 
railroads in Germany directing retrenchment and the discharge 
of a certain percentage of employees. This will not tend to 
allay the socialistic feeling which the young Emperor dreads more 
than a foreign war. Economy may be necessary, but midwinter 
is a bad time to practice it, so far as employees are concerned. 



TRB farther •• Korashan" Toad geti In his icheme to m< 
■JI th* BplrllUI .nl dual r\ pie in 

inUrj Hit* n ■ Bod <"it about this latter dsy & pottle. 

The lnte-i itory ibnui him la that he dtaertod bli wife and child 
li\ e years Ago, an. I La OOnatdefOd bj ihoM Who k new him 
at the East a-* an arrant fraud. Thai in also our opinion. 



UNLESS the law i nongb t.. deal with the blgoblnder 

element ■>( Chinatown, there is serious danger that (hi mat- 
ter will be taken out ol the hands of the authorities hj an up- 
ri^iuc of the people The daily average of murder? is InefG 
entirely too rapidly for the safety of the nty. 

FORAKEEUmade a bold dash for the Henatnrship In Ohio 
old John Sherman carried too many guns for him. Tin- 
chances are that Sherman will be Senator from Ohio as long u he 
iives, if he wants to he. He is a man of considerable ability and 
of vast experience, and he always stands up for Ohio. 

IT seems that the curved armor plates for the Monterey, manu- 
factured by the Bethlehem Steel Works, do not come up to the 
contract requirements, and will not be accepted by the Na\\ De 
partnient. It is refreshing to see the Government hold its own 
for once against the contractors, even though the completion of 
our harbor defense vessel be delayed. 



WORK, at Nicaragua has been suspended, and we now learn 
for the first time how much has been accomplished. A jetty 
has been built on the Atlantic side, a machine-shop and eleven 
miles of rail have been laid. The canal has been cut 3,000 yards 
long, 150 feet wide, but only 17 feet deep. It is clear that there 
is no capital at the back of the existing company. 



JAMES PHELAN showed a commendable spirit in undertaking 
the direction of the Metropolitan Hall meeting. He is one of 
our weathy men; is young, able and ambitious, and has promise 
of a brilliant future. If more of our millionaires would interest 
themselves in behalf of good government, San Francisco would 
not be so notoriously corrupt. 



THE World's Fair Commissioners should appoint a General 
Manager or Superintendent of their work, who would have 
the direction of all the details for the State exposition. Such an 
officer should be a man of ability, experience, diplomacy and 
liberal ideas. If the Secretary of the Board could be induced to 
accept such an office, he would be the right man in the right 
place. 



T B 



ET the Tax Collector resolve to make it a requisite for 
J_j service at his office, that the applicant shall be a gentle- 
man, or at any rate, have some idea of a gentlemanly 
manner; also, that his subordinates shall be required to treat 
taxpayers with more consideration than they now receive. Im- 
press on the clerks the interesting fact that they are the servants 
and not the masters of the people. 



THOS. J. BRADY, of Star-route fame, is now free to express the 
comfort he finds in the elevation of his associate, Elkins. He 
said to an interviewer: " It is very gratifying. It shows that the 
reign of terror of the Garfield and Arthur days is over. But 
who would have thought then that the King of the Star-routers 
would be appointed to the Cabinet of the first Republican suc- 
cessor of Garfield and Arthur?" Who, indeed ? The world does 
move. 

MESSRS. WALLACE, Henley, Lynch & Company must have 
thought that the Superior Judges of this city were " dod- 
gasted idiots," as the late lamented SpO'.pendyke would have put 
it, to elect Wallace Presiding Judge a second time, after the slap 
in the face which he administered to his brother Judges in throw- 
ing out their list of Grand Jurors. The re-election of Wallace 
would have been an admission that he was right, and that they 
were all scoundrels and boodlers. 



GRAND JURY stories are as plentiful around the street as 
blackberries in season. They say that Doc. Cleveland was 
the funny man of the team, and was constantly joking Jerry 
Lynch about the happenings in the Buckley camp when they 
were both members of it. Captain McDonald invariably sat down 
upon the irrepressibles. He wouldn't sign the final report, al- 
though Lynch begged him to do so "with tears in his eyes." "It 
is a document," said the reformed broker, "that will cause your 
name to be emblazoned on the rolls of San Francisco's Mayors." 
"Can't help it," quietly rejoined the Captain; " I'm no fool." 

CONSIDERABLE important business will be transacted at the 
meeting of the State Board of World's Fair Commissioners on 
Tuesday next. AH the Commissioners take great interest in the 
work before them, and their well-known ability and energy al- 
lows no doubt of the grand success of our State exhibit at Chi- 
cago. Governor Markham, who is greatly interested in the suc- 
cess of California at the Columbian Exposition, may be at the 
meeting next week, to give the Commissioners the benefit of any 
suggestions which he may have to make upon the question of 
the exhibition, which he has been closely studying. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



BUCKLEY'S LONDON INTERVIEW. 

BUCKLEY told theS«» interviewer sortie home truths the other 
day that ought not to be allowed to lightly" pass out of mem- 
ory. He came pretty near telling the whole truth as to how we 
are governed in this city. No wonder the Englishmen who 
listened to the story " lost their gravity, seeming to think they 
were hearing a fairy tale." What else could they think ? To 
have an insignificant blind peddler of whisky tell how in an in- 
credibly short time he had risen from poverty to affluence by 
running the politics of this great American ciiy, selling judicial 
decisions, United States Senatorsbips, Legislative acts. City fran- 
chises, and pretty nearly all else that officials could grant or do, 
must, indeed, have sounded " like a fairy tale." The questioning 
of the listeners is not reported, but we can easily understand 
with what keen curiosity they proceeded to inquire how came it 
that one man of but li&tle education, low instincts and occupa- 
tion, criminal surroundings, and sightless at that, could have so 
subjected a whole city full of free and independent American sover- 
eigns to his corrupt will. How could it be that one man, and 
he the insignificant creature before them, could so manipulate free 
institutions as to subordinate 60,000 voters, made up of mer- 
chants, lawyers, doctors, storekeepers, mechanics, etc., to his 
own bad aggrandizement? How came it that a free press had 
not cried aloud and refused to be silenced until a fiery public in- 
dignation had been aroused ? How could it be possible that de- 
scendants of the sturdy and liberty loving Briton had so degen- 
erated as to tolerate fixed juries and packed judicial benches for a 
single day ? Such a state of things, they would be beard to de- 
clare, would create a revolution in any country in Europe 
within a month. Before these intelligent questioners there sat 
the miserable miscreant himself — a sickly, sightless embodiment 
of the state of things that Macauley so long ago predicted. What 
a valuable object-lesson he would prove to the Tory lecturer, 
who might hire his presence to paint a moral and adorn a talel 

Though, as is usual in cable dispatches, the questions are not 
given, the answers are. Only such queries as we have suggested 
could have drawn out the answers telegraphed. No more ominous 
statements ever Mashed along an Atlantic wire. Buckley, to do 
him justice, fraukly and truly met the issues presented to him, 
and thereby did the good service of showing our people just where 
the dilficuhy lies. What he says applies to all American cities as 
well as our own. "The fact is," said Buckley, " the ballot is a 
more dangerous thing when given to everybody than you imag- 
ine. The people are indifferent to their political duties, and the 
result is a system of what we call • practical politics ' in every 
great American city. My business is politics, and you know they 
say politicians are public enemies. The indifference of citizens 
is such that politics has every show with us. Public spirit is so 
much weaker a force than private ambition that a managing man 
has a good game to play, if he has got brains enough to play it. 
You can never get pure politics till yon have the united action of 
a majority of honest, public-spirited citizens. Until you get that, 
all corporate interests, all heavy interests, in fact, will simply be 
compelled to protect them helves against adverse legislation." 
That is it exactly. The mass of citizens are two engrossed in 
their private affairs to have either time or thought for public mat- 
ters. They are hunting the nimble dollar, or their own pleasure, 
all the time. If, for a moment, you arrest their attention and 
try to turn them aside to safeguard some public interest, they 
will ask in effect, if not always in words, " what is there in it 
for me?" 

Where everybody acts upon that principle, bow can the man- 
aging man, or Boss, as he is called, be reasonably expected to 
be an exception to the rule? Moreover, wben he sees a good 
thing lying around loose in politics, he would hardly be a man of 
the times if he did not make every effort to seize it. We are all 
in search of <• good things," and not infrequently use the elegant 
phrase of " feeling like kicking oursefcves," upon the slightest sus- 
picion of having missed a promising chance. It is only fair to 
say that nine out of every ten of us would have done pretty much 
as Buckley has, if the opportunity had offered. Worse men than 
he have been Bosses, and worse ones are now trying to fill his 
shoes. There is more rascality, more corruption, and more in- 
famy generally concentrating around the new combine than ever 
found a lodgment on Bush street, even in its worst days. The 
dailies know this as well as we do, but none of them are fighting 
the New Ihiqtjity, whilst several of them are in with it. It thus 
becomes only a question of choice between corrupt Bosses. For 
years we have been pointing out in these columns that if we 
would preserve popular government, there must be aroused a 
public spirit and conscience equal to the task. Failing that, we 
shall have a continuation of Buckleys, each worse than the 
previous one. 

MR. BLAINE'S stomach-ache has created as much commotion, 
seemingly, as the reported insanity of Emperor William or 
the threatened decease of Queen Victoria. The state of the di- 
gestion of one of our uncrowned kings ought not to be a matter 
of such moment. Candidates for the Presidency are so plentiful 
that the temporary illness of one of them should not convulse the 
whole nation. 



THE STEAM MAIL SUBSIDY LAW. 

FOR more years than we care to recall, the News Letter, in 
season and almost out of it, has advocated a national policy 
of subsidizing steam mail lines on new routes which might seem 
to offer a reasonable probability of building up a profitable trade. 
We have known, from time to time, the great things Great Britain 
was accomplishing iu this direction, and we simply desired that 
our country should profit by her example. By this, however, we 
did not mean the perpetration of any jobs. Neither did we mean 
that a premium should be offered for running inferior steamers, 
or any steamers at all, on the routes already sufficiently well sup- 
plied. Where a trade has built up a steam line, a subsidy, so far 
from being needed, becomes a public injury, because it prevents 
competition. Subsidies should be helps to the pioneering and 
winning of new commercial outlets, simply that, and nothing more. 
When the traffic becomes sufficient to sustain a steam line, the 
subsidy should cease. When it has already called into existence 
sufficient steam communication, a subsidy is obviously not called 
for. From all of which it follows that this matter of creating 
commerce-winning steam lines by means of government aid wants 
managing with the same discrimination that a private merchant 
would apply means to the achieving of desired ends. It is to be 
regretted that the new steam mail subsidy law does not appear to 
admit of being operated in that way. It seems that it is not to 
be destined to call into being a single steam line that did not 
exist before. When the Postmaster-General recently called for 
bids he laid out a promising programme of sixty-two routes, some 
of them trans-Atlantic, and others calling tor the establishment of 
new lines o South America and different other parts of the world. 
Only eleven roiues, however, were bid upon. Of these only four 
called for new lines, and three out of the four have since been 
withdrawn, leaving only, as a new and original proposal, the bid 
by which second-class ships are to begin running from New York 
to Buenos Ayres on Decemher 1st, 1894, provided nothing mean- 
while occurs to discourage the contractor. Four of the contracts 
go to the Pacific Mail Company, which promises to improve its 
service, and the three others go to companies already established, 
and for lines they now operate without a subsidy. It is not a 
cheerful showing. We had hoped that the Pacific Coast in general 
and San Francisco in particular would have reaped substantial 
advantages from the initiation of so promising a policy. 



RECALLING CHILE'S FRIENDSHIP. 

BEFORE we conclude lo fight Chile fur answering us precisely 
as we answered Italy, it *ni be well to recall how Chile 
treated us during and subsequent to our own civil war; for the 
Republic of Chile was once our friend, than which none other was 
more ardent or sincere. The facts and the titue are well worth 
recalling at this juncture. It was during the civil war, when our 
nation was struggling desperately for life. Chile was enthusiast- 
ically on the aide of the Union. Her people contributed more 
money to the Sanitary Commission for the benefit of the northern 
sick and wounded soldiers than was sent through all the other 
legations of this Government combined! The Chilean authorities, 
moreover, at that crucial moment in our history, voluntarily and 
cheerfully acknowledged and paid, with interest, a large claim that 
had originally been preferred against their Government by ours as 
early as 1819. As the war drew to a close, news from the North 
was awaited with extreme eagerness by the people of Chile. One 
night, in the spring of 1865, the American Minister at Santiago 
was awakened from his sleep by a band of music playing " Hail 
Columbia" in front of the legation. Making his way to the 
balcony, he was bailed by a venerable man. This was the Presi- 
dent of the Chilean Republic, and it is our Minister of that day, 
the Hon. T. H. Nelson, who now tell> the story. " Richmond 
has fallen !" shouted the President; " Lee lias surrendered! The 
war is over! " and ihe music began again, mingling its joyous 
notes with the glad cries of the people. A day of feasting was 
proclaimed, all business was suspended, and there was naught 
but rejoicing in the Chilean capital that the greatest of American 
Republics was saved and peace restored. A procession 20,000 
strong, headed by the President, cabinet officers, both branches 
of Congress, civic bodies, etc., paraded the streets to the soul- 
stirring music of one hundred bands playing American airs. 
What has changed all this? After making all allowance for a hot- 
blooded people ju-t escaping from a civil war of their own, can 
one refrain from the belief that to have begotten a progeny of 
hate, the latter-day policy of the United States Government must 
in some way have been wretchedly conceived and bunglingly 
executed? But then we are living under " a great Secretary of 
State," and Pat Egan is his Minister, so that everything must 
have been well ordered. Yet we see what we do see. 



THE Democratic party in New York will re-apportion 
Slate so as to insure the control of the Legislature. In 



that 
1 State so as to insure the control of the Legislature. In view 
of the doubled-and twisted gerrymander by which the Repub- 
licans have held the Slate so long, they can hardly be blamed for 
taking advantage of iheir opportunity. Their course may not be 
defensible ethically, but morals and politics seldom row in the 
same boat. 



Jan 



- w FR VNCISCO NEWS ! ETTER. 



A NEW CHARTER NEEDEP 

WK have had on? till of holidays, »nd now for bo 
has been taken, the balance ol profit am-I loaa ascertained) 

an interregnum ol rt->t Ami recrratiun enjoyed, and DOW it i> lirut* 
to buckle down to work again and (sot* the future, Business 
men In regard to their private alTa for himself in bis 

own way. rewire ti> du that, ami need do suggestions from with- 
!i i» the relation everj en should bear to public 

affairs that we are concerned about. The old year went out 
under a cloud of local '■■• g maoajraments nml corruptions. 

If some of the resolves of (he new year have not pertained to 
tbe curing of at least a part of throe, a period of good Intentions 
has been passed through with singular Inutility. We prefer to 
believe that there has been soniewbat of a quickening ol the 
public energy and conscience. As citizens of Sun Francisco, we 
owe it to our great and promising city, as well as to our own ma- 
terial interests therein, that there should be a renovation, an im- 
proving, and a general uplifting of things. It is idle to say that 
we are powerless to help ourselves, ami that nothing is left us 
but to go along in tbe old rut. The way to do a thing is to do it. 
The way to reform the municipal mismanagement of this city is 
to reform it. It is said that the present Consolidation Act has 
outlived its usefulness, and that the city has far outgrown the 
powers it confers. Very well. Let us then promptly frame and 
adopt a new charter. That is undoubtedly tbe most pressing 
public engagement hefore us. It should be set about in dead 
earnest and at < nee; to the end that all tbe preliminary steps may 
be completed during tbe year and the new insttument advanced 
far enough to be ratified by the Legislature in January next. We 
are persuaded that a vast majority of our citizens are now ready 
to vole for any reasonably good measure. The last submitted 
charter, if it had to be voted upon to-day, would be surely rati- 
fied. The active opposition of the Bosses and official classes, 
aided by the supineness of good citizens, led to its defeat last 
time, or rather to its receiving so slender a majority that it was 
easily counted out. .Mayor Sanderson should signalr/.e his remain- 
ing year of office by putting this charter business in shape. A 
new organic law is needed for the city as a means to tbe accom- 
plishment of many necessary ends. Tbe dreadful lesson tbe 
death rate is teaching us to-day ought to make short work with 
our rotten and defective sewers. With the necessary public spirit 
aroused, all else would follow. 



A DISREPUTABLE APPOINTMENT 



BY WAY OF THE STRAITS OF MAGELLAN. 



T 1 



"'HE Traffic Association should be encouraged to go ahead and 
1 establish its steam line by way of the Straits of Magellan 
without more ado. It is a route on which there are immense 
possibilities. All down tbe Pacific Coast to the straits, and all up 
the Atlantic to New York there are ports with which it is quite 
practicable for us to do a business that could be cultivated into 
large proportions. To be sure, it is not tbe business with the way 
ports that the Traffic Association is assuming to calculate upon, 
but a through competing business with New York that shall have 
tbe effect of bringing the railroads into subjection and compelling 
them to accept whatever freight rates are offered. No practical 
man needs to be informed that there can be no competition worthy 
of the name between a sixty-day steamer and a ten-day locomo- 
tive. A steamship, when tbe conditions are anywhere near equal, 
successfully competes with the sailing vessel, but, when they are 
as grossly disproportioned as they are in this case, the steamer is 
nowhere when pitted against the iron-horse. Steamers by way 
of the Straits of Magellan to New York would possibly take away 
from sailing vessels such freight as would bear a raise of about 
one hundred per cent. It could not be carried by even the whale- 
back for less, and, at best, it would not be the kind of freight that 
now goes by rail. There is simply nothing in tbe proposition to 
make the new route a menace to the railroads. But tber-, is not 
a little in the suggestion that an economical steam service on this 
long-round voyage could be made to build up a business of its 
own that would pay, and greatly expand wiih each recurring 
year. Instead of taking business away from the railroads, it 
would bring business to them. The steamers would not, how- 
ever, leave here loaded down with heavy freight, whose bulk must 
not be broken until New York is reached. That is the present 
idea of the Traffic Association, but it is an impracticable one that 
would not work, would not pay, ami would soon be abandoned 
by the steamship owners, who would find it to their advantage to 
culiivate a trade with tbe numerous wayports, in which they 
would discover the very best of markets for many of the products 
peculiar to California. Our canned fruits and even much of our 
mining machinery would find buyers in this direction. We be- 
lieve in steamers. The more of them the better. We believe in 
good routes to put them on. and we believe the entire coast line 
around North and South America one of the most promising in 
the world. 



DURING the past year the sum of $200,033 was expended in 
Alameda, a city of about 12.000 inhabitants, for public street, 
sidewalk and sewer improvements. Does this suggest anything 
to the city of San Francisco, with its 300,000 inhabitants? 



Tin appointment of Klkinsm Secretary of War It very ninch to 
be regretted, h is a distinct lowering of tbe standard of In- 
. presumed I of Cabinet 

appeared In tbe political arena In 1872 as Con 

from \,.\\ m, m, o R« lerred two terms In this capacity, I 
Ing mining and other ventures, all of which had special < < 
sional grants, or Territorial Courl decisions, or some other pi 
complication which greatly enhanced their value to Bikini 
of his tuosl fam.m- ventures ai tin- Llini was the Maxwell land 
grant, with a bill behind It. Elkins worked so assiduously for 
this lull that it passed, and the grant was subsequently sol 
Dutch syndicate For several millions of dollars, giving rise to a se- 
ries of very ugly scandals. n<> man, except Dorsey, was more In- 
timately associated with" tbe Star route manipulations than Elkins, 
Mr. Blaine was about this period interested with him In certain 
•■good things," and he is still his partner in enterprises in \V« -i 
Virginia and other places. The two men have hum been political, 
as well as business allies, and it is well understood that Harrison's 
reluctant appointment of Elk Ins is part of the price paid to keep 
the Blaine forces quiet at the Minneapolis Convention. Elkins 
was " engineer" of the Blaine campaign of 1884, and worked as if 
if he had a personal interest in it. It turned out that he bad. When 
Bayard came in as Secretary of State, he found pending a claim 
which Blaine had been pressing upon Brazil for $50,000,000, and 
for the promotion of which claim Elkins was the attorney. It had 
twice been rejected by Evans, but Blaine had taken it up in dead 
earnest, and instructed our Minister at Rio de Janeiro to press it 
as a claim due an American citizen, that » in justice and equity 
could not be escaped.'' Mr. Bayard, passing on the same matter, 
wrote: " Such a claim, so stated, shocks the moral sense, and can- 
not be held to be within the domain of reason or justice." When 
the Beh ring Sea controversy was about ripening for settlement, it 
turned out that Elkins, as a member of the North A merican Com- 
mercial Company, had an interest in preventing a closed season, 
and that he had cunningly roped the President's son into the tran- 
saction. Blaine's method of dealing with tbe matter at that time 
was simply inexplicable, but his illness gave the President an op- 
poitunity to settle the whole dispute in the public interest, which he 
promptly did. More might be added, but sufficient has been said 
to enable the reader to judge how far tbe appointment of Elkins is 
a misfortune and a scandal. 



ARE WE MANUFACTURING TIN ? 

TIN is so large an article of domestic use, its manufacture em- 
ploys so many men and would keep so much money in tbe 
country, that every patriotic citizen must ardently desire to see 
the industry successfully domesticated in the country. The 
McKinley tariff has given it every chance. The enhanced price 
which resulted was a serious handicap to our canners, but they 
had no right to complain, seeing that th*-y were more than com- 
pensated by free sugar, and were bound to extend that protection 
to others which they claimed for themselves. The question now 
arises as to what tbe effect of the tin duty has really been. Does 
it give a reasonable promise of creating a new industry? The 
News Letter has diligently searched for information on that 
point, but without satisfactory results. We had heard a great 
deal about what was doing at Temescal, in this State, and sin- 
cerely hoped it was true. It would be a great thing for California 
f. become a great tin producing State. The company gave out a 
quantity of couteur de rose information, which an investigation of 
the facts does not justify. The Los Angeles Herald publishes the 
true state of things. The output for August was 4} tons; on 
September 5tb, October 6th, and during November work was sus- 
pended, as tbe furnace had burned itself out, and repairs were 
not being hurried. Six tons altogether had been smelted prior to 
August, so that the total output from first to last has been 
twenty two tons, all of which ha^ been shipped to St. Louis. 
Supposing it sold there at $500 a ton (the latest market report 
from Cornwall is $200 a ton), the total product would be $11,000. 
The Herald's authority estimates that every ton of tin has cost the 
Temescal company $1,000. If we turn to the Eastern States the 
outlook is no betUr. The ore is too poor to be profitably worked. 
That seems to be the trouble all along the line. The Springfield 
Reptiblican reports that the much advertised Britton factory, near 
Cleveland, Ohio, is an entire failure, and that at Apollo, Pa., the 
tin-bearing ore has petered our. All this i» very much to be re- 
gretted. With a discovery of really rich mines, all else would, of 
course, be easy, but we have no stream tin in the country, and, 
as we have not, it is argued that we can have no tin ore worthy 
of the name. If that be true, no amount of protection can pro- 
duce that which does not exiot. 



IT is almost a pity that the brilliant scheme which was con- 
cocted to rob the pool- rooms all over the United States should 
have miscarried. Shakespeare s*ays, " 'Tis sport to have the 
engineer hoist with his own pttard," and to have the biter bitten 
would 'have delighted almost everybody, and especially those 
who have been made victims by the delusive promises of the 
pool-rooms. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 




SOCIETY baa scarcely settled itself down again in town after 
the holiday visit to Del Monte, and as a consequence, festivi- 
ties have not been so numerous as they ought to have been at this 
season. The chief events were the '* party calls " receptions at the 
Pleasanton and at the Berkshire on Tuesday evening, where there 
was dancing ; the second of the regular hops at the Presidio the same 
evening, and the bal poudrc of the Friday Night Cotillion Club at Odd 
Fellows' Hall last night. Among other affairs, were the very de- 
lightful theatre party given by Miss Emily Hager, at the California 
on Tuesday evening, in honor of her guest, Miss Emma Childs, of 
Los Angeles, the party being composed ot five other ladies, Mrs. 
Mervyn Donahue being the chaperon, and six young gentlemen, a 
supper at the Hager residence, on Gough street, concluding the en- 
tertainment; and the pleasant meeting of the Euchre Club at Mrs. 
Webster Jones', on Thursday evening. To-day Mrs. Charles A. 
Belden will give a tea, from rive until eight o'clock, at her pretty 
home on Gough street, in honor of Mrs. George B. Williams, of 
Washington City, who is visiting her at present. Miss Lucy Upson, 
of Sacramento, has also been a guest of Mrs. Belden this week. 

The several New Year eve dances, both in town and out of it, pass- 
ed off to the satisfaction of nearly every one concerned. The inclem- 
ency of the weather put rather a damper on the out-of-door day 
amusements at Del Monte, but the dance in the evening, and more 
especially the supper which followed it, made amends for that, and 
the advent of the New Year was appropriately celebrated. This was 
also the case at the Bandmann's on Lombard street, where dancing 
was in order till 11 o'clock, and the midnight hour found the guests 
all assembled at the supper table, where 1802 was ushered in with 
toasts, speeches and cheers, and other joyous demonstrations of 
greeting to the New Y'ear. 

TheSylvestre ball at the San Francisco Verein Club was an elabor- 
ate entertainment. The rooms were handsomely decorated, the 
ladies' costumes were beautiful, the supper was bountiful, and Kal- 
lenberg provided the music for dancing, which was indulged in with 
spirit until a very late hour. Last, though by no means least, the 
ball at the Pleasanton was one of the most charming of the many en- 
tertainments Mrs. Pendleton has given. Two bands provided con- 
cert selections and dance music for those who tripped it over the 
carefully canvased floors of the parlors and dining room. Theladies 
were handsomely attired, an elaborate supper was served just before 
midnight, and dancing was continued afterwards for several hours. 

The Hotel Colonial gave its dance on New Year's night, and though 
it did not aspire to, or reach, the dignity of a ball, it was pronounced 
to be a most enjoyable gathering by all who participated. 

One of the incidents of New Year's day at Del Monte was the 
baptism of the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Austin Tubbs. The 
ceremony was performed by Bishop Wingfield, in the little chapel in 
the grounds, and was largely attended by guests from the hotel. 



The wedding of Miss Grace Rideout and Dr. William E. Briggs 
was one of the happy events of New Year's eve. The marriage took 
place at the home of the bride, on Washington street, which, under 
the tasteful and skillful fingers of Miss Bates, presented a most beau- 
tiful appearance. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Dr. James, 
beneath the boughs of the bridal bower, in the front parlor, the at- 
tendants on the bride being her two young cousins, Miss Helen and 
Master Justice Greely. Then followed congratulations and supper, 
after which there was dancing for an hour or more. Dr. and Mrs. 
Briggs left for the East and Europe the next day, where they will 
spend the honeymoon, and several other moons, also, ere they turn 
their footsteps homeward. 

Among recently announced engagements are those of Miss Char- 
lotte Bermingham to Surgeon Stokes, of the Navy, who is at present 
attached to the Naval Hospital at Mare Island, and of Miss Ruby 
Dore to Mr. W. E Bond, of Oakland, and the date for the latter 
we ding is set for early in the spring. The engagement heretofore 
existing between Miss Lena Merry and Mr. Jerome Watson has just 
been det lared ,l off." 



Intellectual San Francisco society is awaiting with pleasure and 
impatience the series of afternoon entertainments, that are to be 
under the auspices of some of our well-known ladies, at which the 
authoress, Miss Su t an Hale, will give her readings, " Afternoons with 
the Old Novelists," which have been so successful in Eastern cities 
during the past year. Miss Hale, who is a sister of Edward Everett 
. Hale, purposes spending some time in California. 



The cruiser Baltimore steamed into harbor last Tuesday, but will 
only remain in this vicinity until next week, spending most of the 
time upon the dry dock at Mare Island. This is not the first visit of 
her valiant commander, Captain Schley, to San Francisco. He was 



quite a feature at the society gatherings of the middle sixties, when 
he visited this port as First Lieutenant of the Wateree, the double- 
ender man-of-war which was afterwards washed ashore by a tidal 
wave on the South American coast. 



When the Press Club train arrives next week it will bring us a 
number of distinguished visitors well known in the world of letters, 
and among the guests of the delegates will be Mrs. Frank Leslie- 
Wilde and her husband, who is a brother of the esthetic Oscar; Miss 
Kate Field and Mr. Eugene Field. Extensive preparations are be- 
ing made for the entertainment of the party, a good many of a pri- 
vate nature being in contemplation besides those which will be of a 
public character. It is hoped on all sides that the weather will not, 
as usual on such occasions, go back on us. 

News has been received of an accident to Lady Hesketh, nee Flora 
Sharon, in the hunting field, which happily was not attended by any 
very serious results. Lady Hesketh has become an ardent lover of 
hunting since taking up her residence in England, and being a fear- 
less rider, is even happier than when following the hounds. 

Miss Sybil Sanderson's success on the Parisian operatic stage still 
continues, though hitherto, according to those who profess to know, 
it has been rather that of a pretty woman than of a grand artiste. 
Pier field has now become more extended, and we shall soon hear 
what is thought of her by the Russians, as she was to leave Paris for 
the Czar's dominions last Thursday, to fulfill an engagement in St. 
Petersburg. 

It is quite on the cards that San Francisco will have a visit from 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred "Sharon before the close of the winter. Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfred Holman are now residents of this city, and Seattle will 
hereafter know them no more, much to the delight of Mrs. Holman's 
mother and sister, Mrs. and Miss Durbrow. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Pinckard are domiciled at the California 
Hotel, where Mrs. Pinckard will receive on Mondays in January. 
Hon. Mr. and Mrs. Boyle are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Hale at the Occi- 
dental Hotel. Mrs. Boyle has been in California for some time, hav- 
ing hastened her coming, so as to be present at the wedding of her 
cousin, Miss Porteous. Mr. Boyle joined his wife here a couple of 
weeks ago. Mr. and Mrs. N. J. Brittan of Redwood City, have been 
at the Palace Hotel during the week. The Misses Blanche and 
Octavia Hoge, who have been spending the last three months at the 
Palace Hotel, have gone to reside on McAllister street. 

Joe Grant is back again in San Francisco, from his several months 
wandering abroad. He arrived home last week. Mrs. Flood and 
Miss Jenny have tired of Gotham, and will arrive from New York 
next week. Major and Mrs. Rathbone will accompany them, making 
the trip overland in the Flood's private car. 

Miss Hope Ellis, who is visiting the Misses Dimond at their home 
on Washington street, will remain in San Francisco for several 
weeks. Mrs. Geo. Loomis did not return to the Pacific Slope with 
her husband, who arrived a few days ago; she will spend the winter 
with her niece, Mrs. Etkins, nee Katie Felton, passing the time 
between Philadelphia and Washington City. 

The date for the marriage of Mrs. Louis Haggin's young daughter 
to Count Festitics has not yet been announced. It may interest 
those of their friends who would incline to the belief that a foreign 
fortune-hunter had captured with his title another of our American 
heiresses, to know that the Count is a man of wealth himself. He 
was an intimate friend and member of the " set" of the unfortunate 
Crown Prince Rudolph of Austria, and upon that Prince's tragic 
death, the Count was among those of his associates who were ban- 
ished from the Empire. 

George A. Knight returned on Tuesday last from a visit to the City 
of Mexico. 

The engagement has been announced of Miss Phrcbe Saalburg to 
Mr. J. Prager, a young merchant of Portland, Or. Miss Saalburg is 
well-known in society circles, and is a charming young lady. Miss 
Annie Euphrat, a very pretty and accomplished young lady, is be- 
trothed to Mr. B. Nathan, a young business man, well known in this 
city. 

Major Frank McLiughlin and his wife and daughter arrived Thurs- 
day morning from Oroville, and are staying at the Palace, where 
they will remain for two weeks. 



Mr. and Mrs. Ansley Davis celebrated the seventeenth anniversary 
of their wedding, at their residence on Scott street, on Wednesday 
evening, in a most enjoyable manner. A large number of the friends 
of the hosts were present, and were charmingly entertained in the 
bijou theatre, which has been built as an annex to the residence. 
Among those who contributed to the evening's enjoyment were 
Nathan Landsberger, the violinist. and J. Franklin Brown. Judge 
Levy was the presiding genius of the evening. 

Rev. W. W. Davts has reconsidered his resignation from St. Luke's 
Church, and has decided to remain in San Francisco as pastor of that 
congregation. 

[Continued on Page 25.] 



Jan. 9 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I FTTH; 



THE CONCORDIA BALL 



THE Oonoordia ball 
pleasantest and 
tpI glvmi by that t'lub. 

•uples present. 
the ladles were very 



New Ynr'i eve 
roost thoroughly 
There were about 
to mat <>f 

beautiful. Mr. 



Loufs Haas was floor manager, and 
he was ably assisted by Mr. An- 
drew Arruer. President Joseph RotbeMld 
and wife led the grand man-It. which was 
given a very pretty elTect under the colored 
rays of various calcium lights. Before sup- 
per there were four dances, ami on the pro- 
grammes was the notice to » Await Develop- 
ments." and not to engage for any dances 
after supper. The last lancers was a novel 
affair. The lights were extinguished and 
(be calciums turned on, and at intervals, 
while the orchestra played appropriate selec- 
tions, lightning Hushed across the hall, 
thunder roared and the New Year was 
ushered in very impressively. After supper 
the "developments" were the announce- 
ment of Mrs. Joseph Rotbcbild as floor mana- 
ger, and several young ladies as assistants. 
Pretty lithographed folders with rules for 
the leap year dance and the programme 
of dances were distributed. The rules were 
very amusing, one being that » Gentlemen 
mu>t act in a lady-like manner; " another, 
" Ladies are requested to see that no gen- 
tlemen remain as wall-flowers:" •• Ladies 
must engage their partners without regard 
to good looks." Mrs. Rothchild's gown 
was a Worth garment of brocaded cream- 
colored silk, trimmed with gold, and was 
particularly becoming to the lady's type of 
beauty.. Among the pretty young ladies 
present were Misses May and Hilda Sles- 
singer. Miss Leah Gerst, Miss Beatrice Cook, 
Miss Tillie Ettinger, Miss Henrietta Mayer, 
Miss Stella Seller, Miss Julia Newmann, and 
the Misses Rose and Lillie Goodman. The 
latter were debutantes, as was Miss Rosie 
Steinhart. 



AT THE TELEPHONE. 



" TJELLO, Central!" 
II " Well? " 

" I want a thousand." 

" I know lots of people in your fix." 

" I say I want a thousand. " 

"So do I." 

" Don't get impudent, Miss." 

" Don't let that keep you awake nights." 

'• I wan't to know if you're going to 
give rae a thousand." 

» What for?" 

" Because I want it." 

" Well, if you get it before I do, ring me 
up." 

m Are you going to give me a thousand?" 

" Wouldn't a hundred do ? " 

" No, I want a thousand or nothing." 

" Well, don't bother me if you do; I'm 
no savings bank." 

» Will you or will you not give me what 
I ask for?" 

" If I were a man I'd hunt you up and 
give you something you didn't ask for." 

11 You are either insane or trying to be 
funny." 

" I think the shoe is on the other foot." 

"I shall ask you once more, will you 
give me one thousand — Brown, Jones & 
Robinson? " 

" Oh, you want the telephone number — 
one, three naughts ? Why didn't you say 
so before ? " 

" Blank -blank -biankety- blank a tele- 
phone, anyhow ?" 

— Survey Brown Jr., in Puck. 



LITTLE GIRL (running to her colored 
nurse) — Oh, Cynthy, dear, the boys are 
calling me skinny, and all sorts of nasty 
things 1 Colored Nurse — Nebber mind, deary; 
de nearer de bone de sweeter de meatl " 
— Moonshine* 



was one 



of the 
affairs 



For llr.uirhUt. tolhmntlr *nl I'nl in.r ( < oiupUltilv 

atrktblt onratlve pro] 

MotHBai by Bun and Dm "Xn Wloalow'i Soothing Srrap" t«r %..ur 
chIM- ethic* iTlrr. ttrenu * bottle 



40 rears the staodnnl 




A Pure Cream 
Tartar Powder 



ROYAL, 

Contains Ammonia. 



TAYLOR'S ONE SPOON. 

Contains Alum and Ammonia. 



Dr. Price gives larger and fuller cans than those 
of any other Baking Powder manufacturer. 

Above cut represents the comparative size of one pound can each 
''Dr. Price's," Royal" and "Taylor's One Spoon." These cans were 
set side by side, then photographed down in exact proportions to 
admit the plate in this space. Ask your grocer to set a one pound 
can of any other brand alongside 1 lb. Dr. Price's Cream Baking 
Powder, and observe the difference, as illustrated above. 

Adulterated powders may usually be detected by their heavier 
bulk, as shown by the small cans, and these scantily filled, often 
containing a circular to help fill out the cans. It is a singular fact 
that many of the ammonia and alum baking powders are advertised 
as "Absolutely Pure," All official examinations prove that it would 
be safe to reject all powders labeled absolutely pure. 

The economy in using Dr. Price's Cream Baking Powder does 
not consist alone in the fact that much larger and fuller cans are 
given, but Dr. Price's is a stronger, purer and more wholesome bak- 
ing powder than any other known. Does better work, and goes 
farther, hence more economical in every way. 

What woman would use an ammonia or alum baking powder if 
she knew it ? Such powders not only undermine the health, but 
ammonia gives to the complexion a sallow and blotched appearance. 
Dr. Price's Cream Baking Powder is reported by all 
authorities as free from ammonia, alum, lime, or any other 
adulterant. The purity of this ideal powder has never been 
questioned. 
Refuse all substitutes. They conceal either ammonia or alum. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 




"We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore 

SINCE Mr. Willard's first appearance at the Baldwin in the 
Middleman, three weeks ago, the nomadic San Franciscan has 
crushed the stay-at-home with his pitying superiority in the con- 
stantly repeated aspiration, " If you could only see him in 
Judah!" This disparaging phrase, with the shake of the head 
which expresses the inexpressible, has made the untraveled in- 
habitant feel that nothing but seeing Judah could lift him out of 
the dust and debasement of provincialism. And lo! Providence — 
represented for the occasion by Messrs. Hayman, Palmer and 
Harry Mann of the California — graciously inclined its ear, can- 
celed outside dates, and brought out Judah at the California last 
Monday night. 

* • * 

There has been a general concession from public and critics 
that Judah is a strong, even a great play, and as greatly played. 
As perhaps the salient figure in the striking picture, Marie Bur- 
roughs — beautiful, intense, and charged to the finger-tips with 
emotional magnetism — has flashed nightly across the canvas, 
looking, with unearthly pallor and flashing eyes, like a vision 
from another sphere. Not an angel, the pearl-powder, kohl and 
henna so lavishly laid on suggesting rather a black-eyed houri 
from Mahomet's paradise, transfused with the high-wrought 
agonies of modern sentimentalism. It is hardly fair, however, to 
dwell upon Marie Burroughs' personality. It is, undoubtedly, a 
strong element in the powerful charm of Yashti Dethic, yet 
altogether subordinate to the artistic portrayal of an exacting 
role. Mr. Willard's Judah, while not more dramatically strong, 
perhaps, than his Cyrus Blenkarn, seems to be so from the fact of 
its appealing to a far wider range of human sympathy. The 
same strength of mentality is evident, and, if one may call it a 
fault, the same fault which attached to his characterization of the 
old potter — an over-refinement leading to an extreme repose and 
repression, which, however satisfying to the intellectual Vere de 
Veres, does not reach and " knock down " the average American 
audience as would an occasional lapse into the stage tragedy 
which tears a passion to tatters and splits the ears of the ground- 
lings. Even the most conservative of theatre-goers has in his 
make-up more or less of "the groundling," and the actor must 
atoop now and then to satisfy this element. Aside from this lack 
of needful concession, Mr. Willard gives in the high-strung and 
over-sensitive young clergyman, a noble companion picture to 
Marie Burroughs' Vashti Dethic; and the Palmer Company need 
wish no higher praise than that it forms in every instance an 
adequate support to the two principals. The senior Pralls (Mr. 
Barfoot and Miss Rivers), their scientific son and his iron-clad 
fiancee, Miss Jopp (Zetfie Tilbury), Lady Eve (Nannie Craddock), 
Dethic, the charlatan (Royce Carleton), and other leading people 
are all worthy of critical notice. F. H. Tyler makes a distinctive 
and well sustained character of Juxon Prall, a special merit be- 
ing his clear enunciation under the handicap of a scientifically 
suppressed drawl. 

* # » 

The attendance at the California during the week has been 
remarkable, even for that lucky house. The rush began in 
curiosity, and has kept up on genuine interest. The immense 
demand in advance for seats has determined the management, 
wisely, to keep Judah on for the second and last week of Mr. 
Willard's California engagement, instead of changing to The Mid- 
dleman, as contemplated. 

* # # 

The Carleton Opera Company has been giving this week, at the 
Baldwin, a good production of standard comic operas to very 
poor houses. The fact may be due to strong novelties elsewhere, 
but still remains in a certain degree unaccountable. 

* * # 

Next Monday night Mr. Wilkinson's Widows will be presented at 
the Baldwin by Chas. Froh man's Comedians. The piece was 
adapted to the American stage by Wm. Gillette, from a French 
farce, Feu Toupinei, by Alexandre Bisson, and is said to be the 
happiest effort of the great adapter. The story runs thus: The 
late Mr. Wilkinson — an eminently respectable London city man — 
left two widows, having been " giddying " sub rosa and unsus- 
pected, till death and his two widows bring to light his misdeeds. 
The ladies, extremely diverse in character, both marry again and 
come together in a London apartment house, where they are in- 
troduced to the audience, and trouble begins. The resulting 
collisions and revelations keep the apartment house lively and 
the auditors amused. The piece had a two hundred nights run in 
New York, and will wake up the Baldwin first-nightera. 

* » # 

Dan'l Sully and The Millionaire are at the Bush, apparently to 
the gratification of its patrons. The play is full of plot and real- 
ism, but might be improved for the general taste by cutting out 
the clap-trap about Ireland and the Irish. Also, if one may say 



it, by cutting out the present Mrs. "Van Buren and putting an 
actress in her place. Mr. Sully is a genial Irishman without over- 
acting, and has a remarkably easy stage manner and appearance. 
Play, player and support are too well known here to need special 
notice. The good attendance at the Bush testifies to their popu- 
larity. 

* • » 

The next Bush-street attraction will be Captain Swift, C. Haddon 
Chambers' play, with Mr. Arthur Forrest in the leading part, the 
production being under the general direction of A. M. Palmer. 
The piece, which has a London record of three hundred nights, 
with the same in New York, has been already seen here at the 
Baldwin, yet will lose no interest on that account. T. J. Myers, 
advance agent, is making every arrangement for a creditable pro- 
duction of the popular play. 

* » * 

The Island of Zenobar, the Tivoli's successful holiday produc- 
tion will be taken off after Sunday night, and on Monday, Janu- 
ary 11th, Audran's The Mascot will be produced, with Gracie 
Plaisted as the Mascot, Tillie Salinger as Fiametta, Arthur Mess- 
mer as Frederic, Phil Branson as Pippo, and Tom Ricketts alter- 
nating with J. W. Norcross, Jr., as Prince Lorenzo and Farmer 
Rocco. 

* * * 

The Orpheum kept on its excellent production of The Bohemian 
Girl till Thursday, owing to delays in transportation of the materi- 
als for the production of The Princess of Trebizonde. This oper- 
atic comedy is one in which Chas. H. Drew is famous, and the 
performance will, no doubt, prove popular with the great major- 
ity of theatre-goers, who prefer fun to genuine music. ■ The piece 
will be finely staged and excellently cast. 

* # * 

The members of the Mr. Wilkinson's Widows company are 
mostly already popular here. Joseph Holland, a favorite of the 
old California, has, in Percival Perrin, a most exacting comedy 
role, his performance being, according to the New York critics, 
" worthy of serious and close study.' Mrs. Georgie Drew Barry- 
more, Emily Bancker (formerly Rosina Vokes' leading lady), 
Annie Wood, Thos. H. Burns, Mattie Ferguson and others are in 
the cast. 

* % # 

Miss Nina Bertini's concert, last Thursday evening, was largely 
attended, and the young prima donna made a strong impression. 
A marked characteristic of her voice is its extreme flexibility, the 
brilliancy of her trill being notable. Her training has been in the 
Italian school, under the most famous vocal teachers. The num- 
bers selected for her concert were calculated to display the purity 
of her high soprano voice and her brilliant execution. Mile. 
Bertini was assisted by Donald de V. Graham, Adolph Lada, 
'celloist; Gustav Schultheiss, pianist, and Hother Wismer, violin- 
ist. A most enjoyable evening was the result. 

A piano recital was given Wednesday evening by Robert Tolmie, 
at Steinway Hall, which, while not so largely attended as it 
should have been, was highly enjoyed by the fortunate ones pres- 
ent. The varied programme was well adapted to display Mr. 
Tolmie's versatility, from the extreme delicacy of his touch in the 
menuetto of the Beethoven number to the brilliancy of his Liszt 
selections. 

* # * 

Miss Magda Bugge, the Norwegian pianist, gave her friends a 
rare treat in a musicale at her residence, 1608 Pacific avenue, last 
Saturday evening. As an interpreter of Grieg's lyric music, Miss 
Bugge is particularly felicitous, and in her selections from Schubert 
and Chopin she showed an equal facility and comprehension. 

* « * 

The first lecture-recital of Wm. H. Sherwood will be given 
Tuesday evening, January 12th, at Metropolitan Temple; the 
second, Thursday afternoon, January 14th. The plan of these re- 
citals is novel and instructive, including an analytical study of 
the composers illustrated on the piano, and they will be particu- 
larly interesting to students and professional musicans. 

* # * 

The following well-known lecturers will visit this city during 
the present season, under the management of John F.Bragg: 
Geo. W. Cable, novelist and reader, February and March; Max 
O'Rell, author of " John Bull and His Island," etc., latter part of 
March; Sir Edwin Arnold, the famous poet, April. These will be 
followed later by "Ben Hur " Wallace, Bill Nye, James Whit- 
comb Riley, and others equally distinguished. 

* * * 

The fourth Musical Sunday Afternoon, at Steinway Hall, under 
the direction of F. W. Ludovici, will take place to-morrow, Sun- 
day, January 10th, with the following excellent programme: 
String quartette, Beethoven, No. 12 in E flat, op. 127, Hermann 
Brandt String Quartette ; Concerto, violin and piano, Mendelssohn, 
Misses Florence Fletcher and Ada Weigel; Songs, Grieg and 
Curschmann, Nina Bertini; Quintette, piano and strings, Dvorak, 
Miss Weigel and Hermann Brandt String Quartette. 



Jan. 9, : 



BAN n; \\(MS( NEWS I ETTEB 



The riral of the nc» mi . H popt will take place at 

Irvin* Hall. Saturday, January Ifllh.al 3 P. *. Music lovers will be 
dedicated to bear that Mrs. Car* (who should be heard in a solo at 
every concert) baa consented to play a tolo, BMthoven'i 8Sd 
variation to C minor. Tbe concert will he entirely devoted t<« 
ren. Mrs. i"arr an. I I 111 play the Aral of the 

Beethoven sonatas for piano ami violin, the plan being to pro- 
duce them in their right order. It was expected to secure Mr. 
tirabam as vocalist, but at this writing Ibis is uncertain. 

The San Francisco Operatic Society will Rive Von Snppe's Trip to 
it tbe Powell Street Theatre Wednesday night Jan. LSth, 
for the benefit of St. Joseph's Home. The society, of which Miss 
Alvina If. Heuer is the prima donna. Signor Pelapiane musical 
director, and A. M. Tbornt-in stage manager, has been in exist- 
ence two years, and has done much good work for charity, beside 
giving pleasure to music-lovers. A full chorus and complete pro- 
fessional orchestra will assist in the coming production. 

A letter from a near friend of Charlie Reed brings the sad tidings 
that the favorite comedian lies seriously ill at tbe Gedney House in 
New York City. 

* • • 

Mr. Won. J. Kotaier, whose coming production of Louis XI. at 
the Grand Opera Huuse, was recently announced in this column, 
so far from being an " aspiring amateur," is a professional of long 
standing, having for three years supported W. E. Sheridan in 
Shakespearean roles. Mr. Kohler has devoted fifteen years to the 
study of tbe legitimate drama, and has given a careful study of 
history as applying to Louis AY., of which play he proposes soon 
to give a grand spectacular production. 
< * * 

The Goodwin Comedy Company will give a dramatic entertain- 
ment, with dancing as a supplement, at Saratoga Hall next Thurs- 
day evening. The farcical comedy. French Flats, will be produced, 
and, from the reputation of tbe company, will doubtless be well 
played. 

* * # 

Tyndall, the mind-reader and hypnotist extraordinary, is hold- 
ing nightly seances at Irving Hall. As an exponent of the new 
element in medical practice, Mr. Tyndall is one of the most re- 
markable yet seen here, and his entertainments are interesting, 
both to the scientific and the curious. 
» « * 

The Olympian Skating Rink is largely patronized, especially the 
training school, by the growing crop of ambitious 'cyclers. Man- 
ager Nevin has some new attraction nightly for his patrons. 

• * * 

The Temple, on Turk street, near Taylor, is a cosy after-theatre 
resort. It is open all day, with stage performance from 8 to 12 p.m. 

# # » 

A Texas Steer will follow Mr. Willard, at the California, January 
18th. 



Some New Pictures. 



Among the recent acquisitions in the art line are half a dozen 
fine paintings, just received by S. & G. Gump. A private view of 
the. as yet, unframed pictures, shows them to be of unusual merit 
and acceptability. Two are from the atelier of Gustavo Simoni, 
whose reputation as a painter of Moorish and Arabian subjects 
equals that of Geronie. One canvas, " The Pasha and Slave " is a 
masterpiece; the texture and coloring of the Persian rugs, the ara- 
besques and carvings on the wall are marvelously produced; and the 
central figure of the girl, who standi in a graceful, shrinking pose, 
expresses the utmost delicacy and beauty. The other canvas repre- 
sents the exterior of a mosque, with its arches and pillars and richly 
colored prayer-rugs. At the base of a pillar an Arab has dropped 
down in his picturesque rags, while a tall figure, in a crimson coat, 
entering tbe mosque, makes a vivid spot of color against the neutral 
tint of the walls. Two charming little interiors, by L. Blurue Siebert, 
are very suggestive of Defregger's work. The figures are animated 
and vivacious, handled with much spirits, and the effect is 
bright and attractive. August Humborg, Munich, has one of 
his clever paintings of monks. The interior of the kitchen 
is represented, and two genial looking padres are offering 
snuff to another, whose hands, wet with the blood of the 
freshly-cleaned fish, cannot touch the proffered treat. The tone of 
the picture is decidedly humorous, the expression on the faces of the 
monks being especially good, and the flesh well handled. " The 
Traveling Physician," a salon picture from the Milan exhibition, is 
by Luigi Bianchi, and is very attractive, by reason of the subject and 
manner of treatment. The doctor, who has alighted from his horse, 
stands on the doorstep, looking at the baby, whose anxious mother 
awaits his verdict. The scene is wintry, and the snow lies deep in 
the yard and field, a striking contrast to tbe bright colors of the 
women's dresses. These paintings are a valuable addition to the fine 
collection now hanging in the art rooms. 

If one wishes a good meal, excellent in every particular, he should 
visit the Orignal Swain's Bakery, at 213 Sutter street, which enjoys 
the well-earned reputation of being the best and most popular restaur- 
ant in the city. The menu always includes all the delicacies which 
make glad the heart of the epicure. Hence the wide popularity of the 
establishment. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

U H,\ viv i , ; , | i ItfMD Boonn Manager 

< JJVnf.v"','' '■•"■>'• '»'■»«)• Hill, I'HAKi.r. FROIiaAX'n 

MR. WILKINSON'S WIDOWS I 
">' AK " I lbs Amoriinn nag* by WUIUm 

SThe Company Inrl, : , ,,„.,, |, Hrrvm „ ri , |Uu MMI 

nson Mis. Kmll] ft «,„ ,,, Meltlde Orey, Mr Jo.. Holland. 

Ir. Tbos. ii. m.n,.. Mr rhoi W i;yi.-v. Mr. Jobn W. Thompson, Mr. >d- 
ward Co einan-u played wo times in S'ew York. 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Handsomest Tlientre in the World. 
Mb. Al. Havman, Lessee and Proprietor | Mb. Harry Mans. Mauager 

Mouday January lltli. Last Week. List Matinee. MK. E. 8. WILLARD 
aud Mb. Palmer's Company, in 

JUDAH | 
Heit W eek— Hoyt's Hest Comedy, A TEXAS STEER. 
£W* Seats on Sale Thursday. 



BUSH STREET THEATRE. 



.Manager. 



M. B. Lbavitt ..Lessee aud Proprietor | J. J. Gottxob 

Laat Week 1 

DANIEL SULLY in 

THE MILLIONAIRE! 

. r M .°S?'KVT J o«VS!X l? th - A - M - Palmer's Madison Square Theatre Success, 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Keeling Bros Proprietors and Managers . 

Last Week! Crowded Houses Nightly! Five New Specialties! New 
Amazon March ! Great Transformation Scene ! 

THE ISLAND OF ZENOBAR I 

Second Edition. 
Monday, January 11th— THE MASCOT. 
Popdlab Prices 2Sc. and 60c. 

TYNDALL, 

THE MXITID I^E-A-IDEK,, 

WILL APPEAR AT 

Irving Hall, 139 Post Street, To-Night, and every Night Next Week. 

Admission, 50 cents. Reserved Seats, 75 cents. 
Matinee ill is Saturday. Prices 25c. and 50c. 

IRVING HALL. 

JANUARY 16, 1892, 3 P. M. 
Fifth Series 

CARR-BEEL SATURDAY POP CONCERT. 

MRS. CARMICHAEL-CARR, Soloist. 

Single subscriptions for the Series, $3. Can be had by applying to Mr. 
Sigismund Beel, care Sherman, Clay & Co. 

METROPOLITAN HALL. 

The Emiaent Pianltt aud Musical Lecturer, 

WILLIAM H. SHERWOOD, 

Will give Two Recitals, Tuesday Evening, January 12th, and Thursday 
Afternoon, January 14th. 

Seats Now on Sale at Kohler & Chase's, 26-28-30 O'Farrell street. 



THE TEMPLE. 

J. B. Francis Proprietor and Manager. 

Turk Street, near Taylor. 
First Class Concert Hall and Family Resort. 
A Tremendous Hit ! 

VIENNA LADIES' ORCHESTRA I 

Vocal Selections by well-known Artists. Performance every Evening, 8 
to 12. Sunday Matinee from 2 to 5. 
Admission 10and20cents 

JAMES B. NEAL, 

LATE OP NEW YORK, 

IF 1 I-. O :R, -A- I-. -A-X^TIST, 

106 Grant Avenue.) (Telephone No. 1550. 

Decorator of Inauguration Ball, Washington, D. C, March 4th, 1885, March 

4th, 1889. 

Table and Wedding; Decorations a Specialty. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



OVER IN OAKLAND. 



THE gilded youth of Alameda are somewhat jealous of the praise 
that has been lavished on the Oakland boys who displayed so 
much talent during the recent amateur theatricals, and in order 
to even things up a little they intend also to launch forth as 
Thespians. Their first efforts will be as misstrels, and in a few 
days they will announce the date of the entertainment, which 
will be given at the Opera House, for the benefit of the Alameda 
Flower Mission. Will F. Cbipman will be the interlocutor, and 
the company will be know as the " Incogs." The event will of 
course be a great society one for the trans-marshites. 

The disposition of the Merritt estate has been the topic princeps 
during the past week. It is rather hard on the next of kin- 
Fred and Jim Merritt— that they should have been remembered 
by Mrs. Garcelon to the extent of only an oil painting each. 
Every one wished them better luck, for they are generous and 
good-hearted, and gentlemen from top to toe. In view of the 
bequests made to them the ballad of "The picture that is turned 
towards the wall" will probably be tabooed in their households 
in future. 

It would be hardly fair to give her name, but she's well known 
in the Madison street part of town, and has had a little trouble 
lately, so some may find a means of identification in that descrip- 
tion. It was her troubles, in fact, that leads up to the whole 
story. She went into a Seventh street drug store the other night, 
and asked for twenty-five cents' worth of laudanum, adding in 
explanation that she was going to use it for a severe toothache. 
The druggist, though, is a veteran at his business, and he realized 
that something was queer, so, instead of giving her tne fatal 
draught, he made up and sold her a compound in which lobelia 
figured largely. He labeled it, however, with the customary 
death's head and cross-bones poison sign, and she hurried away 
with it, thinking that she had the laudannm sure enough. 

About two hours afterward a young man rushed wildly into 
the store, and said to the wily prescription compiler: 
•< Did you sell my sister that laudanum?" 

The old man smi.ed, and gave an Irish answer by asking, " Did 
she take it?" 

" Yes," said the visitor, with a groan, " and she's poisoned." 
The druggist laughed this time, and then said, quietly, " Don't 
you bother about her. She'll be the sickest girl in town for a day 
or so, but that's all the harm it will do her. She's on the outside 
of a big dose of lobelia, and by the time she's through with it, she 
will be to her senses again, and anxious to live." 

His predictions were correct, for the would-be suicide is around 
town again now, and apparently satisfied to remain in this mortal 
coil until death shuttles her off of bis own accord. 

Every now and then one sees in print the list of eligible bache- 
lors of this, that and the other city, but until the present time no 
one has seen fit to so mention the " catches " of Oakland. As one 
of the attorneys said during the famous contestfor the Tichborne 
estates: " There are three classes of men who are liable to get 
along all right in this world— first, those who have money and no 
brains; second, those who have brains and no money, and third, 
those who have both brains and money." In one of these three 
classes is each individual whose name appears in the following 
list; the reader who knows them can easily do the classifying. So 
with this introduction here they are, and, as it is leap year, the 
ladies can make their own selections: Cleve Dam, Harry Melvin, 
Ed. Vincent, Henry Squires, Tim Brady, " Brick " Wheaton, Selby 
Adams, Frank O'Brien, Bert Brayton, Billy Bond (but he's en- 
gaged), J. J. Archibald, Judge Allen, Harry Houghton, Phil. Remil- 
lard, Andy Stone, Harry Coleman, Doctor Fisher, Doctor Buteau, 
Ed. Holland, Jack Connors, Gus McDonald, Alfred Clement, Joe 
Clement, Lester Herrick, Will Powning, Henry Wadsworth, Ar- 
thur Goodhue, W. Finch, Frank^Hume, Frank Bentley, Ed. Prin- 
gle, Will Crane, Ralph Stockman, Shafter Howard, Carl Howard, 
Wallace Hyde, Will Fenton, Will Fine, Charles Bates, Louis Jones 
and Ben Wade. 

Joe Dillon is one of the landmarks of Oakland. He is one of 
the old regime, and when he was Assessor of the city he ran 
affairs so that Republican, Democrat, Mugwump, et ai., swore by 
him as a friend. He is getting on in years now, but he may be 
seen every day on Broadway, and despite the havoc of the grip, 
he declines, as he has ever done, to wear an overcoat. He thinks 
the habit is effeminate. 

There is talk of forming a City Hall glee club, for the hallowed 
building wherein the affairs of Oakland are attended to contains 
many a sweet singer, as is evidenced by the rehearsals held almost 
daily in City Clerk Jim Brady's offices. The organization will 
consist as follows: Tenors, Frank O'Brien, City Treasurer Zach 
Gilpin and Police Judge Ogden; falsetto, Auditor Snow; contral- 
tos, Stewart McMullen, Ed. Holland and Jesse Wall; baritones, 
Geo. Kaufman, Paul Schafer, Billy O'Brien and Sam. Mitchell; 
bassos, City Attorney Johnson, Dave Bostree and J. W. Mc- 
Clymonds; director of music, Jim Brady. 

Hector La Fleur will be well remembered by a good many in 
San Francisco, Oakland and Los Angeles. He was a tall, angular 
youth, with a wild disposition, which resulted in his being kept 
oy his rich relatives where the grass was short, and for a while 



be had a pretty hard time of it in this part of the country. But 
now the kaleidoscope of fortune has made a complete change for 
him. An arrival the other day from Ottawa, Can., says that 
Hector has fallen in for a large estate in the Dominion, and is 
now rolling things very high in the winterpleasure resorts around 
Montreal and Quebec. 

The religious element will be sorry to hear that Dr. Dille, the 
pastor of the First Methodist Church, will bid farewell to Oakland 
in April. In that month he is to be transferred to San Francisco, 
and probably Dr. McCann, of the Bay City, will be appointed in 
his place. Dr. Dille was one of the leaders in the recent crusade 
against the pool-rooms, and bas always interested himself in mat- 
ters of public note, so he will be greatly missed. 



Chas. Lainer, artistic photographer, 715 Market street. Crayon 

Portraits a specialty. There is an unmistakably air of truth about all 
is portraits, from the smallest card photo up to the most ambitious 
specimen of the photographic art. 

^. a 4 f The genuine brand for sale only a 

'Mi THE MAZE 

v in s*i aucc A Motlern Department Store, 

Jv 8 U \A LU V BO. San Francisco. 

HAVE YOU GOT 

Dyspepsia, Bright's Disease, or Dia- 
betes, or do you ■want a pleasant, 
healthful drink? If so, buy 

ARCADIAN WAUKESHA WATER, 

Recommended by our best physi- 
cians as the healthiest drink on earth. 
Johnson-Locke Mercantile Company 
Agents, 204 Front St., S. F. 



a-, "w. OL^Tf^K: &c 

653 Market Street, 



CO. 



WALL 



FOR 

PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 

OLIVE TREES FOR SALE. 

Large numbers of splendidly rooted trees of different 
ages. New process of rooting, the result of ten years' 
experimenting. No artificial heat used. Address 
W. ALSTON HAYNE, Jr., 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 

HOTEL PLEASANTON, 

Sutter Street, corner Jones. San Francisco, Cal. 

The Largest, Best Appointed and Most Liberally Managed Family aud 
Tourist Hotel iu San Francisco. Lighted by Electricity throughout. 

Elegantly Furnished Dining Rooms and Parlors for Banquets, Private 
Dinners, Parties, Weddings, etc. 

The Cuisine a Special Feature. 

MRS. M. E. PENDLETON, 
Proprietor and Manager. 



J. F. B. MeCLEERY, 



Billiard Instructor, 



Flood Building, 



San Francisco. 



THOS. W. BREE, 
.TEACHER OF BANJO, GUITAR AND MANDOLIN 

305 Seventh Street. 
MANUFAtHlKER OF BANJOS. Ul'lTABS, Etc. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS T ETTEH 



9 



SNAP SHUTS. 

(By Pi Viiioi.] 

'* A RK the Chinese good i o ika la a question often uked by 
Pi -imniter* whu ire Impressed with the relation whirh tin' 
CeleMial bears to our domestic arrangements. In a general way 
the question may be answered In the affirmative, bat when it 
comes to particulars, woe for the gastronomic peace of the ques- 
tioner. In the first place, all Chinese cooking is alike in this re- 
spect: the seasoning is at fault. A fhinese rook is quite apt to 
serve bis viand? and dish bis vegetables guiltless of salt, or be 
may pirkle them in brine. As for appreciating the difference be- 
tween seasoning produced by tbe use of pepper and salt while 
the food is cooking, ami that dredged on by a heavy hand just 
before tbe food is placed on the table, that is a point beyond him. 
He has a curious knack of making everything taste alike when 
vegetables pass through his preparations. As for the utensils he 
(UMi, he would just as leave cook and mash potatoes or boil mush 
in a saucepan which has done duty for onions. That one flavor 
may impart itself to tbe next article does not trouble him in the 
least. He would have no objections lo placing his freshly baked 
bread on a table so it would lean against the freshly-painted 
wainscoting, and he would see no reason for hesitating to stand 
a steaming loaf of cake upon a pine board. Let a beatben once 
gain the idea tbat some people like tomatoes sweetened, and he 
will use sugar instead of salt on everything, even the meat. I 
have known high-priced Chinese cooks not only to do this, but 
to send half-baked cake to a table, and to commit that crowning 
crime against our stomachs, to serve cranberry sauce that had 
been cooked in a metal saucepan and sweetened with brown 
sugar! All this may be accounted for on the grounds of the Ce- 
lestial's taste being at variance with our own. I have known 
Chinese cooks who. after having been trained to cook to the per- 
fection of our Caucasian fancy, preferred tbeir own characteristic 
diet of rice and tea. A Chinaman may serve a dinner in a style 
to suit tbe most fastidious, but he will do so only under the in- 
telligent supervision or direction of the one for whom he cooks. 
I do not mean tbat the lady of the house must stand over him, 
amid the pots and kettles, but that she must give him explicit di- 
rections every now and then as to the seasoning, or he will lapse 
into tbe tasteless, flavorless style. 

# # # 

Ella Wheeler Wilcox has written forcibly and well upon sleep 
as a beautifier, and condemns the practice of forcing young girls 
to rise early after a night spent in social gaieties. Now, to my 
mind there is nothing more irritating than the sensation of being 
suddenly awakened. Surely, with our perfect mechanism of a 
human body, with its quietly moving involuntary action, it was 
never meant that we should go to sleep with a jerk or wake up 
with a start; fling ourselves out of bed and into our clothes in just 
so many minutes. Worse of all is to be aroused either from 
slumber or meditation by a loud noise. I had an acquaintance 
with whom I once had the misfortune to share tbe same room in 
the country, whose delight it was to awaken me from a sound 
sleep by yelling at the top of her voice from the hall, or even at 
the door of the room. Had I arisen and annihilated her on the 
spot, I am sure it would have been justifiable homicide. 

# » • 

It would be a tiresome task to attempt to enumerate the differ- 
ent memory systems that have been invented to improve the art 
of not forgetting. But they are all distinguished by this feature: 
each one is more troublesome to master in all its details than it 
would be to remember the independent facts as they occur. But 
in one of these memory systems I found an idea which is worth 
more than a passing thought. The sensation of being lost in a 
strange place is terrible. Not to see one familiar landmark strikes 
one with dismay. Not to know which way to turn means utter 
confusion. Here is the valuable suggestion: When traversing a 
locality for the first time, if the traveler will stop at frequent in- 
tervals, and turn and loot backward over the way he has come, 
he will remove all possibility of losing his way when he returns. 
For in retracing his steps a traveler sees the landscape and sur- 
rounding objects from a point of view just opposite from his first 
view. The road running south must look different from what it 
looked running north. Having gained an idea of both aspects of 
the road by looking back, the traveler shuts (t that strange look" 

out of his path. 

# # # 

In some respects country children have a much quicker intel- 
ligence than city-bred boys and girls. I noticed this during a 
winter tbat I passed on a Point Reyes ranch. " Some one is com- 
ing," said the little girl, a child of six; "perhaps he'll bring you 
some letters." All eagerness for home news I rushed to the door. 
"Oh, he isn't here yetl " laughed the child; " he's way off on the 
mountain." For a moment I was provoked, thinking that the 
child was making game of me. " What do you mean, Gracie? " 
said I ; » surely you cannot see any one at this distance." "But 
don't you see that cloud of dust high up there on the road? " the 
child replied with that air of polite commiseration for my ignor- 
ance, so much affected by children able to instruct their elders; 



" that doat li coming thla way. and it's tome one In a buggv." 
And the Child was right. Hut few rity children would bftT« 
ihown the same * ktloil in regard lo features ol their 

daily life. 

• • • 

In * recent issue of a local weekly, fault was foun.l wilh Anicri 
can girls lor not knowing liow to cook, and (or being incapable 
of supervising a household. That many American girls do not 
rill the bill may be true, but there are ninny Of tbeni who are 
good plain cooks, capable housekeepers and excellent seam- 
stresses. It duel not follow that unless an American girl is visi- 
bly engaged in the laudable task of baking bread, sweeping a 
room or darning stockings that she docs not know how. There 
are some who still ding to the idea that it is more praiseworthy 
for a woman to spend time and brain power and eyesight in the 
making of her own underclothes than to earn the money to buy 
them ready-made, or to hire some one to do it for her. It's a 
poor political economist who cannot see in tbe plan which brings 
the greatest good to tbe greatest number a course of action to be 
both commended and followed. For my part I long ago reached 
the conclusion that when a girl had learned how things should be 
done, when, if necessary, she could take bold and do them her- 
self, but, better yet, could intelligently direct their performance 
with such executive ability as to insure the smooth and equable 
running of the household, she was more to be admired and emu- 
lated than the faithful, patient plodder who spent ber life " doing 
chores." One day, on a railroad train, 1 had the felicity of listen- 
ing to a conversation between a society old young man and a so- 
ciety old young girl. He was giving us both his views on wo- 
men and their work. He said: "I never want to'hear anything 
about work — about cooking. I'd much rather my wife wouldn't 
even know how to cook. I think a woman ceases to be fasci- 
nating when she can attend to so many details." Aud to my great 
amazement my companion agreed to every word. Amazement, I 
say, for she had been the factotum in her family for years, and I 
had respected her ability and honored her for years, only to hear 
ber avowing such sentiments, to see her ashamed of,her womanly 
skill. They were a pair of snobs. I despise snobs. 



The four 

Official Reports, 

U. S. Govern't, Bulletin No. io ; 
Canadian Gov't,Bulletin No. 13 ; 
Ohio Food Commission, and 
N. J. Food Commission, show 

Cleveland's 
Baking Powder 

strongest of all 

pure cream of tartar powders, 
yielding (average) 12.87 percent, 
carbonic acid gas. 

The Scientific American, after a 
most careful examination, of the 
Official Reports, says : " The show- 
ing Cleveland's makes, compared 
with all the principal brands, is such 
as to put it emphatically at the head," 
F. II. AMES A CO., Agents. 




H. MEYERFELD, Proprietor and Cutter, 

Will Guarantee a Stylish Cut and Perfect Fitting Pair of 
Pants, and keep them in Repair for one year without extra 
charge. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



■LQoKER- ON alQ 




TZ5Sfl^r^ , n3QP' ffni, 8B0Pifssre^ass=rn 



ALL his acquaintances know that M. H. Hecht is one of the 
most fiery Colonels who was ever on a General's staff. He is 
imbued with patriotism, he exhales valor, and for a chance to 
distinguish himself upon the field of battle he would, forsooth, 
give his good right arm. So great does he consider the honor of 
his position in the military service of this State that he allows no 
opportunity to escape of announcing his title to the world. 
Thereby hangs this tale. During Mr. Hecht's — beg pardon — 
" Colonel " Hecht's — recent travels in Europe he met Mr. Nickels- 
berg, also a local merchant, on the Alps, which the Colonel was 
crossing from Italy to Switzerland, Mr. Nickelsberg being bound 
for Italy. Both were traveling in diligences, and greeted each 
other warmly. On his road Mr. Nickelsberg stopped for the 
night at a wayside hostelry. He is a small man, of not a very 
impressive physique, and though an American, did not, at first, 
receive much attention. When he went to the register he saw 
upon the page, in a large flowing hand, the signature, » M. H. 
Hecht, Colonel. N. G. C, America." Nickelsberg smiled, all by 
himself, and then signed: "Mr. Nickelsberg, General, M. D. S. 
E., America." The innkeeper came in soon after, and when he 
saw the signature, at once imagined he had another distinguished 
military man from America with him. He hemmed and scraped 
and bowed again and again, as he assured Mr, Nickelsberg of 
his profound pleasure in entertaining so distinguished an Ameri- 
can. " By the way," he added, " there seems to be very many 
American officers visiting Europe now ; how can they be spared?" 
" Oh," replied the » General, M. D. 8. E.," << there is no war now; 
we are at peace with everybody, and we are off on furloughs." 

'* One of your compatriots, a Colonel, honored my house by bis 
presence yesterday," said the Italian, showing Colonel Hecht's 
signature. 

" Oh, yes," said Nickelsberg, " that's Colonel Hecht; quite a 
good officer. He's on my staff." 
# * # 

In the Palace Hotel lobby, on Monday night, Patrick Egan, 
United States Minister to Chile, was under discussion by a num- 
ber of Chicagoans. One of them, who has known Egan ever 
since be came to America, said that first of all, he objected to 
Egan because he was not an American. " He came to this country 
in 1884," said the Cbicagoan, " and had not been here a week be- 
fore he began to make incendiary speeches of the same nature that 
made him a fugitive from Europe. His first speech was at a Clan- 
na-Gael camp meeting in Philadelphia, and these are some of his 
utterances: < I have been reading up the records of the Italian 
banditti, and from them I have come to believe in this rule: To 
meet our enemies with smiles on our faces and with a warm shake 
of the hand, having a dagger in our sleeves ready to stab them 
to the heart.' Egan was one of the five * kill Cronin ' members 
of the nine national executives of that then unlawful organiza- 
tion — its constitution has been revised since the murder of Dr. 
Cronin — known as the Clan-na-Gael, and when he resigned to go 
to Chile his place was filled by that equally notorious dynamitard, 
James Furlong. Egan was a member of the inner circle of the 
clan, and a chum of Alexander Sullivan and the spy Le Caron. 
Since his advent in America, at least, he has been an Irish patriot 
for revenue only, it is said, and pretty fat revenue it was, too, 
before the exposures of Dr. Cronin. Dr. Cronin was killed be 
cause he tore the mask from the faces of such men as Egan and 
his confreres in the triumvirate of the Clan-na Gael. During the 
trial of the murderers of Dr. Cronin at Chicago, Egan was in 
communication with the friends and adherents of the murderers, 
and two different emissaries were sent from Chile to Chicago. 
Egan had not been in the United States very long when he got 
the Chilean portfolio, yet he succeeded in earning for himself the 
distrust and dislike of all law-abiding, loyal Irish-Americans. 
This is the man who wants the United States to go to war with 
Chile. Why? So that English merchants may seize the nitrate 
beds. This postulate may seem far-fetched to those who do not 
know the real character of this loud-mouth British lion tail- 
twister, but the fact is, that Egan has played his countrymen 
false, from first to last, since his advent in this country, as 
his friendship for Le Caron proves." 



It has an oldish, weather-worn appearance, though one can see 
that it does not lack the care of the living. The quaint, low 
walls are storm-eaten, moss-covered and vine-clad, though not in 
ill repair. There is a well-kept lawn in front, and here and there 
some patches of flowers. If you stood behind the iron doors and 
looked out through the rusty gratings to the left a little, you 
would see see an old live-oak tree, and the thought would come 
to you, as it came to me, that old oak is a fitting monument for 
the author of that beautiful ballad, "The Old Oaken Bucket." It 
is not the only vault in Laurel Hill Cemetery, but one recognizes 
in it at once a most fitting spot for the resting place of the bones 
of Samuel Woodworth, poet and literateur. It is not generally 
known that Samuel Woodworth's remains are buried here, and 
still less generally known that two surviving daughters of the poet 
reside in this city. One of the daughters is a Mrs. James S. Weth- 
ered, and her oldest son is named after the dead author. Samuel 
Woodworth died in New York City, December 9th, 1842. His 
mother and other relatives were then in California, and hither his 
remains were conveyed and placed in the family vault at Laurel 
Hill. The true story of the inspiration for "The Old Oaken 
Bucket " has never before found its way into print, though sev- 
eral ingenious fabrications about that interesting event have been 
published, one quite recently. It was while Woodworth was ed- 
iting the New York Mirror and resided in New York City. Re- 
turning from his office to luncheon one warm summer day, he 
drank a glassful of cold spring water that his wife had secured. 

" Ah, it's so good! " said Woodworth, as he downed the last 
glittering drops. " It reminds me of the well water I used to get 
at home in Massachusetts from the old oaken bucket." 

"There, Sam, is a subject for you to write prettily about, the 
old oaken bucket," said bis wife. 

This was the inspiration of the immortal ballad, which was 
conceived and completely written before Woodworth returned to 
his editorial duties that afternoon. 

* * » 

How inconsistent " our society " is, is shown to a degree by the 
slim patronage given the exhibition of Mr. Lee Lash's painting 
at the Bijou Theatre, of the Old People of the Crocker Home at 
Morning Prayer. The swim is ever complaining that there is no- 
where to go — no place to meet one's friends. Now here is both 
olfered them — a delightful lounge for half an hour or so, a won- 
derfully good picture to see, and best of all to the feminine heart, 
a chance to be seen. Yet the exhibition languishes. Possibly 
the inclement weather is in a great measure to blame for this. It 
has been suggested to continue the exhibition throughout next 
week, so that the prominent journalists from the East, who will 
then be in the city, may enjoy it. 

* # # 

The railroad official who caused the erection of the signal post 
at the junction of Hyde and California streets, would not make 
his fortune as a civil engineer. The post has been placed on the 
sidewalk on the southwest corner of the streets named, on a line 
with a row of eucalyptus trees on Hyde street, which prevent the 
post being seen more than fifty yards away by the gripman of an 
approaching car. The post should be placed on the opposite 
corner, in such a position that it could be seen at least a block 
away from approaching cars. 

* * # 

While on the subject of cable cars, I suggest that the companies 
afford more protection to the gripmen in stormy weather. The 
gripman has a hard enough time of it, but when he faces a heavy 
wind and a drenching rain, his lot is particularly not a happy 
one. Could not a high wind and rain guard, or a glass frame be 
rigged in front of the freezing manipulator of the grip, to protect 
him partially from the elements. 

» # * 

A Fourth and Market streets Italian boot-black has imported 
an automatic shoe-blacking machine from Chicago, and will have 
it in running order in a few days. The device comprises two 
small boxes, open only at one end, for the insertion of the foot. 
In these boxes are a system of brushes worked by electricity. 
You stick your foot in, press the button, and, presto, you have a 
shine. The machine does its work so quickly, is so simple and 
cheap, that its owner says he can make money by giving two 
shines for five cents. Of course a man don't want two shines at 
once, but the scheme is to give each patron a return check. This 
innovating boot-black expects to be boycotted by the other mem- 
bers of his profession for departing from the traditional methods, 
but he says he thinks he can stand that if his machine is a 
success. 




s 




27-37 Kearny St. 



HOUSE COATS, GOWNS, 

MACKINTOSH'S, SILK UMBRELLAS, 
OVERCOATS, FINE UNDERWEAR, 

NECKWEAR, SATCHELS, ETC. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS I ETTER. 



11 



J. t>. Keddinx always itsri that the papers invent t: 
■onal notes. At 00« lime they hs-1 htm in Bgypt ( when he hail 
never stirred farther away from town than BftoratoftOto, Mark 
Twain would have considered it bis 'Inly to embark [or fiftTpl al 
once, merely to make Rood Ihe statement, 0n« would Dot faney 
a person's getting angry because a society editor forgo 1 to men- 
Hem his trip across ihe bay. Yet that, or something similar, 
was the case recently with a lady in this city, who is well known 
in society and church circles, and has no end of rich relatives and 
connections to back her up. Her 'laughter came up from the 
South to pay her a visit, and her mother immediately sent the 
notice of her arrival to the papers. One weekly did not publish 
fi. She waited till the following week, but it did not yet appear. 
" Then," she said to a friend. »« I was so provoked that I 
stopped the paper! " How bad that paper would feel if it knew 
why it lost a subscriber! 

Kate Castleton's connections in East Oakland intend to leave 
soon the bouse on Thirteenth avenue, of which they have so 
long been the care-takers. They will return to their New York 
home. Then the famous dogs will be scattered to the four corners 
of the globe— almost. Chris, the bull-pup, will go East, In the 
care of Kate's ex-father-in-law. Jim will also accompany them. 
Ned. the big, black Newfoundland, will remain in East Oakland, 
where Rocks will also stay. Tatters, the homely, but affection- 
ate and bright Scotch terrier, will come to San Francisco to live 
with friends of the family. 

» » * 

The prospective marriage of Senor Ojeda and the daughter of 
the late President Barrios, brings to mind a little story about 
another transplanted South American, 8enor Alvarado, who, for 
a long time, made this city his home. He intended to embark 
for his native land — I forget whether it is Mexico or Chile. His 
plans were all made and his relatives notihed. Warm-hearted 
Spaniards, they all assembled on the wharf to see him off. Now, 
the youth had a dear friend of the opposite sex, in the person of 
a Tivoli chorus girl — a pretty, plump creature of some thirty 
summers. 8he also announced her intention of going to see the 
Senor orf. He was embarrassed, but could not say her nay. 
However, he had the presence of mind to invite his relatives to 
inspect his state-room. Then, when the fair Emma drove down 
in her carriage, he left the others for a moment, begging them to 
excuse him. Then from one to the other he paid flying visits, 
neither of which gave him any pleasure. He could not enjoy 
his friend's presence, through fear that bis relatives would find 
him out. But he got away undiscovered, and the town has not 
seen him since. 

» # » 

Ho, Rainey, on your lonely ranch! 

Ho, Bruner, in the vast! 
Ho, Kelly, at the Mission branch! 
The thrilling cry of "En revanche 1 " 
Comes over seas, and we must launch 

Our fortunes on the cast. 

Ho, Crimmins, in your dive whatward ! 

Ho, Stow, where it may suitl 

Ho, all the members of the Guard! 

The fiery cross has gone abroad — 

It's war to the last stroke of sword, 

And foes cry, " Sauve qui puet! " 

Bold Buckley's coming home once more, 

In his imperial might; 
He counts upon us to restore 
Him to his freehold as of yore, 
And for the service will give o'er 
The city as our right. 
* # * 
How many local beauties are proud possessors of the collar of 
Venus, those three neck circlets which are considered, by some, 
evidences of the favor of the Goddess of Beauty! A Paris paper 
announces that only on the fair throats of American ladies are 
these lines seen in perfection. It was by them that the Duke de 
Rochefoucauld's attention was attracted to our little blonde beauty, 
Miss Mitchell, dining one night at St. Germain. Marie "Van 
Zandt's white throat is minus these marks. As a rule it is an 
adornment more excusable in a mother than in a daughter, and 
at about the time a woman's throat becomes plump enough for 
their appearance her instinct craves some strings of pearls with 
which to hide them, says New York Truth. 
♦ # * 
A new cotillion figure has been introduced in Paris. All the 
men are provided with silk handkerchiefs, upon which are em- 
broidered various initials. Standing in a circle, the dancers are 
reviewed by each lady in turn, who writes on a board the initial 
she selects. When all the initials are thus disposed of the men 
claim their handkerchiefs, and the lady who has attached herself 
to the same. The initials have, of course, in the first place been 
distributed indiscriminately. 



Mta 

60c 

■■■ 
■ 



CURRENT LITERATURE. 

Km mot B 

] Paul ■]. \ 
Stolen dwetu k 
Mrstei 

I nter 
Walton 
PeallOQ Clareodou 
Venetla rretawno? 
Loufea dtaoley 
Carullne of Braoav 

. \ Pai o B< tot 
Frolics of Cupid 
In Uic Arms ui Love 

I'ccftmerou . .", 

PruIteofPhtlo'Ophy 
l>r. HuRiR-t. (Donnelly | 
Stuna Barbara. (Oulda.) 
TheScai.eciint. (HallCaloe.) ... 
All For Him ... , joe 

Selected Stories, {Opic Head.) ,.'..77.. ...'!!.... .7 ".'.' Wc 

A Dead Mau's Diary . ... 2,- lC 

The Shadow of Sha'mc. (Granville.) 50c 

Tragedy of Ida Wobli*. (Rubsell.) . ... iQc 

Hector Servadac. (Verue.) . . •:.,■ 

The Heptameron . . :>'\<- 

Bel-Ami. [Maupassant.) *&oc 

Human Brutes. (Zola.) ■•-„. 

Sappho. (Daudet ) . 26a 

'1 he Fate of a Libertine . 50c 

Mine Own People (K plinp ) ..toe 

Ihe Man uutsi.ie (Bontelle ) jv 

Thais (Anatole France ) "* .... 50c 

Highest References. (Florence Warden.) 30c 

Sardou's Cleopatra 50c 

February "Short Stories" . . '25c 

The Little Minister. (Barrie ) , r )0c 

Philip I-Ienson, M D. (Hastings.) 50c 

Remarks. (Bill Nye ) 50c 

Tom Jones (Fielding ) 50c 

Miss Innocence. (Alan Dale-) 50c 

A Cloverdale Skeleton 25c 

Sweet and Twenty (Sanborn.) 50c 

Don't Marry. (Hildreth ) 25c 

Reincarnation. (Walker) . sue 

The Orcult World (Siuuett.) 51c 

Esoteric Buddhism. (Smuett.) 50c 

Liberty in Literature (Iugersoll) ..25c 

Rubaiyat. (Omar Khayyam ) 20c 

Above or »ny other books currant pre-paid on receipt of 
price. We have a greater variety of paper-covered litera- 
ture than can be found elsewhere. Catalogues post-free. 
Call or address 

WEST COAST BOOK HOUSE, 

1203 MARKET ST., 

OPPOSITE CITY HALL - - SAN FRANCISCO. 




and Water Colors, Specially Selected and Imported by us from 
the different Art Centers of France, Germany and Italy, now ON 
VIEW and FOR SALE at our ART GALLERY, Nos. 581 and 583 
Market Street. 

S. & G. GUMP. 



R. J. WHEELER. 



J. W. GIRVIN. 



J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 

Rubber and Leather Belting, Hose, Packing, etc. 

Rubber Clothing, Boots, Shoes, etc. 

Pacific Coast Agents for Boston Belting Co. and Fayerweather & Ladew, 
formerly J B. Hoyt & Co. 4 California St.. S.F-.t-al. 

FINE DIAMONDS, 

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very reasonable prices. 
A. W STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St. 
Under Masonic Temple. 




12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 




THE recent rains have played havoc with the Presidio bops, 
uipon a recent Tuesday hop, but two ladies being present, as 
against a large contingent of beaux, the affair was brought to 
a summary end, the band sent back to quarters, and — "lights 

out." 

* # # 

Apropos of la grippe, it is a well known fact that whisky is 
prescribed as an infallible preventive — or aid to cure— and 
society at a fashionable watering place wondered on the eve of 
the New Year if a fair Eastern lady had been taking the pre- 
scription con amore. It certainly looked like it, say those who 
were there. 

* * # 

On dit, a double wedding will signalize the nuptials of Romie 
S. Watson and his sister, with Miss Merry and Geo. Shreve. St. 
Luke's Church will be the locale, one of the brides-elect being a 
foremost member of that church. 
» # * 

Lovely Mollie Torbert is coming out of her seclusion, and as 
the period of mourning passes, is likely to be seen more and more 
among society's gatherings. 

* » » 

The wily device, entitled a » cobweb party," is one of the most 
dangerous pastimes a susceptible young man can indulge in. 
Should he yield to the temptations to be more than ordinarily 
demonstrative to the companion of his search, he is apt to be dis- 
covered at an inopportune moment, as in all the windings and 
twistings of the web, people are popping up in all directions. An 
illustration of this was given not long since at an affair of the 
kind. 

* * * 

Mrs. Belle Donahue made her first appearance since her return 
from the East, at a dinner given by Mr. and Mrs. A. J). Splivalo 
on New Year's Day. This gay young widow is looking her pret- 
tiest since her visit to Grtbam, and says that although she had a 
delightful time there, is very glad to be in San Francisco again. 

* *■ * 

Society is in rather a dormant state at present. The young 
folks are grumbling over the paucity of balls or even small 
dances. It is on the cards, however, that one of our big houses 
will open its doors in honor of the bride-elect, who has so re- 
cently returned from a Kentucky visit. 

# # # 

It is said that Jack Parrott is going to the quietude of his San 
Mateo home in order to elaborate his operatic work, the formu- 
lating of which was begun during his late visit to Germany. 

» » • 

Musical circles are begirining to be impatient for the produc- 
tion of Bluff King Hal, rehearsals of which are going on regu- 
larly. 

# * * 

There was no more elaborate "get up "among the beaux at 
Del Monte during the holidays than that sported by the Fresno 
capitalist, M. Theo. Kearney. From diamond stud to patent 
leather pumps, he was a thing of beauty and a joy forever. Like 
the proverbial bee he buzzed from flower to flower; but also like 
that busy worker, he flits as well as buzzes. 

# # # 

"What is the matter with the majestic Carey Friedlander that 
one never hears of him in the leading role these days, either in 
the halls of fashion or the loge of a dive? Can it be that his 
newspaper friends are going back on him and ignore his exist- 
ence ? 

# » # 

Allan St. John Bowie is another brilliant light in the social 
firmament that has not been shining with wonted lustre of late. 
Why is this thus Y 

# # » 

A very charming but somewhat garrulous society girl, who 
dwells on Sacramento street, has confided to several friends — in 
the strictest confidence — that the army and navy german will 
take the prize for novelty and beauty of figures. One feature will 
be a sabre drill figure, and some of the girls are already practicing 
it sub rosa, 

# # # 

Among the New Year's guests at Monterey much regret was 
expressed at the absence of that popular couple, Mr. and Mrs. 
Alvord, who, with their grand-daughter, Miss Keeney, and her 
cousin, Miss Blankman, have heretofore been present on all 
holiday visits. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co. , Real Estate Agents , make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 



1884 




VINTAGE. 



Deutz & Geldermann's Gold Lack Sec. 

Superior to any other Champagne imported. 

CABINET GREEN SEAL. 

This favorite and well-known Wine is admirably adapted for banquets 
aud festive gatherings. In magnums, quarts and pints. 

Charles Meinfcke& Co., 

Sole Agents Pacific Coast. 

HIGHLAND BRAND 
EVAPORATED CREAM. 

g^ ABSOLUTELY PURE, 

UNSWEETENED. 



A warded Gold Medal at the Paris Uni versa 
Exposition Over all Competitors. 

A popular table luxury. 
A superior and most eco- 
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and a perfect infants' food, 

being thoroughly sterilized. 

The John T. Cutting Co., Agents, 

San Frauclsco. California. 

MACKINTOSH 

COATS 



Ladies and Gentlemen 



-MANUFACTURED BY- 







MR. ASHTON P. STEVENS, 

teaches, op banjo. 

8TUD10— 26 Montgomery Street. Room 8. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W.B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 
PAOIFIO 00 AST, 

123 California St., S.F, 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOB SALE BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS in ill; 



THE NIGHT AFTER NEW YEAR 
Or. a V; N:ck. 



Twm the night after New Year, when all through the bonse 

Not a creature was lUrriog, not eTen a mouse; 

My garment* — that i*. tboM I usually wear. 

Wan s»»oie on the mantel ami soma on a chair! 

The rest of the boarders were snug in their bedb, 

While visions of liirkey-ha«h danced in their heads! 

And I, who had been on a New Year's Day ** booze," 

Had just settled into a sort of a snooze — 

When out on the street there rose such ■ clatter, 

I sprang from my bid to Bee what was the matter. 

Away to the window I Bew like a tlash, 

Tore open the shutters, and threw up the sash, 

The glare of the street lamp. Jusl ovel the way. 

Made it almost as brilliant as if it were day. 

When, what to my wonderinp eyes should appear. 

But a small Black Maria, and when it drew near 

I could see that its coursers, outriders and flunkies 

Were nothing, in short, but the queerest of monkeys, 

With a little horned driver, so lively and quick, 

I knew at a glance that it must be Old Nick! 

Mitre rapid than bell-boys his coursers they caiue, 

And be shouted and swore, and called some by name — 

"Now, Bourbon I now, Rum I'uncb ! now Absinthe, you vixen I 
Just see you're not mixed again! Donner und Blitzen! 
To the top of the fence, to the top of the wall! 
I have work for you, quick ! get a move on you all 1 " 
As the boot-jacks and brickbats one sometimes lets fly, 
When they meet with a feline, mount up to the sky, 
8o, up to the house-top the monkeys they flew. 
With the vehicle so drear, and His Majesty, too. 
And then on the roof {I was speechless with fear), 
The scratching and digging of claws I could heart 
As I drew in my head, and was turning around, 
Down the chimney His Ma esty came with a bound. 
He was d:essed all in red, from his head to his foot, 
And his clothes were all tarnished with beer stains and soot; 
His eyes were deep-sunken, and glistened like coals, 
(This may have been due to his thirst for men's souls! } 
His little moustache and goatee were coal black, 
And a lot of blue monkeys were perched on his back! 
Held tight in his teeth was a fresh cigarette, 
(I did not observe whether Old Judge or Pet) 
His hands were like claws, and his features were pale; 
And over one shoulder protruded his tail! 
He was haggard and thin, a most ghoulish old elf — 
I shuddered and shivered in spite of myself; 
But his crestfallen a?r, and grim shake of the head, 
Soon gave me to know I had little to dread — 
For I'd caught him, you see, at his devilish work, 
Which is ever in secretl — he turned with a jerk; 
And, laying his claw on the side of his nose, 
With a whisk of his tail, up the chimney he rose. 
He sprang to his seat, gave a nod to the groom, 
And away they all Hew in the nebulous gloom; 
But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight, 

» I will leave him some monkeys, the next time he's tight I " 
San Francisco, January 9, 1S92. C. F. Davis. 



TO THE LATE GRAND JURY. 



Scott, who did as Wallace bid, 
Men whom Barclay Henley led, 
Prepare your everlasting bed, 
Or fight for victory. 

Rough on you will be the hour 
When, with sore head and temper sour, 
Boss Buckley shall return to power, 
Revenge and tyranny. 

Who of you would misbehave ? 
Who would bow before the knave? 
Who under any squeeze would cave? 
Let him show his hand. 

A recreant Supreme Bench shall feel 
It's not the court of last appeal 
In questions that affect the weal 
Of an entire land. 

Above it towers the people's will, 
Which is the supreme power still, 
And you its mandate did fulfill 

With spirit bold and high. 

By all the ills bossism entrains, 
By good which only valor gains, 
Stand firm and fight while life remains — 
To conquer or to die. 




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Price per bottle. 50 cents 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 




WHEN Congress set aside the reservation known as the Yellow- 
stone Park, it was certainly never intended that in the de- 
sire to accommodate a class of idle pleasure-aeekers with the sight 
of a real live buffalo in his native haunts, the important business 
interests of the country should be interfered with, or its develop- 
ment be hindered or delayed. This has been done, nevertheless, 
and for years past Congress has been laboring over a proposition 
to grant a right of way over a few miles in the extreme northeast 
corner of the reservation, which would permit one of the 
wealthiest mining sections of the State to be opened up. Bill after 
bill has been introduced, only to be shelved after arguments as 
vapid and meaningless as those of some hoosier Senator, who 
could not tell a ship from a camel, debating on questions pertain- 
ing to the navy appropriation. Near Cooke City, in Montana, is 
looated a mining district, where over 1,100 valuable claims have 
been staked out by hardy prospectors, who braved the dangers of 
the plains years before any tourists ventured to indulge their in- 
quisitive propensities under the protection of Government troops. 
The ores are low grade, and it is impossible to work them profit- 
ably on the ground, as coke would have to be brought in for the 
smelters at a heavy cost. The miners keep their annual work 
up, and it is calculated that at least $50,000 is spent every year in 
protecting locations. A creek runs down from Cooke City, skirt- 
ing the precipitous mountains which form the northeastern 
boundary of the reservation. The miners want the Government 
to grant them permission to build a railroad along this creek on 
the reservation side, a distance of some sixty miles, and it is over 
a privilege of this trivial character that so much wrangling has 
been going on for years past. 

5 5 5 

AS may be supposed there is a reason for the determined op- 
position to any encroachment on the national domain, and 
for the interest taken in the proposition to build this little strip 
of railroad. It would not act as a feeder to a grasping railroad 
monopoly which has fastened itself on the territory north and 
west of the reservation. Millions of dollars contained in the ores 
of the New World district, as it is termed, must be buried in the 
earth, because this corporation is not able to control the transpor- 
tation. If the Northern Pacific had everything its own way, a 
flourishing mining district would be increasing the annual wealth 
of the United States. Because it cannot reap the full benefit, the 
representatives of the people at Washington, from the South, 
Ea?t and North, are all ready to stand in and maintain it in its 
position ot dog in the manger. This y.-ar another bill will be in- 
troduced in Congress, which provides that the creek alluded to, 
will be considered the northeast boundary of the Yellowstone 
Park. This looks fair enough on its face, and the specious argu- 
ment will doubtless be presented that this change in the lines 
will benefit the mine owners of the New World district, who will 
then be free to construct a line of railroad along the north side of 
the creek, without encroaching on Government territory. As it 
happens, however, the originators of this bill know very well 
what they are ahout, and that in making this apparent conces- 
sion to the mine owners, they are in reality putting an obstacle 
in the way which will prove fatal to their plans for the construc- 
tion of a line of railroad. Steep cliffs arise upon this side of the 
creek, in some places attaining the height of over 3,000 feet, and 
the engineering difficulties are such that it would be impossible 
to overcome them short of an outlay of fabulous sums of money. 
It is further said that this bill will be presented by a representa- 
tive who is also on the salary list of the railroad company, inter- 
ested in defeating any project which might result in competition 
''om rival lines. This should in itself be enough to kill the 
measure, and bring support to the mine owners, who only re- 
quire an opportunity to build up an important industry. 

its 

THE Directors of the Valley Gold Company have confirmed an 
agreement between the company and Mr. John Haya 
Hammond, the well-known mining engineer of this city, 
whereby they will, trom time to time, raise the capital of 
the company by the creation of not more than 50,000 shares of $5 
each, and resolving that the new shares should be called equip- 
ment shares, and whatever their number might be, they should 
be entitled to one-half of the net profits of the company available 
for dividend in every year, notwithstanding the preference given 
to the holders of preference shares. The board has been in treaty 
with Mr. Hammond, who represents some well known capitalists 
in San Francisco, for raising from $150,000 to $250,000, to bring 
water from Bear Lake and to lay down a complete hydraulic 
plant to treat the gravel on a large scale. These capitalists would 
only subscribe the necessary funds after a complete examination 
had been made, and the mine had been found as rich as they be- 
lieved it to be. The statement goes on to say that the favorable 
reports of mining men who had seen the property hitherto had 
never varied, and therefore the Directors thought the shareholders 



might look forward to this examination with some confidence. 
This is an absolute untruth. The only men who have so far re- 
ported on the property, outside of Del Mar, who sold it to the 
English dupes, condemn it. A Director named Lloyd came out 
here, and having no confidence in his own ability to expert the 
property, he employed a Mr. Williams, one of the best gravel 
miners in the State, to do the work be was supposed to look 
after. Williams condemned the property, and Lloyd took the un- 
favorable report home in his pocket, and it stayed there for aught 
the shareholders learned of it, although the News Letter subse- 
quently published it in full. If John Hays Hammond says there 
is a mine there, that settles the question fo far as we are con- 
cerned, but until he does, our opinion remains unchanged that 
the whole concern is a fraud and a humbug. 
I $ X 

THE miners of California will meet in convention within a few 
days, with the avowed intention of agreeing upon some plan 
of action in regard to the resumption of work in the hydraulic 
mines. It will be welt for them to confine themselves to this is- 
sue. The people of the State are in sympathy with the proposi- 
tion, and now is the time to gain the point, if ever. The decrease 
in the production of gold has attracted public attention, and the 
merchants recognize that to this they are indebted for the falling 
off in their business. It will not do, however, to bring in other 
questions, as some of the delegates intend; and if they are not 
stopped in time, the convention will result in a fizzle. Old sores 
need not be opened, and, outside of the debris dispute, there is 
other recourse for those who believe their liberties have been en- 
croached upon. The list of delegates from this city includes 
representative men in all branches of business; and, while they 
will be found ready and willing to rehabilitate the hydraulic 
miner in his business, there are some other points which may be 
presented, which they cannot and will not support. 
131 

THE report of the Directors of the Golden Feather Channel, 
Limited, is rather different from what some of the local min- 
ing authorities would have people believe had they their way. 
The English investors, after a careful examination of the works, 
by their own men, consider it a great source of satisfaction to 
note that in spite of all delays and difficulties, the great work — 
the greatest which has ever been undertaken in the history of 
alluvial mining — has been completed at a cost, but little, if at all, 
above the original estimates. There is nothing now to prevent 
the successful attainment of the object for which the company was 
formed — that of winning the gold from the bottom of the Feather 
River. The trial washings, the report goes on to say, have proved 
beyond question the value of the deposits in the river-bed, about 
$3,300 having been taken out up to November 30th, by manual labor 
applied on a limited scale. The upper gravel from which this 
amount has been taken have yielded an average of about 2£ 
ounces of gold to the cubic yard. 

5 5 1 

SOME time ago, when the Callustro Company was in its infancy, 
and about to pass into the hands of Proctor, the Chicago oc- 
topus, the News Letter warned the owners of the property that 
they were making a mistake. The inside workings of the East- 
ern boodler were shown, and everything was said which would 
serve to put investors in this city on their guard. It seems that 
the ladies in charge of the company's affairs believed that they 
knew better, and it is only at this late day that tbey have found 
out their error. They are now on the lookout for Mr. Proctor, 
but it is just possible that if that amiable gentleman should turn 
up, that he could again successfully pull the wool over the eyes 
of the female gudgeons, and pack the remainder of the sack over 
the Rockies. As usual, the dailies are in at the heels of the 
hunt, on the alert for the bogie man, who paid them bills for ad- 
vertising the fake. It is strange, in reviewing some matters, 
how easily people are fooled, and particularly the smart set, who 
always know more than any one can tell them. 

SSI 

THE local mining market is dull, with prices unchanged. A 
vigorous bear movement has been made during the week on 
the North End stocks, but so far it has proved futile. The Alta 
deal has not yet materialized, but those who ought to know claim 
that this group of mines will start the market on the boom which 
has been predicted for months past. The Union, Gould it Curry 
and Alta mines were assessed, during the week, 25, 30 and 50 cents 
respectively. An improvement is reported on the 1300 level of 
Belcher. 

15 5 

LOCAL capitalists are rather amused at the announcement that a 
company has been incorporated in London to supply this city 
with gas and water. The capital is said to be in the neighbor- 
hood of $10,000. This amount would not buy a good-sized duck 
pond out here. 

55 3 

THE Bank of British Columbia is now paying the half-year's 
interest now due on the six per cent, and four per cent, 
debentures, issued under the British Columbia Loan Acts 1877 
and 1887. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



SAX PR we:-. M'W 



16 




'llc»rlhec"rlcr'" "Wh.t the dfril art thou: 
• One tint will plmr the lerll. .If. with you." 



H 



AI'l'V the man woo. on s gloomy day, 
When the streets are mud and mire. 
Can put the business of the hour away. 
And before a biasing fire 
Sip to bis heart's desire. 
E'en as be gazes on the crackling log. 
The hottest kind of grog. 

Hoi to the millionaire alone doth Fate vouchsafe 
Wot rain and cold, this pleasing recompense. 
Philosophers of ripened common-sense 
Can tranquilly surrender business obligation. 
And put (such is the great law of life's compensation) 
Upon their doors, while they the goblet sip, 
*• Gone borne to bed — la grippe." 
Though churchyards fatten, and the doctor sees 
With each declining sun, increasing fees, 
For many more than plausible apologies 
We are indebted to la grippe; 
The tlorid face which follows terrapin 
And burgundy, and every kind of ain, 
The morning of the night of song and gin, 
The bloodshot eye, the furnace fire within 
We place, (alas for man's mendacious lip), 
To that convenient visitant la grippe. 
Why reeled the model citizen, the man whose mind 
Is ne'er to pleasures bibulous, inclined ? 
Is that demeanor staid, upset by wine? 
He'll tell you whisky, whisky and quinine 
For grippe the doctors said, he took it, life 
Must be preserved though an indignant wife 
Might scold a man with bitter biting word 
For coming home, his starboard tacks aboard. 
For various kinds of ailment doctors pour 
Into the patient horrid nauseous doses 
Which make the muses gasp and hold their noses, 
And tear the victim to his bosom's core ; 
They leech and blister and in other ways 
Inferno's margin with their tortures graze, 
But in the grippe changed is the painful scene, 
And the afflicted sips with brow serene 
His medicine which nought his soul distresses, 
He only mourns, when he convalesces, 
Nor finds in grippe the welcomed dear excuse 
That friend afforded for his daily booze. 

THERE are two consuls in this city, whose toil in looking after 
the subjects of the nationalities they represent will never 
make them round-shouldered. One is Consul Hall for Turkey, 
the other Consul Holloway for Uruguay. There is one genuine 
Turk in this city, and one native of Uruguay, There is a scatter- 
ing of Armenians and but one Turk; a scattering of South Amer- 
icans, but one genuine Uruguayan. As it might be naturally sup- 
posed, a friendly, but well-sustained jealousy exists between Con- 
suls Hall and Holloway. Mr. Hall, meeting Mr. Holloway on 
the boulevard in the morning, scoffingly inquires, " How is that 
old Uruguayan of yours looking to-day?" To which Mr. Holloway 
replies, "A deuced sight better than your old Turk— pish— paugh," 
and then they pass on. Both gentlemen are, as it may easily 
be conjectured, extremely careful about the sanitary condition of 
their respective wards. If Mr. Hall's Turk were to die, there 
would be no need of a Consul for Turkey, and the same blank 
would be made should Mr. Holloway's interesting foreigner drop 
into one of our cemeteries. Mr. Hale writes once a week to 
Mustapha Ali in Constantinople, giving a bulletin of his Turk's 
health. He warns his Turk not to indulge too freely in the deadly 
candies that subject of the Sultan vends daily on the corner of 
Montgomery and Sacramento streets. The Turk knows his 
power. If the diplomatic Mr. Hall's purchases do not amount to 
a certain sum per diem, the Moslem disappears, and Mr. Hall 
suffers agonies of anxiety. He is in the thraldom of the infidel. 
Now Mr. Holloway'a charge is a barkeeper, so he has less diffi- 
culty in inspecting him than his brother Consul. But he does not 
feel a bit well if the Uruguayan displays a pimple on his nose, or 
any other evidence of having trifled with the bottle. Both diplo- 
mats are eager for some imbroglio between the United States and 
the countries they represent, so that they may prove their title to 
that great gift — diplomacy. 

DETECTIVE BROWN, of Cincinnati, has given us a curious in- 
sight into the methods some of the profession use to gain 
their ends. They put a premium on perjury. They assume that 
because they are in some measure representatives of the law, all 
crookedness, as long as it comes from their side, must be legiti- 
mate. 



Til K reform movement may be simply an Idle tourist, or It may 
bare ooma t.. itay. The infernal trouble ft bo a I I 
logs 1? that it gives cranky people a ohanoe to ventilate their 
Imaginary grievances, and go rocketing ibont the hall on tfaell 
pat bobby-boraea, 1 have always regarded Dr. Btebblna as ft 
level-headed gentleman. While believing that the Church iboold 
keep its hand", off politics, and content itself with gathering in 
souls, there are limes when a parson may be permitted lo address 
laymen in a non-official capacity, but be should not DBS that 
privilege as Dr. Btebblna did, to abuse the press. Who for years 
has reported l>r. Btebblna 1 sermons? The Prase. Who has sent 
the good doctor's jokes and anecdotes ringing down the ages? 
The Tress. Who will save Dr. Btebblna 1 name for posterity? The 
Press. In view of all these things, tho learned divine should have 
spoken mildly, at least of the members of the Fourth BstfttO. 
True, the press may have its imperfections, but then it was stead- 
fast to its task of publishing Sunday sermons in the Monday 
morning newspapers. It has ever cherished the kindliest feelings 
for the pulpit. Dr. Stebbins is ungrateful. His memory of past 
favors is shockingly defective. 

IT is more than probable, that Mr. Pete Bigelow, journalist, will 
depart for Chile at an early day, to act as Examiner correspond- 
ent. The Chilean Government gets even with this glorious 
country by charging $2 a word for every dispatch sent from those 
sassy shores to the land of the eagle. Wolff, of the New York 
Herald, being quite solid with the authorities, works bis cables at 
60 cents a word. It is rotten apples to Navel oranges that Pete will 
knock them all out, if he gets half a chance. He is the smooth- 
est article on the San Francisco press to-day. He has more prop- 
erty smiles at command than the soubrette of a dime variety 
show. His Spanish may, it is true, be a little rusty, but he can 
brace it up so with pigeon English, that it will pass muster. He 
cannot fight a bull; Pete is nothing of a matador, but he can do 
more: he can make a bull with any Irishman that ever ran a San 
Francisco primary. Give him but five days in Valparaiso, and 
Mr. Bigelow would be domesticated with the Commandante, and 
singing mi alma, mi manteca! under the lattice of the prettiest 
senorita in the town. There is great money in Pete, if he be but 
dispatched before the Chile fever cools. 

WILLIS POLK, the architect, whose proposition for a World's 
Fair in San Francisco in 1900, illustrated and described in 
the Christmas Examiner, was so clever, has conceived a project 
for a Home for Decayed Journalists. Mr. Polk's idea is that the 
institution should be situated on the summit of some western 
sand dune, thus presenting no inducements to the inmates to 
walk abroad, and get their shoes full of sand. There will be 
models of real editorial rooms for the poor old imbeciles to play 
at writing articles, and a toy city prison in the basement, where 
make believe topers will be hauled in, to give police reporters, 
suffering from softening of the brain, the amusement of practising 
their once beloved profession. Stuffed effigies of newspaper pro- 
prietors will be set up in different corners of the room for the 
journalists to kick at when the memories of their old grievances 
crowd thick and fast upon them. Rev. Dr. Stebbins has been 
named as chaplain for the new institution, the corner-stone of 
which will be laid on or about April 1st. 

SOME men are gifted with the most vivid and remarkable 
imaginations. A friend of mine, who does business on Cali- 
fornia street, has a cork leg. He swears that if he does not wear 
rubbers on that cork foot it aches more than the one of flesh. Not 
unlike Roger Magee, who protested that the perfume of tube roses 
always made him sick. Buying a bonnet one day in a milliner's 
shop on Kearny street, Mr. Magee suddenly grew pale, and almost 
fell into the arms of a young brunette assistant. " What is the 
matter," inquired the milliner? " Oh, those roses, those tube 
roses," moaned Mr. Magee. The beautiful bonnet-trimmer flew 
to remove the vase, but suffered some embarassment afterwards 
when explaining to Mr. Magee that the tuberoses were but clever 
paper imitations of that fragrant and exquisite flower. 

THE forthcoming marriage of Prince Albert to the Princess of 
Teck has created much pleasurable excitement in Sausalito. 
As soon as the news was confirmed, a subscription was pet on 
foot to oil the church on the hill, and make other preparations 
suitable for this great event. The English colony does not mean 
to leave anything undone to show its appreciation of this event. 
Indeed, since the lines have been broadened, not a few of our 
young Britishers, now temporarily exiled from the family estates, 
but feel that they might in the course of time chip in and capture 
one of the grand-daughters. 

THE weather never is too bad to keep the ladies {God bless 'em) 
in-doors. This week, a beastly one in regard to mud and gen- 
eral discomfort underfoot, saw them paddling about from day- 
light to dark, peering into shop windows, and springing over the 
deep and dangerous lakes at the curb-stones. And they all wear 
black stockings. That is the worst of winter. A black stocking 
is an abomination. It gives no idea of symmetry. A girl with 
underpinnings like Venus di Milo, when in black stockings ar- 
rayed, might be mistaken for a parlor match. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 




A COLLECTION of cat-nmuiniies has recently been sent from 
Egypt to England, to be used as manure. That is rather an 
ignoble end for the animal wbich was worshiped by an ancient 
people. M. Leraormant has treated of the topic elaborately in one 
of his oriental studies, and be gives Asia as the place where the 
feline race started. It is curious that neither in the Bible nor in 
Homer is the cat mentioned. But it is rendered immortal by 
poets and prose-writers. Scott remarked the first signs of age 
when be learned to like a cat. Gray has an elegy on the death of 
a faithful cat, drowned in a tub of gold fishes. Dr. Johnson liked 
his Hodge so much that he was afraid of hurting its feelings by 
any disparaging comments. Cowper tells how he slew a viper 
among his kittens; Wordsworth and Shelly have both devoted a 
poem to the cat, and Keats has sung of the " bright languid seg- 
ments green " of its eyes. The cat is really a friend of poverty and 
age. 

The return by the Dean and Canons of St. Paul's to the use of 
the old-fashioned scarf in public worship has, says a London cor- 
respondent, considerably perturbed the High Church mind in 
London. Dean Gregory, when appointed canon in 1868, was the 
first to wear a black stole with crosses. The reason of the change 
was explained in a paper read last week to th* 1 members of the St. 
Paul's Ecclesiological Society, when the history of the scarf was 
traced to a pre-Reformation period. It was the survival of the 
old fur amice, but was confined as a scarf to the dean, canons and 
chaplains of the diocese and cathedral. It was worn by them at 
all offices except that of the Eucharist, when the stole was worn 
by the celebrant with the vestments or cope, and the stole crossed 
over the side by the acting deacon. It is claimed, therefore, to be 
the oldest survival in the Anglican communion of a pre-Reforma- 
tion vestment. — Yorkshire Post. 

An English bicyclist was coming at great speed down one of 
the steepest streets in Edinburgh, when his machine turned over 
and landed him in the middle of the road. Two carters were 
passing, and they promptly came to bis assistance. " Maun, boo 
did ye fa' ? " kindly inquired one of the carters. To which he re- 
ceived this answer: " I was coming down thatdeclivity with such 
velocity that I lost my gravity and fell on the macadamised road." 
The carter turned from the unfortunate rider with true insular 
contempt. " C'wa', Jock," he said to his mate, "if I'd kent the 
cratur' wis a forriner, he would hae lain in the gutter lang enouch 
for me! " 

The following is a translation of a Chinese joke: Two brothers 
cultivated the same plot of land. One day the eldest, on leaving 
to get dinner ready, called to his brother to come with him. He, 
however, shouted out at the top of his voice: " Wait until I have 
hidden my spade, and then I v\i 1 come." While they were hav- 
ing their meal the other reproached him bitterly for his indiscre- 
tion. " When one hides a thing," said he, « one ought to preserve 
silence, or at any rate not speak above a whisper, for in shouting 
as you did just now one invites people to steal." Dinner over, 
the younger brother returned to the field, looked forbis spade, and 
found it gone. So running to his brother, he whispered in his ear, 
" My spade is stolen ! " 

The life of the late Dean Burgon contains a good deal of anec- 
dote, for the Dean was a story-teller. He was wont to relate how 
Allen, the Quaker, waited on the Duke of Sussex to remind his 
Royal Highness how he had promised to present a petition against 
capital punishment. The Duke did not seem quite to like the 
job, and observed that Scripture had declared : " Whoso sheddetb 
man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed." » Please, your 
Royal Highness," replied the Quaker, " when Cain killed Abel he 
was not hung for it." " That's true," rejoined the Duke; " but re- 
member, Allan, there were not twelve men in the world then to 
make a jury." 

An eminent Scotch clergyman happened to dine with some 
learned lawyers of the Edinburgh bar. He appropriated to him- 
self a large dish of cresses, upon which he fed voraciously. Er- 
skine, wishing to admonish him for his discourtesy, remarked: 

" Doctor, you remind me of Nebuchadnezzer in his degradation. 

Just as this pat allusion was causing roars of laughter from the 
legal lights, the reverend vegetable eater retorted: 

" Ay, do I mind ye o'Nebuchadnezzar'f 1 Doubtless because I am 
eating among the brutes." 

Dr. Barrow, meeting the Earl of Rochester one day, the witty 
peer exclaimed: "Doctor, I am yours to the shoe-tie," to which 
the clergyman replied: " My lord, I am yours to the ground." The 
peer continued : *• Doctor, I am yours to the center." " My lord," 
retorted the doctor, I am yours to the Antipodes." Determined 
not to be outdone by a parson, his lordship said : " Doctor, I am 
yours to the lowest pit of hell." On which Barrow turned on his 
heel and said, " And there, my Lord, I leave you." 



Xl>rSTJ"3a-A.l<3"ODB. 



REMOVAL! 
HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY 

Now Occupies Premises at the N. E. Cor. California and Sansome 

Sts., S. F., Lately Vacated by Wells, Fargo & Co. Bank. 

Twenty-seventh Annual Exhibit. 

January 1, 1891. 

INCORPORATED A. D. 1864. 

Losses p'd since organi'n.$3,175,759.21 1 Reinsurance Reserve J266.043.59 

Assets January 1, 1891 . . . 867,512.19 Capital paid up, Gold. . . . 300,000.00 
Surplus for policy holders 844,944.69 | Net Surplus over ev'yth'g 278,901.10 

Income in 1890 J394.184.52 | Fire Losses paid in 1890. 142,338.90 

Fire Losses unpaid, January 1, 1891 11,404.00 

President J. F. HOUGHTON I Secretary . . . CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-President. .HENRY L. DODGE 1 General Agent.ROBERT H. MAGILL 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

Capital $7,500,001.00 

Invested in U. S 534,795.72 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

333 California St., S. F., Oil. 

C^^General Agents for the United States and Territories west of the 
Rocky Mountains. ■ 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed 910,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve (in addition to Capital) 2,725,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6,124.067.80 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street, San Francisco. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital IIO.6J6000 

Cash Assets 4,701,201 39 

Cash Assets In United States 2,272,084 13 

REINSURERS OF 

Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation 

AND 

Southern California Insurance Company. 

MANAGER. 

D. E MILES, Assistant Manager. 

315 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, S. F. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. BALOISE of Basle— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable m all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street, San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1 782] 
American Fire Insurance Company of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & H ALDAN, Gen' I Agents for the Paeifie Coast. 
473 California Street, San Francisco. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720.J 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 

«EO. F. tiKASrr, Manager. 

PACIPIO ZDrEZP-A-KTIMIDElNrT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN FIRE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1821. 
Paid-up i apital, - - - $ 5,000,000. 
Cash Assets, ----- $21,911,915. 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1710. 
Cash Assets, ------ $9,031,040. 

Assets in America, - - - $1,956,331. 



WEI. J. UHVERS, GeiTl Agent, 20k Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 



LJT^ 



K 



INSURANCE COMPANY- LTD. 

ENELAND.^ 



OF" rvl Ar- 



Capital paid i>, guaranteed !;3,000,0OO,0B. 

Chas A Laton, Manager. 
439 California Sf . Sa» Fi-anracd. 




5UNBEAMS 




"j 



IKK." 



' remarked Brutus a* he strolled inlu ihe great Cmstr's 

tent, "did I ever tell you of the fi^ht I once had among 

the AHobroges?" [Qtit oj along wind}/ iate involving the tingtr- 

■■' daughter of eleven irfrarwru.) *■ Brute, my boy," 

rcmarki >lemnly. when he had finished, " l admire Gaul, 

ally Transalpine (ianl. but -till I must Bay that you remind 

me of a harp shattered by the lightning of (treat Jove." " Bon 

inquired Brutus, unwarily. •■ Because you're :t blasted lyre," 

answered Ca sar, taking a long pull at a flask of Chian of the 7m vin- 

And from that day forth BruttU began to meditate on the 

ton of March. —Yale Re 

FttUow-citisens," thundered the impassioned orator, bringing 

down hard on the table. " What. I ask again, is our country 
coming to? And echo answer? What V " " Pardon me, sir." inter* 
posed a mild-looking man in the audience, rising to his feet, " did I 
understand your question to be—' What is our country coming to? ' " 
■■ Yes, sir." " And you say echo answers ' What?' "" " That is what 
I said, sir." " Then there's something wrong with the acoustics of 
this building." said the mild-looking man, shaking his head in a per- 
plexed way and sitting down again. 

■ Elnquenl Philosopher (to assembled group of 'contemporaries) — Yes, 
the true basis of human happiness you wili find, my fellow philoso- 
phers, consists in the supremacy of the will over the desires, and the 
contempt one learns to feel for the earth's greatest dross— riches. 
"/ Philosophers— Ah, how true! Eloquent Philosopher (continu- 

hut) — Now, to illustrate " Club Waiter (picking up a silver piece) — 

Which of you gentlemen does this dollar belong to? (Philosophers to 
a man) — Me! 

" What is in the package?" asked the clerk at the express 

office, proceeding to fill out a blank. "Old letters," replied the 
young woman. " Value? " mechanically inquired the clerk. " Fifty 
thousand dollars." And the plaintiff in the breach of promise case 
of Joone agt. De Ceinber, who had just remitted a batch of documents 
to her lawyer, walked out of the express office with a vivid but busi- 
ness-like gleam in her eye. — Chicago Tribune. 

Upson Doumes (7 A. J/.)— Great Ccesar! A sneak-thief has been 

in our room and taken all our clothes. What'll we do? Rownede 
Bout— Not all. He has missed our dres3-suits. We can put them on. 
" What? Dress-suits in the morning? We'll be eternally disgraced." 
" Can't be helped. We must put them on and go out to breakfast. 
Perhaps our friends will think we've been out all night." " By Jove! 
Good idea ! We'll pretend to be drunk." —Puck, 

City Editor (sternly)— What do you mean by heading this item, 

" A Slight Mishap on the 23rd Street Line? Assistant — Why, the man 
wasn't hurt; the car merely run over bis wooden leg. City Editor — 
Never mind, sir; head it, " Under the Juggernaut's Wheels." I'm 
afraid you'll never do for the newspaper business ! — Puck. 

( The young man recalls divers damsels who have refused him in the past, 
then whispers, tenderly) — " Ethel, I am utterly unworthy of you. And 
there is the sob of a lost soul in his voice. " That's precisely what 
papa and mamma think, George," she replies. And for a long time 
thereafter he is silent. — Life. 

" Comstock and Bagley were pretty full when they drove into 

the yard last night." " Yes ; it was the result of a miscalculation." 
" How was that? " " Well, Bagley tells me they procured liquid sup- 
plies for ten miles and afterward found the drive was only seven." 

— Judge. 

Pepperby — Mawson, how can you eat lobster and cream? It's 

suicide. Mawson— I know it is, Pep; but I can't help it. I've got a 
hero in my novel that does the same thing, and I've got to know just 
what the sensations are. 

How are you, Parkinson. Busy as ever?" "Yes. I've got a 

heavy controversy on hand." " What's the subject? " " Is Marriage 
a Failure? " " Which side do you take? " " Negative for the Bazoo, 
and affirmative for the Critic. — Puck. 

" Aw, my deah fellah, what is the mattah with your eye, that 

you should keep it shut? " " Me doctah says me eyes are failing very 
fast and that I must take great care of them, so I only use one of 
them at a time." — Life. 

— Crawley— You ain't got another pie like th' one you give me 
this mornin', has yer ? Housewife— Are you hungry again ? Crawley — 
Not 'xactiy ; but I've got t'walk on a stone-ballast railroad track, an' 
I wan' ter perfect both my feet." — Judge. 

What will the Governor of North Carolina say to the Governor 

of South Carolina when the prohibition bill in the latter State becomes 
a law? Not 1 ' Happy New Year," surely. 

Frederick (who is backward) — I would like to be an old time 

knight, to fight for you. She— Wouldn't it be better if you were a 
man-at-arms? 

— Mrs. Behring (shivering in new sealskin)— Isn't it fearfully cold ? 
Miss Welherbee (in new Autumn dress)— Why, I thought it delightfully 
warm ! —Puck. 

Kickshaw— Did you make any New- Year's calls? Dimmick— 

One. Kickshaw— What did the other man bold ? —Judge. 

Atlas was the first leading gentleman. He supported Earth in 

her great roll. 

Ted— Did you go calling in a cab? Ned — No; I came home in 

one. —Judge. 

Monkey fur slippers, solid comfort for Eastern friends at Marsh's 
Japanese Art Repository, under Palace Hotel. 



IlTSTTIi.fVlsrClHJ. 



Insurance Company. 
ii 000.000. , assets .... 12.060.000 



CAPITAL 

D. J. STAPLES Pri>>Mciit 

b"fVvvVvvV!', 1 ,!" n vice IT,.,.,,',:!: 

i. a. liBvlBON Itarlno Secretary 

Aleuts In all promlnout localities throughout the United 8t«to». 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[E8TABLI8HED 1871.] 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up 1400.000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICe 218 AMD 220 SAN80ME STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 

GEORGE L. BRANDER 
President 



CHA8. H. CU8HINQ, 

Secretary. 



Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool, Established 1857. 
Royal Exchange Assurance Corporation of London, 

[INCORPORATED 1720]. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

N. W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 



FIRE 



INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Company of London. 
Imperial Fire Insurance Company of London, 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Mauager. 
Pacific Department, 214 Saiisome St., S. F. 
SWAIN & MURDOCK, City Agents. 



Department of the Pacific States and Territories. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000. | CASH ASSET8 IN U. 8... J746.186.00 

SCOTT SH UNION AND NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

CAPITAL $30,000,000 | CASH ASSETS $19,550,042.00 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Cat. 
W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent 

BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. GO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $5,000,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

Wo. 316 Calllornla Street, San Francisc o. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, $19,724,538.45. 

President, BENJAMIN P. STEVENS. | Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 




vu •^Company?' ]k 



318 O l i For,s "^ S T - 
QJHtf FbrncijjCO 



Dr. Ricord's Restorative Pills. 

Buy none but the Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the Medical Celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 

J. «. STEELE iS CO,, 
No. 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED. Boj: of 50 pills, $1 25: of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills. 
$3 50; o f 400 pills, $6 : Preparatory Pills, $2. Send for Circular. 

LAVER, MULLANY H LAVER, 

ARCHITECTS, 

Furnish plans, specifications, and Superintendence for the construction 
or renovation of dwelling houses, and every description of building. 
Office: 93 Flood Building, Co v. Uh and Mai ket Ms., S. F. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



^M^MstwM 




BOULEVARDS and electric street railways should be the watch- 
words of all real estate men. The indications are especially 
bright for immediate progress on these lines, and this is equiv- 
alent to saying that the real estate outlook is excellent. A force 
of one hundred men is putting the ocean boulevard to rapid 
completion, and the time now confidently set for its completion 
is within the next sixty days. A splendid two-mile driveway, 
one hundred feet wide, will be no small attraction to San Fran- 
cisco. The singular thing about the boulevard, is the cheapness 
of the contract for which the work was taken. Four and a half 
cents a yard is considered dirt cheap, even building a road. It is 
to be hoped, however, that with the completion of this stretch of 
boulevard, the interest in the matter will not die out. Real estate 
men should be the first to see the importance of good boulevards, 
and plenty of them. Aside from the necessities, such as good 
sewers and passenger transportation facilities, nothing adds so 
quickly to the value of real property as its proximity to a good, 
well paved driveway. San Francisco should not be content with 
a single boulevard. She should have a perfect system of them, 
running to all parts of the city, and especially one encircling the 
entire bay shore. Of course such a system would cost money, but 
suppose bonds were floated for the enterprise, is there a reason- 
able doubt but that the increased taxation from the increased real 
values would more than redeem them before their expiration? 

It is not every day that an elec ric street railway is built and 
equipped with its paid-up cash capital. But this is the fact with 
regard to the new line that is to run from the Baldwin Hotel to 
the beach. Not a single bond has been put out, and work is pro- 
gressing with prodigious strides. The first payment made by the 
stockholders was $180,000 in coin. When the road is opened, by 
the first of April, every inch of it will have been paid for in cash, 
and its total indebtedness will be nil. The power house will be 
erected on Carl street, west of Willard. Three miles of the road 
have been completed already, and a force of 150 workmen is em- 
ployed constantly. The completion of this road will open some 
of the best residence property in the city. It is the opening of all 
this outside territory that speaks well tor the real estate market 
this year. Money is concentrated at present, but its holders must 
soon be tired of only bank interest. Then la d selling will take 
a boom, and the real business will be brisk again. 

Of couse business is not especially brilliant at this season of the 
year. A week or two must elapse before the year's business is 
fairly started upon. Yet things are stirring, and sales are being 
made constantly. There is a good demand for $30,000 or $40,000 
properties, but such are scarce. Renting is not at all bad, and 
modern houses are not long without tenants. There is a good 
deal of inquiry, and there is a great deal of business in the air. It 
will all come down soon, however, and the indications are that 
none of it will go up in smoke. 

Bovee, Toy & Co. sold a lot on Castro street, north of Twenty- 
sixth, with a frontage of 175 feet, for $10,500, last week. Fer- 
nando Nelson was the purchaser. He will erect at once seven 
two-story dwellings. 

The improvements in the Richmond district are commendable. 
The San Francisco Land Company has thirteen new blocks now 
under contract for street grading, paving and other work neces- 
sary to putting it on the market for sale in first-class shape. 
Property-holders in that part of the city are falling in line with 
great readiness in the matter of street improvements. Just at 
present there is more activity in Richmond than in any other 
portion of the Western Addition. The report of the Post-street 
Extension Commissioners is expeclgd daily now, and when this 
is made, it will only be a question of a short time when one of 
the cable roads will be extended out there. 

Tevis & Fisher sold the property at 1311 Hyde street to Dr. 
Beverley Macmonagle for $15,000, a lot on the east side of Vicks- 
burg street, north of Elizabeth, for $1,200, and one on Elizabeth 
street, near Castro, for $2,300. 

There have been numerous small sales of outside property and 
an activity in that department which speaks well for the near fu- 
ture. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company, 

Locatiouof principal place of business— Sau Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia Minius; District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the 6th day of January, 1892, an assessment (No. 45) of Twenty-five Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediaiely in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, Room 11, No 303 California street. San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Efeventh Day of February, 1892. will be delinquent, 
and adverl ised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment in made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 2d day of March, 18P2, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. BARROWS, Secretarv. 

Office— Room 11, No. 303 California street, San Francisco, California." 



A CARD. 



We desire to extend thanks to our FRIENDS 
and the PUBLIC for the LIBERAL PATRON- 
AGE they have bestowed upon us in the past, 
and to say WE HAVE MOVED OUR OFFICE 
TO 26 O'FARRELL STREET (Kohler & Chase 
Building), where we shall continue in the Fur- 
niture business. Designs submitted and esti- 
mates given for the Furnishing of Hotels, Pub- 
lie Buildings and Private Residences in their 
entirety. 

F. S. CHADBOURNE & CO. 

7--KEARNY STREET--7 



NO MORE RIPPING. 

THE IMPROVED 

X s . CB1TTEMBEI <Sc CO., 

KID GLOVES. 



PERFECTION OF FIT. 



BEWARE OF IMITATIONS. 



All Uloves Branded with Trade Mark. 



c/ ©&nfomerfv'e)lPc) 




1$yii£gM6> % 



Sold in San Francisco only at 

7--KEARNY STREET-7 

OPPOSITE THE I'HKONUXE ISl ll,l>l\ti. 

VAN VLECK ART STUDIO, 

Room* 6 and 7, 131 Post Street. 

Artistic Wood Carving from original designs 
a specialty. Instructions in all Art branches. 
Art Novelties of all kinds on exhibition and 
sale. 



Dr. J. H. STALLARD 

— AND — 

Dr. J. CLARK, 

^Xaz-srsiCI-A-NS and. STTRGEONS, 
682 Suiter Street. 



Pine Table 
Wines 

From our Celebra- 
ted Orleans 
Vineyard. 




(&S2» J Producers of 

^ECLIPSE 

CHAMPAGNE, 

630 Washington St.l 

BAN FEAHOISCO. I 




The Orleans Vineyards of 
Messrs. Arpad Haraszthy & 
Co. are situated among the 
foot hills of Yolo County, three 
miles west of Esparto, near 
the entrance of the Capay Val- 
ley, and comprises 640 acres 
of rolling hill land, of which 
360 are planted with the 
choicest Imported European 
Grape Vines, whose product 
ranks with the highest grade 
Wines produced in California. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



BAN H: INCI8C0 NEW8 T BTTER 



10 




BKYONlUhe Ions of ihe iteaincr Telephone, *l the mouth of 
the Willamette River Tuesday morning, this has been an 
easy week (or the Pacific Coast manna underwriters. She was 
the finest passenger boat on the Columbia River, and belonged to 
the Columbia Transportation l,ine. She ran on the breakwater 
in a fog. and is now at the bottom. Her passenger? were rescued. 
The hull was valued at $60,000, and her cargo at J500. Borne ol 
the local companies carried small lines on the hull, which is not 
a complete loss, it is thought. 

The grip epidemic is making a heavy call on the resources of 
the life companies all over the country. Perhaps this fact is re- 
rible for the further fact that reform is abroad in the land of 
life insurance; reform as to shaving down useless or not entirely 
necessary expenses in the management of the offices. President 
Hyde, of the Equitable Life, has written a long letter for circula- 
tion among the offices of Ibat company, advising retrenchment 
in the expense of management. 

There is surely no good reason for a gloomy forecast for this 
year's fire insurance business in the United States. It is darkest 
before dawn. It has been very dark, and there is every reason 
to believe that 1892 is the dawn of good business. Underwriters 
have themselves to blame to no small extent for the past year's 
bad business. There has been too much cutting and not enough 
combination. The question as to 1892 is only this: Will the fire 
underwriters continue to carry on their business in an unprofit- 
able manner, or will they cease cutting each other's throats at the 
expense of capital and surplus, and come together on some equit- 
able ba3is ? Of course, these remarks apply to the country in 
general. On the Pacific coast, upon the whole, the year has not 
been unprofitable, and some companies have done excellently. 

There has been a constant fear abroad that the Pacific Insur- 
ance Union could not weather it much longer, but these fears are 
no doubt allayed, for the time being, at least, by the obvious fact 
that already begins to show through the only half-compiled an- 
nual statements, to wit: that the losses have come too heavily to 
permit of any rate pruning. Yes, the Union will live. So much 
seems a safe prediction, and throat-cutting in California and the 
rest of the Union will be unfashionable this year. When one 
gets near the bone one must stop cutting recklessly, or the blade 
will be broken. 

The scare — if there ever was a genuine scare — about the Ameri- 
can fire companies being swallowed up in the capacious maw of 
the British companies is all over now, despite the recent efforts 
of sensationalists to revive it. Robert Lewis, chief secretary of 
the Alliance, of England, has been rere nearly two weeks. Mr. 
Lewis is on his way to Australia. Naturally enough, he stopped 
over here to have a talk with Mr. James, of the Union, and to 
complete the arrangements for the taking over of the Union's 
business, which was purchased some time ago. That is all. 

The Royal Canadian Fire Company, of Montreal, which has 
just been absorbed by the Alliance, of England, was formerly 
represented on this coast and in several Eastern States, but was 
con pelled to withdraw from the United States, on account of the 
heavy losses sustained here. 

The adjustment of the Baker & Hamilton loss, at Sacramento, 
is still unsettled. Messrs. Wetzlar & Easton are still wrestling 
with the proposition, and trying to secure all the salvage they 
deem the companies entitled to. 

The Manchester has re-insured one of the oldest Western Amer- 
ican companies, the Marine Insurance Company, of St. Louis, 
which was organized in 1835. 

Franz Jacoby has been appointed manager of the Prussian 
National for all the territory west of the Rocky Mountains. His 
partner in the local management of the Prussian National, Mr. 
Hirschfeld, has retired from business to attend to bis private 
affairs. Mr. Hirschfeld has been looking for a favorable oppor- 
tunity to retire for some time. With the first of the year, and 
the change in the firm's business, he took the bull by the horns, 
and stepped down and out. 

W.J. Landers, of the Guardian Assurance, will leave Sunday 
evening for New York city, to confer with the managers of the 
Sun Fire Company, of London, and the Guardian Assurance, 
which he represents on the coast. He has had an unusu- 
ally successful year, his loss ratio for the coast being but 33 per 
cent. 

The rumored withdrawal of the City of London from the 
United States does not apply to this side of the Rocky Mountains, 
greatly to the happiness, no doubt, of W. J. Callingham, the 
local manager. 

George Mel has resigned his position in the State Investment, 
to accept a place in the Svea. 

The Maison Riche is second to no restaurant on the coast, and en- 
joys the favor of the city's bon vivanta. 



THE DELBECK 



THE EXTRA 



THE PERFECTION OF A DRY WINE. 





THE HII BRUT 



I 

The highest grade ot Champagne without 
sweetness. 



THE BARTON & GUESTIER 

i (vc.Mi-.Jn.il 1725, Bordeaux) 

Clarets, White Wines and Olive Oils. 




JAMES DE FREMERY & CO., - San Francisco, 

General Agents, Pacific <l'oast. 



>ETNA 

MINERAL 

WATER 

CURES 

DYSPEPSIA. 
SOLD EVERYWHERE. 



PARKE & LACY CO., 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IRON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 

BELTING, OIL8 AND 8UPPLIE8. 

A. LUSK & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Packers of the following celebrated brands: 

CELEBRATED LUSK BRANDS, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY. 

SAN LORENZO PACKING CO. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



W'^ (N 




ORNAMENTED ribbons are used for necklaces in France, not 
only for evening wear, but with day dresses instead of a col- 
lar. They are generally made of bands of velvet or satin, jew- 
eled, and edged witli fur or lace. Bands of Parma violets or tiny 
roses are edged with a ruching of satin ribbon or laid on a delicate 
piece of old lace. Gold or silver galon spangled in serpent-green, 
sapphire-blue or ruby-red, in quaint Egyptian designs, makes 
striking necklets, especially for night wear. The only danger of 
wearing these collarettes lies in the fact that they are very warm, 
so that a great difference is felt if they are dispensed with. They 
are generally lined with Persian silk, and sometimes fastened with 
long ribbons at the back; they are very easily contrived, and 
therefore need not be expensive. 

There never was a bonnier nor more exquisitely dressed bride 
than Miss Daisy Cornwallis West, when she was married to Prince 
Hans Heinrich of Pless, the other day. The Empire gown of 
pearl white satin, with its clouds of the daintiest lace, its under- 
bodice of silver, its garlands of orange blossoms and its five yards 
of brocaded train, attached to the shoulders by a silver collar, was 
almost past description. 8he wore only the diamonds given by 
the groom's family. These were a diamond and pearl crown, 
given by the Prince of Pless to hold the Brussels lace veil, a cross 
from the Princess of Pless, and the bridegroom's necklace — a mag- 
nificent single stone. The bridegroom's gifts were diamonds, some 
of them set with rubies, pearls, sapphires and turquoises, and 
must have cost many thousands of pounds. Among them were 
two necklaces, two bracelets, three rings and three brooches. 
The Prince and Princess of Wales gave a pearl necklace, and the 
Duke and Duchess of Connaught a clock. 

Fur will be used a great deal for millinery purposes this winter, 
and sable in particular. Small toques have a sable tail round the 
brim, with the head of the sable nestling on the hair in front. A 
close black felt hat has purple velvet twisted round the upper 
part of the crown, with upstanding ends in front, and a sable 
placed round the brim, with the tail standing up high at the back, 
and the head lying on the hair in front. Another toque, com- 
posed entirely of the new iridescent spangles, has two wings of 
them in front, with a sable's head between, them, and the tail 
twisted round on the top of the crown. 



Velvet has this winter happily taken the place of plush, which 
is always a little showy and theatrical, and many delicate shades 
of olive, sage and gray are used for dresses and mantles, as well 
as the royal blue, grasshopper green and strong purple, which are 
considered the fashionable tints of the season. A beautiful gown 
of willow-green velvet is edged with silver fox, which also bor- 
ders the round cloak lined with shimmering gray and primrose 
shot silk, the combined tones of the whole costume recalling the 
tender modulations of color to be found in the silvery catkins of 
the willow palm. 



Jeweled trimmings are used to some extent, but spangled net 
and spangled gauzes, used in combination with velvet, are es- 
pecially sought for. For everyday wear, bonnets are made up of 
the materials of the dress more than ever, and are trimmed in 
some dainty, graceful manner with twists of velvet and of gauze. 
Trimmings of quills are in demand for round hats. 

— Good Housekeeping. 

The favorite high-class topcoat of the season is a heavy, dull- 
finished black beaver, with velvet collar ample, but not too 
noticeably so. The lapel is made tff roll quite low down, to ad- 
mit the disclosure of a good-sized scarfing. The single-breasted 
style holds precedence. It is roomsome in fit, and falls grace- 
fully from the shoulder to the calf. 

The bonnets, as the season advances, are exceedingly small, 
and even the round hats have taken in their dimensions per- 
ceptibly. For theatre wear, a yellow velvet bonnet, trimmed 
with black jet in Spanish fashion, is frequently made up. There 
are also bonnets of bright rose velvet and jet. 

How to Get Thin. 
The only safe and reliable treatment for obesity, or (superfluous 
fat) is the "Leverette 1 ' Obesity Pills, which gradually reduce the 
weight and measurement. No injury or inconvenience — Leaves no 
wrinkles— acts by absorption. This cure is founded upon the most 
scientific principles, and has been used by one of the most eminent 
Physicians of Europe in his private practice " for five years," with 
the most gratifying results. Mr. Henry Perkins, 29 Union Park, 
Boston, writes: From the use of the " Leverette" Obesity Pills my 
weight has been reduced ten pounds in three weeks, and my gen- 
eral health is very much improved. The principles of your treat- 
ment are fully indorsed by my family physician. In proof of my 
gratitude I herewith give you permission to use my name if you de- 
siretodoso. Price $2 per package, or three packages for $5 by reg- 
istered mail. All orders supplied direct from our office. The Lev- 
erette Specific Co., 339 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 



b-a_hstjk:s- 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital *3,000,000 00 

Surplus 1,000,000 00 

Undivided Profits (July 1st, 1890) 3,275,919 48 

WM. ALVOB.D, President. 

Thomas Brown. Cashier I B. Murray. Jr .. .Assistant Cashier 

Irving F. Moclton, 2nd Assistant Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; B03TON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman'B 
Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India, China, 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Bhanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



Geo. A. Low, 
N, Van Bergen, 
Thomas Jennings, 



N. W. Corner Sansome and Bush Streets. 

Established 1870. U S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) $1,600,000 

SURPLUS $600.000| UNDIVIDED PROFITS $166,000 

S.G. MURPHY President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT... .Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

directors: 
George C. Perkins. 8. G. Murphy, 

James D. Phelan, James Momtt. 

John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A iipnera] Banking Business Transacted. 
SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 
JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 
Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per auuum (under the exclusive control of 
tho renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
Btorage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p.m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Authorized Capital ?3,5OO,00O I Capital paid up 2.450,000 

Reserve 395,000 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 73 Lombard 51., E. C 

Portland Branch. 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1005 A Street. 

Man ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM 8 EEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and Loudon Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan 4 Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Satheb & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: Chas. Main, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, VVm. P. Johnson, 
C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
ahipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

WELLS, FAR60 & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

>. £. Corner Sansome aiul Salter Streets. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $5,500,000.00 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President : Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Ban kin 
Business. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company. 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL RANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL tl.000,000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | B. H. MILLER, Jr. 

E. C. WOOLWOETH President. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-Presidbnt. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier 

SECURITY SAVIN6S RANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary 8. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 




BAN Ffl INCISCO NEWS T KTTER. 



21 



1 :a t>t BCS. 



TO THE DEAD YEAR.-^m./h.'i. MUlrr. 

What shall be said. O gray year dead — 

Old gray dead year so full of days? 
Above thy »tusi what shall be said? 
Shall we give praise, or sharp dispraise? 
If thou wert well entombed lo day, 
As Egypt laid her dead away, 
What could be told, what should be told, 
When lime thy mummy-cloth unrolled? 
What shall befall? What shall be all 

Of Europe's deeds when time is done? 
Why. cannon-ball and bugle-call. 

And guns thai weighed an hundred ton; 
Fat bloodhounds baying! And each hound 
Athirst and eager that the ground 
Shall voice his brother's blood; that tlame 
And sword shall claim bis puny name. 
And we, the new-born stalwart world? 

Why we, we turn our faces back 
And cheer each battle-flag unfurled. 

And track the baying bloodhound's track 
And praise these paltry cowards; praise 
The wretch who dares not stoop and raise 
His brother up; give praise divine — 
Give peace and love a single line. 

And all o*jr own small tyrants praise, 

And name them kings. We chronicle 
Their coming, going; all their ways 

Of airy walk and speak them well. 
And yet the true king far away 
Amid his corn stands bowed to-day; 
A mortgage on his field, his corn, 
A mortgage on his babe unborn. 
The hero of an hundred wars 

With want, with hunger, with disease 
Stands pensionless, for all his scars 

Won 'mid the victories of peace; 
Stands helpless, friendless, stands alone, 
His stout heart turning into stone; 
Stands quite at bay. The while we gaze 
At pompous fools and praise and praise. 

DUTY'S PATH.— % Mia Wheeler Wilcox. 

Out from the harbor of youth's bay 

There leads the path of pleasure; 
With eager steps we walk that way 

To brim joy's largest measure. 
But when with morn's departing beam 

Goes youth's last precious minute, 
We sigh " 'twas but a fevered dream — 

There's nothing in it." 
Then on our vision dawns afar 

The goal of glory, beaming 
Like some great radiant solar star, 

And sets us longing, dreaming, 
Forgetting all things left behind, 

We strain each nerve to win it, 
But when 'tis ours — alas I we find 

There's nothing in it. 
We turn our sad. reluctant gaze 

Upon the path of duty; 
Its barren, uninviting ways 

Are void of bloom and beauty. 
Yet in that road, though dark and cold, 

It seems as we begin it, 
As we press on — lo! we behold 

There's Heaven in it. 

SWEETHEART, SWEETHEART. 



The wild bird hid in the thicket, 

Sings "sweetheart," over and over, 
And " sweetheart, sweetheart, sweetheart," 

Buzz the brown bees in the clover. 
The brook that ripples and gurgles, 

The bending reeds and grasses, 
The winds, with loving cadence, 

Sing » sweetheart," as she passes. 
Blow softly, O winds of summer, 

Bend blue, sky, above her, 
0, whispering reeds and grasses, 

Whisper to her, I love her. 
San Francisco, January 9, 1892. Florence A. Jones. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3 ooo.OOO 

RESERVE FUMD 1.000.000 

"•"in i ooroor Biuta ud 

HEAD OFFICE 80 LOMBARD STREET. LONDON. 

BBAK0IIB8 Victor!., Brillth OolnmbU: Portland, lie and 

i aooma, Wiifchlugloa. 
B0B-BKANCII1 tmloilor, VuaouTtr, Nanalmo «ad Kkn 

British Columl 
This Bank trau loral Banking Bnaloou. aooonnt* nponod 

ok, aud Special Uopoalta reoolvod. Commi ranted 

available lu nil parts "I ih.' world, Approved lull- discounted and ad 

vanoea made on g i collateral noarUy. Draws direct at current rules 

upon ii> Head Oflicc and Branches, tm.1 upon Its agenlc ai lollowi 
XE\v yiikk. CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank i I M,.u i real: LIVERPOOL 

—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British I. u Company; ikk- 

UAND— Baukol Irelaud; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and Bouth America; CHINA and JAPAN-Chartered Bank "I 
India, Australia and China; AD8TRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank Ol 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney. English, Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Hank and National Buiik of Australasia; 1>KM- 
ERARA and TRIN I DAD (West Indies)— Colonial B an k. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGsTnION. 

632 (nllioriila Street, Corner Webb Street. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Comer Polk. 

Deposit*, June 30. 1891 •SS3.311.061 00 

Uuarauteed Capital and Surplus 1,340,635 00 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin. W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardmau, J. G Eastlaud; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, aud Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks oi reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
-Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evenings, t>:30 to 8. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND $ 1,410,000 00. 

Deposits Jan 2, 1892 27,138,129 14. 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRUSE 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A, H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoemann, E. 
Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, M, Ehrman, B. A. Becker. Attorney 
John R. Jaeboe. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny... Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Moffitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader aud James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecurities. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER ...President. | ERNST BRAND Secretar y 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

uttciied Capital $2,500,000 \ Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $560,000. 
Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Asents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
( Ltd. ), No. 10 Wall St. , N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Bonle 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. EUGENE MEYER, Manager. 
LC . Altschpl. Cashier. __^ 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

|ii. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund. 650,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel Court, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. &. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART } 

P. N. LILIENTHAL.t 



• Managers. 



COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

806 Market Street (Phelan Building). 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for pois- 
tively extracting teeth without pain. "Coltou Gas" has an established aud 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for its purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
in all eases. Thirty five thousand references. Established 1863. Indorsed 
and recommeuded by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
all operations lu dentistry. ^ CHARLBS ^ MCKER 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



"WHO IT IS.— Clothier and Furnisher. 



Who is it stands for fourteen hours 

Within a dry goods store, 
And cometh home at night so tired 

She scarce can ope tbe door ? 

Who is it entertains her friends 
Each night in gorgeous style, 

And when the breakfast comes in late 
She greets you with a smile? 

Who is it wears the newest gown 
And puts your wife to shame, 

And makes you feel so small at timeB 
You long to change your name? — 

Your servant girl. 



CHRONICLES OF THE BUILDERS. 



THE History Company has issued Volume II. of the Chronicles 
of the Builders, which is the third volume of the series pub- 
lished. It sustains the high reputation gained for this excellent 
series of historical studies by the volumes which have preceded 
it, for it is replete with interesting information regarding the de- 
velopment of the Western country, and the men who made it the 
glorious empire it is to-day. The first chapter is devoted to a 
general view of the growth of the government of the new coun- 
tries, in which political corruption is referred to in words of un- 
mistakable condemnation. " Bossism," says Mr. Bancroft, " is 
one of the main props of the money power in politics, which 
asserts itself on this coast in so objectionable a degree." The City 
Councils of San Francisco are charged with having squandered 
her once enormous landed wealth, and sinking in the pockets of 
politicians half the money paid as taxes by the people. The gov- 
ernments of Central America and Mexico are reviewed from aborig- 
inal rule to the present day, and a very interesting chapter is de- 
voted to political history and government in California, which is 
brought down to the end of Governor Waterman's administra- 
tion. Chapters are also given to the government of the interior 
States, including Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Nevada; the 
government and development of Colorado, Texas and the States 
of the Mississippi Valley, and to Oregon. The biographies in this 
volume, each of which is accompanied by an excellent engravingof 
the subject, are of Lorenzo Sawyer, John G. Downey, George C. 
Perkins, Orville C. Pratt, James A. Waymire, Milton A. Wheaton, 
George Hyde, Annis Merrill, Charles Maclay, Robert M. Widney, 
Jeremiah F. Sullivan, Peter Dean, Charles F. Lott, Matthew P. 
Deady, Henry W. Corbett, Solomon Hirsch, La Fayette Grover, 
Philip A. Marquam, Van B. de Lashmutt and Joseph Simon. 
The volume is probably the most reliable, interesting and valuable 
yet published upon the very important topics which it covers. 
Every interesting detail is-fully explained to the great satisfaction 
of the reader, and many new facts are related, which can nowhere 
else be found, as Mr. Bancroft's vast reference library gives him 
unparalleled opportunities for throwing the fullest light upon all 
subjects he writes on. The biographies of many of the men 
prominent to-day upon the Pacific Coast, which are published in 
the volume, are as interesting as romances, and will well repay 
perusal. 

Volume VI. of the " Chronicles " was issu d during the week. 
The greater portion of it is devoted to railway development in 
California, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Oregon, 
Idaho, Montana, Washington, British Columbia, Mexico and 
Central America, and in a most interesting manner the progress 
of events is reviewed from the initial surveys to the completion 
of the great railways which now join the Pacific Coast with the 
cities of the East. On this subject Mr. Bancroft becomes enthu- 
siastic, and expresses confidence in the idea of a cosmopolitan 
railway passing through Alaska aid Siberia, and uniting the sys- 
tems of the Old World and the New. The completion of the 
great trans-Siberian road, now in course of construction, will place 
such a cosmopolitan road within the easy range of probabilities. 
Nearly forty pages are given to the biography of Charles Crocker, 
in the account of whose eventful life is woven a history of the 
Central Pacific. No better illustration of the enterprise and T.tanic 
energy of tbe railroad builder could be given than that on page 58, 
descriptive of the day on which, under his superintendence, 
10 miles and 185 feet of the Central Pacific track were laid 
between daylight and dark. The volume gives a complete his- 
tory of railway development in California, including an account 
of the various Legislative and Congressional enactments, and 
chapters are also devoted to the growth of commerce on the 
western coast of the United States. The biographies are those of 
Charles Crocker, George H. Sisson, Josiah Failing, Henry Failing, 
James Steel, Donald Macleay, Adolph G. Russ, Joseph P. Hale, 
George H. Bonebrake, Albert Miller, Joseph Emeric, Orville D. 
Baldwin, Chauncey H. Phillips and Jerome B. Wheeler. For 
sale by The History Company.] 



White's Hat Store, at 014 Commercial street, is the favorite place 
among men who desire stylish tiles. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

AND 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California. 



NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO. OF IRELAND; 
ATLAS ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON ; 
BOYLSTON INSURANCE CO. OF BOSTON ; 
OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for— 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship I The China Trade and Insurance Co. 

Company, (L'd.), 

"The California Line of Clippers," I The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

from New York, Steel Rails and Track Material. 

"The Hawaiian Line of Packets," | 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, 8. 8. Hepworth'8 Centrl 
fugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 
327 Market Street, corner Fremont. 

8AN FRANCISCO. 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN. 

The Spring Term of this School opened on 
MONDAY, JANUARY 4th. 

Instructors — R. D. Yellaud, Arthur F. Mathews, Oscar Kuuath, Amedee 
Joullia and Lee Lash. 

Terms: Regular Classes— Drawing, $10 per month, $24 per term. Oil 
Painting, $12 per mouth, $30 per term Saturday Class, $4 per mouth, or $12 
for four mouths. 

MR. R. D. YELLAND will deliver Lectures on PERSPECTIVE, illus- 
trated on the Blackboard, ou Wednesdays throughout the term. 

For particulars inquire at the School, 430 Pine street. 

J. R. MARTIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



MME. B. ZISKA, A. M. 

REMOVED TO 

ieo6 T7--Au:tT oshess aveittje. 

Classes were resumed January 7, 1892. 

SGHOOt OF ELOCUTION AND EXPRESSION. 

1170 .Market St., Donohoe Building. 

The school furnishes the most thorough and systematic training for 
voice, body and mind. Courses are arranged to meet all classes. Pupils 
prepared for the stage, public readers, teachers of elocution and expression 
or social accomplishment. The Delsarte system of dramatic training and 
development of grace and ease a specialty. 

i 'irs. May Joseph! Kim-aid, 
PRINCIPALS ] Prof. J. Kobtrts Kliicaid, 
{(Graduate Boston School of Expression) 

ST. MATTHEW'S HALL, SAN MATEO, CAL. 



A SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 



Twenty-sixth Year. 



Rev. ALFRED LEE BREWER, 1)D., Rector. 



Madame Waldow Cohen, 

Teaclier of Piaao I^oxte and 
1815 CLAY STREET. 



Sin.g-iiig', 




LOUIS R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 

The Highest (trade Champagne in the World. 

CABTB BLAUCHE." 

(WHITE LABEL) 

A Magnificent Rich Wine. 

'■Giaj^isriD -viisr sec," 

(BROWN LABEL) 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 
See that every Bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




I'l; LNCISCO M'.w 9 I ETTKR. 



2:i 



wmx 



SUMMARY UF THE MARKETS. 

Flour is Arm: foreign dcmatiii Rood Bxira $?* i *<t* 1 75: Bnperfloe, $8*75. 
Wheat is art! to: (air lnd«; Snipping, II. *0; Mining, »1.82'v^l ^' POT 
c*ntai. 
B*rler is Arm; Brcwlne, 11.1**11 J" Fi •■ I. II <vy*$l .12W Per ctl. 
Oats, Milling, |l.4J 1 -'*li-V»: FeeO, |l -.*|i.<uper ctl. 
Corn. White, |1 SStMl 371*: Yellow. |1.^>^W1.85 per ctl 
Rye, no stock, Rood demand. II •'■ l\*|l < v rcmoni, $2.00@2-7&. 
Hay Is steady: Wheat. li*44K>- Oata, fl30S16; Alfalfa, I~11(#*1'2 ~-0, 
MUUiufT-. eood demand. Bran. |l7i*lly per ton. 
Beau>.«'*>d request, 9L85®$2.Su per ctl. Potatoes. 30*v@50c per ctl. 
Butter is higher: Choice, PsJr.90o.A2So; Eastern, lie to 25c. 

•. light stock, 10c.(*12c. Ecu'-. light supply, S6c@45c. 
limey. Comb, 10c.@13c.: Extra- ,<'• Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth V 4 r. Beeswax i? lower m( 2"2c.@24c. 
Fruit— all kinds dried — active. Fruit la very plentiful and cheap. 
Raisins and Dried Grapes in high favor at good paying rates. 
Hides are s-ieady; Dry. 7e(il0c. Wool is in demand at 14c.@22c. 
Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor Ibe seller at 6@& jc. 
•"offee plead y at 150.321c. ror C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 
Coal is lower, with a declining tendency. Nuts find ready t-ale. 
Quicksilver is scarce at J4S.00 per flask. Hops are in demand at 14@20c. 
Sugar, good stocK of both Raws aud Refined. Whites, 5@5%C 

The year 1892 opens auspiciously; recent rains have been suffi- 
cient to set the plows in motion in all parts of the State. Seed 
sowing is now in order. The hiils and valleys are covered with 
living green: pasturage is now pood for cattle and sheep, and the 
dairymen are jubilant at the bright prospect before them. 

The steamship Oceanic, from the Orient, brought for Cargo 48 
pkgs. Silk Goods, 557 rolls Matting, 662 bags Coffee, 289 pkgs. 
Gambria, 1,417 pkgs. Sugar, 48 pkgs. Opium, 1,863 pkgs. Oil, 972 
pkgs. Tea, 33,000 mats Rice, 10.000 pks. Mdse. ; also in transit to 
go overland 1,604 pkgs. Raw Silk, 39 pkgs. Silk Goods, 2,000pkgs. 
Tea, 268 pkgs. Curios, 344 pkgs. Mdse.; for Central and South 
America, 42 pkgs. Silk Goods, etc. 

The lowest grain charter for the past year was that of the Br. 
iron Bk. Cloncalrd, 1,300 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., Havre, Ant- 
werp or Dunkirk at £1 2s. 6d. Since then the Br. iron Bark Dun- 
nerdale, 1,066 tons, chartered for same voyage at £1 3s. 9d., show- 
ing quite an advance. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship San Juan, sailed for the Isthmus on 
the 5th inst., carrying to Central America Mdse. value of $27,317, 
consisting in part of 2,547 bbls. Flour. 1,000 ctls. Wheat, 1,037 ctls. 
Corn, 3,834 lbs. Tallow, 5.106 lbs. Lard, etc. ; to Mexico, 700 gals. 
Wine, etc.; to Panama 57 bbls. Flour, 27,354 lbs. Sugar, Rice and 
Beans, value $1,817; to Peru 23 cs. Salmon and 1,200 lbs. Dried 
Fruits; also to New York in transit 110 bales Rags, 35,469 gals. 
Wine, 111,018 lbs. Borax, 978 gals. Brandy, etc., value $24,736. 
Total value of Cargo, $60,334. 

The steamship City of Peking, December 31st. hence for China, 
carried 16,350 bbls. Flour, 14,642 lbs. Borax and other Mdse., value 
$147,778; also in Treasure $254,806; to Japan $34,000 in Treasure, 
329 bbls. Flour, 65 pkgs. Leather, 7,482 lbs. Sugar, 2,000 gala. 
Wine, etc., value $17,095; to Calcutta 16,377 lbs. Hops; to Batavia 
50 cs. Canned Goods; to Penang 75 cs. ditto; to Sourabaya 175 cs. 
Canned Goods, etc., value $811. * 

Coffee of the better grades of Guatemala for shipment overland 
is in active request, but otherwise there is very little business 
doing. We note a sale of 500 bags good green unwashed Salvador 
at 194;C Sales from first handy during the past month aggregated 
2,097 bags Central American. During the month of December 
3,338 bags Central American sold to go overland. 

Sugar, since our last weekly reference, has been reduced £c. per 
lb. for all grades, ruling since October last. 

The Wool product of California in 1891 aggregated 33,183,475 
lbs. We exported by sea and rail 26,362,952 lbs. The stock on 
hand at the close of the year, 2,500,000 lbs. We received, in addition 
to the above, some 7,000,000 lbs. from sister States. It is esti- 
mated that local mills consumed about 18,000,000 lbs. last year, 
of which some 7,500,000 lbs. was stock carried over from 1890. 
The freight on Wool by rail to the Atlantic in the grease is l£c. 
per lb., |c. by water; on scoured wool, 2£c. by rail and lc. per 
lb. by water. The wool clip of the State for the past five years 
averages 33,000,000 lbs. 



J. Carmany, of 25 Kearny street, has the most varied assortment 
of gentlemen's furnishing goods in the city. 



Rich, juicy and delicious oysters may always be had at 
Moraghan's famous stand in the California Market. 



PLUMBING 



Fina.Sanitary Plumbing and Gas-fitting 
Estimates furnished. Jobbing promptly 
attended to. 

CHARLES E. ANDERSON, 
1616 Polk Street, near Clay, and 1214. 
Polk Street, near Sutter, 
telephone No. 2107. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

.Ill- '. ■ " Mini rm t 

Lnrniirm ,,i prtoolpil piaca ,,t bwtoaaa, Ban FranalMo, California. Lo- 

i cation of wort Id 111 II Mlnlnt Dlttrlct, Btoror counlr, Norarta. 

roo ih. i hi a mci-tliiK of tin- li. ... r- 1 ..( Director., hd.i 
on too 2.1.1 .lav of December, MM, an aaaasmnonl [No, Wiof rwonli 

par share waa levied upon Ibe r.piiai Moot "f in rporaUon, pay- 
able Immediately, in I'mted sulci v. .1.1 coin, lo im ( . Secretary, al i 1 

nf the company. No 119 California reroet, i 1 8, s«n Pranclaoo, California. 

Any Mock upon which ih - shall remain unpaid on 

The Twonti-c'jhth Day ol January. 1892. will be delinquent. 

and advertlaed for sale «' i-ui.Hr miction; am] nnleaa payment is maAa 
before, will bo s-oi.i on WEDNESDAY, tng 17th .Iny «l February, 
pay the delluqucnt assessment, togethei aritta oosti .>f advertising mni 
espouses of sale. By order of the Hoard of Directors. 

It. E. KELLY. Secretary. 
Office— No. 419 California strctt. room 3, Sau Francisco, California. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Crocker Mining Company, 

Location of principal place nf business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Quljotoa, Arizona. 

Notice is hereby Riven that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 15th day of December, 1891, au assessment 'No 11) of Ten Cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United States ftold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the com- 
pany, No. 26 Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Nineteenth Day of January, 1892. will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on THURSDAY, the eleventh day of February. 1892. to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

NAT. T. MESSER, Secretary 
Office— No. 303 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Hale & Noreross Silver Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the 21st day of December, 1891, an assessment (No. 100) of Fifty Cents 
per share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 58, Nevada Block, No 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Tuesday, the Twenty-sixth Day ot January, 1892, will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and, unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 17th day of February, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

A. B. THOMPSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 58, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francis- 
co, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 



Alta Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— Sau Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Gold Hill Mining District, Storey county, Nev. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the fifth (t>th) day of January, 1892, an assessment (No. 41) of Fifiy (50) 
Gents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in Uuited States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, Room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, California 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The Ninth (9th) Day of February, 1892, will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; aud unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the twenty-ninth (29th) day of February, 
1892, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costsof advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francis- 
co, California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company, 

Assessment No. 68 

Amount per Share 30 cents 

Levied January 5, 1802 

Delinquent in Office February 8, 1892 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock March 1, 1892 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 69, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Home Mutual Insurance Company. 

San Francisco, January 2, 1892. 
Conformably to the provisions of Section 1 of the By-Laws of this Com- 
pany the next annual meeting of stockholders will be held at its principal 
office' (northeast corner of California and Sansome streets, San Francisco, 
California), at 1 o'clock p, m , on MONDAY, January 18th, a. d. 1892, for the 
election of Directors, to serve until their successors shall be elected, under 
the provisions of said by-lawfi. The polls will be open from 1 to 4 o'clock. 

CHAS. R. STORY, Secretary. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



MA83AGE is being advocated by the French faculty in certain 
corneal opacities. The cases most suitable for this treatment 
are those in which the opacity results from abscess or ulceration 
of the cornea, and in which there is not much dense cicatrical 
tissue. A small quantity of an ointment containing lanolin and 
hydrargyrum in equal parts is introduced beneath the eyelid 
once a day and gentle friction made with the finger on the 
closed eyelid; the motion, we are told, should be in a circle, and 
should be kept up for one minute. The eye is subsequently irri- 
gated with a 3 per cent, solution of boric acid. This treatment 
must be continued for months, and requires great patience on the 
part of the medical man and the patient. Generally the patient, 
or a parent or friend, can be taught to carry out the treatment. 
Inflammatory conditions of the cornea or neighboring structures 
are contra-indications to massage. 

In a London paper an account is given of some experiments 

with boilers, in which the difficulty of shortness of water being 
met by turning on feed water, is illustrated. For this purpose a 
boiler was constructed, and the tests were conducted under con- 
ditions closely approximating to those of every-day work. The 
furnaces were bared of water by opening the blow-off cock and 
allowing the water to escape, while good, bright fires were burn- 
ing, which could not fail to overheat the plates. When suffi- 
ciently heated to melt discs of lead, tin and zinc, the feed was 
suddenly turned on, through special pipes, which injected the 
water directly on to the heated plates, but in no case — as is often 
assumed — was this followed by a sudden generation of steam at 
an excessive pressure, but in one instance a reduction of pressure 
actually took place; this, however, being clearly proved to be 
due to not turning on the feed soon enough. In some other tests 
different types of boilers were put to work, and the differtnt 
temperatures carefully taken above and below the furnaces, 
pointing out the inadvisability of hurrying fires when raising 
steam. 

— Any one who may feel so disposed, can, with the aid of an 
ordinary candle, be enabled to see a reflection of the minute 
blood-vessels that are situated at the back of his or her own eye. 
The experiment may be performed in the following manner: A 
lighted candle is held up a few inches from, and on a level with 
the right eye, and the other eye closed. An up and down motion is 
now given to the candle and a beautiful sight presents itself to 
the experimenter. First of all the light of the candle seems to be 
darkened by a whitish mist, out of which a beautiful net or tree- 
like structure, composed of fine black lines, gradually reveals 
itself standing out boldly or faintly as the motion of the candle is 
increased or lessened. There should be no other light in the room 
save that used in the experiment. 

Prince Lucien Bonaparte has bequeathed to the English 

nation his well-known » Cabinet of Chemical Elements." In all, 
there are sixty elementary substances in various quantities, some 
so rare as to be of especial value, and a few almost priceless. Among 
them is the finest and purest gold, platinum still more precious; 
a sample weighing 6J ounces troy of iridium (about the size of 
half a walnut); three times the value of platinum; germanium, 
still higher in money value, the market price being sixty times 
that of pure gold. The contents have been estimated at between 
£250 and £300. The late Prince was greatly aided by the Princess 
in his laboratory work, for she, too, had a great love of chemistry. 
He spent much of his time in this* research. 

— A most interesting surgical operation is reported from one 
of the German hospitals, says Anthony's Photographic Bulletin, 
where a portion of the cornea of the eye, which had been injured 
and turned to a dark brown color by the action of nitrate of sil- 
ver, was removed by a very minute trephine, and a portion, the 
same size, from the cornea of a young rabbit inserted in its place; 
after a few weeks the eye had completely healed, and the color ot 
the entire cornea was perfectly transparent. 

Two armor-plated trains have been designed for the Czar. 

The carriages are to be lined with steel plates of large size, which are 
being made at the Alexandrowski Works of the Soci6te" Franco- 
Russe. This firm has devised a method of producing sheets of 
steel 60 feet long by 4 feet wide from a single ingot. 

The price of platinum has advanced fully 100 per cent., 

owing to its increased use for electrical purposes. 

— A Swedish cavalry officer has invented a horseshoe on 
which the calks and clips are changeable. 



Good Liquors, excellent service, genial company and numerous 
comforts, are the distinguishing, characteristics of the Grand Central 
Wine Rooms, of 16 and IS Third street. The bar is the most popu- 
lar in town among men who understand and can appreciate the best 
of wines and liquors. 



ANNUAL MEETING, 



Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 
The reeular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada 
Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, Room 
15, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California", on 

Wednesday, the 2Cth Day of January, 189?, at the hour of one o'clock P. M.. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Monday, the 18th day of January, 1892, at 3 
o'clock P. M. 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery Street, San Frau- 
cisco, California. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Crocker Mining Company, 
The regular annual meetiug of the stockholders of the Crocker Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the cimpauy. Room 26, Nevada Block, 
309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 18th Day of January, 1892, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. IY1.. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 
Transfer books will close on Friday, Jauuary 15th, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 26, Nevada Block, San Fraucisco, California 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Pajaro Valley Railroad Company. 
The regular auuual meeting of the stockholders of the Pajaro Valley 
Railroad Company will be held at the office of the company, 327 Market 
street, San Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 18th Day of January, 1 89'. at the hour of 1 1 o'clock A. M., 

for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Tuesday, January 5th, 1892, at 3 o'clock p. M. 

E. II. SHELDON, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 
N. E. corner Montgomery and Post streets. 

San Francisco, January 2, 1892, 
At a regular meetiug of the Board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of Four aud one-quarter (4*4) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending December 31, 
1891, free from all taxes, aud payable on and after January 2, 1892. 
R. J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society. 
Corner of Powell and Eddy Sts. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
t the rate of five aud four-tenths (5 4 10) per cent, per annum on term de- 
posits, and four aud one-half (4 1 ;,) per cent, per annum on ordinary de- 
posits, payable on and after Saturday, January 2, 1892. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank, 
Corner of Market and Fourth streeis, in tne Flood Building, City. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of Five and four tenths (5 4-10) per cent per annum ou Term 
Deposits aud Four and one-half (4)4) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable ou anil after January 2, 1892. 
B. C. CARR. Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half-year ending December31st, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of Ave and four-tenths (5 4-10) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits and four and one-half (,i}4) per centper annum ou Ordinary Deposits, 
payable on and after Saturday, January 2, 1892. 

JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

Office— 33 Post street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 
For the half-year ending December 31. 1891, a dividend has been declared 
*.t the rate of five and four-tenths (o 4-10) per cent per annum on Term 
Deposits and four aud one-haif (4V£) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday, January 2, 1892. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and four-tenths (5 4-10) per cent per anuum on Term 
Deposits and four and one half (4J^) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, payable on aud after Saturday, January 2, 1892. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— 526 California street. 

PACIFIC TOWEL C OIVL IF ^IST"^, 

9 LICK PLACE, 
Furnishes Clean Towels at tne following low rates: 

6 Clean Hand Towels each week. $1.00 per month; 12 Clean Hand Towels 

each week, $1.50 per mouth; 4 Clean Roller Towels each week. $1.00 per 

month; 6 Clean Roller Towels each week, $1.25 per month. 



Jan 



BAN n: INCI& NEWS LETTER 



!, vhi) hut U immcr and autumn 

with hrr mother. Mi . iel, h.*-> x mt 1 ! » - 1 to join 

Mr- Jobi -. .- the winter in town 
at ih«* PaUoa Hoti I. 

, Mr*, and Ms-- Chipinau in rho left for the 

rU.it last w« etaod MiM AltceSkem have al»o Ron 

want. ■•■! Haymond hi abroad. 11 

from New York about ten days ajto, ind haibjF this time, no doubt, 
rear hnl the haven where he would he I t -I -h.nl. < ilonel, Mre. and 
the llissea Irwin at>- passing Lb the Virginia 1 1 ■ * t * - 1 in Chi- 

cago. Col. Irwin is now Medical lMiwtoron General MUes'a Staff, 

The widow of the late Maj »r 6 .1 fl^n^eley. at one time a popular 
menilHT of our society, is now a resident of Oregon City, where she 
harming home. She is s\ en ling thfl winter, however, with 
her daughter. Mrs. Will Thornton, in Montana. 

Mr?. Albert \\\ Scott is still confined to her room, though quite 
on the road to recovery. 

There was a most enjoyable party at the residence of Miss Julia 
Krlanger, California street, last Sunday evening in honor of the 
young lady's engagement to* Mr. Jacob Small, of Redwood City. 
About one hundred of the young people's friends were present to 
offer congratulations and make merry. Upon the same evening 
there was a gathering at the residence of Miss Emilie Phillips, 
1,247 Franklin street, in honor of the young lady's betrothal to Mr. 
Benjamin Laver, of Alturas, Cal. The evening was delightfully 
spent, and at midnight rather an elaborate table was spread. The 
young people were heartily congratulated. 

The New Year's Eve ball of the San Francisco Verein was a 
great success, although the attendance was not as large as at the 
Concordia. Mr. Ben Arnold was floor manager. Mr. Hugo 
Rothschild and wife lead the grand march, which was composed 
cf about one hundred couple. The hall was brightly lighted and 
nicely decorated. The supper march was at 11 :45 o'clock, and at 
midnight, mid the clinking of glasses, the b'owing of horns, and 
the general interchange of good wishes, a huge hour glass, labeled 
■* 1891," was suddenly reversed, and showed the figures " 1892," 
surrounded by a circle of light. After supper dancing was re- 
sumed, and continued until a late hour. Among the prettiest 
young ladies present were Miss Viola Hyman and Miss Rosie and 
Miss Minnie Fechheimer. 



From the announcement of the committee in charge of the 
event, it is learned that the » Kinder Fest," to be given by the 
San Francisco Verein on the evening of January 30th, will be in 
the nature of an International Costume Children's Ball. Invita- 
tions will be sent to the children of members and their friends, 
whose names must be presented by this evening. The children's 
ball will be from 7 untill 11 o'clock, after which there will be 
dancing and supper for the adults. The choice of costume 
is left to the parents. From present indications this novel affair 
will be a great success. 

A most pleasant theatre party was that given last Monday 
night at the California Theatre by the Friday Night Bowling Club 
of the Concordia. The Friday Night Club is composed entirely 
of young ladies; and, taking advantage of their leap year privi- 
leges, Miss Phemy Armer, Miss Bell Armer, Miss Rose Mannheim, 
Miss Lucy Cabn, Miss Sophie Rosenberg and the other mem- 
bers of the Bowling Club organized the theatre party, and invited 
their young gentlemen friends. After the performance an adjourn- 
ment was taken to the residence of Miss Mannheim, where the 
young gentlemen were given a champagne supper. There were 
eleven couples present, and the example promises to be followed 
by other coteries of young ladies. 



Mr. and Mrs. M. Ehrman and family will leave for Europe 
to-morrow. 



Mr. Sanford Feigenbaum leaves for Europe next Thursday. 



Mrs. Brinn and her charming daughters, Miss Ray and Miss 
Tenie, have returned to their home at Sutter Creek, after a long 
visit here. 



Colonel Theodore C. Marceau, accompanied by Mrs. Marceau, will 
depart at an early date for Paris, where this popular and successful 
gentleman intends to interest himself financially. Their stay abroad 
will be of some duration, as they will visit St. Petersburg, Norway, 
Sweden and all places of interest in Europe and Asia. The return 
home will be made via Japan. The Colonel and Mrs. Marceau will 
then remain in San Francisco and Fresno county, as heretofore. 



Among the many pleasant events of New Year's week, was the 
delightful party on New Year's eve, given by Misses Fannie and 
Eleanor Lewis at their mother's residence at Belmont, where they 
entertained a number of their lady and gentleman friends. 

Felix. 



Eveev parent should have their children's eyes examined, beginning 
from 10 to 12 years of age. Often great suffering and injury is relieved by 
C. Muller, refraction specialist. 



S. F. NEWS LETTER 

COMBINATION SUBSCRIPTION LIST FOR 1892. 



Special nt! called to the following 

list of publications, each a leader in its class. 
The concessions are the best ever offered by 

any publisher. Send your subscription direct 
to this office. No order taken for less than one 
year. Terms, cash, with order. The S. F. 
News Letter and any publication in this list 

will be mailed to any address in United States 
or Canada for the Combination Price. Address, 
Publisher S. F. News Letter, 7 Flood Building, 
San Francisco. 

Regular Publisher's Combnt'n 

Price. Price Iloth. Subscrip. 

Century Magazine |4 00 IS 00 $7 00 

The Forum 500 900 7 60 

Harper's Monthly 400 800 650 

Scribner's Magazine 3 00 7 00 6 00 

Harper's Weekly 400 800 6 70 

American Cultivator 2 00 6 00 5 90 

Cultivator aud Country Gent ....300 700 620 

Scientific American (A. A B Edit.) 2 50 6 50 5 50 

Decoratoraud Furnisher 4 00 8 00 6 50 

Army aud Navy Journal 6 00 10 00 8 50 

Blackwood's Magaziuc 300 700 626 

Critic 300 700 6 10 

Nation 200 600 5 25 

Freuud's Music and Drama 4 00 800 700 

Electrical World 3 00 7 00 6 25 

Engineering and Mining Journal ..-.400 8 00 700 

Iron Age 4 50 8 50 7 50 

Clothier and Furnisher 100 500 425 

Harper's Bazar 4 00 8 00 6 70 

Frank Leslie's Weekly . 400 800 6 70 

Good Housekeeping 250 650 5 25 

Judge 4 00 9 00 7 50 

Life 5 00 9 00 7 75 

Puck 5 00 9 00 7 50 

St. Nicholas 300 700 600 

Wide Awake 2 40 6 40 5 50 

Albany Law Journal 500 900 7 75 

Insurance Law Journal 600 900 7 75 

American Medical Digest 200 600 525 

Boston Medical aud Suigical Journal 5 00 9 00 7 75 

Medical Journal 500 900 7 75 

Catholic World 4 00 8 00 6 75 

Christian Union 3 00 700. 600 

Congregationalist 3 00 7 00 6 00 

Jewish Messenger 4 00 8 00 6 75 

Lutheran Observer 2 50 650 550 

Hall's Jourual of Health 100 5 00 4 50 

Popular Science Monthly 5 00 9 00 7 50 

Science 3 50 760 650 

Home Journal (N. Y.) — 2 00 600 500 

Town Topics (N. Y.) 4 00 8 00 6 50 

Truth 400 800 6 50 

American Field 5 00 9 00 7 50 

Forest and Stream, 4 00 8 00 6 50 

Ontiug 3 00 7 00 6 00 

Spirit of the Times 600 900 800 

Cas&ell's Fami'y Magaziue 150 5 50 4 70 

Cassell's Magazine of Art 3 50 7 50 6 80 

Current Literature 3 00 7 00 5 90 

Clipper.N.Y 4 00 7 00 6 70 

Dramatic Mirror 4 00 8 00 6 70 

Demorest's Family Magazine 3 00 6 00 6 00 

Dramatic Times 4 00 8 00 6 70 

Harper's Young People 2 00 6 00 6 00 

Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly 3 00 7 00 5 90 

Magazine of American History 5 00 9 00 7 50 

Munsey's Weekly 3 00 7 00 5 90 

North American Review 5 00 900 750 

New York Weekly 3 00 7 00 5 75 

Public Opinion 3 00 7 00 5 75 

Photographic Times 5 00 9 00 7 25 

Scientific American 3 00 700 600 

Scientific American Supplement 5 00 9 00 7 50 

Shooting, Fishing 3 00 7 00 6 00 

The Story Teller 150 5 50 4 70 

Texas Sittings 3 50 7 50 6 00 

Turf, Field and Farm 6 00 9 00 7 25 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Bullion Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Bullion Min- 
ing Company will be held at Lhe office of the company, room 21, 331 
Pine street, San Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, the 12th. day of January, 1892, at the hour of 2 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction oi such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Saturday, the 9th day of January, 1892, at 
12 o'clock noon. 

R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 21, 331 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



26 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 



THE CLANCARTY TWINS. 

The British nobility 
And all the gentility 

Were furious at Belle Bilton, 
When her fortune had run low 
And she caught Lord Dunlo, 

And the peerage made full tilt on. 
Old Earl Clancarty 
Would be no party 

To his wild son's mesalliance, 
And fought the singer 
With tooth and finger, 

And died in his vain defiance. 
But Belle is a winner, 
Kept her even tenor, 

And, in spite of the rage of all parties, 
Presents to nobility, 
As proof of fertility, 

A brace of acknowledged Clancartys. 

TENNIS AND BASEBALL. 

THERE is quite a good deal of talk over the coming match 
between Taylor and Tobin, and Bates and Neel, which will, 
in all probability, take place on Saturday, the 16th inst., at the 
Courts of the California Club. The Oaklanders have been making 
good use of their time, and are constantly in practice with Frof. 
.loe Daily. They are different in this respect to their apponents, 
especially Tobin, who seems to give more attention to football. 
Will Taylor has been keeping bis hand in at the Monterey courts, 
and will probably be in good form for the match. There have 
been quite a number of bets made, as both sides are confident of 
victory. Anyhow, it is to be hoped that when the match comes 
off, there will be none of the ilisagreeableness which was so 
noticeable in the game between Yates and Taylor, and Bates and 
Neel. Moreover, we hope the Committee on Arrangements has a 
sufficient number of impartial umpires, who know their duty, 
and who will not remain in the way of the players. 

It ia strange to notice how easily the papers make mistakes in 
the names of players. Several papers printed the report of the 
California's first tournament, and nearly all made the same error, 
saying Yates defeated Will Taylor, instead of A. Taylor. It must 
be rather annoying to the Champion, who was not in the match 
at all. 

The courts at the Hotel del Monte were well patronized, and 
on Saturday some good matches were played. The principle 
feature noticeable, was the fine driving by a Taylor, who beat his 
brother one set by 6—1. Will Taylor beat A. Wilberforce, 6—2, 
6—5; beat A. Taylor, 6—3, and then lost, 6—1. Wilberforce heat 
A. Taylor, 6—0; beat K. Eyre, 6—4; and A. Taylor and A. Wil- 
berforce beat W. Taylor and R. Eyre, 6—4. Eyre is now a 
rapidly-rising young player, who will do very well in the future 
with steady practice, some of his shots being remarkably fine. 

The Alameda County Championship, which was begun some 
time ago, and was adjourned to New Year's Day, had to be post- 
poned till to-day, owing to bad weather. If} the matches are un- 
finished they will not be commenced till the 23d, the finals of the 
League being set for the 16th inst. The committee have de- 
cided not to let the two things clash. 

At this writing the contest for the Pacific coast baseball cham- 
pionship is undetermined. Portland has to win two games and 
San Jose three before the result will be known. These clubs will 
play in San Jose this afternoon and to-morrow, if the weather 
and grounds will permit. The consolidation between the Pacific 
Northwest and California leagues, so far as the managers are con- 
cerned, is practically settled, and a satisfactory schedule has been 
arranged. Everything, however,, depends upon the rates the 
railroad companies will concede. As the schedule provides for 
games being played between Seattle and Los Angeles, the jump 
will be a very long one in traveling between these points. Games 
will be played at Tacoma and Portland on the northern circuit, 
and at San Francisco and San Juse in the southern division. The 
cost of transportation and the living expenses on the trips will 
be very heavy, as the season will last eight months. It is not 
generally known that the managers bear all the expenses of the 
team and players when the club is playing away from home. To 
illustrate— a player of the San Francisco club can leave San 
Francisco with a nickel in his pocket and travel to all the league 
cities and return home with the nickel, unless be wishoa to spend 
it, as he is under no expense for food, steamer or railroad travel. 
It is the same with the umpires. When the home team is away 
from here, gam s will be played here on Saturdays and Sundays by 
the Central league. Oakland would have been in the new league 
had the managers any assurance that that city would support a 
club. The experience of the Ian two seasons shows that Oak- 
land will not do it. The same may be said of Sacramento and 
Stockton. It cost? more money than the public have any idea of 
to conduct and support a first-class club during a season. 

Young Misses suffering from nervous prostration, tendency to hysteria, 
complaiuiue of neuralgic pains of the eyes, cousi.lt free of charge, C Mnl- 
ler, refraction specialist, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush. 



Fall Millinery ! 



I will be pleased to have 
you examine our large stock 
of FALL MILLINERY. 

I will convince you that 
you will save at least 25 per 
cent by purchasing your 
Millinery from the direct 
importer. 

P. F. BUTLER, 

808 Market Street, Phelan Building. 




Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented, 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the Use of the 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER I 

.Over 300 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

I Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 



Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing 

330 Pine street, Ban Francisco, Cal. 



CO., 



Artistic Hair Dressing 
G V\0\ BEAUTIFYING PARLORS, 

\*^ \j \j\ ^J 106 Elli* St., near I'owell, 



Sf^*^^^^^^^^^^^ \ IMPORTERS OF 

^^^^t^^T ™ Human Hair and Parisian Novelties, 

Toilet Accessories. Cosmetics, Etc., Etc. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

Ji. QUIET H O JUL IE 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 



RECAMIER 
BAZAAR, 

930 Market Street, 

(Baldwin Aunex.) 



1 Medici's Complexion Creme, 
Siempre Viva, 

1 And all the Choicest and Best Toilet 
Requisites. 

> HAIR DRESSING and MANICURING 



Systems—" Slattery " Induction; " Wood " Arc. Factories— Fort Wayne, 
Indiana: Brooklyn, New York. 

Electric Improvement Company. 

General Agents for California, Nevada, Oregon, Arizona and Washington 
of the Fort Wayne Electric i.fcrlii «'o , Fort Wayne, Iiul 

Estimates furnished for Electric Kailways, Eluetric Light and Steam 
Plants, House Wiring, etc. Murine Work a Specialty. 



35 New Montgomery Stre et, San Francisc. 




oltoti 




l]30 Bine ft 

Js»&n lifraricisco 



hotoferavra 




Jan. ' 



s.W PR VNCISCO NEWS LETTER 



SAU FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE 001HHUE BROaonauGE ROUTE" 
rOMJCK' «n.i 

unlit f'ir.:i. - ixm an.l i' 

lemrr from and imvc at ihr 3au 
•enior D«pol, MARKET STREET WHARF •> 
», 
Freai San Francisco for Point TIburon 9eKtd>rt and 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DATS— 1 l" i « . 1 ■ a 10 . a 

3 .«0r. «.,.s<» r «., I .ii r. x. 
8*Tl"RI>AVS ONLY— An ealra Irfn v 

8["M'AY.->-^-u> A.M..9J0 A.M.. llflOA.K .'OOr.M. 
»«r. «., I 1- p. «. 

From San Rafael lor San Francisco. 
WEEK I X., »:30 A M. I 

12 is r.M., I n r n., 6*6 p.m. 

BATCRDAYd ONLY— An i-xlra trip >l 6:30 r.M. 
ol M'AYS— 8:10 A.M.. 9:*0 A.M.. IJ 15 I X 
6:00 k M..6:2S p. M. 

rrom Point Tiburon to San Francisco. 
WF.EK DAY3-6iO a.m.. S:20 A.M., 9:56 a.*.; 1:10 
r. H.. 4:05 p. M.. 5::0 p. M. 
daturdav? onlv au extra trip at 6:55 p m 
SIN DA Yd — 6:35 a.m., 10.O6 a.m.. 12.4J P.M., 
106 p.m.. 5:30 P.M., 6:50 p.m. 



Leaves. F. 



AEE1VK IN S. F. 



Days. 



Sundays 



Destination.: 



ISundaybl 



Week 
Days. 



7:40a.m. SOOa.m. Petaluma 
3:30p.m. 9:30 am and 

6:00 p. m 5:00pm Santa Rosa. 



Fulton 

Windsor, 

7:40a.m. ... Healdsburg, 

3:30p.m. 8:00a.m. LittoD Spring. 

Cloverdale A 

Way Station;- 



7:40a.m. 8:00a.m. J^ffial ' 



10:40a.* 8:50a. M. 
6:06 P.M 10:30a. M 
7:25p.m,6:1Qp.m. 



7:40 a.m. 9:00a. 
3:30 p. M 



jGuerneville. 7:25p.m. 10:30a.m. 
6:10 p. M 



10:30a. V 
6:10 p.M 



7:40a. M. 8:00a.m. Sonoma aud 10:40a.m. 18:50a. M. 
5:C0p.m. 5:00p.m Glen Ellen. 6-.05P.M 6:]0p.m. 



7:40 a.m I 8:00 am | Sebastopol | 10:40a. m | 10:30am 
3:30 P.M (5:00 P.M • | 6.05 p. m | 6:10 p.M 

Stages connect at Santa Rosa lor Mark West 
Springs : a t Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Pniut Arena: at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, KelsSyville, Soda Bay; at Hopland 
for Lakeport ; at Ukiah for Vichy Springe, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Lakeport, 
W ■ illits, Cahto, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, West- 
port, Usal, Hvdesville and Eureka. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days— To Petaluma, $1 50; to Santa Rosa, ?2 25: to 
Healdsburg, $3 40: to Cloverdale, R50; to Hop- 
land, $5.70; to Ukiah, $6.75: to Seba^topol, $2.70; 
to Guerneville, $3.75; to Sonoma, $1.50; to Glen 
Ellen, $1.80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only- 
To Petaluma, $1 ; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to HealdB- 
burg, $2.25: to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, $4,50; to 
Hopland, $3.80: to Sebastopol, $1.80; to Guerne- 
ville, $2.50: to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1.20. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New Montgomery Stree t. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Compauy will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers CITY OF PUEBLA, WALLA 
WALLA and UMATILLA, direct for VICTORIA, 
B. C, and PUGET SOUND ports, at 9 a. m. every 
five days. 

The steamers sailing for Puget Sound ports at 
9 a. m. connect at Port Towuseud with steamers 
or Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
U. P. R'y Co. every four days. 

For SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San Simeon, 
Cayucos, Santa Baebaea, San Buenaventura, 
Hubneme, San Pedro, Los Ange. es and San 
Diego, about every secoud day. 

For EUREKA, ARCATA aud HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, steamer LOS ANGELES, every Wed- 
nesday, at 9 a. M. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

The splendid 3,000-ton steamers of this line, car- 
rying the United states, Hawaiian and Colonial 
Mails, sail from Folsom street Wharf, as under: 

For Honolulu Only, 

S. S. Austealia (3,000 tons) Tuesday Dec. 22, 1891, at 

2 P. M. 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Direct, 

S. S. Monowai Jaauaryll, L892, at 3 P. M» 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 

JOHN D. SPRECKELS & BROS., 
General AgentB 



THE CONFFSSIONALS SECK1 

Tin quest Ion whether a prtaai i* bound 
t<> R ■ In court on tin- ilrength 

of Information tlrrived under the teal nl the 
- '>n.ii. which wu tnswered lately in 
the affirmative by the Judicial •uthorlUai ••{ 
a Norman town, ba* y\*\ been negal I 
the I'ar.N Court «>f Cassation. Tin- i 
a village in the Department «>f the < lalvados. 

dtirinp the trial of a husband who bad Bert 

ou-iy wounded a man whom be believed to 
be on too friendly term;* with his wife, was 
questioned with a view to ascertain whether 
the woman had really furnished the prisoner 
with a reasonable pretext for the assault 
The abbe refu?eii point-blank to throw any 
lipht on the matter, and when urged to do so, 
declared that he could not betray secrets 
which be had teamed in his ecclesiastical 
capacity. He was immediately condemned 
to the payment of a Bne of £4, and appealed 
against this sentence. In reversing the 
judgment, the Court of Cassation, quoting 
from one of the clauses of the 1'enal Code. 
expressed the opinion that ministers of all 
religious denominations recogni'/.ed by the 
State were in duty bound to maintain strict 
silence on the subject of all the revelations 
which might be made to them in the exer- 
cise of their profession. * 

ATOTLET brush is made of two halves 
which are hinged and are detachable, 
one half being the brush and the other half 
the mirror, while in the space between is a 
comb, a tooth brush and a button hook. 



300 Post Sreet. 
Art Novelties and Holiday, Birthday 
and Wedding Presents. 
Oriental Draperies. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 



Through Line to New York, via Panama. 

Steamers will sail at NOON on the 5th, 15th and 

25th of each month. 

DEPARTURES OF | CALL AT 

5th aud 25th I Mazatlan and La Libertad. 

5th, 15th and 25th Acapu co. 

25th. I, Ocos, La Union, [temala. 

5th and 15th Champerico, San Jose de Uua- 

15th | Acajutla, Corinto, Point Arena. 

Through Une Sailings.— January 15th, S. S. City of 
New York; 25th, S.S. SauBiaa; February 5th, "City 
of Sydney." 

Way Line to Mexican and Central American Potts 
and t-anama.— Steamer sails at noon 15th of each 
mouth, calliug at Mazatlau, San Bias, Mauzauillo, 
Acapulco. Port Augel, Saliua Cruz, Tonala, San 
Benito, Ocos, Champerico, Snu Jose de Guatemala, 
Acajutla, La Libertad, la Union, Amapala, Cor- 
into, San Juan del Sur and Punta Arenas. 

Way Line SaMrg.— January 15th, S. S. Acapulco. 

JAPAN AND CHINA UNE FOR YOKOHAMA AND 
HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 
Shanghai, and at Hongkong for liast 
Indies, Straits, etc.: 
City of Rio de Janeiro— Saturday, January 23, 
18t>2, at 3 p. m. 
Chiua— Wednesday, February 17, 1892, at 3 p. m. 
"City of Peking"— Saturday, March 12, 1892, at 
3 P. M. 

Round Trip Tickets to Yokohama aud return at 
reduced rate's. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, corner 
First and Braunan streets. Branch office— 202 
Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC iTBTEII. 

r>*.n« L.««v« and »r« Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

lbave i From December 6. 189?. 
i Ben tela, kunuer, Sacramento 
Haywaraa, Nuea and tfau J 

<"«.. M«r!iiM-*, sau Itnimiii and (,'ai- 



8 uuj 
8:00 i 



i i verano 



■ 



uid Snntrt 1: 

JaeraxntoA Koddlnc, vm, imvin 

It forOgdeli 'in-! Kant, 
aud Ii 10;45 p. 

8:80a. Mllea, Han Jose. tJtocktOQ, lone, 

Sacramento, Marysvllle, Oro- 

vilU- and Red Bhnf 4:46 p. 

9:00a. L<-s AjQgelea Kxprt^s, Fresno, 
bakersfleld, bauta Barbara A 

1 kAgelea I2:ifir. 

12 00m. liayward*, Mies and Llvermore 7:16 t, 

*l:0o p. Sacramento River Steamers "j;ou i\ 

8:00 p. Haywardh, Nlles and Sau JoBe - y;4& a. 

4;0uf. MartLoeSaBan Ramon a Stockton y:4&A. 

4:00 p. Vallejo, Cahsloga, El Vurauoand 

Sauta Ku.sa 9.46 A . 

1:80 p. Beulclft, Vacavllle, Sacramento. 10:4oa. 

4::iop. Woodland and uruvlliu 10:4&a. 

*4:dup. Nile» and Livermore *8:4&a 

5:00p. Sunset Route, Atlantic Express, 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 
Demlug.El Paso, New Orleans 

aud East 8 46 P. 

6:00 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mohave and East 12:15 p, 

6:0Op. Haywards, Niles aud Sau Jose . 7:40a.. 

. ... Nile* and Sau Jose J6:l& p. 

(i:00p. Ogdeu Rou^e Atlantic Express, 

Ogdeu aud East 11:45a, 

I7:00p. Vailejo +8:46 P. 

7:uup. Shasta Route Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 

land, Puget Sound aud East. . . 3:15 a 

Santa Cruz Division. 
S:15a. Newark, CeuterviTle, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 6 20 p. 

*2:15p. Ceuterville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek aud 

SautaCruz *10:50a. 

4 15 p. Centerville, SauJose, Los Gatos, b:&lA 
t11:45p. Huuters' Train to Newark, Al- 

viso, Sau^use aud Los tiatos. J8:05p. 



Coast Division (.Third a id Town send Street s). 
7 :0J a. San Jose, Almaden aud Way Sta- 

tious 2:30p. 

8:30a. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos.Pa- 
jaro.SantaCruz, Monterey, Pa- 
cific Grove, Saliuas, Sau Mi- 
guel, Paso Robles aud Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) 
aud principal Way Stations 6:10 p. 

Lu ; t.7A. San Jose, and Way Statious 5:10 p. 

12:15 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 4-00 p. 

*2 :30p. San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, PacificGrove 
and principal Way Stations. . . .*10:48 A. 
*3:30 p. Menlo Park, San Jo^e aud Prin- 
ciple Way Statious. .. *10:03A. 

*4:15p. Menlo Park and Way Stations.. . *8;06a, 

5 15 p. Sau Jose and Way Stations. 9:03 a, 

6:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. .. 6:36 a. 
j-11:45p. Meulo Park and principal Way 
Stations f7:30p. 



a. xor Moruiug. p. for Afternoon. 
"Sundays excepted. -(-Saturdays only. 
__ ISundays only. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 
Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 P. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer 1391 

Gaelic Saturday, Nov. 28, 12 m. 

BhLGic Saturday, December 19 

Oceanic Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1892. 

Gaelic (via Honolulu). ..Thursday, Feb. 4, 1892. 
^OUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Towusend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, atthe 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San 
Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO. H. RTCIF, Pmffl,. Mmifieer. 

ATLANTIC & PACIFIC R. R. 

(Santa Fe Route) 

Trains Leave au^ Arrive at San Francisco. 
(Market St. Ferry.) 



L've Daily 1 



prom Nuv. 1, 1891. 



500 P M ^ ast exp - via Mojave 
9:00a'.m: AUautic hxpress 

vm Los Angeles 



| Ar ve Daily 



1215 a. m. 
8:45 p. m. 



Ticket Office, 650 Market St., Chronicle Build- 
ing, S. F. W. A. BISSELL, 

General Passenger Agent. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 9, 1892. 




THE English seem to have been very successful of late in the 
Cashmere region against the Hunya Nagaris, who attempted 
to prevent the building of a road from Gilgit to the Pamir district. 
The latest dispatches announce that the hostile tribes have been 
put to flight by the British forces, and that they no longer offer 
resistance to the enterprise. The importance of the victory of 
the British- troops cannot be over-estimated, since the new road 
will secure Great Britain free access to the Pamir region, the 
coveted territory where the interests of three great powers, Eng- 
land, China and Russia meet. The Hunya Nagaris who offered 
resistance' to the progress of the English are friendly to Russia, 
and, no doubt, Colonel Yanoff a.id his Cossacks used their influ- 
ence to incite these people and to misrepresent the intention of 
the British authorities, probably pretending that if the road to 
Chalt was constructed it would lead to the annexation of the 
Hunya territory. 

Lord Lytton's successor as representative of Great Britain at 
Paris is certainly one of the most able statesmen of his country, 
and no better person could have been chosen than the Marquis 
of Dufferin and Ava. Lord Dufferin greatly distinguished him- 
self as Viceroy in India, as well as in his former positions, and 
his great talents, his adaptability and his large experience will 
certainly enable him to represent his government in the most 
successful manner in Paris, where his cultivated taste, his literary 
ability, and also his Irish birth, will gain him, in a very short 
time, the sympathies of the French, who always have received 
in a friendly spirit persons of Celtic origin. 

The national differences existing among the inhabitants of 
Austria-Hungary, instead of disappearing, seem to become greater 
from day to day, and late events in Bohemia show how loosely 
connected are the parts of the Austrian Empire. It would not 
be astonishing, if the next European conflict would produce so 
great a shock to the country that the result will be the disintegra- 
tion of Austria-Hungary. In a speech delivered last month in 
the Austrian Reichsrath, Dr. Gregr, a member of the Young 
Czech party, speaking on the " Appropriation Bill," used expres- 
sions that would hardly be tolerated in any other monarchical 
country. Among other things, he said : " The majority of the 
Czech population of Bohemia is utterly wretched in the midst of 
this alien empire. The bond between the Crown and Bohemia 
will be severed if the traditional rights of Bohemia are scouted 
much longer. The Mannlicber rifle will be of little use in the 
hand of a people without loyalty and without enthusiasm, but 
instead of kindling that enthusiasm for the State by making the 
Bokemian people contented, they are brought to hate — I repeat, 
to hate — this State. And, mark my words, the day of reckoning 
will come." A country where such a spirit of disloyalty prevails 
has little chance of success against a foreign foe, but the Austrian 
Government is responsible for this state of things, since for cen- 
turies it has done nothing to consolidate the Empire, and has 
failed to enforce the adaptation of one official language, without 
which a great country cannot remain united. 

Mr. Gladstone is becoming more radical, not to say anarchistic, 
every day. At present he is preaching to the agricultural laborers 
that they must try to organize, and that the " law of conspiracy " 
ought to be abolished. He has even the courage of making the 
monstrous proposition that "nothing shall be a crime because it 
is done by a combination of men, unless it be in itself an offense 
against the letter and the spirit of the law." Mr. Gladstone has 
missed his vocation. He ought to come to the United States as a 
labor agitator; he would certainly make a good walking delegate. 



TWO pretty school " mams " in a street-car. Says one, " I have 
sent that boy Maginnis to your class-room to have you dis- 
cipline bim." Says the other, " All right, I'll take him in hand." 
A day later, in the school-room. " Did you Hog that wretch 
Maginnis ? " Clever Girl : ' Not I ; wait, dear, until the teachers' 
contest Is over, and then I'll take his hide off." 



REV. CHALMER8 EASTON, though he may be enduring a slight 
attack of la grippe, certainly is not suffering from lack of 
notoriety. He is prominently identified with the Sydney Bell 
case, and his attack on the police Tuesday evening will give bim 
more publicity than if he bad gone on preaching sermons till 
doomsday. 

IF the Timber Trust scheme engineered by J. P. Scupham is not 
more successful than the infamous Quartz Mountain affair 
with which he was connected, his backers here will not have much 
profit for tbeir pains. The English investors had better do a little 
digging for information at Narbonne, in France, before they put 
any money in the new venture. 



NEW RELIGIOUS EDIFICES. 

THE NEWS LETTER presents as a supplement to its readers 
this week, artotypes of four churches erected during 1891, 
which are noteworthy in being representative uf four distinctive 
styles of architecture. All are very handsome edifices and illus- 
trate the progressive spirit of San Francisco as displayed in the 
many ornate structures which have recently been erected in the 
city. The commercial prosperity of a metropolis is in no manner 
better evidenced than by the architectural beauty of its buildings, 
and particularly is this so in reference to religious edifices, for with 
the accumulation of wealth in a community its citizens pay greater 
attention to the beauty and adornment of their places of worship. 
The churches selected are those of four different denominations, 
and surely show that the question of creed is not to be much con- 
sidered when good architectual effect is desired. The Synagogue 
Beth lsnel was constructed from designs drawn by W. Curlett, 
the well-known architect, whose offices are in the Phelan Building 

THE Japanese Silurians who object to the appropriation of 
government funds for the purpose of extending relief to the 
sufferers by the recent great earthquakes, must know something 
of political affairs in this city. The progressive spirit of Japan 
is certainly antagonistic to silurianism, and the sooner that fact 
is impressed upon the opponents of the administration the better 
will it be for the Land of the Rising Sun. 

Participants in amateur theatricals, fancy-dre?s parties, mas- 
querade balls and other entertainments, know how very necessary it 
is that they should procure costumes which shall assist them in ac- 
curately portraying the characters they represent, and shall in all 
respects assist in" the success of any spectacle in which they 
appear. The best place in the city to procure such costumes is at 
Goldstein & Cohn's extensive establishment. The firm, which has 
succeeded Jahn & Foster, has removed to the Scbevra building, at 28 
O'Farrell street. 



TRUSTEE'S NOTICE 

OF 



The undersigned, 
creditors of 



J. C. Maynard, Trustee for the benefit of the 



M. J. FLAVIN & CO., 

Of the City and County of San Francisco, invites sealed proposals 
for the stock of Clothing, Boots, Shoes, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 
Caps, etc., now in his possession and contained in the premises gen- 
erally known as the I X L STORE, Nos. 920-030 Market street. San 
Francisco, as well as for the Fixtures, Showcases and Safe contained 
therein. Separate bids are invited for the entire stock of Merchan- 
dise and for the Fixtures, Showcases and Safe. Bids are invited at a 
percentage of the dollar upon the cost inventory valuation of said stock 
and at a Jump sum for the Fixtures, Showcases and Safe. Inspection 
of inventory and of stock may be had on application to the under- 
signed on tne premises. 

A certified check for 10 per cent, of the amount bid must accom- 
pany each tender. Bids will be received up to and including the 19th 
day of January, 1892, and all bids wilt be opened at the law offices of 
Rothschild cfc Ach, No. 303 California street, San Francisco, on the 
20th day of January, 1892, at 2 o'clock p. m. Bidsshould be directed to 
the undersigned, at the office of Rothschild & Ach. Terms cash. The 
right to reject any and all bids is hereby reserved. 

J. C. MAYNARD, 
Trustee for the benefit of the creditors of M. J. Flavin & Co. 

San Francii-CQ. January 7, 1892. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

The regular animal meeting of stockholders of the Oceanic Steamship 
Compauy will be held at the office of the company, 327 Market street, San 
Fraucisco, California, on 

Thursday, the 21st Day of January, 1892, at the hour ol 11 o'clock A. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year aad the trausactiou of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close ou Friday, January 8th, at 3 p. m. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



S. L. JONES. 



E. D. JONK6. 



S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 

207 AND 200 CALIFOKNIA STREET. 

JOSEPH GILL0TTS STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medals, Paris 1878—1889. 
C^-The6e Pens are " the best in the world." Sole Agent for the United 
3 t ates, MB. H Y. HOE, 91 John St., N. Y. Sold by all Stationers. 



air. 



t *N r«ANoi» 0o 



Bet 



Wumktr 



ER 



California ^dJbjtrttscv. 

OCVOTCO TO THE LEADING MTtfttSTS Of Cal>*ORNiA AND THE PACIFIC GOAST . 

prieior, Kuepkrick 
Marriott. Flo**i Build* ■ Warkrt Streets, San Fran- 

eitco. Annual Si . [Tutted Statt 

Canada, *4; 6 months. $2 50; i month.*, $1 30; /Wi;;i», |6; 
6 month*. f3; 3 mmilV-, $1 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. JANUARY /»'. 1892. 
TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Pagi 
lcadiso articles : 

Items tu Brief 1 
Thf Electric L*ght Wire Ordl- 
iiauce 

Chicago ** » Seaport .: 

A M-ute Carlo iu California 2 

Who i-. tngoto Chlua? 8 
Mayor Sanderson ami a New 

Coflrter - 

■ 1 Jurors. 3 

laa'a Triumph 3 

Our Kxport Trade 

Oar City's Pb\;ical aud Mo al 

ilea'tii " 3 

Distribution of Ability in the 

United States 

Society 4 

Society (continued) . 32 

Tennis and Baseball f> 

God's Love (Poetry) 5 

Over in Oakland C 

Snap Shots (Di Vernon) ... 7 

Pleasure'* > Wand . 8 

Pleasure's Wand (continued) — y 

Our Theatrical Sharps 10 

Koreshan aud I (Poetry) 11 



Paok 
itory Lines to \v. \v. stow 

..U 

u'ter Death n 

Sparks. 12 

A Straight "Cocktail " (Poetry) . 13 

The Looker-Ou 1 1 

ifcer-Oa (coutiuued) 15 

Financial Review ]r, 

Town Crier n 

Real Property is 

He Had '• Kept Bookm " is 

The Bourse aud Underwriter. . ly 

World, Flesh aud Devil 20 

Vanities 21 

Sunbeams 22 

The Rose Jar 23 

Au Ivory Smile (Storv) . . 24-25 
Wells, Fargo A Co.'s Annual Re- 
port .26-27 

" Biz"— Summary of the Markets. 28 
Let Me Believe (Poetry) ... 29 
Told on the Late Watch .30-31 

Virginia City (Poetrv) 31 

Wells, Fargo & Co. ... 31 
Comments on Foreign Affairs 32 



SENATOR CHANDLER charges New England brewers with 
having sold breweries to an English syndicate for $6,300,000 
tbat cost $1,000,000, and were assessed for $500,000. He thinks 
the venders should be behind jail bars as « stupendous felons." 



LOUISIANA is in the throes of a heated State election, which is 
worth watching. It is a question of lottery or no lattery. 
The Democrats have two tickets in the field, while the Repub- 
licans are skillfully trying to make a point by carrying water on 
both shoulders. 

FOREIGN claims upon Chile to the amount of $70,000,000, 
growing out of the civil war, have already been presented, 
and the end is not yet. England demands $50,000,000. Italy 
and Spain $5,000,000, and Germany a sura not mentioned yet, 
besides our own claims which are not yet audited. 



HOW little reliance is to be placed in most of the associated 
press dispatches gotten up for home consumption, is shown 
by the telegraphed statement that Sir George Baden Powell had 
told a correspondent just how far Lord Salisbury wanted to try 
the United States without provoking war on the Behring Sea 
question. It is the veriest bosh, that ought not to deceive a 
school-boy. 

IT ia amazing that a law-abiding, police-regulated city like San 
Francisco should have so few terrors for the societies of 
Chinese highbinders, who are a law unto themselves, sentence 
their countrymen to death, and execute judgment without re- 
gard to American laws. They early acquired a contempt for our 
police, and that is why they show no manner of respect for 
them. 

WHEN the Quebec Government resolved to give a hundred 
acres of public lands to every father who succeeded in rais- 
ing a dozen or more children, it could hardly have been prepared 
for the drain tbat has been made upon its land reserves. Last 
year over one thousand happy fathers came forward duly quali- 
fied, and this year fully an equal number are expected to be added 
to the list. Who shall say that Canada's climate is rrot a healthy 
one? " 

THOMAS LAKE HARRIS, the Santa Rosa seer and socialist 
leader, is receiving a great deal of gratuitous advertising just 
at the present time. The more the matter is stirred up the worse 
it looks for Harris, who seems to be a sort of disciple of the 
Oneida community, and whose notions on many matters, parti- 
cularly those relating to the question of sexuality, are very pecu- 
liar, to say the least. The young woman who has taken upon 
her&elf the labor of exposure, seems sincere, and she is certainly 
zealous and untiring. It might be suggested that a Sonoma 
County Grand Jury could find material for investigation in 
the doings of Harris and his associates, or victims, as the case 
may be. 

- ■ i ■ .i ■ ''- .. ■ 



I pretty wr\\ Bftlli i that at an n. to Up ralM In 

March. R. q \s nttor from 

T*xa», to Oil ■ nstor Kenpnii. When a 

man from I he 8ooih n ■ ^ in nation. 

ftlfUOil safely r* ly upon either keeping hit place or obtain! 0| 



Till: aatunl btnei I ol ol tin- International i 

ol Press Clubs w»* 10 (treat at Sndlt ill ol cltroa 

fruits el tin- Auburn Pair, tbftt some of tbe newspaper men from 
this city could not rctiat the temptation to work In on them the 
old, old story, ol pickli ■ nnowshoes. it wu new to 

the visiting journalists, and <i nances are: that it ha 

to the Bast, vouched f«>r by more than one special correspond- 
ent. 

SPEC! I LTION8 in Eastern papers as to Blaine's Presidential 
intentions are almost endless, and they take on all iorl 
picturesque coloring. There i* a pretty atrong under-current of 

belief, however, that Blaine in delaying the declaration of ins in- 
tention? in order to hopelessly Blde-traob candidates other than 
Harrison. The News Lbttbb concurs In that view, The Demo- 
cratic fight is an open one, but the Republican nominee is not In 
doubt. 



FOUR out of the five highbinders arrested while holding a 
council of war, have been sentenced to aix months' imprison- 
ment, and the fifth paid a line of $2.i0. The charge against them 
was carrying concealed weapons. Perhaps this may be a step in 
the direction of breaking up the Tongs and restoring Chinatown 
to a less belligerent altitude than it now occupies. A small but 
well formed Vigilance Committee would be the most effective 
agency for getting rid of tbe highbinders. 

IT looks very much as though Cleveland's star were still in tbe 
ascendant. Hill may have captured the organization in New 
York, and the defeat of Mills for Speaker may be placed to the 
credit of Tammany, but when the Democratic party meets in 
convention the victory of Cleveland in 1JSM4 will be an argument 
which will be used with much effect. Hill may be a very adroit 
politician, but he baa not tbe hold on tbe affections of the Demo- 
crats of the United States tbat Cleveland still retains. 



THE policy of the present House of Representatives in matters 
of finance, will be in striking contrast to the " Billion-Dollar 
Congress," if Mr. Hoi man of Indiana is allowed to have bis way. 
Mr. Holman proposes to cut down expenditures to the very lowest 
notch, and to make appropriations only for the actual running 
expenses of the Government. The •• Great Objector " should be 
an authority on appropriations, as his long term of service in the 
House has put him in a position to judge between the proper and 
unproper use of the money of the people. 



THE Czar of Russia occupies a very singular position. He has 
declared publicly, on several occasions, that famine does not 
exist in Russia, but at the same time it appears that 65,000,000 
roubles have already been appropriated from tbe imperial treas- 
ury to relieve that which tbe Czar declares does not exist. All 
this money has been expended in feeding tbe starving, and there 
is to be an additional grant of an equal amount for tbe same 
purpose. The Czar would show much more sense by admitting 
the facts and accepting the offers of relief made by other countries. 
It is no time for false pride or silly notions of etiquette when a 
nation is perishing of hunger. 

WE are not out of the woods yet with the Chilean affair. 
While the United States should avoid anything which may 
savor of bullying or jingoism, if it be conclusively shown that 
the attack on the sailors of the Baltimore in the streets of Valpa- 
raiso was a premeditated affair, and not merely a street brawl, as 
the Chileans pretend, our self-respect will force us to demand 
something more than a formal apology. We must insist that 
Chile make due and proper reparation, and that she signify her 
regret for the occurrence by the payment of an indemnity to the 
families of the men who were murdered, and our demand should 
be made so peremptory as to be unmistakable. 



OUR. Eastern exchanges print accounts of the final settlement 
by the Manhattan Bank Directors with Jimmy Hope, the no- 
torious burglar. The last of the bonds stolen, amounting to 
$300,000, hav just been delivered to their rightful owners. This 
makes near!./ $1,500,000 recovered from first to last. The reason 
there has been so much delay in obtaining these last bonds, is 
that they were in the hands of one of Hope's pals, whom he had 
much difficulty in bringing to terms. It is understood that a sum 
in the neighborhood of $100,000 was demanded and ultimately 
paid for this last surrender alone. It can now be seen how right 
the News Letter was in accounting for the milk in the cocoanut 
that k*-pt Jimmy Hope in our City Prison so many months after 
he ought to have been delivered up to the State of New York. 
He never would have been delivered up had he been willing to 
trust our officials to handle the bonds. It will be remembered 
how strenuouj-ly it was denied at the time that there were any 
such bonds. Time invariably verifies the correctness of informa- 
tion appearing in this journal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 



WHO IS TO GO TO CHINA ? 



IT will be remembered that ex-Senator Blair had so set his heart 
upon going as United States Minister to China, that when the 
Peking government refused to receive him as a persona grata, he 
was downcast and refused to be comforted. President Harrison, 
good kind soul that he is, tried to cheer up New Hampshire's 
disconsolate ex-Senator, and did so in a very substantial way. An 
embassy of greater rank and importance was placed at his dis- 
posal. Poor Blair would have none of it: he would either " go 
to Hongkong," or go nowhere, and at that point the matter rested 
for nearly a year. As Congress was about to assemble, and, as 
sufficient time bad elapsed to make it sure that Blair knew his 
own mind, the President began to cast about for a new man to fill 
the China mission. His eyes fell upon Senator Squires, of Wash- 
ington, and it is understood that the appointment was tendered 
to and accepted by him. From his State comes the news that his 
constituents are urging him to hold on to the offer and to go to 
China by all means. The President wanted him, because he had 
taken no part in hostile Chinese legislation and yet was well-up 
in Pacific Coast politics, knows how we feel out here about the 
Chinese, and would be an acceptable Minister to our people gen- 
erally, and, strange to say, the Chinese government wanted him, 
because, when he was Governor, he called out the militia and re- 
quested the presence of United States troops to protect some Chi- 
nese from rioters. But behind all these reasons seems to lie the 
fact that somebody, several somebodies, want the seat of Squires 
in the Senate. It must be confessed that these many causes com- 
bined make out a pretty strong case why Squires should go, and 
a couple of weeks ago that seemed the irrevocable programme. 
But since then there has been another turn of the kaleideoscope, 
and all is changed. Blair, it appears, has some strong missionary 
friends in England and in China, and after considerable diplomacy 
they have succeeded in inducing Li Hung Chang to believe that 
Blair is, after all, a lover of the Chinaman, and, as such, worthy to 
be received and treated nicely as United States Minister. As a con- 
sequence the Chinese government has suddenly made known to 
the authorities at Washington its withdrawal of all objections to 
Blair, who, it will be remembered, was duly appointed by the 
President, confirmed by the Senate, and was on his way to Peking, 
with his commission in his pocket, when the news came that he 
would not be received in China. That edict has been withdrawn ; 
he now clains the office as his of right, and his friends in the Sen- 
ate say that nobody else can be confirmed who deprives him of 
it. This again makes the outlook blue for Squires. The question 
recurs: Who will go to China? 



MAYOR SANDERSON AND A NEW CHARTER. 

HAS Mayor Sanderson the courage of his convictions ? We do 
not believe there is a doubt about it, and in that case, a very 
plain path of duty lies straight before him, which he cannot too 
soon enter upon and pursue to the end. He himself marked it 
out. Being interviewed by a morning contemporary at the 
beginning of the new year, he said San Francisco's greatest need 
at this time was a new charter. He forcibly pointed out how 
completely the city had outgrown the thing of patches and 
shreds known as the Consolidated Act, and how impossible it was 
for the municipality to cure evils under its present limited grant 
of powers as interpreted by successive Supreme Courts. In all 
of which the News Letter perfectly agrees with Mayor Sander- 
son. Horace Hawe's act, originally a sufficient, simple and safe 
enactment, has been changed beyond recognition. Almost every 
Legislature we have had for twenty years past has made addi- 
tions to it, and the worst of it is, that those additions were almost 
invariably designed, promoted and passed by people who had 
axes to grind. That is how we came, for instance, by a system 
of police and other pensions, that will, in a few years, become 
an intolerable burden. The process of adding and amending has 
grown apace during recent years, and each successive Legislature 
carries the bad practice further than the previous one. We should 
adopt a new charter if only to render it more difficult for the 
boodlers of Sacramento to interfere with home rule in this muni- 
cipality. We think the most intelligent citizens are agreed 
on that point. The whole subject matter has been well threshed 
over, and is ripe for settlement. Then why not settle it V The 
authorative answer to that question lies more with Mayor Sander- 
son than with any other man in this community. The power of 
initiative is with him. A call for an election of fifteen freeholders 
to frame a charter is the initial step, and is within the control of 
the Mayor. This brings us back to the question with which this 
article begins: Has Mayor Sanderson the courage of bis convic- 
tions ? If he has, nothing stands in the way of bis going ahead 
and giving them effect. We are very sure he wields the neces- 
sary influence with the Supervisors and Board of Election Com- 
missioners to command their hearty cooperation. It takes the 
best part of a year to go through the preliminaries necessary to 
the ratification of a charter, so that it is not too soon to begin 
now, if the instrument is to be ready for submission at the next 
session of the Legislature. 



THE ELECTRIC LIGHT WIRE ORDINANCE. 

THE announcement of the Chief of the Fire Department that 
be was about to enforce the city ordinance prohibiting the 
placing of electric light wires upon house-tops, has caused con- 
siderable unfavorable comment in circles best qualified to know 
of the safeties or dangers of house-top construction. The insur- 
ance companies are at variance with the municipal powers as to 
the matter, which fact is fully shown by the further one that the 
Electric Improvement Company possesses the full confidence of 
the underwriters. This company seems to be the object of the 
attack of the municipal authorities, for were this ordinance in- 
forced the company would be compelled to go out of business. 
That their method of laying wire is a good one is shown by the 
statements of the electrical expert of the Pacific Insurance 
Union, who, in an able paper, read before that body 
recently said that he had "often thought that a first-class system 
of house-top construction would be far safer and far more satis- 
factory than distributing circuits of pole lines. I cannot but feel 
that proper house-top construction has a legitimate field for use- 
fulness." He also says that if all electric light wires were placed 
on substantial frames, firmly secured to tire-walls, and so con- 
structed as to maintain all wires at least ten feet above flat roofs, 
and if all telegraph and telephone wires were placed on similar 
structures, entirely separate and apart from the electric light 
racks, then crossed circuits would occur with less frequency, the 
streets would be free from poles, and firemen would not be ham- 
pered by wires every time they endeavored to raise a ladder to a 
burning building. The Electric Improvement Company has all its 
wires upon house-top constructions at least ten feet above roofs, as 
approved by the expert. This is the system enforced by city ordi- 
nance in Boston, where no poles are allowed in the business por- 
tion of the city, all the wires being on house-top constructions. 
Not only, therefore, does this company lay their wires in the 
manner approved by the highest authorities, but they also give 
the people the benefit of very low rates, their prices for both gas 
and electric lights being exceedingly low. Their position is a very 
strong one. They follow the best methods and give satisfaction 
to the people, and therefore should not be interfered with to 
satisfy rival corporations. 

CHICAGO AS A SEAPORT. 



CHICAGO is nothing if not ambitious. She now aspires to rival 
New York as a seaport. Fact! " A deep water Congress" 
was held the other day at Detroit, at which Chicago made an 
elaborate showing of how easily great ocean going steamers could 
be enabled to come up to her wharves and grain elevators, and 
take freight and passengers through the lakes and waterways to 
the Atlantic. She proposes a 26-feet channel from Duluth to 
Lake Erie, to cost $3,500,000, and another channel from there to 
the sea at a cost not stated. It was argued that the West is 
bound eventually to have maritime communication with the 
ocean, and that, of course, means that Chicago is to be a great in- 
land seaport, as it were. The important questions were discussed: 
"Shall the old Erie Canal be reconstructed so that Chicago may 
become a seaport?" "Shall an outlet be sought by way of the 
St. Lawrence, uniting Canadian and American interests?" These 
problems are engaging serious attention at Buffalo and other 
points along the route. The proposed schemes are declared to be 
quite practicable, and are only questions of so much money. If 
that be true, Chicago will sooner or later conquer what she be- 
lieves to be her manifest destiny. New York when surprised 
when the Young Giant by the Lake carried the World's Fair 
from her She will be much more astonished to wake some fine 
morning and find Chicago a seaport. It would be an immense 
thing to bring great ocean carriers right into the heart of the con- 
tinent. Among other things, it would cheapen through freights 
to San Francisco. 

A MONTE CARLO IN CALIFORNIA. 



IS the beautiful island of Santa Catalina, which is capable of 
being made the most healthful sea-side resort on our coast, to 
be turned into a Monte Carlo, or place of outlawry, where 
gambling on a grand and attractive scale is not only to be toler- 
ated, but to be fostered and encouraged by all that money can do 
for it ? Nearly a year ago there were rumors on the streets to 
that effect, but they soon died away, and it seemed that 
either there was nothing in the project, or that it had been 
abandoned. This week, however, the press dispatches from 
the East inform us that the proposal has taken on form and 
shape, and is in a fair way to be carried out. It is stated 
that a company has been formed, stock allotted, and capital 
paid up. The island is United States territory, and within the 
boundaries of the State of California. How the incorporators 
propose to get around the laws of the State against gambling, 
does not appear, but with such legislators as we have had in the 
past, and are likely to have in the future, that is not a matter of 
any very serious difficulty. The project would be bitterly fought 
by our best people, who would grieve to have the fair fame of 
California smirched by the toleration of such an institution. 



Jan. 



FR \\. [Si NEWS I ETTER. 



SECURING GOOD JURORS 



Till way lo *c« - >c legal way. The opt ati«m 

has jual been K'"»nc uir-i i^'i in | ' the 

whole people, and leaves nothing »•» be desired in that direction. 
If the 144 names now in the _ reteol h on eat, In- 

lent cfttxens, ibere are none such in California. Bach Superior 
Judge selected twelve names, and was not afraid to take the re- 
■ bllltj ol bis acts. Accordingly, the whole !>>i appears in 
Ibe dailies, and will bear the closest examination. As none but 
good names are now in the box, it is certain that no bad oni 

■ it. Very careful design has been displayed in bringing to- 
gether 9 ° strong *" array of good jurj material. Now design very 
properly ceases, and chance determines which particular nineteen 
out ol the total of 144 names shall constitute the next Grand Jury, 
ling Judges will, of course, very carefully see to it that no 
ballots bearing any sort of distinguishing mark are allowed to be 
used, although if they were, what good that would do boodlera, 
now that there are no suspicious names on any of the ballot 
papers, does not appear. However, as the law intends that the 
drawings shall be Mrictly matters of chance, presiding judges will 
doubtless hereafter take care that no occasion for scandal shall 
arise on that score. Well, that is the wayand the only legal way 
in which we come by Grand J urie?. Who sball say, now that the 
worked up excitement of the hour has passed away, that it is not 
an infinitely better and safer way than to delegate the power to 
one obscure individual to go into the highways and by-ways and 
call his associates, soreheads every one, lo join in a feast of po- 
litical revenge? We have happily escaped a most dangerous pre- 
cedent, got back to real methods, and that is well. Henceforth 
let the dailies continue to publish (as they might always have 
done) tbe names selected by each Superior Judge, and let the pub- 
lic maintain a scrutinizing eye upon the lists so published. It is 
noticeable that Judge Wallace did not include in his twelve se- 
lections the name of any one of the men who were recently the 
choice of bis Elisor. If they were all that was at one time claimed, 
he should have stood by every man of them. But, doubtless, 
that final report disgusted him. He is too well-freighted with 
common sense, and has too keen an appreciation of the ridiculous 
to render himself responsible for men who could attach their sig- 
natures to such a document. His retreat, however pusillanimous, 
was a fortunate escape from weaklings he could not afford to 
stand by. Now that we have an unexceptionable jury list, it is to 
be hoped that excuses will not be made, and that they will not be 
accepted if they are. 

DISTRIBUTION OF ABILITY IN THE UNITED STATES. 



AMIDST the conflict of nationalities in the United States which 
best holds its own? Which race and which country has sup- 
plied the most brains, stamina, nerve and fiber in developing and 
building up this great country of ours? These interesting ques- 
tions are raised in a remarkable article which appeared in the 
Century for September, and has since been widely quoted and dis- 
cussed, both at home and abroad. In it Henry Cabot Lodge 
undertakes to find a basis upon which these inquiries may be 
answered with a reasonable approximation to accuracy. His 
method is to accept as the aggregate of ability the names men- 
tioned in Applcton's Encyclopedia of American Biography, over four- 
teen thousand in number, and arrange and classify the same 
according to race and according to birth-place as to States and 
groups of States. These fourteen thousand persons include all 
not immigrants, who " by their ability have raised themselves 
even slightly above tbe general level. It ia not, of course, an ab- 
solutely perfect standard of comparison, but it would be difficult 
to suggest where to lay our hands on a fairer one. The first table 
shows the classification of these persons by race, from which it 
appears that 10,376 were of English extraction, 1,439 of Scotch- 
Irish, 436 Scotch, 159 Welsh, 109 Irish, 659 German, 336 Dutch, 
85 French, 589 Huguenot, 31 Scandinavians, 7 Spanish, 7 Italians 
and 5 Swiaa. These figures are worth comparing together and tell 
their own story. It ia furthermore curious to know that of the 
23 Presidents the United States has had, 18 were of English ex- 
traction, 3 of Scotch-Irish, 1 of Welsh, and 1 of Dutch. Two 
States, Massachusetts and New York, have furnished more than 
a third of the ability of the entire country, whilst Virginia is in 
the lead in the matter of the production of statesmen. Mr. Lodge 
concludes: "The race table shows the enormous preponderance 
of the English in the up-building of the United States, and if we 
add to the English the people who came from other parts of the 
United Kingdom, that predominance becomes overwhelming. The 
same table shows, also, what 1 think ia the most important result 
of the whole inquiry, that the people who have succeeded in the 
United States and produced the ability of the country, are those 
who become most quickly and most thoroughly Americans. This 
is a moral of wide application and carries a lesson which will 
never be forgotten." This brief reference to a highly intereating 
subject ahould aerve to whet the appetite of the reader for a cloaer 
acquaintance with the article to which it refers. 

IT ia to be hoped the police will keep up their raid upon the drug 
stores that sell morphine to fiends without a physician's pre- 
scription. It is a bad business that ought to be rendered odious. 



: \N s TKITMPH. 

WoaU tht 

United - ■ ■■■< i personal •• triumph," bat most rt 

lag men Will think that there n U too moot) humiliation mi , 
to it to render it a- mi a triumph a* the nation at large 

wonld hare liked It to have been, it li limply discredit! 
Ohio that her legislator* oa, nroald have pushed John 

Bharmin to the wait, In order to make way for Poraker, v. 
conduct in the gubernatorial chair \om the Bute to blfl party four 
year* a*o. u i s an open Moral thai if to. a whole power ol the 
Administration had nol been brought to bear, and that if the 
pressure from New York and other money centers bud bean less 
than it was, the veteran Senator and statesman was « beaten 
man. Even with those aids he had to leave his official duties at 
Washington, go to Columbus, keep open house, button-hole 
legislators, make bargains and dickers he doubtless would gladly 
have b^en spared, and. in general terms, was compelled to descend 
into the filthy pool of politics and engage in a rough-and-tumble 
tight to retain a position that ought not to have been seriously 
disputed. If ever a Senator bud earned the right to an easy re- 
turn to a place of distinguished public usefulness. John Stienn in 
was that Senator. If ever a State owed a debt of gratitude lo a 
public man, Ohio owed one to the representative who had for 
forty-four long and trying years done her honor in the halls of 
national legislation. Besides, both the nation and his party bad 
special need of the peculiar experience of Sherman at this period. 
His power as a debitor, and his skill as a manager of the Senate, 
gave us the present silver law as a foil to the larger and more 
dangerous proposition of free and unlimited coinage. His pres- 
ence in the Senate is abiiit the best guarantee we have that there 
will be no alarming financial legislation. 

OUR EXPORT TRADE. 

THE United States increased it-* exports last year, but not to 
Sjuth America, where, despite the Fan-American Congress and 
reciprocity talk, there was a considerable falling off in the amount 
of sales we effected. Of course, the troubles in Argentina, Brazil 
and Chile had something to do with this bad showing. The 
figures of our total exports for the last two fiscal years are given 
by the Bureau of Statistics as follows: 

1890. 1891 

Europe ?G77,284,3»5 $697,614,106 

British North America 38,544,454 43 813.54J 

South America 37,745,002 37.34..515 

Abiaaod Oceanica 35,920,152 88,41fi,l78 

West ladies 32,183,071 33,226,401 

Mexico, Ceutral America aad British Honlura*. IS 118 J47 21,236,545 

Africa 4,590,127 4,738,8*7 

All other 906,810 879,172 

Total. ...7$84i,293,828 $872,270,233 

Though reciprocity treaties were in force with two or three of 
the South American countries during the latter months of the 
year, their purchases from us continued to fall off, but of course 
it is too early yet to predict anything like failure from the re- 
cently negotiated arrangements. It happens, singularly enough, 
that the countries with which we do not seek to specially en- 
courage trade have been doing exceptionally woll by us. It 
should be noted that the country to the north of us has been a 
better customer of ours than all of South America, taking five 
per cent, of our total exports to the tatter's four per cent., whilst 
Europe takes no less than eighty per cent. Our large exports of 
food products will make the showing still better this year. 

OUR CITY'S PHYSICAL AND MORAL HEALTH. 

THE vital, criminal and other statistics of our city's condition 
during the past year are not as comforting to contemplate as 
they might be. An alarming increase was recorded in the mortu- 
ary rate, the deaths in the city being 6,875 for 1891, as against 
6,i48 for 1890, an increase of 727. During the last month of De- 
cember the deaths numbered exactly 800, arising largely from 
diseases entirely preventible. Until the rain of last week came, 
our sewers were in a frightfully congested condition, and no 
doubt had a large share in the increased death rate. These figures, 
which speak louder than words, ought to arouse public opinion to 
the necessity of better sanitation, or we may well despair that 
anything will. During the year 1891 there were 35 murders com- 
mitted in San Francisco, but nobody was hanged, and if any 
homicide's neck is in serious danger we are unacquainted with 
the fact. In addition to these successful murders, 88 persona 
were arrested for assault to murder, 275 for assault with a deadly 
weapon, 1,625 for disturbing the peace, and 745 for battery. 
Truly we are a bellicose people. There were no fewer than 98 
suicides and 319 insane commitments; 770 suits for divorce were 
commenced. Of the 1,204 male prisoners in San Quentin, 425 are 
under 25 years of age, many of them being as young as 16 years, 
and, of course, these do not include the boys in the Industrial 
School and the House of Correction. The number of places within 
the city limits at which intoxicants may be bought is put at 
4,223. The census gives San Francisco a total population of 
300,000. These are lamentable figures that ought to make an im- 
pression on every good citizen. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 




THE event of the present week has been the coming of the Press 
League, and everything possible has been done to ensure our 
guests baving a pleasant visit hereabouts. Even the clerk of the 
weather gave them a royal welcome, in providing one of our 
ruost beautiful days for their first, experience of winter in San 
Francisco. If we could only show them an uninterrupted series 
of them, there would be actually nothing to regret. 

The hat poudri was, as every one expected it would be, a brilliant 
affair. How could it have been otherwise, with such concomi- 
tants for success as a large and fashionable attendance, good 
music, wine supper, pretty women and brave men? Odd Fellows' 
Hall was elaborately decorated for the occasion, the prevailing 
colors being pink and blue; while a profusion of Japanese lan- 
terns, umbrellas and Pullman car bead-lights served to vary the 
green foliage and streamers. Powdered hair was the rule, but it 
must be acknowledged the effect of whitening the locks was more 
becoming to the women than the men. In the latter case, being 
combined with the dress-coat of the Nineteenth Century, made 
the men seem prematurely aged, while the ladies, in a majority 
of cases, donned a robe of a period to suit the powder. The ball- 
room was a charming scene during the Hashing of different col- 
ored calcium lights upon the dancers. Miss Hager, who led the 
cotillion, is to be congratulated upon the success of the evening. 

The tea given by Mrs. Charles A. Belden last Saturday after- 
noon, was largely attended. The house was charmingly decorated 
with a profusion of eucalyptus bougis and olive branches, roses 
and violets, and presented one of the tnost attractive interiors 
seen this season. During the hours of the reception the parlors 
were thronged; orchestral music and light refreshments were par- 
taken of. The guest of honor, Mrs. Williams, received with Mrs. 
Belden, who was assisted in her duties by Miss Lucy Upson, of 
Sacramento, and several other very pretty young ladies. Mrs. 
Williams left for her home in Washington City on Tuesday last. 

The tea given at the residence of Mrs. C. L. Ashe, the same 
afternoon {Saturday), was almost entirely composed of her 
daughter's young lady friends, but was none the less pleasant on 
that account. 

The Century Club gave a reception at their rooms on| Wednes- 
day last, in honor of Miss Susan Hall, who is at present visiting 
Sau Francisco for -a few weeks. 



Theatre parties appear to be rivaling in favor and number the 
teas, which have so far constituted so large a proportion of the 
season's dissipation. Judah, at the California, and the Carleton 
Opera Company, at the Baldwin, were favored with several last 
one, and Mr, Wilkinson's Widows has been equally so during the 
present one. Suppers have in every instance followed the per- 
formance, and they have all been pronounced " delightful." 

Among the entertainments of the near future are the Jarboe 
tea, the dance at the Pleasanton on the 26th, the Parrott ball and 
the Friday Night Cotillion on the 22d. Probably the one that is 
arousing the most interest is the fortieth anniversary reception 
and ball of California Comniandery, No. 1, Knights Templar, 
which will be given on the 28th, at Odd Fellows' Hall. The list 
of names of the several committees gives assurance that it will be 
one of the most brilliant entertainments of the kind ever given 
on the Pacific Slope. The army and navy german, which wirl be 
the last of the season's Friday night cotillions, will be under the 
leadership of Lieut. Cotton, and it remains to be seen whether he 
or Miss Hager will be entitled to first honors. 

All the enjoyment of this month is not, it seems, to be monopo- 
lized by the grown-up folks, as a children's international costume 
ball will be given at the San Francisco Verein rooms on Saturday 
evening, the 30th inst., which promises to be not only an inter- 
esting event, but. an unusually pretty sight. The hours will be 
from seven till eleven, after which time the children of a larger 
growth will be allowed to dance until as late an hour as they care 
to keep it up, and an elaborate supper will be served to both sets 
of guests. 

Miss Catherwood's wedding day has been named, and the pro- 
gramme announced is that the ceremony will take place at St. 
Mary's Cathedral, on Thursday, the 4th of February, when a 
nuptial mass will be sung, and Archbishop Reardon pronounce the 
blessing. Then will follow a wedding breakfast at the home of 
the bride's mother, Mrs. Catherwoud,on Pacific avenue, and later 
in the day a general reception will be held. The groom, Mr. 
Ernest La Montagne, his sister and brother, who will officiate as 
maid-of-honor and best man, respectively, are expected to arrive 
in about ten days, and possibly several intimate friends of the La 
Montagne family will accompany them in their special car. 

St. Luke's Church was the locale of a marriage last Monday, 
when one of our war veterans, Col. W. C. Parnell, was married 



to Mrs. Hattie Faull, widow of the junior member of the firm of 
Merry, Faull & Co., Rev. Mr. Davis officiating. It was a very 
quiet wedding party, only a few friends witnessing the ceremony, 
the gallant Colonel and his fair bride leaving directly after it for a 
trip to the southern counties. Col. rarnell is a veteran of not 
only our own late war, but of the Crimean war also, having been 
one of the riders in the celebrated charge of the Six Hundred at 
Balaclava. 



The marriage of Miss Gertrude Ames to her cousin, Mr. Wood, 
of Boston, which was to have taken place in the near future, has 
been indefinitely postponed. 



The reception day of Mrs. Milton S. Eisner, who has recently 
moved to 1800 Pierce street, will be the second and fourth Thurs- 
days of the month. 

Mrs. Torbert has returned from her visit East, accompanied by 
her daughters, who will remain in Ban Francisco all winter. Her 
sister, Mrs. John F. Swift, who went East recently, is at present 
in Washington City. 

Mrs. Grace Porter Campobello is visiting her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. David Porter, on California street, and will not probably re- 
join her husband, in Memphis, Tenn., until some time in the 
spring. Miss Sperry is the guest of Mrs. Will Crocker's this week. 

Mrs. Judge Boalt, who has been so seriously ill, at the Palace 
Hotel, is now slowly convalescing. Other sufferers of la grippe, 
Mrs. Webster Jones, Mrs. W. S. Hobart, Mrs. M. D. Boruck and 
Judge Burnett, are all on the road to recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Fisher returned on Wednesday from their 
honeymoon trip down South, and are domiciled at the Palace 
Hotel. Mrs. L. C. Redington and her son, Mr. Henry Redington, 
are also at the Palace Hotel for the rest of the winter. Mr. and 
Mrs. H. B. Chase will arrive in town next week for the balance 
of the season. The Misses Goad have been among their recent 
guests at their country home in Napa, Stags Leap. Miss Frank, 
who has been visiting her brother and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. F. 
A. Frank, for several weeks, has returned to her home in Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Mrs. and Miss Flood, Major and Mrs. J. L. Rathbone are with 
us once more, " tired of the snow, the cold, and the slushy streets " 
of Gotham. 



Col., Mrs. and Miss iyre are expected to return from their visit 
to New York within the next two weeks. Other returns include 
Col. Chas. F. Hanlon and Messrs. Burginand McGlynn from their 
legal visit East. 

Mrs. Frances Edgerton, who leaves for a visit to friends in 
Boston and other Eastern cities, will make an extended visit to 
the Atlantic Coast. Col. Fred Crocker has already departed East- 
ward, via Arizona, and Mr. Will Babcock, who -follows suit, 
intends making a visit of some duration the other side of the 
continent before returning to California. 

Those inveterate globe-trotters, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gillig, are 
about to leave on another trip to Japan and China, and will 
probably make a complete circuit of the world before returning 
to their apartments in New York for a brief rest, ere starting off 
again in some other direction. It is rumored that a trip to the 
North Pole is in contemplation by this restless couple of wand- 
erers. 



Mrs. Edith Coleman and her sister, Miss Lena Blanding, will, 
by their physician's advice, spend February and a part of March 
in the mild air of Santa liarbara. 

Mr. R. Porter-Ashe and Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Wise were in 
New York the early part of this week, as were also Mrs. Samuel 
Blair and son, W. S. Blair, at the Fifth Avenue Hotel. 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rollo Peters sailed from New York last 
wtek for Europe. 

A very enjoyable engagement party was that given at the resi- 
dence of the parents of Miss Annie Euphrat, 2408 Pine street, 
last Sunday evening. Miss Euphrat is engaged to Mr. B Nathan, 
a prosperous young merchant, who is about to make his 
residence in this city. Quite a number of the young lady's friends 
assembled, and their congratulations were heartfelt and sincere. 
Amid dancing, singing and speech-making, a pleasant evening 
was spent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Moses Heller, Jr., have returned from their 
honeymoon, and are domiciled at the residence of the bride's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. N. Walter, corner of Sacramento street 
and Van Ness avenue. Mr. and Mrs. Heller will receive their 
friends next Wednesday evening. For the present they will re- 
side at the New California Hotel. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mose Gunst leave for Cuba, via New York and 
Florida, Sunday a week. They expect to be gone about two 
months. 

[Continued on Page 32.] 






SAN V\X VXCISCO NEWS I ETTKR 



TENNIS AND BASEBALL. 

SIHCB lhe Irtffue jramr between T»Tlnr and Yale*, unci BatU 
am! Nwl, Iherr h»- been * .■ ■ I <lra| ol »nlir»K to the ptptn, 
and dboocstoo about thr point f\vtn a» a -lei" by Ull It n tam to. 
Bowvtct, it Ncmi to n» io b* ol no pirat difficulty in answrrinn 

it. and. moreover, in saying that the writer in the Pacific FUtd 

is quite in the w run ft W« hold that the bnslneu of a 

Bowman la doI to give any decli »n oatalda "f whether a ball Is 

a fault. Io or -"it. or to • fool fault " a player, and the linesman 
in the league match ought to have known his bualneaa better than 
to let the player force him Into giving an answer which. Orally 
ought to have come from the referee, and, secondly, was entirely 
wrong, iiranted that rule 2 says a lineman shall stand opposite 
the service line and then drop down to the base line, etc. This 
rale was probably made when umpires were scarce, and is hardly 
recognized now, when there are so many who would readily 
volunteer to act as linesmen. In all championship matches East 
and abroad there are seven linesmen, one scorer and a referee, 
and. moreover, these linesmen are permanent fixtures, provided 
with seats, some five yards away from the court, where they can- 
nut interfere with the players, and are particularly asked not to 
move during the set. The idea of our learned friend in referring 
to rule 21. and saying, •* As the ball hit the linesman and pre- 
vented Neel from getting it, the linesman very properly called it 
a * let,' " is very funny, as the linesman " very properly " was in 
the wrong, and even our friend knows that, yet he calls it proper. 
We should not be surprised if this same gentleman should try to 
make rules for tennis to suit every emergency which may arise, 
owing to the mistakes players make, before beginning a match, 
in not seeing that everything is as it should be, in a first-class 
competition. It seems to us, however, that it was a great pity 
that the committee did not appoint enough umpires for this 
match, as it would have saved a great deal of talk and disagree- 
ableness, and it is to be hoped that they will see fit to appoint 
enongb for to-day's match. 

One discussion leads to another. The question now is, " how 
wide should the base line be?" This seems a trivial question, but 
in reality it is an important one, for in the matter of " foot fault- 
ing " the width of the line is a very great factor. The rule tells 
one that one foot must be behind the line and the other on it, but 
supposing the line is a thin one, it would be very easy to " foot- 
fault." The base line at Wimbledon last year, during the cham- 
pionship, was fully three inches wide, and if this turns out to be 
the case, that three inches is allowable, it would benefit some 
players very materially. We would be glad to bear from any one 
who is thoroughly conversant with the right sizes. 

The Alameda County championship was continued last Satur- 
day, and remained unfinished. The final matches will be played 
next Saturday. C. Neel beat F. Neel, 6-2, 7-5; Bates won by de- 
fault from Cooke; Haslett beat Younger, 6-4, 6-2, and in thesemi- 
finals Neel defeated Allen, 6 3, 6 2. The match between Bates 
and Haslett was called on account of darkness, but Bates had 
won the first set, 6-4, and was 3 1 in the second, so it is nearly a 
foregone conclusion tha.t Bates and Neel will meet in the finals. 
It was a pity that Hubbard defaulted to Bates, as by so doing 
the onlookers were robbed of a good match. 

The struggle for the Pacific Coast championship did not termin- 
ate as satisfactorily as was desired. San Jose, however, won it 
fairly, and in accordance with the rules governing baseball. When 
the Portland Club arrived in San Francisco it expected to defeat 
the club winning the championship of the California League with 
ease. In this it was greatly mistaken, and under-estimated the 
playing ability of the Californians. There is no question that 
the Portland team that played here was a very strong combina- 
tion, picked from the Pacific Northwest League. The games 
played here during the last ten days have never been surpassed 
by any contests on the California diamond. The consolidation 
between the California and Pacific Northwest League has not yet 
been consummated. There are many things to be looked after 
and arranged before this can be effected. The cost of transporta- 
tion of the players between Los Angeles and Seattle is the most 
difficult matter to be provided. The San Francisco and Portlands 
will play in this city this afternoon and to-morrow, after which 
the players will commence to scatter, some going North, others 
going South, and not a few returning to their families and relations 
in the East, where they will remain until ordered to report for duty 
here in time for the opening game of next season, which will take 
place about March 27th, before which time consolidation or no 
consolidation will be settled, and it will be determined which, 
cities will compose the California League. 

God's Love. — Household Words. 



God's world has one great echo, 

Whether calm blue mists are curled, 

Or lingering dewdrops quiver, 
Or red storms are unfurled; 

The same deep love is throbbing 

Through the great heart of God's world. 



^PRICE'S 




Powder 



Used in Millions of Homea — iO years the Standard. 
MME. B. ZISKA, A. M. 



-RICMUi ED Td- 



160S -v-A-nsr itess -a.t7 - E£ttt.e. 



Classes were resumed January 7, 1892. 



SCHOOL OF ELOCUTION AND EXPRESSION. 

1170 Market St.. Donohoe Building. 

The school furnishes the most thorough and systematic traiuiug for 
voice, body and mind. Courses are arranged to meet all classes. Pupils 
prepared for the state, public readers, teachers of elocution aud expression 
or social accomplishment, ihe Delsarte system of dramatic training and 
development of grace aud ease a specialty. 

i nra. May .loseplil Klncald, 
PRINCIPALS jPrnf. J. Rob rttt Klncaid, 
((Graduate Boston School of Expression) 



ST. MATTHEW'S HALL, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

A SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 

Twenty-sixth Year. 

Rev. ALFRED LEE BREWER, LID., Rector. 

Madame Waldow Cohen, 

Teach.er of nano I^orte and. Sing-lug-, 
1215 IX AY STREET. 

ASK FOR 



SELBY 



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Medicis Complexion Creme, 
Siempre Viva, 



Aud all the Choicest and Best Toilet 
Requisites. 
930 Market .street, 

(Baldwin Annex.) • HAIE DBESSING and MANICURING 

. D. Jones 

S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 

207 and 209 California Street. 




and Water Colors, Specially Selected and Imported by us from 
the different -Art Centers of France, Germany and Italy, now ON 
VIEW and FOE SALE at our ART GALLERY, Nos. 581 and 583 
Market Street. 

S. &. G. GUMP. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 



OVER IN OAKLAND. 

THE Ensemble Club Concert on Thursday night was a delight- 
ful affair. Sigmund Beel went across the bay to give one of 
his violin solos, and Miss Gussie Kuegel, Heine, and Mrs. Carr all 
contributed charmingly to the entertainment. 

Col. J. C. Robinson, who built the cable roads in Los Angeles, 
and then came to live in this part of the country, has returned to 
his native heath, and bas opened offices in London, Eng. For 
some reason or other, he has taken a spite against California, for a 
friend writing from the British capital, says that Robinson is pour- 
ing communications into the English press condemning the cus- 
toms and conditions in this part of the New World. It is rather bad 
taste on his part, to say the least of it, for he cleared up a nice 
snug sum during his residence on the coast, and he was always 
treated well both in social and business circles. 

Names of some of the Oakland boys who, on the morning of the 
1st of January in the present year of grace, swore off all kinds of 
entertainment except those provided for, and encouraged by, the 
constitution of the Y. M. C. A.: Selby Adams, Billy O'Brien, 
Jim Baker, Jim Brady, Billy Monroe, Witherow Hart, Will Miller, 
Cleve Daro, Ben Wade, Lin Church, Frank O'Brien, Harry Melvin, 
Judge Allen, Pat Cadogan, Jim Spafford, Bob Miller, Walter Lay- 
mance, Judge Nusbaumer, Ed Rodgers, Ches. Doyle, Tom Gush- 
ing, Ed Holland, Bob Edgar, George Furrey, Fred Sinclair, Doc 
Stoakes, Paul Schafer, Wm. Heitmann, George Earl, J. A. Fon- 
taine, Geo. Kaufman, J. Sands, Myron Whideen, Bob Leckee, 
Henry Allen, A. L. Frick, Frank Tbwaites. 

Names of those who have already broken aforesaid pledge: 
Same as above. 

The proposition to have an informal musicale at the Athenian 
Club every Saturday night is a good one. There is lots of vocal 
talent in the club, and Sigmund Beel has generously offered to 
organize and manage the entertainments, if there is a good re- 
sponse to the suggestion. 

Young Arthur Davis, of Market street, has gone to Vermont 
with tbe avowed intention of studying for the Ministry. But 
" thereby hangs a tale." Not very far from the Davis place 
dwells Thomas A. Mitchell, the San Francisco agent of the North 
American Insurance Company, with his wife and family. Now 
Miss Alice Mitchell is a charming young lady of about seventeen, 
and as Davis called at the house a good deal, it was naturally 
tnought that there was a case of love hatching. 

But Mrs. Mitchell is herself a comparatively young woman, and 
is of that striking, classic style of beauty that makes the mascu- 
line heart go pit-a-pat without notice. So it was not long before 
some of the members of the school for scandal (and it's a big one 
in Oakland) found out that it was to the married lady Davis was 
paying attentions instead of to the single one. At least they 
claimed to have made such a discovery, though when any one no. 
in their charmed circle asked them for information about the affair, 
they simply uplifted their eyes and shook their heads mysteri- 
ously. In all probability, therefore, there is but little in tbe story, 
though they did connect the fact that Mrs. Mitchell and Davis 
were at Honolulu at the same time, and attempted to make much 
capital thereby. Anyhow the gossip on the subject was worked 
up so much that the result is that Davis, who is only about 
twenty, has been shipped beyond the Rockies to breathe the hal- 
lowed air of one of the New England communities. 

Major Frank O'Brien, of the N. G. C, who also performs the 
onerous duties of deputy city clerk, is an object of great interest 
to the life insurance companies. His pet hobby appears to be the 
massing up of premiums on bis life, and the canvassers for the 
different agencies have evidently got him spotted for an easy 
game, for there is almost a continual procession of them during 
business hours. Of late, the Major has been trying to refuse all 
new solicitations for the honor of his name and patronage, but 
tbe wily callers always succeed in talking him down, and he is 
now in a regular state of seige. What the total of premiums on 
his life already amounts to he doe's not know, but it is well up in 
the thousands, so the Major would be a good catch for some girl, 
who could marry him now and persuade him to die in the course 
of a few years. During the recent complications with Chile the in- 
surance men were very nervous, for they feared the gallant N. G. C. 
would be sent down to combat tbe foe, and if so, the Major would, 
of course, be in the front rank, and one of the first to bite the dust 
for his country's sake. 



Desiccated Cocoanut. — A lot of rancid Eastern cocoanut which the 
Eastern manufacturers tried to force on this market has been shipped 
back. The public is cautioned against unscrupulous dealers who may 
try to palm off this rancid article for the Pioneer Brand, our home 
product, every ounce of which is guaranteed. 

L. G. Sresovich & Co. 



For Debilitated Men! If you desire to be restored to complete 
vigor and manhood, promptly, permanently and cheaply, we will 
send you full particulars (sealed) of a reliable, unfailing Home 
Treatment free. No electric nonsense, no stomach drugging. 
Address Albion Pharmacy Co., Box L. Albion, Mich. 



HAVE YOU GOT 

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healthful drink? If so, buy 

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Recommended by oar best physi- 
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O-. "W". OLARIC & CO., 
653 Market Street, 

FOE 

WALL PAPER, 

W I N D O W SHADES, 
And CORNICE POLES. 

OLIVE TREES FOR SALE. 

Large numbers of splendidly rooted trees of different 
ages. New process of rooting, the result of ten years' 
experimenting. No artificial heat used. Address 
W. ALSTON HAYNE, Jr., 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 

HOTEL PLEASANTON, 

Sutter Street, corner Jones, San Francisco, Cal. 



The Largest, Best Appniuted and Most Liberally Managed Family and 
Tourist Hotel in Sao Fraucuco. Lighted by Electricity throughout. 

Elegautly Furnished Diuiug Rooms aud Parlors for Banquets, Private 
Diouers, Parties, Weddiues, etc. 
The Cuisine a Special Feature. 

Mrs. M. E. PENDLETON, 

Proprietor and Manager, 



J. F. 



McCLEERY, 



Billiard Instructor, 



Flood Building, 



San Francisco. 



VAN VLECK ART STUDIO, 

Rooms G and 7, 131 Post Street. 



At the popular stand in the California Market where Moraghan 
hangs his sign the most delicious oysters may be had at all times. 



Artistic Wood Carving from original designs 
a specialty. Instructions in all Art branches. 
Art Novelties of all kinds on exhibition and 
sale. 

Dr. J. H. STALLARD 

— AND — 

Dr. J. CLARK, 

^XI-2-SICI^.3SrS and. SUROEOITS, 

632 Sutter Street. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

A QTJIBT HOME 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 

THOS. W. BREE, 

JEACHER OF BANJO, GUITAR AND MANDOLIN 

305 Seventh Street. 
MAIUUFAt'lltKER OF BANJOS, UU1TAKS, Etc. 



Jan lfi, 



BAN PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



SNAP SHOTO. 



[Bt I>i Vinov.] 

IT la a rooal do com fori able aiaic of affair*, if it be *afe to Judge 
from app*ir*nc*9. to be in artvanca of one'* own act, or *u- 

prrt-tr t.» Iba station in which one wai horn. and yet DOt he quite 
up (•> the station above 9 pie are compelled to be always 

' In suspense. like Mahomet's colli n. iwixl heaven and earth. 

* • • 

It is not pleasant to meet people who talk with their nose?, not 
simply through them, but irtlA them, each utterance being accom- 
panied by a movement of that member, a sort of combination ef- 
fect of upper lip. muscles of the cheek and of the base of the nose. 
It is too suggestive of that loquacious bird, the poll parrot, which 
Is the favorite type of a talker of the bra nless sort. By the way. 
"pollies" are strange birds. One belonging to a French lady 
was good friends with everybody until some one whistled the 
Marseillaise in its bearing, and then it went mad and bit tbe 
whistler. 

Necessity is the mother of invention. It was at a summer re- 
sort. A hop was projected. A society girl had pink «ilk stock- 
ings and fancy slippers, but as the slippers had no elastics they 
would not stay on. The country lown boasted but one store, 
and in all its varied stock which ranged from nails, butter, dry 
goodi and head-gear, there was not to be found a single piece of 
elastic of any color other than white. Had it been possible to 
buy black elastic the girl would not have hesitated to cast aside 
her pink silk hose for black lisle threads, but imagine a band of 
white elastic crossing either black or pink stockings! The con- 
trast was not to be endured. But the girl was equal to the emer- 
gency. She bought the narrow white bat elastic, and then stained 
it a delicate pink, to match her stockings, by using her tooth- 
wash as a dye. Clever girl! 

* * » 

A writer in Kate Field's Washington says that American women 
abroad never look like anything; that they are dowdy, ill-dressed 
and seem to be wearing out their old clothes. How true that 
may be is still an open question, but it certainly is a fact that 
many women, no matter what their nationality may be, are alto- 
gether too careless of their personal appearance. It is not possi- 
ble for a woman, and perhaps I had better specify and say a busi- 
ness woman, to look as if she had just come out of tbe proverbial 
bandbox. In the hurry that is a part of business life in this part 
of the world, she will sometimes betray some evidences of untidi- 
ness. Of course, it ought not to follow, but it will. When a 
man appears with a button off bis coat people say: " Poor fellow ; 
he has no one to look after him." But a woman who earns her 
own living by working all day long, receives no sympathy. But 
she may be pardoned if at night when she reaches home, and per- 
haps has to cook her own dinner, she looks wearily at the shoe 
button that is hanging by a thread, and hopes that it will last 
another day, although she knows that it will come off when she 
buttons her shoes in the morning, and that she then cannot stop 
to sew it on again. My sympathies are with her when she deftly 
pins the errent button back in place. It is only right to accord 
all honor as a benefactor of his race to the man who invented a 
process by which shoe buttons could be riveted on the shoe and 
never, never come off. 

* # * 

But it is one thing to be untidy in the sense of having a lack of 
agreement among one's hooks and eyes, and quite another in be- 
ing dirty. It is too bad to have to admit it, but many women, 
in addition to being untidy, do not look what is expressed by 
the phrase, "clean and wholesome." Of course health may 
have, indeed, will have, a great deal to do with it; but there can 
be no excuse for neckwear that is soiled, gloves that are dirty, 
hair that looks raussy, or braids ragged and hanging at the bot- 
tom of a dress. Be it far from me to blame a woman because her 
bacK hair will elude the most deftly woven-in hair pin in the 
world and stream out behind in long locks that are aught but at- 
tractive. But a well-washed skin and a well-groomed head carry 
a charm of their own. It is said that we women cannot escape 
the dictates ot fashion, and that we shall soon be sweeping up 
the streets as of yore. When that unhappy time comes, I sup- 
pose we shall all have to take to black underwear. Some people 
wear it now. 

Walter Besant recently said: " There never yet existed an au- 
thor, the type is not possible, who, even when he bad poured his 
whole soul into his work, put into it all the art of which he is 
capable, all the wisdom, all the beauty of which he is possessed, 
was indifferent to the pecuniary value of the work." Such testi- 
mony from auch a man must carry weight; he speaks with au- 
thority as well as one of the scribes. But still, people will babble 
on, and talk about the conceit of a writer who permits himself to 
have a moderately good estimate of his own intellectual powers. 
Who wants to employ a physician who only hopes he knows 
how to treat a disease? who wishes to go to a druggist who mod- 
estly saya he'll try to read the prescription? Why, then, should 



a literary man beadvereely rriticfted for havln,- |n htl 

own pow*r»? Writer* arc the modera slaves of the lamp 

■ • a 

a long lime ago, a clever reotiiloqolst, Dartte by name . <ap 

tared the lown by hi* talking manikin*, which -at DpOll hi* 
knee and talked bat k lo him at a wprlslng rat*. By working a 
thumb lerer In tbe back of their head*. Da vies made Ifaem wag- 
gle their jaw* ami r..|| their rye* vigorously. Some ..f nur 

crop of emotional antora remind one ol tbe Da ▼ lea' manikins, for 
they roll their eyes until lbs audience can almost bear tbera rntiie 
in their socket*, and tin -y drop iheir lower jaws with a jerk that 
suggests the click of Iba lever. If in real life a man acted a 
of our atage-ekrattlng darlings perform, from tin* lighting ol a 
cigarette to the registering «-r an oath of vengeance, people would 
be sure he was going to have a fit, or what is known in country 
vernacular as •« spazzuma." 

• • • 

It is said that the good die young; certainty, some of 
those who live to be old are very bad. There is an elderly 
female who haunts the vicinity of Jones, Jackson and Wash- 
ington streets. For years she has been a terror to the neighbor- 
hood and a curse to herself. She gets drunk: nay, rather, 
she is drunk all the time; that is her normal condition. Her 
husband has deserted her. and not long since her landlord, exas- 
perated by her non-payment of rent, turned her out of his house. 
That made no difference to madame of the bibulous tendencies, 
for she crawled into the back room of an empty store and lay in 
a drunken stupor for three days and nights on the bare Moor, 
with scarcely a rag to cover her. And yet she is not dead. She 
lives, while others caich the grip, and then are caught and 
carried off by pneumonia. But that is nothing — her sleeping un- 
protected from the cold and the draughts of an unoccupied house. 
During our last great storm she distanced all her other achieve- 
ments. One evening, just about dusk, she was seen wandering 
around the top of the bill near Washington and Jones, high above 
the grade, and in the morning she was found lying in a drunken 
sleep on the sidewalk. She was covered with mud and clay; evi- 
dently she had slid down the slope; she had lain there in the rain 
all night, yet, soaked and drabbled, she calmly slept on. As it 
neared school time, the boys of the Washington Grammar School 
came by. Between them and herself there existed that good fel- 
lowship born of an interchange of rocks which they "heaved" 
right merrily at each other, the one woman against a throng of 
boys. These boys, I say, on their way to school, discovered their 
antagonist lying in tbe mud, and with a readiness to take advan- 
tage of an opportunity which characterizes the American small 
boy, especially if he be born of foreign parents, discovered 
that she had on no shoes, and how they tickled the soles of her 
stockinged feet 1 Bad boys I Poor woman 1 Wretched drink 1 

Traveler— Say, my friend, there's no meat in this sandwich. 

Waitress— "Not Traveler— Don't you think you'd better give that pack 
another shuffle and let me draw "again ? — Life. 



How 
They Differ, 

In make up: Most 

baking powders contain am- 
monia or alum. Cleveland's 
does not ; not a particle. 

It is made of pure cream of tartar 
and bi-carbonate of soda, with a 
little flour to keep the strength, noth- 
ing else. Cleveland's is wholesome. 

Ill Strength: hrounded 
spoonful of Cleveland's does 
better work than a heaping 
spoonful of any other. 

A large saving on a year's bakings. 
Cleveland's leavens most. 

In results : Cake made 
with Cleveland's is fine 
grained, keeps moist and 
fresh. 

Cleveland's leavens best. 

F. H. AMES A CO., Agents. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 




[^i/ggW^p 



""We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's." — Ton Moore 

MATTHEW ARNOLD'S dictum, « The theatre is irresistible," 
and the consensus of belief that widows are ditto, have re- 
ceived a partnership corroboration this week at the Baldwin in 
Mr. Wilkinson's Widows, As before statpd in this column, the 
play is founded on the French of Alexandre Bisson. Win. Gillette, 
with a rare tact in the dramatic adapter, has brought over into the 
American version the real French esprit, attuned to harmony with 
Anglo-Saxon propriety. With all the gallant Major's philander- 
ing, which makes a nucleus for most of the fun, there is a de- 
lightfully domestic atmosphere thrown around the young couples 
who occupy the adjoining London apartments, and their conjugal 
devotion is not the least pleasant element in the charming ensemble. 
The strong feature of the play, as presented by Mr. Frohman's 
company, is, however, its irresistible comedy. From opening to 
close the play is amusing to the laughing mark, and even a first- 
night Baldwin audience had to yield to the spell. The repeated 
bursts of loud laughter that floated out on " the listening ear of 
niebt " must have astonished the habitual loungers in that 
locality, unused to hear such demonstrative mirth emanating 
from those decorous portals. It was no fashionably repressed 
giggle or gurgle, no perfunctory cackle of tbe dilettante, but a 
healthy abandonment to genuine enjoyment of a comedy which 
surprised even the most conventional into naturalness and spon- 
taneity. It is well for an audience to be shaken up in this way 
now and then, and in this case the enjoyment is double, combin- 
ing the refinement of what was called in the past dramatic par- 
lance " genteel " comedy, with the modern farcical element which 
gives to the people more humanity and less of the suggestion of 
finely executed lay figures. Mr. Wilkinson's Widows is a comedy 
which should live long on the American stage, and when its time 
comes to go the way of all flesh, it may allow itself to be buried, 
in the sure hope of resurrection in niany a future " revival." 

* » w 

Of the people, the central figure is unquestionably our old young 
friend of the Old California, Joseph Holland. His voice and his 
genial face are tbe same, but his style has taken on a comedy 
sprightliness which, though not unpromised, was yet undeveloped 
in the old days when he did yeoman's service in tbe losing fight 
against financial disaster, so gallantly sustained, and ending in as 
gallant a surrender at the Old California under the E. D. Price re- 
gime. San Francisco never lets go her maternal hold on those who 
have had either their natural or artistic birth here; and alarge in- 
fusion of local pride adds to the satisfaction with which she sees 
Joseph Holland so easily carrying off the honors of Mr. Gillette's 
successful comedy. Georgie Drew Barrymore has an excellent 
part in Mrs. Perrin and plays it with spirit, though the palpable 
imitation of Rosina Vokes' inimitable bird-like jerkiness and curt- 
ness detracts somewhat from the auditor's satisfaction. Perhaps, 
as a friend suggests, it is Rosina who has imitated, but if so she 
carries it with a superiority which entitles her to the patent. Pro- 
bably either lady would rather bear the charge than claim the 
precedence of age, and we may leave them to tight it out, but cer- 
tain it is there is an imitation between them. The other remar- 
ried widow of the lamented but discursive Wdkinson is charm- 
ingly presented by Miss Emily Bancker, who gives to her comedy 
a dash of feeling very pleasant to see. Miss Bancker has much 
of that sympathetic element, so hard to define, so readily felt, in 
which Mrs. Barrymore, with all her artistic ability, is compara- 
tively lacking. Mr. Ryley is satisfactory as the fond husband of the 
once gay widow. Mattie Ferguson makes an ideal Irish servant 
girl. She has tbe good humor and the saucy wit of her class with 
a few little natural touches whioto her stage congeners have gen- 
erally overlooked. Annie Woods' cook is rather a caricature than 
a character, but as a bit of rough comedy it helps along the fun. 
Major Mallory, as personated by Mr. Burns, is a fit companion to 
Holland's Mr. Perrin. As an •< inspired idiot,'; the Major " puts 
his foot in it" with the concentrated ability of the whole Mala- 
prop family, and Mr. Burns' "masterly inactivity " under the fire 
of abuse is one of the irresistible points in the performance. 

The undiminished attendance at the California through the 
week has fully justified the judgmeut of the management in keep- 
ing on Judah through Mr. Willard's engagement, which from the 
opening night to the close has been an unbroken series of crowd- 
ed houses. Next week w ; ll see A Texas Steer, with Tim Murphy 
as Brander Matthews, and Flora Walsh as the lively Bossy, back 
at the California for a two weeks' engagement. 

# * # 

Dan'l Sully, one of the neatest and least conventional of stage 
Irishmen, will finish to-morrow evening his two successful weeks 
at the Bush Street Theatre in The Millionaire. Mr. Sully never 
overacts his part — a virtue as rare as commendable in his line of 
characterization. 



Captain Swift, 0. Haddun Chambers' comedy, will open a two 
weeks' engagement at the Bush next Monday night. The piece 
has achieved a remarkable run at tbe Haymarket Theatre, Lon- 
don, and tbe Madison Square, New York, and will be produced 
at the Bush under A. M. Palmer's direction. If Mr. Arthur For- 
rest, now starring in Captain Swift, merits the press notices he 
has won, he will prove a more than acceptable representative of 
the title rule. 

* * * 

The Orpheum is giving an excellent and spirited production of 
The Princess of Trebizonde. Offenbach's bright opera is rather an 
operatic comedy than a comic opera, yet . it has some very 
musical numbers, which are well rendered by Mr. Bumll's com 
pany. Tellula Evans, Emily Soldene, Chas. H. Drew and George 
Olmi are sufficient to carry any comic opera, and the entire com- 
pany is equal to the various requirements of the cast. The 
choruses, and ensembles generally, are unusually good. Next week 
ITermine will be produced. 

» # » 

The lecture-recital given by William H. Sherwood last Tuesday 
evening was attended by a musical crowd appar ntly full of great 
expectations, the latter warranted by tbe pianist's high reputa- 
tion and justified later on by his performance. Mr. Sherwood 
has tbe qualifications of a great pianist, many of them in a pre- 
eminent degree. Among these is an unusual gift in descriptive 
music, conveying the composer's idea as clearly as words could 
do. An extreme delicacy, yet distinctness, characterizes his pianis- 
simo passages, the latter quality being preserved even to the 
vanishing point of sound. It may be noted, in passing, that the 
thoughtless auditors who sibillaled their remarks during one of 
these passages must have felt highly complimented by the direct 
personal attention bestowed upon them by the irritated arti3t. Mr. 
Sherwood showed his versatility in the equally adequate inter- 
pretation of an extremely varied programme, which ranged from 
the severely classical to the better class of popular composition. 
With a perfect technique and thorough comprehension of the 
composer, Mr. Sherwood, while assuming the independence of 
the modern school of piano-playing, is remarkably free from its 
mannerisms and affectations. The critical and analytical com- 
ment, with which he introduced each numbpr, while interesting 
in themselves, owed nuthing to the speaker's manner, which is 
dry and bard, nor to his personality, which is singularly uninag- 
netic. The programme of Thursday's recital (too late for review 
here) was equally varied and exigent. As an artist Mr. Sherwood 
will hold high rank here among the best pianists who have fa- 
vured us with a visit. 

# # # 

The sixth Musical Sunday Afternoon at Steinway Hall at- 
tracted an audience uf tbe usual size and high standard of musi- 
cal intelligence. The highest praise that can be accorded these 
admirably arranged mu-iicales is in their ever-increasing attend- 
ance and the evident culture which characterizes the audiences. 
The vocalist of the last Afternoon, was Mile. Nina Bertini. Her 
selections were hardly favorable to the display of her best abili- 
ties, and her voice seemed too large for the hall. Of the instru- 
mentalists, one can hardly say too much. The development in 
regard to power and handling which Mr. Brandt has attained 
during the past year is marked, despite his former excellence, 
and much the same is true of the quartette. Miss Ada Weigel 
is not only an accomplished pianist, but has the still rarer gift of 
being a sympathetic accompanist. The final number, a quin- 
tette for piano and strings by Dvorak, was full of the character- 
istic poetry of the composer, and receivtd as poetic interpretation 
by Miss Weigel and the Hermann Brandt String Quartette. The 
exquisite feeling of the andante will not soon be forgotten. A 
charming surprise was in the duet for piano and violin by Miss 
Weigel and Miss Florence Fletcher. It is not. often that an audi- 
ence is favored with the sight of two charming young ladies play- 
ing these two difficult instruments with the skill of snuffy old 
professors. Miss F'letcher has an unusually fine tone on the 
violin, and will be known am mg violinists if she pursue her 
artistic career as she has begun it. The next concert will take 
place February 12th. 

At theTivoli is the ever popular Mascot, with Audran's music and 
the dialogue by I. W. Norcross. The cast includes Gracie 
Plaisted as Bettina, TilMe Salinger as Fiametta, Messmer as Prince 
Frederic, Branson as Pippo,and Ricketts and Norcross alternating 
as Rocco and Prince Lorenzo. The last two, as well as Nat Cantor 
in the Doctor, are rather over-pronounced, even for comic opera. 
The melodious Gobble song and the graceful dancing of Bettina 
and Pippo are very enjoyable. Next Monday evening The Yeo- 
man of the.Quard will be produced. 
» # » 

The Pavilion Skating Rink is well patronized, and the special 
entertainments provided each evening are interesting and enter- 
taining. The bicycle riding school is particularly popular. 

• * » 

The Temple, on Turk street, near Taylor, is a handy after- 
theatre resort. A musical and specialty programme is given 
every evening, 



an. 16 



BAN KK VNCISI NKM 9 ! ETTKR. 



-venlnic* with Tyndtll. Ihp mlnd-rMdtr, mine t«» » 
• *d»jr nijfht. Charlatan ..- rnthoaiut, Mr. TymUll cer- 
tainly has Ihr jtift of enchaining his audience by hi* wnnl, almost 
onranny roiMavm. A pobl i. h powers can ntvrr be 

quite satisfactory, the possibility nf >Uoa1oD. ' nwever unlikely, 
being too obvious. Bat as almost ... ry one at the present day 
a-liuits that there is " something in it," and no one (Including it" 
exponent*' knows just what it is, mind reading may for lb< 
•nl be classed with aruosements rather than with subjects for 
scientific research. Mr. Tyndall will mystify the Oaklanderatbls 
week, and afterward tour the interior. 

* « • 

The new series of Carr-Beel •• pops " begins to-day. Even the 
brief interval since the last series shows the hold these concerts 
have gained on our musical public. This afternoon's programme 
will be exclusively Beethoven. The sweet singer from the Pre- 
sidi-i. Mrs. Brechemin, will sing several Beethoven song?, includ- 
ing some Scotch hallads arranged by Beethoven, with violin and 
*cello accompaniment. 

* • • 

A Trip to Africa, von Suppe's comic opera, was very creditably 
rendered last Wednesday evening, at the Powell-street Theatre, 
by the San Francisco Operatic Society. Miss Aivina Hener, the 
prima donna, has a clear and beautiful voice, well known and 
appreciated in social circles. Miss Heuer displayed a decided gift 
for light opera, on its dramatic as well as musical side. Mrs. 
Madden, Miss Kreling, Miss Turton, Messrs. Schleicher, Wood, 
Ooffin and others, sang and acted well tbeir respective parts. 
The large and fashionable audience gave generous applause to 
the talented amateurs, and St. Joseph's Home must have reaped a 
substantial benefit. 

Minna Gale will follow Mr. WUhmson's Widows, at the Baldwin. 
As Mr. Lawrence Barrett's leading lady, Miss Gale has won a 
reputation which will stand her in good stead in her starring 
venture. Her repertory includes Romeo and Juliet, As You Like 
It, The Hunchback, and similar plays. Mr. Theodore Bromley is 
manager for Miss Gale, and it will be of local interest to know 
that R. M. Eberle — San Francisco's "Bob" — will come with her 
as stage manager. 

* « * 

Freund's Music and Drama says that tbere is at present an epi- 
demic of weddings in theatrical companies. A few funerals in 
some of those which have visited us lately would give both 
variety and improvement. 

# * » 

A concert for the benefit of the Fabiola Hospital, of Oakland, 
will be given some time in February, under the direction of 
Sefiors Sancho and Lombardero, leaders of " Los Bandurristas," 
which popular club will take part. The programme is now being 
arranged, and will include some hundred and fifty performers. 

# * * 

L. R. Stockwell, Geo. Osbourne and Alf. Ellinghouse have taken 
the Powell Street Theatre, and will, it is to be hoped, make a pay- 
ing success of that unlucky house. It may be suggested that the 
less the two actor-managers remember of Alcazar methods the 
better the prospect of a happy result. Mr. Ellinghouse 
was connected with the late management of this theatre, 
and his efforts and popularity did much toward staving off the 
final failure. The work of entirely remodeling and renovating the 
theatre will be begun about the middle of this month, and the 
opening will take place March 1st. 

# * # 

Some four hundred Mystic Shriners will attend the Baldwin in 
a body and in full regalia next Wednesday night. Mr. Hay- 
man, through Manager Alfred Bouvier, has extended to the Press 
League an invitation to visit Mr. Wilkinson's Widows, at the Bald- 
win Tuesday night. The advance sale for Captain Swift at the 

Bush is promisingly large. Francis Wilson, Richard Mansfield 

and Thermidor are coming Baldwin attractions. The N. Y. 

Musical Courier comes enlarged, and in a handsome new dress. Its 

"inside matter" is bright and newsy as ever. Wm. Castle, the 

well-remembered tenor, sang recently in Chicago at a banquet in 

honor of Scalchi. Guille, " the little tenor," sings with Patti 

during her concert tour of America. The Clunie Opera House, 

Sacramento, has been leased by W. Norton, who will open it with 
a stock company on the 18th inst. 



w 



HY expect John L. to draw 
In Broderick Agra 

When he never saw the first side of a bog? 
He could triumph in a minute 
With a piece where he was in it — 

A drama, say, of "Sullivan Agrog." 



Deserving Confidence.— There is no drtie'e which so richly deserves 
the entire coufideuce of the commuuity as Brown's Bjmmchial Troches. 
Those suffering- from Asthmatic aud Bronchial Diseases, Coughs aud Colds, 
should try them. Jb*nce 25 cents. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

K " " ~" v \ . . . . ,. Huactr. 

Km r: i - 

Ki»r. snout ami 8ort»m ! A l.rr. ml K.nnil Hon 

MR. WILKINSON'S WIDOWS I 

..."•" ,\" " r <~ *■•>'• now to any PcrtormMcg Ihli Week or ttoxl 

WMk. NMIboo Baturdaj U 

NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE, 

Handsomest Th«jttra In iho world. 
Al. Dayman & Co I IIibry Mann Manager. 

Monday, January IRth. > , Sunday included, 

Boyt'e Bosl mid M ■ ■ , . . .],. 

A TEXAS STEER! 
Wl h Tim Monr-HY, Punt wai.sh. and the Original Company. 
Seata Now Bell uc f-.r all Perforn 



BUSH STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Leavitt Lessee aud Proprietr | J. J. Gotti.ou Manager. 

Last Two Nights! Matinee S.tnrday. DANIEL SULLY. 

THE MILLIONAIRE! 
Monday, January 18th— "CAPTAIN SWIFT." 
" Se ts Now on Pale, 



TIVOLI GPERA HCUSE. 



Keeling Bros Proprietors and Managers. 

To-Night! Oue Week Only! Audran's Lovely Comic Opera, 

THE MASCOT I 
The Original Euglish Version. 
iW" Ol'K SUWESS: Keeping Promise* Made to tile Public. 

Popular Prices 26c. and 60c. 



Fifth Series 

CARR-BEEL 



IRVING HALL. 

To-Day, 3 P. M. 



SATURDAY POP CONCERT. 

MRS. CARMICHAEL-CARR, Soloist. 

Siuele sub- ripti us for the Series, $3. Can be had by applying to Mr 
SiiriMiiiuul Beei. care sli rinau. liny & Co. 



■ ..ii. i- : r„A LLA6UE BASEBALL GROUNDS, 

i: .,| ul Golden Gate Park Cable Oars. 

Saturday, at 2 p. m PORTLAND vs. SAN FRANCISCO. 

8unday, at 2 p. M PORTLAND vs. SAN FRANCISCO 

Admission, 25 cents. Reserved Seats, 25 cents extra on Sunday. 

^ST-SEND FOR PRICE LIST.^J 

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MANUFACTURERS OF 

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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 



OUR THEATRICAL SHARPS. 



THERE are two sets of men one can always tell at a speedy 
glance— the traveler ami the theatre-goer. Thelong-acuu-tninrii 
traveler soon rinds his way to his seat, and seems not at all dis- 
turbed by the noises around him. He picks his way easily and 
cleanly, avoids an altercation with the woman with the lunch 
basket and the gentleman with the complaint against corporations. 
Indeed, he is quickly at home. The theatre-goer can easily be 
told. He goes straight to his seat, gets his bat under his chair, 
manages to do away with his over coat and isat ease. He glances 
about the theatre, nods to a friend, is at home with the curtain, 
knows what to do with bis legs and leaves his mustachios alone. 
The gentleman from the country is not quite at home in the 
theatre. He has an innate feeling of respect for the man who 
thumps the drum, and has a c>Id feeling of shame for the chap 
with the baton. Then he is rather afraid of the usher, and is aw- 
fully put out by the putting down of the banging seats. Then 
the rush of the ushers, why do they rush, makes him imagine 
that a fire is in progress, especially under his seat, and he can't 
understand why women alwaya come in late, nor is he at home 
when the curtain has gone up and the ushers begin charging about 
more furiously than ever. He dare not turn bis head round for 
fear of being knocked in the eyes by the prominent cane of the 
dude with the lisp, behind him. 

But how different it is with the regular theatre-goer. Take 
Peter Robertson, for instance. Peter never comes in early. He 
generally slides into his seat in an apologetic way, and toys with 
that mustache of his. It is really quite a mustache, but it is 
thought by several well-known actors that Peter Robertson could 
not write a criticism if his mustache were not there to help him 
out. Peter has quite a dreamy air when he is at the theatre. It 
is certainly not a composing thing to watch him, at least that is 
from the theatrical standpoint. 

George Barnes is generally standing about listlessly. No one 
ever saw George Barnes in a seat at the theatre for any length of 
time. Dinsruore, on the contrary, studies his programme with an 
intensity of purpose which is quite enchanting. Mrs. Chrictien, 
who is no end of a clever critic, has quite an interested face when 
she watches the progress of a play, and exchanges opinions with 
W. E. Brown, who is quite an ardent theatre-goer. T. T. Williams, 
who has a slashing pen, used to be very attentive, and had an 
honest guffaw which ended with a sneering snicker. His criticism 
of Dixey when he first appeared as " Adonis " went all through 
the Eastern press. These are the principal newspaper critics. But 
there are other critics besides those who write. J. A. Fillmore is 
an admirer of the drama. The play has to be amusing to suit 
him, and he can laugh as jovially as any one. 

George A. Knight laughs at the worst shows that come to town, 
and enjoys the bad and the good alike. George is sensible. He 
goes to be amused, and amused he is. 

Al. Tobin is a great theatre-goer. He has wept copiously when 
Rhea acted. 

Donald de V. Graham is an admirer of the drama, and lost sev- 
eral pounds of Mesh watching, with tremulous sides, the fantastic 
acting of the widow in The Senator. 

Admiral Gutte is a great patron of the drama. He eschews the 
Baldwin and the Bush and the California, but enjoys the drama, 
with the aid of his telescope, at more classical resorts. 

Julius Bandmann knows a good thing when he sees it, and is 
more at borne in the Baldwin than he is even in his own dining 
room. He was, however, much disconcerted by the angry re- 
monstrance of an idle youth who objected to his head being used 
as a rest for his binoculars when he was taking an observation of 
the plump continuations of a chorus girl in Dorothy. 

Richard M. Tobin is an extensive patron. He loves music, and 
has an idea that Faust Up To Date was not properly appreciated 
by the Know nothings of ban Francisco. 

Edward M. Greenway is a great critic. His style runs more to 
the DeviVs Auction sort of play than to Julius Caesar. Mr. Green- 
way would abandon the theatre if girls had to appear in bloomer 
costumes. 

Ward McAllister is not much of a play-goer. Of course he at- 
tends now and then, but the play has to be severely moral, or else 
he would not go. 

Phil. Lilienthal is quite an admirer of the cultivating art, and 
goes only when the play is good. 

Dr. Julius Rosenstem has a devouring love for the drama. The 
Baldwin is his favorite theatre, and he likes a seat near the or- 
chestra. 

Daniel Murphy and a party of three attend the theatre quite 
frequently. There is generally a suspicion in the minds of the 
Philistines whether they go to see or to be seen. 

The two Casserley boys look upon the California Theatre as 
their home, and are hated by all who happen to sit near them. 

Colonel Perrie Kewen has an eye for the beautiful, and many a 
chorus girl has been transfixed by the ardent light that flies from 
his brave blue eyes. He thumps the floor quite freely with his 
stick as marks of his approval. 

William Tevis, since his mama-in-law has produced a play, is an 
authority on plays and theirproduction. It is, indeed, instructive 
to hear him dilate upon this theme. 



Robert Bolton was a theatre-goer. He was a regular escort 
fiend once, but times are changing. 

Raphael Weil has but a sole regret, and that is that he cannot 
criticise plays in the press. 

Dr. Regensburger is a theatre fiend. 

A. B. Wilberforce is a hero is his way. He is supposed to have 
taught Rosina Vobes all her funny business. 

James D. Phelan never goes to anything unless it is extremely 
classical. He attends the opera, but solely because it isEashiona- 
ble. 

Mr. J. Dunphy is a lover of the art. Jack Featherston is his 
mentor in this respect. 

John Boggs thinks the Senator and the Nominee the greatest 
plays he has ever seen, while the Texas Steer need not be ashamed 
of itself. 

Captain Merry has a love for the opera. " Pretty girls," muses 
the church-warden, " are the flowers of our prosaic workaday 
field," and so he always takes a front seat. 

Alexander Montgomery, the virtuous capitalist, loves a play 
where the villian in discomfited. 

Attorney-General Hart is a Little Lord Fauntleroy sort of indi- 
vidual, and wants stuff of that nature. 

Lloyd Tevis' eyes have been blind with weeping over Hazel 
Kirke. 

Colonel Finnegan admires vastly U & I. Only he transforms it 
generally to ■< 1 & U." But that is his becoming modesty. 

Grunfeld, the Pianist. 



Alfred Grunfeld has made the artistic success of the musical sea- 
son. There is a unanimous feeling that he is the greatest pianist that 
has come to this country since Rubinstein. His success is so com- 
plete that he is booked for a large number of engagements in all 
parts of the country, extending to the Pacific Coast. We are pleased 
to note that he expresses an unqualified preference for pianos of 
American manufacture. He accord* a full moiety of his triumphs to 
the Knabe pianos, which he has used at all his concerts. 

—Judge. New York. December 2<», 1891. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W.B. CHAPMAN, EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 



SOLE AGENT FOR 
PACIFIC OOA3T, 

123 California St.. S F 



FOB SALE BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers 



THE KALMIA, 



Rooms I, 2, 3, 
112 Post Street. 



The most elegantly fitted and arranged nEBMATOI.OGIC'AI. SAI.ON 

in the United States. 



THE "KALMIA" TOILET PREPARATIONS, 

For beautifying and improving the Complexion, and for the Treat 
ment and Removal of all facial blemishes, have been scientifically 
manufactured under the supervision of a skilled pli > sicia u and au expe- 
rienced chemist. 

Manicuring and Chiropody, Hygienic Facial Treatment, 
Electrolysis, Hair Dressing, Etc. 

MRS. SPEDDING and MRS. COPELAND. 




H. MEYERFELD, Proprietor and Cutter, 

Will Guarantee a Stylish Cut and Perfect Fitting Pair of 
Pants, and keep them in Repair for one year without extra 
charge. 



Jan. 16, 



BAN FRANCIS* NEWS I II I'll; 



11 



EOREE 



If WOtat poor lad of Niurtth 

Who M* ihc dawning of our cm. 
And in (he rage of jrootb'l hot breath 

BoMt and fought the son of Mary. 
Had in (he age's* ftftcrg 

EUrlewed hi* boyhood*! bad behavior. 
How would his heart have sunk to know 

He badgered and knocked out the Savior! 
So I, who as a careleM kid. 

Made childhood's days one long fandango, 
And shared with little t'yrus Teed 

Life's happy morning in Chenango, 
Now stand appalled as I look back 

And think with what unawed aggression, 
And with how impious a whack 

I settled once (he great Koreshan. 

Front Creek his bonie, a place that lay 

Within a range tbey called Triana, 
While mine was just three miles away 

Beside the lovely Susquehanna. 
He and his brother George had made 
6>"^»A little cart, a perfect dandy, 
They hauled about, and plied a trade 

In hickory-nuts, pop-corn and candy. 
We loathed them as the thrifty rich, 

And circus nor the muster drumming 
Could rouse us lads to such a pitch 

As did the Teed boys' regular coming; 
We'd lay for them along the path, 

Gangrened by envy's wicked virus, 
And one day, with unrighteous wrath, 

I rose in might and basted Cyrus. 

It was a mean and vicious hit, 

And penitently I regret it, 
So, O Koreshan, when you sit 

Upon your Judgment Throne, forget it! 
For, though to evil I am prone, 

I think the chances are that I a 
Heap more prudence would have shown, 

If conscious you were the Messiah. 
Show something of the charity 

Taught by your gentle Savior brother, 
And for the bat I gave one eye, 

Forgivingly present the other. 
Old chums like us should feel akin 

And you might kindly tell Saint Peter, 
When I apply, to let me in, 

Though way below the standard meter, 
San Francisco, January 16, 1891. Joseph T. Goodman. 



CONSOLATORY LINES TO W. W. STOW. 



On the Occasion of His Having the Grippe. 

So, friend, the whirligig of time 

Has brought in its revenges; 
It came like frost at autumn prime, 
And splashed your bushy beard with rime, 
And harassed your meninges. 

It stole into your trustful heart, 
A base, though gay deceiver, 

And tortured you with many a smart, 

And left a pain in every part 
And torpor in your liver. 

In short, you've had the grip, they say, 

But you should still be mirthful 
For any grip the Furies may 
Have got on you is but child's play 

To how you've gripped the earth full. 

If I were lord like you, Sir Stow, 

Instead of understripper, 
I'd welcome all fate could bestow, 
And smile complacently to know 

I could out-grip the gripper. 



Honor After Death.— William A. Taylor. 



Old Homer, begging in the streets 
Of seven cities, sang in vain; 

Each thrust him out of gilded gates, 
To hunger on the arid plain. 

Old Homer, lying in his grave, 

A god was — turned to dust, 
And madly fought for, where his songs 

Gained not the vagrant's dole of crust. 




GOLD AND SILVER EtECTE VIS?!? plates. 



-MADE SOLELY HY- 



I Powell SI. Cor. Ellis, 
Opposite Baldwin lintel. 



DR. B.W.HAINES, Dentist,;, 

These plates are made by an entirely new process and are absolute- 
ly "perfect," being light, clastic and of " purest metals," and 
"overcoming" all "disadvantages" of "rubber" and all former 
metal plates. The " leading dentists " throughout the East are 
using them "exclusively," with the most "gratifying" results. 
To those who cannot be tided by the "old process " we " guarantee" 
a " perfect fitting plate." 

DIFFICULT CASES SOLICITED. 

Good Cheer and a Souvenir of California for our Eastern Friends. 

Parties desiring to seud to their 
friends East the 

INGLENOOK TABLE WINES 

Can have their or 'er3 filled at San 
Francisco prices aud nf freight at 
car load r, tea added, thus saving 
a great expense by leaving their 
orders iu time with 

F. A. HABER, 
Office and Depot Inglenook Vineyard, 122 Sansome St., S. F 




LOTJIS COOKS. 



WILLIAM COOKS. 



MAX COOKS. 



COOKS BROS., 

IISTTEBIOB ZDZECOZEa-AJTOrRS. 

Dealers in Stained Glass, Wall Paper, Lincrusta Walton, Paper 

Mache, Parquet Flooring, Moorish Fret Work, 

Frescoing, Wall Mouldings, 

943 and 945 Market St,, between 5th and 6th, San Francisco. 
Dr. Rowas' Famous Remedy for Sea-Sickness. 

If you intend takiDgatrip by sea, try a bottle and be convinced of its 
merits. To be obtained from all druggists, aud from 

L. B. ELLERT, 
S. W. corner Kearny and California streets, S. F. 
Price per bottle. 50 Cents 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Jan. 16, 1892. 



SINCE the recent engagement between Miss Fanny Morrison 
and a gallant riding master, parents and guardians are dis- 
posed to let their charges go without further knowledge than a 
brother may be able to give tbera of the equestrian art. 

History is snre to repeat itself, and grooms have been known 
to elope with their masters' daughters before now. Propinquity is 
a dangerous thing, and th^ placing of feminine fingers in a cor- 
rect position on the reins, admits of many a pressure which leads 

to love making. 

* # » 

The charming Miss Hager is fast developing a talent for man- 
aging, inherited, no doubt from her mamma. She leads a cotil- 
lion, or engineers a theatre party with equal success. 

» * » 

Apropos of this handsome young lady, notwithstanding so 
many men have had the credit of capturing her, it would seem 
from laet accounts as though Ed Sheldon, one of her earliest ad- 
mirers, was closest to the winning stake after all. 

Can a rumor of this fact have had the effect of hastening the 
return from New York of Miss Flood and her mother ? 

* * * 

The Hotel Bella Vista is not to be the scene of Miss Lizzie Sin- 
ton's nuptials, as has been generally understood. The Sinton 
family have removed to Mrs. Hogan's boarding-house. 

The bal poudre was very trying in its requirements of frosted 
locks to the blondes present, unless they had dark eyes and pink 
cheeks. But to the sparkling brunette type it was a great beau- 
tiuer. 

* # # 

Could anything, for example, set or? Mrs. Will Crocker's bright 
complexion and dark orbs more than the powdered coiffure ? 
Her sister, Miss Beth Sperry, also appeared to great advantage. 
» » # 

The contingent known in the community as the Opera Box 
Brigade are reveling in the return of the Floods before the arrival 
of La Diva Patti. 

* # # 

Notwithstanding the oft-repeated assurances by those who pro- 
fess to know, that New York held too powerful a magnet to ad- 
mit of the return to 'Frisco of the ladies' pet. Charley Baldwin, 
that fortunate young gentleman made his appearance at the 
recent bal poudre, and was as assiduous in his devotion to the 
charming leader as ever. 

* # # 

The absence of piquant Miss Jessie Bowie from the cotillions 
this season has been sincerely regretted by her friends and ad- 
mirers. Her radiant face, sparking with animation, has always 
been one of the most attractive of the many pretty ones at these 
dances. 

* * * 

What has become of Milty Latham's pretty ma? This ques- 
tion has been frequently asked of late in society circles. 

* * » 

On dit Mrs. Parrott's projected ball is in honor of Miss Roberta 
Nuttall, her late husband's grand-daughter. 

w # # 

It is also rumored that Mrs. Frank Pixley will inaugurate her 
recently-built ball-room by giving a dance for her neice, Miss 
Daisy Topping. 

* * # 

What a number oT social "bummers," so to speak, exists in 
our swim. People who accept every invitation, go everywhere, 
and yet, although having homes of their own, and {presumably) 
means, never open their doors in return, unless a cup of tea, 
tendered once in a decade, can be termed entertainment. 

The many friends of the fascinating Mrs. Marion Wise — and 
their name is legion — are hoping it may be on the cards that her 
sweet voice shall be beard among us again. The lady's musical 
gifts are above the average, and her talent has been aided by cul- 
tivation. 

It seems that after all society will not have the opportunity of 
testing the hospitality of Mr. Edgar Mills in his recently acquired 
residence on California street, until the post-Ienten seasun, when 
not only the fair daughter uf the house will have returned from the 
East, but the son also, thereby giving our belles a most desirable 
addition to their local beaux. 

* ■* » 

Apropos of beaux, of all those who shone at the last cotillion, 
none made a greater success than the handsome friend of young 
Baldwin. His aristocratic features and repose of manner created 
a decided impression upon the girls. 



C. MAREY & LIGER BELAIR'S 



NUITS, 

BURGUNDY WINES. 



Cbablis, (White) 
" 1878 



Chambertin, Clos-Vougeot, 

Beaune, Pommarti, 

In Case.---, Quarts and Pints. 

G. M. PABSTMANN SOHN, 

MAINZ & HOCHHEIM, 

RHINE WINES. 

G. M. PABSTMANN SOHN. MAYENCE— 

Geisenheimer Liebfraumilch Hochheimer (own growth) 

Marcobrunner Ruedesheiiner Sleinwein ( Bosbeutel) 

Johannisberger, Schloss. Steinberger. Cabinet, 

andKOENIGIN VICTORIA BERG, Bronze Label. 

.CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents, 314 Sacramento St , S. F. 

HIGHLAND BRAND 

EVAPORATED CREAM. 

ABSOLUTELY PURE, 

UNSWEETENED. 

Awarded Gold Medal at the Paris Un'versa 
Exposition Over all Competitors. 

A popular table luxury. 
A superior and most eco- 
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and a perfect infants' food, 

be! n fiT thoroughly sterilized. 

The John T. Cutting Co., Agents, 

San Francisco. California. 

IvTackintosh 

COATS 

FOR 

Ladies and Gentlemen 

MANUFACTURED BY 







JAMES B. NEAL, 

LATE OP NEW YORK, 

FLORAL ARTIST, 
1Z6 Grant Avenue.) (Telephone No. 1550. 

Decorator of Inauguration Ball. Washington, D. C, March 4th, 18S5, March 
4th, 1889. 
Table and Wedding Decora* ions a Specialty. _ 



MR. ASHTON P. STEVENS, 

T IE -A. C H E IK, O^ BAKTJO. 
Studio— 26 Montgomery 8treet, Room 8. 



Artistic Hair Dressing 



tAS' 



BEAUTIFYING PARLORS, 

10G Ellis St., near Powell, 

^^j \ IMPORTERS OF 

^^w ™ Human Hair and Parisian Novelties, 

Toilet Accessories, Cosmetics, Etc., Etc. 



Jan. 16, 



BAN FRANCIS* NEWS I iiiti: 



18 



A STRAIGHT COCKTAIL 

Shall the grarM Advancement fail. 
•i one recreant turn tail 
And belittle it with nil his puny might? 
\\V bavt learneti within brief measure 
cmal displeasure. 
And the very childish reason for his spile. 

Has fresh news from over seas 
Tut his Highnesa at bis ease. 

That he thus stultifies himself without delay? 
11 *« the whanging sheet nn whanged? 
Has the banged yoong man unhanged. 

And developed in a very common way' 

Oh. the tale it is as old 

As the pleasant stories told 

For a thousand-and-one nights to the cadi ; 
We know just what we are, 
But are very, very far 

From knowing what within a week we maybe. 



A MILLION A YEAR. 

Lottery and Prize Schemes Used to Sell Alum and Ammo- 
nia Baking Powders. 



ANEW YORK concern, manufacturers of an ammonia baking 
powder, boasts that its yearly profits are over a million dol- 
lars. While, perhaps, none of Ihe makers of alum powders indi- 
vidually can show so large earnings, yet their profits are enor- 
mous. 

A business so profitable will always attract to itself those 
whose greed will cause them to utterly disregard the effect 
their traffic may have upon the health or life of others. 

Alum baking powders are introduced largely by gifts, prizes 
and lottery schemes. A piece of glassware or china, a child's 
wagon, sled, a pewter spoon, or some other article of attractive 
appearance, but of small intrinsic value or cost, is given with 
each purchase, or a number is attached to the can, which entitles 
the customer to a similarly numbered article or to a prize of some 
kind. It is in some such way as this that the trade in alum and 
ammonia baking powders, which has now attained such giant 
proportions, and their consumption by the public, which has 
reached an extent which is truly alarming. 

The highest authorities of all countries condemn the use of alum 
in bread without reserve. In America the most distinguished 
physicians, chemists and hygienists have declared that the traffic 
in alum baking powders should be suppressed by law. In Eng- 
land and France, where the subject of pure food, and its effects 
upon the system, has been more fully considered and made the 
subject of extended experiments by the scientists, so serious a 
matter is the use of alum in bread or other" food considered to be 
that most stringent laws have been enacted to prevent it. These 
laws are rigidly enforced, and the sale of alum baking powders 
would not be permitted for an hour. Any one who attempted to 
make them for use in food, or attempted to use them for raising 
bread, biscuit or cake, would suffer severe penalties. 

The ill effects upon the system of food raised by alum baking 
powders are the more dangerous because of their insidious 
character. It would be less dangerous to the community were it 
fatal at once, for then such food would be avoided; but their del- 
eterious action, because imperceptible at first, is no less certain. 

The puckering effect which alum has when taken in the mouth 
is familiar to every one. Physicians say this same effect is pro- 
duced by it upon the delicate coats of the stomach and intestines. 

What housewife would take home to her family a can of alum 
or ammonia baking powder if she knew it? Such powders not 
only undermine the system, but it is pointed out that ammonia 
taken into the system in even infinitesimal doses day after day, 
impart to the complexion a sallow and blotched appearance. 

It is safe to discard all baking powders sold with a prize or 
gift. 

What a misnomer are the words (l Absolutely Pure," as applied 
to baking powders. Two of the largest selling brands, one made 
from alnm, the other containing ammonia, and both of these 
drugged baking powders have stamped upon their labels and cir- 
culars these words, absolutely pure; as a matter of fact they are 
"Absolutely Poor," as shown by official examinations. 



THE members of the Chinese Sabbath School Association who 
met in New York recently, and protested against the attacks 
made on the instructors in religion of the coolies, should come to 
San Francisco and get acquainted with the gentle John in his 
native slums before they arise to protest. Theories make beau- 
tiful arguments, but San Francisco needs neither when the Chinese 
question is at issue, tor there we are at home; we know whereof 
we speak, and knowing, can say without exaggeration that it is 
to the physical and moral detriment of any young woman to in- 
struct Chinese in the manner prevalent in most Sunday Schools. 



S. F. NEWS LETTER 

COMBINATION SUBSCRIPTION LIST FOR 1892. 

Special attention is called to the following 

list of publications, each a leader in its class. 

The concessions are the best ever offered by 

any publisher. Send your subscription direct 

to this office. No order taken for less than one 

year. Terms, cash, with order. The S. F. 

News Letter and any publication in this list 

will be mailed to any address in United States 

or Canada for the Combination Price. Address, 

Publisher S. F. News Letter, 7 Flood Building, 

San Francisco. 

Regular 

Price. 

Century Magazine ... $4 00 

The Fori l in 5 00 

Harper's Mouthly 4 00 

Scribuer's Magazine 3 00 

Harper's Weekly 4 00 

Amerieau Cultivator 2 00 

Cultivator aud Country Geat 3 00 

Scientific American (A. & B. Edit.) 2 60 

Decorator and Furnisher 4 00 

Army and Navy Journal 6 00 

Blackwood's Magazine , 3 00 

Critic 3 00 

Nation 2 00 

Freuud's Music and Drama 4 00 

Electrical World 3 00 

Engineering and Mining Journal 4 00 

Iron. Age 4 50 

Clothier and Furnisher 1 00 

Harper's Bazar ..4 00 

Frank Leslie's Weekly 4 00 

Good Hjusekeeping .. 2 50 

Judge , 400 

Life 5 00 

puck 5 00 

St. Nicholas 3 00 

Wide Awake 2 40 

Albany Law Journal 5 00 

Insurance Law Journal 5 00 

American Medical Digest 2 00 

Boston Medical and Sui gical Journal ... 5 00 

Medical Journal 5 00 

Catholic World 4 00 

Christian Union 3 00 

Cougregationalist 3 00 

Jewish Messenger 4 CO 

Lutheran Observer 2 50 

Hall's Journal of Health 1 00 

Popular Science Mouthly 5 00 

Science 3 50 

Home Journal (N. Y.) 2 00 

Town Topics (N. Y.) 4 00 

Truth 4 00 

American Field 5 00 

Forest and Stream, 4 00 

Outing 3 00 

Spirit of the Times 5 00 

Cabell's Family Magazine 1 50 

Cassell's Magazine of Art 3 50 

Current Literature 3 00 

Clipper, N. Y 4 00 

Dramatic Mirror, 4 00 

Demorest's Family Magazine 3 00 

Dramat'c Times 4 00 

Harper's Young People 2 00 

Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly 3 00 

Magazine of American History 5 00 

Munsey's Weekly 3 00 

North American Review 5 00 

New York Weekly 3 00 

Public Opinion 3 00 

Photographic Times 5 00 

Scientific American 3 00 

Scieutific American Supplement 5 00 

Shooting, Fishing 3 00 

The Story Teller 150 

Texas Siftings 3 50 

Turf, Field and Farm - 5 00 

A. LUSK & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Packers of the following celebrated brands : 
CELEBRATED LUSK BRANDS, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY, 

SAN LORENZO PACKING CO. 



Publisher's 


Combat 'D 


Price Both. 


Subscrlp. 


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14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 



Jig- ' I^^KER-cpN" 7771777 ^ 




SUCH a raking over as Thou as Lake Harris, the Fountain 
Grove mystic, is receiving at the hands of Miss Alzire A. 
ChevaiHier. his former adherent, has rarely been given by any 
woman to any man in California. She has been down in Pasa- 
dena, interviewing some former members of Harris' queer cult, 
and they have given her enough testimony as to his immorality 
to provide material for a dozen passion novels. It has been dis- 
covered by the little lady that many things that Harris told her 
while she was at Fountain Grove were wholly untrue, particu- 
larly some very naughty statements witb reference to the chastity 
of literary women with whom he had come in contact in a social 
way (for, be it known, Harris is one of the social lions of his sec- 
tion of Sonoma county). Miss Chevaillier will hire a hall in Los 
Angeles, and deliver a scorching lecture against Harris. She be- 
lieves this to be her duty, as she has been told that Harris has 
been attempting to psychologize many young women of Southern 
California, and that he has been successful in many cases. After 
giving her lecture there she will come to San Francisco, and take 
the platform against the " social monster," as she terms the 
Primate of the Fountain Grove community. She says in a letter 
to a friend here, that she has made the breaking up of the Foun- 
tain Grove harem one of the objects of her life-work. She has 
been very successful in lecturing on social reform and woman 
suffrage, and she believes that with such an attractive subject aa 
" Harris and the Harrisites," she is bound to have full houses. 
■* * * 
One of the best known B.itish sea captains coming to this port 
is Captain John Wilson, of the Duchess of Albany, whose vesssl 
arrived here last Thursday from Liverpool, after a passage of 130 
days, with a cargo of 3,000 tens of general merchandise. This is 
Captain Wilson's seventh round voyage on the Duchess. His ves- 
sel was fully described in the News Letter upon her arrival 
here on her first trip about five years ago. The Captain has been 
sailing to this port &ince 1870, in which year he commanded the 
Douglass. Unfortunately, like many other vessels lately arrived 
at this port, the Duchess of Albany has suffered from the decline 
in charters, and it is likely that she will be laid up for some time, 
unless an improvement should take place in freights. 

" P-R-E-S-S C-L-U-B, Club, rah, rah ! " That is the cry which 
has been startling the good people of the State from the mud- 
holes of Auburn to the Cliff House, since Tuesday last. It is the 
slogan of the Press Club of San Francisco, every good and true 
member of which has a headache, a sore throat, a husky voice, 
and is possessed of " that tired feeling," which is relieved only 
by the patent medicine advertised in this journal. Everybody in 
town knows that the delegates to the Convention of the National 
League of Press Clubs are with us; that is the reason >o many 
columns of boiler-plate matter, ancient stories, and mouldy jokes 
have been printed in the dailies during the week. All the report- 
ers have been too busy entertaining to do their work. The 
League delegates are a very bright crowd of ladies and gentlemen, 
all of whom have been most favorably impressed with what they 
have seen of California, and whose written praises of the Golden 
State, should do much to induce the immigration we so much 
desire. The local newspaper men have only two themes during 
theirentertainment of the visitors. These are: "This is God's 
country," and " We are the people." All the delegates have the most 
implicit belief in both statements, for they have been captured 
physically and mentally, and cry with one voice, " Hurrah for 
California." They have been hailed wjth cheers from the Sierras 
to the sea; loaded with fruits, Mowers and wines, and presented 
witb the freedom of the State. The local committee endeavored 
to obtain the key of the Golden Gate to present to President 
Keenan, but unfortunately the key had been misplaced and could 
not be found. 

Among the most famous of the visitors are Mrs. Frank Leslie- 
Wilde and Miss Kate Field. The former has been for years the 
subject of newspaper comment, as she is known as a woman of 
wealth, ability, and business enterprise, with some pretentions to 
good looks. She brought her husband, Willie Wilde, with her, 
and her manner of treating the gentle giant is very amusing. 
Willie is as tall as Joe McAuliffe, and is heavily built. He will 



never be famous, for he is the victim of peculiar conditions, being 
known as " the brother of Oscar Wilde, the teithetic, you know," 
and also as " the man who married Mrs. Frank Leslie." A man 
whose claim to distinction lies in the fact that he is the husband 
of his wife, always has a hard time to evoke an individuality for 
himself, and Willie looks like a man who is willing to be satisfied 
with existing circumstances. On the trip overland Mrs. Leslie 
and the man who married her had separate staterooms, and 
Willie treated her with distinguished consideration. If Mrs. 
Wilde is introduced as » Mrs. Wilde," she immediately announces 
in no uncertain tone, in her husband's presence, that her name is 
" Mrs. Frank Leslie." When I first heard her do this I looked at 
the gentle giant, and wondered how he liked his identity to be 
blotted out by the shade of a dead man. Mrs Leslie will give her 
Willie a chance to make a name for himself. If he does, she will 
consent to be known as Mrs. Wilde; if not — not. 

* # » 

Kate Field is well known by reputation in this State. She had 
a famous controversy with Governor Waterman, which she has 
not forgotten, and of which she is not loath to speak. She is a 
small, bright-looking woman, whose face gives indication of the 
vigorous mind behind it. These two ladies, being best known, 
divide the honors. Miss Otis, however, a bright and handsome 
woman, with an attractive manner, has made many friends, and 
will be well remembered by those who have met her. Another 
notable figure in the party is that of Marshall Wilder, the fun- 
maker. He is little, but " oh, my! " Wilder enjoys the peculiar 
distinction of being the only man on earth who ever caused a 
smile to illumine the solemn face of a government mule. A man 
who can do that will rind a seat high among the gods. At the 
jinks at the Press Club, on Wednesday evening, he told several 
good stories in an inimitable manner. In lact, his manner is 
alone worth the price of admission. He has a very bright face, 
and is possessed of one of the best broad grins ever seen on any 
stage. He just speaks right on, without seeming effort, but never 
loses a point. Two men were playing cards, he said. They 
drew. One wanted to draw a heart. He drew a spade — and he 
had to go to work. Another of his tales of woe had a few 
wrinkles on its brow. It was the tale about the two Irish women 
I in a car. One is weeping. The other says, " An* are yer in 
mourning, Mrs. Maginnis?" " Yis, alanna; boo-hoo, boo-hoo." 
" An' who is did, mavourneen?" " My man, Mike," (sobs ac- 
cording to the temper of the audience). "Oh, my; oh, my. Wow 
isn't that terrible? An' what did he die of, dear?" << Shure, he 
died of a Chewsday ; boo-hoo; boo-hoo." " An' ain't that awful, 
now?" 

* * ♦ 

One of the greatest attractions to the visitors, while crossing 
the ferry, was the flock of sea-gulls which followed the steamer 
to capture the pieces of bread thrown from the decks. The 
Easterners showed great delight in watching the gulls catch 
bread in their beaks while on the wing, and the birds did great 
credit to their trainer. In fact, the show was a sort of gull, any- 
how, for the reception committee, at great expense, had secured 
the services of Scar Faced Charley, the bird man at the beach, 
and he, disguised as a reporter, stood on the lower deck, directing 
his feathery flock, which he had trained to catch anything on the 
fly thrown at not more than one hundred yards. Charley will be 
thanked by the committee for his efficient services. Other unique 
entertainments are also in store for the visitors. One will be a 
knock-out at the California Club, when the delegates will be 
shown the deadly effects of the La Blanche swing, the Dempsey 
cross-counter and the Jackson corner push. Several gladiators, in 
order to insure the pleasure of the city*s guests, have offered 
themselves as sacrifices. The entertainment committee has also 
entered into negotiations with the Bo Sing Seer to furnish two 
highbinders to waylay a member of the Lee Sing Seer, at some 
convenient spot, during the Chinaiuwn trip, and put holes 
through him. The committee was furtunate in getting the 
shooters, who have also attained some fame as hatchet men, at 
low rates, as just at present the man slaying industry is a little 
dull in the Celestial quarter. It is an excellent opportunity to 
show any Coolie admirers in the party just how the thing is done 
in the Far West, and so the committee took advantage of it. An 
endeavor was also made to secure a thoroughly honest Supervisor, 
but as the c mmittee bad only a month to make preparations, 
this idea was given up, on account of lack of time. Several 
" lambs " have been corralled, however, and will be exhibited at 
the proper time. 

* # # 

The Press Club has instructed its delegation to vote for M. H. 




s 




27-37 Kearny St. 



HOUSE COATS, GOWNS, 

MACKINTOSH'S, SILK UMBRELLAS, 
OVERCOATS, FINE UNDERWEAR, 

NECKWEAR, SATCHELS, ETC. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 



BAN n; INCISCO M'v. 



15 



■)r Young f-^r President »f ih« Internttional I nmip, Tb« ••curing 
o( ibe Presidency o\ (he L«agui la an bonof t>» tbr Club, W hW h in 
Mr. de Younit present* lo the League an able Journalist, tht an- 
nouncement u( whose ipi e»»ful < »re<r Is in (Helen I en< omlum. 

* • • 

President Ssbin, of the Tell ; -any. una provided the 

'phone girls with a very comfortnMnloncn room In the Mm 
Library building on Bush street. There the company .*<er\ r* ilu-iu 
with an excellent hot lunch, and provides them ca\v chain, 
lounges and other inducements lo rest and ease. There it« a woman 
cook, neat tables, accom>Mtaiinc. four people, and other attractions. 
If any one fails to get a prompt reply from » central " at the noun 
hour let him be patient, for ruoal of the girls are probably dl 
ing chops and examining eggs, while the others are beginning to 
think they are famishing. One of Wilder'a best stories, by the 
way. is a telephone story. He gives an exact imitation of the 
bell, the bu/.z in the box and the mufTled tones of the fellow at the 
other end. 

As a rule, the '* bright saying9 " of children are discernible only 
by fond and doting parents, whose mental perceptions are 
dulled by overweening pride in their precocious offspring. The 
following, however, is a ca*e where the remark is bright enough 
to be appreciated by all. A pretty little girl of four years, who 
lives in the city, sleeps in the room with her nurse, a woman of 
mature years, whose hair is turning gray. The little one is in the 
babit of getting into "nurse's bed" every morning until it is 
time to get up. This morning nurse was sleepy, and continued 
to doze after the child was with her. The latter amused herself 
by pulling out the gray hairs plainly visible in the head beside 
her, to the discomfort of the nurse, who told her to slop. The 
child continued her work, and was again told to stop, with the 
same result, until, thoroughly aroused, nurse said, ll Baby, stop, 
you must not do that." "Why not?" asked the little voice, 
"I'se only pullin' out the bastin* /reads." 
» * • 

Mrs. Georgie Drew Barrymore possesses a number of relatives 
in this city. One of theru, Charles B. Hill, was formerly assistant 
astronomer at Mt. Hamilton, but is now connected with the Ex- 
aminer. 

Even in its pioneer days, when San Francisco's ways were of 
the free-and-easy order, a strictness prevailed in the churches, es- 
pecially against people of tbestage. Alice Kingsbury, wbo-e fare- 
well appearance as ■' Fanchon " occurred last Thursday evening 
at the Powell Street Theatre, might give an instance of this. 
When a lovely and innocent young girl, she came here in the 
early fifties, she at once identified herself with the First Baptist 
Church, then on Washington street, near the Plaza. For some 
time she taught in the Sunday School, and was greatly beloved by 
her scholars. But an enterprising deacon, who was also the 
school's superintendent, came to the conclusion that it was vastly 
immoral and deteriorating to the school to have as a teacher one 
of those women who earn their living by appearing behind the 
footlights. He requested Miss Kingsbury to resign her class. 
With sore heart and wounded feelings, she complied. To show 
that all church officers are not so bigoted as this one was, the fact 
may be mentioned that Mrs. Uooley is now an honored member of 
a church in the broad-minded Mission, where the fact that she 
was once a favorite actress only endears her the more to her 

friends there. 

* * • 

Mrs. Johnson, who is to follow the Hopkins-Searles' example, 
and marry a man of fewer years than herself — Mr. Carl — is noted 
not only as being the erstwhile owner of Toby Rosenthal's 
" Elaine," but also for her collection of cats. No less than thirty 
of the feline tribe make their home in the mansard roof of her 
residence on the corner of Post and Leaventhwortb street. Maltese, 
Japanese, Persian, tortoise-shell and common varities all dwell in 
harmony. One wonders how the young bridegroom will like the 
proximity of these furry pets. Strozinski, the hair-dresser, pos- 
sesses two cats of a long-haired species, said to be Mrs. Johnson's 

gift. 

• # » 

It is quite amusing, not to say interesting and instructive, to once 
in a while see ourselves as others see us. For instance, the 
way Australians see us. as shown by the following extracts from 
an article on politics in the United States, from a Melbourne 
paper: 

The Democratic candidates in the States of Virginia and New Jersey are 
polling very heavily. Brown was elected for Fast Maryland hy a majority 
of 10,000, Flower for New York by a majority of 16,000, and Major McKinley 
for Ohio by 10,000. The Republican candidate who btood for Pniladelphia 
was returned by the astounding major ty of 4j,000. 

The London Times, in commenting on the United States elections, regrets 
the return oi Major McKinley for Ohio, but beliuves that the electiou w.ll 
result in tbe preservation of peace w.th Chile. 

If State Secretary B'aine is not a candidate, the nomination will probably 
go to General B. Harrison. 

This afternoon, at the grounds of the California Club, corner of 
Scott and Bush streets, lovers of tennis ought to assemble to see 



the linal match for the prnant oil A the 

lengur. bstWi r«yb»r and Tobl ng Lhe Tali- 

n ho sj ill ogbl f->r lhe 

lakland Club. Both iMh bava been hard m practice, and 

iti> sxpect* d thai m and good match will be the retail 

ol their labors, i f,.r J p u., end it ranger* will 

fee to the grounds, which ere 
, roodate ■) nlte :» good « rowd. 

Art lovers are ahoul to iportunity to satisfy theli 

tor works by famous masters, for ii i* said thai 8 &G (Jump will 
bold a sale «>f their fincsl oil patntfnjH an I aquarelles before M ■ 
raon Gump leaves on his annua) Boring vUH i.> the an centers "f Eu- 
rope. Messrs, >• imp have nol held s sale for two (rears, Tbeir gal- 
lery contains man v of tbe chffd i ipean master , tbe 
sale "f which will be received with much satisfaction by conn il 
who will doubtless make the even! very successful. The sale will 
probably be noteworthy, botb for the pictures and the reasonable 

prire-. 

ORIENTAL ART ROOMS! 




CONSTANTINOPLE. 



THE COSTIKYAN CCLLEOTION 

OF 

OIR.IIElsrT-A.IL IR,TTGrS, 
CARPETS, TAPESTRIES, BRIC-A-BRAC, Etc., 

NOW ON EXHIBION AT 



REAL ESTATE E 



16 PDST STREET. 



The public is invited to inspect this Grand Collection, which will be on 
Exhibition until SATURDAY, and 

A GRAND AUCTION SALE 

Will commence MONDAY, January IStli, as per Catalogue. 

CATALOGUES NOW READY. 

COSTIKYAN & BEDR0SIAN, 

IMPORTERS, 

Keal Estate Exchange, 16 Post Street, 



STEINWAY 

&S1HS, 





Also, Gabler, Pease and 
other Pianos, Organs, Mu- 
sical Instruments of all 
Zi>'«n7r?t3"AMn kinds. Sheet music and 
1H(£(SfM0 books. Call and examine 
ltHtf£WoRL])fM ourlarge stock, 

iffiufr M,tfc E,a| 4 Cp " 

Q JJ U n(AP ' k5 I I • STEIN WAY H ALL, 

206 and 208 Pout St. 8 F 

FINE DIAMONDS, 

Gold and Silver Watches. 

The newest designs in jew- 
Ig elry of first quality only, at 
very reasonable prices. 
A. W STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St, 
Under Masonic Temple. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 1892 




THERE is only one point which, if dwelt on with sufficient 
stress, at the coming convention, and presented properly to 
the people of California, will interest iheiu on behalf of the hy- 
draulic miners. It is the heavy loss of gold which the State has 
suffered since the mines were closed down. This is an argument 
which is unanswerable, and when tbe fact becomes generally 
known that $80,000,000 in gold has been kept out of the channels 
of trade to cater to the whims of a few truculent individuals, 
who have been making a mountain out of a molehill for years, 
there will be no difficulty experienced in bringing about the re- 
sumption of hydraulic mining. The merchants of San Francisco 
are more directly interested in this matter than any one else. 
Their trade has fallen off to a marked extent recently with the 
States and Territories surrounding California. In the future they 
must depend mainly on the interior towns of the central and 
northern portions of the State for business, and a renewal of ac- 
tivity in the old-time mining camps is a matt r of vital import- 
ance in this respect. All that the opposing faction can do or say 
should be powerless in the future, when the true position of the 
case is clearly put before the people. Their claim, which has 
been dinged into the ears of every one who would listen to the 
demagogues, that damages aggregating millions of dollars had 
been done to the agricultural lands of the State, is reduced to the 
trifling sum of $2,500,000, covering a period of twenty or thirty 
years, according to the report of the commission appointed to 
investigate the matter by the Federal Government. This is a 
very small item in comparison with a loss of eighty million dol- 
lars in the short space of eight years, since the mines were closed. 
This convention was called originally in the interests of the hy- 
draulic miners, and its labors should be confined solely to procure 
them relief. There is plenty of time to take up other matters at 
a future session of the delegates, which should be called for the 
middle ol the year. Outside issues brought up now will be a 
mistake which may prove a fatal one. This is really the first fair 
chance the hydraulic men have had to gain a public hearing, and 
it should not be thrown away or wasted. 

s s i 

MESSRS. HARVEY AND KIRKPATRICK, tbe committee ap- 
pointed to visit the river mines at Oroville. have sent in 
their report to the Directors of the Golden Gate Alluvial Syndi- 
cate, who in turn have published it in full. It is a very inter- 
esting document, and very complimentary to Major Frank Mc- 
Laughlin, the General Manager of the companies. Speaking of 
the prospects at the mine, the report goes on to say: " That its 
contents will prove extremely rich when tbe lower pay gravels 
are reached is placed beyond doubt by the results of prospecting 
the poor upper gravel removed in working down to the deep pit. 
We have brought home 39 ounces of gold dust, weighed and val- 
ued by our bankers at Oroville (Messrs. Rideout, Smith & Co.) at 
$18 30 per ounce, equals $710, which were taken out by panning 
in a few days, just before the mine was flooded. This gold, as 
you will see, is of heavier and better quality (though obtained 
under precisely similar circumstances) than that of the adjoining 
Golden Feather claim, and, from a very close examination of the 
river banks, I have no hesitation in saying that, length for 
length, the Golden Gate will, in all likelihood, prove richer than 
the Golden Feather claim. The impossibility of bottoming tbe 
deep pools, prevented the reaching of the rich pay dirt, but of 
the wealth contained in it, there can be no possible question un- 
less every experience obtained in river mining is to be treated as 
wurihless. Foiled in his attempt to succeed by hand labor, but 
never beaten, Colonel McLaughlin has placed at the disposition 
of the company the Hendrick's Reservoir, his own private prop- 
erty, and also the Miocene water, also his own property, now 
loaned to the Feather Channel claim as soon as that claim is 
cleaned up, so that tbe results expected from the Golden Gate 
river bed deposits are only temporarily postponed pending 
the clean-up of Golden Feather, while the value of these re- 
sults is assured both by the prospecting in the claim itself, as 
well as the already achieved success in the Golden Feather." 

s * 3 

A LETTER has recently been received in this city from Mr. Geo. 
V. Sims, in which he expresses much indignatioti at state- 
ments which have appeared about him in some of the London 
papers. The whole trouble arose, it seems, from a highly sensa- 
tional article in a morning paper in this city, which, like the non- 
sensical stuff it ran some months ago about the Oroville river 
mines, did more harm than good to the men it intended to bene- 
fit. There is no denying the fact that Mr. Sims was the active 
man of the Lombard Trust Company, of London. He was former- 
ly connected with Villard, and at one time was tne foreign agent 
of the Canadian Pacific. In last October Mr. Latim. r, a promi- 
nent director of the Lombard Company, wrote to a friend here, 
that all tbe affairs of his syndicate had been placed in the hands 
of Sims, who assumed full charge of every thing. In view of this 



it Is deemed strange here that his authority to act has been repu- 
diated. In the letter referred to above, Sims says he has just closed 
up the transfer of stock in tbe San Diego Bank, which failed some 
time ago to Eastern capitalists for a large amount of money, and 
that the institution will open its doors again for business on 
February 1st. He has also made a sale of a large brewing con- 
cern up North, the price paid being in the neighborhood of $500,- 
000. It is likely that there will be some music in the air before 
the dispute with the London Company is settled. 
t$ $ 

THE phenomenal success of the Tominil mines promotion 
scheme in London is to be deplored. The subscriptions for the 
capital of this undertaking were so numerous that pro rata allot- 
ment of shares has been made, applicants receiving about 43 per 
cent, of their application. Judging from tbe opinion of some 
people here, who know these Mexican properties, the subscribers 
who failed to get in on the allotment will be the most fortunate 
in the long run. The last purchaser of the property, a Mr. White- 
sides, dropped some $80,000 in trying to work it. The rush for 
these shares is another case of the poor discrimination of English 
investors. A few months ago they declined to notice tbe Brad- 
ford quicksilver mine, in California, which has just been sold to 
D. 0. Mills and other prominent capitalists of this city, and now 
they swarm like bees around a sugar cask in an endeavor to pro- 
cure an interest in a very-questionable property, located in an 
out-of-the-way place in Mexico. There is no accounting for such 
strange freaks, which prove very clearly that Carlyle was not 
very far astray in his remarks about tbe people of England. 

tit 

THE Com stock market was more active during tbe week. 
Prices remain much the same, and with the exception of Bel- 
cher, the fluctuations have been few and light. The advance in 
Belcher was due to an improvement in the 1,300 level, in new 
ground, 200 feet east of the old workings. Tbe discovery is con- 
sidered of importance, and it is probable that the stock will be act- 
ive until tbe extent of the new find has been defined. There was 
some talk of an improvement in Con. Cal. Virginia, but it was 
only a street rumor, and the stock did advance in response. At 
other points along tbe lode, work is active with some good pros- 
pects for ore in several quarters. The mills are not doing much 
at present, but the ore extraction will be heavier before long. 
Business was dull in outside stocks. The Quijotoa mill is run- 
ning, but bullion production has been slow, owing to the neces- 
sity for repairs to the plant. The Bulwer mill is crushing ore of 
fair grade, but the stock is dull. There were assessments of 25 
cents levied on Mexican and Challenge Con. 

* $ s 

JOHN HAYS HAMMOND, the mining engineer, has been at 
Los Angeles during the week, giving expert evidence in tbe 
litigation between J. S. Doe and the Waterloo Mining Company, 
of Wisconsin. This case involves the question of the right of a 
prior locator to all the ores lying within the walls of the lode lo- 
cated by him, notwithstanding tbe fact that only one wall of the 
lode is within the limits of the claim located by him, and the 
other wall is within tbe boundaries of a junior and adverse loca- 
tion. In other words, that the term lode, as used in the mining 
law of Congress, designates any zone or belt of mineralized rock 
lying within boundaries clearly separating it from the neighboring 
rock. This is agreeable to the decision of Judge Field in the 
celebrated Eureka-Richmond case, which has stood unchallenged 
for many years. 

til 

THE Eureka Con. mine has tbe distinction of being the only 
company listed on the local Stock Exchange which has paid 
dividends in excess of its capitalization. Tne disbursements to 
shareholders aggregate $5,005,000 — over $100 per share. The 
prospects in the mine are still favorable for still further pay- 
ments, and the company is about to open up some new ground, 
which it is believed will prove rich in mineral. The Richmond 
people still pursue a policy of masterly inactivity, while the 
energetic management of the adjoining property is reaping the 
benefits due to their industry and enterprise. The shareholders 
of this concern are to be pitied. 

* $ $ 

AN English syndicate is now said to have obtained an option of 
purchase on all the leading type foundries of the United 
States, including those of this city. Tbe price agreed upon reaches 
from $25,000,000 to $30,000,000, and is based upon tbe profits of 
the foundries for the past three years. Experts have been en- 
gaged for some time in examining the books and accounts of the 
foundries sought to be purchased. If the purchase is made it 
will be completed during the present month. 
$ 

NATIVE silver has been discovered in the black metallic sand, 
principally magnetic, tuat covers the shore at the entrance of 
the Bay of San Bias. This discovery may lead to great results for 
Argentina, as the profundity of this black metallic sand.'whicb, 
according to Professor Kyle, is teeming with silver pellets, is so 
great that the whole city of Buenos Ayres might be covered with 
it, and yet from the seashore not be missed. 



Jan. 16, 



BAN FRANCISCO NBW8 LETTER. 



1; 




■BwtthaCrtu Wh«i : he drill ariitou"' 

'One that will pUr the ■Icrll.ilr. with foil." 







S every side Ull buildings grow. 
And streets wax old which once were new. 
And busy crowds pa*.* (a and fro. 
And many take the place of few; 
The stately new dwarf the old, 
And with their shadow? huge enfold 
The house which we once thought great. 
Pride of the city and the State. 

But 'mid this mighty march, so fleet, 
Unchecked and wise, no doubt — I hold 
The reverence thai we pay the old, 
la justly claimed by Merchant street. 

Asphaltuni pavements may be laid 
On other highways, changed their grade, 
Their surveys altered, and the stride 
Of modern progress marked wilb pride, 
But Merchant street, like some old sage, 
Who's read life's book, from page to page, 
Laughs at the tumult of the age. 

Serene, amid the hammer's clang, 
The pavior's ever busy gang; 
The masons, chipping at the stone. 
The iron post, the derricks groan. 
Swinging the great weights into place, 
Old Merchant street, with tranquil face, 
Happy in being left alone, 
8its on its old historic throne. 

'Tis rich in legendary lore, 

And sometimes garrulous — behold 

In days when ruen cared less for gold. 

Than those who followed them, for dimes — 

Aye, in those grand, untrammeled times, 

Yon building, now a cobbler's store, 

Saw thousands, piled in dust, await 

The fortune of the gambler's fate; 

Careless to lose or win the wad 

Upon the turning of a card. 

Some lead, no doubt, was mixed with gold, 
And powders scent, with wine's perfume; 
Some nights within the faro room 
Was mingled, too— but then few cared, 
For all who came there freely dared 
The worst, and if they got tbe best. 
They dared again, and still they pressed 
Their luck, those free souls of the West. 

Thus, while the world about, each day 
Is marked by progress of each kind — 
The lofty house, the widened way, 
Content to be thus left behind; 
Old Merchant street consumes time's lees, 
Wrapped in its own rich memories. 

SAM DAVIS, ESQ., of Carson City, editor and proprietor of the 
Carson Appeal, is a humorist. Fun permeates Mr. Davis' 
system. Nor is this admirable quality confined to his writings 
alone. Sam loves to be jocose in deed as well as in word. Actu- 
ated by this unflagging spirit of humor, Mr. Davis accosted an 
old granger on Market street. The ancient agriculturist was look- 
ing about him in that vague way, peculiar to a countryman 
dumped into a strange town. Mr. Davis at once hailed him : 
<< Lookin' for a hotel, are you?" said the Carson humorist. 
" Yessir," replied the ancient, getting a fresh hold on his grip. 
"Come in here, this is the Palace, and I'll introduce you to 
my friends. 'Tis a good and a cheap bouse." "That just suits 
me," said tbe granger, and Mr. Davis, winking at his friend, 
blithely led the way. "Give my friend from the country one of 
the best rooms in the house," said Mr. Davis to Mr. Smith, the 
clerk, and the latter, not being in on the joke, and assuming that 
the old gentleman, though eccentrically dressed, was a wealthy 
farmer, put him in a suite, at the modest tariff of $6 a day. This 
was Mr. Davis' joke, but the granger's joke came when he 
solemnly averred that the Carson humorist bad assured him that 
$1 a day would be the price of tbe rooms. Mr. Davis is now 
charged with the difference, and of course will have no hesitation 
about settling the bill. 

A DRAMATIC writer furnishes the information that Mr. Willard 
will give place to " A Texas Steer." I should think he would. 
Most any man who sets a value upon his carcass, would give a 
Texas steer all the way the most ambitioqs animal could desire, 



MK KU Wk COM INS || A rpOftsmsn, an angler from Water 
ford, hut in | itoelvet ..n the stream Foi 

example, last Bnndav Mr ComffjS, with an slaborttS OUtflt.ee- 
labllsbed himself m the tail of Mill Valley ereok to onptore lalmon 
trout, or steel-beads, ea Mr. Jordan, ol the Stanford University, 
will rail them. In addition to the angler's general outfit, Mr. 
Doming had picked up an India-rubber fob, a clever Imitation ol 
a Silver salmon. Now, a favorite walk for the people of BftOM- 
lltols the Mill Valley road. Mr. Oonilni was fishing in full rle« 
Of the road, and every pedestrian that passed was regaled by the 
spectacle of Mr Comlna struggling with his india-rubber fish. At 
la«t the inhabitants ol Mill Vaileygrew wildly excited. The word 
was pasaed around, yea. even to the cascades, that a mighty 
angler was making a terrific killing on the creek in the marsh. 
Down came the crowd, and watched with awe Mr. Frank's per- 
formance with his dummy fiah on the banks of the creek. When 
young Mr. Comlna had landed bis dummy for the last time, be 
quietly disjointed his rod, as if weary of the sport, and sauntered 
towards the Magee villa. And to this moment the spectators of 
that remarkable fishing scene are wondering if he packed away 
his salmon or left them on the bank, and if he did carry them off, 
how the deuce he managed to do it. 

THE journalists will be well taken care of. But, oh ye, who 
are born of the soil, forbear to fill these gentlemen quite too 
awfully full of the glories of the land. Nature, which I suppose 
has something to do with the weather, has treated them with re- 
markable kindness. They have come from the snows into the 
sunshine, (alas! how often will tbey hear this before they shake 
the golden dust from their feet), they have entered the land of 
perennial summer (I heard General Sbeehan work this off five 
times in five minutes): tbey will see in our markets marvelous 
fruits, and growths of garlic and things that will astonish them. 
They must make up their minds to be surprised. We are on our 
mettle, and we are ambitious to do the very best we can to show 
these gentlemen that everything they have read about us in Bret 
Harte'a stories is true business — that we are yet fiery, untamed, 
and very Westernly. We must have the gifted Joaquin trill a 
Song of the Sierras for them, with a mustang, a maid and an out- 
law in it. Deuce take us if we cannot ride them to tbe Park in a 
colossal pumpkin, and let them eat oranges on a beet, cut table- 
wise. 

FROM the position of an ordinary vagrant, a miserable wretch, 
the associate of criminals, and himself a prominent figure in 
the ranks. Affidavit Campbell has been elevated to a lofty position 
in public interest. This grotesque thing is continually confessing, 
and playing with perjury as a child with a jumping-jack. In 
most instances the spectator of a crime is treated, according to the 
astonishing ethics of San Francisco justice, quite as harshly as if 
he were himself guilty of the offense. He is jailed and fed on 
prison fare, unless he can furnish bonds for his appearance as a 
witness when summoned by the authorities. Campbell's case is 
altogether different. He. the companion of Bell at the moment 
of the commission of the murder, is now making an Eastern tour, 
drawing money whenever he needs it, and having in every 
respect a mighty jolly time of it. Never was foot-pad, vagrant, 
and opium fiend so fortunate. Well, the Lord be praised, there 
are a few communities in this republic where such a glaringly ab- 
surd condition of affairs could have no existence. We have an 
unexampled climate, but we are the most legally grotesque people, 
the most inconsistent, the most folly-stricken of any under the 
light of tbe mind-weakening moon. 

MR. WILLIAM WILDE, who had the good fortune to marry 
Mrs. Frank Leslie, is coming in for his full share of notoriety. 
His arrival reminds me of the days when Oscar, tbe great apostle, 
was with us. There walks not upon the expansive surface of this 
earth very many beings who can boast of tbe possession of 
leveler heads than Mr. Oscar Wilde carries upon his shoulders. 
His dress was fantastic, because there was money in it. He took 
fortune at the flood, and floated into a snug harbor. D'Oyley 
Carte was the most merciless of showmen. He had bonded 
Oscar, and he objected to Oscar making himself too public. Now 
all is changed. Oscar has cut his hair and is married, and good 
luck attend him, for he was a bright soul, and in every respect a 
sterling fellow. 

A BOUQUET was sent to a highly respectable funeral, one day 
this week, addressed to the deceased, and marked R. 8. V. P. 
The undertaker, one of the most estimable of his kind, read the 
card, while a look of pate horror stole over his professionally 
mournful countenance. Ha meant R. I. P., thought the grave 
man but when a broken column from the same source met his 
eye, and bearing tbe same legend, he took a mental note of the 
fact, and the next day, meeting the donor of the floral offerings, 
asked him what he meant. And that good old, well-meaning 
member of the Big Board is now hunting about for the newspaper 
man by whose treacherous advice be demanded from the dead an 
acknowledgment of bis sentimental gifts. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 




THERE is no excitement in the real estate market, but the 
opening this week was very satisfactory. The inquiry for all 
kinds of property is developing even better at this early day 
than was expected by the most sanguine- It would be almost safe 
to say that the year's business has fairly begun. There is a fair 
demand and any number of transactions in course of negotiation. 
There have been some good sales, too, in the past week, but their 
number, while encouraging, are not great. Outside property has 
sold very well. The Carnall-Hopkins Company sold six lots at 
Parkside on Monday, at $1,600 each; on Wednesday, two lots at 
Lakeview, and 80 acres at the Cottonwood Park Fruit Colony. 

Renting is very lively, though there are many vacant houses, 
and the reason at this time of the year is obvious. The moving is 
mostly among city people, as the season is not yet far enough 
advanced to expect a very lively demand from outsiders. Ten- 
ants going into new houses, naturally means others leaving old 
houses. The old houses, and those lacking modern improve- 
ments are the ones to suffer most. Still, there is a silver lining even 
to the cloud which hovers over the old houses. There has been, 
and is still, and will be for a week or two yet, a temporary lull 
in building, so the vacant houses, must soon fill up. 

O'Farrell and Lang sold three dwelling houses in the city this 
week for $8,000 each. Their sales for the week aggregate $36,- 
000. 

These are the days when real estate men have little time for 
talk, but when they do catch a moment, their words fly at once 
to the city improvements which should be made, but can't be 
made under the present city charter. " We want a new city 
charter," is a unanimous sentiment daily and hourly given voice 
by the real estate men. The city should be made healthful and 
beautiful. In fact, there is a general desire on the part of all 
public-spirited citizens for a new charter that will permit the 
issuance of bonds for city improvements. New sewers, new pave- 
ments, new drives and boulevards are the need of the hour. 
Were the conditions favorable, there is but little doubt but that 
these much needed improvements would be set on foot at once. 

A feature of the year's real estate business promises to be the 
erection of numerous modest homes. To this end the building 
associations are coming into prominence. Since the banks re- 
fused to loan money on improvements, the building and loan 
associations have taken an active part in the work of funhering 
the needs of small property owners, with whom they are very 
popular. 

One of the signs of the times that speaks well for the future of 
San Francisco is the tendency toward Eastern architecture — that 
is, the erection of modern buildings like those in Chicago and 
New York. There are plenty of croakers who declare that when 
the Mills and Crocker buildings are completed and ready for 
occupancy, the old business offices and blocks will be totally de- 
populated by the rush for modern quarters. There will be a rush 
for modern quarters; that is quite true — indeed, there always is — 
but the demand will be greater than the supply. Everything 
seems to indicate this, and everything seems to point to the need 
for more such structures as the Mills and Crocker buildings. 
Dyspepsia or a badly digested dinner seems to be the only war- 
rant for looking at the real estate market through burnt glasses. 

Will E- Fisher has just returned from a trip in the South. He 
says the climate down there is fine and the fruit glorious, but his 
advice is to invest money in real estate in and about San Fran- 
cisco, if one wants speedy and profitable returns. 

HE HAD "KEPT BOOKS." 

EMPLOYER (bordering on insanity) — What have you been do- 
ing to this ledger? What do these entries mean? Why, you're 
not fit to keep books for a peanut stand, and you told me you 
had kept books for over fourteen years 1 

New Bookkeeper (cheerfully) — Well, so I have. 
" In the name of blazes, what kind of books were they?" 
" Well, they were scientific, biographical and works of fiction, 
loaned to me by friends, such as * Dick's Christian Philosopher,' 
'Memoirs of Thomas Guthrie 'and (neatly stopping a can of 
lunch tongue, and slipping it into his coat-tail pocket, as he 
backed to the door) ' The Last of the Barons,' by Lord Lytton. I 

have also kept Thomas Paine's celebrated " But it was never 

known at the store which of Mr. Paine's celebrated books he had 
" kept," because the (senior partner suddenly following up his 
attack with a patent mop, drove him down Market street for five 
blocks. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



THE French are now painting their war vessels a dull, sulphur- 
ous gray, exacily the color of smoke as it arises from can- 
nons. They say this color has the advantage of being as illusive 
and indistinguishable in fogs and sea mists and darkness as dur- 
ing the smoke of battle. It is more baiting to the search light 
than any other tint. 



Chollar Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virginia, Storey couuty, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the eighth day of January, 1892. an assessment (No. 32) of Fifty Cents 
(50) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 79, Nevada Block, No. 30j Montgomery street, 
San Fraucisco, California. 

Auy stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The Eleventh (lltb) Day of F bruary. 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on THURSDAY, the third day of March, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of-sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHARLES E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Hale & Norcross Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Fraacisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees held 
ou the 21st day of December, 1891, an assessment (No. 10J) of Fi.ty Cents 
per share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately, in Uuited States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 58, Nevada Block, No 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Tuasday, the Twenty-sixth Day ot January, 1892, will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction: and, unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 17th day of February, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

A. B. THOMP?ON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 58, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francis- 
co, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 

Alta Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Gold Hill Mining District. Storey couuty, Nev. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the fifth (oth) day of January, 1892, an assessment (No. 41) of Fif'y (50) 
Ceuts per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, Room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, California 

Auy stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The Ninth (9tb) Day of Febru ry, 1892. will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless paymeut is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the twenty-ninth (29th) day of February, 
1892, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fraucis- 
co, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Utah Consoli- 
dated Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 
23, Nevada Bloct No- 309 Montgomery street, San Fraucisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 27. h day of January, 1 892, at the hour of 1 :30 o'clock P. M., 

for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Saturday, January 23d, at 12 m. 

A H. FISH, Secretary. 

Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 9 

Amount per Share 25 cents 

Levied January 11, 1892 

Delinquent in Office ..February 16, 18y2 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock ... — Man h 10, 1892 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 69, Nevada Block, No. 30y Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Belcher Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Belcher Silver 
Mining Coripauy will be held at the office of the company, Room 8, No. 
331 Piue street, San Fraucisco, Califoru a, ou 

Tuesday, the 26 h Day of January, 1892, at the hour of 1 o'clo? k, 

for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, aud the transaction of su h other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close Sa'.urday, the 23d day of January, 1892, at 12 
o'clock M. 

C. L PEKKINS. Secretary. 

Office— Room 8, San Francisco Stock Exchange Building, 331 Piue street, 
San Francisco, California. 



16, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 




THB latest news to the Insurance world Hon on the 

part "f the r^t. rati I Life Insnrmncfl Company lo open a de- 
partment for the insurance of impaired live?. The thing has 
been talked of in a vague way before, bnl this in the tirst organ* 
Ixed effort to put the idea in effect. The very latest rumor in this 
connection, is that Armstrong is expected to break out in this 
scheme of life insurance. Truly. Armstrong is not dead. It now 
appears (bat the Lancashire is not to control all the old Arm- 
strong companies; that they have bitten off more than they can 
swallow, or at least, that something is not going the way it was 
expected. It is now well understood that E. S Van Slyke, here- 
tofore connected with the general agency of the Lancashire for 
the Pacific Coast, has ceased his connection with that company, 
and will hereafter represent the Mutual, of New York, which 
now blossoms into life again with a paid-up capital of $250,000. 
From this it would appear that when Mr. Armstrong agreed 
with the Lancashire to go out of the fire business for at least 
five years, be did not include the Mutual Company. 

A. A. Snyder, who has acted for years in this city as appraiser 
of fire losses for the insurance companies, was buried Thursday 
afternoon from St. Stephen's Church. He had attained the age 
of three score and sixteen years, and until within a few days be- 
fore his death was enjoying the best of health, and was as spry 
and energetic as a young man of twenty-five. Mr. Snyder wa« a 
character in bis way. and was known as the first man in San 
Francisco to wear a button-hole bouquet. It will be difficult to 
fill the place left vacant by bis death. 

Everything is lovely within the fold of the Pacific Insurance 
Union, and every one is agreed that there is every prospect for a 
most harmonious year. 

The Standard Oil Company's recent $2,000,000 loss was unin- 
sured. The same is true of the $5,000 tire at the Pacific Rolling 
Mills this week. By and by, say local underwriters, these big 
companies will come to see the unprofitableness of carrying their 
own insurance. The past few months has been disastrous for 
the people who do not insure. 

The annual reports are all in hand of the Insurance Commis- 
sioner. They furnish much .food for reflection, and, as a general 
thing, prove that the past year has been a profitable one for in- 
surance on this coast. 

William Sexton's statements for the Lion and the Imperial 
shows a net income for California, of $288,000. His fire losses 
have been 45* per cent., while the expense account aggregates 
about 33* per cent. 

At its annual meeting on the 9th inst., the State Investment 
reduced its directors to seven, one of whom will reside in New 
York and one in Chicago. Charles H. Gushing, the old secretary, 
who has been with the company since its inception, was elected 
Vice-President, while Charles M. Blair, another old-timer on 
the company's pay-roll, was elevated from the position of chief 
clerk and assistant secretary, to the position left vacant by the 
promotion of Mr. Gushing. 

There is a movement on foot for a fire insurance exhibit at the 
World's Fair. A company has been organized to erect and main- 
tain a fire-proof building on the grounds, in which will be shown 
all sorts of protective devices. 

Early in December the Insurance Commissioner sent out blanks 
to the life companies upon which to file their annual statements. 
The figures on these blanks would have shown the bona fide life 
business paid for during the year. This was as it should have 
been, but what followed was all wrong, and several of the lead- 
ing life insurance companies here have issued a vigorous protest. 
What did follow was the recall of these blanks and the substitu- 
tion. for them of blanks which, when all compiled, will show the 
amount of business written. Now, there is a vast difference be- 
tween the number of policies issued and the number paid for, 
and these misleading blanks permit companies who care more to 
make a big showing than to state the facts about their business, 
to inflate the returns beyond the legitimate business transacted. 
Business written is a most uncertain gauge. An indefinite num- 
ber of men may be sent before the medical examiner without af- 
terward receiving policies; any number of policies may be issued 
and then forfeited immediately after the report is in the hands of 
the commissioners, and last, but not least, is the somewhat prev- 
alent method — in other cities, at least — of writing two policies 
for the same amount on one application, in the hopes that the ap- 
plicant may be induced to double the amount of his policy. Of 
course, these things are not done in San Francisco, but they might 
be done, and the blanks upon which the present annual state- 
ments will be made out would make such inflation profitable, for 
appearances sake, at least. 

The schooner Jessie D., which was lost off Cedras Island, is not 
known to local marine underwriters. The whaling bark John P. 
West, which was burned this week 15 miles off Diamond Head, at 
the entrance to Honolulu harbor, was insured by local companies 



to ths amount of J t hall wu rained at $17,000, sod 

D « outllw it ,. WU halms and the Federal both carried 

small lines on the bark, n- did the Kin-nun - Pond and Otban ol 
LOIS city. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Norih Commonwealth Mining Company. 

The rcciilv (dimmI n Una ..f the stookholdi irth Common- 

.llulug Company ,mii i„. r . r- i . l «i i 
I ine street, r.. imi mud 17. Sao Praaelno, California, on 

Tu sda». the 28th Oar of Jinu ry. 1892. at the hour ol 1 oclock P. H.. 

for the purpose .if electing a Board .ii Directors t" leire f»r (he ensuing 

rear ami toe transaction ol inch other baslneu as mar come before the 

mectliiR. 

Trftu>fer books Will close on Friday, January 22, 1892, at :t o'clock P. K. 

„ J. W, l'F.w, Becretary. 

off:< n— 310 Pine street, roomr, 16 and it. Ban Francisco, California. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Pnjnro Valley R.-iilroad Company, 
The regular animal raeotlntr; of the stockholders of the Pajaro Valley 
Railroad Company will bo held at the olllce of the company, &!7 Market 
street, pan Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 18th Day of January. 189?. at the hour cl 11 o'clock A. M.. 

for the purpose of eleetiug a Board of Directors to .serve For the ensuing 

year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

meeting. 

Transfer books will close ou Tuesday, January 5th. 1*92, at 3 o'clock P. M. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

The regular annual meetiug of stockholders of the Oc*auie Steamship 
Company will be held at the bftice of the compmiv, 327 Market street, Sao. 
Francisco, California, on 

Thursday, the 21st Day ot January. 1892. at the hour of 1 1 o'clock A. M.. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year and tne transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meetiug. 

Transfer books will close on Friday, January 8th, at 3 p. m. 
E. H. SHELDON. Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Home Mutual Insurance Company. 

San Francisco, January 2, 1892. 
Conformably to the provisions of Section I of the By-Laws of this Com- 
pany, the next ami ml meetiug of stockholders will be held at its principal 
office (northeast c irner of California and Sausome streets, San Francisco, 
California), at 1 oVb-ck p. m , on MONDAY, January 18th, A. D. 1892. for the 
election of Director!*, to serve until their successors shall be elected, under 
the provisions of said bylaws. J he polls will be open from 1 to 4 o'clock. 
CHAS. R. STORY, Secretary. 

DiV.DEND NOTICE. 

The Hi hernia Savings and Loan Society, 
N. E. corner Montgomery aud Post streets. 

San Francisco, January 2, 1892, 
At a regular meetiug of the Board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of Four and one-quarter (4Vi) 
per cent per aumira on all deposits for the six mouths ending December 31, 
1891, free from all taxes, and payable ou aud after January 2, 1892. 

R. J. TOBIN, Secretary. 



DIViOEND NOTICE. 



The California Savings and Loan Society. 
Corner of Powell and Eddy Sts. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
tthe rate of five and four-tenths (5 4 10) per cent, per annum on term de- 
posits, aud four and one-half t4K>) per cent, per annum on ordinary de- 
posits, payable on aud after Saturday, January 2, 1892 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank, 
Corner of Market and Fourth streets, in the Flood Building, City. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of Five and four tenths (5 4-10) per cent per annum on Term 
Deposits and Four aud one-half (4J-0 per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable ou and after January 2, 1892. 

B. C. CARR, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half-year eu'ling December 31st, 1191, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and four-tenths (n 4-10) per cent i er annum on Term De- 
posits and four and one ha f (4%) per ceut per annum on Ordinary Deposits, 
payable on aud after Satuiday, January 2, 18 2 

JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

Office— 33 Post street 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
1 1 Moutgomery street, corner Sutter. 
For the half-year ending December 31 1891, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and four-tenths (5 4-10) per ceut per annum on Term 
Deposits and four aud one-half {4%) per cut per anuum ou Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable ou and after Saturday, January 2, 1892. 

CYRUS W. CARMAN Y, Cashier. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 




ZB^HSTKTS. 



A NORTH of England journal bas told the strange and 
amusing story of an absent-minded poet of the present gen- 
eration. He received an invitation to dinner, accepted it, and 
went. His conversation at table was brilliant in the extreme. 
Later, in the drawing-room, he read from his own works, and 
expounded the inner meaning of his verses. From the beginning 
to the end of the pleasures of the evening he was leader and lion. 
But astonishment was in preparation for his host. Two or three 
days after the party he met the poet and listened to voluble apol 
ogies; one excuse after another was given. It transpired that 
the honored guest of the evening was absolutely ignorant of the 
fact that he had duly fulfilled his engagement. His absence of 
mind was so extreme that he had supposed the promise broken. 
Advantage has been taken of these dreamers. A tale bas been 
passed round in certain circles of an absent-minded peer and a 
practical joker, who knew all about the little peculiarity. Both 
were members of a club, and frequently dined there. The wit 
happened to come into the dining-room one day hungry. The 
tables were full. "Borry, sir; no room," said the waiter. But 

the other caught sight of the peer. » Has Lord X dined? " 

" No, sir." "Well, obey me — take him his bill." The waiter en- 
tered into the joke, and the account was rendered. " Dear me! " 
said the self-obvious victim. •• Have I really dined? I thought 
I was just going to have dinner. I must have made a mistake." 
It is said that he got up and left, that his smart friend was pro- 
vided for in his place, and was able afterwards to compare notes, 
and, with a chuckle, admit the ruse. 

One of the most remarkable showings made by the c nsus, says 
a New York physician, and one that is most likely to be mislead- 
ing, is that in reference to insanity. There were last year 97,535 
cases of insanity treated, while in 1881 there were but 56,205. 
This shows an inciease in nine years of 74 per cent., or in other 
words, that the insane have increased 25 per cent, faster than the 
rest of the population. This is a proof of the fact that figures 
can outlie anything else when properly manipulated. I have 
given a great deal of attention to insanity cases for the last thirty 
years, and know that there is far less of it than there used to be. 
The reason that the census shows such an increase is to be as- 
cribed to the different manner in which insanity is now regarded. 
When I first went into practice the relations of a person whose 
mind was unbalanced took the greatest pains to prevent the fact 
being known. It was looked upon as something terribly dis- 
graceful. The insane were secluded in the homes of relatives, 
and never sent to an asylum, save as a last resort. Even when 
an asylum was decided upon choice was made of some private 
establishment that carefully preserved secrecy in regard to its in- 
mates. As a result, very few cases of insanity were reported. 
All this is changed now. People are more accustomed to consider 
want of mental balance as the same in kind as other diseases, 
and the secret asylum is practically a thing of the past. Asa 
consequence there is apparently more insanity, while really there 
is much less. 

A Paris newspaper recently announced the sale of one of the 
most curious violins in the world. It formerly belonged to Paga- 
nini, the great violinist, and at first sight merely presents the ap- 
pearance of a mis-shapen wooden shoe. Its history is curious 
and not without interest. During the winter of 1838 Paganini 
was living in Rue de la Victoria. One day a large box was 
brought there by the Normandy-diligence, on opening which he 
found two inner boxes, and wrapped carefully in the folds of 
tissue paper a wooden shoe and a letter, stating that the writer, 
having heard much of the wonderful genius of the violinist, 
begged, as a proof of his devotion to music, that Paganini would 
play in public on the oddly constructed instrument inclosed. At 
first Paganini felt this to be an impertinent satire, and mentioned 
the facts with some show of temper to his friend, the Chevalier 
de Baride. The latter took the shoe to a violin maker, who con- 
verted it into a remarkably sweet-toned instrument, and Paganini 
was pressed to try the shoe violin in public. He net only did so, 
but performed upon it some of his most difficult fantasias, which 
facts, in the handwriting of the violinist, are now recorded on the 
violin itself. 

The inundation of 1701, which swept away a great part of the 
old Tyne Bridge, Newcastle, was long remembered and alluded to 
as "the flood." On one occasion Mr. Adam Thompson was put 
into the witness-box at the assizes. Ttxe counsel, asking his name, 
received for answer, "Adam, sir — Adam Thompson." " Where 
do you live? " "At Paradise, sir." Paradise is a village about a 
mile and a-half west of Newcastle. "And how long have you 
dwelt in Paradisel" continued the barrister. " Ever since the 
flood," was the reply, made in all simplicity, and with no inten- 
tion to raise a laugh. It is needless to say the Judge asked for an 
explanation. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3 000,000 

RESERVE FUND 1,000,000 

Southeast corner Bush and Sausome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and 

Tacoma, Washington. 
SUB-BRANCHES— New Westminster, Vancouver, Nanaimo and Kamloops, 
British Columbia. 
This Bank trausacts a General Banking Business. Acrouuts opened sub- 
ject to Check, aud Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head OrhYe aud Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank ■ f Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North aud South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IKE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— Loudon bank 
of Mexico aud South America. CHINA aud JAPAN-Chaitered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA aud NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, ScoUi>h 
aud Australian Chartered Bduk and National Bank of Australasia; DEM- 
EKARA and TRINIDAD (Weft Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

532 4 alilorula street, Corner Webb street. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, June 30, 1891 $23,31 1,061 OO 

Guaranteed Capital aud Surplus 1,346,635 OO 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, President. George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G Eastland ; LoveU White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loaus only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receiptor the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Omce Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6-.30to 8. 

THE 6ERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street. San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND S 1,410,000 00. 

Deposits Jan 2,1892 27,133,129 14, 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, BDW. KRUSE 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R, SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Esgers, O. Schoemann, E. 
Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, M. Ehrman, B.A.Becker. Attorney, 
John R. Jarboe. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIK President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Moffitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecurities. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Gear/ Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER . . .President. | ERNST BRAND.. SErRETARY 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK- (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Saneome and Sutter Sts. 

uticiied Capital $2,500,000 j Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $550,000. 

Head Office 68 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.). No. 10 Wall St.,N. Y. PARI8— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17Boule 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. EUGENE MEYER, Manager. 
LC. Altschpl, Cashier. 

THE AN6L0-CAUF0ANIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up. $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 650,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel Court, LoLdon, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad st eet. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells draft , nukes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loaus money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART ) Mflnft „ firfi 
P.N. LILlENTHAL.i Maoa g ers - 

Fine Sanitary Plumbing and Gas-fitting 
Estimates furnished. Jobbing promptly 
attended to. 

CHARLES E. ANDERSON, 
1616 Polk Street, near Clay, and 1214 
Polk Street, near Sutter, 
telephone No. 2107. 



PLUMBING 



Jan. 16, 



BAN Ki: VNCISCO NEWS 1 ETTRR. 



21 




• 






HANKS. 



TIIK favorite lutle tables jusi now are an Improvcmeol on those 
with ora» l»c«. whoM grm> ij is to likely t<> b« apset. When 
the legs are only three atui bend >imiewh*l inward. » small sbclf 
set in between a*ldi la iln -.r solidily. In the cue of lour, the 
sfell becomes wide enough to be of re»l use. Made of plain 
wood, they are covered with plash — ollao combinations of light 
blue or mauve and terra cotta pink, or gray or mignonette 
green or puce— pompadour tints, but secured, nevertheless, with 
the same rose gold-headed nails used for I.ouis XIII. tables, ami 
having a smsll wo.den trimming creeping up each leg. like the 
fringe of a moccasin. Some women who have lately taken up 
upholstering a- a pas'ime, and wield hammer and tacks instead of 
their needle and thread, will find tbat these tables fall within an 
amateur scope. The plush must be secured firmly and must be 
evenly put on. The tables with two or four folding leaves might 
be a little above the unlearned dexterity of the beginner. This 
form, however, is in favor not merely for such trivialities in 
plush, but for tbe solid wooden table occnpying the center of a 
library, study or one of those mom=— half studio, half picture 
gallery— now so often found in the new semi-artistic residences. 

Opera cloaks and light-colored wraps for evening wear are in 
considerable variety, regarding size and material, some being no 
more than medium sized capes, while others envelop the figure 
completely. Very elegant wraps are of rich white silk, showing 
interwoven figures or Moral designs in raised gilt and bordered 
with marabout feathers." Others, equally handsome, are in heavy 
corded silk or brocaded bengaline, lined with white mandarin lamb. 
Small white matatasse capes without sleeves and edged round tbe 
neck and down the front with Thibet fur, are brought out for 
young girls; also light-colored cloth capes lined and trimmed with 
fur. Elegant long cloaks are a combination of white matalasse 
and colored plush, with high collar and long white passementerie 
pendants falling over tbe shoulders and down the front. Crimson 
cloth, strew n with gilt figures and combined with black plush and 
feather trimming makes a handsome, rich-looking cloak for an 
elderly person; preference, however, is usually given to white or 
very delicate hues. 

A lady recently paying a visit to a noted modiste in this city 
remarked a delightful odor, like tbat of violets, pervading the at- 
mosphere of the long " display parlor." Not seeing any flowers 
to account for it, the lady made inquiry, and was told, to her 
surprise, that the scent proceded from a dress which was adjusted 
to a "dummy " figure standing near. Looking puzzled still, it 
was explained that the intended wearer, when sending the ma- 
terial to the dressmaker had also inclosed a small sachet of orris- 
root powder mixed with heliotrope, which she desired might be 
sprinkled between the lining and tbe material composing the 
bodice, and also introduced in any available situation in the skirt 
of the dress. This love of perfumery is considered an evidence 
of refinement; that is, if it is not carried too far, and provided, 
also, the very best extracts only are used. In the open air a waft 
of some delicate perfume isdelightful; but in the crowded rooms, 
where ventilation is neglected or insufficient, the effect of much 
perfume is nauseating and vulgar. 

Lovely crapes and silks, with the pattern stamped on them, 
have been embroidered and made up into useful things. A 
" cherry blossom " bed-spread has a Japanese design of their fa- 
vorite flowers, on a rainbow-colored background, beautifully em- 
broidered in different shades of pink ar.d green. Other attractive 
articles, in the shape of piano-covers and chair-backs, are also 
embroidered, or else when they are made in the lovely rainbow- 
tinted crape, the dull gray or black printed pattern alone is suffi- 
cient decoration. A screen, covered with dark blue Irish linen, 
has a deep heading of crape, with a bold Japanese design in dark 
blue on a white ground, and several bed-spreads are made of the 
linen with a border of the crape. Table-centres, made of crape, 
and book covers or music portfolios, embroidered with delicate 
Japanese designs and coloring, are useful presents, as, indeed, are 
most of the things collected. 

Chas. Lainer, artistic photographer, 715 Market street. Crayon 
portraits a specialtv. There is an unmistakably air of truth about all 
his portraits, from'the smallest card photo up to the most ambitious 
specimen of the photographic art. 

In this season of the year, when every fashionably dressed man 
desires to have a hat of the latest style, it should not be forgotten 
that White's, 614 Commercial street, is famous for the superior qual- 
ity of the goods sold there. 

Gentlemen desiring fashionable underwear, gloves, neckties and 
other furnishing goods, should patronize J. W. Carmany, 25 Kearny. 

Mothers be Sure and Use "Mrs. Wiuslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while Teething. Price, 25 cents a bottle. 



Capital 
Surplus 
Undivided Profits 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 



19,000,001 nit 
1.000.000 00 
3,276,919 48 



Geo. A, Low, 
N. Van Bergen, 
Thomas Jennings, 



(juir it**. 

WM. AI.VOKD. PTMldtnt 

THOHAr Brown. iruhtor I B. MrrniAV.Jr AmIkUuiI Stabler 

Irmmi P. Hoi i.t.in. 2nd Assistant UMbter. 

rOKRBSPOHDEH IBi 

NEW YORK— Agonrv ol Hie Bank of i:miloruia; BOSTON— Tremonl 
National Bank: CHICAGO— futon National Bauk; 8T. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in 
London— Mes-r-. N If. Rothschild A Sous. Correspondents tu India, China, 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank hat. Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondent* in all the 
principal Mining District!) and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast 

Letters of Credit issued, available In all part* of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver. Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, Loudnu, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Fraukfort-on-the-Mafn, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama. Genoa, and all cities in Italy aud Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 

v W. Corner Nausome and BunIi Street*. 

Established 1870. U S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) . SI, 500,000 

SURPLUS $500,000 j UNDIVIDED PROFITS $166 000 

S. G. MURPHY President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT.... Vice-President I GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

DIRECTORS: 

George 0. Perkins, S. G. Murphy, 

James D. Phelan, JameB Moflitt. 

John A. Hooper, J, D. Harvey. 

A Ueneral Hauklng llusincss Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from $5 to $HH> per auuum (under the exclusive control of 

i In. renter), for tne care of all valuables. Trunks aud Packages taken on 

storage. A speoslty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a, m. tofi p. m. 

H!ondoTand SAN7RANCISC0 BANKTumiteaT 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital paid up 2.450,000 

Reserve 395.000 

San Francisco Office. 424 California St. | London Office 73 Lombard ou. E. C 

Portland Branch. 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1005 A Street. 

Man ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Asi-ietant Manager, WILLIAM 8 EEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San FranciBCO, and between said citieB and 
all parts of the world. , 

~ THElATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sather &. Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON ... .President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

IDlrector*: Chas. Main, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. Johnson, 
C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agent.*: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bauk. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. Loudon— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

N. E. Corner Sauaoine and Sutter Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CA-H ZAPITAL AND SURPLUS. .. 16.000,000.00 

Dirt EC TORS I 

Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. WadBWorth, Cashier. 

Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Ban kin 

B usiness. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORTCOSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse lor San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for tbe rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. . . 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company, 2 02 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

THtTcROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 11,000,000. 

rH DIRECTORS: 

CHAS. F. CROCKER, 1 B. H. MILLER, Jb. 

R c WOOLWORTH President. 

W E BROWN Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier 

^SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Gnarantee Capital $300,OCO 

OFFICERS: 

Prudent .JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary S. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

viol President . . W. S. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 




5UNLCAMS 



il T\® you ^ink y° u slia 'l always be as fond of me as now? " 
\j asked Mr, Eld R. Lee of his young bride. "I'll try." 
" Try! There will be no effort needed to keep my affection for you 
unchanged." ''Oh, of course. That is where you have the advan- 
tage. People of jour age are always very set in their ways." 

— Indianapolis Journal. 

First Boy — What did yer mother do to yer fer goin' skatin' on 

thin ice an' gettin' in? Second Boy— She boxed me ears. "Did it 
hurt? " " Nope. She was so mad she didn't wait fer me to git me 
ear muffs off." —Street £■ Smith's Good News. 

Wife— John, how is it that you have not smoked any of the 

cigars I gave you Christmas? John— I tried one Christmas, and 
concluded it was better to keep them until Lent and use them as a 
means of self-mortification. 

Mrs. Ipstein—Vot for are you bowing and scraping to dot man? 

Is he a friend ohf yours? Mr. Ipstein—'So; dot is Mr. Soaker; he 
has been dree monts by dot Keeley Cure, und his system is chock 
full ohf gold. — Puck. 

" Tell me what you read, and I'll tell you what you are," said 

the Philosopher. " Well," said the Boston girl, " I read Ibsen, with 
pleasure." " Then," said the Philosopher, " you are a curiosity." 

— Puck. 

First Girl (waiting for the yuan who doesn't come) — David said in 

his haste: " All men are liars." The Other Bitter Oae — If he lived in 
the present age, he might have made the statement at his leisure. 

— Lijc. 

A. young wife who lost her husband by death telegraphed the 

sad tidings to her father in these succinct words: " Dear John died 
this morning, Lo^s fully covered by insurance." 

— Farmers 1 Almanac. 

" Hello, old man, have any luck shooting?" "I should say 

I did. Shot seventeen ducks in one day." "* Were they wild?" 
" Well — no— not exactly ; but the farmer who owned them was." 

— Harper's Bazar. 

Shocked Lady— Do you know what becomes of little boys who 

swear? Little Boy— Yes "m. Wen they gits big 'nough they kin earn 
two an' a half a day drivin' a team." — Street dt Smith's Good News. 

— Bell Boy (excitedly, to hotel clerk)— Lightning has stru k through 
in to -iOO, sir.' Clerk— Is 499 hurt? Bell Boy— 'No, sir. He's all rigut. 
Clerk (to boo k keeper)— Charge 499 $2 for extra heat. — Life. 

—Miss Angle Nue — Do you know, Mr. Holdoff, why this cham- 
pagne does not remind me of you? Mr. Holdoff— No, really. Miss 
Angle Nue— Because it pops. 

Jack— Why has Miss Bonpoint gone in for theosophy ? Alice— 

Never tell. Jack; but I've heard that she imagines her astral body 
may be a little less— er— robust, —Harvard Lampoon. 

Wife— But, George, you are drinking your sixth glass of wine. 

Husband — Well, what of it? Do you expect me to drink the seventh 
glass after the Hfth? — Texas Siftlngs. 

Heinz — Sol, go down by dot blace on Sulifan streed und puy dot 
chob lotof umprellas. I hafe chust fixed it mit der rain-maker for a 
forty-days' rains. I vant to gorner der market." —Judqe. 

Jinks— A prize fight is quite a striking affair. FHkins—Yea, 

but it can't hold a candle to a convention of walking delegates. 

— New York Herald. 
m — Prospective Buyer — Seems to me you ask an exorbitant price for 
that house. Would-be Seller — Yes; buttnen you see it's hand-painted. 

— Puck. 

The ashes of a New York man weighed only seven ounces, and 

yet in his life-time he could manipulate two wards. 

— Topeka Saturday Evening Lance. 

Inquiring Child— Papa, why do people cry at weddings? Papa 

(abstractedly)— Most of 'em have been* married themselves. 

—New York Weekly. 

Teacher— Tommy, what time is it when both hands stand out 

straight on the right side? Tommy — Time to start a museum, 

— Jeweler's Weekly. 
' -— Sin — What is writer's cramp, anyway? He — As a general 
thing it is indistinguishable from what they call the pangs of hunger. 

—Life. 

— No man need expect to play on a golden harp in heaven who 
only contributes to the church collection on a mouth harmonica basis. 

•Ada (boastingly)-No man has ever kissed me. Belle — You 
should make yourself more attractive looking, dear. 



Men who enjoy a drink of good liquor now and theri have found 
that no place in the city suits them better than the Grand Central 
Wine Rooms, at 1U-1S Third street. That is the reason this popular 
bar is always crowded, for it is well known among men about town 
that only the best of stock is carried on its shelves. Straight goods 
is its motto. 

If one desires a good dinner, made more pleasant by unsurpassed 
service, he should patronize the Original Swain's Bakery, at 213 Sutter 
street. The aim of this restaurant is to present to its patrons a menu 
which cannot be excelled in tee city. The chef is a master of his art, 
and he has gained for the Original Swain's Bakery a very high repu- 
tation. 



i:r>rsTT:R,_A_:D>rc:G_ 



REMOVAL! 
HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY 

Now Occupies Premises at the N. E. Cor. California and Sansome 

Sta., S. F., Lately Vacated by Wells, Fargo & Co. Bank. 

Twenty-seventh Annual Exhibit. 

January 1, 1891. 

INCORPORATED A. D. 1864. 

Losses p'd since organi'n.$3,l75, 759.21 1 Reinsurance Reserve $266,043.59 

Assets January 1, 1891 - . . 8b7,512.ly Capital paid up, Gold . . . 300,000 00 
Surplus for policy holders 844,944.69 | Net Surplus over ev'yth'g 278,901.10 

Income in 1890 $394, 184.52 | Fire Losses paid in 1890. 142,338.90 

Fire Losses unpaid, January 1, 1891 11,404.00 

President J. F. HOUGHTON I Secretary . . CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-President.. HENRY L. DODGE | Genera l Agent. ROBERT H. MAGILL 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

Capital $1,500,001.00 

Invested in U. S 534,795.72 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

332 California St., S. F., Cal. 

^l^^General Agents for the United States and Territories west of the 
Rocky M ountains. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed (10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1, 000, 000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6,124,057.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street. San Francisco. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital Jlo.625.ono 

Cash Assets • 4.701,201 39 

Cash Assets In United States 2,272,084 13 

REINSURERS OF 

Auglo-Xevaila Assurance Corporation 

AND 

Southern California Insurance Company. 

"vv"3«n. HVCA-CDO^-A-IjID. 

MANAGER. ' 

D. E MILES, Assistant Manager. 

315 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block. S. F. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Franca. BALOISE of Basle— Capital, 5,000,000 France. 
These three companies are liable jointly aud severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable m all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, theBe com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street. San Francisco. i __ 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1 782] 
American Fire Insurance Company of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco- 



LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. J 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1886.) 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 

GEO. F. GRANT, Manager. 

PACIFIC IDEP^-K.TnM:S3SrT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN FIRE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1821. 
Paid-up i apital, - - - J 5, 000,000. 
Cash Assets, 121,911,915. 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1710. 

Cash Assets, J9.031,040. 

Assets in America, - - - $1,956,331. 



WB. i. USHERS, fien'l Agent, 20S. Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 




K 



INSUR ANCE COMPANY- LTD. 

CHESTER . E:tNH3UyQ,rMD.^ l 



Capital paid 6j guaranteed Si 3,000,000,(10 . 
ChasA Latum, Manager, 

439 eailfars.ii St. .11a;.: Fi-anessca. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 







A BALLADE OF LOYERSLAND.— /.<•>•./.»» Wortd. 

In I.nversland Ihe ak.M are blue. 

Or barred with rosy clouds between; 
Tbe flowers are fairer far of bue 

Than ever flowers of earth were seen; 

And all day long, through meadows green, 
Beside the river, hand in hand. 

Walk youths and maids of gentle mien — 
In Loversland, in Loversland. 

And some there are that lightly strew 

With roses all the way serene. 
And some that pleasant odors brew 

From elder-Mower and eglantine; 

And others still, in dell and dene, 
With brows the kindly sun has tanued, 

Who sow the grain and harvest glean 
In Loversland, in Loversland. 

T>an Cupid schools a merry crew 

Beneath the beeches 1 leafy screen, 
And bids each ardent swain construe 

The glances from his mistress' een; 

No harder task than this, I ween, 
Was ever there for scholar planned, 

To sing and serve his fancy's queen 
In Loversland, in Loversland. 

ENVOI. 

Ah! can it be that we have been. 

Sweet Heart, on that enchanted strand, 

That we. too, know what life may mean 
In Loversland, in Loversland? 



TRIOLET.— A rlo Bates. 



'Twas a Jacqueminot rose 

That she gave me at parting; 

Sweetest flower that blows. 

'Twas a Jacqueminot rose. 

In the love garden close, 

With the swift blushes starting — 

'Twas a Jacqueminot rose 

That she gave me at parting. 

If she kissed it, who knows — 

Since I will not discover, 
And love is that close, 
If she kissed it, who knows? 
Or if not the red rose 

Perhaps, then, the lover 1 
If she kissed it, who knows, 

Since I will not discover. 

Yet at least with the rose 

Went a kiss that I'm wearing! 

More I will not disclose, 

Yet at least with the rose 

Went whose kiss no one knows, 
Since I'm only declaring, 
" Yet at least with the rose 

Went a kiss that I'm wearing." 

AS ROSEBUDS WILL.— Carrie Slake Morgan in Chicago Times. 



The dewdrop loved the rosebud, and the rosebud loved the dew; 
But the frost king, hoary-headed, came between the lovers true. 

Oh, a million jewels brought he to entice the rosebud sweet, 
Ten hundred thousand diamonds, and cast them at her feet. 

The dewdrop's tender opals paled before such kingly show, 
The rosebud chose the diamonds, as rosebuds will, you know. 

And now? Oh, well, the sequel can be whispered in a breath- 
She had her hour of splendor and she paid for it with death. 



•THE COMING MAN."— Philadelphia Press. 



"The coming man will be this and that," 
The spinster said, as alone she sat, 
"And will do great things, so the papers say; 
But the coming man stays long away. 
I've looked for him for several years, 
And he'll find me ready when he appears, 
And what he is, and what he'll be, 
I care not if only he come to me." 






Insurance Company, 
capital. 11.000.000. | assets »2.660.000 

D. J. 8TAPLE9 Prcnldcnt 

I ' H i iKm?,1m LLK Secretary 

J. B. LKVISON Mnrluc Secretary 

Age nts In all prominent localities throughout the United Stales. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up 1400.000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 2IS AND 220 SANSOMt SJHtCT, 

San Francisco, California. 



GEORGE L. BKANDER, 

President. 



CHAB. H. CU8HING, 
Secretary. 



Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool, Established 1857. 
Royal Exchange Assurance Corporation of London, 

[INCORPORATED 1720]. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
N. W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 



FIRE 



INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Company of London. 
Imperial Fire Insurance Company of London, 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 

Pacific Department, 314 Sansoiiie St., S. F. 

SWAIN & MURDOCH, City Agents. 

BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL *5,000,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, $19,724,638.46. 

President, BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 




3I8 C nL i roR ' s "*. § J - —Z/i 



' -^Company? 3 ?■ 



PARKE & LACY CO., 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IRON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING, OIL8 AND 8UPPLIE8. 

Dr. Ricord's Restorative Pills. 

Buy none but the Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the Medical Celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 

J. «. STEELE A CO., 
No. 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED. Box of 50 pills, $1 25: of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills. 
?3 60; of 400 pills, $6; Prepuratory Pills, $2. Send for Circular. 

JOSEPH G/LLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medals, Paris 1878—1889. 
^3^-These Pens are " the best in the world." Sole Agent for the United 
States, MR. HY. HOE, 91 John St., N. Y. Sold by all Stationers. 



24 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 18i>2. 



AN IVORY SMILE. 

THE following sketcb, written by Col. J. McCloud, of Kentucky, 
was recently given to me by a son of that well-known gentle- 
man : 

I lived in Kentucky and owned a number of slaves. Among 
them was an enormous man, named Amos. I think he was the 
strongest human being I ever have seen. Once, when I was a 
boy, I went with Amos to a circus. During the performance the 
ring-master announced that he had a wonderful mule. •• I will 
give this mule to any man who can either ride him or lead him 
around the ring." Amos arose. I plucked his coat and excitedly 
asked what he was going 10 do. 1 asked this, although I knew 
well enough what was on his mind. 

" Chile," said he, " dar ain't no man, white nur black, dat's 
gwine bluff me wid er mule;" and before I could by persuasion 
restrain him, he had stalked into the ring. The mule was a small 
animal and depended for success upon that quality which so well 
served the small man and the politician — trickery. Amos turned to 
the ring-master and said : 

« You means dat I kin hab dis mule ef I kin ride him ur lead 
him?" 

"That is exactly what I mean." 

" Ah, hah, an' doe3 you mean dat ef I takes dis yere mule 
outen de ring I kin hab him?" 

" Yes, if you can take him out of the ring he is your property." 

Atuos seized the mule, and I don't know how, but in a mo- 
ment had him on bis back. The frightened animal struggled, but 
Amos, amid the wildest applause, carried him out of the ring. 

" He's mine," Amos shouted, as he put down his burden. 

» Not so fast, my good fellow," the ring-master cried, quickly 
following him. " I said you might have him if you could lead 
him out of the ring." 

" An' den you said I could had him ef I tuck him out?" 

"Oh, no," the ring-master answered, taking hold of the bridle. 
" I said if you could lead him; but now to show that there's 
nothing mean about me, I will solemnly swear in the presence of 
these good people, that I will give you the elephant if you take 
him on your shoulder down to the river and give him a bath." 

The audience roared as though the world's greatest witticism 
had just been uttered, and Amos, disgusted with the perfidy of 
showmen, returned to his seat. 

I was deeply attached to Amos, who, my father assured me 
was my individual property; and I used to smile over the absurd- 
ity of so small a boy owning so large a man. When I grew up, 
and when the death of my father gave to me the sad inheritance 
of all the slaves, I depended on Amos as a sort of general man- 
ager. He was so faithful and had so apparent an affection for 
rut;, that in gratitude and especially in a Christian prompting, I 
resolved to set him free. So, one day just b fore Christmas, I 
called him as he was crossing the yard. 

" Good mawnin', Mars George; how does you feel dis mawnin', 
sab ? " 

" First rate, Amos. In fact, I feel so well that I have decided 
to give you a great Christmas present." 

" Thankee, sah," be replied, reiuoving his hat and bowing low, 
"an' lemme tell you dat de Lawd ain't gwine furgit you fur dat. 
Lawd duu said He is mighty in lub wid de cheerful giber, an' ef 
you ain't one I doan know who is. Look yere, Mars George, 
whut it gwine be ? " 

>■ Never mind, I'll tell you when Christmas morning comes." 

" Dat's right an' proper, sah, but somehow I'd like ter hab er 
little sorter idee. I wanter know bow ter shape myself. Man 
'pear like he wanter be s'prized, but still he'd rather know whut 
he gwine be s'prized erbout. When de dog trees er 'possum 
would like ter be s'prized ez ter whut sort o' varment dar is up 
dar, still he'd ruther know whuther it's er 'possum ur er coon 
'fo' he chops down de tree." 

"That's all right, Amos, but you go ahead and cut down the 
tree and leave it to me to provide against disappointment.'' 

" Wall, ez you nebber has diserp'inted me, I'll do dat. I got 
up ter go ober in de woods, sah, an' see erbout hawlin' up some 
back-logs fur Christmas. Doan want none de white folks ter git 
cold on dat day, I assho you. Dar ain t nutbin' dat takes de 
brightness offen Christmas day like chilly white folks. Good- 
mawnin', Mars George." 

He went away, singing the blithe song of a light heart. He 
was a giant but he was a child. 

Before daylight, one morning shortly afterward, while I was 
yet in bed, a house servant tapped on the door and told me that 
Amos wanted to see me. "Tell him to come in," I answered. 
The giant, black in the dark shadows of the dim lamp-light and 
the early morning, entered the room and stood near my bed-side. 
There was the sudden gleam of an ivory smile, then a low musi- 
cal laugh and the warm tones of a good-mawnin', Mars George." 

" Well, Amos, what do you want this time of day?" 

" Dat's whut I come ter tell you, sah. I woke up 'bout mid- 
night, an' fo' de Lawd I couldn't go ter sleep ergin fur 'layin' dar 
worryin'." 

" What about?" 

" Wall, sah, jes dis: I wuz wonderin' whut in the worl' yon 
gwine gib me fur dat Christmus present. Now I know you gwine 



turn ober wid one dem flounces de white folks has, an' say I'se 
fool^h an' ain't got no sense, an' I 'low niebbe you'd be right ef 
you did say so, but 1 jest couldn't he'p it, Mars George?" 

But I did not turnover with one oi those flounces that the 
" white folks" have; I reached out and took his band. "My 
poor child," said I, " my poor child — " and I really could say 
nothing else. He broke down. The giant was on his knees. 

" Oh, you calls me er chile, when it wa'n't but de udder day 
dat I toted you in my arms, showing you de geese swimmin' in 
de pond, an 1 now you is er gre't big man an' calls me chile. Ole 
Marster's time does fly monstrus fast when de little toddler o' yis- 
terday terday takes you by de ban' like he gwine lead you, an' 
calls you chile. But I wush you would tell me whut dat present 
gwine be. It doan' pear like I kin stand it no longer, Mars 
George." With the tenderness of a mother's holy touch his hand 
stroked my hair. "Tell me jest dis time, Mara George, an' I 
won't ax you no mo." 

"Amos, you have only two more days to wait, and I don't be- 
lieve that it would be real kindness to tell you now." 

" Wall, sah," he said, slowly arising to his feet, " it will hatter 
go, I reckon. Ain't dar er jug in dat closet, sah? Dat one right 
dar?" 

" Yes, I think so." 

" Wall, would you mind ef I wuz ter tilt it up ez er sort o' good 
mawnin' ter dis new bo'n day, sah? " 

" Help yourself, Amos." 

" I thanks you, I does. Ef dar's anythin' dat smoothes out de 
wrinkles o' er diserp'intment, it's one deze fine articles o' licker." 

He drew out the jug and lilted a long good morning to the new- 
born day, and then, slowly wiping bis mouth with the back of his 
hand, declared that he was strengthened against the trials of an- 
other season of disappointment. 

He did not again speak of the present until early Christmas 
morning. Then he came and tapped on luy bed-room door. 

" Mars George, oh, Mars George." 

" fa that you, Amos? " 

" Yas, aah, an' I come ter : mind you dat Christmas done come." 

"I know that, Amos. 

" Yas, sah, I 'lowed you did, but I wuz sorter skeered dat ole 
Satan ruout put suthin' in yo' way ter make you furgit it." 

" You haven't known him to put many things in ray way to 
make me forget promises, have you? " 

" No, sah, but still you kain't nebber tell what Satan gwine do. 
De Good Book say he alius pokin round seekin' whut he kin 
'vower." 

'■ Well, I'll be out pretty soon, and give you the present." 

" All right, sah, but you ain't gwine turn ober an' go ter sleep 
ergin, is you ? " 

" No, I'm getting up now;" and then I heard him mutter: 
" thank the Lawd fur dat." 

There had been so much speculation among the negroes as to 
what Amos' present was to be, that I was greeted by nearly 
every man, woman and child on the plantation when I stepped 
out upon the gallery. I shall never forget that morning. The 
sun was rising. Far in the west the loitering stars were fading 
one by one, and above them hung the quartered moon, stripped 
of her majesty and paled by the brightening glory of the morn. 
Far down the creek, where the lurking shadows hid under the 
bending willow boughs, the rushing waters playtd a deep-toned 
symphony, and in the woods a tired dog, barked unheeded, where 
he had " treed " at midnight. 

" Amos," I said, stepping forward, 

" Yas, Mars George," he answered, bowing. 

" I promised you a Christmas present, and in view of my great 
attachment, you, with reason, supposed that it was to be some- 
thing to be valued far above the ordinary gift." 

" Yas, Mars George." 

"Amos, I am going to give you something which many of the 
world's greatest men ha\e died for, and for which any great man 
would shed his hlood. Amos, I give you freedom." 

He did not bound in'" ihe air. a* I had expected ; he wiped his 
mouth with the lack o his hii.d a d que ly said: 

" I 'lowed you gw i: e gimme dat 'possum dog." 

"What! You old rascal," I exclaimed "would you rather 
have a dog than your freedom ? ' 

He looked up an i tuns replied : " Er ole man kin hab comfort 
wid er 'possum d u, sah but when freedom comes ter er ole raan 
it makes him feel foolish." 

" Amos, you are not so old. I will give you two hundred dol- 
lars, and you can go away and be a free man. Although I am 
deeply attached to you, yet I would advise you to stay here. 
Come, and I will give you the money." 

Y"ears passed and the war came. I went as a captain into the 
Confederate army. I shall say but little of my military career, 
for there is but a small part of it that concerns this narration. 
While on a raid in Kentucky I was captured. A number of 
depredations had been cimmitted upon Union men, and I was 
charged with these wanton outrages. I was innocent, but, un- 
fortunately, ha i no proof at my command. I was court-martialed 
and sentenced to be shot. My captors were men who knew me — ■ 
most of them were my neighbors, and despised me for not having 
taken sides with them. 






Jnn. 16, : 



. Fi: VNCISi " NEWS I II fKR. 



Tlif nijhl *»( inirn.. ' . - > I lay, hound with 

• ropr re n-> tent- nmd «u ider marching 

order*. There wrrc do •. »« botlllDg bul i:l ■■"" and a 

(rrrzlng atnui»pbrrr. one -•' niy guards was a man who owned 
a small farm near mine. I had done bint favor*. 

.»»« standing near me — ■ Mills. Ihli war 
buyin* ■ erious, Isn't 

•■ li is for traitors,' ba ana 

•• Thai's all right. Mills; hm ynii shouldn't talk that way to 
me simply because I bold an opinion opposite to your own." 

■ My opinion is tbe one hi: Slate," be replied. -Von 
must remember that Kentucky didn't go out o! •the Union. 
Therefore, you are n . ■ i oiilv a traitor to the general government, 
but a traitor to your own commonwealth." 

■ You look at it Hint way, and perhaps you are right, but I 
was born in Virginia, and Virginia has gone out. I am inclined 
to believe that we made a mistake. As for myself, I should hute 
to see this country disrupted." 

■ Yes. it seems so." he sarcastically answered. »• The certainty 
of being shot at daylight ha- a tendency to make a man thought- 
ful at midnight." 

■• Mills." 

>« Well; hut don't talk so loud. You aie supposed to keep 
silent; but what were ynn going to say?" 

'■ I was going to say that I don't want to be shot at daylight." 

"Oh, you were. How did so strange a thought occur toyonT" 

" It occurred to me in a most natural way. Now, just change 
places with me and — " 

•■ No, thank yon." 

■• I mean that you just suppose yourself in my fix." 

» My imagination isn't that -trong. At school, you know, I 
was always a matter-of-fact sort of fellow. You were the imagina- 
tive boy of the class." 

" Yes. and that 8 one of tbe reasons wby I don't relish the idea 
of being shot at daybreak. It strikes me that if I were in your 
position and you in mine, I would do something for you." 

" Ob, yes, when a man's fancy is wrought up, as yours must be, 
anything is likely to strike him." 

o Mills, don't you remember that if it hadn't been for tuy father 
your brother might have gone to the penitentiary?" 

" Yes; but what's that got to do with this affair?" 

" I should think that gratitude would arise and answer that 
question." 

o That was very well said, bnt you must know that gratitude 
rarely keeps a man from being shot at sunrise. I gad, it rarely 
keeps him from starving to death. There is no gratitude, Cap- 
tain." 

o There may not be with some people." 

" I mean that no man is grateful enough to risk his life. But 
before you go any farther, let me say that it would have been 
better had that brother of mine gone to the pen." 

" Why?" 

o Well, he's in the rebel army." 

" Mills," 1 said, after a few moments' silence, '< if it were not 
for one thing, to-morrow morning could not strike so great a 
terror to my heart." 

" What's that?" 

o I am engaged to marry Mary Caldwell." 

o Handsome girl, but she'll soon forget you." 

o I wish I were untied." 

o Yes, I reckon you would like to take to your heels." 

o I would run away, but not until 1 had knocked you down." 

o Good boy; but I reckon you'd better stop talking now and 
go to sleep. You want to be in good trim, you know, for the 
devil's dress parade." 

He walked off a short distance and sat down, I imagined, for I 
could not see. I wondered what time it was, and just then I 
heard Mills say, in answer to an inquiry, that it must be about 
four o'clock. I beard something move on the ground near me, 
and then there came a whisper that thrilled my heart: 

" Doan say er word, Mars George— I'se yere." 

Then 1 felt myself slowly dragged, and then I was lifted from 
the ground and carefully carried away in the deepened darkness 
of the thick woods. 

oDoes you know me?" came another whisper. 

o Yes; God bless you." 

o Hush. Let me git you round on my back an' den we'll be 
all right." 

He seemed to be running, especially after he struck a path, and 
shortly afterwards the raking boughs of tbe trees assured me we 
were again in the thick woods. 

o Put me down and untie me," I whispered. 

"Hush!" 

He hastened along, going faster and faster. He crossed a frozen 
stream and began to climb a hill. 

"I can put you down now," he said, after a long time. He put 
me down and cut the rope that bound me. I was so stiff and sore 
that I could scarely walk. 

The grayish advance of dawn was marching down the hillside 
when we halted. Old Amos turned to me. Again there was the 
sudden gleam of an ivory smile. 



■• Mai tai not makln' mi 

o' dal ; • i rvr . 

•torn what ■!•• l.aud has permitted mi ler enjoy; and now, sab, 
us ruewnirj 

"This li Christmas. A [ bad not thought nl 

"Yas.au rrprreent, You'll And 

ar buaa In dat Hi le liable down yander.pab. G i may 

da I. and Met 



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AND 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansnire Street. Sin Francisco, California. 



NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO. OF IRELAND; 
ATLAS ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON; 
BOYLSTON INSURANCE CO. OF BOSTON; 
OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE CO OF LONDON. 



WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

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o The California Line of Clippers," I The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

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J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
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Agents for Spreckels' Liue of Hawaiian Packets, 8. 8. Hepworth's Ceiitri 
fugal Machines. Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 
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Estimates furnished for Electric Rnilwnys, Electric Light and Steam 
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35 New Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



B. J. WHEELER. 



J. W. GIRVIN. 



J. W. GIRV!N & CO., 

Rubber and Leather Belting, Hose, Packing, etc. 

Rubber Clothing, Boots, Shoes, etc. 

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See that every Bottle bears the private label of 

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Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 



LLOYD TEV1S. President. San Franoisoo. 
JNO. J VALENTINE, Viob- President 

and Gem. Manaoer, San Francisco. 
JAMES HERON, SiC'ETARY. San FRANCISCO. 
H. B >'AKS Na..issr. Sboy. Nsw York. 
H WADS ORTH Irbasopbr. San FRANCISOa 

office of the 
Vice-Pres't and Gen'l Manager. 




&$ 



Saiv eFicmcisco, *3)cce-w-tGct- 31, 1891. 

Dear Sir: The following is our Annual Report of Precious Metals produced in the States and Territories west of the 
Missouri River (including British Columbia) during 1891, which shows in the aggregate : Gold, $31, 975,994; Silver, $60,614,004; 
Copper, ^13,261,663; Lead, 12,385,780. Total gross result, $118,237,441. The "commercial " value at which the several metals 
named herein have been estimated is: Silver, 9S cts. per oz,; Copper, 11 els. per lb.; and Lead, $4.30 per cwt. 

As in former reports, allowance must be made for probable variations from exact figures, by reason of constantly 
increasing facilities for transporting bullion, ores aud base metals from the mines outside of the .Express, aud the difficulty of 
getting entirely reliable data from private sources. Especially is such the case in the reports from Montana and Colorado; — 
in fact, we have estimated the amount credited to Moutana. Statistics gathered in this way are liable to be exaggerated; but, 
with some modifications on this account, made herein, the final general results reached, while only approximately correct, 
may be accepted as the closest approximation possible under the circumstances. No bullion or coin received by Wells, Fargo 
& Co's Express from the west coast of Mexico during iSgr. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



California 

Nevada 

Oregon 

Washington 

Alaska 

Idaho 

Montana 

Utah 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Dakota 

Texas 

British Columbia. 



Total . 



Gold Dustsnd Bul- 
lion by Express. 



Gold Dust and 

Bullion by other 

Conveyances. 



9,104,772 

2,679,675 

954,000 

187,000 

2,520,000 
2,S40,000 

101,696 

4.647.322 
469,649 
759.132 

3,i96,S3S 
290,876 



#27,750,960 



£1,350,716 

50,000 

30,000 

850,000 



ioo.ooo 
ico,ooo 



$2,480,716 



Silver Bullion 
by Express. 



$ 475.745 

4,oS6,92i 
S4,ooo 
112,000 

4,Soo,ooo 
17,012,000 

2,253,045 

i9,o43.75& 

36,821 

521,344 
209,133 
264,423 



148,899, iSS 



Ores and Ease 
Bullion by Freight. 



$ I,2S4 OOO 
I,979, OI 5 



4,275,000 
8,159,000 
11,053.752 

4.51 1.959 

3,631,270 

4,195,681 

16,900 



$39,106,577 



TOTAL. 



$ 12,215,233 

8,745,611 

i,oS8,ooo 

329,000 

8,30,000 

11,595,000 

2S,OII,OCO 

I3.40S.493 

28,203,037 

4,237,740 

5,576,157 

3,422,871 

264,423 

290,876 



$118,237,441 



The gross yield for 1S91, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows: 

Gold 27 T V 5 $31,975,994 

Silver 5'tSV 60,614,004 

Copper Hr'oV 13,261,663 

Lead ioxYj 12,385,780 

Total $118,237,441 

ANNUAL PRODUCTS OF LEAD, COPPER, SILVER AND GOLD IN THE STATTS AND TERRITORIES WEST OF THE MISSOURI RIVER, 1870-1801 . 



YEAR. 


Production as 
perW. F.StLo's State- 
ments, including 
amounts from British 
Columbia aud West 
Coast of Mexico. 


Product after 
deducting Amounts 

from British 

Columbia and West 

Coast of Mexico. 


The Net Troducts of the States and Territories West of the Missouri River, exclusive 
of British Columbia and West Coast of Mexico, divided, is as follows: 


Lead. 


Copper. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


1870 

1S7I 


$ 54,000,000 
58,284,000 
62,236,959 
72,258,693 
74,401,045 

80,889,057 
90,S75.i73 
98,421,754 
81,154,622 
75,349,501 
So, 167,936 

S4.504.4t 7 
92,411,835 
90,313,612 

S4.975.954 
90,181,260 
103,011,761 
104,645,959 
If4,34i,592 
127,677,836 
127,166,410 
118,237,441 


$ 52,150,000 
55,784,000 
60,35 1, S24 
70, 139, S60 
71,965,610 
76.703,433 
87,219,859 
95, Si 1,582 
78,276,167 
72,6S3,SSS 
77,232,512 
81,198,474 
S9, 207. 549 
84,639,212 
81,633,835 
87.3u.382 
100,160,222 
103,327,770 
112,665,569 
126.723.384 
126 Sot,855 
117,946.565 


$ i.oSo.ooo 
2,100,000 
2,250,000 
3,450,000 
3,800,000 
5,100,000 
5,040,000 
5,085,250 
3,452 000 
4,iS5,769 
5.742.390 
6.361.902 
S,ooS,i55 
8,163.550 
6 S34.091 
8,562.991 
9,185,192 

9.631,073 
11,263,630 

14.593,323 
1I.509.57I 

12,385,780 




$17,320,000 
19,286,000 
19.924,429 
27,483,302 
29,699,122 

31,635,239 
39,292.924 
45,846,109 
37,24s, 137 
37.032,857 
3S.033.055 
42,987,613 

48,133,039 
42,975,101 

43,529.925 
44,516 599 
52. 136,851 
50,833,884 
53,15^,747 
64,808,637 

6^,930,S3i 
60,614,004 


$33,750.ooo 
34,39S,oco 

38,177.395 
39,206,558 
3S,466,4SS 
39,968,194 
42,SS6,935 
44,SSo,223 
37,576,030 
31,470,262 
32,559,067 

30,653.959 

29,011, ^iS 

27,816,640 

25. iS3,567 

26,393,756 

29.561,424 

32.500,067 ■ 

29,987,702 

32,527,661 

31.795.361 

31,685,118 




1873 

1S74 

IS75 

1S76 








IS77 

1S7S 

1879 

1SS0 

1SS1 

1SS2 

iSS? 

I8S4 

U85 

ISS6 

ISS7 

I8S8 

iSSg 

1S91 






$ 89S 000 
1,195,000 
4.055,037 
5.6S3 921 
6,086,252 
7,S3S.o 3 6 

9,276.755 
10,3:2,746 
iS,26i,49'j 

14.793,763 
20,569,092 
13,261,663 



The exports of Silver during the past year to Japan, China, the Straits, etc., have been as follows: From London, 
$33,467,075; from San Francisco, $7,912,370. Total, $41,379,445, as against $47,974,309 last year. Pounds Sterling estimated 
at $4.84. 



Jan. IB, 1892. 



BAN PB wr W8 ' i:i in;. 



Wvviteb ^ la lc > of ^lUA-ico. 

ITATBCBfT Of TBI P.O0CC1 OP OOLD AMD SO.VSK U n . „ CT, „ TK..M ,• 

VA1 sis 



YEARS 


Cold. 


si: -. 


T-.TAI 




* 7I7.000 
881,000 

942,000 

1,013,000 

000 

956000 
1,055,000 

914,000 
1,026,000 
1,047,000 
1,031,000 
1.040,000 
1,100,000 
1,150,000 


7.000 

'.OOO 

29.234,000 

LOCO 

29,569,000 
11.000 
33.226,000 
34. 1 r 2,000 
34,600,000 
34,912.000 
40,706,000 
41,500,000 
43,000,000 






1879 


1S79-1SS0 




1SS0-1SS1 

1S81-1S82 


^7.712.000 
I7.000 


1S82-1S8', 


i.OOO 


iSSi-i.SS 4 




i^;-iSSs 


32.750,000 


;-iSS6 


3 1.140,000 


18S6-1RS7 


35,138,000 


18S7-1888 

1S8S-1SS9 


35.647,000 
35.943.000 

41.746,000 
42,600,000 


18S9-1S90 


1890-1891 






Total 


113,839,000 


$458,645,000 


$472,484,000 



EXHIBIT OF COINAGE OF GOLD, SILVER AND COPPER, IN TIIE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, FROM THE 1ST OF JULY 187? 

TO THE 30TH OF JUNE, 189I. ' 



YEARS. 


Gold Dollars. 


Silver Dollars. 


CorrER Dollars. 


1873-1S74 


IS66.743 
862,619 
809,401 
695,750 
691,998 
658,206 
521, S26 
492,068 

452,590 
407,600 
328,698 
423,250 
425,000 
410 000 
340,320 
305,100 
243,298 
308,000 


$18,846,067 
I9-3S6,95S 
I9.454.054 
21.415.12S 
22,084,203 
22, 162,987 
24.01S.52S 
24,617.395 
25,146,260 
24,083,921 

25.377.379 
25,840,728 
25,850,000 
25,600,000 
26,711,000 
25,274,500 
24,328,326 
24,238,000 


$15,966 




1S75-1S76 


30.654 


1876-1S77 


1S77-1S78 


9,035 
41,364 
16,300 
14.035 
42,258 
. ",972 


187S-1S79 




iSSo-iSSr 


18S1-1S82 


18S2-1S83 


1883-1S84 




18S4-18S5 




1SS5-18S6 




1886-18S7 

1887-1SSS 




1888-1S89 

1889-1890 












Total 


19,242,467 


I424.435.434 


$203,296 





Summary.— Totals : Gold, #9,242,467 ; Silver, $424,435,434 ; Copper, $203, 296 ; Grand Total, #433,881,197. 



EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN I537 TO THE END OF TEE 

FISCAL YEAR OF 1891. 



Colonial. Epoch. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Copper. 


TOTAL. 




$ 8,497,950 
.19,889,014 
40.39M47 


$752,067,456 
441,629,211 
888,563,989 


$200,000 


$760,765,406 
461,518,225 
929,298,329 




342,893 


Independence. 


$68,778,411 


$2,082,260,656 


$542,S93 


$2,151,581,960 




$ 557,392 
45,040,628 


$ 18 .575.569 
740,246,485 




$ 19,132,961 
790,522,290 


Republic Eagle — 1824 to 30th June, 1873 


$5,235,177 


Republic. 


$45,598,020 


$758,822,054 


$5,235,177 


1809,655,251 


Eagle coin, from 1st July, 1S73, to 30th of 


$9,242,467 


$424,435,434 


$203,296 


I433.88i,i97 





SUMMARY. 

Colonial Epoch — from 1537 to 1821, $2,151,581,960; Independence— from 1822 to 1873, $809,655,251 ; Republic — from 
1873 to 1891, $433,881,197. Total, $3,395,118,408. 

The returns from Mexico continue to show a steady forward movement, in full accord with the healthy progress of 
mineral developments and mining interests in the United States. This result is owing, in great measure, to the liberal and 
friendly policy of the Federal Government of Mexico, which has afforded enterprises of the kind every reasonable encour- 
agement. The prospects for the future are also very bright. 




/i^c^^z^o^f<^j 



Vice-President and General Manager. 



23 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



Jan. 16, 1892. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour is steady; foreign demaud good; Extras ?5.40@$5.55: Superfine, $3.45. 

Wheat is dull; light trade; Shipping, $1.77%! Milling, $l.80@$1.82>£ per 
cental. 

Barley is slack; Brewing, $1 lS@$l 20; Feed. $1 05@$1.121£ per ctl. 

Oats. Milling, *1.4'2^r^l.o0; Feed, $l.35(#*l.-l0 per ctl. 

Corn, .White, $1 35@ft l '6l\' z \ Yellow, $l.27l£rg$1.35 per ctl. 

Rye, no stock, good demaud, $1.55y&$1.60. Ce ra.fi ut, ?2.00@2.75. 

Hay is steady; Wheat, $13(#*UJ: Oats, $13@$15; Alfalfa, $11@$1'2 50. 

Millstuffs, good demaud. Bran, ?17®?19 per ton. 

Beaus, good request, $l.S5@$J.30 per ctl. Potatoes, 30<*.@50c per ctl. 

Butter is higher; Choice, 8.5c. @37VoC. ; Fair, 20c.@25c; Eastern, 15cto'25c. 

Cheese, light stock. 10c. @12c. Eggs, light supply, 35c.@45e. 

Houey, Comb, 10c.fg)13c. : Extracted, 6e.@i\%c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth U£c. Beeswax is lower at 22c.@24c. 

Fruit— all kiuds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Raisins and Dried Grapes in high favor at good paying rates. 

Hides are steady; Dry, 7c@10c. Wool is in demand at 14c @22c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the sel er at 7@7'.£c 

Coffee steady at 15c.@21c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is lower, with a decliniug tendency. Nuts find ready sale. 

Quicksilver is scarce at $<K00 per flask. Hops are iu demaud at 14@20c. 

Sugar, good stocn of both Raws and Refined. Whites, 5@b%c. 

The arrival of deep water vessels thus far during the month 
have been numerous, adding largely to our stocks of home and 
foreign merchandise. Our bonded and other water front ware- 
houses are filled to repletion with Cement, Salt, Pig Iron, Coal, 
etc., to say nothing of general merchandise. 

Business in the foregoing mentioned lines of goods is dull, and 
trade is exceedingly inactive. Tonnage \s for the time being 
superabundant, and grain charters are down to bed-rock prices, 
with little or no demand. Exporters of grain have their fill of 
charters at rates far above current nominal figures. 

The weather thU3 far, during the winter months, has been and 
is every way favorable to the agricultural and horticultural inter- 
ests. Farmers are busy plowing and seeding the grounds. Some 
slight injury has befallen the citrus fruits, but not to an extent 
to affect the market supply. 

The Tubbs' Cordage Company has raised the price of the differ- 
ent kinds of their rope from J to lc per pound. 

There is soiue talk of a boom in the Calcutta Bag market, but 
this seems to us to be rather premature, from the fact of some 
20,000,000 bags having already been contracted for in Calcutta; 
and this, added to our carry-over stock of 5.000,000 bags, and to 
the proposed out-put of the local Prison. The question of a 
large or small Wheat crop is yet an uncertain quantiiy. 

Imports include the Eclipse cargo from Philadelphia, consisting 
largely of Iron Rails, Iron Pipe and other heavy goods, embracing 
6,000 cases Merchandise. The ship Melville Esland, from London, 
had for leading items of cargo 7,010 cks. Cement, 500 kegs Nails, 
975 bags Sugar, 435 pkgs. Almond Stones, etc. The ship General 
Knox, from New York, had for cargo 5 753 Steel Rails and a large 
quantity of Manufactured Iron, etc. The Duchess of Albany had 
for cargo from Liverpool 5.500 boxes Tin Plate, 6.244 sks. Salt, 
1.184 coils Rope, 300 drrus. Caustic Soda, 10,000 bars and bundles 
Iron, 2,140 kegs Nails, etc. 

The ship Alcido is en route from Liverpool with 53,000 boxes 
Tin Plate. 

The steamer Australia is to hand from Honolulu with 4 443 
bags Sugar, U30 bags Rice and 6,937 bunches Bananas; also 900 
bdls. Hides. 

From the Isthmus and way ports we have the Pacific Mail 
steamship San Bias, with a large New York cargo of 394 pkgs. 
Sheetings, Iron and other heavy goods; from Europe, 22 pkgs. 
cbeese, 490 pkgs. Oil, 150 pkgs. Soap, 21 pkgs. Sheep Shears, etc. ; 
from Central America, 3.936 sks. Coffee; from Mexico, 782 bxs. 
Limes, 13 crts. Pineapples, etc, 

The British Columbia Salmon pack the last season, as published 
by Commerce, aggregated 312,197 cases. In 1890 the pack was 
409 4G4 cases, and in 1888, 414,294 cases. The market at present 
is lifeless. 

The Br. steamship Monowai sailed for the Colonies on the 12th 
inst., carrying Government mails, passengers, and for cargo mer- 
chandise valued at $94,080, consisting in part of the following 
leading items: To Australia, 46,761 lbs. Dried Fruit, 1,427 cases 
Conned Fruit, 50 bbls., 500 £-bbls., 25 J bbls. and 1 427 cs. Canned 
Salmon, 387 flsks. Quicksilver, 502 gals. Whale Oil, 15 rolls 
Leather, 182 bbls. Oil, 30,608 lbs. Broom Corn, 7,500 lbs. Codfish, 
50 csks. Beer, 1,204 Doors, 13 929 lbs. Coffee, etc. To New Zea- 
land, 760 cs. Salmon, 3,600 lbs. Codfish, 1,957 lbs. Hops, 150 cs. 
Canned Fruit, 1,250 lbs. Dried Fruit, etc. For Honolulu, 1,725 
lbs. Cheese, 1,112 lbs. Bacon and Hams. To Apia, 600 lbs. Cod- 
fish, 12 bbls. Flour, etc. To Fiji, 24 cs. Canned Fruit. 



Skainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rentea, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 

Monkey fur slippers, solid comfort for Eastern friends at Marsh's 
Japanese Art Repository, under Palace Hotel. 



TRUSTEE'S NOTICE 

OF 

SALE! 



The undersigned, J. 
creditors of 



C. Maynard, Trustee for the benefit of the 



M. J. FLAVIN & CO., 

Of the City and County of San Francisco, invites sealed proposals 
for the stock of Clothing, Boots, Shoes, b'urnishing Goods. Hats, 
Caps, etc., now in his possession and contained in the premises gen- 
erally known as the I X L STORE. Nos. 920-930 Market street. San 
Francisco, as well as for the Fixtures, Showcases and Safe contained 
therein. Separate bids are invited for ihe entire stock of Merchan- 
dise and for the Fixtures, Showcases and Safe. Bids are invited at a 
percentage of the dollar upon the cost inventory valuation of said stock 
and at a Jump sum for the Fixtures, Showcase's and Safe. Inspection 
of inventory and of stock may be had on application to the under- 
signed on the premises. 

A certified check for 10 per cent, of the amount bid must accom- 
pany each tender. Bids will be received up to and including the 19th 
day of January, 1892, and all bids will be opened at the law offices of 
Rothschild t fc Ach, No. 303 California street. San Francisco, on the 
20th day ot January, 1892, at 2 o'clock p. m. Bids should be directed to 
the undersigned", at the office of Rothschild & Ach. Terms cash. The 
right to reject any and all bids is hereby reserved. 

J. C. MAYNARD, 
Trustee for the benefit of the creditors of M. J. Flavin & Co. 

San Francisco. January 7. 1892. 



Fall Millinery ! 



I will be pleased to have 
you examine our large stock 
of FALL MILLINERY. 

1 will convince you that 
you will save at least 25 per 
cent by purchasing your 
Millinery from the direct 
importer. 

P. F. BUTLER, 

808 Market Street, Phelan Building. 




>ETNA 

MINERAL 

WATER 

CURES 

DYSPEPSIA. 
SOLD EVERYWHERE. 

LAVER, MULLANY &, LAVER, 

ARCHITECTS, 

Furnish plaus, specifications, and Superintendence for the construction 
or renovation of dwelling houses, aud every description of building. 
Office: 93 Flood Building, Cor. nil and Market sis., S. F. 



Jan. lfi, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



39 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY, 

PAHFir SYSTEM. 

Trains L««ve nnd are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

liatb From December 6, 1891. 



7 00 a B«Qiria, Hutn>of, Sacramento 
TA)i. H»rw*rO*. Mueaand omn 
840a. ManiDei. ?au Kam»u and Ual- 



7 15 r. 
•li.iar. 

6:15 r. 



•8 00 a. El Vorauo aud Santa Ko»a 
SOOa. iacram'to ji Kcddlug, TiaLiavta 
840 a. Swoud Cla#* forOffdeu and E**t, 

and fir.-i class locuty 
8:30a. Nile*. Sail JOM. Slucktou, Imie, 
Sacramento, Marv»vii,. 
Ttlleand Ked Blurt" 
9:00a. Los Angeles KxpreMi. Fresuo. 
Baker^fleld, uuU Barbara A 
Los Aueek-s. 
12-00*. Haywards. Niles and Livermore 
■lOOr. Sacramento River Steamer- 
8KW p. Hsywanl.-, Nik's and .-an Jose 
4.00 p. Marti uez, San Kammi a Stockton 
440 P. Vallejo, cali^toga, El Yerauoaud 

Sauta Rosa 
4.10 P. Benicta, Vacaville, Sacramento. 

4.30P. Woodland aud Oroville 

HstfUr. Nile* and Livermore 

5;00p. Sunset Koute, Atlantic Express, 
Sauta Barbara, Los Augeles, 
Deming, El Paso, New Orleans 

and East 

5:00 p. Sauta Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mohave aud East 

6:00 p. Hay wards, Niles aud San Jose.. 

Ntlea and San Jose 16:15 p. 

6:00 p. Ogden Route Atlantic Express, 

Ogden and East. 11:45 a. 

17:00 p. Vallejo +8:45 P. 

7:U0p. Shasta Route Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Bedding, Port- 

laud, Fuget Sound and East. 

Santa Cruz Division. 
8:15a. Newark, Ceuterville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz. 

•2:15 P. Centerville, dan Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

SantaCruz.. *10:50a. 

415p. Centerville, San Jose, Los Gatos, y:tolA 
fll:45p. Hunters' Train to Newark, Al- 
viso, San Jose aud Los Gatos. J8:05p. 



10.46 P. 



(1>F. 



12:15 T. 

T 1 . r. 
•v4ur. 
V:4oa. 
9:46 A. 

9.45A. 
1U.4ja. 
10 :45 a. 
•0:45 a. 



8:45 P. 



12:15 P. 
7:45 a. 



8:15 A 



6:20 p. 



Coast Division (Third a id Townsend Streets). 



7:00 a. San Jose, Almaden and Way Sta- 
tions 

8:30a. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos.Pa- 
jaro, SantaCruz, Monterey, Pa- 
cific Grove, Salinas, San Mi- 
guel, Paso Robles and Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) 
and principal Way Stations 
10:37a. San Jose, and Way Stations — 
12:15 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 

*2:30p. San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, PacificGrove 

aud principal Way Stations. ' 

*3:30p. Menlo Park, Sau Jose and Prin- 
ciple Way Stations * 

*4:15p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . 

5 :15 p. San Jose and Way Stations . . ... 

6:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . 

f-Tl:45p. Menlo Park and principal Way 

Stations 



6:10 p. 
5:10 p. 



10:48 A. 

10:03 A. 
*8:06a. 

9:03 a. 

6:35 a. 

+7:30 p. 



a. tor Morning. p. for Afternoon. 
•Sundays excepted. +Saturdays only. 
ISundays only. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. 5. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 
Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Oceanic Saturday, Jan. K>,- 1892. 

Gaelic (via Honolulu).. .Thursday, Feb. 4, 1892. 

Belgic Tuesday, March 1st, 1892. 

Oceanic Thursday, March 24, 1892 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, atthe 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San 
Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. PasB. Agt. 

GEO. H.RICE. Traffic Manaeer. 

ATLANTIC & PACIFIC R. R. 

(Santa Fe Route) 

Trains Leave an* Arrive at San Francisco. 

(Market St. Ferry.) 



L've Daily | *rom Nuv. 1, 1S91. | Ar've Daily 



5:00 p. M. 
9:00 a.m. 



Fast exp. via Mojave 
Atlantic Express 
via Los Angeles 



12:15 a. m. 
8:45 p. m. 



LETT ME BELIEVE 

I*ot me believe you. l«»v<\ or lei mi 
If on four faith I may nol n 

Beyond all chanCC "1 pond venfur. 

Trusting y«mr hall avowals sweet and shy, 

,\s trusts the lark tin- pallid, lawn-lit sky, 
Then wnuiii I rather In aome grave obscure 
Repose forlorn, than living on, endure 

A question each dear transport to belie. 

It is a pain t<> thlrsl anil do without. 
A pain to MitWr what \w deem unjust, 
To win it joy and lay it in the dust; 

But there's a Dercer pain the pain <<i donbl 
Prom other griefs death Bets the spirit free 
Doubt --teals the light from immortality ! 



IT is astonishing how few English palaces 
have stitfereil from fire. Whithall was 
destroyed, certainly, and Kensington Pal- 
ace was burnt down in the seventeenih 
century. But there has never been a fire 
of consequence at Buckingham Palace, nor 
in any of the Queen's palaces. The fire at 
8t. James's Palace in the early days of this 
century was a very paltry affair, and the 
last fire at Hampton Court was extinguish- 
ed with a few bucketfuls of water. Great 
care is taken, of course, much greater than 
at Sandringbam, where fires are lighted in 
every room in the house for some days be- 
fore the Prince or Princess arrives, and 
often after tbey are in residence. All visi- 
tors to the place find fires in their bed- 
rooms — fires which are kept alight day and 
night; and in numbers there is an un- 
doubted danger. 



OreJ2M& 

300 Post Sreet. 

Art Novelties and Holiday, Birthday 
and Wedding Presents. 
Oriental Draperies. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 



Through Line to New Yoek, via Panama. 

Steamers will sail at NOON on the 5th, 15th and 

25th of each month. 



CALL AT 



Ticket Office, 650 Market St., Chronicle Build- 
ing, 8. F. W. A. BISSELL, 

General Passenger A gent. 



DEPARTURES OF 



5th and 25th | Mazatlau and La Libertad. 

5th, 15th and 25th I Acapuco. 

25th. | Oeos, La Union. [texrala. 

5th and 15th Champerico, San Jose de Gua- 

16th | Acajutla, Corinto, Point Arena. 

Through LlneSailings.— January 25th, S S. SauB'aa; 
February 5th, "City of Sydney; " 15th, S. S. "San 
Jose." 

Way Line to Mexican and Central American Po ts 
and rat.ama.— Steamer sails at noon 15th of each 
month, calling at Mazatlan, San Bias, Manzauillu, 
Acapulco. Port Angel, Saliua Cruz, Tooala, San 
Benito, Oeos, Champerico, San Jose de Guatemala, 
Acajutla, La Libertad, La Union, Amapala, Cor- 
into, San Juan del Sur and Punta Arenas. 

Way Line Saili-g.— February 15th, S. S. "Colima " 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA AND 

HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for East 

Indies, Straits, etc.: 

China— Wednesday, February 17, 1892, at »p M 

"City of Peking"— Saturday, March 12, 1892, a' 

3 P.M. 

Round TriD Tickets to Yokohama and return at 
reduced rates. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, corner 
First aud Brannau streets, Branch office— 202 
Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 

RAILWAY. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-fl AIIGE ROUTE." 

■ »l'NI»AY. -I. and 

until further notice, H.mt* Mid I'raln* will 

leave fr>>m and »rnvc at lh« Ban Kranrlf.cn Pa*- 

I Depot. MAKKKTSTRKKI WHAKK. an 

wiv: 

From San Francisco tor Point Tfburon Belvedere and 

San Rafael. 
WEEK PAYS -7:40 a.m.. 9:20a.m., 11:40 A. M.; 

a SOp. M..SO0 p. M.,fi-J0p. M. 
BATTKDAYS ONI V An ,-xira trip At I:M>p.m. 
BTNDA . '.i.30 a.m., 11:00 A.M.; 2:00 P.M. 

m., 6:16 p. m. 
From San Rafael tor San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS— 048 a. m., 7 K *. H., 9:30 a. m. 
12 l P.M., 3:40 p.m., 6:05 P.M. 

SA riTRDAYS ONLY— An extra trip m BQ p.m. 

B| Ni'AY.i — vIO a.m., 9:10 a.m.. 12 I > i . M., 8:10 P.M. 

6*0 r M..r. : 25 P. M. 

r-rom Point Tlburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK DAY3-0:60 A.M., 8:20 a.m., 9:55 a.m.; 1:10 

p. m., 1:06 P. m., 5.:. i.i p. m. 

Saturdays only an extra trip at 6:56 p m 

SUNDAYS— «:85 A.M., 10:05 A.M.; 12:10 P.M., 
1:05p.m., 5;30p.M., 6:50 p.m. 



LkayeS. F. 




Arkive 


INS. F. 


Da^ : s » U(ifl y« 


Destination. 


Sundays 


Week 
Days. 


7:10A.M. 
3:30 p.m. 
5:00 P.M, 


3:00a.m. 
9:30 a.m. 
5:00f. M. 


Petaluma 

and 

Santa Rosa. 


10:40 a. M 8:5(1 a. M. 
6:05 P.M 10:80 A. M 
7:25P.M <1:10p.M. 




8:00A.M. 


Fulton 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Litton Suriinrs. 






7:40 a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


7:26 p.m. 


10:30a. M 
6:10 P.M 










7:40a. M. 


8:00 a.m. 


Hoplaud 
and Ukiah. 


7:25 p. m. 


6:10 p.m. 


7:40 a.m. 
3:30 p.m 


8:00a. m. 


Guerneville. 


7:25p.m. 


10:30 a.m. 
6:10 p.m. 


7:40 a.m. 
5;C0 p. M. 


8:00a.m. 
5:00 P.M 


Sonoma and 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40a.m. 
6:05 p.m 


S:50a.M. 
6:10p.m. 


7:40 a. m 
3:30 P.M 


8:00a.m 
5:00 p.ar 


Sebastopol | 10:40 a. m 
J fr;05 p. m 


10:30 am 
6:10 p.m 



Stages connect at Sauta Rosa for Mark West 
Springs ; a t Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala aud Point Areua; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay; at Hopland 
for Lakeport ; at Ukiah for Vichy Spfi ngs, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Lakeport, 
willits, Canto, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, West- 
port, Uisal, Hydesville and Eureka. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
iays— To Petaluma, ?1 50; to Santa Rosa, $2 25; to 
healdsburg, ?3 40:. to Cloverdale, $4.50; to Hop- 
land, |5.70; to Ukiah, $6.75: to Sebastopol, $2.70; 
to Guerneville, $3.75; to Sonoma, $1.50; to Glen 
Ellen, $1.80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, $1 ; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Healds- 
burg, $2.25; to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, $1,50; to 
Hopland, $3.80: to Sebastopol, $1.80; to Guerne- 
ville, $2.50; to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1.20. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pasd. and Tkt. Agt. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New Montgomery Street. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows; 

The steamers CITY OF PUEBLA, WALLA 
WALLA and UMATILLA, direct for VICTORIA, 
B. C, and PUGET SOUND ports, at 9 a. m. every 
five days. 

The steamers sailing for Puget Sound ports at 
9 a. m. connect at Port Townsend with steamers 
or Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
U. P. R'y Co. every four days. 

For SANTA CRUZ, MUNTEREY, San Simeon, 
Cayucos, Santa Barbara, San Buenaventura, 
Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Angei.es and San 
Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA, ARC ATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, steamer LOS ANGELES, every Wed- 
nesday, at 9 a, m. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

The splendid 3 , 000-ton steamers of this line, car- 
rying the United ftaies, Hawaiian and Colonial 
Mailb, sail from Folsom street Wharf, as under: 

For Honolulu Only, 
S. S. Australia (3,000 tons) Tuesday Dec. 22, 1891, at 

2 P. M. 

Fop Honolulu, Auckland and 

Sydney, Direct, 

S. S. MoNOWai January 11, 1892, at 3 P. m« 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 
ket street. 

JOHN D. SPRECKELS & BROS., 
General Agents 



TOLD ON THE LATE "WATCH. 



THERE were five of the gang in the reporter's room and only- 
one packet of plug-cut tobacco. Plug-cut tobacco ia generally 
used for pipes, but reporters prefer cigarettes, and that is way 
they were not as happy as they might have been under other circum- 
stances. 

It was Monday night and everybody disclaimed owning a nickel. 
It was also too late to hope to encounter an " angel," and all things 
considered the late watch had reason to feel sad. 

An " angel," by the wa} 1 — and this par parenthese — is one of the few 
streaks of sunshine that illumine the darkness which invariably be- 
sets the latter half of the reporter's fiscal week. It is a party who 
possesses a purse, a thirst, and a convivial disposition. Often report- 
ers go out looking for " angels " just the same as they go out on de- 
tails after murders and things; and it is truly wonderful to note the 
number of journalistic f 'iends that one reporter can meet between the 
moment of his first meeting any given "angel" and accepting his 
invitation to have something in the nearest caravansary. 

Even more beautiful still it is to watch the diplomatic way in which 
the lucky one will pilot his open hearted comrade past even three or 
four reputable licensed victualers' establishments, if he knows that 
there are a couple of his equally thirsty comrades hanging around 
the door of a fifth one beyond. But this talk about " angels" is di- 
gression. It was Monday night, and there were no " angels " at all 
in the dismal reporter's pen at police headquarters. 

" This is what I call tough ! " said Harkell, as he rolled another 
cigarette in a covering of copy paper. 

" Tough in my eye! " ejaculated Kane. " Why, you've nothing to 
do but sit here and wait, while lots of fellows are plodding through 
ten miles of mud for two sticks of copy, and don't kick at it 
either." 

" How's that ? " chorused the other four, with the interest begotten 
of sympathy. 

" Why, that is what the fellows have to do who cover night police 
for the New York agencies. If I'd a nickel for every time I've covered 
that assignment — we call a detail an assignment back East — I would 
not be trying to twist cigarettes out of Wilson's plug-cut to-night." 

" I remember one night I was doing the East Side stations, when I 
happened on what looked like a good sensation at the Bellevue Hos- 
pital. The episode is one that never fully found its way into print; 
it happened away back in the eighties, but it was one that I have 
never been able to get out of my head, and if you wait till I roll my- 
self another cigarette I'll tell it to you." 

The reporter carefully tilted back his chair as he spoke, and with 
his heels balanced on the desk in front, proceeded to help himself 
from the only packet of tobacco in the place, and to curse the quality 
of said tobacco with deep and earnest fluency. When he had finished 
his self-imposed task, he let his heels fall with a bang. " Now boys," 
said he, " I'll tell you how a girl's grit knocked the bottom out of an 
Al story. 

" It was nearly midnight when I got to Bellevue Hospital, and, so 
far, I had not picked up a line of news in the stations along my 
route. I looked over the book for a list of cases. There were half a 
dozen broken legs and things, a few contusions and split scalps that 
were not worth even a local brevity; and then, with no particulars of 
her hurt or ailment, was written the name ' Carrie Stein.' 

" Now Carrie Stein is as common a name among Germans as May 
Smith would be among English people; nevertheless it interested me 
then, and I asked the attendant what was the matter with the woman, 
whoever she was, and why her illness had not been regularly entered 
on the register. 

"'Well,' said he, ' we're just waiting for developments, and I 
guess it is a Coroner's case anyhow. There's an officer over 
there who will tell you more than I can. He is waiting for the 
Coroner to come and take her ante-mortem statement.' 

" Luckily I knew the officer. He ^vas from the 19th Precinct; I 
had met him on a couple of other cases previously and we had be- 
come quite friends. 

" He told me the story tersely enough. Carrie Stein was a young 
girl and a beautful one. What her real name was she refused to tell, 
and there was nothing whatever in her possession whereby she 
could be identified. 

"'She's Dutch, sure;' said he, 'but for all that she do be a rale 
lady. She's dying, too, an' that's as sure as God made little apples.' 

" Then he told me the rest of her story. Some one had ruined 
her; who it was, the girl refused to tell. She had gone to one of 
those criminal practitioners in which all big cities abound, and his 
treatment had killed her. 

" ' She gave the doctor's name quick enough,' said the officer, ' an' 
Sergeant Duggan's gone to arrest him. They'll be here rightaway, 
and the Coroner wid 'em; an' den we'll get her deposition, an,' 
please God, the man as is responsible, will be after swingin' for 
murder.' 

" Even as he spoke the door opened and the sergeant entered with 
his prisoner. Behind him came Coroner Eidmann and four other re- 
porters, who had ' got on ' to the story at the 19th precinct station. 

" They were all dripping wet and shivering with the cold, for it was 
a dreary night out-side. All were excited over the prospects of a big 
story, that is all except the wretched doctor, who was pale as a ghost 



with terror, and whose nose and forehead were reaking with big 
beads of perspiration. 

" 'Mv God!' " he said, " 'I never did it! It's a He! I nerer saw the 
girl! it's '" 

'"Shut up! '"said the Sergeant. " 'What are you hollerin' for? Who 
said you done anything?" 

"At that moment one of the hospital physicians came into the 
office. 

" ' Coroner,' said he, ' if you want that woman's ante-mortem state- 
ment you had better hurry up stairs. She's sinking fast.' 

"We wasted no more time, but all got into the elevator, the police 
and their prisoner entering first, while we boys followed with the 
Coroner. 

" I can remember what followed as plainly as though it occurred 
but yesterday. 

" We all crept into the ward stealthily. The gas was turned so low 
that the beds looked like white catafalques in the gloom, and you 
could hear nothing but the moaning of wretched women as they 
tumbled on beds of pain, and occasionally the short stentorous grunts 
of others endeavoring to suppress unbidden shouts of agony. Three 
big block folding screens had been placed around one cot, and to that 
we were beckoned by one of the nurses. 

" On the bed behind the wall of screens lay Carrie Stein— one of 
the loveliest women I have ever set my eyes on. She was tall and 
dark. Great masses of wavy black hair were tossed about her pillow, 
and her clear-cut features were simply patrician in their regularity. 
She had one of those cupid-bow mouths, and black eyes that gleamed 
like coals in her feverishness. One could see by her thin, narrow 
hands and almon i-shaped nails that she had never had to work for a 
livelihood; in fine, she was gentle-born, and, as the officer had 
described her, a lady. 

'■ She tried to smile when we clustered around her bed, and even 
endeavored to greet us, but was too weak to do so. 

" The Coroner was a little bit nervous. It was a hard task for 
him to tell such a sweet-looking girl that she was about to die; but 
she saw the look of trepidation on his face and understood it. 

" ' I am dying sir! ' said she, I know it! ' 

" You have seen those blank forms on which they write ante-mor- 
tem statements. Well, Eidmann had a bundle of them in his pocket, 
and he handed them to me. ' You can write quicker than I can, 
Kane,' said he, ' jot down what she says, while I question her.' 

" There was a little table at the head of the bed, and, using it for a 
desk, I endeavored to write out her story. 

'* ' You know you are going to die ? ' 

" ' Yes, sir.' 

" ' Do you know this man? ' 

" The Sergeant brought his prisoner to the bedside. 

" ' Yes, sir.' 

" 'She doesn't! I swear she doesn't!' cried the wretch; while the 
Sergeant seized him by the neck as though to throttle him, and 
whispered in his ear, ' Don't shout before women folk that are 
dying! ' 

" ' Did he do anything to you ? ' continued the Coroner. 

" The girl looked at the wilting scoundrel, and then back to her 
questioner. 

" ' He killed me,' she whispered, and then she closed her eyes. 

"The nurse held a little glass of brandy to her lips, but the girl 
was slow to revive. I watched her and saw that her lips were getting 
blue, and that the black rings beneath her eyes were deepening. Out- 
side the screens, and through the dark passage-way of the ward the 
accused practitioner was stalking up and down between the beds 
like a madman. 

" ' I am not guilty! I am not guilty! ' I heard him say; and then 
he would go up to the cot of some suffering woman and clutch her 
by the arm, and reiterate ' I am not guilty ! ' 

" The girl revived a little, and the examination continued. She 
told all the particulars of her visit to the physician. She gave her 
age as nineteen, her birthplace Germany. 

" ' Where abouts in Germany?' asked the Coroner. 

" ' I will not tell.' 

" ' And your name?' 

'' ' Carrie Stein.' 

" ' Is that your real name?' 

" ' No; but it will do.' 

" ' But what is your real name?' 

" ' I will not tell.' 

" Some extra data about how and when she met the physician were 
coaxed from the dying girl, and then, for a second time, she fainted 
away. As soon as she recovered the examination commenced again ; 
but not a word could we get from Carrie that would implicate any 
one but the doctor. 

" The end was drawing very near, and for the third time the Coroner 
attempted to secure the name that might be the link to the girl's en- 
tire history. 

" ' You had a lover,' he said. 

'" I had.' 

" ' Does he know that you are dying? ' 

" The tears came into her black eyes as she answered ' No.' 

" ' Won't you tell us his name? ' 

" ' No! ' she answered; and the third time a gleam of a smile shone 
through the pallor of her face. 



Jan. 16, 



BAN n: INCIS< NEWS I ETTttR, 



31 



! whv VOO'1 >'•! ' ' whcrrflr*! |hr OofOtlcr. 

-in jrmre a *««!>. Her thin ringer-" rltnrhrd. an 4 with a 

r -rt -hi- rai*c 1 herself on her ■ in *«* her •?« now. 

antl (m*I the ■ b Rrsi il me for I wa» DOarest t«> her, am) 

then at Coroner Kiilmann. It «,w ,n «urc of triumph, an exulting 

gleam of con |Q6St, 

Wbj »h« Cried. ' Why '-Why will I m.l tell you' ' 

Irh liebe, frh HH < I love him ! I love him ' " i 
-ank back. ami her I again, and the nurse hastened 

p her. As she did so th< i oroner tomed around ami hoed as 
repor- 

• :iiii he. aii.l hi- to I ha sky, ' Boys, that girl is 

a brick. You may want a Btory from her. but 1 respect grit. I 11 be 
hanged if I'll ask her again for the name of the man that betrayed 
her! >he loved him. you see, and ?oiue of us have had lovers our- 

•' You will have no more occasion to question her, Coroner, ' in- 
terjected the h'wpital physician, at this point. ' Gentlemen.' h<> con- 
tinued. ' we had better go down to the office; Carrie Stein is dead." 

Edward A. Mokphy. 



WELLS. FARGO & CO. 



IN this number of the News Letter we present Wells, Fargo & 
Co.'s annual report of precious metals product in the United 
States and Mexico, a generally recognized and leading authority 
on the subject. 

In this connection, a brief resume of the career of this 
popular company will not be amiss. In the month of 
March. 1852, Henry Wells. William G. Fargo and others 
organized in New York City, under the laws of the State 
of New York, Wells, Fargo Sc Company, to transact an ex- 
press, exchange and banking business, particularly on the Pacific 
Coast, but also between San Francisco. New York ami Europe. 
The company sprang into existence, Minerva-like, fully equipped 
for service, and at once engaged upon its long mission of trust 
and responsibility, ever since maintaining itself successfully 
amidst some of the most trying commercial vicissitudes; extend- 
ing its lines farther and farther, over mountains, across deserts 
and plains, and along inland water-ways, until it spans the 
broad continent, extending throughout forty-one States and Ter- 
ritories witbin tbe United States and Mexico, as well as reaching 
Great Britain and Continental Europe. In 1888 it acquired the 
Erie system, centering in New York, and extensive auxiliary 
lines, thus securing its own direct through lines to New York, 
Boston and all other large commercial centers, and where it is 
now prominently represented. The company operates nearly 
40,000 miles of lines by railway, stage and steamer; has 2,830 
agencies, and over 6,000 employees ; transacts millions of business 
annually in its express department; and bandies, in its banking 
department, its accumulated capital and deposits amounting to 
over $10,000,000. The main office of the company in New York 
City is at 63 Broadway, but its headquarters proper, or general 
accounting office, is in San Francisco. 

It was Wells, Fargo & Company that originated, in 1860, the 
famous Pony Express, for the most rapid conveyance then pos- 
sible of important mail correspondence across the continent. The 
success of the undertaking demonstrated Its practicability, and 
suggested other possibilities of accommodating the needs of the 
age. The narrow trail of the pony may be said to have marked 
out the course soon afterwards followed by the capacious mail and 
passenger coaches, along with the telegraph wires; and in no less 
quick succession, that of the railroad track and swift-speeding 
locomotive, which now unite in one bond of fraternal intercourse 
the widely separated extremities of the continent. The express 
building in San Francisco is one of the marked architectural 
features of this city, its massive exterior covering two-thirds of a 
block, and it is probably tbe largest and best appointed express 
office in the world. 



PEARS' SOAP is about to be incorporated in London, and the 
prospectus will soon be issued. The amount of the floating 
capital has not yet leaked out. 



Inflamed Eyrs and Lids nermauently cured if caused from defective 
sight. Consult (free of charge) C. Muller, refraction specialist, 135 Mont- 
gomery street. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five aud four-tenths (5 4-10) per cent per annum on Term 
Deposits and four and one half K^A) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, payable on aud after Saturday, January 2, 1892. 

GEORGE TOUBNY, Secretary. 
Office— 526 California street. 

DIVIDEND No. 196. 

The Home Mutual Insurance Company 

Will pay its regular monthly dividend of one dollar (?1| per share upon Its 
capital stock on January 11, 1892.. 

CHAS. R. STOKY, Secretary. 



VIRGINIA CITY 

\ wayfarer *boM path haa wound 

O'ei desert, plain ami mountain ragged, 
Who.,- itepa bave atomblad underground 

In eager search of gIMrd nnppcl. 
I n reached (bit goal— • alok-room ilrcar, 

My erntobea near roe— more'a the pity— 
\rnl far— three thooaand mile, from here— 

The outskirts of Virginia Cltyl 

<». dear, wild western town!— the hues 

Of youth and mirth my visage redden 
\> memory illumes the views 

Of thy glad days of joy and freedom. 
5Iy heart hints high as I evoke 

Each jovial tone, each rousing ditty 
That made life fair and care a joke 

Within thy bounds, Virginia City I 
I mind me of the birth of hope, 

The ardent dream of fame and glory, 
The grave ambitions without scope 

That dazed our armed knights of story, 
They wielded a reporter's pen, 

Dipped in the office ink all gritty, 
But fame has crowned no brighter men 

Than we claim for Virginia City. 

A guiding genius ruled their fate, 

And governed tbe progressive daily, 
Bestowed their copy — entered late, 

And joined their festive meetings gaily, 
Whenever signs of failing stirred, 

Or longings born of work to quit, he 
Braced up the weakling with a word, 

" We're booming for Virginia City." 

memories dear! past more bright 

Than all the wealth the Comstock yielded, 
Your radiance dazzles my poor sight 

From visions fair long sadly shielded. 
Come back, comrades of old days, 

With sallies gay and stories witty, 
And shine before my wearied gaze, 

Dear faces of Virginia Cityl 

Ah, no! a stranger river flows 

Before my door in sluggish motion, 
As disinclined to blend it goes 

Against its will to meet tbe ocean. 
The sage-brush plain, the treeless hill, 

The road with dust and shale all gritty; 
The simple speech, the hearty will 

Of far-away Virginia City, 

Are but a vision, giving zest 

To my worn eyes, too dim to sever 
The true scene from tbe palimpsest 

That clouds the honest picture over. 
Unto the God, one prayer I'd make, 

That when my parting soul shall flit, He 
Will grant these yearning eyes may wake 

On Heaven in Virginia City. 
New York, January, 1892. Anne Toland. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Challenge Consolidated Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— tiau Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of work>— Gold Hill, Neva a. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
or the fouiteenth day of January, 1892, an a-sessment (No. 10) of Twenty- 
five Ceats per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Fecretery, at the 
office of the company, 331 Pine street, Room 3, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which Lhis assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Seventeenth Day of February, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; aud unle-s pavmeut is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the ninth day of March, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale, By order of the Board of Directors 

C. L. McCOY, Secretary. 

Office— 331 Pine ftreet, Room 3, San Francisco., California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Mexican Goid and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 14th day of January, 1892, an assessment (No. 44) of Twenty-five (25) 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, Room 79 Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Seventeenth Day of February, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for- sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the tenth day of March, 1S92, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



- 




THE Duke of Clarence and Avondale is dead, and the next heir 
to the throne of England, in case Queen Victoria and the 
Prince of Wales should die, is Prince George; the latter, the 
youngest son of the present heir to the crown, is himself by no 
means of a strong constitution, and his life was even despaired of 
not long ago. Some months ago, when the Duke of Fife's little 
daughter was born, people ridiculed the idea that she would 
ever become Queen of England, but as matters stand now her 
succession to the throne is by no means impossible, and though 
at her birth the title of Princess was refused to her, she may once 
rule one of the mightiest empires of this globe. 

In Japan Christianity makes fair progress. The only question 
is whether the converts adopt the new faith for religious or polit- 
ical reasons. According to statistics lately published there are 
thirteen members of the Japanese Parliament that have become 
converts to the new faith. It would, however, be unfair to judge 
the percentage of conversions in the Empire by this standard, for 
in that case one would have to estimate the Christian population 
of Japan as amounting to over one million and a half, which, 
however, is by no means the case. There are, on an average, 
many more converted Christians amongst the so-called educated 
classes than amongst the other classes of the population. In 
general, the percentage of Christians in Japan is said to be .27 to 
10,000, while in the higher classes it amounts to .433 outof 10,000. 

Cardinal Manning has died at the age of 84 years, and with 
him disappears one of the most conspicuous figures of modern 
England. His conversion to the Catholic faith in 1851 created a 
profound sensation throughout the United Kingdom, but though 
apostates are rarely esteemed. Cardinal Manning's sincerity was 
never doubted, and even bis antagonists never dared to 
question his motives. His literary work was of the very 
highest standard, and his activity during the long period of life 
that was granted to him. was always directed towards the wel- 
fare of his fellow-men. There are many who disagreed with him, 
but nobody denied the fact that he honestly attempted to do 
good, and was successful in almost everything he did. 

Belgium, situated between two great military powers, begins 
to recognize that she will have to imitate her neighbors and make 
military service obligatory upon every citizen. King Leopold is 
in favor of making a change in this direction, recognizing that 
Belgium can no longer feel safe without a strong standing army. 
It is rather odd that the Cabinet, and especially the Minister of 
War, M. Pontus, opposes the innovation, while General Brial- 
mont and nearly all the other military authorities, favor it. The 
causes of the discussion are political differences, but those who 
recognize the probability of a general European conflict will agree 
that Belgura would be at the mercy of its strongest neigh- 
bor, if the present system was maintained. 

The JIambtirger Nachrichten comments somewhat severely on the 
new commercial treaties of Germany, but since, as is well known, 
its views in most cases coincide with those of the ex-Chancellor 
of the German Empire, the opinion of that paper is always 
worthy of consideration. The paper characterizes the manner of 
proceeding with regard to the treaty with Austria as an attempt 
to favor industry at the expense of agriculture, that will lead to a 
conflict between these branches of labor. The " Zollverein " 
policy of 1878 was the result oi a successful effort to unite these 
interests, and it would be deplorable if the harmony obtained 
then should be disturbed, especially since the new treaties did 
not originate with the representatives of German trade and in- 
dustry, but are a political experiment. Prince Bismarck's organ 
says these treaties are merely the " product of theorizing free- 
thinkers, who use the influence tbey have lately obtained in high 
quarters. " This view is somewhat prejudiced. The initiative 
with regard to the new treaties was taken by the Government 
and not by the representatives of industry in Germany, and the 
small concessions made to the latter are by no means sufficient to 
hurt the interests of agriculture. In fact, the commercial treaties 
are undoubtedly the best achievement of the new Administration, 

The accession of the new Khedive of Egypt will by no means in- 
jure the interests of Great Britain in that country. Abbas Pacha was 
educated by an English teacher and imbibed English ideas. As great 
a friend of England a^ Tew rite Pacna has been, bis son is almost 
certain to be even more friendly to Grvat Britain, and France will 
be greatly disappointed if she expects a changed state of affair-. 
Lord Salisbury has again proved himself an excellent diplomatist 
by his prompt action in bringing about the recognition of the new 
Khedive by the Powers, as well as his appointment by the Sultan. 



(Society Concluded.) 
On Monday evening. Miss HildaSlessinger and Mr. M. A. Roth- 
I child will be married. The wedding will take place at the New 

California Hotel. Rabbi Voorsanger will perform the ceremony. 
1 It will be a social event. The bride-elect is one of the belles of 
j Jewish society circles, and carried off the honors at the Concordia 
\ Club's opening ball, where she made her debut. She is a brunette, 
; and has dark, expressive eyes. Mr. Rothchild is a well-known 

and popular wholesale merchant. The hooneymoon is to be spent 

in the Hawaiian Islands, for which place they leave on Tuesday. 

The bride's costume will be an elegant creation. 

General E. D. Keyes. a pioneer, left New York for San Fran- 
cisco by the Aspinwall steamer, January 11th. It is nearly forty- 
two years since he firat crossed the Panama Isthmus, bound to 

: California to take command of his company at the Presidio. He 
is a true representative of California, who always, by word and 

1 deed, upholds the high reputation of the Golden State. 



A very pretty family wedding was that of Miss. Beatrice Cook 
and Mr. Albert Sire, last Thursday evening, at the residence of the 
briile's mother, 1308 Post street. Rabbi Voorsanger, of the 
Temple El Emanuel, performed the ceremony. The house was 
decorated with smilax and flowers, and presented a very 
pretty appearance. The bride looked simply lovely, and was at- 
tired in a becoming and elegant costume of white brocaded silk. 
Mrs. M. Blaskower, sister of the bride, wore an elegant straw- 
colored silk. The happy young couple leave to-mcrrow for New 
York, where Mr. Sire has a lucrative law practice. Mrs. Sire will 
be greatly missed in Jewish society circles, where she was an 
acknowledged belle. 

The San Francisco Verein will have Professor Tyndall, the 
thought-reader, give a private exhibition of his powers next Sat- 
urday night. Only members and tbeir families are to be present. 
Tyndall ^ acknowledged to be the best in bis peculiar branch of 
science since Bishop; and the members of the club will be very 
enjoyably entertained. 

The wedding of Miss Jennie Ries to Mr. Abe Lewis will take 
place at the Harmonie Club rooms. Union Square Hall, to-mor- 
row night. The rooms have been beautifully decorated in pre- 
paration of the event. Miss Ries is a very popular and pretty 
young lady of the brunette type. Mr. Lewis is a prosperous 
down-town merchant. Nearly 150 invitations have been issued 
for the affair. The young people will leave for Southern Cali- 
fornia on their wedding trip. 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Romer and Miss Roruer and Lormas 
Romer, of Anacortes, Wash., are making an extended tour of 
Mexico and the Eastern States. Felix. 



The magnificent collection of Oriental Rugs. Carpets, Tapestries 
and Bric-n-brac, now being exhibited by Costikyan & Bedrosian, 
will be sold at auction in the Real Estate Exchange, 16 Post Street, 
beginning on Monday next. All of these articles have been imported 
direct from Constantinople, and are the best ever seen in this city. 
Connoisseurs have been enraptured by them. Every one in- 
terested in beautiful, artistic creations should visit the exhibition at 
the Exchange, where the articles to be sold are subject to inspection. 

C„ Moi-ler, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush, refraction specialist. Es- 
tablished 1863. 

OLYMPIAN RINK, 

( Mechanics' Pavilion. ) 

This (Saturday) Afternoon— Special Matinee for Ladies and Children. 
Saturday Evening — Kaces for Trophies for the Public s Amusement. 
Admission — Afternoon, including Skates, 15 cents. Evenings, including 
Skates, "25 cents. 

Look out for the Carnival. 
510.000 in Prizes! 510.000 in Prizes 




rot. xur. 



, a m r"*Noi« eo 



Xumhtr t. 



News Better 

(Tnlifornta Afltifrtiscv. 

OrvOTID TO THE LCAO'NG IMTMmSTI ■ ,• LIPQWNUI ANOTMC PACiHC CO*ST . 

Printed and Published <-■ ■ .r, Krkdkrick 

Marki-it. Plead Building, Fourth ».id Market - Fran- 

.nual Subieri} | . , United btai 

:/•!. Ml ,; months, *2 50; .1 months, $1 30; Foreign, |6; 
6 moiifAj. $3; 3 numrY*. $1 



SAN FRAHCISCO. SATURDAY, JAM 1 1.1892. 




TABLE OF 


CONTENTS. 




Pa< 
Leading articlbs : 
Item-' iu Brief 


r 

1 

: 

\ 

. 
-; 

! 

4 
b 


1 eaotfl Ken - 
uver iu OakUifl 


Pack 

7 
... 8 


Parliamentary Government in 

Japan 
The Newpaper of To-morrow 
Ho* Manv briuks Should We 

Take' 
No Subsidies, BouDties or 


The Looker-On 

The Looker Ou (coulinurd) 

a Legend ol the " Homeless" 

Nauky Poo and I (Poetrv) 

il Keview ." 


10 

... 11 
12 

13 

11 


Cardiual M*unine's Death 

The Royal Family's Kereave- 

ment " 

The War to cet Pure Politics 
The Keely Cure 

Onlv a Mouih (Poetrv) 

Sauborn. Vail & Co.'c Sew Quar- 
ters 

Sleieh Bells 

The Message (Poetry) ... 

Pleasure? Wand 


Real Propertv is 

The Bour.-eaud Underwriter, ly 
Scientific aud Useful. 20 
The Ko*.e Jar . 21 

Sunbeams 28 

" Biz'"— Summary of the Markets. 24 

Society (continued) 27 


HALF-TONE ENGRAVING 


-S 


itigh n? Sc -nes at T u kee 





IT appears that it is a disqualification for Grand Jury service to 
speak ill of a Superiur Judge. There are not many qualified 
jurors in this city and county in that case, and there will be fewer 
about the time of the next election. 



THERE is a periodicity in the Chilean war waged by the daily 
papers which is amusing. Roughly speaking, war and peace 
alternate at periods of twenty-four hours. If the war-demon 
shrieks on Monday, the white-winged dove of peace coos gently 
on Tuesday, and so on through the week — which is funny. 

THE news from Tanger is certainly exaggerated. The true fact is 
probably that a revolt of the peasants again3t the Governor has 
commenced, which is important enough as far as local interests 
are concerned, but to speak of eventual international complica- 
tions is merely absurd. If the European great powers are look- 
ing for a casus belli, they can find it nearer home. 

CONGRESSMAN GEARY, of this State, does not take much 
stock in the stories about Blaine being a very sick man. He 
called on him a few days ago, and said that if anybody is bunt- 
ing for an invalid he will do well not to tackle Blaine. The fact 
seems to be that Blaine's health is good, though delicate, and that 
he has to take excellent care of himself to keep entirely well. 

WHEN the mercury gets down to 26 or 30 degrees below zero 
it may be said to be cold, and this was its range for several 
days in St. Paul, Duluth and a number of other places in the 
Northwest during the early part of the week. While the delegates 
to the International League of Press Clubs were driving or walk- 
ing about here in California without their overcoats, Chicago was 
shivering in a blizzard and growling over a snow blockade. There 
is something in climate, after all. 

CAPTAIN SCHLEY is reported to have aaid, that if with the 
Baltimore he cannot make the Esmeralda haul down her colors 
in ten minutes, be hopes he may shiver his tarry toplights, or 
something equally awful and terrible. Nobody wants to see war, 
but if it must come we would like to see the conceit taken oat. of 
that much advertised and bepuffed vessel, the Esmeralda. Our 
Yankee gnns, served by Yankee sailors, would certainly make it 
very interesting for her for a little while. 

LOIE FULLER'S story, as told at some length by dispatches 
from New York, seems to present a case of monumental 
cheek and sublime impudence. On the strength of having, as 
she says, sold two pictures of herself, in a decidedly undress cos- 
tume, to a broker in New York, she claims to have become his 
wife, and has caused bis arrest on a charge of bigamy, he having 
married another woman. If this be the law of marriage in the 
State of New York, it certainly needs amendment.' There is 
nothing novel in the existence of illicit relations between an 
actress and a broker, but when the former devises for herself a 
new marriage law, it becomes a little startling, to say the least. 
This episode may make an argument in favor of a national law 
of marriage and divorce, a subject which has been discussed 
quite extensively within the past three or four years. 



I*n be drarr <*kUy 

It that not a word ran br flihi 

Mini u II Ui« 

rrtjrnfnR |t Ullm r , n ,| (l DQ wro ng, 

Til VT Mftlooi Democrat ami good Call tarn I tit, at, K. Tarpey, 
ha* been reported a« twin* hurled In a mow bank to maw bet* 
ii Harrison rg an.) Washington. Instead ol being In the na 
I Ipllal, making a flghl for San Francisco •« Ihi 
entfon city. Weill know the Ban Pranclecan o( whom il 
was aaid ■« It's a cold daj whan Alack gets left;" but the saying 
blda fsir to be changed by the inbilltnlloo ol Tarpey'a name f->r 
Badlam'a. 



HYDRAULIC mining i« a subject of vast importance to Califor- 
nia. When we re dec I thai a Govern menl Commission has 
asserted that closing down toe hydraulic mines for eleven years 
or thereabouts has cost the miner's more than $100,000,000, we 

ran form some Idea of the enormooa an. nunt of gold which Bllll 
lies beneath the surface of the bills and mountains <>f the Sierra 
Nevada**. It is certainly to be hoped that Borne scheme may be 
devised by which hydraulic mining operations may he resumed. 

THE French Chamber of Deputies is becoming a regular bear- 
garden. There have been slaps in the face," list fights, chal- 
lenges to duels, and nil sorts of skirmishes lately, reminding the 
student of history uf some of the scenes enacted in our own 
House of Representatives in antebellum times. All such exhi- 
bitions are disgraceful in the extreme, and should be punished; 
but the Chamber of Deputies seems to have no rules by which it 
can preserve order or punish unruly and riotous members. The 
outcome is usually a duel, in which it is very seldom that any one 
is seriously hurt, if wounded at all. 

WHEN Chile talks about English and German intervention in 
case of war with the United Slates, she talks the most ar- 
rant nonsense. It is a foregone conclusion that neither country 
would espouse the cause of Chile, for H would be absolutely 
disastrous for them to do so. They would not sacrilice their 
trade with the United States for the trade of Chile a hundred 
times over, to say nothing of the indirect results of a war with 
this country. One or both might offer to mediate in case of war, 
but that is certainly as far as they would go. Self-interest would 
keep them out of war with the United States. 

CONSULS Hall and Hollo way have most diplomatically objected 
to my statement of the number of their wards. Mr. George 
Hall proudly asserts that he has five hundred Moslems, and fiery 
Moslems at that, distributed through this city, from the Latin 
quarter to Cemetery avenue. Mr. Holloway stakes his reputa- 
tion on the fact that Powell street, below Broadway, is heavily 
stocked with Uruguaus. Therefore, as both these gentlemen 
have the perfect confidence of their respective governments, I 
must submit to the multiplication of the Turk and the raising of 
the Uruguan to a high numerical value in the city census. 



A CASUAL inspection of the list of names selected to be placed i R 
the Grand Jury box completely upsets the assertions made by 
the admirers of Judge Wallace and his cross-lo's methods, that a 
good Grand .lury cannot be obtained without the intervention of 
an elisor and a special venire. A dozen elisors could not find in 
the whole city of San Francisco an equal number of citizens bet- 
ter qualified for a Grand Jury, or would do their duty in that 
capacity more honestly, fearlessly and intelligently. It is quite 
time that this city returned to its senses, and to a proper respect 
for the law of the land. 



MFLOQUET'S assertion in the French Chamber that Pope 
, Pius IX. had been a Free Mason in his youth has revived a 
very old controversy. Catholics, of course, says the Paris cor- 
respondent of the Daily Telegraph, scout indignantly — if not as 
emphatically as M. Paul de Cassagnac — the statement, and main- 
tain that the rumor about Pio Nono being a " Mason " was prop- 
agated sedulously by members of French and Italian lodges who 
had been excommunicated and anathematized. There exists, in 
fact, a document purporting to be the " Masonic Diploma " given 
by the Palermo Lodge, in August, 1839, to Giovanni Mastai Fer- 
retti, who was afterwards Pius IX. An obscuie Masonic journal 
also published, in 1874, a decision of the Grand Lodge of Free 
Mason" of the Scotch Rite of the Orient of Palermo, expelling 
Pius IX. from membership for having excommunicated his former 
brethren. The authenticity of these documents has been con- 
tested energetically by the late M. Caubet, a former chief of the 
Paris Municipal Police, who in his lifetime was one of the digni- 
taries of the Grand Orient of France. M. Caubet notes that in 
1865 another document was circulated, in which it was specified 
that Pius IX., while traveling in North America as a Legate, was 
enrolled a member of the Philadelphia Lodge. The Grand Master 
and the secretary of this lodge, however, on being applied to for 
confirmation of this statement, affirmed that the name of Mastai 
Ferretti did not appear in their books; but that a Martin Ferrety 
had been admitud to membership in a branch of the lodge in 
Cuba, in the year 1819. M. Caubet, in fact, shows conclusively 
by facts and dales that Pio Nono never belonged to the Great 
Brotherhood of Masons. Anyhow, the legend has siill a definite 
and substantial shape, as was proved by M. Floquet's assertion. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 



PARLIAMENTARY GOVERNMENT IN JAPAN. 

IP haste in imitating Western methods be indicative of real pro- 
gress, it must then be admitted that the Japanese are the 
most progressive people on the face of the globe. They have 
now a written Constitution and a full-Hedged system of Parlia- 
mentary government. The change was suddenly resolved upon by 
the Mikado. promptly accepted by his aeople and put into operation 
with a celerity that shows that the Japs are as quick in regard to 
great movements as they are smart and dapper in respect to small 
ones. It may well be questioned whether institutions not indi- 
genous to the soil and snapped up in a hurry, will work as well 
as they do in countries where tbey have experienced a gradual 
growth and development of centuries. The Japanese, as good 
imitators, can no doubt readily adapt themselves to the outward 
forms of parliamentary proceedings, but whether they can enter 
into their spirit force and character is altogether another matter. 
We rather fear that they will play with parliamentary forms, as 
children do with new-fangled toys, rather than use them as 
means to accomplish great and practical ends. We reach that 
conclusion not alone from what is known of the characteristics 
of the Japanese, but from the proceedings already had in connec- 
tion with the inauguration of their new system. In the first 
place, tlieir election did not result in the formation of distinct 
parties with well-defined principles, but in the return of a large 
number of small coteries attached to clubs, or societies, each 
jealous of all the others. A government party was formed, but 
its members fall far short of a majority. We have before ua a 
copy of the Japan Weekly Gazettee, in which appears a report of 
parliamentary proceedings. The impression gained from reading 
this is that the members were mere children in intellect playing 
with a toy. Atone sitting they disposed of bills treating of two 
very important subjects, namely, the freedom of the press, and 
the right to assemble and discuss grievances in public meeting. 
Mr. Spirane, on behelf of the govornment, desired to take power 
to suppress a newspaper that incited to public tumult, or sougnt 
to depose the reigning dynasty, but the power of suspension, he 
said, should only be used " as a last expedient in case of danger- 
ous matter being continually published." But this did not suit 
Mr, Fujino,who argued " that Japan's great progress required the 
utmost freedom of the press." Ultimately the bill was referred 
to a committee. The Public Meetings Regulations bill proposed 
that meetings should be limited to the discussion of grievances 
curable by constitutional means, but that did not please the ma- 
jority, and the bill had to go to a committee to be amended. 
Since then the Mikado has had to dissolve his first Parliament 
because it would not vote supplies enough to carry on the public 
service. 

OUR CHINESE MISSIONS. 



DO the missionaries uplift the Chinese to their level or do the 
Chinese drag down the missionaries to theirs — which? The 
marriage of Miss May Foster, Missionary teacher among the 
Chinese at Los Angeles, to Li Ling, a not over attractive or in- 
telligent specimen of the Mongolian race, renders the foregoing 
inquiry pertinent at this time. When Miss Foster first became a 
Missionary teacher she would as soon have thought of marrying 
a Chinaman as she would a sea-serpent. She was then an at- 
tractive girl, of winning ways and fair accomplishments, who 
went to teaching for a livelihood but with a weather eye open 
for a good chance to marry off. No ordinary white man would 
have suited her at that time. He would at least have been re- 
quired to be above the average of young men in habits, attain- 
ments and character. What has happened since then to so lower 
her ambition as to cause her to louk with favor upon the advances 
of an iguorant Chinaman of foul body, benighted mind, and 
heathenish ways? Something must have occurred to so change a 
young Christian American lady of beauty and cultivated taste. 
We pau3e and refrain from pushing the inquiry further on 
that line. It is enough for our present purpose that Li Ling 
has succeeded in dragging down by whatever means, the once 
lovely and accomplished May Foster to bis own level. Of such 
a marriage nothing but evil can come, and the marvel is that it 
should have the warm sanction of lady managers who would ab- 
hor it for themselves or one of their daughters. For the good in- 
tentions of these estimable ladies we have theprofoundest respect, 
but tbey take too much for granted and do not open their eyes to 
many things it is their duty to see. How many more unfortu- 
nate May Fosters are committing themselves to entangling and un- 
happy alliances with Chinese vices? We fear that the local 
Chinese Missionary Endeavor is proving a work not fitted for or- 
dinary women. We are very sure it ought to be personally par- 
ticipated in by only men, or aged females. We know it is spread- 
ing the opium habit in places little suspected, and that alone is 
something so terrible in its consequences that lady managers may 
well pause and deeply reflect upon their responsibilities. Better, 
a thousand times better that none of the Chinese should learn to 
read and write English than that one good American girl should 
become au opium fiend or a Chinaman's wife. 



HOW MANY DRINKS SHOULD WE TAKE? 

AVERY interesting discussion has recently taken place through 
the columns of the London Times, as to the number of drinks 
the average man may safely take in the course of every twenty- 
four hours. It began by an assertion on the part of total abstain- 
ers, that he would be better without any drinks at all, and, 
although this view was supported by the ablest talent available 
to it, the sledge-bararaer blows of some of the highest scientists 
in the land smashed it into smithereens. Without going into de- 
tails, we propose to very briefly give the conclusions that seemed 
to finally prevail. In the first place, it was well maintained that 
alcoholic stimulants, of pure quality and proper quantity, were 
good for man's use. Their frightful and dangerous adulteration 
was freely admitted, and, of course, no attempt was made to 
cover up the alarming tendencies of fusel oil, sulphuric acid, and 
other heating ingredients, which are for the most part responsible 
for the insatiable longing for another, and yet another drink, 
which so enthralls a large percentage of the human race. For 
the use of such adulterants, nothing but unqualified con- 
demnation was employed. Happily, they have now in England 
such a rigid system of food inspection that pure liquor is within 
the reach of everybody, and it was with that understanding the 
discussion proceeded. At an early stage in the controversy, Dr. 
Mortimer Granville easily came to the front a 1 * the first authority 
in the kingdom upon the subject. He held that " there must be 
stimulation, because there must be momentum. The highway of 
life is very crowded, and it takes a lot of forcing to get through 
straight, and this is not to be obtained without alcohol. If there 
was no alcohol at all in the diet of the abstainers themselves, the 
most of them would die of sheer inertia. Alcohol was given to 
man for his mental and nervous stimulation ; wine to make glad 
the heart of man; not unfermented wine, which never made 
any man's heart glad, and never could be good wine." At the 
same time, the learned gentleman laid it down as a fixed law that 
two ounces of pure alcohol was the maximum limit of what a man 
could beneficially take in twenty-four hours, except in rare cases, 
where a medical attendant has disease to combat. This would 
give of spirits containing from forty to fifty per cent, about two 
sherry-glassfulls of whisky or brandy per day. In the lighter 
wines there is about ten per cent, of alcohol, so that a pint is the 
limit of a day's consumption. Lager beer has about five percent, 
of alcohol, and therefore two pints are enough for any man. 
Any more creates irritation and does harm, whilst none at all, 
says the doctor, causes debility, loss of force, incapacity to resist 
disease, and a low tone of mental and physical life. 



THE NEWSPAPER OF TO-MORROW. 



VERILY, of newspaper prophets there are many abroad in the 
land. One of them has just been among us in the person of 
a Mr. Foster Coates, managing editor of the " truly good " Colonel 
Elliot F. Shepherd's New York Evening Mail and Express. Mr. 
Coats knows exactly what the coming newspaper is going to be, 
and took his confreres of the Press Convention into his confidence 
the other evening at the Powell-street Theatre. "The weekly 
paper and the magazine," he confidently asserts, "will be ab- 
sorbed in the daily," and yet in the same breath he is just as sure 
that the coming newspaper will have "either better editorials, or 
none at all." That is the daily's misfortune and the weekly's 
opportunity. It is a necessity of the situation that the newspa- 
per of to-morrow cannot have better editorials, and therefore 
must, according to our prophet, dispense with them altogether. 
The good all-round writers of full, accurate and satisfying 
criticisms of the larger affairs of States and nations, such as Gree- 
ley, Raymond, Bennett and Dana, are either dead or dying, and 
very few of their like, possessed of natural aptitude and acquired 
ability, are coming along, and those few will, for obvious reasons, 
prefer to write for the weeklies. The average daily — there are of 
course exceptions — are treadmills of labor, on which no deep- 
thinking writers work unless they must. The slap-dash-burry- 
up-and-"say-something" style of writing editorials, growing more 
in vogue every day, neither satisfies the thoughtful reader, nor 
contents the capable writer. Thus it is that there are dailies to- 
day with millions at their backs that publish editorials beneath 
contempt. There are simply not better ones in the market upon 
their terms of price and conditions of labor. Yet there are now, 
and there always will be, a numerous class of cultured men and 
women in every large community who are not going to be satis- 
fied with anything short of the best in editorial writing. They are 
and must continue to be the clientele of the most carefully written 
and better class of weeklies, which will grow in importance and 
power in the near future, as they have not done in the past, and 
for the reason that the dailies are abandoning to them the fruitful 
and profitable field of thoughtful writing. The coming daily, as 
a hair-brained gatherer of miscellaneous items, more or less unre- 
liable and sensational, is going to make work for the weekly in 
extracting the boiled down juice of thought and fact from the 
undigestible mental pabulum of which the coming period is to be 
so prolific. 



Jan 



BAN PR \\"< [Si \i ii;k. 



THE KEELY CURE. 

THE SB Wfl LETTER his been clo*ety watching for »onn 
• It that ha« been written. »aul and dune about the K • e 

ind until i ■ refrained from com in U- 

ting ountlvea to an op nloi D< e did not justify 

the judgment one way or the other Hut the eubjeel 
launched on the "ea of publii Dot, we think, to Its ad- 

vantage, that it has become a matter for examination with lucfa 
UgnU rt- we have. It would have been much better if tin 1 so- 
called bi-cbloride ol gold treatment could have been submitted 
to adenttflc teste before Its fame became so noised abroad. The 
public is justified in viewing with suspicion all secret remedies, 
because there Is now no real need for secrecy to protect the inter- 
I the discovery, ami. therefore, when he inM*ts upon with- 
holding the facto, the reasonable presumption is that they will 
not bear examination by experts. Dr. Keely, as a regularly di- 
plomaed physician of the homeopathic school, was bound by 
el ethics and his college oath to give science the benefit of 
whatever discoveries be might make. It was on that condition 
he received from his teachers whatever information ihey pos- 
I. It is that excellent principle of handing on to others the 
ascertained result of experiments that is enabling science to be- 
come progressive and of practical use to the world. When, there- 
fore, a duly educated practitioner disregards his honor pledged to 
bis alum water, bis obligations to the learned professor who made 
him what he is. and bis sacred duty to the noblest of sciences, he 
must have some strange motive for resorting to the much con- 
demned practice of the quack, and what can that motive possibly 
be, if not a desire to become inordinately rich by false pretenses: 
that is, by pretending to own a secret specilic, which he knows 
would not bear scientific investigation? Dr. Keely is a very rich 
man, and has no real need for the million a year that is now roll- 
ing into his coffers, but if he thinks he has, let him pa ent his 
remedy, and whilst thereby securing theprofit of future sales, let 
him afford science an opportunity of investigating and determin- 
ing its merits. The so-called cure tests are no tests at all. They 
may be effects of the imagination, or mind cures, and it is already 
apparent that most of them are only temporary. The greatest 
success (as an advertisement) Keely has yet met with was the 
case of a well-known New York literary man, who was « cured," 
took to the lecture platform to tell how it was done, and wrote 
the well-known article, on its success, in the November number 
of The North American Review, over the signature of " Felix Old- 
boy." With the money he got for that ariicle he went on a worse 
drunk than usual, and was found dead on his own door stoop. 
Whilst suspicious of Keely's " cure," we do not denounce it as a 
fraud, because we are not in possession of the information neces- 
sary to the determination of the fact. 



NO BDBBID1E8 BOUNTIKS OB «.KANTm. 



THE WAY TO GET PURE POLITICS. 

IT is charged that the administration of our city's affairs is now, 
and long has been, corrupt from the center all round to the 
circumference; that there is hardly an act that an official can per- 
form but can be influenced by money. Even the judiciary has 
not always risen higher than its source, nor forgotten that its 
nomination had its origin in a whisky mill. All these things are 
thrice told tales. The question now is as to whatweare going to 
do about it. The answer in regard to what we can do about it is 
simple enough. We can obtain a pure municipal administration 
without further or other effort than that of putting a clean ticket 
in the field and voting for it. Simply that and nothing more is 
required. In times past it was not just as easy to accomplish 
that as it seemed. It was difficult to get a ticket printed, distribu- 
ted and voted unless it came through the regular party organiza- 
tions. But the Australian ballot law under which we now live 
renders all that very easy of accomplishment. If a Boss- 
nominated ticket hereafter amounts to anything, it will be be- 
cause a majority of the voters carefully and intentionally select 
the names upon it from among those nominated by independent 
citizens. Of course, in that case, there is nothing more to be said. 
If, with a ballot placed before them containing the names on both 
the boodle and honest tickets, a majority of the voters deliberately 
set the mark of their approval against the names of the boodlers, 
it will be idle any longer to pretend that this city is ready for 
honest government, or wants it. But that is a matter that has 
yet to be submitted to the test. We are not very sanguine of the 
result, although we should be if we could be assured that all hon- 
est citizens could be aroused to a due decree of activity. But that's 
the rubl What is everybody's business is nobody's business, and 
is neglected in consequence. Hence the great opportunity of the 
corrupt Boss. He makes " business " out of politics, and it pays 
him to see that nothing is lost through supineness or neglect. He 
pays his workers with patronage and soft things generally, and, 
as he sails under a party name, trusts to honeet but foolish parti- 
sanship to make up the balance of votes needed. What we should 
like to see, and ought to see at the next election, is a non-partisan 
ticket placed in the field, not by a nominating convention, but by 
the signing of a nomination paper by the number of citizens {about 
3,000 in San Francisco, requisite to have its names placed on the of- 
ficial ballot. 



T ,n ' '■ i-y so larjre a majority of the it. 

noi to approve ol any subsidy, bounty or 
*r«nt at this aeealon, was to have i t It fa « far- 

ig change ol polli y nil the same, It- directness ol language 
would seem to leave no hope f.-r the steam mall subsidy lav 

■ogw I illea, or the gram ol oredil to the Nicaragua canal, 

> at. if wisely operate d, nil inn I measures f..r the coun- 

try generally, and ol spi 

sore, the rteamahlp subsidy law was nol being operated to the 
besl advantage, but thai Is something thai could be, and ougbl to 

,M ' ;l oded at this session. The sugar bounties are mori 

realising the expectations o! their advocates, and bid Fall to 
much for the Dnited States n* ihey have for France and Germany, 
We bear ol beeta being planted and factories being erected In 
quite a number of Slates. If the Nicaragua canal scheme la nol 
to be strengthened by the loan of the Government's credit, it may 
a* well be abandoned, it cannot raise money abroad, and borne 
capital lights bhy of it. Yet it is a safe enough adventure if 
pushed thro. mh with rapidity and economy, and DlOSt assuredly 
it would greatly benefit California and the whole Pacific Coast. 
It remains to be seen whether the resolution adopted the other 
day will be given in practice the wide scope that its words im- 
ply. We do noMhink it will. We believe the faith of the Gov- 
ernment will he held to be pledged to the payment of the angar 
bounties and mail subsidies, and that enough Southern members 
will favor the Nicaragua bill to ensure its passage, but in all 
other respects, subsidies, bounties and grants are for the present 
at an end. 



CARDINAL MANNING'S DEATH. 



A GREAT Englishman died when the Archbishop of Westmin- 
ister and Prince Cardinal of the Roman Church pffssed over 
to the majority last week. He was the son of a London mer- 
chant, who was a rigid Protestant, and a Tory member of Par- 
liament. Educated at Oxford, Manning was a college chum of 
Gladstone, and the two ran a neck-and-neck race for first honors. 
Their mutual respect and admiration lasted through life and until 
death them did part. Gladstone was away at the time in the 
Riveria, seeking to recuperate in preparation for the next session 
of Parliament. When the news came he took it to heart as a 
personal blow, and refused to be comforted, although numerous 
visitors called upon him for that purpose. It has always been an 
open secret in England that the men were fast friends, and it has 
been credited to Gladstone as weakness that he wrote uncelebrated 
pamphlet against the Papacy for no higher or better purpose 
than to have the Nonconformists of England suppose that he was 
in no manner under the influence of Manning. It is believed 
that the latter's slow conversion to Home Rule for Ireland had 
much to do with taking Gladstone along with him. When so 
sturdy an Englishman as the Cardinal could see safety to his 
country in the proposition, the great commoner had his qualms 
of conscience satisfied, and could no longer withhold his assent. 
The Cardinal was bound to outwardly hold that there was no 
salvation without the pale of his church, but, with the peculiar 
subtlety of that institution, was entitled to all the " mental re- 
servations" he pleased. One of these was surely the belief that 
he and Gladstone would meet on the other side. 



THE ROYAL FAMILY'S BEREAVEMENT. 

THE death of the young Duke of Clarence and Avondale, the 
heir apparent to the British throne, will be regretted most 
because of the blow it strikes at three good women. The world 
dearly loves a lover and especially so when he is a young and ar- 
dent one and Princling and coming King at that. Prince Albert 
Victor, Duke of Clarence, might have gone farther and aimed 
more ambitiuously than he did, but Mary of Teck was good 
enough for him, and with singular unanimity and enthusiasm the 
people of England approved his choice, and declared her to be good 
enough for their future Queen. An English Princess, her home 
life, her accomplishments, and her ways were well known and 
appreciated. There was no chance work and therefore no risk of 
failure in such a marriage, and for that reason, if for no other, it 
satisfied the common sense conservation of the people of Eng- 
land. It was a love match and as such appealed to the sym- 
pathy of the sentimental, The pair were to have been married 
in about three weeks hence. But fate had decreed otherwise and 
now everybody is more or Ipss touched at the sad and forlorn 
condition of the hapless maiden. The aged, widowed and good 
Queen of England has lost her favorite grandchild, and the dark- 
ness of sorrow has once again crossed her path. Beloved for her 
good qualities, her people participate in her sorrows. The 
Mother Princess, too, has universal sympathy. Coming, a 
stranger from her native Denmark to England, she has acted well 
her part, and rendered herself popular with all classes. For the 
rest, England will survive her loss. She had long ago betrayed 
her preference for the more capable brother who remains. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 




LAWRENCE J. KIP BECOMES A CATHOLIC. 

A SENSATION will be 
caused in hie;h church 

and social circles tbit 

morning, when this an 

nouncenient is read — thai 

Lawrence J. Kip, grand 

son of the venerabli 

Bishop Kip, will be bap 

ti'/.ed in the Roman Cath 

olic faith, at St. MaryV 

Cathedral, on Van Nest 

avenue, by Father Mont- 
gomery, at 10 o'clock nexi 

Monday morning. Hi- 
sponsor will be Mr. Will 

iam Callaghan, son of Mr 

Daniel Callagban, tbe we] 

known ban k e r . Th« 
manner in which Mr. Ki] 

has become an aposiat 

from the religious belief i 

his fathers can be only out 

lined in the brief spac- 

which we are able to givi 

the matter in this issue o. 

the News Letter. He has 

always been a deep student, and though now only twenty-three 

years of age, he is far advanced in thought and learning. 

It was while traveling through the State with his grandfather, 
that Mr. Kip's thoughts were first directed to a comparison of 
the dogmas and doctrines of the two great churches of the world. 
His natural inclinations, his associations, and his propensity for 
investigation all led him to make a deeper examination of the 
principles of both faiths. This examination caused hitu to wish 
to learn more about the Roman Catholic Church, and he began 
studying zealously all its teachings. His first preceptor in the 
mysteries of the great Church of Rome was Father Sasia, then 
Superior General of the Society of Jesus upon the Pacific Coast. 
With him Mr. Kip studied for a year and a half, and for the last 
nine months he has been instructed by Father Montgomery. It 
was nnt without a due appreciation of the consequences in a 
worldly sense, to himself, that he decided upon the step he is 
about to take. He realizes that it is contrary to what might be 
considered his best personal interests, but as he is convinced that 
the Roman Catholic Church is the only one which will give com- 
plete satisfaction to the deep student, he has determined to enter 
its fold. If the bible be considered a true mentor, he is fully con- 
vinced that the doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church are the 
only ones that are full and complete. He is fully in accord with 
the dogma of the infallibility of the Pope, and compares the 
Pontiff's position to that of the Supreme Court. From the Pope, 
in religious matters, there is no appeal; from the Supreme Court, 
in legal matters, there is no appeal. Both are infallible, the dif- 
ference being that in one case infallibility is expressed; in the 
other, implied. In the matter of absolution, Mr. Kip believes 
fully in the Roman Catholic doctrine, which holds that there 
can be no true absolution unless tbe sinner be penitent. Abso- 
lution is conditional upon contrition, which to be complete must 
involve our interior and sovereign sorrow for our sins. The 
Episcopal Church pronounces absolution, and has the same belief 
regarding penitence as the Roman Catholic. Mr. Kip has a high 
respect for the many learned clergymen of the Roman Catholic 
Church. Leo, he considers the intellectual peer, if not the supe- 
rior, of any man of the day. If a man lives up intelligently to 
the doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church, says Mr. Kip, he can 
be a better Christian than be can in any other church. He has 
entered fully into the spirit of its teachings. 

Lawrence J. Kip was born in Inglewood, N. J., in 1SG9. At 
the age of sixteen, he entered tbe University of California, but 
did not complete his course, being compelled to retire when half 
through tbe junior year, on account of ill-health. Some six 
months later, he began to study with D. M. Delmas, and on No- 
vember 11, 1890, just after attaining his majority, was admitted 
to the bar. He has since been practicing his profession in this 
city. When seventeen years old, be was appointed Councilman 
for the Pacific Coast for St. Andrews' Brotherhood. He resigned 
this office about a year later, when he began his studies with 
Father Sasia. His father is \V. I. Kip, Jr., of this city. His 
mother is tbe daughter of Hon. W. B. Kinney, who was United 
States Minister to Turin. She was raised in Italy, and was mar- 
ried by Bishop Kip to his son in the English Chapel at Nice. 
Mrs. Kip is a cousin of Orover Cleveland, and a half-sister of Ed- 
mund Clarence Stedman. An elder brother of Mr. Kip is now 
studying for the Episcopal ministry at the General Theological 
Seminary, New York City. Bishop Kip is well known through- 
out the world as a prominent Episcopalian prelate. He was 
consecrated a Bishop in 1854, and is the second Bishop in the 
United States. His text-books are used at Oxford, Cambridge, 
and the University of Canada. 



ONLY A MONTH. 

Chaelie Willis Died December 23rd, 1891. 



Only a month since they did strew 

Their flowers above my one, 
My bud that faded e'er its dew 

Had vanished in life's sun. 
And yet each waking minute seems 

An endless year of pain. 
Soothed only when night's blessed dreams s 

Gives back my boy again. 
The silent house is haunted now, 

And whispers of the dead, 
I fear the lonely morning hour, 

The evening hour I dread. 
For always then his dear lips sought 

His morn and evening kiss. 
Ah! only mothers know how naught 

Can bound life's joy like this. 
Only a month, yet what, indeed, 

Is all the petty score 
Of years that still may drag or speed, 

Until on that bright shore 
1 meet and clasp my own again ? 

Enough that till it be, 
Though all his months be happy ones, 

He longs and waits for me. 
Januaiy 23rd, 1892. 

SANBORN, VAIL & CO.'S NEW QUARTERS. 

NO better indication of the steady increase of a city's business 
interests can be given than the demand of large business 
houses for more extensive quarters for the comfortable transaction 
of their affairs. Such an evidence of prosperity has been recently 
given here by the announced removal of Sanborn, Vail & Co. from 
their large store on Market street, opposite Powell, to the five- 
story building on Market street, opposite Grant avenue, recently 
vacated by F. S. Chadbourne & Co. Sanborn, Vail & Co. have 
leased this very large building for a long term of years, and when 
the improvements they are making are completed, and they be- 
come well settled in it, they will have the largest building in tbe 
State entirely devoted to the business of a private firm. Their 
removal has been necessitated by the rapid d velopment of their 
affairs, for notwithstanding tbe establishment of branch stores at 
Los Angeles and at Portland, they found themselves without 
sufficient accommodation. The new Market-street store is 50x175 
feet. On the first floor will be exhibited moldings and frames, 
artists' materials ami beautiful paintings. This floor is decorated 
in cream and gold, and other delicate tints, in keeping with tbe 
artistic qualities of the goods* exhibited. The offices are also on 
the first floor. On the second floor there has been arranged a 
special exhibit room, 50 feet square, where, under a powerful 
electric light, famous paintings may be shown. A notable feature 
of this exhibition-room will be that the same even light will be 
kept on it night and day. This is the manner in which pictures 
are shown in the art centers of Europe. It is considered the best 
method in vogue, and has always been very successful. On this 
floor there is also a room, facing Market street, devoted to the 
exhibition of etchings, steel engravings, aquarelles, and other 
works of art. 

The wholesale department is on the third floor, and on the 
fourth the picture frames are manufactured. The fifth floor is 
converted into a remarkable store-room, and there, in 1,500 com- 
partments,' as many different style moldings are placed. In the 
basement are stored frames, moldings u-ed in house decoration, 
and manufactured work. The business of this firm is now in 
three different localities. H has the large basement of the Flood 
Building; an immense warehouse on Eighth street, and the store 
on Market, opposite I 'o well. By moving into the large structure 
on Market, opp »site Grant avenue, it will centralize all its busi- 
ness, and will be able to afford customers greater and better facil- 
ities for tbe examination of stock. 

An extraordinary sale of standard and high-bred brood mares 
from the Palo Alio stuck farm will be made by Killip & Co., at tbe 
salesyards at the corner of Van Ness avenue and Market street, be- 
ginning at 10 a. m.. February 24. 1892. One of the principal advan- 
tages of this sale is the opportunity to obtain foals from the noted 
young stallions by that famous sire, Electioneer, whose sons have in- 
herited his great breeding powers. All the animals to be offered are 
possessed of some of the most noted and fashionable strains now in 
use. 



Shainwald, Buckbae 6c Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 

White's hat emporium, of b'14 Commercial street, is the place to 
get your hats, for it is the boast of the house that only the latest and 
best goods are sold there. 

The Maison Riche is considered among epicures the very best 
restaurant in town for diuuer parties. 



Jan 



BAN FRANCIS* M w ! i n-'i:. 



SLEKiK BELLS 

JInflc. U1U; Jlo«lr. twll» jiaflv all tfce d»y. 

Oh, what fun II ■ oo«-hor*« opeu *)cl«h. 

THAT i» the son* of the hour among San Franciscans who are 
-mined to get all the errj ■ . rotnl possible out of life. Man 
Is never satisfied; nor woman, either; particularly woman, and, 
therefore, though we of the < V.v bj the Golden ttale have been 
enjoying midsummer weather in January for many dayi 
tbe other fashionables have demanded new enjoyments, ami they 
have found them in ■• dashing o'er tbe snow," hchind a (ram of 
iters, tilling their lung-* w ith ihecrisp air «.f tbe mountains, 
and in half an hourga:- .- by the exercise. Where is 

all this enjoyment to be bad ' Why, at Truckee. only twelve 
hours away. You take the <; p. m. fast mail train from this city, 
get into the Pullman coach, and at 7 o'clock next morning break- 
fast at Truckee. There the si - ; »l feet deep, tbe air is 
•Id enough to be bracing, and there is sufficient < n.-jmess to 
put a warm glow upon any cheek, be it never so pallid. Excel* 
lent accommodations are easily obtained at the Truckee Hotel, 
and at Irwm'g Stables coaches, cutters, double seat, single seat, 
or any other kind of sleighs may be obtained, with ?xeellent 
teams. The roads are all in first-class condition, and a dash over 
the s-now is one of the greate-t novel pleasures that can be otfered i 
to tbe people of this country of winter sunshine and (lowers. 
Before starting from the hotel, tbe genial proprietor, Mr. McKay, 
put? a couple of hot bricks, wrapped in blankets, into the sleigb, 
on which a lady may rest her feet, thus frightening off any lonely ! 
cough or cold which may be lurking along the road and waiting 
for victims. The drive out on tbe Sierra Valley road is one of tbe : 
most popular, as it may be taken any lime during tbe winter. 
The first stop is usually made at a bill, four miles from Truckee, ' 
w here tbe merry-makers may dismount and try their prowess ' 
upon snow-shoes, or lose their breath tobogganing upon the hill- 
side. Two m les further are tbe ice-ponds, which afford ex- 
Del lent opportunity for skating. On a road leading southerly 
from Truckee, Ponner Lake id reached, about four miles away. ' 
This is also a deligbtful drive. Wben tbe lake is frozen over, 
its surface will present a malchless skating field. Many vis- I 
tors, taking their skates from Truckee, go out to tbe ponds, i 
skate until lunch time, return to the j~ 
town, and then, after lunch, return to 
their amusement, going back to Truckee 
for dinner. One must be of a dull imagina- 
tion who cannot entertain tbe delights of 
sleighing or skating during one of the glori- 
ous moonlight nights which Truckee so 
often enjoys. The Truckee trip has cap- 
tured many local people, and if the exodus 
to the snow roads and ice ponds continues, 
society's ranks will soon be depleted. Some 
parties have made tbe trip, and others are 
now preparing for it. Those who contem- 
plate going should not lorget to take plenty 
of warm clothing, including wraps, gloves, 
over-shoes, veils or blue glasses, over- 
coats, etc. All these necessaries for com- 
fort can, of course, be procured at Truckee. 
If one wishes only a few hours' sleighing 
or skating, the return trip may be made on 
the train which leaves Truckee at noon, 
and arrives here at 10:45 o'clock in tbe 
evening. Another train leaves Truckee 
at midnight and arrives here at 11 :45 a m. 
It is one of the most delightful trips within 
easy reach of the city. There are in San 
Francisco many hundreds, and even thou- 
sands, of young people who have never bad 
a sleigh-ride, nor put on a real skate. This 
is a glorious opportunity for them to enjoy 
themselves in a manner more exhilarating 
and beneficial than any dozen parties or 
cotillions. The half-tone engravings pre- 
sented with this issue of the News Lettee 
are from photographs taken last week of a 
party who went to Truckee for a sleigh ride. 

i a note I want you to hand 
lively when you are sure no- 
body is looking," said a New York society 
man to a colored servant at a fashionable 
Fifth avenue residence. 

"Yea, Bah," said Sambo, showing his 
ivories. 

" But mind you, don't whisper a word to j 
a living soul." 

" You kin jess rest easy about that, boss. 
Yisterday I fotched dat ar' same woman a j 
letter from anudder gemman, an' I ain't 
Baid a word 'bout it to nobody yit. You 
kin jess rest easy erbout my opening my 
mouf." — Exchange. 



THE MESSAGE 

1*0 the haunt* of the faithful 'tWH Radolpfa W 

Wllb tb te of \VirM»aden * t ill .lank on bll frame. 

And In- rous. d tbe shorn lambs into infinite gle« 
&J be .-ned. I>nnk a bumper to BuoklCJ with 

I've a message from Buoklaj which I'm to post high, 
He's out of the racket— keep your ga/.e on my eye — 
He's out of all politics— JuSt as a cat 
Is out of the cream when you watch what she's at. 

He'll assist a few friends can you doubt wbom be means? 
Who'?e DOen loyal and steadfast through all the late S06I1M, 
And he'll tighten tin- thumbfJOTOWl he's for^im- till 
Kvery cur that took courage to bark at his heels. 

Yon kew him loo well to believe that he will 
Howard from bin purse while there's a popular till, 
<>r to punish be wilt not make free u*e of the ."nme; 
Hut remember tbe watchword— Buck's out of the game. 

He'll remain at Wiesbaden— the cure is sublime 
For indictment and chronic congestion of crime— 
He'll remain at Wiesbaden till 1 wire him fully 
If tbe Grand Jury drawn will be olfcast or bully. 

If otTcast, he'll stay— for his health is precarious; 
If bully, you'll see him here, well and hilarious ; 
So fill up your glasses and drink to Buck's cure, 
For if the Jury goes wrong he is not in it, sure. 



Under the name of >« Le Dansk," there is being introduced 

into England, so says Industries, by M. Auguste Pellerin, of Paris, 
a butter substitute which appears to possess the merit of being 
wholesome as well as economical. Its manufacture has just been 
begun at large works which have been erected at Southampton, 
and which were recently opened. " he Dansk " is already known 
in the trade, having hitherto been produced at M. Pellerin's fact- 
ory in Paris. Its basis is the fat obtained from freshly slaughtered 
cattle, which is first converted into oleomargarine and afterward 
treated and made into " Le Dansk." 



Pastry Without Butter. 



" rjEREiaa 
ll. Mrs. Liv 



Light, flaky and digestible pie crust and all kinds of 
fine pastry can be made with Dr. Price's Cream Baking Pow- 
der without butter or with one half the usual portion, if pre- 
ferred, or with a small quantity of lard or other shortening 
as desired. Pie crust made in this way is more wholesome 
and digestible besides being more economical and easier pre- 
pared in addition to saving all the butter if desired. One- 
third the flour is also dispensed with, and the crust is rolled 
that much thinner, the raising qualities of Dr. Price's Powder 
swelling it to the requisite thickness. Those who enjoy the 
appetizing qualities of the delicious home made pie will 
rejoice to know this secret. 

Dr. Price's Cream Baking Powder is the only powder 
that contains the white of eggs. 

Dr. Prtee's Cream Baking Powder is re- 
ported by all authorities as free from Ammonia, 
Alum, or any other adulterant. In fact, the 
purity of this ideal powder has never been ques- 
tioned. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 




" We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore 

ON Tuesday evening, in response to an invitation extended by 
Manager Bouvier, a large contingent oE the visiting Press 
Clubs attended tbe performance at the Baldwin Theatre, and were 
themselves scarcely a secondary attraction to tbe immense local 
andience. The people on the stage seemed to feel tbe incitement 
of the supposed extra infusion of critical intelligence in the au- 
dience, and exerted themselves to beat their own record. The 
evening was undoubtedly one of the most highly enjoyed of tbe 
engagement. On Wednesday .evening some hundred or so 
Mystic Sbriners (who by tbe way seem to be an eminently jolly 
and junketing order of pilgrims through this vale of tears) visited 
the theatre in full regalia, and looking more like Mystic Shiners 
in glittering jewels and gold and purple fezzes. Altogether 
this has been a gala week at tbe Baldwin, and Mr. Wilkinson's 
Widows has entirely escaped tbe comparative cessation of interest 
incident to second weeks in general. The last week of the popu- 
lar comedy bids fair to equal, if not to exceed, the success of-the 
first two. Following Frobman's comedians at tbe Baldwin conies 
Minna Gale, in a well-chosen repertory of classic plays. 

* * » 

Hoyt is a comedy original. One may criticize his productions, 
and tell why they are not funny — but tbe iangh comes in just as 
spontaneously and irresistibly at every turn of dialogue and situ- 
ation. In A Texas Steer the author has taken a somewhat higher 
flight even than that essayed in The Midnight Bell, the play in- 
volving considerable satire, pointed, if not new, on political 
methods and Washington morals. A noticeable fact in the present 
production of A Texas Steer at the California, is that, with perhaps 
one or two qualifications, it is better than the last. We have the 
same Maverick Brander and the same Bossy, and it is hard to 
imagine an improvement on either. Flora Walsh seems to have 
just the personality for a fresh country girl, sufficiently pretty, 
more than sufficiently shrewd and quick-witted, and without any 
over-developed idea, even at the last, of the refinements of con- 
ventionality. Mr. Murphy's characterization of the Texan 
Congressman hardly received full appreciation on a first seeing. 
It deserves more than the superficial " awfully funny," being in 
many respects of detail, and in tbe sustained peculiarity of man- 
ner and accent, never exaggerated, a study. The same comment, 
verbatim, may be made on Will Bray's inimitable " Minister to 
Day-homey." Mrs. Walsh's old part, Mrs. Brander, is unexcep- 
tionally taken by Miss Lizzie du Roy. Julius Eahn, of this city, 
who took, at very short notice, Newton Chisnell's place as Col. 
Brassy Gall, did remarkably well under the circumstances, though 
on Monday and Tuesday evenings his evident nervousness led to 
an overstrained restlessness which became tiresome and monot- 
onous. Doubtless this toned down as Mr. Kahn became ac- 
customed to his work. One of tbe most thoroughly charming 
bits in the comedy is that furnished by Miss Dorothy Sherrod as 
Dixie Stile, the pretty, dangerous little lobbyist from Indiana. 
Miss Dorothy looked so pretty and so bright, talked with so 
captivating a drawl, cast up her bright eyes with such bewitch- 
ing simplicity, and made herself altogether such a"demnition 
fascinating little sweetness " that even the women in the audi- 
ence wished she would prolong tbe interesting interview ; and as 
to the men, it is a wonder they let her go off tbe stage at all. 
Probably they would not if they were not filled with envy for tbe 
lucky Brander. " A thing of beauty and a joy forever " some- 
times springs up unexpectedly, even on the arid soil of farce- 
comedy. 

Cap'ain Swift is an interesting play, but too generally known 
here to warrant reproduction unless by an exceptional company. 
It is acceptably, but not exceptionally well played by Mr. Arthur 
Forrest and his support. Mr. Forrest seems to feel and compre- 
hend his part, and setting aside some rather unpleasing manner- 
isms of voice and carriage, makes quite a realistic part of the re- 
pentant bushranger. Tbe entire company seemed to have taken 
out a patent on a new reading of Noah Webster. They were evi- 
dently determined to have it noticed, too, as they used the word 
"int'resting " {three syllables, accented on the first) twenty-four 
times, by actual count, in half as many minutes. With a more 
extended repertory Mr. Forrest might fill here a longer engage- 
ment, but limited to one play, and that not a new one, his bright 
manager has shown his good judgment in cutting down his stay 
to one week. 

* » • 

Next week Bobby Gaylor will occupy the Bush with Spo'rt Mc- 
Allister; one of the Four Hundred. 

* * » 

Those who enjoy the music of the Carr-BeeL " pops " gave the trio 
a warm reception last Saturday afternoon, at the opening concert 
of their third series. The afternoon was devoted to Beethoven, 
the master composer. The programme opened with a sonata for 
violin and piano, op. 12, No. 1, which was played in excellent 



manner by Mrs. Carr and Mr. Beel. The many admirers of Mrs. 
Carr's fine piano work were glad to see that lady's name on the 
programme for a solo, but unfortunately her selection was such 
as to somewhat detract from the pleasure usually derived from 
her playing. Her execution was, as always, brilliant and fin- 
ished, but the composition, Thirty two Variations in C Minor, is 
a series of technical difficulties, without sentiment or feeling. 
The last number was the delicate and melodious trio in C Minor 
for violin, viola and 'cello, to which the three musicians, Messrs. 
Beel, Heine and Siering, did full justice. Mrs. Brechemin's 
charming mezzo-soprano was heard in three songs, one of Beet- 
hoven's " Neue Liebe, Neues Leben ;" the other two, Scotch 
songs, to the simple airs of which Beethoven gave some delightful 
instrumentation in the form of obligatos for violin and 'cello. 
The third song, " Again, My Lyre," was especially pleasing, and 
was sung by Mrs. Brecbemin with extreme feeling. The next 
concert will take place on the 30th of this month, and it is to be 
hoped, for the encouragement of the painstaking musicians, that 
a larger audience will greet them. 

* * » 

The Orpheum is giving a good production of Erminie, and to 
very good patronage. As the two thieves, Ravannes and Cadeaux, 
Douglas Flint and Chas. H. Drew have had three or four recalls 
every evening. Tellula Evans sings Erminie well, and costumes 
it nattily and tastefully. The Queen's Lacs Handkerchief will come 
next. 

# * # 

At the Tivoli one of the most musical of Gilbert & Sullivan's 
operas, The Yeomen of the Guard has been the week's entertain- 
ment. Gracie Plaistedis pretty and piguante as Sergeant Meryll's 
daughter, and Phil. Branson is a graceful and effective Jack 
Point. Next week a new prima donna, Miss Kitty Marcellus, 
will be heard at the Tivoli, making her first appearance as Boccac- 
cio, in Von Snppe's opera, alternating wilh Tillie Salinger. The 
Tivoli management has been lately adding several new members 
to its company, which will soon be as efficient as even this am- 
bitious house can desire. Ferris Hartman, comedian, and Will 
Henshaw, tenor, are soon tn appear, and negotiations are pending 
with two other Eastern singers. 



A number of interesting matches in racing, foot-ball, etc., 
entertained the Rink patrons at the Pavilion this week. 



have 



Miss Gale's leading man is Creston Clark, a son of John Sleeper 
Clark and nephew of Edwin Booth. Tbe first week's repertory 
will be: Monday and Thursday, Romeo and Juliet; Tuesday, Ingo- 
mar; Wednesday, The Hunchback; Friday, Lady of Lyons; Satur- 
day matinee, Much Ado About Nothing; Saturday night, Duchess of 
Padua. 

* # * 

" My Brown-eyed Marie " is tbe title of a new " song and dance,'' 
composed by Ashton V. Stevens and published by Broder and 
Schlam, 26-30 O'Farrell street. It is much above the average 
music of its class, as well as extremely catchy and effective, and 
will be more than an ordinary acquisition to this line of music. 

* * * 

Continuing the course, Beethoven's sonata, op. 12, No. 2, 
will be played by Mrs. Carr and Mr. Beel, at their next concert. 
Mrs. Carr will also take part with Mr. Heine in a sonato by Men- 
delssohn for piano and 'cello. A duo for violins, by Alard, played 
by Messrs. Beel and Landsberger, will complete the programme. 

Professor Tyndall entertained the members of the San Francisco 
Verein, last Wednesday night. His mystifications were well re- 
ceived, and most of his experiments were loudly applauded. 
Only members and their families were present, but they were 
sufficiently numerous to fill the ball. 

* • » 

Sydney Rosenfeld's comedy, The Club Friend, in which Roland 
Reed has made his latest success, will be produced at the Cali- 
fornia February 8th, under the direction of Mr. E. B. Jack. 

Maud Granger, in her new play, Inherited, will be seen at the 
Bush-street Theatre in the near future. Tbe next Musical Sun- 
day Afternoon at Steinway Hall will take place February 12th. 

A twenty-four hours' race for a prize of $500, for which there 

are fourteen entries, will begin at the Pavilion Skating Rink, 

January 30th. Stuart Robson, in his brilliant production of 

She Stoops to Conquer, will follow Miss Gale at the Baldwin. He 

will also be seen in the delightful comedy, The Henrietta. The 

Musical Courier says that UAmi Fritz (Friend Fritz), Mascagni's 
new opera, is now called « Dear Friend," in view of the high 
price for the rights placed upon it by his publisher, Son- 

sogni. A young and brilliant tragedy star, Adalbert Mat- 

kowsky, a Pole, who created a sensation at Am berg's, New 
York, has made an equal bit in high comedy.— ^Remenyi, the 
eccentric but seraphic violinist, is in America, and will probably 

reach San Francisco while in thecountry. Russell's comedians, 

they of the New City Directory, will produce next A Society Bluff, 
a musical comedy by Louis Harrison.-^— Nellie McHenry, one of 
San Francisco's established favorites, is making one of her best 
hits in Grattan Donnelly's A Night at the Circus. Richard 






Jan. 



SAN PR W' ISi NEWS I I rni: 



Mans! 

my* thai In tax in be :U .«l all 

mean* <>f * 
paper. Sensible Man-t tblt, ih o popular 

*t and rra.Jcr. i* next . in J.hn K. Kraftfc's list o( leot. 

S*" *" H« will be berc in February ftnd March. 7*<" 

irr uVaN with the love tr.-nble* of two yoQDg dentllU. 

Uoogl Mr. Huiue. buabaod of handsome Cher- 

bate Bebrene, San Kranclaco'a buxom beauty, baa just discovered 
that he is jealous of Robert Mantell. At Charlotte has been for 
year? traveling about the country, in Ibe capacity of leedingledy, 
with the handsome actor, Mr. Hume It evidently one in whose 
breast the sleeping lion wakes up slowly. 



LATEST TENNIS NEWS. 



NF.VER in the annals of tennis, on this coast, has there been 
such interest and excitement shown a? in the match laal Sat- 
urday, between Taylor and Tobin. and Bates and Neel, for the 
final round of the league games. After a slight delay the match 
Itarted at 2:30 o'clock, and the first sett fell to Bates and 
Neel at 6-2. Taylor and Tobin then got down to work, and won 
the next two at 6-1 and 6-4, but lost the next at 6-2. Daring the 
final sett ibe silence was at times oppressive, and the next mo- 
ment the applause (and jeers) were tremendous. When the score 
was called at 5-2 in favor of the East Oakland team, the hearts 
of the Californian boys and those of their friends sank very low, 
but Taylor and Tobin made a gallant stand, and after some really 
fine play pulled up to five games all. Then came the exciting 
time, and every stroke was loudly applauded. When ten games 
all was called, it was decided to call the match off, owing to the 
darkness, and the final set will be played again, probably on Jan- 
uary 30tb. 

The play throughout was not as good as expected, the players 
all playing too carefully. Each side made several bad mistakes, 
and each player made a double fault. Neel, as usual, made his 
"gallery jump" over the net, while Taylor amused some by- 
standers by bis attempt to smash several balls too high for him. 
The umpiring on the whole was good, and did not deserve the 
hissing received from the Oakland contingent. It was a pity, 
however, that the tournament committee did not select at least 
two more linesmen, as this would have prevented the attempted 
umpiring of guests of the club, who might have been prejudiced. 
It is unnecessary to state that the courts were crowded with both 
ladies and gentlemen. 

Our friend F. R. Z., in the Field Sports, writes a most mysterious 
article, in which he explains that if he had been the umpire in 
the Taylor-Yates and Bates-Neel match he would have given 
things so ond so. Perhaps it is better for the parties concerned 
that he was not, a3 we think bis remarks show a certain amount 
of ignorance. Referring to Dr. Dwight's rule (rule XVIII), its de- 
cision, etc. may be all right; but if the umpire says: " Yes, the lines- 
man got in the way of Mr. , but I don't think Mr. could 

have taken that ball, had the linesman not been in his way," 
should it then be a let? Our opinion is that, if a player fails to 
see that things are as they should be, before beginning the match, 
it is his own carelessness, and he should loose the points should 
anything arise out of neglect on his owu part to interfere with his 
play. 

The finals of the Alameda County championship are on the 
tapis for to-day, and the honors rest with either Bates or Neel. It 
will, no doubt, be an exciting game, and numerous are the con- 
jectures as to the winner. 

The California Club will hold a tournament on Washington's 
birtbday, but at present it has not been decided whether it shall 
be class singles or double handicap. Anyhow, whatever it will 
be, there will be a large number of entries. All the members are 
putting in good work during practice days. 



The Chicago and Northwestern Railway, 
With its connections, is the fastest line across the continent, land- 
ing passengers at Chicago one hour, and at New York nearly four 
hours ahead of all competitors. It is the only line furnishing through 
sleeping and dining-car service from the Pacific Coast to Chicago 
without change; and it is also the only line connecting with all fast 
afternoon trains from Chicago to Eastern cities. Aside from this ele- 
gant and best daily service, this line will also run an elegant special 
first-clasp sleeper, of the latest improved pattern, through from San 
Francisco to New York without change on the following dates, viz.: 
January 25th and 26th, February 16th and March 15th. Berths in 
any of these through cars, tickets and all information can be ob- 
tained at the company's general offine, 2 New Montgomery street, 
under Palace Hotel, San Francisco; E. A. Holbrook, General Traffic 
Agent. 

The Pioneer Brand of Shredded and Desiccated Cocoanut is used 
by the leading hotels, families and bakers, because it is the best and 
purest in the world. Can be had from all the leading wholesale and 
retail grocers. If your grocer has not this brand, do not be misled 
into taking any other, but address postal card to L. G. Sresovich & 
Co., 505 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cat., who will send you 
sample free, and if any ordered and not giving satisfaction, may be 
returned at our expense. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

tLBinim , „ IttaafW 

■»•■•* • : <u«l.«lr.| lad llrllll.nl Surrc... 

c'UAPMi. Ptoniui TO, In lh« Howilnf 8ui 

MR. WILKINSONS WIDOWS I 

k Torrent of ReDoi onuu of Uurwmiaad LBacbUrl 

^^ Yon Cannot AtT..rd i., Mlu IL WUtl Your gcau at Oncel 
"* Matiuee .-urn, day only. 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Handsomest Theatre In the World. 
Al. Dayman A CO. Proprietor! I Harry Mass ..... Manager. 

TO NIOIIT. Kvcry Night, Sun, lay lurludcd. 
Roars ol Laughter ,tt Every Llue. Boyt'l ureato.-t Cuttudy Success, 

A TEXAS STEER I 
Don't Delay. Secure Scats at Once. 



8USH STREET THEATRE. 

. B. Leavitt. Lessee and Proprietor | J. J. Gottxo 



. .. . Manager . 

Last Four Nights. Matiuee (this) Saturday. The Great Madison Square 
Theatre Success, 

CAP.'AIN SWIFT I 

Presented by Mr Abthci: FoRBEST, and an Excellent Supporting C<mi- 
pauy. 

Nex Monday— Bobby QatloR, SPORT MCALLISTER. 

Seats Now on Sale, 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kremng Bros Proprietors and Managers. 

To-Night! One Week Only! Gilbert A Sullivan's Musical Masterwork. 
THE YEOMEN OF THE GUARD I 

Monday, January 25th— BOCCACCIO. First Appearance of Kittie Mar- 
cellus in the title role. 

Popular Prices 25c. and 50c. 

6RAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Commercing Monday, Jan. 25th; balance of week, includlngSuaday and 
Saturday matiuee. Graud Spectacular Production! 

MR. WILLIAM JOHN KOHLER 

— AS— 

LOUIS XI. 

Supported by Miss Lizzie Vleoureux and a strong Shakespearean Com- 
pany. Two hundred people represented. Ten horses. 

Reserved seats now on sale lor all performances at box office from 9 a.m. 
to b p. m. 

IRVING HALL. 

JANUARY 30th— SECOND CONCERT OP 
Fifth Series 

CARR-BEEL SATURDAY POP CONCERTS. 

Ticketb— One Hundred Reserved Seats— can be had by applying to Mr. 
Sigismund Beel, care Sherman. Clay & Co. 



gpgf-SEND FOR PRICE LIST.jpjf 

The Judson Dynamite and Powder Co., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Dynamite and Blasting Powder, 

18 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Directors : 

Egbert Jodson, Alvinza Hayward, Thomas Bell, John S. Doe, 

Ed. G. Ldkens (President). 




H. MEYERFELD, Proprietor and Gutter, 

Will Guarantee a Stylish Cut and Perfect Fitting Pair of 
Pants, and keep them in Repair for one year without extra 
charge. 



— 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 



OVER IN OAKLAND. 



A WAVE of divorce cases seems to have struck Oakland just 
now. All sorts and conditions of society are indulging in the 
unhappy affairs, and two or three new suits are brought nearly 
every day. The story told by the News Letter last week regard- 
ing the troubles of T. A. Mitchell, of the North American Insur- 
ance Company, and his wife, was verified in every detail as soon 
as it was published, for divorce proceedings were immediately 
commenced by the husband. On Wednesday of this week, though, 
the case was dropped, for both parties realized that the court pro- 
ceedings would bring disastrous notoriety on them, so they decided 
to compromise. 

Banker A. C. Henry's son George, of Oakland, has somewhat 
blotted the family escutcheon by opening this week a saloon right 
in the heart of the City of Oaks. He has sarcastically named the 
place " The Four Hundred," probably in revenge for his treatment 
by society people. 

The Bohemian Club whiskers are becoming ultra-fashionable 
in Oakland. Every one, of course, has observed the style set by 
Joe Redding of full mustachios and closely trimmed beard, 
peaked on the chin, such, in fact, as was worn by the Prince of 
Wales during his most festive career. Well, Charley Yale, Ed 
Hamilton and other Bohemians soon drew up in line also, and 
now the " croppies " may be seen all over Oakland. Ed Clough, 
George de Goha and Judge Laidlaw are some of the exponents of 
the fashion, and it is said that Senator Dargie had serious thoughts 
of following suit, though after a private consultation with the 
leading barbers in town, he decided that he had better not. 

Phil Gaffey, of Los Angeles, brother of John Gaffey, of the 
State Board of Education, is in this part of the country on a visit. 
Phil, in company with Charley Kearney, the politician, and Jack 
Quigley, of the Barbary coast, bad a remarkable experience at 
Santa Monica last summer, that has never before seen print. 
From Col. Kowalsky's hotel, the Arcadia, to Bob Eckert's restau- 
rant, on the bluffs, is a distance of about 100 yards, and between 
the two places formerly existed a roller coaster. It was rather a 
dangerous affair, though, for it ran over a ravine, and the grades 
were so steep that the coaster was kept chained at the Eckertend 
whenever the man who operated it was away. On the night in 
question, though, Phil, Kearney and Quigley bad been having a 
glorious supper at Bob's, and when they sallied forth to go home 
they were a veritable razzle-dazzle trio. . They were tired, too, 
and Quigley, who was always good on scheming, said, " Let's 
unlock the coaster, and ride over to the hotel in it." 

The others thought it was a good idea, so they all piled in the 
roller, and then after experimenting with several keys finally lib- 
erated it. Down it rushed the first grade, and Phil remarked 
" This ish fine " as the summer air was stirred into a delightful 
breeze. It was not far to the other end and soon tbey had ar- 
rived but 

There was no one to capture the coaster, and after stopping for 
scarcely a moment, it started back again for Eckert's. The trio 
looked surprisedly at each other, but only laughed and made up 
their minds that everything would be all right when they got 
back to their starting point. But no! the coaster repeated its 
performance of the other side and soon they were on their way 
back to the Arcadia hotel. And so they went on and on. trip 
after trip, for fully an hour. They were too uncertain of gait to 
attempt any acrobatic Mights at either end, and they did not like to 
shout for help, for they knew that such a procedure would mean 
having the whole town laughing at them the next day. At last, 
though, they got desperate. There was one place where the 
coaster came within fifteen feet of the sand and they decided to 
jump on reaching this spot. And that is bow they escaped. 
Gaffey sprang first, Quigley fell on him and Kearney landed on 
top of them both with a terrible crash. Then they arose sadly 
and slowly, walked down to the ocean-side, swore eternal secrecy 
regarding their night's adventures^ and going to their rooms in 
. the hotel started taking the sand out of their shoes, pockets and 
hair. 

At 1:30 p. m. on Monday a full dress matinee will be given at 
Cavalry Hall by Mrs. Ada Clark. A large number of invitations 
has been sent out. 

It is occasionally astonishing to see how quickly and admirably 
a woman can adapt herself to the most novel surroundings. In 
one of the most fashionable boarding houses on Tenth Street, 
there came to live this winter a charmingly dressed lady from the 
Eastern States. The place in question has a very religious, in 
fact, almost a Puritanical, tone, for the young men about the 
place are high in rank in church societies, and the older folk are 
equally gloomy as regards the pleasures of this life. The visitor, 
however, seemed to be exactly adapted to this sort of thing, and 
in the dining-room, during the ascetic debates which prevailed, 
she invariably took part and acquitted herself with high honors. 
And so the days ran on, until the first part of this week, when 
she started again for her Eastern home, accompanied by the 
prayers and blessings of her newly-found friends. But what a 
shock it would be to their fine sensibilities if they could see her 
in her surroundings as she is now. Her husband is, in fact, a 
bookmaker at the Guttenberg race track, and one of the greatest 
sports around New York, while she herself can polish off a bottle 



of fizz like a rounder. The holy expression which she wore so 
cleverly in the Oakland mansion is, of course, now abandoned, 
and she has doubtless many a good story to tell of her days of 
piety in California. 

Washington Hall, in East Oakland, was all aglow last night, for 
the Lyric Orchestra and Social Club gave its first anniversary re- 
ception and ball there. It was a full-dress affair, and the guests 
were very select. 

Many and many a time has attention been called to the queer 
occupations young Englishmen of good birth, breeding and edu- 
cation, are reduced to in this country. Oakland has got her in- 
stances, too — plenty of them. Inarestaurant at the City Market 
one young fellow, who was educated at Bedford Grammar School, 
is engaged as a scullion; a Cambridge University man is working 
on the streets for $1.75 a day, and an ex-army officer is walking 
his feet off as a boot: agent. In San Francisco there was, until 
recently, a very notable example, too. A conductor on the 
Geary-street cable line, named Stapleton, had occasion to remem- 
ber, as he helped people on and off the cars, that one of his 
brothers is an officer in the Life Guards, the crack regiment of 
the British army, and another brother is the Prior of one of the 
swellest Dominican monasteries in England. 

The Mystic Shriners had an enjoyable theatre party on Wednes- 
day night. They left Oakland for the Baldwin some thirty 
strong, with City Treasurer Gilpin, wearing red fez and Sacred 
Star of the Zem-Zem, in the lead. Southard Pasha was the mar- 
shal of the evening. 

The Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm. 

The Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm has been doing excellent work 
since its organization in this city. By the introduction of its boxes 
into a uumber of residence and business houses, it has so greatly re- 
duced the dangers arising from fire that in recognition of that fact 
the insurance companies have made special rates on risks in which 
the boxes are placed. A very large number is now in use throughout 
the city, no argument being necessary to convince business men of 
the advantages of the system. At the office of the company, at 323 
Pine street, one may obtain all detailed information regarding the 
advantages and workings of the system. It is a simple plan, a small 
box attached to the fire alarm system being so placed that it may be 
easily reached in case of fire, and an alarm be immediately turned in. 

The Grand Central Wine Rooms, of 1G and 18 Third street, has in- 
creased its patronage with the beginning of the new year. It retains 
its popularity because it is well known that its goods are always of 
the best class, the rule of the house being that only the best brands 
shall ever cross its bar. It is the most popular bar in town among 
connoisseurs. 



HAVE YOU GOT 

Dyspepsia, Bright's Disease, or Dia- 
betes, or do you want a pleasant, 
healthful drink? If so, buy 

ARCADIAN WAUKESHA WATER, 

Recommended by our best physi- 
cians as the healthiest drink on earth. 
Johnson-Locke Mercantile Company 
Agents, 204 Front St., S. F. 



CO. 



C3-. 'W. CLABK Sc 
653 Market Street, 



FOB 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 



OLIVE TREES FOR SALE. 

Large numbers of splendidly rooted trees of different 
ages. New process of rooting, the result of ten years' 
experimenting. No artificial heat used. Address 
W. ALSTON HAYNE, Jr., 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 

THOS. W. BREE, 
^-^r-^^TEACHER OF BANJO, GUITAR AND MANDOLIN 

*&-<$ 305 Seventh Street. 

MANUi'At"lllRER OF BANJOS, UU1TARS, Etc 



Jan. 



BAN PR W< [Si O NEWS I KTTER. 



9 



SNAP SHOT8. 
[Bt D i Viiioi.] 



»» \A/*' AT constilulcs a newspaper woman? " is a queMi.<n 
VV often asked and seldom adequately answered. Per b ftp* 
il is oot to •**? to define Ihe chai and ihe qualifica- 

tions entitling one tu claim the proud distinction ol being a 
*• representative of the press." in Ibe first place, being a 
newspaper woman and writing for newspapers, are very different ; 
very different indeed. There are two ways of giving a definition : 
one is to make a positive statement : the other, a negative; in other 
one set of phrases will tell what a thing is. the other what 
tt is not. Let tue avail myself ol the negative form. A news- 
paperwoman is not one who?,- attainments, stop with sending 
sweet spring poems to newspapers, or little poetical effusions, 
which illustrate in themselves a hack ward spring, since they are 
tbe "return balls" of literature, and leap home to the Bender. 
A newspaper woman is not one wbo once " a long time ago 
wrote a little something and sent it to a paper and it was published, 
and not one of the family, nor even the editor, ever knew who 
wrote it." Compilers of report? of charitable societies, solicitors 
of advertisements, those who overwhelm editors with flowery 
accounts of church sociables, strawberry festivals and chrysan- 
themum teas; those wbo write up entertainments, or whose sole 
claim to being " literary " is that they have corrected school-girls' 
compositions, are in no sense of the word newspaper women. 
Tbey have no right to call themselves such, or to invoke the 
name of tbe press as belonging rightfully to them. It is a pre- 
tense. Cranks and fad-fanciers and intellectual pretenders should be 
rebuked. Granted they have a perfect right to organize themselves 
into a society of mutual admiration, and recount how this one 
had a poem printed in the Sunday Sea Qull, and that one had a 
manu=cript accepted by the weekly Wastcbaskct, tbey are at 
liberty to call their organization any grand sounding title that 
may recommend itself to their picturesque imaginations. Per- 
haps "The Literary Ladies' Relief" is as good a name as any, 
but let thera not lay hands of misappropriation upon the great 
name of the press. 

To a professional newspaper woman — one who earns her living 
by her pen — the attempts that some women make to pose as 
writers is at first amusing and then exasperating. For to be a 
successful newspaper woman, to be a power on tbe staff of a live, 
wide-awake, influential publication, requires brains, ability to see 
both sides and around the corner of a question all at once; more than 
ordinary ability of rapid expression, and a strong sense of what is 
news, what is available and what the public wants. A position 
in the newspaper world, where one's name as a writer shall be 
known and respected; where one's writings shall be widely 
quoted and due credit given, is not to be earned in a day, nor by 
any dilletanteism. Therefore, we, oF the craft, cannot stand su- 
pinely by and see others who have never worked in the harness, 
who are back numbers, uncut copies, publications without an in- 
dex, who are unknown and unnoticed save by the thousand eyes 
of their owd egotism, take to themselves the name " newspaper 
women," without a protest. 

Some women are to-day posing as newspaper women who have 
never been inside of a newspaper office in their lives. They have 
been in the habit of corresponding with the editor, and have had 
no occasion to call upon the cashier. They have a vague idea 
that the business office and the editorial room are one and the 
same. Tbey don't know whether a proof sheet is wet or dry 
when it comes off the galley; they don't know what the stone is; 
they roll their manuscripts, and have not the faintest idea what 
is meant by "copy." They belong to the same class who fancy 
that all those wbo are employed regularly on a paper must know 
the identity of every contributor, and that to know any one con- 
nected with a paper will insure the insertion of any item or the 
acceptance of any article that may be sent to the acquaintance in 
question. 

A newspaper woman will not pride herself upon her ignorance 
of current affairs; she will not say "I never read the papers," nor 
will she vote to adopt resolutions of sweeping condemnation of 
the press as it is today. She will have too much newspaper 
sense to imagine that any paper will care whether she or her 
friends stop reading it because it has dared to rebuke the preten- 
sions of literary fakirs. She will not wish to exclude reporters; 
she will not talk about " those horrid newspaper men," nor will 
she wonder how things get into the papers. If she were a news- 
paper woman, she would know without asking. A newspaper 
woman will never give utterance to such arrant fool nonsense as 
to declare that no one should ever dare to write up a society 
woman, or to presume to speak of her at all, no matter in how 
complimentary a strain, until the permission of the aforesaid 
society woman has been obtained. Did any one ever hear such 
an absurdity? The newspaper woman who writes for her living 
knows that the newspaper editor is like the centurion of old, 
who said : " For I also am a man set under authority, having un- 
der me soldiers, and I say to one, Go, and he goeth ; and to an- 
other, Come, and he cometh, and to my servant, Do this, and he 
doeth it." 

The women's columns in many of our dailies are responsible 



for the epidemic i f the lit i. for scribbling. For the simple Might 
of seeing them*. | rtnt, a botl of ||||y women ruifa 

their effusion I nnder the editorial VI, and because they are 

women and represent no outlay of oolnt loeJr "itoff" li 
taken for padding, end nothing do they reoetoe, Bot this, in 
their own eyev entitle- them to the prood dletlDOttOO "f being 

newspaperwomen. Bahl If-ti for the fane to Mop. Berth* 

biers, writers, authors, anything but members of the press. 

see 
Kate Field is a public speaker who always has the intelligent 
attention ol her audience. She has a good presence, speaks with 
rare powers of distinct enunciation, and, besides, she is always In 
such ■• dead earnest " I aim one of those who have a great ad- 
miration for Kate Field, and consider her foremost among the 
newspaper men of the age. All the more, then, were we sorry to 
have Miss Field, at the Powell Street Theatre on Friday night, 
declare that the Chinese never get drunk. Indeed they do, Miss 
Field; indeed they do get abominably drunk, and on opium, 
too. Miss Field, and when they are opium fiends it's very 
complete flends that they are. An opium Chinaman will smoke 
his favorite drug incessantly, until under its influence he falls 
like a log on the floor, or lies like one on his bed, deaf to all sound, 
oblivious to all that passes around htm. The family may wait in 
vain for their breakfast, his candle may burn low in its socket and 
set his table, and bed and hedding on fire. It matters not to him. 
He is lost in tbe stupor of the opium smoker, and cannot be 
aroused. Happy the family whose Chinese servant takes to his 
bed, or, better yet. skips his place, when he " hits the pipe." For 
when an opium fiend tries to keep at his work while he is com- 
ing under the influence, great is the havoc that may be wrought 
by him. Ob, yes, Miss Field, if you will permit the correction, 
the Chinese do get drunk. 

* • * 

One of the Sunday papers had a disillusioning account of the 
prototypes of the characters in Helen Hunt Jackson's story of 
Ramona. It was given with the zest of a new discovery. That's 
nothing; old residents of California knew all that long ago, or, 
to be more exact, tbey knew that Ramona was a beautiful poem 
in prose, that no such Indians as Alessandro had ever existed. 
And Helen Hunt knew it, too, for while she was in Southern 
California she utterly refused to talk about her book, to give any 
reasons for her views, or to tell about the types. She evaded the 
question every time. This was told me by a resident of River- 
side, who vainly tried to engage her in conversation on the char- 
acter of Alessandro. 



Every-Day 

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rounded 

teaspoonful of 

Cleveland's SuDerior Bale- 

x 

ing Powder does better work 
than a 
fif ^\ heaping 
tea- 
spoon- 
ful of anv other. Cleveland's 
is wholesome, leavens best 
and 1»"vp<i.n rrnst. 

F. II. AMES A CO., Agents. 



LOUIS ROEDERER CHAMPAGNE, 

The Highest tirade Champagne in the World. 

CABTB ZBIi-A-USrOZHriE.." 

(WHITE LABEL) 

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'"G-ia-AJSI-ID "VI3ST SEC," 

(BBOWN LABEL) 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 
See that every Bottle bears the privatelabelof 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 






10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 




^c^^ ^f^^^^r^ — m~^fa > 



■LOOKER- orsT 77777 ^ 



U-t^Pl'^lfi -Jl* \JLU^ 



THERE were many humorous incidents in connection wiita tbe 
visit of the League of Press Clubs to this city which are well 
worth the telling. When the party arrived in this city all of the 
visitors were driven in coaches and carriages from the ferries to 
the Baldwin Hotel, for here accommodations had been provided 
for them by the local committee. The best rooms in the hotel 
had been reserved for the delegates, each of whom was given a 
suite with bath. The local committee were not personally ac- 
quainted with the visitors, but as the list of visitors had been 
made, there was no confusion. One gentleman, a^ visitor, re- 
mained standing at the Baldwin counter after the others had gone 
to their rooms, and a committee-man, approaching him, asked 
him if he were of the Eastern party. He said he was, and gave 
his name, Leon Frank, which was on the list. Mr. Frank was at 
once shown to a fine suite, decorated, as were all the others, and 
in which was a large basket of flowers. At Monterey, Mr. Frank 
was also assigned an excellent room. When the coaching parties 
were being made up for the Cypress Point drive, Mr. Frank again 
patiently awaited his turn. When only the seat by the driver 
was left, a committee-man asked Mr. Frank to take it, and then 
climbed up beside him. " Pardon me," said the local man, *< but 
though I have met most of the Eastern party, I have not had the 
pleasure of an introduction to you.'* 

" Oh, my name is Leon Frank," said the other, " and I am the 
barber of the party. But, say, you boys have just treated me 
magnificently." 

■# # * 

At the Stanford University, the visitors, while in the quad- 
rangle, noticed in the artificial stone pavement the name, «■ George 
Goodman," and some asked what it meant, and who it was. 
" Poor Goodman," said Sam Davis ; " he died an untimely death, 
and is buried here within the precincts of the University, whose 
successful foundation was his chiefest wish. He was a very 
learned man, and a poet of charming qualities. As an authority 
upon Sanscrit and arcbaslogy, he was facile princeps. He was a 
brother of Joseph T. Goodman, tbe well-known litterateur," and 
Sam turned away his head and wept, while the visitors mourn- 
fully walked from the " tomb." 

# ■ # 

When the train on the way home from Santa Cruz was passing 
Menlo Park one of tbe enthusiastic committee called to the visitors 
to rush out and see the banana tree beside the track before the 
train left. They did so, and gazed in wonderment at a fine cen- 
tury plant in bloom. 

# * * 

Willie Wilde is proud of the fact that he is an Irishman. At 
the De Young reception, the other night, when speaking to a lady, 
he said that he hoped that he had not left in this country the im- 
pression that he is an Englishman. " Why, I thought you were 
an Englishman," said the lady. " No; I am an Irishman," said 
Wilde, "and am descended from Irishmen. An Englishman! I 
hope I have not left that impression in this country." 
» * * 

When Lucky Baldwin drove his tallyho coach loaded with 
delegates and visitors out to the Sutro Heights, he remained upon 
the box, holding the reins, until most of the excursionists had 
gone into the residence for lunch. Then, as he was about getting 
down, one of Sutro's men, who did not know him, called out: 
"Say, my man, you can get some lunch down in the servants' 
quarters. You need not go into the house." 

While Baldwin was endeavoring to recover from the surprise 
of this announcement, Marshall Wilder said to him : » Pretend to 
do it, and then slip into the dining hall." Baldwin did so, and 
when the Major Dorao saw and scowled at him in the hall. 
Lucky said : li Say, old man, don't give m,e away, will you! I 
just slipped in, and I want to get a good lunch." The servant 
was about to reply angrily, when some one told him who Bald- 
win was, and the man went away and hid himself. 

# # * 

The only unpleasant incident in connection with the tour of 
the Press League happened at Auburn. When the reception com- 
mittee from this city met at Auburn the committee of that town, 
it accepted the invitation of the Auburnites for " everybody to go 
over to the hotel and take a drink." The band played, the Kick- 



ers' Club forgot its sorrows, and sang, and a right royal time was 
had. Then the chairman of the San Francisco committee set 'em 
up again. About thirty men drank, and when the barkeeper 
was asked for the bill he smiled sweetly and softly said : » Twenty- 
three dollars please! " Then the Kickers' Club communed for 
some moments, and an indignant member told the barkeeper that 
although "we are from tbe city, we don't like to be robbed." 
Finally the hotel man took $5, which was more than his liquor 
was worth, apologies were made, it was said the thieving bar- 
keeper would be discharged, and the visitors withdrew. 

* • • 

On Tuesday evening an enthusiastic Californian was saying 
good-bye to a number of visitors, and as he was not acquainted 
with a'.l the party, he bade farewell to local people and Eastern- 
ers indiscriminately. Seeing an austere-looking gentleman stand- 
ing alone on one side of the hall, upon tbe edge of a crowd of 
jolly people, the enthusiast rushed up to him, and, shaking him 
by the hand, said: " Well, as I may not see you again, let me 
take this opportunity to say good-bye. I hope you have enjoyed 
your trip immensely. We tried to make your stay with us a 
happy one, and if we have succeeded we are amply repaid. I 
hope you will return to San Francisco, which I assure you is one 
of the best cities in the universe to live in. Do you take the 
morning train? " 

" No; I will not." 

" Ah, then you wish to remain with us longer. That's right, 
for we will treat you royally. I hope you have visited all the 
points of interest about here. The City Hall is a grand structure. 
You should inspect it; and have you seen our seals? By the 
way, from what part of the East are you?" 

" Oh, I'm not from the East; I'm a San Franciscan." 

" Oh, the deuce you are," said the enthusiast, taken aback 
somewhat; " then who the devil are you?" 

" Only the Mayor of San Francisco," said tbe quiet gentleman, 
and the enthusiast smiled sadly, sighed deeply, and made for the 
punch bowl. 

* * * 

Mrs. Frank Leslie's declaration that she would not permit her- 
self to be called by the name of her present husband, William 
Wilde, until the latter bad distinguished himself so as to attain 
the high literary pedestal on which she stood, has caused much 
comment and a bon mot. The latter was spoken at the Hotel 
Vendome at San Jose, during tbe citizens' banquet to the visit- 
ing delegates last Sunday nigbt. Mrs. Leslie and William Wilde 
sat side by side in places of honor and were the recipients of 
many attentions from those present. As the feast was drawing 
to a close some of the guests even left their places to go and pay 
their respects to the distinguished woman. One of them, a blunt 
fellow, with more fun and wit in his make-up than he had savoir 
vivre, leaned over betwesn the chairs of the couple. 

"Sir!" exclaimed Mr. Wilde, turning abruptly, "who are 
you?" 

" Well," slowly said the one addressed, thinking of the very 
secondary position Mrs. Leslie accorded her husband, •• If I were 
you, I'd be Wilde William." 

* * * 

There can be no impropriety in relating another story apropos of 
this distinguished couple since Mrs. Leslie did not hesitate to lay 
its foundation within the hearing of a number of ladies and gen- 
tlemen at the Hotel del Monte. She was surrounded, as usual' 
by numerous admirers — and others. In the conversation she 
had many nice things to say about California and Californians, 
but she expressed a slight disappointment regarding Del Monte. 
It was not quite up to what she had been led to expect. 

"The door leading to Mr. Wilde's apartment is locked," she 
said, " and to reach it, he must pass through mine. ' 

"That would rather please most California wives," a lady 
present asserted. 

At Monterey the visitors had a "huge" time. The Cypress 
Point drive was one of the events of the trip, and was greatly en- 
joyed by all the Easterners. One of the prominent members of 
the reception committee was made useful in a novel manner by 
the party in his coach when the vehicle was rattling down the 
heavy grades on the return. The brake was not strong enough 
to hold the coach off the haunches of the team, and at the sug- 
gestion of a bright little Bostonian, Colonel Kowalsky placed his 
couple of hundred pounds of avoirdupois on the back steps, where 
he acted as a drag, and kept the coach in proper balance. 

At the Del Monte hotel a " lady " visitor was so greatly impresse 





27-37 Kearny St. 



HOUSE COATS, GOWNS, 

MACKINTOSH'S, SILK UMBRELLAS, 
OVERCOATS, FINE UNDERWEAR, 

NECKWEAR, SATCHELS, ETC. 



Jan 



8AN PRANCI8I <> \r\\ -lit rri; 



1! 



with the bn«ptialiiy .-f idr < > by the 

climate ib»t «h.* rrruatned at the flub-hoBM bar until . 
drinKtn* Uqaora. tod declaring. :t» led tone-, that Ibis 

fftt ib« graaMast oouolrj on earth. \n obtarrat, curiooa a* to 
mtUora of physical dertlopment, mtjrbl have had an excellent 
aubjert in IbbfaJr me from beyond the Rockies, whose capacity 
seemed to increase with the age of the night. She did not know 
the akitt dance, and regretted that she wa* not a hieh kicker, bo I 
did what she could to assure e ;imt aba trosJd not pssi 

by any bottle. It is proper to Bay here that this was the only 
case In which any cf the lady visitor! forgot the dignity which 
we of the woolly West presume attaches to the higher civilization 
or the East. 

• • • 

8am Davis had a woeful experience on the night of the banquet. 
He made an excellent speech, but his efforts so far overcame him 
that, when he subsequently visited the University Club, he was 
able to drain only two bumpers of the seductive mixture of porter 
and champagne, with which the learned gentlemen of that club 
fiU up their love cup. When Sam was seen next day, there was 
a sad expression on his face. He seemed wandering in a dream. 
" Hello, Sam," I called to him. •• bow do you find yourself to-day? " 
"Slightly mixed ; slightly mixed," he «aid, solemnly; "the fact is 
I retired early last night, but I woke up this morning in bed with 
a man I didn't know." 

» » ■ 

So, Doctor Cogswell, you revoke 
Your gorgeous polytechnic gift, 

And the Superior Court invoke 

To bear your pleadings and be swift 
To give you just and plenary shrift. 

May Heaven inspire you to renege 
Your gifts of statuary, too; 

Just say you will, and we will pledge 
Oar honor that you need not sue 
To have them carted back to you. 

Many have doubttess noticed the great change that has taken 
place of late in Lin Church the sweet-voiced Assistant District 
Attorney of Oakland. Once he was volatile, light-hearted and 
gay, now he is deep, mysterious and gloomy; once he delighted 
to stay around with the boys and chat and tell stories; now be has- 
tens away the minute his duties are over, and even on the streets is 
so occupied with his thoughts that he scarcely acknowledges the 
salutations of the many who greet him. Of course there is a rea- 
son for all this, and the fact is that Lin has become a theosopbist. 
He always was inclined to investigate matters, weird and unna- 
tural, and when William Judge delivered his recent course of lec- 
tures in tbis section Lin found what his soul had long yearned 
for. The creed of the Mabatmas with its opportunities for a flight 
into a higher and mystical world appealed at once to his sensi- 
bilities, so be plunged deep into " Isis Unveiled," and the teach- 
ings of Blavatsky, Olcott, Keightley et al.and soon had the men- 
tal foundation st me of his new creed securely laid. But he did 
not end his studies there. The midnight hour always found him 
poring over works so grave that even Buston's "Ode on Melan- 
choly " would seem humorous by contrast, and at last he worked 
himself up to that stage of true belief where the tinkling of astral 
himself. For BUch a communication Lin hoped and prayed and 
bells might be expected or even a spirit letter from Koot Hoomai 
on Saturday night last, as he happened to feel particularly spiritu- 
elle he locked himself in his room and invoked the presence of 
one of tbe " brothers." Waving on high the mystic tripod with 
its lettering "There is no religion higher than truth" he paced 
up and down awhile, and then sitting down in a corner buried 
his face in his hands so as to entirely shut out the world from 
his thoughts. 

A minute or so passed and then be arose to resume bis march. 
He turned towards the door and then — what, what was that? 
Right on the carpet close up to the door lay a white crumpled 
note. With a heart beating at fever heat, for here was undoubt- 
edly a missive from Koot Hoomai at last, he bowed humbly and 
then with reverential air picked the note from the floor and ner- 
vously but eagerly unfolded and perused it. And this is what he 
read: 

January 9th. 
Mr Church: 
Sir:— Your long-standing wash bill amounts to $6.80, and until you call 
and settle it I cauaot let you have this week's wash. 

J. Muston, Collector, Union Laundry. 

# * » 

A railroad man of this city had the pleasant task the other 
night of escorting two married ladies through Chinatown. The 
ladies were from the East, but they were not prudish. They said 
they had heard much of the wonderful sights in Chinatown 
and they wanted to see it all 

" See it all ?" repeated their friend in a deprecatory tone. 

" Yea," they persisted, "we want to see everything. We have 
been slumming in New York. It can't be much worst than that. 
We don't want to miss a thing." 

The railroad man pressed his lips together determinedly, and 
said " All right. You shall see everything, if you insist upon it." 

He showed them through the cavernous passages under the 
sidewalk on Waverly Place, and introduced them to all the hor- 



the actor* .if th« W | Hic-alre. |,„, ,| u . v ,, n |, 

at IhOM. ■■ I* toll ii bad as fou bavr bl 

it nothing." he n "W«ll, don't fool ns. Boon u 

•wjthlng." Bo ho c I u ted thorn Into the dark passagi 

lead off from Dupnnl ■ treat, and let them fm-t tbolr I 
the slants there. After m blob he net Oum Oook alley before thorn 
In all Its naked splendor. Down In one of th€ bo 
menu, where the flea* and the fool odon sie with each other to 
make pagan life happy, one ol the indies closed her «y< 
Leaned heavily back In the anna "f bei escort. She had fallen 
into a dead faint. The other woman looked very whlti 
the gilN and the railroad man. staggering under the weight ..f his 
lovely burden, made bis way Into tbe street with fear and trem- 
bling. Had botb women rain ted at onoe he would have fainted 
himself, be declares. He did not stop to ask them if they were 
satisfied, but called a back and took them to their hotel in a 
hurry. 

• * • 

When A. ('. Basset! was at the head or affairs on the I 
Division of the Southern Pacific , be introduced, in his latter days 
of authority, many radical changes in the style of things, and 
the company has, ever since his dismissal, been repairing dam- 
ages done to its old and time-honored methods. For instance, 
,: Mr. Bassett made the Third and Townsend streets building of the 
company a •• passenger station," and on one door were the words 
" Men's Waiting-room " and on the other " Women's Waiting- 
room." Tbe " passenger station " has been remedied, and is now 
; a " passenger depot." while the waiting-rooms will soon become 
! places of accommodation for "ladies and gentlemen." It is 
thought that Mr. Bassett's originality and simplicity of style 
partly accounts for the fact that he is now running a lumber-mill 
instead of a railroad. 

» • # 

Colonel C. F. Crocker, who is now making bis first journey 
through Mexico, will be absent six weeks from tbe city. He will 
look over the projected line of his company to Durango, and will 
then go to the City of Mexico and to Vera Cruz. After that he 
will go to New York to confer with Messrs. Stanford and Hunt- 
ington with regard to tbe advisability of building the new line. 
He writes to a friend in tbis city that on this present trip he has 
had his eyes opened as to the real extent of tbe interests of the com- 
pany of which he is an officer. It is not generally known, or if 
known, but little thought of. that the Southern Pacific Company 
owns nearly 500 miles of railroad in the southern republic. 

# # » 

R. P. Doolan has received much praise for his active work in 
making certain the success of the performance of A Trip to Africa, 
given by tbe San Francisco Operatic Company at the Powell- 
street Theatre last week, for the benefit of tbe Home for In- 
curables. It was thought that the affair would be a lamentable 
failure. The sate of tickets was very poor, and it seemed that the 
society would be in debt instead of being able to aid tbe charity. 
Then R. P. Doolan came on the scene, and in a week, it is said, 
he sold the entire seating capacity of the house, and crowded in 
two hundred more people. The theatre was packed, the perform- 
ance highly successful, and the Home for Incurables realized 
$1,260. It is said that the " hoodoo " has now been removed from 
the theatre. 

* # » 

Mr. H. C. Barker resides in the beautiful little city of Napa. 
The letteringon Mr. Barker's door asserts that be is an attorney 
and counsilor-at-law. Mr. Barker is fairly endowed with this 
world's goods, and so manages to grow corpulent in spite of clients 
being few and far between. But Mr. Barker talks like a very busy 
and important gentleman, and is usually found around town be- 
wailing the ravages his large practice is making on bis health. 
One sunny morning last week, before going out, be wrote upon 
the slate near the entrance to bis thought foundry, "Will return 
at 2 P. M." An hour later some unfortunate individual strayed 
into the building and wrote beneath the announcement upon the 
slate, "What for? " 



The Original Swain's Bakery, of 213 Sutter street, is the most 
popular restaurant in San Francisco among people who enjoy a first- 
class dinner, excellently served in a charming apartment. The menu 
cannot be excelled in the city, and it always includes the daintiest 
dishes possible for the season. The chef b a past-master of his de- 
lightful profession, and does great honor to himself and his establish- 
ment^ __ 

FINE DIAMONDS, 

Gold and Silver Watches. 

The newest designs in jew- 
elry of first quality only, at 
very reasonable prices. 
A. W STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St, 
Under Masonic Temple. 




12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 



A LEGEND OF THE "HOMELESS.' 



T 1 



By Dr. G. A. Danzigeb. 

"'HE night was calm and glorious. Not a breath of wind, nor 
1 a cloud in the sky. The moon threw her silver light in one 
gigantic beam upon the ocean, and the stars glittered in their ir- 
ridescent background, while our ship, The Homeless, gently rocked 
upon the heaving bosom of the deep. Of the thousand pas- 
sengers on board nearly all were on deck. Almost every nation 
of the civilized world was represented. They were steering for 
the land ol freedom and endeavor — America. They were remark- 
ably quiet at this moment; were they awed by the grandeur of 
the ocean ? Probably. 

Suddenly the trumpet-like voice of the captain broke the 
silence. Every one started. 

" Let us have a song, ladies and gentlemen. Give us a nice 
song, a song in which all may join." 

"Oh, yes, sir; please, sir," chimed an Anglo-Saxon maiden 
from the county of Yorkshire. ll Let us have a genuine English 
song, sir. I propose, sir, we sing ■ God Save the Queen,' sir." 

'* I beg your pardon," said a portly German. » The Queen is 
nothing to us. Let us sing something that will remind us of 
loyalty and bravery and deeds done. Captain, I propose we sing 
»• Die Wacht am Rhein.' " 

" Au diable with the Wacht am Rhein," cried an excitable 
Frenchman. "Gentlemen and ladies, I humbly crave your par- 
don; but I must protest against German songs. The best German 
product is Limburger cheese. I mean no offense. But liberty 
was won when every man of France sang the one great song, * La 
Marseilliease.' Captain, I propose this very popular song." 

" Presto, Signor Capitano," said an Italian. " Ah, there is 
nothing like Italy's great song, ' Patria, mia Cara.' Captain, we 
sing the Italian song, i Patria, mia Cara.' " 

At this, a girl approached the Captain. She was remarkably 
beautiful. And as the moonlight fell upon her figure, she looked 
like one of those forms, modeled by the Greek masters, the poise 
and symmetry of which take the soul captive, and fill the heart 
with longing. 

" Ladies and gentlemen," she said, and her voice sounded soft 
and melodious, like the deep, melting tones of a iiute. " I am an 
American. My patriotism, though strong, is rather cosmopolitan. 
But an American neither fights nor sings for trifles, being ready, 
however, to do both for the blessings of his home. If I under- 
stand the Captain correctly, it is his intention that we should 
have a song to inspire the soul and fill the heart with memories 
and hopes. To accomplish this, yoa must sing a song to voice 
the sentiments of all on board. But for this you need not go to 
London, Paris, Berlin or Rome. The name of the ship we are on 
Is quite suggestive of the general feeling: -Homeless!' Are we 
not homeless just now, floating between life and eternity? And 
what could possibly be nearer to our hearts, from whatever 
country we may hail, than the thought of home, and those loved 
ones we left behind us? I am certain there is no one on this ship 
who would not fall in with those who sing * Home, Sweet 
Home.' " 

" Alas ! yes, there are," said a man in the immediate vicinity of 
the charming and eloquent American. " Yes, Miss, there are over 
two hundred heartbroken Jews below in this ship, who would 
rather lament as did their ancestors : < By the waters of Babylon, 
there did we sit and weep, remembering thee, O! Zion.' We had 
homes and happiness, but the Czar's cruelty and the mob's bru- 
tality robbed us of both. Let those sing of a sweet home who 
have homes, but to us, homeless wanderers of nigh on two thou- 
sand years, to us home is a stigma and a curse. It is very hard 
to be driven from the land of your birth, to be declared homeless, 
but it is harder still to join in a joyous chorus when one's soul is 
in agony and the heart is broken." 

And the poor man covered his jace and wept. 
"My friend," said the beautiful American, " you should not 
weep over past misfortunes. You are going to a land of liber- 
ty, and your future happiness will far outweigh your past misery. 
In suggesting the song, < Home, Sweet Home, 1 I thought of you 
also. I thought of all those that are homeless. While it is true 
that some of us are returning to old established and happy homes, 
still others, and those are by far in the majority, go to America 
to found homes and rear families. A few years hence and your 
past life will be like a dream, aye, a bad dream, but gone and 
forgotten. You and your people will be citizens of a great repub- 
lic, respected and honored by your fellow-citizens. Some of 
America's best citizens are of your faith, who, coming like you, 
poor and homeless, have made for themselves names, homes and 
fortunes. And were you to ask the least of them whether they 
prefer their old to their new homes, I am certain they would be 
in favor of the latter. Cheer up, then, my friend, and in antici- 
pation of your future happiness, sing with us of the glory and 
sweetness of home." 

" God bless you, Miss," said the Jew, while every one on deck 
cheered the wise and fascinating girl. 

Again the voice of the Captain resounded, but there was a slight 
tremor in his deep tones as he said, "Let us sing • Home, Sweet 
Home.' " 



He gave the signal, and the air was filled with the chorus of a 
thousand voices, some singing and some sobbing, "Home, Sweet, 
Sweet Home! " 

The monsters of the deep rose to the surface, the sea heaved, 
the moon shone in tranquil beauty, the stars blinked approval. 
It was a beautiful night; it is a memory now. 



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PALO ALTO STOCK FARM 

IMPORTANT SALE 

OF 

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CHOICE BROOD MARES. 

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WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 24, 1892. 

f^-Catalogues now ready. Will be sent upon application. 
KILLIP .V CO., Auctioneer!), 

33 Montgomery Street. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 
PACIFIC OOAST, 

123CaliforniaSt.,S.F l 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOB SALE BY ALL FIB8T-CLA88 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



Jan 



BAN PRANCISCO NEWS I.KI Hi; 



I ; 



NANKY PUO AND I. 

I have a bird named Nanky Poo. 
A pretty Australian roiclla, 
A matter -piece of scarlet, b 

Gr*en. mauve, while, orange, black an. I yellow. 
Australian does not mean that be 
II is little self ha< immigrated, 
But that way then beyond the sea 

His ancestors first met And mated. 
And bred and loved their little ones, 
'Mid kangaroos and fllatypusses, 
Till some oue from ulterior zones, 

Enamored of the canning cusses, 
Ensnared a lovely pair or two 

And brought them, in vile durance bolden. 
To our fair State, where Nanky Poo 

Of native sons is far most golden. 
He cannot talk and scold and swear, 
Up to a notch of eighteen carats. 
Nor scoff and shriek and rip and tear, 

Like more extolled and gifted parrots; 
He's only a poor paroquet, 

With limitations rather doleful — 
A whistle very faint yet sweet, 

A trill not very loud but soulful; 
But, though his notes are short and low. 
And have the sadness of repression, 
He hath some thought witnin, I know, 

Beyond his power of expression; 
And hour with Nanky I beguile 

In watching his impatient bother 
To make his meaning clear, and smile 

To think how much we're like each other. 
He chirps when everything is well, 
I chirp when all is in bonanza; 
He whistles when his joy is full, 

I likewise trill some joyous stanza; 
He hops about and makes a fuss 

To summon those at his dependence, 
And I jost jump around and cuss 

Until I get the like attendance; 
Anon he flies against his cage 

And wounds himself in senseless anger, 
And I in just as silly rage 

Indulge in just as foolish clangor; 
Till no more strive I to subdue 

His freaks by stern and lofty dealing, 
For I have learned that Nanky Poo 

And I have wondrous fellow-feeling. 
I look across the line that lies 

Between the Here and the dread Whither, 
Which all that creeps or walks or flies 
Must presently confront together; 
And wonder if, when my poor feet 

Shall tread eternity's first headline, 
And I look back, my paroquet 

Will sink behind me, at the deadline. 
I want no share in such a split, 

I wish his pinions to be tossing 
Beside me, or that we both hit 

A balk line that admits no crossing; 
And I'm not going to presume 

That Heaven was made for beings hoary, 
And not for creatures rainbow-plumed, 
And ready to enhance its glory. 
San Francisco, Jan. 23, 1892. Joseph T. Goodman. 



DRAMATIC people have something to learn still ; and one inter- 
esting item seems to have been picked up at the Ober-Am- 
mergau Passion Play last summer. Hitherto it has been supposed 
impracticable to introduce the barn-door fowl as part of a stage 
realism with any effect, because the bird of the poultry-yard could 
not be educated to crow to order. The peasants of Ober-Amroer- 
gau overcame this difficulty very simply. Day after day the cock 
crew, and Peter went out and wept bitterly, precisely as the stage 
manager gave the cue, the expedient being to tickle tbe bird's 
neck. Ere long crowing is sure to form a prime incidental in 
drama or comedy: and it might be made a very comic or a very 
serious event. Suppose any clever fellow wrote a piece, such as 
The Bells, in which some horrible crime was always brought to 
the murderer's recollection by cock-crowing! It would, at any 
rate, be unique in the manner of worldly expiation — perhaps 
highly effective from a gallery point of view, seeing some such 
bipeds apparently get located there occasionally. 



MAUD: Can we play at keeping stores, mamma? 
Mamma (who has a headache) — Certainly, but you must be 
very, very quiet. 
Maud— Well, we'll pretend we don't advertise. — N. Y. Comic. 




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WILLIAM COOKS. 



MAX COOKS. 



COOKS BROS,, 

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Dr. Rowas' Famous Remedy for Sea-Sickness. 

If you intend taking a trip by sea, try a bottle and be convinced of its 
merits. To be obtained from all druggists, and from 

L. E. ELLERT, 
S. W. corner Kearny and California streets, S. F. 
Price per bottle. 50 cents 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 




IT is amusing to » read that portion of the regulation oration of 
the chairman of the Esmeralda Consolidated at the annual meet- 
ing of the company in London, where he refers to the difficulty 
experienced in collecting the last assessment or "Call "as the 
English term it. He says, "Many men have been able to pay 
where we gave them time and humored them, and took, install- 
ments, whereas if we had gone in with a crusher, and pressed 
them for the full amount, we should not have got anything at 
all. The board have issued scores of summonses, and we are 
working them as welt as we can, but when a man says he will go 
into court if we summon him, what is the use of doing bo?" 
If this little speech had been made on this side of the Atlantic, it 
would have provoked some nasty insinuations about «> Yankee 
gall." It certainly would not have been much use in going into 
court, but outside of this particularly mild way of putting the pro- 
position, it might have been dangerous; resulted in a crusher on 
the wrong side of the house, as it were. The directors of this 
company would have bad a remarkably lively time in raking in 
the money from any of the California shareholders, provided 
they knew the inside running of affairs. The gentleman who sug- 
gested that a committee of investigation should be appointed had 
a level head on his shoulders, only he should not have allowed 
himself to be bluffed down. Another gentleman hurt the feelings 
of the management by alluding to their latest investment down in 
New Mexico as "another freak up." The Chairman in horrified 
amazement replied : " You say another; kindly tell me the first?" 
"This, gold? mine"; retorted the shareholder. " Freak up " is 
a very soft term for the Esmeralda Consolidated, and its London 
manipulators, know it. If their dealings with the New Central 
Mines are the same as they were with the Nevada Company, the 
shareholders are to be pitied. 

SSI 

THE mining market is beginning to show revival, and consid- 
erable activity has prevailed in the leading Comstock shares 
during the week. Prices have been higher at the North end, 
Con. Cal. -Virginia selling up to $5 at one time under a strong de- 
mand. This is said to be due to an improvement on the 1800- 
level, in an upraise which was intended to cut the downward ex- 
tension of the ore body encountered on the 1750 level. Another 
feature of the week's business was a sharp upward movement in 
Chollar on the strength of a strike in a west cross-cut near the 
Hale & Norcross line. The ore taken out at this point is said to 
run $40 to the ton, but its extent has not yet been determined. 
The brokers who are desirous of combining mine management 
with the equally lucrative business of carrying clients' accounts 
on margin at one and one-half per cent per month, did not make 
much of a success in their first fight for control. They would 
like to have elected a full Board of Directors for Sierra Nevada, 
but got off lucky with one man on the Board. He will be like 
the fifth wheel of a coach — more ornamental than useful. The 
Belcher election comes off on the 26th, and the result there will 
be about the same as in Sierra Nevada. Probably if business 
looms ap a little more the members of the Exchange who are for- 
tunate enough to have a clientelle will have enough to do with- 
out interfering in outside matters. There were no assessments 
levied during the week, excepting a small one on Found Treasure, 
which is now practically a private concern, with very few shares 
out on the market. Outside stocks have been dull, with steady 
prices. The news from both the Quijotoa and Tuscarora camp 
continues favorable. 

f s s 

THE convention of miners whigh has just been held in this 
city, was a decided success in every respect. It was a most 
orderly assembly, and its business was transacted without the 
slightest friction, in a manner highly creditable to the members. 
The best of harmony prevailed throughout the entire session, and 
everything tended to show that the long and bitterly fought war 
between the miners and the men of the valleys was at an end. 
The resolutions were all couched in conciliatory terms, which 
conceded the right of the farmer to protection, while claiming the 
same for the mining industry. A memorial was drawn up for 
presentation to Congress, asking for the necessary financial as- 
sistance to confine the debris in such a manner as to permit the 
resumption of work on the mines without injury to the navigable 
rivers or the farming lands of the State. The demand made on 
the Federal Government is very moderate, and it will be benefited 
in a great measure by tne increased output of gold. Before ad- 
journment, a permanent organization was formed, under the 
name of the Miners' Association of California. Mr. Neff, of 
Nevada county, who so ably presided over the convention, was 
elected President of the association, and W. O. Ralston Secretary. 
A number of Vice Presidents were also elected, each county 
furnishing one and San Francisco five. Annual sessions will be 
held. 



A CIRCULAR, under date December 31, 1801, states that the 
$250,000 derived from Second Debentures, issued and fully 
taken up, is being applied towards the completion of works and 
purchase of stores, etc. The balance remaining will be held for 
any contingencies that may arise. Mr. Pigou, who is well known 
here, left England on October 17th for Mexico, and arrived at 
Palmarejo on November 10th. Since that date communications 
have been received from him, from which it appears the Pal- 
marejo mill is a grand one. The mine is looking first-rate. Con- 
sidering the great difficulties attending the obtaining and prepar- 
ation of materials at the mine, the mill is worth the money it has 
coat. It is as complete as it can be. The information, taken in 
conjunction with the report of the Mexican Mineral Railway 
Company, points to the whole of the works being in full opera- 
tion and the mill running within a few weeks. 

*$$ 

THE latest farce in the way of trusts is the attempt to dispose 
of the lumber firms on the Coast to an English syndicate. A 
few months ago the mills on the Pacific Coast were supposed to 
be going the same way, but an expert who examined the books 
of one concern broke up the enterprise by his report. The lum- 
ber business is not in the most flourishing condition just now, 
and one or two of the larger firms control the trade. Mr. 
Scupham, who was connected with the Quartz Mountain mine, 
which cost the residents of Narbonne, in France, such an immense 
amount of money, all of which was ultimately swept away by 
the failure of the mine, is said to be engineering the new deal. 
ttt 

SAM DAVIS, the irrepressible, having given up Pine Nut in 
disgust, is now industriously working on a scheme to manu- 
facture asphaltum pipe by machinery. His idea is to establish 
works in Nevada, and it is said lhat a number of Comstock mag- 
nates are backing the enterprise. An attempt was made here 
some time ago to float stock in one of these companies, but it 
failed, owing to the fact that the pipe, stronger and cheaper than 
iron, melts easily under a light heat. It does very well for places 
where water freezes in the winter time, as the cold cannot pene- 
trate the material used in the manufacture. 
tt t 

THE suit between the Southern Nevada and the Holmes mine 
will be resumed next week, and it is intended by the latter 
company that no more continuances will be granted, if they can 
help it. Quite an array of talent will appear on both sides, and 
from all appearances, the battle will be stubbornly contested. 
Professor Price has been retained as an expert by the Southern 
Nevada and Louis Janin by the Holmes. Half a dozen lawyers 
will argue the case for plaintiff and defendant. 

i S ? 

THE Auxilliary Fire Alarm Company held its annual election 
during the week. There were 18,000 shares of stock repre- 
sented, electing the fnllowing officers to serve for the ensuing 
year: Louis Sloss, Jr., President; Wm. Fries, Vice-President; 
Percy T. Morgan, A. Van Booklen, J. D. Phelan and J. Hodges, 
Directors. W. Hansen was reelected Secretary. The company 
had a very prosperous business during the year. 

ss s 

THE annual meeting of the Calaveras Con. has just been held 
in London. The report showed that during the year $100,000 
worth of debentures had been issued, and of that amount $76,950 
had been subscribed. Of this sum the board had sent out $50,000 
here for the development of the mine, and the balance is still 
available. The new 20-stamp miil should be ready to start up by 
this time, although no report has yet been received from the mine 
to that effect. 

sss 

MAJOR FRANK McLAUGHLIN bad the honor of a nomina- 
tion as Vice-President of the Miners' Association of Califor- 
nia, at the Convention which met in this city during the week, 
froui two counties — Plumas and Butte. At the suggestion of the 
President of the Association, his name was afterwards with- 
drawn, in order to make him one of the Executive Committee of 
the' organization. 

SSS 

THE Ventanas mines of Mexico are again offered to the British 
public. They are a better and more promising investment 
than the Tominil prospects, which were snapped up the other 
day, but this may prove a poor recommendation in London, 
where wildcat schemes are more farorably received than legiti- 
mate propositions. 

tt* 

THE manufacture of water gas does not seem to have proved a 
success in Great Britain, and the companies operating there 
at different points all show losses for the past six months. One 
concern in Yorkshire reports a direct loss of $6,960 for the year, 
notwithstanding that there has been considerable cutting down 
of expenses, and that the directors have only taken fees for three- 
quarters of the year. 



Jan. 



BAN KK IXCT8C0 NEWS I ETTETt 



r 




'Hear the Crier!" "Whil :he dert] *rt thmi: 
'Ooeibftt wlllpUr tbe • arHhroa." 



" \IJ HO la making the war, p»pa? " 



The newspaper man. dear, with bis jaw , 
He site in bis ro tod rang, 

A pipe in his mouth, bis feet on the rug. 
At his elhow a well-filled, commodious jug; 
And be loudly shrieks, between puffs ami sips, 
11 Sons of Colombia, bring on your sbipsl " 

•■ Would the newspaper man go fight, papa?" 
He's the greatest fighter yon ever saw. 
On paper, my child, but he likes to write 
About war, so you see lie's no time to fight. 
He tells the Generals what to do, 
He posts the Admirals on tbe crew, 
And he hears, seated safe in his cosy room, 
The trumpets blare, and tbe cannons boom. 

•■ He must be a very wise man, papa." 

Yes, dear, he is, he knows the law 

Of nations, gunnery, seamanship, 

A|horse with the glanders, a fowl with the pip; 

He'll tell you at once the dose to apply, 

But of al! things earthly he lovetb far 

To chat at his ease of tbe art of war. 
" Then he must be fond of gore, papa." 

He is, dear, he sucks it through a straw; 

He takes it hot and be takes it cold, 

He doesn't like new gore, he loves it old, 

With a bit of lime at the glasses rim, 

One lump of sugar will do for him; 

When he quaffs a dozen of fine old gore, 

His soul is mighty, he howls tor war. 

MR. ROBERT DUNCAN MILNE has contributed a most in- 
teresting article to the Examiner anent his experiences with 
tbe bi-chloride of gold treatment. Mr. Milne has made a great 
sacrifice in the cause of scientific investigation. At his ancestral 
castle, on tbe bank o' Clyde, is fully balf an acre of cellarage. 
These vaults are stored with priceless Burgundy and rare old 
Glenlivet. And now, when Mr. Milne falls heir to tbe family 
estates, he must, forsooth, be content to behold the servitors of 
his ancient bouse enjoy those fine liquids, while he looks coldly 
on. The guest, bidden to the banquet hall, will drink deep, and 
sing, to compliment Mr. Milne, " Robbie brewed a peck o' maut," 
while Robert looks sadly on. Fumes, fragrant and dense, will 
ascend from tbe hot Glenlivet, but to Robert's nostrils they will 
be as mere violets. He has lost his appreciation of the bouquet, 
bis lips, trained to cold water, will never burn more with the 
juice of the barley. Souchong, Oulong and the Arabian berry 
imported by the Saracen into Europe, will be the melancholy con- 
solers of the heroic Robert. May bis reward be great in the next 
world, for truly his sacrifice of as fine a thirst as ever man was 
gifted with in this, has been indeed heroic. 

THERE is a haunted house in Mill Valley, a pretty cottage on 
the west side of Throckmorton avenue, not five minutes' walk 
from the station. Shrieks and groans have been heard at the dead 
hour of night issuing from this dwelling. The owner, who at this 
season inhabits it only on Sabbath evenings, can offer no explana- 
tion of the phenomena. The residents of the valley speed timidly 
by this house, and those of the faith cross themselves devoutly, 
and tell their beads when obliged to traverse the avenue after 
dark. On last Sunday the spooks were unusually active. Mr. 
Pat Brady, Mr. Pete Bigelovv, Mr. Roger Magee and other reputa- 
table citizens allege that at midnight a tall figure was seen skip- 
ping about the piazza, moaning: " It's all given out; ah, woe, 
woe! empty, empty." When they couragiously endeavored to lay 
the ghost, and Mr. Fothrell, the land manager, produced a candle, 
bell and book, the spook, with a horrid yell, plunged a corkscrew 
into its breast, and went skimming over the tops of the tallest 
trees. The presumption is that the poor apparition is tbe ghost 
of some old saw miller, who camped on the place long before Mr. 
Magee's beautiful villa "Sabbath Calm" was projected. 

MR. DAN HANLON has just recovered from a very dangerous 
illness. He is now about, and rapidly recovering his old 
sleekness. But while Mr. Dan was lying at the point of death, 
be called his brother Charles, the attorney, to his side. Now, Dan 
is a fine musician, who plays upon a dozen instruments, and plays 
them all well. "What can I do for you, Dan?" asked his 
brother. "I wish," said tbe invalid, feebly, "that you would 
send me up that waiter Alphonse from Marchands who plays 
the harp so nicely." " And what do you want him for? " asked 
Charley. " Because," murmured Dan, huskily, " I'd like to know 
something about the harp, dear boy, to please St. Peter when I go 
on the other side." 



W AK uUUng wai stalks through the 

>H Mm- 

card-rooiuB, can pi i. v tha bar. and makes lUtll at bom« In tb« 
billiard-room. And it h to nay- For too nimbvn "f 

lh »* *- n nave declared thai iboold 

i much further with bar trifling, there lb all ba formtd I 
Pad fio Onion 01 ub Legion whose Intentions and - will 

be far from | rt , yon live, Mb, Al n matter of fact 

tubmen can talk ol nothing but war, Th ay wan I bl i. 

What ar«> baseball victories In comparison with these oonfllcta 
where to ran well rod base, and where eaoh side b 

own nmplreT The {Legion, by reaaon ol a long Indulgence iu ter- 
apln and sparkling winej w ill have to do soma lively drill work 
at the country club in Marin County, packing their rlflea over the 
and practicing the goose-step at the lake-, Colonel \. «•. 
Hawes, because ol long service In the Civil War. will probably 
command the legion with Km! Webster, Ed Boaqul, Dan Murphy 
for Junior officers. This does not mean that there will not be 
other officers. No man will serve unless he has a commission of 
some sort. How this war business gOl its Start nobody can tell. 
Some are of the opinion that it was born one nigh I from the bile 
engendered by an excessive consumption of Welsh rarebits, while 
others hold that it [a the natural evolution from a long spell of 
intense laziness. But no matter how or when its origin, it is 
business right from tbe start. A company of sappers ami miners 
from the Legion will be directed early next week to throw up 
breast works along tbe banks of Mission Creek, so it can be made 
mighty hot for an enemy's Meet, pushing on to capture the Po- 
trero. Butchertown will be strongly fortified, and if necessary tbe 
old San Bruno road will be mined to prevent the enemy getting a 
foothold in San Mateo County. In that case Uncle Tom's Cabin 
will be the commanding officers' headquarters.where meals will be 
served to tbe staff either table d'hote or to order, no extra charge 
for wine. 

HORACE PLATT, genial witty Horace, -who onty wants a villa 
at Tu^culum to make him the perfect prototype of bis 
namesake, the Latin poet, is a bon-vivant from the ground up. Ah, 
a gay roiurier is Horace, and a fine judge of the age of wines. 
Yet the boys tell a strange story about him, in which I believe 
there is hardly a ground of foundation. It was at dinner, and 
Mr. Piatt was enjoying with gusto a plate of remarkably fine 
mock turtle soap. " I have read," said Mr. Piatt, as he pensive- 
ly poured out a glass of dry sherry, " ot the habits of tbe turtle; 
be is captured on the sands, and sometimes afloat, and how the 
female creeps ashore on moonlight nigbts to lay her eggs. But 
pray tell me is the mock turtle likewise an amphibious reptile? " 
And after this very natural inquiry nothing was beard for a few 
moments but the soft glug, glug of tbe decanter bewailing its 
parting with the rich Awantilado. 

WHEN Ned Hamilton, journalist and basso profundo, makes a 
joke, it is always a good one. Deep, it is true, some may 
be, and therefore requiring moments of thought to fathom, but 
when one does get at the rich pearl at the bottom of this well of 
humor, be cannot but confess that it was well worth the labor. 
Mr. Hamilton's latest, and a jeu d'esprit which is now going the 
rounds of the clubs, runs as follows : •' I was on a car," says that 
brilliant raconteur, *' on the rear platform, and I saw seated inside 
a man named Grant, with his grandson. Now, why was the boy 
like twins?" At this stage Mr. Hamilton pauses. The audience, 
of course, give it up. » Because," continues Mr. Hamilton, << he 
was Grant's son and grandson." A mot like this, composed in 
the reign of Louis Quatorze, would have won its author a Mar- 
quisate. 

ASPARAGUS has appeared in the markets, but Dr. Bartlett is 
still overdue on bis prize poem in praise of spring vegetables. 
Heaven bless him, how he does ring the changes on peas and 
asparagus. Let no man say that the divine spark does not linger 
yet in the bosom of Dr. Bartlett. He is getting a little frosty 
now, it is true, and the complexion of his nose affects the rose 
rather than the lily, but the same vigorous onslaught of space 
characterizes this most pious and exemplary of the old guard. 

DETECTIVE BROWN of the Bell case, is a man of singular 
humor. As a compiler of the-day-after evidence, he has not 
his peer on the face of the globe. A clever man, too, to enlist the 
church in the person of the great destroyer of mass meetings, the 
Rev. Chalmers Easton. Mr. Brown remarked, quaintly, the 
other day, " If I owed the devil forty liars, and handed him over 
one in the person of Campbell, I should expect a receipt in full." 

AS a projected dinner party induces a slovenly housekeeper to 
polish her spoons and dust off her furniture, so the Chilean 
business has called Uncle Sam's attention to his navy. The din- 
ner party may not come off, and tbe Chilean war certainly will 
not, but the good effect in both cases remains the same. 

THE style of the California building for the World's Fair Expo- 
sition is to be Moorish. Why not Chinese? They are the 
people we have made all the fuss about. Let us reproduce a Joss 
house, an opium den, and Sullivan alley during a highbinder war, 
and we will own the crowning attraction of the show. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 




AMONG the great noblemen who possess over one hundred 
thousand acres in the United Kingdom the Duke of Devon- 
shire comes second in point of rental, having over one hundred 
and eighty thousand pounds a year; while the Duke of Buccleuch, 
with a quarter of a million, conies first. No one has estates in so 
many counties as the Duke of Devonshire; he owns land in eleven 
English and in three Irish counties, fourteen in all. Half his acres 
and half his income are attaching to his estates in Derbyshire, in 
which county, at Chatsworth and Hardvvicke, which is practically 
the Marquis of Hartington's, he owns two of the finest and state- 
liest of all the "stately homes of England." Numerous as are the 
counties in which he has estates, he owns not a single acre or foot 
of land in the county from which he takes his title; he, the Lord 
Lieutenant and largest landowner in the county of Derby, in this 
coinciding, oddly enough, with the Earl of Derby, who, with a 
rent roll nearly as large as his grace of Devonshire's, has not one 
single acre in the county of Derby. The Duke is one of the few 
surviving M. P.'s of the unreformed Parliament. Thus far there 
has never been a Duke of Devonshire — and there have been seven 
of them — who has not been a K. G. 



A novel clock is now being exhibited by the Watchmakers' 
Union in London. It is of wood, beautifully carved, and stands six 
feet in height. The case is a perfect fort in miniature, and instead 
of a bell and striking hammer, the hours are announced by a bu- 
gler who emerges from a door at one side of the fort, and blows 
the call to assemble and march. Almost instantly doors open on 
all sides, a regiment of automatic soldiers, six abreast, march out, 
wheel to the left, stop a few seconds to » mark time," and then 
march through another part of the fortress to the barracks. These 
marches and counter marches occur each hour. If they come out 
to announce the hour of one o'clock, one soldier tires his tiny gun, 
at two o'clock two soldiers tire their pieces, increasing with the 
hour until the twelve leaders fire their guns, the rear ranks bow- 
ing their heads and pointing with their bayonets towards the dial 
of the clock. 

A celebrated French journalist, Mr. Hagues Ie Roux, was told 
that a begger could make 15 francs a day in the Champs Elysses 
district, so he resolved to put the statement to the test. Getting 
himself up appropriate costume, he began his rounds. The wife 
of a physician gave him an old garment. An elderly gentleman 
gave him two francs. More wonderful was his good fortune with 
a Countess, who received him as if he were "somebody," and gave 
him 10 francs, directing to call again In a very short number of 
calls he made a sum equal to 20 francs. It is interesting to read 
that at the house at which he received 10 francs the concierge 
claimed a commission on his good luck. 

A splendid present has been made to the Czar and Czarina by 
the French colony established in St. Petersburg. The gift is a 
tray of solid silver, with a dull surface, upon which are laid in 
letters of blue enamel the words of an address. Above this inscrip- 
tion are the letters XXV. in gold, and initials of their Majesties 
surmounted with a crown of gold. The arms of France and Rus- 
sia face each other at the sides. Below are the arms of Paris, 
Lyons, Orleans and St. Petersburg. A newspaper suggests that 
the Municipality of Paris should celebrate the visit cf the Czarina 
to Paris by altering the name of the Rue Mazarine to Rue Ma 
Czarine. 

A once celebrated beauty has just died in Poland, where she 
expired unmarried in her fifty-seventh year. The Princess Htilene 
Sagonsko was to the last a famous figure at court, and was among 
the rather numerous ladies who refused the hand of Napolean III. 
Perhaps, when she watched the events that followed the unsub- 
stantial brilliancy of the short-lived second Empire, she had cause 
for thanksgiving that she had not allowed herself to be tempted 
by the glamour of an Imperial crown. She also rejected several 
Austrian grand seigneurs, on the ground of an unrequited affection 
for some person whose name never transpired. 

A French journalist, who publishes an amusing portrait sketch 
of Monsieur Taine, finds fault with the famous author for being 
the worst dressed man in France. He recalls the story of the 
dandy Due de Richelieu's apostrophe to his too negligent friend, 
Due d'Aumont, and transcribes it: "Monsieur Taine, God has 
given you great intelligence, the Sorbonne has given you prizes, 
and the Academy has made you an •Immortal.' It behooves 
you to do something in return, and we can only beseech you to 
brush your clothes! " 

Alfonzo XIII. of Spain, though still a baby, has had his biogra- 
phy written — probably the shortest life that ever yet had itself re- 
corded in a book. The authors of this piece of royal biography 
are Frances and Mary Arnold-Forster. The title of the book is, 
" Born a King." 



iisrsTXiR^irsrcE.- 



REMOVAL! 
HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY 

Now Occupies Premises at the N. E. Cor. California and Sansome 

Sts., S. F., Lately Vacated by Wells, Fargo & Co. Bank. 

Twenty-seventh Annual Exhibit. 

.lauuary 1, 1891. 

INCORPORATED A. D. 1864. 

Losses p'd since organi'n. $3,175,759.21 1 Reinsurance Reserve $266,043.59 

Assets January 1, 1891 ... 8(37,512.19 Capital paid up, Gold . . . 300,000.00 
Surplus for policyholders 844,944.69 | Net Surplus over ev'yth'g 278,901.10 

Income in 1890 $3y4, 184.52 | Fire Losses paid in 1890. 142,338.90 

Fire Losses unpaid, January 1, 1891 11,404.00 

President... .... J. F. HOUGHTON I Secretary CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-President..HENRY L. DODGE I General Agent.ROBERT H. MAGILL 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG. GERMANY. 

Herbert I.. Low. Manager for the Pacific . oast, 

22(1 Sansome St., S. F. 

Capital $1,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S. 534,795.72 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
■ 23'-fl California St.. S. F., «al. 

THAMES 7M~MEHSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve (in addition to Capital) 2,125,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 8,124,067.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street. San Francisco. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital < 1 0.625.000 

Cash Assets 4.701,20) 39 

Cash Assets In United States 2,272,084 13 

REINSURERS OF 

Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation 

AND 

Southern 1'alitorula Insurance Company. 

"wim:. :M:A_c;:Do:Lsr_A_ij:D. 

MANAGER. 

D. E MILES, Assistant Manager. 

315 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block. S. F. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. BALOISE of Basle— Capital 5,000,000 Francs. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for alllosees that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street. San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1 782] 
American Fire insurance Company of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & B ALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Paeifie Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco- 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATIoToTToNDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720.J 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 

GEO. F. <; It AM'. Manager. 

PACIFIC JD^iFJ^Tim^/L^HSTT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN FIRE OFFICE, 

OF LONDON. I OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1821. Established a. d. 1710. 

Paid-up capital, - - ■ J 5,000,000. I Cash Assets, $9,031,040. 

Cash Assets, $21,911,915. I Assets in America, - - - 11,956,331. 

Wffl. J. UBERS, Gen'l Agent, 20i Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 




INSURANCE COMPANY- LTD. 

fc OF- MANCHESTER , EI1NH3 L.>\rMoT^ 1 

Capital paid oj guaranteed S 3,000,000,00 . 

ChasALatom, Manager. 
439 QaVifoFs.n St. San Frasjissscu 



Jan 




FKANCISCO NEWS T ETTER 



TBI newel French material for wioler we*r, writf? a la-ly or- 
pODdeol, ts a dark navy blue aruamn dotb « Ufa BpoU, or 
iwn over it at even distances, of various colore. One 
has sputa of two semi -circular lines; the one amber green, the 
Oth«r pan l»V<Dder. This pattern looks well-made with a hell 
skirt, at the hem two lines of tinted ribbon an Inch w Mr , the one 
of amber preen velvet, the upper of lavender s-ilk. The bodice la 
to be made in coat j-hftpe. with folded basque; Ibe vest end collar 
to be of soft drawn lavender p- -Tit:<-e silfcj the revere and the lin- 
ing of a short medfei collar to he of ambergreen velvet. Anothei 
cloth has splashes of gray and tan. It looks well with a long Wftlst- 
coat of tan suede leather, and the loose coat to be trimmed with 
edging of soft gray curled silk braid fringe. The hem of the skirt 
f the suede leather, 2 in. deep, headed with the gray fringe. 
Yet another blue cloth has a large geometrical figure of dark tan 
and gray. It should have a waistcoat of gray and navy blue 
striped corduroy velvet, and re vers of the tan-colored velvet. It 
should have large cuffs of the cord u toy lined and edged with the 
tan velvet, and two cross-cut bands, one of tht tan velvet and one 
of the corduroy, overlapping each other on the hem. 

The Ulster-shaped tweed overcoat for ladies, with the upper 
cape, is being also used in other and more dressy materials. One 
of the handsomest I have seen was made of dark ntle-green 
amazon cloth. It was edged at the hem, both of the skirt and 
the cape, with seven rows of tan braid, and in each corner there 
was a handsome arabesque design of the same braid. The cape 
was lined with tan-colored silk. A hat of green felt to match was 
worn with it. It had a square brim, and was trimmed with dark 
tan velvet and feathers shading from tan to brown. Another 
coat was of gray, soft, thick woollen material, with a handsome 
arabesque pattern of dark blue. The cape was lined with blue 
silk, and was edged with a thick cord of blue silk. The cord also 
went round the foot of the skirt, round the large collar, and tied 
with a loose bow at the neck and ends, finished with soft balls of 
gray and blue silk, fell to the foot of the skirt. The hat worn with 
it was of gray silk beaver, and was trimmed with handsome open 
work, blue silk embroidery, and blue feathers clasped with, a 
diamond buckle. 



The gloves for evening wear in Paris are handsomely embroid- 
ered with old-fashioned patterns, in beads or silk. In some cases 
small feathers will be appliqued on to them, with a bordering of 
gold thread. The old style of wearing rings outside the gloves 
even threatens to come in again, and one handsomediamond ring 
will be seen placed over the glove on the third finger of the wearer. 
Thick fur-lined gloves are very ugly for ladies' wear, and even 
those covered with fur in gauntlet form make the hands look un- 
naturally large. Those who can afford these really expensive 
gloves would do much better if they had a large muff, as it would 
keep their hands equally warm, and have a much better appear- 
ance. A large mutf is really a very pretty article of dress, espe- 
cially when the coat and hat are trimmed with fur to correspond. 

Moir<5 silks, striped with all the colors of the rainbow, threaten 
to become the rage for evening materials. These silks are specially 
suited to the plain long skirts and the Empire gowns, which prom- 
ise to be worn this winter. The wider stripes are generally only 
in two colors, and pink and green have a very good effect on an 
ivory-cream ground. Even dark colors, such as brown and navy- 
blue, are seen among the narrow stripes, which throw up the 
brilliancy of the many bright shades excellently. A pretty gown 
made in one of these striped silks has a ceinture of numerous 
small baby ribbons repeating all the colors that are shown in the 
silk itself. A deep fall of 6cru lace, nearly reaching the waist, 
is caught up at intervals with rosettes of the same ribbons, and 
the whole effect is very striking and original. 

A queer-shaped toque of velvet rather in the style of a Glen- 
garry cap, has appeared in Paris recently. It is cleft in the mid- 
dle, and has a bordering of fur round the brim. An aigrette or os- 
prey sticks up at one side, fastened by a handsome brooch or 
buckle. Small bunches of grapes, in green and purple velvet, 
decorate many of the hats, and threaten to take the place of 
feathers and ribbons. Lace is used a great deal, and for theatre 
bonnets especially. Nearly all these have long white satin strings, 
which are hardly becoming to many complexions. 

The French sable, which years ago was de rigueur, and paid 
large sums, and has of late been completely shelved and out of 
date, has this winter been again received into favor; so those pos- 
sessing good fur of the kind will now have opportunities of using 
what inexorable fashion has compelled to lie useless, a prey to 
pepper, camphor and various other moth antidotes for so long. 

Monkey fur slippers, solid comfort for Eastern friends at Marsh's 
Japanese Art Repository, under Palace Hotel. 



Insurance Company. 
c ' pit * l 11.000.000. i assets 12.650.000 

i). j. status 

b"fa'vm' iv"; '" ,,N v '■" 

B. P.\-» MU.SVI1.I.K rcUM 

- in all prominent looAIUlai throne"""t 1 1><- Pnltac Btatai. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871. J 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up 1400.000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 SAN80MF STRUT, 

San Francisco, California. 

QEOROE L. BRANDER. CHA8. H. CUSHINO 

President Secre tary. 

Queen Insurance Company. 
Royal Exchange Assurance, 

[INCORPORATED 1720]. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. 
Gesebal Office — N. W. Cor. California and Montgomery Sis. 
City Dei-art.mest — N. W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Sis. 

INSURE your property against FIRE in 

T 1 1! T Tl,e Lion Fire lnsurar,ce Company of London. 
I I M I lill,ierial Fire lnsurance C on, P an y ° f London, 

I |_ WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAPT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 

Faclflc Department, 214 Saiisoine St., S. I". 

SWAIN & MURD0CK, City Agents. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL, 

CAPITAL $6,000,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 Calllornla Street. San Francisco. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MOTOAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, $19,724,638.45. 

President, BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBEN8. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



MkWOMlF{ 




318 C"LiroRNia §t. v 
§r\rf Frrnccjco 



"XpMPA-NY^ y - 



PARKE & LACY CO., 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IRON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING, OILS AND SUPPLIES. 

Dr. Ricord's Restorative Pills. 

Buy none but the Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the Medical Celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 

J. tt. STEELE A CO., 
No. 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PKICES REDUCED. Box of 50 pills, $1 25: of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills. 
?3 50; of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills, $2. Send for Circular. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medals, Paris 1878—1889. 
10^-These Pens are "the best in the world." Sole Agent for the United 
States, MR. HY. HOE, 91 John St., N. Y. Sold by all Stationers. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 







THE realty market is firm. There is a good demand for inside 
business property of the better class, aud the demand is in 
excess of the supply. In the outer districts the demand, though 
very good, is for homes rather than for investment. There is a 
fair inside demand Tor investment, but the speculative market, 
inside and out, is duller than dry bones. This latter fact is not 
troubling the brokers any, however, and experience the world 
over teaches that the joys and profits of speculative booms are 
fleeting. 

Easton & Eldridge have an auction set for early in February, 
but this is about the only one in sight for the near future. It will 
be a sort of miscellaneous sale of inside and outside properties. 

Inquiry for modern and improved realty of almost every de- 
scription is exceedingly good, but yet the buyer and seller are not 
quite jear enough to satisfy the most sanguine of the brokers. 

In outside property there has lately been a brisker movement 
at Presidio Heights than anywhere else. Shainwald & Buckbee 
sold a 50 vara lot at Sacramento and Walnut streets, this week, 
that will be built upon at once. Handsome residences are to be 
erected and placed on the market for sale. Quite recently the 
some firm sold the ground at Washington and Lyon streets, upon 
which a number of handsome twelve-room residences are now 
being built. Their selling price will be $12,000 each. There is a 
good deal of talk, and indeed every prospect, that the Sacramento- 
street cable will soon be extended past the 1st tract, and this fact 
doubtless, has had its weight in causing the little boom there. 
The entire tract is macadamized, graded and sewered, and is all 
ready for building. The extension of the cable road would stim- 
ulate the building at this point considerably. 

Shainwald & Buckbee's sales for the week aggregate $150,000. 

O'Farrell & Lang are having splendid luck with their Cranston 
& Keenan houses. Eight more modern hem i are in course of 
construction by the latter firm now at the northeast corner of 
Fulton and Broderick streets. They are finished in Eastlake, 
have every modern convenience, and will range in price from 
$7,500 to $13,500. In two weeks they will be completed, and the 
indications are that in two weeks more they will be all sold. Men 
on modest incomes may purchase these homes, as the terms are 
so that one can be obtained by paying but $75 a month. O'Far- 
rell & Lang's sales for the week amount to over $50,000. 

McAfee, Baldwin & Hammond are preparing to place on the 
market a new subdivision at the Potrero. There will be three 
blocks in all, in the neighborhood of Twenty-fourth and Rhode 
Island. The contract for the street work will be let immediately, 
the rough estimates being $10,000 for this work. The tract will 
be drained, graded, macadaruized, and put in readiness to build 
before being placed on the market. 

The day has gone by in and about San Francisco when a sub- 
division ca» be handled tc advantage unless it be improved right 
up to the handle. The cry everywhere is for improvements and 
modern properties. 

G. H. Umbsen & Co. have some acre and city property still left 
in the J. M. Donahue estate. It is now announced that this resi- 
due will be closed out cheap, as those most interested desire an 
early settlement of the estate. 

About this cry for improvements. There is something to be 
said on both sides of the question, and the trouble all is, or a 
great deal of it is, with the unequal tax levy. It is claimed now 
that shanties in back streets, or even on main streets, pay hand- 
some profits, while the splendid modern buildings must be satis- 
fied with a return of only about 3 per cent. This apparent con- 
tradiction is explained by the fact that the taxes, instead of (be- 
ing levied on the income a property brings in is placed on the 
value of the improvements. And this discourages improvements, 
manifestly. From an old rookery, with just enough modern fix- 
ings in the interior to make it safe and sanitary or nearly so; 
while the taxes — based on the value of the improvements, or 
rather lack of improvements — are merely nominal, very often a 
handsome revenue is realized, while the great office structures 
like the Chronicle, Mills, and Crocker buildings, with the taxes 
based on the value of the building, are placed at a great disad- 
vantage. It is safe to say that many owners are deterred from 
building structures because of these facts. As long as we must 
have taxes on improvements, why not compute them, upon the 
basis of the percentage they pay on the amount of money in- 
vested? 



One of the most remarkable sales of Oriental rugs, carpets, tapes- 
tries and bric-a-brac that has ever taken place in this city is that now 
being held daily at the Real Estate Exchange, at 10 Post street. The 
goods are from the famous collection of Costikyan & Bedrosian, of 
Constantinople. The public is invited to inspect the collection, and 
should do so at once, as the sale will continue only until VVednesday, 
the 27th inst. Catalogues fully describing the goods presented for 
sale may be had at the Exchange. The Costikyan collection is so 
very well known to all lovers of the beautiful and curious that de- 
scription of it is unnecessary. 



ORIENTAL ART ROOMS! 




CONSTANTINOPLE. 



THE COSTIKYAN COLLECTION 

OF 

o:R,iKnsrT.A_:r_, ze^tto-s, 

CARPETS, TAPESTRIES, BRIC-A-BRAC, Etc., 

KOW ON EXHIBITION AT 



SAN FRANCISCO REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE 



16 POST STREET. 



The public is invited to inspect this Grand Collection, which u being sold 

AT AUCTION DAILY 

Until Wednesday, January 37, 1892. 

CATALOGUES NOW" READY. 

COSTIKYAN & BEDR0SIAN, 

IMPORTERS, 

Real Estate Exchange, 16 Post Street, 

J V^ Vj V\ %^ 1°° Elli * s '-. nf" Powell, 

/7 0mm ~'^^^^^^^^^f \ IMPORTERS OF 

^^^^^» ™ Human Hair and Parisian Novelties, 

Toilet Accessories. Cosmetics, Etc., Etc. 



Artistic Hair Dressing 
BEAUTIFYING PARLORS, 



RECAMIER 
BAZAAR, 



Media's Complexion Creme, 
Siempre Viva, 



y And all the Choicest aud Best Toilet 
Requisites. 

930 Market Street, 

(Baldwin Annex.) • HAIE DRESSING and MANICURING 

B. D. Jones. 

S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers anrl Commission Merchants, 
207 anh 209 Oalifohnia Street. 



Pine Table 
Wines 

Prom our Celebra- 
ted Orleans 
Vineyard. 



/5}^W J Producers of 

^ECLIPSE 

CHAMPACNE, 

630¥ashingtonSt. 

SAN FBAUCISCO. 





The Orleans Vineyards of 
Messrs. Arpad Karaszthy & 

Go- are situated among the 
foot hills of Yolo County, three 
miles west of Esparto, near 
the entrance of the Capay Val- 
ley, and comprises 640 acres 
of rolling hill land, of which 
360 are planted with the 
choicest Imported European 
Grape Vines, whose product 
ranks with the highest grade 
Wines produced in California, 



Jan. 23 



PAN n: wri-i o NEWS I ETTEB 







ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



19 



IN the world Inhibited i,t underwriters, pert) • p. nnre lhan in 
• njr nther «phere. no nt«) i« crnrrally (totxl new!, Certainly 
ihn uj true in the marine insurance world, «inre it« newa la chiefly 
made up of .1>.«a.»ters at tea— wreck, and frightful oc.an accidents. 
Were it not f..r the many changes, reinsrjftneee, births and deaths 
of new and old companies, lb onld he equally true of the 

fire business, since il« best items of news are to he found in the 
sensational columns of the daily paper, under • scare beads," and 
in double leaded accounts of the -ravages of the fire fiend." There 
is. however, just one hit of genuine news this week, that is also 
good news to at least a few of the marine underwriters. It 
is that some merchants have found it necessary to obtain war 
risks on vessels and cargoes bound from Eastern ports to tbe Pa- 
cific Coast, via Cape Horn. Tbe cautious bankers are responsible 
for this move, and quite a number of these financiers, who have 
advances on tbe bills of lading, have required this additional pre- 
caution. 

This is surely grabbing old Father Time by the forelock with 
both bands, for if the war bluster does not soon blow away, it will 
certainly be a long time yet before our merchantmen are likely to 
be troubled by Chilean privateers. 

Tbe result of last year's business must certainly be gratifying 
to local fire underwriters, for the figures show an increase of fully 
$1,000,000 over the fire business of 1890. Before congratulating 
themselves, however, fire insurance men will be likely to con- 
sider the great cost at which this increase was obtained. While 
the extra expense will not entirely overshadow tbe sunny side of 
thequestion.it will be remembered that extra specials and the 
most liberal of commissions to agents and solicitors were ex- 
pended in order to procure this great increase. To a man up the 
tree, who knows nothing at all about the question, it would ap- 
pear though, that tbe only problem is, whether the game was 
worth the powder and shot it cost to bring it down. 

But underwriters are not agreed to this. For such great efforts, 
they say, we should reap a profit more commensurate with tbe 
expenses and the exertions put forth. And then they go on to 
instance the fact that whereas the Compact strictly forbids, under 
severe penalty, the rebating of commissions and such obnoxious 
things, it is nevertheless an open secret that these obnoxious 
things, and especially the rebating, are being constantly perpe- 
trated to no inconsiderable extent. Yes; by members of the 
Compact, sworn to obey its rules. Well, what's to be done? 
Find out the guilty ones and make examples oi them? Of course. 
But bow's this to be done? Aye, there's the rub, for in this 
multiplicity and intricacy of modern business methods, there's 
more than one way to skin a cat alive. 

It may be stated, though, for the benefit of these rebaters, that 
tbe P. I. U. is after them. 

The German-American Fire Insurance Company has increased 
its assets in tbe last year fully $300,000. This is deemed little 
short of phenomenal, considering how disastrous business has 
been in the East. 

Tbe average percentage of losses to premiums on fire risks in 
California, for 1891, was 36.1, for the year previous 43 7; on ma- 
rine risks for 1891 the percentage was 38.2, for the previous year 
72.7. The ratio of losses to premiums on fire risks for this State, 
in 1890, was 43.7, as against 41.7 for 1889, and 50.1 for 1888. 

The amount of fire insurance written in the past year was 
$378,529,166, an increase over tbe previous year of $9,917,801. 
The premiums on the same for tbe last year amounted to $6 669,- 
998, an increase of $366,674. The losses paid were $2,408,156, 
being a decrease over those of 1890 to the amount of $345,236. 
The ratio of losses to premiums was 36 1. 

In marine insurance for the State the amount written last year 
was $163,305,218, or an increase of $28,877,134. The premiums 
on the same amounted to $1,927,088, an increase of $400,635. The 
losses paid were $736,735, or a decrease of $372,696. 

The yearly figures for the California life insurance business for 
the last year show that there were 6,734 new policies written by 
the twenty-three companies, as against only 5,514 for the year 
before. Tbe amount of the policies written was $25 383,998, an 
increase in the year of $2,543,880. The premiums on the same 
aggregated $1,085,009, an increase of $103,813. The number of 
policies renewed were 19,094, as against 17,972 for 1890. 

Eight accidental insurance companies did business here last 
year. They wrote 12,120 new policies, the amount written for 
which was $45,330,283, while tbe premiums thereon amounted to 
$144,673. With all these figures the re-assertion that the Califor- 
nia underwriters have enjoyed a most prosperous year, seems a 
very safe one. 

The Pbenix, of Brooklyn, has issued a very handsome and 
useful advertisement, in Houghton's reversible political and 
United States'map combined. On one side is a political map, and 
on tbe other Rand, McNally & Oo.'s map of the United States. 



' "' • i »|"t«l "lock ,.t lh, 
rarstur lnunp.|lalelr. In l , <. I *i».,.. ( „|,| , .,, 

CalfornlaV" '"'""''" 

Any tfook upon which i' • |hal] remain unpaid 01 

the T.cnl,. fourth Oat of Ftbrulr,. 1892. will be delinquent. 

?','r'l"'!. v l 'n'! M " 1 f ;'. r """.'M I'-'-i''' moUoii: an ■ Mnnenl i, mad, i,„. 

;,"•■" IV, ii,.- nil, ,l«j- ,.f u.rch, ISM, t„ nay 

""' dellnqyen »-. !( .. r „| tn ,|„. „ , lf „, lv ,. r , M -, 

»«PW" ' "»1" B] l!.,„r.! ,,( Din 

Orrics-810 Pine Mroet. room! II an, I 17. San Franc ^r..' fMltofSS!"*' 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Challenge Con I . i Mining Company, 

Location of prlnci, „i place <,i bastneaa-San Francisco, California. Lo- 

I nil. Neva n. 
Notice i- herebs fi.M that al a mectlnc of the Board of Directors held 
or the f..n (eenth day of January, 1892, ao a-ae al (No. 10 "I Fwentr- 

enta per share Was levied upon the capital stock of the COITJO 

payable Immediately I u United Mate* soli In to tbe Pecrel rv al the 

otlicc of the company. IS] IV,, Beet, Koom :l, s»n FraocIsCO California 

Any stork upnn which this at nn-iit siiaii remain unpaid on 

The Seventeenth Day of February. 1892. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale al public audi ami mile s payment is made he- 
fore, will be Bold on WEDNESDAY, the ninth day of March 1892 to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Hoard of Directors 

„ „. C. L. Mcf'OY, Secretary. 

Office— 331 Pine itrect, Room 3, San Francisco., California. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Mexican Cold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— Sau Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works — Virginia, Nevada, 

Notice is hereby giveu that at a meeting of the Board of Directors held 
on the 14 th day of January, 1892, an assessment (No. 44) of Tw^ulv-flve (26) 
Ceutsper share was levied upon the capital slock of the corporation, payable 
immediately iu United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, Room 79 Nevada Block, 3U9 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Seventeenth Oay of February, 1892. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; aud unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the tenth day of March, 1892. to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, Sau FraiiH«"o 
California. _ 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 

Alta Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Cold Hill, Gold Hill Mining District, Storey county, New 

Nutice is hereby given that al a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the fifth (nth; day of Jauuary, 1892, an assessment (No. 41) of Fif y (50) 
Cents per share was levied upou the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately iu United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, Room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
Sau Francisco, California 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The Ninth (9th) Day of Febru.ry, 1892. will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; aud unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the twenty-ninth (29th) day of February, 
1892, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising 
aud expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francis- 
co, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Belcher Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Belcher Silver 
Mining Conpauy will be held at the office of the company, Room 8, No. 
331 Pine street, San Fraucisco, Californ'a, on 

Tuesday, the 26 h Day ot January, 1892, at the hour of 1 o'clock, 

for the purpose oi" electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, aud the trausaction of sujh other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close Saturday, the 23d day of January, 1892, at 12 
o'clock M. 

C. L PERKINS. Secretary. 

Office— Room 8, San Francisco Stock Exchange Building, 331 Piue street, 
Sau Francisco, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Del Monte Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the Stockholders of the Del Monte 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, Ni». 310 Pine 
S re t, rooms 15 and i7, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 27th Day of January, 189 \ at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 

for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year, aud tbe trausaction of such other business as may come before the 

meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Saturday, Jauuary 23. 1R92, at 12 o'clock M. 

J W. PEW, Secretary. 
Office— No. 310 Pine Street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francesco, OaJ. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 



~ j-\~> 



THE art of manufacturing marine engines has almost reached 
the acme of perfection. As an illustration of the wonderful 
completeness of ocean machinery may be mentioned the case of 
the British steamer Woolloomooloo, which steamed from London 
to Melbourne, a distance of 12,125 miles, at the rate of twelve 
knots an hour, and was obliged to stop on the way but once, and 
that but for one hour for the purpose of repacking a gland. This 
feat is remarkable, and shows how absolutely perfect the huge 
steamship engine is nowadays. Distance and long continued mo- 
tion seem to have no effect upon it, and beyond the occasional ne^ 
cessity of having to stop to repack a gland, it runs with the 
smoothness and regularity of Father Time's chronometer. The 
marine engine as it is to-day is a magnificent triumph of the engi- 
neer's art. 

Of various attempts to replace our present brittle glass by a 

similarly transparent but flexible and resisting body, that of the 
Austrian engineer, Herr Eckstein, appears, says Iron, to be 
worthy of record. His process is as follows: From four to eight 
parts of collodion wool are dissolved in about 1 per cent, in weight 
of ether or alcohol; this solution is intimately mixed with from 
2 to 4 per cent, of castor oil, or other non-resinous oil, and from 4 
to 10 per cent, of resin or Canada balsam. This mixture is spread 
on a glass plate and dried under the influence of a current of hot 
air of about 50 deg. Cent., by which it is transformed, in a com- 
paratively short space of time, into a transparent hard vitreous 
plate, the thickness of whish can be regulated as desired. The 
material thus obtained is said to resist the action of salts, alkalies 
and acids, and, besides being transparent, is odorless. The ad- 
vantages which it possesses over glass are that it is flexible and 
almost unbreakable. Its inflammability is much inferior to that 
of other collodion combinations, and it can be further reduced by 
the addition of magnesium chloride, while, an admixture of zinc- 
white produces an ivory appearance. Any color or shade may 
be imparted to the new glass. 

■The Rev. Owen Wat-kins has been prospecting in Mashona- 
land, in the interests of the Wesleyan Missionary Society. In a 
recent letter he says he is presumably the first white man to see 
the Mount of Footprints, which he thus describes: At last we 
came to one large mount of rocks on the top of the hills. Here 
are thousands of impressions on the granite rock. Hundreds of 
human footsteps, thousands of footprints of animals — lions, 
jackals, wolves and antelopes. On the top of the mount the ap- 
pearance is as if a crowd of animals and men had rushed together 
in fright. At whatever period these footprints were made.it 
must have been before the outer surface of the rock had hardened. 
The distance from where the footprints begin to where they cul- 
minate on the mount is 200 yards. 

A most ingenious system exists by which the director at 

Port Said can tell at a glance the exact position of all the vessels 
in the Suez Canal, and thus decide how their passages are to be 
arranged. The director has a model of the canal before him, the 
whole canal being worked from headquarters by means of the 
telegraph. When a vessel enters the canal from either end the in- 
telligence is wired to the office, and a figure to represent it is 
placed on the model. Its movements are communicated from 
each station it reaches, and, whenever it is necessary for vessels 
to pass each other, notice is sent to the station, which signals to 
the particular one indicated to » tie up " for the purpose. 

The most ancient of all toys is the doll. It has been dis- 
covered in excavations in Persia, in Greece, in Home and in Cy- 
prus. Mariette Bey found dolls lying side by side with Egyptian 
mummies, and they have also been obtained from tombs in an- 
cient Gaul. After the doll came the* wooden horse. There is at 
Cambrai a curious collection of these rudimentary quadrupeds, 
rudely-carved blocks with head and mane, but mostly without 
tails, which date from the time of Charles VI. Little Roman 
boys, however, during the reign of the Caesars were in the habit 
of bestriding wooden rocking-horses. 

A new electric lamp for miners has just been brought under 

the notice of some experts in such matters. It is the invention 
of a Frenchman, resident at Cardiff, who, it is said, has spent six 
years in perfecting the lamp. A South Wales paper describes it 
with as much of minuteness as the writer apparently deems fair 
to the patentee. Its light is said to be equal to ten candles, and 
its prime cost five shillings; the weekly outlay for replenishment 
is fivepence halfpenny, and it will last for five years. It might 
be useful to lighten the darkness elsewhere than in a coal pit. 



bjlidjtikis- 



Chas. Lainer. artistic photographer, 715 Market street. Crayon 
portraits a specialty. There is an unmistakably air of truth about all 
his portraits, from the smallest card photo up to the most ambitious 
specimen of the photographic art. 

Mothers be Sure and Use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 
children while Teething. Price, 25 cents a bottle. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,00C 00 

Surplus 1,000,000 00 

Undivided Profits (July 1st, 1890) 3,275,919 48 

WM. ALVORD, President. 

Thomas Beown. Cashier | B. Mueeay, Jr .. .Assistant Cashier 

Irving F\ Moulton, 2nd Assistant Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; B03TON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in 
London — Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India, China, 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver t Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland.O., Los Angeles, Loudon, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankf ort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama. Genoa, aud all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL RANK, 



N. W. Corner Sansonie and Busli Streets. 

Established 1870. U S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) $1,600,000 

SURPLUS $B00.000| UNDIVIDED PROFITS $166,000 

8. G. MURPHY President! E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT.. . .Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

DIRECTORS: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins, 8. G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffitt. 

Thomas Jennings, Johu A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per annum <under the exclusive control of 

tho renter), for cue care of all valuables. Truuks and Packages taken ou 

storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 I Capital paid up 2,450,000 

Reserve 395,000 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 73 Lombard St., E. C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1006 A Street. 

Man . ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM S EEL 
Cashier, GOSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank, 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

~ THE^ATHER^ANKlNG^OllMNY^ 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sather &. Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

directors: Chas. Main, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, VVm. P. Johnson, 
C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York — Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer A Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

_ WELLST FARGO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT^ 

10. £. Corner Sansonie and Sutler Streets. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CiPITIL $ 500,000.00 

SURPLUS 5,488,393-72 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS * 5.988,393~00 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevla, President : Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Ban kin 
Business. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse tor San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling aud storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best aud newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain Bold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company. 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

THE CROCKER-W00LW0RTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL Sl.000,000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Je. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH Pbesident. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-Pbestdent. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier 

SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

Quanuitee Capital 4800,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary 8. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. 8. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

- OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



Jnn 



S\V FRANCIS! n NEWS 1 ETTBR 



91 



TflE 



I \>^4^^ 




HUNKUM HILL Yank* Bmde. 

I used to gaze on Hunkum Hill 

And think it very bigb, 
And one of Nature's niightj props 

That helped uphold the >ky. 
One day I tod-lied Dp its *ide 

And stood upon it? top. 
And then I learned the sky must rest 

t'pon some other prop. 
And there I saw it just heyond. 

Another bill much higher, 
Its summit mingled with the sky 

All fused with sunset lire. 
•That hill's a button on the earth," 

Said I to Little John. 
•The great sky spreads its buttonhole 

And there it hitches on." 
One day I climbed this other hill, 

And found with heavy heart, 
The button and the button-bole 

Were very far apart. 
But there against the crimson west 

Another hill was seen, 
A mighty spangled cushion where 

The big sky loved to lean. 
And so I've kept on climbing hill 

From busy day to day. 
But from the topmost peaks I find 

The sky is far away. 
In spite of many tumbles, still 

This sermon I would preach, 
Life's greatest fun is grasping for 

The things we can not reach. 



ENGAGED.— Eva MacDonagh. 

The little bond that links your life to mine 

Seems slight and fragile; do you think 'twill hold, 
And bear the changes of the coming time, 

When life is dark and all is bleak and cold? 
And do you think that, purified by pain, 
We can take up our lives and love again? 
Or when, like the inconstant skies of spring, 

Our lives are clouded as ber sunny air, 
And we know pain that summer could not bring, 

Will you not find it all too hard to bear? 
And when these storms and weary hours have tried us, 
Can we live on and let no power divide us? 
Then if this little chain, so frail and weak 

It trembles when our lives are fair and bright, 
Could find a voice and each small link could speak, 

Would it not say 'twas frighted of the night? 
If it must break, and we must humbly bow, 
In pity for my weakness, break it now. 
But if you think that it can bear the weight 

Of fiery trials as they come and go, 
We can take heart and boldly meet the fate 

That gives impartially of joy and woe; 
And be it summer fair or winLry weather, 
We can be brave, and meet all, love, together. 

THE LARK AND THE OWL.— J. B. Stedman in Lije. 



The blithesome lark on morning wing, 

ltises to greet the light; 
The owl, though, does the proper thing 

In sitting up at night. 
Wearied with early-rising cares 

The lark rests with the sun; 
The owl, the joys of darkness shares — 

His lark has just begun. 
Let bird that's up at daybreak, kite 

And carol as it may, 
The bird that's bumming round at night 

Is wisest, all men say. 

GREAT PAN IS DEAD!— Henry Peter son, in 1 ' Deus in Naht 

"Great Pan is deadl" a dying creed 
Wailed 'neatb Sicilian skies. 

"Great Fan is dead!" in hour of need 
A spent faith always cries. 
Take comfort, soul; for know, indeed, 
That great Pan never dies! 



Ecra. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

CAPITAL PAID UP S3 0Z0 000 

ft£S£HV£ FUND I obb'.OOO 

roof Bull ud ■ <t. 

HEAD OFFICE OO LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

BRAMj Portland, I ilo mid 

SUB UK INCH] U r. VmirniiTer. Nunnlmonnd Kai.. 

British Columbia. 
Tins K*tik ir, ml Banking Btutneu. AoronnU opened 

ject to Check, ».id ~i-< lal In onilu rewired Commercial Credit, trained 

available 111 all ].arl- ..I ll„. world. Improved Hill 

■ ■ nrilj Dram dlrecl al 
"I""' ts Head i and upon Ita Agents, ■> loll 

HB« ruKK, CHli Mii.i Banket Montreal LIVERPOOL 

— North and south Walc» Bauli jCDTLANI i 

LAND— Bank of Ireland : MEXICO aud SOUTH AMERICA— Loudon Bank 
pi Mexico and South i a HA and JAPAN Chartered Hunk of 

India, Australia and i JTBAUA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank ol 

Australasia, commercial Banking Company ..I Sydney, Eugllah, Scottish 

and Australian Chartered Hank and National Bank of Australasia. I'l'l 
BKARA and TRINI DAD ( West llldli . Hank. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

£32 C'allionila strati, Corner Webb street. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Comer I'nlk. 

l>pposlta,.lunc 30. 1891 $33,311,061 00 

Uuaranteol Capital unci surplus 1,340,030 00 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, President. George W. Beaver. Vice-President: Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond. Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martiu, W. G. it. DeFremery 
beorgeC. Bnardman, J. u Eastland: Lovell White, Cashier. 

Kerrivus h.pnsits, and I, nan- only on real estate security. Country rr- 
miltauces may be sent by Wells, Eargo & Co., or by checks ol reliable 
parties, payable iu Sau Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt ol the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accotnpauy the first deposit. Ko charge is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours— a a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evemugs, f> : 30 to8. 3 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS ANdToTnIoCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street. San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND $ 1,410,000 00. 

Deposits dan 2,1892 27,138,129 14. 

Officerb— President, L. GOTTIQ; Vice-President, EDW. KRUSE 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, \VM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY Board 
of Directors-L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoemaun, E 
Meyer, F. 1'illmauu, H. Horstmann, M. Ehrmau, B. A. Becker. Attorney 
John R. Jarbqb. Jl 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

officers. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMBS PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker 
James Phelan, James Motfitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Oadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid ou Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecurities. JAMBS A. THOM PSON. Cashier. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Gear/ Street, 8an Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER . . .President. | ERNST BRAND Secretary 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cop. Saneome and Sutter Sts. 

uti a ied Capital. $2,500,000 \ Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $650,000. 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. 10 Wall St., N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17Boule 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. EUGENE MEYER, Manager. 
LC. Altschdl. Cashier. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFQRNIAN BANK. Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized ?G,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund. 650,000 

Head Office— 3 Augel Court, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, aud issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchanga 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART t ManfteerH 
P.N. LILIENTHAL.I Managers. 

Fine Sanitary Plumbing and Gas-fitting 
Estimates furnished. Jobbing promptly 
attended to. 
PLUMBING. CHARLES E. ANDERSON, 

1616 Polk Street, nearClay, and 121-4 
Polk Street,*iear Sutter, 
t-elephone No. 2107. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Jan. 23, 1892 



IT seems to be the tendency of the present season to go in for 
small and early dances. Why there should be so few large 
parties one is at a loss to make out— there being many large 
houses well adapted for ball-giving, owned by people of the 
wealth requisite for that style of entertainment, it would be but 
natural that house and means should be utilized for the delecta- 
tion of the dear Four Hundred. 

• # » 

But aw contraire, the flimsiest pretext is eagerly taken advantage 
of as an excuse for not offering extended hospitality. The days 
of lavish entertainment are apparently relegated to the past. An 
unwilling hostess was questioned ihe other day as to why she 
had given up ball-giving; to which she made reply, the difficulty 
of getting dancing men in sufficient number to insure a brilliant 
ball had long since disgusted her, and made her determined not 
to make the effort this season. 

There is no doubt there is much that is just in her remark. 
People growl if there is nothing going on, and yet when invita- 
tions reach Ihem for a swell function they immediately begin 
debating whether it will " pay " to undergo being " bored, don't 
you know." 

One of the visiting Press people was asked what struck her as 
the most marked feature of our society as she had seen it. The 
answer was, how much older the girls seemed than the young 
men. Another fact, in the language of the Immortal Bard, » 'tis 
true, 'tis pity, and pity 'tis, 'tis true." 

There is a rumor going round tbat Charley Baldwin has half 
promised several of his young lady friends to give a fHe Cham- 
pHre at his ranch, near Mountain View, some time in the early 
spring, while the grass is yet green. 

One of the prettiest girls present at the Presidio hop on Tues- 
day evening last, was the charming young daughter of Inspector- 
General Burton, of the Army. 

* » » 

Harry Babcock is looming up as quite a society beau; so it is 
on the cards, say tbe quid mines, that a great friend of his medical 
brother-in-law has a mate picked out for him from the rosebud 
garden of girls on Pacific Heights. 

# # » 

Mervy Donahue's pretty widow is emerging from her weeds, 
and is among those who affect the late fad, masculinity in attire; 
shirt front, neck-tie and cutfs being of the approved mode. 

It was at the last Friday Night. A gentleman asked a friend to 
introduce him to a charming young lady — one of a group. They 
approached. » Miss Blank," said the friend, "allow me to have 
tbe pleasure of presenting my friend, Mr. Spiiggins." Just then 
a dancer became entangled in Miss Blank's train, and as she res- 
cued her drapery, she said sarcastically to the waltzer, " Excuse 
me ! " Spriggins and his friend saw her turn, and heard her ex- 
clamation as he was presented. They were dumbfounded for a 
moment, and then hurried away. Spriggins is now nursing his 
wrath at what he considers a wanton insult. 

* * » 

No sooner did the dailies announce the marriage engagement of 
pretty Rose Magagnos to Lieutenant Johnson, U. 8. R. M., than 
another member of the Oakland family displayed an ambition to 
get his own name in tbe papers. He had a little bout with Fritz 
Wittram, on Monday morning, on the Oakland ferry, in which 
the latter came off second. Fritz is the Berkeley youth whose 
mother had him arrested a few months past for abstracting valu- 
ables from her bureau drawer. He was acquitted; but once ac- 
quired, the taste for newspaper notoriety is notoriously hard to 
eradicate. All this apropos of the lad's antecedents. About five 
or six years ago, F. Wittram, real estate agent, established him- 
self in a rather good-looking house on California street, near 
Webster. His wife prepared to storm society's portals, and in- 
troduce her daughter Lena therein. The first step was to take 
her children from the Public School and send tbem to a more 
select one. The Plymouth Congregational Church was found too 
plebeian, and a more patrician place of worship chosen. The 
plan succeeded. Lena, a bright, vivacious, somewhat too plump 
blonde, made friends among "the swells," and in time was 
launched upon the first wave of the Four Hundred's sea. She 
gave little parties, which numbers of our highest-toned belles and 
beaux attended. Then came a lull. Her parents split upon the 
matter of bills. They separated, Lena and her only brother going 
with their father. When her parent's money went, Lena also 
departed, with a stalwart Englishman. Lately she returned to 
Berkeley, and was concerned in the same suit as that her mother 
brought against the belligerent Fritz. 



It is singular how the tastes of some of our leading men run in 
opposite grooves from their occupations. For instance, Lloyd 
Tevis is known to be devoted to sweets, candy being a daily pur- 
chase of the capitalist. D. 0. Mills rarely omits a soda water 
drink during his day down town. Senator Fair has a weakness 
for perfumes, and Nat Brittan buys Japanese curios. Tom Mad- 
den collects photographs of theatrical celebrities, and Judge Boalt 
indulges in chuddy gum. 

* • • 

People are wondering if Mrs. Kate Johnson will adopt Mrs. 
Frank Leslie's style of retaining no one's name. We take it, how- 
ever, that Carl has an individuality of his own, and would never 
consent to play the role of a wild Willie. 

* * * 

Already the girls are discussing a Lenten Club, where a simple 
form of amusement is to be the order of the gathering, Now ex- 
actly what may come wilbin this category is the question. The 
simplest of our oabyhood frolics embodied <> Kiss in the Ring" 
and " Hunt the Slipper." Can it be that we are to have a return 
to our childhood's pastimes as a proper manner of passing the 
penitential period? 




A. de LUZE & FILS', 

(BORDEAUX) 

FINE OL^IR/IETS. 



St. Estephe, 
Pauillac, 

Brown Cantenac, 
St. Julien, 



Pontet Canet, 
Chat. Leoville, 
Chat. Larose, 
Chat. Paveil, 



Chat. Margaux, 
Chat. Beychevelle, 
Chat. Montrose, 
Chat. Lafite. 



FINE SAUTERNES, 

Sauternes Sup'r., Haut Sauternes, Chateau Yquem 

In Cases, Quarts aud Pints. 

CHARLES MEINECKE &. CO., 

Sole Agents. 314 Sacramento Street. 

HIGHLAND BRAND 

EVAPORATED CREAM. 

ABSOLUTELY PURE, 

UNSWEETENED. 

Awarded Gold Medal at the Paris Urn versa 
Exposition Over all Competitors. 

A popular table luxurv. 
A superior and most eco- 
nomical culinary article, 
and a perfect infants' food, 

beinff thoroughly sterilized. 

The John T. Cutting Co., Agents, 

San Francisco. California, 




JAMES B. NEAL, 

LATE OF NEW YORK, 

FLORAL ARTIST, 

1C6 Grant Avenue.) (Telephone No. 1550. 

Decorator of Inauguration Ball, Washington, D. C, March 4th, 1885, March 

4th, 1889. 

Table and Wedilios Decorations a Specialty. 

Mr. ASHTON P. STEVENS, 

TEACHER OP BANJO. 
Studio — 26 Montgomery Street, Room 8. 



Jnn 23, 1899 



BAN PRANCI8C0 NEWS l UTTER 



3&5UNBEAM5 







AIV0U8 little man, in the ball of tb* Chamber of Com- 
merce balldlng, was tellinc of * .laring robbery on Christ mis 
Why. they hel.i m* up. in*l took mi watch, niv n 
ind hit kn ildesl thing I evi 

-T 11 - 1 think of it. before midnl 
that'" Then, with an impressive im* ..( hi* head, he added : it - 
I thing I didn't have n I tell von." " Wh 

■ I listener. ■■ \Vh\ »oT Why so? Why, confound 
it all. man alive, if 1M had my revolver, they- they'd have taken 
that, b —Chicago fnfer-Oown. 

— — Year* aco. in a famous article on the totnba <<f the Napoleons, 
the I >odon Dniiy Telegraph dining i shed Itself by the statement that 
the remains of the greatest of that family reposed in a cenotaph. 
The /'. r. has happily nol forgotten its cunning, as a passage in one 
of this week's leading articles will testify. There we" read that " at 
i lock on the morning of - i cold. Mack, dismal hour 

—the dead man, unknown, came along the street and sat down on 
some trestles.*' —Globe. 

— ' Pah seems ter been some kin' ob feeling 'tween dem two." 
said a colored man. "Yas. dey does. Hit stab, ted f'um er pokah 
game." "You doan says." "Yas indeed. Yoh see, Jackson he 
hel* foh ares." "Good hand." " Sho; tm'y two ob 'em wus de ace 
nnnds. an' Mr. Skillies i- waitin' for an explanation, which 
Jackson hab as yet eniiably failed to perjace.* 1 — Washington Star, 

——'You see, Mrs. Oilriz." said the suave young man. " thev called 
them * Canaanites ' because they came from Canaan." '* Oh, I un- 
derstand," said the old lady, affably. " There's something that Mr. 
Oilriz knowed and I didn't." "Indeed?" "Yes. He bad heard 
that you spent several years in Paris, and he spoke of you yesterday 
as • a Parisite. 1 " —Judge. * 

• Wasn't your dog sick the other day? " " Yes." " How did 

you treat him?" " Made him swallow a dose of tartar emetic." 
" How much? " " About a gill." (Next day.) " Didn't you tell me 
you gave your dog a dose of tartar emetic?" "Yes." " Well, I 
tried it on a sick dog of mine and it killed him in two minutes." 
"That's right. Fetches 'em every time. Nasty day. isn't it? " 

— Chicago Tribtiue. 

Pastenger— Look here. Cabby, can't you make your horse go 

faster? I must catch the 2:30 train. Cabby — Yes, sir; my boss is an 
old racehoss. boss, and the best way to make him go faster is fur vou 
to bet me a dollar that he won't catch the 2:30 train. Directly" he 
hears that it'll put him on his mettle, and he'll go like greased 
lightnin*. —Comic. 

— —Mrs. (Jiifl(/rnji-Mr, Rennet {coyly)— George, I have carefully 
considered your proposal of yesterday, and while I cannot give you the 
first love that your true worth demands, if you will accept my good 
will instead I am yours. Little Deckle {who has come in unannounced) 
—Say, mamma, do I go with tbe good will of the business. 

— Judge. 

Bummer Pete — Now, Bill, you can't deny dat Mr. Depew is a 

great after-dinner speaker. Trampinq BUI— But I claim dere is em- 
bryonic talent dat can knock him silly. Now, fer instance, you or 
me might be able to do him if we could only get a chance at de din- 
ner. I tell vou, Pete, opportunity makes de man. — Judge. 

t — A certain Bishop once called on a lady of his flock, whose pre- 
cise and regular habit of increasing the population has won her some 
notoriety. As he rose to leave, the lady remarked, "But you 
haven't seen my last baby." " No," he replied, quickly, " and I don't 
expect to ! " Then, it is reported, he fled. 

'How old is your boy?" "Twelve." "Can be write?" 

" No." " Read? " " No." " Whv, aren't you ashamed to deprive 
him of ordinary education? " " Hush ! I'm educating him to bean 
acceptable juror, and it's the terror of my life that he may run away 
.and go tofcchool." — Washington Star, ' 

First Little Boy — I thort you said you lived in a flat. Second 

Little Boy— We does — tenth story. " Wot do you folks want wif a 
great big bulldog like that if you live in a tenth-story Hat?" "We 
has to have him. Mamma always takes him along when she wants 
to talk to the janitor." — Good News. 

d'A uber. — 1 want to ask your advice about a political cartoon. 
It represents the hungry ox and the dog in the manger. Sizzers—Rut 
neither the ox nor the dog has any head. d'Auber — That's it; shall 
I give them to Harrison and Blaine, ur Cleveland and Hill? 

—ruck. 

—-Citizen— Why is it you contractors want twice as much for 
cleaning the streets this year as you got last year? Contractor— 
There's twice as much dirt to clean. Citizen — Why so? Contractor — 
We didn't do any cleaning last year. — Puck. 

The Waiter— 'Xcuse me, sab, but p'raps dat quail was hung a 

little too long, sah. Mr.. Wedderfietd—Hungl Why, you black chip- 
munk, ain't my money's good's any one's? Fetch me a snipe killed 
by 'lectricity I —Judge. 

"She is a perfect Amazon." " Why do you say that? She is 

not ut all like the Amazons of old." " Oh, no; "I mean like the river. 
She has a large mouth and babbles on forever." — Judge. 

Mrs. Chinner— Why does young Mr. Gurley always knock at the 

door when he calls on you? Miss Chinner— He's afraid if he comes 
with a ring 1,11 regard it as a proposal. 

She— I don't like flattery. Please don't flatter me, Charlie. 

He— When I tell you you are the best girl in the world, that isn't 
flattery— (sotto voce)— it's a lie. — Epoch. 



Fall Millinery ! 



I will bi I to hava 

you o\ . u I urge stock 

Of FALL MILLINERY. 

1 will convince yon thnt 
you will save at least 28 per 
cent by purchasing your 
Millinery from the direct 
importer. 

P. F. BUTLER, 

808 Market Street, Phelan Building. 




/ETNA 



MINERAL 



WATER 

CURES 

DYSPEPSIA. 
SOLD EVERYWHERE. 

MME. B. ZISKA, A. M. 

REMOVED TO 

1SOS -V-a.3NT ItTIESS ^.T^E2SrTjrE. 
Classes were resumed January 7, 1892. 

SCHOOL OF ELOCUTION AnTeXPRESSION. 

1170 Market St., Uonolioe Building* 

The school furnishes the most thorough aud systematic training for 
voice, body and mind. Courses are arranged to meet all classes. Pupils 
prepared for the stage, public readers, teachers of elocution and expression 
or social accomplishment. The Uelsarte system of dramatic training aud 
development of grace and ease a specialty. 

t'irs. May .lose plil Klncaid, 
PRINCIPALS jPror. .8. Kobi rin Klucalcl, 
___^__ ^(Graduate Boston S chool of Expression) 

ST. MATTHEW'S HALL, SAN MATEO, CAL. 



A SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 



Twenty-sixth Year. 



Rev. ALFRED LEE BREWER, 1)D., Rector. 



Madame Waldow Cohen, 

Teaclier of na.no IForte and Singing', 
1215 <I.AV STREET. 

J. F. B. McCLEERY, 

Billiard Instructor, 

Flood Building, San Francisco. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour is lower; foreign demand good; Extras $5.30@$5.50: Superfine, $3.35. 

Wheat is dull; light trade; Shipping, $1.75; Milling, $1.S0$U.S2J£ per 
cental 

Barley is firm; Brewing, $l.l5fi£?1.20; Feed, ?1.05@$1.12'2 per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, $1.42' £@?1.50; Feed, $1.35@$1.40 per Ctl. 

Corn, White, $1.35(g).H-S")2: Yellow, n.-z7\4®U-'& per ctl. 

Rye, no stock, good demand, $1.55$$l.(j0. Cement, $2.00@2.59. 

Hay is steady; Wheat, $13@*16; Oats, $13©$15; Alfalfa, $11@$12.50. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, ?17(j)$19 per ton. 

Beans, good request, $1.85@$2.30 per ctl. Potatoes, 30e.@50e per ctl. 

Butter is lower; Choice, 3 c.@35e. ; Fair, 20c.@25c; Eastern, locto 25c. 

Cheese, light stock, 10c.@l2c. Eggs, light supply, 35c.(gi45c. 

Honey, £omb, 10c.(g>13c. ; Extracted, Hc.@(j>%c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onious are worth l'4c. Beeswax is lower at 22c.@24c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Raisins and Dried G-rapes in high favor at good paying rates. 

Hides are steady; Dry, 7c@10c. Wool is in demand at 14c.@22e. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the seller at l(gfl l 4c. 

Coffee steady at 15c.@21c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is lower, with a declining tendency. Nuts find ready sale. 

Quicksilver is scarce at ?4S.OO per flask. Hops are in demand at 14@20c. 

Sugar, good stocK of both Raws and Refined. Whites, i%(g)-i l a G- 
Grain freights to Europe during the current month of January 
have touched the lowest rate for iron ships in the trstory of the 
grain carrying trade of California. In point of facts, two iron 
ships, one under the German tta& and the other that of the Brit- 
ish, have been chartered United Kingdom and the Continent for 
£1 each — both ships of light tonnage, and re-charters at that — 
their original charters being at £2 and upwards, thus entailing a 
heavy loss upon the original charters. These, however, are not 
the only ships in the same fix — the course of the freight market 
this winter being a great disappointment to the trade in general. 
The Italian iron ship, Battisin Aceama, 1,0S7 tons, has now been 
chartered for Cork, U. K., Havre or Antwerp, at £1.0s 9 d, which, 
is an advance over the lowest rate of the season. 

Overland shipments Eastward and Southward by the S. P. K. 
R. for December last, were 13,000,000 lbs. greater than in the cor- 
responding month of the year preceding, the chief item of in- 
crease being of Sugar, 7,000,000 lbs. The total carrying traffic for 
the year 1891, 655,130,900 lbs., being an increase of 75,715,206 lbs. 
over that of 1890. Of fruit shipments during 1891, say in the 
shape of Canned Goods, Dried Fruit, Green Fruit and Raisins, 
250,838,800 lbs. This fruit exhibit shows a wonderful increase 
over the past. 

The Ger. bark Felix, hence for Mollendo on the 15th inst., 
carried 30,836 Railroad Ties, value $11,101. 

The steamship Oceanic sailed hence for the Orient on the 16th 
inst., carrying passengers, Government mails and treasure to 
Hongkong, $276,249; to Japan, $143,000, chiefly silver, say a 
total of $419,249; also, cargo of the total value of $140,214, say to 
China, 14,215 bbls. Flour, 6,989 lbs. Ginseng, 19,000 lbs. Beans, 
1,021 gals. Whale Oil, 400 bxs. Pearl Barley, and 8,000 lbs. Butter, 
Ham and Cheese, value $10,378; to Japan, 621 bbls. Flour, 3,500 
gals. Wine, 162 rolls Leather, 8,868 lbs. Sugar, Canned Goods, 
Provisions, etc.; to Manila, 500 bbls. Flour, etc. 

The steamship Australia sailed hence for Honolulu on the 19th 
inst., carrying passengers, Government mails, $75,000 gold coin, 
and for cargo, 912 bbls. Flour, 1,128 ctls. Barley, 336 ctls. Wheat, 
5,000 gals. Wine, 1,497 ctls. Oats, 676 pkgs. Beer, 1,495 sks. Bran, 
2,500 lbs. Oleomargarine, 13,524 lbs. Tobacco, 36,000 lbs. Pro- 
visions, etc., valued at $98,918. 

Exports of wheat from the North are far in excess of any 
previous years, both from Oregon and Washington. There are 
now twelve ships on the Sound for wheat, making forty-six for 
the season, and there are now six more ships en route to Puget 
Sound for like purpose, and four more to follow. 

The Pacific Mail steamship City of New York, hence for the 
Isthmus on the 15th inst., carried in transit for New York mer- 
chandise value of $41,782.27, consisting in part of 84,462 galls. 
Wine, 50,376 lbs. Borax, 864 galls. Brandy, 2,186 lbs. Herbs, 21,- 
584 lbs. Glue, 1,438 lbs. Beeswax, etc. To Panama, 100 bbls. 
Flour, 50 crates Onions, 1,511 lbs. Beans; value. $621. To Central 
America, 2,062 bbls. Flour, 2,500 galls. Wine, 20,360 lbs. Malt, 250 
cs. Canned Goods. 15,371 lbs. Tallow, 31,102 lbs. Rice, 500 sks. 
Potatoes, etc.; value, $36,000. To South America, 1,125 bbls. 
Flour, etc.; value, $6,748. The steamer Acapulco, of same line, 
carried to Central America 9,110 bbls. Flour, 15,000 galls. Wines, 
and other merchandise; value, $66,500. Also, to Mexico, 3,898 
lbs. Cinnamon, 12,300 lbs. Blue Stone, 250 flsks. Quicksilver, and 
other merchandise; value, $36,000. 



Good Cooking 

Is one of the chief blessings of every home. To always insure good 

custards, puddings, sauces, etc., use Gail Borden "Eagle" Brand 

Condensed Milk. Directions on the label. Sold by your grocer and 

druggist. 

John W. Carmany, of 25 Kearny street, has the largest and best 
stock of gentlemen's furnishing goods in the city. Buy your shirts 
there. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

AND 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, 

Nos. 309 and 3 1 1 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California. 

NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO. OF IRELAND; 
ATLAS ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON ; 
BOYLSTON INSURANCE CO. OF BOSTON ; 
OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON. 

Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the Use of the 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER I 

vOver 800 in Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

r Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 26 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

380 P ine street. «an Francisco, Cal. 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, S. S. Hepworth's Centrl 
fugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 
327 Market Street, corner Fremont. 

8AN FRANCIS CO. 

Systems—" Slattery " Induction; " Wood " Arc. Factories— Fort Wayne, 
Iudiaua; Brooklyn, New York. 

Electric Improvement Company. 

General Agents for California, Nevada, Oregon, Arizona and Washington 

of the Fort Wayne Electric M^lu Co , Fort Wayne, Iml. 

Estimates furnished for Electric Railways, Electric Light and Steam 
Plants, House Wiring, etc. Mariue Work a Specialty. 



35 New Montgomery Street, San Francisco, 



R. J. WHEELER. 



J. W. QIRVIN. 



J. W. GIRV!N & CO., 

Rubber and Leather Belting, Hose, Packing, etc. 

Rubber Clothing, Boots, Shoes, etc. 

Pacific Coast Agents for Boston Belting Co. and Fayerweather &, Ladew, 
formerly J. B. Hoyt & Co. 4 California St., S. F.. Cal. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & GO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for— 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship | Vi.iau Sous Yellow Metal Sheathing 

Company, " Har-o ana's Kahtjen's Composition 

"The California Line of Clippers," I The China Trade and Insurance Co. 

from New York, (L'd.). 

" The Hawaiian Line of Packets," The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

to and from Hoaolulu. Steel Rails and Track Material. 




Jan 



BAN PR »NCI8C0 NEWS I RTTER. 






SAN FRANCISCO AMD NORTH PACIFIL 
RAILWAY. 

"THE DONaHUE BROaDRtUGE ROUTE." 
COMMK:. ' \m\, an<l 

antll further n^'.lcc. Boal 
leave from and L.-rivr at I 

•enter Depot, MARKET ^TKKKT UHAKF. a. 
»» 
Fren San Francisco for Point Tlburon B?l»cdtr« ant 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DAYS-7 « « v.. '!»>.>, 11 I ■ . w 

S 30 r. ».. S TO r x.. ' a P «. 
8AT1K1' VYS ONI V -An oxlra trip at 1 SO r.at 
St'Nl'A Vd-4A0a.il.. 9 JO a.m.. 1100a* 
orOBr. m.. «isr. m. 

From San Rafael lor San Francisco. 
•TOE DAYS— «3G i « m . » 30 a m. 

1. I ■ i y . I l" v M.. 6:06 P.M. 
SATTKI'AY.- ONLY— An ixlra trip at f. 
SI'S DA Yd— 8:10 A.M. .9:40 A.M.. 12 lip. M . .3 40 P.M. 
6:00 ■> M.. fi:25 p. M. 

rrom Point Tlburon to San Francisco. 

WEEK DAYS— 6-.S0 A.M.. 8:20 A.M.. 9^6 A.M.; 1:10 

p. M.. 4 .On p. M.. 3:C0 p. M. 

Saturdays ouly au extra trip at 6:55 p M 

d IS 1>A Yd— 8:35 A.M., 10.O5 A.M.: 12:40 P.M., 

4:05P.M.. 5:30 P.M.. 6:50 P .M. | 

LiaveS. F. I arrive in s. F. 

Destination.! 



£«, k Sunday 



ISundays £«* 



7:40a. K. 8:00a.m. Petaluma 
S:30p.M. 9:30a.M and 

5:00 p.m. 5:00p. m Santa Rosa. 



10:4«i a. M 8:&0a.M. 
6:05 p.m 10:80a. V 
7:25p.m] 6:10P.M. 



Fulton 

Windsor, 

7:40a.m. Healdsburg, 

3:30p.m. 8:00a.m. LitUm Sonne*. 

I Cloverdale A 

, ... Way Station!. 



':40a.m. 8:00 a. m. 



Hopland 
and Ckiah. 



Ma R w u*^^ + roT bvbomtla 

rid ling here, anil remalocd It.ng runnel, to 
attrml tin- wp.niitiK* "f her hrothrr. Mr. M. 
A. Rothohlld, t.> aflu Hilda Slwilngar, ia*t 

Monday evrninc 

THF.V are playing football for rharity 
ilown in Knn-an. <■ Charity otvoketh 
a moltllodfl of iblni,*' la the rpvi^'d and 
accepted version in that protfre^ivr <■■ in 
mon wealth. — Minntapolit Trihunr. 

ONE of the most successful and bfgblj 
enjoyable events of the week was the 
reception on Tuesday evening given l>y Mr. 
and Mrs. M. H. de Young, ai their residence, 
in honor of the visiting journalists. 

MISS Jean Murray has returned from her 
trip through Australia and New Zea- 
land, and is located at the Bella Vista, where 
she has an elegant studio. 

MR. and Mrs. Albert Sirl have left for 
Coronado Beach, prior to their depart- 
ure for New York, where they will reside 
in the future. 



7:40 a.m. 8:00a. M.Guerneville. 
3:30 p. m 



10:.10a.M 
6:10P.M 



:25p.m. 10:30a.M. 
16:10 p. M 



7:40a.m. 8:00a.m. Sonoma and ,10:40a.m. S:50a.m, 
5:00 p.m. 5:00P. M Glen Ellen. 6:05p.m 6:10p.m. 



7:40 a.M I 8:00a m I Sebastopol | 10:40 a. m [ 10:30AM 
3:30 P.H |5:00 P.M j j R.05P.M | 6:10 p.M 

Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs: at Geyserville for Skaggs Springe, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay; at Hopland 
forLakeport; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Lakeport, 
Willits, Cahto, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, West- 
port, Usal, Hydesville and Eureka. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, $1 50; to Santa Rosa, ?2 25; to 
Healdsburg, $3 40: to Cloverdale, $4-50; to Hop- 
land, $5.70; to Ukiah, $6.75; to Seba.stopol, $2.70; 
to Guemeville, $3.75; to Sonoma, $1.50; to Glen 
Ellen, $1.80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only- 
To Petaluma, $1; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Healds- 
burg, $2.25: to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, $4,50; to 
Hopland, $3.80: to Sebastopol, $1.80; to Gueme- 
ville, $2.50: to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1.2u. 
H. C. WHITTNG, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt, 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New Montgomery Street. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers CITY OF PUEBLA, WALLA 
WALLA and UMATILLA, direct for VICTORIA, 
B. C, and PUGET SOUND ports, at 9 a. M. every 
five days. 

The steamers sailing for Puget Sound ports at 
9 a. m. connect at Port Townsend with steamers 
or Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, iu connection with 
U. P. R'y Co. every four days. 

For SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San Simeon, 
Cayocos, Santa Barbara, San Buenaventura, 
Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Ange es and San 
Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA, ARCATA and HOOKTON, HuM- 
boldt Bay, steamer LOS ANGELES, every Wed- 
nesday, at 9 a. m. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS A CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

The splendid 3,000-ton steamers of this line, car- 
rying the United states, Hawaiian and Colonial 
Malls, sail from Folsom street Wharf, as under: 

For Honolulu Only, 
8. 8. Australia (3,000tons) Tuesday Feb 16, 1891, at 

2 P. M. 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 

Sydney, Direct, 
S. 8. Alameda February 4, 1892, at 3 p. M. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 

JOHN D. SPRKCKELS A BROS., 
General Agents 



MISS HAMBERGER has returned from 
a three-months'visit through the North- 
west. 



DOLL that writes letters on a slate is a 
recent invention of a German machinist. 



300 Post Sreet. 

Art Novelties and Holiday, Birthday 
and Wedding Presents. 
Oriental Draperies. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 



Through Line to New York, via Panama. 

Steamers will sail at NOON on the 5th, 15th and 

25th of each month. 

DEPARTURES OF I CALL AT 

5th and 25th. | Mazatlan and La Libertad. 
5th, 15th and 25th Acapu-co, Champerico, San 

Jose de Guatemala. 
15th I Acajutla, Corinto, Point Arena. 



Through L 'ne Sailings.— J&u nary 25th, S. S. Sau B 'as ; 
February 5th, "City of Sydney; ' 15th, S. S. "Sau 
Jose." 

Way Line to Mexican and Central American Po-ts 
and t-anama.— Steamer sails at noon 15th of each 
mouth, calling at Mazatlan Srin Bias, Mauzanillo, 
Acapulco. Pi.rt Angel, Salina Cruz, Touala. Sau 
Benito, Ocos, Champerico, S«n Jose de Guatemala, 
Acajutla, La Libertad, La Union, Amapala, Cor- 
iuto, San Juan del Sur and Funta Arenas. 

Way Line Saiti g.— February 15th, S. S. "Colima." 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA AND 

HONGKONG. 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for East 

Indies, Straits, etc.: 

China— Wednesday, February 17, 1892, at 3 p M. 

"City of Peking"— Saturday, March 12, 1892, at 

Round Trip Tickets to Yokohama and return at 
reduced rate's. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, corner 
First and Braunan streets Branch office— 202 
Front street. ALEXANDER CENTEK, 

General Agent. 



A. BUSWELL, 

Book-Binder, Paper-Ruler, fruiter and Blank Book flaimlan 

torer, 
543 Hay Street, - ' Near tfontgoinerj 

San Francisco. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY 
PACT) 
Tr»tn« L«*v« and «re Due to Arrlvt at 
3AN FRANCISCO: 

fro* December 6, 1391. 

■ 

Haywarda, HUM and Han Jom *u LA r. 
lUitUu r. tfcu EUmoo and Gal< 
.■toga 

• i rmno ku>i Btnta Rom 
l*cram 'to** Koddlus, via Davit v lor. 
Dond OIbm foi Ogdeu ami Kaet, 

■ tl clan local Ij 10:46 p. 

8:30 a. :• 

Sacrament", alary svl He. Oro- 
rille and Ked Hl.iir 4:46 P. 

S.CKja. Loh Angela* Expreaa, Pn 

Hnkersflebl, bauta Barbara A 
lx>h Augelca. 12:15 p. 

1200m. Hay wards, Nlies- and I.lvrrmorr 7 1 1 P. 
•1:00 P. Si "j:t«j v. 

3:00 p. Haywarda. Nllei and Bau Jose 9:46 a. 
1:00 v. MaitloeZ, Ban Uainou A Stockton 'J:45a. 
4;oop. Vallejo. calistoga, Bl Verauoaud 

Santa ftosa , . B.4 1 v. 

Bonlda, Vacavillc, Sticrameuto. !0:4iA. 

4:80p. Wnodlaud and Orovillu 10 ISA. 

■1..HI'. H lies and Llvermore "o:4oa. 

&;00p. Sunset Route, Atlantic Express, 
Santa Barbara, Loj> Angeles, 
Dcming.El Pa^o, New Orleans 

aud East 8:45 p. 

5.0U p. Sauta Pe Route, Atlantic Express, 

b>r Slohuve aud East 12:16 v. 

6:00p. Haywarda, Niles and San Jose.. 7:45a. 

.. Nilesaud SauJoie... 16:15p. 

i>:00p. Ogdeu Route Atlantic Express, 

Ogden and East 11:45 a. 

17:00p. Vallejo +8:46 P. 

7:UU p. Shasta Route Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
laud, Puget Sound and Ea st. . 8:15 a 
Santa Cruz Olvislon. 
8:15a. Newark, Ceuterville, Sau Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Sauta Cruz. 6 :20 P. 

•'2:15 p. Ceuterville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek aud 

Santa Cruz. *10:50 a. 

4 1ft p. Ceuterville, Sau Jose, Los Gatos, y:J>l'A 
+11:15 p. Hunters' Train to Newark, Al- 

viso,_Sau Jose and Los Gatos. |8:0r«r. 

Coast Division (Third a id Townsend Street s). 

7:00 a. Sau Jose, Almaden aud Way Sta- 
tions 2:30 p. 

8:30a. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos.Pa- 
jaro, SantaCruz, Monterey, Pa- 
cific Grove, Salinas, Sau Mi- 
guel, Paso Robles aud Sauta 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) 
and principal Way Stations 6:10 p. 
1.0:37 a. San Jose, and Way Stations.. . 6:10p. 

12:15 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 4:00p. 

*2;30P. San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, PacificGrove 
and priucipal Way Stations. . .*10;48a, 
*3;30 p. Menlo Park, Sau Jose and Prin- 
ciple Way Stations *10:03A. 

*4:15 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . *8;06 a. 

5 15 P. Sau Jose and Way Stations 9 :03 A, 

6:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. .. 6:35 a. 
j-11:45p. Menlo Park and principal Way 
Stations f 7 :30 p. 



a. IorM.orning. p. for Afternoon. 
*8undays excepted. tSaturdays only. 
^Sun days only. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 
Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. m. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Oceanic Saturday, Jan. 16, 1892. 

Gaelic (via Honolulu). ..Thursday, Feb. 4, 1892. 

Bflgic Tuesday, March 1st, 1892. 

Oceanic Thursday, March 24, 1892. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and TownBend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San 
Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 

GEO q. RK'E, rv«iffir M«naeer. 

ATLANTIC & PACIFIC R. R. 

{Santa Fe Route) 

Trains Leave au fl Arriveat Sau Francisco. 

(Market St. Ferry.) 



L've Daily | i-roin Nuv. 1, 1891. | Ar've Daily 



5:00 P. M. 
9.00 a. M. 



Fast exp. via Mojave 
ALlautie express 
via Los Angeles 



12:15 a. m. 
8:45 p. M. 



Ticket Office, 650 Market St., Chronicle Build- 
iug, S. F. W. A. B1SSELL, 

General Passenger Agent, 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 




DINNERS were quite numerous last week, among the hostesses 
being Mrs. Henry Bothin, whose party was in honor of Mr. 
and Mrs. C. A. Spreckels; Mrs. Will Crocker, as an adieu to Mrs. 
George B. Williams, of Washington, D. C. ; Mrs. Peter Donahue, 
where Judge and Mrs. Morrow were the chief guests, and Mrs. 
Sidney Cushing, at the Occidental Hotel. Other pleasant parties 
taking place were the dance given by Miss Nellie Hillyer at Mrs. 
Dunphy's, the cobweb party and dance at Mrs. Salisbury's for 
her nieces, Miss Mamie Scott and Miss Marcado, and the tea and 
reception on Saturday given by Mrs. James and her daughter, 
Mrs. Graves, in honor of some Eastern relatives now visiting 
them. From four o'clock until seven Mrs. James' prettily deco- 
rated rooms were filled with callers. Mrs. Will Ashe and several 
young ladies assisted the hostesses in their duties. In the even- 
ing the guests were chiefly young people, and dancing was in 
order, varied by several guitar and mandolin selections, rendered 
by Mr. and Mrs. Hansbrow, Miss Code and Miss Robinett. Sup- 
per was served in the billiard room, and as the last guest de- 
parted, the affair was pronounced to be a decided case of » linked 
sweetness, long drawn out." 

There was also a large gathering of society youths and 
maidens at the tennis court of the California Club on Saturday 
afternoon. It was said to have been the largest crowd ever con- 
gregated at a tennis game. Another event of Saturday was the 
driving of the first nvet in the battle-ship Oregon at the Union 
Iron Works, which was performed by General Ruger and Ad- 
miral Irwin, in the presence of quite an assemblage of guests from 
Mare Island and the city. The steamer McDowell brought General 
and Miss Ruger, General and Mrs. Hankins, Colonel and Mrs. 
Chandler, Colonel and Mrs. Hunter; the Mare Island launch Ivy 
had Admiral Irwin and a number of officers from the Navy Yard, 
and the tug Active had on board, among others, Mrs. Will Crocker 
and her sister, Miss Sperry, Miss Alice Hobart, Miss Alice Scott, 
Miss Deming, Miss Voorhies and Mr. Irving Scott. Lunch was 
served on the Active, where success to the new vessel was drank 
with due honors. 

Miss Emma Childs, of Los Angeles, who has been visiting Miss 
Emily Hager, was the motif last week for several very pleasant 
gatherings, including a dinner given by Mr. Ed Sheldon at his 
bachelor quarters, lunches at the bands of Miss Hager and Miss 
Ashe; a tea at the Misses Voorhies'; a theatre party by Mr. Joe 
Tobin; and last, though by no means least, the dance at Mrs. 
Hager's on Friday evening, which was the first entertainment 
given by that lady this season. Now that Mrs. Hager has broken 
the ice in her new home, it goes without saying that her doors 
will often be thrown open to her friends, as she has the reputation 
of being one of the most frequent and untiring entertainers in our 
swim. Already it is known that she purposes giving a large ball 
in February, and whispers are afloat of private theatricals, to fol- 
low the ball sometime before the season closes, to say nothing of 
dinners and numerous small affairs. It is a pity that we have 
not a few more hostesses like Mrs. Hager. 



Miss Susan Hale, who has also been a favored guest at lunches 
and teas, and ber Tuesday afternoon readings from old novelists 
have been greatly enjoyed and well attended. Under the auspices 
of the Society for Church Work, she gave an entertainment in 
the rooms of the Unitarian Church, on Franklin s:reet, last 
Wednesday evening, and another will be given next Wednesday 
evening, the third of the series to take place the following Satur- 
day afternoon. 

The present week has been one of the best filled with social 
events of the season, among the many events being the reception 
to the ladies of the Press League by the Pacific Coast Women's 
Press Association, at the Pleasanton on Monday evening, the 
gentlemen of the party being banqueted at the Palace Hotel the 
same night; the hop at the Presidio and the Press reception at 
Mrs. de Young's on Tuesday evening; the tea at the Misses 
Wethered's on Wednesday afternoon, and the reception of Mr. 
and Mrs. Moses Heller, Jr., at the Walter residence on Van Ness 
avenue, on Wednesday evening; the reception at Angel Island on 
Thursday, and the cotillion at Odd Fellows' Hall last night. 



The Army is doing what it can to hold up its end of the social 
festivities of the season. The hop at the Presidio on Tuesday 
evening was a charming little affair, many from the city going 
out to enjoy the dance. Military dances are always pleasant, 
and therefore it is pleasant news to hear that dancing receptions 
are to be resumed at Angel Island. They will be given on the 
third Thursday of every month, the first of the series being the 
one alluded to above. 

The tea at Mrs. Adam Grant's on Tuesday, the hop at the 
Pleasanton on Tuesday evening, and the Templar reception at 
Odd Fellows' Hall on Thursday evening are some of the events 



for the coming week. Another is the first production of the 
operetta of Fantine, which will be sung at the Bijou Theatre on 
Friday evening, with Mrs. Martin Schultz in the leading role. 
Apropos of music, news has been received of Miss Sybil Sander- 
son's first appearance at St. Petersburg, where she sang in the 
opera of Esclarmonde, and it is said achieved quite a success. 

There hare been several notable weddings of late, the first tak- 
ing place at the residence of Mrs. J. D. Spreckels, on Howard 
street, last Saturday evening, when her sister, Miss Emily Siebein, 
was married to Mr. Walter Gibson, by the Rev. Dr. Gibson, in 
the presence of a large party of friends. The bridal bower in the 
bay window where the ceremony was performed, was composed 
of smilax, white violets and streamers of white ribbons. Ferns, 
sniilax, orange boughs laden with blossoms and fruit, were used 
with a lavish hand in decorating other portions of the handsome 
mansion. The lovely bride was charmingly arrayed in a beauti- 
ful robe of white faille Francaise, made with a court train; her 
little maids of honor, the Misses Grace and Lillie Spreckels. being 
costumed in gowns of white India silk and wreaths of pink 
blossoms. Mr. Ed. H. Sheldon supported the groom as best man 
and Mr. J. D. Spreckels gave the bride away. Brandt's orchestra 
performed concert selections during the reception wbicb followed 
the ceremony, and at 11 o'clock an elaborate supper was served. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gibson are spending their honeymoon at Coronado, 
and upon their return will reside at the Pleasanton, and receive 
on Mondays in February. 



The other weddings were those of members noted in the busi- 
ness and social life of Jewish circles. Miss Hilda Slessinger, one 
of this season's debutantes, and Mr. Maurice Rothschild were 
married by the Rev. Dr. Voorsanger, at the California Hotel, on 
Monday evening, when the upper floor of the house was given 
up to the bridal party for the nuptial celebration, and dancing 
was in order till a late hour. Mr. and Mrs. Rothschild sailed for 
their wedding trip to the Sandwich Islands on Tuesday, and will 
be absent several weeks. 



The wedding of Miss Georgia Schweitzer and Mr. Solomon 
Ehrman was celebrated at the residence of the bride's parents, on 
Post and Leavenworth streets, on Tuesday evening, the Rev. Dr. 
Voorsanger again officiating. The house was elaborately dressed 
with festoons of flowers, silken scarfs, ferns and palms, artistic- 
ally arranged, and was filled with guests for the happy event, the 
ceremony taking place in the large room to the left of the en 
trance. The bride's sister. Miss Schweitzer, was bridesmaid and 
Mr. Albert Ehrman best man. Dancing followed for an hour or 
two, when supper was served in a large tent in the grounds, at 
tete-a-tete tables. The costumes were remarkable for their ele- 
gance, and the presents were numerous and costly, running the 
gamut from bric-a-brac. laces and paintings, to gold and silver 
services, and a parure of diamonds, the gift of the groom to his 
bride. Mr. and Mrs. Ehrman will reside at the Palace Hotel until 
their new home, a gift of the bride's father, is ready to receive 
them. 

Mr. and Mrs. Downey Harvey have gone to housekeeping on 
Franklin street, near Broadway. 

Mr. Frank Carolan, who has been visiting the Pullmans, at 
Santa Barbara, accompanied them on a trip to Pasadena, last 
Monday, where they are guests at the Raymond Hotel. 

Mrs. Frank McCoppin is said to be quite charmed with her new 
residence at Vallejo, and has been a constant guest at dinners and 
lunches ever since her arrival, besides visiting among her many 
friends at the Navy Yard, Mare Island. 

The old Polhemus place at Menlo Park has changed hands, and 
has become the property of Col. Eyre's son-in-law, Mr. Girvin, 
who is making some repairs and alterations, in anticipation of its 
becoming the family residence this coming summer. At San 
Mateo, Jack Parrott is making extensive additions to his pretty 
cottage in that vicinity, and in the meantime he and his family 
are guests at Bay wood, his mother's beautiful home at that place. 

Mrs. Sielcken, who, accompanied by her young family, has 
gone to take up her residence at her father's, Dr. Beverly Cole's 
country home, near Calistoga, expects to remain there several 
months, country air being recommended for the youngest child in 
preference to that of the city. 

Mrs. and Miss Flood have been ill in their Menlo Park residence 
almost ever since their return from the East. The impaired con- 
dition of Miss Jenny's health is causing her friends much anxiety. 



Col. and Mrs. Eyre expect to leave New York upon their re- 
turn to San Francisco on Monday next. Miss Eyre will accom- 
pany them. Mrs. John Coleman and her daughter, Miss Jessie, 
are enjoying all the gaieties of a season in Washington City very 
thoroughly, and do not anticipate returning to the Pacific Coast 
until the commencement of the Lenten season. 



Miss Salina Dannenbaum has returned from Portland, Or., 
where she has been visiting friends. 



Jan. 23, 1892 



BAN l'l: INCia NEWS ' ri in: 



Mi«. Lillian W.ier. it again > cir.i at the llrlla VtoU 

\ aniirwaler. who l« » r f thai bolel. ha. t>rrn very 

-ly III with pneumonia, an.l i< ton »k»wlj recovering fron'i 
the attack. 

mg recent arrival, mar be noted that ..f Mr.. Kant,-, who 
render life pl»a«>ni al Angel I. Ian. I dorll 
botbat there. Gen Kama ha. lately hern In command 

at VaneoUTer, an.l was pUrcl up.. n the retired list a (.■« weakl 

Mlaa Kautr. accompanies her n,,.ther, an.l Uiaa Alice Zi.ka. 
Who ha. dmd a gneat ol the Kami family at Vancouver, has alao 
returned to San Kr.inci.ico. 

Mr. Loail A. Garnet! i. en route homewanls from Europe, and 
is about die here. It is the intention of Mr. and Mrs. Herman 
Oelricbs to viail the Pacific Coa.t next month, on business con- 
necte.l witli Mrs. Fair's estate. Mlaa Birdie Fair will also be of 
the party. 

Mr.. I>r. Henry Glbbona returned last week from a delightful 
i( several months to friends and relatives in the East. Dr. 
Gibbons bas sailed for Europe, and will spend the ensuing three 
monthi in France and England. Mrs. Blair and her son. \V. S. 
Blair, are also back in town from an Eastern trip, which occupied 
several weeks. 

Mr. an I Mrs. 0. 0. G. Miller anticipate an early departure for 
Europe, and will remain abroad some time. Mrs. Tucker and 
another ol her daughters will also go abroad with the Millers. 
Mr. \V. s. McMurtey has returned from his trip East and to 
Europe. 

Gossip says that Miss Jessie Bowie is meditating a European 
trip, with a view of joining her friend, Miss Laura McKinstry, 
who is at present abroad. 

Mr. Tim O'Brien gave a very enjoyable lunch to a quartette, at 
the California Hotel, on Wednesday last. 

The engagement is announced of Mr. Ben Levy, a well-known 
young merchant, to Miss Bertha Weil, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
H. Weil. They will receive to-morrow, at 1310 Pine street. 

The engagement has been announced of Gus. Simon, a well- 
known and wealthy merchant of Portland, Or., to Miss Belle 
Lewison, of this city. Miss Levvison is a very pretty and accom- 
plished young lady, well known and popular in Jewish society 
circles. 



leave to-morrow for Havana, Cuba, via 
Mrs. Gunst will not accompany him. 



Mr. Mose Gunst will 
Neiv York and Florida. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cass Zemansky will leave Monday on an extended 
trip through Southern California. They intend to be gone about 
two months. On their return they will receive at 2104 Bush 
street. 



The International costume ball, for the children of members 
and friends of members of the San Francisco Verein, will occur 
next Saturday night. The affair promises to be a success in every 
way, and those fortunate enough to be present will have a most 
enjoyable time. Other entertainments are in store for the Verein's 
members. 



A dramatic entertainment will be given at the Bijou Theatre, 
Thursday evening, January 28th, by a number of society ladies 
and gentlemen, under the auspices of the Helping Hand Society, 
for the benefit of their Kindergarten work. Two comedies, 
Withered Leaves and The Toadies, will be presented by the follow- 
ing caste: Miss Ivy Ashton, Miss Blanch Bates, Miss Kendrlck, 
Mr. John I. Housman, Mr. Frank Murasky, Mr. H. G. Hockey, 
Mr. 0. W. Jackson, Mr. Frank Mathieus, Mr. Wilson, Mr. Cooley 
and others. Full orchestra, under the direction of Prof. Marcus 
Blum. Seats may be reserved at the box office of the theatre 
without extra charge on Wednesday and Thursday, January 
27th and 28th. 

The ladies are complaining that the leap-year privileges so 
eagerly availed of at the bal poudri have not panned out as well 
as anticipated. For instance, men who were invited to dance by 
hitherto unappreciated women, have not responded and asked to 
be accepted as partners for the forthcoming cotillion. When will 
girls learn the true lesson, that men like to do the seeking, and 
n ever do appreciate being sought. It's an old, old story. 

The greatest sympathy has been extended to the bereaved 
young widower, Lieut. Winn, by his comrades at the military 
post, since his return to his erstwhile happy home there. Angel 
Island has entered the lists with the Presidio, but the dances will 
be afternoon affairs and once a month, while at the latter place 
they are fortnightly evening hops. 



While we have a few exceptionally good singers, the season's 
concerts have revealed the fact that, in number and variety, San 
Francisco's vocal talent is far below her instrumental ability. 
Mr. Carlisle Greig, a baritone just from New York, will therefore 
be a welcome addition to our list of vocalists. Mr. Greig has not 
yet sung here in public, but a few of our leading musicians who 



h.veheard him. 1.,,,-r.. thcm-lvr. dtJIffalfd with h 

method He will m>it« hit tir.t appearance 

B « l ' ■ irdav. January .Villi 



the next larr- 

m 



Miimms Champagne. 



Whan the Entertain nl Committee of the Bag p„ 

<i'ii"'. in |uei ii,.. . 

'".''"'"• "it to Ihr gentlemen from the l.a.t only tin 

hat (he market, of the world afforded. (1 II Milium A n 

■ ■■ ink al the 

Banquet al the Palai ■ Hold, which wa leded bv nil whoattended 

to have been one of Hie n dinners ever gin 

rhewlneofO. II Milium i Oo. wag also laker) upon all the 
excursionsgiven the visitors by the local dab and rrom Auburn to 

Monterey the hearts ol the wise men who had <n loot from the 

■ made glad 
sparkle ol this mosl populai uli bampagnes. The choosingol Minnm 
bampagneb] the Pn is Club «» a high compliment. Tbe popu- 
larity of Mumin Champagne In the United Blataa is well shown by 
Uiis reeord of the importations of champagne into the I nited State 
tram July 1st to December 31, 1881 



'J. EL Munim ,fc lo 
Itoel A Chand,.u 
Perrler Jouet 
Pommery 
Veuve Ciioqnot 

Dry Monopoly 

L. Rotdcrer 



»'.,r,S:-, rases 
l\4JO " 
18,884 " 
10,882 " 
'.1,702 " 

7,685 " 

. b,703 " 

Jones. M iin.lv A Co., of 16 Front street, are the Pacific Coast agents 
for G. H. Munim ,*. Co. 



A dramatic event in this citv next week will be the presentation, 
at the Grand Opera House, beginning next Monday evening, of Lowu 
,<,'•' i • ' • 'Jl lam Julln Kohler, of this city. He will be supported 
by Miss Lizzie Vigouieiix und a strong Shakespearean company. The 
presentation will be tirst-class in all respects, and as Mr. Kohler has 
already made a hit in the title role, the indications are that the en- 
gagement will be very successful. 



"The California Hotel," 

Bush Street, near Kearny. 

-A.Tosolta.tel3r nre-proof 

Central to all points of interest, principal stores and places of amusement. 

Select Music in Restaurant every evening between 6 and 8. 

A. F. It IX/.l.KH, Manager. 



HOTEL PLEASANTON, 

Sutter Street, corner Jones, San Francisco, 



Cal. 



The Largest. Best Appointed and Most Liberally Managed Family and 
Tourist Hotel in San Francibco. Lighted by Electricity throughout. 

Elegantly Furnished Dining Rooms and Parlors for Banquets, Private 
Dinners, Parties, Weddings, etc. 
The Cuisine a Special Feature. 

MRS. M. E. PENDLETON, 

Proprietor and Manager. 

OCCIDENTAL, HOTEL,, 

SAN FRANCI800. 

.A (JTJIET H O IT*! ZED 
CENTRALLY LOCATED, 
FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION, 
WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 

VAN VLEOK ART STUDIO, 

Rooms 6 ana 7, 131 Post Street. 



Artistic Wood Carving from original designs 
a specialty. Instructions in all Art branches. 
Art Novelties of all kinds on exhibition and 

s ^^vTac^kintosh 

COATS 

FOR 

Ladies and Gentlemen 

MANUFACTURED BY 




*** AGENTS. 'SAN FRANCLBCO. W 




23 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 23, 1892. 



OUR HYDRAULIC MINES. 




THE convention of miners, which met in this city during the 
week, has attracted public attention more forcibly than ever 
to the importance of the mining industry in California. Never 
before, since the days when g<dd alone was considered the source 
of our wealth, and the basis of the State's prosperity, have so 
many representatives from the mining region been gathered to- 
gether in San Francisco. Their presence has awakened old mem- 
ories, recalling scenes in the early history of California, which, 
unfortunately, have faded in the lapse of years. Everything now 
points to the revival of mining and a marked increase in the 
annual production of gold, which will naturally follow. The 
main object in holding this convention is to consider the proper 
measures for insuring the resumption of work in the hydraulic 
mines, the stoppage of which has resulted in serious injury to 
the industry. The question is how to permit the work to con- 
tinue without detriment to the agricultural interests of the val- 
leys. The miners acknowledge that the farmers have equities on 
their side, and the latter now frankly admit that the provisions 
of the present law are a hardship as they stand in regard to the total 
prohibition of mining. The hostile feeling has died out on both 
sides, and the question will in the future receive calm considera- 
tion, looking toward the protection of the interests of all. 

The importance of the matter 
has also been recognized by the 
Federal Government, which ap- 
pointed a commission for the pur- 
pose of inquiring into and reporting 
on the extent to which the debris 
from the hydraulic mines had ob- 
structed the navigation of the San 
Joaquin, Sacramento, and Feather 
rivers, and damaged the farming 
lands along these streams and tribu- 
taries. Restricted in their labors by 
the ridiculously inadequate appro- 
priation of $10,000, the Commis- 
sioners could do little but review 
the situation. During the course of 
their investigation, they, however, 
procured sufficient data to enable 
them to make many valuable sug- 
gestions. 

Their report which was subsequently published, after briefly 
reciting the history of hydraulic mining, the methods of working 
and process of law whereby it was suspended, goes on to give an 
estimate of the damage done by the debris from the mines. Ac- 
cording to this statement, the loss along the Feather, Yuba and 
Bear rivers aggregates 39,214 acres, valued at $2,871,685, and of 
land more or less injured, a total of 13,955 acres, valued at $422,450. 
This gives a total loss to the land owners of $3,294,035. As against 
this there is an estimated decrease in the gold output annually of 
from seven to ten millions of dollars, which dwarfs the loss by 
mining operations into comparative insignificance. 

The Commissioners, while questioning the probability of any 
recommendation of theirs being likely to result in the rehabilita- 
tion of the industry, in face of the legal status of the question, 
express the opinion that the mining debris could be so far im- 
pounded that it would cause no injury to any interest or property. 
Toward this end they suggest the construction of several dams at 
different points along the rivers named, the cost being estimated 
at $1,690,000, and $20,000 annually for maintaining navigation on 
the Feather river. 

It would be beyond the power of the miners to construct and 
maintain these dams, and there is nothing left but for the Fed- 
eral government to come to the assistance of the people of Cali- 
fornia, and carry on the work which will permit the resumption 
of operations in the mines. The government will benefit largely 
by doing so, from the addition of from $10,000,000 to $20,000,000 
per annum to the gold of the country. 

California has added materially to the wealth of the world in 
gold, and this fact should not be overlooked. Since the discovery 
of gold here, the world's gold circulation has been increased by 
the introduction of about $4,500,000,000 due in a great measure to 
the output of the precious metal from this State. Of the entire 
production of California gold, not less than nine-tenths has been 
yielded by the auriferous gravels, in which more than $100,000,000 
has been invested. But outside of the direct benefit which the 
world at large will derive from the revival of this branch of the 
mining industry the people of this State engaged in business of 
all kinds will profit in a still greater degree. The miner aids every 
other calling, while he competes with none. 

The State presents an illimitable field for mining outside of this 
particular branch of the industry. There is scarcely a county 
which does not possess valuable mineral deposits of some kind, 
and all that is required to develop them is capital. With the re- 
storation of confidence, the repeal of antagonistic legislation, and 
with harmony prevailing among the representatives of sister in- 
dustries, it will not be difficult to procure the necessary funds for 
this purpose. 



The meeting of the valley men and the miners, which has just 
been brought around, will have a most beneficial effect. It will 
be the means of having the claims of the miners presented before 
Congress, backed by a wave of popular sympathy, which will 
sweep away all obstacles which have hitherto blocked every en- 
deavor to obtain relief. It will show an honesty of purpose on 
all sides, and a desire to join issues for the common weal of a 
State which stands always first in the hearts of all favored with 
right and privilege to call it home. 




State Mineralogist. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 
N. E. corner Montgomery and Post streets. 

8an Francisco, January 2, 1892, 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has beeu declared at the rale of Four and one-quarter (4*4) 
ner ceut per aunura oil all deposits for the six mouths ending December 31, 
1891, free from all taxes, aud payable ou and after January 2, 1892. 
R. J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DiV.DEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society. 
Corner of PoweJl and Eddy Sts. 
For the half year eudiug December 31, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
t the rate of five aud four-tenths (5 4 10) per cent, per annum ou term de- 
posits, aud four and one-half ii]4) per ceut. per annum on ordinary de- 
posits, payable ou aud after Saturday, Jauuary 2, 1892 
VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank, 
Corner of Market and Fourth streets, in the Flood Building, City. 




DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half yeareudingDecember31st, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five aud four-tenths (o 4-10) per ceut per aunum on Term De- 
posits and four and one ha'f (4J4) per ceut per annum on Ordinary Deposits, 
payable on and after Satui day, Jauuary 2, 18'j2. 

JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

Office— 33 Post street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 
For the half-year eudiug December 31. 1891, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and four-tenths (o 4-10) per cent per anuum on Tent 
Deposits and four and oue-half (4V£) per cent per annum, on Ordiuary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday, January 2, 1892. 

CYKUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1891, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five aud four tenths (5 4-10) per cent per annum on Term 
Deposits aud four and oue half (4*4) per cent per annum ou Ordinary De 
posits, payable on aud after Saturday, Jauuary 2, 18J2. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 
Offi ce— 526 California street. 

A. LUSK & CO, 

SAN FBANCISCO 
Packers of the following celebrated brands: 
CELEBRATED LUSK BRANDS, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY. 

SAN LORENZO PACKING CO. 

Dr. J. H. STALLARD 

— AND — 

Dr. J. CLARK, 

FHT-SICIA.1TS and STJRGEOITS, 
632 £ utter Street. 

T^^-CITTXC TOWEL COMUP^TSTIT, 

9 LICK PLACE, 
Furnishes Clean Towels at tlie following low rates: 

6 Clean Hand Towels each week. Jl.OOper mouth: 12 Clean Hand Towels 

each week, *1 5" per month; 4 Cleau Holler Towels each week. $1.00 per 

month; 6 Clean Roller Towels each week, $1 25 per month. 






XL I 



News Better 

California ACHjtrtis^r. 

DCVOTCO TO THt LtAOiHO INTtftUri Of >. I ..■►,',.* *nu THE PACIFIC OOAST . 

Printrd, and Pubh tW AvjtHftor, PnBDBUCI 

M arriott. Flood Bui. " ■■.San Fran- 

cuvo. Annual Subscription, including pMlaqe, Unitod States and 
Onuu/n. $4; 6 month*, $2 50; :i iioni**, $1 30; Jorrij/u. |6; 
6 montns. $3; 3 monM*. $1 50. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 1892. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Paoi 

LlADINO \RTICL19 : 

Item> in Brief 1 

Can we Capture the Soutu 

American Trade? .... 2 

- Against the Frauchise J 

: tie the Excises of .Iiir-»r> 2 

,:y Ratified Kather l-ate . :: 

The Parmer* and Miner- .... 3 

What i.i in Kt'M-rve for Rich 

:: 

Blaiuc or Harrisnu— which".' . . 3 

To the Niueteeu (Poetry). 4 

ITwo Municipal Pietnr-;.- 1 

Buckleys FarewelHPoetry) . 

La est Teuui;. Ne»> ■"> 

Pleasure's Wand *'• 

The Dritik of the Country . 7 

Overiu Oakland 8 

Snap Shots (Di Veruoo) 'J 



PAOR 

The Looker-On . lu 

The Looker-ou (continued) 11 

The Nation's Voice (Poetry), la 

A Ej< rviau Let-end. . 12 

Sparks. 18 

Financial Review... 11 

rtex 15 

Scientific and Useful. Lti 

; lean and UeviJ 17 

Real Property 18 

The Bourse and Underwriter lit 

ttuubeams 20 

The Rose Jar 21 

a Queer Divorce ti 

Vanities .23 

'• Biz"— Summary of the Markets. 24 

Society 26 

Society (continued) 27 

Commeuts on Foreign Affairs ... 28 



I 



F the Democrats in Congress feel that they must have a tub to 
jl throw to the Silver whale, an international conference will do 
as well as any other. 

AN amateur athletic festival of the English-speaking countries 
and colonies of the world is the scheme now being agitated in 
Loudon. The United States and Australia are expected to be 
strongly represented. 



THE two fellows who stole the clock from a lawyer's office, 
and tried to pawn it were probably trying to take time by the 
forelock. They may have fancied, too, that it was no crime to 
steal from a lawyer, but the police heartlessly refused to deal with 
such subtle distinctions. 



THE Frankfurter Zeitung, a well-known German paper, was con- 
fiscated this week for publishing an article by Guy de Mau- 
passant, the brilliant French writer. Mrs. Grundy has been 
ruling in Germany since Emperor William II. began suffering 
from tits of morality. 



REV. J. MORROW, who was expelled from the Bethany Home 
for kissing every woman whose cheek he could reach, finds 
it hard work to practice what he considers biblical injunctions. 
It is said he is now quartered in a family which has four pretty 
sisters, so that bis lines are after all cast in pleasant places. 



THE free raw material amendments to the tariff are being pas- 
sionately supported throughout New England, and are highly 
favored in parts of the West. Even so staunch a Republican and 
protectionist paper as the Chicago Tiibune says: "Free wool 
would not only strengthen the prices of domestic wool, but give 
the people cheaper clothing and the manufacturers a larger 
market." 

ELKINS and Foraker claim that they have already enough dele- 
gates to nominate Blaine, whether he consents or not, and in- 
dications, especially in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and even Indiana, 
point to the probability that they are right. Though a hard fight 
has been made, the President will not have a majority of the 
delegates from his own State. 

WITHIN an hour after an explosion in the new water tunnel 
being dug under the lake at Chicago, in which several work- 
men were killed, the places of the victims were applied for a 
dozen times, and this notwithstanding that the work is dangerous 
and the pay small. It is said that there are now 25,0U0 unem- 
ployed men in Chicago, who expected to get work at the prepara- 
tions for the World's Fair. 



NOW that this city has a Grand Jury which is beyond cavil or 
attack, so far as its legality is concerned, we have a right to 
expect that something will be accomplished. The work of the 
recent Grand Jury, though it could result in nothing, will not be 
wholly lost, for it will operate to furnish the key-note to the 
present Grand Jury, and to supply the clew to many things which 
might otherwise escape notice. 



T Bulled Bute* with btYlni 

*"**'■ • , ; of « diapelota from Uli 

, l.TiUndcr and caltinin\ 

il took only one III *| UMMM lOCIpOMlbfl fal-el I. 

I not tbt v* % political opponent. The charge 

was hardly less Insulting, if at all. than the Malta not*, which 
Chile was forced t>. withdraw. 



There seeenH to he a renewed tnlereM in the lubjeet o! dl 
in tin* I niiel State*, springing, very possibly, from |ht 
notoriety which the dlvon s colony of Booth Dakota baa an i 

i I to enact a law of < [dating the 

whole subject of marriage and divorce, and establishing a uni- 
form rule, but the best legal opinion ananas to be that this could 
not be done without an amendment to the constitution, 

THE United Stales baa been ao patient with Chile thai every 
little second or third rate power in the world thinks it may in- 
sult as with Impunity. For example. SI Tiempo, a Mexican 
journal, calls the people of the United States an execrable race of 
cowards, who, because they are powerful, would attack a small 
nation. Hard words break no bones, but Mexico lies too close 
to- the United States to moke it prudent for her to talk too Im- 
pudently. The last time she tried it it cost her Texas and Cali- 
fornia. 



THE Chilean question has overshadowed everything else of 
late. We do not believe that any sober-minded, intelligent 
person in this country has believed sincerely that there would be 
war, but many did believe that it would be necessary for us to 
make a demonstration in torce before Chile would believe that we 
were in earnest. The Chilean Government, however, seems to 
have come to its senses without the intervention of an American 
fle^t, and we may fairly conceive that the difficulty is at an end, at 
least for the present. 



IT is amusing to read the articles in the leading newspapers of 
the East on the political situation, especially on the Democratic 
side. While they agree that this is, or ought to be, a Democratic 
year, they cannot agree upon a candidate for the Presidency. 
The Hill faction declares that Cleveland could not carry New 
York, and therefore could not be elected, and the Cleveland fac- 
tion vows that the nomination of Hill would spell ruin. Between 
thern it is at least possible that a dark horse may slip in and win 
the race for the nomination. 



" QEFORE I could be induced to join the Liberal party again," 
J3 says Mr. Chamberlain, » it would have to be shaken free of 
the English Nihilist element and the Irish rebel section. The 
term, Nihilist element, is rather strong, but not loo strong if one 
considers the fact that Mr. Gladstone and bis followers have been 
supporting nearly every political or social movement that was di- 
rected against the government, whether justifiable from a consti- 
tutional point of view, or not. From the time that theex-Premier 
of England gave his moral aid to the Trafalgar Square rioters until 
the time that he expressed his radical views on labor matters, or 
made his utteranceswith regard to Egypt, he has been an agitator, 
whose only aim seemed to be to annoy the authorities in power. 
If be and his party, therefore, are called Nihilists, they hardly 
can complain. 

IT does not seem possible to ascertain whether the steamship 
line to New York by the way of the Straits of Magellan is go- 
ing to materialize or not. One of the daily papers stated posi- 
tively, a few days ago, that a corporation was to be formed in 
this city to build and operate a line of freight steamers, but that 
is aa far as the matter has gone. There is every reason why such 
a move should be made, but the business men of San Francisco 
lack the energy necessary for the pioneering of a new enterprise. 
Whether our leading citizens and men of wealth are rich enough 
already, or whether ihe weight of years has crushed out their 
ambition, cannot be said, but it is certain that they do not display 
the vigor and push which have built up such cities as Chicago, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis, Duluth, and many other flourishing and 
prosperous towns in the West. San Francisco ought to-day to 
have a population exceeding that of Chicago, and would have, 
had oar citizens displayed the energy which has characterized the 
Windy City. 

THE Street Committee of the Board of Supervisors has formu- 
lated a preliminary plan for a sewer system for this city. It 
proposes in the first place to have made a complete and accurate 
map of the existing sewers, so that it may be determined what 
portion, if any, of such sewers may be incorporated into a 
new system. This being done, it will offer prizes for the best 
plans and specifications for a complete system of sewers for the 
city, and will make its offer large enough to bring forward the 
best sanitary engineering talent in the United States, or even in 
the world. As to the carrying out of the plans when adopted, 
there will be ample time for decision as to ways and means. The 
first thing is to arrive at an exact understanding of the present 
condition of things, and to know the immediate cause of the 
zymotic diseases which cause so many deaths among the in- 
fants and children of this city. When that is done the people of 
San Francisco will not delay long before remedying matters. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 30, 1892. 



CAN WE CAPTURE THE SOUTH AMERICAN TRADE? 



THE trade of our neighbors, the South American Republics, is 
in the aggregate a big thing. The time having arrived when 
we must either rind new markets or limit our manufactures, both 
political parties and our industrial interests generally are keenly 
alive to trade considerations. The present national administra- 
tion sees, as did the one before it, that South America offers the 
most promising field for our commercial activities. It was Secre- 
* tary Bayard, under Cleveland, who issued the invitations that 
brought the Pan-American Congress together, and it was Secretary 
Blaine, under Harrison, who handled the delegates when they 
came; enthused them with his eloquence, surprised them by an 
early and late view of our great country, and captured them by 
his matchless savoir-faire. Clearly all parties realize that if we 
cannot succeed in extending our trade among our neighbors, we 
cannot reasonably expect to succeed anywhere. The Pan-Ameri- 
can Congress was well conceived. It gave to the sensitive Latin- 
Americans the idea that we were concerned about their welfare, 
anxious to extend their commerce as well as our own, and, above 
all, desirous of maintaining peace and good will alt round. The 
idea was carried out in a manner that left nothing to be desired. 
We tickled our visitors into extreme complacency, dined and 
wined them into a most submissive mood, and sent them home 
happy with themselves and contented with us. We had agreed 
that,there should be no more war, and that everything should be 
settled by arbitration. We had declared that a silver dollar 
should be a dollar everywhere. A great railroad, and many steam 
lines were to connect all the Americas together, affording means 
of frequent communication, and meeting the needs of a new and 
greatly developed commerce. Then came the crowning keystone 
that was to complete this strong arch of peace and prosperity. 
Reciprocity was the word to conjure with. It was obviously 
idle to talk of extending trade when each country maintained a 
wall of exclusion in the shape of a high tariff.' The fence we 
had put around ourselves was to be so extended as to take in all 
the Americas, and the partition walls between us were to be 
knocked down. It was a broad conception that seemed to leave 
nothing undone that could be done by statesmen to promote 
peace and advance trade. What is the outlook for success? 

That inquiry brings us to the source whence the suggestion of 
this article sprang. Ever since reciprocity seemed to be one of 
the trump cards in the political pack, Russell Harrison has been 
playing it for all it was worth in the interests of his father. The 
young man owns, in part, Leslie's Illustrated Weekly, and therein 
he some time ago created a sensation by claiming and showing 
that the President, and not Blaine, was entitled to whatever credit 
was due for the measure of acceptance reciprocity had met with 
in South America. Then, and since, the articles in the paper have 
shown an intimacy with inside knowledge that has caused them 
to attract a degree of attention they would not otherwise have re- 
ceived. The latest is a two-column, double-leaded editorial, that 
is evidently meant to be taken as one of more than ordinary im- 
portance. Its burden is that reciprocity is going to fail in South 
America, if somebody does not do something that is not defined, 
or susceptible of being very clearly understood. It is made ap- 
parent enough that » all the sentimentalism about the Monroe 
doctrine, Pan-American banquets, tariff discriminations, and hol- 
low international courtesies, have done nothing to further our 
commercial intercourse with South America." During the last 
half of 189L our exports to our Pan-American guests fell off very 
considerably, and touched a tower mark than for many years. 
On the other hand, Canada, that we would not invite, and with 
whom we wilt enter into no reciprocal arrangements whatever, 
enlarged her trade with us, and took goods worth seven millions 
more than the combined purchases of all South America. The 
reasons for the apparent failure of reciprocity are given, and some 
of them seem pretty conclusive.' It is said that our English and 
German competitors are determined to keep the trade they have, 
even if done at a loss for a time. Our articles of commerce are 
shown to be not only the dearest, but inferior, and not at all 
suited to the peculiar tastes and requirements of the market. 
Moreover, it is alleged that » England has introduced such im- 
mense capital into these countries, investing it in colossal, in- 
dustrial and mineral enterprises," that she has virtually all South 
America in pawn to her. 

What further can we do about it? The oracular son of his 
father tells us that "the great advantage our competitors have 
over us is that they are their own freight carriers, have large 
moneyed interests in the country, and are better represented 
there both by commercial and consular agents." The oracle does 
not vouchsafe any information as to how these and our other 
disadvantages are to be overcome. The burden of his cry is 
simply: "Reciprocity, is going to prove a failure." It seems a 
kind of hedging preparatory to the lamentable showing the 
statistics of the nsxt half year will make. The sober truth about 
the matter, to our way of thinking, is that foreign trade is not 
built up in a day; that it is not to be built up at all when cheap- 
ness and quality are against us, and that that is not reciprocity 
which only offers exemption of duties on articles which we had 
already found it to our interest to put on the free list. 



CRIMES AGAINST THE FRANCHISE. 



IT is net true that "all is fair in politics." Very far from it. In 
point of fact it is a wicked falsehood, that says little for the 
moral perception of the people who employ it, and ought to be 
resented as an insult by every honest man to whom it is ad- 
dressed. Under a government like ours the franchise is the basis 
of sovereignty. It is the source of all that is true, honorable and 
of good repute in our system. He who conspires to defraud the 
result of the ballot box is a traitor against his country, and should 
be tried as for high treason. The 8 to 7 decision to steal the 
Presidency is a damned spot that will not out. Governor Hill's 
success in turning a minority of the New York Senate into a 
majority was smart, because done under the color of legal deci- 
sions, but itremains a scandal and a shame all the same. Nor is 
it bettered by reason of its having made him a party hero. That 
only shows how morally blunted we are becoming by the fre- 
quency of such frauds. Nebraska has had a usurper for Governor 
for over a year past. Boyd, the Democrat, had a large majority 
at the polls, had been a member of the constitutional convention 
that framed the organic act of his State, had sat in both branches 
of its legislature, and, if not otherwise a citizen, as he at all times 
believed he was, he certainly was made one by the act of Con- 
gress which declared all residents of Nebraska at the time of its 
admission to be citizens, but because he cannot find the naturali- 
zation papers of his father, the Governor holds on, and the 
Republican Supreme Court at Washington is in no hurry to see 
that right is done. But a worse case, if possible, exists in Puritan 
New England. Nearly two years ago the people of the State of Con- 
necticut, of olue law fame, voted for a Governor. In order to 
win in that State a majority over ail is necessary. During late 
years the Democrat has usually had a plurality, but failed to poll 
more than all the other candidates combined, and, because of an 
old gerrymander by which certain towns elect a number of rep- 
resentatives out of all proportion to their population, the legisla- 
ture has always been Republican, and has invariably elected the 
man beaten at the polls. Two years ago, however. Judge Morris, 
the Democratic candidate, had the necessary majority over all 
and was elected. Yet he has never been in office a day, and' 
neither has his opponent. Bulkeley holds over by no other or 
better title than that the Republican House refuses to comply 
with the law and "declare the result of the election." The Su- 
preme Court of the State has decided that it has no power to in- 
terfere. It gives its decision to the constitutional interloper and 
legal usurper, but its morality to the swindled Governor. It says: 
'■Morris was elected. The will of the people has failed to be ac- 
complished. A great wrong is being done to them." Call that a 
government by the people? Bah 1 It is a government by rascals, 
through rascals and for rascals. It is the embodiment of the 
principle that all is fair in politics. 

ACCEPTING THE EXCUSES OF JURORS. 

UP to the last moment a very creditable effort was this year 
made to get together a Grand Jury that should be above fear 
and beyond reproach, both as to its morale and the methods of its 
impanelment. But the News Letter knew where the sharp 
corner was, and warned the well-meaning, but young and inex- 
perienced Presiding Judge that it was just ahead of him, and 
assured him it was an exceedingly difficult and dangerous cape to 
turn. Only two weeks ago we expressed the hope that " no ex- 
cuses by Grand Jurors would be made, and that they would not 
be accepted, if they were." Yet it turned out that about every 
juror who asked to be excused was let off, and that more than 
one-half of all whose names came out of the box escaped in that 
way. The juror would walk up to the Judge's desk, exchange a 
few pleasant words with his Honor, beg to be excused, and his 
wish was gratified accordingly. It was a repetition of the same 
old game that the corruptionists have won with time out of mind. 
There are only two classes of persons who do not ask to be ex- 
cused from doing jury duty. The first are good citizens, who 
conscientiously believe that the performance of jury obligations 
is a sacred duty due to good government. Unfortunately, this 
excellent class does not equal more than one in ten of the whole 
number summoned. The remaining class of willing jurors is 
very much more numerous. It has, for more years than we care 
to recall, been made up of men who have had personal reasons of 
one kind or another for desiring to serve. Some had been asked 
not to excuse themselves by people who expected to have need 
of their services. Some had private sympathies in regard to 
matters in hand, and wished to be in a position to give their 
sympathy and not their conscience a treat. Others were men 
who " stand in " on general principles, anxious to make a dollar, 
serve an important interest, make a friend, or gain a point in any 
way possible. It is needless to say that these very willing minds 
make the worst of jury material. As time-serving sycophants are 
numerous in the world, and are much given to bowing and scrap- 
ing to Judges, they succeed in getting their names into the Grand 
J ury box in unexpected numbers, and defile it. Independent men 
are always glad to escape service, and always will, so long as they 
can be excused by the mere asking. No regularly drawn jurors 
should be excused, except for legal reasons, and they should be 
proven by sworn testimony given from the stand. 



Jan. 30, 1892. 



S\\" FUW'I-.m SEWS LETTER 



WHAT IS IN RESERVE FOR RICH MKN 

THE attempt to blow R -,, the next world, made 

by a coveted dynanniard red in many ways 

by Eastern newspaper- it he who invented the 

bomb ihat "antlgbtened the ■ the k tiling ami mangling 

of the late Caar of Russia, builded b» iter than he knew, and put 
in the hands of poverty ihe means of bringing riches to terms. 
Another, of a religious turn, sees the linger ol Divine Providence 
in the dangers in which it believes the rich to be Involved on 
every band. It believes there will be no more failures Ilka unto the 
one in Russell Saee's case. The next millionaire. we are told. will sue* 
cum bright away to any man who makes a demand with a satchel in 
bis hand. We are furthermore assured that there will be an Irrepres- 
sible conflict that has hardly yet commenced by which the poor trill 
not consent to protect the gold of the rich for any mere pittance, 
such as is now paid, and in that good time that is coming the mil- 
lionaire is to act as ■• his own night-watchman* soldier, policeman 
and jailor," because poverty is becoming educated to know us in- 
terests too well to act much longer as tbe paid guardian of hoards 
of wealth that are rendering tbe poor poorer. Tbe Bible is then 
relied upon as tbe high authority upon which it is to go hard with 
the rich man. We are told that "it is harder for a rich man to 
enter the Kingdom of Heaven than for a camel to pass through 
the eye of a needle." which, by the way, is not a true translation 
of tbe original. Camels in the East were trained to stoop, so as to 
pass under low arches and door ways, and, although it was a 
somewhat difficult performance, it was very far from being im- 
possible, and that is what is meant and conveyed in tbe original 
Greek testament. Then we are informed that rich men fare badly 
at the hands of Scripture, and the example is quoted of tbe one 
that was commanded to "go, sell all thou hast, and give to the 
poor. Then follow me." But we think the Bible is, upon the 
whole, an authority the other way. Rich men then, as now, 
fared all the better for being rich. Joseph lorded it over all his 
brethren through becoming the greatest cornerer of wheat the 
world ever saw, and God in a vision told him how to do it. Abra- 
ham was " very rich in cattle, in sheep and in gold." In fact, he 
was a cattle king of those days, and a usurer to boot. Jacob 
stole his brother's birthright, yet he was divinely told where to 
go and what to do, and, by fraud, he, too, became a cattle king. 
Solomon was given wisdom, and with it secured revenues almost 
beyond computation. Tbe incomes of Sage, Gould and Vander- 
bitt seem insignificant in comparison. Moses was the leader of a 
people whose very statuary was made of gold, and stolen gold at 
that. Even tbe Temple was ordered to be ornamented with gold 
and silver as no temple ever was before or since. Manifestly, it 
will not do to quote Scripture against success in life. 



A TREATY RATIFIED RATHER LATE 



BLAINE OR HARRISON—WHICH? 

BLAINE took suddenly ill at a critical moment tbe other day 
at a cabinet meeting. There is no doubt about that fact, be- 
cause he had to be taken home right away, and was unable to at- 
tend to his official duties for several days. The President was at 
the moment considering a message to Congress concerning Chile 
that his Secretary of State is reported not to have approved of. 
Last year Blains fell suddenly ill, and at a critical moment that 
time also. The President was not in accord with Blaine's treat- 
ment of the Behring Sea controversy, and desired to change it, 
when Blaine's illness removed him out of the way until the whole 
matter was practically settled. Yet the burning question of tbe 
day is, as to whether Blaine is a candidate for the Presidency 
this year. It would seem not to be apolitical question, but a 
medical one. A man given to taking ill at critical moments is 
hardly the person to hold the great office that has more critical 
periods in it than any other position on earth. Still, Blaine's 
friends are capturing the primaries for him all over the East and 
West. Pennsylvania has elected a solid delegation for him, and 
wherever a Harrison man made a fight he was defeated. On the 
other hand, the Republicans of the South, mainly office-holders, 
are electing Harrison delegates. It is a curious spectacle. How 
can it possibly be a real contest? For the President and his Pre- 
mier Minister to be open combatants for the succession to the 
chief place would put both in equivocal positions. It would indi- 
cate that Harrison was afraid to dismiss a rival, intriguing and 
distasteful minister. It would place Blaine in a position of hold- 
ing on to office as a vantage ground from which to stab his too 
generous chief. We believe there is an understanding between 
tbe two men, and that Harrison is to be the candidate. 



WHY is it that there is so little respect paid nowadays to testa- 
mentary dispositions of property? A few years ago it was 
very seldom that a will was successfully contested, unless the 
testator were clearly shown to have been of unsound mind, but 
of late wills have been set aside time and again, when it was evi- 
dent that the only reason was that the jury did not agree with 
the testator as to what was the proper disposition of his property. 
If this is to be the rule in cases of wills, the law might as well be 
repealed which provides for the making of a will, and let every- 
body who has any claim on the estate scramble for it, and divide 
it as best they can. 



Till, Sen.it. „f r ■ x\r>% DM |osl SOOOmpllshed an act 

that it ought to have performed mors than a year ago. Bingo- 
larly enough our country li the lasl to oonsanl to tha treaty ol 
>v(dlng that the extinction ol » I every iball bi 

■ real. The treaty was the outcome of nn In ten 
one ol the most humane and therefore one <>f the | 

1 held upon earth, which met In Bmasell about the end of | 
which the United ,\ tome what tardy representaUve- 

ft was itlpulsted that the treaty, to be operative, should ■ 
the final ratification <>f tha leventeen powers thai were parties to 
It, by tbe 10lb June. 1890. The time was supposed to be ample, 
rhe United States Senate was In latalon at tbe time, bnl was too 
much engaged In the losing ftgbt over the Pores Kill to give heed 

; to the small outside matter of the effectual suppression ol the 

j African slave trade, and at one time it look-.] as if the wliols 
matter must fall to the ground for the want of our consent. By 
some tact and much perseverance, certain of the whole SOUled 

| workers in the cause succeeded in procuring an extension ol 
in which ratification might be had. The treaty looks to the pow- 
ers consenting and aiding the Congo free state to establish 
strongly fortified stations, so as to make repressive action effect- 
ive, the construction of railroads and telegraph lines, the restric- 
tion of the importation of fire-arms and ammunition of modern 
patterns, the diminution of tribal wars, by arbitration, the pro- 
hibition of the importation and sale of intoxicants, tbe initiation 
of the natives in agricultural pursuits and the extirpation of can- 
nibalism. To the treaty designed to accomplish these ends tbe 
Senate has just given its approval, but not without an ungracious 
growl. It attached a protest in the shape of a protocol, which 
declared that the United States « having neither possession nor 
protectorates in Africa, disclaims any intention, in ratifying the 
treaty, to indicate any interest whatsoever in the possessions or 
protectorates claimed on that continent by the other powers, or 
any approval of the wisdom, expediency or lawfulness thereof." 
A commercial convention, rendered necessary by tbe terms of tbe 
treaty with the Congo free state, was also ratified by tbe 8enate. 
The other signatory powers recognized the right of Congo to im- 
pose duties on imports in order to raise a revenue, whereas the 
United States had made tbe admission of their products free of 
duty a condition of their recognizing the flag of tbe new State. 
This demand is now so far modified that we have agreed that du- 
ties may be levied not to exceed ten per cent for fifteen years, 
beginning 1890. We confess that we do not comprehend the 
rationale of all this haggling on our part. 



THE FARMERS AND MINERS. 



THE miners of tbe mountains and the farmers of the valleys 
seem in a fair way to compose their differences at last. If 
dams can be built away up in the canyons large enough and 
strong enough to impound the debris of the miners, and engineers 
say they can, the motive for further opposition ceases and no 
further reason exists why mining operations should not be re- 
sumed the moment the dams are ready to receive the quartz; 
bowlders, soil and water, of which hydraulic operations are so 
prolific. The contest has been a long-drawn out one, that might 
have been much more easily compromised, had more moderate 
counsels prevailed on both sides. The miners having acquired 
leases from the Government entitling them to mine under and 
upon certain described lands, they proceeded to construe these 
instruments as giving them the right to carry on all the opera- 
tions incidental to mining. The tearing down of mountain sides 
by means of water was one of those operations. Of course, the 
debris thus formed had to find its level, and it unfortunately 
happened that that level constituted the beds of our only navi- 
gable rivers, and a large quantity of our most highly cultivated 
land in the State. The Government could not give any set of 
men the right to destroy the property of another set, and the 
United States Courts so decided. That decision has for years past 
practically put an end to hydraulic mining. If the hopeful com- 
promise now in sight is reached some $10,000,000 to $15,000,000 
worth of gold will be extracted from the earth annually, and the 
State enriched to that extent. It is well that the vexed question 
should be set at rest. It has been the cause of more legislative 
corruption than will ever see the light. 

WHITELAW RE ID is threatening to resign the French mission, 
and return to New York to take charge again of the Tribune. 
We have always been a little surprised that any self-respecting 
journalist would condescend to leave active newspaper work for 
such a position as United States Minister to a foreign country. 
How can the hand which has controlled the lever that moves the 
world form itself to the inditing of protocols or tbe writing of 
diplomatic notes? There are plenty of ordinary men in tbe 
United States from whom to select Ministers and Ambassadors, 
without making havoc in the ranks of the Fourth Estate. Come 
back, brother Reid, and be one of us again, and leave diplomacy 
to men who are not of sufficient mental caliber to be newspaper 
men. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. SO, 1892. 



TO THE NINETEEN. 



Embodiment of power august, 
Pick of the good and true, 

Who hold our destiny in trust, 
We wait to hear from you. 

It is no common duty we 

Expect you to perform, 
There are fierce breakers on our lea, 

To windward there is storm. 
On whichsoever side we sound, 

The same tale tells the lead, 
Of dangerous s l allows all around 

And sunken rocks ahead. 

Unlawful parties, who approached, 

But were forbid to speak, 
Have whispered tbat our cargo's broached, 

Our vessel all aleak; 
Our timbers shattered like a wreck, 

Our tackling worn and old, 
With contrabandists on our deck 

And pirates in the hold. 

We look to you to re-survey 

The good craft through and through, 

And tell us if the things which they 
Report be false or true. 

You hold the helm, you have the chart, 

Yours is th,e full command; 
We bid you nobly act your part 
And bring us safe to land. 
San Francisco, January 30, 1892. 



THEATRICAL REMINISCENCES. 

9 

MY first appearance on the stage, said a well-known comedian 
yesterday, was at Astley's Theatre, in London, ill 1864. The 
play was a heavy melodrama called The Chain of Guilt. Theresa 
Furtado, afterwards Mrs. John Clarke, who made such a great 
reputation in F. C. Bernard's IxUm, was the star of tbe evening, 
and our strongest scene was a very realistic shipwreck. This 
scene was mounted without regard to cost. The ship was sus- 
pended by powerful machinery from above, which allowed it to 
swing about freely to any part of the stage, and the bowsprit, 
being constructed on the Telescope principle, could be instantly 
shortened to avoid striking the proscenium boxes, and then run 
out clear over tbe heads of those occupying front seats. The hull 
was like a bellows, so that when it was hoisted and lowered by 
the tackle above, the ship appeared to the audience to be rising 
and sinking in tbe waves. James Gates, a prominent scenic art- 
ist, who had painted the scenery, came down after rehearsal, and 
not being altogether satisfied with the sea cloth he got his brushes 
to work, and laid on a lot more white foam. Now, this sea cloth, 
after hanging all day and then getting the heat from so much 
burning gas in the evening, was, as you may suppose, thoroughly 
dry when the shipwreck scene came on, and the white paint 
used to represent foam could be almost blown about with the 
breath. I had not a leading role on this, my first appearance be- 
fore an audience. I was only * i a wave of the sea, driven by tbe 
winds and tossed," and as the time lor the shipwreck drew near, 
I experienced a sickening feeling. At last the shipwreck came 
on, and I was hustled under the sea cloth, along with a dozen 
other " supes." Our business was to make tbe sea arise in its 
might and wreck tbe gallant ship. We had been repeatedly cau- 
tioned at rehearsal not to use our hands, but to go down on all- 
fours and produce the foaming billows by " bumping " our backs 
up and down. This was a very trying exercise; it was much 
easier to use our bands, though it gave to the tolling billows a 
jagged and unnatural appearance, and when the dry white paint 
sifted freely through the cloth, covering us up, choking and blind- 
ing us as the climax approached, I commenced in a fit of despera- 
tion to use my hands, so as to dodge the foam as much as possi- 
ble and keep it from totally blinding me. But I was soon per- 
ceived by the stage carpenter, who instantly dived under the 
cloth, laboring under wild excitement, and commenced cursing 
me in dumb show for not bumping my back as I had been told 
to do. He was so fierce that I quickly edged away from him. 
This made him worse. He signaled me to come back. I edged 
away a little father, and a moment later stood up through a hole 
in the cloth as big as a barn door, in the midst of tbe angry break- 
ers, and covered from head to foot with the white powder. There 
was not a sound in the house until I gave a terrific "cha-boo!" 
and suddenly dived back under the waves. Then you couldn't 
have heard the report of an eighty-ton gun ten yards away. As 
I scrambled out and made a wild break for the door, the late Ed- 
ward Stirling, who was stage manager, called me back, and be- 
tween fits offered me a sovereign every time I would repeat my 
performance, but notwithstanding this liberal offer and many very 
flattering press notices, it was months before I could ever bear 
the sight of a theatre. 



TWO MUNICIPAL PICTURES. 



ti T OOK on this Picture." A man named Kelly was recently 
1j discharged from the Police force on a charge of using language 
which reflected seriously upon the character of Sergeant Wittman. 
He had said that on one occasion he had acted as a go-between in 
a case where, for a certain monetary consideration, Wittman had 
succeeded in keeping a witness out of the way, so that when the 
case came to trial a dismissal followed. Kelly also alleged that he 
could furnish ample evidence in support of the fact that Wittman 
was receiving regular fees from keepers of gambling places and 
disreputable houses. Believing that he could prove these state- 
ments, he preferred charges against Wittman. To him the Ser- 
geant's downfall meant his own re instatement. In his charge 
against Wittman he averred that the Sergeant had, " on divers 
occasions, paid to divers persons, divers sums of money," and 
requested that blank subpcenas be issued in order that his wit- 
nesses might be properly summoned. Clerk Hall then told Kelly 
that unless he furnished the names of the witnesses in advance 
the case could not come up before the Police Commissioners. 
Kelly argued, through Mr. Davidson, his lawyer, that such a 
course was anfair to him; that he was afraid that his witnesses 
would be tampered with, and that after his evidence was in the 
person charged would have ample opportunity to prepare his de- 
fense. But when the Board of Police Commissioners met they 
decided not to go on with the case unless the course outlined by 
Hall was adopted, and Kelly was instructed to furnish a new 
complaint, in which he was directed to give the names of the 
persons who had bribed Wittman, the dates upon which the 
money had been paid, and the amounts given on each occasion. 
This was done. So satisfied was Lawyer Davidson that he had a 
good case tbat when he undertook to conduct it he agreed to 
work on a contingent fee, taking four promissory notes of $25 
each from Kelly, and four notes of $25 each from ex-Policeman 
Briggs, who also expected to be benefited by Wittman's downfall. 
Mark the result! When the case came up for trial Lawyer 
Davidson found it impossible to be present and conduct it, so re- 
turned the notes to his clients, and every witness, without a 
single exception, who had been subpoenaed at Kelly's request, 
upon whose positive statements Kelly bad formulated his charges, 
swore emphatically that they had never paid Wittman any 
money; that they knew of no one who had ; that they had never 
stated that they had paid him any, and that he was, as far as 
they knew, one of the most efficient, most honest and most con- 
scientious officers on tbe force. The charges against him were 
dismissed. 

" And on This." — District Engineer M'Carthy, of the Fire De- 
partment, was suspended the other day upon a complaint filed 
with the Board of Fire Commissioners, charging him with having 
received bribes in connection with his duties as a Fire Warden. 
Chief Scannell alleged, in his complaint, that the money had been 
paid to Mc'Carthy by John Doe, Richard Roe and Joseph Doe, 
the object in using these time-honored mythic names being to 
conceal tbe identity of the persons upon whom he depended to 
make good bis case. "But," argued the hapless M'Carthy, " I 
want to be prepared to meet these charges. 1 do not want to be 
brought face to face with my accusers unprepared, and fall a 
victim to a possible snap judgment. Give me some idea of what 
you say I am guilty, so that I may be prepared to explain mat- 
ters, and show tbat I am innocent." Tbe answer he got was a 
flat refusal, both the Chief and the Chairman of tbe Board de- 
claring tbat they would not show their bands, and give the ac- 
cused an opportunity in advance of rebutting the evidence they 
declare they have against him. The result of the case *w ill probaby 
let in some light. 

Fair-minded people will, doubtless, see in this contrast a game 
of " heads I win, tails you lose " on the part of the city, and a 
need for some definite rule in regard to such matters. Either the 
Police Department or the Fire Department is wrong, and one can 
not help feeling that the power with which they are invested in 
dealing with cases of this kind should enable them to give an 
accused employe every possible opportunity to make his fight 
unhampered. 

Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

Home of Sunol, 2:08%; Home of Palo Alto. 2:08^; Home of 
Arion. 2:10%; Home oi- Bell Bibd.2:26J [. 
Chas Marvin writes under date of January 9, 1890. He found by 
feeding the Red Ball Brand Manhattan Food to the horses under his 
charge, that it proved to be as represented ; also Mr. William Corbitt, 
of the San Mateo Stock Farm, speaks in the highest terms of it, as he 
hay fed it for the past two years with excellent results. All owners 
of horses will do well to adopt this celebrated food. It supplies horses 
with tonic and cooling properties so beneficial to them when stall fed. 
This food is not a condition powder, and contains neither antimony 
or any poisonous drug. It is fed and recommended by the foremost 
vets of California— Masoero, Burns, Egan, Creely and others. One 
who knows. c. k.. 

Many housekeepers have made a visit during the week to the office 
of the Armour Butterine Company, at 657 Market street, where is ex- 
hibited their silver churn butterine. Opportunity is given to sample 
it on hot rolls, cakes, etc., and the result is said to be more than sat- 
factory. 



Jan. 30, 



SAN FRANCISl NEWS 1 BTTER. 



BUCKLEY S FAREWELL. 

Farewell to the party an. I L'oonl J Oomtnlttm, 

Whose powpr I created, w hoM course I cootrollad ; 
Farewell lo tbe thankle*.. yet beautiful t-ity . 

I kept as a shephenl secure in my fold; 
It has turned like a viper and wounded the spirit 

That warmed it to being, and loved it so will. 
It has uttered the wish that I never come near it, 

8o from far-off Wiesbaden 1 waft this farewell. 
I'm not tbe first blind man kicked out of a city. 

Old Homer was shown every gale on the earth. 
Till at length, with a gall that arouses our pity, 

They turned round and [ought for the praise of his birth ; 
And you. San Francisco, whose passion hysteric, 

Has hoisted me out as the vilest of dross, 
When I die with celebrity more than Homeric, 

Will contend for the honor of rearing the Boss. 
I went into politics when the developments 

Called for a firm and executive band ; 
I stood by your town when its terrible elements 

Had wrecked it without a strong arm to command; 
If I gave some positions 'twas only a tittle 

To the infamous cormorants seeking control, 
If I cast out some sop it was preciously little 

For the open-mouthed Cerberus wanting the whole. 
If with the intractable troop that I gathered 

I feathered my nest, it was prudently done, 
For whose nest, I ask you, would not be unfeathered 

If I had consented to lead the gang on ? 
There are times we atop looting a town by displaying 

An easier prize as a preferable lay. 
And I saved your city by craftily saying 

I'd rob it myself and then divy straightway. 
You will find, when the flood of your grand reformation 

Has swept roe away and made everything pure, 
There are ills far surpassing a boss domination, 

And evils more rank than corruption, to cure; 
When the weaklings empowered by senseless illusion 

Grow faint at the wheel, when the ship goes awrack, 
And mutiny follows on brainless confusion, 

You'll wish tbe calm strength of the banished one back. 
Farewell; you have ordained my part; I accept it; 

I'm too proud to beseech and too rich to ask alma; 
I have only this prayer, and I hope you'll respect it, 

They're the words of a greater One — Fodder my lambs. 
I* forgive you, as in a scene just as unluckly 

He forgave, and I wait for tbe slow years to tell 
If your proud city better can do without Buckley, 

Or he without it. All is said. Fate you well. 
San Francisco, Jan. 30, 1892. 

LATEST TENNIS NEWS. 

THE final of the Alameda County championship was played at 
the Alameda courts last Saturday. The honors rested with 
Bates, who defeated Neel by three setts to one, 8-6, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4. 
There was quite a large attendance, but little enthusiasm, as both 
players are members of the same club. Bates played a very fair 
game, but neither player did as well as they do together as part- 
ners. Neel, moreover, was not, from all appearances, looking 
well, and after the match was quite " washed out." It is owing 
to his indisposition that the last sett with Taylor and Tobin, with 
Bates and Neel will not be played today. It has been decided to 
play off on February 6lh, at the California Club. 

The victory of Bates now makes him champion of Alameda 
county, but in justice to Hubbard, who. for reasons best known 
to himself, defaulted in the early part of the match, we will say 
we consider him by far the best player in the county. Last Fri- 
day Hubbard played Bates at the Bast Oakland courts and won 
with ease. The score was 10 8,6-1,6-4. In the first set Hub. 
bard was 5-2 and ought to have taken the set at that score. 

Play was not very lively at the California Club last Saturday, 
as some had gone to witness the Bates-Neel match, but more were 
to be found at the football game, where Tobin so distinguished 
himself. We think be is a belter football than tennis player. 

Hubbard and Will Taylor played some very good tennis, and 
the result was sett all. " Sontbblow " or " Peachblow " Hoff- 
man is now in great form, and if be continues, will be in demand 
in the betting ring when the championship is played. Bobby 
Eyre and Stetson are among the rising players, and play remark- 
ably well. Charlie Yates was heard to remark that the old ones 
would not be in it in a few monlhs with some of the youngsters. 

Washington's Birthday is creeping on, and as we are not to 
play ball with Chile, it would be as well to know what the Di- 
rectors are going to do about the tournament. Whether it is to 
be a class tournament or doubles. We fancy it is almost settled 
now that the class matches will be on the tapis. 

Modieska has now the late champion of Southern California in 
her company. The tall and willowy Carter has forsaken the 
racket to try his hand at being a champion actor. 



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