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Full text of "S.F. News Letter (July-Dec. 1892)"

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D EDO? 1ET1SM7 5 

California State Library 

CALIFORNIA 
STATE LIBRARY 



Call No. 



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V 



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Prtc* per Copy, 10 Centn. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 





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(& villi FrraoGterii sjcr. 




Vol. XLV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 2, 1892. 90S \ 4 Number 1. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Frederick 
Marriott, Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran- 
cisco. Entered at San Francisco Pott-office as Second Class Matter. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page 

Editorial Brevities 1 

Leading articles : 
Can the Democrats Carry Cali- 
fornia?" 2 

Converted Republicans .2 

The Movement for Good Roads 2 

The Glorious Fourth 3 

Defects of the Jury System 3 

The Labir Investigation ... 3 
The Mission of the Bibliophile . . 4 
Tennis and Baseball 5 

Celia and One Dan Cupid (Poetry) 6 

The Devil's Library C> 

A Song of Youth (Poetry) 7 

As Seen by French Eyes 7 

Pleasure's Wand 8-3 

The Divorce Discussion 9 

Dolce Far Nieute (Poetry) 10 

A Midsummer Passear 10 

A Queen's Birthday Sonnet 11 



Page 

An Idea for Chicago Art Lovers. . 11 
Sparks. 12 

The World's Fair 13 

The Looker-On 14-15 

Financial Review. 18 

Town Crier 17 

Real Property 18 

The Bourse and Underwriter . . 19 

A Romance of Blue Lake 20 

Vanities 21 

World, Flesh and Devil 22 

The Rose Jar 23 

The Agnostic's Question—" Is Life 

Worth Living ? " (Poetry) 24 

Obituary 24 

" Same Business Men " 25 

Scientific aud Useful 26 

Sunbeams 27 

" Biz"— Summary of the Markets. 28 
Society 30-31-32 



SAN JOSE'S crusade against selling liquor on Sunday has 
created a great deal of excitement there, and the question has 
not yet been fought out. If that city and every other city, this 
one included, would abolish the side and back: entrances to sa- 
loons, much good would be effected. 

THE street-car companies should have notices posted in their 
cars on the morning of the Fourth, stating at what place and 
at what time the cars will stop to allow the passage of the parade 
8uch a notice would prove a great convenience to many people, 
and would be but little trouble to the companies. 



HEAGERTY, the liquor-selling restaurant keeper at Berkeley, 
who was convicted recently, wants to effect a compromise 
of his sentence by getting out of town. If he will go for good it 
might be advisable to temper justice with mercy, for the end to 
be attained is to stop the sale of liquor at or near the University 
grounds. 

THE scandal regarding Secretary Theobald, of the Humane So- 
ciety of Alameda county, following so closely on the exposure 
of » Holy" Bennett, has shaken the public confidence in institu- 
tions of that ilk. Theobald, by-the-way, is a full-blooded, im- 
ported Englishman, and calls himself " Tibbald" when he is with 
the elite. 

ONE of the most ingenious applications of the flash-light camera 
recently noted is that at Toledo, O., where an amateur pho- 
tographer attached a camera electrically to a cigar case, and thus 
obtained negatives of thieves who robbed the case in the night. 
Some genius should now invent a method by which women may 
get photos of the pickpockets who relieve them of their purses. 

THE number of idle men in San Francisco is greatly exag- 
gerated after the custom of the press of the city. During 
the wees a large contractor tried to secure one hundred men 
to engage in some work in Oregon and failed. The men 
who are professionally looking for work in this city will never 
get it if they see a job coming first. They are in the main pro- 
fessional loafers. 



PRESIDENT HARRI80N'S appointment of John W. Foster to 
be Secretary of State was something of a surprise, especially 
as the proprietor of a prominent Republican newspaper had an- 
nounced so positively that Secretary Tracy was to have the place. 
There is coming to be a very well defined belief that the political 
predictions of the aforesaid proprietor are a good thing to copper. 

ONE of the most highly ludicrous incidents that has yet trans- 
pired in the campaign has been the decision of the prominent 
gentlemen in the Union League Club to march by proxy in the 
campaign processions this year. Their Republicanism is strong 
enough, they say, but their feet are very tender, the result of 
gout, arising from a too severe course of luxuries. 



THAT miserable railroad iron pavement in front of the Academy 
of Sciences, on Market street, to which the News Lettek has 
repeatedly directed the attention of the public officials, is at last 
being torn up and removed. It will be replaced by basalt blocks. 
The Superintendent of Streets should prevent the patching of the 
thoroughfares in future by experimental pavements. 

THE highly moral manner in which President Harrison con- 
siders his office and its prerogatives was recently illustrated by 
the speech made by him in reply to some of hia congratulators. 
He said he was sorry he had not been able to reward all his 
friends with political office. Why not endeavor to have a few 
more created, Benjamin, and put in more of your helpers? The 
country is rich and can stand it. 



THE Marquis de Mores is making bad use of his powers in the 
service of an anti-Jewish crusade, and in support of social- 
ists and anarchists. His ideas seem to be an incongruous mix- 
ture of mediaeval and modern prejudices, and all that he will ac- 
complish by his methods may possibly be that he will be elevated 
to the rank of a dime-novel hero. True glory cannot be found 
upon the path which he haR chosen. 



THE young man at Colusa who had been circulating anony- 
mous slanders about estimable women, and who was soundly 
thrashed for it, is probably repenting in sackcloth and ashes. It 
might be more to the purpose if he were called on to repent in a 
coat of tar and feathers, for if there is anybody who deserves 
such treatment it is the slanderer of women, who are usually un- 
able to avenge themselves. The Colusa women, however, seem 
able to take their own part, and are to be congratulated upon it. 



THERE is something intensely funny in the spectacle of His 
Royal Highness, Tip-o-Tip, son of the late lamented Cete- 
wayo, King of all the Zulus, parading through the country in a 
big wig, and while apparently telling the wondering and admir- 
ing plutocrats of the East all about the wonders of his African do- 
mains, snatched from him by an unfeeling government, actually 
acting as a capper for a brace of burglars. The people of the East 
have been so often deceived by false lions that one would expect 
them to see through the scheme of a thieving negro. 



WHEN Tom Reed was Speaker of the House, he may have 
been a tyrant and a Czar, but be managed to dispatch busi- 
ness. Recently the House has had to yield to the iron sway of 
the Committee on Rules to get anything done at all at this ses- 
sion, and it must be confessed that there is very little difference 
in principle between the domination of a Speaker and that of a 
Committee on Rules. The truth is, that the House of Repre- 
sentatives has to be governed to make it do any work, and one 
party is the same as the other in that respect. 

THE Chicago newspaper faker is not to be outdone by the local 
account of the finding of Noah's Ark on Ararat's snowypeak. 
Now comes a tale about a Moorish palace with a million in gold 
as a feature of the great exposition. The exposed gold is to be 
guarded by trusty armed servitors, who, upon attack, will be 
able, by touching an electric button, to dump all the gold into a 
burglar-proof vault. It is now about time that Fresno discovered 
another dragon, South San Francisco dragged out a cave of civi- 
lized seals on a hilltop, or Oakland presented a truly honest man. 



THE workingmen are beginning to find out what an expensive 
luxury they have saddled upon themselves in the person of 
Alfred Fuhrman, the general manager of the Federated Trades. 
It has been shown that he is a bully animated by motives of per- 
sonal aggrandizement; that he has refused to perform his duties 
as a union officer, when requested, and that he has wilfully in- 
sulted workmen and their wives when in the humor. In open 
meeting of the union he has threatened bodily harm to a man 
bold enough to ask him why be did not perform his duties. As 
the News Letter has repeatedly pointed out, the sooner the 
Federated Trades gets rid of Fuhrman, and men of his stamp, the 
better it will be for the workingmen. 



C 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 



CAN THE DEMOCRATS CARRY CALIFORNIA? 



THE politicians of the machine kind are apt to overlook re- 
volts of a momentous character. The machine knows noth- 
ing but blind obedience and the crushing of all opposition. The 
Republican machine is especially blind to the side-movements in 
politics, despite the fact that it has been carried almost out of ex- 
istence by the tidal waves that have so frequently swept over the 
country. Up to the present time the Republican machine in this 
State and its organs have been disposed to pooh-pooh the idea 
that any danger to the supremacy of its party may lurk in the 
Alliance movement. The People's party, with them, has been a 
subject of ridicule. The Republican managers in California are, 
in the judgment of the most astute politicians, even many of 
those within its own party, doomed to a violent surprise. The 
foundation of their calculation is this same despised People's 
party — not the party of Carl Browne and Dennis Kearney and 
other blatherskite politicians, but the true People's party of the 
Farmers' Alliance. This organization has a membership of nearly 
30,000. To be more exact, it had 27,000 in May. and its growth 
has never stood still a month since it was founded. It has organ- 
ized and will run tickets in nearly every county of the State, 
either for itself or in combination with one or the other of the old 
parties. It has placed in nomination a State ticket, and it will 
on July Fourth place in nomination a national ticket. This will 
be done at Omaha, and this Omaha convention will receive more 
attention in the near future. It is in the hands of experienced 
politicians. The popular notion that the Grangers are novices in 
politics should have been dissipated by the last election. They 
will put in nomination a 6rst-class mans beyond a doubt, and 
they will place him on a strong platform, so far as the West and 
South are concerned. It will be an enunciation of principles that 
will come very close to the desires of the people, and it will mean 
what it says, and in language unmistakable. The Alliance, like 
all " isms," is largely made up of Republicans. It is estimated 
that the 30,000 members in this State comprise 20,000 former Re- 
publicans and 10,000 Democrats. The Republicans carried Cali- 
fornia by a plurality of 7,111 in 1888, and by a plurality of 7,945 
in 1890. A loss of anything like 20,000 votes would mean disas- 
ter. It is believed by the politicians that the Alliance will not 
poll its vote. This is a mistaken idea. The Alliance has shown 
its capacity for voting its membership in other States, and what 
it has done elsewhere it will do here. The Alliance is a secret 
organization, organized largely as the Know Nothings were. Its 
members are in a measure fanatical, and the members would not 
join the lodges of the order if they did not intend to stand by it. 
The Alliance people say they will vote ninety per cent, of their 
members. This would mean that the Democrats would lose 9,000 
votes and the Republicans 18,000 votes. Taking the vote of 
1888, and the relative increase will leave the status of parties pro- 
portionately the same. The Alliance defection would make the vote 
stand as follows: Democratic vote, 108,671; Republican vote, 
100,782; Democratic plurality, 1,889. The People's party has no 
chance of electing anyone. It does not expect to do so; it is 
fighting for principles which it hopes may win some day. 

This defection alone would give the Democracy an excellent 
fighting show in the State, but there are many other things to en- 
courage the Democrats. The defection from Mr. Harrison is very 
great, and it includes old-time, consistent Republicans, who have 
worked for the ticket, and contributed liberally of their means. 
In one club, the other night, seventeen men met in the reading 
room. All had voted for Harrison four years ago. Fourteen of 
the seventeen will vote for Cleveland this year. In financial and 
business circles it is the same everywhere. The conservative ele- 
ment has no use for Harrison, and thousands of this class of Re- 
publicans will vote against their candidates this year. 

Among the rank and file there is a decided antipathy to Harri- 
son. It is Dot a factional feeling, nor yet based on disappoint- 
ment because some one else was not nominated. It is the out- 
growth of personal repugnance. Harrison lost by his trip to 
California, and the election returns will show it. He did not im- 
prove on closer acquaintance. This fact is made patent wherever 
men congregate and engage in general conversation. 

The one feature of tht campaign that gives the Republican man- 
agers more concern than any other, is the way in which the 
masses of the voters have arrayed themselves against the office 
holders. This threatens the large Republican majorities in Los 
Angeles and San Diego counties, and cuts a prominent figure in 
San Francisco. It is this antagonism that has stilled the voice of 
the Los Angeles Times, so valuable to the Republican cause in 
former years. Everywhere in the State the Federal appointments 
have been unhappily made, and have given dissatisfaction. To 
re elect Harrison means the continuance in power of these 
officials. To every successful candidate for these offices there 
were ten unsuccessful ones. The latter, comprising the best 
workers in the party, will not break their necks to keep their 
successful rivals in office, and it is hard to estimate the influence 
of the apathy, if not opposition, of such party workers. Harri- 
son is a much weaker man than he was four years ago, just 
as Cleveland is stronger than he was then, and the outkok is 
decidedly dubious for the Republicans. 



CONVERTED REPUBLICANS. 

THERE is no more significant sign-of the times than the firm 
announcements made by many of the leading Republican 
merchants of the country thit they will support Cleveland and 
tariff reform. The people have had enough of the McKinley bill 
and its severe impositions, and now propose to declare for liberty 
from excessive and unnecessary taxation. Many of the most 
prominent merchants of San Francisco, men whose business in- 
terests involve millions of dollars, and who for years have been 
identified with the Republican party, have announced themselves 
this year for the nominee of the Chicago Convention. Practical 
demonstration of the results of the levying of high import duties 
for the alleged " protection " of home industries, has shown them 
that there is far more theory than fact in the arguments of Re- 
publicans, and that unless they (the merchants) secure relief, they 
will be compelled to suspend business. Nor are the dealers in 
goods taxed by the McKinley bill the only citizens affected detri- 
mentally by the high tariff now existing. It is obvious that if 
importers and manufacturers, who are employers of labor, find 
their sales and profits reduced by business stagnation directly re- 
sulting from improper legislation, they will be required-, and they 
do reduce the wages of their employed. Those who suffer most 
severely, therefore, from the Republican system of high taxation 
are the masses of the people. The laboring classes, who are the 
majority of the country's consumers, also suffer directly by the 
raise in the price of goods, on account of the additional tariff tax. 
The simple fact is that the protective tariff does not protect. This 
is now appreciated throughout the country. The McKinley Act, 
in the words of a prominent local merchant, <* is merely a dis- 
crimination in favor of the manufacturer, and a most decided in- 
jury to other lines of business." Tbe consumer is the one that 
suffers, because he has to pay the extra duty imposed. It is 
well known that domestic manufacturers of protected commodi- 
ties raise the prices of their goods without proportionately in- 
creasing the wages of their men, thus taking advantage of the 
high tariff law, which thereby fails of any good result to the 
people. The McKinley bill is an altogether one-sided proposition. 
It increases the profits of a certain few large manufacturers, de- 
creases the revenues of large numbers of merchants, and raises 
prices without increasing the wages of the people on whom it 
confers no benefits whatever. The November elections will show 
that the citizens of the country, after nearly four years of costly 
experiment, have concluded that their interests lie in the election 
of the champion of tariff reform. 



THE MOVEMENT FOR GOOD ROADS. 

ALBERT A. POPE, of Boston, pursues his crusade for good 
roads throughout the country with highly commendable 
energy. He has addressed circular letters to all the newspaper 
writers in the country, asking their co-operation in the endeavor 
to secure the establishment of a road department at the World's 
Columbian Exposition at Chicago. He calls attention to the fact 
that under the present arrangement and classification of exhibits, 
the visitor to the Fair will be compelled to visit five enormous 
buildings, having, with their annexes, an aggregate area of 
seventy-nine and three-tenths acres to acquaint himself with the 
best methods and machinery to be used in tbe building of a high- 
way. The opportunities presented by the World's Columbian 
Exposition, of teaching the twenty million of visitors what good 
roads are, and how to make and maintain them, should not be 
lost sight of, says Mr. Pope. A comprehensive display of these 
things would advance the movement a hundred years, and would 
hasten the coming in of a nobler civilization and a wider Christian- 
ity. Good roads cheapen the cost of transportation by saving 
time, reducing the wear of draught animals and of vehicles, and 
thus lessen the cost of material to the producer and consumer. 
One of the saddest signs of the times in the older States is the 
tendency of population towards tbe cities and the abandonment 
of farms. Tbe modern development of " slums," the wretched 
outcome of life in tenement houses, can be laid largely to the bad 
roads existing in the farming districts, which in certain seasons 
of tbe year prevent social intercourse, making country life cheer- 
less, isolated and narrow. Churches and schools are neglected 
when roads are such as to made them difficult of access. It is 
interesting to read the testimony of Seliui H. Peabody, Chief of 
the Department of Liberal Arts of the World's Fair, on the sub- 
ject of road3 in the United States. Our common roads are worse 
than in any other civilized country, he says. No other material 
interest in the United States rests under so dense a cloud of ignor- 
ance. No improvement would so greatly aid the American farmer 
as that which would give him as good roads as may be found in 
tbe poorest districts, say of Ireland and Italy. The movement 
for good roads is one which should receive the hearty support of 
every good citizen in the country. 



THE Premium Note Company, referred to heretofore in the 
News Letter as a wildcat lottery scheme, was raided by the 
police on Tuesday, and two of its officers arrested. There is 
small doubt that the affair is a fraudulent concern, and it should 
be suppressed. 



Jul 



1892, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE LABOR INVESTIGATION. 



THE "glorious" Fourth is again upon us; a little moth-eaten, 
it is true, and probably with weaker lungs than a decade ago, 
but yet it is the glorious old Fourth, and, as a well-established 
and venerable friend, we give it our utmost respect. We cannot 
help asking, however, what good is done by the annual clap- 
trap theatrical display of ambitious politicians in open carriages 
(paid for by the city); of numberless shaking floats representing 
Washington crossing the Delaware, and the first flapjack at Grizzly 
Flat, two great historical events (also paid for by the city); of 
political candidates in flaming sashes, rolling on the backbones of 
spavined beasts, and carrying huge, drawn swords; followed by 
our prize beauties, the Supervisors, with drawn salaries {paid by 
the city)? The Fourth of July processions, as conducted in this 
or any other large city in the country, have just about as much 
to do with patriotic sentiment as have the personal political am- 
bitions of the Grand Marshals or the Presidents of the Day or any 
other of the wi-de-sashed and professional patriots, with the im- 
provement of this municipality. We believe in inculcating the 
spirit of patriotism among our people; we believe that this repub- 
lic is the grandest government of the greatest people the world 
has ever known ; we believe in the establishment and maintenance 
of public customs which shall recall to all of us the great deeds of 
our forefathers, and remind us of the liberties for which they 
fought and bled and died. But when the national celebrations, 
established for that end, are conducted as the personal celebrations 
of men with baskets of axes which they desire to grind upon the 
revolving wheel of public approval, then we hold that the cele- 
brations do not fulfill those noble ends which animated their es- 
tablishment, and should be abandoned. This city may be par- 
ticularly unfortunate in its Indendence Day affairs, as for several 
years past they have been fruitful causes of scandalous stories of 
improperly awarded contracts and misapplied funds. Three thou- 
sand dollars of the people's money are expended every year for 
these celebrations. If there is to be the usual procession, let it at 
least be a military pageant worth seeing, and let the fireworks 
make a pyrotecbnical display worth the money they will cost. 
The people like to be humbugged, and they always forgive those 
who humbug them in style. 



WHAT beneficial result* are to come from the inquiry Into the 
condition of local labor now being conducted by the Stale 
Labor OommtaaloDW T For several days the inquiry has been pur- 
sued with «ome bitterness on the part of both employers and em- 

and it is not now apparent that a single, point has been ( 
effected, except the throwing of some public attention upon the 
fact that the Libor Commissioner has an office in this city. Since 
the beginning of the labor controversies in this city, both sides 
have been arrayed solidly against each other, and it seems that the 
question is now no nearer solution, nor are amicable relations 
nearer consummation than t bey were a decade ago. The Btattu 
quo is always one of armed peace, nor is it likely that it ever will 
be any other until the labor unions awaken to the fact that 
although they have rights, the men who employ their members 
have also rights, which they intend to maintain, cost what it 
may. That the numerous strikes of the labor unions for trivial 
c.auses. in this city, have been very detrimental to local business 
there is no denying. Hundreds of thousands of dollars have 
been lost directly, and millions of capital have been prevented 
from investment in this city, by reason of the headstrong actions 
of the leaders of the labor movement. These men, it seems, 
would rather cause a sensation by ordering a strike, thereby di- 
recting public attention to their own power, notwithstanding the 
resulting distress to the workmen dispossessed of employment, 
than they would bend an inch from the line of what the? con- 
sider their mighty rights, and discuss differences with their em- 
ployers in a dispassionate manner. The workmen announce as 
their slogan: <• Agitation, Education, Organization," to none of 
which can any reasonable minded man object. But why do they 
not I've up to the principles they cry are their guidance. Agita- 
tation and organization they can command, we admit, but how 
about education? Are they being educated by allowing their 
leaders to play upon them as upon a flute; to handle them as if 
they were so many toys? Education of the workingmen is what 
we mostly desire, for with education will disappear their inclina- 
tion to obey blindly orders issued by any secret conclave of 
schemers who may have been enabled to secure their election to 
the chief offices in the body of workers. The labor leaders are 
not candid in their discussions of vital questions before the mass 
of workingmen. They defend the boycott by saying it is a self- 
protective measure, that their proposition to the employer is sim- 
ply, " You take our labor, or we will not take your goods." Now 
that seems a simple statement of what appears to be a fair enough 
fact; but the trouble is the statement is not true. Not only do 
the workmen endeavor to prevent others from buying goods, but 
tbey dictate to their employers. This is more than any self- 
respecting employer will bear. If the union men conduct them- 
selves more modestly their claims would be received with great, 
er consideration. 

THE GLORIOUS FOURTH. 



DEFECTS OF THE JURY SYSTEM. 

THE recent trial of John II. Squires on a charge of embracery, 
which resulted in a disagreement of the jury, that body stand- 
ing ten for conviction and two for acquittal, will attract renewed 
attention to the defects in the system of trial by jury, as admin- 
istered at the present time in California. This case was a typical 
one, and may be used with propriety for purposes of illustration. 
The prosecuting witness was William H. Chickering, an attorney 
of this city, whose reputation for truth and veracity stands ab- 
solutely unimpeached in this city and in Oakland, where he has 
resided for many years. Mr. Chickering told a plain and straight- 
forward story, which was amply substantiated by his associate in 
the case out of which the accusation against Squires grew, and 
yet, because Squires went upon the stand and told an absolutely 
ridiculous st ry about Chickering having tried to bribe hira, 
two jurors refused to rind Squires guilty, and forced a disagree- 
ment. What encouragement is there for an honest man to try to 
break up the crime of selling a vote on a jury, if a trial jury, or 
any portion of it, is going to take the word of an already con- 
victed felon against that of an honorable and upright man, acting 
solely in the interests of justice and for the protection of society ? 
Where is there going to be any chance of convicting a criminal of 
any offense, if one or two men on a trial jury are obstinate or 
wrong-headed, or, as is more apt to be the case, are of the same 
stripe as John H. Squires ? We may as well abandon the jury 
system altogether and try criminals by shaking dice or spinning 
a teetotum, in which case the prosecution would have at least an 
equal chance with the defense. There is a remedy, however, if 
the people of California will have courage and nerve 
enough to adopt it, and that is to adopt the same 
rule in criminal trials which prevails in civil trials. In a 
civil case in this State, no matter if millions be at stake, a three- 
fourths verdict is all that is required; that is, in the ordinary jury 
of twelve, if nine agree, their decision is the verdict of the entire 
jury. This innovation has been found to work so well, that no 
one dreams of recurring to the old system, which required a 
unanimous verdict. Litigants are satisfied with it, the bar likes 
it, and it meets the full approval of the bench. Why, then, 
should not the same rule be adopted in criminal cases? It is quite 
true that the life or liberty of a human being must outrank any 
rights of property; but it is a well-settled proposition that not 
once in a million times in California will an innocent man be put 
upon trial. During the preliminary proceedings, from his arrest 
and examination by a magistrate to the investigation of his case 
by a Grand Jury, his innocence, if innocent he be, is morally cer- 
tain to appear, and the case against him collapse at that point, it 
is the guilty man who is the enthusiastic supporter of the unani- 
mous verdict, for, as in the Squires case, two men are as good for 
his purpose as eleven. Every new trial increases the guilty man's 
chances of escape, and makes the case so much the more difficult 
for the prosecution. Change the system, and let juries in crimi- 
nal cases find a verdict by the three-fourths vote, and we shall 
find that disagreements of juries will become much less common, 
and that much more even-handed and substantial justice will be 
done than under the present system of unanimous verdicts. 



IF the news telegraphed from Vienna is true that the Emperor 
of Austria has refused to receive Prince Bismarck in audience 
during the latter's sojourn at his capital, the attitude of bis ma- 
jesty must be interpreted by the Austrian people as a deplorable 
lack of moral courage. That the Prussian Ambassador, in order 
to avoid an interview with the ex-Chancellor, asked for leave of 
absence, is natural, for as an imperial official he is not free to act 
entirely according to his own will, but the ruler of the Austrian 
empire should have avoided the suspicion that he is obliged to 
obey dictates from the Berlin court in order to maintain his posi- 
tion in the Triple Alliance. The German students of Munich and 
the population of that city in general have shown more courage 
and prouder self-reliance, for, although being German subjects, 
they have openly disregarded Emperor William's petty spite, and 
conspicuously expressed their admiration for the great statesman 
in whom they justly revere the chief founder of German unity. 
It is a healthy sign of the German character that the people, 
though loyal to their rulers, do not permit themselves to be dic- 
tated where matters of conscience and feelings of the heart are 
concerned. 

THE killing of Robert Kirlin by Officer Thomson, on Wednes- 
day, is another evidence of the folly of appointing improper 
men upon the police force. Thomson has been an officer for 
three weeks, and he has already killed his man. From the evi- 
dence in the case, it appears that Kirlin was drunk, and attacked 
the officer with a knife, whereupon Thomson pulled his ready re- 
volver and killed him. It is a most deplorable affair. Only cool- 
headed, brave men should be appointed to the police force. Thom- 
son has neither of these qualifications. A proper officer would 
have defended himself with his club against the drunken man, 
and subdued him. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 



THE MISSION OF THE BIBLIOPHILE. 

AMONG the pleasures and benefits of collecting for the library- 
books, both old and new, it generally happens that when a 
person ceases to be satisfied with the reading of current literature 
and with the use of those » things in books' clothing" which are 
not books — biographical dictionaries, encyclopaedias et id genus 
omne — he is pretty sure, if he keeps on reading at all, to develop 
into a bibliophile. From making a choice of books to read and 
re-read, he is insensibly led to care for certain editions, and then, 
if not before, to desire good paper, clear type and suitable bind- 
ings. He soon comes to take an interest more or less profound 
in the history of printing and book-making, and likes to own 
specimens of the work of great printers or binders, or books that 
have belonged to famous collectors of the past. Many of these 
objects of his desires are extremely rare and costly in conse- 
quence. Others which may perhaps satisfy him are occasionally 
to be had almost for the trouble of hunting them out. This de- 
pends in a great measure whether his taste is that of the times or is 
rather for books not so highly appreciated by others. The col- 
lection of a library, no matter how small, beccunes in either case 
an occupation, a pursuit, the interest of which is doubled by the 
attractions of hazard and the rewards which it sometimes has 
for knowledge and perseverance. The amateur usually grows 
into a specialist, acquires tastes and views that are uncommon, 
and information of a sort that has a practical bearing upon them. 

It is by too many assumed that the book-lover is merely a man 
with a hobby, that his studies and endeavors are and can be of 
no consequence to the rest of mankind. Those who are satisfied 
with any cheap edition of a book, which they read without care 
and throw aside after one perusal, have hardly an idea of what 
they owe to the minority, which is convinced about the correct- 
ness of a text and the elegance of a make-up. If printers and pub- 
lishers had no such interested minority to work for, how long does 
anyone suppose it would take for the noblest of handicrafts 10 fall 
away into the condition of a justly-despised trade ? How long 
before even in newspapera and magazines we should begin to find 
tokens of decadence? The most indifferent reader of the most or- 
dinary books would soon be exasperated by all sorts of incorrect- 
ness and slovenliness. Coarse and worthless paper, rude type un- 
evenly distributed, errors in every line, would torment and dis- 
gust him. At the present time the cheapest books and papers 
are, with us, fairly well printed, from type which may often be 
described as beautiful, and although the paper used is commonly 
of poor texture, as it must be for rapid printing, never, at least in 
the history of English printing, has a better average of correctness 
been attained. These are substantial benefits, which the reading 
world owes, for the most part, to amateurs, among whom have 
always been included many printers and publishers. 

Bad books, that is, incorrect, slovenly and inelegant ones, have 
always been produced in abundance, in periods of general in- 
difference, but hardly at any time since the invention of printing 
were bad tastes and apathy universal. There were always being 
published, now here, now there, at Nuremburg, or Venice, or 
Rome; at Paris or Lyons; at London, Oxford or Glasgow, edi- 
tions of standard books which, being satisfactory in many ways, 
or admirable in some, have gone on increasing in value since the 
date of their issue. Even in the first quarter of this century, 
which saw so many tasteless books come from the press the pub- 
lications of Pickering, of London, and Didot, of Paris, were 
marked by exceptional beauty and accuracy. Of earlier artists 
in book-making most readers will remember the Aldi, the Elzevirs, 
the Plantini, the Btephani, and the Gryphiei. In our own time 
may be mentioned Lemerre, and Jonast, and i)e Vinne, the New 
York printer. It is the function of the bibliophile to care for and 
preserve the remains of the fortner masters of the art, while 
without him the best efforts of the moderns would never have 
been made. He is at once the patron of the living artists in 
book-making and the custodian of the models which have come 
down to us from former times. 

The books which an amateur collects are in general those which , 
although desirable, have become, or are likely to become, scarce. 
Princes among bibliophiles collect only manuscripts, preferable to 
the time anterior to the invention of printing. There are not 
wanting later manuscripts, some of them most artistically exe- 
cuted and of considerable historical or biographical importance, 
such as the " Guirlande de Julie " of Rambouillet, with its madri- 
gals copied on vellum by Nicholas Jarry, and its borders of flow- 
ers by the miniaturist Robert. Very few manuscripts remain of 
all the mighty libraries of Rome, Constantinople and Alexandria. 
The most remarkable are the "Virgil" of the Vatican and the 
fragmentary "Iliad" of the Bibliotheque Nationale of Paris. 
Early Christian and Byzantine manuscripts are not much more 
numerous, and may generally be said to be out of the reach of 
even the richest of bibliophiles. But of medkeval books, ro- 
mances and poems, missals and books of laws and breviaries, 
there is still extant a great quantity. They are much sought after 
and highly prized because of their splendid illuminations in azure 
and gold, and on account of their historical value. The minia- 
tures and the colored and gilded initials and borders which they 
contain are of the greatest interest to the student of art history, 
and of hardly less value to whomever would understand the 



manners and customs of the times in which they were written 
and painted. 

Of printed books, early editions of the classics, unless in ex- 
ceptionally good condition, are no longer in great demand, and 
this, with few exceptions, applies to the modern classics as well 
as to the ancient. In England, indeed, everything is collected; 
but in France, which country sets the fashion, so far as there is 
a fashion in books as in other things, the taste of the day runs to 
the pretty illustrated books of the eighteenth century, and to the 
ugly but extremely enrious first editions of the poets, whom 
Gautier classed as " The Grotesques." Villon, Maron, and their 
like, Boileau, Racine, Corneille, sell for a song. On the other 
hand, the first editions of several living authors, and of others re- 
cently deceased, are being collected by people who doubtless ex- 
pect that their favorites will enjoy a longer lease of glory than 
the great men of the past. The fac-simile reprints of scarce edi- 
tions of authors still in vogue, which are put forth by many pub- 
lishers in this country and in England, meet with a ready sale, 
but show little tendency as yet to advance in price. Limited 
editions of new books fare about the bame. But certain fine 
editions of standard authors, illustrated with a luxury of color 
printing hitherto hardly dreamed of, are certain to grow more 
valuable in course of time. The processes used in preparing their 
illustrations are new, are being improved from day to day, and 
occupy at present a large proportion of the best talent that is put 
into book printing. These editions, therefore, will in the future 
be valuable as the earliest specimens of a new art, and will bring 
prices correspondingly high. 



TO San Francisco is constantly being added fame on account of 
the acknowledged excellence of the goods of many of her 
tradesmen. None have done more to aid the city in this manner 
than P. F. McNulty, the popular shoemaker of 222 Post street, 
above Grant avenue. Mr. McNulty was formerly with Thomas, 
of London, and he makes the best shoes in town. 

Tlie artotypes which have formed an artistic and popular feature 
of the News Letter for some years past, are from the ateliers of 
Bolion, Strong & Co., the well-known engravers and plate-makers, 
of 430 Pine street. This firm has the reputation, gained by years of 
excellent work, of being unrivaled in its own particular line. All the 
work it turns out is artistically perfect. 

One of the best tailors in the city is Colonel J. M. Litchfield, of 12 
Post street. His suits are not equaled by those of any other estab- 
lishment in town, for he is a master of the sartorial art, and always 
does his work in an admirable manner. He makes a specialty of 
uniforms and regalias, and does a large business with all uniformed 
societies. 



Laundry Farm is fast becoming one of the most popular pleasure 
resorts in the vicinity of the city. It is visited daily by many people, 
who find great pleasure in its many beauties. Itis reached by way 
of the California Railway, and is only an hour and fifteen minutes 
from this city and forty minutes from Oakland. 

The Maison Riche, at the corner of Geary street and Grant 
avenue, is the most popular restaurant in the city among people who 
enjoy good dinners. It enjoys the patronage of the 6lite 




THE BRENTWOOD- 



O. F. WILLEY & CO., 

ESTABLISHED 18S5. 

Carriage Builders and Dealers, 

317 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, S. F. 

Agency for Brewster & Co., New York (of Broome St.); 
Henry Hooker & Co., New Haven, Conn.; C. S. Caffrey Co., 
Camden, N, J.; Henry Killam Co., New Haven, Conn.; Mil- 
lion Guiet & Cie, Paris, France; H, H. Babeoek Co., Water- 
town, N. Y. ; New Haven Carriage Co., New Haven, Conn.; 
Ohio Buggy Co., Columbus, O. 



Jul* 



[892 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER. 



TENNIS AND BASEBALL. 



TENNIS Q '* ^ ^APAKL looks very gay. The games this year 
O promise lo be very well contested, as the play t< 
are pretty nearly all on a par with each other. The hotel la full 
of players, and the audience promises to be a very large one. On 
Wednesday most of the delegates went over, and the Tourna- 
ment Committee, consisting of Haslett. Haigbt and Wilberforce, 
held the drawing. The games commenced yesterday morning at 
10:30 o'clock, and will be finished to-morrow. The champion- 
ship round will be played Monday, beginning at 2 o'clock. It is 
much to be regretted that Ogden HotTman will not be able to at- 
tend. He was sent away on business and cannot possibly enter. 
He was looked upon as a probable winner, and his absence will 
be a great disappointment lo bis many admirers. The same may 
be said of G. V. Gray, who will also be absent. C. P. Hubbard, 
Joe Tobin, W. H. Taylor, Jr., and Sam Keel leave for the East 
directly after the tournament. They will probably be seen at 
some of the Eastern games, and many are the conjectures as to 
how our players will compete with the Eastern cracks. It is un- 
likely that they will be here for the September meeting, so some 
of the younger players will stand a good chance of winning the 
doubles on Admission Day. I understand that Bates will enter 
the doubles with Carr Keel, and they will certainly make a very 
strong pair. H. H. Haigbt will loose his partner, so there will 
be no championship round and the runners up will hold the cup. 
Hubbard's departure will also lose the three months cup at the 
California Club for him, as the next meeting will be toward the 
end of the month. 

Last Sunday the San Rafael courts were well patronized, and 
quite a crowd went down from the hotel to witness the practice 
games. H. H. H. Collier was quite a hero, and C. R. Yates, the 
" war correspondent " of the Field Sports, remarked that he would 
give some of the olderplayers quite a hard time. G. B. de Long, 
J. A. Code, A. Carrigan, A. J. Treat and Allison also gave some 
interesting sport to the many spectators. 

From news received from abroad, I understand that Ernest 
Renshaw is in excellent trim, and the betting in in his favor, to 
win the all-England championship. I also understand that Miss 
Dud is the favorite, while for the doubles no one at present seems 
to know who will come out ahead. The brothers Badderly, after 
their defeat in Ireland, are not looked upon with much favor. 

Last week, in speaking of the likely winners, I put Hubbard, 
O. Hoffman, Bates and Sam. Neel in for the semi-finals. I now 
think, unless the draw changes the aspect of things, that Sam. 
Neel will come out winner of the all-comers. He has lately been 
playing one of the finest games of the season, and, provided his 
constituiion does not give way, I think he is the most likely to 
combat with Taylor for the title. Alec. B. Wilberforce. 



BASEBALL r P^-^ Oakland team surprised every one last 
" 1 week, by defeating San Jose in the series. All 
the games played were good, with the exception of that played 
last Saturday, wherein the Oaklanders acted like a nine of ama- 
teurs. The club, however, made up for it the next day, by field- 
ing and batting like well-seasoned veterans. The home 
team was also fortunate in capturing the series from 
Los Angeles. All the clubs, except the Oaklands, are 
now very close together. With the exception of Tuesday, games 
will be played every day next week. Should the Oaklands win 
all the games the club plays in, which is not now so improbable, 
as the team is playing good ball, it would put the club well up in 
the race. The Los Angeles team discovered an amateur named 
Strong in Los Angeles, and, as an experiment, gave him a trial 
with the most satisfactory results. As it is the sense of the league 
directors that the double championship would be advantageous 'o 
the league here, it will probably be adopted this winter. 

The Oaklands and San Franciscos will play in this city to- 
morrow afternoon, and also this afternoon and Monday after- 
noon. The new season will probably commence during the latter 
part of this month. 



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HIGHLAND 




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A CULINARY ARTICLE, 

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infants. HIGHLAND EVAPORATED CREAM is simply cows 
milk in an improved form and is the ideal food for infants. 
Sold by Grocers and Druggists Everywhere. 
Write for our Infant Food circular and Highland 
Evaporated Cream booklet entitled "A Few Dainty Dishes." 

HELVETIA MILK CONDENSING CO., 
Sole Purveyors, Highland, Ils. 



"WOLIEPIE'S 
SCHIEDAM AROMATIC SCHNAPPS. 



Used in Millions of Homes — 40 years the Standard. | 



AN OLD MEDICINE REVIVED. 

In days of yore, as we have all learued from the old folks, no medicine 
was so useful to have in the house, or so good iu many diseases, as Pure 
Holland Gin. For a long time, however, the genuine article could not be 
had, until it had appeared under the new name of Aromatic Schiedam 
Schuapps. The article is manufactured exclusively by Udolpho Wolfe, at 
Schiedam, in Holland aud put up in small and large bottles expressly for 
medicinal purposes, with his name on the seal, botile, and label, to protect 
it against counterfeits What a great blessing it is for persons residing in 
the interior of our Southern and Western States that they can now pur- 
chase a pure and u -adulterated article of tin with confidence, without 
the least liability of decep'inn or dissatisfaction. That it will tend to di- 
minish the consumption of the common deleterious and spurious liquors 
which now almost exclusively pervade this country, admits of no doubt. 
We consider the medical profession aud the traveling community are un- 
der obligations to Mr. Wolfe. 

To insure, however, obtainiug the renuine article, ask for Wolfe's Schie- 
dam Aromatic Schnapps and look for the legitimate trade-mark— W. A. S. 
For sale by all Druggists, Grocers and Liquor dealers. 

ZISKA INSTITUTE, 

1606 Van Ness Avenue. 

French, German and English Day and Boarding School for young 
ladies and children. 
A refined home with the best educational advantages. 

Next Term opens August 1, 1893. 

MME. B. ZISKA, M. A., Principal. 
MR. ASHTON P. STEVENS, 

TEACHBB OP BANJO. 
Studio— 26 Montgomery Street, Room 8. 

ALFRED J. KELLEHER, 

Professor of VOCAL MUSIC AT MILLS' COLLEGE (18th year), desires 
to announce that he will give Lessons at his office, his residence, or at the 
residence of the pupil. 

Office— 14 Grant avenue, rooms 62 aud 63. Residence— 2324 Clay street, 
San Francisco. 

liar da Vocal Method. Solfeggio Panseron. 

MRS. R. G. LEWIS, 

FORMERLY OF THURLOW BLOCK, 



HiS REMOVED TO 



531 SUTTER STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 



CELIA AND ONE DAN CUPID.— From Harper's Bazaar. 

Celia caught young Love one day — 

Stole the fellow's bow; 
All his arrows hid away, 

Left him full of woe. 

Then she dried poor Cupid's tears; 

And when this was done, 
Told him modern cavaliers 

Used the Gatling-gun — 

Gun that shoots a thousand shots 

While the bow shoots two; 
Strikes a thousand fatal spots 

With an aim half true, 

"Bows and arrows," Celia said, 

"Long are out of style, 
Danny, use the gun instead" — 

Maiden fall of guile ! 

Cupid must have minded then, 

For in two short years 
Lovely Celia's had quite ten 

Doven cavaliers. 



THE DEVIL'S LIBRARY. 



AN old-time catalogue, in a New York Library, of " the most 
valuable books relating to the Devil, his origin, greatness and 
influence," contains the titles of over five hundred volumes, and 
does not presume to be complete. It is introduced by the motto, 
"Fools deride — Philosophers investigate," and by four motto 
verses, including the fine epigram by Defoe: 

Bad as he is, the Devil may be abused, 
Be falsely charged and causelessly accused, 
When men unwilling to be blamed alone. 
Shift off those Crimes on Him which are their own. 

A series of introductory illustrations show the Devil as he has 
been variously delineated by various races. The Egyptian Devil 
seems to have been a cross between a dog and a hog, walking on 
his hind legs with the assistance of a staff. The Assyrian has a 
lion's body with wings, a scaly neck and a dragon's head with 
horns. The Cingalese Satan has two heads with tusks, four arms, 
sits on a colt and has venomous snakes climbing all over him. 
The French is the first of the old Devils to exhibit the combined 
traits so familiar to us now. He has horns, the ears of an ass, a 
goat's tail and rooster's claws, but his body and head are human, 
with bat's wings growing from the shoulders. This enemy of 
man is shown in the cut to be grinning in a most malig- 
nant and diabolical manner, and scattering gold around to tempt 
his victims within the clutches of his claws. But Beelzebub has 
been represented in other and far more polite forms. There is a 
print from the illustrations of Goethe's " Faust," which shows 
him as a courtly gentleman, elegant in dress and polished in 
manners. It seems as if mankind, as it advanced in refinement, 
improved its great foe as it has improved, or at least refined, the 
vices with which it pays him tribute. Thus, in the thirteenth 
century, the English Devil was a horrible monster, with the dis- 
torted body of a man, the horned head of a bull, a docked tail 
like a hackney horse, only three fingers and toes on each ex- 
tremity, spikes at its knees and shins like the spurs of a game- 
cock. 

By Thomas Landseer's time, however, the artist had elevated 
him to a quite genteel sort of person, with a sardonic leer, but 
good clothes and an unblemished anatomy. Landseer— the 
brother of Sir Edwin, it should be stated— once made ten etchings, 
called "The Devil's Walk," which are very rare and valuable. 
The most industrious and extensive of all artistic glorifiers of his 
Satanic Majesty, however, has been George Cruikshank. That 
ingenious draughtsman has pictured him in every conceivable 
form, as long as it was hateful, for he has always been too con- 
scientious to paint the Devil as an attractive being. " The True 
Legend of St. Dunstan and the Devil" is one of Cruikshank's 
most humorous works, and his " Gentleman in Black " is almost 
inimitable, as far as the unique grotesqueness of the plates is 
concerned. The catalogue contains a choice assortment of 
proverbs applying to the ruler of the infernal regions. All are 
quaint and some are very curious indeed. Thus, one tells us 
"The Devil is good when he is pleased," another that "Satan 
is all Christianity," and another still that " the Devil is ever 
God's ape." " 'Tis a sin to belie the Devil." "An idle 
brain is the Devil's workshop," " Idle men are the Devil's 
playfellows," " What is gotten over the Devil's back is 
spent under his belly," "It's an ill battle when the Devil 
carries the colors," >< He must have a long spoon that must eat 
with the Devil," " Where God builds a church, there the Devil 
builds a chapel," and " Hell and chancery are always open," are 
some odd sayings. Odder still are: "The Devil's meal is half 
bran," "Seldom lies the Devil dead in a ditch," and "Hell is use- 
less to the sages, but necessary to the blind populace;" which 
latter is a very true and philosophic statement indeed. These 
are only a few of their kind, n Hell's prince, sly parent of revolt 



and lies," is one of many names applied to him. " Fear made 
the Devils, and weak hope the gods," and "The Devil 
tempts all, but the idle tempt the Devil," are among the state- 
ments laid down in these wise saws. One tells us, » Resist the 
Devil and he will flee from you;" and another, " He that takes 
the Devil into his boat must carry him over the sound." It is 
unpleasant to reflect that » Hell is wherever heaven is not," but 
the proverb says it is, and of course it must be so. A verse by 
an old English writer tells us 

The Devil 
Is civil 
And mighty polite, 
For he knows 
That it pays, 
And he judges men right; 
So beware 
And take care 
Or your hair he will singe; 
And moil you, 
And soil you. 
And cause you to twinge. 
Better poetry, though no better sense, is the following, by 
Hone : 

Good people all, who deal with the Devil, 

Be warned now by what I say, 
His credit's long and his tongue is civil, 
But you'll have the Devil to pay. 

Other works of a mirthful character are: " A Sure Guide to 
Hell, by Beelzebub; "The Praise of Hell— or a View of the In- 
fernal Regions; its antiquity, situation and stability, manners, 
customs, etc.;" "The Devil in America; a dramatic Satire;" 
" The Devil's Mushrooms," which a Pope is alleged to have eaten ; 
" A Pleasant Historie; How a Devil (named Rush) came to a Re- 
ligions House to Seeke a Service" — which is described as » being 
full of pleasant mirth and delight for the people, and an appendix 
to the " Sure Guide to Hell," " beinga vindication of the common 
practice of cursing and swearing, by Belial." " The Devil's Mem- 
orandum Book" was published in London in 1832. It had eighty 
illustrations, mostly caricature portraits of public characters. In 
1831 was published " The Devil's Walk," a poem, by 8. T. Cole- 
ridge and Robert Southey, the first verse in which reads: 

From his brimstone bed at break of day, 

A- walking the Devil is gone, 
To visit his snug little farm on earth, 
And see how his stock goes on. 
This work was illustrated by Landseer. — The Collector. 



ON the Palace Hotel register, a few days ago, appeared the 
name "Jonathan Chace, Rhode Island." Very few people recog- 
nized him as " the Quaker Senator " who succeeded the vener- 
able Anthony at Washington, and resigned before his term was 
out. He still wears the same Quaker cut coat and a hat that ap- 
proximates orthodoxy, but he very seldom uses "thee" and 
" thou " in ordinary conversation. When he first appeared in 
Washington he asked a friend if his Quaker language was likely 
to hamper his success in the Senate, but he afterward discovered 
that there were other Senators whose language possessed more 
striking peculiarities than his. When asked point blank why he 
resigned the Senatorship, be frankly said: " I think three years 
quite enough time for any one to waste in that body." Mr. Chace 
is not a millionaire. 



Little lord Fduotleroy^ 

Quaker rtoiLEfl White Oats i 




July 2, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A SONG OF YOUTH. -rVirW Swtt Mint*. 

Laughed the youth. •• Love's silken chain 

Hath no charm for me 
When the whole world I may gain — 
Life is Love." quoth he. 
•• Love is blinding," cried the youth, 
•• From Love's altar fires 
Rises smoke that shuts out Truth, 
Hides Life's high desires. 

" Daphne of the woodland shrine, 

Phyllis of the field. 
Seek to woo witn arts divine, 

But to none I yield." 
Eros first laughed at his words, 

Then the god grew wroth, 
Like the whir of huruming-birds 

Sped the arrow forth. 
When Hypatia of the school 

Taught philosophy, 
Bent the youth before her stool, 

For her love prayed he. 
Like a bird with broken wings, 

Which dares not to move, 
Listened he to abstract things, 

Life bereft of Love. 
" Love is life," the poor youth prayed, 
" All the world thou art," 
While the fair Platonic maid 

Smiled, but owned no heart. 

Eros laughed. " This is the cure 
Of the gods," cried he. 
" Who thinks Love does not endure 
Finds philosophy." 

AS SEEN BY FRENCH EYES. 



IT is ODly natural that "the course of true love never rang 
1 smooth." Venus was the daughter of the waves, and also 
the mother of Love. What but tempest can he expected from 
the daughter of the sea? 



THE Gaulois recently began an article on the question of the 
corset by announcing that one whole State of North America 
"after a deliberation of all the medical authorities" has just pro- 
scribed the use of the corset. " By supreme authority all corsets ac- 
tually existing have been burned in the public squares. The American 
women consented to this sacrifice with charming good humor; and, 
our American confrere adds, to look at them you would not know 
the difference." 

The Washington correspondent of the Journal des Debais has pro- 
duced the following paragraph from his perplexed studies of the 
Brigg's controversy: '* The Consistory of New York, before whom 
Dr. Briggs had been prosecuted for heresy by the Seminary of Prince- 
ton, has declared the great Professor of the Seminary of the Union 
innocent. But the Seminary of Princeton does not easily let go its 
hold, and Dr. Patton intends appealing from this decision. Now it 
appears that Dr. Patton is himself guilty of heresy, the crime with 
which he so harshly reproaches his rival. In his lessons to the Sem- 
inarists he confided to them that he was sure that Socrates and 
Plato would be found in the number of the blessed on the last day." 

The same writer gives his readers information concerning our fete 
days: "Thanksgiving day is a solemn festival everywhere in the 
United States. Factories are shut up, shops are closed, and even the 
post refuses to deliver. At 2 o'clock in the afternoou there appears 
on every table, because of a tradition, a roast turkey of the biggest, 
as the substantial dish. For bread they eat toasted maize, for drink 
they have cider, and for dessert pumpkin tartlets. Thus wills cus- 
tom and thus prescribes the proclamation of the President of the 
United States. This Presidential command is always received with 
satisfaction by the pietists and the other citizens who love to cele- 
brate on that day the anniversary of the landing on the coast of 
Massachusetts of the Pilgrims driven from England to embark on 
board the Mayflower." 

THERE was an interesting discovery of remains of mammoths 
and other prehistoric animals, under the streets in the heart of 
London, lately. Workmen who were excavating the streets for 
sewerage works, came upon the remains at a depth of twenty- 
two feet below the surface. Two large tusks of a mammoth were 
first discovered among a pile of bones, probably of the same 
animal. The tusks were broken, but when complete they meas- 
ured between nine and ten feet in length, and one piece was 
nearly two feet in circumference. About fifteen feet away from 
these remains the lower jaw and other bones of a younger mam- 
moth were found. Other unclassified bones were also found. It 
is said to be evident that the animals died at the place where the 
remains were discovered. It is highly interesting to contrast 
what must have been the appearance of the scene when these 
mammoths were grazing on London's site with the appearance of 
the same spot to-day. 

John W. Carmany, of 25 Kearny street, has taken in a full stock 
of the very latest and most fashionable summer goods in men's 
furnishings. 



Marion Harland, 

Author of "Common Sense 
in the Household," writes, 
February 5, 1S92 : "After 
long and careful trial 
of others, I prefer 

(igYelantfs 

BakingPowder. Cleveland's 
is a pure cream of tartar and 
soda mixture, not containing 
alum or ammonia or any 
other substance deleterious 
to the human stomach." 

F. H. AMES .t IO„ Agents. 



HAVE YOU GOT 

Dyspepsia, Bright's Disease, or Dia- 
betes, or do you want a pleasant, 
healthful drink? If so, buy 

ARCADIAN WAUKESHA WATER, 

Recommended by our best physi- 
cians as the healthiest drink on earth. 
Johnson- Locke Mercantile Company 
Agents, 204 Front St., S. F. 

CALIFORNIA FIREWORKS CO., Ld., 

ESTABLISHED 1860. 

Manufacturers and Dealers iu all Descriptions of 

Fireworks, Firecrackers, Flags, Balloons, 

Torpedoes, Campaign Goods, Etc. 

Special attention giveu to getting up exhibitions for Fourth of July or 
the campaign. 

CALIFORNIA FIREWORKS CO., Ld., 

Only Manufacturers on the Pacific Coast, 
Office and Salesrooms, 221 Front Street, Up- stairs. 

LOUIS CAHEN & SON, 

Rectifiers of Spirits and Wholesale Liquor Dealers- 
Manufacturers of Syrups, Bitters, Cordials, etc. 
Pacific Coast /gents Bethesda Mineral Water. 

418 Sacramento Street, S. F. 
LAVER, MULLANY & LAVER, 

ARCHITECTS, 

Furnish plans, specifications, and Superintendence for the construction 
or renovation of dwelling houses, and every description of building. 
Office : 93 Flood Building, Cor. 4th and market Sis.. S. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 




1 We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



THE announcement made by Mr. Chas. H. Hoyt, of farce- 
comedy fame, tbat the report of bis having been a delegate 
to the Minneapolis nominating convention must have been false 
for two conclusive reasons: 1st, that he was not elected; 2nd, 
that he is a consistent and life-long Democrat, reminds one of the 
" report" sent in by the honest committeemen of a country town 
to explain why they did not fire a salute in honor of General 
Grant's arrival at the local " deppo." " We did not fire a salute," 
wrote the village wiseacres solemnly, " for thirteen good and 
sufficient reasons. First, we had no powder." The other twelve 
reasons are unrecorded. The first, like Mr. Hoyt's, seemed pretty 
nearly satisfactory. 

As a personal gratification, however, I am glad that Mr. Hoyt 
has put himself upon record as a good Democrat. Such a leaven 
of virtue may save even a farce-comedy creator from everlasting 
perdition. 

» » * 

The mention of Mr. Hoyt's name in connection with politics, 
though through a mistake of the reliable reporter, calls up a 
reminiscence of a well-known actor-politician of early days in 
Sacramento, and equally well known in this city in his profes- 
sional capacity. Few old-timers will not recall the pleasant and 
always youthful and debonair face and figure of J. H. Warwick. 
In the late fifties Mr. Warwick was a member of the famous 
stock company of the old Metropolitan Theatre (the building was 
torn down to make way for Montgomery avenue) when Edwin 
Booth, as well as his older brother " June" and his wife Agnes, 
were among the regular company. Warwick was extremely pop- 
ular as a Bohemian, though a very domestic married man; and, 
although by no means as great an. actor as he thought himself 
(is any one?) yet a thoroughly reliable all-round actor, and well 
liked on the stage. His rattle-brained, good-natured fellows were 
fond of poking fun at an actor who, a more rare characteristic 
then than now, had social and political aspirations, dressed nat- 
tily and neatly, and had, in fact, a life off the stage as well as on 
it. Among these stories, one of the 'best known to old-timers is 
that of spoiling Warwick's speech on his benefit night. In those 
days the actor who wished to capture a Californian audience, 
used to declare his intention of remaining among us as a perma- 
nency, instead of gathering in our dollars (twenties then) and 
"going back home" to spend them — a custom duplicated in 
these days of traveling companies by the gushing " So glad to be 
back again in dear San Francisco." " Tempore " and " Mores" 
may alike " mutantur" but human nature is always the same. It 
seems that Warwick's peculiar way of assuring Californians that 
he had come here to stay was to declare that he expected " to 
lay his bones in California." So often had this fetching phrase 
figured in this actor's before tbe-curtain speeches, that it had 
passed into a by-word behind the scenes. On the special occa- 
sion mentioned, Warwick was "spreading himself " to an en- 
thusiastic audience, and seemed about to wind up with a graceful 
and climactic peroration, when a sepulchral voice, evidently pro- 
jected through one of the " peep-holes " in the curtain, resounded 
through the theatre, and laid out the orator and his speech to- 
gether: "Don't forget your bones, Warwick; don't forget your 
bones 1 " 

I can't say whether Warwick fled or joined iu the laugh prob- 
ably the latter. 

* * * 

After Mr. Warwick became a fixed resident of Sacramento his 
popularity led to his being nominated and triumphantly elected 
to represent that district in the State Legislature. He proved an 
excellent legislator, and was several times returned. In fact, his 
professional career became merged in his political success, and he 
was to a great extent lost to the stage. He may be alive yet, for 
aught I know, and still figuring somewhere in the antipodes, ac- 
cording to stage precedent, as "the sterling young actor, J. H. 
Warwick. '' 

# # # 

The most notable event of the coming week will be the open- 
ing of Stockwell's new theatre, Thursday evening, July 7th. All 
who have visited the theatre during the present week have ex- 
pressed amazement at the transformation affected, and unquali- 
fied admiration for every arrangement and appointment. The 
loge boxes in the centre are a feature of the auditorium, their 
railings of white and gold, and the harmony of coloring in their 
upholstering making a most attractive break in the usual monot- 
ony of seating arrangement. Tbe proscenium boxes are equally 
graceful in style, the drapery and upholstering being in an artistic 
mingling of peacock blue and orange red, the latter giving the 
needed warmth to the prevailing delicacy of coloring. A less con- 
spicuous, but even more satisfactory feature, is seen in the facili- 
ties for ventilation, one point of which is peculiar co this theatre. 
A large iron flue leading to the top of the building conveys away 
ali the foul air, which is drawn by means of an electric fan 



through a grating in the main aisle. The appliances for the in- 
stantaneous working of colored lights, the system of call-bells, 
and all other accessories of a first-class modern theatre, are the 
best " up to date." Most of the salient features of construction 
and finish have been already described in this column: but a 
close inspection reveals many admirable novelties which would 
be of interest did space admit their description. The foyer will 
contain three genuine works of art — a handsome piece of sculp- 
ture in bronze, placed in a broad marble niche, a large and costly 
vase of elegant proportions, and an oil painting, valued at $650, 
Mr. Stockwell, with excellent taste, preferring quality to quan- 
tity in the adornment of the entrance to his theatre. 

The opening attraction is worthy of the house. Augustin Daly's 
company needs no advertising, and its rendering of As You Like 
It, the opening-night piece, has made it doubly famous in England 
as well as in this country. Thursday evening will, doubtless, 
see Stockwell's crowded with as brilliant an audience as ever filled 
a theatre in San Francisco. The auction sale of choice of seats 
was set for Thursday last, too late for its result to be noted here 
this week, but from tbe previous indications the sale must have 
given a flattering assurance of future popularity. 

* # • 

Even in farce-comedy there are degrees of offense, ranging from 
a mere misdemeanor down to positive crime. McCarthy's Mishaps, 
which has been disgracing the Bush for a week past, is indictable 
on the latter count. From the disgusting make-up of the princi- 
pal to the painfully eleborate " working up to the curtain" at the 
end of each act, the performance is coarse almost to the point of 
indecency. Even tbe really clever dancing of two young Fergu- 
sons, boy and girl, is divested of any possible enjoyableness by 
the unpleasant precocity of tbe children, and the still more un- 
pleasant conviction tbat they should be in a better school. That 
the Bush has been fairly filled all tje week, and that laughter 
and applause have not been lacking, proves not that the piece is 
better, but that the popular taste is worse. Any one who fan- 
cies, for example, that the repulsive acrobatic feat of Ferguson 
and his accessory is funny, should be put on a course of Dickens 
and Jos. Jefferson to learn what humor means. Mr. Ferguson 
" points with pride" to tbe fact that he has played the part of 
McCarthy 1,500 times in Europe and America. In this admission 
he pleads guilty to 1,500 charges of crime against good taste and 
genuine humor, and makes himself a subject for the extradition 
laws of both countries. 

# * * 

Deny it a? he may, every one enjoys a minstrel show, and the 
nearer it comes to the old-fashioned original, with its end-men 
and interlocutor, its plantation darkies and its tuneful balladist, 
the more it is enjoyed. The company which has made the name 
of Col. J. H. Haverly known in the land has preserved all the 
old minstrel characteristics, with enough "new features" for 
advertising purposes. It will be at the Bush for Fourth of July 
week, opening at a holiday matinee on Monday next. Mr. Wm. 
J. Block, representing Haverly's Minstrels, has been in town for 
the last week, preparing for the two weeks' engagement here, 
which will be under Col. Haverly's personal direction, Wm. Foote, 
manager. 

# # * 

Charlie Reed's name is one to conjure with in San Francisco. 
His new piece, IIoss and Hoss, is sure to have the characteristics of 
tbe funny little comedian, prominent among which are a quaint, ir- 
resistible drollery and unqualified wholesomeness. No one ever 
saw a coarse situation or heard an unpleasant suggestion in Charlie 
Reed's broadest absurdity and fun. William Collier portrays an 
original character, that of a country Judge, and Charlie Reed will 
practice in his " co't." Arthur Moulton is still with the com- 
pany, which he leaves after this season to travel with his own 
play, and there are plenty of catchy songs, pretty girls, and light- 
heeled dancers in the company. IIoss and Hoss opens a two- 
weeks' season at the California, July 4th. 

* * * 

Francis Wilson and The Lion Tamer at the Baldwin, and Natural 
Gas at the California, have continued to attract large audiences. 
Next week will be the last of Francis Wilson's six-weeks' en- 
gagement at the Baldwin, which, for its length, has made a re- 
markably sustained success in a town which, like San Francisco, 
can generally exhaust its patronage of one attraction in two 
weeks, or four at furthest. After Mr. Wilson, July 11th, comes 
Qloriana, with Chas. B'roh man's company. 
» # * 

The excellence of the Tivoli production of the melodious and 
ever-popular Bohemian Girl has been a surprise to music-lovers, 
and the bouse has been packed all the week. Belle Thome has 
not only a good voice but sings well, and Arthur Messmer's 
pleasing tenor is heard to advantage in the duets between Thad- 
deus and Arline. The well-known songs are ail encored more 
than once, and the graceful serpentine dance of Miss Julie Kings- 
ley in tbe second act seems to delight the audience almost out of 
its good manners, so often is she obliged to return. Next week 
Suppe's Clover will be produced for the first time here, beginning 
July 4th. Tillie Salinger will return from her vacation, and will 



July 2, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



be very welome. Liltle Grade riaisted. whose recent severe 
illness caused serioas alarm to her friends, will also appear in 
Ctottr. Beside being an artist. Oracie is a brave little woman. 
On the evening when she was attacked with the illness from 
which she has since mffered, Mr. Kreling insisted on ringing 
down the curtain, but she resolutely refused to allow it, and went 
through her part with a spirit and fortitude which a strong man 
might be proud to emulate. She attended the Clover rehearsal on 
Monday, and declares herself able to take part in the coming pro- 
duction. Everyone will be glad to see her restored to health. 

THE DIVORCE DISCUSSION. 



THE discussion in the daily press as to the causes leading to the 
frequency of divorces, is becoming a IriSe wearisome. The 
origin of the trouble is a natural one, inherent to humanity. In 
a measure the French may be right, that » there is nothing 
in love but what we imagine." There is certainly too much 
imagination about the love tnat leads to many marriages. With 
such, marriage is a romance until the book is open. The 
preface may be amusing to some, but it never lasts long, and it 
is always deceptive. Unhappily, there is within us all, too, an 
obstacle to perfect happiness. This is weariness of the things we 
possess, and the desire for the things we have not. So long as 
the civil law recognizes divorce, and human nature remains un- 
changed, there will be divorce suits. To make decrees more diffi- 
cult to secure might discourage many suits. Toe English under- 
stand this, and do it better than we do. Justice Maule brought 
this out in lecturing a prisoner convicted of bigamy, and who 
offered in extenuation the plea that bis wife had taken up with 
a hawker, and run away five years before, that be never saw her 
again and then married again. » I will tell you what you ought 
to have done," said the Justice, " and if yon say you did not know, 
I must tell you that the law conclusively presumes that you did. 
You ought to have instructed your attorney to bring an action 
against the hawker for criminal conversation with your wife. 
That would have cost you about £100. When you had recovered 
substantial damages against the hawker, you should have in- 
structed your proctor to sue in the Ecclesiastical Courts for di- 
vorce a mensii et tkoro. That would have cost you £200 or £300 
more. When you had obtained a divorce a mensa et tkoro, you 
would have had to appear by counsel before the House of Lords 
for a divorce a vineulo matrimonii. The bill might have been op- 
posed in all its stages in both Houses of Parliament, and alto- 
gether you would have had to spend about £1,000 or £1 ,200. This 
system, so well outlined by the sarcastic Justice, is a little hard 
on the poor, upon whom the matrimonial yoke bears heavily, 
but the California system is entirely too easy and lax. To strip 
divorce proceedings of the privacy which the law now sanctions, 
would be a step in the right direction. It would serve as a dis- 
couragement in many of the most disgraceful cases now brought 
before the courts. 

THE King of Denmark often visits Hamburg unexpectedly, and 
when there tries to preserve bis incognito. During his last 
visit, some days ago, he bought several golden-wedding presents 
for the Queen. One shop-keeper was rather taken aback when 
his unexpected customer, after several purchases, said that he had 
not enough money with him to pay for them. Could they be 
sent to the Hotel de l'Europe ? The shopkeeper immediately 
thought of all sorts of fashionable swindlers and cheats, and his 
embarassment amused the King exceedingly. One of the hotel 
officials was at last summoned by telephone, and things were 
made right. At the theatre in Hamburg the King forgot to pay 
the woman in the cloakroom, and she modestly reminded him of 
the fee. The King excused himself, and remarked that at home 
he was always free from these taxes. The woman received a 
much larger sum than the usual fee from the King's aide-de-camp. 
Recognized by a restaurant keeper in a modest seat in the crowded 
restaurant, the landlord offered him a private room, but the King 
sensibly refused, saying he felt quite comfortable among the Ham- 
burg citizens. 

Pomraery versus Fommery. 

Accordingto the Courier de la Champagne of Reims, the Tribunal of 
Commerce has just rendered its decision in the celebrated case of 
Pommery against Pommery. During the proceedings the facts were 
elicited that the syndicate had been formed after the discovery of 
one Veuve Louis Pommery, solely for the purpose of profiting by the 
name of this person at the expense of the well-known house of Veuve 
Pommery, Fils & Co., and the eminent wine bearing that firm's name, 
and that none of the defendants ever had been engaged in the manu- 
facturing of champagne. The judgment against the defendants is ex- 
plicit against in its findings, and severe. They are prohibited from 
dealing in champagne wines under the name of " Veuve Pommery" 
or " Veuve Louis Pommery," and the judgment ordains, besides 
the forfeiture of the deposit made by the defendants in the office of the 
clerk of the Tribunal ot Commerce on the 10th of July, 1891, it also au- 
thorizes the house of Veuve Pommery, Fils & Co. to have inserted in 
the margin of the certificate of deposit the terms of the judgment refer- 
ring to said forfeiture, at the expense of the defendants. Lastly, it 
mulcts the syndicate of defendants and discoverers of Mme. Louis 
Pommery to 8,000 francs damages for dishonest and wrongful com peti- 
tion, and orders the publication of the judgment in ten newspapers. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Al. H»yman A Co Proprietor!. I Alfkki> Booms. Manager. 

nn T. ;.'}'ru\"v','w ;'vi," iL 'v' ' T" =rl«y Matin,.,.. Positively lul «r< 
one ol 1 RANI i.n WLL80N and Company's jreal oomlo opera, 

THE LION TAMER. 

ChalTcJ 110 Circ " sSoc " ' Bounding Brothers, Clms Parade, Great BcenlC 

iw™'n "'" ti'°t H"V, m A "'"'"" s «'eeds." "Poor Tonio," "A Bold 
Uragoon, "The Isle of Lilhpotn. ' 



THE BUSH STREET THEATRE. 



M.B.LuiviTT Proprietor. I Chas. P. Hall Manager. 

Q»nd Holiday Attraction I Monday, July 4, 1892. The record or the 
past a guarantee for the future. 

HAVERLY'S MASTODON MINSTRELS, 

From HAVERLY'S CASINO, Chicago, under the personal direction of 
J. H. Haverly. The Prem-er Minstrel Organization of the World. 

Matinees Wednesday and Saturday. 

Extra Matinee Monday, July 4th. 

NEXT WEEK.- Haverly's Mastodon Minstrels in an entire change of 
programme. 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

AlHaymaniSi Co Proprietors. | J. J. Gotti.ob Manager. 

Beginning Monday evening, July 4th. "The Kings of Fun." REED ami 
< ol.lll.lt. in the funniest of all Farcical Entertainments, 

'•HOSS AND HOSSI" 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Keeling Bros Proprietors and Managers. 

To-night. One week only. Balfe's melodious opera, 

THE BOHEMIAN GIRL I 

Also MISS JULIA KINGSLEY in her Great Serpentine Dance. 
Monday, July 4 Hi, •> I i,o VEK ! " 

Popular Prices 26c. and 50c. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Fred C. Whitney Lessee and Manager. 

Every evening at 8:15. .Saturday matinee at 2 p. m. Last Week of IMM TOK 
t'AKVEK and his phenomenal. y successful WILD AMERICA COMPANY 
presenting the most realistic western play of this decade, 

THE SCOUT. 

Popular Prices— 15c to $1. 

STOCKWELL'S THEATRE. 

L. R. Stockwell Lessee and Proprietor. 

Alf Ellinghouse Business Manager. 

: The Most Magnificent and Perfectly Equipped Play- : 
bouse lu America. 

Inaugurating THURSD A.Y EVENING, JULY 7 ; Dedicating with AUGUS- 
11N DALY'S COMPANY In 

AS YOU LIKE IT! 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday matinee aud Saturday evening. 

Every performance under the personal direction of AUGUSTIN DALY. 

WEEK of Monday, July 11. Every evening (Sunday excepted), Matinee 
Saturday, Me. DALY'S Comedy, THE LAST WOKD I 
PRICES. 

Orchestra and Dress Circle $2 00 

Balcony $2, Jl 50 and 1 00 

Gallery Reserved 50 

Boxes (according to location) $15, 512 and 10 00 

General Admission l 00 

Gallery Admission 50 

Regular Sale of seats commences Saturday, July 2, 9 a.m., at Sherman, 
Clay & Co.'s, Sutter and Kearuy streets. 




FINE DIAMONDS, 

Gold and Silver Watches. 

The newest designs in jew- 
ellery of first quality only, at 
very reasonable prices. 
A. W. STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St, 
Under Masonic Temple. 



KM A ES S liush & Gerts Pianos 
NADC Parlor Organs 

HAINES 



Installments 



A. L. Bancroft & Co. 

303 Sutter St., S.F. 



PIANOS 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 



DOLCE FAR NIENTE.— R. K. Munkittrick. 



Beneath the mossy boughs of this old tree, 
Reclining in the shadow of cool and sweet, 
I watch the dragon-Hy dart o'er the wheat 

And bear the booming of the vagrant bee, 

Above the rosy clover-field, care-free 
I hear the restless bobolink repeat 
His gurgling song, while in the offing meet 

Squadrons of clouds upon the shining sea. 

I watch the happy gull on wing serene 
Above the murmurous ocean gayly veer 
Where lighest winds the snowy sails pursue; 

And, in the mellow distance o'er the green, 

A white spire in the crystal atmosphere 
Rises in peace against the perfect blue. 



A MIDSUMMER PASSEAR. 

IF any one imagines that all the world and his wife are out of 
town, and the city a howling wilderness, let them take a stroll 
on Kearny street some pleasant day at noon-time, and see all the 
familiar faces that will pass before their gaze. To be sure many 
of the gentler sex, who form a large portion of the throng, are 
" over for the day " for shopping, etc. Just see pretty Miss Jarboe 
in her natty outing suit, hurrying up Post street to the White 
House. Handsome Raphael Weil, the genial proprietor, is on 
tbe threshold of the store, passing out to his noonday meal at 
Marchand's, but he courteously pauses to raise his hat with the 
grace of a true Parisian as Miss Kate goes by. Anon comes Miss 
Mamie Burling, her slight figure looking to advantage in a closely 
fitting black costume; her companion is a short girl in grey. The 
girls are smiling as they chat together, and no wonder, for at this 
moment comes into view a young gentleman in light summer 
attire, a grey suit and straw hat, with a poppy in his buttonhole, 
and holding two poppies in his hand. He advances with the de- 
precating air and simper so peculiar to Turner Messersmith. 
Lloyd Tevis is seen with a smile upon his lips, as if in anticipa- 
tion of the lunch he is hastening to at the club further up tbe 
street. William Alvord moves more slowly. Time and good 
dinners are beginning to make an easy gait the most comfortable. 
Judge Garber and Judge Boalt come along arm in arm, and then 
pretty Mrs. Allen, from San Rafael, who is evidently over for a 
day's shopping, as both she and her little daughter are laden with 
small packages. Mrs. Marion Wise is another San Rafaelite who 
is rapidly walking along, her handsome brother Hall by her side. 
Her destination is the music store, and as she stops for a moment 
to say goodbye to her brother, Ludovici comes up, and then Lor- 
ing, so one may be sure that music is in the air, possibly 
about that concert they are said to be getting up. It 
it worth one's while to walk a mile to view the happiness 
of the newly-wedded pair, Rev. and Mrs. Mason, nee Lena 
Merry, who get off the Sutter street car, and enter the Market. 
They fairly radiate with bliss. Beautiful Mrs. N orris, whose 
widow's weeds are a second time donned, passes with graceful 
step, her two young daughters by her side. Meeting her at the 
corner is her pretty niece, sweet Mollie Torbert, whom, gossip 
says, has made Burke Holladay ecstatically happy with a future 
hope. A village cart of yellow hue, a sorrel horse and a bronze- 
haired driver, attract the eye as Miss Myra Lord draws up to chat 
with an army chap, who quickly advances to the curb-stone. A 
small woman in black, whose bright golden hair contrasts charm- 
ingly with her sombre vail, emerges from the White House, ac- 
companied by a big girl with black eyes and white tulle — Mrs. 
McLane Martin and Miss Millie Ashe; too bad the departure of 
Mrs. Carrie Martin and Mrs. Belie Donahue deprive Miss Millie 
of two delightful rural spots for a visit. The young lady is so 
popular, no doubt the loss of one will be the gain of another. 
Major Rathbone hurries by, conscious of having made a telling 
speech at his end of the Democratic ratification meeting. Ed. 
Greenway rolls along soon after; he looks rather dejected — if one 
can imagine jovial Ed. ever looking so. Perhaps he has been 
suffering from an attack of "duty versus inclination" flannel 
cotillion at San Rafael on one side, and lovely Del Monte on the 
other. Donald de V. Graham moves briskly up the street, with 
Louis Sloss, Jr., as a companion. Graham looks jaunty in his 
short coat and Derby hat, a roll of mueic in his hand. He is 
saying how much he misses those jolly gatherings in the music- 
room of the Youngers (to say nothing of the genial dentist's 
orders for Graham's brand of "dry"). Frank Pixley comes 
leisurely along, followed by his huge dog. Boruck meets him on 
the corner, and they discuss the Chicago nominations. Another 
pretty girl trips by — Miss Claire Ralston. She stops to greet a 
lady who alights from a carriage, and no doubt hears all the latest 
news from Del Monte from Mrs. Brugiere. But the whistles are 
blowing, the clocks are striking, and luncheon is next in order 
for We, Us & Co. 

Tested by Time. For Bronchial affections, Coughs, etc., Brown's 
Bronchial Troches have proved their efficacy by a test of many years. 
Price 25 cents. 

The most perfect gift is perfect vision. Obtainable at C. Muller's, the 
optician, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush, San Francisco. 



/ETNA 

HOT 



L 



Situated in Napa County, Cal. 

Reached by a delightful stage ride over the moun- 
tains. Sixteen Miles from St. Helena. Good Ac- 
commodations. Ample Bathing Facilities. 

A FEATURE OF THE PLACE, 

A Large Swimming Tank cf Hot Mineral Water 

The waters of the JEtna Mineral Springs have 
long been celebrated for their wonderful cures in 
cases of Acute and Chronic Dyspepsia, Rheuma- 
tism, Inflammation of the Bladder, and Liverand 
Kidney Complaints. 

Tbe temperature of the water is 98 degrees, and 
is highly charged with Carbonic Acid Gas, making 
it pleasant to the taste, and giving to the bath a 
most delightful sensation. 

High Altitude ! No Fogs ! No Mosquitoes 

Water from the Springs bottled by the 

AETNA MINERAL WATER CO., 

Telephone 536. Wfllee, 108 Itrumm Street, S. F 



YOU'RE OUT 

If you «Io n't so to 

NAPA SODA 
SPRINGS 



THIS SUMMER. 



What Do You Want ? 



A Climate that beats Italy. No Malaria or Cold 
Sea Air. Health-giving Mineral Water. Cuisine 
and Service Unexceptionable. Comfortable Beds. 
Table First Quality. Gas and Running Water in 
Every Room. Hot Napa Soda Baths. 
Two Trains Every Day. 
All Visitors are Satisfied. 

ANDREW JACKSON, - - - PROPRIETOR. 

Napa S3da Springs P. O. 

The Strathmore Apartment House. 

N. W. Cor. Larkin and Fulton Streets. 

Exclusively for families. First-class in every respect. Ele- 
vator day and night. First-class restaurant in the building. 

Apply to Janitor in the building, or to A. Hayward, No. 224 
California Street. 

HOTEL PLEASANTON, 

Sutter Street, corner Jones, San Francisco. Cal. 

The Largest, Best Appointed and Most Liberally Managed Family and 
Tourist Hotel in San Francisco. Lighted by Electricity throughout. 

Elegantly Furnished Dining Rooms and Parlors for Banquets, Private 
Dinners, Parties, Weddings, etc. 

The Cuisine a Special Feature. 

MRS. M. E. PENDLETON, 
Proprietor and Manager. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG, 

THE 

MODEL _&.1>/EEIWC!.A.N" CATBEEE, 

1206 Sailer Street, 

Telephone 2388. SAN FRANCISCO. 

FOREST HOUSE, 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS, 
A desirable place to spend your vacation, Situated on Los Gatos Creek, 
a few minutes walk from Alma Station, on S. P. C. R. R. Fine Hunting 
and Fishing. Terms reasonable. 

C. E. BROWN, Proprietor, Alma Cal. 

OCCIDENTAL. HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

A CJTTIBT HOME 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 



July 2, 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



A QUEEN'S BIRTHDAY SONNET.-/. »'. WtWrt-Smith, in 
Piccadilly. 



Another year 1 God grant thee many yet, 
Girt by thy people's love and reverence I 
God love li.' also by not calling hence 

So wise a Liege above our councils set I 

Around Thy throne what diverse prayers have met. 
From distant Ind and sunny regions whence 
Britons extend an empire's eminence, 

And add new jewels to Thy coronet I 

God grant onr Sovereign generous length of years 

Autumn of life amid the ripening corn ! 

And full reward of all Her soul hath borne 
Nurtured with many an agony of tears 1 
Stablished in joy of all Her heart endears, 

Till God's love crowns Her with the light of morn I 

AN IDEA FOR CHICAGO ART LOVERS. 



A GREAT field has recently been opened for the indulging of the 
artistic tastes of the hog-killers and beef-eaters of Chicago, by 
the coming into fashion of a new material, called membranoid, 
which is defined as a " fancy leather made from tanned tripe." 
This fancy leather is being extensively used in England for book 
bindings, and it is said that the amorous Don Juan or the adven- 
turous Gii Bias bound in tripe presents a much handsomer ap- 
pearance than ever before. Of course, all the pig-stickers of the 
City by the Lake have expensive libraries, which, by the way, 
are provided by the contractors who build the palatial abodes of 
the feedprs of the world. Heretofore the books of the Chicago 
upper-ten have been bound in the ordinary brown and red of 
commerce, but with the advent of the tripe-bound poets, much 
greater variety and beauty may be expected in the homes of the 
porcine plutocrats. Not only will the appearance of the library 
be enhanced by neat inscriptions in letters of gold on the 
sides of the . tripe-bound volumes, setting forth the 
name, pedigree and virtues of the cow that was 
sacrificed for the better adornment of his master's domicile, 
but the hog-bound treatises on ■< Gas as a Factor in Municipal 
Progress," which may be found in the favorite book-case of every 
true Chicagoan, will also be suitably stamped with a representa- 
tion of the defunct squealer, the gloss of whose hide now illus- 
trates the fact that his owner stall-feeds all his herds and sells 
only the best meat in the market. Thus will the aristocratic Chi- 
cagoan combine the pleasures of the student with the satisfaction 
of the successful business men. And see what an opportunity it 
will give him to turn a few hundreds in a quiet way 1 For in- 
stance, a visitor to the wonderful city of the West, while a guest 
at one of its palaces, will be introduced into the library, the 
splendor of which apartment will impress him as much as the 
uniformity with which every shelf is completely filled with books 
of the same size, so that not an inch of space is lost. That's the 
the Chicago way. You don't catch a Chicago man putting his 
poets together, thereby presenting an uneven and probably not 
a completely filled shelf. Not he! It was a Chicago millionaire 
who, while ordering a lot of books for his recently erected man- 
sion, refused to purchase Thackeray because the works of that 
unfortunate author were too many to go on the last shelf of the 
bookcase. But with what a twinkling eye will the wily pork 
packer show his visitors his uniquely bound volumes, mention- 
ing meanwhile, in an offhand manner, how much he sold that 
pork for, as he points to Shakespeare in hog skin, or this 
beef, as he fondles Dickens in tripe. Of course the visitor will 
praise the binding, and be forced to admit that only fine animals 
could have had such fine hides. And then, before he knows it, 
the Lake City man will have sold him a carload of pork at a good 
figure, and at one fell swoop will have made all the cost of his 
library. Oh, a sharp customer is the Chicago man, and many are 
his profits. 

A COUPLE of mahogany tables, which are souvenirs of the 
notorious Jack 8heppard, were recently offered for public 
competition among other articles of furniture, at the old Black 
Jack, Portsmouth street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London. This 
house has a history of its own. It was a favorite resort of Joe 
Miller, who died in 1728, and the first edition of whose jests which 
have rendered his name so famous, was published in the course 
of the year following. The Black Jack, which is almost directly 
opposite to the reputed but not sufficiently authenticated Old 
Curiosity Shop of Charles Dickens, derived an alternative name 
of The Jup, by which it was long distinguished, from the circum- 
stance that Jack Sheppard, upon one occasion, found it daringly 
expedient to jump from one of its second-floor windows, in order 
to evade the officers of justice, otherwise suggestively described 
as the emissaries of Jonathan Wild. It is a somewhat cruel il- 
lustration of the evanescence of the interest taken in the fortunes 
of departed greatness, says The Collector, that a single guinea rep- 
resented the value put upon the tables to which traditions so 
famous are attached. 



THE 



BRUNSWICK-BALKE- 

COLLENDER CO. 




THE MONARCH 



Manufacturers of Billiard and Pool Tables. 

Dealers in Billiard Merchandise Generally. 

Makers of Bank and Office Fixtures. 

Also, Saloon Fixtures, Counters, Coolers, Mirrors, etc., constantly ou 
hand or made to order. Ten Pin Alleys, Ten Pins, Ten Pin Balls, etc. 

653-655 MARKET STREET, S. F. 

CARD. 

We beg to inform you that the business of H. N. Cook, 
the pioneer belt manufacturer of the Coast, established 
in 1860, and having occupied successively the premises 
801 Battery, 415 Market, 405 Market and 32-J Fremont 
streets, is still continued, but in new and more conveni- 
ent quarters, at 317-319 MJSSJOII Street, on the ground 
floor, between Fremont and Beale, where we will do busi- 
ness hereafter under the name of H. N. COOK BELTING 
COMPANY. The business is conducted under the old 
principles and management, and it is still our aim to 
give our patrons a belt made of the good old-fashioned 
article of oak-tanned leather, at the lowest possible cost. 
It is important to add that this house has no connection, 
with any other firm in this business by the name of 
Cook, and we beg t« suggest that all orders intended for 
us be carefully directed. 

Thanking you for past favors and soliciting a continu- 
ance of the same, we have the pleasure to remain, dear 
sirs, yours truly. 

H. N. COOK BELTING COMPANY, 



317-319 Mission Street. 



Per 31. II COOK, Jlanager. 



LOUIS COOKS. 



WILLIAM COOKS. 



MAX COOKS. 



COOKS BROS., 

inSTTZEIRIOIEa DBCOBATOBS. 

Dealers in Stained Glass, Wall Paper, Lincrusta Walton, Paper 

Mache, Parquet Flooring, Moorish Fret Work, 

Frescoing, Wall Mouldings, 

943 and 945 Market St., between 5th and 6th, San Francisco 
HENRY C. HYDE 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 

MICROSCOPICAL KXAMINER 

01 Handwriting, Inis, PaperB, etc., In the Detection of Forgeries , 

Counterfeits and Imitations. 

41 IK CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco, Cal. 




SAINT FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 



MILITARY circles especially, and society in general, wilt soon 
be called upon to mourn the loss of pretty Mrs. Ridgeway, 
who came out to the Presidio some two years ago as a bride, and 
more recently has been living at Alcatraz, where her husband is 
stationed. Lieutenant Ridgeway has received orders for Fortress 
Monroe, and this popular couple will depart for that post in the 

near future. 

# # # 

A lady told the other day how a pretty girl of " the swim " was 
complaining of the independence, as she expressed it, of the men 
in society. "Why!" said she, » If the girls don't actually have 
to ask the men right out to take them round, and half the time 
the men act as if it was a bore to go." Surely no greater illustra- 
tion than this is needed to prove the decadence of good breeding 
in our best society, as it now exists. 

* * * 

Some old gentlemen with fatherly instincts, and some jolly 
bachelors of middle age, have a habit of addressing young men by 
the familiar term of " my son." This is getting to be highly 
dangerous, as it lays a foundation for lawyers to claim that such 
a term indicates an avowal of parentage! In fact, one is 
pretty sure, nowadays, when a rich man dies, to bear of some 
natural son who bobs up serenely to contest his father's will. It 
behooves men with means to be careful of indulging in ante- 
mortem terms of parental affection, unless legally entitled to 
do so. 

It is reported that Mrs. Amy Crocker Gillig has decided upon 
Africa as the scene for the next " excursion " abroad. She ap- 
pears to be desirous of emulating Mrs. Sheldon in her recent ex- 
ploits, and with that end in view will endeavor to penetrate still 
further into the country than did that venturesome lady. 

Another rich plum in the matrimonial pie is likely to be under 
the fingers of the girls to pick out soon, as recent advices from 
Paris report the probable return to our coast ere long of young 
Peter Donahue, the millionaire son of the late James Donahue. 
This will be welcome intelligence to our belles, so many of whom 
have to dance with each other this summer at the San Rafael and 

Del Monte hops. 

* # * 

" What's the matter with Ed. Greenway ? " asked a girl at Del 
Monte last week. " He seems so quiet and subdued. Can it be he 
is in love, and with whom, for gracious sake ? " " Why," was 
the answer, " who wouldn't look as if they had the world on 
their shoulders, with the awful responsibility that he has ? Isn't 
he compiling a Blue Book, and now just think of his task, and 
all the enemies he'll make if he don't give them all front rank ! 
I tell you, it'll take all his skill in tixing things to suit every- 
body, and of all things, to say who's who in 1892." 

* * * 

" 'Tis better to be born lucky than rich," says the old proverb, 
and it would seem that a large blonde young lady has good cause 
to acquiesce in the truth of the axiom. Always a guest among 
millionaires is as good as being one, but Uncle Frank's pretty 
niece is a popular girl in herself. 

What a congregation of pretty y*oung matrons the Tevis con- 
nection will show on the Glorious Fourth. Mrs. Will, Mrs. Hugh, 
Mrs. Fred. 8haron, Mrs. Maggie Blanding, and the Haggin con- 
tingent, beautiful Mrs. Blanche and her Countess daughter. Hard 

to beat, all of them. 

* » # 

There is quite a romance connected with the marriage on Satur- 
day last in St. Mary's Cathedral of W. S. O'Brien and Mrs. Cap- 
tain Bigler. O'Brien was formerly clerk of the Oakland Police 
Court, and, after resigning a couple of months ago, he resumed 
the practice of law. The first case he got was that of Mrs. Bigler 
and it involved some property at Santa Barbara. He won it, and 
her heart also ; and after an acquaintance of only a few weeks he 
proposed and was accepted. Mrs. O'Brien has property in 
her own right valued at $150,000, so O'Brien is in clover 
now. He is well-known throughout the State, especially in 
political circles, for he has been clerk in the State Senate, and 
he led the fight which resulted in the recent increase of salaries 
of clerks of Police Courts. 

The story printed in the News Letter a few weeks ago regard- 
ing the fact that Mrs. Salome Anderson, of 572 Tenth street, Oak- 
land, is the only female Free Mason in the world, has been copied 
into nearly every newspaper in the United States, and is now ap- 
pearing in the journals of England and the Continent. As a re- 
sult, Mrs. Anderson is in daily receipt of notes from all parts of 



the country regarding the subject. The other day she got a letter 
from Paris, France, referring to the article and requesting her 
autograph. 

• * * 

Dan McCarthy, the horseman, is reducing the capital of the 
Oakland pool-rooms considerably. Since Dan brought up his 
string of nags from Pleasanion, and stabled tbem at the Oakland 
Park, he has been around town a good deal and naturally enough 
drops into the pool-rooms to put a little on the horses he has 
running at Chicago. He has had a good streak of luck, too, and 
on the Derby day alone he beat Charley Kingsley out of $2,000, 
his winnings being the result of bets at good odds on Dan's own 
horses, Hercules and Castanet. He made the bookmakers' eyes 
open when he put $100 on Castanet at 10 to 1, and smelling a rat 
they promptly cut the price to 2 to 1. They were too late, though, 
for Castanet won handily and Dan got his thousand. 

* * * 

Montgomery Howe, tbe Piedmont capitalist, looks more like a 
broken-down bankrupt farmer than a millionaire. With dirty 
shoes, old blue coat and ill-fitting, age-stained nether garments, 
he wanders around town as if he were looking for work, and a 
stranger would deem it incredible if told that che musty old man 
lives in one of the most palaiial homes in Alameda county. The 
rest of the family, too, are chips of the old block, for despite 
their wealth, one of the boys is gripman on a San Pablo avenue 
cable car. The Stone family, one of the wealthiest and most in- 
fluential in the lower part of Alameda county, are almost on a 
par, too, as far as the circulation of iheir money is concerned. 
When they drive into Oakland they bring their lunches with 
them so as to avoid the expenses of restaurants. 

# # » 

<< The Pullm&n palace is by far the most gorgeous private resi- 
dence in Chicago," says a truthful writer in an Eastern paper. 
'• It contains, among other things, a miniature theatre, a large 
fountain that can be made to spout pure water, Lubin's Ylang 
ylang or Ruinart brut at tbe will of the owner, and a vast 
chamber known as the Pompeiian room, the chief feature of which 
consists of seven or eight huge pillars of Parian marble, studded 
with twenty-dollar gold pieces that have been presented to tbe 
great inventor by the Pullman car porters who have grown rich, 
gray and grateful in his service. The effect gained by the string- 
ing from pillar to pillar of festoons of roses and peonies fourteen 
feet in circumference may be better imagined than described." 

Shainwald. Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Monlgomery street. 

The Blount Door Check and Spring ! 




Sure to Close the 
Door without 
Slamming. 



JAS. A. MAGUIRE, City Agent, 

G57-G6L Market Street. San Francisco. 

California Wire Works, 

9 fremont street, san francisco- 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

WIRE of all Kinds. WIRE MAILS, 

BARBED WIRE, Regularly Licensed. 
WIRE ROPES AND CABLES. 
WIRE CLOTH AND NETTING. 
HALLADIE'S ENDLESS WIRE ROPEWAY for transporting 
ore and other material over mouutains and difficult roads. 
Send for Illustrated 1'atalogue. 



BRANCHES— 22 Front street, Portland, Oregon; 201 N. Los Angeles 
reet, Los Angeles, California. 



July 2, 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



13 



WORLD'S FAIR NOTES. 

(Hy Pi Versoh.J 

AS the Fourth of July approaches, patriotic feeling takes on an 
additional impetus, and strive- to find expression in enthusi- 
aim over the World's Fair. It is only just to admit that many of 
the most practical, as well as some of the most novel ideas in re- 
gard to the exhibits have been evolved from the fertile brain of 
the Don-vo;ing members of the body politic. It is to the women 
of the country that the great Columbian Exposition will owe 
much of its success. Mrs. Carrie Williams. President of the 
Southern California Silk Culture Association, is most enthusiastic 
in her belief that there is a grand opening for the production of 
silk in California. She speaks for her association, and urges that 
a banner be made of the silk of their production for exhibition at 
the World's Fair. The idea finds favor on all sides, and the ladies 
of Petaluma are inclined to follow the example of their sisters of 
Southern California, and have a fine banner manufactured in 
Petaluma at their own silk factory, which, by-the-way, is the 
only one on the coast, the banner to be made of silk reeled from 
cocoons raised on the spot. Silk culture is especially adapted for 
women. In all the efforts made for the introduction of silk cul- 
ture in the L'nited States, ladies have played an active and im- 
portant part. 

• * • 

It is a satisfaction to San Franciscans to note with what favor- 
able mention the work of our California artists is received. One of 
the latest to be mentioned with enthusiasm is Miss May Randall, 
formerly of this city, and to whom has been entrusted the honor 
of carving the panel of wood to represent California at the World's 
Fair. Each of the States is to be represented by a panel, of a 
characteristic wood, carved by one of its own artists. The name 
of the artist is to stand out in relief at the foot of the panel. The 
Randalls are an old San Francisco family. Mrs. Albertine Ran- 
dall Wheeland, the illustrator, is a sister of (he wood carver. 

* * # 

It has been suggested that one portion of the Exposition 
grounds be set apart for a Children's Temple, in which shall be 
displayed everything that had any bearing upon the mental, 
moral and physical well-being of children. This would indeed 
embrace a wide range, including even their toys, books and games. 
Some enthusiast has entered upon a scheme to have all the dif- 
ferent phases of child life illustrated by children. Against this 
great wrong to the children themselves a vigorous protest is be- 
ing made. No one can measure the amount of injury it would be 
to the children to be placed on exhibition. It would rob them of 
their childhood, of their sweet unconsciousness; it would make 
them little ' ' Scribes and Pharisees," forever posing and acting for 
effect. All further progress would be next to impossible for them. 
Experienced teachers have long been convinced that a lasting in- 
jury is worked to the children who take part in school exhibi- 
tions, and in theatrical representations where the spirit of emula- 
tion and the desire to win applause prevails. It is to be hoped 
that some one will have both the power and good sense to stop 
such a scheme to put American children on the rack of notoriety. 

* * » 

All sorts and conditions of men, all sorts and conditions of ideas 
will doubtless find expression at Chicago. Possibly those who 
have the desire to see cremation become a substitute for the burial 
of the dead, may have already made some arrangements for an 
exhibit of their peculiar fancy. If they have not, they ought to 
do so. Let them erect a crematory, with its chapel and all the 
accessories of that method of disposing of the dead, for the edu- 
cational effect of such an exhibit is not to be despised. Now, if 
some bright mind will only plan for the disposition of the ashes 
of the dead, a vexed problem would be met and solved, and the 
way made plain for many who prefer cremation to burial, but 
who are loath, as they phrase it, to have their ashes lying around 
loose. Some one has suggested that to each crematory be attached 
a windmill with a huge fan, that shall scatter the ashes to the 
four winds of heaven. There was once a man whose dying wish 
was religiously carried out. He was cremated and his ashes divided 
into four portions. Each of these was enclosed in an en- 
velope, and the four envelopes were given at the same time to as 
many captains of vessels, each bound for one of the four points 
of the compass. That sent the packets in four different direc- 
tions, and at a given time each packet was opened and its con- 
tents scattered on the mighty deep. Rather an effectual method 
of disposing of one's self. It certainly had the advantage of not 
being too long in one place. A French scientist once wore a 
signet, which was the compressed ashes of his dead wife. I do 
not see why some one does not invent a process by which the 
ashes of the departed, subjected to high pressure, might be con- 
verted into jewel cases, or become the setting for the picture of 
the dead. It could be done, aud the World's Fair is the place to 
announce the achievement. 

# * * 

A woman's fertile mind has conceived the idea of utilizing all 
the school-houses in Chicago as dormitories for teachers visiting 
the World's Fair. Mrs. Solomon Thatcher, Jr., one of the lady 
managers, advanced the idea, which has been enthusiastically re- 
ceived. It's not a bad idea, either. 



BARGAINS 
IN SILKS. 



Fine Black French Surahs, 27 
inches -wide, at 73 cents. 

Extra Heavy Twilled French 
Surahs, 24 inches wide, at $1. 

Superior Black French Surahs, 
24 inches wide, at $1 23. 



(£f&nnc\4 




\* 1892. ' 



111 to 121 Post Street. 




GOLD SEAL Eubber HOSE, 

THE BEST MADE. 

Goodyear Rubber Company, 



R. H. PEASE, j , t 



677 & 579 Market Street. 



G-. "W. CLABK & CO., 
663 Market Street, 

FOK 

WALL PAPE R, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE P-O L E S. 



«r 



e^WjAvw^ 




Has one specialty and pride and that is the Table. It is supplied 
from the best the market affords in San Krancibco. Our Butter, 
Eggs, Cream aud Vegetables come from the Marin County dairies 
and farms iu the vicinity. Ten trains daily, making it very con- 
convenient for gentlemen to he able to pass the evening with 
their families or friends, and derive the benefits of country air 
aud still be able to attend to business daily in the city. "Com- 
mutes," $5 per mouth ; ladies aud children, 13. 

Telephone 38. Telegraph, or write, or, better still, call aud 
see us any day, and satisfy yourself beyond question. Take Sau- 
salito Ferry aud cars to Larkspur. Round trip, 50 cents. 
Respectfully, 

HEPBURN & TERRY. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 




*-^fi» r, ta rfS; n in ~ »fl '1 -O^li: 



to-LOPKER-oN* 



g^fflPT^^^C^^' 



ONE of the moat outrageous street brawls that ever took place 
in this city was that of the McManus and Welsh factions 
last Saturday. Over a dozen men were engaged in it, on one of 
the main streets in the heart of the city. Knives and pistols 
were used, and two of the men, one of each faction, are now ly- 
ing at the point of death as the result of the wounds received by 
them. The main spirit in the many fights which have occurred be- 
tween the Welshes and the McManuses, it seems, has been Frank 
McManus, the head of his family, and who enjoys the title of 
" King of the Potrero," an honor gained by many a hard-fought 
fight in the region near the sugar works. The Welshes also live 
at the Potrero, and have dared to dispute the right of the King to 
reign over that region. The result has been the continuous war 
between them, of which Saturday's affair was but an incident. 
Both factions are Republicans, the King belonging to the Burns- 
Mahoney side of the house, and the Welshes to the Third street 
bosses. From all accounts, the whole crowd are ruffians and 
bullies, who, while not criminals in the generally accepted sense 
of that word, are certainly persistent law-breakers, for the record 
of their fights is a very long one. The McManus is alow-browed, 
foul-mouthed, ignorant man, whose brute strength, assisted by a 
rough hospitality, has given him his ascendancy in his district. 
He is respected through fear, for his hand is heavy and his arm a 
strong one, and he enjoys the enviable reputation of being the 
most dangerous rough-and-tumble fighter on the South Side. 
These are his only claims to fame, yet he is a member of the Re- 
publican County Committee, and is one of the several highly 
honorable gentlemen in that body who consider themselves well 
fitted to provide for the welfare of this municipality. McManus 
is now awaiting trial on a charge of forgery, and is enjoying his 
liberty on bonds furnished by that other prominent Republican, 
Senator Mahoney. I call the attention of the people to these 
interesting facts, with the suggestion that they should, of course, 
entrust their interests to men nominated by such a fellow as Mc- 
Manus. The distinguished manner in which the King of the 
Potrero was treated by the police during and after Saturday's 
row is also worthy of consideration. He was allowed to dash 
through the streets after the wounded Welsh, crying that he 
would kill him, and was permitted to enter Ihe Receiving Hospi- 
tal, and there, within the very building in which the city prison 
and the police courts are located, he made another attempt to as- 
sault Welsh. It may be taken for granted that McManus will 
not be convicted of any of the charges against him. He is not 
King of the Potrero for his health, and the magnificent develop- 
ment of his " pull " will be well worth watching during the 
progress of his case. 



My attention was attracted some weeks since by seeing several 
women of society fame going into a fashionable drugstore to- 
gether. As I passed the store again the visitors came out, and I 
noticed that their faces seemed ^slightly flushed. A few days 
later, the same ladies were seen going into the same store about 
the same time. Again they were flushed when they came out, 
and on re-entering the promenade, a novice could easily detect 
that they had taken something stronger than soda water. An 
investigation showed that a number of women have a liquor- 
procuring scheme which almost defies detection. They get a 
physician to give them a prescription calling for whisky, brandy 
or what not, for some supposed ailment. This they take to a 
drugstore, and whenever they want a drink, call again at the 
store, give the number of the prescription, and take a swig of 
their " nostrum." It is a great scheme, but if the custom of tip- 
pling in drugstores becomes much more prevalent than it is now, 
it will be necessary for every first class pharmacy to have several 
cabs at their doors. 



The wandering Jew came down the way 

With footstep weak and slow; 
He thought how he had passed one day 

Five hundred years ago. 
" Come in, old stranger," cried a wife; 

<>Come in and rest awhile. 
Full many a year has topped your life; 

You've traveled many a mile." 
He sank beside the cottage door 

And took the bread she gave; 
" Rest," said he, " I shall Bee no more, 

Not even in the grave. 
" My limbs are weak, my head is gray 

And, dame, how could you know 
That I walked down this very way, 

Five hundred years ago ? 
" O, could I pause, but always there 

Is something moves me on." 
" Stop, pilgrim, then, your jaunt forbear, 

The day is nearly gone. 
" Here, read the news." She gave a sheet 

Unto the stranger gray. 
He read, then started to his feet 

And quick resumed his way. 
" My pains," he cried, << are more than thine, 

And though to rest I'd love 
All thought of it I shall resign 

And be right glad to move. 
" For Denis Kearny still doth talk, 

And Doc. O'Donnell blow, 
As when this way 1 chanced to walk 

Five hundred years ago." 

* * • 

The latest fad in fashionable Paris is painting children's faces. 
Mothers in » smart" society paint their children's cheeks and lips 
with the same hue they wear themselves, and the result can bet- 
ter be imagined than described. The wretched little creatures 
cannot be natural; they cannot play nor amuse themselves in a 
healthy manner, for fear of incurring mamma's severe displeas- 
ure by brushing off the rouge, and consequently they are con- 
demned to lives of just such mild exhileration as their dolls en- 
joy; those dolls whom they so much resemble. The result of this 
practice is the withering of the youthful skin, and if they would 
not look prematurely old, the children are then compelled to con- 
tinue to paint, with the consequence that they will be hags at 
thirty, instead of then being in bloom of their womanhood. I 
would not be at all surprised to see some senseless mother on the 
street next week accompanied by a little girl with painted face, 
and a little boy in Fauntleroy costume. Some women seem to 
think children are toys, and certainly use them as such. 

* * * 

Captain John Sloan has been presented with another English 
yachting cap by the British ship masters at Martinez. The cap- 
tain is all appreciation. " Why, those fellows up there want to 
steal " Pop," said one of the captains yesterday, "He can dance 
a jig, tip off a toast, and, don't you know, make things go like a 
King of the Society Islands. It's great fan to have him with us." 
» # * 

Mrs. Willeau von Santen, a very verdant grass widow, is spend- 
ing a few days at Santa Barbara enjoying the exhilerating effects 
of the channel surf. Since she procured a divorce from her hus- 
band, who is now taking in the Oriental sights a9 an electric en- 
gineer in China, » the widow " has been enjoying herself. As she 
has a beautiful form and is young and gay, it is probable some of 
Santa Barbara's young men may fall before her. The " widow " 
will parade the beacb in a bathing suit of black trimmed with 
bright red, that sets off her form admirably. She is rather tall, 
and has a wealth of brown hair. 

# # • 

Billy Minton, the gay and astute young purser of the steamer 
China is in port again, enjoying himself at his luxurious Alameda 
home. The Gillig party returned on the steamer, and it is said 
Billy was on his good conduct this time, deporting himself with a 
most distant but highly deferential manner on shipbard whenever 
he met the fair Mrs. Amy Crocker-Gillig, who on a previous occa- 
sion, it is reported, failing to appreciate the gentleman's advances, 
slapped his pretty face. 




OUTING SUITS — SHIRTS. LADIES 



TENNIS SUITS-SHIRTS, 



WAISTS 



27 TO 37 :k:E.A.I»T-2- STREET. 



July 2, 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 



P. J. Keller, the *< Lord Mayor of riedmont," orders a small 
bottle nowadays when any one a?ks him how is his friend Fran- 
Ota Murphy. Keller is quite a politician, and the night Cleveland 
was nominated at Chicago he passed the evening at one of the 
Oakland newspaper offices reading the bulletins as they came in. 
Now, Francis Murphy was also one of the throng, and with an 
eye to business, he started up in a small way a temperance dis- 
course, and had quite an earnest conversation with Keller, who 
pretended thai be was a Prohibitionist, and had been so for many 
years. Bye-and-bye Murphy became interested in something else, 
and then Keller stepped back and whispered to a well-dressed 
young roan, who had been listening to the temperance discussion, 
•■ Come on, let's fool the old boy and go and have a drink." 

" 8ir," said the invited individual, 6erly, "that gentleman's my 
father " 

It was Edward Marphy, the deputy evangelist, that Keller had 
struck, and amid the laughter of those who bad noticed what 
had occurred, the Mayor of Piedmont made a hurried departure, 
and was seen no more that night. 

• « * 

New stories of Blaine are not plentiful, but here is one that is 
vouched for by one who was very cIobb to the distinguished man 
from Maine in 1884. 8tanding on the rear platform of an ob- 
servation car on the Maine Central Railroad one day, Mr. Blaine 
accidentally dropped one of his gloves overboard. Quick as a 
flash he threw the mate after it. " What did you do that for? " 
asked his fellow-traveler. "For the simple reason," said Mr. 
Blaine, " that one glove ie of little use to me or any one else; but 
now, if some one happens to pick up one of thatpair he may find 
the other also, and he's welcome to wear them." 

* # * 

The Looker-on encountered Jack Featherstone this morning — 
every one knows Jack, his moustache and his gallantry. There 
was a snbdned and pallid look about John's usually placid coun- 
tenance, and when he said, " I have just received a shock," he 
looked it. Sympathetic interrogation brought out the following 
harrowing tale: 

" t was hurrying along Eddy street this morning, when my 
spectacles (Jack wear glasses, of course, being a young man of 
fashion) was suddenly almost splintered by a radiant vision of 
loveliness — something which seemed a harmony in dark blue and 
white, with a sort of celestial electric light set dazzlingly above 
it. On calming down, I saw it was the charming young widow 
from Oroville, Mrs. De Motte, you know her, in a bewildering 
jacket and •• bell skirt " of dark blue cloth, with a snowy white 
vest, and shirt-front under the jaunty cutaway, just masculine 
enough to be dashing and not enough to be fast." 

<< But there's nothing to shock one, Jack, in all this," interposed 
the Looker-on, impatient for the climax. 

"Waitl' 7 said Jack, solemnly; "she threw back the lapel of 
her blue jacket and lisped in the softest of voices — a bewitching 
peculiarity of her's, that soft half-lisp — 'See! my little pet!' 
And there, reposing, unappreciatively, to all appearance, on her 
snowy vest was — what do you think? — a nasty, repulsive-look- 
ing horned-toad I " 

"No?" 

'■Fact! and there she stood patting and caressing the horrid 
little monster, while she murmured, • Bear little fellow, isn't he ? 
So cunning; I've another at home, a little one that I'm raising.' 
I shuddered and left her." 

" But isn't it awful ? " Jack went on. " Is it a fad ? Will all 
the pretty women have 'em ? And can't a fellow, after a while, 
take his best girl to his heart without the danger of « squashing ' 
the true inwardness out of a horned-toad or a slimy lizard all over 
bis shirt bosom ? I tell you , it ought to be looked into." 
# * * 

The admirers of Leland Stanford, Jr., Univerity will be surprised 
to know that several of the professors of the college contemplate 
withdrawal from the institution during the coming vacation. 
Their reasons for this action, as given by one of them, are that 
they have found, after residence at their new quarters, that al- 
though they are receiving good salaries, as the salaries of college 
professors go, they are not so well fixed financially as they were 
in their Eastern homes. They say that living cornea higher to 
them here than in the East, and the salary is not sulhciently 
greater than an Eastern salary to make up the difference. Another 
cause of complaint, and probably one of the principal reasons for 
the contemplated withdrawal, is the hard work imposed on the 
professors by the establishment of the elective system at the Uni- 
versity. By this system any of the students may choose all of 
their studies, and the teacher who instructs them in their main 
study is supposed to coach them also in the others. This is the 
only college on the coast in which the elective system is in vogue. 
At the State University some studies are elective in each course, 
but the student is required also to take certain studies of the 
course. At Palo Alto the student may take any studies that 
please him. If any of the professors leave the college, as they 
now contemplate, there should be no difficulty in filling their 
places at once with competent men, for the fame of Palo Alto 
has gone abroad. 



nil LEADING 
FINK t HAMI'Ai.M 
OF EUROPE, 




ELDERMANN 

GOLD LACK 
(form fuatthj ^-(flumipagiw 

CHARLES MEINECKE5 C?. Aftents: San Francisco 

Moquette Carpets 

At 

Reduced Prices. 



Until July 1st we offer a large variety 
oj desirable patterns at 20 PER CENT 
LESS THAN USUAL PRICES. 
We must close out these patterns be- 
fore our stock-taking on July 1st, be- 
cause our mills have stopped making 
them, and dropped patterns must go 
to make room for new Fall styles. 

W. & J. SLOANE & CO., 

641-647 Market Street. 

CARPETS, FURNITURE, UPHOLSTERY, 
WINDOW SHADES. 

"The California Hotel," 

Bush Street, near Keirny. 

_A.Tosoru.tely Fire-proof. 

Central to all points of interest, principal stores and places of amusement. 
Select Music in Restaurant every evening between 6 and 8. 

A. P. KIMZI.EB. Manager. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Best & Belcher 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 33, Ne- 
vada Block. 309 Montgomery street, 9au Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 1 1 th Day of July, 1 89 ', at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M .. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

m Trau8 S fer books will close on Friday, July 8, 1892, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. _^^______ 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half-year endiug June 30. 1892, a dividend has been declared at 

the ra'e of five and one-fifth (5 1-5) per cent, per auoum on term deposits 

and four and oue thiid (4 1 .,) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free 

of taxes, payable on and after Friday, July 1.UJ*. TH<)Mpg0Ni ^^ 

Office— No. S3 Post street, San Francisco, Gal. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 




THE apology for a Stock Market continues to drag its weary 
way before the public daily. It is, however, only another in- 
stance of the " ruling passion strong in death." There is no busi- 
ness to transact, and the brokers simply go through their duties 
in a perfunctory manner. Prices for the leading stocks have 
fallen to a still lower level by their own weight, no one caring to 
risk a dime in strengthening up an old-time favorite. The risks 
are too heavy, and will be even greater until the incubus in the 
form of the Norcross judgment is lifted from the market. The 
youngest born in this city may live to see the day when the heirs 
and assigns of the gentlemen who figured as plaintiffs in the case 
will reap the reward of an over-ripened virtue, attained, unfor- 
tunately, at a period too late in a lifetime devoted to good works 
to permit its enjnyment by the heroes of the strife. If Lhe wheels 
of the 8upreme Court of this State grind as slowly as usual, the 
twentieth century will be well advanced beforean opinion comes 
down to the lower Court, and then the chances are that the judg- 
ment will be reversed. One thing is certain, the case will be 
fought to the bitter end, and the stories of an arrangement for a 
compromise are simply street talk. The case for the defense was 
badly handled from the first, and it is to be regretted on behalf of 
the stockbrokers and their unfortunate clients that able mining 
lawyers like Kerriu and Garber were not retained in the first in- 
stance. Those who date back to the Bonanza excitement will 
doubtless remember the dull period which preceded the sudden 
advance in prices. It was almost as bad then as it is now, with 
the exception that prices did not get down to their present level. 
The remembrance will be a consolation to some people, and the 
prayers of the faithful will be more fervent than ever for a new 
strike of ore which will divert attention from existing difficulties, 
which, if looked upon in the proper light, are nothing but a silly 
bugbear. 

tit 

IT seems scarcely credible, in view of the flat failure of the Val- 
ley Gold scheme, that Alexander Del Mar is still received with 
a showing of confidence by a few money<d people in London. It 
is only fair to presume that such an exhibition of obstinate stu- 
pidity is due to the fact that a few of his victims are clinging to 
him as a drowning man might to a straw in desperation, hoping 
against hope that he may eventually pull them through on some 
proposition or another. It will not be on the Black Hawk bonanza, 
however, and the sooner this is understood, the better for the 
pockets of those who are now giving Del Mar an opportunity to 
persuade them into supplying the money required to erect a one- 
hundred stamp mill on his San Bernardino county quartz wild- 
cat. We use the term " quartz " to distinguish his latest acqui- 
sition from his » gravel '' wild-cat, the Valley Gold property, in 
the same county. A stamp-mill is as little needed at the one, as 
a hydraulic plant is at the other. Not many months ago the 
News Lettek devoted considerable space to the Black Hawk as 
an investment in an attempt to save some St. Louis capitalists 
from being entrapped, which fortunately proved successful. Tbis 
ground was pretty thoroughly investigated on that occasion, and 
according to the visiting experts, the whole district was simply a 
11 blow out." One of these gentlemen gave the deal a more pro- 
nounced black-eye, by his statements made openly, that his 
samples were » salted " on him, which of course was indignantly 
denied by the men who then controlled the stock. 

J $ ?* 

SOME capitalists in Los Angeles, at that time, claimed to own 
the mine independent of Mr. Del Mar, and in a letter to a 
gentleman in this city, they even went the length of criticizing 
sharply his management of the concern, coupled with a plea that 
they should not be held responsible for his sins. One ol the ex- 
perts who visited the property about the same time was Mr. 
Lambert, a well-known miner of this city, who can get more 
recommendations as an expert to the square inch, from wealthy 
mine owners in this city, than many an individual who hangs a 
shingle out in London as an alleged mining engineer. He did 
not mince his words in reporting on the Black Hawk, which he 
asserted he would not receive as a gift. The location, according 
to his personal statement, covers a great mountain of what the 
owners call ore, which, although they claim it is worth $15 per 
ton, will not pan out $1.50 when put through the mill. The loca- 
tion itself is most unfavorable for working, even if the ore was 
worth taking out. It is on a little spur of the San Bernardino 
range, which, running parallel with the mountains, forms what 
is known as Black Hawk Canon. 

*$$ 

THERE is some wood to be obtained in the vicinity, but the 
great trouble is a scarcity of water. The only source of sup- 
ply is a little spring some miles distant. From this a pipe line 
has been laid down the canon, through which the water trickles 
feebly into a reservoir, scarcely sufficient to run an arastra, let 
alone a mill of one hundred stamps. Mr. Del Mar perhaps ar- 



gues in the same manner as the Lower California (Mexico) 
schemers, that there is plenty of water to be had in the neighbor- 
hood if it could only be found. This, however, is generally re- 
garded as an afterthought, which pin-beaded investors, when 
trapped, can take up at their leisure. The success of the scheme 
will naturally depend upon the result of the search, and those 
who have paid up the money are entitled to the full responsibil- 
ity, in addition to the experience to be gained ultimately, at a 
heavy cost. Speculators abroad are warned to give the Black 
Hawk a wide berth. It is equally as vile a scheme as the Jo- 
sephine and Union Gold, not to speak of the Valley Gold, which 
we will have the pleasure of winding up in short order befcre 
long. Those who are foolish enough to ignore the warning will 
find their financial loss all the more difficult to bear when the 
day of reckoning comes, which will not be long delayed. When 
American investors give a property of this kind the cold shoul- 
der, it is safe to gamble that there is something wrong about it. 
Of course the promotor of such a scheme dojs not care a fig how 
rotten it may be, provided the profits are big enough and the 
chances are favorable for carrying it through. The financial pa- 
per which puffs it, with a full knowledge of the facts, simply be- 
cause it is paid to run the prospectus, is doubly to blame, and its 
fitting reward shuuld be the forfeit of all support from the in- 
vesting public. 

t ft 

A DISPATCH received from Carson during the week stated 
that Inspectors Whitehead and L?ech, from Washington, 
had inspected the United States Mint in that city on charges 
made by San Francisco mining men. They left for the East after re- 
porting every department in excellent condition, with no discrep- 
ancies of any kind. Superintendent Wright was highly compli- 
mented on his general management. This is all tte space given by 
the local papers to an official announcement branding as false, 
charges which, when uttered in open court, were deemed worthy of 
leaded columns with flare headlines. The thieves of the Carson 
Mint, as they were termed, were held up to public scorn on every 
possible occasion, and even the honorable Judge before whom the 
charges were made did not deem it his duty to check the ill- 
tsmpe-ed and base insinmtioni wh'ch, from imi to time, were 
made against the integrity of the officers of such an important 
National institution as a United States Mint. People unbiassed 
by any feeling of dislike to the defendants in the Ha'e and Norcross 
cise, who unfortunately for themselves, are wealthy, naturally 
expected that Judge Hebbard would have referred in his decision 
to the fact that, although sundry charges of a most serious char- 
acter had been made during the course of the trial, that no at- 
tempt had been made to prove them, thereby relieving the gen- 
tlemen reftr ed to of the stigma which rested upon them. But 
no, in his judgment he overlooked all this, being guided solely in 
his deliberations, apparently, by the technical testimony of ore 
abarp3, who knew as little about the subject under discussion as 
people generally do who pose as experts. 

* * $ 

THE public was given full liberty to take whatever stock it 
pleased in stories about State Senator Evan Williams trans- 
acting business with a United States Mint by the aid of duplicate 
keys, and smuggling the bullion bars in a buggy along the high- 
ways of Nevada at the dead of night. << Unknown owners" 
slapped in their deposits of the untold millions surreptitiously 
manipulated out of the treasuries of the Comstock mining com- 
panies, and so on ad nauseam. Clap-trap of the kind evidently 
stood in good stead of any tangible proofs offered in support of 
charges against the mill men. It gave a sensational air to the 
proceedings, amused the gaping crowd of idlers in a Court-room, 
while serving to injure the political reputation temporarily of a 
prominent and respected citizen of a sister State. This kind of 
business may find favor with some people like everything else, 
while the craze lasts, but cooler judgment will prevail eventually, 
when the whole case will be reviewed from the standpoint of 
common sense. 

$ * i 

IN the mean time the majority of people, both here and in Ne- 
vada, who do not care a continental whether or not Hale & 
Norcross, and its millionaire judgment creditors in prospectu, 
were blotted off the map of the globe to-morrow, will feel in- 
clined to congratulate Senator Williams, who had to stand the 
brunt of the onslaught in Judge Hebbard's Court, that he has 
been acquitted of most infamous charges after a careful investi- 
gation by the authorities at Washington. If he has suffered for 
the lime being, the results of the verdict returned by the ex- 
perts, who have just reported on the Carson Mint, will gain him 
friends even among those who were formerly enrolled under the 
banner of an alleged mining reform. Decent people all over the 
world recognize the truth of the Shakesperian maxim that the 
theft of a good name is much more despisable than the theft of 
gold. It remains to be seen whether Mr. Willams proposes to 
accept the vindication of his character in full satisfaction for the 
outrage he was subjected to, or whether he will resort to legal 
measures which may result in a heavy cut, by way of damages, 
into the prospective profits of the Norcross litigation. 



Jnlv 2, 1892, 



SAN FRANi [SCO NEWS LETTER 



17 




'Hearlhe Crier:" "What the deTi] art thou?' 
'Onethat wIUpUt tbe'lev-l.Hir, with you." 



THIS city does not suffer from a poverty of vendettas. We 
have the highbinder vendetta for the north side, the McManus 
vendetta for the Potrero. the Union Sailors' vendetta along tie 
city front, and absolutely the only quarter of town which pines for 
a vendetta is the Western Addition. Yet there are those who say 
that the cult of the Western Addition is of a very high order. 
There are literary and social clubs on every block, and there is a 
wlerd dramatic society, which presents howling melodramas 
about once a month. But there is nothing to attract public at- 
tention, with the exception of two podgy bank clerks, who ride 
out along Lombard street every morning, and who excite the 
hostilities of all the curs along their path. One equestrian is 
costumed in a tight fitting velvet jacket, and cords and tops, of 
the kind that grooms wear in England. The other, who be- 
strides a bonier mustang, wears a semi-bicycle costume t and this 
is the fellow the dogs are particularly down on. If he should 
fall f o d h s horse, which is not at all unlik< If, for he has an 
execrable seal, the dogs w ould bounce on him and rend him limb 
from limb before he had time to whistle for the poundkeeper. 

AN Oakland parson said one day this week, in the course of " a 
few remarks," that there would be no paupers and no crimi- 
nals in the future. This is somewhat in opposition to the crimi- 
nal statistics of this State. From one to three convicts airive 
da ly at the Folsom and San Quentin prisons. There are more 
paupers in the State to-day, in proportion to the population, than 
there have ever been. What is it, then, that is going to check 
crime and pauperism ? Not the increase of churches, for they, 
too, are more numerous in the State to-day than they have ever 
been. Not optimistic nonsense, such as is uttered by the reverend 
Oakland gentleman. Perhaps some effective attention to such 
matters might, but we are too selfish to devote much time in look- 
ing into the causes of the miseries of others. As a matter of fact, 
the individual who is not himself a pauper or criminal, or whose 
interests are not directly and palpably effected by pauperism and 
crime, does nut care the flick of a lamb's tail about those subjects. 
In these times, to make a person really and genuinely philan- 
thropic, the fastenings of his purse must be threatened. 

A WELL-DRESSED young man, who has been frequenting the 
lobbies of the theatres and hotels, gave away the mystery of 
his livelihood the other day. He acts as a target for patent spe- 
cifics. He will take anything in the line of pills and potions, and 
has a hide defiant of all liniments. His fees are small, but his 
business is large, as are his pockets, where he carries specimens 
of everything in the line of patent medicines. When surrounded 
by a bevy of acquaintances, he suddenly complains of a pain in 
bis liver, produces a box of somebody's pills, and bolts a couple 
with the air of a man who enjoys it. On his liniment days, he 
slips, groans, and out comes a bottle of somebody's lotion. He 
rubs it on his shin, and after a decent pause, bounds to his feet 
and springs over a cuspidor. On toothache-drop days, he wanders 
about with his jaw in a sling, and at every favorite opportunity 
cures himself in the presence of a crowd. So with neuralgia; 
and as for corns and bunions, he creates extraordinary impres- 
sions. Whfn he marries, his wife will go into the cosmetic and 
powder business on the same plan. 

WELL, it begins to look now as if we had found everything 
worth finding in this century. The latest and most startling 
discovery is that made by the Rev. Dr. John Joseph Nouri, who 
claims to have stumbled upon Noah's Ark, at the summit of 
Mount Ararat. The positive assurances of the distinguished 
traveler will no doubt convince those agnostics, the members of the 
San Francisco and Pacific Yacht Clubs, that Noah had at one 
time an existence, and commanded a cruiser. The Rev. John 
Joseph Nouri declares that the Ark was over three hundred yards 
long and a hundred feet high. When we consider that Noah was 
compelled fo stow away elephants, tigers, the sharp-nosed rhin- 
oceros, the clumsy hippopotamus, and the Lord knows what be- 
sides, from a giraffe to a flea, his talents as a stevedore cannot be 
too highly commended. But, with all due respect of the reverend 
traveler, he will have to produce Noah's manifest before he can 
secure the belief of this hard-headed, incredulous community in 
his Ark and Ararat story. 

ANEW YORK parson has formed a guild to extend Christian 
fellowship to the Chinese, and to teach Americans to treat them 
with becoming consideration. He should spend a day or two in 
any San Francisco family where Chinese servants are exclusively 
employed, and see how considerately the cook is treated. Time 
was when Bridget was regarded as the only tyrant of the kitchen, 
and the Chinese as the slave. But all that is changed. The 
cunning John has discovered his worth, and issues his ukases in 
pigeon-English with more emphasis and frequency than Bridget 
ever dared, even on the nights when her cousin Mike, the police- 
man was expected to tea. 



THE absnrdfty of a Kieh Oom mission which does nothing but 
sustain a few weakly trout nurseries is manifest to any oh- 
Bervant person who walks jiU.uk the margin of any California 
brook at this Besson. Day after day the riffles diminish. Finally 
nothing bat the pools are left; and these pools are full of baby 
trout for which this most though I less and Inefficient Fi<h Com- 
mission has no consideration. They know that in six weeks 
ben >e even those pools will be dry, and those (ish must perish. 
Take for example Ross creek. There are millions of tiny trout 
in that stream now, which, in August, shall have perished for 
want of water. Why don't the Commissioners have these trout 
cared for and placed where they can arrive at maturity. They 
expend thoi s mds of dollars in hatching them out, but then they 
have n > further business with them. When the pumping from 
the Alameda creek was instituted a few days ago, the bed of the 
stream was left dry, and actually millions of trout perished. But if 
the arrest of a Chinese for killing a shrimp under weight is 
effected, the Fish Commissioners lay smilingly back in their 
official seats and wait for the applause of the State. 

THE zealous clamoring of the ministers of religion, and all good 
Christians, to have the dives closed, is an evidence that a 
spirit of purification exists in this community. They hold mass 
meetings, they make earnest speeches, and they call upon all 
well-intending people to help them. But it seems strange to me 
that they do not go directly to thepowers which could close those 
dives in twenty-four hours. And those powers are the Police 
Commissioners. They can revoke a man's license to retail liquor 
if in their opinion he is the keeper of a disorderly house. Why 
those Comu i oioners do not at one fell swoop crush the dives out 
of existence, is something I can't understand. Those gentlemen 
regard with equanimity the raging sea of public opinion, yet will 
not remove the obstacles which have provoked its waves. 

A SOCIETY reporter of one of the dailies remarks: " An appe- 
tizing dinner was temptingly served and enjoyed in the midst 
of pleasant conversation." Now, what in the name of all that's 
reasonable does that fellow mean by the tempting service of the 
dinner? Does he mean that the waiter poked a dish under the 
nose of the guest, and probably pulled it away, with the remark : 
" You think you're going to get some of this, but you're not." 
There could be no such thing as temptation in the actual service 
of a dinner, though there may be in the hand-squeeze under the 
table, or the gentle pressure of the foot when the host is lying 
about the quality of his claret, and the hostess claims the atten- 
tion of her female guests with a long, elaborate story about her 
adventures at Mentone. 

A BUTCHER was arrested one day this weei: for obstructing 
Market street with piles of bones. It does seem absurd that 
anything in the line of street obstructing could receive the slight- 
est consideration nowadays, when almost every sidewalk in the 
town is blocked with alt sorts of commodities. These feeble 
efforts to enforce an important ordinance never come to anything 
in this city. The fellow, it may be, may be made an example of, 
and for two or three days there is a comparative lull in the erect- 
ing of barricades. Then the boom again begins, and the shop- 
keepers avenge themselves on the public, and hang abundant 
skin scalps at their victorious belt. 

JOHN ADAMS dead? No lighter hand 
Ere cast a fly on summer brook, 
No angler in this Western Land 

So loved to read in Nature's book. 
I've watched him by the river glide, 

On many a morning, bright, serene, 
And fish with skill the babbling tide, 

And o'er the still pool careful lean. 
Peace to his soul; he's gone to rest; 

"We'll miss him from the brook's green shore, 
But ne'er on Mother Nature's breast 

Sleeps one who loved that mother more. 

MILL "VALLEY has a new Episcopal Church, and that fiery 
preacher and eminent controversalist, Rev. Mr. Miel, is the 
parson thereof. Mr. Miel was at one period of his existence a 
reporter on the Call, and there he learned many of the little traits 
of the newspaper business which are effective and useful to 
gentlemen of bis profession. Though his name is the French for 
» honey," Mr. Miel can shoot a gall-tipped shaft into a congrega- 
tion and set ewes, lambs and rams in the wildest confusion in five 
minutes, by the face of any respectable clock. 

THE graphic correspondent from the seaside is now getting bis 
or her work in with industry and volume. The Santa Cruz 
correspondent of the Examiner, however, is lamentably ignorant 
of the social history of this city. He {for it must be a man) has 
the unhappy knack of mentioning occasionally in his dazzring 
paragraphs the names of those who sought Santa Cruz as a haven 
of retirement from the disagreeable glitter of their past sins. But 
he parades them, much against their will, no doubt, and gentle- 
men, and sometimes ladies, who penilentially lounge upon the yel- 
low sands are held up as butterflies courting the full glare of day, 
when as a matter of fact the dim gloaming is their preference. 



- - -• -i .i-.g. . 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 



"jai^iii 



<B^Mcrag 



THAT the real estate market is affected by the high rates of in- 
terest paid by the savings bankp of the city, there can be 
little question. This high return, which causes the moneyed 
man neither worry nor work, checks investment, but as soon as 
there is any talk of reducing the rates, a cry is raised that the 
» workingman " is being robbed of the interest on bis hardly 
hoarded savings. The solution of the difficulty is an easy one, 
and lies with the banks themselves. The original aims and ob- 
jects were, and the reason for existence of savings banks is, to 
provide a safe keeping place for the funds of men of limited 
means. They were established to encourage thrift, and to afford 
to the man of small means a return fur his money, the amount of 
which it was supposed would be too small to afford means of In- 
vestment in realty or in other channels. For the merchant and 
capitalist the doors of the commercial banks always stand open, 
and the savings banks were never intended for his patronage, 
any more than the commercial banks look to the wage-earner for 
business. 8o long as the savings banks limit the amount of deposits 
which any single depositor may be credited with on their books, 
there will be no cry that these institutions interfere with real estate 
business. Most of the savings banks accept money on deposit 
without limit, and to them the merchant naturally turns with 
his surplus funds, and draws a handsome return. The solution 
to the difficulty referred to lies, therefore, with the banks. The 
difficulty is due to the system of unlimited deposits, and the way 
out of it lies in limiting the deposits to from $2,000 to at most 
$4,000 from any one depositor. The amounts on deposit in the 
savings banks of this city are out of all proportion to the size of 
the city, as compared with other cities of the Union. The various 
banks are now announcing their rates of interest for the half- 
year, and they are as high as ever. In spite of these facts, the 
refrain everywhere is, " business is dull." Limit the amount of 
deposits in the name of a depositor, and the large amounts of 
money will be forced into circulation, will stimulate investment, 
will result in the employment of more labor, and will bring forth 
evidences of material prosperity far stronger than are the large 
sums of money on deposit in our savings banks. 

Realty business is summering, and the number of important 
sales made is, of necessity, small. Mountford S. Wilson has 
purchased the » Imperial," a four-story frame family hotel on 
Sutter street, near the University Club. It stands on a lot 34.4x80, 
and the price paid was $40,000. The Luning Company seems de- 
termined to invest the millions of the late financier in this city, 
and among its recent achievements there are three of note — the 
commencement of work on a five-story building on the Market. 
Drumm and California streets gore; the Wbittell residence, at the 
southeast corner of Jones and California streets, to be a costly and 
handsome one, and the purchase, just effected, of the Bay Ware- 
house, on Sansome street, south of Lombard, for $19 000. The 
Hinkel brothers, each for himself, has started a string of im- 
provements. John purchased two fifty-varas on the southeast 
corner of Jackson and Leavenworth streets, and will put up a 



row of houses, while William has bought the southeast corner of 
Washington and Hyde, 107:6x137:6, intending to erect thereon a 
good class of residence. 

Western Addition property has had the call all through the 
year thus far; but as most of the investors in that class of realty 
are out of town, sales have this month been less numerous. The 
Metropolitan Electric road is to be in operation about July 12th, 
and traversing th3 panhandle and Park properties, should stimu- 
late business all along the line of route. To this the Page-street 
cable line, of the Market-street Cable Company, will also add a 
strengthening tone shortly. 

The march of improvement is going on steadily in the West 
Mission, and the growth of that part of the city is more marked 
than that of any other section. The grading of the lot on the 
east line of Mission street, opposite 29th, for a car and power 
house, is an indication that the reconstruction of the Mission 
street car line is not distant. The electric road has been doing a 
heavy business ever since it commenced operations, and has put 
a great deal of property within reach for residence purposes. 
Down-town business property presents the usual picture of stiff 
prices on the one side and steady demand on the other. 

To the two or three purchases mentioned may be added Mrs. 
Coleman's on Jessie and Third, east corner, brick improvements, 
for $32,000, lot 22x70 ; house and lot. 33 :6xl00, south line of Wash- 
ington, near Buchanan, for $20,000, and the fifty-vara southwest 
corner of Pacific avenue and Laurel for $12,000. 

By direction from the Attorney-General at Washington, U. S. 
District Attorney Garter has dismissed the suit of the United 
States against John J. Read et al. t to set aside the conveyance 
and cancel the patent granted by the Government to Belvedere 
Island, originally known as El Corte de Madera del Presidio. The 
grounds of complaint in the suit were that the patent had been 
procured by fraud, and that the island was needed by the Gov- 
ernment for purposes of fortification, There were over one hun- 
dred innocent purchasers of Belvedere land under the patent, and 
it was held that the suit for the condemnation of the city ceme- 
tery for fortification purposes did away with the need of Belve- 
dere by the Government. It was also shown that as considerable 
of the property was swamp laud, if the patent were canceled the 
land would revert to the State. The title to the land is now per- 
fectly clear, being in United States patent, all clouds having been 
removed from it. 

We are in receipt of the board proceedings of the National Real 
Estate Association, formed at Nashville, Tenn., on February 17th, 
18th and 19th last. The association is composed of many of the 
leading real estate men in the country, and should be productive 
of much beneficial result. Will E. Fisher, of this city, is one of 
the Vice Presidents of the association. 





BEATS THEM ALL! NO LAMPS TO BLOW OUT 
NO TUBES TO BURST! NO DANGER! 

PACIFIC CAS OR GASOLINE ENGINES! 

REGAN VAPOR ENGINES! 

- LAUNCHES. ENGINES FOR ALL KINDS OF WORK. 




Over 800 in Actual Use on this Coast, Running Pumps, Hoisting Works, Machinery of all Kinds, and Boats, 

SENDF0R UNION GAS ENGINE C0. 22 ™UV 



CATALOGUE. 



u.-i..* i- un.iviov^r .-*r\,»».^ i.r, i ill,. 



19 




TBI little difference between agents Troy and Agnew, over the 
insurance of tbe convent at San Hafael, referred to last week, 
has raised quite a breeze among the underwriters. Tbe company 
that lost the line say9 the London and Lancashire carries tbe 
whole line now, amounting to about |40,000, but this Colonel 
Macdonald denies. He says his company has lost rather than 
gained Catholic business. Mr. Troy, who is prominent in Catholic 
circles, alleges that the rate was cut thirty per cent, by his busi- 
ness rival. The eight or ten interested insurance companies 
which have demanded an investigation by tbe P. I. U., allege 
that the agent rebated bis commission. Mr. Agnew declares that 
naught but superior persuasive powers, and greater influence in 
tbe church, caused the flop on the part of Catholicity from Mr. 
Troy to himself. The penalty for a company cutting a rate is 
$250 fine and a cancellation of the entire line on which the rate 
was cut, while the agent is fined $50, and is not allowed to write 
in the particular line for an entire year. A statement from Father 
Lagan has not been received by tbe Union's manager, and the 
only comment heard is that the Catholics as a body are excellent 
financiers, and that there must have been something on the side 
to induce a change from Mr. Troy to Mr. Agnew. Whether tbe 
side-issue was in the form of a subscription to some fund or not, 
and whether said side-issue can be construed as a rebate, and 
hence as a valuable consideration to influence business, is for the 
Union to discover. 

A silly story was given publicity last week, to tbe effect that 
there were dissensions in the Union which threatened its exist- 
ence. As a matter of fact, it is probably tbe most solid concern 
of its kind in tbe world, and little investigations such as that re- 
ferred to above, never cause any mateiial dissension. Every 
time a man losses a line of business he jumps to the conclusion 
that the other fellow must have cut the rate, and his conclusion 
is usually erroneous. 

Up to May 1st the losses for the first four months of tbe year 
were only a trifle over those for the same time in 1891. June has, 
however, thrown in a line of heavy losses, which will make the 
first six months' total for 1892 far ahead of that for the corres- 
ponding period in 1891. 

The heaviest loss of the week is that through the total destruc- 
tion of 8chwabacher Bros. & Co.'s wholesale merchandise stores 
in Seattle. The losses aggregate $318,500, made up of $242,500 
on stock, $70,000 on building, and $6,000 on furniture and fix- 
tures. The companies mulcted are the Manchester, Caledonian, 
American, Fireman's Fund, New York Underwriters, Hamburg, 
Connecticut, Queen, People's and others. A. J. Wetzler and V. 
C. DurTield, the adjusters, left on Wednesday evening to handle 
the losses in the interest of the companies named. 

The losses on the fires of Tuesday morning, at 846 Howard 
street, in which a number of frame buildings and 60 horses were de- 
stroyed, are estimated at $30,000, while the insurance loss was 
light. 

Marine losses of the week include the whaling brig Alexander, 
lost in the North, insurance all carried in this city, and the seal- 
ing schooner Maud W., bound from Halifax to Victoria, B. C, 
reported to have been wrecked in the Straits of Magellan. 

In spite of the losses referred to in fire business, there is really 
little cause for complaint. Every one seems to be doing well, 
and tbe year's business will not compare idy with that of many 
of its predecessors. 

Beautiful Photograph Frames. 



That enterprising firm, Sanborn, Vail & Co., of 741-743 Market 
street, is now showing some of the most beautiful goods ever seen in 
the city. Their frames for cabinet photographs made of silver and 
other attractive metals are unsurpassed. They are all of new and 
artistic styles, and are ornamented in white and gold and with bisque 
work. The other small silver goods are also very attractive. They 
include silver inkstands, stamp-boxes, mucilage bottles, pocket flasks, 
and a variety of articles of vertu. The beautiful booklets and leaf- 
lets containing pressed California flowers are probably the most ap- 
propriate presents that could be sent to friends in the East, who de- 
sire to know by observation some of the many attractions of this land 
of flowers. They are selected and pressed especially for Sanborn, 
Vail & Co., and present a very handsome appearance. Persons de- 
siring beautiful goods should examine these. 

Every housewife who wishes to have clean carpets and curtains 
should remember that the only place in the city where her material 
can be cleaned to her satisfaction is at the Carpet Beating Machine 
and Cleaning and Dyeing Works of J. Spaulding & Co., at 553-577 
Tehama street. The work of this firm is always first-class in every 
particular, for which reason it always has a great patronage. 

Visitors to the country should take with them Steele's Grindelia 
Lotion of the fluid extract of Grindelia. It is the best known remedy 
for poison oak, and is also recognized as an unrivalled cure for asth- 
matic affections. The lotion is for sale at the Palace Pharmacy, at 
635 Market street. 



HAVE YOU DECIDED 

WHERE TO GO FOR 

Your Summer Outing? 

The new route via. Calistoga to 

Bartlett Springs, Clear Lake, 
Soda Bay, Harbin Spring?, 

Seigler Springs, Adams Springs, 

Anderson Springs, Highland Springs, 
Howard Springs, 

and the other resorts of Lake County, is the most charming com- 
bination of rail, stage and steamer 
travel in the State. 



Have You Ever Seen The Geysers ? 



Hotel Del Monte, 

El Carmelo, and Pacific Grove 

are dreams of vacation luxury, with very moderate charges. 



Charm ng Santa Cruz, 

Always Has Its Thousands. 



Camping in the Santa Cruz Mountains is the 

sweetest and most healthful 

out pleasure. 



Yosemitf- 
Is Nature's Grandest Expression of the Sublime and Beautiful. 



THE LAKES OF THE HIGH SERIES, 

Tahoe, Donner, Weber, Independence 

Have vast stores of beauty, pure air, hunting, fishing, 
boating, health and happiness. 



The Grand Old Shasta 

Appeals with majestic eloquence to lovers of nature, where the 
New Castle Crags Tavern is open for Guests. 



SANTA MONICA, LONG BEACH AND SANTA BARBARA 

Remain the Gems of the South. 



How Many 

Have Seen the Wonderful Palm Valley. 



Ask Agents Southern Pacific Company for a copy of 

"CALIFORNIA RESORTS." 



Every Summer Resort in California worth visiting is 
on the Lines of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 



A ROMANCE OF BLUE LAKE. 



HIGH up in the mountains, reflecting the color of the sky, lies 
Blue Lake, a sapphire in an emerald setting. On every bide 
the green hills slope down to its curving shores, the foliage being 
mirrored in the still surface of the lake, as in the clearest class. 
Above the water the reeds and grasses dip and bend to their 
quivering images below. The lake and its surroundings is a gem 
of nature's own setting, and happily, its beauty has not been 
marred, as yet, by the hand of unappreciative man. In this 
abiding place for romance and imagination, the every-day, hard- 
working world slips from the mind, and one lives in a realm of 
dreams and fancy. That nothing may be absent from this already 
perfect spot, the romance is here, its hero being the owner of the 
picturesque Swiss chalet, embowered in vines and flowers, which 
gives an additional charm to the scene. The narrator of the pa- 
thetic little story of man's faithfulness and woman's duplicity, 
was the vivacious French hostess of Le p&tit Trianon, » I tell the 
story as 'twas told to me," she said, " but the lively gestures, the 
eloquent pauses, which intensified the interest of the story, must 
be left to the imagination. Several years ago Fritz, a simple- 
minded German, with a large heart and more than the average 
amount of faith in human nature, met and loved, ■ not wisely 
but too well, 1 a scheming young woman whose air of innocence 
covered much avarice and selfishness. At that time Fritz 
was the possessor of a goodly share of this world's 
riches, and his crafty fiancee so played upon his feel- 
ings that she induced hiujj upon the day of their wedding, 
to sign over to her all his property, excepting the home by the 
lake, of which she probably did not know. Having accomplished 
her aim, the heartless woman departed with her ill-gotten gains, 
leaving poor Fritz to mourn the loss of wife and fortune. Then 
this " beau garcon," instead of seeking for the faithless one, or 
making an effort to recover his property, went to his mountain 
home, and, still believing in the woman his heart had chosen, 
there he waits patiently for her return. For three long years has 
he looked for her and wavered not. The days are spent in continu- 
ally beautifying the house and garden, to which "she will come 
back," he says with a faith that time has not shaken. " C'est un 
vel homme," said the little Frenchwoman, with a suspicion of tears 
in her bright black eyes ; and then, when she spoke of the wicked 
woman, whose heartlessness could permit her to deceive the con- 
fiding man, how those black eyes flashed. " Une canaille" she 
said; " Fritz, he say, ■ One day she come back.' Mon! she come 
nevvaire." Thus closed the story. As our boat glided past the 
pretty home, whose lonely master waits day after day for the one 
still dear to him, we wonder and speak tenderly of this marvel of 
enduring love and faith in this cynical and incredulous nineteenth 
century. 

The New Corset House. 

Ladies who desire well-fitting and comfortable corsets should 
visit the New Corset House and Ladies' Emporium of Richard Freud 
and Mrs. W. H. Ober, at 816 Market street, in the Phelan Block. 
Mrs. Ober is the inventor of the popular corset waist, and the agent 
of the Jenness-Miller pads. 



If you have not yet decided where you intend to spend your sum- 
mer vacation, get a copy of " California Resorts " from one of the 
agents of the Southern Pacific Company, and read up on the attrac- 
tions of the many beautiful places along the line of that road that 
offer unusual inducements for an outing, from the lakes of the high 
Sierras to the langerous heat and tropical beauty of Palm Valley, 
from Shasta to Santa Barbara, and from Lake county, that Switzer- 
land of the West, to Santa Cruz, on every side the glories of nature 
abound. The Geysers, Yosemite, Monterey, El Carmelo, Santa 
Monica, the many springs throughout the interior, each offers its pe- 
culiar attractions. 



"THE WHITE HOUSE." 

THE LARGEST RETAIL DRY-GOODS STORE IN THE CITY. 

GREAT SUMMER SALE! 

During the month of June The White House will offer for sale the 
entire stock of this season's importations at Greatly Reduced Prices. 
The stock comprises: 

"Woolen Dress Goods. 

CREPONS, CASHMERES, SERGES. IN FANCT AND PLAIN. 

A Special Bargain. 

100 pieces of Scotch Cheviot, suitable for Outing Suits, at 35c, 
per yard. 

NOTICE.— Tables of Remnants and Short Lengths at Less 
Than Cost. 

Silks. 

An average price of Figured India Silk , sold until now at $1.25 
and $1, for 75c. per yard. 

Ribbon Counter. 

This department offers great inducements to purchasers. Ele- 
gant Woven Ribbons at 25c. per yard. A full assortment of 
Velvet Ribbons, Black and Colored. 

Chiffon and Ladies' Neckwear. 

An inspection will show that prices of the above goods have 
been reduced over 50 per cent. 

Wash Goods. 

Sateens, Cheviots, Percales, Zephyrs, Ginghams, Lawns and 
Organdies, at Cost. 

Cloak Room. 

A very material reduction has been made in the prices of 
Spring Jackets, Capes, Ulsters, Mantles. 

Outing Suits. 

Black India and Surah Silk Skirts, with one or two ruffles ; also 
Fancy Striped Levantine Silk Skirts, reduced from $10.50 and 
$12 to $8. 
£^~ Mail orders solicited. Samples sent ou application. Goods sent 
free to all suburban towns. 

RAPHAEL WEILL k CO., 

N- W. Cor. P ost and Kearny Sts, 

Good Cheer and a Souvenir of California for our Eastern Friends. 



Parties desiring to send to their 
friends East the 

INGLENQOK TABLE WINES 

Can have their orJers filled at San 
Francisco prices aud of freight at 
car-load rates added, thus saving 
a great expense by leaving their 
orders in time with 

F. A. HABER, 

Office and D«pot Inglenook Vineyard, 122 Sansome St., S. 




QUEEN 



OF ALL THE 




(SUMMER RESORTS, 

THE FAMOUS 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

MOWTEEEY, CJL2L,. 
Elegaut Accommodations. Moderate Rates. For reservations and other information addres s 

GKEO. SOZHZOHSnEW^LID, DVL^t^ckee. 



Julv 2. 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWs LETTER. 



21 




'V % 



THERE are fashions in flowers is In everything else. This year 
the bouquets are to be Arcadian, so tosay, and by *• Arcadian ' 
they mean wild, unrestrained, and innocent of the least scrap of 
wire or any such atrocity. Flowing streamers of ribbon have 
Riven place to a >imple bow tied round the stalks, t; a-ses and 
preen foliage, too, are much to the fore, and many of the drawing- 
room posies were a nodding mass of roses, lilies or white lilac, 
half hidden beneath a veil of feathery green, culled from field and 
garden. As to the window boxes, they are quite a sight just now. 
Those deserving to stand highest on the list are at Dudley House, 
where the young Conntess bas followed the example of her mother- 
in-law in choosing a long line of white daisies, planted very thickly 
in cream-colored boxes, with an edging of trailing pink geraniums, 
which, by the way, are among the hardiest and most satisfactory 
of our out-door flowering plants. 

In French millinery the bonnet shapes are close and small, while 
the large hats have brims of great expansion. Both crown and 
brim often have a fluted effect. One of the prettiest summer hats 
seen recently is an artistic affair of fiue sage green chip, with a 
wide brim coming to a point in front. The back and sides of the 
hat have the fluted effect. There is a low double crown to the 
bat, and the edge of the brim is trimmed with pink roses. Two- 
faced ribbon, pink and green, is arranged in standing loops at the 
back. The brim is faced with shirred pink crepe, 

A word may be said concerning the coiffure a la mode. The 
habit of wearing false bair in plaits, braids or frissettes is being 
discarded. Ladies make the best they can of the hair nature has 
supplied them with, which they arrange to suit their faces accord- 
ing to their fancy. The hairdressing fraternity here laments over 
this simplicity in the coiffure of ladies, the building up of false 
chignons, khots, and so on being one of the most lucrative 
branches of their trade. 



In wearing a veil with a round hat, the soft, full folds of the 
tulle or net must be drawn under the chin, over the hair, and 
fastened high up at the back, says the Ladies' Home Journal. 
Fancy pins are not liked for pinning this in position ; instead, the 
material should be knotted and tucked just under the brim of the 
hat. 

The Four Hundred indulges in fads like the rest of the world' 
and at present a mania for collecting playing cards is the chosen 
one. Some of New York's well-known club men have agents in 
different quarters of the globe searching for anything unique and 
original in this line. 

A novelty in hats bas the square, mortar-board crown, with a 
brim of medium width just curving up at one side. The trimming 
most liked for these hats consists of a narrow twist of velvet and 
a shaving brush pompon at one side near the front. 

A favorite decoration for each side of the closing of a black or 
dark blue cloth coat consists of loops and ends of broad, black 
braid so carefully sewed on the material that they look as if they 
were woven on the stuff. 

White undressed kid gloves will be in good taste with the sim- 
plest cotton gowns. They may either close with a large button, 
or slip over the hands in ordinary mosquetaire fashion. 

The red shoe, with hose of the same color, will be the rage at 
watering places. 



SEMI-ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE. 



-OUK- 



MAMMOTH SURPLUS STOCK 



-OK- 



SPRING AND SUMMER 

DRY GOODS AND CLOAKS 



-NOW BEING CLOSED OUT AT- 



TREMENDOUS REDUCTIONS. 

Every Department Brimming With Bargains- 
Call Early and Secure a First Choice. 




1 Building. 

MARKET, JONES AND MCALLISTER STS. 



DR. F. C. PAGUE, 

DENTIST, 

Rooms 4 & 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 

819 Market Street. 

Dr. J. H. STALLARD 

— AND — 

Dr. J. CLARK, 

ZPHC-SrSXaX-A-asTS aad SXTX-^CS-EOiTS, 
632 Sutter Street. 

A. LUSK & CO., 

122 DAVIS STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 
Packers of the following celebrated brands: 
CELEBRATED LUSK BRANDS, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY, 

SAN LORENZO PACKING CO 



CAMELLINE 

The enjy f&ceprep&r&Hen sanctioned as 
ABselytely harmless by the medical prefessien 





jjjjjj- ■■■"■'" i^W^g-^^k^fc^H IpIS! 




22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1592. 



^^W^lh^^^^^^^ 



WITH reference to " Colleen Dhaa Crouthing a Mow," or "The 
Nice Girl Milking the Cow," which was recently sung by 
Madame Patti, if tradition speaks truly, the composition and first 
singing of the song is attributed to no less personage than His Sat- 
tanic Majesty himself. The tradition is that once on a time a priest 
was called upon in a hurry to attend on a dying sinner. It was a 
lovely summer's morning, and he set offon horseback in order to ar- 
rive quickly. All went well till he came to the entrance of a wood, 
at which he was struck spell-bound by hearing the most melodious 
singing that ever greeted human ears. The song was " Colleen Dnas 
Crouthing a Mow." The priest reined up his horse at once in order 
not to disturb the singer, and waited to hear the whole song. After 
which the most demoniacal laughter greeted his ears, which brought 
him to his senses at once, and caused him to ride, fast and furious, 
to the relief of the dying man. But he arrived, alas ! •' too late." For 
as he came in sight of the house the man breathed his last. The 
priest then knew it was the will of the Evil One himself to waylay 
him in order to prevent him from absolving the dying sinner. And 
his reverence, as in duty bound, did penance in sackcloth and 
ashes for his sin of procrastination, and at the same time denounced 
the fatal song from the altar, and fabade all good Catholics ever to 
sing it. As a consequence, it is held in the same repute by the Irish 
peasantry as the " Marseillaise " is held by the clerical party in 
France. ^^.^^ 

The ancient annual ceremony of " Talabbaram," or weighing the 
Maharajah of Travancore against an equivalent weight of gold, 
has come round again. It appears to have been conducted this 
year with great pomp and ceremony, for the present Maharajah 
is a hindoo of the orthodox type, who aspires to keep up the 
traditions of his house. Some months before the ceremony the 
Government purchased through its commercial agent at Alleppey 
about 2,000 pounds' weight of pure gold, the greater part of which 
was converted into coins for this purpose. After presenting an 
elephant and offerings to the shrine the Maharajah entered the 
building prepared for the occasion, and having completed the pre- 
liminary ceremonies, mounted one of the scales. The sword and 
shield were laid in his lap ; in the other side of the scale gold coins, 
struck for the occasion, were placed by the first and second 
princes, till it touched the ground and the Maharajah rose in 
the air, the priest meanwhile chanting Vedic hymns. Volleys 
were fired, the band played, and the troops presented arms. The 
Maharajah worshipped at the shrine and then went to the palace. 
Subsequently the Dewan and other officials distributed the coins 
from the fort gates to about fifteen thousand Brahmins. 

There is only one factory in Russia for the manufacture of playing 
cards. It has a monopoly of the business, and belongs to the Found- 
ling Hospital. It is figured that there are 30,000.000 people in Russia 
who play cards, and to supply the demand this factory puts out 
6,000,000 packs of cards annually. In order to make this enormous 
quantity of cards only 320 women, aged from fifteen to twenty years, 
and 68 men are employed. And they are chosen amid the sisters, 
wives and daughters of the workmen at the factory. Both exteriorly 
and interiorly the factory is a model of cleanliness. This is one of 
the essential conditions of this branch of production. All the em- 
ployees live at the factory, and earn from $5 to $15 a month. They 
work from 6 in the morning to 6 o'clock at night, and are allowed 
two hours a day for their meals. Besides the ordinary playing cards 
of different qualities, the factory produces annually 120,000 packs of 
figured cards for the German colonies, besides 12,000 packs of minia- 
ture playing cards as toys. The annual product of the factory 
amounts to about $800,000. The cardboard is supplied by the Neva 
Paper Mill. 

Twenty steamers, each with a band aboard, together making grand 
music, went out from the port of Riga to gratefully salute the Ameri- 
can vessel Vonemaugh, which brought food succour for the starving 
Russians. This is the third shipment. The cargo consisted of 2,300 
barrels of flour and various kinds of provisions. After landing her 
welcome freight as speedily as she could, with the practical desire to 
send succour as soon as possible, it was blessed by prayer, and im- 
mediately afterward expedited by rail. The Czar sent Captain Spen- 
cer of the Conemaugh a message of warm thanks, begging him also to 
accept as a souvenir a beautiful silver tea service ema'dle in Byzantine 
style. The people of Riga had a grand torchlight procession at night 
in honor of the captain and the gracious American people who had 
given so largely to the distressed Russians. 



At a loss for a new motive for a gamble, two members of a Paris 
club deposited 100 louis each with the secretary, also their watches, 
both timed to the same minute. He was to retain them for two 
hours, at the end of which time, having dined, they called for the 
watches, and the one whose watch was in advance of the time of the 
other took the louis. 



IB^HSTKIS. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 00 

Surplus 1,000,000 00 

Undivided Profits (July 1st, 1890) 3,275,919 48 

WM. ALVORD, President. 

THOMiS Brown. Cashier | B. Murray, Jr . . .Assistant Cashier 

Irving F. Moulton, 2nd Assistant Cashier. 

(ORRESPONDEVTS * 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bant of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild <k Sons. Correspondents in India, China, 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver t Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland.O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Franklort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland- 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 

N. W. turner Sansome and Bush Streets. 

Established 1870. U. 8. Depositary. 

CAPITAL (PAID UP) 91,500,000 

SURPLUS $600,000 1 UNDIVIDED PROFITS $160,000 

8. G. MURPHY. President! E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOPPITT.. . .Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

DIKBCTOBB: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins, 8. G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffltt. 

Thomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 
SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 
JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 
Safes to rent from $5 to ?100 per annum (uoder the exclusive control of 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks aud Packages taken on 
storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p.m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital paid up 2.450,000 

Reserve ■.... 450,000 

San Francisco Office. 424 California St. I London Office 73 Lombard St.. E. C 

Portland Branch. 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1006 A Street. 

Man ARTHUB SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STBBL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YOBK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds ol General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Satheb & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. 8. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

WELLS, FAR60 & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

N. E. Corner Sansonie and Sntter Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CAPITAL $ 500,000.00 

SURPLUS 5,488.393.12 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $ 5,988,393^00 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President; Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Bankin 
Business. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, aud are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul aud smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest ou Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

822 PINK STREET. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 11.000,000. 

DIRECTORS: 
CHAS. F. CROCKEB, I E. H. MILLER, Jb. 

B. C. WOOLWOBTH Peesident. 

W. E. BBOWN Vice-Pbesident. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashibb 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Guarantee Capital tSOO.OCo 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary 8. L. ABBOT.Jr. 

Vice-President W. 8. JONES | Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved secaritlee. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



Julv 2, 1 -92. 



s\\ FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 




AT FOUR O'CLOCK- llarriel Promt Bpofford. 

Ah. happy day. refuse to go I 
Hang in Ibe heavens forever ao! 
Korever in ruid-allernoon. 
Ah, happy day of happy June! 
1'our out thy sunshine on the hill, 
The piny wood with perfume (ill, 
And breathe across the singing sea 
Land-acented breezes, that shall be 
Sweet as the gardens that they pass. 
Where children tumble in the grass 1 

Ab, bappy day, refuse to go! 
Hang in the heavens forever so! 
And long not for tby blushing rest 
In the soft bosom of the west, 
But bid gray Evening get her back 
With all the stars upon her track! 
Forget the dark, forget the dew, 
The mystery of the midnight blue, 
And only spread thy wide warm wings 
While summer her enchantment flings! 

Ab, happy day, refuse to go! 

Hang in the heavens forever so! 

Forever let tby tender mist 

Lie like dissolving amethyst 

Deep in the distant dales, and shed 

Thy mellow glory overhead! 

Yet wilt thou wander— call the thrush, 

And have the wilds and waters hush 

To hear his passion-broken tune, 

Ah, happy day of bappy June! 



JULY DAYS.— John Kendrick Bangs, in Ladies' ITome Journal. 

Softly drone the honey-bees; 
Blossom scented is the breeze; 

Golden is the grain. 
Over all the faintest haze 
Rests, and song birds pipe their lays 

In a sweeter strain. 

From the meadows comes the scent 
Of the new hay, clover blent— 

Id the topaz sky 
Fleecy clouds, like ships at sea, 
Floating onward lazily, 

Or at anchor, lie. 

Nature now is doubly dear 
To my soul, for doubly near, 

At July's behest, 
She has come, and coming brings 
Surcease from all weary things — 

Blissful sense of rest! 



THE SWEETEST EYES.— M. A. Dennison, in the Critic. 

Which are the sweetest eyes to you? 

The brown, where fire and languor meet, 
The sunny, laughing eyes of blue, 

Or black, with glances shy and fleet. 

Or opaline, with changeful hue, 

Or gray, where mind with beauty vies, 

Or violet, so soft and true — 

Tell me, which are the sweetest eye? 

Mr darling bent her sunny head, 

Her radiant face seemed balf-divine. 
" The sweetest eyes to me," I said, 

" Are those tiat look with love in mine." 

DRAWING NEAR THE LIGHT. — Wm. Morris in Boston Beacon. 

Lo, when we wade the tangled wood, 

In baste and hurry to be there, 
Nought seem its leaves and blossoms good, 

For all that they be fastened fair. 

But looking up, at last we see 

The glimmer of the open l ! ght, 
From o'er the place where we would be 

Then grow the very brambles bright. 
So now, amid our day of strife, 

With many a matter glad we play, 
When once we see the light of life 

Gleam through the tangle of to-day. 



BAN-KS. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

CAPITAL PAW UP .. I " COrr " r " ,Cdbr Roya " : "" r,Cr - $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 1,175,000 

Southeast corner Bush and Sansome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE SO LOMBARD STREET. LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria. Vancouver, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; 

Seattle aud Tacoma. Washington. 
SUB-BRANCHES— Kamloops, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, Brlt'sh 

Columbia. 
ThiB Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, aud Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available iu all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Otliee and Brauchea, aud upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company ; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO aud SOUTH AMERICA— Loudon Bank 
of Mexico aud South America: CHINA aud JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China: AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank aud National Bank of Australasia; DEM- 
ERARA and TRINIDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

533 California Street, corner Webb Street. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, June 30,1891 923,311,061 00 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 1,346,035 00 

DIRECTORS. 

.U^rt MilUr, Pr esideut; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only ou real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

PEOPLES HOME SAVINGS BANK AND SAFE DEPOSIT. 

80S Market Street (Flood Building!, San Francisco. 

ORGANIZED MAY, 1888. 

Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000.00 I Surplus Profits $ 45,000.03 

Paid-up Capital 338,333.33 | Deposits, Jan. 1, 1892 1,752,000.00 

OFFICERS: 

COLUMBUS WATERHOUSE President 

P.V.McDONALD Vice-President 

J. E. FARNUM Secretary and Manager 

DORN & DORN Attorneys 

Tbls bank receives savings deposits on term or ordinary ac- 
count, iu sums of one dollar aud upwards. 

Interest paid from date of deposit, semi-annually. The five-cent stamp 
system and the safe deposit department is a special feature of this bank. 
Safes to rent by the month or year, from $4.00 to $25.00 per annum. We re- 
ceive commercial deposits, make collections, issue local aud foreign ex- 
change. 

Money to loan on Real Estate and Approved Collateral. 

THE GERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND S 1,610.000 00. 

Deposits Jan. 2, 1892 27,138,129 74 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-PreBident, EDW. KRU8E 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoemann, E. 
Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon. Attorney, 
John R. Jabbqe. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS DANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICBBS. 

JAMES G. PAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Dieectobs— James G. Fair, Edward Barrou, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Pbelan, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader aud James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecurities. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

ub&ct led Capital $2,600,000 \ Paid Up Capital 92,000,000 

Reserve Fund 9660,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Aoents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd ),No. 10 Wall St.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard FrereB & Cie, 17Boule 
yard Poiesoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' CreditB issued. EUGENE MEYER, Manager. 
LO. Altschul, Cashier. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

r.anital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Bn nsoribed 3,000,000 I Reserve Eund 650,000 

BuDscrmeu .... .^^ QrrICX _ i Ange i Court| London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 

eraDhic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loan B money, buys and sells exchanga 

aud bullion. WN. |TEI|m ART^ j Manageri . 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 



THE AGNOSTIC'S QUESTION— " IS LIFE "WORTH LIV- 
ING?"— Aubrey de Vere in the Spectator. 



Life is a thing worth living to the brave 

Who fear not fortune's spite; in Truth who trust, 

Whose spirit, not thralled by pride or earthward lust. 

Stands up while mortal tumults round them rave, 

Like Teneritfe above the ocean wave; 

Who, mailed in Duty, with divine disgust 

Recoil from frivolous joys and aims unjust, 

Nor miss rewards which Reason scorns to crave. 

Life is worth living to those souls of light 

Who live for others, and by gift bestow 

On them the jubilant beams their own by right; 

Who, knowing Life's defects, more inly know 

This life is not the Temple but the Gate 

Where men secure of entrance watch and wait. 



OBTUARY. 

ONE of the most lamented deaths of the year was that of W. E. 
Holloway, who succumbed on Friday last to the effects of the 
amputation of his leg, brought about by the fracture of the limb 
a few days before, by a fall from bis horse near his home, in San 
Rafael. Mr. Holloway was one of the best known and most 
popular men in the city, and had hosts of friends, who were in- 
tensely grieved at the announcement of his death. The obsequies 
were held at St. Rafael's Church, on Sunday morning last, Rev. 
Joseph McQuade, celebrant. The church was profusely deco- 
rated, and was filled with numerous mourning friends of the 
deceased. The pallbearers were: Colonel E. E. Eyre, Captain 
James Birmingham, E. F. Preston, General Dimond, W. D, Cat- 
ton, R. B. Hail, Captain C. Wilson, Charles Peterson, J. Downey 
Harvey and W. Greer Harrison, who escorted the remains into 
the church. The remains were 'n closed in a handsome cloth- 
covered casket, lined with copper and zinc sheathing. The re- 
mains were shipped by express to Baltimore, Md., Mr. Hollo- 
way's former home. Mrs. Holloway was so prostrated that she 
was unable to attend the services at the church. She is in a very 
deplorable condition at her residence, where she is attended by 
many frinds. Mrs. Holloway is the daughter of ex-Mayor W. 
R. Grace of New York city. She became Mrs. Holloway about 
nine years ago, and has a daughter seven years old. The deceased 
was the junior member of the firm of J. W. Grace & Co., which 
has extensive business relations with the Australian colonies, 
South America, New York and London. 

ANOTHER lamented death of the past week was that of John 
M. Adams, who died at the Klamath Reservation, in southern 
Oregon, whither he had gone on a fishing excursion, with Harry 
Babcock, and Faxon D. Atherton. The health of Mr. Adams 
had been poor for four years. He was subject to strokes of 
apoplexy, and was unable to endure fatigue and exertion. Mr. 
Adams was a New Yorker, and was a graduate of Columbia 
College, both in liberal arts and civil engineering. Soon after 
graduation he went to Idaho, and began mining. His tastes in- 
clined him to city life, however, and in company with a Mr. 
Carter he became the western agent for the fuel concentrator, and 
had continued in that employment up to his death with advant- 
age, his fortune being estimated at $75,000. He was a compan- 
ionable man, and intensely fond of fly fishing, at which sport he 
had few superiors in elegance and the accuracy with which he 
tossed a fly. His friendships were many, and all lasting, because 
of his consideration and invariable courtesy. He was a nephew 
of Colonel W. R. Smedberg, and well known in San Francisco. 

THE sad fate of Harry Davidson v who was killed in a mine dis- 
aster at Wardner, Idaho, last week, created quite a shock to 
Oakland society. Harry was one of the brightest and most popuj 
lar young men in the Athenian city, and his many good traits 
were set off to advantage by his talents and administrative genius. 
He was engaged to Miss Bertha Wilcox, one of the belles of Oak- 
land, and the blow has fallen heavily on her. 

THE death of Mrs. Bowman in Oakland last week removes one 
of the most prominent Theosophists on the coast. Mrs. Bow- 
man has been a disciple of Blavatsky for a long time, and she was 
instrumental in founding the Theosophic library and course of as- 
tral study in the city of churches. In accordance with her wishes 
her remains were this week cremated at Los Angeles. 

JAMES P. KERR, proprietor of the Breeder and Sportsman, and 
one of the best-known turf men on the Coast, died in Denver 
on Monday last. He had gone to that city to attend the races! 
and was prostrated by pneumonia, which caused his death. He 
was a native of Scotland, 38 years old, and had been a resident of 
this city many years. 

TWO well-knowu Swedish scientists, MM. Bjorling and Kalls- 
temuis, arrived at St. Johns, Newfoundland, on J une 3d. They 
are commissioned by the Geographical and Zoological Societies of 
Stockholm to explore the shores of Smith Sound in the Arctic 
regions, to collect specimens of the flora and fauna of the district, 
and to take astronomical observations. They will hire a schooner 
for their voyage, from which they expect to return in September. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Bodie Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Bodie, Mono County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 20th day of June, 1892, au assessment (No. 14) of Twentv-five Cents 

fier share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
mmediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 62, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 22d Day of Juty, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and, unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 22d day of August. 1892, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

H. D. WALKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 62, Nevada Block, 309 Mon tgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business—San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Tuscarora, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 15th day of Jane, 1892, an assessment (No. 8) of Ten (10) Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 20, No. 331 Pine street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, or to E. R. Grant, Transfer Agent, 57 Broadway, New York. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-first Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 18th day of August, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 20. No. 331 Pine Street, San Francisco, California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Belle Isle Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Tuscarora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Sixteenth day of June, 1892, an assessment, No. 14, of Ten Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Company, No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-frst Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 12th day of August, 1892. to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW. Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, Sau Francisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location and principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 7th day of June, 1892, an assessment (No. 15) of twenty-five Cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the ofhee of the com- 
pany, room 58, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The Eleventh Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on SATURDAY, the twenty-ninth day of July, 1892, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. H. FISH, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 58, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Ophir Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of Business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the third (3d) day of June, 1892, an assessment (No. 58) of Fifty ^50) 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 4, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The Seventh Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 27th day of July, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, S. F., Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment .' No. 102 

Amount per Share 25 cents 

Levied .Junel0,1892 

Delinquent in Office July 13, 1892 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock.. ... Aueust2, 1892 

E. L PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



July 2 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



25 



"SAME BUSINESS MEN." 

THERE fpetns to be * provoking sameness in men, the mo- 
notony of which is obviated only by the diversity of methods 
by which tbey seek the one object. This is the same in all hu- 
manity, and can be brie My and concisely characterized — it is 
••selfishness." One man enjoys social distinction; another has 
political aspirations, and free from the embarrassing suggestion of 
his possible fitness for the position, desires to favor high places 
with his distinguished presence. He would even be willing to 
invest the •• White House," at Washington, with his honorable 
and illustrious name. We have a living example of man's de- 
pravity in this direction, in the incumbent. One of the most 
charming features of this glorious climate of California is the 
preservative quality contained in it for our boys. They never 
outgrow their sweet boyish ways. Any day in passing along our 
busy streets you may see one of them, say seventy years of age, 
somewhat bent at the shoulders and crooked at the knees, with 
little hair, and that white, and generally a tri tie disfigured, but 
standing as bravely erect as possible, and displaying for the 
benefit of some six teen- year-old Miss all those irresistable charms of 
manner that made him so " fetching" some twenty or thirty years 
ago. Poor dear boy, he has never grown old. Time has dealt so 
leniently with bim that she has forgotten to lay upon him that 
quiet and gentle dignity that compels respect and veneration from 
youth and inexperience, and adds to years their chiefest charm. 
But although their manners are droll, even grotesque at times, 
their hearts are kind, 

Why, no longer than fifteen years ago, Mr. Hittell offered to 
provide liberally for a widow if she would put her children in an 
orphanage, but he was very young then. I don't think he could 
have been a day over seventy, and now he might not be so gener- 
ous. Thus time robs us of even the desire to do good. 

Col. John P. Irish, whose notoriety is excelled by none, and 
equalled by few, is one of our most conspicuous business men, 
and I speak advisedly when I say "business; " he has more 
business than he can well attend to; in fact, he is rushed to death 
with it. The chief aim, of late, of this great man has been to 
furnish us with a site for our new Postoffice. 

M. M. Estee is another good man upon whom ambition has 
laid its blight, for I think he still secretly cherishes the aims that 
met their Waterloo in so simple a thing as a waste-paper basket. 
Thus great men are brought low. I wonder if sometime the Sage 
of Napa does not suspect that he was born the wrong time of the 
moon. 

I think L. L. Baker took a day off just after his birth, and 
came to conclusions about things in this world. After time has 
rung the changes of years for him, he still feels justified in re- 
taining them, just as they were received fresh from the mint. I 
do not believe that as many as three subjects presented for Mr. 
Baker's consideration have been left self-unsalisfactorily disposed 
of. Such executive ability as his is rare indeed. 

Adolph Sutro is the happy possessor of an ample fortune and 
an irrepressibly affectionate disposition. There is one thing, how- 
ever, that is inexplicable to me, in the rare generosity displayed 
by him in kissing all of those lady journalists. (I saw some of 
them). 

Barclay Henley is an aspirant for fame, but Barclay dear, the 
road leading there unto is long and tortuous and fate has placed 
many temptations along the way, specially designed for politi- 
cians, and it is incredible how familiar she is with the particular 
temptations that may betray you. Beware t 

W. Greer Harrison is a gentleman of infinite good humor, a 
faithful adherent of the "Olympics" and "saltwater," and I 
heartily commend his judgment. San Francisco and San Fran- 
ciscans undoubtedly need salt water. This Idea is both original 
and commendable, which is not the case in his unfortunate deter- 
mination to sever his relations with the Mercantile Library. Such 
a design on the part of Mr. Molera would be considered strategic 
by friends of the institution interested in its welfare and prosperity. 

Of the " Great Scotts," Irving and Henry, I like the former the 
better. He seems to be on more gracious terms with the world in 
general, while his geniality is wholesomely contagious. 

It is a curious fact that in the corner of Mr. Prescott's right eye 
lnrks ever a suspicion of all human creatures, while the left one 
meets you in perfect good fellowship. 

The Crockers, without exception, carry that busy, preoccupied 
air that attaches to men of wealth, who are weighed down with 
the necessary care and anxiety of preventing its ultimate change 
of ownership; but they are also, without any exception, polite in 
the interchange of business courtesies. 

Dr. William J. Younger does not permit the golden hours to fly 
away unheeded, and I fancy that one great reason for his success 
in business is his tact. Ah, Doctor, that is a great scheme of 
yours. In transplanting teeth, he always says to susceptible 
gentlemen (that includes all of them) that the identical tooth he 
is then making their own came from the mouth of the » sweetest 
young lady." But it is hardly the fair thing to the young lady; 
she can't have a tooth left. 

I am rather afraid of the man or woman who laughs too much. 
I know two men who feed the hungry; one is named Wilson and 
the other Grey. Mr. Wilson has never yet been detected in a 



smite. The affairs of life call for his grtVAflt consideration, but I 
never look at Mr. Grey without wondering if his face does not 
get tired, for he smiles and smiles. Men are very queer. 
" Alpha." 

Special attention given to all oases recommended by family physicians 
free m charge. C. Mullcr, refraction specialist, 186 Montgomery street, uear 

Bllsn. 



DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 

Behring Sea Packing Company. 
Location of principal place of business— Sau Fraucisco, California. Lo- 
caliou of caunery— l r gaslu"k River, A aska. 

NOTICE.— There are delinquent upon the following described stock, ou 
account of assessment (No. 1;, levied ou the 13th day of February, 1892, the 
several amounts set opposile the names of the respective shareholders: 
Name. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

C.A.Johnson . 1 60 $50 

C. A. Johnson 2 340 340 

Chas. Carlson 7 30 30 

C. Luudberg 12 390 390 

Aud in accordance with law, and an order of the Board of Directors, made 
ou the 13th day of February, 1892, so mauy shares of each parcel of such 
stock as may be necessary will be sold at public auction, at the oflice of the 
company, No. 9 Market street, San Fraucisco, Cal., ou Friday, the 15th day 
of April, 1892, at the hour of 12 o'clock m. of said day, to pay said delin- 
quent assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising aud expenses 
of sale 

JAMES MADISON, Secretary. 
Postponement. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Behring Sea Packing Com- 
pany, this day, the sale of the above delinquent stock was postponed uutil 
MONDAY, the 16th day of May, 1892, at the same time aud place. 

JAMES MADISON, Secretary. 
San Francisco, April 16, 1892. 

Postponement. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Behriug Sea Packing Com- 
pany, this day, the sale of the above delinquent stock was pos'poned uutil 
THURSDAY, June 23, 1892, at the same time and place. 

JAMES MADISON, Secretary. 
Sau Francisco, May 25. 1892. 

Postponement, 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Behring Sea Packing Com- 
pany the s-ale of the above delinquent stock was postponed uutil Saturday, 
July 23, 1892. JAMES MADISON, Secretary. 

San Francisco, June 23, 1892. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

, Alta Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Fraucisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works-Gold Hill, Gold Hill Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on Saturday, the 18th day of June, 1892, an assessment, No. 42, of Fifteen (15) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able immediately, iu United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the of- 
fice of the company, Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Tuesday, the Twenty-sixth Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the sixteenth day of August, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Lirectors. 

L. OSBOKN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francis- 
c o. California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Union Consolidated Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Union Consoli- 
dated Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 11, 
303 California street, Sau Francisco, California, on Monday, the eighteenth 
day of July, 1892, at the hour of oue o'clock p. m., for the purpose of elect- 
ing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing year aud the transaction 
of such other business as may come before the meeting. Transfer books 
will close on Friday, July 15, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

A. W. BARROWS, Secretary. 

Office.— Room 11, 303 California Street, San Fraucisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Union Consolidated Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Union Consoli- 
dated Miuiug Company will be held at the office of the company, room 11, 
303 California street, San Fraucisco, California, on 

Monday, the 18th day of July. 1892, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, aud the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

Transfer books will close ou Friday, July 15th, 1892, at 3 o'clock p.m. 

A. W. BARROWS. Secretary. 
Office— Room 11, 303 California street, Sa n Francisco, California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declare a dividend for the term endiDg with 
June 30, 1892, at the rate of five and one-fifth (5 1 5) per cent, per aanura 
on Term Deposits, and four and one-third per cent, per annum on Or- 
dinary Deposits 'free of taxes, payable on and after Friday, July 1, 1892. 
y p " ' CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— 101 Montgom ery St , Cor. Suiter, Sau Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank. 

The Board of Directors of this bank have declared a dividend for the 
term ending June 30, 1892, at the rate of five and one-fifth (5 1-5) per cent, 
■ner annum on Term Deposits, and four and one-third (4\ 3 ) per cent, per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits, free from taxes, and payable on and after 
July 1 1892 J.E. FaKNUM, Secretary. 

Office- 805 Market street, Flood Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 



THE expense of a funeral in a large city has grown to such pro- 
portions that the average man commits more extravagance in 
the act of dying than he ever did during life. It has been sug- 
gested that a much less costly form of gravestones than that 
usually erected would meet all the requirements of affectionate 
remembrance and respect, and the suggestion has been carried 
into effect in the patenting of a "grave marker." This is simply 
a memorial leaf. It consists of two outer plates bent so as to 
form a holder for leaves or tablets, adapted to be suspended from 
a frame to receive and retain objects desired to be kept as momen- 
toes of the deceased. The tablets beneath the outer plates can 
be designed in any desired form, and as they have sides of mica 
or transparent material to protect the tokens, any objects, such 
photographs, sketches, etc., can be inserted. For instance, a 
sketch of the life of the departed, or a portait or a lock of hair can 
be placed in the receptacle, where it is security protected from 
the weather, and, as it is covered with mica, it will last for many 
years without bleaching or decaying. 

The creeping of rails has attracted some attention of late, 

and while we do not attempt to explain it, we offer a point on 
the fact that on lines running north and south the western rail 
"creeps" faster than the eastern rail; that is, this strange move- 
ment of the rail toward the south is more marked in one rail than 
the other on the same track. Furthermore, it has been noticed 
that on such a line the eastern rails wear out the fastest. Both 
of these points, we think, can be explained by the motion of the 
earth as it turns from the west toward the east. Mo- 
tion tends to overcome gratification. A rapid skater flies over 
the thin ice without breaking through, and a train at high speed 
has been known to leap a broken bridge unharmed. Momentum 
overcomes gravitation, and the greater the speed the less the 
weight on the rails. Everything that has free motion is dragged 
after the whirling globe; every wind that blows, and every tide 
that moves, feels the influence, and our train going north or 
south is pulled over toward the east, and naturally presses the 
eastern rait most heavily. The western rail, being relieved of its 
share of weight, "creeps" more freely and quickly. It is also no- 
tice that the wheels that run on the eastern rail wear out first, 
and we can but think that this earth motion is the true cause. 
The practical side of this is, that the eastern rail and wheels 
should be stronger. — Scientific American. 

Few people known that there is a good and a bad way of 

drinking milk. The bad way is that which they generally follow, 
viz., to swallow a large quantity at once. When milk goes into 
the stomach it is instantly curdled, and if it is curdled into one 
big mass the juices of the stomach can work on only the outside 
of it. This is the reason that many people who like milk, and to 
whom it should be of the utmost benefit, cannot drink it. They 
say it gives them indigestion, and they are right. Let them give 
it another chance, But this time they must sip it slowly, not 
taking more than a good teaspoonful at one sip, and taking at 
least four minutes to finish the glassful. Each little sip thus be- 
comes curdlei up by itself when passed into the stomach, 
and the digestive juices percolate freely around it and it speedily 
becomes assimilated. One of the best restoratives known after 
excessive fatigue, and one infinitely preferable to any form of 
alcohol, is a glass of hot milk. The heat seems to lighten it and 
and to deprive it of much of the sweetness which is so cloying to 
some tastes. 

For a long time the owners of sardine factories were at a 

loss to know what to do with the mounds of tin clippings that 
accumulated at their docks. The clippings are now collected and 
sorted according to their shape, those made by the dies which 
stamps the bottoms and covers of the cans, being pounded into 
suitable shape for handling, while the strips made by the shears 
in cutting the tin for the sides are bundled and boxed. The 
clippings are smelted down in a furnace, the tin with which they 
are coated being melted and drawn off separately, while the mol- 
ten mass of metal which compose the plate is run into molds and 
formed into window weights and other useful articles. The bright 
tin strips of various sizes are utalized in sundry ways, forming 
tin tags for the ornamentation of plug tobacco, button molds, 
ornamental baskets and dozens of other articles. 

— A new kind of submarine boat has been launched at Sa- 
vona by an Italian engineer, 8ignor Abbatti, which is designed 
for fishing and recovering lost property. It is driven by an elec- 
tric screw, and is capable of remaining under water about six 
hours at a depth of 330 feet. — English Mechanic. 

The Grand Central Wine Rooms, of 16 and IS Third street, are 
the most popular in the city among the men who appreciate the beat 
brands of liquor. The house deals only in the best of stock, and 
consequently its customers are never dissatisfied. One who visits 
this hospitable establishment may be insured of receiving courteous 
attention, and of satisfying his aesthetic tastes in every particular. 



A BOSTON SYMPHONY. -Springfield Graphic. 

Across the moorlands of tbe Not 

We chase the grewsome When, 
And hunt the Itness of the What 

Through forests of the Then. 
Into the inner consciousness 

We track the crafty Where; 
We spear the Ego tough and beard 

The Ergo in his lair. 

With lassos of the brain we catch 

The Isness of the Was, 
And in the copses of the Whence 

We hear the Think bees buzz. 
We climb the slippery Which bark tree 

To watch the Thusness roll, 
And pause betimes in gnostic rhymes 

To woo the Over-Soul. 



FRANCE has a national council of women, in Finland the 
national bodies are federated through the efforts of Baroness 
Alexander Gripenberg; the three Scandinavian countries, Nor- 
way, Sweden and Denmark, have formed a Scandinavian woman's 
council, and in Italy a national club of women has been formed, 
with Queen Margherita as its leader and chief officer. 



Good Cooking 
Is one of the chief blessings of every home. To always insure good 
custards, puddings, sauces, etc., use Gail Borden " Eagle " Brand 
Condensed Milk. Directions on the label. Sold by your grocer and 
druggist. 

IZEsTSTTZR-A-lsrCjE . 




Insurance Company, 
capital $1,000,000,1 assets 12,560,000. 

D. J. STAPLES President. 

WILLIAM J. DUTTON Vice-President. 

B. FAYMONVILLE Secretary 

J. B. LEVISON Marine Secretary 

Agents In all prominent localities throughout the United States . 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

rESTABLISHED 1871.] 
CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up 1400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 SANSOME STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 

SEORGE L. BEANDER, 

President. 



CHA8. M. BLAIR, 

Secretary. 



QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up $ 500,000 

Assets 3,181,753 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,525,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 

City Office— 501 Montgomery St. General Office— 401 Mont'-r, St. 



FIRE 



INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Company of London. 
Imperial Fire Insurance Company of London, 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 
Pacific Department, 214 Sansome St., S. F. 
SWAIN & MURDOCK, City Agents. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL 16,000,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

Wo. 31 6 Calllornla Street. San Francisc o. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets. $19,724,538.48. 

President, BENJAMIN P. STEVENS. | Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBEN8. 

HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE OF REMOVAL 

HOME JH Tl A I. INSURANCE COMPANY Intends removal from its 
present ottce, No. 326 California street, to No. 318 CALIFORNIA STREET, 
San Francisco, on or ahout June 22, 1892. CHAS. R. STORY, President. 

San Francisco, June 7, 1892. 



July 2, 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS IK I IKK. 




SUNBEAMS 



UPON the recent death of an eminent English divine at Cannes, 
the following bulletin was placed by the family upon the door of 

his late residence; "Mr, ^ -It-parted this life for heaven at 

elevt-n o'clock a. m. Borne passing wag, possessed of more drollery 
than reverence, placed beneath the notice a telegraph blank filled 

out in the following manner: Heaven, 12 >i. Mr. 8 , not yet 

arrived. Getting uneasy.— Peter. 

I 'nde Jftwjf — "l's in trouble, suah, sah. My wife she say she 
done get a divorce an' leab me for a dude coon dat's been maktn' up 
to her. sah, ef I don* get a new suit ob clo's." Featherstone— "Well, 
uncle. I mav have an old suit around somewhere. How soon do you 
want it?" VncU Ebony — "Wa-al, dat depeu's. sah. Any time alter 
she leab me, sah, will be soon enough." — Judge. 

Mr. O.mnery — "Can Oi throuble you to hand me mebelt-shtrap, 

Hridget?" Mr*. Cvnnery— "Pfwhat has Jamesey done now?" Mr. 
Connery. — "He's gettin' too shmart. He tould me Terry Tobin wor 
arristed, an' phin Oi axed him pfwhat for, he said he wor wor-rkin' 
in a shtone-yard an' got caught carryin' aff chips fer kindlin'." 

— Judge. 

— Mrs. Pearsons. — People in this country talk about kings and 
sons of kings having no brains. Why, James, you brag all over town 
about your having been a drumraer-boy at fifteen, while here this 
ten-year-«ld son of Emperor William is'a lieutenant. I tell you. his 
parents should feel proud of him ! — Puck. 

Daughter. — "You know, father, they are going to have a fair at 

the church next week, and thought I would like to get something 
for it." Father (handing her a check) — "Certainly, my daughter. In 
the cause of charity I am always liberal. What were you going to 
get?" Daughter— "Something in the way of a new gown." — Judge. 

Fire Marshal — You say it started in the waist-basket. Now, 

you had four of these grenades in a rack at your elbow; how was it 
that you did not use them ? Mr. Cassidy—Och ! Thim things, is it? 
Sure" I thot of thim to wanst; but whoile I was gittin' a corkscrew to 
open wan, the fire got the start of me intoirely ! — Puck. 

New York Snob — "So you have gone and got privately married 

without my consent. You young scoundrel, I'll His son— 

"But you forget, father, that Mr. McAllister's son did the same 
thing.' New York Snob — "Ab, I had forgotten. Bless you, my 
child, bless you. — Rochester Hdrald. 

"Another lettter from Alfred? When do you expect to marry 

him?" "He has two years more at the preparatory school. After 
that he will go to Yale, and when he has been graduated there he 
will go out west and make his fortune. When he has made his for- 
tune we shall be married. O, it all seems so beautiful." — Life. 

•^—Friend. — What on earth are you doing to that picture? Great 
Artist. — I am rubbing a piece of raw meat over this rabbit in the fore- 
ground. Mrs. De Shoddie will be here this afternoon, and when she 
sees her pet dog smell of that rabbit, she'll buy it. 

—New York Weekly. 

Aunt Kate— And when he died — I loved him so— I had him 

stuffed, and I keep him where I can see him whenever 1 wish. 
Little Robert (o?i a visit to a much-beloved aunt). — Auntie, when you 
you die, I'm going to get Papa to have you stuffed, too. —Puck 

Jack (to his fiancee). — I think of getting a musical instrument, 

Maud. Say, perhaps, a cornet. Maud (in dismay).— Oh t no! not 
that horrid thing. Jack (in surprise).— And why not, dearest? Maud 
(blushing violently).— It makes the lips so hard. — Puck. 

—Young Van der Million:— Wouldn't be rare fun for us to become 
engaged just for the summer you know? She. — Just the thing, I 
never did believe in long engagements. —Life. 

Richard III. — A horse! a horse! My kingdom for a horse ! 

Farmer Hayrick— "B 1 gosh, 'Mandy! if I don't sell him the old roan 
mare as soon as the show's aout. — Judge. 

— " There's one thing about a clam," remarked young Feedly as 
he dexterously removed a handful of gravel from his mouth; "he 
never loses his sand." — Yale Record. 

— — ■ " Why should we say to Satan ' Get thee behind me ! ' ? " asked 
the teacher. "So that we shall get ahead of him," returned the 
brigh t boy . —Judge. 

—-McFlanagan (who has traveled)— Waiter, were you ever in Cork? 
Waiter— No sor; but O'ive seen a many dhrawings av it. 

— Frank Leslie's. 
—" What do your club letters, B. S., stand for?" " You won't 
tell, will you?" - l Oh, no." "Then why should I?" —Judge. 

— "Sad about Hicks." " What was that?" "Swallowed his 
teeth and bit a hole in his liver." —Judye. 

Her Father.— Do you work for a livin? Chappie— 0, yaas— yaas 

Her Father (sizing him up).— Whom do you work? —Life. 

"Why did you reject him?" "He was not accompanied by 

stamps." —Life. 

Among the restaurants of San Francisco, none have a higher place 
in popular tavor than the Original Swain's Bakery, at 213 Sutter 
street, which for years has had the patronage of the elite of the city. 
It is centrally located, and therefore convenient to ladies out shop- 
ping, and is also very popular for refreshments after the theatres. It 
is very popular for dinner parties. 



IXTSTJ E,jft.2STCE . 



REMOVAL! 
HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY 

Now Occupies Premises at the N. E. Cor. California and Sansome 
Sts., 8. K., Lately Vacated by Wells, Fargo & Co. Hank. 

Twenty-seventh Annual Exhibit. 

January 1, 1801. 
INCORPORATED A. D. 1864. 

Losses p*d since orgaul'n. 13,175,759.21 I Reinsurance Reserve J2fi6.043.59 

Assets January 1, 1891 . . . 867,512.1!) Capital paid up, Gold . 300,000.00 
Surplus (or policy holders 8-14,944.6!) | Net Surplus over ev'yth'g 278,901.10 

Income in 1890 $894,184.52 I Fire Losses paid In 1890. 142,838.90 

Fire Losses unpaid, January 1, 1891 11404.00 

President J. F. HODGHTON I Secretary CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-Pr esident ..HENRY L. DODGE I General Agent.ROBERT H. MAGILL 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURME~WpANYT~ 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

Herbert L. Low, Manager for (lie Pacific toast Branch. 

22o Sansome St., S. I'. 

Capital $1,500,000.00 

Infested in U. S. 534J95.T2 



GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 

333 California St.. S. F., Cal. 



THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. OF ST, GALL, OF ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000.000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 
410 Californi a St., San Francisco. Cal. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000.000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6,124.057.80 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street. San Francisco. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $1 U.62 6.000 

Cash Assets 4.701,201 39 

Cash Assets In United States 2.272.084 13 

REINSURERS OF 

An£lo-Neva«la Assurance Corporation 

AND 

Southern California Insurance company. 

WDVL. IMI.A.aDOIsr.A-IjID. 

MANAGER. 

D. E MILES, Assistant Manager. 

315 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block. S. F. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, [Established 1 782] 
American Fire Insurance Company of New York [Established 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720.J 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 

GEO. F. ORAICT, Manager. 



PACIFIC IDIEIP.A-ia'TIIVCZEIISrT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1821. 
Paid-up capital, - - - J 5,000,000. 
Cash Assets, $23,194,249. 



OF LONDON. 

Founded a. d. 1710. 

Cash Assets, $10,044,712. 

Assets in America, - - - $22,222,724. 



WM. J. HINDERS, Gen'l Agent, 20S. Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 



K 



INSURANCE COMPANY- LTD. 



JOMESTEZF^, EHN1t31_yg\r 



Capital paid 6j guaranteed $3,000,000,00. 

Chas.A Latdm, Manager, 
433 California St. San Fi-aoEissa. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour is dull; foreign demand fair: Extras ?4.65@$4 75: Superfine 
^Wtett'ta dull; light trade; Shipping, $1.35; Milling, tl.42\i@n-WAver 

Cental 

Barley is nuiet; Brewing. n.00@|1.02H; Feed. 90c@92^c per ctl. 



. .2.00@J2.25. 

Hky'is lower; Wheat, 81113*12; Oats, S10®*11; Alfalfa, J8@J10. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, $18@*18.50 per ton. 

Beans, good request, {2.00@S2.50 per ctl. Potatoes, 45<\@7oc. per ctl. 

Butter is higher; Choice, 20c.@22'^c; Fair, 16c.@17c; Eastern, 14c@15c. 

Cheese, light stock, 8c.@10c. Eggs, free supply, 22c.@24c. 

Honey Comb, Uc.@12c; Extracted, 5c.@6c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions' are worth 42c@75c. Beeswax is higher at 25c.@26c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Raisins and Dried Grapes In high favor at good paying rates. 

Hides are steady; Dry, 6c@7^c. Wool is in good demand at lle.@10c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 7J4@7'4c. 

Coffee lower at 15c.@21c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is lower, with a declining tendency. Nuts find ready sale. 

Quicksilver is nominal at $43.50 per flask. Hops are neglected at lo@18c. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. Whites, 4l£@5%c. 
The recent establishment of some half-dozen lines of sea-going 
steam and sailing ships between this and New York, is likely to 
work considerable detriment to the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company's interest, all the result of excessive transportation 
charges, and brought about by the direct efforts of the recently 
well-ordered Traffic Association, of which Fred F. Castle, Esq., is 
President, and Mr. J. S. Leeds Traffic Manager. 

The grain harvest is progressing finely, and everything is en- 
couraging for full acreage crops of Grain, Hay, Fruit, Vegetables, 

Silver ore, 6,972 sks., received here on the 28th June from Al- 
tata, Mexico, consigned to George & Detrich. This 500 tons of 
Silver and Lead Ore, per stmr. Signal, is from the Madra Garda 
mine, one of a group of seven situated at Topia, Sinaloa. 

The Pacific Mail steamship San Bias sailed hence for the Isth- 
mus and way ports on the 25th ultimo, carrying in transit New 
York cargo valued at $39, 31S, consisting in part of 43,000 gals. 
Wine, 109 gals. Brandy, 119 bales Rags, 231,346 lbs. Borax, 37,743 
lbs Glue. For Central America— 453 bbls. Flour, 2,000 gals. Wine, 
70,000 lbs. Sugar, 63,529 lbs. Tallow, etc., value $24,640. To 
Panama— Rice, Beans and 337 bbls. Flour, $2,253. To Mexico— 
391 gals. Wine, 15 bbls. Flour, 351 pkgs. Machinery, etc., value 
$10,840. To Ecuador— 500 bbls. Flour, etc., value $2,150. 

The steamship Gaelic sailed for the Orient June 25lh, carrying 
for cargo to China and Japan treasure and merchandise, say, to 
Hong Kong, $145,892 Treasure, 15,820 bbls. Flour, 1,263 lbs. Gin- 
seng, 1,020 gals. Whale Oil, 10,827 lbs. Beans, etc.; value, $85,975. 
To Japan, Treasure, $246,700, and for cargo, 1,405 bbls. Flour, 
6,500 lbs. Sugar, 153 rolls Leather, 2,140 gals. Wine, 201 sks. 
Hoofs, etc.; value, $24,440. Elsewhere, merchandise, value, 
$1,000. 

The steamship Australia arrived here on the 28th June, from 
Honolulu, bringing for cargo 7,525 bags Sugar, 3,956 bags Rice, 
3,527 bchs. Bananas, 352 bxs. Fruit, 50 bdls. Sugar Cane, 600 
Hides, etc. 

The steamship Monowai sailed for the Colonies via Honolulu 
June 24th, carrying for cargo to Sydney 29,762 lbs. Coffee, 19 350 
lbs. Dried Fruit, 100 flks. Quicksilver, 3,786 gals, WbaleOil, 1,841 
Doors, and Mdse., value, $14,903. To Melbourne— 29,172 lbs. 
Coffee, and Mdse., value, $8,330. To Auckland— 20 flks. Quick- 
silver, 224 cs. Canned Fruit, etc., value $5,323. To Wellington 
—75 cs. Salmon, etc., value, $2,107. To Brisbane— 3,447 lbs. 
Coffee, etc., value $1,783. To other ports — Salmon, etc., value, 
$6,000. Also, to Honolulu, 225 bbls. Flour and Mdse., value, 
$30,000. To Apia — Mdse., value, $3,363. 

Brimstone and Sulphur from Japan, say 26,000 bales, and 498J 
tons Crude from Hagodate to J. W. Grace & Co., per British ship 
Thielmier. 

Imports from the Orient, per steamer China, include 3,000 mats 
Rice. 1,495 pkgs. Tea, 3.960 bags Sugar, 74 pkgs, Silk, 400 bales 
Gunnies and 1,600 pkgs. Merchandise; also in transit to go over- 
land, 32,491 pkgs. Tea, 434 pkgs. raw Silk, 130 pkgs. Silk goods 
and 137 pkgs. Merchandise; also for Central and South America, 
30 pkgs. Silk, 233 pkgs. Merchandise. 

From Mexico, steamer Newbern from Guayraas had for cargo 
1 904 sks. Bark, 303 pkgs. Shells, 39 live Turtles, 106 bars bullion 
and 30 pkgs. Gold coin. 

Codfish, the second cargo of the season, arrived June 28th from 
the North Pacific, and is consigned to Synde & Hough. 

The P. M. steamship City of Sydney, from Panama and way 
ports, arrived here June 26th. and had a New York cargo of 
merchandise (heavy goods) from Europe, 100 cs. canned goods, 
70 cs. Wine, etc., from Central America, 1,607 cs. Limes and other 
fruit, 90 cs. Garlic, 121 bags coffee, 8 bales Deer Skins, 604 sks. 
Silver Ore, and in Treasure $13,566. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

AND - 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, 

Nos. 309 and 3 1 7 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California. 

NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO. OF IRELAND; 
ATLAS ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON ; 
BOYLSTON INSURANCE CO. OF BOSTON ; 
OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE CO OF LONDON. 

Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the Use of the 
LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER I 

..Over 300 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

LLEWELLYN STEAM CONDENSER MANUFACTURING CO., 

380 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Systems—" Slaltery " Induction; " Wood " Arc. Factories— Fort Wayne, 
Indiana; Brooklyn, New York. 

Electric Improvement Company. 

General Agents for California, Nevada, Oregon, Arizona and Washington 
of the Fort Wayne FJectric right Co , Fort Wayne, Inil. 

' Estimates furnished for Electric Railways, Electric Light and Steam 
Plants, House Wiring, etc. Marine Work a Specialty. 

35 New Mo nt gomery Street, San Francisco. 

R. J. WHEELER. J, W. GIRVIN. 

J. W. GIRVIN &. CO., 

Rubber and Leather Belting, Hose, Packing, etc. 

Rubber Clothing, Boots, Shoes, etc. 

Pacific Coast Agents for Boston Belting Co. and Fayerweather A Ladew, 
formerly J. B. Hoyt&Co. 4 California St., s. F., <'al. 

WILLIAMS. DIMOND & CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for — 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship I Vivian Sons Yellow Metal Sheathing 

Hartmann's Rahtjen's Composition 
The China Traders & insurance Co. 

(L'd.), 
The Baldwin Loeomotive Works, 
Steel Rails and Track Material. 



Company, 
'The California Line of Clippers,' 

from New York, 
'The Hawaiian Line of Packets," 

to and from Honolulu. 



J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Company, 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

General Agents Oceanic 8teamship Company and 
Gillinghaoi Cement. 

327 Market Street, corner Fremont. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS 7 

PROPRIETORS OF THE 

CITY IRON WORKS. 

Office 51 Fremont Street, 

SJ-J25T FBAUCISCO, - - - CJ^L,. 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Boilers, Engines, Pumps and Machinery of Every Description. 

Patent Lead-Lined Coupled Tubing, for use as 

Water Pipe, tor Sale Cheap 

E. D. Jones. 

S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 



207 and 209 California Street. 



+ 



Jul 



1892. 



kNCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



29 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACI7IC SYSTEM. 

Train* L«nve and ar« Due to Arrive «t 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

I.«*ve From Jut/ 1, 1892. arrivk 

7:00 a. Beaiciv Rum>ey. Sacramento 
7 .SO a. tUrwirds. Nile* aud S*u Jose 'I2:16r. 

7:90a. Martlnex. S*q KamoD, C&listoga 

A»<i SauU Komi 6:15f. 

3:00 a. 3»crmm'toA ReddiuR, via Davis 
8.-00 a. Fin>i«ud Second Class lor Ogden 

and East, and flr?t class locally 9:45 p. 
9.30a. Niles. San Jose, Stockton, lone. 
Sacramento, Marys vi lie, Oro- 

vllle and Red Bluff 4:45 P. 

9:00a. Sunset Route, Atlantic Express, 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 
Demine.El Paso, New Orleans 

and East 8:45p. 

•9:00 a. Stockton and Milton *8:45p. 

V200M. Hayward?, Niles and Livermore 7:15 p. 

■1:00 p. Sacramento River Steamers *9:00 p. 

1:30 p. Vallejoaud Martinez... 12:45 p. 

3:00 p. Hay wards, Niles and San Jose . 9:45 a. 
4:00 p. Martinez, San Ramon, Stockton 

Lodi, Merced and Fresno 9:45a. 

4:00 p. Vallejo, Calistoga, El Verano and 

Santa Rosa 9.45 a. 

4:30 p. Benicia, Es-parto, Sacramento. 10:45 a. 

4:30p. Woodland and Oroville 10:45a. 

"4:30 p. Niles and Livermore *8:45a. 

5:30p. Los Angeles. Express, Fresno, 
Bakers field, Santa Barbara A 

Los Angeles. 8.4>a. 

5:30 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East 8:45 a. 

6:00f. Hay wards, Niles and San Jose-. 7:45a. 

. . . Niles and San Jose J6:15 p. 

•i3:00 p. Sunol aud Livermore 

6:00 p. Ogden Route Atlantic Express, 

Ogden and East 9:15 a. 

17:00 p. Vallejo fS:45 P. 

7:00p. ShastaRouteExpress, Sacramen- 
to, Maryaville, Redding, Port- 

land, Puget Sound and East. . 8:15 a 

Santa Cruz Division. 

17:45 a. Sunday Excursion Train for New- 
ark, San Jose, Los Gatos, Fel- 
ton. Big Trees and Santa Cruz 18:05 p. 
8:15a. Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek ana 

Santa Cruz. 6 :20 p. 

•2:15p. Centerville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

SantaCruz '*10:50a. 

4:45 p. Centerville, San Jose, Los Gatos, 
Saturdays and Sundays to Santa 
Cru z... 9:50a . 

Coast Division (Third a id Townsend Stree ts). 

•7:00 a. San Jose, Almaden and Way Sta- 
tions *2:38p. 

17:30 a. Monterey and Santa Cruz Sun- 
day Excursion 18:28 p. 

8:15 A. San Jose, Gilroy, TresPinos.Pa- 
jaro, SantaCruz, Monterey, Pa- 
cific Grove, Salinas, San Mi- 
guel, Paso Kobles and Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) 
and principal Way Stations 6:10 p. 
J9:30a. "Sunday Excursion Train to 

Menlo Park and Way Stations. |2:45 p. 
10 -.37 a. San Jose, and Way Stations.. . 5:03 p. 
12:15 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 3:30 p. 

*2:30p, San Jose, Tres Pinos, SantaCruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, PaclficGrove 
and principal Way Stations. ...*10:37A. 
*3:30 p. Menlo Park, San Jose and Prin- 
cipal Way Stations • .. *9:47 A. 

*4:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . *8:06 a. 

5:15 p. San Jose and Way Stations 8:48a 

6:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. .. 6:35 a. 
fll:45p. Menlo Park and principal Way 
Stations j7:3Qp. 

a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 
•Sundays excepted. ^Saturdays only. 
ISundayB only. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

The splendid 3,000-ton steamers of this line, car- 
rying the United States, Hawaiian and Colonial 
Mails, sail from Folsom street Wharf, as under: 

For Honolulu Only. 
S, 8. Australia, Tuesday, July 5, 1892, at 2 p. m. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 
ket street. 

JOHN D. SPRECKELS & BROS., 

General AgentB 

I CURE FITS! 

When I say cure I do not mean merely to stop them 
for a time and then have them return again. 1 mean a 
radical cure. I have made the d.sease of FITS, EPI- 
LEPSY or FALLING SICKNESS a life-long study. I 
warrant my remedy to cure the worst cases. Because 
others have failed 19 no reason for not now receiving a 
cure. Send at ocee for a treatise and a Free Bottle of 
my infallible remedy. Give Express and Post Office. 
H. G. ROOT, M. C.) 183 Pearl St.. N. Y. 



NORTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD. 

(VIA SAUSALITO). 
Mont Popular Mucin California. 11. -si n. 

itghtrui inmate Most Accessible 
Section. 



SaiK-alito for yachting aud rowing. 

Larkspur for a good dinner. 

Blylhedale for the children. 

Mill Valley for mineral water cures. 

San Rafael for driving. 

Ross Valley for Presbyterians. 

San Quentiu for keeping away from. 

Fairfax for encampments. 

Camp Taylor for rest. 

Tomala for life. 

Duncan's Mills for scenery. 

Cazadero for soda springs. 

Russian River for grandeur. 

Country Club fishing grounds, camping, hunt- 
ing, everything, everywhere. 

Good hotels at all points, fast time, prompt ser- 
vice, best equipment and most enterprising rail- 
road management in California. Reduced fares 
to all points 

E. H. SHOEMAKER, Gen'l. Sup't. 

F. R. LATHAM, Gen. Pass. & T'k't. Agt. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 
Steamers will sail at NOON on the 5th, 15th and 

25th of each month, 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 

America. 

Through Line Sailings. — June 25th, 1892, S. S. "San 
Bias;" July 6th, S. B."City of Sydney;" July 15tb, 
S. S. "San Jose." 

Way Line to Mexican and Central American Po ts 
and Panama.— Steamer sails at noon 18th of each 
month, calling at Mazatlau. San Bias, Manzauillo, 
Acapulco, Port Angel, Salina Cruz, Touala, San 
Benito, Ocos, Champerico, Ssu Jose de Guatemala, 
Aeajutla, La Libertad, La Union, Amapala, Co- 
rinto, San Juan del Sur aud Puuta Arenas. 

Way Line Sailing.— July 18th, S. S. " Colima'" 

When the regular sailing date falls on Sunday 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA AND 
HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for East 

Indies, Straits, etc.: 

S. S. " China," Saturday, July 9th, 1892, at 3 p. M. 

S. S. "Peru" (new), Thursday, Aug. 4th, at 3 p. m. 

"City of Rio de Janeiio," Saturday, Aug. 27th, at 

3 P. M. 

Round Trip Tickets to Yokohama at reduced 
rates. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, corner 
First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 202 
Front street, ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers CITY OF PUEBLA, WALLA 
WALLA and UMATILLA, direct for VICTORIA, 
B. C. r and PUGET SOUND ports, at 9 A. m. every 
five days. 

The steamers sailing for Puget Sound ports at 
9 a. m. connect at Port Townsend with steamers 
or Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
U. P. R'y Co. every four days. 

For SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, SAN SIMEON, 
Cayucos, Santa Barbara, San Buenaventura, 
Hukneme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and San 
Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA, ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, steamer LOS ANGELES, every Wed- 
nesday, at 9 A. M. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



ANEW and simple method of soldering 
aluminium has been patented. It con- 
sists of sprinkling the surfaces to be soldered 
with chloride of silver, and then melting 
down the solder as usual. 



THE largest telephone switchboard in the 
world is that in the Exchange at Berlin, 
Germany, where 7,000 wires are connected 
with the main office. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 

COMMENCING 80NDAY, APRIL 24, 1898. au.l 
until further notice, Boat* and Trains will 
leave from aud arrive at the San Francisco Pas- 
senger Depot, HARKET-STKEET WHARF, as 
follows: 
From San Francisco for Point Tiburon, Belvedere and 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DAYS-7:40 a.m., 9:20a.m., 11:20 A. M.; 

1:80 P.M., 3:30 p. M.,5:05 P. M., 6:20 p. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.: 1:30 P.M. 
3:30 p. M.,V00r. m., 6:15 P. M. 

From San Rafael for San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS-6:2S a. m., 7:66 A. M„ 9:80 A. M. 

11:30 a.m.: 1:40 P.M., 3:40 p.m., 6:05 P.M. 
SATURDAYS ONLY-An exlra trip at 6:30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10 A.M., 9:40 A.M., 11:10 A. M. ; 1:40 P.M. 
3:40 p. m., 5:00 p M.,6:25 p. M. 

rrom Point Tiburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS-6:50 a. m., 8:20 A.M., 9:55 A.M., 11:55 
A. M. ; 2:05 p. M., 4:05 p. M., 5:35 p. M. 
Saturdays only, an extra trip at 6:55 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:35 a.m., 10:05 A.M., 11:35 a.m.; 
2:05 p. m., 4:05 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 6:60 P.M. 



Leave s. F. 



itays* Sl ; ' 



7:40a.m. 
3:30p.m. 
5:05 p.m. 



7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 



7:40A.M 
3:30 p. m 



7:40 a. M 
5:05 p.m. 



8:00 a. m. 
9:30 a. m 
5:00 p. m 



8:00a.m. 
5:00p. m 



Arrive IN 8. F. 



Destination. " 



I9unday8 



Petaluma 

aud 
Santa Rosa. 



Fulton, 
Windsor, 
Heald sburg 
Litton .Springs, 
Cloverdale <fc 
Way Stations, 



Hopland 
and Ukiah. 



Guerneville. 



Week 
Days. 



10:40a.m]8:50a. m. 
6:05 p.m 10:30a. m 
7:25p.m|6:10p.m. 



Sonoma and 10:40a.m. 8:50a.m. 
glen Ellen. 6:05p.m. 6:10p.m. 



10 :30a. m 
6:10p.m 



10:30a.m. 
6:10 p.m. 



7:40a.m 8:00a.m Sebastopol. | 10:40a.m I 10:30am 
3:30 p.m 5:00 p.m j fi'.06p.M I 6:10 P.M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs. Kelsey ville, Soda Bay, Lakeport and 
Bartlett Springs; at Hopland for Lakeport aud 
Bartlett Springs ; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Sara- 
toga Springs, Blue Lakes, Witter Springs, Upper 
Lake, Lakeport, Willitts, Cahto, Mendocino City, 
Fort Bragg, Westport, Usal, Hydesville and Eu- 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, $1 50; to Santa Rosa, 52 25; to 
Healdsburg, $3 40; to Cloverdale, 54 50; to Hop- 
land, J5 70; to Ukiah, J6 75; to Sebastopol, J2 70; 
to Guerneville, J3 75; to Sonoma, 1150; to Glen 
Ellen, $180. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundaysonly— 
To Petaluma, ?1; to Santa Rosa, 51 50; to Healds- 
burg, $2 25; to Cloverdale, 53; to Ukiah, 54 50; to 
Hopland, 53 80; to Sebastopol, 51 80; to Guerne- 
ville, 52 50: to Sonoma, 51; to Glen Ellen, 51 20. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New Montgomery Street. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Saturday, June 25, 1892. 

BELGIC TUESDAY, July 26, 1892. 

Oceanic (Via Honolulu) Tuesday, August 16, '92 

Gaelic Tuesday, Sept. 6,1892. 

ROUND TRIP TIOKET8 AT REDUCED RATE8. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San 
Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 

GEO. H.RICE, Traffic Manager. 



CONSUMPTION. 

I have a positive remedy for the ahove disease; by its 
use thousands of oases of the worst kind and of long 
standing have been onrfld. Indeed so strong is my faith 
in its etfioacy, that I will send two bottles ftjee, with 
a VALUABLE TREATISE on this disease to any suf- 
ferer who will send me their Express and P. O. address. 
T. A. Slocum, M. C.« 183 Pearl St., N. V. 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July % 1892. 




THE past has been a gala week in Berkeley, owing to the 
commencement exercises at the University. The festivities 
were inaugarated on B'riday evening of last week, by a grand 
production of Esmeralda, by the Skull and Keys Club, at Shaltuck 
Hall, which was crowded, many going over from San Francisco 
and from Oakland to witness the performance. The several female 
parts of the play were taken by the Misses Graham, Belle Hutch- 
inson, Jessie Coleman and Mary McNutt. The play was well 
presented, Miss McNutt and Milton S. Latham carrying off the 
honors of the evening. Saturday was class day, and the weather, 
as if to add eclat to the occasion, was ail that could be desired. 
First, there was a concert by the military band from Angel Island, 
in the grove, which was followed by tree and ivy planting. Then 
came luncheon, after which Co-ed Canyon echoed to the plaudits 
whnh greeted the efforts of Henry S. Allen, the class president, 
and W. D. Chapman, the class historian. But it was the class 
dispensation, which was conducted by Isadore Harris, which 
brought down the house, some of the skits being exceedingly 
good, and very amusing. In the evening there was a promenade 
concert, bringing the long day to a pleasant conclusion. On 
Monday evening the Seniors gave their commencement ball, at 
the Harmon Gymnasium. On Tuesday the University Glee Club 
was heard in concert, and on Wednesday the commencement ex- 
ercises were held. The Alumni gave a banquet to the graduating 
class in the evening, at the California Hotel. 



The swellest event of commencement week at the State Uni- 
versity was the ball given on Tuesday evening last in the Harmon 
Gymnasium, on the College grounds. It was a full dress affair, 
and the attendance was representative of the best society in this 
part of the country. The decorations were superb. Ad immense 
center piece of blue and gold was suspended by streamers of the 
same color, from which hung garlands of evergreens. The flag of 
the class of '92 waved outside, and the general make-up of the 
decorations was a mixture of the Grecian and modern styles. 
The dancing was kept up until 1:30 a. m., and the way every- 
thing was conducted reflected much praise on the floor manager, 
Burbank G. Somers and his able assistants, Albert C. Aitken, 
Fred I). Browne and Edward J. Pringle, Jr. Among the many 
present were: Misses Maud Allen, E. McGraw, Mae Smith, Susie 
Hobart, Mamie Powell, Pearl Felton, Mabel Craft, Bessie Shearer 
and Lizzie Chapman, of Oakland; Mabel Gray, Nellie Gray, Carol 
Earl, De Wemis Week, of San Francisco; Miss Bell Juillard, of 
Santa Rosa; Miss Sophia Comstock, of Sacramento; Miss May- 
bury, of Los Angeles; Miss Woodsum, of San Jose; G. H. 
Fletcher, of Grass Valley; Leon Hall, San Jose; A. C. Pait, Sacra- 
mento; Phil Weaver, Bert Elliot. R. T. McKiseck, B. G. Lomen, 
Tom Wells Ransom, J. H. Gray, Sao Francisco; G. P. Robinson, 
Harry Baldwin, Fred Jacobs, Bert Webster, Ira Breedlove, of 
Oakland. * 



There has been a large arrival of holiday visitors at San Rafael 
this week, and others are looked for to-day. Among the guests 
are General and the Misses Dinjond, Miss Mae Holbrooke, Miss 
Alice Ames, Mr. and Mrs. Walter McGaven, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin 
Goodail, Miss Goodall, the Misses Knowles, Miss Coxhead, Mrs. 
Geo. Wheaton, Mrs. and Miss Curry, Mrs. J. A. Folger, Miss May 
Hoffman, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Morrow, Mrs. J. V. Coleman, 
Miss Jessie Coleman; all the Loughboronghs, and their nieces, 
the Misses Zane. Buckboard an'd hay rides, musicales, lunches, 
picnics, etc., are on the tapis, and will be numerous during the 
holiday season. All the cottagers are prepared to have friends 
staying with them, while the hotel will be filled to its utmost 
capacity. The flannel cotillion, which is to take place to-morrow 
evening, will no doubt be the event of the season. Miss Chapin, 
Miss Susie Morgan and Miss Alice Merry are guests of the Rev. 
Charles Mason and his lovely bride, nee Merry, in their pretty 
cottage. 

Among the recent changes in the personnel of the navy officers 
on this coast, San Francisco society will no doubt gladly welcome 
the new commander of the cruiser Baltimore, Captain W. R. 
Bridgeman, who, in former days, was quite a society bean, while 
attached to several of the ships which were stationed in these 
waters during the sixties and seventies. In those days men-of- 
war usually remained longer in port than do the cruisers of the 
present time, and thus enabled their officers to take frequent part 
in the festivities of a season. 



Captain J. C. Watson sailed for Honolulu by the steamer 
Gaelic last Friday. He will assume command of the San Francisco. 
Mrs. Watson came down from Mare Island on Saturday, and is 
staying at the residence of Mrs. Coffee, on ''lay street, where she 
will rem tin during her husband's ab^enoe. Captain Glass and 
his family have taken possession of their quarters at the Navy 
Yard, Mare Island, where Captain Glass is the new officer in 
command. 



The golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rosenberg was 
celebrated on Sunday last, at their residence on Tenth street, 
Oakland, by a grand reception, which was participated in by a 
host of friends and well-wishers from both sides of the bay. 
Many handsome presents were sent as tokens of esteem, and the 
popularity of the old couple was well shown. A breakfast formed 
part of the festivities, and was enjoyed by the Rev. M. 8. Levy 
and wife, Rabbi Sessler and wife, George Davis, Miss Eva Perkins, 
W. Davis, Theresa Rosenberg, Grace Rosenberg, Gladys Rosen- 
berg, Bert Rosenberg, Esnee Rosenberg, L. Copenhagen, Mr. and 
Mrs. George Mossbacher, Mr. and Mrs. A. Wolf, 0. Reinstein, 
Mrs. Solomon, Mr. and Mrs. M. Wolf, Mr. and Mrs. Milton S. 
Eisner, Mr. and Mrs. R. Hirshberg, Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Hirshberg, 
and D. Sessler. 



The yachts that will race to Santa Cruz will sail to-morrow 
morning at 6:30 o'clock. They will be the Lurline, Commodore 
A. B. Spreckels; Chispa, Commodore Isador Gutte; Jessie, ex- 
Commodore J. McDonough ; Aggie, Captain Henry White; White 
Wings, Captain Chittenden; Ramona, Vice Commodore McCarthy ; 
Sappho, Captains Thomas and Engelberg; Penelope, Captain Lacy, 
of San Pedro; Frolic, Captain C. H. Harrison, and the twenty- 
eight foot sloop Pilgrim, The yachts will anchor off Meiggs' 
wharf this evening, and boats will be at the landing at the barge 
office to take guests out 10 the different yachts up to 9 p. m. The 
start will be made to-morrow morning on the firing of the signal 
from the flagship Lurline. Fulton G. Berry, skipper of the Fresno 
Yacht Club, will sail the Jessie, and Captain Alexander Svenson 
will act as sailing master of the Lurline. 



East Oakland was the scene of another pretty wedding on 
Thursday last, the residence of the bride's aunt on 12th avenue 
and 16th street being^he locale where the nuptials of Miss Marion 
Wore and Edward E. Drake were celebrated at noon, the Rev. 
Dr. Chapman tying the knot under a lovely floral canopy in the 
presence of a large party of relatives and friends. Flowers were 
u c ed with excellent effect in the decoration of both the parlors and 
the dining room, where the wedding dejeuner was spread. A re- 
ception was afterwards held. The happy pair left by the over- 
land train for the East in the evening, and on their return from 
their honeymoon trip will make their home in San Francisco. 

Samuel M. Shortridge returned from Coronado on Tuesday. On 
the 5th inst. he will leave for Honolulu, the " Paradise of the Pa- 
cific," as Mr. Shortridge poetically terms it, and will be away for 
six weeks. It is his intention to visit all points of interest in 
the Hawaiian Islands, particularly the great volcano, and he will 
return with his gripsack loaded with curios and his mind bur- 
dened with the myths and legends which he will have accumu- 
lated. After his return, Mr. Shortridge's sonorous voice will be 
heard in behalf of the principles of his party from many stamps 
throughout the State. 

Varney W. Gaskill presided over a charming dinner at the 
Pacific Yacht Club house last Saturday evening. The banquet 
room was handsomely decorated. After the feast of reason there 
was a flow of soul until a late hour, the vocal and instrumental 
music of several of the company greatly enhancing the pleasures 
of the evening. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. Varney W. 
Gaskill. Miss Jessie MeCormick, Miss Cora Piatt, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Percy Rothwell, Mr. and Mrs. James Maguire, Messrs. Ed. Lewis, 
Frank D. Willey, Ashton P. Stevens, Clem Blethen, W. 0. Van 
Schuyler, Professor Cippiloni. 



The 8kull and Keys Club that has recently been formed at the 
State University bids fair to take the lead among the social organ- 
izations in the college town. A series of amateur theatricals will 
be given from time to time, and if the enthusiasm of the mem- 
bers holds out the club will distinguish itself in many ways. 
The charter members are: Of San Francisco — L. E. Van Winkle, 
R. L. Hathorn, M. S. Latham, John A. Marsh, Frank Deacon; 
Oakland — W. H. Henry; Sacramento — Harry McClaughy; Ore- 
gon — Edward Mays; Santa Barbara — David Low; Berkeley — 
Egbert J. Yates. 

The numerous alterations and embellishments which Mrs. Louis 
Haggin is supervising at her residence on Taylor street, would 
seem to indicate that she intends to make San Francisco her place 
of residence for a time at least. San Francisco society can there- 
fore be warmly congratulated upon the return of this charm- 
ing, accomplished and cultivated lady, and should do its utmost 
to induce her to remain permanently, as she will be sure to revive 
the social prestige of the Haggin family, which has ever been 
renowned as being one of the most hospitable on our coast. 

One of the events of next week will be the opening of Stock- 
well's new theatre, on Powell street, on Thursday evening, the 
Daly Company adding brilliancy to the affair. It goes without 
saying that a brilliant audience will assemble to do honor to the 
occasion. San Rafael will send over a large party of fashionables, 
it being the night for the theatre boat; and other parties, from 
Santa Cruz and Monterey, are spoken of as being altogether 
probable. 



July 3 1892. 



SAX PRANCI8C0 NEWS LETTER. 



31 



The gay <mon at Pel Monic will virtually commence with the 
Fourth of July ball next Monday night, (or though several hops 
have already taken place, they have been but lame and impotent 
affairs. Numerous private entertainment* are also on the lapis, 
and though Mrs. Crocker an. I Mr. Rutherford will he mlited, 
.Mrs. Ilager. who is always in the van where the enjoyment of 
young people is concerned, will no doubt do the lion's share, as 
she is said to have more than one novelty (or their amusement in 
view. 

Society on the Encinal turned out in full force on Thursday 
evening, to witness the marriage, at Christ Church, Alameda. o( 
Iflaa Eleanor K. Edwards and George E. Coleman. The church 
was handsomely decorated, and after the ceremony, a reception 
was held at the residence of Mrs. Gibbons, on Pearl street. The 
groom is a son of John T. Coleman, the Grass Valley capitalist, 
and the bride is a daughter of Judge Edwards, of Carson City. 

St. Paul's Chnrch. San Kafael, was the scene of Miss Lizzie Sin- 
ton's marriage to Harry D. Walker, which took place last Satur- 
day morning. The pretty little edifice looked very attractive in 
its floral garniture, and was well filled with guests to witness the 
ceremony, which was performed by Rev. E. J. Lion, of St. 
Stephen's Church, San Francisco. The honeymoon is being 
passed at the Walker Cottage near Laguintas. 



The first ball of the summer season at the Vendome was given 
last Wednesday evening, and was a great success. The pleasant 
life at that charming hostelrie has hitherto been greatly due to 
the presence of Mrs. J O'Neil Reis and her sisters, the Misses 
Brookes, and hopes are expressed that their intended departure 
for Del Monte will be only for a brief visit there, and not a final 
farewell to San Jose. 

Among the many engagements announced this week is that of 
Robert Herbert of Alameda, and Miss Belle Reynolds of San 
Francisco. Mr. Herbert is the son of H. V. Herbert, of the law 
department of the Southern' Pacific, and Miss Reynolds is the 
daughter of attorney Reynolds, who is also an attache of the 
great corporation. The wedding will take place in October. 

George Cheeseman is a welcome addition to the limited list of 
beaux to be found at the summer resorts this season. He will 
make a brief visit to his mother, at San Rafael, before he returns 
to his southern ranch. Gus Taylor and Ed Schmieden have also 
arrived from their trip to Yosemite, in time to take part in the 
gaities of the Fourth, much to the delight of several pretty belles. 

Colonel and Mrs. Stuart Taylor will remain in Paris for 
the present. Mrs. Taylor's mother, Mrs. John C. Fall, 
who has spent the last year in Europe, with her daughter, is now 
supposed to be en route to California, as she was to have left Paris 
early this week for home. Harry Hunt and his daughter are on 
their way home to San Francisco, from New York and Boston. 



Mr. and Mrs. George A. Low, accompanied by their daughter, 
have returned from their visit East, which has extended over a 
period of several months, and are at the Occidental Hotel. Other 
arrivals of the week include the Sharon-Janin party, from New 
York; Frank Newlands, from Washington; Dr. A. F. Sawyer 
and family, also from Gotham. 



Mr. J. Franklin Brown, now In London, met with an unfortu- 
nate accident on the day of his departure from New York for 
England. As the steamer was about to sail, Mr. Brown was 
attacked by a crazy man, in knocking whom down he broke the 
thumb and index finger of his right hand. He is fortunately 
rapidly recovering the use of his hand. 

There has been a large accession ot guests at Del Monte this 
week, and the festivities of the Fourth promise to be as brilliant 
as those of any previous holiday. Mr. J. B. Haggin, who has 
spent most of the past fortnight amid his copper mines in Mon- 
tana, is expected to arrive in time to complete the family circle 
there next week. 



Visitors to Castle Crags are taking life very quietly. Many 
who are accustomed to the whirl and gaiety of a fashionable re- 
sort might possibly call it dull, but as a majority of those who are 
guests at the hotel are invalids or in mourning, no doubt the re- 
pose they enjoy is most pleasing to them. 



Mrs. Charles Sontag has accompanied Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Good- 
sell to Europe, the party sailing from New York by the steamer 
Louraine, for Havre, last Saturday. Charles Kaufman was a 
passenger by the same steamer, and will spend some time in both 
Paris and London, on professional business. 

Oakland society has another wedding in prospective which will 
occur at the First Presbyterian Church some time this month. 
The bride-elect is Miss Northey-Roma, whose bird-like notes have 
so often been heard in the choir of that church, and whose en- 
gagement to Jessie E. Douglass has just been made public. 

Mrs. Thomas H. Selby and her daughter, Miss Selby, of Menlo 
Park, have been in town during the week. 



Mrs. Nichols bus had her sister. MIsaQulntard, ol Philadelphia, 
as her guest for a couple ,,( weeks past at her pretty home on 
Broadway. Miss Qulntard will remain in California until Bishop 
and Mrs. Nichols go East in August, when she will accompany 
them on her return home 

Assistant Chief Wharfinger and Mrs. Charles N. Putnam leave 
to-day for Cazaderu to spend several weeks in the Sonoma red- 
woods. Mr. Putnam is a ton vimnt, and will make it pleasant 
for the rest of the jolly good fellows summering in cottages at 
Ca/.adero. 

From Blylhedale comes the announcement of Miss Emma 
McMillan's engagement to Ellis Wooster, both of whom, with 
their respective families, have been spending June at that pretty 
little resort. The wedding will add one more to the list that is 
already quite large, of those to take place this autumn. 

Fred Otis has gone back to ranch life away down in Mexico, 
after an all too brief and most enjoyable visit to San Francisco. 
His prospective brother-in-law, Fred Lake, is preparing to visit 
him, expecting to leave town in a few days. 

A grand festival will be given by the pupils of the French and 
English Institute, in honor of the sixteenth anniversary of its 
foundation, next Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, in Irving Hall, 
139 Post street. Prizes will be distributed to the pupils. 

A pretty little wedding occurred on Wednesday evening, when 
F. H. Spink, of the Alameda Postoffice, was, married to Miss 
Mary A. Gaig. The ceremony was performed at the residence of 
the bride's mother on Stanton street. 



John Landers, agent for the Manhattan Life Insurance Com- 
pany, and J. L. Halsey, Vice-President of the company, left on 
June 8th for the North. They are now in New York. Mr. Lan- 
ders will be away about a month. 

The Glee Club of the State University gave a concert at Shat- 
tuck Hall, Berkeley, on Tuesday evening. The popularity and 
ability of the performers resulted in the attendance of a large and 
and select audience. 

Mrs. E. H. Schenck, well known in society circles at Washing- 
ton, D. C, and Mrs. Kate F. Seeley, daughter of Mrs. Judge 
Mott, of this city, are making their third tour of Europe, and will 
spend the winter in Italy. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Dodge and Miss Jenny Blair sailed for Eu- 
rope by the steamer Rhyneland, on July 13th. Mr. M. Theo. 
Kearny has gone abroad, and is enjoying the delights of Carlsbad 
by this time. 

Don Catlin, son of Judge Catlin, of Sacramento, will leave to- 
morrow by the steamer Cyrus Wakefield for Liverpool, England. 
He intends spending two years on the continent, traveling and 
sight-seeing. 

On Thursday evening next, Miss Alice Evelyn Bayley will be 
married to Frederick Cheerer Torrey, at the residence of the 
bride's mother, Mrs. J. H. Bayley, of 1408 Castro street, Oakland. 



Miss Nonie T. Fogarty returned home last Monday, after a 
pleasant sojourn in San Rafael. Mrs. Fogarty and her daughter 
Alice will remain in San Rafael until after the Fourth. 



Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Hooker and the Misses Mamie and Bessie 
Hooker have been visiting Seattle, as the guests of Mr. Robert 
Hooker, cashier of the Seattle National Bank. 



Mrs. Charles Crocker and her daughters, the Misses Fanny and 
Jenny Crocker, accompanied by Henry J, Crocker, are among the 
recent arrivals in the French capital 

The engagement is announced of Miss Dora Mohns of Ala- 
meda, and Otto Collischoun of San Francisco. The groom-elect 
is a well-known insurance man. 



Mrs. Venchiarutti is among the cottagers at Santa Cruz this 
season, and contributes in no slight degree to the enjoyment of 
the visitors at that watering place. 



Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Carrigan are spending the summer at 
the Ames place, in Ross Valley, which they have rented for the 
season. 



Mrs. Montgomery Currey and daughter, and Miss Ruth Catlin, 
of Sacramento, are at the Hotel Rafael, attending the tennis 
tournament. 

Mr. Theodore Wores and Bishop Mallalieu were among the pas- 
sengers by the Gaelic for Japan, last Saturday. 

Miss Mary R. Moran and Miss Mary Higgins will pass the 
Fourth at Cypress Lawn, Napa county. 

Mrs. Philip Peck and the Misses Peck have returned from a 
month's visit to Napa Soda Springs. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Redding are in Paris. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1892. 



Mr. and Mrs. D. Samson, Miss Edith and family have moved 
from Bush street to 321 Lott street. Mrs. Samson and daughter 
are at home the first Friday in the month 



Golden Gate Parlor will give a public installation of officers and 
entertainment at Union Square Hall, on Monday evening, July 
11, 1892. 

The Mystic Forty will give their sixth hop at Odd Fellows' 
Hall, Tuesday evening, August 9, 1892. 



The steamship City of Sydney will sail on July 6th, instead of 
July 5th, as advertised. 

Golden Gate Parlor will picnic at El Carnpo the Fourth of July. 

REPRESENTATIVE HERBERT, of Alabama, has offered a 
resolution in the House calling attention to the gross violation 
of civil service rules in Alabama, by the levying on mail clerks by 
their superiors of assessments, to form a Harrison campaign fund. 
This is the manner in which the Animated Iceberg from Indiana 
intends to use the great Federal machine at his command, in en- 
deavoring to secure again the seat in the White House that he 
now occupies. The Democrats of the House should push the 
Alabama investigation without delay, and ascertain all- the facts 
in the matter. If the appointees of President Harrison are guilty 
as charged, the public should know it. 

THE statement #that Portugal intends to dispose by sale of her 
colony at Macao has lately been largely circulated, but is ab- 
solutely without foundation, and has been officially contradicted 
by the Portuguese authorities. A proposal to that effect was 
made several weeks ago by one of the deputies in the Portuguese 
Chambers, but the motion was defeated by an enormous majority. 
Portugal, though a small country, is by far too proud of her 
achievements in colonization in former times, to alienate any of 
her colonies, however great the financial difficulties of the Gov- 
ernment occasionally may be. 

WHAT a poor consolation philosophy is where there is any- 
thing really serious the matter, We can be as philosophical 
as a Stoic over the misfortunes of our friends, or even over minor 
evils of our own, but when a great wave of sorrow or grief passes 
over us, we cry out as lustily and with about as much reason as 
children do over their troubles. Theory and practice are very 
often a complete misfit. 



IT is said that marriage was instituted as a penance for the sins 
of celibacy. The well-to-do bachelors of the city, the society 
people say, are wedded to their clubs and their celibate sins, and 
decidedly disinclined to do penance. 



The Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm. 

The Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm has been doing excellent work 
since its organization in this city. By the introduction of its boxes 
into a number of residence and business houses, it has so greatly re- 
duced the danger arising from fire that in recognition of that fact 
the insurance companies have made special rates on risks in which 
the boxes are placed. A very large numberis now in use throughout 
the city, no argument being necessary to convince business men of 
the advantages of the system. At the office of the company, at 323 
Pine street, one may obtain all detailed information regarding the 
advantages and workings of the system. It is a simple plan ; a small 
box attached to the fire alarm system being so placed that it may 
be easily reached in case of fire, and an alarm be immediately 
turned in. 

■ » 

Baggage Notice. 

Round-trip transfer tickets are now on sale at any of our offices at 
reduced rates, viz. : One trunk, round-trip, 50 cents; single trip, 35 
cents. Keep your baggage checks until you reach this city. Morton 
Special Delivery, 17 Geary street, 108 Taylor, Oakland ferry depot. 

Every man in town who wants a drink of good liquor should visit 
" The Mumm," at 109 O'Farrell street. It is one of the most popu- 
lar bars in town, and always has a large crowd of patrons within its 
doors. Only the best of liquors are sold there, and hence The Mumm 
is ever popular. 

Argonaut Old Bourbon is the best whisky in the market. Its ex- 
cellence is not exceeded by that of any brand known to those who 
like good red liquor. The Argonaut has for years been a popular 
tipple, and so will it continue. It is the favorite with all whisky 
drinkers. 

"We are now using eleven Caligraph Typewriting Machines and 
no others, a fact which speaks for itself. We have tried all kinds, 
and the Caligraph has given us better satisfaction than anything else. 
Yours truly. Pope Manufacturing Co., 

Albert A. Pope, President, Boston, Mass. 



" Kritiko" reads character from handwriting. Write in ink, in an 
unfeigned hand, on unruled paper. State sex. Send 50 cents 
stamps or postal note. Address " Kritiko,"609 Merchant street, S. F. 



Mothers be Sure and Use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while Teething. Price, 25 cents a bottle. 



Burlington Route Excursions. 



Commencing Tuesday. March 15th. at 2 p. M.. from Los Angeles, 
and Wednesday, at 8 p. m.. from San Francisco, and every Tuesday 
and Wednesday thereafter, the Burlington Route will run its regular 
Summer Excursions, with Pullman Tourist Sleeping cars, to Chicago, 
via Salt Lake City and Denver. For particulars and excursion folder, 
apply to agent. Burlington Route, at 204 South Spring street, Los 
Angeles; or 32 Montgomery street. San Francisco. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Consolidated New York Mining Company. 

Location of principle place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo" 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 2Sth day of June, 1892, au assessment (No. a7), of ten (10) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock cf the corporation, payable 
immediately in United StateB gold coin to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 2d Day of August, 1892, will bs delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unle-s pavment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 23d day of Augu t, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOTT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada block, No. 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould 6c Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No 69 

Amount per Share 25 cents 

Levied June 7, 1892 

Delinquent in Office Julyl2,1892 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock ...... August 4, 1S92 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room, 69 Nevada Block, 30J Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, 
California. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Overman 
Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 414 
California street, San Francisco, California, on 

Thursday, the 1 4th Day of July, 1 892, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M. ( 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Tuesday, the 12d day of July, 1892, at 1 p. m. 
GEO. D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 

Office, 414 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Cal fornia Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year endiug June 30, 1892, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five aud four-tenths (5 4-10^ per cent, per annum on term de- 
posits, and four and one-half (4%) per cent, per annum on ordinary de- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on aud after Friday, July 1, 1892. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 
Office— Cor. Powell aud Eddy streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1832, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and one-tenth (5 1-10** per cent, per auuum on Term Depos- 
its and four aud one quarter (4%) per cent, per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, payable on and after Friday, July 1, 1892. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— 526 California street, San Francisco, Cal, 



Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 
PAOIFIO OOAST, 

12SC; liforniaSt..S.F 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 



foe sale by all first-class 
Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



CMpeRS 



Price per Copy, IO Ont<i. 



Annunl Subscription, S4.00 




N E WS p ET T E R 




Vol. XLV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1S92. 



Numbn 'J. 



Printed and Published trerj/ Saturday by the Proprietor, Frederick 
Marriott, Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran 
Cisco. Entered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page 

Editorial Brevities 1 

Leading articles : 
Decayiug N'allnus . ... 2 

Registrar Brown's Threat 2 

The Anti-Dive Agitation 3 

Charles Francis Adams on 

Cleveland. 3 

The Troubles at Homestead ... 3 
Our Professional Patriots .. .. 4 

The Snuff Habit 4 

The Eud ol Fntnres 4 

Bi« Trees and Big Crops 5 

When Joe -McAuliffe Fell (Poetry) 6 

The Flannel Cotillion 6 

The Earl of Warwick's Seat ... 6 

TheSummer Sponge 7 

Pleasure's Wand 8-9 

A Superfluous Husband 10 

The Ideal Boniface 11 



Page 

8parks 12 

Love and Thought (Poetry) 13 

Republican Corruption 13 

The Looker-On ...14-15 

Financial Review 16 

Town Crier 17 

Real Property 18 

Craig and Montgomery 18 

The Bourse and Underwriter ... 19 

Tennis and Baseball 20 

Vanities 21 

World, Flesh and Devil 22 

Sunbeams 23 

Moderu Delusions 24 

The Rose Jar 25 

" Biz"— Summary of the Markets. 26 

Scientific aud Useful 27 

Comments on Foreign Affairs ... 28 
Society 30-31-32 



THE whole French nation is in dread, lest Oscar Wilde should 
expatriate himself and become a naturalized Frenchman. 

MOSES was the first law reporter. This may account for his 
" mistakes, concerning which the great Agnostic has made so 
much. 



WE wonder how that Scotch whiskey tastes in the mouth of 
President Harrison to-day. After the Homestead affair his 
barrel of whiskey will be as famous as his white hat. 

THE Methodists have removed the word "obey" from their 
marriage service. Another instance of the advancement of 
woman on the ladder of human progress. 



THE downfall of many a man proves irresistibly, when probed 
to the bottom, that the whisper of a beautiful woman can be 
heard farther than the loudest call of duty. 



CARNEGIE, it is said, was overcome when he was informed of 
the tragedy at his works at Homestead. What about the 
widows and orphans of the murdered men, when they heard of 
their losses? 



AT last an opportunity for employment has been presented to 
the numerous prize-fighters now in the city. Dr. Coggswell 
wants men to protect his college, and knock out alt intruders. 
Joe McAuliffe ought to be good enough for that. 



THE steady decline of pugilism in San Francisco is a healthful 
sign. Interest in the brutalizing exhibtions has almost wholly 
died out, and the space now given to fistic encounters is very 
small, and reflects the public sentiment. The plug-ugly is no 
longer the demi-god he was four and five years ago. 



THE Baden Stock Yards people are building on precious foun- 
dations. It has been discovered that the rock which they 
are using for concrete fountations for big buildings and a reser- 
voir, contains a small percentage of silver, a little gold, and more 
manganese iron ore, of which they have struck a vein two feet 
thick. 

WHEN the thieves fall out then honest men have a chance. 
Wherefore all honest citizens should determine now their 
position regarding municipal politics. There are beautiful rows 
on among the bosses of both political parties, therefore the good 
citizen may have a show yet. 



THERE is something very funny in the statements of political 
bosses that they are " true " to each other. It is much like 
the protestation of the first bandit to the second bandit, after the 
robbery, that he, the first aforesaid, had taken no more of the 
booty than the second. All tbis, too, in the presence of the vic- 
tim. 



MANY PEOPLE and especially some of the ladies of the Pa- 
cific Coast Women's Press Association, will feel a sympa- 
thetic interest in the plight of Yda Addis-Storke. The well- 
known writer and once proud woman has been forced to ask the 
Supervisors of Santa Barbara county for aid. Here is a worthy 
opportunity for the delicate bestowal of a little generous assistance. 

THE ethics of the law aim high ; the less said of the practice the 
better, but imagine the San Francisco Bar Association adopt- 
ing the following from the title page of Clayton's Reports as its 
motto: "Open thy mouth for the dumb. " * * Plead the 
cause of the poor and needy." This injunction of Proverbs does 
not seem to contemplate the seductive contingent fee. 

" JOHNNY" WILSON is now beginning to appreciate all the 
J fine points of the painful tale of that youth, Icarus, who 
thought he could fly without his father's aid, and found himself 
falling rapidly into eternal " demnition " when the supporting 
hand had been withdrawn. Icarus Wilson is now falling rapidly 
in Ihe political firmament, but when he strikes bottom, there 
won't be mach of a smash, after all. It takes a large body to 
make a noise when it strikes. 



A MAN of most remarkable fortitude is that American mechan- 
ic who was arrested in Mexico for having married thirteen 
consecutive tinms, thus obtaining nine more wives than an old 
statute of the country allowed. The man has been sent to jail, 
and is now closely confined, while the maiden ladies of the 
southern republic wonder what will become of him. The curioi s 
thing about this fellow's wives was that they all died in about 
three months after marriage, which, of course, showed how very 
sensible Mexican women are. 



MUCH good was hoped for from the adjustment of the differ- 
ences between the farmers and miners, which had been al- 
most consummated, when the farmers of Colusa organized to op- 
pose the debris impounding bill pending in Congress. The resump- 
tion of mining would give a great impetus to business, and it is 
a matter for general regret that the two elements cannot find a 
satisfactory basis for reconciliation. The River Convention, which 
will meet in Sacramento on August 6th, will still farther embitter 
the controversy, and the whole State will suffer. 



JOHN CHINAMAN is nothing if not curious, and is alwajB 
anxious to learn, particularly when he can do so without 
cost. The Academy of Sciences has until recently allowed the 
Chinese the same privileges as any one else in regard to visiting 
the museum and examining the curios and specimens. Gradually 
the number of Chinese visitors began to increase until just before 
the order taking away the privilege was issued, on one day over 
two hundred Chinese visited the museum. They handled the 
specimens, gabbled and made their presence so obnoxious, that a 
sign is displayed to the effect that no Chinese are allowed in the 
museum. John would bring his family with him, and in many 
instances remain all day, mach to the discomfiture of the white 
visitors, and hence the order. 



THE Chicago Convention has been productive of only one re- 
sult of importance, locally considered, so far as can be seen. 
It- has added a new name to the Democratic list of possibilities 
for the gubernatorial nomination. This is singular, too, consider- 
ing the gubernatorial timber in the delegation. Nevertheless, the 
name of Alban B. Butler is now more frequently mentioned in 
this connection than that of any other Democrat. Butler was 
chairman of the California delegation to Chicago, and his level 
head and princely liberality are praised on every hand. Butler 
is a raisin-grower at Fresno, and by courtesy that county is 
called his home. In reality he lives in this city, maintaining a 
fine home here, presided over by a beautiful and charming wife, 
who is a cleverer politician than her husband. Butler's Dem- 
ocracy is unquestioned. Despite the duty on raisins he is a free 
trader. He is an available candidate, aside of the fact that he is 
possessed of large means. The fact that the standing' Democratic 
candidates tor Governor are somewhat convention- worn is to the 
advantage of a new man. Butler stands very close to the powers 
that combine the Monarch of the Dailies, and it is hinted that he 
is being groomed for the race in that office. 



.2 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 



DECAYING NATIONS. 



UNDER tbe above title an editorial appeared last week in 
a daily contemporary in which tbe suggestion was made 
that the population of all those European countries which have 
large standing armies is decreasing and that if the truth was 
known Germany's population would be seen to diminish even 
faster than that of France. The writer said: "The census shows 
that in 1890 the deaths in France exceeded the births by 38,446. 
* * * Tue returns show that there has been a large dim- 
inution in marriages and a decrease of 42,000 in tbe number of 
births as compared with the old average." He contiues : "This is 
the fruit of a large standing army. Soldiers cannot marry. They 
would not if they could; and if they could no general would be 
willing to encumber himself with an army corps of women." He 
then goes on as follows; "What is true of France is probably 
true of Germany and Italy. In these countries vital statistics are 
not collected as assiduously as they are in France. If they were 
they would probably show that the population of Germany is re- 
ceding even more rapidly than that of its rival, for Germany has 
to endure a he ivy annual loss by emigration, while France loses 
few of its peoplu from that cause." 

Now the above statements are not only perfectly incorrect as 
regards facts, but the deductions drawn are utterly groundless 
and so misleading that in the interest of truth a correction is de- 
sirable. If the leader referred to should find its way into the 
columns of any European paper the readers would take the 
whole either for a huge hoax or as a sign of astonishing ignorance 
of the subject discussed in it. 

First, as regards the statement that standing armies prevent 
tbe young men from marrying, it needs simply to be pointed out 
that in Germany which has an enormous standing army, and has 
possessed it for a far longer time than tbe neighboring countries, 
the number of marriages and births is only little less than that 
of Great Britain. What has the standing army to do with the 
numbir of marriages? The actual service of the German soldiers, 
i c, the three years when he is obliged to dedicate his whole time 
to military matters are completed usually long before any sensible 
man would think of marrying, namely about the twenty-fourth 
year of age. Afterwards he becomes a private citizen of 
whom no military service is required, of course, except in case of 
war, when his country is in danger and for a few weeks of drill 
or exceptional intermittent occasions as long as he belongs to 
the reserves. As regards bis liberty to marry there is absolutely 
no restrictions at any time as far as the privates and non-com- 
missioned officers are concerned, and the wish of the "general," 
to use the writer's expression, can just as little interfere 
with him as that of tbe king. That the German young men are 
making full use of the institution of marriage is easily proved by 
statistics. Tbe writer insinuates that in Germany vital statistics 
are not collected as carefully as in France. If he would consult 
any specialist with regard to the matter he would learn that the 
statistic compilations of Germany are most excellent, and that 
also Itatly, the country of L. Bodio, whose "Movimentodello stato 
clville" is a standard work all over the world, cannot complain of 
having a lack of statisticians. That Germany is not diminishing 
in population, but just the contrary, is so easily proved by con- 
sulting tbe statistical tables compiled by the first authori- 
ties, that tbe author of the leader in question must be pos- 
sessed of a peculiar courage to have ventured upon his remarks. 
In view of the many accessible materials for proof argument is 
quite unnecessary. The quotation of the following figures will suf- 
fice. Yearly rate of increase of population: France, 1800-60,-48; 
1860-77, .35. United Kingdom, 1801-61, .98; 1861-78, 92. Prus- 
sia with recent annexations, 1830-61, 1.16; 1861-75, .83. 

Average number of births to one hnndred inhabitants: Italy, 
1865-78, 3.70. France, 1865-77, 2.58; England and Wales, 1865-78, 
3.56; Prussia, 1865-78, 3.87. 

Annual percentage of increase of population: Prussia, 1852-55, 
.53; Great Britian, 1841-51, .23. 

Approximate number of years iu which population will be 
doubled: Prussia, 131; Great Britain, 302. 

"Sapienti sat! " The figures are taken from the most reliable 
statistical compendiums and tables, and can be easily verified. 
Tbe population of France is decreasing. There is hardly any 
doubt about the matter, but not in consequence of the standing 
army, which is of much more recent origin than that of Germany, 
but in consequence of causes the discussion of which belongs to 
" moral statistics." People who are imbued with the poisonous 
and fatal doctrines of the Malthusian kind and prevent offspring, 
or who do not marry until after having exhausted their vital 
powers in illicit pleasure, contribute to tbe ruin of their country, 
and decay of tbe nation is the natural result. As far as Germany, 
however, is concerned, the plain facts prove that there is no sign 
of depopulation, notwithstanding the enormous annual number 
of emigrants. 

THERE is no sweeter repose than that which is bought with 
labor. If this truth could only be trephined into the brain of 
some of San Francisco's professional working-men. It might in- 
duce them to take up honest toil. 



REGISTRAR BROWN'S THREAT. 



WA. BROWN, by the grace of Dan. Burns and H. H. Mark- 
, ham, Registrar of Voters of this city, is threatening an 
outrage against the Democratic party of San Francisco. " I am 
the sole arbiter as to who shall go on the ticket," he said tiie other 
day, " and the judge as to what parties shall be represented by 
straight tickets. Here's this Reorganized Democracy, for instance, 
that may not go on straight. See ? It is a new thing, and never 
polled any votes. See? It was the old Democracy that cast the 
votes. Suppose the old Buckley Democracy puts up a ticket, 
why, I'll have to recognize it, don't you see?" When it was 
pointed out that the State Committee had recognized the Reor- 
ganized Democrats, he said: "That makes no difference; the 
Buckley fellows are the Democracy under the law. See?" As 
he said this, a gleam shone from his eyes that told more than his 
words. In case Boss Burns should succeed in naming his ticket 
in this city, he might need the performance of just such service 
from his Registrar. It would cost but little money to get a Buck- 
ley ticket in the field. If tbe Registrar should recognize that as 
the real ticket of the Democratic party, it would inevitably de- 
feat the Reorganizes by placing them at the disadvantage of be- 
ing but a faction, for which no straight votes could be cast. 
Brown's looks, more than bis words, left the impression that this 
was a part of a well-matured plan to defraud the Democracy of 
this city out of an assured victory. It is probably a good thing 
for the party that the intimation was dropped so early. It affords 
ample time in which to meet the contingency. Registrar Brown 
is not a great man. He is the creature of Boss Burns, and was 
appointed to tbe very important office which he holds by Gover- 
nor Markham to please the rising son from Yolo. If any one else 
could have exerted the same " pull," Brown would have been his 
creature as readily as Burns', from which it may be inferred that 
Brown is considerably of a political Hessian. He owes his pres- 
ent position wholly to machine politics. He is fitted for the place 
neither by education, training nor reputation. He is as unfit for 
the position morally as he is intellectually. In neither regard 
does he command respect nor inspire confidence. While it is not 
pleasant to contemplate the development of political accidents 
of this sort, it is sometimes profitable to do so. In Brown's case 
it is a short story. From a devotee of fortune, he graduated into 
a soda water manufacturer, and thence gravitated into 
the Assembly. He is still best known as "Soda 
Water" Brown, however, and it is to be regretted 
that he did not remain in that comparatively harmless 
occupation. He might have done some harm to his patrons by 
the free use of marble dust, but it would have been no circum- 
stance to the injury be has done to the moral sense of the com- 
munity. There is perhaps no more important appointment in 
the gift of the Governor than that of Registrar. It is to be re- 
gretted that Mr. Markham could not have found a cleaner person 
than this fellow. The Governor must have felt keenly the spec- 
tacle his Registrar of voters for this city cut at the Stockton con- 
vention. He was there, before the Committee on Credentials of 
his own party, convicted of political corruption, practically con- 
fessing that he gave fraudulent voters cards assigning them 
names, age and place of abode. He did this in his home district, 
the Thirty-fourth Assembly, and he probably was able to assist in 
casting fraudulent votes through " stutter's cards " by means of 
the records in his office. The showing then made appalled the 
convention, and hia own faction consented to abandon the con- 
test, which was brought of their own motion. It was thought 
that the spectacle then made of him would result in a demand for 
his resignation on the part of the Governor. It was not believed 
that he could permit a man convicted by his own admissions of 
such a crime against the purity of the ballot to remain in an office 
so near to tbe rights of the people. But he did permit him to re- 
main. Then came the scandal over the plans for election houses 
and booths. Designers claimed that bids had been tampered with 
while in Brown's possession. The matter was hushed up by re- 
advertising for bids, and then some of the contractors brought 
their bids to Mayor Sanderson, declaring that they » did not trust 
Brown." It was then thought that the man would surely not be 
retained in office by Governor Markham, but either the Governor 
is indifferent to pure elections, or is dominated, as the people 
say, by Dan. M. Burns. At any rate, Brown is still in office, and 
appears to feel solid enough in his place to threaten to commit 
this outrage upon one-half of this community who happen to 
disagree from him politically. In the hands of a different man it 
would be absurd to fear that such an outrage might be perpe- 
trated in this enlightened city, but Brown is quite capable of it. 
His determination upon the subject should be demanded, and in 
the event of his refusal, his removal be insisted upon. There are 
ample grounds upon which to urge it. 

THE Pioneers are certainly getting very, very old. Their an- 
nual election of officers was held on Thursday last, and there 
was not nearly as much excitement as usually signalizes that 
most remarkable occasion. It is said that even the cab compa- 
nies were not subsidized to send all their cabs to the headquar- 
ters of one of the factions, and no outside political influence was 
used to gain votes. The Pioneers are certainly getting very, 
very old. 



July 9, 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE ANTI-DIVE AGITATION. 



EDITOB SKWS LSTTBR:— PerhaptOlU citizens generally do 
not know that any man, black or white, good or bad, can ob- 
tain a license to open a saloon and to sell liquor in the city and 
county of San Francisco, by the payment of $21 a quarter — 
simply that, and nothing more — no petition, no signatures, no 
recommendation needed; $21 in hard cash gets the necessary 
document. But if, after obtaining a license, the man, fometimes, 
alas, the woman, gets into trouble with the police; if the place 
kept is disorderly, frequented by dissolute characters of both 
sexes, if they run an immoral show, or indecent dance, or if they 
•re convicted of any crime under the laws governing their busi- 
ness, then it sometimes happens that the License Commissioners 
think best to refuse to grant a renewal of said license on its quar- 
terly expiration; tbey cannot revoke it, but they are met with 
the difficulty of the law governing licenses, which says that after 
the License Commissioners have refused a man a license » for 
good cause, ' he can secure the same without their consent on 
the petition of twelve persons owning property in the four 
blocks surrounding his place of business (see Statutes of Cal., 77 
and 7S). Observe now the discrimination. The Board of Police 
Commissioners has full power to give licenses, no power to re- 
voke, and only partial power " to refuse for just cause." A queer 
state of things, surely! Now what is the result? If a law- 
breaking, low, corrupt reprobate can get the signatures of twelve 
men, he can run any kind of a place he pleases in opposition and 
defiance of all license boards, and under full protection of the 
law. Now, when I tell you that it is on these » Property Owners' 
Licenses " that many of the so-called " dives " are now running, 
you will understand why this is called the " Anti-Dive Agitation," 
though really our fight is not so much with the dive-keeper as it 
is with the law which allows such places to exist. The petition 
presented by the Woman's Christian Temperance Union to the 
Board of Supervisors, some two months ago, asking them to 
amend the ordinance by striking out the twelve property owners 
clause, was first presented to the Board of Police Commissioners 
for their endorsement, and received their unanimous approval. 
It would seem that the presentation of these facts, and a request 
to the proper legislative body of our city, would be enough to 
cause a change to be made in the existing license law, but it seems 
not. Hence the » Citizen's League;" hence the " Woman's 
League," auxiliary to the same; hence the " Sunday Mass Meet- 
ings," and the agitation of the subject all over the city; hence 
the groups of citizens nightly besieging the chambers nf the 
Board of Supervisors; hence the out-spoken impatience shown 
by speeches, letters, and through the press, with the unnecessary 
delay of the committee, into whose hands the matter was referred 
by the Board. If they are waiting until the excitement abates or 
blows over, they are making a grave mistake; the agitation will 
not die out; on the contrary, it will increase, for many good men 
and women, too, are taking this occasion to find out for theju- 
selves about the dives and similar places, and groups of visitors, 
not usual in such places, are to be found nightly "doing the 
dives ;" slumming with an object, and the result will be, must be, 
a stronger determination that the agitation shall not die out until 
the desired change is made, which will rid our fair city of many 
of these low, vile places. When they are closed, the work of the 
" Woman's League" will begin. Our work will be the care and 
help and protection of the unfortunate of our own sex, many of 
whom are now employed in these places. The lines and methods 
of work are not yet fully laid out or adopted, but organization 
will be completed on the 9th inst. I hope this will suffice to give 
your readers a clear idea of the origin and present status of the 
Anti-Dive Mass Meetings, the Citizen's League and the Woman's 
Auxiliary League. 

Rose M. French, President Woman's League. 



THE continued boasts of the Gladstonians that they will be 
victorious at the coming election must seem absurd to all 
those who have followed closely political events in England. One 
of their chief causes of confidence used to be the result of the 
municipal elections in London last March. They maintained 
that this result justified them in predicting the success of their 
candidates in the capital. It has been frequently pointed out in 
this paper that the issue at the county council elections was a 
very different one from what it will be at the general elections, 
and that there was not the slightest reason for prognosticating 
Gladstonian sympathies in London. This view was fully con- 
firmed last month by the election of the Conservative candidate 
in North Hackney, Mr. Boustield, by the decisive majority of 969 
votes. After that election the Gladstonian and radical organs of 
the press showed decided sign of despondency, as was natural, 
under the circumstances. At present, however, they are bragging 
and boasting again in the old style, and one looks in vain for any 
cause which may have revived their hopes. It will be amusing 
to watch, a few weeks hence, the excuses which they will have 
to find in order to explain the failure of their predictions. 



THE TROUBLES AT HOMESTEAD. 



IT is said that President Harrison is a great admirer of Napoleon. 
It was probably from the First Consul that he learned that 
the heart of a statesman should be in his head. 



THE recent tragedy at the Homestead Works of Andrew Car- 
negie has sent a thrill of horror throughout the olviUxed 

world. The savage butchery by hired assassins, of honest work- 
Ipgtnen, who were endeavoring to protect their homes and fam- 
ilies, has not a parallel in the history of labor agitation in the 
world. The exemplification of the beauties of a protective tariff, 
which, while giving an employer the benefits of an income of a 
million dollars a year, refuses to the toilers the right to make 
their living, has aroused an interest in the great political question 
of the day in all citizens of the country. That the result will be 
disastrous, as it should be, to the Republican party, there can be 
no doubt. The Homestead affair showed conclusively the man- 
ner in which the manufacturing barons of the country, secure in 
the strength of untold wealth, and certain of the friendship of 
the Chief Executive, who has the Federal forces in his control, 
intend to treat the just claims of the workingmen in their em- 
ploy. The hiring of large armed bodies of men, mercenaries, 
Carnegie Hessians, to assail, and if necessary, to murder the 
wageworkers, cannot be defended on any possible grounds. The 
idea itself is repugnant to the spirit of the republic. No private 
individual or corporation should be allowed to have in his em- 
ploy, or have under his control, large bodies of mercenaries, 
ready, at his command, to do his bidding, whatever it 
might be. The Congressional investigation into the causes of the 
outrage at Homestead, it is to be hoped, will be prosecuted 
with all the vigor which the occasion demands. Not since war 
times have the people been so terribly affected as by the Home- 
stead murders. From the United States Senate to the smallest 
hamlet in the States it is the subject for debate, and from all sides 
comes the cry thai the responsibility for the awful disaster should 
be fixed where it properly belongs— on that " protective" system 
of the Republican party, which first forces men to starvation and 
then allows them to be murdered. Senator Voorhees well voiced 
the sentiments of the people when, in discussing the matter in 
the United States Senate on Thursday last, he said: «< Protection 
is certainly a fraud and a robbery, s© far as the interests of labor 
are concerned, when an industry with from fifty-five to sixty per 
cent, protection enforces its cut in wage rates with bullets, while 
the capitalist concerned is flaunting in the face of the world his 
vulgar efforts to spend his million dollar a year income. Does 
protection protect labor? Ask the widows and fatherless children of 
Homestead who are weeping and moaning over the dead in their 
homes; the dead who died in resisting an attempt of protected capi- 
tal to reduce wages to a point where bread could not be bought 
for those who are weeping to-day. The protected Carnegies of 
this country give their laborers the choice of death by starvation 
or assassins' bullets. The brave, desperate men who died at 
Homestead yesterday accepted the least of the two evils pre- 
sented by their protected employers." 



CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS ON CLEVELAND. 



CHARLE8 FRANCIS ADAMS, President of the Union Pacific 
Railway, a Republican for years, and recognized as one of the 
ablest men in the country, is one of the latest additions to the 
Democratic host which will follow the banner of Cleveland in 
November. Mr. Adams, in an article in the current Forum, dis- 
cusses the political questions of the day in a very able manner. 
" What are the political issues of the impending canvass ? " he 
asks. "Some of them are old, as old as the National Govern- 
ment, and likely long to continue; others are new and of a 
passing character. These issues, new and old, may be enumer- 
ated somewhat as follows: 1. The economic and commercial 
system, commonly known as protective, based upon the idea 
that it is the business of government artificially to foster, or even 
to call into existence, various branches of industry. 2. The 
purification and reform of the civil service; or, as Mr. Carl 
Schurz once tersely expressed it, < the disestablishment of the 
spoils system,' the system which the Jacksonian Democracy in- 
troduced into the administration of our government. 3. What 
is known as the 'currency question,' now taking the form of a 
demand for the free coinage of silver at the national mint at an 
artificial ratio with gold. 4. The pension system. 

" What is the attitude of Mr. Cleveland so far as these issues 
are concerned ? He has been called upon officially to confront 
them all, and on no occasion, so far as I know, has he failed to 
make his position understood, or to give the party of which he 
was the head a distinct, recognized and creditable lead. He has 
not shuffled or vacillated; he, at least upon these issues, has 
emitted no uncertain sound. In this respect the line of responsible 
public action he has pursued has been in most agreeable contrast 
with that usually pursued by politicians, not only of the present, 
but of all time. The crying sin of cattle of that class, especially 
in these days of many newspapers and much rapid communica- 
tion, is their constant endeavor to catch quickly and to reflect 
correctly public sentiment, and neither to think nor to speak for 
themselves. Such has not been the practice of Mr. Cleveland. 
In high public position he has stood forth a clean-cut political 
character, a man with the courage of his convictions." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 9, 1892. 



THE SNUFF HABIT. 



COLLECT all your ancestors' snuff boxes, and send to your to- 
bacconist for a jar of the best macaboy or rappee, and that right 
speedily, if you would be considered in the swim, for the leaders 
of London society have declared that snuff taking shall hereafter 
be considered fashionable. The youths of high degree of London 
now carry with thera snuff-boxes of quaint design and highly 
ornamented, for it is the proper thing to have a snuff-box of as 
much beauty and richness as a fine watch. It is said that the 
habit received its present vogue from the fact that the University 
students, while cramming for their " little goes," found it neces- 
sary to take some stimulant to clear up their overcharged brains, 
and relieve to some extent the pressure on their grey matter. 
Snuff, it is said, gave the desired results, and hence tbe snuff 
habit became fashionable among them. As many of thestudents 
are sons of rioh men, or wealthy in their own right, there is, of 
course, a large army of toadies who always follow in their im- 
mediate wake, and they, imitating the customs of their gods, also 
possessed themselves of snuff-boxes, and proceeded to feed their 
noses in an endeavor to clear up the spaces within their craniums 
which should have been filled with brain. The snuff habit is 
variously considered, as is every vice which receives the sanction 
of so-called high society. It can be said in its favor that snuff 
has been and is indulged in by many famous and learned men, 
and there is no doubt that it has some, at least, of the good qual- 
ities attributed to it. But that it should become fashionable 
among our society is not to be desired, for to most people snuff- 
taking is offensive. If the society youth of the period, starting 
at best with a weak constitution, looking like an animated doll, 
has been partially wrecked by cigarette smoking, absinthe drink- 
ing, gambling and carousals, now takes to snuff, what hope can 
there be for him? Soon a new race of copper-colored dudes will 
appear, whose badge will be a snuff-box. If the snuff habit be- 
comes to any extent popular, the tobacco dealers will reap a har- 
vest, for there is hardly any product of the leaf which is more 
susceptible to adulteration than is snuff. Some of the component 
parts of the snuff of commerce often consist of lamp-black, mo- 
lasses, gum, cabbage, starch, powdered wood, sand, lime, ochre, 
umbre, logwood, aloes, and innumerable other things which are 
not snuff. Then, again, there is of course excellent snuff, daintily 
scented with some rich perfume, which is to the snuff taker what 
a fine Havana is to the smoker, or excellent smoking tobacco to 
the devotee of the pipe. In the olden days, when every gallant 
carried his snuff-box, and it was prescribed by the edicts of polite 
society that snuffs should be exchanged, every snuffer carried his 
rasper with him, and grated his snuff from the leaf whenever he 
wanted a pinch, much as many smokers now cut and powder plug 
tobacco for their pipes, instead of smoking the prepared pipe to- 
bacco. While not as convenient a method of obtaining a pinch 
as taking it from the box, rasping has many virtues. One can at 
least be certain that he is getting some tobacco with what he 
considers his snuff, and he need not be pained by the supposition 
which cannot otherwise be suppressed, that he is filling bis bead 
with powdered shells, or ancient egg yolks, browned for the occa- 
sion. It is with some fear of the results that we announce to the 
imitators of the London society leaders, that the latter have 
raised their snuff-boxes aloft, and have revived the ancient vice. 
If the habit becomes prevalent in this town of colds and catarrh, 
fashionable assemblages may or not be very entertaining here- 
after. That depends on one's individual opinion of the snuff 
habit. 



THE END OF FUTURES. 



THE Hatch anti-option bill, which passed the lower House at 
Washington some time ago, and will soon come up before the 
Senate, does not seen to bave attracted much attention in this 
city, although the business men of New York and the other 
prominent cities of the East are greatly excited over the prospects 
that it will become a law. It simply out-Herods Herod in com- 
parison with the little anti-margin legislation of this State. It af- 
fects all the leading food products, the following commodities be- 
ing especially enumerated: Cotton, hops, wheat, corn, oats, rye, 
barley, grass seeds, flaxseed, pork, lard, bacon, and other edible 
product of swine. The bill does not virtually prohibit dealing in 
futures, but the special taxes imposed are so heavy that the mat- 
ter is prohibitive. Every dealer in options will have to pay an 
annual license fee of $1,000; Jive cents a pound also on cot- 
ton, hups, pork, lard and bacon, and twenty cents per bushel 
on grains. The penalty for non-compliance with the law is a 
fine of not less than $1,000 nor more than $20,000, or imprison- 
ment for not less than six months nor more than ten years, or 
both fine and imprisonment. Senator Washburn is accredited 
by some with engineering the bill in revenge for ill-treatment at 
the hands of Chicago grain brokers, while others believe that 
the millers are trying to bring down the price of grain. Leading 
hrokers threaten if the bill becomes a law to remove their business 
to branch offices in Great Britain, Europe and Canada. The 
wheat speculators here will also find the law rather oppressive 
on operations in futures. They bave evidently not yet awakened 
to a sense of the danger which threatens their profits in this line. 



OUR PROFESSIONAL PATRIOTS. 

THE utter disinterestedness which pervades the meetings of the 
Fourth of July Committee is one of the facts in connection 
with the administration of political business in this city, which 
is deserving of the highest praise. True, the News Lettek did 
refer recently to the prominent members and office-holders of the 
committee as professional patriots, who would never think of the 
matter of personal advantage while working in the interests of 
the common country. Therefore are we the more surprised when 
we ascertain that the secretaries have put in claims for $700 for 
their few weeks' work. This money is to be paid out of the 
funds of the committee, which were formed by the combination 
of the county appropriation and the subscriptions of citizens. 
The secretaries and janitor labored enormously hard for the good 
of the cause, writing letters and sending out circulars, and now 
expect to get paid well for it. There is Secretary Sheridan, for 
instance, who has so distinguished himself by his unselfish 
patriotism (he wants only $200 for his services) that he has been 
named as a possible successor to Supervisor Jackson among the 
city fathers. Of course the men should be paid for their work, 
but that the secretary should receive twice as much as the janitor 
does not seem quite fair, particularly as the janitor did valuable 
service. He sat in every chair in the office in tnrn, and licked 
the postage stamps. Another cause of dispute among the pro- 
minent gentlemen of this committee, and one which will illus- 
trate the opinion in which they hold one another, lies in the 
adoption of the resolution providing that all the prizes for the re- 
gatta shall be distributed by the General Committee, and not by 
the Regatta Committee, and that a receipt shall be obtained for 
each prize. The Regatta Committee thought this resolution re- 
flected on their honesty, but it was passed just the same; ail of 
which goes to show the advantage of men in a Fourth of July 
committee being acquainted with each other. We reiterate, the 
Fourth of July celebration, as conducted in this city, is a farce 
and a humbug. It should be improved, or suppressed. 



THE latest contribution to erotic literature is a novel, by one 
Pierre Beaumont. It treats of hypnotism and its influence on 
weaker minds. Governor Markhaun's hypnotic hand comes in 
for notice. So does Carroll Cook's reformation. The volume is 
copyrighted by William Wilson Knott, a character not unknown 
to fame in San Francisco, and who is now serving a sentence In 
the Illinois State penitentiary at Joliet for violating the laws of 
decency in his publications. In the novel mentioned there is 
little that is interesting, and nothing to be commended. The 
only interest attaching to it is that ex-Judge Robert Ferral is ac- 
cused of being "Pierre Beaumont," the author. He was the counsel 
for Knott in his troubles in this city. It is said that Knott wrote 
his attorney from Chicago, telling him that he was in clover; that 
the law was a good thing, but the fleshy novel was better, and 
urged his former attorney to write a novel. The novel in ques- 
tion is said to be tbe result. Ferral is bantered a good deal about 
the authorship, but he discreetly declines to commit himself. He 
will not confirm the story, neither has he denied it. 



YOUNG ladies traveling to El Campo of a Sunday on the 
steamer Ukiah should be particular about their hosiery. A 
nicely drawn up stocking, of fashionable design, with the proper 
amount of filling is always an artistic sight, but a loose, badly 
fitting piece of hosiery is enough to give one tbe horrors. One 
of the girls last Sunday with an escort insisted on taking a seat 
on the upper deck where nether limbs and garments are freshened 
by the salt breeze. A window glass in the back plainly showed 
everything. From tbe lower deck where the light and shadow 
flitted several young men saw the exhibition and fainted. Moral — 
Be careful girls when you go to El Campo again and have the 
hose in trim for a fire. 

CHARLES R. BEAL, the popular boarding officer of the Cus- 
toms service had a remarkable escape from drowning on the 
Fourth. Beal was on tbe chartered Customs steamer Tia Juana 
when she was run down by the bark Fresno, and was thrown 
overboard by the force of the collision. In the excitement that 
prevailed during the collision Mr. Beal's perilous situation was 
not noticed. He struck out and paddled along as if he was tak- 
ing a little aquatic recreation until rescued by Mike Fitzgerald, 
the marine reporter of the Merchants Exchange, who happened 
along in his boat. 

THE surest remedy for poverty is the will to labor; laziness be- 
gets poverty and crime. 

My preference for the Caligraph, for use in a telegraph office, in- 
creases as I use it, and as I observe other people using other ma- 
chines. From the use of nearly all the different machines in the 
market, my experience has driven me to the Caligraph exclusively. 
Yours very truly, H. K. HIBBETS, 

Night Chief Operator, 
Pacific Postal Telegraph Cable Company. 

Mothers be Sure and Use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while Teething. Price, 25 cents a bottle. 



July o. iso:. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



BIO TREES AND BIO CROPS 



TUB faith of the Kastern people will probably be shaken soon 
again. For a lone time the picture of the six-borse coach 
crashing down the mountains and through a giant sequoia has 
HTtoaal* shaken the belief of these people In the truthfulness of 
Californians. 

Now, however, there is a bigger project on band. It is pro- 
posed to run the trains of the San Francisco and North Pacific 
Coast road through a great redwood tree near the Bohemian Club's 
• ommercamp. a mile and a half this side of Cazadero. William 
Montgomery, proprietor of the American Exchange Hotel, told 
about it recently. He has just been up there. The tree, he says, is 
about 200 yards from the present track, and the latter is to be 
lifted up and switched around. They are going to start in soon 
and cut the tree out. 

" It is a gigantic tree," he said, " and it is estimated that there 
are from 85.000 to 90,000 feet of clear lumber in it. The Baptist 
Church, in Santa Rosa, was made from a single tree, grown near 
<!uerneville. There were 7.5.000 feet of clear lumber in that, and 
it was fully 300 feet high. The tree near Cazadero is bigger than 
this. The running of trains daily through a tree, in this manner, 
will attract much attention. Everybody will want to see it. See- 
ing is believing, and therefore it is safe to say that the stories of 
big trees in California will find a wider circulation than usual. 

The trees in the grove at the Bohemian Club camp are very 
large, but this is, as may be supposed, the biggest in that imme- 
diate vicinity. In a couple of months at most, probably, the 
trains will be whizzing through it." 
* * » 

J. S. Coolican, now at the Grand Hotel, is one of the directors 
of the new Canadian railroad to parallel the Canadian Pacific, and 
reach nearer to the Arctic Circle than any other railroad. He 
lives at Port Angeles, Washington, just sonth across the straits 
from Victoria, B. C. He has confidence in the soil of that sec- 
tion. This is what he said about it the other night: " The tim- 
ber of the Puget Sound Co-operative Colony yielded 160,000 feet 
on the average to the acre. This is the colony that made the first 
substantial settlement there. This timber, that is the stumpage, 
brought $1 per thousand, or $160 to the acre. When it was off 
the settlers proceeded to grow new crops. The results were aston- 
ishing. E. G. Morse raised on some of this same land, near the 
mouth of Morris Creek, a crop of potatoes that averaged 1,340 
bushels to the acre. Jack Wilcox, ot Dungeness, raised wheat 
during successive years averaging 90 to 125 bushels to the acre. 
Oats have averaged 145 bushels. Turnips grew so big that 
they weighed as much as forty pounds each. Hay 
runs from four to six tons to an acre, and hops 
average some years from 2,000 to 3,000 pounds for the same area. 
Besides this, the largest hemlock tanning extract company in the 
world is in operation there. We are in almost the very north- 
western tip of the United States, only a stone's throw from Brit- 
ish soil. It is a rushing region, and no other part of oar country 
surpasses it." 

TH ERE is no doubt that the sudden death of J. W. Breckinridge, 
the brilliant young lawyer, prevented a great tragedy. Breckin- 
ridge had been divorced from a daughter of Lloyd Tevis, the 
children of the unhappy union being in the custody of the grand 
parents. Breckinridge's mind was set on killing Lloyd Tevis, and 
only a few days before his death he declared that he would kill 
Tevis. He was then perfectly sober. Indeed, just previous to 
his death be had not been drinking much, and drink did not kill 
him. Neither did he commit suicide, as has been hinted. He 
died from an overdose of morphia, administered by a physician. 
He had just returned to his home at Merced from Fresno, where 
he had successfully defended John D. Smith for the killing of 
Percy Williams, a brother of Tom Williams, of Onion Island. 
He was in high glee, and in possession of a good fee. Before 
leaving Fresno, he made the threat against the life of Mr. Tevis. 
He seemed to think that he had a lien on his ex-father-in-law's 
cash box, and resented the [alters refusal to open it at his de- 
mand. He had once or twice terrified the Tevis household, by 
flitting about the place and threatening vengeance. His death 
may have been providential. 



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WOLFE'S 



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AN OLD MEDICINE REVIVED. 

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Holland Gin. For a longtime, however, the genuine article could not be 
had, until it bad appeared under the new name of Aromatic Schiedam 
Schnapps. The article is manufactured exclusively by Udolpho Wolfe, at 
Schiedam, in Holland, and put up in small and large bottles expressly for 
medicinal purposes, with his name on the seal, bottle, and label, to protect 
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the interior of our Southern and Western States, that they can now pur- 
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ZISKA INSTITUTE, 

1606 Van Ness Avenue. 

French, German and English Day and Boarding School for young 
ladies and children. 
A refined home with the best educational advantages. 

Next Term Opens August 1, 1892. 

MME. B. ZISKA, M. A., Principal. 
Mr. ASHTON P. STEVENS, 

"I" E -£l. C EI B E, OP B-A-IsTTO. 
Studio— 26 Montgomery Street, Room 8. 

ALFRED J. KELLEHER, 

Professor of VOCAL MUSIC AT MILLS' COLLEGE (18th year), desires 
to announce that he will give Lessons at his office, his residence, or at the 
residence of the pupil. 

Office— 14 Grant avenue, rooms 62 and 63. Residence— 2324 Clay street, 
San Francisco. 

Garcia Vocal Method. Solfeggio Panseron. 

MRS. R. G. LEWIS, 

FORMERLY OF THURLOW BLOCK, 
HAS REMOVED TO 

531 SUTTER STREET. 



; a ".v.-—- — .- s.-j 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 



WHEN JOE McAULIFFE FELL. 



This is the rockiest of years 

For favorite sons to bloom; 
Their course ts marked by care and tears, 

And grief and woe and gloom. 
In tender acaents now we speak 

Of those once loved so well, 
And even freedom did not shriek 

When Joe McAuliffe fell. 

The tanneries are decked with crepe, 

No merry voices sing 
The praise of him of mighty shape 

Who once plowed 'round the ring. 
The umptarara's silent now. 

The boom-der-ay is mute, 
And quiet men are counting how 

They lost on the galoot. 

They try to think how, long ago, 

His hide was full of vim, 
And how they used to yell for Joe, 

And bet their cash on him. 
But now the rolling, surging earth 

Is but a howling sham, 
And he they loved is hardly worth 

A continental d . 

The raven's croaking "Nevermore" 

Comes like a prophecy; 
Alack, there's none so bruised and sore, 

And black and blue as he. 
There's consolation in that fact, 

Although when all is said, 
We're sorry Goddard hasn't cracked 

That fat and pudding head. 

But let us gather round and build 
A grave for him who's gone; 

For him the bungling Barrier killed 
When hope was at its dawn. 

We'll raise a shaft of feathers white, 
And then call out the club 

To read the epitaph we'll write: 



Hie jacet just a dub." 



Carl Smith. 



THE FLANNEL COTILLION. 



San Rafael. 

DEAR NEWS LETTER: As all the world and his wife want to 
know how we enjoyed ourselves at the flannel cotillion, at 
the suggestion of the girls I scribble off these few words to tell 
you what a lovely time we had. The weather was simply broil- 
ing, and every one had melted or roasted all day looking at the 
tennis matches. But when the night came and the dining-room 
was prepared, and the band tuned up, they were all ready to go 
in. The men alone were expected to do the flannel act, but even 
they did not all adhere to it. Between you and me there's mighty 
few that look well in neglige. Ed. Greenway's suit looked for all 
the world like a loose bathing costume. Now, I know he'll say 
that I'm some spiteful creature whom he did not ask to dance, by 
my saying this; but in reality I had two lovely waltzes with him, 
and he said 1 had his step to a T. (I hope I don't roll). Well, to go 
back to the cotillion. There were what Will 8herwood calls no end 
of pretty girls present. Apropos* of Will, ain't he just grand! He 
always looks so spick and span; even the heat didn't spoil his 
collars. Well, I suppose you'll want to know who was the belle? 
Hard to say, for all the girls looked real sweet, and the married 
ladies looked fine. Mrs. Schmieden was elegantly dressed. Ain't 
it lucky for her that Ed. don't hanker after matrimony, and so 
there's only one Mrs. Schmieden, now as ever. MayHoffman 
and Alice Ames had most of the local beaux's attention. You 
know they used to live over here, so no doubt got well acquainted. 
May is an awfully nice girl, and a favorite everywhere. Southard, 
her brother, is a pet, too. Ward McAllister was real devoted to a 
pretty married woman, but I'm not going to mention names, 
because Charley Hanlon told me it was "bad policy," and 
he ought to know, I suppose, being a lawyer. Mrs. Steinhart 
looked gorgeous. She and Mrs. Seligman kept together a good 
deal. The Robert Osnards and Basil Heathcotes also seemed to 
like each other's society. Misses Houghton and Holbrook had 
such pretty gowns on, it was easy to see they had rich pa's. May 
Tubbs appeared to prefer the veranda of the Rafael to that at 
Del Monte, but I guess, as all her folks are booked for the latter 
place, she'll have to go too. A girl who received a good deal of at- 
tention was Miss Jennie Sherwood, only daughter of the wealthy 
widow (who herself is quite a belle). They have been living for 
some time in the East, but now tney seem to have half decided 
to return to California for good once more. No relation to Will 
or Harry, but old-time friends of the Sharon-Fry crowd. My! 
didn't Lieut. Blake have a good time! I told him once that I 
just did wish Myra could see him. He and Lieut. Stevens wore 



very swell white suits with broad white braid, and they look 
stunning, and no mistake. Helen Walker and Jennie Hobbs had 
a good time, to judge from the lots of partners they had. Chauncey 
St. John kept watching Ed. Greenway when he led the figures as 
if he could do better. Everyone said how much alike the alpha- 
betical Nuttall couple are. Judge and Mrs. Morrow looked on. 
So did Mr. and Mrs. Bigelow. Mrs. Edith Blanding Coleman has 
a good time always. She is as merry as a cricket and as bright 
as a lucifer match, when it is struck real hard. Harry Durbrow 
and his sister, and the Mayo Newhalls tried iced lemonade be- 
tween dances; so did most people, for that matter. Some ill- 
natured old hen was saying it was astonishing how the folks 
kept going over to the bar all the time, but, my gracious, I'd like 
to know if any person in the world would not like to leave a 
heated ball-room and stroll in the soft moonlight over to the 
Casino, especially if accompanied by a swept partner. Evidently 
« Yes," to judge by the numbers who did it. 

Well, the long and short of it was, the cotillion was a success, 
even if the heavy swells were at Del Monte. Sam. Murphy says 
he is going there for the rest of the summer. Guess every one 
knows why! One of the prettiest girls at the hotel was Miss 
Helen Walker. She wore the California Lawn Tennis Club's 
colors. 

Well, good-bye. Kitty. 



THE EARL OF WARWICK'S SEAT. 



THE Prince of Wales and the Duke of York were recently 
guests of the Earl of Warwick, at Warwick Castle. The Earl 
of Warwick's magnificent seat is one of the most historically in- 
teresting edifices in the country, the ancient Keep having been 
erected by a daughter of King Alfred the Great, and every part 
of the Castle teeming with unique associations. The pictures 
alone are of immense value and interest, and amongst them are 
such famous masterpieces as Van Dyck's portrait of Charles I., 
in complete armour and riding a gray horse, and Peter Paul 
Rubens' superb portrait of Ignatius Loyola. Relics of the days 
of Warwick the King-maker, and of the struggle between the 
Cavaliers and Roundheads are plentiful, and the ancient crest of 
the House, the Bear and Ragged Staff, is also in evidence. Of 
Guy, Earl of Warwick, one of the Seven Champions of Christen- 
dom, the Castle still contain the spur and spear, buckler and bow, 
with a romantic souvenir in the shape of the slippers of the lovely 
Phyllis whose beauty inspired his heroic deeds. The old story 
goes that the first Earl was Arth or Arthgal, a Knight of the 
Round Table, whose emblem was a bear, and that when Morvid, 
the second Earl, overcame a giant in single combat, despite the 
monster uprooting a whole tree for a club, the " ragged staff " 
was added to the Warwick insignia. But every stone of the 
Castle has its story, and the Prince of Wales, who is wonderfully 
well-informed upon the history of all the great families of Eng- 
land, did not fail to appreciate keenly the unique associations of 
the stately building which was honored by his presence. 



A CHEAP g'ass cutter can be made from the ends of un- 
burned arc light carbons, which are often found with sharp crys 
talized points possessing many of the properties of the diamond 




July 9 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE SUMMER SPONGE. 
[Bt Di VlftHOI.] 

Sl'MMF.R resorts are the last hope or many a person anxious 
to Ret into the social swim. It is amusing to watch the en- 
deavors of such to ingratiate themselves with the people for 
whose notice they are pining. Their disappointment would be 
pitiable were it not that they so richly deserve the fate which 
their own folly brings upon them. A sojourn at a summer resort 
is always a sort of profit to the special teacher off on a vacation. 
Musician or elocutionist, it's all the same. Advantage is taken 
of every opportunity to pose as an exponent of a fad, a devotee 
of an art. and the acts of politeness paid to possible pupils ought 
to meet and does meet with success. Many a failing clientele of 
private pupils is brought up to a full list by a judicious choice of 
watering places and a masterly play for golden opportunities. 

The world is full of people who are anxious to get something 
for nothing. In order to accomplish it, they will resort to some 
very mean tricks. No descent is quite to steep for them. For 
instance, there is the summer sponge. Sex has nothing to do 
with it. Take the man first, under consideration. Generally, he 
is a big. burly fellow, lubberly in his appearance, loutish in his 
manners, who does nothing for the entertainment of the com- 
pany upon which he thrusts himself. He does not even make 
himself agreeable to the ladies, by those delicate little courtesies 
in the way of fetching and carrying. He is never known to re- 
lieve a lady of her bundle on the way from the boat to the hotel, 
or to offer, even to offer to take her library book to the city for 
her. He monopolizes the best seat on the veranda, in the shadiest 
spot. He never allows any one to read his copy of a weekly 
society paper, although he is an inveterate appropriator of any 
papers that their owners may place temporarily upon a seat 
within radius of bis clutch. At the table he shows forth in all 
his meanness. He is the first to enter the dining-room. Before 
he has been served with soup he helps himself to fruit, picking 
out the most alluring and luscious from the dish, and prepares 
bis peaches in advance, so as to make sure of the biggest and the 
best. With the same unblushing effrontery he appropriates the 
choices slices of tomatoes, the nicest cakes. He is known as a 
sponge among his men acquaintances, who '• shake " bim on all 
occasions. He never treats, not because he is a total abstainer, 
but because he is too mean to spend a cent on any one but him- 
self. He drinks at the table, but he never, as do the other men, 
asks any one to share his liquor with him; but when a general 
treat is going on he comes to the front with alacrity. Or if he 
imagines that such a treat is soon to take place, be is doubly on 
the alert. He is not above opening the window on the porch, 
and thrusting his head into the parlor to call out, " Don't forget 
to let me in on the drinks." Is it any wonder that such a man 
is thoroughly detested? 

When the summer sponge is a woman, she goes beyond the 
man's meanness, because her opportunities are greater. She is 
on the spot all the time. She has no scruples about sponging. 
She belongs to the class who never take a daily paper, but who 
borrow one with unfailing regularity, always neglecting to return 
it. 8he appears early on Saturday morning, soon after the deliv- 
ery of the first mail, and borrows the News Lettee, promising to 
return it in less than half an hour, and does not remember to do 
so until she is asked for it, about Monday noon. If she has a 
sick husband she is able to sponge just so much more extensively, 
because then she is able to float around unattacked, and take up 
ber station at whatever table in the dining-room that seems to 
promise the most in the way of good eating. For, when the bill 
of fare is about the same, individuals can order extras, and fre- 
quently do lend variety to their meal by calling for some dainty. 
The summer sponge, by trained observation, has not taken long 
to find out who is most apt to do this, and she does not hesitate 
to waylay such epicures as they are on their way to the dining- 
room, and to say, " I am going to eat dinner with you to-day," 
and so she does, regardless that often her advances are met with 
what a person who was not a pachyderm might regard as a direct 
snub. If there be wine on the table she helps herself to it, with- 
out being asked, and does not hesitate to fill and refill her glass. 

Again, it is customary for ladies at a summer resort, to offer 
little treats to each other. Boxes of candy are opened on the 
porch and passed around; no one is omitted in the act. They 
make up little parties for a trip on the steam launch, and invite 
their friends from the city. They order lemonade from the hotel, 
or make it in their rooms, or pass around glasses of raspberry 
vinegar, and the Madame, the summer sponge, pushes herself 
into all the parties; she partakes of all the treats, enjoys the deli- 
cacies, and gives in return — nothing. Others may sing, play, 
read aloud or recite; she will take it all in and add nothing. She 
is a sponge. Uninvited, she will attach herself to a rowing party 
and night after night enjoy a row, which costs her nothing. She 
is never around when a " chip in" treat is being discussed, or if 
she is, will manage to escape the payment of her share of the ex- 
expenses. 

Eyes tested according to physiological laws of light, and not by machin- 
ery. C. Muller, the progressive optician and refraction specialist, 186 
Montgomery street, near Bush. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 




'We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



THE statement that " everybody haa a sneaking fondness for 
negro minstrelsy, and shows it openly when opportunity 
offers," was not a rash one, at least ao far as the Bash and Hav- 
erly's Minstrels are concerned. The little theatre has been 
crowded every night and at two raatin6es, the holiday attendance 
having amounted almost to a " crush." There is no doubting the 
long-established fact that Billy Rice is a genuine humorist in 
burnt cork. The twinkle of bis eye and the extensive expression 
of his mouth are but accessories; his humor emanates (a rare cir- 
cumstance) from above them. His famous lecture is full enough 
of really good hits to furnish forth a column for a professional 
humorous writer, and many of them are so covert and so quietly 
satirical as to miss the applause of the many and win the appre- 
ciative smile of the few who do not use their hands at the theatre 
— though they ought to, by the way. The other comedians are 
good supports to the chief, and E. M. Kayne, interlocutor and 
stage manager, evidently knows how to hold bis people in band 
and keep things from •< stopping over." The singing is "up to the 
usual minstrel standard ;' c'est a dire, very bad, it heard anywhere 
else. But somehow it seems to fit in with negro minstrelsy so 
naturally that artistic singing would be as doubtful a substitute 
as electric lights in a circus for the time-honored tallow candles 
in a hollow square. Ellwood — " the Great Ellwood " — is an ex- 
ception. However, he isn't a nigger minstrel at all, but simply 
the handsomest and beat dresaed woman on the stage. Mr. Ell- 
wood has evidently been original enough to learn how to sing be- 
fore making his living as a vocalist, and his clean, accurately 
taken tones would be accepted from any opera singer. Among 
the best specialty performers are the banjoist, E. M. Hall; Kissell, 
whose manipulation of musket and bayonet ia a marvel of skill 
in balancing and handling; and Harry Constantine, a dancerwho 
almost startled the audience as he bounded and pirouetted in front 
of the drop scene during a change of setting. The limited space 
prevented Constantire from really showing his mettle, but next 
week he will appear in his own act. It should be noted that the 
ensemble ia decidedly improved by the omission of the " Court 
first-part " of last year, with its King of Spades, Jack of trumps, 
and the rest of the deck, and of other features extraneous to 
minstrelsy as it was. There are people enough, and the absence 
of the unintended absurdity is a relief. Next week a new bill 
will doubtless insure a renewal of this week's success. 

# ■ w 

" What's in a name" after all? The title of Charlie Reed's 
new play, Hoss and Hoss, would create a natural prejudice, but on 
its first performance, Monday night, at the California, the preju- 
dice, if it existed, died as natural a death. Farce-comedy calls 
for no criticism; it is what the people make it. Hoss and Hoss 
has considerable original ingenuity of construction, but whatever 
its merits or faults, the actors in it are undeniably bright and 
clever. The wildly effervescent uproariousness of William Col- 
lier's style, and the quaint simplicity and irresistible unconscious- 
ness of Charlie Reed suggest to every auditor the obvious impres- 
sion that as hoss and hoss they are "a whole team." Arthur 
Moulton— Birdie Hoss— ia graceful and debonair aa ever, and 
easily leads the singing, aside from the "specialty" vocalists. 
The dance done by Moulton, Baker, May Jordan and Allene Cra- 
teris one of the prettiest things in the performance, beside being 
novel. Dancing, indeed, is a feature of Hoss and Hoss, which ap- 
pears to have captured the entire " Lightfoot Brigade." Louise 
Allen (Mrs. Collier) naturally carries off the ladies' prize in this 
line, but her pretty competitors are elose after her, if not neck- 
and-neck— notably, May Jordan, the popular little grotesque 
dancer. Charlie Reed's songs are full of his own original drollery 
in subjects and rendering, even the undying "Tamale" song hav- 
ing received a new touch. Collier's ditties are equally charac- 
teristic, and James B. Gentry sings a song, with a tie between 
the stanzas, which ia full of the prevailing oddity, and captures 
the house. Arthur Moulton and David Baker make a hit in their 
bong, " The New York Beau Brummel." As a matter of course, 
Charlie Reed makes of lawyer Hoss rather a burlesque than a 
character of either farce or comedy, but he does it so well aa lo 
justify his title of " plain comedian," " in black and white." 
* * * 

Following Francis Wilson at the Baldwin next Monday night 
will come Gloriana, which is pronounced one one of the best and 
brightest of Manager Charles Froh man's many comedy successes. 
Gloriana is the work of Jamea Mortimer, and is founded on a 
French comedy, True d' Arthur. Like Wilkinson's Widows, All the 
Comforts of Home, and other Frohman productions, Mr. Morti- 
mer's comedy-farce is not only bright in dialogue and amusing m 
situation, but its tone is thoroughly clean and wholesome. 
Gloriana ia a dazzling young widow, who, before the play opens, 
haa fallen in love with a young English diplomat. He, however, 
loves and is engaged to marry the pretty daughter of a rich tan- 
ner. All is arranged for the wedding, when suddenly appears 



upon the scene Gloriana, still infatuated with the handsome dip- 
lomat. To cool her unwelcome ardor, he poses as a valet, and 
paaaes off his own man as the master. To his dismay, Gloriana 
romantically declares her resolve to raise hira from his lowly po- 
sition. In the meantime her maid, who loves the real valet, is 
broken-hearted at rinding him, as she supposes, so far above her 
own station; while, to make matters worse, a Russian count, in 
love with Gloriana, appears, and gets the valet and diplomat 
dreadfully mixed up, challenging the former as his rival, etc. 
The fun arising from these complications continues, till finally 
all is cleared up, and the curtain comes down on three pairs of 
happy lovers. Mr. Froh man's company includes some of the 
best- known and most talented people on the comedy stage, 
among them, E. S. Henley, Henrietta Crossman, May Robson, 
Wm. Robson, Edwin Stevens and others. 

# * * 

The opening of the new and beautiful Stockwell's Theatre took 
place Thursday evening, with the Daly company in As You Like 
It, but too late for review in this column Ada Rehan should 
make a spirited and unconventional Rosalind. Monday next ihe 
company will give The Last Word. During this engagement 
twenty five performances in all will be given, and the company 
will then return direct to Daly's Theatre, New York. 

# » » 

Clover, Von Suppe's comic opera in a prologue and three acts, 
will be next week's attraction at the Tivoli. Its postponement 
from last Monday night was on account of the continued illness 
of Gracie Plaisted, who was cast for Fanny. The Pirates of Pen- 
zance was substituted, Tillie Salinger making her re-appearances 
as Mabel. 

# « # 

Visitors to the Baldwin last Monday night were struck by the 
appearance of neatly lettered business tags attached to the back 
of every seat by ribbons in the patriotic colors— red, white and 
blue. These proved to be announcements of Gloriana. This clever 
advertising dodge originated with Mr. Ted Marks, Mr. Frohman'a 
advance agent. " If you put your advance notice on the previous 
week's programme," said Mr. Marks, "people may read it and 
they may not; but every visitor is bound to examine this con- 
spicuous card and to see what is on it." Mr. Marks is a graduate 
of San Francisco's commercial schools and gives them the credit 
of his business success. The card scheme is certainly a clever 
one and bound to reach the public. 

It was amusing to watch the mystified expression on the faces 
of the Bush-street patrons last Monday night as they looked 
from stage to programme, in the pnzzled attempt to reconcile an 
evident " discrepancy somewhere." The play-bills distributed 
were old onea from some Eastern theatre but, through the fore- 
thought of Mr. Haverly's representative, Wm. J. Block, a few 
correct bills were secured and given to the press representatives. 
" You see," said Mr. Block, " the confusion arose from its being 

the Fourth of July, and " " Yes, I see," murmured the too 

astute listener; » celebration, of course, things will get mixed a 

little " " No, you don't see," protested the indignant young 

traveling man; "it was nothing of the sort; the fact was only 
that, being the Fourth of July, all the printing offices were 
closed, and we couldn't get out our programmes. But it will be 
all right to-morrow night." 

One result of the situation was that Mr. Delmore, who dis- 
appears as an old man and cornea back in four seconds a young 
one, lost his applause, the audience, without the explanatory 
lines, evidently taking him on his reappearance, for another 
man. 

# • * 

Audiences have to endure some very trying moments from 
poor acting, but, as Betty Cobb says in The Dodd Family, " May- 
nials, praise be to God, can make thimsilves very unpleasant, 
too," and audiences sometimes Ret back at the stage in good 
style. For example, that at the California, Tuesday night, which 
resolutely refused to catch the phonetic connection between 
" lair " and " layer," when Charlie Reed said " the bird returned 
to his lair," and was corrected by the omniscient interlocutor. 
Poor Charlie made several gasping efforts to work it through the 
layer of fat down to the gray matter (if any) in the auditorial 
skull, but it was useless, and he gave it up. 

*:- * * 

Arthur F. Clark, business manager for Chas. Frohman's stock 
company, is in town, in the interest of The Lost Paradise, soon to 
appear at the Baldwin. Mr. Clark is a popular Eastern news- 
paper man, having been for several years connected with the 
editorial staff of various Chicago papers. After a long association 
with the dramatic department of the Chicago Times, he became 
dramatic editor of the Chicago Mail, from which position he 
naturally found his way into theatrical management, under Man- 
ager Frohman, whose numerous important ventures require many 
hands and the shrewdest of brains. 

# * * 

Kirke La Shelle, E. D. Willard's manager last season, tells a 
atory of Mr. Clark which will bear repeating. " I never shall 
forget," he says, " the time when Clark interested himself in a 



July 9, 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



chmritv . »ne, and wilh wbit disastrous result. While on the 
Jin H. Mr. Clark was one day called upon by several ladies and 
urged to interest himself in the case of a poor widow with Ave 
small children starving in a hovel somewhere on Western avenue. 
Clark threw himself into the case with enthusiasm, and wrote 
such thrilling and pathetic appeals that considerable money soon 
poured into the hands of Judge Tally, the well-known Chicago 
jurist, whom Clark bad named as the receiving agent. Unfor- 
tunately, however, in his ardent efforts to arouse public sympa- 
thy. Clark bad called the tenement occupied by the poor family 
•a rattle-trap, through the roof of which the elements entered,' 
et<-. The landlord, seeing the description of bis rented property, 
grew exceeding wroth, and presenting himself before Judge Tully, 
swooped in for back rent all the money collected. Useless was 
the Judge's protest against his heartlessness. * If tbey hadn't 
called my bouse a rattle-lrap,' he stormed; < they've been in it a 
year without paying a cent, and they could have stayed there, 

but a rattle-trap, indeed! I'll never get another tenant after 

that, and they've got to pay.' Since that Air. Clark has steered 
clear of charity, except in his private capacity." 

• * * 

May Robson, the servant girl in Gtoriana, is so changed by 
her eccentric make-op so as to be hardly recognizable by those 
who remember her as the spinster in the original The Private 
Secretory company. Miss Robson is a pretty and winsome little 
woman and endowed with a variety of talents. It is she who 
designs the tasteful and novel souvenirs which have become a 
featnre of Mr. Frohman's management. Her fertility of inven- 
tion is remarkable, and the souvenirs she plans are mostly pretty 
articles of use as well as ornament to the dressing table or writ- 
ing desk. 

* * * 

Henrietta Crossman, for several years a prominent member of 
the Lyceum Stock company, is the widow in Qloriana, and is 
said to make one of the most captivating of that dangerous class. 

Manager Alfred Bouvier has somewhat recovered from his 

late attack of inflammatory rheumatism and has gone to Paso de 
Robles Springs for two week. His friends will be glad to hear of 
the abatement of an illness which at one time looked serious, and 
will hope that the famous mud baths will work a complete res- 
toration.— —Young Salvini's new play for this season is called 
The Heir of Grammont. He and his manager, Mr. Wilkinson, are in 
Europe securing models for scenery and costuming..^— With The 
Lost Paradise, Monday, July 18th, begins the ninth season of the 
Baldwin Theatre under its present management. That it has been 
an able and energetic one the popularity and high standing of 

this tbreatre will amply testify. David Henderson's latest 

spectacle, All Baba, is said to eclipse even its two bril- 
liant predecessors, The Crystal Slipper and Sinbad. — — 
Appolyon is the name of a new comic opera in 

preparation by the Carleton Opera Company. Dr. Carver's 

Wild America show was a prominent feature of the Fourth 
of July parade. The native sons in feathers and war 
paint were appropriately American.- Fred La Greene, the actor 
in Moran's Theatre, New York, who killed another actor with 
two blows of his fist, must be a fair athlete. He should join Sul- 
livan's company. Her name, by the way, was Mabel Leighton. 

Marie Wainwright is summering in Tacoma. Eugenia Blair, 

whose Virginia in Frederick Warde's production of Virginius was 
& delicately limned picture not easily to be forgotten, will this 
season travel with her husband, Nat Downing, under the man- 

agementof Wm. R. McConnell. Pretty Rose Chesneau, formerly 

one of the Little Puck beauties, is here with her husband, Arthur 
Moulton of Hoss and Hoss. Her absence from the stage is due to 
the fact that a little five-months-old boy claims her attention for 

the present.' Arthur Moulton's new play, with which he will 

travel after his present engagement, is called A Dark Horse. It 
should win. 

OUTBOUND.— Bliss Carman, m the July Century. 

A lonely sail in the vast sea-room, 

I have put out for the port of gloom. 

The voyage is far on the trackless tide, 

The watch is long, and the seas are wide. 

The headlands blue in the sinking day 

Kiss me a hand on the outward way. 

The fading gulls, as tbey dip and veer, 

Lift me a voice that is good to hear. 

The great winds come, and the heaving sea, 

The restless mother, is calling me. 

The cry of her heart is lone and wild, 

Searching the night for her wandered child. 

Beautiful, weariless mother of mine. 

In the drift of doom I am here, I am thine. 

Beyond the fathom of hope or fear, 

From bourn to bourn of the dusk I steer. 

Swept on in the wake of the stars, in the stream 

Of a roving tide, from dream to dream. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Ax H.vMu A Co. ...Proprietor*. | Alfrkd Bouvicr Manager 

r.HS'v'^," c"» a! ' ,J ' ,1> ' ' N °" York ' P ' rl8 * ui L »-l"»'» BrtillMI 

GLORIANA. 

ca?t i fo > rnp r ,friv r , HS i r " :i ';', , '" 1 ' 1 J ,> ' M J' Charles Frohmaii. with Hie original 
out for nearly 150 nights i In New v..r* City. Ur. K. J. Beuley Mr Fred- 
erlckBourl, Mr Bdwiiisiercn,., Mr. Charles B. Wells, Mr° Joseph Allen 

1 nomas A. wise, Mr. Henry Bobson, preceded every evening al 8:16 by 
THE MAJOR'S APPOINTMENT. 

COMING— Mr. Charles Frohman's Btoot Company in "The I.ost Paradise." 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

ALHiYMAN.tCo Proprietors. |J. J. Gottlob Manager. 

hUarioiuMt, °' ' he favorites ' KEEB AS, " D WMJUMB, in the howling, 
■HOSS AND HOSS I" 

*£ffiESEEl > ES&j8£l fre8hUeSS ,nd "W*"*- P ^ M " sic - 
COMING-Another Novelty— TUXEDO. 



THE BUSH STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Lkavitt Proprietor. | Chas. P. Hall Manager. 

Positively last week I 

HAVERLY'S MASTODON MINSTRELS, 

,*?5Uw ?iV. uge of Programme. Next week, July 18th, MARIE HUBERT 
rKOHMAN m 

THE WITCH. 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Keeling Bros Proprietors and Managers. 

To-night ! Gilbert & Sullivan's Satire, 

PIRATES OF PENZANCE I 

Monday, July 11, CLOVER. Reappearance of MISS TILLIE SALINGER. 
Popular Pricks 25c. and 50c- 

STOCKWELL'S THEATRE. 

L. R. Stockwell Lessee and Proprietor. 

Alf Ellinghouse Business Manager. 

: The Most MasulAcent and Perfectly Eqnlpped Play- 
house In America. 

Dedicated with AlUI si 1I\ DALY'S COMPANY la 

AS YOU LIKE IT I 

Saturday matinee and Saturday evening;. 

Every performance under the personal direction of AUGUST/IN DALY. 

WEEK of Monday, July It. Every evening (Sunday excepted). Matinee 
Saturday, Ma. DALY'S Comedy, THE LAST UOKD ! 

PRICES. 

Orchestra and Dress Circle ' $2 00 

Balcony $2, $1 50 and l 00 

Gallery Reserved ... sn 

Boxes (according to location) $15, ji2 and 10 00 

General Admission i 00 

Gallery Admission 50 

Regular Sale of seats at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s, Sutter and Kearny Sts 

"The California Hotel," 

Bush Street, near Kearny. 

_A.Tasolvi.tely Fire-proof. 

Central to all points of interest, principal stores and places of amusement. 

Select Music in Restaurant .every evening between 6 and 8. 

A. F. KINZJLER, Manager. 

FINE DIAMONDS, 

Gold and Silver Watches. 

The newest designs in jew- 
ellery of first quality only, at 
very reasonable prices. 
A. W. STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St, 
Under Masonic Temple. 

Dl AHIAC Knabe, Haines, 

rIMIlWd Bush <fcGerts, Mothers. 

" ™^^^ CashorinstallrasntB. Rented 
and Repaired. Please call or send for circulars. 

TsT BANCROFT 




10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 



A SUPERFLUOUS HUSBAND. 

" TTO^ many suits for divorce have you on hand?" I asked 
JnL one of my friends, an eminent Jawyer, whose numerous 
conquests make him an object of terror to all husbands. 

" I have but one," he replied, " and that is for none of the causes 
you suppose, neither adultery nor cruel treatment. If you wish to 
use the case as the plot of a play, I'll make it known to you." 

" On what plea, then, is the demand for divorce based?" 

" On the dread of seeing again one from the other world." 

" I do not understand." 

" You know Mme. A. de B ?" 

11 Of course; but I thought her the most loving, the most beloved 
wife in the world; also a devoted mother." 

" Exactly what I shall say in court.' ' 

11 As for her husband, he is a true gentleman, loyal, obliging, and 
of spotless reputation." 

" Again what I shall say." 

" And those people wish to separate?" 

My legal friend enjoyed for a few moments the perplexity he was 
causing me, and then told me the strange story here transcribed. 

11 Mme. A. de it , who is not yet thirty-two years old, and 

scarcely appears thirty-one, has her name on all the subscriptions 
for charity, and is cited at all fashionable routs. Seeing the eager- 
ness and zest which she displays for enjoyment, and the freshness 
and bloom of her beauty, one would hardly suppose she were com- 
pensating herself for sad days in the past. She has been married 
five years, or rather re-married, for at twenty she was the wife of one 
of the Bourse's most reckless speculators, who left her a widow by 
a death so tragic that it is yet remembered. One morning, seven 

years ago, we learned that Jacques de T , the well-known club 

man and social favorite, had been found dead in his bed at his coun- 
try property of G , his face mutilated and brains scattered over 

his pillow. It was at first thought he had been assassinated; it was 

winter and the house isolated and unoccupied. M. de T had 

come there to search for some account books he needed. Owner of 
a large manufactory in the neighborhood, he often made such trips, 
leaving his wife for a day at Paris. An old gardener, who lodged in 
a cottage a short distance off, waited upon him. 

As soon, however, as the affairs of the unfortunate man were in- 
vestigated, it was no longer possible to doubt that he had committed 
suicide. He had, also, a banking house near the Rue Lafitte, but he 
was totally ruined ; the dot of his wife, even, had been absorbed. 

Maledictions in plenty were not lacking; some persons instituted 
suits, which the poor wife easily had set aside. She wept for him 
and regretted him with all her heart. He had been a loving and 
generous husband. She was the most earnest, most correct and 
most beautiful widow, in her artless weeds, that one could wish for. 
She returned to her own family, and having no children (they had 
been married such a short time!) seemed to resnme the life of her 
girlhood, save her unceasing grief. Complete misfortunes have one 
advantage; they are a claim to the privileges of martyrdom. People 
pitied her; every one said she would never marry again. They forgot 
that happiness most abruptly cut short is often that which soonest 
buds anew. 

Monsieur A. de B is as handsome as the first husband, goes less 

frequently to his club, and has an assured fortune. He fell in love 
with a woman who had lost hers; how could she refuse him? The 
second marriage gave happiness of another type, less turbulent, 
more home-like and complete. First came a boy, then a little girl, 

and when Madame A. de B made her annual visit to the decorous 

tomb she had erected to the memory of unlucky T , it was almost 

with a smile of gratitude that sWe prayed for the dear departed. As 
she fervently recommended him to divine mercy, she was certain 
her prayers were heard, for all the merits of her first husband seemed 
augmented by the charming qualities of the second. One day Mme. A. 

de B received a letter which had been a long time reaching her. It 

was directed to Mme. de T , and stamped with an American stamp. 

The hand-writing of the address troubled her, and, when the en- 
velope was torn open, the first lines made her quiver. Was it a 
sacrUigious mystification? or had poor de T planned, before kill- 
ing himself, a deception like that which gave R£tif de la Bretonne 
the plot for a curious novel? Had he ordered that every seven years 
a letter should be delivered to his wife, to prevent her grieving for 
him, and persuade her that he still lived? 

That was M. A. de B 's first idea when his frightened little wife 

brought him the strange missive, dated from New York; but, when 
his emotion was somewhat calmed, in weighing well its words and 

studying its probabilities, he was obliged to acknowledge that T 

was not dead; that the letter was indeed from him, and that it an- 
nounced his return. 

But the suicide? the corpse? the burial? Alas! the letter had a 
reply for everything. 

T related how, face to face with bankruptcy, he had wished at 

once to indemnify his honor and facilitate for himself a way to recon- 
quer his lost fortune. "With the assistance of a grave-digger of the vil- 
lage of G , he got possession of a corpse of his size and general ap- 
pearance. The occasion had been waited for during several months ; 
the grave-digger liberally bribed. At night he placed the body in his 



bed, and, when he had dressed it in his linen, fired in its face two 
pistol shots, which rendered it absolutely unrecognizable. Then, 
having accomplished that suicide, in an empty house, he escaped, 
taking with him only the money necessary for his passage, and went 
to try his luck in America. 

The miserable fellow seemed enchanted with his expedient. He 
had the grace, however, to be somewhat sober in his self-praises ; but 
he ran on endlessly in telling of the sorrows of separation, the 
anguish of that long voyage, the torture he had imposed on himself 
in remaining dead for her, as he was for the rest of the world. He 
should never have had the courage to persevere in his task of re- 
habilitation if she had written to him, if she had recalled him ! He 
had condemned himself to seven years of work, of silence, of burial. 

With all the fatuity of a martyr, he never seemed to doubt that 
she had remained a widow and inconsolable; therefore, among the 
joys that he promised himself in the future, he gave the first place 
to the greatest, that of consoling her, at once, suddenly. " Do not 
die of joy 1 " he wrote to the one who felt ready to die of terror on 
the spot. In short, he was very rich, two or three times more so 
than he had ever been, he was coming back to pay all his creditors, 
interest and principal, to clear his name, and, as now he would have 
no more cares and anxieties, he should have plenty of time to devote 
to loving his dear little wife. He gave fleeting glimpses, as into an 
unknown paradise, of the children, of whom he was certain. The 
wretch even made poetry on that subject, a millionaire's poetry : 
Babes would float through the heaven of their inalterable bliss like little 
angels, or little Cupids. That passage particularly aroused the fury of 

M. A. de B . As though they had needed that " dead-alive " to 

call forth angels and loves! Corpse he might not be, but at least he 
should not return alive! 

The second husband's plan was to meet number one pirt way on 
his way home and kill him, since he dared to come out of his legal 
tomb under pretext that he was not dead. The official records would 
justify that murder; nothing would have to be changed in the cer- 
tificate of death; nothing effaced — but a man! It would not be 
a duel, scarcely even a murder; merely a case of legitimate self-de- 
fense, the stamp that Hamlet gives, on the ground to drive back the 
importunate ghost. The idea was a good one, and be must leave at 
once. 

" No, no, not that!" cried Mme. A. deB , terrified. 

Was her first love, perchance, resussitating with her firsthusband? 

" You take his part?" demanded No. 2, trembling with jealousy 
and horror. 

" Ungrateful man 1 Do you not owe to him our five years of hap- 
piness?" 

" The scoundrel has taken them back from me!" 

" He has not the right." 

" Our marriage is null; his is not." 

" Null, and our children?" 

" Ah! our children, our children !'' 

They were there, the little hypothetical cherubim of whom the 
wanderer spoke in his letter. They enclosed their father and mother 
in their caressing arms : they soothed the wrath of the menaced hus- 
band. The couple wept, kissed, and ended by going to consult my 
friend, the lawyer. It was agreed that he should ask for a divorce 

for Mme. A. de B from her first husband as soon as M. de T 

had been given to understand that it is dangerous for him to return to 
France. His escapade is complicated by a violation of sepulture. 
The gravedigger is dead ; but he, by his own avowal, ordered and 
paid for the crime. They cannot reasonably ask him to kill himself, 
but they might, possibly, obtain from him a promise to continue to 
play dead man in the depths of America; and, if his probity revives, 
let him furnish the elements for an integral payment of his debts, 
without appearing in the matter; but that is a romantic way out of 
the difficulty. Thanks to M. Naquet, there is a more practical 
method. They will obtain a divorce, and then M. and Mme. A.de 

B , whose marriage may temporarily be considered void, will be 

re-married. 

It appears, from last news, that M. de T is resigned to that ar- 
rangement. He will not come to France, and will let the divorce be 
pronounced against him. If he is condemned for having placed a 
pauper's corpse in his bed and afterwards in a handsome tomb, he 
will not protest; he will pay his French debts and become a natural- 
ized American, and, as it is as easy to have in one's home little 
angels or little cupids in America as in France, he will not deny him- 
self that happiness. Indeed, why? For he permits them to perceive 
the true reason why he has had courage to keep silent for seven 
years, and not to write to his darling wife. It was because he would 
have had to dip his pen in the ink-bottle of an American widow. His 
pent up feelings find relief in that bit of spite. At the end of seven 
years of an honorable intimacy, and when the bonds were less 
tightly drawn he had, indeed, been able to push an arm through his 
yielding chains, and sent the letter announcing his resurrection. 
Since they force him thereto, however, he will prove that he knows 
how to make the best of a losing game. 

Once free in France, he will atone for his " falling-out " with the 
widow by marrying her. In America, as here, that is the surest way 
to rid one's self of a mistress. Louis Ulbaoh. 

Translated from the French by V. E. T. 



Julv 9. 1892. 



BAN KK INCIS< <> NBWfl I ETTER. 



11 



THE IDEAL BONIFACE. 

I —TV Roof Garden of : Mr. Keentrun (iYopriefor 

nf Idtrutnd, Mdl fcy tA*-& Iff, /..ir* «</ Qotkam i— A )i . Mr. 

liirk" . . . delighted. Mr. Lark, (mrprtJwf)— What I Mine- 
host Keenwun .' What a pleasure ' , /./-id* Aim antlf and grout 
eonidential.) Say, I'm coming down to Idlewind next week to 
spend . . . yes. same party. What* . . . ah, thanks! . . . 
Same terms as last year? . . . ah, (hanks! Let's have a small 
bottle! (They grow rery exclustn <-ivr the «imc, uhiie Mr. Keenutm 
flashes hit ken't egg diamond in the ttjrt of the hypnotized damsels ) 

II.— Th' Office of Idlewind, i:drn-i>y-ihe.Sea, 5 P. M. En. 
Iff Mr. Lark much agitated, scanning the corridor lest he spy an ac. 
•fuaint'iurf. Sees Mr. Keenwun, whose look of confidence inspires him. 
Mr. Lark — Ah! mineuost Keenwun! . . . delighted! Mr. Keen- 
wan — Ah, Mr — er Browne! . . . charmed. [Turns register around 
and hands Mr. iAirk a pen, trith which thf- latter writes with a flourish 
■ •.if- gmd Jfrt, /at. P. ISrowne, Jersey Ctty." Mr, Lark [in a whisper) 
Serve dinner in same private dining-room . . . Don't forget 
those crabs, now . . . Yes, three wines and a champagne. Let 
everything be — Mr. Keenwun [with a silencing gesture) — Leave 
that to me! . . . (J/r. Lark trips off as if he were treading on birds' 
egg$.) 

Art III. — Same place 9 P. M. Enter a tall, dark-complexioned man 
u Hh t>'>th hands in his side overcoat pockets. Looks about stealthily, then 
with the air of one suppjessing a terrildc mental excitement, saunters 
up to the register and scans it eagerly. Mr, Keenwun [blazing his dark- 
lantern solitaire full into his face)— Do you wish to register, sir? 

Stranger [disconcerted]— N — no, sir; I'm — er looking for a friend 
of mine . . . a — er — Mr. Lark and wife ... I understand 
that they are here! Mr. Keenwun [polishing his glasses) — Lark? 
Lark? Never beard the name before, sir. Stranger [feigning de. 
light, yet not yet taking his hands out of his overcoat pocket) — Ah, 
here is my old friend Browne of Jersey City. Will you send word 
up and tell him to come down? Mr. Keenwun — Brown? . . . Oh, 
you'll find him over there at the Salvation Army pavillion. You 
know he leads the prayer-meetings there this week? Stranger 
[disappointed) — Oh! . . . ah, yes, urn! well, it must be another 
party. Strange how such mistakes occur, etc. . . . thank you, 
sir! [Goes out the back entrance, draws his hands out of his pockets at 
last, each grasping a 38 calibre revolver, which he unloads. Takes out 
a cigar, sits down on a settee, resolved to wail for the last train.) 

Act IV. — Same Place, 10 P. M. {A heavily -veiled lady, extremely 
agitated, dashed up to Mr. Boniface Keenwun, raising a veil which dis- 
closes an extremely pretty face half bathed in tears of rage and mortifi. 
cation.) Lady [in trembling voice) — Is — er — there a Mr. Lark stop- 
ping here, sir? [Mr. Keenwun sighs, polishes his glassss very leisurely, 
adjusts them accurately and scans the register, running up the list with 
his fat digit.) Mr. Keenwun — Lark 1 Lark! . . . Uiu! how do 
you spell the name, Madam? [Madam too agitated to spell anything ) 
Mr. Keenwun — No! I don't see any such name on my register. 
Why? Lady — [dejected) — I — oh! . . . I — er . . . (spies the name 
Browne and wife) Ah, will you do me the kindness to take my 
card up to Mr. Browne and — er — wife (chokes violently.) Mr. Keen- 
wun (calmly) — With pleasure; but I know they are not in. I 
think you will find them down at their new shop. Mr. Browne 
ia our new barber, you know I Lady (checkmated) — Oh . . . ah I 
. . . It — er — must be another party. Thanks, awfully I (Sighs, 
goes out the front entrance, puts the cork back in the bottle of vitriol, and 
sits down to await the next train back.) 

Act V. — Scene I — The front piazza, half an hour later. Bonifacs ap- 
proaches the Veiled Lady. Mr. Keenwun (sternly) — Madam, it is 
whispered about (he bouse that you have made this place a ren- 
dezous for no proper purpose. As proprietor 1 beg lo inform you 
that this establishment is eminently respectable; and, as such, 
your presence is undesirable, etc. (Veiled lady utters an exclama- 
tion of horror and disappears in the direction of the railway station.) 
Scene II. — The back entrance. Boniface, accompanied by a seven-foot 
bouncer, approaches dark-complexioned stranger. Mr. Keenwun (stern- 
ly)— Sir, we are informed that you have mistaken the character 
of our respectable establishment, and insulted us by appointing 
it as a place of meeting, etc. You wilt consider this a peremptory 
request to leave the premises! (Stranger straightens, glares at the 
Boniface, shows two rows of white teeth, but at the sight of the seven, 
footer and the recollectio7i that his revolvers are unloaded, he shuffles off 
and disappears in the daikness.) The only document in the case: 
Idlewind, Eden-by-the-Sea, June 4, 1892, Mr. Jas. P. Browne, 
To Boniface Keenwun, Dr., To Hotel accommodations, wine, etc. 
$36 41, Miscellaneous, $100; Total, $136 41; Paid, B. Keenwun. 

— Town Topics. 

Since its opening, " The Murara," at 109 O'Farrell street, has be- 
come one of the most popular resorts in the city. Being centrally 
located, convenient to all the theatres, and a pleasant place to call, it 
has already attracted the patronage of gentlemen who appreciate 
good liquor. The decorations of the establishment are of sufficient 
beauty to gain general attention and admiration. 

The artotypes which have formed an artistic and popular feature 
of the News Letter for some years past, are from the ateliers of 
Bolton, Strong & Co., the well-known engravers and plate-makers, 
of 430 Pine street. This firm has the reputation, gained by years of 
excellent work, of being unrivaled in its own particular line. All the 
work it turns out is artistically perfect. 



/ETNA 



L 



Situated in Napa County, Cal. 

Reached by ■ ddbrhtfal stage ride over the moun- 
tains. Sixteen UUi I [elens. I a. 

oommodatlona. Ample Bathing Facilities. 

A I-kati RE OF THE PLACE, 

A Large Swimming Tank of Hot Mineral Water 

The waters of the .Ktna Mineral Springs have 
long been celebrated for their wonderful curea In 
cases of Acute and Chronic Dyspepsia, Rheuma- 
tism, Inflammation of the Bladder, and Liver and 
Kidney I !omplaints. 

The temperature of the water is 98 degrees, and 
is highly charged with Carbonic Acid Gas, making 
it pleasant to the taste, and giving to the bath a 
most delightful sensation. 

High Altitude ! No Fogs ! No Mosquitoes 

Water from the Springs bottled by the 

AETNA MINERAL WATER CO., 

Telephone 536. Office, 108 nrumm Street, S. F 



YOU'RE OUT 

If you doii't go to 

NAPA SODA 
SPRINGS 



THIS SUMMER. 



What Do You Want ? 



A Climate that beats Italy. No Malaria or Cold 
Sea Air. Health-giving Mineral Water. Cuisine 
and Service Unexceptionable. Comfortable Beds. 
Table First Quality. Gas and Running Water in 
Every Koom. Hot Napa Soda Baths. 
Two Trains Every Day. 
All Visitors are Satisfied. 



ANDREW JACKSON, 



PROPRIETOR. 



Napa Soda Springs P. O. 



The Strathmore Apartment House. 

N. W. Cor. Larkin and Fulton Streets. 

Exclusively for families. First-class in every respect. Ele- 
vator day and night. First-class restaurant in the building. 

Apply to Janitor in the building, or to A. Hayward, No. 224 
California Street. 

HOTEL PLEASANTON, 

Sutter Street, corner Jones. San Francisco. Cal. 

The Largest, Best Appointed and Moat Liberally Managed Family and 
Tourist Hotel in San Francisco. Lighted by Electricity throughout. 

Elegantly Furnished Dining Rooms and Parlors for Banquets, Private 
Dinners, Parties, Weddings, etc. 
The Cuisine a Special Feature. 

MRS. M. E. PENDLETON, 
Proprietor and Manager. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG, 



model _a.:m::e:iw:c!-a.:]it oatbeer, 

1206 Sutter Street, 

Telephone 2888. SAN FRANCISCO. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 
a <a -er i :e a: home 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 
FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 

HENRY C. HYDE 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 

MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 

Of Hanawriting.Inks, Papers, etc., in the Deteotion of Forgeries, 

Oounterf eitBand Imitations. 

41 IK CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July 9, 1892. 



THE swim is saying that the recently announced decision of 
young Walter Dean, Jr., that hereafter California is to be his 
permanent abiding place, is but the precursor of another » an- 
nouncement " of a most interesting character. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. John O'Neil Reis have given up the lease of the 
Lent house at Polk and Eddy streets, and having spent most of 
the spring at San Jose, are thinking of Del Monte as their locale 
for the rest of the summer season. 

* * • 

Those devoted friends, Mrs. Louise 8haron and Mrs. May Janin, 

are opposites of each other, not alone in coloring of hair and eyes, 

but in temperament as well. They are wonderfully alike, though, 

in love for Del Monte, and enter with vim into the aquatic sports 

of that charming spot. 

* * • 

It is said that the Freddie Sharons tried their powers of per- 
suasion on his sister Flora to induce her to join them at Monterey. 
The little wife of the good-natured Sir Thomas does not hanker 
after California since her father's death, and has become thor- 
oughly wedded to her British surroundings; British, inasmuch as 
Ireland, and not England, is her favorite stamping ground, so to 

speaK. 

* * # 

Del Monte on the Fourth had an air about it strongly suggestive 
of an Eastern watering place, so many chic gowns were worn that 
betrayed their foreign importation. Mrs. Fred Sharon was in the 
van, closely followed by Miss Emily Hager. 

* * • 

The elderly ladies have a cosy coterie as they take their favor- 
ite seats on the veranda at Del Monte. Mrs. Lloyd Tevis is 
usually employed knitting; Mrs. M. B. M. Toland keeps the rest 
amused with her excellent powers of mimicry; Mrs. Foute, the 
clergyman's wife, has a book; Mrs. Alvord talks in a decisive 
manner; Mrs. J. B. Haggin listens quietly, and now and then 
reads the newspapers. Mrs. Hager knows everybody and every- 
thing, and is sure of an attentive audience. 

* * * 

The ederly gentlemen take their otium cum dignitate on another 
portion of the veranda. Some with a cigar, some with magazines 
or papers. One of them likes ladies' society, and of the young- 
est, prettiest, liveliest description. The younger Benedicts re- 
semble much the beaux, as they seek their pleasures in the 
same manner, devotion to the fair sex ; swimming in couples ; con- 
fabs under shady parasols, or drives in the cool of the day, 
» » * 

The young matrons Buffer from— not lack of inclination — but 
a lack of material for their ammunition to work on. What an 
experienced dame would call " nice men " are decidedly few and 
far between at all the out-of-town resorts. The advantage Del 
Monte possesses over the others lies in the fact that all tourists 
go there as a sure thing. So chance of travel brings some very 
delightful people into view, even if but for a brief period. 

* # » 

Two men in the parade on the National Holiday received the 
lion's share of attention from the fair sex along the line of march, 
Dr. Carver in his suit of gray, and Adjutant Delany in his mar- 
tial uniform. Both are fine looking men. 

*•* * 

Mrs. Frank Kewlands' youngest sister, Miss Eva McAllister, 
will visit Mrs. Newlands, at Reno, during this month, and it is 
possible may accompany her to Washington City, upon her return 
there, later in the year. 

* * * 

A divinely tall, blonde-haired maiden of artistic mein and great 
originality came to sad grief because of her original freaks. She 
had chosen San Rafael for this year's summering, and during 
last Saturday night's warm weather, bethought herself to change 
her couch for the hammock. She accordingly swung the airy 
hammock from side to side of the vine-covered veranda outside 
her chamber door. About two o'clock of the next morning there 
was a hideous scream, a dull, heavy thud, and the maiden fair, 
with golden hair, was weeping. Miss W. is now mournfully 
nursing her exquisite Greek nose. 
» » » 

Barton Hill and his 200-pound Danish dog form one of the 
principal features of the scene presented on the beach at Santa 
Cruz. The event of the day, though, is always the appearance 
of Miss Bessie Boston for her afternoon dip. A queenly woman, 
with clear, refined, well-cut features, and a figure like a marble 
goddess— such is Miss Boston, and as she trips daintily from the 
bath-house to the surf, the hearts of her thousand and one ad- 
mirers beat to double quick time. She is a splendid swimmer, 
too, and a trip to the outside raft and back is but a bagatelle 

for her. 

* * * 

Doctor Healey, late of the City and County Hospital, has joined 



the Oakland poolroom brigade. He is a constant attendant, since 
the fever laid hold of him, and he may be seen every day, with 
an anxious look on bis face, as he leans against a post near the 
door, with his upper vest pocket bulging with pool tickets. 

* # # 

The Keeleyites at Los Gatos celebrated the Fourth in original 
style. Headed by Sam Taylor, they marched in parade through 
the village, the piece de resistance being a burro attired in full 
dress, including a clawhammer coat and a plug hat. The bi- 
chloriders all wore straw hats and carried their motto, "B. of G," 
on high. Up town they fell in line at the end of the procession 
of school children, and they kept things jolly until the proceed- 
ings were over. 

* * * 

Charlie Reed still sings "Tomales," and is evidently popular, 
but his favor is more from the gallery and less from the dress 
circle. About twelve years ago, every schoolgirl made an idol of 
Charlie, who had just been raised to the zenith of fame by 
" Betsy B's" kindly criticisms and protection. The gallery was 
then the abode, not of whistling gods, but of pretty, blushing god- 
desses, who considered it not beneath their dignity to munch 
peanuts between smiles at Charlie's witticisms. Was it at that 
season, or later on, that the episode of the parasol occurred? No 
doubt many who were down town that day will remember how 
the brown-eyed member of the half-world was belabored with 
that light instrument of torture, wielded by Mrs. Reed, while the 
latter's husband looked on and wondered. 

* * « 

It seems widows still hold the inside track at summer resorts, 
to the envy of the buds. One of the prettiest and most popular 
at the Hotel Rafael is petit Mrs. Dore. whose appellation to her 
friends is » Ada." Possibly she does not find the suburban hotel 
quite so enlivening as San Francisco, though she both rides and 
strums the banjo; else why should one meet her nearly every 
afternoon in town? Miss Edith Kittredge, a sojourner at Sausa- 
lito, is also quite often observed walking up Market street, ac- 
companied by her guitar. 

* * * 

The stage continues to be reinforced by recruits from the world 
of society. The latest, Holbrook Blinn, who will make his de- 
but at a local theatre in the fall, and has already been offered a 
profitable engagement, is far from being a youth to fortune and 
to fame unknown. Though only twenty years of age, he is a lad 
of more than usual parts, having already gained more celebrity 
than ordinarily falls to the lot of men thrice his years. The 
Palo Alto's daring supplement launched him farther upon the sea 
of notice than could any number of successful appearances in 
amateur theatricals. 

* » • 

The Fourth was duly celebrated at Sausalito, and there were 
several novel styles of entertainment. Frank D. Willey, Jack 
Featherstone and Clem Blethen gave an exhibition of the latest 
Fiji dance before a select bevy of ladies and gentlemen, at one of 
the cottages. The dancers were attired in the latest effect iu 
bathing suits, gee strings, plug hats and paper collars, and, need- 
less to say, created a sensation. Rumor says that they will re- 
peat the dance on the stage. Several theatrical managers are now 
endeavoring to secure their services. 

* • * 

Last week, George Mearns ruined his new full-dress suit. He 
was endeavoring to step gracefully from a launch to the Belve- 
dere wharf, when a mermaid, catching sight of his magnificent 
figure, caused him to slip, and he fell into the briny deep. A 
boat-hook was used to pull him from the water, and he hugged a 
hot stove during the whole evening. 

THE health of James G. Blaine, which was so rubust a few 
months ago, is now. it is feared, too critical to allow him to 
stump the country for Mr. Harrison in the fall. The political phy- 
sicians are now diagnosing the complaint. 



Elegant Stationery. 



Society's leaders have become very aesthetic of late in the matter 
of their stationery, and the} 7 now insist that those in the swim shall 
use for their correspondence only the latest and most fashionable 
note and letter paper, such as that to be seen in the handsome estab- 
lishment of Sanborn, Vail & Co., at 741-743 Market street. This firm 
gives special attention to fashionable stationery, and has all the finest 
made in the world. Toe royal purple, double repp in tints. Crane's 
kid-finish, with crests and ornamental Mowers, and other brands, are 
sold in neat boxes, with envelopes to match. A box of this fine 
paper, with a set of sealing-wax, candles and dyes, form a very hand- 
s me present for a young lady There is also a fine line of mourning 
btationery. The copper-plate engravings of Sanborn, Vail & Co. is 
unexcelled in the city, and society people are all getting their cards 
printed from these plates, the printing having in every instance given 
great satisfaction. The stationery department of this house is un- 
excelled. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specially 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rentea, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 



Julv *>, 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 



LOVE AND THOUGHT 



KhxmII Lourlt. 



Whit bath Love with Thought to do? 
Still at variance are the two. 
Love is mi. Men. Love la rasb. 
Love is like the levin Hash, 
Comes as awifl. as swiftly goes, 
And his mark as surely knows. 

Thought is lumpish. Thought is slow, 
Weighing lang 'tween yes and no; 
When dear Love is dead and gone, 
Thought comes creeping in anon, 
And, in his deserted nest, 
Sits to hold the crowner's quest. 

Since we love, what need to think? 
Happiness stands on a brink 
Whence too easy 'tis to fall 
Whitber's no return at all; 
Have a care, half-hearted lover. 
Thought would only push her over! 

REPUBLICAN CORRUPTION. 

SAN DIEGO, Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties have, 
for the last six years, given the majorities by which the Re- 
publicans carried the State. This year will show a very decided 
change in the political complexion of these counties. They have 
been under the domination of the Republicans so long that the 
rings have become bold, and have carried things with a high 
band. This is especially true in San Diego county, where there 
is a great revulsion of feeling. Times are very dull on the beau- 
tiful bay of the South. Money is scarce, and the people are poor. 
There are practically only two classes down there — poor people 
and Republican office-holders. A great fight is being waged be- 
tween the tax-payers and the tax-eaters. The former have been 
greatly aided in their fight by the action of the Grand Jury, 
which found that the Clerk, the Recorder and the Sheriff were 
practically embezzlers. This grand inquest, largely composed of 
Republicans, has found that an appalling state of corruption exists 
and has denounced the evil-doers by name in the most scathing 
language. Indictments will naturally follow. The county offi- 
cials have made demands for additional appropriations for depu- 
ties. The taxation is already too burdensome, and their demands 
were refused. The officials then threatened to obstruct public 
business. It was here that the enterprising Democracy of San 
Diego stepped in. The party offered to furnish, free of cost to the 
counly, all the clerical force that was needed. The offer was de- 
clined. It is now made evident by the report of the Grand Jury 
that the boodling county officials did not dare to bring honest 
men into their offices, for fear their wrong-doing would be dis- 
covered that much earlier. These facts are now before the people, 
and they will be user! with telling effect in the campaign pend- 
ing. The situation in San Diego is rather desperate. To live, the 
people will have to throw off the corrupt men who have ruled 
the county, and the tax-payers' only hope lies with the Democ- 
racy. The outlook for the Democracy in the South is very 
hopeful. 

IT begins to look as if the Examiner's list of strong men was ex- 
hausted. That enterprising journal has given us, up to the 
present, only the phenomenal of physical strength. Suppose 
that it presented to us some models of moral force — an illustra- 
tion of the man who, on a bright sunny day, will stand without 
flinching on the sidewalk at the very threshold of the portals of 
the tailor he owes for the suit which shields him from the weather, 
aye, and knowing that Snip is ready to dart upon him at any 
moment with goose and shears, would be a pleasing picture. The 
full face of the male person who dares to stay out all night with- 
out accusing, upon his return home, the friend of his bosom, for 
leading him into such delinquency, might well go into that gallery. 
A full length sketch of the individual who had sand enough to 
tell the proprietor of a swell French restaurant that his dishes 
were frauds, his waiters imbeciles, himself a pirate, and his 
charges atrocious, would be more pleasing to the eye of the reg- 
ular subscriber than a man who measured ninety-seven inches 
around the chest. Alas, and alack a-day, there is no place in 
history for those heroes of humdrum life. Yonr fellow who 
hoists a gigantic tar-barrel on his shoulders, or who breaks a rib 
against an iron anvil, has glory enough, but the true warriors, the 
men of extreme courage, remain, so far as the newspapers are 
concerned, unknown, unhonored and unsung. 



AFTER the recent fight the epigrammatic Mr. Carnegie will feel 
diffident about hanging up " God bless our Homestead," on 
the walls of his steel works. 

One of the bsst tailors in the city is Colonel J. M. Litchfield, of 12 
Poit street. His suits are not equaled by those of any other estab- 
li>bment in town, for he is a master of the sartorial art, and always 
does his work in an admirable manner. He makes a specialty of 
uniforms and regalias, and does a large business with all uniformed 
societies. 



SPECIAL SALE 
CHENILLE PARTIERS 

20D pairs at $4 OO 
200 pairs at $B OO 
2SO pairs at $6 OO 
Full Size. Fringed, 

Handsome Dados, 

Elegant Colors. 
The best values everoffered in San 
Francisco. 



(£{%nnc\4 




^ 1892. ' 



111 to 121 Post Street. 




GOLD SEAL Eubber HOSE, 

THE BEST MADE. 

Gjodyear Rubber Company, 



B. H. PEASE, ( A „„„ ta 

S. M. RUM YON, ( A &enra. 



577 * S70 Market Street. 



O-. "W. CLABK &c CO., 
653 Market Street, 

FOB 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 

Good Cheer and a Souvenir of California for our Eastern Friends. 

Parties desiring to send to their 
friends East the 

INGLENOOK TABLE WINES 

Can have their orders filled at San 
Francisco prices and of freight at 
car-load rates added, thus saving 
a great expense by leaving their 
orders in time with 

F. A. HABER, 

Office and Depot Inglenook Vineyard, 122 Sansome St., S. 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 




Bi-LQPKER-9N® 



I : ^lAtM-^nbtft**-^ 



ONE of the greatest male nuisances of the Hotel Rafael this 
season has been a stout man, with a stoop in his shoulders 
and a pronounced Semitic cast of countenance, who has taken 
great delight in making matters uncomfortable for the hotel 
guests. There may be some excuse for the fellow, however, for 
he is a tailor, and as there were not eight other sartorial artists 
with him, of course he could not be expected to look and act like 
a man. It was probably this tailor's idea that by appearing in 
loud check suits, he would be considered a lion at the popular 
summer resort; he found himself, however, relegated to the high 
social standard of that animal which, when roasted, forms the 
Chinese favorite dish. Every time the bus left the hotel for the 
train for a number of days past, this fellow managed to se- 
cure an end seat against the entrance. There he would squat his 
bulk, and no matter who wished to get in, the passenger would 
have to squeeze against the tailor's offensive personage. Finally 
some of the boys determined to teach the fellow a lesson, and as 
his feet are as expansive as his cheek, they decided to carefully 
tramp upon them as entrance was made into the coach. Webster 
Jones led the host. The other day, when the bus drove up, the 
offensive tailor, as usual, plumped himself in his favorite seat, 
and spread his feet upon the floor of the bus. Then the time had 
come. The avengers gathered around the steps of the bus, pre- 
pared for action. Jones mounted the steps, and as he entered the 
bus, planted himself upon the obstructing feet. The tailor uttered 
a howl, and drawing his feet beneath him, made himself as small 
as possible. The lesson had an immediate and good effect. 

# # • 

The friends of City Clerk Jim Brady, of Oakland, have often 
wondered why he is such an enthusiast over circus performances. 
Whenever there is a ring ihow anywhere accessible he is always 
a constant patron, and those who have been with him at such 
times have invariably noted what a vast amount of technical 
knowledge he displays regarding the manipulation of the saw- 
dust arena. The fact of the matter is that Brady once traveled 
with a circus as an employ e\ His friends and social acquaint- 
ances will be surprised at such a statement, but it's true, and 
there is quite a story connected with why he gave up the pro- 
fession. 

Jim, a few years ago, was treasurer of one of the many ring 
organizations that travel through the Eastern States. His bold 
financiering always made the accounts balance, so that the ghost 
went the rounds regularly, and he was naturally very popular 
with every one, from the tent peggers up. One night the show 
was given at a little town near Binghampton, N. Y., and the 
treasurer's wagon, with Brady at the window, was placed on the 
side of a hill that commanded the entrance to the tent. Blocks 
were beneath the wagon wheels, and in fancied security Jim sat 
and guided the silver stream of 'quarters and halves into the 
strongbox of the company. But alas! just as he had got the 
money all set out on a desk preparatory to counting the even- 
ing's receipts, some gamins removed the blocks from the wheels, 
and away went the wagon. Increasing in velocity as it sped 
along, it was soon flying at a hurricane rate, and poor Jim sat on 
his stool, holding on with both hands and his teeth, and expect- 
ing a crash at any moment. He did not anticipate in vain. The 
wagon was wrecked against a tree at the bottom of the hill and 
overturned, sending the money in every direction. The gang of 
urchins started stealing with both hands, Jim got mad, had a row 
with the manager, and finally quit then and there. He never got 
another position of the kind, but there has always been a soft 
spot in his heart for the nomadic life of the ring, and it is this 
yearning that draws him magnetically to every circus he can 
get at. 

* » * 

Again is there dissatisfaction in the Second Brigade of the Na- 
tional Guard, and once more is the cause of dissension about the an- 
nual encampment. The division encampmentof the troops will be 
held at Santa Cruz in August, and as there are six Brigadier Gen- 
erals in the division, and just aboutenough men in th« whole Na- 
tional Guard to form one decent brigade, the regiments have to be 
divided up, so as to make provisional brigades. In so doing, the 
Fifth Regiment, which is regularly attached to the Second Brig- 
ade, has been assigned to the command of General Muller, of tbe 
Third Brigade, much to the disgust of 'the regiment. The Fifth 
has camped for years with the other regiments of the brigade, and 
as all tbe men are acquainted, they always have a most enjoya- 



ble time in camp. With the Third Brigade, however, they would 
be with strangers. Colonel Fairbanks, of the Fifth, is trying to 
arrange things so as to camp with tbe Second Brigade, and drill, 
if necessary, with the Third. 

• * * 

There were many sights at San Rafael during the holiday week 
which made the angels weep, but none caused greater mourn- 
ing among the cherubim and seraphim than Petey Bigelow, on 
Thursday night. Petey was in his element, for he was in the 
midst of the brightest and most fashionable of the city's society 
people, and there were dozens of pretty girls who hung upon his 
smile (Petey's is an expansive smile), and looked deep into his 
soulful eyes, as they listened to tbe poetic fancies uttered by him 
in that mellifluent voice which is ever as gentle, and has ever the 
same charm, whether announcing that its owner stands pat or 
inquiring for the health of the consort of the royalty whom 
Petey may happen at the moment to be entertaining. But Petey 
overdid himself on Thursday night. Like most bright and pop- 
ular men, he suffers from the effects of the magnetism of his own 
individuality. It is not his fault, of course, if a girl falls in love 
with him as soon as he meets her, and he is not to blame if a 
gloom were cast upon the bevy of beauties at the Rafael when 
it was ascertained that he is not in the matrimonial market. But 
Bigelow did what he could to assuage the grief of the fair ones. 
To each of his various admirers he promised, on the word of a 
gentleman, to send a lock of his hair as soon as he returned to 
the city, and had made terms with the tonsorial artist who has 
the extreme felicity to handle the Bigelowian locks. It is un- 
derstood that even now the scissors are at work, and that Petey 
has already purchased several rolls of colored ribbon wherewith 
to bind up the ends of his offerings. Meanwhile the price of wigs, 
under the cruel dispensation of an unfeeling Republican admin- 
istration, continues to approximate toward the ultimate. 

* # » 

The general supposition that Bigelow had hollow legs was 
shown to be groundless, during the passing of Taylor's love cup. 
after the tennis match. " Petey " said the cupful would be no 
drink for him, and one of the joyful bloods offered to bet him $20 
that he couldn't drink its measure. The bet was taken, and the 
cup was filled to the brim. It held just two quarts of champagne. 
Petey raised the bowl carefully to his lips and began his task. It 
was very easy at first. He quaffed the sparkling wine slowly 
and steadily, and the tide receded gently but surely, while serene 
sunset beams of confidence and satisfaction lit the Bacchanalian 
hero's face. Pretty soon the draughts became intermittent, and 
then the wine-kissed lips began to splutter. The fountain's 
quiet flow became spurts. Petey gulped, looked doubtfully at 
the lightened bowl, gulped again, looked doubtful and weary, 
and gulped. Finally he set down the broad silver vessel and said 
confidently, but sadly, <• Gentlemen, I have lost the bet." There 
was a pint of wine left in the bowl, but it looked like a barrel to 
the vanquished reveller. It was a triumphant defeat, though, 
for it had brought its own balm and antidote. Two quarts of 
wine may be a trifle for a night, but just try it in one drink. 

* # * 

General Passenger Agent Goodman may or may not know of 
the trick that is being played on the Santa Cruz branch of the 
Southern Pacific. The round-trip fare to Santa Cruz is $5, but to 
Felton, a short distance this side of the Beach City, a hunter's 
round-trip ticket can be obtained for ?3 50. Now, as the fare 
from Felton to Santa Cruz is only 25 cents, lots of people who are 
on to the combination get their round-trip tickets to Felton, and 
then pay the local fare for the rest of the way. By this method, 
the journey only costs $4, and then again, the traveler has the 
satisfaction of knowing that he has got big casino on the railroad 
company. 

» * # 

British India is apparently not the best of places for enterprising 
Americans to tackU, Will Mastin and George Mastin, two wealthy 
young men of Oakland, went to Calcutta and thence to Bombay, 
with tbe purpose of locating under the Union Jack, if the condi- 
tions proved favorable. A letter was received from them the other 
day, saying that the country was no place for Americans, and an- 
nouncing that they will leave for California again at an early 
date. 

# * * 

Tales will be told all summer about the series of tennis events 
at San Rafael, which resulted in the victory of Champion Taylor. 
Anyone who says anything about the respective and respectable 
noses of Umpires Wilberforce and Joe Daly, however, should see 
before doing so that they have a means of escape which will put 
them beyond the wrath which is sure to come. For be it known 
that Wilberforce and Daly are rather tender just now on the 
nasal question, and good right have they to be. We see in these 
two gentlemen martyrs to the game of lawn tennis, who have in 
the interest of the advancement of the sport allowed their per- 
sonal beauty to be marred by the disfigurement of their most pro- 
nounced facial features. Wilberforce has a nose that is a sight. 
On the Fourth it was red, white and blue — red where the sun had 
scorched it most, white on the shady side, and blue on the top, 
where the skin had peeled off and the new cuticle was forming.i 



July 9, 1892. 



SAX FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



16 



Bat Paly's nose! Ob. Daly's nmr, in the words of the immortal 
bard, is a la-la. Only Daly ooold hare inch a nose as that. But 
be doesn't care, for a scorched no«c to a tennis-player is a badge 
of honor, as a broken finger signifies the prowess of a baseball- 
catcher. It Is said that the California Lawn Tennis Club will 
have both noses photographed, ami the picture will be hung on 
the club rooms as a souvenir of the great event of 1892. 

* « « 

One of the most pleasant and praiseworthy features of the 
tennis tournament was the umpiring of Mr. Wilberforce. He isa 
veteran and expert lawn lentil* player, and knows every rule in 
the book and every play in the CO or la. His umpiring was through- 
oat the tournament distinguished by prompt and just decisions, 
which gave universal satisfaction to those who know the game. 

* * » 

Jbe friends of Will Taylor became wildly hilarious on the night 
of the champion's great victory over Hubbard. That may be the 
reason that the hotel bar was wrecked, a number of billiard cues 
smashed, and several holes punched through the floor. 

* » * 

The Bohemian Club is about completing the purchase of fifteen 
acres of land in the redwood region, some three miles from Mill 
Valley, from the Taraalpais Land and Water Company. On this 
beautiful tract will be located the summer quarters of the club; 
here beneath the towering redwoods and beside a rippling 
stream, will the midsummer jinks be held. A dam will be built 
in the stream to make a swimming pool, huts will be constructed, 
and withal the club will have an ideal retreat. The land com- 
pany will widen the present trail from the Bolinas road to the 
canon into a wagon road. It is proposed to increase the member- 
ship of the club from 500 to 800, on account of the increased ex- 
penses of the new club-bouse and the country place. The club is 
now in excellent condition, and its future daily becomes more 
brilliant. 

* * # 

The Art Association again has an opportunity to secure for it- 
self one of the best buildings in the country for an art gallery. 
Whether it will be able to handle the great Hopkins mansion, 
however, is a question. The house ia a very expensive one to 
run on any basis, and the financiers of the Art Association are 
just now considering the matter. It is to be hoped that they 
will receive sufficient assurances of assistance from the wealthy 
art patrons of the city to warrant them in accepting the generous 
gift of the Nob Hill mansion from Mr. Searles. As suggested in 
the News Letter some months since, the house would make an 
ideal art gallery. It can be used advantageously only for some 
such purpose, or by a club. Mr. Searles would not be likely to 
let it out as a hotel, and it is not probable that any family 
would care to take it. With the Art Association in the Hopkins 
mansion, this city would have an art gallery equal to any in the 
country, for the owners of private galleries would not be averse 
to loaning their pictures when they know they would be shown 
well and be well protected. 

* * * 

There are many very elegantly fitted up law offices in San 
Francisco, but those of Mr. A. H. Ricketts, in the new Crocker 
Building, surpass any I have yet seen. His rooms are numbers 
201, 202 and 203, on the tenth floor. His library is elegantly 
fitted up, and his law books occupy all the shelves upon the four 
sides of the room. A portion of the hall has been partitioned off 
by an elegant glass and mahogany door, thus forming a com- 
fortable reception room. One of the two other rooms is for the 
use of clients, and the other is Mr. Ricketts' private office. The 
finest of the rooms is in West Coast mahogany, in splendid con- 
trast to which is the handsome oaken furniture. Mr. Ricketts 
enjoys a large and lucrative practice, being principally engaged 
in mining cases. He numbers among his clients the Waterloo 
Mining Company, of Calico. This company has been engaged in 
a most remarkable series of mining litigation for the last five 
years. He is also counsel for the Oro Grande Mining Company, 
the Burning Moscow Mining Company, of Calico; and the C. J. 
Bradley Mining Company, of Union county, Or. The Guild Gold 
Mining Company, of Tuolumne county, is also a client. This 
company is now erecting a $100,000 plant on the Rawhide mine. 
The Abbott Quicksilver Mining Company, in Lake county, has 
also secured Mr. Ricketts' services. The American ifixploring 
Company has headquarters in Mr. Ricketts' offices. This large 
organization has for its object the dealing in and developing of 
mining properties in California, and, in fact, all over the world. 
It has offices in the Mills' Building, New York city. John Hays 



Hammond, of San Francisco, and Frederick (J. Corning, of New 
York, are the consulting engineers, and Mr. Ricketts laths counsel 
of the company, who* A ramifications extend from Mexico to 
Wyoming. 

• • • 

No one who knows Marcus Daly, the Montana copper king, 
will begrudge him his success on the turf, his stables having cap- 
tured the two great purses of the season. He is a whole-souled, 
genial gentleman, and one of the foremost business men in the 
country. He is tbe practical end of the great mining quartette of 
Hearst, Haggin, Tevis .t Daly, and tbe resident partner on the 
Anaconda property. He established his stables in tbe Deer 
Lodge Valley in 188. r i and for three years they have been consid- 
ered in all the great events. In the language of the frontier, 
Daly is all grit and a good loser, but he is undoubtedly content 
that " they are coming " the other way for him this season. He 
pocketed $65,000 in purses alone in two races and always 
"backs" his horses strongly. 

* # • 

William Drake, who committed suicide at Pelaluma, last Wed- 
nesday, was not a barkeeper, as stated in the Chronicle. He held 
a prominent position in one of the leading commercial houses of 
the city, and was a man of unusual ability. 

# * # 

Misfortune has befallen Jack Allan, who was recently in this 
city with Mrs. Hebden. with whom he had eloped from Mon- 
treal. He has been turned out of the Allan Steamship Company, 
and as he enjoyed a salary of $20,000 per annum as Montreal 
manager, he may live to regret the plunge his mad infatuation 
for Mrs. Hebden led him into. " Love wilt find the way," and 
as a rule, laughs at sacrifice and barriers. But in this instance, 
alas for the deserted ones. Mrs. Jack Allan Is still in England 
with her children, and is expecting very soon her sixth accouch- 
ment. As an illustration of the servility of the Montreal press 
to a wealthy and influential family, white the New York papers 
teemed with accounts of the scandal, and thousands of copies 
were sold on the streets of Montreal, not a line appeared in any 
of that city's newspapers. Nothing seems to be known of tbe 
present whereabouts of the guilty pair, but fresh developments 
may be expected. 

* * * 

An unusual opportunity for the obtaining of bargains in all 
kinds of furnishing goods is to be presented on Monday next, I 
understand, at the Maze. The occasion is the beginning of tbe 
"inventory sale." The house will have been in business just a 
year on the 30th inst,, to signalize which event a complete new 
stock of goods will he put in. These goods are now being pro- 
cured in the East by the house's buyers. To prepare for them, all 
the present stock will be sold off for what it will bring, without 
regard to cost prices. The store will doubtless be crowded with 
eager customers while the sale continues. 




DUFF GORDON SHERRY, 

THE MOST CELEBRATED AND BEST KNOWN BRAND IN 

THE WORLD. 

Sold by tl>e Leading Wine Merchants and tirocers. 

Charles Meinecke & Co., 

Sole Agents Pacific Coast. 3 14 Sacramento St., S. F 





OUTING SUITS-SITS, LADIES 



TENNIS SUITS-SHIRTS, 



WAISTS 



27 TO 37 TECE.A-IfclT"H" STREET. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 




LATELY in these columns, in noting the fact that the Golden 
Fleece Gravel Mining Company had taken steps to procure a 
United States patent for its mines on the Hogs-Back divide in 
Placer County, we called attention to the act of March 3,1891, 
the provisions of which seem to render it expedient that miners 
should procure patents to their mines rather than rely upon loca- 
tion, possession and annual labor only. The matter is of general 
interest to our readers, and we therefore publish a synopsis of the 
act, kindly furnished to us by Col. Edward A. Belcher, the well- 
known mining lawyer of this city. This statute acquires an added 
interest, as under the Federal law there would seem to be a ques- 
tion as to the right to work mines on the public mineral lands 
without procuring patent, the statute merely giving the right 
to explore (i.e. : to prospect for — to find mines) and " to purchase" — 
one act or right being predicted upon the other — the contention 
being that the purpose of the Federal Statute is to provide for the 
disposition of the public mineral lands, and not merely for the 
subtraction of the minerals therefrom, etc., etc. The synopsis of 
the act referred to is as follows: [1.] Every miner who has per- 
formed the labor, etc., required by law for the holding of mining 
claims upon the public mineral lands, shall, within thirty days 
from the time limited for performing the labor, file an affidavit 
with the County Recorder of the County in which the mine is 
located, particularly describing the labor performed, etc. , which 
affidavit is made prima facie evidence of the facts stated. [2] Upon 
failure to perform annual labor, etc., or to file the affidavit, the 
claim shall be subject to are-location; but if the annual labor is 
performed and the affidavit filed previous to the re-location, the 
claim shall not be subject to re-location by reason of the previous 
failure, etc. [3] Upon the failure of any co-owner to contribute 
to the annual labor, etc., the co-owner who has performed the 
labor may, at the expiration of the year within which the labor 
is to be performed, give notice to the delinquent in writing, or by 
publication in a newspaper published nearest the claim once a 
week for ninety days. A copy of the notice, duly proved, is to 
be filed and recorded in the office of the County Recorder, and if 
the delinquent co-owner does not contribute his proportion of the 
expenditure, his claim is to become the property of the other co- 
owner. An essentially similar permission is found in the statutes 
of other States and in the Federal statute; also in the mining 
laws of British Columbia. [4.] The labor expended upon tunnels 
or cuts in opening a claim shall be deemed labor done upon the 
claim. (Same as Federal law). [5.] All mining locations are sub- 
ject to the right of way for ditches, canals, etc. (Same as Inderal 
law). 

its 

IF the public had stood under the mining market during the week, 
prices might have closed higher than they are. There is a cer- 
tain amount of timidity displayed among the investing classes, 
which does not augur well for the immediate future of the busi- 
ness. There is no doubt that the mines are looking well, if not 
better than they have for months past; but owing to the uneasy 
feeling which prevails on the street, it is questionable if a bonanza 
gtrike would attract more than passing attention. The spurt in 
Belcher had little effect on the neighboring stocks of a beneficial 
character, and even the unexpected increase in the assays of the 
Con.-Cal. Virginia fell flat. There has got to be a certain amount 
of reconstruction carried out on Bine street before much can be 
hoped for in the way of outside assistance. The brokers, ably as- 
sisted by a clique of malcontents, have managed to demoralize 
things to their entire satisfaction, and few, outside themselves, 
are inclined to worry over the unravelling of the snarl. The busi- 
ness will recuperate eventually, but it will be under a different 
class of managers — men who are not idiots enough to snap their 
noses off to spite their faces. No one is to blame for the wreck 
of an easy and profitable business but the gentlemen themselves, 
who for years past have been playing fast and loose with the 
public, to their personal disadvantage in the long run. The 
writing on the wall has been plainly apparent for B3me time, but 
any suggestion to prepare for the coming storm was scoffed at 
in disdain. Any attempt at listing new mines running on a profit- 
able basis was frowned down by the ultra-conservative members 
of the board; but to-day they would be only too glad to accept 
any proposition of the kind which offered a chance for salvation. 
Outside of Belcher, nothing new has transpired during the week. 
The North End stocks were, as usual, fairly well supported, but 
the balance of the market suffered at the hands of the chippers, 
who never miss a possible nickel. There is no holding for keeps 
on Pine street just now. 

$ $ t 

AN inquiry Is again springing up for California mines, and a 
number of representatives of British capital are scouring the 
State looking for " a going concern," as they term it. They will 
probably get suited with some old played-out property, which 
will be dressed out for their benefit. One-half of the foreign min- 



ing sharps who visit this State could not tell a mine from a hole 
in the ground. The history of transactions in the past will prove 
this statement. They have invariably overlooked mines when 
presented to them, and taken up the most wretched propositions, 
which have always resulted in a heavy loss to the people who 
placed faith in their opinion. It is little use warning these people 
against a pitfall prepared for them; they know it all, and argu- 
ment on the subject is only so much waste of time. For the 
benefit of the class we will, however, add that during the past 
year three of the best mining men in this town, backed by all the 
necessary capital, have been looking for a fair prospect in this 
State, which can be taken up and worked on business principles, 
the most liberal terms being offered, but so far they have not 
found anything which will justify them In advising their princi- 
pals to invest. There are plenty of old shafts filled with water 
which have just been closed down as the bonanza was about to 
be opened up, but this, in nine cases out of ten, is a "go it blind" 
proposition, and the day for such a display of idiocy is gone by 
among local mining men. It would be just as well for some of 
the fresh experts from abroad who are now here to take the hint, 
and avoid any disagreeable possibilities in the future of fiascos 
like the Josephine, Ilex, and others of the same ilk. 

IN the news from the Comstock mines come the report of a 
steady improvement ,in the west workings on the 900-level of 
Union and Sierra Nevada. The development which sent Belcher 
on the up grade holds out, and it is said that the ore extracted is 
running bigh. The Con. Cal. -Virginia mine is looking well, and 
it is confidently expected that the assays for the week will be 
well up to the recent high mark, which proved rather a surprise 
to the few bears who still brave it out in face of the rumors 
which threaten their annihilation. 8orae fair grade ore is being 
taken from the upper levels of several of the prominent mines on 
the lode, which in the majority of instances is being shipped for 
reduction. Occidental shipped bullion recently valued at $8,000, 
and has ore concentrates on hand valued at $7,000. In the Bodie 
group, Bulwer is shipping ore to the Bodie mill, running $20 to 
the ton, and the stopes are said to be looking well Standard, in 
the same camp, shipped $19,779.56 in bullion, the total output of 
the mine last month. The Quijotoa companies are prospecting 
with good results, and the management are still in hopes of find- 
ing a good pay body of ore. A small assessment of five cents has 
been levied on Peerless, the first since September, last year, which 
will be used to open up some new and interesting ground. The 
Ophir, Gould & Curry, Utah and Chollar assessments were de- 
linquent during the week. 

si $ 

AN attempt is being made to send delegates from this city to the 
Mining Congress to be held in Helena, Montana, on the 12th 
inst. There are few of the delegates who can well afford to pay 
their own expenses on a trip of this kind, and it would seem only 
proper that some effort should be made by the different mining 
companies here to send on a representation of competent men. 
Whether the appropriation in the support of the Mining Bureau 
can be drawn upon to some extent for the necessary means is un- 
certain, owing to its limited amount, but it is just for such con- 
tingencies that it should provide. This session of the Mining 
Congress will be a most important one, and the State of Califor- 
nia is deeply interested in more than one topic which will come 
up for discussion. It will not look well if the Golden State, of 
all others, should fail in having a representation. 
$ $ $ 

THE space fiend on the Panama Star and Herald is still gloating 
over what he styles a descriptive article on the newly discov- 
ered El Dorado of Ecuador. This was an account of some alleged 
placers, sixty square miles in area, with "pay dirt" from 15 to 
150 feet in depth, gold being found from grass-roots to bed rock. 
These are to be worked by three mythical New York companies, 
one with a capital of $1,000,000, a second with $2,000,000, and a 
third with $10,000,000. Their is nothing small about this, nor in 
the additional statement that there is not money enough in the 
Bank of France, and half a dozen other financial concerns of the 
kind thrown in, to buy these new bonanzas. 

$$ $ 

THE Bank of Nevada has declared a quarterly dividend, at the 
rate of 6 per cent, per annum, payable July 15th, the first div- 
idend since the reorganization of the bank, three years sgo. The 
bank has now a surplus of $532,000, and it is expected that 
henceforth shareholders will receive a regular quarterly dividend 
on their shares. Th« present disbursement is at the rate of $1 50 
per share upon the 30,000 shares of capital stock. The semi-an- 
nual statement of the bank, issued on the 1st inst., shows cash 
on hand amounting to $1,166,305, and undivided profits aggregat- 
ing $132,664. 

$ $ $ 

THERE is again some talk about starting up the Amador gold 
mine. All the differences are settled, it is said, the payments 
j on liens alone aggregating some $20,000. The London financial 
, papers have applied jack-screws to the stock, which is now 
I quoted at about 75 cents for the fully paid up $5 shares. 



July 9, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 




Hear the Crier: - ' "What the devil artthouT" 
" On> lhal will pUt the ■!*■ Til.<ir. with too.*' 

ALL fenced around and tended well, 
Within the garden stands 
That garden's pride, the leafy tree, 

I'pon its owner's lands. 
Beneath, the turf is smooth and green. 

Nj withered leaves rest there. 
To cut away each rotten branch 

Is aye the gardener's care. 
About its roots the mold is spread, 

It knows not pain or drouth, 
Its parching leaflets never bend 

Imploring to the south. 
And so it grows and thrives, and towers, 

In triumph toward the blue, 
But ah, these spreading branches yield 

Their shelter to the few. 
Far nobler is the wayside tree, 

Beneath whose shade may rest, 
The weary, as tired children He, 

Upon their mother's breast. 
A careless vagabond it stands 

Hard by the dusty road, 
Inviting all who pass it by 

To pause and ease their load. 
Its withered leaves beneath the boughs, 

All carelessly are shed, 
And here at noon or eventide, 

Behold a gracious bed. 
Unlike the haughty garden tree, 

Where only few are bidden, 
The kind shade of this vagabond 

To all is freely given. 
'Tis Nature's inn, where all may stay, 

Nor ever reckoning call, 
On winter's night or summer's day, 

The tree is free to all. 
Then blessing on the kindly hand, 

The hospitality 
Which plants outside the bounded land, 

The kindly wayside tree. 

THE Hon. Thomas Fottrell of Mill Valley, is the possessor of a 
monkey which has done more to disturb the Sabbath calm of 
Mill Valley than any animai, with the exception of a few archi- 
tectural ami artistic humans ever introduced into that beautiful 
retreat. The monkey is of the ring-tailed species, and in locomo- 
tion walks with its head erect and packs along the slack of its 
chain with the dignity of a court damsel holding up her train. 
But though apparently wild in demeanor, the monkey is largely 
imbued with the spirit of its kind. He is permitted to run loose 
and delights in moonlight passear°. Now, Mill Valley is noted 
for the picturesque character of its lovers' walks. The monk de- 
lights in trailing a pair of confiding lovers to the gnarled stump 
which they have selected as the shrine whereon their vows of 
enduring affection &h ill be poured forth. And ju?t at the moment 
when Gabriel the salesman, is assuring Evangeline, the saleslady, 
that his heart beats for her alone, with a shrill and diabolical 
tbriek, the monk, his tail wrapped around a projecting branch, 
swings before the eyes of the startled pair, who, of course, be- 
lieving that it is the devil who has included himself in their gar- 
den of Eden, flee to the highway screaming trayers of contrition 
to heaven. Another fantastic trick of the monk is to appear at 
open windows when quiet villagers are enjoying their evening 
repast, and poking his black muzzle in just when the soup is 
being served, communicate a shock to the crowd which leads to 
the capsizing of the nutritious fluid. Still he has many good 
traits, among which is a hearty detestation of the citizen soldiery 
who disturb the quiet of the valley by the beating of drums and 
the blowing of trumpets and all the pomp and circumstance and 
buttons of inglorious war. When they pass by thumping their 
drums and struggling with their unwieldy muskets Mr. Fott- 
rell's monkey waxes wild with indignation. He bounds along the 
pickets of Sabbath Calm fence and groans and chatters at the 
warriors as they pass by. In appearance he closely resembles a 
well-known street contractor of this city, except that the monk 
has whiskers a trifle grayer than the man whose ancestors fought 
with Brian Boru. 

STANLEY'S mother-in-law wanted to make a member of Par- 
liament of him. Ke did not want it a bit, not he. And now 
the telegraph says that the old lady is fatigued, and completely 
out of health. Ha, here is plucking enjoyment from the claws of 
defeat. 



In philanthropist was harassed even to the edge of the silent 
grave bj boalden cut in the path of his philanthropy that 
nun i- h- Coggswell. Aching to go down to posterity "as tho 

beiiefa«u.>r of his race, this worthy person has been devising 
mean* to bar a th • euphonemis name o! Cnggawell stand side by 
■Ida with franklin, Morse, and the last of the Mohicans. He be- 
Btrawd tb« town With drinking fountains; he erected untn himself 
a bronze Maine, bat to this moltOO image the populace refused 
to dufl th.ir huts. On the contrary, they jeered thereat, and spat 
upon the counterfeit presentment of the good man's beard. Ulti- 
mately the nieipality hail the brazen image of Coggswell re- 
moved from the market place, and the thirsty who passed that 
way might go dry or buy steam beer. Years wore on, and then 
the doctor, e mteniplating another attack upon posterity, built 
and endowed a college, and now to open this college, appears to 
be about as difficult as to enter one of the sub-treasury vaults 
to which Gill's burglar alarm is attached. The faculty have one 
another by the legs, the doctor is in a dilemma, and that portion 
of the community which would drink at the Pierian spine is sim- 
ply staggering along in thirst on the desert of ignorance. 

THE dailies, the day atter the Fourth, congratulated the com- 
1 munity upon the fact that there were less fires this year than 
heretofore. Well, I suppose it is all right, but it does seem as if 
the patriotic enthusiasm of the people might find some outlet 
which did not imperil property and life. The infernal fire-cracker 
is used by the Chinese to scare away the devil, to placate mis- 
chievous dieties, to speed the believer's soul to heaven, and, be- 
yond all, to contend with and smother the stinks of the Chinese 
quarter. The American youth has but one use for it. He burns 
the same fire-cracker to glorify the independence of the land of 
his birth. On this point of making horrible noises and disagree- 
able smells, the Mongolian and the Caucasian shake hands across 
the rampant dragon. The economical civilization of the future 
may wisely arrange that the Chinese New Year be amalgamated 
with the Fourth of July, and thus make those warring races 
equally responsible for smell and fires. 

THE last novelty in social organizations is the Strasbismus 
Club. This is an association of cross-eyed ladies and gentle- 
men, to regulate the apparently irreconcilable things of life. One 
of the first questions brought before the club was the solution of 
Mr. Petey Bigelow wearing a dark green necktie, with a pale blue 
shirt. When this debate terminated in a tie, a most interesting 
statement that the Rev. Dr. Grey's laundress was color blind, 
provoked an animated discussion. Those who contended that 
the reverend gentleman's chokers were tinted terra-cotta instead 
of white, obtained an overwhelming majority. 

AT a discussion, a few evenings ago, in regard to the reason 
why there is no rule laid down in the German grammar about 
the gender of the article, a lady said: ■« It puzzles me why the 
moon, which is feminine in English and in French, should be 
masculine in the German. A member of the Arion Club, Mr. 
Windmiller, replied, " The only reason, madam, that I can assign 
for the moon being masculine in the German is that he is in the 
habit of getting full and remaining out all night." 

WE don't want Ward McAllister here to teach our society peo- 
ple new paces. Ned Greenway is good enough for us. He 
fills the bill to perfection. Ned leads the German, keeps forward 
young men where they belong, and checks the enthusiasm of the 
debutantes. But there is a heraldry man in town now who is 
trying to get up a boon on crests and things. He won't do, be- 
cause naturally the villain must deal with grandfathers in his 
business. He is premature by at least two generations. 

AMIDST all the growling about bard times that we hear on 
every side, the fact is apparent that the hardships of the 
period are not sufficiently marked to keep the good people of 
this city from their regular enjoyments. The theatres do not 
suffer, and as for the circus — well, the circus carried away a 
bar'l of money. Here is where the spirit of juvenility hits us all. 
We may deny some of our relatives a few yards of dry goods, but 
heaven forbid that the lady bareback rider and the Shakespearean 
clown should go unrewarded. 

JOHN WELCH and Cornelius McManus are convalescent. The 
knife and bullet were powerless to terminate the lives of this 
brace of distinguished citizens. But let some good and holy man 
come home with wet feet or take an overdose of corn-beef and 
cabbage, and almost before he has had time to pull off his socks, 
or pick his teeth, the flapping of the wings of the Death Angel is 
heard outside his chamber door. 

THE church and the bar, as represented by Judge Murphy and 
the Rev. Chalmers Easton, have had a tilt, and the parson is 
indignant that the Judge should have gone for his vitals. Mr. 
Easton should be more careful of his cloth. When a clergyman 
handles money for things which lie beyond the spiritual, he lays 
himself open to criticism in this censorious age. 

R. CARNEGIE'S cask rests in Harrison's vault, 

The whisky is old, good for stomach and head; 
Its color is amber, and here is the fault, 

For 'twere but consistent, its hue should be red. 



M 1 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 



£EQjy£zn%\ 



THE statistics of real estate sales and improvements in San 
Francisco for the first six months of the current year, show 
that the business dullness, of which much complaint has been 
made of late, has greatly affected the building trades and the real 
estate markets. The sales this year in the period mentioned, ac- 
cording to Thomas Magee, recognized as an authority on local 
real estate, numbered 2,778, for the sum of $9,358,263. This was 
about $11,000,000 less than the sales in 1890, and some $6,000,000 
less than the sales of 1891, the figures for those years being as 
follows: 1890, 3,481 sales, for $20,245,501; 1891, 3,752 sales, for 
$15,451,122. The investments in improvements during the first 
half of this year amounted to $3,200,000 in round figures, and 
represent the erection of about 550 new buildings, the number of 
contracts let being 448. These totals, like those in real estate 
business, fall short of those for the three preceding and corre- 
sponding half years. The buyer now has the call on prices, 
which are holding firm, one reason for the apparent decrease in 
the number of sales. Good investment property is not to be had 
for the asking, owners not being willing to sell, unless they have 
in immediate view an opportunity for a better investment. 

During June the reports show that investments were made on 
ninety buildings, amounting to $622,090. The sales for June 
numbered 461, valued at $1,682,390. June seems to have been as 
good for the real estate men as it was bad for the insurance men, 
for it ranks second among the first six months of the year. The 
bank reports show that during the past half of the year, money 
was plentiful. Money has been plentiful during the entire half 
year, and the sums on deposit in the savings banks are larger 
than ever. The total mortgages for the six months number 2,198, 
and amount to $7,504,209, and the releases numbered 1,430, for 
$5,118,838. In the detailed statement of loans private individuals 
figure collectively far more than any of the banks, and are set 
down for 956 loans, aggregating $2,852,018. The Hibernia Bank 
lent $1,598,212, and the German Bank $1,160,300 

It is now the desire of owners to keep the market in its pres- 
ent condition, in which land is held firmly at fair figures. While 
the real estate market is in such a condition there need be no fear 
of a boom, and a resulting depression when the temporary ex- 
citement is over. There is no likelihood that such will be done 
in real estate during the summer, and as there are many vacant 
houses, the building trades will also be given a rest. 

CRAIG AND MONTGOMERY. 

ONE of the richest letters that have been written and published 
for some time anent local insurance business is that of Rev. 
Father George Montgomery, Chancellor of the Archdiocese of 
California, in which the reverend gentleman in polished lan- 
guage denounces Hugh Craig, of the New Zealand company, as 
a coward and a liar. The letter was in reply to an interview 
with Oraip, published in an evening paper, regarding the Troy- 
Agnew difficulty over the reinsurance of the San Rafael convent, 
the story of which was first published in the News Letter. Mr. 
Craig made a sweeping denunciation of the manner in which he 
said all church business was transacted, and among other things 
said an agent never received all his preminm for such insurance, 
and never expected it. Now comes Father Montgomery, who, by 
the way, is a very able man, and says if in his denunciations Mr. 
Craig includes the Roman Catholic Church, why, then, his state- 
ments were infamously false, ile wrote to Craig on the subject, 
and that gentleman replied that he was personally responsible 
for that part of the interview which. did not include the usual re- 
portorial padding. Portions of the letter of Rev. Father Mont- 
gomery are so strong that we republish them. Referring to the 
Craig statement, that all church business are obtained by ques- 
tionable methods, the priest's letter says: » Mr. Craig has church 
business, therefore it is presumed that Mr. Craig has obtained it 
by questionable methods. If he answers that these questionable 
methods were on the part of the agents, I reply that according to 
his own assertion the company is the only one that has profited 
by them, for he says the agents had to give back the full amount 
of the comruissior 8 Now the coward who stands in the back- 
ground, and receives or profits by stolen goods, is more con- 
temptible than the thief himself. Mr. Craig says that * premiums 
on church insurance are hard to collect, and that if a company 
gets half of them it is doing well.' The church to which Mr. 
Craig belongs may deserve this complimentary notice — it will 
have to speak for itself; but, if minus 'the padding,' Mr. 
Craig asserts this of the Catholic church of this city 
and diocese, it is simply untrue. I will venture to say 
that the New Zealand Company never lost one cent 
of its premium on a Catholic Church policy. Mr. Craig contin- 
ues : " It is of no use to sue them (the church people). You can- 
not get a judgment against them, and if you did you could not 
collect it. Besides being false and a base insinuation, that asser- 
tion is foolishly absurd, and unworthy of the manager of a great 
company. If Mr. Craig does not want church insurance, why 



does he take it? I feel certain that no Catholic priest ever asked 
him or his company to write a policy on their property, and yet 
he has written, or caused to be written, several. We have never 
solicited any company to insure us, bat they have solicited us to 
let them insure us. I trust that in future he will not be 
troubled by any insurance of Catholic church property. The 
tone of the interview, however, indicates that he has rot bad as 
much of it as he would desire. Mr. Craig is at liberty to make 
any wild assertions that he chooses, but I have the same liberty 
of characterizing his bad manners as they deserve." 

It is now in order for some one to get Craig's opinion on the 
proposition whether or not it is a "questionable" method of do- 
ing business to appoint farmers as agents. 

Grandma's made happy with perfect fitting glasses from C. Muller, op- 
tician, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush. 



Moquette Carpets 

At 

Reduced Prices. 



Until July 1st we offer a larje variety 
oj desirable patterns at 2G P£R CENT 
LESS THAN USUAL PRICES. 
We must close out these patterns be- 
fore our stock-taking on July 1st, be- 
cause our mills have stopped making 
them, and dropped patterns must go 
to make room for new Fall styles. 

W. & J. SL0ANE & CO., 

641-647 Market Street. 

CARPETS, FURNITURE, UPHOLSTERY, 

WINDOW SHADES. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Best & Belcher 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 33, Ne- 
vada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 11th Day of July, 189', at the hour cf 1 o'clock P. M.. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 
Transfer books will close on Friday, July 8, 1892, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Frau- 
cisco, California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For tbe half year ending June 30, 1892, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and one-tenth (5 1-10' per cent, per aunum on Term Depos- 
its and four and one-quarter (4'4) per cent, per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, payable on and after Friday. July 1, 1892. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— 526 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The Blount Door Check and Spring ! 




Sure to Close the 

Door -without 

Slamming, 
JAS. A. MAGUIRE, City Agent, 

657-G61 Market Street, S. F. 



July 9 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I ETTER. 



19 




TH E Agnew-Troy controversy continues to attract the attention 
of the insurance world, and it is said by the talkers on the 
Bourse that interesting developments will soon be made. The 
nature of the developments, however, is not hinted at. Manager 
Duval, of the Compact, is looking into the matter, and has 
already procured considerable testimony in the case. Troy has 
made an affidavit setting forth his side of the story, and Agnew 
has also told what he had to say about it. It is only fair to 
Agnew to say that in no manner did he shirk an investigation; 
in fact, be preferred to have an inquiry made into his methods 
of doing business. Apropos of this matter, that interview with 
Hugh Craig, published in an evening paper last Saturday, has 
caused much comment. Craig to a considerable extent is a pro- 
fessional Christian and holy man, and the manner in which he 
speaks about church business is somewhat shocking to one ac- 
quainted with this surpassingly good man. "Church business is 
never obtainable except by questionable methods," he is reported 
to have said. " There is nothing in it. In the insurance de- 
partment of every church the cloven hoof is always to be found. 
They are professional corrupters of the average honest man." Of 
course Mr. Craig is not an average honest man. "The ecclesias- 
tical clans of the nineteenth century," continued the California 
street saint, as he is familiarly termed, " who live on their flocks 
for the fleece and the tallow, have inspired their financial com- 
mittees with the same methods, so that in order to save a dollar 
they would sell ail the souls of their congregation." Now, of 
course, any one at all acquainted with the manner in which 
cburch risk3 are taken, is aware that more or less rebate is always 
made on the premium, whether directly or by way of donations 
to the institution, makes no difference; the reduction is certainly 
made. But that the good Mr. Craig, a pillar of the church, with 
his unsullied reputation as a professional Christian, should refer 
in such slighting terms to those good men who point out the way 
to the better world, where there are no fires, is astonishing. It is 
shocking! What may we expect next, when Craig speaks of the 
cloven hoof and churches in the same breath? 

Underwriters say that the losses for May and June have been 
unusually heavy this year. The spell of hot weather, and the 
consequent dryness and highly inflammable condition of the 
country, are greatly responsible for the unpleasant condition of 
affairs. The Seattle, Woodland and San Jose fires all bit local 
offices heavily. The Gutte agency, for instance, was in to the 
extent of $25,000 on the blazes. The management of the San 
Jose fires has caused much adverse criticism on the condition of 
the fire department in that enterprising burg. The cause of most 
of the damage was the fact that no water to play on the flames 
could be obtained until half an hour, at least, after the blaze had 
begun. San Jose's department is a poor one, anyhow. The 
horses, for instance, are required to work every other day on out- 
side work, which, to a great extent, unfits them for fire depart- 
ment work. It has been suggested by an old underwriter that 
San Jose do away with the horses altogether, and get up a com- 
pany of men who would run " wid der machine." The men 
would do better service than the horses in dragging the engines 
over the level streets, and their services would be less expensive, 
as many, if not the great majority of the men, would work the 
ropes for nothing, being satisfied with the knowledge of the 
glory they have in working for the commonwealth. 

Colonel W. R. Smedberg returned from the East last Thursday. 

What is technically known as "the 80 per cent, coinsurance 
clause" was last week put in operation by Chicago underwriters 
on a large class of risks. This was following closely similar ac- 
tion by the underwriters of New York and other Eastern cities. 
There are many excellent and logical reasons in favor of coinsur- 
ance, but the most prominent reason brought forward by the in- 
surance men of Chicago and of the other cities was that the exi- 
gency of the situation demanded such action, because not only 
the profits but the capital of insurance companies were being 
wiped out by the magnitude of the fire losses, and radical meas- 
ures were necessary to save the remaining companies from bank- 
ruptcy. A recognized authority in matters of insurance statis- 
tics, the Spectator, presents a particularly elaborate table showing 
the operations of fifty-one of the leading fire insurance companies 
for the last decade. The particular point to which this page of 
statistics led was to show that the ratio of profits to premiums 
had in that decade been but .08 of 1 per cent. In drawing con- 
clusions from this showing, the paper says: " It will be seen 
that the majority of fire insurance companies, if we may judge 
the balance by the fifty-one whose statistics are given, are public 
benefactors and philanthropists so far as the results show. The 
companies in the aggregate have transacted the business of fire 
underwriting for nothing." It should be noted that this .08 of 1 
per cent, in a decade is not the ratio of profit on the capital stock, 
returned in dividends to the stockholders, but the very different 
matter of the ratio of profit to the premiums. The same figures 



which have been ingeniously used to demonstrate the unprofit- 
ableness of the insurance business present a widely different 
showing if they are looked into a little further. The point that 
would first strike one's attention, is that while these fifty-one 
companies received in premiums during the decade JiS74,fi81,866, 
they only paid back in losses »390.990,202. This shows tbat there 
was left $2"7,G85,. r ."4 to pay the expenses of collecting the premi- 
ums and profits of the business. This was unquestionably a large 
sum, large enough to provide for a most liberal quota of expenses 
and still leave a margin for stockholders' profits. 

Insurance companies to the number of 175 engaged in 
the business in Illinois in 1891. The paid up capital Btock of 
those companies was $63,801,875. The dividends paid to stock- 
holders was $6,738,G31, or at the rate of 10A per cent. The aver- 
age return to the stockholders of the railroad companies operating 
in Illinois was 2 1-5 per cent. 



Good Cooking 

Is one of the chief blessings of every home. To always insure good 
custards, puddings, sauces, etc., use Gail Borden " Eagle " Brand 
Condensed Milk. Directions on the label. Sold by your grocer and 
druggist. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Savage Mining Company. 

The regular animal meeting of the stockholders of the Savage Min- 
ing Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 4, Nevada 
Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on Thursday, the 
2lst day of July, 1892, at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of elect- 
ing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction 
of such other business as may come before the meeting. Transfer books 
will close on Monday, July 18, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Spring Valley Water Works. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Spring Valley Water 
Works will be held at the office of the company, No. 516 California Street, 
San Frauclsco, Cal., on WEDNESDAY, theUOth day of July, 1892. at the hour 
of 12 o'clock m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for 
the e nsuing year, and the transaction of such other business as* may come 
before the meeting. 

WM. NORRIS, Secretary. 
Office— No. 516 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Hibernia Savings and L-an Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Hibernia Savings 
and Loan Society, held July 1, 1892, a dividend was declared at the 
rate of four and one-quarter (4\£) per cent per annum on all deposits for 
the six months ending June 30, 1B92, free from all taxes and payable on 
and after July 1, 1892. R. J. 10BIN, Secretary. 

Office— Northeast corner Montgomery and Post streets, S. F. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declare a dividend for the term ending with 
June 30, 1892, at the rate of five and one-fifth (5 1 5j per cent, per annum 
on Term Deposits, and four and one-third per cent, per annum on Or- 
dinary Deposits "fiee of taxes, payable on and after Friday, July 1, 1892, 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— 101 Montgomery St., Cor. Sutter, San Franc isco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank. 

The Board of Directors of this bank have declared a dividend for the 
term ending June 30, 1892, at the rate of five and one-flfth (5 1-5) per cent, 
per annum on Term Deposits, and four and oue-third (4^J) per cent, per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits,, free from taxei, and payable on and after 
July 1, 1892. J. E. FaRNUM, Secretary. 

Office— 805 Market street, Flood Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1892, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and four-tenths (5 4-10; per cent, per annum on term de- 
posits, and four and one-half (4J^) per cent, per annum on ordinary de- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on aud after Friday, July 1, 1892. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 
Office — Cor. Powell and Eddy streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half-year ending June 30, 1892, a dividend has been declared at 

the rate of five and one-fifth (5 1-5) per cent, per annum on term deposits 

and four and one-thiid (4J-6) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free 

of taxes, payable on aud after Friday, July 1, 1892. 

J. A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 
Office— No. 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DR. RlCORD'S RE8T0RATIVE PlLLS. 

Buy none but the Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the Medical Celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 

J. G. STEELE A CO., 
No. 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED. Box of 50 pillB, 51 25; of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills. 
53 50; of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills, $2. Send for Circular. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 



TENNIS AND BASEBALL. 

THE proudest man in America on the Fourth of July was W. 
H. Taylor, Jr. who again has won the lawn tennis champion- 
ship of the Pacific States. Mr. Taylor has an unbeaten record 
for five years, and everyone was pleased to see him win this 
year, especially as he will not be seen again in championship 
matches. The match between bira and the " all-comer," Mr. C. 
P. Hubbard, was, without doubt, the most exciting ever played 

on this coast, and the ten- 
nis, though not a brilliant 
smashing game, was 
purely scientific. Both play- 
ers, at the beginning of the 
match, were slightly nerv- 
ous, as they realized that 
great things were expected 
by their adherents. To- 
wards the middle of the 
first sett, Taylor began to 
show a great superiority 
over his opponent in vulley- 
ing, and at the same time 
placing the swift returns of 
Mr. Hubbard. Cheer after 
cheer rent the air when the 
first sett was placed to Tay- 
llor's credit. The second 
Isett, after being hotly con- 
gested, went in the same 
way, and the Oakland con- 
tingent were beginning to 
feel rather blue at the pros- 
pect of seeing their favorite beaten in straight setts. They were, 
however, very jubilant when the third and fourth setts were 
taken by Mr. Hubbard, after some of the finest head work dis- 
played on the courts. In the fifth and final sett, Mr. Taylor be- 
gan to play for all he was worth , and made two of the prettiest 
drives down the side lines, in fact, the only two in the match. 
His placing and volleying began to get stronger, and Mr. Hub- 
bard could not stand up against them. The courts were in pan- 
demonium when the last stroke was played, and Taylor was 
hoisted up on the shoulders of his friends and proclaimed winner. 
After silence had been restored, Mr. W. Mayo Newball, in his 
usual graceful way, presented the cup to the champion. Mr. 
Hubbard is certainly to be congratulated on his bard-fought 
matches, and the manner in which he carried himself through- 
out. As " runner-up" he bad to fi^bt against several fine players, 
and bis matches with Bates and Sanborn will live long in the 
memory of those who were fortunate enough to witness them. 
Mr. Bates was within one point of beating Mr. Hubbard, and the 
excitement was intense. The former has really improved won- 




C. P. Httbbard. 




derfully, and will, in all probability, be a strong favorite next 
year. Sanborn was quite a dark horse, and was not for a mo- 
ment looked upon as a likely winner. When, however, he de- 
feated Tobin without losing a sett, and with comparative ease 
beat S. Neil, he was looked upon with dread, as Hubbard was 
certainly the favorite. The people breathed more freely when 
Hubbard won the all-comers match in straight setts. The public 
were disappointed at Mr. Neil's defeat, but his wrist was pain- 
ful and he was not playing his game, while his opponent was 
playing the game of his life. 

One of the very close matches, which can justly be spoken of 
as a very tine exhibition, was that between Bates and Carr Neei. 
Mr. Bates had all he could do to win, and deserved great credit 
for working up in the final sett with four games to love against 
him. The match between Dr. Philips and H. H. Haigbt was very 
interesting, and the Reno man has shown that a year's practice 
has greatly improved him. Mr. Tobin was disappointing to his 
many friends, for, after defeating Haight, he was looked upon as 
the one to meet Hubbard, but Sanborn completely outplayed him. 
I mentioned in a previous article that in my opinion Hubbard, 
Bates and S. Neel would, unless the draw interfered, come into 
the semi finals. Of the many other players in the tournament 
there is but little to say, except that they deserve praise for their 
efforts to make the tournament a success, which undoubtedly it 
was. In my opinion, and in the opinion of those present, the 
play and style was far better than that shown at previous meet- 
ings. The play, instead of being a simple smashing game, or pure 
battledoor and shuttl«cock, has proved itself to be a very scienti- 
fic pastime, where only skill and endurance can battle success- 
fully. Alec. B. Wilhebforce. 

On Sunday, at San Rafael, there were some consolation doubles 
which were highly interesting and amusing. The best games 
were those between Stetson and De Long, and Bates and Haight. 
The former won, after a hard fight, and finally took the prizes, 
beating 0. Hoffman and Sanborn in the finals. C P. Hubbard 
and Joe Tobin left for the East last Wednesday. We will look 
forward with interest to the outcome of their tennis matches with 
the Eastern cracks. S. Neel has also departed for Chicago. 

The Stetson tournament will be discontinued for the present, 
and will be turned into a double tournament after the Admission 
Day doubles. 

The quarterly tournament for the California cup will be held at 
the end of this month, at the club grounds. Mr. Hubbard has 
already won it twice, but owing to his departure for the East, he 
will not be able to enter. 

The Northern Championship was held at Liverpool, Eng., June 
14th, and O. S. Campbell, champion of America, was among the 
entries. In the first round he defeated G. W. Hillyard, 6-4, 7-5, 
1-6, 6-3, but was defeated in the second hy F. O. Stoker, 3-6.6-4, 
2-6, 7-5, 6-2. In the American singles be was defeated by W. 
Baddeley (champion). 6-2, 6-0; also by Pirn, 4-6, 6-4, 12-10, and 
last by H. S. Barlow, 6-1, 1-6, 6-4. In the doubles, partnered with 
Barlow, they won the first and second rounds, hut were defeated 
in the third by Renshaw and Hillyard, 6-8, 7-5, 7-5, 6-2. 

We have received tne following special cablegram from our 
English correspondent: 

Wimbledon, July 4th. — The All-England championship round 
played to-day resulted in a victory for the holder of the cup, Mr. 
Wilfred Baddeley. 



BASEBALL. ^ 



W. It. Taylor, Jr., Pacific Coast Champion. 



'HE positions of the clubs this week in therace 
for the baseball pennant is another illustration 
of the uncertainties in a game of baseball. Two weeks ago every- 
thing indicated that the race lay between San Jose and Los An- 
geles, the home team having only a remote chance to win. At 
this writing it looks as if the home team would come out in the 
lead, with San Jose and Los Angeles struggling for second place. 
This state of affairs is liable, however, to change within the next 
two weeks. The California League has, as we foreshadowed sev- 
eral weeks ago, adopted the double championship season, as con- 
ducted by all the other leagues in the country. The first season 
will end two weeks from to-morrow, and the next season will 
commence on the following Wednesday. The National Board of 
Control, through President Young, has awarded the Los Angeles 
Oakland protested game of May 5lh to the latter club. This pulls 
Los Angeles down a peg. It does not do Oakland much good, 
but it hurts Los Angeles, and assists the San Jose and home 
tnams. The ground of the protest was that a portion of the 
bleachers < f the Los Angeles grounds was in fair ground when 
he bleachers should have been entirely in foul territory. Com- 
mencing with to-day, each of the clubs will play twelve games 
bpfore the first season ends. Oakland has been playing good ball, 
and should be in the race from the beginning of next season until 
the end. Next week the home team will have to battle with the 
San Jose club at the home of the latter. The Oaklands, during 
the same time, will be playing with the Los Angeles nine in this 
city and Oakland. The home and Los Angeles teams will play 
in this city this afternoon and to-morrow. The Los Angeles has 
signed Lytle. This would indicate that the club intends to make 
a strong fight to win the present series. 



July 9, 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 







AMONG novelties fa hats a tut bonnets ell the prettiest seem to 
be triranied with antenna or Mephistophelean feathers. A 
Urge chip hat with the siuall crown composed of a rough straw, 
has the brim slightly caught up in front with wings of lace and 
antenn.< as the only trimming. A bonnet with a small crown 
and a brim of lace caught up here and there, has a bow of moss 
green velvet in front fastened with a paste bnckle, and two Me- 
phisto feathers rising op from it. A hat, which in shape resem- 
bles a glorified sailor's bat, has large bows of purple velvet in 
front, witb branches of cherries and nuts sticking up at one side. 
Another hat the same shape has two upright bows of ribbon 
placed at each side, which have the appearance almost of donkeys' 
ears. A bonnet, which from the front appears to be nothing but 
a butterfly poised upright on the head, has the small crown com- 
posed of scintillating blue spangles, and the butterfly is made of 
the same spangles, with the antenna' of gold wire. Another bon- 
net which is equally novel and extraordinary, has a flat gold 
crown, which is encircled by a green snake, the head of which 
rises up above the fringe in a most startling way. 

Black and green, pink and green and all the shades of mauve 
and canary color are popular combinations. A new material has 
a canvas ground with corded silk stripes, producing a shot effect. 
Flowered organdie muslin and dotted Swiss are in favor again. 
Oriental printed silks are a novelty, with patterns similar in de- 
sign and coloring to those on India shawls. The pattern is out- 
lined in jet. 



An odd little jewel-box is especially designed for the << sailor- 
made" girl. It is made of cardboard, covered with silk and bolt- 
ing cloth. It is shaped like a small anchor of unusual thickness. 
Inside it is lined with tufted silk, while on the outside is painted 
a diminutive portrait of the owner. 

A smart bracelet for a girl who rides, or who is inclined to out- 
door sports, is a gold crop, curved and caught in the center by a 
horse shoe and with a nail in the latter. The handle and end of 
the crop are elaborately engraved, so that an extremely pretty ef- 
fect is produced. 

Large services in cases of individual salts, peppers, butter plates, 
salt spoons and butter knives are now lavishly presented. The 
daintiness of the gilt-lined salt spoons and the lovely little knives 
make them desired as wedding presents. 

Elsie Bee, in The Jewelers 1 Circular. 

Penknives have gone up in the scale of price and quality. They 
are at present one of the features of the French girl's chatelaine. In 
size tbey are small and narrow and made of silver or gold, with 
delicately tinted enameled flowers upon them. 

Cologne sprays are just now in popular favor. The novelty in 
this line is a tiny silver watering-pot, perfect in every detail — 
spout, the spray attachment and all. Cologne sprays of Dresden 
china, set in silver cases, are also used. 

Asparagus tongs are sumptuous. The under part is flat and 
shovel-shaped, the upper part is a large claw of silver gilt, perfectly 
copied from nature, says the Jewelers 1 Circular. The ordinary as- 
paragus tongs have wide braided and perforated shovels, 

Bow knot pins are now sold with a chatelaine attached ; the 
chatelaine hook may be removed if desired. These bow knots 
come in dnll yellow, etruscan or bright polished gold, and also in 
silver, plain and filigree. 

A novelty very pretty for the dinner table is a silver slipper 
with a high heel and rosette, chased to imitate brocade, says the 
Jewelers 1 Circular. This is filled with small ferns as a jardiniere. 

Numbers of skirt supporters are coming in the market. They 
are something like little chips in the form of fleur-de-lis and other 
devices with chains and rings for the finger. 

The fancy for white ribbon ties around the braided knot of hair 
still continues. The ribbon should be about an inch wide, of gros- 
grain with a corded edge. 

Onyx bracelets faceted in squares and rimmed with gold is an 
old mourning fashion re-established. 

Small gold hairpins come in sets with one large pin. They have 
tops of trefoil and fleur-de-lis. 

« ouglis. Hoarseness, Sore Throat, etc., quickly relieved by Brown's 
Bronchial Troches. They surpass all other preparations in removing 
hoarseness, and as a cough remedy are pre-eminently the best. 



gkr,:ea.t 
SEMI-ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE. 



-o uk- 



MAMMOTH SURPLUS STOCK 



-OF- 



SPRING AND SUMMER 

DRY GOODS AND CLOAKS 



-MOW BEING CLOSED OUT AT- 



TREMENDOUS REDUCTIONS. 

Every Department Brimming With Bargains- 
Call Early and Secure a First Choice. 




MARKET, JONES AND MCALLISTER STS. 

DR. F. O. PAGUE, 

BESTIST, 

Rooms 4 &. 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 
819 Market Street. 

DR. J. H. STALLARD 

— AND — 

DR. J. CLARK, 

X=XI-2-SICI-A-lNrS and STXIRGrEOiTS, 
632 Sutter Street. 




O. F. WILLEY &. CO., 

ESTABLISHED 18S5. 

Carriage Builders and Dealers, 

317 Montgomery Street, Kevada Block, S. F. 

Agency for Brewster & Co., New York (of Broome St.); 
Henry Hooker & Co., New Haven, Conn.; C. S. Caffrey Co., 
Camden, N. J.; Henry Killam Co., New Haven, Conn.; Mil- 
lion GuietA Cie, Paris, France; H. H. Babeoek Co., Water- 
town, N. Y.; New Haven Carriage Co., New Haven, Conn.; 
Ohio Buggy Co., Columbus, O. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 



MR. O'SHEA tells a good story of Grimbush, an Irish actor, 
who went on the stage as the Ghost of Hamlet, thinking him. 
self William in Black-Eyed Susan. He was, of course, very much 
intoxicated. " Instead of striding in with martial stalk, the 
Ghost, hitching his cuisses in sailor fashion, lurched on the 
boards, and, grasping the hand of the astonished Marcellns, roar- 
ed out, 'What cheer, messmate? Tip us your nipper, my hearty.' 
Marcellus was too much taken aback to speak; but Bernardo, 
Horatio, and Francisco began frowning and whispering emphatic 
warning to the Ghost in dumb show. 'Avast heaving, you lub- 
bers!' shouted Harry; 'I take you to be no better than a crew of 
cowardly land sharks. But a true British sailor'— here a hitch of 
the cuisses— 'never turned his back to a lass or a glass, or hauled 
down his colours before a dozen beggarly foreigners.' A call of 
■Hornpipe !' was thereupon raised from the gallery, and the Ghost 
of Hamlet's father, in 'the very armour he had on when he the 
ambitious Norway combated,' went through the paces of that 
sprightly dance with complacent nimbleness." 

M. F. S. Dymotfe, the "Queen's Champion" was recently 
very ill in London. His family has, since 1377, held the Manor 
of Scrivelsby, in Lincolnshire, by the tenure of challenging all 
comers to dispute the Sovereign's right on the day of Coronation. 
The Champion has not been called upon to exercise his functions 
since 1821, when the Dymoke of the period rode in full armour 
on horseback up Westminister Hall, where the banquet was be- 
ing held, dared the world to dispute the right of George IV., and 
received a golden cup as his fee. The family has adopted an ex- 
cellent canting motto — pro rege dimico — and its three crests are a 
lion, a sword, and (with strange irony) the "scalp of a hare." 

The badly mixed condition of political affairs in Roman families 
may be judged from the fact that a prince of the highest distinc- 
tion is a chamberlain to the Pope, while one of his sons is an of- 
ficer in the Italian army, a zealous Italian, and devoted to the 
King; another is a senator, after having been a depute. A prince 
is hereditary Marshal du Conclave to the Pope, thus having the 
position of Minister of Police to His Holiness. The son of this 
prince, who will succeed him on his death, or upon his retirement, 
is an officer of cavalry, and devoted to his Sovereign. A great 
many more instances might be sighted to prove that things are 
very mixed. 

The most important addition which has recently been made 
to the Department of Antiquities in the British Museum is the 
famous Carlisle collection of engraved gems from Castle Howard, 
which is one of the finest in Europe, and which has been pur- 
chased from Lord Carlisle. The collection was formed by Henry, 
fourth Earl of Carlisle, who died in 1758. A letter from Horace 
Walpole to Richard West, dated Rome, May 7, 1740, gives a very 
diverting account of the manner in which one of the most valu- 
able parts of this collection was acquired. The letter in question 
is to be found in the first volume of the Walpole Correspondence. 



B-A-zrsrics- 



The Princess Louise, whose artistic accomplishments are well 
known, has nearly completed the bust of the Queen, which is to 
be shown at the Chicago Exhibition. The Princess has had many 
sittings from Her Majesty, and as her facility in catching like- 
nesses is wonderful, as is acknowledged by all who have seen 
her wonderful portrait of Paderewski in the New Gallery, the 
sculpture will have an intrinsic value beyond that which will be 
attached to it as a work of the Queen's daughter. 

The admirers of Sarah Bernhardt are rejoicing in the fact that 
the great actress has gained in bulk since she was last seen in 
England. Perhaps Mme. Bernhardt is not enthusiastic as to this 
question of growing stout, for a fat tragedienne would be an 
anomaly. But certain the star of the moment is not quite so 
thin as she was in the days when, on being taken to see a por- 
trait of herself with her pet hound, Dumas fils exclaimed, "Ah, 
yes I I see; a dog and a bone." 

The opening of the theatre in the Eiffel Tower in Paris was an 
interesting event. The new piece given was called Paris en I'Air. 
It is a jolly trifle, eminently Parisian, and none the worse for 
that; it is high above all other dramatic works being now given 
in the metropolis — 500 feet high. 

Go to the Grand Central Wine Rooms, at 1(1 and 18 Third street, 
if you would enjoy good liquor, served in an incomparable manner. 
It is the boast of this house that all of its stock is of the best brands, 
and is the finest to be found in the world. It is one of the most 
popular bars on the coast, and deserves all its great success. 

The Maison Riehe, at the corner of Geary street and Grant 
avenue, enjoys the patronage of all the best people in the city, for its 
excellence is well known. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital »3,0O0,00C0O 

Surplus 1,000,000 00 

Undivided Profits (July 1st, 1890) 3,275,919 48 

WM. ALVORD, President. 

Thomas Brown Cashier I B. Murray, Jr . . . Assistant Cashier 

Irving F. Modlton, 2nd Assistant Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; B03TON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India, China, 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Costst. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama. Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL tmT 

N. W. Corner Sansome and Bush Streets. 

Established 1870. C. 8. Depositary. 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) $1,600,000 

SURPLUS f 600,000 | UNDIVIDED PROFITS $1 50.000 

S. G. MURPHY President IE. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT.. . .Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

DIBECTOBB: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins, S. G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffitt. 

Thomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A ueiieral Banking Business Transacted. 
SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT. 
JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 
Safes to rent from $5 to ¥100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A specialty made of thecareof wills. Office hours, 8a. M.to6p.M. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Authorized Capital $3,600,000 I Capital paid up. 2,450,000 

Reserve 450.000 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 73 Lombard St., E. C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1006 A Street. 

Man ARTHUR SCRIVENER; ABSistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank, 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said eltiesand 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Satheb & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

.Directors*: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. ■ 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. Loudon— Brown, 
Shiple y A Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

WELLS, FAR60 & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Sutter Streets. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CIPITAL S 500,000 00 

SURPLUS 5,48 8.393.72 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS t 5,988,393.00 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd TeviB, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. P. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Bankln 
Business. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Com pany. 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 11,000,000. 

DIRECTORS : 

CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Je. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH President. 

W. E. BROWN VlCE-PBESIDENT. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashibb 

SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

Guarantee Capital 43O0.0C0 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary 8. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. 8. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



July 9, 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LKTTKK 






5UNBEAMS' 




B^^ICS. 



A NOISE of hurrying feet was beard In the room overhead, fol- 
lowed by a series of blood-curdling yells and a muffled sound 
as of a band rising and falling at brief and regular intervals some- 
where on the yeller'i* penOD. Presently the noise ceased and foot- 
steps were heard on the stairway. The p rof e ss or left his Study table, 
went and opened the door of hia room, and looked op. " What is the 
tmuMe up there. Fletcher" " he asked, mildly. " M -me and mother," 
sobbed the boy, " has b-been holdtn* a H-democratic convention ' " 

— PhUaddphia Press. 

Soft the mild breeze our face doth fan, 

Bringing a joy to old and young; 
While the light coat and moving van 

Proclaim to us that spring has sprung. 

Solicitor Life Insurance Company — Here's an application that is 

hardly worth considering. The applicant's father died of heart 
disease and his mother of consumption. His lungs are very much 
gone. He ha-* palpitation of the heart, and shows indications of 
Blight's Disease. Superintendent— What is bis business? Solicitor— 
He holds a clerkship for life, or during good behavior, in a Federal 
Office at Washington. Superintendent— Wny, that is a gilt-edge risk! 
He'll never die. —Puck. 

— Mr. Packer (of Chicago) — Say, I've read a lot about Boston be- 
ing full bluestockings. Miss Arihenia Bean— Yes; J know that the 
outside world looks upon us in that light. Mr. Packer — Well, it ain't 
so. Miss Bean— I fear you are disappointed in us. Mr. Packer — Well. 
I don't know as I can say I'm so much disappointed, but I've been 
here a month and I've stood on Winter street every rainy day and I've 
only counted two pairs of blue out of the whole lot. —Town Topics. 

■■- ' Willie Snivel y (sympathizing with the victim of an exploded toy- 
cannon) — Poor Sammy! tne doctor cut off two of your tingers and 
spoiled your Fourth, didn't he? " Sammy Snodgrass— Yes, I wouldn't 
have minded that; but after the doctor was gone, pop wouldn't let 
me shoot any more, and it was only four o'clock too." —Judge. 

—-Little Country Girl— There! You've spilt a lot of rich cream all 
over your nice new dress ! Visiting Cousin (from the ct£i/)— What dif- 
ference does that make? " It'll make a great big grease spot." "' 0, 
how nasty! It isn't a bit like the cream we have at home! " 

— Philadelphia Press. 

— Lawyer Holdem— You say you were never in Dublin ? Mrs. Mc- 
Guirk— Oi wor not. Lawyer Holdem— How do you account for this 
document which says you were there in eighteen-seventy ? Mrs. Mc- 
Guirk— That wor me daughter, sor. She wor bor-rn there about thot 
time. —Judge. 

——In the spring a deeper crimson comes upon the robin's breast; 
In the spring the wanton lapwing gets himself another nest; 
In the spring six days are cloudy for each one that's bright and fair; 
In the spring we know not when to peel our flannel underwear. 

— " You must wake me at the usual hour in the morning," said 
Shattuck to his wife on the evening of the third of July. " You are 
not going to the office, are you? ** " No; but I want to have the su- 
preme satisfaction of rolling over and going to sleep again." — Judge. 

— "An Illinois village struck by a whirl-wind," is the way in 
which a Philadelphia newspaper refers to the tornado which visited 
Chicago. From any other source the insult might be tolerable. It 
takes a village to absorb a World's Fair. — New York Advertiser. 

^— Athletic Youngster— How large is Lapland, Papa, and how many 
people are therein it? Father— I don't know. Why? Athletic Young- 
ster— I only want to figure out how many Lapps there are to the mile. 

—Puck. 

^—" Why, Tommy Jones, shame on you! " You didn't say all 
your prayer." " Papa said I might leave out about our daily bread 
while mamma went to cooking school." — Chicago Inter-Ocean. 

^— Monte— I saw four queens when I was in Europe this spring! 
Jackel— Indeed? Monte— Yes; I saw them with a full house, and 
came home steerage ! — Town Topics. 

The people of Chicago eat 300,000 pies every day, but they don't 

come up to Boston yet in pie-eating. In Chicago pie takes the place 
of religion. —Texas Siftings. 

— Mrs. Brown— Keep quiet, Johnnie. The doctor says you mustn't 
talk. Little Johnnie— Just answer me this, ma. Will I be well again 
by the next fourth ? - Judge. 

—Customer (in a restaurant)— Soe here, waiter, I've found a but- 
ton in this salad. Waiter— That's all right, sir; it is part of the 
dressing. — &• Y. Press. 

—Friend— Trouble with your wife, eh? What rock did your do- 
mestic ship split on? Spinks— None at all. Hadn't rocks enough; 
that was the difficulty. —N. Y. Weekly 

Amateur Yachtsman— What do you do for amusement here? 

Clam-Digger— We watch young city fellers sailin' boats. 

Street & Smith's Good News. 

——Bore (in Bawville Clat'ton office)— What was that horrible 
crash? Editor— Horrible crash ? Must have been our composing- 
room towel. — Puck. 

Mrs. Be LTamvie—Hov? is your husband to-day ? Mrs. Cannery— 

Divorced. — Detroit Free Press. 



The best meal in the city may be had at the Original Swain's 
Bakery, at 213 Sutter street, the most popular restaurant with ladies 
and families. The bon vivants find at this popular resort all the deli- 
cacies which their educated tastes require, and that is the reason they 
make it their favorite resort. The restaurant has for years enjoyed 
the best patronage of the elite of the city. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Iri.-..r|H*r«ted by Koyal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3 000,100 

RESERVE FUND 1,1 75, M0 

Southca.*l corner Bush ami Saonorae Streets. 

HEAD OFFIOE 60 LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; 

Seattle and Tacmna, Washington. 
SUB BKANcnr.S-Kumloops.Naualrao, Nelson, New Westminster, British 
Columbia. 
This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, aud Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits grauted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted aud ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office aud Branches, aud upon its Agents, as follows: 

HEW YORK, CHICAGO aud CANADA— Bank of Moutreal: LIVERPOOL 
— North aud South WaleB Bank; SCOTLAND— British Liueu Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO aud SOUTH AMERICA— Loudon Bank 
of Mexico aud South America; CHINA and JAPAN-Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottli-b 
aud Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEM- 
ERARA aud TRINIDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVIN6S UNION. 

532 California Street. Corner Webb Street. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, Jane 30, 1891 $23,31 1,061 OO 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 1,346,635 00 

DIRECTORS. 

AlSsrt MUUr. Pr esldent; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martiu, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastlaud ; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be seat by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable iu San Frauciuco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

PEOPLES HOME SAVIN6S BANK AND SAFE DEPOSIT. 

805 Slarket Street (Flood Building, San Francisco. 

ORGANIZED MAY, 1888. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000.00 | Surplus Profits $ 45,000.03 

Paid-up Capital 333,333.33 | Deposits, Jan. 1, 1892 1,752,000.00 

OFFICERS: 

COLUMBUS WATERHOUSE President 

F. V. McDONALD Vice-President 

J. E. FARNUM Secretary and Manager 

DORN & DORN Attorneys 

This bank receives savings deposits on terra or ordinary ac- 
count, In sums of one dollar aud upwards. 

Interest paid from date of deposit, semi-annually. The five cent stamp 
system and the safe deposit department is a special feature- of this bank. 
Safes to rent by the mouth or year, from $4.00 to $25.00 per annum. We re- 
ceive commercial deposits, make collections, issue local and foreign ex- 
change. 

Money to loan on Real Estate and Approved Collateral. 

THE GERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND S -1,010,000 OO. 

Deposits Jan. 2, 1892 27,138,129 74 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRUSE 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HEKRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig. Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoemann, E. 
Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon. Attorney, 
John R. Jabbob. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS DANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICBBS. 

JAMES G. PAIR ■■ .......President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

DiEECTOES— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Moffltt, S. Q. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 

gg gpaid on Term and 0^°°7 A gf s °^ TH ^ 80 ° N ° Aggroy, 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN DANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and. Sutter Sts. 

ubscrled Capital 92,600,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

1 Reserve Fund $650,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd) No. 10 Wall St., N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie,17Boule 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits iBsued. EUGENE MEYER, Manager. 
L C. ALT8CHUL, Cashier. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN DANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

raDital Authorized 16,000,000 I Paid up 11,500,000 

aXsihed 3,000,000 [Reserve Fund 650,000 

BuDscriDeu .... ^ ead 0FpICE _ 8 j^ggj Co urt, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a goneral banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
££)<• transfers and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
rid Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 



grav— 

world. Sends 
and bullion. 



IGN. STEINHART , M „ n .„„. 
P. N. LILIENTHAL, I Managers. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 



MODERN DELUSIONS. 



THE world, that is, that portion of it which calls itself civilized, 
has outgrown the folly of witchcraft, and demoniac posses- 
sion, and voudooism, and the evil eye, and all the rest of the no- 
tions of that kind which were once held as cardinal articles of 
belief, but in their place has taken up a new set of delusions and 
fancies, thus continually justifying the assertion of the Latin 
satirise, populux vult decipz. These modern delusions bear a variety 
of names— mind-cure, faith-cure, Christian science, prayer-cure, 
and others — but they are all of the same general class, and all 
proceed upon the same theory. The particular delusion which 
has attracted the moat attention of late, owing to the mishaps 
which have accompanied its attempted exercise, is known as 
Christian science, which has been brought into special notoriety 
by reason of a number of deaths of people who were being treated 
by distinguished exponents and practitioners of the new idea. It 
is very difficult to pin a Christian scientist down to an exact 
definition of his faith or the methods by which he expects to ac- 
complish the results which he promises, but a fair statement of 
the doctrine is this — that Christian science denies the existence 
of matter, and hence the existence of illness and pain. In their 
creed the mind is everything, the body nothing. Pain or sick- 
ness is only a disordered condition of the mind, which, because 
of human unlikeness to the great first cause, manifests itself in 
the body, but which, if the mind be properly attuned, is really as 
non-existent as the pictures of dreamland. From this there fol- 
lows, naturally and inevitably, the belief that disease is to be 
cured not by the use of accepted remedial agents, but by " treat- 
ment," which, in the Christian science dialect, means impressing 
on the mind of the sick person the firm belief that there is no such 
thing as disease, and consequently that while he may think he is 
sick, he is not and cannot be. The corollary to this proposition, 
which, however, only the most advanced Christian scientists 
venture to maintain, is that there is no such thing as death, or, 
rather, that there is no necessity for death, since the mind or soul, 
being immortal, can be conscious of no such change as that which 
we call death, and the body being absolutely subservient to and 
dominated by the mind, cannot or should not experience disso- 
lution. Of course people die, even the Christian scientists them- 
selves, but that they account for by saying they had not attained 
the state of perfection for which they were striving, and that the 
body dies because the mine is not at one with its divine and im- 
mortal creator. It is not to be denied that Christian scientists 
have met with measurable success in healing certain kinds and 
classes of disease, particularly those which are associated with 
the obscure affections of the nervous system for which no specific 
name has been found, but which may be called, for lack of more 
accurate definition, hysterical troubles. Many of these complaints 
which defy medical skill, yield to Christian science because they 
are, to a great degree, mental affections, and the diverting of the 
mind from them is all the cure they need, and probably the one 
that would prove the most efficacious. But because Christian 
science can relieve the tension of overstrained nerves or bring 
temporary relief to sufferers from neuralgia and kindred afflic- 
tions, it does not follow that it can cure all diseases, and that is 
where the Christian scientists make a glaring and radical error. 
For certain maladies there are almost universally accepted reme- 
dies, and while these do not effect a cure in every case, they 
prove of benefit in so large a proportion of cases that they may 
safely be relied on. Quinine, for example, is almost a specific in 
certain febrile affections, yet the Christian science healer spurns 
the experience of the world, accumulated since the discovery of 
cinchona and its curative qualities, and relies upon his peculiar 
kind of " treatment " to effect a core. If the patient dies, he ac- 
counts for it by saying that the sick man was not far enough ad- 
vanced in Christian science to derive the full benefit of the treat- 
ment, and consoles himself with the reflection that doctors of 
medicine do not always succeed in saving the life of a 
patient. The Christian science healer wholly ignores the 
studies and experiments of men of science who have de- 
voted their lives to attempting to ameliorate the con- 
dition of the humam race, and, by wresting passages of 
Scripture out of their proper connection, reading literally where 
it suits them, and figuratively where that suits them better, and 
wilfully mistaking Oriental hyperbole and imagery for statements 
of fact, construct a theory which involves the constant exercise 
of miraculous power and a division of omnipotence with the 
Deity. It seems strange that the Christian scientists should find 
reasonable and reasoning people credulous enough to submit 
themselves to their ministrations, but such is certainly the fact, 
as the death-roll Bhows. And now, what is the remedy, if any 
there be? There must be some way to protect society against 
these Christian scientists, many of whom, beyond question, are 
as much deluded as their victims. It is evident that s ; ncerity 
and honesty of purpose will not excuse them for what they do, 
for if it would, a man who firmly believed that prussic acid 
would cure measles, or strychnine whooping cough, could not be 
convicted if he should slay as many children as Herod. It is the 
duty of the medical societies in a State like California, where the 
practice of medicine is cared for and hedged about by legislative 
enactments, to take up such cases as occurred in Oakland re- 



cently, and bring them before the Grand Jury of the county. It 
has been shown by experience that there is no surer cure for a 
popular delusion than a little well-advised and well-timed sin- 
cerity, and a conviction of Borne Christian science-healer for the 
crime of manslaughter might open people's eyes and make them 
hesitate before yielding to a belief which has nothing to com- 
mend it beyond its novelty and the air of mysticism which is 
scrupulously thrown about it. 

You should call for the J. F. Cutter whisky, if you want liquor 
that is really good, and is always satisfying to your tastes. The J. 
F. Cutter has gained a world-wide fame by years of excellence. No 
other whisky made can beat it, a fact appreciated by all who have 
ever tasted it. 

DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 

Behring Sea Packing Company. 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of cannery— Ugashik River, Alaska. 

NOTICE.— There are delinquent upon the following described stock, ou 
account of assessment (No. 1;, levied on the 13th day of February, 1892, the 
several amounts eet opposite the names of the respective shareholders; 
Name. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

C.A.Johnson l 60 $50 

C. A. Johnson 2 340 340 

Chas. Carlson 7 . 30 30 

C. Lund berg 12 390 890 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board of Directors, made 
on the 13th day of February, 1892, so many shares of each parcel of such 
stock as may be necessary will be sold at public auction, at the office of the 
company, No. 9 Market street, San Francisco, Cal., on Friday, the 15th day 
of April, 1892, at the hour of 12 o'clock m, of said day, to pay said delin- 
quent assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses 

JAMES MADISON, Secretary. 
Postponement. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Behring Sea Packing Com- 

Sany, this day, the sale of the above delinquent stock was postponed until 
[ONDAY, the 16th day of May, 1892, at the same time and place. 

JAMES MADISON, Secretary. 
San Francisco, April 16, 1892. 

Postponement. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Behring Sea Packing Com- 
pany, this day, the sale of the above delinquent stock was postponed until 
THURSDAY, June 23, 1892, at the same time and place. 

JAMES MADISON, Secretary. 
San Francisco, May 25. 1892. 

Postponement. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Behring Sea Packing Com- 
pany the sale of the above delinquent stock was postponed until Saturday, 
July 23, 1892. JAMES MADISON, Secretary. 

San Francisco, June 23, 1892. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Consolidated New York Mining Company. 

Location of principle place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo" 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 28th day of June, 1892, an assessment (No. »7), of ten (10) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately ia United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 2d Day of August, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 23d day of August, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOTT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada block, No. 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company, 

Assessment No. 69 

Amount per Share 26 cents 

Levied June7,1892 

Delinquent in Office July 12, 1892 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 4, 1892 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room, 69 Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 102 

Amount per Share 25 cents 

Levied June 10, 1892 

Delinquent In Office July 13, 1892 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August2, 1892 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cis co, C alifornia. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Overman Silver Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Overman 
Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 414 
California street, San Francisco, California, on 

Thursday, the 1 4th Day of July, 1 892, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 
Transfer books will close on Tuesday, the 12d day of July, 1892, at 1 p. M. 

GEO. D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 
Office, 414 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

L 



July 9, 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKW8 l.KTTER. 



25 



TtiE RoSsM 




IN ABSENCE Vem York Tribune. 

The Mimnifr is emu* with its sun and its breeze; 

The lilies in bloom, the leaves on the trees; 

But what of the sunshine, the breeze and the showers, 

With no little girl to look after the flower? ? 

The hammock-bouse stands deserted and lone, 

Aa it stood tbruugh the winter and spring that are gone; 

What use for the hammock or any such thing, 

With no little girl in the hammock to swing? 

The freezer is ready, the milk is quite new; 

The ice in the box, the chocolate too; 

But only to think, how odd it wonld seem, 

With no little girl to help eat the ice-cream! 

Laid away in the drawer is the musical flute: 

Its tones are all bushed, its notes are all mute, 

How can we enjoy its melodious ringing. 

With no little girl to join in the singing? 

The chambers are ready, the beds neat and clean; 

Not a spider or fly anywhere to be seen; 

But grandpa and grandma — how can they feel right, 

With no little girl to kiss them good-night ? 



IN PARADISE— From the Times- Democrat. 



Down through the golden tnnset way, 
We sail a misty, perfumed sea; 

We turn our faces from the shore, 
And float in love's eternity. 

For you are here and I am here, 
And Love the only guest besides — 

Sweet Love, that folds his flimsy wings 
As falls the purpling eventide. 

What lies beyond the crimson bar, 
That marks where sky and water meet 

What sound will fall upon our ears, 
Beyond these hushes low and sweet? 

Heaven bends so near we look within, 
And this the vision that we 3ee; 

Heaven holds no greater gift than this — 
That Love shall rule eternally. 



O TIME AND CHANtiE— From W. E. Henley s "Song of the Sword,' 



Time and Change, they range and range 

From sunshine round to thunder! 
They glance and go as the great winds blow, 

And the best of our dreams drive under; 
For time and Change estrange, estrange — 

And, now they have looked and seen us, 
we that were dear we are all too near 

With the thick of the world between us. 

Death and Time, they chime and chime 

Like bells at sunset falling! 
They end the song, they right the wrong, 

They set the old echoes calling; 
For death and Time bring on the prime 

Of God's own chosen weather, 
And we lie in the peace of the Great Release 

As once in the grass together. 



POETIC PERCEPTION. 



What mind we of the cause or reason why, 
8o we enjoy the present at ?ts best, 
In richly rounded impulses, that rest 

As syllables, while sentenced life goes by, 

Our builded hopes were lasting did we try 

To fashion them from serious soil, not jest, 
Being matched in stature to the soul as test 

That lives illumed when lesser light* shall die. 

Rose M. Davip. 



FROST.— St. George Best, in June Lippmcotts. 

I traced her name upon the frost 

That blurred my window pane; 
At morn the sweet device was lost, 

The glass was blurred again. 
So fades the impress that we make 

On those who love no more; 
'Tis like the ripple on the lake, 

Scarce seen till it is o'er. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



n. .,!,.* © 



dated Ml 



I" 
ii 



Company. 

Uiealiouol principal pin I l.n.inos— San Franol.co, California. Lo- 

eatlou ol »..rk. Bodte, Mono Countj, California. 
Nmire i. harabj civi'ti thai m a moating or the n..»ri ol Director*, hold 

OU the Mill day of Juno, ism, ao aiuo-sMiii'iil Nn Mi ..f Tm iilv m . 
->er share «•«* loTlod on the capital utoelt of the corporation, pavnlilr 
mmr.lialcly. In UDlted Stat.', gold coin, to the 8ecrel*ry, at the nflfoc of 
Ho company, room N, Nevada Block, No. llfti M»ut|{nmi-rv street, Sun Fran- 
.California. 
aDyatOGk upou which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 22,1 Day ol July, 1892. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at puhlie auction; and, unless payment Is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, tho HI day of AiiRiist, 1R92. lo 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising aud 
expeuscsof sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

II. I). WALKER, Secretary. 
Oppice— Room 6-2, Neva da Block. 309 Montgomery HI.. San Fraucitco, Oal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company. 

Locatlnu of principal place of business— Sau Francisco, Call fornia. Loca- 
tlou of works— Tuscarora, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting; of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 15th day of June. 189*2, an assessment (No. 8) of Ten (10) Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable Immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
omce of the Company, room 20, No. 3*1 Pine street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, or to E. R. Grant. Transfer Agent, 67 Broadway, New York. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-first Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment Is made be- 
fore, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 18th day of August, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising aud ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 

Office — Room 20. No. 3 31 Pine Street, San Francisco. California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Belle Isle Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of worts— Tuscarora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Sixteeuth day of June, 1892, an assessment, No. 14, of Ten Cents 
per 6hare was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Company, No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-first Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 12th day of August, 1892, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW. Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location and principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey County, rJevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 7th day of June, 1892, an assessment (No. 15) of twenty-five Cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at ihe office of the com- 
pany, room 58, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assesbment shall remain unpaid on 

The Eleventh Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on SATURDAY, the twenty-ninth day of July, 1892, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. H. FISH, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 58, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Alta Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works-Gold Hill, Gold Hill Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on Saturday, the 18th day of June, 1892, an assessment, No. 42, of Fifteen (15) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the of- 
fice of the company, Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the Twenty-sixth Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the sixteenth day of August, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Dlrectora. 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francis- 
c o. California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Union Consolidated Mining Company, 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Union Consoli- 
dated Mluing Company will be held at the office of the company, room 11, 
303 California street, San Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 1 8th day of July. 1 892, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

Transfer books will close on Friday, July 15th, 1892, at 3 o'clock p.m. 

A. W. BARROWS. Secretary. 
Office— Room 11, 303 California street, San Francisco, California. 



26 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flonr is dull; foreign demand fair: Extras H.65@li.75: Superfine 

<-^.10 
Wheat is dull; light trade; Shipping, $1.35: Milling, $L42i-3»H7 1 - per 

CtU'S." 

Barley is quiet: Brewing. 9~>c (W1.02 1 ,: Feed. 90c®92Sc per ctL 

Oats. "Milling. H.508O.55; Feed. $L3u<*$LS5 per ctL 

Corn. White. $1 30: Yellow. SLSiMLSTi . per ctl. 

Rve no stock, good demand. $1. 15@5L2u. Cement, $2.00@»2.2d. 

Hav is :™»:: Wheat. JM3S12: Oats. $10r#sil: Alfalfa, $7®*9. 

Millsraffs. good demand. Bran. Jis.i»l*.50 per ton. 

Beans, good request, flOft^tiSO per ctl. Potatoes. 45^.@7V. per CtL 

Butter is hieher; Choice. ■XK.&» l - t C-- Fair. 16c<S17c: Eastern, 14c@15c 

Cheese. light stock. Sc.#9c Eggs, free supply, >>c.®24c 

Honev. Comb. llc@l'Jc. : Extracted. 5c@Sc Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth 25c^75c. Beeswax is higher, at 2dc#26c. 

F — — i" >::.:; Iried— active Frail is very Bfeatifal Had :-^s.; 

Raisins and Dried Grapes in high favor at good paying rates. 

Hide* are steadv: Drv, 6c@7 1 2 c Wool is in good demand at llc@16c 

Provisions move off steadilv. Bags favor the buyer at 7>.®7(<c. 

Coffee lower at 15e4>21e- for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is lower, with a declining tendency. Nuts find ready sale. 

Quicksilver is nominal at $43-50 per flask. Hops are neglected at 15@17c 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. Whites. 4>^»o?^c- 

Daring the past California cereal year, ending Jane 30th (twelve 
months.. 269 foil cargoes of Floor and Grain cleared, chiefly for 
Europe. We have now in port, under grain charter, some 50,000 
tons register, against 63,000 tons same date a year ago. In addi- 
tion to the above fleet of chartered ships we have some 50 ships 
more over suited to the trade. 

The annual issue of the Comwfrciaf _Y?iri and Skipping List sum- 
marizes the past crop year as follows : Wheat exports, 12.632,367 
ctls.: Barley, 1,037.982 ells.; Corn, 87,188 cUb.; Oats. 15,107 ctls.: 
Flour. 1,059,880 bbls. The combined exports of Wheat and 
Flour, reduced to grain, amounts to 790,600 tons. 

The highest freight rate for the year was £2 10s. to Cork. U. K.; 
lowest rate was 16s. 6J. The average rate for the past 12 mos. 
was £1 lis. 5d. 

Grain bags, spot price, 7cts.; 31,000,000 bags required the last 
harvest year in this State. 

Coal receipts, home and foreign, for the pas' 12 months were 
1.814,606 tons (about equally divided >. This is the largest amount 
ever received here, and indicates a decided increase in the con- 
sumption. Low prices have generally ruled, and the bnsiness un- 
profitable to importers. 

Lumber receipts at this port for six months, 1892 — Pine, 163,- 
636.3*9 feet; Redwood. 85,957,921; Shingles, 43,030.050; number 
Railroad Ties. 514.420. 

London— C«ment The Br. ship Galena, thence, bad for cargo 

19.040 cfcs. to J. D. Spreckels, Bros. 

Japan— Sulphur. — The schr. Qaeen, from Hagodate. brings 
5,351 bags. 

For Mexico — Stmr. Sewbern, hence July 1st. carried cargo val- 
ued at $60,000, consisting in part of Chemicals, 28. OSS lbs. Tallow, 
lbs Sulphur, 140 flks- Quicksilver, etc 
Honolulu— The bktne. S. X. Castle, hence July 1st, carried 13,- 
500 lbs. Sugar, 575 bbls Floor, etc.. value $26,000; the bk. Paul 
Isenberg. for same, carried 2.225 bbls. Flour, Corn, Barley, 3,652 
lbs. Tallow and Mdse.. value. $32,660. 

For Liverpool — The Br. ship Willie Rosenfeld. hence June 30th 
had for cargo 22.644 ctls. brewing Barley, 51,922 ctls. Wheat. 3.167 
cs. Salmon, 12.750 lbs. Ore, 16.610 ft. Lumber, etc., value $115 S12; 
ship Cvms Wakefield, for same, carried 7,032 ctls. Barley, 61,576 
ctls. Wheat, value, J92.200. 

Tahiti — The Tropic Bird, hence June 30th. carried 13.45S lbs. 
Sugar. 1,036 bbls. Flour, 54 II ft. Lumber, 2.152 gls. Wine, and 
mdse.. value $25,000; also for Marquesas, mdse. of the value if 
$3,000. 

Recent grain charters embrace the following: Brit, iron ship 
Vandura, 2.012 tons. Wheat to Cork, U K.. Havre. Antwerp or 
Dunkirk, £1 6s. 3d. ; Brit, iron bark Glamis, 1,150 tons. Wheat 
same voyage, was chartered prior to arrival at £1 12s. 6d. ; Brit, 
iron ship Ulrica. 1.923 tons Wheat same voyage, £1 6s. 3d. 

Quicksilver receipts at this port for the past six months. 10.232 
risks : same period. 1S91, 6,720 flsks. Exports in same period, 
six months. 1S92, 4,773 risks., value $197,525: 1891, 2,061 flsks., 
value $93,043. 

Brit, sap Rathdowi, from Cardiff, va Belfast, brought 
for cargo 701 tons Steel Blooms. 2,142 tons Coke and 500 tons 
Scrap Iron to Balfour. Guthrie A Co. 

There is no life to business in any trade department. Exports 
of new Wheat. Flour. Barley, etc. have not yet made a begin- 
ning, and there is at present very little margin of profit discern- 
ible. 

The markets continue to be well-supplied with Apricots, Berries. 
Peaches. Apples. Pears and Plums as yet make but a poor ex- 
hibit. Dryers and canners of frnit are rushing things with energy, 
with a good outlook for profits later in the season. Canielopes 
and Water Melons are now obtainable, 



The Pacific Mail Steamship, Geo. W. Elder. 16 ds. from Panama 
and way ports arrived on the 5th inst. bringing a large New York 
Cargo of Iron and other heavy goods; from Europe. 125 pkgs. 
Steel, 295 cs. Liquors, 420 cs. Oil, 200 cs. 8oap. 45 cs. Cheese and 
140 pks. Mdse.: from coast ports, 164 bags. Coffee; from Mexico, 
1.400 bars Silver Ores and 1,135 bxs. Limes, etc., and from Central 
America 705 bags Coffee, etc 

Wine and Brandy receipts since January, 1st 6 months, were 
5,484.074 gals of the former and 369,908 gals, of the latter. 



THE Russian doctors seem to have a novel method of treating 
consumption, to judge by the case of the Grand Duke George, 
the Czar's second son. Ever since his enforced return, through 
illness, from his Indian tour, the Grand Duke has been under 
medical treatment for pulmonary disease. A private letter re- 
ceived in St. Petersburg from Abbas-Tnman, in the Caucasus, 
where the Grand Duke has been wintering, states tbat his Im- 
perial Highness is undergoing a most remarkable course of treat- 
ment. The walls in his apartments are bare and unpapered, the 
furniture is of plain wood or cane, without upholstering or stuff 
covering of any kind, and bis bed consists only of the thinnest of 
mattresses. Throughout the winter only a very moderate fire 
-has been kept np, while the windows of the Grand Duke's rooms 
have been continuously open. His attendants have suffered 
dreadfully from the cold, but his medical advisers hold tbat this 
low temperature is very beneficial to their imperial patient, as it 
tends to destroy the bacillus and prevent the formation of 
tubercle. They maintain that the progress of the disease has been 
arrested, and express hopes tbat, if the treatment which they 
prescribe is persevered with, the Grand Duke will, in two years' 
time, have completely recovered. 

Every housewife who wishes to have clean carpets and curtains 
should remember that the only place in the city where her material 
can be cleaned to her satisfaction is .at the Carpet Beating Machine 
and Cleaning and Dyeing Works of J . Spaulding & Co.. at 553--:>i . 
Tehama street. The* work of this firm is always first-class in every 
particular, for which reason it always has a great patronage. 

BREW^ctHQ 



Insurance Company. 

..$1,000,000. : ASSETS $2,550,000. 



CAPITAL 

D. J. STAPLES President. 

WILLIAM J. DFTTOS Vice-President. 

B. PATMOXVTT T.E Secretary 

J. B. LEYISOX Marine Secretary 

Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United States. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871J 
CAPITAL STOCK PlM Up $400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICe 278 AHD 220 SAKSOMC STRtCT, 

San Francisco, California. 



GEORGE L. BRAXDEB. 

President 



CHAS. M. BLAIR, 

Secretary. 



QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up | 500,000 

Assets 3.151,753 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1.52D.157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 
City Office— 301 Montgomery St. General Office — 401 Mont's. St. 



FIRE 



INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire liSBn.ce Company of London, 
Imperial Fire Insiraioe Company of Loidon, 

WM. SEXTOX. R. C. MEDCRAFT. 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 
Pacific Department, 214 Sanaome St.. s. F. 
SWAIS A MXRDOCK, City Agents. 

BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL 

CAPITAL $5,000,000 

A.OKNTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., 

He. SIS California Street. San Francltc*. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS- Assets. $19,724,538.46. 

President, BEXJ AMIS F. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GLBBESS. 
HENRY K. FIELD. Oeneral Agent. 

324 Montqomerj Street, San Francisc*. 



July 9, 1892. 



BAN KRANCI8C0 NEWS LETTER. 



'.'7 




- «rv 



VstnrmcMmFM 



IT has for some lime been understood that a New York electrical 
firm, which has been experimenting in the application of 
electricity in domestic purposes, was about to bring out a num- 
ber of devices that would effect a revolatlon in the art of house- 
keeping. This promise is yet unfulfilled. The English, how- 
ever, have been fnrpinc ahead in the same field, and with most 
gratifying results. Complete sets are now being manufactured in 
Knnland. by the use of which an immense reduction in the labor 
of household duties can be enjoyed. The sets include an elvclric 
kettle, which boils water a very few minutes after the switch is 
turned, and by which an invalid or business man in a hurry can 
make bis own breakfast without trouble. There is also an electric 
toaster, and in the electric saucepan an egg can be boiled or stew 
prepared with the greatest ease, while on the electric grill chops, 
steaks and pancakes are turned out with dispatch. In the com- 
plement are electric ironing appliances, and the electric beaters 
and bath warmers are much admired for efficiency and cleanli- 
ness. On the other hand, a series of fans can be so arranged that 
any room can be kept cool in the hottest day in summer. 

— A convention will be held in New York of the American 
Electro-Therapeutic Association in the fall. It is calculated to do 
an immense amount of good in directing attention to the admir- 
able results that have been attained in many departments of 
surgery and medicine by means of electrical applications. An- 
other outcome of such a meeting can be looked for with satisfac- 
tion. The field of electro-therapeutics is covered by three pretty 
clearly defined classes of practitioners; the really earnest and 
scientific worker; the ordinary practitioner, who, recognizing 
that electricity is " the thing nowadays," uses it in a blind and 
perfunctory manner, knowine. perhaps, that certain causes give 
certain general results, but not knowing or, perhaps, not caring 
to know why, and the electrical medical humbug. It is no small 
advantage that such an opportunity can be afforded of differen- 
tiating between sound and questionable practice, and it is not 
unlikely that the stimulus afforded by the proposed convention 
wi 1 be the means of urging on many practitioners, who may now 
come under the second class, to such work as will place them in 
the first rank. 

A great source of annoyance and expense to railway com- 
panies is the encroachments of the grass which grows around the 
rails of their lines. An effective mode of getting rid of this 
nuisance has just been devised in the shape of an electrical vege- 
tation destroyer. This consists of a wire brush, very much in 
appearance like an ordinary scrubbing brush. This is connected 
by a wire with a dynamo in the nearest available electric light or 
power station. A powerful current is turned on, and an operator 
drags the fully charged brush, which is supplied with a wooden 
handle, over the grass, killing it instantly. There are many ways 
in which this ability to instantly destroy vegetation can be util- 
ized. Gardeners, especially, are likely to be grateful for such a 
ready method of getting rid of noxious weeds on garden walks as 
well as in flower beds. 

The very height of strawberry eating is with coffee. No- 
body ever really tasted coffee who has not drunk it in alternate 
nionthfuls with strawberries, and nobody knows the strawberry 
flavor excepting immediately after the clearing of the taste which 
comes from drinking coffee, says the New York Post. The clear- 
ing property of coffee is familiar enough, but there is strange 
ignorance of thiB special application of it. The best of straw- 
berries with the best of coffee makes the supreme refinement of 
indulgence in the fruit. 

Prof. Houston, in his Brooklyn address, made five interest- 
ing prophecies on the future of electricity, namely : That elec- 
tricity would be produced directly from coal; that the steam 
engine would be entirely replaced by the electric motor; that 
©rial navigation would be effected by electricity; that electric 
light would be produced without heat, and that electriciiy would 
be applied to the curing of diseases and the prolongation of life. 

A joint committee of the two houses of the English Parlia- 
ment has reported electricity a suitable and efficient source of 
motive power, and recommended that electric railway construc- 
tion be encouraged throughout England. 

An electro mechanical vacuum pump has lately been per- 
fected which, it is claimed, will do away with the costly and 
troublesome mercury pumps at present used for exhausting the 
air from incandescent lam p bulbs. 

Visitors to the country should take with them Steele's Grindelia 
Lotion of the Huid extract of Grindelia. It is the best known remedy 
for poison oak, and is also recognized as an unrivalled cure for asth- 
matic affections. The lotion is for sale at the Palace Pharmacy, at 
635 Market street. ___ 

John W. Carmany, of 25 Kearny street, is the most popular 
dealer in men's furnishing goods in town. He always has a stock of 
the latest and best goods on hand. 



nSTSTTR^IN-CBL 



ia66.0IS.B9 

300,000 00 
278.901.10 
142,888.90 



REMOVAL! 
HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY 

Now Occupies Premises at the N K. Oar. California and Hanaome 

Bts., 8. K., Lately Vacated hy Wells, Kargo ,t Co. Hank. 

Twenty-seventh Annual Exhibit. 

jRiiuary 1, im-.ii. 
INCORPORATED A. 1>. 1864. 
Lossesp d since organiu.|3.lT.\7W.21 I Rclnsurauco Kcseryo 
Assets January 1, l»ul 967,811 HI Capital paid up, Oold 

Surplus for policy holders tM.'M m \ Net Surplus overeVyth'e 
Income In 1890 *.t..4.im.&i | fire Losses paid In 1890 , 

Ftre Losses unpaid, January 1, 1891. 1140100 

President. J FHOUUHTON I Secretary CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-President .HENRY L. I'ORGE I General Aeent. ROBERT H. MAGILL 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG. GERMANY. 

Hi tIi n L. low, Manaser for tin I'.clHc loaat Branch, 

S2» Ssaiiaome t„ S. *■. 

Capital... : . ...... $1 ,500,C0^.00 

Invested in U. S 534J95.T2 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
9»8 < allfonilH St.. S. F„ <al. 



THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE CCMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BAbLK. OF 8T. GALL. OF ZURICH 

COMB NED CAPITAL 4 000 000 DOLLARS 

'lhese three Companies are liable jointly and severally fo'r all Losses that 



may be sustained. 



HARRY VV. SYZ, General Agent, 

410 California St., San Francisco. Cal. 



THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital SubBirlbod flO.000,000 

Capital Paid Up ' 1 00 000 

Cash Rbbbtob (In addition to Capital) 2' 126 000 

Total Aaseta Decsmber 31, 1888 .......... .W... 6.124.057 B0 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

306 California Street. San Francisco 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital .... (IO.62S.000 

Cash Assets 4 701201 39 

Cash Assets In United States 2.272lo84 13 

REINSURERS OF 

Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation 

AND 

Southern California Insurance Company, 

■wdm:. nyn^.CTJOisr^SL.iiiD. 

MANAGER. 

D. E. MILES, Assistant Manager. 

315 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, S. F. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, [Established 1 782] 
American Fire Insurance Company of New York [Established 1857.] 

BUTLER & BALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
413 California Street, San Fran cisco. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720.J 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 

GEO. F. GRANT, Manaser. 

PACIFIC DEPABTMEISTT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1821. 
Paid-up Capital, - - - 15,000,000. 
Cash Assets, $23,194,249. 



i 

OF LONDON. 

Founded a. d. 1710. 

Cash Assets, 110,044,712. 

Assets in America, - - - $2,222,724. 



WIH. i. MlJHiliN. Gen'l Agent, 204. Sansome St.. San Francisco. Cal. 




INSURANCE COMPANY- LTD. 

Capital paid &) guaranteed 99,000,000,00. 

Chas.A La.to»f, Manaber. 
439 Cal if or ma St. San Francisco, 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 



THE elections in England are this year accompanied by occur- 
rences which formerly were confined to polling days in the 
•• Emerald Isle." It is deeply to be regretted that party passions 
should get the better of common sense, which is one of the most 
prominent and most laudable features of the British character. 
The causes of the unpleasant change must be mainly attributed to 
the agitation among the lowest classes of the population, by men 
who have only their own selfish ends in view. 

There is a decided difference between the manner in which the 
adherents of the government and their opponents speak of their 
hopes with regard to the result of the elections. The Gladston- 
iana are boisterous, brag without limitation, and pretend to be 
absolutely sure of victory. The Unionists, on the other hand, 
are calm and reticent. This latter attitude is a dignified one, but 
it is very doubtful whether it is well adapted to the state of modern 
politics. One thing is certain, it gives their opponents an oppor- 
tunity to accuse them of diffidence. Although the educated and 
well-informed people of the United Kingdom know perfectly well 
that the Government party, on account of its achievements dur- 
ing the last few years, has just reason to hope for victory, the 
lower strata of the population may be misled by the pretensions 
of the radicals, and therefore it would be advisable for the politi- 
cal leaders of the Government party at least to encourage their 
sympathizers by clearly pointing out to them that if they are 
loyal victory is certain. In the rough-and-tumble struggle of 
modern politics, too much dignity is often dangerous. 

Prince Bismarck has been very outspoken of late with regard 
to his opinion on the political condition of Europe. He has 
openly criticised, in words as strong as could be used by the 
former chief officer of the government, the serious blunder com- 
mitted by Emperer William II., in alienating the sympathy of 
Russia. He also indicated that at present it would be best to 
confirm the friendship between Germany and Austria. But to 
those who can read between the lines, it is plain that the words 
faute de mieux should be interpolated. If Russia ia to become an 
enemy of Germany, in the full fense of the word, then, of course, 
a close alliance with Austria is of almost paramount importance. 
Better, by far, it would have been if the present ruler of the Ger- 
man Empire bad remembered the dying words of his grandfather : 
" Remember our friendship with Russia." Although he has not 
done so in the beginning, much evil may still be averted if he will 
bend his stubborn will to the wish of the people, and make an 
attempt to renew the old friendly relations, for whether victo- 
rious or defeated, Germany must inevitably suffer greatly from 
a contest with the country of the Czar, the recuperating power 
of which is far greater than her own. Perhaps, however, it is 
already too late, and there is a tone of despondency in the words 
of the ex-Chancellor in his interview, which indicates that he 
seems to think so. Under these circumstances, the maintenance 
of the triple alliance, at all costs, is very desirable, and the finan- 
cial aid said to have been promised by Germany to Italy in order 
to maintain her standing army in the present status, is well ad- 
vised. 

Lord Randolph Churchill has been re-elected by his South 
Paddington constituents, witbqnt opposition, the Radicals well 
knowing that to contest that seat would be useless. Lord Salis- 
bury, therefore, during his new term of office, will have his enfant 
terrible, as usual, to count with. The best thing he could do would 
be to send the noble Lord on some foreign mission as soon as 
possible, and give him another chance of lion-hunting. Even 
then, it will not be easy to keep the only member of the » Tory- 
Democrat" party out of mischief. 

The chulera, the usual cam-follower of starvation, has re- 
appeared in a violent form in Russia, and already invaded some 
other European countries. For sanitary reasons alone, if for no 
other cause, it would be desirable for the European countries to 
form an international league, forcing all governments belonging 
to it to prevent famine in their country, and making each of them 
responsible in case of neglect. 

Emperor William is going north again this month on a whale- 
hunting expedition. If his former Chancellor were still in power, 
the young monarch's absence would be better, the longer it lasted, 
and in the words of the song in the Mikado: " He never would be 
missed." Under the circumstances, however, and since he has 
concentrated government in a rather autocratic manner in his 
own person, his Viking wanderings are justly disapproved by 
many of his subjects. 

The people of Madagascar, according to the latest information, 
absolutely refuse to recognize the Anglo-French convention, 
which resulted in an exchange of Zanzibar and Madagascar by 



the contracting Powers. One cannot blame the Malagasy people 
for not recognizing this political barter, in which they were not 
at all consulted. Madagascar has never surrendered her right as 
an independent country, and the inhabitants will have the heart- 
felt sympathy and support of the United 8tates, if tbey try to 
maintain their independence. For the sake of justice, it ia to be 
hoped that the Anglo-Malagasy treaty will be abolished, provided 
England should insist on subjecting the control of the law courts 
and the representation of the British subjects in the island to 
France. 

MENU cards under microscopes is the latest novelty, produced 
on the occasion of the annual dinner of medical members of 
New York University at Relmonico's restaurant. By the side of 
each plate was a small bottle, and in this a brass-mounted micro- 
scope, an inch in diameter and two inches long. On looking 
through the glass at the eye-piece the bill of fare, in the form of 
a doctor's Latin prescription, was discoverable. 

Laundry Farm enjoys great popularity as a picnic ground, and 
is visited weekly by thousands of people, who find it one of the most 
enjoyable spots within easy reach of (he city. The California Rail- 
way runs directly to it. Laundry Farm is only forty minutes from 
Oakland, and an hour and fifteen minutes from this city. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

AND 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, 

Hos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California. 
NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO. OF IRELAND; 
ATLAS ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON ; 
BOYLSTON INSURANCE CO. OF BOSTON ; 
OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON. 

Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, hy the Use of the 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER I 

vOver 800 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212 s . Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

330 Pine street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Systems— "Slattery " Induction; " Wood " Arc. Factories— Fort Wayne, 
Indiana; Brooklyn, New York. 

Electric Improvement Company. 

General Agents for California, Nevada, Oregon, Arizona and Washington 
of the Fort Wayne Electric Light Co.. Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Estimates furnished for Electric Railways, Electric Light and Steam 
Plants, House Wiring, etc. Marine Work a Specialty. 



35 New Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



R. J. WHEELER. 



J. W. GIRVIN. 



J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 

Rubber and Leather Belting, Hose, Packing, etc. 

Rubber Clothing, Boots, Shoes, etc. 

Pacific Coast Agents for Boston Belting Co. and Fayerweather & Ladew, 
formerly J. B. Uoyt & Co. 4 California St., S. F., Cal. 

WILLIAMS. DIMOND & CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for— 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship I Vivian Sons Yellow Metal Sheathing 
1 Hartmann's Rahtjen's Composition 
The China Traders <fc Insurance Co. 

(L'd.), 
The Baldwin Loeomotive Works, 
Steel Rails and Track Material. 



Company, 
" The California Line of Clippers,' 

from New York, 
"The Hawaiian Line of Packets," 

to and from Honolulu. 



J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Company, 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

General Agents Oceanic Steamship Company and 



Gillingham Cement. 
327 Market Street, corner Fremont. 

8AN FRANCISCO. 



July 9, 1892. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PAC1FH' BTBTXH. 

Trains Le« v« «nd «ro Due 10 Arriv* at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

From Jul/ J, 1892. I Auiri 

7.00*. Bent eta, Rumsey. Sacramento 7 I5r. 
7:S0a. H»Tw»rJ*, Nile* and San Jose *12:l5r. 

7 30a. Martiuei. San Ramon, Calls tog a 

and Santa Ro<-a 6:15 P. 

SrOOa. 3acram'to«* Redd log, via Davis 7:16p. 

8 00 a. First and Second Class for Ogdeu 

and Ea*t. and first class locally 9:45 r. 
$-.30*. Nile*. San Jose. Stockton, lone. 
Sacramento, Marysville, Oro- 
Tille and Red Bluff 4:45 p. 

9:00*. Sunset Route, Atlantic Express, 
Santa Barbara. Lob Angeles, 
Demi ng. El Paso, New Orleans 

and East 8:45 P. 

•9:00*. Stockton and Milton *8:45f. 

12-OOm. Hay ward 8, Niles and Livermore 7:15 p. 
•1:00 p. Sacramento River Steamers •9:00 p. 

1:30 p. Vallejo and Martinez ...... 12:45 p. 

3.00 p. Hay wards, Niles and San Jose . 9:45 *. 
4 -.00 p. Martinez, San Ramon, Stockton 

Lodi, Merced and Fresno .... 9:45*. 

4 KX> P. Vallejo, Calistoga, El Verano and 

Santa Rosa 9.45*. 

4:30p. Benicia, Esparto, Sacramento. 10:45*. 

4:30P. Woodland and Oroville 10:45a. 

'4:80p. Niles and Livermore •8:45*. 

5:30 p. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfleld, Sauta Barbara & 

Los Angeles. 8.45*. 

5.30 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojaveand East 8:45 A. 

6:00 P. Haywards, Niles and San Jose.. 7:45 a. 

. ... Niles and San Jose J6:15p. 

•6:00f. Sunol and Livermore 

6:00 p. Ogden Route Atlantic Express, 

Ogden and East 9:15a. 

17:00 P. Vallejo +8:45 p. 

7:00p. ShastaRouteExpress, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land, Paget Sound and East. . . 8:15 a 

San ta Cruz Division. 

17:45*. Suuday Excursion Train for New- 
ark, San Jose, Los Gatos, Fel- 
ton. Big Trees and Santa Cruz 18:05 p. 
8:15*. Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 6 :20 P. 

•2:15 p. Centerville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz *10:50 a. 

4:45 p. Centerville, San Jose, Los Gatos, 
Satur ays and Sundays to Santa 

Cruz 9:50a. 

Coast Division (Third a id Townsend Streets). 

•7 :00 a. San Jose, Almaden and Way Sta- 
tions *2:38p. 

17:30 a. Monterey and Santa Cruz Sun- 
day Excursion J8:28 p. 

8:15 a. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, Pa- 
jaro.SantaCruz, Monterey, Pa- 
cific Grove, Salinas, San Mi- 
guel, Paso Kobles and Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) 
and principal Way Stations 6:10 p. 
19:30a. "Sunday Excursion Train to 

Menlo Park and Way Stations. 12:45 P. 
10:87a. San Jose, and Way Stations. . . 5:03p. 
12:15 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 3 :30 p. 

*2:80p. San Jose, Tres Pinos.Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, Pacific Grove 

and principal Way Stations. *10:37 a. 

*3:30 p. Menlo Park, San Jose and Prin- 
cipal Way Stations *9:47 A. 

*4:30p. Menlo Park and Way Stations.. . *8:06a. 

5 :15 P. San Jose and Way Stations 8 :48 A 

6:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. .. 6:35 a. 
fll:45p. Menlo Park and principal Way 
8tations +7 :30 p. 

a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 
•Sundays excepted. ^Saturdays only. 
t Sundays only. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

The splendid 3,000-ton steamers of this line, car- 

Sing the United States, Hawaiian and Colonial 
ails, sail from Folsom street Wharf, as under: 

For Honolulu Only. 

8. 8. Australia, Tuesday, July 5, 1892, at 2 p. M. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 32V Mar- 
JOHN D. SPRBCKELS A BK08., 
General Agents 

I CURE FITS! 

When I say cure I do not mean merely to etop them 
for a time and then have them return again. I mean a 
radical care. I have made tbed.sease of FITS, EPI- 
LEPSY or FALLING SICKNESS a hfe-long study. I 
warrant my remedy to cure the worst cases. Because 
others have failed ia no reason for not now receiving a 
cure. Send at once for a treatise and a Free Bottle of 
my infallible remedy. Give Express and Post Office. 
H. G. ROOT, M. C.» 183 Pearl St.. N. Y. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEW9 LBTTEB 
NORTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD 

{VIA SAUSALITO). 



20 



Popular Line In < h 1 1 Torn In M«»si De- 
lightful Miniate ■oftl Acre «II»lr 
Section. 



Satir.alito for yachting and rowing. 

larkspur for a good dinner. 

Blytbedale for the children. 

Mill Valley for mineral water cures. 

San Rafael for driving. 

Ross Valley for Presbyterians. 

San Quentin for keeping away from. 

Fairfax for encampments. 

Camp Taylor for rest 

Tomala for life. 

Duncan's Mills for scenery. 

Cazadero for soda springs. 

Russian River for grandeur. 

Country Club fishing grounds, camping, hunt- 
ing, everything, everywhere. 

Good hotels at all points, fast time, prompt ser- 
vice, best equipment and most enterprising rail- 
road management in California. Reduced fares 
to all points. 

E. H. SHOEMAKER. Gen'l. Sup't. 
F. R. LATHAM, Gen. Pass. & T'k't. Agt. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 
Steamers will sail at NOON on the 5th, 15th and 

25th of each month, 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 

America. 

Through Line Sailings. — June 25th. 1892, S. S. " San 
Bias;" July 15th, S. S. "San Jose;" August 5th, 
"City of New York." 

Way Line to Mexican and Central American Po ts 
and tanama.— Steamer sails at noon 18th of each 
month, calling at Mazatlau. S-tn Bias, Manzanillo, 
Acapulco, Port Angel, Saliua Cruz, Touala, San 
Benito, Ocos, Champerico, Sun Jose de Guatemala, 
Acajutla, La Libertad, La Union, Amapala, Co- 
rinto, San Juau del Sur and Punta Arenas. 

Way Line Sailing.— July 18th, 8. S. " Collma'" 

When the regular sailing date falls on Sunday 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA AND 

HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for East 

Indies, Straits, etc.: 

S. S. "China," Saturday, July 9th, 1892, at 3 p.m. 

S. S. "Peru" (new), Thursday, Aug. 4th, at 3 p. m. 

"City of Rio de Janeiio," Saturday, Aug. 27th, at 

3 P. M. 

Round Trip Tickets to Yokohama at reduced 

For freight or passage apply at the office, corner 
First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 202 
Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers CITY OF PUEBLA, WALLA 
WALLA and UMATILLA, direct for VICTORIA, 
B. C, and PUGET 80UND ports, at 9 A. M. every 
five days. 

The steamers sailing for Puget Sound ports at 
9 a. m. connect at Port Townsend with steamers 
or Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Orego:*, in connection with 
U. P. R'y Co. every four days. 

For SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San Simeon, 
Cayucos, Santa Barbara, San Buenaventura, 
Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and San 
Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA, ARCATA and HOOKTON, HUM- 
BOLDT Bay, steamer LOS ANGELES, every Wed- 
nesday, at 9 A. M. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

TRAMP — Pleaae, mum, me feet's on th' 
ground ; an' if ye could spare me an old 
pair o' shoes, I'd — 

Mrs. Spinks— There's a wedding going 
on in that big house across the street. Just 
you go ever there and wait. When the 
couple comes out the family will throw a 
lot of the bride's old shoes after her." 

"But, mum, they'd be too small. 

"Huh 1 Wait till you see her feet."— New 
York Weekly. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE DONAHUE 8R0A0-GXU0E ROUTE." 

COMMENCING 8UNDAY, APRIL 24, 1892, and 
until further notice, Boat, and Trains will 
leave from and arrive at the San Francisco Pas- 
senger Depot, MAKKKT8TREET WHABK as 
follows: 
From San Francisco for Point Tlburon, Belvedere and 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:40 a. m., 9:20 A. M., 1120 A at • 

1:30 P.M., 3:80 p. M.,6:05 p. M., 6:20 p. M. 
8UNDAYS-8:00 a.m., 9:80 a.m. ,11 :00 a.m.; 1-30 P.M. 

3:80 P.M.. 500 p. m., 6:16 p. M. 
„,„„ From San Rafael tor San Francisco. 
WEEK DAY8-6:25 a. m., 7:5.5 a. m., 9:80 A M. 

11:30 a. m.: 1:40 p.m., 8:40 p.m., 6:05 p.m. 
SATURDAYS ONLY-An extra trip at 6:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10 A.M., 9:40 a.m., 11:10 a. M.; 1:40 P.M. 
3:40 p. M., 6:00 p M.,6:25 p. M. 

r-rom Point Tlburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS-6:60 a. m., 8:20 a.m., 9:66 A.M., 11:55 
a. m. : 2:05 p. m., 4:06 p. M., 6:86 p. M. 
Saturdays only, au extra trip at 6:55 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:36 a.m., 10:06 A.M., 11:35 a.m.; 
2:05 p. M., 4:05p.m., 6:30p.m., 6:50 P.M. 



Leave 8. F. 




Arrive in 8. F7 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays 


Destination. 


SundayB 


Week 
Days. 


7:40a.m. 
3:80 p.m. 
5:05 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 
9:30 a.m. 
6:00p.m. 


Petaluma 

and 
8anta Rosa. 


10:40 a.m 8:60a.m. 
6:05 P.M 10:30 a.k 
7:26p.m 6:10p.m. 






Fulton. 
Windsor, 
Healdsburg, 
Litton Sprinffs, 
Cloverdale A 
Way Stations. 






8:66a.m. 






7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


7:26p.m. 


10:30a. m 
6:10p.m 








7:40a. m. 


8:00 a.m. 


Hopland 
and Ukiah. 


7:25 p.m. 


6:10p.m. 


7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


8:00a.m. 


Guerneville. 


7:26p.m. 


10:30a.m. 
6:10 p.m. 


7:40 a.m. 
6:06 p.m. 


8:00a.m. 
5:00 p.M 


Sonoma and 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40a.m. 
6:05p.m. 


8:50a.m. 
6:10p.M. 


7:40 a. m 
3:30 p.M 


8:00 a. m 
5:00 p.M 


Sebastopol. | 10:40 a.m 
! 6i06p.m 


10:30am 
6:10 p.M 



StageB connect at Santa Rosa for Mart West 
Springe; at Geyserville for Skaggs SpringB, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelsey ville, Soda Bay, Lakeport and 
Bartlett Springs; at Hopland for Lakeport and 
Bartlett Springs ; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Sara- 
toga Springs, Blue Lakes, Witter Springs, Upper 
Lake, Lakeport, Willitts, Canto, Mendocino City 
Fort Bragg, Westport, Usal, Hydesville and Eu- 

EXCUR8ION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days— To Petaluma, ?1 60; to Santa Rosa, $2 25; to 
Healdsburg, $3 40; to Cloverdale, $4 50; to Hop - 
land, $5 70; to Uklah, $6 75; to Sebastopol, $2 70; 
to Guerneville, $3 75; to Sonoma, $160: to Glen 
Ellen, $1 80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for SundayB only— 
To Petaluma, $1 ; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Healds- 
burg, $2 25; to Cloverdale, $3: to Ukiah, $4 50; to 
Hopland, $3 80; to Sebastopol, $180; to Guerne- 
ville, $2 50; to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1 20. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New Montgomery Street. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. 3. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama wltfr 
Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Saturday, June 25, 1892. 

Belgic Tuesday, July 26, 1892. 

Oceanic (Via Honolulu) Tuesday, August 16, '92 

Gaelic Tuesday, Sept. 6, 1892. 

ROUND TRIP TICKET8 AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend Btreets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, atthe 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San 
Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen.Pass. Agt. 

GEO. H.RICE, Traffic Manager. 



CONSUMPTION. 

I have a positive remedy for the above disease ; by its 
use thousands of cases of the worst kind and of long 
standing have been enrod. Indeed bo strong is my faith 
in its efficacy, that I will send TWO BOTTLES free, with 
a VALUABLE TREATISE on this disease to any suf- 
ferer who will send me their Expree a and P. O. address. 
T. A. Slocnm, III. 0.« 183 Pearl St., N. Y. 



rawweww 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 




AUGUST is looked forward to by our club men witb especial in- 
terest this year, inasmuch as during that month two events of 
more than passing note are named to take place. The midsummer 
jinks of the Bohemian Club will come first, and Cazadero has 
been selected as the locale where they will disport themselves. It 
is hoped that Mr. Fred. Somers will arrive from Honolulu to 
officiate as Sire, in which event it is expected that several novel 
ideas will be introduced by him as features of the celebration. 
Charles Warren 8toddard will contribute a poem. Professor 
Stewart is writing some music to be sung by the club quartette, 
and it is regarded as a dead certainty that the affair will eclipse 
all former gatherings of the kind, here or elsewhere. Towards 
the end of August the Country Club will hold their annual meet, 
at Del Monte, for which preparations are already well under way. 
The programme includes promenade and sacred concerts, the 
music for which will be provided by the Park band and Noah 
Brandt's orchestra; hot suppers, shooting, al fresco lunches, 
dancing, 6reworks. etc., etc., to say nothing of the numberless 
attractions possessed by the hotel and the many other ways of 
enjoying life at that most famed resort. 

A very interesting ceremony took place at Grace Church Cathe- 
dral last Thursdey morning, when William I. Kip, the third, was 
admitted to the deconate of the Episcopal Church. The service, 
in which eighteen clergymen, including Bishops Kip, Wingfield 
and Nichols, took part, commenced with the ordination sermon, 
which was preached by the Rev. E. B. Spalding, of St. John's 
Church, after which the Litany was read by Bishop Wingfield, 
and the communion by Bishop Nichols. The candidate for holy 
orders was then presented by the Rev. Giles Easton and the ven- 
erable grandfather of the newly admitted deacon. Bishop Kip 
bestowed upon him the authority for his office. The church was 
crowded, and the handsome new marble altar was a mass of pure 
white flowers, relieved by green tendrils. The Rev. Mr. Kip will 
remain in San Francisco for the present, where he will undertake 
missionary work. 

The Fourth at San Rafael was a grand success, and the Hotel 
Rafael was literally packed for tbe National holiday. Crowds 
were drawn from far and near to view the tennis contest on Sat- 
urday, and the Flannel Cotillion in the evening was greatly en- 
joyed by all who took part. But it was reserved for Monday to 
witness the most exciting day in the annals of the place. The in- 
terest of all was wrought up to the highest pitch during the strug- 
gle between Taylor and Hubbard; and when at length Taylor 
was declared the victor, enthusiasm ran riot and did not fairly 
cool down the whole night afterwards, Champion Taylor being 
the toast on every lip. The dance in the evening was pleasantly 
varied by vocal and mandolin music. Many of tbe young ladies 
who were visiting cottagers in the village joined the throng at 
the hotel, and looked charmingly in very becoming gowns. 



The recent Eastern announcement of Mr. Charles Bonner's en- 
gagement to Miss Tripp, of Boston, recalls to the memory of 
our older society folk the marriage of his father, Charles Bonner, 
to his mother, who, as Miss Rosa Gore, was one of the most 
popular of San Francisco's early-day belles. She and her sister, 
the first wife of John H. Reddington, the wholesale druggist, 
were a couple of the prettiest women in the society of that period, 
and though of different styles, one being a demi-blonde and the 
other a decided brunette, opinion was divided as to which carried 
off the palm for good looks. Mr. Charles Bonner, Sr., who was a 
mining superintendent on the Comstock, died many years ago, 
and his son, the present Charles Bonner, is a resident of Fresno. 



The past fortnight has been extremely dull in town, the thoughts 
and steps of most of its dwellers tending countrywards in divers 
directions. The Fourth is a thing of the past now, with all its 
noise and uproar, and parents and guardians are turning their 
faces citywards again in anticipation of the school-days which re- 
commence next week. The holiday was made the incentive for 
merry-makings all over the country; balls were given at nearly 
all the principal resorts; country homes were filled with guests 
from town, while everywhere there was festivity in one form or 
another. It is needless to say Del Monte was full to overflowing. 
Both tbe balls were voted successes, and the chic costumes worn 
by the ladies, especially those of recent arrival from the East, 
added greatly to the brilliancy of the ball-room. 



Among the pretty girls wbo spent the national holiday at San 
Rafael, were Miss Agnes Burgin, Miss Nuttall, Miss Helen 
Walker, Miss Holbrooke, Misses Mae and Eleanor Dimond, Miss 
Hillyer, Miss Jennie Sherwood, Miss Ethel Smith, who was the 
guest with Miss Mary McNutt of Mrs. George Boyd, Miss May 
Hoffman and Miss Nellie Jolliffe, who were staying with Miss 
Maud Morrow, Miss Minnie Houghton, and the Misses Lough- 
borough. 



Pretty little St. Peter's Church, on the corner of 6tockton and 
Filbert streets, was looking its prettiest on Wednesday evening of 
last week for the nuptials of Miss Jewel Clark and John E. Sands. 
It was charmingly dressed with flowers and foliage and crowded 
with guests to witness the ceremony, which was performed by 
tbe Rev. Dr. Emery; Miss Alma Wassenberg and Fred Clark 
were bridesmaid and groomsman, and the Rev. Mr. Matthews 
gave the bride into the keeping of her husband. Following the 
service in church, a reception was held at the Clark residence, on 
Lombard street, which was very largely attended. Mr. and Mrs. 
8ands will make their future home in Nevada county. 



The tug Ida If., in charge of sea deacon Captain Dan James, 
noted as a marriage expert on runaway matches outside the 
Heads, started around the bay on the Fourth with a very jolly 
crowd. J. Homer Fritch acted as master of ceremonies, and was 
ably assisted by Captain Jack Roberts, of the steamer Emily, 
Charley McKay, Ned Sutton, H. Hirschler, P. W. Hubbard, and 
others of the party. Sansalito was taken by storm, and the seal 
captured at the Hunters' Resort, and Tiburon visited and livened 
up. A third stop was made at El Campo, where an impromptu 
race was had with the steamer Tiburon to this city. The Ida H*. 
gave the steamer half a mile start and beat her to tbe dock, much 
to the gratification of all on board. 

One of the most enjoyable camps in the woods this summer is 
Camp Alpine, which is charmingly situated on the banks of Bear 
Creek, in the center of a grove of redwoods and oaks, about half 
a mile from the Boulder Creek station. There are fourteen people 
in the party, and they are accommodated in seven large and com- 
fortable tents. The creek affords fine fishing and swimming, and 
the woods give splendid opportunity for enjoyment. The camp- 
ers are Mr. and Mrs. B. N. Rowley, Master H. C. Rowley, Lloyd 
Rowley, Toby Rowley, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. F. Nibchardt, Miss E. 
J. Gallagher, Mr. and Mrs. J. Sankey, Miss May Sankey, Miss 
Florence Sankey, Master Althon Sankey, and Miss Emmons. 



A brilliant home wedding was that of Miss Adele Seller to Mr. 
Ludwig Feigenbaum, at the Seller residence, corner McAllister 
street and Van Ness avenue, last Wednesday evening. A large 
number of intimate friends of the family were present. Rabbi 
Voorsanger performed the ceremony, after which all sat down to 
a sumptuous repast, and the newly-wedded couple were toasted 
in bumpers of wine. Dancing followed, and gaieties were kept 
up until an early hour. The bride is well known in society circles, 
and is a very popular young lady. The groom is a prosperous 
merchant at Rhonerville, Humboldt county. Tbe presents were 
many, beautiful and costly. 



Tbe presence of tbe yachts contributed in no slight degree to tbe 
pleasure of the guests at Santa Cruz on the Fourth, the arrival of 
the victorious Lurlinc causing much rejoicing among the owner's 
friends and admirers there assembled. There were hops, fishing 
parties, germans and delightful lounges on the beach, and the 
thousand and one modes of passing a holiday to one's satisfaction. 
Among holiday visitors to Santa Cruz were Miss Mamie Burling, 
Miss Romie Wallace and Miss Grace Thorne under the chaperon- 
age of Mrs. Luke Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Newton, wbo 
were guests of Mrs. J. Philip Smith at Sunshine Villa, Albert 
Castle, A. L. Gump, etc. 

Tbe little settlement around the village of San Mateo is getting 
quite lively socially. Mrs. H. P. Bowie (at her beautiful quaint 
old homestead) has once again entered the list of entertainers. 
Mrs. Will Crocker has infused new life into the dolce far niente 
existence of the dwellers in that locality, and rumor goes that Mrs. 
A. M. Parrott will soon give a fete champetre to welcome the 
lately returned member of her Tamily from abroad. Mrs. Bowel, 
now that her pretty daughters are blooming into opening buds, 
will no doubt also be beard from socially. The Corbett sisters, 
who as girls were such favorites in society, are spending the sum- 
mer at the family homestead at San Mateo, having since their 
marriage led most domestic lives. 

It may be of interest to those who remember Miss Jenny 
Chamberlain when, with her mother, she spent a winter at tbe 
Palace Hotel, several years ago, and who is now the wife of 
Captain Naylor-Layland, and a resident of London, England, to 
hear that at the recent christening of uer infant son two of the 
sponsors were tbe Duke of York (Prince George of Wales) and 
the Duke of Cambridge, the Commander-in-Chief of the British 
army. 

The only event of much social importance in Oakland during 
the week was the marriage on Thursday evening of Miss Alice 
Evelyn Bayley to Frederick Cheever Torrey. The ceremony 
took place at the Bayley residence, 1,408 Castro street, tbe scene 
of the brilliant garden party a few weeks ago. Elaborate decora- 
tions were placed in all directions to honor the nuptials, and the 
ensemble was very pretty. 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry Gibbons and family have been passing tbe 
last two weeks at Pescadero, but expect to return home on Mon- 
day. 



July 9, 1892. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS I I'lTKi: 



81 



Three pretty new bods birr been added to society parterres by 
the recent arrival. fre»b from school, ol Miss Carrie Taylor. Mm 
Kmlly Carolan and M:<- Ihth Mcltean. all ol whom will he 
among the attractive features at the hops in the Pel Monte ball- 
room during the rest of the season there. Yassar will be repre- 
•anted by Miss Alice JollinV. who will, however, return there to 
complete ber course. 

Next Monday will see a fresh arrival of guests at Del Monte, 
most of whom will remain there during July at least, if not 
longer. Among them will be Mr. and Mrs. Henry Scot:. Miss 
May Scoit. Mr. and Mrs. Austin Tubbs, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Belden. Mrs. D. J. Tallant, Mr. and Mrs. J. 0. B. Guna, Mrs. and 
Mi.. Pierce, Mrs. A. J. Pope, Mr. and Mrs. Frank, Mr. and Mrs. 
Reqoa. 

The wedding of Miss Carrie Xorthey, the charming Oakland 
aoprano, to Jesse E. Douglas, of Omaha, will take place towards 
the close of the month. The service will be performed at the 
Kirn Presbyterian Church, where Miss Northey has long been 
choir-leader. Oakland will suffer a social loss by the nuptials, 
for Mr. and Mrs. Douglas will take up their residence in Omaha. 

John D. Spreckels and party have reached Paris in safety, 
where tbey were by last accounts, but intend doing the continent 
very thoroughly, and are no doubt by this time following the 
programme they laid out, and are en route from Norway to Russia, 
where tbey will spend some time in St. Petersburg. 



It is quite among the possibilities that San Francisco shall 
soon lose one of the oldest of its resident families, in the 
persons of Judge and Mrs. J. D. Thornton, who have been mem- 
bers of society since its very earliest days. They are seriously 
contemplating a return to the South, there to pass the rest of 
their days among relatives and friends in " Old Virginy." 



Lieut. 8trother has gone East under orders, but his absence 
will only be brief, as he returns to the coast almost immediately. 
Our military beaux have been reinforced by the arrival of Lieut. 
Clement Flagler from Willett's Point, New York, and as be is said 
to be an excellent dancer, doubtless he will be in demand at bops 
as soon as society returns to town again. 

The usual hop takes place at the Pacific Yacht Club house at 
Sausalito this evening, and no doubt the moonlight will add 
materially to the pleasure of the sail there and home again. The 
tog Relief leaves Mission-street wharf with the invited guests at 
half-past seven, and the hour for returning from the club-house 
will be quarter-past eleven. 

Joe Tobin, Sam. Neel and C. P. Hubbard left for the East on 
Wednesday, where they intend to show the tennis players of 
that locality what Californians can do with the racquet. They 
will take part in the tournament which begins in Chicago on 
Monday next, and also in the National tournament at Newport, 
next month. 

Mrs. Delmas and her daughter are most delightfully settled for 
the season at Santa Cruz. They occupy one of the largest cot- 
tages in the village, and have their own carriage and riding 
horses. The young ladies are among the most expert swim- 
mers, and are always the centre of an admiring circle when they 
appear upon the beach. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hays Hammond, Miss Bettie Hammond 
Miss Helen Wheeler, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Hume, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Main and their daughter, Mrs. C. P. McDermott, the 
Misses Chabot, Mrs. Gordon Blanding and her young daughter, 
arrived at Del Monte in time to take part in the festivities of the 
Fourth. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. H. de Young have returned from their visit 
to Minneapolis and New York, and are occupying their cottage 
in the vicinity of San Rafael. Col. W. 8 Smedberg is also with 
ns again, having returned from West Point last week. Mrs. Smed- 
berg and Miss Nellie will remain at the East until late in the au- 
tumn. 

Gala times are anticipated at Santa Cruz while the military are 
in camp, and terpsichore will rule as usual. There will be dances 
in camp, hops at the hotels, and Mrs. J. P. Smith has announced 
her intention of giving a ball in honor of General Dimond and his 
staff during encampment week at her pretty Sunshine Villa. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. de Guigne and family were among the ar- 
rivals last week, after an absence of a couple of years in Europe. 
Tbey will occupy their cottage at San Mateo during the rest of 
the summer. Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller will return from their 
European trip about the middle of next month. 

Philip Wooster is another of our young men who has become 
infatuated with life in Mexico, and when he returns there in 
August, it will be with the intention of making it his future 
home. He has been paying his family a visit of late, and ex- 
pects to remain a few weeks longer in California. 



Mr. and Mrs. Boat P/ltion, N. K. Masien and his daughter, 
Mr'- W. A. lliasell and family, Mrs. ('. N. Bhaw, Mrs, I . a 
all, Mlsa May Crowell, Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Towna, Mr., a B 
Baldwin, Miss Fanny Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. II. B. Huntington, 
flr ,, among the guests at Castle Crags. 

The celebration of the one hundred and third anniversary of 
the fall ol the Bastile will be held at Woodward's Gardens, com- 
mencing at 1 :30 p. m. on Thursday, the 14th inst. There will he 
literary exercises, a garden concert and a festival. C. L. P. Marais 
will be President of the Day. 



\V. H. Keith, Jr., of this city, now studying for grand opera in 
Pans, recently met with a serious accident. A horse stepped 
upon Mr. Keith's foot, badly injuring it, crushing some of the 
toes, and making it likely that the consequent lameness may not 
be the affair of a moment. 



Lieut. George M. Storey has been appointed Aid to Admiral 
Irwin, the Commandante at the Navy Yard, Mare Island, and 
will take up bis residence there at once. Mrs. Storey has been 
visiting her brothers, Messrs. William and Harry Babcock, at San 
Rafael. 



Sam. Sbortridge left for Honolulu on a six weeks' trip, which 
includes both business and pleasure, as well as search for health, 
by the steamer Australia, last Wednesday. Mr. and Mrs. Claus 
Spreckels were also among the passengers by the same steamer to 
Honolulu. 



Mr, and Mrs. Moore and Judge Henshaw, of Oakland, were 
among the tourists who sailed for Honolulu by the steamer 
Australia, last Wednesday. They purpose making a tour of the 
Hawaiian Islands, and expect to be absent about six weeks. 

Judge Muphy has departed for Oregon, and intends to spend 
his vacation there and in Washington. Chief Quartermaster J. 
G. Chandler, U. S. A., accompanied by his wife and son, have 
gone to spend a few days at Del Monte. 

Mrs. A. D. Splivalo was given a surprise party last Thursday 
evening, by a number of her friends, who had arranged all the 
details in the most perfect manner. They were well carried out, 
and a very pleasant affair was the result. 

Mrs. Ivers and her daughter, Miss Aileen, C. A. Spreckels and 
family, and Mr. and Mrs. Sylvain Weil are about arriving in the 
haven where they would be, Paris. 



Mr. D. 0. Mills (now known to fame as Whitelaw Reid's 
father-in-law) arrived from New York last Monday, and will re- 
main on the Coast until August, when he will return East in 
time for the New York season. 

Mme. Casinua Etchehome and Miss Leontine Etchehome, who 
have been spending the past two months at San Rafael, have re- 
turned to this city, and will leave to-day for San Jose, where they 
will pass the season. 

Two of society's absent beaux have returned to it again: Jini 
Phelan and Lansing Kellogg are both back from their trip across 
the continent, having reached here in time to enjoy all the gaieties 
of the Fourth at Del Monte. 



Society at San Rafael was made happy last Tuesday by the^ 
arrival of Frank Carolan and his bride from the East. They will 
spend the rest of the season there, with a trip to Del Monte in 
September. . , j: 

Blythedale rejoices in the arrival of Mr. and Mrs. Louis T. 
Monteagle, who have just returned from their Eastern trip, that 
little resort being the usual summer abiding place of this popular 
young couple. 

August is coming to the front as a month for weddings; an- 
other one added to the list will be that of Miss Emeline 
Dumont to Charles E. S. Dunberg, which will be solemnized early 
in the month. 

Dr. and Mrs. Breyfogle had a delightful visit East, but express 
a vast amount of pleasure at again finding themselves upon the 
cool shores of the Pacific, after the heat of the other side of the 
continent. 

On June 30th, Mrs. B. E. Caswell of this city, accompanied by 
Miss Jessie D. Seale of San Francisco, sailed for Europe on the 
Furst Bismarck, to visit Paris, Munich, Berlin and Dresden. 

There was another pretty wedding in Berkeley last week, when 
Miss Hattie Chamberlain was married to Alfred C. Herrick, the 
Rev. Dr. Kimball offici ating. 

Dick Pease and his beautiful wife, her mother, Mrs. R. L. Og- 
den, Mr. and Mrs. Abbott, are spending the summer together at 
Santa Cruz, where they have charming quarters. 

Miss Lilabel Crane has returned to San Francisco, after an ex- 
tended and pleasant visit with friends in Santa Cruz. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1892. 



Walter Hinkle, the assistant District Attorney, and Miss Red- 
ding, the society editor of the Chronicle, will be married to-morrow 
at the residence of the groom's parents in this city. The young 
couple have many friends in this city and throughout the State, 
all of whom will wish them happiness. Mr. Hinkle is one of the 
leading young lawyers of the city. He has displayed great ability 
in his arduous position, and has a brilliant future before him. 
Misa Redding is a charming young lady of far more than usual 
ability. Mr. and Mrs. Hinkle will reside in this city after the 
happy event. 

The monthly tug-boat party and hop of the Pacific Yacht Club 
will take place to-night. The Relief will leave the Mission Street 
Wharf No. 1 at 7 :30 o'clock, sharp ; returning, will leave the Club- 
house wharf at 11:15. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. W. Gibbs spent the week preceding the 
Fourth at Del Monte. Mrs. Robert I. Bowie passed the Fourth 
of July at the Hotel Vendome, 8an Jose. 



Mr. and Mrs. Waring Wilkinson are en route homewards, after 
an extended visit to Europe, and are looked for about the end of 
July at their home in Berkeley. 



Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Hassett, who postponed their contemplated 
Eastern trip until later in the autumn, spent the holidays at the 
Napa White Sulphur Springs. 



Col. Joseph R. Smith, the new Medical Director of this Depart- 
ment, arrived from Los Angeles on Saturday last, and will in 
future reside in San Francisco. 



Mrs. E. L. G. Steele and family and Miss Elsie Bennett have 
gone from Santa Barbara to Coronado, where they spent the 
Fonrth of July. 

Colonel and Mrs. and Miss Otis, of Los Angeles, have been 
spending the week at the Occidental Hotel, after visiting Castle 
Crags tavern. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Highton have returned from Coronado. 
Mrs. Higbton will be in Shasta county during the remainder of 
the season. 



Mrs. Fogarty and the Misses Margaret and Alice Fogarty are 
sojourning in San Rafael, where Mrs. John J. Kelly is their guest. 

The engagement of Misa Emma Durbrow and Spencer Buckbee 
is another of the announcements of the midsummer season. 



Coroner W. T. Garwood's wife and family have been visitors at 
.Etna Springs for several weeks, but will return home to-day. 



Mrs. W. J. Younger and her four daughters sailed from New 
York for Europe by the steamer Augusta Victoria, on Thursday 
last. 



Among recent departures Eastward is Will Ralston, who has 
gone on a visit of official business to Washington City. 

Major Frank Vail has returned from a sojourn in Los Angeles, 
in which he combined business with pleasure. 

Mrs. Wm. Hinckley Taylor spent the holiday week with her 
mother, Mrs. Kittle, at San Rafael. 



Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hubbard are spending a couple of weeks 
at Vichey Springs. 

Dr. C. J. Bucknall is spending a few days at Calistoga and 
Howell Mountain. 



Miss M.R. Moran has returned from a pleasant visit to Cypress 
Lawn. 



Camp While-away, Mill Valley, will not be " at home" during 
July. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Bouvier are at Paso Robles Springs. Mr. 
Bouvier's health is improving. 

Mark Thall left for the East yesterday. 



Burlington Route Excursions. 



Commencing Tuesday, March 15th, at 2 p. m., from Los Angeles, 
and Wednesday, at 8 p. m., from San Francisco, and every Tuesday 
and Wednesday thereafter, the Burlington Route will run "its regular 
Summer Excursions, with Pullman Tourist Sleeping cars, to Chicago, 
via Salt Lake City and Denver. For particulars and excursion folder] 
apply to agent, Burlington Route, at 204 South Spring street, Los 
Angeles; or 32 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

Baggage Notice. 



Round-trip transfer tickets are now on sale at any of our offices at 
reduced rates, viz. : One trunk, round-trip, 50 cents; single trip. 35 
cents. Keep your baggage checks until you reach this city. Morton 
Special Delivery, 17 Geary street, 408 Taylor, Oakland ferry depot. 



THE SULTANS HAREM. 

THE Sultan has of late found it difficult to keep his Imperial 
harems up to their proper strength. The ladies who used to 
be brought in sucb large numbers from the Circasian coast are 
now not to be bad the Cxar having strictly forbidden the traffic, 
but several Circasian families that have migrated into the Turk- 
ish dominions continue to carry on the supply — not in the open 
market, as formerly, but in private houses. The chitf of the Sul- 
tan's eunuchs— the Ki&laaga— has a revenue of about £5,000 a 
year. Among the eunuchs, some of the most important are the 
mussaibs, or conversation tellers, so-called, not for their habit of 
eavesdropping, but because they act as the messengers to convey 
the words of the Sultan to the harem or to bring back to him the 
replies. The total expense of the Sultan's chief harem is over 
half a million a year, but only about £20,000 is employed in pay- 
ing about sevenhundred lady concubines; theo the eunuchs have 
to be paid, aod they muster about five hundred; the other money 
is absorbed in amusements, in which the ladies of the harem in- 
dulge. 

THE California Safe Deposit and Trust Company has declared 
a serai-annual dividend of $1.50 per share, and the First Na- 
tional Bank one of $4 per share, at the rate of 8 per cent, per an- 
num. 

'• Kritiko" reads character from handwriting. Write in ink, in an 
unfeigned hand, on unruled paper. State sex. Send 50 cents 
stamps or postal note. Address " Kritiko," 609 Merchant street, S. F. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Peerless Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Qui jotoa, Arizona 

Notice is hereby given that at a meetiug of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 6th day of July, 1892, an assessment (No 18) of 5 cei ts per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable Immediately in 
United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the company, room 
23, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street. Sao Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
The Eleventh Day of August, 1 892. will be de inqnent. 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 7th day of September, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and txpen- 
ses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ANNUAL MEETING- 

Savage Mining Company. 
The regular annual mee'iug of stockholders in the Savage Mining Com- 
pany will be held on THURSD J.Y, the 21st day of July, 1892, at the oftU-e of 
the company, room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Frsncisco, 
Cal., at the hour of 1 o'clock p.m. Transfer books will close on Monday, 
the ISth of July, 1892, at 3 o'clock p. BE. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 



HARNESS! 



If you want a reliable harness that will stand some service go to a house 
that is staying in the business and has some regard 
for its reputation. 

W. DAVIS & SON, 410 Market Street, San Francisco. 

Are not closing out, and require no white signs to htlp'sell their harness. 
No shaddy leather used. Harnesses from $6 5u a set up. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOB 
PAOIFIO 00A8T, 

123CUiforniaSt..S.F 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 



FOB SALE BY ALL FIBBT-CLA8S 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



CaWpeRS 



Prlc« per Copy, 10 Ont« 



Annuni Subscription, $4. CO 




•M *SS!**** 



ews Better 




Vol XLV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 16, IS 92. 



Number 3. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Frederick 
Marriott, Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran 
eisco. Entered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page 

Editorial Brevities 1 

Leading articles : 
Arrets Bodies of Alieu Forces. 2 
Naming Country Roads . ... 2 

Raisin Growers' Combine 2 

Interfering With Justice 3 

Presidential Speculations 3 

India and the silver Question - 3 
Comment* on Foreign Affairs ... 3 
The San Francisco Yacht Club. .. 4 

The British Elections 5 

Concentration (Poetry) 5 

They Extended Their Sympathy 6 

Paul Schafer's Horse 6 

Columbus Day, October 12, 1892- 

Pleasure's Wand 

A June-time Parable (Poetry) 

His Little Game 10 

To Love (Poetry) 11 

The Illusions of Genius 11 



8-9 
10 



Page 

Sparks 12 

Tennis and Baseball 13 

The Looker-On 14-15 

Financial Review. 16 

Town Crier 17 

Real Property 18 

The Bourse and Underwriter ... 19 

The Library Table 29 

Vanit'es ...21 

World, Flesh and Devil 22 

Held Up (Poetry) 22 

The Rose Jar 23 

Fashions for Men 24 

Extension of Joint Stock Enter 

prise 23 

Scientific and Useful 2fi 

Sunbeams 27 

" Biz "—Summary of the Markets. 26 
Society 30-31-32 



ARTOTYPE-San F ancisco Yacht Club. 



THE Post is offering a gold watch to the most popular police- 
man. Why not add an alarm clock for the drowsiest patrol- 
man in the force? 



AID is asked in behalf of the California Horticultural exhibit at 
the World's Fair. It is a deserving portion of the exposition, 
and every citizen should take sufficient interest in its success to 
contribute to it in some degree. 



DOCTOR JEROME A. HUGHES is prominently mentioned as 
a candidate for Coroner on the Democratic ticket. Dr. Hughes 
would make an excellent official. He has scores of friends in 
the city, and if nominated, would make an excellent showing. 



THE Supervisors could not do a better or more deserving work 
than improving Alamo Square. The square is in an excellent 
location, but in a deplorable condition. It should be improved as 
soon as possible. An appropriation has been made for the work 
and it should be prosecuted. 



DR. COGGSWELL went down hard in his fight for the college 
bearing his name. The eminent doctor is a curious study in 
philanthropy. The collection of strings which he ties to his ben- 
efactions is large and curious, and all the strings are strong; but 
sometimes they break in the tussle, as in this instance. 



THE Burns contingent of the G. 0. P. is about to organize an- 
other club on the lines of the Alliance, from which Jatter or- 
ganization the followers of the gallant Colonel will withdraw 
The local Republican party is about as badly mixed as it can very 
well be. This is the opportunity for the Democracy to take ad- 
vantage of the enemy's distress. 



THE young man who passed a forged note on that veteran finan- 
cier, Asa Fiske, has been held to answer on a charge of forgery 
ahd will be tried in the Superior Court. It is strange that an ad- 
miring community does not do something to show its admiration 
for the enterprising youth who is the only man on record who 
ever got ahead of Fiske in a money transaction. 

THOSE Mexican editors who fought a duel near Puebla, Mexi- 
Cot on Thursday, and fired nine shots at each other without 
doing any injury to either, ought to be intensely ashamed of 
themselves. We presume they are. An editor of a Western 
paper who could not do some execution in nine shots would be 
run out of town as a mental and physical imbecile. One of the 
first requisites for editing a paper in the wild and wooly portion 
of this great Republic is to be able to pot your man at one hun- 
dred yards. A pencil pusher who cannnot do that can never 
succeed west of the Missouri. But eighteen shots without a dropl 



THE Democratic State Central Committee is now well organized 
for the campaign. Max Popper, the recently elected Chair- 
man, has been an ardent worker in the cause of Democracy for 
years, and he is the right man in the right place. Mr. Popper is 
a man of ability, energy, and of unblemished reputation, who 
should give good returns of his stewardship in November. 

THE new bank of Sisson, Crocker & Co. is now in the quarters 
at 322 Pine street, recently vacated by the Crocker, Wool- 
worth Bank, and there it is now prepared to do a general bank- 
ing and exchange business. The establishment has been im- 
proved and so perfected that it now affords facilities to transact 
business on the largest scale. The officers of the bank are- 
George W. Scott, President; W. W. Van Ardsdale, Cashier. The 
Directors are J. H. Strobridge, D. W. Earl, ,T. H. Sisson, F. H. 
Green, J. M. Haven, W. W. Van Ardsdale and George W. Scott. 

THE Republican State Central Committee has decided the local 
fight in the G. 0. P. in favor of the Third street bosses, and at 
present it looks very dubious for the gentlemen affiliated wiih 
that astute little man Ruef. The manner in which Ruef has 
jumped around the circle in the endeavor to place himself has 
been very funny. Just at present he seems to be out in the cold, 
while the little Napoleon and his friend Ketley rule the roost. The 
next move is for Burns, Ruef and their followers to organize a 
separate organization and put up an independent Republican 
tieket. 



WITH the decease of Newton Booth, who died at Sacramento 
on Thursday evening, a prominent figure passes from the 
arena of California political life. Aa State Senator, Governor and 
United States Senator from California, Mr. Booth distinguished 
himself by all those characteristics ;which go to make up a suc- 
cessful man. He was a native of Indiana, sixty-seven years old, 
and came to this State in 1850, settling in Sacramento, where he 
became a merchant. In 1863 he went to the State Senate, and 
eight years later became Governor, after a very exciting cam- 
paign. On February 27, 1875, he resigned the office of Chief 
Executive of the State, to accept that of United States Senator, to 
which he had been elected to succeed Eugene Casserly. Mr. 
Booth's death was caused directly by "a hemorrhage. He had 
suffered some time from a cancer of the tongue. 



THE peculiarities of the manner of assessing real property in 
this city and county are beyond the ken of any man except 
Assessor Siebe. A case in point ie the assessment fixed upon two 
irregular shaped lots fronting on Grattan street, in the Meyer 
Nursery Tract. These lots have been assessed at $420 each. A 
smaller piece of land, without street frontage, bought of the Mar- 
ket and Stanyan Company, and adjoining the irregular lots in 
the rear, has been assessed for $1,000. The objectof its purchase 
by the owner of the two irregular lots was to give his property a 
straight line in the rear. From this assessment, it appears that 
the rear half of the property, without frontage, is worth $160 
more than the front half, which has frontage. As the matter 
now stands, the property is assessed for $1,840. It was pur- 
chased only a short while ago for $1,300. In what manner As- 
sessor Siebe can justify such an assessment as this, is something 
that property-owners are interested in finding out. 



THERE is much dissatisfaction amoDg the property-owners on 
Green street, between Joaes and Leavenworth, on account of 
an order recently passed by the Supervisors, directing that a main 
sewer be placed in the block named. This action was taken on 
the petition of a Mr. Nordwell, who recently moved his hou?e 
upon the block. The block is the highest portion of Russian 
Hill, and the houses are about ten feet below the grade, which 
was established some time after most of the buildings had been 
erected. As the hill slopes on one side of the block to Vallejo 
street, and on the .other side to Union street, the house sewers 
run to the mains in those streets, the natural drainage thus being 
used to advantage. Nordwell's house is the only one not 
connected with a main sewer. To connect his place, 
he would have to run a short line to Jones street, yet 
all the property-owners on the block are to be assessed for the 
building of an unnecessary sewer, simply for one man's accom- 
modation. It is a gross imposition, and should not be allowed 
by the Supervisors. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 16, 1892. 



NAMING COUNTRY ROADS. 

MUCH interest is being taken throughout the country in what 
is known as the Contra Costa plan of naming country roads. 
The system is the invention of Mr. A. L. Bancroft, of this city, 
and is one of the simplest and best schemes ever devised for 
locating houses in the country. Now for the system itself. The 
roads are first named; not a different one for every town that is 
passed, but in as long lengths as practicable. Half a dozen dif- 
ferent names might be given to the highway, for instance, but a 
single one is much better. In selecting names for roads the name 
of either terminus is not chosen, because while going towards a 
town a road bearing the name of the town might be appropriate, 
when going in the opposite direction it would not be so. The 
possessive case is avoided in road names. It is not likely to be 
carefully and correctly written, and does not look well. The 
names should be selected from some landscape feature, some his- 
torical association, Indian names, historical characters, etc. Only 
those are taken which are easy to spell and to pronounce, and 
which would be unobjectionable to all. The arrangement of the 
roads in the list is commencing at the north, they go to the east, 
south, west and back again to the north. By keeping this in 
mind one will know where to look for the name desired. The 
roads, and the numbers upon them, commence at the county 
seat, or at the end nearest to it. They are measured and blocked 
off, ten imaginary blocks to the mile. These blocks have 
only frontage, not depth nor thickness. This makes the 
length of each block 528 feet, 176 yards, 32 rods, or 8 chains. 
Two numbers are assigned to each block; the odd ones upon the 
left and the even ones upon the right. It makes no difference 
whether the block has an entrance upon it or not, the number 
is assigned, just the same, and it is always available should a 
building be erected. Each house has the number of the block 
upon which the entrance is located. The second and all succeed- 
ing houses have the same number, but followed by a distinguish- 
ing letter, 426, 426a, 426b, etc. The numbers indicate distances 
from the commencement of the road, which can be very quickly 
ascertained by a short mental calculation, and any school child 
who understands decimal fractions will have no difficulty in do- 
ing so. As there are two numbers to each block, divide the 
house number by two, which will give the number of blocks 
from the starting point. As there are ten blocks to the mile, di- 
vide this result by ten, or point off one decimal, and the distance 
in miles and tenths is shown. There being two numbers to each 
block, if a house number is odd, one should be added to it in or- 
der to complete the block before calculating the distance. For 
instance, house No. 685 is the same distance from the starting 
point as 686, just opposite, so to calculate the distance of 685, 
add one. making it 686; divide by two, or half it, making 343; 
divide again by ten, or point off one figure, and we have 34.3 — 
that is in common fractions 34 310 miles from the begin- 
ning of the road. A little practice will enable any 
one to make this calculation very quickly and easily. 
When the fences are in good condition and are suitable, a line 
will be placed, showing the division between the blocks, with the 
block number upon each side of it. As you face the numbers 
from the road, those upon the left would read, for instance. 127 — 
129, and upon turning to the right they would read, 130—128. 
This brings 128 opposite 127, and 130 opposite 129. At the end of 
each complete mile, where practicable, as a reminder, the same 
as a mile stone, a complete circle wdl be placed. Make one on a 
piece of paper and see how it looks. Inside of the circle will be 
a cross like a letter X laid on Upside. Make the X in the circle. 
At the half-miles a half circle with half of the X will be made. 
The X will indicate the ten blocks, and when it is divided and but 
half of it taken, it becomes a V, and indicates half of the ten, or 
five blocks; half a mile. Draw a line through the complete circle, 
divide it and the X, and see how it looks now. By having the 
full circle blue and the half-circle red, a glance will distinguish 
them. This process of numbering county roads is now being in- 
troduced in Contra Costa. It is an excellent idea, and will 
doubtless be generally followed throughout the country. 



WE hail with much gratification the announcement that Con- 
gress is about to investigate the manner in which the Eighth 
and Mission streets lot was recommended favorably for the Post- 
office Site. It was certainly a most remarkable action on the 
part of the Goverment officials. Notwithstanding the protests 
made against the site by every paper in the city; notwithstand. 
ing allegations of fraud in connection with the affair, and not- 
withstanding the adverse report of the special agent of the Treas- 
ury sent here to look into the matter, Mr. Wanamaker recom- 
mended the acceptance of the site. Something interesting should 
develope in the course of an inquiry of the reason that a piece of 
property valued at about $700,000 or $S00,000, should be rated at 
$1,500,000, simply because the Government was to be the pur- 
chaser. The ring interested in the transaction may find matters 
becoming very warm for them before the investigation is con- 
cluded. That honest motives did not animate the recommenda- 
tion of the Postoffice Site there is no doubt. 



ARMED BODIES OF ALIEN FORCES. 

RECENT events have directed the attention of thinking men to 
the fact that in this country there are numerous armed bodies 
of men, organized and drilled as military companies, which as 
such owe no allegiance to the Government, and which parade 
under alien flags The military organizations formed by citizens 
of foreign birth, to keep alive the remembrance of the fatherland; 
the armies, such as the Pinkertons, which are at the orders of 
corporations, and the battalions of workmen and anarchists, 
banded together for whatever purpose they may see fit to ac- 
complish, are three great dangers to the autonomy of the Govern- 
ment which should be at once removed. The constitution gives 
every citizen the right to bear arms, but nowhere is the cloak of 
the law cast upon those bodies of men who form themselves into 
independent military commands for their own purposes. To sat- 
isfy the desires of all citizens who wish affiliation with a military 
life, and who at the same time are animated by a spirit of patriot- 
ism, the National Guard was organized, and is sustained by State 
and Federal aid. The members of the National Guard take an 
oath of allegiance to the Government, and swear to uphold its 
laws. They are under the command of the Governor of the 
State, and can be called on by him to protect the 
lives or property of citizens. But what of the various 
independent companies ? True, some of them may offer 
their services when needed; many, doubtless, would gladly 
volunteer to uphold the State, but all cannot be depended 
on. And therein, in time of trouble, would be the danger of hav- 
ing in our midst armed bodies of trained men who may become 
enemies of the republic. The opinion is rapidly spreading, and 
with increasing force, among men who appreciate the breadth of 
the anarchistic feeling among the lower classses throughout the 
country, that in no State should there be allowed any armed 
bodies, except the proper Federal, State or Municipal forces, each 
member of whom has taken an oath to support the laws. A 
recent dispatch from Chicago states that the Secretary of State 
of Illinois has granted permission to the Carpenter's Union, an 
association of 3,500 members, to organize armed military com- 
panies. Such an army would be an ever increasing source of 
danger. The dispatch is hardly to be believed, for it does not 
seem probable that the establishment of such an army 
ihould be allowed in Chicago, which, of all cities, has suf- 
fered severely from labor troubles. Liberty of action, speech and 
ideas is all well enough, but when that liberty as practiced be- 
comes dangerous to the government, it is time that it should be 
curtailed. 



RAISIN GROWERS' COMBINE. 



FROM present appearances the efforts of the raisin growers 
throughout the State to form a combination to protect them- 
selves against a repetition of the experience of a year ago bid 
fair to be rewarded with success. This movement appropriately 
originated at Fresno, the center of this industry, and those who 
inaugurated it prepared circulars which were sent to every raisin 
grower in California whose address could be learned, explaining 
the object of the proposed combination and pointing out its ad- 
vantages. Besides sending out the circulars inviting the co-opera- 
tion of the growers, a personal canvas was undertaken in the 
largest raisin-producing localities, and here a practical unanimity 
of sentiment was found to exist. Without exception, so far as 
reported, the raisin growers have declared their willingness to 
enter into the agreement that is proposed, and which binds them 
not to sell tbeir fruit to the packers for less than a certain fixed 
price, to be hereafter determined upon. While not definitely 
settled still there appears to be a tacit understanding that the 
rates to be demanded shall be not more than 5 to 5£ 
cents a pound in the sweat-box for the best grades and 
proportionately lower prices for fruit of poorer quality. Cer- 
tainly no one can reasonably claim that the demands of the pro- 
ducers are unreasonable. At the rates mentioned no more than a 
decent living profit is afforded the grower in return for his labor, 
investment and risk. Between these figures and those paid by 
the consumer lies a margin sufficiently large to enable the packers 
and dealers to pay all expenses and still be well rewarded for 
their share of the labor and risk. No fair-minded^man can find 
any reasonable ground for objection against such a combination 
as the one proposed. While it has for its object, it is true, the 
advancement of prices in this particular commodity, yet it is not 
at all likely that the consumer will suffer inconsequence. In the 
past California raisins have retailed in the East for from three to 
six times the price realized by the producer, and the amount that 
finds its way into the pockets of the intermediaries may well be 
reduced in order that the producer may realize at least a fair re- 
turn for his investment and risk. 



THE French dynamiter, Ravachol, has finally met his fate and 
has been executed. This is of course gratifying, for the sake 
of social order. But the secrecy of the trial, as well as of the ex- 
ecution, does not redound to the credit of the French authorities, 
since it gives almost the impression as if they were afraid to 
do an act of common justice. 



July 16. 1892. 



PAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKB 



PRESIDENTIAL SPECULATIONS. 



THK campaign just opening will in some respects be the moat 
surprising the country has ever seen. It will undoubtedly 
witness the breaking up of old political lines, and unless all signs 
fail, there will be a tremendous shaking up about November. It 
is quite certain that the fight cannot be conducted upon old lines, 
and the Republican? were the tir>t to note this fact, when they 
elected Campbell, of Illinois, chairman of their National Commit- 
We. Never in the history of the country have party lines rested 
so lightly on the people as they do now. The apathy of the peo- 
ple is the surest indication of the breaking up that is portending. 
Preceding all great political revolutions such a state of the public 
mind has been noted. This was especially true in 1861. As men 
then arrayed themselves against the tyranny of slavery, so now 
they are arrayi.ig themselves against the tyranny of an oppres- 
sive tax. imposed under the guise of protection. Then the South 
and West work wonderfully well together. Both sections are in 
the development stage, and tneir needs are identical. The Vir- 
ginias and the Carolinas are in a quiet revolt. Tennessee and 
Kentucky are restless, and even Georgia is not by any means 
content. All lh*»se States, save, perhaps, West Virginia and North 
Carolinia. will, however, remain true to the Democracy. The 
negro problem cements the South, and will hold it safely to its 
ancient political moorings. There is no social problem to bind 
the West to the Republican party. Colorado, Montana, Idado and 
Nevada are already in revolt, openly and defiantly. It is the 
roost dangerous revolt that has yet occurred in the Republican 
party, and there does not appear to be any way of pacifying the 
malcontents. It has taken the shape of an independent move- 
ment, and promises to wrest these four States from the Republi- 
cans and turn them over to the People's party. The same move- 
ment is in motion in Washington, where the farmers of thegreat 
Palouse valley threaten to turn the new State over to the Peo- 
ple's party, by the aid of the disaffected Republicans. There is 
scarcely any doubt that the People's party or the Democracy will 
carry Kansas and Nebraska. Michigan will probably be kept in 
line by the money and personal influence of General Alger, but 
Wisconsin and Illinois are as certain to cast their electoral votes 
for Cleveland as Alabama or Texas. In these two States a pecu- 
liar condition exists. First, there is a discontent over the condi- 
tion of trade, and the uprising of the Lutherans against the anti- 
parochial school laws has become quite serious. In Illinois 
20,000 members of this very stubborn religious body, all voters, 
have withdrawn from the Republican party and publicly taken a 
position hostile to that party. Tbey have been deceived by 
promises so often that they will not be cajoled that way again. 
In Wisconsin the school question is also an important factor in 
the campaign. The Dakotas are not by any means safe to the 
Republicans, and Indiana is as doubtful as New York. In all 
these threatened changes the Democracy would seem to be the 
residuary legatee. This is in a degree as real as it is apparent. 
Its chances of carrying Kansas, Nebraska, the Dakotas, Wiscon- 
sin and Illinois are excellent. Never was the Democracy as con- 
fident of carrying California as it is now, and with cause. 



INTERFERING WITH JUSTICE. 

A COMMITTEE of ladies, representing the association known as 
the Daughters of the Good Shepherd, have busied themselves 
during the week endeavoring to block the wheels of justice and 
to prevent the working of the sentence of the outraged law upon 
a convicted murderer. These ladies are soliciting signatures to a 
petition to Governor Markham asking him to commute the 
sentence of McNulty to imprisonment for life. Such pun- 
ishment as that to which he has been condemned is the only 
expiation which the law allows, and with it the Governor of the 
State will not interfere. He killed a man over two years ago, 
was arrested, tried for murder, was convicted and condemned to 
death. He had a fair and impartial trial before twelve honest 
men, who carefully weighed all the evidence in the matter and 
adjudged the defendant guilty of the awful crime of which he was 
accused; and the judgment of the law and the sentence of the 
court was that he shall be hanged by the neck until he is dead. 
Far be it from us to interfere with any movement in behalf of a 
man unjustly convicted or condemned to excessive punishment. 
But no such allegations can be upheld in this case. Why should 
we make laws in defense of life and property, if we do not up- 
hold them ? A number of citizens have signed the petition cir- 
culated by the ladies referred to, and it is said that several of the 
jurors have also. Those jurors who have signed the petition 
surely cannot be good citizens. If tbey found McNulty guilty 
and condemned him, believing him innocent, then they should 
go to jail, for they were false to their trust. If they believed be 
should be executed for his crime, and so adjudged when the evi- 
dence was fresh in their minds and the case was clear before 
them, and they now ask for a commutation of sentence, they 
evidence an unmanly weakness. Some of the signatures to this 
petition have been given by merchants who placed their names 
on the paper rather than argue the matter with those who pre- 
sented it. All these things should be carefully considered by 
Governor Markham, to the end that the law shall be upheld. 




Til E official organ of the German Empire, Ihe Beich$an 
published a paragraph last week declaring that the utterances 
attributed to Prince Bismarck are not of such practical value as 
to induce the government to concern itself with them. This 
statement seems rather absurd, in view of the fact that for the 
last few days quite a number of official and semi-official commu- 
nications have appeared in the German press, indicating that 
the government is preparing for an active struggle with the Ger- 
man ex-Chancellor. It has even been intimated that Count Ca- 
privi. at the instigation of his royal master, has the intention of 
anticipating eventual revelations of Prince Bismarck by publish- 
ing the government version of the causes which led to the ex-Chan- 
cellor's dismissal. Whether this is so or not remains to be seen; 
at all events, it is clear that Emperor Widiam fully recognizes 
the practical importance of Prince Bismarck's recent altitude. 

THE Gladstonian campaign orators, during the last few days 
have rivalled in reviling Mr. Balfour's late administration of 
Ireland, and in declaring that during his Secretaryship the condi- 
tion of the country had grown more deplorable from day to day. 
Facts, however, speak louder than words, and nothing shows 
more the absurdity and injustice of such statements than the fact 
that ever since Mr. Balfour went to Ireland, the number of emi- 
grants had been decreasing. Statistical tables show that in 1887 
the number of Irish emigrants was 82,923; in 1888, 78,684; in 
1889, 70,477; in 1890, 61,313, and last year emigration sank to 
the figure of 59,623. These numbers become even more signifi- 
cant when it is stated that after Mr. Gladstone came into power 
in 1880, the emigration rose immediately to 95,517, and in 1883 
had reached the figure of 108,724. Comments are quite unneces- 
sary. 

ARABI PACHA continues to bewailhis fate in being obliged to 
remain in exile in Ceylon under the guard of the British au- 
thorities, and desires to give the impression that he is most cruelly 
treated by England. He seems to have entirely forgotten that he 
and his comrades would have been executed after the miscar- 
riage of the rebellion had not the British Government interfered, 
and that they owe their very heads to British influence. 



T 1 



INDIA AND THE SILVER QUESTION. 

IHE cause of the consent of England to take part in the Bimet- 
1 allist Conference, at the invitation of President Harrison, is 
apparently somewhat misunderstood in this country, for many 
people seem to imagine that the English Government has really 
changed its former opinions with regard to the double standard. 
The fact, however, is that the hesitating consent of Lord Salisbury 
is due mainly to the pressure exercised upon his cabinet by the 
Indian officials, and that it would have been impolitic at the 
present moment not to show at least an apparent inclination to 
consider their grievances. The period immediately preceding a 
general election is not the time to give offense by undue stub- 
bornness to a considerable part of the population that sympathizes 
with the employees in the Indian civil and military service, and 
the Premier, by declaring that Great Britain will be represented 
during the international discussion of the silver question, has 
given the impression that the Home Government will do all in 
its power to give assistance to the government of India. The 
latter has the support of a majority of the members of all the 
British chambers of commerce, which are at this moment rather 
anxious and depressed, in its demand to increase the use of sil- 
ver in the currency of nations. The prolonged depreciation of 
the Indian rupee has proved to be an enormous hardship 
to the Indian officials, since, in consequence of it, their salary is 
reduced from 30 to 35 per cent, below the amount which it 
nominally should represent. During the last fifteen years the 
rupee has fallen in value from 2 shillings to Is. 3d., which is 
a loss that must greatly embarrass the employees of 
the Government who have to incur large expenses, es- 
pecially if they want to give their children an education in the 
mother country, and maintain there those members of their fami- 
lies for whom the trying Indian climate is too dangerous. In 
England their money has, as is seen from the above, only about 
half of its nominal value, and the government ought to do some- 
thing to protect them against such a loss. The feeling of dissatis- 
faction with this state of affairs is naturally very great, and Lord 
Salisbury could not afford to disregard it by refusing to at least 
make an effort of assisting the experiment of raising the silver 
value, whatever his opinion about the real result of such an ex- 
p rriment may be. 

THE story of the finding of Noah's ark is recalled by that told 
by an Oakland man, who says he has in his possesion the 
hand of Lot's wife, which he bought from an old Jew on the 
shores of the Dead Sea for $500. This story, however, should be 
taken with a grain of salt. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO YACHT CLUB. 



WHEN yachting first commenced in the bay of San Francisco 
in the "fifties," the boats nsed were mainly small sloops 
and plunders, or cat-boats which bad been brought here from the 
East on ships' decks. The boats were usually of the << skimming- 
dish " type, so prevalent in New York waters in those days, of 
very light draught, wide beam and with large sails. It was soon 
found that the sails had to be cut down to fit the prevailing 
strong winds, and then in course of time the boats were improved, 
and the new ones built were deeper and more able crafts in every 
way. It was not until about 186S that there was any talk of 
organizing a yacht club to which the few real yachts could be- 
long. Most of the boats which had been in the races were those 
which were commonly in trade, as small carriers or boatmen's 
craft. But about that date there was a movement inaugurated to 
start a club. The club was organized, and a club house built on 
Long Bridge, Mission Bay, and 0. H. Piatt was elected Commo- 
dore, with W. H. Davis as Secretary. In August, 1869, the first 
real yacht regatta ever held in this bay was sailed. In that race 
the winning yacht, the Emerald, was sailed by her owner, John 
L. Eckley; the Peerless, owned by Commodore R. L. Ogden, was 
sailed by Captain Edwin Moody; the Minnie, by Dr. J. C. Tucker; 
the Lotus, by Charles G. Yale; the Raven, by Henry Howard, 
and the Virgin, by Mr. "Williams. Commodore Piatt took the 
members out to see the race in his steam yacht Amelia. Commo- 
dore Odgen succeeded Commodore Piatt in office, and Henry G. 
Langley became Secretary. After that race, yachting was fairly 
inaugurated here, and club life commenced. The fleet was not 
large, and many supposed, when they joined the club, that the 
boats were "free for all." But this was a mistake, and by-and- 
by the yacht-owners began to cease using the club house, and the 
members stopped coming, too. Then the railroad company 
wanted the wharf where the club bouse was, and finally the club 
dropped out of sight for a time. About 1874, a reorganization of 
the club was perfected, new officers were elected, and the club 
prospered. R. L. Ogden was elected Commodore, and after him 
Commodore C. H. Harrison, the latter gentleman holding the 
office for a number of years. When the club was reorganized, 
Charles G. Yale was elected Secretary, and held the office con- 
tinuously for some sixteen years, Franklin Bangs, Henry Under- 
bill, Solon Williams and Charles Kellogg in turn served as Treas- 
urer. The reorganized club had no headquarters, and after a 
time it was decided to build. The question of point of location 
brought about a disagreement, which resulted in the formation of 
the Pacific Yacht Club, and both clubs built houses at the points 
wbere they still stand. The San Francisco Yacht Club made a 
mistake in its earlier history in taking in too many life members; 
a mistake, by the way, which was repeated by the Pacifies with 
equally disastrous results. Both clubs had to reorganize, and stop 
the life membership plan. The San Francisco Yacht Club has 
always had a reputation among the yacht clubs of this country 
as one in which the members knew how to sail their own boats, 
and did sail them. It never was merely an ornamental organiza- 
tion, formed for the members to frequent a club house, but all 
hands entered the regattas, went on the cruises, and did actual 
sailing. Tbe brass button and uniform feature never made much 
show with the boys who gave the club its reputation. They 
were yacht-sailors, and all the officers were yacht owners and 
yacht sailors. There are now very few of the original members 
left on the roll of the present club, though there are some who 
still retain their membership. Several of the old members have 
been elected to honorary membership in consideration of earlier 
services to the club. This club, as the pioneer of the yachting 
organizations of the bay, started the regattas and cruises, meas- 
ured and laid out the courses for racing, got up the tables of dis- 
tances, the signal code, and all that which the more recent clubs 
follow. It was in this club that the mosquito regattas originated, 
in which all sorts of small sailing craft entered — fishermen, 
whitehalls, ships' boats, yachts, etc. These were very popular 
annual races for many years, but of late no one seems to have 
interested himself sufficiently to start them up. Most of the old 
members of this club before its reorganization will remember the 
famous clam-bake at Sausalito. All the yachts were placed at 
tbe members' disposal, and Commodore Harrison had charge of a 
steamboat which towed the fleet to Sausalito to tbe clam-bake. 
It was a great day, but when the bills came in they swamped the 
club. The blow was one from which the club did not recover, 
and it was directly due to this that it languished several years, 
until new blood came in. The club house has always been rather 
expensive to maintain, and some years it has been a hard rub to 
pull through. But within the past two or three years the club 
has again got a new lease of life, and is a prosperous organiza- 
tion. 

The present home of the club, at Sausalito, is shown on the 
picture issued with this week's News Letter. The club-house is 
easily accessible, being but a short walk from the ferry landing. 
It is in charge of "Charlie" Dexter, who is as valuable au ad- 
junct to this club as the club-house itself. The club house is 
comfortably fitted up. There is a large room for small boats, a 
large assembly room, off of which is a ladies' retiring room and 
the directors' room, a wine room and buffet, and the galley. The 



walls are adorned with pictures of yachts and vessels of historic 
interest. Steps lead from the porch and from the boat-house to a 
commodious float; if necessary yachts can come alongside the 
wharf. The club entertains lavishly, and all its affairs are well at- 
tended. Tbe fleet is very large, among the vessels being the schoon- 
er Chispa, belonging to Commodore I, Gutte; the Lurline, belonging 
to the J. D. and A. B. Spreckels; the Jessie, belonging to ex-Com- 
modore J. Macdonough; William Lacey's Penelope, ex-Commodore 
Wm. N. McCarthy's Ramona, C.Chittenden's White Wings, E. W. 
Newhall's Virginia, C. S. and A. H. Wieland and Captain Harry 
White's Aggie. The yawls are Frolic, belonging to ex-Commodore 
C. H. Harrison; the Emeralda, belonging to W. Letts Oliver, and 
W. H. Shelley's Seven Bells. The sloops are L. B. Thomas and E. 
A. Engleberg's Sappho, Hancock Banning's La Paloma, J. W. 
Pew's Truant, C. H Morrell's Helpless, Dr. Taos' H. Hill's Grade, 
E. A. Von Schmidt's Cyclone, Davidson Bros.' Folly, the Pilgrim 
and the Minnie. The launches are E. C. Bartlett's Gypsy, B. W. 
Stickuey's Nemo, John Lee's Bob, the Edivinna and several others. 

Commodore I. Gutte's Chispa is one of the oldest and fastest 
yachts on the bay. She flies the championship pennant and has 
never been beaten. Commodore Gutte entertains lavishly, and 
his boat has carried many a gay crowd of friends. The Chispa 
is comfortably fitted up and has two commodious staterooms, a 
large cabin, galley and berths for the crew. Commodore Gutte is 
one of the old-time yachtsmen, and it is because of such enthu- 
siasts as he that yachting has maintained local prestige and that 
the club is so popular. He has been Commodore of the club for 
several years, and is popular among all the members. 

The Ramona is one of the new yachts, being only a little over a 
year old. Her owner, ex-Commodore Wm. N. McCarthy, takes 
great interest in yachting, and much pride in his boat. He has 
sailed a3 far south as San Diego, and his boat is in constant use 
for himself and friends. The Ramona is 68.6 feet long, 15 feet 
beam, and 8£ feet draught. She has a large cabin, four state- 
rooms, a galley and forward bunks for the crew. The state- 
rooms are comfortable, and fitted with every convenience, and 
the panels of the cabin and galley-wall are decorated with fine 
miniature oil paintings by French masters, which Mr. McCarthy 
secured in Europe. He is a generous host, and a sail on the Ra- 
mona is an event not to be forgotten. Mr. McCarthy is a zealous 
member of the club, and has done much to stimulate the interest 
being taken in yachting. 

The Sappho, owned by E. A. Engelberg and L. B. Thomas, is 
one of the prettiest boats in the fleet, and has the record for mak- 
ing the fastest trip from San Francisco to San Diego, the time be- 
ing three days, five hours. She is kept busy all the year round, 
and her owners being both popular young men, have many 
friends who enjoy the pleasure of a yacht cruise. The Sappho is 
elegantly appointed. Her dimensions are: Length, 46 feet; water 
line, 40.6 feet; beam, 15 feet; draught, 5 feet. She has two state- 
rooms, a large cabin, galley, etc., and her interior is finished with 
a pretty design in lincrusta walton. 

Dr. T. H. Hill, the owner of the twenty-seven-foot sloop yacht 
Grade, is an enthusiastic believer in small yachts and sailing 
them, thinking, with a great many others, that more pleasure 
can be had in carefully managing a small boat and doing the en- 
tire work about such a craft, than to simply sit at the wheel and 
follow the directions of a sailing-master. Dr. Hill's experience 
on the bay has been only during the past three years, his first 
boat being the twenty-five-foot sloop Never Sink. At the begin- 
ning of this season he bought and put into commission the Grade, 
and is quite prepared to sail her against any boat of her size in 
the club. The last cruise of the Grade was up the Sacramento 
river, starting on June 11th, and returning on the 19th, going as 
far as Walnut Grove. 

The Jessie, owned by ex-Commodore J. Macdonough, and the 
Aggie, owned by Charles S. and Albert G. Wieland and Captain 
Harry White, have been described before in these columns. They 
are both magnificent boats, and their owners are well known for 
their hospitality and generosity. It may be said here that there 
is a question as to which is the faster boat, which no doubt will be 
settled by a match-race. 

Isadore Gutte is the Commodore of the club, and has been at 
different times for many years past. He has guided the affairs of 
the club with marked success and is as popular with outsiders 
as he is with the members. R. A. Eddy is Vice Commodore. 
George W. Reed is Secretary. Mr. Reed is a well-known amateur 
photographer, and several of the pictures on the souvenir are 
from his negatives. He makes an efficient and courteous officer. 
Charles H. Morrell is the Financial Secretary. He is a very pop- 
ular official, and owns the yacht Helpless. Charles L. Barrett is 
Treasurer, and has shown himself to be a competent officer. He 
takes great interest in the club's affairs. Matthew Turner, the 
well-known shipbuilder, is the Measurer of the club, and baa 
been for several years, which fact proves his popularity. The 
Directors, J. Macdonough, William McCarthy, Ben W. Stickney 
Mora M. Barrett and E. C. Bartlett, are all popular with the club 
members, and labor earnestly for the club's interests. 



"Brown's Bronchial Troclies" are widely known as an admirable 
remedy for Bronchitis, Hoarseness, Coughs, and Throat Troubles. Sold 
only in boxes. 



July 16. 1892. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE BRITISH ELECTIONS. 

ALTHOUG I{ the final lesulu of the general elections in Eng- 
land ij not yet known, the polling so far baa shown that the 
statement §o often repeated in the News Lrttkr, namely, that 
Mr. Gladstone has lost all his hold upon those of his compatriots 
who desire the welfare of their country, is absolutely correct. 
There is not the slightest cbance any longer that be will obtain a 
majority in tbe House of Commons without the assistance of the 
Irish members, and there is a strong probability that even with 
the vntes of the Irish representatives be will be in the minority. 
Now. let us suppose that Mr. Gladstone's supporters among the 
English and 8cotch members are able to defeat tbe govern- 
ment if Parnellites and anti-Parnellites together vote on their 
side, can Mr. Gladstone then honorably take upon himself the 
task of introducing a home-rule bill? Certainly not. If he has 
the slightest self-respect he must abstain from doing so. He once 
called himself " an old parliamentary hand," thus indicating that 
he knows all the tricks of " politicians," and unfortunately he 
has proved on more than one occasion that he is not above them, 
yet be cannot introduce a home-rule bill without a majority in- 
dependent of tbe Irish members, provided he does not want to 
"swallow his own words" in the fullest sense of the terra. 

It is not easy for any one on this side of the Atlantic to form a 
correct opinion of Mr. Gladstone if he relies for his information 
upon the telegrams sent here by the correspondents of our daily 
contemporaries, for the greater number of them are colored to 
suit the Irish readers and adapted to the general taste. Those 
however, who have been present in England during the last few 
years will have carried away a very different opinion of the 
"grand old man" than that which they are accustomed to see in 
our daily press. The grandeur is all gone in reality and little 
remains of the old idol. Mr. Gladstone has stooped to do so many 
things of late, in order to regain his power, that it would not be 
astonishing to see him hungry for office even with an English- 
Scottish minority, but it would be a pity if he really should fall 
so deeply. What such an effort would mean may be judged from 
the following words which we quote from a speech delivered by 
him in November, 1885; » If tbe Liberal party was in a position 
where it was only a minority, dependent on the Irish vote for 
converting it into a majority, I tell you sincerely and solemnly 
that although I believe the liberal party itself to be honorable, 
patriotic, sound and trustworthy, yet in such a position as that 
it would not be trustworthy. In such a position as that it would 
not be safe for it to enter upon the consideration of the principle 
of a measure with respect to which, at every step of its progress, 
It would be in the power of a party coming from Ireland to say, 
* Unless you do this or that we will turn you out to-morrow.' " 
We ask once more, can Mr. Gladstone now, provided that the 
contingency of which he then spoke arrives — and that is the only 
thing which the Liberals can hope for even in the best case — 
venture to introduce a home-rule bill? We say emphatically, No. 
The Liberal party, to use Mr. Gladstone's own words, cannot be 
trusted in such a case, nor could the safety of the United King- 
dom be entrusted to him. For England's welfare may it be hoped 
that his defeat at this election will be strong enough not to lead 
him into temptation. 



IT is said that there are so many Smiths in Chicago that the di- 
rectory men are all going crazy in their efforts to get their pro- 
nomina and cognomina — or words to that effect. It is in order to 
suggest to the innumerable Smith family that a little change of 
spelling would facilitate matters. What is the matter with Smif, 
Smitfe, Smitthe, Smiv or Smivthe? Ringing a few changes on the 
unfortunate name would relieve it of its monotony, and even the 
Bmytbes might take temporary refuge under the shade of the 
euphonious orthoefical title of Smeyphffe. 

UNLIKE the Romans of a later age, the Egyptians did not con- 
fine the privilege of shaving to free citizens, but obliged their 
slaves to shave both face and head. The data are not exactly as au- 
thentic as one would like to have them, but it is believed that 
the custom of shaving the beard was introduced in Home in tbe 
year 300 b.c. According to Pliny, Scipio Africanus was the first 
Roman who shaved daily. 

^PRICES 

Baking 
Powder 

Used in Millions of Homes — 40 years the Standard. 




HIGHLAND 




(feam 



* TABLE 



LUXURY. 
A CULINARY ARTICLE, 

AN INFANTS FOOD. 
HIGHLAND EVAPORATED CREAM 
Is unsweetened and free from all preservatives. Retains 
its delicious and wholesome qualities for an indefinite time in 
all climates and at all seasons. 

Sold by Grocers and Druggists Everywhere. 
Write for our Infant Food circular and Highland 
Evaporated Cream booklet entitled "A Few Dainty Dishes." 

HELVETIA MILK CONDENSING CO., 
Sole Purveyors, Hiqhland, III 



SCHIEDAM AROMATIC SCHNAPPS, 



AN OLD MEDICINE REVIVED. 

In days of yore, as we have all learned from the old folks, no medicine 
was so useful to have in the house, or so good in many diseases, as Pure 
Holland Gin. For a longtime, however, the genuine article could not be 
had, until it had appeared under the new name of Aromatic Schiedam 
Schnapps. The article is manufactured exclusively by Udolpho Wolfe, at 
Schiedam, in Holland, aud put up in small and large bottles expressly for 
medicinal purposes, with his name on the seal, bottle, and label, to protect 
it against counterfeits. What a great blessing it is for persons residing in 
the interior of our Southern and Western States, that they can now pur- 
chase a pure and unadulterated article of sin with confidence, without 
the least liability of deception or dissatisfaction. That it will tend to di- 
minish the consumption of the common deleterious and spurious liquors 
which now almost exclusively pervade this country, admits of no doubt. 
We consider the medical profession and the traveling community are un- 
der obligations to Mr. Wolfe. 

To insure, however, obtaining the genuine article, ask for Wolfe's Schie- 
dam Aromatic Schnapps and look for the legitimate trade-mark— W. A. S. 
For sale by all Druggists, Grocers and Liquor Dealers. 

ZISKA INSTITUTE, 

I6O6 Van Ness Avenue. 

French, German and English Day and Boarding School for young 
ladies and children. 
A refined home with the best educational advantages. 

Next Term Opens August 1, 1892. 

MME. B. ZISKA, M. A., Principal. 
Mr. ASHTON P. STEVENS, 

HAS RESUMED INSTRUCTIONS ON THE BANJO. 

Studio— 26 Montgomery Street, Room 8. 

ALFRED J. KELLEHER, 

Professor of VOCAL MUSIC AT MILLS' COLLEGE (18th year), desires 
to announce that he will give Lessone at Mb office, his residence, or at the 
residence of the pupil. 

Office— 14 Grant avenue, rooms 62 and 63. Residence— 2324 Clay street, 
San Francisco. 

Garcia Vocal Method. Solfeggio Panseron. 

MRS. R. G. LEWIS, 

FORMERLY OF THURLOW BLOCK, 
HAS REMOVED TO 

531 SUTTER STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1S92. 



CONCENTRATION.— Ella Wheeler Wilcox in June Lippvncotts. 



The age ia too diffusive. Time and force 

Are frittered out and bring no satisfaction. 

The way seems lost to straight determined action. 

Like shooting stars that zigzag from their bowers, 

We wander from our orbit's pathway; spoil 
The role we're fitted for to fail in twenty; 
Bring empty measures that were shaped for plenty 

At last as guerdon for a life of toil. 

There's lack of greatness in this generation, 

Because no more man centres on one thought: 
We know this truth and yet we heed it not — 

The secret of success is concentration.. 



THEY EXTENDED THEIR SYMPATHY. 

ALL three had evidently been hanging dull care with perhaps 
a little more earnestness of purpose than the precept de- 
manded. Rounding the hill coming up from Harbor View, they 
stopped to lean against the stone wall encompassing a magnificent 
mansion, to rest. 

" Feller 't owns 'at house dunno his luck," observed the short man 
looking in maudlin admiration upon the structure. 

" Well, now, I d'no," philosophically observed the slender one, 
digging his hands into his pockets and squaring off to look well at 
the mansion. " We d'no. He may be worried for fear of a strike of 
his hands, or because his bonds is goin' down." 

" Zat'a right," convincingly put in the fat one with the double 
chin. "An 1 he may have son in penitentiary, fer all we know." 

The short man himself jumped into the swim. " Er a daughter 
gone to the devil," he said. 

" Er a wife run away with a postal clerk with blon' moustache," 
added the thin one. 

" Er rbeumatiz er somethin 1 ," put in the fat man. "Say, boys," 
(sympathetically), " I pity 'at feller." 

"Sod' I." 

"An' me." 

"Tell you wbatle's do; le's go'n symp'thize with 'im. It'll do 'im 
good. He'll 'preshate it." 

Consolation beamed from three faces as they rolled up the stoop 
and pulled the bell. When the Chinaman started to slam the door 
in their faces, the fat man gave him a merry slap that sent him eight 
yards back, and they all filed in solemnly and waited. When the 
head of the house came thundering down they looked solemnly upon 
him and each extended a hand. 

"Cheer up, ole man," soothingly observed the fat man; "we're 
with you." 

" Too bad," said the thin one, reaching for his pocket handker- 
chief. " But don't you give in." 

,l Never say die." 

" What are you men talking about, and what do you want? " an- 
grilj' inquired the man whose Chinaman had been assaulted. 

" We want symp'thize with you 'cause yer wife's run away." 

"An' yer son's been hung." 

"An 1 yer bank's goin' to bust." 

"An' yer daughter's 'bout to commit suicide." 

"An ." 

"Get out of here, you infernal tramps. How dare you invade my 
house and insult me in your drunken fit? " 

" What! Don't want our sympathy? " 

"Get out, I tell you!" 

"All ri'. All ri'. Delicate subject, but sorry, all same. Don't 
blame us if nobody else takes interest 'nuff to come an' see you,' 1 
and they moved down the steps, the fat man observing with some 
show of spirit: 

" I hate a man 'at can't accept sympathy in right spirit." 



PROSPEROUS PROFESSIONAL CHRISTIANS. 

THERE is undoubtedly lots of money in being an evangelist, as 
witness the luxury enjoyed by Moody, General Booth, Sam 
Jones and others of the ilk. The subject is rather an interesting 
one just now, in view of the little troubles that have cropped out 
in the charches regarding the raising of money for B. Fay Mills, 
who is now crusading in clover in Oakland. A good sample of 
the way things go is illustrated in the visit of Mills across the 
bay, for just before he came up from Los Angeles he wrote to the 
Athenian clergy and told them that as living was so high in Cal- 
ifornia he would bave to raise his fees for personal expenses from 
$800 to $1,200. They squirmed a little at this, but they were in 
it too far to pull out, so they raised the extra $400. 

Francis Murphy, the temperance orator, furnishes another case 
in point. He is always for the poor man in his addresses, but he 
is mighty good at driving a bargain, and he wears fine dia- 
monds, the best of clothes, and lives like a king. He has been rest- 
ing at the Del Monte after his labors in Oakland, and, in full even- 
ing dress, he has been a familiar figure on the promenades during 
the evenings. Of course he does not drink, but he is very well 
disposed towards choice two-bit cigars. 



PAUL SCHAFER'S HORSE. 

PAUL SCHAFER, Secretary of the Oakland Board of Health. 
wears garments of sackcloth and ashes beneath the Bruru- 
mellian costume with which he cuts such a dash on bis way to 
and from the City Hall. And if any one wants to see him trans- 
form from a Dr. Jekyll into Mr. Hyde, just asked Paul what he 
thinks about keeping a horse in Oakland — whether it's a good 
speculation or not. Of course, there Is a story to all this, and 
here it is: After his discovering a place where all drinks, even 
whisky, are retailed at five cents a glass, Paul began to save 
money, and as the shekels accumulated in his pockets to such an 
extent that they proved more ballast than he could carry around, 
he decided to make an investment. The ambition of his life, 
from the days when be was a small boy in pantalets and frills, 
bad been to own a horse, so he made up his mind that now was 
the appointed time, and started looking around accordingly for a 
suitable equine. Sanitary Inspector Douglass came to the rescue 
on the second day, and generously offered to turn over to Paul a 
nag on the installment plan — $4 down and $1 a week until the full 
price of $38 was paid. The generous offer was accepted by the 
Secretary, and within a few hours the steed was installed in Paul's 
back-yard with the chickens and goat. The horse was not much 
to look at, and he showed a constant longing to lie down, which 
Douglass, however, explained by saying that the animal had 
done a big day's work, and was tired. Paul was satisfied ; he 
paid Douglass the $4 deposit, gave the horse some mush for 
supper, and retired. The next morning he aroused himself with 
an alarm clock at 5 o'clock, and rushed down to tend to his new 
purchase. The horse was still lying down and refused to rise. 
Paul kicked, prayed and cursed, all to no avail, however, and 
at last he sent for a couple of jackscrews and tried to raise the 
animal that way. But, alas! just as he had got everything in 
full working order, the nag suddenly gave a gasp and died, leav- 
ing Paul hollow-eyed, broken-hearted and indignant. He had 
blood in his eye for Douglass when he went down town, but as 
he threw open the office door with an anathema on his lips, it 
died away, for a roar of laughter greeted him. Douglass, it appears, 
had sold him a horse that bad been condemned by the veterinary 
officer, and the nag was to have been taken to the pound and 
shot, only Douglass conceived the idea of turning it over to Paul 
for a consideration. The $4 deposit was spent on drinks for the 
crowd, and Paul says the dollar a week installment is off. 



THE Queen of the Sandwich Islands has just presented a large 
cocoanut tree to San Francisco, and according to the papers 
it took eleven men three hours in getting it off a wagon. How 
many men were required to get the vegetable on the wagon, or 
bow much room it took up on the steamer, are as yet unrecorded 
facts. Whilst transplanting Kanaka trees is the fad of the hour 
it would be a good idea to acclimatize the taro plant so that the 
uncivilized American might in the near future enjoy the luxury of 
eating with his fingers pale blue "Poi" specially masticated by 
Mongolians. 

The Red Sea is for the most part blue. It gets its name 

from the fact that portions of it are covered by minute animalcule, 
which dye the surface of the water red where they float. 



Little lord Fduotlcroy^ 

Quaker KoaED white Oats , r 




'OBI »l»ld «»u»S adXjoWV 



w Artotype Series. Plate 130 




The Club House 



Ex-Commodore Wm. M. McCarthy's Yacht "Ramona." 





r 



Wm, N. McCarthy, 
Director. 



Commodore I. Guite's Yacht "Chispa. 1 



Dr. T. L. Hill's Yacht "Gracie." 



THE SAN FRANClSC(i n 






With S F NtWI Lr-ttop, July 1(3, 1882. 




Ex-Commodore J. Maedonough's Yacht "Jessie.' 



cdonough, 
or. 



... 







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vj 


i 


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1 1 1 




1 -fl I 








iK3j5sgis 


l^^ggn 




33^ 








- : - - 


■— -,." 






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— vv 



Wieland Brothers and "White's Yacht "Aggie." 



Engleberg <& Thomas' Yacht "Sappho.* 



CLUB, SAUSALITO. 



July 16, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



OOLUMBTJS DAY. OCTOBER 12. 1892. 
[B T I) i V II ■ ox.] 

WORLD'S Fair projects 611 the air. .Some of ihom are fanciful. 
chimerical, and will fail of realization. But if one class 
should claim precedence over anothrr. it is that one which ha* 
weight as an educational factor. The youth of the land are the 
hope of the country, and as they are impressed by the patriotism 
of the occasion and developed along the lines of American citi- 
aensbip. so must the value of that Columbian Exposition be 
judged. Those who have authority in the matter have been 
quick to recognize this fact, and are making strenuous efforts to 
have all the children of the United States take an intelligent in- 
terest in the great subject, which we may say, without being 
charged with Yankee bluster or American brag, is challenging the 
attention of the whole world. In January, 1891, the Youth*' 
Companion proposed that October 12, 1802, the four hundredth 
anniversary of the discovery of America, should be observed 
everywhere in America, and claimed that the public schools of 
the republic would form most fitting centers for ail local celebra- 
tions. The day will be marked in Chicago by the dedication of 
the Columbian Exposition grounds. A national public school 
observance simultaneous with the Chicago exercises will awaken 
a popular interest in the coming exposition. The public school 
is the one characteristic institution which links al! the neighbor- 
hood together, and can thus furnish a common bond for a national 
celebration. No better proof of the general intelligence of the 
American youth could be desired than is afforded by tbe fact that 
the proposition of the plan by the Youth's Companion was hailed 
with delight by the children of the land, and thousands of letters 
were received by tbe editor, written by enthusiastic children, 
eager to participate in the general celebration. 

The pn as of the day is the uncrowned king of the age. Its 
word is law. The suggestion made by a newspaper was received 
with favor by tbe World's Congress Auxiliary of the Columbian 
Exposition, which at once took up tbe proposal calling upon all 
the people of the republic to observe the day in their own locali- 
ties, and indorsing the idea that the public schools should every- 
where be the centers of the celebration. Then the superintendents 
of education were the next to recognize the fitness of giving to 
the public schools the first place in this Columbian anniversary. 
At their national convention in Brooklyn, in February, 1892, 
they took charge of tbe movement and appointed an executive 
committee to lead the schools in their commemoration. This 
executive committee will furnish a programme of exercises — sim- 
ple, adapted to any school — yet so arranged that more elaborate 
exercises may be added wherever desired. It is the aim of the 
committee to secure a certain uniformity in the leading features of 
these exercises throughout the schools of the republic. 

It is designed to have a strong committee in each city, town 
and hamlet in the United States. The committee should embrace 
citizens, scholars and teachers. It has been suggested that pro- 
cessions should be arranged , the principal feature in which should 
be the children, escorted by the war veterans and by the other 
military, civic and religious organizations of the town holding such 
a celebration. Right here a word of protest must be uttered. It 
is radically wrong to send our public school children to parade 
the streets alone, unattended by their teachers ; and that, for in- 
stance, the eight hundred teachers of our San Francisco Public 
Schools, women, with but few exceptions, should be asked to 
walk the basalt blocks and the crooked cobble stones of this city, 
each at the bead of a class, is simply preposterous. Let the exer- 
cises be of such a nature as can be carried out within the walls of 
the school-houses. The morning might be devoted to the literary 
exercises', the afternoon to a grand historical display. 

Why not make a naval pageant one of the features of the 
coming Columbus Day? Our bay would be a magnificent scene 
of action; it is surrounded by hills, that would be the seats of a 
vast amphitheatre. Surely some such historical scene might be 
arranged. The old-time vessels might be reproduced ; there could 
be one scene representing Columbus setting sail from the harbor 
of Palos; another his landing on the shores of a new world. We 
have a large contingent of Italian fisherfolk, who with their boats, 
conld lend the proper color to the scene. Our bay is a beautiful 
Bight when it dons its holiday attire. We have a magnificent 
fleet of yachts, and such an undertaking, in the proper hands, 
would be a magnificent success. 

In the evening there could be a grand display of fireworks 
from Telegraph Hill and from the Twin Peaks, provided the fog 
could be prevailed upon not to wrap its mantel round the city. 
In fact, it would be necessary to have several local centers for the 
display of fireworks, so that all the school children might have a 
fair chance to see the pyrotechnics. The art of making fireworks 
has attained such perfection that any historical scene could be 
produced, and with excellent effect. A few other suggestions as 
to the proper observance of the day, or as to the best way of im- 
pressing the children with the importance of the coming celebra- 
tion, might be acceptable at this time. 

All teachers know that it is only by constant iteration and re- 
iteration that a fact is finally impressed upon the minds of 
children, and that the more senses that are aroused to take cog- 



nisance of a fact. lb» mora Tlvld and lasting will be thetlrnprw 
sum. Tell a child that two and two make four, and ho may re- 
peat It poll-parrot fashion after you. until he knows it as far as 
»ordl JO. Show bin, tw „ objects, placed beside two more, then 
ho can sec. as well as hear, that two and two are four. Now It 
will he mlaalni a gre.il opportunity if the coming celebration 
should not take the opportunity to appeal to the eye as wall an 
to the car. For instance, every nickel in-tlie-slot machine that 
has pictures to show should be fitted up with pictorial represen- 
tations of scenes connected with the life of Columbus. Enter- 
prising showmen should al once procure panoramas setting forth 
the same period. Theatres should produce dramas bearing on the 
same line. It is with a feeling of great satisfaction and local 
pride that we 8an Franciscans can point to the work of Daniel 
O'Connell and Henry Stewart in their opera of Columbus. That 
production is most necessary, and if the gentlemen are enterpris- 
ing they ought to secure proposals from managers, eager to secure 
a timely and appropriate attraction for the World's Fair year. 
The theatres, orchestras and public bands ought to play patriotic 
airs, and even the advertisements of the day might lend them- 
selves to the patriotic fervor of the moment. 

Several times little picture books have been distributed by lead- 
ing firms in this city, and prizes given to the children whose col- 
oring of the pictures in the book have been adjudged the most 
artistic. Why not get out some such book now, with pictures 
chosen to illustrate the life and labors of Columbus, and distribute 
them broadcast among the school children of the land, offering 
prizes for the best work from each school, each class in every 
city? It could be done, and would be a money-making scheme 
of vast magnitude, if the man who managed it for the United 
States sold the advertising rights to two or three prominent firms 
in each city. Under each picture should be a brief and easily un- 
derstood account of what the picture represents. The educational 
value of such a project is not to be despised. 

Another thing, children are always delighted with medals of 
any sort. They treasure up foreign coins, metal buttons, and 
even " China moneys." Now, take those metal discs used as ride 
tickets at Golden Gate Park. They are treasured by the children, 
and are more or less valuable as souvenirs of the city, because 
they bear an image of the children's play-ground. Could not 
some way be devised by which a Columbus Day medal might be 
given to every child in the United 8tates ? The cost of such a 
medal ought not to be so great as to preclude the possibility of 
obtaining it. Could not the local Boards of Education, or tbe 
Boards of Supervisors, appropriate some money with this object 
in view ? If not, the advertiser must be appealed to again, and 
certainly, for the sake of getting his firm name into such general 
circulation, he would be willing to spend a little money on a 
scheme that would bring in such good returns. One side of the 
medal should contain a bust of Columbus, with appropriate 
wording; the reverse might have some such device as "Presented 
to the boys and girls of America," by— the firm. There's an idea 
without a string to it. 




" Absolutely the Best." 

It is made of pure cream 
of tartar and soda, no am- 
monia, no alum. A like 
quantity goes farther and 
does better work. It is 
therefore cheaper. 

Cleveland's is the baking 
powder used in the U. S. 
Army and by teachers of 
cookery. It never varies, 
and always gives perfect 
satisfaction. Try a can. 

F. H. AMES .* €U„ Agents. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 




'We Obey no Wand but Pleasure 



Tom Moore. 



THE magnificent promise of success in the brilliant and fash- 
ionable house which graced the opening of Stockwell's new 
and beautiful play-house was reiterated in the second production 
of the Daly Company. Ada Rehan's Rosalind will remain, how- 
ever a picture, all brilliant lights and fascinating effects, as long 
as the new theatre stands. It seemed to show us the real Rosa- 
lind, not her counterfeit presentment, tender, playful, spirited, as 
full of deep feeling as of airy and delicate humor, changeful yet 
constant, a combination of delightful paradoxes, and withal a 
beautiful woman — in brief, just what Ada Reban would have 
been had she been Rosalind and dwelt in the forest of Arden. 
Mr. Stockwell may well feel proud of the opening of his theatre, 
as signalized by a production which will live in local dramatic 
history while the last theatre-goer of to-day survives. 

* * * 

The house which greeted the second production of the Daly 
company at Stock well's Theatre, Monday night, proved conclu- 
sively, either that the dictum, « Everybody is out of town" mnst 
be accepted in a strongly restricted sense, or that the aforesaid 
Everybody had come into town for this occasion. It is notice- 
able that Mr. Daly's company always plays with rather than to 
the audience, the enthusiasm of the house keeping pace with the 
efforts of the players, and making the relation of those before and 
behind the footlights rather that of a social gathering toward its 
entertainers than of performer and judge. Monday night was no 
exception. The audience enthused at the right moment, and the 
right moment came often. There is, too, an element of strong re- 
gret underlying all the enjoyment, which gives an added interest 
to this engagement, and makes the theatre-goer feel that he must 
lose nothing of it, in the remembrance that its close will see the 
breaking up of a famous and familiar pair of lovers — Ada Rehan 
and John Drew. Every word and situation when these two are 
on the stage is followed closely, and the feeling grows that some- 
thing in the way of friendly intervention should ward off the 
coming separation. 

* * * 

The Last Word, an adaptation from the German of Franz von 
Schoenthan, is comedy with a serious plot and motive, and gives 
Miss Rehan an opportunity to show her power of delineating 
deep feeling, as well as the airy humor so essentially her own. 
The scene in which she recites with simple but impressive pathos 
the story of her little brother's death, to soften the obdurate heart 
of the father toward his son, called out as demonstrative applause 
as was accorded to the best of her delightful comedy. Her most 
effective scene with John Drew is the one in which, in reply to 
his warning, " You do not know my father," she turns upon him 
in a fine outburst of temper with " He does not koow MeV The 
dialogue, or rather monologue, which follows is so spirited 
and exciting that the audience was so completely carried away as 
almost to drown the conclusion in applause. John Drew has his 
effectiue work, too, in the scene in which the Baroness (by the 
way an altogether new type of the female Russian abroad) con- 
verts him into a partisan of his sister's love match, though he does 
some work quite as enjoyable, in its way, in the first scene with 
the fair Russian, in which he explains to her, poor fool, how well 
and thoroughly he knows women — "from my books." James 
Lewis has a delightful part in Alexander Airey, an over-suscepti- 
ble young gentleman, and with Winifred (Kitty Cheatham) makes 
a pair of lovers as entertaining,as the principals. The third young 
couple is the one on whose affairs of the heart the plot centres, 
but decidedly the least prominent in the acting, although Miss 
Isabel Irving and Sidney Herbert play their respective parts in- 
terestingly and well. The two older men, Secretary Rutherell 
and his brother, the Professor, are admirably played respectively 
by George Clarke and Chas. Wheatleigh. Mrs. Anna Corvell 
makes of the little she has to do as M'lle Lida, a genuine charac- 
ter study. 

» » # 

Next week the company will give The School for Scandal, Mon- 
day, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings, and at Wednesday's 
matinee, and for the remainder of the week The Foresters, Tenny- 
son's play, based on the familiar story of Robin Hood and Maid 
Marian, with the music, under Harry Widmer's direction, by Sir 
Arthur Sullivan. 

» » • 

"Gloriana," which finishes to-night a week's engagement 
at the Baldwin, is what the professional critic would call a 
"qualified success." The farce is funny enough in spots, but 
there is a vast amount of groundwork which is decidedly flat in 
tint, if not absolutely colorless. The same may be said of the 
people. E. J. Henley's Count Evitoff stands out in alto relievo, 
and, as a dramatic creation, would alone give Qloriana an » ex- 
cuse for living." Equally noteworthy in its way is Frederick 
Bond's amusingpersonation of Spinks, the valet, his speech and 
manner, while masquerading as his master, being the very es- 
sence of laughable travesty and the highest of high comedy below 



stairs. Henrietta Crossman, the dashing widow, Gloriana, with 
an unusually attractive personality and a fascinating grace of 
movement which render her very presence on the stage a pleas- 
ure to the beholder, and with an evident intelligent sense of 
humor, yet somehow, in her best situations, just misses meeting 
the expectation. Joseph Allen is entirely conventional, but 
good, as the retired tanner, and May Robson does some original 
and funny juggling with her borrowed gown and hat, which 
causes plenty of laughter. All these good points, however, are 
offset by so much of the comparatively flat and uninteresting as 
to bring the average hardly up to the Frohman standard, cer- 
tainly not up to its heralding. 

# # » 

More interesting to the local contingent at the Baldwin Mon- 
day night, than even the piece de resistance, was The Major's Ap- 
pointment, a one-act curtain-raiser, inasmuch as it introduces 
Edwin Stevens, the former popular comedian of the Tivoli, in a 
serious character. The Major's Appointment is so melancholy 
throughout, and its pathos so painful, especially as the gloom is 
unrelieved at last, as to call for a dramatic law that every one-act 
play shall have a good ending. There isn't time for the mind to 
work itself up to the proper high-strung emotional realization of 
the artistic unities, that will reconcile the auditor to a tragic end- 
ing of the drama. The story of this little play is that of a cash- 
iered officer of the army, who has grown old and feeble in a vain, 
but ever renewed, effort to be reinstated. The old man's long and 
brave struggle and his final disappointment are so finely de- 
picted by Mr. Stevens (who, a born comedian, seems in this as- 
sumption to justify his life-long aspirations toward this line of 
characters) that it would be a pity to change a line or a situation. 
Yet in the interest of a tender-hearted and harrowed public, I 
would like to persuade Mr. Stevens to defy the authors and give 
his little play a good ending. There would be no need to sacrifice 
even the heart-rending finale, which gives such scope to Mr. 
8tevens' acting powers. The heartless joke of some smart sub- 
altern in sending the pretended appointment, the old soldier's 
pathetic elation, and the still more pathetic care of the old 
martinet in giving his shabby apparel the regulation soldierly 
trimness before reporting at headquarters, the terrible reaction 
when the cruel hoax is made clear to him, his brave struggle to 
carry off the disappointment as a trifle, all these, even to the 
death, could be retained for the actor's benefit. But this is the 
way it should end. Just as the sympathetic clerk says, solemnly, 
referring to the old soldier's promotion to the heavenly ranks. 
" The appointment has come at last," enter, breathless, a mes- 
senger — he holds out a paper — granddaughter clutches it, glances 
at contents, and throws herself at the veteran's feet — " House 
yourself, dear, dear Grandpa I The real appointment— See, see! * 
A quiver passes over the seemingly lifeless frame, the eyes open 
and there you have it. The painful tension in the audience re- 
laxes comfortably, and the curtain falls amid a contented murmur 
of •• What an exquisite bit, and how delightfully acted! "in 
place of " No one has any business to harrow up our feelings 
with such a play as that! " Yet the hero would lose not a single 
opportunity, and would actually gain an effective one. I hope 
Mr. Stevens will try it. 

* # * 

The Witch, in which Marie Hubert Frohman, under the manage- 
ment of her husband, Gustave Frohman, will appear at the Bush- 
street Theatre next Monday night, is a play written for Marie 
Hubert Frohman by Philip Hamilton and Marie Madison. Its 
subject is somewhat outside the beaten path. It deals with the 
famous superstition known in history as the " Salem Witchcraft," 
and incidentally presents a faithful and interesting portrayal of 
Puritan austerity and prejudice, as well as its manners and dress. 
The story may be summed up briefly. A young man on his way 
to visit an Indian encampment, falls in with a lovely young white 
girl, who has been reared in primitive innocence and simplicity, 
by the Catholic missionaries, loves and marries her. Leaving her 
behind, he returns to Salem, but on the way is waylaid by an 
Indian, a self-constituted guardian of the girl, whom he believes 
has been wronged, and is left for dead. Recovering, the young 
man makes his way to Salem, but with mind so disordered that 
when his bride follows and finds him, he declares that he never 
saw her. Under the pleasant and sensible Puritanic custom 
which has made the old historic town famous, she is accused, 
and, after much dramatic persecution, sentenced to be hanged as a 
witch. They used to burn the witches, I believe; but the dramatist 
has doubtless studied up on this point as well as that of sending 
his hero to "the Mohawks" instead of to the Wampanoags, 
Narragansetts, or some other tribe of historic New England locale. 
The young husband now recovers his senses, acknowledges his 
wife, and, with the aid of the good missionary, secures a pardon, 
with which he arrives at the foot of the gallows just late enough 
to make the audience begin to feel anxious, but not too late to 
save the girl. Monday evening every lady at the Bush will re- 
ceive a "Salem" spoon, of sterling silver, as a souvenir, of the 
450th production of the play. So liberal a catering to the present 
souvenir-spoon mania will no doubt crowd the Bush in the in- 
terest of Packenham's combination — » Beauty and Booty." 
* * • 

The music of Clover, the new Tivoli production, is bright and 



July 16, 1892. 



SAN FKANCISi'0 NKWS I.KTTER. 



9 



•parkling— in fact, Von Suppe. The production la c»r«(olly pin 
on a* lo auging and ooa taming, ami with Ibe usual exoallant 
riea in chorus and orchestra The plot appears somewhat 
ambiguous, and ia not rendered less so by Ihe singers who seem 
lo hare conspired to keep Ihe audience from bearing a single 
word. As the new opera has made an unquestioned bit, and will 
probably be continued. It may not be amiss to suggest to tbegood 
Tivoll people tba\ while the music ol an opera Is the main thing, 
yet some of the interest depends upon following the story. With- 
out the " argument'* considerately furnished on the programme 
[a custom, by the way, greatly to be commended) I doubt that a 
score of the auditors could have understood that of Clover Mon- 
day night. Tbe cast is in all respects suitable. Tiliie Salinger's 
fine singing and acting of 8tella confirmed the audience in the 
opinion tbat her place on the Tivoli stage would be hard to fill. 
Uracie t'laisted, as the waiting maid, Fanny. Is piquanteas usual. 
Ferris Hartman is good as Casimlr, Rudolph's half-witted re- 
tainer, and George Olmis Rudolph is fair. M. Cornell bas little 
to do, but does the little in his reliable way, and the rest of tbe 
cast is satisfactory, except in the one particular of inaudibility. 

* • • 

Next Monday night The Lost Paradise, with Cbas. Frohman's 
stock company, will appear at the Baldwin. This is the third 
annual tour of the company, which includes \V. H. Crompton, 
Wm. Morris. Orrin Johnson, Cyril Scott, Annie and Maud Adams, 
Odette Tyler, and others too well and favorably known here to 
need any introduction. The play, which is by Henry C. de Mille, 
though founded on a German play by Ludwig Fulda, is dis- 
tinctively American. It deals with the great labor question, the 
workingman's garb taking for the most part the place of the con- 
ventional dress coat. 

» # • 

With The Lost Paradise, Monday evening, July 18th, begins the 
tenth year of tbe Baldwin under its present management. The 
uniform prosperity and popularity of the Baldwin during tbat 
period must be attributed to the rare combination of business 
ability and good judgment with tact and courtesy on the part of 
Manager Bouvier and his assistants. L. A. Morgenstern, treas- 
urer and assistant manager, has won the favorable vote of Ihe 
community by the unfailing good humors.nd polite interest shown 
to ticket-buyers under what every man who has ever stood in a 
box-office knows to be frequently trying circumstances. Man- 
ager Bouvier has just returned from Paso de Robles quite re- 
cuperated in health, after a long and serious attack of inflamma- 
tory rheumatism. During bis absence his office has been in the 
sole charge of his private secretary, Emanuel Greenberg, a young 
man educated in the public schools of this city, and whose strict 
attention to business and indefatigable industry do them credit, 
while assuring him a prosperous business career. 

* * * 

The associated Press dispatcher is earning his title by " dis- 
patching" people right and left, without reference to race, color, 
or previous condition of servitude. After killing off W. W. As- 
tor, he turned upon poor Lottie Collins, of " Ta-ra-ra, Boom de- 
ay" fame, and finished her by telegraph — electrocuted her, so to 
speak. Both^have survived their untimely taking-off. I am glad 
Lottie still lives. Astor can afford to be glad for himself, and be- 
side, he will not " entertain" San Francisco in any sense, while 
Lottie will, Cbas. Frohman having added the popular concert 
singer of London and Paris to his collection. 

* * * 

Mr. Al. Hayman has made arrangements with tbe Tuxedo com- 
pany, which was to follow Reed and Collier at the California, to 
come later, thus enabling him to transfer Qloriana to the Califor- 
nia theatre where it will appear next Monday evening. It will 
be preceded by The Major's Appointment, as at the Baldwin. 
Thatcher's Minstrels and Tuxedo will come to the California Au- 
gust 1st. 

* * # 

Extensive improvements to the Opera House at Ukiah are just 

completed May Robson, the Kitty in Qloriana, made a hit as 

the spinster in the original The Private Secretary. Beatrice 

Vehon, of Chicago, iB the latest American singer to capture 
Europe, having made a signal triumph at the Royal Court Thea- 
tre at Stockholm. Henry E. Abbey has engaged Henry Irving 

and Ellen Terry, for a thirty-weeks' American tour, beginning in 

San Francisco in September, 1893. Hugo Toland, who, beside 

his natural claim as a Native Son, gained the favor of San Fran- 
cisco by his clever portrayal of the title role in Mr. Barnes of New 
York, bas a capital part in The Junior Paitner, which will soon be 

seen at the California, under Mr. Chas. Frohman's direction. 

Emily Bancker, who was last seen here in Mr. Wilkinson's Widows, 

is in The Junior Partner company. H. 0. Husted, Mr. and Mrs. 

Kendall's American manager, has been ergaged by Mr. Frohman 

to manage John Drew's tour. Oliver Jurgensen, manager for 

Gustave Frohman, has been in town all the week, preparing for 
the appearance of Marie Hubert Frohman, at the Bush, next 

Monday night. Dunlop's Stage News says, authoritatively: 

" Edwin Booth will not appear next season, as reported, nor any 

other season." Harry Lee must be a sensible man. He will 

quit starring, and join a good company as leading man. Atten- 
tion, stars I John W. Jennings, an old San Franciscan, has a 



new melodrama, which ha will try next season Tin Mnr.u, 

Mayer who failed to pay Ooqnalln'l salary and made a « 
wreck, in London, la ,,,,1 Ban Kranclsro's Marcus, who la in N,., v 

YorK, enjoying a high tide of prosperity. Maud Jeffreys, » 

fair American, born south of Maaon and Dixon's line, la Wllaon 
Barrett a leading lady, and has captured London and the prOT- 

itices. During JerTrcys-I.cwia' season, at Stockwell'a, aho will 

play an English version of Theodora Frank Mnrdannt will 

play next soa-.m with .las. O'Nell. 

Argonaut Old Bourbon i- not excelled in the market. It is the 
Besl whisky known to the trade, and is far superior to anv others. It 
is procurable at, ill first-clasa bars, for it is indulged in bv connois- 
seurs who will have only the best. Argonaut is a great favorite with 
all whisky drinkers. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Al Hayman & Co Proprietors. I Alfred Bouvier. .. Manager 

■ U T S ""rf,\ t neCoLed e ;. k r 1 u m 1 p y n: Matlnee 8rtnnta ^-«» ««»«"» "ft made 
GLORIANA. 
Presented at 8:16 by the THE MAJOR'S APPOINTMENT. 

i^n^ST^L ?,^ rl . e ^? r .? hml ; a u s f tock Company of New York present- 
mg Henry^C. de Mille's distinguished success, "The Lost Paradise!" Seats 



now on sale. 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Al Hayman & Co ...Proprietors. | J. J. Gottlob Manager. 

Gr^at S Co C m a eV r T?i P u g m m h n '' Monday eyenin S. July 18, Charles Frohman's 

GLORIANA. 
As presented formerly 160 nights in New York and direct from its immense 

THE BUSH STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Leavitt Proprietor. | Chas. P. Hall Manager. 

Engagement extraordinary, beninnlng Monday, July 18th, Matinee Wed- 
nesday and Saturday, MAKIE II! lis It I FuOHHAN, and her New 
York Company in 

"THE WITCH." 

A mirror of ye old colonial times; a great picture cut clear from life- 
grand souvenir event, Monday, July 18th; 450th performance: tbe ladies 
on the low er floor will be presented with Sterling Silver"Wltch"Souvenir 
Spoous. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Keeling Bros Proprietors and Managers. 

To-night, all our great company, including Tillle Salinger, Ferris Bart- 
man, Graeie Plaisted, George Olmi, Julie Kiugsley, Ed. N. Knight Grace 
Vernou, Phil Branson, Emma Vorce and M. Cornell, are all in 

CLOVER I 

By Suppe. Supentine dauce at 10:30 o'clock. 
Popular Prices 25c. and 50c. 

STOCKWELL'S THEATRE. 

L. R. Stockwell Lessee and Proprietor, 

Alp Ellinghodse Business Manager. 

Al'UUSTIN DAI/iT'S COMPANY OF COMEDIANS, this evening 
last performance Augustin Daly's successful comedy, 

THE LAST WORD I 

Commencing July 18— Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings and 
Wednesday Matinee SCHOOL FOR StAMlAl; Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday, and Saturday Matinee, Lord Tennyson's Poetic Comedy THE 
FORESTERS, with all the original music by Sir Arthur Sullivan.' Seats 
now on sale. Farewell week a great programme engagement, positively 
terminates July 30. 

"The California Hotel," 

Bush Street, near Kearny. 

_A."bsol-u.tel;y Fire-proof. 

Central to all points of interest, principal stores and places of amusement. 

Select Music in Restaurant .every evening between 6 and 8. 

A. F. KINZLER, Manager. 

FINE DIAMONDS." 

Gold and Silver Watches. 

The newest designs in jew- 
ellery of first quality only, at 
very reasonable prices. 
A. W. STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St, 
Under Masonic Temple. 




KMtDC Bush & Gerts Pianos 
HHDb Parlor Organs 

HAINES Installments _ Rentals 

A. I. Bancroft & Co. 
303 Sutter St., S.F. 



PIANOS 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 



A JUNE-TIME PARABLE.— Philip Burke Marston in The 
Independent. 



With twining roses, red and white, I made, 
When June was hot, a pleasant bower for shade. 

A gracious place it seemed, by night or day, 

Where one might wake or sleep, give thanks or pray. 

Upon it fell the dew and rose the moon, 

There nightengales made glad the nights of June. 

But as one eve I listened to their song, 
It seemed to me my very heart was stung 

With sharp, swift pain; whereon I searched, and lo! 
Lithe snakes, with murderous eyes, wound to and fro. 

Thereon I left my bower, nor may it be 
That it again in June shall shelter me. 

But when its leaves have withered, one by one, 
When nightengales have fled, and pales the Bun. 

When in deep snows snakes may not breed or house, 
I will go back; and, 'neath the bare rose boughs, 

Bream of the summer and the leaves that made. 
When June was hot, my pleasant place of shade. 



HIS LITTLE GAME. 



to the 



(l '"THIS is a sporting town," he said, as he moved up 
1 cashier's desk in the restaurant. 

it Very much so," replied the man behind. 

" Stuck on feats of endurance — walking matches, and so on?" 

"Oh, yes." 

"General feeling in favor of record making in any particular 
line, I believe? " 

" Yes; what will you " 

" Interested yourself? " 

"Oh, to some extent." 

" Well, I'm glad of that. What I want to say is this: You've 
heard of the man wheeling the barrow across the country? Well, 
I'm going to beat him. I am going to start from San Francisco 
to go to New York, and I shall prove that hospitality is not dead. 
I propose to show that a man who is known to be square and 
who doesn't fake at all gets encouragement ? " 

"Yes?" 

" I'm going to make that trip and write it up. Every man 
who eneourages me shall be rewarded with a favorable mention 
and shall go down in history with me. Now, then, I give you 
the chance to head the list. I start from here and your house is 
the first I mention. The dinner I get from you will be celebrated 
in the archives as an exact opposite to the Barmeside feast. Do 
you understand?" 

«• You want me to give you grub for nothing? " 

" Well, I'd hardly put it that way. It " 

" You gol " 

" You refuse, then, to buy fame with a paltry 25-cent meal "> " 

"You bet I do! " 

" I'll compromise for a dish of pork and beans." 

" No. If you intend to get to New York this century you bet- 
ter start right away." 

" Nor even two doughnuts ? " 

"Get out, I tell you." 

" Very well," (haughtily). " You will regret this when history 
proclaims the man across the street in the position I offer you. 
I go. Fortune truly knocks at our doors and we turn her awav 
I " 

But the cashier was around the counter after him now, and he 
shot through the door to start on his journey to New York by 
way of Washington street. 



THE Cologne Gazette tells an extraordinary story of revenge. At 
Amay, in the district of Huy, in Belgium, it says, a young 
man was about to be married to a young lady, when he en- 
gaged in a flirtation with another. This was objected to by the 
young man's betrothed. One day a trip to the forest was ar- 
ranged by the offended lady, with three female companions. The 
promised bride invited her rival to accompany them, which in- 
vitation was innocently enough accepted. The forest was in- 
vaded by the little party, and, at a given signal, the four city 
beauties fell upon the unsuspecting girl. They beat her black 
and blue, and dealt her a dangerous wound upon the head. Then, 
with a cord around her, they drew her up to the bough of a tree. 
A letter-carrier passing at the time interfered; but be was set 
upon, scratched and bitten, and driven away. A second cham- 
pion soon came up, and, with the assistance of the postman, pot 
the women to flight. The new-comer discovered in the lady his 
sister. The girl still lives; but the doctors consider her life to be 
in danger. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office' 
407-109 Montgomery street. 




THE BRENTWOOD- 



O. F. WILLEY & CO., 

ESTABLISHED 18SS. 

Carriage Builders and Dealers, 

317 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, S. F. 

Agency for Brewster & Co., New York (of Broome St.); 
Henry Hooker* Co., New Haven, Conn.; C. S. Caffrey Co., 
Camden, N. J. ; Henry Killam Co,, New Haven, Conn.; Mil- 
lion Guiet & Cie, Paris, France; H. H. Babcoek Co., Water- 
town, N. Y*.; New Haven Carriage Co., New Haven, Conn.; 
Ohio Buggy Co., Columbus, O. 

HAVE YOU GOT 

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betes, or do you -want a pleasant, 
healthful drink? If so, buy 

ARCADIAN WAUKESHA WATER, 

Recommended by our best physi- 
cians as the healthiest drink on earth. 
Johnson- Locke Mercantile Company 
Agents, 204 Front St., S. F. 



LOUIS COOKS. 



WILLIAM COOKS. 



MAX COOKS. 



COOKS BROS., 

UtTTZEIRIOIK, DECOEATOBS. 

Dealers in Stained Glass, Wall Paper, Lincrusta Walton, Paper 

Mache, Parquet Flooring, Moorish Fret Work, 

Frescoing, Wall Mouldings, 

943 and 945 Market St.. between 5th and 6th. San Francisco 

LOUIS CAHEN & SON, 

Rectifiers of Spirits and Wholesale Liquor Dealers- 
Manufacturers of Syrups, Bitters, Cordials, etc. 
Pacific Coast Agents Bethesda Mineral Water. 

418 Sacramento Street, S. F. 

A. LUSK & CO., 

122 DAVIS STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 
Packers of the following celebrated brands: 
CELEBRATED LUSK BRANDS, 

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ARCHITECTS, 

Furnish plans, specifications, and Superintendence for the construction 
or renovation of dwelling houses, and every description of building. 
Office: 93 Flood Building, Cor. 4th and Market sis., s. 1'. 



July 1G 1892. 



PRANCIS1 NEWS LETTER. 



11 



TO LOVE. 

To love means not surrender. 

Lore means more — to endure! 
Yet for eacb look and lender 

Thought that your soul shall send her. 
You may rest safe and sure 

In virgin faith so pure — 
Where heart-throbs pain engender 

Love will remain secure, 
If love cannot surrender 

It can do more— endure! 

R. M. David. 



THE ILLUSIONS OF GENIUS. 



THE illusions of genius are extremely fantastic. To every stu- 
dent the fact that Goethe imagined he saw himself stalking 
about the streets in converse with strange people is familiar. 
Other great men have at various times and in various countries 
been the victims of mighty illusions. Napoleon the Great was a 
profound illusionist ; indeed, it is one of the weaknesses of true 
genius to be possessed of pleasing illusions. For instance, we of 
San Francisco are truly people of a volcanic and unsubduable 
genius; therefore it does not surprise us when we learn that 
among our young men of prominence, social, political and com- 
mercial, there are nursed illusions. How can it be otherwise? 
Now what can please us more than to know that Richard 
M. Tobin has an idea that he is a Pagannini. Who has not looked 
on him with rapture when he has been engaged in manufactur- 
ing music from out the bowels of his fiddle? Itis an unforgettable 
pleasare. Then Mr. Castle thinks, and not injudiciously, that in 
bim there are the makings of an actor, which shall one day 
thrust into pale sba-ies the glittering reputation of Coquelin. Mr. 
H. G. Piatt has to use his great force of character to repress his 
evil passions, for he feels that he is infinitely more fitted to be a 
saturnine highwayman of daringly illegal acts than to be a legiti- 
mised robber of the defenceless, and be known as a lawyer. 

Carter Tevis feels himself a financier, but the environments of 
San Francisco are too small for a magnificent outspreading of 
bis financial genius. It is an illusion which he should cherish. 

Dick Hammond's illusions are worthy of bim. They lead him 
into flowery realms, and so ardent ia this all-inspiring passion 
that the prosiest sand heap either blossoms into a garden or 
throbs with the life of an embryo city. 

Edward M. Greenway's illusions are many, but the chief is 
that of moral censor, and in the dim twilight of his inner con- 
sciousness be has seen himself in a toga sitting on a curile chair, 
with a laurel wreath on his head, looking on the immolation of 
the offenders of the proprieties. 

Baron John G. Kittle's pet illusion is, that he is a haughty rob- 
ber chieftain, with a castellated rookery on the banks of the 
Rhine. His pretty cottage nestling in umbrageous woods is his 
castle, the muddy slough that passes through the adjacent 
marsh lands is the Rhine, and his neighbors are his dependents, 
whom he could slaughter, but refrains from so doing. The ferry 
is his navy. Great is the Baron, whose original ancestors settled 
near W«-t Point. 

Captain Griffiths is modest. He thinks he is a Jehu, and when 
he cracks his whip and sends his steeds along, every gate he 
passes sheds nails through fear. 

Mr. Donald de V. Graham hugs to himself the thought that he 
is a Mario. Young and susceptible maidens need not think there 
is any connection meant with marriage. 

Joe Tobin's imaginings used to be rather painful. A year ago 
a persistent illusion used to be maintained by the press about a 
Mrs. Tobin. The athletic Joe now pictures himself as an austere 
monk, the order of La Trappe being preferred. 

Thomas Emmet Flynn carries an illusion in his cranium that 
he is mistaken for an Englishman. Itis a highly commendable 
illusion, but scarcely flattering to the exiles of Sausalito. 

Roger Magee's illusion is that he is a farmer, which is very 
hugely shared by banker Thompson. 

Commodore Gutte thinks that in him was lost a Paul Jones and 
Nelson, and Perrie Kewen laments the Inglorious era of peace 
which prevents there flaring into eye-blinking glory a martial 
leader, combining a dash of the caution of Hannibal, the reheal- 
ing qualities of Moreau and the gallantry of Ney. 

These are the great illusions of a few of our men who, by their 
brilliant talents, are helping to build up for San Francisco a rep- 
utation which shall vie with Babylon or Belus. 



Visitors to the country should take with them Steele's Grindelia 
Lotion of the fluid extract of Grindelia. It is the best known remedy 
for poison oak, and is also recognized as an unrivalled cure for asth- 
matic affections. The lotion is for sale at the Palace Pharmacy, at 
635 Market street. 

If you would be considered well-dressed, be certain to procure 
your furnishing goods from John W. Carmany, at 25 Kearny street. 

Inflamed eves and lids permanently cured if caused by defective sight. 
Consult (free of charge) C. Muller, refraction specialist, 135 Montgomery 
street, near Bush, San. Francisco. 



/ETNA 

HOT 



L 



Situated in Napa County, Cal, 

Reached by ■ dallirhtfal >l irar the moun- 

tains. Sixteen Hues from si. Helena. i"»«l \. 
oommodatione. Ample Bathing Facilities. 

a l'KATt'KK OF THE PLACE, 

A Large Swimming Tank of Hot Mineral Water 

The waters of the M tn a Mineral Springs have 
long been celebrated for their wonderful cures in 
cases of Acute and Chronic Dyspepsia, Kheuma- 
ti.sni, 1 nllammation of the Bladder, and Liver and 
Kidney Complaints. 

The temperature of the water is 98 degrees, and 
is highly charged with Carbonic Acid Gas, making 
it pleasant to the taste, and giving to the bath a 
most delightful sensation. 

High Altitude ! No Fogs ! No Mosquitoes 

Water from the Springs bottled by the 

AETNA MINERAL WATER CO., 

TelepUone 536. Office, 108 Drunim Street, S. 1 



YOU'RE OUT 

If you don't go to 

NAPA SODA 
SPRINGS 



THIS SUMMER. 



What Do You Want ? 



A Climate that beats Italy. No Malaria or Cold 
Sea Air. Health-giving Mineral Water. Cuisine 
and Service Unexceptionable. Comfortable Beds. 
Table First Quality. Gas and Running Water in 
Every Room. Hot Napa Soda Baths. 
Two Trains Every Day. 
All Visitors are Satisfied. 



ANDREW JACKSON, 



PROPRIETOR, 



Napa Soda Springs P. O. 



The Strathmore Apartment House. 

N. W. Cor. Larkin and Fulton Streets. 

Exclusively for families. First-class in every respect. Ele- 
vator day and night. First-class restaurant in the building. 

Apply to Janitor in the building, or to A. Hayward, No. 224 
California S treet. 

HOTEL PLEASANTON, 

Sutter Street, corner Jones. San Francisco, Cal. 

The Largest, Best Appointed and Most Liberally Managed Family and 
Tourist Hotel in San Francisco. Lighted by Electricity throughout. 

Elegantly Furnished Dining Rooms and Parlors for Banquets, Private 
Dinners, Parties, Weddings, etc. 
The Cuisine a Special Feature. 

MRS. M. E. PENDLETON, 
Proprietor and Manager. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG, 



MODEL -A-Ifc^EHaiC-A-iT CATERER, 

1206 Sutter street. 

Telephone 2888. SAN FRANCISCO. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisoo. 

.A. <atJI3E3T HOLIES 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 



HENRY C. HYDE 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 

MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 

Of Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc., in the Detection of Forgeries , 

Counterfeits and Imitations. 
41 \% CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco, Cal. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 



A CHAP was moralizing the other night at Del Monte, after the 
festivities of the evening were over, and a few congenial spirits 
were having a *< weed" before turning in. Said he : " Now, 1 leave 
it to any of you fellows, if a girl doesn't look more attractive and 
loveable in a clean white gown, with some dainty ribbons, or 
flowers, if you will, but simple and well-fitting, than in the 
muchly-trimmed, bedizened silks and laces, that cost a fortune, 
and make a man sigh to think bow much of his month's salary 
it would take to provide one?" Needless to say, the speaker was 

an old bachelor. 

* * * 

It is a noticeable fact, that the presence of the pastor of Grace 
Cathedral's flock at Del Monte keeps a good many of his sheep 
in the path of church-going, etc. Sunday ia not so much a day 
of recreation as it used to be, and the pretty little chapel near by 
is sure of a goodly contingent from the hotel for morning service. 

# « * 

" Handsome Harry," as the ladies dub Dr. Tevis, is still free 
from Hymen's chains. Gossip avers that a pretty face in Gotham 
holds the gallant medico a captive, but if this be so, one thing is 
certain — " absence makes the heart grow fonder," sure enough. 
But of several en masse, to judge by his general attention by the 

seaside. 

# * * 

Freddie Sharon is notquite up to his usual mark this summer. 
Natty he always is, and neat as wax. But there is an air of be- 
ing bored about him at variance with the whilom jovial mood so 
characteristic of the fortunate young millionaire. And yet, for- 
tune showers several old favorites upon his pathway. 

* * * 

How singularly lucky some men seem to be. Not very many years 
gone by, and no less than three, nay four, of our prominent men 
were pursued by angry threats and fears of personal injury. Now 
Judge Field and Frank Newlands can visit the city without fear 
of Althea's vengeance. Lloyd Tevis and Fred Sharon can walk 
the streets unterrified by pistols from Merced. 

# * » 

Society is delighted by a whisper which has got out, somehow, 
to the effect that the Whitelaw Reids are contemplating a short 
visit to Mlllbne, and in honor of the event D. O. Mills will give 
one of the swellest entertainments ever known in that locality, 
strongly reminiscent of the Belmont affairs of long ago. 

* #■ *■ 

Dame Rumor is busy assigning the fascinating son of a fasci- 
nating father, Bill Barnes, to a charming girl whose bright eyes 
are shaded by a nobby parasol on the beach at Santa Cruz every 

day. 

» « • 

The mention in last week's News Letter of Miss Rosa Gore has 
called up many reminiscences of early-day belles, and one of Miss 
Gore herself may prove amusing. At that period South Park 
was one of the most fashionable residence quarters in San Fran- 
cisco, and in its semi-circle there dwelt, among others, three young 
ladies who had been dubbed " the world, the flesh and thedevil." 
Miss Gore, from her well-known love for gaiety, was the first; 
Miss Lottie Hall, a very buxom^damsel, was the second; and Miss 
Patsey Ritchie, from the sharpness of her tongue, was the third. 
Miss Ritchie, who had the misfortune of being cross-eyed, was 
exceedingly fond of wordy encounters in which she nearly always 
came out ahead. But one notable exception was on the occasion 
of ber calling attention to Miss Gore's rather large nose. Where- 
upon Miss Gore responded : " Well, if it is large there is one satis- 
faction that I have; I am not always looking at it." 

# » # 

Castle Crags flourishes. The pretty widow, Mrs. Fabre, is 
noted for her pedestrianism. Another widow, Mrs. Latham, 
takes her pleasure in siestas, while a third, Mrs. Poole, reads by 
the hour. The Misses Goad ramble about in search of ferns, 
of which there is an endless variety. Mrs. Rutherford, her 
daughter and George Crocker make frequent excursions round 
the neighborhood, and have discovered many charmiDg spots of 
rural beauty. 

w » # 

From present appearances of the "booking" list.it would 
seem as though the whole of society would be at Monterey dur- 
ing the last two weeks of August. No doubt the shoot of the 
Country Club is the magnet to many, while others are pretty sure 
to follow in the lead. 

* # * 

It is not generally known that Eddie Foy, the star comedian of 
Henderson's Chicago extravaganzas, is a cousin of Miss Minnie 
Fogg, the pretty Oroville girl, who last season smiled upon Santa 
Cruz's population as a protege of Major Frank McLaughlin. 



Melburn Greene, the young University of California graduate, 
succumbed to the charms of the fair widow, Doctress Francois 
Marx, and married her at the altar of St. Stephen's Episcopal 
Church some days ago. The match is entirely a love affair, and 
the widow Greene was unable to break if off even with the threat 
of disinheritance. The widow is said to be very bitter over the 
youngest son's perversity. Even the marriage by a prelate of 
the church of which she is a prominent member and the retire- 
ment of Jewish principles to Episcopalian supremacy, has failed 
to have any effect. Greene has already received $10,000 as a 
legacy, so is not likely to starve. His brother Harry has given 
up bis pretty cottage at Santa Cruz for the honeymoon, and there 
the two lovers will spend a couple of weeks. When they tire of 
their bower by the sea they will hie themselves to Europe. 
« • # 

Pretty Miss Kitty Cheatham, of the Daly Company, is cousin 
to Attorney Billy Foote of this city. Mr. Foote, by the way, is 
a scion of one of the most distinguished families in the South, for 
his father served in the United States Senate and later on was 
Governor of Mississippi. The Governor married twice, his second 
wife being Miss Cheatham's aunt Miss Cheatham makes her 
home at the residence of Henry Watterson, in Kentucky, during 
the off seasons. Her mother travels with her, but was taken ill 
at St. Louis, so Miss Kitty had to come to the coast alone. 

# # * 

The faro dealers have at last abandoned all hopes of running in 
this city, for a while at least, and have set forth for other fields 
to conquer. Most of them have gone up on the Sound, where 
the games are " protected," that is for certain monetary consid- 
erations. Carroll, Webber and Ross, the three monarchs of the 
business, have all grown wealthy at it, their individual fortunes 
being estimated all the way from $50,000 to $100,000. Webber is 
president of a brick company in the southern part of the State, 
owns a cottage at Santa Monica, and lives altogether in about as 
good style as a Chicago alderman. 

« » * 

There is nothing that delights Deputy City Clerk F. R. O'Brien, 
of Oakland, so much as to address him by his title of Major. 
He holds a commission to that effect in the National Guard, but 
this is by no means all his honors, for he ia Secretary of the Re- 
publican State League, Commander of the Resaca Club, elder of 
the Unitarian Church, and a few other things in that line. But 
he bows his head in shame just now, despite bis dignities, and 
it's all on account of the explosion on Saturday last. When it 
occurred the Major was seated in the Council room at the City 
Hall, amidst the rest of the officials, and at the first aound of 
crashing glass he jumped wildly to bis feet. Then, when the sec- 
ond and the third concussions came, and sky lights were break- 
ing and plaster falling, he gave a wild shriek of despair, threw 
up his arms and fell in a dead faint on the floor. And he a Major 
and a warrior, too — no wonder the memory of the day is now a 

horrible nightmare to him. 

# # » 

No one should remember poor Kate Castleton with more kind- 
ness than her divorced husband, Harry Phillips. She bore with 
his frailties until it was no more possible for her to do so, and 
then provided for him handsomely when the separation was 
agreed upon. A proof of this ia that Harry's relatives, whom the 
late burlesque atar always befriended, will never hear a word said 
against her, and considered her one of the most generous of 

mortals. 

# # * 

The successful opening of the new theatre recalls memories of 
the grand opening night of Baldwin's Academy of Music, on 
Monday, March 6th, in Centennial year. The play was Richard 
III., with Barry Sullivan {his first appearance here) aa the ill- 
favored uaurper of the Britiab throne. J. F. Cathcart aasumed 
the role of the Earl of Richmond, Lewis James was the Duke of 
Buckingham, Annie Adams and Zoe Tuttle were the Princes in 
the Tower, E. J. Buckley, Tressel; M. A. Kennedy, Catesby; 
Dave Belasco, Ratcliff; Louise Hawthorne, Queen Elizabeth; 
Emily Baker, the Lady Anne, and Mrs. Belle Douglass, the 
Duchess of York. Others in Sullivan's brilliant company were 
W. H. Crane, James O'Neill, L. Belmour, A. H. Hastings, James 
A. Heme, Emmie Wilmott, Katie Mayhew, Kitty Belmour, and 
Mary More, whose names are less well-known to theatre-goers. 
8ouvenir programmes, printed on bronze satin, provided by a local 
dry goods house, were given to every one in the audience upon 
the occasion in question, and Hamlet was announced to he in re- 
hearsal. Tom Maguire leased the theatre then, and J. A. Heme 
was stage manager. The latter afterwards married little Katherine 
Corcoran, a pupil of the same teacher who launched Nellie Calhoun 
upon the sea of dramatic fame. 

My preference for the Caligraph, for use in a telegraph office, in- 
creases as I use it, and as I observe other people using other ma- 
chines. From the use of nearly all the different machines in the 
market, my experience has driven me to the Caligraph exclusively. 
Yours very truly, H. K. HIBBETS, 

Night Chief Operator, 
Pacific Postal Telegraph Cable Company. 



July 16, 1892. 



BAN PRANCISCO NBW8 LETTER, 



13 



TENNIS AND BASEBALL. 



A 1.1, the excitement is over for the present, and tennis otrclM 
will resume their normal conditions until the double cham- 
pionship and ladies' single championship, which will, in all prob- 
ability, take place in San Kafacl on Admission Day. The courts 
at all the principal clubs are being well patronized, as there are 
smaller tournaments on the tapis. The first will be the quarterly 
tournament at the California Club, and from the outlook, there 
will be quite a large entry. It will be remembered that the cup 
presented by the members of the club has to be won five times 
altogether, and Mr. C. P. Hubbard, who has been working won- 
ders in Chicago, has already won it twice. He will not be here 
to compete, and so it will fall this time into other hands. 0. 
Huffman. Gray and Yates, owing to business, are not likely to 
play, and it is expected that the cup will go to one of theyounger 
players. 

The number of strokes, etc., in the Taylor-Hubbard match has 
been counted, and the record is as follows: In the first sett, Tay- 
lor won 34 to Hubbard's 25, and both players made a double 
fault; in the second, Taylor won 39 to Hubbard's 31, Mr. Hub- 
bard making two double faults: in the third, Hubbard won 35 
to Taylor's 30, and 47 to 44 in the fourth, where Hubbard made 
again a double fault. In the fifth and final sett, Mr. Taylor won 
34 to Hubbard's 28, Hubbard making two double faults. The 
totals show that Mr. Taylor won 28 games to Hubbard's 23, and 18i 
strokes to 166. In the first sett, Taylor won two love games to 
Hubbard's one; in the second, one to none; in the third, one to 
none, and in the fifth, Hubbard won one to none. 

J. Tobin and C. P. Hubbard arrived in Chicago in time for the 
United States National Lawn Tennis Association's tournament, 
and entered in the doubles. In the first round, the Californians 
bad it all their own way, defeating Messrs. Gardner and Wren in 
straight setts — 6-4, 6-0, 6-1. In the second round they 
defeated Messrs. Mundy and Allen — 6-2, 6-1, 6-3, but were de- 
feated in the semi finals by Ryerson and Carver, by three setts to 
two — 9-7, 4-6, 3-6, 6-3, 9-7. Chicago advices say that such 
team work had never been witnessed there before, and it is more 
remarkable, as Hubbard and Tobin were rather unfamiliar with 
each other's game. If, however, they had practiced more to- 
gether, we do not doubt that the result would have been 
different. 

K. Harrison has returned from college, and is practicing hard 
for the California cup. His game is much improved. 

H. "Continuous "Stetson left Thursday for Lake Tahoe, where 
be will remain two weeks, but will return for the cup tournament. 

All the tennis players will sympathize with C. R. Yates on the 
loss of his father, which occurred last Saturday. 

J. J. Archibald, C. Neel and Will English have been appointed 
by the Oakland Tennis Club as the committee to rank the players 
of that club and start a continuous tournament. The Napa Lawn 
Tennis Club has also started one, both for ladies and gentlemen, 
and Reno will shortly follow suit. 

RASFRAI I A ^ tD * 3 wr ^* n 8 tje Los Angeles club has a fair 
' * J\ prospect of coming out in the lead for the base- 

ball pennant, with San Francisco and San Jose struggling for sec- 
ond place. Each club has to play eight games more before the 
season changes. The result of these games is liable to change the 
position of any one of the three leading clubs. Oakland and San 
Francisco have also two postponed games, which they can play 
with each other if they wish. Los Angeles will play in this city 
this afternoon and to-morrow. Next week the club will finish 
the first part of this season at San Jose with the club of that 
place. The Stockton people are anxious to be once again in the 
baseball world, and with that end in view an effort ia being made 
to have the San Jose franchise transferred to Stockton. The San 
Jose people have not supported their club as liberally this year as 
they should, considering the first-rate club that they have, and 
the fine character of ball which has been played in San Jose this 
season. It is now two years since Stockton was in the League. 
At one time that city was a fine baseball place. McDermott met 
with an injury last Tuesday, which prevented his umpiring dur- 
ing this week. Fortunately President Mone was able to secure 
Gagus to take his place temporarily. The race promises to finish 
as close this year as in former seasons. Every one expects to see 
Oakland cut out the pace the other clubs shall travel next season. 
The present season will end a week from to-morrow, and the next 
season will commence tie following W. dneaday. Oakland will 
open next season in Los Angelea. 

SINGERLY — I hear your firm offered you an increase in 
salary or a month's vacation, and you are going to take the 
vacation. What are you going to do that for? I should think 
you would rather have the increase. Strawher — Not much, old 
fellow. My vacation is the only time during the year that I can 
fall in love with a we althy girl. —Tom Masson. 

Laundry Farm is not excelled as a pleasure resort within easy 
reach of the city. Since its opening it has been considered one of 
the most delightful picnic Grounds in the vicinity of San Fran- 
cisco. It is reached by the California railway, which also runs direct 
to Miils Seminary. Laundry Farm is an hour and fifteen minutes 
from this city and forty minutes from Oakland. 



HOSIERY 

FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN 
AND CHILDREN I 



Complete Assortments, Standard 
Makes, 

LOWEST PR CESI 




111 to 121 Post Street 




GOLD SEAL Eubber HOSE, 

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Goodyear Rubber Company, 



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077 .1 579 Market Street. 



»© TO 

Or. W. CLARK &c CO., 
663 Market Street, 

FOB 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 

Good Cheer and a Souvenir of California for our Eastern Friends. 

Parties desiring to send to their 
friends East the 

L INGLENOOK TABLE WINES 

Can have their orders filled at San 
Francisco prices aud of freight at 
car-load rates added, thus saving 
a great expense by leaving their 
orders in time with 

F. A. HABER, 

Office and Depot Inglenook Vineyard, 122 Sansome St., S. 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 




*-^m» ^ re tfs nan «S 



&e.LQPKER-9N^ 



Ol!gp^<_|} H Lu ^^*'t^ J,itt - a ^ 



WILLIAM H. RAYMOND, better known as " Uncle Billy," 
one of the beat known of the early mining men of the Pa- 
cific Coast, was buried in this city last week. Raymond waa a 
most remarkable man in his way, and bis luck as a miner was 
phenomenal. It is said of him that if he conceived the idea of 
sinking a shaft on a roadway, he would strike a mine. He was 
one of the first to open up the mines of Pbaranaghat district, in 
southern Nevada, shortly after his arrival in the State, in 1865. 
He took a party, with twenty-two yoke of cattle and twenty 
span of mules, across the desert to this camp, and on the way ex- 
perienced a number of adventures, which would have daunted 
many a man of less determination. The effort nearly cost him 
his life, for, becoming short of water, he lay down from sheer ex- 
haustion, and would have expired, had it not been for the sharp 
instinct of the old bell-mare which he had with him. His 
younger brother had picked him up and thrown him across the 
back of this animal, when she suddenly left the trail and made a 
bee line for a point seven miles distant, where water was found, 
and Raymond was resuscitated. After leaving Pharanaghat, 
where he extracted over a million dollars from the mines, he went 
to Pioche. In 1868 he was at the head of the Raymond and Ely 
mines, from which he took nearly $6,000,000. From there he 
went to the Lodi district, where his luck followed him, the Ar- 
genta mine, which he opened, paying $400,000. When that gave 
out he came to California, and located at Calico, where there was 
about as much prospect of a mine, according to experts, as th*re 
is to-day on Goat Island. He struck it eventually, all the same, 
and in partnership with J. S. Doe, of this city, erected a thirty- 
stamp mill, which has turned out millions in bullion. There he 
got a sun-stroke, from which he never recovered, and for the past 
two years he has been perfectly helpless. He was a native of 
New York State, where he was born in the year 1817. 
* * * 

No one who has traveled between San Francisco and Los 
Angeles will ever forget that weary, desolate stretch of country 
lying between the town of Tehachipi, on the north, and the Sole- 
dad Canon on the south. This section is a portion of the Mojave 
desert, and for miles on miles the level surface stretches away in 
every direction, unrelieved save by a scanty, dust-colored and 
dust-laden herbage, and the gaunt, ungainly trunks of the yucca 
palms. It is the very " abomination of desolation " spoken of in 
the Scriptures. No indigenous animal life of any kind is to be 
seen, and except for the noise of an occasional passing train and 
the mournful rattling of the yucca leaves in the almost perpetu- 
ally blowing gale, no sound breaks tbe death-like silence. If 
there be sustenance for man or beast here, then appearances must 
be deceptive, while a limited residence would assuredly prepare 
any one for permanent occupancy of an apartment in the insane 
asylum. Yet it is an actual fact that some ingenious and heart- 
less speculator has laid out a town in the midst of this wilder- 
ness, and tbe gleaming white stakes that mark the boundaries of 
the "choice business corners" and "eligible villa sites" 
shine among the cactus and weeds like tombstones 
over the perished hopes of the unwary. A little railroad 
station has been built, and half a mile or so away are the un- 
gainly walls of a couple of rudely-built shanties, one of which, 
presumably, is a hotel. Here, one desolate, bleak, dreary night 
last week, the overland train stopped to allow a party of emi- 
grants — men, women and children — fresh from the fatherland, to 
alight. For the best part of the day they had been passing 
through a veritable garden spot — the valleys of Southern Califor- 
nia — and now, as night was falling, they were deposited in the 
midst of the desert, with surroundings whose depressing charac 
ter could not possibly be made greater. That they had been 
forming glowing anticipations of their destination was evident, 
and their bitter disappointment was depicted unmistakably upon 
their faces. But they sturdily, though silently, shouldered their 
luggage and struck out across the bleak waste toward the two 
lonely buildings in the distance. Who was responsible for this 
cruel deception could not be learned, but not a person witnessed 
the scene who was not filled with profound pity for these latest 
victims of the land speculator. 

* # • 

There is considerable rivalry between Messrs. Adolph Spreckels, 
Charles S. Wieland and Frank H. Burke, as to who is the pos- 
sessor of the fastest team of horses. In order to settle the mat- 



ter a match has been arranged, and it will take place at Sacra- 
mento during the coming State Fair. A valuable trophy will be 
given the winner. The conditions are that the owners of tbe 
teams are to drive them. As each of the gentlemen possesses fast 
horses the match will be a very interesting one. 
» # * 
Richard Ferrer, that talented young musician of whom San 
Francisco will, ere long, be justly proud, went one day, soon after 
his arrival in Berlin, into the many shops, upon the windows of 
which is inscribed, " English spoken." "Do you speak Eng- 
lish?" he asked of the clerk. The man shook his head. "Do 
you speak Spanish?" Another shake of tbe head. » Well." said 
young Ferrer, "do you speak Deutsch?" "Yah, yahl"came 
the ready answer. "Then," said Mr. Ferrer, in solemn English, 
" give me a pocket knife." 

* * * 

Stories about the shock caused by the recent powder explosion 
continue to come in. In tbe down-town stores there was much 
damage done. In the establishment of Langley ft Michaels, 
when the first shock startled the clerks in the front office, it was 
thought that an explosisn had occurred in the chemical labor- 
atory on the top floor. One of the firm rushed to tbe tube, and 
whistled upstairs to the chemist to ascertain his condition. There 
was no reply. He whistled again, and while waiting for a reply 
the second shock came. Then the clerks were certain that the 
laboratory had blown up, and they rushed upstairs to find the 
chemist's remains. When theyfgot to the laboratory, the door 
was carefully opened, and as entrance was made, the head of the 
chemist was seen peering down through the skylight. He was 
not taking any chance, for he had determined that if anything 
was going to drop that he would have a clear fall, and if any- 
thing was going up he wished no obstructions to intervene be- 
tween himself and the heavens. 

* * * 

_ Dr. George Franklin Shields had a rather uncomfortable expe- 
rience last Sunday. He was himself the innocent cause of all his 
trouble. The doctor is very fond of taking a little exercise of a morn- 
ing, in his rooms, at the corner of Stockton and O'Farrell streets. 
He walks briskly through his three rooms, admiring possessions 
of brick, cement and wood that will be his some day by inherit- 
ance. His attire was very brief, and his chest swelled with pride 
as he walked to and fro. A draft of air closed his bedroom door. 
It has a spring lock. The doctor was shocked. He rushed to 
the door and tried the knob. He was locked out. His trousers 
hung on the back of a chair in the inner room, and in the pocket 
was his latch key. Here was a predicament. The day was cold, 
and the doctor sat in his office chair and shivered. On the floor 
was a bear rug. He folded it around his shoulders and went to 
the door and yelled for the janitor. A passer-by in the hallway 
saw the apparition and fled; a patient likewise took to his heels. 
For three hours the doctor waited, and at last the janitor ap- 
peared, got the keys, and the doctor donned his Sunday attire 
and went out for a walk, but not until he had sworn the janitor 
to secrecy. 

* # » 

Charles Erin Verner, the delineator of Irish character, who has 
been causing the hearts of the fair one on the promenade to go 
thunipety-thurop lately, whenever he appeared on the Rialto 
under that fetching traveling cap of his, is a man with a calm 
assurance that would be worth ten thousand a year to a com- 
mercial traveler. Verner has been everywhere, and knows every 
one worth knowing, from Cape Colony to the Straits of Carpen- 
taria. He has kissed the Blarney Stone, and has as smooth a 
tongue as ever charmed an audience. His manners are as gallant 
as those of any true Irish gentleman, and it is of an instance il- 
lustrating that fact that I write. Recently Mr. Verner escorted a 
couple of gentlemen friends and a lady from the Alcazar Theatre 
to the Ellis street cars. The gallant actor found a comfortable 
seat on the dummy for the lady, and then, after tucking her robes 
about her, and wishing her a pleasant journey and happy dreams, 
this son of Erin, notwithstanding the electric lights and the stares 
of the Roman populace, bent down and kissed the lips of the fair 
maiden. He then bowed again, went upon his erratic way, while 
the less brave San Franciscans who were with him stared and 
wondered. 

* * * 

*< What's in a name?" is an old saying, but there is at least one 
young man in town who is certain it is a most foolish one. This 
is the reason of his belief. He was recently nominated for mem- 
bership in the University Club. Unfortunately his name is ex- 
actly tbe same, even to the initials, as that of a man who has 
more enemies than friends in the club, and the opinion became 
general that it was the disliked man who was endeavoring to 
secure the privileges of the comfortable club-house on Sutter 
Btreet. Tbe result was that when the candidate for refined asso- 
ciates was balloted for he was black-balled so unmercifully that 
hardly a single white ball could be found in the box. The candi- 
date was astonished, shocked; his sponsor was indignant and de- 
manded an explanation. He wanted to find out why his friend 
had been treated so cavalierly. He was informed that the gentle- 
man whom he had proposed was a villain of the deepest dye, who 



Julv 16, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IS 



could not be allowedjto associate with the coll«gl»ns. An Investi- 
gation was made. and soon It w»» discovered lb»t it was the 
wicked Droruio at whom the black-balls had been cast. When II 
wa» explained to tbe gentlemen who had rejected the candidate 
tbal they bad put an affront upon an entirely innocent individual, 
of course there was sorrow and lamenlaling. The rejected candi 
date's name was again posted, a new election ordered, and he 
entered tbe club with flying colors. He is thinking aerionily, 
however, of changing his name, or painting a strawberry mark 
on bis cheek, or doing something to show he is not the other 
fellow. 

• • • 

The fakiig tendencies of some of the local correspondents for 
the Eastern press was again illustrated on the day of the explo- 
sion. Two or three correspondents wired sentimental stories 
East to the effect that over one hundred lives had been lost, and 
that devastation was widespread in the vicinity of tbe scene of 
tbe explosion. It was just such a false, sensational tale as was 
sent East at the time of the earthquake several months ago. Such 
liars as these correspondents prove themselves to be should not 
be employed by any reputable journal. Tbey have it in their 
power to greatly injure a community, and that they do so, with- 
out regard to the consequences, has been repeatedly shown. 

• • * 

The French colony had a great time on Thursday. They al- 
ways do on the Fourteenth of July. Parades, music, fireworks, 
literary exercises, banquets, balls, masquerades, picnics, excur- 
sions, and a dozen different methods of entertainment are en- 
joyed by the descendants or the doughty Frenchmen who 
knocked spots out of the old bastile. The French processions 
are a little more reliable than those of Independence Day regard- 
ing their lime of starting. Tbe announced hour for the 
parade Thursday was two o'clock, and when St. Mary's 
bell struck out its chimes, the vicinity of Montgomery 
avenue and Pacific streets, the rendezvous, was crowded 
with a mass of Frenchmen, all eager for the trumpets to 
sound the advance. The exercises of the day befitted the 
occasion. The parade was under the command of Grand Mar- 
shal M. A. Froment, whose Chief Aid was M. A. Decourtieux. 
J. Laracbe and P. Desenfant also acted as aids. The proces- 
aion made a good appearance. The battalion from the Third Reg- 
iment, under the gallant Colonel O'Connor, was greeted with 
great applause. The literary exercises were held at Woodward's 
Gardens. L. P. Marais was President of the Day. In the even, 
ing there were fireworks at the Gardens and a ball in the Pa- 
vilion. The Cercle Francais banquet on Wednesday night, at the 
club rooms, was a great success. President Em. Raas was toast- 
master, and patriotic sentiments were responded to by many of 

the orators present. 

» # » 

An incident occurred on last Saturday which was overlooked 
by the police reporters in the flurry which followed the powder 
explosion. The son of one of the most prominent physicians in 
the State outside of this city, being short of cocaine and also of 
the necessary funds to procure a supply, conceived the idea of 
forging an order for the drug on a drug-store. He selected as his 
first victim the firm of Langley & Michaels. Securing the ser- 
vices of a messenger boy, he dispatched him with an order for co- 
caine, opium and several brands of patent medicine, signing the 
name of a well-known dealer in this city. The boy happened to 
run across a clerk who was born and raised in the vicinity of a 
powder factory, and he noticed something peculiar in the signa- 
ture of the dealer, who happened to be an old customer. The 
clerk sent for a detective at once. The boy was then given the 
patent medicines, and followed. When he delivered the package 
to a man waiting a couple of blocks off, both were arrested and 
taken to the city prison. When the identity of the young man 
was discovered he was discharged with a caution. When searched, 
another order was found on him drawn on the firm of Redington 
& Co., which was evidently intended to be used in case the first 
had failed. It is lucky for some people that their fathers were 
born before them. 

Burlington Route Excursions. 

Commencing Tuesday, March 15th, at 2 p. m., from Los Angeles, 
and Wednesday, at 8 p.m., from San Francisco, and every Tuesday 
and Wednesday thereafter, the Burlington Route will run its regular 
Summer Excursions, with Pullman Tourist Sleeping cars, to Chicago, 
via Salt Lake City and Denver. For particulars and excursion folder, 
apply to agent, Burlington Route, at 204 South Spring street, Los 
Angeles; or 32 Montgomery street. San Francisco. 




A. de LUZE & FILS' 

(BORDEAUX) 

IET I IST IE? C L ^ IR, E T S . 

St. Estephe, Pontet Canet, Chat. Margaux. 

Pauillac, Chat. Leoviile, Chat. Beychevelle, 

Brown Cantenac, Chat. Larose, Chat. Montrose, 

St. Julen, Chat. Paveil, Chat. Lafite. 

FINE SAUTERNES. 



Sauternes Sup'r., Haut Sauternes, 

la Cases, Quarts aud Pints. 



Chateau Yquem, 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents, 311 Sacramento Street. 



Moquette Carpets 

At 

Reduced Prices. 



Until July 1st we offer a large variety 
oj desirable patterns at 20 PER CENT 
LESS THAN USUAL PRICES. 
"We must close out these patterns be- 
fore our stock-taking on July 1st, be- 
cause our mills have stopped making 
them, and dropped patterns must go 
to make room for new Fall styles. 

W. & J. SLOANE k CO, 

641-647 Market Street. 

CARPETS, FURNITURE, UPHOLSTERY, 
WINDOW SHADES. 

JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS 

PROPRIETORS OF THE 

CITY IRON WORKS. 

Office 51 Fremont Street, 

SAJST FBAETCISCO, - - - CAL. 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Boilers, Engines, Pumps and Machinery of Every Description. 

Patent Lead-Lined Coupled Tubing, for use as 

Water Pipe, for Sale Cheap 




s 




OUTING SUITS- 
TENNIS SUITS- 



— SHIRTS. 

-SHIRTS, 



LADIES 



! 



WAISTS 



27 rpQ 317 JS:E!^a.E.lT"S" STREET. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 




THE Hale & Norcross case is not ended yet by any means, and 
before many days have passed there will be some interesting 
developments which will place the matter in a new light before 
the public. In other words, there will be a change of base all 
around, and those who have been the most prominent in a com- 
bined attack upon personal character will find their powers taxed 
to defend themselves, instead of forcing the fighting. First and 
foremost will be Superior Judge J. C. B. Hebbard, who will be 
impeached in due course of time by the defendants. A close and 
critical analysis of his decision, in what bids fair to become a 
celebrated case, has revealed a number of discrepancies, and a 
disregard for facts, proven by the evidence, which are simply 
astounding, more especially when the magnitude of the judg- 
ment is remembered. The alleged conspiracy was based accord 
ing to this decision on the proposition that the stockholders of 
the company suffered a loss of legitimate profits during the 
period covered by the complainant, which extended over 
the statutory term of three years, from September, 1890 
back to 1887. In an attempt to maintain this point 
Judge Hebbard, in his decision, goes onto say " that out of a 
mass of 88,887 tons of ore dug out of the Hale & Norcross during 
the years 1887, 1888, 1889 and up to July 1st, 1890, showing a val- 
uation by car sample of $3,505,361, and crushed at the Vivian, 
Mexican and Nevada {or Chollar) Mills, not one cent was ever re- 
ceived by the stockholders in the shape of profits. There was 
one dividend of $112,000 declared during that time, but there 
were also two assessments of $112,000 each levied dur- 
ing the same time, making $224,000 of assessments as 
against $112,000 of dividends, and therefore a net loss to the 
stockholders during those three years and a half of $112,000, in- 
stead of any profit whatever." This is the main point at issue, 
which justifies the decision rendered against the plaintiff. It will 
be a surprise to a great many people who have only read the be- 
ginning and tail end of this decision to learn that the statement 
is absolutely incorrect and misleading. 
91 S 

THERE were not two assessments levied from the time the ore 
was discovered in Hale & Norcross, in the latter part of 1887, 
down to the commencement of this suit. When the last levy 
was made, in July, 1887, prior to the strike, there was not a 
pound of ore opened up in the mine worth taking out. From 
that date, and during the period embraced in the complaint, but 
one assessment of $56,000 was collected, and that was levied on 
April 9th, 1890. Instead of only one dividend being paid during 
the period intervening from the discovery of ore, in 1887, and up 
to July 1, 1890, ho less than /our were disbursed among the share- 
holders, aggregating $224,000. In addition to this, the indebted- 
ness of the mine, amounting to $30,000 at the time the ore was 
found, was also paid out of the profits, together with all the 
expenses of the mine for the period named. 

HOW Judge Hebbard arrived at the " net loss to the stockholders 
during those three years and a half of $112,000," is a question 
which it is proposed to find out. He had the books of the com- 
pany before him, and furthermore it is in evidence that Mr. 
Wood, attorney for the defense, called the attention of the court 
to the statement of Mr. Baggett, representing the plaintiff, that 
only one dividend was declared during the period referred to, 
offering at the same time documentary proofs of the correct num- 
ber and the various amounts. In face of this, however, Judge 
Hebbard ignores the facts as represented on the trial, to the 
detriment of the defendants. It was on this point of dividends 
and assessments that the whole case hinged, and yet we find the 
court completely reversing their order, only one dividend out of 
four being recognized in his decision, while the assessments are 
swelled from one of $56,000 to two of $112,000 each, aggregating 
$224,000. Irrespective of what the defendants may think or do 
in regard to such a strange discrepancy in figures, which has 
borne so heavily against them, the public will naturally look for 
an explanation of such a strange proceeding. A strong exception 
will also be taken by some of the defendants to what is consid- 
ered a display of animus in the allusion to the uncertainty re- 
garding the disposition of Levy's one-eighth, and also to the 
statement that the notice and demand was served individually 
upon the Board of Directors. 

f $ $ 

NOW, in regard to the defendants' liability. Judge Hebbard 
holds that the stockholders have been damaged to the extent 
of $1,011,835. He arrives at this conclusion by the very ingeni- 
ous method of substituting actual bullion returns for the assay 



value of the pulp. He places a value of $3,505,361, whether 
right or wrong, as the case may be, on the 88,887 tons of ore ex- 
tracted during the three years mentioned in the complaint. From 
this amount he deducts $10 per ton as the difference between the 
car sample assay value and the value in bullion, which is not only 
ridiculous and preposterous, but entirely contrary to the evidence 
presented and concurred in by both sides during the trial. From 
every car of ore, as it comes out of the mine on its way to the 
mill, the foreman takes a handful, indiscriminately. This is put 
in a bag, and at the end of the day the mass is assayed as a check 
against the mill, which in turn furnishes the pulp assay values. 
There is always a wide difference between the car sample and 
pulp assays, and in this or any other case $10 is a very moderate 
allowance for the variation. The ore in pulp is itself subject to 
a heavy reduction during the treatment to which it is subjected 
in converting it into bullion. 

Ml 

ON the Comstock, when 65 per cent, of the pulp assay value 
is recovered, it is considered fair enough, and in many mines, 
here and elsewhere, it has been the misfortune of the owners to be 
out of pocket through an inability to save the metal in ores 
which have run high, in both the car samples and pulp assays. 
It is evident, therefore, that there is a very material difference 
between the value of ore as it is assayed from the car and the 
actual return in bullion after passing through the reduction pro- 
cess. Judge Hebbard, however, has ignored all this in his de- 
cision, although the greatest stress was laid on this point, so as 
to make it as clear as possible for his benefit. He simply takes 
a car sample and slashes off $10, to obtain the actual return in 
bullion, ignoring altogether the difference between the ore and 
pulp assays; the loss in the treatment and the actual value of the 
bullion; allowing for the different percentages of gold and silver, 
and the heavy loss in discount on the latter. This may all seem 
very right and proper to Judge Hebbard and his friends, but with 
the majority of people, legal opinions based on such absurdities 
will not carry much weight. 

It i 

BY such a loose method of calculation, there is little difficulty 
in swelling the bullion return of any mine up into the rail- 
lions, and the hint may be worth something in the future to a 
certain class of mining promoters, who live by their wits. Tak- 
ing the very fignres of the judgment, but calculating correctly 
and in accordance with the evidence, shows a very material 
difference in the results. The value by car samples of the 88,887 
tons of ore extracted, as estimated by Judge Hebbard, is $3,505,- 
361. Deducting $10 per ton for the difference between the car sam- 
ple value and the pulp assay value of the ore, leaves $2,616,491 — . 
the amount quoted by the court as the value in bullion. Allow- 
ing 74 per cent, for the returns from the pulp, the actual bullion 
recovered is worth, nominally, $1,936,204, a very material differ- 
ence from $2,616,204, shown by erroneous calculation in the 
judgment. The statement of Judge Hebbard goes on to show 
that the amount of bullion returned to the company was $1,826,- 
873, which, deducted from $1,936,204. the actual bullion return, 
leaves an apparent deficit of $109,331 in bullion, which should 
have been accounted for to the company. What was this bul- 
lion worth? That is the next question. Like all other Com- 
stock bullion, that of the Hale & Norcossruns about two-thirds in 
silver, and about one-third in gold. On this basis the 66 per cent, 
returned in silver, allowing a moderate discount of 35 per cent, 
on sales, leaves a market value of $46,903. To this must be 
added 34 per cent., or $36,193, the value of the gold, showing a 
total deficit for three years' working of only $84,076, or less than 
$1 per ton on 88,887 tons, the total amount of ore extracted from 
the mines during that period. This is rather a material reduction 
on the deficit of $789,618, which Judge Hebbard finds by his pe- 
culiar method of calculating ore values. 

J f 5 

BUT he does not stop here. A deficit of the magnitude estab- 
lished on his theory constitutes a fraud. No one will deny this, 
but the fraud lies in the method of manipulating the figures so as 
to obtain such an outrageous result. The defendants, however, 
must suffer the penalty as the decision shows. They are fined in 
profits on milling at the rate of $2.50 per ton on the total output 
of 88,887 tons. This amounts to $222,217, which is tacked 
on the alleged deficit of $789,618, to make up a round mil- 
lion. The decision expresses a different view of these milling 
profits in another paragraph. There the Judge remarks, when 
discussing the charge that $7 per ton was an exorbitant and ex- 
cessive rate: « If the case depended upon this allegation 
alone the proofs would hardly support any judgment against 
the defendants; that is to say, the mill-owners would be entitled 
to make as large profits as they might honestly make." Of the 
total ore output referred to, 5,000 tons were worked at the Vivian 
mill, owned by outside parties altogether, but still the defendants 
in the Norcross case are fined in the profits on this transaction. 
These are a few of the points which will be raised by the defend- 
ants, aDd there are others to follow of equally vital importance. 
There will be no compromise of the Hale & Norcross suit. It 
will be fought by the defendants to the bitter end. 



July 16, : 



FRANCISl NEWS I ETTER. 



IT 




'Hear the Drtai What the deTll art thou r 

One that wlltplir the devil. »lr. with you.** 



H 



OMK from the Coliseum. 

Home from the Appian Way, 

Back to the scenes of triumphs dead, 

Of lambs dispersed, and lambkins tied, 

Chris Buckley comes to-day. 

Who goeth forth to meet him 

With fife and thunderous drum ? 

Who throngs around his chariot wheels, 

Wbn by his haughty presence kneels, 

Who to his hand petition steals ? 
Is all the city dumb ? 

And yet it seems but yesterday 

Wbea home from foreign shore. 
The leaders came, retainers rushed 
To train, boat, carriage, wildly crushed 

To hail their chief once more. 

The festal board was gayly spread, 

On ice the wine was laid, 
Placed at the groaning table's head, 
The while the merry moments fled. 
He was their toast, they owed him bread, 

Aud tribute freely paid. 

He played the game with daring skill, 

And masterful and bold, 
With mighty band grasped bis reward, 
Moved every piece upon the board, 
With will of iron ruled bis horde, 

And gathered in bis gold. 

The reckless few that scorned his sway, 

And dared the leader's wrath, 
Beheld their fond ambitions fail, 
Their very friends their hopes assail, 
And withered by the blasting gale, 

Were swept from Buckley's path. 

A new regime confronts him now, 

Though past friends rule the roost, 

The new has triumphed o'er the old, 

And those are high within the fold, 

Who e'en when in his ranks enrolled, 
To down him was their boast. 

He comes, a sad, converted man, 

Content to stand alone, 
And mark the Democratic pot, 
Simmer and steam, and then grow hot, 
But who may say that Chris is not 

A power behind the throne? 

AS a matter of course our California wines will make another 
struggle for recognition at the World's Fair. If we ponder 
upon those few figures representing the costs of shipment of the 
late firm of Alfred Greenebaum & Co., we may arrive at the qual- 
ity of the wine our friends beyond the mountains receive as a 
sample of what we can do in wine-making in the ultimate West. 
The cost of a case of California wine bottles, case and bottling, 
without the wines, is $1 65. To lay down this case in New Or- 
leans, without the wines, cost this firm that used to be, $2 25. 
To put the wine in those bottles costs Mr. Greenebaum just 25 
cents, and this stuff, with all its glamor of good bottles, good 
corks, glittering caps, elaborate labels and precious cases, was 
offered to the people as a trustworthy sample of our California 
red wines. Knowing something about clarets, the California ar- 
ticle was very properly condemned as very poor stuff. And this 
is just the business that has given California a black eye wherever 
shipped by gentlemen of the same financial yearning as gentle- 
men fortunately recently deceased. 

I HAVE been creditably informed that among the places 
for the exhibits of curios from this State, there will be a stall 
set aside for the display of California millionaires. Mr. David 
Jacks, of Monterey, will occupy stall No. 1. His warm friend 
and mentor, Mr. Asa Fisk, will occupy the adjoining enclosure. 
Willis Polk, the gifted young architect, will paint the sign for 
this interesting department. It will be an apotheosis of usury, 
representing Messrs. Jacks and Fisk arrayed in garments affected 
by the luxurious Roman in the days of Caligula, careering in 
gilded chariots over a corduroy road of gaping skulls. Far off 
in the misty clouds will be discerned the yearning and pathetic 
face oE Counsellor Clarke, who tried the pleasing game, but got 
knocked out at the close of a misguided compound interest life 
an unaccountable failure to call the turns. 



AUBREY « fir bat broktn out In the camp of the arlltita. A 
btff alga tor the California department ol Ilia World's Fair is 
needed, and they all want a brush in the pie, because in these 
days Of ehromos and steel engravings and etchings, paint on 
canvas la at ft discount. Therefore the despondent brethren of 
the brnsh have concluded thai in order to hold their own they 
must double the quantity of their canvases and spread on the 
pigment with a lavish hand. And who can blame them ? Time 
was when the San Francisco artist really found in art a profitable 
occupation. Picture buyers — men like Tiburcio Parrott, W. II 
L. Barnes, John T. Doyle, and many others, with a host of ladies 
added, visited the San Francisco studio, looked at the artists' 
sketches, and bought the pictures on the easel, or from the rough 
studies ordered the painting that suited them. There was no pot 
boiling in those days. The painters knew that if they turned 
out a good picture they got their price for it. Now sign painting 
and fake sales are in the ascendancy. I know one of the most 
promising young men that ever put brush to canvas, who was 
commended by his teacher in Munich for his industry and talent, 
who is now painting absurd landscapes, and turning them out at 
the rate of three a day, and yet withal he has not been able to 
utterly destroy the golden promise of bis youth. Genius, 
smothered and semi-strangled, it is true, but still genius is ap- 
parent in those pictures, which net the comfortable income of 
five dollars a day, paid invariably in advance. 

THE Rev. Junius Laertes Hatch has a knack of bobbing up 
serenely in those cases which the conscientious reporter clas- 
sifies under the head of domestic infelicity. The last time this 
Reverend austere gentleman appeared upon the stage was under 
circumstances which received wide publicity. A fond and foolish 
old lady in the Western Addition married a young and giddy 
barber, grew jealous of him, as a matter of course, and the Rev. 
Junius was called in as amicus curiae, and he did prove so wonder- 
fully friendly tbat when the old lady died he was kindly remem- 
bered in her will. But the implacable courts broke the will and 
Mr. Hatch in despair moved his residence to Oakland and took 
to horse flesh. Now, after nearly two years of retirement from 
the domestic infelicity arena, we hear of him as the protector of 
an Alameda county choir singer, who is known as the Swedish 
nightingale. The protector, it seems, was only in name, for the 
nightingale, as becomes her Norse ancestry, is a stalwart and 
muscular lady, and Mr. Hatch tips the scales in the close vicinity 
of a hundred pounds. The inevitable followed. The doctor 
made a request for some moneys advanced to the nightingale, 
and that sweet singing bird fastened her claws in the old gentle- 
man's anatomy, beat him sorely witb her wing, pierced him with 
her rosy but ravening beak, and then threw him down stairsjf If 
this does not prove a warning to Mr. Hatch to keep clear of 
warring wives and husbands may the next lady land him beyond 
that bourne where marriages and divorces have no abiding place. 

THIS destruction of palates by the epicurean rich is a rapidly 
growing and alarming evil. Some months ago I called atten- 
tion to this cruelty, and showed that the victim had taken a pos- 
itive dislike to steaks, chops and plain food generally, and kept 
moaning in his delirium for sweetbreads, omlette souffle, and vol 
au vents. His destroyer permitted him to become convalescent, 
but, alas, seized on him one day this week and filled him up 
again with choice pates and burgundy. Now the relapse is more 
acute than the first attack, and the wretched epicure, left once 
more to the gruesome mercy of a boiled dinner, is willing to pledge 
his bouse and lot to feed the undying worm which will be sa- 
tiated only by French cookery. 

SOME time ago the dailies commented severely on the brutality 
of the London mob that hit Mr. Gladstone in the eye with an 
onion, and squelched Stanley's political aspirations under a 
shower of dead cats. They piously remarked that we had nothing 
of that kind of a mob in this free and enlightened country. It 
must be allowed that the Coeur d'Alene gang and the Homestead 
people have raised more pure devilment in one week than the 
combined atrocities of old country mobs for years past. Without 
dwelling upon the rights or wrongs of the business, both of those 
emeutes have positively attained the dignity of a civil war. 

SMILES, beaming smiles wreathe the faces of the candidates, 
for lot the lust for place is abroad in the land, and hundreds 
have selected the positions they will accept at the hands of a 
grateful party. Though the times be hard, the polished surface 
of the bar will ring to the clash of the silver dollar, as the bland 
candidate for popularity performs the first political duty of every 
aspirant to office. 

THE summer has almost gone by, unproductive of a solitary 
seaside or mineral spring scandal. What blight has fallen 
upon the merry grass-widows who were wont to be so gay? Or 
has the depressing pale of discretion smothered those frolics 
which were the delight of "our special correspondent?" It begins 
to look alarmingly like it. 

IT was Lord Brougham who defined a lawyer as " a legal gentle- 
man who rescues your estate from your enemies, and keeps it 
himself." The definition stands for the average " legal gentle- 
man" of to-day. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 




THE cry of the real estate agent is still " business is dull." 
There are in the city from 4,000 to 6,000 empty houses, and 
yet new houses are being steadily built in the Western Addition, 
the vicinity of the Park and in the Mission. The building specu- 
lators continue to put up rows of houses and series of detached 
dwellings of steadily more and more expensive style. The situa- 
tion is then evidently one of dull times and abundance of money. 
The banks with their heavy deposits support the latter state- 
ment and help to prove the existence of this anomalous condi- 
tion, if proof be necessary. The dullness is not due to the lack 
of money; there is no hampering for lack of funds. What there 
is a lack of is — enterprise. Not the enterprise which builds 
houses, but the enterprise which builds cities. No more convinc- 
ing proof of this can be offered than the Assessor's supplementary 
reports on our manufactures for the past two or three years. The 
wealthy nations of the old and new world are the manufacturing 
nations; the thriving cities are those which team with factories, 
In this respect San Francisco is wofully backward. The manu- 
facturing development of the city by the Golden Gate is an un- 
known quantity, and though a new railroad would help such a 
development it will not create enterprise. The reports of our 
manufacturers show that they are in the same condition as they 
were years ago; that in proportion to the age and population of 
the city no advancement worthy of the name is being made. The 
Chamber of Commerce which is always casting about in search 
of outside causes for depression, and which is continually em- 
balming itself in long drawn out and meaningless resolutions, 
had better look for inside causes. A microscope will fail to dis- 
cover the inducements to a competing road, to steamship and 
clipper ship lines. 

The spirit of verbosity is and always has been rampant, and 
the spirit of enterprise is a much-talked-of stranger. The man 
who is continually looking about for help instead of putting his 
shoulder to the wheel will remain, and will rot in the rut in 
which he has stuck fast. 

In the absence of manufacturing developments, advance in real 
estate business is not to be expected. The number of vacant 
houses must increase, and the progress in building must halt. 
The inter-dependence of business is such in any community that 
in time the lack of enterprise must gradually tell upon every 
branch of trade. The League of Progress and the Traffic Associa- 
tion suggest that business men are awake to the fact that some 
decided steps must be taken, and they wisely state in their plat- 
forms that their objects are to do anything and everything which 
will add to and foster the industries of the State. They do not 
confine themselves to the securing of a competing line, but also 
to the consideration of inducements to a road to compete, and in 
this encouragement to enterprise possibilities of salvation lies. 

So far as actual buying and selling in real estate is concerned 
agents are making the best showing they can, and many quote 
sales, which in other times would be considered too small to men- 
tion, merely to show that there is something doing. One sale in 
down town business property was made during the week, and 
has not been made public yet. McAfee, Baldwin & Hammond 
made the deal for $65,000, but particulars are temporarily with- 
held. 

The News Lettee drew attention a fortnight ago to the mistake 
of allowing unlimited deposits in savings banks. These institu- 
tions are now refusing to accept large sums. The demand for 
money is a little better, but is not anything like on a par with the 
supply. 

Park property is quiet. O'Farrell and Lang have made one 
or two fair sales, including an inside lot 25x102 :8 on the south side 
of Clay, between Central avenue and Walnut for $4,800. 

O. F. von Rhein & Co. will hold an auction sale this month, 
and will offer the Presbyterian Church, fittings, and lot 75x80 
on Golden Gate avenue and Polk. Easton, Eldridge & Co. will 
offer at public auction a miscellaneous catalogue on Tuesday 
next, including several Western Addition houses, Mission dwell- 
ings and a number of small lots in Precita Valley. 

A Seattle capitalist has purchased the lot 137:6x100 on the 
southwest corner of Golden Gate avenue and Steiner, and intends 
improving it with aresidence and twelve flats. 

The Comttjck market has been weak and dull during the weak, 
with little outside inquiry for even the better class of stocks. Busi- 
ness with the brokers is at low ebb, but the majority of them are 
still hopeful that they will be in the swim again. The proposi- 
tion to sell the Exchange building is still bruited, and several of 
the members talked themselves hoarse in the affirmative at the 
last executive session on Wednesday. In view of the dismal 
prospects it is little wonder that the men of small means favor a 
reduction of expenses, which would follow a retirement to some 
less pretentious establishment, and besides the dividend from the 
proceeds of the sale would be of great assistance financially. The 
strongest stocks at present are those of the North End mines. 
They are well concentrated in strong hands, and the lightest de- 



mand affects prices favorably. There is some talk about the re- 
turn of John W. Mackay, about the end of the month. Assess- 
ments continue to come in well, which proves that some people 
have confidence in the situaticn. At the Belcher sale, held re- 
cently, only 300 shares were soJd, which is the smallest amount 
on record for that company. The Tuscarora and other outside 
stocks are in light demand, with prices weak. 

Mothers be Sure and Use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
children w hile Teething. Price, 26 cents a bottle. 

THE 

BRUNSWICK-BALKE- 
COLLENDER CO. 




THE MONARCH 

Manufacturers of Billiard and Pool Tables. 

Dealers in Billiard Merchandise Generally. 

Makers of Bank and Office Fixtures. 

Also, Saloon Fixtures, Counters, Coolers, Mirrors, etc., con- 
stantly on hand or made to order. Ten Pin Alleys, Ten Pins, 
Ten Pin Balls, etc. 

653-655 MARKET STREET, S. F. 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Company, 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

General Agents Oceanic Steamship Company and 
Gillingham Cement. 

327 Market Street, corner Fremont. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

MR. AND MME. J. H. ROSEWALD, 

Will Resume Giving Instructions on August 1st. Ap-I 
plicant8 for time will please call on friday or satur- 
DAY, July 29, 30, From 2 to 4 p. m, at 922 Geary St. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINSS AND LOAN SOCIETY. ~ 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER, ... President | ERNST BRAND Secretary. 



PACIFIC TOWIEXj COl^CX 3 JOIST'S", 

9 LICK PLACE, 
Furnishes Clean Towels at the following low rates: 

Clean Hand Towels each week. $1.00 per month; 12 Clean Hand Towels 
each week, $1.50 per month ; 4 Clean Roller Towels each week. $1.00 per 
6 month; 6 Clean Roller Towels each week. $1.25 per month. 




NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY 



Founded by flF MIIQIP Carl Fahltbn, 



Director. 
Fine Arts, Literature, 



Dr.EbenTourj& 

.Music, Elocution, _ 
Langnages and Toning. A safe and inviting Home 
forlady pupils. Send for Illustrated Calendar. 

FRANK W. HALE, Gen'IManager, Boston, Mass, 



J 



July 16 1892. 



BAN PRANCI8C0 NEWS LETTER, 



10 




TM K most important matter now being considered by the under- 
writers is the proposition of Leo Zagat to handle and dispose of all 
fire damaged stock in behalf of the underwriters. It is a scheme 
which has been in successful operation in Chicago and other East- 
ern cities for some time past, but has never been in practice on 
this coast. Mr. Zagat proposes to take full charge of the stock 
soon after the fire, be responsible for it. state its value as it lay 
and the time required and cost of handling and potting it in order 
for the market. He would then buy the stock, or work for the 
nnderwriters on commission. They should furnish a warehouse 
for storing the stock, and in which it might be repaired and sold. 
In the cases wherein he traveled outside the city he should be 
considered in the employ of the underwriters, and should receive 
traveling expenses and pay for time until the stock be stored in 
San Francisco. For the faithful performance of engagements with 
the underwriters he would furnish good and sufficient bonds 
whenever required. A meeting of underwriters was held 
at the rooms of the Union on Thursday afternoon to 
consider the matter. Mr. Zagat wag present, and explained 
bis proposition, and a committee, of which Mr. George 
D. Dornin is chairman, was appointed to consider and report 
upon it. The salvage problem is one of the most important be- 
fore the underwriters. The difficulty of properly estimating the 
amount of damage done a general merchandise stock by a fire 
seems almost insurmountable. For instance, at a fire in a whole- 
sale clothing house not long since, an estimate was made by one 
adjuster that the total loss on damaged stock was $7,500. The 
firm claimed over $100,000. Expert clothiers and adjusters fixed 
the damage at from $10,000 to $90,000. The amount allowed the 
firm was $84,000. If there were a salvage store, the difficulty of 
fixing the amount of damage could be overcome by sending the 
damaged goods to the store, and selling them at what they would 
bring. Such sales always attract crowds of customers, and the 
damaged goods sell like hot cakes. Instances have been known 
of merchants who took advantage of the sale of fire damaged 
goods to work off their old stocks which had become shopworn. 
The salvage scheme is a good one. Whether it would pay in this 
city is a question, for a large stock would be needed to keep the 
store going. Damaged goods, however, could be shipped here 
from various points. The Chicago salvage store receives goods 
from all over the East and South. 

Bromwell, Fowler & Co., will soon be well established in 
their new offices at 313 California street. The entry of this 
new firm into the field has caused something of a shaking-up 
among the offices on the Bourse, where of late several agencies 
have been taking matters quietly. Both Messrs. Bromwell and 
Fowler have been engaged in the insurance business for years in 
this city, and are well and favorably known throughout the 
Coast and the East. Colonel L. L. Bromwell waB for fourteen 
years connected with the California Insurance Company, first as 
General Agent, then as Secretary, Vice-President and President. 
He is an underwriter of far more than usual ability, whose name 
is synonymous with success. Mr. W. H. C. Fowler was also 
affiliated for many years with the California. For eighteen years 
be was connected with the company; portion of the time being 
Marine Secretary, and for the last six years being Secretary. 
Both gentlemen, on account of their long experience, have inti- 
mate knowledge of the condition of the insurance business on 
this Coast. That they are considered highly among the managers 
of Eastern companies is shown by the fact that, notwithstanding 
the recent formation of the firm, it has already secured 
the general Pacific Coast agency for three well-known 
companies — the People's Fire, of Manchester, the New York 
Bowery and the United States, of New York. These companies 
have been on the coast a long time, and enjoy the confidence of 
all policy holders, on account of the promptness with which they 
pay all losses. The New York Bowery dates from 1833. It is one 
of the oldest and best established fire insurance companies in the 
United States, which can also be said of the United States Fire 
Insurance Company, of New York, which was organized in 1824. 
The capital of the Bowery is $300,000, and of the United States, 
$250,000. The People's Fire, of Manchester, has a paid-up cap- 
ital of $500,000. It was organized in 1884. All three are first- 
class companies. Bromwell, Fowler & Co. will push their busi- 
ness throughout the Coast by the establishment of numerous 
sub-agencies., and that success will attend their efforts there can 
be no doubt. 

The Schwabacher loss at Seattle is being investigated by A. J. 
Wetzlar, L. B. Edwards and G. Driffield, who will report to a 
committee composed of W. J. Cunningham, C. D. Haven and 
George W. Spencer. The loss amounted to $300,000. 

The loss on the Kaufmann hardware stock at Salt Lake City 
has been compromised for $8,000, a figure much lower than had 
been anticipated. 

The fire waste caused by the Independence Day jubilation is 



lets than in former year*, bnt yet It In considerable. In the courie 
of human events, after numerous more small boys have been 
blown to atoms, and a few millions more have gone up In smoke, 
on account of blazes caused by fireworks, the great American 
public will begin to appreciate what fools they have been making 
of themselves. 

George D. Roberts, the well known mining man of New York, 
is in town. 

Gardner P. Williams, the well-known South African mining 
man. is still here, lie will leave for the East within the next ten 
days, visiting on his way the Yellowstone Park and the Calumet 
and Hecla mines. He will then go to Chicago to make arrange- 
ments for the exhibition of diamonds from the De Beers mine, in 
Africa. A 300-ton lot of the blue cement will be sent to the ex- 
hibition, where it will be washed and the diamonds extracted. 
The stones will be cut by the firm of Tiffany *fc Co., in New York. 



Statement 

Of tne Actual Condition and Value of tbe Assets and 
JJaMUtleH of 

PACIFIC BANK, 

s v\ rit \>< IM <>. tAL. 

At the close of business hours ou the 30th day of June. 1892. The assets all 
being situate in the City and County of San Francisco, the Counties of Al- 
ameda. Contra Costa, Los Angeles, Marion, Santa Clara. San Diego and 
Tulare, in the State of California, and in the County of Genesee, m the 
State of Michigan. 

ASSETS: 

Solvent bills receivable ?2,685,171 72 

Banking house aud other real estate 325,53181 

Sundry stocks and bonds 785,144(15 

Due Irom solveut banks and bankers 258,206 88 

Money on hand 782,002 01 

{4,836,057 07 
LIABILITIES. 

Capital stock J1,000,000 00 

Surplus fund 800,000 00 

Undivided profits 81,974 43 

Due depositors 1,773,316 25 

Due banks and bankers 1,140,659 99 

Due dividends 40,108 00 

Total 54,836,057 07 

State of California, I „_ 

City and County of San Francisco, i 
R. H. McDonald, Jr., Vice President, and Frank V. McDonald, Cashier of 
Pacific Bank, do make oath and say that the forgoing statement is true to 
the best of their knowledge and belief. 

K. H. MCDONALD, Jr., Vice President. 
FRANK V. MCDONALD, Cashier. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day of July, A. D., 1892. 
E. H. THARP, Notary Public. 



Statement of the Amount of Capital of 

PACIFIC BANK, 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA. 

At the close of business hours on the 30th day of June, 1892. 

A m. Mini Actually paid In U. S. OoW Coin $1,000,000 OO 

State of California, City and County of San Francisco, ss.— R. H. Mc- 
Donald, Jr., Vice President, and Frank V. McDonald, Cashier of Pacific 
Bank, do make oath and say that the foregoing statement is true to the 
best of their knowledge and belief, 

R, H. MCDONALD, JR., Vice President. 
FRANK V. MCDONALD, Cashier. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day of July, A. D. 1892. 

E. H. THARP, Notary Public. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Virginia and Gold Hill "Water Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Virginia and Gold 
Hill Water Company will be held at the office of the company, room 16, 
Nevada block, 309 Montgomery st., San Francisco, Cal, on THURSDAY, 
the 28th day July, 1892, at the hour of one (1) o'clock p. m., for the purpose 
of electing a board to trustees to serve for the ensuing year and for the 
transaction of such other business as may come before the meeting. 

W. W. STETSON, Secretary. 

San Francisco, J uly 11, 1892. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Lady Washington Consolidated Company. 
Office of Lady Washington Consolidated Company, room S3, Nevada 
Block 309 Montgomery st., San Francisco, Cal., July 13, 1892. The annual 
meeting of the stockholders of the above named company for the election 
of directors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other 
business as may he presented will be held on WEDNESDAY, July 27th 
1892 (the last Wednesday in July), at the hour of 1 o'clock p. M., .on that 
day at the office of the company in this city. Transfer books will be closed 
on Saturday, July 23, at 12 o'clock m. L . OSBORN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 

The Board of Directors declare a dividend for the term ending with 

June 30 1892, at the rate of five and one-fifth (5 1-5) per cent, per annum 

„. Term Deposits, and four and one-third per cent, per annum on Or- 

^nary-De Wree of taxes, payable on Uafter Fn|ay,Ju,y 1,^ 

Office— 101 Montgomery St., Cor. Sutter, San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July 16, 1892. 



'■Some Children of Adam," by R. M. Manley. The Rose Library, pub- 
lished by Worthiugtou & Co., N. Y. 

ACHILLE RENAUD, a well-educated Frenchman, once a notary 
in a provincial town, is obliged to leave his country in conse- 
quence of being detected in some act of dishonesty. He comes to 
the United States with his wife and daughter; the wife lives only 
a short time and father and daughter are left alone. Achille is a 
worthless scoundrel ready to live on his daughter's earnings, and 
even to make her sell herself for gain. She, however, is strong 
enough to keep herself pure, and earns a hard and precarious ex- 
istence by type-writing and copying. Accidentally she meets 
with Raymond Franklin, a rich New Yorker, who is much at- 
tracted by her.. Achille is delighted, and urges his daughter, whose 
name is Desirfie, to make his infatuation as costly as possible. 
Raymond gradually becomes so enamored of DesirGe that he can- 
not bear to leave her, and fancying that his sociaJ position, as the 
representative of a wealthy family, prevents him from marrying 
her, he proposes to take her with him to Europe. Wishing to 
make her independent, he settles $30,000 upon her, giving her a 
check for that amount and full directions how to get it cashed. 
Achille overhears these instructions, and plots to kill Desiree and 
get the money himself. How his plot is foiled and he is caught 
in his own trap, and how the tale ends as regards Raymond and 
Desir6e, we will leave the reader to find out for himself. Achille 
Renaud, the cynical, utterly unprincipled man, without even the 
natural instincts of a father, is very well-drawn, and DesirSe 
seems to as a lifelike character. Of the subsidiary characters 
the best is Plato Croxton, an eccentric old man full of impossible 
schemes for the amelioration of mankind and the abolition of war. 



The story is well told, in a plain, clear and sensible manner, 
without any attempt at high-flown description or the use of that 
exaggerated language which the average novelist seems to con- 
sider essential in a work of fiction. The attempted murder of 
DesirGe Renaud by her father, we noticed in our reading, is spoken 
of in a strangely misused word, " infanticide." Now, as she is a 
young woman, twenty years of age, she can hardly be called an 
" infant," which, except as a merely legal term, means a child so 
young that it cannot speak. Mr. Manley's story is not only 
agreeably written, but is also accurately printed, in good type, on 
paper of excellent quality, things which add much to the pleas- 
ure of the reader of taste, and which delights the bibliophile. 
We think the Rose Library the handsomest series of the fifty-cent 
books we have seen. 



" Mark Twain, the Story of his Life and Work," by Will M. 
Clemens, has been published in both cloth and paper covers by 
the Clemens Publishing Company of this city. In this entertain- 
ing little volume the best biography of the famous American 
humorist yet written is presented to his hundreds of thousands of 
admirers. Mr. Clemens reviews the erratic career of his name- 
sake from the time he played hookey from school until these days 
when he is a millionaire and a literary Midas. The career of 
Twain has been as picturesque as some of his fancies, and his 
success has been greater thau that of any other contemporary 
American writer. This volume contains many interesting ac- 
counts of his adventures, and humorous reminiscences of the 
Twain of the early days, related, by those who knew him in his 
hour of need. Many extracts from his works are given, and the 
last chapter is devoted to gems from his writings. The volume 
is very interesting. The frontispiece is an excellent cut of the 
humorist. 

"Alone on a Wide, Wide Sea;" by W. Clark Russell. The Broadway 
series, published by Johu A. Taylor, N. Y. 

This is by a well-known writer of stories of the sea, and has for 
its secondary title, "An Ocean Mystery." Agnes Campbell, a 
young married Englishwoman, starts out from a village on the 
west coast of England, in company with a single boatman, for an 
afternoon's sail. The breeze freshens, the boatman stands up to 
arrange one of his sails, is stricken by heart disease, and falling 
into the sea, is drowned. A storm comes on, and Agnes drifts 
about alone in an open boat. The agony of the long exposure 
turns her hair completely white, and the mast of the boat, in 
falling, strikes her head so heavily that it injures the brain and 
entirely deprives her of her memory. She is rescued by a French 
brig, which is soon run down by a large vessel, the Deal Castle, 
bound for Sydney, Australia. The captain and passengers of 
the Deal Castle treat her with the utmost kindness, but she re- 
mains utterly unable to tell her name, her age, or any single fact 
about her life prior to the time of the accident. On board, she 
becomes intimate with a Mr. and Mrs. Lee, and on returning 
from Australia, lives with Mrs. Lee, whose daughter died from 
consumption on the voyage out to 8ydney. After some months 
of absolute loss of memory, the dead Miss Lee appears to her in 
a dream, holding Mrs. Campbell's two children by the hand. 



This startling occurrence restores her memory, and she at once 
sets out to find her husband and children. Her husband has 
married her sister, but the sister does not long survive the shock, 
and thus husband, wife and children are re-united. The narrative 
ol Agnes' ineffectual efforts to remember something about her 
former life, and of the countless suggestions offered by nearly 
everybody she meets, is rather iuterminably spun out, but with- 
out all this there would be no story whatever. Mr. Russell's 
style is readable, though occasionally he becomes a little wild, as 
in the following passage descriptive of a ship moving rapidly 
through a high sea: "The broad and hissing furrow she left be- 
hind seemed to stream the very horizon, lifting and falling straight 
as a lion, like the scintillant scar of a shooting star on the velvet 
height of the night." This is what is perhaps termed "poetical 
prose," and is intended to be read as if written thus: 

" The scintillant scar 

Of a shooting star, 

On the velvet height 

Of the night." 
However, the story is interesting and manifests that acquaint- 
ance with nautical matters for which itB author is famous. 



Just as we have ceased following the adventures of Nick 
Tarvin, of Topaz, Colorado, and Kate Sheriff, through the pages 
of the Century, the story of "The Naulahka" is published by 
Macmillan & Co. in a very neat volume. This story of the West 
and East, by Rudyard Kipling and Walcott Balestier, is one of 
the most admirable of the year. There is a fascination in the 
comparison of the booming young Colorado mining town and its 
life and people, with the Indian city of Rhatore, its luxurious old 
Maharajah, its intriguing Queen and her murderous slaves. Much 
that is in the plot reminds one of an operetta extravaganza, but 
not a line is dull or uninteresting. The hand of the lamented 
Balestier is seen in the descriptions of the Colorado scenes, and in 
the portrayal of the strength of character displayed by the hero- 
ine, who, inflamed by the tale of woe of the Pundita Ramabai, 
dedicated herself to the cause of the Indian sufferers. Tarvin is 
painted with a free hand in strong lines, and makes an excellent 
figure as he gallops and shouts bis way through the old city of 
Rhatore. Kipling has given his vivid descriptive powers full 
scope in many of the scenes. The account of Tarvin's visit to 
the Cow's mouth in search of the Naulahka ; his facing the lances 
of the Maharajah's charging body guard on the road, and his 
meeting with the Gypsy beside the reservoir, are as thrilling bits 
as have been read in novels for many days. In none of Kipling's 
writings has he more fully exposed the intrigues and falsity at- 
taching to an Oriental court. This volume is supplied with copy- 
righted chapter headings by Kipling. The novel is the best with 
which that writer's name has been connected. Those who begin 
it will regret finishing it. It is full of life, and is animated with 
all the " get there " qualities of its hero. The story moves right 
on, and carries all its readers with it. (Macmillan & Co., New 
York and London. For sale by Wm. Doxey, Palace Hoted; $1.50). 

The admirers of F. Marion Crawford, and there are many, will 
welcome the new uniform edition of bis works, now being issued 
by Macmillan & Co., in dollar volumes. The books are all neatly 
printed and bound in cloth, and make a handsome addition to a 
library. Those already issued incfude " Zoroaster," " Mr. Isaace," 
"The Three Fates," " Dr. Claudius," "The Tale of a Lonely 
Parish," " Khaled," "The Witch of Prague," and the Italian 
stories. Crawford has a never-dying charm. Whether wander- 
ing with Khaled upon the desert; with Zoroaster in the palace of 
Darius; making love with George Wood; shivering under the 
baleful influence of the Witch of Prague, or sauntering with 
Saracinesca down the Appian Way, all readers of Crawford have 
satisfaction in the strength of the characters to whom they are 
introduced, and their entertaining adventures. His strongest forte 
seems to be in his Oriental tales, for which he has given himself 
a good preparation, '« Zoroaster," " Mr. Isaacs," and " Khaled," 
are all very good. His Italian stories come next, " Saracinesca," 
in parts being as good as anything he ever wrote. Crawford's 
contemporary tales, however, are not pleasing to one who knows 
his strong characters. The " Witch of Prague" is a weird, un- 
satisfactory tale, while " The Three Fates " indicates in many 
pages that Mr. Crawford is writing against space. {Macmillan & 
Co., New York, London. For sale by William Doxey, 631 Market 
street, and by S. Carson & Co., 208 Post street.) 



Nocton & Co., of New York, have issued a small paper-covered 
volume, by Marie St. Felix, called "A Game with Destiny." It 
is one of the modern erotic tales, describing how a married man, to 
save the name of his mistress, who is about to give birth to his 
child, induces his brother to marry her. The book, notwithstand- 
ing its somewhat repulsive motive, is well written, and its author 
is capable of better things. 

Colonel J. M. Litchfield's tailoring establishment, at 12 Post 
street, is one of the best-known and most popular sartorial empo- 
riums in the city. During the many years that this gentleman has 
done business in this city, he and his goods have always enjoyed an 
excellent reputation. Colonel Litchfield makes a specialty of army, 
navy, National Guard uniforms and society regalia. 



July 16, 1892. 



- W FRANCISCO NEWS l BTTER, 



21 




^#o 






The nightdress case is as long » the pillows are brvail. and is in- 
tended to be placed against them, not at the foot of the bed. Kach 
.■f these sachets are made of wash materials and embroidered with 
wash silk in a design of the flowers whose odors are represented in 
the perfume powder used inMde. Bach case has a pad of tarletan 
covered wadding as an interlining. In the folds of these pads the 
sweet odors are secured, that iliey may be replenished easily, as they 
must be every three months. Each dress has a set of three sachets. 
one as long as the skirt and two the length of the sleeves, and these 
•re kept in the dress when it is not being worn. Besides these the 
dress is usually supplied with three small soft sachets, which are worn 
in the waist, ami two long ones, not more than an inch wide, which 
are fastened down each side of the skirt in the back. 

The French bicycling costume for ladies consists of a tunic and 
knickerbockers made exactly like those worn by men, except that the 
tunic feminine is a little longer than that worn by men. The most 
approved costume for the njaid-a-wheel in this country has a full di- 
vided skirt, supported from the shoulders by suspenders, a light silk 
blouse held in place by a rubber band, a Windsor tie at the neck, a 
jacket like the skirt, beneath all a " union suit " of wool. 

The Empress Josephine had a very long and slender foot. To 
shorten the length of her feet she had recourse to very high heels 
which were sloped toward the ball of the foot. This apparently di- 
minished the length, so that the Empress came to have the reputa- 
tion of the owner of a remarkably small foot, although she wore a 
shoe that would now be marked with a large No. 6. 

At the Earl of Westmoreland's recent wedding, the bridesmaids 
wore black hats with pink roses and black tips. The dresses were of 
white grenadine with pink sashes, and besides their nosegays of La 
France roses, each of the attending maidens carried a fan of white os- 
trich feathers with the initials of the bride and bridegroom entwined 
in gold upon the tortoise-shell sticks. 

Sandalwood is a popular perfnme for sachet cases now, as it is deli- 
cate and retains its perfume longer than most of the others. But 
most women have a favorite perfume, as they have a favorite flower, 
and like to have their garments filled with it. Orris root, used in 
combination with any of the odors chosen, makes them more delicate 
and enduring. 

Pale green has been added to the list of colors in m'tra-fashionable 
stationary. The lettering of theaddress is in a darker shade of green, 
the sealing wax also in the same tint. With this paper the script 
must be written in with blackest ink flowing freely from a quill pen, 
and the result, if absolutely illegible, is certainly stylish. 



One of the essentials to the swagger girl's satisfaction with life is 
natty little betting books, silver mounted, with flexible covers, and 
just the right size to slip into the pocket of her sacque track coat 
These smart trifles are to be found in great variety in the shops a. 
prices quite the reverse of reasonable. 

From Paris the order comes that the sleeves of summer dresses are 
to extend only to the elbow, an order sensible in itself but entailing 
extravagant consequences, for short sleeves call for long gloves, and 
those for summer wear must be light in color, fresh and dainty. 

Sishes just now are of two styles, either very narrow, only a rib- 
bon folded round the bottom of the basque and tied at the back, or of 
soft silk folded very widely round the waist and fastened with an 
enormous rosette at the left side. 

Roses are the most popular flower of the season in millinery. The 
strings of new bonnets are formed entirely of tiny rosebuds, while the 
bonnets themselves and large hats are covered with buds and blos- 
soms of larger growth. 

Black stockings with polka dots of white or mode upon them are 
noticed, and so are the black stockings with long hair lines of white- 
However, womankind in general remains faithful to the plain black 
or dark blue. wwv. 

One of the most expensive corsets ever made appeared in Paris this 
season.- It was of mode undressed kid, trimmed at the top with real 
rose point, and having topazes set between the lace and the stays. 

The Grand Central Wine Rooms, at 16-18 Third street, are the 
headquarters for hundreds of men who require good liquor to satisfy 
their thirst, and to inspire their inner man. Only the best brands of 
liquors have ever crossed its bar, and it is for this well-known reason 
that it is daily crowded with men who know a good thing when they 
taste it. 



GREAT 

SEMI-ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE. 



-OUK- 



MAMMOTH SURPLUS STOCK 



-OF- 



SPRING AND SUMMER 

DRY GOODS AND CLOAKS 



-NOW BEINO CLOSED OCT AT- 



TREMENDOUS REDUCTIONS. 

Every Department Brimming With Bargains- 
Gall Early and Secure a First Choice. 




1 Building. 

MARKET, JONES AND MCALLISTER STS. 



DR. F. C. PAGUE, 

DENTIST, 

Rooms 4 & 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 
819 Market Street. 

Dr. J. H. STALLARD 

— AND — 

Dr. J. CLARK, 

m^H-SICI-A-ISrS and S"U\R,GrECasrS, 
632 Sutter Street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1892, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and four-tenths (5 4-10) per cent, per annum on term de- 
posits, and four and one-half (4%) per cent, per annum on ordinary de- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Friday, July 1, 1892. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary 

Office— Cor. Powell and Eddy streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half-year ending June 30, 1892, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and one-flfth (5 1-5) per cent, per annum on term deposits 
and four and one-thlid (4}/ 3 ) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Friday, July 1, 1892. 

J. A, THOMPSON, Cashier. 

Office— No. 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 

For the half year ending June 30, 1892, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and one-tenth (5" 1-10) per cent, per annum on Term Depos- 
its and four and one-quarter (4%) per cent, per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, payable on and after Friday, July 1, 1892. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office— 526 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank. 

The Board of Directors of this bank have declared a dividend for the 
term ending June 30, 1892, at the rate of five and one-fifth (5 1-5) per cent, 
per annum on Term Deposits, and four and one-third (4%) per cent, per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits, free from taxes, and payable on and after 
July 1, 1892. J. E. FARNUM, Secretary. 

Office— 805 Market street, Flood Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 




A SINGULAR racing "incident" of which ex-King Milan is the 
hero has been the subject of much gossip in sporting circles in 
Paris. According ta the published accounts King Milan bet M. 
Matbysens 5,000 frs. to 150,000 frs. that he would name the six 
winning horses of the races to be run that day at Longchamps. He 
succeeded in doing so for the first four races, and his bet was more 
than half won. However, he was afraid of his favorite, Fable, 
being beaten by Livie II. To prevent the latter from running, 
and thus to insure the victory of Fable, he at once offered to buy 
Livie II. M. Mathysens, who became aware of this manoeuvre, 
sought to baffle it. While the ex-King was negotiating for the 
purchase of Livie II., M. Mathysens commissioned one of his 
friends to buy Fable. Ex-King Milan failed to get pos- 
session of Livie II., which took part in the race and won it, 
while bis favorite Fable, having become the property of Ibe friend 
of M. Mathyserls, remained quietly in its stall. At first the ex- 
Monarch determined to make the Betting Ccm uittee judge the 
affair. He contended that to suppress his favorite was not to 
win his money. Ultimately M. Adams, president of the Sub- 
urban Club, was appointed arbitrator, and he awarded King 
Milan 1,320*. w^-^-^ 

It is, perhaps, not well known that the Pope is a poet, and is 
very fond of putting his imaginatings into Latin verse. The other 
day there was an official gathering of cardinals to settle business 
of importance. It had lasted an hour and a half, when the Pope 
astonished all by exclaiming, apparently apropos of nothing, 
"Fa bene /" Each cardinal looked at each cardinal for an expla- 
nation, when his holiness said to a cardinal at his side, "By-the- 
bye, you are a distinguished Latin scholar; tell me now just 
what you think of this bit of Latin poetry, which I wrote last 
night to while away my sleepless hours." After carefully study- 
ing the M.S., and unmindful of the clerical experience of Gil Bias, 
the cardinal exclaimed with great joy, "I have found out a false 
quantity." "Impossible," said the Pope. "Your holiness is not 

infallible in Latin verse" — continued the cardinal, and then he 

pointed out the error. The Pope read and re-read the passage, 
and then said to the cardinal, "For once in your life you are 
right." Perhaps the cardinal then thought of Gil Bias. 



A very funny scene took place at the close of the Czar's visit 
to Copenhagen. One morning early the whole Palace of Amal- 
ienborg was thrown into a commotion, sentinels were startled out 
of their wits, police agents came Hying to the rescue, and crown- 
ed heads were seen popping out of quickly-opened windows, while 
a whole regiment of princely faces peered forth to find out "what 
could the matter be?" And it looked very serious at first for His 
Majesty Alexander III. of Russia had rushed forth into the garden 
in bis shirtsleeves and slippers, crying out wildly, and lifting up 
his hands to the skies in horror. Of course, every one thought a 
bo"mb had been found under the Imperial bed, or an infernal ma- 
chine beneath the Czar's dressing table. But it proved to be only 
that His Majesty had perceived, from his window, that two of 
his favorite dogs were chasing King Christian's dearly beloved 
black cat; and had rushed gallantly forth, to the rescue of his 
papa-in-law's pet pussy, in person! 



The ex-Empress Eugenie goes daily to pray in the mortuary 
chapel near her present home, Farnsborough Hall. There is 
an altar, before which a monk says mass, with only one mortal 
auditor. Every one else is excluded while the unhappy wife and 
mother is within. An arm-chair is placed at the foot of each of 
the two sarcophagi, wherein lie the remains of Napoleon III. 
and the Prince Imperial; and first in one and then in the «ther 
the Empress often sits alone in prayer. Both tombs are decorated 
with floral wreaths and scattered flowers. Of the latter, violets 
are the most numberous; and some of these are taken away as 
mementoes by the visitors who are admitted when the Empress 
has gone. 

The Duke of Portland, who is one of the richest noblemen in 
England, has just added 20,000 acres to his shooting preserves. 
The Duke has now 80,000 acres, or 125 square miles, reserved 
solely for the use of his gun. He believes in doing things on a 
large scale. His town house extends along nearly the entire side 
of Cavendish Square and "Welbeck," his seat in Nottinghamshire, 
is said to be the finest woodland domain in England. 



Pope Leo XIII. will celebrate two anniversaries next year. 
February 19 will be the fiftieth anniversary of his consecration as 
Bishop, and December 13 the fortieth anniversary of his conse- 
cration as Cardinal. 

The Maison Riche at Geary street and Grant avenue, is crowded 
every evening with prominent people, who there congregate to enjoy 
the excellent dinners the chef always presents to his admiring pat- 
rons. 



HELD VP.-Puck. 



She threw around my soul a charm, 

I threw around her waist my arm, 

And we strolled along in the cooling shade 

Of a quiet path, where I kissed the maidl 

Something strange — a joy, a thrill. 

Came over me — my heart stood still, 

The red blood rushed — all seemed a whirl, 

And a wonderful change came o'er my girl. 

Did her brown eyes flash, and a cry of wrath 

Echo along that shady path ? 

Nay, nay; but clinging fast as ivies climb, 

She held her head up every time. 



THE Bank of France, the proposed renewal of whose charter in 
1897, at which date the one already existing will have ex- 
pired, is engaging so much attention just now, was founded in 
the year XII. of the First Republic One and Indivisible, in other 
words in 1800, according to the ordinary chronology. That was 
at the period of the Consulate, just before Bonaparte had seized 
the supreme power. It is, therefore, a much more modern insti- 
tution than our own Bank of England, which, as most people 
know, was the outcome of the financial troubles in the reign of 
William of Orange. Both banks, however, have a similar origin, 
for it was in order to provide a ready means of raising funds that 
the Consuls granted a charter to the men who, uniting several old- 
established banking businesses, founded the Bank of France. In 
France, that bank alone has the privilege of issuing bank-notes, 
but in return for this and other advantages it is under very severe 
restrictions both with regard to reserve of cash, and also as to the 
sort of security on which it shall advance money. Commercial 
paper, for instance, can only be discounted if it bears three signa- 
tures. On the 2nd of June last year the Bank of France had in 
its vaults the enormous sum of two milliard 850 millions of francs, 
or about £114,000 sterling, in about equal quantities of gold and 
silver. This is about the average amount, and it represents about 
one-third of the total quantity of the precious metals in France. 



The Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm. 

The Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm has been doing excellent work 
since its organization in this city. By the introduction of its boxes 
into a number of residence and business houses, it has so greatly re- 
duced the danger arising from fire that in recognition of that fact 
the insurance companies have made special rates on risks in which 
the boxes are placed. A very large number is now in use throughout 
the city, no argument being necessary to convince business men of 
the advantages of the system. At the office of the company, at 323 
Pine street, one may obtain all detailed information regarding the 
advantages and workings of the system. It is a simple plan ; a small 
box attached to the fire alarm system being so placed that it may 
be easily reached in case of fire, and an alarm be immediately 
turned in. 




Insurance Company. 

...$1,000,000, | ASSETS 12,650,000. 



CAPITAL 

D. J. STAPLES President. 

WILLIAM J. DUTTON Vice-President. 

B. FAYMONVILLE Secretary 

J. B. LEVISON Marine Secretary 

Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United States ■ 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 
CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up 1400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 A/ID 220 SAMSOMC STHtCT, 

San Francisco, California. 



GEORGE L. BKANDER, 

President. 



CHAS. M. BLAIR, 

Secretary. 



QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up $ 500,000 

Assets 3.181,763 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,526,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 
City Office— 501 aiontsoniery Si. Oeneral Olflee — 401 Mout'a, St. 
INSURE your property against PIEE in 



FIRE 



The Lion Fire Insurance Co. of London, Limited. 
Imperial Fire Insurance Co., of London, Limited. 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 

Pacific Branch, 214 Samome St., S. F. 

SWAIN & MDEDOCK, City Agents. 



July 16, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



23 




TWO MOODS.- Flomaj Bailey. Udrick in HtrpwU Monthly. 



1. 
Between the budding and the falling leaf 
Stretch happy skiea; 
With colors and sweet cries 
Of mating birds in uplands and in glades 
The world is rife. 

Then on a sudden all the music dies, 
The color fades. 
How fugitive and brief 
Is mortal life 

Between the budding and the falling leaf ! 
O short-breathed music, dying on the tongue 
Ere half the mystic canticle be sung! 

harp of life, so speedily unstrung! 

Who, if 'twere his to choose, would know again 
The bitter sweetnesB of the lost refrain, 
Its rapture and its pain? 

11. 
Though I be shut in darkness, and become 
Insentient dust, blown idly here and there, 

1 hold oblivion a scant price to pay 

For having once had held against my lip 

Life's brimming cup of bydromel and rue — 

For having once known woman's holy love 

And a child's kiss, and for a little space 

Been boon companion to the Day and Night, 

Fed on the odors of the summer dawn, 

And folded in the beauty of the stars. 

Dear Lord, though I be changed to senseless clay, 

And serve the potter as he turns his wheel, 

I thank Thee for the gracious gift of tears ! 



A BACHELOR'S GROWL AT THE WOMEN.-Pimd. 

Oh, the beautiful woman, the woman of ancient days, 

The ripe and the red, who are done and dead, 

With never a word of praise; 

The rich, round Sallies and Susans, the Pollies, and Joans, and 

Who guarded their fame, and saw no shame [ Prues, 

In walking in low-heeled shoes. 

They never shrieked on a platform; they never desired a vote; 

They sat in a row and liked things slow, 

While they knitted or patched a coat. 

They lived with nothing of Latin, and a jolly sight less of Greek, 

And made up their books and changed their cooks 

On an average once a week. 

They never ventured in hansoms, nor climbed to the topmost 
Nor talked with a twang in the latest slang; ['bus, 

They let these fashions to us. 

But, ah 1 she was sweet and pleasant, though possibly not well 
The excellent wife who cheered your life, [ read, 

And vanished at ten to bed. 

And it's oh, the pity, the pity that time should ever annul, 

The wearers of skirts, who mended shirts 

And never thought nurseries dull. 

For everything's topsy turvy now; the men are bedded at ten, 

While the women sit up, and smoke and sup 

In the Club of the Ghickless Hen. 



THE DIFFERENCE.— By Larry Chittenden. 



Ten years ago, my lovely Kate, 

Eighteen was I with you, 
But now, when I am twenty-eight, 

You're only twenty-two. 
How is it, in Time's equal race, 

My years have your's surpassed ? 
Because— laughed Kate, with roguish face, 

" Because" — " you lived so fast! " 

LETHE.— Edith M. Thomas. 

Remembrance followed him into the skies. 

They met. Awhile mute Sorrow held him tbra'I. 
Then broke he forth in spirit words and sighs: 
"Great was my sin! but at my contrite call 
Came pardon and the hope of Paradise; 

Jf this be Heaven, thy blessing on me fall!" 
She looked. Peace filled her unremembering eyes; 

She knew him not— she had forgotten all. 



xisrsxTR^-n^cEi. 



REMOVAL! 



j-.'fj..ms.;.9 
.100,000 00 

278,901.10 
142,338.90 
11.104.00 



HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY 

Now Occupies Premises at the N. E. Cor. California and Sansome 

8ts., S. F., Lately Vacated by Wells, Kargo & Co. Bank. 

Twenty-seventh Annual Exhibit. 

■ miliar) 1, l.ijl. 
INCORPORATED A. T>. 1864. 
Losses p'd since organrn.»3,17.i,769.21 1 Reinsurance Reserve ... 
Assets January 1, 1891 S67,r>12.19 Capital paid up, Gold 

Surplus lor policy holders 8-11.944.69 | NetSurplusover ev'yth'g 

Iucomelnl890 J394, 184.62 | Fire Losses paid In 1890 

Fire Losses unpaid, January 1, 1891. 

President . J. F. HOUGHTON I Secretary CHARLES R. STORY 

\ Ice-President. .IIENKY L. HODGE I General Agent.ROBKRT H. MAGILL 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 
Herbert L. Low, 51 anaser for the 1'aclflc toast Branch. 

22U Sa ii-.nm.- St., S. 1 ■'. 

Capital .... $1,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S. 534,795.72 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
____^_ 238 California St.. S. F., Cal. 



THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. OF ST. GALL. OF ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 
41 California St., San Francisco , Cal. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed 910,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve (in addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6.124,057.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street. San Francisco 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, [Established 1 782] 
American Fire Insurance Company of New York [Established 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Paeifie Coast. . 
413 California Street, Sa n Franc isco. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720.J 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 

GEO. F. UKANT, Manager. 

PACIFIC IDIEIPJ^RTIMIIEIErT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 

OF LONDON. OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1821. Founded a. d. 1710. 

Paid-up Capital, - - - $ 5,000,000. Cash AsBets, {10,044,712. 

Cash Assets, J23,194,249. Assets in America, - - - ?2,222,724. 

WM. J. LMDERS. flen'l Agent, 20!. Sansome St.. San Francisco. Cal. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL »6,000,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street. San Francisco. 

THE NEW EN6LAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets. $19,724,638.46. 

President, BENJAMIN P. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBEN8. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 




K 



INSURANCE COMPANY- LTD. 



HESTER , Eir- 



Capital paid 6) guaranteed 83,000,000,00. 

ChasA Latdn, Manaiier. 
439 California St. . San Francisco. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 



FASHIONS FOR MEN. 
From the Clothier and Furnisher. 

THERE are always two kinds of silk hats, each of the best 
quality, on sale in London. One is the strictly fashionable 
model, "the latest," or whatever one may choose to call it, 
which is retailed in the West End at from a guinea ($5) to twenty- 
five shillings ($6). The other is the style which immediately pre- 
ceded it and has " gone out," although the quality is unchanged. 
This is usually called the " city" hat. and costs ?4 (16s.) The 
distinction is a very peculiar one. Employees of large London 
commercial houses are not expected to be up to the hilt in fash- 
ion, and if they are, it is sure to be resented by their employers. 
A London city magnate would not be seen wearing the same 
shape hat as one of his bookkeepers, and so the great army of 
salary-drawers keep just a shape behind the bond-holding com- 
munity. For instance, now that the bell-crowned " topper" is 
au fait, the "city" hat is a "taper crown," and as such is strictly 
correct. 

The wide-brimmed hat of last year of the fashionable types was 
found in the ultra shape 1 * only in the imported article. They are 
unusually weighty, the inside band being of flannel, insufferably 
hot. This season they are wider-brimmed, lighter, in more be- 
coming shapes, greater variety of styles, and are American made. 
The straw hat of '92 is a benizon of summer-time. 

The tendency of the summer is for what is striking in mascu- 
line raiment, and the shrewd providers pander to these caprices 
of the warm weather spell with subtle and attractive specialties. 



The wearing of the yachting cap in town remains as much a 
solecism as ever, and with the tennis costume, as shown in some 
illustrations in alleged fashion catalogues, it is, of course, incon- 
gruous in a palpably flagrant degree. But upon the seashore, or 
indeed in any perspective when the background is marine in 
character, the style is now deemed allowable. 

The yachting cap is distinctly an appurtenance of this royal 
sport, and its wearing under any other conditions is not deemed 
strictly au fait. The becomingness and distingue touch which 
this shaped headgear gives the man of average physique, how- 
ever, has led to warranting its somewhat more liberal use. 

One of the boons of the greater range of selection in summer- 
time raiment is the enhanced opportunity it affords the true swell 
to vent his individualism. With a certain bit of neckwear, worn 
with a suiting in subjugated texture, he may secure a contrast 
that makes him the envy of his fellows. The advanced savant of 
the conventional regime can, betimes, by artistic affiliation, trans- 
form an article of attire, which, in its original intention, was a 
pitfall for the unwary into the veriest well-spring of good taste. 
There is, indeed, as much speculation in men's fashion nowadays 
as in Wall street, but the " flyers" are reasonably safe, because 
operations are along safe conservative lines. 

The edict for glove wearing is now positive — more particularly 
so for evening shades — and not only at receptions, but at the 
opera and for formal calls the best men of society have decreed 
the light shade of gloves should be worn. Such a positive stand 
will only be taken at first by the ultra swells, but their influence 
will be felt, in that men that npw eschew gloves at the more 
formal functions will begin to wear them. 

The latest thing out is the smoking waistcoat. There is in the 
upper left side a cartridge-like pocket for holding individual 
cigars, so that they will not break. Then again, in this way the 
various grades for more or less valued acquaintances may be 
placed — 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and readily reached without embarrassment. 
There is in the upper side a curiously shaped pocket for the pipe- 
bowl to rest in. and a loop in which the stem reposes. The 
lower pocket on both sides are double pockets. On the left side 
under the flap is a place for smoking tobacco — roomsorue, and 
lined specially for that purpose, while behind the flap is a place 
for the watch to repose. On the right-hand side, behind the flap, 
there is a suitably prepared receptacle for matches, and under 
the flap a place for money or poker chips. 

FOOTWEAR is one of the details of the attire of a well-dressed 
man, which always requires the greatest consideration. 
Therefore it is that the gentlemen who patronize P. F. McNulty, 
of 222 Post street, above Grant avenue, always wear neat and 
fashionable shoes. Mr. McNulty is a master of his art, for he 
was formerly with Thomas, of London, and he has no superior 
in his line in the city. 

The Original Swain's Bakery, at 213 Sutter street, is one of the 
most popular restaurants in the city, and deservedly, for there a 
patron is always assured of excellent treatment, and can always en- 
joy a splendid dinner. The elite of the city patronize the Bakery. 
Its chef is a gentleman who has thoroughly mastered his art. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Bodie Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Bodie, Mono County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 20th day of June, 1892, an assessment (No. 14) of Twenty-five Cents 

fier share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
mmediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room G2, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 22d Day of Juty, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and, unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 22d day of August, 1892, to 
pay tbe delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

H. D. WALKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 62, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery 8t, San Francisco, Ual. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California, Loca- 
tion of works— Tuscarora, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 15th day of June, 1892, an assessment (No. 8) of Ten (10) Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 20, No. 331 Pine street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, or to E. R. Grant. Transfer Agent, 57 Broadway, New York. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The Twenty-first Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 18th day of August, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 20, No. 331 Pine Street. San Francisco, California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Belle Isle Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Tuscarora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Sixteenth day of June, 1892, an assessment, No. 14, of Ten CentB 

fier share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
mmediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Company, No. 310 PiDe street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-first Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment Is made he- 
fore, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 12th day of August, 1892, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costB of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW. Secretary. 
Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Alta Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— Sau Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works-Gold Hill, Gold Hill Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on Saturday, the 18th day of June, 1892, an assessment, No. 42, of Fifteen (15) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the of- 
fice of the company, Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Tuesday, the Twenty-sixth Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the sixteenth day of August, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francis- 
co, California. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



Peerless Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Quijotoa, Arizona. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 6th dayof July, 1892, an assessment (No 18) of 5 cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately in 
United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the company, room 
23, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

The Eleventh Day of August, 1 892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 7th day of September, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expen- 
ses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, S09 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 69 

Amount per Share 25 cents 

Levied June 7, 1892 

Delinquent in Office July 12, 1892 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 4, 1892 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room, 69 Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. . 



Julv Ifi. 1*9:2. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'2. r > 



EXTENSION OF JOINT STOCK ENTERPRISE. 

TH K practical lessons derivable from the immense result* 
achieved elsewhere in the fields of commerce, finance, tod lb« 
general industries, by the association ol numberless sua'] 
amounts ol capital under the joint Block principle, are but Im- 
perfectly understood in California. The utilization, in various 
important enterprises, of large amounts of capital thu* collected, 
is a healthy feature in the prepress of many advanced countries. 
Sums of money unproductive and insignificant in themselves. 
when thus associated are rendered powerful in the accomplish- 
ment of desirable ends, benerittinc alike the owners and the com- 
munity generally. This is seldom, if ever, the case with us. 
When the joint stock system is applied it is usually of a primi- 
tive and contracted character, adopted for the exclusive advan- 
tage of a few of the >arger stock holders, to the detriment, and 
not unfrequently the destruction of ihe interests of those who do 
not •■ control " the undertaking. This sacrificing of tbe interests 
of the many to the rapacity of the few, is a glaring abuse of the 
fundamental principle upon which corporate associations can 
alone be justly or successfully conducted. Hence the imperfectly 
developed condition of this principle among ns; a principle 
which has much to do with the material progress of 
most modern countries. Although possessing fully that 
power of organization, that aptitude for combination 
which forms one of the many peculiar qualities of the American 
character, we have hitherto negleted its application in the man- 
ner indicated, to tbe many opportunities presented in this State. 
We have numberless small commercial incorporations of a variety 
of natures, but they are, with few exceptions, dwarfed and un- 
developed, and are, together with the few of greater magnitude, 
simply joint stock concerns in name only, being owned and con- 
trolled by some central figure with his few satellites, and a mere 
scant following of small shareholders to make up the necessary 
number. 

We have nothiDg to compare with those large joint stock enter- 
prises which are a distinguishing feature in the commercial under- 
takings of Great Britain, where the shareholders are composed of 
men in all conditions of life, and are scattered over tbe United 
Kingdom — undertaking whose operations are, in many cases, of 
vast magnitude, whose credit is not unfrequently on a higher 
plane than that of many leading European countries, and whose 
operations extend over the globe. They are one of the means 
through which the commerce of tbe world pays tribute to the 
power of English associated capital. Yet such a thing as the 
" control " of such undertaking, within our meaning of the term, 
is unknown. They are worked in the interests of the entire body 
of shareholders under laws specially adapted for that purpose. 
Many of the English enterprises in America, which are ignorantly 
attributed to the action of " wealthy syndicates," " English capital- 
ists" and the like are the works of joint stock companies, com- 
prising thousands of shareholders; among whom there is proba- 
bly not a millionaire nor a single capitalist. That American brew- 
eries, iron works, tin mines, meatpacking companies, agricultural 
and pastoral lands and the like should fall under the control of 
the aggregation of small sums of English money, while we, pos- 
sessing the same power, but unable or unwilling to exercise it, 
are content to deposit our saved millions in savings banks, and 
loan on real estate to the fictitious increase of values, raising of 
rents upon ourselves, and generally contracting the supply of 
money to manufactures, commerce and the like — is a strange an- 
omaly. English banks, English insurance companies and such 
enterprises in our midst, indicates the opportunities existing 
within ourselves, which we leave to others to develop. California 
is specially favored in possessing opportunities of richest promise, 
where the association of capital can produce profitable and desira- 
ble results It is time she became conscious of her own fay arable 
conditions. Joint stock enterprises of merit introduced by men 
of character, ability and integrity should be able to be established 
from the resources of the general public alone. There is now an 
abundance of stagnating capital in the East (not to speak of the 
condition of our own savings banks coffers), and well considered, 
soundly established enterprises could, and would, attract all that 
was needed, even if our own resources were insufficient for our 
legitimate local undertakings, which, happily, they are not. 

It is needless to indicate tbe opportunities which almost all 
branches of industry and commerce present for extension on tbe 
joint stock principle; but one may be alluded to as a promising 
instance, to which reference was recently indirectly made in 
these columns, on treating upon tbe subject of banking extension. 
In this direction profitable opportunity waits upon energy. The 
conditions are all favorable and well considered; joint stock 
banking enterprise cannot but succeed under the existing condi- 
tions of this State. One or two large banking companies, whose 
interests were confined to no one center, and whose operations 
would in time be spread over the entire State, with a numerous 
proprietory distributed throughout California, securing connection 
and extended business at all points, would prove a public boon, 
apart from the advantages its shareholders would enjoy. Before 
the progress of such institutions as are indicated, and on the ap- 
pearances of their branches at every important center of popula- 
tion, the local banks would be compelled to amalgamate or to 



withdraw, as time went on, The economy in the manofrciiMiu 
and the equalization in the supply of capital from point! 
II was plentiful and Unemployed, to Others where enterprise had 
rendered the demand inure active, would be ehVcled to an extent 
and at a reduction ol OOSI unknown at present, while In, 
COrrencea of increase or decrease of prosperity Don Id not In flu 
enco the progress of such institutions as a whole. Instil Ml on a 
Ol Die nature but roughly Indicated here, are not experimental ; 
there is no theory involved; such financial undertakings are ac- 
complished facts, and most successfully, extensively and profit- 
ably operated elsewhere. We have no parallel of such in this 
State, but time and opportunity now wait their development. 
A large and well-distributed number of shareholders, with limited 
interests in such undertaking, is alt that is required, none having 
control, or being capable of in any way obtaining it, the interests 
of each being tbe interest of all. This is but one of tbe many 
instances which might be suggested, where opportunity exists, 
for tbe extension of the principle referred to in its true and 
proper application. There are many others of equally good 
promise; and if this State is to keep pace with other advancing 
countries in the active international rivalries of to-day; if it is to 
utilize its golden opportunities, and not allow its advantages to 
lie idle or undeveloped, it must use its capital (and the other 
capital which would be attracted here by new and profitable chan- 
nels for investment) with energy, economy, system, ability and 
integrity. 






DEUNQJENT SALE NOTICE. 

Behrinp; Sea Packing Company. 
Location of priDcipal place of business— San Francisco, California Lo- 
cation of cannery— Ugashik River, A aska. 

NOTICE.— There are delinquent upon the following described slock on 
account of assessment (No. 1 ,, levied ou the 13th day of February 1892 'the 
several amounts set opposite the names of the respective shareholders': 
Name. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

C.A.Johnson 1 60 ?s0 

C.A.Johnson 2 840 340 

Chas. Carlson 7 30 30 

C. Lundberg.. 12 390 S90 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board of Directors re ade 
on the 13th day of February, 1892, so many shares of each parcel of such 
stock as may be necessary will be sold at public auction, at the office of the 
company, No. 9 Market street, San Francisco, Cal., ou Friday, the 15th dav 
of April, 1892, at the hour of 12 o'clock m. of said day, to pay said delin- 
quent assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
01 sale. 

JAMBS MADISON, Secretary. 
Postponement. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Behring Sea Packing Com- 
pany, this day, the sale of the above delinquent stock was postponed until 
MONDAY, the 16th day of May, 1892, at the same time and place 
„ „ . JAMES MADISON, Secretary. 

San Francisco, April 16, 1892. 

Postponement. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Behring Sea Packing Com- 
pany, this day, the sale of tbe above delinquent stock was postponed until 
TH URSDA1', June 23, 1892, at the same time and place. 

„ „ , JAMES MADISON, Secretary. 

San Francisco, May 25. 1892. 

Postponement. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Behring Sea Packing Com- 
pany the sale of the above delinquent stock was postponed until Silurdav 
July 23, 1892. JAMES MADISON, Secretary. 

San Francisco, June 23. 1892. 

~ NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Consolidated New York Mining Company. 

I ocation of principle place of business— Sail Francisco, California. Lo- 
ca'ion of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 28th day of June, 1892, an assessment (No. a7), of ten (10) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon whicli this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 2d Day of August, 1892, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unle-s payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 23d day of Augu t, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOTT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada block, No. 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California- 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Savage Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Savage Min- 
ing Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 4, Nevada 
Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on Thursday, the 
21st day of July, 1892, at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of elect- 
ing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction 
of such other business as may come before the meeting. Transfer bouks 
will close on Monday, July 18, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Spring Valley Water Works. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Spring Valley Water 
Works will be held at the office of the company, No. 516 California Street 
San Francisco, Cal., on WEDNESDAY, the 20th day of July, 1892. at the hour 
of 12 o'clock M., for the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for 
the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other business as may come 
before the meeting. 

WM. NORRIS, Secretary. 
Office— No. 516 California street, San Francisco, Cal, 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 



BY some German chemists tests have been made to ascertain 
the physical cause of the coking or fasing of bituminons coal 
into the form of coke, under a distilling heat, the conclusion be- 
ing that such a phenomenon is connected with the chemical com- 
position of the coal, with special relation to the richness of the 
coal in what is called disposable hydrogen, or that proportion of 
it which is in excess of the quantity required to form water with 
the oxygen present. It has recently been asserted, however, 
that such a standard for the coking quality in coal does not cor- 
respond with observed results, nor does the richness of a sample 
of coke in carbon determine its coking capabilities, the fact being 
that two specimens of coal of practically identical carbon compo- 
sition will often be found to behave very differently in the returt 
of coke ovens. It is argued, therefore, that, if the property of 
coking does not reside either in the surplus hydrogen or the fixed 
carbon, it is certainly not to be found in the content of the coal 
in oxygen, which gives no indication whatever of the physical 
behavior of the coal under heat. Some coking coals coke with- 
out much swelling, while others swell to a considerable extent 
during the process. In either case the coal uiu3t undergo a stage 
of fusion, in which it becomes a thick, semi -fluid mass, through 
which the gas escapes. 

— An interesting arrangement of pneumate mechanism for 
the production of high-class music has recently been exhibited. 
The instrument has two and one-fifth sets of reeds, the regular 
action of the air grooves being located above, and on top of the 
board containing these is a row of small pneumatics corresponding 
in number to the keys of the instrument; underneath this board 
are four rows of large pneumatics, one beneath the other, and, 
from an arm on each of these pneumatics, hangs a wire attached 
to a lever oparating on the coupler buttons' on the pitmans, or 
wooden rods, connecting the keys of the instrument wilh the 
reed board valves. By means of these levers, operated by pneu- 
matics, the movement of the valves becomes automatic, subject 
to the passage over the airboard of perforated paper. A peculiar 
characteristic of the motor which operates the music rolls, which 
distinguishes it from all other appliances of the kind, is its adapt- 
ability for running to the right to wind music and the left to re- 
wind, or vice versa. When the instrument is in operation, the 
keyboard becomes a thing of life, keys dropping with the exact 
rapidity required by the selection rendered. 

A German has patented a process for making barrels with- 
out staves. The trunk of a tree is sawed into lengths to the size 
of the barrel required, and the chunks are placed in a boiler and 
boiled for a few hours. It is believed that if a current of electric- 
ity be passed through the boiler a chemical action is generated 
that softens the wood for working. After the boiling the bark is 
stripped from the chunks. In front of a cutting tool the chunks 
are held by forks in a manner similar to that in which a piece of 
wood is held in a lathe. The chunk revolves rapidly against the 
edge of a fixed broad blade that cuts a continuous shoot of soft 
wood of any desired thickness. The strip passes to a flat table, 
where it is cut transversely into lengths of the required size. One 
machine cuts grooves for the head and the bottom and another 
cuts V-shaped slots out of the edgeF. Then the pieces are bent 
into cylinders and hooped. Moisture is extracted by a drying ap- 
paratus. 

A valuable practical device is that which has lately been 

brought to notice by a French inventor, designed to facilitate rope 
climbing, while at the same time permitting the climber to have 
free use of his hands. The apparatus consists of two boards, 
joined by a hinge, with a hole passing through both the hinge and 
the boards, and the extremities of the latter providedwith straps, 
which can be fastened to the feet of the man using the aparatus. 
The method of climbing involved in this arrangement is simple. 
When the feet attached to the boards are lifted the rope is free, 
but the moment the feet are pressed down on the two boards 
the rope is firmly gripped. It is only necessary, therefore, to lift 
the body by both hands as far as possible, and it can then be held 
by the hinged clamps until another lift is made. By the use of a 
belt to hold the bodyjclose to the rope the hands may be left free. 
The device, which is claimed to fulfill its purpose admirably, is^ 
designed especially for the use of firemen and painters, also to 
serve as a fire escape. 

— —There is a church in the town of Bergen, Norway, that is 
built entirely of paper. It can seat 1000 persons in comfort, and 
has been rendered waterproof by a solution of quicklime, curdled 
milk, and white of eggs. 

Sickness Among Children, 
Especially infants, is prevalent more or less at all times, but is large- 
ly avoided by giving proper nourishment and wholesome food. The 
most successful and reliable of all is the Gail Borden "Eagle" Brand 
Condensed Milk. Your grocer and druggist keep it. 



IB-A-IDsriECS- 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 1,175,000 

Southeast corner Bush and Sansome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; 

Seattle and Tacoma, Washington. 
SUB-BRANCHES— Kamloops, Naoaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, Brit'sh 
Columbia. 
This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA-Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and douth WaleB Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America: CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEM- 
ERARA and TRINIDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVIN6S UNION. 

532 California street, Corner Webb Street. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, June 30, 1891 $23,31 1,061 OO 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 1,346,635 00 

DIRECTORS. 

Albart Miller, Pr esident; George W. Beaver. Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastlaud ; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loaus only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or bv checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. 



PEOPLES HOME SAVINGS BANK AND SAFE DEPOSIT. 

80S Market Slreet (Flood Itnlldlns), San Francisco. 

OKGANIZED MAY, 1888. 

Guaranteed Capital. . . . Jl, 000,000.00 I Surplus Profits f 45,000.0) 

Paid-up Capital 333,333.33 | Deposits, Jan. 1, 1892 1,752,000.00 

OFFICERS: 

COLUMBUS WATERHOUSE President 

F. V. MCDONALD Vice-President 

J. E. FARNUM Secretary and Manager 

DORN & DORN Attorneys 

This bank receives savings deposits on term or ordinary ac- 
count, in sums or one dollar aud upwards. 

Interest paid from date of deposit, semi-annually. THe five-cent stamp 
system and the safe deposit department is a special feature of this bank. 
Safes to rent by the month or year, from $4.00 to $25.00 per annum. We re- 
ceive commercial deposits, make collections, issue local and foreign ex- 
change. 

Money to loan on Real Estate and Approved 1'ollateral. 

THE GERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND J 1 ,646 OOO 00. 

Deposits Ju v I. '892 28,776,697 91 

Officebs— President, L. GOT TIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRU8E 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGER8 ; Cashier, A. H. R. 8CHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoemann, E. 
Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon. Attorney, 
Jo hn R. Jabbqb. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, 8. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Moilitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecuritieB. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

JS. W. Cor. Sansome and. Sutter St3. 

ubsciied Capital $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital 92,000,000 

Reserve Fund 9660,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. 10 Wall St.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard FrereB 4 Cie, 17Bonle 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
merclal and Travelers' Credits issued. EUGENE MEYER, Manager. 
LC- Altbchtjl, Cashier. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up 91,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund. 650,000 

Head Office— S Angel Court, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. 8ends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART j „„.„.>„ 

P. N. LILIENTHAL. Managers. 



July lfi, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEB 



27 



-5UNJJD\A\51: 

LIVIN<; BKKLBTON \gnsmpil — The two beaded man makes 
me lired ! He wants ibeearih. \\'\ld Mnn of }lornro — What e 
■ be matter with him. Sims? jirl<lon-He fttls tiro meals to my 
one; ilon't he ? He smokes with ore month and chews with the 
other; and he can whistle and sing both at the same time. He says 
he i.- Roinc to vote twice at the coming election, anil I saw him kiss- 
ing two tiinVrem girls at the same lime last night. And yet he wears 
only one auit of dollies, and rides on a single railway ticket. He 
want-* the earth. — Puck, 

The Hi.nl of a rajah, who had been released from the cares of 

this world and an uncongenial wife, presented himself at the gates 
of paradise. " Have you been in purgatorvyet? " demanded Brahma. 
1 No; hut I have been married." " Knter then — it is the same 
thing." At tbis moment another soul arrived, who begged Brahma 
to allow him also to enter. " boftly. softly— have you been in purga- 
tory >et?" "No; but neither has that other fellow — he died the 
same day I did." " Very true; but he had been married." " Mar- 
ried, indeed ! Why. I Have been married three times." "Away, 
then, to the lower legions," said Brahma, sternly; " paradise is not 
made for imbeciles." — South Australian Chronicle. 

Mistress (to new housemaid, fresh from the country) — Now, see. 

Mary, this is the way to light the gas. You turn on this little tap. so, 
and then apply the match, so. You understand? New Housemaid — 
Yes, ma'am ; quite, ma'am. Mistress {next morning) — Why, what a 
horrible smell of gas! Where can it come from 7 We shall all be suf- 
focated ! Neu- Housemaid (with murl t pride)— Please, ma'am, wh it shall 
I do next? I've made up all the beds and dusted the room, and 

turned on all the gases ready for the night, and . — Boston Ghb6. 

" Mary. 1 wish you would be a better little girl," said a father 
we know of to his little girl. " You have no idea how sorry I am that 
luatnma has to scold you so much." "Oh, don't worry about it, 
papa." was the reply. " I'm not one of those sensitivechiidren. Half 
the time I don't hear what she says." — Wilmington Weekly. 

" Gone forever I " he sighed, laying down his last coin, a ten 

dollar gold piece. "There goes my only eagle, wings and all!" 
" Yes," said the business-like man who hail called, as be handed over 
a receipted document, " but you can keep the bill, you know." 

— Chicago Tribune. 

Smallman —I went to the opera last night. Veecut — No! Did 

you 7 Why. my wife and her brother were there. Where did you 
sit? " Immediately at her back." " How did you enjoy it? " "Oh, 
very much indeed;' but I think she is suffering' from a slight rash — 
isn't she? " 

Proud Father — We've bad twins in our family on two occasions. 

You can't beat that, sir? Little Man {who hadn't spoken before) — Well, 
1 don't know about that. My wife presented me the other day with 
triplets, and three of a kind beat two pair, don't they ? — Life. 

Proprietor— What are you takingback there? Waiter— Customer 

sent this beefsteak back ; says he couldn't cut it. Proprietor {examining 
in— Take it right back to him and tell him he'll have to pay for it. 
We can never use it again; he has bent it all out of shape. — Puck. 

— ' Why, Bridget," exclaimed the housewife, " I can write ray 
name in the dust here." " Deed, ma'am," replied Bridget, admir- 
ingly, " thot's more nor I can do. There's nothing loike education, 
after all, is there, ma'am ? " — Washington Star. 

Footpad— Hold up yer hands! Citizen— I have nothing. Foot 

f.ad—Yes. yer have. I saw yer come out of a bank an' I follered yer. 
Citizen— That wasn't a bank. That was the gas office. Footpad— Go 
ahead. —Judge. 

" How did you like it in the West?" " Not very well. It took 

tc o much at en ion to find out jUit when to throw up your hands and 
when to lay down your hands." — Puck. 

C'erk nf Hotel (to departing guest)— Your key, sir. Guest (absently)— 
Eh? Clerk (gruffli/)—Your key, I said. Guest— Oh ! The ball and 
chain. 1 left them in the cell. —Puck. 

"Got everything ready, Chollie?" "Yes." " Plenty of cbam- 

pagneandsandwiches?" "Yes." " And an opiate for the chaperon ? " 
" By Jove! no." —Judge. 

"Now, Johnny, who is the mythological person who is sup- 
posed to support the world on his shoulders?" " Pulitzer, ma'am." 

— Judge. 

She— That odious Mrs. Newritch seems to think more of her 

dog than of her boy. He— Oh, well, the dog has a pedigree. —Life. 

Impatient Guest— How long is my steak going to be? Waiter— 

About eight inches, boss, we give big portions here. —Puck. 

It is noticed that bathing suits this year at the seaside resorts 

are a great deal more numerous, but less. 

Surface— What sort of a war record has General Bulger? Row- 
ley, — About a mile in six minutes. — Life. 

Dentist— Will you have gold in that cavity, sir? Free-silver Con- 
gressman — No, sir! —Judge. 

For Debilitated Men! If you desire to be restored to complete 
vigor and manhood, promptly, permanently and cheaply, we will 
send von full particulars (sealed) of a reliable, unfailing Home Treat- 
ment free. No electric nonsense, no stomach drugging. Address 
Albion Pharmacy Co., Box L, Al bion, Mich. 

You may always find good liquor at " The Mnnini," at 109 O'Par- 
rell street. This'6ne establishment has gained the great favor of all 
who have visited it since its opening, for its goods are always A 1, 
and its service is incomparable. Drop in there and take a drink. 



Bj^JSTKS. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital »3,000,00t 00 

?. ur J! lu . , J , , - 1,000,00000 

Undivided Proflu (July lut, ISM) 3,275,919 48 

WM. ALVORD, Pronldent. 

rsoms B»o»» Cmhler I B. Mt'BRAV.Jr . AaslntaniCMhl r 

iRvisii F. Mot'LTON, -2nd Assistant Cashier. 

< <> it it i s,|.,»\iii:m > | 

NEW YORK— Agency ol the Ban* of California; B03TON-Tremout 
Natioual Bank; CUIC.AQO-Unlnu National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatmau's 
Bank; NEW ZEALAND-Thc Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent lu 
Londou— Mossrs. N. M. Rothschild A Sons. Correspondents In India, China 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virgiula City, and Correspondent* In all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Const. 

Letters of Credit iBsued, available In all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, BoBton, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland.O., Los Angeles, Loudon, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen 
Hamburg, Frankiort-on-the-Main Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai. Yokohama. Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL IaNKT" 

N. W. Corner Sansome and Busli streets. 

Established 1870. n s. Denosltarv 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) .*T«00 000 

SURPLUS $600,000 I UNDIVIDED PROFITS... «16o'oOO 

8. S. MURPHY President IE. D. MORGAN .Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT... .Vice-President I GEO. W.KLINE Ass'tCashier 

DIRECTORS: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins, S. G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffltt. 

ThomasJeuuings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A Ueneral Banking Business Transacted. 
SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 
JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 
Safes to rent from $5 to ?100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 
thn renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A spe cialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p.m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Authorized Capital 53,500,000 | Capital paid up 2.450,000 

Reserve 45o!oo0 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office ... .73 Lombard m.,E. C 

Portland Branch. 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1005 A Street. 

Man ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Km. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York — Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City — First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, HarjeB & Co. 

WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

N. £. Corner Sansome and Sutler Streets. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CAPITAL $ 500,000 00 

SURPLUS 5,488393.12 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS * 5,988,393 00 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Ban kin 
Business. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS FORT COSTA. California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowestrates of intereston Grain ftored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in Firat-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

Office ot the Company, 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL (1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS s 
OHAB. F. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Ja. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH Feesident. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-Pbesidbnt. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cabhibb 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary 8. L. ABBOT.Jr. 

Vice-President W. 8. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street, San Franclsoc. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour Is lower; foreign demand fair; Extras $4.45@?4.50; Superfine 
?2.75@*3.10 
Wheat is dull; light trade; Shipping, $1.35; Milling, |1.40®$1.45 per 

Barley is quiet; Brewing, 9 Vi.@ttL.00 Feed, 90c@$1.00 per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, ?l.40@$1.4>; Feed, $1.30(a)?l.35 per ctl. 

Corn, White, $1 30; Yellow, Jl.25@ifl.37 1 3 per ctl. 

Rye, no stock, good demand, ?l-15ig$1.2U. Cement, $2.00@$2.25. 

Hay is lower; Wheat, $12: Oats, ?S^$10; Alfalfa, 17@|9. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, $18@?18.50 per ton. 

Beans, good request, $2.00@$2.50 per ctl. Potatoes, 45c.@75c. per ctl. 

Butter is steady; Choice, 20c. @22'^c. ; Fair, 16c.@17c; Eastern, 14c@15c. 

Cheese, light stock, 8c.@9c. Eggs, free supply, 22c.@24c. 

Honey, Comb, llc.@12c. : Extracted, 5c.@6c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth 25c@50c. Beeswax is higher, at 25c.@26c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Raisins and Dried Grapes in high favor at good paying rates. 

Hides are steady; Dry, 6c@7j.3C. Wool is in good demand at llc.@16c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 7\4®7 l 4c. 

Coffee lower at 15c.@21c. forC. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is lower, with a declining tendency. Nuts find ready sale. 

Quicksilver Is nominal at $43.50 per flask. Hops are neglected at 15@17c. 

Sugar, good stoct of both Raws and Refined. Whites, 4}4@rb%c. 

We have repeatedly made reference to the inroads upon the 
business of this port by and through the influence of the Cana- 
dian Pacific route. We are now advised of a recent order from 
Shanghai, China, for 3,000 bales of Cotton Goods, to be shipped 
from Manchester, N. H., to China via the aforesaid route, and 
that on the 12th of June last ten carloads of Sheetings were for- 
warded, to be followed by 28 carloads additional. The entire in- 
voice of 38 carloads were duly forwarded en route during the 
month of June last. The Tea trade of the Orient in like manner 
is being diverted from us, and also from the Suez Canal route, by 
the several Northern Canadian rail and steamship lines via Brit- 
ish Columbia, Washington and Oregon lines, so that at present, 
New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Montreal and other Eastern At- 
lantic cities are drawing their supplies across this continent quite 
independent of the Southern Pacific Company. 

Flour and Grain of all descriptions dull of sale. Fruits of all 
kinds plentiful and cheap. Cannera and driers of fruit are 
actively engaged curing fruit. 

The Pacific Mail Bteamship China departed for the Orient on 
the 9th inst., carrying in treasure $376,621, nearly all in silver; of 
this $221,921 went to Hongkong, $82,200 to Japan, and $52,500 to 
Calcutta. For China the cargo consisted of 15. 919 bbls. Flour, 812 
pkgs. Provisions, 300 bxs. Pearl Barley, 17 bbls. Beer, 35 cs. 
Canned Goods, etc., value $82,375; to Japan, 612 bbls. Flour, 
1,706 gals. Wine and Mdse., value $16,829; to Manila, 500 bbls. 
Flour, value $2,200; elsewhere, 89 cs. Salmon, 69 cs. Canned 
Fruit, and 56 cs. Canned Meats. 

Imports of Staple Groceries by sea for the past six months: 
Sugar, 204,141,775 lbs.; six months of 1891, 227,355.411 lbs. Tea, 
874,195 lbs.; six months of 1891, 1.204.522 lbs.; Coffee, 18,683,253 
lbs.; six months of 1891, 18,513,481 lbs.; Rice, 26,683,634 lbs.; 
six months of 1891, 29,062,240 lbs. Since January 1, 1892, im- 
ports, foreign, six months, in value. Merchandise, $23,768,103; 
and for six months of 1891, $29,958,401; Treasure imports, six 
months of 1892, $2,087,763; 1891, $2,271,088. 

Exports to Honolulu include cargoes per Forest Queen, 550 
bbls. Flour, 3,141 gals. Wine, and Mdse., value $24,412. The 
stnir. Australia, for same, carried cargo of assorted Mdse. valued 
at $18,000. For Kahului, per J. D. Spreckels, 400 cs. Kerosene and 
Mdse., value $2,971. 

Cement arrivals include the cargo per Br. ship Eurasia, from 
London, with 15,288 bbls. Stock is large and prices too low to 
cover costs and charges. 

Sealskins — The first arrival of the season is per schr. Emma 
and Louisa, 19 days from the Aleutian Islands, with 1,342 skins, 
to C. D. Ladd. The catch up to June 25th, is reported by this 
schooner, aggregates 31,383 skins as the catch of 50 vessels, the 
largest 2,042 skins, and the smallest 40 skins. 

Thestmr. Belgic, from the Orient, brought for cargo 837 bales Cal- 
cutta Gunnies, 300 bags Cotfee, 6,293 bags Sugar, 200 pkga. Opium, 
4,272 pkgs. Tea. 14.750 mats Rice, 4,000 pkgs. merchandise. In 
transit to go overland, 20,339 pkgs. Tea, 119 pkgs. Silk Goods, 102 
pkgs. Raw Silk, 185 pkgs. Curios, etc. 

Grain charters, etc.— The Br. iron ship Thallata, 1,748 tons, 
Wheat to Cork, Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, £1 6a. 3d.; Br. iron 
ship California, 2 991 tons, Grain and Merchandise to Liverpool 
direct, laid on; Br. iron ship Poseidon, 1,708 tons, Wheat to Cork, 
Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, £1 10s., September loading, prior to 
arrival; ship A. J. Fuller, 1,782 tons, Merchandise to New York, 
in the Dispatch Line. 

Codfish. — The second cargo of the season is at hand. Schr. 
Czarine, from Pirate Cove, with 240,000 Fish, causing a decline in 
price. 

The steamship City of 8ydney, hence for the Isthmus and way 
ports, carried en route for New York 43,000 galls. Wine, 120 galls. 



Brandy, 192,785 lbs. Borax, 94 bales Raga, etc., value, $31,500; 
also to Central America, 742 bbls. Flour, 25,130 lbs. Malt, 600 galls. 
Wine, 23,251 lbs. Tallow and Merchandise, value, $14,500; to 
Mexico, 40,000 lbs. Beans and Merchandise, value, $1,527: to 
South America, 500 bbls. Flour, 108.930 lbs. Malt, value, $4,525; 
to Panama, 400 bbls. Flour and Merchandise, value, $1,981. 

Flour from Cardiff.— We have the Br. Bk. Centaur with 1,601 
tons Coke and 709 tons Steel Blooms to Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 

The Glen, from Apia, bad for cargo 269 sks. Copra and 125 tons 
Old Iron and other metal. 

The stmr. Alameda, from Sydney, brought for cargo 2,288 ingots 
Tin, etc.; from Auckland 56 bales Tow, etc.; from Honolulu 924 
bche. Banannaa, 383 cs. Pine Apples, etc. The schooner Robert 
Lewers, 22 ds. from Honolulu, brought for cargo 23,590 bags Sugar. 

Sugar imports for the week under review embrace the following: 
from Hilo, pr. Harvester, 43,330 baga; from Honolulu, pr. Andrew 
Welch, 26,849 bags. 

Wheat shipments of the new crop are now in order. The Br. 
ship Mooltan sailed for Cork July 11th with 57,427 ctls., value 
$78,962. 

Railroad Material for Central America.— The schr. Joseph Russ 
has sailed hence for San Jose de Guatemala with 13,000 R. R. 
Ties and 63 cs. Dynamite, value $4,431. 

The brig. Sea Waif sailed from Peru for Callao on the 12th inst., 
carrying 247 pkgs. Machinery, 200 bbls. Flour, 22,687 lbs. Tallow, 
55,000 feet Lumber, 80,000 Shingles, 1,104 pkgs. Shooks, 293 pkgs. 
Hardware, etc.; value $48,685. 

Our Dairy Supply continues free and liberal, and prices of But- 
ter, Cheese and Eggs remain at normal rates. 

The most perfect gift is perfect vision. Obtainable at C. Muller's, the 
optician, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush, San Francisco. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

AND 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO. OF IRELAND; 
ATLAS ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON ; 
BOYLSTON INSURANCE CO. OF BOSTON ; 
OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON. 

Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the Use of the 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER I 

vOver 300 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

RemoveB all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

380 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Systems—" Slattery " Induction; " Wood " Arc. Factories— Fort Wayne, 
Indiana; Brooklyn, New York. 

Electric Improvement Company. 

General AgentB for California, Nevada, Oregon, Arizona and Washington 
of the Fort Wayne Electric Light Co., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Estimates furnished for Electric Railways, Electric Light and Steam 
Plants, House Wiring, etc. Marine Work a Specialty. 



35 New Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



R. J. WHEELER. 



J. W. GIRVIN. 



J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 

Rubber and Leather Belting, Hose, Packing, etc. 

Rubber Clothing, Boots, Shoes, etc. 

Paniflc Coast Agents for Boston Belting Co. and Fayerweather & Ladew, 
formerly J. B. Hoyt & Co. 4 California St., S. F., Cal. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

AgentB for— 

The Cunard Royal Mall Steamship I Vivian Sons Yellow Metal Sheathing 

Company, Hartmann's Rahtjen's Composition 

"The California Line of Clippers," I The China Traders & Insurance Co. 

from New York, i (I>'6\)t 

"The Hawaiian Line of Packets," The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 
to and from Honolulu. ! Steel Rails and Track Material. 



July 16, 1892. 



SAN FRANCIS! NEWS 1 !■ I IKK. 



20 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains Ltavi and are Due to Arrl-va at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



lauvi I From Jul) 1, 1892. 

740a. BeolciA. Bum>cy, ^.cramcnlo 
7 SO*. lUrwardr. Nile, andean Jo»e ' 
7:30*. Martinet. San Ramou, Callstoga 

and Santa Ko.a 
840 a. jacram to* KeddlDg, vial'avi. 
840*. Firstand SecoadClau lorOgdca 

and East, aud first olan locally 
8:80*. Nilos, San Jo»e, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, MarvsTlllc, Oro- 
Tlllc and Red Bluff 
9:00*. Sunset Route, Atlantic Express, 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 
Demlng.El Paso, New Orleans 

and But 

•9:00 a. Stockton and Milton 

L2-0UM. Haywards, Niles and Livermore 
•lOOr. Sacramento River Steamers .... 
1:30 p. Vallejo and Martinez 
340 p. Haywards, Niles and San Jose 
440 p. Martinez, San Ramon, Stockton 

Lodi, Merced and Fresno 

440 p. Vallejo, Callstoga, El Yerano and 

Sauta Rosa 

4:30 p. Benicia, Esparto, Sacramento. 

4 :30 p. Woodland and Oroville 

•4:30p. Niles and Livermore 

5-30 p. Los Angeles Express. Fresno, 
Bakersfield, Santa Barbara & 

Los Angeles 

5.30 P. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East 

6:00 p. Haywards, Niles and San Jose.. 

. ... Niles and San Jose 

•640 p. Sunol and Livermore 

640 p. Ogden Route Atlantic Express, 

Ogden and East 

17 40 p. Vallejo 

7:00 p. Shasta Route Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East. . . 



I ttuvi 
7 IS P. 

6:1JP. 
7:14 P. 

MS r. 
4:45 P. 



8:45 P. 
•- IS p. 

7:15 p. 
•9:00 p. 
)2:45P. 

9:45*. 

9:45*. 

9.45*. 
10:45*. 
10:45*. 
•8:45 i. 



8:45 a. 
7 :45 A. 
16:15 p. 



9:15 a. 
+8:45 P. 



8:15 A 



Santa Cruz Division. 



J8:05 p. 



•2:15 P. 



4:45 P. 



17-45 a. Sunday Excursion Train for New- 
ark, San Jose, Los Gatos, Fel- 
ton, Big Trees and Santa Cruz 
8:15a. Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 6 :20 p. 

Centerville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

SantaCruz *10:60a. 

Centerville, San Jobc Los Gatos, 
Saturdays and Sundays to Santa 

Cruz 9:50A . 

Coas t Division (Third aid Townsend Street s). 

, Ban Jose, Almaden aud Way Sta- 
tions *2:38 p. 

Monterey and Santa Cruz Sun- 
day Excursion 

8:15 a. San Jose, Gllroy, Tres Pinos, Pa 
jaro, SantaCruz, Monterey, Pa- 
cific Grove, Salinas, San Mi- 
guel, Paso Robles and Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) 
and principal Way Stations 
19-30 a. "Sunday Excursion Train to 
Menlo Park and Way Stations. 
10-37A. 8an Jose, and Way Stations. . . 
12:15 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 3:30p. 

•2:80p. San Jose, Tres PinoB, SantaCruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, Pacific Grove 
and principal Way Stations. . .*10:37 a. 
♦3-80 p. Menlo Park, San Jose and Prin- 
cipal Way Stations *9 ;47 A. 

•4-30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . *8:06 A. 

6i5 p. San JoBe and Way Stations ? : iS! A ' 

6 -SO p. Menlo Park and way Stations ... 6 :35 a. 
H.1-.46F. Menlo Park and principal Way 

Stations f7:30r. 



•7:00 a. 
17:31 



18:28 p. 



6:10 p. 



12:45 P. 
5:03 P. 



a. for Morning. 
•Sundays excepted 



p. for Afternoon. 
tSaturdays only. 



"yi>f look ltd, Birdie; whafs th. mat- 
I ter?" were the words addressed to 
llirdie McApinipin. by her friend Mollie 
Squeers. a? they melon Manhattan avenue. 
•■ I'm not feeling well.'* " Are you sick ? " 
■■ No. I'm not precisely sick; but I feel tired j 
and overworked." » Do tell me all about 
it." " Well, you see our colored cook is 
sick, and now poor mother bas to do all the 
cooking and scrubbing and washing and 
ironing, and it makes me feel so tired to see 
the old creature, she is so slow." 

— Texas Diflingt. 



tSu ndays only 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

The splendid 3,000-ton steamers of this line, car- 

Sing the United States, Hawaiian and Colonial 
ails, sail from Folsom street Wharf, as under: 
FOR HONOLULU, AUCKLAND AND SIDNEY, 

S. S. Alameda Friday, July 22, at 2 p. M. 

Fop Honolulu Only. 

8.8. Australia Tuesday, Aug. 3, 1892, at2P.H. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 
ket street SPBK cKELS & BROS. CO, 
General AgentB 

I CURE FITS ! 

"When I say cure I do not mean merely to stop tnem 
for a time and then have them return again, I"" 3 *?* 
ladical cure. I have made the disease of FT1 S. t^l* 
LEPST or FALLING SICKNESS a life-long study, i 
warrant my remedy to cure the worst cases. Because 
others have failed ia no reason for not now receivinga 
cure. Bend at once for a treatise and a Free Lottie 01 
my infallible remedy. Give Express and Post Office. 
H. G. ROOT, M. C.» 183 Pearl St., N. Y. 



SHE was a pretty and sprightly little 
creature, with blue eyes, golden hair 
and an inquisitor's tongue. She plied the 
stranger with questions and toyed with his 
watch-chain, and her mother, evidently a 
widow, looked round now and then with a 
beaming smile. He began to feel out of 
sorts. At last he said to the mother: 
" Madam, what do you call this sweet little 
darling?" The widow smiled encbanting- 
ly, and answered, with a sigh, "Ethel." 
11 Please call her, then," said the stranger, 
as he buried himself in bis book. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, APRIL 24. 1892, and 
until further notice, Boat* aud Tmlun will 
leave from and arrive at the San Francinco Pas- 
senger Depot, MARKET-STREET WHARF. a> 
follows: 
From San Francisco for Point Tiburon, Belvedere and 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:40 A. M., 9:20 a. m., 11:20 A. U.\ 

M., 3:30 p. H.,5:06 P. M., 6:20 p. If. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., II :00 A.M. ; 1:30 P.M. 
3:30 P. M., 5:00 p. m., 6:15 p. M. 

From San Rafael for San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:25 a. m., 7:65 a. m., 9:80 A. M. 

11:30 A.M.; 1:40 P.M., 3:40 P.M., 6:05 P.M. 
SATURDAY8 ONLY— An extra trip at 6:30 r.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10 a.m., 9:40 a.m., 11:10 A. m. ; 1:40 p.m. 
3:40 P. M., 5:00 P M.,G:25 P. M. 

prom Point Tiburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:50 a. m., 8:20 A.M., 9:56 A.M., 11:55 
A. M.; 2:05 P. M., 4:05 P. M., 5:35 p. M. 
Saturdays only, an extra trip at 6:55 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:35 a.m., 10:05 a.m., 11:86 a.m.; 
2:05 p. m.,4:05p.m. ,5:30p.m., 6;60p.m. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Link to New York, via Panama. 
Steamers will sail at NOON on the 5th, 15th and 

26th of each month, 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 

America. 

Through Line Sailings. — June 25th, 1892, S. S. " San 
Bias;" July 15th, S. S. "San Jose;" August 5th, 
"City of New York." 

Way Line to Mexican and Central American Ports 
and Panama.— Steamer sails at noon 18th of each 
month, calling at Mazatlau. San Bias, Mauzanillo, 
Acapulco, Port Angel, Saliua Cruz, Tonala, San 
Benito, Ocos, Champerico, Sen Jose de Guatemala, 
Acajutla, La Libertad, La Union, Amapala, Co- 
rinto, Sau Juan del Sur aud Punta Arenas. 

Way Line Sailing.— July 18th, S. S. " Colima"' 

When the regular sailing date falls on Sunday 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA AND 
HONGKONG, 
Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 
Shanghai, and at Hongkong for East 
Indies, Straits, etc.: 
S. S- "Peru" (new), Thursday, Aug. 4th, at 3 p. m. 
"City of Rio de Janeiio," Saturday, Aug. 27th, at 
3 P. M. 

S. S. " China," (via Honolulu), Tuesday, Sept. 9, 
1892, at 3 p. M. 

Round Trip Tickets to Yokohama at reduced 
rates. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, corner 
First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 202 
Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers CITY OF PUEBLA, WALLA 
WALLA and UMATILLA, direct for VICTORIA, 
B. C, and PUGET SOUND ports, at 9 a. m. every 
five days. 

The steamers sailing for Puget Sound ports at 
9 a. m. connect at Port Townsend with steamers 
or Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oreqo:i, in connection with 
U. P. R'y Co. every four days. 

For SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San Simeon, 
Cayucos, Santa Barbara, San Buenaventura, 
Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and San 
Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA, ARCATA aud HOOKTON, HUM- 
BOLDT Bay, steamer LOS ANGELES, every Wed- 
nesday, at 9 a. u. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

SERGEANT O'RAFFERTY {calling roll)— 
Atkins! Private Atkins 1 Frivate Allans 
(first appearance on parade) — Ye-es, sir. Ser- 
geant O'Rafferty (severely)— All you have to 
do when your name is called is to say here, 
whether you are there or not. — Moonshine. 

LAZY BRICKLAYER [looking through 
ski/Ught of offices)— Well, I've been a- 
looking at them three clerk chaps for the 
last hour, and they haven't done a stroke 
of work. It's a darn shame to rob their 
employers that way, I sez.— Pick-me-Up. 



Leave S. F. 



Week 
Days. 



Sundays 



7:40 A.i 
3:30p.i 
5:05 p.] 



7:40 a. 
3:30 p.; 



7:40A. M 
3:30 p. m 



7:40a. M. 
5:05 P.M 



Destination, 



:00 a. 
:30 a. 
:00p. : 



8:00 A. M 
5:00 p.m 



SundayB 



Petaluma 

and 
Santa Rosa. 



10:40 a. m 
6:05 p.m 
7:25p.m 



Fulton, 
Windsor, 
Heald sburg 
Litton Springs, 
Cloverdale & 
Way Stations. 



Hopland 
and Ukiah. 



Guernevllle. 



Sonoma and 10:40a.m 
Glen Ellen. 6:05p.m. 



Arrive in 8. F. 



Week 
Days. 



8:60a. m. 
10:30 a. m 
6:10 P.M. 



7:40a. m 8:00a.m Sevastopol. | 10:40a.m 10:30am 
3 :30 p.M 5 :00 P. M ■ fi-.05p. M 6 : 10 p. M 



10:30 A. M 
6:10 p.M 



10;30a.m. 
6:10 p.m. 



8:50 a.m. 
6:10p.m. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs ; a t Geyserville for Skaggs Springs. 
Stewart's Point, Gualala aud Point Arena; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport and 
Bartlett Springs; at Hopland for Lakeport and 
Bartlett Springs ; at Ukian for Vichy Springs, Sara- 
toga Springs, Blue Lakes, Witter Springs, Upper 
Lake, Lakeport, Willitts, Canto, Mendocino City, 
Fort Bragg, Westport, Usal, Hydesville and Eu- 

EXCURBION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, $1 50; to Santa Rosa, ?2 25; to 
HealdBburg, $3 40; to Cloverdale, |4 50; to Hop- 
land, ?5 70; to Ukiah, $6 75; to Sevastopol, $2 70; 
to Guerneville, ?3 76; to Sonoma, $150; to Glen 
Ellen, ?1 80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, ?1; to Santa Rosa. $1 50; to Healds- 
burg, $2 25; to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, $4 50; to 
Hopland, $3 80; to Sevastopol, $180; to Guerne- 
ville, $2 50; to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1 20. 
H C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt, 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New Montgomer y Street. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Saturday, June 25, 1892. 

Belgic Tuesday, July 26, 1892. 

Oceanic (Via Honolulu) Tuesday, August 16, '92 

Gaelic Tuesday, Sept. 6, 1892. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, atthe 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San 
Francisco. 

T.H.GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 

GEO. H.RICE, Traffic Manager. 



CONSUMPTION. 

IhaveapoBitiveremedyfor the above disease; by its 
nse thousands of cases of the worst kind and of long 
standing have been enred. Indeed so strong is my faith 
in its efficacy, that I will send two bottles free, with 
a VALUABLE TREATISE on this disease to any Buf- 
f erer who will send me their .Express and P. O. address. 
T» A. Slocmu, M. C.t 183 Pearl St., N. Y. 







— — — — 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 




JULY has for many years been known as the most decidedly 
off-month in the society life of San Francisco, and this year 
has proved no exception. To say it is exceedingly dull in town 
is to put it very mildly; there is actually nothing in the gay line 
taking place; weddings are for the moment lacking to fill in the 
empty bill, and even theatricals are suffering from the general 
apathy felt by those in town. The resorts have been feeling the 
reaction after the festivities of the recent holidays; but that is 
only natural, besides promising to be but of brief duration. At 
San Rafael the tennisites have been in great glee over the news 
received of the successes of our Californian players in the Chi- 
cago courts, and Hubbard and Tobin are the heroes of the hour. 
Teas and picnics have been the chief means used to pass life 
pleasantly at Del Monte. 

A number of departures from Del Monte citywards also followed 
the gaities of the holiday season, among the defections being 
Mrs. Bob Hastings, Mrs. L. S. Adams, Mias Ella Adams, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Hays Hammond, Miss Betty Hammond, Miss Helen 
Wheeler, Frank Johnson, Joe Grant, Charley Fair and Lansing 
Kellogg. But great will be the gathering of the clans there next 
month, and during August and September it is expected that 
those who consider themselves the hundred and fifty of San Fran- 
cisco's Four Hundred will all be found at Del Monte. Among 
those who are already named to arrive there towards the end of 
this month and early in August are Mrs. Casserley and Miss Tes- 
sie; Judge and Mrs. W. T. Wallace and Miss Romie; Mr. and 
Mrs. James Stewart; all the Tubbs; Lieutenant and Mrs. Oyster; 
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. McCutchen and Miss McCutchen ; Gen., Mrs. 
and Miss Houghton; Mr. and Mrs. Alvord, Mr. and Mrs. Ramon 
Wilson; Mr. and Mrs. John Sabin; Mr. and Mrs. A. Page Brown; 
Mr. and Mrs. Faxon Atherton; Mr. and Mrs. Perry Eyre, Miss 
Eyre and Miss Alice Simpkins; Mrs. and Miss Dibblee, from San 
Rafael; the Misses Dimond, Mrs. Ellis, Miss Hope Ellis, Mrs. 
Charles Webb Howard, the Louis Haggins and the Count and 
the Countess Festetiea. 



There was a brilliant wedding in Jewish circles last Sunday, 
when Miss Fanny Steiner and Jonas Erlanger were married at tbe 
home of the bride, on Eddy street, the Rev. Jacob Voorsanger 
performing the ceremony. Tbe decorations of the rooms were 
tasteful in the extreme, and remarkably pretty. Tbe prevailing 
tints were white and green; smilax, ferns, white roses, camelias 
and tiger lilies being used with a lavish hand in ornamentation. 
The bride, escorted by her brother, Joseph Steiner, entered the 
parlors, which were crowded with guests, promptly at eight 
o'clock followed by the groom and his best man, his brother, Simon. 
Miss Emma Steiner was maid of honor to her sister: the Misses 
Hilda and Toby Steiner, Inez Steinberger, Fanny and Julia Gal- 
linger, Essie Erlanger and Rosa Goodenheim forming a bevy of 
very pretty bridesmaids. The wedding robe was an elaborate 
creation of white duchess satin richly trimmed with crystal 
ornaments and draperies, and bouquets oE orange blossoms. Tbe 
ceremony was followed by feasting and merriment, many tele- 
grams of congratulation being received and read during supper, 
and the festivities were prolonged to a late hour. 



There were two entertainments at Santa Cruz last Saturday 
evening. Mrs. J. Philip Smith gave a delightful garden party and 
hop at her pretty 8unshine Villa, at which most of the belles now 
visiting that resort were present, aa well as many of the party 
who composed the late yachting cruise, some of whom remained 
especially for it, while others returned again from town. The 
grounds were lighted with innumerable Japanese lanterns, mak- 
ing the scene particularly attractive and beautiful. The second 
was at the new Santa Maria del Mar Hotel, which was formally 
opened by a hop, with supper afterwards, which proved a very 
pleasant affair. It is the new summer resort built by the Catholic 
Ladies' Aid Society, and promisea to become very popular. The 
houae ia a pretty one and very comfortable, and the marine views 
charming. Mrs. Martel and Miss Edith are among the guests at 
the Sea Beach. 



July ia the month for freah school terms to begin, and in anti- 
cipation thereof those noted inatructresses of our faireat belles, 
Mra. Mills and Madam Ziska, have returned from their vacation 
trips to Southern California. Madam Ziaka was accompanied by 
her pretty daughter, Miss Alice. Our medical* men are also com- 
ing back from their well-earned vacations. Dr. Geo. Bucknall 
has returned from Howell Mountain and Dr. Luke Robinson 
has returned from a four weeks' trip through Oregon and Wash- 
ington; Dr. and Mrs. Henry Gibbons are back from their visit to 
Pescadero, and to-day Dr. and Mrs. 0. O. Burgess will return 
from Santa Cruz, where the Doctor has been enjoying the fishing 
and Mrs. Burgess the sea beach since early in June. Dr. and 
Mrs. J. A. W. Lundburg have been visiting the Hotel Vendome, 
at San Jose. 



A very pretty wedding took place on Thursday at the handBOme 
residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. Walter Scott, in East Oakland. The 
contracting parties were Charles F. Rhorer of Santa Rosa, and 
Miss Nora Wright of Delano. The ceremony was performed by 
the Rev. Dr. Lathrop, and was witnessed by a large social throng. 
The bride was attended by Miss Edith Beers and Miss Mabel 
Beers, while Will Rhorer, brother of the groom, acted as best 
man. Among the many present at the reception, which followed, 
were Mr. and Mrs. Emil Frick, Dr. and Mrs. B. Beers, Mrs. B. 
C. Wright, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Simpson, Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Culver, 
Mr. and Mrs. Einhorn, J. P. Rynders, Mrs. D. Rynders, Miss 
Mabel Beers, Miss Edith Beers, Miss Mabel Craft, Miss Florence 
Mulligan, S. Hedges. 

There was a grand scattering of guests from San Rafael during 
the week, some going back to the resorts from which tbe festivi- 
ties at the delightful Hotel Rafael lured them away, some return- 
ing home on account of » school days," while others, and tbe ma- 
jority, but changed their quarters from that little village to Del 
Monte. Among the flitters General and the Miss Dimond and Miss 
Holbrooke are at their Menlo Park homes; Mrs. Coleman and 
Mias Jessie have returned home to Oakland; Mr. and Mrs. A. P. 
Holaling went to the Hotel Vendome; Mr. and Mrs. Will Fisher 
came back to town; Miss Hoffman and Miss Mary McNntt were 
among those who went to Pescadero. 

Musical circles are inclined to be despondent over the departure 
of Mr. Donald de V. Graham, who left for the East last Saturday. 
In New York he expects to become one of the Gillig-Unger- 
Schyler party, and with them spend several weeks yachting on 
the New England coast, and a jovial time is a foregone conclu- 
sion. There is some consolation to the mourners in the thought 
that he could scarcely have chosen a better time for his absence, 
for there is literally nothing of moment occurring in social life in 
San Francisco, and his visit East will only extend over a couple 
of months at the most, which will bring him back in time for the 
Carr-Beel new season of concerts. 



Mare Island society is to be congratulated upon the arrival at 
the navy yard of Mrs. Woods and her neice, Miss Florence 
Woods, who have been traveling in Europe since early in the year. 
Tbe Naval Hospital, where they will reside with Dr. George W. 
Woods, the medical inspector, bids fair to become the scene cf 
many a pleasant gathering hereafter. Mrs. Icy Cutts, the fascin^ 
ating little post trader at the navy yard, has had a cosy cottage 
erected for her residence in anticipation of the return of her 
daughter, who will accompany her uncle, Surveyor-General 
Brown of the navy, when he arrives here from Washington City 
in the near future. 

Mrs. Rutherford, who was one of tbe « wanderers " from Del 
Monte this season, will return to her early love ere long. She 
and her pretty daughter, Miss Alice, at present purpose leaving 
Castle Crags, wnere they have been for several weeks, about the 
end of July, and will pasa August and September at the seaside, 
accompanied by the other members of their family. George 
Crocker will also be of the party. Mr. and Mrs. Peter McBean 
and their daughter, Miss Edith, will follow suit later on, expect- 
ing to leave Castle Crags towards tbe end of August for Del 
Monte, where they will remain during September. 

The Misses Marie and Kate Voorhies will possibly be among 
the missing at next winter's festivities, aa it is among the proba- 
bilities that they will spend the next six months on the continent 
of Europe. They have been passing the last three months the 
other side of the Rocky Mountains, with relatives and friends, 
and enjoying their visits thoroughly. We shall, however, have 
Miss Maud Howard back again ere the winter season begins, 
though she will remain abroad until late in the autumn. Her 
recent experiences of mountain climbing she describes in a very 
graphic manner, and as having been enjoyable to a degree. 

A double wedding took place on Willow street, West Oakland, 
on Monday last two sisters becoming the brides of two brothers. 
The happy couples were Miss Emma Winkler and L. F. Clark, 
and Mias Lydia Winkler and A. H. Clark. The first named groom 
is an Oakland druggist, while the latter ia a San Francisco mer- 
chant. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Dr. Dille, and 
after a reception and a wedding dinner the newly united couples 
left for Blue Lakes. On returning from their honeymoon they 
will occupy a double residence in the Athenian City. 

Oakland, which has been so prolific of weddings this season, 
is still well in the van, and this week it can boast of the un- 
usual in that line. It is very rarely that the marriages of two 
sisters to two brothers are celebrated at the same time and place, 
and such an event occurred in West Oakland last Monday, when 
the Misses Emma and Lydia Winkler were united in holy wed- 
lock to Messrs. F. L. and A. H. Clark, the Rev. Dr. Dille tying 
the nuptial knot. The happy double couple are passing their 
honeymoon at Blue Lakes. 

That popular couple, Mr. and Mra. Tom Dargie, of Oakland, 
were among recent visitors at Del Monte. 



July 16, I 



BAN FRANi [SCO NEWS I ETTER 



31 



Major J. L. Kathbone'i friends are dell«bled »t the ntwi which 
indicate* the determination on hi« part to now remain a perma- 
nent resident ol Ban Francisco. He n« purchased a lot on Junes 
street, and removed to it the bouse he recently occupied on Cali- 
fornia street, and as soon as it is in readiness 10 receive them, bl- 
and Mrs. Katbbone will take possession. Visions of delightful 
dinners within its walls the coming winter are now in order. 

The news of Mrs. Maria Coleman's death, which occurred in 
Paris, was received here early in the week, and caused much sor- 
row to ttie many friends in tfan Francisco, by whom she was loved 
and esteemed for her noble qualities of mind and heart, and her 
numerous acts of unostentatious charity. To her son, Mr. James 
V. Coleman, and her twin daughters, the Mesdames May. who 
were all with ber at the last, are extended many expressions of 
heartfelt sympathy in their great loss. 



Another pretty but very quiet wedding was the ceremony which 
united Miss Beatrice Moses and Walter Hinkle. which was 
performed at the Hinkle residence, on Leavenworth street, last 
Sunday afternoon, the Rev. Dr. Lathrop, of Oakland, officiating. 
Miss Helen Walker was sole bridesmaid, Frank Willey best man 
to the groom, and D. M. Fraser gave the bride away. Lake Ta- 
boe is the charming locality where Mr. and Mrs. Hinkle are 
spending their honeymoon, 



Fruit Vale is evidently determined to keep pace with Oakland 
in the matrimonial line, as the latest news from that pretty locale 
announces the engagements of Miss Estelle Hush to Thomas 
Magee, Jr., and her sister. Miss Harriet Hush, to William A. 
Magee. August is the month when the weddings are to take place, 
and directly after the quartette will depart for Europe on their 
honey-moon trip. 

The yacht Lurline, Commodore A. B. Spreckels, returned from 
Santa Cruz last Monday, the trip being made in eighteen hours. 
Two of the guests on the vessel were Frederick Keene and Theo- 
dore Cramp, of New York. On Saturday last, before leaving 
Santa Cruz, Commodore Spreckels and party were the guests of 
Mrs. Smith at a garden party given by her in honor of the win- 
ners of the trophy for the Santa Cruz race. 



Mrs. F. H. Tyler, who, with her daughters, has been spending 
the summer in Sausalito, has taken a house on California street. 
Her sisters, the Misses Blanche and Octavia Hoge, will reside 
with her this coming winter. Mrs. L. Ponton d'Arce and her 
daughters, Miss Marie Ponton d'Arce and Mrs. Ricardo Villa 
Franca, have named Wednesday as their reception day at their 
new residence, 1704 Sacramento street. 

Mrs. Alexander Forbes and her daughters, including Mrs. John- 
son, who have been spending several months in Europe, have re- 
turned to the United States. They passed last week in New 
York, en route homewards to California. Mr. James Freeborn, 
whose present home is in Paris, was also in New York last week, 
and no doubt San Francisco will ere long be gladdened by his 
presence. 

The wedding of Miss Carrie Northey, the well-known vocalist, 
and Jessie E. Douglas, of Omaha, is to be one of the events of the 
month in Oakland. It will take place at 8 p. m. on the 27th inst. in 
the First Presbyterian Church, where Miss Northey has been leader 
of the choir for a long time past. A reception will afterwards be 
held at the residence of the bride's parents on East Fifteen street. 

Among the East-bound passengers last Tuesday, were Mr. and 
Mrs. J. B. Haggin, who have gone to New York to take up what 
their friends here fear will be their permanent residence. Mrs. 
Haggin's many friends in this city have parted with her with 
deep regret, and she, it is said, was very unwilling to bid adieu 
to San Francisco, which has for so many years been her home. 



Mr. and Mrs. Antony Hellman, who have been residents of 
Sausalito for several years, have taken a house at Santa Cruz, 
where they will remain all summer, and possibly may pass the 
coming winter there also. Dr. Beverley Cole, who is spending 
the summer at Sausalito, was among the visitors at Santa Cruz 
during the recent cruise of the yachts thither. 

Among the engagements announced in Oakland this week are 
Frank Risdorph and Miss Lizzie Pinkney; J. Arnold and Miss 
Ethel Sargent; L. Soio-mon and Miss Millie Marcus; S. Manheim 
and Miss Henrietta Kahn; E. Michael and Miss Minnie David- 
son; c. E. Gottschall and Miss Alice M. Kenyon, and Frank G. 
Woodward and Miss Dell Chapman. 

Another August wedding is promised in the lately announced 
engagement of Miss Dell Chapman and Frank G. Woodward, both 
of Oakland. And yet another will no doubt take place that 
month, when Miss Alice Kenyon, also of Oakland, joins her for- 
tunes to those of C. E. Gottschalk, one of our well-known archi- 
tects, whose engagement has recently been made public. 

The tugboat party of the Pacific Yacht Club last Saturday 
night was a most enjoyable affair. 



.1 ,',,...' m • U "*. "'•"'Py"'* «•>• N«d Hopkins villa 
at Monto lark thl, summer, during the absence of Mrs. Z.lhy, 
ssterand her fam.lv i„ „, e ,.;«„. Th.-y entertained a ple«.„t 
Mile hons, parly during,!... nN.nl holiday, and expect to h"vo 

a soeewtrton ol friend, visit ,i„. , hU , ,,„.,. reIn . ln in "™ 

coil n i ry . 

Mrs. Mamie Hastings, who returned from Del Monte last week 
Will depart almost immediately for Europe, contemplating an ab- 
sence of some duration. Mr,. .1. |„ i- „i e , who came to the city 
o attend the ordainatlon ol her late husband's cousin, W I Kin 

pi*,,/., 6 " 1 ™ 6 ' 1 agaiD t0 ' Ca8lle 0ra *"' leavin 8 to »" "»> ' **™ 

tj > cm tip. 

Mrs. John H.Dickinson, accompanied by Miss 8hipman, who 
bad a most enjoyable visit to Cisco, has returned to Sausalito 
where, with the exception of a visit to Monterey later on, she 
will remain until autumn. Mrs. Chauncey R. Winslow was a 
guest at ban Rafael du ring the Fourth of July holiday season. 

?« oL 0< ?j &n i Miss Jenn V. accompanied by James L. Flood 
and Ed. Sheldon have recently passed ten days very pleasantly 
making a tour of the southern counties, in their own private car. 
They have returned to their villa at Menlo Park, where they will 
now probably remain the rest of the summer months. 

A merry party of Oaklanders and Berkeleyites have gone 
into camp in Cobb Valley, Mendocino county. The rusticaten 
are Professor Richardson, Archie Borland, Fred Cleft, Will Clark 
Will Foote, F. A. Leach, Jr., Seabury Mastick, Hart North' 
Arthur North, John A. Sanborn and Judge Charles W. Slack. 

Mr. W. W. Belvin was among the arrivals at the Palace Hotel 
early in the week. He and Mrs. Belvin returned from their 
European trip the last of June, but Mrs. Belvin elected 
to remain in New York while her better-half paid a flying busi- 
ness visit to the Pacific Coast. 



We are soon to have the pleasure of welcoming Mr. John 
Mackay again, as he is about leaving New York for the Pacific 
Coast. Young Mackay appears to prefer the pleasures of the 
Old World to those of the new, as at last accounts he was enjoy- 
ing life in Paris. 

The Misses McMillen, Mr. Robert McMillen and Ellis Wooster 
have changed their base from Blythdale to Larkspur Inn, where 
they purpose spending the rest of July and August. Mr. and 
Mrs. Will F. Mau will also pass the rest of the summer at Larks- 
pur Inn. 

There are very well authenticated rumors in the air that Miss 
Delphine Delmas' engagement will be announced at a very early 
day. That of Miss Ada McAllister, daughter of W. F. McAllister, 
to Mabry McMahon, is one of the announcements of the past 
week. 

Senator Stanford's friends have been greatly gratified at hearing 
such excellent news regarding his health, which has been steadily 
improving since his arrival at Aix-les-Bains. He and Mrs. Stan- 
ford propose remaining abroad until quite late in the autumn. 



Mrs. W. B. Collier has been in the city from Lakeport during 
the present week. Mrs. Del Linderman has returned from a very 
pleasant visit to Paso Robles, and is at the residence of her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Thompson, on Van Ness avenue. 

Mile. Cortaz, who chaperoned a party of young ladies abroad, 
has, with her charges, the Misses Ives, Benjamin and Palmer, ar- 
rived in Paris. Mrs. McGregor and Miss Helen McGregor have 
also reached that most delightful of all European cities. 

A burro party has gone on a sketching tour to Yosemite. They 
will travel both ways on their long-eared steeds, and they antici- 
pate a happy time. The jaunters are Messrs. Blake, Easton, Ray- 
mond Russ, Sims, Hewlett, Palmer and Record. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Scott, Miss Crittenden, Mrs. Hitchcock 
and Mrs. Lilly Coit, who have returned from a very delightful 
visit to Alaska, will spend the greater part of the remaining sum- 
mer months at Del Monte. 

Jack Fetberstone has gone to Mount Shasta, and James Brett 
Stokes to the Yosemite Valley, which be has announced his in- 
tention of exploring more thoroughly than has ever yet been 
done by man. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ansel Easton are anticipating a visit to Japan 
which may possibly be still further extended, as they will be 
absent about three months from California. 

W. I. Kip and family have gone to spend several weeks in the 
vicinity of Santa Rosa, and do not contemplate returning to town 
until September. 

The marriage of Miss Rose 8tern and Mr. Isaac Frohman will 
take place at 7 o'clock next Wednesday evening, at the residenoe 
of the bride's parents, 1609 Laguna street. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1892. 



The travel to the Yosemite this season promises to be heavy, 
as the valley is in its most beautiful garb. The favorite route is 
by way of Wawona and the Big Tree Grove, from which the well 
equipped stages of the Yosemite Valley Stage Company convey 
the tourists into the valley. The attractions of the famous grove 
of big trees is only second to those of Yosemite itself. The Stone- 
man House, in the valley, at which all visitors stay, is as well 
managed a hotel as can be found in this State of famous hos- 
telries. 

The many attractions of the Hotel Rafael continue to attract 
visitors to that beautiful and popular resort. During the tennis 
tournament the hotel was crowded with thousands of visitors, 
many of whom remain. The Rafael is the Mecca of society's 
leaders. Its beautiful location, nearness to the city and excel- 
lent management combine to make it one of the most popular of 
our hotels. 

The California tennis players, Tobin and Hubbard, were checked 
in their victorious course at the Chicago games on Wednesday. 
Their defeat settles all chance of the championship of the tourna- 
ment coming out further West. They played Ryerson and Carver 
Wednesday, and were defeated by the following score: 9-7, 4-6, 
6-3, 3-6, 9-7. 

Judge Garber leaves for Sissons, on his vacation, to-day. He 
says if he does not bring down a string of mountain trout, he 
will know the reason why. 

Charles M. Palmer gave a very enjoyable Spanish dinner to 
sixteen guests, in the Latin quarter, on Wednesday evening. 

Mr. W. Archibald Wilson has returned from Bartlett Springs, 
completely recovered f rom his illness. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Connelly have returned from Alaska 
and are at Lake Tahoe. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Rosewald are at El Paso de Robles Springs. 

Mrs. W. F. Button has returned frfiru Pescadero. 

Get a Wedding Cake Box. 



This is the mating season, when lovers sigh beneath the trees, 
and determine to soon seek for themselves a nest. The number of 
weddings which have recently occurred, and the greater number an- 
nounced for the near future indicates a boom in the matrimonial 
market Sanborn, Vail & Co., of 741-743 Market street, determined 
to help the good cause along, have recently imported a quantity of 
verv handsome wedding cake boxes, in which may be placed choice 
pieces of the confection cut by the fair band of the bride. The boxes 
are very dainty little receptacles, and so pretty that as soon as a girl 
sees one she will make up her mind to get married, just so she can 
send ber friends a souvenir of the occasion in the little box. The great 
demand for the exquisite stationery being shown by this enterprising 
firm still continues. Their stationery is without question the most 
elegant in the city. It is used by all those obeyers of society's dic- 
tates who consider themselves in the swim. 

Notice to Housekeepers and Connoisseurs. 

Whittaker's celebrated Sugar-cured Star Hams are always sweet, 
juicy and appetizing. Whittaker's Golf Bacon (or picnic hams) 
are cured in the same pickle as the ham, and are considered supe- 
rior to the ordinary hams offered for sale in this market. Whitta- 
ker's Rolled Spiced Meat is the most economical and delicious part 
of the hog Whittaker's Patent Bacon is a table delicacy. Whitta- 
ker's Lard is absolutely pure. Ask your grocer for Whittaker's 
inputs imd lard and don't let them palm off cheap salt stuff on you. 
' THOMAS LOUGHRAN, Agent, 

221 and 223 Clay street. 



Baggage Notice. 



Round-trip transfer tickets are now on sale at any of our offices at 
reduced rates, viz. : One trunk, round-trip, 50 cents; single trip, 35 
cents Keep your baggage checks until you reach this city. Morton 
Special Delivery, 17 Geary street, 408 Taylor, Oakland ferry depot. 

The place to send your clothing, of every description, when you 
want them cleaned or dyed, is the Pacific Cleaning and Dye Works 
of J. Spaulding & Co.. at 353-357 Tehama street. This establishment 
is the leading one in its line on the Coast. It makes a specialty of 
cleaning ball and evening dresses, all its work being done with the 
greatest care and dispatch. 

" Kritiko" reads character from handwriting. Write in ink, in an 
unfeigned hand, on unruled paper. State sex. Send 50 cents 
stamps or postal note. Address " Kritiko,"tiOt> Merchant street. S. F. 

SEARCHER OF RECORDS 

AND 

EXAMINER OF TITLES TO LANDS IN ALAMEDA COUNTY. 
G. W. MCKEAND, 

OFFICES— Southeast comer Sixth and Broadway streets. Residence— 
810 Thirteenth, near Market street, Oakland. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Belle Isle Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of Business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Tuscarora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the sixteenth day of June, 1892, an assessment (No. 14) of Ten (10) 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
ofhce of the company, No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-first Day of July, 1892, will be delinquent. 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 12th day of August, 1892, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Yellow Jacket Silver Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Yellow Jacket 
Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, at 
Gold Hill, Nevada, on 

Monday, the 1 8th Day of July, 1 892, at the hour of 3:30 o'clock P. M. T 

for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

meeting. 

Transfer hooks will close on Monday, the 11th day of July, 1892, at 3 p. m. 

W. H. BLAUVELT, Secretary. 
Office— Gold Hill, Nevada. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Union Consolidated Mining Company, 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Union Consoli- 
dated Miaing Company will be held at the office of the company, room 11, 
303 California street, San Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 18th day of July, 1892, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 

for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Friday, July 15th, 1892, at 3 o'clock p.m. 

A. W. BARROWS. Secretary. 
Office— Roo m 11, 303 Cali f ornia street, San Francisc o, California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Hibernia Savings 
and Loan Society, held July 1, 1892, a dividend was declared at the 
rate of four and one-quarter (4K) per cent per annum on all deposits for 
the six months ending June 30, 1892, free from all taxes and payable on 
and after July 1, 1892. R. J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Office— Northeast corner Montgomery and Post streets, S. F. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Coptis Mining Company. 

Office of the Coptis Mining Company, Sau Francisco, July 12, 1892. At a 

meeting of the board of directors of the above named company, held this 

day, adivideud, No. 3. of 12 cents per share was declared, payable July 

18, 1892. Transfer books will close July 16, 1892. 

E. M. HALL, Secretary. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W.B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 
PAOIFIO OOAST, 

123 CaliforniaSt.,S.F 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 



FOE SALE BY ALL PIE8T-CLA8B 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



DR. RlCORD'S RE8TORAT.VE PlLLS. 

Buy none but the Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the Medical Celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 

J. G. STEELE A * <►., 
No. 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED. Bok of 50 pills, $1 26: of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills. 
$3 50; of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills, $2. Send for Circular. 



0NEM1NUTE 

CaWpeRS 



Prte« p«r Copy, IO Cinii. 




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NE1 ys E etter 




Vol. XIV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 23, 1892. 



Number 4. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Frederick 
Marriott. Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets. San Fran 
eueo. Entered at San Francisco Pert-office a$ Second Class Matter. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAOB 

Editorial Brevities I 

Leading articles : 

Olive Culture in California ... 2 

A Political Buebear 2 

Why Cleveland Should he 

Elected - 2 | 

The National Campaign 2 

Practical Christianity 3 ' 

A Model Town Sj 

The Adulteration of Milk . ..3 

The Democratic Outlook 4 

The Foresters at Stockwell's 

Theatre 4 

The Sockless Socrates (Poetry). . . 5 | 

The Late General Noble 5 

Bill English and the Babv 5 

A Hero In the Ranks 6 

The Sanitary Condition of Our 

Homes 7 I 

Pleasure's Wand 8-9 

When Both Sides Win (Poetry). . 10 I 



Pagk 

Colonel Pope ainl (.ioml K. m. Is 11 

Sparks. 12 

Teuuisaud Baseball 13 

The Looker-On 14-15 

Financial Review. 16 

Town Crier 17 

Real Property 18 

Rev. Dr. Hatch as a Lothario ... IS 

A Swedish Bath ly 

The Bourse and Underwriter 19 

Comments on Foreign Affairs . .. 20 

Vanit'es 21 

World, Flesh and Devil 22 

The Rose Jar . . 23 

The Longs and the Shorts 24 

Sunbeams .. 25 

" Biz"— Summary of the Markets. 26 

Scientific and Usef nl 27 

The Venezuelan Revolt ... 28 

Society ... ...... 30-31-32 

Followers of Christ 32 



ATTORNEY T. J. LYONS is one of those modest lawyers whom 
it is a great pleasure to meet. Fifteen thousand dollars is all 
he wants for handling the Fuller estate. Timothy J. will get 
along in the world. There is nothing wrong with his diaphragm. 

THEY have a way of dealing with bandits and murderers in 
Mexico which commends itself to the people of this com- 
munity. We have a jail full of convicted murderers, and there is 
no telling when we will have the pleasure of seeing a few of them 
hanged. More executions and a little less argument about the 
law is what is needed for the moral reformation of this common- 
wealth. 



(( npHE Wine of Bohemia," a song by Daniel O'Connell, with 
1 mnsic by Mr. George E. P. Hall, Consnl for Turkey, will 
be issued as a supplement to the News Letter on Saturday next. 
The song, which is a lovely melody, is sure to become popular. 

" A ^' y° u '" De tDe fi ,8t t° Ret smashed," said Leon Hennery to 
/\ J. N. E. Wilson, on the day of the Republican primaries. 
The gentlemen were merely exchanging political courtesies, and 
there were no hard feelings. That is one of the main beauties of 
practical politics. 

TFE Oakland School Directors have been taken in and done 
for by a parcel of rascally school-book agents, who are enjoy- 
ing the discomfiture of the men of wisdom. If fraud can be 
proved in the transaction, the school directors owe it to the com- 
munity to prosecute the agents vigorously. 



THE Oakland experiment of having two Sundays in each week 
instead of one will be watched with much interest. Those 
who favor the methods practised by B. Fay Mills and other 
evangelists will probably declare that the mid-week Sabbath is a 
complete success, while those who take little stock in emo- 
tional religion will regard it as a failure. 



THE investigation of the methods of assessing large corpora- 
tions, which will be brought about by the complaint of the 
Citizens' Defense Association against Assessor Siebe, should be 
promotive of good results. That there has been a great deal of 
fraud practiced in the Assessor's office there can be no doubt. We 
would now like it practically determined who is the culprit. 



THE harmony that prevailed at the Republican primaries, on 
Wednesday, was so solid that it could have been cut into 
•hunks and used for paving stones. The singular feature about 
the election was that the largest number of votes on the tally- 
sheets were found in the districts where the smallest number of 
people actually voted. Buckley never did better work than this. 



THERE was a ring in Cleveland's speech in Madison Square Gar- 
den that awakened the enthusiasm of every one of bis twenty 
thousand auditors. Speaking of the high tariff policy, he said: 
" Our workmen are a i ill told the tale oft repeated in spite of its 
demonstrated falsity, that the existing protecting tariff is a boon 
to them, and that underits beneficial operations their wages must 
increase. While they listen, scenes are enacted in the very abid- 
ing place of high protection that mock the hopes of toil and at- 
test the tender mercy the workingman receives from those made 
selfish and sordid by unjust governmental protection." Ttis such 
talk as this that will awaken the masses to the truths of the day. 
The campaign is one of education. The facts abound throughout 
the country; it is the duty of the Democracy to bring them 
forcibly to the notice of the people. 



CONGRESSMAN CAM1NETITS Hydraulic Mining bill, from 
\j which so much was expected, has reached, we fear, a lame 
and impotent conclusion. The best the House of Representatives 
would do with it was to pass it with a $15,000 appropriation, 
which is of little use in carrying out the objects of the bill. Per- 
haps the next session may do better for it, after the election is 
over, but as the bill stands now it presents but cold comfort to 
the hydraulic miners. 

THE dentists are trying to be funny by reading humorous pa- 
pers about their experiences in extracting gigantic molars. 
There is just about as much humor in listening to the story of the 
extraction of a painful tooth as in reading the tale of a man killed 
by a train of cars. The dentists not only pull our teeth, but they 
also make fun of us. They will receive a just punishment, for 
every one of them who refuses to advertise will find bis custom 
disappear like the snow before the wind. 



LOS ANGELES is determined to retain its reputation as an ideal 
resort, where people may not only enjoy the beauties of na- 
ture, but may also take pleasure in the singing of birds and the 
calls of the animals peculiar to the district. The county has 
passed an ordinance protecting for all time the seal, sea-lion 
mountain gray squirrel, California oreole, road-runner and meadow 
larks. We would like to add to the Los Angeles list the Third 
street vultures, the City Hall cormorants and the other birds of 
ill-omen now preparing to swoop down upon the city. 

THE chaining of a prisoner to a seat in a railroad car, by means 
of a heavy chain padlocked about his neck, is a new wrinkle 
in the transportation of desperate criminals that is not quite in 
accordance with the adopted views of those penologists who 
have given much study to the matter of the handling of prison- 
ers. Sheriff White, of Texas, chained Jim Bennett, a murderer, 
to a seat in a car at Los Angeles in such a manner. Bennett was 
also handcuffed, wore an Oregon boot and had a chain around 
his waist. Such methods are somewhat revolting in these days 
of reformation. 



JOHNNY WILSON advised the Republicans gathered in the 
new Wigwam, on Thursday night, to " bury our differences," 
so as to insure success for the Third-street bosses in November. 
Harmony, he said, was necessary. It is laughable to hear Wil- 
son talk harmony, as his presence in politics has had so much to 
do with the disgraceful rows which have occurred in the Repub- 
lican camp. The gentleman cries « ■ peace," but there is no peace. 
Nor will there be, until Dan Burns waves Wilson's scalp tri- 
umphantly in the air, which he is very likely to do before election 
day. 

THE Kelly-Crimmins primary election was one of the greatest 
outrages ever perpetrated upon a body of long-suffering elect- 
ore. The Third street bosses simply ran the election as they 
pleased, having gangs of hoodlums at every needed point to there 
win by force what could not be obtained by persuasion. The 
officers of election were of course tools of the bosses, and so open 
and defiant were the frauds committed that no attempt was made 
to conceal them. Officers of election were seen to stuff handfuls 
of ballots into the boxes. Ij one precinct the box was emptied 
on the floor, the ballots sorted over, and then replaced in the box. 
Kelly and Crimmins are certainly the natural successors as the 
rulers of the city of Buckley and his men. The respectable, 
honest Republicans of the city should remember on election day 
that the nominee put up by the tools of the Third-street men 
are not worthy of trust. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1892. 



OLIVE CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA. 

IT really seems to take the people of California longer to find out 
what this State is good for, and then to avail themselves of 
their knowledge, than any other people on the face of the earth 
to ascertain similar facts. Whenever a proposition is presented 
to our citizens, they shy at it, like a timid horse at a strange ob- 
ject in the road, and it is only by the most strenuous efforts at 
coaxing that they can be induced to examine it. This growl — 
which, however, possesses the merit of truth — emanates from a 
consideration of the matter of olive culture in California, as set 
forth at the recent meeting of olive growers in this ciiy. 
Enough was developed at that meeting to demonstrate the great 
desirability of olive culture in California, the adaptability of soil 
and climate to olives, and the reasonable chance there is for profit 
in the manufacture of olive oil and cured olives, and yet it is safe 
to say that for the next ten years we shall go on eating the same 
vile mixture of olive oil and cotton-seed oil over which we smack 
our lips now, simply because it comes to us under a foreign name 
and a foreign label. The plain fact of the matter is, that Califor- 
nia olive oil is the best oil in the world, bar none, and that no 
person of taste, who has ever eaten it, will ever be satisfied with 
any other. The California olive oil tastes of the olive, while the 
foreign or alleged foreign oil might, in most cases, be as well made 
out of tallow, for all the olive taste it has. We shall not attempt 
to usurp the functions of the olive groves of California, nor venture 
to give them advice, for they know more about the business than 
a newspaper can ever pretend to, and that is putting the case veiy 
strongly ; but we may venture to suggest to the farmers and fruit 
grower* and grape growers throughout the State, especially thote 
who have some hilly land on their farms, that it costs very little 
money and takes very little time to stick in an olive shoot here 
and there, and that, after they get a start, they will come pretty 
near taking care of themselves. If this be done by the time the 
trees get ready to bear, there will be a market for the fruit, and 
the farmer will find his income increased almost without know- 
ing where the extra dollars come from. After the olive tree comes 
to bearing it goes right along bearing for a century or two, so tbe 
farmer need not be afraid that he will outlast his olive trees if he 
plants them now. Olives in any form are very healthy, the oil 
being especially adapted to build up the system and create adi- 
pose tissue in place of those nerves which are the curse of Amer- 
ican womankind. California ought to supply the whole of the 
United States with olives and olive oil, and to lay down the olive 
products at less figures than are now asked by the producers. 
We must say that the prices asked for first-class olive oil are too 
high for any but the rich to stand, but inasmuch as the demand 
continues ahead of the supply, we suppose there is no remedy 
but to wait until California gets a little more sense, and produces 
fine olive oil in much greater quantities than at present. 

A POLITICAL BUCiBEAR. 

IS the conflict of testimony and statements over tbe Temescal 
Tin Mine between the Examiner and the Chronicle a bit of free 
trade versus McKinley's tariff political engineering, or is it on the 
merits of the property ? A well written, or as some put it, a well 
concocted statement has been made by the Examiner — one that 
would call for extreme caution, had it been intended for the eyes 
of intending buyers of the property, but it now calls for the 
query nil bono ? The salt must be kept handy for sprinkling 
upon any such out and out voluntary denunciations of other 
people's property. There is ev^ry reason for the belief that tbe 
ore bodies in that tin ruine are precarious, and not to be implicitly 
relied upon for regularity and permanence, but ihis applies to 
many mines besides those yielding tin ores, which are found in 
deep workings, without any reliable definition. The ore is ad- 
mittedly of high grade, but this is a question of quantity and not 
quality. The enormous expenditure in machinery now in place, 
and in course of erection on that property, could well have been 
spared for a long time to come. It is unpardonable on the part of 
any manager or superintendent to recommend such premature 
expenditures in " improvements " as is visible on the ground 
there. Much of it could have been spared for years, even if the 
ore were plentiful. If tbe English investors lose in this specula- 
tion, they need not complain, for they will have themselves en- 
tirely to blame — having followed the advice of their own experts. 
It may be as well to call attention to the determination on the 
part of some critics to fix the nationality of the late manager, 
Colonel E. N. Robinson in England. It is unkind to the trusting 
investors. The gallant Colonel is a native born American, a 
brother of the late L. L. Robinson, and his 'ounds and 'unters 
were only the self-imported results of his visits to England. An 
English Colonel seldom gets into business. A Captain may, but 
the " Captain " who succeeded the " Colonel " in this instance was 
a ** mining captain," an official underground title well known in 
Cornwall. He is a well-tried, experienced miner, and the com- 
pany looses in bim a good man. So far as the value of the mine 
is concerned, it will be well to leave its consideration open until 
after the decrees of fate are known in regard to the future Presi- 
dent of the United States. 



WHY CLEVELAND SHOULD BE ELECTED. 

THE Hon. William M. Springer discusses the political issues of 
the day in the July Arena, and gives various reasons why, in 
his opinion, Grover Cleveland, as the representative of the Dem- 
ocratic party, should be elected the next President of the United 
Stales. In the ensuing Presidential contest tbe tariff question 
will be the paramount issue. Upon that question tbe people 
have already spoken, and especially at the election in 1890 for 
Representatives in Congress, says Mr. Springer. An unprece- 
dented majority was returned to that body in opposition to tbe lead- 
ing features of the McKmley Bill, the policies of the Republican 
party generally, and in favor of a thorough and genuine reform 
of the tariff laws of the country. I have no doubt a large ma- 
jority of the American people still adhere to the decision ex- 
pressed in 1890. Under our conservative form of government it 
is possible, and in fact frequently happens that a popular ma- 
jority of the electors, as expressed at a particular election, would 
be in favor of one political party, while through the machinery 
of the Electoral College a President would be chosen in opposition 
thereto. Such a result at the ensuing election would be a public 
calamity. The people who elect the Congress should have the 
benefit of executive co-operation in the law-making power. 
The Republican party has controlled the executive of- 
fices of the Government, with the exception of the four 
years of Cleveland's administration, since 1861. Mr. Cleve- 
land's administration was conservative in methods. During 
his entire administration the Senate contained a majority of 
Republicans, while the House was Democratic. No legislation in 
harmony with Democratic principles was possible, except such as 
was coerced from an unwilling Senate. During those four years 
little was done in legislation, except to pass appropriation bills 
and such other measures as were regarded as non-partisan. There 
has been no opportunity, therefore, for more than thirty years 
for the enactment of laws in harmony with the wishes of one of 
the great political parties of the country, which has, at many of 
the Presidental elections intervening, cast a majority of the popu- 
lar votes of the country. It is high time that that party should 
be placed in position to control legislation, and to overhaul all 
the departments of the government. During Mr. Cleveland's ad- 
ministration there was a great reform in the Executive depart- 
ments in the expenditure of public money. When he turned the 
government over to his successor, we were collecting a hundred 
millions a year more than was necessary for the ordinary and con- 
tingent expenses of tbe government. Now, after three years of Re- 
publican rule, the surplus has been squandered and we are 
threatened with a large deficit. 

The next President should be a Democrat, because that party 
is the better representative of true Americanism. It is not sec- 
tional, but has its representatives in every actual district through- 
out the length and breadth of the land. The Republican party, by 
the very nature of its organization, is sectional. Owing to the 
almost continued Republican ascendancy during the past thirty 
years, nearly all the judges of the United States courts are Re- 
publican. A partisan judiciary is unfortunate, and will 
not promote the best interests of the people or give confi- 
dence to litigants. Tbe judges should be as nearly equally 
divided in political sentiment as possible. For this 
reason, if for no other, the next President should be a 
Democrat. 

THE NATIONAL CAMPAIGN. 



THE people of the United States are to be congratulated on the 
fact that the Presidential campaign of the present year bids 
fair to be conducted upon broad lines and discussions of econ- 
omic principle and policy, with little or none of the personality 
that sometimes disgraces such contests. There is no reason, cer- 
tainly, why the case should be otherwise. The Democratic nom- 
nee has served a full term as President, and the Republican nom- 
inee nearly a full term, so that the people of the whole country 
know what each is in an official capacity, and how far each is to 
be favored in his present aspirations. There is but one issue be- 
fore the country, and that is the tariff issue. The contest 
is one between tariff for revenue and tariff for protection, It its 
not our purpose to discuss this issue at this time, but only to 
make it clear that it is the sole issue of the campaign. Silver is 
out of the way; there is no foreign complication which can dis- 
turb us; the condition of the country, except in two places, is 
wholly peaceful; and there is nothing to do but to study the 
question of the tariff and then vote as our convictions of what 
will be best for tbe country may dictate. It would be absurd to 
look for any heated debate or excited discussion over the ques- 
tion of the tariff. We might as well get stirred up over the bi- 
nomial theorem as to rage and rant over the tariff. We have a 
right to expect that those who have made a study of the subject 
in all its bearings will afford us exact and accurate information 
as to the results of their researches. It is gratifying to know 
that whatever may be the result of the election, the Chief Magis- 
tracy will be held by a man competent to fill it with honor and 
dignity, and one whose hands will be absolutely clean. For 
these reasons, the campaign should be a real, genuine campaign 
of education, and not one of abuse and vituperation. 



July 23, 1892. 



-an FRANCIS* NEW8 LETTER 



PRACTICAL CHRISTIAN 

ONE of tbe daily papers of this city told a story a few days 
ago which illustrates very I trclblj the necessity for leai the- 
ology and more practical Christianity among the churches and 
church-goer* of Ban Francisco, The story was that a ynung man 
out of employment, and hungry, went into a church where two 
evangelists were exhorting people t • ooma to Him who was love 
and charity incarnate. Tbe hungry man asked those in charge of 
tbe services tr» assist him to get something to eat and a place to 
sleep, but tbe net result of his piteous appeal was that he was 
directed to the headquarters of tbe Associated Charities, where 
be was refused assistance on the ground that he was young ami 
strong. He could get nothing because the charities had "so many 
poor families to assist." If this be tbe practical result of tbe 
zealous attempts at the evangelization of San Francisco, it would 
be better, perhaps, to let us relapse into our pristine heathendom, 
for in that remote era no man was allowed to go hungry if the 
one to whom be appealed bad the means wherewith to feed him. 
In those primitive times this city was noi blessed with many line 
churches, in which paid choirs sang hymns and psalmy and 
spiritual songs to the accompaniment of ten thousand dollar 
organs, nor were there many ministers of the gospel who had de- 
veloped chronic sore throats, to be cured only by a three months' 
vacation every year under full salary; but there was cherished 
and cultivated certain homely virtues, grown unfashionable in 
this jin de fiiccU era, among which was charity. In those days 
there used to be some regard to a definition of religion, for which 
one St. James was responsible, and which declares that » Pure re- 
ligion and undefiled before God and the Father is this: to visit the 
fatherless and widows in tbeir affliction and to keep himself 
unspotted from the world." And there was often quoted another 
maxim, attributed to another saint, which asserted that: » Now 
abidetb faith, hope and charity, these three; but the greatest of 
these is charity." We understand, of course, that an apology is 
due for even referring to such trite and out-of-date topics, but we 
take the liberty of asking these gentlemen who are devoting a 
great deal of eloquence to their work of evangelization, what 
they can expect or hope to accomplish if their practice is so an- 
tagonistic to their doctrine ? What use is there in bidding the 
people to come and take of the waters of life freely, without 
money and without price, when a poor, starving, shivering sinner, 
without a bite to eat or a place to lay his head, cannot, out of the 
whole audience at tbe revival meeting, have his bodily necessities 
supplied, even for the time being. Must not these evangelizing 
laborers in the Lord's vineyard have thought of the most terrible 
denunciation that ever fell from the loving lips of the Saviour of 
mankind, " Inasmuch as ye have not done it unto tbe least one 
these, ye have not done it unto me." Such concrete exam- 
ples of the distinction between Christian theory and Ohriatian 
practice do more to build up the ramparts of infidelity and skep- 
ticism than all the writings of all the atheists and agnostics who 
ever put pen to paper. 

THE ADULTERATION OF MILK. 



A WORTHY work is now being engaged in by Dr. Bucknall 
and the Board of Health. At the meeting of the Board of 
Health, held last Wednesday evening, Dr. Bucknall called atten- 
tion to the urgent need of an immediate investigation of the 
adulteration of milk by the dealers in this cily, with a view to 
the prevention of such practices in the future. He has had a 
large number of analyses made of milk from different dairies, 
procured at the local headquarters of the milkmen. The results 
have so far shown that the virtue of much of the milk is de- 
stroyed by the combination with it of various deletorious sub- 
stances. After he has completed his investigation, Dr. Bucknall 
will make a full report to the Board of Health of tbe results he 
has procured, and in this report due credit will be given to those 
dairymen who sell pure milk, and the names of alt men who use 
adulterants in the product of their dairies sent out by them for 
consumption in this community will likewise be quoted, so that 
consumers by knowing tbe offenders may protect themselves 
against them. Some years ago the News Letter investigated 
the milk question, and at that time aroused tbe people of 
the city to a full appreciation of the dangers to health 
directly arising from the adulteration practiced by dairymen. 
The inquiry so properly instituted by Dr. Bucknall should re- 
ceive the most earnest support of the Board of Health and of all 
physicians in the city. Dairymen found to be guilty should be 
as severely dealt with as the law will allow. They should be ex- 
posed without mercy, so that the people whose health has been 
endangered by them may have an opportunity to deal with them 
as they deserve. Thousands of babes are fed upon milk procured 
from the dairies of this and adjoining counties, and many in- 
fantile disorders arise directly from the fact that the purity of the 
milk has been destroyed. The publication of tbe names of the 
men who adulterate milk, as suggested by Dr. Bucknall, should 
have the desired effect, and put an end to this nefarious practice. 
The Board of Health should not allow the prosecution of this in- 
vestigation to abate in the slightest degree, for it is only by the 
constant inspection of the sources and qualities of food that the 
public health can be preserved. 



A MODEL TOWN. 

MB I W. Qroano, well known in financial oJrclM in tbe East, 
has boon making a tour of the Pacific Cooot, In company 
with ■ parly ol prominent English and Bootofa capitalists. Dar- 
ing tbe past week a brief visit was paid to San PrancUeo, and 
Mr Greene hastily outlined to a NaiM Lf.ttbr representative the 
principal features of a novel enterprise which he and bis asso- 
liave decided to enter upon, and for which the preliminaries 
are already well under way. In a sentence, the enterprise em- 
braces tbe laying out and building of a model town. In which all 
the essentials, conveniences and ornamentations of modern urban 
life shall be provided before a single individual is invited or per- 
mitted to take up his residence therein. A large tract of 
land has been secured some ten or a dozen miles 
from tbe well-known town of Riverside, in 8an Bernardino 
county, and lying on the Santa Ffi railroad. This tract will 
be laid out into a town of extensive proportions, the 
residence portion being on one side of the road and the business 
section on the other, the two localities being connected by streets 
below the grade of the line. A wide space on both sides of the 
rail will be devoted to parks, lawns and flower-gardens, inter- 
spersed with fountains, shrubbery, etc. The streets will be 
paved, sidewalks laid, water, gas or electricity and sewerage pro- 
vided after tbe best modern systems, and in fact, every detail of 
the latest improvement will be attended to. There will be no 
straight streets and no rectangular blocks. Everything will be 
laid out in curves and circles, thereby presenting a pleasing va- 
riety to the eye and avoiding the monotony of straight thorough- 
fares and abrupt corners. When all the improvements shall have 
been completed, as outlined, then people will be invited to take 
up their residence and engage in business in the model town. 
They will be subject to certain restrictions, however, in 
the character of the buildings which they will be allowed 
to erect. It is the design of tbe projectors of the enterprise to 
prevent the construction of unsightly or poorly built structures, 
and hence each deed or contract will specify the character of the 
business building or residence that shall be erected by all purchas- 
ers, and it will be made incumbent upon them to carry out the 
stipulation to the letter. No lots will be sold for speculative pur- 
poses, but all purchasers will be required to build at once. The 
model town is to be called Aleasandro, and as its projectors are 
provided with an abundance of capital, and are men of energy 
and enterprise, there can be no doubt that the scheme will be 
successfully carried out. Its outcome will certainly be watched 
with interest by all, particularly the people of California, who 
have been so accustomed to see towns built in tbe most hap- 
hazard fashion that a scheme of this sort comes with a refreshing 
novelty. 



SHIPPING FRUIT TO ENGLAND. 

A DECIDEDLY important step for all concerned was taken 
during the past week in tbe inauguration of snipments of 
fresh fruit from California to England. There seems to be little 
room for doubt that these shipments will reach their destinatiou 
in good condition, since small experimental lots of peaches and 
other fruits have been sent over the same route with success here- 
tofore; and there is besides the example of the South African 
fruit growers, who have for years been engaged in this business. 
They have labored under the handicap of being at least three 
weeks from the English market, while the promise is made that 
the California fruit shall reach its destination in thirteen days 
from the time of departure. Whether the transhipment of the 
California fruit from car to steamer, at New York, shall 
prove detrimental remains to be seen, although there is 
no reason why it should. Car and steamer are brought side 
by side, and with ordinary care tbe packages should be trans- 
ported so quickly from the one to the other that the higher 
temperature of the outside atmosphere will not have time to 
affect the fruit. It is stated that the entire cost of transportation 
across tbe continent and over the ocean will be less than five 
cents a pound. If the fruit sells for any such prices as have been 
paid heretofore for the South African product, the freight will 
cut little figure in the proceeds. When six-ounce peaches sell for 
two shillings each, as is frequently the case, tbe cost of trans- 
portation becomes an insignificant factor. There is no good rea- 
son why a large and profitable trade should not be built up in 
this direction, and thus another outlet be afforded for the products 
of our orchards and vineyards, while at tbe same time giving the 
over-production croakers another set-back in addition to tbe 
many they have already received. 



GOVERNOR PATTISON says he will keep the Pennsylvania 
troops at Homestead all summer, if necessary to vindicate 
law and order, and will, if occasion demands, exhaust the treas- 
ury and mortgage the State to pay them. What a pity that he 
did not display some of this 8partan firmness in time to have 
prevented the sanguinary collision between the strikers and tbe 
Pinkerton men, as he might have done had he responded prompt- 
ly to the Sheriff's first appeal for assistance. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1892. 



THE DEMOCRATIC OUTLOOK. 

THE Democratic party possesses many advantages to-day in the 
discussion of the main is3ue between the two great political 
parties — the tariff. Our standpoint is that of a tariff for revenue 
only, as against a tariff for the protection of infant industries. 
Four years ago we had to combat the erroneous ideas formed 
among the labor classes that the effect of tariff reduction would be 
to reduce wage?. Acting upon this idea many workingmen voted 
for Harrison instead of Cleveland. During this campaign the condi- 
tion of affairs will be different, as the tariff issue is now better under- 
stood among the people. It has been demonstrated that the wages 
of men employed in the industries protected most have suffered 
most, through and by the great influx of foreign immigration that 
affects the labor market which is, naturally, unskilled labor. The 
people have had severe experience resulting from the imposition of 
a high protective tariff, aud have gained wisdom thereby. Now, be- 
lieving that we have educated the uneducated mind up to this point, 
that our tariff policy will not cause a reduction in wages, we feel 
that we have this year an excellent chance to elect our candidate, 
who is himself the embodiment of tariff reform. In California, 
particularly, are the effects of the high protection policy appar- 
ent. Here, following the adoption of the present tariff bill, times 
are not as good as they should be. We have had no drouth : the 
crops are good, and yet there is a stagnation, a dullness, and an 
absence of that healthy prosperity the people had been led to ex- 
pect. This condition of affairs has created dissatisfaction through- 
out the State and will tend to secure to the minority much of 
that support formerly given to the party, the enactment of whose 
principles has caused the dissatisfaction. California is always 
considered debatable ground, the majority for either party not 
being so great that it cannot be converted. The experience of 
men who have had to do with political affairs in California shows 
that there is in this State a certain purchasable vote, larger in 
populous districts than in others. I have always considered that 
this purchasable vote is sufficient to constitute the balance of 
power. Tn San Francisco alone it amounts to 5,000, and through- 
out the remainder of the State is as much more; there being 
in all about 10,000 to 12,000 purchasable votes. This is suffi- 
cient to change the result either way. When United States Senators 
are to be elected in this State, who have great wealth and large 
resources at their command, and readily expend their money to 
secure seats in the United States Senate, the expenditure of that 
money naturally enough indicates that the chances of success 
will be with the party which has this pecuniary aid at its com- 
mand, whether Republican or Democratic. I have great faith in 
the Australian ballot law, to be tried for the first time this year 
in California, and think that the operation of the law will neu- 
tralize, to some extent, the purchasing of votes. I take it that, 
as in other places, the Australian system will prove beneficial to 
the party with the least money to expend. We calculate on re- 
ceiving much support on local issues, for which reason we think 
we will have a majority of the Legislature. The last Legislature 
certainly did not put the Republican party in a very enviable 
light, nn account of the manner in which the Representatives, 
most of whom were Republicans, conducted the affairs of State. 
All this has created dissatisfaction in the Republican camp, and 
naturally tends to send votes to the opposing side. Referring 
again to the Australian system of voting, I think that that sys 
tem will affect in a large degree the influence or influences mostly 
derived by the expenditure of money in State elections, 1 think 
the time has come when the people of this State should recognize 
that intelligence and brains are far more necessary to represent 
this State in the United States Senate than the weak abilities of 
men whose sole recommendation is their power to make 
money. This will be a fight for principle. If we do not win this 
time we will in the future, for we have determined to educate the 
people to a full appreciation of the principles of the Democratic 
party, under which only can the affairs of the government be 
properly conducted. 

1 believe that the State of California owes a debt of gratitude 
to Mr. Cleveland for having signed the Chinese Exclusion bill, 
and for thus establishing the only law protecting labor now on 
the statutes. If more were done to protect laborers in the over- 
crowded markets of the East, we should hear less of strikes and 
other labor troubles. We are not in a position this year to fight 
our opponents with weapons similar to those they hold, for we 
are shorn of patronage. Another point in our favor this year is 
the fact that the Republican nominee is personally unpopular 
among many of his former adherents. His nomination, particu- 
larly in California, has not been received with that outburst of 
enthusiasm which usually signifies the approval of the action of a 
national convention. On the other hand, Mr. Cleveland's nom- 
ination has been hailed with applause from one end of the Union 
to the other. We intend to educate the people by means 
of the newspapers, the platform and by circulation of lit- 
erature upon the issues of the day, until the principles of the 
Democratic party are thoroughly understood by the electors. We 
think we have a fighting chance this year to place California in 
the roll of Democratic States. Max Popper, 

Chairman Democratic State Central Committee. 



THE FORESTERS AT STOCKWELL'S THEATRE. 



FEW great poets of modern times have given to the stage a 
lasting drama, though many have essayed it. Byrona 
dramas, intensely dramatic aa they are, are simply poems in 
dramatic form, and so evidently unadapted to actual stage pro- 
duction that the attempt to give them is never even thought of. 
Byron, indeed, anticipated matters by declaring that they were 
never intended to be played, though there is little doubt that the 
vanity of genius would have been highly gratified at seeing his 
dramatic poems behind the footlights. 

Lord Tennyson, on the other hand, wrote The Foresters with the 
distinct intention of stage production. With the added attraction 
of Sir Arthur Sullivan's music, an overwhelming success seemed j 
but a reasonable expectation to the many. The few doubted, ! 
and the few were, as usual, right. Tennyson has written poor : 
poems, but The Foresters is not one of them. Old as is the story, 
it ia no older, though better known, than that of King Arthur 
and his Knights of the Round Table; and, while without the 
lofty grandeur of the Idylls, it is full of the exquisite charm of die- : 
tion, imagery and sentiment which are so essentially Tennysonian. 

As presented by the Daly Company, it is a beautiful poem aa 
beautifully illustrated. There should be no surprise at the total 
variance of opinion regarding ita merita among auditors of equal 
critical taste and judgment. That opinion depends mainly on 
the mood of the hearer. If be chance to be in a humor to sit 
through an evening in dreamy enjoyment of a poem presented in 
a series of exquisite pictures and pronounced by pleasant voicea, 
he will go away more than satisfied; but if he expect a purely 
dramatic treat, he will hardly find enough live interest to meet 
hia expectation. The Foresters will undoubtedly find an occa- 
sional production on the present stage, and may even be a sub- 
ject for " revival" by some Daly of the future. But that it will 
not fill any permanent or prominent place among acting dramas 
appears certain. 

Ada Reban, in her quaint and beautiful costuming, will live in 
the memory an artist's ideal of the famous Maid, and the fairy 
acene in Sherwood Foreat, with ita ethereal, ahadowy aprite in 
cobwebby robea, so different from the ordinary stage fairy, hard 
of outline and palpably material as to costume, is another beauti- 
ful picture. Of these, indeed, there are many, and to them is due 
the main dramatic charm. John Drew's face, voice and manner, 
the acme of perfection in the personation of the modern society 
young man, utterly refuse to fit in with the surroundings, and 
the strenuous effort of even the most imaginative, aa well as par- 
tial, auditor to realize him as a dweller in the green wood, are a 
failure. He remains an incongruity and an anachronism. Little 
John is a noticeable character, his antic spirit making consider- 
able life in a comedy way. 

The people of San Francisco will be thankful to Mr. Daly for 
giving them a chance to see the great poet's much talked-of play, 
and the Daly Company need not feel chagrined at the partial suc- 
cess of a play which proved, with its great London cast, includ- 
ing Ellen Terry, a pronounced and acknowledged failure. 

A POPULAR RESORT. 

THE palatial resort recently opened in the Panorama bull ling 
at the corner of Eddy and Mason streets, ia without 
the question of a doubt the most popular hall of its kind on 
the coast. The management is in the hands of experienced men who 
fully appreciate the requirements of the public, and who have catered 
to them in every way. The ladies' orchestra, which, by the way, is 
the best ever heard in the city, is a leading feature deserving of the 
highest praise It is composed of excellent musicians, who delight 
the patrons nightly by their enjoyable rendition of selected music. 
Ladies take great. pleasure in vistting The Palace, on account of the 
unusual accommodations there provided for them. There is a broad 
and comfortable circular promenade which overlooks the main hall, 
and there ladies and their escorts may sit. watch the crowd, enjoy 
the music and exchange sweet nothings, as their fancy dictates. The 
promenade and refreshment rooms up stairs are strictly reserved for 
ladies and their escorts. The restaurant is the pride of an excellent 
chef, who places the latest delicacies of the season before customers 
in a manner that would tempt an anchorite. The restaurant is di- 
vided from that portion of the hall where those who enjoy the foam- 
ing lager or liquors sit by a handsome wood and glass parti- 
tion. The liquors The Palace presents to its customers it is grati- 
fying to say are the best known to lovers of the flowing bowl. 
Bacchus himself, it seems, has graced The Palace with all the charms 
with which he endows his devotees and the places of their devotions. 
The hall itself is beautiful, for it has been most handsomely deco- 
rated. From the apex of the great dome long streamers bend their 
graceful curves to the balcony balustrade. Brilliant incandescent 
lights, covered by variously colored globes, peep out from all quar- 
ters, and flood this pleasure rendezvous with a brilliant but soft and 
mellow light. At the Palace every evening may be seen many family 
groups, for it is above all a place where families may safely gather. 
The regulations of the house are so good and so strictly en- 
forced that the very slightest breach of good manners is impossible. 
It is a first-class resort in all respects. It is on the ground floor, a id 
has absolutely no obj ectionable features. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses reiuea, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commiasion. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 



July 23, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NKWS I.KTTKR. 



THE SOCKLESS SOCRATES. 

PHK ion* that won (he moat •pplnnr at the BUU Convtntloi 
1 of the People's Party in Kansas w«» entitled ■• The Sock it? » 
locrates of Medicine Lodge." Here are three of the fifteen verses: 

m the wilds of bleeding Kansas, with hay-seed in his locka. 
tnd a heart devoid of fear, ami with [eel devoid of socks, 
'omt* the champion of the Grangers, of Hawbuck and of Hodge, 
"be dauntless Jerry Simpson, the ■• Pride of Medicine Lodge." 
ve seen the ballet in New Y«irk. with ankles neat and trim. 
?bere nymphs have skipped and fairies danced, all liberal in 

limb; 
n'by they'd bring down a bouse composed of stones, and sticks, 

and stocks. 
Jot they wouldn't move a Kansas crowd like Jerry's want of 

socks. 

flat, prouder than a Roman, be treads the marble hall. 
and puts bis feet upon the desk, where they are seen by all, 
\nd the people in the galleries wonder and tbey stare, 
\t the man who thinks protected stocks won't do for him to wear. 

BILL ENGLISH AND THE BABY. 



"PHF.RE Is one story that W. D. English, the Democratic cbief- 
1 tain, does not tell wbeD be is relating the anedotes connected 
with bis recent trip to the Chicago Convention. It is too good, 
hough, to keep under a bushel, so here it is. When the delegates 
irnved at Omaha they found a grand reception arranged for them. 
overnor Boyd, the Mayor and the Councilcoen were present to 
>id them welcome; bands were playing, streamers were flying, 
nd a procession was formed to escort them about town. Car- 
iages ad libitum were provided for the visitors, and into the first 
>ne got Governor Boyd. A. P. Butter, of Fresno, chairman of the 
'alifornia delegation, his wife, carrying her nine months old baby, 
nd W. P. English. Butler advised leaving the child behind 
with the nurse, bnt his wife would not hear of it, so the little one 
went along. Everything progressed satisfactorily for half an 
aoor or so, and then the tale of woe began to unravel. The baby 
ommenced to howl with all the force of a pair of leather-lined 
nngs. and, as all efforts to check the youngster's demonstration 
were in vain, Bill English offered, as a last resort, to take the 
part of nurse. The child was, therefore, turned over to him, but 
is coaxing availed naught, and at last he announced that he 
'.•i. id leave the cariage and take the little one back on a street 
ar to the train. 
| Efforts were made to dissuade him from this fatherly move, 
but be was persistent, and his programme was adopted. The car- 
riage was stopped, Bill English, with the child in bis arms, 
alighted, and then he boarded a down-town car, and, with the 
child on his knee, endeavored to pacify it witb aongs like "The 
harp that once through Tarra-ra-boom-de-ray's halls," *• Rock-a- 
bye paper," and t( Where is my wandering boy to-night?" The 
youngster, however, refused to be entertained, and the infantile 
> creams grew fiercer as the populated streets were reached — so 
much so that English was the center of attraction. It is all a 
nightmare to him now — that fearful experience from terminus of 
the street car to the train, where he was greeted with an ovation 
by the few delegates who had stayed behind for the occasion. As 
a climax they sang " Where did you get that child," and the 
Democratic leader did not hear the end of it all the rest of the 
way to the Windy City. 

THE LATE GENERAL NOBLE. 



HIGHLAND 



THE late Major-General W. H. Noble, R. A., who died on May 
17th last, was best known as the Superintendent of the Royal 
Gunpowder Factory, at Woolwich. During the tenure of that 
command he made numerous improvements in the manufacture 
of prismatic gunpowder. He was the author of many books on 
military subjects, and an inventor of scientific instruments relat- 
ing to military manufacture. He was born in Ireland in 1834, 
and after graduating at Trinity College in 1856, left the gown for 
the gun, and became a lieutenant in the Royal Artillery. He 
served the Queen in both hemispheres, fighting through the 
Afghan War. 

WRICES^ 




Powder 



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A CULINARY ARTICLE, 

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HELVETIA MILK CONDENSING CO., 
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ZISKA INSTITUTE, 

1606 Van Ness Avenue. 

French, German and English Day and Boarding School for yoang 
ladies and children. 
A refined home wilh the best educational udvaiUages. 

Next Term Opens August 1, 1892. 

MME. B. ZISKA, M. A., Principal. 
Mr. ASHTON P. STEVENS, 

HAS RESUMED INSTRUCTIONS ON THE BANJO. 

Studio— 26 Montgomery Street, Room 8. 

ALFRED J. KELLEHER, 

Professor of VOCAL MUSIC AT MILLS' COLLEGE (18th year), desires 
to announce that he will give Lessons at his office, bis residence, or at the 
residence of the pupil. 

Office— 14 Grant avenue, rooms 62 and 63. Residence— 2324 Clay street, 
San Francisco. 

Garcia Vocal Method. Solfeggio Panseron. 

MR. and MME. J. H. ROSEWALD, 

Will Resume Giving Instructions on August 1st. Ap- 
plicants for Time will Please call on Friday or Satur- 
day, July 29, 30, From 2 to 4 p. m, at 922 Geary St. 

DR. F. C, PAGUE, 

DENTIST, 

Rooms 4 & 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 

819 Market Street. 

DR. J. H. STALLARD 

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Clean Hand Towels each week. $1.00 Per month ; 12 Clean Hand Towels 
each week $1 50 per month; 4 Clean Roller Towels each week. $1.00 per 
6 month ■ 6 Clean Roller Towels each week, $1.25 per month. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1892. 



A HERO IN THE RANKS. 

IT was on a spring morning in 1882 that Neil C. Damsiedt, a na- 
tive of Sweden, having known the usual vicissitudes of the life 
of the sailor in hoth the naval and mercantile marine, enlisted for 
the second tin e in the service of the United States Navy. On 
the evening of the same day be " slung his hammock" on the 
berth deck of the United States receiving ship Independence, 
Captain Charles S. Norton, commander— the ship referred to by 
Rxhard H. Dan?, in his appendix to "Two Years Before the 
Mast,' as long ago as 1856. as " the old Indfptndence." In all 
probability Darustedt's frank young face, and the native refine- 
ment evidenced by his gentle voice and graceful ways, together 
with the alacrity and efficiency with which he obeyed an order, 
and his ready apprehension of the spirit as well as the letter of 
his duty, attracted the attention of Captain Norton, for he was 
soon assigned to the post of » coxswain of the gig," a boat which, 
in the United States Navy, usually pulls six oars, and is devoted 
to the use of the commanding officer. Here, in the care of the 
boat, the direction of the crew and the duty of steering, Dam- 
stedt had abundant opportunity of justifying the good opinion 
that had placed him in so responsible a position. It was while 
serving Uncle Sam in this capacity that he acquired the sobriquet 
of » The Jolly Coxswain." In attire a model of neatness and in 
manners a model of politeness, not too large to be natty and nim- 
ble and not too small to be dignified and capable, the Jolly Cox- 
swain was, in bis sailor's garb, the embodiment of the Jack Tar 
of fiction and poesy. 

After two years' service on the Independence, on report of Com- 
mander Frederick Rodgers, Damstedt received from the Secretary 
of the Navy, Hon. Wm. E. Chandler (dated Navy Department, 
Washington, May 8, 1884), an official recognition and commenda- 
tion of his « extremely praiseworthy and courageous conduct, 
in rescuing from drowning Henri Prangner, fireman, on the morn- 
ing of April 24, 1884;" the communication closing with the ex- 
pression of "the appreciation entertained by the Department of 
hia prompt and brave action on that occasion." As acceptable as 
such a tribute from such a source would be to any man, it ia, 
nevertheless, to be deplored that for such heroism the United 
States Government offers our sailor-men no more substantial 
award. Secretary Chandler's letter, on file in the Commander's 
office of the Independence, and Damstedt'a attested copy which 
already ahows the wear and tear of time and its owner's appre- 
ciation, are all that he has to show for one of the most heroic of 
all deeds — that of grappling with a drowning man in the effort 
to save his life, with the extreme probability of losing hia own. 
For the encouragement of heroism, for the incitement of the 
young to noble deeds; for the honor of our country, and for the 
juBt reward of the deserving, it Is to be hoped that the Govern- 
ment will accord more than an ink-and-paper recognition to the 
heroes of the late explosion at the Mare Island Navy Yard, con- 
cerning one of whom this paper is written. 

Though long familiarity may render a man insensible to danger, 
it is, nevertheless, an accepted fact that none are so careful in 
the handling of explosives as those whoae daily duty it is; their 
training and experience being such as to give them a lively ap- 
prehension of personal peril. If such, indeed, were not the case, 
there would be small security for any community in the neigh- 
borhood of a magazine; for only a soul cast in the noblest mold 
is able, under varying physical conditions and surrounding cir- 
cumstances, from the sheer sense of duty, unflinchingly to face 
the most appalling of all dangers. On that fatal morning of 
Monday, June 13, 1892, Neil Damstedt, being << off duty," was at 
his house on a bill adjacent to the magazine, engaged in some 
plumbing repairs, while his yonng wife was occupied near him 
with her household duties. Mrs. Damstedt had remarked that 
during the night he had risen in his sleep, trembling, and talking 
of something which he dreaded. 

" It was nothing, madam," said he, with the quaint courlli- 
neas for which he ia remarkable; "it was nothing. I had a 
dream — that was all." 

" You have told me," said his wife, " that you have had such 
dreama in the past." 

" It is true, my wife. I have had such dreams before." 

" And alwaya previous to a shipwreck, persisted she." 

" Yes," he reluctantly admitted, " on three such occasions I 
have had such, dreams." 

" I hope nothing is going to happen." 

« I hope not, Madam, but— whatever may happen, remember 
— God is above." 

At that instant a terrific detonation almost stunned them 
where they stood. The house rocked as in an earthquake, and 
the plaster fell from the center of the ceiling, covering the floor 
between them. Damstedt rushed to the door, his wife following. 

" The magazine! " cried she. 

» No, not the magazine," he assured her; " one of the powder- 
houses, only." 

» Don't gol " she entreated. " Damstedt, don't got " 

" I mast go," he said , » and, my wife, whatever happens, keep 
cool, and put your trust in God." 

Arriving at the scene of the explosion, the first object that met 



his horrified gaze was one to make the stoutest grow faint— a fel- 
low-being without a shred of clothing, or even of skin, burnt 
brown from head to foot, the surface like a jelly. A hand was 
waving back and forth, and a voice murmured: " Take my hand 
— take my hand 1 " 

Damstedt drew near and spoke, anxious to bid him put his 
trust in God ; but the poor sufferer was already beyond the reach 
of his voice. 

Clouds of dust and smoke hid from view the horrors yet to be 
revealed, but here he met Collins, one of the watchmen on duty, 
blood trickling down his face; and now came GunnerT. M. John- 
ston, the officer in charge of the magazine, followed by Sylvester, 
a laborer who had been at work repairing the road back of the 
magazine. 

'•The hose!" cried Gunner Johnston; "Damstedt, man the 
hose!" And in a trice the water was on, directed first to the 
burning debris that threatened the other buildings, and then into 
the wrecked building, where the bursting shells still kept up a 
fusillade. Here Gunner Johnaton and Damstedt, with the aid of 
Sylvester, and manfully assisted by Collins, wrestled with the 
hose, which, owing to the strong force of water, became almost 
unmanagable. Their united effects could scarcely control the 
nozzle, which was like a thing of life struggling to escape them; 
and it was almost impossible satisfactorily to direct the stream 
until the arrival of Dr. D. O. Lewia, Surgeon U. S. N., and B'irst 
Assistant of Medical Director G. W. Woods, at the Naval Hospital. 

"Light the hose, there! light the hose! " was the cry to which 
Dr. Lewis speedily responded. " We spoke to the Doctor," says 
Damstedt, in a tone of awe, " as if be had been any common man." 

Thus, until the arrival of sufficient help to start another stream 
of water, they worked on; at what peril let those who saw them 
moving around among the hissing shells and struggling with the 
tremendous force of water, where one misstep must have been 
fatal, and where, in any case, they were in instant danger of be- 
ing reduced to auch condition as those whom they now saw 
strewn far and near around them. When Damstedt left the 
magazine where crowds of workers and spectators were now as- 
sembled, he went first to inquire for the welfare of a fellow-watch- 
tuan whom he missed; and finding him " on hia feet," went 
home to change his clothes, which were completely soaked. 
While thus engaged, he heard the voice of Capt. C. E. Clark, In- 
spector of Ordnance, calling him by name. 

" I came to the top of the stairs," says Damstedt, " and there 
was Captain Clark below. ■ Excuse me, Captain Clark,' said I, 
* I am only half dressed, sir.' « Never mind that, Damstedt,' said 
the Captain, coming toward me; ' I only want to shake hands 
with you, Damstedt, and to thank you for your brave conduct 
this day.' ft was almost too much for me — I could hardly say, < I 
only did my duty, sir! ' " 



u X/ES, dear wife," and he closed his eyes, 
I 



the end is near. 
The world grows dark about me. Tl e "e is a mist around me 
gathering thicker and thicker, and there, as through a cloud, I 
hear the music of angels— sweet and sad." " No, no, John dear; 
that's the brass band on the corner." " What! " said the dying man, 
jumping from his bed and flinging the bootjack at the leader; " Have 
those scoundrels dared to come round here when I am dying! " And 
he recovered — Life. 




I 



Foly 28, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



THE SANITARY CONDITION OF OUR HOMES. 
[By Hi Vimoi .] 

1>HK unitary condition of oar homes is a question not to he 
mated with contempt, nor waved aside as something not to 
he dtoOfnad. I« is a question of such magnitude that one who 
hopes to cope with existing conditions may well stand aghast, 
ar.d lose heart at the task before him. I will not speak of tbe 
condition of our city streets further than lo aay that their condi- 
tion Is not accidental, not occasional, bat habitual, is a standing 
trii nt *»o the executive ability of our C ty Fatbirs. In Chicago, a 
bano of women took it upon themselves to see ihat the sanitary 
OOndhiufU oi that city were what they should be. and the picture 
of Chicago •• before and afterwards" are evidence of what 
women can do as housekeepers on a large scale. Without wish- 
ing to disparage the natural ability of that superior creature, 
man, one may be pardoned for saying that as a private or a pub- 
lic housekeeper be is not a success. In proof of this, one has 
only to point to schools and other public buildings where tbe 
work of cleaning is performed by men, and compare the result 
with what exists under the regime of woman. It is doubtless 
owing to the fact that a woman's mind is so much more petty 
than man's that it can busy itself with trifles, and not be conscious 
of ibat sense of loneliness which a solitary idea inspires in the 
more deeply commoluted cranium of a lord of creation. That any 
of tbe superior sex should ever condescend to sweep out a room 
or to flourish a dust brush is against nature, and to follow the 
usual order of argument offered when a woman wishes to step 
out of tbe broom and dust-pan stage — it » unsexea " tbe unhappy 
person who engages in it. Perhaps it is as a sort of protest 
against the " unmanly " occupation of " cleaning up " that these 
janitors need so much looking after. If the ladies of San Fran- 
cisco could organize themselves into a Public House-cleaning 
league, and be given authority to enforce their rules and regula- 
tions, our city would be vastly improved from a sanitary stand- 
point. Who is the proper person to inaugurate such a movement? 
A property holder. Perhaps the time is not so far distant when 
such a league may come into existence in San Francisco. This is 
not a Hltby city. There is a great deal of dirt lying around loose 
for the sport of the winds and the vexation of spirit of the in- 
habitants. It can hardly be otherwise, since the drifting sands 
are not to be kept down with a paper weight, and the character 
of the soil of our city's site is sandy. But when we come to the 
street corners we are greeted with strong proof that the sanitary 
condition of our city is not what it should be. " Whew — how 
the sewers smell! " is a common exclamation. There is nothing 
but folly and harm in being an alarmist. Some of our dailies de- 
light to seize upon tbe slightest pretext for a sensation, and if the 
cholera but makes its appearance among the poorest peasants of 
the furthest Russian steppes, the sensation mongers would have 
ns believe that the dread scourge is at our very doors. 80 with 
smallpox, so with the other contagious diseases, lii.t there is a 
wide difference between panic-stricken alarm and a wise 
precaution against the spread of these evils, which 
rightly have been called "dirt diseases." As to quar- 
antine and other legislative measures for repulsing the advance 
and checking the spread of these diseases, we must leave that to 
the authorities. But each woman has a duty to perform in this 
matter, a duty which she owes to her own family, and to the 
community. She must help create a public sentiment that will 
take hold, and take bold vigorously and at once of the sanitary 
conditions of otir homes. Every woman can insist upon cleanli- 
ness in her own house, and in that of her neighbor to the extent 
of having an offensive swill barrel removed from under her win- 
dows. In no city should such barrels, in fruit season and melon 
time, remain unemptied for weeks, and yet they do here. Prop- 
erty holders should combine, and discover and prosecute those 
miscreants who by night make vacant lots and street corners the 
receptacles for the bags of rubbish they are too penurious to pay 
an ashman to remove from their premises. 

How is it within the houses themselves? Go into that house on 
the hill. It is one of a row — nice, large houses, roomy, well- 
lighted, in a desirable locality. As you enter the hall, you are 
offended by a peculiar odor. " Oh," says the agent, who suavely 
shows you through, « that is nothing at all, only the house has 
not been occupied for so long, naturally the air is a little close." 
I should say so. Let me ask that house agent a question. On 
the second floor there is not a wash-basin nor any pipe properly 
connected with the sewer. Why is it that at certain times dur- 
ing the day that second floor, particularly the parlors, near the 
folding doors, is pervaded with a smell that drives the occupants 
forth into a purer atmosphere? It ia the proof of the de- 
fective sewerage. There should be a law that would 
require that there shall be no bath rooms or toilet 
rooms without a window opening directly into the open air. 
There are hundreds of houses in San Francisco whose bath-rooms 
are ventilated through transoms opening into halls, which open 
into the sleeping apartments. Is that a proper state of affairs, 
viewed from a sanitary standpoint? If the greed of builders 
causes them to sacrifice the health of their tenants to their desire 



ttOmln tpaoa, (hen let the law speak to them. Not long 
ago the accommodations of a certain largl hoarding -hmise in this 
city were increase.! by the addition of a number of rooms. In 
building the annex, the hath rooms of the main houso were com- 
pletely closed up; shut off from the air, and they found ventila- 
tion through the corridors of thin vast caravansary. What 
wonder (hat malaria, scarlet fever and mumps raged through the 
building. Yet that is hut one of the many buildings "perfect in 
all their appointments." The women of San Francisco should do 
something for the health of the city. Such things should not be 
suffered in silence. 



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SEARCHER OF RECORDS 

AND 

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OFFICES— Southeast corner Sixth and Broadway streets. Residence— 
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Select Music in Restaurant .every evening between 6 and 8. 

A. F. KINZLER, Manager. 

MRS. R. G. LEWIS, 

FORMERLY OF THURLOW BLOCK, 
HAS REMOVED TO 

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Parties desiring to send to their 
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Office and Depot tngtenook Vineyard, 122 Sansome St., S. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1892. 




'We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's.' 



THE present week will be one of tbe longest remembered in a 
memorable engagement at Stock well's new theatre. The brilli ni 
production of A School for Scandal has eclipsed every previous 
effort of the Daly Company. Ada Rehan at once realizes and 
idealizes Sheridan's wilful, high-spirited, and lovely heroine, with 
too much heart to become altogether the woman of fashion of her 
period and her coterie. Her exquisitely modeled and becoming 
gowns, her coquettish beplumed hats, her powder, her patches, 
and her mincing gait, are as much a part of the creation as her 
coquetry, her love of pleasure, her pride, and her impulsiveness. 
From the lovely woman of to-day she is transformed, soul and 
body, into the lovely woman of a past age, and carries us with 
her so completely that it is with a start of surprise that we find 
ourselves, when the curtain has shut out the enchanting vision 
of the past, facing an end-of-the-nine eenth century audience. The 
subtle auggestion of the excitement of novelty as the motive 
power in the abandonment with which the country-bred girl 
throws herself into the pleasures and frivolities of tbe town, tbe 
innocent mischief in the sparkle ot her eye and around the droop- 
ing corners of her mouth, are a part of Ada Reban's peculiar gift 
of putting herself en rapport with her audience without uttering a 
word, and make quite natural Lady Teazle's final honest straight- 
forwardness, and tbe quick awakening of gratitude and loyalty 
in response to her old husband's tenderness and devotion, so con- 
trary to the falsity and heartlessness of the » women of fashion " 
among whom she has been thrown. Even her scandal accentu- 
ates the difference, so evidently is it inspired by thoughtless mis- 
chief and high spirits, rather than by malice and envy. Miss 
Rehan's appearance here this time has been something like a 
fresh revelation of her dramatic powers even to her most ardent 
admirers, and makes it easy to understand the furore she excited 
among the usually hard-headed and cool-blooded Britons. 

* * * 

John Drew's Charles Surface was also, perhaps, the best and 
most thoroughly artistic thing he has done yet. He could scarcely 
have fallen upon a part more calculated to intensify tbe regret at 
his leaving the company for which he has done so much, and 
which has done so much for him. Like Miss Reban's Lady 
Teazle, Mr. Drew's Charles Surface maintains the traditional 
spirit by entirely untraditional methods. The moral, if any, in 
Sheridan's most sparkling and delightful of comedies is bad in the 
apparent suggestion that generosity and goodness of heart are 
naturally associated with laxity of morals and the defranding of 
tradesmen, but John Drew renders this unpleasant corollary less 
prominent than it appears in reading the play. 

* * * 

This production was further signalized by tbe first appearance 
during this engagement of Mrs. Gilbert, whose Mrs. Candour is, 
it need not be said, on a par with tbe work of the principals. In 
a less finished performance the acting of Lady Sneerwell by 
Adelaide Prince, of Sir Benjamin Backbite by Sidney Herbert, of 
Joseph Surface by George Clarke, of Sir Peter Teazle by Charles 
Wheatleigh, of Sir Oliver by William Sampson, and of almost 
every minor part, as well, would demand a paragraph. It is, as 
often asserted , this all-round excellence which has given Mr. Daly's 
company its acknowledged preeminence, and in nothing has it been 
more brilliantly conspicuous than in The School for Scandal. The 
freshness and elegance of the costumes, the beauty of stage set- 
ting and appointment, are all a part of the outcome of the eternal 
vigilance which is tbe price of dramatic perfection. The opening 
scene of the high-bred scandal-mongers at Lady Sneerwell's, that 
in Sir Charles Surface's apartments with his convivial friends, and 
the elaborate dance at the close of the second act, are each alone 
worth spending an evening to see. Lloyd Daubigny's singing of 
" Here's to the Lass" is a vocal gem in a sparkling setting. 

* * # 

The Lost Paradise, which opened the tenth season of the Bald- 
win Theatre under its present management last Monday 
night, has again given the Frohman pendulum a swing to the 
upward point of its arc. The proper placing of its authorship, 
whether Mr. Ludwig Fulva gave de Mille " the points," or de 
Mille stole the play bodily, is a question which chiefly interests 
themselves. For the general public, " the play's the thing," and 
it is so good a thing that Mr. de Mille must at least be given 
credit for sound judgment in his predatory work. 

The adjustment of capital and labor will never be accomplished 
by sentimental handling in novel and drama; yet there is a dilet- 
tanteish pleasure in playing with economics which has its 
charm, and which gives added zest to tbe enjoyment of The Lost 
Paradise. The absence of Frank Mordaunt — tbe Andrew Knowl- 
ton of the New York production— ceased to be felt as a disap- 
pointment in the manly and appropriate acting of the part by 
W. H. Crompton. Another change is that of Miss Odette Tyler 
from Polly, the country girl, to the heroine of the main story, 
a part filled by Sydney Armstrong in the New York production. 



Her Margaret Knowlton, if not strongly dramatic, is in good 
taste, and shows her ambition to be not unfounded. Polly her- 
self loses nothing of her naive charm in the bands of Miss Elaine 
E lson, though it would be hard to fail with so delightful a vis-a- 
vis as Cyril Scott's Bob Appleton. The villain of the play is only 
an everyday villain, who could pass fairly as a rather nice 
young man anywhere but on the heroic stage. As it is, 
Orrin Johnson divests the part of the usual staginess, 
notably in his final exit, which, while entirely with- 
out the customary melodramatic defiance and hardihood, 
yet avoids anything like a bid for sympathy. James O. Barrows 
is an old favorite here, and his excellent acing of Fletcher was 
no surprise. Mr. Barrows contrives to bring out a genuine humor 
from lines in which that quality is somewhat strained. Maude 
Adams has in Nell, the factory girl, a case of hopeless love com- 
bined with the pallid and drooping type of poverty, and which 
is almost inevitably conventional in the acting. She has a lively 
foil in Cinders, another girl employed at the works, and whom 
Mias Etta Hawkins makes an amusing, if occasionally over- 
pronounced hoyden of the "tough" order. Her hobbledehoy 
" beau," Billy, is as good in his way, and the two are responsible 
for most of the laughter the drama permits. The central figure 
is, of course, William Morris, as the young superintendent who, 
while having a bard time of it between higb-placed love and class 
loyalty, gives the audience a fine manly picture of the educated 
American workingman, who can walk into and, without much 
difficulty, adapt himself to any society where fate may chance to 
cast him. The part is suited to Mr. Morris, and even the some- 
what over-wrought heroics in which he has to indulge are made 
natural by his excellent acting. The Lost Paradise will hardly 
wear its welcome out in the two more weeks it has to run at the 
Baldwin. 

# * * 

The Witch, which has just finished a successful week at the 
Bush-street Theatre, is one of the stroqgest in plot, interest, and 
dramatic action among recent plays. Original as is its theme, 
the originality strikes the auditor less than the wonder that no 
playwright has before taken for hi3 subject a superstition which 
formed in itself a thrilling drama, with a somber and tragic inter- 
est as absorbing as any in history. The Salem witchcraft de- 
lusion, with its attendant horrors — made still more horrible by a 
certain diabolical grotesqueness — is tbe main element in The 
Witch, but we are given incidentally a series of pictures of the 
life and customs of the Puritans in both light and dark shades — 
the ludicrous and the cruel. 

The story has been already told in this column, and it remains 
only to speak of tbe actors in the drama. Marie Hubert Froh- 
man aa the innocent Marguerite, accused of practicing witch- 
craft, looks tne incarnation of simple girlhood, awakened to the 
realities of life by her love and her abandonment by her young 
husband, and his subsequent repudiation of her and her claims. 
As the tender young wife, joyful at once more finding her Wal- 
ter, and as the indignant and resolute woman, refusing to abjure 
her rights even under threat of the gallows, her acting ia alike 
marked by unusual earnestness and depth of feeling. If there ia 
one flaw in a tine performance it is tbe easily mended one of an 
indistinct utterance and tooabrupt gesticulation. Her scene with 
the dove is full of tender beauty and pathos. Walter Leyden 
finds an earnest and poelic interpreter in Charles Jehlinger. 
Herman Hirschberg makes a striking character of the young In- 
dian, Amooka. Elizabeth Leyden, Walter's betrothed before the 
journey which led to his marriage to Marguerite, is well though 
not quite evenly acted by Al'ce Brown; Goody Oliver, who is put 
under the pump as a "common scold," and the Irish skipper, 
who, transiently ashore in the queer old town, outrages its res- 
pectability by kissing a fair Priscilla on its streets, and the young 
couple pilloried for profanely kissing on the Lord's day, and not 
listening to an improving sermon, are amusingly represented by 
Jennie Casey, Frederic Backua, James Loan, and Vivia Ogden, 
and t le entire cask shows a surprising evenness of excellence. 

Mr. Gustav Frohman's method of arranging hia Hat of people in 
the order of their coming upon ihe stage greatly aids the audi- 
ence in knowing the actors, and is a practice to be recommended 
for imitation. The Witch will remain at the Bush one more week, 
and should be seen by all lovers of genuine artistic work. 

Oloriana seems to have taken the California audiences, and its 
removal to that theatre has proved a good move on the part of 
Mr. Hay man. Following Gloriana, August 1st, the California 
will have Thatcher's Minstrels and Tuxedo. The experiment 
made by Rich and Harris with George Thatcher, in combining 
their farce-comedy organization with Thatcher's MinatrelB, ia 
said to have proved highly successful, beside being novel and 
original. 

# # * 

The Tivoli continues Clover to crowded houses. Monday, July 
25th, Planquette'a beautiful historic opera, Nell Gwynne, will be 
produced, with the excellent and well-allotted caat which the 
augmented Tivoli company renders possible. Beauty and the Beast 
is announced for Monday, August 1st. 

# * * 

Following The Lost Paradise at the Baldwin comes Alabama, 



July 23, 1892. 



8AM FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



g 



with nearly the same cam »« that which presented it so delight. 
fully last year. The memory of the various character? in this 
charming Southern home drama lingers so vividly and so pleas- 
antly that its renewed loeotas at the Baldwin is a foregone con- 
clusion. 

The Daly repertory for next week, as originally arranged, if as 
follows: Monday night. \>incy i»»d Company, in which, beside 
Ada Rehan and John Drew. James lewis. William Gilbert. Mn, 
Gilbert, Sidney Herbert, William Sampson. Isabel Irving, Maria 
Shotwell. Kitty Cheatham and Herbert Q res ham will appear; 
Tuesday evening and Wednesday matinee, Love hi ftinctem; 
Wednesday evening. The Lottery of Love; Thursday and Friday 
evenings and Saturday matint'e, Taming of the Shrew; Saturday 
• et i ig A Sight Off. Owing to the great demand for seits, V s 
play for Monday night has been changed from Nancy d> Co. to 
that of -4 School for Scandal. 

• • • 

Little Tippett, a farcical comedy by Alexander Bisson, will be 
the next Bush-street attraction. The cast includes, among 
others. Messrs. Edward Bell, Charles Bowser, Harry J. Morgan, 
Mabel Bert, and Genevieve Tyler. Mr. Bell while here as leading 
man of A. M. Palmer's company made himself very popular both 
on the stage and socially, and 
can favorite who will be wa M«hPl Bert is an old San Francis- 

• * % 

The general desire to secure one of the " Salem " souvenir 
spoons given out at the Bush on the opening night of The Witch, 
has led Manager Frohman to make next Monday night, July 
25lh, another souvenir night, when a spoon will be given to each 
lady on the lower tioor. These souvenirs are genuine in every 
respect, being of sterling silver, aDd made by Daniel Low, in the 
ancient town itself. They were also, it is claimed, the first souve- 
nir spoons put upon the market, and began the popular fad of 
spoon collecting. 

* * * 

The great Paderewski will be here in November next. Hia 
fame has already become national in America, as his late tour of 
the principal cities has been a vent, vidi, vici affair, inserting 
" they heard " for «< I saw." The final test of an artist's powers 
may be admitted to be the financial one, and on this line Pade- 
rewski can challenge the record among pianists. His last Boston 
recital brought in $5,413, the last in New York $7,417, and in 
London $5,000. The great pianist made a sensible move while in 
London by cutting his hair. Such a lion needs no mane. It is 
boldly asserted that Paderewski has no superior as a pianist, not 
even excepting the hitherto invincible Rubinstein. San Fran- 
cisco may prepare for a musical craze next November. 

# * * 

Already the murmur of expectation may be heard concerning 
the coming of Lillian Russell. The "Queen of the Dudes " may 
have • uporarily lost her firm seat on the throne referred to, by 
getting stout, married, and a baby; but her prestige has returned, 
and there is still but one Lillian Russell. She will appear at the 
Baldwin in her great success, La Cigale, also in The Mountebank. 

Jeffreys-Lewis, with Harry Mainhall and her maaager, Arthur 
C. Aiston, will arrive here tomorrow, and on Monday next the 
other imported members of Stockwell's Stock Company, Harry 
Duffleld and his wife (Phosa McAllister), Arthur Byron, and Ralph 
Delmore, will reach the city. 

# * * 

The secession of John Drew from Mr. Daly's company, and the 
choice of his successor, renders interesting the following cruelly 
suggestive paragraph from Sport, Music and Drama: " There is one 
blessing vouchsafed to those who follow the precarious career of 
acting, and that is longevity. Actors live longer than parrots, 
and often rtta : n their faculties unimpaired until yerylate in life.' 
These remarks are suggested by the report that Mr. George Clarke 
is to be Mr. Daly's leading juvenile next season, replacing Mr. John 

Drew. 

* • * 

The opening of a new theatre is a great venture, which is 
naturally watched with interest. The unrestricted expenditure 
of time, money, work and personal supervision on the part of 
Mr. Stockwell in fitting up his new theatre, and the striking and 
eminently satisfactory results, intensify in his case this natural 
interest, and create a genuine pleasure in the knowledge that its 
brilliant opening by the Daly company has brought money to the 
liberal and ambitions proprietor, as well as a fame which has 
given this place of amusement a long start on the road to per- 
manent success. 

Monday, August 1st, will see the beginning of the regular stock 
season at Stockwell's. It will be a notable one, bringing back 
the always favorite Jeffreys-Lewis in new plays and with new 
and handsome costumes, secured during her late London visit. 
She will open in Clotilde, the title role being one peculiarly 
adapted to her powers— thatof a passionate, unreasoning woman, 
whose mentality is dominated by animalism which finds a nat- 
ural outcome in hypocrisy, treachery and revenge. She will be 
ably supported by Stockwell's new company, which includes 



Ethel Brandon, Eleanor Barry, Bene Vinlng. Phosa McAllister. 
Nellie Ynnng. Harry Dulllold. Harry Mainhall, Arthur Living- 
stone. Nick Long, G«org« Henuance, Arthur Byron and L. U. 
Stockwell. A heller Mm of nan. en ooold hardly be arranged. 

Oooi Liquors, excriit" bdIaI compaov and numerous 

comrorta, are thedlaUnguishlnfrcharactertstloa ol the Grand tVntral 
Wine Rooms, of 16 and IB Third straat. This bar i* the most popu- 
lar in town among men who understand and ran appreciate the beBt 
01 wines and liquors, for of such i> the Stock composed. 

John W. Carmauy. of 26 Kearny street, has the most complete 
Btock of Gentleme n's Furnishing Goods for summer wear in the city. 

BALDWIN THEATRE. 

AlHayman iStCo Proprietors. | Alfred Boovier. Manager. 

To-night again ! A genuine triumph ! The heartiest Indorsement ever 
accorded an American Play by a San Francisco audience was given to 

THE LOST PARADISE I 

Admirably presented by CHARLES F» OHM lli'S STOCK COM- 
PANV, of New York. The engagement here will last for three weeks, at 
this theater only. A liviug lesson for the laboring man. A study for all 
classes of theatre goers. 

NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE^ 

AlHayman & Co Proprietors. I J. J. Oottlob Manager. 

Last week of CHARLES I'KOII.il A vs Brilliant Comedy 

"GLORIANA." 

Preceded by the MAJOR'S APPOINTMENT. Monday, August 1. 
"TOXtllO." 

THE BUSH STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Leavitt Proprietor. | Chas. P. Hall Manager. 

Last week MARIE HUBERT FROHMAN, in her great success 

"THE WITCH." 
In the near future LITTLE TIPPETT. 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kbeling Bros — Proprietors and Managers. 

To-night ! Our greatest success ! Have you seen all our great company in 
CLOVER? 

See CLOVER 1 Last week of Miss Julia Kingsley, Surpeutine daucerl 
Next Opera— Nell Gwyane. 
Popular Pricks 25c. and 50c. 

STOCKWELL'S 1hEATRE7~ 

L. R. Stockwell Lessee and Proprietor. 

AlfEllinghousr Business Manager. 

Commencing Monday, July 25th, positively farwell appearance in San 
Frauciaco of 

MR. DALY'S COMPANY. 

Monday evening NANCY «fc CO.; Tuesday evening and Wednesday Mat- 
inee, "LOVE IN TANDEM;" Wednesday evening, "LOTTERY. OF 

LOVE;" Thursday and Friday evenings and Saturday Matinee, "TAMING 
Or THE SHREW;" Saturday evening, "A NIGHT OFF." 

Seats now on sale. Next? Commencing Monday Aug. 1, the JEFFRYS 
LEWIS season, supported by the STOCKWELL COMPANY OF PLAY- 
ERS carefully presenting the Society Drama, "CLOTILDE." 

SH1RUQSC0 WW NORTH PACIFIC UlLUt 



THIRD GRAND EXCURSION 

OF THE SEASON, TO 

ON 

SUNDAY JULY 24, 1892. 



Tickets for the Round Trip, Only $2.00. 



Boat leaves Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market street, at 8:00 a. m. Return- 
ing, train leaves I kiih .t 4 00 f. m 
ticket Office— No. 2. New Montgomery street, and Tiburon Ferry. 



H. C. WHITING, 

General Manager. 



PETER J. MCGLYNN, 

Gen. Pass. 4 Tkt. Agt 



Dl Jl HI AC Kn»bi>, Haines, 
rlnlllUO Bush AGferts, Mothers. 

■ ■" " ~ ^ ^ Oaahorinstallments. Rented 
and Repaired. Please call or Bend for circulara,- 

^ BANCROFT 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1892. 



WHEN BOTH BIDES WIN. 

Good Barnum, whither walks thy ghost? 

Conld yon but make progression 
Down this way, you could get a most 

rnenomenal accession. 
All interest in rival shows 

You rapidly might smother, 
By presenting those ardent foes 

Who swallowed one another. 

O, (( Kelly-Crimmins," tell us now 

Which one of you was beaten, 
And Burns inform the public how 

The eater may be eaten; 
Each claiming triumph, who can tell 

The truth side from the doubt side? 
In swallowing, did you draw — well, 

The inside or the outside? 

It isn't right to leave us so 

Bewilderingly tangled; 
We're very anxious now to know 

Who floats the banner spangled. 
When fights are won we'd like to hear 

The names of those who win it, 
And though you've fallen out, it's clear 

That one of you is in it. 

And which one that may be — ah, yes, 

It's open to opinion: 
But still it worries us to guess 

Who's master and who's minion. 
UnJe°s we speedily are told 

What's the solution, soon it 
Will be impossible to hold 

The G. O. P. a unit. 

Of course the quarrel's settled, yet 

There's many a betting sinner 
Would like most earnestly to get 

A line upon the winner. 
And though the battle red doth cease, 

It's certain at this writing, 
That such a wild and woolly peace 

Is worse than all the fighting. 

THE LOTTERY OBEYS THE LAW. 

IN view of the contradictory rumors circulated regarding the in- 
tentions of the Louisiana State Lottery Company, and in order 
to accurately answer numerous inquiries, a representative of the 
Times-Democrat yesterday interviewed Mr. Paul Conrad, the Presi- 
dent of the Company, with the result expressed below: 

Reporter— Mr. Conrad, it was asserted some weeks ago in the 
Northern newspapers, and the statement his since been revived re- 
cently, that the company is about to remove to Nicaragua, and there 
under a government franchise, open up the business on a grander 
scale than ever. 

President Conrad— I have heard something of this, but there is no 
foundation for it. The company has officially stated that it bows to 
the decision of the Supreme Court, and will respect the laws 

Reporter— Then have you no plans of future action ? 

President Conrad— I cannot state the case more strongly than was 
done at the time the company decided not to attempt to obtain a re- 
newal of its charter. I can only repeat that the company will con- 
tinue in business until the expiration of its present charter and then 
cease to exist. I cannot understand, after all that has been said 
why there should be any confusion in the ntihlin rm'n/l .k»»i,^ 
matter. 

Reporter— Have you any objection to nr 
for the satisfaction of the public? 

President Conrad — None whatever. 

Re ??K tC f^ Sc ; m ,! o£ the Ea3ter » papers, Mr. Conrad, persistently 
assert that the lottery company continues to use the United States 
niails in the prosecution of its business; wiU you kindly tell me if 
that is true? J 

President Conrad-It is utterly untrue. We are obeying the law 
m its letter and spirit, and our agents everywhere are instructed to 
obey it. We are using the express companies only in our business 
and in all our circulars are printed instructions to all persons dealing 
with us to avoid the mails. -Times Democrat, New Orleans La 



be any confusion in the public mind about the 
stating this as a finalty 



WHATEVER may be said against the present German govern- 
ment, it must be acknowledged that it is not alow in taking 
upon itself the full consequences of its anti-Russian policy, as 

evidenced by its rather ostentatious catering to the susceptibilities 
of Turkey. Not very long ago the German authorities went so 
far as to expel from Berlin a Panslavist journalist, M de Wes- 
selitzki, for having stated false rumors as regards the Sultan's 
health. Not to speak of the ludicrous side of the occurrence it is 
very regrettable that Germany, which has troubles enough on 
band, should again take an active part in Oriental politics, which 
if Germany had continued her former wise policy, would be of 
only remote interest to her. The young Emperor's hostility to 
Russia is preparing numerous dangers for the country from dav 
to day of which, no doubt, he did not dream when he started 
upon his perilous road. 




| - j ~~— '-- -^-^-~ 



THE BRENTWOOD^ 



O. F. WILLEY & CO., 

ESTABLISHED 18S8. 

Carriage Builders and Dealers, 

317 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, S. F. 

Agency for Brewster & Co., New York (of Broome St.); 
Henry Hooker & Co., New Haven, Conn.; C. S. Caffrey Co., 
Camden, N, J. ; Henry Killam Co., New Haven, Conn.; Mil- 
lion Ouiet & Cie, Paris, France; H. H. Babeoek Co., Water- 
town, N. Y. ; New Haven Carriage Co., New Haven, Conn.; 
Ohio Buggy Co., Columbus, O. 

HAVE YOU GOT 

Dyspepsia, Bright's Disease, or Dia- 
betes, or do you -want a pleasant, 
healthful drink? If so, buy 

ARCADIAN WAUKESHA WATER, 

Recommended by our best physi- 
cians as the healthiest drink on earth. 
Johnson-Locke Mercantile Company 
Agents, 204 Front St., S. F. 



LOOTS COOKS. 



WILLIAM COOKS. 



MAX COOKS. 



COOKS BROS., 



iisTTEiaioie 



DECOBATOBS. 



Dealers in Stained Glass, Wall Paper, Lincrusta Walton, Paper 

Mache, Parquet Flooring, Moorish Fret Work, 

Frescoing, Wall Mouldings, 

943 and 945 Market St.. between 5th and 6th. San Francisco 

LOUIS CAHEN & SON, 

Rectifiers of Spirits and Wholesale Liquor Dealers- 
Manufacturers of Syrups, Bitters, Cordials, etc. 
Pacific Coast Agents Bethesda Mineral Water. 

418 Sacramento Street, S. F. 

A. LUSK & CO., 

122 DAVIS STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 
Packers of the following celebrated brands: 
CELEBRATED LUSK BRANDS, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY, 

SAN LORENZO PACKING CO 

LAVER, MULLANY & LAVER, 

ARCHITECTS, 

FurniBh plans, specifications, and Superintendence for the construction 
or renovation of dwelling houses, and every description of building. 
Offices 93 Flood Building, Cor. 4th and Market Sts., S. F. 



July 23, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



IMPORTANT NOTICE TO TOURISTS 



Regarding the Placing on Sale of Special Excursion Tlokets. 
San Fracct-co to Lick Observatory and Return 

COUMftNOING July Bib, the Southern Ptclfle Company will 
pl«ce on sale at their ticket offices in San Kranciaco three dis- 
tinct forms of excursion licketa, covering the trip from 8an 
Francisco to Lick Observatory and return. 

These tickets are so arranged as to include all traveling ex- 
penses in connection with these interesting trips, namely, the rail 
transportation between San Francisco and San Jose, the stage 
service. San Jose to Mount Hamilton and return, and the neces- 
sary stop at the Hotel Vendonie, San Jose. 

The two-day. or Saturday and Sunday, excursion ticket re- 
quires that the purchaser leave San Francisco by any one of the 
three following trains from San Francisco, namely: 

vl5 a. m— From Third and Townsend streets depot, via Menlo 
Park. 

7:30 a. « — From ferry lauding, foot of Market street, via 
Niles. 

S:15 a. m. — From narrow-gauge ferry landing, foot of Market 
street, via Newark. 

Early lunch at Hotel Vendonie. 

Leave Hotel Vendonie at 12:30 p. m. for the Observatory, re- 
turning leave Observatory shortly after 10 p. m., and arrive back 
»t San Jose shortly after midnight, when the hotel management 
serve a uice supper. 

The ticket further provides for a night's lodging at the Hotel 
Vendome, and breakfast and lunch Sunday. 

The coupon covering the passage from 8an Jose to San Fran- 
cisco, attached to this book of tickets, will be good on any of the 
regular trains on the Sunday sold for, and also good for stop-over 
privileges en route. 

Rate for this form of ticket, $12. 

The three-day, or Saturday, Sunday and Monday ticket, is very 
similar in its arrangement to the ticket before referred to, with 
this exception, that it gives an additional day's stop at the Hotel 
Vendome. 
Rate for this form of ticket, ?14: 

The third form of excursion ticket is so arranged that it can be 
purchased on any day in the week, and is good on any regular 
train going or returning, and in addition to the stage service be- 
tween San Jose and Lick observatory, it also provides for a stay 
of one week at the Hotel Vendome. 

This ticket will also be good for use within thirty days from 
day of purchase, so that in the event of the purchaser desiring to 
remain longer than one week at the Hotel Vendome, San Jose, he 
can do so by paying proportionate rate for the additional time he 
may remain there. 
Rate for this form of ticket, $26. 



COLONEL POPE AND GOOD ROADS. 



COLONEL A. A. POPE of Boston and bicycle fame has sud- 
denly sprung into some notoriety as a writer and philanthrop- 
ist, through the medium of the Harpers. No one is inclined to quar- 
rel with the gallant Colonel for his hobby, and the press has mag- 
nificently come to his aid by gently patting him, metaphorically 
speaking, on the back, and urging him to go forward in his work 
of providing this country with good roads. Of course, apart from 
the fact that bicycles cannot be used except on good roads, Colo- 
nel Pope's endeavors are thoroughly disinterested; and, it is to 
be hoped, he believes what he says, especially when he observes 
that good roads make good settlements, and it is a mistake to 
first forma settlement and then build a road. The Colonel's head 
is very level, and those who live in the country will appreciate 
the solid sense of such an argument, and there is not a person 
who would not want Colonel Pope as a neighbor. But here Col- 
onel Pope's goodness ceases 1 The Colonel has large properties in 
California, notably at Palm Springs, a place unique in maiy 
respects, climatically and otherwise; but does Colonel Pope build 
good roads on his property? Not a bit of it! There is not a road 
on his rancho, or on any approach to it. The eminent Canadian 
horticulturist who looks after the Colonel's interests, when try- 
ing to have a road built to the depot, said it was the duty of the 
settlers to make the road, to which great enterprise the Boston 
millionaire would subscribe $10 or $20. However, a portion of 
that sum would have to be taken out in work by the Boston 
capitalist's Canadians 1 The articles of the Colonel are not nearly 
so much appreciated by the Colonel's California neighbors as they 
are by those who know nothing of him. The spectacle of the 
Boston Colonel's animals dragging through banks of shifting sand 
his groceries, his employees and farm implements rather invalid- 
ates the value of his monographs which so earnestly plead for 
good roads. There is a strong disposition on the part of the peo- 
ple of Palm Valley to believe that the Colonel sees no outlet there 
for the sale of bicycles, or that he is one of the grand army of 
christians who do not practice what they preach. 

Grandma's made happy with perfect fitting glasses from C. Muller, op- 
tician, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush, Saa Francisco. 



/ETNA 



Situated in Napa County, Cal. 

Reached by :> delightful stage mi.' over the an" 

tiiins. Sixteen Mil.", from i»t. Helena d v 

commodatlons. Ample Untiling Facillthw. 

A l'T.A PURE OF THE PLACE, 

A Large Swlnillj Tank cf Hot Mineral Water 

The waters . .f the .Kln:i Mineral Springs have 
long been celebrated for their wonderful cures in 
cases of Acute and Chronic Dyspepsia, Rheuma- 
tism, In (lam [nation of the Bladder, and 1 aver and 
Kidney Complaints. 

f the water is 98 degrees, and 
1 Carbonic Acid Gas, making 
pleasant to the taste, and giving to the bath a 
most delightful sensation. 

High Altitude ! No Fogs ! No Mosquitoes 

Water from the Springs bottled by the 

AETNA MINERAL WATER CO., 

Telephone 536. Ofllce, 108 Drumin Street, S. F 



u>iu, iiiiKininiiuHin 01 i 

Er\ a ■ Kidney Complaints. 
M fl I The temperature of I 
nil I is highly charged with! 
I ITlL, it pleasant to the tasti 



YOU'RE OUT 

If you don't go to 

NAPA SODA 
SPRINGS 



THIS SUMMER. 



What Do You Want ? 



A Climate that beats Italy. No Malaria or Cold 
Sea Air. Health-giving Mineral Water. Cuisine 
and Service Unexceptionable. Comfortable Beds. 
Table First Quality. Gas and Running Water in 
Every Room. Hot Napa Soda Baths. 
Two Trains Every Day. 
All Visitors are Satisfied. 



ANDREW JACKSON, 



PROPRIETOR. 



Napa Soda Springs P. O. 



The Strathmore Apartment House. 

N. W. Cor. Larkin and Fulton Streets. 

Exclusively for families. First-class in every respect. Ele- 
vator day and night. First-class restaurant in the building. 

Apply to Janitor in the building, or to A. Hayward, No. 224 
California Street. 

HOTEL PLEASANTON, 

Sutter Street, corner Jones. San Francisco, Cal. 

The Largest. Best Appointed, and Most Liberally Managed Family and 
Tourist Hotel in Saa Francisco. Lighted by Electricity throughout. 

Elegantly Furnished Dining Rooms and Parlors for Banquets, Private 
Dinners, Parties, Weddings, etc. 

The Cuisine a Speeial Feature. 

MRS. M. E. PENDLETON. 
^ Proprietor and Manager. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG, 

THE 

MODEL -A.:&»££iI%IC.A.lT C-A-TEIRIER,, 

1206 Sutter Street, 

Telephone 2388. SAN FRANCISCO. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

.A. CJTJIBT HOME 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 

HENRY C. HYDE 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 

MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 

Of Handwriting, InkB, Papers, etc., In the Detection ol ForgerieB , 

Counterfeits and Imitations. 

41 IK CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July 23, 1892. 



THERE has rarely been a more romantic marriage than that of 
Henry M. Herman and Miss Jeanne H. Dyer, the announce- 
ment of which surprised Oakland society this week. The Dyers 
are well known in social circles on both sides of the bay, and the 
bride's father, the late Joseph P. Dyer, will be well remembered 
in San Francisco, for he was the millionaire stockbroker who 
went under with such a crash about five years ago. But to the 
romance. It appears that about thirteen months ago, Miss Dyer 
was visiting friends in Washington Territory. She traveled alone, 
and when she turned her head homewards again she came down 
to Oakland on the Shasta line of the Southern Pacific. On board 
the train was Henry M. Herman, a fifty-year old resident of 
Spokane, who was en route to Oakland with the dead body of 
bis wife. The remains were in tbe baggage car, and he was tak- 
ing them to Mountain View Cemetery for interment. Somehow 
he struck up an acquaintance with Miss Dyer on the cars, and 
ere the journey's end was reached they were actually in love. 
The day after his arrival in Oakland Herman buried his wife. 
The next evening he called on Miss Dyer at the handsome fam- 
ily residence on Jackson street. They became engaged, with the 
understanding that they were not to be married until a year had 
passed, out of respect to his dead spouse. The time of probation 
expired the other day, and then, true to their agreement of a year 
before, they were united in marriage. The immediate relations 
of the bride objected strongly to the match, it is said, for the rea- 
son that they did not like the way tbe engagement was made, 
and also because Herman was so much older than his prospective 
bride. However, love laughs at all such difficulties, and the up- 
shot was that they were married on Friday last. The ceremony, 
however, took place at the residence of the bride's brother, on 
Fourteenth street, instead of at the Dyer mansion, and this has 
led to a good deal of gossip among the favored few who know 
the circumstances of the affair. 

# * * 

The Delmas family are stout adherents of the Santa Cruz beach, 
and every day the three girls are to be seen, sometimes accom- 
panied by their mother; lately by Miss Mamie Harrington, sitting 
by the » sad sea waves " and enjoying the cream of the mascu- 
line element gathered there. 

* * * 

Mrs. Jeremiah Clarke and Miss Lottie are also to be seen daily. 
The Keeney family is well represented. Auburn-haired Mrs. 
Charley and her twin sister, Mrs. Blakeman, and Dr. Jim's wife, nee 
Jones, are all there. Miss Ethel Keeney and Leontine Blakeman 
will join their grandmother, Mtb. William Alvord, at Del Monte 
for the month of August. The railroad has been represented by 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Mills and daughter, and Miss Bessie Hunt- 
ington. 

* * # 

Visitors from the East who have been sojourning at Del Monte, 
declare that Newport or Saratoga cannot show more costly gowns 
or prettier women than are to be found at Monterey. Miss Hager 
and Mrs. Freddie Sharon furnish the one, and scores of buds and 
blossoms the other. 

# • * 

Recent visitors to Fair Oaks report that Major Kathbone is 
waking np that somewhat prosy neighborhood with suggestions 
of a festive character. Rumor goes that the gallant es-Consul 
has been using his persuasive eloquence upon a wealthy maiden 
lady of Menlo Park, with tbe *iew of having her aid in building 
a big tent-like enclosure. " What for ? " asks the outsider. " Can 
it be for a political club? " But the initiated insider replies : " No 
political crowd is expected there; it will be a different kind of 
circus altogether." 

» » « 

The guests at Del Monte have had many regrets at the absence 
there this season of Mrs. Mollie McMullen Latham, but that band- 
some widow declares she is more than contented with her sojourn 
in the mountainous region of Castle Crags. 

Any one at all conversant with the residence locale of London 
will be certain of the disgust of Donald de V. Graham when he 
reads in a recent society item of one of our dailies, that at one 
period (before his arrival in America) he was the pet of the draw- 
ing-rooms of East London. 

* • * 

Winsome Mrs. Collier has been visiting among her city friends, 
and one evening last week chaperoned a theatre party, supple- 
mented by a cosy supper given by Ed. Sheldon. 

# » • 

Pretty Mrs. Marion Wise is the center of a merry circle of Ross- 
Valleyites, who are adepts in knowing how to make the most of 
life as it goes by. This charming little widow ia ably assisted in 
her efforts to make her friends have a good time by her mother 
Mrs. Louise McAllister, whose thorough knowledge of this envia- 



ble art renders it a foregone conclusion they attain their wish. 
# # * 
Society will be glad to know that charming Miss Jessie Bowie, 
who has been an " unknown quantity " in its ranks for over a 
year past, will resume her place in the gay world the coming 
winter. 

THIS 

BRUNSWICK-BALKE- ! 
COLLENDER CO. 




THE MONARCH 

Manufacturers of Billiard and Pool Tables. 

Dealers in Billiard Merchandise Generally. 

Makers of Bank and Office Fixtures. 

Also, Saloon Fixtures, Counters, Coolers, Mirrors, etc., con- 
stantly on hand or made to order. Ten Pin Alleys, Ten Pins, 
Ten Pin Balls, etc. 

653-655 MARKET STREET, S. F. 

COMFORT AND 



ADORNMENT. 



Are the principal objects in furnishing 
a home. We all appreciate comfort- 
able things, and know when appear- 
ances please us. To obtain the best 
results is, however, not so simple a 
matter; it requires not only native 
good taste, but also that command of 
materials and knowledge of details 
which long experience alone can give. 

We have all the requisite materials 
—in Carpets, Furniture and Uphol- 
stery—for any style of furnishing, and 
are prepared to carry out any ideas 
or plans desired, or to assume entire 
charge and responsibility. 

Sketches and estimates on applica- 
tion. 

W. & J. SLOANE & CO., 

CARPETS, FURNITURE, UPHOLSTERY, 

641-647 Market Street. 



FINE DIAMONDS, 

Gold and Silver Watches. 

The newest designs in jew- 
ellery of first quality only, at 
very reasonable prices. 
A. W. STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St, 
Under Masonic Temple. 




-*- 






July 88, 1392. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTER. 



13 



TENNIS AND BASEBALL. 

TENNIS *FHK OakUml Tennis ilub is making an effort la 
1 put forth some -f the beat plftyt-r* on the Coaal 
and certainly if the members improve In the way they have of 
late Ihej will make a very fine showing on Admission I>ay. The 
secretary has issued a circular, stating that in view of the coming 
championship double tournament to he held in September, it bas 
been deemed advisable to inaugurate a continuous tournament 
for double teams on same plan as the Stetson single tournament. 

Hem*. J. Archibald, Carr Neel and W. English will act as a 
committee to place the different teams in their proper order, and 
to decide questions arising during the tournament. Any in- 
formation may be obtained by applying to them. The entries 
will be received by C. Comslock, and the tournament will begin 
shortly. Bates and Carr Neel, \V. English and W. Allen will 
play together, and these two will be very formidable pairs, and 
probably the most likely to carry orf the honors. All four of the 
players are in excellent form, and are keeping in practice, and we 
shall not be surprised to see them in the finals on Admission Day. 
With Tobin and Hubbard away, and the absence of Vernon 
Gray, HotTman and Yates, the California men will have but a 
slim showing, and the most talked of team now is Stetson and 
l'e Long, who, it will be remembered, acquitted themselves very 
creditably at San Rafael. It would be just as well for some of 
the younger members to buckle down to bard work, and make a 
showing at the coming championship. 

The California Club will hold its quarterly tournament on July 
30th, at the club's grounds. The entry so far is J. M. Kilgarif, R. 
J. Davis, W. B. Collier, Jr., W. O'Connor, A. G. Field, H. N. Stet- 
son, J. A. Code, P. C. Moore, R. N. Whitney, G. S. Bradshaw, D. 
E. Allison, Jr., G. B. de Long, R. M. Eyre. E, N. Bee, G. A. 
Loughborough, F. S. Mitchell, A. 8. Keeler, F. de Long, S. Hoff- 
man, Jr. The courts are in excellent condition, and interesting 
games are promised. Never a day goes by wiLhout there being 
quite a number of enthusiasts out on the grounds, and we expect 
to see many more names added to the list, which closes on July 
28tb. W. H. Taylor, Jr., the pride of the club, has played several 
times with Professor Dailie, and is quite up to the form displayed 
by him at San Rafael. He will be sadly missed at the champion- 
ships, butthe memory of bis numerous victories will remain green 
in all annals of tennis. 

Letters received from Chicago state that the Californians have 
bad a very brilliant time, and ihey speak very highly of the kind 
treatment they received. Interest is not as keen as it is on this 
coast, as there were scarcely a hundred spectators on the first 
day, but the play all through was good. Hubbard was especially 
pleased with the turf courts, because the balls bounded higher 
than he anticipated, and he was able to play his favorite cut 
stroke without hindrance. Both he and Tobin will probably 
enter the singles at Newport, and if they do as well as they did 
in the doubles we shall not feel that we are out of it altogether. 
In the single championship round at Chicago Chase defeated 
Ryerson 6-3, 6-2, 6-2, and retains his title, 

In the Beckenham, isng., Championsnip, Barlow beat Meers, 
4-6, 2-6, 8-6, 6-2, 6-3. Miss Shackle beat Miss Jacks, 6-3, 6-1, 
and the brothers Baddeley beat E. Renshaw and Goodbody, 6-0, 
5-7, 6-3. Ernest Renshaw has decided not to play any more in 
singles for the present. Neither be nor his brother were among 
the entrees for the All-England Championship, and this is the 
first time in thirteen years that a championship has taken place 
without either of them being among the competitors. In the 
first round of the All-England games, O. S.Campbell defeated F. 
A. Bowlby, 6-4,6-3, 8-6, but was beaten in the second round by 
A. W. Gore, 6-1, 8-6, 8-6. Campbell is partnered with J. Pim 
(who won the championship of Yorkshire) for the All-England 
doubles, and they certainly ought to make a very strong pair. 
E, W. Lewis will play with Barlow. 

In the London Championship, held July 16lh, Miss Shackle 
won the Queen's cup, and Pirn defeated 0. S. Campbell in the 
semi-final round. 

THE first half of the present baseball season will 
BAdc-dALL. ^ close to-morrow, and at this writing everything 
indicates that the Los Angeles club will win the first champion- 
ship, with San Jose and San Francisco respectively a good second 
and third in the race. For months the public has been wishing 
to have the schedule changed, so that a few games between San 
Jose and Los Angeles would be played in this city. This has been 
done, and these teams will play here this afternoon and to-mor- 
row. The Oaklands and San Franciscoa will play in Stockton 
this afternoon and tomorrow. Should the attendance at the 
games satisfy the League people that Stockton wants 
laeball, the San Jose club will be transferred to Stockton, 
The next season will open in this city next Wednesday, and con- 
tinue until November 27th. Had Oakland played the same ball 
four or five months ago as it has within the last month or six 
weeks, it is more than probable the club would be in at least sec- 
ond if not first place. President Young, of the National League, 
has announced that Jerry Denny has signed with Louisville. 
Denny cannot play elsewhere than in California without obtain- 
ing his release from his manager. If Louisville wants him she 
will have to pay for his release. 



BLACK SILKS. 



French Surahs, 26 inches wide, 
at 73 cents per yard, superior in 
quality, weight, and finish to the 
usual dollar grade. Special values 
in Novelty Surahs and Taffeta 
Glace. 




Ill to 121 Post Street 




GOLD SEAL Eubber HOSE, 

THE BEST MADE. 

Goodyear Rubber Company, 



K. H. PEASE, j .„„„,„ 
S. M. RUMVON.j Agents. 



577 .v 579 Market Street. 



C3-. W. OLABK &c CO., 
653 Market Street, 

-FOE 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and 
Locomotive Works will be held at the office of the Company, southeast 
coiner Beale and Howard streets, San Francisco, on 

Monday, the 1st Day of August, 1892, at the hour of II o'clock A. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
vear and the transaction of such other busiuess as may come before the 
meeting. L - E * M.EAD, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Nevada Queen Mining Company. 
Office of the Nevada Queen Mining Company, San Francisco, July 18, 1892. 
At a meeting of the board of directors of the above named company, held 
this dav a dividend No. 1, of 20 cents per share was declared, payable Mon- 
day July 25 1892. Transfer books will close THURSDAY, July 21, 18y2, 
at the hour of 3 p. m. R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1892. 



/THE. LQPKER-oN^ 



^LJOgSL^Li; ^■^■ifcifc**-^ 



THE little family trouble in the congregation of Calvary Cburch 
maybe only a chastening switch applied as a tender means of 
grace, but the story is interesting as something to talk about, and 
also as an etching of a picturesque and shadowy corner in the 
Church of Christ at the present day. The nub of the trouble is 
that Calvary Church is not drawing large enough congregations 
to keep the coffers full, and it is hard times with the church. A 
deficit of $1,000 for the current fiscal year must be met, and the 
trustees want to borrow the money to meet it. This is not, of 
course, a serious situation, but it is an interesting one, and it is 
made more interesting by the offer which the pastor, Rev. T. 
Chalmers Easton, has just made to reduce his salary from $5,000 
to $4,000 a year to help the rich congregation out. Calvary 
Church is rich, and has the most valuable ecclesiastical plant 
among the Protestant churches of the city, but it seems to be like 
a great shop, with nothing but a little repair work to do because 
business is dull. When the church was built, twenty-five years 
ago, the debt was $60,000. Eight years ago the debt was $29,000. 
Then a hustling debt-raiser named Kimball was brought out frum 
New York, and he nearly wiped the indebtedness out. When 
Alexander Montgomery gave the church $5,000 it was entirely free, 
and the property bad increased in value immensely. The church 
has always done pretty well, but every once in a while the con- 
gregation has concluded that it ought to get up more of a boom. 
When the Rev. Mr. Pitblado, Dr. Easton's predecessor, was in- 
stalled, the members thought they had a stunner, who would 
draw the godly and the godless in large numbers and bring sun- 
shine and flowers. Three years ago the congregation looked 
around for somebody else, and found Dr. Easton in the pulpit of 
another Calvanistic denomination in Newark, N. J. He accepted 
$5,000 a year, which was equal to the largest salary the church 
had ever paid, and he has been here ever since. 

* # # 

Dr. Eiston is undoubtedly a good man, but he seems to have a 
" hoo-doo." Some of the congregation were sorry that he got so 
prominently mixed up in the row over Dr. Ellis, and then he 
tumbled into a very unfortunate position in the Bell murder case. 
It made him enemies and created prejudice both in and out of 
the church. Some of his flock winced at reading constantly of 
the way heir pastor was getting » roasted," and they were sorry 
that Bell's soul had not fallen to the care of some other goud and 
devoted man. It may be that it is because the cburch is in San 
Francisco, bat at any rate the congregations are smaller than 
they are in the Salvation Army hall on Market street, and the 
membership is not increasing. The situation was considered at 
a meeting of the congregation held one week ago last Monday 
evening. It is an unwritten law now that no more debts shall be 
incurred, and the request of the trustees to borrow $1,000 was 
met by a decision to raise it by special subscription. About $250 
has now been subscribed. The main purpose of the inciting was 
to consider the possibility of reviving the life of the church, and 
getting larger congregations. Definite action of any kind was 
postponed until the annual meeting in September. 

* * * 

At this meeting an interesting letter from the pastor to » My 
dear little flock " was read. He said that his audiences had not 
decreased numerically. He made an interesting contribution to 
the discussion of the burning question, » How shall we fill our 
churches?" by saying, " Nor will your pastor condescend to in- 
troduce sensational methods and degrade the church and minis- 
try to win a crowd of hearers who neither pay nor pray." Dr. 
Boston adds his solution of the difficulty. "In this," he says, 
" most of you will naartiiy sustain me. I cannot, however, refrain 
from saying that a warmer sort of social feeling among our mem- 
bers, a kinder reception to strangers, aud a thorough canvass of 
the congregation by the pew committee, to have seats rented by 
the congregation, and also a systematic ushering that would ex- 
press a cordial welcome to all who worship with us. would have 
gone far to relieve us from our present condition." He ended by 
proposing that his salary be reduced to $4 000, beginning with 
ihe coming fiscal year. Many of the congregation are warm 
supporters of Dr. Easton, and they refer to another element as 
the " kickers." Some of the kickers have withdrawn, and many 
sittings have been given up and the holders gone ti other churches, 
tiougti the total reduction in pew rents in the past ; e .r was 
only $220. There is a subdued feeling among many of ttie con- 
gregation that Dr. Easton has been injudicious and "unfortunate. 



The problem of getting in more of the sort who will " pay or 
pray" remains a serious one, and is being seriously discussed. It 
is interesting to know that it coats this little flock about $12,000 a 
year to worship God according to John Calvin. This ia the run- 
ning expense, exclusive of payments to general boards, and of 
the Sunday-scbool and internal organizations. Besides the pas- 
tor's salary there is the choir at $2,400; church notices in the 
Sunday morning papers cost $163 last year; pew rents yielded 
$6,38G and collections $2,756. The church has soft red-cushioned 
pews; a great pipe organ thunders as impressive and beautiful 
harmonies as any organ can; the carpets prevent disturbing 
sounds, and the mellow light that steals through the big windows 
subdues the soul and allures it to devotions. It seems strange 
that such a church shoul 1 languish for patronage and put up with 

a $4,000 pastor. 

■* * » 

There is always a fellow-feeling among those who love dogs, 
those most faithful friends of man, and for the interest it may 
awaken among the possessors of some favorite Towzer or Tray, 1 
relate these facts, which recently came under my observation. 
A little girl, living in the city, picked up a stray dog one day on 
the street and took the puppy home, where it soon became a 
great favorite. The dog was greatly attached to its little mistress 
and showed the greatest intelligence, evidently understanding 
nearly everything said to it. It followed the child all over the 
house, and trotted after her wherever she went. One day the 
dog was taken across the bay, away from the child it loved. It 
was noticed that the pup soon became restless. It prowled 
around the house, whining incessantly, and almost visibly wore 
away. It's never-ending whines and cries soon became a nuisance, 
and one day the mistress of the house determined to stand it no 
longer, and as the dog sat howling in a corner, she said to him, 
"See here, this thing must stop. We have stood your noise jnst 
as long as we intend to. Now, out you go." She turned to open 
the door to eject the pup, but as she did, the poor beast fell over, 
dead. Now, did that dog die of grief for his little mistress ? 
That's a question which now concerns the members of two 
households. The dog did not see the child from the day it was 
taken to Oakland. There are numerous instances on record of 
dogs dying of grief, and their is nothing remarkable in the case 
of the local puppy. 

# « ♦ 

The Christian workers of Oakland seem to be doing consider- 
able good work. One of the most recent objects of their assist- 
ance has been Rev. Mr. Kingdon, who, several years ago, was a 
minister in good standing in one of the Oakland Baptist Churches. 
He is a college graduate and a man of fine personal appearance. 
During his ministry, and while he was very popular, he was 
prostrated by sickness, and the attending physician prescribed 
brandy for him. He became a slave to the liquor habit, and went 
very low, being seen several times in the prisoners' dock of the 
Police Court. All efforts to reform him were in vain. When 
Francis Murphy was in Oakland the fallen minister signed the 
pledge, and resisted the craving for liquor determinedly, until he 
found it was too strong for him. He then threatened to commit 
suicide. The temperance workers assisted him in time, and he 
is now at the Keeley Institute at Los Gatos, and is improving 
rapidly. 

# # » 

In this column, two weeks ago, there was a paragraph refering 
to Webster .Tones tread'ng on the corns of a tailor stopping at the 
Hotel Rafael. Since the paragraph appeared the report has cir- 
culated throughout the hotel that it referred to Mr. Charles Lyons, 
one of the guests. Now, as he is not the person at all whom the 
item was meant for, this is inserted to correct the erroneous im- 
pression. We regret that any one should have tried to apply the 
paragraph to him. 

# * • 

There is an outbreak of colored glasses on the noses of the 
students in the normal class of the new Girls' High School. A 
visiting County School Inspector this week was so struck with 
the extraordinary appearance of at least fifty out of eighty dam- 
sels, otherwise buxom and healthy-like, that he called upon Miss 
Fowler, the worthy preceptress of the budding schoolmarms, for 
an explanation. Her reply was easily understood. Pointing to 
two immense uncurtained and unobscured windows to the right 
of her platform, and to the array of windows along the side of 
the room, also to her right, the cause for protecting the eyes of 
the pupils was very evident. All the seats necessarily face these 
windows because of the position of the rostrum, and the incon- 
venience, if not pain to the eyes, called forth the unbecoming 
remedy Mr. John Swett and Mr. Babcock in good time recently 
called the attention of the architects to the danger of so arranging 
the seats, but they were disregarded, apparantly. The gentleman 
from the county expressed himself as thankful that they knew 
better than that in Milpitas. 

* # * 

There is no truth in the rumors of a combination between the 
Cosmos and Bohemian Clubs. The story arose from a ren ari 
made by a member of the latter club to the effect that it might 
be beneficial to both clubs if they would join forces; but beyond 



7 



Julv 2^, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS I BTTER. 



[6 



that there is nothing Id it. Tin- Bohemian Olob la jusl now In ■ 
audition, and with it-. new .-hib boii!»e. summer qu*rl«n 
and prospective increase id membership, II will continue to liu- 
ioa Is one ol the qaiet, »Uld ctaba ol lown al 
least it has that reputation, though some of Us members who are 
solid, respectable men of business are anything but ■•qatet." 
They are a little bit more quiet nowadays than ever. Botue 
time ago a blooded Englishman made his headquarters at the 
club, and after talking familiarly of various tilled nonentities 
" touched" many of the club men for various sums, and then 
left town. Therefore the Cosmos men have since been very 
quiet. San Francisco has become quite a city of clubs. There 
are probably more big and strong elnbs here than in any other 
city in the country of the same si/.e. Most of our clubs are good 
ones, and compare favorably with the most famous of the Bast. 
This is not a city of homes; there are too many public and 
private hotels, and fashionable lodging bouses and flats, furn- 
ished rooms, etc. The homes are in the minority by far; there- 
fore the clnbs flourish. 



Frank D. Willey, the dashing young oarsman, was mourned as 
dead in Sausalito last Saturday night. Frank owns the finest 
row-boat on the bay (so he says), and every fine evening may be 
seen rowing about the Sausalito water-front. It seems the boat- 
keeper took his wife out for a row last Saturday night in Frank's 
boat, and was capsized. Those who witnessed the accident sup- 
posed it was Mr. Willey and his best girl, and efforts were made 
to save tbem. A steam launch picked up the unfortunate boat- 
keeper and his wife, who hastened to their home. The boat was 
towed ashore, and soon inquiries were made for Mr. W.lley. No 
one had seen him, and the report spread that he was drowned. 
It was decided to keep the news from his folks unt the morn- 
ing. His good qualities and failings were all discussed by sym- 
pathetic friends, and many regrets at bis early death were ex- 
pressed. Frank was in this city, and knew nothing of his kind 
friends' distress. Sunday morning's first boat took him over to 
Sausalito, and those of his friends who were at the boat grabbed 
him and plied him with questions as to how he escaped. He was 
thunderstruck, but soon managed to get details enough to enjoy 
a hearty laugh. It is needless to remark that all Sausalito's fair 
ones are overjoyed that Frank is still alive, but as it costs money 
properly to express an appreciation of the gratification of friends 
at findidg the supposed defunct very much alive, the Willey ex- 
pense account has of late largely increased. 
» • ■ 

Rev. J. W. Ellis, the former pastor of the Central Presbyterian 
Tabernacle, who had the famous battle with the Presbytery, and 
was deposed by tbem, has now appeared in a new guise. He is 
charged by a young Englishman, named Mr. Poulter, with fraud 
in connection with the operation of a clock game in the pool- 
room in the General Keyes building, on Stockton street. Ellis 
organized the California Promoters' Association, the object of 
which was, as announced by its business cards, " to buy and sell 
stocks," " interest capital in paying investments," and to trans- 
act other business of a somewhat remunerative but equally pre- 
carious nature. This association, unfortunately for itself, has an 
office on Kearny street, which places it in bad odor at once, for 
nearly every company of this sort which was ever located on 
Kearny street had something crooked in connection with it. 
Poulter says that he was hired by Ellis to go to the " Public Ex- 
change," the General Keyes gambling hall, and there to gamble 
on the returns from the phonograph machine. This is one of the 
numerous sure-thing machines which wins dollars from the un- 
wary. It does not come within the lines of the law against the 
maintenance of games of chance. There is no chance in it for 
the player — he is sure to lose. Poulter says he was paid $3 a day 
for his endeavors to beat the game. He made two very fortunate 
buys, and gave Dr. Ellis the returns. He now says that the 
former clergyman cheated him out of $4. Of course, Poulter 
does not amount to much. No professional gambler does,, and 
the young Englishman may find it hard to make people believe 
that the man who so very recently was in the pulpit of 
a leading church in the city would absolutely steal from 
his employee. Ellis yet has many friends in the city — people 
who believe he did not receive a fair show in his recent troubles 
with the Presbytery, and that if he had his rights he would be 
one of the ablest laborers in the vineyard of the Lord. Yet that 
does not change the fact that Dr. Ellis, the former clergyman, is 
a frequenter of agambing hall, where games of chance are played. 



I have seen the preacher go furtively Into the Public Bxofaange 

il limes. He always seemed to b« aoxtoat not to i ■■ 
for he looked carefully op am) down the street before entering 
the ball. Still, the idea that he wished to avoid being seen may 
be only an Impression gained by his genial manner on the it reel, 
for be Ifl I man who looks sharply at every QmJ who passes, and 
seems ever on the alert. He isof medium height, light build and 
apparently about IT. or 17 years old. On the siren be wears a 
cutaway BOll and alight blue slouch hat— a cigarette hat, so-called. 
In all, he looks more like an old sporting man than ■ clergyman. 
It is, of course, surprising to learn that he has openly engaged in 
the business in which it is said he is now interested, for In- Is 
possessed of no mean ability, and ought to be able to place him- 
self to advantage in some occupation which would be above sus- 
picion. Poulter, who charges Ellis with cheating him, may press 
the charges against the doctor. 

» « m 

Dr. Ellis is working on a voluminous history of his long and 
fierce battle over the charge that he had misappropriated funds of 
the Central Presbyterian Tabernacle. Those who have been al- 
lowed to look through the big file of manuscript, which will be 
in the printer's hands in a few weeks, say that he "roasts" his 
accusers and persecutors right and left. He squarely charges 
that Rev, Dr. Easton and Hugh Eraser committed willful and de- 
liberate perjury in their testimony, in order to secure a convic- 
tion, because if Dr. Ellis were acquitted, they would have been in 
a mean position. He says that in their examination of himself 
they sought in every way to entrap him by sharp methods, " a les- 
son which the ■ little Dominies' learned from the Jews two thou- 
sand years ago." He asserts that when his civil suit for 
damages was dismissed because sufficient malice was not shown, 
some of the jury were indignant, and told him that a verdict for 
$50,000 had been formed in their minds. " The devil," writes Rev. 
Dr. Ellis, " is in the preacher [and he ought to know], and in the 
church, and in the Presbytery, and when the Eastons and the 
Frasers and others of that ilk arise they should be driven out and 
into the swine, and the swine into the sea." The author is par- 
ticularly bitter against Dr. Easton, and never misses an oppor- 
tunity to hit him a rap, nor minces his language. He says that 
one purpose of the book will be to show the injustice of submit- 
ting a criminal charge to a church court, for it is impossible for 
such men as the preachers to understand the law of evidence, 
and the trials are swayed by prejudice and bitterness. He swears 
that he will never let up on his enemies. 

If one wishes a good meal, excellent in every particular, he should 
visit the Original Swain's Bakery, at 213 Sutter street, which enjoys 
the well-earned reputation of being the best and most popular restau- 
rant in the city. The menu always includes all the delicacies which 
make glad the heart of the epicure. Hence the wide popularity of 
the establishment. 



Mothers be Sure and Use "Mrs. Wiuslow's Soothing Syrup 1 
children while Teething. Price. 25 cents a bottle. 



for your 



C. Marey L Liger Belair's 

NUITS, 

BURGUNDY WINES. 



Chablis, (Wbife) 
" 1878 



Chambertin, Clos-Vougeot, 

Beaune, Pommard, 

In Cases, Quarts aud Pints. 

G. M. PABSTMANN SOHN, 

MAINZ & HOCHHE1M, 

RHINE WINES. 

Geisenheimer Liebfraumilch Hochheimer (own growth) 

Marcobrunner Kuedesheimer Johannisberger, Schloss 

Koenigin Victoria Berg (bronze Label) Steinberger, Cabinet, 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents, 314 Sacramento St , S. F. 





OUTING SUITS-SITS, 
TENNIS SUITS-SHIRTS, 



LADIES' 

WAISTSi 



ST7 TO 37 KEA.BUT STEEET. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1892. 




THE more closely Judge Hebbard's decision in the Hale & Nor- 
cross case is studied, the more glaring become the discrep- 
ancies between the evidence presented during the trial, and the 
findings of fact on which the enormous judgment of over one 
million dollars against the defendants is based. The results are 
not calculated to strengthen public confidence in our local courts, 
and the disagreeable question suggests itself, if such palpable 
errors creep into one decision, involving not money alone, bat 
personal character, why not in others where the amounts at 
stake are not of sufficient magnitude to excite more than pass- 
ing interest. Last week the News Letter called attention to the ex- 
traordinary methods of calculating ore values, by which the judge 
arrived at a deficit of $1,011,835, which is charged as the amount 
of damage which the stockholders suffered by the action of the 
defendants. It was there shown that against all the evidence in- 
troduced on technical points regarding the reduction of ores, the 
percentages of 103S and discounts, that the court simply con- 
tented himself with taking a car sample value of ore produced 
from the mine, and deducting $10 therefrom, in order to obtain 
the actual value in bullion. He ignores altogether, for some rea- 
son or other, the fact which was brought strongly to his attention 
in the course of the trial, that this reduction of $10 per ton on 
the out-put should have been made for the difference between 
car sample values and the battery assay value. The actual bullion 
returned was only at the rate of 74 per cent, of the battery assay 
value, to be still further reduced by an allowance for a discount 
of 35 per cent, and over for silver on two-thirds of the total out- 
put, which Judge Hebbard asks the defendants to account for on 
a gold basis. Now as to the percentage returned on 
the battery assay value of the Hale & Norcross ore 
crushed at the Nevada mill. During the period covered by the 
complaint the actual bullion recovered and accounted for to the 
company was at the rate of 74 per cent, of the battery assay 
value of the ore. During the early portion of last March the ore 
worked at the Nevada mill before the company changed hands, 
returned as high as 81 58-100 per cent., but this included the final 
clean-up, which made the percentage of returns larger than other- 
wise. Since then, under the new management, we believe that 
the work done at the Brunswick mill was as honest and econom- 
ical as possible with the appliances at command, and yet the 
average percentage of the battery assays returned in bullion 
during the four months' run was only 6G 6 10 per cent. To show the 
vast difference which exists between the pulp assay value of the 
ore and the actual value of the bullion returned, we will quote 
the working results under the new management, which are proof 
against criticism, for the last sixty days when the mill was in 
operation. In May last the bullion return by battery sample was 
valued at $29,431; the actual bullion value was only $19,095.07, at 
the rate of 68 85 per cent. Last month there were worked 1,815$ 
tons of ore, the value of which by battery assays was $31,159.30. 
The actual yield in bullion from thi3 pulp was $19,810, at the rate 
of 63 58-100 per cent, on the battery assays. This yield, too, in 
bullion, was subject to the still further reduction of at least 
35 per cent, silver on two-thirds of the product, which makes the 
difference in the returns from the battery samples of ore and 
market value of the bullion still wider. We merely quote these 
figures to show what the company did under what is generally 
admitted the very best of management. With the most rigid care 
and economy, their average return in bullion was only 66 6-10 
per cent, on the pulp assay value of the ore, as against the 74 
per cent, returned by the mill may who have fallen under the 
ban of Judge Hebbard. 

f ? ? 

ONE of the most glaring evasions of fact in this new "Comedy 
of Errors," is to be noted in connection with the transfer of 
the management and responsibility of the Vivian mills to the de- 
fendants in the action. There were 4,817* tons of Hale & Nor- 
cross ore worked at this concern during the period covered by the 
complaint, and Judge Hebbard in his findings declared that this 
was done under the control and management of the defendants. 
In his opinion he admits that there is no direct testimony con- 
necting the defendants with crushing ore in the Vivian mili, and 
Mr. Baggett, attorney for the plaintiff, in his final argument, as 
well as during the trial, admitted in open court that there was no 
evidence connecting defendants with the reduction of this ore. 
Yet in face of all this, Judge Hebbard rinds that the defendants 
are responsible for the actions of the owners of this mill, and in 
summing up he charges them tor bullion not returned. The bul- 
lion product of this 4,817J tons of ore is included in his apparent 
deficit of $768,000, and in addition the defendants are asked to 
pay as damages a forfeit of profits at the rate of $2.50 per ton on 
all ores worked at the Vivian mill, while in point of fact the de- 
fendants, each and all of them, never owned, controlled, nor 
leased the mill tjen, or at any time, nor had anything to do, 
whatsoever, with it or the handling of the ores sent there from 



Hale & Norcross. There is little room for argument on a proposi- 
tion of this kind. It is surely enough to hold a person responsi- 
ble for matters in which they are or may have been directly con- 
cerned, but litigants are taking big chances before a court 
which simply blots out evidence of all kinds in reviewing a case 
preparatory to rendering a decision, and where Tom Jones is lia- 
ble to be held pecuniarily responsible for the actions of Bill Smith. 
There may be a great deal of law about a decision of the kind, 
but there is little common sense. Why should the owners of the 
Nevada mill be compelled to foot the bills of rival mill owners, or 
beheld responsible for their actions? This is the view Judge 
Hebbard takes of the case, and in consequence the sum total 
of the judgment is swelled by the addition of 4,817* tons of ore, 
valued by a strange method of calculation, and augmented by a 
fine of $2.50 per ton, just for the sake of appearances. This is 
another and not the least striking feature of this noteworthy de- 
cision. 

$ 1 1 

AGAIN, at another stage of his review, in discussing the work- 
ing of the slimes and concentrates of Hale & Norcross for 
the benefit of the mill companies, Judge Hebbard says: "The 
exact amount of profits derived therefrom is uncertain, but Mr. 
1 Williams admits $28,000 in profits." Mr. Williams never ad- 
i mitted anything of the kind. The only testimony given on this 
! point was the result of an examination of the books made by Mr. 
Williams under a stipulation between attorneys Baggett and 
Woods at Virginia City. The report made at that time showed 
that only a few batches of sulpburets and slimes had been 
I worked, and that the gross receipts were $14 859 03, without any 
| charge as expenses for working, and including profits on ores 
I from all sources; ores from Chollar, Potosi and other mines 
1 worked at this mill. Judge Hebbard also finds in reference to 
I the mixing of low and high grade ores, the books of the company 
show that something like 3,500 tons of ore were hoisted from the 
mine and crushed at the mill, the testimony being referred to 
that ore assaying less than $12 to $14 by mine assay will not pay 
to mill. To arrive at this, Judge Hebbard simply takes the low 
assays of a particular line of cars, never taking an average which 
would have shown c'early that no ores weretaken from the mines 
which averaged less than from $12 to $14 per ton. When 
ore is hoisted from a Comstock mine, two samples are al- 
ways taken for car assays. One of these is taken immediately after 
the car reaches the top, and is placed in what is known as the 
surface box. The second is, taken when the car arrives at the ore 
bouse, both being finally- assayed for the different returns which 
are afterwards figured upon for a general average. A few ex- 
amples of how these samples run will show the wide range between 
the samples taken from a car of ore. Each set of figures repre- 
sents a day's work. Ore house box, $60.97; surface box, same 
car, $26.60. Ore house box, $8.92; surface box, $27.85. Ore 
house, $111.92; surface box, $25 60. Ore house, $120.43; surface 
box, $22,70. Ore bouse, $5 05; surface, $22,70. Ore house, $26 68; 
surface, $114.00. All of these daily returns were taken from the 
same car, and an average taken between the surface and ore 
house figures gives the average of the car. Judge Hebbard can- 
not show by following this system, universally adopted at all 
mines as a check on ore values, tbat there was any ore average of 
such a low grade as he figures out in his decision. 

{SI 

FROM the foregoing it will appear that the determination upon 
the part of the defendants in the Hale & Norcross case to im- 
peach Judge Hebbard is about the only course to adopt, which 
which will open up and develop the inside workings of the case, 
and explain the real cause for such an unaccountable calculation 
and misconstruction of facts presented in evidence, which has 
resulted in a verdict for an outrageous amount in the form of 
damages. Every good citizen is interested in an explanation of a 
case in which a judge deliberately ignores facts brought out be- 
fore him in testimony, and renders a judgment which the merest 
tyro in mining can criticise. It is to be regretted that the Gov- 
ernor did not call an extra session of the Legislature, so that the 
impeachment proceedings might have been commenced without 
delay. The sooner a question of such an important nature — in- 
volving the reputation of the Bench — is decided the better it will 
be for the community. 

T $ $ 

IT is often remarked by old mining men that it is not a bad sign 
of the value of a mine when there is a lawsuit or two hanging 
over it. It looks as if there was something to fight about. The 
latest from the new camp to the north of Kingman, in Arizona, 
is to the .effect that lawyers, local and from San Francisco, are 
on the ground, knee-deep in legal conflicts over possessory rights. 
The same despatches seem to infer that a good deal of what has 
been said of the new El Dorado has been rather <» too previous." 
Water and all the necessaries of life are hard to get, and the rich 
ore seems to be a bit scarce also. 

?$ * 

THE CarboDdale coal and mineral lands now offered in London 
are hampered with law suits. A purchase under such condi- 
tions means a loss ultimately to the investors. 



July 23, 1892. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




17 



'Hearthe Crier:" -What ihedeiil ultbou?' 
■ One lh»t will plftr the lcrll,»lr.wUhyoD." 



L« »NG before Tom Flynn became the proud editor of a weekly 
paper, or ever dreamed of owning such a stud as his fast-trot- 
ting, razor-backed ateed •■ Bally Hooly," he was the writer of 
short paragraphs on a mining stock journal. It was while pur- 
suing this occupation that Mr. Flynn became connected with 
tbe show business, and this is how it happened: Mr. J. O'Connor 
Roach, an actor, got stranded from Australia upon these shores. 
As be bailed from tbe beautiful and historic city of Limerick, 
where Mr. Flynn tirsl saw the light, a bond of friendship was 
at once established between those exiles. One day Mr. Roach 
rushed into Flynn's office, breathless with excitement, " Oh, Tom, 
Tom." be said. "Sure if I only bad a little capital, me fortune 
would be made!"' Now, Mr. Flynn, even at that age, was a 
thrifty soul, and never averse to making an honest dollar on a 
boat race or a sprinting match ; so he pricked up his ears and 
hearkened to Roach's plain, unvarnished tale. It was simply 
this: Another countryman from the wilds of Connemarra had a 
panorama of picturesque Ireland » in soak." To release it and 
open a show on their own account was Mr. Roach's scheme. He 
would play •* Barney the Guide," and Mr. Flynn would read the 
lecture to the delighted spectators as the beauties of tbe isle un- 
folded themselves. To all these things did capitalist Flynn pleas- 
ingly incline, with one reservation, however, and it was that he 
would look after the box-office himself, thus presenting another 
evidence of that caution which has to-day made him the Jay 
Gould of the Pacific Coast journalists. The show was adver- 
tised, the doors thrown open, and Mr. Flynn's smiling, expect- 
ant face was framed in tbe redwood margin of the cash- 
hole. The printers on Mr. Flynn's paper, numbering about five, 
bied them to tbe show, concluding, as a matter of course, they 
would pass in free. All with the exception of one ancient typo, 
who had been associated with Mr. Flynn before. " Get ready 
your coin, boys," be said, " you'll want every cent of it if you're 
going to pass into Tom's show." "Oh, nonsense," said a fresh- 
hearted lad named Charley, "Tom wouldn't expect anything 
from poor fellows like us." The discussion grew so warm that 
pools were made whether or no Mr. Flynn would demand tariff 
at the door. One of the party of pleasure-seekers was to find 
out, and the choice fell upon Charley, the confiding. He was to 
go ahead and feel the way. He walked blithely to the box office 
where Mr. Fiynn was toying with piles of silver and laid down a 
half dollar with a smile, as if it was a good joke, that the money 
would be immediately returned to him. But with a steely glitter 
in his eye, Mr. Flynn scooped in the dross, while Charley, 
with a look of horror in his face, cried out to the expectant crowd 
below, "Be heavens, Mike, he took the half." The typographical 
staff of the Daily Exchange did not attend the panorama that 
evening. They blew their money in on beer. 

(( T DID not like to go to the church to beg, but simply can't 
1 get any work to do, and was starving to death. I thought 
I could get some help there, if only a piece of bread and a place 
to sleep. Rev. Mr. Buck very kindly came up to roe and said; 
< Well, my young man, are you saved? Do you want religion? I 
am glad to see you.' I told him I was very hungry, and wanted 
something to eat, and would he be so kind as to help me. He 
looked at me for a moment, and then went and got me a card, on 
which were the words, * Give Nothing to Beggars.' " I swear by 
the Twelve Apostles, that one might ransack the city for a year 
before he could dig up a finer example of the religion most in 
vogue to-day. Religion on an empty stomach is rather nause- 
ating than otherwise. But this vapid, tinseled, mouthing of 
the time, for which lazy, black-coated loafers in the vineyards 
are paid high salaries, resembles the true religion of Christ about 
as much as a camel does a canary-bird. I use the word camel ad- 
visedly, because I regard his transit through the eye of a needle 
as probable as that any of these indolent hypocrites shall ever 
rest In Abraham's bosom. They are lively traders in stones when 
bread is demanded, and will invariably proffer a serpent when a 
call for fish comes into question. All the use one can find for 
them is to cast them like rats into the theological pit, and get 
some good agnostic bulldog to worry them to death. 

NIGHT in the Western Addition. The pale stars looked coldly 
down upon a group of three who had halted under the 
shadow of the Oriel Hotel. There was a dejection in their mien 
which attracted the attention of the sympathetic patrol roan, and 
led to the gentle inquiry, " Have yez lost anything?" The trio 
gazed upon the kindly guardian of the night with streaming eyes. 
They were the three deposed kings of the Democracy, Nealon, 
Blanclifield and Corbett, mourning over their departed greatness, 
and waiting for the anvil chorus that never came, announcing 
the return of Christopher. Bat not even their once powerful 
chief might ever hand them the reins of power again. 



SAT ll our bugaboo ? 

Steamer day. 
What makes tbe city blue? 

M<>amer day. 
Rusty, moss-grown, out of date, 
The ulcer of tbe State. 
It sticks to us like fate; 

Steamer day. 

What makes Eastern merchants smile? 

Steamer day. 
Grin, and ridicule our style? 

Steamer day. 
Why should they get inside, 
And swim upward with the tide, 
While we fossils sit astride 

Steamer day. 

To this idol of the past, 

Steamer day, 
Our prosperity we're cast. 

Steamer day, 
Like the old man of the sea. 
Clings, and will not set us free, 
Yet we humbly worship thee, 

Steamer day. 

Let us bury fast and deep 

Steamer day, 
In a long unbroken sleep, 

Then we may 
Trade as other merchants trade, 
And cease slipping down the grade, 
Shaking off the fools that made 

Steamer day. 

TALK about the elixir of life, about old and weary men 
growing young in an hour, and renewing the follies of their 
youth, about the rust of age falling off one, as scales fly from 
hammered iron, Colonel William Doolan has got the combina- 
tion, and it exists in the Vichy Springs, just three miles from 
Ukiah. In the first place, the journey to the Springs by the 
North Pacific Coast Broad-gauge is delightful. On to the north 
through a rich and most picturesque country, through glowing 
orchards, and emerald vineyards, and yellow grain, and far- 
stretching pasture lauds. Herds of fat cattle dot the hillsides. 
The air is clear, warm and bracing, and soon the azure thread of 
the Russian river is reached, and the road, winding along ihe 
rocky banks of that fine stream, presents at every turn beautiful 
and ever varying vistas of scenery. And then comes Ukiah and 
the Vichy Springs. Babble about champagne baths ! Why never 
grape juice sparkled and foamed over the delighted body as this 
marvelous water, velvety, electric, all embracing, incomparably 
invigorating. It gushes from the rock an eternal stream, never 
changing its volume, proving the wealth of the mysterious 
caverns which have been its home for centuries. It is charged 
with vitality; it permeates the system. Every drop is a mole- 
cule of electricity. One may go in fatigued and languid, but 
twenty minutes in this bath of life sweeps away all aches and 
weariness as a loose garment, and you emerge strong, craving 
effort and full of peace. Then the surroundings are perfect — 
shade, flowers, trees, calm. I should like to put Asa Fiske and 
Davy Jacks through a course of these baths. I think it would 
not alone make better men physically of them, but clean away a 
large percentage of their mental dirt. 

A MEDICAL journal loudly clamors against the custom of phy- 
sicians advertising, and protests that it smells quackery in 
the air. The accused parties come back at the editor and declare 
that he has been presented with a piano, to which be blatantly 
invites tbe attention of the wives and daughters of his readers 
to try, and be convinced that its tones are the most soothing in 
the world. Alack-a-day, the wily medical advertiser is not he 
who boldly proclaims in the newspapers that he has a specific 
for all evils. It is the sly Jobling sort of fellow who whispers 
into the reporters ear that he has just completed an excellent 
operation, bids bim to the refreshment table and begs his guest 
not for worlds to mention the little incident in his columns. The 
other members of theprofession gnash their teeth, but the cunning 
man of pills has secured his "ad" without infringing upon tbe 
etiquette of the guild. 

THE man who drank the pint of champagne and then com- 
mitted suicide, evidently made up his mind that he must be 
talked about in the newspapers. He has been paragraphed now 
for about a week, and received a distinction never granted to the 
ordinary crank who shuffles off without leaving anything more 
remarkable behind him than a note to the Coroner. 

POOR old Montgomery street has got the heaves again. No 
sooner did its turbulent bosom receive a dose of wires, and 
tbe basaltic sea return to its normal condition, than its vitals are 
ripped open anew by some of the necessities of the Mills build- 
ing. May the Lord deal with its enerous as they have done with 
this venerable thoroughfare. 



!^BBWB^IP 



.'■_. ■_-'. -';-- 'rr~ 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1892. 







REAL estate men have had plenty to talk about. In the two 
matters which have been the absorbing topics of conversa- 
tion unequal assessments have been the subjects. In both cases 
the evidence of temporary mental aberration have been strong. 
but particularly is this the case in tne » report" of the Sixteenth 
street extension commission. Anything more flagrantly inequita- 
ble than this precious document it would be difficult to discover. 
There is absolutely no need of the opening of the street. Seven- 
teenth street when opened will for years to come afford all the 
required means of communication between the Mission on one 
side and the Park on the other. Its opening will require far less 
labor, as its extension will cross south of Mount Olympus at the 
lowest point of these hills. The assessment for it has been made 
with much fairness, and though there are some little inpqualities 
the work of the commission bears on the face of it the evidence s 
of conscientious effort to do justice. Sixteenth street, which 
runs almost directly into Mount Olympus, will cost an enormous 
sum to open. The work is wholly unnecessary for the time 
being, and the report of the extension commission is waste paper. 
The Board of Supervisors can do but one thing with the report- 
reject it. This it should do very promptly ; on August the 2nd. 
Many instances might be cited from the "report," in wbich 
favoritism of the grossest kind has been displayed, especially to 
influential persons politically and to large corporations, while 
other cases of " cinch " equally gross can be with ease selected. 
Drury Melone owns two lots on the northwest corner of Seven- 
teenth and Castro streets. His assessment for the opening of 
Seventeenth is $99, and for the opening of Sixteenth street, which 
would benefit him but little, comparitively speaking, he is as- 
sessed $230; George W. Deane owns property just west of Mr. 
Melone's, on Seventeenth street, and his assessment for the open- 
ing of his own street is about half what it is for Sixteenth street; 
R. D. Chandler is charged $300 for Seventeenth street opening 
and $650 for Sixteenth, bis property fronting on the former street. 
Ex-Supervisor Barry, a member of the " solid nine " board of 
evil memory, is dealt with very gently, and his assessments are 
trivial compared with those of his neighbors on each side, who 
are less known in political circles. The Sixteenth-street Com- 
mission has been at work twenty-seven months, and its expenses 
amount to $71,500; the Seventeenth-street has finished its labors in 
five months, at a cost of $7,467. By the virtual presentation of 
the required ground for street purposes by Mrs. Emily T. Pope 
and Adolph Sutro, the entire Seventeenth street assessment dis- 
trict is saved forty-five per cent, on the original assessment, 
making a reduction for the property owners of nearly $8,000, and 
rendering the opening of the street possible at a smaller cost than 
any other street has been opened for in the history of street 
extensions in this city. The Market-street Cable Company has a 
franchise to build a line over Seventeenth street, thus making this 
thoroughfare the avenue from the Mission to the Park. 

The other topic which has called forth opinions of a very dif- 
fering nature from the docli in real estate circles, is the Assessor's 
report and the appeals from it to the Board of equalisation. Out- 
side land values have depreciated, Mr. Magee says, twenty per 
cent, and central properties have gone down twenty-five per 
cent, in value. To this statement many objections have been 
made. To say bluntly that Mr. Magee is wrong is a manifest 
absurdity, as there can be no doubt of the two facts that the as- 
sessment is far too high in ma^ny cases, and that real estate 
depreciated considerably in some portions of the city. Mr. Magee 
has taken an extreme view, when he quotes the high percentage 
of depreciation which he did, and Spencer C. Buckbee, of Sbain- 
wald, Buckbee & Co., strikes nearer the exact condition when he 
says that a man cannot get as much to-day as he could a year 
ago for the same property, but there is no general depreciation, 
because owners are holding on and will not lower their asking 
figures. David Rich, of the firm of O'Farrell & Lang.says: " The 
trouble is not that there is a marked depreciation, but a marked 
inactivity. There are in the hands of his firm orders for the in- 
vestment of at least $1,000,000 in properties from $50,000 up, but 
few can be found to sell inside property, and of tne few none will 
abate their prices." Other firms are similarly situated, and all 
have orders to fill for inside property. 

The business of the week has been light. O. F. von Rbein sold 
the building and lot 506 Kearny, for $32,650; O'Farrell <fc Lang 
sold the southeast corner of Montgomery and Vallejo, 34:3x137:6, 
for $11,500; Shainwald, Buckbee & Co. have sold one of (be 
Rountree houses. 

Eastoo, Eldridge & Co. will run an excursion and hold an auc- 
tion sale at Menlo Park to-day. 

The Carnall-Hopkins Company are soliciting offers for the prop 
erty of the late Martin Kelly, wbich is to be sold at probate sab . 
The estate includes the corner of Larkin street and Golden Cue 
avenue, 87:6x84, with three houses, and the. lot, 50x114, at the 
corner of Twenty-fourth and Noe streets. 



REV. DR. HATCH AS A LOTHARIO. 

THAT gay old Lothario, Dr. Junius Laertes Hatch, has again ex- 
tracted himself from the depths of what appeared to be a most 
serious case. The charge of adultery preferred against him by 
Mrs. Liljfgren, who says ibat the reverend but irreverent Hatch 
toyed with her affections and the physical charms of the fair 
Mrs. Liljegren, has been withdrawn, and the gray-haired lover is 
once more free to work bis wiles upon the susceptible fair ones of 
the sinless city across the bay. The Rev. Junius is a character 
well worth studying. He was formerly a minister, then a public 
lecturer, a reporter, a writer of sermons for christian papers, and is 
now the representative of this great and glorious government, and 
determines who are the proper people to be allowed within our 
portals. As Transportation Commissioner, Hatch has been a 
howling success; as a lady-killer he has no equal; as a hoary- 
headed old hypocrite he has a front place in the ranks of the un- 
regenerated. Hatch first became prominent in the community 
by becoming the legatee of some old lady whose acquaintance he 
had made as a reporter. There was a lawsuit, somewhat sensa- 
tional developments, and the papers devoted considerable space 
to the old fellow, and the smooth manner he had of winning the 
confidence of married and maiden ladies who had anything 
to give away. Of course it was all in the name of 
Christianity that Hatch did these things. It was prob- 
ably with an idea to get some knowledge of the 
wicked, wicked world after midnight, that he attended a mask 
ball at the Pavilion some years ago. It was one of the old time 
balls. There is nothing like them nowadays. To go to a mask 
ball at the Pavilion some five or six years ago immediately 
stamped a man as being quite devilish and a woman as being 
without any hopes of salvation. Hatch beamed on the scene of 
revelry about 2 in the morning, just when the fun was becom- 
ing fast and furious. He was immediately laid hold of by a gang 
of women of the town, in whose midst he looked like Silenus on 
a time with the Bacchanalian nymphs. They danced a can-can 
around the Rev. Junius, and his face beamed with pleasure, and 
though his old eyes did linger upon the many exposed charms of 
the frail ones, it was, of course, all in bis tineas a minister of the 
gospel. They may not haveplayed leap-frog, but Laertes and the 
nymps had a gay old time. Hatch is one of the milest mannered 
men who ever caught a woman's smile, but, like the man in the 
song, he is '• devilish sly." 

Drink the J. F. Cutter Whisky. For years it has been the most 
popular brand u-jed by admirers of good liquor. It is sold at all first- 
class bard, and should be demanded by all gentlemen who desire a 
gouk whisky. The J. F. Cutter Whisky has no superior and few, 
if any, equals. 

PROBATE SALE. 



Property or the Estate of HAKTIN KELLY, deceased For sale 
by order of Court. Sub.uit offer. 



Corner Laikin St, and Go.den Gate Ave., 87:6x84, 
with Three Houses; also, Lot 50x114, Corner Twenty- 
Fourth and Noe Sts. 



Full particulars at 



THE CARNALL-HOPKINS CO,, 

SOLE ^.CS-EInTTS, 

624 Market Street, San Franc'scO. 



THE 

BLOUNT DOOR CHECK & SPRING. 




SURE TO CLOSE THE 
DOOR WITHOUT SLAMMING. 



JAS. A. MAGUIRE. City Agent. 

-_ 657-661 Market Street, 8. F, 



July 28, 1892. 



BAN PRANCI8C0 NEWS n ITER. 



19 




AEBION which is of great iir trance oouipantes 

was rendered in the Dotted Stales Circuit Court ol Appeals 

of the Ninth Circuit. It was in the case of James Steel, adminis- 
trator of the estate of Ben Holla. lay. against the Pbo?nlx Insur- 
a ice Company of Brooklyn. Judge Hurley wrote the opinion 
ol the court. Judge Gilbert concurring and Judge McKenna dis- 
senting. The point decided involves the construction of the 
clause in politics which provide* that no Miit ->r action for the re- 
covery of any claim by virtue of the policy >hall be sustainable 
in any court of law or chancery, unless ■• commenced within 
twelve months next after the date of the fire from which such 
loss shall occur." Two questions were considered : First. • When 
does the twelve months' limitation commence to run?" Second, 
*« Is it from the date of the fire or from the ex- 
piration of sixty days after the proofs of loss were furnished?" 
It was held by the Circuit Court of Appeals that a policy of in- 
surance which contains conditions reducing the statutory time 
for the commencement of any suit thereon ought to be construed to 
mean twelve full months, exclusive of the lime when suit could 
not be bronght, either by other clauses or by any conduct of 
the company preventing the insured from bringing suit, lhe 
suit to recover was brought thirteen months and twenty-one days 
after the fire. The insurance company's agent had held out the 
hope of an amicable a ljustment of the difficulty, and thus de- 
layed the action of the insured, in substance, the law, as ex- 
pounded by the Circuit Court of Appeals is, that the time during 
which the insured could not sue should not be counted as part of 
the year in which he is required to sue. In other words, the parties 
cannot be presumed to have suspended the remedy and provided 
during the same time for the running of the period of limitation. 
Judge Hawley further says in the opinion that as the insurance 
company prepares the contract and embodies in it such conditions 
as it deems proper, it is in duty bound to use language in the vari- 
ous provisions of the policy in such a manner that the insured 
cannot be mistaken or misled as to the duties and burdens thereby 
imposed upon him. He adds: " The courts have uniformly held 
that the various conditions of a policy of insurance must be 
strictly construed against the company and liberally in favor of 
the insured. This principle is applied to all classes of insurance 
policies, whether fire, life, accident or other kinds. 

The annual meeting of the Spring Valley Water Company was 
held during the week, and 73,000 shares out of the 110,000 shares 
of stock were represented. President Charles Webb Howard, in 
his annual report, shows that there are not more than 3,200 va- 
cant bouses in the city. The total receipts for the twelve months 
were $1,657,757.51, out of which $6G0,000 was disbursed in divi- 
dends. The old Board of Directors were re-elected, with Charles 
Webb Howard, President; Charles Mayne, Vice-President ; Wil- 
liam Norris, Secretary, and Pelham W.Ames, Assistant Secretary. 

The most interesting bit of news on the street this week is that 
regarding the temporary and probably permanent change in the 
local management of the affairs of the Insurance Company of 
North America. Tom Mitchell has been connected with the com- 
pany's local agency for twenty years past. The agents were 
originally Jonathan Hunt, Sons & Co., Mitchell being the " Co." 
Hunt died, and the style was then changed to Hunt's Sons & Co. 
Then the sons died and the agency went to Mitchell. He has 
been general agent of the company in this city for about eight 
years. The company Is one of the largest in the United States, 
its capital being very great. The exact condition of its business 
affairs is, of course, not known on the street, but surprise has 
been expressed that Mitchell did not do a larger business with 
the splendid opportunity offered bim. Mr. Mitchell is now un- 
able to attend to business, being confined to his residence in Oak- 
land by an ulcer on the leg. He has been given three months' 
vacation, and James D. Bailey, formerly Marine, Secretary of the 
Union, has taken the vacant chair and is now acting as temporary 
manager. It is thought on the street that Mr. Bailey will retain 
the position and will be appointed manager by the company. If 
so, he would go to the front, directly over the heads of two of the 
oldest and best of the special agents — Messrs. Hamilton and 
Beck. As it is, the management of the company is now a most 
interesting matter of discussion on the Bourse. 

The investigation of the large loss at Seattle is progressing, the 
committee, as suggested in this column last week, having de- 
termined to push the case vigorously. An executive session of 
the committee was held on Thursday, and from the reports mada 
there it seems likely that the companies will resist to the utmost 
the prosecution of the claims. A civil suit at law, if not a crim- 
inal case, is imminent. 

It is reported that the Mexican steamer Don Juan has been 
wrecked off the Mexican coast. 

Mr. J. B. Levison, Marine Secretary of the Fireman's Fund, re- 
turned from a trip to New York on Wednesday. 



The < Omatock mining market developed no new features ol In 
teres! during the week. Kosloeu was .mil and price, heavy 
m mm!. to resulted as usual In n walk over for 
thrmshh-. The oppoaltion scored one point in ti. 
fortunately for the shareholders. The old officers were re ■ 
to hold for the ensuing term. 

A SWEDISH BATh7 

Till-: extent to which ■« Parkhuratlng " Is appreciated in New 
■S ork is -shown by the recent publication in The Church Union, 
of that city, of a letter from its European correspondent, George 
0, Bartlett, of his experiences in a Swedish bath* in that city. 
After entering the bathhouse and purchasing a ticket, Mr 
Bartlett was received by a young lady, who oshered him into a 
finely furnished parlor. ••Here," he writes, "another woman 
appeared. She was handsome, tall and strong, her dress was 
Dowered, with a red ground.it had no sleeves— less than no 
sleeves; it was cut under the arms decollete! The entire front of 
her dress was covered by a white linen apron. Her blond hair 
grew thick, and a bunch nf it budded gracefully on the back of 
her head. She repeated her former remarks with a smile. I 
simply answered, 'Bath, bath 1 ' She then said, ■ Parlez-vous 
Franrais?' 1 replied,- 'Nay, nay.' She said, 'Sprechen sie 
Ueutsch?' ' Bath,' said I. She then started to leave the room, 
and motioned me to follow. ' Barkus was willing/ I was con- 
ducted into as fine a bath-room as I had ever seen. It was up- 
holstered in maroon velvet; there were mirrors, chairs, sofa, books 
for your clothes, slippers, etc. The bath-tub was of polished olive 
wood, encircled by bands of gi.t and silver, with large bright-headed 
nails driven in all around it. This lovely Amazon and I gave up 
our language and became dumb, that we might learn of each 
other by signs. I soon heard the water roaring in the tub, and 
with a " Swedish movement" of her hand she motioned where to 
hang my clo:ho. When I was parily undressed she picked up 
a silver bell, dangled it before my face, and then placed it on the 
window-sill beside the tub and left the room. A little later I 
stood in the bath; I reached for the bell, rang it, and this same 
Venus of the bath appeared. She laid her hand on my shoulder 
and motioned me to sit down in the tub. I sat. She then made, 
by the use of a long towel, a kind of a hammock, which she 
placed across the head of the tub. My next position was to lie 
on my back, my head resting in the hammock; then this water- 
nymph commenced operations in earnest. Up she took my left 
leg and with brush and soap scrubbed it well. Then along my 
side underneath the water swung her strong arm to and from 
throat to foot, like a mighty pendulum. Presently X was turned 
over with my face in the hammock, to have my other leg oper- 
ated upon and my back scrubbed. I then sat up in the tub 
and was thoroughly ehampooed. She then led me a step or two, 
and after a kindly push I found myself in a small enclosure tak- 
ing a refreshing shower-bath; after which she threw over me a 
large cloak made of Turkish toweling, and at once gave me a 
thorough rubbing down until I was dry. I was then seated upon 
the sofa, and she sat by my side! She placed my clean foot in 
her massive lap, and with the aid of scissors, file and chamois, 
put it in perfect order. Before manicuring the other foot she left 
the room, but soon returned to serve me with a glass of water. 
The glass was thin ; it had a silver holder, it was on a silver tray, 
and the water was fresh I After my feet were sufficiently oper- 
ated upon, my finger-nails were cut, cleaned and beautified, and 
before leaving the room she did not forget to turn my socks. 
When I was partly dres-ed she returned without my ringing the 
bell, and helped me on with my vest and coat. Then I presented 
her with a silver coin, and she presented me with a smile. I shall 
probably remember the smile long after she has forgotten the coin. 
Men are so constant? I have taken many baths, in many coun- 
tries, but the Swedish is the best of all." 

WHEN Bob Woodward broke his arm be was the most interest- 
ing tbing in town. He looked so soldierly, so sweet, so like 
a fellow who had led a charge, don't you know, and whose gal- 
lant charger had fallen on him, or something else. The ladies 
petted Bob, and his empty sleeve grew to be fashionable. Other 
men turned up with ingrowing nails, and boils, and sties in their 
eyes, but they were not in it. Bob had the pole. But now Billy 
Kittle has fal en from the dam at Bear Creek on the County Club 
and broken his ankle. When he comes upon the street he will 
have the handsomest crutches in town. Mr. Woodward's stock 
is falling visibly. 

Sun Fire Office, of London. Instituted A. D. 1710. 



San Francisco, July 18th. 1892. 
Charles R. Naylor, agent for "The Caligraph "— Dear Sir— We 
beg leave to advi*6 that we have used your type-writing machine for 
a number of years, and take pleasure in stating that it has given 
complete satisfaction. We are using an almost new Caligraph just 
now replacing one we had in constant use for about six years. 

Yours, faithfully, Wm. J. Landers, General Agent. 

For strengthening aod clearing the voice, use *' Brown's Bronchial 

Troches " " I have commended them to friends who were public speak- 
ers, and they have proved extremely serviceable."— Ate. Henri/ Ward 

lirrch' r. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1892. 



THE Canadian government will sooner or later find itself obliged 
to deal with the Chinese Question, for a great deal of discon- 
tent is expressed by tbe working men in British Columbia, and 
several prominent Catholic prelates in the Dominion have recently 
declared openly that they consider the Chinese invasion as a 
menace to tbe country. The authorities at Ottawa, however, are 
still disinclined to enact any prohibitive measures, because the 
trade with China is, for the Dominion, of the utmost importance, 
and they hope that they will succeed, by a peaceful agreement 
with the Chinese government, in inducing the latter to restrict 
the number of Chinese coming to Canada. In the interest not 
only of tbe Dominion, but also of the United States, it is to be 
hoped that the Mongolian migration to British Columbia will be 
kept within the narrowest possible limits. 

Captain Lugard, the agent of the British East African Company, 
Uganda, has sent his official report to London, from which it ap- 
pears that the doubt which was expressed in this column some 
weeks ago, with regard to the English Protestants in Uganda was 
perfectly justified. It bad been stated in French papers, as will 
be remembered, that the British forces in Uganda had been the 
aggressors in a bloody struggle against King Mwanga, the leader 
of tbe Catholic party, and bis French patrons. It seems now, 
however, that Mwanga was simply captured because he refused 
to punish the murder of a Protestant chief, and that, in conse- 
quence of this, the French forces in overwhelming majority at- 
tacked Lugard's command. Only after this, Captain Lugard took 
the offensive, and drov